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Full text of "History of the town of Mason, N. H. from the first grant in 1749, to the year 1858"

NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



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HISTORY 



OF THE 



TOWN OF MASON, N. H. 



THE FIRST GRANT 



IN 1749, TO THE YEAR 1858; 



JOHN B.HILL 



BOSTON: 
LUCIUS A. ELLIOT & CO 

D. BUGBEE & CO., BANGOR, 

18 5 8: 



PRINTED BY SAMUEL S. SMITH, 
BANGOR, ME, 



PREFACE 



It has been my object in the preparation of this work, to 
exhibit all the steps in progress, by which a New England 
town and church are built up and constituted, from the earli- 
est beginnings to their full establishment in independent 
existence and power. These institutions are, both in church 
and state, the purest and most absolute democracies the 
world has ever seen. They are the genuine out-growth, the 
ripened fruit of the puritan development in England. Tlieir 
basis is a perfect equality of rights, without a shadow or 
trace of aristocracy. Free use has been made for this pur- 
pose of whatever has been found in the annals of the pro- 
prietary, the town and the churches, worthy of note, as illus- 
trating the incidents, manners, and character of the age and 
people. The mode adopted has been as far as practicable, 
to exhibit the actors in full life, and let them tell their own 
story, in their own words. 

The proprietary, the municipal, and the ecclesiastical his- 
tory of the first half century of their existence, occupy a 
large share of the work, both on account of the greater 
interest of the incidents, and because the facts of that period 
are fast passing away from all living memory, into the region 
of dim and shadowy tradition, illuminated only by a few 
imperfect records, which, in themselves, are liable by daily 
impending accidents, totally to perish. For this part of the 
work, the authorities principally relied on, have been the 
proprietary, the town and the church records, all of which, 
are in good preservation, and more perfect than will in most 
cases be found ; and all these records have been carefully 
searched and examined, with a view to this work. The 



IV PREFACE, 

records of deatliS; marriages, family registers, and statistical 
tables, &c., are sufficiently explained in the chapters in which 
they are found. Most of the biographical sketches of per- 
sons recently deceased, have been furnished by other hands. 
The sketches of the village churches, and of the Christian 
church, are by the pastors of those churches. 

Important aid has been derived from the History of New 
Ipswich, Butler's Groton, Shattuck's Concord, and the New 
England Genealogical and Historical Register. Dr. Thomas 
H, Marshall, and Mr. Charles P. Richardson, of Mason, and 
Mr. Frederic Kidder, and Mr. Lucius A. Elliot, of Boston, 
have rendered very important aid and encouragement, in the 
preparation of this work. My brother, the Rev. Joseph B. 
Hill, has contributed much to the value of the work, in the 
preparation of statistical tables, and of the list of early 
settlers. 

J. B. Hill, 

Bangor, May 1, 1858. 



CHAPTER I 



Captain John Mason ; Grants to him of Lands in New Hampshire ; Settle- 
ments commenced by him ; Controversies with Massachusetts respecting the 
title and jurisdiction ; how settled ; Title vested in the Masonian proprietors. 

The tOTvn of Mason is situated in the county of Hillsbo- 
rough, in the State of New Hampshire. It lies upon the 
southern border of the State, about midway between the 
eastern and western extremities of its southern boundary. 
On the south it bounds upon Townsend and Ashby, on the 
west upon New Ipswich, on the north upon Temple and Wilton 
and on the east upon Milford and Brookline. It is in that 
portion of the State of New Hampshire which was granted 
by the council of Plymouth in 1621 to Capt. John Mason. 
As the town derives its name from that gentleman, and the 
title to the soil therein is in fact derived and claimed under 
this grant to him, and sundry subsequent grants in coniirm- 
ation thereof, and as the State is also indebted to him for its 
name, it being derived from that of the county of Hampshire, 
in England, of whose principal town, Portsmouth, Mason was 
at one time governor, a brief sketch of his life and of the 
titles granted to him, and of the various and long-continued 
controversies to which the uncertain and indefinite descrip- 
tions of the boundaries of the original and subsequent grants 
gave rise, and of the manner in which they were finally sct- 
2 



6 HISTORY OF MASON. 

tied, will not be deemed an inappropriate introduction to 
these memorials of the place and its people. For the facts 
stated, the authority mainly relied on, is Belknap's history of 
New Hampshire. 

Capt. John Mason was born in Lynn Regis in the coimty 
of Norfolk in England. Of his parentage and early life little 
is known. The year of his birth is not stated by the histo- 
rians. It must have been not far from the year 1570, in the 
midst of the stirring times of Queen Elizabeth. His first en- 
gagement in active life, was as a merchant in London. After- 
wards he entered the naval service, and served as an officer 
in the fleet in the war between Spain and the Dutch republics. 
After the i)eace of 1609, by which the independence of Hol- 
land was secured, he was appointed Governor of Newfound- 
land. This island was discovered by Sebastian Cabot in 
1497. It was taken possession of, in the name of Queen 
Elizabeth, by Sir Humphrey Gilbert, August 5th, 1583. The 
fisheries upon the banks became, at an early period, an import- 
ant business, the tendency of which was to foster and promote 
voyages of discovery to the continent. At the time Mason 
was appointed its governor, this island was one of the most 
valuable English possessions in North America. In this 
post he remained long enough to become acquainted with the 
country; and he formed so high an opinion of its future 
destiny, as to induce in him a willingness to adventure his 
fortune in advancing its settlement. This led him on his 
return to England, into a close intimacy with those who were 
engaged in discoveries in the new world. He was, after his 
return, appointed Governor of the town of Plymouth, in the 
county of Hampshire ; and upon a vacancy happening in the 
council of Plymouth, he was elected a member of that bod}^, 
and was chosen their secretary. He was thus placed in the 
front rank of those who were actively engaged in promoting 
discoveries and encouraging settlements in North America. 
He gave to these enterprises, not only his countenance and 
advice, but he was willing to embark his fortunes in the bus- 



CAPT. JOHN MASOX. 7 

iness, and to devote to it his time and means. With that 
intent he procured from the council of Plymouth, in March, 
1621, a grant of " all the lands from the river Naumkeag," 
now Salem, '' round Cape Ann to the river Merrimack, and 
up each of those rivers to the farthest heads thereof, then to 
cross over from the head of one to the head of the other, 
with all the islands lying within three miles of the coast." 
This district was called Marianna. This was the first terri- 
torial grant made by the Plymouth council. It bears date 
March 9, 1621. Those to Plymouth colony are dated in 1621 
and 1623; that to Massachusetts, March 19, 1627, all sub- 
sequent to Mason's. Of these last, each was granted to a 
company or association, or to an individual in trust for a 
company. Mason undertook his enterprise alone and single 
handed. Xo individual can be found, who exhibited more 
courage and perseverance in the cause, or more confidence in 
its ultimate success, or who expended his means with a more 
liberal hand, or in larger amount, in promoting the settlement- 
of the country. 

In 1622, another grant was made to Gorges and Mason 
jointly, " of all the lands between the rivers Merrimack and 
Sagadahock, extending back to the great lakes and river of 
Canada," and this was called Laconia. The points of com- 
mencement of the first of these grants were wholly within 
what is now Massachusetts. The territory included is partly 
in New Hampshire and partly in Massachusetts. The second 
grant included a large part of New Hampshire, a portion of 
Maine and of Canada. The knowledge then possessed of 
the country, and of the courses of the rivers, was imperfect 
and uncertain, and consequently, these bounderies were found 
to 1)0 uncertain and indefinite. Settlements were by Mason 
attempted to be made, at a place called Little Harbor, in 
Portsmouth, where salt works were erected; and a house 
called Mason Hall, was built at Dover. In 1629, he procured 
a patent under the common seal of the council of Plymouth, 
for the land "from the middle of Piscataqua river, and up the 



8 HISTORY OF MASON. 

same, to the farthest head thereof, and from thence northward, 
until sixty miles from the mouth of the harbor were finished ; 
also, through Merrimack river, to the farthest head thereof, and 
so forward up into the land westward, until sixty miles were 
finished, and from thence to cross over land to the end of 
sixty miles, accounted from Piscataqua river, together with all 
the islands within five miles of the coast." This tract was 
called New Hampshire, a name derived from that of the 
county of Hampshire, in England, of whose principal town, 
Portsmouth, Mason was governor. Under this charter the 
towns of Portsmouth, and Northam, afterwards called Dover, 
Hampton, and Exeter were laid out. 

The attempts at settlement were not prosperous. The 
views of those engaged in the enterprise, were chiefly turned 
to the discovery of lakes and mines, the cultivation of grapes 
and the advantages of trade and fishery. Little regard was 
had to agriculture. They often complained of their expenses, 
and might with reason, for they had not only to pay wages to 
their colonists, but to supply them with provisions, clothing, 
utensils, medicines, articles of trade, implements for building, 
husbandry and fishery, and to stock their plantations with 
cattle, swine and goats. Bread corn was either brought from 
England in meal, or from Virginia in grain, and then sent to 
the windmill at Boston to be ground. Very little improvement 
was made on the lands, the lakes were not explored, the vines 
planted came to nothing, no mines were found but those of 
iron, and those were not wrought; three or four houses only, 
were built in the first seven years ; the peltry trade with the 
Indians was of some value, and the fishery served towards the 
support of the inhabitants, but yielded no profit to the adven- 
turers, who received but inadequate returns in lumber and 
fish. They, seeing their interests sinking and withering away, 
grew disjjirited, and the greater part of them either abandon- 
ed the enterprise, or sold their shares to Gorges and Mason, 
who were more sanguine than the rest, and who thus became 
either by purchase or by tacit consent of the others, the 



CAPT. JOHN MASON. 9 

principal, if not the sole proprietors. They prosecuted the 
settlement with zeal, but met with many hindrances, amonp- 
which were claims made by the Virginia company to have their 
charter revoked. Mason finally succeeded in procuring a new 
charter in 1635, extending from Naumkeag to Piscataqua, 
and sixty miles northward within land. He did not long 
survive the issuing of this patent. He died Nov. 16th, 1635. 
In his will, he disposed of his immense estate, as follows : To 
the corporation of Lynn Regis in Norfolk, the place of his 
nativity, he gave two thousand acres of land in New Hamp- 
shire, subject to the yearly rent of one penny per acre to his 
heirs, and two-fifths of all mines royal, on condition that five 
families should within five years be settled thereupon. To 
his brother-in-law, John Wollaston, three thousand acres, sub- 
ject to a yearly rent of one shilling. To his grandchild, Ann 
Tufton, ten thousand acres at Sagadahock. To Eobert Tuf- 
ton, his grandson, he gave his manor of Mason Hall, on con- 
dition that he should take the surname of Mason. He also 
gave his brother Wollaston in trust one thousand acres for 
the maintenance of " an honest, godly and religious preacher 
of God's word," and one thousand acres more for the sup- 
port of a grammar school ; each of these estates to be con- 
veyed to fi'eofTees in trust, and their successors, paying an- 
nually one penny per acre to his heirs. The residue of his 
estate in New Hampshire, he gave to his grandson John Tuf- 
ton, he taking the surname of Mason, and to his lawful issue ; 
or, in want thereof, to Dr. Robert Mason, Chancellor of the 
Diocese of Winchester, and his lawful issue, and to his own 
and other right heirs, forever ; provided that it should not 
go out of the name of Mason. The residuary legatee was 
required to pay five hundred pounds out of the estate to his 
sister Mary, and all the grandchildren were to relinquish their 
right to one thousand pounds due from the estate to their 
father, Joseph Tufton. The estate in America was valued in 
the inventory, at ten thousand pounds sterling. It is under 
this will, that the title to the soil of the town of Mason is 



10 HISTORY OF MASON. 

derived ; and it is not a little remarkable, that so far as is now 
known, this town is the only representative of the name of 
Capt. John Mason in the State. 

The little legacy of five hundred pounds given by the will 
to the sister of John Tufton, would, if put and kept at inter- 
est and compounded, from the year 1635, when the testator 
died, up to the present time, 1858, amount to a greater sum 
than the total inventory and valuation of the real and per- 
sonal property of the whole State of New Hampshire at the 
last valuation. Let those who doubt it try the figures, and 
let all who are paying interest for money borrowed or sums 
due, learn that unless the business or investment in which it 
is employed, is yielding more than six per cent, per annum, 
they must be sadly going behind hand. 

It will be seen that Capt. Mason was particularly solicitous 
to perpetuate his name by attaching it to the ownership of 
his land in New Hampshire. He bestows it finally upon his 
" right heirs forever, provided it shall not go out of the name 
of Mason" ; but of all his vast estate, it is not probable that 
a single acre is now owned by any of his descendants, or that 
his name is now connected with any portion of the territory, 
except that of this town. 

In 1638, after the death of Capt. Mason, his widow and 
executrix, Mrs. Anne Mason, sent over Francis Norton as her 
" general attorney," to whom she committed the Avhole man- 
agement of the estate. But the expense so far exceeded the 
income, and the servants grew so impatient for their arrears, 
that she was obliged to relinquish the care of the plantation, 
and tell the servants they must shift for themselves ; upon 
which they shared the goods and cattle. Norton drove above 
one hundred oxen to Boston, and there sold them for twenty- 
five pounds sterling per head, which it is said was the current 
price of the best cattle in New England at that time. These 
were of a large breed imported from Denmark, from whence 
Mason had also procured a number of men skilled in sawing 
plank and making potashes. These Danes were the pioneers 



CAPT. JOHN MASON. H 

of the great lumber business, which has engrossed so much 
of the capital and enterprise of Xew Hampshire and Maine. 
Having shared the stock and other materials, some of the peo- 
ple quitted the plantation ; others of them tarried, keeping 
possession of the buildings and improvements, which they 
claimed as their own. The houses at Newichwannock were 
destroyed by lire, and thus Mason's estate was ruined. These 
events happened between 1638 and 1644, 

Lumber and the fisheries seem to have been the great objects 
in view in Mason's enterprise. These branches of business, 
though important in connection with other pursuits, form, too 
narrow a basis for the foundation of a commonwealth. Per- 
sons who engaged in these employments, in those early times, 
did not possess that persevering industry and frugality re- 
quired for the successful building up of a state. The charac- 
ter and manners of the fishermen of that day, are most vividly 
and happily painted in the following extract from Josselyn's 
two voyages, in Thornton's Ancient Pemaquid. The lum- 
bermen would present a companion picture. Mr. Tiiornton 
says : — "Josselyn, who left Black Point for England in the sum- 
mer of 1671, describes the people of Maine after several years' 
residence among them. He classifies them as " Magistrates^ 
Husbandmen or Planters, and Fishermen ; of the Magistrates 
some be Royalists, the rest perverse Spirits, the like are the 
planters and fishers, of which some be planters and fishers 
both, others mere fishers ; there are but few handcraftsmen, 
and no shopkeepers ; English goods being kept by the Massa- 
chusetts merchants, here and there, on the coast, at a profit of 
cent, per cent., in exchange for fish." ^' They have a custom of 
taking Tobacco, sleeping at noon, sitting long at meals, some- 
times four times in a day, and now and then drinking a dram 
of the bottle extraordinarily ; the smoaking of Tobacco, if 
moderately used refresheth the weary very much, and so doth 
sleep" 1 The fisherman of that day he paints to the life. He 
says, "to every Shallop belong four fishermen, a Master or 
steersman, a midshipman, and a Foremastman, and a shoreman 



12 HISTORY OP MASON. 

who washes it out of the salt, and dries it upon hurdles pitcht 
upon stakes breast high and tends their Cookery ; these often 
get in one voyage Eight or Nine pound a man for their shares, 
but it doth some of them but little good," for there comes 
in "a walking Tavern, a Bark laden with the Legitimate bloud 
of -the rich grape" ; "the conclusion of which is the costly sin 
of drunkenness." Thornton's Ancient Pemaquid. See Col. 
Maine Hist. Society, Vol. 5. pp. 234, 235. 

If such was the character of Mason's planters and servants, 
no one can be surprised that his enterprise, though prosecuted 
with* all his energy and perseverance, should prove to be a 
failure. 

The character and objects and results of Mason's efforts, 
are with much truth and pertinency thus summed up in Bar- 
stow's History of New Hampshire: — "In the midst of his 
fond anticipations of better fortune. Captain Mason was 
removed by death. This happened near the close of the 
year. (1635.) He had accomplished none of the great pur- 
poses for which he came to this wilderness world. He em- 
barked with vast expectations of boundless wealth and gran- 
deur. * * Golden visions hovered round him to the last, 
in spite of the light of experience. He had no religious 
views in the purchase and settlement of New Hampshire. 
His whole energies were absorbed in the discovery of wealth, 
and the aggrandizement of himself and his family. His dar- 
ling scheme was the introduction of the feudal system into 
New Hampshire ; by which his family were to be the lords, 
and the people tenants of the soil. For this he labored; for 
this he sacrificed his all ; still dreaming of the profits of dis- 
covery, and the glory of founding a state. But though a 
dreamer, he was at the same time a man of action. * * 
Nothing daunted him. Nothing deterred him. Though ad- 
versity might cloud his prospects, it never depressed his spir- 
its. The frustration of his efforts and the frequent wreck of 
his hopes only seemed to display the indestructible vigor of 
his mind. Amidst disappointment and discouragement he 



CAPT. JOHN MASON, 16 

continiiecl to attempt the foimdation of a feudal empire, until 
death interrupted his toils and left him only a reputation for 
attempting impossible things. * "' * 

"Well was it for posterity that the unnatural eyes of 
Adventure, alone, could discern mineral wealth in the hills 
of New Hampshire. Fortunate was it that the soil was, for 
the most part, reserved for men who should settle upon it 
with no chimerical and vain hopes of treasure; but men 
viewing human life and society in a true light — not building 
the castles of avarice ; but living by their industry — expect- 
ing only the rain and dew upon the seed they had sown— p 
hoping for health and competence — and laying the only sure 
foundation for a great and flourishing country in intelligence 
and public virtue — good* schools, good morals, government, 
and sober industry. These are the strength of a state." 
[Barstoiv^s New Hampshire, pj). 33, — 37. 

The inhabitants of these towns finding it difficult to main- 
tain any stable government, were with their consent, received 
into the jurisdiction of Massachusetts, about the years 1641, 
'42. The union continued about forty years. This extension 
of the colony's jurisdiction could not fail of being noticed 
by the heirs of Mason ; but the distractions caused by the 
civil wars in England, were invincible bars to any legal 
inquiry. The first heir named in Mason's will dying in infancy, 
the estate descended after the death of the executrix, to Rob- 
ert Tufton, who was not of age till 1650. In two years after 
this, Joseph Mason came over as agent for the executrix, to 
look after the interests of her deceased husband. He found 
the land at Newichwannock occupied by Richard Leader, 
against whom he brought actions in the county of Norfolk, 
a county which then included the northeasterly part of Massa- 
chusetts and the New Hampshire towns. A dispute arose 
whether the lands in question were within the jurisdiction of 
Massachusetts, and the court of Norfolk judging the action 
not to be within their cognizance, recourse was had to the 
general court at Boston, which on this occasion ordered an 



14 HISTORY OF MASON. 

accurate survey of tlie northern bounds of tlicir patent to be 
made. A committee of the general court, attended by John 
Sherman and Jonathan Ince, surveyors, and several Indian 
guides, went up the river Merrimack, to find the most north- 
erly part thereof, which the Indians told them was at Acque- 
doclitan, the outlet of the lake Winnipiseogee. The latitude 
of that place was found to be 43° 40' 12", to which three 
miles being added, made the line of the patent, according to 
their construction, fall within the lake, in latitude 43° 43' 12". 
The same latitude was ma.rked on an island in Casco bay, 
and an imaginary line drawn through these points from the 
Atlantic ocean to the South-sea, as the Pacific ocean was then 
called, was supposed to be the northern boundary of Massa- 
chusetts. This line included the wliole of Mason's claim by 
his last patent. The committee of the general court to 
establish the line, were Capt. Edward Johnson, author of the 
History of New England, and Capt. Simon Willard, after- 
wards an assistant and a commander of a portion of the 
Massachusetts forces, in the Indian war of 1675. The expe- 
dition took up nineteen days in the months of July and 
August, and the whole expense was not less than eighty-four 
pounds. The following is a copy of the report of the sur- 
veyors : 

" The answer of John Sherman, Sergeant at Watertown, 
and Jonathan Ince, Student at Harvard College in Cam- 
bridge, to Capt. Simon Willard and Capt. Edward Johnson, 
Commissioners of the General Court, held at Boston, May 
17, 1652, concerning the latitude of the northernmost part of 
Merrimack river. 

Whereas we, John Sherman and Jonathan Ince, were pro- 
cured by the aforesaid Commissioners to take the latitude of 
the place above named, our answer is, that at Aquedahcan, 
the name of the head of Merrimack, where it issues out of 
the lake Winnapusseahit, upon the first of August, one thou- 
sand six hundred and fifty-two, we observed and by observa- 
tion found, that the latitude of the place was fourty-three 



CAPT. JOHN MASONS 15 

degrees fourty minutes and twelve seconds, besides those min- 
utes that are to be allowed for three miles more north w=^ run 
into the Lake. 

In witness whereof, wee have subscribed our names, this 
nineteenth of October, one thousand six hundred and fifty- 
two. John Sherman, 

Jonathan Inge, 
Jur. coram me, JOH. ENDECOTT, Gubr.'' 

Having settled this matter, the Court were of the opinion 
that some lands by agreement of Gorges, and by purchase 
of the Indians, and by possession and improvements, were 
properly claimed by Mason, and they ordered a quantity pro- 
portionable to his disbursements, with a privilege of the river, 
to be laid out to his heirs. 

The agent, finding it hopeless to prosecute the claim any 
farther, left the country. During the Commonwealth and the 
Protectorate of Cromwell, there could be no hope of relief; 
as the family of Mason had always been attached to the 
royal cause. On the restoration of Charles II. Tufton, 
who had taken the surname of Mason, petitioned to the king 
for restoration of his rights. The petition was referred to 
Sir Geoffrey Palmer, the attorney general, who reported, that 
"Robert Mason the grandson and heir of Capt. John Mason 
had a good and legal title to the province of New Hamp- 
shire." Nothing effective was done to restore to him his 
rights. Edward Randolph who was a kinsman of Mason, was 
sent over with the king's letter to the government of Massa- 
chusetts, requiring them to send over agents within six months, 
to answer to the complaints which Mason and the heirs of 
Gorges had made, of their usurpation of jurisdiction over 
the territory claimed by them : all the answer he could get 
from Govenor Leverett and the council, was that "they would 
see about it." The matter was pursued in England. Lieut. 
Gov. Stoughton and Peter Bulkley, the speaker of the house 
of deputies, were sent to England in behalf of Massachusetts. 
The subject was referred to the judges. They reported that 



16 HISTOEY OF MASOX. 

they could give no opinion as to the right of the soil, the 
proper parties not being before them ; that Mason had no 
right of government, none having been granted to him "with 
the soil; and finaUy, that the four towns Portsmouth, Dover, 
Exeter and Hampton, were out of the bounds of Massachu- 
setts. It was also admitted that the title could only be tried 
in the place, there being no court in England that had cogni- 
zance of it. It became necessary, therefore, to set up a new 
jurisdiction before Mason's title could be tried. It was done. 
Thus, in consequence of this controversy and claim. New 
Hampshire was seperated from Massachusetts, and was again 
organized under a distinct and independent jurisdiction. 
Eandolph was appointed governor. He was greatly and de- 
servedly unpopular. The whole number of voters in his prov- 
ince was 209, all in the four towns of Portsmouth, Dover, 
Hampton and Exeter. In the first assembly, the whole num- 
ber of Eepresentativcs was eleven : from Portsmouth, Dover 
and Hampton, three each, and Exeter two. Mason came 
over from England in the latter part of the year 1681, He 
had been appointed one of the council, and took his seat as 
such. He attempted to enforce his claims in a haughty and 
arbitrary manner. He met with a sturdy resistance on the 
part of the tenants, and by his hasty and injudicious proceed- 
ings, lost the countenance and support of the council. The 
controversy Avith the council prevailed to such length, that a 
warrant was issued for apprehending him, which he avoided 
by making his escape to England. Finding the government, 
which he had procured to be erected, was not likely to be 
administered in a manner favorable to his views, he made it 
his business to bring about a change, and procured Edward 
Cranfield to be appointed Lieut. Governor. To provide for 
his support, he surrendered one fifth part of his quit rents, to 
the king. These, and the fines and forfeitures, were appropri- 
ated for the governor's support. Not satisfied to rely on 
these alone, he took from Mason a mortgage on the whole 
province for twenty one years, to secure the payment of one 



CAPT. JOHX MASOX. 17 

liimclred and fifty pounds per annum, for seven j^ears. On 
this encouragement, Cranfield relinquished a profitable office 
at home, with a view of Lettering his fortunes by this arrange* 
ment. 

His commission gave him almost absolute power. He com- 
menced his rule in 1682. Mason was named in his commis- 
sion as one of the council, and seems to have had a great 
share in the management of affairs. Suits were brought to 
enforce his claims. They were resisted. Nothing effectual 
was done to establish his title. When he succeeded in obtain- 
ing judgment, he was forcibly resisted in his attempts to get 
possession. Many of the tenants claimed under Indian deeds, 
which were then much regarded ; others shew possession for 
from forty to sixty years, uninterrupted by any successful en- 
forcement of his rights. In 1686 a purchase was made of 
the Indians, of a tract on both sides of the Merrimack river, 
six miles in breadth, extending from Souhegan river to Win- 
nipisseogee lake. The purchasers were Jonathan Tyng, Jo- 
seph Dudley, Charles Lidgat, John Usher, Edward Randolph, 
John Hubbard, Robert Thompson, Samuel Scrimpton, William 
Stoughton, Richard WartoB, Thomas Hinchman, Thaddeus 
Maccarty, Edward Thompson, John Blackwell, Peter Bulkley, 
William Blathwayt, Daniel Cox and " three other persons, to 
be thereafter named and agreed upon." Mason, by deed, con- 
firmed this purchase, reserving to himself and his heirs a 
yearly rent of ten shillings. This was called the million acre 
purchase. About the same time he farmed out to Hezekiah 
Usher and his heirs, the mines, minerals and ores within the 
limits of New Hampshire, for the term of one thousand years, 
reserving to himself one quarter part of the royal ores and 
one seventeenth of the baser sorts ; and having put his affairs 
in the best order the times would admit, he sailed for England, 
to attend to the hearing of a case appealed against him to 
the king. 

The appeal to the king was decided in his favor, and he 
retmrned in the spring of 1687, full of hope of realizing some- 



18 HISTORY OP MASON". 

thing out of his claims ; but unexpected obstructions were in 
his way. The government, under Andros, was in the hands 
of a set of harpies, who could not look on without determin- 
ing to come in for a share of his success. He succeeded in 
getting his case brought before the Supreme Court in Boston, 
but before he could get a decision he died at Esopus, N. Y., 
on a journey to Albany, where he had accompanied the 
governor. Sir Edmund Andros, leaving his sons, John and Rob- 
ert, heirs of his claims and controversies. They sold their 
claim to Samuel Allen, of London, for seven hundred and fifty 
pounds. John Usher married Allen's daughter. He was a 
native of Boston, and by profession a stationer ; was rich, was 
one of the partners in the million acre purchase, and had san- 
guine expectations of gain from that quarter ; as also, proba- 
bl}^, from the mines he had purchased of Mason. He was ap- 
pointed lieutenant governor, and administered the affairs of 
the province. He resolved to enforce Allen's claims. He 
found that Pickering, the defendant's lawyer, had with a com- 
pany of armed men, taken out of the hands of Chamberlain, 
the secretary and clerk, the records and papers relating to 
the Mason suits. After having recovered the papers, he seems 
to have made no effectual progress with the suits. In 1700, 
Allen took the matter in hand himself, but found, when the 
records were examined, that twenty-five leaves were missing, 
in which it is supposed the judgments recovered by Mason 
were recorded. No evidence appeared of his having obtained 
possession, and the whole work was to be gone over again. 
Suits were commenced anew. The jury found for the defend- 
ant. Allen claimed an appeal to the king, which the court 
would not allow, and he was compelled to apply to the king 
by petition, on which his appeal was granted. Allen appoint- 
ed Usher to act for him in prosecuting his appeal, having pre- 
viously mortgaged one half the province to him for £1,500. 
When the appeal came on for hearing, it appeared that no 
proof was produced to show that Mason was ever in possess- 
ion, and therefore judgment was rendered against him, but 



CAPT. JOHN MASON. 19 

with the right to commence again in the courts in the prov- 
ince. New suits were commenced, ending as before, in judg- 
ment for the defendant and appeal by the plaintiff. Allen was 
now old and poor, and proposed a settlement by compromise, 
but before it was effected he died. His son, Thomas Allen, 
renewed the suits with the same result, judgment for the de- 
fendants and an appeal to the queen in council. Before the 
appeal was ready to be heard, Allen died in 1715. This put 
an end to the suit, which his heirs, being minors, did not 
renew. 

When the sale was made by John and Robert Mason to 
Samuel Allen, in 1691, it took place in England, and by a 
fiction of law, the land was supposed to be in England and 
the conveyance was by fine and recovery in the king's bench. 
In this process the land was described as being in " New 
Hampshire, Maine, Masonia, Laconia, Mason Hall and Mari- 
ana in New England in America, in the parish of Greenwich ;" 
a fiction of law by which a parish in England includes within 
its limits the principal part of two states of this Union. 
John Tufton Mason, the son of Robert Tufton Mason, after 
the death of his uncle and father, who were Allen's grantors, 
being advised that their conveyance to Allen could give him 
only an estate for their own lives, and that the recovery in 
the king's bench in England was void for want of jurisdiction, 
prepared to assert his claims, but died in Havana in 1718, 
where he had gone to procure means to carry on his suit. 
His son, John Tufton Mason, came of age about the year 
1738. The controversy between the provinces about the 
southern boundary of New Hampshire, was at this time re- 
newed and brought to a crisis. Massachusetts claimed that the 
line should run three miles east from the river to a point 
three miles north of the junction of the Pemigewasset and the 
Winnipisseogee river ; thence due west till it should meet the 
boundaries of the other governments. The commissioners 
doubted whether this should be the line, or a line commencing 
three miles north of the mouth of Merrimack river and run- 



20 HISTORY OF MASON. 

uing due west till it sliould meet the other governments, and 
they referred the question to the king in council. While this 
controvers)'' was pendmg, negotiations were entered into both 
on the part of Massachusetts and New Hampshire for the 
purchase of Mason's title. The agent of New Hampshire, 
Thomlinson, made an agreement with him for the purchase, 
on behalf of that province, of his whole interest, for one 
thousand pounds New England currency, but no legal assent 
to the purchase was made l)y the authorities of the province. 
The question of boundary was settled not in accordance 
with either statement of the commissioners. The reason for 
departing from the letter of the grant was, that when it was 
made it was supposed, the country not having been explored, 
that the course of the Merrimack river was from west to east, 
and therefore that the dividing line would run nearly west, 
and that so far then, as the course of the river corresponded 
with that supposed state of facts, a line three miles north of 
it should be the dividing line, and then the line crossing the 
river should take a course due west ; and such a line was finally 
adopted and established. Thomlinson was the agent for New 
Hampshire, and Thomas Hutchinson for Massachusetts. The 
line was run by George Mitchell, from the ocean to the 
station north of Pawtucket falls, at which point the due west 
line was to commence; and by Richard Hazen from that point 
to Connecticut river. They were directed to allow ten de- 
grees for the westerly variation of the needle. The work 
was done in February and March, 1741. "This determina- 
tion," says Belknap, vol. 1, p. 257, "exceeded the utmost ex- 
pectation of New Hampshire, as it gave them a country four- 
teen miles in breadth and above fifty in length, more than 
they had ever claimed. It cut off from Massachusetts twenty- 
eight new townships, between Merrimack and Connecticut riv- 
ers, besides large tracts of vacant land, which lay intermixed, 
and districts from six of their old towns on the north side of 
the Merrimack, and if as was then supposed, the due west 
line were to extend to twenty miles east of Hudson's river, 



CAPT. JOHN MASON. 21 

the reputed boundary of New York, a vast tract of fertile 
country on the western side of Connecticut river was annexed 
to New Hampshire, by which an ample scope was given for 
landed speculation, and afterwards for cultivation and wealth." 
The estaldishment of this line was undoubtedly a public 
benefit. It put to rest doubts and controversies about juris- 
diction and ownership, which had seriously retarded the set- 
tlement of the country. But it occasioned in many places 
great heartburnings and trouble. It severed the ancient town 
of Dunstable into two parts, leaving them in different juris- 
dictions. The line passed through the town nearly in the 
centre, leaving the meeting-house a short distance on the New 
Hampshire side. This town had been granted by Massachu- 
setts nearly eighty years, and had been more or less settled 
more than one hundred years before this time. It had always 
claimed and been considered to be within the limits of Mas- 
sachusetts. This decision placed their meeting-house, their 
minister, their grave-yard, and a large portion of themselves 
in another jurisdiction, and threw an air of doubt and distrust 
upon the validity of the titles to the lands upon the New 
Hampshire side of the line. The effects were most disas- 
trous upon their interests and institutions, both of town and 
church. The church was broken up. The minister withdrew 
and left the place. The meeting-house was abandoned, and 
for more than half a century the results of this disturbance 
of the municipal and church affairs in that place, were appar- 
ent. Hollis was then a part of Dunstable, a precinct or 
parish, and shared in the troubles of the mother town. Most 
of Brookline was then included in Hollis, and Pepperell was 
a part of Groton, which lost a portion of its territory by the 
new line. In Townsend, the complaints of the wrong done, 
were long and loud. At a legal town meeting held Oct. 6, 
1740, in that town, John Stevens was chosen moderator. 
The proceedings of the meeting on this subject are recorded 
as follows : " Being informed that by the determination of 
his Majesty and Council respecting the controverted bounds 
4 



22 HISTORY OP MASON. 

between the Province of Massachusetts Bay and New Hamp- 
shire, now part of this township, is excluded from the Prov- 
ince of Massachusetts Bay, to which they supposed they 
always belonged; therefore voted, that a jfetition be pre- 
ferred to the King's most excellent majesty, setting forth our 
most distressed circumstances, and j)raying that we may be 
annexed to the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, and voted 
nemine contradiccnte, that Thomas Hutchinson, Esquire, of 
Boston, be and is hereby fully impowered to prefer a petition 
to his majesty, and to appear and fully to act for the proprie- 
tors and inhabitants in said town, respecting the subject : 
Also, voted that the aforesaid agent shall have no demand on 
the town of Townsend for charges in petitioning as aforesaid, 
seperate from any other town in the Province ; Also, voted, 
in case the said Thomas Hutchinson be not chosen by the 
major part of the tovms, or if chosen, cannot engage in said 
affair, then Capt. John Stevens be fully impowered to join 
with other the towns of the Province in the choice of another 
agent to act in said affair, and that the aforesaid John 
Stevens have full power in behalf of said town to prepare 
and sign any petition to his majesty concerning said lines, as 
shall be necessary, and that he shall have forty shillings 
reward for his services in this affair." Town Records Vol. 1, 
p. 31. It does not appear that any remedy or recompense 
for the wrong done, resulted from these proceedings. But the 
good people of Townsend looked for and obtained a remedy 
nearer home. The general court granted to the town a tract 
of land as a compensation for lands cut off by the New 
Hampshire line, and at a town meeting in 1786, the selectmen 
were directed to make sale of the lands so granted. 

The agreement made by Thomlinson with Mason for the 
sale of his title, to the Province of Nevf Hampshire before 
mentioned, was lodged in the hands of the governor, and was 
by him laid before the house. It lay on their table a long 
time without a,ny formal notice. In the meantime Mason had 
suffered a fin.e and recovery in the courts of New Hampshire, 



CAPT. JOHN MASON. 23 

by -which he could convey his interest in fee. He sent in a 
memorial, stating that he ttouIcI "wait no longer, but consider 
inaction on their part a refusal, and intimations were given 
that if the agreement should not be ratified, a sale would be 
made to other persons, who stood ready to purchase. At 
length a resolution passed the house, that they would comply 
with the agreement and pay the price, and that the land should 
be granted by the general assembly, to the inhabitants, as they 
should think proper. A committee was appointed to com- 
plete the business with Mason, but he had on the same day, 
by a deed of sale for the sum of fifteen hundred pounds, con- 
veyed his whole interest to twelve persons in fifteen shares. 
The purchasers were Theodore Atkinson three fifteenths, 
Mark H. Wentworth two fifteenths, Richard Wibird, John 
Wentworth, (son of the governor,) George Jaffrey, Nathaniel 
Meserve, Thomas Packer, Thomas Walliugford, Jotham Odi- 
orne, Joshua Pierce, Samuel Moore and John Mofiatt one fif- 
teenth each. 

When it was found that the conveyance had been made, 
there was much dissatisfaction. Some attempts were made 
to negotiate with these purchasers for a conveyance to the 
Province, but without success. One obstacle in the way was, 
that the house would not make the purchase, unless with the 
stipulation that the land should be granted by the legislature ; 
but the governor and council and the purchasers seem to have 
insisted, that it should be granted by the governor and council, 
and for that reason principally the negotiation failed. 

In 1749 the purchasers took a second deed, comprehending 
all the Masonian grant from Naumkeag to Piscataqua ; where- 
as their former deed, was confined to the lately established 
boundaries of New Hampshire. This deed was not recorded 
till 1753. 

After they had taken the first deed, they began to grant 
townships, and continued granting them to petitioners, often 
without fees, and always without quit-rents. They quieted the 
titles in the towns on the western side of the Merrimack, 



24 HISTORY OP MASON. 

which had been granted by Massachusetts, before the estab- 
lishment of the line, so that they could go on peacably with 
their settlements. The terms of these grants were, that the 
grantees should within a limited time, erect mills and meeting- 
houses, clear out roads and settle ministers. In every town- 
ship they reserved one right for the first settled minister, 
another for the ministry, and a third for schools. They also 
reserved fifteen rights for themselves, and two for their attor- 
nies ; all of which were to be free from taxes, until sold or 
occupied. By virtue of these grants, many townships were 
settled, and the interest of the people became so united with 
that of the proprietors, that the prejudices against them 
gradually abated. The heirs of Allen menanced them by 
advertisements, and warned the people against accepting these 
grants. To this fact and claim undoubtedly, reference is had 
in that clause in the grant of the township, by which the grant- 
ors engage " to defend through the law to the King in Coun- 
cil, if need be, one action that may be brought against them 
or any number of them," &c. By these proceedings, a way 
was prepared for giving to settlers a valid title to the lands, 
which had so long been a subject of doubt and controversy ; 
and a grant was made to the proprietors, under which the set- 
tlement of the town was commenced and proceeded with as 
will be detailed in the next chapter. 



CHAPTER II. 

PROPRIETARY HISTORY. 

Groton Grant in 1734, tlie earliest grant in this part of New-Hampshire. Order 
of time of grants in the vicinity. No. 1 granted by the Masouian Proprietors. 
First inhabitants. Division among the grantees. Plan of the township. 
Proceedings in proprietors' meetings. Roads. Report of settlements and 
improvements, in 1752. Meeting House. MiUs. Ministers and preaching. 
Call of E. Champney. Two hundred acres added on the north side. Call of 
James Parker. Vote for incorporation. Vote giving the Meeting House to 
the town. Final meeting. 

The earliest historical trace of the claim of ownership in 
the territory and soil of the town of Mason, is found in con- 
nection with the town of Groton. The original grant of the 
township of Groton, on the petition of Dean Winthrop 
and others, under date of 23d, 5th m., 1655, was of a tract 
" equal to eight miles square." In 1715, a portion of this ter- 
ritory was annexed to Nashobah and incorporated by the 
name of Littleton. There were also included within the 
bounds of Groton, as originally surveyed and located, two 
farms previously granted to individuals, containing about 
thirteen hundred acres, for which no allowance was made in 
the survey. In 1734, the inhabitants of Groton petitioned 
the General Court "for some of the unappropriated land of 
the Province, as an equivalent for the said farms, and the land 
so taken off by the line established, dividing between Groton 
and Littleton." On this petition a grant was made of "ten 
thousand eight hundred acres, in a gore between Townscnd 
and Dunstable." This tract is undoubtedly the same repre- 



26 HISTORY OF MASON. 

sentcd on Douglas' map made in 1748, as " Groton Grant." 
According to that map, it emLraced a territory extending to 
Souhcgan river, which would include a large part of Ma- 
son, and a part of Wilton. See extract from Douglas' map 
Hist, of New Ipswich, page 28. Under this grant, the inhab- 
itants of Groton took possession of, and occupied the terri- 
tory. It was their custom to cut the hay upon the meadows, 
and stack it, and early in the spring to send up their young 
cattle to be fed upon the hay, under the care of Boad, the 
negro slave. They would cause the woods to be fired, as it 
was called, that is, burnt over in the spring ; after which fresh 
and succulent herbage springing up, furnished good store 
of the finest feed, upon which the cattle would thrive and 
fatten through the season. Boad's camp was upon the east 
side of the meadow, near the residence of the late Joel 
Ames. "When the Province line was run in 1741, it "passed 
through Groton Gore, leaving a large portion thereof, and a 
triangular piece of what was originally Groton, in the state 
of New Hampshire." For the land so lost by the establish- 
ing of the Province line, on the petition of the inhabitants of 
Groton, the General Court in June 1771, granted them 
" seven thousand and eight hundred acres of unappropriated 
lands lying on the western part of the Province." See But- 
ler's Groton, pp. 58 — 62. To have a distinct understanding 
of the state of territorial titles in 1734, the date of the 
grant of Groton Gore, it may be necessary to review the 
territorial grants previous and subsequent to that date, of 
the adjacent and neighboring towns. 

Chelmsford and Groton were granted in 1655. Dunstable 
in 1673. This town originally comprised the territory now 
embraced in Dunstable and Tyngsborough in Massachusetts, 
Hudson, Nashua, Hollis, most of Brookline, all of Milford 
and Merrimack south of Souhegan river, and most of Litch- 
field, in New Hampshire. Dunstable was "bounded south by 
Chelmsford to Groton line, on the west by Groton and by 
countrey land, the line running due north from the bound- 



PROPRIETARY HISTORY. 27 

ary" [that is the north east angle of Groton] "ten miles 
till you come to Souhegan river, at a place called Dram Cup 
Hill at a great pine tree nigh ye said river, at a [bound or 
corner] of Charlestown scoole farm; bounded by the Souhe- 
gan river on the north," &c. As ''a triangular piece of what 
was originally Groton" was by the running of the Province 
lino in 1741, left within the State of New Hampshire, the 
north east angle of Groton must be found in Brookline ten 
miles south of Souhegan river, not far from Potanapus pond. 
The tradition is that the west line of Dunstable, which must 
have commenced at the north east angle of Groton, passed 
through this pond. A tract about one mile wide lying on the 
east side of Mason, was added to a portion of Hollis, for- 
merly Dunstable, and incorporated by the name of Raby, af- 
terwards changed to Brookline. Thus it appears that the 
western line of Old Dunstable passed about one mile east of 
the eastern line of Mason. 

Townsend was incorporated in 1732. A part of this town 
also was left by the Province line, in New Hampshire, and is 
included within the limits of Mason. New Ipswich was 
granted by Massachusetts in 1735. This grant was vacated 
by the establishment of the line ; but it was regranted by the 
Masonian proprietors, with a change of boundaries, April 17, 
1750. Hollis, the west part of Old Dunstable, was organized 
as a parish or precinct, December 28, 1739, and incorporated 
as a town, April 20, 1746. The name originally was Holies, 
from the family name of the Duke of Newcastle, prime min- 
ister of Great Britain in the reign of George H. at the time 
Louisburg was taken, in 1745, under Sir William Pepperell. 
Pepperell, another name commemorating the same event, was 
incorporated in 1753, being formerly a precinct or parish of 
Groton. Brookline, originally named Raby, was incorpo- 
rated March 30, 1769. The original charter embraced a part 
of the west part of Hollis, two miles wide and the mile slip, 
so called, a piece of land a part of the old Groton Gore, 
about one mile wide, "lying on the easterly side of Mason." 



28 HISTORY OF MASOX. 

The east line of this mile slip must have been the west line 
of Old Dunstable, which bordered on "countrey land," from 
Groton to Souhegan river. In 1786, another portion of Hol- 
lis, three fourths of a mile wide, was added to Brookline. 
Wilton was granted by the Masonian proprietors, October 1, 
1749. Temple was incorporated about the year 1770. Ash- 
by in 1767. Thus it appears that the original grant of this 
tract to Groton, by Massachusetts, was prior, in point of 
time, to that of any adjoining territory, except Townsend. 

The title to the township of Mason, except two gores, one 
on the north and one on the south side, was granted Novem- 
ber 1, 1749, by an instrument of that date executed by Col. 
Joseph Blanchard, on behalf of the Masonian proprietors, of 
which the following is a copy : 

[Copy of the Grant.] 
Province of New Hampshire. 

Pursuant to the power and authority, granted and vested in me by 
the Proprietors of lands purchased of John Tufton Mason, Esq. in the 
Province of New Hampshire, by their vote passed at the meeting, held 
at Portsmouth, in said Province, the IGth day of June, 1749, 

I do by these presents, give and grant, all the title and interest, 
property and possession of the proprietors aforesaid, unto William 
Lawrence, Esq., Peter Powers, EJeazer Blanchard, John Goff, Esq., 
David Adams, Paul March, Philip Olerick, Eleazer Farwell, John 
Stevens, Nathaniel Meserve, Jr., Peter Powers, Jr., Joseph Blodgett, 
John Butterfield, Jonathan Powers, Jr., Zaccheus Lovewell, Jonathan 
Hubbard, John Varnum, Josiah Brown, John Jennison, Joseph Blan- 
chard, Jr., Elnathan Blood, Mr. Thomas Packer, Jonathan Hubbard, 
Jr., Clement March, Robert Fletcher, Jr., Israel Hubbard, Amasa 
Parker, Jacob Gould, Benjamin Parker, David Stearns, Thomas, Tar- 
bell, Samuel Tarbell, Shadrack Whitney, Edward Jewett, all their 
[heirs] of in and to all that part of a township or tract of land in the 
Province of New Hampshire aforesaid, containing about the contents 
of seventy-seven square miles, bounded as follows, beginning at a stake 
and stones the southeast corner of the premises, and runs from 
thence, north eighty degrees west, five miles and twenty rods by the 
Province line to New Ipswich corner, from thence north by the 
needle, five miles to a white pine tree marked, from thence east by 
the needle, five miles to a hemlock tree marked, from thence south 
by the needle, to the first bounds mentioned, which said town- 
ship is laid out, drawn for, and lots ascertained for each grantee 
respectively, with two lots for encouragement of building of mills, 6lc. 
and three shares for public uses, viz : one for the first settled minister, 



PROPRIETARY HISTORY. 29 

one for the ministry, and one for the schools there forever, which 
said shares and lots, to be the same as already drawn and entered 
in the schedule and plan hereunto annexed, unto them respectively 
and their heirs and assigns. To have and hold on the following 
terms, conditions and limitations, and on them only, that is to say, 
that a meeting house be built as near the centre of said town, as by the 
grantees shall be judged most convenient, and that when such place 
shall be agreed on, six acres shall be reserved for public uses ; that the 
remaining lands not entered in the schedule and plan aforesaid, speci- 
fied within the bounds of the township aforesaid, be and hereby are 
reserved to and for the use of the Grantors of the premises, their 
heirs and assigns forever, free and clear from all charges, tax or 
incumbrance of settlement, until their, or any of their parts are 
improved by them, or some holding under them. 

That the aforementioned grantees, exclusive of the three public 
lots, shall carry on, perform and make settlement at their own 
expense, in the following manner, viz : that there be all necessary 
highways laid out in said town where they will be most convenient, 
without any pay or allowance, to those grantors or grantees, through 
whose land the same shall go, that the grantees build a convenient 
house for the public worship of God, there at or before the last day 
of May, 1753, for the use of those who shall then, or afterwards 
inhabit there. That there be on some one lot of each of the forty 
shares belonging to the grantees, three acres cleared, inclosed and 
fitted for mowing or tillage, so far as is profitable, at or before the last 
day of November, 1751, and each of the said lots to be cleared as 
aforesaid, to be settled with having a house of sixteen feet square, at 
the least, and seven feet stud or more, with a chimney and cellar, fin- 
ished and fitted for a dwelling house, thereon at or before the last day 
of May, 1752, and some person or family inhabiting and resident in 
said house, and they or some others in each of their steads, continue 
residing there until the last day of May, 1755. That the owners of 
each of the forty settling shares, have on each of their rights respec- 
tively, three acres more, in like manner fitted, at or before the last day 
of November, 1752, and the like quantity annually, for two years 
then next coming. That the remaining six shares, to wit, the shares 
of Jonathan Hubbard, Benjamin Parker, Nathaniel Meserve, Jr., 
Josiah Brown, John Jennison, Eleazer Blanchard, be excused from 
the duty of building, improving or settling, until the last day of No- 
vember, 1755, and then to have the whole duty performed as the 
others at that time. That each of the grantees at the executing of this 
instrument pay, thirty pounds each old tenor, to defray the necessary 
charges, risen or arising in bringing forward the settlement, to be 
deposited in the hands of such person as they shall appoint, being a 
freeholder and resident in the Province. That the aforesaid grantees 
or their assigns assess such further sum, or sums of money equally in 
[pro] portion to the right, or the share of each grantee, exclusive of 
the three public lots, as may be thought necessary, for carrying on 
and completing any of the public matters, in making the settlement 



30 HISTORY OF MASON. 

and charges, always provided there be no Indian war, within any of 
the times aforesaid, for doing the duty conditioned in this grant, and 
in case that should happen, the same time to be allowed for the re- 
spective matters aforesaid, after such impediment shall be removed. 
That all white pine trees fit for masting his Majesties royal navy, 
growing on said land, be and here[by] are granted to his Majesty, 
his heirs and successors forever. 

Lastly, said grantors do hereby promise to the said grantees, their 
heirs and assigns, to defend through the law, to the King and 
Council if need be, one action that shall and may be brought against 
them, or any number of them, by any person or persons whatsoever, 
claiming the said land, or any part thereof, by any other title than 
of the grantors, or that by which they hold and derive theirs from. 
Provided the said grantors are avouched in to defend the same, and 
that in case the same shall be recovered against the grantors, the 
grantees shall recover nothing over against the grantors for the 
said lands and improvements, or expenses of bringing forward the 
settlement, and further, that the said grantors will pay the necessary 
expenses of time and money, that any other person or persons shall be 
put to, by any other suit or suits, that shall be brought against them, 
or any of them, the said grantees for tryal of the title, before one 
action shall be fully determined in the law. In witness whereof, I the 
said Joseph Blanchard of Dunstable, have hereunto set my hand and 
seal, this first day of November, 1749. 

JOSEPH BLANCHARD. [seal.] 

This copy is a transcript from the proprietors' records. 
The original has not been found. There is undoubtedly a 
mistake in the number of square miles in the contents of the 
town. It should be twenty seven, not seventy seven. 

There is no record or tradition existing which shows when 
the first inhabitants began to reside within the limits of the 
town. Joseph Herrick was chosen " second deer officer" in 
Townsend, at the annual town meeting in March, 1742. In 
1745, that town "voted to abate Joseph Herrick's rates, 
provided the money was raised after he went out of town." 
Joseph Herrick lived in the south-easterly part of the town 
of Mason, near where Elisha Boynton lived. In what part 
of Townsend he resided before he "went out of town," 
is not known. He was undoubtedly the pioneer in the settle- 
ment of that part of Mason. There, probably, his oldest 
son, Joseph Herrick was born, Sept. 30, 1751. He may 
claim to be the first person of European parentage, born 



PEOPRIETARY HISTORY. 31 

"withiu the present limits of the town. His only competitor 
for this honor, is John Lawrence, son of Enosh Lawrence. 
No record of his birth is found. He was the youngest of 
the children of Enosh Lawrence and Sarah Stevens, his wife. 
The birth of nine of their children is recorded in the town 
records of Pepperell, the last of which was April 12, 1748. 
There is a tradition that he was born in 1751, and that he 
was the first child born in the town ; that is, within the limits 
of the original grant. It would seem that Lawrence was 
residing in Pepperell in 1748, and that Herrick removed out 
of Townsend in 1745; so that the last was probably the 
earliest permanent resident within the present limits of the 
township. He was a " deer of&cer," which indicates that he 
was a hunter, fond of sylvan pursuits. 

A meeting of the " grantees and proprietors" was held at 
the house of Capt. Joseph French, in Dunstable, Oct. 16, 
1749 ; at which, the township having been divided into lots, 
and a list made of the lots, they were drawn for, and entered 
to each proprietor his lots, which list is inserted on page 34. 
On pages 32 and 33 will be found a plan of the town with the 
names of the grantees, &c., of the several lots according to 
the said list. 



32 



rilSTORY OF MASON. 



PLAN OF TOWNSHIP 



K. 10 
20 Eobert Fletcher. 


9 
J. Peircc. 


8 7 
Jona. Powers, Jr. J. T. Mason. 
1 


ScoUay & March. 


10 
19 S. Moore. 


9 
J. Peircc. 


8 
Jona. Moffatt. 


7 
Saml Tarbell. 


6 

Saml. TarbelL 


10 
18 S. Moore. 


9 
D. Stearns. 


8 
Thos. Tarbell. 


7 
Jos. Blanchard. 


6 
N. Messerve, Jr. 
D. WiUiams. 


10 
17 J. Odiorne, 


9 
Maj. J. Hubbard. 


8 
"Wm. Lawrence. 


7 
Wm. Lawrence. 


6 
Benj. Parker. 
0. Nutting. 


10 
16 J. Odiorne. 


9 
Maj. J. Hubbard. 


8 
Jona. Hubbard. 


7 
J. Blanchard. 


Jona. Hubbard. 6 

J. Hull. 

E. Sf T. Blood. 


10 

15 N. Messerve. 


9 
N. Messerve. 


8 
David Stearns. 


7 
Benj. Parker. 
H. Jefts. 


6 
Joshua Peirce. 
E. Fish. 


10 
14 J. Stevens. 


9 

J. Stevens. 


8 
George Marsh. 


7 
J. Hubbard, Jr. 


6 
M.H.Wentworth. 

N. Hall. 


10 
13 J. Stevens. 
/. Barrett. 


9 1 8 
J. Stevens. Th: Parker, Esq. 
Z. Daris. Saml. Laurence. 


7 
T. J. Mason. 
Saml. Lawrence. 


Thos. Parker. 6 

H. Jeffs. 

J. Bachelder. 


10 
12 J. Odiorne. 


N. Messerve. 9 Jos. Jennison. 8 
A. Alien. Josiah ff^heeler. 
Jos. Merriain. H. Warren. 


J. Hubbard, Jr. 7 

Samuel Hill. 
John Blodgett. 


6 
Maj. J.Hubbard. 

Amos Holden. 


10 
11 J. Jennison. 


9 8 

J. Stevens. J. Stevens. 

N. Whipple. 


Maj. Lawrence. 7 
B. Mann. 
S. Ames. 


6 

Joseph Blodgett. 
Ab. Merriam. 


10 
10 Josiah Brown. 


9 8 
J. Stevens. J. Varnum. 
Jos. Merriam. 


Maj. Lawrence. 7 

J. Jefts. E.Bali. 

N. Boynton. 


School. G 
MeeVsHuuse Lot. 
Dr. tVm. Barber. 


10 
9 Maj. J. Hubbard. 
A. Wheeler. 


9 
J. Stevens. 
E. Lawrence. 


8 
W. Parker, Esq. 
Jona. Searle. 


J. Stevens. 
N. Barrett. 
J. WhUaker. 


J. Jennison. 6 

S. Abbott. 
Rer. E. Hill. 


10 
8 Maj. J. Hubbard. 
Lt. 0. Parker. 


9 1 8 
G. Jaflfirey. J.Wentworth,Jr. 
T. Rohbins. T. Wheeler. 


E. Blanchard. 7 

D.Fay. J. Wait, 

Jr. J. Flagg. 


E. Blanchard. 6 

Joshua Wi/eth. 

E. Wilson. 


10 
7 M. Liverraore. 
E. Daris. 


9 Josiah Brown. 8 
M. Livermore. Ministry. 
James Wood. Ster . Lawrence. 


7 
J.Wentworth,Jr. 

1 


Jos. Blanchard. G 

D. Blodgett. 

John Winship. 


10 
6 Z. Lovewell. 


<) 
M.H.Wentworth 


8 
J. Powers, Jr. 


7 
JohnButterfield. 
J. Webber, .Jr. 


Ph. Olericke. 6 
W, Cummin gs. 
John Sirallow. 


10 
5 Z. Lovewell. 
T. fFheelock. 


9 
N. Messerve, Jr. 
Samuel Woods. 


Jos. Farrar. 8 

Mill Lot. 
E. ShattucJc. 


7 
JohnButterfield. 
Seth Robbms. 


6 
School. 
Zac. Barrett. 


10 
4 S. "Walling:ford. 
0. Hosiner. 


9 

N. Messerve, Jr. 


8 
Geo. Jaffrey. 
T. Hodgman. 


7 
Rich'd "Wibird. 


6 
Wm. Lawrence. 
Capt. I. Brown. 


10 
3 T.'Walling-ford. 


Phil. Olericke. 9 

Wni. Cammings. 

R. Weston. 


8 
Josiah Brown. 


7 
Joseph Blodgett. 


6 
Wm. Lawrence 
Enos Lawrence. 


10 
2 P. March. 
E. Hodgman. 


9 
D. Adams. 
John Barrett. 


8 
W. Parker, Esq. 


7 
Rich'd Wibird. 


Wm. Lawrence. 6 
Jostah Rohbins, 
Dea. J. Webber. 
Mark H. Went- 6 
worth. JV. Win- 
ship. W. Barrett. 


10 
1 G. Jaffrey. 
J. Hodgman. 


9 
P. Powers, 


8 
E. Blanchard. 


7 
School. 













The plan of which the above is a copy was found among 
It is in the hand writing of John Blodgett, Esq., who was 
south side is l-epresented a gore 240 poles wide at the east 
the soutfelwest corner of the town. It is not laid out into 
on the plan is in these words : "A plan of Mason without 



the papers in the town clerk's office, 
for many years town clerk. On the 
end, the south line of which runs to 
lots. The only note or memorandum 
any north slip," and on the south 



PROPRIETARY HISTORT. 



33; 



NO 1, OE MASON. 



5 

Theo. Atkinson 


-1 
Jona. Lawrence. 
J. Hubbard. 


3 2 
Jona. Hubbard. Benj. Parker. 

1 


Ainasa Parker. 20 
J. Jefts. 


5 
Wm. Lawrence. 


■i 
Thos. Tarbell. 


3 
Elnathan Blood. 


David Stearns. 


1 
Thomas Parker. 19 


5 
Theo. Atkinson. 


■1 
Jacob Gould. 


3 
Mr. Th: Packer. 


J. Hubbard, Jr. 


1 
E. Jewett. 18 


5 

Wm. Lawrence. 


4 
Wm. Lawrence. 


3 
J. Hubbard, Jr. 


2 

George March. 


1 
Ministry. 17 


5 
Jona'. Hubbard. 


4 
Amasa Parker. 
J. Jffts. 


3 
J. Hubbard, Jr. 


2 
J. Blanchard, Jr. 


1 

J. Blanchard, Jr. 16 


5 
John Moffat. 


5 
Saml. Tarbell. 


3 
Robert Fletcher. 


2 
Joseph Farrar. 
Mill Lot. 


1 
Eleazer Farwell. 15 


5 
M.H.Wentworth 


4 
Jacob Gould. 


3 

Kobt. Fletcher. 


2 
Jos. Blanchard. 


1 
Scollay & March. 14 


5 
Scollay & March. 


4 
Samuel Moore. 


3 
J. Hubbard, Jr. 


2 1 
J. T. Mason. Peter Powers. 13 


5 
Amasa Parker. 
J. Jefls. 


4 
Peter Powers. 


3 
Elnathan Blood. 


Jacob Gould. 


1 
Peter Powers. 13 
Wm. Spaulding. 


5 
Minister. 


4 
Thos. Tarbell. 


3 
Elnathan Blood. 


John Stevens. 


1 
Peter Powers. 11 
Win. Spaulding. 


5 

Minister. 
./. Searle. 


Peter Towers. 4 
John Tarbell. 
Joshua Davis. 


3 
E. Jewett. 
T. Tarbell. 


2 
T. Parker, Esq. 
Udm. Tarbell. 


1 
Th: Parker, Esq. 10 
Wm. Spaulding. 


5 
J. Stevehs. 
N. Wurren, 


4 
Jona. Blanchard. 
Jason Russell. 


3 

John Moffat. 


J.Wentworth, Jr 


1 
M.H.Wentworth 9 


John Uotf. 5 
n. Hussell. 


4 
Thos. Taylor. 
H. Russell. 


3 

Theo. Atkinson. 


2 
Jona. Livermore. 
— Hubbard. 


1 
J. Powers, Jr. 8 


5 

Ministry* 
Joseph Win skip. 


4 
Paul March, 
.v. Simth. 


3 
George March. 


2 
M.H.Wentworth 


1 
Peter Powers. 7 


5 
Peter Powers, Jr. 


Jos. Blodg-ett. 4 

B. Barrett. 
H. Richardson. 


3 

David Adams. 


2 
Peter Powers. 


1 
Peter Powers,Jr. 6 


5 

Peter Powers, Jr. 


4 
David Adams. 
Amos Blood. 


3 

Ministry. 
J. Brown. 


2 
Phil. Olericke. 

— Cummings. 


1 

Peter Powers. 5 


John Varnum. 5 
John Dutton. 
John Blood. 


John Goff, 4 

.S'. Greeley. 

Joseph Bloud. 


3 
Maj. J. Hubbard. 


•2 
W.Parker, Esq. 


1 
Eich'd Wibird. 4 


5 
E. Farwell. 


4 
John Stevens, 


3 
John Stevens. 


2 

Wm. Lawrence. 


1 
Minister. 3 


5 
T.Wallingford. 


4 
John Stevens. 


3 
John Stevens. 


2 
John Goff. 
— Fou-ers. 


1 
M. Livermore. 2 


5 
Paul March. 


4 
John Butterfield. 


3 
Shadr. Whitney. 


2 
Eleazer Farwell. 


1 
John Varnum. 1 



side, "Five mil^s East"; on the east, "Five miles North"; on the north, "Five miles 
West"; on the west, "Five miles South". In some instances the name of the original 
grantee is not on this plan, and is restored in this copy. The names of the grantees are in Bo- 
man letters. The names in Italic in all cases are those of subsequent residents on, or owners of 
the lots, and in most cases of original settlers on the lots. 



34 HISTORY OP MASON. 

RECORD OF THE DRAFT OF LOTS IN TOWNSHIP NO. 1. 



NAMES. 



Ministry, 
School, 

George Jaffrey, 
Peter Powers, * 
Eleazcr Blanchard, 
John GofF, Esq., 
David Adams, f 
Paul March, 
Phillip Olerike, 
Eleazer Farwell, 
John Stevens, Esq., 
Thomas "\Vallingford, 
Nathaniel Mcserve, Jr., 
Peter Powers, Jr., 
Joseph Blodgett, 
John Buttertield, J 
Jonathan Powers, Jr., 
Mark Hunlcing Wentworth, 
Thomas Taylor, $ 
Matthew Livermore, 
John Stevens, Esq., 
William Lawrence, Esq., 
William Parker, Esq., 
John Wentworth, Jr., 
Maj. Jona. Hubhard, 
Maj. Wm. Lawrence, || 
John Varnum, IT 
John Stevens, Esq., 
Josiah Brown, 
Hichard Wibird, Esq., 
Jotham Odiorn, 
Nathl. Meserve, Esq., 
John Gennison, 
John Stevens, Esq., 



^ 


U 




u 




>H 




bo 


% 


bD 


J3 
S 


bo 


.2 

3 


bo 

c 


1 


'A 


7 


3 




I?; 
1 


17 


9. 


6 


."i 


6 


10 


7 


1 


3 


10 


1 


9 


8 


8 


4 


4 


y 


1 


a 


6 


1 


5 


.'i 


8 


1 


7 


8 





8 


(i 


5 


8 


4 


4 


a 


2 


7 


9 


2 


4 


5 


3 


6 


8 


10 


2 


4 


7 


t) 


1 


9 


9 


3 


6 


6 


•2 


5 


10 


5 


3 


a 


1 


i 


15 


11 


4 


3 


5 


4 


4 


a 


10 


10 


4 


10 


3 


t) 


y 


l.-i 


9 


."J 


9 


4 


b 


18 


14 


5 


f> 


b 


6 


1 


6 


l.-i 


7 


3 


4 


6 


6 


U 


IH 


7 


6 


4 


1 








17 


8 


20 


1 


8 


8 


6 


18 


6 


1 


9 


fi 


1 


9 


19 


10 


6 


10 


•> 


4 


8 


20 


10 


7 


9 


7 


1 


2 


21 


10 


14 


7 


9 


5 


9 


n 


."i 


19 


e 


2 


2 


3 


2?. 


8 


9 


8 


2 


2 


4 


2+ 


8 


8 


7 


7 


2 


9 


2r> 


10 


9 


10 


8 


3 


4 


26 


7 


10 


7 


11 






27 


8 


in 


1 


1 


5 


4 


ys 


9 


10 


9 


11 


2 


11 


29 


in 


10 


8 


3 


8 


7 


.30 


7 


4 


7 


2 


1 


4 


.SI 


10 


17 


10 


12 


10 


16 


.12 


10 


l.'j 


9 


12 


9 


15 


.13 


10 


11 


8 


12 


6 


9 


34 


9 


13 


9 


14 


3 


a 



NAMES. 



John Stevens, Esq., 
Samuel Moore and * 
Joseph Farrar t 
Minister, 

Joseph Blanchard, Jr., 
Peter Powers, X 
J. P. '^ 

Elnathan Blood, 
Thomas Parker, Esq., 
Mr. Thomas Packer, 
J. P. II 

John Tufton Mason, Esq., 
George March, 
Mark H. Wentworth, 
Capt. Robert Fletcher, 
Saml. ScoUay and March, 
John Moffat, Esq., 
Jonathan Lawrence, [bard, 
Mr. Trowbridge, now Hub- 
Amasa Parker, 
Jona. Hubbard, Jr., 
Jacob Gould, 
Wm. Lawrence, Esq., 
Benja. Parker, 
Maj. Jona. Hubbard, J. P. ,11 
Mr. David Stearns, 
Capt Thomas Tarbell, 
Joseph Blanchard, Esq., 
Theodore Atkinson, Esq., 
Wm. Lawrence. Esq., 
Capt. S.aml. TarbeU, 
Joshua Pierce, 
Sliadrack Whitney, 



bn 

3 

Q 




bi 




be 

C 
s 


XI 

3 
s 


bo 

a 


35 


8 


n 


9 


9 


3 


3 


36 


in 


18 


10 


19 


4 


13 


37 


2 


15 


8 


5 






38 


.5 


10 


5 


11 


1 


3 


39 


4 


9 


2 


16 


1 


16 


40 


4 


10 


T 


12 


1 


13 


41 


4 


la 


1 


11 


1 


7 


42 


3 


12 


3 


11 


3 


19 


43 


8 


13 


1 


in 


2 


10 


44 


fi 


13 


1 


19 


3 


18 


45 


3 


13 


2 


18 


7 


12 


46 


7 


20 


7 


13 


2 


13 


47 


8 


14 


3 


7 


2 


17 


48 


6 


14 


5 


14 


2 


7 


49 


3 


14 


3 


15 


10 


ai 


.50 


5 


13 


6 


20 


1 


14 


51 


5 


15 


8 


19 


3 


9 


52 


<J 


16 


4 


20 


2 


8 


53 


5 


16 


3 


20 


8 


16 


54 


4 


16 


ll20 


5 


1-:^ 


55 


3 


16 


317 


7 


14 


56 


4 


14 


4118 


2 


12 


57 


5 


17 


8 


17 


7 


17 


58 


6 


17 


a!20 


7 


Vy 


59 


9 


17 


9;i6 


6 


12 


60 


9 


18 


3 19 


8 


15 


61 


8 


18 


4 19 


4 


11 


62 


I 


18 


6 7 


2 


14 


63 


5 


18 


5 20 


3 


H 


61 


6 


3 


6 


4 


4 


17 


65 


7 


19 


6 


19 


4 


15 


66 


9 


19 


9 


20 


6 


15 


67 


3 


1 











The foregoing is a True Copy of the Draught and numbers of the lots In the Township No. One, 
so called, lying in the Province of New Hampshire, as they was Drawn by the Proprietors of 
said Township. A true copy. Examined and Recorded, 

Pr JOHN STEVENS, Prop's Clerk. 

Note. In the original copy, in the margin against the names and figures, are sundry addi-- 
tions indicated by the references below : 

*7.5. * Daniel Pierce. 



t8 [in the 6th column should be 3.1 

^7.5. 

^ Z. LovewelL 

fl Two lots to this right. 

IT J. P. 



fMill Lot. 

J J. P. 

§ Capt. Peter Powers. 

II Jona. Hubbard, Jr. 

IT J. P. [above the name.] 



At the same meeting, William Lawrence and John Stevens, 
Esq.; were " directed, at the charge of the grantees and set- 
tlers of this township, to mark out a highway in said town- 
ship, from where the road enters into said township, that 
leads from Amos Sartell's house in Townshend, to the meet- 
ing-house place, as marked on the plan of the division of 
said township, and from said meeting-house place, to near the 
middle of the north line in said township, in the most conve- 
nient place for a road, and fit for a feasible cart road, the 



PROPEIETAEY HISTORY. 35 

said highway, as soon as may be, aud that Messrs. Benjamin 
Parker and Peter Powers, be desired and empowered as 
aforesaid, to lay out, and clear, and fit for a feasible cart 
road, in the most convenient place, from said meeting-house 
place to the town of Hollis." In this extract from the pro- 
prietors' records, a distinction is made between " grantees 
and settlers," which is kept up through the whole period of 
the proprietorship, which continued long after the incorpora- 
tion of the town. Many of the proprietors never resided in 
the town; some of the original proprietors resided in the 
town, and several persons, whose names do not appear among 
the original proprietors, resided in the town, and attended 
proprietors' meetings, and voted and took an active part 
therein ; while other persons who resided and owned land in 
town, do not appear to have attended the meetings, or to 
have been recognized as having any of the rights or powers 
of proprietors. What constituted the line of distinction 
between the owners of land who had a right, and those who 
had not a right to meet and vote in proprietary meetings, 
does not appear. The road first above described, is substan- 
tially the same now travelled from Townsend west village, 
leading by the meeting-house northerly, to and beyond Jona- 
than Bachelders. The other was the road leading from the 
meeting-house to Brookline, then a part of Hollis. At an 
adjournment of the same meeting, held Nov. 7, 1749, at the 
same place, Joseph Blanchard, Jr. was chosen Clerk, Joseph 
Blanchard, Esq. Treasurer, Major Jonathan Hubbard, John 
Stevens, Esq. and Capt. Samuel Tarbell were chosen a com- 
mittee " for managing the prudentials of the society." The 
mode of calling future meetings was also provided for; noti- 
ces for which were to be posted fifteen days beforehand, in 
some public place in Dunstaltle, in Townsend, and in Groton. 
It was also " voted to accept of the two mill lots marked on 
the plan for that use, and chose a committee to bargain and 
indent with some person or persons, to build and finish a 
saw mill by the last day of February, 1750, and a corn mill in 



30 HISTORY OF MASON. 

nine montlis from that time ; that they contract for said mills 
to be kept in repair; also that every of the inhabitants on 
bringing suitable timber, have it sawed for half the stulF at 
least; also to dispo.se of the two mill lots, or so much of 
them for that use as they shall agree for ; that Messrs Benja- 
min Parker, Major Jonathan Hubbard, Capt. Jolm Stevens be 
the committee for this purpose." 

The plan referred to has not been found; nor any plan 
upon which the mill lots are marked, among the records of 
the proprietors, but in the schedule of the lots drawn to the 
different rights against right or "draught," No. 37, are two 
lots 2 R. 15, and 8 R. 5, marked in the margin "mill lots," and 
in a plan in the hand-writing of John Blodgett, Esq., who 
was in 1799, and many years after, town clerk, on file with 
the papers in the town clerk's office, these two lots are 
each marked "mill lot." 

Some question seems to have arisen at this early period as 
to the nature and the validity of the title claimed under the 
grant, for at this same adjourned meeting, Mr. John Varnum, 
Major William Lawrence, and Capt. John Stevens were chosen 
a committee " to enquire into, and view the tenor of the 
grant, and report their opinion of the safety therein ; and 
that Capt. Thomas Tarbell be joined to this committee." 
Probably the committee were satisfied " of the safety therein," 
for no report has been entered on the records, nor docs any 
question as to the validity of the title seem ever after to 
have been seriously made. This movement, probably, had 
reference to Allen's advertisements before mentioned to, cau- 
tioning persons not to take titles under the Masonian propri- 
etors. 

At this same .adjourned meeting, it was also voted, that the 
committee chosen at the first of this meeting, for marking out 
and clearing highways, be directed to mark out, and open a 
road so that horses or cattle may pass from the meeting-house 
place, westward, near to the west line of the town." This 
was, probably, the road from the meeting-house to New 



PROPRIETARY HISTORY. 37 

Ipswich, by 0])adia]i Parker's house. At this early period, 
the roads leading from the south to the north, and from the 
cast to the west borders of the town through the center, 
seem to have been provided for. 

At an adjournment of the same meeting, holden on the 
last Tuesday in Dec. 1749, Capt. Thomas Tarbell was added 
to the committee for laying out and clearing the road from 
the meeting-house place to Hollis ; also " voted, that John 
Stevens, Esq. amend the range line between the sixth and 
seventh range, so as equally to divide the quantity of land 
between the two ranges, and he to be paid six pounds old 
tenor for that service, which he agreed to ;" also " voted, that 
Capt. Samuel Tarbell be joined to the committee chosen to 
contract with some suitable person to build the mills in this 
township, in the room of John Stevens, Esq. ; voted, that 
Joseph Blanchard, Esq. take security of the person who builds 
the mills ; that John Stevens, Esq. go and look out the mill 
places and see on whose lots they fall, and make return to 
Joseph Blanchard, Esq. where they are, by the first day of 
next March, and if any mistakes should be in his first account 
of said lots, that Col. Joseph Blanchard procure the said lots 
where the mills are to stand, in behalf of the grantees, they 
paying the sum or sums of money which they shall cost." No 
report on this subject is entered on the records. If any was 
made in writing, it has not been found. The two lots marked 
on the plan, were, one in the north east part of the town, 
near where Elias Elliot built a mill, and the other in the 
south west part, near where the mill of Frederic Jones 
stands. It seems that under this vote and instruction, some 
change was made, for the mills contracted for by the propri- 
etors were built on the site of Dakin's mills, in the village. 

At this adjourned meeting, it was also " voted, that Mr. 
Benjamin Parker run out the two lines that are not already 
run, and that he have twelve pounds old tenor for doing said 
work, which he agreed to, [and] that he go and lay out two 
hundred acres of land lying between the north line of No. 1, 
6 • 



38 HISTORY OP MASON. 

and the south line of No. 2, in the best manner he can, for 
the use of the o-rantccs of No. 1. Voted that the Treasurer 
pay him for doing said work, at his returning the plan of said 
land, [and] that if anything should happen that he should not 
do the wOrk by the middle of January next, that Capt. Peter 
Powers be directed to do said work forthwith, on the same 
conditions as aforesaid." 

By what claim or right the grantees of No. 1 were entitled 
"to go and lay out two hundred acres of land" between No. 
1 and No. 2, does not appear. A tract or gore of land 
between the original lines or boundaries of these townships, 
was at some time annexed to No. 1. In the original location 
of townships in tliat part of the state, there was not the pre- 
cision which has prevailed in the surveys of the public lands 
of the United States, or in the more recently settled parts of 
New England. No base lines or meridian lines were run. 
Each township or tract was run out by itself, and it might 
readily happen that different surveyors going into the wilder- 
ness to run out tracts of land, not knowing what other survey- 
ors may have done, should not make their lines parallel, or 
corners coincident ; so that it is not a matter of surprise, 
that gores should be found to exist between tracts, which 
were intended and supposed to be bounded by the same line. 
Such seems to have been the case in this instance. The orig- 
inal grant of No. 2, now Wilton, was as follows : In June, 
1735, the General Court granted to Samuel King and 
others, in consideration of their sufferings in the expedition to 
Canada, in the year 1690, the township of Lyndeborough, and 
about one third of Wilton, on the north side, under the name 
of " Salem Canada." The word " Canada" added to names 
of grants, was common at that time. Thus, Ipswich Canada, 
New Ipswich, Dorchester Canada, Ashburnham, &c. are in- 
stances. The tracts, with this addition to the names, were 
granted to the citizens of the several towns indicated, for 
their services in the expedition to Canada in 1690. In 1749, 
the Masonian proprietors made a grant of a tract of land 



PEOPRIETARY HISTORY. 39 

adjoining " Salem Canada" on the south, under certain condi- 
tions, to forty six persons. The grantees had it laid out and 
annexed to a part of Salem Canada, and called No. 2 ; which 
was afterwards, Jan. 2, 1765, incorporated under the name of 
Wilton. 

A trouble which is apt to be incident to the undertaking of 
all new enterprizes requiring the expenditure of money, that 
is, the want of promptness on the part of those who are 
chargable with the payments, seems to have met the grantees 
at an early stage of their proceedings ; and very frequent 
and repeated references to the same difficulty, even to the 
very last stage of their proprietary existence, show that it 
was a constant and permanent source of annoyance. The 
final proceedings of this first meeting, continued so long by 
adjournments, referred to this matter, as follows: "Voted, 
that all persons refusing or neglecting to pay the respec- 
tive sums of money raised on their rights, after the third 
Tuesday of January next, [their rights] are hereby forfeited 
to the rest of the grantees, they paying the aforesaid sums of 
money, to defray the necessary charges in bringing forward 
the settlement of the town." 

The next meeting of the proprietors, was holden at the 
house of William Lawrence, Esq., in said township, on the 3d 
day of Dec. 1751. Wm. Lawrence, Esq. was chosen modera- 
tor. The proceedings were as follows : " Voted to build a 
meeting-house in said township, for the public worship of 
God, of the following dimensions ; viz : thirty feet in length, 
and twenty four or twenty six feet in width, as the committee 
chosen for that service shall think fit, and sixteen feet 
between joints. Voted and chose for said committee, Wil- 
liam Lawrence, Jonathan Hubbard, Esq., and Capt. Thomas 
Tarbell. Also voted, that the said committee be directed to 
inclose said house, lay the under floor, and to build a conven- 
ient place for the minister to stand to preach in." 

" Voted, to choose a committee to let out the mills in 
said township. Chose for said committee, Wm. Lawrence 



40 HISTORY OF MASON. 

and Jolm Stevens, Esq. ; the saw mill to be built and com- 
pleted, fit for service, by the 25tli day of May next, and the 
corn mill to be completed, fit to grind by the 25th day of 
May, 1753. Also voted, that the committee chosen to build 
the meeting-house, be directed to employ the proprietors or 
inhabitants both at the meeting-house, and at the highways, 
provided they will work as cheap and as well as others." 

At a meeting held at the house of Mr. Enos Lawrence, on 
the 4th Tuesday of Oct. 1752, a vote was passed to change 
the dimensions of the meeting-house to be built, to 40 feet 
by 30, and to add Benjamin Parker and John Stevens to the 
committee ; that the frame should be set up by the first of 
January next, and the house finished as directed by the former 
vote, by the first day of November next, which must be 
intended November, 1753. At this meeting John Stevens was 
chosen proprietors' clerk, the road from the Province line to 
the meeting-house place, was accepted as laid out, and "the 
meeting was adjourned to Mr. James Lawrence's in Groton 
west parish, that day three weeks." At the adjourned meet- 
ing, "Voted, that if every proprietor, by the twentieth day of 
May next, obliged by the charter to settle a lot in said town- 
ship, have not built a dwelling-house and fenced six acres fit 
for plowing or mowing, [he] shall forfeit his land, according 
to the charter ; except such proprietors at said time, shall 
ease or consider the same ; provided that those persons that 
have done nothing on their rights, pay each man two shillings 
and eight pence lawful money for the use of said proprietary, 
for their past neglects, or else to have no benefit by the 
former vote." 

And on said adjournment, the committee chosen to view 
the lots report, as follows : 

THE committee's REPORT. 

" This contains an account of what each man has done in 
No. one. 

Enos Lawrence has a house, and about eight acres cleared, 
and dwells there. 



PROPEIETARY HISTORY. 41 

Nathan Hall, a house and seven acres of land, six of it 
broke up, and dwells there. 

Nathan Fish, a small house, about five acres cleared. 

Henry Jefts, seven acres cleared, and about three of it 
broke up, and a house. 

Obadiah Parker, a good house, ana about two acres cleared. 

Ebenezer Butterfield, a good house, eight acres well cleared 
and broke up. 

Josiah Robbins, about three acres cleared, and a poor fence. 

John Swallow cleared about one acre, and got some timber 
for a house. 

William Lawrence, a house and barn, and about ten acres 
cleared. 

Samuel Right, [Wright,] a cellar dug, two acres cleared. 

James Withee, a cellar dug, and three acres cleared and 
broke up. 

Simon Green, about two acres cleared and broke up, and a 
cellar dug, and a frame. 

Ensign Shattuck, one acre cleared on each lot. 

Capt. Thomas Tarbell, about three acres cleared. 

Capt. Samuel Tarbell, about three acres cleared. 

James Lasley, [Leslie,] house up, about three acres cleared. 

George Lasley, [Leslie,] a camp, about one acre cleared. 

Reuben Barrett, about three acres cleared, and two of it 
broke up. 

William Spaulding, a pretty good house, and some land 
cleared, and something done to a second lot. 

William Elliot, two acres cleared, and a cellar dug, [and] 
timber drawn for a house. 

Capt. Stevens, about nine acres cleared and fenced, also, 
about five acres more. 

Samuel Right, [Wright,] two lotts about one acre and a 
half cleared, and a camp. 

Shadrack Whitney, a house and barn, and about twenty 
acres cleared and fenced, and a young orchard. 

Signed, William Lawrence, per order." 



42 HISTORY OP MASON. 

At a meeting at tlie house of Enos Lawrence in said town- 
ship, on the 27th of November, 1753, " Col. Lawrence chosen 
moderator of said meeting; voted to choose a committee of 
three men for the service hereafter mentioned, &c. The 
committee to send Mr. Bellows a letter, to have the corn 
mill done by the first of June next, or else tl\e Treasurer to 
put the bonds into execution. 

" Voted to allow sixty pounds to pay for preaching between 
this and next May, and the inhabitants of said town to 
appoint the time and place. Col. Lawrence chosen to get a 
minister, and Col. Lawrence chosen Treasurer. Voted that 
the papers belonging to the proprietors, be put on public 
record, in the Province of New Hampshire so far as the com- 
mittee shall think fit. The committee for said service to be 
the same that takes the bonds." 

The delinquent proprietors continued to be a source of dif- 
ficulty. On page 49 of the proprietors' records is entered at 
large the vote first, above referred to. It is as follows: 
" Whereas, it appears to this proprietary that some rights in 
the said township No. One, that were obliged to settle the 
lots according to charter, have neglected to comply with the 
same, and in order for as speedy compliance with their duty 
as possible, it is necessary that such others should be admit- 
ted in their room that will comply with the same. Therefore, 

"Voted, That Col. Lawrence, Samuel Tarbell and John 
Stevens be a committee fully impowered to make a strict en- 
quiry who are now wholly delinquent, or that was delinquent 
on the 4th Tuesday of October, 1752, and to take good secu- 
rity to the value of one hundred pounds new tenor, that they 
will enter upon and perform their duty agreeable to the char- 
ter, viz : that is to say, to have three acres of land well 
cleared and fenced at the least, a house built and inhabit the 
same by the first day of May next, and upon the failure of 
entering into bond with the aforesaid committee within one 
month from this date, to enter upon such delinquent proprie- 
tors' right and take possession of the same, and dispose of it 



PROPRIETARY HISTORY. 43 

to some suitable person, that will immediately enter upon 
such right and comply with the duty as abovesaid, and pay 
such sum of money for the use of said proprietors as the 
said committee and the new grantee shall agree for, or such 
old grantee to pay such a sum of money for the use of said 
proprietors, to the abovesaid committee for the past neglect, 
as the said proprietors shall order at this meeting ; and the 
abovesaid committee are further directed to take a bond of 
each grantee or settler, that hath not complied with their 
duty, for the faithful performance of the condition of their 
grants, &c., and to save the proprietors harmless, &c., for 
want of the duty being done and taxes paid in season ; the 
obligation and condition of said bond to be as the abovesaid 
committee shall think most just and reasonable and better to 
bring forward the settlement of said plantation, &c. Also, 
Voted, That each delinquent proprietor that hath done noth- 
ing on his right shall pay three pounds, old tenor, to said 
committee for the use of said proprietors." 

A meeting was called at the house of Enos Lawrence, on 
the 16th of July, 1754. A recital in the record of that meet- 
ing sets forth that William Lawrence, Esq., and others, at a 
meeting on the 17th of November, 1753, were appointed a 
committee and authorized to enter into and dispose of delin- 
quent rights, and to take bonds for performance according to 
the tenor of said vote, &c., so that it is probable that the &c. 
after the word "vote," is one of the pregnant &c's of Lord 
Coke, and embraces and includes the whole vote so entered 
as above, and that the whole record commencing with the 
word "Whereas," should have been inserted in place of the 
&c., but not having been drawn up in proper form till the rest 
of the record had been made and entered, it was entered by 
itself, without preface or explanation. At the meeting July 
16th, 1754, the time for taking bonds by the committee was 
extended thirty days from that date, and the time to comply 
with the requirements of the charter as to " inhabiting, fenc- 
ing and clearing," was extended to November next, and 



44 HISTORY OP MASON. 

Joseph Blanchard; Esq., was desired to apply to the grantors 
for an enlargement of the time for compliance with the set- 
tling duties. 

At the same meeting, one hundred pounds of the money 
already raised was appropriated for preaching, and Thomas 
Tarbell, Enos Lawrence and Reuben Barrett, were chosen a 
committee "to provide preaching so far as one hundred 
pounds old tenor goes." 

At a meeting held at the house of Enos Lawrence, Novem- 
ber 18, 1754, fifty pounds, old tenor, was allowed out of 
money already raised to pay for preaching, and a committee 
of nine was appointed "to view for a burying place and make 
return to the next meeting." The committee were Enos 
Lawrence, Thomas Tarbell, Neheraiah Gould, Obadiah Par- 
ker, Reuben Barrett, Nathaa Hall, Henry Jefts, Eleazer But- 
terfield and William Eliot, all of whom were probably then 
inhabitants, and most of whom remained inhabitants till the 
time of their death. 

There is no record of any meeting between November 18, 
1754, and May 11, 1757, at which last date a meeting was 
held at the house of Enos Lawrence. William Lawrence, 
Esq., was moderator. A vote was passed to have "ten days' 
preaching in said township, as soon as conveniently may be. 
Also, to raise ten pounds old tenor New Hampshire bills on 
each right liable to settle in said township, or two Spanish 
milled dollars to answer the same tax" ; by which it would 
seem that one pound old tenor New Hampshire bills was 
equal to twenty cents. One hundred and fifty pounds was 
also appropriated to be worked on the highways, at thirty 
shillings per day. Enos Lawrence, Thomas Tarbell and Na- 
than Hall, were appointed " to have the oversight of working 
out the money on the highways." One half was to be worked 
out from the meeting house on the east to Pole Hill, one 
quarter from Townsend line to the meeting house, and the 
other quarter "by Mr. Hall north of the meeting house, and 
from said house to Obadiah Parker's house." 



PROPRIETARY HISTORY. 45 

"Voted, To choose a committee to put Mr. Bellows' bond 
in execution for not building the mills, unless he immediately 
prevent the same by accommodation." Col. Blanchard, Col. 
Lawrence and John Stevens were chosen for this purpose, and 
directed if they could not agree with Mr. Bellows "then to 
agree with some other person or persons to build one or both 
of said mill or mills." "Voted, To add Nathan Hall and 
Thomas Tarbell to the committee for finishing the meeting 
house according to the former vote." 

At a meeting held October 24, 1758, "Voted, That Reuben 
Barrett be joined to the committee for laying out highways 
in the room of Mr. Goold deceased." 

This is the first record of death in the town. It appears 
by the journal of Joseph Holt, who resided many years in 
Wilton, which has just been published in the tenth volume 
of the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 
see page 307, that Corporal Gould of No. 1, was killed in 
battle, near lake George, on the 20th of July, 1758. This 
was undoubtedly Nehemiah Gould, referred to in this entry 
in the proprietors' records. Who of the present inhabitants 
ever heard his name, or knows where he resided ? How com- 
pletely one hundred years had swept him to oblivion, but for 
this casual entry in this comparatively unknown and almost 
forgotten book. Jacob Gould was one of the grantees of 
the town. His lots were No's 4 R. 18, 4 R. 14, and 2 R. 12. 
Whether he was a relative of Nehemiah Gould, is not known. 
\, Nehemiah Gould was married to Molly Kemp, at Groton, 
^ March 9, 1773. He may have been a son of Corporal Gould. 
An extract from Holt's journal may be found in the Appendix, 

A tax of X90 was " assessed on the rights liable to pay 
charges; to be laid out only for preaching." "Voted that 
Enos Lawrence provide a preacher." 

A meeting was held January 2, 1759. " Chose Col. Law- 

rence, moderator. Voted, That Jonathan Blanchard be a 

committee man to supply the place or places of the late Col. 

Joseph Blanchard in anything wherein he was concerned for 

7 



46 HISTORY OF MASON. 

said proprietary. Obadiali Parker was chosen collector. 
" Voted the sura of forty six dollars, or equal thereto, ac- 
counting them equal to X276 New Hampshire old tenor, be 
raised on this proprietary. Voted, That half a dollar on 
each right, or equal thereto, in New Hampshire bills, be 
assessed on this proprietary, to be applied for preaching." 

In the warrant for the meeting, November 26, 1759, the 
5th article was " To see if the proprietors will make up the 
depreciation of the New Hampshire bills to Mr. Francis 
Worcester." This was undoubtedly Mr. Francis Worcester, 
of Hollis, the ancestor of the Rev. Dr. Noah Worcester, of 
Brighton, Mass., the Rev. Leonard Worcester, of Peacham, 
Vt., the Rev. Thomas Worcester, of Salisbury, N. H., and the 
Rev. Dr. Samuel Worcester, of Salem, Mass. The service 
for which he had been paid in depreciated bills, was probably 
preaching, for that was his vocation. The record of the 
meeting does not show specifically what was done with this 
claim. No doubt it was allowed among '' sundry accounts, 
the particulars of which are on file." There is a tradition, 
probably well founded, that Mr. Worcester, on one occasion 
going to No. 1 to preach,being overtaken by night and darkness 
in the forest, in the valley east of the old meeting house near 
where the railroad crosses the highway, was pursued by 
wolves and driven to take refuge upon the top of one of the 
immense bowlders so abundant in that locality, on which he 
spent the night, and in the morning went on his way rejoicing. 
Another version of the story concludes with stating that by 
his shouts he alarmed the neighbors, who, under the lead of 
Capt. Thomas Tarbell, went to his assistance and delivered 
him from his perilous condition. At this meeting, one dollar 
was raised on each right, to be applied for preaching next 
April, and Obadiah Parker was chosen a committee to provide 
a preacher. 

In the warrant for a meeting to be held November 25, 1760, 
the second article is, "To see if the proprietors will choose 
an agent or trustee to succeed Joseph Blanchard, Esq., de- 



PROPRIETARY HISTORY. 4T 

ceased, for tlie recovery of a certain bond given to him in 
that capacity by Benjamin Bellows, Esq., for building mills in 
the township aforesaid,'" &c. At the meeting, Jonathan 
Blanchard was chosen trustee in place of Joseph Blanchard, 
Esq. One dollar on each right was raised for defraying the 
expenses of prosecuting the suit on Bellows' bond, and one 
dollar also for further finishing the meeting house, and one 
dollar more for highways. 

This last record is in Jonathan Blanchard's hand writing, 
but is not signed. It is the last entry in his hand writing. 
A notice issued by him for a meeting, dated August 16, 1762, 
is recorded by Thomas Tarbell, Clerk. All the subsequent 
entries are made by Thomas Tarbell, as clerk. 

His oath of office as clerk is recorded by him as follows : 

"October the 20, 1762. Then Thomas Tarbell parsonely 
appeard & maid orth that in the offies of Propts Clerk for 
No. one, to which he was chosen, he would act acording to 
the beast of his judgment. 

Sworn before 

JoHX Hale, Jostes pees." 

At the meeting September 14th, 1762, it was "voted that 
the remainder of the money not already laid out, that was 
raised for the prosicution of Mr. Bellosses Bond, be appro- 
priated towards paying for preaching. Voted to rais for 
dolers for to pay for Preaching; voted, Capt. Thomas Tar- 
bell, Mr. Nathan Hall and Enosh Lawrence, be a new meeting 
house coraeete ; voted Mr. Nathan Hall and Elias Eliot, be 
a committee to examin, and see if a good road can be had 
from the falls in Souhcgon river at William Mansur's, through 
part of this Township, to come in by Mr. Hall's, and to make 
return at Next meeting." This was undoubtedly the road 
leading from the village, by Silas BuUard's and Jonathan 
Bachelder's, to the meeting-house. " Voted that Mr. Barrat 
and Mr. Hobins, Capt. Thomas Tarbell, be comeett to provid 
preaching. Voted that ten dollars be paid to Jonathan 
Blanchard bv the Treashuer as soon as the saim corns into 



48 HISTORY OF MASON. 

the Tresiire, and Treshr be dischargd of that sum accordingly 
when paid, for his sarvis as dark, with the ten dolers reed 
for the prosecution of Belloses Bond in full for his sarvis." 

In the warrant for the meeting of the proprietors to be held 
on the 6th of April, 1763, the second article was, "to see if 
the proprietors will give a call to any of the gentlemen who 
have preached with them, and choose a committee to present 
said call and Incouragement, if any they will give, to said 
gentlemen, as shall be agreed on by said propraits." At the 
meeting, Obadiah Parker was chosen moderator. " Voted to 
give the first seteled minister, seven hundred pounds silver 
Old tenor as setelmcnt, and four hundred pounds salary year- 
ly, and a right of land in said township. Voted to give 
Mr. Ebenezer Champney a call to setel in the Gospel; 
chose for a comeett to present said call, Thomas Tarbell, 
Enosh Lawrence and Whitcomb Powers." There is a tradi- 
tion, that Champney's reply to the committee who presented 
the call, was that it would take more than two such cauls to 
make a candle. His tastes inclined him to secular rather 
than clerical pursuits. He left preaching and became a law- 
yer, and was for many years Judge of Probate, which office 
he held till he resigned it a short time before his death, Sep- 
tember 10th, 1810. " Voted to give six months to have the 
mills completed." At the meeting, March 29th, 1764, Oliver 
Eliot, moderator, "chose Col. James Prescott, Capt. Thomas 
Tarbell and Obadiah Parker, a committee to examine the 
papers, and accompts belonging to said propts, and put 
them in a proper form, and prepare a list of the names of 
the paiers as well [as] the original grantees, with the sum of 
money that they may be Essesed for. Voted to reserve one 
dolar for preaching. Voted to except Left. William Prescott 
and others, to come in as proprietors of No. one, upon their 
obliging themselves to pay taxes as other propts, and that 
they should have a strip of land Ginning No. two." This 
Left. William Prescott was the famous Col. William Prescott 
of Bunker Hill memory. At a meeting, January 29th, 1765, 



PROPRIETARY HISTORY. 49 

"Voted to turn the road through Obadiah parker's land from 
wheare it was laid out, to wheare it gose now." 

" Voted, that each man have half a dolar a day, [for work 
on the highways] said work to be done by the last day of 
Agost next." 

"At a meeting of the priters of No. one, March 20th, 1765, 
at the house of Capt. Thomas Tarbell. Voted and chose 
Leftenant William Prescott moderator. 

Voted not to chues a new proprts clerk. 

Voted not to chues a new Treshurer at present. 

Voted to rais too dolers a wright to pay for preaching. 

Voted for comeet to hier preaching, Capt. Thomas Tarbell^ 
En. Enosh Lawrence and En. Whitcomb Powers. 

Voted to have the proporters' meetings at the meeting- 
house in No. one, and their onely for the futer. 

Voted that the svears of highways be otherized to setel 
with the Treshurer about highway raits," <fec. 

At the meeting April 23rd, 1766, " chose for svers, John 
Swallow, Jonathan Crospy, Ensign Whikomb Powers and 
Beuben Barrett. 

Voted to Obadiah Parker four dolars for costs that he paid 
for being sued on the propts accompt. [interlined, June 
16th, 1767, then the above accompt paid to Obadiah Parker.] 

Voted that Jonathan Crosbe and Eben Blood be cometee 
to lay out a road from Richard Lawrence's, to the road that 
comes from Blood's to the meeting-house." This is a part of 
the same road which Hall and Elliot were to examine. 

In the warrant dated November 5, 1766, for a meeting to 
be held December 16, 1766, the 7th article was, "To see if 
the proitors will give the Rev'nd James Parker a call to 
setel with them in the gospel, and to see what Incouragement 
they will give him as to setelment and salery, and chose a 
comett to present said call." 

At the meeting "chose Left. William Prescott moderator. 
Voted, To give Mr. James Parker a call to setel with them 
in the Gospel. Allso, Voted, To give him, if he setls, as 



50 HISTORY OF MASON. 

setlment, ninety three ponnds six shillings & eight pence, 
Lafel money. AUso, Voted, To give as salery Four hundred 
pounds silver, old tenor, yearly, until there is eighty familys, 
and then four hundred and iifty yearly until there is one hun- 
dred families, and then five hundred pounds yearly. AUso, 
chose a comeett to presant said call, Capt. Thomas Tarbell, 
Mr. Jona. Crosby, En. Whitcomb Powers." 

In the warrant for the meeting March 10, 1767, the 4th ar- 
ticle was " To see if the proportors will chues a comeettee to 
lay out the pew and seat ground in said No. 1 meeting house. 

" 5thly. To see if tlie propts will order in what manor the 
pues shall be disposed of. 

"6thly. To see if the propiortors will pass a vote that every 
man's vot in said meeting shall be according to the taxes he 
shall pay in said township." 

At the meeting, it was "Voted, Chose Obadiah Parker, 
Nathan Hall and Whitcomb Powers comeett to Lay out the 
pue ground & seat ground in said meeting houes. 

"Voted, That the first setelers & highest payers have the 
pew ground, provided they seal the meeting house to the girts 
by October next. 

"Voted, That every man should not vot according to what 
he pays in said township. 

"Voted, To except of Mr. Elias Eliot's mills." 

At a meeting November 4, 1767 : 

"Voted, That the comeet Brais the meetinghouse forthwith. 

"Voted & chose a comeett to view the roads to accommo- 
dat Slipton, said comeett, Mr. Joseph Bullard, Mr. Josiali 
Robins, Left. Obadiah Parker, Mr. John Swallow, Mr. Nathan 
Hall, and if the comeet think the road by Mr. Baret's mills 
will accomodat Slipon, then said comeett to lay out said road." 

This was the road leading from Mason Village to Temple. 
Slipton was a slip or tract of land north of No. 1, and now 
included in Temple and Sharon. 

"Voted, To rais one doler on each right for highways, and 
to make a bridge over the river at the mils, said mony to be 



PROPEIETARY HISTORY, 51 

divided as was usal, said comeett, Cornelius Cook, Ruben Bar- 
rat, Ins. Whitcomb Powers, Left. Obadiah Parker." 

In the warrant for the meeting January 5, 1768, the 6th 

article was "To see if the proportors and Inhabitance will 

pas a vote to be Incorporated, and if so to chues a man or 

more to Goo to Portsmouth & get the same accomplished." 

At the meeting it was, 

"Voted, for a comatt to make Inquryes how the Township 
may be incorporated. Ens. Whitcomb Powers & Capt. 
Thomas Tarbell & Leftenant Obadiah Parker. Then ajornd 
the meeting four weeks. 

"The propts meet at Time & place and voted as followeth, 
viz: Voted, To be incorporated. Allso, Voted, That Left. 
Obadiah Parker disburst the money, & that he shall have a 
hansom reward for the same, & that he get the same Incorpo- 
rated as soon as may be." 

In the warrant for the meeting March 8, 1768, the 3d arti- 
cle was, 

"To see if the propts will dispose of any of the public lots 
in No. 1. Namely: Lot No. 5 in 7 Raing, & No. 6 in the 5 
raing. No. 1 in 3 raing, & No. 9 in 1 raing." 
At the meeting it was, 

"Voted, To dispose of two of the school lots, namely: No. 
6 in the 5 raing, and 7 in the 1 raing, by a comeett chosen for 
that sarvis, sd comeett, En. Whitcomb Powers, Capt. Thomas 
Tarbell, Ruben Barrett and Josiah Robens. Voted and chose 
for comeet to Rectifie the mistakes in the school [lots], Jo- 
siah Wheeler, Enosh Lawrence and Thomas Tarbell." 

The following is a copy, verbatim and literatim, of the 
warrant and record of the meeting, June 22, 1768 : 

" Where as aplication hath ben maid to me the subscriber 
for calling a propts meeting of the propts of No 1. North of 
Townshend in the province of Newhampshier These are 
there fore to notifie & warn said propts to asembel & meet 
at the meeting house on the 22 Day of this Instant June at 
Nine clock in the fore noon to act on the foleing articals : 



52 HISTORY OP MASON. 

lly. To chues a modrater to govern said meeting. 

2dly To sec what the propts will chues to have the Town 
called. 

3dly. To chues a comeett to setel with such parsons as 
have ben consarned with the propts money sins the setalment 
with Col Lawrence ares. 

41y To see what the propts will do consarning Road to Mr 
Thos Barts mills 

51y To alow accompts to any persons that has don sarvis 
[for] said propts If they Think proper. 

61y To see if the propts will dispose of the grond of the 
two hind seatts to such parsons as they shall think proper, 
that shall make aplication 

71y To see if the propts will turn the road a few rods 
Through Thos. Robens Land that comes from Left Parker to 
the meeting house. 

Test Thos Tarbell, propts Clerk. 

June the 7th, 1768. 

At a Legual meeting of the propts of No. one held at the 
meeting house on the 22 day of June 1768. 

Voted & chose Josiah Robens modrator 

Voted to have the Town called Sharon. 

Voted for comeet to recon with the comeette [and] Tres- 
hureyr Joseph Bulard Ruben Baret & Olever Eliot. 

Voted, for comeett to view & Lay out the road to Mr 
Thomas Baretts mills Obadiah Parker Nathan Whipel & John 
Swallow. 

Voted Capt Thomas Tarbell four Dolers for his sarvis as 
propts Clerk To be Drawn out of the Treshery to be in full 
for this sarvis to this Day. 

Voted not to dispose of the Ground of the two hind seats. 

Voted to turn the road a fue rods thrue Thos Roben Land. 

.Then the meeting dismissed. 

A True Litry. Thomas Tarbell, propt Clerk." 



PROPRIETARY HISTORY. 53 

At the meeting held March 22, 1769, it was, 

"Voted, To give the meeting house to the town, except the 
privilege of the pues." 

At the meeting held October 18, 1769, it was, 

" Voted, To raise two dolers on each right liahel to pay- 
taxes in Mason, and the comeett to have their pay out of 
said money for their being sued for said propty for hiring 
preaching." 

At the meeting held January 6, 1772, it was, 

"Voted, To Josiah Robens one doler." [Interlined. 
"Robens got the doler March the 30, 1773."] 

The following is the record of the last doings of the pro- 
prietors : 
"Province of New Hampshire — H'dhhorongh, ss. 

"Pursuent to the request of more than live of the propts 
of Mason, in the county aforesaid, for calling a propts meet- 
ing, These are, therefore. To Notifie & warn the propts of 
sd Mason to meet at the public meeting house in Mason, afor- 
said, on the second Tuesday of January next, at one of the 
clock in the afternoon, then and there to act on the fowling 
articals, to wit : 

lly. To chues a moderator for the regular carying on 
said meeting. 

2dly. To hear and examine the accompts and demands of 
all persons that have any demands on the proprorts, for past 
services as Individuals, and they are desired to bring in the 
same, or Else Expect to befor Ever after debarred, &c. ; and 
to alow such as shall apcar Reasonabel, and give order for 
payment as the propriorts shall think proper. 

3dly. To chuese a commettee to examine into the con- 
duct of those who have heretofore recevd any of the propts 
money, as Tresherer, comats or Trustees, and to enabel them 
to give such discharges as they shall think proper, and to 
report as soon as may be. 

Thomas Tarbell, propt's Clerk. 

Mason, Dec. 16th, 1772. 
8 



54 HISTORY OF MASON. 

At a legal meeting of the propts of Mason, hild on the 
12th of January, 1773, 

Voted and chose Mr. Nathan Hall modrator, and voted to 
agorn the meeting to Mr. Samuel Abbots. 

Voted for comeetee to Look into the Estait of the Tresh- 
ery, and to Recon with the Tresherer, or commeetes, or Trus- 
tes Last chosen, to sell the Delinquants propts lands, said 
comeet Mr. David Bloget, Mr. Reuben Baret, Mr. Oliver 
Eliot. Then voted to agorn the meeting to the Last Tues- 
dsij of March next, to the meeting-house in Mason, at one o 
clock afternoon. 

March 30 the propts met acording to the agornment, and 
by reason of the comeet making a mistake in reconing with 
the Tresherer, agorned to the thirteenth day of Aprial, at 
three o clock afternoon, at this place. April the 13 the propts 
met at the time and place, and voted to agorn the meeting 
to the third Wednsday in May, One o clock afternoon, at this 
place. May the 19, then the propts met at the time and 
place and agorned to the first tuesday of June Next, att one 
oclock afternoon to this place. Test Thomas Tarbell propt 
Clerk.'' 

Sic exit in fumo, — thus vanish into shadows, the original 
proprietors of Mason. This is their last appearance. 
Whether the mistake made by the "comeet in reconing with 
the Tresherer" was ever rectified, does not appear, and will 
never be known by those who at this late day, endeavor to 
peer into their doings. They were a worthy body of men, 
and deserved well of the town and of their country, for their 
indefatigable efforts under circumstances of great embar- 
rassment, in "carrying on the settlement" of the place. 

Undoubtedly, before this apparently last and inconclusive 
meeting, all the land, except perhaps the lots reserved for 
schools and for the minister and ministry, had become the 
property of individuals ; so that there was little if anything 
left for the proprietary to concern itself with. The town 
was incorporated, and was thus made capable of taking and 



PKOPEIETARY HISTORY. 55 

holding the fee in the said lands, for the uses set forth in the 
original grant of the territory. It seems that the ''delin- 
quent propts" lands had been sold, and this last meeting had 
been called for the purpose of a general settlement of all 
out-standing claims, against' the proprietary ; which it is 
hoped and trusted was satisfactorily made, although it does 
not appear of record. 



CHAPTER Hi 



MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 

Proceedings and incidents in tlie Municipal affairs of tlie town from the yeaf 

1768, to 1858. 

[Copy of the Charter.] 

Province of i George the Third, by the Grace of God, of 

New Hampshire. } Great Britain, France and Ireland, King, 

Defender of the Faith, 6i^c. 
To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting: 

Whereas, our Loyal Subjects, Inhabitants of a Tract of Land 
within our Province of New Hampshire, known by the name of No. 
One, and containing about five miles Square, and bounded as here- 
after mentioned, have Humbly petitioned and requested us, that they 
may be erected and incorporated into a Township, and infranchised 
with the same privileges which other towns within our said Province, 
have and Enjoy by Law, and it appearing unto us to be conducive to 
the General Good of Our said Province, as well as of the said Inhab- 
itants, in particular, by maintaining good order, and Encouraging 
the culture of the Land, that the same should be done ; Know ye, 
therefore, that We, of Our Especial Grace, certain Knowledge, and 
for the Encouraging and promoting the good purposes and Ends 
aforesaid, and with the Advice of our Trusty and Well Beloved John 
Wentworth, Esq., Our Governor and Commander in Chief, and of 
Our Council for said Province, Have erected and Ordained, and by 
these presents, for us, our Heirs and Successors, Do will and Ordain, 
that the Inhabitants of the Tract of Land aforesaid, and others who 
shall inhabit and improve therein hereafter, the same being butted 
and bounded as follows, viz : Beginning at a stake and stones on the 
Province line, thence running on the same line, five miles and twenty 
rods, to the StE corner of New Ipswich, then running north on New 
Ipswich line, five miles to a white pine tree, to Wilton corner, then 
running east, on the south line of Wilton, five miles to a hemlock 
tree, then running south, five miles, by the Needle, to the bounds 
first mentioned, be and hereby are declared to be a Town Corporate, 
and are hereby erected and incorporated into a Body Politic and Cor- 
porate, to have continuance forever, by the name of Mason, with all 



1768. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 57 

the powers &- authorities, Privileges, Immunities & Franchises, 
which any other towns in said Province by Law have and Enjoy, to 
the said inhabitants, or who shall hereafter inhabit there, and their 
successors forever, always reserving to us, our heirs and successors, 
all white pine trees, which are or shall be found growing and being 
on the said Tract of land, fit for the use of our Royal Navy ; Reserv- 
ing also to us, our heirs and successors, the poAver and right of divid- 
ing the said town when it shall appear necessary and convenient, for 
the Inhabitants thereof: Provided, nevertheless, and it is hereby de- 
clared, that this charter and grant is not intended, nor shall in any 
way or manner, be construed to extend to, or affect the private prop- 
erty of the soil within the limits aforesaid; and as the several Towns 
within our said Province are by the Laws thereof enabled and author- 
ized, to assemble and by a majority of votes present, to choose all 
such officers, and transact such affairs, as in the said Laws are 
declared, We do by these presents, nominate and appoint, Obadiah 
Parker, Gent., to call the first meeting of said Inhabitants to be held 
within said town, at any time within forty days from the date hereof, 
giving legal notice of the time and design of holding such meeting, 
after which the annual meeting of said town shall be had for the 
choice of said officers & the purposes aforesaid, on the second Mon- 
day of March, annually. 

In testimony whereof, we have caused the public seal of our said 
Province to be hereunto affixed. Witness John Wentworth, Esquire, 
the aforesaid Governor, the twenty-sixth day of August, in the eighth 
year of our reign. Anno Domini, 1768. J. Wentworth. 

By his Excellencie's command, with advice of Council. 

T. Atkinson, Jr., Sec'y. 
Province of New Hampshire. — Secretary' s Office. Recorded in 
the Book for recording Charters of Incorporation, Pa. 303, 304. 

T. Atkinson, Jr., Secretary. 

At the proprietors' meeting, held January 5th, 1768, Oba- 
diah Parker was chosen "to Goo to Portsmouth" to get the 
incorporation, and was authorized to " disburst the money" 
therefor. This duty he attended to, and procured the charter, 
a copy of which is found on the preceding pages. The origi- 
nal charter shows the name of the town, first inserted, to 
have been Sharon, according to the vote of the proprietors ; 
but it was erased, and the name Mason substituted. This 
was, undoubtedly, done in compliment to John Mason the 
original proprietor, or to John Titfton Mason, who was one 
of the grantees of the original township. The above copy 
was transcribed from the town records ; it is not certain that 



58 HISTORY OP MASON. 

it is a true copy of the original Charter. Acts of incorpo- 
ration in those days, were granted by virtue of the executive 
or prerogative power of the Governor and not by legislative 
enactment. At that time it was a long and tedious journey 
from Mason to Portsmouth. Parker must have performed 
it on horse-back, or not unlikely, on foot. His "disburst- 
ments and charges for this service," appear by the record of 
the town meeting, November 7th, to have been XI 2 6s. 6d. 
oq. Under date of March 21st, 1769, is recorded an order 
to pay him X9 4s. lid. Oq., and interest for the charges of the 
incorporation. The items of the bill would at this day, be 
a matter of great curiosity ; but they cannot be recovered. 

Parker was by the charter, authorized to call the first 
meeting of the inhabitants, in their corporate capacity, and 
he issued his warrant therefor, a copy of which, being the 
warrant for the first town meeting of the town, is here 
inserted. 

'•' Province of New Hampshire. By order of his Excel- 
lency, John Wentworth, Esquire, and the Honorable 
Council, for calling a meeting of the Inhabitants and Free- 
holders of Mason, in order for the choice of Town officers, 
<fec. I therefore notify and warn the Inhabitants and all Free- 
holders and voters by law of the Town of Mason, to meet att 
the meeting-house in Mason, on Monday, the nineteenth of 
September instant at ten of the clock in the forenoon, and 
when assembled and duly mett, then and there to act on the 
following articles ; viz : 

1st. To chuse a moderator. 

21y. To chuse a town clerk. Selectmen, and all other town 
officers, as the law directs. 

3dly. To see whether the town will except the road lately 
laid out by Mr. Thomas Barrett's and Amos Deakin's mills 
and build a bridge over the river, now the water is loiv, and to 
act upon any other article, that they shall then think proper 
for to bring forward the town. 

^ason, Sept. ye 5, 1768. Obadiah Parker." 



1768. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. .59 

At the meeting, Parker was clioseu moderator : Josiah 
"Wheeler, clerk ; Josiah Wheeler, Obadiah Parker and Joseph 
Bullard, selectmen ; Reuben Barrett and John Swallow, consta- 
bles ; Nathan Hall, treasurer ; John Asten and Jonathan Win- 
ship, tythingmen; Thomas Barrett, Enosh Lawrence Jr., Lem- 
uel Spaulding and Josiah Robbing, surveyors of highways ; 
Capt. Thomas Tarbell, sealer of weights and measures ; John 
Asten, sealer of leather ; Richard Lawrence and Joseph Blood 
fence viewers ; Samuel Lawrence and Joseph Lowell, hog con- 
stable ; Aaron Wheeler and Oliver Elliot, deer ofi&cers. 

"Voted to except the road as it was latety laid out to Mr. 
Thomas Barrett's and Amos Deakin's mills. Voted that all 
the roads formerly laid out by the proprietors, and now upon 
iile, shall stand as town roads. Voted to build a bridge 
over the river by said Barrett's and Deakin's mills ; therefore, 
voted that Amos Deakin, Thomas Barrett and Aaron Wheeler 
be a comtee to eifect the same." 

Thus the town was fairly set up and provided with officers, 
its roads recognized and made valid. How the committee 
succeeded in building a bridge without means will in due time 
appear. It was also voted that the selectmen should serve 
without pay ; a scheme which, although it had a look of econ- 
omy, did not, in the end, as will appear, work well. Although 
everything looked fair, there was trouble ahead. Some of 
the officers chosen at the town meeting, refused to take the 
oath of office, and ''therefore the selectmen appointed a town 
meeting in order for a new choice of such officers," &c. The 
meeting was called to be held on the 7th of November. In 
the warrant for the meeting, among other articles, was 

" 3dly. To see if the town will raise a sum of money to 
pay the charges of incorporation, to hire preaching, to pur- 
chase the Province laws and town books, and to defray other 
necessary town charges. 

"4thly. To see if the town will come into any measure for 
further finishing the meeting house : also, to choose comttee 
to eflect the same." 



€0 HISTORY OF MASON. 

At tliis meeting most of tlic recusant officers were rechosen. 
The only change was in the highway surveyors. The new 
board were Elias Eliot, Ens. Enoch Lawrence, Jonathan Jefts 
and Joseph Blood, and in the deer officers, Aaron Wheeler 
taking the office alone. The sum of X33 6s. 8d. Oq. lawful 
was raised to pay charges of incorporation, to hire preaching 
and to defray other charges. At this meeting it was, 

"Voted, To except a road laid out two rods wide, from 
New Ipswich line, through Amos Deakin's land, beginning at 
a heap of stones on a stimp and running to a hemlock tree on 
the banck of the river, then running as the marks direct to the 
bridge," «fec. 

"A heap of stones on a stump," would not be regarded, in 
these days, as a suitable Ijoundary to mark the limits of a 
road. Much exactness was not then required in the descrip- 
tion of the boundaries, angles, courses and distances, in lay- 
ing out roads. A most remarkable sample of such work, is 
found in the records of Townsend. It is as follows, under 
date of 1737 : "Voted, a highway from the Pearl Hill brook 
to the place where the timljcr is cut to build a bridge, and 
from the said bridge to the Little Goose pond, near where 
Horsely and Wallis and Brown and Wyman and Woodbury, 
goeth along for their hay, from thence we come down the path 
to the hither Goose pond and over the dam thereof, from 
thence as marks direct across the plain, and so down the little 
footpath till we pass the little brook and into the cartpath 
by the knoll, this side of James Stevens' house, from thence 
down by said last path till we come to the hollow beyond 
Horseley's field, so along Horseley's west line to Deacon 
Spaulding's meadow lot, from thence over Rackkoon brook 
and across the corner of Manning's land, and from thence 
across the plain to the corner of the lot Daniel Sartell lives 
on, and turning said corner on John Stevens' land, and come 
along near the line between the lot Sartell lives on, and Ste- 
vens' land, to Hartshorn's brook, where the cartway goeth 
over, from thence on said Stevens' land between the lot afore- 



1769. 



MUNICIPAL HISTORY, 



61 



said and Hartshorn's farm to John Scales' old house place, 
from thence to Scales' nor east corner, which we found to be 
three miles and one hundred and sixty pole." 

At this meeting the town, 

"Yotcd, To allow Obadiah Parker's accompt for geting 
the town Incorporated, which sum is £12 6s. 6d. 3q." 

Then follows in the record, a copy of the warrant to '^Mr, 
John Swallow, one of the constables, &c., commanding him in 
his majesty's name, to collect X17 15s. 6d. 2q." For the 
assessment and collection of taxes the town was, from the 
first, divided into two districts — the east and the west ; two 
constables or collectors were chosen, one in each district, to 
whom separate warrants were issued for the collection of the 
"rates." John Swallow was the constable or collector for 
the west side, and Reuben Barrett for the east side. A copy 
of the assessments committed to them is here inserted, by 
which it will appear who resided and were taxed on each part 
of the town, and what was their relative apparent ability to 
pay taxes: each warrant bearing date, January 28th, 1769. 



FIRST TAX LIST. WEST SIDE. 





£ sid 


q 


David Lowell, Jr., 


0| 7 


51 


Josiah Bobbins, 


1 3 


4 





Nathan Whipple, 





9 


00 


Ens. Enosh Lawrence, 


1 1 


6 


1 


John Jefts, 





6 


1 1 


Samuel Lawrence, 


8 


8 


1 


John Asten, 





7 


80 


John Swallow, 


0;11 


4 


2 


Joseph Barrett, 





9 


22 


Isaac Holdin, 


0| » 


7 


(.) 


Nathan Procter, 


0, 7 


00 


William Badcock, 





9 


6 





Lieut. Obadiah Parker, 


19 


02 


William Barrett, 





7 


5!l 


Joseph Bullard, 


12 


(11 


Nathaniel Barrett, 





19 


9'1 


Josiah Wheeler, 


7 


61 


Jonathan Foster, 





6 


o'o 


Zachariah Davis, 


o! 1 


51 


Stevens Lawrence, 





7 








Heuben Tucker, 


01 2 


10 


Thomas Kobins, 





6 








Joseph Tucker, 


o| 


8 2 


Enosh Lawrence, Jr., 





10 


7 


1 


Capt. Amos Lawrence, 


Oi 


82 


Aaron Wheeler, 





U 





2 


Mr. Will. Lawrence, 


Ol 4 


11 1 


Nathaniel Hosmer, 





6 


1 


li 


Amos Deakon, Barrett, 


0. 


82 


John Button, 





6 


2 


2 


Edmund Town, 


Oi 1 


51 


Widow Burge, 





4 


2 2 


Joseph Lowell, 


OJ 6 


DO 


John Eliot, 





18 


io!o 


Cofnelius Cook, 


6 


00 


Moses Lowell, 





12 


1 


Benjamin King', 


o! 6 


1 1 


Richard Lawrence, 





9 


6'0 


Dennis McLain, 


6 


00 


Joseph Merriam, 





9 


5,1 








David Lowell, 


0ll3 


80, 


Sum Total, 


17,1.3 6l2l 



A similar warrant was issued to "Mr. Reuben Barrett, 
Constable for the East side," to collect £17 10s. 7d. Iq., 
as follows : 



62 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



FIRST TAX 


LIST. EAST SIDE. 












£i s. d.'fj 


Oliver Eliot, 





111 5 


2 


Capt. Thomas Tarbell, 


1 


10 in!o 


Daniel Eisk, 





3i 6 





Elias Eliot, 


n 


UJl 1 


Mary Jefts, Widow, 





1 


6 





Jason Eussell, 





9^ 2I0 


Thomas Jefts, 





6 


2 


1 


Kathanit'l Smith, 





9 


.-SI 


Jonathan Jefts, 





14 


1 


1 


Joseph lloss, 


(1 


11 


■.VI 


Nathan Hall, 





15 


7 


1 


Nathaniel Tarbell, 








OiO 


James Hall, 





6 


3 


1 


Edmund Tarbell, 





( 


o'f 


Patience Eish, Widow, 





18 








Jonathan Williams, 





9 nil 


Eleazer Fish, 


(1 


G 


2i0| 


Reuben Barrett, 


(1 


19 lOil 


Ebenezer Blood, 





1-1 







Hannah Eliot, Widow, 





1 61 


Jason Dunster, 





(i 


6 





Samuel Scripture, 


1 


0; 9,1 


Joseph Kerrick, 





( 


11 





James Weathee, 





10' 9 


(1 


Jonathan Winship, 





19 








Lemuel Spaulding-, 





8 4 





Samuel Tarbell, 





6 


8 


2 


Elizabeth Powers, Widow, 





(■> 4 


V' 


Nathaniel Barrett, Jr., 





6 








Joseph Blood, 





6 


II 


John Leornard, 





6 


11 


2 


Abel Shedd, 





6 





Jonathan Eish, 





6 


8 


2 


Georg-e Woodard, 





B 2 
















_ 


Jabez Kendall, 


9 8 





Sum Total, 


17 


10 


7 


1 



An important duty of the selectmen in those days was, to 
take due care that the town should not be made chargable for 
the support of paupers, whose residence was in other places. 
Among the earliest official acts of tlie first board of select- 
men, was the issuing of warrants to warn such persons to 
remove from the town, by which process they were prevented 
from gaining any lawful settlement by residence in the town, 
so as to make the town liable to support them, in case they 
should become unable to support themselves. As a sample 
of the mode in which this provision of a by-gone age was 
carried out, a copy of the first such warrant issued by the se- 
lectmen, and of the return of the of&cer thereon, is inserted : 

WARRANT. 

Province of New Hampshire. To Mr. John Swallow, con- 
stable in Mason, in said Province : Whereas, a person named 
Dorothy Stevens hath, for some time, resided in the town of 
Mason, in said Province, and [is] likely to become a lawful 
inhabitant in said town, unless lawfully prevented, these are, 
therefore, in his majestic's name, to wnll and require you, the 
said constable, forthwith to warn the said person to depart 
out of said town, within fourteen days, and to remain in said 
town no longer. Hereof fail not, as you will answer your 
default in the penalty of the law, and make due return of this 
warrant and of your doings therein, within fourteen days. 



1769. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 63 

Given under our hands and seals, at Mason, the 17th day of 
January, A. D. 1769, and in the ninth year of his majestie's 
reign. Obadiah Parker, ^ 

Joseph Bullard, > Selectmen. 

JosiAH Wheeler, ) 

return. 

Province of New Hampshire. Mason, January 20, 1769. 
By virtue of this warrant, I have warned the within named 
Dorothy Stevens, to depart out of said town, within fourteen 
days, and to remain in said town no longer. 

John Swallow, Constable in Mason. 

Similar warrants and returns are recorded for warning out 
Mary Jefts and her b. child, January 26, 1769; Elizabeth 
Parker, February 25, 1769 ; Samuel Bennett and Sarah Wor- 
rer, July 24, 1769; Jonathan Cafford, July 27, 1769; Jonas 
Perry, February 27, 1770. After which, nothing is recorded 
but the names of the parties and dates of the warrants. 

At the meeting, March 13, 1769, "Voted, To allow Amos 
Dakin and Aaron Wheeler's accompt for building a bridge 
over the river by said Dakin's mills, which sum is =£8 Os. 9d. 
3q. starling money of Great Britain." 

March 21, 1769. Treasurer is ordered to pay Josiah 
Wheeler XO lis. 9d. Oq. for town books; Obadiah Parker 
£d 4s. lid. Oq. and interest, for the charges of incorpora- 
tion; John Swallow XO 3s. 3d. for -warning several persons 
out of town ; Obadiah Parker XO 14s. 4d. for boarding Mr^ 
Coggin; Obadiah Parker X3 12s. Od. Oq. "for to pay Mr. 
Jacob Coggin for four days pritching." 

The proprietors having voted to give the meeting house to 
the town, at their meeting held March 22, 1769, there was an 
article in the warrant for the town meeting to be held May 
9, 1769, "To see if the town will except the meeting house, 
provided those men that own pews take them for their seats ; 
also, to determine whether the town will do anything towards 
finishing said house, and how far they will go in iinishing it." 
At the meeting held May 9, "Voted, That the town excepted 



64 HISTORY OF MASON. 

tlie meeting house if the men that own pews take them for 
their sets. Voted, To bild the seats and to nail the Bords 
on the outside of sd house. * * Voted and chouse Enosh 
Lawrence, Joliu Astcn, Aaron Wheelear, comcte to hier prich- 
ing. Voted and chouse John Asten, John Swallow, Nathan 
Whipel, comete to Bild the seats and nail the Bordes on sd 
house. Voted, To chuse a comete to see into the steat of 
the selectmen, assessors, and into the state of the Tresure. 
Aron Wheelear, Ruben Barret, Oliver Alet were chouse 
cemete men. '-^ '•■ Voted, The road throu William Bad- 
cock's land where it now goes to Josiah Wheeler's and to 
New Ipsshed. The sixt articakel not acted on. * ^' Voted 
and chouse a comete to picli upon a place or places for a 
grave yard. Enosh Lawrance, Samauel Scripter, Nathan 
Hall." 

At the meeting Sept. 11th, 1769, "Voted to except the 
money that two of the 'cool lots was sold for by the proprie- 
tors last Febueary in lew of the lots that was sold." 

January 11th, 1770, the treasurer was ordered to pay 
Josiah Wheeler One pound four shillings Lawful money, to pay 
Mr. Josiah Willard for one day preaching in the year 1768. 
Also to pay Stephen Lawrence six shillings for boarding Mr. 
Nathan Bond while preaching in 1769. Also to pay John 
Swallow two shillings and eight pence for keeping Mr. Nathan 
Bond's horse while preaching in 1769. 

The town seems at an early period, to have been troubled 
with "idle persons." In the warrant for the annual meeting, 
in 1770, the 9th article is, "To see if the town will provide 
a work house in order to set Idle persons to work, also, to 
appoint an overseer for said house." At the meeting, it was 
" Voted that there be a work house provided and that Reuben 
Barrett be the overseer and master of said house," a vote 
that may have operated in terrorem, and frightened away the 
idle persons ; for although no house was provided, yet it is 
some years before any new complaints appear, of the preva- 
lence of idle persons. At the same meeting, " Voted to have 



i 



1771. ■ MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 65 

but one graveyai'cL Voted to except of that piece of ground 
for a graveyard ^vbicli tlie committee, that was appointed to 
lav out graveyards have laid out at tlie west end of lot No. 
6, in the ninth range on the west side of the road that goes 
to Townshend, running on said road twenty poles from the 
south line of said lot, containing two acres." 

Aug. [10] 1770. Ordered one pound twelve shillings paid to 
Samuel Scripture " for boarding Mr. Bigglow and Mr. Ward 
while preaching in Mason." Also, to Obadiah Parker " twelve 
shillings seven pence for going after a minister," and same 
tlate to James Withee 4s. lOd. "for paying John Asten for 
nine dinners for the ministers Mr. Bigglow and Mr. Ward." 
Mr. Asten probably lived at the nearest house to the meet- 
ing-house, the cellar of which now remains in the north west 
corner of the Rev. Mr. Hill's old orchard. 

A meeting was called August 27th, 1770, among other 
matters, "to see if the town will give Mr. Jonathan Searle 
an invitation to settle among them in the Gospel ministry 
and what they will offer him as settlement and salary." 

"othly. To see if the town will raise money to release 
Samuel Scripture the difficulty about Mr. Brown's preaching." 
At this meeting it was "voted unanimously to give Mr. Searle 
a call ; to give him one hundred pounds Lawful, settlement, 
half in six and half in twelve months after ordination, sixty 
pounds lawful as salary, the first ten years, and at the end of 
ten years X66 13s. 4d. as yearly stated salary." 

"Voted not to act on the 5th article," so Mr. Scripture 
was not "relieved of his difficulty." 

1770, December 18th, the treasurer was ordered to pay 
James Withee IBs. "for paying Mr. Jona. Searle so much." 

^'Dec. 24. The Treasurer was ordered " to pay Aaron 
Wheeler X8 8s. to pay Mr. Ward for seven days preaching." 

1771, Feb. 18. The Treasurer was ordered to pay Thomas 
Tarbell X4 4s. "for boarding Mr. Searle 14 weeks." 

At the annual meeting 1771, a rate was made for improving 
the school lot, to be paid in labor. A man was allowed 2s. 



(50 HISTORY OF MASON. 

8d., and a yoke of oxen, Is. 4d. a day. "Voted to allow the 
town Treasurer 2d. 2q. on the pounds for taking [in] and 
paying out the towns money." The school lot here referred 
to, is the lot on which the meeting-house was built. 

1771, March 7th, the treasurer was ordered to pay Ens. 
Enosh Lawrence XI Gs. 8d. "for boarding Mr. Searle 4 
weeks." 

Mr. Scripture still being "in trouble about Mr. Brown's 
preaching," applied to the town for relief. In the warrant 
for the meeting June 3d, 1771, the second article was, "To 
see if the town will make Mr. Samuel Scripture any allowance 
with respect to the charge and trouble he has been put to 
relative to Mr. Brown a late preacher in said town ; he the 
said Scripture being the person that employed him for that 
business, and he has been sued and put to cost and chai'ge 
upon this account, and to say what he shall have allowed him 
for the same." The town voted not "to allow him for the 
same," for what reason does not appear. 

November 18, 1771, "Voted, To hire Mr. Newcum [New- 
comb] one month upon probation, in case he will supply us.'' 

Same date. Treasurer ordered to pay Insign Enosh Law- 
rence X2 7s. 3d. Iq. "in part for boarding ministers the sum- 
mer past." 

January 3, 1772. To the same, 12s. "in part for boarding 
ministers the summer past." 

April 29, 1772. An order "To pay Thomas Tarbell eight 
shillings for providing for a fast we had on account of giv- 
ing Mr. Searle a call." 

At a meeting August 10, 1772, the call to Mr. Searle was 
renewed, with the same settlement and salary. This call 
was accepted. Of his answer, a copy is inserted on pages 67 
and 68, in this chapter. 

September 7, 1772. At a meeting called to appoint a day 
for the ordination, &c., "Voted, To accept Mr. Searle's 
answer, and that the 14 of October be the day of ordination, 
and to send to the following nine churches under the pastoral 



1772. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 67 

care of their ministers to assist, viz : Hollis, Rev. Daniel Em- 
erson ; Byefield, Rev. Moses Parsons ; Pepperell, Rev. Joseph 
Emerson ; New Rowley, Rev. James Chandler ; Townshend, 
Rev. Samuel Dix; Linebrook, Rev. George Leslie; New Ips- 
wich, Rev. Stephen Farrar ; Old Rowley, Rev. Jedediah Jew- 
ett ; Temple, Rev. Samuel Webster." 

"Voted, To give Lieut. Obadiah Parker, eight pounds four- 
teen shillings and four pence, L. money, to entertain the 
council, together with all the other gentlemen of the clergy, 
and Mr. Searle's relations and friends, that may attend the 
ordination." 

"Voted, That Mr. Searle may be absent two Sabbaths in a 
year yearly, in order to visit his relations, in case it may not 
be in his power to provide a supply." 

Josiah Wheeler, Amos Dakin and Obadiah Parker were 
chosen "A committee to send out letters missive for the ordi- 
nation. Voted, To choose a committee to prop up the gal- 
leries in the meeting house, as tliey shall think proper, before 
the ordination." David Blodgett, Jacob Blodgett, Lieut. John 
Swallow, Samuel Scripture and Enosh Lawrence Jr., were 
chosen a committee for that purpose. "Voted, To chuse a 
committee to tend the meeting house doors, and keep the 
body seats the men's side for the church, and the women's 
side for the council, on ordination day." Edmund Tarbell 
Jason Russell, Reuben Hosmer and Nathaniel Hosmer, were 
chosen for this purpose. 

The call or invitation to Mr. Searle is not recorded, nor 
has any copy of it been found. His answer is entered at 
length in the records. It is characteristic of the man, and as 
it is one of the few memorials of him left, it is here inserted : 

"To the Freeholders and other Inhabitants of Mason: Be- 
loved Friends ; As God, who has the Hearts of all Men in 
his hands, has called me, tho' most unworthy, to preach in 
several Places, and of late in this Place ; so I Humbly hope, 
through Grace, that it has been and is still my real Desire to 
hearken to his Voice in Providence, and readily to comply 



68 HISTORY OF MASON. 

with the same. And as you have proceeded according to 
the Coppy of your Votes, which the Committee lodged in my 
hands, to renew your Call for my Settlement in the work 
of the Ministry among you, and that, as I understand, with 
much Harmony and good Agreement, I look upon myself 
bounden in Duty to encourage the same ; since I trust God 
has, by his Spirit, made such an application of his word and 
Providence to my mind as leads me to see that I'm called not 
only of Man but of God : Accordingly, I do cheerfully give 
up myself to God, to serve him by his Grace in the Gospel of 
his Son ; and it is my Purpose to give myself to you by the 
will of God. 

"I take it for granted in your vote respecting my settlement, 
you mean to give me One Hundred Pounds, in addition to 
and over and above those Lands given by your Charter to the 
first minister, and upon that condition give an affirmative 
Answer to your request. 

"I beg a constant and fervent Remembrance in all your 
Addresses at the Throne of Grace, that God would abun- 
dantly furnish me for the Work of the Ministry, with the 
Gifts and Graces of his holy Spirit. 

''And now Sirs, may God graciously smile upon and bless 
you in all your concerns, particularly respecting your settle- 
ment in Gospel Order. I do fervently commend you "to God 
and to the Word of his Grace which is Able to build you up 
and to give you an inheritance among them which are sancti- 
fied," And Subscribe myself your Servant in our Common 
Lord. JoxATHAN Searle. 

"P. S. Whereas my Relations live at some considerable 
Distance whom 'tis likely I shall incline to visit once a year, 
when it may not be in my Power to provide a Supply, I should 
take it very kindly if in your next meeting, you would take 
this Matter into Consideration, and give Liberty that I may 
be absent two or three Sabbaths in a year, as you may think 
proper." 

This is all that appears upon the town records, in reference 



1772. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 69 

to the call and ordination of Mr. Searle. In the History of 
the New Hampshire Churches, page 23, it is stated, that Mr. 
Searle received a call to settle at Candia, N. H., between 
1768 and 1771, which he seems to have declined in favor of 
Mason. This connection commenced with favorable auspices, 
was not a happy one. Difficulties soon arose, of which the 
details will appear in their proper place. The call, it may be 
remarked is not in accordance with the principles upon 
which congregational churches now claim to be established. 
This call proceeded from the town alone. There was at the 
date of these proceedings no church. That was not organ- 
ized or formed until the 13th of October, the day before the 
ordination. The '' letters missive" were issued by the town. 
It is now the prescribed and universal rule, for the letters to 
be issued by the church, and for the town or society by their 
committee to join with the church in sending out the letters. 
The call also should proceed from the church, in the first 
instance, as it is from the church alone that it has any eccle- 
siastical or binding force, as a religious institution or ordi- 
nance. The action of the town is merely subsidiary, and 
has reference only to temporalities, such as the salary, settle- 
ment, use of lands, parsonage, &c. Such rights, towns in 
their corporate capacity, continued to exercise, a concurrence 
on their part with the church, being requisite for the lawful 
settlement of a minister, until the act of the Legislature, 
passed July 1st, 1819, took away from towns all such power; 
and parishes, or societies came in place of towns, in the con- 
tracts for settling ministers. The clergyman, in those days, 
was the minister, that is, the servant of the town and people ; 
but the pastor, that is the keeper, the shepherd of the church. 
Then permanence gave dignity and authority to the office ; 
gravity, learning, and a paternal interest and care for the 
whole people, made the minister the first and principal man 
in the town, whose character, especially if for good, impressed 
itself thoroughly and permanently, upon the whole town, and 
all its interests and institutions. That he should be right- 
10 



70 HISTORY OF MASON. 

minded, able and faithful, was as important for the prosperity 
of the town and people, as such characteristics are in the 
husband and father of a family, for the peace, happiness and 
prosperity of the domestic circle. What a change a half 
century with its new notions, has brought about. The rever- 
ence paid, and authority yielded to the clergy, is gone, and 
with them are gone much of the peace, order, sobriety and 
prosperity of our communities, especially in the agricultural 
regions. The old-fashioned charity, hospitality and brotherly 
kindness have vanished away, and their place has not been 
supplied by any gifts or graces, that should cause their loss 
not to be noticed and lamented. Possibly, in worldly pros- 
perity, some show of advance has been made, but in domestic 
felicity and neighborly good feelings, the by-gone days may 
fearlessly challenge a comparison with the present times. 

November 17tli, 1772. The treasurer is ordered "To pay 
Mr. Jacob Buruap fourteen pounds eight shillings L. money 
for preaching and supplying Twelve Sabbaths in Mason." 

January 6, 1773. The Treasurer is ordered "To pay In- 
sign Enosh Lawrence £3 10s. Od. 3q. L., which sum, with what 
he has already rec'd, amounts to the sum total of his account 
for boarding Mr. Steward, Mr. Burnap and Mr. Wioth, while 
preaching in Mason. 

February 27, 1773. Order "To pay Lieut. Obadiah Par- 
ker £10 16s. L., which sum he paid Mr. Jonathan Searle, in 
part for preaching in the town of Mason, in the year 1770," 
and same date, order to pay Nathan Coburn, three shillings 
"for carrying Mr. Jacob Burnap's money to him, which was 
due to him for preaching in Mason in the year 1771." Same 
date, Mr. Nathan Hall, as treasurer, is charged as " Dr. to 
the selectmen XI Is. 4d., the Rev. Jacob Burnap having 
abated so much out of the sum the selectmen ordered the 
treasurer to pay him." 

March 5, 1773. Order "To pay Abijah Allen £4 6s. 8d for 
boarding Mr. Ames seven weeks, when preaching in Mason, 
and for boarding the Rev. Mr. Searle seven weeks, while 



1173. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 71 

preaching in Mason, before his ordination, and for expenses 
to Concord in going after Mr. Ames." 

March 24, 1773. Order "To pay Elisha Withington three 
pounds for keeping school in Mason two months last winter." 

This is the first entry that appears, of money paid for 
schools. Mr. Withington continued for many years to be 
employed as a school master. There were then no school 
districts, or school houses. The whole management of the 
schools was under the superintendence of the selectmen. 
They employed the teacher and directed when and where the 
schools should be kept. The only memorials left, of the 
schools and teachers, are to be found in the records of the 
orders for the payment of their wages and expenses of wood 
and rent of rooms. 

May 31, 1773. Order "To pay Lt. Obadiali Parker 8s. 9d, 
3q. for his cost in sending for a law book, paying for a juror 
box, and paying Esq. Goss, for swearing the selectmen to the 
Inventory taken in April last." 

May 31, 1773. Order "To pay Lt. Obadiah Parker £2 Is. 
5d., which he paid to the Rev. Jonathan Searle in full for his 
preaching in the town of Mason, in the year 1770, and like- 
wise £2 17s. Id., in part for what he preached in the year 
1772, before his ordination." 

In the warrant for the town meeting, July 12, 1773, one 
article was, " To see if the town will provide a work house, 
or determine what method they will come into for the sup- 
port of the poor." Another was, "To see if the town will 
give liberty to Mr. Stevens Lawrence to build a house and 
horse stable on tlie school lot, for his own use on Sabbath 
days." Another, "To see if the town will accept of a piece 
of ground of Capt, Thomas Tarbell, for a graveyard." The 
town voted, "That there be a work house provided," that 
"Stevens Lawrence, or any other man, may have liberty to 
build a house or horse stable on the school lot, for their own 
use on Sabbath days." The work house was not built. The 
threat to build it probably induced the "idle persons" to 



72 HISTORY OF MASON. 

withdraw or go to work. The piece of ground for a grave* 
yard, was that now occupied for that purpose, in the cast part 
of the town, near where Capt. Thomas Tarbell then lived, 
about one mile east of the old meeting house. Under the 
liberty to build on the school lot, horse stables and houses 
for Sabbath days, two such houses were built, both of two 
small rooms, with a fire place in each room — one of them, by 
Stevens Lawrence, Jonathan Searle, Aaron Wheeler and John 
Swallow, the other by Col. James Wood, Joseph Woods, Oli- 
ver Hosmer and Timothy Wheeler. A long line of horse 
sheds or stables was built, on the west side of the road oppo- 
site to the meeting house, and another line of stables on the 
north side of the meeting house. The earliest built were 
stables, in form and fact, being wholly enclosed and shut by a 
sliding door. These were fitted only for the accommodation 
of horses without carriages. The primitive mode of convey- 
ance to the public meetings, for worship, was on horse back. 
The father of the family with his wife behind him on the pil- 
lion, each with an infant child in their arms and with their 
Sunday dinner of brown bread, nut cakes or dough nuts, and 
cheese and apples in their pockets, left the humble cottage 
dwelling in the cleared patch, surrounded by the original 
forest, accompanied by the other members of the family, 
children and hired men, or relatives, inmates of the same, on 
foot, the procession wending its way, over the road but 
partially cleared of rocks and stumps, proceeded to the rough 
boarded, unpretending meeting house. The horse was well 
provided for in the close stable, sheltered from wind and 
storm. The people resorted to the Sabbath-day house, or as 
it was more generally called '''noon house," at the season of 
intermission, where, by a good, comfortable fire, they enjoyed 
their homely but healthy fare of a dinner, with a social drink 
of cider, and such friendly and cheerful chat as served to keep 
up an intimacy and neighborly intercourse which tended to ^ 
preserve personal friendship and good feeling in society. 
September 22, 1773. Order "To pay Josiah Wheeler £9 



1774. MUNICIPAL HISTOEY. 73 

12s., for paying Mr. Sylvaniis Ames for preaching eight Sab* 
baths in Mason." 

March 14, 1774. Order "To pay Ens. Enosh Lawrence 
£5 14s. 8d. 2q., for paying Mr. Wyeth for four days' preach- 
ing, and 16 months interest for the same." 

July 15, 1774. At a meeting called expressly for that 
purpose, Amos Dakin "was chosen to send to meet the sev- 
eral towns in the Province at Exeter, on the 21st of July, in 
order to choose a committee to join the Congress at Phila- 
delphia, on the first of September next, in order to consult 
what measures may be best to be taken to secure our rights 
and privileges." This is the first distinct notice, that appears 
on the records of any action of the town in reference to the 
great struggle that was then impending, the successful result 
of which is destined to work a greater revolution, for the 
better, in human afiairs, than any other event, that has oc- 
curred since the introduction of the Christian religion. The 
subsequent records show, that this little community, amidst 
poverty and privations, were not, in proportion to their 
means, second to any in the land, in their efibrts to secure to 
themselves and their posterity, the great boon of political 
freedom and self-government. 

August 22, 1774. Josiah Wheeler was, at his request, ex- 
cused from further services as town clerk and selectman. 
He was a leading and active man in the aflFairs of the town 
and church, from the first organization of each, till this date. 
He served in the office of town clerk, to which he was chosen 
on the first organization of the town, every year but one, and 
as one of the selectmen every year, till he resigned both 
ofi&ces, as above, probably on account of ill health. By the 
record of deaths, it appears that he died October 17, 1774. 
His records are very well made, in a plain and distinct hand, 
and are now perfectly legible, in that respect comparing favor- 
ably with any of his successors, and very much superior to 
most of them. In what year he came into town has not been 
ascertained. His native place was Concord. He was one of 



74 HISTORY OF MASOX. 

the original members of tlic clnircli, and took an active part 
in its proceedino's. The birth of his eldest daughter, Lucy, 
is recorded January 16, 1765. This was anterior to the 
commencement of the town records. The entry is made by 
himself, as town clerk. He probably then lived in town. He 
lived upon the farm afterwards ownaed by Hincksman Warren. 
His widow continued to live upon the farm till October 25, 
1775, when she was married to David Blodgett, who lived on 
the farm several years after the marriage, and probably till 
it was sold to Warren. In the first assessment of taxes in 
the town, he was rated at 7s. 6d. Iq. The list contains sev- 
enty six names. Two or more were non-residents. The 
highest rate in the list of residents, that of Josiah Robbins, 
was XI 3s. 4d. Oq., the lowest, that of Joseph Tucker, 8d. 2q. 
Thirty seven were higher and thirty eight lower than Mr. 
Wheeler, showing him to have been placed in that happy state 
of mediocrity, in which, alone, the true enjoyment of life 
is to be found. Probably none of his descendants reside 
in the town. No monument shows where he rests from his 
labors. 

The storm of revolutionary troubles now began to wear a 
dark and threatening aspect. October 23, 1774, a warrant 
was issued, calling a meeting on Monday, the 24th of October, 
"To choose a committee to send to Amherst, to meet the ses- 
sions, and also to act on some other articles, that may be then 
thought proper." At the meeting, Lieut. Obadiah Parker 
and Mr. Joseph Barrett were chosen a committee to meet the 
sessions, and Amos Dakin, Samuel Brown, Abijah Allen, 
David Blodgett and Lieut. Obadiah Parker, were chosen a 
committee of correspondence for the county. The notice for 
this meeting was issued on Sunday, to meet the next day, 
thus verifying Mr. Webster's remark in his Baltimore speech, 
that "revolutionary times know no Sundays." 

Immediately after the record of this meeting, but without 
any preface, introduction or explanation, is entered in the 



1774. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 75 

records, in the hand writing of Benjamin Mann, town clerk, 
the following paper, copied verbatim and literatim : 

"THE COVENANT OF NON-IMPORTATION AND AGREEMENT, 1774. 

"We, the Subscribers, Inhabitants of the Town of Mason 
in N. H. Having Taken into our Serious Consideration the 
Precarious State of the Liberties of N. America, and More 
Especially the Present Distressed Condition of our Sister 
Colony of Massachusetts Bay, Embarrassed as it is By Sev- 
eral Acts of the British Parliament tending to the Entire 
Subversion of their Natural and Charter Rights, among which 
is the Acts for Blocking up the Harbor of Boston; and Being 
Fully Sensible of our Indispensible Duty to Lay Hold on 
Every Lawful Means in our Power to Preserve and Recover 
the Much Lijured Constitution of our Country, and Conscious 
at the same [time] of no Alternative between the Horrors of 
Slavery, or Carnage and Desolation of Civil War, But a Sus- 
pension of all Commercial Litercourse with the Island of 
Grate Britain, Do, in the Presence of God, Solemly and in 
Good Faith covenant and Engage with each other : 

" 1st. That from Henceforth we will suspend all Commercial 
Intercourse with the said Island of Grate Brittain, until the 
Parlaiment shall Ceas to Enact Laws Imposing Taxes upon 
the Colonies without their consent, or until the Pretended 
Rights of Taxing is Dropped, and Boston Port be opened, 
and their and our Constitutional Rights and Privileges are 
Restored to ye Colonies. 

"2dly. That there may be less Temptation to others to 
Continue in the said Now Dangerous Commerce, and in order 
to Promote Industry, Economy, Arts and Manufactures among 
ourselves, which are of the Last Importance to the Welfare 
and Well-being of a Community, We do in like manner 
Solemly Covenant tliat we will not knowingly Buy, Purchase 
or Consume, or suifer any Person by, for or under us, to Pur- 
chase, nor will we use in our Families In any manner what- 
soever, any Goods, Wares and Merchandize which shall Arrive 
in America, from Grate Britain aforesaid from and after the 
last of August Ensuing ; Except only such articles as shall be 
Judged absolutely necessary By the majority of the Signers 
hereof; and as much as in us Lies to Prevent our Being inter- 
rupted and Defeated, in this only Peaceble Measure entered 
into for the Recovery and Preservation of our Rights and 
the rights of our Brethren in our Sister Colonies ; We agree 
to Brake off all Trade and Commerce with all Persons, who 



76 HISTORY OF MASON. 

Preferring their Private Interest to the Salvation of their 
now almost Perishing Country, who shall still Continue to 
import Goods from Grate Britain, or shall Purchase of those 
who import after the said Last Day of August; until the 
aforesaid Pretended Right of Taxing the Colonies shall be 
Given up or Dropped, Except so much as Christian Duty 
Requires Toward them.. 

'• 3dly. As a refusal to come into this or a similar agree- 
ment, which promises deliverance of our Country from the 
Calamities it now feels, and which, like a torrent, are rushing 
upon it, with increasing violence, must, in our opinion, 
evidence a disposition enimical to, or criminally negligent of 
the common safety, it is agreed that all such ought to be con- 
sidered, and shall by us be esteemed, as encouragers of con- 
tumacious importers. 

" 4thly. We hereby further engage that we will use every 
reasonable meathord to encourage and promote the produc- 
tion of manufactures among ourselves, that this covenant and 
engagement may be as little detrimental to ourselves and 
fellow countrymen as possible. 

"Lastly, we allow ourselves liberty to comply with the 
result of the General Congress. Also we agree to make such 
alterations as shall be thought suitable by the majority of the 
Signers, after [being] notified in a public manner by a com- 
mittee chosen for that purpose, eight days before said meet- 
ing." 

No names are recorded as being signed to this document. 
It is without date, except of the year. The original has not 
been found, nor any list of the names. Immediately follow- 
ing the above record, is a notice of a meeting to be held 
November 7th, 1774. "To make such alterations in the said 
covenant, &c., as shall be thought proper." In the record of 
the meeting, it is set forth that " the signers, &c., met and 
agreed on the following articles to be exempted that the 
above signers may have liberty to purchase, "Viz : Arms and 
ammunition, also steel sewing needles, pins and awls, and 
Doctors drugs that cannot be purchased in this country of 
equal value. Voted, That those persons that have not signed 
the Covenant of Non-Importation are to do it within a fort- 
night, or else have their names returned to the other towns. 

Benjamin Manx, Town Clerk." 

At a meeting, November 21, 177--1:, it was "Voted, to sell 
to Stephen Lawrence, the ministry lot of land that he now 



1775. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 77 

lives on, being lot No. 7, Range 8, for £53 Gs. 8d.," and the 
Rev. Jonathan Searle was to be paid sixteen shillings yearly 
for it, which he agreed to take during his ministry, and a 
committee was chosen to make the conveyance and take the 
acquittance of Mr. Searle. This subject had been before the 
town at former times. It seems that it was not settled by 
this vote of* the town, for a meeting was called January 2nd, 
1775, " To see if the town will make further enquiry relative 
to the ministerial lands" &c., and to see whether the privilege 
of improving said lands belongs to the Rev. Jonathan Searle, 
or to the town. Also to see what enquiry should be made, 
and whether at the expense of the town." At the meeting, it 
was, voted "to make the enquiry, at the expense of the town, 
and that David Blodgett, Benjamin Mann and Samuel Smith, 
be a committee to draw up articles to send to Squr Yarnum, 
in order for advice relative to said ministry lands." What 
advice was obtained of '-Squr Varnum" is not on record. 

A meeting of the signers of the covenant, &c., was called 
January 12th, 1775, at which it was "Voted, To adopt the 
resolves of the Continential Congress." Also, Voted, To 
send one committee man to meet at Exeter, January 25, in 
order to choose a committee to "joyn the Congress at Phila- 
delphia," &c. Joseph Barrett was chosen. The committee 
chosen October 24th, was continued, and two more added to 
the number, to wit: Reuben Barrett and Samuel Smith. 
"Voted, That the aforesaid committee, viz: Messrs Amos 
Dakin, Samuel Brown, Abijah Allen, David Blodgett, Lieut. 
Obadiah Parker, Reuben Barrett and Samuel Smith," be a 
committee of inspection to see that "the Resolves of the 
Continential Congress is Duely observed." 

March 9th, 1775. Order "To pay Amos Dakin 19s. 6d. 
for finding hors and expenses to go to Exeter in ye year 
1774." 

At the annual meeting March 17th, 1775, it was, " Voted To 
pass over the 5th article of the warrant, of discontinuing the 
Rode that leads from the widow Powerses up by James 
11 



(O HISTORY OF MASON. 

Scriptures and his fathers, which was a request of Ebenezer 
Muzzy and others in the warrant, For which James Scripture 
declared in the meeting' that he would [give] said Ebenezer 
Muzz}^ Free Liberty to Pass and Repass threw His Land to 
said Muzzy Land, with said Muzzy 's Being Injenias and keep- 
ing up the bars." It was also, " voted to draw out of the 
Treasury" [that is for the town to pay] the town's propor- 
tion of " the charge of the Continental Congress ye present 
year, which sum is £'2 8s. Od, Oq." Amos Dakin was chosen 
a "Deputy to send to Exeter." 

At this period of time, the habits of the people were such 
as to render them independent, in a great measure, for the 
comfortable supply of the wants of life, of articles not pro- 
duced in the town. Tea was prohibited by the non-impor- 
tation agreement. For sugar and molasses, the rock maple 
was a reliable resource. Every common article of food and 
clothing was produced in the town, or at least in the neigh- 
borhood. The clothing was made of wool and flax of domes- 
tic growth, spun and woven by the kitchen fire, by the husj 
and industrious hands of the mother and daughters. Native 
woods and plants furnished coloring matters suitable and sat- 
isfactory to their simple tastes and unostentatious habits. 
Economy, thrift, and a happy contentment with their lot were 
characteristics of the times and people. In point of real inde- 
pendence, the comparison of their condition with that of their 
successors would be much in their favor. But there was one 
important article of which there seems to have been very 
vivid apprehensions that the supply, by reason of the war, 
might fail. That article was salt. This, they had no means 
of producing, nor had they any substitute to take its place. 
The subject was of so much consequence that it was taken up 
as a town matter. At a town meeting, held May 12, 1775, 
It was, "Voted, To purchase 30 hogsheads of salt as a town 
stock upon the town credit. Voted, That Dea. Amos Dakin, 
Lieut. Obadiah Parker, Lt. Eprhraim Sattwell, be a commit- 
tee to agree with any person or persons who shall appear to 



1775. MtJNICIPAL HISTOEY. 79 

bring up the salt, and upon what terms. Voted, That Mr. 
David Blodgett should go to Salem to procure said salt, and 
to allow him six shillings for his trouble. Voted, To give 
two shillings per bushel for bringing up said salt. 

"Voted, That there be two companies in said town, and 
that the alarm company be separate from the military com- 
pany. Voted, To clioose ofi&cers for each company." 

This is the first notice of the military affairs of the town. 
Who were chosen officers is not stated. The alarm com- 
pany, or "alarm list," or '-elerum list," as it is sometimes 
called, was an important institution. It was a body of able 
men, practiced in the use of arms, ready to assemble at any 
time, on the "alarm" at the beat of the drum, or other signal, 
at the shortest possible notice, in battle array, prepared with 
arms and equipments, to march to meet the enemy and repel 
invasion. This institution of the alarm list was kept up long 
after the occasion — the war of the Revolution — that gave 
rise to it, was passed. Even within the recollection of the 
writer, it was usual, at the annual May training, for the vet* 
erans, the alarm list, to turn out and assemble with the arms 
and equipments that had seen service at Bunker Hill, at Sara- 
toga, at Ticondcroga, at White Plains, at Rhode Island, and 
various other battle fields of the Revolution, and parade in 
due form under their old ofiicers, to show the "boys" how 
the thing was done. After marching and counter marching, 
displaying various intricate evolutions, winding up with that 
most wonderful performance, whipping the snake, it was 
customary, on retiring from the active duties of the day, to 
indulge, often times too freely, with an article then known and 
used in the form of toddy and flip, which had much better be 
let entirely alone. In happy contrast with those times, it 
may now be said that no decent body meddles with the 
poison. 

In May, 1775, a convention of delegates met at Exeter, 
for the purpose, in fact, of taking from the hands of the Pro- 
vincial authorities, the government of the State, and devising 



80 HISTORY OF MASON. 

a new mode of carrying it on- It continued in session, Avith 
little interruption, till late in November. One hundred and 
two towns were represented b}' one hundred and thirt}^ three 
members. Governor Wentworth, after a fruitless effort to 
repress the spirit of liberty in the body of the people and in 
their representatives, had adjourned the assembly to the 28th 
of September, But this body met no more. Alarmed by 
some demonstrations of popular feeling, he retired to the 
Isles of Shoals, and there issued a proclamation, ordering a 
further adjournment to the next April. This was the closing 
act of his administration. He soon after withdrew to the 
British territories, leaving the government of the State in 
the hands of the patriots. 

The convention appointed a committee of safety, which 
exercised the authority of a supreme executive. Theodore 
Atkinson, the former secretary, by order of the convention, 
delivered up the Province records to a committee, which was 
sent to receive them. Ebenezer Thompson was appointed in 
his place. George Jaffrey, the former treasurer, delivered up 
the public money in his hands, and Nicholas Gilman was ap- 
pointed in his place. The convention was chosen for six 
months only. They made provision to call a representation 
of the people, who should be empowered by their constituents 
to assume the government, and continue it one year. Every 
elector was required to have an estate of twenty pounds 
value, and every representative an estate of three hundred 
pounds value. Each town of one hundred families was to 
have one representative, and one more for each additional 
hundred families. Towns with a less number were to be 
classed. An enumeration of the people in each county had 
been ordered, and it was determined that the number of the 
representatives should correspond with that of the people, as 
follows : 



1775. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 81 





CENSUS OF NEW 


HAMPSHIRE. 




Counties. 


Population. 




Representatives, 


Rockingham, 


37,850 




38 


Strafford, 


12,713 




13 


Hillsborough, 


16,487 




17 


Cheshire, 


11,089 




15 


Grafton, 


4,101 




6 



82,200 89 

This ratio would give one representative for about nine 
hundred and twenty three inhabitants. Under this arrange- 
ment, Mason and Rabj, now Brookline, were classed for the 
choice of a representative, and these towns continued to be 
so classed until 1793, in which year Joseph Merriam was 
chosen to represent Mason alone, under a new classification. 
Brookline was afterwards classed witli Milford. Benjamin 
Farley was chosen to represent Raby and Milford in 1796. 
The number of inhabitants in Mason, according to an enumer- 
ation made by the assessors October 30, 1775, was 501. 
Males under 16, 148; males from 16 to 50 not gone to the 
army, 86; all males above 50, 12; persons gone in the army, 
27; all females, 227; negroes and slaves for life, 1. Total, 
501. The number of guns, 48; pounds of powder, 14J. 
" The number of those that have not guns is 49." This is 
the earliest census of the inhabitants of Mason. The enumer- 
ation was taken, by the assessors, in obedience to the Pro- 
vincial Congress. At this time, Portsmouth had 4590 inhab- 
itants ; Londonderry, 2590; Exeter, 1741; Dover 1666. 

A meeting was called by warrant, dated November 1, 1775, 
article third was, '' To see what the town will do in regard to 
the town stock of salt, wheather it shall remain preserved as 
a town stock any longer, or wheather it shall be Disbusted to 
every one according [as] he shall need the same, and also in 
what manner it shall be distributed to every one. 

''4thly. To see what the town will do in regard to that 
cow that the town purchased for the benefit of Mr. Nathaniel 
Barrett's family this year, wheather the town will sell said 
cow or have her kept this winter." 



82 HISTORY OP MASOX. 

At the meeting, November 6, Samuel Brown was moderator. 

''Yotcd, To pass over tlie third article." So it seems that 
the salt did not get "Disbusted" at this meeting. On the 
fourth article, the town directed the cow to be sold at public 
vendue. Also, on the fifth, "Voted, that Joseph Barrett be 
one of the committee of Inspection for the town in Mr. D. 
B 's room." 

The first warrant for choice of a representative, was issued 
by the selectmen, November 23, 1775. It was for a meeting 
of the freeholders, &c., of Mason to meet at the meeting 
house, on the 11th of December, "To choose a suitable per- 
son having real estate to the value of two hundred pounds^ 
Lawful, to represent them in General Congress, to be held 
at Exeter the 21st of December next." A like warrant is 
recorded, issued by the selectmen of Mason, for a meeting of 
the freeholders, &jc., of Raby, at the same time and place, and 
for the same purpose. 

The record of the meeting is as follows : 

"At a legal meeting, held in Mason, at the public meeting 
house in said town, December ye 11, 1775, the electors of 
Mason and Raby, then present, 

"Voted, To act upon the precept sent from the Provintial 
Congress to the selectmen of Mason, to notify the legal inhab' 
itants of the above said towns of Mason and Raby, to meet 
and choose a man to represent them at. the Provintial Con- 
gress, to be held at Exeter, the warrant that was put up for 
the above said purpose, being blown away by the wind. 

" Chose Mr. Samuel Brown moderator. 

"Voted, To send one man to represent them, at the Pro- 
vintial Congress, the year ensuing. 

"Voted, That those men that sent their votes, by Joseph 
Merriam, to the moderator of said meeting, have the privilege 
of putting in their votes, for the choice of the above said 
representative, namely : Obadiah Parker, Joseph Ball, Jonas 
Fay, Abel Shed, Thomas Robbins, Nathan Wheeler, Seth 
Robbins, John Lawrence. 



1776. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 83 

''Voted, That James Scripture and William and Elias Eliot 
have the liberty of putting in a vote for their fathers, accord- 
ing to their fathers' desire, their fathers being absent, whose 
votes were wrote after the meeting began. 

'•'Voted, That the aforesaid Obadiah Parker, Joseph Ball, 
Jonas Fay, Abel Shed, Thomas Bobbins, Nathan Wheeler, 
Seth Robbins and John Lawrence have their votes thrown out. 

"The above said electors of Mason and Raby personally 
present, chose Amos Dakin, of Mason, to represent them the 
year ensuing. 

Attest : Joseph Barrett, Town Clerk, P. T. 

The style of the heading of warrants for town meetings 
had been, up to February 26, 1776, "Province of New Hamp- 
shire, Hillsborough, ss."; but on August 19, 1776, it was 
changed to "Colony of New Hampshire, Hillsborough, ss." 
Probably the Patriots thought that to use the style of Prov- 
ince, &c., was, in some sort, to acknowledge the authority of 
the kingly government, under which the Province had been 
established, and so to avoid even the appearance of longer 
submission, they repudiated the name of Province. In the 
warrant for the next meeting, the Colony disappears, and the 
State assumes its place, the State government having been 
established. 

It seems that dissatisfaction was felt and manifested with 
the doings at the meeting of the electors of Mason and Raby, 
at which Amos Dakin was elected representative. Whether 
it was that the votes sent by Joseph Merriam were received, 
or because they were thrown out, or because certain worthy 
citizens, in dutiful obedience to the wishes of their absent 
fathers, were permitted to write and put in votes for them, 
does not appear and cannot now be known. If it arose from 
any dislike to the man of their choice, it seems not to have 
been of a deep or lasting nature ; or, at least, not to have 
been wide spread nor permanent, for the same gentleman 
continued, by repeated elections, to represent the same con- 
stituency most of the time till his death, April 28th, 1789. 



84 HISTORY OP MASON. 

The difficulty assumed so serious an attitude, that a town 
meeting was called, to be held March 7, 1776. In the war- 
rant, the second article was, " To see if the town Avill 
approve of the proceedings of the electors of this town, that 
were present at the last town meeting, that was called for 
the choice of a representative for this town and the town 
of Raby; and also to see if the town, after due deliberation 
on this matter, will approve of the representative then chosen 
to be chosen according to Liberty and Justice, or to be the 
free choice of the electors of the town. 3dly. If the town 
shall not approve of the above said representative as being 
legally chosen, to see what measures the town will take in 
regard to the matter." 

At the meeting, it was, " Voted That the town look upon 
it that the meeting, &c., was not conducted according to Lib- 
erty and Justice, and that they do not approve of the same. 
Voted, to send a man to the General Court to present to the 
Hon'ble Court the proceedings of the town meeting held at 
Mason, ye 11 of December, 1775, which was called for the 
choice of a Representative, &c., and also the proceedings of 
the town meeting held at Mason, March 7, 1776, Samuel Low- 
el's vote being put by his saying that he never paid taxes in 
any place. Voted, To send Joseph Barrett to present the 
proceedings of both the above said town meetings to the 
General Court. Voted, That if the General Court do not 
approve of the proceedings of the town meeting held, &c., in 
the choice of a representative, that the above said Joseph 
Barrett pray the General Court to set them in some way 
agreeable to their pleasure for to the have privilege of repre- 
sentation." As nothing more appears upon the records, on 
this subject, it is probable that the general court did not con- 
sider these matters of grievance, if they were ever presented, 
as showing any valid objection to the right of the member 
elect to his seat. 

And now the town's salt appears again. January 9, 1776. 
Order, ''To pay twenty shillings to Joseph Merriam for 



1776. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. ' 85 

money borrowed for the benefit of the teamsters in bringing 
up the town stock of salt," and same date, an order for the 
same sum, for the same purpose, to Joseph Barrett. Febru- 
ar}' 22. In several distinct orders, the treasurer was directed 
to pay 





£ s. d. q. 




£ 


s. d. q. 


Samuel Smith, 


2 14 9 2 


Samuel Brown, 


2 


3 6 


James Scripture, 


2 6 


Nathan Hall, Jr., 


2 


2 7 


Silas Bullard, 


17 8 


Obadiah Parker, 


1 


13 



each, ''for his bringing up a part of the town's stock of salt." 
Also, to John Larned 10s. 8d. and Jonathan Williams 10s. 8d, 
each, ''for liis oxen in bringing up the town stock of salt." 

April 3, 1776. Like order to pay to, 

£ s. d. q. £ s. d. q. 

Enosh Lawrence, Jr. 1 13 6 Joseph Merriam, 1 18 
Aaron Wheeler, 12 Stephen Lawrence, 2 8 
each, "for bringing up a part of the town's stock of salt," 
and John Swallow, for his oxen, twelve shillings. 

The salt had arrived, and the salt troubles soon began. 
It must be paid for. How shall the money be come at ? 
Some of the inhabitants will not pay ; shall they have their 
share ? Some of the tax payers are non-residents ; shall they 
be compelled to pay for what they do not have, and do not 
want ? All these questions came up to trouble the fathers of 
the town. Such difficulties will always arise, when municipal 
bodies leave their legitimate duties, and undertake business 
for which they are not fitted. 

March 11th, 1776. At a town meeting it was "Yoted, that 
a proportion of the money for the salt be made directly, and 
the money be collected within four weeks from our annual 
meeting; and at the end of four weeks, the salt be awarded 
to every man according to his rate, and every one that shall 
neglect, or refuse to pay his proportion of rates by the said 
time, " Shall forfeit his Part of thee Salt." 

In the warrant for a meeting May 6th, 1776, the second 
X2 



86 ' HISTORY OF MASON. 

article is, " To see if tlic town will sell a part of the town's 
stock of salt at Public Vendue, or any other way to make 
up the Non-Residence part, or proportion which they were 
rated for, which sum is £2 lis. Od. 0(|." At the meeting it 
was "Voted, to sell the Non-Residence part of salt, Avhich 
they were rated for, and neglected to pay the money, and 
take the salt, which sum was X2 lis. Od. Oq. and sold ten 
bushels of salt for £2 12s. Gd. Oq." This would be nearly 
eighty seven cents per bushel. 

"Voted to have the remainder of the salt divided by the 
rate. 

"Voted, To choose a committee of Inspection for the 
Insuing year, Messrs. Joshua Davis, Amos Dakin, Abel Shead, 
Nathaniel Tarbell and Joseph Barrett was chosen for the 
purpose aforesaid." 

August 19th, 1776, a town meeting was called. The second 
article was, "To see what instructions the town will give 
their Representative, previous to the choice of field officers, 
for the regiment we belong to. 3dly. To see if the town 
will have a town stock of powder, lead, flints and fire-arms 
provided for said town, or Ither of these necessary articles 
for our defence. 4thly. To see if the town will recommend 
any suitable person to the Great and General Court, for a 
Justice of the Peace." At the meeting it was "voted to 
refer the choice of field officers to the General Court, to raise 
X15 Os. Od. Oq. to be added to £12 Os. Od. Oq. already raised^ 
to purchase a town stock of powder, lead and flints for said 
town. Voted to pass over the 4th article." Probably so 
many thought themselves fit for the office, that it was difficult 
to find a majority for any one. 

May 6th, 1776. An order "to pay Capt. Miles Ward £20 
Is. Od. Oq., it being to pay Capt. Jonathan Peele for our town's 
stock of salt." 

At the meeting September 2d, 1776, it was "Voted, That 
the bridge by Dea. Dakin's and that by Elias Eliot's [mills], 



1776. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 87 

and that between Nathaniel Hosmer's and Jonas Fay's, be 
maintained Ijy tlic town." 

At the meeting of the town of Mason and Raby, November 
18th, 1776, for the choice of Representatives, Dea. Amos 
Dakin was chosen representative. It was '^ "Voted, To send 
Mr. Samuel Brown to join with the committee of the State of 
Massachusetts, in order to Repel the exhorbitance of our 
trade, &c. What elfect this effort had on the "exhorbitance 
of our trade" does not appear. 

May 31st, 1776. Order '• to pay Amos Dakin XI Is. 4d. 
Iq., it being for his going to Exeter at the first Congress on 
service of the town." 

In the warrant for the annual meeting in 1777, was an arti- 
cle " to see if the town will raise any sum of money to pur- 
chase any number of tickets in the Continental Lottery" ; 
which the town declined to do. At the meeting, Obadiah 
Parker, Reuben Barrett, Samuel Brown, Abijah Allen and 
Benjamin Mann were chosen a committee of inspection. At 
an adjournment of this meeting it is recorded that "a peti- 
tion was laid before the town of a number of paragrafts. 
Voted, That the first paragraft be a matter of grievance 
Also, voted that the paragraft be a matter of grievance. 
Voted, To accept the prayer of said petition, all but the 
clause where it respects the forming and regulation of the 
militia in this State ; and where it respects the Courts send- 
ing writs to every town, to send a man to the convention 
therein mentioned. Voted Benjamin Mann, Capt. Tarbell 
and Lt. Obadiah Parker be the committee aforesaid." 

What this petition so full of grievances was, the records do 
not show; nor will posterity probably ever know, what "par- 
agraft" of the petition was, by the town, voted to be "the 
second matter of grievance," inasmuch as the clerk has inad- 
vertantly omitted the number of that unfortunate "paragraft." 
At the same meeting it was "voted, to choose a committee to 
procure a graveyard, for the use of the town. Dea. Hall, 



BS HISTORY OP MASON. 

Benjamin Mann and Lt. Bloclgctt were chosen for the afore* 
said purpose.'' 

''Voted, That Lt. Swallow and Mr. John Whitaker dig the 
graves that are reasonabhj needed in said town." What pro* 
vision should be or could be made for graves unreasonably 
needed ? 

"Voted, To choose a committee to seat the meeting house. 
Mr. Samuel Brown, Capt. B. Barrett, Benjamin Mann, Lieut. 
Obadiah Parker and Mr. Abel Shead, were chosen the com- 
mittee aforesaid. Voted, That the inhabitants are seated 
according to their age and pay. Voted, To sell the ministry 
lots of land. Voted, That the selectmen seat said meeting 
house." 

The "piece de resistance," the standing, unconquerable 
difficulty of seating the meeting house, like Mons. Tonson, is 
always "coming again," to plague the patriots, even in the 
midst of the alarms of war, of troubles of false brethren, to 
be looked after by the committee of "Inspection," as well as 
of sisters slyly taking a clandestine cup of tea, in violation 
of the articles of non-importation, of salt troubles, now 
happily at rest by the sale of ten bushels of salt, to raise the 
money which the wicked "non-residence" would not pay, and 
of the election of a representative made "not according to 
Liberty and Justice." How this seating difficulty will be 
settled, or, perhaps more properly said, be left unsettled by 
the grave committee of live, chosen for that purpose, but 
from whom, before they had time to act, by a vote "not 
according to Liberty and Justice," the subject, and their 
authority to act, was taken away, being referred to the select- 
men, remains to be seen, and will be faithfully reported, as 
soon as it shall appear. 

April 1, 1777. A meeting was called. The second article 
was, " To assist in some way and manner, as the town shall 
see fit, in raising fourteen "affective, able-Bodyed" men, for 
the term of three years, or during the war with Great Britain, 
as that is our proportion from orders received from Colonel 



1777. iruxiciPAL history. 89 

Moses Xicoles, [Nichols] pursuant to orders from the couucil 
and general assembly of the State." At the meeting, it was, 
"Toted, To raise our proportion of men as a town. Voted, 
To raise $1400 as Incoriageement for soldiers to enlist into 
the Continental service. Voted, To choose a committee to 
estimate the turns. Voted, Lt. Blodgett, Lt. Parker, Capt. 
Barrett, Mr. Abijali Allen and David Brown, "be the committee 
aforesaid. Voted, Not to accept the report the committee 
made. Voted, To reconsider the vote concerning the raising 
the $1400. Voted, To choose a committee to join the 
commissioned officers to make an estimation. Voted, William 
Eliot, Dea. A. Dakin, David Blodgett, Joseph Merriam and 
Lt. Obadiah Parker, for the committee to estimate each 
man's proportion. Then adjourned to the next Friday." At 
the adjourned meeting, "Voted, To take in all above sixteen 
years old into the estimation. Voted, To approve of what 
the town had done as to the estimation of the tui'ns done in 
the services and calculation of the three years forward." 
The proceedings of this meeting did not seem to accomplish 
the business. A meeting was called the 28th of April, 1777, 
"To see if the town will come into any other method different 
from what hath been already acted, with regard to raising of 
a sum of money, for the purpose of hiring soldiers, that is 
now called for into the service of the United States of Amer- 
ica." At this meeting it was, "Voted, To raise $1400, for 
the purpose," &c. Also, "To accept the estimation the 
(Committee made with regard to the prices of every campaign." 
"Voted, To exempt those who have done their turns from any 
cost of procuring said soldiers, until it properly comes to 
their turns. Also, chose a committee to hire men, and 
appointed a collector to collect the money and pay it to the 
committee." May 8, 1777. At an adjournment of the meet- 
ing, "Voted, That all those men that neglect paying their 
proportion for hiring soldiers for the three years' service, as 
was levied by a committee chosen for that purpose, are to be 
the persons looked upon subject to the first draft when made. 



90 HISTORY OF MASON. 

Voted, That Benjamin Mann receive the aforesaid propor* 
tion. Voted, That those persons that were procured by the 
committee are to go for the squadrons whom they expected 
to go for when they engaged. Voted, To reconsider the first 
vote above mentioned. Adjourned to May 12." At the 
adjournment, "Voted, To divide the town stock of ammu- 
nition to individuals, as they need. Voted, Tliat each person 
that received ammunition belonging to said town, and don't 
give a satisfactory account of said ammunition when properly 
requested by said town, each person so neglecting or refusing, 
is to pay a fine of twenty shillings, L. money. Voted, That 
Samuel Brown procure the aforesaid ammunition. Voted, 
To purchase one hundred weight of powder, two hundred 
weight of lead, and four hundred flints. Adjourned to May 
15." At the adjournment, "Voted, That if said arms are 
procured and are needed by individuals, they are to have 
them at the cost that said town is at for them. Voted, That 
if Mr. Samuel Brown, who is pitched upon to purchase said 
arms, does procure them, he is to hire a carriage to transport 
them to Merrimac river. Voted, That the selectmen borrow 
the money to pay for the powder that is already procured, 
that is not paid for. Voted, To sell the meeting house lot 
for the sake of accommodating a blacksmith, all save about 
fifteen acres, around said meeting house. Voted, To allow 
Mr. Abijah [Allen] $12, as a town, for his time and expenses 
in going to Ticonderoga, in behalf of said town, in 1777. 
Adjourned to May 27." At the adjournment, "Voted, Tb 
reconsider the vote to allow Abijah Allen $12 for going to 
Ticonderoga. Voted, That the town stock of powder be 
brought to Benjamin Mann's, to be divided the next training 
day, which is in three weeks from this day." June 17. It 
was, "Voted, To reconsider the vote to divide the ammu- 
nition. Voted, To allow the three soldiers that enlisted to 
go to Portsmouth for one month, twenty shillings for each 
man, as a town charge. Voted, Not to make any return in 
the valuation to court, of buildings and wild land, and the 



1777. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 91 

moderator dissolved tlie meeting." The reader will think it 
was time somebody "dissolved the meeting." The record is 
given as a sample of the mode in which such matters were 
then managed. 

May 5, 1777. An order to pay David Blodgett '-for making 
a coffin for Mr. Nathaniel Barrett." May 8, 1777. An order 
''To pay Capt. Miles Ward for 4 molasses Hds. and 1 Dry 
cask £0 18s. Od." June 26, 1777. An order, ''To pay Wid. 
Abigail Barrett twelve shillings, for her taking care of tlie 
meeting house one year, from August, 1775." 

Town meeting, August 19, 1777. The second article sets 
forth, that the vote formerly passed, "That the soldiers 
procured by the committee should go for the squadrons they 
expected to go for when they engaged, seems to appear to a 
number of the inhabitants very detrimental to the catise.^' It was 
proposed, "To see if the town would supercede that vote." 
At the meeting, it was "Voted, To go on as a town, and tax 
said town for all the money and cost of raising the three 
years' soldiers. Also, voted, that if the money that the town 
doth raise for the aforesaid purpose, doth not eifect the 
purpose, that those men that are now delinquent in paying, 
or procuring the men, shall be the men that shall be subject 
to the first draft, and shall go, or procure said delinquent 
soldiers for three years, now called for. Voted, To choose 
a committee to procure the delinquent three years' soldiers 
now called for. Chose Joseph Barrett, Samuel Brown and 
Stephen Lawrence." 

September 12, 1777. "Voted, That the committee that 
was chosen for that purpose at a former meeting, agree with 
Mr. Samuel Abbott for a piece of land for a graveyard." 
This is the same land referred to on page 68. The land 
finally taken and occupied for the graveyard, was a part of 
lot No. 6, Range 8, lying next to and adjoining this tract on 
the south. 

December 15th, 1777, a meeting was called. The second 
article in the warrant was as follows : " Whereas, the general 



92 HISTORY OP MASON. 

Court of said State, of late passed an act, that all said 
State's money is to be called in, and State notes on interest 
to be given for the same, which appears to many to be a 
grievance ; this, therefore, is to see if the said town will con- 
sult on some measures, that may be thought more agreable, 
and petition said Court for redress." It was "voted to send 
a petition to the Court, that the said act may be repealed, 
and the square money so called, to pass as specified on the 
face of said bills, or until the above said bills may be called 
in by a tax." 

This vote, is the first indication of the difficulties arising 
from a deficient, disturbed, inadequate and unsound currency. 
The troubles arising from this source, were severely felt, 
from this time, through the whole period of the war. There 
was, at the commencement of the war, no national mint, or 
power to regulate the currency, except under the authority of 
each province. 

The people having discarded and refused to obey the pro- 
vincial authorities of New Hampshire, were under the neces- 
sity of assuming the government of themselves ; and they at 
once proceeded to provide, as well as their want of experi- 
ence in such matters would allow, for the continuance of civil 
government. For this purpose, a convention was called, 
which met at Exeter, in May, 1775, and continued, with little 
interruption, till November, as has been stated on page 80. 

During the year, under the authority of the convention, 
three emissions of paper bills were made — the first of ten 
thousand and fifty pounds, the second of ten thousand pounds, 
and the third of twenty thousand pounds. For the amount 
of those sums, the treasurer gave his obligation in small 
notes, which passed for a time as current money, equal in 
value to silver and gold. But as emissions were multiplied, 
as the redemption of the bills was put ofi" to distant periods, 
and the bills themselves were counterfeited, it was impos- 
sible for them long to hold their value. In 1776, more paper 
bills were issued, to pay the expenses of the war, and 



1778. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 93 

provision was made for redeeming some of the bills by taxes. 
But the depreciation, after it began, proceeded rapidly. 
After the year 1777, the State issued no more bills. Those 
that had been issued were called in, and exchanged for 
treasury notes on interest, in sums not less than five pounds. 
It was against this act that the vote of the town, just recited, 
was directed. Probably it was feared, that if the "square 
money," as the paper money was in common parlance called, 
should be withdrawn, there would be nothing left to serve as 
money and maintain a currency for exchanges. The conti- 
nental bills still continued to pass, but were daily and rapidly 
depreciating, until, in the spring of 1781, they suddenly, and 
by general consent, went out of circulation, and solid coin 
succeeded in their place. To show the rapid depreciation of 
this paper money, for which the faith of the government was 
pledged, but for the redemption of which, no reliable means 
or funds were provided, it is sufficient to refer to the scale of 
depreciation, which was established and recognized, and 
according to which the people endeavored to regulate their 
business and payments. The scale commences in January, 
1777, at which time XlOO of silver was represented by X104 
of paper. The same amount of coin was worth in paper, in 
December of 1777, by X310; 1778, £620; 1779, X2393; 
1780, £7300, and in June, 1781, by £12,000, at which rate no 
wonder the currency ceased. 

January 5, 1778. The selectmen abated the poll taxes of 
Joseph Lowell, Timothy Lowell and Joseph Hodgman, Jr., 
for the year 1776, "they being excepted by the act of the 
General Court, from paying any poll tax, by reason of their 
engaging in the continental service for the year 1776." At 
the town meeting, February 4, the town voted to abate Joshua 
Smith's rates for 1776, and Christopher Mann's rates for 
1775, probably for a like reason, and February 26, by order 
of the selectmen, the poll taxes of Joseph Lowell and of 
Jacob Blodgett, for 1775, were abated, "being excused by 
vote of Congress." Also, an order was issued, "to pay 
13 



94 HISTORY OP MASON. 

Joseph Hurlbiit one pound, bcina; voted to him for going to 
Portsmouth one month last May." Also, one pound to Joseph 
Hodgman, "for his son Nathan going to Portsmouth, &c., 
one month." 

At the annual meeting, March 9, 1778, "Chose Samuel 
Brown, Lemuel Spalding, David Blodgett, William Eliot and 
Zachariah Davis, Committee of Safety." 

March 27, 1778. An order issued to pay Samuel Brown 
^8 10s. 8d. Oq., "it being for his going to Exeter, for ammu- 
nition, and time spent in getting the continental men, and 
service as treasurer." 

April 20, 1778. "Chose David Blodgett, a representative 
in the convention for forming a constitution to meet at Con- 
cord, June 10th." 

April 20, 1778. An order "to pay Lt. Obadiah Parker 
£1 17s. 8d. Oq., for sugar and rice he sent to our militia that 
went on the Elerum at the evacuation of Ticonderoga." 

December 8, 1778. Chose Dea. Amos Dakin representa- 
tive, and the meeting was adjourned to Tuesday next. "The 
meeting at the adjournment not attended by reason of the 
badness of the weather, was Naterly disolved." 

Town meeting, March 30, 1779. The selectmen were 
appointed "a committee to make a proportion of the several 
campaigns, and to call all former committees that were chosen 
to procure continental soldiers, to account, and take the 
money that may be found in said committees' hands. Voted, 
That each person that shall neglect or refuse to bring in his 
receipts for men hired and turns done, in service and term of 
time in actual service, since last estimation, their money and 
term of actual service shall be forfeited to the town. Voted, 
That the inhabitants shall bring in their invoice in the month 
of April, or be doomed." 

April 22, 1779. Town meeting. The third article of the 
warrant was, "To see what measures the town will pursue to 
procure our quoto of men during the present war, now called 
for. 5th. To put out Asa Fish, by vendue, to the lowest 



1779. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 95 

bidder, till he is one and twenty years of age." The meeting 
"Voted, To raise 2000 dollars as a State and Continental 
bounty, to procure four men to enlist during the war." What 
was done with Asa Fish is not stated, but May 7tli, an order 
passed "to pay James Mann £3 19s. lid., for keeping Asa 
Fish 3 weeks," being 22s. 6d. per week, equal to $3,75 a 
week for keeping a child about six years old. 

July 6th, 1779, at the town meeting, "Voted, to raise our 
quoto of continental and Rhode Island men as a town ;" and 
further details are recorded of the arrangements made about 
"estimating campaigns, hiring men, &c." A meeting was 
called August 17th, 1779. Article 2nd, "to see if the town 
will approve or disapprove of the bill of rights and plan of 
government, formed by a convention chosen for that purpose, 
or alter the whole, or any part of said bill of rights, or plan 
of government as they may think fit. Voted to approve of 
the proceedings of the town of Portsmouth, and appointed 
David Blodgett to meet said Portsmouth with other towns at 
Concord, to take into consideration our sinking currency." 
At an adjournment of this meeting held October 25th, "Voted 
and Improved [approved] of the proceedings of the conven- 
tion at Concord, for stipolating prices, for sundry articles of 
the necessaries of life. Voted that Mr. Elias Eliot, Benjamin 
Mann, Benjamin Hodgman, Joseph Merriam, Joseph Ball, 
David Blodgett, Jacob Blodgett, William Chambers and John 
Wood be a committee to "Stipolate" prices among us, seven 
of whom are a "corum." 

What was the action of the town on the bill of rights and 
plan of government, the record does not show. At the meet- 
ing, this subject was postponed. The meeting was adjourned 
sundry times, through the months of August, September and 
October ; the great and absorbing subject before the town, 
being the controversy with the Rev. Jonathan Searle. If any 
vote was passed upon the subject of the bill of rights, and 
plan of government, it was not recorded. A convention was 
held in 1779, to propose a plan of government, by which a 



96 HISTORY OF MASON. 

system of government was drawn up, and submitted to the 
people, which was undoubtedly that referred to in this article. 
It was so deficient in its principles, and inadequate in its 
provisions, that it was by the people, in their town meetings, 
rejected. Another convention was appointed. It continued 
more than two years, from June 1781, to October 1783. A 
system was by this convention submitted to the people, pro- 
viding for a senate of twelve, and a house of fifty members ; 
apportioned twenty to Rockingham, eight to Strafford, ten to 
Hillsborough, eight to Cheshire and four to Grafton, to be 
chosen in county conventions, consisting of one delegate for 
every fifty rateable polls. The plan was printed, and sent to 
every town. The inhabitants were requested to state their 
objections distinctly, to any particular part, and return them 
at a fixed time. The objections were so many and various, 
that it was found necessary to alter the form, and send it out 
a second time. In the amended form, the representatives 
were to be chosen by the towns ; each town of one hundred 
and fifty polls, choosing one, and of four hundred and fifty, two. 
This plan was generally approved, but it was not laid before 
the people in season to be adopted, before the close of the 
war. The old form of government having expired with the 
war, was, by the order of the people, continued a year longer ; 
in the mean time, the new form was perfected, and adopted, 
and went into operation in 1784. 

It will be recollected, that the town approved of the pro- 
ceedings of the town of Portsmouth, &c. This was a propo- 
sal for a convention, to take into consideration "our sinking 
currency," or in other words, the financial difficulties of the 
times. David Blodgett was chosen a delegate to this conven- 
tion. He attended, and shared in the labors of the conven- 
tion, and, what is very remarkable, and perhaps without a 
parallel in history, he returned after the close of the conven- 
tion, and brought the report of their proceedings, and sub- 
mitted it to the same town meeting by which he was chosen, 
it having continued by adjournments till the 25th of October. 



1779. MUNICIPAL HISTOET. 97 

The report of tlie committee, appointed in pursuance of the 
recommendation of this convention "to Stipolate prices," is 
not recorded. It was a very common notion in those days, 
that the evils of a depreciated currency, could be alleviated, 
and perhaps wholly cured, by regulations establishing prices, 
which would compel persons in buying and selling, to conform 
to the prices established by law, and that thus, the nominal 
rates of the currency would be maintained. But the remedy 
was never resorted to, until the disease had assumed a des- 
perate type. Its tendency when applied, was rather to 
hasten, than to retard the catastrophe. It is vain by legisla- 
tion, to attempt to bolster up a paper currency. Its only 
value is its credit. When that has no basis, the paper 
becomes mere rags. Neither laws, nor regulations can give 
it value. As well may the laws require a man to breathe a 
corrupted atmosphere, and derive from it health and vigor, as 
require a community to use for a currency, an irredeemable 
and worthless paper, at its par value, and derive from it the 
benefits and efficiency of a sound currency, founded on intrin- 
sic value. The complaints of a depreciated currency were 
general, and the remedy by "Stipulating prices," was generally 
resorted to. The town records of Townsend, under date of 
Febuary 20th, 1777, show, that after a meeting of the com- 
mittees of Groton, Lunenburg, Fitchburg and Shirley, on this 
subject, "the Selectmen and town of Townsend agreed that 
the following articles shall not exceed the following prices. 





s.d. 


s. d. 


Wheat per bushel, 


6 8 


Dinner at tavern of boiled 


Rye per bushel, 


4 4 


and roast victuals, 1 


Corn per bushel, 


3 4 


Dinner at tavern, for either 


Sheep's wool, per pound, 


2 


boiled or roast only, 10 


Fresh pork. 


4 


A mug of West India Phlip, 11 


Salt pork. 


8 


" New. Eng. do., 9 


Salt per bushel, 


14 





But these prices, although "Stipolated" and agreed to, 
did not remain firm and unchanged. They rapidly increased, 
so that in 1779, August 17, a committee of that town, chosen 



98 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



" to state the price of the several articles necessary for the 
support of life and trade in the town," made a report, which 
was accepted, in which they established the price of the 
following articles, as below : 





£ s. 




£ s. d. 


West India rum, per gallon 


,6 11 


Beef, per lb. 


4 6 


New England rum, 


4 18 


Mutton, 


3 6 


Molasses, 


4 15 


Butter, 


11 


Coffee, per lb., 


18 


Salt pork. 


11 


Tea, 


6 


Cheese, 


5 6 


Brown sugar, from 12s. to 


15 


Oats, per bushel. 


1 16 


Cotton wool, 


1 18 


Eng. hay, per cwt, 


1 15 


Salt, per bushel, 


12 00 


Cyder, per bbl., 


5 2 


German steel, per lb.. 


1 17 


Sheep's wool, 


1 4 


Refined iron. 


10 


Flax, 


12 


Wheat, per bushel, 


7 13 


Men's shoes, 


6 


Rye, 


5 2 


Women's do.. 


4 


Corn, 


3 14 


Shoeing a horse, 


4 16 


Beans, 


5 2 


Common boards, 


18 


Potatoes, 


1 


W. I. Phlip, 


15 


Turnips, 


1 


N. E. Phlip, 


12 



This table shows a pretty rapid appreciation of prices. 
In the same town, at this town meeting, the town " Voted, 
To give to each soldier, of our quota, of the nine months 
continental service, 1000 dollars, or 90 bushels of rye," by 
which it appears that rye was worth more than ten dollars a 
bushel. No record was made of prices in Mason " stipo- 
lated" by the committee appointed for that purpose. 

October 1, 1779, the town of Townsend voted to "raise 
1000 pounds for the support of the Rev. Samuel Dix and 
his family, the present year, including his salary." His salary, 
by the contract, was X66 13s. 4d. At the town meeting, 
March 6, 1780, the town voted that "labor on the highways 
be .£6 a day till the first of September, after that, £4 10s., 
and July 4, "Voted, X6000 to make up Mr. Dix's salary to 
4th of September next." At the town meeting, March 5, 
1781, "Voted, That labor on the highway be 40 dollars a 
day till the first of September, oxen 30, and carts 10 dollars 
a day. These facts show how little success attended the 



1781. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 99 

stipulating of prices, in that town ; some of the same character 
appear in the records of Mason. For example, April 20,, 
1780, an assessment was made of "the Continental and State 
tax for the present year," the amount being £13,948 10s, 9d. 
Iq. Of this tax, the assessment to Deacon Amos Dakin 
was £110 6s. Id. 2q. August 4, 1780, a tax was assessed 
"to purchase beef for the continental army" of £15,000, 
September 12, 1780, "Voted, To raise £14,000 to pay the 
soldiers that were hired in July last, making in all £42,948 
10s. 9d. Iq. assessed in one year, for State and Continental 
purposes. A committee was appointed to purchase the beef. 
At a meeting December 6, 1780, Capt. Joseph Barrett, for 
that Committee, made a report, that " the prime cost of the 
beef which the committee purchased for the town, was 
£11,750." February 6, 1781, an order "to pay Nathan 
Wood £25 10s. for a pair of overhals delivered to Deacon 
Amos Dakin, for one of the soldiers." March 26, 1781, an 
order "to pay Oliver Scripture £90 for two sheep delivered 
to one of the three months' men, for the year 1780. May 
25, 1781, an order to pay "Richard Lawrence £470 for a 
cow which he delivered to the selectmen, for the purpose of 
paying Abraham Merriam part of his hire for three years' 
service." June 8, 1781. In a warrant committing a "rate of 
£528 3s. 5d. Iq., it being our State tax for the present year," 
are set forth the various currencies then afloat, and the rate of 
allowance in each, as follows: "The whole to be paid in bills 
of the new Emition, or in notes of ten pounds, or of iive 
pounds issued by the authority of the State, commonly called 
soldiers" bounty notes, which were dated before the last day 
of April, 1777, estimating one pound of said notes equal to 
one pound of said bills, or in such of the notes issued by the 
authority of said [State], commonly called depreciation notes, 
as were due on the 31st day of December, 1780, with 
compound interest on said bounty and depreciation notes, 
estimating one pound of said depreciation notes equal to one 
pound sixteen shillings and sixpence of said new bills, pro-. 



100 HISTORY OP MASON. 

vided tliat the same are paid into the treasury by the last day 
of June instant ; or in the old bills emitted by the State or 
by Congress, estimating X40 of said bills equal to one pound 
of the bills last emitted." 

The faster prices were raised, the faster the currency went 
down. Here are four kinds of paper money, differing in 
value as compared with each other, at rates ranging from 
par, up to forty for one. In short, so worthless was the cur- 
rency, that it would take a sack full of paper notes, to pay 
for a pipe full of tobacco. The evil became intolerable, and 
a resort was had to silver money. September 13th, 1781, 
" Voted, To raise £40 silver in lue of £3000, raised at the last 
annual meeting, to defray town charges." For State and 
Continental taxes, the State treasurer was bound to receive 
the paper money at the rates above specified ; but to defray 
the town charges with £3000 of that currency, was found 
impracticable, and so its place was supplied with the very 
modest tax of £40 silver. The bubble burst, and prices 
resumed their former moderate and reasonable rates. 

December 6th, 1779. At town meeting of Mason and 
Raby, Dea. Amos Dakin was chosen representative. 

April 10th, 1780. The main purpose of the meeting was, 
to procure and forward to the state government, the evidence 
of the services, and payments by the town, for services of sol- 
diers. David Blodgett, Joseph Barrett, and Obadiah Parker, 
were chosen a committee "for the matter about the services 
of the soldiers, &c. ; and to petition the general court, for 
liberty to tax wild land." "Put to vote, to see who would 
carry the receipts the continental soldiers gave, to Exeter, 
the cheapest, with the accounts of the same ; Mr. Joshua 
Davis bid it off, for two hundred dollars." The object in 
asking for liberty to tax wild land, probably was, to enable 
the town to tax the unimproved lands, of the original grantees 
of the town, which, by the terms of the grant, were exempted 
from taxation, until improved. For many years, the assess- 
ments and tax bills after this period, had a list of rates 



1781. MUNICIPAL HISTORY, 101 

headed "Lord's Proprietors," in which these lands were 
included. 

June 27th, 1780. At the town meeting "Voted, To raise 
four men towards completing the battalions of this State, in 
the continental army, and that the selectmen hire the men on 
the town's cost. Appointed Abijah Allen, Capt. Joseph 
Barrett and James Scripture a committee to procure our pro- 
portion of beef, for the army." 

"The selectmen of Mason, being called upon to raise and 
send forward soldiers immediately, into the public service, 
without loss of time, immediately notified the town's people, 
to meet at the meeting house on July 3d, 1780." 

This is the record in the book, instead of the ordinary 
record of the warrant for a town meeting. The record goes 
on to say, "Met, and chose a committee to hire six men for 
the term of six months, into the public service, and two, to 
go to Coos, for six months," 

July 11th, 1780, "Voted, to reserve six acres for the 
meeting house and common, the form to be square, and the 
house near the centre ; and to sell all of the lot east of the 
road, and appointed a committee to make the sale, and give 
the deed," 

October 31st, 1780, "Voted, To allow creditors 90 for 
one in the war rate. Voted, To fence the burying ground, 
and chose Ens, John Wood, Lt, Swallow and Capt, Benj, 
Mann a committee for that purpose." This was the burying 
ground on the road from the meeting house, to Townsend. 
See p. 65. 

February 6th, 1781. "Voted to raise four men towards 
completing the continental army." 

May 7th, 1781. Chose Benjamin Mann to represent the 
town in the convention at Concord, to form a constitution. 

June 9, 1781. It appears from orders given, that Jonathan 
Foster, Joseph Wilson, son of Edward Wilson, and Abijah 
Eaton, were soldiers. 

August 14, 1781. "Voted, To hire preaching, and to raise 
14 



102 HISTORY OF MASON. 

twenty pounds silver for tliat purpose, and adjourned to the 
21st. Then Voted, To reconsider the vote to hire preaching, 
and adjourned to the 28th. Then Voted, To hire preaching 
and to raise £20, liard money. Voted, To leave it to Mr. 
Aljijah Allen to pay or not, as he pleases, and chose Deacon 
Hall, Joseph Mcrriam and Ens. John Wood, committee to 
hire preaching." 

September 13th, 1781. "Voted to raise X40 silver, for 
the purpose of clearing and fencing the school lot, that the 
meeting house stands on," and a committee was chosen to lay 
out the money. It was to be paid in labor, if the payer 
chose. " Voted that man's labor be 3s. 4d., and ox labor 2s. 
a day." 

November 1st, 1781. <'The selectmen made a rate of X18 
Is. 2d. Oq. L. mo. silver, for the purpose of purchasing sixty- 
three and a half gallons of West India Rum for the use of 
the Contlneiitial army." 

November 15, 1781. Benjamin Mann was chosen to repre- 
sent Mason and Raby, at Exeter. 

January 2, 1782. "Voted, To direct the committee to 
hire preaching, to apply to Mr. Kimball to supply the pulpit 
for some further time. Voted, to engage him for three months. 
Voted, Not to allow seats for the singers to sit together. 
Voted, To choose another querister to assist in setting the 
Psalm, and chose Amos Dakin, Jr." 

February 12, 1782. Voted, That the selectmen "strain on 
the Treasurer amediately." 

By orders, given in February and March, 1782, it appears 
that Joshua Richardson and Simon Fish were soldiers for the 
town in 1779 and 1780; Zebulon Dodge, in 1779, and Jacob 
Weatherbee, in 1780. 

March 11, 1782. Annual meeting. "Voted, To hear Mr. 
Kimball six Sabbaths after the time he is now engaged for. 
Voted, to seat the meeting house, and that the committee 
have reference to age, and the last year's invoice, in seating 
the meeting house." 



1782. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 103 

By orders, given in March and April, it appears that Joseph 
Herrick, Benjamin Mann, Ephraim Nutting-, Ebenezer Blood, 
Jr., Asa Blood and Reuben Ilosnier, were soldiers in the 
service for the town. 

April 30, 1782. A meeting was called, ^'To see whether 
the town Avill concur with the church in giving Mr. True 
Kimball an invite to settle in this town as a gospel minister.'' 
At the meeting, "It was put to the town by the moderator, 
whether any person had any objection to the town proceeding 
in concurrence with the church, to give Mr. True Kimball an 
invite to settle in this town for their gospel minister. — 
Voted, To give Mr. Kimball an invite as above. Accord- 
ingly, the moderator called for the votes to be brought in, 
yeas or nays ; the votes being called, not one negative vote 
appeared." It was also "Voted, To exempt Mr. William 
Dodge for his poll paying any tax to the minister rate. 
Voted, To give Mr. True Kimball one hundred and eighty 
pounds L. mo. as settlement, and to be two years in paying 
said settlement. Voted £66 13s. 4d. to be paid yearly, as 
salary. William Eliot and Abijah .Mien dissented in the face 
of the meeting, against the two above votes of settlement 
and salary, as a town. Reason, because to go on by way of 
a town, and to use coercive measures, obliges persons to help 
support a man, that the major part of the people, in any town, 
shall see fit to hold as their minister ; whereas, the said Eliot 
and Allen think the gospel is free, and every person has a 
right to hear, where he can be best edified ; if so, then to 
choose his own teacher, and to support him and no other." 
A committee. Ens. John Wood, Capt. Benjamin Mann and 
Capt. Joseph Barrett, were appointed to wait upon Mr. Kim- 
ball, with a copy of the above vote ; and the meeting was 
dissolved. 

The vote under date of June 9th, 1781, to leave Abijah 
Allen to pay or not as he pleases, and this dissent of Wil- 
liam Eliot and Abijah Allen, are the first indications, upon 
the records of the town, of the prevalence of baptist senti- 



104 HISTORY OF MASON- 

ments in tlic town. Mr. Eliot was the fii'st minister or elder 
of the Baptist church, soon after formed in the town. 

''On August ye 18th, 1782, Mr. True Kimball gave his 
answer to ye town of Mason (to their calling him to settle 
with them in the ministry) in the negative. 

"Attest: Wm. Eliot, Town Clerk." 

August 28, 1782. Town meeting. Sixth article. "To see 
if the town will allow those men that served in the conti- 
nental army three years, the sum of money that was taken 
out of their wages, and the town is now credited for, or do 
what the town think proper in the affair." The town "Voted, 
To allow Mr. David Fuller the sum of money that was taken 
out of his son Ezra's wages, by the court, and the town is 
DOW credited for in the State tax." 

December 3, 1782. "Proceeded to take under considera- 
tion the bill of rights and plan of government. Chose a 
committee to revise the abovesaid constitution, and make 
what remarks they think proper, and make report to the town 
at some future day. Chose Deacon Amos Dakin, David 
Blodgett, William Eliot, Ens. John Wood, Joseph Merriam, 
Samuel Smith, Joseph Barrett, Abijah Allen and Timothy 
Wheeler, for said committee. Voted, to ratify the north 
west corner of Mason, according to the agreement of the 
selectmen with the selectmen of the other towns. Voted, To 
take that part of the State tax, which is over paying the State 
treasurer (by reason of a certificate that came from the State 
treasurer, on account of the town's paying soldiers' bounty 
and wages), to defray town charges. Adj'd to the 16th. 
Then Voted, To dismiss William Eliot as clerk, and chose 
David Blodgett, town clerk, P. T." 

"Voted, Not to accept of the constitution as it now stands. 
Voted, To accept of the bill of rights, with the amendment 
of the 28th article. Voted, To accept the constitution with 
the following amendment, and then the meeting was dis- 
solved." No paper or record has been found which shows 
what these several proposed amendments were. 



1783. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 105 

The perambulation of the west liae of the town is recorded 
as follows : 

'■'On October the 28th, A. D. 1782, the selectmen and com- 
mittee of the town of New Ipswich and the selectmen of the 
town of Mason, met at the north west corner of said Mason* 
and after establishing said corner, proceeded to perambulate 
the line between said towns, and agreed tliat the stake and 
stones south of Mr. Edmund Town's, about 25 rods, to be a 
bound between said towns. Also, that a maple tree is a 
bound ; said tree stands south of the road, that leads from 
Dea. Dakin's to New Ipswich, from thence to a heap of stones 
in Lt. Stratton's pasture, and so on to a heap of stones south 
of the road that leads from said Stratton's to said Mason, 
then to a stake and stones on the north side of the great 
road below Mr. Pierce's, from thence to the road that leads 
from Col. Hale's to Prospect, a heap of stones on the south 
side of said road, and from thence to the corner of said 
towns, viz : the south west corner of Mason and the south 
east corner of New Ipswich. Said corner is a heap of stones 
on the Province line, with a large hemlock tree marked, fell 
down on said stones. 

Joseph Parker, ^ Committee 
Benjamin Hoar, > for 

Paul Pritchard, ) New Ipswich. 

William Eliot, ^Selectmen 
Samuel Smith, > of 
Joseph Merriam, ) Mason. 

A true entry, per me, 

Wm. Eliot, Town Clerk." 

To this perambulation reference is had in the vote "to 
ratify the north west corner of Mason," passed December 
3, 1782. 

March 10, 1783. Annual meeting. "Chose Mr. David 
Blodgett and Benj. Mann, Esq., to take care of what was blown 
off the meeting house, namely : boards, shingles, nails, &c. 
Voted; To mend the meeting house, and chose Jacob Blodgett, 



106 HISTORY OP MASON. 

James Wood and Thomas Robliins, a committee to mend the 
meetini^ house. Voted, To double board the part that the 
wind blew the roof of from." 

May 26, 1783. Order "To pay Capt. Wm. Chambers 4s. 
L. mo., it being for two mugs of Philp, that the arbitrators 
had, that set on the dispute that the town had with Ensign 
Joseph Ball, and for two mugs that the Selectmen had when 
they venducd the shingles and nails that blew from the 
meeting house." 

December 9, 1783. Chose Benjamin Mann, Esq., to repre- 
sent Mason and Raby. 

November 3. [No year.] Town meeting. "Voted, To 
raise X32 lis. 4d., to pay the cost of building the bridge by 
Mr. John Stevens' saw mill." This is probably the mill near 
Frederic Jones'. 

. March, 1784. Annual meeting. "Voted, That £40 be 
added to what was raised to hire preaching the ensuing year, 
in order to pay the ministers that the town oweth, and that 
the selectmen be directed to assess the same as soon as pos- 
sible, and it shall be called the ministers' rate, and that the 
constables be ordered not to take any order for said rates, but 
what shall be given by the ministers ; and shall be ordered to 
pay the same to the treasurer." 

Benjamin Mann was chosen to represent Mason and Raby. 

July 19, 1784. Town meeting. The second article was, 
" To see what measures the town will pursue to find a candi- 
date to supply the pulpit, inasmuch as the committee have not 
been so happy as to find any. This article was inserted by 
request of Enosh Lawrence and others. The town voted to 
pass it over, probably thinking the committee competent to 
their duty. 

At this meeting, it was "Voted, To make up to Mr. Samuel 
Abbott, for his son Ebenezer's bount}', as good as the State 
would [have] paid him if the town had not been credited for 
the same ; in State notes, on interest, or other pay, as we 
may agree." 



1784. ^ MtJXICIPAL HISTORY. 107 

August 19tli, 1784. An order "to pay Capt. W. Chambers 
for keeping Mr. Bailey and Mr. Emerson, three Sabbaths." 

October 5, 1784. "Voted, To build a meeting house for 
the use of said town. Voted, To set the house on Captain 
Chambers' hill, above his orchard, if the town and he, the 
said Chambers, can agree to exchange lands for that purpose. 
Voted, To choose a committee of three men to agree on the 
aforesaid exchange. David Blodgett, Benjamin Mann, Esq., 
and Dea. Amos Dakin, were chosen for the aforesaid commit- 
tee. Then the meeting was adjourned to Monday, the 18th 
instant. At the adjournment, Voted, That the meeting house 
shall be raised sometime in the month of June, 1786. Voted, 
That the said house shall be fifty five feet long and forty five 
broad, the height to be in proportion to the bigness. Voted, 
To provide boards, sliing:les, nails and glass, window frames, 
and all materials for finishing the outside of said house, by 
the time affixed for the raising. Voted, To accept the report 
of the committee that was chosen to exchange lands with 
Captain Chambers, which was to exchange six or seven acres 
off the south west corner of the school lot, for the same 
quantity of acres on the top of said Chambers' hill. Voted, 
To choose a committee to compute the quantity of stuff it 
will take to finish the outside of the house, and the cost of 
the same. Chose William Hosmer, Jacob Blodgett, David 
Blodgett, Joseph Woods and Benjamin Mann, for said com- 
mittee." Adjourned to November 10, at which time neither 
the moderator nor the warrant could be found, and nothing 
more was done. 

The site selected for the house, at this meeting, was one 
commanding a view hardly to be surpassed in New England, 
embracing a great portion of the counties of Middlesex and 
Worcester, and including the whole valley of the Nashua river 
and its branches. On the north west the Grand Monadnock, 
on the south west Watatook and Wachusct, and on the north 
the Jo English hill in New Boston, and on the east a long 
sweep of the valley of the Merrimack river, formed portions 



108 HISTORY OF MASON. 

of a landscape worthy of admiration. But it seems difficul- 
ties arose, and objections Avere made to the site, and it was 
eventually abandoned. At a subsequent meeting, December 
16, 1784, it was '-'Voted, To build a meeting house, and to 
set it about twenty feet north of the old one." This was 
not satisfactory, for the record proceeds to reconsider that 
vote with a proviso, "That there be an article inserted in the 
next Avarrant for the annual meeting, for the town to deter- 
mine where it shall stand. Chose a committee to provide 
stuff for the window frames and sashes ; Benjamin Mann, 
David Blodgett, and Samuel Smith." 

November 1, 1784. An order to pay Capt. Chambers for 
entertaining ministers, namely : Messrs. Langdon, Whitman, 
Bruce and Dix. 

In the History of New Hampshire Churches, it is stated 
that Mr. Bruce, who was settled at Mont Yernon, received a 
call to settle at Mason. No evidence of that fact appears 
upon the records of the town or church. This order shows 
that he was employed by the town as a preacher. 

March 15, 1785. An order "to pay Capt. Thomas Tarbell 
<£1 2s., it being for boarding Mr. Bruse and his horse three 
weeks in October, 1784. Also, March 21, for monies paid to 
Phinehas Wright." 

Warrant for the annual meeting, March, 1785. Article 4. 
"To see if the town Avill supersede a vote of a late town 
meeting, for setting a meeting house upon Capt. Chambers' 
hill, and determine where said meeting house shall stand. 

At the meeting, it was "Voted to supersede a vote of a 
late town meeting, Avhich was to set a meeting house upon 
Capt. Chambers' hill. Voted, To set the meeting house 16 
or 20 feet north of the old one. Voted, To waive the 
building of a meeting house till we can agree better." The 
record states, that at this meeting, "37 votes for Mr. George 
Atkinson, for a president of the State," were given. The 
meeting adjourned to March 21, at which time it was "Voted, 
To withdraw the vote for senators and proceed to a new 



1786. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 109 

choice. There were 61 votes for John Preston, Esq., 60 for 
Benjamin Mann, Esq., and one for Matthew Thornton. Voted, 
To withdraw the vote for a President and begin again. 
There were 44 votes for George Atkinson, Esq., for Presi- 
dent." Also, "Voted to take the above vote respecting a 
meeting house under consideration for debating. Voted, The 
above vote for setting the meeting Iiouse 16 or 20 feet north 
of the old one, siiall not stand. Voted, The proposed 
meeting house stand about four or live rods south or west of 
south [of the present place.] Then, Voted, To raise X300 
to builcl a meeting house with. Voted, To build a bridge over 
the brook near i\Ir. John Stephens' saw mill. Chose Jonas 
Fay, Stephen Lawrence and William Hosmer a committee to 
build it ;" and thereupon, this somewhat extraordinary meet- 
ing was adjourned. It would be considered, in these days, a 
great stretch of power, for a town to vote to supersede 
ballotings, which had taken place at a former meeting, for 
governor and senators, and try it over again, which seems to 
have been done in this instance, without objection. The 
result was, to increase the vote for governor, (then styled 
president.) How the original vote stood for senators, is not 
recorded ; nor is any clue left for even a conjecture, as to the 
reasons of this anomalous proceeding. 

June 10th, 1785. An order "to pay Abijah Allen £1 
for boarding Mr. David Daniels, while preaching in town." 

October 1st, 1785. An order "to pay Jonathan Chandler 
10s. in full, for going to Concord after Mr. Whipple, to supply 
the pulpit." 

September 3d, 1785. At a town meeting, the town 
"Voted, that the town will take good merchantable rye, in 
Leu of the town and minister tax, to be delivered at Dea. 
Amos Dakin's, at any time from the first of November, to 
the last of December. Dea. Dakin to take it, at 4s. per 
bushel, and give receipts." 

March, 1786. Annual meeting. Benjamin Maun chosen 
to represent Mason and Raby. 
15 



110 HISTOHY or MASON. 

November 2, 1786. Town meetinc^. Article 2. "To see 
if the town will accept the plan proposed to make paper 
money, or point out any other method for the same, as they 
shall think proper." On this article, the town "Voted, Not to 
make any paper money." The vote so laconically recorded, 
would seem to be conclusive of the wishes of the town, but it 
was not so, for, 

December 4, 1786, another town meeting was called aliout 
paper money. The action of the town is recorded as follows : 

"Voted, Not to have paper money on the plan proposed 
by the court. No. 17; none appearing for said plan. ^o. 11 ; 
not for paper money on any plan. No. 3 ; for said money on 
some plan." 

The meeting house controversy comes back again. At a 
town meeting May 28th, 1787, it was "Voted, to build a 
meeting house. Voted to set it just back of the old meeting 
house. Then voted to reconsider the last vote, and to choose 
a committee to say where it shall stand, chose Maj. Abiel 
Abbott, Timothy Farrar and Daniel Emerson, Esqs., and 
chose a committee of live to wait on the committee, and 
chose for that purpose, the selectmen, Benjamin Mann, Esq. 
and Samuel Smith." 

September 4th, 1787. At a town meeting "Voted, to 
accept the report of the committee, on the place for the 
meeting house. Voted, that the selectmen assess the money 
raised for that purpose." 

"Voted, that the selectmen assess one hundred and fifty 
of the three hundred pounds raised heretofore, for the pur- 
pose of building the meetinghouse, and chose Benjamin Mann, 
Esq., Lt. James Scripture, Mr. H. Russell, Elias Eliot and 
Joseph Woods a committee to affect the purpose of build- 
ing a meeting house in the town." The selectmen were 
ordered "to furnish the committee a copy of the assessment, 
and that the receipt of a majority of the committee, or of 
the chairman, shall be sufficient to discount with the consta- 
bles for each ones tax." 



1789. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. Ill 

March 30tli, 1788. Chose Obadiah Parker to represent 
Mason and Raby. It appears by the record of the warrant 
for this meetmg, that it was issued by the selectmen of Mason, 
alone. The record shows their warrant, directed to '-the 
freeholders, and other inhabitants paying taxes in the town 
of Raby, to meet at the meeting house in Mason, for the 
choice of a representative." 

June 16th, 1788. ''Voted to build the meeting house on 
the plan proposed by the committee. 

Voted to let out the west part of the school lot, to Dea. 
Amos Dakin for fifteen years, [for] his clearing and fencing 
the same with stone wall, 4 ft. 4 inches high." This contract 
was not carried out. Dea. Dakin died April 28, 1789. 

May 4th, 1789. "Voted, that the Selectmen stake out the 
spot for the meeting house. Voted to set the front according 
to the three north stakes, set up by the Selectmen. 

"Voted to postpone the building of the meeting house, 
till the first day of August, providing Mr. Kendall's business 
will submit to it." 

Mr. Kendall was of Ashby, was a celebrated master 
builder, a faithful and a good workman. It seems his busi- 
ness would not submit to the postponement, for it appears 
by the following letter, which is inserted as illustrating the 
times and characteristics of the people, that early in Septem- 
ber of that year, the meeting house was raised. The letter 

is directed to Sr. Hill, Preacher in Ashby. The title. Sir, 

was once commonly given to graduates of universities. It 
seems to have been the English equivalent of the Latin Domi- 
nus, or Magister ; but was, perhaps, exclusively bestowed on 
the clergy; [See the Odorherty Papers.] To return to the 
letter. The original is in the hand writing of Jonathan 
Searle, Esq., and is as follows : 

" Much respected Sr. B[ill, 

We in the Capacity of a Town's Com- 
mittee for building a meeting House in Mason, take this method 
to wait upon you with our sincere Regards for your Person 



112 HISTORY OP MASON. 

and Wellfare, and with our earnest Desire (as we expect with' 
the Leave of Providence, next Week on Wednesdaj^ to begin 
raising the meeting House in this Town) that you would give 
us the Pleasure of waiting on you in town next week on 
Tuesday at farthest, since it is agreed upon, you should lead 
in Prayer early the next Morning. Pray Sr. don't disappoint 
us of this our desire, as you will much oblidge your humb. 
Servts. ^ Chairman 

Bexjamin Mann, > of Said 
) Com'tee. 
Mason, August ye 29th, 1789. 

The above letter is copied verbatim from the original, pre- 
serving the orthography, punctuation, abbreviations, and use 
of capital letters. It was once a custom with English writers 
and printers, to commence every noun with a capital letter, 
which rule has, except in a few instances, been observed in 
this letter, and the common error of the illiterate, of com- 
mencing with capital letters other words than nouns, is sedu- 
lously avoided. The service requested, it is reported, was 
performed, in an appropriate manner and with due solemnity. 
This letter further brings to mind a distinguishing character- 
istic of our fathers, a feeling, and a ready public acknowl- 
edgment of, their dependence on the divine blessing in all 
their ways. The letter is one of the earliest documentary 
evidences that has been found of the connection of Mr. Hill 
with the affairs and interests of the people and town. It 
was not, however, his first appearance on public service in 
the town, where he preached four or more Sabbaths, com- 
mencing in April, 1789, but was, at the date of this letter, 
preaching in Ashby. 

The raising of a meeting house in a country town was a 
matter of no small moment. As the records of Mason have 
preserved no details of the preparations for and of the pro- 
ceedings on this occasion, resort will be had, as in former 
instances, with much profit, for interesting details of vari- 
rious matters and proceedings, to the records of Townsend. 



1789. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 113 

At a town meeting in that town, on May 28, 1770, it was 
"Voted, That the commite chosen to take cair for the raising 
of the new meeting house, be directed to provid jins and 
roaps necessary for the same, and also to choose such hands 
to raise the same as they think proper, and make suitable 
provision for their entertainment as they think proper at their 
discretion ; and also to provide some person that can splise 
roaps if they break, all at the town's cost, except their 
services in town." 

The next proceeding of the town of Mason on record, has 
an intimate connection with the subject of the preceding 
page. 

At a meeting, called October 15, 1789, and adjourned to 
October 19, the record states as follows : Then the town did 
concur with the church, in giving Mr. Eben'^. Hill a call into 
the work of the ministry. No negative. Voted, To reserve 
"the ministry rite of land in the town, for the use of the 
town." 

Voted, one hundred and fifty pounds settlement to Mr. 
Hill, provided he should accept the call of the church and 
town ; one half of the above to be paid in money, the other 
half in neat stock and farm produce, one half in one year 
after his settlement, and the other half in the next year 
following. 

Voted sixty six pounds, thirteen shillings, and four pence 
yearly, as salary dui-ing his ministry with us. Chose Jona- 
than Searle, Esq., Lt. Obadiah Parker and Capt. Isaac Brown, 
a committee "to wait on Mr. Hill, with the above proceed- 
ings." 

In the meantime, without waiting for the result of tjiis 
action, the business of building the meeting house went on. 
At a town meeting, December 14, 1789, " Voted, To accept a 
plan of the body pews, drawn by Lt. Kendall, and of the 
wall pews, by Lt. James Wood, and to sell the pews by 
vendue ; that the purchaser of a pew below, should pay twelve 
shillings, and of a pew in the gallery, six shillings, as a for- 



114 HISTORY OF MASON* 

feiture for not paying for the pew. Chose a committee to 
give and take security, Jonathan Searle, Benjamin Mann 
and Joseph Merriam, and at an adjournment, [apparently after 
the sale,] then proceeded to business, to wit, for each man 
that purchased a pew, to give in to the town's committee to 
build the meeting house, what articles he would procure 
against next April, necessary to finish said house." 

The following is a copy of the proceedings of the church 
in Mason, in making choice of Mr. Hill to become their pas- 
tor, and in presenting their call to him, to the work of the 
ministry with them. 

"Oct. 13th, 1789. At a church meeting. Rev, Samuel Dix 
of Townshend, was chosen moderator for the said meeting. 
After prayer, the church chose Mr. Eben'. Hill for their pas- 
tor and teacher, and determined to invite him to take the 
oversight of them, and the people of this place, as their 
minister. 

"Voted to choose a committee, to wait on Mr. Eben^ Hill, 
and inform him of the above determination of the church ; 
chose for that purpose, Deacon Nathan Hall, Mr. Jason Dun- 
ster and Mr. Samuel Smith. 

"Voted that Deacon Hall, the standing moderator of the 
church, communicate to the inhabitants of the town, at their 
meeting on thursday next, a copy of our proceedings at this 
time, with respect to the choosing, and calling, of Mr. Eben^ 
Hill to settle with us in the ministry of the gospel. 

Attest, Samuel Dix, moderator." 

On the margin is the state of the vote of the church, as 
follows : 
."Deacon Nathan Hall, yea. John Russell, yea. 

Jason Dunster, yea. Edmund Tarbell, yea. 
Samuel Smith, yea. Hubbard Russell, yea." 

Also, is added on the margin: "Capt. William Chambers, 
John Winship, Hinksman Warren, Jonathan Bachelder, Abel 
Adams, Joseph Woods, Timothy Dakin, members of other 
churches, expressed their desire that Mr. Eben^ Hill should 



1790. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 115 

settle here." These brethren were then resident in the 
town, and afterwards united with the church. 

Februar)^ 16, 1790. The town "Voted, To provide thirty 
cords of wood yearly, for Mr. Hill, so long as the town can 
procure the same without a tax, and if that measure should 
ever fail of providing said thirty cords of wood as above, 
then the town will add to his salary so much as to make it 
seventy five pounds, lawful money, yearly, during his ministry 
in said to^vn. 

" Voted, To pay Mr. Ebenezer Hill one half of the settle- 
ment the said town voted him October ye 15th, 1789, in six 
months after his ordination in said town, the other half in 
eighteen months after said ordination, provided he should be 
in necessity for the same. 

"Voted, That Mr. Joseph Merriam and Joseph Barrett 
wait upon Mr. Hill with the above proceedings of the town." 

Mr. Hill had preached several months in Marlborough, N". 
H., and been called by the church in that town to become their 
pastor, and the town, at a meeting held November 30, 1789, 
by their vote, concurred in the action of the church. This 
call he had under consideration at the same time as that of 
Mason ; after due deliberation, he declined the call of the 
church in Marlborough, and accepted the invitation of the 
church and people of Mason, to become their pastor and 
minister. 

The following is a copy of his answer : 
^^To the church of Christ and peojile in Masoii: 

"My Christian brethren and Friends, 

" It hath pleased Almighty 
God so to order in his Providence that I have been called to 
preach the Gospel of Christ among you, — I have been so 
long time with you as to give all an opportunity, who are so 
minded, to have personal acquaintance with me, and to be 
acquainted with my sentiments, and public performances ; as 
it is now about 15 months since I first came among you, and 
it has pleased you, unworthy as I am, to invite me to settle 



116 HISTORY OF MASON. 

with you in the work of the Gospel Ministry. It is [a] long 
time since 1 have had your call under consideration, and the 
longer perhaps, as 1 have been so unhappy, as to have another 
call, at the same time from another church and people, but I 
hope and trust I have made it a matter of serious and 
prayerful enquiry, seeking direction from the Father of Lights 
— and considered it, as it is, a most solemn and important 
undertaking, and who is sufScient for these things ? 0, to 
have the charge of Souls is a most awful charge ! Since if 
any perish, thro' the carelessness or unfaithfulness of the 
Watchman, his blood shall be required at the Watchman's 
hands; — and to be guilty of the blood of souls is dreadful! 
I hope I am, in some measure, sensible of my insufficiency of 
myself, for such an undertaking — that all my own strength is 
weakness, and that my sufficiency must be of God, who 
chooseth the weak things of the world to confound the wise. 
I trust he hath called me to this work, therefore relying on 
his mercy and grace, and requesting and depending upon your 
prayers for me, that I may have grace to be fomid faithful, 
and be more and more furnished for the work, and depending 
upon your assistance as fellow helpers to the truth, I accept 
of your invitation, provided there shall arise no matter of 
difficulty before any further relation may take place. Again 
I request, brethren, pray for me, that I may be willing to 
spend and be spent in the service of Christ ; that I may be a 
faithful Minister of the New Testament — and a helper of 
your joy. And may the pure religion of Jesus Christ prevail 
everywhere, in this town in particular, that God may be glori- 
fied among us is the prayer of 

Your Humbl. Servt. in the Lord, 

Ebenezer Hill." 

This document is without date, but was communicated to 
the town, probably, in July or August, 1790. 

While these proceedings were in progress, the affairs of the 
meeting house were in hand. At a meeting, March 8, 1790, it 
was "Voted, To dismiss the committee to build the meeting 



1790. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 117 

house, and chose in their stead, Joseph Merriam, Hubbert 
Russell and Lt. James Wood." 

September 23, 1790. In the warrant for the meetino;, the 
second article was, "To see what time the town will prefix 
for the ordination of Mr. Ebenezer Hill into the work of the 
Gospel Ministry. 3d. To see what provision the town will 
make for said ordination." 

At the meeting, "Voted, That Mr. Ebenezer Hill be absent 
two Sabbaths in a year, yearly, if it may not be in his power 
to procure a supply. Voted, To accept of Mr. Ebenezer 
Hill's answer upon the Invitation of the Church and Town to 
settle with them in the work of the Gospel Ministry. 

" Voted, That Wednesday, the third day of November next, 
be the day prefixed for the ordination of Mr. E. Hill into 
the work of the Gospel Ministry in this town. 

" Voted, To send to seven churches to assist in the solem- 
nity of the ordination, viz : 

To the Church of Christ in 
Rindge under the Pastoral care of the Rev. Seth Payson, 
Hollis, " " " Daniel Emerson, 

New Ipswich, " " " Stephen Farrar, 

Pepperell, " " " John Bullard, 

Wilton, " " " Theophilus Fiske, 

Temple, " " " Noah Miles, 

Townsend, " " " Samuel Dix. 

"Voted, To pay five dollars down, and the other part of the 
one half of the cost for entertaining the council, in money, in 
three months ; the other half to be paid in rye, at 4s. per 
bushel, and corn at 3s. per bushel, the whole to be paid in 
three months from the ordination. Voted, To give Benjamin 
Mann, Esq., five pounds for entertaining the council, with all 
other gentlemen of the clergy, and Mr. Hill's relatives and 
friends, that may attend the ordination. Chose Lt. Obadiah 
Parker, Jonathan Searle, Esq., and Dea. Nathan Hall, to send 
letters missive to the several churches above mentioned." 
16 



118 HISTORY OF MASON. 

The Slim tlms to be paid for entertaining the Council, &c., 
amounted to $16,GG. 

These preparations having been made, the ordination was 
conducted in due form. The council met on the 2d day of 
November, 1790. The following is a copy of their proceed- 
ings. As such documents are rarely to be found in print, 
this will be looked upon by such as feel an interest in the 
minutia of the ecclesiastical proceedings of the New England 
churches, with a deeper sentiment than that of mere curiosity. 

" An Ecclesiastical Council, by virtue of letters missive 
from the church of Christ and congn. in Mason, desiring their 
advice and assistance in the ordination of Mr. Ebenezer Hill, 
to the work of the Gospel Ministry among them, on Wednes- 
day, the 3d day of November, 1790; consisting of the follow- 
ing churches of Christ, Viz. : ye chh. of Christ in HoUis, ye 
chh. of Christ in New Ipswich, ye chh. of Christ in Towns- 
end, ye chh. of Christ in Wilton, ye chh. of Christ in Pep- 
perell, ye chh. of Christ in Rindge, and ye chh. of Christ in 
Temple, met as requested, at the house of Benjamin Mann, 
Esq., in said Town, on the evening proceeding said day. 

''After some deliberation upon the subject of their meeting, 
Voted, To embody, and made choice of Rev'd. Daniel Emer- 
son as moderator, who led the council in prayer to God for 
light and direction upon the important occasion. Then the 
council made choice of the Rev'd John Bullard as scribe, and 
proceeded to consider the call of the church and people to 
Mr. Hill, to the pastoral office among them, and his answer to 
said call, and being satisfied as to the regularity of both, they 
examined the candidate for ordination as to his qualifications 
for the work of the ministry, and his views in undertaking it, 
carefully attending to his confession of faith. Then voted to 
adjourn till next morning at nine o'clock. 

"Wednesday, A. M. Met according to adjournment. After 
prayer, the council being satisfied as to the character, senti- 
ments, qualification and views of Mr. Hill, upon the church 
receiving him into their holy fellowship and repeated requests 
to have the pastor elect separated to the work to which he 



1790. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 119 

was called, Voted, Nem. con., to proceed to liis ordination, 
(and he was ordained accordingly.) 

"Mar., Nov. 3d, 1790. John Bullard, Scribe. 

"N. B. The solemnity was introduced with prayer, by 
Rev. Mr. Fiske ; Rcv'd Mr. Payson preached npon 2 Cor. 5 ; 
20. Rev'd Mr. Emerson made the ordaining prayer. Rcv'd 
Mr. Farrar gave the charge, Rev'd Mr. Dix gave the right 
hand of fellowship, Rev'd Mr. Bullard made the closing 
prayer." 

Here it may be proper to remark, that these proceedings 
were in full accordance with the principles of congregational- 
ism ; that is the absolute independency'of each church. The 
candidate was not ordained, until he became a member of 
the church; and being such, was by the church chosen as their 
pastor and teacher, and at their request, being one of their 
brethren, was by the council, set apart and ordained as their 
pastor. This land mark of the order, is not now so carefully 
preserved, as it should be. It is apprehended that it will be 
found, in many instances, that the pastors of congregational 
churches, are not members of their churches. If the notion 
prevails, that by being ordained over the churches, they by 
that act become members of the churches it is one that has 
no foundation in Congregationalism, and is at total variance 
with its fundamental principles and doctrines. 

This connection between the pastor and church thus formed, 
proved to be a happy one. It continued with the town till 
December 19th, 1835 ; when the civil contract with the town, 
was, at his request, dissolved. Of the church he remained 
pastor, till his decease. May 20th, 1854. 

December 2d, 1790. At a town meeting " Voted, To sell 
the old meeting house at vendue, exclusive of the sash and 
glass. Voted, That the men that built pews in the old meet- 
ing house, hold them as their property." John Brown became 
the purchaser. He was a merchant. He removed it to the 
south side of the common, at the foot of the hill on which it 
formerly stood ; and placed it at the corner, on the west side 



120 HISTORY OF MASON. 

of the road leading to Townsend ; where Freeman Elliot's 
house now stands. It was occupied as a dwelling house and 
store by Mr. Brown, and afterward by Thomas Whiting and 
Jabez Prescott; for the same purpose. 

It was afterwards occupied by Henry Jefts, and perhaps 
some otherS; as a dwelling house, till it was purchased by 
Hollis Amsden of Mr. Parkman, who resided in Charlestown. 
Mr. Amsden occupied it for many years as a dwelling house 
and turner's shop. He sold it to Aljraham Hobbins, by whom 
it was taken down, removed, and set up again where it now 
stands, on the farm formerly occupied by Seth Bobbins, a 
little way off from the road leading to Townsend. 

Up to this period, the town had been but poorly furnished 
with school houses. Being provided with a meeting house 
and a minister, attention was now directed to the schools, 
one of the most important institutions in New England. 

At a meeting March 14, 1791, it was "Voted, To raise 180 
pounds to build school houses, viz : 20 pounds for each school 
district," and a committee was chosen, consisting of Jonathan 
Searle, Benjamin Mann, Obadiah Parker, Reuben Barrett, 
Samuel Smith, Jotham Webber, Stephen Lawrence, Oliver 
Scripture, John Lawrence, James Scripture, Joseph Saunders, 
David Hall and Joseph Barrett, to divide the town into 
school districts, and fix the place in each for the school house. 
Their report was made and accepted, and recorded. The 
town was divided into nine districts, the description and 
numbers of which will appear in a subsequent chapter. 

The next interest which the fathers looked after was, to 
put in order the grounds around the new meeting house. At 
the meeting March 14, 1791, it was "Voted, That a single 
head pay one shilling, and other estates accordingly, towards 
wharfing around the meeting house, and making a parade." 
It was further " Voted, That it be assessed and put into sepa- 
rate columns, in the surveyors' lists, and committed to the sur- 
veyors; the price of work per day and utentials, as for 
highway work." Benjamin Mann, Isaac Brown and James 



1791. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 121 

Wood, were chosen a committee, to direct the surveyors 
what work should be done ; and it was further ordered, "that 
it be done by the 10th of June next." " The making the 
parade/' was preparing the ground for a training field. 

Now appear the first symptoms of a division in town 
affairs, which afterwards was the occasion of much trouble 
and heart-burning ; that is the taxing the Baptists for building 
the meeting house. If the house had been built solely for 
public worship, there would seem to be no good reason to 
require those who did not use it for that purpose to pay the 
expenses of the erection ; but that rule would apply to some 
who did not pretend to be Baptists, but from indifierence to all 
religious teaching, or for other reasons, absented themselves 
from public worship. All these persons were ready enough 
to use the house for secular purposes, and in those days, 
when town meetings were seldom less than a dozen a year, 
the use of the house for that purpose, was almost as impor- 
tant in itself, and was quite as wearing and destructive to the 
building, as its use for religious purposes. 

August 22, 1791. In the warrant for the meeting, the 
second article was, "To see if the town will direct the 
selectmen to order the constables who have demands on the 
Baptists in this town, or other towns not belonging to this 
State, to make distress immediately on such delinquent 
persons, of that denomination, as have not paid their several 
taxes to the minister or the meeting house, in the town, or to 
see if the town will strike upon measures of an amicable 
nature with the Baptists, respecting their said taxes, as they 
appear fond of the latter, but entirely averse to paying either 
of said taxes, except being obliged by law, unless happily 
agreed to by the parties." This article exhibits an amusing- 
jumble of ideas. The doings of the meeting partook some- 
what of the same character. It was "Voted, That the 
Baptists have the liberty to pay their proportion of the first 
assessment of £150, or not to pay anything at all. Voted, 
That the non-resident Baptists pay their proportion of the 



122 HISTORY OP MASON. 

above tax of XI 50, or he liable to be called upon for tlic 
whole of the tax now assessed against them to said meeting 
house. Voted, ; That the Baptists in town and out of the 
State, be exempted from paying any minister's tax made 
against them since the first invoice after they can procure a 
certificate that they have joined a sect or denomination of 
Baptists." On the 27th of September, at another meeting, 
the vote respecting the Baptists out of the State, was recon- 
sidered, and a vote passed to exempt the Baptists out of the 
State from paying anything to the tax for building the meeting 
house. The result was, as appears by the records, that those 
who had not paid were excused, and those who had paid 
received back their money out of the treasury, by orders 
drawn in their favor. 

The titles to the lands in the to^vn were granted upon the 
express condition that the town should, within a specified time, 
build a meeting house, and, as is undoubtedly implied in those 
terms, should maintain it and rebuild it as often as necessary, 
and as the grantors had given valuable lands, for the ministry 
and the support of the ministry in the town, the undoubted 
intention of which was, that the town should support a minis- 
ter, and as the town had enjoyed the full benefit of that grant, 
and had sold the ministry land and received the money for it, 
the town was morally, if not legally bound to maintain a 
minister, and continued to be so liable, until the laws of the 
State abridged the powers of the towns in this particular. 
There can be no doubt, that the conditions of the grants and 
the acceptance of the charter by the original grantees, made 
their lands chargeable with the burdens of building and main- 
taining a public meeting house for the town, and that all who 
held lands under this grant, or derived their title from the 
original grantees, under this charter, held them subject to 
those charges. No change had then been made in the law, 
with regard to the house ; and it is doubtful if any had been 
made concerning the support of the minister which would 



1793. MUNICIPAL HISTOEY. 123 

exonerate the owner of lands in town from the payment of 
assessments on their lands for this purpose. Such being the 
fact, one knows hardly which most to admire, the confidence 
with which the claim, on the part of the Baptists, to be 
exempted from the expenses of building the house, were 
urged, or the readiness with which the other inhabitants took 
upon themselves the whole burden of building and keeping in 
repair the meeting house. 

March 12, 1792. Annual meeting. Obadiah Parker was 
chosen to represent Mason and Raby. 

May 20, 1792. "Voted, To sell Dr. Wm. Barber a part of 
the parade ground at the rate of 52s. per acre." 

At a meeting, this year, an article of the warrant was, " To 
see if the town will give leave to introduce the small pox by 
inocculation, and to set up a hospital." '• Yoted, Not to have 
the small pox brought into town, by any person or persons 
being inoculated. Yoted, not to have a hospital set up in 
said town." 

March meeting, 1793. Chose Joseph Merriam "To repre- 
sent the town of Mason." The population of the town had 
now become large enough to be entitled to choose a repre- 
sentative, and to Mr. Merriam belongs the honor of being the 
first representative, under this apportionment. No citizen of 
Mason was ever more worthy of this mark of the confidence 
of his townsmen. Mason, as has already been stated, was 
for many years classed with Raby, for the choice of a repre- 
sentative. In those years in which no mention is made in 
Mason records of the choice of a representative, there is no 
doubt that the representative chosen was an inhabitant of 
Raby and that the choice is recorded in Raby records. 

At this meeting, John Brown was chosen collector for the 
whole town. He refused or declined to serve, and a meeting 
was called July 8, 1793, to choose a collector in his room. 
At the meeting, "Voted, Not to excuse Mr. Brown. Voted, 
That he pay a fine of 203. Voted, To accept an order of 
20s. upon the town treasurer, from the Rev. Mr. Eben''. Hill, 



124 HISTORY OF MASON. 

for said 20s." Siicli was the law of the land ; persons chosen 
into town offices who refused or declined accepting the office, 
were liable to be fined, unless excused by the town. 

At a meeting in September, the town "Voted, To have two 
companies of militia in the town of Mason. Voted, To 
have the town divided for that purpose, according to the 
tax bills." 

At the annual meeting, March 10, 1794, Obadiah Parker 
was chosen to represent the town. The ninth article in 
the warrant was, "To see if the town will let Benjamin 
Mann, Esq., have that old road formerly trod by Mr. Brintnall 
Witherell's shop near to the bridge, by Mr. John Brown's 
Pirlash, or pay said Mann for the road as now trod on said 
Mann's land." The town voted to give him the old road for 
the new one. Mr. Brown's pearlashery stood on the south 
side of the road on the east side of the stream, below the 
bridge, near the present residence of Mr. Ephraim Russell. 

March meeting, 1795. Joseph Barrett was chosen repre- 
sentative. 

May 18, 1795. "Voted, To each man who shall turn out 
as a volunteer in the service of the United States, for the 
term of one year, 12s. bounty, and to make up the wages to 
$10 per month." This bounty was paid by the town, to the 
following persons : Samuel Merriam, Elisha Buss, Ezra New- 
ell, Aaron Wheeler, Jr., Thomas Bobbins, Jr., Joseph Mer- 
riam, Jr., Capt. James Wood. 

October 22, 1795. "Voted, To have the meeting house 
dedicated on Thursday, the 26th day of November next, if 
agreeable to the Rev. Mr. Hill, and that the selectmen assist 
Mr. Hill in making entertainment for the ministers." On the 
26th day of November, 1795, in pursuance of this vote, the 
meeting house was dedicated. No record has been preserved 
of the proceedings on that occasion. In the memoir of the 
Rev. Mr. Hill, will be inserted a fac simile of the first page 
of his sermon preached at the dedication. 



1795. 



MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 



125 



The view of the house, here presented, -was drawn from 
recollection, many years after the building was taken down ; 
but it exhibits the appearance and proportions of the edifice 
so truly, that none familiar with its sacred form will fail at 
once to recognize it. 












FRONT VIEW OF THE OLD MEETING HOUSE. 



" Our meeting-house — our meeting-house, 

It stood upon a hill, 
"Where autumn gales and wintry blasts 

Piped round it loud and shiill. 
No maple tree -with leafy shade, 

Nor tall, protecting oak, 
Stood near to guard the ancient house 

When tempests round it broke. 

No steeple graced its homely roof, 

With upward-pointing spire; 
Our villagers were much too meek 

A steeple to desire. 
And never did the welcome tones 

Of Sabbath morning bell, 
Our humble village worshippers 

The hour of worship teU." 

These lines, taken from the History of New Ipswich, describe so 
happily and perfectly, the Mason meeting house, that it is impossible 
to resist the impulse to use them, a liberty which it is hoped the 
author of the lines and the editor of the book, will pardon. 

n 



126 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



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1795. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 127 

GROUND PLAN OF THE GALLERY. 



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NAMES OF PEWHOLDERS. 

GROUND PEWS. 



No. 


No 


1 Benjamin Mann, Esq. 


24 


2 Joseph Merriam. 


25 


3 James Wood, Esq. 


26 


4 John Whitaker. 


27 


5 Oliver Hosmer. 


28 


6 Dea. Rogers Weston. 


29 


7 Captain James Scripture. 


30 


8 Stephen Lawrence, Esq. 


31 


9 Abel Adams. 


32 


10 Timothy Wheelock. 




11 Jonas Fay. 


33 


12 Dea. Nathan Hall and Jeremiah Boynton. 


34 


13 Samuel Smith. 


35 


14 Timothy Wheeler. 


36 


15 Captain Jesse Barrett. 


37 


16 Captain Joseph Barrett. 


38 


17 Thomas Tarbell, Jr. 


3U 


18 Jonathan Searle, Esq. 


40 


I'J Capt. Benjamin Barrett and Dea. Hezekiah 


41 


Richardson. 


42 


20 Silas BuUard. 


43 


21 Jason Dunster, Jr. 


44 


22 Thomas Hodgman. 


45 


23 Lieutenant John Swallow. 


46 



Joseph Woods. 
Deacon Noah Winship. 
Captain John Barrett. 
Samuel Townsend. 
Jason Russell and HoUis Amsden. 
David Brown and James Brown. 
John Winship. 
Samuel Merriam, Esq. 
Edward Wilson and Captain Thomas Wil- 
son. 
Ebenezer Shattuck. 
Jonathan Bachelder. 
Caplain Amos I'lagg. 
Jonathan Williams. 
John Swallow, Jr. 
Hinksman Warren and Samuel Hill. 
Lieutenant Obadiah Parker. 
Joseph Tufts and Jason Dunster, Senior. 
Deacon Timothy Dakin. 
Doctor William Barber. 
Hubbard Russell. 
Elias Elliot. 
Joel Ames. 
Reverend Ebenezer Hill. 



GALLERY PEWS. 



1 Captain Samuel Smith. 

2 Amos Holden. 

3 Captain Sam Stevens Parker. 

4 Joseph Saunders and John Blodgett, Esq. 

5 Seth Bobbins. 

6 Major Abijah Elliot. 

7 Nathaniel Boynton. 

8 Deacon Timothy Dakin. 

9 Amos Russell. 

10 Ezra Brown and Capt. Artemas Manning. 

11 James Wood, Esq. 



12 William Barrett. 

13 Captain Ebenezer Hodgman. 

14 Lieutenant Joses Bucknam. 

15 Josiah Flagg. 

16 Joseph Blood. 

17 James Withee and Micah Russell. 

18 Ezra Merriam and Ephraim Russell. 

19 Captain Samuel Withington. 

20 Stephen Lawrence, Esq. 

21 Lieutenant Ebenezer Gilmam 

22 Amos Blood. 



128 HISTOEY OP MASON. 

The meeting house, a view of which appears on page 125^ 
was by the vote of the town, to be fifty five feet long, and 
forty five feet wide. It was constructed with galleries on 
three sides. At each end was a porch, with two doors, one 
on the west, and one on the south side in one, and one on the 
east, and one on the south side in the other. From each 
porch, a door led into the main body of the house below, and 
two flights of winding stairs, one from each outer door con- 
ducted to the second story of the porch, from which a broad 
flight of steps in each porch, without a door, led into the 
gallery of the house. The accompanying ground plan, will 
give a better idea of the division of the house within, than 
any length of description. The outside was finished with 
very prime clapboards, and painted, the color having a slight 
tinge of yellow, making a straw color. The windows were 
large, the panes, eight by ten glass. The doors all panelled, 
the front double, the porch doors single. The finishing inside 
was ceiling, up to the bottom of the windows. The walls 
above, and ceiling overhead, of plaster; the fronts of the 
galleries were finished witii panelled work, and a heavy cor- 
nice ; the whole supported by Ionic columns, on which rested 
the heavy oaken beams, which furnished the groundwork of 
the galleries. These beams were planed and painted, and 
not enclosed by the plaster. The posts were very large, 
extending the whole height of the house, and projecting into 
the house ; towards the top, where they were to receive the 
beams, they were enlarged, somewhat like the capital of a 
column. They were of the finest white oak timber, and 
finished and painted like the gallery beams. The pews were 
square, of panel work, with a balustrade of miniature Ionic 
columns. The pulpit was finished with panel work, outside 
and in, with angles and curves, which would tax the skill of 
an artist to describe in words ; surmounted by a sounding 
board, octagonal in form, also of panel work, in the highest 
style of art of that day. All the work was in the best style, 
and of the best material. The following description, taken, 



1786. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 129 

with a few cliangeS; from the description of the old meeting 
house in New Ipswich, in the History of New Ipswich, will 
present a vivid picture of the inside of the house, and of the 
worshippers. The pulpit was lofty ; the ascent to it was by 
a flight of stairs outside, with a balustrade of Ionic columns, 
of a larger size, but similar in form, to those used in the con- 
struction of the pews. It had a recess or rostrum, in which 
the speaker stood ; behind him, was a curtainless arched win- 
dow; above him, the sounding board hung near his head, 
suspended from the ceiling by an iron rod, so slender as to 
have excited in many a youthful mind, apprehensions of its 
falling, and speculations' of the consequences of such a disas- 
ter : beneath him, in front of the pulpit, were the deacon's 
seats, in a sort of pen, where they sat facing the congrega- 
tion, with the communion table hanging by hinges, in front of 
them. The pews were about six feet square ; a row of hard, 
un-cushioned seats, surrounded the interior, and generally, 
there was one or more high-backed, flag-bottomed chairs in 
the centre, most usually occupied by the grand-mothers of 
the family, a shake of whose head, had a wonderful effect in 
reducing to instant sobriety, any youngster, attempting any 
trespasses upon the solemn decorum of the place. The seats 
were hung by hinges, so that they might be turned up as the 
congregation rose, at prayer, as was tKe goodly custom of 
our fathers ; and the slam-bang, as they were turned care- 
lessly down, at the close of the prayers, not unlike a volley 
of musketry, was no inconsiderable episode in the ceremonies. 
Behold now the congregation, as it assembles on the Sab- 
bath. Some of them are mounted on horses; the father, 
with his wife or daughter on a pillion behind him, and perhaps 
also his little boy astride before him. They ride up to the 
stone horse-block and dismount. The young men and maid- 
ens, when not provided with horses, approach on foot. They 
carry in hand a rose or a lilac, a pink, a peony or a pond-lily, 
(and this was the whole catalogue of flowers then known) or 
what was still more exquisite, a nice bunch of fennel or cara- 



130 HISTORY OP MASON. 

way seeds. Instead of this, in winter, they bear a tin foot- 
stove, containing a little disli of coals which they have care- 
fully brought from home or filled at some neighboring house 
or noon-house ; and this was all the warmth they were to 
enjoy during the two long hours of the service. They have 
come a long distance on ox-sleds, or perhaps have skimmed 
over the deep, untrodden snow on rackets. They enter the 
house, stamping the snow from their feet and tramping along 
the uncarpeted aisles with their cow-hide boots. Let us 
enter with them. The Avintry blast howls and shrieks around 
the exposed building ; the ill-fastened windows clatter ; and 
the walls re-echo to the thumping of thick boots, as their 
wearers endeavor to keep up the circulation in their half 
frozen feet, while clouds of vapor issue from their mouths ; 
and the man of God, as he raises his hands in prayer, must 
needs protect them with shaggy mittens. So comfortless and 
cold, it makes one shudder to think of it. In summer, on 
the contrary, the sun blazes in, unscreened by blind or cur- 
tain ; the sturdy farmer, accustomed to labor all day in his 
shirt sleeves, takes the liberty to lay aside his coat in like 
manner for the more serious employments of the sanctuary; 
especially is this the case with the singers, who have real 
work to perform. 

Every man is in his appropriate place ; for it was little less 
than sacrilege, in the days when the Sabbath was kept with 
all puritan gravity and severity, to stay away from meeting, 
let the weather be what it might. 

The prayers are offered ; the sermon begins, and advances 
by regular approach up to 8thly, and even to IGthlyj the 
elderly men, unaccustomed to long sittings, occasionally 
standing erect or leaning against the partitions of the pews^ 
to relieve the fatigue of their position ; Tate and Brady is 
lined off, two lines at a time, by a person selected for the 
purpose, and sung with good nasal twang and hearty good will 
to some good old tune. Wells or St. Martins ; and, finally, the 
benediction is pronounced. The congregation still remains 



1790. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 131 

in its place to go out in prescribed order : first the minister 
— and as he passes the deacons, they follow — then those in 
the front seat below, and at the same time those in the front 
gallery seat and those in the pews — then those in the second 
seat, and so on in successive order. Would that a like deco- 
rum in this respect could be substituted for the impatient and 
irreverent rush of modern days. They separate for a short 
intermission and to dispatch their lunch of dough-nuts or 
apples ; in summer they stroll in the graveyard, to hold silent 
converse with those who sleep there, and impress the lesson 
of their own mortality; and in winter those from a distance 
take refuge before the blazing hearth of some friend in the 
village, and are perhaps regaled by a hospitable mug of cider ; 
and soon all are reassembled for the afternoon service. 

After this, they wend their way home, to partake of a 
hearty warm dinner, the best of the week, in most instances 
too, prefaced by an exhilerating draught of hot toddy; and 
finally "to say the Catechism." That Westminster Assem- 
bly's Catechism ; who that was trained in the early part of 
the century will forget it ! Its pictorial alphabet of aphorisms, 

In Adam's fall we sinued all ; 

My Book and heart shall never part, — 

the story of John Rogers, with the picture of the martyr at 
the stake, surrounded by the grim officials, and, standing near, 
his wife and nine children, certain ; (whether the one at the 
breast was one of the nine, or one to be added to that num- 
ber, was a problem too deep for youthful minds to solve,) 
Agur's Prayer ; and Dialogue between Youth, Christ and the 
Devil; — it was the only book beside the Bible and Psalm 
Book allowed in the hands of youth on the Sabbath. The 
Catechism concluded the religious observance of the day. 
Then the children were let loose, and in summer, all the 
family walked over the farm to observe the crops and salt 
the cattle. 

As those who were actors in these almost forgotten scenes 
recall them, with a thousand associations which it is impossi- 



132 HISTORY OF MASON. 

ble to recount, it must seem almost a dream ; and those who 
are now in the morning of life would doubtless smile could 
these old times and customs be but once presented in reality. 
But they were good old times ; and the Sabbath and the 
sanctuary were then regarded with a strictness and reverence 
Avliich we should be glad to see observed in our day. 

The meeting house was so far finished that it was used at 
the ordination of Mr. Hill, November 3, 1790, and from that 
time to the time of the dedication, it continued to be used 
for public worship. The date of the year of the erection 
of the house appeared in large, gilded figures, 1790, on the 
capital of the two columns supporting the gallery, one on 
each side of the aisle in front of the pulpit, the position of 
which, in pews five and six, is indicated by the mark ° in the 
plan, on page 126. It was probably nearly completed at that 
time. Why the dedication was deferred till 1795, is not 
stated ill any record or memorial of the times. This house 
continued to be occupied by the church and congregation over 
which Mr. Hill was settled as minister, till November, 1837, 
when a new society having been formed under the laws of the 
State, in connection with the church, and a new house built for 
their use in a more convenient and eligible locality, they 
removed to it, abandoning the old house. It continued to be 
used by the town, as a town house, for town meetings, and 
occasionally, by other societies and denominations, as a place 
of worship, until the town house was built in 1848, soon after 
which, it was sold and removed. It stood upon the top of the 
hill where the road leading to Brookline leaves the Wilton 
road. The locality, although at first it appeared pleasant and 
suitable for a village, proved wholly unfit for such purpose, it 
being impossible to dig cellars or wells, by reason of the 
ledges cropping out too near the surface. The first plot 
occupied in the town for a graveyard, was in the rear of this 
house; and after a few years it was abandoned, for the same 
reason. Some of the dead, originally deposited there, were 
removed to the burying ground south of the centre of the 



1798. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 133 

town ; others still rest in their lonely graves. A few monu- 
ments, the oldest in town, remain to mark their places of 
repose. 

March meeting, 1796. Joseph Barrett was chosen repre- 
sentative. 

March meeting, 1797. Joseph Barrett was chosen repre- 
sentative. 

''Voted, To make a present to the Rev. Mr. Ebenezer Hill, 
of the obligation he gave the selectmen, dated March 13, 
1793, for $105. Voted, To leave the fixing of the burying 
grounds to the selectmen, provided they can have a sufficient 
title from Thomas Tarbell, of that burying ground near said 
Tarbell's house." 

June 23d, 1787, sundry orders "To Capt. TVm. Chambers, 
£5 15s. lid. 2q., it being for sundries he let the Rev. Mr. Dix 
have, and also for dining the Rev. Mr. Whitman, and keep- 
ing his horse ; also for answering Mr. Whitman's order upon 
the town or selectmen, and for Lt. Farley's rats, that was 
abated, and for boarding Mr. Dix." 

September 4th, 1787. Capt. Wm. Chambers X2 19s. Id. 
it being for boarding several ministers, and finding the com- 
mittee that was chose to place the meeting house, a dinner, 
and for paying the Rev. Mr. Dix for preaching on fast day." 

December 11th, 1787. "Joseph Merriam, for boarding Mr. 
Jesse Remington, 5s. Od. Iq." 

April 26th, 1788. "Hubbert Russell 7s. paid Mr. Warren, 
and for boarding Mr. Warren 3 weeks and three days, XI 7s." 

June 16th, 1788. "Jonathan Searle for keeping school, £1 
12s. Od. Oq." 

June 21st, 1788. Eleazer Fish, "for a pair of steers he 
turned in to the town, to pay a debt due to Mr. Whitman for 
preaching, £9 5s." 

October 9th, 1788. To Wm. Chambers, "for paying a note 
to Mr. Jesse Remington, and for paying a debt to Mr. Nahum 
Sargent, and for keeping Mr. Aiken's horse and Mr. Reming- 
ton's horse, £5 6s. 6d." 
18 



134 HISTORY OF MASON. 

December 5th, 1788. Lt. James Wood, in all, £2 8s., "for 
boarding Mr. Nathan Church;" another order, "for boarding 
Mr. Church, 6s., and for paying him 7s." 

February 2d, 1789. Isaac Brown, two orders, in all £2 6s., 
" for a saddle he let the town have, to pay a debt due Mr. 
Benjamin Green, for preaching." 

February 16th, 1789. William Chambers, 13s., "for drink 
for the committee, when they vendued the timber for the 
meeting house." 

March 17th, 1790. Order, To pay Jonas Fay 3s. 4d., 
"for a pound of tea, he let Mrs. Betty Locke have, towards 
her keeping school in 1788." 

March 12th, 1791. Aaron Wheeler, "for his meetinghouse 
tax in 1789, 12s. lOd. 3q." 

April 28th, 1791. Order to pay Dr. William Barber £2 
8s. 9d., "for keeping school in the South District in 1789." 

January 31st, 1792. William Eliot, "for his meeting house 
tax in 1789, 12s. 2d." 

Messrs. Eliot and Wheeler were Baptists, and their taxes 
were abated, pursuant to the order of the town. See page 
122. 

1793. John Brown, "for two palls, or funeral cloths, X2 8s." 

1795. The following persons were paid 12s. each, for 
bounty, for enlisting as volunteers ; Samuel Merriam, Elisha 
Buss, Ezra Newell, Aaron Wheeler, Jr., Thomas Bobbins, Jr., 
Joseph Merriam, Jr., Capt. James Wood, James Withee, 
according to the vote of the town. See page 124. 

1796. Order "to pay Capt. Joseph Barrett $4,19, it being 
so much he paid at Hopkinton court in December, 1796, with 
his own money, for a lawyer to speak respecting the north 
road, to our petition, for entering said petition, and for being 
recognized twice at said courts, and for expenses of myself 
and horse." It must be admitted, that, for all these items, it 
was a very moderate bill. This is the first time the federal 
currency appears in the town's accounts. 

November 17th, 1797. "The Selectmen, ordered the 



1799. MUNICIPAL HISTOEY. 135 

Treasurer, to pay S. M. 25 cents in full, for killing a crow, 
the town, by a vote, allowing the same." 

A bill for articles furnished for building a school house, by 
Timothy Dakin, a merchant in the town, the following prices 
appear, of this date. Board nails, 8s. per m ; shingle nails, 
2s. 4d. per m ; double tens, 6s. for 500 ; a pair of door hinges, 
4s. 6d. ; a bushel of lime, 2s. 6d. 

In December, 1798, eleven persons petitioned the select- 
men to call a town meeting, ''To take some measures to 
petition Congress in regard to the land tax," the petitioners 
''■ viewing it to be unequal and injurious to the rights of the 
people." A meeting was held December 13th, 1798, pursuant 
to this petition, and the subject considered, and Dea. Jotham 
Webber, John Blodgett, Joseph TufFts, Dr. Joseph G-ray, 
and Dea. Rogers Weston, were appointed a committee to 
petition to the Court, &c., for redress of grievances, &c., 
and the meeting was adjourned four weeks. At the adjourn- 
ment, " Proceeded to read the report of the committee," &c., 
and then ''Voted, Not to be so much dissatisfied with the 
land tax, so called, as to petition Congress upon the subject." 

Most of the persons appointed on this committee, were 
leading men in the democratic party in the town. The land 
tax, one of the measures of John Adams' administration, was, 
with that party, very unpopular. No doubt the design of this 
movement was, to encourage and incite opposition to his 
administration. The report of the committee, which was 
read, is not found in the records, or on file. The manner in 
which it was disposed of by the town, at the adjournment of 
the meeting, shows that the object of the petitioners was not 
favored by the citizens. 

April 5, 1798. Orders. Maj. James Wood, $4,17 in full, 
for his "procuring and conveying articles for Mr. John 
Goddard, such as rum, sugar, raisins, and other necessary 
articles when he was sick, and for making and carrying a coffin 
to his house for said Goddard." 

March 9, 1799. "Benjamin Mann, eight dollars in full, for 



136 HISTORY OF MASON. 

making a piece of road [near] Mrs. Chambers', and for liquor 
at the vendue of Mary Jefts, and doing writing when the 
selectmen received a deed of John Smith and for toddy at 
the time, and for liquors at the vendue of the town land and 
pound, and the wall round the graveyard, and assisting at 
said vendue, and for one cord of wood, delivered at the school 
house in the centre district, for 1798." One would think 
that for all this, eight dollars was cheap enough. 

March 20, 1799. James Withee's taxes abated. "The 
town favored him on account of his losing his barn and rye 
and hay by iire." 

The municipal history is now brought down to the close 
of the eighteenth century, also to the close of the first half 
century of the proprietary and corporate existence of the 
town ; within which time, the forest has been subdued, the 
roads have been made, the mills, meeting house, school 
houses, and farm houses and barns, have been built, and the 
town and church, with all their institutions, put into success- 
ful operation. In the extracts from the records and com- 
ments upon them thus far given, the object has been, to let 
our fathers, as far as might be, become their own historians ; 
therefore, whatever it was judged would exhibit the charac- 
teristics of the people and of the age, and would illustrate 
their manners, habits, customs, and modes of thought, and 
way of managing their affairs in church and state, has 
been freely used for that purpose. The municipal history of 
the next fifty years will occupy much less space. It is, in 
itself, less note worthy, less important, and less illustrative 
of the manners of the people. To pursue it in as full detail 
as has been given to the preceding period, would occupy 
space required for other matters, and would swell the book to 
a size beyond what was contemplated. Besides, it is but fair 
to leave something for the historian of the next one hundred 
years. It is a remark worthy of consideration, that those 
communities are by no means the happiest which furnish the 
greatest amount of materials for the historian's page. 



1809. MUNICIPAL HISTOEY. 137 

At a town meeting, November 5, 1804, "Chose Thomas 
Wilson and Joseph Winship saxtons." 

March 12, 1805. Annual meeting. After the choice of 
moderator, "Then chose Col. James Wood and Mr. Joseph 
Merriam, a committee to wait upon the ReV. Mr. Eben^ Hill, 
in order to open the meeting with prayer. Then Voted, 
That all the voters should take the east side of the meeting 
house before they voted, and pass to the' other side when 
they voted, so as to change sides when they carried in a vote." 
This extraordinary measure indicates that a fierce struggle 
for party ascendency was impending. This year, for the first 
time, a democratic majority was found in the town. The 
votes for governor were, for Gilman, federalist, 64; for 
Langdon, republican, 64 — a tie. For Senator, J. K. Smith, 
republican, 64; for Frederic French, federalist, 63. For 
counsellor, Benjamin Pierce, republican, 71 ; for Phillip 
Greeley, federalist, 54. "Voted, To add one hundred dollars 
to the Rev. Mr. Eben^. Hill's salary, for this year only." A 
similar addition of one hundred dollars to his salary was 
voted in 1807 and in 1808. This custom of inviting the min- 
ister to attend and open the annual meetings with prayer 
was observed many years. It may be justified by the same 
reasons as the employment of chaplains by legislative bodies. ' 

1809. The law of the state required the towns to make 
provision for the feeding of the militia on the field, at the 
regimental musters. It was the custom for the selectmen to 
make a schedule of the provisions required, and let the fur- 
nishing by auction, to the lowest bidder. Several of these 
schedules are recorded. That of 1809, is copied as a sample. 
"Provisions for the soldiers, at the muster at Temple, On 
Oct. the 6, 1809, Viz: One hundred weight of good beef, to 
be well cooked, that is, either roasted or baked; one bushel 
of good wheat, made into good bread, and one bushel of good 
rye, made into good bread; twenty five weight of good 
cheese ; five gallons of good West India Rum ; five pounds of 
good lofe sugar; one barrel of good new cider; all to be at 



138 HISTORY OP MASON. 

the mustering field, at Temple, by the time that the battalions 
meet on Friday, the 6th day of Oct., 1809," bid oflf by Josiah 
Russell, at $24,50. Well docs the writer, though then but a 
lad, remember, on the gathering of the companies around the 
cart, upon the para'de ground, getting a generous slice of the 
beef and bread, and a drink of the cider, and probably of the 
rum, for then it was thought to be good for every body, old 
or young. A boy^'s appetite, sharpened by a walk of some 
seven or eight miles, on a raw October morning, would 
have made an indifferent piece of beef and bread an accept- 
able oblation to the god of hunger, if such god there be ; but 
he is ready to testify, even after the lapse of so many years, 
that in this instance, the beef and the bread fully came up to 
and answered the requirements of the schedule. 

September 26, 1815. The town "Voted, To make up to 
the soldiers who volunteered [for the defence of Ports- 
mouth] their wages to $15 a month." 

1816. The small pox appeared in the family of Silas 
Lawrence. The town was at once in commotion. Several 
town meetings were held, in reference to that subject. The 
first was January 29th, at which ''Chose a committee of five 
men, all to consist of such men as have had the small pox, to 
advise with the selectmen on means to be taken to prevent 
the further spreading of the small pox. Chose Jedediah 
Felton, Lt. Joses Bucknam, Ezra Merriam, Joseph Tuffts and 
Dea. Jotham Webber. Voted, That the selectmen give leave 
that two or more persons, not exceeding five, who have had the 
kine pox and have been exposed to taking the small pox, may 
be enoculated with the small pox, provided that Mr. Willard 
Lawrence is willing to have the enoculated persons go and 
remain in his new house until they have gone through [the] 
operation, at their own expense." A second meeting was 
called, February 5, at which it was "Voted, To send for Dr. 
Spaulding, of Amherst, forthwith, to examine L-a Lawrence 
and give his opinion whether he had the kine pox or small 
pox. Then Voted, The small pox committee cleanse the 



1819. MUNICIPAL HISTOEY. 139 

Wid. Abigail Ricliardson's house, and keep it for the purpose 
of putting in any persons who, in the judgment of said com- 
mittee, hath simtims of the small pox, until it be known 
whether they be likely to have the small pox or not. Then 
Voted, To have two more added to the small pox committee, 
and chose Abel Adams and Henry Isaacs." It was the cus- 
tom then, on the appearance of any contagious disease in a 
town, for the selectmen to cause the highways leading by the 
house in which the disease was found, to be closed against all 
passing, by fences across the same, and to cause to be exhib- 
ited at the fences a signal, usually a red flag, as a warning to 
avoid the place. Such precautions were taken in the present 
instance, that the disease did not spread beyond the family 
in which it appeared. Silas Lawrence died of the disease ; 
also his mother, an aged lady. His son, in whom the disease 
first appeared, recovered. The deceased were buried upon 
Mr. Lawrence's farm, as interments of persons who died of 
contagious diseases, were not then permitted in the public 
burying grounds. The funeral services were attended by the 
Rev. Mr. Miles of Temple, the only clergyman in the vicin- 
ity who was qualified, by having had the small pox, to ofiiciate 
on such occasions. 

January 19th, 1819. In the warrant was an article, ''To 
see if the town will vote that each religious society in said 
town of Mason, shall have the use of the public meeting house 
their proportion of Sabbath days, and also at other times." 
The result of the vote on this article is, "Voted, Not to give 
the Baptist Society their right in Mason meeting house." At 
the annual March meeting, the next year, was an article " To 
see if the town will rectify a mistake or erroneous vote, by 
said town, January 18th, 1819," reciting the vote as thus 
recorded. The town "Voted, To rectify the mistake or erro- 
neous vote, and "instead thereof, that we are willing that 
they should have their right in said house." 

How they could claim any right, in a house which they had 
refused to aid in building, and also, to aid in repairing, is a 



140 HISTORY OF MASON. 

problem not easily solved upon any principles that should 
govern the conduct of men. The more sedate and substantial 
men of that society were not in favor of this movement. 
But there are, in every community, some unprofitable persons, 
"whose moving principle of action is, to make mischief and 
disturbance. It is only in scenes of confusion and tumult, 
that they can shine. A state of peace and quiet, is for 
them, a state of insignificance. Although the town had voted 
that, '*they were willing the Baptists should have their right," 
still, nothing further was done. They never appeared to 
claim it. There is no evidence that Elder Eliot or the 
leading men in his society took any interest or share in these 
movements, or that he had any desire to disturb his old 
neighbors and friends in the enjoyment of their rights. They 
never made any claim to the use of the house, or to interfere 
with its occupation. The effect intended was produced. The 
mischief was done. The society, which, under the laws of the 
state, had rightfully occupied the house, at the time it was 
built, and which no subsequent laws had in any manner 
deprived of that right, finding, from this and subsequent move- 
ments in the same direction, that their peace and quiet were 
subject to constant interruption, withdrew from the house, 
and built one for their own accommodation, after a fruitless 
effort, in accordance with a vote of the town, to secure to 
themselves the peaceful and undisturbed occupation of the 
house, in pursuance of which vote they expended a large sum 
of money in repairing it ; and thus the connection between 
the Congregational denomination and the town, which had 
existed from the earliest period of its history, was severed, 
and each religious denomination was left to manage its own 
affairs in its own way. 

March 16, 1820. "Sarah Smith's clothing was allowed to 
be equal to what it was when Mr. Abraham Bobbins took her 
to keep on March 19, 1819." The articles are thus minutely 
described: "Gowns, 1 good silk one, 5 of calico, 1 cambric, 
2 gingham, and 1 woolen ; Petticoats, 2 of wool, 1 cotton, 1 



1821. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 141 

linen, 1 muslin, 1 tow; one good loos coat, 1 green ditto, 
middling good; six good shawls, 4^ yds. of woolen cloatli 
for another, and 1 linen sheet, two good cotton sheets, two 
calico aprons and two pairs of shoes that are not very good." 
One would think this was a pretty good supply of clothing 
for a town pauper. This individual had been maintained by 
the town for many years, and continued to be a town charge 
until she died, April 19, 1754, at the age of ninety six years. 

March, 1820. An order "to pay Benjamin Weatherbee, 
Samuel Wardsworth, Ii-a Hall, Joseph Saunders, Jr., Josiah 
Elliot, Jr., Joseph Woods, Jr., and Elijah Knapp, their bounty 
for enlisting," &c., in 1814. Also, a subsequent order in favor 
of Asa Merriam, John Boynton, Hubbard Amsden, and Elias 
Elliot, Jr., drafted to go to Portsmouth in 1814. 

March meeting, 1821. This was in politics the "era of 
good feelings," indicated by the votes for governor, which 
were, for Samuel Bell 16, Josiah Butler 1, David L. Morrill 
9, Horace Sawtell 3, Joel Tarbell 1, John Kimball 1 ; D. 
Stewart, county treasurer, 71 ; Isaac Brooks, register, 72 ; for 
revising the constitution, yeas 0, nays 71. The people did not 
care a fig for the governor, but the keeping of the money and 
of records of deeds, were matters of consequence, and these 
of&cers got a full vote. Nor would they have the constitution 
meddled with. At this meeting, a vote was passed to pro- 
hibit all horses, neat cattle, sheep and swine from going at 
large in the highways, and from that time the public high- 
ways have ceased to be used as pastures. 

This year, John Blodgett, Esq., declined a re-election to 
the office of town clerk. He was first elected to this office 
in 1799, and continued in office, with few exceptions, till the 
present year, having served nineteen years in all. He also 
served as chairman of the board of selectmen during most 
of the same period, and as such, was charged with the duties 
of town treasurer, and had the oversight of the town's expen- 
ditures. He was a very careful, prudent and economical 
manager of the affairs of the town, and deserved well of the 
19 



142 HISTOEY OF MASON. 

community, for Ms labors and cares in office. A vote of 
thanks, for his long and faithful services as an officer of the 
town, was offered by the Rev. Mr. Hill, and unanimously passed. 
His reply is recorded as follows: ''My friends, accept my 
grateful acknowledgments for the repeated respects you 
have shown me for many years. May it please the Supreme 
Ruler to cause his blessing to rest upon this town, that the 
olive branch of peace may be planted and nourished in every 
breast ; may it become like Aaron's rod, ever budding, ever 
blossoming, ever bringing forth the fruits of brotherly love 
and Christian charity, to the latest generations." He soon 
after removed from the town and resided in Dunstable or 
Tyngsborough, in Massachusetts, to , the close of his life. 
He died in extreme old age, having arrived to nearly if not 
quite one hundred years of age. 

The selectmen of this year seem to have entertained and 
acted upon the notion, that when a town takes a pauper to 
maintain, they take him cum onere, with all his liabilities, and 
become liable therefor, in the same manner as a husband is 
liable for the debts of his wife contracted before marriage. 
April 11, 1826, is recorded an "Order to pay Aaron Warren, 
Esq., $3,71, in full, for a note and account he had against 
Elijah Morse, the town's Poor." Also, May 11, an "Order 
to pay Amos Herrick $5,93, in full, for a note and account he 
had against Elijah Morse in favor of Arrington Gibson, give7i 
to said Gibson previous to said Morse throwing himself upon the 

t0W7l." 

July 10, 1826. A meeting was called "To see if the town 
will let the Baptists have the use of the meeting house a pro- 
portion of the time, according to their polls and estates, or 
to see what otlier measures the town will take to satisfy the 
Baptists with regard to their claims on said house." The 
town "Voted, To pass over the article." 

At the annual meeting, March, 1832, the town voted to 
purchase a farm, on which to support the poor, and chose a 
committee for that purpose, consisting of Timothy Wheeler, 



1832. MUNICIP.iL HISTORY. 143 

Jouatlian Baclielder, Jr., Elisha Barrett, James Taft and John 
Stevens. This committee was authorized to purchase stock, 
farming utensils, &c., and to employ a person to take the 
charge thereof. The committee purchased the farm formerly 
owned by Zaccheus Barrett, and then owned by his son, Capt. 
James Barrett, being lot No. 6, range 5, on the plan. See 
page 32. By the report of the committee appointed to settle 
with the selectmen and treasurer, dated March 10, 1832, it 
appears that the cost of the poor farm, including, probably, 
repairs of and additions to the buildings, was $2500, and that 
of the stock, utensils, furniture, and improvements, was $863. 
This farm has been used for the purposes intended to the 
present time, and has i^urnished a comfortable home for many 
of the aged and destitute, who had outlived their friends and 
means of support, as well as for many others, dependent, 
from various causes, on public charity. 

April 18, 1830. A meeting was called, ^'To see if the 
town will vote that each religious denomination in said town, 
may occupy the public meeting house in said town, their due 
proportion of Sabbaths and other times, in proportion to 
their polls and estates." The vote was in the negative. 

May 31, 1830. A meeting was called, "To see if the town 
will raise a sum of money to repair the meeting house." At 
this meeting, the town voted to give the use of the house to 
the Congregational church and society, for twenty years, pro- 
vided they would keep it in good repair, and let the town 
have the use of it for a town house, and let those who have 
private property in said house, have it to worship in when the 
Congregational church and society are not using it. The 
selectmen \tere a committee to carry the vote into effect, and 
to take a sufficient bond, &c. That church and society 
repaired the house, and occupied it for some time, but it is 
believed that, owing to some disagreement about the terms 
of the bond, none was given. 

At the annual meeting, March, 1832, the town voted to 
pass over the article to raise the salary of the Rev. Mr. Hill ; 



144 HISTORY OP MASON. 

but at a meeting called for that purpose, March 31, the salary 
was voted. A meeting was called, April 21, "To see if the 
tOAvn would dismiss the Rev. Eben'. Hill from being minis- 
ter of said town. The vote was in the negative." 

December 19th, 1835. " Voted, To comply with the request 
of the Rev. Ebenezer Hill, to dissolve the civil contract 
between him and the town of Mason, as minister of said 
town, and it is on our part dissolved, after paying his salary, 
to the month of March next. Voted, The thanks of the town 
be given to the Rev. Ebenezer Hill, for his ministerial labors, 
for the space of forty five years." Upon the record is entered 
the consent of Mr. Hill to this arrangement, as follows : 
" Whereas, the town of Mason, agreab\y to my request, have 
by their vote in legal town meeting, consented on their part, 
that the civil contract existing between the town and me as 
their minister, should be dissolved, as in said vote is 
expressed, which contract was formed in the year 1790, I 
hereby express my consent on my part, that said contract be 
dissolved in accorda.nce with the vote just passed ; and I do 
accordingly relinquish all claim for salary, from the town, 
after the first of March next. Mason, December 19th, 1835." 

November, 1840. Nathaniel Shattuck, Esq., was chosen a 
committee to " examine, and report whether any society or 
individuals were responsible to keep the town house in repair ; 
and if none, to proceed to repair the house, and chose 
Nathaniel Shattuck, Josiah Russell and Samuel Smith a com- 
mittee for that purpose." This was the old meeting house. 

April, 1843. "Voted, to instruct the Selectmen to repair 
the town house, in a proper manner, and also to look after 
those who have in any way injured the house, and prosecute 
if they think proper and necessary." 

Annual meeting, 1848. Article 14th. "To see if the town 
will sell or repair the meeting house, or do anything in rela- 
tion to the same. Voted, to choose a committee of five, to 
dispose of the old meeting house. Chose Jonathan Russell, 
Jona. Bachelder, Oliver H. Pratt, Willis Johnson, Charles 



1848. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 145 

Scripture and Orlando W. Badger. Voted, To instruct tlie 
committee to proceed legally in disposing of the house. 
Voted, That the selectmen call a town meeting to hear a 
report of said committee, when said committee is ready to 
make their report." 

The old meeting house, being no longer occupied for public 
worship by any society, was fast falling into decay. It was 
exposed to depredations, the windows were broken, the doors 
were often found open, exposing the building to the effects of 
storms. The location was unsuitable and inconvenient for 
town meetings to be held there, and therefore it was con- 
cluded to dispose of the old house, and build a town house. 

May 23d, 1848. A meeting was called, to hear the report 
of the committee, to see if the town would ])uild a town 
house, to fix its location, and to raise money to build, or pur- 
chase a town house. At the meeting. Voted, " To accept the 
report of the committee. Voted, To build a town house. 
Voted, To locate it at the centre of Mason. Voted, To raise 
$1000 to build the house. Voted, To appropriate the balance 
of the sale of the old meeting house, for the building of the 
town house. Voted, That the expense is not to exceed 
$1200. Chose Jonathan Bachelder, Charles Scripture, 
Willis Johnson, Asher Peabody and Samuel Smith, Jr., a com- 
mittee for building the town house." The town house was so 
far completed, that a town meeting was held in it, November 
7th, 1848. 

The frame of the old meeting house, was used and worked 
up into the frame of the saw and grist mUl, built by Mason 
mill company, near the centre of the town. 

Thus the town is left without a minister, or a meeting 
house ; and such is the change in the habits, views and feelings, 
that, as a town, they will probably dispense with these once 
useful institutions, for all time. There is to be no more a 
servant of religion, in whom all feel a common interest; 
no more a place where all can assemble on days of public 
worship, and meet as townsmen, on common ground ; but the 



146 HISTORY OP MASON. 

meeting houses are matters of private interest, and although 
they are in numbers much multiplied, it may well be doubted, 
whether there is in the town, more genuine piety and venera- 
tion for religion, than in those days, when all assembled in 
one place, and listened to the teachings of the town's 
minister. 

1856. This year will be remembered in the annals of the 
town, for the very liberal donation to the town, of the sum of 
ten thousand dollars, made by the Hon. John Boynton of 
Templeton, Mass., to be invested in stock or other good secu- 
rities, and the interest to be applied, forever, for the benefit 
of the common schools in the town. This gentleman is a 
native of Mason. His father, the late Jeremiah Boynton, 
became a resident of the town as early as 1789, and contin- 
ued to be an inhabitant till his decease, October 27, 1839. 
He was a farmer, a worthy, industrious man, a good citizen, 
and much respected and esteemed. The liberal donor of 
this fund, was his eldest son. Having retired from active 
business with an ample fortune, acquired by industry, econ- 
omy, and a successful management of his affairs, he has not 
forgotten the place of his nativity ; nor has he left it for the 
hand of an executor to carry into effect his generous design ; 
but while in full health, and vigor of body and mind, has 
himself seen to the execution of his purpose, and to securing, 
in a proper form, the efficiency and permanency of the aid 
thereby given to the great cause of the education, for all 
coming time, of the children of this, his native town. 

The object of his bounty is the common schools, to which 
he was indebted for all the means of education by himself 
enjoyed in early life ; and to which our common country is 
more deeply indebted for its intelligence and for the preser- 
vation of its liberties and free government, than to all other 
means of education, or institutions of learning. His purpose 
to make this endowment, he made known to some of his 
friends, inhabitants of the town, in the summer of 1856. 
Desirous, on the one hand, to make the provisions of the 



1856. MUNICIPAL HISTOEY. 147 

endowment such, that its benefits sliould be sacredly secured 
to its object, the education of every child in town, and at 
the same time to place it under such provisions and safe- 
guards, that it should never become a source of contention 
or party strife, after consultation with a committee of the 
citizens, he submitted, for the consideration of the town, a 
proposition to make the endowment under certain restric- 
tions and limitations, which, with the action of the town, 
appears in the following extract from the records of the 
doings of a town meeting, called for that purpose : 

At a legal town meeting, holden September 17th, 1856, 
"Article 2d, it was Voted, To receive of John Boynton, Esq., 
of Templeton, Mass., the sum of ten thousand dollars in 
money, or in securities for the payment of money, upon the 
following conditions, viz : That the same shall forever be 
kept upon interest, and shall forever be known as <The 
Boynton Common School Fund,' and that the interest or 
income thereof shall annually forever be applied by said town 
of Mason, to the support of district or public schools in said 
town, in proportion to the number of scholars in such 
districts or schools, between the ages of five and fifteen 
years. And whenever the said town shall fail so to apply 
the interest or income of said money annually, in addition to 
the sum that shall be required to be raised by law by said 
town, for the support of district or public schools, the said 
town shall repay the same sum of ten thousand dollars 
to the said John Boynton, his executors, administrators, or 
assigns. 

"Voted, To choose a committee of three to receive the 
said sum of ten thousand dollars in money or securities for 
the payment of money, of said John Boynton, Esq., and also 
to authorize said committee, for and in behalf of said town, 
to execute an agreement, that the said town of Mason shall 
repay the said sum of ten thousand dollars, to the said 
Boynton, his executors, administrators, or assigns, whenever 
the town of Mason shall fail to apply the interest or income 



148 HISTORY OF MASON. 

of said sum of ton thousand dollars, in addition to the sum 
that shall be required by law to be raised by said town, for 
the support of district or public schools in said town of 
Mason, and to divide the said income or interest annually 
between the several districts or public schools in said town, 
in proportion to the number of scholars belonging to said 
districts or public schools, between the ages of five and 
fifteen years. 

"Voted, That the aforesaid committee consist of Doctor 
Thomas H. Marshall, Jonathan Russell, 2d, and Charles 
Scripture. 

"Voted, To choose a committee to petition the legislature, 
for an act to authorize the town of Mason, to choose five 
trustees, who shall, under the direction of the town, have the 
care of the Boynton Common School Fund, and to see that 
the same is safely invested, and upon interest. 

"Chose Dr, Thomas H. Marshall, Jonathan Russell, 2d, 
and Charles Scripture for that committee." 

On application to the legislature, an act was passed, of 
which the following is a copy : 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

An Act authorizing tlie town of Mason to elect trustees of the 
Boynton Common School Fund. 

WJiereas, John Boynton, Esquire, of Templeton, in the State of 
Massachusetts, has given to the town of Mason, the sum of ten 
thousand dollars, in trust, the income of which is to be appropriated 
for the maintenance of common schools in said town of Mason; 
and, whereas, by the provisions of the grant, the said grant is to be 
under the control of five trustees, to be elected by said town of 
Mason ; therefore, 

Be it enacted hy the Senate and House of Representatives in Gen- 
eral Court convened: 

Section 1. That said town of Mason shall, on the second Tuesday 
of March, A. D. 1858, choose, by ballot and by a major vote, five trus- 
tees, to be called Trustees of the Boynton Common School Fund, 
one of whom shall hold the office for one year, another for two years, 
another for three years, another for four years, and the other for five 
years, and till some other person is chosen and qualified instead of 
each; the term of office of each to be determined by lot at their first 
meeting, and a record thereof made in the office of the town clerk 



1857. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 149 

of said town. One such trustee shall be chosen annually, at the 
annual meeting of said town, after said second Tuesday of March, 
A. D. 1858, by ballot, and by a major vote, to fill the vacancy which 
will annually occur by the expiration of the term of office of one of 
the incumbents. 

Section 2. The said trustees shall have the entire control and 
management of the Boynton Common School Fund, and shall invest 
the same in a safe and prudent manner, and shall annually pay to the 
treasurer of said town of Mason, in the month of January, the 
income of said fund, to be divided among the several districts or 
common schools in said town, in proportion to the number of schol- 
ars, between the ages of five and fifteen years, in said districts or 
schools. 

Section 3. The trustees shall, at each annual meeting of said 
town, make a report of the state of the fund, and the income of the 
same ; and the town may require of them bonds for the faithful dis- 
charge of the duties of the office. 

Section 4. In case of the death or resignation of either of the 
trustees, or in case either of them, by sickness or otherwise, be dis- 
qualified for the duties of the office, they may, at the annual or at a 
special meeting called for that purpose, elect another person for the 
unexpired term. 

Approved, June 36, 1857. 



20 



CHAPTER IV. 

CONTROVERSIES WITH THE REV. JONATHAN SEARLE. 

No document, record, or entry, has been found, which 
shows at what thne the troubles and misunderstandings 
between the Rev. Jonathan Searle and his church and people, 
were first manifested ; nor are the grounds of the controversy 
and difficulties anywhere clearly set forth. They are to be 
gathered rather by inference, than from any satisfactory or 
positive statement. The records of the church, during the 
time of the controversy, are exceedingly meagre, and contain 
very little information upon the subject. The town records, 
however, contain entries which give some insight into the 
matter. Probably there is no document or living memory 
remaining, which can throw any light upon such parts of the 
transactions as are not, by the entries in the town records, 
sufficiently set forth to be understood. It will be recollected 
that the salary voted to him on his settlement, was X60 
lawful, a year, to be increased at the end of ten years to X66 
13s. 4d. He was ordained, October 14, 1772. A town 
meeting was called, January 5, 1779. Among other articles 
was one for inquiring "into the conduct of the Rev. Jonathan 
Searle, in his not giving receipts in full for the money he hath 
received for his yearly salary, &c., and for increase of his 
salary." The record proceeds as follows: ''Mr. Searle being 
present. Voted, That the moderator ask him whether he 
would discharge the town of his salary, if said town would 
pay him up the nominal sum from the first settlement, &c., 
and trust the town's generosity for an addition to said salary; 



1778. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 151 

the question being asked by the moderator, his answer was in 
the affirmative. The moderator called on the constables to 
make a settlement with Mr. Searle ; the said constables 
readily complied with the terms ; the moderator at the same 
time wrote a receipt and read it to Mr. Searle, and asked 
him whether he would sign such a one. His answer was that 
he would, or any one that the town should require. The town 
then proceeded to get the money that was his due as salary 
from the first of his settlement in said town, until the 14tli 
day of October, 1778, and pay it to him. Said money being 
offered to Mr. Searle by the selectmen, requiring him to 
sign said receipt, he utterly refused to sign said receipt, or a 
similar one. For which reason, the town voted to assess the 
last year's salary, and order it into the treasurer's hands, 
there to remain until it should be ordered otherwise. By 
said town. Voted, That Lt. Samuel Brown take the money 
and make a lawful tender to Mr. Searle, of the whole of his 
salary that yet remains unpaid from the first of his settlement 
in said town, until the 14th day of October, 1778, and require 
him to sign such a receipt as was approved by said town." 
Then adjourned to the 8th instant. At the adjournment, 
"Voted, To choose a committee to desire the Rev. Jonathan 
Searle to attend the meeting by adjournment, in order for 
him to make some proposals to the town, on what terms he 
would settle with the town, and if he refused to come, for 
him to send in writing, by said committee, on what terms he 
would settle." Dea. Amos Dakin and Lts. Samuel and Isaac 
Brown, were the committee. The town, after transacting 
some other business, adjourned to the 12th of January. At 
the adjournment, "After hearing the Rev. Jonathan Searle's 
letter directed to the moderator read, Voted, That it was 
not an acceptable answer, according to the town's request. 
Voted, To choose a committee to reason with Searle and 
make a report to the town." The committee were Joseph 
Barrett, Joseph Merriam, Dea. N. Hall, William Eliot and 
David Blodgett. Adjourned to the 20th instant. At the 



152 HISTORY OF MASON. 

adjournment, "Voted, Not to make any addition to the Rev. 
Jonathan Searle's salary, for the time being." The authority 
of the committee was continued, and they were directed to 
report at the next meeting. Adjourned to February 9. It 
was at the adjournment, "Voted, That the Rev. Jonathan 
Searle's conduct hath been dissatisfactory to the town, with 
regard to what hath been acted on his part, relative to his 
falling from his first agreement, as well as at other meet- 
ings held after adjournment." "Voted, That the town call 
upon the Chmxh of Christ in this place to desire the Rev. 
Jonathan Searle to join in a mutual council, and have all 
matters of aggrievance subsisting between Mr. Searle and this 
people brought before said council for their wise deter- 
mination. Voted, That the town and church are connected 
together in paying the cost of said council. Capt. Joseph 
Barrett, Dea. Nathan Hall, and Mr. Edmund Tarbell, each 
entered their dissent against the proceedings of this meeting, 
so far as what is comprehended in the second vote of said 
meeting." 

At the annual meeting, March 8th, 1779. The seventh 
article was, " To see if the town will pay the Rev. Jonathan 
Searle his salary, for the year 1778." On this article, the 
town "Voted, To pay the salary of the Rev. Jonathan Searle, 
provided he give a receipt in full, &c." 

At a meeting called March 30th, 1779. "Voted, To pass 
over the article about the Rev. Jonathan Searle." 

At a meeting called April 22d, 1779. "Article 2d. To 
see what method the town will pursue, for a settlement with 
the Rev. Jonathan Searle, and if a settlement cannot be 
effected, to see if the town will vote him a dismission, or dis- 
continue him as our minister." At the meeting, a committee 
was appointed to request the attendance of the Rev. Jonathan 
Searle. An addition of £Z0 was voted to the nominal sum 
of his salary for 1778, "provided, he give such a receipt, as 
he proffered to the town in January last." "Voted, Not sat- 
isfied with his conduct, in not securing the town for the money 



1779. MUNICIPAL HISTOEY. 153 

paid by the constables for his salary, with other things." 
William Chambers, Joseph Merriam and Abijah Allen were 
appointed a committee, "to offer him the nominal sum, and 
interest, and the addition above voted, and to make a legal 
tender, and demand a receipt in full from his first settle- 
ment." Adjourned to Friday. At the adjournment, "Voted, 
That the committee have a record made of the tender to 
the Rev. Jonathan Searle, according to law," and adjourned. 

July 6th, 1779. A meeting was called, "To see if the 
town will join with the church in a council," &c. " The motion 
being moved by the Rev. Daniel Emerson, whether the town 
would leave it to a reference, previous to other matters being 
left to a council, respecting negligence of pay, or fall of 
money being made up, or any part thereof, to the Rev. Jona- 
than Searle; it passed in the negative," and then the meeting 
was adjourned to July 7th; and at that meeting "Voted, To 
concur with the vote of the church of Christ in this town, on 
the 6th of July, instant, for dismissing the Rev. Jonathan 
Searle from his pastoral relation in this town. Voted, The 
meeting house doors be kept shut up, during the town's 
pleasure. Voted, The selectmen have power to open and 
shut the meeting house doors. Chose a committee to make 
a tender to the Rev. Jonathan Searle, &c." 

A meeting was called, August 17th, 1779. Among other 
matters, was this article, "To see if the town will join with 
the church to make the following proposal to the Rev. Jona- 
than Searle ; to leave it to a mutual council, to determine, 
whether Mr. Searle is constiuulonalhj dismissed from his pas- 
toral relations in this place, and if the council result that he 
is not dismissed, then, would have the council take under 
consideration, the difficulties subsisting between the parties ; 
the advice of the council to be accepted by the parties." At 
the meeting, "Voted, To concur with the proposals of the 
church, to the Rev. Jonathan Searle, and on Mr. Searle's com- 
pliance therewith, to leave all matters now subsisting between 
said parties, to a mutual ecclesiastical council; the town 



154 HISTORY OP MASON. 

being at the cost of said council." Adjourned to the 31st. 
"Chose Benjamin Mann, Joseph Merriam and Abijah Allen a 
committee to provide for the ecclesiastical council to sit in 
October, 1779. Chose David Blodgett, Wm. Chambers, 
Thomas Tarbell, Timothy Wheeler and Reuben Barrett, a 
committee to receive complaints from the Rev. Mr. Searle, 
against the town, and also to prepare complaints against the 
said Rev. Mr. Searle, and also, bring them before the council." 
The meeting was adjourned to the fifth and to the sixth of 
October; at which time, Abijah Allen and Joseph Merriam 
were added -'to the committee, for carrying on the com- 
plaints against the Rev. Jonathan Searle, before the council." 
Adjourned to the seventh and to the eighth. "Voted, That 
the committee call on the Rev. Mr. Searle, to make out the 
negligence of pay, and that the committee be ready to settle 
with him. Voted, That the present committee of the town 
be empowered, in behalf of said town, to leave the substance 
matter of Mr. Searle's complaint against the town, to refer- 
ence, and that Esq. Abbott's method be adhered to ;" and 
adjourned to one o'clock. Then "Voted and agreed to the 
form of an agreement, between Mr. Searle and the town of 
Mason, drawn by the Rev. Mr. Farrar." Adjourned to the 
9th. Then "Voted, Not to allow any sum of money, for the 
negligence of pay to Mr. Searle, from his first settlement, to 
October 14th, 1777. Voted, To make a grant of money to 
Mr. Searle. Voted, To open the meeting house doors," and 
adjourned to Monday, October 25th; then adjourned to the 
26th; then "Voted, To accept of Mr. Searle's acknowledg- 
ment of his fault, to the town as satisfactory," and then after 
accepting some roads the meeting was dissolved. 

The following entries in the record are in the hand writing 
of Mr. Searle, and were signed by him : 

"Mason, Oct'r 9th, 1779. This day received of the town 
of Mason, by the hand of the selectmen, one hundred and 
twenty pounds, L. money, in full of all my dues and demands 
of every name and nature whatsoever, from the first day of 



1779. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 155 

my settlement with said town up to this day. Received per 
me, Jonathan Searle. 

"Attest; David Blodgett. 

Sam'l Brown." 
"Mason, Oct'r 26, 1779. That whereas, there was a civil 
contract effected between the town of Mason and myself, on 
the 14th of Oct'r, 1772, as to my ministerial support, so long 
as I should remain their Gospel minister, this is a full and 
final cancel, on my part, of said contract ; and in testimony of 
this my free act, I hereunto set my hand. 

Jonathan Searle. 
"Attest: David Blodgett. 
Samuel Brown." 

Thus this town meeting, commenced August 17, and con- 
tinued by adjournment, to nine different subsequent days, was 
concluded. The long battle was fought, and the town won. 
Undoubtedly, on the 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th days of Octo- 
ber, there was a council in session ; but as the church records, 
then in the hands of Mr. Searle, are silent on the subject, no 
means remain of determining who composed the council, or 
what were the articles of complaint on the part of the church 
or of the town against him, or on his part against them. One 
would suppose, judging from the entries in the book above 
recited, that all connection between the town and Mr. Searle 
was ended, and that there would be no more controversy 
between them. But it was not so, as will presently appear. 
It is not unfrequently the case, that the expenses of a contro- 
versy very much exceed the amount of the sum in iispute. 
So it was in this case. The sum paid by the town to Mr. 
Searle was £120, being two years' salary. The expenses 
paid by the town for entertaining the council were X327 19s., 
paid as follows: to William Chambers, X199 10s.; Abijah 
Allen, £66 18s.; Samuel Abbott, £1 16s.; Ephraim Sartell, 
£14 12s.; Lieut. Isaac Brown, £16; Jacob Blodgett, £8 8s.; 
Jonathan Searle, £23 13., in all, $1092,07, a pretty round 
bill for entertaining some half a dozen of the clergy and their 



156 HISTORY OP MASON. 

attendant lay delegates, one week. Probably the depre- 
ciation of the currency was an element which had something 
to do with the magnitude of this bill, as it was undoubtedly 
the foundation, and if not the only origin, one of the sources 
of the difficulty. But as no distinction is made as to the cur- 
rency in which the £120 was paid to Mr. Searle, and that in 
which the ,£327 19s. was paid for entertaining the council, 
the matter is left somewhat in the dark. Probably he was 
paid in a currency equal to gold and silver, and the bills for 
the expenses, were paid in the depreciated currency. 

April 10, 1780. At a town meeting, Mr. Searle again 
appears. The fourth article was, "To see if the town will 
concur with the church and receive the Rev. Jonathan Searle 
as their minister, according to an agreement between him and 
the church." The town "Voted, To accept the first article 
of the agreement that was formed between the church and the 
Rev. Jonathan Searle, October 26, 1779, which is as follows: 
We agree that there shall be no compulsion about the minis- 
terial support ] every one in church and town shall be left at 
liberty to contribute what sum he pleases, or none at all. 
This article proposed by Mr. Searle. Voted, To receive Mr. 
Searle upon the above mentioned agreement." How, then, 
stood the case? He had, by his agreement of October 26, 
discharged the town from the contract, and by the vote of 
April 10, to which he was a party, had agreed that he should 
have no claim for support on church or town, except the vol- 
untary contributions of his friends. Yet it seems he contin- 
ued to make claims of the town, for at the meeting, October 
31, on an article on this subject, the town "Voted, That it is 
the mind of the town that the Rev. Jonathan Searle discharge 
the town from October 14, 1779, to October 14, 1780, of any 
demands he hath or may have against the town." 

December 6, 1780. "Voted, To accept of a discharge that 
the Rev. Jonathan Searle wrote and sent to the town, which 
is as follows: Mason, Dec. 6, 1780. Know all men by these 
presents, that I, Jonathan Searle, for and in consideration of 



1781. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 157 

•what my friends., in and out of town, have done for me in the 

course of the year past, do fully discharge the town of Mason 

from all legal demands in future, respecting my ministerial 

support the last year, beginning Oct. the 14, 1779, and ending 

Oct. 14, 1780, excepting what is due to me from said toAvn on 

special obligation, either of note or bond, which is not and 

■cannot be supposed to be included in this discharge. As 

witness my hand, 

Jonathan Searle. 

"Yoted, Not to pay the Rev. Jonathan Searle the note he 
has against the town, at present. Voted, To reconsider the 
vote not to pay the Rev. Jonathan Searle his note, &c., and 
Voted, To pay it, and to make the money as good as when 
the note was giv^en, and appointed a committee to go to him 
and pay him." 

January 18, 1781. The second article was, "To hear the 
report of the committee, &c., to wait on Mr. Searle to see 
whether he would take the money due him upon his note 
given in October, 1779, and if, on hearing the report, they 
find he hath not complied with the request, then, 3dly. To 
see if they will choose a committee to make a lawful tender. 
4thly. To see if the town will make any enquiry into Mr. 
Searle's conduct in breaking over the result of council respect- 
ing that part of the advice of the venerable council, which 
was for him to give up all his demands upon the town for his 
ministerial support, up to the 14th day of October, 1778, 
except the nominal sum, and likewise, in breaking over the 
agreement he voluntarily made with the town, in compliance 
with the result of council, and likewise said he would give up 
all but the nominal sum, to October 14, 1778," &c. At the 
meeting, "Voted, Not to make the tender. Voted, Not to 
make the Inquiry. Voted, To reconsider the vote not to 
make the tender. Voted, To make a tender, and chose a 
committee for that purpose, and dissolved." 

March 12, 1781. "Voted, To order the selectmen to take 
the invoice of the Rev. Jonathan Searle's real and personal 
21 



158 HISTORY OP MASON. 

estate, and tax him to the Continental, State and War tax 
accordingly." 

April 11, 1781. At a town meeting, on an article to that 
purport, the town "Voted, To own the Rev. Jonathan Searle 
to be their minister. The persons whose names are under- 
written entered their dissent against the Rev. Jonathan 
Searle being any longer their minister : Wm. Eliot, Jonas 
Fay, Jonathan Foster, Jr., Andrew Eliot, Silas Bullard, 
Abijah Allen, Nathan Whipple, Enosh Lawrence, Joseph 
Lowell, Jonathan Chandler, John Adams, John Lawrence,. 
Joseph Ball, Thomas Blood, Amos Dakin, David Blodgett, 
Zaccheus Davis, Simon Ames, Thomas Bobbins, Oliver Scrip- 
ture, Edmund Adams, Stevens Lawrence." 

June 21, 1781. "Voted, Not to concur with the church in 
their vote passed 4th of May last, to dismiss the Rev. Jona- 
than Searle from his pastoral relation to said church." 

August 14, 1781. The second article was, "To see if the 
town would concur with the church in their vote to dismiss 
Mr. Searle, 4th of May last." It was "Voted, To concur. 
Voted, To hire preaching, and to raise X20, silver, for this 
purpose." Adjourned to the 21st of August. Then "Voted, 
To reconsider the vote to hire preaching, and adjourned to 
the 28th. Then Voted, To hire preaching, and to raise X20, 
hard money. Voted, To leave it to Mr. Abijah Allen to pay 
or not, if he pleases, and chose Deacon Hall, Joseph Merriam 
and Ens. John Wood, committee to hire preaching." 

March 11, 1782. "Voted, To direct the selectmen to apply 
to Mr. Jonathan Searle, for a settlement of a note that ho 
has against the town, said note to be liquidated by the scale 
to balance his taxes." 

August 28, 1782. The seventh article was, "To see what 
the town will do with regard to making out a settlement with 
Mr. Searle, as he is advised to leave the matter to the gener- 
osity of the town." " Voted, To make out legal settlement 
with Mr. Searle as soon as may be, and chose as a committee, 
Benj. Mann, Wm. Eliot and Joseph Merriam, for the purpose." 



1788. MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 159 

February 20th, 1783. At a meeting called for that purpose, 
" Voted, That if Mr. Scarle will settle a note he has against 
the town, and take the money according to the scale of 
depreciation of this state, that for the sake of peace, the 
town will abate his rates for the year 1781. Chose a com- 
mittee to make the settlement, James Withce, Benjamin 
Mann, Esq. and Wm. Eliot. It was further Voted, That if 
he would not accept the proposition, the town would leave it 
to men," &c. 

Annual March meeting, 1785. "Article 5th. To see if 
the town will desire the church to call upon Mr. Jonathan 
Searle, in an ecclesiastical manner, to make satisfaction for 
words he has spoken, which is thought to be a scandal upon 
said town and church; and be at the cost of it, should it end 
in advice of council." The vote was in the negative. 

September 4th, 1787. "Voted, To leave the complaint 
which Jonathan Searle, Esq., exhibited against the church and 
people, &c., for neglecting to pay him for his support in 1779, 
together with a bond and order he had against the town, to 
arbitration ; that the Rev. Mr. Payson, of Rindge, be one of 
the arbitrators, and act as chairman; and chose Joseph 
Merriam, Dea. Amos Dakin, Benjamin Mann, Esq., Hubbert 
Russell and Joseph Barrett, a committee to agree with Jona- 
than Searle, Esq., in choosing the other two arbitrators, and 
to conduct the defence before the arbitration." 

January 1st, 1788. "Voted, To raise sixty pounds, to pay 
Jonathan Searle, Esq., his due, by the award of arbitrators. 
Voted, To make the rate to pay Jonathan Searle, Esq., in 
two columns." 

Thus, a controversy which lasted as long as the Trojan 
war, and which exhibited about as many vicissitudes, as did 
that memorable contest, was brought to a close. All that 
can now be known of the merits and different aspects of the 
controversy, has been above exhibited ; and it is left for the 
candid minds of readers, to draw their own conclusions. 

Soon after these difficulties arose, Mr. Searle ceased to 



160 HISTORY OF MASON. 

preach. He owned a valuable real estate in the town, on 
which he continued to reside, till the close of his life. He 
was commissioned as a justice of the peace, and acted in that 
capacity many years. He took an active part in the building 
of the meeting house, and in the settlement of his successor^ 
as has already appeared. He was frequently employed in 
matters of town business, but from some time near the close 
of the last century, he, in a great measure, withdrew from all 
active concerns in business affairs, and devoted himself^ 
almost entirely, to agricultural pursuits. He died, December 
7th, 1812, aged sixty eight years. 



CHAP TEE V. 

RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, AND OF DEATHS, AND 
FAMILY REGISTERS. 

Record of marriages of early residents in Mason and of 
some of their ancestors, taken from the town records of 
Groton, Pepperell and Townsend : 



GROTON. 

1666. 
June 30. Thomas Tarbell, Hannah . 

1686. 
Dec. 1, Thomas Tarbell, EUzabeth Blood. 

1716-17. 
Jan. 1. Thomas Tarbell, Abigail Parker. 

1725. 
Dec. 19. Samuel Tarbell, Lydia Farnsworth. 

1729. 
Dec. 18. Elias Elliot, Ruth Lawrence. 

1730. 
May 7. Nathan Whipple, Hannah Boynton. 

1733-4. 
Jan. 29. Enosh Lawrence, Sarah Stevens. 

1737. 
Nov. 1. Nehemiah Gould, Esther Bowers. 

1741-2. 
Jan. 19. Thomas Tarbell, Jr., Esther Smith. 

1746. 
Oct. 9. Samuel Scripture, Jr., Mary Green. 

1755. 
April 16. John Stevens of Townsend, Susannah Tarbell. 

1758. 
March 30. Jonathan Foster, Betty Hazen. 

1762. 
Dec. 21. Enosh Lawrence of No. 1, Esther Woods. 

1766. 
March 18. Nathan Whipple, Abigail Bowers. 

Dec. 23. John Whitaker, Jr., Thankful Pierce. 



PEPPERELL. BY REV. JOSEPH EMERSON. 

1748. 
July 21. Zachariah Withee, Esther Kemp. 

1752. 
March 19. William Elliot, Elizabeth Williams. 



162 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



1755. 
Nov. 19. 

1758. 
Jan. 19. 

" 24. 
Dec. 27. 

1759. 
Oct. 18. 

1767. 
Feb. 3. 

1775. 
June 26. 



1745. 
Sept. 3. 

1757. 
May 30. 

1758. 
April 21. 



1764. 
Feb. 21. 

1765. 
Dec. 29. 

1767. 
Dec. 1. 

1771. 
May 3. 

1779. 
Jan. 28. 
June 17. 

1781. 
Feb. 1. 

1782. 
May 30. 
Dec. 10. 

1785. 
May 12. 

1786. 
Dec. 14. 

1787. 
Feb. 1. 
March 30. 



John Swallow, No. 1, 

Oliver Elliot, No. 1, 
Josiah Wriglit, No. 1, 
Jonathan J efts, No. 1, 

Whitcomb Powers, Hollis, 

James Hall, No. 1., 

Elias ElUot, Mason, 



Sarah Lawrence, No. li 

Mary Fisk. 
Dolly Shattuck. 
Lydia Lawrence. 

Elizabeth Lawrence. 

Sarah Roe. 

Sarah Pierce. 



TOWNSEND, BY REV. PHINEHAS HEMENWAY, 
Benjamin King, Sarah Taylor. 

Samuel Lawrence, No. 1, Mary Avery, Townsend* 

Josiah Bobbins, Townsend, Sarah Ames, Hollis. 

BY REV. SAMUEL DIX. 



Josiah Robbins, No. 1, 

William Barrett, No. 1, 

Benjamin Jefts, No. 1, 

Edmund Tarbell, Mason, 

Jacob Blodgett, Mason, 
Joseph Woods, Townsend, 



Mary Campbell, Townsend, 

Sarah Robbins, No. 1. 

Martha Sloan, Townsend. 

Mary Hildreth. 

Sarah Taylor, Townsend. 
Mary Waugh, Townsend. 



Hincksman Warren, Townsend, Esther Taylor, Townsend. 



David Hall, Mason, 
Jonathan Jefts, Townsend, 

Amos Blood, Pepperell, 

Edmund Tarbell, Mason, 

Henry Jefts, 

William Eliot, Mason, 



Margarett Graham, Townsend, 
Lydia Horsley, PeppereU. 

Sarah Blood, Pepperell. 

Buelah Hildreth, Townsend, 

Elizabeth Waugh. 

Rebecca Hildreth, Townsend* 



1772. 
Dec. 9. 

1773. 
June 24. 
July 29. 
Dec. 9. 

1774. 
Feb. 1. 
March 15. 
March 52. 

1775. 
Feb. 14. 



MASON. BY REV. 

Isaac Flagg, 

Zachariah Davis, 
Zaccheus Barrett, 
Randall McDaniels, 

John Tarbell, 
James Wilson, 
Joseph Clough, 

Asa Hastings, 



JONATHAN SEARLE. 

Keziah Russell. 

Susannah Brown. 
Sarah Hodgman. 
Martha Russell. 

Sarah EHot. 
Hannah Parker. 
Mary Scott. 

Mary Lowell. 



RECORD OP MARRIAGES. 



163 



1775. 






June 15. 


James Scripture, 


Sibel Shepley. 


Oct. 25. 


David Blodgett, 


Lucy Wheeler. 


Dec. 21. 


Daniel Fay, 


Jemima Scripture. 


1776. 






Auff. 21. 


Amos Child, 


Sarah Dakin. 


1777. 






Jan. 1. 


Thomas Jefts, 


Abigail Barrett. 


Feb. 5. 


Joseph Hodgman, 


Sarah Lawrence. 


Oct. 21. 


Josiah Davis, Jr., 


Susannah McDaniels 


1778. 






July 8. 


Thomas Tarbcll, Jr., 


Sarah Barrett. 


April 24. 


Silas Spaulding, 


Hannah Brown. 


May 27. 


Joseph Pike, 


Nabby Sartwell. 


June 25. 


Zachariah Emery, 


Mary Lemon. 


Sept. 9. 


Isaac Lawrence, 


Anne Hodgman. 


Oct. 20. 


Amos Holden, Jr., 


Lydia Sloan. 


Oct. 20. 


Eleazer Fish, 


Rachel Goold. 


1779. 






April 28. 


Thomas Lawrence, 


Mehitable Hall. 


Sept. 28. 


Benjamin Jefts, 


Juda DeGrett. 


Nov. 24. 


Joseph Osgood, 


Abigail Barrett. 


Nov 30. 


Jonathan Foster, 


Mercy Towns. 


Dec. 8. 


Phinehas Parker, 


Elizabeth Swan. 


1780. 






Jan. 25. 


Zebedee Kendall, 


Molly Dakin. 


Feb. 10. 


Whitcomb Tarbell, 


Ruth Dodge. 


1781. 






July 26. 


Nathan Wood, 


Susannah Dutton. 




BY JONATHAN 


SEARLE, J. P. 


1785. 






March 15. 


Abijah Eaton, 


Elizabeth Eliot. 


March 25. 


Peter Rumrey, 


Ruth Parker. 


March 27. 


Noah Winship, 


Deborah Swallow. 


April 12. 


Rogers Weston, 


Deborah Lawrence. 


Nov. 1. 


Ezra Merriam, 


Susannah Eliot. 


Nov. 29. 


Samuel Eliot, 


Sarah Merriam. 


1786. 






Feb. 2. 


Solomon Gilson, 


Dorothy Wood. 


March 9. 


Joseph Robeus, 


Molly Sloan. 


June 22. 


John Searle, 


Susannah Lawrence. 


Oct. 22. 


Samuel Green, 


Molly Swallow. 


1788. 






May 27. 


Joseph Sanders, 


Betty Hall. 


1789. 






May 19. 


Edward Wilson, 


Lydia Dakin. 


1790. 






Sept. 23. 


William Scott, 


Esther Eliot. 


1802. 






Nov. 16. 


Peter Thomas, Concord, 


Mass., Mary Reed, Concorc 



BY REV. STEPHEN FARRAR. 

1783. 
Dec. 11. Amos Dakin, Mary Kingsley. 

1787. 
Dec. 6. Jonathan Chandler, Rachel Wilson. 

1809. 
Jan. 29. Mark Safford, Washington, Mercy Barrett. 



164 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



1782. 
July 1. 



1789. 
July 1. 

1790. 
March 16. 

1791. 
March 29. 

1793. 
Feb. 2. 
June 6. 
Nov. 4. 

1794. 
Jan. 14. 
Mav 17. 

1796. 
Nov. 20. 

1797. 
Dec. 24. 

1800. 
April 8. 
June 29. 
Nov. 16. 

1801. 
Feb. 7. 
May 19. 

1802. 
April 8. 
Aug. 22. 

1803. 
March 8. 
April 5. 
Oct. 16. 
Dec. 22. 

1804. 
Jan. 12. 
Sept. 1. 
Sept. 10. 

1805. 
Feb. 27. 
Oct. 21. 
Nov. 24. 
Aug. 19. 

1806. 
Jan. 30. 
March 27. 
March 27. 
June 3. 
Sept. 16. 

1807, 
Nov. 6. 
Nov. 16. 
Dec. 1. 

1809. 
July 9. 
Oct. 3. 
Nov. 3. 



BY EEY. MR. JUDSOX. 
Silas Eullard, Avis Keyes. 

BY REY. WILLIAM ELIOT. 



John Sloan, 

John Squire, 

\Villard Lawrence, 

Richard Hall, 
Moses Jolinson, 
David Brown, HoUis, 

Ezra Mansfield, 
Asa Hobart, HoUis, 

Ephraim Woods, Hollis, 

William Butterfield, Jr., 

Quincy Adams, 
John Whipple, 
William Butterfield, 

Nathan Perry, 
Joshua Davis, Hollis, 

David Fuller, Temple, 

Jona. Rider, [Rideout ?] Hollis, 

Oliver Eliot, 

Amos Brown, New Ipswich, 
Thomas Hutcliinson, Carlisle, 
Joseph Haskell, Mason, 

Abraham Robbins, Concord, 
Joseph. Brabrook, Acton, 
Josiah Warren, Norridgewock, 



Sarah Blood. 

Sibbel Procter. 

Betsey Austin. 

Hannah Kendall. 

Molly Eliot, 

Rhoda Alexander, Dunstable. 

Abiah Wood. 

Deborah Phelps, Hollis. 

Dorcas Jewell, Dunstable. 

Ruth Hubbart. 

Dolly Eliot. 
Hannah Dady. 
Esther Hale. 

Rebecca Brown. 
Sarah Tarbell, Mason. 

Polly Horsley, Temple. 
Rebecca Powers, Dunstable. 

Betsey Hutchinson, Milford. 
Sarah Tarbell, New Ipswich. 
Sarah Eliot, Mason. 
Rebecca Barrett, Mason. 

Hannah Eliot, Mason. 
Sally Adams, Mason. 
Betsey Searles, Mason. 



John Adams, New Ipswich, Hannah Leavitt, Milford. 

Daniel Jewett, Hollis, Rebecca Jaquith, Hollis. 

Capt. Thomas Roby, Dunstable, Wid. Phebe Dresser, Dunstable. 

Henry Butterfield, Dunstable, Priscilla Wheeler, Dunstable. 

Abiathar Winn, Nottinghamwest,Lucy Gouldsmith, Wilton. 

David Wallace, Milford, Polly Farmer, Dunstable. 

Thomas Jaqviith, Hollis, Lydia Woods, Hollis. 

Nathan Brown, New Ipswich, Betsey Gouldsmith, Wilton. 

George Farrar Wallis, Lydia Lawrence, Townsend. 

Moses Lovejoy, Wilton, Nancy Tarbell, Mason. 

Aaron Marshall, Dunstable, Mrs. Lydia Billings. 

Benj. Wyman, Nottinghamwest. Betsey Campbell, Nottingham W 

John Ulot, [Eliot ?] Milford, Abigail Rollins, Milford. 

Othni Crosby, Dublin, Anna Davis, Mason. 

JohnSpaulding,Whitingham,Vt. Rebecca Conant, New Ipswich. 



RECORD OP MARRIAGES. 



165 



10. 

7. 
25. 



1810. 
Feb. 25. 
Nov. 15. 
Nov. 22. 

1811. 
April 21. 
Dec. 10. 

1812. 
Feb. 27. 
Aug. 25. 
Oct. 11. 

1813. 
April 8. 
April 11. 
Sept. 7. 
Sept. 12. 
Dec. 24. 

1814. 
Jan. 25. 
July 2. 
July 
Aug. 
Dee. 

1815. 
Jan. 7. 
Nov. 27. 
Dec. 12. 

1816. 
May 23. 
June 2, 

1817. 
Nov. 13. 

1820. 
Feb. 22. 
Nov. 20. 

1821. 
Jan. 4. 
April 19. 

1822. 
Feb. 28. 
Nov. 5. 

1823. 
Oct. 29. 

1824. 
Jan. 20. 
May 9. 
Oct. 10. 
Oct. 21. 

1825. 
Jan. 24. 



Joel Blanchard, Belgrade, Me., 
Isaac Longley, Wilton, 
Eomanus Emerson, Boston, 

George Mt. Kendall, Mason, 
Ebenezor Adams, Mason, 

John Felt, Temple, 
John Sargent, Milford, 
Joseph Smith, Wilton, 



Abigail Simons, Wilton. 
Hannah Peabody, Wilton. 
Jemima Burnam, W^ilton. 

Folly Eliot, Mason. 
Jemima Mansur, Wilton. 

Sally Bullard, Mason. 
Martha Simons, AYilton. 
Lucy Adams, Mason. 



Jonathan Jefts, Jr., Mason, Nabby Robb, Mason. 

Benjamin AVetherbee, Mason, Hannah W^adsAvorth, Mason. 
David Goodwin, Milford, Sarah Putnam, Milford. 

Taylor Fay, Mason, [Ipswich, Betsey Sanders, Mason. 
William Bulless, [Bellows ?] New Abigail W^adsworth, N. Ipswich. 



Isaac Lovejoy, Wilton, 
Levi Wheeler, Berlin, 
Samuel Woodbury, Shirley, 
John Dickerman, Francestown, 
Moses Barrett, Lancaster, 



Rebecca Eliot, Mason. 
Olive Colburn, Berlin. 
Mary Weethee, Mason. 
Sally Dakin, Mason. 
Sarah Hill, Mason. 



Jacob Rideout, Wilton, Sally Simons, Wilton. 

John Parkhurst, New Ipswich, Lydia Burrows, New Ipswich. 

David Whitney, Ashby, Charlotte Blanchard, N. Ipswich. 

Willard Lawrence, Mason, Lydia Dakin, Mason. 

Amos Dakin, Mason, Mrs. Elizabeth Lawrence. 

Rev. Benj. J. Lane, Wilton, Susan Eliot, Mason. 

Rev. John Parkhurst, N.Ipswich, Celia Burrows, New Ipswich. 

Moody Lancey, BrookKne, Charlotte Kemp, Mason. 



Paul Davis, Mason, 
George Elliot, Mason, 

Thomas Robins, Mason, 
John Robins, Mason, 



Mary Kimball. 

Sally Farnsworth, Sharon. 

Hannah Blood, Mason. 
Dolly Adams, Mason. 



Edward Wilson, Troy, N. Y., Betsey Elliot, Mason. 

Francis Shepherd, Betsey Hutchinson. 

Eli Nutting, Mason, Lydia B. Nutting, Mason. 

Martin Rand, Lucy Cummings. 

John RoUins, Mont Vernon, Mary Smith, Milford. 



Ezra Bennett, 



Harriet Hunt. 



BY JOHN BLODGETT, J. P. 



1816. 
Feb. 14. John H. Sartell, Mason, 

1819. 
Sejit. 10. Levi Barrett, Mason, 

1821. 
Feb. 1. W^iUiam Nutting, Mason, 

22 



Patty Jefts, Mason. 
Sally Baldwin, Mason. 
Cynthia Blood, Mason. 



166 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



1819. 



BY REV. THOMAS BEDEE. 



May 27. Samuel Merriam, Mason, 



Huldali Burton, Wilton. 



BY TIMOTHY DAKIX, J. P. 



1821 




May 


17. 


Aug. 


9. 


Sept. 


4. 


1790 


1, 


Nov. 


4. 


Dec. 


21. 


1791 




March 17. 


May 


1. 


June 


30. 


Oct. 


13. 


Nov. 


17. 


Dec. 


19. 


Dec. 


29. 


1792 




Jan. 


'l2. 


n 


23. 


(< 


23. 


(( 


26. 


Feb. 


16. 


March 


29. 


April 


19. 


Dec. 


20. 


179? 


i. 


Jan. 


1. 


<< 


15. 


(( 


15. 


April 


18. 


" 


25. 


May 


1. 


n 


2. 


" 


22. 


Oct. 


21. 


(( 


22. 


1794. 


Jan. 


7. 


>t 


8. 


Feb. 


18. 


April 


14. 


July 


3. 


(( 


8. 


Oct. 


23. 


Dec. 


11. 


1795. 


Feb. 


11. 


April 


16. 


n 


21. 


Aug. 


27. 


Oct. 


17. 


Dec. 


24. 



Moses Dakin, Hope, Me., 
John Hubbard, Ma.son., 
Noah Hale, Dunstable, 



Sarah W. Whiting, Mason. 
Mary Kennedy, Mason. 
Hannah Dakin, Mason. 



BY REV. EBENEZER HILL. 



John Seaver, Rabj'', 
John Russell, E,aby, 

Jonas Baldwin, Jr., Townsend, 

Elisha Buss, 

Jonathan Williams, 

John Whitaker, Jr., 

Josiah Eliot, 

William Shed, 

Samuel Farnsworth, Piaby, 

Samuel Dunster, 
Samuel Russell, Raby, 
Jonas Campbell, 
Samuel Douglass, Jr., Raby, 
Jonas Tarbell, Groton, 
Benjamin Hodgman, 
Abner Chickering, 
Samuel Smith, Jr., 

Oliver Hosmer, 

Amos Hodgkins, 

William Parkhurst, Temple, 

Jason Dunster, Jr., 

Daniel Hill, Cambridge, 

Oliver Eliot, Jr., 

Stephen Hall, Raby, 

Amos Croutch, Boxborough, 

Oliver Nutting, 

Joel Barrett, 



Esther RuscU, Raby. 
Leat'ce Lawrence. 

Prudence Haven. 

Polly Mann. 

Mrs. Anna Stevens. 

Dolly Fay. 

Polly Weatherbee, Raby. 

Patty J efts. 

Azubah Badger, Mile Slip. 

Hannah Townsend. 
Susannah Campbell. 
Elizabeth Russell, Raby. 
Sarah Seaver, Raby. 
Abigail Hodgman. 
Mrs. Mary Shed, Ashby. 
Eunice Dakin. 
Phebe Wheelock. 

Patty Lawrence. 
Priscilla Smith. 
Sally Swallow, Temple. 
Polly Merriam. 
Elizabeth Russell. 
Rebecca Ross. 
Submit Shattuck, Raby. 
Lydia Brown, Raby. 
Naomi Blood. 
Mercy Townsend. 



Brintnal Witherell, Hannah Searle. 

Josiah Russell, Eunice Saunderson. 

John Winship, Jr., Polly Barrett. 
Solomon Bacon, Bedford, Mass., Lucy Barrett. 

William Barrett, Jr., Hannah Dutton. 

John Russell, Jr., Lydia Blood. 

Artemas Manning, Rhoda Wyeth. 

John Baldwin, Townsend, Sibbell Barrett. 

Samuel Gilbert Sumner, Keene, Susannah Towns. 



Ebenezer Emery, Jr., Raby, 
Jonathan Russell, 
Frederick Smith, 
Moody Shattuck, Raby, 
Abijah Eliot, 



Abigail Shattuck, Raby. 
Hannah Flagg, Ashby. 
Lucy KendaJl. 
Eunice Tarbell, Pepperell. 
Rachel Williams. 



RECOED OF MAREIAGES. 



167 



I79f 


). 


June 


24. 


Aug. 


2i. 


Oct. 


0, 


(( 


27. 


A^OT. 


23. 


«' 


24. 


« 


24. 


179? 


'. 


Jan. 


3. 


June 


8. 


July 


30. 


Oct. 


3. 


Dec. 


17. 


179S 




Jan. 


9. 


Feb. 


8. 


it 


8. 


(( 


17. 


<< 


28. 


March 20. 


April 


19. 


Oct. 


25. 


Nov. 


28. 


Dec. 


27. 


179£ 


1. 


Jan. 


14. 


Feb. 


12. 


March 


, 5. 


April 


25. 


June 


27. 


Sept. 


8. 


Dec. 


18. 


(( 


26. 


ISOC 


1. 


Feb. 


27. 


March 


. 6. 


(( 


n. 


'< 


IG. 


Julv 


1. 


Oct. 


20. 


(( 


21. 


Nov. 


11. 


n 


13. 


<' 


13. 


«« 


23. 


Dec. 


3. 


1801. 


Feb. 


5. 


(( 


22. 


(< 


24. 


March 


L 1. 


June 


30. 


Nov. 


10. 


1802. 


Feb. 


4. 


Dec. 


9. 


11 


30. 


<i 


30. 



Edward Taylor, Townsend, 
Jacob Austin, Raby, 
John "Wait. 
Stephen Withington, 
Philhp Farnsworth, Raby, 
Clark Brown, llaby, 
Amos Herridc, 

Samuel Wilson, Troy, N. Y., 
John Austin, Concord, 
Timothy Pratt, Maiden, 
Jonathan Smith, 
James Mann, 

William Bride, 

Reuben Hosmer, Jr., 

Isaac Allen, Andover, 

Pearley Saunders, Townsend, 

Asa Hevwood, Concord, Mass., 

William" Miles, 

Stephen Prichard, N. Ipswich, 

John Barrett, Ashby, 

Silas Shed, 

Ezra Newell, 

Josiah Winship, 

Jonathan Blood, Townsend, 

Daniel Hodgman, 

Reuben Hodgman, Jr., 

Eliphalet Bailey, New Ipswich, 

Jason Russell, 

Aaron Peabody, Jr , Milford, 

Zaccheus Lancy, Milford, 

Joseph Stickney, Jr., N. Ipswich, 
John Stevens, Alstead, 
WiUiam Cutter Blood, 
Abraham Boynton, Charlestown, 
Aaron Warren, Townsend, 
Darius Hudson, 
Eli Towne, Temple, 
Joshua Blood, Jr., Pepperell, 
Rufus Russell, 
Amos Robbins, 
HoUis Amsden, 
Ezra Brown, 



Sally Brooks. 

Isabell Mcintosh, Raby. 

Lucy Farmer. 

Polly Austin, Townsend. 

Rhoda Badger, Milford. 

Mrs. Sarah Withee. 

Wid. Sarah Miles. 

Betsey Mann. 
Sally Lawrence, Concord. 
Ruhamah Russell. 
Susannah Barrett. 
Mercy Town. 

Polly Scripture. 

Susanna Whitaker. 

Rebecca Dakin. 

Sarah Todd, Townsend. 

Polly Lawrence, Concord, Mass. 

Lydia Townsend. 

Polly Start, New Ipswich. 

Lucy Lawrence. 

Polly Williams. 

Eunice Swallow. 

Sybbel Swallow. 

Rachel Squire, Townsend. 

Anna Walker. 

Hannah Walker. 

Sally Richardson, New Ipswich. 

Mrs. Lvdia Chambers. 

Polly Miles, MUford. 

Sally TarbeU. 

Anna Hosmer. 
Lydia Brown. 
Sally Townsend. 
Hannah Jefts. 
Sally Wheeler. 
Sibbel Scripture. 
Betsey Scripture. 
Mary Russell. 
Esther Tarbell. 
Polly Dudley. 
Polly Chambers. 
Eunice Flagg. 



Thomas Boylston Chambers, Dolly Merriam. 

James Scripture, Jr., ' Lucy Dakin. 

Nehemiah Russell, Weston, Vt., Sally Barrett. 

John Longley, Norridgewalk, Judith Searle, Norridgewalk. 

Ephraim Russell, Sally Eliot. 

John Withington, Sally Spaulding, Townsend. 



John Hodgman, Ashby, 
Elijah Towne, New Ipswich, 
Dea. Timothy Dakin, 
David Boynton, Townsend, 



Abigail Davis. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Flagg. 
Mary Bowers. 
Polly Wheeler. 



168 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



5. 



G. 



1803. 
Feb. 27. 
March 1. 
1. 

April 10. 
May 1. 
Nov. 3. 

«' 17. 

" 27. 

1804. 
Jan. 19. 

" 24. 
Feb. 21. 
April 
May 13 

" 20 
June 
Aug. 26. 
Sept. 9. 
Nov. 27. 

1805. 
Jan. 8. 

" 15. 
Feb. 6. 
March 5. 
Aiig. 26. 
Nov. 19. 
Dec. 15. 

1806. 
May 4. 
June 1. 
Aug. 15. 
Oct. 1. 

" 19. 

" 23. 

Nov. 13. 

29. 

1807. 
Jan. 1. 

«' 1. 

15. 

29. 

31. 

3. 

" 3. 

3. 

7. 

Sept. 8. 

Dec. 27. 

1808. 
May 5. 
July 13. 

1809. 
March 9. 

" 23. 
May 25. 
July 2. 
Sept. 3. 

Oct, 1. 



Feb. 



June 



Isaac Crane, Alstead, Patty Brown. 

William Whitaker, Polly Russe 11. 

Dr. Samuel Lovejoy, Wilton, Betsy Lawrence, Wilton. 

David J efts, Edce Barrett. 

Benjamin Locke, Jr., Lexington, Betsy Lawrence. 

Abel Fletcher, Betsy Gilman. 

Benj. Hutchinson, Jr., Milford, Azubah Tarbell, Milford. 

Elislia Barrett, Nabby Russell. 



Abraham Merriam, 

Thomas Wilson, 

Elias Eliot, Jr., 

David Jefts. 2d, 

Ebenezer Gilman, 

Benjamin Russell, 

Joseph Woods, Jr., 

Joel Richardson, Boston, 

William Farwell, 

David Pierce, New Ipswich, 



Mary Lawrence. 
Rebecca Merriam. 
Rebecca Tufts. 
Abigail Barrett. 
Hannah Pratt. 
Sally Brooks. 
Nancy Ditson. 
Mrs. Hannah Barrett. 
Rebecca Smith. 
Hepzibah Davis. 



Asa Wilder, Ashby, Rebecca Emerson. 

Joel Richards, Trypheua Kemp. 

Shebuel Conant, Pepperell, Anna Farley, Hollis. 
Benjamin Cummings, Brookline, Lucy Whitaker. 

John Brown, Lucy Gray. 

Joshua Boutell, Hancock, Hannah Lawrence. 

William Russell, Polly Dakin. 

Samuel Nutting, Pepperell, Sarah Weatherbee. 

Leonard Badger, Milford, Sally Barrett. 

Luther Robbins, Marlboro', Ms., Nabby Champney. 



Daniel Brooks, New Ipswich, 
Luther W. Wright, Pepperell, 
Eleazer Fish, 

Sampson Klarter, Westford, 
Joseph Tufts, Jr., Danvers, Ms. 

Moses Perry, Dublin, 

Samuel Townsend, 

Samuel Wesson, 

Joshua Blood, 

WilliamUpham, Jr., Maiden, Ms, 

Benjamin Lawrence, Ashby, 

Cyrus Colman, Ashby, 

Geo. Martin, Westminster, Ms., 

Joseph BuUard, 

Benjamin Kendall, 

Timothy Weatherbee, Jr., 

James Snow, 
Reuben Darlini 



Beulah Billings, New Ipswich* 
Betsev Tarbell. 
Sally 'Williams. 
Sally Gilman. 
Lucy Eliot. 

Persis Townsend. 

Betsey Nutting. 

Nancy Wheeler. 

Anna Russell. 

Dorothy Blanchard, Wilton. 

Polly Townsend. 

Lydia Miles. 

Zrlpha Townsend. 

Sally Woods. 

Betsey Weatherbee. 

Betsey Kendall. 

Esther Heald, Shirley. 
Hannah Scripture. 



Samuel Gates, Ashburnham, Ruth Lawrence. 

Hiibbert Russell, Jr., Polly Woods. 

Oliver Wright, Tyngsborough, Hannah Wheeler. 
Francis Butterick, Jr., Pepperell, Millicent Hodgman. 

Elijah Knapp, Rhoda Swallow. 

Samuel Hill, Mary Adams. 

Joseph Winship, Achsah Richardson. 



EECOED OF MAERIAGES. 



169 



1809. 


Oct. 


3. 


<< 


17. 


Nov. 


2. 


(1 


U. 


Dec. 


7. 


<f 


21. 


1810. 


Jan. 


11. 


Teb. 


19. 


April 


12. 


May 


29. 


June 


20. 


July 


15. 


Aug. 


30. 


Dec. 


13. 


«' 


23. 


181] 


I. 


Jan. 


3. 


n 


31. 


Feb. 


14. 


" 


21. 


March 10. 


(< 


24. 


May 


23. 


April 


11. 


Not. 


7. 


18U 


1. 


Feb. 


2. 


March 19. 


Oct. 


26. 


Nov. 


27. 


Dec. 


7. 


" 


17. 


" 


17. 


181S 




Jan. 


''l7. 


Feb. 


6. 


May 


4. 


<( 


24. 


Oct. 


10. 


(< 


14. 


Nov. 


2o. 


1811 




March 


* 8. 


t( 


15. 


ct 


28. 


April 


18. 


Oct. 


23. 


Nov. 


1. 


Dec. 


1. 


" 


5. 


<( 


22. 


ISle 


i. 


March 


I 9. 


April 


11. 


(1 


16. 


(( 


17. 


June 


8. 


<< 


25. 



Jos Barrett,Esq. Bakersfield,Yt., Mary Appleton, New Ipswich. 
Josiah Bachelder, Jr., N. Ips'ich, Rebecca Brooks, New Ipswich. 
Capt. Isaac Spauldiug, Wilton, Mrs. Marv Coburn, WUtou. 
WilHam Fay, Esther Tufts. 

Thomas Stevens, Enosboro',Vt., Susanna Adams, New Ipswich. 
Samuel Stone, Jr., Townsend, Lucy Wheeler. 



Asa Farnsworth, New Ipswich, 
Jacob Putnam, Peterborough, 
Jona. Stow Adams, Leominster, 
Timothy Wheeler, Gardner, 
Capt. Solomon Davis, N.Ipswich, 
Cyrus Davis, 
Noah Winship, Jr., 
Jesse Seaver, Townsend, 
Samuel Withiugton, 

John Swallow, 3d, 

Benjamin Farvvell, 

Levi Whitaker, 

WUliam Webber, 

John Hartshorn, Lyndeboro', 

True Robbins, 

Simeon Cragin, Temple, 

Jesse Barrett, Jr., 

George Dakin, 

Aaron Wood, 

SewaU Woods, 

James Wood, Jr., 

James Kennedy, New Ipswich, 

Thomas Felt, Temple, 

WilUam Darling, 

VVilham TarbeU, Milford, 

Timothy Wheeler, Ji:, 
Thomas Gary, 2d, Leominster, 
Joshua Da"sis, 
James Barrett, 
Josiah Merriam, 
David Saunders, 



Nabby Brown, New Ipswich. 
Lucy Brooks, New Ipswich. 
Betsey Wood. 

Polly Wheeler, New Ipswich. 
Esther Allen, Nev/ Ipswich. 
Phebe Hay Bucknam. 
Abigail Parker Blood. 
Betsey Warren. 
Azubah Swallow. 

Sally Woods. 

Sarah Winship. 

Eunice Tarbell. 

Hannah Flagg. 

Susanna Curtis, Lyndeborough. 

Rebecca Hodgman. 

Betsey Dakin. 

Lucy Scripture. 

Ama Wood. 

Rebecca Wright. 

Anna W^hitaker. 

Betsey Jones. [Ipswich. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Chamberlain, N. 

Sibbel J efts. 

PoUy Wood. 

Lydia Spaulding, Milford. 

PoDy HUl. 

Nancy Weethee. 

Sarah Richardson, Wilton. 

Lucinda Knapp. 

Sally Kill. 

Ama Wheeler. 



Caleb Campbell, New Ipswich, Lucy Taylor, New Ipswich. 

Hubbard Amsden, Anna Saunders. 

Aaron Holden, Wilton, Rebecca Merriam. 

Samuel Heald, Jr., Carlisle, Sibbel March, Carlisle. 

Amos Howard, Westminster, Rebecca Flagg. 

Charles Johnson, Southborough, Prudence Stuart. 

Samuel Fish, Sally Eliot. 

Samuel Tarbell, Mrs. Rhoda Atherton, Shirley. 

Samuel Dakin, Mary Gilchrist. 

Woodis Lee, Azubah Holt. 



Phinehas Allen, 
Abel Farewell, 
Ephraim Russell, 
Joseph Putnam, 
Ebenezer Hodgman, Jr., 
Thomas Kenworthy, 



Sally Campbell. 
Sally Huston. 
MiUy Eliott. 
Lucy RumrHl. 
Ann H. Mitchell. 
Mrs. Mary Merriam. 



170 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



1815 


i. 


Dec. 


28. 


" 


28. 


1816 


\. 


Feb. 


27. 


April 


18. 


<< 


22. 


June 


23. 


Sept. 


29. 


Oct. 


13. 


(( 


24. 


Dec. 


3. 


«' 


22. 


1817 


', 


March 


5. 


April 


16. 


June 


2. 


«i 


4. 


<( 


5. 


July 


16. 


<< 


17. 


Sept. 


2o. 


«< 


28. 


Nov. 


20. 


ii 


18. 


11 


19. 


(< 


25, 


« 


25. 


i< 


28. 


1818 


i. 


Feb. 


5 


April 


19 


May 


7. 


Aug. 


29, 


Oct. 


15, 


Dec. 


17, 


it 


30 


1819. 


Feb. 


23. 


May 


27. 


Aug. 


5. 


Oct. 


26. 


1820. 


March. 15. 


" 


15, 


April 


19, 


May 


1, 


June 


18, 


Sept. 


5 


Dec. 


26, 


1821. 


Feb. 


15. 


(( 


20. 


(( 


22, 


i( 


22. 


March 12. 


April 


10. 


<< 


17. 


May 


8. 


June 


5. 



Benoni C. Kimball, 
Amos Wheeler, 

Joel Cutter, Jaffrey, 
Asa Merriam, 
Francis Humphries, 
Ephraim Hilclreth, 
Cotton Tufts, Jaiirey, 
David Shattuck, Ashby, 
Jonathan Davis, New Ipswich, 
Eleazer Davis, Shirley, 
Abel Wilder, Keene, 

Samuel Hartshorn, Jr., Wilton, 

Lyman Newton, Southborough, 

John Bachelder, 

John Spaukliug, Wilton, 

Robert Taylor, Jr., Ashby, 

John Webber, 

EHjah Xing, 

Luther Nutting, 

Zenas Gibbs, 

Charles Scripture, 

Artemas Rowell, 

Amos Holden, 

Amos Russel, 

Amos Davis, Groton, 

David Hobart, Brookline, 

William Wright, 

Pearly Saunders, Townsend, 

Micah Russel, 

Jonas Kendall, 

Ezra Merriam, Jr., 

Caleb Bucknam, 

Isaac Brown, Cambridge, 

Zadock Merriam, Washington, 

Moses RusseU, 

Asher Eliott, 

Spaulding Eliott, Pepperell, 



Mary Dunster. 
Prudence Parker. 

Mary S. Jones. 
Polly Saunders. 
Dorcas Swallow. 
Matilda Hodgman. 
Abigail TarbeU. 
Hepzibah Shattuck. 
Elizabeth Jones. 
Rebecca Robbins* 
Lydia Jefts. 

Polly TarbeU. 

Polly Stewart. 

Mary Hartshorn, Wilton* 

Eunice S. Russell. 

Polly Hodgman. 

Mary Knapp. 

Mrs. Deidama Parker. 

Ruthy Adams. 

Martha Kimball. 

Nabby Bucknam. 

Betsey Swallow. 

Hannah Barrett. 

Polly Brown, Ashby. 

Hannah Barrett. 

Eunice Wright, Brookline. 

Nancy Flinn. 

Hannah Rubbins. 

Sally Strattoii, New Ipswich* 

Sarah Seaver, Brookline. 

Sally Scripture. 

Deborah Barrett. 

Sally Flagg. 

Patty Eliott. 
Betsey Dunster. 
Charlotte Flagg. 
Mary Ehott. 



William L. Steele, Wilton, [Vt., Dolly TarbeU. 
Jairus Robinson, Weathersfield, Roxana Holt. 



Benjamin Edwards, 

John Russell, Jr., 

Abner Holden, 

Artemas Wood, Mont Vernon, 

Caleb Biicknam, Townsend, 

Charles Granger, 
Samuel Smith, Jr., 
Capt. Ira Hall, 
Amos Eliott, 
Charles Scripture, 
Francis Wright, 
Solomon B. Baldwin, 
Loami Chamberlain, 
Joseph B. Robbins, 



Lucy Jefts. 
Elizabeth Williams. 
Eunice Barrett. 
Susan Barber. 
Loisa Brooks Snow. 

Clarissa P. BuUard. 
Clarissa Atherton. 
Polly Boynton, 
Betsey Felton. 
Prudence Webber. 
Mrs. Lucy Barrett. 
Agnes C. Smith. 
Eliza Tucker, Brookline. 
Hannah Blood. 



RECORD OF MARRIAGES. 



171 



1821. 


June 


7. 


Nov. 


18. 


" 


29. 


Dec. 


20. 


'< 


27. 


1822. 


Jan. 


17. 


May 


fi. 


<( 


12. 


<( 


28. 


Aug. 


25. 


Sept. 


8. 


Oct. 


1. 


(( 


24. 


Nov. 


28. 


Dec. 


19. 


<( 


24. 


1823. 


Jan. 


30. 


April 


6. 


a 


28. 


May 


22. 


'< 


22. 


Aug. 


21. 


8ept. 


7. 


Oct. 


5. 


(t 


9. 


Nov. 


16. 


<' 


20. 


Dec. 


21. 


" 


31. 


1824. 


Feb. 


5. 


April 


30. 


May 


18. 


" 


26. 


June 


3. 


Aug. 


12. 


Dec. 


9. 


<i 


25. 


1825. 


Jan. 


13. 


Feb. 


17. 


June 


2. 


Dec. 


29. 


182( 


5. 


Jan. 


26. 


March 30. 


April 


20. 


May 


23. 


July 


4. 


Sept. 


19. 



Horace Sawtell, Sally Saunders. 

Thomas Loring, Rebecca Danforth, 

Jonas Brown, Townsencl, Phebe Winship. 

Benj. WiUianis, 2d, N. Ipswich, AbigailJeits. 
Leonard E,ead, Hannah Ford Foster. 

Thomas Hodgman, Jr., Esther Flagg. 

Charles Barrett, Temple, Susanna Seaver, New Ipswich. 

Curtis Lawrence, Grotou, Lucv Merriam. 

[Oliver Stearns, Milford, Dolly Wright, Milford. 

By Rev. Richard Hall of New ipswich.] 



Benjamin Fletcher, 
Jonathan Richardson, 
John Bo}'nton, Templeton, 
Alexander Lynch, 
Edmund Bancroft, Pepperell, 
John Jenkins, Townsend, 
Ariel Godding, New Ipswich, 
Abel Kemp, Brookline, 

Calvin Blood, 

Joel Eliott, 

William Carson, Wilton, 

Abel Davis, Jr., Concord, Ms., 

Stephen Brooks, Ashby, 

Nathan B. Shattuck, Ashby, 

William Kesson, New Ipswich, 

Abijali Eaton, 

Asahel Green, Milford, 

Amos Hodgman, Pepperell, 

Timothy Farrar, 

Ammi Shattuck, 

Joseph Merriam, 2d, 

Benj. Lane, Jr., Ashburnham, 



Deidama Austin. 

Rebecca Hill. 

Nabby Merriam. 

Anna Barrett. 

Eliza Ames, Brookline. 

Loisa Brown. 

Eliza Chickering, New Ipswich. 

Mary Dean, Townsend. 

Indiana Blood. 

Annah Shed. 

Dorcas Pcussell. 

Rebecca Lewis, New Ipswich. 

Narcissa Pratt, New Ipswich. 

Esther Smith, New Ipswich. 

Mary Harding, New Ipswich. 

Judith J efts. 

Pamela Scripture. 

Polly Flagg. 

Sally Richardson. 

Phebe Hutchinson. 

Nancy Davis, Townsend. 

Abigail Walker, New Ipswich. 



Andrew Eliott, 

William Johnson, Boston, 

Samson Mcintosh, Brookline, 

Orris Knapp, Ashburnham, 

James Frost, Jr., Windham, 

Samuel Dix Blood, 

David Jewett Stickney, [pie, Lydia Amsden 

Timothy Wheelock Smith, Tern- Eliza Austin. 

Asher Tarbell, Mary Ann Barber. 



Sally Warren. 

Deidama Pritchard, New Ips'ich. 

Eliza Amsden. 

MiUey Flagg. 

Martha F. Russell, Windham. 

Nancy Richardson. 



Oct. 26. 



Jesse Saunders, Townsend, 
Cyrus Putnam, Wilton, 
John Kimball, Fitzwilliam, 
Abraham Wright, 
Orlando Cragin, 

James Parker, Brookline, 
George Betterly, Brookline, 
Jonathan Russell, Jr., 
John R. Jordan, Temple, 
William Bailey, Milford, 
William Ward, Newport, 
Luke George, Brookline, 
John M. Mayuard, Jaffrey, 



Mary Ann Kemp. 
Lucinda Tarbell. 
Nabby J. Hill. 
Liicinda Flagg. 
Melinda G. Cristy. 

Deverd Corej^ Brookline. 
Hannah Lee, Brookline. 
Rebecca Blood, Sharon. 
Susan Darling. 
Ruthy Austin, Milford. 
Rebecca Boynton. 
Harriet J. H. Ho wet, Brookline. 
Harriet K. Bullard. 



172 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



1826 




Nov. 




Nov. 


20. 


Dec. 


24. 


<< 


31. 


1827 




Jan. 


2. 


May 


22. 


June 


19. 


July 


3. 


" 


5. 


Aug. 


16. 


Sept. 


IS. 


1828 




March 25. 


April 


27. 


May 


9. 


(1 


9. 


June 


18. 


Oct. 


15. 


Nov. 


11. 


Dec. 


25. 


182S 


1. 


March 26. 


April 


9. 


" 


14. 


May 


7. 


May 


31. 


June 


4. 


Oct. 


29. 


Dec. 


29. 


1830. 


May 


27. 


June 


13. 


" 


13. 


July 


1. 


Oct. 


26. 


1831. 


Sept. 


6. 


Nov. 


6. 


" 


15. 


Dec. 


1. 


t( 


6. 


tc 


20. 


1832. 


Jan. 


26. 


March 11. 


<i 


20. 


'« 


22. 


April 


10. 


" 


26. 


May 


10. 


(t 


23. 


Sept. 




June 


8. 


Nov. 


1. 


(< 


1. 


i( 


8. 


Dec. 


26. 


♦' 


31. 



Ilubbert Russell, Jr., 
John Boyntou, Petersham, 
George Hall, 
John Flagg, 

Calvin Brooks, Lowell, 
Jacob Bloclgett, Now Ijjswich, 
Nathan Saunders, 
Samuel Whiting, 
Daniel Bills, Townsend, 



Climena Brown. 
Chloe Brown. 
Abigail Boynton. 
Mary Eliott. 

Eliza S. Flagg. 

Mary Jofts, New Ipswich. 

Betsey Shed. 

Hannah Russell. 

Lucretia Tucker, Townsend. 



Nathaniel H. May, New Ipswich, Maria Nicholas, New Ipswich. 
Jesse Matthews, Hancock, Almira Preston, Hancock. 



James Weethee, 

John Richards, 

Jonas Hobart, 

Josiah Sawtell, Townsend, 

Gulliver Wright, Pepperell, 

Ebenezer Flagg, Jr., 

John Peabody, 

Charles Barrett, 



Mrs. Tryphena Richards. 
Nancy Farwell. 
Louisa Scripture. 
Rebecca Barber. 
Mary Kemp. 
Betsey Ehott. 
Fideha Saunders. 
Mary Shattuck. 



Elias D. Eliott, 

Samuel P. Nutting, 

Thomas Hodgman, Jr., 

Abiel Nutting, New Ipswich, 

James Spaulding, 

Oliver H. Pratt, 

Ebenezer Hodgman, Townsend, Mary Ann Blood 

Abijah Eliott, Jr., Sally Russell. 



Sally Eliott. 

Liicy S. Barrett. 

Betsey Burnham, New Ipswich. 

Lucinda "NVarren. 

Betsey Smith. 

Maria Hill. 



Charles Nicholas, New^ Ipswich, Mary Blood, New Ipswich. 
Calvin Boynton, Hannah D. Martin. 

James Wood, Jr., Mrs. Mary Webber. 

Eli R. Torrey, New Ipswich, Mary Bailey, New Ipswich. 
Jonathan Bachelder, Elizabeth Russell. 



William Warren Whitaker, 
Davis Greene, Brewer, Me., 
Calvin Blanchard, New York, 
Calvin Eliott, 
Nathaniel G. Bailey, 
William Sawtell, 

Eleazer Kinson, 

Hutchinson Rogers, Billerica, 

Luke H. Cutter, Peterborough, 

Nelson March, Ashby, 

Stow A. Verder, Townsend, 

Luther Austin, 

William Farley, 

Stephen Walker, Grafton, Yt., 

Silas Keyes, Jr., Temple, 

Franklin Merriam, 

Benjamin Merriam, 

Frederick Mansfield, 

Amos B. Russel, 

Edward Richardson, 

Azariah Arlin, New Ipswich, 



Adalucia Wetherbee, Rindge. 
Sophia Daniels, Brookline. 
Martha Barrett. 
Mary P. Johnson. 
Lucy Eliott. 
Maria W^hitaker. 

Eliza Lawrence. 

Keziah Coburn, Brookline. 

Abigail Ames. 

Thirza Mcintosh, Brookline. 

Eliza D. Douglass. 

Lucy Scripture. 

Eliza B. Flagg, New Ipswich. 

Loiza Barrett. 

Rebecca Pratt, Temple. 

Mary Ann Lane. 

Irene Knapp. 

Hannah Bailey. 

Mary Eliott. 

Fidelia Barrett. 

Betsey Richards, New Ipswich. 



EECORD OF MARRIAGES, 



173 



lOOO. 

March 12. 


'« 


U. 


May 


2. 


<c 


7. 


(( 


12. 


i( 


U. 


Sept. 


17. 


" 


17. 


Oct. 


8. 


Dec. 


19. 


1834. 


Jan. 


6. 


March 


5. 


Aug. 


13. 


Oct. 


13. 


Nov. 


13. 


Dec. 


11. 


1835- 


Jan. 


13. 


Feb. 


17. 


March 


. 3. 


April 


14. 


May 


9. 


June 


25. 


Sept. 


3. 


Oct. 


8, 


«' 


22. 


<( 


29. 


Dec. 


10. 


(< 


29. 


<c 


29. 


1( 


31. 



1839. 
AprU 11. 

1840. 
April 28. 
30. 

«« 30. 

1841. 
April 8. 

1842. 
March 31. 

1843. 
Dec. 28. 

1844. 
Oct. 27. 

1846. 
Sept. 17. 

1848. 
Nov. 23. 
Dec. 18. 

1849. 
March 15, 



Amos Herrick, 

Jonas Richards, 

Capt. Thomas Wilson, 

Dea. Hezekiah Richardson, 

John G. Merriam, Westminster, 

Jonas Farmer, Townsend, 

Samuel B. Tibbetts, N. Ipswich, 

Aaron Blood, 

Elon BButterfield, Concord, Ms., 

Eliab Going, Jr., Townsend, 

Emory BoUes, Springfield, Vt., 

Mcintosh, Brookline, 

Calvin Davis, 

Ephraim Gibson, Jr., Fitchburg 
Nathaniel Brown, Acton, 
Wiuslow Ames, 

Joseph Proctor, 

Joseph H. Fletcher, Ashby, 

Levi Wyman, Winchendon, 

Oliver Tenney, Boston, 

Waterman Wheeler, 

Loring Hazelton, 

Luther L. Barrett, [don, 

Nahum J. Raymond, Winchen- 

Philemon Russell, Ashburnham, 

Dr. Otis Hoyt, 

Capt. Eliab Going, Townsend, 

Jonathan D. Gibbs, Jaffrey, 

Alvah Dodge, Dunstable, 

Rufus Coffin, Royalston, 

William Pike, New Ipswich, 
Elnathan Boynton, 

David Wallace, Brookline, 
Josiah Winship, 



Capt. Ira Hall, 

Ira B. Foster, Charlestown, Ms., 
Benjamin A. EKott, 
George Taft. 

George W. Rolfe, 

Jas. P. Hartshorn, Bedford, Ms., 
Sylvester Putnam, 

Aaron K. Putnam, WUton, 

John S. Proctor, 

[den, Me., 
Edwin Ruthven Hodgman, Cam- 
George Eliott, 2d, 
William Wheeler, 

Simon T. Smith, 

23 



Mrs. Mary Barrett, Townsend. 

Sarah D. Washburn, N. Ipswich. 

Mrs. Lucy Lane. 

Mrs. Betsj' Farwell, Ashby. 

Sarah F. Warren. 

Gratia Grant. 

Marv Lee, New Ipswich. 

Sally Eliott. 

Elizabeth B. Kemp. 

Hannah Warren. 

Lucretia Priest. 

Betsey Wright, Brookline. 

Susan Jones. 

INIary Brown. 

Eliza Robens. 

Lucy R. Barrett. 

Mrs. Sibbel Baldwin. 

Clarissa I. Kennedy. 

Helen M. Eliott. 

Betsey Cragin. 

Rebecca E. Newhall. 

Margaret Richards. 

Emily Russell. 

Bathsheba Eliott. 

Clarissa Smith. 

Mary F. King, New Ipswich. 

Mrs. Dorcas Humphries. 

Sarah H. Wilson. 

Lydia Eliott. 

Rebecca A. Richardson. 

Rebecca Holden. 
Rachel Eliott. 

Sarah Ann Smith, Brookline. 
Sarah Hunt. 

Mrs. Jerusha Parker, Dunstable, 



Thirza F. Newhall. 
Mary Knapp. 
Abby H. Flagg. 

Mary S. Barnard, 

Elizabeth C. Kennedy, N. Ips'ich, 
Elizabeth Hill. 

Nancy Wright. 

Mary Turrell, Nashua, 

Martha Hill. 

Mary Flagg. 
Sarah C. Merriam. 

Rowena A. Woods, 



174 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



BY REV JOSEPH B. HILL. 
1840. 

Dec. 17. S. B. Butler, Lorinda Ames. 

Dec. 24. limothy Amsden. Martha C. Hill. 



1841. 



MARLBOROUGH. BY REV. JILES LYMAN. 



April 20. Josepli B, Wilson, Mason, 



Melinda Blodgett, Marlborough. 



MASON. BY REV. ALBERT G. COMINGS. 



1849. 
Jan. 23. 

" 23. 
May 1. 
Nov. 4. 

1850. 
Jan. 3. 



Abel S. Farwcll, 

Otis Hodgraan, 

Isaac P. Woods, Dunstable, 

Hiram D. Richardson, 

Warren E. Shattuck, 



Maria L. Hodgman. 
Maria White. 
Henrietta E. Willey, 
Mary Ann Scripture. 

Alvira Davis. 



In tlic following list the name of the officiating minister or 
mao;istrate is not recorded : 



1851. 
Eeb. 11. 



April 7. 
June 5. 
Sept. 18. 
Nov. 25. 
Dec. 8. 

" 30. 

1852. 
Jan. 7. 
Feb. 17. 
March 11. 

1853. 
Nov. 17. 

1854. 

Jan. 12. 

Feb. 21. 

Dec. 14. 

27. 

1855. 
March 5 . 
31. 
April 1. 
May 14. 
July 3. 

1856. 
Jan. 7. 
April 27. 
May 28. 

1857. 
April 25. 
May 31. 



Leonard Jefts, 
Asa B. Hodgman, 
William Tarbell, 
Albert O. Dimmick, 
William Sawtell, 
Albert Taylor, 
William A. Short, 
George Barrett, 
Charles A. Foster, 
William E,. Putnam, 
Leavitt L. Livingston, 

F. R. Marcy, 
James O. Fitch, 
Isaac Russell, 

Charles P. Richardson, 

James R. Kidder, 
Ezra F. Baker, 
PhUander Eddy, 
Francis C. Pope, 

Myal Tarbell, 
Benjamin Wallace, 
John S. Proctor, 
Thomas D. Bennett, 
Grovenor McClure, 

George Hehue, 
Joel Elliott, 2d, 
Willard D. Hero, 

Joseph P. Elliott, 
George VV. Scripture, 



Mary Webber. 

Betsey Winship. 

Sophronia Eliott. 

Adaliza Wright. 

AHce L. Heywood. 

Sarah J. Barnes. 

Mary Jane Whitney. 

Zoa Blood. 

Clarinda Felch. 

Martha Jane A. Hartshorn. 

Martha Jane Mcintosh. 

Sarah M. Felt. 
Betsey J. Burbank. 
Mrs. Jane Russell. 

H. Amanda Mansfield. 

Caroline M. Barrett. 
Sarah H. Cristie. 
Maria Lynch. 
Emeline R. Searles. 

Harriet M. Morse. 
Elizabeth J. Eastman. 
JuHa E. Weston. 
Adaline F. Putnam. 
Lucy Towne. 

Matilda L. Hodgman. 
Emily Hoiden. 
Elizabeth Peabody. 

Mary E. Dunn. 
Maria Wheeler. 



RECORD OF MARRIAGES. 175 



1857. 






June 14. 


Edwin R. Farnsworth, 


Abby J. Webber. 


SeiJt. 9. 


Abel Adams, 


Alary Gillman. 


" 26. 


Edwin L. Nutting, 


Mary A. Annis. 


Oct. 22. 


Francis B. Cragin, 


Ruvina Richardson, 


22. 


Henry A. Cragin, 


Susan M. Elliott. 


31. 


Lucius A. WMte, 


Margaret Lyle. 



The list of marriages in Groton and Pepperell is copied from 
Butler's History of Groton ; that in Townseud, from the town 
records of that town. The parties probably resided in the 
several towns in which the marriages are recorded, except in 
those cases where it is otherwise stated. The other lists, 
except that of Mr. Hill, are taken from the town records of 
Mason. In those of Mr. Searle, the residence of the parties 
is stated in only one instance. Most of the persons in these 
lists resided in Mason. In the list of Mr. Eliot, the resi- 
dence given in the record is stated in every instance. The 
date of the first marriage in this list, that of John Sloan 
and Sarah Blood, on the record, is "January 1, 1782." This 
cannot be correct, as Mr. Eliot was not ordained till 1786, 
and had no authority to officiate, in man-ying persons, before 
he was ordained. The date 1789 is inserted as the probable 
date. On page 165, in a few copies, the following marriage 
was accidentally omitted, and should be supplied: "1821. 
October 11. Joseph Smith, Wilton, Lucy Adams, Mason." 
The list of marriages by Mr. Hill is copied from his original 
record. In this record, the residence of the parties is stated, 
in all cases ; but in the list above published, the residence of 
parties in Mason is omitted ; that of others is stated. In Mr. 
Hill's records, in a few instances, the day of the month is not 
inserted. Two marriages by the Rev. Joseph B. Hill, are 
copied from his original record. The remainder of the list, 
from January 23, 1849, to October 31, 1857, is copied from 
the town records; the name of the officiating minister or 
magistrate, and the residence of the parties, is given wherever 
it is found in these records. It must be apparent that the 
record of marriages in the above list, for several of the last 
years, is very imperfect. 



176 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



RECORD OF DEATHS. 

A record of deaths of the inhabitants and residents of the 
town of Mason, commencing July 20, 1758, and ending Janu- 
ary 1, 1858, gathered from the town records, monuments, and 
documentary evidence, for the period from 1758 to November 
2, 1790; from that time to the close of the year 1837, taken 
from the record of deaths kept by the Rev. Ebenezer Hill, 
with a few corrections and additions derived from monuments 
and reliable evidence ; for the years 1838 and 1839, no record 
having been found, resort was had to monuments, minutes of 
burials kept by the sextons, and reliable tradition ; from the 
close of that period, use has been made of the record kept 
by Dr. Willis Johnson. 

"Time is a river, deep and wide, 

And while along its banks we stray, 
We see our loved ones, o'er its tide, 

Borne from our sight away, away." 



A record of deaths previous 
from town records, monumeuts 

1758. 
July 20. Corporal Nehemiah Gould, 



1761. 
Sept. 5. 

1762. 
Jan. 27. 

1763. 
Feb. 7. 



killed in battle near Lake 
George. 

Grace, d, of Obadiah and 
Ruth Parker, 16 days. 

Obadiah, s. of the same, 4 
years 1 month. 



to November 3, 1790, gathered 
1, and other sources : 

1766. 
July 1. Joseph, s. of Benjamin and 
Martha Mann, 1 y. 5 ms. 



Anne, d. of Richard and 
Anna Lawrence, 4 ms. 15 
days. 
Dec. 28. Sarah, w. of John Swallow. 

1764. 
Oct. 2. Rebecca, d. of John and 
Susannah Button, 11 ms. 



1765. 
July 8. 

1766. 
Feb. 13. 

Mar. 24. 



Simon, s. of Simon and 
Sarah Ames, I y. 10 ms. 

Jonathan, s. of Jonathan 
and Lydia Jefts, 1 m. 

Lemuel and Thomas, twin 
sons of Lemuel and Sa- 
rah Spaulding, 12 ds. 



1767. 
Jan. 13. 

Aug. 10. 

1769. 
Nov. 4. 



Dec. 23. 

1771. 

Aug. 1. 

1772. 
Feb. 11. 



Mar. 22. 

May 6. 
Nov. 8. 



Joseph, s. of Simon and 
Sarah Ames, 6 ms. 

John, s. of Aaron and Lucy 
Wheeler, 8 ds. 

Ruth, d. of Jonathan and 
Ruth Williams, 2 ys. 21 
days. 

Dorcas, d. of Amos and 
Sarah Dakin, 6 ms. 

Jonathan, s. of Jonathan 
and Ruth Williams, 1 y. 

Hepsibath, d. of Lemuel 
and Sarah Spaulding, 1 
y. 1 m. 

Elizabeth, d. of Josiah and 
Lucy Wheeler, 2 ys. 7 ms. 

John, s. of James and Sarah 
Withee, 4 ys. 4 ms. 

Anna, w. of David Blodg- 
ett. 



RECOED OF* DEATHS. 



177 



1773. 
Sept. 2. 

1774. 
Oct. 17. 
Dec. 3. 



1775. 
June 17. 

Oct. 2. 



1776. 
April 7. 

July 24. 



Aug. 25. 

Sept. 29. 

Nov. 18. 

1777. 
June 30. 

Sept. 10. 

" 10. 

« 14. 
Oct. 8. 



29. 



Nov. 



1778. 
Sept. 16. 

" 28. 
Oct. lU. 

1779. 
Jan. G. 

Oct. 2. 



1781. 
Feb. 9. 

June 24. 



AmoS) s. of Josiah and 
Sarah. Robens, 23 y. 

Mr. Josiah Wheeler. 
Eunice, d of John and 

Mary Swallow, o m. 
Mr. Joseph Herrick. 

Joseph Blood, killed in 
Bunker Hill battle. 

William, s. of John and 
Thankful Whitaker, 1 y. 
6 m. 

Mr. Nathaniel Barrett. 

Dorothy, d. of Joshua and 

Dorothy Davis, 3 y. 7 m. 
Benjamin, s. of Benjamin 

and Martha Mann, 13 y. 

3 m. 
Elizabeth, d. of Lemuel and 

Sarah Spaulding, 9 d. 
Susannah, d. of John and 

Thankful Whitaker, 1 m. 
Silas, s. of E-ichard and 

Anna Lawrence, 3 y. 1 m. 

Ephraim, s. of John and 
Leefe Lawrence, 3 m. 20 
days. 

Lucy, d. of Benjamin and 
Martha Mann, 2 y. 3 m. 

John, s. of John and Su- 
sannah Dutton, 11 y. 8 m. 

Mason, s. of same, 5 y. 

Deborah, d. of Daniel and 
Jemima Fay, 11m. 

Mary, w- of Henry Jefts, 
67 y. 

Polly, d. of Benjamin and 
Martha Mann, 2 d. 

Mr. Benjamin King. 

Sarah, daughter of Samuel 
and Sarah Wood, 7 m. 

Ens. Enosh LawTcnce, 68 y. 

Amos, s. of Abijah and 
Mary Allen, 8 y. 

Daniel, s. of James and 
Sarah Withee, 9 y. 3 m. 

Ebenezer, s. of Samuel and 
Sarah Wood, 1 m. 12 d. 

Mrs. Foster, w. of Jonathan 
Foster. 

Josiah, son of Samuel and 

Sarah Wood, 6 m. 
John Eliot, 65 y. 



178 
Aug. 


2. 

7 


Oct. 


5. 


1783. 
Mar. 13. 


June 


2 

18 


i( 


25 


July 


1 


ii 


16 


K 


20 


<( 


24 


Aug. 


3 


1784. 
May 4 



Oct. 15. 

1785. 
Jan. 

Feb. 8. 

9. 

" 23. 
Dec. 19. 

1786. 
April 30. 



June 14. 
Nov. 1. 

1787. 
June 3. 

July 22. 

1789. 
April 7i 

" 16. 

" 28. 
July 11. 



Isaac, s. of William and 
Dorothy Eliot, 4 m. 

Abel, son of Joseph and 
Sarah Barrett, 4 m^ 

John, 8. of John, Jr., and 

Rebecca Swallow, 12 d. 
Mr. Daniel Fay. 
Alice, d. of Aaron and Lucy 

Wheeler, 2 m. 
Oliver, s. of William and 

Sarah Miles, 3 y. 6 m. 
Andrew, s. of Andrew and 

Hannah Eliot, 5 m. 
Samuel, s. of Elisha and 

Mary Withington, 9 m. 

10 d. 
Sibbel, d. of James and Sib- 

bel Scripture, 4 y. 6 m. 
Hannah, d. of Benjamin 

and Hannah Barrett, Im. 
Isaac, s. of Hubbard and 

Sarah RusseU, 23 d. 

David Sloan, s. of Amos 
and Lydia Holden, 3 y. 
8 m. 15 d. 

Lydia, d. of Abraham, Jr., 
and Hannah Merriam. 

Thomas, s. of Thomas and 
Sarah Tarbell, 3 y. 5 m. 

Thomas, s. of Jason Rus- 
sell, 7 y. 8 m. 26 d. 

Mary, w. of Edmund Tar- 
bell, 36 y. 

Elias Eliot, 78 y. 

Ensign John Wood, 69 y 

John, 8. of Jotham and 
Elizabeth Webber, 1 y. 

3 m. 

Dorothy, w. of Wm. Eliot. 

George, s. of Aaron and 

Lucy Wheeler, 2 y. 5 m. 

Hannah, w. of Jonathan 

Chandler. 
Jonas, s. of Joseph and 

Sarah Barrett, 3 y. 1 m. 

Polly, d. of Andrew and 
Hannah Eliot, 11 m. 

Alice, d. of Aaron and Lucy 
Wheeler, 1 day. 

Deacon Amos Dakin, 57 y. 

Rebecca, d. of Thomas and 
Rebecca Hodgman, 3 y. 

4 m. 15 d. 



178 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



1789. 
Aug. 23. 

Sept. 25. 

Dec. 1. 

1790. 
Mar. U. 



Polly, d. of Jos. and Mary 
Woods, 2 y. 2 m. 27 d. 

Sally, d. of Jonas and Dolly 
Fay, 1 m. 

Elizabeth, wid. of Ensign 
John Wood, 75 y. 

Isaac Brown, Jr., 18 y. 



1790. 
April 16. 

May 1. 

Juno 24. 

Auir. 1. 



John, s. of Nathaniel and 

Hannah Williams. 
Jonas, s. of Deacon Amos 

Dakin, 18 y. 
Rachel, w. of Jonathan 

Williams, 58 y. 
Anne, d. of Jonas and 

Dolly Fay, 7 y. 4 m. 



Record of deaths, from November 2, 179G, to December 
31, 1837, from the record kept by the Rev. Ebenezer Hill: 



1790. 


Nov. 


2 


<< 


7 


1791. 


Jan. 




Feb. 


26 


" 


27 


Mar. 


26 


April 


26 


June 


2 


Aug. 


22 


Sept. 


4 


Nov. 


15 


(1 


24 


1792. 


Jan. 


27. 


Feb. 


2 


Mar. 


3 


tk 


8 


June 


10 


Oct. 


10 


Nov. 


2 


Dec. 


5 


Dec. 


9 


1793. 


Jan. 


12 


Feb. 


7 


April 14 


«( 


14 


June 


6 


<< 


10 


Nov. 


29 


1794. 


Feb. 





Mar. 



25. 



In. d.of Joseph Russell, 5 y. 
Betsey, d. of Reviben Ken- 
dall, 18 y. 

In. c. of Reuben Barrett. 

Nancy, d. of Wm. Miles. 

Wife of Benj. Hodgman. 

Elizabeth, d. of Joseph 
Merriam, 19 y. 

Mr. Eleazer Fish. 

Elizabeth, w. of Wm. Shed. 

Mary, w. of Joseph Mer- 
riam, 48 y. 

Capt. William Chambers. 

Wid. Sarah Elliot. 

Lydia, w. of David Whita- 
ker. 

In. c. of Reuben Barrett. 

Timothv, s. of Uea. T. Da- 
kin, 4 m. 22 d. 

Joseph Bullard, 73 y. 

Billy, s. of Asa Stone. 

In. c. of Dr. Joseph Gray. 

In. c. of Peter Zuire. 

Polly, w. of Dr. William 
Barber, 24 y. 

Elisha Withington. 

In. c. of Amos Blood. 

In. c. of Jeremy Steward. 

Daniel Warrer, (negro.) 

Dorcas, d. of Samuel Hill, 
4 ra. 

Wife of Reuben Hosmer. 

Sally, w. of Artemas Man- 
ning. 

Sally, d. of John Winship. 

Ruth, d. of John Winship. 

James, s. of Samuel Woods, 

3 m. 9 d. 
Polly, w. of Rev. Ebenezer 

Hill, 29 y. 
Sarah, w. of Capt. Joseph 

Barrett, 43 y. 



1794. 

Aug. 4. 

Sept. 6. 

6. 

Nov. 13. 

" 28. 

Dec. 3. 

" 17. 

" 19. 
" 23. 

1795. 
Feb. 11. 

'« 22. 

" 24. 
Ai^ril 25. 

" 26. 
June 29. 

" 29. 
Julv 10. 

"" 19. 

1796. 
Jan. 26. 

Feb. 9. 
Mar. 15. 
April 4 . 
May 4. 

" 27. 
June 2. 

" 27. 

July 4. 
Sept. 13. 

Dec. 14. 

1797. 
Jan. 2< 
Feb. 16. 



Prudence Crane. 
In. c. of Thos. Blood, 4 y. 
In. c. of Thomas Blood. 
Elizabeth, Avid. of Ensign 

John Wood, 71 y. 
Leafee, d. of Clark Haven, 

17 y. 

Ruth, wid. of Elias Eliot, 

85 y. 
Josiah, s. of J. Eliott, 2 y. 
Allen Haven, 11 y. 
In. c. living with Mrs. War- 



In. twin children of John 

Wait, Jr. 
David Weatherbee, 77 y. 
Betsey Scripture, 13 y. 
Rebecca, d. of Abel Adams. 
Patty, d. of Abel Adams. 
In. c. of Abel Swallow. 
Wid. Mary Marrett, 83 y. 
Wife of Benjamin Darling. 
In. c. of Jonas Amsden. 

Esther, w. of Capt. Thomas 
Tarbell. 

Capt. Thomas Tarbell, 77. 

In. c. of Jonathan Russell. 

James Weethee. 

Nabby, d. of Joses Buck- 
nam. 

Wife of John Wait. 

Lucy and Nancy, d. of Jos. 
Tufts. 

Charles, s. of Dea. T. Da- 
kin, 2 m. 16 d. 

In. s. of Daniel Hill. 

Artemas, s. of Artemas 
Manning. 

Betsey, d. of Zaccheus Bar- 
rett. 

Abijah Ames, 18 y. 
John, s. of Maj. Jas. Wood, 
12 y. 



RECORD OF DEATHS. 



179 



1797. 


Apri 


3. 


July 


4. 


" 


12. 


Aug. 


20. 


(( 


25. 


(( 


25. 


Sep. 


1. 


" 


9. 


« 


17. 


Nov. 


22. 


« 


26. 


a 


28. 


Dec. 


10. 


1798. 


Jan. 


24. 


May 


17. 


4(" 


20. 


June 


21. 


July 


8. 


Sept. 


28. 


Oct. 


15. 


i( 


20. 


(( 


20. 


Nov. 


14. 


(( 




1799. 


Mar. 


12. 


April 


7. 



May 24. 



Oct. 


18 


1800. 


Jan. 


9. 


May 


U. 


June 


18 


<( 


23 


July 


20 


Aug. 


8 


Sep. 


19 


<< 


29 


<t 




Oct. 


19 


Nov. 


3 


(< 


17 


(( 


18 



" 29. 



In. c. of John Swallow, Jr. 

Jesse, s. of Silas BuUard, 
8 m. 

Rebecca, w. of E,ev. Eben- 
ezer Hill, 26 y. 

John Tarbell. 

In. c. of Stephen Withing- 
ton. 

In. c. of John Baldwin. 

Wid. Sarah Lawrence. 

Susan, d. of Ezra Merriam. 

In. c. of Dea. li. Wesson. 

Timothy, s. of Dea. T. Da- 
kin, 2 y. 10 m. 

Mr. Abraham Merriam. 

In. c. of John Eliott. 

Mr. John Goddard. 

Mr. Abraham Haskell. 
In. c. of Joel Parker. 
In. c. of Silas Bullard. 
Samuel HUl, 66 y. 
In. c. of Oliver Nutting. 
In. c. of Jedediah Felton. 
Dr. Enosh Lawrence, 25 y. 

10 m. 12 d. 
In. c. of Stephen Balcom. 
Elizabeth, w. of Dea. R. 

Wesson, 34 y. Urn. 2 d. 
Two in. c. of same. 
In. c. of Jonas Mann. 
In. c. of Timothy Wheeler. 

Wid. Elizabeth Heald, 85 y. 

Rebecca, d. of A. Wheeler, 
19 y. 10 m. 

Elizabeth, w. of Jason Rus- 
sell, 54 y. 

In. c. of R. Hodgman, Jr. 

In. c. of Thomas Blood. 

Mr. Joseph Russell. 
Mrs. Dorothy Fish. 
Sally, d. of Ezra Merriam. 
Jonas Fay, Jr., 25 y. 
Molly J efts. 

Artemas, s. of A. Manning. 
Reuben Barrett, 71 y. 
In. c. of Richard Hall. 
In. c. of same. 
In. c. of Oliver Eliott. 
In. c. of John Russell, Jr. 
Capt. Isaac Brown, 55 y. 
In. c. of Jer. Stewart. 
In. c. of Peter Sanderson. 
Two in. c. of same. 
J^ydia, d. of Samuel Hill, 

3y- 

Mr. Ebenezer Blood. 



1800. 




Dec. 


7. 


In. c. of Eben Stacey. 


(( 


20. 


In. c. of Thomas Blood. 


1801. 




Jan. 


5. 


Wife of Thomas Blood. 


» 


31. 


Wid. Chapman, 97. 

In. c. of Daniel Williams. 


Sep. 


6. 


In. c. of Josiah Sawtell. 


Oct. 


8. 


John, s. of Captain S. S. 
Parker. 


ti 


12. 


James, s. of same. 


Dec. 


2. 


Benjamin, son of Aaron 
^Vheeler, 24 y. 


1802. 




Jan. 


25. 


Mr. Benjamin Hodgman. 


Mar. 


20. 


Jonas Amsdeu, 53 y. 


(( 


26. 


"William Hosmer, 74 y. 


(> 


26. 


Wife of WiUiam Blood.^ 


AprU 22. 


Mr. Eben Stace)'. 


<i 


28. 


Ehzabeth, w. of Dea. Tim- 
othy Dakin, 37. 


June 


13. 


Mary, w. of Ohver Eliot. 


July 


9. 


In. c. of Widow Stacey. 


<i 


31. 


Nancy, d. of WilUam B. 
Flagg, 19 m. 


Sep. 


16. 


Polly, d. of Th: Hodgman. 


(( 


17. 


In. c. of John Lawrence, Jr. 


(( 


19. 


In. d. of Abel Adams. 


Oct. 


4. 


Mr. David Sloan. 


II 


14. 


Amos, s. of Deacon Timo- 
thy Dakin, 1 y. 4 m. 25 d. 


<( 


15. 


Widow Zuire. 


Nov. 


13. 


In. c. of Nabby Barrett. 


Dec. 


4. 


In. c. of Azubah Swallow, 

ly- 

Nathaniel Smith, 81 y. 


i( 


18. 


(1 


31. 


In. c. of Andrew Eliott. 


1803. 




Jan. 


9. 


Wife of Joel Ames. 


" 


29. 


William Saunders, 90 y. 


Feb. 


19. 


Betsey Townsend, 14 y. 


Mar. 


18. 


In. c. of Amos Dakin. 


Apri 


2. 


W^illiam Blood, 83 y. 


i< 


9, 


Persis Lawrence, 23 y. 


II 


30. 


Aaron Wheeler, Jr., 34 y. 


Aug. 


14. 


In. c. of Daniel Hodgman. 


11 


15. 


Artemas, s. of Captain John 
Barrett, 3 y. 


II 


23. 


Daniel Hodgman, 27 y. 


Sept 


5. 


Thomas, s. of Abel Adams, 

5y. 

James, s. of the same. 


II 


10. 


" 


12. 


John Stevens, 16 y. 


II 


17. 


W'ife of Joel Richardson. 


II 


22. 


Noah W., s. of Sam'l Hill, 
4 y. 6 m. 


II 


28. 


Lydia, d. of the same, 3 y. 


Oct. 


12. 


In. c. of Edward Tarbell. 


II 




Widow Haskell. 


Nov 


20. 


Widow Saunders. 


II 


26. 


Haley, w. of Zac. Shattuck. 



180 



HISTORY OP MARON. 



1804. 
Feb. 2, Mr. Samuel Green. 
" 6, Lucy Kemp. 
" 14. In. c. of William Barrett. 
" 25. Wife of Joel Richards. 
Mar. 1. Wife of Jonathan Leo. 
" 5. In. c. of Ruel Richardson. 
« B. Franklin, s. of Elijah 

Davis. 
" In. c. of John Lawrence, 

Jr. 
In. o. of Ambrose Gould. 
Eunice, w. of Abner Chick- 

ering, 29 y. 
Deborah Winship, 17 y. 
In. c. of John Russell, Jr. 
In. c. of John Withington. 
Susan Amsden, 16 y. 
Mr. Thomas Austin. 
Rebecca Lawrence, 28 y. 
In. c. of Jonathan Blood. 

In. c. of John Robbins. 

Jason Dunster, 79 y. 

Wid. Shattuck, 91 y. 

Mr. BiUings. 

Hannah Lawrence, 2G y. 

Wid. Hildreth. 

Benjamin Jefts, 2d, 25 y. 

John Waugh, 99 y. 

In. c. of William Newell. 

Sally, d. of R. Wesson, 

18 y. 
Luther Lawrence, 20 y. 
David Eliott, 15 y. 
Ammi A., s. of Andrew 

Tufts, 4 y. 
Benjamin Woods, 25 y. 
In. c. of William Barrett, 1 

y. 6 m. 
Nov. 6. In. c. of William Bride, 

21 d. 

" 8. Hannah, w. of Ebenezer 

Gilman, 24 y. 
" 30. Asa, s. of John Whitaker, 

22 y. 

Dec. 22. In. c. of John Brown, 2 d. 
'« 24. William Hill, of Bedford, 

21 y. 
1806. 
Jan. 18. Abraham Morriam, 48 y. 
Feb. 16. Rebecca, widow of Jason 

Dunster, 74 y. 
Mar. 23. Lucinda Hodgman, 1 1 y. 

«< 27. In. c. of Joshua Blood, 6 h. 
April 7. Joshua, s. of Joshua Blood, 

" 16. Amos Holden, 54 y. 
" 17. John, s. of John Russell, 
Jr., 1 y. 



(( 


24. 


May 


7. 


(t 


26. 


C( 


26. 


June 


6. 


Oct. 


15. 


Dec. 


19. 


(( 


21. 


<( 


27. 


180 


5. 


Jan. 


3. 


Feb. 


19. 


(( 


22. 


u 


28. 


Mar. 


19. 


April 


14. 


May 


1. 


June 


16. 


" 


26. 


July 


3. 


C( 


16. 


Aug. 


1. 




10. 


Sept. 


8. 


" 


27. 



1806. 


April 


19. 


June 


1. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


20. 


Dec. 


3. 


1807. 


Jan. 


2. 


" 


3. 


« 


9. 


(( 


19. 


Feb. 


27. 


April 


5. 

7. 


May 


5. 

7. 


Aug. 


13. 


Sept. 


5. 


(> 


9. 


" 


12 


(( 


20. 


Dec. 


2 


t( 


12. 


1808. 


Jan. 


16. 


(( 


18. 


Mar. 


3 


April 23 


" 


30. 


May 


19 
20 


June 




July 


26. 


Aug. 


22. 
28. 


Sept. 


3 


t( 


7. 


Dec. 


13. 


11 


30 



Mary, w. of Joshua Blood, 

28 y. 
In. 0. of David Withee. 
Benjamin Kendall, 56 y. 
d. of Josiah Eliott, 7 y. 
Alvah, s. of Capt. Jesse 

Barrett, 3 y. 
Aaron Wheeler, 66 y. 

Mr. Knapp, 86 y. 
Prescott, s. of A. Wheeler, 

12 y. 
John Adams, 65 y. 
Lydia, w. of Samuel Hill, 

37 y. 
In. c. of John Robbins, 

6 m. 
In. c of Levi Morse. 
Benjamin Jefts, 60 y. 
In. c. of Silas Bullard, 6 m. 
Deacon Nathan Hall, 91 y. 
Zaccheus Barrett, Jr., 30 y. 
Widow Rebecca Jones, of 

Bedford, 53 y. 
Rachel, d. of Jere. Boyn- 

ton, 5 y. 
Stephen Robbins, 22 y. 
Widow of Abraham Mer- 

riam, 69 y. 
In. s. of Capt. Manning, 

ly- 

In. c. of Joseph Bullard. 
Sally, w. of Joseph Bullard, 
21 y. 

Betsy, d. of Jotham Web- 
ber, 20 y. 

Susan, w. of James Snow, 
28 y. 

Lydia Miles, 7 y. 

Susannah, w. of Zachariah 
Davis, 57 y. 

AmoB, s. of Amos Blood, 
12 y. 

John Shed, 24 y. 

Sampson Clator, 24. 

Mr. Thomas Jefts. 

Juliana, d. of Jason Dun- 
ster, 5 m. 

Lydia Whipple, 28 y. 

In. c. of Cyrus Colman 2 d. 

Martha, d. of Capt. Jesse 
Barrett, 7 y. 

In. c. of John Sawtell, 4 y. 

Sukey Tarbell, (negro,) 34 
years. 

Sarah, wid. of Samuel Hill, 
75 y. 



RECOED OF DEATHS. 



181 



1809. 


Feb. 


13 


" 


27 


Apr. 


24 


Sep. 


14 


(( 


24 


Not. 


23 


Dec. 


10 


(I 


11 


1810. 


Jau. 


3 


" 


17 


Mar. 


12 


<( 


20 


>( 


21 


IC 


22 



Apr. 22, 

JSIay 

June 1. 

" 15. 

" 19. 
'« 25. 

July 8. 

" 10. 

Aug. 

Oct. 12. 

« 27. 
1811. 

April 15. 
June 28. 

Aug. 3. 

" 13. 

•' 14. 



Sep. 30. 

Nov. 7. 



Widow Weatherbee, 88 y. 
Hannah, widow of Jonas 

Amsden, 55 y. 
Esther Holden, 22 y. 
In. c. of Jeremiah Boynton. 
Sally Austin, 12 y. 
In. c. of Elijah Knapp. 

In. 0. of Groves, 7 m. 

John Jefts, 70 y. 

Lt. Enosh Lawrence, 72 y. 

In. c. of Capt. John Barrett. 

MiUev Holden, 20 y. 

Mr. S. Walker. 

In. c. of John Baldwin, 2 y. 

Lucy Russell, 21 y. 

In. c. of Samuel Townsend. 

In. c. of Eleazer Pish. 

In. c. of same. 

Burley C. Amsden, 2 y. 6 
months. 

Hannah Barrett, 20 y. 

In. c. of WilUam Eliott, 1 
y. 3 m. 

In. c. of Noah Winship, Jr. 

Wheeler, s. of Sam'l Wes- 
ton, 4 y. 

William Warren Whitaker, 

5 y- 

Capt. Jas. Scripture, 62 y. 
Rebecca, d. of Jason Dun- 

ster, 5 y. 
Timothy J., s. of Rev. 

Ebenezer Hill, 2 y. 9 m. 
Horatio, s. of A. Manning, 

10 y. 
Maria, d. of Joseph Mer- 

riam, Jr., 4 y. 
Isaac, 8. of A. Manning, 1 

month. 
Mary, wid. of Dea. Nathan 

Hall, 88 y. 

Mary, w. of Thomas Ken- 
worthy. 

Joseph Merriam, Jr., 41 y. 

Sarah, wid. of Deacon A. 
Dakin, 74 y. 

Rebecca, w. of John Swal- 
low, Jr., 56 y. 

Edev, w. of Aaron Wood, 
33' y. 

William B. Flagg, Jr., 9 y. 

In. c. of Samuel Nutting, 
21 d. 

Jotham, s. of A. Wheeler, 
25 y. 

Dea. Andrew Eliott, 56 y. 

Wife of Mitchell Whittier, 
25 y. 

24 



1811. 



In. e. of John Blodgett, Esq., 
14 d. 
John Smith, 46 y. 

Wife of J. Kenworthy,29 y. 
Widow Farley, 88 y. 
Sarah, w. of Joshua Davis, 

58 y. 
Asa Reed, 36 y. 
In. c. of G. Kimball, 21 d. 
Mollv,w. of Jonas Fay, 62 y. 
Mrs.'Ditson, 68 y. 
Elijah Davis, 67 y. 
In. c. of James Snow. 
Mrs. Bachelder, 78 y. 
In. c. of Simon Heald, 10 m. 
Mrs. Wyman. 
xMiss Wealthy Hayward, 

50 y. 
Wife of Jonathan Jefts, Jr. 
Brintnall Witherell, 46 y. 
Jonathan Searle, Esq., 68 y. 
In. c. of M. Whittier, 2 y. 

Polly Boynton, 18 y. 

Eli, s. of Jona. Jefts, 22 y. 

Mary, w. of Capt. Samuel 
S. Parker, 50 y. 

Samuel Hill, 49 y. 

George Kimball, 38 y. 

Pritchard, 21 y. 

Lucy Russell Barrett, 3 y. 

Lucy Sylvania Russell, 3 y. 

Stephen, s. of John Rob- 
bins, 2 y. 

Wiie of Samuel TarbeU. 

Widow of Nathaniel Smith, 
83 y. 

Patty Holden, 35 y. 

Reuel Richardson, 45 y. 

In. c. of Jona. Jefts, Jr. 

Martin Havward, 20 y. 

George, s. of Wm. Whita- 
ker, 5 m. 

d. of Willard Lawrence, 13 
years. 

Sylvester Snow, 10 y. 

Sally, w. of Ephraim Rus- 
sell, 38 y. 

In. c. of Putnam. 

Mary, d. of Hubbert Rus- 
sell, Jr., Iv. 4 m. 

Susan, d. of A. Wood, 8 y. 

W^idow Agnes Waugh,84 y. 

Phebe, d. of Josiah Russell, 
18 y. 
Sep. 10. Mary, d. of Reuel Richard- 
son, 3 y. 6 m. 



Dec. 30. 

1812. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 2. 

" 19. 

" 22. 

April 1. 

8. 

'• 21. 

" 21. 

" 30. 
May 2. 
Aug. 
Sept. 11. 



Nov. 20. 
Dec. 7. 

« 17. 

1813. 
Feb. 4. 
8. 

" 22, 

May 23. 
June 
Jtily 25. 
Aug. 1. 

" 7. 



1814. 
Jan. 4. 

" 12. 
Feb. 2. 



April 25. 



May 


9 
11 


June 
Aug. 


6 




8 
11 
31 



182 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



1814. 
Sept. 12. 

Oct. 27. 
Dec. 1. 



«' 12. 



181 


0. 


Jan. 


29. 


Feb. 


9. 


<< 


17. 


(< 


19. 


Mar. 


1 


(< 


13. 


(( 


18. 


{1 


27. 


(( 


30 


Apri! 


28 


(( 


29. 


May 


3 


(( 


12 


June 


1 


<< 


29 


July 


11 



" 12. 



Aug. 


13. 


(( 


30. 


Oct. 


23. 


Nov. 


1. 


(( 


23. 


Dec. 


5. 


<( 


6. 


1816. 


Jan. 


2. 


<i 


5. 


(( 


25 


<( 


26. 


<( 


29. 


<( 


30 


Feb. 


1 


<( 


16 


Mar. 


18 


April 14 


(( 


15 


(( 


19 



Daniel Prentice, 70 y. 
In. c. of AVoodis Lee, 5 y. 
In. c. of Abial Green, 6 m. 
s. of Samuel Wadsworth, 

14 y. 
In. c. of Dan'l White, 4 m. 
Epbraim Flagg, 84. 
In. c. of Paul Davis, 2 y. 

Elizabeth, d. of Jeremiah 

Boynton, 23 y. 
In. c. of W. B. Flagg, 4 y. 
In. c. of Hubbard Amsden, 

6 m. 
In. c. of Othni Crosby. 
John Boynton Wright, 18 y. 
Mrs. Sawtell, 33 y. 
In. c. of Tliad's Morse, 2 d. 
Rebecca Tarbell, 26 y. 
Nathan Adams, 26 y. 
Jonas Wheeler of New Ips- 
wich, 96 y. 
Mr. Farwell, 68 y. 
Loammi, s. of Deacon H. 

Richardson, 2 y. 6 m. 
Mr. John Baldwin. 
In. c. of Josiah Eliott, 14 d. 
Patty Eliott, 22 y. 
Hannah, d. of Joseph Mer- 

riam, Jr., 17 y. 
Estlier, wid. of Lt. Enosh 

Lawrence, 80 y. 
In. c. of Eben Hodgman,Jr. 
Polly Bachelder, 29 y. 
Israel Eliott, 27 y. 
In. c. of Taylor Fay. 
Eliab Knapp, 67 y. 
Richard Lawrence, 80 y. 
Lt. John Swallow, 86 y. 
Mary, w. of Amos Dakin, 

52 y. 
Samuel Smith, 74 y. 

Widow Flagg, 82 y. 

Fanny Huston, 12 y. 

In. c. of Paul Davis, 1 m. 

7d. 
William Barrett, 90 y. 
Betsy Boynton, 23 y. 
Willard Lawrence, 56 y. 
Anna, wid. of Richard 

Lawrence. 
Rebecca, wid. of Jason 

Dunster, 72 y. 
Mehitabel, av. of Thomas 

Robbins, 68 y. 
In. c. of Taylor Fay, 1 y. 
In. c. of Oliver Nutting, 3 y. 
In. c. of Hollis Amsden, 3 

y. 8 m. 



1816. 


Apr. 
Aug. 


19. 
11. 


(( 


31. 


Oct. 


5. 


'< 


26. 


Dec. 


9. 


1817. 


Jan. 


18. 


" 


22. 


Feb. 




(( 


19. 


Mar. 


5. 


^l■ 


14. 


<( 


15. 


May 
July 




Aug. 


30. 


Sept. 
Oct. 


9. 


<< 


15. 


i< 


20. 


(( 


20. 


1818. 


Jan. 




Feb. 


5. 


Mar. 


18. 


Apri 


114. 


X 


25. 


May 
June 15. 



July 7. 

Aug. 27. 
Sept. 

7. 

" 14. 

" 18. 

" 22. 
Oct. 23. 



Benjamin Cragin, Esq. 

Jesse Barrett, Jr., 27 y. 

Twin children of E. Dex- 
ter, 1 m. 

Lt. Obadiah Parker, 86 y. 

In. c. of J as. Kennedy, 4 y. 

Hannah, w. of Samuel 
Townsend, 68 y. 

In. c. of James Gardner, 1 y. 
In c. of Thomas Russell, 1 

m. 21 d. 
In. c. of Ebenezer Hodg- 

man, 3 m. 
In. c. of Jeremiah Preston. 
Wife of Paul Davis, 34 y. 
Mary, w. of John Blodgett, 

Esq., 46 y. 
Lydia, d. of Colonel James 

Wood, 16 y. 
In. c. of Willard Lawrence. 
Lydia, wid. of Amos Hol- 

den. 
Lucy, w. of Samuel Mer- 

riam, 42 y. 
Hubbard Amsden, 27 y. 
Lowis, wid. of John Jefts, 

71 y. 
Ruth, -wid. of Joseph Mer- 

riam, Jr., 45 y. 
Lorena, d. of Andrew and 

Lydia Elliott, 11m. 20 d. 
In. c. of Mr. Read. 

In. twin children of Levi 
Morse. 

Rebecca, w. of Abel Adams, 
58 y. 

Ruth, wid. of Obadiah Par- 
ker, 86 y 

Sampson Parker, 50 y. 

In. c. of Noah Winship, Jr., 
10 m. 

George, s. of Isaac and Dei- 
dama Parker, 8 y. 

In. c. of Willard Lawrence. 

Jonathan Jefts, 86 y. 

Hannah, w. of William Bar- 
rett, 58 y. 

Widow Russell. 

Anna, wid. of William Hos- 
mer, 85 y. 

In. c. of Lemuel Tarbell. 

Joel Richards, 28 y. 

Simeon Kemp, Jr., 21 y. 

In. c. of Darius Hudson,5 y. 

c. of same, 11 y. 

In. c. of same, 3 y. 

In. c. of Jona. Richardson, 
7 m. 



RECORD OF DEATHS. 



183 



1818. 
Oct. 23 


Nov. 
« 


30 

7 
11 


<( 


15. 




18. 
20. 



Dec. 

" 8. 

" 11. 

" 13. 

" 14. 

" 21. 

" 21. 

1819. 
Jan. 2. 

« 8. 

" 18. 

«« 19. 

« 20. 

«• 22. 

« 27. 
Feb. 7. 



Mar. 24, 
April 1, 

" 2, 
" 5, 

6. 

" 12. 
" 15 

" 19, 

«' 21 

May 19 



Wife of Jason Diinster, Jr., 

24 V. 
6. of William B.Flagg, 9y. 
Widow Sarah Osgood, 96 y. 
Artemas, s. of Capt. Elijah 

Knapj), -5 y. 8 m. 
In. c. of Samuel Withing- 

ton, 8 d. 
In. d. of Daniel Foster, 5 y. 
Betsey, d. of Capt. Elijah 

Knapp, 3 y. 5 m. 
Rebecca, d. of Josiah Eliott, 

14 y. 
In. c. at J. Davis', 3 y. 
In. c. of Asa Merriam, 2 y, 
d. of Eben'r Gilman, 8 y. 
Albert, s. of Captain Amos 

Flagg, 5 y. 4 m. 
In. 0. of Mrs. Lucy Mer- 
riam. 
Emaline, d. of Capt. Amos 

Flagg, 2 y. 4 m. 

Polly, w. of Amos Russell, 
28 y. 

Joseph Warren, s. of Jos. 
Sanders, Jr., 2 y. 6 m. 

William, s. of David and 
Ama Sanders, 4 y. 9 m. 

Eveline, d. of Jonas and 
Sally Adams, 4 m. 

George E., son of same, 6 
months. 

Emily, d. of Seth and Phebe 
Elliott, 1 y. 3 d. 

John Powers, 2-5 y. 

Lydia, d. of Daniel Hill, 7 
years. 

Alva Parker, 11 y. 

In. c. of Eben'r Adams. 

Dea. Noah Winshiji, oo j. 

Charles, s. of Chas. Scrip- 
ture, m. 

d. of Oliver Nutting, 11 y. 

In. c. of Eben'r Williams, 
18 m. 

In. 0. of Oliver Nutting, 3 
years. 

Sally Saunderson, 18 y. 

Dorcas, d. of Oliver Nut- 
ting, 13 y. 

In. 8. of Eben'r Williams, 3 
years. 
. Thu-za, d. of Peter Saun- 
derson, 1-5 y. 
. Mary Ann, d. of William 

and Polly Darling, 4 y. 
In. d. of Jonathan Richard- 
eon, 4 y. 



1819. 
July 4. 



Aug. 


1. 

8. 


(( 


25. 


Nov. 


27. 


Dec. 


23. 


« 


29. 


1820. 


Jan. 


5. 


(( 


11. 


(( 


31. 


Feb. 


9. 


<< 


28. 


Mar. 


12. 


(( 


20. 


AprU 
Oct. 




'< 


11. 


(( 




Nov. 


2. 



<( 


12 


(( 


13. 


(( 


15. 


Dec. 


13 


(i 




(( 


23. 


(( 


26. 


182 


1. 


Jan. 


1 


Mar. 


18 


<< 


23 


u 


31 


June 




AprL 


9 


<* 


28 


]\Iay 


17 



Oct. 



Addison, s. of Samuel Mer- 
riam, 5 y. 

Elisha Withington, 73 y. 

Lydia, "w. of John Russell, 
Jr., 51 y. 

John Winship, 77 y. 

Wife of John Withington, 
42 y. 

Edward FarweU, 88 y. 

In. c. of James Kennedy. 

Lucy, d. of Edward Wil- 
son, 59 y. 

In. c. of Sam'l Weston, 4 y. 

Deborah, w. of Caleb Buck* 

nam, 20 y. 
Abigail, w. of Chas. Scrip- 
ture, 21 y. 
Betsey Russell, 22 y. 
Azubali, d. of Robert and 

Azubah Searle, 27 y. 
Mary, d. of John and Mary 

Webber, 8 d. 
In. c. of David Jefts, 2d, 1 

y. 8 m. 
In. c. of Abel Adams, Jr., 

6 m. 
Polly, w. of WUliam Bride. 
Widow Cragin, 76 y. 
Mr. Stratton, 50 y. 
Mrs. Rachel Isaacs, 57 y. 
Wife of Paul Davis. 
Sally, d. of Jeremiah Boyu' 

ton, 23 y. 
Widow of Joseph Bullard, 

96 y. 
In. c. of Jonathan Jefts. 

c. of Cutler, 8 y. 

Philena, d. of Benjamin 

Kendall, 11 years. 
Simon Ames, 80 y. 
Timothy Wheeler, 68 y. 

d. of Benjamin Farwell, 9 y. 
Wife of Leonard Read, 36 y. 
In. d. of Abel FarweU, 5 y. 

Susanna Davis, 47 y. 
Jonathan Williams, 85 y. 
In. c. of John Sawtell, 1 y. 
Jonathan Foster, (died in 

Ashby,) 100 y. 
Peter Kemp, 16 y. 
Wife of John Robbins. 
Silvia, (a negro girl), 14 y. 
In. c. of Taylor Fay, 6 m. 
Widow Goddard, 81 y. 
In. c. of Leonard Reed, 8 m. 
Polly Loring, 30 y. 
Isaac Kimball, Jr., 6 y. 3 m. 



184 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



182 
Oct. 


1. 


Nov. 


28. 


Dec. 




(< 


15. 


(1 


26. 


1822. 
Jan. 10. 

" 23. 

" 29. 
Feb. 26. 


Mar. 
AprD 


29. 
1. 


May- 
July 


21. 
23. 




16. 


Aug. 


14 


Sept. 


22. 


<( 


26. 


Oct. 


5. 


<< 


6. 

7. 


<( 


23. 
17. 


Nov. 


3. 
3. 


Nov. 


10. 


Dec. 


11. 


«' 27. 
1823. 
Mar. 5. 


Apri 
« 


22. 

2. 

20. 



Daniel Witliee, 21 y. 

In. c. of J. Jefts. 

Sarah, vi\ of John Austin, 

53 y. 
In. c. of Isaac Hussell, 1 m. 

14 d. 
David Brown, 83 y. 
Polly Boynton, d. of Jos. 

Merriam, 5 y. 
Wife of Enosh Barrett, 22 

years. 

Widow Barrett, 91 y. 
Charles Withec, 14 y. 
In. c. of Thomas Loring. 
In. c. of Ezekiel Merriam, 

21 d. 
Samuel Townsend, 88 y. 
In. c. of Captain Elijah 

Knapp. 

In. c. of Richardson. 

In. c. of Joel Tarbell. 
Wife of Jonathan Hichard- 

son, 36 y. 
Bichard Hall, 54 y. 
In. c. of Henry Isaacs. 
In. c. of Wm. Nutting, 9 m. 
Mary, wid. of Lieut. John 

Swallow, 76 y. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Campbell, 

(of Brookline,) 50 y. 
Judith, wid. of John Win- 

shij), 82 y. 
d. of Jotham Webber, Jr., 

12 y. 
William, s. of Timothy 

Wheeler, 4 y. 10 m. 
William Barrett, Jr., 22 y. 
Mary, d. of Tim. Wheeler, 

2 y. 6 m. 
In. c. of Paul Davis, 1 y. 
Laura, d. of Elijah Knapp, 

4 y. 6 m. 
Artemas, s. of same, 3 y. 
Lydia, w. of Andrew Eliott, 

33 y. 
David Green, (of Groton,) 

82 y. 
Adrian, s. of Noah Win- 
ship. 
Amos Holden, 31 y. 

Addison, s. of B. C. Kim- 
ball, 26 d. 

In. 0. of B. Farwell, 14 d. 

Woodis Lee, 48 y. 

Joshua Loring, 30. 

Samuel Merriam, Esq., 50 
years. 



1823. 
May 

June 3. 
Auo-. 13. 



Sept. 
Oct. 24. 

Nov. 10. 



1824. 
Jan. 

Feb. 14. 

" 16. 

Mar. 2. 

" 25. 
April 18. 

" 29. 

May 2. 

" 6. 

" 25. 

May 30. 
July 



Aug. 



15. 



" 21. 



Sept. 


26 
2 


<( 


2. 


" 


4 




14. 
30 


Oct. 


18 


Nov. 


26 


" 28 
1825. 
Jan. 2 


(( 


13 


May 


16 


.< 


27 



Widow of David Brown, 7^ 
years. 

Wife of Abijah Eaton. 

William, s. of Dea. Andrew 
and Hannah Eliott, 20 y. 
Sarah, wid. of Timothy 
Wheeler, 69. 

In. c. of Capt. N. C. Searle. 

Widow Hannah Huse, 50 y. 

George Alvin, s. of George 
Eliott, 3 m. 17 d. 

Rhoda, w. of James Gil- 
man, 68 y. 

In. c. of Luther Nutting. 

Mr. Amos Cutler. 
Widow Edwards, Sly. 
Jonas Campbell, 18 y. 
John Webber, 34 y. 
Samuel Tarbell, 65 y. 
William Kendall, 72. 
Job Hodgmau, 37 y. 
Dea. Jotham Webber, 72. 
Alva Green, 24 y. 
Widow Lois Gould, 84 y. 
Josiah Flagg, 74 y. 
In. c. of David Amsden, 1 

y. 9 m. 
In. c. of Phinehas Webster. 
Timothy, s. of Timothy 

Wheeler, 2 y. 3 m. 
Widow Fletcher. 
In. c. of Jonas Kendall, 1 

y. 6 m. 
David Hall, 71 y. 
Mr. Samuel Smith. 
In. d. of Jonas Kendall, 3 

y. 6. m. 
Lydia, d. of Samuel and 

Mary Dakin, 2 y. 5 m. 
Stephen Lawrence, Esq., 

80 y. 
Samuel Dakin, Jr., 9 y. 6 m. 
Mary Ann, d. of B. C. Kim- 
ball, 4 y. 8 m. 18 d. 
Widow of William Barrett, 

91 y. 
Ebenezer Williams, 79 y. 
In. c. of Samuel Dakin, 4 y. 
In. c. of Martin Band. 
Rhoda, d. of Elijah Knapp. 

In. d. of Benjamin Farwell, 

George Jefts, 14 y. 
James Weston, 34 y. 
Huldah, wid. of Samuel 

Merriam, 46 y. 
Elizabeth Winship, 58 y. 



RECOED OP DEATHS. 



185 



1825. 
May 29. 
July 



Aug. 

Aug. 17. 
« 28. 

<( 

Sept. 2. 

it 
Sep. 20. 

" 20. 
" 20. 

Nov. 11. 



Dec. 26. 

1826. 
Mar. 5. 

'« 11. 

" 11. 

" 13. 

" 15. 

April 

" 25. 

" 26. 
May 16. 

Aug. 11. 
" 13. 

" 18. 
" 27. 

Sept. 20. 

Oct. 28. 

'< 29. 

" 30. 
Nov. 6. 
Dec. 6. 

1827. 
Jan. 10. 
Feb. 1. 



Capt. Horace Sawtell, 26 y. 

Nichols, s. of Dea. E. Kob- 
iu.son, 3 y. 

Jeremy, s. of Samuel Wes- 
ton, 4 y. 

In. c. of William Newell, 
1 y. 6 m. 

In c. of Jonathan Jefts. 

Ebenezer, s. of Josiah Mer- 
riam, 5 y. 

William, s. of same, 2 y. 6 
months. 

Widow Shepherd, 20 y. 

PoUv, w. of Ilubbert Rus- 
sell, Jr., 32 y. 

In.c. of Sampson Mcintosh. 

Adam, s . of John Blodgett, 
Esq., 22 y. 

Amos Boynton, 23 y. 

Jason Russell, 83 y. 

Mr. Priest, 62 y. 

Mary Snow, 18 y. 

Henry, s. of Daniel and 
Ruth Felch, 14 y. 

In. c. of Joseph Merriam, 
2d, 2 d. 

Widow Blood, 95 y. 

Aaron Haskell 34 y. 

Molly, w. of Joseph Rob- 
bins, 64 y. 

In. c. of Ira Hall, 

Lucinda, d. of Thomas 
Hodgman, Jr., 2 y. 

John, s. of Maverick Wy- 
man, 8 y. 7 m. 

In. c. of James Saunderson. 

Abel Adams, 69 y. 

Diantha Russell, 16 y. 

Jonas Fay, 77. 

In. c. of Taylor Fay, 10 m. 

Numa Sawtell, 24 y. 

Lucy d. of John Warren, 
10 months. 

Jonathan Barrett, 40 y. 

Joseph Addison, s. of Jo- 
seph B. Robbins, 4 y. 

Caroline, d. of Dea. Joseph 
Saunders, 19 y. 

Harriet Farley, 22 y. 

In. c. of Isaac Kimball, 10 
months. 

Artemas Winship, 18 y. 

d. of Henderson, 10 y. 

Joseph Merriam, 82 y. 

Capt. Hiram Smith, 25. 

Thomas Tarbell, 73 y. 
Abigail, w. of George Hall, 
27 years. 



1827. 



18. 



Mar. 


26 
14. 


Apri 
iMar. 
June 

July 

(I 


4 

4 

21 

23 

4. 

12. 


Aug. 


13 
15 


" 


IG 


" 


17 


(( 


20. 


<' 


21 


Sept. 
Oct. 


7 
2. 


" 


9 


Nov. 


20. 


Dec. 


20. 


1828. 
Jan. 18. 
Feb. 5. 


a 


7 
10. 


Mar. 


12 


April 
June 


21. 

6. 
8. 


t( 


12 
21. 



July 



14. 



Aug. 

Sept. 2. 

8. 

«< 17. 



Esther, w. of Capt. Jesse 

Barrett, 59 y. 
Zaccheus Barrett, 79 y. 
Lucinda, d. of Thomas and 

Esther Hodgman, 2 y. 
Diantha Jefts, 9 y. 
Hiuksman Warren, 75 y. 
Ezra Merriam, 67 y. 
Wife of Daniel Williams. 
Daniel Williams, 73 y. 
Elizabeth, w. of Daniel Hill, 

58 years. 
In. s. of Wm. Russell, 5 y. 
Wid. Elizabeth Williams, 

82 years. 
Sally, w. of George Elliot, 

30 y. 
In. c. of John Bachelder, 

3 y. 
c. of John Bachelder, 11 y. 
In. c. of Benjamin Farwell. 
Lucy Ann, d. of Thomas 

Wilson, 14 y. 
Capt. Isaac Brown, 47 y. 
Oliver H. s. of Capt. John 

Barrett, 17 y. 
Betsey, w. of James Wood, 

Jr., 37 y. 
Abigail, cl. of Sam'l Smith, 

44 y. 
In. c. of Amos Holden, 4 y. 
Capt. Sam. S. Parker, 64 y. 
Amaziah Blood, 41 y. 
Thomas Robbins, 83 y. 

Wife of Jas. Withee, 66 y. 
In. s. of Jona. W. Elliot, 

2y- 

In c. of Capt. Ira Hall. 

Samuel Leander, s. of Wid. 
Martha Sloan, 4 y. 

Sarah, w. of Amos Her- 
rick, 82 y. 6 m. 

Jason Dunster, 65 y. 

Widow Bennett, 81 y. 

Lucretia, d. of Joseph Jefts, 
17 y. 

Mary Taft, 22 y. 

Polly, w. of Jona. Bach- 
elder, 70 y. 

Jotham Weijber, 54 y. 

Esther, w. of Thos. Hodg- 
man, Jr., 33 y. 

John Farriugton Wallcer, 
30 y. 

Mr. Ditson, 87 y. 

Wid. Beatrix Parker, 67 y. 

Mary Jane, d. of Thomas 
Pierce, 2 y. 1 m. 3 d. 

In. c. of Andrew Elliot, 2 y. 



186 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



1828. 




1830. 


Oct. 18. 


Eebecca w. of Eld. William 
Eliot, 6.5 y. 


Aug. 15. 


« 24. 


Jonathan Russell, 77 y. 


Sept. 




Wife of Ira Iladley, 33 y. 


Oct. 


Nov. 12. 


In. c. of Jona. F. Russell, 

3 m. 
Elijah Towne, 62 y. 


Nov. 8. 


Dec. 2o. 


1831. 


1829. 




Jan. 16. 


Jan. 25. 


Sarah, w. of Hubbert Rus- 
sell, 76 y. 


" 20. 


" 27. 


John Powers, 25 y. 


•' 20. 


Feb. 3. 


In. c. of Mr. Barnard. 




4. 


Patty, w. of Oliver Hos- 


Feb. 




nier, 60 v. 


March 



♦' 5. In. c. of Benjamin Far- 
well, 1 y. 4 m. 
•' 15. Elizabeth, w. of Jas. Wood, 
Esq., 71 y. 

Sarah, wid. of Simon Ames, 
86 y. 

Rhoda, d. of John Sawtell. 

Parker Blood, 15 y. 

Joshua Hobart, 26 y. 

Sally Russell, 20 y. 

In. c. of Caleb E. Bullard, 
3 y. 6 m. 

In. c of Amos Eliott, 3 y. 

Eleazer Fish, 50 y. 

Abel Kemp, 87 y. 

In. c. of Ebenezer Adams. 

In. c. of Dea. B. Robinson, 

3y. 

Samuel Whiting Esq., 33 y. 
Anna, w. of Roger Weston, 

Esq., 71 y. 
John Whitaker, 85 y. 

In. d. of Henderson, 3 

years. 
Wid. Richardson, 87 y. 
Wife of Joel Tarbell. 
Wid. White, alias Green, 
85 y. 
Nov. In. d. of Daniel Hill, Jr., 2 

years. 
" Beulah Austin, 58 y. 

*' In. c. of Asher Peabody. 

Dec. Hannah, wid. of Jonathan 

Searle, Esq., 80 y. 
Dec. 12. Dea. Josej^h Saunders, 65 y. 
In. c. of Thomas Loring. 
1830. 

Jan. Mr. Lawrence, 45 y. 

In. c. of Joseph Merriam. 
John Swallow, 73 y. 
May 11. Joseph Woods, 76 y. 
June 4. Rev. William Eliot, 81 y. 
" 12. Simeon Heald, 56 y. 
♦' 13. Sarah, widow of Stephen 
Lawrence, 84 y. 



Aug. 


12 
16 
18 


<( 




Sept. 


22 
23 




24 
31 


Oct. 


1 
26 



April 



May 

June 
Aug. 
Sept. 6. 



Nov. 18. 



(< 


25. 


Dec. 


20 


>( 


28 


18 


32. 


Jan. 


11 


<< 


20 


<( 


27 


(( 


30. 


Feb. 


2 


C( 




Mar. 


2 


(( 


11 


Apri 


8 



Rebecca, w. of Roger WeS' 

ton, Esq., 76 y. 

Wife of Loring. 

Benjamin Farwell. 45 y. 
Polly, w. of T. Dakin, 

Esq., 51 y. 

"Wid. Parker, 89 y. 
Anna, w. of Dea. H. Rich- 
ardson, 53 y. 8. m. 18 d. 
In. c. of David F. Hunt, 4 

m. 10 d. 
Wid. Sarah Elliot, 94 y. 
Miss Keyes, 70 y. 
Elliot Russell, 22 y. 

Farley, 70 y. 

Rebecca, wife of Thomas 

Wilson, 50 y. 
Wid. of Benjamin Jefts, 72 

years. 
Wife of John Robbins, 52 y. 
Joseph W^inship, 57 y. 
Thankful, widow of John 

Whitaker, 87 y. 
Nancy Adelaide, d. of 

Henry Clements, 1 m. 21 

days. 
Vv^idow Sally Allen. 
Josiah EUott, 68 y. 
In. c. of Abel Farwell, 2 y. 
Zaccheus Davis, 87 y. 10 m. 
Capt. Joseph Bsirrett, 86 y. 
Sally Brown, 35 y. 

HoUis Amsden, 54 y. 
Timothy Weatherbee, 84 y. 
John Pratt, 77 y. 
Nancy, w. of Jos. Woods, 

Jr., 45 y. 
In. c. of Jona. Jefts, 2 d. 
In. c of John Smith, 10 m. 
Widow Hannah Holden, 

37 y. 
Wife of Daniel Lawrence, 

72 y. 
David Hill, 24 y. 
In. s. of George Eliott, 1 y. 

6 m. 
In. d. of same, 3 y. 



May 


9. 


In. c. of Farnsworth, 

In. c. of Mellen, 2 y. 

In. c. of C. Granger. 


Oct. 




In. c. of Nutting. 

Leonard Read, 50 y. 
Widow Flagg, 90 y. 


Nov. 




Rebecca Kendall, 40 y. 


Dec. 




In. c. of Joel Tarbell. 


(( 


15. 


John Russell, 86 y. 



EECOED OF DEATHS. 



187 



1833. 
Jan. Anna, -vvid. of Jona. Wil- 

liams, 83 y. 
In. c. of Charles Scripture, 
2 m. 
Feb. In. c. of Orlando Cragin. 

" 24. Joseph B., s. of Timothy 
Wheeler, 1 y. 6 m. 
Mar. 11. Ebenezer H., s. of Oliver 

H. Pratt, 2 y. 3 m. 
June 9. Mary C, d. of Dr. William 
and Mary Barber, 40 y. 
'« 14. Sarah, wid. of Joseph Mer- 
riam, Sly. 
July 14. James Ford, s. of David F. 
Hunt, 9 m. 12 d. 
" 16. Abraham B. Wright, 72 y. 
Oct. 18. Patty Flagg, 38 y. 
Dec. Widow Hodgman, 86 y. 

1834. 
Jan. In. twin children of Mr. 

Howard, 4 d. 
" 12. Emily Stevens, (of Boston) 
16 y. 
Feb. Asher Austin, 21 y. 

" In. c. of Samuel Dakin, 5 

years. 
Mar. 3. Sibbel, wid. of Capt. James 
Scripture, 78 y. 
" 9. Mary, d. of Jas. and Lucy 
Scripture, 17 y. 
April In. c. of George Elliott, 10 

months. 
In. c. of E. Wellington, 3 d. 
Sarah, wid. of John Pratt, 
86 y. 
May In. c. of James Campbell, 4 

days. 
June 7. ^latilda, w. of Ephraim 
Hiklreth. 
" 11. Warren Tarbell, 20 y. 
William Ncwhall, 6o y. 
July AVifc of Aaron Blood. 

Sept. 29. Elizabetli, wid. of Samuel 
Smith, 88 y. 

Oct. In. c. of Chandler. 

Nov. Mary, w. of Samuel Dakin. 

" In. s. of W'idow Farrar, 2 

y. 6 m. 
Dec. In. c. of Francis Wright. 

Mrs. Felt, 34 y. 
1835. 
Feb. 21. Mr. Tarbox, 22 y. 
Mar. 1. Harriet, w. of James Bald- 
win, 19 y. 
" 30. In. c. of Jonathan Russell. 
<' 31. Mr. Gerry, (stranger,) 23 y. 
April 11. Lt. Joses Bucknam, 75 y. 
May In. c. of Thaddeus Morse, 3 

months. 



1835. 


May 


15, 


June 


20. 


(( 


21. 


« 


24. 


Aug. 




Sept. 


10. 


u 


11. 


u 


19, 


(( 


19. 


Oct. 


11 


Dec. 


8 


>> 


11. 


1836. 


Jan. 




" 


23 


Feb. 


8 


Mar. 


15 


- 


17. 


<( 


18 



April 



May 1. 
Aug. 11. 



15. 



.Oct. 



Nov. 6. 

1837. 
Jan. 



Feb. 2. 

" 22. 
Mar. 18. 



July 18. 
Aug. 



Silas BuUard, 83 y. 

Widow of Thomas Rob- 
bins, 80 y. 

Sarah, w. of Seth Robbins, 
82 years. 

Thomas Blood, 77 y. 

Wife of Jolm Spaulding, 
41 years. 

Maria, w. of Oliver H. 
Pratt, 29 y. 

Wife of Mr. Mores, 70 y. 

In. c. of Mr. Tibbets. 

Anna, d. of Jer. Boynton, 
23 years. 

Mrs. Grossman, 91 y. 

Lucy, wid. of Edw'd Wil- 
son, 97 y. 

Mrs. Fry, 30 y. 

Catharine Barrett, 14 y. 

Sibbel, w. of Josiah AVin- 
ship, 67 y. 

Simeon Kemp, 76 y, 

Elizabeth, wid. of Dea. Jos. 
Saunders, 71 y. 

Ruth, d. of Stephen Spaul- 
ding, 16 y. 

In. s. of Abijah Eaton, Jr., 
5 years. 

Avis, wid. of Silas Bullard, 
72 years. 

Miss Holt, 19 y. 

Eunice, w. of Josiah Rus- 
sell, Esq., 

William Bruce Flagg, 66 y. 

Francis Ann, w. of Samuel 
E. Howard, 28 y. 

Thomas Hodgman, 82 y. 6 
months. 

Wife of Capt. Ira Hall, 42 
years. 

Hubbard Russell, 88 y. 

In. c. of Mary Ann Bald- 
win. 

Ruhamah, widow of John 
Russell, 88 y. 

In. c. of Bailey. 

Anna, w, of Nathl. Cum- 
mings, Esq., 51 y. 

James Wood, Jr., 51 y. 

Lydia, w. of Roger Weston, 
Esq., 81 y. 

AVidow Chapman. 

Oliver Eliot, 102 y. 7 m. 

Martha, d. of Asher Pea- 
body, 1 y. 1 m. 

Wife of Pollard Felt. 

In. c. of John Smith. 



188 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



1837. 



Sctli Robbins, 92 y. 

Mrs. Withee. 

Phebe, w. of Jonas Brown, 

[60 v.] 
Mrs. Kemp, 84 y. 



1837. 



Miss Tarbox, [75 y.] 
Mr. Christie, [35 y.] 
Mrs. Knapp, [48 y.] 
"Widow of Gershom Flagg, 
[75 y.] 



Record of deaths for the years 1838 and 1839 



1838. 
Feb. 7. 
Mar. G. 

" 30. 



April 



May 

July 11. 
" 31. 
Sept. 



Aaron Wyeth, 23 y. 

Elizabeth, widow of Dea. 
Jotliam Webber, 82 y. 

Aldice, w. of Oliver Bar- 
rett, 45 y. 

Jason Russell, 23 y. 

In. c. of Pollard Felt, 8 
months. 

Jonathan Bachelder, 85 y. 

In. c. of Wniis Hall, 1 y. 
6 months. 

Widow Searle, 77 y. 

Col. James Wood, 83 y. 

Leonard Ames, 19 j. 

In. c. of Mr. MeUen. 



1838. 




Oct. 25. 


Son of Capt. Flynn, 20 y. 


Dec. 8. 


Mary, vr. of John Bachel- 




der, 45 y. 


1839. 




May 7. 


Abel Hunt, 44 y. 


June 0. 


Ira Hodgman, 35 y. 


" 17. 


Dea. Hez. Richardson, 67 




years. 


Aug. 19. 


Elizabeth Davis, 63 y. 


Sept. 20. 


Jonathan Loring, 81 y. 



In. d. of John Flagg, 3 v. 
Oct. In. d. of Asher Elliot, 3"y. 

" 27. Jeremiah Boynton, 74 y. 
Dec. 25. In. s. of Rev. A. G. Com- 



Eecord of deaths from January 1, 1840, to December 31, 
1858, kept by Dr. Willis Johnson : 



1840. 
Jan. 29. John Blood, 80 y. 
Feb. 5. In. c. of Pollard Felt. 

" 14. Wilson Swallow, 38 y. 
Mar. 29. ISIaria, d. of S. Smith, Jr., 

17 y. 
May 31. Wid. of Elias Elliott, 88 y. 
July 17. Charles Otis, 21 y. 
Widow Polly Davis. 
" 27, Charlotte Be'ckwith, 17 y. 
«' 28. Lt. James Gilman, 88 y. 
Aug. 23. Betsey, wife of Artemas 
Rowell, 54 y. 
" 27. ]\Iary Sylvania, d. of Isaac 
and Mary Russell, 25 y. 
Sept. 11. Wife of Aaron Holden, 48 
years. 
" 24. In. c. of J. B. Robbins. 
Oct. 3. J. Horace, s. of John and 
Fidelia Peabody, 9 y. 
" 16. Joshua Davis, 96 y. 
" 25. Ephraim Flagg, [50 y.] 
Nov. 6. :Mrs. Walker, 80 y. 
Dec. 19. Amos Blood, 83. 

1841. 
Jan. 8. Mary, wid. of Jos. Woods, 

81 y. 
Feb. 5. Mary Ann Tarbcll, 22 y. 
Mar. 26. In. c. of J. Brown, 5 y. 



1841. 
April 5. 


July 
Aug. 


24. 
3. 


Sept. 


10. 


Oct. 


4. 


" 


13. 


" 


20. 


Nov. 
Dec. 


7. 
10. 
16. 


(( 


25. 


1842. 
Jan. 30. 


April 


1. 

16. 


(( 


26. 


« 


9. 



In. c. of Freeman Elliott, 1 

y. 9 d. 
Mrs. Putnam, 69 y. 
In. c. of Sampson Mcin- 
tosh, 3 d. 
In. c. of Timothy Amsden, 

3 m. 14 d. 
AVidow of Joshua Davis, 

80 y. 
In. c. of William Creigh- 

ton, 15 d. 
Martha, d. of David and 

Betsey Amsden, 22 y. 
W^ife of Pollard Felt, 21 y. 
Daniel Hill, 78 y. 
In. c. of Elisha Withington, 

3 m. 3 d. 
Deborah, widow of Noah 

Winship, 79 y. 

Ellen, d. of John SwaUow, 

13 y. 
Dana Morse, 2 y. 
Mary Sylvania, w. of Isaac 

Sylvester Russell, 21 y. 
In c. of Abraham Moore, 2 

days. 
In. c. of Mr. Taft, 1 y. 4 m. 



RECOED OF DEATHS. 



189 



1842. 
April 

May : 



" 9. 

" lo, 

" 28. 

June 17. 

July 2 

" 10 

" 16. 



Oct. 


S. 
14. 


<( 


17. 


Nov. 


22. 
29. 
27. 


1843. 
Jan. 9. 


Feb. 
(< 

Mar. 


10. 

22. 

1. 


(1 


9. 
11. 


AprL 


15. 
10. 


<i 


10. 
11. 


(( 


17. 


May 


24. 
2. 


June 


28. 
19. 


July 


31. 


Sept. 
Oct. 


13. 
21. 
20. 



Georgianna, d. of Abraham 
Wright, 1 y. 6 m. 
. In. c. of Moses Taylor, 1 

y. 4 m. 
. Samuel E. Howard, 37 y. 
In. c. of Caleb E. Bullard, 

y- 
Willis, s. of Abner Holden, 

8y- 

, Amanda, d. of same, 3 y. 
, In. c. of Mr. Clark. 

Ira, 8. of "William W. Whit- 

aker. 11m. 
John Jefts, 69 y. 
. In. c. of James Barrett, 2y. 
. Marshall \V., s. of W. W. 
Whitaker, 3 y. 6 m. 
Hannah, wid .of Jonathan 
Russell, 92 y. 
In. 0. of Chas. Prescott, 3 d. 
, In. c. of George Hall. 
Sarah, wid. of Thos. Tar- 
bell, 86 y. 
, Mary.wid.of A. B.Wright, 
75 y. 
Mr. Keyes, 54 j. 
Amos Dakin, 82 y. 
In. c. of William Robbins, 
2 y. 6 m. 

. Dorothy, w. of Dr. Willis 

Johnson, 58 y. 
. Mr. Danielson, [50.] 
. Samuel D. Blood, 44 y, 8 m. 
. Wife of John Robbins, 61. 

years. 
. Dea. R. W^eston, 85 y. 
Abigail, w. of John Boyn- 

ton, 41 y. 
, Henrj' Scripture, 11 y. 
. Widow of Johu Russell, 

98 y. 
, Widow Shed, 90 y. 
, Mary Ann, wife of Asher 

Tarbell, 42 y. 
. Wife of Amos Robbins, 65 

years. 

In. c. of Keyes. 

, Rachel, d. of Oliver Barrett, 

. 17 y. 
. Susan, d. of same, 19 y. 
. Rebecca, wid. of Thomas 

Hodgman, 82 y. 5m. 
, Widow of Thomas Blood, 

85 y. 
In. c. of Lucas Adams, 3 y. 
, James Snow, Esq., 70 y. 
In. c. of Butler, 7 

months. 



18^ 


[3. 


Nov. 


10. 


Dec. 


21 


1844. 


Jan. 


2 


" 


8. 


Mar. 


40 


<» 


27 


Apri: 


6 


Mar. 


29. 


July 


20 


Aug. 


10 




10 


Oct. 


7 


(C 


8 


Nov. 


1. 


(t 


9. 


n. 


11. 


" 


23 


«' 


19 



Dec. 7. 



1845. 
Jan. 4. 



9. 

27. 



Feb. 15. 

« 16. 

" 19. 

«' 26. 

Mar. 24. 



" 31. 
April 15. 
June 21. 

July 23. 
Aug. 14. 

Sept. 5. 
" 5. 

" 7. 
9. 

" 9. 

Oct. 6. 



In. twin children of Samp- 
son Mcintosh, 1 d. 

Esther, wid. of Hinksman 
Warren, 88 y. 

Hepzibath Lawrence, 56 y. 
Oliver Nutting, 76 y. 
Ephraim Russell, Jr., 40 y. 
Josiah Russell, Esq., 77 y. 
In. c. of Daniel Felch, 10 

months. 
Hannah Reed, 21 y. 
Dorothy, wife of Calvin 

Amsden, 29 y. 
WilHam Barrett, 84 y. 

In. c. of Taft. 

Rev. Alfred L. Mason, 32 y. 

John Russell, 76 y. 

In. c. of Bennett, 1 y. 

3 m. 
Alice Swallow, 52 y. 
Capt. Jesse Barrett, 82 y. 
Rodney H. Amsden, 28 y. 
Susannah, w. of Jonathan 

Smith, 76 y. 
Jane, d. of Abram and 

Julia M. Moore, 7 y. 8 

m. 14 d. 

AVife of Jedediah Felton, 

69 y. 
Jedediah Felton, 76 y. 
AVealthy M., d. of Edwin 

and Lavinia Hodgman, 3 

years. 

In. c. of Haseltine, 6 y. 

c. of Walker, 9 y. 

In. c. of Henry Sawin, 14 

days. 
Daniel Felch, 64 y. 
George Walker, 15 y. 
AVilliam, s. of Dr. William 

and Rachel C. Barber, 42 

years. 
Miss Blanchard, 17 y. 
In. c. of James Davis. 
Mary, wid. of John Adams, 

87 y. 
Luther Robbins, 52 y. 
In. c. of Luther L. Barrett, 

7 d. 
Thomas Hodgman, 45 y. 
J. Newton Kimball, 20 y. 
Miss Marsh, 22 y. 
Phebe, w. of Capt. Samuel 

Smith, 78 y. 
Nancy, w. of Capt. Samuel 

AVeston, 58 y. 
George Robbins, 21 y. 



25 



190 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



1845. 
Oct. 
Dec. 25. 

1846. 
Jan. 6, 
Mar. 16. 

April 11. 

" 16. 

" 26. 

♦< 29. 

July 25. 
Aug. 30. 

Sept. 6. 
Oct. 2. 

" 20. 

Nov. 5. 
" 16. 



" 18. 
1847. 
Jan. 20. 

Feb. 21. 
Mar. 18. 
AprU 10. 

" 20. 

July 31. 

Aug. 7. 

« 15. 

Sept. 13. 

" 19. 

Nov. 29. 
Dec. 20. 

1848. 
Jan. 22. 

" 27. 
Feb. 20. 

Mar. 1. 
" 22. 
« 26. 

" 30. 

April 13. 
May 8. 



Dea. Timothy Dakin, 82 y. 
Mrs. Farley, [78.] 

Daniel Chapman. 

Chloe, w. of James Brown, 

83 y. 
Lois, wid. of EHab Knapp, 

88 y. 
John Frederick, s. of David 

F. Hunt, 8 m. 14 d. 
In. c. of Samuel M. Mer- 

riam. 
Ruth, d. of Jona. Williams, 

73 y. 
Sylvester Putnam, 47 y. 
In. c. of Warren Russell, 

3 y. 10 m. 
Wife of Geo. Amsden, 25 y. 
Artemas L., s. of Leonard 

and Deborah Farwell, 1 

m. 21 d. 
Luciuda, w. of Jos. Hodg- 

man, oo y. 
Hildreth Dutton, 25 y. 
Samuel H. L., s. of Sam'l 

B. and Mary Tebbetts, 1 

y. 8 m. 12 d. 
Samuel Hartshorn, 36 y. 

Sarah Octavia, d. of David 
F. Hunt, 3 y. 7 m. 

Elizabeth Bobbins, 17 y. 

Sarah M. Robbins, 23 y. 

Mary, wid. of Elisha With- 
ingtou, 99 y. 6 m. 

In. c. of Amos Scripture, 
3 y. 7 m. 6 d. 

John Cutter, 2 y. 8 m. 27 d. 

Caleb Kemp, 25 y. 

In. c. of Luther A. Tar- 
bell, 2 y. 1 m. 

In. c. of Asa E. Woods, 1 
y. 6 m. 13 d. 

In. c. of Elnathan E. Boyn- 
ton, 6 y. 

Mr. Butler, 65 y. 

Ebenezer Flagg, 85 y. 

Sophronia, wife of Amos 
Scripture, 39 y. 

Mary Cragin, 33 y. 

Martha, d. of Lucius Ad- 
ams, 21 y. 

Mary Merriam, 60 y. 

In. c. of Henry Sawin, 2 y. 

John Stevens, Esq., 64 y. 

Wife of Otis Childs, 26 y. 

Ira Taylor, 19 y. 

Susan Merriam, 45 y. 



1848. 




^lay 


21. 


Mary, d. of J. W. Eliot,16 y. 


June 


10. 


Samuel Tarbell, 63 y. 


Aug. 


14. 


Emily, d. of William and 
Nancy Wright, 17 y. 


(C 


14. 


Emily, w. of J. Lang, 16 y. 


(( 


28. 


Sally Ames, 75 y. 


i( 


28. 


Harriet jM., d. of Timothy 
Wheeler, 1 y. 9 m. 23 d. 


Sep. 


10. 


In. c. of Essex, 2 y. 


" 


18. 


In. d. of Justus Peabody. 


<( 


30. 


In. 8. of same, 2 y. 


Oct. 


7. 


Mary Stevens, 18 y. 


(t 


24. 


Adalucia, wife of William 
W. Whitaker, 37 y. 


Nov. 


8. 


Amos Herrick, 85 y. 


11 


9. 


In. c. of Daniel Felch. 


<( 


22. 


Mrs. Otis, 58 y. 


« 


23. 


^Ir. Timothy Moore. 


Dec. 


1. 


Ebenezer Flagg, 53 y. 


" 


21. 


Esther, w. of Hinksman 
Warren, 88 y. 


1849. 




Jan. 


11. 


Mr. Ira Hadley. 


K 


22. 


In. c. of Timothy P. Elliott, 
2d. 


Feb. 


9. 


Capt. Samuel Smith, 84 y. 


(< 


7. 


Keyes, 68 y. 


Apr. 


26. 


Mrs. White, 42. 


<< 


26. 


Elizabeth, w. of Jeremiah 
Boynton, 81 y. 


May 


21. 


Margaret Barrett, 21 y. 


" 


24. 


In. c. of John Conway, 2 
m. 7d. 


June 


13. 


In. c. of Daniel Dugald, 1 
y. 5 m. 


<< 


15. 


Mr. Josiah G. Heald. 


t( 


24. 


John Robbins, 74 y. 


July 


7. 


George Morse, 26 y. 


Aug. 


18. 


Lydia, w. of Luther Rob- 
bins, 55 y. 


(( 


21. 


In. c. of George Elliott, 2 
m. 14 d. 


i( 


30. 


Mrs. Hodgman, 50 y. 


Sept. 


2. 


EdAvard Melvin, s. of OK- 
ver H. and Catharine W. 
Pratt, 2 y. 


(C 


6. 


WilUam Bailey, 43 y. 


<i 


13. 


In. c. of Cain Hungarn, 9 d. 


u 


13. 


Julia A. d. of William and 
Eliza Farley, 4 y. 9 m. 


<l 


14. 


Frederic T., s. of same, 1 

y. 4 m. 
In. c. of C. Raflin. 


Nov. 


1. 


Mary Ann Herd, 17 y. 


(( 


17. 


David Hunt, 83 y. 


(( 


24. 


Elias Elliott, 70 y. 


Dec. 


1. 


In. c. of Benjamin Living- 
ston, 5 V. 


(< 


13. 


William RusseU, 70. 



EECORD OF DEATHS. 



191 



«' 28. 

" 26. 

Sep. 10. 

" 12. 

« 28. 



James Conner, 23 y. 

In. s. of Rev. E. R. Hodg- 

man, 7 d. 

14. In. c. of Adams. 

17. Sarah, wid. of "William Bar- 
rett, 82 y. 
19. Harriet C, w. of Charles 

Belcher, 33 y. 

Gassett, 68 y. 

d. of Albert Taft, 15 y. 
Elizabeth, wid. of Amos 

Dakin, 8-5 y. 
Joseph Blood, 96 y. 
Wife of Aaron Blood, -54 y. 
Asa E. "Woods, 33 y. 
c. of Freeman Elliott, 8 y. 
In. e. of John P. Linson, 4 

days. 
Charles Farwell, s. of Chas. 

Belcher, 3 m. 9 d. 

O'Xeil. 

Mrs. AVarner, 71 y. 
Seth Robbins, 65 y. 
In. c. of Seneca Lynch, 1 

m. 21 d. 
George Elliott, 53 y. 
Hannah M., d. of Ebenezer 

and Betsey "Webber, 27 

y. 9 m. 13 d. 
Mrs. Sparrow. 

Mrs. Sally Barrett, 57 y. 
Mary H., w. of Isaac Rus- 
sell, 61 y. 
True Robbins, 63 y. 
Mary A. Hildreth, 27 y. 
Miss Hutchinson, 9 y. 
Wife of Isaac Woodbury, 
33 y. 

" 30. Mrs. Fisher, 47 y. 
Feb. 3. Nancy, d. of John Rich- 
ards, 5 m. 
Mar. 30. Theodorea, s. of Asher Pea- 
body, 19 y. 2 m. 
May 3. Maj. Abijah Elliott, 78 y. 
June 4. Wife of Abel FarweU, 55 y. 
" 9. Mary Foster, 37 y. 

" 29. Center, 52 y. 

July 22. Lemuel Tarbell, 65 y. 
Aug. 4. Wife of Noah Winship, Jr., 
21 y. 
" 13. Susannah, widow of Ezra 

Merriam, 86 y. 
" 22, Nathan Heaid, 19 y. 
Sept. 23, Lucinda, wife of Milo Rob- 
bins, 23 y. 
" 23. Oscar, s, of same, 2 m. 
" 24. Hannah, w, of Jos. B.Rob- 
bins, 57 y. 



t< 


19 


18 


51. 


Jan, 


2 


" 


9 


<( 


21 


<( 


10 


C( 


19 


<( 


20 



18a 


1. 


Oct. 


9. 


" 


11. 


« 


13. 


'< 


31, 


Dec. 


27. 


1852, 


Jan. 


12, 


« 


17. 


Feb, 


8. 


'« 


20. 


Aprij 


1, 


June 


11. 


(( 


15. 


July 


11. 


t( 


31, 


Aug. 


12. 


(( 


19. 


<i 


26. 



91. 



Sept. 5. 
" 22. 

Oct. 7. 

" 9. 

Oct. 10. 
" 11, 

« 15. 
Nov. 
Dec. 10. 

«« 14. 
1853, 
Feb. 6. 
« 6. 

Mar, 6, 

" 30. 

April 6. 

May 11. 
June 6. 

July 1. 

" 12. 



Henry Campbell, 58 y. 
In. c. of John S, Spaulding, 

5 mo. 10 d. 
Albert Whitney, 4 m. 
Jane Heald, 26 y. 
Wife of Luther Livingston, 

52 y. 

Luke Newell, Jr., 22 y. 
Ransom Fiske, 53 y. 
Edward P. Tarbell, 22 y. 
Joseph Proctor, 88 y. 
In. c. of Martin L. Blood, 

12 d. 
Orriu W., s. of Walter 

Robbins, 1 y. 8 m. 
Esther, wid. of Jas. Snow, 

Esq., 82 y, 
Dr, William Barber, 85 y. 
Noah Winship, Jr., 23 y. 
In. c. of Augustus Flagg, 

2y. 

In. c, of House. 

In. c. of Moor. 

Levi Wyman, 

Widow of William Newell, 

73 y. 
Hervey E,, b. of Samuel 

Wheeler Weston, 2 y. 

11 m. 
Joseph Hodgman, 67 y. 
In. c. of James Hartshorn, 

10 m. 
Wife of John SAvallow, 64 

years, 
Abigail, w, of Elisha Bar- 
rett, 64 y. 
William Wheeler, 25 y. 
Samuel E., s. of Captain S. 

Smith, 19 y. 
Oliver Hosmer, 88 y. 
WiUiam Putnam, 23 to 27 y. 
Lydia, wid. of Jos. Blood, 

83 y. 
Wife of Abel Adams, 60 y. 

Wife of Levi Morse, 73 y. 
Betsey, wid. of David Ams- 

den, 65 y. 
Charlotte Mcintosh, 32 y. 
In. c. of Oilman Heath, 8 m. 
Charles Weston, 31 y. 

Joseph A. Tarbell. 
Ezra Walker, 31 y, 
Nancy, w. of Wm, Wright, 

61 y. 
Widow of Wm, B, Flagg, 

78 y. 
Samuel Heald, 14 y. 



192 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



1853. 


July 


20 


Aug. 


9 


Sept. 


14 


Nov. 


9 


" 


22 


w 


24 


Dec. 


5 


18c 


'4. 


Jan. 


2 


i< 


17 


<. 


21 


Feb. 


11 


« 


19 


Mar. 


11 


April 19 


(( 


25 


(( 


26 



May 2. 



(( 


9. 


(( 


12. 


<< 


20. 


(t 


26 


June 


5 


July 


25 


Aug. 


13 


Sept. 


14 


Oct. 


21. 


185 


0. 


Jan. 


22 


Feb. 


6 


«' 


17 


Mar. 


3 


" 


19 


April 


5 


" 


29 


May 


3 


"' 


24 


June 


8 


July 


18 


«« 


18. 


<< 


20. 


<( 


29 


Aug. 


6 



Mary Moor, 1 7 y. 
AVilliam lluss, 38 y. 
Joel Ames, 82 y. 8 m. 3 d. 
Abby B., d. of Ephraim 

and Martha llussell, 19 y. 
Wife of Walter Weston, 

30 y. 
Loammi Chamberlain, 63 y. 
Jeremiah W. Marsh, 68 y. 

Azubah, Avid. of Woodis 

Lee, 84 y. 
Rhoda, wid. of Samuel 

Tarbell, 86 y. 
Timothy Wheeler, 71 y. 
Abigail, wid. of Luke H. 

Cutter, 45 y. 
Josiah Winship, 83 y. 
James Brown, 84 y. 
Sally Smith, 96 y. 
Mrs. C. Amsden, 35 y. 
Charles Robbins, 32 y. 

Mrs. Wheeler, 18 y. 

Martha H. w. of Rev. E. 

R. Hodgman. (at Lun- 
enburg,) 37 y. 
Stephen Withington, 82 y. 
Edward B. Wheeler, 25 y. 
In. c. of M. Hurlburt, 23 d. 
Rev. Ebenezer Hill, 88 y 3 

m. 20 d. 
Martha, d. of Rev. E. R. 

Hodgman, 1 m. 
William Withington, 83 y. 
In. c. of Leonard Jefts, 2 y. 
In. c. of Wilder Reed, 1 y. 

8 m. 
In. c. of Leonard Farwell, 
John Tarbell, 80 y. 
Sarah Francis, d. of Dr. T. 

H. Marshall, 10 y. 

Stephen Corburn, 73 y. 
Betsey Wheeler, 76 y. 
James Withee, 93 years. 
George Newell, 21 years. 
Mrs. Mary Hadley, 47 y. 
Silas Shed, 80 y. 
Mrs. George Hall, 44 y. 
John H. Jones, 40 y. 
David Blood, 67 y. 
Mrs. Betsey Shed, 78. 
Wid. of John Blood, 96 y. 
Ezra Wood, 42 y. 
John Austin, 89 years. 
In. c. of Amos Russell, 4 y. 

In. c. of Hartwell. 

Anna, w. of Sewall Woods, 
68 y. 



1855. 


Aug. 


9. 


(( 


17. 


Oct. 


22. 


Nov. 


3. 


<i 


3 


" 


23. 


Dec. 


3 


Dec. 


24. 


(1 


27. 


1856, 


Jan. 


19. 


Feb. 


23 


It 


24 


Mar. 


3. 


il 


15 


H 


25. 


Apri 


3. 
12. 


June 


1. 


(( 


13. 


« 


28 


July 


3 


<i 


20 


Aug. 


9 


(( 


19 


(( 


21 


it 


21. 


It 


23 


<( 


26 


Sept 


2. 


t< 


4 


it 


7 


(( 


9. 


Oct. 


] 


" 


10. 


It 


12. 


1757. 


Mar. 


16 


June 


15. 


«' 


21. 


July 


19. 
21. 


<< 


31. 



Eliza, wid. of George EUiotj, 

56 y. 
William, s. of Wm. Clag- 

gett, 2 y. 
Henry Campbell, 62 y. 
Mrs. Betsey Russell, 78 y. 

d. of McClure, 12 y. 

Capt. John Barrett, 79 y. 
Mrs. Bailey, 75 y. 
Mr. Winn, 87 y. 
Mr. McClure, 49 y. 

In. c. of Milton Merriam, 7 

months. 
Wife of E. Brooks Barrett, 

35 y. 
In. c. of E. A. Larkin, 1 y. 

6 months. 
James Taft, Esq., 75 y. 
In. twin children of John 

AUinson, 5 m. 
Mrs. Tinkham, 48 y. 
Louisa Russell, 19 y, 
Polly, w. of William Whit- 

aker, 71 y. 10 m. 
Ammi M. Shattuck, 29 y. 
John Warren, 62 y. 
Rebecca, wid. of Elias El- 
liot, 71 y. 
Warren Flagg, 29 y. 
Matilda, wife of Ephraim 

Hildreth, 69 y. 
In. c. of Joel Sawyer, 2 y. 
In. c. of John Scripture, 2 

months. 
Charles Gardner, 34 y. 
In. c. of Willard Jefts, 1 y. 
Joel Sawyer, 46 y. 
George Mansfield, 19 y. 
In. c. of Hubbard Amsden, 

4 m. 
In. c. of Anthony Halleran, 

4y. 

In. c. of Dr. Thomas H. 

Marshall, 5 y. 
In. c. of Willard Jefts, 3 m. 
Mrs. Sawyer, 70 y. 
Wife of John Campbell. 
James Richardson, 25 y. 
In. c. of Anthony Halleran, 

14 m. 

In. c. of Wilson, 2 y. 

Jonathan Bachelder, 72 y. 
In. c. of Benjamin Dix, 2 y. 
John Scripture, 28 y. 
Mrs. Woodis Lee, 51 y. 
Elisha Barrett, 80 y. 
Thaddeus Morse, 70 y. 



RECORD OF DEATHS. 193 

18-57. 



18o7. 
Aug. 24. fierman Putnam, 51 y. 
" 27. In c. of Eben'r Elliot, 3 y 

6 m. 
" 28. Edward Keyes, 37 y. 
" 29. In. c. of Francis Nutting 
3 y. 
Sept. 14. Sybil, wid. of Joseph Proc- Nov. 16. Elisha Boynton, 57 y. 
tor, 90 y. I '« 21. James Scripture, 80 y 



Sept. 


27. 


Oct. 


5. 


« 


6. 


(( 


31. 


Nov. 


16. 


c< 


21. 



In. c. of Stillman Farwell, 

In. c. of "\\ alter 'Robbins, 4 

3'ears. 
In. c. Stillman Earwell, 3 y. 
Charles Henry Elliot, 19 y. 



The obituary list for 1836, '37, '38 and '39, is by no means 
so reliable and satisfactory as that of the preceding and suc- 
ceeding years. Mr. Hill, in those years, not being in the 
active pastoral charge of the church, and being employed 
much of the time in other places, did not keep, in 1836 and 
1837, so perfect a record as had been his custom in former 
years. His record is all that can be found of those years, 
and it is given in form as he left it, except that some names 
and dates, made certain by examination, have been added. 
For the purposes of this work, a careful personal examination 
has been made of every monumental headstone in each of the 
two ancient graveyards, and many corrections have been 
made in dates and in errors, and omissions of names; and 
some names, not found in the original entries, have been added 
from memoranda thus made. 

For the years 1838 and 1839, no record has been found, but 
the want of it has been supplied, as well as can be done, by 
reference to the minutes, &c., kept by the several sextons, 
and by personal inquiries of individuals. The list is undoubt- 
edly deficient, and probably may by incorrect as to dates, but 
it is given as the best that can now be procured. 

It is not improbable, that with all the care that has been 
bestowed upon this list, errors and omissions may be found. 
It should be borne in mind that, during the whole period 
embraced in the obituary record in this volume, there was no 
law requiring any returns to be made to any ofl&cer, or pro- 
viding for any record to be kept, of deaths occurring. It is 
believed that few towns in New England can show so com- 
plete an obituary list for the period of one hundred years as 
that presented in this volume. In this list, will be found the 



194 HISTORY OP MASON. 

names of some persons not inhabitants of the town, but tern- 
porarily residing therein, at the time of their decease. Also, 
of some, inhabitants of the town who died in other places, but 
were buried in Mason; and of some, who died in Mason, 
but were buried in other places. In Mr. Hill's record, the 
death of Mr. Eliab Knapp is entered under date of October 
26, 1816. The date on his monument is October 23, 1815. 
The date on the monument, although probably erroneous, 
is adopted in the list. To this list should also be added 
the following : Taylor Fay, died at New Ipswich, in March, 
1840, aged 48 years; Mrs. Larkin, died at Manchester, in 
January, 1841; and John Sawtell, Jr., aged 32 years, killed 
by the bursting of a grindstone at Millbury, Mass., February 
14, 1841 ; all natives of Mason and buried there. It is not 
improbable that, with all the care that has been bestowed in 
preparing this obituary list, there will be found in it errors 
in names, dates, and ages. Any such, if discovered, should be 
excused, in consideration of the great number of the names, 
dates, &c., and the fact that the work was prepared and 
printed at the distance of two hundred and fifty miles from 
the locality to which it refers. 

In the record kept by Mr. Hill, the disease or cause of 
death is, in most instances, stated ; but as the principal use 
that could be made of such entries is secured in the table of 
ages, diseases, &c., to be found in this book, it was thought 
that the space required would not be compensated for by the 
Insertion of these items. In the record of deaths, a few 
abbreviations are used, to be explained as follows : In. infant, 
c. child, s. son, d. daughter, w. wife, y. m. d., years, months, 
days. 



FAMILY REGISTEES. 195 

FAMILY REGISTERS. 

Many of the first settlers in Mason were descendants of 
John Lawrence of Watertown, and, therefore, it is thought 
expedient to insert so much of the family register of his 
family as will show the pedigree of the Mason families, 
which compose a portion of his very numerous descendants. 
The earliest ancestor of this name, of whom any record has 
been preserved, is Sir Robert Lawrence, of Ashton Hall, Lan- 
cashire, England. He was a companion in arms of Richard L, 
the Lion-hearted King of England ; and accompanied him in 
his expedition to Palestine, at the time of the crusades. In 
1191, Richard conferred upon him the honor of knighthood, 
for his bravery in scaling the walls of Acre. Sir Robert's 
son James married Matilda, daughter and heir of John de 
Washington, and thus the family of Lawrence became con- 
nected with that of Washington, and from that family connec- 
tion Lawrence Washington, the grandfather of General Wash- 
ington, derives his name. Their son John married Margaret 
Chesford ; their son John married Elizabeth Holt ; their son 
Sir Robert married Margaret Holden ; their son Sir Robert 
married Amphilbus Longford. From their son Nicholas Law- 
rence of Agercroft, descended John Lawrence of Suffolk, who 
died in 1461. His son Thomas Lawrence of Rumburgh, in Suf- 
folk, made his will July 17, 1471. His son John died in 1504, 
leaving a son Robert. His son John's will is dated June 27, 
1556. His son John was buried at Rumburgh, May 21, 1590. 
From him descended John Lawrence of Wisset, who was 
buried January 16, 1607. His son Henry Lawrence probably 
came to New England, in 1630, and settled at Charlestown. 
His son John, baptized at Wisset, October 8, 1609, came to 
New England about 1630, probably with his father, and set- 
tled at Watertown, whence he removed to Groton, 1662, 
where he died, July 11, 1667, aged 58 years. His first wife 
Elizabeth died at Groton, Aug. 29, 1663. His second wife Su- 
san Bachelder died July 8, 1668. His second son Nathaniel, 
born at Watertown, in 1639, was the ancestor of Hon. Abbott 



196 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



Lawrence, and of Ainos Lawrence, the eminent Boston mer- 
chants. His seventli cliild, Enosli or Enoch, was born at 
Watertown, January 1, 1G49. His wife was Ruth Shattuck. 
Their son Nathaniel was born February 21, 1678. His son 
Enosh, born November 15, 1710, removed to Mason about the 
year 1749 or 1750, and died there September 28, 1778, aged 
68 years. Zachariah, the third son of Enosh Lawrence and 
Ruth Shattuck, was born 16th day of the 5th month, 1683. 
His wife's name was Abigail. Ruth, their second child, was 
born September 3, 1710. She was the wife of Elias Eliot, 
married December 18, 1729. They removed to Mason, where 
she died, December 3, 1794, aged 84 years. Three of their 
sons, William and Oliver, born in Groton, and Elias, born in 
Pepperell, settled in Mason, and died there, leaving numerous 
descendants. 

So much of the family register of John Lawrence's family, 
as connects the Mason families with him, taken from Butler's 
History of Groton, is here inserted ; and taken from the same 
work are inserted the family registers of the families of Oba- 
diah Parker, of Samuel Scripture, of John Swallow, and of 
Thomas Tarbell, all of whom were among the early settlers 
in Mason, and left numerous descendants in that town. 



John Lawrence, Sen.* and Eliz- 
abeth, t Susanna Bachelder.J 
(Married Susanna, Nov. 2, 166i,atCharlestowu.) 
John, born 14d. Im. 1635, at 

Watertown. 
15d. 8m. 1639, do. 
30d. 3m. 1643. do. 
[died young, do. 
16d. 5m. 1645, do. 
lOd. 11m. 1647, do. 



Nathaniel, 

Joseph, 

Jonathan, 

Mary, 

Peleg, 

Enosh, or 

Enoch, 

Samuel, 

Isaac, 

Elizabeth, 

Jonathan, 

Zachariah, 

Abigail, 

Susanna, 



5d. Im. 1648-9, do 

do. 

do. 

May9, 1655, at Boston. 

at Watertown. 

9d. Im. 1658, do. 

Jan. 11, 1606, of 

Susanna, at Groton. 

July 3, 1667, do. 



* Died at Groton, July 11, ICC". 
tDied at Groton, Aug. Z9, 1063. 
JBied at Charlestowu, July 8, 1668. 



Enosh Lawrence* and Ruth Shat- 




TUCK. 


(Married, March 6, 1676-7.) 


Nathaniel, 


born Feb. 21, 1678. 


Daniel, 


March 7, 1681. 


Zachariah, 


16d. 5m. 1683. 


Jeremiah, 


" May 1, 1686. 


* 


Died, Sept. 28, 1744. 


Nathaniel 


Laavrence and Anna or 




Hannah. 


Nathaniel, 


born May 13, 1702. 


James, 


Aug. 26, 1705. 


Anna, 


July 8, 1708. 


Enosh, 


" Nov. 15, 1710. 


Sarah, 


Mar. 15, 1713. 


Martha, 


Dec. 7, 1715. 


Joseph, 


April 10, 1717-18. 


Benjamin, 


Nov. 6, 1720. 


Rebecca, 


April 17, 1724. 


Lois, 


« Sept. 6, 1726. 


Eunice, 


'< July 25, 1728. 




[died Nov. 15, 1747- 



FAMILY EEGISTERS. 



197 



Zachauiah Lawuexce and Abigail. 

Zachariah, born May 8, 1708. 

Ruth, " Sept. 3, 1710. 

Jeremiah, " Dec. 7, 1713. 

Josiah, '« July 4, 1715. 
[died Nov. 13, 1717. 

Abigail, " May 16, 1718. 

Elizabeth, « July 31, 1720. 

Josiah, " Oct. 11, 1723. 

Rachael, (no date.) 

Enosh Lawrence and Sarah Stevens. 



(Married January 29, 1733-4.) 



Samuel, 
Pdchard, 
Enosh, 
Sarah, 
Lydia, 
Stephen, 
Daniel, ) 
Lois, 5 



bom 



Sept. 12, 1734. 

July 15, 1736. 

July 24, 1738. 

Aug. 6, 1740. 

July 16, 1742. 

Mar. 23, 1744. 

Mar. 28, 1746. 



[Daniel died Oct. 30,1747. 
Hannah, born April 12, 1748. 

Elias Elliot and Ruth Lawrence. 
(Married, Dec. 18, 1729.) 
[Children born in Groton.] 

William, born July 22, 1730. 



Rachel, " 


Aug. 10, 1732. 


Ohver, " 


Aug. 24, 1734. 


Jeremiah, " 


May 22, 1737. 


Abigail, " 


March 16, 1740. 


Elizabeth, " 


July 4, 1743, 


[Born in Pepperell.] 


Ruth, 


June 18, 1745. 


Mary, " 


July 13, 1747. 


EUas, 


June 25, 1750. 


Obadiah Parker and Hannah. 


Abijah, born March 11, 1727. 


Hannah, " 


Oct. 31, 1729. 


Obadiah, " 


April 19, 1730, 


Abigail, " 


Jan. 19, 1731-2. 


Oliver, " 


Oct. 15, 1733. 


Jacob, " 


Oct. 10, 1735. 




[died Sept. 18, 1736 


Rebekah, '< 


April 4, 1741. 


Simeon, " 


Feb. 19, 1742-3. 




[died Sept. 1, 1758 


Elizabeth, " 


Jan. 9, 1745. 


Samuel Scripture and Elizabeth 


Samuel, bom 4d. 8m. 1675. 


Mary, " 


Feb. 7, 1680. 


Abigail, " 


Jan. 28, 1686-7 


Ruth, « 


Feb. 2, 1696. 


Lydia, " 


June 28, 1700. 



Samuel Scripture, Jr., and Mary,* 

Elizabeth. 
Sarah, born Dec. 16, 1700. 
Jemima, <' April 19, 1702. 

[died Sept. 30, 1723. 
Samuel, " April 25, 1705. 

[died Sept. 28, 1723. 

James, ; died Sept. 28, 1723. 

Samuel, " April 27, 1727, of 
Elizabeth. 
*(Died Sept. 25, 1723.) 

Samuel Scripture, Jr., and Mary 

Green. 
Mary, born May 5, 1747. 
James, " Jan. 11, 1749. 
Oliver, " Dec. 19, 1750. 



John Swallow 
John, born 
Amaziah, <' 
Benjamin, " 

Sarah, " 

Peter, " 

Mary, '♦ 

Deborah, " 

Elizabeth, " 

Hannah, " 

Jonathan, " 



and Deborah, Sarah. 
Feb. 22, 1729-30. 
Nov. 22, 1731-2. 
Oct. 21, 1736, of 

Sarah. 
Nov. 25, 1741. 
Oct. 9, 1743. 
Feb. 28, 1746. 
Feb. 9, 1748. 
Dec. 17, 1750. 
Jan. 17, 1754. at 

Dunstable. 
June 22, 1757,atdo. 



Thomas Tarbell and Hannah* or 
Anna. 
(Married June 30, 1666.) 
Thomas, born July 6, 1667. 
Anna, " June 10, 1670. 

William, " Oct. 1, 1672. 
Mary, " 2d. 2m. 1675. 

*(Died Dec. 29, 1680.) 

Thomas Tarbell* and Elizabeth 
Blood. 
(Married Dec. 1, 1686.) 
Thomas, born Sept. 15, 1687. 



William, 
Elizabeth, " 
Sarah, " 
John, " 

Samuel, " 
Zachariah, " 
Anna, " 
James, " 
Eleazer, " 



June 10, 1689, 

Aug. 19, 1691. 

Sept. 29, 1693. 

July 6, 1695. 

Oct. 14, 1697. 

Jan. 25, 1699-1700. 

May 28, 1702. 

Feb. 13, 1701-5. 

April 28, 1707. 



(*Died Jan. 24,1717.) 



26 



198 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



Thomas Tahbell and Hannah, Abi- 
gail Parker. 
(Married Abigail, Jan. 1, 171G-1V.) 



Hannah, 
Rachael, 
Sara, 
Thomas, 

Abigail, 
Sarah, 
Jonathan, 
Eunice, 



born 



July 


1, 


1702. 


Dec. 


8, 


1704. 


Nov. 


20, 


1707. 


Feb. 


2, 


1719, of 

Abigail 


June 


6, 


172'2. 


Apr, 


14, 


1726. 


Feb. 


27, 


1727. 


Mar. 


7, 


1730-1. 



[died Nov. 10, 1751. 



David, born Aur. 21, 1732. 
Emma, '' June 16, 1734, 

[died Nov. 3, 1651. 
Solomon, " Mar. 11, 1736-7. 
Esther, " May 4, 1739. 

Thomas Takbell, Jk., and EsT^n. 
Sarah, born Jan. 19, 1742. 



Nathaniel, 

Edmund, 

John, 

Thomas, 

Jerusha, 



Dec. 

April 
June 
Oct. 
Sept. 



4, 
4, 
4, 
8, 
25, 



1744. 
1747. 
1749. 
1751. 
1753. 



From the records of the towns of Groton, Pepperell and 
Shirley, the foUowmg items, relating, as is supposed, to early 
settlers in Mason, are taken : 

GROTON. 

Joseph Blood, Jr., and Hannah Blood, married September 
9, 1743. Joseph, their first child, born July 29, 1743 ; killed 
at Bunker Hill. See page 177. 

Ebenezer Blood and Abigail. Ebenezer, their fifth child, 
born June 30, 1727, was probably Ebenezer Blood, who died 
at Mason, November 29, 1800. 

James Blood and Elizabeth Longley, married September 7, 
1669. His second wife Abigail. John, their second child, 
born March 16, 1689. 

John Blood and Joanna Nutting, married July 13, 1712. 
John, their first child, born February 18, 1713-14. 

John Blood, Jr., and Abigail Parker, married December 8, 
1741. John, their seventh child, born April 15, 1761, is 
supposed to be John Blood who died at Mason, January 29, 
1840. 

John Holden and Sarah Davis, married November 22, 
1715. Amos, their fifth child, born June 16, 1726. 

Amos Holden and Prudence Holden, married February 6, 
1750-1. Amos, their first child, born at Groton, September 
21, 1752, is supposed to be Amos Holden who died at Mason, 
April 16, 1806, aged 54 years. Four other children of this 



FAMILY REGISTERS. 



199 



wife were born at Shirley, aud eleven children of Sarah, his 
second wife, at the latter place. 

Samuel Kemp and Sarah. Ebenezer, their seventh child, 
born in April, 1729. 

Ebenezer Kemp and Mary. Simeon, their sixth child, born 
September 28, 1758, is supposed to be Simeon Kemp who 
died at Mason, February 8, 1836, aged 76 years, (originally 
entered 77 years.) 



PEPPERELL. 



In the records of Pepperell, is the family register, as fol- 
lows, of 



WILLIAM BLOOD and LUCY. 



"William, 

Lucy, 

Jonas, 



born 



September 14, 17-18. 
July 13, 1750. 

September 26, 17-54. 



Amos, 

Hannah, 

Lydia, 



born October 16, 1757. 
March 31, 1762. 
April 8, 1768. 



There is no doubt that the name Jonas is an error in the 
record or copy. It should be Joseph. He died in Mason, 
July 5, 1850, aged 96 years; Amos died December 19, 1840, 
aged 83 years ; Lydia, wife of John Russell, Jr., died July 5, 
1819, aged 51 years; Lucy was the wife of Ebenezer Shat- 
tuck, all of Mason. 

Family Registers of the Families of some of the early 
Settlers in Mason, copied from the town records : 



SAMUEL ABBOTT and BATHSHEBA. 
Samuel, born June 20, 1774. 

JOBN ADAMS and MARY. 

John, born August 24, 1778. 

Polly, August 11, 1780. 

Sally, June 11, 1782. 

Jonas, August 31, 1784. 

Ebenezer, November 15, 1786. 

Nathan, February 15, 1789. 

Seth, January 21, 1791. 

Lucy, July 9, 1793. 

Hannah, May 8, 1795. 

Kuth, July 14, 1797. 

ABU AH ALLEN and MARY. 
Amos,* born February 8, 1770. 
Isaac, September 6, 1771. 

Abiiah, July 16, 1773. 

J°J|y' ] June 19, 1775. 

bally, 5 



Joseph, 
Lucy, 



March 22, 1777. 
February 27, 1779. 



Died October 10, 1778. 



SIMON AMES and SARAH (MANN). 


[Children born at Walthan 


'•] 




Simon,* born 

Joseph,t 

Thaddeus, 


September 

July 

May 


3, 

8, 
18, 


1763 
1766 
1768 


Joel, 


January 


11, 


1771 


[Children 


jorn at Mason. 


J 




Sally, born 
Daniel, 


May 
April 


9. 
12, 


1773 
1777 


Abijah,J 
Hannah, 
Elijah, 
Simon, 


June 

September 
February 
July 


19, 
19, 
14, 
21, 


1779 
1782 
1785 
1788 


*Died July 8, 1765. t Died January 13, 1767 
I Died January 7, 1797. 



200 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



JOHN ASTEN and SARAH. 

Sarah, born April 3, 1707. 

John, July 29, 17C0. 

Mary, June 12, 1761. 

Martha, JSIarch 1, 1763. 

Beiijamin, January 19, 170'). 

Aaron, July 29, 1766. 

iildad, April 29, 1708. 

JOSEPH BALL, born at Waltham, Jan. 5, 1747; 
LYDIA, his wife, at Weaton, Nov. 14, 1750. 

Peter, born September 22, 1771. 

Polly, January 10, 1774. 

Lydia, August 1, 1770. 

Samuel, October 17, 1778. 

Nabby, November 19, 1780. 

Rebecca, December 14, 1782. 

JOSEPH BARRETT and SARAH, LEAH. 

Joseph, born January 25, 1774. 

John, August 21, l77o. 

Elisha, December 7, 1776. 

Sarah, October 12, 1778. 

Mercy, August 5, 1780. 

Abel,* June 3, 1782. 

Hannah, September 13, 1783. 

Jonas.t December 31, 1784. 

Polly, January 8, 1787. 

Rebecca, May 26, 1789. 

Sarah, wife of Joseph Barrett, died March 25, 

1794. Of Leah, 

Asa, born April 5, 1800. 

Loisa, " September 26, 1803. 

* Died October 5, 1782. t Died January 22, 

1787. 

REUBEN BARRETT, 3d, and MARY. 
Polly, born May 25, 1775. 

Samuel, May 21, 1778. 

Sarah, April 6, 1780. 

Reuben, June 6, 1782. 

BENJAMIN BARRETT and HANNAH. 
Hannah,* born June 13, 1783. 

Hannah, May 21, 1784. 

Polly, April 18, 1786. 

Sally, February 19, 1788. 

Lydia, March 7, 1790. 

Benjamin, September 7, 1792. 

* Died July 24, 1783. 

JOHN BARRETT and SUSANNAH. 
Harathusa, born February 3, 1783. 

JONATHAN BAOHELDER and POLLY. 
Jonathan, born December 13, 1784. 
Polly, October 22, 1786. 

John, December 4, 1789. 

Phebe, August 2, 1795. 

DAVID BLODGETT and ANNA, LUCY. 
Anna, born February 8, 1772. 



Anna, his wife, died Nov. 7, 1772. Of Lucy, 
Luther, born August 7, 1776, 

EBENEZER BLOOD and SARAH. 
Ebenezcr, born May 14, 1757. 

Thomas, March 6, 1759. 

Asa, September 28, 1763. 

Sarah, December 1, 1766. 

Naomi, May 13, 1773. 

JOSEPH BLOOD and RUTH [DUNSTER]. 
Joseph, born June 17, 1769. 

Silvanus, May 8, 1771. 

William Cutter, March 22, 1773. 
Ruth, January 8, 1775. 

Mr. Joseph Blood died June 17, 1775. 

THOMAS BLOOD and MOLLY. 
Polly, born September 14, 1784. 

Ebenezer, June 18, 1786. 

Thomas, , June 9, 1788. 

Josiah, August 17, 1790. 

Phebe, August 20, 1797. 

ASA BLOOD and PATTY. 
Patty, September 24, 1781. 

Lucy, April 8, 1793. 

AMOS BLOOD and SABAH [BLOOD.] 
Married by Rev. S. Dix, May 12, 1785. 
David, born, December 19, 1787. 
Abigail, April 4, 1789. 

Sarah, February 6, 1791. 

Hannah, December 31, 1793. 

Amos, May 6, 1796. 

Samuel Dix, June 22, 1798. 

Inde, December 12, 1801. 

SAMUEL BROWN and MARY. 
Josiah, born April 15, 1775. 

Daniel Emerson, July 4, 1777. 

SILAS BULLARD and AVIS [KEYESl- Mar- 
ried by Rev. Mr. Judson, July 1, 1782. 

Joseph, born April 2, 1783. 

Sampson, October 24, 1784. 

Silas, September 5, 1786. 

Amasa, July 22, 1788. 

Isaac, November 1, 1790. 

Sally, February 21, 1793. 

Eleazer, November 9, 1794. 

Jesse,* November 3, 1796. 

Caleb Emerson, August 29, 1799. 

Clarissa Page, May 26, 1802. 

Abigail Brooks, December 20, 1804. 

George, October 26, 1806. 

Charles Keyes, February 22, 1807. 

Hannah Keyes, December 22, 1808. 
*Died July 14, 1793. 



FAMILY REGISTERS. 



201 



ELISHA BUSS and POLLY [MANN J. 
Po%, born July 30,1791. 

Lucy, March 21, 1794. 

John, November 14, 1796. 

TTTLLIAM CHAMBERS and LYDIA [LOR- 
ING]. 

Mary, born March 3, 1782. 

JONATHAN CHANDLER and HANNAH, 

RACHEL. 

[Children bora at Grafton] 

Hannah, born August 6, 1776. 

John, January 12, 1778. 

[Children bom at Mason.] 
Jonathan, born July 21, 1780. 

Daniel, Xovember 13, 1782. 

BetseyWhitmore, January 26, 1785. 
Mary, May 26, 1787. 

Hannah, wife of Jonathan Chandler, died June 
3, 1787. Jonathan Chandler and Rachel Wil- 
son, married by Rev. S. Farrar, December 6, 
1787. Of Rachel, 

Joseph, 



AMOS DAKIN 
Sarah, 
Molly, 
Amos, 
Hannah, 
Timothy, 
Lydia, 
Dorcas,t 
Samuel, 
Jonas, 
Eunice, 
Rebecca, 
Lucy, 

*Dea. Amos Dakin 
December 23, 1769. 



born October 


14, 1788. 


KIN* and SARAH 


[MINOT]. 


born June 


9, 1756. 


April 


27, 1758. 


May 


13, 1760. 


January 


20, 1762. 


March 


27, 1764. 


April 


11, 1766. 


•June 


6, 1768. 


November 17, 1770. 


March 


17, 1773. 


March 


26, 1775. 


AprO. 


15, 1777. 


May 


20, 1779. 



died April 28, 1789. tBied 



AMOS DAKIN and MARY [KINQSLEY]. 

Married by Rev. S. Earrar, December 11, 1783. 

Amos, born September 18, 1784. 



Dorcas, 


January 31, 


1786 


Polly, 


September 4, 


1787 


Sally, 


September 4, 


1789 


Samuel, 


May 27, 


1791 


Jona.s, 


November 10, 


1792 


Moses, 


May 20, 


1794 


Leonard, 


May 8, 


1796 


Lydia, 


March 20, 


1798 


Hannah, 


May 18, 


1800 


Sophronia, 


February 7, 


1803 


Cynthia, 


January 19, 


1805 



JOSHUA DAVIS and DOROTHY. 

Pveuben, born June 26, 1768. 

Joshua, January 12, 1771. 



Dorothy,* 
Timothy, 
Dorothy, 
James, 
Paul, 
*Died AprU 7, 1776. 



September 12, 1773. 
November 18, 1775. 
April 2, 1778. 

March 26, 1780. 
February 23, 1782. 



SUSANNA 



ZACHARIAH DATIS and 
[BROWN]. 

Susanna, born April 10, 1774. 

EUzabeth, May 24, 1776. 

Cyrus,* February 25, 1778. 

Anna, February 9, 1785. 

Cyrus, . March 13, 1789. 



*Died_March 24, 1788. 



JOHN DUTTON and SUSANNA. 



Susanna, born 
Mary, 
Rebecca,* 
John,t 
Elijah, 
Rebecca, 
Royal, 
Josiah, 
Mason, 
Joanna, 
John Mason, 
Benjamin, 
* Died October 2, 17 



January 

January 

November 

January 

June 

January 

January 

November 

September 

August 

August 

June 



5, 1761. 
14, 1762. 

4, 1763. 
27, 1765. 
22, 176G. 

8, 1768. 
30, 1769, 
11, 1770. 

9, 1772. 
1, 1774. 

27, 1777. 
4, 1780. 



64. tBied Sept. 10, 1777. 



OLIVER ELIOT and MARY. 



Samuel, 

Mary, 

Elizabeth, 

Susanna, 

Esther, 

Oliver, 

Abijah, 

Sarah, 



born 



July 

August 

January 

February 

April 

July 

October 

August 



30, 1758. 

15, 1760. 

2, 1762. 

20, 1765. 
2, 1767. 
7, 1769. 

21, 1771. 
23, 1774. 



WILLIAM ELIOT and DOROTHY. 



Molly, 

Betty, 

William, 

Dolly, 

Israel,* 

Sarah, 



born 



August 

March 

February 

March 

April 

May 



2, 1773. 

3, 1775. 
3, 1777. 
3, 1779. 

10, 1781. 
29, 1783. 



Dorothy, wife of William Eliot, died June 14> 
1780. William Eliot and Rebecca Ilildreth, 
married by Rev. S. Dix, March 20, 1787. Of 
Rebecca, 

Israel, born 

Joseph, 

David,t 

Seth, 

Rebecca, 

Samuel, 

Susan, 

Jesse, 



January 1, 1788- 
April 12, 1789- 

September 24, 1790- 
May 8, 1792- 

July 9, 1794. 

March 22, 1796. 

March 4, 1798. 

December 24, 1799. 



202 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



Elscy, born October 20, 1803. 

Abel, May 5, 180.5. 

Addison David, May 18, 1809. 

Juliann, January 12, 1811. 

Mr. John Eliot died June 24, 1781, aged 65 years. 
* Died August 7, 1782. t Died Aug. 1, 1805. 

ELIAS ELIOT and SALLY. 

Sally, born December 7, 1777. 

Elias, February 2, 1779. 

Lucy, April 15, 1781. 

Joel, July 18, 1783. 

Nabbv, April 15, 1786. 

Pamela, July 24, 1788. 

Polly, July 25, 1791. 

Patty, April 11, 1793. 

Dorcas, January 23, 1797. 

ANDREW ELIOT and HANNAH. 



Andrew,* born 
John, 
Hannah, 
Polly, t 
Andrew, 
PoUv, 
Sally, 
George, 
Amos, 
William, 
Betsey, 
* Died July 1, 1783. 



January 
June 
March 
May 

February 
June 

December 
April 
March 
February 
May 
t Died April 



25, 1783. 
18, 1784. 
3, 1786. 
24, 1788. 
10, 1790. 
27, 1792. 

17, 1794. 
24, 1797. 

8, 1799. 
1, 1804. 

18, 1805. 
7, 1789. 



ABIJAH EATON and ELIZABETH [ELLIOT]. 

Abigail, born June 4, 1785. 

Haliet, June 18, 1789. 

Abel, December 24, 1791. 

Esther, January 11, 1794. 

Betsey, October 30, 1796. 

Vearon, December 17, 1798. 

Isaac Green, May 14, 1801. 

William, July 15, 1803. 

SAMUEL ELIOTT and SARAH. 
Sally, born February 2, 1787, 



Nabby, 

Merriam, 

Polly, 



June 23, 1789. 

April 30, 1791. 

November 11, 1793. 



JONAS FAY and MOLLY. 
Jonas, born 

John, 
Polly, 
William, 
Anna, 
Betsey, 
Artemas, 
Sally,* 
Sally, 

* Died September 25, 1789. 



July 

February 

October 


6, 

26, 
7, 


May 

March 


19, 
29, 


March 


19, 


March 


11, 


August 


17, 


May 


23, 



1775. 

1777. 
1779. 
1781. 
1783. 
1785. 
1787. 
1789. 
1791. 



Taylor, 


born October 25, 


1792. 


Nancy, 


May 26, 


1795. 


DANIEL FAY and JEMIMA SCRIPTURE. 


Deborah,* 


born November 21, 


1776. 


Deborah, 


February 2, 


1778. 


Jemima, 


January 9, 


1780. 


Lydia, 


May 29, 


1782 


Mr. Daniel Fay died June 2, 1783. 




* Died October 8, 1777. 




JONATHAN FISH and DOROTHY. 


Jonathan, 


born September 8, 


1762. 


Ebenezer, 


March 11, 


1765. 


Hannah, 


April 11, 


1767 


Levi, 


March 4, 


1769 


Asa, 


September 14, 


1772. 


JONATHAN FOSTER and THANKFUL 


[HAR 




RINGTON.] 




Jonathan, 


born November 15, 


1759 


Nathan, 


July 15, 


1762 


liichard. 


November 28, 


1764 


Andrew, 


July 5, 


1768 


Betty, 


March 12, 


1771 


Daniel, 


December 4, 


1773 


Samuel, 


March 18, 


1776 



Thankful, wife of Jonathan Foster, died about 
January, 1779. Jonathan Foster and Mercy 
Towus, married by Rev. Jonathan Searle, No- 
vember 30, 1779. Of Mercy, 

Joseph, May 28, 1780. 

Stephen, April 27, 1782. 

SAMUEL GREEN and MOLLY [SWALLOW.] 
Samuel, born August 14, 1788, 



Abiel, 




April 


6, 1791. 


Polly, 




July 


26, 1793. 


Russell, 




January 


14, 1796. 


George, 




June 


30, 1798. 


NATHAN HALL, born at Bradford, December 


25, 1715; 


Mary, 


lis wife, bom 


at Boxford, 


March 29, 


1723. 






James, 


born 


July 


25, 1743. 


Mary, 




March 


9, 1746. 


Nathan, 




August 


23, 1748. 


Mehitabel 




December 


24, 1750. 


David, 




January 


24, 1754. 


Daniel, 




May 


5, 1756. 


Henry, 




October 


26, 1758. 


Elizabeth, 




March 


5, 1765. 


Richard, 




September 


12, 1768. 


JAMES HALL and SARAH. 


James, 


born 


January 


28, 1768. 


Asa, 




March 


10, 1770. 


Sarah, 




March 


29, 1772. 


John, 




April 


30, 1774. 


Mehitabel 




May 


28, 1776. 



I 



FAMILY REGISTERS. 



203 



NATHAN HALL, Jr., and ELEANOK. 
Mary, born March 31, 1771. 

Nathan, ) ^j^^^j^ 28, 1773. 

Eleanor, ) 

Jonathan, May 2, 1775. 

Betty, September 12, 1777. 

JOSEPH HERRICK and LOIS. 
Joseph, born September 3, 1751. 
Lois, December 12, l7o3. 

Shadi-ach, January 26, 1756. 

Amos, February 21, 1763. 

HEZEKIAH HODGKINS and LYDIA. 
Pelatiah, born October 12, 1784. 

THOMAS HODGMAN and REBECCA. 



Hannah, 


April 


7, 


1784 


Rebecca,* 


February 


26, 


1786 


MiUey, 


March 


16, 


1788 


Polly, 


February 


16, 


1790 


Rebecca, 


March 


6, 


1792 


* Died July 11, 


1789, 







DAVID HODGMAN and HANNAH. 
David, born January 26, 1774. 

AMOS HODGMAM and LOIS. 
Amos, born November 15, 1775. 

AMOS HOLDEN and LYDIA [SLOAN]. 



Pattj-, born 

David Sloan,* 

Lydia, 

Prudence, 

Esther, 

Molly, 

Amos, 

Aaron, 

Abner, 

* Died May 4, 1784. 



June 8, 1779. 

August 19, 1780. 
July 9, 1782. 

November 12, 1784. 
October 1, 1787. 
September 7, 1789. 
August 12, 1791. 
June 28, 1793. 

April 19, 1795. 



ELIJAH HORTON and HANNAH. 
Betsey, born December 16, 1779. 
Samuel, May 15, 1782. 

NATHANIEL HOSMER and ELIZABETH. 



Tabitha, 


born 


May 24, 


1757. 


Anna, 




November 13, 


1759 


Eunice, 




August 22, 


1762 


Nathaniel, 




August 9, 


1765 


Asa, 




August 10, 


1769 


JOHN HULL and MARTHA. 




Lucy, 


born 


January 6, 


1774 


Sophia, 




August 19, 


1779 


Joseph, 




July 31, 


1781 


John, 




September 11, 


1783 


James, 




October 6, 


1785 


Asa, 




September 21, 


1787 



Pattv, born September 17, 1789. 

Frank, October 16, 1791. 

AVilliam, March 16, 1793. 

JONATHAN JEFTS and LYDIA. 
Jonathan,* born January 16,1766. 



Henry, 




April 29, 1768. 


* Died February 13 


, 17(i(j. 


JOHN JEFTS and LOIS. 


Jonathan, 


born 


June 1, 1767. 


Hannah, 




September 15, 1769. 


LaA\Tence, 




September 13, 1771. 


John, 




AprU 27, 1773, 


David, 




June 4, 1776. 


Daniel, 




December 17, 1778, 


Louis, 




September 27, 1780, 


Lydia, 




November 2, 1782, 


Joseph, 




July 2, 1785, 


Willard, 




May 8, 1787 


Francis, 




July 3, 1789. 


THOMAS JEFTS and ABIGAIL [BARRETT]. 


Benjamin, 


born 


April 10, 1777 


Polly, 




June 19, 1782 


Thomas, 




June 13, 1784 


Sibbel, 




June 13, 1787 


Lucy, 




April 1, 1789 


Lydia, 




April 1, 1792 


Zebulon, 




May 22, 1796 


David, 




August 13, 1799 


Abigail, 




July 26, 1801 


BENJAMIN JEFTS and JUDITH [DE- 




GRETT.] 


David, 


born 


August 7, 1780 


Judith, 




August 5, 1783 


Henry, 




August 29, 1788 


WiUiam, 




July 6, 1790 



MOLLY JEFTS. 
Henry Sloan, UL, born May 20, 1768. 
Nathan Fish, ill., Nov. 9, 1770. 

EENJAMIN KENDALL and ELIZABETH 
[DEANE]. 

[Cliildren born at Woburn.] 
Betsey, born February 8, 1781. 
Benjamin, May 16, 1783. 

[Ctiildren born at Mason.] 

Joshua, 

Susannah, 

Rebecca, 

Jonas, ) 

Daniel, } 

Samuel, 

George, 

Polly, 

John Butterfield, May 



December 

March 

October 


9, 
26, 

n. 


1785 
1788 
1790 


July 


8, 


1793 


July 
April 
May 

May 


31, 

9, 

13 

30, 


1795 
1798 
1800 
1803 



204 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



ELIJAH KEYES and GRACE. 
Lydia, born November 6, 1779. 

Eiisha, April 19, 1781. 

Batbsheba, July 2, 1783. 

BENJAMIN KING ond SAKAH. 
Ebenezer, born February 22, 1768. 

CHAELES KIEK and . 

John, born October 19, 1789. 

Thomas, July 28, 1792. 

Daniel, May 5, 1795. 

BENJAMIN KNOWLTON and ABIGAIL. 



Abigail, 


born 


June 22, 1777. 


Charlotte, 




October 13, 1778. 


Benjamin, 




August 10, 1780. 


Amos Prichard, 


January 16, 1783. 


Lucy, 




January 13, 1786. 


HENEY 


KNOWLTON and SIBBEL. 


Henry, 


born 


September 20, 1779. 


Sibbel, 




April 18, 1781. 


Euth, 




January 25, 1783. 


Charles, 




November 13, 1784. 


Timothy, 




July 2, 1788. 


John, 




May 10, 1790. 


EICHAED LAWEENCE and ANNA. 


Anna,* 


born 


September 19, 1762. 


SQas,* 




November 30, 1763. 


Willard, 




May 24, 1766. 


Sampson, 




June 3,1768. 


Anna, 




June 8, 1770. 


Richard, 




September 11, 1772. 


Hannah, 




October 19, 1775. 


Zachariah, 




August 31, 1777. 


Mary, 




March 25, 1779. 


Ruth, 




February 18, 1781. 


Silas, 




October 14, 1783. 


* Died Februai7 7 


, 1763. fDied November 


18, 1776. 






ENOSH 


LAWEENCE and ESTHER 




[WOODS]. 


Deborah, 


born 


November 18, 1763. 


Susannah, 




December 3, 1765. 


Esther, 




October 28, 1767. 


Martha, 




August 25, 1769. 


Enosh, 




November 16, 1772. 


Lucy, 




March 1, 1775. 


STEVENS LAWEENCE and SAEAH. 


Sarah, 


born 


March 18, 1769. 


Polly, 




April 7, 1771. 


Stevens, 




March 20, 1773. 


Betsey, 




January 16, 1775. 


Rebecca, 




February 8, 1777. 


Hannah, 




December 28, 1778. 


Persis, 




October 20, 1780. 



Deidama, born December 22, 1782. 
Luther, May 31, 1785. 

JOHN LAWRENCE and LEEFE, [RE- 
LIEF?] 

Leefe, born December 21, 1772. 

John, August 21, 1775. 

Ephraim,* March 10, 1777. 

Lucy, March 29, 1778. 

Enosh Lawrence, son of Nathaniel Lawrence 
and Anna, his wife, was born at Groton, No- 
vember 15, 1710. Died September 28, 1778. 

* Died June 30, 1777. 

JOHN LEAENED and MAEY. 
Daniel, born March 14, 1767. 
Abigail, November 13, 1768. 

Mary, February 23, 1772. 

Sarah, February 11, 1774. 

MOSES LOWELL and SAEAH. 
Rholand, born February 19, 1767. 
Sarah, May 27, 1770. 

Abraham, February 21, 1773. 

DAVID LOWELL and PHEBE. 
Phebe, born January 13, 1770. 
MoUy, " " - - 



November 7, 1771. 



BENJAMIN MANN and MAETHA [DEANE]. 
Benjamin,* born April 10, 1763. 

Joseph,t January 21, 1765. 

James, February 15, 1767. 

Polly, January 26, 1769. 



[Children born at Mason.] 



April 

Apiil 

June 

October 

November 



17, 1771. 

23, 1773. 

12, 1775. 

31, 1777. 

7, 1778. 



Jonas, born 

Betty, 

Lucy, :j; 

Patty, § 

Lucy, 

[Benjamin, No date.] 

*Died July 24, 1776. fDied July 1, 1766. 

t Died Sept. 10, 1777. $ Died Nov. 2, 1777. 

CHEISTOPHEE MANN and ALICE. 
SeHnda, born May 8, 1782 or '83. 
Thomas, February 15, 1784. 

JOSEPH MEEEIAM and MAEY. 
Joseph, born July 7, 1770. 

EUzabeth, June 7, 1772. 

Samuel, October 14, 1773. 

Dorothy, October 11, 1778. 

Rebecca, July 26, 1781. 

Mary, wife of Joseph Merriam, died August 
22, 1791. 

ABEAHAM MEEEIAM, Jr., and HANNAH, 
MAEY. 

'jS,| '"" ^-mber 1,1784. 



FAMILY EEGISTERS. 



205 



Hannah, born May 31, 1788. 

Enoch, October 19, 1790. 

Ephraim, February 2, 1793. 

Jesse, February 17, 1796. 

Abraham Merriam, Jr., and Marj- Lawrence, 
married January 19, 1801. Of Mary, 

John, born September 25, 1804. 

Lydia, daughter of Abraham Memam, Jr., 
and Hannah, died October 15, 1784. 

SILAS MEREIAM and M.\IIY. 
Silas, born February 14, 1785. 

Polly, March 8, 1787. 

Cheney, April 13, 1789. 

Rebecca, October 16, 1791. 

Asa, July 28, 1794. 

EZKA MEERLWI and SUSANXA [ELLIOT]. 
Susanna,* born August 16, 1786. 
Ezra, May 17, 1788. 

Josiah, April 19, 1790. 

Zadock, April 16, 1792. 

Samuel, March 31, 1794. 

Sally.t November 5, 1796. 

Nabby, December 28, 1798. 

Benjamin, May 13, 1801. 

Susanna, April 3, 1803. 

Patty, May 5, 1805. 

*Died Sept. 9, 1798. f Died June 6, 1799. 
WILLIAM MILES and SARAH. 
William, born March 2, 1770. 

Sarah, May 21, 1771. 

Nancy, March 24, 1773. 

Polly, August 23, 1775. 

Betsey, August 27, 1777. 

Oliver,* December 1, 1779. 

Patty, April 12, 1782. 

*Died June 25, 1783. 

LIEUT. OBADIAH I'AKKER was bom in 
[Groton], April 11, 1731; Euth, his wife, 
was born in , January 5, 1733. 

Hannah, born July 18, 1754. 

Phinehas, May 11, 1756. 

Obadiah,* December 17, 1758. 

Grace,! August 19, 1761. 

Sam Stevens, October 17, 1763. 

Puth, September 8, 1765. 

Sampson, October 11, 1767. 

Grace, June 2, 1770. 

Obadiah, February 18, 1772. 

Joel, July 11, 1775. 
* Died Jan. 27, 1763. t Bied Sept. 5, 1761. 
THOMAS EOBENS and HITTE. 

Thomas, born November 29, 1774. 

John, February 20, 1777- 

James, April 22, 1779. 

Stephen, June 2, 1785. 

Joseph Brown, June 4, 1795. 

27 



I JASON EUSSELL and ELIZABETH. 

Jason, born June 2, 1763. 

Jonathan, February 8, 1765. 

Josiah, January 13, 1767. 

Elizabeth, July 2, 1769. 

Samuel, April 4, 1772. 

Benjamin, August 2, 1775. 

Thomas,* October 2, 1777. 

William, October 6, 1779. 

David, March 6, 1782. 
[Thomas.] 
[*Died Februarj- 8, 1785.] 

HUBBEET EUSSELL and SAEAH [WAE- 
EEN]. 

Nehemiah, born September 24, 1775. 

Sarah, June 13, 1777. 

Abigail, July 30, 1779. 

Hubbert, August 1, 1781, 

Isaac,* July 11, 1783, 

Polly, June 19, 1784. 

Isaac, Februarv 17, 1787. 

Lucv, February 28, 1789. 

Micah, April 26, 1791. 

Moses, December 2, 1793. 

Hannah, April 14, 1796. 

Betsy Warren, June 16, 1798. 
* Died August 3, 1783. 

EPHEAIM SAETELL and ABIGAIL. 
Ede, born May 18, 1778. 

SAMUEL SCEirTUKE and MAEY [GREEN]. 
[Sarah,] born 

Samuel, December 9, 1760. 

Hannah, June 3, 1763. 

John, September 18, 1765. 

[See page 197.] 

JAMES SCEIPTUEE and SIBBEL [SHEP- 
LEY]. 

Polly, born February 28, 1776. 

James, November 10, 1777. 

Sibbel,* January 12, 1779. 

Betsey, February 10, 1782. 

Sibbel, February 20, 1784. 

Sally, 

Ward, 

Lucy, 

Charles, 

Oliver, 

*Died July 20, 1783. 

OLIVEE SCEIPTUEE and JANE. 
Betty, born August 7, 1777. 
Sarah, October 5, 1779. 

Jane, June 23, 1781, 

Oliver, June 16, 1783. 

Lucinda, July 24, 1785. 



May 


18, 


1788 


July 


20, 


1790 


May 


20, 


1792 


May 


26, 


1794 


October 


10, 


1796 



206 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



SAMUEL SCRIPTURE, Jr., and BETSV. 
Samuel, boin February 8, 1784. 
Betsy, March 27, 1786. 

JONATHAN SEAELE and HANNAH. 
Judith, born January 31, 1773. 
Hannah, May 16, 1774. 

Jonathan, [well, Tsovember 4, 1775. 
Nathaniel Coggs- July 4, 1778. 

Betsey, October 19, 1782. 

Samuel, April 17, 1784. 

Deborah, September 27, 1788. 

Polly, August 27, 1793. 

ABEL SHED and RUTH. 
Abel, born August 25, 1769. 

John H., March 1, 1771. 

Samuel, August 5, 1773. 

Ebenezer, November 6, 1773. 

Henry, June 16, 1779. 

WILLIAM SHED and ELIZABETH. 

Silas, born June 18, 1773. 

Hannah, March 23, 1777. 

Simeon, March 2, 1779. 

Abel, March 8, 1780. 

Elizabeth, October 21, 1781. 

John, October 16, 1783. 

William Parker, April 2o, 1787. 

SAMUEL SMITH and ELIZABETH. 
Frederick, born April 12, 1770. 
Abigail Harrington, May 19, 1784. 

LEMUEL SPAULDING and SARAH. 

Thomas,* 1^°™ March 12,1766. 

Esther,' March 9, 1767. 

Sarah, April 3, 1768. 

Hepzibath,t January 4, 1771. 

Jerusha, December 19, 1772. 

Lemuel, January 28, 1774. 

Elizabeth,! May 16, 1776. 
* Died March 24, 1766. t Died February 11, 
1772. I Died August 25, 177G. 

SILAS SPAULDING and HANNAH. 

(At Ashburnham.) 

Mary, born February 22, 1779. 

JOHN SWALLOW and SARAH [LAWRENCE], 
MARY [HALL], 

John, born January 3, 1757. 

Sarah, October 2, 1758. 

Lydia, October 31, 1760. 

Deborah, November 15, 1762. 
Sarah, wife of John Swallow, died December 
28,1763. Of Mary, 

Molly, born December 14, 1766. 



Abel, 

J ocl, 

Sibbel, 

Eunice,* 

Eunice, 

Daniel, 

Azubah, 

Rhoda, 

Betsey, 

Dorcas, 



born 



May 

May 

April 

July 

December 

July 

August 

June 

February 

July 



31, i768. 
14, 1770. 

6, 1772. 

3, 1774. 

1, 1775. 
3. 1778. 

17, 1780. 

17, 1783. 

18, 1786. 

2, 1788. 



* Died December 3, 1774. 

JOHN SWALLOW, Jr., and EEBECCA [DUN- 

STKE]. 
John,*- born March 1, 1783. 

John, February 3, 1785. 

Isaiah, March 29, 1787. 

Abel, November 3, 1789. 

Nehemiah, May 22, 1792. 

Ezra, December 22, 1794. 

Kebecca. May 3, 1799. 

* Died March 13, 1783. 

EDWARD TARBELL and RACHEL [HIL- 

DRETH]. 

Betsey, born May 8, 1787. 

Dolly, October 25, 1790. 

James, February 12, 1792, 

Joseph, May 31,1793. 

Kachel, February 10, 1795. 

Eda, November 25, 1796. 

NATHANIEL TARBELL and RUTH. 
Ruth, born February 14, 1772. 

Elizabeth, January I, 1775. 

JNathaniel, December 19, 1776. 

JOHN TARBELL and SARAH. 
John, born January 1, 1775. 

Abigail, January 29, 1778. 

Azubah, October 9, 1780. 

Sarah, December ;2, 1782. 

William, February 7, 1786. 



THOMAS TARBELL 
Sally, born 

Esther, 
Thomas,* 
Heuben, 
Lemuel, 
Thomas, 
Eunice, 
Joel, 
Lydia, 
* Died January, 17 



and SARAH [BARRETT]. 
November 6, 1778. 
August 11, 1780. 
August 17, 1782. 
July 19, 1784. 

February 14, 1786. 
October 19, 1788. 



April 

July 

March 

•85. 



24, 1791. 

9, 1793. 

21, 1797. 



SAMUEL TARBELL and ANNA. 
Samuel, born October 10, 1784. 
Nancy, June 4, 1786. 

Rebecca, July 23, 1788. 



FAMILY REGISTERS. 



207 



ifabbv, born March 26, 1791. 

Polly* February 9, 1793. 

Dolly, May 3, 179.5. 

Asher, January 23, 1797. 

Luciuda, December 12, 1798. 

EDMUND TAKBELL and MARY [HILDRETH]. 

Polly, born February 19, 1772. 



Dolly, 

Sibbel, 

Edmund, ) 

Sarah, 5 

Lucy-, 

Hannah, 

Oliver, 



December 29, 1773. 
March 6, 1775. 

:March 25, 1777. 



Xovember 21, 1780. 
March 19, 1782. 

February 2, 1785. 

Mary, wife of Edmund Tarbell, died February 
', 1785. 



SAMUEL TOWNSEND ami HANNAH 


[LAW 


RENC-L]. 




[Children born at Northborough. 


] 


Hannah, born 


August 8, 


1770 


Polly, 


September 4, 


1771 


Joshua, 


November 7, 


1773 


Mercy, 


September 1, 


1775 


Sarah, 


September 1, 


1777 


Lydia, 


June 30, 


1780 


[Children 


born in Mason ] 




Persia, 


August 28, 


1782 


Samuel, 


February 9, 


1784 


Zilpah, 


October 28, 


1785 


Madamoisella, 


May 8, 


1787 


Betsey, 


February 27, 


1789 


Madamoisella, 


March 19, 


1794 



[TAY- 



HINKSMAN WARREN and ESTHEI 
LOR]. 

[Jonathan, born in To\vnsend.] 

Sarah, ) -.r 

Elizabeth, I ^^^y 

John, June 12, 1794. 



27, 17^ 



JOTHAM WEBBER and ELIZABETH [RUS- 
SELL]. 

born December 24, 1778. 
September 24, 1780. 
July 18, 1782. 

January 13, 1785. 



Jotham, 
Jason, 
"SVilliam, 
John,* 
* Died April 20, 1786. 

ROGERS WESTON and DEBORAH [LAW- 
RENCE]. 

Samuel, born October 4, 1785. 

Sally, April 3, 1787. 

Rogers, April 11, 1789. 

Jeremiah, November 19, 1791. 

James, February 24, 1793. 

Lawrence, November 19, 1795. 

JOSIAH WHEELER and LUCY. 
Lucy, born January 16, 1765. 



Elizabeth,* August 

Eleanor, April 

Elizabeth, July 

Mr. Josiah Wheeler died October 17, 1771 

* Died March 22, 1772. 



6, 1768. 

29, 1779. 
22, 1761. 
19, 1773. 



AARON WHEELER and LUCY. 
John* born August 2, 1767. 



Aaron, 

John Brooks, 

Nathan, 

Daniel, 

Lucy, 

Benjamin, 

Bebecca, 

Patty, 

Alice, t 

George, J 

Jotham, 

AHce,§ 

Prescott, 



July 9, 1768. 

March 11, 1770. 
December 4, 1771. 
April 3, 1774, 

February 16, 1776. 
January 14, 1778. 



October 

August 

April 

June 

April 

April 

June 



25, 1779. 

4, 1781. 
20, 1783. 
11, 1784. 
19, 1786. 
15, 1789. 

3, 1794. 



* Died August 10, 1767.t Died June 18, 1783. 
I Died Nov. 1, 1786. § Died April 16, 1789. 

TIMOTHY WHEELER and SARAH [HUB- 
BARD]. 

Sally, born March 27, 1777. 

Betsey, January 5. 1779. 

Polly, March 14,1781. 

Timothy, January 16, 1783. 

Lucy, December — , 1784. 

Nancy, April 14, 1787. 

Hannah, May 7, 1789. 

Ebenezer, July 19, 1791. 

Amy, September 18, 1793. 

llebecca, December 6, 179G. 

NATHAN WHIPPLE and ABIGAIL. 
Dorcas, born May 19, 1767. 

Sally, May 28, 1770. 

Hannah, March 1, 1772. 

Nathan, September 16, 1774. 

JOHN WHITAKER and THANKFUL 

[PIERCE]. 

William,* born April 12, 1774. 

Susannah,! August 16, 1776. 

* Died October 2, 1775. t Biid Sept. 29, 177-. 



Hannah, 



— WHITE and - 
born March 



28, 1769. 



JONATHAN WILLIAMS and RUTH. 
Ruth,* born October 14, 1767. 
Elizabeth, September 25, 1768. 

Jonathant August 11, 1770. 

Ruth, June 5, 1772. 

* Died Nov. 4. 1767 or 9. t Died Aug. 1, 1771. 



208 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



Rachel, 
Polly, 



born 



Jantiarj'- 
May 



13, 1775. 
11, 1777. 



NATHANIEL WILLIAM? and HANNAH. 
Molly, born September 4, 1787. 

8amucl, September 6. 1789. 

Joel, August 26, 1791. 

John, . died April 16, 1790. 

JONATHAN WINSHIP aud ELIZABETH. 
Edmund, born October 2, 1765. 
Isabel, September 2, 1769. 

NOAH WINSHIP and DEBORAH [SWAL- 
LOW]. 

Noah, born June 22, 1785. 

Deborah, February 9, 1787. 

Sarah, February 7, 1793. 

[John]. 

JAMES WITHEE and SARAH. 
Daniel,* born September 30, 1760. 

January 18, 1763. 

October 5, 1765. 

February 2, 1768. 

July 2, 1770. 

September 24, 1772. 

September 4, 1774. 

August 13, 1779. 
I Died May 6,1762. 

[ELISHA WITHINGTON, son of William Witli- 
inffton and Sarah Locke, his wife, was born 
in Stow, April 1, 1746, married MARY PREN- 
TICE, daughter of Stephen Prentice and Es- 
ther, his wife, born in Grafton, September 15, 
1748]. Their children were, 

11, 1769. 

8, 1771. 
1, 1773. 

28, 1775. 

9, 1779. 
6, 1782. 
8, 1785. 

1, 1789.] 



James, 
Nathaniel, 
John.t 

William Parker, 
Sarah, 
John, 
Daniel, 
* Died Jan. 6, 1779. 



Elisha, 


born 


May, 


William, 




March 


Stephen, 




February 


Mather, 




October 


John, 




March 


Samuel, * 




October 


[Samuel, 




December 


Ebenezer, 




March 


t Died July 16, 178J 


!. 



SAMUEL WOODS and SARAH. 



Rebecca, born 

Rhoda, 

Sarah* 

Ebenezer,t 

Jofiiah.J 

Ebenezer, 

Isaac, 

Dinah, 

Jonas Brooks, 

James, § 

* Died Sept. 16, 177 
t Died Feb. 9, 178-. 



December 6, 1774. 
July 19, 1776. 

February 22, 1778. 
August 21, 1779. 
August 4, 1780. 

July 3, 1782. 

September 9, 1784. 
September 25, 1786. 
July 31, 1788. 

October 23, 1793. 

I. t Died October 2, 1779. 
5 Died Feb. 1, 1794. 



JOSEPH WOODS and MARY 



Joseph, 

Sewall, 

Polly,* 

Sally, 

Polly, 

Betsey, 



born 



October 

October 

May 

April 

March 

April 



[WATJGH]. 
27, 1782. 

6, 1784. 
27, 1787. 
19, 1790. 

7, 1792. 
19, 1798. 



Died August 23, 1789. 



JAMES WOOD and ELIZABETH [BUSS]. 



James, 

John,* 

Betsey, 

Polly, 

Artemas, 

Amy, 

Nathan, 

John, 

[Lydia.t 



born 



September 29, 1783. 
October 14, 1785, 
September 19, 1787. 
October 21, 1789. 



August 
July 
April 
April 



9, 1791. 

1, 1793. 

[1795]. 

1, 1797. 

1801,] 



Ensign John Wood died Dec. 19, 1785, aged 69 
years ; Elizabeth, his wife,J died Dec. 1, 1789, 
aged 75 yeai's. 

*Died Feb. 16, 1797. t Died March 15, 1819. 

J The word wife, in this entry, should be sister, 
and the age 79 years. Elizabeth, his widow, 
died November 13, 1794, aged 71 years, as ap- 
pears by the tombstones. These errors appear 
on page 178, and should be corrected. 



In the foregoing tables of Family Registers are included 
all sucli found in the records before the year 1790. They are 
copied from the record with no change but the correction of 
manifest errors in orthography. Apparent errors in figures, 
are left as found. All additions made to the original record 
are included in brackets. None are made except upon evi- 
dence deemed reliable. The family of Samuel Squire, entered 
in Mason records, from a copy certified by the town clerk of 
Westford, is not inserted — none of the children having been 
born in Mason, or permanently resident there. 



FAMILY REGISTERS. 20d 

Family register of the family of Edward Wilson, taken 
from his family bible, in possession of his son, Capt. Thomas 
"Wilson, of Mason: 

Edward Wilson, born at West Cambridge, July 6, 1734; 
Lucy Francis, born at Medford, March 21, 1739, married No- 
vember, 1757; removed to Mason with his famil}^, in 1780, 
and to Troy, New York, in 1804. Edward Wilson died, at 
Troy, June 17, 1816, aged 82 years; Lucy, his widow, died 
at Mason, December 8, 1835, aged 97 years. Their children, 
born at West Cambridge, were : 

Joseph, born. October 9, 1759. 

Lucy, January 12,1761, died December 23, 1819. 

Edward, April 4,1762, died March 7, 1843, at Milton, N. Y. 

Ebenezer, August 18, 1763, died July, 1825. 

Rachel, February 13, 1765, m. Jona. Chandler, died Oct. 16, 1846. 

Samuel, September 16, 1766, died July 31, 1854. 

Nathaniel, February 10,1768, died August 19, 1854. 

William, October 25, 1769. 

Aaron, March 10, 1771. 

Andrew, January 1, 1777, died April 23, 1841. 

Thomas, October 23, 1778. 

Edward, Jr., and Samuel, removed to Troy, N. Y., about 
the year 1800, and were, for many years, actively engaged in 
business there. The following notice of the death of the 
latter, is taken from the New England Historical and Genea- 
logical Register, vol. 8, p. 277 : 

"Samuel Wilson died at Troy, N. Y., July 31, 1844, aged 
88 years. It was from him that the United States derived 
the name of Uncle Sam. It was in this way. He was a con- 
tractor for supplying the army in the war of 1812, with a 
large amount of beef and pork. He had been long familiarly 
known by the name of Uncle Sam, so called to distinguish 
him from his brother Edward, who was, by every body, called 
Uncle Ned. The brand upon his barrels for the army was 
of course U. S. The transition from the United States to 
Uncle Sam was so easy, that it was at once made, and the 
name of the packer of the United States provisions was im- 
mediately transferred to the government, and became famil- 
iar, not only throughout the army but the whole country." 



210 HISTORY OP MASON. 

Genealogy of the families of Nathaniel and William Hos- 
mer, furnished for this work, by the Rev. Edwin R. Hodg- 
man, of Lynnfield, Mass. ; and family register of the family of 
William Hosmer, from the record in the family Lible of his 
son, Oliver Hosmer: 

1 James Hosmer, emigrated from Hockhurst, comity of 
Kent, England, took the freeman's oath in 1637, settled at 
Concord, and died there, February 7, 1685. 

2 Stephen, his son, born in 1642, married Abigail Woodj 
May 24, 1667. 

3 John, their son, born August 1671, married Mary Billings, 
May 12, 1699. 

4 Nathaniel, their son, (marriage not recorded at Concord.) 
s Nathaniel, his son, born November 29, 1731, married Eliz- 
abeth Heald, July 1, 1756. Removed to Mason. For regis- 
ter of his family, see page 203. Nathaniel died at Camden, 
Me., August 6, 1814, aged 83 years; Elizabeth, his wife, died 
August 23, 1810, aged 77 years. 

Tabitha married John Sartell, died March 4, 1841, at Rock- 
land, Me., aged 84 years. 

Anna married Job Hodgman, January 1, 1789, died August 
3, 1839, at Camden, Me., aged 79 years. 

Eunice married Samuel Russell, March 15, 1787, died De-^ 
cember, 1833, aged 71 years. 

Nathaniel married (1) Mary Wheeler, January 1, 1789, (2) 
Nancy Fay, February 3, 1803, died June 3, 1846, aged 81 
years. 

Asa married Nancy Eaton, October 2, 1795, ( ? ) died Sep- 
tember 9, 1854, aged 85 years. 

William, son of Nathaniel,^ born October 19, 1729, married 
Anna Heald, (born 1733,) June 19, 1753, at Concord, by Revw 
Daniel Bliss, removed to Mason, died March 26^ 1802, aged 
74 years; Anna, his wife, died July 7, 1818, aged 85 years. 
Their children were : 

Elizabeth, born 1755, married John Stimpson, died at Cam- 
den, Me., December 18, 1848, aged 93 years. 



FAMILY EEGISTERS. 211 

William, born 1758, died at Chester, Vt., March 20, 1813. 

Amos, born 1760, died January 18, 1831. 

Oliver, born 1764, married (1) Martha Lawrence, January 1, 
1793 ; Martha died February 4, 1829, aged 60 years ; married 
(2) Mrs. Eunice Brown, died at Mason, October 15, 1852, 
s. p., aged 88 years. 

Polly, born 1766, married (1) Ebenezer Boutwell, (2) 
William Hemenway, died 1845, aged 79 years. 

Reuben. 

Lucy, m. Benanuel Pratt, died at Chester, Yt., March, 1819. 

Anna, married Stickney, died at Andover, Yt. 

Josiah Flagg, born in Worcester, December 24, 1750, mar- 
ried (1) Eunice Barber, born in Worcester, 1758, (2) Esther 
Weatherbee, born in Lunenburg, December 3, 1763. Josiah 
Flagg died May 30, 1824, aged 73 years, 5 months, 6 days; 
Eunice, his wife, died December 13, 1785 ; Esther, his widow, 
died August 6, 1832. Children of Josiah and Eunice, were: 
Elizabeth, born January 29, 1780; Eunice, born October 14, 
1781; Mary Ann, born January 14, 1784; Josiah, born De- 
cember, 1785, all in Worcester. 

The above from the record in the family bible of Mrs. 
Eunice Hosmer, daughter of Josiah Flagg. 

Of Josiah and Esther: Hannah; Sally, married Isaac 
Brown, December 30, 1818; Esther, born 1795; Polly, born 
June, 1799. 

Jason Dunster, of Mason, was a lineal descendant of Henry 
Dunster, first president of Harvard College. The line of 
descent is as follows : i Henry, the president, 2 Jonathan, 
3 Henry, '^ Jason, 5 Jason, of Mason. His children were : 
Ruth, married Joseph Blood, killed in Bunker Hill battle ; 
Henry ; Rebecca, married John Swallow, Jr. ; Martha, mar- 
ried Oliver Wright, of Nelson; Isaiah, married Davis, 

of Roxbury; Jason, married Polly Merriam, of Mason; Sam- 
uel, married (1) Hannah Townsend, removed to Ashburnham 
and married (2) Townsend. 



212 HISTORY OF MASON. 

List of marriao^cs at Mason, from the records of the Rev. 
Joseph B. Hill, not received in season for insertion in their 
proper place. The parties were resident in Mason, unless 
otherwise stated: 

1840. 

Dec. 17. Samuel E. Butler, Lorinda Ames. 

" 24. Timothy Amsden. Martha C. Hill. 

1841. 

May Oliver H. Pratt. Catharine "Warner, at Groton, ^Ms. 

1842. 

Feb. 9. Sampson Fletcher, N. Ipswich. Mrs. Lavinia Blood. ' 

April 10. William Davis, - Betsey Green. 

Sept. 22. Henry H. Sawin, Julia Ann Russell. 

Nov. Ephraim Forbes, Westboro', Ms., Harriet ChUds. 

1843. 

April 26. Abel F. Adams, Townsend, Ms., Lydia M. Newhall. 

June James Davis, Azubah F. Withington. 

July Jonas Morse, [Mass., ISIary Ann Sawtell. 

Oct. George G. Amsden, Springfield, Eliza Ann Kimball. 

1844. 

May 21. AnsonBarrett.Townsend, Mass., Nancy Morse. 

Aug. 14. Merrill A. Elliott, Martha E. Sawtell. 

Sept. 19. Walter Atherton,Towns'd,Mass., Dian K. Felt. 

" 19. Otis Childs, Mary Joan Bachelder. 

Nov. 14. Leonard Farwell, Deborah B. Barrett. 

1845. 

Jan. 9. Samuel H. Wheeler, Mary Ames. 

Feb. 13. Lowell Howe, Nashua, Emily M. Felt, 

Aug. 26. Seneca Lj-nch, Elizabeth Swallow. 

Nov. 6. Samuel VVeston, [^lass., Hephzibah Fletcher. 

" 13. Harrison O. Lampson,Brookfield, Harriet E. Warren. 

" 27. Timothy Wheeler Jr., Ann Maria Harding. 

Dec. 25. Calvin Fitch, Pepperell, Mass. Harriet Warner, Pepperell, Mass. 

1846. 

Jan. 7. Isaac Windship, Henniker, Mary March. 

Mar. 1. Charles Robbins, Eunice Windship. 

July 12. Sumner J. Weston, Sarah A. Morse. 

Aug. Otis F. Larkin, Berlin, Mass. Charlott Pierce. 

" 30. Earle S. Smith, New Ipswich, Mary P. Farwell. 

Oct Geo. E. Sparrow, Colchester, Ct., Martha A. Cragin. 

1847. 

Feb. 11. John .P French, Mary Weston. 

Mar. 7. Albert Hodgman, Rosantha L. Rockwood. [trim. 

May 20. John R. Gregg, Peterborough, Sarah E. Fletcher, Antrim, at An- 

" 23. Frank E. Greisingcr, Mary E. Hadley, 

Sept. 14. Charles Belcher, Worcester, Sarah C. Farwell. 

♦' 16. Samuel E. Wright, Harriet E. Amsden. 

ANTRIM. BY REV. JOHN M. WHITON. 
1845. 

Aug. 26. Rev. Joseph B. Hill, Mason, Harriet Brown, Antrim. 



RECORD OF MARRIAGES. 



212a 



For a like reasoD, tlie following lists, copied from the town 
records, are here inserted : 



1836. 
Nov. 10. 
Dec. 1. 
9. 

1837. 
May 28. 
Sept. 12. 
Oct. 31. 

1838. 
April 24. 
May 30. 
Sept. 20. 

1839. 
Feb. 13. 
Sept. 11. 

1840. 
Feb. 12. 



1839. 
Feb. 28. 



Mar. 
May 
July 
Sept. 
Oct. 



31. 

16. 

9. 

26. 



Dec. 5. 

1840. 
Feb. 16. 
Mar. 22. 
Oct. 8. 
Nov. 22. 

1841. 
April 20. 
Dec. 7. 
Oct. 17. 

1842. 
April 7. 
May 18. 
June 2. 
Oct. 16. 

1843. 
Feb, 23. 

1844. 



1848. 



June 


27. 


May 
Sept. 
Oct. 


21. 
7. 
J. 



MASON. BY REV. ANDREW H. REED. 



Samuel Hodge, Francestown, 
Charles Day, 
Charles W. French, 

John H. Jones, Ashby, 
Amos H. Hosmer, 
Ebenezer Nutting, 

Joseph P. Felt, 
Calvin Amsden, 
Thomas Wetherbee, Pdndge, 

Elisha Withirigton, 
Winslow Ames, 



Josiah Cook, "Whitefield, 



Mrs. Elizabeth Town. 
Martha H. Barrett. 
Koxana W. Barrett. 

Martha Ilildreth. 
Abigail Barrett. 
Martha Sanders. 

Sarah Swallow. 
Dorothy D. Horton. 
Almira Whitaker. 

Betsey Newell. 
Harriet Wood. 

Rozetta Sanders. 



BY REV. 
Elijah F. Davis, 



ALFRED L. MASON. 

Hannah Spaulding. 



William Mansur, 
Edmund F. Jefts, 
Elisha F. Davis, 
John Felt, 

Samuel A. Hartshorn, 
Lot Nicols, Sharon, 
George Weston, 
Lorenzo Woods, 



Mrs. Hannah Elliott. 

Elizabeth Pierce. 

Roxana Jefts, New Ipswich. 

Silvia Warren, Stoddard. 

Louisa Felt. 

Mary Ann Fitch, Temple. 

Rebecca Baily. 

Mary Dakin. 



Edwin J. Hodgman, Levinia Foster. 

Charles Smith, Lowell, Emeline Hodgman. 

Arnold KendaU, INlary Felt. 

NehemiahH. Swain, N. Reading, Elmena L. Hodgman. 



John Tewksbury, Warner, 
Nathaniel Smith, 
Hezekiah Burnham, 



Isabella Nutting, New Ipswich. 
Lucy A. Baldwin. 
Mrs. Jane A. Kimball. 



Thomas Hays, Lucy A. Robbins. 

Solon P. Bingham, Keene, Harriet E. Adams. 

Mr. Tinkham, Lunenburg, Mrs. Emma W. Blood. 

Joseph Tucker, Mary Campbell. 

Edmund C. Stanley. Hannah Mason, Wilton. 

Sylvester Fitch, Providence R.L, Susan A. Hadley. 

BY REV. JOHN W^OODBURY. 



Cyrus Blanchard, Fitchburg 
Israel Putnam, 
George L. Adams. 
Frederick M. Greisinger, 

27b 



Emily Robbins. 
Lucy E. Andrews. 
Hannah H. Hartshorn, 
Elmira B. Darling. 



2126 HISTORY OF MASON. 

BY REV. WILLIAM OLMSTEAD. 

1847. 

April 12. Horace W. "Wilson, Amanda IM. Hideout. 

Nov. 16. Samuel Kimball, Adelia A. Livingston. 

" 29. Franklin Meed, Boxborougli, Nancy S. Morse. 

BY REV. .JOHN F. WHITNEY. 
1856. 
April 27. Joel Elliott, 2d, Emily Holden. 

May 28. AVillard D. Hero, Elizabetli Peabody. 

BY REV. GEORGE W. CUTTING. 

1855. 

Nov. 11. Charles Howard, Fitcbburg, Mary A. Sawtell. 

1857. 

Sept. 5. Edwin L. Nutting, Mary A. Annis. 

Nov. 22. George R. Elliott, Eliza E. Stevens. 

Dec. 17. Henry Kirk, Sarah Gardner. 

Dec. 31. Kendall N. Davis, Sharon, Lueinda Chamberlin. 

1858. 

Jan. 4. Edmund Holden, Elizabeth Flagg. 

BY REV. SAMUEL J. AUSTIN. 

1857. 

June H. Edwin R. Earns worth, Abby J. Webber. 

Oct. 22. Francis B. Cragin, lluvinia M. Richardson. 

" " Henry A. Cragin, Susan M. Elliott. 

" 31. Lucius A. White, Margaret Lyle. 

RY REV. JOSIAH L. ARMES. 

1854. 
Dec. 14. Philander Eddy, Foxborough, Maria Lynch. 

1855. 
June 24. Jerome Davis, Mary L. Boynton. 

Several marriages inserted ou pages 174 and 175 have, in 
the above list, been re-inserted, with the name of the officiat- 
ing minister added. 

Marriage is the key of domestic life. The far sighted 
policy of the Eoman church, at an early period, discerned 
the importance of possessing this key. Hence, marriage in 
that church, is made a sacrament. In all countries where the 
Roman church is in the ascendant, no marriage is valid, 
unless it be contracted within the rules, and celebrated 
according to the forms of that church. All persons living in 
the state of matrimony, without the blessing of the priest, 
are in a state of mortal sin. Hence, the power of the priest 
to determine what is lawful matrimony, and to regulate the 



EECORD OP M ARE! AGES. 2126' 

conjugal and maternal duties of the wife, open to liim the 
most sacred recesses of the household, and places in his 
hands an engine of power, the effects of which, are felt in 
every condition of life, from the palace to the cabin. 

By the reformation in the church of England, the assump- 
tion that marriage is a sacrament, being without a shadow of 
scriptural foundation, was not recognized; but still, by the 
laws of England, marriage could be celebrated lawfully, only 
by a priest of the English church, according to the formu- 
laries prescribed, and in a church building, or licensed chapel 
of that church, except by special license. For many years, 
dissenters could be married in England, only according to the 
form of that church. Such were the laws, when our ances- 
tors came to New England. They fled to the wilderness, to 
escape from the power and tyranny of the English priesthood. 
Of course, the English laws and formularies, would not 
answer their needs. Not content with rejecting the power 
of the English clergy, they went farther, and would not 
allow their own clergy to celebrate marriages. Only the 
governor, deputy governor and assistants, had authority for 
many years, to celebrate marriages. These magistrates 
having exclusive power to celebrate marriages, construed 
that power to extend to all cases, and even presumed to 
marry themselves. Lt. Gov. Bellingham, was fined for mar- 
rying himself, so also, was Mr. Joseph Hills of Maiden. 

Having regulated the celebration of marriages, the court 
next undertook to regulate courtships by law. The act for 
this purpose was passed by the general court of Massachu- 
setts, November 11, 1647. The preamble is as follows: 
" Whereas, Grod hath committed ye care and power into ye 
hands of parents, for ye disposing of their children in mar- 
riage, so yt it is against ye rule to seek to draw away ye afiec- 
tions of yong maydens, under pretence of purpose of mar- 
riage, before their parents have given way or alowance in yt 
respect, and whereas, it is a comon practice, in divers places, 
for yong men irregularly and disorderly to watch all advan- 



2l2d HISTORY OF MASON. 

tages, for tlioir evil purposes to insinuate into y*^ affections of 
yong maydes, by coming to tlicm in places and seasons, 
unknown to their parents, for such ends, whereby much evil 
hath grown amongst us to ye dishonor of God and damage of 
ye parties, for ye prevention whereof, for time to come, it is 
ordered," &c., and making it a penal offence, "to endeavor 
directly or indirectly to draw ye affections of any mayden in 
this jurisdiction, under pretence of marriage," before liberty 
and allowance therefor by the parents, &c., or in the absence 
of such, by the court. The punishment was a fine for the 
first and for the second offence, for the third to be put under 
bonds, failing to procure which the offender was liable to be 
imprisoned at the pleasure of the court. Fancy the trial of 
an action in court! The Commonwealth vs. Richard Roe, 
for seeking to draw the affections of Dolly Doe, without the 
consent of her parents, &c., first being had. 

In 1692, authority was given, by statute, to ordained minis- 
ters, and also to justices of the peace, to celebrate marriages. 
The clergy soon received the monopoly of the marrying busi- 
ness. None were married by justices except for some pecu- 
liar reasons. Fifty years ago, the marriage ceremony took 
place at the residence of the bride, or at the minister's house, 
seldom at the meeting house, although not unfrequently, the 
Sabbath was the day, the parties coming sometimes with but 
more frequently without attendants, to the minister's house, in 
the morning before service or in the evening after the close of 
the meetings, left the house with the indestructible knot tied, 
and sometimes on foot, sometimes on horseback, the cavalcade 
consisting of one or two horses, according to the means or 
the taste of the parties, proceeded to their new home, to be 
made cheerful and happy by the busy cares and pains taking 
of the wife, assuming a station and character, the influence of 
which, for the well being of society, is second to none other. 
From the venerable pastor of the Mason church, all the mar- 
ried couples got a good solid talking to. 



CHAPTER VI. 

A LIST OF EARLY SETTLERS, AFFAIRS OF THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR, 
AND LISTS OP TOWN OFFICERS, AND STATISTICAL TABLES. 

An alphabetical list of the names of all persons who appear, by the pro- 
prietary or town records or tax lists, to have been inhabitants of the 
town of Mason, from the earliest settlement, to the year 1790, showing, 
as far as is known, the date of commencement of residence, their place 
of residence, their service in the revolutionary war, and time of decease, 
or of removal from town. 



1769. 


Asten John, 


1770. 


Allen Abijah, 


1771. 


Adams John, 




Ames Simon, 


1772. 


Abbot Samuel, 




Abbot Ebenezer, 


1774. 


Adams Edward, 


1778. 


Amsden Jonas, 




Aldridge John, 


1782. 


Adams Abel, 


1785. 


Asten Timothy, 


1788. 


Ames Thaddeus, 


1790. 


Austin Thomas, 


1752. 


Buttcrfield Eleazer, 




Barrett Keuben, 


1759. 


Blood Ebenezer, 


1767. 


BuUard Joseph, 



1769. Badcock William, 
Barrett "William, 

Barrett Nathaniel, 



Burge, Widow, 
Barrett Joseph, 

1769. Blood Joseph, 



Jason Russell's. B. about 1773. 
Dea. Eranklin Merriam's. R. after the war. 
S. Jonas Adams'. Died January 9, 1807, 6-5 y. 
S. Joel Ames'. Died November 15, 1820, 80 y. 
S. Rev. E. Hill's orchard, R. 
S. Son of Samuel Abbot. 

East of John Adams. Brother of John Ad- 
ams — R. to Lincoln. 
Ebenezer Shattuck's, afterwards east of Dea. 

Wood's, Died March 20, 1802, 53 y. 
R. 
S. Jedediah Felton's. Died Oct. 25, 1826, 69 y. 
R. 

Son of Simon ; went to Maine. 
In the 3d School District. 
R. 

Capt. Jesse Barrett's. Died Sept. 19,1800, 71y. 
S. Eli Nutting's. Died November 29, 1800. 
Silas Bullard's. Born in Weston ; R. to New 
Ipswich about 1743, with his brother Eben- 
ezer Bullard, and resided with him till his 
marriage in 1775. Soon after 1760 he re- 
moved to Mason. Died March 2, 1792, 73 y. 
Rev. Jona. Searle's. R. next year. 
Jonathan Smith's, near Townsend line. Died 

January 26, 1816, 90 y. 
John Whitaker's. The father of Zaccheus 
Barrett, Nathaniel Barrett, Jr., and Mrs. 
John Baldwin. Died about 1775. 
R. next year. 
S. Elisha Barrett's. Was an inhabitant before the 

incorporation. Died Dec. 30, 1831, 86 y. 
S. Thaddeus Morse's. Killed June 17, 1775, at 
Bunker's Hill. 



Note. In this table, S. following a name, indicates service in the land or naval forces ; K. 
removal from town. 

28 



214 

1769. 



1770. 
1771. 

1772. 



1774. 
1775, 



1776. 

1778. 

1779. 
1780. 
1782. 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



1782. 
1785. 



175 
17i 



1790. 



1766. 
1767. 

1769. 
1770. 
1772. 



Barrett Nathaniel Jr., S. 
Brown David, 

Ball Joseph, S. 

Barrett Zacchciis, 
Barrett lleuben Jr., 
Blodgett David, 

Blod<jett Jacob, S 

Blanchard Abel, S. 

Brown Samuel, S. 

Blood Ruth, widow, 

Barrett Joseph, Jr., 
Barrett Isaac, S. 

Barrett Keuben, 3d. 
Brooks Job, 
Bullard Silas, S. 

Brown Lt. Isaac, S. 

Burt Oliver, 
Burt Capt. James, 
Barrett Jesse, 

Barrett Benjamin, jr. 

Blood Thomas, S. 

Blood Asa, S. 

Blood Ebenezer, jr. S. 

Bullard Eleazer, S. 

Barrett John, 

Barrett William, jr. 
Blodgett John, 



Ball Eleazer, 
Blood Amos, 
Blood Josiah, 
Barrett Joel, 
Blackington William, 
Boynton Jeremiah, 
Ball Jonathan, 
Buss Elisha, 

Barber Dr. William, 

Bachelder Jonathan, 
Crosby Jonathan, 
Cook Connelius, 
Coburn Josiah, 
Coburn Nathan, 
Cafford Jonathan, 
Child Amos, 



Luther llobbins'. E. 1772, 

Saml. D. Blood's and James Bi-own's. Died 
Doc 1811, 83 y, 

Dea. liobinson's. R. 

Poor farm. Died Feb. 26, 1827, 79 y. 

Capt. Jesse Barrett's. Son of Reuben Barrett. 

S. Withington's, formei'ly John Winship's. — 
R. soon after the war. 

, H, Warren's. R. soon after the war. 

Hired to Jason Russel. R. 

Geo. Martin's, foi-merly Sam.Townsend. Came 
from HoUis ; R. soon after the war. 

Widow of Joseph Blood who was killed at 
Bunker Hill ; daughter of Jason Dunster. 

R. 

Son of Nathaniel Barrett. R. 

West of John Richard's. R. about 1784. 

Ephraim Russel's. R. 

With his father. Son of Joseph Bullard. 
Died May 15, 1835, 83 y. 

Knapi:>'s, now Prescott's. In Battle of Bun- 
ker Hill. Died November 3, 1800, 55 y. 

Eben. Nutting's. R. and joined Shakers. 
Same. Same. 

Capt. Jesse Barrett's. Son of Reuben Bar- 
rett. Died November 11, 1844, 82 y. 

Frank Wright's and E. Richardson's. R. to 
Lunenburg. 

E. Nutting's. Son of Ebenezer. Died June 
24, 1835, 77 y. 

E. Nutting's. Son of Ebenezer. R. 

Taken prisoner in the Battle of Bunker Hill, 
and never returned. 

Son of Joseph Bullard. 

Son of Captain Joseph Barrett. R. to Ver- 
mont. 

Charles Barrett. Died Aug. 10, 1844, 84 y. 

John Bachelder's. Town clerk, splectman, 
and representative for many years. His 
name first appears as a school master in 1777. 
R. from town in 1821 or 1822, to Dunstable, 
and died a few years since, aged nearly 100 y. 

Amos Robbins'. R. 

Saml. D. Blood's. Died Dec. 19, 1840, 83 y. 

R. 

R. 

R. 

Elnathan Boynton's. Oct. 27, 1839, 74 y. 

R. 

Cabinet maker ; built and resided in the 
Joshua Blood house. R. about 1804. 

Dr. Barber's, near the old meeting house. 
Died July 11, 1852, 85 y. 

Jona. Bachelders'. Died April 9, 17*6, 85 y. 

R. 

B. C. Kimball's. R. 

Ed. Tarbell's. R. to Chelmsford. 

School master. R. 

R. 

Hir-ed man to Dea. Amos Dakin. R, 



LIST OF EARLY SETTLERS. 



215 



]77o. Chambers Capt. Wm. S. 



1779. 
1780. 
1785. 
1787. 
1778. 
1789. 



1768. 
1769. 



1770. 
1772. 
1774. 
1776. 

1782. 



1785. 

1790. 
1752. 
1762. 
1764. 

1766. 
1767. 

1769. 
1770. 
1771. 
1774. 
1777. 
1778. 
1783. 

1784, 
1786. 

1752. 
1769. 



Chandler Jonathan, 
Crane Benjamin, 
Cummings John, 
Chatraan Oliver, 
Chickering Abner, 
Campbell John, 
Campbell Jonas, 
Crossman James, 
Dakin Dea. Amofs, S. 
Button John, 
Davis Zachariah, S. 

Dunster Jason, 

Davis Joshua, S. 

Davis Elisha, 
Dai'by tSamuel, 
Dunster Henry, S. 

Dodge William, 
Davis Ebenezer, 
Dodge John, S. 

Dakin Amos Jr., S. 



Lieut, of 
Died Sep- 



R. toN. Ipswich. 



Rev. E. Hill's. Born in Scotland 
a privateer under Com. Manly, 
tember 4, 1791. 

Jedediah Felton's. R. 

South of Frank Wright's. R. 

R. 

R. 

Abel Adams' in the villa 

R. 

R. 

Died about 1836, not far from 90 y. 

Eben. Richardson's. Died Apr. 28, 1789, 57 y. 

Calvin Blood's. R. 

Micah Russell's. Died Nov. 27, 1831, 88 y. 

Benjamin Prescott's. R. to Ashburnham and 
returned, and died Feb. 10, 180-5, 80 y. 

David Jcfts and Charles Scripture's. Died Oc- 
tober 16, 1840, 96 y. 
R. 

Chapman's. R. 

Son of Jason. R. 

Luther Nutting's. R. 

R. 

A privateersman. R. 



Dunster Jason, Jr., S. 



Dunster Isaiah, S. 

Dodge Zebulon, S. 

Dakin Timothy, 

Davis Reuben, 

Eliot William, 

Eliot Elias, 

Eliot Oliver, S, 

Eliot John, 

EUot Rev. William, 

Eliot Wid. Hannah. 

Emerson Asa. S. 

Eliot John, Jr , 

Eliot Elias, Jr., 

Eliot David, S. 

Eliot Dea. Andrew, S. 

Eliot Widow, 

Eliot Samuel, 

Eaton Abijah, S, 

Fish Nathan, 

Foster Jonathan, S, 



South of Dea. Cragin's. Son of Dea. Amos 
Dakin Died Oct. 29, 1842, 83 y. 

B. C. Kimball's. Son of J. Dunster. Died 
March 21, 1828, 67 y. 

Son of Jason Dunster. R. 

R. 

Dea. S. Cragin's. Son of Deacon Amos Da- 
kin. Died October, 1845, 84 v. 

R. 

Daniel Hill's. Son of Elias. Died about 1768. 

Elias Eliot's. Died Feb. 23, 1785, 78 y. 
. Southeast of Capt. S. Shed's. Son of Elias. 
Died September, 1836, 102A y. 

Andrew Eliot's. Died June 24. 1781, 65 y. 

Son of John, and lived with his father. Died 
June 4, 1830, 81 y. 

Last on tax list, October 14, 1771. 

R. 

Son of John. R. 

Son of Elias. Died Nov. 17, 1838, 89 y. 

Son of John. R. 

Son of John. Died September 30, 1811, 56 y. 

Supposed to be 



Taxed " for her son Josiah." 
the widow of William. 

R. 

Taken prisoner by the Algerines. R. to Win- 
hall, Vt.. with his family, about 1804. 

North of Dea. N. Hall's. 

East of W^m. Bai-rett's, near Townsend line. 
His wife. Thankful, died in 1779, and was 
buried at the expense of the town. He was, 
in part or wholly, supported by the town 
from that time till his death, (at Ashby,) 
March 31, 1821, at the age, it is said, of 102 
years. He was an able-bodied man, always 
enjoying vigorous health, but he had an in- 
vincible repugnance to work in any form. 



216 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



1769. Fish Wid. Patience, 
Fisk Daniel, 
Fish Jonathan, 

Fish Eleazer, 
Fish iSTathan, 
Fish Simon, 
1771. Flagg Isaac, 

Fessenden Aaron, 
Farnsworth Daniel, 

1773. Fuller Silas, 

1774. Fay Jonas, 
Fay Daniel, 

1780. Fi-ench John, 
Foster Jonathan, Jr., 
Foster Nathan, 
Fuller Ezra, 

1781. French William, 
1783. Fay Jemima, Wid. 

Farley Samuel, 
1790. Farwell Edward, 

Farnsworth Sampson, 
17.52. Green Simon, 
1754. Gould Nehemiah, 

1771. Green Nehemiah, 

1774. Gibson John, 

1780. Green Samuel, 

1781. Grace Manuel, 

1782. Gordon James, 

1786. Giles Joseph, 

1787. Goddard John, 
1790. Gray Dr. Joseph, 

Grimes John, 
1752. Hall Dea. Nathan, 
1757. Herrick Joseph, 

1768. Hall James, 

1769. Hall Nathan, Jr., 
Hoi den Isaac, 
Hosmer Nathaniel, 
Hosmer Reuben, 

1770. Hodgman Timothy, 

1771. Hodgman David, 

1772. Hodgman Joseph, 
Hodgman Reuben, 
Herrick Joseph, Jr., 

1773. Hodgman John, 

1774. Hodgman Benjamin, 

1775. Hodgman Joseph, Jr. 
Herrick Lois, Wid. 

1776. Herrick Shadrack, 

1777. Hurlbert John, 

1778. Hodgman Zacheus, 
Holden Amos, 

1779. Hosmer William, 
Hart Joseph, 

1780. Hodgman Job, 
Hall Henry, 
Horton Elijah, 



John Russell's. R. 

Eleazer Fish's. Last on tax list Dec. 13, 
1769. Died after 1772. 

Capt. Ira Hall's. Died April 26, 1791. 

R. 
S East of Luther Nutting's. R. 
S. Elijah Davis'. In Bunker Hill battle. 

R. 

R. 

Jonas Fay's. R. 
S. Moses Russell's. Died May 16, 1826, 77 y. 

Josiah Flagg's. Died June 2, 1783. 

R. 
S. Son of Jonathan. R. 
S. Son of Jonathan. R. 
S. R. 

R. 

AVidow of Daniel Fay. 

R. 

Capt. S. Weston. Died Aug. 28, 1819, 88 y, 

R. 

R. 

Killed in battle near lake George, July 20, 
1758. 

R. 

R. 

East of Ens. Enosh Lawrence's place. R. 

R. 
S. Said to be a Hessian. R. 

In the 2d school district. R. 

In the 4th school district. Died Dec. 10, 1797. 

Vearon Eaton's. R. 

In the 4th school district. R. 

Capt. Jos. Sanders'. Died May 7, 1807, 91 y. 

Benjamin Prescott's. Died. Last on tax list 
JNovember 30, 1773. 

Abijah Eaton's. Son of Dea. N. Hall. R. 

Son of Dea. Nathan Hall. R. 

Bachelder's. R. in 1774 or 1775. 

Otis'. R. to Camden, Me. 
S. East of Walton's. R. 
S. R. 

S. Oliver Hosmer's. R. 
S. Calvin Blood's. R. 

Moore's. R. 
S. Benjamin Prescott's. R. to Brattleboro', Vt. 

West of Oliver Hosmer's. R. 

Moore's. R. 



S. Sewall Wood's. 

Widow of Joseph. 

R. to do. 
S. R. 

S. Noah Winship's. 
S. Abner Holden's. 
S. Oliver Hosmer's. 

R. 
S. R. 
S. Tarbell's. R. 

Timothy Kemp's. 



R. to Brattleborough, Vt. 



R. 

Died April 16, 1806,54 y. 
Died March 26, 1802, 74 y. 



R. 



LIST OP EARLY SETTLERS. 



217 



1780. 


Hull John, 


S. 


1782. 


Hall David, 


s. 




Hodgman Nathan, 


s, 




Huiibiirt Josiah, 


s, 




Hodgman Thomas, 




1783. 


Herrick Amos, 


s. 


178.5. 


Hodgkins Hezekiah, 
Hosmer Oliver, 




1786. 


Hodgman David, 




1788. 


Haven Clarke, 
Hall Richard, 




1790. 


Haven Nathaniel, 




1752. 


Jefts Henry, 




1765. 


J efts Jonathan, 




1769. 


Jefts Mary, Widow, 
Jefts John, 
Jefts Thomas, 
Jefts Benjamin, 
King Benjamin, 
Kendall Jabez, 




1774. 


Kendall Nathan, 




1775. 


Knowlton Benjamin, 


Jr., 



1778. Kendall Jabez, Jr., 
1780. Knowlton Henry, 

Keyes Elijah, 
1782. Kemp Abel, 
1785. Kendall Benjamin, 



Kendall Reuben. 

1751. Lawrence Ens. Enosh, 

1752. Leslie James, 
Leslie George, 
Lawrence AVilliam, Esq., 



1762. Lowell Moses, 

1769. Lowell David, 

Lowell Joseph, 

Lowell David, Jr., 

Lowell Simeon, 
Lawrence Enosh, Jr. 
Lawrence Samuel, 
Lawrence Stevens, 
Lawrence Richard, 
Lawrence John, 





Leonard John, 




1775. 


Lowell Joseph, Jr., 


R, 


1778. 


Lowell Timothy, 
Lakin Ambrose, 


S, 


1780. 


Locke Abraham, 




1781. 


Lawrence Isaac, 





Below Dr. Barber's. R. 

Son of Dea. N. Hall. Died August 25, 1824, 

71 years. 
Son of Joseph Hodgman. R. 
R. 

T. Hodgman's. Died August 16, 1836, 824 y. 
Ben]'. Prescott's. Son of Joseph. Died Nov. 

8,' 1848, 85 y. 
R. 

Oliver Hosmer's. Died Oct. 15, 1852, 88 y. 
R. 
R. 

Son of Dea. Hall. Died July 16, 1822, 54 y. 
R. 

Jona. Batchelder's. R. before incorporation. 
Hartshorn's. Died May, 1818, 86 y. 

Amos Robbens, Jr. Died Dec. 10, 1809, 70 y. 
Thomas Jefts'. Died June, 1808. 
Benj. Jefts'. Died April 7, 1807, 60 y. 
North part. Last on tax list January 27, 1777. 
R. 

B. C. Kimball's. Son of Benj. Knowlton, of 

NeAv Ipswich, born 1753. R. with his father 

to New York, about 1807. 
R. 
Brother of Benjamin Knowlton, Jr., born in 

1756. R. 
Simeon Kemp's. R. 
A. Kemp's Died Sept. 23, 1829, 87 y. 
Near John Blodgett's. Killed by lightning at 

his brother's house in Dublin, June 1, 1806, 

56 years. 
R. 

Eph. Hildreth's. Died Sept. 28, 1778, 68 y. 
R. 
R. 
A meeting was held at his house in No. 1, in 

1752, but he was not, probably, ever more 

than temporarily resident in the town. 
R. Last on the tax list November 30, 1773. 
Capt. Joseph Barrett's. R. Same. 
On the road from R. Lawrence's to Dakin's 

mill, near the old brick vard. R. 
R. Last on tax list Nov. 30, 1773. 
R. 

John Jefts. Died Dec. 11, 1809, 71 y. 
Son of Ens. Enosh. R. to Townsend. 
EdAvard Merriam's. Died Sept. 4, 1824, 80 y. 
A. Dakin's. Died November 1, 1815, 80 y. 
Eph. Hildreth's. R to Swanton, Vt., about 

1806, and died there. 
Between Oliver Eliot's and Reuben Barrett's. 

Last ou tax list January 30, 1778. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 



218 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



1788. 
1789. 
1769, 
1771. 



1773. 

1774. 



1775. 
1778. 
1780. 
1781. 



1782. 
1784. 



1782. 
1790. 

1779. 

1752. 
1762. 
1769. 

1770. 
1771. 

1777. 
1778. 
1783, 

1785, 



1788, 
1789. 



1752. 



liawrence Sampson, 
Lee Jonathan. 
Lawrence Willard. 
Lawrence Daniel. 
IMerriam Joseph, 
McLain Dennis, 
ISIaun James, 



Mann Eenjamin, S. J 

Mansfield Elijah, 
Mann Christopher, 



Miles William, 

Munroe Dr. Ephraim, 
Muzzy Benjamin, 
Merriam Abraham, S 



Merriam Ezra, 



Mossman Aaron, 
Merriam Silas, 



S. 



1785. Merriam Abraham.Jr, S. 



Nutting Ephraim, 
Nutting Peter, 
Osgood Josei:)h, 



S. 



Parker Lt. Obadiah, 
Powers Whitcomb, S. 
Powers Elizabeth, Wid., 
Proctor Nathan, 
Perry Joseph, 
Parker Samuel, 
Parker Oliver, Ens. 
Patten Nathaniel, 
Parker Phinehas, 
Parkhurst Jesse, 
Pike AVilliam, 
Parker Sam Stevens, 

Parker Junea, 
Parkhurst Andrew, 
Parker Sampson, 

Patch Asa, 
Pratt John, 
Robbins Josiah, 



Moses Merriam's. Died Nov. 6, 1826, 82 y. 

li. Last on tax list October 14, 1771- 

J. Ames' farm nc:ir John Hachelder's. He was 
father of Benjamin Mann, came into town 
with him, and died about 1780-1. 
Ames, and Asher Peabody's. 11. to Keene 
and to Tro}', N. Y. Died, 1831, 91 y. 

R. 

J. Ames' orchard. <'A free negro man, for- 
merly slave to James Mann." B,. to New 
Ipswich and died there; 

Died between 1782 and 1796. Amos Herrick 
married his widow. 

R. next 5'ear. 

East of James Scripture's. R. 

At the corner where the road turns to ^Vilton. 

Died November 26, 1797, 
Near Pratt's pond, afterwards at his father's. 
Son of Abraham Merriam. Died June 21, 
1827, 67 y. 

R. 

At Pratt's pond, with Ezra, son of Abraham. 
R. to Maine. 

Abraham Merriam house. Died January 18, 
1806, 48 y. 

R. 

R. 

Old orchard, south from Tufts'. Married the 
widow of AVni. Barrett. Died before 1790. 

Lieut. Parker's, Died Oct, 5, 1816, 86 y, 

R. 

Last on tax list February 28, 1783. 

R. 

R, 

R. 

R. 

R. 

Son of Lt. O. Parker, born May 11, J 756, R. 

R. 

R. 

Son of Lt. Obadiah Parker, born October 17, 
1763, and died December 20, 1827, 64 y. 

R. 

R. 

Son of Lt. Obadiah Parker, born October 11, 
1767, and died March 18, 1818, 50 y. 

R. 

Pratt's pond. Died January 27, 1832, 77 y. 

Dea, AVebber place. Came from Townsend 
with his familj', began the farm on the Dea. 
Webber place, R. soon after 1774, and died 
at Stoddard in 1787. There is a tradition 
that his wife died, that he married again, 
and died, and that he and his first wife were 
buried in the old grave yard, by the side of 
his son Amos. Last on tax list, Oct. 1774. 



LIST OF EARLY SETTLERS. 



219 



1768. Robbins Thomas, 

1769. Robbins Seth, 

Ross Joseph, S. 

Russell Jason, S. 

1771. Ross Andrew. 

1772. Robbins Amos, 

Russell Hobart, 
1774. Russell John, 
1780. Richardson Joshua, S, 
1787. Russell Samuel, 
1789. Reed Thomas, 

Russell Jonnthan, 
1752. Spaulding William, 

Shattuck Ensign, 

Swallpw Lt. John, 
1761. Shattuck Oliver, 
J 765. Spaulding Thomas, 

1769. Spaulding Lemuel, S. 
Shed Abel, 

Smith Samuel, S. 

Smith Nathaniel, 

Scripture Samuel, S. 

1770. Scripture James, S. 

1771. Sloan David, 

1772. Searle Rev. Jonathan, S. 
Sloan John, 



T. R.obbins' place, near Dea. "Wood's. Son of 

Josiah liobbins. Died Dec. 1827, S3 y. 
Luther Robbins'. Son of Josiah Robbins. 

Died July 31, 1837, 93 y. 
East of Dr. Barber's. R. 
Jason Russell's place. Died September 26, 

1825, 84 y. 
Joseph Tufl'ts' place. R. to Rindge. 
Son of Josiah Robbins. Died Sept. 2, 1773, 

and was buried in the old graveyard, in rear 

of the old meeting house. 
H. Russell place. Died ^ov. 6, 1836, 88 y. 
Ephraim Russell's. Died Dec. 15, 1832, 86 y. 
Lived with Capt. Isaac Brown. R. 
R. 
R. 

West of O. Hosmer's. Died Oct. 24, 1828, 77 Y. 
R. 
R. 

Josiah Winship. Died Not. 23, 1815, 86 y. 
R. 
R. 

Lt. E. Gilman's. R. 

E. D. Richardson's. R. to Rindge in 1775. 
Cajjt. Smith's. Died Dec. 6, 1815, 74 y. 
H. Russell place, and Thad. Morse's. Died 

Dec. 18, 1802, 81 y. 
James Scripture's place. R. to Nelson and 

died there, about 90 years. 
Ward Scripture's. Son of Samuel Scripture. 

Died June 19, 1810, 62 y. 
Jonathan Batchelder's. 

Ebenezer Blood's. Died Dec. 7, 1812, 68 y. 
Son of David Sloan. 



1773. 


Squire Samuel, 


S. 


S. Dix Blood's. Burnt to death in the 


army. 


1774. 


Stone Jonathan, 




William Whitaker's. R. 




1775. 


Scripture Oliver, 
Sawtell Lt. Ephraim, 




Elnathan Boynton's. Son of Samuel 

ture. R.. to New Ipswich. 
Widow Amsden's. R. 


Scrip- 


1776. 


Smith Joshua 




R. 




1779. 


Swallow John, Jr., 


S. 


Calvin Blood's. Son of Lieut. John 
low. Died January, 1830, 73 y. 


Swal- 


1780. 


Start George, 




R. to New Ipswich. 




1781. 


Smith Nathaniel, Jr., 


s, 


, East of Amos Robbin's. R. 




1782. 


Spaulding Thaddeus, 
Stacy William, 




R. 
R. 






Scripture Samuel, Jr. 


s. 


, R. to Nelson. 




1783. 


Shed William, 




R. 




1784. 


Sloan David, Jr., 
Stevens John, 




R. 
R. 




1786. 


Searle John, 




Son of Rev. Jonathan Searle. R. 




1786. 


Sanders, Joseph, 




Dea. Hall's. Died Dec. 12, 1829, 65 y. 






Smith Samuel, Jr., 




Son of Saml. Smith. Died Feb. 2, 1849 


, 84y. 




Stuart Jeremiah, 




R. 




1787. 


Saunderson William, 
Saunderson Isaac, 
Saunderson Solomon, 
Sartell Micah, 
Shattuck Nehemiah, 
Smith John, 




R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
Son of Nathaniel Smith. R. 





220 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



Smith Jonathan, 



1787 .Shipley, Jonathan, 

1788. Simonds Thomas, 
Scott William, 
Scripture John, 

S-were or Znire Peter, 

1789. Shattuck Ebcnezer, 

1790. Swallow Abel, 
Spaulding Abel, 
Shed William, 

1749. Tarbell Capt. Thomas, 

Tarbell Capt. Samuel, 



1769. Tarbell Nathaniel, 
Tarbell Edward, 
Towne Edward, 

1771. Tarbell John, 



Tarbell Thomas Jr., S, 

1778. Tarbell Whitcomb, 
17S2. Townsend Samuel, 
1783. Tarbell Samuel 

Tarbell Edward, 

1785. Tarbox Daniel, 
Trask John 
Tarbell Benjamin, 
Temple John, 

1786. Turucliff William, 
17o2. Whitney Shadrack, 

Wright Samuel, 
Withee James, 

1767. Wheeler Aaron, 
Wheeler Josiah, 

1768. Whipple Ens. Nathan, 

1769. Woodward George, 
Williams Jonathan, 

Winship Jonathan, 

1771. Wheeler Nathan, 

Withington Elisha, S 

1773. Wheeler Timothy, 
Whitaker John, 

1774. Woods Samuel, S 
1776. Wheeler Abijah, 

1778. Wood Ens. John, 

1779. Wait John, 

1780. Wood Col. James, S. 



Son of Nathaniel. Married Susannah, daugh- 
ter of Wm. Barrett, and lived near Towns- 
end line. 

R. 

R. 

R. 

Son of Samuel Scripture. Went to Canada 
and died there. 

Died. 

E. Shattuck's place. R. to New York. 

Son of Lieut. John Swallow. R. 

R. 

R. 

T. Tarbell's place. Died February 9, 1796, 
77 years. 

Eli Nutting's. Tory. His estate was confis- 
cated. He left town, and died in poverty 
and wretchedness, at Groton, his native 
place. 

John Sawtell's. Son of Capt. Thomas. R. 

Dutton place. Same. R. 

Hartshorn's. R. 

Charles Scripture's. Son of Captain Thomas. 
He fell dead at the door of the meeting 
house on Sunday, August 20, 1797. 

T. Tarbell's. Son of Capt. Thomas. Died 
July 10, 1827, 73 y. 

R. 

Geo. Martin's. Died March 29, 1822, 88 y. 

North of T. Tarbell's. Son of Capt. Thomas. 
Died March 24, 1824, 6.5 v. 

Near Saml, Tarbell's. Son of Capt. Thos. R. 

R. 

R. 

R. 

R. 

ii.' 

He had a farm in town, but it is uncertain 

whether he ever resided there. 
R. 

James Withee's. Died April 4, 1796. 
West of John Jefts'. Died Dec. 3, 1806, 66 y. 
John Warren's. Died Oct. 17, 1774. 
Isaac Russell's. R. 
Last on tax list, Oct. 22, 1770. 
Jonathan William's place. Died March 18, 

1821. 85 y. 
Jesse Barrett, 2d's. His house was burned. 

R. Last on tax list January 8, 1777. 
John Warren's. Brother of Josiah Wheeler. 

R. to Temple. 
, E. Withington's place. Died July 5, 1819, 

73 years. 
T. Wheeler's. Dec. 13, 1820, 68 y. 
W. W. Whitaker's. Died Oct l,"l829, 85 y. 
, A. Farewell's. R. 
Brother of Josiah. Removed to Temple. 
Oliver Allen's. Died Dec. 9, 1785, 69 y. 
R. 
0. Allen's. Died July 31, 1838, 83 y. 



I 



THE EEVOLUTIONARY WAR. 221 

1780. Wood Nathan, Brother of James. Married and R. 
Wilson Edward, Capt. Thomas Wilson's. R. to Troy, N. Y. 

Died June 17, 1816, 82 y. 
Winship John, S. Withington's. Died Aug. 1, 1819, 77 y. 

Webber Dea. Jotham, S. Dea. Webber place, formerly Josiah Robbins. 

Died May 2, 1824, 72 y. 
Weatherbee David, S. Dix Blood's. 

Weston Dea. Roger, S. Roger Weston's. Died March 9, 1843, 85^_ y. 

1781. Wyeth Joshua, Wilsons's Orchard, opposite the burying 

ground. R. 
Wait John, Jr., Josiah Flagg's. R. 

1782. W^oods Joseph, Sewall Wood's. Died May 11, 1830, 76 y. 
Wheeler David, R. 

Wetherbee Jacob, S. R. 

Wetherbee Timothy, S. Centres. Died January 20, 1832, 84 y. 

1783. Wilson Edward, Jr., S. Son of Edward. R. to Troy, N. Y. 
WUson Joseph, S. Son of Edward. R. to New York. 

1784. AVithee James, Jr., James Withee's. Died Feb. 17, 1855, 93 y. 

1785. White Benjamin, 

1786. Wilson Ebeuezer, Son of Edward. R. to Troy, N. Y. 
Warren Hinksman, Came from Townsend. Died May 4, 1827, 75 

years. 
Walker Capt. Silas, R. 

Winship Dea. Noah, John Winship's. Son of John Winship. 

Died March 24, 1819, 55 y. 
Williams Nathaniel, 

1786. Williams Nathaniel, Jr., 

1787. Wright Josiah, 

1789. Wheelock Timothy, Otis place. R. 
Wellington Benjamin, R. 

1790. Winship John, Jr., R. to Vermont. 
Withington Elisha, Jr., Son of Elisha Withington. R. 

AFFAIRS OF THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR. 

The foregoing list contains the names of all inhabitants of 
the town, appearing by the tax lists to be such, who served 
in the war of the revolution. Most of them served for the 
town ; a few served for other towns, and became inhabitants 
afterwards. Some, who did not reside in town, served on 
behalf of the town or some of its inhabitants. Their names 
appear in the following list, which, added to those marked S, 
in the foregoing list, completes the roll of soldiers and ma- 
riues in the war, residing in town previous to 1790. The 
length of time of service of each man cannot, in many 
instances, be ascertained. Many served more than one term 
or campaign. It appears that the town was, by some arrange- 
ment among the inhabitants, divided into "squadrons," probably 
according to the amount of the inventory, rather than the 
number of inhabitants, and the number of soldiers to be fur- 
29 



222 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



nishccl was equally divided among the squadrons, but no 
record of the division has been found. Much trouble was 
experienced in settling the "averages" and "turns," as they 
were called, as appears in the municipal history. 

The following persons, whose names do not appear in the 
foregoing list, served in the war for the town of Mason : 



Fish Nathan or Nathaniel, 
Hodgman Abel, 
Lampson Joseph, 
Harrup Mather, 



Mitchell Isaac, 

Worthington Matthew Harrup. 

Moore James, 



Of these, Nathaniel Fish and Abel Hodgman, there is no 
doubt resided in the town, but their names were not found 
upon the tax lists. Lampson, Mitchell and Moore, were not 
resident in the town. Mather Harrup and Matthew Harrup 
Worthington, are undoubtedly the same person, although the 
names appear on the records, in several places, as those of 
difierent persons. 

The following lists are copied from documents and records 
in the office of the secretary of state, at Concord: 



CAPT. MANN'S COMPANY AT BUNKEE HILL. 



William Parker, 
Sam. Campbell, 
John Buxton, 
John Adams, 
John Thomas, 
Robert Worsley, 
J^ohn Sloan, 
Amos Colburn, 
Thomas Tarbell, 



Sam. Scripture, 
Elijah Avery, 
J ere. Holt, 
Saml. Wright, 
Isaac Flagg, 
Saml. Abbott, 
John Fish, 
Simeon Hildreth, 
Joseph Hodgman, 



Eben'r Carlton, 
George Woolson, 
John Robbins, 
Isaac Barrett, 
Zaccheus Hodgman, 
Jos. Blood, 
Lt. Brewer, 
Capt. Mann, 
John Gilson. 



RETURN OF SOLDIERS IN COL. NICHOLS' REGIMENT, ENLISTED 1777. 

Reuben Hosmer, April 23, Scammel's regiment, Frye's company. 

Ebenezer Abbott, April 23, " 

Thomas Blood, April 28, »' 

David Hall, April 29, " 

Jona. Foster, April 30, «« 

Nathaniel Fish, April 30, " 

Nath'l Smith, May 8, «' 

Mather Harrup, Aug. 7, " 

Jos. Ross, May 8, " 

James Mitchell, April 10, Cilley's '» Scott's 

James Moore, March 10, " 

All these enlisted for three years, except Reuben Hosmer, 
who enlisted " for th© war." 



THE REVOLUTIONARY "WAR. 223 

Sen. WHIPPLE'S BRIGADE OF VOLUNTEERS TO RHODE ISLAND, 1778 — COL. MOSES 
NICHOL'S REGIMENT. 

Ninth Co., Capt. Ben- ) Wages. Horse hire. Travel. Subsistence. Charges. 

jamin Mann, Mason. 5 £219 7s. 6d. £500. £366 13s. 4d. £10. £7 16. 

The state records show that forty five men were in the 
service at Winter Hill, in 1775. An enumeration of the 
inhabitants, made in October of that year, by the selectmen, 
under oath, shows the number absent in the army, to be twenty 
seven. The whole number of inhabitants by that enumera- 
tion, was 501. The whole number of males, from sixteen to 
fifty, not gone in the army, was eighty six, showing that in 
the summer nearly one half, and in the autumn nearly one 
quarter of all the able-bodied men and boys were in the army. 
In 1776, the number reported as in the army, was forty four, 
and in 1777, fifty five, but probably not all in the service at 
the same time, in those years. These facts show a patriotism 
on the part of these poor people, who were wholly dependent 
upon their daily labor for the support of themselves and their 
families, which has scarcely a parallel in the annals of history, 
and which is certainly highly creditable to their spirit of inde- 
pendence and zeal for the cause of liberty. 

The following documents, copied from the town records, 
furnish information as to the services of individuals and ex- 
penditures of the town, and of individuals, in procuring sol- 
diers to serve in the war : 

This may certify that I, James Moor, not an inhabitant of 
any town, have inlisted myself with Capt. Will. Scott, Into the 
three years' service on behalf of and for Messrs. Stephen 
Lawrence, Joseph Ball, Jonas Fay and Daniel Fay, for the 
space of three years, in consideration of having Eec'd one 
hundred Dollars over the Bounty given for sd service, as wit- 
ness my hand. 

his 

James x Moor. 
Mason, March 14, 1777. '^^''^• 

Attest: Isaac Mitchell, 
Obadiah Parker. 



224 HISTORY OP MASON. 

This may certify that I, Isaac Mitchell, not an inhabitant of 
any Town, is inlistcd into the three years' service, with Capt. 
Will. Scott, in the room and for to Do a Turn for the space 
of three years in sd service, for the Rev. Mr. Jonathan Searle, 
and Mr. Nathan Wheeler and Obadiah Parker, In considera- 
tion for having had payed me one hundred Dollars over and 
above the Bounty Given for sd service, as witness my hand. 

his 

Isaac x Mitchell. 
Mason, March ye 14th, 1777, '^^'■''■ 

Attest: Margrett Spear, 
James Moore. 

Mason, April 22, 1777. Rec'd of Messrs. John Swallow, 
David Blodgett, Daniel Fay, Timothy Wheeler, Eeuben Bar- 
rett ye 3d, John Whitaker, John Jefts, Their proportion 
allowed to them by a committee chosen for that purpose, to 
hire a man for the term of three years. Also three pounds 
for their making fence for me. I say, Rec'd by me. 

Samuel Abbott. 

Mason, April 22, 1777. Rec'd of Messrs.Benjamin Hodgman, 
Jonathan Winship, John Hodgman, Reuben Hodgman, Na- 
thaniel Hosmer, Joseph Ball and Thomas Robens, their pro- 
portion allowed to them by a certain committee, chosen for 
that purpose, to hire a man during the war with Britton. I 
say, Rec'd by me. Reuben Hosmer. 

Mason, April ye 30th, 1777. These lines may certify all 
persons it may concern, that I have received of Will. Eliot, 
Four pounds, two shillings, L. mo., it Being his Proportion 
Towards hiring one to serve for the squadron he belonged to, 
to procure a man for ye tliree years' service. Received by me. 

Thomas Blood. 

Same date, a similar receipt of John Eliot, of X7 Is. 4d., 
signed Thomas Blood. 

Same date, a similar receipt of Ebenezer Blood, of .£5 
15s., signed by Thomas Blood. 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR. 225 

May ye 8th, 1777, a similar receipt of Zacliariah Davis, for 
£4: lis. 7d., signed by Thomas Blood. 

May ye 8th, 1777. This day Rec'd of Abijah Allen, Forty 
six Dollres |^ of a DoUer, as the town bounty. I say Rec'd 
by me. David Hall. 

May ye 3, 1777. This day Rec'd of Abijah Allen, Twenty 
six Dollers ^Doller, as the Town bounty. I say Rec'd by me. 

David Hall. 

Maso7i, April ye 29th, 1777. I this day Rec'd of Joseph 
Merriam, Eight Pounds, Four Shillings and six pence, the 
Town bounty, it being his proportion, as hath been already 
Levied by a com'tte chosen for that purpose. Rec'd by me. 

David Hall. 

Mason, May ye 12, 1777. This Day Rec'd of Oliver Eliot, 

the sum of Eleven Pounds, eighteen [shillings], L. mo., it 

being his part of his money for the Town Bounty. I say 

Rec'd by me, for the three years' men. i^s 

Nathan x Fish. 

mark. 

May ye 14, 1777. This day Rec'd of Abijah Allen, Eighteen 

pounds, two shillings and six pence, as Town's Bounty. I 

say Rec'd by me. his 

Nathan x Fish. 

mark. 

May ye 8th, 1777. This day received of Abijah Allen, 
Thirty Pounds L. mo., as the Town's Bounty. I say Rec'd 
by me. Joseph Ross. 

Mason, November ye 26, 1777. This day Rec'd of Samuel 

Brown, one hundred Dollers, as hire for my ingaging in the 

Continental service, for three years, for the town of Mason. 

I say Rec'd by me. lus 

Matthew Harrup x Wortington. 

mark. 

BunstuUe, 4th August, 1779. Rec'd of the Selectmen of 
Mason, by the hand of Daniel "Warner, one hundred and 



226 HISTORY OF MASON. 

twenty pounds, L. mo., it being for one half a Town's bounty 
for a year service in tlie Continental army, sd service To be 
Don for the Towns of Duustable and Mason. Pr. 

Joseph Lamson, Jr. 

Memorandum. Paid by the selectmen of Mason, July 13, 
1779 : Zebulon Dodge, £300 ; Abijah Eaton, ,£300. July 19 : 
Simeon Fish, £60. July 24: Samuel Squire, £210. Rec'd 
an obligation of the town against sd Squire, which was turned 
in at as many pounds, £90. August 4 : Joseph Lampson, Jr., 
£30. The above for one year. July 21 : To Abel Hodgman, 
as bounty' and travel, £40. July 26 : To Edmund Farns- 
worth, £190. For Rhode Island. 

This may certify all whom it may concern, that I, Ezra 
Fuller, have inlisted in the Continental service, during the 
three years' campaign, in the room and stead of Amos Dakiu, 
of Mason. Ezra Fuller. 

The foregoing receipts Truly entered my me. 

David Blodgett, Town Clerk. 

The names of John Elliot and Jonathan Fish, should be 
added to the list of soldiers. John Elliot, Jr., removed to 
Hudson, and died there. Samuel Squire died April 3, 1780. 

The list of residents, commencing this chapter, was com- 
piled in 1842-3, by Rev. Joseph B. Hill, then resident in 
Mason. The place of residence was indicated by the name of 
the owner at that date. His list closed with the year 1783. 
It has since been brought down to the year 1790, and a few of 
the earlier names, and time of decease, age, &c., added, and, 
in a few instances, places are described by the name of the 
owner residing thereon in 1858. 

The evidence of the service in the revolutionary war, is, in 
most instances, found in the town records and in the office of 
the secretary of state at Concord. No name has been in- 
serted among the soldiers, without evidence from one or the 



d 



THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR. 227 

other of these records, except in the instance of some whose 
services were rendered for other towns before they became 
inhabitants of Mgison. 

The following account, copied from papers in the secretary 
of state's office, shows the amount allowed by the state to the 
town of Mason, for bounties paid and other expenditures, of 
the town, during the war. It will also show the number of 
men in the service, in different years : 

MASON, FOR BOUNTIES, &c. 

Winter Hill, 45 men in 1775, 
Militia, 15 men for the year 1776, 
Wyman's reg't, lo men. 

Paid by the town, 
'• " individuals, 
Baldwin & Oilman's reg't, 14 men in 1776, 
May. Continental, 10 men in 1777, 
Nov. do. 1 man in 1777, 

June. Sea Coast, Portsmouth, 3 men in 1777, 
Alarm at Tyconda., 17 men in 1777, 

Provisions and transporting, 7 
July. Stark's brigade, 16 men in 1777, 

Saratoga volunteers, 8 men in 1777, 
March. Peabody's reg't, 1 man in 1778, 

Volunteers to Rhode Island, 25 men in 1778, 
July. Continental, 5 men in 1779, 

Deducted below, 
Sept. Sea Coast, Portsmouth, in 1779, 

Nichols' reg't, 6 men in 1780, 
June. New levies in 1760, in silver, 

4 men, in paper. 
Continental, 5 men in 1781, 
Cotninental, 2 •' in 1782, 



Aug. Continental, Jo. Lampson, in 1779, i;jU 'above, 120 
Sept. Reynolds' reg't, 3 men in 1781, 

Dr. 

To £120 for state bounty, 2 men in 1779, deducted, repaid £120, 



£ 


s. 


d. 




£ 

252 
182 


s. 

16 

8 


d. 





loO 














22 


6 


8- 


— 


172 
37 


6 

16 


8 



30 








{ 


300 

23 

5 


6 

2 

14 


3 
9 



15 


2 















2 


0- 




■ 22 
68 
15 
15 
47 


4 
8 
4 

10 









1200 








\ 


78 


7 


2 


120 








7 


17 


2 










3 


12 













54 








56 


13 


4 










300 





0- 




• 61 
370 
150 


18 




2 





1860 


13 





7 


9 





36 








1904 


2 





7 


17 


2 



1896 4 10 



228 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



PROPRIETARY AND TOWN OFFICERS, AND JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

List of moderators of tlic proprietary meetings and of 
clerks of the proprietary : 



MODERATORS. 



October 


16, 


1749 


December 


3, 


1751 


October 


— J 


1752 


November 


27, 


1753 


July 


16, 


1754 


November 18, 


1754 


May- 


11. 


1757 


October 


24, 


1758 


January 


2j 


1759 


November 26, 


1759 


November 2-5, 


1760. 


Septembei 


14, 


1762 


December 


14, 


1762. 


April 


5, 


1763. 


March 


29, 


1764 


January 


29, 


1765 


March 


20, 


1765. 


April 


23, 


1766 


December 


11, 


1766 


March 


10, 


1767 


June 


2 


1767 


November 


4, 


1767 


January 


5, 


1768 


March 


8, 


1768 


June 


22, 


1768 


March 


22, 


1769 


August 


21, 


1769 


October 


18, 


1769 


March 


6, 


1770 


January 


6, 


1772 


January 


12, 


1773 



Joseph Blanchard, Esq. 
"William Lawrence, Esq. 
Maj. Jonathan Hubbard. 
Colonel Jjawrcnce. 
Maj. Jonathan Hubbard. 
Colonel Lawrence. 
William Lawrence, Esq. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Colonel Lawrence. 
Capt. Samuel Tarbeli, 
Col. William Lawrence. 
Capt. Samuel Tarbeli. 
Nathan Hall. 
Obadiah Parker. 
Oliver Eliot, 
Ens. Whitcomb Powers. 
Lieut. William Prescott. 
AVhitcomb Powers. 
Lieut. William Prescott. 
Ens. Whitcomb Powers. 
Nathan Hall. 
Lieut. Obadiah Parker. 
Lieut. Obadiah Parker. 
Ens. Whitcomb Powers. 
Josiah Robbins. 
Lieut. Obadiah Parker. 
Josiah Robbins. 
Nathan Hall. 
Nathan Hall. 
Josiah Robbins. 
Nathan Hall. 



Joseph Blanchard, Jr. 
Joseph Blanchard, Jr. 
John Stevens. 
John Stevens. 
John Stevens. 
John Stevens. 
John Stevens. 
Jonathan Blanchard. 
Jonathan Blanchard. 
Jonathan Blanchard. 
Jonathan Blanchard. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 
Capt. Thomas Tarbeli. 



The following list contains the names of the moderators at 
the annual town meetings, the town clerks, the selectmen, and 
town treasurers, from the year 1768 to the year 1858, inclu- 
sive, and of representatives from the year 1775 to 1858, in- 
clusive ; 



*rOWN OFFICERS. 



229 



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HISTORY OF MASON. 



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Obadiah Parker 
Josejih Barrett. 
Joseph Barrett. 
Joseph Barrett. 
Joseph Barrett. 
Josejih Merriam 
Col. Jas. Wood 
Col. Jas. Wood 
Col. Jas. "SVood 
Co!. Jas. Wood 
Col. Jas. Wood 
Dea. R Weston 
Dca. R. Weston 
Dea. R. Weston 
Dea. R. Weston 
Jas. Wood, Esq 
Dca. R. Weston 
Joses Bucknam 
John Blodgett. 
Joses Bucknam 
John Blodgett. 
John Blodgett. 
H. Richardson. 
H. Richardson. 
John Blodgett. 
Josiah Winship 
Josiah Winship 
H. Richardson. 
Josiah Russell. 
Voted to pass the 


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TOWN OFFICERS. 231 



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232 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



JUSTICES OP THE PEACE AND OF THE QUORUM. 



1783. 


Benjamin Mann. 






1831 


1785. 


Jonathan Searle. 






1833 


1804. 


James Wood. 






1835 


1808. 


Rogers AVeston. 






1836 


1809. 


John Blodgett. 






1838 


1818. 


Timothy Dakin. 






1838 


1821. 


Samuel Merriam. 






1844 


1823, 


Samuel Whiting. 






1848 


1823. 


Willis Johnson. 






1855 


1825. 


John Stevens, Quorum, 


1831. 


1855 








COKONERS. 


Stephen Lawrence. | 


James Snow. 



Israel Hcrrick, Quorum, 1836. 
Nathaniel F. Cummings. 
Nathaniel Shattuck. 
William Wright. 
Jonathan Russell. 
Samuel Smith. 
George Taft. 
Thomas H. Marshall. 
Charles Scripture. 
Joseph B. Wilson. 



Samuel Merriam. 



TRUSTEES OF THE BOYNTON COMMON SCHOOL FUND. 

1858. Thomas H. Marshall, Jonathan Russell, 2d, Charles Scripture, George 

Taft, Charles Prescott. 

From 1775 to 1793, Mason and Raby were classed for the 
choice of a representative. Dea. Amos Dakin was the repre- 
sentative in the years 1775-'76-'78-'79 ; Joseph Barrett, in 
1780-'95-'96-'97-'98; Benjamin Mann, in 1781-'83-'84-'86 ; 
Lieut. Obadiah Parker, in 1788-'90-'92-'94; Joseph Merriam, 
1793, 1799. There is no record of the choice in 1777-'82- 
1785-'87-'89-'91. It may be that in those years the repre- 
sentative was from Raby. The records of Raby show that 
Dea. Amos Dakin was elected representative March, 1787, 
and Capt. Campbell March, 1789, for Mason and Raby. Camp- 
bell was a citizen of Raby. 

In the following tables, prepared by the Rev. Jos. B. Hill, 
is inserted the number of deaths in the town of Mason, in 
each year for 60 years, from January 1, 1791, to Jan. 1, 1851, 
taken from the record kept by the Rev. Ebenezer Hill, from 
1791 to 1838, and from that kept by Dr. Willis John- 
son, from 1840 to 1851 ; the years 1838 and 1839 being sup- 
plied from other sources ; in which appears the number over 
70 years of age, and the principal diseases in each year : 



STATISTICS OP MORTALITY. 



233 



TABLE OF DEATHS IN MASON, FROM JANUARY 1, 1791 TO JANUARY 1, 1851. 



>< 


to 

Is 
o 




<6 

> 
O 




Is 


o" 

s 

> 

o 




00 

"tS 







to 


to 



n 

V 

> 




3 


to 

ai 


Q 



i^ 



> 




to 


■5 

ci 






> 



1791 


10 


2 


1801 


6 


1 


II8II 


11 


1 


1821 


18 


4 


1831 


19 


8 


1841 


14 


4 


1792 


8 





1802 


19 


1 


11812 


18 


2 


1822 


29 


5 


1832 


20 


4 


1842 


24 


4 


1793 


7 


2 


1803 


19 


2 


1813 


10 





11823 


13 


2 


1833 


11 


3 


1843! 20 


7 


1794 


12 


2 


1804 


17 





1814 


22 


4 


1824 


27 


9 


1834 


21 


3 


1844 


14 


6 


1795 


7 





1805 


20 


3 


1815 


22 


5 


1825 


21 


3 


1835 


16 


8 


1845 


21 


5 


1796 


10 


1 


1806 


13 


1 


1816 


18 


3 


1826 


20 


1 


1836 


12 


4I 


1846 


13 


3 


1797 


15 


1 


1807 


15 


2 


1817 


13 


1 


1827 


26 


7 


1837 


19 


s; 


1847 


12 


2 


1798 


10 





1808 


15 


1 


1818 


34 


4 


;i828 


22 5\ 


1838 


14 


4 


1848 


23 


2 


1799 


6 


1 


1809 


9 


3 


1819 


31 


3 


1829 


29 


9 


1839 


9 


2| 


1849 


27 


7 


1800 


19 


J 


1810 


20 


1 


1820 


22 


4 


1830 


11 


5 


1840 


21 


' 


1850 


10 


3 




104 


10 




154 


15 




201 


271 




216 


50 




162|52| 




184 


43 



PROPORTION OF DISEASES, &c., TO DEATHS IN EACH PERIOD. 



Decades. 


7: 


. 


S 




6 


tn 










^ ^ 


C4-: 


5 ~ 


> 



"^ 


TS 




a 





l-H 


u i: 


fc. 








First decade, 


104 


1 

TJT 





tV 


i 


4. 


1 


Second decade, 


154| ^\ 


ttV 


tV 


* 


i 


1 
T5" 


Third decade, 


201 


2 
1 5 


tV 


2 

1 3 


* 


* 


1 


Fourth decade, 


216 


i 


^ 


1 

24 


^ 


^ 


] 
TO- 


Fifth decade, 


162 


* 


tV 


^V 


tV 


a. 

5 


1 

5 


Sixth decade, 


184 


i 


i 


_1_ 

1 5 


i 


i 


i 


For sixty years. 


IO21I 1 


I 

T4- 


iV 


i 


i 


i 



TABLE OF TOTALS. 












(i 












to 


S 


^ 




S 








ci 





^ 









































From 


to 





+3 


t-4 



to 


£ 




bo 

<! 
























'i^i 


a 


t> 


s 


tS 










ct 












W 





hH 





Ph 








1791tol801 104 


10 





10 


14 


20 


2 


1801 " 1811 


154 


15 


3 


14 


19 


33 


13 


1811 " 1821 


201 


27 


17 


31 


32 


25 


16 


1821 " 1831 


216 


50 


23 


9 


23 


22 


21 


1831 " 1841 


162 


52 


16 


6 


9 


30 


34 


1841 « 1851 


184 


43 


24 


12 


29 


32 


29 




1021 


197 


73 


82 


126 


162 


115 



AGES OF THOSE DYING ABOVE 70 YEARS. 



At the age of 70 9 


At age of 87 6 


71 5 


88 13 


72 8 


89 1 


73 2 


90 6 


74 8 


91 5 


75 9 


92 1 


76 11 


94 1 


77 8 


95 1 


78 3 


96 5 


79 5 


97 1 


80 11 


98 1 


81 9 


99 1 


82 11 


99.i 1 


83 12 


100 1 


84 11 


102 1 


85 12 


102i 1 


86 11 





234 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



TABLE OF DISEASES, OR BILL OF MORTALITY, FROM JANUARY 1, 1791 TO JANUARY 
1, 1851, — SIXTY YEARS. 





1791 


1801 


1811 


1821 


1831 


1841 


1791 


Diseases. 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 

1851 




1801 


1811 


1821 


1831 


1841 


1851 


Total. 


Consumption, 


20 


23 


25 


22 


30 


32 


162 


Fever, 


14 


19 


32 


23 


10 


29 


127 


Old age, 


2 


13 


16 


21 


85 


29 


116 


Infantile complaints, 





3 


17 


23 


16 


24 


83 


Canker rash or throat distemper, 


10 


14 


31 


9 


6 


12 


82 


Dysentery or cholera morbus. 


10 


15 


7 


22 


7 


12 73 


Unknown and sudden, 


2 


7 


5 


15 


9 


3 


41 


Dropsy, 


6 


4 


3 


7 


6 


6 


32 


Fits, 


11 


6 


2 


1 


1 


2 


23 


Stillborn, 


9 


4 


6 


2 


1 





22 


Quinsy, 


5 


6 





5 








21 


Chronic, 


2 


2 


3 


6 








13 


Cancer, 


2 





2 


2 


4 


4 


14 


Childbirth, 


3 


2 


4 


1 





1 


11 


Intemperance or delirium tremens, 


1 








4 


5 


4 


14 


Mortihcation, 


2 


3 


2 


1 


2 


1 


10 


Whooping cough, 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 





10 


Hydro cephalus, 





1 


2 





5 


2 


10 


Palsy, 


1 


2 


5 


4 


4 





16 


Scrofula, 








2 


2 


2 


3 


9 


Measles, 








4 


3 





1 


8 


Disease of the liver. 








2 


9 





1 


12 


Apoplexy, 





1 





3 





1 


5 


Croup, 








1 


1 


1 


2 


5 


Atrophy, 








1 





3 





4 


Burns and sores, 








4 


3 


1 





8 


Diabetes, 








1 





2 


1 


3 


Debility, 





1 





2 


1 





4 


Affection of the heart. 


1 














2 


3 


Premature birth, 


1 


2 














3 


Drovi^ned, 





1 


2 











3 


Lightning, 





2 





1 








3 


Dyspepsia, 











2 


1 





3 


Inflammation of the bowels, 














1 


11 2 


Inflammation of the brain. 











1 


1 


1 3 


Inflammation of the bladder, 

















2 2 


Ervsioelas, 





1 





2 





3 


Killed by falling. 











1 


2 


3 


Ulcer on the leg, 

















3 3 


Canker, 





1 





1 





2 


Asthma, 








1 


1 








a 


Small pox, 








2 











2 


Lethargy, 











2 








2 


Cholic, 














1 


1 


2 


Diseases not classed. 


5 


13 


8 


9 


6 


4 


45 



In each decade, some deaths are recorded by diseases, &c., 
not falling into any of the classes of diseases in the tables, 
as follows : In the first decade, obstructed stomach, ulcer on 
the lungs, cholera dysentery, vomiting, schirrous tumors, one 



STATISTICS OF MORTALITY. 



235 



eacli; total 5. In the second decade, rickets, falling from the 
bed, eating cherries, shot bj accident, overlaid, suffocated by 
a bean, salt rheum, complication of diseases, gravel, fracture, 
lockjaw, tussis, killed by a falling tree, one each; total 13. 
In the third decade, inflammation from a fall, sore mouth, 
ulcers, bilious cholic, thrown, from a wagon, indigestion, chick- 
en pox, strangury, one each ; total 8. In the fourth decade, 
cholera infantum, spina bifida, suicide, fistula, bleeding from a 
slight wound, epilepsy, hydro thorax, hernia, diseased kidney, 
one each; total 9. In the fifth decade, influenza, fluor albus, 
abortion, gangrene of tiie foot, pleurisy, universal disease, one 
each; total 6. In the 6th decade, malformation, diarrhea, 
killed in blasting rocks, casualty, one each ; total 4. The 
sum total of these is added at the foot of the table, as dis- 
eases not classed. Infantile complaints include all diseases 
of infants not otherwise specified. 

In the table of deaths, 197 are recorded as above the age 
of 70 years. Of these, 68 were between 70 and 80; 97 be- 
tween 80 and 90; 23 between 90 and 100; and 3 above 100. 
Of these last, Jonathan Foster, entered in Mr. Hill's record 
at 100 years, is entered in the table at 102 years, that being, 
probably, his true age. These tables show a degree of lon- 
gevity, which indicates a healthy region. On comparing the 
past with the present, it will be perceived, that the average 
length of human life is increasing, and that consumption is 
not, as many suppose, more prevalent and fatal now than for- 
merly. It also appears, by the table of persons residing i|,i 
the town on the first day of January, 1857, of the age of 70 
years and over, that the ratio of longevity is now fully equal 
to that of any former period. 



TABLE OF THOSE LIVING 70 YEARS OF AGE AND UPWARDS, JANUARY, 1857. 



At the age of 


70 


7 


At the 


age of 


77 


4 


At the age of 84 


3 




71 


7 






78 


4 


85 


1 




72 


4 






79 


5 


87 


2 




73 


8 






80 


3 


88 


1 




74 


2 






81 


1 


91 


1 




75 


6 






82 


1 


93 


1 




76 


4 






83 


1 


Age not specified, 


6 



236 



HISTORY OF MASO^^ 



BIRTHS. 

Of births, no accurate record has been kept. Mr. Hill 
kept a record of births from November 3, 1796, until the 
year 1820, but in several of the years it is manifestly imper- 
fect. There was no law requiring a record of births to be 
made. The duties of his office .^ave the minister much better* 
means to keep an accurate register of deaths than of birtlis. 
As no other record of births was kept, it is thought best to 
give the number of births each year, according to Mr. Hill's 
record : 

lABLE OF BIRTHS IN MASOX, FROM 1796 TO 1820, INCLUSIVE. 



iTrom Xov. 3, 1796 to Nov. 3, 1797, 41 


FromDec. 31,1807toDec.31, 1808, 


23 


" Nov. 3. 1797 to Dec. 31, 1798, 44 


«' 31, 1808 




31, 1809, 


16 


" Dec. 31, 1798 to Dec. 31, 1799, 33 


" 31, -1809 




31, 1810, 


33 


" 31, 1799 " 31, 1800, 27 


" " 31, 1810 




31, 1811, 


30 


" 31,1800 " 31, 1801, 32 


" " 31, 1811 




31,1814 


85 


" 31, 1801 " 31, 1802, 29 


«' " 31, 1814 




31, 1817, 


56 


" 31,1802 " 31, 1803, 32 


" 31,1817 




31, 1818, 


32 


" 31,1803 " 31, 1804, 33 


" " 31,1818 




31, 1820, 


62 


" " 31, 1804 " 31, 180-5, 29 


<« 1750 to 1858, 


twin 


births, 


40 


" 31, 1805 " 31, 180G, 36 


" 1750 to 18o8, 


illeg 


, about 


15 


" 31,1806 " 31, 1807, 25 










POPULATION. 








Census. 








1 767. By Provincial authority : 








Unmarried males from 16 to 60 years of age, 




20 




Married males from 16 to 00 years of age. 




47 




Males under 16 years of age, 




80 




Males 60 years of age and abovfe, 


1 




Male slaves. 









Unmarried females, 




79 




Married females, 




47 




Widows, 




4 




Female slaves, 









Total, 









278 



1775. By order of the Provincial Congress : 

Males under 16 years of age, 148 

Males from 16 to 60 years of age, not gone in the army, 86 

Males over 50 years of age, 12 

Males gone in the army, 27 

All Females, 227 

Negroes and slaves for life, 1 

Total, 501 

By the United States census : 



1790 


922 


1820 


1313 


1840 


1275 


1800 


1179 


1830 


1403 


1850 


1626 


1810 


1077 











SCHOOL DISTRICTS. 237 

The decrease in numbers from the former census reported 
in the census of 1810, was so unexpected and so great, as to 
give rise to strong doubts of the correctness of the return. 
The subject was taken up at the town meeting, and a commit- 
tee appointed in each school district, to take a new census. 
This was done, and the result confirmed the accuracy of the 
return. The decrease was owing to the active emigration, 
then tending to the new lands in Vermont and Western New 
York. The decrease from 1830 to 1840 was, probably, owing 
to a similar emigration to the west and to the manufacturing 
towns in the vicinity. 

In the Hillsborough County Eecord, published in 1853, the 
statistics of the town are stated as follows : 

STATISTICS or THE TOWN OF MASON, IN 1850. 



Population, 1626 

Number of families, 346 

Number of houses, 313 

Number of farms, 168 



Value of lands, $262,606 

Yalvie of stock in trade, 17,700 

Total Talue of the inventory, 483,256 



POPULATION OF THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIEE. 



1767 52,700 

1775 82,200 

1790 141,899 



1800 183,762 

1810 214,360 

1820 244,161 



1830 


269,328 


1840 


284,574 


1850 


317,976 



SCHOOL DISTRICTS. 

At the annual town meeting, March 14, 1791, a committee, 
consisting of Jonathan Searle, Benjamin Mann, Obadiah Par- 
ker, Reuben Barrett, Samuel Smith, Jotham Webber, Stephen 
Lawrence, Oliver Scripture, John Lawrence, David Hall, 
James Scripture, Joseph Saunders and Joseph Barrett, was 
appointed to divide the town into school districts, and fix the 
place in each for the school houses. Their report made, was 
adopted, and is recorded in volume 3, page 153. The town 
was divided into nine districts, ''bounded by the persons 
hereafter named." This document will show who were the 
occupants of all the principal farms in the town, at that date. 

MIDDLE, OR FIRST DISTRICT. 

Dr. Joseph Gray, Abraham Merriam, Jr., Edward Wilson, 
Benjamin Mann, Esq., Andrew Ross, Benjamin Kendall, Capt. 
William Chambers, John Tarbell, Ezra Merriam, Nathaniel 
31 



238 HISTORY OF MASON. 

Boyiiton, Edward Wilson, Jr., Simon Ames, Abraham Mer« 
riam, Josiali Merriam, Jr., John Whitaker. 

SOUTH, OR SECOND DISTRICT. 

John Winship, Capt. Isaac Brown, Scth Robins, Nathaniel 
Smith, Lt. John Swallow, John Lawrence, Noah Winship, 
Nathaniel Smith, Jr., Zacheus Barrett, John Swallow, Jr.. 
Joseph Giles, William Barrett, John Wait, Jr., Jotham Web- 
ber, John Campbell, Reuben Barrett. 

SOUTHEAST, OR THIRD DISTRICT. 

Daniel Lawrence, Amos and Lois Herrick, Benjamin Bar- 
rett, Jacob Weatherbee, Samuel Dunster, Elisha Withington, 
Amos Blood, Abel Kemp, Daniel Tarbox, William Sanders, 
Peter Zwere, Thomas Asten, Thomas Reed, Wid. Miles, Saml. 
Green, Jabez Kendall, David Weatherbee, Abel Brown, Ben- 
jamin Grace. 

EAST, OR FOURTH DISTRICT. 

Clark Haven, James Weethee, Jesse Barrett, Hubbert 
Russell, John Wait, James Weethee, Jr., Thomas Tarbell, Jr., 
Lt. James Gilman, John Goddard, John Grimes, Edward Tar- 
bell, Samuel Smith, Lt. James Scripture, Reuben Barrett, 
Jason Russell, John Eliott. 

NORTHEAST, OR FIFTH DISTRICT. 

David Brown, Oliver Eliott, Joseph Sanders, John Russell, 
Elias Eliott, Jonathan Williams, Joseph Abbott, Abijah Eaton, 
Samuel Tarbell, Jeremiah Boynton, John Cummings, William 
Barrett, Jr., Samuel Elliott, Abel Shedd, Simeon Fish, William 

Scott. 

NORTHWEST, OR SIXTH DISTRICT. 

Henry Knowlton, Samuel Townsend, Oliver Scripture, Ens. 
John Hull, Benjamin Knowlton, Silas Bullard, John Jefts, 
Eleazer Fish, William Parkhurst, William Eliott, Ebenezer 
Blood, Dea. Nathan Hall, Timothy Dakin, Andrew Eliot, 
Thomas Blood, David Hall, Richard Lawrence, John Adams, 
Asa Stone, Jonathan Bachelder. 



SCHOOL DISTRICTS. 2S9 

WEST, OR SEVENTH DISTRICT. 

Jonathan Searle, Esq., Hinksman Warren, Abel Adams, 
Abijah Allen, Joseph Merriam, Joseph Barrett, Ens. Nathan 
Whipple, Zachariah Davis, Reuben Kendall, John Blodgett, 
Amos Dakin. 

SECOND WEST, OR EIGHTH DISTRICT. 

Obadiah Parker, Stephen Lawrence, Roger Wesson, Sam 
Stevens Parker, Thomas Robins, Timothy Wheeler, Aaron 
Wheeler, Lt. James Wood, Lt. Enosh Lawrence, Jonas Fay, 
Joseph Woods. 

SOUTHWEST, OR NINTH DISTRICT. 

Ebenezer Shattuck, Benjamin Hodg-man, Timothy Wheelock, 
Thomas Hodgman, Reuben Hodgraan, Samuel Wood, Edward 
Farwell, Reuben Hosmer, Isaac Elagg, Samuel Russell, Wm» 
Hosmer, Jonathan Russell. 

The school districts thus arranged, remained, with very 
little change, for the next fifty years. The principal change 
has been, the arrangement of a district in the village, which 
is now much the largest in the town, composed of territory 
included in this division in the sixth and seventh districts. 



CHAPTER VII. 

MASON VILLAGE, AND THE RAILROAD. 

The water power on the Souliegaii river, at Mason village, 
was occupied by mills at an early day. The lots upon which 
it is found were not among those selected for mills by the pro- 
prietors, when they divided the township and assigned the lots 
to the several owners, owing to some error or mistake^ 
which was discovered, and measures were taken to procure 
the lots for the purpose of the mills, see Proprietary History, 
page 35, and the lots were, undoubtedly, acquired by the 
grantees of the township for that purpose, by some negotia- 
tion or arrangement ; for, in 1751, it appears, a committee 
was appointed at a proprietors' meeting, to make a contract 
for building mills on this privilege, the saw mill to be com- 
pleted by the 25th of May, 1752, and the corn mill in a year 
from that date. The committee made a contract with Col. 
Bellows, to build the mills, and took his bond to secure the 
performance of the contract. This he failed to do, and a suit 
was brought upon the bond, which was pending many years ; 
for it seems not to have been settled in 1760, as will be seen 
by reference to the Proprietary History, page 47. In the His- 
tory of New Ipswich, it is stated that Charles Barrett, in con- 
nection with his brother Thomas Barrett, built the mills, and 
that he sold his interest to Amos Dakin and removed to New 
Ipswich in 1764. At a proprietors' meeting, November 4, 
1767, a committee was appointed "to lay out a road by Mr. 
Thomas Barrett's mill," and in the warrant for the first town 
meeting, dated September 8, 1768, was an article for accept- 
ing the road by Mr. Thomas Barrett's and Amos Dakin's 




i 



MASON VILLAGE. 241 

mills. Mr. Dakin soon after became the sole proprietor, and 
so remained till his death, in 1789. The property passed to 
his son, Dea. Timothy Dakin, who rebuilt the mills in a very 
substantial manner, and remained the owner till 1814, when 
he sold the mills and privilege to Maj. Seth King and John 
Stevens, Esq. The first dam above the bridge was built by 
Dea. Amos Dakin, about 1788. Below this dam, on the north 
side of the stream, a carding and fulling mill was built by 
John Everett, about the year 1800. It was occupied by him 
and afterwards by Othni Crosby, and subsequently by others, 
for that purpose, till about the year 1829, Avhcn it was 
removed and upon its site was erected the present factory 
building, under the direction of Charles Barrett, Esq., agent of 
the Columbian Manufacturing Company. It was put into 
operation in 1830, and has continued in successful operation, 
with few interruptions, till the present time. This building 
was 100 feet long by 43 wide, and contained, when first put in 
operation, 64 looms for weaving sheetings and shirtings, with 
other machinery and apparatus sufficient to run that number 
of looms. It now contains 2946 spindles, and 77 looms, em- 
ployed in the manufacture of denims, of which the daily 
manufacture now is 3100 yards. After Mr. Barrett relin- 
quished the agency, the mills were run by Messrs. Dakin and 
Daniels, under a contract to manufacture for the company by 
the yard. The mills were run by the company under Leonard 
Dakin, their agent, from 1837 to 1839 ; under John E. Bacon, 
agent, from 1839 to 1841. From that time, Mr. Willard 
Daniels was agent till his death, in 1843. He was succeeded 
by the late Hon. Stephen Smith, who remained agent till his 
death, in 1857. He was succeeded by Charles P. Richardson, 
the present agent. In 1845, the company purchased the Sou- 
hegan water privilege near the high bridge in New Ipswich, 
and, under the direction of Mr. Smith, their agent, the present 
factory was there erected, in length 120 feet, breadth 44 feet, 
containing 3328 spindles and 100 looms, employed in the 
manufacture of denims, the daily production being about 



242 HISTORY OF MASON. 

4200 yards. In 1854, the company purcliascd tlic old grist and 
saw mills, on the site originally occupied by Dakin's mills, and 
erected a building thereon for a dye and finishing and packing 
house, in length 166 feet, breadth 44 feet, one story high. In 
the same year, the company purchased the Mountain mill, for- 
merly called the Watcrloom mill, in New Ipswich, and erected 
a new factory, 114 by 40 feet, containing 2190 spindles, and 
54 looms, in which the daily manufacture is about 2370 yards 
of denims. In the year 1856, the same company erected, on 
the site of the old Dakin mills, a factory 100 by 44 feet, four 
stories high, and a picking room 20 by 44 feet, two stories 
high. This building adjoins the dye and finishing house. In 
it are 3456 spindles, and 96 looms, employed in the manufac- 
ture of denims, of which the daily production is about 3950 
yards. The mills at Mason and New Ipswich, above de- 
scribed, are all upon the Souhegan river, and belong to and 
are managed by the same company, under the same agent. 
All these last were substantial brick buildings, erected under 
the direction of Dea. Stephen Smith, the company's agent. 

At the Mason mills the weekly consumption of cotton is 
15,384 pounds ; annual do., 800,000 pounds. Yards of denims 
manufactured weekly, 42,120; annual do., 2,190,240. At the 
New Ipswich mills, the weekly consumption of cotton is about 
13,505 pounds; annual do., 691,860 pounds; number of yards 
annually manufactured, 1,909,440. Total yards manufactured, 
3,099,680. The yarn for all the mills is dyed at Mason. In- 
digo used per week, 461 pounds. The cloth from all the 
mills is finished and packed at the finishing rooms in Mason 
villao-e. 



NUMBER OF PERSONS EMPLOYED AND AMOUNT OF MONTHLY PAY ROLL AT THE 
MASON AND NEW IPSWICH MILLS. 

Males employed at New Ipswich, 86 
Females " '« «' 96 

Pay roll monthly " «' $3000,00 



Males employed at Mason, 121 

Females ' 120 

Pay roll monthly " '« $4300,00 



The stock of this company is principally owned in Boston. 
Messrs. Wright & Whitman, of Boston, are the selling agents, 



to whom the goods are consigned. 



MASON VILLAGE. 243 

About 1500 cords of wood are consumed, annually, in all 
the mills, drying works, &c. The mills at Mason are driven 
by two water wheels, 22^ feet in diameter and 20 feet long, 
and estimated at 75 horse power each. 

The water power on the south side of the stream, above 
the bridge, was first occupied for a blacksmith's shop, in which 
was a trip hammer. It was carried on by Ezra Newell, for 
the manufacture of scythes and axes, with other blacksmith 
work. In this shop, near the commencement of the present 
century, was put in operation, a machine for the manufacture 
of cut nails. The business did not succeed, and was soon 
abandoned. About the year 1813, a wooden building was 
erected on the site of the old blacksmith shop, for the spin- 
ning and weaving of woolen goods, under the direction of 
Maj. Seth King. This business not succeeding, it was, after a 
few years, abandoned. 

About the year 1812, a building of wood was erected on 
the site next below the old Dakin mills, and occupied as a 
cotton factory, by Roger Chandler and others associated with 
him. This company manufactured large quantities of cotton 
yarn, which was purchased by the farmers' wives in the vicin- 
ity, and by them woven into cloth for family use. The com- 
pany also manufactured cotton cloths for the market. At that 
time, all the cotton used in the mills was picked and cleaned 
of its seeds by hand, having been sent to the market by the 
cotton planters, without having been ginned. This cotton 
picking furnished a great amount of employment for the 
women and children in the farmers' families. It was deliv- 
ered out by weight at the mill, and, when returned, the 
cleaned cotton and the seeds and dirt were again weighed as 
a check against dishonest practices. Many a Mason boy 
earned his first money by picking cotton for the factory. 

The manufacture of potash was carried on by Dea. Timo- 
thy Dakin, for many years. His potash works stood upon the 
bank of the river in reai* of Mr. Richardson's house. The 
country was then full of hard wood, the farmers kept up 



244 HISTORY OP MASON. 

lusty fires, and largo quantities of strong ashes were every 
year hauled to the potash works. 

The first merchant, who kept an extensive stock of goods 
for sale at the village, if not the first in point of time, was 
Isaiah Kidder, son of Col. Reuben Kidder, of New Ipswich. 
He commenced trade at that place, then and for many years 
after, called Mason Harbor, in 1799. By his enterprise and 
fair dealing, he soon won the confidence of the community, 
and as his was then the principal store in Mason, Temple and 
Wilton, his trade was extensive and lucrative. On closing 
his business at the expiration of six years, he declared that 
thirty dollars would cover all his losses by bad debts, a fact 
which speaks well, both for the people and the merchant. 
He returned to New Ipswich and engaged extensively in the 
manufacturing business, but was cut off by fever at the early 
age of forty one years. His loss was deeply felt by his fellow 
citizens of his native town, as well as by his numerous friends 
and acquaintances in the neighboring towns. His funeral 
sermon was preached by the Rev. Mr. Hill, of Mason, an 
extract from which, shows the estimation in which he was held 
by one who knew him well, and who never dealt in indiscrim- 
inate eulogy : 

" The general grief is his best eulogy. It shows that you 
are not insensible to the worth of the man, and to the loss 
society sustains in his death. Possessed of a strong mind, 
cultivated by a good education, and enriched by reading and 
observation, his judgment was sound, active, and enterprising. 
He was capable of much business, and very extensive useful- 
ness. Warmly interested in the prosperity of his country, 
and vigilant to promote the common welfare, he justly mer- 
ited the confidence of his fellow citizens." 

Dea. Isaac Kimball, for many years carried on the business 
of blacksmithing, and the manufacture of axes and other 
edged tools. This was without the aid of water power. He 
removed to Temple about 1836, and has become one of the 
most enterprising and successful farmers in the region. 



THE RAILROAD. 245 

The pottery business, or manufacture of eartliern ware, was 
carried on many years by Ruel Richardson, but since his death 
in 1814, but little, if anything, has been done in that line. 

In 1857, Mr. James H. Chamberlain erected, below the site 
of the Dakin mills, one of the most extensive and complete 
flouring mills, in the state. The building is of brick, commo- 
dious, and every way well fitted for the intended use, that is, 
the manufacture of flour from western wheat, brought to the 
mill by railroad. 

The importance of the railroad to the business interests 
of the village, renders this a suitable place to introduce the 
following account of the 

PETERBOROUGH AND SHIRLEY RAILROAD. 

This railroad, as its name implies, was originally intended 
to connect the Fitchburg railroad at Shirley, Mass., with 
Peterborough, N. H., passing through the towns of Towns- 
end, Mass., and Mason, New Ipswich and Temple. The New 
Hampshire charter was granted in 1846. Soon after this, the 
road was built as far as Townsend and went into operation, 
from Groton junction to Townsend. 

In 1850, the road was completed to a station near the river, 
almost a mile below the village, and the cars commenced run- 
ning on the 11th of November, of that year. In 1852, it was 
completed to Mason village, its present terminus. The whole 
length of the road in New Hampshire, is nine and one third 
miles. More than $35,000 of the cost of constructing this 
part of the road was paid by citizens of Mason, in addition to 
several thousands of dollars for building the Massachusetts 
portion. Owing to the hard times and other causes, the 
road became involved in debt, and was finally sold to the 
Fitchburg company, for about $50,000, (the sum required to 
pay its liabilities,) though the legal transfer has not yet been 
made. The stock was a total loss to the subscribers, and 
thereby the business prosperity of the town was, for a time, 
severely crippled. The road has generally been under the 
control of and run by the Fitchburg company. 
32 



M6 HISTORY OF MASON, 

That portion of the town through which the road passes, 
has been incidentally much benefitted, by the market it has 
opened for its lumber and stone. Exhaustless quarries of 
granite exist on or near the line of the road, which only wait 
a favorable railroad tariff to cause it to be worked and exten- 
sively exported. 

The railroad runs through the most wild and rugged por- 
tions of the town, yet presents to the traveler, prospects of 
rare and peculiar beauty. This is especially true of the four 
miles before reaching the village. Far beneath are seen the 
Souhegan river, sparkling and sporting itself over its rocky 
bed, further on, the high, precipitous banks, the beautifully 
rounded hills, crowned with their thrifty farm houses, and the 
vision is finally bounded by the lofty circling range of hills 
which rise, amphitheatre like, in the north and west. 

The railroad bridge, half a mile from its terminus, is "one 
of the greatest works of art in New Hampshire, spanning the 
long distance from bluff to bluff, high above the swift waters 
of the Souhegan." The bridge is about 600 feet in length, 
and, where it crosses the stream, about 100 feet in height. 
The ends rest on abutments of stone, while at equal distances 
between rise two piers of solid stone masonry, to a giddy 
height, supporting the latticed framework on which the rails 
are laid. The height of the highest pier is about 80 feet. 
It rests on piles driven into the sand and gravel in the bed of 
the river. The western abutment has a similar foundation. 
The other abutment and pier rest on the ledge. The whole 
cost of this bridge was about $20,000. 

Although the expense of building this road was a burden 
that fell heavily upon most of the stockholders, it proving, so 
far as any returns or dividends were concerned, a total loss, 
yet it is undoubtedly of great benefit to the community, in 
the certainty, ease and rapidity of communication which it 
affords, and diminution of expense, in which the saving of 
time is no inconsiderable item. Forty years ago, a traveler, 
leaving Boston for Mason, must take a seat in the mail stage 



THE RAILROAD. 24T 

coach at one of the clock in the morning, and after a •weary- 
ride would arrive at Wheeler's tavern on "the turnpike," at 
the line of Mason, near S. Wheeler Weston's, at from five to 
six of the clock in the afternoon, then to find his way on foot, 
or by some private conveyance, to his place of destination. 
Now, he can leave Boston at seven of the clock and arrive at 
Mason at ten of the clock in the forenoon, or leave at three 
and arrive at seven in the afternoon, at less than half the 
expense for fare, and no necessary expenditure on the waj. 
For more than fifty years after the settlement of the town 
"was commenced, the only market for farm produce was to be 
sought at Boston, or at Concord and Charlestown, on the way 
to Boston. The farmer would, at the close of his day's work, 
put dobbin into the stable and give him an extra feed, and be 
ready to start, long before day, for the market, with two boxes 
of butter, hung in panniers, one on each side, on the back of 
his steed, and, perhaps, quarters of veal, chickens, eggs, or 
other products of the farm or dairy. So, also, on the near 
approach of the great New England anniversary, thanksgiving 
day, many a farmer would load his ox cart with farm produce, 
and trudge on foot, by the side of his patient team, to the 
metropolis, to procure his annual supply of necessaries and 
luxuries, for the great feast, and for the approaching season 
of winter. Now, by reason of the increased facilities of trans- 
portation afforded by the railroad, and to the building up of 
manufacturing towns and villages, in the vicinity, the farmer 
need not leave his own premises to find a ready market at 
remunerating prices, for all the surplus produce of his farm. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

ECCLESIASTICAL AFFAIRS. 
THE CONGREGATIONAL CHUBCH. 

The records of this cliurcli commence October 13, 1772. 
The first entry in the book, is as follows : 

A CHURCH COVENANT, 

Consented and subscribed to by the brethren, on ^^ 13th of October, 
1772, when they were, by advice of council, embodied into a dis- 
tinct Chh. Society. 

We, whose names are hereto subscribed, apprehending ourselves 
called of God, (for the advancing of his Son's kingdom, and edifying 
ourselves and posterity,) to combine and embody ourselves into a dis- 
tinct Chh. Society: and being for that end orderly dismissed from 
the Churches to which we heretofore belonged, do (as we hope), with 
some measure of seriousness and sincerity, take upon us the follow- 
ing profession and covenant, viz : 

As to matters of faith, we cordially adhere to the principles of 
Religion (at least the substance of them) contained in the shorter 
catechism of the Assembly of Divines, wherewith also the New Eng- 
land Confession harmonizeth : not as supposing, that there is any 
authority, much less any infallibility in these human creeds or forms, 
but yet verily believing that these principles are drawn from and 
agreeable to the scriptures, which is the fountain and standard of 
truth. 

And we moreover adhere to these principles in the Calvinistical, 
which we take to be the genuine, or natural sense, hereby declaring 
our utter dislike of the Arminian Principles, vulgarly so called. 

In firm belief of the above-mentioned doctrines, from an earnest 
desire that we and ours may receive the love of them and be saved, 
and with the hope that what we are now doing, may be the means of 
so great an happiness, we do now, (under a sense of our utter unwor- 
Ihiness of the honor and privileges of God's covenant people,) in the 
most solemn and yet free and cheerful manner, give up ourselves and 
offspring to God the Father, to the Son the Mediator, and the Holy 



Ecclesiastical affairs. 249 

Ghost the Instructor, the Sanctifier and Comforter, to be henceforth 
the people and servants of this God, to believe in all his revelations, 
to accept of his method of redemption, to obey all his commands and 
to keep all his ordinances, to look to and depend upon him to do all 
for and work all in us, especially relating to our eternal salvation, 
being sensible that of ourselves we can do nothing. And it is our 
purpose and resolution (by divine assistance,) to discharge the duties 
of christian love and brotherly watchfulness towards each other; to 
train up our children in the nurture and admonition of the Lord; to 
join together in setting up and maintaining the public worship of 
God among us ; carefully and joyfully to attend upon Christ's sacra- 
ments and institutions; to yield all proper obedience and submission 
to him or them that shall, from time to time, in an orderly manner, 
be made overseers of the flock ; to submit to all the regular adminis- 
trations and censures of the church, and contribute all in our power 
to the regularity and peaceableness of these administrations. 

And respecting church discipline, it is our purpose to adhere to 
the methods contained in our excellent platform, so called, for the 
substance of it, as thinking it a rule, the nearest the scriptures and 
most probable to promote and maintain purity, order and peace of 
any. And we earnestly pray, that God would be pleased to smile upon 
this undertaking for his glory, that whilst we thus subscribe with our 
hand to the Lord, and surname ourselves by the name of Israel, we 
may, through grace given us, live as become Israelites indeed, in 
whom there is no guile; that our hearts may be right with God and 
we steadfast in his covenant ; that we who are now combining in a 
new church of Jesus Christ, may, by the purity of our faith and 
morals, become one of those golden candlesticks, among whom the 
Son of God, in way of favor and protection will condescend to walk, 
and that every member of it, through imputed righteousness and in- 
herent grace, may be hereafter found among that happy multitude 
whom the glorious head of the church, the heavenly brideoroom, 
shall present to himself a glorious church, not having spot or wrin- 
kle, or any such thing. 

N. B. By the expression in the above covenant, "for the sub- 
stance of it," we intend and promise this, to govern ourselves by the 
platform so far as that agrees with the only perfect rule, the word of 
God. 

Signed, JONATHAN SEARLE, OBADIAH PARKER, 

ENOSH LAWRENCE, NATHAN COBURN, 

NATHAN HALL, JOSIAH WHEELER, 

JOHN ELIOT, SAMUEL SMITH, 

JASON DUNSTEK, JOSHUA DAVIS, 

AMOS DAKIN, WILLIAM ELIOT. 

The above-mentioned brethren, after having signed the cov- 
enant, and the council expressed their sentiments, that they 
are now a visible, distinct church, regularly and scripturally 
embodied; the church then unanimously Voted, To receive 



250 HISTORY OF MASON. 

the hereafter-mentioned sisters as standing in full church 
membership with them, viz : 

SARAH, wife of ENOSH LAWRENCE. LrCY, wife of JOSIAH WllEELER. 

MARY, " NATHAN HALL. ELIZABETH, " SAMUEL SMITH. 

SARAH, " JOHN ELIOT. DOROTHY, " JOSHUA DAYIS. 

REBECCA, « JASON DUNSTER. ELIZABETH, " JONA. WINSHIP. 
SARAH, " AMOS DAKIN. 

The proceedings of the town and church, in the call and 
ordination of Mr. Jonathan Searle, the first minister of the 
Congregational Church in Mason, and his answer to and 
acceptance of the call, being found in the town records, are 
inserted in the Municipal History. See pages 66 to 68. He 
was ordained October 13, 1772, He was dismissed by the 
church May 4, 1781, and the town concurred in the action of 
the church, at the meeting August 14, 1781. The details 
respecting his ordination, his salary, &c., have already ap- 
peared in the Municipal History of the town. 

The Rev. Ebenezer Hill, the second minister of this church, 
was ordained, November 3, 1790. His pastoral relation to 
the church continued until liis decease, which took place May 
20, 1854. He was, at his own request, released from his 
contract as minister of the town, December 19, 1835. For 
the proceedings of the church and town and of the council, in 
the call and ordination of Mr. Hill, see Municipal History, 
pages 114 to 119. 

In June, 1830, a religious society was, under the statute of 
July 3, 1827, organized, in connection with the church, and 
occupied the old meeting house, until November, 1837, when, 
having built a new house of worship for themselves, they 
removed to it and have occupied it to the present time. 

The Rev. Andrew Reed was installed November 23, 1836, 
as colleague pastor. He remained in office till December 11, 
1839, when he was, at his own request, dismissed, and Mr. 
Hill resumed the sole charge of the church and society, in 
which he continued until October 20, 1841, when his son, the 
Rev. Joseph B. Hill, was settled with him as colleague pastor. 



ECCLESIASTICAL AFFAIRS. 



251 




NEW MEETING HOUSE. FIRST OCCUPIED NOVEMBER, 1837. 

He commenced preaching for tlie church and society, August 
1, 1840, and continued till the date of his installation, to 
preach as a candidate. During this time, a season of revival 
was enjoyed by the church, the result of which was the addi- 
tion of 83 members by profession to the church in the year 
1841. He remained in office until April 22, 1847, when he 
was, at his own request, dismissed. After this time, the 
church was supplied, about two years, by the Rev. Mr. Har- 
rington, of Lunenburg, Mass. He did not come to reside at 
Mason, but made his home in Lunenburg. 

On the 30th of October, 1850, the Rev. Josiah L. Armes, 
was installed colleague pastor. He was, at his own request, 
dismissed, May 13, 1857, and immediately after, the Rev. 
D. Goodwin was employed by the church, as their preacher. 



NAMES OF MEMBEES ADMITTED, FEOM OCTOBER 13, 1772 TO JANUARY 1, 1800, AND 
THE NUMBER OF THOSE ADMITTED, EACH YEAR, FROM 1800 TO 1843. 

Note. In this table, the letter w. signifies wife, and 1. by letter. 

1772. Clark Erown, of Raby. 

1773. Elias Eliot, Hannah, \v. of Rev. Jonathan Searle, Sarah, w. of Lemuel 

Spaulding, L from Pepiierell, Elizabeth, \v. of Nathaniel Hosmer, 1. 
from Concord, Rnth, ■«-. of Abel Shed, 1. from Lancaster, Mary, w. 
of Oliver Eliot, Edmund Tarbell and Mary his yr,, Oliver Eliot. 



252 HISTORY OF MASON. 

1774. Sarali, w. of Simon Ames, 1. from Woburn, Samuel Brown, 1. from 
Hollos, Ilubbcrt Eussell, and John lluBsell and liuhamsib his w., 1. 
from West Cambridge, Sarah, ^v. of Ilubbcrt Kussell, 1. from Weston. 

1776. Thankful, w. of John Whitaker, Sarah, \v. of John Tarbell, Dorothy, 

w. of William Eliot, Ebenezer Blood and Sarah his w., Eleanor, w. 
of Nathan Hall, Jr. 

1777. Jonathan Winship. 

1783. Jonathan Chandler, 1. from Grafton. 

During Mr. Searle's ministry, the following persons were 
admitted "to own the covenant": 

Joseph Barrett and Sarah his w., Christopher, a negro man, (and baptized,) 
David Ilodgman and w., Ebenezer !Muzzj' and w. (of llaby), Timothy AVheeler 
and w., Jonas Fay and w., and Daniel Fay and "w. 

According to the doctrines of the Congregational churches, 
the children of "believers" only, were admitted to baptism, 
and, by a strict construction, the privilege of bringing their 
children to baptism belonged only to members of the church 
in full communion. Many serious minded persons were not 
prepared to unite with the church, in its communion, but still 
were desirous to have their children baptized. Hence, a cus- 
tom grew up, and was for many years extensively practiced, 
to admit such persons "to own the covenant," that is, to 
acknowledge, in their own persons, the duties and obligations 
of the covenant, although they did not fully assume and 
promise to observe its requirements. Having so done, they 
were considered as a sort of quasi or half-way members of the 
church, and were permitted to receive baptism for themselves 
and to bring their children to baptism. This custom proba- 
bly owes its origin, in part, to the old colonial regulations 
of Massachusetts, which restricted the right of voting in all 
elections to the members of the churches. On the commence- 
ment of Mr. Hill's ministry the practice was discontinued. 

Under Mr. Hill's pastorship, the following admissions are 
recorded : 

1790. Jonathan Bachelder and wife, 1. from Reading, Hinksman Warren and 

Av. and Joseph "Woods and w., 1. from Townsend, Benjamin Knowl- 
ton, Abel Adams and w., Timothy Dakin and w. and Lydia, w. of 
Edward Wilson, Jr., 1. from New Ipswich, John Winship and w. and 
Elizabeth, w. of Jotham Webber, 1. from West Cambridge, William 
Chambers and wife, 1. from Lexington, Ebenezer Hill, 1. from Kludge. 

1791. Mary, w. of Amos Dakin, Jr., 1. from New Ipswich, Ebeirezer Shattuck 

and w., and Anna, w. of William Hosmer. 



ECCLESIASTICAL AFFAIRS. 



253 



1792. John Russell, Jr., , w. of Reuben Kendall, Roger Weston. 

1793. Anna, w. of Jonathan Williams, 1. from Wilton. 

1794. Samuel Hill, 1. from Williamsburgh, Elizabeth, w. of Reuben Hosmer, 

1. from Acton. 

1795. Elijah Davis, 1. from New Ipswich. 

1796. Noah Wmship and his w., Sarah Brown, of Raby. 



Year. 


By Profession. 


By Letter. 


Year. 


By Profession. 


By Letter. 


Year. 
1834 


By Profession. 


By Letter. 


1800 


4 




1814 


3 


i 


12 


2 


1801 


7 


1 


1815 




1 1 


ll83o 


20 


3 


1802 


41 


3 


11816 


4 




1836 


5 


1 


1803 


1 




1817 


2 




1837 


6 


4 


1804 




3 


1819 




1 


1838 


14 


2 


1805 




1 


1820 


8 


1 


1839 




1 


1806 




1 


1822 


1 




1840 




1 


1807 


2 




182C 


62 


3 


184! 


83 


9 


1808 




1 


1827 


17 




1842 


7 


3 


1809 


1 




1828 


3 


1 


1843 


4 


2 


1810 


1 




1831 


21 




1844 




3 


1812 


25 




1832 


2 


1 


1846 




2 


1813! 4 




1833 


4 


1 


1848 




2 



DEACONS. 



Nathan Hall, chosen Dec. 29, 1774. 



Amos Dakin, 
Timothy Dakin, 
Rogers Weston, 
Noah Winship, 
H. Richardson, Jr. 
Isaac Kimball, 



Dec. 29, 1774. 
March 7, 1791. 
Aug. 18, 1794. 
Nov. 1, 1805. 
April 29, 1814. 
July — , 1827. 



Nathan Wood, chosen Jan. 7, 1828. 



Franklin ilerriam, " 
Simeon Cragin, " 
Oliver H. Pratt, " 
Saml.Withington, " 
Amos H. Hosmer, " 



1837. 

1837. 
Aug. 27, 1847. 
Aug. 27, 1847. 

1855. 



Mr. Scarlc and Mr. Hill carefully recorded all baptisms, 
but it is not thought expedient to publish the list. 

THE BAPTIST CHURCH. 

The first religious institutions of the town were of the Con- 
o-regational form and order, and there seems to have been no 

DO / 

disagreement among the proprietors or among the inhabit- 
ants, on this point, until after the dismissal of Mr. Searle. 
The first intimation of the dissenting views, was on the occa- 
sion of the call to Mr. True Kimball, in 1782. At the meet- 
ing called for that purpose, the vote of the town was unani- 
mous to give Mr. Kimball a call. The town also voted to 
give him a settlement of £180, and a yearly salary of X66 
13s. 4d. Against these votes "William Eliot and Abijah 
Allen dissented in the face of the meeting," for reasons 
which are stated in the Municipal History, page 103. In this 
protest, and in the vote to excuse William Dodge and Abijah 
Allen from paying taxes, found on the same page, are, un- 
33 



254 HISTORY OF MASON. 

doubtcdly, to be discerned the first gcrins of the Baptist 
Church in Mason. 

The records of the church commence as follows : 

THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE BAPTIST CHURCH OF CHRIST IN MASON. 

On the 28th day of September, 1786, sd chh was Irabodied. As- 
sistance from the chh of Christ at Clielmsford, by their pastor, Abia- 
thcr Crossman, and two brethren, viz : Dea. OHver Prescott and 
Brother Thomas Hutcliius. Likewise from the church at Temple, 
by two brethren, viz : Dea" John Averett [Everett] and Nathaniel 
BaU. Those that Imbodied were, (males,) Ezra Mansfield, William 
Eliot and Jonathan Chandler, (females,) Sarah Blood, Anna Law- 
rence, Hannah Cliandler, Sarah Blood ^ 2d, and Molly Ball. 

There were added, October 26, by dismission from the church in 
Chelmsford, Brs. Joseph Bullard and Aaron Wheeler, and four sisters 
likewise were added, viz : the widow Sarah Eliot, Sarah Tarbell, 
Rebecca Mansfield and Rebecca Hildreth. 

1787. March 8. The confession of the chh at Chelmsford, with 
some amendments, was adopted. Br. Bullard was chosen to serve 
the table. 

June 24. Added by baptism, William Mansur and Willard Law- 
rence, Sarah Davis, Sarah Bullard, Elizabeth Perry and Elizabeth 
Austin. 

Several of these persons were among the original members 
of Mr. Searle's church. 

1788. Aug. At a meeting, voted unanimously, that Br. Wm, 
Eliot be set apart as an Evangelist, and that we call for assistance 
from our sister chhs in the ordination of said Br. Voted to send for 
council and help to the Baptist chhs at Salem, Chelmsford, Temple 
and Cambridge. The third Wednesday in Oct. was appointed the 
time. At a subsequent meeting, the chh at Newton was added. At 
a subsequent meeting, [no date] Voted to give Br. Eliot a call to 
settle with us in the gospel ministry, and to continue with us so long 
as it shall appear it is for the glory of God and our mutual advantage. 
To which he gave his consent, and was ordained on^^ third Wednes- 
day of October, 1788, by the following council : 

In consequence of letters missive from the Baptist chh in Mason, 
to the Baptist church in Cambridge, the Baptist church in Newton, 
the Baptist church in Chelmsford, the Baptist church in New Salem, 
the Baptist church in Temple, for the purpose of setting apart Mr. 
Wm. Eliot to the office of pastor in said chh in Mason. 

First. Elder Thomas Green opened the business by prayer. 2. 
Chose Klder Thomas Green Moderator of the council. 3. Chose 
Elder Joseph Grafton Clerk of council. 

Present : 
From the chh in Cambridge — Elder Thomas Green, Dea. Thaddeus 

Davis, Dea. Daniel Brooks. 



ECCLESIASTICAL AFFAIRS. 255 

From the chh in Chelmsford — Elder Abisha Grossman, Thomas 

Hutchins, Samuel Taylor. 
From the chh in New Salem — Elder Samuel Fletcher. 
From the chh in Temple — Elder John Peckens, Dea. John Everett, 

Ebenezer Drury. 
From the chh in Newton — Elder Joseph Grafton, Nathan Dana. 

The council enquired of the church if they still desired Br. Eliot 
to settle with them in the ministry. To which they answered in the 

affirmative. 

* * * * * * * * « 

The council enquired of Mr. Eliot if he accepts the call of the 
chh. Answered in the affirmative. 

Mr. Eliot was called upon to give an account of his Ghristian 
experience and his teachings to preach, with which the council voted 
they were satislied. 

The council examined the chh respecting their Ideas of supporting 
the minister. It appears, by a vote of the chh, that they held it their 
duty to support by the rule of equality. 

Voted, upon the whole, that the council are unanimous in proceed- 
ing to the ordination of Mr. Wm. Eliot. 

Voted, that Elder Peckens make the introductory prayer. That 
Elder Green preach the sermon. That Elder Grossman Pray at the 
imposition of hands. That Elder Fletcher give the charge. That 
Elder Grafton give the right hand of fellowship, and make the con-' 
concluding prayer. 

As the chh, in their letters to the chhs, desired assistance [in] set- 
ting apart one of their brethren as a Deacon in the chh. Voted, that 
there is a propriety in their request, and [we] are satisfied with the 
conduct of the chh respecting this affair. 

Voted, that the council, after examining the character and abilities 
of Mr. Ezra Mansfield, as Deacon, they are free to ordain him as 
such. 

Voted, That the council proceed to set apart Brother Ezra Mans* 
field to the office of Deacon, in- the following manner : 

First — Prayer with imposition of hands, with a charge and right 
hand of fellowship. 

Voted, that Elder Peckens pray at the imposition of hands at the 
ordination of the Deacon. That Elder Green give the charge, and 
Elder Grossman give the right hand of fellowship. 

Voted, that the council adjourn till after divine service. 

The council met according to adjournment. Voted, to dissolve 
the council. (Signed,) Tnos. Green, Moderator. 

Joseph Grafton, Clerk. 

1788. Sept, Rachel Chandler was received, being baptized 
before. 

In 1790, the additions were 2 ; in 1791, 11 ; in 1792, 6 ; in 
1794, 1; in 1795,3; in 1796, 1; in 1799, 1; in 1800,4; in 
1801, 34; in 1802, 15; in 1803, 9; in 1804, 6; in 1805, 3; 



256 HISTORY OF MASON. 

of these numbers, 56 are judged to have ])ecn inhabitants of 
other towns. 

The whole number of members reported in 1805, was 98; 
in 1806, 101: in 1807, 106; in 1808, 105; in 1809, 79; in 
1810,87; in 1811, 92; in 1812, 94; in 1813,93; in 1814, 92; 
in 1815, 73; in 1816, 74. In no other years, is the whole 
number of members entered. During these years, this church 
embraced members residing in New Ipswich, Temple, Wilton, 
Milford, Lyndeborough, Brookline, Hollis, Dunstable, Towns- 
end, Society Land, and perhaps other towns. In 1809, the 
Milford church was organized, which reduced the number from 
105 to 79. In 1815, the list was revised and corrected, and 
the number reduced from 92 to 73. 

The peace of this church seems to have been but little dis- 
turbed by cases of discipline, but it was not wholly free from 
such trials. Brother Aaron Wheeler thought he had a call to 
preach, and ''The church agreed to hear Br. Wheeler's gift 
till we have gained satisfaction respecting his call to preach." 
His "gift" seems not to have approved itself to the brethren, 
for, presently after, it is recorded that " The church called 
upon Brother Wheeler and Brother Chandler to give in their 
reasons for withdrawing from the chh at the Lord's Table, 
and not fellowshiping the chh, and setting up a meeting by 
themselves." They gave their reasons as follows: "1st. Be- 
cause the^-e is not a oneness in the chh. 2d. Because the chh 
don't hold to that liberty in improving of gifts in the chh that 
they agreed to when they Imbodyed." The church took these 
reasons into consideration, and voted that they were not suffi- 
cient to justify them in their conduct. The aggrieved breth- 
ren, at an adjourned meeting, set forth the reasons of their 
withdrawal more fully and specifically, the principal one of 
which was, the "not allowing the improvement of Brother 
Wheeler's gift." The church voted that these reasons, thus 
newly assigned and set forth, were not sufiicient. The matter 
was, in some way, adjusted; how, the record does not show. 
The date of these disturbances was 1787. In 1789, Brother 



ECCLESIASTICAL AFFAIES. 257 

Chandler received a letter of dismission to the church in 
Stoddard. Brother Wheeler subsequently withdrew from the 
meetings of this society, and, for many years previous to his 
death, was a constant attendant on the meetings of Mr. Hill's 
society. He kept up a careful watch against any departure 
from orthodox doctrines. 

Under the ministration and watch and care of their worthy 
elder, this church enjoyed a long season of peace and prosper- 
ity, their numbers gradually increasing, until, in process of 
time, assuming the office and duties of a mother church, they 
established, from members of their own body, new and inde- 
pendent churches in the neighboring towns, all of which con- 
tinued to be, in some measure, under the watch and care of 
the venerable Elder Eliot so long as he was able^ to journey 
from place to place, and exercise his ministry among them. 

In 1802, it was "Voted, That Dea. Webber, Br. John 
Adams and Br. Dakin be a committee to admonish those bap- 
tized persons who have joined Mr. Hill's chh, and report to 
the chh." 

In 1803, "Voted, unanimously, against bearing arms and 
taking oaths, and to communicate these sentiments to the 
association." 

The place of worship of this society was, at first, the school 
house near the residence of their elder. Afterwards, a house 
for worship was erected about one fourth of a mile on the 
north of the Congregational meeting house. It was a one 
story building, but it was never finished, inside or out. It 
was built principally by individuals, with some aid from the 
society. There is no entry in the church records of the pro- 
ceedings in the building of this house, but there is a vote 
recorded, November 9, 1812, the house having been sold, 
directing "that the money for the old meeting house be dis- 
tributed among those that built the house," and on the 10th 
of June, 1817, it was "Voted, That Dea. Webber give a deed 
to Joshua Blood of the meeting house lot." The house was 
taken down about the year 1812, after which the society 



258 HISTORY OP MASON. 

continued their meetings at the school house until the brick 
house was erected in the village, in the year 1827, after 
which, but, it is supposed, under a new organization, that 
house became and continued the place of worship of the 
church and Society. 

Dca. Jotham Webber and Dea. AndrcAV Elliot served in the 
office of deacon in this church for many years, and each until 
his death. Dea. Joseph Saunders was elected to the office of 
deacon, and served as such for several years. Benjamin Rob- 
inson was afterwards set apart to fill that office, by the 
church. 

In 1827, the brick meeting house was built in the village, 
and a new Baptist church was organized in 1828. At this 
time, Eld. Eliot was so burdened with the infirmities of age as 
to be, in a great measure, cut off from active duties. He died 
June 4, 1830. After his decease, this church kept up its organ- 
ization for some years, but most of its members having united 
witli the new church organized at the village, it soon ceased to 
hold public meetings for worship, and its existence may, per- 
haps, be considered as merged in that of the new church. 

THE VILLAGE fiAPTIST CHURCH. 

The original Baptist Church in Mason, being, for many 
years, composed of members, many of whom resided in ad- 
joining and some in more distant towns, found no inconven- 
ience in holding their meetings at their place of worship near 
the residence of the elder, or at their meeting house near the 
centre of the town, but as from time to time churches were 
formed in the adjoining towns, leaving most of the members 
remaining in this church resident in town, and as the popu- 
lation, business and importance of the village were, from year 
to year, advancing, and yet in it there was no place of wor- 
ship, of any denomination, it was found to be in accordance 
with the views of a majority of the church to remove their 
place of worship to that locality. Accordingly, measures 
were taken to insure the erection of a meeting house for this 
church, which was so far completed in 1827 as to be ready to 



ECCLESIASTICAL AFFAIRS. 



259 



be occupied. In 1828, a new Baptist church was constituted 
at the village, consisting of 24 members — ten brethren and 
14 sisters. The pastors' names, time of commencement and 
close of the labors and the additions to the church during the 
term of each, are as follows : 

NAMES OF PASTORS, TIME OF COMMENCEMENT, AND CLOSE OF THEIR LABORS, AND 
THE ADDITIONS TO THE CHURCH, FROM 1828 TO 1858. 



Names of Pastors. 


Time of commencement. 


Close of labors. 


Ad 
14 


Rev. Bela "Wilcox, 


December 24, 1828, 


March 4, 1831, 


" John Woodbury, 


June 19, 1831, 


November 19, 1833, 


54 


" Joel Wheeler, 


January 24, 1834, (or- 








dained June 11,1834) 


January 10, 1835, 


21 


" Benjamin Knight, 


June 16, 1835. 


September 18, 1836, 


1 


" Alfred L. Mason, 


Ord. Nov. 27, 1836, 


Died October 7, 1844, 


73 


«< D. F. Richardson, 


June 21, 184.5, 


April 1, 1848, 


16 


" John Woodbury, 


April 23, 1848, 


April 21, 1849, 


5 


" Isaac Woodbury, 


April 25, 1849, 


December 31, 1850, 


21 


" Daniel P. French, 


January 5, 1851, 


January 18, 1852, 


10 


« A. II. House, 


AprU 18, 1852, 


June 19, 1854, 


13 


«< Geo. W. Cutting, 


May 8, 1855, 







Mr. Cutting remains pastor to this time. A manufacturing 
is much more fluctuating than an agricultural population, and, 
in consequence of that fact, the present number of members 
of the church is much less than would be indicated by the 
additions above reported. No list of removals that can be 
relied on as accurate, has been kept, so that it has not been 
possible, from time to time, to state, in this account, the 
actual number of members. It is, however, stated by the 
pastor to be 63, in March, 1858. The church edifice is a well 
built structure of brick. It was thoroughly repaired in 1854, 
at an expense of about $900, and is now made commodious 
and perfectly comfortable for all seasons of the year. This 
church adopted, at an early date, the resolution to pay their 
minister his salary quarterly, and have adhered to this plan 
with honest punctuality. It is now in a state of prosperity; 
its members are united in christian fellowship and effort, and 
looking for richer displays of the power and grace of God in 
their increased spirituality and enlargement. 

The deacons of this church are : Abel Adams, chosen in 
1830; Amos Elliot, chosen December 4, 1830, dismissed at 



2 GO HISTORY OF MASON. 

liis own request January 9, 1835; Jonas Adams, chosen No- 
vember 5, 1831 ; James Barrett, chosen September 2, 1833, 
dismissed on his removal from town April, 1835; Adams B. 
"Winn, chosen March 6, 1840, died May 31, 1842; Samuel 
Hartshorn and Calvin Boynton, chosen January 17, 1843. 
Dea. Boynton was dismissed from the church, July 15, 1855. 
Deacons Abel Adams, Jonas Adams and Samuel Hartshorn 
remain in office. 

THE SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 

The place of meeting for the public worship of the Con- 
gregational church, was first established at the centre of the 
town, and notwithstanding the business and population of the 
village had increased at a much greater ratio than that of the 
other parts of the town, the Sabbath ministrations of that 
church and society had continued to be held at the meeting 
house at that place until 1847. At a public meeting held at 
the village, February 1, 1847, a resolution was offered, and, 
after a full discussion, adopted, "that the time has come, 
when the spiritual interests of this community and the cause 
of religion require that a Congregational church be estab- 
lished at this place." The reasons justifying and requir- 
ing this step were, the large numbers of the Congregational 
church, who would be better accommodated at the village than 
at the centre. In furtherance of these proceedings, measures 
were taken to call an ecclesiastical council, which was con- 
vened June 3, 1847, and in pursuance of the advice of this 
council, a new church, composed of eight members, was organ- 
ized, under the name of the "Second Congregational Church 
of Mason." On the 20th of June, 1847, 58 members were 
received by letters of dismission from the old church. 

On the 11th of April, 1849, the Rev. William Olmstead, 
was ordained pastor of this church. His labors were blessed 
in the conversion of souls to Christ. During the winter pre- 
vious to his ordination, a season of religious interest was 
enjoyed, which continued into the summer following, the fruits 
of which were the addition of 33 members by profession. 



ECCLESIASTICAL AFFAIES. 261 

Thirteen were added also by letter. The early death of their 
young pastor, was deeply felt by this church, and by many 
others in the community. By it, each member of the congre- 
gation lost a personal friend, and the church a spiritual and 
devoted pastor. He died while on a visit to his friends in 
Connecticut, so suddenly that the news of his illness pre- 
ceded that of his death but a few hours. It was his dying 
request that his mortal remains should rest in the cemetery, 
into which his congregation would, in God's due time, be 
gathered, with them to rest till the final resurrection, and his 
dying wishes were complied with, and there he was buried. 

His successor in office was the Rev. E. M. Kellogg, installed 
May 20, 1852, and on account of ill health, dismissed at his 
request, December 26, 1855. The Eev. Samuel J. Austin 
was ordained pastor of the church February 25, 1857. 

On the 9th of September, 1847, Simeon Cragin, Stephen 
Smith, Nathan Wood and Franklin Merriam were elected 
deacons of this church. Deacons Merriam and Wood soon 
after removed from town. Deacon Smith died in 1857, and 
Merrill C. Dodge was elected to fill the vacancy. 

The society occupied a commodious hall in Dea. Cragin's 
house, until accommodated with a house of their own. A 
house of worship was erected, by individual subscriptions, for 
this church and society ; and was dedicated to the Triune God 
on Sabbath, December 16, 1849; sermon by the pastor, the 
Rev. Mr. Olmstead. The building is of wood, 70 by 43 feet. 
It contains 64 slips, and in all about 400 sittings. The cost 
was between $4000 and $5000. Four sons of Dea. Cragin, 
on the completion of the house, presented to the society an 
excellent church bell. The basement is finished into an 
ample vestry. 

The salary of the two first pastors, payable quarterly, was 
$600 a year; that of the present pastor is $700. 

Owing to the fluctuating nature of the population of a man- 
ufacturing village, the burthen of supporting religious institu- 
tions falls, in a great measure, upon a few, but it is to the 
34 



262 HISTORY OF MASON. 

credit and praise of this society, that all its en,ffagcments have 
been promptly met, notwithstanding the severe losses of many 
of its members by the railroad and by the depression of 
business. 

TEE CHRISTIAN CHURCH. 

This church, in Mason, had its origin in the following man- 
ner : Some few brethren, who were not united with any 
denomination, were desirous of hearing preaching from some 
ministers of the Christian faith, to learn what were their 
views of bible doctrine. Accordingly, an invitation was given 
to some ministers in Boston and other places, to make them a 
visit, and permission was given, by the selectmen of the town, 
to hold a meeting at the old meeting house, when the people 
came together and heard them gladly. This was in or about 
1831. In 1832, Elder Henry Plummer visited them, and 
preached in different parts of the town, in school houses, 
where he had an opportunity, but mostly in the northeast part 
of the town, where there was a good interest in religion, and 
the largest portion of believers. On the 15th of July of that 
year. Elder Plummer baptized three individuals, viz : Doctor 
Willis Johnson, William Wright and John Peabody. The 
first two named are still living, and members of the church. 
September 23, seven others, two males and five females, were 
baptized by Elder Plummer. November 4, eight others, two 
males and six females, were baptized. 

There were baptized on the 7th of April, 1833, three indi- 
viduals, and May 19, one, making in all, twenty two. On the 
23d of May, a meeting was attended by several ministers, 
among whom were E. Shaw, J. C. Blodget and H. Plummer, 
at which time the church was organized, composed of the 
twenty two above mentioned baptized persons, who unani- 
mously agreed to acknowledge Jesus Christ as their Head 
and Leader, and the New Testament as their rule of faith 
and practice, and to acknowledge no name but that of 
" Christian." Of the twenty two who composed the number 
at the organization, ten are still living, and members of the 



ECCLESIASTICAL AFFAIRS. 263 

church. William Wright was chosen the first deacon, and 
David Blood, clerk. During the year, nine other individuals 
were received into fellowship, eight of them by baptism. 

In 1834, twenty nine were added to the church by baptism, 
and one by letter, who afterwards became a minister. One 
young lady was baptized June 1, and deceased July 18, of 
this year. 






THE CKMSTIAN CHAPEL, ERECTED U 1815. 



In 1835, thirteen were added to their numbers, who were 
baptized by different ministers, who visited the place and 
preached to the church and people. 

Only five were added to the church during the year 1836, 
three by baptism and two by letter. Elder Plummer, though 
not living in the town, had been the pastor np to this time. 

In 1837, Elder A. G. Comings became the pastor, and the 
church was still in a prosperous condition, but one member 
out of eighty one, up to this time, had been excluded. From 
August 6 to December 31, the ordinance of baptism Avas ad- 
ministered, seven times, and twenty were added to the church. 
On the 4th of October, Mr. Joseph Elliott, a member of the 
church, was ordained to the work of the ministry, by recom- 
mendation of the church and ministry. 



264 HISTORY OF MASON. 

During the year 1838, but few were added, and some trials 
were endured, and labor was engaged in to enforce good disci- 
pline. One member received the approbation of the church 
to labor in public as a minister of the gospel. 

In the two succeeding years, Eld. C. W. Martin had the pas- 
toral care, and thirteen were added, eight of them by baptism. 
Some trials were also endured. From 1841 to 1843, inclu- 
sive, Eld. H. Burnham had the care of the church, and during 
his ministry, over sixty were added to the church, fifty two by 
baptism, but many of these soon fell away, and were of no 
permanent benefit to the church. 

The church had now existed ten years, and were in an unu- 
sually prosperous state, with but little labor required to 
enforce good discipline. About one hundred and eighty per- 
sons had been members of the church. From this time the 
church passed through a series of trials, and for a number of 
years no additions were made, but, on the contrary, a number 
were dismissed, by their own request, to unite with other 
churches, and some withdrew under the excitement of 1844, 
to "get out of Babylon," and some were excluded. During 
this season of declension. Eld. J. Goodwin, Jr., labored with 
the church two years, after which they were supplied with 
preaching, without any regular pastor, by several ministers, 
until 1849, when Eld. A. G. Comings again took the pastoral 
charge, and remained nearly six years. But the trials did not 
cease when the pastor was settled over them, and but few 
were added to the church. 

In 1854, Eld. L. Phillips became the pastor, but remained 
only one year, during which time nine persons were added to 
the church. In this year, the society purchased a neat and 
convenient parsonage, for the minister. The house is situ- 
ated within about thirty rods of the chapel. 

In the spring of 1855, Eld. J. F. Whitney took the pastoral 
care of the church, and labored with them until the autumn of 
1857, when he closed his pastoral relation with it. During 
his pastorate, ten were added to the church by baptism. 



ECCLESIASTICAL AFFAIRS. 265 

In December, 1857, Eld. W. H. Nason became the pastor, 
by the request of the church, and is now pleasantly situated 
with them, as their spiritual leader under Christ. 

This church has now existed over twenty four years, and 
has maintained the worship of God the greater part of the 
time, by sustaining preaching, and other meetings of worship. 
It has had eight pastors, including the present one. There 
have been two hundred and twelve members in all, who have 
united with the church, sixty six males and one hundred and 
forty six females. One hundred and six persons now remain 
members, twenty four males and eighty two females. 

There is no other church of the same denomination within 
thirty five miles of Mason, and it seems rather strange that 
there should have been one here, isolated as they are from 
the body of the denomination, and yet maintaining all the 
distinctive features of the body as to doctrine and practice. 
And amidst all the severe trials through which they have 
passed, they have clung to that word which, at the beginning 
of their history, they took for their only rule of faith and 
practice, and the distinctive principles, which underlie the 
Christian structure, are still dear to the hearts of all its 
devoted members. 



CHAPTER IX. 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF NATIVES AND CITIZENS 

OF MASON. 

Dr. John Bachelder, son of John Bachelder and Mary 
Hartshorn, his wife, was born in Mason, March 23, 1818. He 
graduated at Dartmouth College, July, 1841, and commenced 
the practice of his profession at the village called Monument, 
in Sandwich, Mass., in 1844, and received his medical diploma 
from the Massachusetts Medical Society, January 29, 1845. 
He was married to Martha Swift Keene, of Sandwich, Sep- 
tember 30, 1846. 

Dr. William Barber, was born in Worcester, Mass., in 
1767. His father's dwelling was burnt, by accidental fire, 
when he was an infant, by which his life was exposed to immi- 
nent danger, from which he was saved by the courage and 
presence of mind of his elder sister, afterwards the wife of 
Mr. Josiah Flagg. He pursued his professional studies at 
Worcester, with Dr. Greene. He came to Mason in Novem- 
ber, 1790, and commenced the practice of physic and surgery, 
which he continued until disabled by the infirmities of age. 
He married (1) Mary Campbell, of Berlin, Conn. She died 
November 2, 1792. (2) Rachel Cutter, of New Ipswich, who 
suiwives him. He died July 11, 1852, aged 85 years. 

Capt. Joseph Barrett, was a descendant of Humphrey 
Barrett, who came from England, and settled in Concord, 
Mass., about 1640. He was born in Concord in 1745. His 
wife was Sarah [Brooks ?], born in Concord in 1751. She 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 267 

died March 29, 1794, aged 43 years. He came to Mason 
before the town was incorporated, and settled on the farm 
lately owned by his son Elisha Barrett, and now owned by 
his grandson, Elisha Brooks Barrett. He was a frugal, indus- 
trious farmer, and well esteemed by his fellow citizens. 
Their confidence in him is shown by the many important 
offices to which he was elected by their suffrages. He was 
town clerk fourteen years, first selectman fourteen years, 
second selectman one year, town treasurer twelve years, rep- 
resentative four years, and was frequently chosen a member 
of conventions, and on committees in public business. The 
records made by him as town clerk, fill the principal part of 
several volumes, made up in a very neat and uniform hand, 
but in the somewhat uncertain and wandering orthography of 
those days. He died December 30, 1831, aged 86 years. 

Key. Charles Emerson Blood, son of Eeuben Foster 
Blood and Relief Whiting, his wife, was born in Mason, 
March 1, 1810, joined the Congregational church at Rindge, 
in October, 1828, pursued his preparatory studies at Xew 
Ipswich Academy and in Jacksonville, 111., graduated at Illi- 
nois College in Jacksonville, in 1837, and at the Theological 
Seminary in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1840. He was ordained 
pastor of the Presbyterian chm-ch in Colliusville, 111., Novem- 
ber, 1840. He married Miss Mary B. Coffin, formerly of 
Wiscasset, Me. For three years previous to 1858, he has 
been and is now a home missionary in Kansas. He has 
organized a church of twenty eight members, of which he has 
the pastoral charge, at Manhatten, K. T., where he resides. 

Rev. Lorenzo Whiting Blood, brother of Charles E., 
born in Mason, April 13, 1812, pursued his studies prepara- 
tory for college at Wilbraham, Mass., graduated at the Wes- 
leyan University, Middletown, Conn. He was ordained a 
deacon of the Methodist Episcopal church, by Bishop Hed- 
ding, at Providence, R. I., June 13, 1841, and elder by the 
same, at Warren, R. I., June 11, 1843, and is (January, 1858,) 



268 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



a member of the Providence Conference, and stationed at 

West Killingly, Conn. 







RESIDENCE OF LOAMI CHAMBERLAIN. 

LoAMMi Chamberlain, son of Captain Isaac Chamberlain, 
was born at Chelmsford, Mass., June 6, 1791. At an early 
age, he gave evidence of a predilection for the mechanic arts, 
and was apprenticed to Salathiel Manning, a machinist of his 
native town, to learn that trade. Mr. Manning afterwards 
removed to New Ipswich, where Mr. Chamberlain graduated 
a "Master of Arts," in a noble sense, in 1812. 

Soon after, he took a contract for building the cards for 
the Mason Cotton Mill Company, doing the work at the shop 
of his late master, in New Ipswich. Having finished this 
engagement, he came to Mason village, and put the carding 
and spinning machinery into operation. For two or three 
years subsequently, he appears to have been engaged, much 
of the time, in setting up machinery and "starting on" mills, 
in New Ipswich, Milford, and various other places. 

About the year 1815, in company with Roger Chandler and 
Eleazer Rhoades, he bought a small mill in New Ipswich, near 




-Lift-liyl GrDzeiier.Boston. 



c:^'^-^47 



Cy 



ifc^^^A ^2^^ -^2 '^ /' t^ '^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 269 

the present residence of Col. Gibson, fitted it up, and for two 
or three years was concerned in manufacturing cotton yarn. 

In 1818, he bargained for water power of the Mason 
Cotton Mill Company, and built a machine shop, which is 
still standing. In 1821, Mr. Chamberlain made a contract 
with the Mason Cotton Mill Company, "to build, make and 
put in complete operation, sixteen power looms, equal, in 
every respect, to those in the Waltham Factory," and, if neces- 
sary, "to buy a loom of the Waltham Factory for a pattern, 
then the said company are to advance the money for the 
same," &c. About this period, he made a valuable improve- 
ment on the power looms then in use. This added greatly 
to his reputation as a machinist, and gave him employment in 
business from most of the adjoining states. For several 
years, he carried on, quite extensively, the manufacture of 
woolen and cotton machinery, machine tools, &c., employing, 
at times, thirty or forty workmen. In 1846, he sold his 
machine tools, and engaged wholly in other pursuits. For 
several years he carried on blacksmithing. 

About the year 1840, in company with Thomas Pierce, he 
fitted up the lower cotton mill, which had stood idle since 
the failure of the Mason Cotton Mill Company, and manu- 
factured, for a short time, satinets, and other woolen fabrics. 
About this time, also, he built a saw mill on the river, below 
the village, upon the new road leading to Wilton. For sev- 
eral years previous to his death, he was chiefly employed in 
superintending his saw mill and farm. 

Mr. Chamberlain possessed strong powers of observation, 
good inventive talent, and mechanical skill in a high degree. 
Among his apprentices, may be reckoned some of the best 
mechanics in the country. By his workmen he was generally 
beloved, and some were dismissed, when he closed his shop, 
who had become old in his employ. Few men have done 
more for the material prosperity of Mason village than Mr. 
Chamberlain. He never courted public distinction, but filled 
some offices in the town, with honor and ability. As a neigh- 
35 



2T0 



HISTORY OP MASON. 




BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 271 

bor and citizen, he was highly esteemed. He was eminently 
a domestic man, and it was in the bosom of his family and in 
the circle of his intimate friends, that his virtues were best 
known and his excellencies most fully appreciated. 

In 1821, he married Eliza S. Tucker, of Brookline, who is 
still living. His son and only child, James Langdon Cham- 
berlain, was born February 16, 1824, and married Mary A. 
Prescott, of Mason, February 16, 1854. He now carries on 
successfully the extensive business left by his father. 

Mr. Chamberlain was subject to periods of melancholy and 
great depression of spirits, which sometimes continued for 
many months, or even years, unfitting him for business or 
social enjoyment. He died of disease of the heart, resulting 
in dropsy, November 24, 1853, aged 62 years. Having been 
a member of the order of Odd Fellows, and also a Free 
Mason, his funeral was conducted in conformity to the burial 
rites of those orders, and attended by a large concourse of 
citizens. 

Upon the water privilege, occupied by the old cotton mills, 
referred to on page 243, owned by Mr. Chamberlain at the 
time of his decease, but upon the other side of the river, his 
son has, during the last year, 1857, erected one of the most 
extensive and complete flouring mills in the state. The 
buildings, a view of which is presented on the opposite page, 
are of brick, constructed in the most substantial manner, with 
window and door sills and caps of granite, and, in all respects, 
as nearly fire proof as buildings of that kind can be made. 
They are 34 by 42 feet, and two stories high. In their con- 
struction 180,000 of bricks were laid up. The bridge shown 
in the view, is a substantial structure of granite, the length 
is 168 feet, the height from the river bed to the top of the wall 
36 feet, the span of the arch 37 feet, the arch being a half 
circle. The expense was about $4600, paid by the town. 
It is a fine piece of masonry, a noble structure, as lasting as 
time. 



272 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



Dea. Simeon Cragin, is the son of Benjamin Cragin, Esq., 
formerly of Temple, who died at Mason, April 19, 1816. He 
was born in Temple, January 4, 1787, and was the youngest 
son of his parents. In 1806, he commenced the shoemaking 
business at Mason village, and continued it two and a half 
years. He then returned to Temple, and took his father's 
farm, and carried it on and supported his parents through life. 
He married Elizabeth, the only daughter of Dea. Timothy 
Dakin, May 23, 1811. In 1816, he purchased of Dea. Dakin, 
his father-in-law, the farm where he now lives, and removed 
to MasoU; and devoted his attention wholly to agriculture. 




RESIDENCE OF DEA. SIMEON CRAGIN. 



The Cragin family in this country, it is said, are the descend- 
ants of John Cragon, a Scotchman, who, with other prisoners 
taken at the battle of Dunbar, Sept. 3, 1650, by Cromwell, 
was, by order of the English government, shipped to Massa- 
chusetts, and sold for a term of years, to pay the expenses of 
the transport. His name appears in the list of two hundred 
and seventy three "passengers in the John and Sarah, of 
Loudon, John Greene, mr,, bound for New England," under 



filOGEAPHICAL SKETCHES. 273 

date of November 8, 1651. Of the poor prisoners thus taken 
forcibly from their homes and carried into exile, the Rev. 
John Cotton, of Boston, in a letter addressed to ''the Lord 
General Cromwell," under date at "Boston in N. E., 28 of 
5th, 1651," respecting some who had arrived in a previous 
vessel, says : 

"The Scots, whom God delivered into your hands at Dunbarre, 
and whereof sundry were sent hither, we have been desirous (as we 
could) to make their yoke easy. Such as were sick of the scurvy or 
other diseases have not wanted physick and chyrurgery. They have 
not been sold for slaves to perpetual servitude, but for 6 or 7 or 8 
yeares, as we do our owne ; and he that bought the most of them (I 
heare) buildeth houses for them, for every four an house, layeth some 
acres of ground thereto, which he giveth them as their owne, requir- 
ing 8 dayes in the weeke to worke for him (by turnes) and 4 dayes 
for them themselves, and promiseth, as soone as they can repay him 
the money he layed out for them, he will set them at liberty." See 
New England Historical and Genealogical Register, vol. 1, p. 380. 

About four thousand were killed in the battle and about ten 
thousand taken prisoners. A romantic incident is related of 
John Cragon : 

"The scurvy broke out on board during the voyage, and Cragon 
being supposed at the point of death, was about to be thrown over- 
board, but was spared at the intercession of a young woman, by 
whose assiduous attentions he was restored, and whom he afterwards 
married, and settled in Woburn." See Hist, of New Ipswich, p. 354. 

Capt, Abner Chickering, was a descendant of Thomas 
Chickering, who, in the reign of Henry the VIIL, resided in 
Wymondham, in the county of Norfolk. Stephen, his eldest 
son, lived in Wicklewood, a village adjoining Wymondham. 
He died in 1576. Henry, his eldest son, removed to Kings- 
field, in the county of Norfolk. He died in 1627. Henry, 
his eldest son, and his brother Francis and his nephcAV, 
Nathaniel, emigrated to New England, about the year 1635, 
and settled at Dedham, Mass. Henry held important offices, 
and was several years a representative in the general court. 
He died in 1671. His only son, Dr. John Chickering, of 
Charlestown, was heir to his large estates. From him, Capt. 
Abner Chickering is a descendant, in the fourth generation. 



274 HISTORY OF MASON. 

He was born in Holden, Mass., in 1767. He came to 
Mason about 1788. He was a blacksmith by trade, and 
carried on that business at the village and at the centre. His 
first wife was Eunice, daugliter of Dea. Amos Dakin. They 
were married April 19, 1792. She died May 7, 1804. He 
built and resided in the house in the village now owned by 
Dea. Abel Adams. Here most of his children were born. 
He removed to New Ipswich, where he resided on what was 
called the Knowlton place. He was a good farmer, and a 
good citizen. He died in 1841, aged 74 years. 

Jonas Chickering, son of Capt. Abner, was born in Mason, 
in the year 1798. He removed with his father's family to 
New Ipswich. He had a world-wide celebrity for his taste in 
music, and for the excellence of the pianos by him manufac" 
tured. He established a manufactory of pianos in Boston, 
in which instruments were produced that have never been sur- 
passed. He died at Boston, December 8, 1854, suddenly, in 
the midst of his enterprises, his usefulness, and his fame, 
in the 57th year of his age. 

Dea. Amos Dakin, was the son of Capt. Samuel Dakin, 
who was born in Concord. He was a descendant of Thomas 
Dakin, who was resident in Concord before 1650, and died 
October 21, 1708. His son, Dea. Joseph, was the father of 
Capt. Samuel Dakin. Amos Dakin, his son, was born January 
29, 1732. His mother died when he was an infant, for his 
father married his second wife, Mercy Minot, December 13, 
1732. His father, Capt. Samuel Dakin, lived in Sudbury, 
He was a Captain in the French war, and was slain in battle 
with the French and Indians, at Halfway Brook, near lake 
George, July 20, 1758. His wife was Sarah Thankful Minot, 
daughter of Dea. Samuel Minot, of Concord. She was born 
March 4, 1737. Her mother, Sarah Prescott, of Westford, 
died March 22, 1737, when she was less than three weeks old. 
They were married before they removed to Mason, and lived, 
it is said, ia Lincoln. The date of the birth of their first 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 275 

child, is June 9, 1756. Thomas Barrett, Jr., married one 
sister, and his brother Charles Barrett married another sister 
of Dea. Dakin's wife, and it seems that it was in some con- 
nection in business and ownership with them, that he came to 
Mason to live, and became a part owner with them at first, 
and finally sole owner, of the mills and water power and farm, 
at the village. It was, at least, as early as 17G8, that he 
began there, for in a warrant for a town meeting in Septem- 
ber of that year, Thomas Barrett and Amos Dakin's mills are 
mentioned. See Municipal History, p. 59, also tax list p. 60. 
He was one of the most useful and enterprising citizens of 
the town, as will appear by referring to the Municipal His- 
tory, in which it will be found, that he was constantly called on 
by his fellow citizens to act for them in all important concerns 
of the town, as delegate to the Provincial Congress, to Con- 
ventions, as representative in the legislature, and on import- 
ant committees during the time of the revolutionary war, and 
in all matters of importance in affairs of the town, church, 
and state. He was one of the original members of the 
church when it was first gathered, and was chosen one of the 
two deacons at the first election of those ofl&cers, and in this 
of&ce served till his decease, which was April 21, 1789, in the 
midst of life and usefulness, at the age of 57 years. 

Dea. Timothy Dakin, son of Dea. Amos Dakin, was born in 
Lincoln, Mass., March 17, 1764. He succeeded his father as 
owner of the mills and farm at the village. He was elected 
deacon by the church in place of his father, deceased. He 
was a man of action, always full of business, in which he 
engaged as a farmer, a merchant, mill owner, manufacturer of 
and dealer in lumber, manufacturer of potash, and contractor 
for building roads, bridges, school houses, meeting houses, &c. 
He built the house in which the widow of Samuel Hill lives, 
in which he lived many years. It was adjoining his father's, 
which stood where Mr. Richardson's house is. He also built 
the house in which Dea. Cragin lives. About 1821, having 



276 HISTORY OF MASON. 

disposed of his mills and real estate, lie removed to western 
New York, and there engaged extensively in the lumber 
business and other enterprises, in which he was not successful. 
Having lost his property, he returned to Mason, and a few 
years after died, in October, 1845, aged 81 years. 

Samuel Dakin, son of Dea. Amos Dakin, was born in 
Mason, November 17, 1770. He graduated at Dartmouth 
College in 1797, was an attorney and counsellor at law many 
years in Jaflfrey. He married a daughter of the Rev. Stephen 
Farrar, of New Ipswich. While residing at Jaffrcy, he 
engaged in the manufacture of crockery ware, using for this 
purpose a clay found in that town, which, it was thought, 
would make a good article, but the enterprise was not suc- 
cessful. He removed to western New York, and died at 
Hartford, N. Y., about the year 1843-44. 

Dr. Moses Dakin, son of Amos Dakin, Jr., was born in 
Mason, May 20, 1794. He adopted the medical profession, 
and settled in Hope, Me. His wife was Sarah W. Whiting, 
of Mason. They were married May 17, 1821. 

George Elliot, was descended, by both his parents, from 
early settlers in the town. His father was Dea. Andrew 
Eliot, a son of John Eliot, and brother of Eld. William Eliot. 
His mother, Hannah Dakin, was a daughter of Dea. Amos 
Dakin. He was born in Mason, April 24, 1797. He was but 
fourteen years old when his father died ; after which he 
labored several years at farm work, a part of the time on 
the homestead, for his elder brother, Andrew, and, at other 
times, for farmers in the neighboring towns. His education 
was obtained in the short terms of the district schools of his 
own neighborhood. 

When near twenty one years of age, he and his brother 
Amos, carrying their bundles, traveled on foot in search of 
employment, to Troy, N. Y. After driving coach a short time, 




ii'jiiyi Uro-.eliErBoitoli- 



y^cj. ^^^^^'^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



277 




RESIDENCE OF GEORGE ELLIOT. 

he engaged in school teaching at Castleton, Yt., at which place 
and in Greenbush, N. Y., he spent two or three years teaching 
schools, returning home once or twice in the meantime, walk- 
ing both ways. 

In the fall of 1820, he came home, and taught a term of 
the district school. Early in the following year, he bought a 
stock of goods of Dea. T. Dakiu, and commenced trade in 
the village. On the 19th of April, 1821, he married Sally 
Farnsworth, of Sharon. She died August 17, 1827. By this 
marriage, he had two children. One died in infancy. The 
other, Lucius Alva, born October 25, 1825, is now a merchant 
in Boston. On the 2d of September, 1828, he married Eliza 
Cumings, of New Ipswich, who survived him a few years, and 
died August 9, 1855. By this marriage, he had several chil- 
dren, all of whom died in infancy. 

Mr. Elliot was a large sufferer by fire. In 1823, his store, 
with all its contents, was burned. It was rebuilt, and the 
second story occupied as a dwelling. This shared the same 
fate about two years after. Nothing was saved. His wife, 
with an infant child in her arms, followed by the nurse, barely 
36 



278 HISTOEY OF MASON. 

escaped over tlie burning stairs. Absent at the time, Mr. 
Elliot returned only to find his property in ashes, and his 
little family without shelter, food, or clothing, except as fur- 
nished by neighbors. Yet his heart failed not. He was lib- 
erally aided by his fellow citizens, and the present building was 
erected on the old site, and he was soon again in successful 
business. He afterwards lost two or three other buildings 
by fire, on none of which was there any insurance. Insurance 
against losses by fire had not then become common. He 
continued trade at the old stand, till his death, nearly thirty 
years. His son was associated with him. in business for a 
year or two before he died, and afterwards he sold the stock 
of goods to William Claggett, who still occupies the store. 

Mr. Elliot was remarkable for his industry, frugality and 
perseverence. He not only prosecuted his own business with 
energy and success, but took an active part in the affairs of 
the village and town. He was public spirited and liberal, the 
friend of morality, good order, and general education. In 
private life, he displayed many excellencies of character. His 
sympathies were quick and active, and his manners bland 
and deferential. Pie was a regular attendant on public 
worship, and contributed generously for the support of the 
Baptist society, to which his ancestors and relatives generally 
belonged. 

When the Peterborough and Shirley Railroad was pro- 
jected, he engaged heartily in the enterprise, and subscribed 
liberally to its stock. He was chosen one of its directors, 
and also one of the executive committee for superintending 
the building of the road. The financial difficulties in which 
the road became involved, induced him, and others of the 
board, to pledge their private securities to carry on the 
undertaking. In the midst of such labors and perplexities, 
he was seized with the typhoid fever, which terminated fatally 
on the 15th of November, 1850. His age was 53 years. His 
memory is cherished by his numerous friends, as that of one 
by whom the duties of life were faithfully fulfilled. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 279 

Rev. "William Eliot, was the son of John and Sarah Eliot. 
He was born in Bradford, Mass., December 1, 1748, 0. S. 
About the year 1766, his father purchased a lot of land in 
the northwesterly part of Mason. William was his second 
son. He then being but eighteen years old, with the assist- 
ance of his younger brothers, David and Andrew, commenced 
the preparation for a farm and residence upon the lot, being 
then an unbroken wilderness, and built a house and made 
arrangements for the comfort of the family, before his father 
removed from Bradford. His father is rated in the first tax 
assessed in the town, in the year 1769, and was probably then 
a resident. William continued to live in town, and on the 
same farm, Avith his father. His first wife was Dorothy, the 
daughter of the Rev. Mr. Merrill, of Nottingham west, now 
Hudson, They were married in September, 1772. They had 
six children, two sons and four daughters. His wife Dorothy 
died June 14, 1785. His second wife was Rebecca Hildreth, 
daughter of Mr. Oliver Hildreth, of Townsend. They were 
married by the Rev. Mr. Dix, of Townsend, March 20, 1787. 
Their children were twelve, eight sons and four daughters. 
She died October 18, 1828, aged 65 years. He died June 4, 
1830, aged 81 years, and nearly six months. 

His advantages for education were limited, having no other 
means to that end, than the ordinary country schools of that 
day, which furnished very poor and indifferent means for the 
acquisition of learning. But he possessed naturally a very 
strong and vigorous mind and a sound judgment, which are of 
more value in the conduct of life than all the teachings of all 
the schools, where these are wanting. But he was by no 
means deficient in education, according " to the standard of 
that day, in his state in life. This is evidenced by the fact, 
that he was for many years employed as a school teacher, and 
took a very active and important part in the management of 
the affairs of the town, especially through nearly the whole 
period of the revolutionary war, often serving during that 
period, on important committees, in town business. He 



280 HISTORY OP MASON. 

served as town clerk and first selectman in the years 1780, 
1782-'85-'86; was moderator of the annual meeting in 1785, 
and town treasurer in 1783 and 1784. His records remain- 
ing in the town books are well made up, and his handwriting, 
although possessing no claims to elegance, is perfectly plain 
and legible. In those days of trouble and disturbance with 
the people of this town, both in church and state, town meet- 
ings were very frequent. A great number and great variety 
of taxes were raised and assessed, the whole labor, probably, 
of assessing, certainly of recording which, fell to him. Of 
course, the records made by him occupy more space than those 
of many more times the same number of peaceful years. 

He became a member of Mr. Farrar's church in New Ips- 
wich in 1772, and afterwards, on the formation of the Con- 
gregational church in Mason, October 13, 1772, he was one of 
the original members. His father and mother became mem- 
bers of that church at the same time, and his wife Dorothy in 
the year 1776. In the unhappy contentions between the Rev. 
Jonathan Searle, their first minister, and the church and 
people, he was, with few exceptions, upon all the committees 
on behalf of the town, for conducting their cause. The 
records of the church, during this time, contain no allusion to 
the controversy, but he was, undoubtedly, as active in his 
sphere in the aifairs of the church, as of the town. 

But the most important view of his life, is his character 
and services as a preacher of the gospel. It has been stated, 
that, early in life, he became a member of the Congregational 
church. It was the church of his fathers. No other denom- 
ination was then known, especially in the country places in 
New England. All serious minded persons united with the 
church in their towns. The clergy and the church then pos- 
sessed a power and authority little dreamed of in these days 
of license and misrule. But all was peace and harmony. No 
one thought of or inquired for any other or better way. But, 
with the war of the revolution, and with the establishment of 
independent governments in the former colonies, came juster 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 281 

notions of civil rights, and, as a necessary concomitant, more 
freedom of inquiry and of religious opinion. The Baptist 
denomination, soon after the close of the war, began to make 
itself felt in New England, as an element of religious life. 
The subject became, with Mr. Eliot, a matter of the most 
serious consideration and the gravest examination, which ulti- 
mately resulted in a settled conviction, in his mind, that the 
Baptist views of the ordinance of baptism, were the only 
scriptural views. He accordingly adopted them, fully and 
heartily, and devoted the remainder of his life to a zealous 
and unwavering support of the principles and practices of 
that order. It is stated, in the sketch of the history of the 
Baptist church, that he made these views known, by a protest 
against a vote to raise money to pay for preaching, in town 
meeting, in 1782. He was one of the three original male 
members of the church "imbodyed" September 28, 1786. 
He seems to have devoted himself from that time, to the work 
of preaching and exhortation, with such acceptance on the 
part of the church, that in August, 1788, the church, at a 
meeting, voted unanimously, that he be set apart as an evan- 
gelist ; and arrangements were made for a council to meet to 
ordain him. At a subsequent meeting, the church voted to 
give him ''a call to settle with them in the gospel ministry, 
and to continue so long as it shall appear it is for the glory of 
God and our mutual advantage." He accepted the invitation, 
and was ordained on the third Wednesday of October, 1788, 
and continued to be the minister of the church till his death, 
June 4, 1830, a period of 41 years and 8 months. 

The bible was his book, almost his only book. With its 
contents, he was thoroughly and intimately acquainted. With 
its spirit, his temper and heart were imbued. From the time 
he began to preach, he gave up all active participation in the 
affairs of public, political, and municipal life, and seldom, if 
ever, attended a town meeting, or cast a vote for any officer, 
of town, state, or nation. Indeed, his labors were abundant. 
He not only had charge of the interests of his denomination 



282 HISTORY OF MASOM. 

in his own town, but, for many years, in all the neighboring 
towns and a large region around. The Baptist churches in 
New Ipswich, Wilton, Jaffrey, Milford, Hollis and Townsend, 
owe their origin and early growth, in a great measure, to his 
self-sacrificing and almost, in an earthly sense, unrewarded 
toils. 

fie secured for three of his sons advantages of education 
very niucli superior to what he had himself enjoyed, and had 
the happiness to see them all walking in his footsteps in the 
service of his and their Lord and Master. Israel graduated 
at the University of Vermont in 1813. He was drowned in 
Boston harbor, August 29, 1815. Joseph was ordained at 
Hinsdale, in June, 1809, at which place and afterwards, in 
many other important churches of the Baptist denomination, 
he ministered with much acceptance and success, until recently, 
he has removed to Elliota, Minnesota, the residence of his 
son, Mr. J. W. Elliot. His son Jesse graduated at the Liter- 
ary and Theological Seminary, at Hamilton, N. Y., in 1826, 
was ordained the same year, and is now the pastor of the 
Baptist church in Mayville, N. Y. 

Notwithstanding the irreconcilable differences of opinion 
upon many subjects of doctrine, ordinances and discipline, the 
two pastors of the Congregational and Baptist churches, Mr. 
Hill and Mr. Eliot lived in great peace and harmony with each 
other, mutually entertaining a high esteem and regard, each 
for the other, manifested by many instances of christian sym- 
pathy and brotherly kindness, in seasons of affliction, with 
which both were severely visited ; and in view of this fact, 
perhaps no more appropriate close can be made of this sketch 
of the life of Mr. Eliot, than the following extract from a 
sermon preached by Rev. Mr. Hill, in his own pulpit, on the 
Sunday, while the remains of his departed friend lay unburied, 
awaiting the last sad and solemn ceremony of committing 
"earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust." 

The text of this discourse was these words : " Thanks be 
to God, who giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus 



BIOGEAPHICAL SKETCHES. 283 

Christ." 1 Cor., 15:57. After opening and explaining the 
subject, he proceeds to say : 

I have been led to call your attention to this subject more particu- 
larly at this time, on account of the death of the aged and Rev. 
William Eliot, whose corpse now lies unburied. Mr. Eliot, we 
believe to have been a sincere christian, a true believer on the Son of 
God. And we have as full and satisfactory evidence, as we can have, 
perhaps, in any case, that to him is given the victory over death and 
the grave, and that he possessed this victory for a long time before 
his departure. 

Mr. Eliot was not favored, in early life, v/ith more than ordinary 
means of education. Had his strong mind and sound judgment been 
cultivated in early life, no doubt he would have been distinguished 
above many. His constitutional temperament was rather grave and 
serious than otherwise, and inclined to serious contemplation, and 
from his habits of contemplation and a disposition to euibrace oppor- 
tunities for improving his mind, he acquired what was, in those days, 
called a good education. He was, for many years, employed in the 
public business of this town. It was not, however, till after he had 
lived some years in this town in a family state, as I have learned from 
his own mouth, that he was made the subject, as he trusted, of experi- 
mental religion. I speak now merely from recollection of conversa- 
tions in times past. He was, for a time, a subject of some serious 
impressions, and became very careful of his walk, and attentive to 
the duties of religion, and indulged the hope that he was a christian. 
But he was at length led to see that he was resting on his own righte- 
ousness — his foundation was sand — Christ, in him, was not his hope 
of glory. What were the leading steps that brought him to the dis- 
covery of his self-deception and groundless hopes, I do not now recol- 
lect, but for a time he was under deep and pungent conviction of sin, 
until, at length, he was brought to discover, in the once crucified but 
now exalted Jesus, all that he needed for salvation; and, as he 
trusted, and we also trust, he was brought to bow to Him as the Lord 
our salvation, and to be willing to be in His hands, and be saved by his 
merits alone. The gospel scheme of salvation by grace through faith, 
and not by works of righteousness which we have done, appeared 
glorious to him, and so continued to the last. His own particular 
experience greatly qualified him to deal with self-exalted or deeply 
wounded spirits. He at length was persuaded in his own mind, that 
he was called to preach the gospel to his fellow dying men, and was 
ordained a minister over the Baptist church, and, for more than forty 
years, continued to preach Christ as the only name whereby we must 
be saved, and faith in Him as the only way, the necessity of regener- 
ation by the spirit of God, and the fruit of repentance, as the only 
evidence of grace in the heart. His general system of doctrine was 
what is called evangelical, and was drawn from the bible. This book 
he studied much, and, being favored with a retentive memory, he 
could quote it with much readiness. And, we have reason to hope, 



284 HISTORY OF MASON. 

that he has been an instrument, in the hands of God, of good to 
many souls. In his numerous family, he was a kind husband and a 
tender father, and very exemplary in his walk before his house, and 
among his fellow men. Although his particular views of gospel order 
did not permit him to hold visible fellowship in some parts of the 
christian walk witji other denominations of cliristians, yet he loved 
and enjoyed the society of ail those, of whom he had evidence, that 
they loved the Lord Jesus Christ. 

But in his long continued and grievous sickness, the evidence and 
the fruits of religion shone, perhaps, with the greatest brightness. 
In all this time, his mind was clear, and though his sufferings were 
frequently severe, and pain excrutiating, he bore them with patience, 
not a word escaped from him as if God dealt hardly with him, but 
his language was that of praise to God, for unmerited mercies and 
light alHictions. Almost uniformly his evidence was bright, his faith 
strong, and when frequently brought, as he thought, to the very close 
of his trials, and just ready to launch forth beyond the reign of sin 
and suffering, he seemed quietly to submit to be borne back upon the 
troubled ocean, and to wait and suffer what more his Heavenly 
Father saw fit. And when, at last, the hour had come for his dis- 
missal from trial, his mind was clear, as I am informed, and he could 
view the king of terrors approaching without the least dismay. As 
far as is possible for man to judge, he had a glorious victory over 
death and the grave — his end was peace. 

This example is invaluable for the interesting lesson it affords. 
What strong proof of the truth of God's word! How should it ani- 
mate the believer to run the race set before him. How should it 
excite all professors to see whether they are indeed following the 
Lamb of God. Happy, happy soul is he who is as a servant waiting 
for the coming of his Lord, prepared to receive him. Then though 
he go down through the valley of the shadow of death, he need fear 
no evil, for Christ will be with him and his rod and staff shall 
support him. 

Israel Elliot, son of the Rev, William Eliot, was born in 
Mason, January 1, 1788, graduated at the University of Ver- 
mont in 1813. After graduating, he taught school at Caven- 
dish and Chester, Vt. He was drowned in Boston harbor, in 
1815. 

Rev, Joseph Elliot, son of the Rev. William Eliot, born 
in Mason, April 12, 1789, was an eminent Baptist minister. 
He was ordained at Hinsdale in 1809, at which place and in 
many other important churches of his denomination in New 
England and in the west, he ministered with much acceptance 



BIOGEAPHICAL SKETCHES. 285 

and success, until recently, when, suffering under the infirmi- 
ties of age, he has removed to Elliota, M. T., the residence of 
his son, Mr. J. W. Elliot. 

Jesse Elliot, son of the Rev. William Elliot, was born in 
Mason, December 24, 1799. He graduated at the Literary 
and Theological Seminary, at Hamilton, N. Y., in 1826, and 
was ordained a minister of the Baptist church the same year, 
and is now pastor of the Baptist church at Mayville, Cha- 
tauquc county, N. Y. 

JoxAS Fay, Jr., Son of Jonas and Dolly Fay, was born in 
Mason, July 0, 1775. He was a member of Harvard College, 
but died when an undergraduate, June 23, 1800, aged 25 years. 

Dr. Joseph Gray, was a physician. He came into town in 
1790, and settled on the farm now owned by Vearon Eaton, 
and removed from town about 1806. 

Dr. Henry Gray, son of Dr. Joseph Gray, surgeon and 
physician, was born in Mason. He practiced in Mason a short 
time, and then removed to Cavendish, Vt. 

Dea. Nathax Hall, was born in Bradford, Mass., Decem- 
ber 25, 1715. Mary, his wife, was born in Bosford, March 
29, 1723. He removed to Mason, then called No. 1, about 
1751. He bore his full share in the labors, trials and priva- 
tions attending the settlement of the new town. He began 
upon the farm on which Capt. Joseph Saunders now resides. 
In 1752, in the report made by the committee, at the propri- 
etors' meeting, of "what each man has done in No. 1," he is 
entered as follows : "Nathan Hall, a house and seven acres of 
land, six of it broke up, and dwells there." See Proprietary 
History, p. 41. He was frequently appointed on committees 
in the business of the Proprietary, and after the incorporation 
of the town, he was elected town treasurer, which office he 
37 



286 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



held eight years in succession. He was one of the original 
members of the Congregational churcli, and elected a deacon 
at the first election of those officers, and held the office till 
his death. He died ]\Iay 7, 1807, aged 91 years, leaving 
behind him a reputation for spotless integrity and a useful 
and blameless life, which his posterity may cherish as the best 
legacy he could leave for them. 




RESIDENCE OF REV. EBENEZER HILL. 



Rev. Ebenezer Hill, was born in Cambridge, Mass., Jau- 
ury 31, 1766, graduated at Harvard College in 1786, and was 
ordained pastor of the church and minister of the town of 
Mason, November 3, 1790. He died May 20, 1854, in the 
89th year of his age, and the 64th of his ministry. For a 
more extended account of his life and labors, see the Memoir 
published at the same time with this volume. 

Rev. Joseph B. Hill, son of Rev. Ebenezer Hill, was born 
in Mason, November 25, 1796. He graduated at Harvard 
College in 1821. Ordained an elder of the Cumberland Pres- 
byterian church in Tennessee, he was, for many years, an itin- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 287 

erant minister of that chnrcli in Tennessee, Alabama, Missis* 
sippi and Kentucky. He returned to New England in 1840, 
and was settled as colleague pastor, with his father Rev. E. 
Hill, of the Congregational church in Mason, in 1841. This 
connection continued until 1847. Since that time, he has 
resided most of the time in Colebrook and Stewartstown in 
New Hampshire, employed in the duties of his calling. 

Rev. Timothy Hill, youngest son of the Rev. Ebenezer 
Hill, was born in Mason, June 30, 1819. He graduated at 
Dartmouth College in 1842, and at the Union Theological 
Seminary in New York city in 1845. He preached as a mis' 
sionary, under the direction of the Home Missionary Society, 
for several years, in Missouri, and is now pastor of a Presby- 
terian church in Saint Louis, Mo. 

Dr. Otis Hoyt, came to Mason in the spring of 1835, and 
commenced practice as a physician and surgeon, at Mason 
village. He was a pupil of his uncle. Dr. Enos Hoyt, of Sand- 
bornton. His first wife was a daughter of Maj. Seth King, of 
New Ipswich. In September, 1837, he removed to Framing- 
ham, Mass., where his wife died. His second wife was also a 
daughter of Maj. King. In 1838, he received the degree of 
M. D., at Dartmouth College. At the commencement of the 
Mexican war, he joined the army as a surgeon, served to the 
end of the war, then returned to the United States and estab- 
lished his residence in Wisconsin, and was appointed receiver 
in the land office at Hudson, in that state. 

Rev. Nehemiah Hunt, son of David Hunt, was born in 
Mason, in the month of September, 1812. He joined the 
Congregational church in September, 1833, and in 1834 was a 
student in the Oberlin Institute in Ohio, from which he went 
to the Mission Institute in Quincy, Illinois, at which and at 
the Lane Seminary in Ohio, he pursued his studies for the 
period of eight years, and completed his academical and theo- 



288 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



logical education. He was licensed to preach in 1845, and 
has resided iu Illinois since that time, engaged in preaching, 
and, most of the time, also, teaching high schools. He now 
resides in Bethel, Bond county, Illinois, wlierc he has been 
pastor of a church for the last seven years. 




RESIDENCE OF DR. WILLIS JOHNSON. 

Dr. Willis Johnson, was born in Sturbridge, Mass., Dec. 
21, 1780. He studied medicine with Dr. Ephraim Carroll, of 
Woodstock, Conn., two years, and with Dr. Ferdinand Leth- 
bridge of South Brimfield, Mass., one and a half years. He 
married (1) Dorothy Flinn of Woodstock, Conn., March 30, 
1806. She was born January 16, 1785. He first commenced 
the practice of his profession at Jaffre.y, in August, 1807, and 
removed to Peterborough in January, 1808, where he remained 
till 1814, in July of which year he removed to Mason, where 
he now resides. Dorothy, his wife, died January 2, 1843. 
He married (2) Sarah Ann Robbins, daughter of Mr. Luther 
Bobbins, of Mason, August 4, 1844. 

Dr. Johnson was elected town clerk of Mason, May 5, 1823, 
to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Samuel Mer- 
riam, Esq., and he was re-elected to that office at the annual 




lithlyi [jrozelierBostDiv 




^1/ 




BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 289 

town meetings between 1823 and 1854, twenty one times, so 
that lie served in the office of town clerk twenty two years 
in all, a longer time than the office has been held by any other 
person. He also served five years as chairman of the board 
of selectmen. He was appointed a justice of the peace in 
1823, and still holds that office. 

Dr. Enosh Lawrence, was the son of Lieut. Enosh Law- 
rence, and grandson of Ens. Enosh Lawrence. He studied 
medicine, and had just commenced the practice when he was 
cut down by disease. He died a victim of consumption, Sep- 
tember 28, 1798, at the age of 25 years, 10 months, 12 days. 

Benjamin Mann, Esq., removed with his family from 
Woburn, to Mason, about 1771. His father and mother^ 
James Mann and his wife, and his brother-in-law, Simon 
Ames, removed to Mason about the same time. Mr. Ames' 
wife was Mr. Mann's sister. These three families settled on 
the farm lately owned by Joel Ames. One of their dwelling 
houses was in the field north of the road and east of the 
John Bachelder house, the other was near the large willow 
tree by the road side south of and near the residence of S. 
H. Wheeler. Benjamin Kendall, whose wife was a sister of 
B. Mann's wife, came from Woburn about 1785, and built the 
house where Mr. White now lives; and about 1780, Abraham 
Merriam, whose wife was an aunt of Benj. Mann, came also 
from Woburn, and settled on the Wilton road, on the lot east 
of Mr. Mann's. James Mann and his wife both died about 
the year 1781. 

Benjamin Mann was, soon after he came into town, employed 
in public offices in town. He was moderator of the annual 
town meetings twelve years, town clerk four years, one of the 
selectmen six years, representative four years, and was chosen 
several times a delegate to conventions, a member of the 
committee of safety, and on many other important commit- 
tees in business relating to the revolutionary war. He com« 



290 HISTORY OF MASON. 

mandecl a company in the battle of Bunker Hill, also in the 
army in Rhode Island. He built the house in the centre 
village, now owned by Ai^her Peabody, and kept a tavern 
there, and also a small store of goods. That village is also 
indebted to him for the noble elm trees which adorn the com* 
mon. These he planted on the day of the ordination of Mr* 
Hill. Also, for the venerable willow planted about the same 
time, which has attained a circumference of about fifteen feeU 
Mr. Mann was the first person appointed a justice of the 
peace in town. About the year 1800, he sold his estate in 
Mason, and removed to Keene, and from that place to Troy> 
N. Y., where he died in 1831, aged about 91 years. 

Dr. Thomas Hastings Marshall^ son of William Mar* 
shall, was born in Jafirey, December 2, 1806. His father 
William, the son of Thomas, was born in Tewksbury, Mass* 
He removed to Jafifrey during the time of the revolutionary 
war, and commenced a farm upon a new lot of land in the 
west part of that town, on which he resided until his death, 
in 1828. His mother was Sarah Cutter, born in New Ipswich. 
Her first husband's name was Kimball. Dea. Isaac Kimball, 
of Temple, John Kimball, of Fitzwilliam, and Benoni C. 
Kimball, of Mason, are her sons. Mr. Marshall was her 
second husband. Dr. Marshall and one sister are the only 
children of this marriage. He worked upon the farm with his 
father until he was 21 years of age, about which time his 
father died. His early education was obtained in the district 
schools of his native town. After studying two or three 
terms at New Ipswich Academy, and keeping school a few 
winters, he commenced the study of medical science, in 1832, 
with Dr. Luke Howe, of Jaffrey, a physician and surgeon of 
good reputation. He graduated M. D., at Dartmouth College, 
in 1834, having attended medical lectures at Bowdoin College, 
at Dartmouth College, and at Harvard University. He com- 
menced his professional life at Fitzwilliam, in 1835. His wife 
is Abigail Sophia Hawkes, of Templeton, Mass. They were 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



291 




RESIDENCE OF DR. THOMAS H. MARSHALL. 

married December 1, 1836. He removed to Mason village in 
September, 1837, and has there continued in practice as a 
physician and surgeon to the present time. 

Joseph Merriam, was born in Concord, in which place his 
ancestors have lived from its earliest settlement, and so many 
of them of his name that it is difficult to trace out his line- 
age. He settled in Mason about the year 1769. He was an 
industrious farmer, a good manager, and acquired a good 
estate. He enjoyed through his long life a large share of the 
confidence and esteem of his townsmen, shown by their elect- 
ing him to important offices. He had not the gift of speech 
making, but he possessed a sound judgment and an honest 
heart — qualities more useful in life than the most full and 
flowing eloquence without them. He was one of the select- 
men fourteen years, and was the first representative elected 
after the town ceased to be classed with Raby. He lived 
many years on the farm now owned by Capt. Moses Merriam. 
About the year 1800, he built the large house near where Mr. 
Abijah Allen lived. Here he died, November 6, 1826, aged 
82 years. 



292 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



Samuel Merriam, Esq., was the son of Joseph Merriam, 
born at Mason, October 14, 1773. His first wife was Lucy, 
daughter of Aaron "Wheeler. He served many years in town 
offices, as moderator, town clerk and selectman, was a justice 
of tlie pcdce and coroner, and was much respected for intel- 
ligence, integrity and business capacity. Lucy, his wife, died 
August 30, 1817. He lived on the farm now owned by his 
son, Capt. Moses Merriam, where he died, April 20, 1823, at 
the age of 50 years. His second wife was Huldah Burton, of 
Wilton, who survived him. 




^ __,. .^- 

RESIDENCE OF MOSES MERRIAM. 

Eev. Alfred L. Mason, was the son of Daniel and Martha 
Mason, and was born at Andover, Mass., in February, 1812. 
At the age of fifteen years, he united with the Congregational 
church at Andover. With the design of engaging in the min- 
istry, he commenced a course of study at the Teacher's Sem- 
inary, in Andover. After a brief term at that institution, he 
was, for a time, obliged to relinquish effort in that direction. 
Returning again as soon as circumstances permitted him to 
do so, he applied himself with the utmost earnestness, to pre- 
paration for the great work which he had chosen. His means 




lilKliyl-CrDidlieD.'BQStcm. 



^M /^/l^-. 



-^7^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 293 

were limited to the earnings of his own hands, and very few 
students contend with greater difficulties than those which 
encompassed his path. He was generally obliged to labor 
until late at night in the manufacturing of shoes, to procure 
the means of continuing his studies, and his constitution was, 
naturalh^, by no means strong. 

In 1830, he united with the Baptist church at Methuen, 
Mass. On the organization of a Baptist church at Andover, 
he removed his membership thither. By this church, he was 
licensed to preach, and was soon called to the pastorate of 
the church at Mason village. This call was accepted, and his 
ordination took place on the 20th of June, 1836. 

On the 15th of November, 1837, he was married, by Prof. 
Emerson, of Andover Theological Seminary, to Miss Mary 
Town, of Andover. Of this marriage, were three children, 
Mary, Judson and Daniel, all of whom, with their mother, 
still survive, and reside at East Cambridge, Mass. 

Mr. Mason's constitution, delicate always, and doubtless 
greatly impaired by efforts while in his academical studies, 
gradually gave way under the earnest labors of his charge, 
until the autumn of 1843, when a severe attack of hemor- 
rhage of the lungs laid him aside from his public duties. 
Somewhat recovering, after a time, he renewed his labors, but 
was soon again attacked as before, and continued to decline 
until his decease, which took place October 7, 1844. 

Of the characteristics of Mr. Mason, the following is an 
extract from an extended obituary notice of him, in one of the 
papers of the Baptist denomination : "His character was pecu- 
liarly amiable and lovely. He was distinguished for equanim- 
ity, cheerfulness, affability and kindness. His piety, more- 
over, was not more simple and unaffected, than it was fervent 
and sincere. He manifested piety at home. As a preacher, 
his style was correct and impressive. His simple exhibition 
of truth and earnest appeals to the conscience, delivered in 
an affectionate manner, produced powerful and lasting impres- 
sions on many of his hearers. As a pastor, he felt deeply 
38 



294 HISTORY OF MASON. 

for the spiritual advancement of his charge, was laborious 
and eminently successful." 

Charles Tilden Otis, pursued his preparatory studies at 
New Ipswich Academy, and entered Yale College in 1839. 
He was a good scholar, an amiable, promising youth, but was 
cut off by disease while a member of the college. He died, 
July 17, 1840, aged 21 years. His grave, in the village grave- 
yard, is marked by a headstone, but on it no mention is made 
of his literary life. His father, who resided on the farm for- 
merly occupied by Timothy Wheelock, removed out of town 
soon after his decease. 

Lieut. Obadiah Parker, may well be considered one of 
the fathers of the town. He was born in Groton, his wife, it 
is supposed, in Chelmsford, Mass. He began his farm on lot 
No. 8, R. 10, on which he built his house within a few rods of 
the line of New Ipswich. It is probably owing to this fact, 
that, in the History of New Ipswich, he is placed in the num- 
ber of the early inhabitants of that town. The same is the 
case with Aaron Wheeler, whose lot was next north of Lieut. 
Parker's, and his house near New Ipswich line. Lieut. Parker 
began to improve his lot in 1751. In the report made by the 
committee, at the Proprietors' meeting, in 1752, is entered: 
"Obadiah Parker, a good house and about two acres of land 
cleared." When he removed his wife into town, there were 
but three women in the place, and he used often to remark, in 
after years, that when his wife "was young, she was the hand- 
somest woman in town, except three." Lawrence, Hall and 
Tarbell, were the three who settled prior to Parker. It will 
be noticed, that Lieut. Parker's name appears on almost 
every page of the early history of the town, that he was a 
leading and active man in all affairs of church, town and state, 
on committees to hire preaching, and to seat the meeting 
house, &c., under the Proprietary, and was sent to Portsmouth 
to get the incorporation, and was directed, by a vote of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 295 

Proprietary, to "clisburst the money" for tliat purpose. He 
was moderator, selectman and representative mider the town 
organization. Possessing at all times through life the confi- 
dence and respect of his fellow citizens, he passed through the 
changes of life to extreme old age, and died October 5, 1816, 
aged 86 years. Without sickness or pain, in the quiet of 
night, without a struggle, from the repose of natural slumber, 
he fell into that deeper sleep that knows no waking. 

Obadiah Parker, son of Lieut. Obadiah Parker, was born 
in Mason, February 18, 1772. He graduated at Harvard Col- 
lege in 1799. He never entered upon any professional life, 
but gave his attention to teaching in private schools. He 
had, for several years, a popular school at Lexington, Mass. 
Afterwards, he removed to the state of New York, pursuing 
the same business, at various places, and finally, in the city of 
New York, in which place or in that vicinity, he died, about 
the year 1830. 

Jason Russell, John Russell and Hubbard Russell, were 
brothers, and their sister, Elizabeth Webber, wife of Dea. 
Jotham Webber, were born in West Cambridge, then called 
Menotomy. They all settled in Mason, Jason in 1769, Hub- 
bard in 1772, John in 1774, and Dea. Webber in 1780. Each 
brought up a numerous family, and lived to old age, Jason to 
84, John 86, Hubbard 88 years, and Mrs. Webber 82 years. 
Hubbard Russell served as selectman several years. 

Richard Russell was, undoubtedly, the ancestor of this fam- 
ily. He was born in Hereford, county of Hereford, England, 
in 1611. He came to New England, and settled at Charles- 
town, in 1640. He was a representative from Charlestown 
thirteen years, was several times elected speaker of the house, 
was treasurer, and one of the assistants. He was an eminent 
merchant, and several of his descendants have been distin- 
guished for their success in mercantile business. John Rus- 
sell was appointed, 1645, "clerk of the writs at Cambridge." 



296 HISTORY OP MASON. 

Rev, Jonathan Searle, was born at Rowley, Mass., in 1744. 
He graduated at Harvard College, in 1764. He preached in 
Mason, as a candidate, in 1770, and received an invitation 
from the people to settle as their minister. In 1772, he 
accepted the invitation, assisted in organizing a church, of 
which he was one of the original members, and was, on the 
13th of October, of that year, ordained pastor of the church 
and minister of the town. As the first settled minister, he 
was entitled to a right of land in the town. This he owned 
in fee simple. A part he disposed of early, and a part he 
continued to own till near the close of his life. He purchased 
the valuable farm now owned by Ebenezer Blood, and built 
on it a very good house, which is yet standing in good condi- 
tion, and in it he resided till his death. It has already been 
related in this work, how difficulties arose between him and 
his people, which resulted in his dismissal, in 1781. He was 
commissioned as a justice of the peace, in 1785, and held that 
office until his decease. Soon after his dismissal, he ceased 
to officiate as a minister, and devoted his attention to his 
farm, on which he brought up, in a very respectable style, his 
numerous family. He died December 7, 1812, aged 68 years. 

Stephen Smith, was born at Kingston, R. I., August 31, 
1807. At the age of fourteen years, he entered the employ of 
Bradford Sparrow, of Killingly, Conn., a cotton manufacturer. 
With him, he remained several years, and acquired a good 
practical knowledge of that business. His next engagement 
was with a manufacturing company in Sutton, Mass., by the 
failure of which, in 1829, he lost all his savings, several 
hundred dollars, and was left in debt, even for his board. 

In the spring of 1830, he returned to Killingly, and engaged 
in the employ of Jedediah Leavins, with whom an intimate 
friendship sprung up as lasting as life. In the year 1831, he 
united with the Presbyterian church in Killingly. In 1832, 
he married Marcia G. Leavins, a sister of his employer. In 
1834, he went to Norwich Falls, Conn., and there he bui-ied 




^^-' 




IitbliyL Grozelierloston. 



JBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 297 

all his family, a wife and two infant daughters. In 1837, he 
married Maria Ellis, of Attleboroiigh, Mass. Their only child, 
Erwin L., was born November 6, 1839. 

The financial crisis of 1837 having thrown him out of 
employment, he, with another, undertook to operate a small 
mill in East Haddam, Conn. Disappointed as to the pecu- 
niary ability of his partner, and by the failure of the man 
who contracted to stock the mill, the enterprise, after a few 
months, was abandoned, leaving him once more stripped of all 
his hard earnings, and plunged in debt. Under these circum- 
stances, his health became impaired, his spirits depressed, and 
partial derangement ensued. He returned to Killingly, and, 
at the genial home of his brother-in-law, Leavins, gradually 
regained his wonted strength and cheerfulness. 

In the spring of 1839, he removed to Uncasville, a small 
manufacturing village in the town of Montville, Conn. While 
residing here, he removed his church relations to Montville, 
and was elected deacon. 

In 1843, he was invited by the Columbian Manufacturing 
Company, to take charge of their nj^ll at Mason village, to 
which place he soon after removed his family. The company 
having had full proof of his integrity and capacity for ])usi- 
ness, increased their operations, and, in 1845, rebuilt the High 
Bridge mill, in New Ipswich, now No. 2. In 1855, having pur- 
chased the old saw and grist mill in the village, then owned 
by William Durgin, the company commenced building, upon 
its site, the new or No. 4 mill. About the same time, the old 
Water Loom mill in New Ipswich, now No. 3, was bought, and 
underwent thorough repair. The planning, drafting, contract- 
ing for, and supervision of, all this business, was done by Mr. 
Smith. In the midst of these multiplied labors and cares, his 
health again failed, and his mental equilibrium was once 
more overcome. In January, 1857, he relinquished business, 
and in April, by advice of eminent physicians, he was placed 
at the McLean Asylum, in Somerville, Mass., where he died, 
August 13, aged 50 years. 



298 HISTORY OF MASON. 

Stephen Smith was a self-made man. In youth, he Trag 
bashful and retiring, almost shunning society, which he after- 
wards highly valued and enjoyed. His educational advantages 
were little more than those of the common schools, but doubt- 
less well improved. He wrote a fine hand, composed readily 
and correctly, and was an effective public speaker. His 
private residence and corporation improvements, are monu- 




A 




RESIDENCE OF HON. STEPHEN SMITH. 

ments of his refinement and taste. He united a good degree 
of mechanical ingenuity with what may be termed executive 
ability, and great energy in the prosecution of business. 

Mr. Smith held the office of a justice of the peace through- 
out the state, was once elected representative of Mason to 
the legislature, and served two years as one of the executive 
council. He was always foremost in good works, and espec- 
ially generous in his contributions to aid the cause of educa- 
tion, temperance and anti-slavery. Every good cause had his 
sympathy, and every one he regarded bad, his fearless oppo- 
sition. 

But it is as a philanthropist and a christian that his mem- 
ory breathes the choicest fragrance. His was an earnest life. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 299 

guided by principle. He evidenced his sincerity by his sacri- 
fices. As an illustration of his character and the spirit of the 
times, the following incident is given: While at Norwich 
Falls, he opened an anti-slavery prayer meeting at his house, 
which was threatened with mob violence unless discontinued. 
But the faith within was too strong for the force without. 
The little band prayed on unmolested. 

Dea. Smith was one of the principal founders and support- 
ers of the Congregational church, formed at Mason village, in 
1847, also one of its officers, and for many years the efficient 
superintendent of its Sabbath school. With children, he was 
always popular, enjoying with them innocent hilarity and 
cheerful recreations, with the keenest relish. 

The prominent traits of his character were, a vigorous will, 
generous impulses, strong sympathy with suffering, and a prac- 
tical zeal for reform of the social, political and religious evils 
of our day. 

His funeral took place at Mason village. Sabbath, August 
16 — a large concourse of people testifying by their presence 
and sadness, that a friend and public benefactor had fallen. 

Rev. John Spauldixg, son of Hezekiah and Sally Spauld- 
ing, was born in Mason, November 30, 1800, graduated at 
Middlebury College, in 1825, completed his theological studies 
at Audover Theological Seminary, in 1828, and was ordained 
a missionary to the valley of the Mississippi, September 25, 
1828. He was installed pastor of the Presbyterian church at 
Athens, Ohio, April 23, 1829, and of the Main-street Presby- 
terian church at Peoria, Illinois, June 6, 1838 j was Secretary 
of the Western Education Society at Cincinnati, Ohio, four 
years and a half, and Corresponding Secretary of the Sea- 
man's Friend Society, New York city, sixteen years. He was 
a successful and popular school teacher, having before and 
during his college life, taught school four successive winters, 
in all one and a half years. During his pastorate of eight 
years, were admitted to his churches mostly on examination 



500 



HISTORY OF MASON. 



and profession of faith, 177 persons. Of one of his bible 
classes, in number 87, all but nine became professors of reli- 
gion ; of these, twenty one entered the ministry, two of whom 
were missionaries in foreign countries. Of the ladies of the 
class, five or six married ministers. 




^i' 





RESIDENCE OF JOHN STEYENS, ES^. 

John Stevens, was born at Wilton, N.H., July 21, 1783. His 
parents removed from Chelmsford, Mass., and were among 
the early settlers of that town. He had several sisters, but 
no brother who attained mature age. The rural sports of 
childhood, and the labors of the farm, contributed to give 
him a fine physical development, a heritage to be coveted by 
every youth, whatever may be his future employment. 

In addition to the advantages of the district school, the 
subject of this sketch attended, for a time, a private school, 
kept by the Rev. Mr. Beede, the clergyman of that town, to 
whom Wilton is much indebted for the high character, her 
common schools have so long held. 

When about eighteen years of age, he commenced school 
teaching, an employment in which he soon attained great 




.'!.feToieJier,Ho5tmi 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 301 

celebrity. The ''hard schools" particularly, sought his ser- 
vices ; and; what moral suasion and kind treatment could not 
effect, his powerful arm was prompt to accomplish, the entire 
submission of the most refractory scholars. For more than 
twenty years, his winters were chiefly devoted to this busi- 
ness. 

June 6th, 1807, he married Hannah Lovejoy, of Wilton, 
and settled upon the homestead farm, ministering to the 
wants of his parents, while they lived. His mother, from an 
accidental injury, was almost helpless for many years. 

In January, 1824, he removed to Mason village, and was 
employed as clerk and treasurer of the Mason Cotton Mill 
Co., till the failure of that company. 

He soon afterwards, built the family residence where his 
widow still resides, with her son-in-law, Mr. Albert Taft. 

From this period till his death, when not engaged in pub- 
lic business, he was chiefly employed in his work-shop, or 
upon his farm. 

Mr. Stevens, in person, was tall and commanding. His 
countenance was strongly marked, indicating talent and exec- 
utive power. In manners, he combined a judge-like gravity, 
with politeness and affability of deportment. 

His strong intellect was early stimulated into active exer- 
cise, by high aspirations. Self culture, and the mental train- 
ing which a want of educational helps imposes, fitted him to 
"act well his part," in those public stations, he was after- 
wards called to fill. 

His dignity, urbanity and tact, made him a good presiding 
officer. He was, consequently, frequently chosen to preside 
in town meetings, or on other public occasions. As select- 
man, he did much service. As representative in the state 
legislature, either of Wilton or Mason, he served more than 
twenty years. The office of justice of the peace he long held, 
and in it transacted much business. His papers were charac- 
terized by good penmanship, minute accuracy, and business- 
like execution. 

39 



302 HISTORY OF MASON. 

In politics, he was a whig, and hence, though the choice of 
his party, the higher offices of the county and state were 
closed against him. 

As a citizen and a man, he always stood in his lot, meeting 
the wants of society, with a liberal spirit and a generous 
hand. He was a kind husband, a tender father, and an oblig- 
ing neighbor. He died of an affection of the heart, March 
25, 1848, aged sixty -four years. 

Dr. Oliver Scripture, a physician and surgeon, the son of 
Oliver Scripture and Jane, his wife, was born in Mason, June 
16, 1783, He married Eliza, the youngest daughter of the 
Hon. Timothy Farrar. He settled in Hollis, N. H., where he 
now resides. It was in his family that Judge Farrar passed 
the closing years of his life, and there he died, February 21, 
1849, aged 101 years, 7 months and 12 days. 

Lieut. John Swallow, was the eldest son of John Swallow 
and Deborah, his first wife. He was born in Groton, Febru- 
ary 22, 1729-30. His father removed to Dunstable, Mass., 
about the year 1750. While residing in his father's family, at 
Dunstable, he commenced clearing up his farm. His lot was 
No. 6, R. 6, now owned and occupied by his son-in-law, Dea. 
S. Withington, and his grandson, Luke Newell. Here he com- 
menced his farm, probably in 1751. In 1752, he is reported 
as follows: "John Swallow, cleared about one acre, and got 
some timber for a house." At that time, there was no road 
from Dunstable to No. 1. He would start on Monday morn- 
ing, from his father's, with a pack load of provisions on his 
back, and, finding his way by marked trees to his clearing, 
he would fill the forest echoes with lusty blows of his ax, from 
sun to sun, till his stock of provisions was exhausted, and 
then starting a few hours before sun set, he would wend his 
solitary way through the forest, twenty two miles to his Dun- 
stable home, to replenish his stock, and, after a brief resting, 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 303 

would again renew his journey and his labors. Thus he sub- 
dued the forest, built his log cabin, and set up his household. 
In this log cabin, a house of one small room, he lived till after 
the birth of his eleventh child, when he removed into the 
two story framed house now standing, in which he spent the 
remainder of his life, extended to the good old age of 86 
years. He never knew what it was to be sick, or ever tasted 
of any thing called medicine, until past his 75th year. His 
death was occasioned by a fall and broken bone, the pain of 
which wore out his life, November 23, 1815. He was twice 
married. His first wife was Sarah, daughter of Ens. Enosh 
Lawrence, the second, Mary, daughter of Dea. Nathan Hall. 

Dea. Rogers Weston, was born in Billerica, Mass., Sep- 
tember 30, 1757. His father was Samuel Weston, born in 
Reading, Mass., in 1722. He was a descendant of John 
Weston, who was married to Sarah Fitch, April 18, 1653. 
Dea. Weston was an inhabitant of Mason as early as 1780. 
He began his farm on the lot where his son Rogers Weston 
now lives. He married, (1) Deborah Lawrence, daughter of 
Ens. Enosh Lawrence, April 12, 1785. She died, October 20, 
1798. (2) Anna Frost, of West Cambridge, Mass., Decem- 
ber, 1799. She died September 30, 1829. (3) Rebecca 
Keyes, of Townsend, in 1830. She died August 15, 1830. 
(4) Mrs. Lydia Buttrick, of Pepperell, in 1831. She died 
March 13, 1837. (5) Mrs. Betsey Wright, of Brookline, 
who survived him. He died March 9, 1843, aged 85 years, 5 
months, 9 days. Dea. Weston was an industrious, frugal and 
successful farmer. He was an active and ardent politician, 
and for many years the leader of the democratic, or, as it was 
then called, the republican party in the town, a firm supporter 
of the policy and administrations of Jefferson and Madison, 
and, as such, was elected to represent his town five years in 
the legislature. He was appointed a justice of the peace in 
1808, and held the office till his death. 



306 



HISTORY OP MASON. 



Col. James Wood, became a resident in Mason, about tKe 
year 1780. His father, Ens. John Wood, removed to Mason, 
with his family, in 1778. Their ancestor, William Wood, was 
born in England, in 1582. He settled at Concord, Mass., in 
1638, where he died. May 4, 1671, at the age of 89 years. 
Ens. John Wood was born in Concord. He died at Mason, 
December 9, 1785. Col. James Wood, came from Leominster, 
Mass., to Mason. He was a cabinet maker by trade, and 
worked at that business through life. He built the house 
where Oliver Allen now lives, a view of which is here pre- 
sented. He was of a generous, liberal disposition, his hand 




RESIDENCE OF COL. JAMES WOOD. 



and heart were always open to the call of friendship, or to 
the claims of the indigent and distressed ; always ready, to 
the full measure of his ability, to aid in every good word and 
work, he was popular in his manners and well esteemed by 
all his fellow citizens. He was, in politics, a federalist of the 
old school, and, for many years, the leading man of his party 
in town. He was the representative of the town five years 
in succession, commencing in the year 1800, and was again 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 307 

elected in 1809, making, in all, six yeai's. He served as 
one of the selectmen seven years. He had a taste for mili- 
tary aifairs, in which he held office from the lowest grade up 
to that of colonel. He was, also, in office for many years as 
a justice of the peace. His character, as a townsman, a 
neighbor, a christian and a public officer, was without blemish. 
No man ever lived in the town who was more universally and 
more deservedly beloved. He died, July 31, 1838, at the age 
of 83 years. 

Rev. William Olmsted, was born at Westchester, a parish 
or society in Colchester, Conn., January 5, 1821. His parents 
were Zachariah and Elizabeth Olmsted. They were both 
pious, and earnestly desired that William, the youngest of 
eight children, might be a minister. His father dying when he 
was eleven years old, he was left to the guardianship of his 
elder brothers. He is represented as a slender, quiet, home 
loving boy, who preferred the society of his sisters, to the 
harsh, out-door amusements, boys generally love. His early 
youth was chiefly spent at school. At the age of sixteen 
years, he was placed as clerk in a store at East Haddam. 
It was at this place, during a revival of religion, that he was 
converted and united with the church. Here he probably 
remained till he was of age. He next engaged as a clerk in 
a dry goods store at Hartford. Being taken sick shortly 
after, he changed his plans for future life, and resolved on pre- 
paring for the ministry. Everything afterwards was made 
subsidiary to this purpose. When sufficiently recovered, he 
entered Williston Seminary, where he remained till August, 
1844. During vacation, he was examined and admitted a 
member of Yale College. But his health being delicate, by 
advice of friends, he abandoned the idea of a college course 
and commenced at once theological studies. His first year 
was passed at East Windsor, the two last at Union Theolog- 
ical Seminary, at New York. He graduated in 1847. A soci- 
ety in Brooklyn, N. Y., secured his services for one year, and 



308 HISTORY OF MASON. 

wished to retain him longer. Thinking his health might be 
better in the country, he came to Mason village in the fall of 
1848, and was ordained there, April 11, 1849. In May, 1852, 
with health slightly impaired, he left his people to attend the 
anniversaries at 'New York. On his return, he stopped for a 
few days with his friends in Connecticut, fell sick and died 
in his native town, and among his kindred, June 6, 1852. 
Agreeably to his dying request, "bury me among my beloved 
people," his remains were interred in the graveyard at Mason 
village. The marble which marks his resting place bears this 
inscription, indicated by himself: '-1 shall be satisfied when I 
awake in thy likeness." 

To speak of Mr. Olmsted as he still lives in the hearts of 
his "little flock," might be thought flattery. But the mem- 
ory of the good should be blessed ; fragrance should exhale 
from the tomb of earth's benefactors. In person, he was 
tall and slender, seeming to want that muscular propor- 
tion and physical symmetry so necessary to active endurance, 
and which, in many cases, early out-door exercise and bodily 
labor only can impart. His eye was dark and penetrating, 
the whole countenance intellectual and benignent in expres- 
sion. Alas, that so many of earth's gifted ones should perish 
ere they are ripe, from this unequal development — this dis- 
proportion between the brain and its animal machinery ! His 
style, as a writer, was chaste and graphic, and his manner oi 
speaking was peculiarly his own, animated, impressive and 
winning. His power, as a public speaker, seemed to be 
derived mainly from his knowledge of human character and 
his sympathy with and ready adaptation to the wants and the 
minds of men. An intimate friend and room mate thus 
speaks of him: "For his age, he had the best knowledge of 
human nature of any one I have ever met. He had a faculty 
of keen and close observation of the thoughts and motives of 
men, which was truly wonderful. He saw at a glance, he 
moved instantly, he made it plain to all. His end was the 
ministry, and he carried the direct aim of all true business 





'c^^AJ:^^ 



fEl¥o W21MAK iaMiSH®, 



BIOGEAPHICAL SKETCHES. 309 

life into his studies. The study of Latin and Greek classics 
had no charm for him ; it seemed like drudgery ; but he 
trained himself by a thorough course of mental philosophy, 
and delighted in the investigation of every question which 
bore upon his great object. He was eminently conscientious. 
In all my acquaintance with him, I cannot recall a single 
word or act, which could throw the least discredit upon his 
Christian character." 

Mr. Olmsted was social in his habits, decided in his opin- 
ions, and bold and fearless in their advocacy. He took a 
deep interest in public improvements, and whatever promoted 
the general welfare. The erection, during his ministry, of 
the church edifice for the Congregational society in the village, 
was greatly aided by his influence and example. A sermon 
from Jeremiah 7:18, "The children gather wood, and the 
fathers kindle the fire, and the women knead their dough, to 
make cakes to the queen of heaven," was preached by him in 
promotion of this object, and was a happy specimen of the 
writer's tact and genius. His brief life with his people, 
abounds with pleasant reminiscences. 

James Taft, was born in Uxbridge, Mass., June 13, 1780. 
In 1796, he commenced his services as an apprentice to learn 
the tanner's trade, at Petersham. In 1802, he established 
himself at New Ipswich, in the business of a tanner. His 
tan yard was that commenced in 1787, by Jeremiah Pritchard, 
at the foot of the hill south of the old burying ground. He 
built the house lately occupied by Mrs. Clary. He commenced 
business in company with Roger Chandler and Henry Isaacs, 
in 1812, and removed to Mason village. This company built 
the first cotton factories in the village, and for several years 
made the spinning of cotton yarn their principal business, 
and some years after they introduced machinery for weaving 
cotton cloths. In the spring of 1837, he commenced busi- 
ness as a merchant, and continued in it until his death, March 
3, 1856. 

40 



310 



HISTORY OF MASON. 




RESIDENCE OF JAMES TAFT. 

In 1805, Mr. Taft married Hannah Proctor. His only 
daughter, Mary, died June, 1828, aged 22 years. His three 
sons, Albert, George and James, survive him, and all reside in 
the village. He served many years as one of the selectmen. 




RESIDENCE OF liEUKGE TAFT, ES(i. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SSETCHES. 311 

Capt. Thomas Tarbell, was one of the original proprie- 
tors of No. 1, and named as such in the grant of the Masonian 
proprietors. He was one of the first settlers, was clerk of 
the proprietary, first chosen in 1762, and continued in office 
till the last meeting of that body, in 1773, and was one of 
the most active and leading men in all affairs of the township 
prior to the incorporation. Six of his sons settled on farms 
near him. He was a native of Grotou. Thomas Tarbell, his 
ancestor, was one of the original proprietors of Groton in 
1661. In the list are the names of Thomas Tarbell, Sen. and 
Thomas Tarbell, Jr. There were so many of the name of 
Thomas, that it is difficult to trace them all to Thomas, Sen., 
from whom, undoubtedly, they all descended. One Thomas 
was town clerk in Groton in 1704-'5, another from 1731 to 
1733, another from 1745 to 1756, inclusive. The extracts 
from Capt. Tarbell's records, as clerk of the proprietors, on 
pages from 47 to 54, show that his notions of orthography 
were peculiar and unique. The following specimen, from a 
record of his ancestor, Thomas Tarbell, town clerk of Groton, 
will show that he could plead ancestral example in excuse for 
the liberties he took with the syllables of the language : 

grotton march 8 1704 
at a legul townraeeting the town did yot that they wul met for the 
futur to chus town offesurs the fust tusday of march annuelly 

thomas tarbell dark 

The name of Tarbell is very rare in this country. It does 
not appear in the long list of those who took the freeman's 
oath before 1669, nor does I^armer, in his Genealogical Reg- 
ister mention any of the name except Thomas, Sen., and 
Thomas, Jr. It is from these that all of the name in Massa- 
chusetts and New Hampshire are descended. There is one 
romantic incident in the history of the family thus related in 
Butler's Groton, page 96, in the chapter relating to the suffer- 
ings of that town in the Indian wars. He says : 

Besides these instances of alarm, attack and suffering from a 
savage foe, others are known to have occurred, of which there is 



312 HISTORY OF MASON. 

more or less authentic evidence. One, of which the tradition is 
undoubtedly nearly correct, is that of two lads, John Tarbell and 
Zachariah Tarbell, brothers, and sons of Thomas Tarbell, who 
were taken and carried to Canada. The story runs thus. One 
evening, a little after sunsetting, the Indians came suddenly upon 
the inmates of a garrisoned house, which stood where the Rev. Mr. 
Sanderson's house now stands, or near that spot. They all escaped 
and got safely into the garrison, except these boys, who being on a 
cherry tree, had not sufficient time to descend and save themselves 
from captivity. The precise time of this event is not known, but it 
is said Zachariah was so young, that he entirely lost his native lan- 
guage, and the records of Groton show, that John was born July 6^ 
1695, and Zachariah January 25, 170U. So it was probably 
between 1704 and 1708. Some years after, they both came to 
Groton on a visit, but having become accustomed to savage life, no 
persuasion prevailed on them to return and live with their friends 
and relatives. The present inhabitants of that name are their 
collateral kindred. Their descendants are still among the Indians 
in Canada; 



APPENDIX. 



NOTE TO PAGE 45. 



EXTRACT FROM A JOURNAL OF JOSEPH HOLT, OF WILTON, N. H., "OF THE MARCfl 
OF CAPT. EBEN'R JONES' COMPANY, IN THE EXPEDITION TO CANADA," IN 1758. 

Joseph Holt, probably of Andover, Mass., and who resided 
many years at Wilton, N. H., was a soldier in the French war 
of 1758. He kept a journal, from day to day, from the time 
he left home. May 24, 1758, to October 24. This journal was 
recently found in the possession of a gentleman in the city of 
New York, and copied and forwarded for publication in the 
New England Historical and Genealogical Register, by Fred- 
eric Kidder, Esq., a gentleman to whom all who feel any 
interest in the past history of New Ipswich and its vicinity 
are greatly indebted. It is published in full, in vol. 10, pp. 
307-310 of the Register. The following extract from this 
journal will be of interest to many in the town of Mason and 
the vicinity : 

July 20. A terrible day as ever I saw. Early in the morning, as 
a party often men were comeing down from ye Lake, the enemy 
fired upon them, and killed & took all but one; sundry officers and 
men, to the number of about thirty, sallied to the assistance of the 
scout, &. many others directly followed ; the enemy exceeding our 
number, they run upon us and beat us off, & killed 6 commissioned 
officers, & took and killed many others, a list of which follows : 
Captains Samuel Dakin of Sudbury, Ebenezer Jones of Wilmington, 
Thomas Lawrence of Groton, all killed : Lieutenants Samuel Curtis 
of Sudbury, of Capt. Dakin's company — Simon Godfrey of Billerica, 
of Capt. Jones' Co. ; Ensign Daniel Davis of Methuen, of Capt. 
Foster's Co. ; Sergant Peter Russell of Concord, of Capt. Fletcher's 
Co. — all killed. Sergant Wright of Westford, of Capt. Lawrence's 



314 APPEND!]!^. 

Co., missing. John Bateman of Concord, Abner Keys of Billerlca, 
Bill Eaton of do., allofCapt. Fletcher's Co., killed. Corporal Gould 
of No. 1, [now Mason, N. H.], Eleazer Ames of Groton, Abel Saw- 
telle &L Stephen Foster of do., Simon Wheeler and Joel Crosby of 
Westford, all belonging to Capt. Lawrence's Co., killed. Joshua 
Newton of South Berwick, missing. Isaac Little of Dedham, 
William Grout of Sudbury, Jonathan Patterson & Nathaniel Moul- 
ton of do., belonging to Capt. Dakin's Co., missing. David Payson 
of Rowley, killed. Caleb Kimball of Ipswich, Moses Hagget of 
Andover, killed. William Coggin of Wilmington, wounded. Abra- 
ham Harding of Pennycook, of Capt. Foster's Co., killed. 21st. We 
went out with a party of 200 men to reconnoitre the woods and 
ground where our yesterday's battle was, and to seek for missing 
men; we found 4 dead, and also the enemy's lurking place; P. M., 
I went up to the lake to take care of the sick we left there; Moses 
Hagget died of his wounds. 

NOTE TO PAGE 42. 

For many years after the settlement of Mason was com- 
menced, the inhabitants were dependent upon the neighboring- 
clergy for such religious services as their exigencies required, 
except as they were, from time to time, temporarily supplied 
by candidates and preachers hired for short terms. This 
state of things continued for twenty years or more. The 
neighboring clergy, at that time, were the Rev. Caleb Trow- 
bridge, of Groton, H. C, 1710, ordained at Groton, March 2, 
1714-15, died September 9, 1760; the Rev. Phinehas Hemen* 
way, of Townsend, H. C, 1730, ordained at Townsend, Octo- 
ber, 1734, died May, 1760 j the Rev. Daniel Emerson, of Hol- 
lis, H. C, 1739, ordained at Hollis, April 20, 1743, died Sep- 
tember 30, 1801 ; the Rev. Jos. Emerson, of Pepperell, H. C., 
1743, ordained at Pepperell, February 26, 1746-47, died Oct. 
29, 1775, and the Rev. Stephen Farrar, H. C, 1755, ordained 
at New Ipswich, October 22, 1760, died June 23, 1809. Of 
these, the nearest, in point of distance, was the Rev. Mr. 
Hemenway. He received a call to settle in Townsend in 1734. 
His acceptance is dated July 22, 1734. The time for his 
ordination was, by vote of the town, the third Wednesday of 
October. Under date of July 12, 1734, is recorded the vote 
of the town, that Mr. Hemenway's " stated annual salary shall 



APPENDIX. 315 

altar in proportion as the valle of silver shall alter with 
the goldsmiths aucl merchants in Boston, as silver money at 
25s. per ounce." His stated salary was £60, half yearly. In 

1740, the town raised ,£200 for Mr. Hemenway's salary, in 

1741, X140 16s. 8d., in 1742, £180. For subsequent years 
till 1753, no entry is made. Probably the salary of £120 
remained unchanged. In that year, the town, May 28, 

Voted, To raise one hundred pounds, old tenor, for Mr. Hemen- 
way, this present year, it being for his great sickness and lameness 
the year past, and for the great Cearcity of provisions the present 
year. 

Voted, That the money be paid in labor, grain, meat, butter, cheese, 
wool, flax, &c., or else in cash, before the last day of January next. 

Mr. Hemenway died in May, 1760. On the 2d day of June 
the town 

Voted, To pay all the charges that has already arisen for the Rev. 
Mr. Hemenway's funeral, which sum is .£102 16s. 8d., old tenor. 

September 16, 1760, the town 

Voted. That the Rev. Mr. Hemenway's salary shall run on six 
weeks after his decease, provided Madam Hemenway will give the 
town the boarding of the bearers the six days they preached, and all 
the board at the fast, and be entirely easy with the same. 

It was the custom of that age for the town to pay the 
expenses of the funeral of the minister, the amount of which, 
in some instances, might now be thought extravagant. The 
neighboring ministers officiated as pall bearers, and it was the 
rule for each of the bearers to give one Sunday's preaching 
and services to the bereaved parish and church, and it is to 
this custom that allusion is made in this condition of the 
town's vote to continue Mr. Hemenway's salary six weeks 
after his decease. 

In October following, the town "chose Mr. Samuel Dix to 
be their pastor and gospel minister, by a unanimous voat," at 
a salary of £66 13s. 4d. Mrs. Hemenway did not remain 
long in widowhood, for in the record of marriages by Mr. Dix, 



316 APPENDIX. 

under date of October 20, 1761, is the marriage of Mr. David 
Taylor, of Concord, and Mrs. Sarah Hemenway. 

NOTE TO PAGE 102. 

Congregational singing, that is, the singing of psalms and 
hymns in metre, by the congregation in the public worship, 
was a custom revived in the churches, at the time of the 
reformation, it having been banished by the Romanists from 
their worship. This service was highly prized by our pilgrim 
ancestors. But among the singers, although their purpose 
was to cultivate harmony of voices, there was not always 
found harmony of temper. Sometimes bitter heartburnings 
and controversies arose among them. This was especially the 
case, when attempts were made to introduce new modes, new 
music and instruments. The organ was looked upon as a box 
of whistles, the violin as a profane and ungodly instrument, 
and even the solid base viol was regarded as no better than 
one of the bulls of Bashan. One of the most amusing cases 
illustrating this characteristic of our fathers, is found in the 
memorial of Joseph Hawley, presented to the general assem- 
bly of Connecticut, in 1725, literally copied as below, from 
the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, vol, 
10, p. 311: 

To the Honourable y^ General Assembly at hartford y^ IS'^'^ of may 
1725. 

the memorial of Joseph Hawley one of y® house of Representa- 
tives humbly sheweth your Memorialist his father and Grandfather & 
y^ whole Church & people of farmingtown have used to worship God 
by singing psalms to his praise In y*^ mode called ye Old way. 

however t'other Day Jonathan Smith & one Stanly Got a book &, 
pretended to sing more regularly &iy so made Great disturbance In 
y^ worship of God for y^ people could not follow y^ mode of sing- 
ing, at Length t'was moved to y^ church whither to admit y^ new 
way or no, who agreed to suspend it at least for a year. 

yet Deacon hart y'^ Chorister one Sabbath day Jn setting y^ psalm 
attempted to sing Bella tune — and yo"^ memorialist being used to ye 
old way as aforesd did not know helium tune from pax tune, and sup- 
posed y^ deacon had aimed at Cambridge short tune, and set it wrong, 
whereupon y"^ petitioner Raised his Voice in y^ s*^ short tune & ye 



APPENDIX. 317 

people followed him, except y^ s'^ Smith & Stanly, &, y® few who 
Sang allowd In bella tune; & so there was an unhnppy Discord in 
y® Singing, as there has often bin since y® new singers set up, and 
y'= Blame was all Imputed to yo'" poor petion[er]. and Jn° Hooker, 
Esq"" assistant, sent for him, & fined him y® 19th of feb'^ L-ist for 
breach of Sabbath, and so yor poor petition"" is Liyed under a very 
heavie Scandal & Reproach & Rendered vile & prophane for what 
he did in y*^ fear of God, tSi in y'^ mode he had bin well educated in 
and was then y*^ setled manner of Singing by y*^ agreem*- of y^ Church. 

Now yo'" Petition"" thinks y*^ Judgment is erroneous, first, because 
y® fact if as wicked as m"" hooker supposd Comes under y^ head of 
disturbing God's worship, & not y*^ statute of prophaning y*^ Sabbath: 
secondly, because no member of a Lawful! Church Society can be 
punished for worshipping God in y® modes & formes, agreed upon, & 
fixed by y*^ Society, thirdly because tis errors, when y*^ Civill author- 
ity sodenly Interpose Ijetween partyes y' differ about modes of wor- 
ship, & force one porty to Submitt to y*^ other, till all milder methods 
have bin used to Convince mens Consciences, fourthly because tis 
error to make a Gent of yo"" petition'" carracter a Scandalous offender 
upon Record, for nothing but a present mistake at most, when no 
morral evil is Intended. 

Wherefore yo"' poor petioner prayes you to set aside y*^ s'^^ Jud, or 
by what means yo' hon""^ please, to save you'" poor petition"" from ye 
Imputation of ye heinous Crime Laid to him, & yo"" poor petion"" as 
in duty ^c shall ever pray. Joseph Hauly. 

lu order that the play upon "words in the latin terms used 
in the petition may be understood, it is well to add that bella 
is "wars ; bellum, "war ; pax, peace. 



XOTE TO PAGE 124. 

In anticipation that a large armed force might be required 
to put down the ''Whisky rebellion" in Pennsylvania, Con- 
gress, on the 9th of May, 1794, passed an act authorizing the 
president to make requisitions on the executives of the sev- 
eral states for troops. The whole number provided for was 
80,000. Of these, the number required from New Hampshire 
was 3,544. It was under this act that the volunteers ten- 
dered their services, and were paid the bounty by the town. 
This insurrection, which, at one time, assumed a threatening 
and formidable attitude, was quelled by the forces under Gen. 
Lee, without bloodshed, and the troops from New Hampshire 
were not called for. 

41 



318 APPENDIX. 

NOTE TO PAGE 82. 

When the government of Massachusetts was established 
under the first charter, none could vote at any elections of 
magistrates or officers, except those who had been admitted 
to take, and who had taken, the freeman's oath. For some 
years, the elections were all held at one place, generally at 
Boston. All the freemen were required to attend personally 
at the stated time and place. While they all thus lived in 
the vicinity of Boston, no great inconvenience to the voters 
or danger to the community was experienced by the compli- 
ance with this rule. But as the settlements were extended 
to considerable distances from Bostoft, and as the people 
began to be under alarm of sudden attack by their Indian 
enemies, it was found necessary to provide for some modifica- 
tion of the law, which was done by the two acts of the gen- 
eral court, copies of which are here given : 

1635-6. March 3. Further, it is ordered, that the Gen'all Court 
to he holden in May next, for elec'oii of mngistrates, &,c., shall be 
holden at Boston, th;it the townes of Ipswich, Neweberry, Salem, 
S:iugus, Wayinouthe and Hinghain, shall have libertie to stay soe 
many of their ffreeraen att home, f )r the safty of their towne, as they 
iudge needefiil, and that the said ffreemen that are appoyneted by the 
towne to stay att home shall have liberty for this court to send their 
voices by pr'x'y. 

1738-7. March 9. This court tal<eing into serious consideration 
the greate danger and damage that may accrue to the state by all the 
ffreemen's leaveing their plantations, to come to the place of elec- 
tions, have therefore ordered it, that it shal bee free and lawfull for 
all freemen to send their votes for elections by proxie, the next Gen- 
e'all courte in May, and so for hereafter, vv'"'^ shall bee done in this 
manner : The deputies w'^^^ shall bee chosen shall cause the freemen 
of their townes to bee assembled, and then to take such freemen's 
votes as please to send by pr'xie for every magistrate, and seale them 
vp, severally subscribing the magistrate's name on the back side, and 
soe to bring them to the court sealed, with an open roule of the 
names of the ffreemen that so send by pr'xie. 

Some dim tradition of these laws having come down to 
their times, probably furnished the foundation of the claim of 
Obadiah Parker, Joseph Ball and others, to send their votes 
for representative; to the town meeting by Joseph Merriam, 



APPEXDIS. S19 

NOTE TO PAGE 247. 

Ko national festival was ever kept with more heart-felt 
pleasure than the old-fashioned New England thanksgiving. 
Our fathers regarded tlie christmas festival as a remnant of 
popery, or, at least, as one of the superstitious observances 
of the church of England, from whose tyranny they had fled 
into the wilderness, and they at once instituted the thanks- 
giving festival in its place. For them, it had all the charms 
of the old Christmas festival, without any of its objectionable 
features. It was first introduced in 1633, by the following 
order of the general court: 

1633. Sept. 3. In regard of the many and extraordinary raercys 
w'^^ the Lord hath beene pleased to vouchsafe, of late, to this planta* 
con, viz : a plentiful harvest, ships safely arrived with p'sons of spe- 
tiall use and quality, &.C., it is ordered, that Wednesday, the ICth 
day of this present month shall be kept as a day of publiqne thanks- 
giveing through the sev'ral plantacons. 

The custom finally prevailed for the governor, with advice 
of council, to appoint the day, and give notice thereof by 
special proclamation. For many years the observance of this 
festival was peculiar to New England, but it is now becoming 
the practice in most of the states, for the governor to appoint 
a day of thanksgiving, to be observed at the close of the har- 
vest. The time generaily selected is some one of the Thurs- 
days in the two last weeks of November or the first week of 
December. Not content with establishing thanksgiving, in 
opposition to christmas, our fathers went further, and actually 
prohibited the keeping of christmas, under a penalty, by the 
following law : 

For preventing disorders arising in several places within this jurisdic- 
tion, by reason of some still observing such festivals as were super- 
stitiously kept in other countries, to the great dishonor of God, 
and offence of others : 

It is therefore Ordered by this Court and the authority thereof, 
That whosoever shall be found observing any such day as Christmas, 
or ihe like, either by forbenring labor, feasting, or any other way 
upon any such account as aforesaid, every such person so offend ing 
shall pay for every such offence five shillings, as a tine to the Country. 



320 



APPENDIX. 



Ill a report upon the revision of the laAvs in 1681, this, 
among others, having been objected to bj the attorney gen- 
eral and solicitor general in England, it was disposed of as 
follows : " 8th. The law against keeping Christmas to be left 
out." 

DEPTH OF SNOWS. 

No record has been kept, in Mason, of the state of the 
weather, depth of snows, &c., for any considerable length of 
time. The following table, kept by Mr. Luther Nutting, in 
the northerly part of the town, of the depth of snow each 
year, commencing in the fall of 1843 and ending in the spring 
of 1857, he having carefully measured and recorded every fall 
of snow, may be relied on as accurate : 

TABLE or DEPTH OF SNOWS, IN MASON, FROM 1843 TO 1857, INCLUSIVE. 





ft. in. 




ft. in. 




ft. in. 




ft. in. 


1843-44, 


13 6 


1847-48, 


7 2 


1851-52, 


10 11 


1855-56, 


7 3 


1844-45, 


6 7 


1848-49, 


5 8 


1852-53, 


7 00 


1856-57, 


7 9 


1845-46, 


5 11 


1849-50, 


8 8 


1853-54, 


6 3 






1846-47, 


6 9 


1850-51, 


7 9 


1854-55, 


9 10 







ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 

Pago 277, after Dr. Moses Dakin, add M. D. Bowdoin College, 1828. 

Page 285, Dr .losejih Gray was born in Providence, R. I., in 1751, took an 
active part in the war of the revolution, studied physic with Dr. IMann, of 
Rhode Island, attended the medical lectures of Dr. Rush, was one of the earli- 
est regularly educated physicians in the county of Hillsborough. He com- 
monced practice in Nottinghamwest. He married Lucy, daughter of Dea. 
Sam'l Bancroft, of Reading, Mass. In 1790, he removed to Mason, and resided 
there till 1809, in which year he removed with his family from the town. 

Dr. Henry Gray, was born in Nottinghamwest, in 1783, removed from 
Mason to Londonderry, Vt., where he now resides. 

John Gray, son of Dr. Joseph Giay, studied law, was established in pros- 
perous business in Kentucky, but died at an early age. Two of his sons are 
lawyers in Kentucky. 

Page 161, line 19, for 1758, March 30, read 1759, April 11, and for Betty 
Ilazen, r. Thankful Harrington, of Pepperell. 

Page 178, 1. 6 and 7, for wife, r. sister, and for 75, r. 79 years. 

Pa-ie 179, 1. 29, for Elizabeth, r. Deborah. 

Page 210, after 1. 18, insert, their children were; 1. 26, for June 3, r. June 
17; 1. 35, for 1755, r. January 7, 1756. 

Page 211, 1. 10, after Lucy, insert, born March 6, 1762, and in the same line, 
for 1819, r. 1849 ; 1. 11, before Stickney, insert Jose]3h. 

Page 215, ]. 8, for 1778, r. 1788. 

Page 220, 1. 21, for Edward, r. Edmund. 

Page 250, 1. 32, for Andrew Reed, r. Andrew H. Reed. 

Page 260 and 261, for Olmstead, r. Olmsted. 



INDEX. 



AcaUEDAHCAX, 14. 

Alarm list, 79. 

AUeu, sale to, 18, not A-alid, 19, heirs 

of threaten suits, 2-1. 
Alleu's advertisement, 36. 
Ammunition, 90. 

Ancient customs, of marketing, 247. 
Arms purchased, 90. 



Bachelder, Dr. John, 266. 

Baptist church, 2o3, in village, 258. 

Barber, Dr. William, 123, 266, school- 
master, 134. 

Barrett, Capt. Joseph, 266. 

Battle of Halfway Brook, 313. 

Beef for the armv, 101. 

Bill of rights, Oo', 104. 

Biographical sketches, 266-312. 

Births, 236. 

Blodgett, John, 141. 

Blood, Eben, James, John, Joseph, 
AViUiam, 198, 199. 

Blood, Rev. Charles E., 267. 

Blood, Rev. Lorenzo W., 267. 

Boad, 26. 

Bounty to volunteers, 124, 134. 

Bount)% to soldiers, 89, 141, for killing 
a crow, 135. 

Boyntou common school fund, 146. 

Bovnton, Hon. John, 146. 

Bridges, 59, 63, 86, 106. 

Brookline, 5, 27. 

Bruce, Rev. John, 108. 

Burnap, Rev. Jacob, 70. 



Cabot, Sebastian, 6. 

Canada, 38. 

Certihcates of soldiers sent to Exeter, 

100. 
Changing sides, 137. 
Chamberlain, Loammi, 268. 
■Chamberlain, James H., 271. 
Champney, Ebenezer, 48. 
Character and habits, 78. 
Chickering, Abner, 273. 
Chickering, Jonas, 274. 



Christian church, 262. 

Christmas, law prohibiting, 319. 

Churches, 248-265. 

Clergy, character and influence of 69. 

Collector fined, 123. 

Colony of New Hampshire, 83. 

Committee of correspondence, 74, 77. 

Committee of inspection, 82, 86, 87. 

Committee of safety, 94. 

Committee on exorbitance of trade, 87. 

Completing the continental army, 101. 

Congregational church, 248, in village, 

260. 
Congregational singing, 316. 
Constitution, vote on accepting, 104. 
Convention, at Exeter, 1774, 73, 79, at 

Amherst, 74, to form constitution, 

94, on currency at Portsmouth, 95, 

at Concord, 101. 
Cotton picking, by hand, 243. 
Cotton, Rev. John, 273. 
Covenant of non-importation, 75. 
Covenant, signers adojjt resolves, 77. 
Cragin, Dea. Simeon, 272. 
Craniield, Governor, 16. 
Cromwell, Lord General, 273. 
Cut nails, machine for making, 243. 



Dakin, Amos, goes to Exeter, 73. 

Dakin, Dea. Amos, 274. 

Dakin, Dea. Timothy, 275. 

Dakin, Samuel, Esq , 276. 

Dakin, Dr. Moses, 276. 

Davis, Joshua, goes to Exeter, 100. 

Deaths, record of, from 1758 to 1858, 

176-193. 
Delinquent proprietors, 39, 40, 42, 43. 
Dissent of Eliot and Allen, 103. 
Doings detrimental to the cause, 91. 
Douglass' map, 26. 
Dram Cup Hill, 27. 
Dunstable, 21, 26, 27. 
Dunster, Jason, 211. 



Early settlers, list of, 213-221. 
Earthen ware, 245. 



322 



INDEX. 



Ecolcsiasfical affnir!?. 2i8-2Go. 

Elerum list, 79, at Ticouderoga, 94i 

Klias VMiA, 197. 

Eliot, Rev. William. 279. 

Elliot, Geoi-nc, 276. 

Elliot, Israel, 284. 

Elliot, Rev. Jesse, 285, 

Elliot, Rev. Joseph, 284. 

Elm trees, 290. 

Eudccott, John, 15. 

Era of good feeling, 141. 



Family registers. 195-211. 
Fast, Capt. TarbcU paid for a, 66. 
Fay. Jonas, Jr., 285. 
Federal currency, 134. 
Fish, Asa, at vendue, 94. 
Flagg, Josiah, 211. 
Flouring mills, 245, 271. 
Forleitun- of rights, 39, 40. 
French, Capt. Joseph, 31. 



Gil'iert, Sir Humphrey, 6. 
Gould, Nehemiah, 44," 45, 314. 
Government, new established, 80, 93. 
Grantees and settlers, 35. 
Gravevards, 44, 64, 65, 71, 91, 101, 

132," 133. 
Graves, reasonably needed, to be dug, 

88. 
Grav, Dr. Joseph, 285, 320. 
Gray, Dr. Henry, 285, 320. 
Gray, John, 320. 

Habits and custom of worshipers, 72, 

130, 132. 
Hall, Oca. Nathan, 285. 
Harrington, Rev. Mr., 251. 
Hawley, Josepli's petition, 316. 
Hemenway, Rev. IPhinehas, 314. 
Herrick, Josej)h, 30. 
Highways, 34, 36, 40, 44, 47, 49, 50, 

52, 59, 60, 77. 
Hill, Rev, Ebcnezer, 286, donation of 

town to, 133, addition to salary of, 

137. 
Hill, Rev. Joseph B. 28G. 
Hill, Rev. Timothy, 287. 
Hillsborough county, 5. 
Holden, Amos, John, 198. 
Holland. 6. 
HoUis, 27. 
Holt's journal in the French war of 

1758, 313. 
Horse stables, 71. 
Hosmcr family, 210. 
Hoyt, Dr. Otis, 287. 



Hunt, Rev. Nehemiah, 2S?. 
Hutchinson, Thomas, 20, 22» 



idle persons, see paupers. 
Improvements, report upon, 41j 
Inre, Jonathan, 14, 15. 
Incorporation. 51, charges of, 63. 



Justices of the peace, 232. 
Johnson, Dr. AVillis, 288. 



Kemp, Ebenezer, Samuel, 199. 
Kendall, Lieut., builds meeting hoiisej 

111, 113. 
Kidder, Isaiah, 244; 
Kimball, Isaac, 244. 
Kimball, Rev. TruG, called, 103. 



Land tax, 135. 

Law book, Parker paid for sending for, 

71. 
Lawrence, Enosh, 31. 
Lawrence family, 196, 197, 
Lawrence, Dr. Enosh, 289. 
Lawrence, John, 30. 
Leader, Rich'd, resists Mason's title, 13» 
Letters missive, 69. 
Leverett, Governor, 15. 
List of early settlers, 213. 
Littleton, 25. 

Locke, Mrs.Hctty, pound of tea for, 134* 
Lottery, continental, 87. 



!Mann, Benjamin, Esq., 289* 

Manufactures, 241. 

^larianna, 7. 

Marshall, Dr. Thomas IL, 290. 

Marketing, 247. 

Marriage.^, records of, in Groton, Pep- 
l^jcrell and Townc-end, 161, in Mason> 
162-174, 212-2126, remarks on mar- 
riage laws and customs, 2V2b-2\2d, 

Mason, town of, situation, 5, orant, 28, 
plan and draft of lots, 32^ 34, 200 
acres added on north, 38, charter, 
53, name 57. 

Mason, Capt. John, hirth and early 
life, 5, 6, grants to and settlements 
by, 7j objects and results, 8, 10, 11, 
12, d^ath and will, 9. 

Mason Hall, 7. 

Mason, Mrs. Anne, executrix, aban- 
dons the estate, 10. 

Mason, Joseph, her agent brings suits* 
13. 



INDEX. 



32: 



Mason, Robert Tuft on, 13, attorney] 
general reports in his favor, 15, he 
bi'ings new suits, If!, inortpiages to 
Crantield, 16, sells the million aero 
tract, 17. dies, 18. 

^lason, John and Robert, sell to Allen, 
18, sale not valid, 19 

Mason, Robert Tufton, dies, 19. [ 

Mason, Robert Tufton, his son, c^mes 
of age, 19, offers to sell to the Prov- 
ince, 20, 22, sells to Masonian pro- ! 
prietors, 23. i 

Masonian propi-ietors, •v\ho, 23, quiet 
titles, 23. ! 

^lason, proprietors of, first meeting, j 
and choice of officers. 31, 3.5. ! 

Mason, Rev. Alfred L., 292. I 

Massachusetts, 7, lakes jurisdiction, 
13, surveys north line, 14, 15, juris- ! 
diction set aside, 16, Province line, i 
settled, 19, 20. : 

Merrimack river, 7. ' 

Meeting houses, 39, 40, 45, 47, 50, 53, j 
59, 63, 64, 67, going to meeting, 72, | 
seated, 88, six acres around it re- 
served, 101, boards blown off, 105, 
vote to build. 107, site of, 107-110, 
raising of, 11 1-113, j^lan of pews, 113, 
sale of pews, 113, 114, old house 
sold, 119, wharfing round, 120, Bap- 
tists refuse to pay taxes for building, 
121, dedicated, 124, view and de- 
scription of, 125, plan of pews in, 
126, 127, tax of Eliot and Wheeler 
abated, 134, Ba])tist society claim 
rights in, 139, 142, 143, use of voted 
to Congregational society, 143, com- 
mittee to inquire about rights in, 
144, new built, 132, vote to sell, 145. 

Merriam, Joseph, 291, first representa- 
tive, 123. 

Merriam, Samuel, Esq., 292. 

Mile Slip, 27. 

Miles, Rev. Noah, buries the victims 
cf small pox, 139. ' 

Milford, 5 

Military affairs, 79, 86, 87, 124, rations 
for muster, 137. 

Million acre purchase, 17. 

Mills and mill lots, 35, 36, 37, 42, 45, 
47, Eliot's accepted, 50. 

Ministers and preaching, 42, 44, 46, 47, 
call to Champney, 48. call to Parker. 
49,-53, 63, 64, call to Searle, 65, 
66, ordination of Searle, 67, 70, 71, 
73, monev raised for, 102, Kimball 
called, 102, 103, 106, 109, 110, 111, 
Hill called, 113, accepts, 115, ordi- 
nation of. 117, 118, 133, 134, salary 
not voted, 144, Mr. Hill resigns, 144, 



J. Searle, controversy with, ISl-'ieO, 
power of towns to settle, 69. 

Ministry land sold, 77. 

Mortality, statistics of, 233-235. 



Xashobah, 25. 

Xaumkeag. 7. 

Newcastle, Duke of, 27. 

Newell, Ezra, 243. 

Newfoundland, 7. 

New Ipswich, 5. 

New Ipsshed, 64. 

Noon houses, 72. 

Northwest corner ratified, 104. 



Olmsted, Rev. "William, 307. 
Otis, Charles Tilden, 294. 



Paper money, 92, 93, 110. 

Parade made, 120. 

ParagraftH, 87. 

Parker, Rev. James, 49. 

Parker, Lieut. Obadiah, 294. 

Parker, Obadiah, 197, 295. 

Paupers and idle persons, 62, 63, 64, 

71, 95, 140, 142. 
Pemaquid, 11. 
Pepperell, 27. 
Perambulation, 105. 
Petition to (Congress about land tax, 

135. 
Plan of government, 95. 
Plymouth, council of, 6, 7, town of, 6. 
Poor fiuin purchased, 143. 
Population, 81, 236, 237- 
Portsmouth, 5, 7, 8, 16, 51. 
Potash manufactory, 243. 
Powder, purchased, 86, divided, 90. 
Prayers at town meetings, 137. 
Prescott, Lieut. William, 48. 
Prices, extraordinary, 95-100, stipo- 

lated, 97, 98, of nails, hinges, &c,, 

135. 
Proprietary officers, 228, 



Querister chosen, 102. 



Railroad, 245. 
Reed, Rev. A. H., 250. 
Registers, family, 195-211. 
Report on improvements, 40. 
Representation, si. 
Representative, chosen, 82, new meet- 
ing, doings at, 84. 
Representatives, list of, 229-232. 



324 



INDEX. 



Revolution, first appearance of, 73, in 

n;ovcinment of the state, 80. 
Revolutionai'}' troubles, 74. 
Revolutionary war, 221-227. 
Rum for the continential army, 102. 
Russell, Jason, 29o. 
Russell, John, 295, 
Russell, Hubbard, 295. 
Rye, tax paid in, 109. 



Salt purchased, 78, disbusted, bills, 
&c., 81-86. 

School, districts, 237, fund,146,truRlees 
of, 148,232, houses, 120, lands fenced, 
102, leased to Dea. Dakin, 111, sold, 
51, 64, 65, to Dr. Barber, 123. 

Schools, 71. 

Scotch prisoners, sold, 272. 

Scripture, Samuel, 197. 

Scripture, Samuel, difficulties about 
Mr. Brown's preaching, 65, 66. 

Scripture, Dr. Oliver, 302. 

Scythes and axes, 243. 

Searles, Rev. Jonathan, 296, call, 65, 
renewed, 66, answer, 67, ordination, 
67, 68, call to Candia, 69, payments 
to, 70, 71, noon house, 72, lands, 
77, 113, pew, 127, keeps school, 133, 
on committee to wait on Mr. Hill, 
113. 

Settlers and grantees, 35. 

Sextons, 88, 137. 

Sharon, name voted, 52, 57. 

Sherman, John, 15, 16. 

Sinking currency, 95. 

Sir equivalent to dominus 111. 

Slipton, 50. 

Small pox, 123, 138. 139. 

Smith Sarah, clothing, 140. 

Smith, Stephen, Esq., 296. 

Snows, depth of, 320. 

Soldiers, raised, 88, 89, 91, 101, taxes 
of abated, 93, bounties paid to, 89, 
91, 94, 95, for Rhode Island, 95, 
certificates of sent to Exeter, lOU, 
allowance to, 104. 

Spaulding, Rev. John, 299. 

Square monej', 92. 

Squr Varnum, 77. 

Sr. Hill, HI. 

Statistics of mortality, 233-235. 

Stevens, John, Esq. ,300. 



Stones on a stump, 60- 
Swallow, Lieut. John, 197, 302. 



Taft, James, 309. 

Tarbell, Thomas, 197, 311. 

Tarbell boys, Indian prisoners, 312. 

Taxes, paid in rye, 109, J. AVithee's 
abated, 136. 

Taxing the Baptists, 121. 

Tax land, petition against, 135. 

Tax list, first, 61, 62. 

Tea. pound of to Betty Locke, 134. 

Temple, 5, incorporated, 28. 

Thanksgiving, origin of, 319. 

Town house built, 145. 

Town officers, list of, 229-231. 

Town stock of powder purchased and 
divided, 86, 90 

Townsend, 5, divided by Province line, 
21, petition for redress, 22, incorpo- 
rated, 27, 60. 

Thomlinson, 20, 22. 

Three years' men, 88, 91. 

Uncle Sam, 209. 

Village, 241-245. 

Warning out, 63. 

Warrant, for proprietors's meeting, 51, 

for last meeting, 53, for first town 

meeting, 58, Taxes, 61, paupers', 62, 

blown away, 82. 
Weston, Dea. Roger, 303. 
Wheeler, Josiah, resigns, 73, character 

of, 74. 
Wheeler, Timothy, 304. 
Wheeler, Timothy, Jr., 304. 
Wheeler, Aaron, '30o. 
Wilton, grant of, 38. 
Wilson, Edward, 209. 
Wilson, Samuel, anecdote of, 209. 
Winnipissiogee, 14. 
Winthrop, Dean, 25. 
Withee, James, taxes abated, barn 

burnt, 136. 
AVithington, Elisha, schoolmaster, 71 . 
Wood, (Jol. James, 306. 
Wolves, 46. 

Worcester, Francis, 46. 
Workhouse, 64, 71. 




''^^^^^~-(;>P^y (7t^-^-^^J^_J 




MEMOIR 



REV. EBENEZER HILL, 

PASTOR OF THE 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 

I N 

MASON, N . H . 

FROM NO\^MBER, 1790, TO MAY, 1854. 

# 

WITH SOME OF HIS SERMONS, 

AND HIS DISCOURSE ON THE 

HISTORY OF THE TOWN. 



JOHN Br^ILL. 



BOSTON: 
LUCIUS A. ELLIOT &, CO. 

D. BUGBEE & CO., BANGOR, 

18 5 8. 



PRINTED BY SAMUEL S. SMITH, 
BANGOR, ME. 



PREFACE 



To write the biography of a parent, is a delicate task. It 
has not been undertakeii in the present instance, without a 
full appreciation of the difficulties in its accomplishment. 
Neither the feelings of the writer, nor the proprieties of the 
occasion, would permit any other tone than that of eulogy. 
My endeavor has been in this sketch, to exhibit fairly, the 
prominent traits of the character and incidents of the life of 
my father, especially in their effects upon the church and peo- 
ple of his charge ; and in doing so, I am not conscious that I 
have stepped beyond the line of propriety, either in the 
exhibition of commendable traits, or in the concealment or 
suppression of faults or imperfections. For the main body 
of this sketch, I am indebted to my brother, the Rev. T. Hill, 
of Saint Louis, Mo. 

The discourse upon leaving the Old Meeting House, is 

printed from a manuscript transcribed from the original, soon 

after it was delivered. The other discourses, are reprints of 

the first edition, with no change, but the correction of manifest 

errors. The portrait accompanying this volume, is engraved 

from a painting made at the age of about seventy years. 

The engraved page of a sermon, is a fac simile of the ser^ 

mon preached at the dedication of the meeting house, in 

1795. 

J. B. Hill. 
Bangoe, May 1, 1858. 



MEMOIR. 



•' Every man's life is of importance to himself, to his famUy, to his friends, 
to his country, and in the sight of God. They are by no means the best men, 
who have msde most noise in the world ; neither are those actions most 
deserving of praise, which have obtained the greatest show of fame. Scenes 
of violence and blood, the workings of ambition, pride and revenge, compose 
the annals of men. But piety and purity, temperance and humility, which 
are httle noted and soon forgotten of the world, are held in everlasting remem- 
brance before God." Hunter's Sacred Biography, vol. 1, p. 24. 

No two men have ever existed, wliose lives were, in all 
respects, exact counterparts of each other. Every human 
being, is thoroughly individualized by his own will, and has a 
history that is peculiar to himself, which can never be so 
blended with that of another, as not to possess points of 
interest, in contrast, to attentive observers. No two persons 
can be found, whose physical endowments are not such as to 
render them distinguishable by their intimate friends. So 
also, a marked distinction will be found in the mental powers, 
the modes of thought, and manner of action of individuals 
most closely resembling each other. Each, in all these 
respects, will have traits in a good degree original and pecu- 
liar to himself. Hence, the faithful portraiture of the char- 
acter of any individual will afford instruction to others. 
They will recognize in it, situations similar to their own, and 
by observing how difficulties have been overcome, and trials 
borne, or how temptations have led to ruin, they may be 
encouraged to struggle for victory, and shun the path whicli 
led another to destruction. 
2 



6 MEMOIR OF THE 

If it be true, that every man is so individualized as to ren- 
der his real life instructive to otlicrs, it is peculiarly so, with 
the life of a christian ; for with him a new element of power 
is introduced, and grace controls and silently renovates the 
man, evolving its own light from the darkness of nature, and 
so moulding the original elements, that upon all is enstamped 
the glorious image of Jesus, and the man is formed anew, and 
fitted for heaven. 

Could the real life of any christian be written, it would 
form a most interesting volume, and it would matter little, 
what position in life the subject of it might have occupied. 
The life of Moses is rich and varied, but the simple sketch of 
Lazarus, sitting at the rich man's gate, — dying alone, and 
borne by angels to Abraham's bosom, has a touching beauty, 
equalling in interest anything found in that of the law-giver. 

If these views are correct, the life of any earnest, success- 
ful preacher of the gospel, must have an intrinsic interest in 
whatever station his lot has been cast. He may not have 
been as eloquent as Whitfield, as deep a theologian as Ed- 
wards, nor have possessed the finished grandeur of Robert 
Hall; but he has fought a good fight himself, has pointed 
many sinners to the Lamb of God, that taketh away the 
sins of the world ; and trained many souls for immortality, 
and fitted them for heaven. The memory of such a man is 
enshrined in the best affections of many who have felt always 
his influence, and a view of his life will furnish them, and 
others also, with new motives for leading a life of faith. 

Such was the humble, earnest life of him, of whose history 
and character, it is proposed here to give a brief outline. 
His was the quiet life of a retired pastor of a country 
church ; of one, whose highest ambition it was, to be a faith- 
ful preacher of the gospel, to those whom God had placed 
under his care. It is the object of this sketch, to enable 
those who read it, to form a distinct idea of his individual 
character, of his manner of life, and of the general results of 
his labors ; and the many friends who revered and loved him 



EEV. EBEMEZER HILL. ' 1 

while living, to preserve a fresh and vivid memory of their 
departed pastor, counselor and friend. 

Ebenezer Hill, the subject of this memoir, was born in 
Cambridge, Mass., January 31st, 1766. He was the youngest 
son of Samuel Hill and Sarah Cutler, his wife. His father 
was born in Boston, but of his parentage and ancestry, 
nothing is certainly known. He was a carpenter by trade, 
but never rose above the condition of the most humble 
poverty. He served as a common soldier, in the war of the 
revolution, and returned to Cambridge at its close, to resume 
his occupation as a carpenter. After his son Samuel settled 
in Mason, he came to that place, and resided there with him, 
most of the time, till the close of his life. He died at Mason, 
June 21st, 1798, aged about sixty-six years. His mother, 
Sarah Cutler, was born in the year 1733, in what was, April 
24th, 1746, incorporated as the second precinct of Concord, 
and afterwards on the 19th of April, 1754, incorporated as a 
town by the name of Lincoln. Her father, Ebenezer Cutler, 
was one of the petitioners for the incorporation of the pre- 
cinct. She was a woman of great energy. With very scanty 
means, and, in a great measure, with the labor of her own 
hands, she provided for the support, training and education 
of her children. In October, 1781, she purchased a lot of 
land in Cambridge, thirty feet square, for the price of '-nine 
pounds, twelve shillings, lavrful money of this Common- 
wealth." It is described in the deed, as lying "on the north 
side of the house of Moses and William Boardman, deceased ; 
on the road leading to Lexington." It was about one mile 
northerly of the colleges. Upon this plot, she placed a 
small cottage house, in which she and her family resided. 
The building was a portion of barracks occupied by the Rev- 
olutionary army, when stationed at Cambridge. The land 
was appraised by three disinterested persons, in June, 1796, 
at one hundred and thirty-five dollars. It undoubtedly com- 
prised, at that time, the principal part of the family estate. 
About the year 1790, she went to Mason, and resided there 



8 • MEMOIR OF THE) 

witli licr son Ebenezer, until the close of her life. She died 
Deccmljcr 30th, 1808, aged seventy-five years. 

Two sons, Samuel and Ebenezer, were their only children. 
Samuel, the eldest, was born in 1764. He was a carpenter 
by trade, and followed that occupation through life. It 
seems that the brothers at an early period, formed the reso- 
lution to fix their residence in the same town. Samuel writes 
to Ebenezer from Goshen, Vermont, under date of November 
24th, 1787, as follows: "If things will permit, as you wrote 
to me about our living in one town, I hope, that by the 
blessing of Grod, we shall ; but when, I know not, but must 
wait God's own due time." This purpose, so early formed, 
was accomplished. Samuel came to reside in Mason, proba- 
bly, in the year 1792. He was certainly resident there early 
in 1793, and there he passed the remainder of his life, a 
useful, industrious man, noted for sterling integrity and inde- 
pendence of character; a good husband, father, and citizen. 
He died May 23d, 1813, aged forty -nine years. His first 
wife was Dorcas Wyeth, born in Cambridge. She died at 
Mason, January 19th, 1807, at the age of thirty-seven years. 

His second wife, was Mary Adams, daughter of John and 
Mary Adams, born in Mason, August 11th, 1780. They were 
married in September, 1809. This wife survived him, and is 
still (January, 1858) living in widowhood, at Mason. 

Ebenezer, the second son of Samuel and Sarah, was the 
favorite son of his mother. By the devotion, on her part, 
of all her means to that end, he was prepared at the age of 
sixteen years, to enter Harvard college. His preparatory 
studies were pursued at the grammar school in Cambridge, 
under the tuition among other teachers, of the late Rev. Dr. 
Bancroft, of Worcester, and Rev. Dr. Kendall, of Newton. 
Students were then admitted to the college, upon a personal 
examination into their literary qualifications, made by the 
officers of the college ; and if found by them to be sufficiently 
grounded in the requisite preparatory studies, and to furnish 
the proper testimonials of moral character, their names were 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 9 

entered upon tlie books of the steward as students, on their 
producmg the bond, and making the payments required by 
the college laws. A printed extract from these laws, was 
delivered to the student, whose examination had been found 
to be satisfactory, pointing out what further was required to 
be done on his part, before he could become a member of 
the college. This document, as well as the bond he gave, 
was found carefully preserved, among his papers. It is 
thought that as a matter of curiosity, and as illustrating the 
manners of the times, most readers of this book, will feel 
interest enough in the subject, at least to excuse its insertion. 
It is as follows : 

"Extract from the second and third laws of Chapt. 1st, of 
the College Laws. 

Chap. I. Part of Law 2d. 

"The Parents or Guardians of those who have been 
approved on Examination, or some other person, shall pay 
three pounds to the Steward, towards defraying their College 
Charges; also, give bond to the Steward, with one or more 
Sureties to his Satisfaction, in the sum of two hundred ounces 
of silver, to pay College Dues Quarterly, as they are charged 
in the Quarter Bills, Viz : the Stewards, Glaziers and Sweep- 
ers. And in case of Death or Removal before College 
Charges arise, to the sum of three pounds, the Steward shall 
return the remainder to the person who gave the bond." 

In the original paper the sums expressed were "thirty shil- 
lings," which was erased, and "three pounds" inserted; and 
"Forty pounds" erased, and "two hundred ounces of silver" 
inserted; and "thirty shillings" erased, and "three pounds" 
inserted. 

"Part of Law 3d. Every one that has been accepted, shall, 
as soon as may be, exhibit to the President, a Certificate of 
the Steward, that the foregoing rules have been complied 
with. Upon the receipt of which, the President shall sign an 



10 MEMOIR OP THE 

Order for the Admission of such Person, in the following 

words : 

Cantabrigiag Augusti. 

Addmittatur in Collegium Harvardinum. A. B. 

Prajses. 

And the Order shall be kept on File by the Steward. And 
no one sliall be allowed to take Possession of any chamber 
in the College, or receive the Instructions of that Society, or 
be considered a member thereof, until he has been admitted 
according to the form prescribed." 

This paper is dated July 19th, 1782. At the foot, is a 
memorandum in the hand-writing of Joseph Willard, the 
president, and signed by him as follows : 

" The above alterations were made in conformity to a late 
order of the Government of the College. 

J. Willard, Presdt." 

Upon the first page of the same sheet, is the admittatur in 
the words following : 

"FORM OF ADMISSION. 

" Cantabrigias Julii 13° 1782. Admittatur in Collegium 
Harvardinum Ebenezer Hill. 

JosEPHUS Willard, Praeses." 

The bond required, was signed by his mother's brothers, 
Elisha Cutler of Waltham, yeoman, and Jonas Cutler of 
Groton, shop-keeper, and is dated August 13th, 1782. 

He thus become a member of this venerable and useful insti- 
tution, and supported by the exertions of his mother, and his 
expenses borne, in part, by the aid furnished by funds liber- 
ally and thoughtfully contributed by benevolent persons, to 
enable students in want of pecuniary means to pursue their 
studies, he completed his college course with commendable 
diligence, and a fair exhibition of scholarly attainments, but 
without displaying any striking traits of character, or meet- 
ing with any note-worthy incidents ; a sample of that class of 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 11 

industrious, persevering and conservative students and pro- 
fessional men, who have contributed in no small degree, to 
make the character of the New England people and their 
institutions, what it has been, and, it is hoped, will continue 
to be, for all coming time. 

Of his student life, few memorials remain ; but these are 
enough to prove it to have been both pleasant and profitable. 
He always spoke of, it as if the associations connected with it 
were agreeable, and there remain indications of his progress, 
which shew that it must have been with him a time of indus- 
try, and of creditable success. His knowledge of the Latin 
language, was quite accurate, and he retained his fondness for 
that noble speech until his old age. 

While in college, he acquired a habit of exactness which 
remained with him through life. His penmanship, which was 
always singularly uniform, close and beautiful, was early 
acquired. A blot or illegible word, or word misspelt, will 
hardly be found in all his manuscripts, which are very 
numerous, embracing a period of more than seventy years. 
There is no difficulty, in recognizing the same beautiful hand 
through the entire period. A sample of his hand-writing, 
being a fac simile of a page of one of his sermons, will be 
found among the illustrations of this work. 

There is now, in the possession of the writer, a manuscript 
book of one hundred and thirty foolscap pages, containing a 
system of mathematics, as taught while he was a member of 
the college, being, in fact, the exercises required to be 
wrought out by the student, in that branch of study ; embrac- 
ing arithmetic, algebra, geometry, surveying, drawing, &c., 
all written and executed with the most singular neatness 
and care. The diagrams are drawn with great beauty and 
accuracy, and some of them are carefully and tastefully 
colored. There is, also, in the same possession, a letter 
written on his eightieth birth-day, which, when compared 
with the manuscript book, shews the same hand almost 
unchanged. Nor did it ever change, until his powers so 



12 MEMOIR OF THE 

failed that his trembling hand no longer obeyed his will, and 
the feeble lines traced by it, too plainly showed the decay of 
old age. 

He graduated at the commencement, in 1786. Among his 
class-mates were the Hon. Timothy Bigelow, many years 
speaker of the house of representatives, of Massachusetts ; 
Rev. Alden Bradford, secretary of the commonwealth, and 
author of a valuable history of the state ; Rev. Dr. Wm. Har- 
ris, president of Columbia College ; Hon. John Lowell, 
distinguished as a jurist, a politician, a controversial writer 
and an agriculturalist; Hon. Isaac Parker, chief justice of the 
supreme judicial court of Massachusetts ; and Thomas W. 
Thompson, and Christopher Grant Champlin, members of the 
house of representatives and of the senate of the United 
States. Of his intimate friends in the class, the Rev. Jacob 
Norton, formerly of Weymouth, survived him. He died at 
Billerica, where the last years of his life were spent, January 
17th, 1858, at the age of ninety-three years, eleven months, 
five days, being, at the time of his death, the oldest surviv- 
ing graduate of Harvard College. 

There is a fact worthy of a moment's notice, as an indica- 
tion of the comparative longevity of the New England clergy. 
In his class, the number of graduates was forty-five. Ten of 
these were cleroymen. When the triennial catalogue of 
1839 was published, but fifteen of this class were living, and 
of that number, seven were clergymen. As another indica- 
tion of the same fact, it is worthy of note, that on the first 
day of May, 1854, there were residing in the state of New 
Hampshire, within a distance not exceeding in all fifteen 
miles of each other, three congregational clergymen, whose 
united ages would make two hundred and seventy-eight years ; 
Rev. Laban Ainsworth of Jafi"rey, at the age of ninety-seven, 
Rev. Gad Newell, of Nelson, at the age of ninety-three, Rev. 
Ebenezer Hill, of Mason, at the age of eighty-eight years ; 
all of them enjoying a comfortable measure of health, and 
all of them residing in the town and society in which they 



REV, EBENEZER HILL. 13 

were originally settled in tlie ministry ; Mr. Ains worth having 
passed his one hundredth, and Mr. Xewell his ninety-sixth 
year, still (January, 1858) survive. Another remarkable 
instance of the longevity of the clergymen of that time and 
region, is presented in the fact, that in February, 1858, there 
were living, four graduates of Dartmouth college, whose 
united ages exceeded four hundred years ; viz : the Rev. John 
Sawyer, D. D., of Bangor, Maine, one hundred and two years 
and four months, the Rev. Laban Ainsworth, of Jaffrey, N. H., 
one hundred years, seven months, the Rev. Ethan Osborn, of 
Fairton, N. J., ninety-nine years, five months, and the Rev. 
Zachariah Greene, of Hampstead, L. I., ninety-nine years, one 
month ; all undoubtedly natives of New England. 

Soon after graduating, in the autumn of 1786, he com- 
menced school-teaching in "Westford. He remained there, and 
in that employment, about two years. Here he formed the 
acquaintance with his first wife, Mary Boynton, daughter of 
Nathaniel Boynton, and Rebecca (Barrett) his wife. While 
residing at Westford, he seems to have finally determined on, 
and made choice of the gospel ministry, as his profession 
and business in life. In a letter from his friend and class- 
mate, Tapley Wyeth, dated June 9th, 1787, occurs this sen- 
tence. "I am glad to hear you are determined on the study 
of divinity ; the prospects are bright, when compared with 
those of the other learned professions." This, to be sure, 
was a very mundane view of the subject, but it was one per- 
fectly in accordance with the notions on this question, by 
many entertained at that period. With the subject of this 
memoir, there is reason to believe, that the .considerations 
finally inducing him to the adoption of this line of life, were 
of a much more grave, serious and appropriate character. 
The citation is made, rather to show that at this early period 
he had made known to his friend, his determination to adopt 
the clerical profession, rather than to indicate his ultimate 
inducements to that choice. 

It was, in those days, customary for young men soon aftex', 
3 



14 MEMOIR OF THE 

if not before, graduating, to make choice of a professional life 
according to their several tastes. It was not then, as now, 
among the clergy calling themselves orthodox, deemed an 
essential qualification, before commencing the study of theol- 
ogy, that the student slionld possess and profess personal 
piety, and manifest it by uniting with some church ; but the 
embryo preacher chose his profession, undoubtedly in most 
instances, with serious reflection and consideration ; and 
acquired his piety and religious experience, not before, but 
after he commenced his theological studies. Whether Mr. Hill's 
thoughts were turned in this direction, before, or soon after 
graduating, is not now known, but it is understood that he had 
in his own mind, made choice of this walk in life, before he 
was the subject of any personal religious impressions. While 
eno'ao-ed in his duties as a teacher at Westford. the thought 
occurred to him, when contemplating his purpose of a clerical 
life, how inconsistent it would be for him to undertake to 
teach others the way of life, and become their spiritual guide, 
when he was himself ignorant of " the way, the truth and the 
life." This reflection fastened itself upon his mind, and led 
to deep, serious, and anxious enquiry, resulting in religious 
conversion, and the full and sincere dedication of his life and 
all its energies, to the work of the ministry. This incident 
of his religious life and experience, a subject to which he 
was, in his intercourse with his most intimate friends, singu- 
larly sparing in any allusion, is preserved alone in the mem- 
ory of Mrs. Dunster, who in a venerable old age, with a 
remarkable preservation of mental vigor, remains in the year 
1858, the sole* surviving member of the church as constituted 
at the time of his ordination as its pastor. The authority 
for this statement, is the funeral sermon, preached at Mason 
village, after the death of Mr Hill, by the Eev. Mr. Kellogg. 

A singular incident connected with his school-teaching at 
Westford, was brought to light a few years before his death. 
As it exhibits a remarkable instance of firmness, decision of 
character, energy and perseverance in a yankee boy, conduct- 



REV. EBEXEZER HILL. 15 

ing him to the most honorable and useful stations in life, it is 
hoped that the use made of the correspondence, as an illus- 
tration of the manners of the times and the characters of 
the actors, by its introduction here for that purpose, will be 
pardoned. In January, 1848, Mr. Hill received by mail 
the following letter : 

M ^, Vermont, Jan'y 4, 1848. 

Rev, Ebenezer Hill, 

Mrj Dear Sir: — I noticed, not long since, your name as a 
clergyman in Mason, in a New Hampshire register. My 
object in writing to you is, to ascertain if you are the person, 
that taught a district school in Westford, about the winter 
of 1788. Will you be so kind as to inform me by mail, and 
if I find that you are the same person, I will then, inform you 
of my object, in asking for this information. 

Yours, with great respect, J R . 

To this letter, Mr. Hill replied as follows : 

Mason, Jan'y 10, 1848. 
Mr. J R ; 

Sir: — I received a line from you, requesting information, 
whether I am the person who taught a district school in 
Westford, in the winter of 1788. 

In answer to your question, I say, I graduated at Cam- 
bridge, in the year 1786, and in the autumn of the year, took 
the town school in Westford, for a year. This school, I kept 
two years, removing from one district to another. Whether 
the turn came to the Forge, or Stony Brook district in the 
winter of 1788, I do not recollect. But of this I am sure, 
that there was no school kept in the town, in those two 
years, other than was taught by me, and, for a season, after 
quitting the schools, I remained in Westford, and made that 
town my home, so that I feel confident, that no school-master 
of the name of Hill, taught a school in Westford, but myself. 

I shall, sir, with some degree of excited curiosity be wait' 
ing, for the promised information, respecting the enquiry. 
Respectfully yours, EBEN'R HILL. 



16 MEMOIR OF THE 

To this the following reply was received: 

M , Vt., Jan'y 18, 1848. 

Rev. Ebenezer Hill : 

Dear Sir: — Yours of the 10th instant is received, in which 
you say, you taught school in Westford two years, commenc- 
ing in the autumn of 1786. I am satisfied, that you are the 
person I have been anxious to find, for the last half century 

or more. I am the son of J R -, living in the east 

part of the town. I attended your school in the winter of 
1787, and in the fall of the same year, when you kept in the 
middle of the town, also, the winter school of 1788, you kept 
in the district where my father resided. Col's Wright and 
Osgood lived in the same district. I think you boarded with 
Capt. Peletiah, or Capt. Thomas Fletcher, both winters. 
All passed pleasantly, till the last week in February, when 
for some trifling fault, in (say whispering,) being then only 
eleven years of age, you called me up, and ordered me to 
stand out in the middle of the floor, about an hour before 
the school closed in the afternoon, and let me stand there 
without my reading or spelling, until the school closed for 
the day, and without your saying a word to me ; which I 
considered a great insult.. I therefore remained, until you 
and the scholars had retired, except a young man (Levi 
Wright) who was to take care of the house. I then thought 
of revenge, &c., and collected your books, inkstand and ruler, 
with intent to burn them up ; but before I could effect the 
object, Levi Wright discovered what I was doing, and inter- 
fered, and saved all except the inkstand, ruler, and a small 
book or two, say to the value from three to six shillings 
worth. Wright told me I should be whipped to death the 
next day, which brought me to my senses. I then resolved 
to leave the country. I had an uncle visiting at my father's, 
who lived at Plymouth, N. H. I resolved to go home with 
him, to get clear of punishment, and finally persuaded my 
father to let me go, though he would not if he had known 
the reason, and I was off in a day or two ; so I escaped the 



REV. EBENEZER HlLL, 17 

jDUnlshment I so richly deserved, without my parents know* 
ing my crime, and I never returned [to reside in the town.] I 
have ever regretted my fault and error, and have intended, if 
ever I could see you, or learn your place of residence, to 
make an apology and satisfaction, though, perhaps, you have 
long since forgotten the transaction. I now sir, enclose to 
you $5,00, to pay debt and interest, which I hope you will 
receive with the same kind feelings, which I have in sending 
it to you ; and wish you to consider my extreme youth when 
the error was committed. Perhaps you may have some curi- 
osity to know my success in life, &c. I resided in Plymouth 
until May, 1803, when I came into this state and engaged in 
trade, and followed trade successfully about thirty years. 
In public life, I have been eight years a representative to the 
legislature, a justice of the peace thirty years, a judge of our 
courts some years, also, judge of probate in this county, 
one of the electors of president and vice president of the 
United States, (Harrison) one of the council of censors to 
revise the constitution of this state, county treasurer the last 
twenty years, and many minor offices. I now live in retire- 
ment, being seventy-one years of age. Respectfully yours, 
loith my best wishes for your health and happiness. 

J R . 

P. S. Will you be so good as to acknowledge the receipt 
of this, and oblige J. R. 

The substance of Mr. Hill's letter in reply, is as follows : 

Hon. J- — R -. 

Dear Sir: — Yours of the 18th instant, came safe to hand, 
and you may be assured it has been read repeatedly, with 
deeply interested feelings. I thank you for the favor. It 
has led to some reflections on the ways of Divine Providence 
in bringing about events very important, yet unlooked for, 
and unexpected. Who would have thought that the wild 
freaks of a boy eleven years old, in attempting to escape 
punishment for a pardonable fault in school, would lead him 



18 MEMOIR OP THE 

to forsake liis father's house, and all the endearments of 
home and family connections, and youthful acquaintances ? 
that such an event, should be the first step to bring that 
youth to fill places of honor and trust to which few aspire, 
and to which very few attain ? And yet, had one link been 

wanting in the chain of events which placed J R , 

the little lad, with his distant relatives in Plymouth, he 
would not be, as at this day, the Hon. J R -., in Ver- 
mont, having filled most of the various offices of high and 
honorary trust. With respect to the '' debt and interest" of 
which you write, I had no debt, and the circumstances named, 
were entirely forgotten. If debt was due to either, it was 
rather to you, than to me. However, I receive the sum 
gratefully, as a token of your kind remembrance and contin- 
ued friendship. I rejoice in the blessings which God has 
bestowed upon you, and hope still to enjoy your kind remem- 
brance while I remain on earth. Judging from the pleasure 
I have received in the sketches of your life, I am led to 
presume that it will not be entirely uninteresting to you, to 
learn some of the events of my life since the time to which 
your letter refers. 

After leaving the school, I made Westford my principal 
home, until I went to read with Dr. Payson of Rindge. In 
the year 1790, I was ordained pastor of the congregational 
church in Mason, and that relation has continued to the pres- 
ent day. I have had two colleague pastors settled with me, 
but now am alone in that office. I have been blessed with an 
unusual degree of health, having in all my ministry, but very 
few times been taken off from public ministerial labors, for 
want of health, and through the abounding mercy of God, 
have been spared to see the last day of January, 1848, which 
completed my eighty-second year of pilgrimage on earth. 
But four or five are now living in the town, who were at the 
head of a family, when I became their minister." The letter 
closes with some particular details of his family, which will 
be more pertinently introduced in another connection. 



REV. EBEXEZER HILL. 19 

To resume the narrative. After closins; his school-teachins: 
at Westford, he pursued the study of theology with the Rev. 
Seth Pay son, (afterwards known as Dr. Payson,) of Eindge, 
N. H. While residing at Rindge, and in his family, he united 
with the church in Rindge, by profession, September 28th, 
1788. 

At that time, there were no theological seminaries in the 
land. The usual course was, for the candidate for the minis- 
try, to resort to some well known diviue, who had a reputa- 
tion for learning and ability to teach, and with him to pursue 
such a course of study, as the parties should think proper. 
After the course of instruction was sufficiently advanced, the 
pastor would introduce his pupil to his own pulpit and 
people, before he went abroad ; and thus give him the benefit 
of a certain degree of experience, under the most favorable 
circumstances. This form of instruction, if it did not furnish 
to the student so good an opportunity for extensive and accu- 
rate scholarship, as the present mode, yet possessed advan- 
tages for carefully observing the operations of divine truth on 
a christian parish, and thereby preparing himself for the dis- 
charge of his professional duties, with fewer embarrassments 
than are usually in the way of a cloister student, who has 
passed through a full curriculum of collegiate and theological 
education. 

The reasons inducing him to apply to Dr. Payson for 
instruction, are not now known, but he seems to have been 
favored by a divine providence, in the selection of his 
teacher. Dr. Payson was a man of sterling worth, and he 
secured the regard of his pupil, and retained it till his death. 

If, as stated in his letter to Mr. R , he spent two years 

as a school-teacher in Westford, he must have commenced 
his residence with Mr, Payson in August, 1788. That it 
was so, his letters show ; for in one bearing date at Rindge, 
August, 1788, (the day of the month not inserted,) he writes, 
"I have now been here eleven days." His novitiate was very 
short, for his license to preach, bears date October 28th, 



20 MEMOIR OP THE 

1788, He commenced preaching as a candidate, immediately 
after. Many of his sermons remaining, bear date in that 
year. Indeed, it is probable, that his first effort in conduct- 
ing the public worship in the pulpit, was prior to that date, 
for in a letter dated, as usual with him at that time, by the 
day of the week, omitting that of the month, under date of 
Saturday evening, October, 1788, he writes, "Mr. Payson has 
just been into my study, and says I must preach for him 
to-morrow, for he is not prepared." The letter continued on 
subsequent days, till Saturday, two weeks from the first date, 
makes no mention of the examination or license. 

The following copy of this venerable document is worthy 
of insertion, for its quaintness, and also, as a sample of the 
mode in which such important matters were disposed of, 
by the fathers of the New England churches : 

Q^t a7i/ Q/tUocta^con/ 172/ Q^//waZ7mam'', (yc^. 26', 

/'/S'S', &//e/i z (k^Cc, Q^, =^! aA/ieazea ana /uOmUlef/ 

■mTn/e// /o exanunatcon ad a ^anaMa^ /oz 'ue/ ^^oMec 

lumMiu .-^^^^il/ioTi/ enauitu i?i/o Am 'f?tozac ^^Aazac^, 

•TTuntfteztai JaznUute^, ana inewd if 2/ unaeziaAi.na 'ue/ 

too^A, i}o^a ano/tumoa/cu ^alcfuea tocln' (^TcifTz/ 192/ act 

^^Aazac^z, ana @Z^ id Aeazli/u ^ecom9nenaea ^o Ateacn- 

^(f'n'e^eeve^ '^^oa ifz/ Ac4 ^£yioviaence/ J/iau aive/ mm/ 

Q/i^oz^uni^u : ana me' ti^iM- &1^ 9?iay ^zoi^e a iten> ..^u^ 

oima ^0 ^/i6 ^yAA a?ia .^/lie o/^/^oa, ana ^-Aa^ &nCe mau 

ve an aA/e ana QPaclAAai yyztm^iA^z 0/ ^Ae net^ ^eua-men/^. 

.^^0?/ CJiae'P ^/ y^^ aAaoc('a{con{ 

jCodn/ ^&u/Auna, /cuAe. 

There cannot be much doubt, that while teaching school 
during the two years in Westford, he was under the direction 
of Dr. Payson, pursuing his theological studies, and that the 
date above stated, is that of the commencement of his resi- 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 21 

dence in the family of his instructor, rather than that of the 
commencement of his professional studies. 

Among other places, he exercised his ministry in the town 
of Marlborough, so much to the acceptance of the church 
and people, that they gave him a call to settle in that place, 
as their minister. This call was voted in concurrence with 
the church, at a town meeting, held November 13th, 1789. 
The provision for his support, offered by the town, was as 
follows : 

"Voted, To give Mr. Hill one hundred and sixty pounds, 
settlement ; sixty pounds to be paid in specie, one half of 
which, is to be paid in three months after his ordination, the 
other half, to be paid in niue months. The one hundred 
pounds to be paid in beef cattle, Equal to beef at twenty 
shillings per hundred, or other neet stock Equivilent; sd. 
beef to be paid the fifteenth day of October, after his ordi- 
nation. 

"Voted, To give Mr. Hill sixty pounds salary for the first 
year, and to add Twenty shillings a year, until it arrive to the 
sum of sixty-eight pounds, and also, 

"Voted, To give Mr. Hill thirty cords of wood, delivered 
at his house, the salary and wood to be paid annually, so long 
as Mr. Hill shall perform the work of a gospel minister, in 
this place. 

"Voted, That when the majority of the Church and Town 
shall agree to invite a council, to settle any difficulty, if any 
should arise between pastor and church and Town, that Mr. 
Hill be obligated to join with the chmxh and town, in a mutual 
council." 

At a subsequent meeting, December 24th, 1789, the offer 
was modified by the following vote : 

"Voted, To alter the payment of Mr. Ebenezer Hill's 
salary as it now stands, in the proposals which the town has 
made to him, and to pay the said salary, annually, so long as 
he shall remain our gospel minister." This was, undoubtedly, 
intended to apply to, and modify that provision of the 
4 



22 MEMOIR OF THE 

former offer, which limited the payment of the salary, by the 
phrase " so long as Mr. Hill shall perform the work of a gos- 
pel minister in this place." This made the payment contin- 
gent on services actually performed. Tlie contract by which 
a preacher was settled, as the pastor of a church and minis- 
ter of a town, was then regarded as indissoluble, without 
fault on the part of the minister, as the marriage contract 
was then esteemed to be. Hence it followed, that if the 
minister should become disabled from disease or old age, to 
perform " the work of a gospel minister," he was still enti- 
tled to claim and receive his stipend, and the people were 
not permitted, after having enjoyed the best services of his 
youth and vigorous manhood, to turn him adrift in his old age, 
laboring under poverty and infirmity, to spend his last days 
in penury and misery. The clergy were particularly cautious, 
not to permit any stipulations looking to an abridgement of 
this right, to be incorporated into the contract ; on the other 
hand, the people were somewhat inclined to entertain the 
notion, that the principle of no work, no pay, should apply 
to these, as well as to other contracts. These ideas, doubt- 
less, had something to do with the framing of this proposed 
contract, and of the modification, adopted at the second 
meeting. These were old world notions. As the French 
say, ''All this, we have changed." Now the contract between 
ministers and people, has little more permanency than a 
hiring from year to year, and, from the frequency with which 
divorces are sought, and the ease with which they are 
obtained, in some parts of our country, the marriage contract 
is fast verging to the same miserable state. It is sufficient 
to say, that this call was not accepted ; for what particular 
reasons, does not appear. He had, at the same time, under 
consideration, a similar call from the church and peo]^le in 
Mason, which was first in point of time, and was by him finally 
accepted ; but he ever entertained for the people of Marlbo- 
rough, an affectionate regard. 

His first introduction to Mason, the scene of his future 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 23 

labors, in which his life was to be spent, was undoubtedly, 
through the Rev. Samuel Dix, of Townsend, with whom he 
formed an acquaintance while residing at Westford, or at 
Eindge, which ended, only with the life of that worthy gen' 
tleman. Addressed "To Mr. Ebenezer Hill, at Rindge," is a 
letter, of which the following is a copy : 

"Mr. Hill: — I am desired in behalf of the town of Mason, 
to request you to preach with them four Sabbaths ; to begin, 
the first or second in April next. They wish to know soon, 
whether you comply or not ; if you please to send the infor- 
mation to me, I will convey it to them, by divine permission ; 
I mean, in case you can't bring it yourself, to your friend and 
servant, Sam'l Dix." 

Tow^SEND, May 20th, 1789. 

There is, undoubtedly, a mistake in the date of this letter. 
It should be March, instead of May. This invitation was 
complied with. It appears by the minutes of the Holies 
Association, that at their meeting at Townsend, July 1st, 
1789, there were present as "company, the Rev. Mr. Bullard, 
of Pepperell, and Mr. Hill, a candidate preaching at Mason." 

In coming to this, his futiu'e home, he came to no place of 
ease, no well cultivated garden spot, where the young 
preacher was to find a polished people, a full salary, and to 
enjoy the opportunity for becoming a scholar, a theologian ; 
but he came to an uncultivated field, which demanded, from 
its occupant, the most laborious toil, in order for success. 
The people were poor, unpolished in manners, but sincerely 
desirous of the establishment of the institutions of religion 
among them, and ready to receive their minister, with open 
hand and heart. The "Gains, mine host" who first received 
and entertained this youthful apostle, upon his entry into 
this his future diocese, was the worthy and excellent Jason 
Dunster, a lineal descendant of Henry Dunster, the first 
president of Harvard college. He then resided in the south- 
east part of the town. Mr. Dunster, then an aged man, 
remained his firm and unwavering friend, to the close of 



24 MEMOIR OP THE 

his life. The mode of travelling in those days, was on horse- 
back, the wayfarer taking with him his scanty wardrobe, and 
a few books, and manuscript sermons in his saddle-bags. 
There were then, no wheeled carriages in the town, except the 
ox-carts, and no vehicle for winter conveyance, except the ox- 
sleds and pungs, a coarsely-made box, placed upon runners, 
and drawn by one or more horses. The roads were rough, 
and by no means free from stumps and stones ; so that the 
means of passing from place to place, were only those just 
described, or the more primitive method, the use of the 
sturdy limbs furnished by nature to all well made up men 
and women. 

His services as a minister, seem to have been from the 
first, very acceptable to the people of his future charge, and 
he continued to preach in the place, with a few interruptions 
of time, spent in other places, until his final settlement and 
ordination. Soon after coming into town, he became domes- 
ticated in the pleasant family of Mr. John Winship, in which 
he resided most of the time, till he was married, and could 
sit down by his own domestic hearth. For this worthy fam- 
ily, he always entertained an affectionate regard. It seems, 
that after fulfilling his first engagement at Mason, of "four 
sabbaths," probably extended to a few more weeks, he 
preached at Asliby, at which place he was employed in August, 
1789 ; as appears, by the letter of the meeting house commit- 
tee of Mason, dated August 29th, 1789, addressed to him at 
Asbby; which has been inserted in the History of Mason, 
page 111. 

The people of Mason, without any long trial of their can- 
didate, determined to invite him to become their minister. 
A church meeting for this purpose, was held October 13th, 
1789. Just seventeen years before that time, October 13th, 
1772, the meeting was held for the gathering and formation 
of the church, into an ecclesiastical body. The church, at 
this meeting, at which the Rev. Mr. Dix presided, voted, 
unanimously, to invite Mr. Hill to become their pastor. In 



EEY. EBEXEZER HILL. 25 

this action of tlie cliiircli, the town concurred by their votes, 
at a meeting held on the 16th of October. Copies of the 
votes of the town and of the church were communicated to him. 

Tlius, was presented to him, the most important question 
he would be called upon to decide in his long life ; one, 
upon which his happiness as a man, and his usefulness as a 
public teacher and minister of the word of God, was mainly 
to depend. The prospect was far from cheering. There 
were many discouragements. The town was small, and the 
inhabitants few in number. They were poor, and there was 
little promise that they would ever be otherwise. Their sole 
employment was agriculture, except the few handicrafts 
always found in agricultural communities, and the character 
of the hard, stubborn, rocky soil was such, as to afford prom- 
ise of rather scanty harvests, and no anticipations of rapid 
improvement. But, on the other hand, the people were 
industrious, temperate, frugal, warm-hearted, ready to do 
according to their best ability for his comfort and support. 

The church formed October 13, 1772, then consisting of 
twenty-one members, twelve men and nine women, had hardly 
kept its numbers good. Unhappy diSiculties arose, soon 
after the settlement of their first minister, the Rev. Jonathan 
Searle. He was dismissed August 14th, 1781. After his 
dismission, they had procured a temporary supply, from time 
to time, and had invited several preachers to settle with them 
but all the invitations had been declined. Only one member 
had been added to the communion, for more than thirteen 
years, and he, Jonathan Chandler, by letter, from the church 
in Grafton. 

But there were circumstances of encouragement. The 
neighboring ministers, particularly Dis of Townsend, and 
Farrar of New Ipswich, were anxious to welcome him as a 
fellow-laborer, and to have the waste place which this church 
had, for so many years exhibited, built up. In 1785, a reli- 
gious revival, of a remarkable character, took place in New 
Ipswich, in which the neighboring towns, and particularly the 



26 Memoir op the 

to-wn of Mason, largely shared. Manj- of the young persons 
in that town, on becoming subjects of the revival, had united 
with the church in New Ipswich. All these were now readyj 
in prospect of the re^establishment of gospel ordinances, to 
remove their church-membership to Mason church ; and many 
inhabitants of the town, members of churches in the places 
in which they had formerly lived, were ready to remove their 
membership to this church. These, uniting with the remain- 
ing members of the church, constituted at the time of his 
ordination, a body of thirty-six in number, ready to receive 
him as their pastor and teacher. 

After due consideration, in July or August, 1790, he gave 
his answer to this call in the affirmative, accepting the invita- 
tion. In pursuance of these proceedings, an ecclesiastical 
council was called, whicli met on the second day of November, 
1790, and, having made the necessary examinations and 
arrangements therefor, on the next day, they proceeded to 
ordain him, as pastor of the church. For the details of the 
votes of the church and of the town, his answer to their 
call and the proceedings of the council, reference may be 
had to the History of the town of Mason, pages 111 to 119. 

His inducements to accept this invitation, rather than that 
of Marlborough, appear in a letter to a friend, under date of 
May 5th, 1790. He writes, "I have tried to think it was my 
duty to settle at Marlborough, but it appears quite plain to 
me, that Providence has pointed out Mason as the place. I 
think I never saw such an union, and such engagedness, as is 
apparent in this place. What their motives are, I am not 
able to say, but trust, with regard to the greater part, they 
are gospel motives, and upon the whole, I dare not deny 
them." 

The provision for his support amounted to $250 a year, a 
very moderate stipend upon which to sustain a family and 
keep up the hospitality which was then expected of the 
clergy, and generally maintained by them. It was, however, 
considering the habits of living of the times, quite as ade- 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 27 

quate for that purpose, as the cempensation now paid gener- 
ally by country parishes to their clergymen. It was a matter 
belonging to the town, in its municipal capacity, to see that 
this sum was paid, which was done by levying and collecting 
a tax upon the poll and estates of all the inhabitants and 
land-holders in the town, except such as by the laws of the 
laud were excused from the payment, by reason of their 
membership of other religious societies. 

According to the provisions of the charter, by which the 
title to the lands in the town was granted, see History of 
Mason, page 28, he would, in addition to the sum of seventy 
five pounds annual salary, be entitled to the use of the lands 
granted ''for the use of the ministry"; but at the meeting 
held October 16, 1789, immediately after passing a vote to 
concur "with the church in giving Mr. Ebenezer Hill a call 
into the work of the Gospel Ministry," the town "Voted, To 
Reserve the Ministry Rite of land in this Town for the use of 
sd. Town." This assumption, on the part of the town, of the 
right to appropriate this land to any other use than that lim- 
ited in the original grant, was clearly without authority. The 
land was never the property of the town, and the town could 
grant no lawful title to it. It was not given to the town, but 
was reserved out of the grant, by the proprietors of the whole 
township, "for the use of the ministry." No action of the 
town could lawfully divert it from that use, or apply it to any 
other purpose ; much less could the town sell it, and give any 
valid title to a purchaser. No doubt, the fathers thought 
they had a right to do as they pleased with it. The land was 
subsequently sold by the town, and the proceeds paid into 
the town treasury, and applied to the ordinary town charges ; 
and thus a provision intended by the grantors of the town 
for the support of the ministry, was, in violation of law, at 
this early period, diverted from its original object, and, so far 
as that purpose was concerned, entirely lost. 

Of course, he was the servant, or in other words, the min- 
ister of the town ; all of the people had a right to attend on 



28 MEMOIR OF THE 

the public worship as conducted by him, and for that purpose, 
ample provision was made, for the accommodation in the 
meeting house, without charge, of all who, for want of 
means, or other reasons, were not provided with pews, or 
seats in pews. There was no other society or meeting in 
town than his, for many years, except a small society of 
Baptists, composed of residents in this, and some of the 
neighboring towns, who had religious services a part of the 
time in town. He was expected to visit all in sickness and 
affliction, and attend to the burial of the dead. These ser- 
vices he considered it a part of his duty to do, and he per- 
formed them faithfully, at all seasons, postponing thereto all 
considerations of private business, convenience, or inclination. 
In the sick room and in the house of mourning, he was always 
received as a welcome visitor. His addresses and ministra- 
tions on funeral occasions, were remarkable for appropriate- 
ness, solemnity and tenderness. Many of his discourses on 
such occasions were, at the request of the friends of the 
departed, published, of which a list will be found at the close 
of this memoir. From the time of his ordination until he 
ceased to take any active share in parochial affairs, he kept 
an accurate record of all marriages by him celebrated, and 
also of the death of all persons occurring in the town, gener- 
ally with some indication of the disease and of the age of the 
decedent. Both these records are inserted in the History 
of Mason. 

But it is time to resume the narrative of his life and labors. 
Having found and united himself with a church and people, 
he forthwith proceeded to supply the next great want of a 
New England clergyman, a domestic household. This he 
formed, by uniting in marriage with Mary Boynton, of West- 
ford. They were married by the Rev. Samuel Dix, of Towns- 
end, February 2, 1791. As early as March of this year, he 
commenced a negotiation with John Bishop & Son, of Med- 
ford, for the purchase of the farm formerly owned by Capt. 
William Chambers, and then owned by these gentlemen. 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 29 

This negotiation resulted in a purchase of the place, and he 
thus secured for himself a home, in which he spent all the 
remainder of his days. To this first purchase, he afterwards 
added, at different times, a meadow lot, a wood lot and a 
pasture, making in all a productive and valuable farm. This 
was a fortunate proceeding on his part, as this farm rendered 
him, in a good degree, independent. The house was small. 
It was one of the oldest buildings in the town. It stood in 



the garden, a little distance north and west of the present 
edifice. The first house on the farm, was built in the north- 
west corner of the old orchard, where the remains of the 
cellar, now mark the place. It was occupied many years as a 
tavern, by Samuel Abbott. It was the. nearest dwelling to 
the old meeting house, and on occasion of town meetings, in 
the cold winter weather, the fathers would adjourn to Mr. 
Abbott's tavern, to warm up. The road then passed east of 
the site of the present buildings : a view of which is here 
presented. The wall on the west side of the old orchard, 
was the boundary of the road, which came into the road now 
travelled near the school house. The road leading to New 
Ipswich, left the road opposite Abbott's tavern, and making 



30 MEMOIR OP THE 

a curve, came into the road as now travelled, on the site of 
the town house. 

About the year 1799, he commenced the erection of a 
comfortable and commodious dwelling, to which he removed 
in the year 1800. 

This mansion was built in the most substantial manner, in 
a fashion common at that day, though now seldom copied. 
The rooms are large and square, and in the internal arrange- 
ments, as well as outward appearance, it presents a marked 
contrast to the dwellings in the now prevailing fashionable, 
sharp, zigzag, multi-angular, modern style, in which the object 
of the architect seems to be, to multiply corners rather than 
comforts. In the frame, more timber was used, than would 
now be employed in the construction of five houses of the 
same size. The form of the roof, though perhaps, not the 
most convenient, is one that gives the greatest strength and 
power of resistance to tempests. This quality of the roof 
was severely tested, in the most violent tempest which has 
visited the coast of New England within the last hundred 
years, known and remembered as the September gale of 
1815. This gale, driving from the south-east, and meeting 
with nothing on its way from the ocean, to break its force, 
burst with its full power npon this dwelling. The two tall 
chimneys upon the southern side, were, by the force of the 
gale, at the same instant broken off, at the point where they 
issued from the roof, and fell with a thundering crash upon 
the roof, where shattered in peices, they lay till the storm 
abated, when it was found that the roof had escaped unin- 
jured, needing but a few shingles to be replaced, to make it 
perfectly sound ; the weight of the falling mass having been 
received and sustained by the corner rafters of the roof. 
Such a mass of brick and mortar, thus falling upon a roof of 
the common form, would have broken it through, and exposed 
the whole roof, to be torn into fragments and carried away 
by the tempest ; leading, probably, to a total destruction of 
the edifice. 



REV. EBEXEZER HILL. 31 

The -wood seen in this view, on the east, in rear of the build- 
ings, is a portion of the native forest, composed in great part 
of white oaks, hickories, chestnuts and pines ; among which, 
one of the monarchs of the original forest is conspicuous. 
This wood, he protected and cherished with great care, and 
it has now become one of the most valuable timber lots in 
the vicinity. 

By means of the farm, with the aid of his salary, he 
brought up and educated, in a respectable and creditable 
manner, a numerous family, and had always a seat at his 
board and fireside, and a spare couch for his brethren of the 
clergy, who were always made welcome, whether coming from 
near or distant parts, to his hospitality, and sent on their 
way, on their departure, rejoicing. Many a poor student on 
crossing his threshold, has felt that he was in a haven of rest 
and comfort. For such, he felt gTeat sympathy, remembering 
that he was once himself, a poor student. 

It is proper here to state, that in some years he was 
in a great measure deprived of the benefit of his salary, 
by the facility with which he was induced to give orders, 
anticipating the payment of it in favor of persons, who 
applied to him for pecuniary aid, and who frequently made 
very inadequate returns to him for the aid so received. 

During the first twelve years of his ministry, there was 
nothing of a marked character exhibited, in the religious 
condition of his parish ; there were no revivals, and no indi- 
cations of any rapid changes among his people. The seed 
was carefully sown, but seemed to germinate slowly. The 
regular services of the Sabbath, were two long written 
sermons. There were but few meetings of any kind, during 
the week, except the lecture preparatory to the regular bi- 
monthly celebration of the Lord's supper. These discourses 
were delivered in a meeting tiouse, in which no fire was ever 
found, however severe the winter weather might be. The 
first use of stoves for warming the meeting house, was in the 
winter of 1820-'21. 



32 MEMOIR OP THE 

But if the first twelve years were not distinguished ])y 
success in his work, they were a period of singular and 
severe trials to himself, in his domestic relations, such as to 
leave their traces on his character ever after. With his first 
wife, he lived but three years and one month. She died 
March 2d, 1794, aged twenty-nine years. 

After a single life of a year and a half, he married 
(November 18tli, 1795) Mrs. Rebecca Howard, widow of 
Samuel Howard, and daughter of Col. Ebenezer Bancroft, of 
Tyngsborough, Mass. But his house was soon again left des- 
olate. Consumption took from him the second wife July 2d, 
179*^. She was twenty-six years and four months of age. 

On the 27th of September, 1799, he married Mrs. Alngail 
Stearns, widow of Edward Stearns, and daughter of Col. 
Timothy Jones of Bedford, Mass. With her he lived in great 
harmony and happiness, the remainder of his days, and she 
still lingers in lonely widowhood, at the home now desolate, 
where for many years, a numerous and happy family was 
gathered. 

These severe afflictions seem to have had an important 
influence upon his character ; they gave him a capacity to 
appreciate scenes of sorrow, and enabled him to sympathize 
with, and console those who were in trial. 

It has already been remarked, that the first years of his 
ministry, were not distinguished by any particular and strike 
ing indications of progress. It was a time of quiet labor, 
and preparation for future harvest. In a country community, 
receiving no accessions from abroad, and sending off con- 
stantly, many of its most enterprising young people to the 
cities, and to Vermont and New York, the then distant West, 
the increase of the church, was usually slow and silent. 

In 1802, there was a revival season, which resulted in the 
addition of forty-four persons to the church. Again in 1812, 
there was another season of revival, by which twenty-five 
persons were brought into the church. From this time, until 
1826, no time of particular attention to religion, occurred. 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 33 

From time to time, persons united with the church, but no 
period of general interest was seen. 

In the 3^ear 1826-'27, there occurred a more general and 
powerful revival, than had ever been known in Mason. It 
was a genuine work of grace, and had immediate and perma- 
nent effects upon the church and town. Many who have been 
influential and decided christians, entered the church at that 
time. The season was one of constant and arduous labor 
for the pastor ; he preached almost incessantly on week days, 
in the school houses, and in the private houses of the town, 
and held frequent meetings for conference and inquiry, that 
he might know the state of all, and adapt his instructions to 
their condition. 

Rev. John Spaulding, who is pleasantly remembered for 
his participation in the labors of that season, has furnished 
some important items, respecting it. He says in a letter, 
''It was my privilege to be a co-worker with him, to witness 
the joy of the harvest, as he garnered the seed long before 
sown. How many scenes and incidents during that work, 
never to be forgotten ! That first prayer-meeting of the 
youth at the house of Mr. W., one of the daughters of the 
pastor, there being so impressed, that she went home to 
weep and to pray, and to give her heart to Christ, that very 
night. The many meetings for inquiry and prayer, in the 
pastor's house, meetings of weeping and joy ! I seem still 
to see the heaven-lighted countenance of the good pastor 
glow, as successively informed that one and another and 
another, perhaps the last and least expected, had given the 
heart to Christ." 

Several letters of his own remain, in which he gives many 
facts, concerning this deeply interesting work. From these 
letters, a better idea of that work can be formed, than from 
any other source, now accessible. The first of these, is a 
letter to his son in New York, dated Mason, March 15, 1826. 
An extract from which, is as follows: "It is with humble 
gratitude, that I can give you some intelligence more pleasing 



34 MEMOIR OF THE 

than I could have done a few weeks since. God is manifestly 
visiting this long barren spot, with some tokens of his 
special favor. There is, more than formerly, a degree of 
serious attention in some sections of the town, but it is not 
general. Religious meetings are frequent in some school 
houses. Some persons are now, under serious impressions, 
some greatly distressed, and a few, are already rejoicing in 
hope of salvation; and many others appear to listen and 
hear, with attention and feeling. **-^*** **** i^as had 
a most distressing season for some weeks, so as not to attend 
to any work, but he appears to have found relief, and has a 
supporting hope. None have as yet, joined our church. We 
hope these are but the first-fruits of a large harvest. The 
Lord in his mercy grant that I may be able soon to give you 
a richer account of the displays of his grace, among the 
people of Mason." The second letter, giving a fuller account, 
is as follows : 

Mason, May 1, 1826. 
My Deae Son : — My time is so much taken up attending 
meetings, preaching, &c. that I can spare but little for writing 
now, and as I scarcely know any thing that is doing on the 
farm, shall not attempt to tell you any thing concerning it or 
other worldly affairs. I attend one or more meetings every 
day in the week, except Saturday. The attention to religion 
yet increases. It first appeared in the westerly part of the 
town and has extended on to the east, like the progress of a 
cloud driven by the wind and shedding down rain. At pres- 
ent it seems confined to Mason in a great measure, if not 
entirely. You remember that a few years since, the neigh- 
boring towns had a refreshing shower, while not a drop fell 
on this barren spot. It seemed as if the very lines of the 
town were a barrier to the influences of the Spirit. I pray 
that the present refreshing cloud may spread over all our 
region. I have not ascertained exactly the number of hope- 
ful converts, but it is probably not much from eighty, in both 
societies, (the Congregationalist and Baptist.) Thus far the 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 35 

work has been different from what has been common in works 
of revival and reformation. It is principally among the mid- 
dle aged and heads of families, and the greater part of them 
men ; comparatively few young men have yet been subjects of 
convertiug grace. It is devoutly hoped that where stubborn, 
irreligious heads of families are made to bow, there is a 
blessing in reserve for their children. I mourn to see so 
little effect on my own family. This day, the concert of 
prayer was attended, the fullest I have attended in Mason. 
After that, an enquiry meeting was held at my house ; more 
than forty persons present, not all enquirers. This evening, 
a very full conference, at J. W's. I have noticed above, 
stubborn heads of families, but here remark, some of the 
most moral and regular, have been subjects of as deep and 
pungent conviction as any. Their names will convey to you 
all that is needful, to show you that the most moral and 
immoral, are included in this work of grace. * * * 

I have mentioned these persons, to give you some view of 
the wonderful work. Several of these men I have named 
have their wives with them, either rejoicing in hope, or trem- 
blingly anxious. And I must name to you, as trophies of 
divine grace, the distinguished worldlings, ^ ^ ^^ * * * * * 
anel * * * * * * * * ^ ^ ^ * ^._ j ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^-^ ^^ ^^,^_ 

tion your friend, W. B. He has had a long season of convic- 
tion, but has now a very comfortable, if not joyful hope. In 
short, the greater part of the people of the town, are unusu- 
ally thoughtful. It is late, and I am weary. I can write no 
more, only to commend you to God, and the riches of his 
grace, and devoutly pray that you may share, and your 
brothers and sisters, in the same divine mercy here displayed. 

From your Father, 

Eben'^. Hill. 

The next letter written to the same son, further described 
the progress of the revival. 



36 MEMOIR OP THE 

Mason, January 12, 1827. 

Dear Son : — ^ * * * As for news from this region, the 
report is, the general state of health is good. The weather 
has been very mild and open until Christmas, then we began 
to experience Christmas loeather. The ground continued bare 
until new year's day, when a severe snow storm commenced, 
and now we have an old fashioned winter, snow sufficiently 
deep, and drifts sufficiently large. 

But to come to matters of more importance than all 
worldly concerns. The state and progress of religion, I think, 
is still promising in this town. After an apparent declension 
for some weeks, of the religious excitement and attention 
which had existed and been so powerful here, in some parts 
of the town, there is a manifest increased attention. There 
has been a short wintry season. Christians feared the work 
of grace was over. They were aifected to see the multitude 
left out of the ark, and, I believe, gave themselves to prayer. 
The church met once and again for conference, to enquire into 
their own state of feeling, and to search for the causes of the 
work of God declining. Their hopes now begin to revive. 
In some parts of the town, the meetings are full and solemn. 
Two new cases of deep concern, and at least of conviction 
of danger, have come to knowledge this week. The last 

week, Mr. , who has been wading in deep waters since 

last spring, fearing for himself, yet contending against God, 
has discovered ttliat nothing was in the way of his salvation, 
but his own wicked, rebellious heart, and has joyfully bowed 
in submission. His difficulties all removed, so that he won- 
dered at them, and thought he could show every one the way 
so that they 7nust see it. Alas ! he cannot make them open 
their eyes. I hope when I write to you again, I shall be able 
to write you more similar interesting facts. Through the 
goodness of God, we are all in health. 

From your affectionate Father, 

Eben^ Hill. 



EEV. EBENEZER HILL. 37 

Three clays later he wrote to his eldest son, residing in 
Tennessee. In the following extracts from this letter, some 
additional facts are stated. 

Mason, January 15, 1827. 

My Dear Children : — * * * * j jj^ve another reason 
however, for not writing many letters in the year that is 
passed. We have had a season of unusual religious atten- 
tion. The revival began in the winter, and for a time, very 
few, if any in all the town, were not unusually thoughtful and 
solemn. For six or eight months, I preached as often as 
once a day, or nearly, besides on the sabbath, and attended 
many other meetings. You must be sensible my time has 
been fully occupied, nevertheless, I have not forgotten, but 
daily remembered my absent, far distant children. ! may 
they be the happy partakers of that mercy and grace, which 
has been displayed here. We have received into the church, 
sixty-seven members. Above thirty have joined the Baptist 
church. Probably fifty more entertain hope in Christ. And 
although the work seems to have abated, new cases of seri- 
ous concern occur. Among those who have made profession 
of religion, are our principal young married men, who are 
taking the places of their fathers, gone and going off the 
stage. Of my family, only Lucy has made a profession of 
religion. I hope the rest are not all without some well- 
grounded hope, of having chosen the better part. ! could 
I hear from my distant children, that they are wise for them- 
selves, this would indeed be good news from a far country. 
Will you not each one, at my request, on the receipt of this 
letter, sit down and calculate what will be the real profit, to 
gain the whole world and lose the soul. Since the soul 
may be lost, and if lost, it is forever lost, every dictate of 
reason and prudence, urge to attend to the salvation of the 
soul, before any other concern. We may trifle with solemn 
subjects, we may frame or admit as forcible, arguments which 
may make us careless about our souls, or may quiet our 
minds, when but little moved, but so long as awake to our 
6 



38 MEMOIR OF THE 

eternal well-being, nothing but hope like an anchor, can sup- 
port us ; and ! eternity is near ! and as surely as God is 
holy, so must we be holy, to be happy in him. Consider, 
"Can two walk together, except they be agreed ? " After 
death, there can be no change until the judgment, the sen- 
tence then will be eternal. * * * * ^f 

From your affectionate Father, 

Eben'^. Hill. 

Such letters as these, show something of the rise and 
progress of this interesting work of grace, and also, exhibit 
the pastor's uprightness and skill in the work before him. 
The direct results of that revival, were the addition of 
eighty-six members to the Congregational church, and also, 
a large number to the Baptist church. Religious things were 
in a better state, for many years following that interesting 
season, than they had ever been in Mason. There were no 
new measures used, no protracted meetings in the more 
recent acceptation of that term, and not much preaching, 
except by the pastor, and Mr. John Spaulding, a young minis- 
ter, who was his particular assistant. There was no ejffort 
made to gather numbers into the church, but an earnest effort 
to have all the professed converts well indoctrinated, and 
thoroughly acquainted with practical religious truth. Time 
has given good evidence for the greater part of those con- 
verts, shewing that they were the children of grace ; they 
have been prominent in all the religious affairs of the town, 
from that time until the present ; they are now found the 
active members of the churches of Mason and other places, 
while some of them have gone home, leaving behind them 
evidence that they sleep in Jesus. 

In 1831, the report of the meetings held in Western New 
York under the name of "three days meetings," attracted 
attention abroad, and gave rise to the idea of having them in 
other sections, and on the 19th of April, 1831, a three days 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 39 

meeting was commenced in Mason. It was a new thing, and 
attracted much attention. Many persons who had not been 
in the habit of attending religious meetings, were induced to 
come where the gospel was preached, and there was a general 
attention to religion among all classes of people, for a time. 
Several persons were added to the church, apparently the 
fruits of this meeting and the state of things that followed it, 
but nothing like a general revival took place. 

In 1835, there was a time of religious interest, which 
resulted in the gathering of thirty-eight persons into the 
church. This was the last season of revival while Mr. Hill 
remained sole pastor of the church, and dm-ing this season, 
he was aided for several weeks, by a young man of very 
decided ability, but somewhat erratic, who did not always 
carry out the views of the pastor and the more judicious 
members of the church. 

These seasons of revival, were the most prominent points 
of the long pastoral life of the subject of this sketch ; they 
were the harvests of the seed sown in quietness, and watched 
and waited for with care, at times when no direct results 
were apparent. Such times and seasons, when free from 
sectarian zeal, and when they are, as these were, the out- 
growth of quiet, permanent influences, are the richest rewards 
of the pastor's life, seasons of his highest joy and most satis- 
factory labor, glorious harvest scenes, when the souls of 
men are gathered into the kingdom of God. Blessed is that 
minister, whose manner of preaching and course of life, is 
best adapted to induce and promote them. 

While attention should be directed to the seasons of 
revival in a particular manner, there are many things of a 
different character, details of common, practical life, that 
need to be given, in order to exhibit a distinct idea of a 
New England pastorship, and the general customs of that 
region during the period of his life. The customs of society 
are always silently changing, and the changes are, perhaps, 
as manifest in religious things, as in any other. These 



40 MEMOIR OP THE 

changes, are also better seen in reviewing the long life of a 
single individual, than in any other wa}^ 

During Mr. Hill's life as a minister, the most remarkable 
religious revolution that has ever been seen in New England, 
began, and passed on to its full development ; it was the 
rise and progress of Unitarianism. The germs of this move- 
ment, are found much farther back, but there was nothing of 
it visible, for years after he began his active ministry. The 
Calvinism of the puritans, preserved the forms of its ancient 
life for many years after its spirit ceased to live in the heart 
of many of the churches. Few of the New England churches 
passed through the period of the war of the Eevolutipn, 
retaining their ancient doctrine and spirit entirely unchanged. 
But the development of principles is always slow, and it was 
a long time before this departure from the ancient faith, 
became fully evident. The time at length came, when those 
holding doctrines so unlike as the Armiuian or Socinian and 
Calvinistic, could no longer walk together in the same 
religious fellowship; division must take place. A large 
majority of the churches in that section of New England, 
were divided into parties, known as Orthodox and Unitarian. 
It was a time of difficulty and trial; a time, when the ties 
that had bound neighbors and families for years in harmony, 
were to be violently sundered, and two churches, often hostile 
to each other, or at least, one party feeling that they had 
been deeply wronged, were found, where but one had been 
before. In this movement, the pastor of the church of Mason 
never was a prominent actor. His attachment to the Calvin- 
istic form of doctrine was strong, and his avowal of his sen- 
timents, bold and earnest ; but he was never in a position to 
become a partisan. 

Neither his natural disposition nor his habits of life, fitted 
him to be a polemic. In his own parish but little of the 
Unitarian element developed itself. The church at its organ- 
ization, declared itself to be Calvinistic, upon the basis of 
doctrines set forth in the Westminster Assembly's Catechism. 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 41 

Such had always been the faith of its pastor, and in this faith 
the church and people had been carefully instructed. At 
an equal remove from the Arminianism of some of the 
churches in the region, and the Hopkinsianism of others, 
this church had ever held, with its pastor, a middle ground ; 
not a middle ground of compromises and concessions, but of 
sound and rational interpretation and reception of doctrines. 
But although not called upon to meet and combat in his own 
parish, what he viewed to be erroneous doctrines, he could 
not look with indifference on the struggle which took place 
between the old and new doctrines in his neighborhood. In 
this controversy the rule he adopted and followed, was that 
to which he adhered through his long life, that is, first to 
ascertain what is duty, and then to the extent of his ability 
to do it, without passion, haste or undue feeling or excitement. 
In two of the adjoining towns, this disturbing element appear- 
ed, to the interruption of the ancient harmony and fellowship. 
In this contingency he, without hesitation, placed himself on 
the side of those who held to the ancient faith, and aided 
them by his council and services, and encouraged them to 
establish for themselves, a church organization, and the insti- 
tutions of public worship. 

In the first portion of his pastorship, the system of Sab- 
bath School instruction, as now practiced, was not known in 
this region. But though that important aid, now considered 
absolutely necessary to the well-being of every church, did 
not then exist, its place was in a good degree supplied, by 
the careful attention given to catechetical instruction. In 
this way, many minds were more thoroughly indoctrinated, 
than most are, who are taught in the Sabbath Schools of 
these days. The following extract, from a letter written by 
one trained in his congregation, gives a picture of the manner 
of instruction then pursued. 

"The last Sabbath of every month, I think it was, the 
children, not only of the church but of the parish, were 
gathered together, and seated on the long seats in front of 



42 MEMOIR OF THE 

the pulpit, the girls on the right hand, and the boys on the 
left of the broad aisle, to be catechised. Those were happy, 
pleasant times, I can assure you. Many happy faces were 
seen on catechising day, as it was called. This was all the 
real public, personal instruction the children received, when 
I was young ; and, in truth, it was a great and everlasting 
blessing, to both parents and children; it was "line upon 
line, and precept upon precept," not soon to be forgotten." 

In this matter of the catechism, his precept and example 
coincided, for he was ever careful to train his own family, 
into a thorough knowledge of its principles. His usual 
custom was, to assemble his whole fam-ily on Sabbath after- 
noon, after the second service, and go through the whole of 
the Westminster Assembly's Shorter Catechism, with great 
care, interfusing as he went, his own illustrations and com- 
ments. This was continued, until the youngest of his family 
had been trained through it. But although he was attached 
to the catechism, he hailed with joy the rise of Sabbath 
Schools. A Sabbath School was permanently established in 
his congregation, about the year 1816. At that time, he 
preached a sermon from Eccl. 11. 6: "In the morning sow 
thy seed, and in the evening withhold not thine hand : for 
thou knowest not whether shall prosper, either this or that, 
or whether they both shall be alike good." The same person 
who has described his manner of catechetical instruction, also 
describes the introduction of Sabbath Schools, as follows : 
"Mr. Hill made several trials to have a Sabbath School, but 
failed, for want of suitable superintendents and teachers. 
Sometimes a few persons would collect together for a few 
Sabbaths, and recite verses of hymns, learned probably, 
years before at home, and a few chapters of the Bible, and 
then drop away one by one, as their stock of hymns wore 
away, and the novelty wore off. The first Sabbath School 
that was kept through the summer, was in 1816. * * * 
was the superintendent. Three or four females were found, 
who would go in and hear the children recite their lessons. 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 43 

It was the first Sabbath School I ever attended. * * * 
would open the school with prayer, and then leave. Some- 
times he would return in season to close the school, and 
sometimes we would get tired of waiting, and leave for our 
dinner. The children had something set down to them, 
according to the number of verses recited, and when it 
amounted to one cent, a ticket was given. At the close of 
the school, the account was reckoned up, and a reward to the 
value of what each child had earned, was given. From the 
commencement of the Sabbath School, the [public] catechis- 
ing was given up." 

In his care for his people, Mr. Hill was an industrious 
pastor, watching closely every opportunity to interest and 
benefit them. The sick and the afflicted in every part of the 
town, and of every denomination and character, shared his 
parochial care. He considered himself the servant of the 
whole town, and felt bound to render them all the aid in his 
power. Whenever any accident or calamity occurred, he was 
among the first to be sent for, and often, on like occasions, 
he was called to neighboring towns. Many in town, who 
neither did anything for his support, nor attended his church, 
were sure to send for him in time of affliction. A careful 
observer of disease, his opinions and judgment respecting the 
condition and prospects of the sick, were often sought for, 
although he never in any way, intruded upon the physician's 
profession. A quiet self-possession which never forsook him, 
and a general knowledge of the common principles of physi- 
ology, enabled him often in cases of emergency to render 
useful services, one marked instance of which occurred at 
Townsend. It was on the occasion of the preparatory lec- 
ture, which he was to preach. The services had just com- 
menced, when a sudden shower arising the house was struck 
by lightning, and one of the worshipers was left apparently 
dead. It was a scene of confusion and dismay, in which no 
one seemed to know what should be done. He at once inter- 
fered and directed what should be done, and saw to the exe- 



44 MEMOIR OF THE 

cution of his orders, with so much promptness and efficacy, 
that the happy result was the perfect restoration to life and 
eventually to health, of the apparently lifeless sufferer. 

An incident illustrating the character of Mr. Hill, and 
shewing the confidence which was placed in him by his parish- 
ioners, is related thus : One of the members of his church, 
feeling himself aggrieved with his pastor, on account of some 
matters growing out of the politics of the day, made a com- 
plaint against him to the church, which resulted in the calling 
of a council, before which, the matter was to be laid. As 
the time for the hearing approached, the complainant found 
that it was necessary on his part, that the subject matter of 
his complaint, should be put in proper form, to be presented 
to the council. The brother, having exhausted his own skill 
in his efforts to draw up, and present his complaint in proper 
form, and not succeeding to his mind, finally brought his 
papers to his accused pastor, whom he was about to bring for 
trial before the council, and asked his aid in putting his accu- 
sation into proper form, which was readily and cheerfully 
given. It may be added, that the council, a large part of 
which, were the political friends of the complaining brother, 
after the hearing, by an unanimous vote, exonerated the pas- 
tor fully, from all the charges in the complaint. 

Thus time passed rapidly on, bringing the various changes 
related above, and Mr. Hill, leading a quiet and cheerful life, 
was silently growing old. In 1836, he was by far the oldest 
active pastor, in that region of country, and although appa- 
rently as well able to perform the duties of his office, as he 
had ever been, he proposed of his own accord, to his people, 
that they should select a young man as colleague with him, 
in the pastorship of the church, offering, at the same time, to 
relinquish his whole salary, in order that the younger man 
might receive a support. On this subject. Rev. John Spauld- 
ing, who was the one first written to by the church, to act 
as colleague, says "Sometime before he resigned, and before 
his people agitated that question, he called a public meeting 



PvEV. EBEXEZER HILL. 45 

of liis people, and reminded them that he was growing old, 
expressed his willingness to resign, and suggested the 
appointment of a committee to nominate a successor. The 
committee was appointed, including himself as chairman. In 
behalf of the committee and the congregation, he addressed 
me on the subject, and after urging various reasons why I 
should leave a western for an eastern field of labor, he char- 
acteristically remarked, "I wish to resign my pastoral charge, 
now, while I am in full possession of my mental faculties, 
lest, in remaining longer, they become so impaired, I shall be 
unwilling to resign." The proposed arrangement was made 
in the most amicable manner, with the undiminished confi- 
dence and regard of all parties. Mr. Hill performed all his 
duties as before, until a colleague was found in the Rev. 
Andrew H. Reed, who was installed November the 23d, 
1836. 

A new society having been formed in connection with the 
church, a new meeting house was builtin 1837, leaving the 
old one to stand unoccupied, and Mr. Hill took leave of the 
place where he had spent so many happy Sabbaths. In his 
farewell sermon delivered in the old meeting house, in No- 
vember, 1837, on taking leave of that edifice, he declared of 
the pulpit in which he was then standing, " This is the dearest 
spot on earth to me." In this sermon, he reviewed the his- 
tory of the church, during the period of its occupancy of that 
house. It is thought that this sermon is worthy of preser- 
vation, and it is included among his discourses inserted in this 
volume. 

Mr. Reed remained until December 11th, 1839, when he 
was, at his own request, dismissed, and Mr. Hill again 
resumed his post as an active pastor, and continued his 
labors, until he was succeeded by his own son, Joseph Ban- 
croft Hill, who began his labors in August 1st, 1840, and was 
installed as co-pastor, October 20th, 1841. Mr. J. B. Hill 
remained, until preparations were made for the division of 
the church, for the purpose of forming the Mason village 
7 



46 MEMOIR OF THE 

churcli, in February, 1847, after which at his own request, his 
pastoral relation was dissolved, by the result of a council 
held April 22d, 1847. The church did not secure a perma- 
nent pastor, until 1851, when the Rev. J. L. Armes was 
installed as colleague with Mr. Hill, and he remained pastor 
until the decease of Mr. Hill. 

Mr. Hill was always fond of preaching. The gospel was 
to him, a great reality, and he was happy in his work, as a 
herald of its glorious truth. After his retirement from the 
active duties of his own parish, he still continued to preach, 
for many years. He preached regularly for some time in 
Sharon, and after the death of Rev. Mr. Tinker, of Ashby, 
he supplied the pulpit there, for a short time, but his most 
useful labors, were at Brookline. The church in Brookline 
was small, and disheartened by a series of untoward circum- 
stances. * Their meeting house, which, like the first houses 
in all that section, was built by the town, passed from their 
control, and they were left, few in number, as sheep without 
a shepherd. In this condition, they spoke of disbanding, and 
scattering to other towns, for the purposes of worship, but 
Mr. Hill encouraged them to remain together, and offered to 
preach for them until they could secure a pastor. He encour- 
aged and aided them in their efiForts to build a meeting house 
of their own, remaining with them as pastor, preaching in the 
school houses of the town. Soon after their house was com- 
pleted, he met with a recent graduate of Andover, who was 
not then employed, and he was so much pleased with him, 
that he engaged him to preach for a single Sabbath, in Brook- 
line, and he was there and heard him. So confident was he, 
that God had sent them the right man, at the right time, he 
at once informed the church that he should preach for them 
no more, and urged them to secure the services of the candi- 
date without delay. They followed his advice, and the result 
was the settlement of the Rev. Daniel Goodwin over that 
church, and time has fully shown the wisdom of the choice. 
Mr. Goodwin in a letter to the writer, says "It was through 



REV. EBEXEZER HILL. 47 

his (Mr. Hill's) agency aloiie, that I came to occupy this 
post." 

In the year 1839, and again in 1840, Mr. Hill was elected 
by the town, a representative to the state legislature, and 
served as such, in the sessions of those years. He was never 
a political partisan, but he was firm and decided in his politi- 
cal views, and was well known as an advocate of the general 
policy of the whig party. While in Concord, he wrote to 
his youngest son, June 16th, 1839, "It has fallen to me, to 
perform the duty of chaplain, most of the time. Some of 
the members of the house, were opposed to having prayers 
by any person, yet there was a good majority for it, and it 
was determined that the service should be performed by the 
clergymen belonging to the house. When the search was 
made, it was found there were but two in the house, myself, 
and Mr. Whitaker of Weare, (a Free Will Baptist.) We 
have leave to invite others to perform with us." The follow- 
ing letter was written from the house of representatives, to 
the same son, then a member of Dartmouth College. 

Concord, June 20th, 1840. 

My Son : — I received yours by Mr. B , and was glad to 

hear of your health. I spent last Sabbath at home, and can 
inform you that all the family were then well. This week 
has hitherto been a noisy week ; and I have been much 
wearied with it. I do not attempt to describe to you, the 
scenes of Wednesday. It has been calculated, that not less 
than seven thousand men formed and marched on to the hill 
in procession; and I should judge there -were as many in the 
streets, and on the hill, as in the procession. There was 
speaking in abundance. General Wilson took up at least 
two hours, in a continued strain of eloquence. Our session 
is short, it will close Saturday morning. It has, on the 
whole, been a quiet and peaceable session ; nothing of a very 
exciting nature has come forward, to stir up bad feelings. I 
send you a small sum of money, which I hope will be a 
supply for your present wants. I have full confidence that 



48 MEMOIR OF THE 

you do, and that you will, use all the economy, that is neces- 
sary for a poor scholar to use. But I most earnestly desire, 
that while you are cultivating the mind, and laboring to fit 
yourself for usefulness, you will have great watchfulness over 
your heart, and strive to grow in grace. Ambition for dis- 
tinction as a scholar, has often proved detrimental to spirit- 
ual improvement ; your only safety is in continued prayer. 
■X- * * * a- ■jf 

From your Father, 

Eben^ Hill. 

At this time occurred an incident of a domestic character, 
which will long be remembered by his family ; it was the 
meeting of his whole family, for the first and only time. 
Mr. Hill had a numerous family of children, and they were 
early and widely scattered from their father's house. The 
eldest left home, and settled in Fayetteville, Tennessee, 
before the birth of the youngest, and he did not revisit the 
place of his birth, until the youngest had grown up to man- 
hood. In July, 1844, there was a meeting of all the living 
children, ten in number, at their father's house. It was a 
time of the deepest interest to all parties, of joy to the 
parents, at the sight of long absent children, pleasure among 
the children, of forming acquaintance with those they knew 
and loved by report, but who were strangers in fact. 

The time spent together by the family, was quite short. 
The intercourse was most cheerful and social, but partook 
largely of a religious character ; and the father threw a hal- 
lowed feeling of calm religious reverence, into his most com- 
mon actions. The worship around the family altar, the visits 
at diiferent places, were all full of tenderness, and cheerful 
religious emotion. After a few days spent together, the com- 
pany separated, each to his home, and never met again. 

Mr. Hill retained all his faculties, both of body and mind, 
with a good degree of activity, until about the year 1846, 
when he began perceptibly to fail in both. There was no 
sudden change, but a gradual decline of all his powers. His 



REV. EBEXEZER HILL. 49 

health was good, but his strength was wastiug away, his 
memory was broken, and his mind ceased to act with its 
accustomed vigor. It was the decline that knows no restora- 
tion ; the shadows of evening, precursors of the sunset of 
life. About the last of 1851, the childhood of extreme old 
age began to come over him. There was little of sickness, or 
apparently of pain, but a gradual wasting away of strength, 
until about the middle of May, 1854, when, in consequence of 
having taken a slight cold, there was induced a low stage of 
fever, under which he suffered until the 20th day of May, 
1854, when he quietly fell asleep. His exit from the scenes 
of time, was perfectly calm ; there was not a struggle or a 
groan ; his breathing grew difficult, short, and with intervals 
between each respiration, until it gently ceased forever. He 
slept in Jesus, on the morning of the 20th day of May, 1854, 
an old man, full of days. His age was eighty-eight years, 
tfcree months, and twenty-one days. 

On the 23d, his funeral took place. He was followed to 
the grave by a great concourse of relations, friends and 
parishioners. The day was calm and bright, in which he was 
laid to rest. The mild sunshine of spring fell upon the 
world of nature bursting into life ; the trees and shrubs, many 
of which planted by his own hand, bordered the road leading 
from his dwelling to the graveyard, awaking from the death 
and sleep of winter to the bloom and verdure of spring, 
were emblems fit of the resurrection that awaits the good, 
after the winter of the grave. On such a day he was borne 
to his resting place, into which he had seen all but a few 
scattered surviving remnants of his original congregation, 
one after another, gathered. It was fitting that he too should 
slumber there, pastor and people together, until the final 
morning hour. Of the large concourse which followed him 
to the grave, few had known him before the meridian of life, 
and fewer still had witnessed his ordination day. But one 
person, who was a member of the church when he was 
ordained, survived him ; and the church of this day is com- 



50 MEMOIR OF THE 

posed mainly of tlie cliildren and grandchildren of those 
who were his people then. 

Thus within sight of the dwelling he had so long occupied, 
was he left to repose, in the ancient graveyard ; " the garden 
of the dead," which in his latter years, he was wont frequent- 
ly to visit, and there to spend the declining hours of the 
summer afternoon, calling up to recollection, the forms of 
the departed sleeping there ; his family, his parishioners, his 
neighbors and intimate friends of two entire generations, 
whom he had attended to this, their last resting place, and 
whose company he was shortly expecting, and patiently wait- 
ing to join. 

The funeral sermon was preached by the Rev. A. W. Burn- 
ham, of Rindge ; the successor of his own venerated instruc- 
tor, and for many years, a valued personal friend. The 
following extract from this discourse, exliibits the view there- 
in presented of the personal and professional character ^f 
the deceased. 

"As a man, our departed father was small in stature, but 
of a firm, vigorous, well constituted frame, of sound constitu- 
tion, he enjoyed remarkable health, till overtaken by the 
infirmities of old age. It is a singular fact, that for fifty 
years he was detained from public worship, but two Sabbaths. 
Exceedingly amiable in his disposition, moderate in his tem- 
perament, a mind well balanced, conceptions clear, reasoning 
powers of no mean order, with no inconsiderable degree of 
shrewdness, he had a large share of that quality so much 
needed, but unhappily not possessed by every minister: good 
common sense, sense that could be used for good in the exi- 
gencies of life. In his deportment, grave, as befitting a min- 
ister of Christ, gentlemanly and courteous in his bearing, he 
was instructive in conversation, familiar and pleasant in all 
social intercourse, in the family, among his people, and his 
brethren. 

In his domestic relations, true-hearted, kind and careful, 
he aimed to fulfil every conjugal and parental duty, in the 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 51 

fear of God, and with a conscientious regard to the highest 
welfare of the numerous household, of which he was the 
head. 

"As a christian, he appears to have had deep experience in 
spiritual graces. Profoundly reverent of God and sacred 
things, he was imbued with love to God, his house, people, 
word and worship, submissive in trials, patient in tribulation, 
rejoicing in hope, and relying on Christ alone for acceptance, 
he aimed and was enabled to maintain a devout walk with 
God. As a theologian he was sound in the faith, holding the 
system of doctrines, usually denominated Calvinistic, as set 
forth in the Assembly's Catechism. 

" As a preacher, plain, effective and impressive, he set forth 
with simplicity and earnestness, in the mode and style of the 
generation to which he belonged, the doctrines of the gospel 
in their true aspects and bearings, always careful to engraft 
upon them, the enforcement of practical godliness, as their 
genuine fruit. 

" In his pastoral intercourse and duties, our reverend father 
set an example worthy to be imitated by all who hold the 
same office. Deeply interested in all that affected the wel- 
fare of his people, he was affectionate yet faithful, and having 
drunk deeply of the cup of affliction himself, he was able and 
ready to sympathize with his people, and administer to them 
the same consolations wherewith he himself was comforted, 
of God. And as he watched for souls, as one that must give 
an account, God gave him success in his ministry. While 
under his regular ministrations, the children of God were 
nourished up unto eternal life, and sinners were occasionally 
gathered into the fold; several seasons of spiritual refresh- 
ing, more or less general in their extent, and abundant in 
their fruits, were enjoyed. In those days, the pastor rejoiced, 
labored and prayed with a diligence, fervency and faithfulness 
becoming a minister of the gospel, and evincing the tender 
concern he cherished, for the spiritual welfare of the flock 
over which the Holy Ghost had made him overseer. In a 



52 MEMOIR OF THE 

■word, he was a good minister of Jesus Christ, one who 
studied to show himself approved of God, a workman that 
needed not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of 
truth." 

One of his brethren in the ministry of a neighboring town, 
and who, in point of age, approached the nearest to the 
deceased, writes of the deceased, "He was a man of good 
intellectual powers, well educated, and his mind was well 
stored with theoretical and practical knowledge. He might 
have filled almost any department in public life, with credit 
and usefulness." Another, whose acquaintance with him 
commenced after old age had gently laid its hand upon him, 
writes as follows : "Were I to speak of him in general terms, 
I should say, he was distinguished for a somewhat rare, yet 
exceedingly desirable combination of qualities, which ren- 
dered him agreeable and instructive to all parties, gave him a 
peculiar ease and familiarity, and at the same time, a decis- 
ion, energy, dignity, and solemnity, which are rarely found in 
the same person. 

Children were always interested in him, and I think none 
would be disposed, as is sometimes the case, to shun his 
presence, for his manner and conversation were admirably 
fitted to place them at their ease, and secure their confidence. 
He possessed, for certainly he exhibited, a great amount of 
kind, social, benevolent feeling. His house was always a 
welcome home for clergymen, and for others who sought his 
aid and direction. I have said he was an old man, when I 
first became acquainted with him, but I would rather say, that, 
in a most important sense, he was never old. He certainly 
kept up with the spirit and enterprize of the age if he did 
not go before it, and kept himself thoroughly versed in rela- 
tion to all questions of doctrine and practice, and adapted him- 
self with great ease and propriety, to the occuring changes and 
exigencies. Thus by keeping up his acquaintance with these 
matters till the last, he was always a warm friend of younger 
brethren in the ministry, and was always regarded by them 



REV. EBEXEZER HILL, 53 

as a father in aflfection and interest. Hence too, his services, 
after he had ceased to be the active pastor of his own church, 
were frequently sought, and highlj' prized by the neighboring 
churches. * * As a pastor, as far as I can judge, and I 
speak in part from what I have felt, he had few equals. It 
was my privilege, when a beloved wife was lingering under a 
fatal disease, through ten long months, to enjoy his frequent 
calls, and well do I recollect how much these visits were 
prized, not only by myself, but by her whose spirit was 
ripening and longing for heaven." On this subject also, Mr. 
Spaulding has said, " What a father and friend was he, in the 
house of mourning ! how appropriate his addresses and ser- 
mons, how specific ajid well suited his prayers ! and how sym- 
pathetic his heart in the sick room, and on funeral occasions." 

There was much of tender earnestness in his addresses at 
the celebration of the Lord's supper, and in all things con- 
nected with the examinations for admissions to the church. 
He loved to dwell on those themes, that are peculiarly appro- 
priate to the communion season ; they were ever new to his 
taste, and sources of deep emotion, which he manifested in 
his addresses at such times. 

A lady who united with his church quite early in life, thus 
writes on that subject: "Do you remember the day when 
we were examined for admission to the church, at the old 
meeting house ? There was one little incident connected 
with it, which I shall ever remember. As my name was 
called, and I started tremblingly up the broad aisle with but 
little thought that I should be accepted, the pastor met me, 
and as he took my brief "experience" from my hand, said, 
with his kindest look and tone, " We love to see the lambs 
come." How assured I felt. It seemed as if the Good Shep- 
herd was speaking to me through him. I always love to 
remember that I united with the church, when he was the 
only pastor." 

Mr. Hill was in his person small, not much exceeding in 
stature five feet, but perfectly symmetrical in his limbs and 
8 



54 MEMOIR OF THE 

proportions, quick and active in his movements, of a cheerful 
temperament, frugal and temperate in his habits, industrious 
and economical in worldly affairs. He enjoyed throuirh his 
long life, a remarkable degree of health and exemption from 
sickness and pain, having never been confined to his bed for 
the space of twenty four hours, until his last sickness, less 
than one week before his death. With small means, he 
brought up, in a respectable style, his numerous family, all of 
whom were trained to habits of industry and constant em- 
ployment, to which they owe their success in life. He care- 
fully and sedulously accustomed them all, in early life, to im- 
prove all leisure time in reading useful and instructive books, 
a taste and habit which they have great reason to thank him 
for implanting and cultivating at that early period. He never 
had the means to acquire an extensive library, but he had 
many rare and valuable books, among which were the works 
of William Perkins, of whom Fuller quaintly says, "He had 
a capacious head with angles winding, and roomy enough in 
which to lodge all controversial intricacies," of Owen and other 
puritan divines of the age of Cromwell, some of the works 
of Baxter, of Bishop Patrick, of John Newton, and of the 
pioneers of the NewEngland churches, Richard Mather, Samuel 
Shepherd, John Wise of Ipswich, " the simple cobbler of Aga- 
wam," Increase and Cotton Mather, and Edwards. These, 
with the social library, a small but well-selected collection, 
which he was instrumental in forming about the year 1802, 
were his sole reliance in the way of literature. It is a ques- 
tion well worth propounding, which deserved best of their gen- 
eration, those who collected the social library and for more 
than thirty years used it and preserved it in good condition, 
or those who sold and scattered it to the four winds of 
heaven. His literary taste was sound and correct. His style 
of writing, was plain and simple, free from ornament ; the 
substance of his discourses was direct .and practical. 

Of the English poets, Milton, Pope, Young, and Cowper, 
were his favorite authors. But with him, the book of books 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 55 

tvas the bible. To it, he alwavs appealed. From it, all his 
illustrations and proofs were drawn. His habits of study- 
were little methodical. The subject upon which he was to 
preach, would be thought over in his own mind during the 
week, but generally, he would not commence writing until 
Saturday. Then his discourses, both for forenoon and after- 
noon upon the same text, would be fully written out, but 
often not until late in the night of Satm-day. When compos- 
ing his discourses, he had the power of abstraction, in an 
unusual degree ; so that when seated by the cheerful fire, of 
a Saturday evening, sm*rounded by his family, uninterrupted 
by their conversation or employments, he would pursue the 
train of thought induced by the subject selected, and follow 
it with a speedy pen, with as much regularity and composure 
as if in the recesses of the most retired study. 

Although his public discourses were all carefully pre- 
pared and written out, he was by no means deficient in the 
power of ready and forcible extemporaneous discourse. 
This was often witnessed on funeral occasions, and in meet- 
ings for conference upon religious topics. On these last 
occasions, frequently taking a passage of scripture, sometimes 
a part, or the whole of a chapter, reading it verse by verse, 
he would accompany the reading with an extemporaneous 
commentary and explanation, which would be pertinent, apt 
and profitable to the hearers. Such meetings were his delight. 
He attended them constantly and regularly, till the physical 
and mental disability attendant on old age, deprived him of 
the power so to do. And, in the last years of his life, when 
his mental power was broken, and his mind was often wan- 
dering, he would many times on a winter's evening, when the 
household work was done, and his family, then reduced to a 
small number, were seated by the parlor fire, fancy himself in 
the conference room, and commence an exhortation in a quiet, 
low, indistinct tone of voice, and continue it for the space of 
half an hour or more ; then having closed and dismissed his 
meeting, he would rouse up and remark that it had been a 



56 MEMOIR OF THE 

very pleasant meeting, and enquire whether a goodly number 
had attended. 

He was not litted by nature, nor trained by habit to be a 
pioneer. He seldom sought out of his own accord, new 
paths. He was content to walk in the old and trodden ways, 
but still, he was always ready to welcome and further all 
new movements which he judged tended to the improvement 
and benefit of the human family. As such, he gave a ready 
and hearty welcome to the temperance movement, which has 
produced in many places, such immense good. The habit of 
using ardent spirits as a beverage, was universal in his early 
life, and until he had passed the meridian of life, he never 
thought it a duty to abstain, or that the indulgence of the 
habit was dangerous. The same was the case, with all the 
clergy of his day, and indeed of all the gentry, and it may be 
said of all the people. Some of the clergy of his acquain- 
tance fell victims of this indulgence, and the wonder is, not 
that here and there one was swept away by the demon, but 
that all did not go down. 

These warning examples produced no effect ; but when the 
public mind was aroused to the consideration of this evil, he 
at once saw, as every man of sense must see, that the only 
safe rule, was total abstinence. He readily adopted it, and 
from that time to the close of his life, a period of some 
twenty-five or thirty years, strictly practiced total abstinence 
from all intoxicating liquors. He also abandoned the use of 
tobacco, to which he had been addicted from early life. He 
was ready to testify to the perfect safety of the immediate 
adoption of total abstinence in both cases, and to the happy 
effect of the reformation, whether regard be had to peace and 
comfort, either physically or mentally considered. 

Another instance of the readiness with which he saw, and 
appreciated the importance of new movements, first brought 
forward by others, has already been stated on page 42, in 
regard to the introduction of a new system of sabbath school 
instruction. 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 57 

In tlie sermon there referred to, he directed the attention 
of his people to the importance of the early education of 
children, in matters of religion, and in the knowledge of the 
scriptures, and urged them to new and more persevering 
efforts in that direction ; and from that time, so long as he 
was able to take any part in this portion of christian duty, 
he devoted a large share of his time, to the sabbath schools ; 
and he left among his papers, at his decease, manuscript ques- 
tions carefully prepared by him for his own use, as a sabbath 
school teacher, embracing the whole circle of sabbath school 
instruction, usually undertaken in his parish. His last efforts 
as a religious teacher, were bestowed upon the children of his 
parish. 

This summary of his life and character cannot be better 
concluded, than with the closing sentences of a notice of him, 
published soon after his death, in The Congregationalist. " In 
his later years especially, he was accustomed to spend several 
hours each day, in reading the Bible and in communion with 
his Savior. His humility was manifest, and also his love of 
the sanctuary. To him " Christ was all," and self was mor- 
tified and forgotten. His regard for his church was ever the 
same, he cherished for it an undeviating affection. Between 
him and his colleagues, there was perfect harmony. He 
never gave them the least trouble. The ruling purpose* of 
his mind showed itself, amid all his infirmities. Often when 
he was unable to preserve the sequence of his thoughts on 
ordinary subjects, and when he scarcely knew whether it was 
morning or evening, he would offer prayer in a perfectly 
coherent manner, as if his family were gathered around him. 
The christian graces all seemed to be ripe in him, years 
before his exit, and he "came to his grave in a full age, like 
as a shock of corn cometh in his season." 

" Soldier of Christ well done, 
Praise be thy new employ, 
And while eternal ages run, 
Rest in thy Savior's joy." 






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A SERMON, 



PREACHED IN THE OLD MEETING HOUSE, IN ilASON, NOVEM- 

BER, 1837, 

ON THE OCCASION OF THE REMOVAL BT THE CHURCH AND SOCIETY, OP 
THEIE PLACE OF WORSHIP, TO THE NEW MEETING HOUSE, 

BY THE REV. EBENEZER HILL. 



DEUT. XXXII. 7. 
Remember the days of old, consider the years of many generations. 

When Moses had conducted tlie children of Israel, God's 
chosen people from Egypt, through the great and terrible 
wilderness to the very borders of Canaan, and was informed 
that the time was just arrived, that he should leave them and 
be gathered to the great congregation of the dead, by divine 
direction he gathered the people together, and rehearsed in 
their ears the great things God had done for them, and put 
them in mind of their many provoking sins and acts of 
rebellion, and of the many judgments God brought on them 
and their fathers for their sins and provocations, and also, 
the great mercy of God in sparing them. And when he had 
written the history of the law to be deposited in the sacred 
ark, by the same divine command, he was led to compose a 
hymn or song, comprehending the important facts in their 
past history, likewise containing many predictions of future 
events. This was designed for them to commit to memory, 
and to be often rehearsed and sung, that so they might never 
forget them. Here we see how important it is, in the sight of 
God, that men should retain the knowledge of his mighty 
acts, and remember his mercies and his judgments. He 



60 MEMOIR OP THE 

knew tlieir liability to forget even the most remarkable and 
solemn scenes and events, and provided a help against this 
sinful infirmity, by having such facts as would excite the 
young to enquire about them, and keep the recollection of 
them ever fresh in their own memory, embodied in a popular, 
familiar song. This was the most effectual way of diffusing 
the knowledge, and preserving the memory of remarkable and 
solemn events which could be before the art of printing was 
discovered, and consequently when books would be scarce. 

This is the only way in which unlettered nations can, or 
do preserve, any fragments of their history ; even by embody- 
ing them in their songs, and thus handing them down from 
generation to generation. God not only took care thus to 
preserve the history of his church and his dealings with his 
people and their enemies, but also in the very same way incul- 
cated the duty of charging the memory with these truths, and 
meditating on them much. Hence, whenever they repeated this 
song, they would of course repeat the command to " Remem- 
ber the days of old, and consider the years of many genera- 
tions." They are cautioned, that it is not enough for them to 
admit the facts related by their fathers, and treasure them up 
in their memory, but it is requisite, that they frequently call 
them up and cause them to pass before their minds, and make 
them subjects of deep thoughtfulness and meditation. From 
the words following the text, it is manifestly a duty to enquire 
after and seek to obtain knowledge of what God has wrought 
in ancient times and in later days. It is added to the text, 
'•' Ask thy Father and he will shew thee, your Elders and they 
will tell thee." It is a solemn and important duty i)f us all, 
to make ourselves acquainted with the history of the days of 
old, as far as we can, aud that we frequently revolve in our 
minds the events of past generations. This was certainly 
the case with the children of Israel, and we should remember 
that God addresses us in the same language that he did them. 
" Remember the days of old, consider the years of many gen- 
erations :" and ignorance or forgetfulness in us of the most 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 61 

wonderful and remarkable events of very ancient or of more 
modern times, would be very inexcusable. For we have the 
bible, which will carry back the mind to the very beginning 
of time, and we have richly the means of obtaining knowl- 
edge of civil and ecclesiastical history, in this day and land 
of books and general education. This is required as a duty, 
not only in the text, but in many other places, in plain and 
positive language ; and it is designed and calculated, as all 
other duties are, to promote our spiritual and moral edifica- 
tion, and comfort. 

In further pursuing the subject, I shall call your attention, 

1st. To some things we may see as included in the requi- 
sition, "Remember the days of old." 

2d. To some of the advantages, which may result from 
the due remembrance and the contemplation of the days of 
old, and the years of many generations. 

I. The remembrance of the days of old ; things to be 
remembered and studied. Here I can name but few, and 
dwell upon none of them, as their importance requires. The 
things to be remembered and studied I name as included : 

1st. The whole history of redemption, from the first inti- 
mation of mercy to fallen man, down to the full completion of 
the great work of redemption, by the actual sufferings of 
the divine Redeemer, and ascension of the Son of God. 

Whatever other events may be correctly related, constantly 
remembered and carefully studied, if this be not in some 
measure remembered, and do not engage our solemn con- 
sideration, we shall only have the more splendid way down 
to eternal death. It would have been better for us, never to 
have had an existence, nor to have known what great things 
God has wrought for sinners, than for us to disregard the 
divine command, in this respect. 

2d. Among the things included in the days of old, and to 

be remembered, we may see as included, the constant and 

unchangeable care which Christ has ever taken of his church, 

and the protection he has afforded to individual saints, and 

9 



62 MEMOIR OP THE 

tlie wonderful deliverances he has effected for them, in sea- 
sons of the greatest perils and sufferings. Often has the 
church been brought low, exceedingly low, and the enemies 
have thought that they had prevailed, but the Lord has 
brought deliverance, and given the triumph to his distressed 
people. And we should remember the instances of his faith- 
fulness with individuals, when he has borne with them, and 
carried them through severest trials ; though they have passed 
through the water, it has not overflowed them, and though 
they have passed through the fire, it has not consumed them. 

Wonderful indeed have been many instances, where God 
has wrought for his saints, when all other hope was gone, and 
these are recorded that we may remember and meditate on 
them. 

3d. Again, the many instances wherein God has brought 
sore judgments upon his cliurch and people, and individual 
saints, for their sins, are to be remembered by us. They are 
recorded, that we may know them well, and be admonished ; 
for examples, we have the histories of David, Hezekiah, and 
others. 

4th. Again, the things to be remembered of old, are the 
remarkable judgments God has brought upon his enemies, and 
the enemies of his people ] such, for instance, as upon Egypt, 
Pharaoh and his host, and upon Babylon. We may also, 
especially on this day, view as included among the things of 
old to be studied, the events of divine Providence in which 
we are directly or individually concerned, such as : 

1st. The preparation of our forefathers to leave their 
native land, their pleasant dwellings and possessions, in order 
that they might have the gospel in its purity, and worship 
God according to the dictates of their consciences, and 
especially, in preparing an asylum for them in this land, so 
shortly before unknown to the old world. Here God planted 
his choice vine, and caused it to take root and bear fruit, 
once glorious fruit, however since degenerated. The kind- 
ness of the Lord to our forefathers, the deliverances he 



REV. EBEXEZER HILL. 63 

wrought for them, when foes rose up against them, and the 
blessings he bestowed npon all their labors, until a little one 
had become a great nation ; these are all of them, things of 
old, which are to be remembered, and which ought to be 
studied, until our hearts are filled with gratitude and praise. 

2d. There are many things in the history of our own life, 
though it be short, and in the events which have led on to the 
circumstances in which we are placed this day. Our child- 
hood and youth, our manhood and age, have not passed away, 
without many dispensations of Providence, which call for our 
continued remembrance, with deep feelings of gratitude, holy 
joy, and lively praise. The history of this town and of this 
church, with all the train of events, which have led to the 
circumstances in which we are placed this day, contains many 
things, which call for our lasting remembrance, and solemn 
meditation. In them, we may trace the leadings of divine 
Providence, and though on a smaller scale, yet more remark- 
able, because so much nearer to us. 

II. I proceed to invite your attention to some of the 
advantages resulting from the continued remembrance, and 
due consideration of past events. And it is believed to be 
capable of proof, that historical facts, especially those which 
are contained in the bible and the late history of the chmxh, 
teach us most conclusive lessons of wisdom, and the most 
solemn, remarkable, alarming, and profitable truths. If we 
remember and consider well, the whole history of redemp- 
tion, we shall learn that there is, and can be but one possible 
way of escape for sinners, from the just, though tremendous 
wrath of God. The dispensations of God against the wicked, 
as well as his faithfulness and truth to those who fear 
his name and believe his promises, occur on every page. 
The first hope that sinful man could ever indulge, was 
grounded on the promises to the woman's seed ; the display 
of divine anger against stubborn sinners, in the days of old, 
is sufiicient to make those fear, who are not in the way in 
which sinners may come into the favor of God. ! what 



64 MEMOIR OF THE 

proofs does the history of the world give of the prevalence 
of sin, and of its hatefulness to a holy God. If we look 
through the days of old, to the very morning of time, we see 
death reigning over all, in that all have sinned, for the wages 
of sin is death. In every view we take of the days of old, 
we see the evil of sin, and the .dreadful consequences of 
apostasy from Grod. The whole history of redemption con- 
tained in the bible, when it is seriously contemplated, goes to 
teach the wicked world, that vain is the effort to prevail 
against, and overturn the church of God. How has God 
swept away whole and mighty nations, when they have risen 
up against his little flock ! How solemn a call *is this on 
sinners, to accept his mercy ! We may learn some of the 
special benefits of remembering the days of old, and of 
acquaintance with ancient times, from many crises related in 
the bible ; and the special benefit to be obtained thereby, is 
to be seen. Thus, is the chuixh in a low, depressed, or 
oppressed state ; are christians borne down with troubles, 
discouraged, and ready to faint ; let them remember the days 
of old, &c., and they will find facts, which may strengthen 
their faith, and encourage their hope. Thus it was with the 
Psalmist, as related in the seventy-seventh Psalm. He had a 
season of darkness and sore trial, and was almost ready to 
despair of the mercy of God ; but when he remembered the 
days of old, the years of ancient times, when he called to 
mind his song in the night, and on his having made diligent 
search, he was led to ask, will the Lord cast off forever ? 
Can such a thing be ? Will he be favorable no more ? Is his 
mercy clean gone forever? Do his promises fail? Hath God 
forgotten to be gracious ? Such desponding, unbelieving- 
thoughts had troubled him. But how did he check himself, 
and recover a tranquil state ; yea, a state of holy joy, by 
calling to mind what God had done of old. His language is, 
"I said this in my infirmity," and instead of yielding to such 
despondency, he said, "I will remember the years of the right 
hand of the most High, I will remember the works of the 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 65 

Lord, I will remember the wonders of old ;" and we find him 
soon speaking the language of praise. This is the benefit 
that the people of God may derive, from remembering the 
days of old, when they are by any means brought low. Here 
they may take courage. 

Again, when Moses would keep the people low in their own 
minds, and grateful to God for all his wonders of mercy and 
favors, he called upon them to " remember that thou wast a 
servant in the land of Egypt, and that the Lord thy God 
brought thee out thence through a mighty hand and a stretched 
out arm." If we would call to mind past events, and even go no 
further back than our own experience, we should remember our 
once totally ruined state, our state of slavery in sin, and how 
we owe all to divine mercy, if we are not now in worse than 
Egyptian bondage. If any thing in the world can humble us 
and hide pride from us, this would do it. And this is the 
great good received. And when he would bring them to deep 
repentance and continued humility, he charged them " remem- 
ber and forget not, how ye provoked the Lord your God to 
wrath in the wilderness, from the day when ye departed 
out of the land of Egypt, until ye came into this place ye 
have been rebellious until this day." And when he would 
inspire them with courage to face their enemies and attempt 
arduous duties to which they thought themselves not able, he 
thus called upon them, " Thou shalt remember what the Lord 
did unto Pharaoh and unto all Egypt." 

Such benefits may result to us from proper meditation, on 
the years of many generations gone by. And the more we 
acquaint ourselves with the history of this nation and the 
Church Of Christ contained in it. And the more frequently 
we call to mind, and the more closely we meditate on the 
dealings of God ; the more we shall find to humble us and 
bring us to repentance, to incite in us gratitude and a desire 
to make returns for unmerited kindness. And to these mar- 
velous events we have not time to advert. Many circumstan^ 
CCS conspire to call our attention to know what to some would 



66 MEMOIR OP THE 

be things of many generations, things transacted long before 
their birth, and to some few, although they are tilings in which 
they had a personal share, they would seem of ancient times 
long since done. But entering immediately on the subject, I 
will call our attention to a few inferences ; I shall barely name 
them and then leave them for our own reflections. The Old 
Testament, much despised by many, would be of exceeding 
value for the edification of all, and for the strengthening of 
their faith ; not only is it very essential to their salvation, as 
well as the New Testament, but to their establishment in the 
hope of the gospel. Here only have we the history of the 
dealings of God with man anfl with his church for about four 
thousand years. 

2d. We see the value of his preached word. 

3d. Acquaintance with the history of God's dealing with 
the church and the world, with the history of former times, 
is of importance, as affording subjects for profitable medita- 
tion, at all times, to the exclusion of vain, foolish and impure 
thoughts. 

This day is an epoch in the history of this town and chmxh. 
This day, we leave this house, where we, and our fathers 
have worshiped for many years, and we may receive it as 
the voice of God to us. "Remember the days of old." Let 
us now together meditate on the events occurring in the days 
of our fathers, and trace them down to the present day, and 
we shall see much to humble us, and to shew us the many, 
and wonderful kindnesses of our God. I begin with some in 
the civil history of the town, such as I have been able to 
collect. The time of the first inhabitants moving into this 
town, was in the year 1752, and it was called township No. 
1 ; and the first white child born in the town, would be, if 
living, more than eighty years of age. The first settlers in 
the town were many of them poor, and the settlement did 
not proceed so rapidly as in some other towns, nor was it 
until the year 1768, that an incorporation was sought and 
obtained. In that year, the inhabitants were incorporated a 



REV. EBEXEZER HILL. 67 

body politic, and the place named Mason. This was in 
August ; and in November following, when the first tax was 
levied, there were but seventy-six rated polls or persons, 
liable to be taxed. The original proprietors erected a meet- 
ing house, just by where this stands, for the inhabitants, 
before the town was incorporated; that is, they set up a 
frame, covered and enclosed it, but it never was finished. 
There it stood a shell until 1790. And in that your fathers, 
and some now living, worshiped, and even in the winter. 
In that house, I commenced my ministry in this pla^. Then, 
there was not a riding carriage in the town, and in the winter, 
whole families would come to meeting on a sled drawn by 
oxen, and the ladies were not ashamed to be seen in their 
plain, decent, ivarm, comfortable, homemade clothing. Were 
those times more unfavorable, or on the whole more uncom- 
fortable; than the present, judge ye. 

At length the town as a corporate body, agreed to build a 
house for the worship of God, but were not agreed as to its 
location. This was submitted to a committee of disinter- 
ested persons, and they unhcippily selected this spot. I say 
unhappily, for had it been located where it should have been, 
it might have well continued many years longer as the place of 
our solemnities, and with small expense be made comfortable. 
When our fathers entered upon the work of building this 
house, it was with many discouragements and fears. They 
felt poor, and weak handed for such an imdertaking; but God 
smiled upon them, and succored them far beyond their fears. 
They felt it to be a heavy burden, but they undertook it with 
cheerfulness, and were enabled to sustain it. And forty seven 
years ago this present month, the house was so far finished, 
that the ceremonies of my ordination were performed in it, 
which were the first public religious exercises in this house. 
It was soon after solemnly dedicated unto Almighty God, as 
a place for his worship, and through the rich goodness and 
mercy of God, very few sabbaths have passed from that time 
to the present, when the house has not been occupied by some 



68 MEMOIR OP THE 

as a place of worship. And since that time the Lord has 
blessed his people, agreeably to his promises to his chosen 
people of old. He has increased their number and increased 
their wealth, proving that none are poorer for what they 
spend for God. In the year 1790, when this house was built, 
there were but about one hundred and ten dwelling houses in 
the town, poor and good, and now there are more than two 
hundred and ten, and our eyes are permitted to behold a new 
house completed, to be dedicated to God for the use of this 
church aiife the congregation worshiping with them. Surely 
we have cause this day to set up our Ebenezer, and say, hith- 
erto hath the Lord helped us, and to give thanks at the 
remembrance of his merciful kindness, when we remember 
the days of old, and consider and think upon our present 
state as a society, for when we go out of this house we are 
not left houseless. 

I will now add something relative to the changes that have 
taken place in the town, to be remembered among the things 
of the days of old. There is but one dwelling house and two 
barns now standing in all that can be considered as contained 
in this centre village, which were standing when I first came to 
this town, and but one building of any kind in all the west vil- 
lage, and there had never then been a resident physician, nor 
other professional man, except the short time Mr. Searle was 
the minister. Supposing five persons to a dwelling house, 
there would not at that time have been more than five hun- 
dred and fifty inhabitants, but they did probably some exceed 
six hundred. We have enjoyed at least a comfortable share 
of health with other places, and there have been many instan- 
ces of longevity. But some years have been distinguished by 
great mortality. Li the years 1818 and 1819, we were visit- 
ed with that dreadful scourge angina maligna or throat dis- 
temper, and it swept away many of the children. In the year 
1818 was the greatest number of deaths that ever were in 
the town in one year ; there were thirty four ; of these twenty 
two were children under fourteen years of age, and of these 



I 



KEY. EBEXEZER HILL. 69 

twelve died of throat distemper. In 1819, there were thirty 
one deaths, and of these eighteen were under fourteen years 
of age, and twelve of them were removed by the same malig- 
nant distemper. 

In the space of forty-seven years, there have been removed 
from this place to the narrow house prepared for all the 
living, somewhat rising eight hundred. What a large congre- 
gation ! How often have all the now living, been warned to 
prepare for death and the judgment. 

But it is time to call to mind the years of many genera- 
tions, respecting the church in this place. Previous to my 
acquaintance with this church, it had been in a state of per- 
plexity and trouble, for most of the time of its existence as 
a church. Among the earliest settlers in the town, were 
some professors, but no church was constituted until 1772, 
four years after the town was incorporated. When the 
church was embodied, it was stated to be a Calvinistic church, 
and the articles of faith to agree essentially, with the West- 
minster confession of faith. At this time Rev. Jonathan 
Searle was ordained, and constituted the pastor of this 
church. Shortly after, unhappy difficulties arose between the 
pastor and the flock, which caused his dismissal, nine years 
after his settlement. Soon after, or from the time of this 
event, he ceased to preach. He was appointed a civil magis- 
trate, officiated in that capacity, and remained in the town until 
his death. During the nine years of his ministry, fourteen were 
admitted by profession, and nine by letter, and eleven owned 
the covenant, so called, according to the practice of most of the 
churches in N. England, in those days. After that period, until 
the time of my ordination, I find record of admission of one 
member only. There was a long time of deathlike sleep in 
the church, until about the year 1785, when it pleased God 
to pour out his spirit, and cause a great revival of religion 
in his people, and of his work in converting sinners, in New 
Ipswich, under the ministry of the venerable Mr. Parrar, 
and soon it extended, in some measure, to this and other 
10 



70 MEMOIR OF THE 

towns. This part of the vineyard, although in a very deplor- 
able state, was not wholly passed by ; some few christians 
were awakened, and brought to submit themselves to their 
long neglected duty. 

Many of the people of Mason, especially of the young, 
flocked to the solemn meetings at New Ipswich, and were 
struck with wonder, and soon some were convicted of sin, 
and became anxious for their soul's salvation, and shortly 
after were rejoicing in the hope of pardoning mercy. But 
such was the state of the church in Mason, destitute of a 
minister, broken, dispirited, that the new converts sought to 
unite with the church in New Ipswich, to which they had 
become greatly attached, by their acquaintance with the 
members, which the situation and intercourse had brought 
about, and by that mutual love, which new born souls who 
have mourned, and wept, and rejoiced together, feel. Their 
request was granted, on condition that they removed their 
relation, whenever the church in Mason should become 
settled. One happy effect of this revival, was a determina- 
tion in the church and congregation, to seek the settlement of 
a gospel minister ; and, in the very mysterious providence of 
God, the present speaker was elected to this office, and is 
continued to this day. 

Just before my ordination, those who were residing in town, 
members of other churches, and these members of the New 
Ipswich church, removed their relation to this church. The 
church consisted of thirty-six members when I settled with 
them, and has now rising one hundred and fifty-seven, in this 
town, in regular standing. The whole number added, during 
my ministry, is two hundred and eighty-one ; of these, two 
hundred and sixty-one by profession. A small number indeed 
compared to the number of inhabitants, and length of time, 
although we have been favored with some precious seasons 
of refreshing, from the presence of the Lord, seasons when 
the Holy Spirit has come down with power, and wrought 
wonders, making the word of God powerful, and causing joy 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 71 

and gladness on earth and in heaven, over penitent sinners. 
It will be doubtless refreshing to some, to be reminded of 
those years, in which they rejoiced when first they knew the 
Lord, or rejoiced when salvation came to their house, and 
their dear friends became dearer to their hearts, by being 
united to the family of God. 

The years 1801 and 1802 were indeed years of the right 
hand of God. After a long season in which but few, and at 
distant intervals, were persuaded to embrace the Savior, God 
was pleased to grant such a refreshing season, as never had 
before been experienced in this place, and the fruit that was 
gathered, was an addition of fifty -four members by profession. 
The number that united with the Baptist church, I cannot tell. 
It seemed then, as if it could not be, that there should be 
such a lowering down as would be like night after a bright 
and glorious day. But oh ! what wonderful changes we have 
witnessed, which should humble our souls, while we rejoice in 
the goodness of God, that after his spirit has been grieved 
away, and his people gone away backward, he should remem- 
ber them in mercy. Again, in the year 1812, was a short 
season of the special display of the mercy of God, and twen- 
ty-five were added to the church. After this, only now and 
then a mercy drop was found to fall, until the year 1826, 
which was a year more distiuguished than any other in the 
annals of this church. God wrought gloriously, every part 
of the town was visited, aud so manifest was the work of 
God, that for a time, all opposition seemed to be silenced, 
and the fruit of this glorious revival, was an addition to this 
church, of sixty-two members. Oh ! that we may soon see 
such another day of the mercy and goodness of God. As 
the fruits of this revival, there were added to the church in 
1826 and in 1827, seventy-nine members; in 1831, twenty- 
one, and in 1834 and 1835, thirty-two. Remember the days 
of old, consider the years of many generations, and think 
what changes will shortly take place here. 

When I look around on this assembly, I can see but one of 



72 MEMOIR OP THE 

the number of those, who from this town joined the church 
in New Ipswich, and removed their relation at the time of 
my settlement. Then they were young, but where are they ? 
I can see but two [Jonathan Batchelder, and the widow Polly 
Dunster] of all the thirty-six, which composed the church in 
that solemn hour, when I was constituted their pastor. 
Where are they ? Some have removed to other churches, and 
perhaps remain on earth, but most of them have fallen asleep. 
Oh 1 how near at hand, should this view bring the time of 
our own departure ; how excite us to be up and doing, while 
it is day. It is matter of rejoicing certainly to me, that 
when we leave this house, we have a place of worship to 
which we may repair, and that, although I minister no 
longer in this house, or any other, I do not leave you as 
sheep without a shepherd. 

Where will be the present inhabitants of this town, after 
the revolution of such another period as we have contem- 
j)lated. Certainly, with many, the places that now know 
them, shall know them no more. Some few may remain on 
earth, monuments of God's sparing mercy and goodness. It 
is hoped, that many will be shouting the praises of redeem- 
ing love in heaven ; and oh ! distressing thought ! it is feared 
that some will be wailing their folly and madness, in eternal 
despair. What changes may be expected to take place, 
in half a century to come, in this church and congregation, 
and the inhabitants of this tOAvn. The farms we now culti- 
vate with so much care, will have passed into other hands. 
The houses we now inhabit, will not be inhabited by us then. 
This house, which has been consecrated to God, for his ser- 
vice, and the place where he has displayed his mercy, will 
then be mouldered into ruins. 

The house to which we are about to remove will become 
old, and the religious assembly will be another generation ; 
while we shall probably all be sleeping in dust. Yes, that 
communion table will be surrounded with other members, 
unless God in his wrath shall remove his candlestick. Not 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 7 J 

only will these seats be vacated by this assembly, not only will 
the present communicants cease from coming to this table, 
not only will these walls cease to resound with the voice of 
praise from the lips of this assembly, but the house in which 
we are to worship after this day, will be filled with other 
worshipers than those who may have the privilege to unite 
with us in the first religious exercises in that earthly temple. 
In thirty years another generation will occupy our present 
places. 

It is right that as we leave this house, we should leave it 
under the impression of such remarkable truths. I cannot 
however, say farewell to this house, before once more calling 
on christian brethren and sisters, to remember the time is 
short, and to do with their might what they have to do ; think 
not your work is done because you leave this house of wor- 
ship. Keep in grateful remembrance the works of God. 
Take courage from his precious promises and his dealings 
with his people, in the years that are gone, be instant in 
season and out of season. Cease not to plead with God, 
for the outpouring of his spirit upon this church and congre- 
gation. Let your light so shine, that others seeing your good 
works, may come and put their trust in that God and Saviour 
you love and adore. Oh ! sinners, this is the last message to 
you from this place, you can have but little time left, the 
door of mercy is now open ; ! fly to the Saviour, who 
stands with open arms to receive you, while it is yet an 
accepted time, and a day of salvation. 

I now bid farewell in my own name, and in the name of 
this church and congregation, to this house as a place of wor- 
ship, as the place of our solemn assemblies. 

Farewell to this Pulpit : to me indeed, for many years, 
the dearest spot on earth. And although I expect not to 
labor any more in this pulpit, if I do in any other, I never 
shall think of this place, and remember the days of old, 
without such associations as will be calculated to move the 
feelings of humility and gratitude. 



74 



MEMOIR OP THfi 



Farewell to this House, which has been the place, in 
which we have witnessed many painful and joyous scenes. 

! may these walls, once consecrated to God, never be 
desecrated or polluted, by being made the place where infidelity 
or error sliall be disseminated ; or the spirit of party, manage 
to subvert the freedom of this favored land. 





=^iiiPiiiiiiilllli 

|Pfjl||..|:Ml; i 





OLD MEETING HOUSE. FIRST OCCUPIED NOVEMBER 1 1790. 





NEW MEETING HOUSE. FIRST OCCUPIED NOVEMBER, 1837. 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 75 



A FUNERAL SERMON, 

DELIVERED AT MASON, F. H., ON LORD'S DAY, 

DECEMBER 10, 1826, 
OCCASIONED BY THE DEATH OF 

CAPTAIN HIKAM SMITH, 

Who Deceased December 6, 1826, Aged U Years. 

BY REV. EBENEZER HILL. 



JOB XXI. 2 3, 2 4, 2 5, 2 6. 



One dieth in his full strength, being wholly at ease and quiet. His breasts 
are full of milk, and his bones are moistened with marrow. And another 
dieth in the bitterness of his soul, and never eateth with pleasure. They 
shall lie down alike in the dust, and the worms shall cover them. 

One interesting point of instruction conveyed in these 
words of the aged, experienced, and afflicted Job, is mani- 
festly this. The grave may be very near to the most pros- 
perous, and healthy, and strong, as well as to those who 
endure the greatest afflictions, and most severe sufferings. I 
shall endeavor, briefly, to establish this truth, in order to 
exhibit some of the important instructions which the great 
uncertainty of life seems forcibly to convey to us all ; and to 
prepare the way for such application and addresses as the 
solemn scene which so lately passed before our eyes, together 
with others of no long date, seem to require. 

Job was a man of very eminent piety. It appears from 
divine testimony, that he exceeded all the men on earth in 
his day, in devotedness to God, and in labor after inward 



76 MEMOIR OF THE 

purity, and practical holiness. "Hast tlioii considered my 
servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect 
and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth 
evil?" Job was a wise man; a man of good understanding; 
a man of much and careful observation. It is evident he 
was well acquainted with the history of preceding ages, so 
far as this was handed down by tradition ; and he had atten- 
tively observed the dispensations of Divine Providence in his 
own day. The remark in the text was the result of his 
own observation, confirmed by the testimony of the fathers, 
who had lived long before him. And the same truth has been 
gaining additional evidence in every age of the world since, 
down to the present day. " One dietli in his full strength, 
being wholly at ease and quiet. His breasts are full of milk 
and his bones are moistened with marrow. And another 
dieth in the bitterness of his soul, and never eateth with 
pleasure. They shall lie down in the dust, and the worms 
shall cover them." 

This truth also comes to us with authority ; being written 
by the pen of inspiration, preserved by the providence of 
God, and making a part of the holy scriptures. let us feel 
our personal interest in this solemn truth ! As we know that 
it is appointed to all men once to die ; as we know that we 
are of the dust, and must return to dust again ; so we are 
taught in the text, that we are not sure of any long previous 
warning of the time of our dissolution. No circumstances in 
life can give any security that death is not at the door. 

If to be full of strength, and free from any disease, the 
blood and spirits flowing with life and vigor, can give no secu- 
rity for the continuance of life ; then surely no attachments 
to life, no worldly circumstances, no pleasing prospects, no 
connections formed, no engagements made, can give the least 
assurance that the grave is not just before us. How often do 
we see this melancholy truth demonstrated ! We do not need 
to repair to the chronicles of ancient times for evidence that 
the young, even children, and the sprightly youths of fairest 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 71 

promise, may suddenly drop into an untimely grave. Neither 
need we go far for proof that the young, the strong and vig- 
orous — their parents' hope, their parents' joy, while in the full 
enjoyment of health, — their warm and lively imaginations 
painting bright prospects before them, which seem to them 
certain,' perhaps forming connections, which they fondly 
believe will be lasting, and on which they ground the warmest 
expectations of happiness — we need not, I say, go far for 
proof, that such may, in an unexpected hour, fall into the cold 
embrace of death. 

Parents, while they feel not, or scarcely begin to feel any 
of the decays of nature ; while their nerves are strong, and 
their bodily organs are able to perform their functions with 
ease, and they behold with joy, their children like olive plants 
around their tables, or settling in the world with hopeful 
prospects — no sickness, no apparent messenger of death 
alarms them — they may drop and die in the fulness of their 
strength; or their children may fall before their eyes. In 
either case, how unlooked for, how surprising the change ! 
Circumstances in life give no more security against death, 
than health. Death spares the rich no more than the poor. 
Engagements, of whatever kind, are unavailing to protect 
against death. We may have much upon our hands to do, 
much unfinished business, according to our promises to others, 
or plans which we have laid out for ourselves ; but as our 
full strength will not be able to withstand, so our engage- 
ments and promises will not move death to delay his stroke, 
when commissioned to strike. And oftentimes there is little 
or no warning given, by any previous indisposition, before the 
strong man is made to bow. One dieth in his full strength, 
being wholly at ease and quiet, as well as another at whose 
door death had seemed to knock, by long continued, or fre- 
quent sicknesses. 

Death, in unnumbered forms, stalks in every path we tread. 
The grave is ever before us, and we are constantly approach- 
ing it ; and no one can say that the next step is not into it. 
11 



78 MEMOm OF THE 

As David said of himself, so it may be with us, "There is but 
a step between me and death." The prophet was directed 
to cry, "All flesh is grass, and all the goodness thereof as the 
flower of the field. The grass withereth and the flower 
fadeth; because the Spirit of the Lord bloweth upon it. 
Surely the people is grass." Job also, guided by the Holy 
Spirit, hath said, "Man that is born of a woman is of few 
days, and full of trouble. He cometh forth as a flower, and 
is cut down; he fleeth also as a shadow, and continueth not." 
Surely then no one may consistently boast himself of 
to-morrow. However firm his health now is, he may then be 
in his grave. 

It is not my intention to labor to prove a truth so evident 
in frequent occurrences. I have barely reminded you, my 
fellow-mortals, of what we all admit, I trust, and what every 
one must admit, who receives testimony of God, or only casts 
his eye over a little space around him ; and I have done it for 
this purpose, that our minds might be prepared to receive the 
instruction which such facts press upon all the living. 

You will sufi'er me to state, and, I beseech all duly to 
weigh, some consequences which must follow from the forego- 
ing acknowledged facts. And, 

1. If then in the midst of life we are in death; if, in the 
fullness of our strength, and in our brightest worldly pros- 
pects, we are liable every moment to be cut down by death, 
and in the grave to be hidden from the world and all it con- 
tains ; to have all our connections dissolved, and to leave all 
our earthly enjoyments behind us forever; then, certainly, 
they are miserably poor who have no better interest than 
what this world affords ; nor enjoyments superior to all those 
of time and sense. Though they be now free from suffering- 
pain, in full health and strength ; though placed in the most 
easy and flattering circumstances, and having the brightest 
earthly prospects before them, they are poor indeed ! We 
may feel ourselves to-day to be full and happy in our wealth 
and friends ; but if these be all we have, in one short hour 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 79 

vre may have nothing. Is not vanity inscribed on all this 
"R'orld, when immortal beings seek their happiness in it ; and 
neither the most vigorous health, nor the greatest abundance, 
nor the most endeared connections and friends, can save us a 
moment from death ; and as soon as death passes upon us we 
must leave the world as naked as we came into it ! 0, if we 
have not a better inheritance, richer enjoyments, and more 
glorious prospects than all this world can afford, we are in an 
unenviable, in a most pitiable state. 

2. A correct view of the uncertainty of life, the certainty 
of death, and the change produced by death, shews the ines- 
timable value of Religion. 

It is only religion, personal religion, which consists in con- 
formity of heart to the character and government of God, and 
the gospel of salvation by Jesus Christ, that can reconcile the 
mind to leave the world, support it in the near view of death, 
and render the soul happy after death. then, of what 
incalculable worth is religion ; since we all must die, leave 
kindred and friends, and possessions behind us, and launch 
into the eternal world. Nothing but that glorious hope 
which springs from feeling reconciliation to God, trust in 
Christ's atoning blood for the pardon of sin, and belief in 
the promise of his favor forever, can enable us to view the 
world receding, and the constant, near and certain approach 
of death, without dismay. And it is only evidence that they 
possessed this religion, which can give us consoling hopes, 
and comfort our hearts, concerning those who were dear to 
us, but are hidden from our eyes in the cold grave. It is this 
religion only which fits the soul for heaven. Who then can 
conceive, much less express the danger of every soul, desti- 
tute of religion, and thus unprepared to die. For no one 
knows the day of his death ; and there is no change of moral 
character after death. There is no work, nor devise, nor 
knowledge, nor wisdom in the grave ; yet the soul must exist 
forever, and in a state to be decided according to the charac- 
ter formed, and the deeds done in the body: Who then, can 



80 MEMOIR OP THE 

rest without evidence of a heart by grace subdued to the will 
and service of God ? without evidence of vital union to the 
Lord Jesus Christ, the only Savior of sinners ? Surely to 
know Jesus Christ, and him crucified ; to know him as the 
Savior in whom we trust, whom we love, and whom we serve, 
must be that wisdom which is thus described by the king of 
Israel, "Wisdom is more precious than rubies; her merchan- 
dise is better than the merchandise of silver ; and the gain 
thereof than fine gold. She is a tree of life to them that lay 
hold on her; and happy is every one that retaiueth her." 0, 
who can dare, in this dying world, to believe his own immor- 
tality, and not seek this treasure ! 

3. The view which has been presented, of the close con- 
nection between us and death, between every thing here and 
the grave, should teach us to live habitually as strangers and 
travelers in this dying world, and not to set our affections 
on things below. Surely our hearts ought to sit very loose 
to all things we hold by such an uncertain tenure as life. 
And to make anything which is purely of this world, our con- 
fidence, our hope, our idol, is not only exceedingly criminal but 
exceedingly absurd. Why should we cleave so fast to that 
which we may so soon be called to leave forever ? if the 
case be with us as has been represented, how careful should 
we be not to suffer any inferior attachment to hinder us in 
seeking the present enjoyment of God, and laboring to secure 
an heirship to the glories of his heavenly kingdom. 

In attempting an application of the subject to the assem- 
bly at large, the few aged people present will permit me to 
offer a word directly to them in the first place. 

Is it true, my aged friends, that some die in youth, yea, die 
in their full strength, being wholly at ease and quiet ? Have 
you walked so many years on earth, that but few of all your 
youthful acquaintances are left ? then, while you well may 
wonder that you are alive this day, you may know that the 
time of your departure is at hand. Although you have been 
wonderfully spared, you have not obtained a discharge from 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 81 

the warfare. You must meet the king of terrors. Are you 
prepared now to meet death ? Are you prepared to stand in 
the presence of the holy God? If any of you have lived 
to this day without returning to God by unfeigned repent- 
ance, and by faith in Jesus Christ, not only death, but ever- 
lasting destruction is before you. The sparing mercy of God, 
if you have rejected, and continue to reject his grace, offered 
in the gospel, will only aggravate your condemnation. then, 
while a few more sands may run, and you are continued pris- 
oners of hope, turn to the strong hold. If any of you, aged 
friends, have a comforting evidence that you are prepared, 
through grace, for a peaceful death, see that ye be as servants 
who watch and wait for the coming of their Lord at an 
unknown hour. 

From the aged, I turn to call upon the middle aged, and 
young people. I ask you, dear friends, to consider, in view 
of the subject, and the occasion of it, and let your own 
understanding answer the following questions. Is it possible 
that you can have any business, or concerns of so much imme- 
diate importance as the immediate care of your souls ? Is 
there any thing you cannot neglect with more propriety, and 
less hazard than preparation for death ? Can you believe that 
you may die in the fulness of your strength, and yet dare to 
live to another day without seeking God ! Can any of you 
dare, not to attempt now to do what you must wish you had 
done, but it may be too late to do, when you feel the cold 
hand of death? 

But it is expected that some particular address will be 
made to the mourners ; made mourners indeed, by the affect- 
ing instance of mortality which has been publicly mentioned 
this day ; and for whom, I trust, many have earnestly prayed, 
that they may be sanctified, and supported, and comforted, 
under their heavy trial. 

To the dear friend of the deceased we first look, and with 
no ordinary feelings of sympathetic grief. How has this 
truth, thus painfully realized, " one dieth in his full strength," 



82 MEMOm OF THE 

struck a death blow to your pleasing earthly prospects ; per- 
haps fond dreams of years to enjoy the society of a beloved 
friend ; and that ye might go down the vale of years together. 
Perhaps you were anticipating much worldly comfort and res- 
pect, by your mutual efforts, and mutual kindness. Perhaps 
hoping that you might be helpers of each other's joy in a 
wearisome journey to a brighter world. Death has stepped 
in, and the bright visions have disappeared. Your friend is 
gone ! But while the scene through which you have passed, 
is heart affecting, and long must be, it is instructing ; for it is 
the voice of God. He does not forbid you to mourn; and no 
one may ; but He calls you to take up the cross, to humble 
yourself under his mighty hand, to bear the yoke of trouble 
in your youth ; and you have the prayers of many that you 
may find it good for you. 

I say, the scene through which you have passed, is instruct- 
ing. You cannot easily be taught, and more impressively, 
the uncertainty of life, and the importance of being prepared 
for death, at an miwarned hour. You cannot have set before 
you, more feelingly, the uncertainty of all earthly prospects. 
But are you comfortless ? there is a source of consolation 
always open for the afiBicted. God reigns. The heavenly 
Father reigns. He who afflicts calls the afflicted to seek him 
early in their afflictions. We hope you know the way to the 
mercy-seat through a crucified Savior. Draw near in humble 
boldness in his name, and he who has laid this burthen on you 
will support you. let the loss of an earthly friend render 
the Friend of sinners more precious to your heart. Let the 
disappointments in human calculations raise your heart above 
the world, and lead you to seek divine consolations, and press 
forward towards the mark for the prize of the high calling, 
and you will find lasting benefit from the scenes, which for 
the present are so grievous. If Christ be indeed the friend 
of your heart, he will never leave nor forsake you. And you 
may look forward to a sudden death and an early grave with 
composure ; or quietly wait all the days of youi- appointed 



EEV. EBEXEZER HILL. 83 

time, till your change shall come, even though you continually 
bear a cross. 

To the bereaved parents all our eyes turn, and our hearts 
move with tenderness. 

God has been very gracious to you, in bestowing an uncom- 
mon share of health in your family. Your children have all 
been spared to grow up to manhood ; and the voice of health 
has been heard almost constantly in your habitation. Now 
grievous sickness and death have entered your home. The 
breach is made. A beloved son is taken away in the fulness 
of his strength; and while your hopes and fond expectations 
were rising, and his prospects brightening. How suddenly, 
how unlooked for, has your trouble come ! But you will 
remember, mourning friends, " Aflfiiction cometh not forth of 
the dust, neither doth trouble spring out of the ground." You 
will eye the hand of God, which has touched you in this event; 
and listen to his voice. It is, Prepare suddenhj to exchange 
time for eternitij. You see a breach made in your family, 
which is a sure presage that all the rest must go, and that 
you must follow, or precede them. You see that you are not 
sure of wearing out with old age, or that you shall have long 
warning of the approach of death. Healthy, promising, 
children are apt to be their parents' hope in their declining 
years : but you are now feelingly admonished not to lean on 
such props. let the Lord be your confidence, and then, 
though all earthly props sink under you, you will be sup- 
ported and comforted ; for in every affliction you may repair 
to him, and he will be found a present help. Your age 
admonishes you that your time must be short; but what 
scenes of trouble, what sore disappointments are first to be 
endured, you do not, and cannot know. You are to look for 
troubles in this world. May you be favored with the teach- 
ings of the Holy Spirit, and make a wise improvement of 
this affliction, and be prepared for what is to come. We 
wish you divine consolation. God has inflicted the wound, 
and He alone can heal. You may lose the sensible and pun- 



84 MEMOIR OP THE 

gent feeling of your trouble ; time will render the remem- 
brance less painful ; l)ut it is only God who can heal the 
wound; and repair the breach. 

What can I now say to the brethren and sisters of the 
deceased ? what need I say ? The voice of God speaks to 
you loudly; and most intelligibly. A beloved brother has 
fallen in the prime of life, in the fulness of his strength. 
Your health, your strength, your prime of life, can no more 
secure you against the arrest of death. Dear friends, be 
entreated to listen to the voice of Providence, which calls 
you to attend to the concerns of your souls, without delay. 
And, 0, listen to the dying request of your brother. Did 
you witness his anxiety for his own soul, and for your souls ? 
Did you hear his warning, supplicating voice, while his reason 
lasted, urging you to seek religion ; to become reconciled to 
God without delay ? Did you hear him reprobate the senti- 
ment he had labored to believe, and warn you against it ? 
Did you hear him declare his full conviction of his own just 
condemnation as a sinner ; and that the only hope of escap- 
ing everlasting death was through the atoning blood of 
Christ, even by faith in him ? 0, then, rely upon it, the time 
will come when the favor of God, peace in the soul, and hope 
like an anclior, sure and steadfast, will be found, hy you, 
to be of more value than the whole world, and all the fulness 
thereof. When shall this be sought ? You may die suddenly, 
in the fulness of your strength. You may be deprived of 
reason before the close of life ; and then nothing can be done 
to prepare for death. It is certain yoiL must die, the time is 
unknown ; and when death has his commission to strike, he is 
inexorable. then let not the plea be made in vain, acquaint 
noio yourselves with God, and be at peace with him, that good 
may come to your souls. , 

On this solemn occasion the officers and soldiers composing 
the Militia Company of which the late Hiram Smith was Cap- 
tain, have a right to be particularly noticed in this address; 
for they are specially afflicted in this mournful event of 



REV. EBEXEZER HILL. 85 

Divine Providence ; for they are, indeed; mourners, as their 
appearance at his funeral, and on this holy day, clearly mani- 
fests. 

How affecting, how alarming have been the calls of Provi- 
dence to this Company ! In the short space of one year and 
a half, two Captains, young and active, have been cut down, 
not by the sword of battle, but by that foe with whom each 
one, officer and soldier, must contend in single combat, and 
before whom each one must fall. 

You, respected officers and soldiers, notwithstanding the 
military parade you make, live in a time of profound peace 
in your country. There are no apparent indications that you 
may soon be called jto active service. Why then all this mili- 
tary parade ? Why all these pains to learn the discipline 
and art of war ? 0, methinks I hear you say, '-'It is the dic- 
tate of wisdom, in peace to prep?.re for war. It is uncertain 
how soon we may be called to defend by force and arms, our 
dearest rights, and jeopardize our lives in the high field of 
battle ; and what then, if found unacquainted with the art of 
war, wholly unprepared, undisciplined, unarmed ? " Forcible 
reasoning ! let it apply with all its aptness, with all its 
force, in another case. Here I may address you as fellow 
soldiers, although I am unacquainted with all your military 
manoeuvres. Before us is a war in which there is no dis- 
charge ; no engagements, nor attachments, nor fears, can be 
an excuse. Here, is it not equally the dictate of wisdom, Li 
peace prepare for tear? that we should arm ourselves with 
that armor which will not fail in the day of battle ; acquaint 
ourselves with the holy discipline, and become expert in the 
use of those arms ? When called to combat with the com- 
mon enemy, death, and all the innumerable foes of our souls' 
salvation, it is only when clad in the whole armor of God, 
the shield of faith, the helmet of salvation, the sword of 
the spirit, and the breast-plate of righteousness, that we 
can come off conquerors and more than conquerors. Thus 
armed and disciplined, we shall be crowned with victory, 
12 



86 MEMOIR OP THE 

althougli the enemy shall seem to triumph. You now, fellow 
men, appear as soldiers. But are you soldiers of the cross ? 
are you marching in the ranks of the great Captain of salva- 
tion, and obeying his orders ? Then may you proceed boldly. 
But whatever leader you may follow, when you fall as you 
must, you fall to rise no more. 

Hence, whenever you meet on military occasions, your very 
manoeuvres are calculated to remind you of interesting truths, 
and to convey to you important instruction. And it seems 
strange that in a christian land, military meetings are not 
generally solemn meetings. Every word of command given, 
every manoeuvre performed, every step marched to the music 
should remind you of the necessity of preparation for the great 
conflict, and of the danger of being untrained to the holy 
war. Can this Company meet again and trifle with the art of 
war ? Can a training be a season of rude merriment after 
this ? Can the soldiers, who see their officers fall before 
them, feel safe, until they have enlisted under the great Cap- 
tain of salvation, Jesus Christ, the same forever ? This day 
you see, you have painful evidence, that the art of war cannot 
defend from death. No more can any other arts or devices. 
Your Captain was esteemed a good officer ; but he has fallen. 
Death did not respect him: no more will he respect you. 
Soldiers may inconsiderately brave death in the field of bat- 
tle ; but it is only the christian soldier who has true courage 
in the hour of danger, and can contemplate the constant 
approach of death without dismay. It is not courage, it is 
dreadful hardiness to jeopardize life fearlessly without the 
prevailing hope of a happy eternity. 

Soldiers, you acknowledge Captain Smith was a good 
officer. But you may rely upon it, for I had it from his own 
lips, he felt the worth of his immortal soul ; he acknowledged 
himself justly condemned as a sinner ; with lively emotions 
he mourned his past neglects ; and he was anxious for the 
salvation that is in Christ. Now will you not be anxious for 
salvation ? can concern for the soul be unbecoming a soldier ? 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 87 

To you, the surviving officers in this Company, this day 
must be a solemn day. Who can be the successor to your 
late Captain, and look back one year and a half, and not 
tremble ? Who can rise to a higher grade and not tremble ? 
But why speak of this ? Each one, whether he rise in rank 
or not, must bow to the king of terrors, and go to that 
world from which there is no return. Who, which of you, 
is prepared to follow next ? whose turn will it be next ? 
This is a question no man can answer. One in his full 
strength as likely as one who is diseased and feeble. then, 
let me affectionately entreat you, and not entreat in vain, to 
take care of your souls. Now give yourselves to Christ. 
Delay no longer. Receive him as your commander; rely on 
his righteousness; believe and obey his word. Then, and not 
till then, may you live in peace, die in peace, and be crowned 
with victory. 



MEMOIR OF THE 



THE SUBSTANCE OF TWO LECTURES 

ON TH B 

HISTORY OF MASON, 

DELIVERED BEFORE THE LYCEUM 

IN MASON VILLAGE. 



BY REV. EBENEZER HILL. 



COREESPONDENCE 



To THE Rev. Ebenezeb, Hill, 

Dear Sir : — We, whose names are here subscribed, ■were appointed a com- 
mittee, to request a copy for publication, of your recent instructive and inter- 
esting discourse upon the early history of Mason, delivered before the Mason 
Village Lyceum. Desirous of preserving the history of the past, and admon- 
ished by your advanced age, that we cannot long hope to enjoy your society^ 
we trust you will comply with our request. 

Yours truly, 

GEORGE ELLIOT, 
THOMAS H. MARSHALL, 
D. F. RICHARDSON. 
Mason Village, February 24, 1846. 



To George Elliot, Esq., Dr. Thomas H. Marshall, and Rev. D. F. Richardson, 
Gentlemen : — The request of the Lyceum, made through you, of a copy of 
the Lectures on the History of the Town, delivered last winter, I cannot refuse. 
Yet I am constrained to appreciate the request, rather as a mark of respect to 
old age, than as an evidence of merit in the performance. 

Various hindrances have caused delay in examining facts, and in transcribing 
and preparing the copy. Such as it is, I cheerfully present it to you, and 
through you. Gentlemen, to the members of the Lyceum, with many warm 
wishes for the spiritual and temporal prosperity of the risen and rising gen- 
eration. 

Very respectfully your friend and humble servant, 

EBENEZER HILL. 
Mason, May 1, 1846. 



EEV. EBEXEZER HILL. 89 



LECTURE 



Most people take pleasure in reading history, and learning 
the events of ancient days. But when the history relates to 
scenes in which their immediate ancestors were concerned — 
to events which have a bearing on their own state and condi- 
tion, the interest deepens as they proceed. 

Who will not find entertainment and profit in reading the 
history of England from its earliest period ? But as the 
time approaches when our forefathers were forced to leave 
their pleasant dwellings and their beloved country, and seek 
an asylum in a newly discovered continent, where they might 
enjoy civil and religious liberty, what man of common sensi- 
bility — certainly, what true American, is not moved more and 
more ? And is there even a scholar in our common schools, 
who can read the landing of the pilgrims on the rock in Ply- 
mouth, and the severe sufferings they had to endure, and the 
labors they had to perform, without feeling his heart beat 
quick within him ? But history, whether civil, ecclesiastical, 
or biographical, not only affords entertainment, but in a 
pleasing manner valuable instruction. Nor is it necessary 
that the history should abound in marvelous and wonder- 
stirring events, to render it pleasant and profitable. 

Entertaining these views, I am led to believe that the his- 
tory of Mason may be thus useful to the present inhabitants 
of the town, and especially to the young people ; and in com- 
pliance with a special request, I now attempt to present such 



90 MEMOIR OF THE 

facts relative to this town, and its early inhabitants, as I have 
been able to collect, from records which have come into my 
hands, and from conversation had with old people, almost all 
of whom are now — as we must shortly be — in the grave. 

The land included in this town is part of a grant made to 
Captain John Mason, of London, by the king of England, and 
it appears from records that certain persons bought of John 
Tufton Mason, heir of John Mason, a tract of his said grant 
in New Hampshire, containing about 77 square miles, of 
which tract this town is a part. 

At a meeting of these proprietors by purchase of Mason, 
held at Portsmouth, Joseph Blanchard, of Dunstable, was 
accredited their agent ; and as such, in their name, by deed 
or charter, conveyed to a company, whose names are 
expressed in the instrument, a certain tract of land five miles 
square, which was the dimension and shape of this town in 
its original grant : but afterwards a strip of land containing 
200 acres was taken from No. 2, now Wilton, and annexed to 
No. 1, so called; also when the Province line was run 
between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, a gore of land 
was cut off from Townsend, and annexed to Mason ; so that 
it was no longer square, but wider from North to South than 
from East to West. The charter or deed was executed June 
16, 1749 ; and the names of thirty -four men are inserted in 
the instrument as grantees ; most of whom, as far as I can 
judge by the names and other circumstances, were from the 
towns of Dunstable, HoUis, Groton, Pepperell and Townsend. 
This township, thus obtained, was designated No. 1, in the 
Province of New Hampshire, north or back of Townsend. 

In the charter were certain reservations, which shew the 
regard, both grantors and grantees had for the education of 
the youth, and the moral and religious instruction of all, as 
well as for the comfort of the early settlers. For instance, 
two lots of land were reserved for encouragement to build 
mills J six acres were reserved for a common, wherever the 
meeting house should be located. Three shares were 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 91 

reserved for other uses, viz : One share to the first settled 
minister ; one share for the ministry from generation to gen- 
eration.'?^' This right has been disposed of, and I say happily 
disposed of, (notwithstanding the good intentions of the 
grantors, and perhaps the illegality of the act,) for in this 
day it is not a bone of contention. A third share was 
reserved for the support of schools ; and it is a matter of 
regret that this also is disposed of. 

There were not only reservations, but also conditions in 
the charter. The first condition was that a meeting house 
should be built by the grantees, for the use of the inhabi- 
tants; and built as near the centre, as by the grantees should 
be judged most convenient. The time for this to be done 
was limited to May, 1753. Such a house within about three 
rods north east of the now Old Meeting House, was erected, 
enclosed and covered, and little more ever done to it. Thus, 
it remained the place of worship, until after what is now 
called the Old Meeting House in the centre was occupied.f 

Another condition in the charter was, that on some lot in 
each share, three acres should be cleared, enclosed, and fitted 
for mowing or tillage in two years from the date ; and on 
each should be a house at least sixteen feet square, and seven 
feet or more studded, with a chimney and cellar, fitted for a 
dwelling, and some person or family inhabit it, before the 
last of May, 1752; and residence be continued until May, 
1755. 

The settlement of the town advanced slowly. Yet it 
appears from the report of a committee, appointed to ascer- 
tain who had not performed their duty, that in three years 
after the grant, twenty-three settlements had been begun — 
few had more than eight acres cleared, and the greatest 
clearing was twenty acres. Two good houses, one barn and 

* Supposed to be three lots. 

I This house was afterwards torn down ; and at tlie time the following incident took place. 
When the frame was all down except the four posts confined by the gallery sills, Amos Dakin 
was standing on one of these sills, when the remainder of tlie frame swayed and fell. He kept 
his place until almost to the ground, and then leaped and fell flat ; the timber just passed over 
him, and he received no injury. 



92 MEMOIR OP THE 

a youug orcliarcl were reported. What kind of houses, the 
first were, may be gathered from this circumstance, that Mr. 
Obadiah Parker's house was the first framed house in the 
town, perhaps the only one, at that time,"^ and only two were 
called good. From which we may conclude that twenty-one 
out of the twenty-three were made of round logs, or at Lest 
with square timber; but one of these log houses remains to 
this day.t 

When the settlements were very few, instead of being 
compact, as might have been expected from the social nature 
of man, they were scattered to almost every part of the 
town. Enosh Lawrence, whose axe was first heard to 
resound in our forests, was from Pepperell, and began his 
settlement in the south part of the town, where Ephraim Hil- 
dreth now lives. His wife was the first white woman in the 
town, and lived to old age. Nathan Hall, known here as 
Deacon Hall, also from Pepperell, began next to Mr. Law- 
rence, and settled in the north part, where Joseph Saunders 
now lives. Obadiah Parker located himself on the west side 
of the town. There were only three women in the town, 
when Mrs. Parker left her relatives and friends in Chelms- 
ford, to accompany her husband into this wilderness, which 
was then considered as almost the far West. Thomas Tarbell 
settled in the east, where some of his descendants now live, 
and a Mr. Powers located in the extreme east. For a time 
the only place that appeared like a neighborhood was on the 
hill, where deacon Hall settled. Soon after him Henry Jefts 
began where Jonathan Batchelder lives ; Nathan Fish where 
L-a Hall lately lived, and one Samuel Tarbell where Luther 
Nutting lives. 

The character of the first settlers was that of plain, honest 
farmers. Most of them, in the common language of the 
world, were poor. Some of them had scarcely more than 
their clothes, their axe and a little provision. They were 

* This is tlie old house, on the place where Samuel Wheeler Weston now lives, 
•f The house in which Stephen Foster now resides. 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 93 

also men of little education, and their children suffered greatly 
for want of schooling. 

Would our children and youth know how great their privi- 
leges are, and how to prize them, let them, in imagination, go 
back fifty or sixty years, and place themselves for a little 
time beside those of their age at that period. The children 
were then so widely scattered, that for a time it was imprac- 
ticable to form them into schools. The standard of educa- 
tion also was low. A man who could read plain reading, and 
cypher to the Rule of Three, was considered qualified to 
teach a common school. And even in the early days of your 
fathers, my young friends, when they went to school they had 
not a well constructed and comfortable school house. Most 
commonly they had a room in some private house, miserably 
fitted up with benches to sit on, and a kind of tottering table 
on which to write, and not unfrequently scarcely light enough 
to see to read. Add to all this, they had very few books in 
schools or in families. In many places scholars seldom if 
ever heard in school of English Grammar, Geography, Natu- 
ral Philosophy, Mathematics, <fec., which are studies now 
brought within the reach of almost every youth. If therefore 
the present generation do not exceed the preceding in useful 
learning, great blame must be attached to them. 

Our forefathers, and mothers too, who subdued the wilder- 
ness before them, were a hardy and an industrious race. 
The prime object of their clothing was comfort, and their 
food was very uniform and plain.' Tea was not known among 
them in this early period. In summer, milk and bread was 
the food, especially of children, morning and evening ; and in 
the winter, as a general thing, they had a good boiled dish for 
dinner, which laid the foundation for a supper, and for a 
breakfast next morning for the family. And I presume those 
early inhabitants of the town never heard of such a disease 
as dyspepsia. They were not distinguishingly subject to 
fevers ; and cases of consumption were very rare ; and where 
they did occur, they were slow in their progress— not unfre- 
13 



94 MEMOIR OF THE 

quently did it take years to do the work, which consumption 
now sometimes performs in a few weeks. Also, when our 
hardy ancestors were going through the toil of subduing the 
wildernesS; they did not have ardent spirits to cool them in 
the heat of labor, when toiling in the sun, or to warm them 
when buffeting the storms, or enduring the cold of winter. 

Another trait in the character of the early settlers of No. 
1, is to be distinctly noticed, or we shall injure them. Most 
of them were brought up where the holy Sabbath was 
regarded, and they were accustomed to hear the gospel 
preached. They did not, when removed far from the sanctu- 
ary, and from the ordinances of the gospel, feel as if this 
were a desired freedom. They not only made early eiforts, 
even before they were an incorporate body, to have occasional 
preaching, but they were desirous of having a minister settled 
among them ; and few and feeble as they were, they did not 
shrink from the effort on account of the expense. As early 
as 1753, the proprietors and inhabitants voted to allow sixty 
pounds (Old Tenor undoubtedly,) to pay for preaching, and 
from this time it appears they had preaching more or less 
every year. 

Previous to this, they had voted to build a meeting house, 
agreed upon the dimensions, appointed a committee, and 
directed them "to enclose the house, lay the under floor, and 
build a convenient place for the minister to stand in to 
preach." This was an arduous undertaking considering their 
number, and especially that they had no mill, in which they 
could prepare materials for building from their own forests. 
But it was done. And having a house for worship, they were 
not satisfied with preaching part of the time. They voted to 
settle a minister as early as 1762, i. e., in thirteen years 
after the grant of the township. At the same time they gave 
a call to Mr. Ebenezer Champney, (the late Judge Champney, 
of New Ipswich,) to settle with them ; and offered him as 
settlement "700 X silver, 0. T. X400 salary yearly, and a 
right of land." This was a generous offer considering their 



REV. s;benezer hill. 95 

number and circumstances. I have named these sums more 
particularly for the benefit, or perhaps the amusement, of 
the young people, who may wish for some information 
respecting this Old Tenor, and its valuation. 

The currency of our ancestors in New England was reck- 
oned in pounds, shillings and pence, and was called Old 
Tenor, in distinction from another valuation of the same 
denominations of money, called Lawful money, or sometimes 
New Tenor, Now although the same terms were used in 
both, their meaning, or valuation was widely different. The 
denomination in Old Tenor was just seven and a half times 
less in value, than the same in Lawful money. Hence to 
reduce Lawful money into Old Tenor is to multiply it by 7J, 
and to reduce Old Tenor into Lawful money, divide by the 
same. Hence we see that the offer made to Mr. Champney 
was, in the present currency of the day, $311 12 cents settle- 
ment, and $177 78 cents salary.* Mr. Champney did not 
accept the call ; nevertheless the people were not discouraged. 
In 1766, they gave a call to one James Parker, with an offer 
of £400 0. T., until there were eighty families, and then X450 
until one hundred families, from which time the salary should 
be established at X500. This call was not accepted ; and it 
does not appear that any other like attempt was made, until 
an act of incorporation was obtained. 

These hardy pioneers not only suffered many privations, 
but endured many severe hardships. Not the least of- these 
was the labor of making roads, and for years the badness of 
traveling, where something was done to make a road. And 
until they could raise some grain on their new farms, all 
their bread stuffs, and most of their other provisions must be 
brought from the older settlements. The instance of hard- 
ship, which I am about to name, may be an extreme case, but 
it may help our young friends to form some idea of the suffer- 
ings incident to new settlers, especially to those, who are 

* Thus Jt;700-:-7i=£03, 6, 8 Laivful=|311 11-1- settlement. Again, JE400 O. T.-:-by 7i= 
£53 6s. 8d. Lawful^to $177 78-l-cents. 



86 MEMOIR OP THE 

poor and destitute. Deacon Hall, who has been named, I 
have been informed, after having toiled all day on his farm, 
has in the night traveled on foot to Pepperell, and returned 
bringing a bag of meal on his shoulder for his hungry chil- 
dren ; and then labored the next day as usual. 

Not the least of the sufferings, and the cause of continued 
suffering, arose from their ignorance of clearing wood land, 
by felling the trees and then burning the ground over. I 
have been told by some of them that for several years, the 
only method of clearing the forest was to chop the wood, 
draw it together, pile it, burn the heaps, and then break up 
the ground with the plough, or breaking-up hoe, before plant- 
ing or sowing. This accounts in some measure for the slow 
progress they at first made in clearing. 

Again, the people suffered very much for years from want 
of mills. It was a primary object with the grantees and 
first settlers to have mills erected ; and, as encouragement, 
mill seats were looked out, and land granted and contracts 
made, but I can find no evidence, of a mill of any description 
in the town before the year 1766 or 7. In the year 1767, I 
find an article in a warrant for a meeting of the proprietors, 
to see if they will accept the road by Thomas Barrett's mill, 
and build a bridge across Souhegan river, near said mill. It 
appears that Benjamin Bellows, Esq., contracted to build 
mills at this place, but did not fulfil his contract. And also 
that Thomas Barrett and Charles Barrett built mills in this 
place, and sold them to Amos Dakin, of Lincoln, Mass., who 
removed with his family into this town in the year 1768. At 
that time, seventy-eight years since, there was no opening in 
the dense forest, where this village now stands, except for 
the mill, and a spot cleared for a house. In 1767, Elias 
Elliot's mill was accepted by the proprietors. I have also 
evidence that not far from the same time, a mill was erected 
in the east part of the town, on the Ward place so called, 
where Mr. Bennet now lives. 

Now think how much the people must have suffered who 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 97 

lived ten or fifteen years, where, if they raised any grain they 
must carry it to Townseud or Pepperell, and sometimes even 
to Groton, to have it made into meal ; and although they had 
timber in abundance, they could not have a board, but it must 
come from another town. Yet they submitted to these 
inconveniences and hardships with cheerfulness, and perse- 
vered in labor, till they had prepared for the comfort of 
their children. 

Not only did the men display courage, and resolution, and 
public spirit, but I have been told by the women themselves, 
that they have traveled, some two, and some three miles 
through the woods, with nothing to direct their way but 
marked trees, to carry dinner to their husbands, when work- 
ing at the meeting house. I believe that some of my hearers 
would think such a case a great hardship, if the case was 
theirs. 

But, however strong female fortitude may be in duty, where 
none are exposed to danger but themselves, how must the 
tender mother suffer, if her young children are absent a little 
longer than was expected, or if out of sight when the light 
of day departs — where the wolves and other wild animals 
are so numerous, that their noise in the night would break 
those of their rest, who had toiled all day, and needed the 
refreshment of sleep ? 

Many of the early settlers reared up and left large families, 
and their descendants are numerous in the town ; but some 
of the families are almost extinct. Our fathers, where are 
they ? Many of them lived to be old. But they are gone.* 

As to natural curiosities, this town does not abound in 
them. There are no very remarkable caverns, or precipices, 
or streams 5 and we all know that the face of the ground is 
uneven, and the soil is stony. There is, however, in the deep 

* A case I will here name as very uncommon and remarkable. Deacon Hall, of whom I have 
spoken, built him a house in the early period of his settlement, and dwelt in it, with his fam- 
ily (which was not small) to his old ag'e — till it was no longer habitable, and never did an 
instance of death occur in that house. Nevertheless, the builder, and I believe all that were 
brought up in that house, have gone the way of the earth. 



98 MEMOIR OP THl! 

hollow, east of the old meeting house, (where by some con- 
vulsion of nature the rocks are thrown together in wild con- 
fusion,) a small cave, which those who have visited, have 
thought worthy of a visit. The streams of water are small, 
yet they afford some valuable mill sites, on which are now 
eight saw-mills in operation part of the year, and six run of 
stone for grinding grain. 

In this place, I will name another fact, which may be con- 
sidered belonging to the history of the town. The hills were 
favorite hunting grounds, and long before a grant of the town 
was obtained, and for years after it began to be settled, the 
hunters frequently kindled fires in the woods for the benefit 
of their hunting. And if the hunters did not fire the woods, 
some men from lower towns did, that young sprouts might 
come up for young cattle to feed upon. By these means, 
some parts of the town, especially Pole Hill, so called, rang- 
ing south from the stone school house, was greatly injured, 
while yielding grain to those who did not own the soil. And 
some families in Groton used to make hay in the meadow, 
near the centre, called Nose-meadow, where they had a camp, 
and in the latter part of winter send up young cattle, and a 
black man named Boad, to feed and tend them, until they 
could get their living in the woods. '^ Here Boad used to 
spend months alone, year after year, like Robinson Crusoe, 
"sole monarch of all he surveyed." 

The period to which we have now arrived, was to this town 
like that of youth, just blooming into manhood. They began 
to think, and talk of being incorporated. They had a desire 
to be like other towns ; and yet had fears whether equal to 
take such a stand. This kind of trembling state of mind 
appears from their votes at meetings, where the subject was 
agitated. At a meeting called partly for this purpose, April, 
1766, it was finally voted, not to be incorporated at present. 
Thus it rested until January, 1768, and the meeting was 

* Boad's camp was but a few rods from the spot, on which Joel Ames' house now stands. — 
This Boad was a slave. 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 99 

adjourned four weeks for consideration. At the adjournment 
it was voted to be incorporated, " and that Lt. 0. Parker be 
appointed to attend to the business, and get it accomplished 
as soon as may be." 

The next point to be settled, was the name by which the 
town should be called. And at a meeting held June, 1768, it 
was voted that the town be called Sharon. It does not appear 
from any records I have seen, or from any tradition which has 
reached me, why the name of Sharon was dropped, and the 
name Mason adopted. There was, however, a report current 
among the old people, that "a bell was sent from England for 
this town, as a present from the heirs of Mr. Mason," which, 
if fact, will account for the name. It is also reported, that 
by the knavery of the agent of Mr. Mason in Boston, the bell 
was lost to the town — that he sold the bell, and absconded 
with this and other dishonest gains. And the bell on the 
Old South in Boston, is said to be that bell. The next meet- 
iug was warned in the name of the inhabitants of Mason ; 
and the place was no longer known as Number 1. But 
although they had assumed a rank among the towns in the 
Province, they felt themselves, as a society, weak and feeble. 
When the first tax was assessed under the corporation, there 
were but seventy-six rateable polls, and probably not more 
than fifty-six voters ; for young men between eighteen and 
twenty-one years of age were rateable, and their' rates 
charged to fathers or masters. And for a number of years, 
Brookline, then Raby, was classed with Mason to send a rep- 
resentative to the General Court ; and the meetings for 
choice were held alternately at Brookline and Mason. 

It will be necessary now to take some notice of the church, 
in connection with the history of the town. At that time a 
town was an incorporate religious, as well as civil society. 
And all the inhabitants of a town belonged to that society, 
except they united with, or formed another religious society, 
according to law. The meeting house erected by the original 
proprietors, was by them given to the town, and remained 



100 MEMOIR OP THE 

the only house for their religious assemblies, and other public 
meetings, until the year 1790. It was an uncomfortable 
place. In that house did your fathers worship ; and uncom- 
fortable as it was, seldom did a Sabbath pass, even in the 
cold of winter, in which there was no meeting, after they had 
a stated ministry. A good number of the garly settlers were 
members of the Congregational church, in the towns from 
which they removed, but no church was formed in Mason, 
until the year 1772, at which time Mr. Jonathan Searle was 
ordained their pastor. The church then consisted of twenty- 
one members, twelve brethren and nine sisters, all of whom 
are gone to their long home. When the church was gathered, 
it was stated to be a Calvinistic church, and that their articles 
of faith agree substantially with the principles of religion, 
contained in the Shorter Catechism of the Assembly of 
Divines. 

Shortly after the settlement of Mr. Searle, unhappy diffi- 
culties arose between the pastor and the flock, which eventu- 
ated in his dismission, in nine years and three months after 
his ordination. From that time Mr. Searle ceased to preach, 
but continued in the town, and officiated as a civil magistrate, 
to an advanced age. During his ministry, only fourteen were 
admitted to the church by profession, and nine by letter, and 
eleven owned the covenant, as it was called, according to the 
practice of many churches in New England, in those days. 
The last admitted by profession in Mr. Searle's ministy, was 
in April, 1777, and but one more, and that by letter, until 
1790. Here was a long death-like sleep ! but one added to 
the church in thirteen years. The sleep seems to have been 
profound — death-like indeed, until the year 1785, when a 
great revival of religion, and of the work of God, com- 
menced in New Ipswich, under the ministry of the venerable 
Farrar — a name venerated indeed by all who knew him. 
The gracious work extended into other towns ; and this part 
of the vineyard was remembered in mercy. Some few chris- 
tians were awakened, and brought to apply themselves to 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 101 

neglected duties ; and the people in Mason, especially tHi 
young, flocked to the solemn meetings in New Ipswich, and 
soon some were reproved of sin, became anxious for their 
souls, and after a time, rejoiced in hope of pardoning mercy. 
Such, however, was the state of the church in Mason, broken, 
and dispirited, that the young candidates for the church were 
led to seek admission to the church in New Ipswich, to which 
they had become peculiarly attached by that acquaintance, 
which their situation and intercourse had brought about ; 
and by that mutual love which new-born souls, who have 
mourned, and wept, and prayed and rejoiced together, must 
feel. Their request was granted, on condition that they 
remove their relation whenever the church in Mason should 
become in a settled state. In the year 1790, the resident 
members of other churches removed their relation, and the 
church was increased to thirty-six in number, and in the same 
year, Nov. 3d, was the present pastor ordained, and constitu- 
ted pastor of this church. In this long period of fifty-six 
years, there have been precious seasons of revival. I will 
mention some of those seasons. In 1802, the church was 
increased by the addition of forty-four members — in 1812, 
added twenty-five — in 1826 and 7, added eighty-six — in 1834 
and '35, added thirty-eight; and in 1841, added eighty-three. 
The whole number of members, received by profession and 
letter, is rising four hundred and fifty. 

A Baptist church was embodied in this town, Oct. 28, 1786, 
then consisting of seven members, three males and four 
females. Additions were made by letter and profession to 
this church in this and neighboring towns. About this time, 
Mr. Wm. Elliot, an inhabitant of the town, commenced 
preaching the gospel, and labored much in this and other 
towns, as an evangelist, until in August, 1788, the church of 
which he was a member, gave him a call to become their 
pastor, which call he accepted, and was ordained by an eccle- 
siastical council, on the 3d Wednesday in November, 1788. 
For a time, the care of almost all the Baptist churches in the 
14 



102 MEMOIR OP THE 

"Vicinity, came upon liim. He raised up a numerous family, 
and had two sons settled in the ministry. He lived to a 
good old age, his last sickness was very distressing, which he 
endured with patience, and died in the triumphs of faith, 
June 14, 1830, aged 81 years. The church of which he was 
pastor, is now merged in the Baptist church in Mason village. 

In the month of May, in the year 1833, another church 
and society was gathered and embodied in this town, consist- 
ing at the time, of twenty-three members. This society 
assume only the name of Christian. 

Since the year 1790, there has been no inconsiderable 
increase of inhabitants, and no little improvement in build- 
ings, and other accommodations. The exact number of voters 
in 1790, is not ascertained; but in 1768, we may calculate 
about fifty-six, and in March, 1845, our check list told three 
hundred and six legal voters. In the year 1790, when almost 
the whole town undertook to build a meeting house, it was 
with many discouragements and fears. They felt poor and 
weak -handed for such an undertaking. The house was built 
and remains the meeting house of the town. And now, besides 
this, we have three meeting houses, and three religious socie- 
ties, and probably each society equally able to build their 
house, as was the first. 

I can reckon up but one hundred and ten dwelling houses, 
of every description, standing in the town in 1790. And at 
that time, on all the ground which contains this flourishing 
village, there were standing the first mill built here, one 
dwelling house, built at two times, for the accommodation of 
two families, and one barn.* Now we can count fifty-two 
dwelling houses, three stores, one meeting house, three fac- 
tory buildings — one in full operation, carrying two thousand 
four hundred and sixty-four spindles, in this village. 

Compare the present state of the Columbian Factory, with 
the one first built here, and it will give a fair view of the 
advance of our country in manufactures, arts and commerec. 

* The widow Polly Hill now occupies the remaining part of the house. 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 103 

The first Cotton Factory in Mason, commenced operation 
in the year 1813, with one hundred spindles, in four small 
frames, and was kept running night and day. At that time, 
the price of cotton was from twenty-five to thirty cents 
per pound, and the price of yarn, No. 16, was one dollar per 
pound. In 1814 cotton was forty cents, and yarn one dollar 
and sixteen cents per pound. At that time all the cotton 
was picked by hand, in private families, and the cloth was 
wove in house looms ; and the price of shirting, was from 
thirty to forty cents per yard. For constant market the cloth 
must be sent in wagons to Albany. And at that time there 
was no market here for farm produce. 

At the time referred to, 1790, there were but four, and 
those very poor, school houses in the town ; now there are 
ten ; some of them may be called good. And not only is the 
number of dwelling houses increased, but there is an advance 
in elegance and convenience. At that time many of the 
dwellings were miserably poor ; and but one in all the town, 
Mr. Parker's, had any paint on the outside, and that scarcely 
perceptible by reason of age. And I can think of only three 
rooms in all the town, then adorned with paper hangings. 

Since those ancient days there have been great changes in 
customs and fashions, and manner of living: and many con* 
veniences have been introduced; but whether on the whole 
for the better, remains to be proved. At that period there 
was not a chaise, or other wheel carriage for pleasure, in all 
the town, (a light one horse wagon, for pleasure or business 
is a modern invention,) neither was there one single sleigh. 
To ride on horseback was fashionable for men and women ; 
and could they have a single horse, this was traveling in style. 
It was not uncommon for a man and woman to ride on the 
sajne horse to meeting or a short journey^ and carry one or 
two children. Probably if I should tell some of my young 
friends, that their mothers and grandmothers rode on a pillion 
behind their husbands, they would have no idea of that easy 
and commodious seat, a pillion. But, I have frequently seen 



104 MEMOIR OF THE 

a man and his wife ride together on a horse to meeting, on 
the sabbath, after their united ages amounted to one hundred 
and sixty-nine years. It was also not uncommon for families 
to ride to meeting, or to make social visits, in the winter, on 
sleds drawn by oxen, and they would chat and smile as cheer- 
fully, as they now do in a stage and four or six. 

And will you, my young friends, believe that your mothers 
and grandmothers, and those who moved in the first grade of 
society, were not ashamed to be seen in the religious assem- 
bly, or in any company on other occasions, dressed in their 
plain, decent, warm, home-made clothing, or at the most, in 
the summer, in a chintz gown, and a white linen apron ? Such 
was indeed the fact. And you may judge, whether they were 
not more comfortable than they would have been in some mod- 
ern dresses — whether the change to costly elegance and finery 
has been a real advance in the enjoyment of life. 

In the early period of the settlement, it was often imprac- 
ticable to keep the roads open in the winter, so as to pass 
with a team or a horse from house to house, to meeting or 
to mill. The people were not however confined at home, 
through a long and dreary winter. Every family, and almost 
every man was provided with a pair of snow shoes, otherwise 
called raclcets. (It would doubtless be as difficult at this day 
to give our young men a correct idea of rackets, as to give 
our young ladies a correct idea of a inlJion. ) With these 
SQOw shoes they were enabled to walk on the snow, and after 
passing a few times would have a good foot path from house 
to house. And not unfrequently were they necessitated to 
get up their wood, and carry their grain to mill, on hand sleds 
drawn on these racket paths. And although horses could not 
travel, you may not think the young ladies or their mothers 
were confined at home, and must lose all the pleasures of 
social visits, while the snow lay deep on the ground. They 
too would put on the snow shoes, and travel off; and although 
enduring a little more fatigue, they enjoyed their visits, it is 



REV. EBENEZER SILL. 105 

■presumed, as \rell as do ladies at the present day, when grafted 
over the snow with the music of bells. 

Our ancestors were a hardy, race, but they were sometimes 
visited with sickness, and death entered their dwellings. For 
a long time they must have obtained all their medical aid 
from other towns ; for there never was a resident Physician 
in the town, until about 1790, when Dr. Joseph Gray and 
Dr. "William Barber established themselves permanently here. 
Dr. Barber is yet living. Dr. Willis Johnson commenced 
medical practice here in the year 1814. 

The inhabitants were not so exactly on the peace establish- 
ment as to have no litigation ; but they were necessitated to 
seek legal advice and services from gentlemen of the bar in 
other towns. For there never was a lawyer became an inhab- 
itant of this town, until the late Samuel Whiting, Esq., opened 
an office, and commenced residence about the year 1825. At 
the time of my earliest acquaintance with the town, there 
were, and there had never been, but two justices of the peace 
in the place, Jonathan Searle and Benjamin Mann; they 
remained the only magistrates in the town several years after 
this. Esquire Mann held his office until he removed from the 
town, and Esquire Searle held his until his death. Who was 
the first Representative of the town in the General Court, as 
it was then called, is not easily ascertained. But it appears 
that as early as the year 1775, Amos Dakin was chosen by 
the joint ballot of Raby and Mason, to represent them iu a 
Convention at Exeter in December ; and likewise commis- 
sioned to act in the Assembly, if requisite. This must have 
been the time when Mr. Dakin traveled from Mason to Exe- 
ter on snow shoes, because not practicable in any other way. 
He may be considered the first Representative. The first 
Grand Juror chosen was Thomas Tarbell, the first petit Juror 
drawn was Zachariah Davis — the year 1771. 

The early inhabitants of the town of Mason were true sons 
of liberty. When the difficulties between the mother country 
and the Colonies, arose to such a pitch as to take awaj^ the 



106 MEMOIR OF TfiE 

hope of accommodation, they were ready to act with decision. 
I have never heard of but one inhabitant of Mason, at that 
time, who was unfriendly to the cause of the Colonies. Cap- 
tain Samuel Tarbell was then considered a torij, as those were 
called, who were disposed to espouse and maintain the cause 
of the King and Parliament in all their oppressive acts against 
the Colonics. He, after the war commenced, fled and took 
refuge within the British lines. When it was apparent that 
the Colonies must submit unconditionally, or, weak and feeble 
as they were, must defend themselves against the mighty 
power of Great Britain, these sons of the forest were by no 
means behind any of their brethren, in making preparation 
for defence, and in readiness to step forward and exert their 
strength, when called to action. In the year 1774, meetings 
of the town were frequent ; and it appears that there was 
great unanimity in their resolves, which were all of the defen- 
sive character. In this year they voted to purchase a town 
stock of ammunition, and a quantity of arms. At the same 
time, they entered into solemn covenant to suspend all com- 
mercial intercourse with Great Britain, until her acts of Par- 
liament leveled at the rights of the Colonies should be repeal- 
ed, and the Port of Boston, which was then shut, should be 
opened. This covenant was substantially the same, as was 
entered into in the Colonies generally; but the spirit of these 
sons of liberty was seen in the closing up of the solemn cov- 
enant, the last clause of which was in substance, that " all 
who refused or neglected to come into this or a like agree- 
ment, ought to be, and should by them be considered and 
esteemed enemies to their country." Such a covenant was 
not only voted in town meeting to be accepted, but a com- 
mittee was appointed to see that the covenant be signed by 
the inhabitants, and to take and report the names of all who 
refused to sign. This committee consisted of the following 
persons : Amos Dakin, Samuel Brown, Joshua Davis, Nathan 
Hall and James Wethee. Also, in 1775, a committee of 
inspection was appointed, to see that the resolves of the Con- 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 107 

tinental Congress be duly observed. And to prepare for 
comfortable subsistence as well as for defence, in to^vn meet- 
ing it was voted, in view of the increasing difficulty wliicli 
might be expected, of procuring such a necessary article as 
salt, "that thirty hogsheads be purchased, while it could be 
had, for the use of the town." 

We have evidence also, that the fathers of the present gen- 
eration were not only brave and prudent in Resolves, but also 
in action. 

When tidings arrived in Mason, that the Regulars, i. e. the 
British troops, had gone out from Boston, and proceeded as 
far as Concord, and that blood was actually shed in Lexing- 
ton and Concord, the men dropped their tools, and with all 
possible speed, hastened to the spot, where blood had flowed. 
And I have been informed that the training soldiers, on this 
occasion, ready to avenge the blood of their slaughtered 
countrymen, marched under officers, who held their commis- 
sion from the King, whose troops they were willing to 
engage, without thinking of any impropriety. New Hamp- 
shire troops were distinguished in the war. And as far as 
can be judged at this time from town records and tradition, 
Mason bore its full proportion, with other towns, in sufferings 
and effective labor. 

I wish I could give you the names of all the Mason men, 
who were with the gallant Stark in the battle of Bennington. 
Many of the young men of the town spent their best days in 
the army. Some of the elderly men were found in the 
tented field ; but many of the soldiers entered the service of 
their country in their very boyhood, not by compulsion, but 
by voluntary enlistment, and continued in the service, until 
the independence of the country was acknowledged, and 
peace spread her blessings over the land. A few, and but a 
few of them all, survive to the present day. 

The names of most of the early settlers in the town, are 
handed down in their posterity. A few families have lost 
their name, yet the greater part of the present inhabitants, 



108 MEMOIR OP THE 

are descendants of those who cleared the forests for them. 
Who will be ashamed of such ancestors ? We pretend not 
that they were faultless ; but let their descendants emulate 
their virtues, and avoid their errors and faults, as far as they 
are known, and Mason will be a happy spot in our favored 
land. 

Your attention is now called to another subject, which 
makes a part of the history of the town, yet of a different 
character from that which we have been contemplating. 

Health is said to be the greatest of temporal blessings. 
Of this we have been favored with, at least, a common share 
with other towns around ; and we can tell of many instances 
of longevity. In the course of the forty last years, there 
have died in this town fifty-seven between eighty and ninety 
years old, fourteen between ninety and one hundred. One 
man, Jonathan Foster, exceeded one hundred years, and 
another, Oliver Eliott, one hundred and two and one-half. It 
may be well to note in a passing remark, that these two old 
men were very temperate in the use of intoxicating drinks, 
for the age in which they lived, and their common food was 
of the plainest kinds. ♦ 

But notwithstanding the acknowledged healthiness of the 
place, and many instances of longevity, we have had seasons 
of calamity, in which mortal sickness has prevailed. We 
have had two seasons in which angina maligna, or throat 
distemper, or canker rash, so called, has spread terror and 
dismay over the place, and carried many of the young children 
and blooming youth, to an early grave. In the year 1810, 
this dreadful distemper made its appearance, in the last of 
March, or beginning of April, and continued to spread dismay, 
until the month of August. In this short period many fami- 
lies felt the scourge, and death cut off twelve children, all but 
two, under the age of five years. Again, in the years 1818 
and 1819, the same dreadful disease was epidemic in the 
town, and many of the children and youth fell before this 
destroyer. These years were the years of the greatest mor- 



REV. EBENEZER HILL. 109 

tality ever known in the town ; in one 34, in the other 31 deaths, 
65 in two years. In the reign of this malignant disease, 
but one aged person fell before the shaft of death, while 
40 were cut down under the age of eighteen. With respect 
to the visitation of this malignant distemper at this time, it 
is to be remarked, it began in the South East part of the 
town, in the family of Darius Hudson, in a small house stand- 
ing on an highly elevated spot, not near any other building; 
this was about the middle of September, 1818 ; and it continued 
to rage until tlie beginning, of August, 1819. It is noted,' it 
began in the South East part of the town. By this, you will 
understand, that we have no knowledge that the sickness 
existed at that time, in any neighboring town, and certainly 
it was not in any other house at this time. Its first appear- 
ance was in its most malignant form. In the short space of 
eight days, three out of seven children died in the first visited 
family. The disease did not spread in the nearest families. 
This did not appear to be a radiating point, from which 
contagion should issue forth in all directions. Instead of 
that, its next appearance was at a good distance, at least a 
mile to the North East, where there had been no communica- 
tion between the families. And the third case was in the 
extreme South part of the town. And thus it extended from 
East to West, from North to South, to every part of the 
town. Neither was it always the case, that all the children 
of the same family, or who lived in the same house, where 
the sickness was, had it. And not only, as in the first 
instance, but in other instances, those had the disease, who 
had not been exposed to catch it, as they say, by coming in 
contact with the diseased, or entering infected places. 

Here I will name one extraordinary case, and leave it 
without comment. 

There was a little girl in a family in the South side of the 

town, somewhat remote from neighbors, who was the only 

child in the house. She was an adopted daughter ; and the 

foster mother liad such forebodings of death, should the 

15 



110 MEMOIR OP THE 

disease attack her cliild, and such apprehensions of danger 
from exposure, that from the first knowledge she had of the 
existence of the disease in the town, she restricted her child 
to the house, and suffered no child from abroad to enter her 
doors. This secluded child fell sick of this frightful disease, 
and died. 

In conclusion of this point of interesting history, I state 
that in the space of the last forty-six years, there have been 
removed from this town — from their houses, and fields, and 
possessions, to the narrow home appointed for all the living, 
a number, little, if any short of eight hundred and thirty. 
What a congregation this would make ! more than half the 
number of the present inhabitants. Looking at the past, 
what changes may be expected in the future ? It is believed 
that there are but two living, on earth, who were members of 
the Congregational church, in this town, in the year 1790, 
(LydiaWilson and PollyDunster,) and but two who were at that 
time at the head of a family, (widow "Withington and James 
Wethee.) how often have we all been admonished to prepare 
for death, and for that judgment which is after death. Death 
doth not select his victims among the aged, but often levels 
his arrow at the fairest blooming youth. Let such another 
period, as we are contemplating, pass away, and few, if any, 
of the present active inhabitants of this town, will be on 
earth. 

Be not offended, then, with one who has passed the greater 
part of his short life with you, and whose glass of life is just 
run out, who would affectionately entreat you to consider 
your latter end — would direct your attention to the end of 
time, and to your present preparation to die. remember, 
Christ in you is the hope of glory, and the only hope that 
will not fail. Look away to the Lamb of God, as the only 
savior of sinners — go to him as sinners — go without delay. 
Or if you have already made Christ all your salvation, let 
him have your heart — let him have your life, and then when 
you shall have done with all things here below, you will not 



REV. EBENEZER HiLL. Ill 

only rest from all your labors in the peaceful grave, but you 
will live in the full enjoyment of the love and favor of Christ, 
forever and ever. Your friend prays that your future history, 
may be pleasantly instructive to all who come after you 5 and 
may your last end be peace. 



112 MEMOIR OF THE 



LIST OF PUBLISHED DISCOURSES. 



The following list includes; it is believed, all the published 
discourses of Mr. Hill. 

1. A sermon delivered at Mason, April 11, 1803, at the 
funeral of Miss Persis Lawrence, daughter of Mr. Stephen 
Lawrence, aged 23 years. Text Eccl. 8 : 8. Printed at 
Amherst, by Joseph Gushing. 

2. A sermon delivered at Mason, March 22, 1805, at the 
funeral of Miss Hannah Lawrence, daughter of Stephen Law- 
rence, Esq. Aged 26 years. Text, Psalm 90 : 12. Printed 
at Amherst, by Joseph Gushing. 

3. A sermon delivered at Mason, July 18, 1805, at the 
funeral of Mr. Luther Lawrence, son of Stephen Lawrence, 
Esq., aged twenty years. Text 1 Gor. 15 : 21. Printed at 
Amherst, by Joseph Gushing. 

4. A sermon delivered at New Ipswich, June 3d, 1811, at 
the funeral of Miss Ruthy Bacheldcr. Text, Psalm 88 : 7, 8, 
18. 

5. A sermon delivered at New Ipswich, August 6th, 1811, 
at the funeral of William Kimball Bachelder. Text, Eccl. 
9:12; with an appendix, containing a sketch of the life of 
Miss Bachelder, and extracts from her letters and papers. 
Printed at Boston, by Munroe and Francis. Sermons and 
appendix, pp. 48. 

6. A sermon delivered at New Ipswich, September 22, 
1815, at the funeral of Miss Glarissa Davis. Text, Eccl. 9 : 
4; with an appendix, containing extracts from her diary and 
letters, by the Rev. Richard Hall. Printed at Boston, by 
Samuel T. Armstrono-. 



REV. EBENEZER HlLL. 113 

7. A sermon delivered at Mason, May 16tli, 1817, at tlie 
funeral of Mrs. Mary Blodgett, wife of John Blodgett, Esq. 
who was instantly killed by being thrown from a wagon. 
Text, Ezekiel 24 : 18. Printed at Amherst, by Richard 
Boylston. 

8. A sermon delivered at Brooklinc, November 27th^ 
1817, at the interment of the remains -of the Rev. Lemuel 
Wadsworth, pastor of the Congregational church in that 
place. Text, 2 Cor. 5:1. Printed at Amherst, by Richard 
Boylston. 

9. A sermon delivered at Mason, August 28th, 1826, at 
the funeral of Joseph Addison Robbins, son of Joseph B. 
Bobbins and Hannah his wife. Text, Jer. 9 : 21. Printed 
at New Ipswich, by Salmon Wilder. 

10. A funeral sermon delivered at Mason, on Lord's Day, 
December 10th, 1826, occasioned by the death of Capt. 
Hiram Smith, who deceased December 6th, 1826, aged twenty- 
five years. Text, Job 21 : 23 — 26. Printed at Amherst, at 
the Cabinet press. 

11. A sermon delivered at Mason, at the house of James 
Wood, Esq., November 4th, 1835, being on the completing of 
his eightieth year. Text, Psalm 90 : 9 — 12. New Ipswich, 
printed at the News Gatherers's office. 

12. A sermon preached at Ashby, at the house of Mr. 
Jacob Cowdry, on the birth day of Mrs. Tabitha Pearson, 
who then completed the one hundredth year of her age. 
Text, 2 Sam. 19 : 34, 35, 37. Amherst, printed by Richard 
Boylston. 

13. The substance of two lectures on the History of 
Mason, delivered before the Lyceum in Mason village, Febru- 
ary, 1846. Printed at Fitchburg, by W. J. Merriam. 

These, with some contributions to the IMedical and Agri- 
cultural Register, a periodical conducted by Dr. Daniel 
Adams, and some occasional communications to the Farmer's 
Cabinet, a newspaper published at Amherst, N. H., comprise 
all his printed works, so far as is known at this time. 



In a family monument of native granite, erected in the old 
grave yard, is inserted a marble tablet, with an inscription, 
of which the following is a copy : 

HIS CHURCH AND PEOPLE DEVOTE THIS 
TABLET TO THE MEMORY OF THE 

KEY. EBENEZER HILL. 

BORN IN CAMBRIDGE, JAN. 31, 1766. 

GRADUATED AT HARVARD COLLEGE, 1786. 

ORDAINED PASTOR OF THE CHURCH, 

AND MINISTER OF THE TOWN OF MASON, 

NOVEMBER 3, 1790. 

DIED MAY 20, 1854, IN THE 89th YEAR OF HIS 
AGE, AND THE 64th OF HIS MINISTRY. 

A FAITHFUL SERVANT, HE DEVOTED HIS 
TIME AND STRENGTH TO THE WORK OF HIS 
LORD AND MASTER; READY AT ALL TIMES 
TO DIRECT THE ENQUIRING, TO CHEER THE 
DOUBTING, TO WARN THE SINFUL, TO VISIT THE 
SICK AND AFFLICTED, AND OFFER TO THEM 
THE COMFORT AND SUPPORT OF RELIGION; 
AFTER A LONG LIFE OF USEFULNESS, HE 
DEPARTED IN PEACE, HUMBLY TRUSTING TO 
RECEIVE THE WELCOME MESSAGE, WELL DONE 
GOOD AND FAITHFUL SERVANT, ENTER THOU 
INTO THE JOY OF THY LORD. 



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