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Full text of "History of the town of Mont Vernon, New Hampshire"



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HOX. CHARLES J. SMITH. 



HISTORY 



OF THE 



TOWN 



OF 



MONT VERNON, 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



BOSTON. MASS. 

BLAXCHARD PRINTING CO., 

27 BEACH STREET, 

1907. 



PREFACE. 



The preparation of the History of the Town of Mont 
Vernon has involved the outlay of considerable time and 

Z patience, and like other publications of the same character can 

r* not be perfect. 

:**■ The author of the History of Amherst, the late Mr. D. F. 

(jv. Secombe. in acknowledging the incompleteness of that pub- 
lication very justly remarks that the proper preparation of a 
town history is the work of a lifetime, and not of three or 
four years. 

The History of Mont Vernon is necessarily brief. Its 
history was merged in that of Amherst, the parent town, until 
the year 1803, from which it was then severed. 

The town is small in population ; its largest number of 
inhabitants, being 763 — in 1830 — small in industries and busi- 
ness, but the enterprise of its people is not to be measured by 
these things. The writer has been unable to gather much 
material in the shape of records, personal intercourse with 
old settlers, etc., upon which to work as a basis. Had he an- 
ticipated some fifty years since, that it was to be his task to 
prepare at some future time a history of the Town of Mont 
Vernon, he might then have collected much valuable material 
from interviews with aged people, who have passed away 
since, which would have proved entertaining and interesting. 
As it is, there is scarcely a person living, who could furnish 
facts concerning the early history of the town. 

The writer has collected and put into shape all available 
material. 

I'M 



IV PREFACE 

Taking all these facts into consideration the reader must 
see that the History of Mont Vernon would be short, that it 
would be impossible to make it a book of much size. 

After all we know but comparatively nothing of the 
perils and privations of the pioneer's life. They toiled amid 
dangers and difficulties of which we have no adequate concep- 
tion. 

Rough, hardy, worthy people were the)', having a con- 
stant struggle for existence, with little pleasure in their lives. 
Such as these were the founders of this great republic, which 
they left behind them as an imperishable monument. 

Let us who come after them strive to cherish and per- 
petuate these institutions, which they founded, for our chil- 
dren, as they cherished and perpetuated them for us. 

The writer hopes that this work will prove readable, and 
• also be a valuable book of reference, perhaps not so much to 
the present generation as it will to the future generation. 

The map of the old church was drawn and presented by 
Mrs. S. J. Bunton. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Hon. Charles J. Smith Frontispiece 

Old Meeting House 81 

New Meeting House 96 

Appleton Academy 112 

Old Mount Vernon House 169 

Summer Residence of J. Frank Wellman 185 



CHAPTER I. 



Early History and Early Settlers — Narragansett 
Townships — First Settlement — Establishment 
of Boundaries between New Hampshire and 
Massachusetts — Incorporation of Amherst — 
Pioneer Settlers of Mont Vernon — Second 
Church — Building of Church — Incorporation 
of Second Parish — Warrant for Parish Meeting 
— Miscellaneous Proceedings 1-14 

CHAPTER II. 

Condition Preliminary to the Separation from the 
Parent Town — Public Events — Sketch of Charles 
H. Atherton, Charles G. Atherton, Samuel Dana 
and Others — Troublous Times — Organization 
of Third Parish — Incorporation of Milford — 
Political Parties 15-26 



VI INDEX 

CHAPTER HI. 

Separation from Amherst — Voting Actions of North- 
west Parish — Act of Incorporation of New Town 
Boundary — Tax Payers — First Town Meeting 2 J -30 

CHAPTER IV. 

Description and Boundaries — Situation — Surface — 
Brooks and Ponds — Game, Birds, Etc. — Climate 
Purgatory — Dedication of Purgatory 31-35 

CHAPTER V. 

Politics — Free Soil Party — Careers of Marden and 
Bruce — Highways and Bridges — Old Turnpike 
Taverns — Notable Events — Spotted Fever — 
Tempests and Floods -- Dark and Yellow Davs 
— Long Winters 36-53 

CHAPTER VI. 

Ecclesiastical History — List of Ministers and Dea- 
cons — Sketches of the Eighteen Ministers — 
Revivals — Temperance Reform ;, 1-82 

CHAPTER VII. 

The Old Meeting-House — Pew Grounds — Altera- 
tions — Transfer of Parish Matters to Town — 
Buildings on the Common — Fire in Meeting 
House— Its Removal Across the Road— Hearse 
and Hearse House — As a Town Hall — Town 
and Society Quitclaim to Each Other — Certain 
Rights Reserved — Changing Meeting-House to 
Town Hall — Town Hall Dedicated 83-04 

CHAPTER VIII. 

The New Meeting House --How Project Started — 
Committee — The Dedication — Programme of 
Exercises — Report of Building Committee — 
Dedication Sermon — Description — Memorial 
Windows 05-105 



INDEX VII 

CHAPTER IX. 

Educational — Public Schools — Early Pupils — 
Aurean Academy at Amherst — Latin Grammar 
School — Money Appropriated — Literary Fund 

— Appleton Academy — Built by Shareholders 

— Incorporation of Academy — First Printed 
Catalogue — New Academy Building — Library 
Given by Mr. Appleton — Permanent Fund — 
Sketches of Principals 106-148 

CHAPTER X. 

McCollom Institute Succeeds Appleton Academy — 
Endowment by George W. McCollom of New 
York — Charter Amended - - Different Principals 

— Improvements — Trustees Incorporated — ■ By- 
Laws — As a Town High School — Triennial 
Alumni Reunions 149-180 

CHAPTER XL 

Old Home Week — Mont Vernon First Town to 
Respond — The Governor Attends — Three Days' 
Festivities — Illuminations, Fire Works, Sports. 
Etc. — Celebrations Each Year 181-191 

CHAPTER XII. 

Three Celebrations in One — The Triennial Alumni 
Reunion, Old Home Week and Hundredth An- 
niversary of the Incorporation of the Town — 
Outline Report of All Three — Col. Goerge A. 
Bruce's Oration — H. Porter Smith's Church 
Story — Reminiscences by Rev. C. C. Carpenter 192-251 

CHAPTER XIII. 

Military History — French and Indian Wars — Revo- 
lutionary War — War of 1812 — Musters — Mex- 
ican War — Civil War — Action of Town as to 
Bounties — Men Furnished I nder Different Calls 

— Raising Quotas -- Action as to Drafted Men 

or Substitutes 222-233 



VIII INDEX 

CHAPTER XIV. 

Statistical — Population — How and Why it Decreased 
— Indebtedness of Town Before and During Civil 
AYar — AYar Expenses — Bounties — Town Bonds 
Longevity — Moderators, Town Clerks, Select- 
men — Their Compensation — Representatives. . 234-243 

CHAPTER XV. 

Conclusion 244-2 tS 



HISTORY OF MT. VERNON. 



CHAPTER I. 
EARLY HISTORY AND EARLY SETTLERS. 

Narragansett Townships — Meeting of Proprietors of Souhegan 

Wk-t- T<>wn- to whii ii Proprietors Belonged — First Set- 
tlement in Township — Lieut. Joseph Prince — Pioneers' Dif- 
ficulties— Sawmill — Establishment of Boundaries Between 
New Hampshire and Massachusetts — Grist-Mill Built — In- 
( orporation of amherst — ploneer settlers of mont vernon 
— Desire of the Northwest* Part of Town to be Set Off 
Into a Second Parish — Exertions of Northwest to be Set 
off — Second Church of Amherst — Building of Church — 
Petition of Northwest Part of Town — Act of Incorpora- 
tion of Second Parish — Warrant for Parish Meeting — 
Actions of Parish Meeting — Hiring of Mr. Bruce Estab- 
lishment of Parish Boundaries — Completion of Church Edi- 
fice — MlS< ELLANEOUS PROCEEDINGS. 

IN 1733 the Province of Massachusetts assigned certain un- 
settled tracts of territory, afterwards formed into townships, as a 
reward of valor, to seven companies composed of those who were 
officers and soldiers in King Philip's War ( which occurred in 1675-76). 
and particularly those who were in the Narragansett expedition, and 
took part in the Swamp Fight on December 19th, 1675. under Captain 
Benjamin Church. They were known as the Narragansett townships, 
from the name of the leading tribe with which King Philip's War was 
waged. 

The grantees were surviving officers and soldiers, or their legal 
representatives. Each company was composed of one hundred and 
twenty grantees. The seven Narragansett townships were located as 
follows: Massachusetts, three: New Hampshire, two: Maine, two. 
Grant Number Three, located in New Hampshire, was called Souhe- 



2 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

gan West, and comprised all of Amherst and Milford, and the larger 
parts of Merrimack and Mont Vernon. Grant Number Five, known 
as Sonhegan East, embraced the present town of Bedford and parts 
of Merrimack, and of what is now the city of Manchester. 

The first meeting of the proprietors of Sonhegan AVest was held 
at Salem, July 17, 1734. A committee of three was appointed to 
take a "particular view of the circumference of said township and 
make report to the Grantees on the second Tuesday in September 
next." They were authorized to employ a surveyor and such guides 
as might be necessary, at the expense of the proprietors. Another 
committee of eight was appointed to sub-divide the township. In 
September, 1734. the proprietors met to hear the report of their view- 
ing committee, who stated that they had been disappointed in the 
surveyor they had engaged, but "they had been on the land and found 
it well timbered." The sub-dividing committee was directed to lay 
out sixty acres to each proprietor for his, or her, first home lot; what 
was wanting in quality to be made up in quantity. 

At a meeting January 8, 17:55, it was voted that three lots be 
reserved : one for the first settle'd minister ; one for the ministry : and 
one for the school. The lots laid out by the committee appear to 
have been drawn by the proprietors at this meeting. The towns to 
which the proprietors belonged, and the number in each town, were 
as follows : Andover, 9; Beverly. 14; Boxford, 4; Bradford, 1 : 
Chatham, 1 ; Falmouth, 2 ; Gloucester, 5 ; Lynn. 27 ; Marblehead, 7 ; 
Reading, 2; Salem, 29; Scarborough. 1 ; Topsfield, 13; Wenham, 4; 
York, 1. Of these, two were females, and one hundred and eighteen 
were males : twenty-nine were survivors of the tight at Narragansett 
fort, December, 1675, and ninety-one were children or legal heirs of 
those to whom territory was assigned. 

At a meeting May 1, 1735, a committee of three was appointed 
to visit the township and find and lay out the most commodious place? 
whereon to erect a public meeting-house, a convenient public burying 
ground, another for a training field, moreover one for the ministry, 
one for the minister, and one for the school, and make a return to the 
clerk, that he may record the same. 

The first settlement in this township was probably made in 1735, 
by Samuel Lamson and Samuel Walton, both from Reading. Massa- 
chusetts, a mile south of Amherst Plain, where they built a log-house. 
Lamson, about 1740, removed to Mont Vernon. In 1765 he removed 
to Billerica, Massachusetts, and died there in 1779. His sons, Jon- 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 3 

athan and John, passed their lives and died in Mont Vernon. Sarah, 
daughter of Jonathan, married Deacon Jacob Kendall, of Mont 
Vernon, in 1782. Four daughters and one son of John spent most of 
their lives in this town. Lieut. Joseph Prince, of Salem Village, now 
Danvers, was the only one of the original proprietors who settled in 
the township. He was a proprietor in the right of his uncle, Richard 
Prince. According to a family tradition, he once owned a belt of 
land extending from Bedford line westward to near where Mont 
Vernon village now stands. He first located about L740, and lived 
some years on the farm about one mile southeast from Mont Vernon 
village known as the Jones farm, for many years owned by Samuel 
Campbell, now by William Gurdy. The cellar of the log house Prince 
occupied has been discovered by Mr. Gurdy in the southern part of 
his farm, near where it adjoins George C. Hadley's farm. He 
[Prince] removed thence to the easterly part of Amherst, lived, and 
died there in November, 1789, on the farm now the homestead of his 
great grand-son, Solomon Prince. Other settlers followed Prince. 
mostly from the vdcinity of Salem, but the progress of the settlement 
was blow, notwithstanding that the proprietors voted sums of money 
and made great efforts to induce settlers to locate in the township. 

The lives of the first settlers in the New Hampshire townships 
were a constant struggle for existence. A settler in one of them thus 
describes his town in its infancy: "A howling wilderness it was, 
where no man dwelt. The hideous yells of wolves, the shrieks of 
owls, the gobbling of turkeys, and the barking of foxes were all the 
music we heard. All a dreary waste and exposed to a thousand diffi- 
culties." In lT.'iii a bridge was built over the Souhegan River, for 
which the proprietors paid £95. 

The building of a sawmill was now in order, ami in April. 1737, 
the proprietors appointed a committee "Mo secure the building of the 
-a me upon Beaver Brook where it may be most convenient, provided 
that said mill be lit to saw the first of November next, and that it 
shall be kept in good repair for ten years, and to saw for the propri- 
etors by the halves during that time.'" and £120 was levied upon the 
proprietors to pay for the same. 

March .">. 1740, the King in council established boundaries be- 
tween the provinces of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, which 
had been in dispute, which have remained unchanged until the present 
time. By this decision Souhegan West, with twenty-seven other 
townships, which had been granted by Massachusetts, with large 



4 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

quantities of ungranted land intermixed among them, became parts of 
New Hampshire. 

April, 1741, it was voted that the proprietors give to John Shep- 
ard, of Concord. Massachusetts, one hundred and twenty acres on the 
Souhegan River, to begin at William Peabody's line and run down to 
the bottom of the falls, he to build a good mist-mill and a good Saw- 
mill on said river against the aforesaid land, and to keep them in goo-] 
repair for the use of said proprietors, having the liberty to cut such 
white oak timber for the mill as he wants." The same year he built 
the mill, and became a useful and honored citizen of the town. 

At the same meeting they voted to build a bridge over the S< 
began River, and appointed a committee of three to say where it 
should be built and to get it done. This committee was composed of 
Capt. Samuel Bancroft, Capt. Thomas Tarbox, and Joshua Hicks. 
They also voted that they -will give no encouragement to a blacksmith 
to settle among them," but they soon thought better of it. for on the 
22d of May. 174.">, they voted that they "will give encouragement for 
a blacksmith to settle with them, and thai (apt. Parker, Lieut. Prince, 
and Mr. Lamson lie desired to agree with a good smith to settle with 
them." Capt. Parker and Mr. Lamson resided in the district now 
included in Mont Vernon. 

As the sixty families required by the grant had not settled in the 
township, the proprietors voted, March. 1747. to choose a committee 
to treat with and get an obligation to secure at least sixty families 
with those that are already there to settle immediately, agreeably to 
the grant. 

In January, 1753, a petition was presented to the Governor ami 
Council of New Hampshire by thirty-two citizens of Souhegan West, 
for incorporation as a town. Seven of these citizens lived in that 
part of the town which is now Mont Vernon. They were Ebenezer 
Ellinwood, Ebenezer Kllinwood. jr.. Samuel Lamson. Samuel Lam- 
son, jr.. Ebenezer Lyon. Joseph Steel, and Caleb stiles. This 
petition failed. Seven years later. January, 1760, in answer to an- 
other larger petition by the inhabitants. Governor Benning Went- 
worth, with the advice and consent of the Council, granted a charter 
incorporating Souhegan West into a town by the name of Amherst. 
"reserving to us, our heirs and successors, the power and the right 
of dividing said town when it shall appeal' necessary and convenient 
to the inhabitants thereof." Lieut. -Col. John Goffe was appointed 
"to call the first meeting of inhabitants of said town within forty 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

days," at which meeting Col. Goffe read the charter. lie was ehoseu 
moderator, and the town voted t<> accept the charter. Col. (xoffe 
was then the leading citizen of the town. 

The resident tax-payers in Amherst in 1760 were one hundred 
and ten. Of these certainly twenty-two lived in what is now Mont 
Vernon. These original settlers bore the names of Averill, Bradford. 
Carlton, Cole, Curtis. Ellinwood, Gould, Harwood, Holt, Lovejoy. 
Lamson, Odell, Smith. Steel. Stile-. Weston, Wilkin-. 

From this date the growth of the northwest part of the town. 
afterwards known as the Northwest Parish, now as Mont Vernon. 
was rapid. 

The pioneer settlers of .Mont Vernon were a rough, hardy, 
worthy people. In many of them the religious element was strong. 
Their attendance at church was regular, though the route was long 
and tedious. They early looked forward to the time when this section 
should become a separate parish. In 1777 Rey. Daniel Wilkins, the 
tirst minister of Amherst, had become so enfeebled by age as to be 
incapable of performing his duties acceptably; the town sought to 
obtain a colleague pastor. The people of the northwest part of the 
town made this an occasion for a strong and persistent effort for 
organization into a separate parish. 

In the winter of 1777-78, the church and town extended a call 
to Mr. John Blydenburg to become associated with Mr. Wilkins as a 
colleague pastor. Against this action seventeen citizens of what is 
now Mont Vernon made a written protest, demanding that it be 
placed on the town records. Mr. Blydenburg declined the call. 

In the spring of 1 7 7 '. » petitions were presented to the General 
Court by sundry persons belonging to the northwesterly part of the 
town to be set off as a parish. The town chose a committee to treat 
with these petitions, in March. 177'.». and at a subsequent meeting 
on the 31st of said month, after hearing the report of the committee, 
voted not to set them off. 

In August. 177.9, the town appointed an agent to prepare and 
present reasons why this petition should not he granted before the 
General Court. 

December 6, 177'J. sundry inhabitants of the northwest part of 
the town asked to be voted off as a parish, on condition that the in- 
habitants of that part of the town should pay their full proportion 
towards the support of Rev. Mr. Wilkins and every charge of the 
town, except the settlement of a minister, until they could supply 



6 HISTORY" OF MONT VERNON. 

themselves with preaching in the parish, but the town refused to 
grant their request. 

In December, 1779, the church and town united in inviting Mr. 
Jeremiah Barnard to become their minister, whereupon thirty-Two 
residents of the northwest part of the town tiled a protest setting forth 
"That having repeatedly petitioned to be set off as a distinct parish, 
and their petitions having been rejected, they enter their prob 
against Mr. Barnard's being settled, or any other minister, while they 
remained in conjunction with the town and their request not granted." 
It would seem that their opposition to their ministerial candidates 
was almost wholly based on their desire to be made a distinct parish. 
Mr. Barnard, having accepted his call, was ordained March •">. 1780, 
prior to which a lengthy and earnest remonstrance was addressed to 
the ordaining council, by thirty-seven residents of what is now Mdiil 
Vernon, and a few others. 

Another committee was appointed by the town September 11. 
17S0, to show cause before the General Court why the prayer or a 
number of the inhabitants of the town residing in the northwesterly 
part of the same, asking to be set off as a separate parish, should not 
be granted. But the people of this part of the town insisted upon 
having a ministry' of their own selection, and in September. 1780, 
called a council, which organized here, what was called the Second 
Church of Amherst. No records of these transactions, or of the 
church for the first thirteen years exist, but it is known that the first 
deacons were Oliver Carlton. Nathaniel Heywood, and Richard Ward. 
all men of sound orthodoxy and fervid piety. 

Immediately after the organization of the church, the Rev. .Air. 
Coggin, of Chelmsford. Massachusetts, preached to a large congrega- 
tion in Major Cole's barn on the Capt. Kittredge place, in the south 
part of what is now Mont Vernon, upon the importance of immediately 
erecting a house of worship. This, in the poverty of those Revolu- 
tionary times, was no slight undertaking; but in the month of April, 
following, each farm in the community had contributed its free-will 
offering of timber for the frame and covering of the edifice, which still 
stands on the summit of the hill, a monument to those brave christian 
men. It is related that the heaviest timber was drawn upon the 
snow-crust the last of April, without obstruction from walls or 
fences. 

Lieut. .lames Woodbury gave the land where the church, now 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 7 

converted into a town house, stands, and also another lot one-fourth 
of a mile above, for the burial ground. 

So urgent was the demand for the house, that as soon as the 
frame was covered, and before the floor timber was laid, it was occu- 
pied without any formal dedication. They finished the house gradu- 
ally, as they were aide. The first worshipers here sat upon rough 
benches, with a single open floor, with nothing to warm them but the 
glad tidings of salvation. The old-fashioned square pews were 
constructed as the families felt able, "the pew-ground" merely being 
deeded by the parish. 

The organization of a church and providing a place of worship 
were but preliminary to the renewal of their effort to be legally set 
off into a second parish. They, in March, 17<si, presented to the 
( General Court convened at Exeter, an extensive petition, setting forth 
their reasons in asking for a separation. 

"To the Hon'ble the Council & Cents of the Hon'ble House of Rep- 
resentative in General Assembly Convened at Exeter in the 
State of New Hampshire, March 14, 1781 : 

"The humble petitions of the -several persons whose names are 
hereto set and subscribed. Inhabitants of Amherst in the County of 
Hillsborough,, living chiefly in the northwest part of said town. 
Sheweth that the Rev. Daniel Wilkins, the former minister of Am- 
herst, Being by Age and Infirmities Rendered incapable of Duty, the 
Town chose a committee to hire preaching until another minister 
should be ordained. By which means the Reverend Mr. Jeremiah 
Barnard was introduced into the church there only by Way of Supply, 
the town not being in a proper situation for settling a minister. 
However, the s'd Mr. Barnard officiated there some time. That your 
petitioners for Reasons hereafter mentioned. Could by no Means 
Rest Satisfied under his Ministry and openly disapproved of him. 
Notwithstanding which a party was form'd in favor of s'd Barnard, 
which party taking advantage of Calling Church and Town Meetings, 
when the severity of the season was such, and times when such an 
abundance of snow had fallen that it was extremely Difficult if not 
morally impossible to have a general attendance of the town's inhabi- 
tants, it was carried by a very small majority, to give the s'd Mr. 
Barnard a call. An Ecclesiastical Council was convened at Amherst 
on the first day of March, 17<S0, for the purpose of ordaining him. 
That although your petitioners were convinced to their great Grief 
and Sorrow (by being out voted) that they were not the greatest part 
of the inhabitants of said Town, yet being Conscious of their weight 
and Importance (as paying a greater part of the Taxes than those 
1 hat voted in favor of Mr. Barnard's settling) they did think themselves 
aggrieved in having the s'd Mr. Barnard imposed upon them in that 
unfair nut una ; and they did, previous to the s'd ordination, sign and 



8 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

address a Memorial and Remonstrance, Couched in the strongest but 
most modest Terms, to the s'd Council, setting forth among other 
things that with Regard to Mr. Barnard, they must say that he was 
not a man of their choice, that he was not the man they should choose 
for their Spiritual Guide, for their Instructor in the Great and Deep 
Mysteries of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and that his. the s'd Mr. 
Barnard's, discourses — however Doctrinally sound they might be — did 
not appear to be delivered in the demonstration of the spirit, and 
with that life, power, and energy which they could wish for. nor yet 
with that clearness and perspicuity which they thought they had a 
right to expect from a man thoroughly furnished to every good work, 
and from one who might come to them in the fulness of the blessings 
of the (iospel of Peace. 

"And in conclusion, hoping that the bare sight of such a number 
of names as would be annexed to s'd memorial might be sufficient to 
convince Mr. Barnard that he ought not to think of settling where 
there was so little prospect of his being Beneficial to the people and 
comfortable to himself. And praying the Venerable Council that the 
said Mr. Barnard might not be ordained. — to which Memorial your 
Petitioners pray leave to refer themselves, and that it may be taken 
as pail of this petition. That notwithstanding there are some few of 
your petitioners who did not sign said memorial, yet did they oppose 
Mr. Barnard's being settled as their minister, and did in the strongest 
(though) modest terms manifest to the said Council their disappro- 
bation of the said Mr. Barnard's being ordained as a minister of the 
Church and People of this town. 

"That notwithstanding the said Memorial and Remonstrance, the 
Council thought tit to ordain, and did accordingly ordain the said Mr. 
Barnard. In consequence whereof for the reasons aforesaid, and 
also because the said Mr. Barnard and his party carry the Advantage 
they have gained in manner as before set forth, with a high hand, 
your Petitioners cannot in conscience resort to the now place of Public 
Worship in Amherst, nor can they join in prayer, nor in communi- 
cation with the said Mr. Barnard, nor reap any benefit from his 
discourses, so that they wholly absent themselves and may lie said to 
be without any settled minister. Moreover, under all these difficulties 
and hardships which they labor under, your Petitioners are liable to 
be rated with their equal proportion of rates toward the support of 
the said Mr. Barnard, and as under the foregoing circumstances your 
Petitioners think hard of paying them; it seems to open a door of 
Contention and Lawsuit, which they would avoid. 

"That your humble petitioners in Expectation of Being sett off 
as a separate parish, did some time ago at their own proper charge, 
build a commodious Meeting-IIouse at the said northwest part of said 
Amherst, and have hired preaching for some time past, hoping at the 
same time to have enjoyed the privilege of a minister of their own 
choosing, our local situation being such as required the same. But 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 9 

that not being granted by the then Hon'ble Assembly, your Petitioners 
now have recourse to your Honors, praying that yon should take their 
most unhappy cases into your Serious Consideration, and that they 
may be at liberty to bring in a bill whereby they may be severed from 
the said New Meeting-House and Minister, and from any future min- 
ister there, and from paying any rates for the repairs of the said 
meeting-house, or support of the new minister of the same, and that 
your Petitioners may he invested with the power of assessing, levying, 
and raising money for keeping their said meeting-house in Repair, 
when the same shall be in want thereof, and for settling and con- 
stantly maintaining a Gospel Ministry in said Northwest Meeting- 
House. and that it may and shall be lawful for any now minor children 
or servants of your Pet'rs. as soon as they shall come of age. to poll 
off. if they see fit. and join such future Minister or Ministers of the 
Gospel at the said Northwest Meeting-House, and may be in like 
manner declared Independent of said Mr. Barnard's Meeting-House, 
and separate therefrom. & from all rates whatsoever incident to the 
support of that meeting-house or minister, provided that such child 
or children, servant or servants, so coming of age do signitiy to the 
Town C'l'k of Amherst in writing his. her, or their desire of joining 
and becoming members of the said Society of the Northwest Parish, 
or that your lion's will grant your Pet'rs Relief in such other manner 
as you in your great wisdom shall deem most meet. And your Peti- 
tioners, as in duty bound, will ever pray." 

This was signed by John Averill and fifty-one others. With 
the foregoing petition we have the following record : 

••State ok New Hampshire. 

■•In the House of Representatives, .June 20.1 7*1 . I'pon read- 
ing and considering the foregoing petition : Voted that the prayer 
thereof be granted, and that the Petitioners have leave to bring in a 
bill accordingly. 

••Sent up for Concurrence. 

"John Langdon, Speaker. 

••In Council June 21. 1781. Read and Concurred. 

"E. Thompson, Sec'y." 

The act for the incorporation of the Second or Northwest Parish 
is as follows : 

••State ok New Hampshire. 

"In the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty- 
one. 
••An act to enable sundry inhabitants of the Town of Amherst to 



10 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

riect a new parish in the northwest part of said town for trans- 
acting ministerial affairs only. 

"Whereas sundry inhabitants of Amherst in the county of 
Hillsborough have petitioned the General Assembby, setting forth 
(among other things) that in humble expectation of being sett off 
from the Society and Meeting-House whereof the Rev. Jeremiah 
Barnard is now minister in said town, they had at their own proper 
charge built a commodious meeting-house in the northwest part of 
said town, and hired preaching for some time past and praying thai 
they might be severed from said Mr. Barnard's church in future by an 
especial act, and be exempt in future from paying any rates towards 
the repairs of the said Mr. Barnard's meeting-house, or the support 
of him or any future minister of the same, upon which petition, the 
Agents of said town having been heard and the prayer appearing 
reasonable. Therefore be it enacted and it is hereby in Council and 
House of Representatives in general assembly convened and by the 
authority of the same petition above referred to, viz. : Nathaniel 
Hey wood, Oliver Carlton. Amos Stickney, John Cole, John Mills, Jo- 
seph Farnnm. Daniel WilMns, Joseph Langdell, Josiah Dodge, William 
Lamson, Abijah WilMns, James Smith, Jacob Smith, John Averill, 
Joseph Lovejoy. Nathan Jones, Joshua and Eli Elkins, Joseph Tuck, 
Timothy Smith, jr., Nathan and Nathan Flint, jr., Daniel Simonds, 
Peter Woodbury, William Bradford, jr., Daniel Smith, Isaac Smith, 
Samuel Winchester, Andrew Leavitt, Knight Nichols, James Wood- 
bury. Thomas Carlton, Joseph Perkins, Joseph Duncklee, John 
Duncklee, Allen ( Goodrich, Richard Gould, Thomas Town, jr., Nathan 
Cole, Richard Ward. Jeremiah Burnham, Samuel Sterns, John Har- 
wood, Enos Upton, Ezekiel Upton, Hannah Peabody, Win. WilMns, 
James Hopkins. Daniel Gould, Robert Parker, Joseph Steel, and 
Timothy Smith be and they hereby are separated, exonerated, and 
discharged from paying any taxes towards the support of the Gospel 
Ministry and Public worship, in said town of Amherst, from and 
hereafter the day of the date hereof excepting in the Parish hereby 
erected, together with all the polls belonging to their respective fami- 
lies, and all the estates which they do now or shall hereafter own, 
being in said town, and the said persons, polls and estates be and 
they hereby are elected and incorporated into a new parish, and in- 
vested with the privileges and authorities of a parish, separate and 
distinct from the other parts of said town, and the parishioners of 
the said new parish are hereby enabled to raise money as there shall 
be occasion, on the polls and estates thereto belonging for the main- 
tenance of the Minister of the Gospel, and the repairs of their 
meeting-house when necessary, and the support of Public Worship 
amongst themselves, and assess any necessary taxes on the said polls 
and estates for that end. and to levy and collect the same in the same 
manner that town taxes are levied and collected, and for that purpose 
to choose any Dumber of suitable persons belonging to said parish in 
the month of March annually, for assessors or a collector or collectors 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 11 

thereof, who shall have the same power to levy and collect such taxes, 
and in default of the due discharge of said office to be subject to the 
same pains and penalties as the constables of Towns in this state 
are liable Ivy law, and also choose any other persons to such offices 
and trusts as the said parishioners shall judge proper, and they are 
hereby authorized to act accordingly. 

••And lie it further enacted that any minor children of said pa- 
rishioners, any persons who may hereafter come and settle in said 
town and inhabit the town, and their minor children, who shall in 
time to come be desirous of belonging to the new perish, who shall 
within six months after such new settler coming into said town, and 
after such minor children attaining the age of 21 years giving their 
names and signifying their desire and design in writing to the clerk 
of said town, for the time being, which being done, such future settlers 
and minors shall be entitled to every privilege in this act with said 
parishioners, otherwise to be precluded therefrom, and the parishioners 
of the said new parish are hereby authorized to meet and to choose 
all necessary officers for the service of said parish for the current 
year, and until their next meeting in March next, and at any time in 
the month of July next, and Nathaniel Heywood is authorized to call 
the same. Provided nevertheless that nothing in this act shall be 
construed to exempt any of said parishioners, their polls or estates, * 
from paying their just proportion of all ministerial charges arising in 
said town of Amherst, nor from the future support of Rev. Daniel 
YVilkins. the late minister of said town, and now living according to 
contract." 

••State ok New Hampshire. 

"In the House of Representatives. June 28th, 1781. 
•'The foregoing bill having been read a third time. Voted that 
it pass to be enacted. 



••Sent up for Concurrence. 



•'John Langdon, Speaker." 



"In Council, June 30th, 1781. This bill was read a third time 
and voted it should be enacted. M. Weare, president. Copy ex- 
amined by E. Thompson, Sec'y." 

Of the names found in the act of incorporation, some are inter- 
esting as being the progenitors of present active residents of at least 
the fourth generation. 

••State of New Hampshire. 
"Hillsborough, ss. July 11. 1781. 

••To the Inhabitants of the Second Parish in Amherst. Greeting: 
"Whereas the Honorable Council and House of Representatives 



12 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

of this state have ordered,— That the inhabitants of this parish should 
meet some time in this month to choose parish officers, and have au- 
thorized me to call said meeting ; therefore J, the subscriber, by virtue 
of said authority, hereby warn all the freeholders and other inhabi- 
tants belonging to the said second parish of Amherst who are qualified 
to act in such parish meetings to meet at the meeting-house in said 
parish on Tuesday, the 24th day of July, at three o'clock in the 
afternoon, for the following purposes, viz. : 

"1st. To choose a Moderator for said meeting. 

••I'd. To choose a parish clerk and other parish officers. 

"3d. To choose a committee to hire preaching in said parish. 

"4th. To transact such other business as may appear needful." 

The first parish meeting was held 24th .Inly, 1781. Nathaniel 
Heywood was chosen moderator ; Eli Wilkins, clerk ; Peter Woodbury, 
Nathaniel Heywood, and Abijah Wilkins, assessors; James Wood- 
bury, treasurer; Nathan Flint, collector; Oliver Carlton, Richard 
Gould, and Win. Bradford a committee to hire preaching. Lieut. 
James Woodbury, Ensign Thomas Stickney, and Abijah Wilkins 
were chosen a committee to lay the lower floor and sell the pew-ground 
in the meeting-house at public vendue. .Inly 4, 17-S2. It was voted 
to hire preachers on probation "and that the committee apply to such 
gentlemen to preach as they think proper." August 29, 1782. Voted 
to hire Mr. Powers to preach in said parish. At the same meeting a 
proposition to unite with the Southwest Parish in hiring preaching at 
Mr. Abner Hutchinson's was rejected. 

January 13, 1783. John Mills, moderator. Voted to hire Mr. 
Allen to preach four Sundays if his services can be procured. 

March 4, 1783. At the annual meeting chose Peter Woodbury, 
Nathaniel Heywood, Abijah Wilkins assessors. Richard Gould, Tim- 
othy Smith, Richard Ward a committee to hire preaching. Voted 
£50 to defray parish expenses. 

September 9, 1783. ('apt. .1. Mills, moderator. Voted not to 
hire Mr. Allen any longer. Voted not to send to Dartmouth College 
for a preacher. 

December 9, 17*:',. Voted to concur with the church in giving 
Mr. Samuel Sargent a call to settle in the gospel ministry in said 
parish. The effort to settle Mr. Sargent failed, for on the 29th of 
December, 1784, they voted to concur with the church in giving Mr. 
John Bruce a call to settle in the gospel ministry of this parish. 
Voted to give Mr. Bruce £120 lawful money as a settlement and £60 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 13 

lawful money and twenty cords of wood yearly as long as he supplies 
the pulpit, and £30 and 20 cords of wood during' life, after he had 
ceased to supply the pulpit. Voted Nath'l Heywood, Dea. Oliver 
Carlton, and Lieut. Wm. Bradford a committee to treat with him 
relative to his settlement. Voted Capt. John Mills, Joseph Langdell, 
Daniel Smith to be a committee to take a deed from Lieut. Wood- 
bury of the ground on which the meeting-house stands. Mr. Bruce 
accepted the call after some delay, and was ordained the 3d of 
November. 1785. lie continued pastor of the parish and town until 
his death, which took place the 12th of March. 1809. 

An act defining the boundaries of the Second Parish in Amherst 
was passed by the legislature the 24th of January, 1789. 

January 7. 1790. The First Parish having petitioned for the re- 
peal of the act establishing the boundaries of the Second Parish. 
William Lamson, Henry Campbell. Capt. William Bradford were 
appointed a committee to appear before the General Court and show 
cause why the prayer of this petition should not be granted. 

.Line 1, 1700. Capt. William Bradford and Henry Campbell were 
appointed a committee to go to Concord to hear the report of a com- 
mittee appointed by the Genera] Court respecting the alteration of 
the boundary bines between Mr. Bruce's and Mr. Barnard's parishes. 

April 26, 1790. The meeting-house still remaining unfinished, 
the parish chose a committee to finish the same, as was voted, the 
committee to return any overplus that might arise from the sale of 
the pews to the treasurer. 

October 15, 1790. Voted that the committee for the time being 
furnish the ministerial pew on the spot reserved for that purpose. 

January 25. 1791. Another act establishing the boundaries of 
the Second parish was passed by the legislature, changing them 
somewhat from those fixed by the former act. 

March 21. 1791. Voted to accept a strip of land lying in the 
easterly part of Lyndeborough, with the inhabitants living thereon, 
as a part of the parish, provided the consent of Lyndeborough is 
obtained. 

1792. Voted J. Mills '.» shillings for sweeping the meeting-house. 

March, 1792. Dea. Oliver Carlton and others chosen a com- 
mittee to complete the meeting-house were instructed to finish the 
whole of the joiner work inside, not already let out. 

May 24. 1792. Eli Wilkins being the only Justice of the Peace 
in the Northwest parish, at a town meeting on that date it was voted 



14 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

that •'.John Conant, of Beverly. Massachusetts Bay, is a person mo- 
suitable to be recommended" for a commission of Justice of the 
Peace. 

May 2."), 1 7 i > 2 . Voted to build a wall by the highway against 
the burying-ground. Voted that the bass-viol be not carried into the 
meeting-house in time of exercise. Voted that £6 be paid to the 
minister, instead of 20 cords of wood, annually, "if he agrees to 
accept the change." Andrew Leavitt built the graveyard gate, and 
John Mills made the hinges and bolts. 

October 25, 1792. It was voted to allow the bill of the com- 
mittee for building the gate in front of the burying-ground amounting 
to £4. 19s. 5d. 

Voted to build another piece of wall by the side of the burying- 
ground. 

March IS, 1793. Voted a pew in the gallery of the meeting- 
house to the use of the singers. 

March 12. 17'.)4. Voted (apt. .Mills 12 shillings for sweeping 
the meeting-house 4 times, and caring for the same 1 year. 

March 21. 1796. An article having been inserted in the warrant 
calling the meeting holden this day, asking for the consent of the 
parish that the bass-viol be used in the meeting-house on Sunday to 
assist the singers in time of public worship, failed of approval. Eben 
Fisk was sexton, and Dea. J. Carlton, parish clerk, 1799-1804. 



CHAPTER II. 



CONDITIONS PRELIMINARY TO THE SEPARA- 
TION FROM THE PARENT TOWN. 

Public Events — Loyalists — Sketch of Joshua Atherton — Sketch 
of Charles H. Atherton — Sketch of Charles (i. Atherton — 
Sketch of Samuel Dana — Rev. Jeremiah Barnard — Loyal- 
ists' Influence in Politics — Troublous Times in the Country 
— Establishment of Constitution — Mr. Atherton's Objection 
to Constitution — Organization of Third or Southwest Parish 
Incorporation of Milfokd — Dissension Between Pakishei — 
Petition of First Parish — Political Parties — Extract from 
a Town Meeting — Or a Touch at the Times at A t — 

Meeting Between Bradford and Author of Poem — Feeling 
Between First and Second Parishes — Sketch of Major 
William Bradford — Sketch of Dr. Rogers Smith. 

A GLANCE at public events of this period, and their effect in 
influencing local conditions, so as to require for the peace and order 
of both communities a complete severance of all corporate interests, 
will give to those interested a clear idea of the influence of the various 
causes which converted the northwest parish of Amherst into the 
town of Mont Vernon. 

For several years prior to the War for Independence, and even 
after the breaking out of hostilities, while the majority of the colonists 
were bitterly hostile to King George and his ministry, and 1 egarded 
his policy as so unjust and tyrannical as to justify revolt, and yet 
hoped for a reconciliation with the mother country, there was } T et a 
considerable minority loyal to the royal government. They believed 
the attempt at independence would not succeed, that it was madness : 
that the trained troops sent over by the King would overpower the 
raw militia, and the result would be the ruin of the colonies. They 
were generally rich and prosperous, of aristocratic tendencies, but 
mostly men of moral worth. These loyalists were vulgarly called 



16 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

tories, and were in excessive odium among the patriots. Many of 
them who did not flee, acquiesced in the order of things, but it was 
conformity without change of opinion. Those who were most un- 
compromising were exiles and their property was seized and confiscated 
during the war. The provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia 
were their refuge, and among the valuable citizens of those provinces 
today are many descendants from the tory refugees of the United 
States. John Holland, a rank tory. nephew of Joshua Atherton, of 
Amherst, was seized and banished to New Brunswick, where he died. 

AVhen Gen. Gage evacuated Boston, in March, 1776, twelve 
hundred American loyalists went with him to Halifax, but few of 
whom returned. Prophetic were the words of the brave Dr. Warren 
who fell at Bunker Hill : "The contest may be severe, but the end 
will be glorious." 

Joshua Atherton was at this time easily, in reputation, ability, 
and influence, the first man in Amherst. Born in Lancaster, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1737, after graduating at Harvard, he studied law and 
practised six years in Merrimack. In the summer of 1773 he moved 
from Merrimack to Amherst, and being an able lawyer, 'was soon 
busily employed in the practice of his profession. As the dispute 
between the mother country and her American colonies increased in 
bitterness, he, being an open and avowed loyalist, became exceedingly 
unpopular. 

September 20. 1774. some three hundred men from Bedford, 
Amherst, and vicinity, assembled at Amherst and chose a committee 
to wait upon Mr. Atherton and request him to come to the court- 
house, which he did, and sign a declaration and read it to the people, 
who accepted it. Notwithstanding this declaration, the persecution 
continued, but he was not cured ol his loyalty. 

In 1776 he refused to sign the Association Test Paper when it 
was presented to him. Finally he was arrested and placed in Exeter 
jail 'as a person at large whose presence would he dangerous to the 
liberties of the country." He was afterwards transferred from Exeter 
to Amherst jail. He was ultimately liberated in June, 1778. At the 
January term of court, 1779, he tojk the oath of allegiance and 
attorney's oath, and was again admitted to practice. The good will 
of his fellow citizens began to return to him, a id his business became 
lucrative. He was a warm friend of Mr. Barnard, and took an active 
part in his ordination in 17<so. During the rest of his life he was 
Senator in the state legislature, and attorney-general of the st.ite. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 17 

Many young men, afterwards distinguished, resorted to his office for 
instruction in their chosen profession. He died in 1809. 

The name of Atherton among his descendants is now extinct. 
But among the Atherton female branch, those bearing the name of 
Spaulding, Gordon, Means. Bigelow, and others have achieved honor- 
able distinction. 

His son, Charles Humphrey Atherton, born August, 1773, died 
January, 1853, was for many years one of the most prominent 
lawyer, of Hillsborough county, and as a probate lawyer had no 
superior in the state. 

He was a high-toned Federalist, and in religious belief a Unitarian 
of the Channing type. He was Register of Probate three years, also 
representative three years, and many years on the superintending 
school committee. He had a great interest in historical and genealog- 
ical researches, and was a Master Mason. By close attention to 
money matters, he accumulated one of the largest estates ever left in 
Amherst. 

His son, Hon. Charles Gordon Atherton, graduated at Harvard 
in 1822. and in 1825 entered upon the practice of law at Nashua, New 
Hampshire. He early engaged in politics, and being ambitious, 
identified himself with the Democratic, then the ruling party in the 
state, and likely to remain so for many years. He was five years rep- 
resentative in the state legislature, and four years speaker of the 
House. In 1837 he took his seat as a Representative in Congress, 
which he held four years December 10, 1838, he introduced into 
Congress what was famous as the "Gag." a rule which provided that 
all petitions for the abolition of slavery should be laid upon the table 
without further action. This was in force until 1845, but this, like 
all other measures to stay the anti-slavery agitation, increased it. In 
1843 he was elected United States Senator, and served a full term 
of six years. In 1853, through the influence of the President-elect, 
Franklin Pierce, he was again returned to the Senate, to be the organ 
in that body for the incoming administration, but died suddenly while 
attending court at Manchester, November 14, 1853, aged 49. He 
was a man of acute and scholarly intellect, a fluent and polished speak- 
er, and ranked high as a counsellor and advocate. In temperament 
he was cold, distant, and aristocratic in bearing, and won no follow- 
ers by personal magnetism. He married the grand-daughter of the 
life-long personal and political friend of his immediate ancestor, Rev. 
Jeremiah Barnard, by whom he had no children. 



18 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Another of these loyalists active in this community was Hon. 
Sam'l Dana. He was graduated early at Harvard College, fitted for 
the ministry, and was settled at Grotou, Massachusetts, in 1761, and 
remained in office until May, 1775, when he resigned. Being a rank 
tory, the affections of a larger part of his people had been diverted 
from him by the course he pursued during the Revolution. In 1780 
he became a law student at the office of his friend, Joshua Atherton. 
In the spring of 1781 he purchased a small tenement of Mr. Atherton 
and moved his family from Groton to Amherst. In the autumn 
following he was admitted to practice as an attorney, and soon acquired 
a large business. In 1782 he purchased a farm and buildings at the 
west end of the plain, and built the mansion that was afterwards for 
many years the homestead of Dr. Matthias Spalding, where he died 
April, 1798. 

During his residence in Amherst, he was successively Register 
and Judge of Probate, and a member of the state Senate. He was 
the father of Benevolent Lodge of Amherst, and was its first Grand 
Master. In 1826 this institution was removed to Milford, where it 
now flourishes. His religion was liberal (Unitarian), and he was a 
close friend and supporter of Rev. Mr. Barnard. He exhibited talents 
as a lawyer above mediocrity. His daughter Mehitable married 
Sam'l Bell in 1807, and became the mother of Chief Justice Samuel 
Dana Bell of New Hampshire, and James Bell. United States Senator. 
A son of Samuel Dana Bell was Samuel N. Bell, a representative in 
Congress, who in 1874 declined the offer of appointment as Chief Jus- 
tice tendered him by Gov. James A. Weston. 

Rev. Jeremiah Barnard settled in 1780 in Amherst, and died 
January 15, 1835, on his farm on Christian Hill. Amherst, aged 85. 
He was a man of more than ordinary abilities. His lot was cast in a 
stormy time, as religious and political divisions prevailed in the parish 
for the first thirty-five years of his ministry. But his will and energy 
enabled him to breast the storm, when a man of more peaceable and 
quiet disposition would have been overcome by the contending factions. 
Of religious differences he was very tolerant, but not so of political. 
He was warmly attached to the Federal school of politics, and de- 
nounced the opposition in and out of the pulpit with great zeal. He 
was most emphatically a fighting political parson, but his marked 
social qualities, his general good sense, warm attachment to friends, 
and kindness of heart enabled him to prosper through his long min- 
istry. These men of aristocratic predilections and others of like 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNOX. 19 

tendencies largely controlled public sentiment in Amherst, and their 
influence at the time of intense political excitement gave complexion 
to the politics of the citizens of what is now the town of Amherst. 

The sketches of the lives of these men do not bear directly upon 
th^ history of Mont Vernon, but they had important and indirect 
influence in shaping opinions and events, which led to a final separa- 
tion. 

The War for Independence had closed. But the whole country 
was in a most unsatisfactory condition. The colonies were very poor. 
A period of distress and depression prevailed, sharper than at any 
crisis of the Revolutionary struggle. Their money had so declined 
in value that it took one hundred paper dollars to buy a pair of shoes. 

The government of the League of Confederation was weak and 
inefficient. The people were so jealous of it that they had hardly 
given Congress means of action. It could not raise money by taxes 
or establish rates of duties on foreign goods imported, nor compel 
obedience to any law. It was so loose and feeble that treaties with 
foreign countries were impossible. Washington said: "We are one 
nation today and thirteen tomorrow." The people were heavily in 
debt. Public and private credit was destroyed. A rebellion broke 
out in Massachusetts, called "Shay's Rebellion," composed of men 
who thought that all taxes and debts should be suspended at such a 
time. Complaints were rife that attorneys and officers of the law 
sought to advance their selfish interests to the ruin of their fellow- 
citizens. In the midst of these troubles, a petition from fifty citizens 
of Amherst, and mostly of the Northwest Parish, was presented to 
the General Court in February, 1783, asking for some legislation to 
relieve the situation. These financial troubles continued for some 
years, but the establishment of the Federal Constitution, taking effect 
in 1788, in a large measure operated to close them. In 1787 a con- 
vention met in Philadelphia, to form a new constitution, which, if 
adopted, would insure a stronger government. After many weeks' 
discussion, September 17, 1787, the convention finally adopted what 
is substantially the present United States Constitution, and sent it to 
the thirteen colonies for acceptance. 

In the New Hampshire State Convention, Col. Ebenezer Web- 
ster (father of Daniel Webster), who was a delegate from Salisbury, 
did not vote at all on the question of acceptance or rejection. January 
1, 1788, ten citizens of Amherst were chosen a committee to examine 
this form of government and report their judgment upon it. They 



20 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

reported that they could not recommend it to the acceptance of the 
town in its present form. The only member of the committpe from 
the Northwest parish was Rev. John Bruce. Three others of the ten, 
Messrs. Atherton, Dana, and Barnard, were men of liberal education. 
January 15. 1788, the town chose Joshua Atherton to represent it in 
the state convention to decide upon the adoption of the present con- 
stitution. In that body Mr. Atherton made a very sensible and 
feeling speech against Section IX Article I. of that instrument, which 
tolerated the African slave trade for a term of years. His objections 
were not heeded, as the constitution in its entirety was ratified at an 
adjourned session held in Concord the following June, though sixteen 
out of the twenty-five delegates from the old county of Hillsborough 
voted against its acceptance. 

What is now Mont Vernon having become the Second Parish in 
Amherst, forty-seven residents of the southwest part of the town 
petitioned the General Court at its session March 1, 1782, to be set 
off into a third parish. 

September 9, 1782, the first parish appointed Messrs. Blauchard, 
Dana, and Wilkins to show cause before the legislature why the 
prayer of this petition should not be granted. Their efforts were 
unsuccessful, for November 23, 1782. the General Court constituted 
the petitioners as the Third or Southwest Parish of Amherst, "for 
transacting ministerial affairs only." Being thus severed from the 
First Parish, they organized, January 9, 1783, and voted 4k to build a 
meeting-house of the same size and bigness as the Northwest Parish 
has built except the porches." The frame of this meeting-house was 
erected in the summer of 1784, but not completed until eight years 
afterward. This building for nearly half a century was the place of 
worship for the Congregational church in Mil ford, and also its town- 
house. It was in the center of what is now Union Square, now located 
on the east side of the Square, and known as Eagle Hall, which has 
been refitted and is used for business purposes. 

In October, 1793, at a parish meeting, it was voted to petition 
the General Court to set them off as a separate town in connection 
with the Mile Slip and Duxbury School Farm, and a part of Hollis. 
Therefore January, 1794, the town of Milford was incorporated, con- 
sisting of one hundred and forty-two tax-payers, and preceding the 
organization of the Northwest Parish into Mont Vernon just ten 
years. 

The dissensions between the different sections of Amherst, which 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 21 

commenced with the building of the second meeting-house in 1771-74, 
and aggravated bv the settlement of Mr. Barnard, were in no wise 
healed by the division of the town into parishes. 

A lengthy application, signed by one hundred and twenty inhabi- 
tants of the old parish, was sent to the General Court in February. 
1783, setting forth an uuhappy state of affairs. This document recites 
that in May, 1781, sundry persons, whose names are given, obtained 
an act erecting them into a distinct parish, still leaving them to act 
with the town of Amherst in all mattei's, save religious, proper to 
such a corporate body. That whereas disuniting in some things 
disunites them in other things. This unfortunate act had operated 
to create variance and discord, that their town meetings were scenes 
of confusion, irregularity, and vexation, therefore they invoked the 
General Court to relieve their uuhappy situation and extricate them 
from the bondage of continual discord and party factions. They 
speci lied the remedy they wished applied as follows: "•Permit us to 
part with one of them, and to ask your Honors that the persons above 
named, who have chosen to be separated in part, may be separated 
from us wholly. Your Honors have ample powers to complete the 
separation in all matters whatsoever, as we do not wish to retain 
them to our mutual vexation " 

This was aimed at the Northwest Parish only. Though respectful 
in form, it indirectly ceusured the action of a previous legislature, in 
setting off a fractious minority against the remonstrance of a majority 
of the voters in Amherst. The legislature took no action upon this 
doleful petition, but twenty years later the desired relief came, to the 
satisfaction of both communities. 

The establishment of the Federal Constitution divided the people 
into political parties, a division which became more acute after the 
breaking out of the French Revolution, hailed, with all its terrible 
excesses, by one party as a triumph of the people, and regarded by 
the other side as the precedent of destruction of all government among 
men. Jay's treaty with Great Britain during Washington's adminis- 
tration was very much opposed by the Republicans, but more odious 
to them was the "Alien and Sedition Law," and the "Land Tax 
Law." both passed during the administration of John Adams, which 
greatly intensified the divisions among the people. 

At the annual meeting in March, 1799, the selectmen were 
appointed a committee to petition Congress to repeal the "Alien and 
Sedition Law," and to change the mode of assessing and collecting 



22 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

the land tax. The selectmen declined the appointment, whereupon 
Major William Bradford, Eli Wilkins, Esq., of the Second Parish, 
and William Low, of the First Parish, all Republicans, were chosen 
as the committee. At an adjourned meeting the next Tuesday, they 
presented a report, which the town by a majority vote accepted, which 
greatly exasperated the Federalists. The Northwest Parish, being 
almost entirely Republican, voted almost unanimously for the report, 
and this will explain the following description of the meeting, which 
made its appearance in the " Village Messenger" of March, 1799, and 
which is introduced here to show the bitterness prevalent in this 
community at that period : 

"Extract From a Town-Meeting, Or a Touch of the Times at 
Am t : 

"March comes, the first born child of Spring - ; 
The bells for annual meeting - ring; 
Joy smiles in every patriot's face. 

And Am t dreams not of disgrace. 

Forth from the North in crowds came down 
Old age, on crutch, and youth, half-grown: 
Old age, whose one foot in the grave is, 
Whose other to the gout a slave is; 
And youth, not 3*et arrived at freedom, 
Who need their nurses still to lead 'em: 
All, all came down, a motley nation, — 
As tho' 'in hell there were vacation. ' 
Burning with Jacobinic zeal. 
To overturn the public weal. 
Before them stalked a man of stature. 
Designed a Jacobin by nature, 
Whose mind and mien strong traces bore 
Of that great Jacobin of yore, 
Who, for Sedition, forth was driven. 
Eternal from the gates cf heaven. 
Despising peace and lawful labors. 
• He sows sedition 'mong his neighbors; 

Tells them that governments are knaves, 
That they, poor souls, will soon be slaves, 
And those that rule them soon will stand 
The lords and sovereigns of the land. 
To church he goes, but not for preaching; 
He gives his precious time to teaching 
That those that dare not tell a lie 
Have surely lost their liberty. 
He at his heels the rabble brought, 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 23 

Who long' beneath his eye were taught 

To banish order, stir up evil. 

And serve their lord and master, Devil. 
* * -::-.* * * * 

At length the cause of all their ills, 

The Alien and Sedition Bills, 

The tax direct on land and houses. 

Which every foe to peace arouses, 

Comes publickly to be discussed 

By friend and foe. by blest and cursed. 

A solemn pause — debates proceeded. 

As though the Jacos some man needed 

Some natural son of base sedition. 

To rise and speak for their petition. 

Their chief arose. 'Tis strange,' he cries, 

'Since freedom is our blood-earned prize, 

That we, like slaves, should be debarred 

The use of speech,— indeed, that's hard. 

No more shall scandal charm our souls. 

Since government our tongues controls 

Aliens no more with monied reason 

Shall stir up faction, death and treason ; 

But under harrows, saws and axes, 

We be compelled to pay our taxes, 

Support our Congressmen in style, 

By cruel, unrewarded toil, 

Till we, at last, O, dreadful thought! 

Beneath those tyrants shall be brought. 

And see in tears the fatal day 

When we to tyrant laws gave way. 

Beware, my friends, 'tis our condition! 

O, curse the law against sedition! 

O, curse the Pres no, no, I fear 

Some friend to government may hear, 

And I like friend and brother Lyon, * 

Be tried and feel the power of iron. 

O, Liberty, 'tis but a name, 

When we no longer can defame !" 

Reasons were offered when he ended, 

And government and laws defended; 

But sense and reason all are vain, 

When faction rules the heated brain; • 

For ignorance, deceived by lies, 

All human argument defies. 

The question put, the chief uprose, 

*Matthew Lyon was at that time a Republican member of the National House of Repre- 
sentatives A motion to expel him from the House had just failed. 



24 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Surveyed his friends, surveyed his foes: 
His minion friends united stand, 
Instructed by his factious hand. 
Their chief they watch, his actions view, 
And when he votes, why they vote too. 
Such are Columbia's servile foes, 
Led on, like asses, by the nose; 
Seduced from order by a villi an. 
Whose honor is not worth a shilling, 
Who, worse than Judas and such gents. 
Would sell our State for thirty cents. 
O, would he ape that child of hell 
In all his actions 'twould be well; 
His neck, too, then, a rope would grace, 
And he depart to his own place. 

Amphion. 

The Jacobin who was so offensively caricatured and so insolently 
abused was Major William Bradford, an active and influential citizen 
of the Northwest Parish, and for the next three years representative 
from Amherst. A few days afterward he repaired to Amherst, in- 
tending to inflict personal chastisement upon the writer of this abuse. 
He demanded of the editor the name of the author and where he 
might be found, and was pointed to a certain law office and was told 
that he would there find a student who would respond to his call. 
Major Bradford had been through the Revolution, was a man of 
stately proportions and in the full vigor of manhood, and would be a 
formidable antagonist in a personal encounter. He went as directed, 
and was presented to a young man, in whom he beheld his match, a 
six-footer of stalwart proportions, a very Hercules in muscle, and he 
deemed it discreet to retire without stating his errand " Amphion" 
was a young Wilton Federalist, who studied law and taught school in 
Amherst, and in later life was known as the Hon. William Abbott, 
of Bangor, Maine. 

The Northwest Parish folks bore the dwellers on the plain and 
the lowlands in the neighborhood no good-will. They called it Sodom, 
and spoke of seeing "the smoke of its torment ascending to the 
heavens on frosty mornings." This was somewhat akin to the spirit 
of one of their number who, in the days when Parson Barnard was 
prophesying against the Democracy, gave as a Fourth of July toast : 
"Amherst: — It has a big meeting-house with a tall steeple, an 
Arminian preacher, and a cursed people." 

The time was now approaching for an entire separation from the 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 25 

parent town. Twenty-three years before, this had been partially ac- 
complished by the formation of the Second Parish as religiously 
independent of the First, but this, we have seen, did not tend to unity 
of thought or action. 

In the party divisions, which distinguished the close of the last 
and the beginning of the present century, the ruling influences in 
the Second Parish were as decidedly Republican or "Jeffersonian" as 
were those of the First in an opposite direction. 

For three years, 1800-1802 inclusive, the offensive "Jacobin," 
Major Bradford, represented Amherst in the General Court, with the 
aid of the Second Parish vote, and the Federal elements anticipated 
a restoration of their local ascendency by freedom from this connec- 
tion. Here it may be proper to remark that in the First Parish itself 
there was a minority of active Republicans, conspicuous among whom 
were Hon. William Fiske, Cols. Daniel Warner and Paul D. Sargent, 
and Capt. Eli Brown. 

Major William Bradford, so stigmatized by Mr. Abbott in his 
"Extract from a Town Meeting," a leading Republican of Mont 
Vernon, was a man of note. His ather was William Bradford, from 
Middleton, Massachusetts, who settled in Souhegan West previous to 
its incorporation as a town. The son was born here in 1753. He 
was a sergeant at the age of 22, in Capt. Josiah Crosby's company at 
Bunker Hill, and an ensign in Capt. Wilkins's company at the Cedars, 
where he was taken prisoner and abused by the Indians. He after- 
wards served as a lieutenant in the Continental Army. In 1800, 
1801, 1802 he represented Amherst, and in 1804. 1805, 1806 he 
represented Mont Vernon in the New Hampshire Legislature. He 
was the active promoter of the incorporation of Mont Vernon as a 
separate town. In 1812 he received a major's commission in the 1st 
Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers. He married for his second 
wife Mrs. Lois, widow of Rev. John Bruce. He had two brothers, 
Samuel and Joseph, who were in the Revolution, and his first cousin, 
Capt. John Bradford, of Hancock, commanded a company in the 
battle of Bennington, and was the first man to scale the enemy's 
breastworks. Major Bradford removed in 1815 to Barre, Vermont, 
where he died October 25, 1816, aged 63. For record of his children, 
see Family Register. 

Another citizen prominent in political and town affairs during 
this period was Dr. Rogers Smith. He was the eldest son of James 
and Moriah (Rolfe) Smith, and was borr. in Middleton, Massachu- 



26 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

setts, June 12, 1776. His parents a few months later moved to Mont 
Vernon. He studied medicine with DV. William Jones, of Lynde- 
borough, commenced practice in Amherst in 1802, removed to Mont 
Veruon in 1805, to Greenbush, New York, as surgeon in the army, in 
1813, and in 1816 to Weston, Vermont, where he died March 25, 
1845. During his seven years' residence in Mont Vernon, he was 
three years moderator of the town meeting, once selectman, three 
years town clerk, aud three years on the School Board. He was a 
man of fine literary taste, a cultivated writer, and a well informed 
and ardent politician. He was the father of Asa Dodge Smith, 
president of Dartmouth College from 1863 to 1877. 



CHAPTER III. 



SEPARATION FROM AMHERST. 

Voting Actions op Northwest Parish— Act of Incorporation of 
New Town — Name Boundary Lines of New Town — Boundary 
of New Town — Name of Tax Payers — First Town Meeting. 

ON the third day of May, 1802, the Northwest Parish voted to 
take measures to effect a separation from the town of Amherst, and a 
committee consisting of Major William Bradford, John Carlton, Capt. 
John Batchelder, Capt. Joseph Perkins, Capt. Thomas Cloutman, 
Uea. Jacob Kendall, Lieut. Benjamin Parker, Lieut. Joseph Farnum, 
Eli Wilkins, Parker Richardson, Nathan Jones, and Lieut. Timothy 
Hill were appointed a committee to petition the town relative thereto. 

On the last Thursday of May, 1802, the Parish voted to petition 
the General Court to incorporate them into a new town, with the same 
boundaries as those established between the First and Second Parishes. 

On the first Monday of June, 1802, chose Nathan Jones, Capt. 
Joseph Perkins, and Capt. Benjamin Parker to present the petition to 
the General Court. 

May 2, 1803, at a town meeting held that day, Col. Robert 
Means, Samuel Wilkins, Daniel Warner, Samuel Whiting, and William 
Fisk, of the First Parish, and William Bradford, Josiah Perkins, Eli 
Wilkins, Ebenezer Odell, and Joseph Langdell, of the Second Parish, 
were chosen to confer together upon a division of the town, and were 
instructed to report at this meeting. After an hour's session the 
committee reported verbally, "not agreed." Whereupon the town of 
Amherst chose Col. Daniel Warner agent to attend the General Court 
in the matter of the Second Parish petition. Daniel Campbell, Samuel 
Wilkins, and Chas. H. Atherton were appointed a committee to con- 
sult with said agent and give him such advice and instruction as they 
think proper, before he shall attend the General Court. 

However, an act incorporating the town of Mont Vernon was 



28 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

completed by the signature of Gov. John Taylor Gilman, Dec. 15, 
1803. 

The verdure of the farms, which cluster about the eminence upon 
which the village is located, it is said by some, suggested the name 
of Mont Vernon for the town. A statement like this may be found 
in the sketch of the town by the Rev. C. D. Herbert (once settled 
over the church at Mont Vernon) in Lawrence's History of the New 
Hampshire Churches, published in Claremont, in 1856. But this ex- 
planation seems to be open to doubt. The English name "Vernon," 
is not at all the same as the French word from which are derived such 
words as "verdure," "verdant," etc., signifying greenness. And, 
referring to the probabilities, the Rev. C. C. Carpenter of Andover, 
Mass., who also occupied the position of pastor of the church for 
several years, and who is a past master in historical research, says : 
"I do not think the hard-headed farmers of our hill were so imagina- 
tive, in the month of November. 1803, as to consider their pastures 
green enough to suggest the name for the town." And he adds: 
"Per contra, it seems to me the preponderating likelihood is that the 
name was intended to be in memory of Washington's home, the be- 
loved Father of his Country having then so recently died." The 
name " Mont," which seems to have been used in the act of incorpo- 
ration, was probably due to a blunder in transcription. The original 
act cannot be found, but a certified copy gives it "Mont." The 
postoftice name is, however, "Mount" Vernon, and the name is some- 
times given as *' Mont," and sometimes as "Mount," in official or 
semi-official volumes. Washington's home, Mount Vernon, was 
named for Admiral Vernon of the Royal Navy. 

Its boundaries, as given in the act of incorporation, were as follows : 
"Beginning at the northwest corner of Amherst, on New Boston, 
south line, thence running sutherly on the west Hue of Amherst about 
four miles and a half to the northwest corner of the town of Milford, 
thence easterly on the north line of Milford to the southeast corner of 
a lot of land now in possession of David Dodge and John Cochran, 
thence northerly to the northwest corner thereof, thence easterly to 
the southwest corner of a lot now in possession of Nathan Fuller and 
John Fuller, thence northerly to the northwest corner thereof, thence 
easterly on the north line of said Fuller's lot and the north line of 
Elisha Felton's house lot, and the same course on the line of Enos 
Bradford's and Lambert Bradford's land to the southwest corner of 
land now or lately owned by Enos Bradford, thence northerly on the 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 29 

east line of said laud and the east line of a lot now owned by John 
Clap to the northeast corner of said Clap's land, thence a few rods to 
the southwest corner of a lot now iu possession of Andrew Leavitt, 
thence northerly on the west line of said lot in possession of said 
Leavitt and on the west line of a lot n >w owned by Col. Robert Means 
and others to the southeast corner of land now owned by Joseph 
Nichols, theuce northerly on the west line of said Nichols's land to the 
northwest corner thereof, thence easterly on the north line of said 
Nichols's land to a line running south from the east side of Henry 
Spaulding's land and on the easterly line thereof until it intersects 
New Boston line, thence westerly to the place of beginning." 

The following one hundred and thirty five tax-payers were resi- 
dent in Mont Vernon, April 1, 1801: Timothy Austin, Jesse Averill, 
John Averill, jr.. Ebeu Batchelder, Israel Batchelder, John Batchelder, 
James Bennett. Ebenezer Bills, Jonathan Bixby, Enos Bradford, 
Lambert Bradford. Widow Bradford. William Bradford, William 
Bradford, jr , Mark Burnam, Charles Cambridge, John Carlton, Mrs, 
Emma Carlton, Nathan Cleaves, Josiah Coburn, Thomas Cloutman, 
Henry Codmau. Joseph Coggin, William Coggin. Jonathan Conant, 
Jonathan Conant. jr.. Lot Conant. Nathan Cross, Jacob Curtis, Jacob 
Curtis, jr.. Alleu Dodge. Joseph Dodge. Josiah Dodge, Malachi 
Dodge. Jonathan Dnncklee, Benjamin Durant. Israel Farnum, Joseph 
Farnum. Thomas Farnum, John Fisk. John B. Flanigan, Nathan 
Flint, Samuel Flint, Lieut. Allen Goodridge, Allen Goodridge, Nathan 
Green. John Harwood.John Harwood, jr., William Hastings, Lieut. 
Josiah Herrick. Peter Herrick, Mrs. Judith Hill, Timothy Hill, 
Ebenezer Holt Ezekiel Holt James Hopkins, James Hopkins, jr., 
Robert Hosea, Nathan Jones, Peter Jones, Daniel Kendall, Jacob 
Kendall, John Kendall, Lieut. Thaddeus Kendall. William L. Kidder, 
Josiah Kittredge, Solomon Kittredge. Dr. Zephaniah Kittredge, Jesse 
Lamson, Jonathan Lamson, jr., Mrs. Mary Lamson, Joseph Langdell, 
Jonathan Low, Isaac Manning, John Manning, David Marshall, 
Ebenezer Mills, Samuel Mitchell, Lieut. Ebenezer Odell, Ebenezer 
Odell, jr., Capt. Benjamin Parker. Robert Paiker. jr., Aaron Peabody, 
John Peabody, Moses Peabody. Samuel Peabody, Capt. Joseph 
Perkins, Joseph Perkins jr.. Samuel Phelps, Ensign Benjamin Pike, 
Ephraim Pike, James Ray. James Ray. jr.. Levi Ray, Mrs. Phoebe 
Raymond. John Roby, John Roby. jr., John Rollins, Daniel Secombe, 
Dea. Daniel Smith, Daniel Smith, jr., David Smith, Eben Smith, 
Isaac Smith, Isaac Smith, jr., Jacob Smith, James Smith, Jeremiah 



30 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Smith, Nathan Smith, Timothy Smith, Abijah Spofford, Benjamin 
Stearns, Cyrus Styles, Josiah Swinington, Robert Taggart, Henry 
Treavitt, Allen Towne, John Trow, Joseph Trow, Joseph Trow, jr., 
Enos Upton, Dea. Ezekiel Upton, Lieut. Ezekiel Upton, Nehemiah 
Upton, Isaac Weston, John Weston, Thomas AVeston, Abial Wilkins, 
Abijah Wilkins, Eli Wilkins, Jonathan Wilkins, Peter Wilkins, James 
Woodbury. 

The first town meeting was held January 23, 1804, at the Center 
school-house. Joseph Langdell was chosen moderator, John Carl- 
ton, town clerk, and John Carlton, Jos. Langdell, and Jacob Kendall, 
selectmen. 

At the first annual town meeting, March 13, 1804, the same 
town officers were re elected, and Major William Bradford was chosen 
as representative. 



CHAPTER IV. 



• DESCRIPTION AND BOUNDARIES. 

Sitdatiok — Boundaries — Surface — Fruits — Brooks — Ponds — El- 
evations — Trfes — Granite — Game — Birds — Snakes — Climate 
— Rainfall— Description of Purgatory — Dedication of Pur- 
gatory. • 

THE town of Mont Vernon is situated in the county of Hills- 
borough in the State of New Hampshire. It lies a little southward 
from the territorial center of Hillsborough County, being third in the 
tier of towns northward from the Massachusetts line. It is situated 
in latitude 42 degrees 51 minutes north. Mont Vernon is irregular in 
shape, averaging four and one-half miles in length, and three and 
one-half in width. It covers an area of about 10,000 acres, of which 
a very small part is covered with water. 

The towns which bound it are : New Boston on the north, Am- 
herst on the east, Amherst andMilford on the south, and Lyndeborough 
on the west. 

It is twenty-eight miles south by southwest from Concord, fifteen 
miles southwest from Manchester, fourteen miles northwest from 
Nashua, and four and one-half miles north from the line of the Nashua 
and Wilton railroad at Milford village. Its distance from Boston is 
about fifty-five miles. 

The surface is hilly, the larger part of the town being a lofty 
ridge lying between the valley of the south branch of the Piscataquog 
River on the north, and that of the Souhegan on the south. It is 
emphatically an upland town. The soil is rocky, but generally deep 
and fertile, well repaying careful cultivation. It seems especially 
adapted to the apple, several thousand barrels of this fruit being the 
annual product of its orchards; and the winter apples grown here 
have long been known as not excelled by any for their keeping quali- 
ties. The annual crop of blueberries gathered from its pastures is 
many hundred bushels. 



32 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Its water courses are limited to five brooks, of any considerable 
size, four of which flow southerly to the Souhegan, and one northerly 
to the Piscataquog. The largest of these streams has its rise in the 
northeasterly part of the town, flows southerly some four miles, 
( furnishing in the easterly part of the town two mill sites. ) to Holt's 
Meadow, in Amherst, where it unites with Caesar Brook, which rises 
in Mont Vernon village, two miles above, and unitedly they form 
Beaver Brook, which courses southward, and, after furnishing the 
water power to Amherst village, makes its confluence with the Sou- 
hegan River, three miles below. The Indian name of this stream as 
given on some maps is the " Quohquinnepassakessananagnog." This 
name excites much interest among those who come to Mont Vernon 
as strangers. A third brook, known as Harwood's, rises in the 
meadow northwest from Mont Vernon village, and after a journey 
southward from three to four miles, empties into the Souhegan, one 
and one-half miles above Milford village. 

Black, or Purgatory. Brook issues from Smith's Pond, one mile 
northerly from the village, has a course of some five miles, and after 
receiving a large tributary from Lyudeborough, known as Curtis 
Brook, empties into the Souhegan River about three miles above 
Milford village. 

A fifth stream rises in the northwest part of the town, and after 
a course of two miles northward, discharges itself into the Piscataquog 
at the hamlet known as Paper Mill Village, in New Boston. It is 
generally known as Baldwin brook, or sometimes called Colbv. 

Smith's Pond a bod} 7 of water located one mile north from the 
village, covers an area of twenty-five acres. This name. Smith's 
Pond, is not usually applied to it. "The Old Pond," being its com- 
mon designation. 

Joe English Pond is divided between Mont Vernon, New Boston, 
and Amherst, the larger part being in Amherst. 

Roby's Hill, rising in the northeast part of the town near Joe 
English Pond, forms the highest elevation. 

Other conspicuous prominences are McCollom Hill, on the north- 
erly line of the town; Beech Hill, in the northwesterly section; Carle- 
ton Hill, in the southwesterly part of the town; and near the village 
easterly and southeasterly are Campbell Hill and Prospect Hill. 
From the summit of the latter, which is a broad plateau elevated some 
one hundred feet above the village, is obtained a prospect most varied 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 33 

and extensive. An expanse of country forty miles in every direction 
is seen with the naked eye. 

Mont Vernon is on an eminence nearly 1000 feet above mean 
tide water. 

Nearly all the different kinds of forest trees and shrubs, usual in 
southern New Hampshire, abound in Mont Vernon. Hard wood is 
found chiefly here, largely beech, birch, maple, and chestnut, also soft 
wood including pine, hemlock, and spruce. 

A little granite is to be found, principally in the southern part 
of the town, being of a fair quality. What granite has been quarried 
here, has been mainly used for door-stones and underpinning. 

The smaller wild and cultivated fruits, blackberries, blueberries, 
raspberries, and strawberries, are plentifully produced, and hundreds 
of bushels of the different kiuds, more especially blueberries, are 
sold at the boarding houses, while more are sent to Boston and other 
cities. Forty years ago the wild fruits were available to any who 
might desire to gather them. But of late years they have become so 
valuable that in most blueberry pastures the public are warned not to 
gather them. In the north and east parts of the town certain persons 
make a business, in the season, of picking, or hiring others to pick, 
blueberries, and each day carry crates of them, in quart boxes, to 
Milford, whence they are shipped by rail to Lowell and Boston. 

As not any of the ponds of Mont Vernon are of any considerable 
size, no fish of much consequence are to be found in them. The 
brooks above named, however, still abound in small trout, except 
Purgatory brook. The brooks are, however, so persistently fished, 
and dry summers are so frequent, that the fishing is not at all what 
it used to be, although every year several hundred trout are taken 
within the limits of the town. Large game was abundant in the early 
days of the town, and small game is now. Within late years Mont 
Vernon has had many famous hunters for a town of its size. The 
smaller animals, as the mink, coon, musk-rat, otter, fox. rabbit, or 
hare, etc., are frequently met with. Squirrels are very common. 
Even now a deer is seen occasionally. In fact, within ten years these 
animals have become quite common. At present no shooting of deer 
is allowed, and they bid fair to become detrimentally plenty to the 
farmers. Formerly the birds that were to be found in the country 
were more common than at the present day. Robins, bluebirds, 
sparrows, bobolinks, swallows, orioles, or golden robins, partridge>. 
quail, and a host of others appear every summer. The voice of the 



34 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

whip-poor-will is a pleasant feature of the summer evenings. Often 
in their semi-annual migration wild geese are seen or heard coursing 
through the air. Rattlesnakes are very rare. Only one has been 
seen here within the memory of the present generation, a large one 
beins; killed in 1840 by Mr. Chester B. Southworth, in the garden at- 
tached to his house, on the west side of the cemetery. Adders, water 
and spotted, also black, green, and striped snakes are common. 

Sudden and extreme changes in temperature occasionally occur, 
as great and sudden as fifty degrees in eighteen hours have been 
noticed The average snow fall for each of the forty last winters has 
been a little less than seven feet. The greatest rain fall within that 
time is believed to have been in October, 1S69, when, after a drought 
of three months, nearly eight inches of water fell, damaging hillside 
highways and dams. The damage amounted to S3, 000 in this town, 
and the sawmill of Arthur A. Trow and Daniel W. Trow on the Har- 
wood Brook was swept away. The old turnpike, near the old Town 
Farm, was so washed out at this time that it was discontinued as a 
highway. 

PURGATORY. 

"Purgatory" is the name given to a rocky gorge two miles west 
of Mont Vernon, forming part of the boundary lines between the 
towns of Mont Vernon and Lyndeborough. It is a deep ravine, more 
than half a mile in length, through which Black Brook makes its way. 
At the "Upper Falls" the brook plunges perpendicularly about fifty 
feet into a deep chasm or pit, from which the view upw T ard of a solid 
wall of rock on either side and dense overhanging forest is one of 
singular wildness and grandeur. One hundred rods down this steep 
gorge, the stream makes several further leaps known as "Lower 
Falls." Close by the channel at the "Upper Falls" is the "Devil's 
Beanpot," a circular excavation or "pot-hole" several feet deep in the 
ledge, and hard by is a perpect impriut as of a human foot, seven 
feet long, embedded in the rock, and known as the "Devil's Foot- 
print." In the gulf below are the "Pulpit," the "Overhanging Rock," 
the "Devil's Den," the "Old Boy's Face," (sometimes called the 
"Giant's Head") "Hog Rock," and many other points in this museum 
of Nature's wonder works. 

There is a fine grove near the "Upper Falls" which is fitted up 
for picnic parties. The approach to the glen is down a steep hill 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 85 

one-half mile long from the Mont Vernon side, on the old highway 
from Amherst to Lyndeborongh, and a domestic once remarked, 
after emerging from its gloom, that this Purgatory was as hard to 
get out of as the other. 

Doubtless this gorge had a human history long ere the Anglo- 
Saxon set foot here. The dusky tribes of the forest no doubt fre- 
quented it to gaze in awe and wonder. The students at the village 
academy were accustomed to make weekly picnic excursions to Pur- 
gatory ; but the name has no particular significance. 

For some years, one day in the latter part of August of each 
year, hundreds of dwellers in Mont Vernon and adjacent towns had 
been accustomed to resort to Purgatory on a picnic excursion. In 
July, 1889, Mr. H. A. Hutchinson, the owner of the Falls and lands 
in the vicinity, associating himself with Messrs. Henry F. Dodge and 
Joseph G. Carleton, formed the plan of improving the grounds and 
providing the requisite accommodation for the entertainment of any 
number or excursionists who might be attracted thither. A band 
stand, dancing platform, bowling alley, and other facilities were 
erected. In short, they designed to enlarge the gathering and make 
Purgatory Picnic a permanent institution. So, in August, 1889, over 
two thousand persons assembled to inaugurate the scheme. J. H. A. 
Bruce, Esq., then the proprietor of the Hotel Bellevue, presided. The 
survivors of the world-renowned family of Hutchinson singers, John 
W. Hutchinson, of Lynn, and his sister, Mrs. Abby H. Patton, of 
New York, who led a choir composed of such other members of the 
"Tribe of Jesse" as had inherited something of that rare gift, thrilled 
and charmed the vast audience by the sweetest music. 

Hon. Charles J. Smith delivered a very acceptable historical ad- 
dress on "Purgatory and Surroundings," which was published. Since 
then, on the Thursday next the 20th of August, not less than 1500 to 
2500 persons from near and far have annually gathered here to honor 
the occasion and make it permanent; and these throngs coming each 
returning August, establish the fact that the festivity is popular. 



CHAPTER V 



POLITICS, ROADS AND BRIDGES, NOTABLE 

EVENTS. 

Political Feeling between Amherst and Mont Vernon — The 
Free Soil Party Growth — Votes at Several Elections — 
Boy Spellbinders — Careers of Marden and Bruce — High- 
ways and Bridges — The Old Turnpike Charters — Second 
Turnpike Road of New Hampshire— The Amherst Turnpike 
Corporation — Turnpike Taverns — Other Roads — Notable 
Events — Spotted Fever — Tempests — Frosts — Rain Storms — 
Floods — Grasshoppers — "Dark" and "Yellow" Days — Long 
Winters. 

AT the time of the incorporation of the Northwest Parish of Am- 
herst into the town of Mont Vernon, Thomas Jefferson was President 
and Aaron Burr was Vice President of the United States. Both were 
Republicans. 

The country was divided into two large political parties, intensely 
antagonistic to each other, and this party rancor affected the social 
relations of every community in this country. The aversion of the 
Amherst Federalists to the leading influences of Mont Vernon con- 
tinued until the incoming of President Munroe's administration, when 
the "era of good feeling" began to pervade the country. The follow- 
ing well-authenticated anecdote furnishes an instance of the feeling. 
A prominent citizen of Concord, who was born in Amherst in 1801, 
left in 1822, and died in 1883, was noted for his quaint and original 
sayings. Whenever the town of Mont Vernon was mentioned he 
would scowl and express himself thus : "Mont Vernon ! Mont Vernon ! 
it was nothing but a communitv of savages before the advent of Dr. 
Adams, whose coming brought civilization into the town." 

Politically, Mont Vernon, in its early days was overwhelmingly 
Republican, as what afterward became the Democratic party was then 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 37 

called. The opposing party was the Federalist party, which later 
was known as the Whig party. The anti-slavery sentiment grew very 
strong in the early forties, and when the "Liberty," afterwards the 
"Free Soil," and, later still, the modern "Republican" parties were 
organized, there was a strong minority of anti-slavery men to join 
those organizations. The town, however, was almost uniformly 
Democratic. 

In 1804 the national vote was : Federalist 3, Republican 74. 

State vote — Oilman, Federalist 13, Langdon, Republican 129. 

1812 — National vote: Federalists 35, Republicans 120, 

1836 — National vote: AVhigs 26, Democrats 61. 

1840 — National vote: Whigs 67, Democrats 92, Liberty 4. 

1844 — National vote : AVhigs, 18, Democrats 77, Liberty 40. 

1846— State election: Oovernor, Colby, Whig 18 ; Berry, Liberty 
56; Williams, Democrat 80. 

1851 — Governor vote: Atwood, Liberty 98 : Sawyer, Whig 11; 
Dinsmore, Democrat 48. 

1852 — Governor vote: Martin, Democrat 80; Atwood, Liberty 
61; Sawyer, Whig 18. 

National vote : Democrats 77, Liberty 57, AVhigs 12. 

1856 — National vote: Democrats 110, Republicans 86. 

1860 — National vote: Breckenridge and Lane 6, Douglas 83, 
Lincoln 80. 

1868 — National vote : Democrats 95, Republicans 83. 

1876 — National vote : Democrats 96, Republicans 74. 

1880 — National vote: Democrats 104, Republicans 63. 

1884 — National vote: Democrats 76, Republicans 64. 

1892 — National vote : Democrats 79, Republicans 60. 

1896 — National vote : Palmer, Gold Democrat 15, Bryan, Silver 
Democrat 27, McKinley, Republican 86. 

1898 — Governor vote: Rollins, Republican 65, Stone, Democrat 
63. 

A good many of these anti-slavery men lived in the village, and 
at the Lyceums, which used to convene in the old red school house, 
many of the debates were on anti-slavery "questions." It was at 
these meetings that vouna: Geo. A. Bruce and Geo. A. Harden, both 
little lads and chums in the primary classes, being duly coached by 
their respective fathers, who were rank abolitionists, began their 
careers as public speakers. 

The town threatened to become anti-democratic under this con- 



38 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

stant hammering of the anti-slavery element, but it was saved to the 
democratic party by a timely annexation of a democratic strip of 
Lyndeboro' along the west line, in 1852. This annexation had been 
petitioned for the year before by Abraham French and others, but 
was not enacted 1»3 T the Legislature. In the town warrant for the 
March meeting in 1852, Article 6 was as follows: "In consequence 
of a petition signed l>y Hiram Perkins and others, to see if the town 
will vote in favor of disannexing a part of Lyndeboro', and annexing 
the same to Mont Vernon, it being the same as that petitioned for by 
Abraham French and others at the last session of the Legislature." 
The vote was 76 yeas, to 22 nays. At the March meeting in 1853 it 
was voted to raise §105.00 to defray the expenses of said annexation. 

In 1860, when Lincoln was elected President, the anti-democratic 
voters, having joined hands as modern Republicans, were exceedingly 
jubilant, and, a few evenings after the election, celebrated the victory 
in most enthusiastic style. A company of "Wide Awakes," as the 
campaign organizations of the party were known, paraded the streets 
in uniform hats and capes, and carrying lighted torches. Every Re- 
publican house in the village was illuminated, in the way then in 
vogue, with a lighted candle in each window pane. A brass band es- 
corted the procession with martial music, and a mass meeting crowded 
the "New Academy Hall," where speeches were made by several 
local orators, including young Bruce and Marden, who were now class- 
mates and room-mates in Dartmouth College, where they graduated 
the next summer. Marden was just old enough to cast his first vote 
for Abraham Lincoln, but Bruce, whose birthday did not come until 
November 19, was a bit too young to share in that glory. 

It may not be out of place here to record certain facts in the 
careers of these two young men, which were, at that time, considered 
somewhat remarkable. Both were born on the main village street, 
within a few rods of each other — Marden, August 9, and Bruce 
November 19, 1839. They attended the same district school, drove 
the family cows to the same pasture, were always together in their 
studies and their sports, entered Appleton Academy together, gradu- 
ated in the same class, entered Dartmouth College together, roomed 
in the same rooms and ate at the same tables, through the entire four 
years, belonged to the same society, and graduated together in the 
class of 1861. They did not serve together during the war, but were 
both in the service about three years. Both studied law after the 
war, but Marden drifted into journalism, and Bruce was admitted to 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 39 

the bar; and in 1867 they were both in Boston, again sleeping in the 
same room and sitting at the same table. In 1884, Bruce was elected 
President of the Massachusetts Senate, and Marden was elected, for 
the second time, to the Speakership of the Massachusetts House of 
Representatives. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRID(.E>. 

The town of Mont Vernon as constituted at this writing (1904) 
has about 60 miles of public highways within its limits. It has no 
bridges of any great importance to maintain. Its roads are fairly well 
kept, and the annual expense of maintenance, including road-breaking 
in winter, is now about S1400. The modern "road-machine" has done 
much to improve those roads which are not too much used, but the 
main travelled roads often are made worse by the scraping from the 
gutters into the middle of the highways, of the worn out material 
which has so long been subjected to the wear of travel. 

It is difficult to learn the details of the laying out of the earliest 
roads, but among them it is certain that the old Turnpike is one of 
early enterprises in this direction. 

THE TURNPIKE. 

The "Second Turnpike Road in New Hampshire" was incorpo- 
rated in 1779. We are indebted to the Hon. E. N. Pearson, Secretary 
of State, for a copy of its charter, which was as follows : 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

[L. S.] 

In the Year of Our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and 

Ninety Nine. 

AN ACT TO INCORPORATE A COMPANY BY THE NAME OF 
THE PROPRIETORS OF THE SECOND TURNPIKE ROAD 
IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in Gen- 
eral Court convened, that Josiah Stevens, Isaac Green, and Nathan 
Coolidg'e, and their associates and successors be, and they are hereby 
incorporated and made a body corporate and politic under the name of 
the Proprietors of the Second Turnpike Road in New Hampshire, and 
in that name may sue and prosecute & be sued and prosecuted to final 
judgment and execution, and shall be, and hereby are vested with all 
the powers and privileges, which by law are incident to corporations of 
a similar nature. 



40 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

And be it further enacted that the said Josiah Stevens shall call a 
meeting - of said proprietors by advertisement in the newspapers printed 
at Walpole and Amherst to be holden at any suitable time and place, at 
least fourteen days from the first publication of said advertisement & 
the proprietors by a vote of a majority of those present or represented at 
said meeting, accounting and allowing one vote to each share in all 
cases, shall choose a clerk, who shall be sworn to the faithful discharge 
of said office, and shall also agree on the method of calling future meet- 
ings, and at the same time, or at any subsequent meetings, may elect 
such officers and make and establish such rules and by-laws, as to them 
shall seem necessary and convenient for the regulation and government 
of said corporation for carding into effect the purpose aforesaid, and 
for collecting the tolls herein after established, and the same by-laws 
may cause to be executed and annex penalties to the breach thereof, 
provided the said rules and by-laws are not repugnant to the constitu- 
tion and laws of this state; and all representations shall be proved by 
writing signed b} T the person to be represented, which shall be filed 
with the clerk, and this act, and all rules, by-laws, regulations and 
proceedings of said corporation shall be fairly and truly recorded by 
the clerk in a book or books provided and kept for that purpose. 

And be it further enacted that the said corporation are empowered 
to survey, lay out, make and keep in repair a turnpike road of four rods 
wide, in such rout or tracts, as in the best of their judgment and skill, 
shall combine shortness of distance, with the most practicable ground, 
from the lottery bridge in Claremont, to the plain in Amherst in this 
state, near the court house. 

And be it further enacted, that if the said proprietors, and the 
owners of land, over which the road may run, shall disagree on the 
compensation to be made for said land, and the building or buildings 
thereon standing, and shall not agree in appointing persons to ascer- 
tain such compensation, the judges of the court of common pleas in the 
county in which said land lies, if not interested, and if interested, the 
judges of the superior court, upon application of the said proprietors, 
or the owners of the land, reasonable notice of such application having 
been given, by the applicants, to the adverse party, shall appoint a 
committee, who shall ascertain the same, in the same way as compen- 
sation is made to owners of land for highways as usually laid out, and 
execution on nonpayment, against said proprietors shall issue of 
course. 

And be it further enacted, that the corporation may erect and fix, 
such, and so many gates or turnpikes upon and across said road, as will 
be necessary and sufficient to collect the tolls and duties hereinafter 
granted to the said company, from all persons travelling in the same, 
with horses, cattle, carts and carriages. 

And be it further enacted, that it shall and may be lawful for said 
company to appoint such and so many toll gatherers, as the}' shall think 
proper, to collect and receive of and from all and every person or per- 
sons using said road, the tolls and rates herein after mentioned, and 
to stop any person riding, leading, or driving any horses, cattle, hogs, 
sheep, sulkey, chair, chaise, phaeton, coach, chariot, cart, wagon, 
sleigh, sled, or other carriage of burden or pleasure from passing 
through the said gates or turnpikes, until they shall have respectively 
paid the same; that is to say, for every mile of said road, and so in pro- 
portion, for a greater or less distance, or greater or smaller number of 
sheep, hogs or cattle (viz) for every ten sheep cr hogs one cent, for every 
ten cattle or horses two cents; for every horse & his rider, or led horse 
one cent; for every sulkey, chair, or chaise, with one horse and two 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 41 

wheels, two cents; for every chariot, coach, stage-wagon, phaeton or 
chaise with two horses and four wheels, three cents, for either of the 
carriages last mentioned with four horses, four cents; for every other 
carriage of pleasure the like sums, according to the number of wheels 
and horses; drawing the same; for each cart, or other carriage of bur- 
den, drawn by one beast, one cent; for each wagon, cart, or other carri- 
age of burden, drawn by two beasts, one cent and an half ; if by more than 
two beasts, one cent for each additional yoke of oxen or horse; for each 
sleigh drawn. by one horse, one cent: if drawn by two horses, two cents; 
and if by more than two horses one cent for every additional horse: for 
each sled drawn by one horse one cent; for each sled drawn by two hors- 
es or a yoke of oxen, one and a quarter cent, and if by more than two 
horses, or one y r oke of oxen, one cent for each additional pair ot horses, 
or yoke of oxen; and at all times when the toll-gatherer shall not attend 
his duty the gates shall be left open; and if any person shall with his 
carriage, team, cattle or horses turn out of the said road to pass the said 
turnpike gate, or ground adjacent thereto, with intent to avoid the pay- 
ment of the toll due, by virtue of this act, such person shall forfeit and 
pay three times so much as the legal toll would have been, to be recov- 
ered by the treasurer of the said corporation to the use thereof in an 
action of debt or on the case; provided that nothing in this act shall ex- 
tend to entitle the said corporation to demand toll of any person who 
shall be passing with his horse or carriage to or from public worship, 
or with his horse, team or cattle, or on foot, to or from any mill, or on 
the common and ordinary business of family concerns within the same 
town. 

And be it further enacted, that the said proprietors are hereby em- 
powered to purchase and hold in fee simple, so much land as will be 
necessary for said turnpike road; and the share or shares of any of said 
proprietors may be transferred by deed duly executed and acknowl- 
edged and recorded by the clerk of said proprietors on their records, 
and the share or shares of any proprietors may be sold by said corpora- 
tion on nonpayment of assessments duly made agreeable to the by-laws 
that may be agreed upon by said corporation. 

And be it further enacted, that no toll shall be taken by said cor- 
poration for any mile of said road until eight hundred dollars shall 
have been expended thereon, or a proportionate sum upon the whole 
number of miles, reckoning from the Lottery Bridge in Claremont to the 
place where said road may terminate. 

And be it further enacted, that said corporation ma} T be indicted for 
defect of repairs of said road after the toll gates are erected, and fined 
in the same way and manner as towns are by law fineable for suffering 
roads to be out of repair, and said fine may be levied on the profits and 
tolls arising or accruing to said proprietors. 

Provided nevertheless, and be it further enacted, that if the said 
turnpike road shall in any part be the same with any highway now 
used, it shall not be lawful for said corporation to erect a gate or turn- 
pike on or across said part of the road that now is used and occupied 
as a public highway anything in this act to the contrary notwith- 
standing. 

And be it further enacted, that when said proprietors shall make it 
appear to the judges of the superior court of judicature that they have 
expended said sum of eight hundred dollars on each mile, or a propor- 
tionable sum as before mentioned the proprietors shall have the liberty 
to erect the gates as aforesaid. 

And be it further enacted, that at the end of every ten years after 
the setting up any toll gate an account of the expenditures upon said 



42 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

road, and the profits arising therefrom shall be laid before the judges 
of the superior court for the time being - , under forfeiture of the priv- 
ileges of this act in future, and if the neat profits of the said ten years 
shall exceed twelve per cent, per annum, the said court may reduce the 
future toll so far as that it may not exceed twelve per cent. : and if the 
profits shall not amount to six per cent., the said court may raise the 
toll so that it shall not be less than six, nor exceed twelve per cent. 

And be it further enacted, that if in ten years the said road shall 
not be completed according to the provision in this act, every part and 
clause thereof shall be null and void: Provided also that the State of 
New Hampshire may at any time after the expiration of forty years 
from the passing of this act, repay the proprietors of said road, the 
amount of the sum expended by them thereon, with twelve per cent, per 
annum in addition thereto, deducting the toll actually received by the 
proprietors, in that case the said road shall to all intents and purposes 
be the property of the State of New Hampshire, anything in this act 
to the contrary notwithstanding. 

State of New Hampshire. 
In the House of Representatives, Deer. 20th, 1799. 
The foregoing bill having had three several readings passed to be 
enacted. 

Sent up for concurrence, 

JOHN PRENTICE, Speaker. 

In Senate Deer. 23d, 1799, This Bill having been read a third time, 
was enacted. 

AMOS SHEPARD, President. 
Approved Deer. 26th, 1799. 

J. T. OILMAN, Governor. 
A true copy, 

Attest, Philip Carrigain. 

In 1812 "The Amherst Turnpike Corporation" was chartered, 
and as it was a continuation of the Second Turnpike Road, above re- 
ferred to, it is of interest in connection therewith, and its charter 
was as follows : 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

[ L . S.] 

In the Year ok Our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and 

Twelve. 

AN ACT TO INCORPORATE A COMPANY BY THE NAME OF 
THE AMHERST TURNPIKE CORPORATION. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives in General Court convened, that David Dexter. Josiah Stevens and 
Samuel Fiske and their associates an:l successors be and they hereby 
are incorporated and made a body corporate & politic forever, under 
the name of the Amherst Turnpike corporation and in that name may 
sue and prosecute, and be sued and prosecuted until final judgment and 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 43 

execution; and shall be and hereby are vested with all the privileges 
and powers which by law are incident to corporations of a similar 
nature. 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, that the said David Dexter and 
Josiah Stevens or either of them, shall call a meeting- of said propri- 
etors, to be holden at any suitable time and place, by posting- notifica- 
tions, one at least in some public place in each town through which 
said road is contemplated to pass, at least fourteen days before the time 
of holding said meeting expressing the time, place and design of said 
meeting; and the proprietors by a majority present or represented at 
said meeting, accounting and allowing one vote to each share in all 
cases, shall choose a clerk who shall be sworn to the faithful discharge 
of the duties of his Office; and shall agree on a method of calling future 
meetings; and at the same or at any subsequent meeting, may elect such 
officers and make and establish such rules and by-laws as to them 
shall seem necessary and convenient, for the regulation and government 
of said corporation for carrying into effect the purposes aforesaid, and 
for collecting the tolls hereinafter established; and the same by-laws 
may cause to be executed and annex penalties to the breach thereof; 
provided said rules and by-laws are not repugnant to the laws of this 
State. And all representations at an} T meeting shall be proved by 
writing signed by the person to be represented, which shall be filed by 
the clerk in a book or books provided and kept for that purpose. 

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, that the said corporation are 
hereby empowered, to lay out, make and keep in repair a turnpike road 
of four rods wide, beginning at the end of the second New Hampshire 
turnpike on Amherst plain thence running to the line between the State 
of New Hampshire and Commonwealth of Massachusetts in a direction 
to meet the Turnpike road in Tyngsborough in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, conforming to the survey lateh* made by Daniel Warner 
Esquire as near as the nature of the ground will permit. 

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, that if the said proprietors, and 
the owners of land over which said road may run, shall not agree on 
the compensation to be made for such land, and shall not agree in ap- 
pointing persons to ascertain such compensation, the Justices of the 
Court of Common pleas in the County where such land lies, if not inter- 
ested, and if interested the Justices of the Superior Court, upon the appli- 
cation of the proprietors or owners of the land, reasonable notice having 
been given to the adverse party, of such application shall appoint a 
committee who shall ascertain the same in the same way as compensa- 
tion is made to the owners of land for highways as usually laid out. 
Provided nevertheless that it shall not be lawful for said proprietors to 
make such road until the damages done the owner or owners of the land 
through which the same is laid out, is ascertained and paid, or tender 
thereof made, or security given for the paj'ment of the same to the said 
owner thereof to his or their satisfaction. 

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, that the said corporation may 
erect and fix such and so many gates or turnpikes upon and across said 
road as will be necessar}' and sufficient to collect the tolls and duties 
herein after granted to said companj-, from all persons travelling the 
same with horses, cattle, carts or carriages. 

Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, that it shall and may be lawful 
for said company, to appoint such and so many toll-gatherers as they 
shall think proper, to collect of and from all and every person or per- 
sons using said road, the rates and tolls herein after mentioned, and to 
stop any person riding, leading or driving any horses, cattle, carts or 
carriages from passing through said gates or turnpikes, until they shall 



44 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

respectively have paid the same; that is to say for every mile of said 
road, and so in proportion for a greater or less distance, or greater or 
smaller number of horses, cattle or carriages Viz. f >r every ten sheep 
or swine one half cent; for every ten neat cattle, horses or mules one 
cent; for every horse and his rider or led horse one cent; for every sulk- 
ey, chair or chaise, with one horse and two wheels two cents; for every 
coach, chariot, stage, phaeton or chaise with two horses and four wheels, 
three cents; for either of the carriages last mentioned with four horses, 
four cents; for every T other carriage of pleasure, the like sums according 
to the number of wheels and horses drawing the same: for each cart, 
waggon or other carriage of burthen drawn by one beast, one cent; for 
the like carriages drawn by two beasts, one and a half cents; if by 
more than two beasts, one cent for each additional yoke of oxen or pair 
of horses; for each pleasure sleigh drawn by one horse, one cent and a 
half; if drawn by two horses, two cents; if drawn by more than two 
horses, one cent for each additional horse; for each sled or sleigh of 
burthen drawn by one horse, three quarters of a cent; if by two horses 
or one yoke of oxen, one cent; if by more than two horses or one yoke 
of oxen, one cent for each additional yoke of oxen or pair of horses; and 
at all times when the toll gatherer does not attend his dutj- the gates 
shall be left open; and if any person shall with his carriage, team, 
cattle or horses turn off the said road to pass the said turnpike gate on 
ground adjacent thereto, not being a public highway, with an intent to 
avoid the payment of the toll due by virtue of this act, such person 
shall forfeit and pay three times as much as the legal toll would have 
been; provided that nothing in this act shall extend to entitle said cor- 
poration to demand or receive toll of any person who is an inhabitant of 
any town where any gate may be erected, nor any officer or soldier of 
the militia under arms, going to or from the place of military duty nor 
to any funeral that may have occasion to pass said gate. 

Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, that the said corporation are 
hereby empowered to purchase and hold in fee simple, so much land as 
will be necessary for said turnpike road, and the share or shares of any 
proprietor may be transferred by deed, duly executed, acknowledged 
and recorded by the clerk of said corporation on their records; and said 
shares may* be sold by said corporation on non-payment of assessments 
duly made, agreeable to the by-laws of said corporation. 

Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, that the said corporation shall 
take no toll for any mile of said road until six hundred dollars shall 
have been expended thereon, reckoning a proportionate sum upon the 
whole number of miles from the second New Hampshire turnpike road 
on Amherst plain, to the line between the State of New Hampshire and 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; nor shall any toll be taken for any 
mile of said road until the Justices of the superior court shall adjudge 
that said road is sufficiently made to entitle the said corporation to re- 
ceive toll, at which time said incorporation may erect gates thereon ac- 
cording to the provisions of this act. 

Sec. 9. And be it further enacted, that said corporation may be 
indicted for want of repairs on said road after the toll gates are erected, 
and fined in the same way and manner as towns are by law fineable 
for suffering highways and bridges to be out of repair; and said fines 
may be levied on the profits and tolls accruing to said corporation- 
provided that if said Turnpike road shall in any part be the same 
with any highway now used, it shall not be lawful for said corporation 
to erect any gate or turnpike upon or across that part of said road 
which is now used as a public highway, anything herein to the contrary 
notwithstanding. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 45 

Sec. 10. And be it further enacted, that at the end of every six 
years, after the setting - up of any Toll-gate upon the road aforesaid an 
account of the expenditures upon said road and the profits arising 
therefrom, shall be laid before the Justices of the superior court for the 
time being under the forfeiture of the privileges of this grant in future; 
and if the net profits for the said six years shall exceed nine per 
centum per annum, the said court may reduce the future rates of toll so 
far as that it may not exceed nine per centum per annum: and if the said 
profits shall. not amount to six per centum per annum, the said court 
may raise the future rates of toll, so that it shall not be less than six 
per centum per annum nor more than nine per cent, per annum. 

Sec. 11. And be it further enacted, that if in four years from the 
passing- of this act, the said road and every part thereof shall not be 
completed, agreeable to the provisions of this act, every part and clause 
thereof shall be null and void — provided also that the State of New 
Hampshire ma}' at any time after the passing hereof repay the proprie- 
tors of the said road the amount of the sums expended by them thereon, 
with nine per cent, per annum in addition thereto, deducting the toll 
actuall}- received by said corporation; in that case the road shall, to all 
intents and purposes, be the property of the State of New Hampshire, 
provided further that the Legislature of this State shall have a right to 
adopt such measures in future, as shall by them be considered necessary 
or expedient, to compel said proprietors to keep said road in good 
repair. 

State of New Hampshire. 
In the House of Representatives, June 17, 1812. 

The foregoing Bill having had three several readings passed to be 
enacted. 

Sent up for concurrence, 

CLEMENT STORER, Speaker. 

In the Senate, June 18, 1812. This Bill having been read a third 
time was enacted. 

JOSHUA DARLING, President. 

By the Governor, the same day, approved. 

WILLIAM PLUMER. 
Recorded agreeabl\ T to the original. 
Attest: 

Saml. Sparhawk, Secretary. 

The Second Turnpike Road of New Hampshire was built in 1802. 
It ran from the southern line of Mont Vernon, through the center of 
the town and its entire length, making its distance in the town about 
five miles. The first toll-house above Amherst was in the north- 
westerly part of Mont Vernon, and was kept by James McCauley 
forty years. The stage ran daily on this road from Amherst to 
Windsor. Vermont, for more than fifty years. 

The turnpike built by the two corporations ran southerly through 
Amherst and South Merrimack to Nashua, and so on to Boston, 



46 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

though it was not a turnpike for the entire distance. To the north it 
passed directly to Francestown, and thence down the long hill to 
Cork Plain to Hillsborough, and through Hillsborough Lower and 
Upper Villages, Washington, Lempster, Goshen, and Unity, to Clare- 
mont, and thence to Windsor, Vermont, crossing the Connecticut 
river by a bridge. In the days before railroads were established, 
this thoroughfare was, at certain seasons, filled with teams of the 
farmers, of one, two, four or six horses, carrying their produce to 
Boston, and returning, to the country stores and homes, groceries, 
liquors, dry goods, etc., demanded for home use. A most interest- 
ing description of things in this regard will be found in the admirable 
historical address given by Col. Bruce at the centennial celebration 
of the town in 1903, which is printed elsewhere in this volume. 

"On the 15th of April, 1837, agreeably to a vote of the Pro- 
prietors, all the gates on the Second New Hampshire Turnpike were 
thrown open, and the road was made free from that day." The 
foregoing is found in Seombe's History of Amherst, p. 453. No 
mention is made of the discontinuance of the road built by the "Am- 
herst Turnpike Corporation," but as the latter was only an extension 
of the former, and the proprietors were the same, probably the whole 
turnpike was discontinued at the same time. Mr. Secombe's History 
adds that the act of incorporation was repealed by the General Court 
July 4, 1837, and the care of the road thenceforth devolved upon the 
towns through which it passed. 

On the 3d and 4th of October, 1869, occurred the very heavy 
rain, above noted, which so Avashed out the turnpike near the foot of 
the hill close by what had been the "Town Farm," that it was dis- 
continued, as not worth repairing for the small amount of travel 
passing over it. 

To accommodate the travel on the turnpike in its palmy days, 
there were numerous taverns, at intervals of two or three miles, some 
of which are still standing, though their use as places of refreshment 
for man and beast has been rendered obsolete. In those days, how- 
ever, they must have sheltered many a weary teamster, and their 
open fire-places must have brewed many a mug of flip, and the bars 
must have dispensed many a glass of rum and "black-strap." Then 
everybody imbibed, and rum was no small item in the freights of the 
returning teams. 

Among these is a tavern about a mile from the village, which 
used to be kept by Zepbaniak Kittredge. It is now owned by Mr. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 47 

Lucius B. Hutchinson, who bought the place for its lumber. The 
house is occupied at intervals by more or less transient people, and 
the buildings are fast going to ruin. 

A large house standing, at the junction of the Turnpike and the 
road to Paper-Mill Village in New Boston, was once a tavern, which 
went out of commission when the teaming business lapsed. It was 
occupied afterwards by the late Stephen G. Dunbar, and later still 
by the late David McCollom. 

Not far east of this is a house in which Nelson E. Shedd kept 
tavern, but it is now in poor condition. All these landmarks will 
soon disappear. 

The old turnpike is a notably hard road as far as it runs in Mont 
Vernon. It is rocky and in places sandy, and just at the New Boston 
hue, beyond the McCollom, or as it used to known, the Parker place, 
is a long and very sandy hill, known as Warner Hill, which was 
always the bane of the stage-driver and the teamster. 

Sept. 30, 1823. ''Voted to lay out a road from the meeting- 
house down the hill to the old road between William Richardson's 
and Joshua Cleaves's place." 

This is the road to the ' 'Maple Tree," probably, striking the 
road which led easterly to Amherst, and westerly to Lyndeboro'. 

A new road from Amherst to Weare was built in 1828. It 
passes through the entire length of the easterly part of Mont Vernon, 
and its construction and maintenance have been a heavy burden to 
this town. The road 'is direct from Amherst village to New Boston 
village, and follows the stream known as the Quohquinnepassakessa- 
nanagnosj to its source. 

March 10, 1840. Hiram Perkins having presented a petition 
that about 25 rods of the road south of his house (the Woodbury 
place, later owned and occupied by Hiram Perkins, and at this writing 
known as ''the Hearthstone) be discontinued, and a new road be laid 
out, it was voted to discontinue said piece of road and lay out one 
on the north of his house, provided said Perkins will give the land 
and wall the same — and the selectmen were authorized to lay out 
the same, which was very soon done. 

In 1853 was built the new road from "the Maple tree" to Milford, 
a direct line through the woods and passing what is now Hartshorn's 
Mill. Formerly to get to Milford, Mont Vernon people had to go 
round by the south school-house, and the Raymond and Hutchinson 
places. The new road is much shorter and easier. 



48 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

In 1878 the town built from the corner near John A. Carleton's, 
in the southerly part of the town, a road to connect with the road 
which formerly ended at Josiah Swiuington's. A new road was also 
built from the East main road to John Elliot's. 

In 1890, the road known as the "Boulevard" was built from 
Main Street to the top of Prospect Hill. 

In 1893 two short pieces of road were%nihT~ The first one began 
at the north road to Amherst, near the house of Edward Hiklreth, 
having its terminus on the south road to Amherst, near the house of 
Jesse S. Trow. 

The second one beginning on the Lyndeborough road, near the 
house of Joseph G. Carleton, formerly the John A. Carle ton place, 
extends to the Purgatory road, near the foot of Harwood's Hill, form- 
ing with its connections a convenient route from Mont Vernon to 
West Milford and Wilton. 

From the foot of the Harwood hill to the turnpike or Frances- 
town road, near Coggin's blacksmith shop, is a delightful piece of 
road through the woods, and it is known as "Lovers' Lane." It was 
built in 1860. 

In 1903 a piece of road was built from the place owned by Charles 
Blood, just off the road to«New Boston, at the north-east part of the 
town, across to the road from the east part of the town to Joe English 
Hill, near the farm now owned by J. F. Best. 

NOTABLE FACTS AND EVENTS 

In the winter and spring of 1812 a new and most virulent epi- 
demic, known as the spotted fever, appeared. Very few physicians 
could treat it skilfully. Its attack was as sudden and violent as the 
cholera or plague. Its progress was rapid, and it terminated fatally 
in most cases. This scourge brought death into many families in 
Mont Vernon. The services of Dr. Matthias Spalding, of Amherst, 
who was credited with more than average success in coping with this 
fearful disease, were in requisition day and night for several months. 

One of the most severe tempests ever experienced here occurred 
on the 22d of September, 1815. It began at 11 : 30 a. m., and con- 
tinued with great violence for two hours. Trees were uprooted, 
fences blown down, buildings unroofed, and their fragments scattered 
in all directions. No lives were lost here. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 49 

The year 1816 was remarkable for its unusual severity of weather. 
Snow fell every month, causing light crops. 

July 15, 1818. This day was of unusual darkness in New 
England, probably caused by the uncommon smoke produced by the 
burning of woodlands on the mountains, and of brush fires in all 
directions. 

1826 is remembered as the grasshopper year. So plenty were 
these insects that they devoured every green thing. In some places 
they were caught in nets and fed to the hogs. The last week in Au- 
gust a great rain storm occurred which largely destroyed them. More 
water fell than had fallen in the same length of time for many years. 
It was during this storm that the White Mountain slide took place, 
by which the Willey family were destroyed. It was a year of disease 
and death. Whooping cough, measles, and an epidemic form of 
dysentery of a malignant type prevailed through this county, and 
swept away old and young. 

November 13, 1833, there occurred the grandest meteoric display 
ever witnessed in America, at half-past five in the morning. Thou- 
sands of meteors might be seen flying in every direction through a 
clear, unclouded sky. As daylight approached they appeared less 
frequent, but they were seen as long as the stars were visible. 

Three severe thunder storms occurred June 30, 1841. The 
second of these was accompanied by furious wind and hail, which did 
an immense amount of damage. Some hailstones were as large as 
good sized hen's eggs. Nearly ten thousand lights of glass were 
broken in this town alone. A terribly cold storm of wind and snow 
occurred June 11, 1842, and at its close, snow to the depth of four 
inches covered the ground, and the next day a very high wind pre- 
vailed, which would have done credit to November. 

The latter part of the winter of 1842-43 was remarkably long 
and severe. Sleighs were used until late in April, and on the 17th of 
that month snow was three feet deep on a level. There was very 
little fruit that season. 

In April, 1860, the tannery, owned by Starrett and Kittredge, 
was entirely destroyed by fire. 

In August, 1864, the spacious fancy box shop of H. H. Bragg 
was destroyed by fire and not rebuilt. 

October 3, 1869. There had been no rain of any consequence for 
nearly three months. Seven or eight inches of water fell October 3d 
and 4th, doing a great amount of damage, entirely destroying the mill 



50 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

of Arthur A. Trow and Daniel W. Trow in the southerly part of the 
town, also rendering the old turnpike road and several hillside roads 
impassable. Neighboring towns suffered more than Mont Vernon. 
The damage done in this town was between two and three thousand 
dollars. 

In July, 1879, the steam mill of Trask W. Averill, on the old 
tannery site, was burned. 

Sept. 5. 1881, occurred what has generally been known as the 
"Yellow Day." It grew very dark after the morning had passed, 
and the atmosphere had a brazen appearance. The Rev. C. C. Car- 
penter was then pastor of the church, and on that day attended a 
meeting of the Hollis Association of Ministers at New Ipswich. In 
writing about it to the Farmer's Cabinet, he says : ''The wonder of the 
day was the brazen sky above, the tinted world beneath, and the mid- 
day darkness, which compelled the lighting of lamps. The Association 
actually dined with two full-burning '•student" lamps on the table, at 
half-past one o'clock p. m., and it was not a light dinner even then." 
Whether the darkness was due to prevalent Ores in the woods, or 
some other cause, is not known. The darkness was reported over a 
considerable area. On the ponds and streams of New Hampshire 
and Massachusetts was found a yellow deposit, which some took for 
sulphur, and others said it was a substance like pollen, and came from 
certain trees, but it does not appear what trees would be in blossom 
and in a stage to supply pollen so late in the season. 

In the winter of 1880-1881 the stnge went "on runners" to Mil- 
ford 105 days, and on roads north of the village there was continuous 
sleighing for 120 days. 

November 27, 1881. The horsesheds were partially destroyed 
by fire, the old meeting-house and the parsonage narrowly escaping 
destruction. The horsesheds were rebuilt the next year. 

July 8, 1882. Telephonic communication established. There 
never was a telegraphic service, all messages having to be brought 
up from or sent to Milford. The telephone enabled the sending of 
messages to Milford, and thence by telegraph elsewhere. 

[October, 1905. Local telephones put in, there being about a 
dozen subscribers, affording facilities for communicating with other 
parts of the town, or with other towns, without rendering it necessary 
for those having telephones to go to the store which was the central 
"pay station." Before this the only telephones in the village were 
in the store and the Grand Hotel.] 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 51 

March 23, 1883. W. H. Conant's box-shop (standing where 
store now stands) and Peter F. Pike's house adjoining, burned. 
The box-shop was formerly Hollis's boot and shoe shop. 

October 27, 1883. William G. Bruce, aged 64, accidentally 
shot himself in taking his gun from his wagon, while on a hunting 
expedition in New Boston. 

October, 1883. T, H. Richardson's store, the only one then in 
the village, which stood at the junction of the old turnpike and the 
main street, in front of the Hotel Bellevue, and ta the corner of the 
village Park, was moved to the site of W. H. Conant's box-shop, 
where it now (1905) stands. 

October, 1883. The Park was graded by the Village Improve- 
ment Association. 

January 10, 1884. The Capt. Timothy Kittredge house, the 
old Kittredge homestead, (owned by Dr. Charles M. Kittredge), 
destroyed by fire. 

June 17, 1884. New school-house in the South District dedi- 
cated, with historical address by the Hon. Charles J. Smith, and a 
poem written by Mrs. Family Dodge Simpson of New York, daughter 
of Henry C. Dodge, and in girlhood a pupil of the school. 

June, 1884. Granite watering trough set up at the old well 
near the site of the store at northwest corner of the Park, the gift of 
C. Amory Stevens, of New York, son of Calvin Stevens, and grand- 
son of Asa Stevens. 

April 27, 1885. Woods Brothers, (John A. and Willard P.), 
sons of Walter Woods, both of whom were born in Paper Mill 
Village in New Boston, succeeded Thomas Haskell Richardson, in 
the village store. Mr. Richardson, who always was called by his 
second name, "Haskell" Richardson or by his initials, "T. H." Rich- 
ardson, began trade in a very small way in the old box-shop of 
Deacon William Con ant, which was situated on the other side of the 
street nearly opposite. He bought out J. E. Bruce, who traded at 
the store situated then near what is now the Park, about 1847, and 
remained in trade till this date after the store was moved to where it 
now stands. 

June 14, 1886. The Park was laid out with walks, trees were 
set out, and the Village Improvement Society determined to raise 
money to build a summer house on the Park, which was put up the 
next May. 

April 25, 1887. John M. Fox & Co. (the "Co." being the son 



52 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

William P.) bought out Woods Brothers (Johu aud Willard P.) 

Juue 15, 1888. The Dr. Dauiel Adams House struck by light- 
ning and burned. 

March 7, 1888. Dwelling house in south part of town, owued 
by Elmer E. Carlton destroyed by fire. 

April 16. Residence, baru and shed of Milton W. Wallace and 
Asa Carson, beiug the old Upton place on Beech Hill, destroyed by 
fire. 

April 7. Store of John M. Fox entered, and $100 worth of 
goods and $15 worth of po&tage stamps stolen. 

May. Village drain running from the bog hole in rear of the 
Tabitha Stevens residence across to Campbell hill, down through the 
Bragg field, and under the old Baker store, (then the old Hillsborough 
house) under the park, completed. This drain was made as a sani- 
tary measure, but it was never adequate, and the assessments levied 
as for betterments on account of it caused much dissatisfaction, and 
were never fully collected. 

June 29, 1889. Dr. Frederick Chandler assumed office of post- 
master. 

September, 1889. The three cottages on the hill where the 
Grand hotel was erected later on, then belonging respectively to 
Frank Marden, Mrs. Lauretta E. Phillips, and John A. Spalding of 
Nashua, in process of erection. 

October 1, 1889. Hotel Belle vue leased to Willard P. Woods, 
by George E. Boutell, the owner. 

Stage and mail route from Milford to Mont Vernon and North 
Lyndeboro purchased by Elmer E. Smith of Hillsboro. Mr. Smith 
also bought out Mr. Walter Woods, who had been proprietor of the 
stage line for 17 years. 

The Dr. J. K. Smith house, next to the old Baker store, pur- 
chased by Elbridge F. Trow, and occupied by John M. Fox. 

August, 1890. Dr. F. Chandler resigned as postmaster, and 
sold his real estate to John M. Fox. It was the house next south of 
the Bellevue, and is now occupied by Mr. Fox, although from 1900 to 
1904 Mr. Fox resided and conducted a grocery business in Roches- 
ter, N. H. He returned to Mont Vernon in 1904. 

December, 1890. Elmer E. Smith sold out his mail route con- 
tract and stage line to Willard P. Woods. 

June 17, 1892. Barn on the William G. Bruce place struck by 
lightning aud entirely consumed. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 53 

April 13. O. W. Battles sold bis farm and removed to Sequa- 
chee, Tenn. 

Alouzo Winn sold his farm and removed to Wiltcn. 

September, 1892. "William E. Robinson harvested 1000 baskets 
of peaches from his orchard of 300 trees. 

Alonzo Travis' cottage and barn sold to Dea. William H. Conant. 
This cottage stood on the main village street, next above the 
McCollom Institute. It was moved back, facing the road across 
from the main street to the old turnpike, and a fine new house was 
erected on its former site, which up to this time (1905) has been oc- 
cupied by W. H. Conant and his family. 

December 31. W. F. Pinkham presented a piano to Prospect 
Grange (Patrons of Husbandry) and to the Congregational Society 
for their joint use. 

January 20, 1903. Mont Vernon post-office made a money- 
order office. 

September 15, 1893. TV. P. Woods sold stage route to Herbert 
C. Dickey, of Manchester. 

May 13, 1896. A supplemental grading-.bee for new church 
ground. 

May 15, 1896. Conant Hall destroyed by fire — cause unknown. 
It burned about 9 o'clock p. m. 



CHAPTER VI. 



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. 

List of Ministers — List of Deacon — Ministers Called but who 
Did not Come — Sketches of the Eighteen Ministers who 
Served — First Pastor, Rev. John Bruce — Revival— Second 
Pastor, Rev. Stephen Chapin — Resignation of Mr. Ciiapin — 
Salary of Mr. Chapin — Opposition to a Baptist Meeting — 
Third Pastor, Rev. Ebenezee Cheever — Fourth Pastor, 
Rev. Nathaniel Kingsbury — Revival Days —Temperance Re- 
form — Fifth Pastor, Rev. Edwin Jennison — Confession of 
Faith — Removal of Church Edifice — The Slavery Question 
— Retirement of Rev. Mr. Jennison — Sixth Pastor, Rev. 
Bezaleel Smith — Seventh Pastor, Rev. Charles D. Herbert 
— Eighth Pastor,' Rev. Charles E. Lord — Ninth Pastor, 
Rev. George E. Sanborne — Attitude of Mont Vernon Cler- 
gymen in Civil War — Tenth Pastor, Rev. Benson M. Frink 
— Erection of Parsonage — Eleventh Pastor, Rev. Seth H. 
Keeler, D.D. — Twelfth Pastor, Rev. William H. Wood- 
well — Thirteenth Pastor, Rev. Charles C. Carpenter — 
Fourteenth Pastor, Rev. Richard H. McGown — Fifteenth 
Pastor, Rev. John Thorpe — Sixteenth Pastor, Rev. Thomas 
J. Lewis — Seventeenth Pastor, Rev. Donald Browne — 
Eighteenth Pastor, Rev. Henry Porter Pe< k. 

THE troubles and dissensions which the people of the Northwest 
Parish, now the town of Mont Vernon, had with the Amherst church, 
which led to the formation of a new religious society, and subsequent- 
ly to the erection of a new town, have been described in the chapters 
on "Early History and Early Settlers" and '"Conditions Preliminary 
to Separation From the Parent Town," as has also the early ecclesias- 
tical history of the only church in Mont Vernon. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 55 

LIST OF MINISTERS. 

The following is a list of ministers who have preached for any 
length of time in Mont Vernon since the organization of the church 
in 1780. There having been but the one church organization, it is a 
simple matter. to make a record of its pastors, and it is clear, all the 
way through this history, that whenever the church is referred to, the 
First (and only) Congregational church of Mont Vernon is meant. 

From the organization of the church in 1780, to 1782, there ap- 
parently was not a "stated supply" for the pulpit. August 29, 1782, 
a "Mr. Powers" was invited to supply for a year. 

In 1783 a "Mr. Allen" is said to have been called to supply for 
a year. Then a Mr. Samuel Sargent was invited to settle, but 
declined. 

After this came the following succession of ministers, all of them 
supposedly having been duly "settled" over the parish by ordination 
or installation, clown to Rev. Dr. Keeler's time. Since then Rev. 
Mr. Carpenter and Rev. Mr. McGown are the only ones who were 
installed. 

Rev. John Bruce began preaching in 1784, was ordained Nov. 
3, 1785, and died while in service, March 12, 1809, aged 51. 

Rev. Stephen Chapin, D.D., installed Xov. 15, 1809; dismissed, 
at his own request, Nov. 18, 1818. 

Rev. Ebenezer Cheever, ordained Dec. 8, 1819 ; dismissed April 
8, 1823. 

Rev. Nathaniel Kingsbury, ordained Nov. 8, 1823; dismissed 
April G, 183G; died July 12, 1843, aged 49. 

Rev. Edwin Jennison, installed April 6, 1836; dismissed Aug. 
19, 1841 (on account of ill health) ; died at Conway, Mass., Dec. 25, 
1887. 

Rev. Bezaleel Smith, installed Aug. 19, 1841 ; dismissed April 
30, 1850; died at Randolph, Vt., May 15, 1879. 

Rev. Charles D. Herbert began preaching July 5, 1850 ; in- 
stalled Nov. 6, 1850; dismissed July 21, 1856; died at Hebron, N. 
Y., Oct. 13, 1893, aged 75. 

Rev. Chas. E. Lord began preaching Oct. 1, 1856; installed 
Feb. 4, 1857 ; dismissed April 2, 1861 ; died at Newburyport, Mass., 
Feb. 19, 1902, aged 90. 

Rev. George E. Sanborne, installed April 2, 1862; dismissed 
May 29, 1865; died at Hartford, Conn., Jan. 7, 1900. 



56 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Rev. Benson M. Frink, installed Nov. 1, 1865; dismissed Nov. 
1, 1867. Living (June, 1905) at West Brookfield, Mass., but not 
settled in any pastorate. 

Rev. Seth H. Keeler, D.D., began preaching Jan. 9, 1868; dis- 
missed Sept. 24, 1875; died at Somerville, Mass., Dec. 26, 1896, 
aged 86. 

Rev. Wm. H. Woodwell, began preaching Nov. 1 , 1875 ; closed 
his sendee March 28, 1880. Now (June, 1905) living at Seabrook, 
N. H. 

Rev. Charles C. Carpenter, began preaching Nov. 1, 1880; in- 
stalled July 12, 1881 ; dismissed Sept. 19, 1885. Now (June, 1905) 
living at Andover, Mass. 

Rev. Richard H. McOown. began preaching Jan. 10, 1886 ; in- 
stalled June 23, 1886; dismissed Feb. 28, 1888. Died at Everett, 
Mass., April 1, 1900. 

Rev. John Thorpe preached for the first time April 15, 1888 ; 
May 18, same year, accepted engagement to preach as supply ; and 
served till Sept. 1, 1894. Now (June, 1905) pastor of Congrega- 
tional church at Center Harbor, N. H. 

Rev. Thomas J. Lewis began preaching as supply Nov. 11, 1894 ; 
and closed his labors at Mont Vernon Dec. 5, 1897. Now (June, 
1905) pastor of the Congregational church at Conway, N. H. 

Rev. Donald Browne began preaching in November, 1898, and 
ceased service in November, 1900. Now (June 1905) he is serving 
as rector of an Episcopal church at South Groveland, Mass. 

Rev. Henry Porter Peck assumed the duties of pastor Jan. 1, 
1901, and still continues (June, 1905). 

DEACONS. 

It seems to be impossible to secure the full details as to the dates 
of appointment and terms of service of all those who have been dea- 
cons of the church at Mont Vernon. It is probable that the following 
list comprises all who have been deacons, however, and the dates of 
appointment are nearly all given, but only a part of the dates of res- 
ignation or death. Doubtless most of the deacons served as long as 
they lived, the office having a life teuure. The following names are 
taken from a list published in the Mont Vernon Annual Church and 
Town Record for 1891 : 

Between 1780 and 1795, Oliver Carlton, Nathaniel Heywood, 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 57 

and Richard Ward are supposed to have been the deacons. From 
that time on, the appointments are on record: 

Appointed March 28, 1794, John Carlton, Ezekiel Upton, Daniel 
Smith. 

Appointed October, 1800, John Carlton, Jacob Kendall. 

Appointed May 27, 1817, Jonathan S. Adams. 

Appointed April 27, 1820, John Bruce; died Jan. 19, 1872, 
aged 83. 

Appointed April, 1829, Josiah Kittredge 2d. 

Appointed Aug. 31, 1832, William Conant; resigned Aug 15, 
1875; died at Somerville, Mass., Feb. 20, 1890. 

Appointed Nov. 10, 1836, Joseph A. Starrett; resigned March, 
1858 ; died May 22, 1895, aged 89 years, 9 months. 

Appointed April 4, 1858, Geo. E. Dean. Died Feb. 26, 1891. 

Appointed Aug. 22, 1875, William H. Conant; died May 19, 
1903. 

Appointed May 2, 1889, Geo. G. Batchelder; died Jan. 8, 1896. 

Appointed October 29, 1891, Maj. Charles F. Stinson and Wil- 
liam H. Kendall. Major Stinson died March 10, 1893, aged 52 
years, 5 months. Deacon Kendall is still serving (1905). 

Appointed April, 1899, Jay M. Gleason; still serving (1905). 

SKETCHES OF THE MINISTERS. 

Concerning the temporary ministers, who preceded, or were 
asked to precede, Rev. Mr. Bruce, the following facts are furnished 
by the Rev. C. C. Carpenter : 

"Mr. Powers, who was called to supply for the year 1782, was 
doubtless Rev. Peter Powers, son of Capt. Peter Powers, first settler 
of Hollis ; was born in old Dunstable, Nov. 29, 1729, and came to 
the Holhs part of Dunstable in 1730 ; graduated at Harvard in 1754, 
the first college graduate from Hollis. In 1764 was settled in Haver- 
hill, N. H., and Newbury, Vt., on opposite sides of the Connecticut. 
The towns were opposite in sentiment, as in location, and didn't agree 
iu politics. Powers was a "'high whig," and was persona non grata 
to the Newbury folk; removed to Haverhill iu 1781, in spring. Con- 
tinued to preach a year or two, and dismissed sometime in 1782. 
He soon after settled in Deer Isle, Maine. I find no hint of his 
going to Mont Vernon, but it is very probable that he would have 
been the likely man to be called at just that time, because he was just 



58 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

getting through at Newbury and Haverhill, and because as a Hollis 
man he would be well known in Amherst. I do not understand that 
he actually preached in Mont Vernon, only was asked to do so." 

"The Mr. Allen of the 1783 call, was presumably Ebenezer Allen, 
born in Martha's Vineyard in 1746, graduated from Harvard in 1771. 
He was settled in Wolfeboro in 1792. When he came there he had 
recommendations from ministers in Andover, Haverhill, Plaistow, 
Stratham, etc., showing that he was known all about, and was per- 
haps seeking a parish in New Hampshire about those days." 

"I find no Samuel Sargent to answer the demand of the '83 man 
at all, which is singular, as it is a familiar New Hampshire name, 
although not perhaps in the ministerial line." 

The First Pastor was the Rev. John Bruce, who ministered to 
Mont Vernon church from 1784 until his sudden death of apoplexy 
March 12, 1809. He was born in Marlborough, Massachusetts, Au- 
gust 31, 1757, and graduated at Dartmouth College in 1781. 

The following is an interesting extract from the records of the 
Second Parish of Amherst : 

Second Parish of Amherst, N. H., Dec. 29, 1784. 

At a legal meeting-, duly warned, voted to concur with the Church 
in giving' Mr. John Bruce a call to settle in the gospell ministry in this 
Parish. 

Voted to give him one hundred and twenty pounds Incouragement 
as settlement. 

Voted to give Mr. Bruce sixty Pounds sallery and twenty cord of 
wood annually, as long as he carry's on the gospel ministry in this 
place, and if in case he should be disinabled to carry on the work of 
minister by Infirmness of Body or old age, to give him thirtj- pounds, 
and twenty cords of wood annually as long as he remains our Minister. 

Of the first ten and last eight years of his pastorate there are no 
church records. A list of the members of the church, in Mr. Bruce's 
hand-writing, about 1798, makes its membership one hundred and 
ten. The next fifty were added by profession. This revival was the 
first known in this section, and it awakened much interest far and 
near. 

In 1809 there were printed by Richard Boylston (Farmers' Cab- 
inet Press), Amherst, in a small pamphlet, a copy of which is extant, 
two sermons preached at Mont Vernon by the Rev. Stephen Chapin, 
Mr. Bruce's successor, the second Sabbath after his installation, Nov. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 59 

26, 1809, from the text, "Now then we are ambassadors for Christ, 
as though God did beseech you by us, we pray you iu Christ's stead 
be ye reconciled to God." The title page bears the subject, "On the 
duties of an ambassador of Christ," and ''Published by desire." 
Doubtless one sermon was preached in the forenoon and the other in 
the afternoon. 

In the same pamphlet appears a considerable sketch "On the 
Life and Character of the Rev. John Bruce, by A Parishioner," from 
which the following is condensed : 

The Rev. John Bruce was born in Maryborough. Massachusetts, 
August 31, 1757, of respectable and pious parents. He lost his 
mother at the age of seven. His father was a farmer. He fitted for 
college in some school not named in the sketch, and entered Dart- 
mouth College in 1777, and graduated in 1781, and "by his teachable 
disposition, gentleness of manners, mild, serious and dutiful behavior 
in all respects, he obtained, it is said from the highest authority of the 
college, the distinguishing appellation of 'the good Mr. Bruce.'" He 
afterwards received from his alma mater the degree of M. A. Soon 
after leaving college he began the study of divinity, and in due time 
was licensed to preach. After preaching on probation for several 
years in various places, ami a sufficient time in the Second Parish of 
Amherst, New Hampshire', now Mont Vernon, he received and ac- 
cepted a call to the pastoral care of the church and congregation in 
that place, ami was ordained Nov. 3. 1785. On the 15th of December 
following he married Lois Wilkins of Maryborough, whom he left 
a widowed mother of six children. He continued with faithfulness 
to fulfil the various duties of his sacred office, from the time of his 
ordination till his death, a period of twenty-three years and four 
months. 

"His constitution was not firm and robust, being probably 
enervated by stud}' and a sedentary life, although his stature was 
considerably above the middle size, well proportioned, and of an ath- 
letic appearance. For several years before his death, his health 
sensibty decayed, and for more than one year he was affiicted with 
almost a total blindness of one eye, which necessitated him to extem- 
porize in his public discourses, instead of using notes, which had been 
his custom. On Saturday morning, March 11, 1809, he arose early, 
as was his usual practice, and complained of a slight headache, which 
however, he mentioned but once, and appeared as usual till he sat 
down to breakfast. He had taken but little food ; when he was 
suddenly attacked with a Hemiplegia, or palsy of the right side, 
accompanied with an entire loss of reason and alarming symptoms of 
apoplexy. Medical aid Avas immediately called in, but in vain. The 
lethargic and apoplectic symptoms, in defiance to every exertion to 
procure relief, continued to grow more profound, and to assume a 
more threatening aspect, till nearly three o'clock on Sunday morning, 



60 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

when he slept the sleep of death. Thus ended the life of this excellent 
man ; thus sudden and unexpected, though insensible to the pangs of 
dissolving nature, was his transit to eternity. 

"He was meek, pious and humble; kind, gentle, and easy to be 
entreated He 'became all things to all men, that if possible he might 
gain some;' while at the same time he steadfastly adhered to 'the 
faith once delivered to the saints.' He possessed in an eminent de- 
gree that charity which 'suffereth long and is kind,' which 'beareth all 
things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things.' 
But the most distinguishing traits in his character, next to his love of 
piety and religion, were prudence and a peaceable disposition. He 
was prudent and discreet in all things, and eminently entitled to the 
appellation of a peace-maker. These virtues were so conspicuously 
displayed by him, that he had not a personal enemy in the world, but 
all who knew esteemed and revered him. As a husband he was 
faithful, affectionate, tender, and sincere. As a parent he was kind, 
indulgent, and anxiously solicitous for the temporal, but chiefly for 
the eternal, well-being of his children. As a neighbor he was friendly 
and hospitable ; as a citizen patriotic, and friendly ; as a man, in all 
respects, a true and sincere christian." 

The sons, John, James, William and Nathaniel, were heads of 
families, all worthy citizens, and lifelong residents of Mont Vernon. 
Their united ages at their decease were three hundred and twenty-two 
years. 

The Second Pastor was the Rev. Stephen Chapin, who on the 
decease of Mr. Bruce, immediately received a call from this church, 
but was not installed until November 15, 1809. Born at Milford, 
Massachusetts, in 1788, a graduate of Harvard in 1804, a pupil in 
divinity with the famous Dr. Nathaniel Emmons, of Franklin, 
Massachusetts, his first settlement was in the neighboring town 
of Hillsborough, four years, from 1805 to 1809. Mr. Chapin was 
a man of positive conviction, and bold, unadorned, and uncom- 
promising in his style of preaching. His earnest, able preach- 
ing, and stringent discipline made a deep impression upon his 
people. During a pastorate of nine years one hundred and fifteen 
were added to the church. On one Sabbath in 1817, fifty-oue con- 
verts were received into fellowship. While all hearts were completely 
united in him, the day of separation came from a quarter least 
expected. In October, 1818, the pastor suddenly announced a change 
in his views respecting the mode and subjects of baptism. He was 
a man sincere and true, and conscientiously embraced Calvinistic 
Baptist views. He at once resigned his pastorate here, and was dis- 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 61 

missed in November, 1818. After a three years' pastorate as a 
Baptist clergyman at North Yarmouth, Maine, he was, in 1822, called 
to a professorship at Waterville College, Maine, and thence to the 
presidency of Columbia College at Washington, D. C, which he 
occupied for many years. The salary of Mr. Chapin was stipulated 
at four hundred dollars per annum, and if, from any cause, he was 
unable to preach, no abatement, unless such absence exceeded six 
weeks. 

Relative to the great revival of 1817, the Farmers' Cabinet of 
Oct. 25, 1817, had an editorial commenting on a meeting held on the 
previous Thursday, at which fifty-one persons came forward for ad- 
mission to the church, the fruits of the revival which had been going 
on the past summer. "We have," said the editor, "seldom witnessed 
a scene more solemn and interesting." 

About 1821 a Baptist meeting was appointed at the red school- 
house in the Center District. This would have a divisive tendency. 
One morning Dea. John Carlton, a staunch Congregationalist, whose 
self-appointed function was to protect the fold from intrusion, was 
heard, before the regular church meeting commenced, haranguing a 
company of his brethren in front of the old yellow church in this wise : 
"If so be that our minister preaches the gospel, we have the gospel. 
If so be he preaches not the gospel, we want not the gospel." 

The Third Pastor, called after an interval of a little more than 
a year from Mr. Chapin's dismissal, was the Rev. Ebenezer Cheever, 
a native of Reading, Vermont, a graduate of Bowdoin College. He 
was ordained December 8, 1819. He continued pastor till April 8, 
1823, with an addition to the church in the meantime of twenty-two 
members. He baptized thirty-nine children in less than three years. 
In the spring of 1820 the first Sabbath School was organized here, 
being held in the school- house and composed exclusively of children. 

The Fourth Pastor was the Rev. Nathaniel Kingsbury, from 
Connecticut, and a graduate of Amherst College, who commenced his 
labors two weeks after Mr. Cheever's dismissal. He was ordained 
November 8, 1823, and dismissed April 6, 1836. The following 
were the exercises at his ordination : Ordaining Prayer, Rev. E. P. 
Bradford, New Boston ; Sermon, Rev. Chancy Booth, of Coventry, 
Connecticut; Consecrating Prayer, Rev. Moses Bradford, Frances- 
town ; Charge, Rev. Humphrey Moore, Milford ; Fellowship of 



62 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Churches, Rev. N. Merrill, Lyndeborough ; Address to Congrega- 
tion, Rev. E. P. Bradford, New Boston ; Concluding Prayer, Rev. 
Nathan Lord, Amherst. Hon. C. Claggett, of Amherst, and Sol K. 
Livermore, of Milford, were members of the ordaining council. 

Mr. Kingsbury removed West and died some years since in Wis- 
consin. He was not a man of marked ability, but his ministry here 
was prosperous, and during it one huudred and fifty-four were received 
into the church. Two periods of peculiar interest occurred, the 
former in 1828, when thirty-four were added, the latter in 1831, when 
nearly sixty united by profession. 

These were revival days when the ministers aided each other in 
what were called "protracted meetings," which were often seasons of 
thrilling interest and great power. Never before nor since, has tbis 
church been the scene of such religious activity, scenes still living 
vividly in the remembrance of some among us. 

It was in 1830, during Mr. Kingsbury's pastorate, that the tem- 
perance reform began in the church, and was vigorously and steadily 
prosecuted outside until it expelled liquors from the town. The youth 
of the present day can hardly imagine the condition of this small 
community, with eight tavern licenses signed in a single year. In 
some places they sold a hogshead of liquor a month : and though but 
a small portion of this quantity was dispensed to residents, it was 
enough to alarm the thoughtful and virtuous. At that period two 
public roads led northward, through different sections of the town. 
They were thoroughfares thronged with light and heavy travel. At 
all hours of the day lines of canvas-covered six-horse merchandise 
wagons might be seen bearing their heavy freight from and to the 
seaboard. To modify and control public opinion was no easy matter, 
work which required strong heads and true hands. Dr. Daniel Adams 
may be named as one early prominent in this movement of philan- 
thropy. He delivered convincing and effective addresses on this 
subject in this and other towns. 

The Fifth Pastor, Rev. Edwin Jennison, was born in Wal- 
pole, N. H., August 26, 1805, being the son of Maj. William and 
Phebe (Field) Jennison. He fitted for college at Alstead, N. H., 
and Windsor, Vt., and graduated at Dartmouth College in 1827 ; and 
at Andover, (Mass.), Theological Seminary in 1830. August 16, 
1831, he was ordained pastor of the Congregational church in his 
native town, and was dismissed therefrom March 18, 1835. He was 



HISTORY OF MO XT VERNON. 63 

called to the church at Mont Vernon to succeed the Rev. Nathaniel 
Kingsbury, and was installed April 6, 1836. The installing prayer 
was by the Rev. A. Burgess, Hancock ; the sermon by Rev. Nathan- 
iel Kingsbury, the retiring pastor, who also delivered the address to 
the church and society. The charge and concluding prayer were by 
the Rev. E. P. Bradford of New Boston ; and the fellowship of the 
churches, by the Rev. William Richardson of Lyndeboro. He was 
dismissed on account of ill health, August 19, 1841. After recruit- 
ing his health, and visiting England and Scotland, he was called to 
the church in Ashburnham, Mass., where he was installed May 12, 
1842, from which pastorate he was dismissed in 1846. He then ac- 
cepted a call to Hopkiuton, N. H., where he was installed June 6, 
1847, and dismissed June 6, 1849. He preached in Alstead in 1850- 
2, aud in Langdon, 1852-4. His health became so much impaired 
that he was compelled to abandon the active ministry, and in 1860 
retired to a small farm in Winchester, N. H., whence, in 1880, he 
removed to Conway, Mass., to be, with his wife, under the more 
immediate care of their children. 

Mr. Jennison was married in Ipswich, Mass., January 25, 1832, 
to Miss Mary Barker Shannon, daughter of Dr. Richard Cutts and 
Mary (Tebbetts) Shannon, of Saco, Me. They had four children — 
Edwin Shannon, born at Walpole, December 13, 1832; William 
Cutts, born at Mont Vernon, May 29, 1837; Mary Theresa, born at 
Mont Vernon, April 4, 1840 ; and Helen Maria, born at Ashburnham, 
November 23, 1844. The second and third of these children died 
and were buried while Mr. Jennison was in England. Mrs. Jennison 
died November 22, 1885 ; and Mr. Jennison, December 25, 1887, at 
the ripe old age of 82 years and 4 months. 

It was during his pastorate that the following Church Covenant 
was adopted, at a church meeting held September 21, 1837 : 

CONFESSION OF FAITH. 

You believe, — 1st, That there is one God and but one, who is the 
Creator, Preserver, and Governor of the Universe, and who possesses 
every natural and moral perfection. 

2nd, That the Bible was written by holy men, as they were moved 
by the Holy Spirit, and is a perfect rule of faith and practice. 

3d, That God exists in three persons — the Father, the Son and the 
Holy Spirit, and these three are one God, the same in essence and equal 
in ever\ r divine perfection. 

4th, That God has made all thing's for himself, and that known 
unto him are all his works from the beginning': that he governs and 
controls all things, creatures and events, according to the council of his 



64 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

own will; and that the administration of his government is perfectly 
holy, just and good. 

5th, That God created Adam perfectly holy, and constituted him the 
representative of all his posterity, suspending their moral character 
upon his probationary conduct. 

6th, That in consequence of the fall of Adam all mankind are by 
nature entirely sinful and deserve to be punished with eternal death. 

7th, That the Lord Jesus Christ, who is God and man, has by His 
death on the cross, made an atonement for the sins of the whole world. 

8th, That through the atonement, salvation is freely offered to sin- 
ners, in the Gospel: Yet they all naturally reject this gracious offer, 
and refuse to come to Christ that they may have eternal life. 

9th, That God in the covenant of redemption chose all who ever 
obtain salvation by Christ in him from before the foundation of the 
world, and from eternity predestined them to be holy heirs of eternal 
glory. 

10th, That the Holy Spirit, by an act of special grace, renews the 
heart of all the elect, and causes them in the present life to accept the 
salvation of the Gospel. 

11th, That the foundation of the forgiveness of believers is the atone- 
ment of Christ; in this atonement they become interested by true faith 
alone. Yet God will reward them for all their holy services. 

12th, That God promises to preserve all who have been renewed in 
the spirit and temper of their minds from final apostacj', and conduct 
them through the sanctification of the spirit and belief of the truth into 
the Kingdom of Glory. 

13th, That none but those who really and truly love the Lord Jesus 
Christ ought to partake of the Lord's Supper; every church ought to re- 
quire a profession of love to the Redeemer, of all whom they admit to 
their communion. 

14th, That adult believers who have not been baptized are subjects 
of baptism, and the children of professing believers. 

15th, That God has appointed a day in which he will judge the 
world in righteousness by Jesus Christ, who will then receive the right- 
eous to endless happiness, and the wicked to everlasting punishment. 

A true record: J. Bruce, Secretary. 

It was also during Mr. Jermison's pastorate in 1837, that the 
meeting-house was removed from the easterly to the westerly side of 
the street, and remodeled and furnished with a belfry, bell and 
organ, an account of which is given elsewhere. Mr. Jennison occu- 
pied, during his residence in Mont Vernon, the house opposite the 
entrance to the cemetery, now known as " Elm Cottage." His salary 
was 8500. Dr. Daniel Adams led the choir in those days. The 
deacons were John Bruce, William Conant and Joseph A. Starrett. 
During his pastorate twenty-three persons were admitted to the 
church. It is said of him that as a sermonizer he excelled, but as 
pastor he did very little visiting. During his pastorate the slavery 
question somewhat agitated the church and disturbed its peace. A 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 65 

very good portrait appears of him elsewhere, made from a daguerreo- 
type, furnished by a daughter, Mrs. Chelsea Cook of Conway, Mass. 

The Sixth Pastor was the Rev. Bezaleel Smith, a native of 
Randolph, Vt., a farmer's boy, whose parents were John and Sarah 
(Lawrence) Smith, who were married in Lexington, Mass., Nov. 15, 
1781, and removed to Randolph, Vt., about 1790. They had nine 
children — four sons and five daughters. The father was in the bat- 
tie of Lexington. Bezaleel was born April 2, 1797, and was named 
for his maternal grand-father, Bezaleel Lawrence. 

He was born and grew up as most New England farmers' boys 
do, fitting for college at Randolph, and graduating at Dartmouth 
with the class of 1825. 

He became a Christian when nineteen years of age. His con- 
version was of the rugged sort of those days, and the struggle through 
which he passed stamped his character with earnestness and fervor, 
that permeated his subsequent religious life. Writing of this in later 
years, he says, " Returning from a meeting on a certain Sabbath, I 
took up my Bible to read, when I felt a rising opposition in my mind 
to what I read. My heart was tilled with hate and blasphemy. It 
went out in opposition to Christ, and to whatever was in His praise." 
This hostility continued for several weeks, but terminated by the 
complete surrender of himself to Christ, whom he ever after delighted 
to love and honor, as his rightful Master. 

Mr. Smith soon decided to prepare for the ministry, anticipating 
with great delight, that his business would be to meditate upon the 
truths of the Bible and lead others to this enjoyment. His college 
life was marked by a high standard of religious thought and life. 
On graduating, he taught in the Academy at Hampton, N. H. One 
of his pupils was Eliza Esther Morrison, daughter of John B. Morri- 
son, a merchant of that place. Shortly after Mr. Smith's first 
settlement in the ministry, that pupil became his wife. She died at 
Mont Vernon, where she was laid to rest in the village cemetery, 
mourned by a large circle of devoted friends. Eight children were 
b ru to them. He married for a second wife Mrs. Laura S. Brown, 
daughter of Belcher Salisbury of Randolph, who died in 1896. 

After teaching for a time at Hampton, Mr. Smith returned to 
Hanover to study theology under President Tyler. A written sermon, 
forenoon and afternoon was then required. The writer of this sketch 
remembers his father telling him, that when he handed President 



66 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Tyler his second sermon, after it had been duly criticised, the presi- 
dent said, " Now you can preach all day." 

Mr. Smith received his licei se from the Harmony Association at 
Plymouth, N. H., November 14, 1827. He preached at different 
places, until the spring of 1829, when he was ordained and installed 
over the church at Rye, N. H., as associate pastor, with Rev. Hunt- 
ington Porter. From Rye he went to Mont Vernon in 1841, where 
he was installed August 19 of that year. 

The exercises were as follows: — Invocation and Reading, Rev. 
John Haven, Stoneham, Mass. ; Introductory Prayer and Right Hand 
of Fellowship, Rev. Austin Richards, Nashua; Sermon and Installing 
Prayer, Rev. Jonathan French, North Hampton, N. H. ; Charge to 
the Pastor, Rev. E. P. Bradford, New Boston ; Addresses to the 
People and Concluding Prayer, Rev. H. Moore, Milford. 

He remained in this pastorate nine years, being dismissed April 
30, 1850. 

He was a sound but not brilliant preacher ; cautious and discreet, 
a pastor who made no enemies Slaveholders were by vote excluded 
from church fellowship and from the Lord's table, and thirty-two 
persons were added to the church duriug his pastorate. He removed 
from here to Roxbury, N. H., and laboring there two years was 
called to the pastorate of the church in New Alstead, N. H., aud 
thence to the church in Hanover Centre, N. H , in 1861, where he 
remained for ten years. His final ministry was at West Hartford, 
Vt., from which church he retired as an active minister, December, 
1877. 

The last days were passed in his native town. During his half- 
century in the ministry, there were only five Sundays when he did 
not preach; twice only, when he was detained from the pulpit by 
illness. A brother minister said, at the time of his death, "The 
elements of character which combined to make him a success in the 
ministry were, energy of purpose, a ready acquiescence in the call of 
duty, self-devotion to all the interests of the church, generosity in 
his religious sympathies, and the retention of a youthful spirit." He 
died in Randolph, Vt., May 15, 1894. 

The following interesting paragraph concerning Mr. Smith is 
from the Congregationalist in December, 1877, from the pen of the 
late Rev. Lewis Grout, of Brattleboro, Vt, : 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. (57 

A LIVE MAN. 

" Here is a young man for you; not that he is wanting" a call or 
waiting for a parish. He could not be, spared from the parish he 
now occupies and serves — West Hartford, Vt. He has been here a 
a little more than five years, and in that time has seen the resident 
membership of his church more than doubled by the addition of more 
than forty to their number. He will be only eighty years old next 
April, and has been in the ministry as yet only fifty years. Yester- 
day (Dec. 10) was one of the coldest of wintry days. On the day 
previous a foot of snow fell, and the wind blew furiously all day 
Saturday and all night, putting the snow in piles, putting the railroad 
trains from three to six hours behind time even with engines doubled. 
And yet, with the mercury below zero, our octogenarian, the Rev. 
Bezaleel Smith, for such is his name, started out Sabbath morning 
with his own team, to drive to a neighboring parish, six miles away, 
to honor an appointment for an exchange of pulpits, and reached 
there just in time to astonish his stalwart brother of thirty-five and 
inspire him with courage to start out and meet his part of the engage- 
ment. Let the men of years take heart and woik on, and let the 
young men see to it that they are not outdone by the fathers.'' 

The Seventh Pastor, the Rev. Charles D. Herbert, youngest 
son of Hon. George Herbert, of Ellsworth, Me., was born at that 
place, September 18, 1818; graduated at Bowdoin College in 1841; 
and three years later at Bangor Theological Seminary. He was 
immediately ordained, and went as a home missionary to the West. 
After several years on the frontier in this service, he returned to 
New England. He commenced preaching in Mont Vernon, July 5, 
1850, and was installed pastor, November 6, 1850, the exercises 
being as follows : Invocation and Reading of Scriptures, Rev. W. 
G. Tuttle, Littleton, Mass, ; Reading First Hymn, Rev. D. Goodwin. 
Brookline; First Prayer, Rev. L. Swain, Nashua; Second Hymn 
and Sermon, Rev. J. Maltby, Bangor; Installing Prayer, Rev. J. 
Willey, Goffstown ; Charge to Pastor, Rev. J. G. Davis, Amherst; 
Fellowship, Rev. K. B. Claggett, Lyndeborough ; Address to the 
People, Rev. E. N. Hidden, Milford; Concluding Prayer, Rev. Mr. 
Kellogg, New Boston. 

Coming here young and enthusiastic Mr. Herbert devoted him- 
self with singleness of aim and Christian zeal to his work. His 
labors here exhibited him as a kiud, sympathetic and sincere friend, 
and an earnest and consecrated man. Under his ministry in 1851 
and 1852, quite a number of young people in the academy and 'out- 
side attained the Christian hope. The whole number added to the 



68 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

church during his ministry was fifty-five. lie closed his labors here 
early in 1856, and was soon after settled over a church in West 
Newbury, Mass. After a ministry there of many years, he qualified 
himself for the practice of medicine, and labored in Rutland, Mass., 
some years, both preaching and practising Some years since he 
was recalled to his former parish at West Newbury, bath preaching 
and practising medicine there. In 1887 he became pastor of the 
Presbyterian Church in Hebron, N. Y., which he resigned on account 
of ill health. He was then much prostrated by an attack of la grippe, 
and continued to decline slowly but steadily, to a peaceful and pain- 
less end, October 13, 1893. The burial was at Mt. Auburn, Mass., 
October 17, 1893. 

The Eighth Pastor was the Rev. Charles E. Lord, who having 
commenced preaching October 1, 1856, was installed February 4, 
1857, the exercises being as follows: Scribe, Rev. J. G. Davis, 
Amherst; Reading Scripture and Opening Prayer, Rev. Lothrop 
Taylor, Francestown ; Sermon, Rev. Dr. J. P. Cleveland, Appleton 
Street Church, Lowell, Mass.; Ins' a ling Prayer, Rev. E. B. Clag- 
gett, Lyndeborough ; Fellowship, Rev. E. N. Hidden, Milford ; 
Address to the People, Rev. E. C. Cogswell, New Boston. 

Mr. Lord was dismissed April 2, 1861. He was born in Ports- 
mouth, N. H., February 11, 1817, the son of John Perkins Lord, a 
brother of the famous historical writer, Rev. John Lord, and a 
nephew of the still more famous educator and theologian, Rev. 
Nathan Lord, D. D., for thirty years President of Dartmouth 
College. The subject of this sketch fitted for college in South 
Berwick, Me., to which town his parents removed in his early child- 
hood. He also studied at Phillips Academy at Aiidover, Mass., and 
graduated at Dartmouth College with the class of 1838. He taught 
in the South Berwick, Me., Academy for a year, and for two years 
had charge of an academy at Kingston, X. C. He studied theology 
at Union Theological Seminary, New York, and was at the Theologi- 
cal school at New Haven for two years, and studied one year at 
Auburn, X. H. He was ordained to the ministry at Jonesville, Ind., 
May 8, 1<S44. In 1845 he preached at Marshall, .Mich. November 
17, 1846, he was installed as pastor of a Presbyterian church at 
Niles, Mich., being dismissed therefrom in 1849. He was one year 
with the Presbyterian church at Evausville, Ind., and subsequently 
preached at Mont Vernon, Chester, Vt., 1865-1869, Beverly, New 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 69 

Jersey, 1869, 1870, North Eastern Mass., Pelham, N. Y., and from 
1888 till his death conducted a mission under the name of Hope 
Chapel at Salisbury Beach, near Newburyport, where he resided. 
He received his degree of D. D., from East Tennessee Wesleyan 
University in 1873. 

Dr. Lord was a voluminous writer on theological and ethical 
topics. He was an ardent abolitionist and a warm patriot. At the 
breaking out of the Civil War he preached two war sermons at Mont 
Vernon (April 28, 1861) which were published. The text of Ms 
morning sermon was " Speak unto the children of Israel that they go 
forward." Exodus, XIV: 12. The afternoon text was, "And he 
that hath no sword, let him sell his garment and buy one." Luke 
XXII : 36. The two discourses well fitted the strenuous texts. 

The Congregational Year-Book for 1903, in a sketch of his 
career makes the following mention of his teaching and other service, 
and published works : 

"Made a member of the Society of Science, Letters, and Art, Lon- 
don, 1888; professor of Christianity and Church History in Talmage's 
Lay College, Brooklyn, N. Y. , 1873; professor in Lay College, Revere, 
Mass.; secretary of Peace Society, New York, 1874. Publications: 
Natural and Revealed Theology, J. B. Lippincott & Co. , Philadelphia, 
1870, pp. 550. Possibilities of the African Race, a lecture before the 
National House of Representatives, Washington, D. C, 1869. Pamph- 
let on Slavery, Secession, and the Constitution, and Our Country's 
Crisis, 1861. An Appeal to Our Country's Loyalty, 1864. History of 
Congregational Church, Chester, Vt., 1868." 

Dr. Lord was married, January 15, 1857, soon after he came to 
Mont Vernon, to Miss Eunice Elizabeth Smith Pike, daughter of 
Joseph Smith and Sarah (Pettengill) Pike, of Newburyport, who still 
(May, 1905,) survives him, having reached the age of ninety in 
August, 1903. 

Hope Chapel was burned in the autumn of 1902, and Dr. Lord 
was actively engaged in securing its rebuilding at the time of his 
death, which occurred very suddenly, February 19, 1901, from heart 
failure. 

The Ninth Pastor, the Rev. George E. Sanborne, was the son 
of Rev. Peter and Martha (Wakefield) Sanborne, and was born at 
Reading, Mass., April 16, 1827. He fitted for college at Williston 
Seminary and Monson Academy, and graduated at Amherst College 



70 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

in 1853. He took the full course at Anclovev Theological Seminary, 
1853 to 1856, and February 12, 1856, was licensed to preach by the 
Andover Association in Lowell. January 1, 1857, he was ordained 
pastor of the church in Georgia, Vt., and served that church until 
1861, and having served as acting pastor of a church in Portsmouth, 
N. H. for a year, he was installed over the church at Mont Vernon, 
April 2, 1862. 

The exercises were as follows, Rev. William Clark, of Amherst, 
being moderator, and Rev. Charles Cutter, of Fraucestown, scribe : — 
Reading Scriptures, Rev. Darwin E. Adams, Wilton; Prayer, Rev. 
E. B. Claggett, Lyndeborough ; Sermon. Rev. C. W. Wallace, D.D., 
Manchester ; Charge, Rev. C. E. Lord, retiring pastor ; Fellowship, 
Rev. J. T. Hill, Nashua; Charge to the People, Rev. Augustus Berry, 
Pelham ; Concluding Prayer, Rev. C. Cutter, Rochester, N. H. 

He was dismissed May 21), 1865, and went to a church in North- 
boro, Mass., where he remained until 1870. From 1870 to 1875 he 
was Superintendent of the Hartford, (Conn.,) Orphan Asylum, also 
preaching in 1870-1872 at Tolland, Conn., at Wethersfield Avenue 
church in Hartford (which he organized), and in 187.5 at Enfield, 
Conn. He then became steward of the Retreat for the Insane 
at Hartford, in which capacity he served till 1895, when owing to 
feeble health he was obliged to retire, although he continued to live 
in Hartford until he died of sclerosis of the spinal cord, January 7, 
1900. 

Mr. Sanborne was married June 10, 1858, to Annie E. Knowlton, 
daughter of Dea. Joha Knowlton of Portsmouth, and she survived 
him. He was much beloved by his parishoners of Mont Vernon for 
his genial manners and kindly courtesy, and he was a preacher of 
many rare qualities. 

The ministry of both Messrs. Lord and Sanborne was barren of 
noteworthy incidents and the numerical increase to the church slight. 
The Civil War was waging, and public attention was concentrated 
upon it, to the exclusion of other interests. The clergymen of Mont 
Vernon, like most of their brethren, during that eventful period, 
omitted no effort to set and keep the public opinion around them in 
what they deemed the right channel — the prosecution of the war for 
the destruction of slavery, and the conquest of rebellion as the only 
basis for a re-united country. They sought in and out of the pulpit 
to stimulate the zeal and sustain the courage of the people. And 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 71 

the event has justified their patriotism as of the true quality. A 
peace based on righteousness conquered. 

The Tenth Pastor was the Rev. Benson M. Frinlc, who in re- 
sponse to a request for the salient points in his life sent the following 
personal sketch : — 

I was born in Bartlett, Carroll County, N. H., June 20th, 1838; the 
youngest of four sons of the Rev. Silas and Sarah P. Frink. When I 
was two years of age, my family moved to Conwa} r Center in the same 
County, where my father died when I was fifteen years old. I received 
my earl}' educational training in my native town, and in the Academy 
in Fryeburg, Maine, and in Beloit, Wisconsin. 

In October, 1859, I entered Bangor Theological Seminary with nry 
brother, from which we were graduated in a class of 23 in 1862. 

After engaging in missionary work in Quebec and the Townships, 
for one year, I was called to the pastorate of the Congregational Church 
in Derby, Vermont. Here I was pastor for two years, during which 
time, I opened the long closed Academy, serving as principal for one 
term; but the added responsibility of sixty-six pupils and three assist- 
ants was more than my strength would permit, with my other work, 
and I declined to continue my connection with the school. 

During the month of August, 1865, I supplied the church in Mont 
Vernon. While there, I received a very urgent call to the pastorate, 
which I accepted, beginning my work September 24th, and was installed 
November 1st. In October, 1867. I received a unanimous call from the 
Central Congregational Church, Portland, Maine, and November 1st, 
I was dismissed from the Mont Vernon Church, that I might accept the 
call extended me from Maine. Since then I have been pastor in Saco, 
Maine; Beverly, Hamilton, Whitman, Shelburne and West Brookfield, 
all in Massachusetts, and in this last place I now (May, 1905) reside 
without a permanent pastorate. 

August 28th, 1859, I was married to Miss Mary E. Webb, in Bridg- 
ton, Maine, to whom I am largely indebted for any success which I 
may have had in the Christian ministry. 

Of the two years service in Mont Vernon, much was accom- 
plished by our united effort. During the first winter, every activity 
was turned toward the special work of the church. Mr. Charles A. 
Towle was then the principal of the Academy, (succeeding Rev. C. F. 
P. Bancroft,) who gave to us his earnest and faithful service, and for 
five evenings each week for seventeen weeks, meetings were held in the 
various school districts of the town, and in the spring 57 persons united 
with the church. 

When I went to Mont Vernon, its beautiful scenery, location and 
the intellectual character of the people, having made it a center of at- 
traction, it was impossible to procure a house in which to reside, and 



72 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

we found a home in the family of Dea. George E. Dean; and in the 
following' spring - , the little room off the chapel was fitted up for a study. 
At that time it became evident that a special effort should be made to 
secure a parsonage if possible; but the usual hinderances were freely 
presented, and to these was added the forceful argument that, "Every 
minister has tried and failed, for we cannot raise the amount neces- 
sary for such a house as we need and ought to have. " Nothing daunted, 
and seeing that something heroic must be done, I drew up a simple 
subscription paper, and wrote down 18 names of leading people whose 
ability I learned from the town taxes and report, and attached the 
amount I thought each ought to contribute to make the enterprise a suc- 
cess. The list of names was headed by Dea. William Conant, and 
Mrs. Asa Stevens, each for $200, it being my belief that the beginning 
would decide the result, and they must set the example of doing great 
things; and after a little delightful diplomacy each wrote "Approved" 
against their names. Then followed Messrs. F. O. Kittredge, H. H. 
Bragg, Capt. Timothy Kittredge, Dea. Joseph A. Starrett, Dea. John 
Bruce, and others of like willingness to help on the good cause, after 
which it was plain sailing, and in eight days I had secured the pledge 
of $2,400, a small part of which was to be paid in labor, and I am hap- 
py to record that every dollar subscribed was paid, and much more was 
freely given in drawing timber, grading, and other work in and about 
the building of the house by the generous and enthusiastic friends. 

I immediately drew plans for the house to be submitted to a carpen- 
ter to determine if it were a workable plan; and it was approved by the 
building - committee and the builder. The contract was made, and work 
immediately begun in the early summer, and on October 25th, 1866, we 
moved into the new home, and it would be difficult to decide which were 
the happier, the people or ourselves; certainly the people manifested a 
full measure of appreciation, and generous hearts added much to the 
pleasure of the "House Warming" which followed. Every one seemed 
to take pride in the movement, and the guests were kind and generous 
to the young pastor and his family. 

As I look over my old records I find these entries that tell a story 
of commendable liberality for that people, none of whom could be rated 
as rich, but they were heartily in earnest and gave to the limit in every 
demand made upon them. Here are a few figures that may interest 
those who were young people then: 

For Parsonage, $2,500 

" New Pulpit furniture and carpet, 100 

" Communion Service, 75 

" Changes and repairs in chapel, 25 

$2,700 

This did not lessen the benevolences of the church, or the prompt 
payment of my salary. The many summer guests who came to this 
town were of a very high order, and very many of them were constant 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 73 

in their attendance on the Sabbath services. They were considerate 
and generous, and I recall that the first year I was handed an envelope 
containing- $130 from the boarders at the hotel (the old Mount Vernon 
House, kept by Mr. F. O. Kittredge) and Mr. Dean's. The following- 
year another purse was presented to us from the guests of $80. I cannot 
refrain from making mention of like kindnesses from our people in ways 
not measured by dollars. I recall that one Monday morning I entered 
the "Box Shop" as was my custom, when I was met by some young; 
ladies working there, who handed me a package, requesting me not to 
open until I reached home. To our very great delight it contained the 
works of Dr. Horace Bushnell, V Vols. — each volume inscribed thus: 
"Rev. Benson M. Frink, 

From his friends, 

Martha E. Conant, 
Cordelia M. J. Bragg, 
Ellen M. Bragg, 
Mary E. Cloutman, 
Mrs. John F. Colby." 
December 25, 1865. 

Few communities could then, or can today, boast of more delightful 
homes or educated sons and daughters who have exerted a wide and 
lasting influence in educational, religious and business circles. I have 
believed, and shall continue to believe, that the long and faithful min- 
istry of Rev. Mr. Bruce and his successors, and the inspiration of the 
honored and distinguished principal of the Academy, the late Rev. C. 
F. P. Bancroft, D.D., Ph.D., had much to do in guiding to high pur- 
poses the young men and women who have honored their native town 
in church and state. 

The fathers and mothers sleep; sowers and reapers pass on, but 
their work abides in the Old Granite State, and the Christian democ- 
racy of this nation. 

The clock that was presented to us Christmas Evening, 1865, at the 
home gathering of Dea. W. H. Conant, has ticked away the 3 r ears from 
then until now; changes have come to all, and many we then knew as 
our people rest in silence; but memory brings back their sacred names, 
and their deeds of kindness and love troop in to make glad the years we 
now live; and no years of my public life are more cherished than those 
spent among the good people of Mont Vernon, N. H. 

Our only child, a daughter, Florence Leonola, was born September 
6, 1863, at Magog, Province of Quebec. 

The Eleventh Pastor was the Rev. Seth Harrison Keeler, D.D., 
who was born in Brandon, Vt., Sept. 24, 1800. In 1823 he entered 
the Sophomore class at Middlebury College, graduating in 1826, and 
entering Andover Theological Seminary the same year. Soon after 



74 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

his graduation from there he was called to the church in South Ber- 
wick, Me., and was ordained as its pastor in October, 1829. The 
following winter he was married to Mary Felt, of New Ipswich, N. H., 
of whom he said : "Not a little of my success as a pastor 1 gratefully 
ascribe to her example and influence." In tin- autumn of 1836 he 
accepted a call to the church in Amesbuiy Mills, Mass.. and after a 
successful ministry of three years, (April 18, 1836 to December 7, 
1839), by the advice of a council of clergymen, answered the call to 
a church in Calais, Me. There he remained for twenty-seven years, 
(November 30, 1839, to October 22, 1874), extending his usefulness 
so much beyond his own church that he was called the "Bishop of 
Washington County." In 1865 the trustees of Middlebury College 
conferred upon him the degree of D.D. Full of patriotism, and long- 
ing for some share in the Country's sacrifice, he asked permission 
from his people to serve in the Christian Commission at Washing- 
ton, and was thei'e for some weeks, comforting the sick, and sustain- 
ing many a soldier in his last hours. In 1866 he resigned his pas- 
torate at Calais, and came to Reading. Mass.. purposing to rest, and 
preach occasionally as he might have opportunity ; but at the close of 
1867, through his friend Dr. Clark, of Amherst, he went to preach 
at Mont Vernon, New Hampshire, and, receiving a unanimous call 
from the church, entered once more upon the labors he loved as 
pastor, continuing at Mont Vernon from 1867 to 1875. He often 
spoke of the eight years he spent there as most happy. He delighted 
in the beautiful scenery, and said the fine air gave him a new lease 
of life. He took a lively interest in Appleton Academy. This was 
his last pastorate. In 1875 he removed to Soinerville, Mass., to be 
near a son and daughter, and lived thei'e until 1886. On Christmas 
day of that year he died in church, just as he had risen to join in 
singing — a most fitting ending to an exceptionally beautiful and use- 
ful life. He was 86 years, 3 months and 2 days old at the time of 
his death. Though advanced in years when his service to this people 
commenced, he proved himself as an able, scholarly and faithful 
religious teacher. In 1873 and L874 some forty people united with 
the church as the result of special religious interest in the community. 
On the 5th of September, 1880, Dr. Keeler came and preached 
a centennial sermon, the church having been organized in 1780. 

The Twelfth Pastor was the Rev. William H. Woodwell, who 
was born at Newbury (now Newburyport), Mass.. September 9, 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 75 

1844. He attended the public schools of Newburyport, graduating 
from the High school in 1862. Between that date and the time he 
entered Bowdoin College in 1865, he was employed a part of the 
time as a special reporter on the Boston Transcript. He graduated 
at Bowdoin in 1869, and at once entered the Andover Theological 
Seminary, where he graduated in 1872. He was ordained as a min- 
ister at Wells, Me., June 12, 1873, and was pastor of the Congrega- 
tional church at that place until May, 1875. In November of that 
year he became pastor of the church at Mont Vernon, serving until 
about April, 1880. In January. 1881, he went to Hawaii, Sandwich 
Islands, and was pastor and teacher there until May, 1882. He was 
called to the pastorate of the Congregational church at Orient, N. Y., 
and served that church from 1883 to 1887. After a short pastorate 
at New Marlborough, Mass., he was called to the Congregational 
church at Sandwich. Mass., and was there from near the close of 
1888 to October. 1898. He soon after removed with his family to 
Washington, D. C, and supplied pulpits of churches of his denom- 
ination in Washington and elsewhere until April, 1901, when he 
preached at Hampton, Conn., where he remained till April, 1904, 
when he assumed the pastoral care of the Congregational churches at 
Hampton Falls and Seabrook, N. H., where he now is (May, 1905). 

On the 18th of April, 1873, Mr. Woodwell was married to Miss 
Martha Haskell, of Newburyport. The following children have been 
born to them : — 

Julian Ernest, born at Wells, Me., Jan. 7, 1874, who graduated 
from t e Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Eva Ceciba, born at Mont Vernon, N. H , and graduated at 
Mount Holyoke in 1900. 

William Herbert, born at Pohala, Hawaii, May 5, 1881, and was 
a member of the Law School of George Washington University, at 
Washington, D. C. 

Archer Roscoe, born at Newburyport, May 23, 1883, now 
(1905) residing at Fredericksburg, Va. 

Carolus Sylvester, born at New Marlborough, Mass., February 
9, 1889, and now a member of Phillips Academy at Exeter, N. H. 

The Thirteenth Pastor was Rev. C. C. Carpenter, who began 
his pastorate simultaneous!}' with the second century of the church, 
occupyiug the pulpit of the church first on September 19, 1880, and 



76 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

removing his family here from Peabody, Mass., in November fol- 
lowing. 

Charles Carroll Carpenter was born in Bernardston, Mass., July 
9, 1836, the son of Dr. Elijah W. Carpenter, for forty years a physician 
in that town, and Vallonia Slate. He was of the eighth generation 
from William Carpenter, an English emigrant of 1638, who had been 
influenced to join the Plymouth Colony by Governor Bradford, hus- 
band of Alice Carpenter, a cousin. He settled first at Weymouth, 
Mass., soon after at Rehoboth, where the successive generations 
dwelt until Dr Carpenter's father, after his service in the Revolution- 
ary army, removed to Vermont. 

Mr. Carpenter fitted for college at Goodale Academy in his 
native town, at Williston Seminary, and at Kimball Union Academy 
in Meriden, N. H., but the complete break-down of his health pre- 
vented him from pursuing his studies further. A health excursion 
to the coast of Labrador led him, after two years spent in business, 
to visit that coast again in 1858, under the auspices of the Canada 
Foreign Missionary Society to see what could be done for the un- 
privileged inhabitants. He took lumber down the St. Lawrence, 
built a mission-house on Caribou Island, in the Straits of Belle Isle, 
and at that station, and at a winter statian on the banks of Eskimo 
River, served as missionary among the sailors and shoremen until 
the fall of 1865, when the severity of the climate compelled him to 
retire. In the meantime he had visited "the States" repeatedly, at- 
tending lectures at Harvard Medical College, receiving ordination at 
Montreal in 1860, marrying in 1862, and spending the last winter of 
the Civil War in the service of the U S. Christian Commission in the 
Army of the Potomac. 

From 1866 to 1872 he was superintendent of the Lookout Mount- 
ain (Tenn.) Educational Institutions for white youth, having for as- 
sociates, for a part of the time, Principal Cecil F. P. Bancroft and 
his Mont Vernon wife, Frances Kittredge. He was a student at 
Andover Theological Seminary from 1872 to 1875, then minister at 
South and West Peabody, Mass. (two parishes), until 1880. He 
was formally installed pastor at Mont Vernon, July 1, 1881, and 
closed his pastorate, Sept. 20, 1885. He has since resided in An- 
dover, Mass., without pastoral charge, occasionally preaching, but 
mostly engaged in literary work ; was editor of the Andover Towns- 
man for two years, and has been a contributing editor of the Con- 
yregationalist from 1886 ; he published a Biographical Catalogue of 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 77 

Phillips Academy, Andover (1778-1830), and is now preparing a 
general catalogue of Andover Seminary. He received the honorary 
degree of A. M. from Hamilton College in 1869, and from Dart- 
mouth College in 1887. 

Mr. Carpenter married, May 1, 1862, Miss Feronia N. Rice, of 
Auburn, Mass. They have had five children: George R., Harvard 
College, 1886, professor in Columbia University; Charles L., Dart- 
mouth College, 1887, civil engineer on the Panama Canal; "William 
Bancroft, Harvard College, 1890, teacher in Boston public schools; 
Jane B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1897, teacher; Miriam F. (born in 
Mont Vernon), Colorado College, 1905. 

The Fourteenth Pastor was the Rev. Richard Hastings Mc- 
Gown, who commenced preaching here Jauuary 10, 1885, and was 
installed June 23, 1886. He was born at North Ellsworth, Me., May 
13, 1850, was educated principally at the Eastern State Normal 
School at Castine, and graduated in 1878 from the Bangor Theological 
Seminary. Became a preacher of the Methodist Conference, and as 
such was stationed at Dover, Tremont, and Pembroke, Me. March 
7, 1882, he was ordained as a Congregational minister at Harrington, 
Me., was acting pastor at Turner, Me , from December, 1833, to 
November, 1885, and at Mont Vernon from December, 1885, until 
February 26, 1888. He was afterwards two years each at Cornish, 
Me., and at Northwood, N. H. His last pastorate was at the Court- 
land street Congregational church in Everett, Mass., where he died in 
the service, April 1, 1900, after a brief illness. His wife and two 
sons and two daughters survived him ; also two brothers, Dr. Wilkes 
McGown, of Lynn, Mass., and the Rev. A. J. McGown, now (1905) 
pastor of the Congregational church at Amherst, N. H. 

Sept. 25, 1875, he married Abby Frances Rowe, of Ellsworth, 
Me. Five children were born to them: Ruth May, Ralph Sumner, 
Anna Estella, Roy Edmund, and Ernest Alfred, the last named child 
dying in iufancy. 

A newspaper account of his death says : " Wherever he has 
been he has left the impress of his faithfulness, and people were 
everywhere impressed by the integrity and faithfulness of his Chris- 
tian life and ministry; and everywhere he was called ' a good man.' 
While his life was comparatively short it would be hard to estimate 
the good he has done." 



78 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

The Fifteenth Regular Pastor was the Rev. John Thorpe, 
who was born May 4th, 1845, in the village of Newton Heath, three 
miles from the city of Manchester, England, which, at this writing 
(1904), is a ward of said city. His father, Joel Thorpe, was born 
in Moston, a suburb of Manchester, and died in October, 1880, at the 
ase of 75. His mother's maiden name was Sarah Brown, and she 
was born at Compstall Bridge, Derbyshire, England, Jan. 5, 1811, 
and is still (1904) living with grandchildren. Both father and mother 
were silk weavers on the hand loom. There were eleven children, of 
whom John was the sixth. He went to school at three years of age, 
and at eight worked in the print works at what was known as a 
♦'half-timer." At thirteen he began to work as a "full-timer," and 
attended a night school until he was twenty. He began work as a 
local preacher at the age of sixteen for the "'Methodist Xew Con- 
nexion," still working as a calico printer, at the Claybon Vale Print 
Works, Manchester. At twenty-one he went to work in a Manches- 
ter ware-house, first as a porter aud messenger, then as travelling 
salesman. At the age of twenty-four he married Miss Emily A. C. 
Bennett, eldest daughter of Alfred and Sarah Ann Bennett, of New- 
ton Heath. Mr. Bennett was superintendent of a cotton mill at the 
time of his death in 1870. Her mother is still (1904) living in 
Failswortb, Manchester, at the age of 76. 

At the age of twenty-five John Thorpe sailed for New York, and 
after a rough passage of 52 days in a clipper ship, landed at Castle 
Garden, New York, May 8, 1871. He worked three months in a 
woolen mill at Raritan, N. J., and then went to Lawrence, Mass., 
and at first worked as a cloth-folder in the "Washington Mills, and 
later as a cloth-inspector. On Sundays he was engaged in mission 
services, supplying pulpits in various places, and following his occu- 
pation in the mill during the week. 

In May, 1874, he returned with his wife to England. Leaving 
her with her mother, he went to London, and in June, 1874, sailed 
for Quebec, Canada, removing to Upper Canada, and then to Detroit, 
and Chicago, at which last named place he was employed by a sur- 
veyor for a brief time. Then he went to Elgin, 111., as an attendant 
in a hospital. On the first of March, 1875, he went to Washington, 
D. C, aud thence to Baltimore, and later to Philadelphia, from which 
place he shipped in a Guion steamer for London, and later rejoined 
his wife in Manchester. They soon went to house-keeping in the 
Lancashire seaport town of Southport, where he did odd jobs for a 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 79 

hardware dealer, and finally acted as a salesman. He afterward was 
employed as lodge-keeper and messenger at the Lancashire Indepen- 
dent College at Whalley Range, Manchester ; and later as librarian at 
the Longsight (Manchester) Mechanics Institute. . 

In January, 1880, he returned to Lawrence, Mass., as a cloth- 
inspector, and also resumed religious work under his local preacher's 
license. In 1884 he served the Tower Hill Congregational church of 
Lawrence as pulpit supply. In 1885 he removed to South Weare, 
N. H., as preacher and missionary, and Dec 30, 1885, was ordained 
and installed as a Congregational minister in the Congregational 
church at South Weare. On Sunday afternoons he also supplied the 
pulpit at North Weare, also preaching often for the Free Baptists. 

June 17, 1888, he began his pastorate of the Congregational 
church at Mont Vernon, where he preached until Sept. 1, 1894. On 
this date he began service as pastor of the Congregational churches 
at Andover and East Andover, N. H., laboring there until March 1, 
1899, when he removed to Brookline, N. H., where he served as pas- 
tor of the Congregational church until June 1, 1902, when he began 
his labors with the Congregational church at Center Harbor (on Lake 
Winnepesaukee), N. H., under an engagement on a mutual basis for 
what is called ''An Indefinite Time" — which connection he still holds 
(June, 1905). 

In the Old Scholars' Union Magazine, a Sunday-school publica- 
tion, issued in 1891, Mr. Thorpe gives a good many facts in his 
career. His call to be a preacher, he says, came when he was a 
child, when his ambition was to enter the ministry. At 16 he joined 
the church, at 18 he preached his first sermon in the old Culcheth 
school, at 19 he was put on the "plan," and at 21 went to work in 
the city of Manchester. At 24, he says, he "married the prettiest 
Lancashire lass in the whole county." At 25 he set sail for New 
York, where he landed, May 8, 1871. At 26 he joined the Free Con- 
gregational church at Lawrence, Mass., and the next year preached 
for the Methodists at various places in Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire. 

One who knows him well says : 

"The free, frank, independent, happy-go-lucky, roaming, rhym- 
ing, contented, rollicking spirit of John Thorpe was learned by him 
from reading and assimilating over and over again the life of John 
Wesley, who said : ' I look upon the World as my parish. I have 



80 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

no time to be in a hurry. God buries his workmen, but continues 
his work. The best of all is, God is with us ' " 

"No foot of land do I possess, 
No cottage in this wilderness — 

A poor way-faring- man; 
I lodge awhile in tents below, 
And gladly wander to and fro, 

Till I may Canaan gain. " 

Mr. Thorpe's ministry at Mont Vernon was busy and successful. 
He might well be called a ''hearty" minister, both in his preaching 
and in his parish work. His varied experiences made him a fit_ex- 
emplar of St. Paul's note of his own course in " becoming all things 
to all men," and he had a whole-souled manner which made him wel- 
come in every household. 

The Sixteenth Pastor was the Rev. Thomas Jones Lewis, son 
of Thomas and Susan (Jones) Lewis, and he was born in Swansea, 
"Wales, July 2, 1857. He attended the public schools in his native 
place, and began to preach when only eighteen years of age in a Con- 
gregational church in Swansea. He came to the United States in 
August, 1883, and was a s'udent at Marietta, Ohio, in that and the 
succeeding year. From 1884 to 1887 he was a student at the Theo- 
logical Seminary at Bangor, Me., graduating with his class. 

After graduation he preached two years at Deer Isle, Me., but 
was not ordained to the gospel ministry until Dec. 5, 1889. This 
occurred at Southwest Harbor, Me., where he began preaching in 
September of that year, and continued until April, 1891. In May, 
1891, he became pastor of the church at East Andover, N. IL, and 
served there until July, 1894, when he succeeded the Rev. John 
Thorpe as pastor of the Congregational church at Mont Vernon, who 
in turn succeeded him at East Andover. Mr. Lewis remained at 
Mont Vernon until December, 1897, when he went to Wales, supply- 
ing a pulpit at Porthcawl for about a year. In 1899, having returned 
to this country, he was recalled to the pulpit at East Andover, N. 
H., which he served until January, 1904. At this time he was 
called to the pastorate of the Congregational church at Conway, N. 
H., where he is still serving successfully and happily (June, 1905). 

On the 19th of February, 1878, Mr. Lewis was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Annie Daniels, by whom he has had four children, of 
whom three are living. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 81 

Mr. Lewis's pastorate at Mont Vernon was successful in every 
respect. It was during this pastorate that the new meeting-house 
was dedicated. Mr. Lewis was an honest, faithful, and devoted 
Christian minister, and a preacher of no mean abilities. He possessed 
the entire respect and esteem of all his people. 

The Seventeenth Pastor, the Rev. Donald Browne, commenced 
preaching here November, 1898. He was born at London, England, 
November 3d, 1851, son of Donald and Sarah (Humphrey) Browne. 
Educated in Devonshire, then became teacher. He took charge of 
an Episcopal Mission School in Newfoundland four years. He was 
Judge of District Court six years at St Barbes, Newfoundland. He 
studied in the theological department of Boston University, was or- 
dained over a Congregational church at Tiverton, R. I., in 1889, re- 
maining there three years. In 1892 he went to the Broadway Con- 
gregational church. Fall River, preaching there several years. He 
closed his two years' pastorate here November, 1900. Mr. Browne 
while here assisted in the work of Grace Episcopal Church of Man- 
chester, N. H., of which the Rev. W. Jones was rector. Mr. and 
Mrs. Browne were very highly esteemed here, and the universal 
sentiment of the parish was or* much regret at their departure He 
went from Mont Vernon to pastoral work in Manchester, N. H., and 
later to Derry, N. H.. and at this writing (June, 1905,) he is at 
South Groveland, Mass. These last two charges were in the Episcopal 
denomination. 

The Eighteenth Pastou of the church (who is serving at this 
date, June, 1905,) is the Rev. Henry Porter Peck. He was born in 
Kalamazoo, Michigan, Oct. 25, 1853, and spent his boyhood and 
early manhood in Norfolk, Conn. He fitted for college at Williston 
Seminary, at Easthampton, Mass., and graduated at Amherst College 
in the class of 1878. He spent two years in the study of theology at 
Auburn, N Y., and two years at Andover Theological Seminary, 
where he graduated in 1882. May 1, 1882, he was called to the pas- 
torate of the Congregational church at Plymouth, N. H., where he 
served from 1882 to 1889. October 1, 1889. he was called to the 
Second Congregational church at Winsted, Conn., where he remained 
until Oct. 1, 1891, and May 1, 1892, was settled over the Congrega- 
tional church at Milford, N. H., until Oct. 1, 1899. He began his 
ministry at Mont Vernon in the winter of 1900-1901, where he still 



82 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

continues (June, 1905.) Mr. Peck is a preacher of unusual ability, 
always discoursing without notes, and his sermons are plain, practical 
Christian utterances, illustrated by a fund of ready reference to cur- 
rent events and up-to-date thought. 

For the last twenty-five years the strength of the church and so- 
ciety has waned, by the death, or departure from Mont Vernon, of a 
considerable number on which both relied for strength and support. 
A considerable summer clientage, however, helps to maintain public 
worship in the decidedly handsome and commodious little meeting- 
house, which is among the most attractive in the country. 



CHAPTER VII. 



THE OLD MEETING-HOUSE. 

Pew-Grounds — Pew-Spots — Alteration? and Repairs — Transfer 
of Parish Matters to Town — Horse-Sheds — Buildings on the 
Common — Call to Rev. Stephen Chapin — His Dismissal— The 
Ministerial Fund — Extensive Repairs — Parsonage — Fire in- 
Meeting House — New Modelling the House — Its Removal 
Across the Road — Hearse and Hearse House — Last Service 
in Old House — As a Town Hall — Town and Society Quit- 
claim to Each Other — Co-partnership Ended — Certain 
Rights Reserved — Appropriation to Change Meeting-House 
to Town Hall —The Changes — Old Baptismal Bowl Found 
— Town Hall Dedicated. 

The story of the building of the first meeting-house in 1781, is 
given at some length in the first chapter of this history, as well as 
sundry notes relative to changes therein, and to the "burying- 
ground," which is about a quarter of a mile from the meeting-house, 
towards Francestown. The accounts of what has been done, from 
time to time, to the building are meagre. 

1784, Dec. 29, the Parish voted a deed of "pew ground," No. 
33, 'to the Widow Hannah Peabody, of Amherst, 6 ft. 1 in. long 
by 4 ft. 11 in. wide, according to a scheme of ground plot or plan of 
laud now lodged with the public record of said Parish ;" which is of 
interest as fixing the size of the "pew-grounds." 

When the new meeting- house was built in 1896, some of these 
"pew-ground" deeds, which had descended by inheritance or other- 
wise to persons then living, were offered in exchange for pews in the 
new edifice, but of course that could not be allowed, as the old pew- 
grounds were then valueless ; nor was such an exchange necessary, 



84 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

» 

as no pews were sold, or even rented in the new meeting-house, 
sitting's in which were made free to all. 

1790, April 26, the Parish voted "to allow 4 pews more in front 
of those now built on the lower floor, in said house." 

Also voted "6 'pew-spots' more in the gallery," and chose a 
committee to sell the "spots" to the highest bidder. 

Voted "to impower the committee to pay up the arrearages and 
finish the meeting-house." 

1791, July 9. Voted "to find stuff and to build the seats in said 
meeting-house, except the front of the brestworks in said seats." 

1792, Oct. 25. Voted "not to have the Small Pox any longer in 
said Parish after the House now infected can be cleaned." 

1804, March 13. The uew Town of Mont Vernon had an article 
in the warrant "to see if they will acknowledge all former contracts 
of the Second Parish of Amherst not legally discharged, as their own, 
and order the selectmen for the time being to call for a transfer of 
all monies, grants and obligations in favor of said Parish." Under 
this article it was 

Voted "to take a transfer of all parish matters to the Town of 
Mont Vernon, and acknowledge them as their own." 

Here ended the Parish, and the Town succeeded to its privileges 
and obligations. 

1808, April 13. An article was put in the warrant "to see if 
the town will agree to I t old buildings that is hailed on to the Common 
in said Town and left there by John Averill, jr., and Jesse Averill, 
still continue there : if not, to see if said Town will allow said build- 
ing to have a place anywhere on the common near said meeting-house." 

"To see what method said Town will take in future in regard to 
the building of horse- sheds, and the methods the inhabitants shall 
take to obtain leave for that purpose." 

At the meeting held May 16, 1808, Voted "there should not 
an} 7 buildings stand in front or in rear of said meeting-house." 

Voted "that all the horse-sheds and other buildings should not 
stand where they now stand." 

Voted "to choose a committee of seven persons to say where the 
said sheds should stand." 

The committee was at once named, and reported to the meeting, 
and it was voted "that persons having buildings should be notified to 
move them within 30 days." 

The agency of the Town as a successor of the Parish in manag- 




M If u 



III 



Mil 



■ 



* 

V 





THE OLD MEETING HOUSE. 
( Erected in 1781.) 

Before Remodelled as Town Hall. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 85 

ing the affairs of the church is shown in a vote, April 11, 1809, "to 
choose a committee to hire a candidate to supply the pulpit ; also to 
raise $127 for hiring preaching, and to appropriate the school land 
money in place of the $127." 

1809, Sept. 25. There was an article in the warrant "to see if 
the Town will concur with the Church in said town, in giving a call 
to the Rev. Stephen Chapin to settle with said church." The vote 
was in the affirmative, and a committee appointed to report "what 
encouragement ought to be given to said Chapin. ' After a recess of 
three-quarters of an hour, the committee reported that he should be 
paid an annual salary of $400 "including the annual interest on the 
ministerial money." Later, a day was voted by the town for Mr. 
Chapin's installation, and a' committee was appointed to manage it, 
so far as the town was concerned. 

1813, March 9. Voted "to remove the seats (except the front 
ones) on the lower floor of the meeting-house, and sell the ground at 
vendue on the day appointed for selling the Town's poor." 

1818, Nov. 9. In consequence of a petition signed by Asa 
Stevens and others, an article was put in the warrant "to see what 
measures the Town will take relative to the situation of the Rev. 
Stephen Chapin and the People of his charge concerning some 
scriptural points." 

Voted "to choose a committee to wait on Mr. Chapin and re- 
quest him to come forward and make a publick statement, relative to 
his disposition." 

Also voted "that Mr. Chapin be dismissed agreeable to his re- 
quest." 

For many years the town voted to appropriate the income of 
what was commonly known as the "funded money" towards the 
"support of the Gospel." The term for the same money was. some- 
times, "ministerial fund." The Rev.C. C. Carpenter says: 

"The 'ministerial fund' was created by the sale of the 'minis- 
terial land,' an hundred acres or so, originally set aside in the settle- 
ment of a town, for the use of the minister as long as he remained 
such. In process of time, because they were remote from the center 
of the town, or for other reasons, this was sold — in whole or part — 
and the proceeds made a fund, the income of which was to be used 
for the support of preaching — not so much as an addition to his 
salary, as for helping the people to make up the amount they had 
pledged. Some times this fund, through mismanagement, was lost, 



86 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

and in other eases — perhaps the most — used in some emergency for 
paying debt to the pastor. In some other cases, when other denom- 
inations than the 'standing order' sprang up, they claimed a share of 
it, and it was turned over to them. The sum was not large in any 
case, as the lands did not usually bring much." 

1821, in June, there was an article in the warrant "to see if the 
town will vote to repair the outside of the meeting-house, agreeably 
to an act of the Legislature passed in 1819, and raise money for that 
purpose." 

On this it was voted (June 15, 1821) "to repair the outside of 
the meeting-house. To choose a committee to report the repairs 
necessary to be made, and the best manner of effecting them." 

The committee were evidently prepared beforehand, for after a 
recess of half an hour, they reported: "To right the underpinning, 
and point it with lime, supply the water-tables and clapboards that 
are wanting, and secure all the clapboards by sufficient nailing, 
shingle the two porches, and the roof on the backside with good 15- 
inch shingles, laying 4 J inches to the weather, supply glass and puttv 
and mend the window sashes, make a new front door, and door-stools 
to all the doors; and paint the house with two coats of good paint 
and oil, the trimmings with white lead, and the body of the house a 
bright yellow, composed of 2-5 of white and 3-5 a French yellow, the 
doors of a mogany [mahogany] color." 

The committee added that the repairs were recommended "to be 
let out to the lowest bidder in two separate jobs or lots, viz. : The 
painting, glass and p itty in one lot, and all the other repairs specified 
in another, reserving the privilege of letting the wh >le job together, 
if it can be done cheaper." 

The Town voted to accept the report, an I that the repairs must 
be done by the last day of September; and chose a committee of 
three to oversee and accept them. Mr. Porter Kimball offered to 
do the entire job for 8239, and it was "struck off'' to him, and the 
Treasurer was authorized to borrow the money and pay him. 

About all that is in the Town records for several years after this 
relative to the church, is a vote each year that the income of the 
"funded money" be paid to the religions society for the support of 
the ministry ; but in 1825 there was an article in the warrant "to see 
if the Town would vote to purchase a parsonage" with the funded 
money, or a part of it. Instead of voting this, however, it was voted 
"that the interest be appropriated (as last year) to the support of 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 87 

the Gospel; that the selectmen collect the funded money as. soou as 
consistent, and loan it to the Rev. N. Kingsbury, by his giving good 
security — providing he may want it." 

At the same meeting a committee was appointed to make ar- 
rangements for letting individuals "■build horse-sheds on the com- 
mon." It does not appear that anything was done under this vote, 
as in 1831 it was voted ''to grant individuals the privilege to erect 
horse-sheds near the meeting-house." 

1832, March 13, it was again voted '-to let Rev. N. Kingsbury 
have the use of the funded money, by his giving satisfactory 
security." 

At the same meeting it was voted that '"the Rev. N. Kingsbury's 
society keep the meeting-house in repair the present year." 

It was also voted "that the selectmen see that the meeting-house 
is properly swept after this meeting has adjourned." 

It seems that the meeting-house caught tire in the winter of 
1833-34, for at an adjourned Town meeting held April 7, 1834, it 
was voted "'to repair the meeeting-house" ; and farther it was voted 
"to pay those who watched the meeting-house on the night of the fire 
5 shillings each " 

1836, March 22, at an adjourned meeting,, there being no article 
in the warrant on that subject, it was 

Voted, "to take the money called the Ministerial Money to defray 
the expenses of the Town, to be paid into the town treasury " 

1837, March 14 There was an article in the warrant '-to see if 
the town will hear any proposition that may be made by the Congre- 
gational Society in this place for new-modelling the meeting-honse ' : 

On this it was voted t) choose a committee to confer with a 
committee of the Congregational Society respecting this article, and 
Allen Goodridge, George Raymond, and Jonathan Herrick were 
appointed 

This committee reported at an adjourned meeting, and the report 
was accepted The following votes were then passed: 

1. "That the Town unite with the Congregational Society in this 
place in new-modelling" the meeting-house. 

2. "That one-half the ground floor of said meeting-house be ap- 
propriated for a Town Hall. 

3. "That the Town furnish the Town Hall appropriated for their 
use, and that they sustain the roof of said house, making all repairs 
which may be required from time to time. 

4. "That the Congregational Society be at the expense of all alter- 



88 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

ations, excepting- what pertains to the Town Hall, that they sustain the 
body of said house, making all repairs which may be required from 
time to time, and that the said Congregational Society have sole control 
of said house, excepting the Town Hall for the transaction of town bus- 
iness. 

5. "That the town choose an agent to convey their right or interest 
in the Meeting-House to the Congregational Society, reserving the right 
to the Town, agreeably to the above votes. 

Chose Jonathan Herrick to make the above conveyance. 

This contract was scrupulously adhered to fifty-nine years, and 
the church and town occupied the edifice harmoniously, within clearly 
defined limits, until the building of the new church in 1896 

Until this time (1837) the meeting-house had stood on the 
common, on the easterly side of the main road to Milford and Am- 
herst ; but when this new modelling took place, it was moved to its 
•present site on the westerly side of the road. There seems to be no 
record of just what was done by the way of change in the building, 
but it was undoubtedly finished in two stories, and was furnished 
with a bell and an organ It is also probable that the "two porches" 
spoken of in earlier records were removed, and an addition was 
made of the present front, on which was erected the steeple and 
belfry Two front doors were put in, and a "vestry" was put in the 
lower story, while the rear half of the ground floor was finished as a 
town hall, and here the meetings of the Town were held until the 
entire building was taken for a Town Hall in 1897. 

Rev. Mr. Jennison. who was pastor at the time, has said there 
was no formal dedication sermon at the occupation of the new mod- 
elled building. 

1838, March 13 It was voted "to finish the Town Hall the 
present year;" also 

"That the selectmen cause the Town Hall to be finished the 
present year, with as many new windows as they shall deem needful :" 
also 

"That the town pay for ringing the bell for funerals, and on all 
occasions except for Society meetings, at $7.50 per year." 

1840, March 10 Voted "that Nathaniel Bruce be a cnnmittee 
to ascertain if the town have a right to sell the land on the common 
east of the road passing by the Meeting- House." 

1841, March 9 Voted "that the bell be rung at 12 of the 
clock, noon, and at nine of the clock at night, and the town pay Mr. 
Shattuck a reasonable compensation." 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 89 

1842, March 8. Voted "that the Town buy or procure a 
Hearse, Hearse-house and harness for the use of the town : 

"That N. Bruce be a committee to procure the same: 

"That the selectmen cause the necessary repairs to be made on 
the outside of the Meeting-House as soou as practicable. 

"That the Town pay for ringing the bell once in a day. That 
it be rung at noon 

"That if the person who rings the bell fails to ring it at the true 
time, as a general thing, he shall have nothing for the same." 

1843, March 14. Voted, "That the Town rebuild the wall in 
front of the burying-ground 

"To buy a stove for the Town-house." 

The last service in the o d meeting-house occurred on Sunday, 
July 5, 1806, the sermon being preached by the Rev. C. F. P. Ban- 
croft. D D , Principal of Phillips Academy, Audover, Mass. The 
then Pastor, Rev. T. J. Lewis, conducted the devotional exercises. 
It was an occasion of surpassing interest. For something over 116 
years the venerable building had been used as a place of worship on 
this hill-top. It had been hallowed by many prayers and sermons, 
christenings and baptisms, marriages and funerals. It was dear to 
all the people of the town, and however much more comely and com- 
fortable the new meeting-house might be, the old house of worship 
held a place in their hearts which no more modern structure could 
fill. 

AS A TOWN HALL. 

The frame of the old meeting-house was of the durable character 
of buildings constructed in those days. It is of hewn oak, and as the 
building has always stood upon the solid rock, which, in many points 
near the site crops out in a ledgy surface, it has mainly kept sound 
until this day 

When the new meeting-house was completed, in 1896, a move- 
ment was started to dispose of the Congregational Society's right and 
interest in the old meeting-house. The first suggestion was that the 
town should buy out the society's interest in the land and building, 
and pay Si 500 therefor. At the March meeting of 1895 such an 
article was put into the warrant, but it was voted "to pass by the 
article." Similar action was taken in 1896. In 1807 at the March 
meeting, it was voted "to appoint a committee of five to report a bill 



90 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

covering the whole matter." The committee consisted of Willarcl 

P. Woods, Daniel Richardson, Geo. W. Averill, Wm. G. Burnham, 

and Henry F. Dodge, and they reported the following resolution, 

which was adopted : 

"Resolved, That the selectmen be instructed to quitclaim to the 
Mont Vernon Congregational church Society all right and title to land 
and buildings on east side of road, known as the Woodbury land, 
upon condition that said Society quitclaim all right and title to land 
on west side of said road including buildings thereon." 

The deed of conveyance was as follows : 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, 

THAT the Town of Mont Vernon, County of Hillsborough 
and State of New Hampshire, for and in consideration of 
the sum of One Dollar and valuable considerations before the 
delivery hereof, well and truly paid by the First Congrega- 
tional Society of Mont Vernon, New Hampshire aforesaid, 
the receipt whereof it doth hereby acknowledge, have re- 
mised, released, and forever QUITCLAIMED, and do by 
these presents remise, release, and forever QUITCLAIM 
unto the said First Congregational Society of Mont Vernon 
and its assigns forever : 

All that certain piece, tract or parcel of land situated, 
lying and being in said Mont Vernon in the County of Hills- 
borough and said State of New Hampshire, and described 
as follows : so much of the "Meeting House lot" so called, 
as is situated east of the main road leading from Mont Vernon 
village to Milford, and the buildings "New Church and Par- 
sonage" thereon. 

TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the afore-descrihed premises, 
with all the privileges and appurtenances thereunto belonging 
to the said First Congregational Church and Society and 
assigns, to its and their use and behoof forever. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Town of Mont Vernon 
by its selectmen have hereunto set their hand and seals this 
eighth day of April, in the Year of Our Lord, One Thousand 
Eight Hundred and Ninety-seven. 

Signed, sealed and delivered in presence of us : 

HARRY G. BLOOD, ) Selectmen 

W. L. ROBINSON, of 

W. H. KENDALL, ) Mont Vernon. 

It may be as well to give, here, the corresponding deed given by 
the Society to the Town, which was as follows : 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 91 

First Congregational Society of Mont Vernon to Town of 
Mont Vernon. 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS 

THAT the First Congregational Society of Mont Vernon, 
New Hampshire . a corporation duly established under the 
laws of the State of New Hampshire, for and in considera- 
tion of the sum of One Dollar and other good and valuable 
considerations to it before the delivery hereof, well and truly 
paid by the Town of Mont Vernon, the receipt whereof it 
doth hereby acknowledge, hath remised, released and forever 
QUITCLAIMED and by these presents doth remise, release 
and forever QUITCLAIM unto the said Town of Mont 
Vernon, and its assigns forever: 

All that certain piece, tract or parcel of land situate, lying 
and being in said Mont Vernon, in the County of Hills- 
borough and said State of New Hampshire, and described 
as follows : So much of the "Meeting House lot" so called, 
as is situated west of the main road, including the premises 
acquired by said Society from Israel Burnham and from 
George W. Averill, excepting so much thereof as has been 
heretofore released to the said Averill, together with the 
Meeting House thereon, subject, however, to the following 
conditions : First, that this release shall not in any wise 
affect the rights and privileges of the owners of the horse- 
sheds on said premises. Second, that said Town shall 
maintain a bell on the building, on said premises, which bell 
said Society and the Church connected therewith shall have 
the right to ring for all meetings of said Church or Society. 

Third, that said Church or Society shall have the right to 
use the hall in said building for business meetings or enter- 
tniuments without charge, except for the cost of heating and 
lighting. TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said granted 
premises with all the privileges and appurtenances to the 
same belonging to the said Town of Mont Vernon and its 
assigns, to its and their own proper use and benefit forever. 

In witness whereof the said First Congregational Society 
has caused a seal to be hereto affixed and these presents to 
be signed, acknowledged and delivered in its name and 
behalf by Frances A. Holt as Treasurer, hereunto duly 
authorized this eighth day of April in the year one thousand 
eight hundred and ninety-seven. Signed, sealed and de- 
livered in presence of : 

First Congregational 
W. H. CONANT, ) w .. Society 

W. H. KENDALL, j U ltnesses - f Mont Vernon. 

FRANCES A. HOLT, Treasurer. 



92 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

At a special meeting of the First Congregational Society of Mont 
Vernon, New Hampshire, duly called for the purpose and held in said 
Mont Vernon on the twenty-second day of March, A. D. 1897, and 
adjourned to the twenty-fourth day of March, the foregoing deed hav- 
ing been read and considered, the following vote was passed: 

Voted, that Frances A. Holt, the Treasurer, is hereby authorized 
and instructed to execute, acknowledge and deliver in the name and 
behalf of the Society, the deed from said Society to the Town of 
Mont Vernon which has just bsen read. 

A true copy : Attest, CLARK CAMPBELL, Clerk. 

Here ended, finally, the co-partnership between the Town and 
the Church and Congregational Society, which formally began in 
18ci7, but which was really initiated when the town was incorporated 
in 1803, and which grew out of that union of "church and state," 
which existed from the beginning of New England history. But even 
at this writing, as will be seen from the deeds which passed between 
the Town and the Society, there are still vestiges of the old partner- , 
ship left, as in the provisions of the deed of the Society to the Town, 
the right was reserved to use the bell, which was allowed to remain 
in its old place in the belfry of the old meeting house, for summoning 
its worshipers to all meetings, and also the right to use the Town 
Hall for business meetings and entertainments, free of charge, except 
for the cost of heating and .lighting. Furthermore the rights of the 
individual owners of the horse-sheds were reserved to them, under the 
transfer. It was said that the bell was allowed to remain in the old 
belfry to head off the mischievous youth of the town, who were ac- 
customed to break into the building on the night before the Fourth 
of July, and begin the celebration of Independence at midnight in the 
way which Daniel Webster said John Adams would have recom- . 
mended. It might be considered an open question whether the Town 
needed specifically to convey the new meeting-house and parsonage, 
for if any buildings ever belonged to the Society, which built them, 
with no aid from the Town, these two did. However, it was only a 
swapping of any and all possible rights, giving the Town a clear and 
indisputable right to the property on the west side of the road, subj ct 
only to the reservations named above, and the Society an equally 
clear title to the property on the east side of the road. 

It is supposed, however, that another vestige of the Town and 
Society partnership remains, in a joint ownership of the building 
originally erected for an Academy, and a school room for the Centre 
di rict, long known as the Chapel, and used for many years as such 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 93 

by the church. It is believed, without any conclusive documentary 
evidence, that the upper part of this building was given to the Soci- 
ety by the proprietors, who built it by issuing shares at $5 each, 
as will be seen later in the chapter relating to schools. Since the 
new meetino-house was built, the church has had no use for it, and 
at this writing it is rented by the Grange, or "Patrons of Hus- 
bandry." It is understood that this piece of land was not a part 
of the "meeting-house lot" quitclaimed in above deed. 

The tendency to such partnerships seems to have been strong in 
Mont Vernon, and about this time, the Congregational Society and 
the Trustees of McCollom Institute established a new and better line 
between their adjoining premises by a similar device of quitclaiming 
to each other. 

The vote of the Town above recorded was supplemented by 
votes appropriating the sum of fifteen hundred dollars "to reconstruct 
the old church into a town hall;" and Wm. G. Burnham, Geo. W. 
Averill, Clark Campbell, Wm. H. Kendall, and Joseph W. Averill 
were appointed a committee to carry out the vote. 

At a special town meeting held Aug. 16, 1897, it was voted to 
appropriate not exceeding five hundred dollars "to complete the Town 
House;" and also "to purchase the seats for the town hall." 

In making the chauges the floor of the old church, running on an 
incline from the entrance to the back of the auditorium, was taken 
out, and replaced in such a way as to make the rooms below a little 
higher posted and more usable than before. A dining room, select- 
men's room, and kitchen were arranged on the grouud floor, in the place 
of the old basement, used partly as a town hall, and partly as a furnace 
room. The two entrances on the east end were closed, and a large 
one made in the centre. The two short flights of stairs on either side 
of the lower entry, leading to one of corresponding size above, were 
torn out, and a wider stairway made on right of entrance. The same 
arrangement regarding chauges of entrances into the church audi- 
torium were made in the upper hallway. The main hall is exactly 
the same in size and form as was the old church auditorium, the only 
changes beiug in making the floor level and in the frescoing of walls 
and ceiling. The stone steps were not changed The furnace was 
in use in the old church. The windows were changed from small 
panes of glass to larger ones, but not as to the size of the frames. 
The space formerly occupied by the choir loft has been made into a 



94 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

commodious stage, with curtains and foot-lights, and an ante-room 
on either side. 

When the building was remodelled into a town hall there were 
found sundry interesting relics of former times, which had gotten out 
of sight in the unfinished roof or in the belfry tower. The most in- 
teresting was a baptismal bowl made of white metal, pewter or 
Britannia, about nine and one-half inches in diameter and two a half 
inches in depth. It is of "repousse" or hammered work on the side, 
with a rim apparently turned on a lathe, and in the centre of the 
bottom inside, it has, in relief, as a crest, a stag's head, and under- 
neath a monogram, the lower part of which is worn smooth, but the 
upper part shows half of two letters in script which may be "P. R." 
or "B. R." or B. B." or some combination similar. None who have 
seen the bowl can recall that it was ever in use in their day. It 
apparently must have disappeared in 1837, when the meeting-house 
was moved and remodelled, and some who have examined it are of 
the opinion that it is a piece of Paul Revere's handiwork, and that it 
is his monogram which is on the bottom of the bowl. The crest, 
however, is not identified as his, even if he had one, and the letters 
of the monogram are too indistinct as to their lower half to be 
legible. 

The other things found at the same time were an old-fashioned 
tin lantern, with holes all around to let the light shine through, two 
very old-fashioned oil lamps of metal, made to hang on the wall, and 
an old-fashioned whale-oil hand lamp of the style known as the •' petti- 
coat" lamp. 

The new town hall was dedicated on the evening of September 
8, 1897. Speeches were made by chairman of the committee, W. Or. 
Burnham, who introduced Hon. Geo. A. Marden, of Lowell, Mass., 
as president of the evening, who introduced the following speakers : 
Gov. Geo. A. Ramsdell, a former student at the Academy here, who 
made a reminiscent and very interesting speech ; Hon. Chas. H. Burns, 
of Wilton; John H. Colby, Esq., of Boston; Hon. Arthur H. Well- 
nian, of Maiden; Hon. George A. Bruce, of Somerville; Col. W. H. 
Stinson, of Dunbarton; Mr. Chas. E. Osgood, of Boston. 



CHAPTER VIII. 



THE NEW MEETING-HOUSE. 

How the Project Started — Building Committee — The Dedication 
— Dedicatory Service — Full Programme cf Exercises — Re- 
port of Building Committee — The New Meeting-House 
Turned Over to the Society — Accepted by the Society — 
Dedication Sermon — Full Description of the Edifice — Me- 
morial Windows. 

Just when the project for a new meeting-house took definite 
shape is not known. As early as 1890 a movement was begun to raise 
money for remodelling the old meeting-house, which had become an 
apparent necessity. The pulpit was located at the easterly end of 
the audience room, between the doors of entrance, and everybody 
who entered the room had to "face the congregation ;" while the floor 
had a determined slope, rising several inches from front to rear, to 
enable all readily to see the occupant of the pulpit. It was very 
awkward for the late comer, no matter how great his or her assurance 
or lack of self-consciousness. The whole building needed renovation 
and repair. 

After considerable agitation in this direction, without making 
much progress, the project of building a new meeting-house was sug- 
gested, but it was considered almost preposterous to expect to secure 
the necessary funds. A timely and most generous offer, however, 
from two ladies, descendants of a native of the town, opened the 
way, and in a short time the necessary amount was secured. 

A building committee was chosen by the Society, consisting of 
Hon. Geo. A. Marden, of Lowell, John H. Colby, Esq., of Boston, 
Clark Campbell, John T. McCollom and Win. H. Kendall of Mont 
Vernon, who were empowered to report on a site, and, later, were 
authorized to erect a new church building. As the report of this 



t>6 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

committee made at the dedication gives, in detail, the story of the 
enterprise, it will be necessary only to refer to it as given quite fully 
below. It wis a strenuous enterprise for the little community, even 
to raise the S6000. required to secure the liberal donations of Mrs. 
Richardson and Miss Stevens, but there was a generous rivalry among 
former citizens, natives, summer visitors, and local organizations, in 
contributing money, and on the 7th of July, 1896, the fine little 
church edifice was complete, both in finishing and furnishing, and 
ready for dedication. The Manchester Daily Union, which published 
an extended report of the dedication, said: 

"The dedication of the church had been carefully planned, and 
it was not the committee's fault that the weather kept away many 
who mi<>ht otherwise have attended. Meteorological conditions were 
anything but favorable. There had been a steady drizzle for three 
days, and this morning found no change A heavy black cloud hung 
ominously over the hill, and the rain drizzled and dripped in the most 
approved fashion, until noon. Then the cloud settled down over the 
hill and enveloped the entire town. 

"Then it poured. Great basketfuls of rain fell out of that 
cloud and anybody who happened to be out got wet. But there was 
quite a crowd out to the dedication with all the disadvantages. The 
morning train brought along a few visitors and many others interest- 
ed in the church drove into town. 

Among the visitors were the Rev. D. W. Waldron, Boston city 
missionary, and Miss Waldron ; I. E. Noyes. president of the Metro- 
politan National bank, Boston: Sydney F. Squires, Boston; the Rev. 
F. H. Page, Lawrence, Mass.; the Rev. H. P. Peck, Milford ; the 
Rev. Dr. R. A. Beard, Nashua; Miss Catherine A. Stevens. Xew 
York city; the Rev. C. A. Towle, Iowa: Prof. C. S. Campbell, Pin- 
kerton academy", Deny ; the Rev. C. F. P. Bancroft, principal of 
Phillips academy, Andover, Mass. ; Dr. C. M. Kittredge, Fishkill-on- 
the-Hudson; ex-Sheriff John M. Clark. Boston: Col. James F. Hill, 
Boston; H. Porter Smith, Cambridge, Mass.; Mrs. Asa Stevens, 
New York city; Mrs. J. A. Parker, Summit, N. J.; the Rev. 
William H. Hopkins, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. ; the Rev. R. II. McGown, 
a former pastor of the church, Everett. Mass. ; the Rev. T. M. 
Davies aud wife, Manchester, and the Rev. Dr. W. R. Cochrane, 
Antrim. 

The Dedicatory Services. 

The dedicatory exercises began promptly at 1 : 30 o'clock, and 
the church was comfortably filled, although a few chairs were ar- 
ranged in the aisles for the slight overflow. 




THE NEW MEETING HOUSE. 
Dedicated July 7, 1896. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 97 

There were on the platform, the Rev. R. H. McGown of Everett, 
Mass. ; Rev. Dr. Warren R. Cochrane of Antrim ; the Rev. Nehemiah 
Boynton D.D., of Detroit, Mich., and Deacon William H. Kendall, 
George A. Marden, Clark Campbell, John T. McCollom, and John 
H. Colby of the building committee. 

The following was the order of exercises : 

EXERCISES. 



1. ORGAN PRELUDE. 

Solon W. Stevens, Esq., 
Organist First Congregational Church, Lowell, Mass. 

2. INVOCATION. 

Rev. John Thorpe, Andover, N. H., 
A Former Pastor. 

3. ANTHEM— "Except the Lord Build the House," Gilchrist 

By The Choir. 

4. SCRIPTURE LESSON. 

Rev. Augustus Berry, Pelham, N. H., 
Former principal of Appleton Academy. 

5. ARIA— "With Verdure Clad," From The Creation 

Mrs. O. F. Davis, Plymouth, Mass., 
A former preceptress of the Academy. 

6. Report of Building Committee and Transfer to First Con- 

gregational Society. 

Hon. Geo. A. Marden, Lowell, Mass., Chairman. 

7. ACCEPTANCE BY FIRST CONGREGATIONAL SOCIETY. 

Deacon Wm. H. Conant, President. 

8. OFFERTORY. 

9. HYMN— Written by Mr. H. Porter Smith, Cambridge, Mass. 

Tune "Anvem." 

Choir and Congregation. 

God of our fathers! here we raise This house shall be a beacon light, 

A grateful song, a hymn of praise, — Far reaching from its beauteous height; 

Thou safely didst the fathers lead, Triumphant Faith its walls inspire, 

And hast supplied their children's need. Its altar burn with heavenly fire. 

With a new song to-day we come Now may Thy grace our souls renew, 

Within these walls, our Sabbath home; Give us of Thee a clearer view. 

Firm on this mount our temple stands, May all our lives be sanctified, 

Accept the labor of our hands. And, like this temple, beautified. 

In what our hands, dear Lord, have done, Then shall the prophecy of old, 

Our hearts have been with love led on; Be here fulfilled to bless this fold, 

The gifts a joy, the labors sweet — And ours the -word of promise be — 

Behold this house of Thine, complete ! The Lord will build a house for thee. 



98 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

10. DEDICATION SERMON. 

Rev. Nehemiah Boynton, D. D., Detroit, Mich. 

11. HYMN— Written by Dea. W. H. Conant, Tune, '-Italian Hymn.''' 

Choir and Congregation. 

Oh, Thou whose presence fills Here may a fruitful soil 

These temples of the hills Reward the lab'rer's toil 

With light and power, An hundred fold. 

Enter this sacred place Endue Thy Church with power. 

With consecrating grace, Send Pentecostal shower, 

While now we seek Thy face, Bring Ziou's favored hour 

This holy hour. To young and old. 

Here, where our fathers prayed, Stand on this hill-top, then, 

And sure foundations laid, Thou witness unto men. 

In early days. In His dear name. 
Memorial stones we place; Sound out o'er hill and plain- 
That future years may trace God's Love and Truth remain, 
Thy wondrous love and grace, Christ and His Cross are gain— 

And speak Thy praise. Ever the same. 

12. DEDICATORY PRAYER. 

Rev. Warren R. Cochrane, D.D., Antrim. 

13. BENEDICTION. 

By the Pastor, Rev. T. J. Lewis. 

After the introductory exercises, in accordance with the above 
program, George A. Marden of Lowell, Mass., chairman of the build- 
ing committee, then transferred the keys of the church to the society. 
His words were : 

CHAIRMAN MARDEN'S REPORT. 

I do not know just when this movement for building a new meeting 
house was started. The original proposition was to remodel the old 
meeting house, and the first money raised by that indefatigable and 
most successful organization, the Ladies' Home Circle, for improved 
church accommodations, was for remodeling. 

Later a most generous proposition was made by Mrs. M. Grace 
Richardson and Miss Catherine A. Stevens of New York, daughters of 
the late Calvin Stevens, a native of this town, that if the sum of $6000 
should be pledged towards the building of a new church edifice, they 
would each add the sum of $2500 to the fund. This proposition gave 
new impetus to the enterprise, and subscriptions began to come in so 
freely that active steps were taken to put the society in shape to utilize 
them. It was found on investigation that the society had virtually 
lapsed, from failure to hold its annual meetings legally, and the first 
step taken was to resuscitate the organization by petitioning a justice of 
the peace to call a meeting, as provided in the Public Statutes, when 
the society could be re-organized. 

This meeting was held May 11, 1895. Officers were duly chosen, 
a code of by-laws was adopted, and it was voted that names of a build- 
ing committee of five members, "to erect a new church building", should 
be reported at the next meeting of the society. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 99 

A subsequent meeting - was called on the 25th of May, and a full 
discussion of the enterprise was had, and announcements were made as 
to funds pledged, from which it appeared that the amount required by 
Mrs. Richardson and Miss Stevens, to wit: SbOOO, had been pledged. 
The society then unanimously voted that a new church should be built, 
and a committee of five should be appointed to carry this vote into effect. 
It is in behalf of that committee that I now beg leave to report. 

Your committee was first instructed to inquire as to the cost of 
several lots which had been suggested as a site for the new meeting 
house, and at an adjourned meeting held June 8, 1895, it was voted that 
the building committee "be given full powers as to the location and 
erection of the church.*' The committee at once organized and investi- 
gated the several sites proposed, and at a special meeting of the socie- 
ty, held August 17, 1895, it was further voted that "the building 
committee have full power to locate, build and equip a church edifice 
for the first Congregational society." The money subscribed was at 
once called for. and a large proportion of it was soon in the hands of 
the treasurer of the committee. 

The site selected for the new building was this spot, on the land 
originally given by James Woodbury, and conveyed by him January 5, 
1786, to the Second parish of Amherst "for the use of a meeting house 
spot, and likewise for a common." Mont Vernon did not at that time 
exist as a town, and Mr. Woodbury was a citizen of Amherst, occupy- 
ing the house across the way, now owned by Dr. C. M. Kittredge. The 
Second parish had been incorporated in 1781 "for transacting ministe- 
rial affairs," and the petition for the act of incorporation alleges that 
the petitioners had for some time maintained public worship in a 
commodious meeting house erected for the purpose, and on this same 
land, which in 178b was conveyed by Mr. Woodbury to the parish. For 
in 1784 the parish voted to ''to choose a committee to take a deed from 
Lieutenant Woodbury in behalf of said parish for the ground that the 
meeting-house stands on," a copy of which deed is now in our possession. 

In 1802 the parish voted to petition the Legislature to set it off from 
Amherst, and incorporate it as "a distinct town," and also to ask that 
a strip half a mile wide from Lyndeborough be joined with it. In 1803, 
December 15, the new town was incorporated under the name of Mont 
Vernon. 

In 1804 the town voted to "take a transfer of all parish matters" 
including all moneys, grants and obligations in favor of said parish, 
and thus the town succeeded the parish as trustee under the Woodbury 
deed, of the property conveyed by him to the parish. The town records 
show that the town exercised all parish functions in transacting minis- 
terial affairs (to use the exact language of the act incorporating the 
parish i. including the repairs and alterations in the meeting house, the 
care of and jurisdiction over the Woodbury property, the calling, set- 
tling and dismissing of the minister in connection with the church, and 
levying taxes to pay the minister's salary voted by the town. 

No mention of a "society" appears in the records until 1821, when 
the town voted "the interest of the funded money" (whatever that 
might have been), to "the Congregational society' for the support of 
of the Gospel," and this was passed annually for several years, and it 
seems that this was the town's only contribution to the minister's sala- 
ry, there being no mention of any tax levied for this purpose. 

In 1832 it was voted by the town that "the Rev. N. Kingsbury's 
society keep the meeting house in repair the present year." 

In 183b it was voted "to take the money called the ministerial mon- 
ey to defray the expenses of the town, to be paid into the town treasury. " 
This indicated a growing divorce between the town and its original 



100 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

parish functions, and in 1837 the town voted to choose a committee to 
confer with a committee of the Congregational society concerning 
"any proposition which might be made by said society for new model- 
ling of the meeting house. " 

The two committees were chosen and met and reported, and the 
town accepted the report and passed the following votes: 

(1). That the town unite with the Congregational society in this 
place in remodeling the meeting house. 

(2). That one-half the ground floor of said meeting house be appro- 
priated for a Town Hall. 

J). That the town finish the Town Hall appropriated for their 
use, and that they sustain the roof of said house, making all repairs 
which ma}- be required from time to time. 

(4). That the Congregational society be at the expense of all alter- 
ations excepting what pertain to the Town Hall; that the}" sustain the 
bod}' of the house, making all repairs which may be required from time 
to time, and that the said Congregational society have sole control of 
said house, excepting the Town Hall for the transaction of town busi- 
ness. 

(5). That the town choose an agent to convey their right or interest 
in the meeting house to the Congregational society, reserving the right 
to the town agreeably to the above votes. 

Jonathan Herrick was chosen the agent to make the conveyance, 
and he probably made it in due form, although there is no record of the 
same, any more than there is a record of the original conveyance by the 
parish to the town. 

It is not probable that any action has been taken on this subject by 
the town since 1837. until January 18, 1890. when it was voted that "the 
town relinquish all claims to the Town Hall, provided that another 
place is provided for town meetings.'" 

I have recapitulated these facts to show that this Congregational 
society had an existence many years ago, which was recognized by the 
town, and that it had and still has certain clear and indisputable rights 
in the property, jointly with the town; further, that it undoubtedly suc- 
ceeded to the functions for which the parish was established originally, 
and which the town for several years exercised, but finally transferred 
to, or allowed to be assumed by, the Congregational society. 

These facts had not become definitely and fully established by the 
record when your committee began its work, but they were assumed to 
exist because they coincided with the known practice of both the town 
and the society, and hence it was decided, on the whole, to be best to 
locate the new meeting house on the Woodbury lot, as retaining all 
rights of the society, which might be lost by removing its place of wor- 
ship to another locality, and on the whole, as being as convenient a 
location as could be found. 

To utilize this location it seemed wise to move the parsonage down 
the hill and erect the meeting: house substantially on the vacated site. 
This job was let to Mr. Haviford Thompson of Milford, who began work 
in August, and had completed the same about the first of September. 
This change has been a great improvement to the parsonage, which 
now has a large, high-posted cellar, in place of a little hole in the ledge, 
and by the kindness of Dr. Kittredge has an ample supply of excellent 
water, whereas before it had next to none. The change also enabled 
other improvements to be made in the parsonage, and a considerable 
portion of the amount expended upon it out of the church building fund 
would properly be chargeable to some other account. 

The total amount of money, including- that represented by savings 
bank books at their face value received up to date, has been 311, 702.01. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 101 



Of this amount, including interest reckoned to July 1, 1894, there is 
$832.73 on three books in the Milford Saving's bank, on which only 10 
per cent has been paid, leaving - to be collected in the uncertain future, 
if ever, $749.47. There have been sundry subscriptions in work, the 
exact amount of which can only be estimated. The cost of the church, 
iucluding the moving and improvements of the parsonage, the carpet, 
the chairs for the vestry, the furnaces and the pulpit, architect's serv- 
ices and insurance is, in round numbers, S12,000. The original prop- 
osition was to build the church, without furnishings, for $11,000. This 
has actually been bettered, and if our Milford Saving bank money had 
been good for its face, we should have come out without any considera- 
ble shortage. As it is, we shall need a round $1000 to clear up our 
obligations, leaving the money at Milford as, perhaps, a "permanent 
investment. " 

It is impossible to estimate accurately the number of individual 
contributors, as the money deposited in the savings banks represent 
manj T whose names are not known, as well as sums accumulated by the 
Home Circle and the King's Daughters. But of the total amount re- 
ceived, $8233 in spot cash was given by persons non-resident in the town, 
and aside from the amounts coming frjom the savings banks, the indi- 
vidual contributions of residents of the town is less than $1150, and of 
this amount $825 was contributed by five persons. 

And now, Mr. President, in behalf of the committee, I turn over to 
you the keys of this beautiful house of worship, so well appointed for 
its purposes, and in which every citizen of this little town may, if he 
will, have an equal proprietary interest, and in which all should feel 
a common pride. Beyond and beside the sacred use to which it is about 
to be dedicated, it will prove that "thing of beauty" which "is a joy 
forever," and a material minister to the needs and wants of a communi- 
ty which depends so largely on the outside world for its subsistence. 

The society which you represent, as I have shown, is an ancient or- 
ganization, with an honorable and self-denying record. It has main- 
tained the faith of the fathers these many years in the old meeting 
house, it will do no less in this more modern temple as the years go by. 

DEACON CONANT ACCEPTS. 

The acceptance of the building was by the president of the so- 
ciety, Deacon William H. Conant. The deacon spoke as follows : 

"It becomes my pleasant duty as president of the Congregational 
society to extend our heartfelt gratitude to the building committee for 
its self-denying faithfulness and devotion in the months past, until they 
present today this completed and beautiful church edifice, admirably 
adapted to the purpose for which it was designed. A good Providence 
has raised up and qualified these men to call forth gifts, quicken en- 
thusiasm, inspire confidence, harmonize conflicting views and manage, 
with wisdom and discretion, this work so as to get the best results for 
the amount expended. And they have spared no time or effort to make 
the enterprise a success. 

"We also wish to express our obligation to those kind and benevo- 
lent ladies whose ancestors lived here for many generations, who 
suggested the building of a new church instead of repairing the old one, 
and who contributed so large a proportion of the amount necessary to 
its accomplishment. Also to the numerous friends and donors, many 



102 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

of whom are with us today; to the Home Circle, the King's Daughters 
and other organizations who have for years worked patiently and saved 
for this object; and to all who have by the smallest word of encourage- 
ment or in the humblest way contributed to the result. 

"I accept in behalf of the society the keys to the building with a 
sense of the obligation which they imply and the labor and sacrifice 
which this finished temple represents. The Lord has indeed done great 
things for us, whereof we are glad. We promise that it shall be held 
for the high and sacred purposes for which it was intended and to which 
today it is dedicated. We hope it will enable us to hold the Christian 
Sabbath and Christian worship to us and our children in the coming 
years. 

"And while some have thought that this church is too good for this 
little town on the hilltop, we regard it as none too good for the Master 
we love and the God we serve. It must be our effort to avail ourselves 
of our new and increased facilities for worship, t) enlarge our faith, 
our zeal, our Christian hope, to the full measure of our enlarged privi- 
leges and opportunities, and to make this church a witness to the truth 
in the present and in coming years " 

When Deacon Conant had finished and a collection had been 
taken, the choir and congregation sang a hymn written for the occa- 
sion by H. Porter Smith of Cambridge, Mass. 

The dedicatory sermon was preached by the Rev. Dr. Nehemiah 
Boynton of Detroit, Mich., formerly pastor of the Union Congrega- 
tional Church, Boston. His address was a masterly effort and thrilled 
his congregation with its eloquence. His text was found in Ephesians 
v: 27, ''That he might present it to himself a glorious church, not 
having spot or wrinkle, or any such thing; but that it should be holy 
and without blemish." 

Dr. Boynton's address was a strong dissertation on the church. 
He began by defining the chur h as the "social state permeated by 
the spirit of Jesus Christ." He enlarged upon his theme and painted 
beautifully the majestic life of love and sanctity passed by the 
Saviour. 

Speaking of the motive of the church, Dr Boynton said it was 
the worship of God. "Go where you may," he argued, "and you 
will find that the instinct to worship will show itself in some form, 
even though the manifestation be a feeble one." 

The preacher advocated beautiful church buildings, arguing that 
the beautiful is sometimes more useful than the useful itself. "No 
church is too beautiful for God," he said. 

Rev. William H. Hopkins of Poughkeepsie read a hymn, written 
for the occasion by Deacon W. H Conant. 

The dedicatory prayer was offered by the Rev. Warren R. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 103 

Cochrane, D.D., of Antrim, and the benediction was given by the 
pastor, the Rev. T. J. Lewis. 

In the evening a somewhat inform il meeting was held in the 
church, at which Hon. Geo. A. Harden presided. Addresses were 
made by several gentlemen, and there was music. The chief feature, 
however, was the raising about a thousand dollars to provide for 
that amount of indebtedness, due to the fact that money subscribed 
was locked up in several suspended New Hampshire savings banks. 
It is but fair to say that nearly all this amount was afterwards paid 
by the banks. The proceedings in raising the money were exceed 
ing merry, and the result was that every dollar required was pledged 
before the meeting adjourned. 

The Church Edifice. 

The architect to whose skill and taste the little church owes its 
beauty, elegance and adaptedness to its purpose, was Mr. G. "Wilton 
Lewis, of Boston. It is a model structure, and is one of the chief 
attractions of the village. 

The general design of the new edifice is of the picturesque colo- 
nial, with details of the renaissance, and is charmingly adapted to its 
situation, overlooking from its lofty eminence a wide prospect over 
the plains below, with the neighboring villages of Milford, Amherst, 
and Merrimack, and the cities of Nashua, Manchester and Lowell. 

The walls, to the height of the window sills, are of field stones ; 
thence to the ridge-pole is frame, clothed with shingles. The roof is 
olive-stained, to complement the rustic, moss-covered field stone, 
separated by walls of yellow brown and trimmings of cream white. 
Many of the stones used in the wall were brought by persons inter- 
ested in the building, picking up here and there in their drives about 
the country any that were distinguished for their beauty. 

In plan it forms a cross, with the apse at the north, lighted by 
five small windows, and flanked on the east by the organ loft and 
choir gallery, and on the west by the pastor's room. 

The auditory is 53x36 feet in area, and has a seating capacity 
of 300. It is well lighted at the east and west by large triple win- 
dows under the gables. Under the roof of the cloister and in the 
opposite wall these windows are filled with bevel plate glass, provid- 
ing a fresco of nature, far exceeding that of art, in the wide and 
distant expanse of mountain and valley. 



104 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

The remainder of the windows above are memorials in artistic 
stained glass, set in lead, giving richness of effect. At the south 
three large flexifold doors screen the Sunday school and prayer meet- 
ing room, which is of a semi-circular shape, with a seating capacity 
of 150 ; also a ladies' parlor and primary department, with 50 sittings. 
These last rooms open into each other, as well as the auditory, mak- 
ing a comfortable capacity for 500 sittings, all within good view of 
the pulpit. 

There is an ample supper room for special occasions, provided 
with kitchen conveniences complete. 

A ladies' room is provided, with a large brick- fireplace, securing 
comfort and ventilation. 

The Sunday school library is in a niche provided for that pur- 
pose, enclos d in diamond sash doors. 

The finish of the building is quartered oak, finished light, mak- 
ing the interior of the Puritan order, while the walls are tinted with 
colors complementing the woodwork, and ornamented in graceful 
designs. The building is heated by a wood furnace of great capacity. 

There is a porte cochere at the tower entrance The tower is 
large, surmounted by a belfry and lookout. 

The building is practically a memorial church. The two chief 
donors to the building fund, Mrs. Richardson and Miss Stevens, 
made their contributions in memory of their father, Calvin Stevens, 
a native of this town, the son of Asa Stevens, and the grandson of 
Calvin Stevens, a Revolutionary soldier, who fought at Bunker Hill, 
and who spent his last years in Mont Vernon, where he lies buried; 
also in memory of their mother, who in earlier years was a frequent 
visitor in the town. There are fourteen memorial windows in the 
edifice, several of them large and of artistic beauty. One of these is 
for Deacon William Conant and his wife, given by their grandchil- 
dren. It is a figure of the Madonna and Child. Mrs. Charles F. 
Frasse of New York, provided a beautiful window in memory of her 
father, Asa Stevens, a brother of Calvin. The figure is that of St. 
John, and it is perhaps the finest window in the church. The friends 
of the late John F. Colby, Esq., of Boston, gave an elegant window 
bearing a representation of Hoffman's Christ, standiug with out- 
stretched arms and open hands. Mr. Colby graduated at Appleton 
Academy, married Miss Ruth E. Cloutman, a native of Mont Vernon, 
had a summer home in town for many years, and was one of its most 
ardent admirers. He was the father of John H. Colby of the build- 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 105 

ing committee. Another of the large windows is in memory of Capt. 
Timothy Kittredge and his wife, the former a native, and both life- 
long residents of the town, and very prominent in the town and 
church. The window was given by their children. 

Other windows are in memory of Esther Clontman Gray, who for 
many years was organist of the church, one in memory of Thomas 
Henry Stinson, another in memory of Deacon George E. Dean, giv- 
en by his daughter, Miss Harriet A. Dean of Dorchester, (Boston) 
Mass. ; and one for John Smith. 

A handsome communion table is a memorial of the late Major 
Charles F. Stinson, a veteran of the Civil War and a deacon of the 
church ; this table being a gift of his widow. 

The pulpit was the gift of the pastor, Rev. Thomas J. Lewis. 

The old organ in the old meeting-house was considered past 
usefulness. The resources of the people were not sufficient to war- 
rant a new up-to-date pipe organ. But a very acceptable substitute 
was found in a Mason & Risch Vocalion, built in Worcester, Mass., 
which is described as«"a reed organ with pipe effects." It cost- 
$855, and was paid for, $300 down, and balance in instalments, chief- 
ly through the efforts of the Home Circle. It is substantially the 
equivalent of a pipe organ that would have cost $2500, and was pro- 
nounced, by prominent organists who have tried it, a very satisfactory 
substitute for a pipe organ. It was set up and in order for the 
dedicatory services. 

The deed of the laud by James Woodbury to the Second Parish 
of Amherst, for a meeting-house site, provided that if it were not used 
for this purpose, it should revert to the heirs of James Woodbury. 

The deed was di'awn by James Woodbury himself, in 1787. He 
was an ancestor of Judge Charles Levi Woodbury of Boston. He 
was a surveyor, and was granted a square mile of land on top of this 
hill "in consideration for services rendered as surveyor." 



CHAPTER IX. 



EDUCATIONAL. 

The Public Schools — Before the Town Was Incorporated — 
Names of Early Pupils — Aurean Academy at Amherst — A 
Latin Grammar School — Money Appropriated to North- 
west Parish — Appropriations Since Incorporation of Town 
— The Literary Fund— Decline in Population — Increase of 
Appropriations — Superintending Committees — Appleton 
Academy — Its Real Beginning — First Academy Hall — Built 
by Shareholders — Incorporation of Academy — Meagre Rec- 
ords — Organization of Trustees — Nabies of Pupils First 
Term — Mr. Clough as Principal — Mr. George Stevens's 
Success — First Printed Catalogue— His Assistants — When 
and Why He Left — The Neay Academy Building — Purchase 
of Kittredge Place by Mr. Stevens — Sale of Lot for Acad- 
emy Site — Name of Academy — Library Given by Mr. Apple- 
ton — Building Fund Subscriptions — Erection of Building — 
A Permanent Fund — Sketches of King, Berry. Bancroft 
and Other Principals. 

Mont Vernon, prior to the close of 1803, was an integral part of 
Amherst. Whatever of schooling its adult inhabitants had received 
they had obtained from the school privi'eges provided by the mother 
town, and used by them as a part of its population. 

By the records we find that in 1762 it was voted, ''To keep a 
school iu five divisions, the selectmen to divide;" but as uo appropri- 
ation was made, this was only a prophecy of what they would do 
years later. The first appropriation was made in 1771, when the 
town of Amherst voted twenty p >unds lawful money for schooling, 
and that "the school be kept some part of the time in several parts 
of the town." Also voted that the people of the towu "keep as many 
schools as they see fit, and each family that does keep a school 
shall be entitled to draw their proportion of the money above granted." 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 107 

The next year twenty-six pounds and two-thirds of a pound were 
voted. 

But little attention was paid to other than private instruction 
through the Revolutionary War. In 1778 it was "Voted to keep a 
grammar school," and in that and the year following the names of two 
teachers appear as thus employed. March 8, 1779, the town was di- 
vided into "squadrons" for schools, each to draw its proportion of 
the money appropriated. They made an appropriation this year, and 
gradually increased it each subsequent year. 

In 1781 it was voted "the schools be kept by each neighborhood 
classing together." In 1787 a grammar school in the Centre District 
of Amherst was provided for, conditioned "that the district shall 
make up to the master in a private way what their proportion of the 
school money falls short of an adequate salary." 

This year at same meeting, a committee of whom Rev. John 
Bruce was one, was appointed "to examine the ability of schoolmas- 
ters and mistresses," and none should be employed in any district, 
but those recommended by them. From 1787 to 1793 the annual 
appropriation for schools was one hundred and fifty pounds. In 
1789 the town voted to "excuse such as had united for the support of 
an academy from the payment of any school tax, so long as they 
should sustain the proposed academy." The use of the townhouse for 
school purposes was also granted them. 

Isaac Brooks of Woburu, Mass., afterwards for many years 
Register of Deeds at Amherst, N. H., kept a private school in the 
North- West Parish as follows : — 

"Tuesday 8 December, 1789, began a school at the North West 
Parish, by an agreement with Dr. Zeph. Kittredge. The names of 
pupils are as follows : 

Dorcas Cleaves, Jno. Fuller, 

Betsey Cleaves, Wm. Fuller, 

Sail} 7 Cleaves, Hannah Hazelton, 

Nath'l Cleaves, Zeph. Kittredge, 

Polly Cleaves, Asa Kittredge, 

Huldah Chaves, Ingalls Kittredge, 

Amos Dodge, Sally Kittredge, 

Sam'l Duncklee, Peter Kittredge, 

Sally Duncklee, Nabby Kittredge, 

Polly Duncklee, Rob't Parker, 

Anna Duncklee, Hannah Perkins, 



108 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Jno. Felton, Mark Perkins, 

Elisha Felton, Sally Stearns. 

Rachel Felton, 

"Wednesday March 10th, 1790, finished keepiug three yearly 
months' school." 

February 10, 1791, an act of incorporation was granted for the 
"Aurean Academy" at Amherst. Twenty-six of the thirty-one grant- 
ees were of Amherst, and five from other towns. Nathan Cleaves 
was the only grantee in the Second Parish. This school soon after 
went into operation. It had an existence of ten years, and ten pre- 
ceptors, among whom were J. Heywood and Daniel Weston from the 
North West Parish. In 1810 this academy was finally closed for lack 
of funds. 

At that time a law was in effect requiring that "in shire and half- 
shire towns, a portion of the school money shall be applied for the 
support of a Latin Grammar School" or a school in which that lan- 
guage might be taught, if desired. This will explain the following 
votes : 

Api'il 13, 1801, Voted, "that the grammar school be kept eight 
months in the First Parish and four months in the Second Parish, 
this year." 

March 3, 1803, seven hundred dollars was appropriated for 
schools, three hundred dollars of which was to be used for the sup- 
port of grammar schools, the Centre District of the First Parish to 
have two hundred dollars, and that of the Second Parish to have one 
hundred dollars ; and it was provided that every person in town have 
liberty to send to the grammar school. 

These votes will explain the fact that for several years immedi- 
ately preceding the incorporation of Mont Vernon, a school of high 
character had been kept in the Center District — a select school, open 
to any in the parish. David Dodge and Ephraim P. Bradford were 
two of its teachers. 

At the first annual meeting of the new town, March 13, 1804, it 
was voted to raise two hundred dollars for schooling, and to choose 
a committee of twelve persons to class the town for the convenience 
of schooling. March 27th this committee presented their report, di- 
viding the town into five school districts [classes] and defining their 
respective limits. 

May 1, 1804, accepted the report of committee, and voted to 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 109 

raise money to build new school-houses in three of the districts ; voted 
to raise one thousand dollars for this purpose. 

March 12, 1805, appropriated three hundred dollars for schooling 
during the current year. This sum was raised each successive year 
until 1822, when it was increased to three hundred and fifty dollars. 
In 1830, there having been a small source of revenue (about thirty 
dollars) derived from the "literary fund," applied to schools, the 
town voted but three hundred dollars which was the amount of ap- 
propriation, until, in the year 1851, it was increased to four hundred 
dollars, in 1853 advanced to four hundred and fifty dollars, and in 
185-4 fixed at five hundred dollars; which being augmented by the 
"literary fund" amounted to five hundred and sixty dollars, the av- 
erage amount devoted to schools between 185-4 and 1870. In the 
latter year two hundred dollars additional school money was voted, 
and it was continued annually for fifteen years, making an average of 
seven hundred and sixty dollars expended upon the district schools an- 
nually. 

From 1889 until 1893, the town voted seven hundred dollars an- 
nually for schools ; in 1893, eight hundred dollars ; 1894, nine hundred 
dollars; 1895, nine hundred dollars; 1896, seven hundred dollars; 
1897, nine hundred dollars ; 1898, one thousand dollars; and each 
year thereafter to this writing (1905) one thousand dollars. 

Additional to this, since 1871, the town has given McCollom In- 
stitute a total of over 87000, in payment of tuition of town pupils in 
this institution, in annual grants of from 8200 to §300 to pay the 
tuition of town scholars who attended it. 

The "Literary Fund" is fully explained in the following extracts 
from the compilation of the 'Laws of New Hampshire Relating to 
Public Schools," by the Department of Public Instruction, from the 
Public Statutes, and the Session Laws, 189-1905 inclusive; 

"All taxes collected by the state upon the deposits, stock and at- 
tending accumulations of depositors and stock-holders of savings banks, 
trust companies, loan and trust companies, loan and banking- compa- 
nies, building- and loan associations, and other similar corporations, 
who do not reside in this state, or whose residence is unknown, shall be 
known as the 'literary fund. ' 

"The state treasurer shall assign and distribute, in November of 
each year, the literary fund among the towns and places in proportion 
to the number of scholars not less than five years of age who shall, by 
the last reports of the school boards returned to the superintendent of 
public instruction, appear to have attended the public schools in such 
towns and places not less than two weeks within that year. 

"No unincorporated place shall receive its portion until a treasurer 



110 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

or school agent shall have been chosen to receive and appropriate the 
same as required by law. 

"The portion of the literary fund so received by any town or place 
shall be assigned to the districts as other school money, and shall be 
applied to the maintenance of the public schools during the current year; 
one fifth part thereof may be applied by the school board to the pur- 
chase of blackboards, dictionaries, maps, charts, and school apparatus. 

"If am' town or incorporated place or the agent of any unincorpo- 
rated place shall apply any money so received to any other purpose, 
the town, place, or agent so offending shall refund to the state treasury 
double the sum so misapplied. " 

With the decline of population has come a diminution of the num- 
ber of pupils in our district schools. In 1859, the whole number was 
one hundred and forty-nine; and in 1860, was one hundred and six- 
ty-seven. For the years 1884-1885 it was less than one hundred of 
total attendance, and now (1905) is barely fifty. The school money 
has increased about in the ratio that the number of those receiving its 
benefits have been diminished. 

From 1803 to 1818, there is no record of any special superin- 
tendence of schools by an examining committee. For ten years. 
inclusive, from 1818, a superintending committee, consisting of three 
persons, were chosen by the voters at the annual town meeting. Be- 
low are the names of these, with the number of years they served : 

Dr. Daniel Adams, ten years; Jonathan S. Adams, nine years; 
John Prentiss, one year; Artemas Wood, four years; Rev. Ebenezer 
Cheever, three years; Aaron F. Sawyer, three years. From 1*27 to 
1840-41, there is no trace of a superintending committee. The Board 
of Selectmen made the appointment from 1841 to 1*77, since which 
the voters have done it at the March meeting for the choice of town 
officers. The persons who held the office from 1841 to 1853 were 
Dr. Daniel Adams, Rev. Bezaleel Smith, Samuel Campbell, Dr. Sam- 
uel G. Dearborn and Rev. C. D. Herbert. From 1852 until 1887 the 
committee consisted of one person only : 1853-56, R v. Charles D. 
Herbert; 1857-59, Rev. Augustus Berry; 1860-64, Charles J. Smith: 
1865-66, Charles A. Towle ; 1867, Joshua V. Smith; 1868-72, Charles 
J. Smith; 1873-77, George W. Todd : 1878, J. W. Carson: 1879, 
Charles J. Smith; 1880, William H. Ray: 1881-86, inclusive, Charles 
J. Smith. 

A new educational law took effect in 1886 providing for a school 
board of three persons after the first election, one to be elected every 
year, each board consisting of three persons : the first election being 
one for one year, one for two years, one for three years, after which 
every newly elected member of the board served for three years. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. Ill 

Charles J. Smith served in 1886, '88, '89, '90; John W. Carson, 
1886, '87; William H. Kendall, 1886 to 1892, six years; Mrs. Clark 
Campbell, nine years, 1887-'93, '95-'98; Col. W. H. Stinson, three 
years, 1892-'95 ; F. O. Lamson, ten years, 1891-1900; W. F. Pink- 
ham, one year, 1893 ; Joseph O. Carleton, two years, 1894-'96 ; Mrs. 
Annie E. Perham, 1896-1900, four years ; Henry F. Dodge, three 
years, 1898-1901; Marietta A. Lamson, 1901-'03; Mrs. C. H. Trow, 
1902-'04; Mrs. W. H. Kendall, 1903, '04. At this time the incum- 
bents all resigned, and Messrs. Jay M. Gleason, George C. Hadley, 
and Willard P. Woods were elected, and are serving at this writing 
(1905). 

The schools of late years have suffered as in all sparsely settled 
New England towns, from the paucity of children, the lack of money, 
and the scattered school districts. So few pupils were in attendance 
that there was a lack of the stimulus which in larger schools encour- 
ages competition in study, and excites an interest which is so healthful 
to the minds and efforts of children. Attempts have been made at 
several times to induce the town to abolish the district system, as 
may be done under existing laws, and to assemble all the children of 
school age at the Center district, where a single properly graded 
school might be conducted, with competent teachers, and by a con- 
centration of money expended, longer terms might be had, as well as 
schools much better in character and efficiency. The wages paid are 
so small that it is impossible to secure trained and experienced teach- 
ers, and the entire condition conduces to inefficient and inadequate 
school privileges. 

APPLETON ACADEMY. 

The chief factor and feature in the educational history of Mont 
Vernon has been its Academy. This institution was incorporated in 
1850, and bore the name "Appleton Academy" until 1871, when it 
was renamed The "McCollom Institute", which name it still bears, 
though it has ceased to perform the functions of an Academy, owing 
to changed conditions, and does duty, without change of name, as 
the Mont Vernon High school, having not, at this writing, a single 
pupil from beyond the limits of th town, an I only eleven all told. 

The history of this institution of learning is most interesting, 
and is a monument to the aspirations and achievements of the men 
who lived in this town about the middle of the first century of its ex- 



112 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

istence, as well as to their sacrifices that their children might have 
better educational advantages. 

The real genesis of the Academy antedates its incorporation some 
three years, and is to be found in a fall term of a "high school", as 
it was called, in the vestry in the first story of the old Meeting- 
House, and taught by George Stevens, in the autumn of 1847. Mr. 
Stevens was the son of the widow Tabitha Stevens, who had lately 
removed from Hancock to Mont Vernon. He was at the time a jun- 
ior in Dartmouth college, where he graduated in the class of 1849. 

This sort of a school had been of nearly, if not quite, annual 
occurrence since 1835, usually being taught by college undergradu- 
ates, and naturally many of them came from Dartmouth Mr. Stev- 
ens was a teacher of rare capacity He not only knew, but he had 
an unusual faculty for making others know and remember In this 
special term he so aroused the interest of the people that they were 
more than ever eager to establish a permanent school And they at 
once set about getting ready for one 

The Centre District school-house was then a typical New Eng- 
land "little red school-house," standing where its successor was so 
soon to be erected It was too small to accommodate the children in 
the district. 

In 1848 the district voted to build a new school house. This 
seemed a favorable opportunity to secure some sort of quarters for 
the proposed higher school, and in November of that year the fol- 
lowing subscription paper was started, to raise money with which to 
house the Academy which it was proposed to establish, by putting on 
a second story over the room to be devoted to the district school. The 
response, as will be seen below, was quick and generous. 

November, 1848. 

Whereas the Centre School District in the town of Mont Vernon is 
about to build a school house, and at a legal Meeting- of said District, 
they voted that individuals might have the privilege of putting on a 
second story on said schoolhouse for a public school, etc., by paying the 
expense thereof, 

Therefore, it is thought best to raise the sum necessary to carry in- 
to effect the aforesaid object, that it be made into shares of five dollars 
each, and we severally agree to take the number of shares set to our 
names, and pay the same when wanted to any person authorized by 
said shareholders to receive the same, providing enough be raised to 
defray the whole expense. 




APPLETOX ACADEMY— McCOLLOM INSTITUTE. 

First occupied in fall of 1853. 

( Piazza and Porte Cochere added later.) 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



113 



NAMES. NO. SHARES. 

Asa Kendall, 1 

S. N. Stevens, 1 

William H. Conant, 1 

I. C. Richardson, 1 

David Boardman, 2 

David Dutton, 1 

Nathaniel Bruce, 2 

D. W. Baker, 3 

Win. A. Stinson, 2 

Mrs. Hanah Whittemore, 1 

Jesse Averill, 3 

Z. Kittredge, 3d, 1 

John Carleton, 1 

James Bruce, 2 

Mrs. Elizabeth Bruce, 1 

Timothy Kittredge, 2 

Joseph Harwood, 2 

Luther Odell. 2 

Milton McCollom, 2 

Joseph P. Trow. 1 

Daniel Adams, 3 
J. E. Bruce, 
Clinton Roby, 
Bezaleel Smith, 
Mr. Joseph Perkins, 
Dr. Dearborn, 
Albert G. Starrett, 

Rev. Mr. Herbert, 2 
Total, 102 shares. 

The names comprise an undoubted majority of all the legal voters 
in the district, and also some women who had no male representatives 
in their families. As was to have been expected, Dea. "Wm. Conant, 
Mr F O. Kittredge, Dea John Bruce, Dr. J K Smith, and Dea 
J A Starrett were the largest subscribers. The amounts were not 
large, but for the immediate purpose they were sufficient. The num- 
ber of shares at first subscribed was 102, and the capital stock 
amounted to S510. Later when the Academy had been incorporated, 
and a commodious new Academy building was called for, these same 
men and women subscribed what were, for them, large sums for the 
object they had so much at heart. 

The school-house was a very well constructed building, with a 
district school-room and entry on the first floor, and a room for "high- 
er education," reached by a stairway in the corner opposite the dis- 



NAMES. NO. SHARES. 


Wm. Conant. 


6 


Luther Wisewell, 


2 


Newell D. Foster, 


1 


H. H. Bragg, 


3 


J. A. Starrett, 


5 


Wm. A. Starrett, 


1 


John Elliott, 


1 


John Bruce, 


5 


J. K. Smith, 


5 


Thos. H. Richardson, 


3 


Chas. A. Gray, 


1 


Thomas Cloutman, 


3 


Wm. Bruce, 


1 


Isaac Foster, 


1 


Asa Wetherbee. 


1 


F. O. Kittredge, 


5 


Hiram Perkins, 


2 


Charles Marble, 


1 


C. B. Southworth. 


1 


H. C. Dodge, 


1 


Ira Kendall. 


1 


Zephaniah Kittredge, 


2 


S. Bancroft, 


1 


Joseph Trow, Jr., 


1 


Porter Kendall, 


1 


Matthew G. Rotch 


2 


Mark D. Perkins, 


1 


Wm. G. Bruce, 


1 



114 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

tact school entry, and an ante-room over the same. To the admiring 
youth and their ambitious parents it seemed a very spacious and 
commodious educational home. Just when it was opened for use 
does not appear. But at the June session of the Legislature, 1850, 
the following act of incorporation was passed, it being Chapter 105, 
of the Laws of 1850 ; 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

In the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty. An 
act to incorporate the Appleton Academy. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives in General Court convened that Nathaniel Bruce, D. W. Baker, 
Wm. Conant, S. G. Dearborn, J. A. Starrett, F. O. Kittredge, their 
associates and successors, be and hereby are incorporated by the name 
of the Appleton Academy, and by that name may sue and be sued, pros- 
ecute and defend to final judgment and execution, and shall be and 
hereby are vested with all the powers and privileges, and subject to all 
the liabilities which by law are incident to corporations of a similar 
character. 

Section 2. That said corporation is hereby authorized and empow- 
ered to acquire by purchase or otherwise, suitable buildings for ac- 
ademical purposes, and may hold real estate to the amount of three 
thousand dollars, and the same may sell, convey and dispose of, at 
pleasure, and ma}' receive by donation or otherwise personal estate to 
the amount of twenty thousand dollars, the interest of which shall be 
expended to defray the expenses of said Academy. 

Section 3. That said Academy shall be located in the town of Mont 
Vernon, in the county of Hillsborough, and Nathaniel Bruce, D. W. 
Baker, and William Conant or any two of the aforesaid grantees, may 
call the first meeting of said corporation by giving ten days' personal 
notice or by posting up three notices of the time and place of meeting in 
the most public places in said town of Mont Vernon, at least fifteen 
days prior to said meeting, at which meeting, or some subsequent one, 
they shall choose all necessary officers and adopt such rules and regu- 
lations as may be necssary or useful, not being contrary to the laws of 
the State. 

Section 4. The legislature may- alter, amend or repeal this act at 
any time when the public good may require it. 

N. B. BAKER, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

RICHARD JENNESS, President of the Senate. 

Approved Jul}' 13, 1850. 

SAM'L DINSMOOR, Governor. 

The "Grantees and Associates" were summoned to meet at 
"Academy Hall," on Monday, August 5, 1^50, at five o'clock p. m., 
"to see if they would accept the act of incorporation," and, if they 
did, "to choose all necessary officers, and adopt such rules and reg- 
ulations as may be necessary to carry into effect the objects of the 
grantees." The notice was signed by Nathaniel Bruce and William 
Conant, two of the grantees, authorized to call the first meeting. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 115 

It appears from this that the "Academy Hall" must have been 
finished. The grantees met and were called to order by Nathaniel 
Bruce who was chosen moderator, aud Dr. S. G. Dearborn, clerk, pro 
tern. It was voted to accept the act of incorporation, and that share- 
holders might become "associate grantees," and Newell D. Foster, 
Dea. John Bruce, Thos. H. Richardson, Thomas Cloutman, Isaac C. 
Richardson and James Bruce were added to the list of grantees. 
Messrs. N. Brnce and Dr. Dearborn were appointed to draft "rules 
and regulations for the corporation," and the meeting adjourned to 
meet "on Monday next." 

At the adjourned meeting by-laws were reported and adopted, 
and a committee was chosen to invite the rest of the share-holders to 
become "associates," which seem to have been the same as "grantees." 

August 17, an adjourned meeting of the corporation was held. 
and S. G. Dearborn was elected clerk, and Matthew G. Rotch, treas- 
urer. William Conant, Nathaniel Bruce, Samuel G. Dearborn, 
Franklin O. Kittredge, Joseph A. Starrett, James Bruce, and Hiram 
Perkins were elected as the first Board of Trustees. A large number 
of shareholders were voted in as associates or grantees. 

August 23, a set of By-Laws of Appleton Academy were adopted, 
and as they show the animus of the founders of the institution the 
salient points are given herewith. 

The annual meeting was fixed for the first Monday in August. 

The officers of the corporation were a Clerk, a Treasurer and seven 

Trustees, to be elected by major vote of the shareholders, each share 

being entitled to one vote. Section 3 was as follows : 

"All persons who have paid five dollars or more towards the 
building which is contemplated for a public school, shall be Associates 
unless they shall object thereto; and any person who has not already 
paid anything toward the aforesaid building may become associated 
with us, on recommendation of the Trustees, and the payment of five 
dollars to the Treasurer of said corporation, taking his receipt there- 
for." 

The Board were to choose one of their own number as President, 
who was to appoint "a visiting committee, whose duty it shall be to 
visit the school from time to time, and make such examination as 
may be necessary to see that the school is conducted in the best pos- 
sible manner; and if anything is ascertained by them which they 
think is wrong, or anything is suggested to their minds which would 
be beneficial to said school, they shall report the same to the Board of 
Trustees, who shall forthwith take such action as is necessary in the 



116 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

premises. The trustees shall also transact any business to the sus- 
taining of the aforesaid Academy. 

"They may agree with some suitable person to open a school so 
many terms as may be thought best, during the year, providing he 
will take the use of the room and open the school upon his own re- 
sponsibility. But in no case shall they have power to hir teachers 
without being directed by a special vote of said corporation." 

After providing for filling vacancies, etc., the following article, 
showing the expectations for future prosperity was adopted : 

"Art. 9. All moneys received by donation or otherwise, after 
paying for the Academy building and fixtures, shall be appropriated 
for the purchase of such apparatus as is most needed, until said Acad- 
emy is well supplied, and the residue to be retained as a fund of said 
corporation to be placed at interest with good security. 

"Art. 10. As this corporation was not intended for a money- 
making business, but simply for educational purposes, therefore no 
officer in this corporation shall receive any compensation for his ser- 
vices, except the honor which he may win fulfilling them satisfacto- 
rily to himself and others." 

The Board then organized by the choice of Nathaniel Bruce as 
President, and Rev. Charles D. Herbert, Dr. S. G. Dearborn, Samuel 
Campbell, Capt. Timothy Kittredge, George E. Dean, George W. 
Stinsoii, John Averill, Ira Kendall, Jesse Robinson, T. H. Richard- 
son, Rev. Bezaleel Smith, Dea. John Bruce. J. H. Goodale, esq., 
Rev. J. G. Davis and Edward D. Boylston of Amherst, Rev. E. B. 
Claggett of Lyndeboro, Dr. Kittredge of Nashua, Dr. Daniel Adams 
of Keene, Oliver Bixby and Rev. E. N. Hidden of Milford, as a vis- 
iting commitee. The Rev. Mr. Herbert had just been called to suc- 
ceed the Rev. Bezaleel Smith as pastor, and the latter had not left 
town, which accounts for both being on the list. 

Strangely enough the record book of the Trustees of Appleton 
Academy does not contain any account of the first term of school 
which was conducted after the passage of, if not under, the act of in- 
corporation. It was held in the new Academy Hall, however, in the 
autumn of 1850. Lucien B. Clough was its first principal, assisted 
by John Ordronaux, a graduate of Dartmouth, and since a distin- 
guished professor of Medical Jurisprudence in Columbia College for 
many years. The first was afterward a most respectable lawyer in 
Manchester, and the last has long enjoyed wide celebrity for his ability 
as a public teacher of law and medicine in the city of New York. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 117 

The announcement of the opening of the school appeared in the 
Farmers' Cabinet of Aug. 15, 1850, and was as follows: 

APPLETON ACADEMY 

AT 

MONT VERNON, N. H. 

The Trustees of Appleton Academy take pleasure in announcing to 
the friends of education, that they have recently completed their build- 
ing - , and are now prepared to open it to the public. 

They feel assured that the pleasant location of this Institution, and 
the universal interest of the people of ont Vernon will insure success. 
And they also natter themselves that the}' have secured such Teachers 
as will entitle them to a patronage and give satisfaction to those who 
ma} 7 avail themselves of the opportunity offered them. 

The First Session will commence Aug. 21, and continue 12 weeks, 
under the instruction of L. B. Clough, A.B., aided by competent assis- 
tants. Tuition: Common English Branches, S3. 50. Latin and Higher 
Branches, $4.00. 

Board can be had in good families, including rooms and lights, for 
Si .50 per week. Rooms can be obtained by students wishing to board 
themselves. 

Per order of the Trustees. 
For more particular information address 

Nathaniel Bruce, Esq., 
Dea. Wm. Con ant, 
D. W. Baker, Esq., 
Thomas Cloutman, Esq., 
F. O. Kittredge, Esq. 

The following is a list of the pupils during the term. There was 
no printed catalogue, but the list was preserved by Principal Clough 
and furnished by him, in response to a request made by the Rev. C. 
C. Carpenter, under date of August 16, 1884: 

Averill, Almira J. Clough, M. C. 

Averill, Carrie Clough, Abbie C. 

Baldwin, Sabrina F. Clough, F. V. B. 

Baldwin, Susan A. Conant, Walter S. 

Baldwin, Maria S. Dunbar, Annette E. 

Bancroft, Wm. H. C. Dunklee, G. W. 

Batchelder, Charles Foster, Samuel K. 

Batchelder, John A. French, Almira 

Batchelder, Nancy R. French, Clinton 

Brown, ? Hartshorn, John A. 

Bruce, Clarinda F. Hutchinson, ? 

Bruce, George A. Jones, Jane M. W. 

Bruce, James P. Kendall, Emeline 

Campbell, Wm. H. Kendall, Cyrene E. 

Campbell, Elizabeth M. Kittredge, Charles 

Cloutman, Sarah Emeline Kittredge, Harriet E. 



118 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Kittredge. Nancy M. Smith, Elizabeth J. 

Lang-dell, Frances Smith, H. Porter 

Perkins, Ann M. Starrett, Henrietta M. 

Putnam, Helen M. Stewart, Edmund P. 

Robinson, Mary E. Stinson, Sarah Ann 

Roby, Kilburn Towne, Emily 

Rotch, Albert M. Wheeler, E. M. 

Rotch. Maria Adelaide Wilkins, Nancy H. 
Smith, Augusta 

The total number of names above given is 49, which was a very 
good number to begiu with, before the school had fairly been organ- 
ized. With half a dozen exceptions the pupils were residents in 
Mont Vernon. Mr. Clough taught but a single term. 

Nothing was done towards permanently starting the school until 
January 26, 1851, when at a special meeting it was voted to make im- 
mediate arrangement for a Spring session of school, and Dea. Wm. 
Conant was authorized to procure a teacher. 

A week later the Deacon reported that it was thought that the 
encouragement was not sufficient for a Spring term of school, and it 
was voted to arrange for a Fall session. 

On the 3d of May, 1851, at a special meeting it was voted that 
individual members of the Board should "gather the necessary infor- 
mation relative to the school;" and on the 17th of May, Deacons 
Starrett and Conant were made a committee "to confer with George 
Stevens in regard to engaging his services as an instructor," and 
Nathaniel Bruce and F. Kittredge, were requested to draw up a 
paper certifying Mr. Stevens' terms, and to present the same to citi- 
zens soliciting their names to become responsible for the specified 
sum. 

June 16, at another special meeting, Hiram Perkins and Deacon 
Conant were a committee to secure board and rooms for students, 
and Esquire N. Bruce. S. G. Dearborn and F. 0. Kittredge were ap- 
pointed to prepare a notice or announcement of the commencement of 
the school; and at an adjourned meeting June 23d, the notice was 
reported and adopted. The committee on board and rooms reported 
that they "had made ample provision." 

August 8, 1851, the stockholders of the corporation elected N. 
Bruce, moderator; S. G. Dearborn, clerk: Wm. A. Stinson, treasur- 
er; and N. Bruce, J. A. Starrett, AVm. Conant, John Bruce, James 
Bruce, Thomas Cloutmau, and F. O. Kittredge, trustees for the en- 
suing year. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



119 



There is no further record of anything more done by the Board 
of Trustees this year, except to appoint, at a special meeting held 
Sept. 12, 1851, a large committee "to visit and report the appearance 
of the school at its close." No record appears of the agreement made 
with Mr. Stevens, or of the fact that he was engaged to teach the 
school at all. But there is extant a copy of the first catalogue that 
was printed, and its title page shows that it was "A Catalogue of the 
Trustees, Instructors and Students of Appleton Academy at Mont 
Vernon, N. H., for the Academical year ending August, 1852." 
"Concord : Steam Power Press of McFarland & Jenks." The year 
began in August, 1851. 

The second page contains the names of the Trustees, Nathaniel 
Bruce, Esq., Chairman, Dea. Wm. Conant, F. O. Kittredge, Dea. J. 
A. Starrett, Jno. Bruce, Esq., Thomas Cloutman, James Bruce. S. 
G. Dearborn, M. D., Secretary. "Board of Teachers : Mr. Geo. Stev- 
ens, A. B., Principal; Mrs. Elizabeth R. Stevens, Preceptress, and 
Teacher in French, Drawing and Painting; Mr. James M. Emerson, 
Assistant Pupil, 'and Mr. Josiah M. Blood, Teacher of Penmanship." 

It is perhaps a matter of sufficient interest to reproduce the 
names of these charter members, so to speak, of the Academy, and 
to give also the other pages of this first catalogue, as showing how 
the school started out. 

STUDENTS— FALL TERM, 1851. 

GENTLEMEN. 



NAME. 
Batchelder, John A. 
Blood, Josiah M. 
Brown, Joshua 
Brown, Leonard J. 
Bruce, George A. 
Buzell, George B. 
Campbell, WilliamH. 
Cleaves, William L. 
Conant, Albert 
Conant, Charles E. 
Conant, Harlan P. 
Dudley, Lorenzo E. 
Emerson, James M. 
Goffe, Nathan 
Hanson, Caleb W. 
Hartshorn, John L. 
Hutchinson, Elias S. 



RESIDENCE. 

Mont Vernon 

Hollis 

Mont Vernon 

Amherst 

Mont Vernon 

North wood 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mt. Holly. Vt 

Barnstead 

Bedford 

Barnstead 

Amherst 

Milford 



NAME. 

Hutchinson, Jesse L. 
Kittredge, Charles M 
Marden, George A. 
Norton, John 
Paige, Benjamin F. 
Parker, Charles I. 
Rotch, Albert A. 
Smith, Daniel H. 
Smith, David A. 
Stearns, Charles H. 
Stuart, Edmund 
Thorndike, Thomas 
Trow, Henry H. 
Upham, Phineas E. 
Vent, Charles F. 
Wheeler, John E. 



RESIDENCE. 

Milford 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Hudson, N. Y 

Pittsfield 

Bedford 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Antrim 

Lowell, Mass 

Amherst 

H. Pittsfield 

Mont Vernon 

Amherst 

Pittsfield 

Amherst 



120 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



LADIES. 



NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Adams, Lucy M. K. Littleton, Mass 
Averill, Caroline S. Mont Vernon 
Averill, Sarah F. Mont Vernon 

Baldwin, Maria S. Mont Vernon 
Baldwin, Mary Mont Vernon 

Baldwin, Susan A Mont Vernon 
Batchelder, Mary J. Mont Vernon 
Batchelder, Nancy R. Mont Vernon 
Beard, Sarah W. Mont Vernon 

Brown, Rebecca D. Mont Vernon 
Campbell, Elizabeth M. 

Mont Vernon 
Cressy, Martha F. Beverly, Mass 
Hartshorn, Elizabeth S. Amherst 
Hutchinson, Georgiana Milford 
Kendall, Elizabeth C. Mont Vernon 
Kittredge, Harriet E. Mont Vernon 
Parker. Philinda P. Piscataquog 



NAME. 

Perkins, Ann A. 
Perkins, Emily L 
Perkins, Marj' F. 
Phelps, Sophia E. 
Rand, Nancy E. 
Robinson, Harriet A. 
Robinson, Mary E. 
Rotch, Maria A. 
Sawyer, Miranda L 
Smith, Augusta S. 
Smith, Elizabeth J. 
Smith, Maria S. 
Smith, Theresa M. 
Stevens, Caroline A, 
Starrett, Henrietta M. 

Underwood, Ellen J. 
Weston, Mary J. 



RESIDENCE. 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Amherst 

Lyndeborough 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mt. Holly, Vt 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Peering 

Mont Vernon 



Mont Vernon 

Amherst 

Mont Vernon 



WINTER TERM, 1851-2. 



GENTLEMEN. 



NAME. 

Blood, Jos i ah M. 
Brown, Joshua 
Bruce, George A. 
Campbell, William H 
Coburn, George E. 
Conant, Walter H. 
Dunbar, Stephen H. 
Emerson, James M. 
Hanson, Caleb W. 
Hanson, John 



RESIDENCE. 

Hollis 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

New Boston 

Barnstead 

Barnstead 

Barnstead 



NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Hutchinson, Andrew B. 

Mont Vernon 
Hutchinson, Elias S. Milford 

Hutchinson, Hayward Milford 

Marden, George A. Mont Vernon 
Morrill, Ashley C. Canterbury 

Paige, Benjamin F. Pittsfield 

Parker, Francis W. Piscataquog 
Rotch, Albert A. Mont Vernon 

Thorndike, Thomas H. Pittsfield 
Upham, Phinehas C. Amherst 



LADIES. 



RESIDENCE. 

Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
M. 
Mont Vernon 
Cloutman, Sarah E. Mont Vernon 
Hartshorn, Elizabeth S. Amherst 
Hutchinson, Georgianna, Milford 
Jones, Jane M. W. Amherst 



NAME. 

Baldwin, Almira J. 
Baldwin, Maria S. 
Baldwin, Susan A. 
Brown, Rebecca D. 
Campbell, Elizabeth 



NAME. 

Marden, Sarah L. 
Parker, PMlinda P. 
Perkins, Ann A. 
Perkins, Emily L. 
Perkins, Mary F. 
Rotch, Maria A. 
Smith, Maria S. 
Stevens, Caroline A. 
Sawyer, Miranda L. 



RESIDENCE. 

Mont Vernon 
Piscataquog 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mt. Holly, Vt 



SPRING TERM, 1852. 



GENTLEMEN. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



121 



NAME. 

Adams, Leonard B. 
Adams, John W. 
Blood, Josiah M. 
Brnce, George A. 
Buzell, George B. 



RESIDENCE. 

Littleton, Mass 

Littleton, Mass 

Hollis 

Mont Vernon 

North wood 



Campbell. William H. Mont Vernon 
Conant, Walter H. Mont Vernon 
Emerson, James M. Barnstead 

Fletcher, Eihvard Littleton, Mass 
Hanson, Caleb W. Barnstead 

Hanson, John Barnstead 

Hutchins, Charles L. Concord 

Hutchinson, Andrew B. 

Mont Verm hi 
Hutchinson, Hayward Milford 

Hutchinson, Justin E. Milford 

Hutchinson, Jesse L. Milford 



NAME. 

Kittredg-e, Charles F 
Kittredge, Charles M 
Marden, George A. 
Moore, Gilman D. 
Morrill, Ashley C. 
Parker, Charles J. 
Parker, Francis W. 
Perkins, John T. 
Roby, Kilburn H. 
Smith, H. Porter 
Starrett, William S. 



Thorndike, Thomas 
Trow. Arthur A. 
Upham. Phinehas C 
Vent, Charles F. 
Wheeler. John E. 



RESIDENCE. 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Bedford 

Fisherville 

Bedford 

Piscataquog 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

New Alstead 

A. 

Mont Vernon 

H. Pittsfield 

Mont Vernon 

Amherst 

Pittsfield 

Amherst 



LADIES. 



NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Adams, Lucy M. K. Littleton, Mass 
Baldwin, Susan A. Mont Vernon 
Beard, Sarah W. Mont Vernon 

Bragg, Cordelia M. J. * 

Mont Vernon 
Bruce, Frances C. Mont Vernon 
Bruce, L. Augusta Mont Vernon 
Butterfield, Ann W. New Boston 
Campbell, Elizabeth M. 

Mont Vernon 
Cloutman, Ellen R. * Mont Vernon 
Cloutman, Sarah E. Mont Vernon 
Davis, Harriet W. Brownsville, Me 
Hutchinson, Georgianna, Milford 
Hutchinson, Laura A. Milford 

Hutchinson, Mar}' Josephine 

Milford 
Jones, Jane M. W. Amherst 

Kimball, Sarah E. Littleton, Mass 
Kittredge, Harriet E. Mont Vernon 

* Students in Drawing. 



NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Kittredge, Lauretta E. * 

Mont Vernon 
Manning, Mary E. 



Moore, Hannah St 
Morrill, Mary A. 
Otis, Elizabeth E. 
Parker, Emily J. 
Parker, Philinda P. 
Perkins, Ann A. 
Perkins, Mary F. 
Rotch, Maria A. 
Starrett, Henrietta M 



Littleton, Mass 

Stephens, N. B 

Fisherville 

New Boston 

Piscataquog 

'. Piscataquog 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 



Stevens, Caroline A. 
Stinson, Mary A. 
Stinson, Sarah A. 
Underwood. Ellen J 
Wallace, Marion 
Wilson, Georgianna E. 

Mont Vernon 



Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Amherst 
Manchester 



SUMMER TERM, 1852. 



UEXTLEMEN. 



NAME. 
Adams, John W. L 
Bruce, George A. 
Conant, Harlan P. 
Emerson, James M. 
Hartshorn, John L. 
Kittredge, Charles F. 
Morrill, Ashley C. 
Perkins, James W. 



RESIDENCE. 

ittleton, Mass 

Mont Vernon 

Mont Vernon 

Barnstead 

Amherst 

Mont Vernon 

Fisherville 

Mont Vernon 



NAME. 

Ramsdell, George A. 
Ramsdell, George T. 
Rotch, Albert A. 
Smith, H. Porter 



RESIDENCE. 

Milford 

Milford 

Mont Vernon 

New Alstead 



Thorndike, Thomas H. Pittsfield 
Tuten, Edward T. Mont Vernon 
Vent, Charles F. Pittsfield 



122 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON, 



LADIES. 



NAME. 

Bragg, Cordelia M. 

Cleaves, Augusta, L 
Cloutman, Ellen R. " 
Cloutman, Mary E. 
Conant, Martha E. 
Elliott, Sarah E. 
Harwood, Mary J. * 



RESIDENCE. 
J. * 

Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Amherst 
Mont Vernon 



NAME. 

Kittredge, Ellen J. 
Kittredge, Lauretta 

Perkins, Mary F. 
Rotch, Maria A. 
Stinson, Mary A. 
Upton, Jane * 



RESIDENCE. 

Mont Vernon 
E. 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 
Mont Vernon 



Students in Drawing. 



Fall Term. 
Winter Term, 
Spring Term, 
Summer Term, 



SUMMARY. 



66 

38 
66 

28 



Total, 198 

TEXT BOOKS. 

ENGLISH. 

American School Reader; Smith's Quarto Geography; Weld's New- 
Grammar; Parker's Aids to English Composition; Weld's Parsing 
Book; Paradise Lost; Goodrich's Pictoral History: Worcester's Ele- 
ments of Universal History; Comstock's Natural Philosophy: Corn- 
stock 's Chemistry, Revised; Wood's Botany; Hitchcock's Geology; 
Abercrombie's Intellectual Philosophy: Wayland's Moral Science; Cut- 
ter's Physiology; Colburn's Decimal Arithmetic; Adams' Arithmetic, 
Revised; Robinson's Algebra; Robinson's Astronomy; Davies' Survey- 
ing; Davies' Legendre's Geometry; Preston's Book-keeping; Wilson's 
Punctuation; Greene's Analysis. 

LATIN. 

Weld's Latin Lessons and Reader; Andrews and Stoddard's Latin 
Grammar; Caesar's Commentaries; Cicero's Select Orations; Sallust; 
Virgil; Cicero de Senectute; Horace; Livy, Ovid; Arnold's Latin Prose 
Composition; Andrews' or Leverett's Latin Lexicon; Butler's Atlas 
Classica; Ramshorn's Latin Synonyms; Anthon's Classical Diction- 
ary; Smith's Greek and Roman Antiquities. 

GREEK. 

Crosby's Greek Lessons; Crosby's Grammar; Crosby's Xenohpon's 
Anabasis; Greek Testament; Homer's Iliad; Liddell and Scott's or 
Pickering's Greek Lexicon; Sophocles Greek Verbs; Arnold's Greek 
Prose Composition. 

FRENCH. 

Bugard's French Translator; Telemaque; Charles XII; Racine; 
Madame DeStael's L'Allemagne; Surrenne's Dictionary; Ollendorff's 
Exercises. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 
This Institution has now been in operation one year. The success 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 123 

which has attended it encourages the Trustees in the prosecution of their 
original plan, to make it a permanent school. The uncommon fitness 
of the localitj' requires no comment to recommend it to all who have vis- 
ited the place. Fanned by the purest of New England's breezes, it also 
enjoys the healthiest moral tone. Transgression is difficult where there 
are no possible means by which to transgress. 

All scholars are required to attend church upon the Sabbath, also 
a Biblical exercise. 

Especial attention will be given to such as may wish to fit for Col- 
lege. It is intended to make the instruction in the Classical Depart- 
ment of the most thorough character, and to present advantages sur- 
passed by none, to those who may enter epon such a course of study. 
While no branches shall suffer neglect. Classical and Aathematical 
studies shall receive their place as the foundation of a thorough educa- 
tion. 

A Teachers' Class will be formed in the Fall and Spring Terms, 
if desired. 

APPARATUS. 

A new Philosophical Apparatus will be procured before the com- 
mencement of the Fall Term. The school-room is already adorned with 
Geographical Maps, and both Lambert's and Cutter's Physiological 
Charts. 

LECTURES, ETC. 

The Teachers will, in the course of each Term, give lectures upon 
Philosophy, Chemistry, Physiology, Geography, Teaching and Morals. 
Physiology will be made a general exercise. There is also a general 
exercise dailv' in Mental Arithmetic. 

WEEKLY EXERCISES. 

There will be weekly exercises in Declamation, Composition, Spell- 
ing, Analysis of words, and Punctuation. The prominence which will 
be given to any one of these branches will depend upon the deficiencies 
of scholars. 

FRENCH, DRAWING AND PAINTING. 

To those who may wish to pursue these branches, unusual facilities 
are afforded here. Skillful instruction will be given in Pencil Draw- 
ing. Black and Colored Crayoning, Painting in water colors and oils. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Public examinations are had at the close of each Term, under the 
charge of a committee selected by the Trustees. 

CALENDAR. 

There are Four Terms annually of Eleven Weeks each, commencing 
for the ensuing j r ear as follows: 

Fall Term, .... Aug. 30 

Winter Term, .... Nov. 29 

Spring Term, .... Feb. 28 

Summer Term, .... May 29 



124 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



EXPENSES. 

Common English Branches, per term, $3.50 

Higher English and Languages, 4.00 

Drawing (extra), 2.00 

Painting in Water Colors, • 2 00 

Painting in Oils, 10.00 

Music, 8.00 

Writing, 1.00 

Bills are made out for one half of a term, or for the whole, only. 
Board in good families at reasonable rates. Conveniences are good 
for those who may wish to board themselves. 

TEACHERS FOR THE ENSUING YEAR. 

Mr. George Stevens, A. B. , Principal. 

Mr. John Colby, A. B. , Assistant. 

Mrs. Elizabeth R. Stevens, Preceptress, and Teacher in French, 
Drawing and Painting. 

Miss Caroline M. Burnham, Teacher in Music. 

Catalogues will be sent, or any information in respect to the school 
given on application to the Principal or either of the Trusees. 

Mrs. Stevens came to Mont Vernon a bride. She was a native 
of Littleton, Mass., and a most worthy helpmeet as a member of the 
board of instruction with her husband. Mr. Emerson came over from 
Pittsfield, N. H., where Mr. Stevens had been teaching the Pittsfield 
Academy since his graduation from Dartmouth in the class of 1849. 
The residences of the pupils show that many of his students followed 
him to Mont Vernon. Mrs. Stevens, then Miss Kimball, was his as- 
sistant at Pittsfield. 

The second catalogue contains the added names of Miss Abby 
W. Jaquith as Preceptress, with Mrs. Stevens as teacher of drawing 
and painting, Mr. W. S. B. Mathews as instructor on the piano forte, 
and George Bowers as teacher of penmanship and book-keeping. 
Inadvertantly the name of Mr. John Colby, A. B., was omitted from 
the list as Assistant Principal. He had just graduated at Dartmouth 
(class 1852), and had intended to go directly to Andover Theological 
Seminary, but in order to earn some money he engaged to teach for 
Mr. Stevens during the fall term of 1852. Mr. Colby again assisted 
Mr. Stevens during the fall term of 1853. In a letter written from 
Fitzwilliam, N. H., under date of January 18, 1905, (where Mr. 
Colby was then living as a retired clergyman, he having been settled 
over the Congregational church there for several years) he says: "I 
think the fall term of 1853 was the largest in numbers known to Ap- 
pleton Academy. My impression is strong that it was the last term 
of Mr. Stevens as Principal of the institution. I cannot speak defi- 






HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 125 

nitely of the time Mr. Stevens closed his connection with 'Appleton.' 
But I was there with him in the same relation to the Academy in the 
Fall term of '53 as in the Fall term of '52. I boarded in his family 
in '53. It would be difficult to estimate the number of times I took 
little George about the house in a baby carriage, with the announce- 
ment — 'Music and Drawing taught here' — little George furnishing the 
Music and I the Drawing. The exact date when Mr. Stevens gave 
up his position of Principal I cannot give. But in a little time after 
my return to Andover, at the close of the Fall term, Mr. F. 0. Kit- 
tredge, as Chairman of the Board of Trustees, came to Andover, and 
in an interview with him he expressed the desire of the Board that I 
would take the position which Mr. Stevens had given up. But I could 
not think of postponing my Seminary studies." 

The above reference to "little George" may explain why Mrs. 
Stevens did not act as full Preceptress during the second year. In 
the second catalogue the classification of students is not by terms, 
but by classes, and into "Classical" and "English" Departments. 
But in the summary it is shown that during the fall term there were 
101 students; winter term, 37; spring term, 80; summer term, 47. 
Total, 265. Whole number of different students, 160. It was, as 
Mr. Colby says, the largest number known at Appleton Academy. 

It is probable that Mr. Colby is not quite right in assuming that 
Mr. Stevens left the school at the end of the Fall term, 1853, for 
Chapman's History of Dartmouth College has this statement concern- 
ing Mr. Stevens, which probably he furnished himself: "He taught 
at Gilmanton Academy from 1849 to 1850; Pittsfield Academy, 1850 
to 1851 ; Mont Vernon Academy, August 1851 to March 1854." This 
book was published as early as 1867, and is probably correct. 

Mr. Colby delivered the address at the first meeting of the 
Alumni, which occurred August 31, 1854. In this address he alluded 
to the completed new building, so that it must have been finished 
sometime during the fall term of 1853 ; for the closing exhibition that 
term was in the new building, which was so crowded with a standing 
audience — the settees having been removed — that the "exhibition" 
could not take place, and was adjourned indefinitely. But early in 
the morning, long before daybreak, after a big contingent of rude 
visitors from outer places had departed, the boys aroused the sleep- 
ing students and villagers, and the exhibition was gone through with 
successfully, concluding about the time it had come to be broad day- 
light. 



126 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

The New Academy hall was the pride of the Trustees, the teach- 
ers, the students, and the people of the town. It is unfortunate 
that the Academy records are so meagre. It is impossible now to 
trace its progress to completion, its cost, or the sources of all the 
money which was secured for building and equipping it. 

The records of the Trustees are very meagre and unsatisfactory, 
after the organization had been effected. Just why it was named 
"Appleton Academy" is not told in the records. Neither does it ap- 
pear what were the conditions on which Mr. Stevens undertook to 
carry on the school. January 1, 1853, there was a meeting to con- 
sider a request of Mr. Stevens to be released from his contract, al- 
though there is no record of his having preferred such a request. 
The school had started out splendidly under Ms management, and the 
people were much disappointed at the prospect of losing him. The 
trustees voted, however, at this first of January meeting to comply 
with his request, "providing we can procure a good teacher to take 
Iris place." 

January 8, 1853. Voted '-to release Mr. Stevens agreeable to his 
request," and Nathaniel Bruce and J. A. Starrett were chosen a com- 
mittee "to notify Mr. Stevens that after the close of the present term 
he is released from his agreement unconditionally." Two days later 
the trustees were informed that Mr. Stevens had been notified, and 
the members of the Board were "severally requested to exert them- 
selves to find a good teacher." 

The project for erectiDg a new Academy building must have been 
well underwaj T before this, and the people were incited to effort to 
achieve this by the success which the school had met, and by the per- 
sonal push and spirit of the Principal. His release did not seem to 
dampen their ardor. This enthusiasm was general, and in no wise 
confined to the Trustees. It seems that the corporation had already 
run behind. 

On the 13th of May there was a meeting of the "Trustees and 
others" and a committee was appointed "to collect what money they 
could" for the Academy, and on the 20th, the committee was author- 
ized "to see if they could procure 8250 towards paying the debts of 
the corporation." 

May 14, 1*53, the Trustees voted "to build a new Academy 
building, and that it be placed on land of George Stevens, if the land 
can be bought." F. 0. Kittredge, William Conant and Nathaniel 
Bruce were appointed a building committee, and it was voted that 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 127 

"the building be 38 by 58;" also voted "that the building committee 
trade with Mr. Stevens for land, if they can." 

On the 24th William H. Conant was chosen Clerk both of the 
corporation And the Trustees, and Dea. Starrett was appointed a 
committee to procure a teacher for the Fall term of 1853. 

It is exasperating to the historian, who is trying to make out a 
clear and connected story, to find breaks in the very official records 
which should make it plain sailing for him ; and to be obliged to 
search here and there contemporary records, and miscellaneous 
sources of information. In this case the records of the trustees fail 
to tell us when Mr. Stevens was allowed to leave the school. Nor is 
there any story in detail as to how the new Academy was built, or just 
when it was finished. This much, however, is certain : A deed found 
in Hillsborough county records shows that on the 27th day of May, 
1853, George Stevens conveyed to the Trustees of Appleton Acad- 
emy the land on which the Academy was subsequently erected, the 
consideration being 8215. In further consideration the Trustees 
were "to build a good picket, or tight board or other fence against the 
Stevens land," and it was provided that "no building or other in- 
cumbrance should be placed on the piece of land reserved for a 
street on the north side of the above lot, providing it is not used for 
a street." 

This land so conveyed, was a part of the old Dr. Zephaniah Kit- 
tredge place, which was afterwards "Conant Hall," burned in 1896, 
and now (1905) the site of a fine summer cottage owned by Mr. 
C. E. Osgood of Boston. Zephaniah Kittredge, (son of Dr. Zepha- 
niab) and Charles Wilkins are named in the deed as the grantors to 
Mr. Stevens. There were about seven acres in the lot, and it ex- 
tended on the turnpike from the old tavern fine of Thomas Cloutman to 
the place of S. O. La Forest (now owned by A. TV. Bragg), and on 
the Milford road from the old blacksmith shop of Capt. William 
Bruce, just below the southwest corner of the Park, to the meeting- 
house lot, north of the new meeting-house. The deed to Mr. Stevens 
was dated February 6, 1852, and the consideration named was §1500. 
The roadway reserved was evidently the present street, running from 
the Milford road, just south of the William H. Conant house, since 
built, to the turnpike, just below George W. Averill's house, which 
whs built by John Kidder, after this transaction. 

Of course when Mr. Stevens purchased this place, he must have 
intended to remain more or less permanently at Mont Vernon. And 



128 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

the committee having been "able to trade with Mr. Stevens for the 
land," the}' must now push for the new building, that was to furnish 
a permanent home for their Academy, which had made so auspicious 
a beginning. 

The institution had no doubt been named Appleton Academy in 
honor of William Appleton of Boston, one of her wealthy business 
men, and afterwards the representative of one of the Boston districts 
in Congress. 

Jn the book of the treasurer, Mr. William A. Stinson, under 
date of November, 1853, is the following entry : 

"Received of the Bon. William Appleton. by donation, a library 
containing about seven hundred volumes, for the use of the Institu- 
tion " 

It is not of record whether there had been any promise or 
intimation of Ihis gift, before the school was named, but its found- 
ers evidently had "expectations" from the namesake of their 
academy. Mr. Appleton had often visited the town, where his 
mother and three sisters had resided for some years. It is said 
that he was not consulted as to the name, and it was felt by some 
that he did not very warmly appreciate the honor done him. The 
library was, however, a very welcome adjunct to the equipment of 
of the school, and was a well-selected and valuable collection of 
books, which have been freely used by teachers and pupils, and which 
were accessible to the towns-people, and to this day, are in constant 
use. Mr. Appleton also added one hundred dollars in cash, to his 
donation, in the spring of 1855. 

The propriety of the name "Appleton" was enhanced by a do- 
nation of S500 in money by Samuel Appleton, a cousin of William, 
as is shown by an entry on a page of the Record book of the Trus- 
tees, next following a record of a meeting held August 16, 1852, but 
which is itself without date, to the effect that the Trustees requested 
that a record be made upon the book of records, "of a donation of 
the Hon. Samuel Appleton towards the New Academy of Five hun- 
dred Dollars, also a donation of Two hundred and fifty dollars from 
Dr. Ingalls Kittredge of Beverly, Mass., for the same building." 

In the Treasurer's book for 1853 (William A. Stinson, Treas- 
urer) is the following entry of donations and loans to build the new 
Academy, which were received in cash: 

Samuel Appleton, $500.00 

Dr. Daniel Adams, 25.00 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



12!) 



Dea. William Conant, 300.00 

F. 0. Kittredge, 250.00 

M. G. Rotch, 50.00 

Thos. Cloutman, 100.00 

Timothy Kittredge, 125.00 

Albert Conant, 25.00 

Ladies Levee, 64.11 

W. H. & A. Conant, 50.00 

Rev. C. D. Herbert, 15.00 

Nathaniel Bruce, 50.00 

Zephaniah Kittredge, 25.00 

Wm. A. Stinson, 50.00 

John Trevitt, 25.00 

H. H. Bragg, 100.00 

John Bruce, 50.00 

James Bruce, 50.00 

Dea. Geo. E. Dean, • 50.00 

George Stevens, 50.00 

Joshua Cleaves, 10.55 

Ira Kendall. 5.00 

Wm. L. Cleaves, 10.00 

Ezra Batchelder, 3.00 

Henry Batchelder, 3.00 

Clinton Roby, 5.00 

Daniel P. Kendall, 5.00 

Ira Wilkins, 5.00 

W a rren Willi ams , 1.00 

Thos. H. Richardson. 100.00 

Dr. Ingalls Kittredge, 250.00 

Dea. Alvah Kittredge, 100.00 

Ezra Holt, . 3.00 

Fines of Buruham & Langdell, 8.75 

Interest and Lumber, 1.95 

Building Committee, (Money Borrowed,) 1625.00 

N. Bruce, Auction bills, 4.76 

Levee Feb. 22nd, 1854, 59.50 

Asa Stevens, 50.00 

Building Committee, (Note given John Elliott,) 175.00 

Wm. T. Haskell, 25.00 

Lumber sold at Auction, 6.75 



130 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



Geo. E. 


Dean, (Money Borrowed,) 


60.00 


Hannah Lamson, " " 


25.00 


Greenoi 


igh Harden, " " 


800.00 


Widow Blanchard, '• " 


400.00 


Donation of T. H. Richardson, 


25.00 


(< 


a 


D. R. Baker, 


25.00 


u 


t< 


A. A. Gerrish, 


10.00 


u 


CI 


J. A. Starrett, 


25.00 


ti 


t< 


Chas. G. Perkins, 


5.00 


a 


a 


C. D. Herbert, 


5.00 


a 


u 


Jos. TV. Perkins, 


3.00 


u 


tC 


Hrs. TVhittemore, 


3.00 


u 


i< 


John Bruce, 


5.00 


(( 


t< 


Joseph Underwood, 


3.00 


t< 


a 


Samuel Baldwin, 


1.50 


it 


a 


Ira Kendall, 


2.00 


t< 


K 


Sardis Johnson, 


3.00 


a 


n 


Perley Batchelder, 


2.00 


it 


u 


Henry Batchelder, 


1.00 


u 


a 


B. F. Harden, 


5.00 



$5319.85 

This was the beginning of the enterprise of building the Acad- 
emy. It is a pity that the story cannot be told more in detail. It 
was no small undertaking for these men, none of them of more than 
moderate means, to raise upwards of five thousand dollars for such a 
purpose. It was secured only by the co-operation of some men who 
could but little more than support their families, and by the widows' 
mites. 

The Trustees' records are silent as to when work on the Academy 
was begun, or as to what its entire cost was.. In his u Annals," read 
at the Quarter-Centennial celebration in 1875, Hr. H. Porter Smith 
says : "TVe remember the day that Capt Kittredge and others came 
with their oxen and broke grouud for its foundation." He does not 
give the date when this happened, but as the above list of donations 
is dated Harch, 1853, the breakiug of ground most likely occurred as 
early that spring as the ground could be worked. 

The Treasurer's book shows in detail to whom the money which 
had been raised was paid, but it does not furnish much information 
as to the details of what was done. There is no mention of any 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 131 

contract entered into by the building committee, and perhaps there 
was none. The construction was superintended by Mr. Samuel Mar- 
den, of Newton, Mass., a contractor and builder of large experience, 
and whose wife (born Eliza Ann Young) was formerly a resident of 
Mont Vernon. Mr. Marden did a remarkably good job. The 
Academy, which still stands apparently as sound as ever, is a hand- 
some structure, 40 feet by 60 in size, the upper story mainly devoted 
to a fine hall, nearly 40 x 50, with 12 foot posts, and well adapted 
to the purpose for which it was erected. Work on it was rapidly 
pushed all summer, and the disbursements shown on the Treasurer's 
book indicate that about every mechanic and farmer in town was 
more or less employed on the building. There were frequent loans 
of not large amounts, from time to time, as exigences arose, and all 
the time there were accessions to the funds by contribution. 

Not only were these contributions for the erection and equipment 
of the building, but there were long lists of contributions "towards 
defraying the deficiency for teachers' services, after deducting tuition 
for the year ending in 1856." Thirteen citizens are recorded as hav- 
ing paid an assessment of $20.43 each towards this deficiency. 

There was still another subscription towards "paying the Acad- 
emy debt." It is dated 1855 and 1856, and is worth reproducing, as 
showing the devotion and persistence of the men who were pushing 
the enterprise. 

Dea. William Conant, 8750.00 

F. O. Kittredge, 400.00 

J. A Starrett, 150.00 

Timothy Kittredge, 150.00 

Geo. E. Dean, 100.00 

James Bruce, 171.90 

John Bruce, 100.00 

Thomas Cloutman, 50.00 

C. B. Southworth, 10.00 

Win. A. Stinson, 25.00 

Samuel Campbell, 3.">.00 

Dr. A. A. Gerrish, 25.00 

Hiram Perkins, 20.00 

Newell D. Foster, 5.00 

Chas. R. Beard, 25.00 

Daniel R. Baker, 25.00 

Wm. H. Conant, 25.00 



132 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

William Lamson, 20 00 

John Weston, 10.00 

Trask W. Averill, 10.00 

Nathaniel Bruce, 25.00 

Wm. O. Lamson, 10.00 

Mrs. E. W. Bruce, 25.00 

Matthew G. Rotch, 25.00 

Joshua Cleaves, 10.00 

The donation of 8750 by Dea. Wm. Conant was the valuation of 

a house bought by him probably for a boarding house for pupils. It 

is now known as the "Sunset House" for summer boarders owned by 

W. H. Marvel. 

Besides these there were several small contributions, including 
sundry amounts of interest due on money loaned — and very likely 
some of the subscriptions represented the principal of loans to the 
Academy. In fact in addition to the above is an entry of "Cash 
received of Dea. John Bruce, balance of note given up, 827.00." 

The records of the Trustees, until the endowment by Mr. 
McCollom in 1871, and the change of name, abouQd in eutries show- 
ing frequent "taxes" as they were sometimes called, or "assess- 
ments," or "subscriptions" to make up deficiencies of teachers' 
salaries, or to pay debts. But these records almost every time fail 
to give the details which would be most interesting. 

In the catalogue issued at the close of the school year (August, 
1853,) it is remarked that "the Institution has now been in opera- 
tion two years. The unexpected success which lias attended it encour- 
ages the Trustees to prosecute their plan of making it a permanent 
school. A new, elegant and spacious building, now in process of 
erection, will be opened for the school at the commencement of the 
Fall Term, 1853/' 

It is also remarked that "the school is furnished with a good 
Philosophical Apparatus." Several pieces of this apparatus are still 
in use. 

It is al&o noted that "the Philorrhetorian Society, a Literary 
Association connected with the school is already in possession of a 
valuable library, which is to be enlarged the present season by 
books to the value of five hundred dollars presented for that purpose 
by the Hon. William Appleton, of Boston." This last came duly to 
hand in November, and was housed in a room set apart for a library 
in the new building. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 133 

Without finding any record showing that the Fall Term of 1853 
began in the new building, it seems to be established that Mr. 
Stevens began the year as principal, and that the new building was 
moved into late in the term, and it is certain, as previously narrated, 
that the "closing exhibition" was given there. 

Geo. Stevens was a remarkable teacher. He was not only a 
scholar of high attainments, but he had the rare gift of arousing the 
interest and enthusiasm of his pupils, and an unusual ability in im- 
parting instruction, and in making the student work for himself. He 
was the prime cause of the establishment of the Academy, in securing 
the new building, and in starting the school on a prosperous career. 
Rev. Dr. Bancroft of Phillips Academy at Andover, one of Mr. 
Stevens's successors, in a paper read at the alumni meeting in 1890, 
said : "There were many who might properly be mentioned as found- 
ers of this school. It is doing none of them injustice to say Mr. 
Stevens was at the head of the column, and that but for him the thing 
would not have happened as it did, or when it did.'* 

Mr. Stevens not only planned and pushed the erection of the new 
building, but he gave, from first to last, most liberally iu a pecuniary 
way to its success, even in years after he had left it. When became 
to Mont Vernon from Pittsfield Academy, he brought with him a con- 
siderable number of young men who had attended his school there, 
and whose character and attainments did much to give the school a 
reputation. They had tested Mr. Stevens's abilities as a teacher and 
followed him in order to further profit by them. They not only in- 
cluded the Pittsfie'.d names which appear in the first catalogue (1851- 
52 ) given above, but those of Buzzell of Northwood, Emerson and 
the Hansons of Barnstead, Wheeler of Amherst and Morrill of 
Canterbury. 

Mr. Stevens was born in Stoddard, N. H., October 23, 182-1. His 
father was Daniel Stevens, a farmer, and his mother was Tabitha 
(Sawyer) Stevens. Later the family removed to Hancock, and later 
still to Mont Vernon. He worked his way through a preparation for 
college, and entered Dartmouth in 1845, paying his way chiefly by 
teaching. He graduated with his class in 1849, and at once began 
teaching at Gilmanton Academy, and the study of law in the office of 
Ira Allen Eastman, who was a Dartmouth man of 1829. The next 
year (1850-51) he taught the Pittsfield Academy, continuing his law 
studies with the Hon. Moses Norris of that town. In the fall of 1851 
he came to Mont Vernon, where it is to be presumed that he contin- 



134 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

ued his law studies as he found opportunity. When he had gotten 
the school well started, he asked to be released from his contract with 
the Trustees, and they released him. He removed to Lowell in 
March, 1854, and finished his law studies in the office of the Hon. 
William A. Richardson, afterwards Secretary of the Treasury under 
President Grant. Three of the young men who had begun to fit for 
college with him at Mont Vernon, followed him to Lowell and fin- 
ished their preparation under his tuition there. They were Ains- 
worth E. Blunt and John F. Colby, who subsequently graduated at 
Dartmouth, and William E. Barrett, who graduated at Harvard. 

Mrs. Stevens was Elizabeth R. Kimball, daughter of Mr. James 
Kimball of Littleton, Mass. She graduated at Mount Holyoke Fe- 
male Seminary in the class of 1847, and for a time' occupied the 
position of secretary to Mary Lyon. She assisted Mr. Stevens at 
Pittsfield Academy. They were married at Littleton, September 19, 
1850. 

On his admission to the bar at Lowell in 1854, Mr. Stevens at 
once began to achieve success in his profession. On January 1, 
1856, he was appointed Clerk of the Police Court in Lowell and 
served in that capacity until August 1, 1857. The Justice of the 
court at that time was the Hon. Nathan Crosby, a prominent gradu- 
ate of Dartmouth. From 1858 to 1874 Mr. Stevens was an Associ- 
ate Justice of the same court, and frequently presided at its sessions. 
In 1858 he served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives, 
but declined a re-election, saying he could not afford to spare the 
time from his practice. In 1867 and 1868 he held the office of City 
Solicitor of Lowell, and for five years (1874-1879) he served in the 
position of District Attorney of the North Middlesex District. 

There seems to have been no catalogue published of the last 
(partial) year of Mr. Stevens's administration. But there is in pos- 
session of the Rev. John Colby, his assistant, a list of names of 
those in attendance during the fall term (1853) who presented Mr. 
Colby with "a very valuable book in 2 volumes" as "a token of their 
respect and regard." The names of 41 ladies and 37 gentlemen ap- 
pear on this fist, and it is not improbable that there were some who 
could not afford to enroll themselves; so that there must have been 
over 78 pupils in attendance that term. 

It is a remarkable fact that neither the records of the Trustees 
nor the Treasurer's book make the slightest reference to the school 
year 1854-.">5, during which Mr. Fenner E. King was the third prin- 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 135 

cipal of the Academy. There was no catalogue published of Mr. 
King's year. There is extant, however, the circular issued by the 
Trustees under date of August 1, 1854, from which we learn that — 

The Board of Instruction consisted of Fenner E. King-, A. B., 
Principal; Miss Elizabeth A. Neilson, Preceptress; Miss Sophia M. 
Neilson, Associate Preceptress. The following- paragraphs, among 
others, appeared in the circular: 

"The new and splendid Academy Building erected the past year, 
is completely finished." 

"MEETING OF THE ALUMNI.— In accordance with the wish of 
many of those who have enjo3'ed the privileges of Appleton Academy, 
the Trustees hereby extend an invitation to all its former students, as 
well as those who propose attending the ensuing Fall Term, to meet at 
Academy Hall, Mont Vernon, on Thursday, Aug. 31, 1854, at 10 o'clock 
A. m., to review the pleasant social feelings of the past; and at2o'clock 
p. m... listen to an address from the Rev. John Colby, a former Instructor, 
and remarks from those who have been connected with the school. 

Per order of the Trustees, 
Wm. H. Coxant, Clerk." 

This was to be the first of a long list of alumni meetings, a 
somewhat detailed account of which will appear later on. 

Mr. King had a fairly prosperous year. He was a most courte- 
ous and dignified gentleman. He was married either before the 
school opened, or during the first term, as Miss Elizabeth A. Neilson 
became Mrs. King before the school closed. 

Mr. Augustus Berr} T was the fourth principal. Under date of 
October 12, 1855, the Trustees are recorded to have chosen Mr. F. 
0. Kittredge a committee "to wait on Mr. Berry and invite him to 
meet them." Also "instructed Mr. Berry to ascertain what Miss 
Bradbury's terms would be for assisting in instruction one year." 
The next evening Mr. Berry reported that Miss Bradbury would not 
want to stay less than 8250 per year. It would seem to have been 
even more important to have recorded uuder what conditions Mr. 
Berry and Miss Bradbury began their work. No catalogue of 1855- 
56 (Mr. Berry's first year) seems to have been published. But one 
was published under date of January 1, 1857, which must have cov- 
ered a portion at least of the year 1856, and perhaps it was intended 
to cover the whole of Mr. Berr} 7 's first year. It gives the names of 
the students in the "Male," and "Female" departments — the males 
numbeiing 66 and the females 52 — being, no doubt, the number of 
different pupils for the year. 



136 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

The catalogue, under the head of ''Expenses" says that "board 
can be obtained at various prices, according to the quality and dis- 
tance from the Academy. The usual terms per week are $2.25 for 
males and $2.00 for females." It was at this time that Mr. F. O. 
Kittredge's Mont Vernon House, (the old Clontman tavern,) which 
had been pui-chased by himself and Captain Timothy Kittredge on 
purpose to furnish boarding accommodations for teachers and stu- 
dents, was used for that purpose, and was announced in this cata- 
logue as available. Mr. and Mrs. Berry boarded there. 

This catalogue gives the name of Augustus Berry, A. B., as 
Principal, and Miss Martha W. Bradbury as Preceptress and Teacher 
of French and Music 

The next catalogue is dated April 1, 1858, and was "published 
by the students," as the title page informs U3. Miss Bradbury is 
succeeded by Miss Emily A. Snow (a sister of Mrs. Berry) as 
Preceptress. The number of students in the Male department foots 
up 89, and in the Female department, 75. But this is not very intel- 
ligible, and it is not certain just what time is covered. The names 
of George A. Bruce and George A. Marden are among those in this 
catalogue, though both left at the end of the summer term of 1S56-57 
and entered Dartmouth College in the autumn of 1857. 

The next catalogue is dated April 1, 185!), and as before, is 
"published by the students." There were 96 students in the Male 
department and 86 in the Female department. 

April 10, 1856, the Trustees chose a committee "to raise funds 
to pay the debt on the Academy." 

June 18, 1857, a committee was named "to make the tax on 
the arrearages of the past year of the school, and to collect the same, 
and to obtain names to be responsible for Mr. Berry's salary another 
year." 

June 28, 1858, the Trustees met to take measures to settle the 
Academy expenses in relation to hiring Mr. Berry another year. 

July 2, it was voted by the Trustees to "continue the school 
another year, and that a committee be raised to make a bargain with 
Mr. Berry for his services as teacher." A committee was also chosen 
"to draw up a paper for the support of the school another year, and 
spend one day soliciting names or signers to bear their proportion of 
the deficiency if any should occur." 

None of these committees seem to have reported anything, but 
tlte debts were paid, and the deficiencies were made up. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 137 

July 1, 1858, the Trustees voted "to write to Dr. Ingalls Kit- 
tredge, of Beverly, in relation to the farm willed to the Academy by 
his father." But there is no solution of the mysterious vote on the 
subsequent records. 

There seems to have been a permanent fun d established during 
Mr. Berry's term of service, though just how much it amounted to, 
or how it was raised is not clear. Under date of May 15, 1857, the 
Treasurer's book contains the following entry : "Received of the 
Ladies' Circle in Mont Vernon, one hundred and sixty-seven dollars 
for a permanent fund for Appletou Academy, the interest only to be 
used yearly for the support of said institution. The above loaned to 
the Town of Mont Vernon." 

In the Trustees' records for March 30, 1859, it was voted "That 
the treasurer obtain what donations he can for the Academy, and 
that he collect the interest on the fund, on or before the 1st of July 
next; also that he obtain a note of Capt. Timothy Kittredge for the 
amount of the fund in his hands (8500), said note to be lodged with 
the Treasurer." 

There are two more references to a "fund," but we look in vain 
for any clear information in the records. It is evident that there 
was some difficulty about insurance on the Academy, and under the 
last named date, the following queer vote was taken : 

"Voted, that any persous applying to the Treasurer shall receive 
from him a receipt or certificate that they are proprietors in the 
House to the amount they have paid in towards the New Academy 
Building, and if they choose to get their property insured they can 
do so." 

March 31, 1860, there is another reference to the "fund" in the 
choice of a committee "to wait on Capt Kittredge and ascertain if he 
intends to pay the interest on his fund annually which he promised 
the Academy when the debts were paid." April 13, the committee 
reported, and the report was accepted, but there is no clew as to 
what the report was. 

This is the financial story of the school during Mr. Berry's stay. 
It was a constant task to keep the school going and the bills paid — 
but it was done. 

As is seen by the figures given above, in numbers the Academy 
was growingly prosperous under Mr. Berry's charge. He was a man 
of rather stern demeanor, and called boys and girls alike by their 
first names, and was disciplinary in a familiar way. He was thor- 



138 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

oughly conscientious, and did his best by all. Everybody gave hirn 
sincere respect and admiration as a teacher and as a man. He closed 
his connection with the school at the end of the summer term of 1860. 
In a letter written at the time of the quarter-centennial of the school, 
Mr. Berry said : "There was not a term while I was there, that there 
were not individuals who have since made their mark." "The period 
in which I had charge, I think was distinguished by nothing more 
than by the union of effort on the part of the citizens in sustaining 
the school, and its increasing prosperity was the result of that effort." 

Miss Bradbury, his first assistant, was a most vivacious, charm- 
ing and delightful woman, and a brilliant teacher. Her pupils all 
doted on her. Miss Emily C. Snow, who succeeded her, and re- 
mained as long as Mr. Berry did, was also a most faithful and com- 
petent teacher. 

Augustus Berry was born in Concord, N. H., October 27, 1824, 
the son of Washington and Maria (Dale) Berry. He fitted for col- 
lege at Francestown Academy, and graduated at Amherst College in 
1851. He was principal of an academy at Limerick, Me , 1851-53, 
at Lyndon, Vt., 1853-55, Appleton Academy, Mont Vernon, 1855- 
60. While at Mont Vernon he was licensed to preach by the Hollis 
Association, and often supplied the pulpit at Mont Vernon, and in 
the neighboring towns. After leaving Mont Vernon, he studied at An- 
dover Theological Seminary as a resident licentiate, and was ordained 
as pastor of the Congregational church at Pelham, N. H., October 
30, 1861. It was his only pastorate. He died suddenly in the har- 
ness, of heart failure, after a service to one church of nearly 38 
years, October 4, 189'J, aged 74 years, 11 months and 27 days. He 
was married November 24, 1853, to Dora Richardson Snow of Dub- 
lin, N. H., who died March 15, 1873. January 30, 1877, he was 
married a second time, to Mary Currier Richardson, of Pelham, who 
was then a teacher in Bradford Academy, and who survives him, 
and is still (1906) a resident of Pelham. 

Cecil Franklin Patch Bancroft was the fifth principal, who came 
fresh from Dartmouth College, where he graduated in July, 1860, the 
fourth in rank in a class of sixty-five. He was not only a brilliant 
scholar, but he became one of the most eminent of American educa- 
tors, being at his death in the twenty-eighth year of consecutive 
service as Principal of that famous fitting school Phillips Academy, 
at Andover, Mass. He came to Mont Vernon with only the degree 
of A. B. to ornament his name. He died entitled to write A. M., 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 139 

Litt. D., Ph. D., and LL. D., after the A. B., and with a record fully 
entitling him to the honors. 

In a letter to H. Porter Smith, which is published in the 
"Annals" of Appleton Academy prepared by Mr. Smith for the 
Quarter-Centennial of the Academy, Dr. Bancroft said: "I went to 
Mont Vernon in August, 1860, and remained four years. My sister 
(now Mrs. A. Conant) was my assistant, and George A. Marden, 
Miss Sarah A. Stinson, and Miss Martha E. Conant, also had classes 
for a short time. At that time the Academy had a fund of seven 
hundred dollars, and no boarding-house. One fall I had eighty schol- 
ars, and it was regarded as a great success. One year, when all my 
'big' boys had gone to war, my salary amounted to four hundred and 
twenty dollars, and some of the time I taught ten hours a day." 

After naming some of the most prominent of his pupils, he 
adds: "The war interest was the great one in my time, and our 
schools all suffered for want of men and means. I l'emember W. 
H. Con ant's coming in, pale with excitement one evening, in my first 
spring term, April, 1861, with the news of Massachusetts men slain 
in Baltimore. When I resigned in 186-4, our armies were lying about 
Petersburg apparently idle ; prices went up, and receipts went down, 
and the wonder to my mind now is, that we accomplished as much as 
we did. But the people of Mont Vernon were always kind and ap- 
preciative, and my residence there, though not without many draw- 
backs to usefulness and happiness and personal improvement, was 
one for which I have every reason to be grateful. 1 was invited to 
the place without seeking it, and left it without pressure, to pursue 
my further studies. My interest in the school will never die. May 
the school flourish forever, and its friends rise up to make it a bless- 
ing to the ends of the earth, and to the end of time." 

As usual the records are silent as to the coming of Mr. Bancroft 
or his assistant, and as to the arrangements under which he was to 
conduct the school. But at the annual meeting, March 30, 1861, a 
committee was appointed "to engage the services of Mr. Bancroft 
another year ;" and, if possible, "on the same terms as last year." 
These terms are now stated, viz ; "he is to take the school on his own 
responsibility, and if his receipts during the year do not amount to 
8900, he is to have the interest of the fund." In the language quot- 
ted above. Mr. Bancroft put the fund at 8700, which must chiefly 
have been made up of the 8167 received from the Ladies' Circle, and 
the $500 in the hands of Captain Kittredge. 



140 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

On this same 30th of March it was voted "that a committee be 
raised to prepare a communication to be presented to Hon. William 
Appleton of Boston, soliciting from him an addition to the fund of 
the Academy." The committee made a report, but "in consequence 
of the exciting war news" action was postponed. Mr. Bancroft said 
he would stay another year if the Trustees "would find him in wood," 
and they at once set about raising money to buy the wood. 

Mr. Bancroft continued in charge of the school through to the 
close of the summer term of 1864, with a hundred dollars increase of 
salary, and with a release from the requirement to have an assistant 
during the winter and summer terms. As usual a subscription was 
started to raise the hundred dollars increase in salary, and for money 
enough to pay the Hillsborough Fire Insurance Company what was 
due it for insurance. 

Cecil Franklin Patch Bancroft was born in New Ipswich, N. H., 
November 25, 1839, and died at Andover, Mass., October 4, 1901. 
He was of plain, sturdy, honest patriotic New England ancestry. In 
childhood he was practically though not legally adopted by a Mr. 
and Mrs. Patch, of Ashby, Mass. He fitted for college at Apple- 
ton Academy, New Ipswich, graduated at Dartmouth in 1860, taught 
at Mont Vernon 1860-1864, graduated at Andover Theological Sem- 
inary in 1867. At his death, his close friend, the Rev. C. C. 
Carpenter, wrote as follows of him in the Congrer/ationah'st of October 
12, 1901: 

"Although ordained to the Congregational ministry (at Mont 
Vernon, May 1, 1867) he was never a settled pastor, choosing teach- 
ing as his life work, a service long and grandly fulfilled. From 1867 
to 1872 he was principal of C. R. Robert's institution for white youth 
on the summit of Lookout Mountain, Tenu., gaining the lasting 
affection of many men and women of the Southern States. After a 
year of European travel and study (in the University of Halle) he 
was elected in 1873 to the principalship of Phillips Academy — the 
position filled for thirty-four years by Dr. Samuel II. Taylor. 

"He was a worthy successor of that great teacher, though with 
a rule less stern as befitted the changing times. With marvellous 
tact, with most kindly heart and most genial temperament, with a 
phenomenal remembrance of names and faces, seeming to know every 
'Phillips boy,' from the oldest alumnus to the youngest under-gradu- 
ate, he impressed himself strongly alike on the student body and the 
hosts of alumni, about five thousand of whom had been in the school 
in his twenty-eight years of service. * * * * 

"As a citizen of Andover he was greatly honored and beloved. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 141 

Like his intimate friend, the late Professor Churchill, his heart and 
hand were in every good work, public and private. The University 
of the State of New York gave him the degree of Ph. D. in 1874, 
Williams College that of Litt. D. in 1891, and Yale University that 
of LL. D. in 1892. Since 1897 he has been a trustee of Dartmouth 
College. He was also a trustee of the state institutions at Tewks- 
bury and Bridgewater, and had been President of the Dartmouth 
Alumni Association, the Merrimack Valley Congregational Club, and 
of the Head Masters' Association of the United States. He found 
time to prepare many addresses on educational topics, and to write 
valuable articles. 

"Dr. Bancroft was also, during the whole period of his princi- 
palship, a member of the board of trustees having charge of the 
Theological Seminary as well as of Phillips Academy. As resident 
member of the board and its clerk he had a large additional respon- 
sibility, which only his ceaseless activity and his genius for hard work 
and for minute details enabled him to meet. 

"Dr. Bancroft married, May 6, 1867, Miss Frances A. Kittredge 
of Mont Vernon, N. H. She died in 1898. Four children survive, 
Mrs. William J. Long of Stamford, Conn., Cecil K. Bancroft, in- 
structor in Yale University, Phillips Bancroft, a student at Yale and 
Miss Mary E. Bancroft, a student at Smith College." 

Mrs. Bancroft was the daughter of Capt. Timothy Kittredge, 
and was a pupil of Mr. Bancroft while he was Principal of Apple- 
ton Academy. 

Again do the records of the Trustees fail in neglecting to record 
the engagement of Mr. Bancroft's successor, but during the summer, 
a committee were at work on the problem, and by the records of July 
17, 1865, we find a resolution "expressing appreciation of the ser- 
vices of our worthy Preceptor, Mr. Towle," and a desire to retain 
him another year, and he was pledged cordial co-operation, and $250 
in addition to the tuitions for the year ensuing — 1865-66. This was 
Charles Augustus Towle, a native of Epsom, N. H., born June 20, 
1837, fitted for college at Pembroke Academy, and at Pinkerton 
Academy, graduated at Dartmouth in 1864, was principal of Apple- 
ton Academy at Mont Vernon two years, 1864-65 and 1865-66, 
studied at Andover Theological Seminaiy, 1866-68, and graduated at 
Chicago Theological Seminary in 1869, ordained pastor of the Con- 
gregational church at Sandwich, 111., June 9, 1869, and remained 
there until 1873; pastor of the church at South Chicago, 1874-76; 
pastor of Bethany church, Chicago, 1877-82; at Monticello, la., 
1882-86 ; state superintendent for Iowa of the Congregational Sunday 
school and Publishing society, 1886-89, residing at Cedar Rapids 
1**6-89, and at Grinnell, la., until his death, February 22, 1899, 



142 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

aged 61 years, 8 months and 2 days. While in college he enlisted for 
nine months in the 15th N. H. Volunteers. He was married Decem- 
ber 14, 1869, to Mary Jane Lay, of Chicago, who died May 8, 1881. 
Was married again August 30, 1894, to Ella Reinking of Des Moines, 
la., who survived him, with three sons and one daughter, — a mar- 
ried daughter having died in 1896. 

Mr. Towle was a man of stalwart physique, aud a conscientious, 
hard-working teacher of sterling character. There are no catalogues 
of his day, so far as can be learned, and the school was diminishing 
in numbers. He had two lad} 7 assistants, one being Miss Martha E. 
Conant, and the name of the other is not recalled. 

Joshua V. Smith, a graduate of Bowdoin College, succeeded Mr. 
Towle as principal, and is said to have remained two years, presum- 
ably 1866-67 and 1867-68. The only entry on the records (and this 
is on the Treasurer's book) which names Mr. Smith, is under date of 
June 25, 1868, crediting the treasurer with a payment of "$20.64 to 
J. V. Smith." There is no record of any meeting of the Trustees 
between July 17, 1865 and March 23, 1867. 

On the last named date there was a meeting of the corporation 
"to take into consideration the expediency of offering the use of the 
Academy property to the State for a Normal School;" and it was 
unanimously voted "to make over to the use of the State for a Nor- 
mal School the Academy building and grounds, with library, philo- 
sophical apparatus, piano, cabinet, etc., so long as the Normal School 
shall be continued here." 

A committee of three was appointed to communicate the action 
of the corporation to the State commissioner, and they were requested 
to communicate ••what action the Town had taken relative to the 
establishment of a Normal School here." 

The town had begun to agitate the matter, and December 25, 
1866, at a special town meeting, it was voted "to instruct the Select- 
men to cause application to be made at the next session of the New 
Hampshire legislature for an enabling act giving to the town of Mont 
Vernon power to raise and appropriate money to aid the establishment 
of a State Normal School in said town." 

It was further voted that the sum which might be raised should 
be $5000. 

Evidently the work of keeping the Academy in operation was 
becoming burdensome. Conditions which have since almost abolished 
the country academy in New England had begun to come. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 143 

Nothing, however, was done under the vote above recorded, and 
on the 18th of August, 1868, at a meeting of the Trustees, it was 
voted, as a means of broadening the interest in the school, "to make 
some addition to the board of trustees of gentlemen interested in the 
cause of education, resident among us," and Rev. Dr. Keeler, Mr. 
Albert Conaut, Mr. William Stevens, Mr. H. H. Bragg and Charles 
J. Smith were unanimously chosen. These must have been consid- 
ered honorary elections, as the number of trustees was fixed. 

August 24, 1868, a committee was appointed to make to the 
coming alumni meeting, to be holden August 26, some statement of 
the present conditions of the institution ; and at an adjourned meeting 
August 31, a committee was appointed to consider a proposition of 
AVilliam H. and Albert Conant, in regard to a boarding-house, which 
proposition is stated further on. 

Meantime Mr. Smith had continued at the head of the school, 
which could hardly have been counted prosperous. There seem to 
have been no catalogues issued, and nothing further put on record 
concerning the Academy. 

Sometime in the summer of 1868 there was a determined effort 
to secure a fund of $5000 for the support of the Academy. A sub- 
scription of a considerable amount was made, which resulted, in the 
end, in action at the meeting of the alumni as thus described in the 
Farmers' Cabinet containing a report of the meeting : 

" It appeared that it had been in contemplation for some time to 
endeavor to do something toward raising a fund for the school, and 
put it on a firm foundation. As a step in that direction, William H. 
Conant of Mont Vernon and Albert Conant of Boston, had purchased 
the Campbell place (the old Dr. Kittredge place) which they proposed 
to fit up for a boarding-house for the school, provided a fund of 
85000 could be raised. In a brief speech, George Stevens, Esq., the 
founder of the school, urged energetic action, and as evidence that 
his heart was in the work, booked his name for 8500. Mr. Asa 
Stevens of New York, came down with a round 81000 ; and Messrs. 
William Stevens and F. O. Kittredge, of Mont Vernou followed with 
subscriptions of 8500 each. Other sums varying from 825 to $200 
were subscribed, and at the close of the diuner the sum of $4100.00 
was pledged. A committee of ten (five ladies and five gentlemen) 
was appointed to solicit further donations, and it is hoped that the 
sum will be raised to $10,000." 

The original subscription paper is in the hand writiug of George 
Stevens, and is as follows : 



144 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



We the undersigned, agree to give our several notes to the corpo- 
ration known as " Appleton Academy," for the sums set against our 
respective names, of which we will annually pay to the Trustees of 
said corporation the interest for the use of said Academy located in 
Mont Vernon, N. H., and for the support of a school therein, and the 
principal thereof we agree to pay in ten years from date. These 
subscriptions however are upon the express condition that a perma- 
nent fund of Five Thousand Dollars at least, including these subscrip- 
tions, shall be raised for the support and maintenance of said school 
in said Academy, of which fund no more than the income or interest 
shall ever be used for said purpose. 



NAME. 


RESIDENT E. 


AMOUNT. 


Geo. Stevens, 


Lowell, 


$ 500 


Geo. A. Maiden, 


Lowell, 


100 


Geo. A. Bruce, 


Boston, 


100 


T. L. Livermore, 




25 


Asa Stevens, 


New York, 


1000 


W. Stevens, 




500 


T. H. Richardson, 




100 


C. F. Kittredge, 




100 


F. 0. Kittredge, 




500 


H. H. Bragg, 




100 


John Bruce, 




50 


Walter S. Conant. 




100 


H. P. Conant, 




200 


Augustus Berry, 




25 


Chas. F. Stinson, 




25 


Henry E. Spalding, 




25 


J. V. Smith, 




100 


J. E. Bruce, 


Milford, 


50 


John F. Colby. 




100 


W. H. Curtis, 




50 


H. C. Shaw, 




25 


Mrs. J. J. Phillips, 




100 


Geo. E. Dean, 




25 


A. W. Bragg, 




25 


Geo. W. Orel way, 


Chicago, 


25 


Geo. W. McCollom. 




100 


Chas. E. Conant, 




200 


Henry A. Kendall, 




100 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 145 

Andrew Dutton, 100 

II. Porter Smith, 100 

Benj. J. Boutwell, 50 

Mrs. Loveredge, 50 

D. E. Kittredge, 25 

Timothy Kittredge, 500 

C. F. P. Bancroft. 50 
Dated, Sept. 1, 1868. 

The subscriptions were not in cash, but notes, which were 
printed as follows : 

APPLETON ACADEMY. 

WHEREAS, divers persons, of whom I am one, have agreed with 
each other and with the APPLETON ACADEMY, an incorporated 
educational institution, located in Mont Vernon, in the State of New 
Hampshire, to give and to pay to said APPLETON ACADEMY, each 
a certain sum of mone} - , which he has set against his name upon a paper 
of subscriptions signed by him, and which is named in the note hereon 
written, in ten years from date, with interest to be paid annually, for 
the purpose of making in the aggregate a fund of not less than five 
thousand dollars, for the purposes of education in the Academical 
School of said body corporate ; which fund is to be managed and invested 
by the trustees of said APPLETON ACADEMY, and the income 
thereof and no more ever to be used for the purpose of giving education 
to the youth of both sexes, in the Latin, Greek, and Modern languages, 
and also in the various branches of a thorough literary, mathematical 
and scientific education in the English language; 

Now, in consideration of the above agreements and subscriptions, 
and of the acceptance hereof by said APPLETON ACADEMY, and 
that the said fund shall not be less than five thousand dollars, I hereby 
make the promissory note written hereon, the proceeds of which are to 
be used in the manner and for the purposes set forth above, and no 
other. 

$100. Mont Vernon, Sept. 1st, 1868. 

Ten years after date, for value received, I promise the APPLE- 
TON ACADEMY, a body corporate, located in Mont Vernon, in the 
State of New Hampshire, to pay it one hundred dollars, with interest 
at the rate of six per cent, per annum, payable annually. 



Of these notes there still remain "alive" but those of W. H. 
and A. Conant (§1500), and John F. Colby ($100) on which the 
interest has been regularly collected to date. Of the others many 
were paid in full, or "settled" on some basis, though why for less 
than their face does not appear. There still remain in the hands of 
the Treasurer notes amounting to 81200 on which interest was col- 



146 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

lected only a few years, and which are now of course "outlawed," 
and are without value, even where the makers are still living. 

It is of record that at a meeting of the Trustees August 31, 1868, 
it was voted that the Secretary be instructed to write to Asa Stevens 
of New York and George Stevens of Lowell, and others, expressing 
the thanks of the Trustees for their generous donations to the 
institution. 

The Academy was now "in fund," if not "in funds." The notes 
above referred to were mostly dated September 1, 1868, and at once 
began to draw interest. It might have been expected that the names 
of William H. and A. Conant would have appeared in the list of note 
contributors ; but they two had purchased the old Kittredge or Camp- 
bell place (the same place which Mr. George Stevens had bought 
when he first took the Academy) and had agreed to give it to the 
institution for a boarding house. January 9, 1869, at a meeting of 
the Trustees, it was voted : 

"That if W. H. and Albert Conant shall give to the Appleton 
Academy corporation their note for fifteen hundred dollars, with 
interest annually, the same as other members of the alumni, that they 
shall be released from all obligation in regard to the Campbell Place, 
so-called, as a boarding-house for the Academy, and they shall have 
full control of the same, this sum being the original cost of the place." 

Under date of June 25, 1869, the Treasurer's book records the 
fund account as consisting of the Town Note (money raised by the 
Ladies' Circle, and loaned to the Town) $167.00. Notes on hand, as 
per subscription list, $5225.00. W. H. and A. Conant's note taken 
in lieu of the Campbell place, $1500.00. There was a small note 
besides, of Deacon J. A. Starrett, of $23.12, and the total fund figured 
up $6915.12. The Treasurer added a'l the accrued income, during 
the year, making a total of $7369.22, but of course this was a mixing 
of fund account and cash account not cpiite intelligible. The income 
at 6 per cent, which was the legal rate, amounted, however, to over 
four hundred dollars a year, and that was a great relief to the over- 
burdened promoters of the school. 

Still the Academy was languishing, and we have to go outside 
the scrappy records of the board to gather that Mr. Smith left at the 
close of the school year 1867-68. Nor do we learn, except by impli- 
cation, that there was no school at all during the year 1868-69, or 
what was doing, if anything, during that year. There is no record 
of the engagement of Prof. Lucien Hunt to teach for the year begin- 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 147 

ning in August, 1869, but in the Treasurer's book, under date of May 
25, 1869, it is stated that there was paid to Prof. L. Hunt, to date, 
$500.00; and tradition says that he was principal until the close of 
the school year 1869-70. His assistants were Mr. S. A. Holton (af- 
terwards Principal of Lawrence Academy, Falmouth, Mass.,) Mr. 
A. M. Goodspeed of Falmouth, and Mrs. Hunt. 

And now reappeared the scheme to get the s'ate to locate its 
proposed Normal School at Mont Vernon, and September 20, 1870, 
the Trustees held a meeting to consider the proposition of the state 
for a Normal School location, and on motion of Deacon William 
Conant, it was unanimously voted — 

"That the Trustees of the Appleton Academy offer to the state 
the use of all the property belonging to the corporation, provided the 
State Normal school shall be located in this place, during its contin- 
uance here, provided the state shall keep the buildings and other 
property in good repair ; " also voted — 

"That the Secretary and Rev. Dr. Keeler be a committee to 
write to the different donors to the fund of the Academy to obtain 
their consent to allow the funds to be used in aid of the Normal 
school ;" also voted that the same committee — 

"Make out a statement of the property belonging to the Acad- 
emy, and offer the same to the State. Voted, further, that the same 
committee take measures to have the selectmen of the Town call a 
town meeting to see if the Town will make any appropriation for the 
support of said Normal School." 

Again we learn, from sources outside the records of the Trustees, 
that Mr. D. A. Anderson, a Dartmouth graduate, was the principal 
of the school, beginning with the Fall term of 1870, and that he 
remained two years, with very moderate success. A catalogue was 
issued in November, 1871, which shows that the Trustees were Dea. 
George E. Dean, President; Rev. Seth Keeler, D. D., Sylvanus 
Bunton, M. D., William A. Stinson, William Conant, William 
Stevens, Dea. John Bruce, Thomas H. Richardson, George Stevens 
(honorary member) Lowell, Mass. ; George W. McCollom (honorary 
member) New York ; William H. Conant, secretary, and F. O. 
Kitr,redge, treasurer. 

The instructors were D. A. Anderson, A. M., Principal; Miss 
Martha E. Conant, Preceptress; Miss Mary C. Mclntire, assistant 
pupil; Miss Laurania Smith, teacher of music; A. F. Newton, 
teacher of penmanship. 



148 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

There was one in the graduating class, Frank Richardson of 
Milford. There were seven gentlemen and nine ladies in the classical 
department, forty gentlemen and twenty-five ladies in the English 
department, and there were in all twenty-eight pupils during the 
winter term, twenty-eight in the spring, and fifty-four in the fall. 

The catalogue gives the information that u the discipline of the 
school is entrusted to the Principal," and that "it is intended to be 
mild but efficient." A capacious boarding-house is kept by William 
H. Conant, and expenses are : tuition, English branches, $5.00 a 
term; languages, $7.00; music, $10.00; use of piano, $2.00; board 
per week, including room-rent and washing for bed, $3.50. 

Presumably, this catalogue was for the school year 1870-71 — but 
this is only a guess. It may have been for a part of the two years 
covered bv Mr. Anderson. 



CHAPTER X. 



EDUCATIONAL CONTINUED. 

McCollom Institute Succeeds Appleton Academy — Endowment 
by Ggorge W. McCollom of New York— Charter Amended 
— Mr. Anderson's Principalship — He Served both Appleton 
Academy and McCollom Institute — A Liberal Fund Well 
Invested — George W. Todd as Principal — Great Prosper- 
ity — Large Classes — Dissatisfaction among Donors at 
Change of Name — Affects the " Gratuity Notes" — Why 
Prof. Todd Left — Principalship of W. H. Ray — Prof. 
Lucten Hunt (who takes the school a second time) — Hi- 
ram Q. Ward — Cassius S. Campbell— Improvements to 
Building and Apparatus — Oscar S. Davis as Principal — 
Prof. J. B. Welch Succeeds Davis — The Dean Place Bought 
for Principal to Live In — Trustees Authorized to Hold 
More Property — Trustees Incorporated and Why — By-Laws 
of New Corporation — G. W. Cox as Principal — G. S. Cha- 
pin Succeeds Him — School Suspended for Year 1900-1901 
— Building Repaired — Rev. H. P. Peck Conducts the School 
for the Year 1901-1902 — The Institute as a Town High 
School — Rev. Mr. Peck and Miss A. L. Williams Teachers 
— Mr. and Mrs. Leslie A. Bailey Succeed Them — Then 
Prof. Henry W. Delano — Triennial Alumni Reunions. 

Early in the year, 1871, George W. McCollom, then of New 
York City, offered to the Trustees, as a permanent endowment, the 
sum of ten thousand dollars, provided that they would cause the name 
to be changed from Appleton Academy to that of McCollom Academy, 
and provided further that the town of Mont Vernon should for five 
uccessive years, raise and pay to the institution the sum of three 
hundred dollars, being an aggregate amount of fifteen hundred dollars. 
The conditions were complied with, and now for thirty-four years the 
school has enjoyed the income from this valuable endowment. Mr. 



150 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

McCollom was a native of New Boston, but came with his parents to 
Mont Vernon to reside in early life. He married the eldest daughter 
of Asa and Mary A.,(Appleton) Stevens of this town. She died in 
New York in 1865, and her husband's donation was intended as a 
grateful memorial of her. A marble tablet p'aced by him in the hall 
of the Institute bears this inscription: "Endowed by George W. 
McCollom in memory of his wife Mary Ann S. McCollom." 

Mr. McCollom died in New York, September 4th, 1878. 

Just how the proposition came to be made for a change of name 
of Appleton Academy to McCollom Institute does not appear ; but it 
was probably owing to a suggestion made by the Treasurer, William 
H. Conant, who was fertile in plans for securing advantages for the 
school. 

At a meeting of the board of trustees June 5, 1871, it was voted : 

"That in consideration of the offer of George W. McCollom of 
New York to give an endowment of ten thousand dollars if the name 
of the institution shall be changed from Appleton Academy to 
McCollom Academy, that the trustees comply with that condition;" 
and also voted : 

"That Dea. Bruce and Rev. Dr. Keeler be a committee to carry 
out the above vote by petitioning the Legislature for such a change 
of name." 

The Trustees met on the 8th of June to hear the report, and 
recommitted it for the petition to be revised and amended, and for- 
warded to the Legislature at an early day. 

On the 12th of June the Trustees voted that when the name is 
changed it be called McCollom Institute, provided Mr. McCollom did 
not object. Whose idea this was does not appear, but it was a most 
unfortunate change, and the name "Institute" has been a constant 
burden to the school ever since. 

The name of the institution was changed to McCollom Institute 
by the following act, which was approved, July 7, 1871 : 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

In the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and seventy- 
one. An act in amendment of an act to incorporate the Appleton 
Academy, Mont Vernon, N. H. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 
Court convened. 

Section 1. That section one of the act entitled an "Act to incorpo- 
rate the Appleton Academy" be amended by striking out the words 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 151 

"Appleton Academy" and inserting- instead thereof the words "McCollom 
Institute." 

Section 2. All acts or parts of acts inconsistent with this act are 
hereby repealed, and this act shall take effect from and after its passage. 

WILLIAM H. GOVE, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
G. W. M. PITMAN, President of the Senate. 
Approved July 7th A. D., 1871. 

JAMES A. WESTON, Governor. 

Messrs. F. O. Kittredge, W. H. Conant and William Stevens 
were a committee to 1 hank Mr. McCollom for his generous endow- 
ment, and to receive and invest the amount as a fund for the benefit 
of the Institute. 

Mr. Anderson's second year was as principal of the " McCollom 
Institute," and the Trustees, being now well-to-do financially, voted him 
four hundred and seventy-five dollars in addition to the tuitions. 
The Treasurer's book for October, 1871, shows a fund amounting to 
$17,206.87. The subscription notes contributed in 1868 were all 
paying six per cent., and one of the halves of Mr. McCollom's endow- 
ment was in a western railroad bond which paid seven per cent. The 
other half was in a good 7 per cent, mortgage. 

In the spring of 1872 a proposition was made to enclose the 
Academy grounds with a fence, and in the autumn of the succeeding 
year it was done. It was not many years, however, before the com- 
munity were as anxious to get rid of the fence as they had been to 
have it built. 

In 1872 George W. Todd, of Rindge, N. H., became the 
tenth principal, a man of untiring zeal, great executive ability and 
experience. He at once associated with himself, as classical teacher, 
Rev. Charles P. Mills, an accomplished scholar, a graduate of Amherst 
College, and later in the ministry at Newburyport, Mass., and serving 
afterward with distinction in the Legislature of Massachusetts. Mr. 
Todd held the office of principal six years, retiring in 1878. His 
later assistants were Messsrs. F. A. Eldredge and G. W. Putnam, 
graduates respectively of Harvard and Dartmouth. 

The first year, Mr. Todd was to receive from the fund income six 
hundred dollars, in addition to the tuitions, and the Trustees were to 
pay the salary of Miss Martha E. Conant as assistant, but Mr. Todd 
was to pay all the other expenses of the school. 

The change of name of the institution gave great offence to some 
of the previous benefactors of the school, and the interest on some of 



152 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



the subscription notes was defaulted, and later the principal. In one 
or two instances the givers of the notes compromised by paying a 
reduced sum. 

Of the notes given, the following were at different times paid in 
full to the institution : 

George Stevens, 

George A. Harden, 

George A. Bruce, 

Thomas L. Livermore, 

William Stevens, 

T. H. Richardson, 

H H. Bragg, 

John Bruce, 

H. P. Conant 

Augustus Berry, 

Henry E Spalding, M. D., 

J V. Smith, 

J. E. Bruce, 

George K. Dean, 

Alonzo W. Bragg, 

George W. Ordway, 

George W. McCollom, 

Charles E. Conant, 

Andrew Dutton, 

Benjamin J. Boutwell, 

Mrs Loveredge, 

Darwin E. Kittredge, 

Timothy Kittredge, 

C. F. P. Bancroft, 

Asa Stevens's note for 81 0( 

With the exception of the note of W. H. & A. Conant of $1500, 
and John F. Colby's note for $100 (which has been assumed by his 
son, John H. Colby) and which are still alive, the interest having 
been paid up to date, all the notes given in 1868, not paid, as shown 
above, have become void under the statute of limitations This 
shows $3375 collected, and $1600 still collectible— a total of $4975. 
About $1100 seems to have defaulted. 

There was a catalogue issued for 1873-74, which was probably 
the first one of Mr. Todd's administration. The Trustees of McCol- 
lom Institute at this time were Rev. Seth H. K eler, D. D., President, 



Lowell, 


$500.00 


u 


100.00 


Boston, 


100.00 


. i 


25.00 


Mont Vernon, 


500 00 


I 4 


100.00 


It 


100.00 


(C 


50.00 


Boston, 


200.00 


Pelham, 


25 00 


Boston, 


25.00 




100.00 


Milford, 


50.00 


Mont Vernon, 


25.00 


Boston, 


25.00 


Chicago, 


25.00 


New York, 


100.00 


Boston, 


200.00 


a 


100.00 




50.00 


New York, 


50.00 




25.00 


Mont Vernon, 


500.00 


Andover, Mass., 


50.00 


(compromised) , 


350 00 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 153 

Dea. George E. Dean, Sylvanus Bunton, M. D., William A. Stinson, 
Dea. William Conaut, William Stevens, and Thomas H. Richardson. 
George W. McCollom of New York, George Stevens of Lowell, and 
Albert Conaut of Boston were recorded as "Honorary Trustees;" 
William H. Conant was Secretary, and Daniel R. Baker, Treasurer. 
The board of teachers consisted of George W. Todd, LL. B., 
Principal. Miss Martha E. Conant, First Assistant, Mrs. George W. 
Todd, Second Assistant, Miss Martha Aldrich, Assistant, Spring 
term, Miss Emma D. Putnam, Assistant Pupil, Winter term, Miss 
Laurania Smith and Miss Ellen B. Richardson, teachers of music. 

The summary gives twenty-four gentlemen and twenty-two ladies 
in the Classical Department, forty gentlemen and twenty-nine ladies 
in the Higher English, and fifteen gentlemen and six ladies in the 
Common English. In the Fall term (1873) the total number of pupils 
was eighty-one, in the Winter (1873-74) eighty-eight, and in the 
Spring (1874) ninety-one. 

For the first time the catalogue is adorned with a lithographic cut 
of the Academy building, which shows the new fence which had been 
built around the grounds. 

The students were furnished board at various homes in the vil- 
lage, and Conant Hall, which had been first purchased and fitted up 
and presented to the Trustees for a boarding-house, was now adver- 
tised as a place where pupils could engage board of William H. 
Conant, who had become its proprietor, and who also conducted it 
most successfully as a summer boarding-house. 

The catalogue gives other information as to the Institute, under 
its new career: "The average age of students here is 18 years and 4 
months — a significant fact," says the catalogue. "The prosperity of 
this school for the past two years," it goes on, "has been almost 
unparalleled, having risen in average attendance from 36 in 1871-72 
to 86 in '73-74." 

"The Principal has taught twenty-four years, and is engaged for 
the third year," Mr. Todd having begun his work with the Fall term 
of 1872. 

August 25, 1873, the Trustees voted Mr. Todd the sum of one 
hundred dollars to purchase apparatus. 

October 30, the same year, the Trustees met "to consider the 
matter of building a Hotel in accordance with a vote of the town to 
appropriate five thousand dollars for the purpose." A committee of 
five — Rev. Dr. Keeler, W. H. Conant, Daniel R. Baker, William 



154 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Stevens, and Prof. G. W. Todd — was appointed "to prepare a sub- 
scription paper and solicit funds for the purpose." 

July 27, 1874, the Trustees voted to offer the position of assistant 
the coming 3 7 ear, to Mr. Charles P. Mills, a recent graduate of 
Amherst College, and to offer him two hundred and fifty dollars per 
term, it being a proposition of Mr. Todd "to pay fifty dollars of this 
amount per term, provided the Trustees would in some way raise the 
balance." 

As usual there is no record that the committee appointed to carry 
out this vote ever reported, but Mr. Mills came, and in April, 1875, 
they voted to endeavor to engage Mr. Mills for another year on the 
same terms. This was done, and a lack of boarding places was made 
good by special effort. The price for board had increased like every- 
thing else, but "including room and washing for bed" it was still but 
three dollars and fifty cents per week. 

In April, 1876, Mr. Todd was engaged for the school year 
beginning in September, he to furnish all the assistance, and pay all 
the running expenses, and to receive, in addition to the tuitions, the 
sum of eight hundred dollars from the Trustees. 

This agreement was renewed for the next school year, (1877-78), 
at the close of which, Mr. Todd's connection with the school ceased. 

Mr. Todd was a most energetic and pushing man, and the school 
was quite prosperous under his administration. Mr. Mills proved a 
most valuable assistant. It does not appear who succeeded him, but 
in the catalogue for 1876-77 under the head of First Assistant, no 
name appears, but the words "Best man and ripest scholar that can 
be obtained." In this catalogue also appears the name of Mrs. S. J. 
(Trevitt) Bunton as "teacher of all kinds of painting." G. L. Adams 
was teacher of penmanship. 

As was the custom, the principal of the Institute was usually 
elected (when he would accept it) as Superintending committee of 
the Town schools. Mr. Todd tilled this position several of the years 
while in Mont Vernon, and he carried the same energy and push into 
his administration of this otlice as he did in managing McCollom 
Institute. 

In his last report to the town as Superintending committee, made 
in the spring of 1878, he gives a brief history of his connection with 
the Institute, which was thoroughly characteristic, and which contains 
the reasons why he left, as follows : 

"Nearly six years ago we became principal of this school. Before 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 155 

we came into town we were strongly advised not to come, for we 
could not succeed without much expense and much opposition in 
various forms. But not afraid of soiled clothes, bare hands or hard 
work, we went to work with high hope and good resolution. We 
were self-conceited enough to think we knew how to manage a school 
of this kind successfully. AVith these feelings we made our prepara- 
tions. The first year the school was small, but larger than for some 
years previous. It required the first year to decide the people whether 
we were capacious enough to fill the place. During the next four 
years (12 terms) most of the terms numbered eighty, — ranging from 
that to one hundred and two, — the average being above eighty for the 
whole four years. To keep the school up to a high standard we have 
paid out (including next term) $1650 for assistance, upwards of 
81000 for stationery, postage and printers' bills, above S700 for fuel, 
and 8200 for repairs, to building and , furniture, improvement of 
grounds and apparatus. This last sum we have mostly raised by 
Exhibitions. During these four years we claim that our labors have 
resulted in bringing more dollars into town than those of any other 
man. By far the largest portion of the money paid us hei'e has been 
spent and in this town, too, when we could obtain what we needed, 
paying above 81000 over the counter of one store for supplies, and 
above another 81000 for fuel and farm products. We claim also 
to have contributed our full share to benevolent objects abroad, to 
public enterprises at home, and to the support of preaching and other 
religious matters in town. In these respects conscience does not 
reprove us in the least. 

"Two years ago at this time the school reached its highest 
point. For a good while about that time we heard, and heard of, 
a good deal of talk about the enormous sum of money we were making 
and how fast we were getting rich. We were often told and knew as 
well, that we had reached the zenith of our glory here. One year we 
paid Mr. Mills §150, the next year 8175. The retention of Mr. Mills 
left the trustees nearly 8300 in debt. — Now every dollar of that debt 
is liquidated by reduction of our income during these last'two years. 
It is admitted, we have made some money ; but have we not worked 
hard for it? We took the school in a very reduced condition and 
furnished the needful to raise it to a good standing. Surely we have 
a right to reap where we sow. Honestly, we believe the net income 
from one of our largest boarding-houses is better for six months than 
is ours for six years. We mean to give full credit for what the town, 
the Board of Trustees, and friends have done for the school and for 
us. We feel that we have worked faithfully for the interests of the 
town, the Institute and the public schools, and the varied enterprises 
of home interest since we have been a citizen of the town. At the 
close of the Spring term we are to dissolve our connection with the 
school, trusting as the rising sun eclipses the setting sun, and the 
welcome new takes the place of the departing old, the school will 
witness a return of patronage, a new revival of interest, a new and 



156 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

long lease of prosperity. It has had a season of remarkable prosper- 
ity and usefulness. Twenty-four have graduated the last three years. 
Representatives of that number are in five different New England 
colleges now. A fair sized class is expected to graduate next term. 
We do not take this step because we feel entirely devoid of friends. 
Kinder-hearted, more obliging, or more accommodating neighbors we 
never had and never desire to have while we live. Our reasons for 
this step are various. The school is much reduced in numbers. — We 
do not feel it to be our fault. The causes are various. — Some out of 
town, and in tow T n, say the people are not in harmony with us, — some, 
that the Trustees desire this step, — some, that our politics are in the 
way — but most say it is the 'hard times,' little business and less money. 

"1st. — No man can run the school, as a scientific and classical 
school, without an able male assistant. No one female teacher in a 
thousand could till the place of Messrs. Mills, Chapman, Putnam or 
Eldridge, and that one would want, and could command as good pay 
as either of them had. The income, with present patronage, will not 
meet expenses. We can not lay up a dollar this year beyond moder- 
ate day wages for a common farm laborer. 

"2nd. — Compared with two years ago the town has withdrawn 
above 40 per cent, of its patronage this year. 

"3rd. — We are well acquainted with the schools of this town and 
see but very few in them who will be fitted to enter the Institute for 
three or four years to come. 

"4th. — A good many of our patrons are slow in the payment of 
bills, so slow that we have twice had to discount notes at the bank to 
pay our assistants. At the time of writing we hold fifty unpaid 
tuition bills, mostly against our friends in town. These bills vary in 
time from a few weeks to three years. 

"5th. — Not to attend church regularly would be a scandal. To 
attend is to suffer for the next day or two, and the prospect of a 
better state of things very soon is dim. Smoke is bad to breathe. 

"Last and not least. — We need release and rest from the long 
and constant anxiety, severe labor, continued care and nervous wear 
peculiarly incident upon a school of this kind." 

Mr. Todd was elected to the New Hampshire State Senate from 
this district in 1879-80. His death occurred from typhoid pneumonia 
at Norridgewock, Maine, where he had just goue to assume the posi- 
tion of Master of the High School, on the loth of April, 1884. 

William H. Ray, a Dartmouth graduate, succeeded Mr. Todd, 
at the beginning of the Fall term, 1878. He was to have seven 
hundred dollars from the fund income, and all the tuitions, was to 
furnish a competent female assistant, and paj' all the running expenses 
of the school, and the Trustees' records add : 

"It is also expected that he will remain at least five years." 




PROF. LUCIEN HUNT. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 157 

In April, 1879, the length of the Fall and Winter terms was made 
thirteen weeks each, and the Spring term twelve weeks, thus length- 
ening the school year by two weeks. Capt. John Trevitt and the Rev. 
W. H. Woodwell, the latter having succeeded the Rev. Dr. Keeler as 
pastor of the church, now appear on the list of Trustees, though no 
record of their being elected is found. Daniel R. Baker, Treasurer, 
having died, Capt. John Trevitt was chosen in his place. 

Mr. Ray resigned in February, 1881, to take effect at the end of 
the school year, and the school was kept through by Mr. "William 
Whiting of Dartmouth College, Mr. Ray going to a position in the 
public schools in Yonkers, N. Y. 

The catalogue for 1878-80 shows that Mr. Ray was assisted by 
Miss Mary A. Loveland, Miss Ellen F. Conant, Mr. George W. 
Putnam, A. B., and Miss W. Farwell. It was the most elaborate 
catalogue ever published of the school, and contained an earnest 
appeal for an addition to the funds and equipment. Mr. Ray was an 
accomplished teacher, and held several important positions after he 
left Yonkers, being finally at Hyde Park, 111., a suburb of Chicago, 
where he died. 

Mr. Lucien Hunt, who was the eighth principal in 1869-70, was 
invited to return and take charge of the school as the eleventh prin- 
cipal after Mr. Ray's last year. He was to have eight hundred dollars 
a year from the income of the fund for two years, and after that 
seven hundred dollars. He was to have all the tuition, all income 
from any use of the hall, and was to pay all the expenses of the 
school, the Trustees to keep the building repaired. The Trustees put 
this declaration on record: "We hope this arrangement will be so 
satisfactory to both parties that it will be a permanent one, and for 
the lasting benefit of the institution." 

January 22, 1882, the board chose the Rev. C. C. Carpenter, 
president, and Prof. Hunt, a member of the board. 

Mr. Hunt was a most excellent teacher, and a very valuable man 
for the social as well as material interests of the town and school. 
He bore an active part in everything, and was much esteemed. His 
assistant was Mr. Arthur V. Goss, of Chelsea, Vt., a Dartmouth 
graduate. 

The hope of permanence, however, failed again, and Prof. Hunt 
declined to serve longer than two years. 

The next principal was Mr. Hiram Q. Ward of St. Johnsbury, 
Vt., a Dartmouth graduate. He remained but a single year. His 



158 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

assistant was a Miss Doane. The school seems to have fallen to an 
average of about thirty pupils each term, though no catalogues were 
published. 

Mr. Ward was to have seven hundred dollars from the income of 
the fund, the three hundred dollars appropriated by the town to pay 
tuition of town pupils, all tuitions received from out of town pupils, 
and all income from use of hall, and he was to pay all expenses. 

Prof. Hunt remained in town for some time after his connection 
with the school had ceased, and was active on the board of Trustees. 
Mr. Ward was succeeded as principal by Prof. Cassius S. Campbell, 
Prof. Hunt having presented a strong endorsement of him from a 
friend in Hastings, Minn., whei'e Mr. Campbell had served as super- 
intendent of schools for some time. He was born in Windham, N. 
H., Nov. 19, 1845, which town was originally a part of Londonderry, 
and his first paternal ancestor in America emigrated from London- 
derry, Ireland, in 1733, settling in the New Hampshire town of the 
same name. 

Cassius fitted for college at Pinkerton Academy, and graduated 
at Dartmouth in the class of 1868, and at once became superintend- 
ent of schools at Hastings, Minn., where he remained for ten years. 
He then became Principal of the High school at St. Paul, which place 
he held for five years, and then came to McCollom Institute, where 
he did as good work as the school had ever known ; and where he 
remained until 1888, when he became one of the faculty at Pink- 
erton Academy, where he remains at this writing (1906.) 

Mr. Campbell's forte was in Physics, Mathematics and the 
natural sciences. The school flourished with new vigor under Prof. 
Campbell's all-round ability, and his pervasive energy and enthu- 
siasm. Everybody liked him, and his rare acquirements and ability 
made a lasting impression. Especially did he set about putting the 
school-building and its equipment in order. The following resume of 
what was accomplished during his term of service was furnished by 
him at the special request of the editor of this history : 

"The condition of the building was not attractive when I took 
possession of it. The basement was nearly full of all kinds of 
rubbish apparently dating from its erection, and was used by the 
school instead of outbuildings without any provision being made 
therefor. One of the rooms was filled to the ceiling with disabled 
settees and other rubbish, etc., etc. Fortunately the wind and snow 
had the freedom of the basement so that the health of the school did 
not suffer except from occasional colds through the winter. A cam- 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 159 

paign of repairs and improvements was at once begun, and at the end 
of my four years the building was clean and wholesome throughout; 
every foot of plastering in it, if I remember rightly, had been newly 
papered by Mr. Mixer; the building fully equipped with new stoves, 
lamps and automatic electric bells for the school programme ; an 
up-to-date chemical laborator} 7 and other apparatus fully equal to the 
demands of the school ; the library newly arranged and a new catalogue 
made and printed ; the piazza and porte-cochere built. 

"All this was paid for primarily out of my pocket, with the distinct 
understanding; that the Trustees should never be under the least 
obligation to make up to me any deficiency that might exist. 

"The following is an abstract from my personal account of the 
whole matter : — 

Chemical laboratory and apparatus, $871 

Programme clock, Electric bells, Stoves and pipe, Plumbing 

materials, 85 

Paint, Paper, Shades, Desks, Cases, Carpet, Glass, Hard- 
ware and Piazza, 629 



81585 

Trustees of McCollom Institute, Si 00 

24 Lectures and School Entertainments, 297 

Materials sold and unsolicited donations, 77 



8474 



"When I left Mont Vernon I took with me the three principal 
pieces of apparatus I had bought and the Trustees gave me a check 
for 8435, which came within about 8125 of balancing the account. 
This was abundantly satisfactory to me, and if it was not satisfactory 
to the Trustees it was their own fault." 

The amount which Mr. Campbell was to receive from the income 
of the fund was only six hundred and seventy-five dollars. The other 
conditions were substantially as with his predecessors. 

It was he who proposed the piazza in front of the building, and 
the porte-cochere, which was a great convenience, and the Trustees 
voted that he might build it "at his pleasure," adding: "the under- 
standing is that he will not hold the Trustees, as such, responsible for 
any expense that may be incurred." 

At this same time the following significant vote was passed by 
the board: "That Prof. Campbell may allow the Academy bell to be 
rung only for one hour at sunrise and sunset on July Fourth, and 
that the Trustees will prosecute any person who shall break into or 
enter the building at night, for any purpose." 



160 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

May 9, 1886, the Trustees authorized the Treasurer to expend 
one hundred dollars for tables, chemical apparatus, etc. 

Dr. Frederick H. Chandler having come into town as a practising 
physician, he was at this time elected a Trustee. 

Prof. Campbell carried on many enterprises to raise money for 
improvements and apparatus duriug his stay. The Trustees seem to 
have thought he was not giving quite as much attention to the 
"classics" and some "practical" branches, as they should receive, and 
suggested certain changes in this regard. But Prof. Campbell's 
administration was considered almost a new era of prosperity, and 
when he resigned to accept a place in the Pinkerton faculty, his leav- 
ing was very much regretted. 

August 3, 1888, the Trustees accepted Mr. Campbell's resigna- 
tion as Principal, and that of Prof. Lucien Hunt as a Trustee. The 
matter of selecting a new Principal was delegated to a committee, 
and Col. William H. Stinson was elected a Trustee. 

August 11, it was voted to engage Mr. Os( ar F. Davis of Bellows 

Falls, Vt., as Principal, on same conditions as previous principals, 

except that the amount allowed from the income of the fund was 

reduced to seven hundred dollars. Mr. Davis was a graduate of the 

University of Vermont. His wife was his assistant. The school was 

fairly prosperous. He remained until 1891, when he resigned to 

accept the position of the head of an important educational institution 

in Salt Lake City. 

Mr. Davis afterward entered the ministry, and was for some 

time settled at Plymouth, Mass., and later removed to Vermont. He 

was later located in New Richmond, Wis. 

John B. Welch, A. M., a veteran teacher, succeeded Prof. Davis 
in 1891. He was a native of Onondagua County, N. Y., a graduate 
of Wesley an University, Middletown, Conn., and had been teacher 
for a period covering twenty years at Willimantic, Conn., and West- 
field and Pittsfield, Mass. Mrs. Welch was his assistant the first 
three years, and the last year George S. Chapin. Prof. Welch was 
a thorough scholar and rigid disciplinarian. He left here in 1895 to 
take charge of Marmaduke Military Institute, Sweet Springs, Mis- 
souri. He was later principal of a preparatory school at Columbia, 
Missouri, for Missouri State University. 

The terms under which Prof. Welch was engaged were like those 

of former principals, except that the amount granted him from the 

fuud income was increased to eight hundred dollars, "for the first 
year only." 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 161 

In November, 1891, Charles H. Raymond and Henry F. Dodge 
were elected Trustees, and Hon. George A. Maiden of Lowell, Charles 
M. Kittredge, M. D., of Fishkill, N. Y., and William F. Pinkham of 
Mont Vernon were chosen honorary members of the board 

On the first of August, 1892, Messrs. Albert Conant and W. F. 
Piukham were chosen active members of the board, and the latter 
was chosen President, but declined to serve. 

August 13, 1892, the Trustees voted "that the Trustees hereby 
express to Prof. Welch their confidence in him as a competent teacher, 
and desire that he will remain with us as Principal of McCollom 
Institute at least five years ; and if, to that eud, he will purchase or 
build a permanent home among ns, they will loan him for that pur- 
pose a reasonable amount on mortgage of the same at five per cent, 
per annum ; and that the Clerk forward a copy of this vote to Prof. 
Welch." 

No response to this communication is on record, but a proposi- 
tion was received from Mr. W. F. Pinkham who had some time before 
purchased the Dean p'ace, so-called, to sell the buildings and about 
one acre of the land of said place to the Trustees "for the use of 
the Institution." This proposition was accepted, and the property 
was bought for two thousand dollars, and was occupied by Prof. 
Welch and his family as long as he remained Principal. This no 
doubt accomplished the purpose of the above-named "proposition." 
Prof. Welch inaugurated, in his new home, the practice of taking a 
few boys into his family to be specially instructed, and made more 
of an income than any previous Principal. Of course he paid a 
rental for the Dean place, which was at the rate of one hundred and 
twenty -five dollars per year. 

The changes made in the personnel of the Trustees are not all 
accounted for in the records. At the beginning of the school year, 
August, 1894, the list appears as follows: F. O. Kittredge, Clark 
Campbell, Charles H. Raymond, William H. Conant, Albert Conant, 
George A. Marden and John H. Colby. It was voted that John H. 
Colby and George A. Marden be a committee to secure a new charter 
for the corporation, if necessary, and take measures to legalize past 
acts of the corporation. This was to enable the corporation to acquire 
more real estate than the charter already allowed, and to cover any 
possible illegality in the methods of electing Trustees. 

The committee referred to at the next session of the Legislature 
(1895) secured the passage of the following act: 



162 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



CHAPTER 201. 

An act to authorize McCollom Institute to acquire, hold and convey 
real estate, and receive donations. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 
Court convened. 

Section 1. That McCollom Institute, which was incorporated by 
the laws of 1850, chapter 1051, under the name of Appleton Academy is 
hereby authorized and empowered to acquire by purchase or otherwise 
suitable building's for academical purposes, and may hold real estate to 
the amount of ten thousand dollars, and the same may sell, convey and 
dispose of at pleasure, and may receive by donation or otherwise 
personal estate to the amount of fifty thousand dollars, the interest of 
which shall be expended to defray the expenses of said academy. 

Section 2. The trustees of said institute shall be elected annually 
and shall hold their office until their successors are elected. 

Section 3. The acts of the acting - trustees heretofore within the 
scope of the powers of actual trustees are hereby ratified and confirmed. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. (Approved 
March 5, 1895. ) 

The original corporators were shareholders in the original build- 
ing, and others were afterwards voted in on payment of a certain sum. 

Of late years it had been found difficult to secure the attendance 
of any considerable number of the members of the corporation at the 
annual meeting, and accordingly the names of nearly every one of 
them, who survived, was obtained to a petition to the Legislature to 
have the Trustees incorporated, with the power to fill vacancies, in 
order that there might be a certain perpetual, definite and accessible 
body to hold the property belonging to the institution, and to execute 
its purposes. 

The result was the passage of the following act : 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

In the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
seven. 

An act to incorporate the Trustees of McCollom Institute. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 
Court convened. 

Section 1. William H. Conant, Franklin O. Kittredge, Clark 
Campbell, Charles H. Raymond, George A. Marden, Albert Conant and 
John H. Colby, and their successors, are hereby made a corporation by 
the name of the "Trustees of McCollom Institute," for the purpose of 
maintaining a school in the town of Mont Vernon, with all the powers 
and privileges, and subject to all the duties, restrictions and liabilities 
set forth in all general laws, which now are, or may hereafter be in 
force and applicable to such corporations. 

Section 2. Said corporation shall have authority to receive, hold 
and manage the funds and property now held by McCollom Institute, 
and any other donations or bequests which may be made for its benefit, 
and may hold, for the purposes aforesaid, real and personal estate to an 
amount not exceeding One Hundred Thousand Dollars. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 163 

Section 3. The said Trustees shall have the power to adopt such 
by-laws as may be useful or necessary, with authority to elect one of 
their own number as President, also a Treasurer and a Secretary who 
may or may not be members of the corporation. Whenever a vacancy 
shall occur in the Trustees bj- the death, resignation or disability of any 
member, a successor shall be elected by the remaining - Trustees, who 
shall thereby become a member of the corporation. 

Section 4; All the acts and transactions of the Trustees acting 
under supposed authority as said Trustees, up to the present time, are 
hereby legalized and made valid. 

Section S. The purpose of this act is to continue the work con- 
templated in the establishment of the McCollom Institute under Chap. 
1051 of the Laws of the }'ear 1850 and acts amendatory thereof and 
additional thereto. 

Section 6. This act shall take effect on its passage. 

The first meeting of the corporation under the act above quoted, 
was called by George A. Maiden, the President of the old Board, 
and assembled at Institute Hall on Wednesday, September 8, 1897, 
at, four o'clock, all the corporators named in the act being present. 

Mr. Marden called the meeting to order, and read the act of 
incorporation. 

Mr. Colby thereupon presented for consideration the following 
by-laws, which were unanimously adopted : 

TRUSTEES OF THE McCOLLOM INSTITUTE. 

BY-LAWS. 

Art. 1. The officers of this Corporation shall be a President, a 
Treasurer and a Secretary, all of whom shall be members thereof. 

Art. 2. The officers of this Corporation shall be elected by ballot 
each year at the annual meeting, to hold office until their successors are 
duly elected. 

Art. 3. The annual meeting, after 1897, shall be held in Mont 
Vernon on such day in August as may be designated by the President 
of the Corporation. Special meetings may be called by the President 
whenever he deems it necessary, and he shall call a special meeting 
whenever three members of the Corporation shall so request in writing. 
Special meetings ma}' be held elsewhere than in Mont Vernon. 

Art. 4. Notice of meetings shall be given either by personal service 
on each member by the Secretary or President, or by mailing notice a 
sufficient time before the meeting is to be held. 

Art. 5. The Treasurer shall have the custody of all the funds and 
securities of the Corporation, shall collect all money due the Corporation 
and disburse all moneys to be paid out, under direction of the President 
and Secretary, but he shall make no permanent change of investment of 
any money in the funds without the authorit\- of the board. He may be 
required to give such bond with such securities as the board may 
determine. 

Art. 6. Four members of the board of trustees may be a quorum to 
do business. 

Art. 7. Any of these by-laws may be suspended or amended by a 
three-fourths vote. 



164 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

George A. Marden was then elected President of the Corpora- 
tion by ballot, having six votes which was the total number cast. 
Albert Conant was in like manner elected Secretary and Treasurer, 
Deacon William H. Conant, who had for many years served the old 
corporation in those capacities, declining further service. 

On the 6th of February, 1895, at a special meeting of the Trus- 
tees held in Boston, it was voted inexpedient to retain Prof. Welch 
another j 7 ear, and G. Wilbert Cox, a graduate of Harvard, 1895, who 
had been graduated from Acadia College, Wolfeville, N. S., was 
hired as teacher, remaining here three years ; his wife, Mrs. E. D. 
Cox, furnishing such assistance as he required. The last year of his 
residence here, he supplied the pulpit to the acceptance of the church. 
He was a patient, faithful and laborious teacher much beloved by the 
students. He took an active interest in town affairs and was much 
respected by all. He left here in 1898 to accept a more lucrative 
position of Superintendent of Schools at Bellows Falls, Vt. 

He was succeeded in September, 1898, by George S. Chapin, who 
was an assistant under Prof. J. B. Welch, a graduate of Bowdoin 
(1893), an accomplished scholar, who designed to pursue teaching as 
his life vocation. 

At the first meeting of the new corporation, September 8, 1897, 
it was voted to sell the Dean place so called to Mrs. Ellen F. Stinson 
for two thousand dollars, and to take a mortgage for that amount on 
the place at five per cent, the taxes to be paid by the mortgagor. Mrs. 
Stinson either managed the place or rented it season by season as a 
summer boarding-house, until 1905. when the Trustees again came 
into possession through a deed from Mrs. Stinson. 

Mr. Chapin remained in charge of the school, which was small in 
numbers, and consisted only of pupils resident in the town, until the 
end of the school year of l#98-99. 

At the annual meeting August 25, 1900, it was voted to put the 
building in charge of a janitor "until a school is opened," and though 
various plans for op.niug the school were considered with some 
arrangement between the town and the Trustees, nothing came of 
them, and there was no school during the year 1900-'01. 

Extensive repairs were made on the building during the inter- 
regnum, a new furnace was put in, and the premises were put in most 
excellent condition, which used up a good portion of the income of 
the fund during the school suspension. 

The regular triennial alumni meeting was due to have occurred 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 165 

in 1899, but as the next year would be the semi-centenuial of the 
founding of the school, it was voted to postpone the alumni meeting 
till 1900. 

During the year while the Institute was closed, the board of 
education of the town undertook to provide suitable school privileges 
for the town pupils who would have attended the Institute, and the 
Trustees voted one hundred dollars toward paying for the same. 

For the school year beginning September 3, 1901, an arrange- 
ment was made with the Rev. H. P. Peck, pastor of the Congrega- 
tional church, to conduct the school in connection with his pastoral 
work, he to act as Principal, and to receive five hundred dollars from 
the Trustees, together with any sum appropriated by the town for 
the Institute. 

And Mr. Peck was also authorized to make such arrangements 
with the town board of education with reference to the joiut use of 
the Institute building by such of the town schools as they may 
mutually agree upon. 

June 28, 1902, an informal conference was held by the Trustees 
and the town board of education as to what should be done with the 
school the coming year. The arrangement of the previous year had 
not proved satisfactory, because it did not furnish full High school 
privileges, without which, approved by the State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, any parent might send a child competent to enter 
a High school, to any High school in the state, and the town would 
have to pay the tuition therefor. There was an animated discussion, 
but no action. 

At the annual meeting held August 16, 1902, it was voted that 
owing to the complete and long-continued disability of W. H. 
Conant, which rendered him incapable of performing the duties as a 
member of the board, this position was hereby declared vacant ; and 
a highly complimentary resolution to the retiring member was passed. 

A resolution expressive of the valued services of F. O. Kittredge, 
one of the charter members of the Trustees, who had recently died, 
was passed. Dea. William H. Kendall and Mr. Willard P. Woods, 
both residents of Mont Vernon, were elected to fill the vacancies, and 
on the organization of the board, Mr. Marden was re-elected Pres- 
ident, and Mr. Woods Secretary. 

The report of the confei'ence between the town school board, and 
the Trustees was then taken up, and a proposition to be made to Rev. 



16G HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Mr. Peck to taka the school another year was read and discussed, 
but no final action was taken. 

September 1, 1902, a plan was adopted to provide such a curric- 
ulum and such instruction as should meet the approval of the State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, and required by law for a High 
school. This plan was jointly signed by the Trustees and the town 
board. The Trustees were to pay towards the expenses five hundred 
dollars from the income of the fund, and to allow the use of the 
Institute building and its appurtenances. The town was to pay the 
two hundred dollars appropriated already, and to use its best endeav- 
ors to secure a further town appropriation of three hundred dollars 
for the balance of the year. The Trustees were to hire a Principal 
and an Assistant, satisfactory to the town board, and the Assistant 
was to be satisfactory to the Principal. The balance of the money, 
after reserving a sufficient amount to pa} T for heating, lighting, care 
and school supplies, was to be divided between the Principal and 
Assistant, as the Trustees might deem best. If the town should fail 
to appropriate the three hundred dollars, then the school was to be 
closed after as many weeks as the money provided would pay for; 
and tlie arrangement was to last but one school year, unless renewed. 

A course of study was made up from suggestions of the State 
Superintendent, which was approved by him, and McCollom Institute 
was designated as an institution acceptable as a High school. 

Rev. Mr. Peck was engaged as Principal, and Miss Annie Louise 
Williams of Brattleboro, Vt , a graduate of Brown University, as 
Assistant. The nice hundred dollars remaining after the expense of 
care, heating, etc. ( which was fixed at one hundred dollars) was 
divided equally between the Principal and Assistant. 

.Miss Williams proved a teacher of rare ability, and it was with 
regret that the Trustees received her declination to serve another 
year, which she offered in order to accept a better position in the 
High school of Whitefield. 

The High school for the year was fairly successful, but was 
under the disadvantage of so large a number of classes as the law 
required, with so few pupils — the maximum number being not more 
than twenty. 

The triennial meeting of the alumni fur 1903 was voted by the 
Trustees to be held on the oth of September, in connection with the 
annual celebration of the Old Home Week, and the Centennial anni- 
versary of the town, for which arrangements were making. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 167 

Prof. Leslie A. Bailey and his wife, of Dresden, Maine, were 
engaged as Principal and Assistant for the year beginning in Septem- 
ber, 1903, the High school arrangement being continued as before. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bailey remained but a single year, he resigning 
to accept a school in Maine, very much to the regret of the Trustees. 

For the next year, 1904-05, Mr. Henry W. Delano, a Dartmouth 
graduate, and a resident of Marion, Mass., was secured as Principal, 
and Clarence H. Hallowell, M. D., was induced to act as Assist- 
ant. 

It was a most satis factory combination, and was renewed for the 
succeeding year. Dr. Hallowell, however, removed from town, in 
January, 1906, and Prof. Delano, with the assistance of Miss Annie 
Hazeu, an advanced pupil, continued the school. 

Mr. Delano was one of the best principals the school has ever 
known. But the number of pupils of High school age and capacity 
had now become reduced to eleven, and there was small encourage- 
ment to continue the school as a High school. 

For some years the permanent population of the town had been 
diminishing, and the surrounding towns, also growing smaller, were 
sending their children to High schools in towns which were large 
enough to support them. The regular fitting schools had. by their 
superior advantages, drawn many of the class that formerly came to 
Mont Vernon, and McCollom Institute could no longer compete in 
the work. 

REUNIONS OF ALUMNI. 

It was early determined that it would be pleasant and valuable 
for those who had been pupils at Appleton Academy to have frequent 
reunion meetings. As there was no complete and formal curriculum 
ending with graduation by classes, every pupil who attended the 
school w r as accounted as an alumnus. It is a great pity that complete 
records of these reunions were not kept and deposited in the Academy 
library. But from the files of the Farmers' Cabinet, and other 
sources have been gleaned a considerable number of facts c uicerning 
all the meetings held. 

Beginning in 1854, reunions were as follows, generally with 
a regular period of three years intervening, but not always : 

No. 1, 1854, August 31. 

No. 2, 1857, August 19. 



168 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

No. 3, 1859, August 24. 

No. 4, 1862, August 28. 

No. 5, I860, August 30. 

No. 6, 1868, August 26. 

No. 7, 1872, August 28. 

No. 8, 1875, July 20, (25th Anniversary). 

No. 9, 1878, August 28. 

No. 10, 1881, August 24. 

No. 11, 1884, August 27. 

No. 12, 1887. August 24. 

No. 13, 1890, August 21. 

Fo. 14, 1893, August 23. 

No. 15, 1896, August 19, 

No. 16, 1900, August 15, (50th Anniversary). 

No. 17, 1903, September 5, (Town Centennial). 

No. 1. The first meeting was held in Academy hall, Aug. 31, 
1854, beginning at 10 a. m. George A. Ramsdell was chosen pres- 
ident; Ainsworth E. Blunt, vice president; George Bowers, of 
Hancock, secretary ; John D. Nutter, John F. Colby and H. Perham 
were marshals. The Amherst Brass Band furnished the music. As 
the Cabinet put it, "the procession proceeded to the dinner tables 
collocated under a covert of verdant bowers, and spread with the 
luxuries of a prolific season. The pastor of the church, Rev. C. D. 
Herbert, asked a blessing. Toasts offered by the alumni called out a 
cheerful and pathetic response from Rev. Mr. Colby, Rev. Mr. 
Herbert, Mr. King and others." The location of the tables is not 
mentioned, but it probably was just above the Dr. Kittredge place, 
afterwards Conant Hall. The Rev. Mr. Colby was John Colby, one 
of the early assistant principals of the school ; and the Mr. King was 
Prof. Fenner E. King, the third regular principal after the school was 
incorporated. 

When the dinner was over, the procession was reformed, and 
returned to the hall, where the Rev. John Colby delivered an address, 
his subject being "Our Influence on Others, a Stimulus to Right 
Action." 

There was a committee appointed for the purpose, consisting of 
Prof. King, Mr. Blunt and George A. Spalding, who reported a series 
of resolutions, which were adopted, pledging hearty co-operation with 
the trustees, teachers and parents in promoting the interests of the 
Academy, declaring their gratitude to and friendship for the former 




OLD MOUNT VERXOX HOUSE. 
F. O. Kittredge, Prop. Burned. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 169 

teachers, Mr. Clough, Mr. and Mrs. Stevens, Mr. Colby and Miss 
Jaquith, and their appreciation of the work of the trustees, and of the 
citizens of Mont Vernon. The second resolution was as follows : 

Resolved — That we tender to Hon. William Appleton, of Bos- 
ton, our grateful acknowledgments for the liberality manifested in 
the donation of our Library, and the generous aid afforded in the 
erection and establishment of the Appleton Academy 

After some responses to toasts, the meeting adjourned till even- 
ing, when a pleasant social hour, with miscellaneous entertainment 
of speeches and singing, was enjoyed. 

No. 2. The second alumni meeting was held August 26, 1857, 
at half-past ten in the forenoon in Academy hall. The names of the 
officers are not given. "Hundreds" were in attendance, and the 
exercises were prayer by the then pastor, Rev. Charles E. Lord, music 
by the Glee Club, and an oration by John E. Wheeler, A. B., of 
Amherst, on "Literature;" a poem by Dr. George E. Bowers, of 
Nashua, on "Progress." We have the word of the reporter that Mr. 
Wheeler's address was one of "rare excellence," and that Dentist 
Bowers's poem evinced that "its author possessed much taste and 
cultivation." 

A procession was formed at the close of the exercises and 
marched to F. O. Kittredge's Mount Vernon House, where dinner was 
served to the merry crowd. The procession then returned to the hall, 
where the Matrimonial Statistics were read by A. E. Blunt of Dart- 
mouth College, and the Obituary Record by J. F. Colby also of 
Dartmouth College. A toastmaster was chosen and the "most prom- 
inent members" of the alumni were called out. After singing "Old 
Hundred," the meeting was "adjourned for two years." 

It is a pity the reports were not fuller. It would be interesting 
to know who were the officers, what band furnished music (if they 
had a baud) and why they adjourned for "two" years, instead of 
three. Perhaps the triennial custom had not then been adopted. 

No. 3. The third meeting was held August 24, 1859, probably 
in Acadenry hall. William Barrett presided, the oration on "Amuse- 
ments," was by George A. Ramsdell, then hailiug from Peterboro ; 
and the poem by Ainsworth E. Blunt. In the evening there was a 
social reunion in the hall, the only formality recorded being the read- 
ing of an ode written by Eliza Boutelle of Wilton. 

No. 4. The fourth alumni meeting was held on Thursday, August 
28, 1862, in the midst of the time of the Civil war. It was largely 



170 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

attended. The president of the day was John F. Colby, Esq., of 
Boston. Rev. Augustus Berry, of Pelham, officiated as chaplain, and 
William Barrett, then practising law in Nashua, delivered the 
address, his subject being "Books; their Uses, etc." The Poem was 
by J. M. Blood, M. D., then of Temple, and it was described as 
'•amusing and sprightly," and in the metre of Hiawatha. The Annals 
had been written iu the field, in Virginia, and iu the hospital after 
the '"Seven Days Fight," by George A. Marden, who had not expected 
to be present at the meeting, but it so happened that he got a fur- 
lough just in time to appear and read the paper himself. The toast- 
master was George A. Bruce, then engaged in recruiting a company 
for the Thirteenth New Hampshine Volunteers. The Matrimonial 
Record was read by Frank G. Clark, of Lyndeborough, and the 
Obituary notices by Charles M. Kittredge, who soon after was com- 
missioned a .Second Lieutenant in the Thirteenth. The Ode was 
written by Charles F. Kittredge, who also, with Clark Campbell, 
officiated as Marshal, and they formed a procession of the alumni at 
the Academy hall where the exercises were held, and, with the New 
Boston Brass band, marched to Baker & Campbell's hall, where 
dinner was served. Toasts were given, and responses made by Dea. 
William Conant, Jonas Hutchinson and Lieut. George A. Marden, 
who, after serving about eight months as a private and non-commis- 
sioned officer in the Berdan U. S. Sharp-Shooters, had just received a 
commission as first lieutenant. 

In the evening there was a social reunion at the Academy hall, 
where addresses were made by Rev. Augustus Berry and others. 

No. 5. The fifth meeting of the alumni was held on Wednesday, 
August 30, 1865, the number attending being described as "unprec- 
edented." The weather was delightful. At eleven o'clock, under the 
marshalship of Clark Campbell, a procession was formed at the Mount 
Vernon House, with the Wilton Cornet Band furnishing the music, 
and proceeded to Academy Hall, which had been elaborately deco- 
rated for the occasion, and which was filled to overflowing. William 
Barrett, Esq., of Nashua, presided, and prayer was offered by Rev. 
John E. Wheeler. John F. Colby, Esq , of Boston, delivered the 
oration, his subject being "America and Her Institutions." George 
A. Maiden read the poem. A Military record was read by Prof. 
C. F. P. Bancroft. There was no Matrimonial or Obituary 
record, owing to some oversight. An ode was sung, written by Miss 
Mary Frances Perkins. After the exercises at the hall, a procession 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 171 

of four hundred was formed and marched to the Hiram Perkins grove, 
where a dinner prepared by the ladies of the town was served. 
Harlan P. Con ant, of Boston, was loastmaster, and responses were 
made by George Stevens, Esq., of Lowell, Mass., Rev. Augustus 
Berry, of Pelham, and Dr C. F. P. Bancroft, all former principals, 
Prof. Charles A. Towle. the present principal, Capt. George A. Bruce, 
Lieut. George A. Maiden, Rev. John E. Wheeler, George A. Rams- 
dell, Jonas Hutchinson and Dr. J. M. Blood. 

At the conclusion of the exercises, the procession marched back 
to the village. In the evening the hall was again filled for a prome- 
nade concert and a social reunion. The Wilton band was then a 
crack organization, led by Carl Krebs, and its music was a great 
attraction. Miss Agnes Giles, (since Mrs. Agnes (Giles) Spring, 
of Boston,) was just coming into notice as a fine contralto singer, 
and she was a member of the school. Her singing added much to the 
evening's pleasure. 

Arrangements were made for the next Triennial to be held on 
the last Wednesday in August, 1868. 

No. 6. The sixth triennial occurred at the Academy Hall, 
Wednesday, August 26, 1868. The Hall was beautifully decorated 
with bunting. The services were opened with prayer by the Rev. 
Augustus Berry, of Pelham, a former principal. William H. Towne, 
Esq., of Boston, presided, and gave an address of welcome, Col. 
George A. Bruce, of Boston, delivered an address on "American 
Culture," and as Mr. George B. Buzell, of Portland, Maine, one of 
the earliest alumni, who had been appointed poet, failed to appear, 
George A. Marden, editor of the Loicell (Mass.) Daily Courier, read 
a poem written for another occasion, in his stead. The Matrimonial 
Record was read b} T Maj. Charles F. Stinson, of Charlestown, and 
the Obituary Record by Henry E. Spalding, M. D., of Hingham, 
Mass. The closing ode was written by Miss Ellen C. Sawtelle, of 
Brookline. 

A committee of five was chosen to make arrangements and select 
officers for the next triennial. 

A photograph of the alumni, assembled in front of the Academy, 
was taken, after which the multitude marched to the Mount Vernon 
House to dinner. After "the cloth was removed," John F. Colby, 
Esq., was introduced as toast-master, and responses were made by 
George Stevens, Rev Augustus Berry and Charles A. Towle, former 
principals, and Rev. John Colby, former assistant, J. V. Smith the 



172 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

present principal, W. H. Conant, George A. Bruce, George A. Mar- 
den, Dr. Henry E. Spalding, Col. Thomas L. Liverraore, and Maj. 
Charles F. Stinson. 

The music for this gathering was by the Nashua Cornet band, 
E. T. Baldwin, director, which gave a delightful promenade concert 
in the evening. The marshals were Col. Thomas L. Livermore, 
Clark Campbell, and Darwin E. Kittredge. 

No. 7. The next meeting of the alumni was held in the meeting- 
house, Wednesday, August 28, 1872. The weather was fine and 
there was a large gathering. The morning meeting at 11 o'clock saw 
a church filled with people. Prayer was offered by the Rev. William 
H. Cutler, of Westminster, Mass., who was once a pupil of the school 
from Lowell, Mass. George Stevens presided, and made an address 
of welcome. Rev. Augustus Berry, of Pelham, a former Principal, 
delivered an address on "What education do the masses need, and 
how better to secure it?" Rev. C. F. P. Bancroft, a former Principal, 
and lately from Look-out Mountain, Tenn , where he had been Prin- 
cipal of a successful educational institution, read a poem. The 
Annals were read by Chestina A. Hutchinson, the Matrimonial 
Record by Harlan P. Conant of Somerville, Mass., and the Obituary 
Record by Mrs. Ellen J. (Kittredge) Drury, of Lowell, Mass. The 
Milford Cornet Band furnished music. The exercises at the church 
closed with an Ode to the tune of "Auld Lang Syne'' — the name of 
the author not being given in the report. 

The alumni then marched to Academy (now Institute) Hall 
where dinner was served. After dinner George A. Marden, of Low- 
ell, was introduced as toast-master, opening with a brief poem of his 
own composition, and offering tlie successive toasts in rhyme. These 
were responded to by Rev. Dr. Seth H. Keeler, then pastor, George 
A. Ramsdell, Esq., of Nashua, Clerk of the Supreme Court of New 
Hampshire, Rev. Augustus Berry, Dea. William H. Conant (who also 
read letters from Rev. John E. Wheeler and Rev. Vaola J. Harts- 
horn,) George A. Bruce, H. P. Conant. Prof. George W. Todd 
present Principal, just beginning his first term, Rev. W. H. Cutler, 
Prof. Andrews of Boston, A. A. Rotch, junior editor of the Cabinet, 
and Dr. Bunton. Prof. J. H. Morey of Concord, being present, 
favored the alumni with some most delightful music on the piano. The 
church and hall were profusely decorated with the national colors. 

In the evening the usual promenade concert was given by the 
band, with additional piano music by Prof. Morey, and the singing 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 173 

of the Star Spangled Banner by Miss Mary Miller, of Salem, an 
alumnus of the school noted for her fine vocalism. TV. H. Conant, 
George O. Whiting, Henry T. Stinson, George A. Ramsdell and 
George A. Marden were appointed a committee of arrangements for 
the next triennial and twenty-fifth anniversary, to be held in 1875. 

No. 8. This triennial was held July 20, 1875, in celebration of 
the twenty-fifth anniversary of the founding of Appleton Academy in 
1850. In 1871, Mr. George TV. McCollom of New York City, who 
was once a resident of the town, and whose wife, Mary Ann (Stevens) 
McCollom, was a native, gave the school an endowment of 810,000, 
in consideration of which its name was changed to "McCollom Insti- 
tute." Mrs. McCollom was a daughter of Asa Stevens, and her 
mother was Mary (Appleton) Stevens, who was a sister of the William 
Appleton, for whom Appleton Academy was named. The day of 
celebration was, for some reason, changed from Wednesday to Tues- 
day, and the month from August to July. The increased importance 
of the quarter-centennial anniversary was recognized in the decora- 
tions on the village street and the "Institute" (as the building has been 
called since the change of name.) On the outside, in large letters and 
figures in evergreen, was the inscription "1850 — WELCOME — 1875," 
and the hall was also decorated within, as was also the Meeting-House, 
where the literary exei'cises were held, beginning at 11 o'clock, a. m. 
The excellent Wilton Cornet Band furnished the instrumental music, 
during the day, and in the evening, Curtis's orchestra. The exercises 
were opened with prayer by Rev. Frank G. Clark, of Rindge, a native 
of Lyndeboro, and a graduate of the school, and of Amherst College. 
George A. Ramsdell was President of the day, and made an appro- 
priate welcome address. The oration was by Col. Frank W. Parker, 
of Quiney. Mass., on "New England Culture and its Influences." The 
poem was by Edward E. Parker, Esq., of Nashua. Mr. H. Porter 
Smith, a merchant of Boston, real the Annals, giving a brief histor- 
ical sketch of the school and its teachers. The Marriage Record was 
read by Henry T. Stinson, and the Obituary Record by Wendell P. 
Marden. The closing ode was written by Miss Emily (Dodge) Simp- 
son, of Lawrence, Mass. 

Maj. Nathan B. Boutwell, an officer in the Boston Custom House, 
was marshal, and under his direction a procession was formed at the 
close of the exercises in the meeting-house and marched to Institute 
Hall, where dinner was served by J. H. A. Bruce, the then land- 
lord of Hotel Bellevue. Over the platform was the inscription 



174 HISTORY OF MONT VEENON. 

" '50 — ALL HAIL- -'75", while the walls were hung with flags, pic- 
tures, mottoes, etc. Col. George A. Bruce officiated as toast-master, 
and responses were made by Rev. Dr. S. H. Keeler, then pastor at 
Mont Vernon, George W. McCollom, of New York, for whom the 
Institute was named, Hon. Lucien B. Clough, the first principal after 
the school was incorporated, William Barrett, Esq., of Nashua, Rev. 
F. G. Clark, Rev. Henry Marden, a native of New Boston, a gradu- 
ate of the school and of Dartmouth College, and a Missionary in 
Turkey, who was home on a leave of absence, John F. Colby, Dr. 

C. M. Kittredge, of Fishkill-on-the-Hudson, N. Y., Rev. Augustus 
Berry, of Pelham, Rev. C. F. P. Bancroft, Principal of Phillips Acad- 
emy of Andover, Mass., Prof. Lucien Hunt of Falmouth, Mass., a 
former Principal, Rev. Vaola J. Hartshorn of Hyannis, Mass., Prof. 
George W. Todd the present Principal, Rev. Darwin E. Adams of 
Wilton, a grandson of Dr. Daniel Adams, for many years a promi- 
nent physician of the town, Hon. George A. Marden of Lowell, 
Mass., Clerk of the Massachusetts House of Representatives and 
editor of the Lowell Daily Courier, George W. Putnam of Amherst, 
Rev. Bezaleel Smith of West Hartford, Vt., pastor of the church at 
Mont Vernon from 1841 to 1850, and Charles H. Hopkins, an under- 
graduate. 

This long list of speakers did not allow an adjournment until 
six o'clock p. m. Mr. McCollom was honored with demonstrations of 
great appreciation of his generous endowment of the Institute, and 
he gave to the school portraits of himself and his departed wife, which 
were hung in the hall. Of the ten Principals of the school, six were 
present : Judge Clough, Rev. A. Berry, Dr. Bancroft, Prof. Hunt, 

D. A. Anderson of Newton, N. J., and George W. Todd. 

In the evening there was the usual promenade concert and social 
reunion. Resolutions of gratitude to Mr. McCollom were passed, 
and thanks to those who had so successfully managed the celebration. 
There was singing by Maj. N. B. Boutwell and Dr. C. M. Kittredge. 
The teachers at this time were Prof. Todd, Charles P. Mills and Mrs. 
Todd, and there were ninety pupils. 

No. 9. This reunion was held on Wednesday, August 28, 
1878, and was largely attended. Institute Hall was handsomely dec- 
orated, and the exercises began there at 11 o'clock. Music was 
furnished by Curtis & White's orchestra. Hon. George A. Bruce 
presided, prayer was offered by Rev. Augustus Berry, Charles P. 
Mills of Andover, Mass., a former assistant teacher, delivered the 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 175 

address, and Newton H. Wilson, Goffstown, the poem. Mrs. Eliza- 
beth (Bontwell) Parkhurst, of Boston read some happy "Reminis- 
cences of School Life," the Marriage Record was by William H. 
Stinson, of Dunbarton, and the Obituary Record by George W. 
Putnam, of Amherst. The ode sung was written by Emma F. 
Wyman, of Mont Vernon. 

At the close of the exercises, Clark Campbell, as chief marshal, 
conducted the alumni procession to Hotel Bellevne, where, in the 
orchard in rear of the house, tables had been spread for the dinner 
by Landlord J. H. A. Bruce, at which 250 sat down. No toast-master 
had been appointed, but the President of the day officiated in the 
double capacity, and drew speeches from Hon. George A. Ramsdell, 
Rev. Dr. Keeler, of Somerville, Mass., who spoke in behalf of Dea. 
William Couant (who was unable to be at the dinner,) Samuel Hodg- 
kins, Henry Robinson, George A. Marden, A. A. Rotch, Rev. A. 
Berry, Rev. W. H. Woodwell (present pastor,) Dr. George Bowers, 
Col. F. W. Parker, Prof. C. P. Mills, Prof. George W. Todd, and 
Prof. William H. Ray, who had just assumed the Principalship. There 
was singing by a male quartette, led by Maj. Bontwell. The sad 
news was received that Mr. George W. McCollom of New York, had 
been stricken with paralysis. 

In the evening a promenade concert was held at Institute Hall, 
and appropriate resolutions relative to the report as to Mr. McCollom 
were adopted. The social reunion was enjoyed with singing and 
other music, and the reuuion wound up with dancing. This is the 
first record of any dancing at one of these reunions. 

No. 10. The tenth reunion was held Wednesday, August 24, 
1881, with "an unexpectedly large attendance." Col. Thomas L. 
Livermore, of Manchester, was President of the day. The alumni 
met ia the Meeting-house at 10.30 in the forenoon, and prayer was 
offered by Rev. Dr. Bancroft, of Andover, Mass. John H. Hardy, 
Esq., of Boston, delivered an address on "Freedom of Thought," and 
John W. Adams, of Littleton, Mass., read a poem. Henry F. Rob- 
inson, of Hancock, read the Matrimonial Record, and Mrs. Ann A. 
(Perkins) Campbell, of Mont Vernon, the Obituary Record. The 
ode sung was written by Miss Lucia E. Trevitt. Music both day 
and evening was furnished by Nickles 1 Orchestra of Milford. It is 
not stated in the report, but probably these exercises were held in the 
Meeting-house, and that the dinner, which was served to 300 persons 
by George E. Boutell, landlord of Hotel Bellevue, was in Institute 



176 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Hall. The after-dinner speaking (no mention being made of a toast- 
master) was participated in by George Stevens, Esq., of Lowell, 
Mass., John F. Colby, Esq., of Boston, Rev. C. C. Carpenter (then 
pastor), George A. Marden, of Lowell, Prof. Lucien Hunt, Dr. Ban- 
croft of Andover, and Dr. John P. Brown, Supt. Taunton (Mass.) 
Insane Hospital, (who married Caroline A. Stevens, sister of George 
Stevens.) There was the customary social reunion in the evening. 

No 11. This reunion was held Wednesday, August 27, 1884, 
with the morning exercises in the church. Hon. George A. Marden, 
of the Lowell Courier, and Speaker of the Massachusetts House of 
Representatives, was President of the Day. Rev. Charles P. Mills, 
of Newburyport, offered prayer, the oration was by Hon. Augustus 
E. Sanderson, of New Jersey, one of the early graduates, and the 
poem by Mrs. Emily Dodge Simpson, of New York, the Marriage 
Record by George W. Putnam, of Lowell, Mass., and the Obituary 
Record by Mrs. Carrie (Averill) Trow, of Amherst. This record was 
notable, in that it recorded the deaths of George Stevens, the founder 
of the school, Hon. George W. Todd, a receut principal, and Miss 
Martha Ellen Conant, daughter of Dea. William Conant, who had 
been for several terms an assistant teacher. The exercises closed 
with the singing of an Ode written by Alice Hammond Peaslee, of 
Bradford. Appropriate memorial addresses on the several teachers 
above mentioned were read, that on George Stevens by H. Porter 
Smith, that on Prof. Todd by G W. Putnam, and that on Miss 
Conant by Rev. Mr Berry. 

Dinner was served to as many as Institute Hall would hold, and 
the after-dinner speakers were Hon. George W. Sanderson, of Little- 
ton, Mass., who, as a member of the Massachusetts Senate, was 
asked to report for Hon. George A. Bruce, President of that body, 
who was unable to be present, Hon. A. E. Sanderson, the orator of 
the day, and brother of the preceding speaker, Rev. C. C. Carpenter, 
Rev. R. R. Meredith, D. D., pastor of the Union Congregational 
church, Boston, and a summer resident of Mont Vernon, Rev. A. 
Berry, Prof. Hunt, Rev. C. P. Mills and Prof. C. S. Campbell, who 
was just assuming the position of Principal. 

In the evening the social reunion was furnished with instrumental 
music by Nickles' Orchestra of Milford, and the assembled alumni 
and friends were delighted with singing by Mr. Ludlow Patton of 
New York, and his wife Abby (Hutchinson) Patton, the soprano of 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 177 

the famous Hutchinson Family, who gave a number of the old-time 
Hutchinson songs. 

No. 12. The twelfth reunion was held Wednesday, August 24, 
1887. It rained when the alumni gathered in the church at 11 o'clock, 
but the house was filled. Clark Campbell was marshal. Nickles' 
Orchestra furnished the music, Rev. Dr. Bancroft officiated as Chap- 
lain, Dr. C. M. Kittredge was president, and Hon. E. Moody Boynton, 
of Newbury, Mass., a friend of several prominent members of the 
alumni, delivered the address, his subject being "Our Western 
Christian Civilization, the product of three forces — the Teacher, the 
Preacher, and the Inventor." The poem was written by Henry A. 
Kendall, of Somerville, Mass., and read by H. Porter Smith, and the 
Ode by Henrietta N. Hanford, of Danville, 111. The Matrimonial 
Record was read by Heury T. Stinson, of Winchester, Mass., and the 
Obituary Record by J. B. Twiss, of Jaffrey. This latter recorded the 
death of Dr. J. V. Smith, a former Principal, at Melrose, Mass., also 
the death of a Trustee, William Stevens. 

Dinner was served in Institute Hall. Dr. Kittredge presided, 
and the speakers were Hon. George A. Marden, Prof. Hunt, Prof. 
Campbell, John F. Colby, Lucius B. Hutchinson of New York City, 
Dr. W. H. Weston of New York, and H. P. Smith. Among those 
present was F. O. Kittredge of West Medford, one of the charter 
trustees. The reunion closed as usual with a social gathering in the 
hall. 

No. 13. The fortieth anniversary and the regular triennial 
reunion were held on Thursday, August 21, 1890, meeting at the 
church at 10.30. Eastman's orchestra of Manchester was in 
attendance. Hon. George A. Ramsdell of Nashua presided, and 
Hon. George A. Marden of Lowell, Mass., Treasurer and Receiver 
General of Massachusetts, delivered an address on "The Relation 
between the Country Academy and the People among whom 
it is Located." The poem was "Reminiscences of School Life," by 
Rev. J. P. Mills of Michigan. The Matrimonial Record was by Alice 
P. Campbell, and the Obituary Record by Charles C. Stinson, of Port- 
land, Me. The record noted the following deaths, among others, 
since the last report : John F. Colby, Boston ; Jesse Hutchinson, Bal- 
timore ; William Barrett, St. Paul ; Rev. Henry Marden, Turkey ; 
John W. Adams, Littleton, Mass. ; Dr. J. M. Emerson, Barnstead ; 
Thomas H. Thorndike, Pittsfield — all early graduates. 

Memorial sketches were then presented — on Dea. William 



17* HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Conant, by Dr. Bancroft; on John F. Colby, Esq., by EL P. Smith; 
on Rev. Henry Marden, by Rev. F. G. Clark; on Prof. W. H. Ray, 
by Miss L. E. Trevitt. An ode was then sung which was written by 
Dr. H. E. Spalding of Boston. 

Dinner was then served in Institute Hall, and speeches were 
made by Dea. W. H. Conant, Rev. John Thorpe, (then pastor), E. 
B. Gould, Esq., Nashua, Hon. J. P. Bartlett, Manchester, Rev. Frank 
G. Clark, Plymouth, Dr. William H. Weston, New York, Rev. A. 
Berry, Mrs. Berry, Prof. C. S. Campbell of Pinkerton Academy, 
Derry, Prof. Oscar F. Davis (present principal), Col. W. H. Stin- 
son, Hon. Charles H. Burns, Wilton, Hon. George A. Marden, John 
H. Colby, Esq., Boston, H. P. Smith, Lucius B. Hutchinson, Rev. 
George E. San borne of Hartford, Conn., a former pastor, and Maj. 

D. E. Proctor of Wilton. 

In the evening there was the usual promenade concert and social 
gathering in the Hall. 

No. 14. This reunion was held August 23, 1893. The morning 
exercises were in the Meeting-house at 10.30. H. Porter Smith pre- 
sided, Rev. John Thorpe was chaplain. Hon. John P. Bartlett, of 
Manchester, delivered the oration on "The Educational System of our 
Country — its Moulding Influence on Character;" the poem was by 
Hon. Edward E. Parker, Judge of Probate, Nashua ; the Matrimonial 
Record was by Mrs. Fannie (Dodge) Clark, of Amherst; the Obituary 
Record by Clarence Trow, of Amherst; and the ode was written by 
Mrs. Emma F. Abbott, Wilton. Music was by Custer's Grand 
Hotel Orchestra. 

Memorial sketches were read by Dr. Bancroft, on Dea. George 

E. Dean, Thomas H. Richardson, and Capt. John Trevitt, three 
members of the Board of Trustees. 

Dinner was served by the Ladies' Home Circle in Institute Hall, 
and the after-dinner speakers were Dea. W. H. Conant, Rev. John 
Thorpe, Dr. W. H. Weston, Judge Bartlett, Judge Parker, George A. 
Marden, F. C. McLaughlin of Somerville, Mass., a summer boarder, 
John H. Colby, and Prof. John B. Welch, the new Principal. 

In the eveniug Custer's Orchestra (from the Grand Hotel just 
opened) gave a concert in the Hall, and a social hour was enjoyed. 

No. 15. The date of this reunion was August 19, 1896, the 
exercises being in the church. Dr. W. H. Weston, of New York City, 
presided ; Rev. C. P. Mills, of Newburyport, was chaplain ; Rev. Frank 
G. Clark, of Plymouth, was the orator ; Miss Lucia E. Trevitt read 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 179 

the poem; the Matrimonial Record was by Emily C. A. Starrett, of 
Mont Vernon; the Obituary Record was by Hon. A. M. Wilkins, of 
Amherst; and the ode by Jennie B. Carpenter, of Andover, Mass. 

Dinner was served in Institute Hall by the Home Circle. The 
after-dinner exercises had begun most merrily. Mr. F. O. Kittredge, 
the venerable and only surviving original Trustee, had been honored 
with great applause. Dea. Albert Conant had made an interesting 
speech on some of the Institution's financial trials ; Mr. Willard P. 
Woods had spoken with his accustomed energy on "The relation of 
the Academy to the Town ;" Rev. Thomas J.Lewis, then pastor, had 
made a happy speech on "The Church and the School;" and the next 
speaker was Dr. C. M. Kittredge (or, as his boyhood familiars knew 
him, "Charlie M.") And there are few efforts on such occasions so 
happy, bright, cheerful and witty as his. He had especial delight in 
recalling boyish pranks and incidents with his old chums, and told, 
with great glee, and with evident looking forward to what would be 
said in reply, by his especially close chum, George A. Harden, a 
story of the time when they played pick-a-back and frightened an ox 
in a yoke belonging to Hiram Perkins as he stood chained to a stake 
at Capt. William Bruce's blacksmith shop, waiting while his mate was 
in "the swing" being shod, and so disturbed the animal that he flew 
around and broke the yoke. As the Doctor sat down amid cheers 
and laughter, at the close of his speech, he was noticed to fall back 
in his chair, and with a gurgle in his throat he became unconscious. 
Drs. Dearborn and Weston were at once by his side, and he was 
removed to the lower rooms, where he died almost at once. The lately 
merry gathering was awe-stricken at the sudden calamity. At the 
suggestion of Rev. Mr. Hills, two verses of "Nearer, Hy God, to 
Thee" were sung, and, when this had been done, Dr. Weston returned 
to the presiding officer's chair, and said, in tremulous voice, to the 
hushed audience, "the Doctor has gone from us." 

Of course this ended the alumni reunion, but at a business meet- 
ing held later L. B. Hutchinson moved that Mr. Harden, Rev. Mr. 
Mills and Prof. George W. Cox, the incoming new principal, be a 
committee to frame appropriate resolutions for the occasion, which 
was done, and they were adopted. 

No. 16. This triennial reunion was due to have been held in 
regular course in 1899. But as the year 1900 would be the fiftieth 
anniversary it was postponed a year, in order that the two events 
might come together. The semi-centennial celebration was held 



180 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Wednesday, August 15, 1900. This was also the first day of the 
town's celebration of "Old Home Week," and the reunion and semi- 
centennial were, therefore, made a part of the town celebration. 
The exercises were held in the new meeting-house for the first time, 
and began at half past ten o'clock. After an organ prelude, prayer 
was offered by the Rev. Dr. Bancroft, Principal of Phillips Academy, 
And over, an address followed by Hon. Geo. A. Maiden of Lowell, 
Assistant United States Treasurer at Boston, and President of the 
Board of Trustees. This was followed by a duet, "O Salutaris," sung 
by Mrs. Browne, wife of the Rev. Donald Browne, then pastor of the 
church, and Mrs. John A. Woods of Manchester. An able historical 
address was then delivered by Col. Wm. H. Stinson of Dunbarton. 
The Matrimonial Record was by Mrs. Henry F. Robinson, Hancock, 
and was followed by a vocal solo by Harry M. Kittredge, of Fishkill, 
N. Y., son of the late Dr. C. M. Kittredge. The Obituary Record 
was by Edgar J. Kendall, Esq., of Milford, and the Ode was written 
by Geo. A. Marden. 

At the close of the exercises dinner was served in Institute Hall, 
but without the usual after-dinner formalities and speaking. 

In the evening there was a social reunion in the Town Hall, fol- 
lowed by a fine concert by the Tabasco Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar 
Club of Lowell, with singing and dancing. 

The seventeenth triennial reunion was held on Saturday, Sep- 
tember 15, 1903, in connection with the celebration of Old Home 
Week, and also in connection with the centennial celebration of the 
incorporation of the town. As a full chapter further on gives a re- 
port of this joint celebration, it is unnecessary to give the details in 
this place. 



CHAPTER XI. 



OLD HOME WEEK. 

Establishment in 1899 by Gov. Frank W. Rollins — Mont Vernon 
First Town to Respond — Elaborate Preparations — The 
Governor Attends — Three Days' Festivities — Illuminations, 
Fire Works, Sports, Sunday Services, Etc. — Celebrations 
Every Year from 1899 to Date of this History. 

It was a happy thought of His Excellency Frank W. Rollins, 
Governor of New Hampshire in 1899, to issue the following procla- 
mation, which explains itself : 

Old Home Week 

in 
New Hampshire 
Aug. 26 to Sept. 1, 1899. 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

The residents of New Hampshire have conceived the idea of 
celebrating the week of August 2(3 to September 1 of the present 
year as "Old Home Week," and of inviting every person who ever 
resided in New Hampshire, and the descendants of former residents, 
to return and visit the scenes of their youth and renew acquaintance 
with our people. 

It affords me pleasure as governor of New Hampshire to extend 
this invitation in behalf of our people, and to assure those who may 
be able to accept that they will receive a cordial greeting in any 
section of the Old Granite State. 

During this week our people intend to keep open house, and the 
doors of our hospitality will be swung wide open. A large number 
of towns and cities in the state will have local celebrations during 
the week, to which all are cordially invited. 

Old Home appeals to every person of mature years, fath- 
er, mother, and childhood, and when you think of the old home, 



182 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

you bring back the tenderest memories possessed by man ; true love, 
perfect faith, holy reverence, high ambitions — "the long, long 
thoughts of youth." Few states have furnished more men and women 
who have achieved distinction and renown than New Hampshire, and 
our people hold these sons and daughters in high regard, In behalf 
of the people of New Hampshire, I heartily invite all to whom New 
Hampshire is a former home or place of nativity, to visit the State 
during Old Home Week. 

(Signed) F. W. ROLLINS, 

Governor. 

Mont Vernon was the very first town to respond to the Gov- 
ernor's summons, and as an initial step an Old Home "Week Association 
was formed, with the Hon. Geo. A. Marden as President, and Miss 
Ruth S. Conant as Secretary. The necessary committees were ap- 
pointed, and every arrangement was made for a first celebration of 
the new anniversary. An elaborate invitation was prepared, pub- 
lished in the newspapers, and sent to every native and former resident 
of the town, whose address could be learned, giving the details of the 
proposed celebration, which was to begin on the I'fith of August, 
1899, and to continue three days. This invitation was as follows : 

TO ANY AND ALL WHO HAVE EVER LIVED AT MONT 

VERNON, N. H. 

You are hereb}' cordially invited to come back to the old place to 
celebrate "Old Home Week" as recommended by Governor Rollins. 

The local celebration will beg-in on Saturday Evening - , August 26, 
1899, and the following programme will be carried out as far as 
possible: 

Saturday Evening, August 26. Town Social at the Town Hall. 
To this everybody in town at the time is cordially invited. There will 
be an informal social meeting for interchange of greetings, to be fol- 
lowed by dancing. Good music will be in attendance. If the Town 
Hall should prove inadequate, Institute Hall will also be thrown open. 

A Grand Illumination of the streets and houses will be made dur- 
ing the evening, and a huge Bonfire will be lighted on one of the hills 
of the town nearby. 

Sunda}- Morning, August 27. There will be, in the new Meeting- 
House, a service appropriate to the occasion, to be conducted by Clerg} 7 - 
men who have either been settled in the town over the Congregational 
Church, or who have at some time resided in the town. 

Sunday Evening, August 27. The Evening Service will be con- 
ducted by distinguished laymen who have been residents of the town. 

A special double quartette of good singers will furnish music for 
both the above services. 

Monday, August 28. The morning will be devoted to rides and 
walks, golf, bicycling, tennis, and social calls; and in the afternoon a 
Basket Town Picnic may be held in the Splendid Pine Grove near the 
Grand Hotel, with such sports and entertainment as may be devised. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 183 

There will be ample accommodation at the various summer boarding- 
houses, and at private houses, for all who desire, and at very reasonable 
rates. Those desiring" to secure rooms and meals will be provided by 
addressing Mr. Will P. Woods, Chairman of Entertainment Committee. 

Come back to the old hearthstone, and see what a nice, tidy, at- 
tractive village old Mont Vernon has become, and renew old associations, 
and meet old friends. 

GEO. A. MARDEN, 

President Old Home Week Association of Mont Vernon. 

Of the way in which these promises were carried out, the follow- 
ing dispatch to the Boston Daily Globe, from its special reporter, 
will give information : 

MT. VERNON, N. H., Aug. 26, 1899.— The "home week" cele- 
bration began here today, under the happiest auspices, the weather 
being all that could be wished for, and the projectors of the affair 
showing notable enthusiasm in the enterprise. 

Already it is evident that the inhabitants of this enterprising and 
hustling little town are determined to make their celebration the most 
notable one ever held in this part of the state. 

To Mt. Vernon belongs the credit of having the first "Home 
Week" celebration in the state. The hotels, boarding-houses, and 
private residences are jammed full of visiting natives. 

Today a large number came from Boston and other points to 
join in the week's festivities. The fame and beauty of the town also 
brought many strangers, who have entered into the spirit of the occa- 
sion as if the} 7 had been born and bred in the granite State. 

Early this forenoon the people began to decorate their estab- 
lishments, and by noon almost every residence and other building 
was swathed in bunting and flags. 

Soon after sunset hundreds of Japanese lanterns, which adorned 
the more pretentious residences along the main streets, were lighted. 
With the green foliage for a background they made a pretty picture. 

Gov. Rollins's portrait, garlanded with flags and bunting, was to 
be seen as a part of the decorations on several public buildings. 

By 8 o'clock bonfires and fireworks illuminated the town and 
made merry the crowds that perambulated the streets until midnight. 
Everyone, practically, kept open house. At 9 the town hall was 
opened to the public, and then the ''home week" committee held an 
informal reception, enlivened by music furnished by the Second Regi- 
ment Band. Dancing was indulged in until midnight. 

The most elaborate decorations of a public character are on the 
town hall, school-house, academy, and the Grand, Bellevue, and 
Campbell hotels. 

Private displays worthy of special note, many of them made by 
people who are summer residents only, are given by Alderman J. H. 
Colby, Capt. E. G. Martin, P. O. Kittredge, A. W. Bragg, Paul 
Stucklen, all of Boston ; Hon. Geo. A. Marden of Lowell, Dr. J. P. 



184 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Brown "of Taunton, Hon. H. P. Moulton of Salem, Hon. A. H. Well- 
man of Maiden, J. T. Bridge of Medford, J. F. Wellington and 
A. D. Clark of Somerville, Dr. C. F. P. Bancroft of Ando- 
ver, and the following local residents : Deacon A. Conant, Mrs. 
Blood, John T. McCollom, Col. Clark Campbell, G. W. Averill, Rev. 
Donald Browne. Benjamin F. Davis, W. H. Conant, Mrs. J. A. 
Holt, Lincoln Hall, W. P. Fox, Dr. W. I. Blanchard, W. H Kendall 
& Co., Mrs. P. F. Pike, George D. Pike, the Cutter cottage, Mrs. 
Fred W. Davis, Mrs. Maria Bruce, Walter Woods, Mrs. O. C. White, 
Mrs. AVilliam Stevens, W. S. A. Starrett, William H. Marvell, J. M. 
Gleason, Joseph W. Averill, W. F. Jenkins, Frank Smith. 

It is worth while to go a little more into detail in narrating the 
story of these celebrations of Old Home Week, because the town has 
not been much given to celebrations generally, and because in those 
which have been held in connection with the Academy, and Old Home 
Week, there has always been a somewhat remarkable exuberance and 
enthusiasm. 

On Sunday, Aug. 27, the second day, there was a special relig- 
ious service in the morning at 10.45 o'clock, in the charming little 
new meeting-house, every seat in which was occupied, and many 
chairs in addition were brought in, and some persons even had to 
stand. 

The service began with an organ prelude by Mrs. J. F. Choate 
of Maiden, a summer guest in the town, followed by the singing by a 
double quartette of "The King of Love My Shepherd Is," a h} T mn by 
the congregation, responsive Scripture readings, Scripture lessons, 
prayer, and a selection by a male quartette, "I Cannot Always Trace 
the Way." An offertory followed, and then came an able Old Home 
Week discourse by the Rev. Donald Browne, pastor of the church, 
dwelling chiefly on the duty of the sons and daughters of New Hamp- 
shire who have left the old state towards the home from which they 
had departed. 

Addresses were also made by the Rev. Chas. E. Lord, D.D., 
of Newburyport, Mass., who was pastor of the church from 18.36 to 
1861, and by Rev. C. F. P. Bancroft, Ph. D., Principal of Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass., who was Principal of Appleton Academy 
in this town from 1860 to 1864. The double quartette then sang a 
selection entitled "The Homeland," the congregation sang "America," 
and the morning exercises closed with the benediction by Rev. Dr. 
Bancroft. 

Governor Rollins did not arrive in town until 4 o'clock in the 




SUMMER HOUSE OF J. FRANK WELLINGTON*. 

Erected on site of old Dr. Daniel Adams House. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 185 

afternoon, when he became the guest of an old schoolmate and 
townsman of his, Walter I. Blanchard, M. D., the medical practi- 
tioner in the village. 

The eveniug exercises were denominated k 'A Laymen's Service," 
over which the Hon. Geo. A. Marden presided, and made an open- 
ins; address of welcome to those who had returned to the old hearth- 
stones, and congratulated everybody on the entire success of the 
celebration, due to the hearty interest which everybody had manifested 
in carrying it on. 

Mr. Marden then introduced Governor Rollins, who was greeted 
with great enthusiasm. The handsome little church had been appro- 
priately decorated and it was crowded to the doors. 

The governor proceeded to make a plain statement of facts, as 
he said. He said that New Hampshire had been a farming state until 
fifty years ago, when the great west began to compete with the 
farmers of New England and rendered farming unprofitable. Then 
came the manufacturing. To his mind no country can be prosperous 
without a happy and contented yeomaury. It is the foundation of 
civilization and good government, he asserted. He spoke of the 
centralization of people in large cities, told of the evils springing 
from the crowding of people into cities, and pictured how much 
better off they would be if they would make their homes in the coun- 
try instead of living in city tenements. 

He dwelt upon the large number of New Hampshire men who 
had taken up their abode in other states of the union, and pointed 
out what they had accomplished in building up the American nation. 
He expressed the hope of getting some of them back to their native 
soil, if only for a week in the summer time. 

Governor Rollins then went on to tell the people what was 
needed. The first thiug that should be done, he said, was to build 
some good roads. He intended to see that a start was made in this 
direction before he went out of office. The next thing was to protect 
the forests of the state, he said. And the next was to improve the 
district schools. He favored state supervision. He paid a warm 
tribute to the state grange, and told how much it was doing to im- 
prove the condition of New Hampshire farmers. 

He said that he was very much pleased with the way the people 
had taken hold of home week, and that it was sure to be a permanent 
feature every year in New Hampshire. He especially complimented 



186 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Mont Vernon on its celebration, saying that outside of Concord's cel- 
ebration Mont Vernon's was by far the best held. 

Gov. Rollins was followed by Hon. George A. Bruce of Somer- 
ville, Mass., a native of the town, and former President of the 
Massachusetts Senate. He made an eloquent and stirring speech, as 
did Lucius B. Hutchinson of New York city, another native, and 
Mr. H. Porter Smith of Cambridge, Mass. 

The exercises closed by appropriate singing, and benediction 
by the pastor, and the formal home week celebration so far as Mont 
Vernon was concerned was over. 

The exercises on Monday were mainly informal, the visitors en- 
joying themselves in any way which seemed good to them, finding 
every latchstring out ; and in the evening an impromptu reception 
was given the Rev. Benson M. Frink, a former pastor of the church, 
and to Mrs. Frink, they having arrived in town during the day, hav- 
ing been unable to be present sooner. 

In 1900 the second Old Home Week celebration took place, in 
connection with the semi-centennial anniversary of the incorporation 
of Appleton Academy. As before, circular invitations were sent to 
everybody whose address was known. The Academy anniversary 
was celebrated on Wednesday, Aug. 15, and on the next day there 
was a golf tournament, and the day was given up to various informal 
social events. On Friday, Aug. 17, there was no formal exercise, 
but a good many people had arrived in town and were enjoying 
themselves. 

On Saturday, Aug. 18, the Old Home Week celebration proper 
was begun with a Clam Bake in the beautiful pine grove on the old 
Woodbury (later the Hiram Perkins) farm, owned at this writing by 
the estate of Dr. Chas. M. Kittredge. It was a delicious summer 
day, and the First Regiment Band of Boston, a crack musical organ 
ization, furnished most delightful music at the grove. About 5 o'clock 
in the afternoon Governor Rollins and his staff arrived in a tally-ho 
coach with four horses, driven by Hon. John A. Spaulding of Nashua, 
who owned and occupied one of the cottages on Prospect Hill, and 
an experienced whip. The gubernatorial party were received at the 
Town Hall by a battalion consisting of a company of 44 young ladies 
in white, and a company of golf-playeri and caddies armed with golf 
clubs, commanded by Maj. W. I. Blanchard, M. D., and headed by 
the First Regiment Band. The party thus escorted marched to the 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 187 

Golf Links, and a charming dress-parade was held, the Governor and 
his party reviewing the parade. A pretty episode occurred, when the 
parade was dismissed, in a grand rush of the young ladies in white 
surrounding Governor Rollins and his staff and showering them with 
bouquets of flowers. 

The Governor and staff then took supper at the Grand Hotel, 
and in the evening a complete illumination of the village occurred, 
and there was a parade, led by the caddies and the young ladies in a 
four-horse barge, with other vehicles, and with the band, and numerous 
banners, which made the tour of the village, preceded by a band con- 
cert on the Park. Fireworks closed the day, outside, and a fine 
ball was given at the Grand in honor of the distinguished guests. 

Sunday morning a special Old Home Week service was held in 
the new meeting-house with a sermon by the pastor, Rev. Donald 
Browne, and with special music fitted to the occasion. The evening, 
as last year, was devoted to a Laymen's service presided over by 
Hon. Geo. A. Maiden. There was singing by Col. Coit of the Gov- 
ernor's staff, Mrs. John A. Woods, Miss Kitty Osgood, and Miss 
Gertrude M. Sewall. Governor Rollins delivered an earnest and 
eloquent address in which he enlarged on the practical as well as 
sentimental value of Old Home Week, and Michael J. Murray, Esq., 
one of Boston's finest orators, followed in an address of rare power. 

The celebration in 1901 occurred on Saturday and Sunday, Au- 
gust 24 and 25. The Saturday evening illumination and out-door 
concert were interfered with by a heavy rain, but the First Regiment 
Band of Nashua, a very fine organization, gave a concert in the Town 
Hall, wdiere the crowd assembled, and passed a delightful evening in 
social festivities. 

The Sunday morning service was conducted by the Rev. Henry 
Porter Peck, who had succeeded to the pastorate of the church, and 
who preached from a text taken from the 103d Psalm: "How shaU 
we sing the Lord's song in a strange land?" An orchestra from the 
band played at the service, and a charming violin solo was given by 
Miss Grace Whitmore of Boston, a summer guest. The band gave a 
sacred concert on the Park toward evening ; and at 8 o'clock the now 
customary Laymeu's service was held in the meeting-house, with Mr. 
Marden presiding, the orchestra helping out the music, and eloquent 
addresses were made by the Hon. Chas. J. Noyes, former Speaker of 
the Massachusetts House of Representatives, Hon. Harrison Hume, 



188 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

formerly a member of the Maine Senate, and Col. J. P. Bradley, and 
the Hon. Thomas M. Babson, all of Boston, and the last two summer 
residents in town. 

The celebration in 1902 occurred on Saturday and Sunday, Au- 
gust 23 and 24. The afternoon of Saturday was devoted to a grand 
coaching parade, which was organized by a committee headed by 
Mr*. H. P. Peck. Mr. J. F. Wellington served as Marshal, with ten 
aids. There were nearly thirty entries in all classes, and prize banners 
were awarded by a committee to the following : 

First prize for Tally-ho coaches to the Hotel Bellevue; second, 
to a coach entered by Col. W. B. Rotch, proprietor of the Milford 
Cabinet. 

Double Teams— First prize to Mr. J. F. Wellington ; second to 
Mr. C. E. Osgood. 

Single Teams— First prize to Mrs. R. F. Marden and Miss Bessie 
B. Hadley, both of Lowell, Mass., and summer guests. 

There was a fine illumination in the evening, and very profuse 
decoration of the residences, public buildings and grounds. The First 
Regiment Band of Nashua, was again in attendance, and gave a con- 
cert on the Park. 

The Sunday morning service was conducted by Rev. H. P. Peck, 
and a chorus choir of sixteen voices furnished the music. A most able 
and impressive sermon was preached by the Rev. A. A. Berle, D.D , 
of Boston, from Exodus iii :6 : "f am the God of thy fathers, the 
God of Abraham; the God of Isaac; the God of Jacob." At the 
laymen's service in the evening, presided over by Mr. Marden, as 
usual, a masterly address was delivered by the Hon. Chas. H. Burns 
of Wilton. 

The celebration of 1903 was held in connection with the centen- 
nial celebration of the incorporation of the town, and an account 
of what was done will appear in a later chapter devoted to the 
centennial. 

The celebration in 1904 occurred on Saturday and Sunday, Au- 
gust 20 and 21, but a heavy rain prevented the customary illumination 
and decorations and the band concert. On Friday evening there had 
been a fine musical entertainment at the Town Hall for the benefit of 
the Golf Club by a number of the First Corps of Cadets of Boston, 
and a quartette of their number had been engaged to remain over and 
furnish music in the church at the Old Home Week Sunday services. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 189 

As the storm prevented the carrying out of the out-door plans on 
Saturday, the Colonial Quartette (which was the name of the Cadet 
quartette) volunteered, with several of the members outside the quar- 
tette, who had remained in town, to give an impromptu entertainment 
on Saturday afternoon, and the hall was well filled, and those present 
were royally entertained. 

Sunday morning was perfect as to weather. Rev. Henry Porter 
Peck preached a sermon exactly appropriate to the anniversary, and 
the singing by the Cadets made as complete a celebration service as 
could have been asked for. In the evening at the Laymen's service 
Guy A. Ham, Esq., assistant U. S. district attorney at Boston, de- 
livered an eloquent address, and there were other brief addresses, 
which with the music, concluded the exercises of the sixth Old Home 
Week celebration. 

The seventh annual celebration in 1905, was limited to Sunday, 
August 20, so far as the official exercises were concerned ; but some 
of the villagers felt that there ought to be something doing on Satur- 
day evening, and they hired the Laurel Band of Milford to come up, 
and there was quite a fine illumination of many of the residences and 
grounds, and though the affair was virtually impromptu the streets 
were quite full of pedestrians, carriages and automobiles. The Golf 
Club house was decorated and illuminated, and quite an elaborate 
display of fireworks was given on the golf links in front of the 
house. 

The Sunday services were conducted by the Rev. H. P. Peck, 
and the sermon was preached by the Rev. Geo. L. Perin of Brook- 
line, who was spending the summer at the neighboring town of Brook- 
hue, N. H. The music was by a double quartette. The church was 
beautifully decorated with clematis and golden rod by the young lady 
guests of the Mount Vernon house. The evening Laymen's service 
was in charge of John H. Colby, Esq., of Boston, and a most eloquent 
address was delivered by Solon W. Stevens, Esq., of Lowell, Mass., 
a member of the Middlesex County bar, supplemented by a brief and 
inspiring talk by the Rev. Francis H. Rowley, D.D., of the First 
Baptist church of Boston. 

The town made quite a reputation by these observances of Gov. 
RoUins's popular celebration, and they contributed to the material 
advancement of the town, which at this time had become to depend 
so much on what is known as the "summer business," as well as to 



190 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

the enjoyment of both its permanent residents and summer guests. 
The "sprucing up" of the village, in getting ready for the Old Home 
Week holiday, led to permanent village improvement, and while the 
village had always been noted for its tidy and well-kept condition, its 
attractiveness was enhanced by these special efforts, and the reports 
of its vivacious observance of the new idea were spread abroad over 
the country, and secured for it a valuable interest. 

OTHER CELEBRATIONS. 

It does not appear that the people of the town were much given 
to celebrations before the days of the Academy. At any rate the 
records of such events are most meagre. 

There was a Fourth of July celebration in 1808, but there is no 
full iiccount of it to be found. There is, however, a printed copy of 
the Oration delivered on that occasion by Dr. Rogers Smith. It 
was printed at Amherst by Joseph Gushing, and on the title page 
appears this quotation, credited to Washington's Legacy: " Why 
quit our own, to stand on foreign ground?'' William Bradford, John 
Carlton and Zephaniah Kittredge were appointed to wait on the Doc- 
tor and "present the thanks of the Committee of Arrangements for 
his ingenious and patriotic oration," and "to request the favor of a 
copy for the Press." 

To this the orator replied : 

"Gentlemen: I herewith submit the copy requested, with all its 
imperfections, to your disposal, and to the candor of the public. Per- 
mit me to express the high sense I feel of the honor done me by the Com- 
mittee of Arrangements, and of the flattering terms in which you have 
been pleased to communicate their request. 
"I am, Gentlemen, 

most respectfully, 

your sincere friend, 

and obliged humble servant, 
"R. SMITH." 

The address was quaint, as from its date would be expected. 
It was but the thirty-second anniversary of the Declaration, and the 
orator started with an apology that he was "unused to pubbc decla- 
mation," and "too young to recollect the important events we this 
day celebrate." But he was old enough and bold enough to discuss 
"the nature, design and end of civil government." 

The writer recalls but one other Fourth of July celebration, and 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 191 

that was in the late forties or early fifties, and took the shape of a 
Sunday School picnic in the Hiram Perkins grove. 

An account of the celebration by the republicans of the election 
of Abraham Lincoln, in November, 1860, has already been given. 

The democrats took their turn at celebrating a national victory 
when G rover Cleveland was elected President a second time. On the 
21st of November, 1892, the democrats had a grand jubilee at Insti- 
tute Hall. They brought the old Revolutionary cannon, -'Molly 
Stark," from New Boston, and fired a hundred guns from Campbell's 
hill. The village was more or less illuminated. 

October 21, 1892, Columbus Day was celebrated by the schools, 
it being the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America. 



CHAPTER XII. 



THE CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. 

Three Celebrations in One — The Triennial Alumni Reunion — 
Old Home Week — The Hundredth Anniversary of the In- 
corporation of the Town — An Outline Report of All Three 
— Col. Geo. A. Bruce's Oration— H. Porter Smith's Church 
Story — Reminiscences by Rev. C C. Carpenter. 

So important an event as the celebration of the one hundredth 
anniversary of the incorporation of the town certainly deserves an 
important place in the town history. It can hardly be accomplished 
better than by reproducing most of the contents of a pamphlet printed 
at the time by the Milford Cabinet, which Col. W. B. Rotch, pro- 
prietor of that journal, himself the son of a Mont Vernon ancestry, 
kindly allowed the use of in the preparation of this history. 

It preserves in full the admirable oration of Mont Vernon's 
gifted and distinguished son, the Hon. Geo. A. Bruce, the most 
interesting story of the old church, and the personnel of its congre- 
gations of fifty years ago, by Mr. H. Porter Smith, the son of one of 
its pastors of that time, and appropriate reminiscences by the Rev. 
C. C. Carpenter, who once occupied its pulpit. 

It also gives a brief account of what was done, as well as said, 
at the celebration, and the names of many who took part therein. 

STORY OF THE CELEBRATION. 

The exact date of the hundredth anniversary of the incorporation 
of the Town of Mont Vernon would have been December loth, 1903. 
But in a hill town, away from the railroad, such a celebration could 
not be conveniently held in the winter. Besides, it was deemed best 
to combine with the centennial celebration, the seventeenth triennial 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 193 

reunion of the Alumni of the McCollom Institute, which was due to 
be held tins year, and the fifth annual observance of "Old Home 
Week," which had been postponed from August. 

At the annual March meeting the town voted an appropriation 
of $200.00 towards the centennial celebration, and appointed the fol- 
lowing named gentlemen to act as a committee, with full powers to 
expend this money : Dea. W. H. Kendall, Chas. H. Raymond, Lucius 
B. Hutchinson, Frank 0. Lamson, and Hon. Geo. A. Marden of 
Lowell, haviug a summer residence in the village. All the committee, 
except Mr. Marden, were citizens of the town. 

Messrs. Kendall, Raymond and Marden being members of the 
Board of Trustees of McCollom Institute, and Mr. Marden being 
President of the Mont Vernon Old Home Week Association, it was 
easy to secure the co-operation of both these organizations in a triple 
celebration. 

The necessary sub-committes were appointed, and the date of the 
celebration was fixed on September oth and 6th. 

Saturday, September 5th, opened auspiciously, and the celebra- 
tion began at sunrise, with the ringing of the bells upon the Institute 
and Town Hall, and the firing of a national salute on the grounds of 
the Mont Vernon Golf Club, under the direction of Colonel J. Pay son 
Bradley of Boston, a summer resident of the village, a former com- 
mander of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Boston, 
and a veteran of the Artillery service of the Civil War. Col. Brad- 
ley had brought from Boston two light guns from his yacht, and paid 
all the expense of the salute, which was also repeated at sunset. 

Meanwhile, the Town Hall (the old Meeting House), the new 
Meeting House, the Institute building, and the district school house, 
together with practically every private residence in the village, had 
been profusely decorated with the national colors, wild flowers and 
other adornments, and preparations were made on a large scale for 
the evening illumination, which has always been a prominent feature 
in the Old Home Week celebrations. 

At 10 : 30 many members of the Alumni of McCollom Institute 
(and Appleton Academy as it used to be named) and others assem- 
bled in the new Meeting House for the Triennial Reunion. The 
meeting was called to order by Mr. W. P. Woods, of the committee 
of arrangements appointed three years ago, and H. E. Spaulding, 
M. D., of Boston, was introduced as President of the Day. Dr. 
Spaulding made a brief and feeling address of welcome, after which 



194 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

the Triennial Matrimonial Record was read by Miss Emily Starrett 
of Mont Vernon, and the Mortuary Record by Mrs. Fannie Dodge 
Clarke of Amherst. Instead of the usual formal address, brief re- 
marks were made by Gen. A. E. Blunt of Wellesley, Mass.; Hon. 
Geo. A. Bruce, Hon. A. M. Wilkins of Amherst ; Levi A. Bruce, 
M. D., of Utica, N. Y., and Hon. Geo. A. Marden, all former pupils 
of the institution, Messrs. G. A. Bruce, Blunt and Marden having 
been members of the earliest class in Appleton Academy. The 
speakers were all fluent in happy reminiscence, and a very lively 
meeting was enjoyed. 

During the exercises the Schubert Quartette of Boston, and the 
First Infantry Band of Nashua, arrived, and the Quartette sang 
several selections, and the Band played under the trees in front of 
the meeting house. 

At 12: 30 an abundant dinner was served in the dining-room 
under the Town Hall, by the Ladies' Home Circle, to such as desired, 
at the price of fifty cents. The band entertained the crowd with 
numerous selections. 

At 1 o'clock p. m., a heavy shower came up, with sharp lightning 
and heavy thunder, and with a dash of hailstones as large as marbles. 
The lightning struck twice in the upper part of the village, but did 
no material damage. The storm did little harm to the decorations, 
as the Chinese lanterns, which had been hung out for the illumination, 
were all taken in. The shower cleared off about two o'clock. 

At 2 : 30 the Centennial celebration occurred in the Meeting- 
House. Prayer was offered by the Rev. H. P. Peck, pastor of the 
Congregational church. Hon. Geo. A. Marden presided, and de- 
livered a brief address of welcome to the returning sons and daughters 
of the old town and other visitors. The church was filled with an 
interested audience, including many who were natives, or had at some 
time been residents of the town. Inspiring music was furnished by 
the Schubert Quartette of Boston and the First Infantry Band of 
Nashua. 

The chief address was delivered by the Hon. Geo. A. Bruce of 
Boston, a native of the town, and a grandson of the first pastor, the 
Rev. John Bruce. Colonel Bruce's oration is given in full elsewhere. 

After the Centennial exercises, a social hour was enjoyed, with 
many greetings between those who had not met for many years. 
Meantime, the villagers and the committee on decorations and illum- 
inations were busily engaged in preparing for the evening. The 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 195 

weather had become pleasant, there was no wind, and a profusion of 
Chinese and Japanese lanterns, fancy lights, red, white and blue and 
colonial buff bunting, and flags and streamers were displayed, and the 
illumination was one of the finest ever known. 

The band gave a concert from a temporary band stand erected 
on the Park, and later played on the pavilion at the Golf Club House, 
while a grand display of fireworks was made by a committee consist- 
ing of Mr. J. F. Wellington of Somerville, and John H. Colby, Esq., 
of Boston. The village street was filled with carriages and the side- 
walks with pedestrian visitors, viewing the continuous illuminations 
of the streets and buildings, and the crowd centered at the Golf Club 
for the final display. 

The celebration was continued on Sunday, which dawned clear 
and beautiful, and with a most comfortable temperature. The people 
filled the new Meeting-House at half -past ten. Preliminary devo- 
tional exercises were conducted by the pastor, with special and most 
charming music by the Quartette, with a prelude by Mr. Charles Clem- 
ens of Cleveland, Ohio, who was a guest at the Grand Hotel, and kindly 
consented to preside at the organ ; and with Congregational hymns. 
Then followed "An Historical Sketch of the Church," by Mr. H. 
Porter Smith of Cambridge, a Boston merchant, son of the Rev. B. 
Smith, who was pastor of the church in the forties. It is given in 
full elsewhere, and was hugely enjoyed for its interesting reminiscences 
and historical facts, and especially for the merry humor which per- 
vaded the entire address. 

Mr. Smith was followed by the Rev. C. C. Carpenter of Andover, 
Mass., a former pastor, with reminiscences of his pastorate, which 
were exceedingly interesting. 

In the evening the customary Old Home Week laymen's service 
was presided over by Hon. Geo. A. Mai'den, the Rev. Mr. Peck con- 
ducting the preliminary devotional service. Mr. Marden delivered a 
brief informal address, "taking his text" from the History of Am- 
herst, of which Mont Vernon was formerly the Northwest Parish, 
and dwelling somewhat on the historical genesis of the town as the 
result of a theological schism in the Amherst church. The Quartette 
furnished delightful music, and the congregation sang familiar 
hymns. 

A most fitting address was also made by Mrs. Elizabeth Frances 
Bennett of Lowell, Mass., president of the Middlesex Woman's Club, 



106 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

who was a temporary guest at Hotel Bellevue. Col. J. P. Bradley 
also gave a stirring talk, and Mr. C. E. Osgood spoke briefly. 

Collections to help defray the expenses were taken up at both 
morning and evening services, resulting in $109.00. In addition to 
this and the town's appropriation of $200.00, the expenses were pro- 
vided for by a guaranty fund pledged in sums of $25.00 each, by 
Messrs. G. A. Marden, A. Conant, Colby, Best, Baker, Wellington, 
Kendall, Osgood, Bragg and L. B. Hutchinson, and by contributions 
of $10.00 by Mr. Henry F. Dodge and $15.00 by Mr. W. P. Woods. 
Only 50 per cent, of the guaranty subscription was finally needed to 
pay all the bills. 

Messrs. C E. Osgood and A. Conant were a committee on dec- 
orations and illumination; J. F. Wellington and J. H. Colby were a 
committee on fireworks ; Frank Smith, Will P. Fox, Will Jenkins and 
Miles Wallace furnished the bandstand ; Daniel Richardson and wife 
were in general charge of the dinner provided by the Ladies' Home 
Circle, from which about $50.00 profit was realized for the treasury 
of that organization ; W. P. Woods and Deacon W. H. Kendall were 
the committee on invited guests and entertainment; Geo. A. Marden 
on music and publicity. 

No effort was made to have a very formal celebration, but, on 
the whole, it was a most satisfactory affair 

ADDRESS BY COL. GEORGE A. BRUCE. 

Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen : 

The town of Mont Vernon has invited all her children wherever 
scattered over the earth's broad surface to return to their old home to 
assist in commemorating the hundredth anniversary of her birth. If 
any there be who are not able to be present on this occasion we know 
that it is not from lack of interest or desire. To all here present she 
extends a hearty welcome, and to the absent, like a good mother, she 
sends her warm good wishes and kindly benediction. This gathering 
is little more than a family reunion on a large scale. Time has made 
this occasion for us, and we are here to enjoy it all by ourselves. We 
do not challenge the world's attention to what we do or say here, but 
none the less it is for us an event filled with satisfaction and joy as 
great as if it were to be seen and heard of all men. 

In many ways the observance of those years which mark the close 
of periods in our civic life are of value not only to us but to those 
who are to come after us. They tend to turn inquiry backward, and 
are the cause of gathering and preserving in enduring form the record 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 197 

of events in our history which otherwise might be forever lost ; they 
tend to excite and cultivate a strong local attachment which cannot 
fail to be of service and value to this town ; they tend to lead us to 
reflect upon what a town's good name and prosperity rests, and help 
to make more sure the future which now begins to unfold before us. 

Very fortunately some years ago, in anticipation of this celebra- 
tion, it was decided to have prepared a complete and full history of 
Mont Vernon from the earliest date, and this important work was 
confided to the most competent person that could have been found, 
and very soon, I doubt not, the finished labors of the Hon. Charles 
J. Smith will be in the possession of every citizen. 

In the opinion of most men the settlement of Plymouth in 1620 
is the most conspicuous and important event in the history of New 
England. It is, perhaps, the most important act of colonization in 
the annals of mankind. History has gathered up and preserved in 
her treasury every event in the lives of the Pilgrims, while art, poetry 
and eloquence have exhausted their powers in presenting to our im- 
agination the story of their hardships, their sufferings, their heroism, 
their virtues and their unchangeable devotion to religious and political 
freedom. We do not complain of this. They caught and hold that 
added glory which comes to those who stand first in a long series of 
events which culminate in great and fortunate results. This it is 
which gives renown to Lexington, and to the first shot at Fort Sumter 
in the Civil War. 

There is, however, but little difference in the character and 
motives of the men and women who came to Plymouth and those who 
soon followed them to the settlement of Charlestown, Boston, Salem, 
and the other towns of New England. They left alike the most 
beautiful country the sun in all his course is permitted to look down 
upon to seek a new home in the wilderness ; they encountered the 
same hardships ; they came face to face with the same difficulties and 
dangers ; and they bore in their bosoms hearts as brave, wills as 
strong, faith as pure, convictions as unchangeable and a reverent 
trust in God which never knew shade of doubt. While the world 
will continue to hold in its especial care the name and fame of the 
Pilgrims of Plymouth, here at least we are bound to give to the first 
pilgrims to Mont Vernon the same measure of praise and admiration 
which in a wider field has been so abundantly accorded to them. 

We are living now in an age of great events and great things. 
We have a great nation, great cities, great towns, great railroads and 
great everything else. Small things and small events are passed by 
as unworthy of attention in a great age. Any number less than a 
million has been lost from our common speech. 

It is well for us once in a while to remember that a million is 
made up of units, and that there is value in small things as well as 
in large things. To be a small good man is better than to be a large 
bad one, and a small town with a virtuous population is better than a 
large city filled with a vicious population. 



198 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Mont Vernon is one of many small towns in New Hampshire, 
and though its story resembles very closely that of many others, yet 
to us, her children, it is full of interest and tender memories. It has a 
local flavor all its own and readily distinguished from that of all others. 
Though but little of the heroic and tragic has been enacted here, yet 
the simple annals of the years that bound her history are full of 
lessons of private and public devotion that appeal to the heart of civ- 
ilized man. No great battles for civil and religious liberty have been 
fought here to attract the world's attention to this spot ; no martyr 
has enriched our fields with his blood or sanctified them by his 
sufferings ; but the simple living of plain New England people has 
furnished many examples of how a man should live to gain most of 
that which God intended he should gain through his gift of human 
existence. 

For forty-three years Mont Vernon formed a part of the town of 
Amherst, which was incorporated in 1760. It owed its settlement to 
a grant made by the Massachusetts Bay Colony to soldiers who had 
taken part in King Philip's war in 1675, or to their descendants and 
representatives. It was 120 years from the landing of the Pilgrims 
when the first house was built in the eastern part of this town on land 
included in what for half a century has been known as the Samuel 
Campbell farm. At that time what may be termed the heroic age in 
New England colonization had passed. The Indian wars were then a 
matter of history. The eastern part of Massachusetts and the whole 
surface of Rhode Island and Connecticut were dotted with cultivated 
farms and growing villages. Boston contaiaed a population of about 
ten thousand, and Charlestown, Marblehead, Salem and Newburyport 
were busy ports crowded with ships engaged in the fisheries and 
colonial trade. In the whole of New England there were at least 
300,000 white men and women. There was a large population born 
upon the soil who were beginning to think of themselves as Americans 
and not as Englishmen. There were five newspapers published 
weekly in Boston alone. Benjamin Franklin had begun his great 
career and was even then the most conspicuous person in America. 
Jonathan Edwards, who ranks among the brightest ornaments of the 
Christian Church iu any age and any country, had been settled for 
15 years in Northampton. A new nation was in process of forma- 
tion and the instinct of nationality was asserting itself in every one 
of the older colonies. Only five years later, Massachusetts, just to 
try her wings for independent flight, with slight aid from Connecticut 
and Rhode Island, captured the fortress of Louisburg, which was 
considered the Gibraltar of America. 

At the time Mont Vernon was first being settled, the American 
Colonies contained a larger population than had ever before gone out 
from any nation for such a purpose. All this had been accomplished, 
not by aid of the English government, but in spite of it. Religious 
persecution had in part started it, and subsequently helped it. A 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 199 

political revolution had given it a new impulse ; but the real explana- 
tion of its great success is to be found in causes that reach back as 
far as the Norman Conquest. For nearly a thousand years the title 
to the greater part of the soil of England has been vested in the hands 
of less than a hundred men. In the estimation of mankind nothing 
gives to the individual so much importance and dignity, so much of 
all that which makes life attractive as the possession of great landed 
estates. The passion to own land is inborn in every Englishman. 
He looks upon it as the crown and glory of life. What one sees to 
be so advantageous to others he desires to possess for himself. It 
was this passion for the ownership of lands, of estates great or small 
according to the means possessed for acquiring them, that led most of 
the English colonists to found their homes in America. They did not 
come here in quest of gold, or glory or adventure or novel excite- 
ments, but to build up homes for themselves and their children. Un- 
fortunately the information which we possess in regard to the earliest 
settlers upon this hill is very meagre. We know the names of some 
of them, but no memorial of their existence remains save that which 
they have left on the surface of the earth which we daily tread. 

How we should treasure and with what delight we should now read 
a well-kept diary by one of our earliest settlers covering the first fifty 
years of our history ! Not Pepy's or Evelyn's or Fannie Burney's 
would be to us half as interesting and instructive. It would be what 
Bradford's history is to a wider circle of readers. B\ T its aid we 
should almost be able to see passing before our eyes the transforma- 
tion of a wilderness into a prosperous and civilized town. Perhaps, 
too, we might learn what were his emotions and what was his wonder 
as he gazed for the first time from the brow of t lis hill upon the most 
extended view obtainable in New England from any spot habitable by 
man and saw no trace of man's existence ; how he received and with 
what delight he welcomed the incoming of other settlers to become his 
neighbors and friends, each in turn making a new opening in the 
forest where for centuries the giant trees had wrestled with wind and 
storm and tossed them off from their branches in the glory of their 
strength ; when and who brought under cultivation Prospect Hill, our 
highest elevation, where now the summer visitor from the piazza of 
the "Grand" can enjoy a view of surpassing loveliness by day or 
watch the coast-wise lights send out their friendly rays to the wan- 
dering ship by night ; when and who wrought into lawn-like smoothness 
the waving lines of Campbell's hill where the golfer of today at the 
ninth tee looks up to catch a smile or receive a frown from Crotchet 
Mountain at the success or failure of his stroke ; by what way and 
when the first horse and cow and pig and sheep and hen were brought 
here to equip the shaping farm ; when the footpaths leading from 
house to house were transformed into roadways for more convenient 
travel ; how long it was before the blueberry, raspberry and blackberry 
bushes sprang up and bore fruit from the burnt-over soil ; when, too, 



200 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

was the house ready for the incoming of the wife to cheer and en- 
courage all wit'i her genial presence, and when and where did the 
first-born see the light on Mont Vernon soil ; who first discovered and 
with venturesome step descended into the gloomy depths of Purga- 
tory — facilis descensus Averno, sed revocare gradnm superasque, 
evadere ad auras, hoc opus, hie labor est —these and a thousand other 
facts of greater or less interest we should know, if only Lamson, 
Wilkins, Carleton, Averill or Smith could have foreseen that a century 
and a half later this church, which has taken the place of the one 
they helped to build, would be crowded with their descendant * and 
successors to bless their memories for such a gift. 

As early as 1760 there were fourteen taxpayers in t e town, and 
after that date its settlement must have been very rapid, for during 
the Revolutionary War our territory furnished about fifty soldiers and 
two commissioned officers, Stephen Peabody attaining the rank of 
Lieutenant Colonel, with the command of a battalion of infantry be- 
fore its close. 

It is almost certain that before the end of the century every acre 
of land which we now see cleared and many more now grown up into 
woodland had been brought iuto cultivation, and the houses now 
standing, with a few exceptions, had been built. 1 am amazed as I 
attempt to compute the amount of labor which this achievement repre- 
sents. What workers these early Mont Vernon men must have been ! 
The only thought then could have been how short could the hours of 
sleep and how long couid the hours of labor each day be made. The 
"walking delegate" was the creation of a later day 

We hear much at the present time of what is called the strenuous 
life — of urgent and persistent labor in one way or another that taxes 
strength to its utmost limit of endurance, of a determination to do 
things that never ceases until the spring is broken or the sands of life 
have run out. It is spoken of as if it were an incident of our day 
only, and is held up as a racial menace. But there were heroes be- 
fore Agamemnon and hard workers before the age of Roosevelt. The 
man, who, with a warrant for 120 acres in his pocket, a rifle on his 
shoulder, and an axe in his hand, first came upon this hill, and during 
a lifetime, by the labor of his own hauds, transformed his wilderness 
tract into fields of timothy and clover, of wheat and rye, barley and 
oats, corn and potatoes ; who erected a commodious house for a large 
family, and a barn ample for fifty sheep, twenty head of cattle and 
the necessary winter supplies ; who in the off-days of the year con- 
structed ten miles of fencing from the loose and half-buried boulders 
that some prehistoric glacier had scattered about his fields, apparently 
for the very purpose of keeping him from idleness ; who had reared a 
family of eight or ten children and given them a good education ; who 
had fulfilled all the duties of a good citizen in helping to keep the 
town up to a high standard of excellence in all things ; the wife of 
this man who did a full share in this great accomplishment, who rose 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 201 

before the lark in summer and before the weasel in winter just to put 
the house in order for a good day's work ; who with her own hand 
made the butter and cheese from the milk of twenty cows, washed 
and spun the wool from forty sheep, became the mother of ten children 
and did all the work for such a household without the aid of any 
servant ; who tried out the lard from the fat of half a dozen hogs ; and 
who made the candles to light the house through the long nights of winter 
when she knit the stockings and from the waste pieces of woolen 
braided the mats that were scattered over the floor of every room in 
the house, including the front entry ; who cultivated her own little 
flower-bed, set out and watered the hollyhocks that bloomed on either 
side of the front door and made it look like an entrance into paradise : 
who dispelled the wintry gloom by filling the sunward windows with 
flowers almost as bright and cheerful as her own warm and sunny 
heart ; who held herself in readiness every day of the year to sit by 
the bed of sickness at the summons of any neighbor in distress; who 
found her only recreation in going to church on Sunday three miles 
away to listen to a sermon three hours long, keeping off the chilblains 
by a little portable stove filled with coals from the parish fire, — this 
man and this woman knew something of a strenuous life that the men 
and women of our day little dream of. 

From the beginning of time did the Infinite Eye ever look down 
upon brighter examples of absolute consecration to duty than the 
fathers and mothers who made this beautiful New England in order 
that they might leave to their children and those who were to come 
after them something which they may have dreamt of but never 
realized? 

Can it be a matter of wonder to us that in the early ages of our 
kind, among children of such parents as these, if such there were, 
who had heard from the lips of father and mother and in part seen 
with their own eyes the long story of their toil and struggle to build 
up a home in order that they might bequeath to them that which they 
did not inherit, there should have sprung up the thought and feeling 
for ancestral worship that still survives as one of the religions of the 
world? In life they had been their earthly parents seen, and in death 
they became their heavenly parents unseen. 

Though we know but little of the first generation of Mont Vernon 
men and women individually, we know much of them collectively. 
They were a strong, vigorous, God-fearing race, who never turned 
from the path of duty as they saw it until the race of life was run. 
Religion was to them something more than a formality; it was a 
stern, living, ever present reality. 

The inconvenience of going from two to six miles to church, at 
a time when no roads existed, was very great, yet it is doubtful if 
there was a family here that failed in going to Amherst every Sunday 
of the year to hear the preaching of the Gospel until a house of wor- 
ship of their own had been provided. As early as 1779 many residents 



202 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

petitioned the General Court of New Hampshire to be set off as the 
second parish of Amherst, but the petition was not granted until two 
years later. Before this, however, a church had been organized and 
the building across the way from this in which we are now assembled 
had been constructed, every farmer in the town having contributed of 
the materials entering into it, the heavy timbers having been hauled 
to this spot by oxen over the snow then piled so high and crusted so 
hard that stone walls were invisible and a straight, smooth road was 
open from one place to another in any direction. 

The Rev. John Bruce from Marlborough, Mass., a graduate of 
Dartmouth College, was the first ordained minister, of whose quali- 
fications I am unable to speak for two reasons : First, that I never 
heard him; and second, that I am one of his direct descendants. 

Separated as the people here then were from Amherst ecclesi- 
astically, the ties that bound them to the old town became very slight, 
and from ecclesiastic to political independence was a natural and easy 
step. In 1783, 121 residents petitioned that the second parish of 
Amherst might be set off as an independent town, but then as now 
such applications were not readily granted, and it was not until 1803 
that an act of incorporation was obtained and Mont Vernon then be- 
came and has ever since remained one of the brightest of all the jewels 
that adorn the crown of New Hampshire. It is this event and that 
which flowed from it that we have met here today to commemorate. 

It was right and proper that the people living upon this hill 
should form a little commonwealth by themselves, and govern it as 
they deemed best. They were in numbers sufficient, their wealth 
was equal to it, and in intelligence and capacity they were in no way 
lacking. They felt for this laud so lifted up towards the heavens all 
the passionate love which the Swiss feel for their snow-clad mountains 
or the highlander of Scotland for Ben Nevis or Ben Lomond. They 
took a pride in their lofty isolation and desired to give to it a local 
habitation and a name, and the mention of that name has never yet 
brought a blush of shame to the cheek of one of its citizens. 

It was, is, and always has been a little town. In population it 
never reached much t eyond seven hundred, but it has succeeded in 
always making itself known and felt, sometimes in one way and 
sometimes in another. It is always throwing out its banners, and 
when one grows dim, it lifts up another. Into obscurkvy and neglect 
it will never consent to drop. When the cultivation of the soil began 
to fail, its enterprising citizens turned their attention to manufactur- 
ing, and there w r as not a town or city in the country that did not hear 
of it through its fancy boxes and portable writing desks. And even 
before new fashions threw these into innocuous desuetude the same 
men erected a temple of learning on this hill which for half a century 
has shed its light over the surrounding country and spread the fame 
of Mont Vernon far and wide. Finally, she invited the world to 
come and see her as she is when she puts on her summer robes of 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 203 

beauty, to breathe her air as pure as that which mantled Eden ere sin 
polluted it in spots, to drink of the waters that gush from her granite 
breast, to look up into her heavenly dome of a blue not less lovely 
than that o'erarching the Ionian land, to open their eyes upon a land- 
scape of surpassing loveliness aud of endless extent, to gaze upon 
her western skies when in autumn the sun drops behind the Lynde- 
borough mountains and paints the piied-up clouds in colors more 
brilliant and variegated than Turner saw when looking over Venice 
from the Lido ; and the world came and still comes and will continue 
to come as long as men seek heal h, beauty and rest, where health, 
beauty and rest are found. 

Mont Vernon followed the order which is observed in the evolu- 
tion of nearly all of our New England towns. The farms came first 
and then the village. When the population was sufficient they first 
erected a church. For convenience it was located near the territorial 
center and around it the village grew. First came the doctor, then 
followed in natural succession the blacksmith, the shoemaker, the 
storekeeper, the carpenter, and these, with the few owners of nearby 
lands which they cultivated, make up with their homes the typical 
New England village. Such was the little village of Mont Vernon a 
few years after the erection of the church already spoken of, and it 
has continued in the form in which it was originally constructed to 
the present day, with only few changes and some additions. For a 
generation after its incorporation the citizens of Mont Vernon were 
almost entirely engaged in agriculture and prosperously so until 1840 
or a few years later. The decline in this industry was due to causes 
beyond their control. They affected every agricultural community in 
New England to a greater or less degree. Events are every day 
happening in this busy world that bring a blessing to one place and a 
blight to another. We can neither foretell them, nor guard against 
their effects. A Portuguese navigator passing around the Cape of 
Good Hope to India destroyed the commerce of the Mediterranean 
and built up that of the English Channel and the North Sea. Eli 
Whitney invented the cotton gin and indirectly brought on the Civil 
War. England repealing her corn laws reduced the value of her 
farming lands one-half and made herself the greatest manufacturing 
nation in the world. When our railway system was extended into 
the valley of the Mississippi our New England farmers found that 
they could no longer raise corn and wheat and oats and barley in 
competition with the owners of more fertile lands and easier of culti- 
vation, and from that date and for this cause besran the abandonment 
of our Monl Vernon farms, and I fear the end has not yet been 
reached. Not only man and his belongings, but the birds of the air 
even are subject to the decrees that evolution is issuing from her 
irresistible throne. 

Where now are those flocks of wild pigeons that in the gloom 
and glory of an autumnal morning fifty years ago darkened the sun 



204 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

in their flight like the arrows of Xerxes at Thermopylae ? When the 
wheat and rye fields disappeared they took their flight and not one 
from their untold millions remained to remind us of their existence. 

After the Revolutionary War the process of settling of New 
Hampshire continued with an accelerated pace, and before the close 
of the century our eager home builders had pushed northward to the 
very borders of Canada and filled up the lands between. Though a 
farming population is the most independent and self-sustaining of all, 
yet there is no such thing as real independence. We are always lean- 
ing one upon another. The city is dependent upon the town and the 
town upon the city. One nation draws from another and gives of her 
own what is wanted in exchange. As New Hampshire did not pos- 
sess navigable rivers, and was unable to construct canals as did New 
York, Pennsylvania and Maryland, they were obliged to build road- 
ways to meet the demands of trade. In 1802 the Second New Hamp- 
shire turnpike was completed from Amherst through this town to 
Claremont, and later by extension to Windsor in Vermont. They 
imitated the Romans and laid it out in a straight line, neither turning 
to the right nor left, whatever might be the difficulties in the way. 
Our sturdy ancestors seemed to delight in overcoming obstacles and 
never turned aside to avoid them. The opening up of this road was 
an event of great importance to Mont Vernon. It was the avenue 
through which passed the travel of northern New Hampshire and Ver- 
mont to the metropolis of New England. It continued to hold it until 
the Concord and Nashua Rauxoad was opened in 1837, when the 
toll-gates were pulled down and its glory was a thing of the past 

I have heard my father say that he has seen 125 two-horse teams, 
loaded with the products of the farm, passing one after the other 
through this village on their way to Boston. Scarcely a day would 
pass in the appropriate season of each year when droves of cattle and 
sheep and swine were not seen passing in the same direction. To 
accommodate this immense traffic taverns were built every two or three 
miles along the pike, and there were some capable of providing for 
the care of forty horses at one time. The town then could boast of 
four stores, and it has been said that the village tavern, located on 
what is now the pub ic square, was in the habit one time of dispens- 
ing to its customers a barrel of rum a week This period marked the 
culmination of the prosperity of Mont Vernon as an agricultural 
community, and can be looked back to as its most picturesque and 
busy age. Fortunately for its future there were then growi g up here 
a group of men of high intelligence and ambitious views who gave a 
new impulse to the town and for a general ion kept it in prosperous 
ways. 

The manufacture of desks and fancy boxes was carried on by 
William Conant and Harry H. Bragg, which at times gave employ- 
ment to fifty people; a large tannery was established by Joseph A. 
Starrett; the husk business was the conception of F. O. Kittredge, 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 205 

and besides these, clocks and organs were sent out from here that 
kept good time and made fine music, and as they bore the name of the 
place of their manufacture upon them, thpy sold readily without a 
warranty. 

In 1850 the men whose names have just been given, joining 
hands with several other of the prominent citizens, learning from their 
own experience the value of a good education, and desiring that the 
rising generation should have within their reach opportunities beyond 
that which they had enjoyed, resolved that an academy of the first 
order should be erected, and th3 result of their labors and contribu- 
tions was so)n seen in the institution which for along time flourished 
here under the names of Appleton Academy and McColldm Institute. 
Siuce then I have mingled somewhat widely with men and affairs, but 
there has never come under my observation or within my knowledge 
an instance of such liberality or such great personal sacrifices as were 
made by these men in the establishment of this school. It is certain 
that one of them gave to it at least one-fifth of all his wealth, which 
was limited to a few thousand dollars. 

There was a time when 125 scholars were being educated in 
yonder building, and the flourishing years of the academy gave to 
the village a life and vivacity to which before it had been a stranger, 
and to hundreds of boys and girls t l ie opportunity of gaining an edu- 
cation, which, but for the labor and sacrifice of these men, they never 
could have gained. 

The next stage in the history of Mont Vernon is due to the 
sagacity, good judgment and business enterprise of F. O. Kittredge. 
His love for his native town was intense and beyond that of most 
other men. What he thought to be so attractive and beautiful, he 
believed other people would also enjoy, and in the fifties he erected 
in the village a hotel for summer boarders that in outward appear- 
ance and interior equipment was the equal of any house of the same 
character in New England. From the date of its construction until 
its destruction by fire in 1872 it was annually filled with guests of 
high standing and refinement, whose presence was welcomed with the 
same pleasure and cordiality by the people of the town as they ex- 
tend to their successors of the present year. 

It is not possible to close the history of Mont Vernon, that seems 
to be so far removed from the rush and roar and turmoil of the great 
world as to be hardly in touch with it, without reminding you that it 
is one of the little units that forms a part of a mighty nation. Though 
far removed the nerves of human allegiance reach here and thrill here, 
and nowhere have human hearts moved more deeply and responded 
more quickly to the demands of patriotism. 

To the men and women of Mont Vernon, to the men and women 
of every city and town and hamlet of the North, the year of 1861 
stands out in the background of tbeir lives as the one most memor- 
able and eventful. It presents itself to us still in a dual aspect — 



206 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

filled with light the brightest, and with shadow the darkest. It is a 
canvas from which stands out the majestic figure of America, full of 
strong and lusty life, in the act of putting on her armor and taking 
up the sword, set in a frame of mourning. 

I need not tell you how the currents of our lives began to widen 
and to flow into the broad stream of the Nation's life, helping it and 
strengthening it with heart and hand, with thought and deed. 

No longer then were the thoughts uppermost in the minds of men 
when woidd the warm and mellow earth be ready for the seed, no fear 
of summer drought to wither or early frosts to kill the growing corn. 
All the hopes and fears of everyday life were overshadowed by the 
impending national calamity and the resolution and work to avert it. 
It was a conflict on our part not of aggression, but of preservation. 
We were a people unused to arms. The story of our wars had been 
told to us, if told at all, by the descendants of those who had partic- 
ipated in them. The actors had passed away. 

But when the nation rose from its sleep of security to put forth 
its strength in defense of life and honor, we recall with what quick- 
ness of decision and alacrity of step our young men left field and 
workshop, school and college, home and friends to meet the unknown 
but certain perils of war. They were caught up and carried along 
almost joyously to the strife by that spirit which kindleth a flame in 
the hearts of a people when great dangers threaten and heroic work 
is laid upon them to perform. They made no excuses ; they asked not 
for delay, but to the call gave the quick response, "We are ready." 

The Union soldier was gifted with that intelligence which enabled 
him to see the importance of the conflict in which he was engaged, 
and its relation and bearing upon the nation's history and that of the 
civilized world. He knew and felt that though his own name might 
soon be forgotten, yet his valor, aiding and stimulating that of his 
fellows, was being wrought and spent in deeds which were to live 
through all human story, and, with this foretaste of immortality 
charged home against the foe. Thus and thus only have the great 
battles of freedom been won. From the beginning to the close of the 
war Mont Vernon furnished four commissioned officers and about fifty 
enlisted men. 

The names of your soldiers were upon the muster-roll of every 
army ; they followed the fortunes of the Army of the Potomac from 
the beginning to the end ; they were present at the taking of New 
Orleans ; they joined in the assault at Port Hudson, and helped to 
open up the Mississippi to the peaceful commerce of the world ; they 
endured the hardships and experienced the pangs of hunger without 
complaint under Burnside in the siege of Knoxville, and marched 
with happy hearts under Sherman from Atlanta to the sea. 

And now the hour has struck and the story is ended. We stand 
face to lace with the new century. We will not attempt to penetrate 
into the future, but await its unfolding as surely it will unfold with its 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 207 

duties and responsibilities, with its joys and sorrows, its smiles and 
tears. The good God has set your lives in pleasant places and 
scattered around you with prodigal hand the beauties of wood and 
field, of hill and mountain, the wavy lines of the smiling plains that 
stretch and prolong themselves till they meet the sea at its margin. 

In my day I have traveled far and wide and seen many of the 
places famed for their beauty and loveliness. I have stood on Castle 
Hill in Edinborough and looked down upon the contrasted picture of 
water and cultivated earth and far-off hills that spread out before and 
around you there ; I have seen the fields and meadows that roll away 
from the foot of Windsor Castle in all their wealth of rural loveli- 
ness ; I have gazed upon the wonders of an Italian landscape, crowded 
with the fig, the pomegranate, the orange and the lemon when they 
burst forth into what seems a springtide of eternal bloom ; I have 
crossed and recrossed our great continental uplift, seamed with mar- 
velous canyons, whose granite, iron and marble walls, painted by 
storms, gleam with wonders of color as brilliant and variegated as 
sunset clouds, broken by lofty mountain ranges, whose peaks are 
covered with eternal snow, where from the mists of ocean are brewed 
the storm-cloud, which moviug from their mountain home and spread- 
ing their wings in flight until they cover a continent, fertilize it with 
a wealth of generous waters, and at times terrify it with the wrath of 
tempests, but nowhere have I looked upon that which has left a more 
enduring and pleasing recollection upon the mind than that which for 
a hundred times I have looked out upon from the top of Prospect 
Hill. 

When a century hence some one shall fill the place which I now 
hold, and to the generation of Mont Vernon men and women then 
living shall unfold the annals of the hundred years then passed, may 
the record be as white and free from blot or stain as that which I 
have been able, all inadequately, to record to you. 

SOME HISTORICAL SKETCHES OF THE CONGREGA- 
TIONAL CHURCH. 

By Huntington Porter Smith, Cambridge, Mass. 

The fathers and mothers of this church were of Puritan stock. 
They had the Puritan spirit, the Puritan religious principle, the Puri- 
tan faith in God which overcomes the world. They were resolute, 
intelligent, worthy pioneers, who began the settlement of the place 
about 1765. They were accustomed to walk from the extreme borders 
five or six miles to the village below for public worship. This they 
did cheerfully until their hearts were moved to prepare a church home 
nearer their dwellings. In the winter it was common for whole fam- 
ilies to ride down to church on their ox-sleds. In the summer, during 



208 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

the week, they occasionally had preaching in the barns of these remote 
districts, but they early looked forward to the time when this section 
should become a separate parish. For this they planned. When a 
majority of the church in Amherst extended a call to Rev. Jeremiah 
Barnard, they said they should object to any other settlement until 
their request to form another parish was granted. "They insisted," 
says a writer at a later period, "upon having a more pious and more 
orthodox ministry and proceeded to supply themselves." In Septem- 
ber, 1780, a council was convened which organized here what was 
called the Second Church in Amherst. 

No records of this church for the first thirteen years are to be 
found ; but aged men who were living here fifty years ago said the 
first deacons were Nathaniel Hayward, Richard -Ward and Oliver 
Carlton. These aged men also gave other information concerning 
the early days which happily has been preserved. For example, that 
Rev. Mr. Coggin from Chelmsford, Mass., preached to a large audi- 
ence in Major Cole's barn which was said to have been just south of 
the spot where the old meeting-house stands. His sermon was upon 
the importance of immediately erecting a house of worship. This 
was in revolutionary times and a large thing for these farmers to 
undertake, but on the following April, each farm in the community 
sent in its free will offering of timber for the frame and covering for 
their house of worship. 

The first settler on the hill, Lieut. James Woodbury, presented land 
for the church. Those venerable men to whom we have alluded as 
living here fifty years ago said that the heaviest timber was drawn 
upon the snow across the fields and over the walls and fences without 
obstruction. This was in the month of April, 1781. David said, 
looking forward to the time when there should be a suitable resting 
place for the ark of God, "I will not give sleep to mine eyes, or 
slumber to my eyelids until I find out a place for the Lord, a taber- 
nacle for the mighty one of Jacob." Of like spirit were these pro- 
genitors. In June, 1781, fifty-four individuals were constituted by 
the General Court the Second Parish of Amherst. So urgent was the 
demand for the house that before the floor timbers were laid, it was 
occupied without any formal dedication. We may well imagine the 
unfinished walls and roof resounded with fervent prayer and praise. 
As they were able, they slowly but s'eadily completed what their 
longing hearts had prompted them to begin. 

During the first winter they worshiped there, sitting upon rough 
benches, with a single floor, and most of the windows loosely boarded 
up. "To this place came men and women walking even from the 
Chestnut Hills, five miles distant, with nothing to warm them but the 
glad tidings of salvation, which they could scarcely hear for the rag- 
ing of the wind without." So says one who wrote at a later day of 
this beginning. The old fashioned square pews were constructed as 
families felt able, the "pew-ground," as it was called, being deeded 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON- 209 

by the parish. There was for a time much space left for the benches. 
The ground for four or five of the square pews was elevated in front 
of the pulpit and reserved for free seats. 

We say of such men, we say of these men, ''they build ed better 
th:iu they knew" ; but we also say of them they knew they were build- 
ing well. They knew that the timber that they drew from their farms 
was the soundest and the best. They knew the foundation upon 
which they placed those timbers was not shifting sand, but a rock. 
They knew that they were not building for themselves alone but for 
future generations, and thev knew they were building a church for 
God. 

There is an old couplet that runs : 

•'He who builds a church for God and not for fame 
Will never mark the marble with his name." 

Name aud fame were not their ambition. 

"Though dead they speak in reason's ear and in example live, 
Their faith, and hope, and mighty zeal still fresh instruction give." 

Looking up to the old meeting-house, recalling its history, and 
the lives of these faithful men and women, one has an impulse to 
stand with uncovered head. Men and women of the present day, 
you have done well to preserve this ever sacred edifice, which from 
afar as well as near "many an eye has danced to see." You have 
perpetuated that which shall be an inspiration for braver, nobler liv- 
ing to yourselves and children, a cause for gratitude to every home- 
comer. To a remarkable degree the church here and the town have 
ever been interwoven. Though you now have a more beautiful house 
of worship, the old meeting-house as the fathers planned, and for 
which they toiled, is still a link that unites the town and the church. 

In 1780 and 1781, there was no regular minister. In 1782, a 
Mr. Powers supplied. In 1783, Mr. Samuel Sargent was called to 
settle, but declined the call. Rev. John Bruce was the first pastor, 
and this was his first and only pastorate. He was born in Marlboro, 
Mass., in 1757, and entered Dartmouth College at the age of twenty. 
graduated in 1781, with honor and greatly beloved by his instructors. 
In 1784, he came here from his theological studies, having declined 
an invitation to be the pastor at Mason. He remained twenty-five 
years, this being nearly twice as long as any other minister, and died 
suddenly, March 12, 1809. The people had gathered as usual on 
that Sabbath morning for the service when the announcement of his 
death was made. 

Mr. Bruce was eminently a successful minister, greatly endeared 
to his people, and deeply mourned. The lapse of time has not been 
permitted to efface his memory, for children's children have sacredly 
kept it as a rich legacy. Though but fifty-two years of age at the 
time of his death, such was his dignity of character and gracious 



210 HISTORY OF 3IONT VERNON. 

bearing that he was known as "Father Bruce." For the first ten 
years and the last eight when he was here, there are no church 
records, but in 'the handwriting of Mr. Bruce there has been brought 
to light what is undoubtedly a list of members of the church when he 
became pastor, numbering 110. During the seven years, from 1794 
to 1801, it appears that 83 members were added by letter or pro- 
fession ; 50 were added by profession in the year 1799. This re- 
vival was the first one known in this section, and awakened much 
interest far and wide. 

As will be noticed, it was in his day that the town was incor- 
porated. Who first so happily suggested the name of this town? 
I waited in vain for the town historian to tell us yesterday. Though 
the right name is as we now see it, others must have been suggested : — 
West Amherst, Montville, perhaps. But who naturally would be the 
one to give a name in which all would unite, but the man in whom all 
hearts were united — the intelligent, sweet-spirited pastor? One 
afternoon he rides in a chaise from Chestnut hill where he has been 
making calls. Looking off from a hill-top to this one he has new 
views or new impressions of the beaut}' and the verdure of the fields 
and farms clustering here, and he says "Mont Vernon." So the town 
votes Mont Vernon. Thus the imagination pictures it. 

Rev. John Bruce had four sons, all of whom lived beyond the 
alloted age of man and passed their entire lives in this town. Deacon 
John, "Squire Nat," James, and Captain William. How familiar their 
names ! In our boyhood days how familiar their forms and features. 
Intelligent men, men of worth, they faithfully served the church and 
the town. 

Just eighty years after the first pastor graduated at Dartmouth 
College his grandson, George Anson Bruce, sou of Nathaniel, received 
his diploma from his grandfather's college, and at the same time and 
place his townsman and boon companion, George Augustus Marden. 
The historian of 2003 will have ample occasion to speak of these 
men. 

I will not tarry here to enlarge upon their distinguished record, 
but simply say that side by side they prepared for college, and passed 
their four years together there : both served our country in the Civil 
War, and since then in legislative halls as well as in the arena of life 
they have greatly honored their native town and state. The future 
historian will doubtless refer to this period as the '"time of the 
Georges." 

The second pastor was the Rev. Stephen Chapin. He had been 
dismissed from a neighboring church, so I find it written, on account 
of his "deep and discriminating orthodoxy, and his bold, unadorned, 
uncompromising style of preaching." He immediately received a call 
to this church. He remained here nine years, during which time 
large numbers were added to the church. He was a graduate of 
Harvard College, and died while President of The Columbian College, 
Washington, D. C. The cause of his separation from this church 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 211 

was from a quarter least expected. A child being presented for bap- 
tism, Mr. Chapin refused to administer the rite, announcing a change 
in his views respecting the mode and subject of baptism. So com- 
pletely were the hearts of the people united in him, that it was sup- 
posed" that the flock would follow the shepherd, but led by the Rev. 
Humphrey Moore of Milford, they stood their ground in argument, 
and not a single individual swerved from the faith. "Yet," says the 
record, "they treated Mr. Chapin with great affection and tenderness." 

After an interval of more than a year, Rev. Ebenezer Cheever, 
a graduate of Bowdoin College, became pastor. He continued until 
1823. In 1820, the first Sabbath School was organized. It was held 
in the old red school-house which stood where the village school-house 
now stands. The Sabbath School was composed only of children. 

Rev. Nathaniel Kingsbury followed Mr. Cheever in a prosperous 
ministry of thirteen years. The temperance movement began early 
in Mr. Kingsbury's time. It is on record that there were eight tavern 
licenses given in one year here. In some of the places a barrel of liquor 
was sold per week. It was no easy matter to control public opinion. 
The church seemed on the point of being rent asunder and the minis- 
ter driven from his post. There is an anecdote which illustrates the 
times : The new road was being built south of the church. Mr. 
Kingsbury, passing that way, overtook one of his deacons with "two 
pails full of grog." The deacon advised the pastor to go on the old 
road as the workmen were so drunk that he would be insulted. It is 
mentioned th-^t church members would angrily leave the sanctuary if 
the subject of temperance was alluded to. But the pastor was faith- 
ful ; devout men and women stood by him, and the truth was finally 
triumphant. "Intemperance was excommunicated from the commu- 
nity, as well as from the church." 

In this ministry, I notice that on September 4th. 1831, the 
following; persons were received into the church : William Conant and 
wife, Thomas Cloutmau and wife, John Carlton, Timothy Kittredge, 
Susan Maiden, Dr. Daniel Adams. Dr. Adams was a man of con- 
siderable fame, being the author of Adams's Arithmetic which, in 
after vears some of us bovs and girls knew to a very limited extent 
and not by heart. In the days of his medical practice, the doctor 
was a great favorite. To quote from one of the Hutchinsons' well 
known sougs, he was one of those doctors who came 'dike post with 
mail but ne'er forgot his calomel." T f the baby died, it was a great 
consolation to feel that it had been under Dr. Adams s care. There 
was a tune when the good doctor led the choir, and with a tuning fork 
pitched the tune. Here I may as well pause, and speak of some of 
the traditions and recollections of the choir in the thirties and 
forties. 

Thomas Cloutmau was chorister after Dr. Adams. Capt. Clout- 
man was a sturdy man, erect in figure and with upright hair; prompt, 
a good timist and drill master. It was "Down, left, right, up, 
Sing !" with him. Are there any members of Dr. Adams's choir here? 



212 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON 

I hardly dare assume it, but I am confident there are enough of 
Thomas Cloutinan's choir who could, if the}' would, give us an Old 
Folks' Concert that would be interesting and inspiring. How we 
should like to hear them sing : — 

"Fly like a youthful hart or roe 
Over the hills where spices grow" 

to the accompaniment of violins and bass viol. Must of that choir 
are members of the Choir Invisible, but some of them are spared to 
us. 

.More of you remember the choirs in the forties rather than in the 
thirties. Some are born singers. Such were some of these. The 
pastor enjoyed the singing beyond expression . "How beautifully 
Emeline sang today," I heard him exclaim more than once as he came 
home from a Sabbath service. Emeline Cloutman was only twelve 
years old when she became a member of the choir. They had an 
organ then and Esther Cloutman played it. When she was called to 
join that choir above, her father could no longer remain in this one. 
If she has her earthly form and face there, it is in harmony with all 
we imagine of that home. Laurana Smith, the village music teacher 
and. after Esther Cloutman, church organist, ever faithful at her post 
of duty : Levi Averill, the organ blower, shall I not speak of him? 
An illness in childhood left him not entirely what he would otherwise 
have been; but he was all there, body and soul, when he "played the 
organ." as he called it. 

As you see, I have anticipated the years. Let me agaiu refer to 
Mr. Kingsbury's time. It was in the latter part of his ministry that 
a stove was procured for the church. Some few regarded it "too 
oppressive an innovation to be borne." They claimed it reflected 
upon the habits of those earlier day.-. It may also be recorded that 
in 1837 the church was removed to the other side of the street, re- 
modeled, and furnished with bell and organ. In 1855, 1 may add, 
••with all needed repairs it was supplied with furnaces." 

Rev. Edwin Jenuison, introduced by Mr. Kingsbury, was in- 
stalled on the day the latter was dismissed. April 6. 1836. the people 
regarded Mr. Jennison as unsurpassed by any minister in the county 
as a sermonizer. On account of failing health he asked for dismissal, 
and took a voyage to Europe. 

Rev. Bezaleel Smith was installed August 19th, 1841, and con- 
tinued for about nine years. The pastor's son, though but a small 
boy, may be supposed to have considerable to say of thi- period, but 
ministers' children should be careful what they say. You have prob- 
ably noticed that they are. That was a basic principle in this family. 
Still the size of the family and that of the salary is public property, 
therefore this minister's son does not make any break in saying that 
the family consisted of the parents, six children, and a grandmother. 
The annual salary was £500, with an annual donation party, if mem- 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 213 

ory serves. The donation parties were memorable occasions. On 
the pages of the church book there are no itemized accounts or state- 
ments of gross receipts, but this child can testify that anything 
nourishing was acceptable in the family, from a string of onions or a 
string of dried apples up to a barrel of flour. The children's warmest 
thanks were bestowed upon those who sent in pumpkin pies and 
doughnuts. Alas! for those country minister's children who never 
know the joys of the old fashioned donation party. Oh that some 
genius like the our who wrote of the moss-covered bucket would sing 
of those joys [ 

Not only at those parties, but usually, this minister's son was a 
pretty happy boy. But for a time he felt that he did not have a fair 
and square deal with the world because he was a minister's son. To 
him the air upon this hilltop seemed to be blue with that old Satanic 
falsehood about "ministers' sons and deacons' daughters." The at- 
mosphere was cleared one day as by ;i bolt from heaven when Dr. 
Davis of Amherst preached upon that subject. He vividly and 
eloquently illustrated his sermon with anecdotes of successful and 
distinguished men and women who were children of Christian par- 
ents, ministers and deacons especially included. The boy does not 
remember one of the sermons of Humphrey Moore who often supplied 
his father's pulpit, and not all of his father's, but he does remember 
that one of Dr. Davis's, and that he went out of church that day, his 
head erect and as he believes a stronger, better boy. These were the 
days of tin foot stoves which we boys had to All from the red hot 
stove in the vestibule and deposit at our mothers' and grandmothers' 
feet. 

A majority of the church at this time took ultra ground against 
African slavery and voted, as did other New England churches, to 
exclude all slave-holders from the pulpit and the Lord's table. Mr. 
Smith, while abhorring slavery as much as any one, did not believe 
in that method of expressing his abhorrence. There were those in 
the South, sincere Christians, who had come into possession of slaves 
which they thought it their duty to retain and care for. He had a 
college classmate who was that kind of a slave-holder. The pastor 
felt that such men should not be excluded from the communion table. 
We cannot hide that the saints had their little differences then as 
now. Von know the old hymn says : 

"They wrestled hard as we do now 
With sins and doubts and fears," 

and probably with one another, as we do now. It is remembered 
that the pastor said in his farewell sermon : 

••When I am willing to have my wife and children placed upon 
the auction block and sold one by one to the highest bidder, then you 
may accuse me of being pro-slavery." But these conflicting opinions 
left no scars which time did not soon obliterate. Nothing has ever 



214 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

been wanting on the part of this people to show their affectionate 
regard for this pastor, his wife, and their children. While here, the 
wife of his youth was taken from him and her tranquil grave is in 
yonder cemetery. Later, three of their children were brought here, 
and are resting by their mother's side. 

The name of Couant has been identified with the history of this 
church for more than eighty years. As we have noticed, William 
Conant and wife united here on profession of faith September 1st, 
1831. The church was not long in finding out that it had in this 
young man good material for a deacon. May 1 not say — many 
deacons, since it was well grounded in the doctrines of foreordii.a- 
tion and predestination. Mr. Conant was unanimously chosen for 
high office just a year alter he united with the church. "Once a 
deacon always a deacon" by Divine right, when such as he are elected. 
Not a tall man in stature — measured by his soul, he was a large man. 
He had five sons and three daughters — two pews full, counting the 
father and mother. The}' were round, smiling faces. Smiles are 
usually responsive with children, often leading up to an explosion. 
1 remember, one of this deacon's sons got one of the minister's sons 
into trouble just by a smile, and the latter came very near being in- 
vited into the pulpit. I once heard a talented young minister say at 
a Council in reply to the question, "What led him to choose the min- 
istry," that he thought it must have been because he always saw the 
humorous side of things. Was it for this reason that William Co- 
nant's live mirthful boys all became the best of deacons? Yes, and 
because the father's veins were full of deacon blood, I should say, 
and the daughters were of the same type and mould as the sons. 
From this country church they went, one remaining to fill the father's 
place. This family fully demonstrates what is undeniably true, that 
country churches furnish in a large measure the life and strength of 
the city churches. I wonder it those children heard that sermon 
alluded to, preached by Dr. Davis more than fifty years ago. They 
are an illustrious example of the truth that was proclaimed that day. 

William H. succeeded his father in office here, and faithfully 
served the church until laid aside by illness. Only a few months ago 
some of us came to this fair village and stood beside the open grave 
of this good friend of the church and our good friend. 

The eighth minister of this church was the Rev. Charles D. Her- 
bert, who remained nearly six years. Mr. Herbeit was a man of 
ardent religious spirit. The Academy was incorporated about the 
commencement of his ministry. Several of the students took an 
active part in the work of the church. John F. Colby, of enduring 
memory, was among these, uniting with the church at that time. 
With the pastor he was holding neighborhood meetings that fall, 
1852, beginning then the work of an earnest Christian from which he 
never ceased. 

The next pastor was the Rev. Charles E. Lord, who served the 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 215 

church a little more than four years, leaving here on account of Mrs. 
Lord's health. The letter of the church to them on their departure 
is one of special affection and appreciation. 

The Rev. George E. Sanborne followed, and although he con- 
tinued only three years, his ministry was one of great usefulness in 
uniting more closely the hearts of the people in Christian fellowship. 
Mr. Sanborne was a man of tender, persuasive spirit, and the light 
of it pervaded the whole community. 

Rev. Benson M. Frink was the next pastor for two years. He 
was a young man of exceptional ability, fully consecrated to his high 
calling. He went from tins church to the Central Church, Portland, 
Maine. The Council in granting the letter of dismission expressed 
their warm sympathy in the frequent trials of the church in it> changes 
of ministers, and said : "The ministry of our young brother has been 
largely blessed in this place." 

The parsonage was built at this time. One other special event 
which occurred during Mr. Frink's stay was the ordination here of 
C. F. P. Bancroft, Ph. D., who went as teacher and pastor to Look- 
out Mountain. Dr. Bancrofts wider fame is that of Andover, but 
he was the successful principal of our Academy for four years. He 
closely identified himself with the work of the chinch, often supply- 
ing the pulpit in the absence of the pastor. While I am not expected 
to speak here of the Academy, 1 cannot forbear quoting from the 
annals published on the 25th anniversary in 1875 : "He" [Mr. Ban- 
croft] "came immediately after graduating at Dartmouth, and when 
he was but twenty years of age. We are told that his rule was one 
of love, and not of terror, — a rule that worked very satisfactorily 
for him since one of his pupils was so effectually subdued that she 
has been willing to be governed by it to this day." To this quota- 
tion let me add, that from this favored spot no choicer spirits have 
ever gone forth than Cecil and Fannie Kittredge Bancioft. Lovely 
and pleasant in their lives, in their death they were not long divided. 

The next pastor. Dr. S. H. Keeler, was here eight years. That 
this was a ministry of strength and uplifting power is abundantly 
testified by living witnesses, although the records are very meagre. 
John Bruce, after a continued service of fifty years as deacon, re- 
signed the office about this time. At his death he left a legacy to the 
church of S400. 

Deacon J. A. Starrett and Deacon William Conaut also, after 
their long years of service, resigned. Tender and appreciative letters 
were given to each of these faithful servants of God, which are 
placed in your records. Deacons Bruce, Starrett, and Conant ! — a 
cluster of names that will ever add bright lustre to the pages of the 
history of Mont Vernon church ! 

Rev. W. H. WoodweD, of Hampton, Connecticut, followed, and 
remained nearly four years and a half, having endeared himself to 
the church by his wisdom and sympathy. 



216 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Rev. C. C. Carpenter commenced his labors here Nov. 1st, 1880. 
After nearly five years of generous toil he laid aside the work on ac- 
count of impaired health and by advice of his physician. I find on 
his leaving, a tribute of great respect and affectionate esteem, voted 
by the church :md signed by a committee consisting of these beloved 
brothers who have now all passed on — Win. H. Conant. George E. 
Dean, Thomas H. Richardson. 

Mr. Carpenter is the man above all others to prepare the annals 
of this church, and would have done so now, had he felt that health 
permitted. By good fortune he is with us today, bringing his greeting 
and his own account of the church and people in his time. 

After him came Richard A. McGown, John Thorpe, T. J. Lewis, 
Donald Brown, and H. P. Peck, the present pastor. 

On some future occasion, others will speak more fittingly of these 
later pastorates, of the new church building, of the large gifts for it, 
from distant friends, as well as smaller gifts from equally devoted 
and loving hearts. Especially will they tell how the last thousand 
dollars of the debt was raised on a Sunday evening by George A 
Marden, when by mirthful personal appeals, witty anecdotes, and 
characteristic persuasion he gathered the needed sum, an entertain- 
ment never excelled on this hilltop, besides being the most profitable 
one. But is mine to speak of earlier days. 

Let me give you one or two more pictures of the long ago. When 
I was a boy, I saw as a boy, I thought as a boy. The old meeting- 
liouse was the centre of all things here, and from its belfry you could 
see everywhere Go up into the belfry ami I will show you the 
cyclorama on a Sunday morning of that time. Everybody is on his 
way to meeting. Looidng east, you see winding along the side of 
Preble Hill (they give it a grander name new, because the city folks 
require it) a long row of wagons loaded down almost to the axles 
with Batchelders, Kendalls, Wilkinses, Robies, Robinsons, Mc- 
Colloms. Coming across Cloutman's blueberry pasture is Mr. Eliot, 
the village carpenter who lives outside the village. Samuel, John 
and Jane are with him. Look north, and you see wagon loads of Bat- 
tleses, Averills, Lamsons, Westous, Richardsons, Smiths, Perkinses, 
Trows, and many others on foot. Look east by south, — those are 
the Campbells, Baldwins, Browns, Trevitts. That is Sarah Jane 
Trevitt with a beautiful bouquet of flowers for the pulpit. Toiling 
slowly up the hill, from the south, with his horse stopping to puff at 
every other kl, thank-you-marm," is Joshua Cleaves with his wife and 
two daughters, Lydia and Augusta. The latter teaches the village 
school held in the old red school-house. - The former has also taught 
there. Mr. Cleaves's brother John and his son William are walking. 
Uncle Joshua will have a comfortable nap before he returns. An- 
other wagon is that of William Richardson. He is driving his son 
Justin's white mare, "pushing on the reins" continuously. Justin is 
walking. Then Capt. Kittredge's family (where the minister was 
never allowed to be criticized), two loads of them, one wagon and a 



I11STOKV OF MONT VERNON. 217 

rockaway, the latter the toniest vehicle in town. They have with them 
old lady Coburo and the widow Kittredge. Sabrina Goburn is also on 
the way. Charles and George Kittredge are walking up the old 
road with their two cousins, Nancy and Harriet. There is James 
Bruce with his three daughters. Behind them is Deacon John Carl- 
tun, son of the first deacon Carlion, and wife, with Harriet and 
Abbie. Joseph and John are walking cross-lots. The Trows of the 
south part of the town are on their way; also a stray Hutchinson 
( most of them go to Milford). Turn in a westerly direction, and 
you see the Uptons coming over the old, uneven Purgatory road, and 
Henry Dodge's family, who live at the Old Homestead. The Dodges 
are in a double-seated "democrat" wagon, good, honest Democrat that 
he is. He is fair to middling in size and weight (rather more so), 
but there is room for his wife and four little girls besides little Hemy 
Francis, who adds his mite to help bring down the wagon springs. 
From different points of the compass, as you see, they all come "with 
one accord to one place." They bring their luncheons and stay all 
day. You cannot see how they and the village folks can crowd in, 
but 1 remind you that it is a very large meeting-house, and they are 
all there, except those whom the minister mentions in his "■long" 
prayer as "not present on account of severe illness or the infirmities 
of age." 

Come down from the belfry and look in with me over the audi- 
ence. You sae Braces enough and those connected with them by the 
"ties of nature and affection" to fill a fair-sized meeting-house. The 
Conants are there all right, about two-thirds up the right aisle. The 
Stevens pews are full, and a portion in the singers' seats. There 
is a full pew of Cloutmans, aud the balance in the choir. How it 
would delight President Roosevelt's heart to see that row of chubby 
Marden children. They are all young, but George is old enough to 
repeat to his Sabbath School teacher, 

"Though I am young, a little one, 
Yet I can speak and go alone." 

Zephaniah Kittredge, his sons and daughters and grandchildren, 
Starretts, Stinsons, Marbles, Dunbars, Odells, Smiths, Bakers, 
Braggs. If 1 have omitted anyone, he need not speak, for him I have 
not offended ! 

Ah ! these "scenes that once were mine and are no longer mine !" 
It does not harm us to have smiles as well as tears in God's House 
as we recall them, especially at such a time as this We will turn 
from these things but cannot forget them, certainly not the hallowed 
names. We wid "look up and not down, look foiward and not back- 
ward," and we will "lend a hand," and "all abide in the deepening 
conviction that there is no institution like the Christian church, noth- 
ing that is worthv of one's utmost devotion save the kinodom of our 
Master." 



218 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

ADDRESS BY REV. C. C. CARPENTER. 

The speaker selected for this commemoration of the first hundred 
years of the Mont Vernon church, to whose interesting address we 
have just listened, is certainly far better fitted for that service than 
I. for he belonged to that century and 1 did not ! He came to fhe 
town to reside, with his reverend father — at an early age, to be sure — 
nearly forty years before I set foot within its borders. My pas- 
torate began indeed on the very boundary line of the church's second 
century. When 1 first visited Mont Vernon in September, 1880, I 
was told that the venerable Dr. Keeler had preached, two Sabbaths 
before, a centennial sermon in recognition of the original organization 
of the church in September, 1780. That first century had been 
blessed with twelve pastors — the full apostolic number — and when 
after the true Congregational fashion the people gave forth their lots, 
the lot fell upon me to be numbered with them and to take part in 
their ministry. And I always felt that I entered into their labors, 
and to a good extent reaped what they had sown. All praise to the 
memory of those early pastors ; their faithful ministrations moulded a 
whole generation of strong-hearted, true-hearted men and women who 
believed in God, in the Bible, in the Church, in the Sabbath, in the 
seriousness of the life that now is, because connected with the life 
which is to come ! 

I have been asked for some remembrances of my pastorate. 
Memories I surely have, vivid and tender, of those five happy years 
of humble service here, although they ended nearly a K-ore of years 
ago. I remember that first Sunday on the hilltop in the autumn of 
1880, and the dear old meeting-house in which I preached— learning 
afterwards that my coming had been kindly arranged by my good 
friend, Dr. Bancroft, in the capacity of a candidate! And when the 
days of candidacy were over and the family had come to the parson- 
age — then of course standing on this site, and so ensuring still more 
of the brisk and beautiful breezes of winter than in its present humbler 
location — I remember that characteristic hospitality of Mont Vernon 
homes, which though not always entertaining angels always seemed 
to provide "angels' food" — and this hospitality continued unto the 
end 

The elder Bruces and Kittredges had passed on, but good old 
Deacon Conant remained — though only in the summer time — as also 
Mr. Cloutman, who lived till he was able to say with Joshua, "Lo, I 
am this day fourscore and five years old." Hiram Perkins died on 
the morning of the first Sunday of my pastorate. How well I re- 
member all the rest : Deacou Starrett, Deacon Dean, Deacon Wm. 
H. Conant, Haskell Richardson — and his brother Nathan "in the 
singers' seats" — Capt. Trevitt from his fertile farm in the valley, and 
Porter Kendall from his rocky farm in the East, — a farm which 
seemed to bring forth "honey out of the rock" according to the 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 219 

Scripture! — Dr. Bunton in his last days, Charles J. Smith, with his 
encyclopediac memory of all the past, B. F. Maiden with his origi- 
nality and mental independence, Major Stinson, the Batchelders, the 
Battleses, the Averills, the McColloms, the Lamsons, the Smiths, the 
dwellers in the North District, in the South District, in the East Dis- 
trict, in the West District and on Beech Hill, and godly women not a 
few, such as Mrs. Trask Averill, Mrs. Nancy Stinson, Mrs. Mary 
Starrett, .lane Elliott, yes, and Laurania Smith with her passion for 
music, and many others, both men and women, whom time, not mem- 
ory, fads me to tell of. 

I remember the Academy and its work — education and religion 
co-operating after the plan of the fathers (the handmaids standing 
side by side now, instead of on opposite sides of the road) —the 
shorter priuci|>alships of Ray aud Ward and Hunt, the longer one of 
Cassius Campbell, who was a tower of strength to church and pastor. 
I remember the Center school and the children who successively at- 
tended it — I still preserve tenderly a big bunch of their letters written 
when I came away ; they are children no longer, and although I re- 
member all their names, I wonder whether I shall recognize all their 
faces if I see them today ! I remember the Sunday School, with 
Deacon Dean as superintendent and George Starrett and afterward 
Lucia Trevitt as librarians, and the quarterly concerts where were 
exhibited the rolls of honor for faithful attendance. I sent up to Mr. 
Marden the other day some of the lists executed in red crayon. I 
remember the Home Circle, with its pleasant entertainments, its be- 
neficent and comprehensive work — repairing the chapel, painting the 
parsonage, building a parsonage barn, blowing the organ, plowing 
out the sidewalks in winter; I remember the training of the Buds of 
Promise — promise well fulfilled ! — the levees and the lyeeums and the 
Village Improvement Society, and, perhaps, best of all, the formation 
at the parsonage one stormy winter evening of the Christian Endeavor 
Society, the influence of which proved the glad beginning of open 
Christian life for many of our youth. I have brought back that 
precious roll of beginners to the church. 

I remember seasons of joy and sorrow almost too sacred to men- 
tion — bride and bridegroom taking the glad vows of marriage, and 
the times of mourning, as one after another of our townsfolk de- 
parted hence, or sons and daughters of the town were brought back 
to be laid among their kindred in "God's acre." One specially tender 
incident I remember at the funeral of a dear old mother in Israel, 
whose name I need not speak, brought back from Somerville for burial 
here, when her seven sons and daughters, in a few minutes of waiting 
at the close of the service in the old meeting-house, as by common 
impulse sang together 'Tn the sweet by and by, we shall meet on the 
beautiful shore." 

You must pardon me, friends, if as I recall the pastors who pre- 
ceded me and the parishioners of my time, one sad thought is for the 
moment uppermost in my mind. Of that roll of twelve pastors of 



220 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

the first century closing in 1880, five have died since that date— Jen- 
nison, Herbert, Lord, Sanborn, and Keeler— only Frink and Wood well 
remain. Mingled with the joy of meeting old friends is the sadness 
of not meeting others. Of those whom I used to see before me in the 
old meeting-house, how many I miss ! I found most of their names 
this early morning in the quiet city of the dead : Dea. William Conant, 
Dea. Starrett, Dea. and Mrs. Dean. Mrs. Mary Starrett, Mrs. Nancy 
Stinson, Mrs. Bunton, Mr. and Mrs. Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. Porter 
Kendall, Capt. Trevitt, Mr. and Mrs. Batchelder, Mr. and Mrs. 
Trask Averill, Mr. and Mrs. Travis, Mr. and Mrs. Marden, Mr. and 
Mrs. Marble, Mr. and Mrs. Stinson, Mr. Stevens, Alonzo Brace, 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Perkins, Justin Richardson, and I presume this 
does not include all. Besides these I think of friends closely identi- 
fied in our minds with Mont Vernon : John F. Colby, Augustus Berry, 
Dr. Bancroft and Mis. Bancroft, Dr. Kittredge, Prof. Ray, Chas. P. 
Mills and others. Last of all, and in respect of church associations 
nearest of all, I think of Dea. William H. Conant, gone so lately to 
realize what he often used to quote in our prayer meetings — we can 
almost hear his familiar voice even now — "Though our outward man 
perish, yet the inward man is renewed day by day ; for our light afflic- 
tion, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceed- 
ing and eternal weight of glory ; while we look not at the things 
which are seen, but at the things which are not seen, for the things 
which are seen arc temporal, but the things which are not seen are 
eternal." 

But in place of this sad note — which is not really sad — let me 
add words of greeting, of cheer, of promise. Instead of the past, we 
have the present, and future. In an old exhibition program of your 
academy, twenty years ago, I noticed the other day the title of an 
essay written by one of your girls — "Mt. Vernon a Hundred Years 
Hence." What is the outlook for the town's new century? There 
are many elements of encouragement: a new sanctuary of "strength 
and beauty" : instead of the fathers are the children ; new friends 
are added to the old who remain; the never failing freshness of this 
air, the never fading beauty of these hills. But let religion and edu- 
cation have the first place. Mt. Vernon's second century will be 
largely what the church and the school shall make it, shall mould it ! 
The children of my time are the citizens of today: the children of 
today will be the citizens of your second century. For the best and 
truest prosperity of Mt. Vernon's future, make sure that these insti- 
tutions are constantly, heartily, strongly sustained ! 

Nor let us be disturbed because the thoughts and ways, the 
sermons and experiences of those ministers and people in the past 
differ so much in appearance from those of the present day. Were 
they all wrong in the past? Are we all wrong now? Neither! I 
have just read over the sermon of Stephen Chapin in commemoration 
of John Bruce, whose pastorate was not only the first, but by far the 
longest of all — how fitting that his honored grandson can be the his- 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 221 

torieal orator at this time ! — and I read such stern doctrine and gloomy 
exhortation as no preacher of today would think of using, and no 
congregation would listen to. I used, to read when in Mt. Vernon an 
old set of written experiences of candidates for membership which 
some pastor had preserved, describing in stereotyped doctrinal phrase- 
ology their feelings, or what they thought their feelings ought to be. 
We could not possibly feel so or speak so. But they were light in 
their time — noble, sturdy men and women, true to their light and their 
consciences. We are right in thinking and speaking differently: the 
differences, however great they may seem, are really small — they 
represent the unimportant and the transient. 1'nder these differences, 
these changing creeds and forms of statement, is the same truth — 
that is vital and enduring: "The things which cannot be shaken re- 
main.'' Like the rock under your ancient church, like the hills which 
surround you as the mountains about Jerusalem, so the Rock of Ages 
is beneath all, the great facts of reason and revelation stand firm as 
the everlasting hills. Dear Dr. Bancroft, a few days before his 
death, said to me, "There are a few great, simple verities to be 
thought of now !" Let us keep them uppermost: God's existence, 
God's love for his children on the earth, His immortality and ours, 
Jesus Christ the same, yesterday and today and forever; these make 
what John Fiske called "the everlasting value of religion" — these are 
the simple, blessed verities which abide — we can trust them ! 

For all the past ministers of the dear old church on the hill-top, 
I will now say, "peace be within thee!" God grant that it may still 
be as a city set on a hill, as a light on a candlestick, attracting and 
guiding children and youth, men and women, into an earnest faith in 
great and blessed things, training them for pure and honest and use- 
ful lives, so that they may enjoy whatever is true and right and good 
here, and thus be best fitted to inherit and enjoy that grander life, 
veiled now from our eyes, but not far away from us in elder years — 
not very far from any of us — when we shall come to Mount Zion and 
dwell at home, not for one "home week," but forevermore, all God's 
children united in the Father's House. 

Mr. Carpenter closed with an exhortation to the maintenance of 

the precious heritage of the past — not to be content with praising the 

fathers but to imitate them — and recited Dr. Bacon's old hymn of the 

Pilgrim Fathers, "O God, beneath Thy guiding hand.'" the last stanza 

of which was especially appropriate : 

•• And here thy name. God of love. 
Their children's children shall adore. 
Till these eternal hills remove. 
And spring adorns the earth no more." 



CHAPTER XIII. 



MILITARY HISTORY. 

French and Indian War Soldiers — The REvoLUTiONARr War — The 
War of 1812 — Militia Misters — The Mexican War— The 
Civil War — Action of Town as to Bounties — Men Furnished 
Under Different Calls — Me\ t in the Second, Third. Fifth, 
Eighth, Tenth, Eleventh, Thirteenth and Sixteenth New 
Hampshire Regiments, and the United States Sharp-Shoot- 
ers — Town Agent For Raising Quotas — Action as to Drafted 
Men or Substitutes. . 

Mont Vernon, as small as she is, has had a part in all the wars 
which have taken place in this country, except the Spanish War. 
That part has not been large, but it has in every case been creditable. 
The story is a brief one, but it is honorable. Men went from this 
town to nearly all the New Hampshire organizations in the several 
wars, but the greater number served in the Civil War, and in the 
Thirteenth New Hampshire Volunteers, enlisting in Company B, with 
George A. Bruce, who was early chosen First Lieutenant, and with 
Charles M. Kittredge, who was later First Sergeant and then Second 
Lieutenant of the same Company. This company and regiment saw 
much active service. 

Six soldiers who at that time lived in what is now Mont Vernon 
served in the French and Indian War, closing in 1763. They were 
Samuel Lamson, Jonathan Lamson, John Mills, Samuel Bradford and 
Daniel Weston. Stephen Peabody was a sub-officer. 

Mont Vernon acted in conjunction with Amherst, it being a part 
of that town, in military affairs, until its entire separation in 1803. 

About fifty soldiers served from what is now Mont Vernon, in 
the War for Independence. The following are their names : John 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 223 

Averill, Daniel Averill, Sr., Enos Bradford, Joseph Bradford, John 
Cole, Nathan Cole, Isaac Palmer Curtice, John Carleton, Enoch 
Carleton, Jacob Curtice, Benjamin Dike, corporal, Stephen Dike, 
Amos Flint, Asa Farimm, John Farnum, Joseph Farnum, Stephen 
Farnum, John Faruham, Stephen Gould, Allen Goodrich, Silas 
Gould, Joshua Ha}' wood, William Haywood, Zephaniah Kittredge, 
Soloman Kittredge, Joseph Lovejoy, Samuel Lamson, Andrew Leav- 
itt, Joseph Leavitt, Jeremiah Lamson, John Mills, John Odell, 
Ebenezer Odell, Joseph Perkins, William Parker, Robert Parker, 
James Ray, Peter Robertson, Moses Sawyer, Daniel Smith, Asa 
Swinnerton (Swiniugton?), Samuel Sterns, Henry Trivet (Trevitt?), 
Eli Wilkins, Lemuel Winchester, Levi Woodbury, Jesse Woodbury. 

Stephen Peabody was Adjutant of Col. Reed's regiment. 

Levi Woodbury, uncle of Judge Levi Woodbury, who died in 
1850, served on the privateer Essex, which was taken by the British. 
He was carried to England, a prisoner of war, where he died. 

The following Mont Vernon soldiers died in the Revolutionary 
War: Lieut. Joseph Bradford, John Cole, Benjamin Dike, Jeremiah 
Lamson, Sylvester Wilkins. 

The people of Mont Veinon, believing that the War of 1812 was 
just and necessary, ardently favored its prosecution, and quite a 
number enlisted for permanent service. 

Captain James T. Trevitt, commanding a company in Colonel 
Steel's regiment, was for sixty days at Portsmouth, where was ex- 
pected an attack from a British fleet cruising near by. This company 
was made up of men drafted for special service. Dr. John Trevitt 
was a surgeon, who continued permanently in the service after the 
conclusion of peace, and died in 1821 at Augusta, Ga., at his post of 
duty. 

Dr. Rogers Smith was an assistant surgeon on the frontier. 

In the days of "militia musters" Mont Vernon was always rep- 
resented. For thirty years a first-class company of infantry was 
sustained here under the militia law. It would be exceedingly inter- 
esting to have a roster of the company or companies, or detachments, 
of the militia organizations in which there were Mont Vernon repre- 
sentatives, but the names are not known to be on record. Within 
the last half-century there were officers living in the town who 
probably gained their titles in the military service — such as Capt. 
Thomas Cloutman, Capt. N. R. Maiden, (who later lived in Frances- 



224 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

town), Capt. William Lamson, Capt. Joseph A. Starreit, Capt. 
William Bruce, and others. 

In the war with Mexico, Chandler Averill was a volunteer. 
Capt. John Trevitt, a graduate of West Point in 1840,. being in the 
regular army, served in this war. 

THE CIVIL WAR. 

The Civil War affected the little town of Mont Vernon much as 
it affected all rural New Hampshire. A spirit of intense patriotism 
was aroused, and the town was stirred to its depths by a determina- 
tion to do anything within its power to aid in preserving the Union. 
The official action in town meeting is perhaps the best story of what 
was done in this direction : 

1861. In a warrant for a special town-meeting, called for May 
15, was the following article: 

"2. To see if the Town will make the wages of those that vol- 
unteer to serve their country up to §18 per month, and furnish them 
with a suitable outfit, or make them a donation equal thereto, and 
make suitable provision for their families, or make a> much provision 
for them as those that volunteer are accustomed to do for the families 
with which they are connected." 

The vote on this article seems to have been somewhat extraordi- 
nary, in view of the proposition made therein. It was : 

"Voted, that the Selectmen of Mont Vernon be directed to order 
paid from the treasury of said town to the following persons, who 
have enlisted in the volunteer service of the United States, the sum 
of seven dollars per month each, for a period not exceeding three 
months from the date of their enlistment in such service, viz : George 
Farnam, A. E. Bennett, John H. Smith, James Marvell, James 
Beard, Albeit York, and also George W. Kittredge, if he has not 
been guaranteed extra wages by any association of persons, or by 
any town. Also that said Selectmen be instructed to pay an expense 
of board incurred for said individuals while drilling at Milford, ami 
their wages at said Milford at eleven dollars per month, and also to 
pay for any material used in garments made and furnished to them 
as an outfit prior to their leaving for the point of rendezvous of their 
regiment in this state; Conditioned, however, that if the Legislature 
of this state shall, at its next ensuing session make any appropria- 
tions covering any of the above expenses, only such money shall be 
paid under this vote for those of the above specified objects as are 
not provided for by such legislative acts." 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 225 

It was also voted "to give to each of the above named persons 
who have volunteered a revolver, or twelve dollars in money.'' 

At a special meeting held Oct. 18, 1861, there was an article in 
the warrant 

"To see if the Town would raise money, or authorize the Select- 
men to borrow money, to carry out the votes above recorded." 

"Also to see if the town would pay for the soldiers' rubber 
blankets or overcoats, which were furnished by Milford people to 
those who first volunteered for three months from said Mont 
Vernon." 

Art. 3. Also to see if the Town will pay the amount to each 
soldier for .the support of his family, as provided by the law passed 
at the last session of the Legislature in this state." 

At the meeting it was voted "That the Selectmen be instructed 
to borrow money to pay the bills which have been contracted for 
those who have volunteered for three months' service in the present 
war from the town of Mont Vernon." 

Voted "That the town adopt the law in regard to paying each 
soldier for the support of his family, as provided by the law passed 
by the last session of the Legislature in this state." 

August 12, 1862, at a special meeting, there was an article in 
the warrant 

"To see it the Town will pay any amount of money as an in- 
ducement to persons to enlist into the military service of the United 
States, that drafting may be dispensed with." 

On this the following vote was passed : 

"That the town of Mont Vernon shall pay to any citizen of this 
Town who shall volunteer into the U. S. service for the term of three 
years, unless they shall sooner be discharged, the sum of one hundred 
dollars, which shall be paid to each volunteer upon his being mus- 
tered into the U. S. service." 

Sept. 19, 1862. At a special town meeting, there was an article 
in the warrant 

"To see what action the Town will take to encourage enlistments 
under the last call of the President of the United States." 
On this article it was voted — 

"To pay each person who will enlist into the United States 
service for the term of nine months, one hundred dollars, on his 
being mustered into the United States service." 

1863, Sept. 4. At a special town meeting called for this date, 
an article in the warrant was — 

"To see if the town will pay those that may be drafted and go 
into the service, or their substitutes who may perform the service, 



226 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

three hundred dollars each, or any other sum, as part compensation 
for their service." 

"On this it was voted — 

"That the Selectmen of Mont Vernon be instructed to pay to 
each of the drafted men from this Town, under the present call, or 
their substitutes, three hundred dollars, after their being mustered 
into the United States service ten days." 

Dec. 2, 1863, at a special town meeting called to see what action 

would be taken in regard to furnishing men for the United States 

service under the recent call of the President, it was voted — 

"That the chairman of the board of Selectmen be authorized to 
furnish the substitutes for this Town on the best terms he oan, under 
the last call of the President." 

Also, "That James Upton be authorized, in behalf of said town, 
to borrow money sufficient to pay the substitutes for the quota re- 
quired of Mont Vernon, and receive from the Government and the 
State the amount to be paid, and pay the same into the treasury, to 
he appropriated in liquidating the debt thus incurred by the Town." 

James Upton was the chairman of the board of Selectmen. 

March 8, 1864, there was an article in the warrant "To see if 
the town will make an appropriation in favor of all or any of the 
soldiers who enlisted from the town in 1861." 

Voted — To pass by the article. 

June 2, 1864, a special meeting was called "To see if the town 
will pay the soldiers about to be drafted, the sum of three hundred 
dollars each, or any other sum the town may see fit to give." 

Voted — That the Selectmen be instructed to pay to volunteers, 
drafted men, or their substitutes, three hundred dollars on their be- 
ing mustered into the United States service, and this vote to hold 
good till the next annual March meeting in 1865. 

Voted — That the Selectmen be authorized to till our quotas with 
volunteers or substitutes, and the Town will pay any sum over three 
hundred dollars which the same requires. 

June 27, 1864, a special meeting was held "To see if the town 
will vote to raise a sum of three hundred dollars in gold, or its 
equivalent, for each drafted man or their substitutes, for the present 
call, and volunteers or drafted men or their substitutes for all calls 
that may take place before the annual meeting in March next." 

The following resolutions were passed : 

"Resolved, That the sum of three hundred dollars in gold be 
raised and paid to every man who has been drafted and held to ser- 
vice from Mont Vernon under the last call of the President for 200.- 
000 men: or to his substitute on his being mustered into the United 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 227 

States service, if the Selectmen and Town Agent (to fill quotas) shall 
deem it expedient to do so. 

"Resolved, That Charles J. Smith, who was chosen, on the 
second day of June, agent for the Town of Mont Vernon, to look out 
for the interests of the Town and fill our quotas with volunteers or 
substitutes, to hold said office until our annual meeting in March, 
1865, be authorized, empowered and invested with the amplest gen- 
eral discretion to expend such sums of money as may be raised, in 
such a manner as he may deem best calculated to promote the pecun- 
iary interests of the Town, and to fill any quotas of Mont Vernon 
under present or future calls of the President for troops, promptly, 
according to his best judgment. 

"Resolved, That a sum not exceeding 810,000 be raised to carry 
into effect the votes passed at the Town meeting held on June 2nd 
and the vote passed this day." 

March 14, 1865, an article in the warrant was — "To. see what 
action the town will take in furnishing men that may be called for by 
the President for the Army for the coming year," 

Voted, "To take no further action on the subject, the number of 
men to answer all calls not yet having been contracted for by the 
Town's agent for this purpose." 

Article 6 was "To see what action the town will take with regard 
to paying those men that furnished substitutes under the call for two 
hundred thousand men." 

Voted, "To dismiss the article " 

When President Lincoln made a call for 75,000 volunteers for 
three months' service in 1861, no one went from this town, though 
three who have since resided here enlisted at that time in other parts 
of the state. They were Samuel J. Beard, New Boston, John M. 
Fox. Amherst, and Daniel H. Green, Milford, all enlisting in the 
2nd N. H. Regiment. They enlisted in April for three mouths, and 
re-enlisted in May for three years as privates. Mr. Beard was 
wounded at Oak Green, Va., and was discharged on account of his 
wounds. Mr. Green was wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., and appointed 
a corporal. He lived on the old Nathaniel Bruce place in the village, 
which he had purchased, for some years, and died there in 1896. 
Mr. Beard lived in town, mainly at Mr. Henry F. Dodge's, but after- 
wards entered the Soldiers' Home at Tilton, where he died May 29, 
1902, aged 66. Mr. John M. Fox lived in Mont Vernon, when he 
enlisted, on the farm formerly owned by William H. Ireland. He at 
first carried on the tailor's trade, having a shop in the D. W. Baker 
store. Later he bought out the store so long kept by T. H. Richard- 



228 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

son, and for some years was postmaster. In May. 1898, having 
sold his store to Dea. W. H. Kendall, he removed to Rochester, N. 
H., where he kept a grocery store until May, 1903, when he leturned 
to Mont Vernon, whei'e at this writing (1906) he still lives, not being 
engaged in any regular business. 

In the latter part of 1861 several went into service from this 
town, also one from Danbury — Warren D. Johnson — who enlisted in 
the 5th New Hampshire Regiment, and subsequenily moved here, and 
died in 1893. He was a native of Danbury, and enlisted in Company 
I, of the Fifth Regiment. Oct. 5, 1861. He re-enlisted Jan. 1, 1864, 
and was promoted to Sergeant, being mustered out Jan. 12, 1865. 
He is said to have been several times wounded, and about a year 
before he died he received a pension. He came to Mont Vernon 
from New Boston, May 8, 1876, and died here Sept. 6, 1903, aged 
50. He was in the battles of Chancellorsviile, Vicksburg, Lookout 
Mountain, Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Petersburg. Five Forks and 
other.-. 

Augustus Johnson enlisted from Nashua in 1861, in the Third 
New Hampshire Regiment, and was discharged for disability the same 
year. He enlisted again in the Tenth New Hampshire, July 30, 
1862, and was discharged Nov. 10, 1865. He was a pensioner and 
came to Mont Vernon, where he married the widow of James Smith. 
After her death he entered the Soldiers' Home at Tilton, where he 
still is (July 5, 1906). 

Matthew F. Burnham enlisted in the Third N. H. Regiment in 
1861 ; was discharged, disabled, in 1863. He died at Mont Vernon 
in 1896. 

George H. Faruum enlisted in 1861 in the Fifth N. H. Regiment 
as musician, was wounded at Fredericksburg, Ya., Dec. 13, 1862, 
transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, and was discharged May 4, 
1867. 

Henry N. McQuestion enlisted in the Fifth N. H. Regiment in 
1861, as private, and died of disease June 6. 1862, at Newport News, 
Ya. 

The following men enlisted in the Eighth N. II. Regiment in 
1861 : Charles W. Brooks, as private. He died in Roxbury, Mass., 
in May, 1890. 

George W. Brown, as private, died May 2f>. 1863, at New- 
Orleans, La. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 229 

John Follansbee, as corporal, was wounded twice, was dis- 
charged disabled, Nov. 18, 1864. He died at Nashua, May 2, 1881. 

William E. Ireland, as private. He was drowned July 26, 1864, 
iu the Mississippi River at Morganzia, La. 

Howard B. Ames enlisted from Lyndeborough in 1862, in the 
Eleventh New Hampshire Regiment. He moved to Mont Vernon 
and died here Nov. 12, 1876. 

The following men enlisted in the Thirteenth N. H. Regiment in 
1862: 

George G. Averill, as private ; afterwards detailed as musician. 

George A. Bruce, as private; appointed 1st Lieut. 1862, ap- 
pointed Capt. Co. A. May 30th, 1864: wounded, 1864, at Fort 
Harrison, Va.. appointed Brevet Lt.-Col., Maj. and Capt. U. S. V. to 
March 13th, 1865, for gallant and meritorious services during the 
war. He now resides in Boston, Mass. 

Albert Burnham, as private — was wounded June 1, 1864, at Cold 
Harbor, Va. 

Israel Burnham, as private : discharged disabled, May 20th. 
1864. He now lives in Nashua. 

Charles W. Dodge, as private : appointed Corporal 1863, dis- 
charged to accept promotiou to U. S. Colored Troops, Dec. 22, 
1863, appointed 2nd Lieutenant Veteran Reserve Corps, 1865. 

Charles M. Kittredge, 1st Sergeant; commissioned 2nd Lieut., 
resigned 1863. He moved to Fishkill-on-the-Hudson. He died in 
Mont Vernon, August 19th, 1896. 

John T. Perkins enlisted as a private; appointed Corporal, 1864, 
wounded slightly May 16, 1864 at Drewry's Bluff. Va. He lives at 
Westboro', having a position there in the Massachusetts Insane 
Hospital. 

Peter F. Pike enlisted as private. He died in September, 1898. 

Charles H. Robinson, as private. He died May 23, 1864, at 
Milford. 

Henry K. Shattuck, as private. Died of disease Nov. 23, 1863. 

John H. Smith, as private. Discharged disabled, at Newport 
News, Va.. March 12, 1863. 

William S. A. Starrett, as private ; discharged disabled, March 
21, 1863. 

Charles F. Stinson enlisted as a private: was discharged 1863, 



230 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

to accept promotion as Captain and Brevet Major, [' . S. Colored 
Troops. He died March 10th, 1893. 

Elbridge F. Trow enlisted as private; was discharged disabled, 
Oct. 23, 1862. He died March 19th, 1892, at New Boston. / 

Solomon Jones, private; mustered in Sept. 18, 1862, mastered 
out, June 21, 1865. 

George N. Copp, private: discharged Jan. 19, 1864, to accept 
an appointment as First Lieut, in Thirtieth Regiment V. S. Colored 
Troops. 

Cyrus P. Douglass, private; mustered out with regiment, June 
21, 1865. 

Albert Yorke enlisted as a private, in the Third N. H. Regiment 
in 1861 ; was appointed Sergeant, wounded in 1865, at Fort Fisher, 
N. C. 

Alfred Yorke enlisted in the State Service as a private. 

John P. Alexander enlisted in the Sixteenth Regiment N. H. 
Volunteer Infantry in 1862 as private; discharged August. 1863: 
died at Mattoon, III., Sept. 20th, 1863. 

Nathan F. Kendall enlisted as private in the Sixteenth N. H. 
Regiment in 1862 ; died of disease Aug. 13, 1863, at Concord. 

Oramus W. Burnham enlisted from Hillsborough in 1862 as 
private in the Sixteenth N. H. Regiment: was appointed 1st Lieut, 
in 1862, and resigned in 1863. He moved to Mont Vernon in 1888. 

George H. Blood enlisted as private from Bedford, in 1864, in 
the Second Regiment Berdan's U. S. Sharpshooters. He died in 
Mont Vernon in 1898. 

George A. Maiden enlisted in Company G, Second Regiment 
Berdan's U. S. Sharpshooters, Dec. 10, 1861, as private; appointed 
3rd Sergeant on organization of Company : appointed Quarter- 
master of 1st Regiment Berdan's U. S. Sharpshooters, July, 1862: 
discharged, 1864. He died in Lowell, Mass., Dec. 19. 1906. 

James D. Towne enlisted as private in 1861, in the Second Reg- 
iment Berdan's V. S. Sharpshooters. He died of disease, Dec. 20. 

1861. at Washington, D. C, Camp of Instruction, V. S. S. 
William H. Upton enlisted in the Sixteenth N. H. Regiment, in 

1862. as private. He died Feb. 18th, 1863, at New Orleans, La. 
The editor hereof wrote to the Adjutant General of New Hamp- 
shire asking for a list of all soldiers from Mont Vernon who served 
in the several wars, and the names of all who were credited to the 



HISTORY' OF MONT VERNON. 231 

Town during the Civil War. To this the following reply was received : 

Concord, Feb. 19, 1906. 

Hon. George A. Marden, 

Assistant Treasurer, l*. S. 
Boston. Mass. 
Dear Sir : 

I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your letter of Feb. 
17, in relation to the soldiers of Mont Vernon in the several wars, 
and regret to say there is nothing in any of our state offices giving 
just the information you desire. 

The Revolutionary records give the towns from which men went 
in but very few cases. There are no records whatever of the War of 
1812 and Mexican War in this office save as published in Nat Head's 
reports for 1868, which are not official and which do not give the 
residence of the men. In the Civil War I can give you all the men 
credited to Mont Vernon under the call of July 1, 1862 and subse- 
quent calls, but for some reason when the credits to towns were made 
up they did not go back of the above date. I enclose the list. I think 
von will find some men whose names are given as of the quota of 
Mont Vernon were not from the Town, and were picked up either as 
substitutes or to fill the quota. 

The Revolutionary-rolls in possession of the state have all been 
published in Vols. 14, 15, 16 & 17 of State Papers, also called Vols. 
1,2,3 & 1 of Revolutionary-rolls, with index to each volume. These 
books are iu the Public Library at Mont Vernon and also in the 
rooms of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

Very Respectfully, 

A. D. Ayling, 

Adjutant General. 

List of men mustered into the U. S. Service from New Hamp- 
shire, under the call of July 2, 1862, and subsequent calls, and as- 
signed to the quota of the Town of Mont Vernon. 

Lewis Green (Gerrie). 3rd Regiment. 

John Burns, 

Daniel Bradbury. 5th 

Edwin Austin, 

Peter Adams, 6th 

George Werner, 

Joseph Farley, 7th 

William J. Harding, 

Henry Stewart, 8th 

John Petty, 

John Riley. 9th 



232 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



Melchoir Warsch, 
William G. Holt. 
Marius Blanc, 
James Davis, 
Thomas Martin, 
Charles Lynch, 
George White. 
James Calligan. 
Henry K. Shattuck. 
Solomon Jones, 
George G. Averill, 
Albert Burnham. 
Israel Burnham, 
George N. Copp, 
Charles W. Dodge, 
Cyrus P. Douglass, 
Peter F. Pike, 
John T. Perkins, 
Charles H. Robinson, 
John H. Smith, 
"William S. A. Starrett, 
Charles F. Stinson, 
Charles M. Kittredge, 
Elbridge T. Trow, 
George A. Bruce, 
Nathan F. Randall. 
John P. Alexander, 
William H. Uptou, 
John Brown, 
Edward Lockwood, 
Robert Murry, 
John Gilbert, 
John Mackey, 
Robert Cowell. 
Morris Costoloo. 
John Mclntyre, 
John Leary, 
James E. Follansbee, 
George Turner, 



9th Regiment. 
10th 
11th 



13th 



16 th 



18th 
1st 


Cavalry 
» 


» 


>> 


»» 


n 


>! 


>> 



Heavy Artillery. 

U. S. Sharpshooters. 

U. S. Colored Troops. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 233 

James Wallace, U. 8. Colored Troops. 

Patrick Sullivan, U. S. Navy. 

Edward Williams. " " " 

Aaron B. Hutchinson, Lafayette Artillery. 

It is probable that from all the foregoing, every man who served 
from or for Mont Vernon in the Civil War is accounted for. 



CHAPTER XIV. 



STATISTICAL. 

The Population — How and Why It Decreased — Indebtedness of 
the Town — Before the Civjl War — During the War — Items 
of War Expenses — Bounties for Enlistments— Filling of 
Quotas — Town Bonds — Longevity — Town Meeting Modera- 
tors — Town Clerks — Selectmen — Their Compensation — Rep- 
resentatives — A Novel Petition. 

For sixty years after its incorporation Mont Vernon varied but 
little, from decade to decade, in population. Just how many people 
it had at the very beginning of its corporate existence does not appear 
to have been a matter of record. As stated in chapter three, there 
were one hundred and thirty-five tax-payers on the list in 1804. which 
should represent somewhere about six hundred to seven hundred 
population. The successive census periods show the following 
number : 

1810. 762. 1860, ~ri:>. 

1820, 729. L870, 601. 

1830. 763. 1880, 516. 

1840, 720. 1890, 475. 

1850, 722. 1900, 453. 

Up to 1860 the conditions upon which the population depended 
were not much changed. There was, in the period preceding, quite 
a variety of manufactures carried on in a small way, which tended to 
keep a considei able number of families here. But the whole trend 
of things about this time was to carry manufacturing where railroads 
existed, and where power could be obtained at reasonable cost. The 
old families, which had been fairly large, began to lose their maturing 
members, who must find a wider field for their enterprise, and the 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 235 

farming interests were interfered with, as the manufactures, were, 
by changed conditions, and chiefly by western competition, in the 
growing of staple products. Changed conditions in education tended 
to keep away children from abroad, who formerly depended on the 
Academy, and this w:is another factor in the reduction of the 
population. 

THE TOWN DEBT. 

The indebtedness of the town prior to the Civil War was not 
large. In 1848 it was only $2097.28. The Town reports were rather 
meagre, and often gave no statement as to the condition of the Town 
treasury. In 1851, the debt is reported as $837.72. In 1852, it was 
$511.40. In 1857, it had risen to $3601.27. In 1858, it was $3221.99. 
In 1859, it was $3308.60. In 1860, it was $3459.06. In 1861, it 
was $3619. 87. In 1864, the debt had risen to $10,911.74. In 1865, 
it was $15,779.29. In 1866, it had fallen to $14,036.15. In 1867, 
to $13,715.07. In 1868, to $12,099.48. 

Of course the rapid increase during the years of the war is read- 
ily accounted for by all sorts of war expenses — the chief of which 
was the filling of quotas, the payment of bounties, the aid given to 
soldiers' families, etc. But it is also to be remarked that the Town 
reports varied more or less in their methods of accounting, so that it 
is not possible to say exactly what the real indebtedness at any given 
time was. It was paid off in part soon after 1872, by the sale of 
certain "town bonds," as the treasurer's report calls them. In an- 
swer to an inquiry made by the editor of this history of the Hon. 
Solon A. Carter, State Treasurer of New Hampshire, as to what these 
"bonds" were, and how many the town had, the following communi- 
cation was received. 

C.ncord, Feb. 23, 1906. 

Hon. George A. Marden, 
Asst. Treasurer, U. S. 
Boston, Mass, 

My dear Marden : 

Your note of 21st inst. duly received. 

The New Hampshire legislature of 1871 authorized an issue of 
State bonds, styled municipal war loan bonds, to be dated Jan. 1, 
1872, maturing in 20 to 33 years. These bonds w. re given outright 
to the towns on the basis of $100 for each three years man credited 



236 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

on the quota of the town under the President's call of July 2, 1862, 
and subsequent calls, and a proportional amount for longer and 
shorter terms of enlistment. 

The total issued was $2, 206, 100. The amount apportioned to 
each town was determined hy a Commission. 

This Commission found Mont Vernon entitled to the following 
credits : 

Term. No. men. Amt. awarded. 

Four years enlistment, 1 $ 133.33 

Three " " 49 4900.00 

One " 1 33.33 

Nine months 3 75.00 

Three " 1 8.34 



55 $5150.00 

On the 20th of April, 1872, the record shows that D. R. Baker, 
Agent for the town, received 

Cash, $ 50.00 

$100 Bonds (Nos 471 to 476) (6 pieces) 600.00 

$500 " (Nos. 328 to 332) (5 pieces) 2500.00 

$1000 " (Nos. 198 & 199) (2 pieces) 2000.00 



$5150.00 
Gen. Ayling informs me that he has furnished you the names of 
the men credited to Mont Vernon by the Commission. 

The list does not include the names of those who enlisted prior 
to July 2, 1862. 

If I can serve you furthur command me. 

Yours truly, 

Solon A. Carter. 

Treasurer. 

LONGEVITY. 

The Town has always been noted for the "length of days" of 
many of its inhabitants. No attempt has been made to make a full 
record of those who have reached an advanced age as residents of the 
Town ; but in 1882 there were eight persons in town eighty years old 
and upward. In 1883 there were four more who came into the list. 
In 1899 there were six. 

MODERATORS OF TOWN MEETINGS. 

The following is believed to be a complete list of those who have 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 237 

served as moderators at Town meetings since the incorporation of the 
Town, giving also the years in which they served : 

Joseph Langdell, 1804, 1805, 1806. 

Dr Rogers Smith, 1807, 1809. 

A. F. Sawyer, 1808, 1810, 1811, 1*12. 

Ephraim Pike, 1813, 1815. 

Thomas Needham, 1814; Andrew Wallace, 1816. 

Elijah Beard, 1817; Nathan Jones, 1818. 

Levi Jones, 1819, 1820, 1821, 1822. 1823, 1824, 1825. 

Aaron F. Sawyer, 1826, 1827, 1828, 1830, 1831. 

Dr. Daniel Adams, 1832, 1833. 

Porter Kimball, 1834, 1835. 

Z. Kittredge Jr., 1835, 1839, 1840, 1841. 

William Brnce, 1837, 1850; C. R. Beard, 1838. 

Leander Smith, 1842, 1843, 1844, 1845, 1846, 1847, 1848, 1849, 
1851, 1854, 1855, 1856. 

Charles J. Smith, 1852, 1853, 1857, 1858, 1859, I860. 1861, 
1862, 186.J, 1864, 1868, 1881, 1883. 

Alonzo Travis, 1865, 1866, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1872, 1873, 1874, 
1875, 1876, 1877, 1878, 1879, 1880. 

C. F. Kittredge, 1867. 

J. W. Carson, 1882. 

Clark Campbell, 1884, 188.3, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889, 1890, 1891, 
1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897, 1900 (Fall meeting.) 

William H. Kendall, 1898, 1900 (March meeting), 1902. I90o, 
1904, 19j5, 1906. 

TOWN CLERKS. 

John Carleton, 1803, 1804, 1805. 

Benjamin Durant, 1806, 1807, 1811, 1812, 1813, 1814. 
Dr. Rogers Smith, 1808, 1809, 1810. 

John Bruce, 1815, 1816. 1817, 1819, 1820. 1822, 1823, 1824, 
1825. 

Elijah Beard, 1818. Dr. Daniel Adams, 1821, 1833. 

Timothy Kittredge, 1826, 1827, 1828, 1830. 

C. R. Beard, 1831, 1832, 1834, 1835, 1836. 

Nathaniel Bruce, 1837, 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842, 1844, 1845. 

F. O. Kittredge, 1843. J. E. Bruce, 1846. 1847. 



238 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Alonzo Travis. 1848, 1849, 1850, 1852, 1853, 1854. 1855, 1856, 
1857. 1858. 

J. D. Nutter, 1851. 

W. H. Conant, 1859. 

Clark Campbell. 1860, 1861, 18C.2, 1863, 1864, 1871, 1872. 

Charles J. Smith, 1*65, 1866. 187-".. 

John Kidder, 1867. 

George W. Averill, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1880, 1881, 1882, 1883. 

John M. Fox, 1874, 1875. 1876, 1877, 1878, 1879, 1886, 1887, 
1888, 1889, 1890, 1891, 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897. 1898. 

Dr. Frederic Chandler. 1884. 1885. 

William H. Marvell, 1899. 

Arthur P. Temple, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1904, 1905, 1906. 

Joseph H. Blood, 1903. 

SELECTMEN. 

John Carleton, 1803, 1804, 1805. 1806. 

John Langdell. 1803, 1804, 1805, 1806, 1807, 1808. 

Jacob Kendall. 1803, 1804, 1805, 1806, 1807, 1808, 1809, 1810. 

Benjamin Durant, 1807, 1808, 1811, 1812, 1813, 1814. 

Dr. Rogers Smith, 1809, 1810. 

Eben Odell, 1809, 1810, 1811, 1812, 1813. 

Jonathan Herrick. 1811, 1812, 1815, 1816, 1817, 1818, 1820, 
1822. 

Edmund Batchelder, 1813, 1814, 1815, 1816, 1817. 

Dr. Zephaniah Kittredge Sr., 1824. 

Ezekiel Upton, 1815, 1816, 1817, 1818, 1819. 1820, 1822, 1823, 
1824, 1825, 1826, 1*27. 1828. 

Zephaniah Kittredge Jr., 1824, 1826. 1836, 1843, 1856. 

John Bruce, 1818, 1819, 1820. 

John S. Adams, 4819, 1821, 1823, 1824. 

George Raymond. 1821, 1822, 1823, 1832. 1833, 1837, 1838. 

Asa Webber, 1821. 

Allen Goodrich, 1825, 1*26. 1827, 1828, 1830, 1831. 

Nathaniel Bruce, 1826, 1827, 1829, 1830, 1831, 1832, 1833, 
1834, 1835, 1837, 1838, 1839, 1842, 1848, 1849. 

Ezra Langdell, 1830, 1832, 1833, 1834. 

Timothy Kittredge, 1*31, 1847, 1848. 

('apt. Leander Smith, 1834. 1835, 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 2;.i , .i 

Josiah Russell, Jr., 1835, 1836. 

William Coggin, 1836. 

Ira Kendall, 1837, 1838, 1839, 1840, 1843, 1844, 1845. 1850, 
1852, 1853, 1854, 1857, 1858, 1859. 

John Averill.Jr., 1839, 1840, 1841, 1844, 1845, 1851, 1852. 

Henry C. Dodge, 1840, 1841, 1842, 1846. 1847, 1850. 1853, 185.".. 

Clinton Roby, 1841, 1842, 1843, 1851. 

John Carletou, 1844, 1845, 1846, 1849. 

Trask W. Averill. 1846, 1847, 1857, I860. 

Andrew W. Raymond. 1848, 1853, 1854, 1857, 1858. 

James Weston, 1849. F. O. Kittredge, 1850. 

George E. Dean, 1851, 1860, 1867. 

C. R. Beard. 1852, 1864. 

William Bruce, 1854, 1855, 1859, 1861, 1862, 1865. 

J. P. Trow, 1855, 1856. 

J. D. Towne, 1856. 

Alonzo Travis, 1857, 1858, 1879, 1880. 

Nelson E. Shedd, 1860, 1861. 

James Upton, 1861, 1862, 1863. 1876, 1877, 1883, 1894, 1895. 

George W. Averill, 1862, 1863 1864, 1865, 1866. 1874. 1875, 
1887. 

Samuel F. Livingston. 1863, 1864, 1865. 

Henry H. Trow. 1866, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1879, 1900. 

Captain John Trevitt, 1866, 1868, 1871, 1872, 1873. 

J. H. Tarbell. 1867. 

Thomas Wason, 1867. 

Charles J. Smith, 1868, 1869, 1870. 1871. 

Daniel R. Baker. 1869, 1870. David Marden, 1871. 

John T. MeCollom, 1871. 1872. 1873. 

Cornelius Green, 1874. 

Henry F. Dodge, 1873, 1874. 1876, 1877, 1878, 1892, 189:5. 

David Stiles, 1875. Jesse Wilkins, 1875. 

Thomas H. McQuestion, 1876, 1877. 1878. 

Charles H. Raymond, 1878, 1879, 1880, 1881, 1885. 1886, 1890, 
1891, 1896, 1899, 1900, 1902, 1905, 1906. 

Benjamin F. Davis. 1881, 1882. 

George G. Batchelder, 1880, 1882. 

Josiah Swinnington, 1881, 1883. 

John W. Carson, 1882, 1883, 1884, 



240 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Frank O. Lamson, 1884, 1888, 1906. 

Joseph W. Averill, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1888, 1900. 

George A. McQuestion, 1885, 1886, 1887. 

William F. Hadley, 1887, 1889, 1890. 

Joseph G. Carleton, 1888, 1889, 1901, 1902. 

Willard P. Woods, 1889, 1890. 

William G. Burnham, 1891, 1892, 1893. 

George C. Hadley, 1891, 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895. 

Daniel Richardson, 1894. 

Harry G. Blood, 1895, 1896, 1897, 1901, 1903, 1904. 

William L. Robinson, 1896, 1897, 1898. 

William H. Kendall, 1897, 1898, 1899. 

Charles H. Trow, 1898. 

Charles O. Ingalls, 1899. 

Louis A. Trow, 1901, 1902, 1903. 

Joel F. Perham, 1903. 

Leander F. Humphrey, 1904. 

Nathaniel F. Hooper, 1904. 

John M. Fox, 1905. 

Edward W. Trow, 1905. 

John M. Fox, 1906. 

TLiere has been no fixed compensation for town officers, and no 
records have been kept of this, except in the annual town reports 
which commenced about 1868. 

For the year ending Feb. 28th, 1871, the selectmen's bills 
amounted to $174.00. 

For the year ending February 28th, 1882, $123.50. 
" " " " March 1st, 1891, 133.00. 
" " " " February 15th, 1896, $110.25. 
" " " " " " 1897, $121.00. 

" " " " " " 1898, $141.25. 

" " " " " " 1899, $140.00. 

REPRESENTATIVES. 

In giving a list of the names of those who have served the town 
as representatives in the legislature, it is interesting to recall a peti- 
tion to the General Court, dated Mont Vernon, December 20, 1803. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



241 



which was just after the town had been incorporated. The petition 
i> given as recorded, both in spelling and punctuation : 

To the Honorable Sennate and House of Representatives in Gen- 
eral Court conviened sheweth, that our present Situation, is sutch, that 
we cannot be conveniantly Anexed to Any other Corporation for the 
benefit of representation, in said General Court, As our present 
Numbers Amount to no more than one hundred and twenty seven — 
votable polls — Therefore your petitioners pray that we may have lib- 
erty to send a representative to represent us in your Honorable 
House the Next Session and so in filter. 

Mont Vernon December 1803. 



Eli Wilkins 
David Smith 
Ebeuezer Mills 
William Hastings 
John Harwood 
Josiah Kittredge 
Joseph Cogin 
Benj'n Durant 
Thos. Kendall 
Jonathan Lord 
James Ray 
Parker Richardson 
Joseph Dodge 
Joseph Perkins, jr 
John Colburn Kendall 
Benjamin Steams 
Nathan Jones 
Abijah Spofford 
Jake Peabody 
William Bradford 
Samuel Phelps 
Wm. Bradford, jun 
Jonathan Wilkins 
James Woodbury 
Peter Herrick 
James Bennett 
John Fisk 
John Trow 
Nehemiah Upton 
Joseph Langdell 
Jesse Avrell 
James Smith 
Joseph Perkins 
John Averel 
John Averill, Jun 
Mark Burnham 
John Carleton 



Joseph Trow, Jn'r 
Ezekiel Upton, Jr 
Enos Bradford 
Joseph Farnum 
I sack Weston 
Isac Smith 
Sollomon Kettredge 
Cyrus Stiles 
Ebenezer Holt 
Mun Dodge 
Benjamin Pike 
Jacob Smith 
Wiliam Cogen 
John Batchelor 
Lant Kidder 
John Lamson 
John Weston 
Allen Goodridge 
Eben'r Batchelder 
Lamb't Bradford 
Aaron Peabody 
John Peabody 
Timothy Hill 
Samuel Mitchell 
Moses Peabody 
John Rollings 
Daniel Smith 
Nathan Flint 
Jacob Curtice 
William Lamore 
Nathan Smith 
Dan'l Kendall 
Jacob Kendall 
Josiah Dodge 
A bial Wilkins 
William Wilkins 
Josenh Trow 



212 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

This petition was referred to a joint committee of the two 
branches, who after investigation reported that the prayer of the 
petitioners be granted, and this report seems to have been accepted. 
Whether any formal enabling act was passed is doubtful. At any 
rate, Major William Bradford represented the town in 1«04. The 
following is a list of the several representatives and the years in 
which they served : 

Major William Bradford. 1804, 1805, 1806. 

1807, no representative. 

Capt. John Batchelder, 1808, 1809. 1810. 

Benjamin Durant, 1811, 1812, 1813, 1814. 1815. 

Andrew Wallace, 1816. 

Ezekiel Upton. 1817, 1818, 1819, 1820, 1821. 

Dea. John Bruce, 1822, 1823, 1824, 1825, 1826. 

Aaron F. Sawyer, 1827, 1828, 1829. 

Nathaniel Bruce, 1830, 1831, 1832, 1833, 1840. 1841. 

Daniel W. Baker, 1834, 1835. 

Porter Kimball, 1836. 

George Raymond, 1837, 1838, 1839, 1842. 

Zephaniah Kittredge, jr., 184.3. 

William Conant, 1844. 

Leander Smith, 1845, 1846, 1847, 1851, 1852. 

John Averill, 1848. 

J. A. Starrett, 1849. 

William Bruce, 1850. 

Alonzo Travis, 1853, 1854, 1855. 

Charles R. Beard, 1856, 1857. 

Ira Kendall, 1858, 1859. 

Charles J. Smith, 1860. 1861. 

Ira Roby, 1862. 

Wm. G. Bruce, 1863, 1864. 

Henry C. Dodge, 1865. 

Geo. A. Bruce, 1866. 

Charles F. Kittredge, 1867. 

Andrew W. Raymond, 1868, 1869. 

Joseph H. A. Bruce, 1870, 1871. 

James Upton, 1872, 1873. 

John Trevitt, 1874, 1875. 

Dan'l P. Kendall, 1876, 1877. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 243 

Elbridge F. Trow, 1880, 1882. 

1884, voted not to send. 

1886, not entitled. 

Henry F. Dodge, 1888. 

John M. Fox, 1890. 

Wm. G. Bnrnham, 1892, 1894. 

Not entitled, 1*96. 

Franklin Marden, 1898. 

Charles H. Raymond, 1900, 1902. 

William H. Kendall, 1903, 1904. 

.Joseph Gr. Carlton, 1905, 190fi. 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

The following citizens of Mont Vernon have been commissioned 
as Justices of the Peace: Eli Wilkins, Jonathan Conant. Dea. John 
Carleton, Aaron F. Sawyer, Dr. Dan'l Adams, Elijah Beard. John 
Bruce. Nathaniel Bruce, George Raymond, Alonzo Travis, John 
Trevitt, Franklin O. Kittredge, Charles J. Smith, Wm. H. Conant, 
Clark Campbell, Alonzo S. Bruce, AVm. F. Hadley, John M. Fox, 
Win. H. Stinson, Oramus W. Burnham. Wm. 11. Kendall, Arthur P. 
Temple. 



CHAPTER XV. 



CONCLUSION. 

In writing this, the closing chapter, it is left only to record the 
testimonial o*' our citizens to the splendid work done by those who 
have with great painstaking labor compiled the interesting data of 
these pages. 

In 1890 the town voted to publish a history and appointed a 
committee of three, William H. Conant, Charles H. Raymond, and 
Charles F. Stinson, to have charge of the arrangements for the com- 
pilation of it. In the same meeting the sum of five hundred dollars 
was appropriated for the use of the committee. 

Hon. Charles J. Smith at once commenced work, and the assem- 
bling of facts for a true history of the generations past and present 
has been carried on until now. As usual where much time is required 
to sift and sort the facts from the fiction, to verify tradition and 
hearsay, it has seemed to those waiting that the history would have 
to repeat itself. 

Only one, Mr. Raymond, of the original committee remains, the 
others having passed from amongst us ; his associates now being 
Henry F. Dodge and Willard P. Woods. 

It is a pleasure as well as a measure of justice to say that out of 
a mind stored with accumulated facts acquired through a long life of 
vital, active interest in the affairs of Mont Vernon we secured results 
which money could not buy io the work of Mr. Smith. Having been 
endowed with a wonderful memory, he has given to us a genealog- 
ical record simply beyond comparison, and we are deeply grateful 
for his life and work. 

In the original resolution it was written that a final revision of 
the work should be made by Hon. George A. Marden. During the 
past four years, through failing health and great physical discomfort, 
he has worked on this with a thoroughness and iidelity which can 
never be overestimated. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 245 

He died December li», 1906, before entirely completing the 
work, and it is unusually fitting that this book should close with a 
tribute of love and praise for the absolutely unselfish interest, for 
the self saerifice and the limitless generosity which has characterized 
his whole life. Living as he has through the epoch making period of 
oui country's existence and taking no small part in shaping its truer 
life, he ever and always stood staunchly for justice and the right. 
It is with honest pride of justification that we treasure the honor of 
his complete life as our heritage. 



PART II 



GENEALOGY 



GENEALOGY 



LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 



b. — born. res. — resides or resided. 

ch. — child or children. unm. — unmarried. 

d. — died. wid. — widow. 

dau. — daughter. yrs. — years. 

dys. — days. & — and. 

grad. — graduated. rem. — removed. 

m. — married. Regt. — Regiment. 

mos. — months. Dist. — District. 

Mt. V.— Mont Vernon. 

There are the usual abbreviations for months of the year, and states 
of the Union. 



EXPLANATORY NOTES. 

The sign * before a given name denotes that that person is mentioned 
at length afterward, or mentioned elsewhere. 

The numeral placed after a given name denotes the number of the 
generation of such person reckoning from his earliest ancestor, mentioned 
in the genealogy. Where cities and towns in New Hampshire are referred 
to, the name of the state is not given, nor is it given, if the city mentioned 
is a well-known city. 




DANIEL ADAMS, M. D. 



ABBOTT. 

1. Deacon Ephraim Abbott, b. December 16, 1742, m. Dorothy, dau. 
of Caleb Stiles. She was b. September 2, 1740. Deacon Abbott lived on 
the place now occupied by Miss Lizzie R. Parker. He was a Baptist dea- 
con, and d. in Goffstown, 1827. 

2. His son, Rev. Samuel Abbott, b. in Mont Vernon in 1777, m. in 
1798, Sarah, dau. of Rev. John Rand of Lyndeborough. He was pastor 
of Baptist churches at Middleboro, Bridgewater and Chester, Mass., and 
Londonderry, N. H. He was the inventor of "Abbott's Window Shades," 
1825, went to Antrim in 1838 and bought an estate in Clinton Village, 
where he remained until his death in 1853. Mr. Abbott was wholly un- 
educated in the schools, but had strong native abilities, was a good ser- 
monizer, and an impressive preacher. In style, he was bold, incisive and 
logical. As a minister he was honest and fearless. He never wrote a 
sermon. He had nine children, one of whom, Rev. Stephen G. Abbott, 
was b. in Bridgewater, Mass., November 9, 1819. 

3. Sarah, dau. of Deacon Ephraim and Dorothy Stiles Abbott, m. 
Rev. Jonathan Rand, one of the seven children of Rev. John Rand, first 
minister of the Congregational Church, Lyndeboro. They moved to An- 
trim in 1844. She d. in 1848. They had seven children. 

4. Rev. Stephen G. Abbott, son of Rev. Samuel Abbott, b. Bridge- 
water, Mass., November 9, 1819. He studied theology at New Hampton, 
settled in Needham, Mass., and other places. He m. in 1846 Sarah B. 
Cheney of Holderness. He received the degree of A. M. from Bates 
College in 1870. Has one child who is : 

5. Hon. John T. Abbott, b. Antrim, 1850, graduated from Bates 
College, 1871, is now a lawyer in Keene. 

ADAMS. 

Dr. Daniel Adams was b. in Townsend, Mass., September 9, 1773, 
graduated at Dartmouth College in 1797, and at its medical school in 1799. 
After residing several years at Leominster he removed to Boston. For 
a period was engaged in publishing an agricultural journal in Boston; 
came to reside in Mont Vernon in 1813, and was employed in preparing 
his various publications and in his profession here until his removal to 
Keene, in 1846. His "Scholar's Arithmetic," Adams' "New" and "Re- 
vised" all were in very extensive use for many years. He wrote and pub- 
lished several pamphlets. Dr. Adams was very highly esteemed in Mont 
Vernon, and during his thirty-three years' residence here, he wielded a 



6 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

controlling influence in behalf of temperance, education and morality. 
In 1839 and 1840 he was a member of the New Hampshire Senate from 
the district where he resided. He m. August 17, 1800, Nancy, dau. of Dr. 
Mulliken of Townsend, Mass. She d. at Keene in 1851. He d. at Keene, 
June 8, 1854, aged 90 years, 9 months. Their ch. were : 

1. *Rev. Darwin Adams, b. Leominster, Mass., October 10, 1801. 

2. Arabella, b. Leominster, September 9, 1803, d. in infancy. 

3. Nancy, b. Leominster, July 7, 1810, d. June 1, 1820. 

4. *Dr. Daniel Lucius, b. Mont Vernon, November 1, 1814. 

5. *Nancy Ann. b. Mont Vernon, December 3, 1821. 

Rev. Darwin Adams, eldest son Dr. Adams, b. Leominster, October 
10, 1801, graduated at Dartmouth College 1824, at Andover Theological 
Seminary 1827, m. October 9, 1828, Catherine H. Smith of Hollis, N. H., 
who d. at Wellesley Hills, Mass.. July 1897, aged 95 years. He d. in 
Groton, Mass., August 16, 1889. Their children were : 

1. George Darwin, b. Camden, Me., April 18, 1830, m. Eliza Ann 
Brown of Ohio, resides at Tanesfield, Ohio. 

2. *Rev. Daniel Emerson Adams, b. Camden, Me., June 22, 1832. 

3. Mary Emelia, b. Alstead, N. H., April 1, 1835, d. Dunstable, 
Mass., July 5, 1855. 

4. Catharine Lucretia, b. Alstead, November 12, 1836, d. Alstead, 
December 31, 1845. 

5. John Smith, b. Alstead, October 7, 1839, enlisted in Company F., 
Sixth N. H. Regiment in 1862 as 2nd Lieutenant, was with Gen. Burn- 
side at Hatteras Inlet, and Roanoke Island, was wounded in the second 
Bull Run battle, and reported as killed, laid on the field from Thursday 
until Monday afternoon, and lived to return to his father's home in Al- 
stead. He was afterwards Commissary of Stores in Hospitals at Brattle- 
boro, Montpelier and Bennington, Vt. Was promoted to Captain. He 
was at the time of his death, March 11, 1869, engaged in the wholesale 
linen business in New York City. He was in his youth a student at 
Appleton Academy (McCollom Institute.). 

Dr. Daniel Lucius Adams, second son of Dr. Adams, was b. at Mont 
Vernon, November 1, 1814, graduated at Yale College, 1835, m. Cornelia 
A. Cook of New York City, March 7, 1861. He d. at New Haven, Conn., 
January 3, 1899. Their ch. were: 

1. Charles C, b. Ridgefield, Conn.. August 24, 1864, d. September 21, 
1864. 

2. Catharine, b. Ridgefield, Conn., May 3, 1866, m. April 23, 1896, Dr. 
William L. Elkin, Professor in Yale University. 

3. Mary W., b. Ridgefield, Conn., October 15, 1869, resides New 
Haven, Conn. 

4. Frank M., b. Ridgefield, Conn., June 7, 1871, Professor in Yale 
Umversitv. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 7 

5. Roger C, b. Ridgefield, Conn., May 1, 1874, electrician in Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

Nancy Ann Adams, youngest dau. of Dr. Adams, b. Mont Vernon, 
December 3, 1821, m. May 18, 1841, William S. Briggs of Keene. She d. 
February 14, 1868. Ch : 

1. Daniel A. Briggs, d. in infancy. 

2. William A. Briggs. b. July 31, 1848, m. November 27, 1872, 
Emelia F. Whiting of Montpelier, Vt. 

Rev. Daniel Emerson Adams, second son of Dr. Darwin Adams, b. 
Camden, Me., June 22. 1832, graduated Bangor Theological Seminary, 
was settled over a parish in Wilton, N. H., where he was the beloved 
pastor of the Congregational Church many years. He was then called to 
the pastorate of a church at Wellesley Hills, Mass. He is now (1902) 
preaching in Mason, N. H. He was at one time Supt. of Public Schools 
for Hillsboro' County, m. (l) September 16, 1854, Ellen F. Kingsbury 
of Keene, who d. at Ashburnham, May 21, 1882. He m. (2) Marion E. 
Center of Wilton, February 28, 1884. Ch., all by first wife, were : 

1. Charles Darwin, b. Keene, October 21, 1856, m. August 24, 1881, 
Julia A. Stevens of Wilton, graduated Dartmouth College, 1877 ; is Pro- 
fessor of Greek in Dartmouth College, has three children. 

2. Mary Catherine, b. Wilton, April 7, 1863, m. December 4, 1899, 
Rev. Martin F. Nevis, Pastor Pilgrim Congregational Church, Southboro', 
Mass., 1 child. 

3. George Wilton, b. Wilton, April 27, 1873, m. June 8, 1899, Grace 
A. Turner of Natick, Mass., has one ch., residence Mattapan, Mass. 

Dea. Jonathan S. Adams, brother Dr. Daniel Adams, trader here 
several yrs. He d. 1867, age 81. His wife Betsey W. Adams d. 1866, 
age 79. 

ALEXANDER. 

1. James Alexander, b. in Londonderry, April 19, 1802, m. (1) 
Eliza M. Dickey, June 14, 1835. She was b. May 31, 1813, d. June 25, 
1854; m. (2) Elizabeth L. Reed, December 1, 1854, settled in the easterly 
part of Mont Vernon, adjoining Amherst, about 1836. He died July 24, 
1885. Their ch. were : 

1. William E.. b. July 13, 1837, m. Emma F. Keith, July 5, 1871. 
He is a soap manufacturer, resides on what was formerly the Daniel 
Campbell farm in Amherst, and has five children., 

2. James A., b: November 17, 1838, m. (1) Mary L. Sargent, De- 
cember 3, 1860, resides in Boston, Mass. He m (2) Evaline Gusting, 
March 7, 1879. 

3. John P., b. April 20, 1840, d. September 20, 1863, Mattoon, 111., 
was a member of the Sixteenth N. H. Volunteer Infantry. 



8 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

4. Harriet M., b. April 2, 1842, m. Ira Chase, October 5, 1862 ; resides 
in Milford. , 

5. Mary E., b. May 6, 1844, m. William D. Robbins of Brookline, N. 
H., April 23, 1884, one daughter. 

6. Sarah J., b. January 6, 1846, m. January 1, 1867, John T. Grafton 
of Milford. They have two sons. 

7. Ellen F., h. March 6, 1850, m. Edward Cloutman of Lynn, Mass., 
December 17, 1879. She d. at Milford, a widow, March 6, 1893. 

8. Daniel C. Alexander came to Mont Vernon from Nashua in 1896, 
and has since resided in the East District. He was b. in Vermont, Janu- 
ary 25, 1865, m. May 30, 1891, Mary Alice Grant of Craftsbury, Vt. She 
was b. February 16, 1866. 

ALCOTT. 

Gilman Alcott, son of Benj. Alcott, a native of Bedford (now West 
Manchester), moved here from Lowell in 1843, and bought the Goodrich 
farm (now belonging to Mrs. Joseph H. Tarbell). He was a tin pedler. 
He removed to Lowell in 1848 and d. there September 11, 1858, aged 47 
years. He m. ( 1 ) June 24, 1837, Lucy Ann, dau. of Ezra and Rebecca 
Langdell of this town. She was b. August 6, 1814, d. March 12, 1838. He 
m. (2) Mary F. Langdell, sister of his first wife. She was b. April 6, 
1829. By his second wife he had children. 

ANDERSON. 

Edwin L. Anderson, b. Limington, Me.. October 20, 1853, m. 
Abbie C. Leavitt, August, 1880. She was b. in Tuftonboro', N. H., De- 
cember 28, 1862. Mr. Anderson and family came from Parsonsfield, 
Me., to Mont Vernon in August, 1897. He works on the Edward H. Best 
farm in the East District, and resides in East District. Their children 
were : 

1. Jessie May, b. Parsonsfield, November 18, 1882. 

2. Annie Ruth. b. Parsonsfield, October 20, 1886. 

3. Marion Mabel, b. Parsonsfield, November 30, 1895. 

4. Grace Verna, b. Mont Vernon, September 3, 1898, d. January 26, 
1900. 

Mr. D. A. Anderson, a native of Goffstown, N. H., a graduate of 
Dartmouth, was the ninth principal of McCollom Institute, remaining two 
years, from 1870 to 1872. 

AVERILL 

John Averill, the ancestor of all the name in Mont Vernon, was b. in 
Middleton, Mass., June 2, 1740, m. Mary Bradford, dau. of William and 
Mary Lambert Bradford (Bradford was the ancestor of the Mont Vernon 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 9 

Bradfords). She was b. in 1741. They came to what is now Mont Ver- 
non in 1763. He d. May 21, 1815, aged 75. His wife d. August 21, 1814, 
aged 73. Their children were : 

1. Naomi. 

2. *Daniel. 

3. Mary m. Benjamin Simonds of Mont Vernon, whither he re- 
moved to Antrim in 1793. They had eight children, of whom four were 
born in Mont Vernon, and four in Antrim. 

4. Anna, m. McAllister. 

5. *John, Jr., b. October 13, 1767. 

6. *Jesse, b. 1772, d. March 2, 1840, aged 67. 

7. *Levi. 

Daniel Averill, son of John and Mary (Bradford) Averill, m. (1) 
April 24, 1783, Mary, dau. of Daniel and Mary (Hartshorn) Weston. 
She was b. Mont Vernon, February 20, 1766. He m. (2) April 26, 1827, 
Mrs. Manning. He was a Revolutionary soldier, and d. in Barre, 
Vt., April 21, 1848, aged 86 yrs. He lived on the Odell farm in West 
District (now J. Hazens). He had several ch. all by first wife, of them: 

1. Alary, b. Oct. 26, 1783, m. May 16, 1805. *David Smith of Mont 
Vernon, d. Aug. 25, 1864. 

Of his sons : 

David W., m. Aug. 27, 1809, Submit French (sister of Abraham and 
Dolly French). 

Daniel, m. July 17, 1809, Dolly French (sister Abraham and Submit 
French). Both sons settled in Barre, Vt., and among their descendants 
are prominent merchants of that city. 

Sylvia, a dau., m. Nov. 11, 1824, *Timothy Baldwin. She d. March 
28, 1867, age 62 years, 6 months. 

John Averill, Jr., son of John and Mary Averill, b. Oct. 13, 1767, 
d. Oct. 26, 1844, m. Anna, dau. of James and Hannah (Trask) Woodbury. 
She was b. Aug. 4, 1774, d. May 9, 1858. They lived in the west part of 
the town, near Beech Hill. Their children were : 

1. Nancy, b. Feb. 19, 1792, m. Asa Wallace of Milford, Aug. 16, 
1814, who d. in Tennessee, Feb. 5, 1815. Mrs. W., afterwards m. William 
Bradford of Goshen, and d. Aug. 13, 1837, aged 45, leaving one child, 
Asa Wallace. 

2. Betsey, b. Feb. 7, 1794, m. Levi Trow of Mont Vernon, May 5, 
1812. They moved to Goshen. 

3. *John, b. March 10, 1796. 

4. Bernard, b. April 26, 1798, m. Harriet Richardson, Nov. 4, 1829, 
settled and d. in Farmington, N. H., leaving five daughters and two sons. 

5. Hannah, b. May 13, 1800, d. July 23, 1803. 

6. Mary, b. July 13, 1802, m. Nathaniel Cutter of Jaffrey, N. H., 
Oct. 11, 1827. 



10 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

7. Hannah, b. Jan. 7, 1805, m. William Butterfield of New Boston, 
Dec. 26, 1835. She d. Oct. 13, 1890, leaving four children. 

8. Fanny, b. June 5, 1807, d. June 6, 1814. 

9. Lucretia, b. March 5, 1809, m. Joel W. Duncklee of Milford, 
March 8, 1832. She d. Aug. 25, 1844, leaving seven children. 

10. *Trask Woodburv b. March 20, 1841. 

Jesse Averill, son of John and Mary (Bradford) Averill, b. 1772, 
d. March 2, 1840, age 67 years. He d. at small house near Henry F. 
Dodge's old farm. He m. (1) *Sarah, dau. Andrew Leavitt. He m. (2) 
Dec. 4, 1825, Abigail Swinnington (sister Elisha and Job Swinnington). 

Children by first wife : 

1. Joseph, settled in Lowell. 

2. *Jesse, b. 1799. 

3. Franklin, m. Flanders, 4 children : three daughters and one 

son. 

4. Chili, b. 1805, d. Coburg, Ontario, Oct. 11, 1884, aged 78 yrs. 

5. William, d. Merrill, Wis., 1885, age 78. 

6. Chandler, d. Mont Vernon, July 6, 1853, aged 43. He was a soldier 
in the Mexican War. He left one son. 

7. Jonathan, d. Mont Vernon, May 28, 1831, age 19 years, 4 months. 

8. A dau. Sarah of Jesse and Sarah (Leavitt) Averill, m. Dr. 
Abram McMillen of New Boston. 

Children by second wife : 

9. Miles, d. July 4, 1847, aged 26. 

10. Rensalaer, left home when about 18, and was never heard from. 

Levi Averill, youngest son of John and Mary (Bradford) Averill, 
m. Mary Jones of Wilton. He lived in the West District, on the place 
now occupied by George Stearns. He d. Aug. 31, 1868, age 85. She d. 
November 28, 1864, age 80. Their children were : 

1. Mary Bishop, b. Feb. 19, 1804, m. Thomas Dunlap of Antrim. 
He d. Aug. 17, 1865, aged 62. She d. June 18, 1874, age 70. They had 
thirteen children. 

2. Hiram, b. Oct. 21, 1805, d. Warren, R. I., Feb. 1, 1886, aged 80. 
He was a brush manufacturer in Charlestown, Mass., of the firm of 
Averill and Hunting. 

3. Lucinda, b. Sept. 8, 1809, m. Nov. 16, 1829, Alexander Jameson of 
Antrim. She d. Nov. 26, 1843, aged 34, leaving three daughters, viz : 

1. Mary R., m. D. F. French of Washington, N. H., d. three weeks 
after marriage. 

2. Anne W., m. Harris E. Cutter, lives in Chicago. 

3. Emily S., d. 1869, aged 27. 

4. Lucy, m. Sumner French, lived in Milford. 

5. Mark, settled in Tewksbury, Mass. 

6 and 7. Nancy and Hannah, twins. Nancy m. Carter, lived in 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 11 

Somerville, Mass. Hannah m. (1) Clough, (2) Seaver of En- 
field, N. H. 

8. John P., graduated Dartmouth College, was for many years prin- 
cipal of the Chapman School, East Boston, Mass., is now living in Con- 
cord, N. H. Has two children. 

9. Thomas, lived in New Boston and Francestown, d. in Frances- 
town. 

10. Levi, b. April, 1821, d. May 26, 1892. 

John Averill, son of John and Anna (Woodbury) Averill, b. March 
10, 1796, m. (1) Dec. 15, 1825, Hannah, dau. of Abraham and Naomi 
French. She was b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 9. 1804, d. July 10, 1855. He m. (2) 
Dec, 1856, Dorcas Smiley. She d. March 21, 1885, age 71. He d. May 
3, 1883, age 87 years. He lived on the farm, now of Henry H. Trow, 
but moved to the village, where he died. His children, all by his first 
wife were born at Mont Vernon : 

1. Charles Frank, b. Nov. 4, 1826, now living unm. in California, 
where he emigrated in 1850. 

2. *George Woodbury, b. March 10, 1829. 

3. Harriet Frances, b. Dec. 31, 1830, d. April 16, 1850, unm. 

4. Caroline S., b. Nov. 15, 1832, m. Sept. 22, 1859, *Benjamin F. 
Davis, resides Mont Vernon. 

Trask W. Averill, youngest child of John and Anna (Woodbury) 
Averill, b. March 20, 1811, m. (1) Hannah W., dau. of Joseph and Sally 
(Smith) Perkins, April 9, 1835. She was b. April 24, 1816, d. May 2, 
1849. He m. (2) Oct. 11, 1849, Hannah, dau. of Silas and Martha (Far- 
num) Wilkins. She was b. May 11, 1816, d. Feb. 28, 1900. He d. May 
26, 1899. He resided in the North District for many years. His children 
by first wife were b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Sarah Frances, b. March 24, 1836, m. Oct. 19, 1858, Capt. Brown 
Flanders of Boston. She d. Sept. 15, 1881. She left one dau. Lilla. 

2. Nancy Maria, b. May 21, 1838, m. (1) *Plumer Jones, by whom 
she had one son. She m. (2) his brother *Solomon Jones, by whom she 
had one dau. and two sons. She d. Nov. 16, 1876. 

3. Emily Caroline, b. Jan. 3, 1840, m. (1) Mr. Hutchinson, m. (2) 
Frank H. Hopkins. She d. Feb. 15, 1900, leaving no children. 

4. *Woodbury T., b. Sept. 6, 1841. 

5. Josephine Eliza, b. Sept. 23, 1843, m. (1) 1867, ^Stephen G. 
Clement, m. (2) Frank Brooks of Greenfield, Sept. 23, 1892. She d., 
Greenfield, May 20, 1901, leaving one daughter, Gertrude E. Clement. 

6. Mary Henrietta, b. May 27, 1846, m. Samuel Leadbetter of East 
Boston, Mass. They had one son, William. She d. Aug. 27, 1882. 

7. Franklin Perkins, b. April 6, 1849, now (1902) resides in Mont 
Vernon, has spent many years in California. 

By his second wife : 

8. *Charles Eugene, b. August 6, 1855. 



12 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Jesse Averill, Jr., son of Jesse and Sarah (Leavitt) Averill, b. 1799, 
m. 1820, Eliza, dau. of Lot Conant. He d. May 24, 1850, age 51 years. 
She d. May 21, 1872, age 67. Their children were: 

1. Joanna G., b. Jan. 12, 1821, m. 1843, Jeremiah O. Pulsifer of Man- 
chester. She d. July 22, 1855, no children. 

2. Eliza M., b. 1824, m. *Newell D. Foster, June 10, 1846, d. June 
5, 1852, age 28, three children. 

3. Charlotte W., b. Sept. 6, 1827, m. George H. Chandler of Man- 
chester. She d. January 3, 1854. 

4. *Joseph Woodbury, b. Dec. 1, 1829. 

5. George G., b. Feb. 8, 1831, m. March 9, 1868, Sarah L., dau. of 
Benjamin F. and Betsey (Buss) Marden. She was b. May 9, 1835, no ch, 
He was in the 13th N. H. Reg't in Civil War. Farmer, residence Mont 
Vernon Village. 

6. Almira J., m. James Gilmore of Manchester, not living. 

7. Mary M., b. July. 1840, m. Orville B. Stevens, d. May 1, 1870, 
age 29 years, 9 months. He d. Jan. 30, 1869, age 29 years, 5 months. 

8. Angelia M., b. 1835, m. Jonathan F. Williams of Lowell. She d. 
April 15, 1898, age 53 years, 11 months ; one son, George. 



George Woodbury Averill, son of John and Hannah (French) 
Averill, b. March 10, 1839, m. Nov. 10, 1857, Nancy E., dau. of William 
and Serviah Lamson. She was b. Oct. 7, 1827. He has been repeatedly 
elected selectman of this town and is an industrious and skillful farmer. 
Their children are : 

1. El}a Augusta, b. Nov. 2, 1858, attended Wellesley College two 
years, was for three years a teacher in South Africa, m. Dec. 25, 1889, 
Henry F. Robinson of Hancock, has four children, resides in Hancock. 

2. Carrie Frances, b. Aug. 24, 1861, m. *Charles H. Trow of Mont 
Vernon, Dec. 19, 1882, one son. 

3. George Franklin, b. April 18, 1866, m. Oct. 26, 1893, Fanny L., 
dau. of John A. and Amanda (Wilson). Carleton of Mont Vernon. He is 
an enterprising and successful merchant of Milford, N. H. 

Woodbury T., son of Trask W. and Hannah (Perkins) Averill, b. 
Sept. 6, 1841, m. Rebecca, dau. of George Jones of New Boston. She d. 
West Medford, Mass., March 23, 1885, age 35. He lived in Hancock from 
1873 to 1877, went to Manchester, thence to Boston, where he d. Feb. 23, 
1895, age 53. He was a massage physician, also a great hunter and fisher. 
Their children were: 

1. Belle, b. Mont Vernon, July 31, 1867, m. Albert Shepard of Ips- 
wich, Mass. 

2. Alonzo W., b. Hancock, Nov. 14, 1868, resides in Boston. 

3. Willie, b. April 4, 1877, d. Dec. 26, 1895. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 13 

Charles E. Averill, son of Trask W. and Hannah (Wilkins) Averill, b. 
Aug. 6, 1855, m. Sept. 1, 1875, Ruth A., only child of Almus and Lydia A. 
Fairfield of Antrim. She was b. Nov. 12, 1853. He d. Nashua, Sept. 20, 
1883, leaving one son, Ernest. 

Joseph W. Averill, son of Jesse and Eliza (Conarit) Averill, b. Dec. 
1, 1829, m. Sabrina F., dau. of Timothy and Sylvia (Averill) Baldwin, 
Dec. 3. 1857. .She was b. March 15, 183G, d. June 16, 1896. He has been 
five years selectman, and is respected by all. They had one son. 

1. Chester B., b. Jan. 17, 1867, m. Oct. 19, 1892, to Edith Leonard of 
Warren, N. H. They reside in Warren, N. H., and have one daughter. 

James J. Averill, son of Ebenezer and Anna (Johnson) Averill, b. 
Milford, Aug. 6, 1778, m. March 3, 1807, Lucy Wallace Burnham of Mil- 
ford, b. March 20, 1785, d. Jan. 16, 1855. He lived for many years in the 
South District on the farm known as "Chas. H. Raymond's old farm." He 
d. here July 11, 1867. Children : 

1. Mary Ann, b. Milford, June 1, 1809, d. unm. in Mont Vernon, May 
24, 1883. 

2. Lucy B., b. Oct. 4, 1816, in Mont Vernon, m. 1844, *Stephen C. 
Langdell. She d. Feb. 9, 1903. Four children. 

3. Helen M., b. Mont Vernon. March 15, 1827, m. March 28, 1847, 
*Joseph Fitch Crosby. She d. Milford, Nov. 14, 1879. 

Granville C. Averill, b. Mont Vernon, Dec. 21, 1832, was reared in the 
family of his grandfather, James Hopkins, m. 1867, Nancy Jane, only ch. 
of George and Hannah P. (Stearns) Green. She was b. Feb. 8, 1843, d. 
Dec. 4, 1900. He d. June 24, 1901. They lived in the West District. 
Their children were : 

1. *Edward G, b. April 6, 18GS, New Boston. 

2. Rufus G., b. Jan. 6, 1876, resides Mont Vernon. 

3. Hannah J., b. June 29, 1878, m. (1) Dec. 15, 1895, Walter J. 
Blanchard, by whom she had one son, m. (2) George Page, 1901, d. July 
18, 1901. 

Edward G. Averill, son of G. C. and N. J. (Green) Averill, b. April 
6, 1868, at New Boston, m. March 9, 1892, Mrs. Abbie M. (Pollard) 
Pease. She was b. Jan. 27, 1871. They reside in Mont Vernon. Ch : 

1. Eva Belle Pease (Mrs. Averill's ch. by first husband), b. Epping, 
Feb. 2, 1890. 

2. Ina May, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 1893. 

Moses Averill, Jr., was a son of Moses, who was a son of Ebenezer, 
who was the first Averill to settle in Milford. He was b. in Mont Ver- 
non, Jan. 26, 1785. Came from New Boston to Milford in 1824, d. Mil- 
ford, July 14, 1861, m. Sally Odell, June 6, 1811. She was b. Mont Vernon, 
Feb. 21, 1787, d. Milford, Nov. 30, 1873. Ch : 



14 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

1. Sophronia, b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 4, 1811, m. Oct. 11, 1832, John 
B. Wilson of Canaan, d. Oct. 18, 1897. 

2. Sarah L., b. Sept. 16. 1813, m. 1834, Joseph P. Myrick, resided 
Cleveland, O., d. March, 1891. 

3. Clementine, b. Aug. 9. 1815, resided Valrico, Fla. 

4. Abby L. O., b. New Boston, May 5, 1820, m. 1850, resided Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

5. Calvin H., b. New Boston, Dec. 29, 1822. Came to Milford in 
1824 with his father, was a matchmaker, m. Sept. 1848, Mary B., dau. of 
Amos and Mary (Burns) Gutterson, b. Milford, March 27, 1831, d. April 
30, 1865, one dau. 

6. Clementine Elexene, b. Milford, March 9, 1850, m. Herbert O. 
Lilly, resided Cleveland, Ohio. 

BAKER. 

Daniel W. Baker, b. Stoddard, N. H., June 13, 1795, m. (1) Desire 
Rose, dau. of Abraham Rose of Lyndeborough, Nov., 1823. She was b. 
Nov. 5, 1802, d. June 30, 1828, m. (2) Mrs. Delinda Dutton, Jan. 6, 1851. 
She d. March 29, 1862, m. (3) Mrs. Helena C. Atherton of Nashua, Sept. 
8, 1863. He d. at Nashua, Jan. 11, 1865. He was appointed postmaster in 
1829, serving as such until 1832. He was Representative to the Legisla- 
ture in 1834-1835. By his first wife he had one child. 

1. Daniel Rose Baker, b. June 17. 1828, m. Dec. 20, 1860, Mary E., 
dau. of Milton and Sophronia (Trow) McCollom. She was b. May 5, 
1860. He was postmaster from 1835 to 1842 and from 1853 to 1861. He d. 
July 25, 1879, aged 51 years. They had no children. 

BALDWIN. 

Timothy Baldwin, b. Billerica, Mass., Oct. 11, 1791, m. (1) Sally 
Marshall, June, 1815. She d. May 21, 1824, age 32 years. He m. (2) 
Sylvia, dau. of Daniel and Mary (Weston) Averill, Nov. 11, 1824. She d. 
March 28, 1867, age 62 years, 6 months. He d. May 25, 1869. His ch., 
five by his first wife, were : 

1. Lydia J., b. June 30, 1816, Mt. Vernon, m. *Wm. Harrison Smith. 
She d. April 26, 1868, leaving three daughters. 

2. Ruth A., b. Sept. 19, 1818, Mt. Vernon, d. Dec. 22, 1853, unm. 

3. Hannah, b. April 14, 1820, Mt. Vernon, d. April 7, 1861, unm. 

4. Samuel B., b. Jan. 1, 1822, Mt. Vernon, d. Sept. 18, 1822. 

5. John B., b. Aug. 8, 1823, Mt Vernon, d. Nov. 20, 1823. 
By his second wife he had : 

6. Sarah C, b. Sept. 27, 1830, Mt. Vernon, d. March 3, 1332. 

7. Mary A,, b. Aug. 2, 1832, Mt. Vernon, d. Aug. 21, 1834. 

8. Sabrina Frances, b. March 15, 1836, Mont Vernon, m. *Joseph G. 
Averill, Dec. 3, 1857. She d. June 16, 1896, leaving one son. 



HISTORY OF .MONT VERXOX. 15 

Samuel Baldwin owned and occupied the farm now of E. C. Flanders. 
He was b. Wilmington, Mass., Sept. 7, 1789, d. Mont Vernon, July 8, 1856, 
m. Mary Dane, Feb. 1, 1816. She was b. Chelmsford, Mass., April 18, 
1794, d. Bedford, Nov. 23, 1874. Children : 

1. Samuel Dane, b. Oct. 4, 1817, m. (1) June 3, 1840, Clarissa Hild- 
reth. She d. July 24, 1852, m. (2) Sarah S. Sanders, Sept. 28. 1853, re- 
sided Nashua. He d. Feb. 18, 1885. 

2. Silas H., b. June 20, 1819. d. Dec. 13, 1844. 

3. William O., minister, b. Aug. 25, 1821, m. (1) Oct. 4, 1854, Mary 
Proctor. She d. Jan. 24, 1872. He m. (2) Letty A. Gilman. He graduated 
Amherst College, settled in Central Xew York as a Presbyterian clergy- 
man, and d. there. 

4. Jonathan N., b. Jan. 19, 1824, d. Oct. 12, 1825. 

5. Mary, b. June 26, 1826, m. Daniel K. Mack of Manchester, Oct. 
8, 1856. 

6. Susan A., b. Francestown. Nov. 2, 1828, m. Leonard C. Farwell, 
Dec. 10, 1856, resided Temple, d. Sept. 4, 1895, 3 children. 

7. • Sophia J., b. Dec. 23, 1830, d. March 17, 1832. 

8. Sophia M., b. July 18, 1832, unm. 

9. Charles H., b. March 7, 1835, d. May 20, 1836. 

10. Almira J., b. March 25, 1838, m. Isaac G. Wheeler, Jan. 12, 1864, 
d. Allston, Mass., March 26, 1895. 

BANCROFT. 

Stowell Bancroft, b. Groton, Mass., April 11, 1799, m. Martha D., 
dau. of Joseph and Betsey (Perkins) Trow, July 3, 1825. She was b. 
Mont Vernon, Feb. 7, 1796, d. Dec. 15, 1876. He was a brick-mason, and 
lived in the North District. He d. at Lancaster, Mass., Feb. 14, 1883, age 
83. Their children were : 

1. Emily, b. Lowell, Mass., July 29, 1826, m. John P. Batchelder of 
Lowell, d. at Worcester, Mass., Dec. 29, 1826, leaving four children. 

2. Andrew J., b. Dunstable, Mass., April 28, 1829, m. Mary A. 
Clough of Lowell. He is a prominent and wealthy citizen of Lancaster, 
Mass. They have five children, viz. : Edward E. M. Bancroft, M. D. ; 
William L., lumber dealer; George A. Bancroft, M. D. ; Charles G., a 
lawyer; Martha S., a teacher. 

3. Sabrina F., b. Amherst, Aug. 28, 1831, lives unm. in Lancaster, 
Mass. 

4. William H., b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 10, 1833, m. Martha Varney 
of Lowell, lives in Lancaster, Mass., has three children, two sons and 
one daughter. 

5. Charles B., b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 4, 1838, m. Eunice Billings of 
Newton, Mass., has ch., resides in Lunenburg, Mass., d. June 3, 1903. 



16 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Dr. Cecil Franklin Patch Bancroft, son of Dea. James and Sarah W. 
(Kendall) Bancroft of New Ipswich, N. H., was b. in that town, Nov. 
25, 1839. He fitted for college at Appleton Academy, New Ipswich, 
graduated at Dartmouth College in 1860. He came here in Aug., 1860, 
as Principal of Appleton Academy (now McCollom Institute), remain- 
ing four years. He was young, genial and enthusiastic, with conceded 
ability and soundness in judgment. He graduated at Andover Theological 
Seminary, 1867, was ordained at Mont Vernon, 1867. He then went 
to take charge of Robert College on Lookout Mountain, Tenn. He re- 
mained there five years. In 1873 he was chosen Principal of Phillips 
Andover Academy, which position he filled with eminent success until 
his death, Oct. 4, 1901. He received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
from New York State University, 1874, the degree of Doctor of Laws 
from Yale University in 1892. He was appointed a trustee of Dart- 
mouth College in 1897. He was one of the most accomplished educators 
in America, and prepared for college a larger number of boys than any 
other American teacher, by whom he was universally beloved and honored. 
He was a man of rare insight and wonderful business ability. One of 
his townsmen said of him, "Had Dr. Bancroft been a business man, he 
would have become a millionaire." He had a gracious kindly manner, 
and was ever courteous to all. 

In Andover, he won his way up to being "the first citizen of the 
town." He was a man of tireless energy, and wrought so intensely as to 
probably shorten his life. He d. Oct. 4, 1901, loved and esteemed by all 
who knew him. For several summers preceding his death, he made his 
summer home at "The Hearthstone," and ever manifested a cordial in- 
terest in the welfare of Mont Vernon. May 6, 1867, he m. Frances 
Adelia, dau. of Capt. Timothy and Frances (Marsh) Kittredge, an ac- 
complished and lovely lady. She was b. Feb. 15, 1844, d. at Andover, 
Mass., March 29, 1898. Their children are: 

1. Cecil Kittredge, b. Dec. 15, 1868 ; is a Professor in Yale University. 

2. Frances Marsh, b. Sept. 12, 1872, m. Sept. 5, 1900, Rev. William 
J. Long of Stamford, Conn., has one daughter. 

3. Arthur Kendall, b. March 10, 1874, d. Aug. 9, 1880. 

4. Phillips, b. April 21, 1878. 

5. Mary Ethel, b. May 22, 1882. 

BATCHELDER. 

Ebenezer Batchelder, b. Nov. 24, 1710, m. Jerusha Kimball in 1740, 
settled in Wenham, Mass. Their children were: 

1. Anna, b. 1741. ^ 

2. Mary, b. 1743. 

3. Lydia, b. 1745. 

4. Jerusha, b. 1747. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 17 

5. *Ebenezer, b. Nov. 5, 1750, settled in Amherst (now Mont Ver- 
non). 

6. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 25, 1753. 

7. *John, b. Aug. 16, 1755, settled in Amherst (now Mont Vernon). 

8. Mehitable, b. March 9, 1761. 

9. Samuel, b. June 15, 1763. 

*Ebenezer Batchelder, son of Ebenezer and Jerusba (Kimball) 
Batchelder, b. Wenham, Mass., Nov. 5, 1750, m. Elizabeth (Thompson) 
Sherwin. He settled in the East District, Mont Vernon about 1778, where 
he d. April 24, 1849, aged 98 years. She d. March 10, 1841, aged 85 
years. Their children were : 

Children probably b. Mt. Vernon. 

1. Betsey, b. July 18, 1779, m. David Wiley, d. in Landgrove, Vt. 

2. Joseph, b. Nov. 21, 1781, m. Anna Cochran, lived in Landgrove, 
Vt., and afterward in Illinois. 

3. *Ebenezer, b. March 16, 1783. 

4. Fanny, b. July 8, 1785, m. *Robert Parker, May 29, 1806, d. in 
Landgrove, Vt. 

5. Lydia, b. Nov. 21, 1786, m. Benjamin Wilkins, Nov. 27, 1806, d. in 
Hillsborough. 

6. Mehitable, b. Aug. 25, 1788, m. *Isaac Weston. 

7. *Reuben Kimball, b. Feb. 7, 1790. 

8. *Ezra, b. March 2, 1792. 

9. Atness, b. April 5, 1794, m. *William Coggin, 2nd, Dec, 1814, set- 
tled in Mt. Vernon, d. Oct. 4, 1835. 

10. Levi, b. March 10, 1797, m. Mary Peabody, d. Landgrove, Vt., 
Aug. 10, 1856, father of E. C. Batchelder, who was a well known mer- 
chant of Milford. 

Capt. John Batchelder, son of Ebenezer and Jerusha (Kimball) 
Batchelder, b. Wenham, Mass., Aug. 16, 1755, m. his second cousin Betsey 
or Elizabeth Batchelder, dau. of Amos Batchelder of Woburn, Mass. 
She was b. Nov. 20, 1758, d. April 15, 1815. Capt. Batchelder settled in 
Mont Vernon in the East Ditsrict, on the farm now (1902) owned by 
Edward H. Best. He represented the town 1808, 1809, 1810. He d. Dec. 
8, 1848. Their children were b. in Mt. Vernon. 

1. *John, b. July 6, 1780. 

2. Israel, b. Oct. 18, 1782, m. July 28, 1805, Abigail Wiley. He d. 
Peru, Vt, Aug. 31, 1858. She d. April 20, 1842. Had two daughters, 
Mary Jane and Abigail. 

3. Betsey, b. Jan. 19, 1785, m. John Haseltine of Amherst, Dec. 25, 
1805. She d. April 20, 1842, had eight children. 

4. *Edmund, b. Aug. 5, 1787. 

5. Nancy, b. Oct. 19, 1789, m. Dec. 26, 1808, Robert Wason, settled in 



18 HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 

New Boston, d. July 28, 1863, had nine children, viz.: Elbridge, Louisa, 
Hiram, Xancy, Mary, Robert B., Adeline, Caroline, George Austin. 

6. ' *Lydia, b. Feb. 11, 1792, m. her cousin *Ezra Batchelder, d. Sept. 

29, 1882. 

T. *Perley, b. July 26, 1794. 

8. *Relief, b. Dec. 16, 1796, m. Sept. 2, 1830, *Dea. Josiah Kittredge, 
of Mont Vernon. She d. July 19, 1868. 

9. *Amos, b. June 4, 1799. 

10. Cyrene, b. Oct. 17, 1803, m. May 10. 1832, *Ira Kendall. She d. 
Goffstown, Dec. 16, 1872. 

Ebenezer Batchelder, son of Ebenezer and Elizabeth Batchelder, b. 
March 16, 1783, m. June 30, 1811, Rachel, dau. of Timothy and Elizabeth 
(Kendrick) Jones of Amherst. She was b. 1786, d. Jan. 9, 1863, in Am- 
herst, aged 76. He d. Feb. 26, 1815. Had several children. A daughter, 
Mrs. Fanny (Batchelder) Blaisdell, d. San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 28, 1890, 
aged 76 years. His son, William Batchelder, d. Feb. 20, 1860, aged 48. 
There were other daughters. 

Reuben K. Batchelder, son of Ebenezer and Elizabeth T. S. Batchel- 
der, b. Feb. 7, 1790. He m. (1) Alice, dau. of Daniel and Sarah (Love- 
joy) Kendall. She was b. August 1, 1800, d. June 26, 1846. He m. (2) 
Mary, dau. of John and Abigail (Haseltine) Weston. She d. July 22, 
1877, age 66 years, 28 days. He d. Dec. 13, 1867, age 77 years, 10 months. 
Two children by first wife, b. Mt. Vernon : 

1. Reuben K., b. Feb. 17, 1836, left Mt. Vernon, 1861, lived in Mil- 
ford. Has resided in Nashua for several years, is unm. 

2. Sarah Eliza, b. March 30, 1838. m. Dr. David P. Stowell, resides 
at Waterville, Maine, no children. 

18. Ezra Batchelder, son of Ebenezer and Elizabeth Batchelder, b. 
March 2, 1792, m. his cousin. Lydia Batchelder, dau. of Capt. John Batchel- 
der. d. May 19, 1S75. She was b. February 11. 179:2. d. Sept. 29, 1882. 
He lived on his father's farm in the East District. Their children were 
b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. *Hiram, b. April 20, 1820. 

2. *George Gage, b. Nov. 16, 1824. 

3. Susan Frances, b. Aug. 4, 1827, m. Sanford Trow, Aug. 3, 1847, 
son of Richard Trow of Hopkinton. They lived in Milford. moved from 
there to Haverhill. Mass., had several children. 

4. Charles, b. Jan. 29, 1830, m. Dec. 15, 1853, Sarah J. Dinsmore of 
Londonderry. X. H., she d. Feb. 5. 1858, aged 28 years. 1 month. He d. 
Jan. 18, 1856, Nashua, N. H. 

5. John A., b. Dec. 29, 1831, d. March 24, 1859. 

6. Xancy Richards, b. Feb. 4, 1834, d. at Wareham. Mass., unm., Jan. 
26, 1892. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 19 

Deacon John Batchelder, son of Capt. John and Betsey B. Batchelder, 
b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 14, 1780, m. (1) Sept. 13, 1802, Polly Hildreth, 
m. (2) Nancy Barnard of Peru, Vt. He d. Peru, Vt, June 9, 1851. By 
his first wife he had eight children : 
1. Mark. 

Fanny. 

Eliza. 

John. 

Lucy Ann. 

Edmund. 

Mary Ann. 

8. Mahala. 

By his second wife he had : 

9. Josiah. 

Edmund Batchelder, son of Capt. John and Betsey B. Batchelder, b. 
Aug. 5, 1787, m. Betsey, dau. of Timothy and Elizabeth (Kendrick) 
Jones of Amherst. She d. in Peru. Vt., July 9. 1869, aged 83 years, 3 
months. He d. at Peru. Vt.. July 23, 1869. Children probably b. in Ver- 
mont. Their children were ■ 

1. Ira K. 

2. Frances. 

3. Porter. 

4. Roxana. 

5. Amos. 

6. Hannah. 

7. Daniel. 

8. Charles. 

9. James. 

Perley Batchelder, son of Capt. John and Betsey B. Batchelder, b. 
July 26, 1794, m. (l) 1823, Rebecca, dau. of Benjamin and Mary (Hosea) 
Damon of Amherst. She was b. Feb. 12, 1800, d. July 4, 1840. He m. 
(2) Alsinda Wason of New Boston, who d. Nov. 18, 1870, age 66. He d. 
Oct. 22, 1878. He lived on the farm and buildings in the East District, 
now owned by Edward H. Best. His children, all by first wife, were: 

1. Clarissa D., b. June 12, 1825, d. Nov. 12, 1850, unm. 

2. Rebecca Jane, b. Aug. 4, 1827, d. July 28, 1828. 

3. Henry, b. July 28, 1829, m. Mary Anna, dau. of Samuel Brown of 
New Boston, Dec. 18, 1861. He d. of consumption, Jan. 19, 1863, aged 33 
years. His widow m. for second husband, Prescott Farrar of Hillsboro', 
April 11. 1866. 

4. Mary Jane, b. July 26, 1831, d. Lowell, 1903, m. Dec. 10, 1862, 
William A. Mack of Lowell, Mass., formerly of Amherst, where all their 
children were born. Maria A., b. Feb. 1. 1864; Emma, b. April 18, 1866; 
William L.. b. July 13, 1868 ; Julia, b. July 27. 1870, d. Aug. 15, 1870. 



20 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

29. Amos^ Batchelder, son of Capt. John and Betsey B. Batchelder, b. 
June 4, 1799, m. Sept. 1, 1831, Nancy, dau. of William L. and Nabby 
(Jenkins) Kidder. He lived in the smaller house on the farm in the 
East District now owned by E. H. Best. He d. Feb. 10, 1847. Their ch. 
were: 

1. Eliza E., b. Aug. 15, 1833. 

2. Abby Maria, b. Oct. 9, 1838, m. (1) Henry Winchester, Feb. 14, 
1855. He d. 1856. She m. (2) William Ryerson of Roxbury, Mass, 
children: William H., b. Wisconsin, March 31, 1859; Abby Francis, b. 
Dec. 8, 1862 ; Edith L., b. Wisconsin, April 9, 1865 ; Tillar, b. Aug. 2, 1870. 

33. Hiram Batchelder, son of Ezra and Lydia Batchelder, b. April 
20. 1820, m. (1) Jane Howard of Amherst, dau. of Henry and Polly O. 
Howard, Nov. 10, 1842. She was b. April 10, 1818, d. May 25, 1857. He 
m. (2) Mrs. Sarah A. Decatur of Mont Vernon, b. July 27, 1826. She was 
the dau. of James and Jane (Bixby) Upton, d. June 22, 1897. He settled 
in Reading, Mass., was a foundryman, children b. Reading. He d. Feb. 
1, 1883. His children all by first wife were: 

1. Nelson, b. Nov. 6, 1844, d. Feb. 19, 1857. 

2. Eleanor, b. Sept. 16, 1846, m. April 16, 1868, Edward Eaton. 

3. George, b. May 11, 1849, m. Jennie Wylie, July 31, 1870. 

4. Harlon, b. Jan. 6, 1852. 

5. Willie, b. April 27, 1854. 

Deacon George Gage Batchelder, son of Ezra and Lydia Batchelder, 
b. Nov. 16, 1824, m. Nov. 25, 1849, Mary Elizabeth Home of Dover, N. H. 
She was b. Aug. 10, 1826, d. June 23, 1899. He d. Jan. 8, 1896. Lived on 
his father's farm in East District, now owned by Vict. D. Gustine. Their 
children were b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Charles Albert, b. Oct. 20, 1850, d. unm, Nov. 11, 1885. 

2. George Herbert, b. July 18, 1852. 

3. Marcia Ellen, b. March 3, 1864, m. Jan. 9, 1890, Frank O. Lam- 
son of Mt. Vernon, has three children. 

Susan Frances Batchelder, dau. of Ezra and Lydia Batchelder, b. 
Aug. 4, 1827, m. Aug. 3, 1847, Sanford Trow, resided Milford, children 
were : 

1. Willie A., b. Sept. 26, 1860. 

2. Charles Albert, b. Sept. 3, 1863. 

3. Gracie Eaton, b. Dec. 10, 1869. 

4. George Eaton, b. April 14, 1876. 

BATTLES. 

Samuel Battles, Sr., came to Mont Vernon from Plymouth, Mass., in 
1813. He m. Deborah Atwood. He settled on the farm now of C. W. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 21 

Blood, in the East District. Three children, viz. : 1. William, 2. William, 
3. Louis, d. in infancy at Plymouth. He had six children when he came 
here, Deborah, Samuel, Jr., John, Edward, Louis and Sarah. Of these 
Edward and Louis grew up, but were not m. He d. 1864, age 93. Ch: 

1. Deborah, m. *Daniel Kendall, Dec. 31, 1818. She d. April 24, 
1871. 

2. Samuel Battles, Jr., m. Lydia Holmes, about 1820, moved from 
Mont Vernon to North Randolph, Vt, d. there April 16, 1880, had three 
sons, Charles, Lysander, and Edward (killed in the army) and several 
daughters. 

3. John, b. Aug. 14, 1797, m. Sarah Kendall, dau. Daniel and Sarah 
(Love joy) Kendall in year about 1827. She was b. July 26, 1794, d. 
March 6, 1858. He d. Dec. 11, 1877, had adopted son, Samuel F. Living- 
stone. 

4. Edward. 

5. Louis. 

6. Sarah, m. *George Jones, about 1831. She had three sons and 
three daughters. She d. Jan. 2, 1894. 

7. *Thomas W., b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 17, 1817. 

Thomas W. Battles, son of Samuel, Sr., and Deborah (Atwood) Bat- 
tles, b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 17, 1817, m. Lucy M. Stevens, June 1, 1837. 
She was b. in Mont Vernon, Oct. 23, 1818, d. Decatur, 111., Aug. 8, 1900. 
He lived for many years on the farm owned and occupied by Charles W. 
Blood. He moved to Decatur, 111., several years since, where he now 
resides. Children b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Orintha M., b. March 5, 1838, m. March 14, 1861, John C. Roby, 
resides Decatur, 111. 

2. Charles W., b. August 18, 1843, m. Emma L. Spring, Aug. 18, 
1869, has two daughters. Flora E., and Ella L., both b. in Decatur, 111., 
where he resides. Carpenter. 

3. George W., b. March 23, 1851, m. Lizzie A. Parker of Goffstown, 
March 25, 1880, is in shoe business, resides Decatur, 111. 

4. Orrin W., b. Sept. 30, 1852, m. Ella E. Whittemore of Goffstown, 
June 15, 1886. Resides Decatur, 111. 

Children b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Alice E., b. Nov. 5, 1887. 

2. Maude, b. Aug. 29, 1889. 

BEARD. 

Charles Rodney Beard, b. New Ipswich, N. H., 1799, moved to Mont 
Vernon about 1825, formed a partnership in the tannery with Dea. Joseph 
A. Starrett, sold out and removed to Newport, N. H., came back here 
after his first wife's death, and bought out D. W. Baker's half of store. 
He was representative in 1856-1857. He d. in New Ipswich, Dec. 16, 



o9 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

1880, age 81 years. He m. (1) 1829, his cousin, Betsey J., dau. of Mark 
and Mahala Perkins, she d. Jan. 26, 1850, age 40. He m. (2) Fanny, dau. 
of Capt. William Bruce of Mont Vernon. She was the widow of David 
Boardman. She d. Nov. 13, 1873, age 62. Three children by first wife: 

1. Charles E., b. May 31, 1832, lived in New Ipswich. 

2. Sarah W., b. May 24, 1835, m. Jesse Hutchinson of Milford, lived 
in Baltimore. 

3. Frank. 

Samuel J. Beard, son of Samuel Beard, b. in Hollis, N. H., March 
23, 1836, came to Mont Vernon in 1860, enlisted in 22d N. H. Regiment; 
discharged for wound in knee, Dec, 1862. He was a helper in the fami- 
lies of John Follansbee and Henry F. Dodge many years. He entered the 
Soldiers' Home at Tilton in 1897, where he d. May 29, 1902. He was unm. 

Elijah Beard, came here from Hillsboro'. Children Elijah and Lucy 
Beard. 

1. Cyrene Adeline, b. Feb. 17, 1816. 

2. Stillman A., b. Dec. 17, 1817. 

BENNETT 

John H. Bennett of Canterbury, N. H, m. Polly Johnonnot of Goffs- 
town, N. H. He d. in Mont Vernon, Aug. 28, 1871, aged 58. She d. Aug. 
5, 1895, aged 89 years, 4 months. Children all b. in Mont Vernon were : 

1. Marden J., b. Dec. 3, 1836, d. Feb. 2, 1893, was a carpenter, unm. 

2. Elizabeth, b. March, 1839, d. Nov. 29, 1888. She m. *Clinton May, 
who d. May 18, 1877, age 46. They had three children. 

3. Alvan E., b. July 23, 1841, m. April, 1861, Ellen, dau. of Mark and 
Mary (Twiss) Putnam of Amherst, has three children, George, Mark P., 
Florence. 

4. Harvey, d. May 28, 1868, age 16 years (adopted son). 

BISHOP. 

Henry Bishop came from Marblehead, Mass., lived on the Joseph 
Conant farm in the East District 15 years, moved to the village and d. 
there Nov. 8, 1860, age 66. His wife, Sally D. (Barker) Bishop, d. 
Marblehead, Oct. 16, 1890, age 89. A child d. in infancy, March 13, 1841. 

BLANCHARD. 

George Walter, son of Timothy and Dorcas (Hood) Blanchard, b. 
Milford, Nov. 19, 1824, moved in the West District, Mont Vernon in 1876. 
He d. Nov. 2, 1896. He m. Delia Finnerty, b. Aug. 5, 1835, children: 

1. George D., b. 1862, farmer, lives Mont Vernon. 

2. James, b. March 4, 1865, d. at San Bernardino, Cal., Dec. 13, 1891. 

3. Walter J., b. July 6, 1870, m. 1895, Hannah J. Averill, one child. 
She d., 1901. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 23 

BERRY. 

Rev. Augustus Berry, b. Concord, N. H., Oct. 17, 1824, was principal 
of McCollom Institute from 1856 to 1860, thence went to Andover, Mass., 
to study theology, was settled as minister of the Congregational Church, 
Pelham, until his death, Oct. 10, 1899. He m. (1) Nov. 24, 1853, Miss 
Dora Richardson Snow of Peterborough, who d. March 15, 1873. He m. 
(2) in 1877, Miss Mary Currier Richardson of Pelham. No children. 

BLOOD. 

George A. Blood, b. Merrimack, N. H., 1804, was a soldier in the 
10th New Hampshire Regiment, d. in hospital, Nov., 1863, m. 1839, Alice 
Seavey Butterfield, b. Feb. 19, 1821, in Bedford. Children: 

1. *George Henry, b. Bedford, Aug. 5, 1845. 

2. Alonzo, b. Merrimack, 1846, m. Clara Pearson, has three sons, 
lives in New Boston. 

3. Mary Ann, b. Bedford, June 19, 1848, m. Henry J. West, of Am- 
herst, d. 1866. 

4. Eliza J., b. Merrimack, Sept. 27, 1854, m. Jan., 1874, J. Minot Har- 
vell, resides in Milford. Children : Sarah Alice, b. at Mont Vernon, Sept. 
5, 1875, m. Chandler of New Boston. Herbert Minot, b. Dec. 1, 1880, at 
Mont Vernon, resides Milford. 

5. Elizabeth E., b. Merrimack, Sept. 27, 1858, m. Dec. 28, 1880, 
James Kennett of Beverly, Mass., has two sons. 

6. Ida E., b. Bedford, July 16, 1860, dressmaker, unm.. resides Mont 
Vernon. 

7. *Charles W., b. March 26, 1862. 

George Henry Blood, b. Aug. 5, 1845, m. Nov. 27, 1897, Mary J. West 
of Amherst, b. Sept. 9, 1850. He d. Sept. 21, 1898. Farmer. Resided in 
North and South District (Justin Richardson farm). Children except 
Bessie b. Amherst. 

1. Harry G, b. May 2, 1869, m. April 27, 1892, Harriet M. Kittredge, 
dau. of Henry J. and Jane (Murray) Kittredge. Farmer. Resides North 
District. 

2. *Joseph H., b. June 24, 1872. 

3. Alice R., b. March 3, 1876, clerk, resides Mont Vernon. 

4. Charles E., b. March 25, 1879, m. Feb. 12. 1900, Ida Millay, resides 
Stoddard. One son. 

5. Bessie May, b. Mont Vernon, April 21, 1895. 

*Charles W. Blood, b. March 26, 1862, m. June 21, 1890, Ida J. Cod- 
man, dau. of Nathan and Hannah (Cree) Codman. She was b. W. 
Deering, Sept. 27, 1869. Children b. Mont Vernon. 

1. ' Helen M., b. March 18, 1891. 

2. Olive E., b. Feb. 28, 1893. 



24 HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 

Joseph H. Blood, b. June 24, 1872, m. Jan. 10, 1900. Myrtie A., dau. 
of Frank Brooks of Greenfield. He is senior partner of firm of Blood & 
Temple, village grocers. Children b. Mont Vernon : 

1. George B., b. Dec. 8, 1900. 

2. Jennie A., b. June 1, 1902. 

BOARDMAN. 

David Boardman from Halifax, Vt., settled in Mont Vernon in 1840, 
m. Oct. 6, 1842, Frances E., dau. of Capt. William Bruce. He d. July 25, 
1850, age 42. She d. Xov. 13, 1873, age 52. They had three children : 

1. Irving went to western New York, studied medicine, and is a 
practising physician there. 

2. Frances Estelle, d. Sept. 2, 1852, age V/ 2 years. 

3. Emily, d. March 14, 1849, age 18 months. 

BOHONAN. 

Walter Bohonan, son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Whitcomb) Bo- 
honan, b. Temple, N. H., Dec. 22, 1856, came to Mont Vernon in 1895, 
and settled on the Simeon F. Kendall farm in the East District. He m. 
Estella F., dau. of Henry and Frances (Marshall) Heald of Milford. She 
was b. April 22. 1868. Children: 

1. Elsie Marion, b. Milford, April 28, 1893. 

2. Frances Elizabeth, b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 3, 1896. 

3. Hattie Florence, b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 17, 1897. 

4. Bertha May. b. Mont Vernon. Nov. ?,. 1899. 

5. George W.. b. Mont Vernon, Sept., 1901. 

BOUTELLE. 

Lilly E. Boutelle, son of Joseph and Sarah (Eaton) Boutell, b. Am- 
herst, 1796, m. Feb., 1820, Phebe Holt of Temple. She was b. Jan. 8, 
1793, d. Oct. 27, 1847. He d. July 24, 1839, age 33, children were : 

1. George E., b. Amherst, June 29, 1825, m. (1) Mrs. Nancy S. 
Bohonan of Nashua, she d. March. 1867, m. (2) Ella A., dau. Albert B. 
and Harriet E. (Cummings) McCrillis of Francestown, b. Nov. 19, 1848. 
Children : Georgia Ella, d. young ; George Curtis, b. Feb. 12, 1871, in- 
surance solicitor, m. and res. Buffalo, N. Y. ; Edwin Tracy, b. Sept. 10, 
1873, d. Feb. 14, 1878; Carl Vernon, b. Mont Vernon, Dec. 26, 1884. 

2. Phebe A., b. Amherst, Dec. 26, 1826, d. Nashua, June 17, 1899, 

unfn. 

BOUTELL. 

Horace S. Boutell, son of Calvin Boutell, b. Amherst, N. H., Jan. 
24, 1822, m. Martha A., dau. Jesse and Nancy (Cochran) Trow of Mont 
Vernon. June 6, 1848. She was b. Mont Vernon, March 10, 1825, d. Am- 



HISTORY OF MOXT VERNOX. 25 

herst, N. H., Aug. 18, 1893. Mr. Boutell was a railroad engineer in 
Hillsborough, removed to Mont Vernon, lived on the farm now occupied 
by Maurice Herlihy in the South District, and on the Harwood place 
west of the village, thence removed to the Moses Hill's Place in Amherst, 
where he d. Oct. 14, 1896. Children: 

1. Martha E., b. Hillsboro', May 6, 1850, m. Henry A. Hill of Stone- 
ham, Mass., April 23, 1871, d. Amherst, N. H., April 18, 1876. 

2. Frank T., b. Hillsboro', March 22, 1854, m. Delia Foster of Marl- 
boro', Mass., Jan. 11, 1879, res. Amherst, N. H. 

3. George P., b. Mont Vernon. July 29, 1861, m. Hattie B. Tobin of 
Amherst, N. H., Oct. 14, 1896, d. Amherst, Oct. 25, 1897. 

4. Fred, b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 21, 1865, m. Martha E. Boutelle of 
Corinth, Me., June 10, 1897, lives at Amherst. 

5. Harry, b. Stoneham, Mass., Dec. 27, 1869, m. Anna C. Whiting, 
dau. Benj. B. Whiting of Amherst, Dec. 27, 1893, lives at Amherst. 

Reuben Boutell, b. Reading, Mass., 1760, m. Olive Bradford, moved 
from here to Antrim. A son. Chandler B., b. March. 

BRADFORD. 

William Bradford came here early in life from Middleton, Mass., 
m. (1) Mary Lambert, Jan. 18, 1737. She was b. March 11, 1718, d. Feb. 
18, 1770. He m. (2) Rachel Small. She was b. May 7, 1738, d. Jan. 26, 
1802. He d. 1791. 

Children by first wife : 

1. Samuel, b. about 1738, was a Revolutionary soldier, m. Anna 
Washer, d. in Antrim at Elijah Gold's, Feb. 5, 1813. 

2. Patience, m. Joseph Lovejoy of Amherst. July 9, 1761, had eight 
children, d. in Amherst, March 3, 1826, aged 85. 

3. Mary, m. *John Averill, d. Mont Vernon. August 21, 1814, aged 
73. She was baptized in Middleton, Mass.. 1742. 

4. *Enos, b. Nov. 3, 1744, m. Sarah Chandler of Bedford, Jan. 24, 
1769, d. of starvation, from a disease of the throat which prevented him 
from swallowing food. 

5. *Joseph. 

6. *William. 

7. Huldah, unm. 

8. Olive, m. Reuben Boutell, Jr., Nov. 11, 1789, removed to Antrim, 
1783. 

9. Eunice, m. Moses Pettengill, Feb. 4, 1779. 
By second wife : 

10. Hannah, b. May 20, 1773, m. James Tuttle, July 5, 1798. 

11. *Lambert, b. March 18, 1775. 



26 HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 

Enos Bradford, son of (1) William and Mary (Lambert) Brad- 
ford, b. Nov. 3, 1744, m. Sarah Chandler of Bedford, Jan. 24, 1769. He 
settled near his father in Mont Vernon. Their children were: 

1. Chandler, b. Nov. 20, 1772, d. Jan. 29, 1775. 

2. Enos, b. Dec. 26, 1774, d. Sept., 1797. 

3. Lambert. 

4. Sarah, b. 1780. 

5. Chandler, b. Aug. 13, 1783, d. Feb. 22, 1784. 

6. Nancy, b. 1792, m. Sept. 10, 1809, *John L. Lamson of Mont Ver- 
non, d. Jan. 23, 1812. 

Joseph Bradford, son of William and Mary (Lambert) Bradford, was 
a Revolutionary soldier, d. Medford, Mass., July, 1775, left two children: 

1. Molly, m. Robert Taggard, Sept. 20, 1793. 

2. Lavina. 

They were placed under guardianship, April 28, 1779. They had been 
previously cared for by Nathan Jones. 

William Bradford, Jr., son of William and Mary (Lambert) Brad- 
ford, m. (1) Hannah , and settled in Mont Vernon. She d. Sept. 

1, 1812, age 56; m. (2) Mrs. Lois Bruce, widow of Rev. John Bruce. She 
d. 1828, age 67. He was a Revolutionary soldier, and a prominent char- 
acter in the early history of the town. He removed in his old age to 
Barre, Vt, where he d. Oct. 25, 1816, aged 63 years. Maj. William Brad- 
ford, though and old man, commanded under Gen. Miller at "Lundy's 
Lane." He lived on the John Averill farm in North District. His ch. 
were : 

1. William, b. 1780, m. Mary Green, d. Barre, Vt., March 3, 1866. 

2. Joseph, d. Winchester, Tenn., Jan. 19, 1859, age 72 years. 

3. Mary, m. Daniel L. Stearns, d. Goshen, Aug. 1849. 

4. Leonard, m. Betsey, dau. Phinehas and Sarah (Hildreth) Jones, 
May 4, 1815, settled in Washington, N. H. 

5. Anne, d. unm. in Goshen. 

6. Lucy, m. Eber Curtis of Antrim, had seven children. 

7. Fanny, an adopted dau., m. Eben Averill of Milford, d. Feb. 12, 
1850, age 66. 

Lambert Bradford, son of William and Mary (Lambert) Bradford, 
m. Phebe Farnum. He d. Merrimack, Feb. 12, 1850, aged 75. Their 
children were : 

1. Polly, b. March 9, 1795, m. George Wiley, Jan. 1, 1818. 

2. William, b. March 16, 1797, m. Ruth Whiting of Merrimack, 
March 16, 1826. 

3. Minerva, b. Aug. 11, 1799. 

4. Nabby, b. Dec. 1, 1801. 

5. Susannah, b. April 6, 1802. 







HARRY H. BRAGG. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERXON. 27 

BRAGG. 

Harry H. Bragg, b. Springfield, Vt.. Jan. 4, 1813, m. (1) Malvina M. 
Wilkins, dau. Frederick Wilkins, Dec. 24, 1839. She was b. Feb. 25, 1819, 
d. Oct. 19, 1873. He m. (2) Mrs. Mary S. Bruce of Milford, N. H., Feb. 
11, 1875. He d. Nov. 11, 1883. He was an honest, straightforward man 
of business, kind and friendly disposition, and during the 30 years he was 
a citizen of Mont Vernon, his enterprise contributed largely to the pros- 
perity of the town and his removal after the burning of his factory in 
1864. was a serious loss. His children were all b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. Cordelia M J., b. Feb. 3, 1841. m. Henry J. Allen of Boston, Dec. 
3, 1874. She d. Feb. 19, 1882 ; no children. 

2. Alonzo W., b. Oct. 29, 1842, m. (1) Sept. 26, 1865, Sarah N. Hol- 
land of Boston, who d. He m. (2) Mrs. Mary E. Lamb of Revere, who d. 
He m. (3) March 20, 1884, Miss Mary Edgerly of Boston. He was en- 
gaged in active business, as a manufacturer and merchant in Boston for 
25 years, is now successfully retired with an ample estate which has been 
increased by fortunate investments. He is sharp and shrewd in financial 
matters. 

3. Ellen M., b. April 27, 1845, m. Nov. 1, 1868, Arthur J. Haseltine 
of Manchester, N. H., by whom she had one daughter. She m. (2) Feb. 
8, 1893, William G. Burnham of Mt. Vernon. She d. at Sharon, Mass., 
March 18, 1896. 

4. Henrietta E., b. June 29, 1849, m. Charles B. Dodge of Milford, 
Dec. 24, 1870, d. Aug. 2, 1873. 

5. Harry A., b. Nov. 29, 1854, d. Dec. 28, 1860. 

BROWN. 

Amasa, son of Joshua and Sally Potter Brown, b. Concord, Mass., 
April 16, 1808, d. March 10, 1883, settled in Mont Vernon in 1833, m. Sept. 
3, 1833, Maria, dau. of James Wilkins and Hannah Brown Wilkins of 
Carlisle, b. July 17, 1808. She d. Oct. 29, 1900. Children all b. in Mont 
Vernon. 

1. Joshua, b. June 29, 1834, d. Aug. 11, 1853. 

2. Rebecca D., b. March 6, 1836, m. October, 1859, Lorenzo A. Lane 
of Ashburnham ; one son, Elmer C, b. Oct. 15, 1867, m. Nov. 27, 1889, 
Mary Allen of Alfred, Me., have two children, res. Dorchester, Mass., 
Mrs. Rebecca (Brown) Lane d. Feb. 12, 1881. 

3. *James A., b. Nov. 7, 1837. 

4. Sarah P., b. May 25, 1840, lives on homestead, unm. 

5. Susan B.. b. May 25, 1840, d. May 26, 1840. 

6. George W., b. Feb. 11, 1842, d. while a member of Company B., 
Eighth N. H. Regiment at New Orleans, May 25, 1863. 

7. Hiram W., b. July 7, 1844, lives Mont Vernon. 

8. Charles D., b. Dec. 0, 1850, lives Mont Vernon. 



28 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

James A. Brown, son of Amasa and Maria Wilkins Brown, b. Nov. 
7, 1837, m. (1) May, 1856, Adeline L. Small. She d. Dec, 1863. He m. 
(2) Adeline A. Davis of Ashby, March 24, 1865. She was b. Dec. 21, 
1850. Children by first wife were : 

1. James, b. March, 1857, d. April , 1857. 

2. Clara M., b. May, 1860, d. Feb. 25, 1879. 

3. Sarah J., b. May, 1863, d. Dec, 1863. 
Children by second wife were : 

4. Susan E., b. July 17, 1866, m. Chas. Johnnott, resides in Nashua; 
one child. 

5. James W., b. Dec. 19, 1868, engineer. 

6. Albert Irving, b. June 23, 1870, m. resides in New Boston; has 
two children. 

7. Joseph Derby, b. July 8, 1873. 

8. Charles Reuben, b. Jan. 22, 1876. 

9. George Amasa, b. Nov. 8, 1878. 

10. Sarah Ellen, b. Oct. 16, 1881. 

11. Warren F., d. Feb. 24, 1887, age two years. 

12. Marion Blanche, b. July 9, 1889. 

John Dalton Brown, son of William and Tabitha (Boutelle) Brown, 
b. Amherst, Sept. 28, 1818, m. Dec. 25, 1849, Mary dau. Eli and Polly 
(Hidden) Buttrick. She was b. Pelham, N. H., April 11, 1828, d. Feb. 
22, 1903, at Milford. He came here from Amherst about 1864, lived on the 
farm by the big maple tree, now owned by C. O. Ingalls, then on the old 
poor-farm (now Edw. Hildreth's), thence to the Rollins' farm in East 
District. While driving his team, one of the stakes struck him in the 
neck inflicting a wound from which he died the next day, May 29, 1879. 

Children were : 

1. Alvah, b. Amherst, Feb. 12, 1850, d. April 14, 1850. 

2. Elwin, b. Amherst, July 11, 1852, d. Aug. 30, 1854. 

3. Martha J., b. Amherst, May 27, 1855, m. (1) Chas. O. Brooks of 
Greenfield, Sept. 23, 1874, by whom she had two children; m. (2) El- 
bridge K. Jewett, Dec 25, 1844, four children, res. in Milford. 

4. Lewis W., b. Amherst, Sept. 3, 1857, m. Martha Granicher, Dec. 
22, 1887 ; eight children ; reside in California. 

5. Ellen M., b. Amherst, Dec 5, 1859, m. Hubbard H. Sanderson, 
Nov. 23, 1881; two children; res. Milford. 

6. Otis G., b. Amherst, Jan. 21, 1862, res. in Milford, unm. 

7. Martin L., b: Mont Vernon, Jan. 16, 1866, m. Sept. 30, 1897, Bertha 
M. Lund, one child, res. in Milford. 

8. Hattie Eva, b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 4, 1868, d. Milford, Dec. 25, 

1888. 

9. Clara M., b. Mont Vernon. March 8, 1871, d. Milford, Dec. 7, 1883. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 29 

Mrs. Charlotte Brown, lived where Jay M. Gleason now does, in the 
forties and fifties. One dau. Charlotte, d. Sept. 9, 1844, aged 28. A dau. 
Julia Ann, m. *Elisha R. Manning, d. Sept. 9, 1877, aged 56 years. 

BROWNE. 

Rev. Donald Browne, b. London, England, Nov. 3, 1851, son of Donald 
and Sarah (Humphrey) Browne, educated in Devonshire, was a teacher, 
had charge of an Episcopal Mission School four years. Judge of District 
of St. Barbe's, Bombay, Newfoundland six years, studied theology at Bos- 
ton University, ordained 1889, preached at Tiverton, R. I., '1889 to 1892, 
was pastor of Broadway Congregational Church at Fall River, Mass., 
1892 to 1895, at Mont Vernon N. H. Congregational Church from Nov. 
1898 to Nov. 1900. He is now Rector of the Episcopal Church at Derry, 
N. H. He m. (1) 1874, in Birmingham, Eng., Miss Agnes Anderson, who 
d. 1890, two children by first wife. He m. (2) Mrs. Caroline (Crapo) 
Swain of Fall River, Mass., one child. 

3. Donald, b. Nov. 26, 1897. 

BRUCE. 

Rev. John Bruce, b. Marlborough, Mass., Aug. 31, 1757, d. in Mont 
Vernon, March 12, 1809, m. Lois Wilkins of Marlborough, Dec. 15, 1785, 
who after his death m. Major William Bradford. She d. in Mont Vernon, 
Feb. 12, 1828, aged 67. He settled in Mont Vernon in 1785, was the pastor 
of the Congregational Church from 1785 until his death in 1809. He was 
called the "good Mr. Bruce." He lived on the farm, now occupied by 
Miles E. Wallace, west of village. Their ch. were b. Mont Vernon. 

1. John, d. Dec. 14, 1786, age 6 weeks, 6 days. 

2. *John, b. Feb. 11, 1788. 

3. *James, b. Nov. 15, 1789. 

4. *William, b. Aug. 7, 1791. 

5. Lois, b. 1793, m. William S. Stinson, Sept. 12, 1816, d. Oct. 5, 
1823, had three sons. 

6. *Nathaniel, b. 1794, d. March 2, 1874. 

7. Fanny, m. Stephen Peabody, by whom she had children, lived in 
Montpelier, Vt. 

Deacon John Bruce, son of Rev. John and Lois (Wilkins) Bruce, b. 
Feb. 11, 1788, was representative, moderator, and deacon in the church 
here. He m. Dolly Durant. She was b. May 3, 1792, d. Aug. 28, 1871. 
He d. Jan. 19. 1872. He lived on his father's farm. He was also County 
Treasurer several years. Their children were b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Maria Jane, b. Aug. 21, 1814, m. Dec. 10, 1833, Dea. Joseph A. 
Starrett, d. Oct. 20, 1869, had four children. 



30 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

2. *John Erastus, b. Nov. 4, 1817. 

3. *Levi W.. b. July 21, 1821. 

4. *Alonzo Swan, b. July 3, 1826. 

5. Emily Frances, m. Nov. 15, 1849, William A. Starrett of Frances- 
town, d. Mont Vernon, Aug. 19, 1853, age 23. 

James Bruce, son of Rev. John and Lois (Wilkins) Bruce, b. Nov. 
5, 1789, m. (1) Sarah, dau. of Thomas Parker of New Boston. She was 
b. March 11, 1794, d. at Mont Vernon, Nov. 28, 1844, age 50 years. He m. 
(2) Mrs. Elizabeth Wheelwright. She d. May 1, 1883, age 82. He d. 
July 19, 1869, age 79 years, 8 months. He moved in Mont Vernon, moved 
to Lyndeboro', thence removed to Mont Vernon, where he d. Children all 
by first wife. 

1. John W., b. July 30, 1816, resides Medford, Mass. 

2. Sarah, b. April 14, 1820, m. May 6, 1846, Nathan Richardson of 
Lyndeborough, where she d. Aug. 3. 1888. She had four children, viz. : 
1. Edward B. ; 2. Sarah E., m. Stephen H. Dunbar of Wilton ; 3. Ella F., 
m. Eli Curtis of Wilton; 4. Harry J., lives in Lyndeborough. 

3. *Elizabeth, b. April 24, 1825. 

4. Clarinda F., b. Jan. 10, 1831, m. James H. Carr of Lyndeborough, 
has one son, Frederic B. Carr. 

5. James P., b. May 3, 1834, d. at Mont Vernon, April 11, 1854. 

Capt. William Bruce, son of Rev. John and Lois (Wilkins) Bruce, b. 
Aug. 7, 1791, in Mont Vernon. Lived in the village, was a blacksmith, m. 
Dec. 1, 1814, Hannah, dau. Peter and Betsey Woodbury Jones. She was 
b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 20, 1793, d. July 18. 1871. He d. July 21, 1871. Ch. 
b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Jane T., b. Jan. 1, 1816, m. March 26, 1833, Stephen Dunbar of 
Milford, son Rev. Elijah Dunbar, d. Manchester, Feb. 8, 1890. 

2. William G., b. Feb. 1, 1819, mechanic, lived in village, m. Augusta, 
dau. James and Hannah (Stevens) Whittemore. She was b. May 12, 
1825, d. Sept. 6, 1891. He. while hunting in New Boston, shot himself, and 
d. as a result, Oct. 27, 1883. He was representative in 1862 and 1863, 
two years. 

3. Frances E., b. 1821, m. (1) Oct. 6. 1852, *David Boardman, m. (2) 
Chas. R. Beard. She d. Nov. 13, 1873. 

4. Nancy B., b. Oct. 1, 1825, m. Sept. 23, 1843, *Thos. Haskell 
Richardson. She d. June 6, 1892. 

5. Artemas F., d. July 18, 1831, aged 10 months, 15 days. 

Nathaniel Bruce, son of Rev. John and Lois (Wilkins) Bruce, b. 
1795, m. (1) Frances Tay of Bedford, m. (2) Lucy Butterfield of Lynde- 
boro'. She was b. Dec. 12, 1803, d. Jan. 11, 1880. He lived firsf in South 
District, then in village where Walter Woods now lives. He d. March 2, 




NATHANIAL BRUCE, ESQ. 




JOSEPH H. A. BRUCE. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 31 

1874. Was a justice of the peace. He was County Treasurer from 1843 
to 1846. He was appointed postmaster in 1861 to 1873, and representative 
in 1830, 1831, 1832. 1833, 1840, 1841. Children by first wife. 

1. Maria, b. Feb. 10, 1817, d. young. 

2. Nathaniel F., b. May 25, 1819, m. (1) Harriet N. Oliver of Stone- 
ham, Mass., kept store in Wakefield and Billerica, Mass., 28 years (14 
years in each place). His ch. are: 1. Clarence M., a merchant of Billerica; 
2. Jasper, res. Billerica : 3. Romanzo L.. Methodist preacher of Vermont 
Conference, lives California ; 4. Eva Caroline, m. Orlando Hoyt, res. 
Stoneham, Mass. ; 5. Louis F., resides Stoneham ; 6. Nathaniel E., m. 
Emily J. Hatch, resides Stoneham. 

3. Frances Maria, d. at 12 years of age. 

4. Caroline, d. at 10 years of age. 

5. Mary, m. John Oliver, d. Portsmouth, N. H.. where she resided. 

6. Sarah Ann, m. Henry Oliver of Stoneham, Mass.. d. there Jan. 
31, 1884. 

7. Joseph Harvey Appleton, b. Oct. 30, 1833, m. (1) Emily, dau. 
Mark D. and Mahala (Jones) Perkins of Mont Vernon. She d. June 19, 
1860, age 26 years, 9 months. He m. (2) Elvira, dau. George Hoyt of 
Francestown. They had one dau. Emilie (now Mrs. Chas. Abbe of Pitts- 
burg, Pa.), m. (3) Mrs. Emma (Burton) Hoyt of Wilton. He was repre- 
sentative in 1870 and 1871. He is the proprietor of a summer hotel at 
Bethlehem, N. H., and a winter hotel at Lakeland, Fla. 

8. Frances M., m. Henry Mosman, by whom she had three dau.. 
Gertrude, Jennie, Frances. He d. April 23, 1880. She m. (2) June, 1887, 
Daniel Holley, res. San Jose, Cal. 

By second wife, Lucy Butterfield Bruce : 

9. *George Anson, b. Nov. 19, 1839. 

10. Lucy Augusta, b. May 28, 1841. m. July 10, 1861, Alfred Kirke, 
b. Harrison Co., Ohio, Feb. 16, 1832. Children: Allen B.. b. June 2, 1868; 
Harold B., b. Sept. 20, 1876. They reside in Chicago. 

John Erastus Bruce, b. Nov. 4, 1817. went to Milford, 1849, was a 
merchant there many years, m. June 16, 1846, Sarah J., dau. of James and 
Hannah (Stevens) Whittemore, b. Weymouth, Mass., May 22, 1827. Ch: 

1. Charles E., b. Mont Vernon, Dec. 18, 1846, manufacturer, res. 
Elmira, N. Y., m. 1873, Fanny McMurray, Troy, N. Y. 

2. Josiephine E., b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 26, 1848, teacher, res. Med- 
ford, Mass. 

3. Ella A., b. Milford, Nov. 24, 1850, m. Nov. 16, 1870. W. N. Robin- 
son, has three children, res. Milford. 

4. Emily F., b. July 2, 1853, m. Nov. 1874, Judge Walter H. San- 
born, res. St. Paul. Minn. 

5. Sarah W., b. Sept. 6. 1859, m. April 29, 1891, Edwin A. McCrillis, 
res. Milford. 



32 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



Levi W. Bruce, b. July 21, 1821, d. July 2, 1855, m. Dec. 18, 1851, 
Alma, dau. Daniel and Olive (Proctor) Holt of Milford. She was b. 
Milfo'rd, May 24, 1834. She m. (2) 1857, *Dea. George E. Dean of Mont 
Vernon.' She d. Mont Vernon, Dec. 31, 1891. Mr. Bruce was a merchant 
tailor and lived in Milford. Children : 

1. Augustus Levi, b. Milford, Nov. 24, 1854, grew up in Mont Vernon, 
graduated McCollom Institute, graduated at a homeopathic school in 
Chicago, 111., is a successful physician of the osteopathy method at Utica, 
N. Y., has been an instructor in the Atlantic School of Osteopathy, 
Wilkesbarre, Pa. He m. Nov. 29, 1888, Miss Elizabeth Harris of Victory, 
N. Y. 

Alonzo Swan Bruce, son of Deacon John and Dolly (Durant) Bruce, 
b. July 3, 1826, d. April 27, 1892, m. May 31, 1865, Maria N., dau. Robert 
and Nancy (Smith) Tuten. She was b. Cambridge, Mass., Sept. 20, 1843. 
He was postmaster for several years. Children : 

1. John Alonzo, b. May 1, 1868, m. Nov. 22, 1894, Lizzie Blanche, 
dau. John F. and Mary E. (Hatch) Amsden, one ch., is a clerk and res. 
in Milford. 

2. Alice Frances, b. Nov. 22, 1874, d. Nov. 12, 1895. 

3. Robert Tuten, b. Dec. 26, 1876, res. at Mont Vernon. 

Elizabeth Bruce, dau. of James and Sarah (Parker) Bruce, b. April 
24, 1825, m. Dea. Nathaniel F. Mclntire of Lyndeborough, April 12, 1848, 
d. Feb. 2, 1903, in Lyndeborough. Children : 

1. Mary C, b. Feb. 28, 1851, m. June 9, 1874, *Jay M. Gleason, two 
children. 

2. Lois E., b. Oct. 11, 1854, lives in Lyndeboro'. 

3. Herbert B., b. July 3, 1857, m. Ida Woodward of Marlboro', N. H., 
is a doctor in Cambridge, Mass. 

George Anson Bruce, son of Nathaniel and Lucy (Butterfield) Bruce, 
b. Nov. 1'.). 1839, fitted for college at Mont Vernon, graduated at Dart- 
mouth in 1861, studied law one year with Hon. D. S. Richardson at 
Lowell. In August, 1862, he enlisted in the Thirteenth N. H. Regiment, 
and went to the front as first lieutenant of Company B. He served with 
distinguished bravery until the close of the war, holding at its close the 
position of brevet lieutenant-colonel. In 1865 he resumed his legal studies 
at Lowell. In 1866 he represented Mont Vernon in the N. H. Legislature. 
In 1866 he was admitted to the bar and opened an office in Boston, where 
he pursued his profession with an assured reputation as an able counsellor 
and advocate until recently. He is now retired. Establishing his residence 
in the city of Somerville, he was in 1877 elected its Mayor, holding the 
office three consecutive years. In 1883 and again in 1884 he was in the 
State Senate from his district, and the latter year its presiding officer. 




HON. GEORGE A. BRUCE. 




SYLVANUS BUNTON, M.D. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 33 

He now lives in Boston. He m. Clara M. Hall of Groton, Mass., by 
whom he has one child, who survives. 
1. Clara Augusta, b. Nov. 19, 1882. 

BULLARD. 

Edmund E. Bullard, son of Xahum and Keziah (Peabody) Bullard, 
b. Amherst, March 25, 1835, m. June 22, 1863, Rachel E. Roberts of Hub- 
bardton, Vt. He lived in the Proctor house (now burnt), near George 
C. Hadley, several years, moving to Amherst in the eighties. He d. Aug. 
6, 1901, at Amherst. Their children were: 

1. Lovicey J., b. March 23, 1864, d. Nov. 22, 1864. 

2. Charles D., b. Nov. 7, 1868, m. Abby A. White, June 26, 1890, 
lives in Amherst. 

3. Anna E., b. Oct. 29, 1871, m. Sept. 2, 1891, Willis M. Chandler, 
one daughter. 

John A. Bullard, son of Nahum and Keziah (Peabody) Bullard, b. 
Amherst, June 26, 1851, m. Xov. 23, 1875, Ida B., dau. Josiah and Sally 
( Farnum) Swinnington, b. May 25, I860, Mont Vernon. He resides in 
Lyndeborough. Their children are : 

1. Harry Orville, b. Mont Vernon, July 17, 1877. 

2. Winfield Stetson, b. Amherst, Sept. 5, 1880. 

3. Arthur Brooks, b. Mont Vernon, June 26, 1886. 

BUXTON. 

Dr. Sylvanus Bunton, b. Allenstown, N. H., March 8, 1812, graduated 
Dartmouth College, 1S40, studied medicine in Baltimore. First settled 
in his profession in Manchester, X. H., where he continued until June, 
1864, when he was appointed assistant surgeon of Seventh N. H. Regiment, 
promoted to surgeon, mustered out July 20, 1865. Then he settled in his 
profession at Hollis, and in 186S removed to Mont Vernon, X. H, where 
he d. Aug. 13, 1884. He m. (1) Dec. 17, 1846, Clarissa Conant. She was 
b. Hollis, May 1, 1S14, d. at Mont Vernon, July 3, 1873. He m. (2) Dec. 
1S74, Sarah J., dau. Capt. James T. and Sally (Gillis) Trevitt. She was 
1). Mont Vernon, Sept. 22, ISIS, d. Mont Vernon, Dec. 26, 1899. Children 
by first wife : 

1. Henry S., b. Manchester, N. H , April 6, 1848, m. in Winthrop, 
Mass., May 9, 1S80, Mary G. Giles. He is treasurer Hyde Park Savings 
Bank, Hyde Park, Mass. 

2. Leonard J., b. Dec. 28, 1858, d. 1859. 

BURXHAM. 

Azel W. Burnham, son of Col. Joshua Burnham of Milford, b. Mil- 
ford, May 15, 1787, was a farmer in Mont Vernon, where he d. April 24, 



34 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

1865, m. Sept. 20, 1816, Lydia H. Peabody of Mont Vernon, had eight ch. 
who reached adult age. 

1. David, d. Wilton. 

2. Azel, d. in Concord. 

3. Sabrina, d. Nov. 9, 1846, age 24, unm. 

4. Moses. 

5. *William P. 

6. Hiram, lives in Prescott, Minn. 

7. Matthew F., b. 1832, m. Fanny Follansbee, three children d. Til- 
ton, N. H. He d. April 28, 1895, aged 62 years. 

8. Walter, d. in Milford, leaving children. 

William P. Burnham, son of Azel W. and Lydia (Peabody) Burn- 
ham, b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 22, 1827, resided on farm of John Bartlett in 
Milford, d. there May 3, 1885. m. Nov. 12, 1850, Frances C, dau. John 
Bartlett. She was b. June 15, 1831. Children b. in Milford. 

1. Ella S., b. Nov. 30, 1851, m. Dec. 23, 1885, George C. Evans, re- 
sides Jefferson, N. H. 

2. Annie J., b. Aug. 5, 1853, m. Oct. 16, 1890, Walter Warren. 

3. Mary F., b. June 12, 1856, m. Sept. 23, 1880, George C. Hadley of 
Mont Vernon. She d. Mont Vernon, Dec. 15, 1881. 

4. Myra E., b. July 4, 1859, m. Oct. 5, 1882, Frank L. Macomber of 
Boston, resides Nashua. 

5. William W., b. May 17, 1862, res. Milford. 

6. Carrie I., b. July 24, 1869, m. Jan. 1, 1891, Cyrus W. Foss of East 
Raymond, Me., resides Nashua. 

Oramus Walter Burnham, youngest son of Thomas and Rachel 
(Conant) Burnham, and grandson of Col. Joshua Burnham of Milford, 
b. Antrim, May 25, 1827, m. (1) July 30, 1857, Ellen, youngest dau. of 
Capt. Daniel Hartshorn of Amherst, m. (2) Mrs. Ellen J. (Kittredge) 
Drury, dau. of Zephaniah and Elizabeth (Mclntire) Kittredge, Nov. 27, 
1884. She was b. Jan. 24, 1841. They lived in Mont Vernon, on the farm 
occupied by Stephen M. Carpenter, from 1888 to 1902, when they moved 
to Waltham, Mass. 

John Burnham, b. Dumbarton, d. 1826, aged 46, m. Sarah Hook 
Appleton, dau. of Rev. Joseph Appleton, D. D.. of North Brookfield, Mass. 
She d. Boston, Nov. 11, 1884, aged 90 years. Their children were : 

1. John A., b. Hillsboro', N. H., June 16, 1813, m. Miss Dennison of 
Stonington. Conn., had several children, graduate of Amherst College, 
1833, was first agent of the Stark Mills, Manchester, from 1839 to 1847, 
was then a cotton broker in Boston and travelled through the South buy- 
ing cotton for New England manufacturers ; accumulated a large fortune, 
estimated at $100,000, d. Aug. 23, 1883, aged 70. 

2. William, engaged in the cotton business in the South, d. unm. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNOX. 35 

3. Sarah, m. Capt. Augustus Whittemore, lived in Boston, had two 
daughters. 

4. Maria Theresa, m. George Dodge of Attleboro', Mass., resided 
Boston. 

William Gage Burnham, son of Norman and Nancy (Gage) Burn- 
ham, b. Lowell, Mass.. Sept. 15, 1850, m. (1) Oct. 20, 1875, Ell?n, dau. of 
Thomas H. and Nancy (Bruce) Richardson. She was b. Dec. 1, 1847, d. 
July 22, 1887. He m. (2) Feb. 8, 1893, Mrs. Ellen (Bragg) Haseltine, 
dau. Harry H. and Malvina (Wilkins) Bragg, and widow of Arthur 
Haseltine. She was b. April 27, 1845, d. Sharon, Mass., March 18, 1896. 
He d. at Holliston, Mass., April 18, 1901. 

1. Nellie Blanche, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 19, 1877, d. Aug. 24, 1877. 

Andrew Burnham, b. Wilton, Sept. 3, 1800, d. May 1880, m. Martha 
Hutchinson, June, 1823. She was b. Milford, Feb. 27, 1801. d. Oct. 17, 
1887. Came to Mont Vernon from Lyndeboro'. Lived in West District. 

1. William S., b. Feb., 1823, m. Gibbons, has children, res. Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

2. George W., b. Lyndeboro', May, 1824, m., lived in Nashua, is not 
living. 

3. Mary Jane, m. Charles Eaton, lives Long Island, has ch. 
Twins. 

4. Louisa, b. Lyndeboro', March 4, 1827, m. William Southworth. 
lived in Ashburnham. 

5. Lavinia, b. Lyndeboro,' March 4, 1827, m. Daniel Kendall of 
Brookline, left children, is not living. 

6. James A., b. Lyndeboro', drowned in Trow's Pond, June 22, 1851, 
aged 18. 

7. Israel, was a butcher, had a slaughter house in Mont Vernon 
several years, res. Nashua. 

8. Albert, b. Lyndeboro', Jan. 7, 1839. 

CAMBRIDGE. 

Charles Cambridge, an Englishman, lived in the South District, in 
a house, now torn down, on the Carleton farm. He had several children, 
one of whom, Edward, was an apprentice in the Cabinet office at Am- 
herst, d. of consumption, Aug. 1, 1807. 

Charles, m. Anna. dau. of Joseph Langdell, July 2, 1810, had five sons 
and two daughters : 

1. *Joseph L. 

2. William G, was a Universalist minister. 

3. Arthur. 



:56 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

4. Eleanor, was m. and lived in Lowell. 

5. Mary Ann, was m. and lived in Lowell. 

6. Henry. 

7. Charles. 

Joseph L. Cambridge, b. Mont Vernon, moved to Lowell, then to Am- 
herst, practised as a Botanic physician. He returned to Lowell. 

CAMPBELL. 

Henry Campbell came to Mont Vernon from Windham, between 1780 
and 1790. He was an active citizen here. He went to Antrim in 1793, 
and opened a store in the east part of Antrim, where he traded 8 years. 
In 1801 he was drowned while bathing in the Charles River near Bos- 
ton, whither he had gone to purchase goods. He m. Amy, youngest dau. 
of Dea. Oliver Carleton. She was b. May 24, 1769. She m. after her 
husband's death, William Grout of Acworth, had several children by him. 
She moved to Ohio and d. there. Henry and Amy Campbell had two ch. 
who were buried on "Meeting House Hill," in Antrim, in 1793 and 1796. 
He is supposed to have been the Henry Campbell who signed the Asso- 
ciation Test in Windham in 1776. 

Samuel Campbell, b. New Boston, long a single man, and long a 
teacher in Massachusetts, d. Sept. 27, 1867, aged 86. He came to Mont 
Vernon about 1830 and bought the Gurdy farm in the Southeast part of the 
town. He moved to the village about two years before his death. He was 
a quiet, sensible man, much respected, and served as school committee 
for several years. He m. Rebecca Kingsbury of Dedham, Mass. She d. 
July 24, 1878, aged 77 years, 5 months. Children : 

1. Elizabeth, d. Oct. 15, 1855, aged 22 years. 

2. *William Henry, b. July 30, 1835. 

William Henry Campbell, b. July 30, 1835, at Mont Vernon. He was of 
the firm of Conant (Walter S. Conant) & Campbell, in New York City 
12 years. He commenced the manufacture of paper boxes in Nashua, 
Nov. 1, 1S86, as successor to S. S. Davis. He m. (1) March 14, 1SG4, 
Helen A. George of Newport, N. H. She d. July 14, 1865. He m. (2) 
Helen A. Wing, dau. of Phillip Wing of Grafton, Mass., Nov. 24, 1870. 
She d. Aug. 26, 1891. Children: 

1. George Wing, b. Oct. 30, 1871, m. Frances Freeman of Boston, 
res. Nashua. 

2. Bessie Rebecca, b. Aug. 14, 1874, m. Seth S. Staples of Rondout, 
N. Y., res. there. 

Clark Campbell, son of Captain Daniel and Sabrina (Moor) Camp- 
bell, b. New Boston, March 17, 1836, m. (1) Ann A., dau. of Hiram and 
Serviah (Lamson) Perkins, Nov. 27, 1862. She was b. Jan. 15, 1838, d. 
August 16, 1900. He m. (2) July 2, 1902, Lillian J., dau. of William P. 




CLARK CAMPBELL. 




CASSIUS S. CAMPBFXL, 



HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 37 

Cooke of Revere, Mass. In 1857 he became associated in the store here 
with Daniel R. Baker, having purchased the interest of C. R. Beard. He 
was town treasurer from 1876 to 1899 ; representative, 1878 and 1879, and 
served as moderator many years. He was Democratic candidate for State 
Senator and High Sheriff at one time. He served from 1894 to 1899 as 
United States Marshall for the State of New Hampshire. Was ap- 
pointed Rural Mail Inspector in 1900. Children : 

1. Alice Perkins, b. Sept. 22, 1870, graduated Wellesley College, 
1895, assistant teacher in Milford High School, 1S95-1898, m. June 6, 
1899, Fred A. Wilson of Xahant, one child, Constance P. Campbell, b. 
April 13, 1900, lives in Xahant. 

2. Mary Grace, b. Oct. 14, 1873, d. Aug. 20, 1882. 

CARKIN. 

Charles Carkin of Lyndeborough, lived with his sister, Mrs. John 
Hartshorn several years on the Beech Hill Road. He d. unm., April 9, 
1888, aged 72 years. 

CARLETON. 

Edward Carleton, a freeman and man of importance in Rowley. Mass., 
in 1642, lived in Rowley some years, returned to England, b. in England 
about 1630. 

John settled in Haverhill, m. Hannah Jewett, had several children, d. 
Nov. 16, 1668. His son, Thomas, lived in Bradford, had five children, of 
whom George, the third child, was b. Sept. 26, 1702, in Bradford, m. 
Nov. 9, 1725, Mary, dau. of Samuel Hale of Boxford, to which place they 
removed in 1727 where she d. Nov. 28, 1780, age 75. He d. Feb. 13, 1783, 
age 80. They had five sons and two daughters, of whom the third, 
Thomas, b. Nov. 10, 1730. m. Jane Stickney, Nov. 28. 1754. She d. be- 
tween 1760 and 1770. He moved to Mont Vernon, m. (2) Mrs. Mary 
(Hartshorn) Weston, widow Daniel Weston, dau. of David and Sarah 
(Phelps) Hartshorn. Children: 

1. Thomas. 

2. Sally. 

3. David Hartshorn, left Antrim. 1820. 

4. Joseph Stickney, moved to Antrim, 1790, lived there in 1816. 

1. Edward Carleton. 

2. John Carleton. 

3. Thomas Carleton. 

4. George Carleton. 

Deacon Oliver Carleton, son of George and Mary (Hale) Carleton 
of Boxford, Mass., b. Boxford, Sept. 11, 1732. came to Mont Vernon about 
1760. He was a prominent man in the Northwest parish, now Mont Ver- 



38 



HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 



non. He was on the Committee that provided for soldiers' families in the 
War for Independence. It was related that he was so zealous to accomp- 
lish the completion of the first church building here (being on the Build- 
ing Committee), that he neglected his own work so, that he was obliged 
to sell a pair of steers to cancel his indebtedness. He m. Amy dau. of 
John and Hannah (Wilkins) Washer, 1761. She was b. in Middleton, 
Mass., d. 1812. He d. 1801. He lived on farm in South District occupied 
by his great-great-grandson, Joseph G. Carleton. Children: 

1. *John, b. Oct. 16, 1762. 

2. Rebecca, b. Jan. 21, 1764, m. Sept. 11, 1783, *Robert Parker, Jr. 

3. *Enoch, b. Sept. 15, 1765. 

4. Oliver, b. Aug. 23, 1767, m. Mary, dau. of Lieut. Joseph Farnum, 
removed to Vermont before 1800, had a large family mostly sons, and d. 
in Claremont about 1860, aged 92. He was a carpenter by trade. 

5. Amy, b. May 24, 1769, m. (1) *Henry Campbell, m. (2) Wm. 
Grout. 

6. Stephen, b. Oct. 23, 1771, studied medicine with Dr. B. Jones of 
Lyndeboro', settled in Acworth as a physician in 1803, and d. there in 
1857, aged 86 years, never married. He was a man of few words, a 
gentleman, very much esteemed as a physician, and valued as a citizen, 
was noted for his kind and generous assistance to deserving young men. 
He represented Acworth in the Legislature several years. 

Deacon John Carleton, son of Deacon Oliver and Amy (Washer) 
Carleton, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 16, 1762, d. Dec. 20, 1838, m. (l) Judith 
Weston, dau. of Daniel and Mary (Hartshorn) Weston. She was b. 
March 29, 1763, d. Xov. 25, 1824. He m. (2) Mrs. Tabitha (Wilkins) 
Gilmore, March 30, 1825. She was b. Oct. 28, 1774, d. in South Marlow, 
Sept. 16, 1848. He was a prominent, public spirited and respected citizen 
for many years, a Justice of the Peace, selectman and town clerk. In 
1800 he was elected a deacon of the church in place of his father who d. 
that year. Lived on the Carleton farm in South District. Children b. 
Mont Vernon. 

1. Clarissa, b. Sept. 9, 1781, m. William Davis of Acworth, who set- 
tled in Denmark, Me. She d. in 1869, had five sons and three daughters. 
1. William ; 2. John, settled in Xaples, Me., was a state senator two years ; 
3. Josiah ; 4. Oliver ; 5. Ezra, settled in Xashua, was first lieutenant in 
Company B., 7th X. H. Regiment, d. on board transport, Xew York har- 
bor, July 30, 1863 ; 6. Clarissa, d. unm. ; 7. Emma, m. a Mr. Pingree of 
Denmark, Me., had three sons; 8. Elizabeth, m. (1) Oliver Smith of Den- 
mark, Me., by whom she had one son, Peleg Smith, m. (2) George E. 
Dean of Rockford, 111. 

2. Judith, b. July 8, 1783, m. April 21, 1804, *Josiah Coburn, d. Oct. 5, 
1864. 

3. Emma, b. Aug. 21, 1785, d. of spotted fever, Feb., 1812. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 39 

4. *John, b. July 26, 1787, d. Jan. 14, 1868. 

5. Mary, b. Jan. 19, 1790. m. *Dr. Luther Smith, July 22, 1817, d. 
March 20, 1872. 

6. Daniel Weston, b. Dec. 5, 1791, d. in infancy. 

7. Daniel Weston, b. Nov. 26, 1793, d. in infancy. 

8. Achsah, b. July 21, 1795, d. Jan. 2, 1842. 

9. George, b. May 16, 1797, d. young. 

10. Lucy, b. May 2, 1799 d. young. 

11. *OHver, b. July 20, 1801. 

12. *Daniel, b. Oct. 27, 1805, m. Hannah Goodrich of Biddeford, Me., 
had four sons and a daughter. 

John Carletcn, son of Dea. John and Judith (Weston) Carleton, b. 
July 26. 1787, d. Jan. 14, 1868, rn. Fanny Lewis of Milford, b. April 9, 
1791, d. Sept. 10, 1863. He was an industrious, worthy farmer, living on 
the Carleton farm in the South District. Ch. all b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. nVilliam Davis, b. June 15, 1815. 

2. Emma Frances, b. July 19, 1818, d. April 20, 1826. 

3. Harriet Elizabeth, b. Sept. 19, 1823, m. Sept. 19, 1846, Luther 
Wiswell. She d. Sept. 25, 1859, one child, Emma F. Wiswell. b. July 9, 
1854, m. Gilbert A. Heald. 

4. *John Adams, b. Aug. 8, 1826. 

5. Abby Temple, b. Jan. 29, 1829, m. Spencer Guild of Milford, Oct. 
16, 1850. He was b. in June, 1820. d. Nov. 17. 1885. Children : 1. Fanny 
Carleton, b. Sept. 17, 1856, head Miss Gilman School, Boston ; 2. William 
Albert, b. March 7, 1862, insurance business, Boston ; 3. Frank Spencer, b. 
April 12, 1866, Art Editor, Ladies' Home Journal, Philadelphia. 

Enoch Carleton, son of Deacon Oliver and Amy (Washer) Carleton, 
b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 1, 1765, m. (1) Hannah, eldest dau. of Col. Stephen 
Peabody. She was b. July 2, 1768. He moved to Cambridge, Vt., prior 
to 1S00. had four children by this wife, viz.: 

1. Enoch, Jr., m. Rosamond Chadwick, had nine children. 

2. George, accidentally killed. 

3. Stephen Peabody, twice married, d. Dixon, X. Y., about 1842, 
left four children. 

4. Hannah, m. Luke Xichols. They d. about 1850, leaving four 
sons, 1. Jonathan, lives Westford, Vt. ; 2. Franklin, d. at 25 ; 3. Chandler, 
lives northwest part of Illinois ; 4. Levi, lives Westford, Vt. They are 
all sterling and energetic men. 

Enoch Carleton, Sr., m. (2) Eliza Thurston, two children. He d. 
Richford, Vt., Sept.. 1845, age 80. 

5. Levi Atwood, m. a Warner, both d. leaving a son Charles, who d. 
and left a widow and daughter in New York City. 



40 HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 

6. Caroline, m. Alden Sears, had six children, most of whom grew 
up and settled in California, and ultimately went to Oregon. 

7. *Andrew J., b. July 23, 1S28, m. Esther Brown, had three ch., 
lives Springfield, Mass. 

E. Carleton, m. (3) Clarissa (Goffe) descendant of Wm. Goffe. 

Oliver Carleton, Esq., son of Deacon John and Judith (Weston) 
Carleton, b. July 20, 1801, at Mont Vernon, prepared for college at Phillips' 
Academy, Andover, graduated Dartmouth College, 1824, tutor in Dart- 
mouth College, Aug. 1824 to Aug., 1826. principal of Academies in various 
places in Mass. and X. H. From 1832 to 1856 was principal of the 
Salem Latin School, Salem, where he distinguished himself as an able 
educator. He was afterwards head of private schools in Portsmouth. 
X. H. and Salem, Mass. He d. Salem, Mass., June 21, 1882. He m. (1) 
Margaretta, dau. Hon. Clifton and Margaret (McQuestion) Clagget of 
Amherst. She d. March 13, 1829, age 26. He m. (2) Louisa A., dau. 
Hon. Bailey Bartlett of Haverhill, Mass. She was b. Oct. 17. 1S09, d. 
June 20, 1840. He m. (3) Aug. 18, 1841, Mary Smith of Salem, Mass. 
She was b. Bath, X. H.. July 23, 1803, d. Salem, 1874. 

Children by first wife : 

1. Clifton C, d. in infancy. 
Children by second wife : 

2. Edwin Bartlett, b. Nov. 2, 1832, drowned at sea in 1851. 

3. William Jarvis. b. May 12, 1835, d. 1861, m. Eliza Ham of 
Danvers. 

4. Joseph George Sprague, b. Aug. 10, 1837, resides Lynn, Mass. 

5. Mary Louisa, b. Oct. 16, 183S, res. Salem. Mass., unm. 
Children by third wife : 

6. Harriet E., b. July 21, 1842, res. Salem, Mass., unm. 

Daniel Carleton, youngest son of Dea. John and Judith (Weston) 
Carleton, b. Oct. 27, 1805, m. Hannah Goodrich of Biddeford, Me., had 
five children. He d. in Biddeford, Me., in 1852. Children were: 

1. Caroline. 

2. Chas. Henry, d. at about 18 years of age. 

3. Daniel Freeman, lives in Springfield, Mass. 

4. Thomas Lord. , 

5. Benjamin, d. young. 

William Davis Carleton, son of John and Fanny (Lewis) Carleton, 
b. Mont Vernon, June 15, 1815, m. Dec. 27, 1840, Clarissa J. Wells of Goffs- 
town, b. June 25, 1818. He was for a time Master of the Yard of the 
Stark Corporation, Manchester, went West in 1847, settled respectively in 
Trenton, Beaver Dam, and Sun Prairie, Wis. He lived for many years 
and d. at Sun Prairie, Oct. 5. 1900. He was an active busmess man. Mrs. 
Carleton d. 1898. Children: 




REV. CHARLES C. CARPENTER. 
Thirteenth Pastor, L880-1885. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON, 41 

1. Frances Jane, b. Manchester, Feb. 23, 1842. 

2. William Mimroe, b. Manchester, Nov. 27, 1844, m. Margaret 
Graham, lives in Minneapolis, has two daughters. 

Twins. 

3. Emma Ellen, b. Sept. 14, 1847, in Wis., m. Oct., 1865, David 
Samuels, has two children. 

4. Anna Viola, b. Sept. 14, 1847, in Wis., m. 

5. Charles. Edwin, b. Sept. 26, 1850. 
6.' Mary Alletta, b. Feb. 20, 1852. 

7. John, b. July 10, 1858. 

8. Ernest, b. May, 1862. 

John Adams Carleton, son of John and Fanny (Lewis) Carleton, b. 
Aug. 8, 1826, m. June 14, 1848, Amanda Wilson, b. Norwich, Vt, Jan. 21, 
1827, d. April 28, 1896. He d. Milford, May 29, 1898. He lived on his 
father's farm in South District. His children were all b. in Mcnt Vernon. 

1. Ella Amanda, b. July 16, 1850. d. Sept. 2, 1852. 

2. John William, b. Dec. 17, 1852, m. June 12, 1883, Ida M. Adams, 
resides Manchester. 

3. Charles Frederic, b. Jan. 1, 1857, d. Jan. 4, 1857. 

4. Lilla, b. Aug. 4, 1858, m. William F. Easton, Dec. 25, 1880, lives 
in Wilton. 

5. Elmer E., b. June 29, 1861, m. 1894, Dora J. Pillsbury, d. Oct. 4, 
1894. 

6. * Joseph George, b. May 20, 1863. 

7. Will Stearns, b. Oct. 31, 1864, lives in Manchester. 

8. Fannie Lewis, b. Nov. 7, 1866, m. Oct. 26, 1893, George F. Averill. 
lives in Milford. 

9. Charles Gage, b. June 1, 1868, m. Oct. 11, 1894, Lillie M. Butler of 
Lyndeborough, has one son. and resides in Nashua, is a clerk. 

Joseph G. Carleton, son of John A. and Amanda (Wilson) Carleton, 
b. May 20, 1863, m. Nov. 25. 1891. Minnie B.. dau. of Otis and Hannah 
( Swinnington) Spaulding, of Mont Vernon. She was b. Milford, Sept. 1, 
1869. He resides on the ancestral farm in the South District. Children 
b. Mont Vernon. 

1. George Otis, b. April 29, 1894. 

2. Elmer Ellsworth, b. April 25, 1896. 

3. Alwin, b. April 7, 1897. 

4. Oliver Wilson, b. April 10, 1901. 

5. Abby, b. Dec. 7, 1902. 

CARPENTER. 

Rev. Charles C. Carpenter, was b. at Bernardston, Mass., July 9, 
1836. His father was Dr. Elijah W. Carpenter, a physician of that town. 



40 HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 

Mr. Carpenter fitted for college at Williston Seminary, Mass., and at 
Kimball Union Academy, New Hampshire. He studied theology at An- 
dover, and was ordained to the ministry at Montreal in 1860. He was in 
the service of the Canada Foreign Missionary Society, principally at 
Caribou Island, Labrador, from 1858 to 1867. In 1866 he was appointed 
financial superintendent of Robert College, Lookout Mt., Term., where he 
remained until 1872. In 1875 he became pastor of a church at South Pea- 
body, Mass., resigning in 1880, to accept a call to a less arduous charge 
at Mont Vernon. The honorary degree of A. M. was conferred on Mr. 
Carpenter by Hamilton College, Xew York. In 1885 he removed to An- 
dover, Mass. Mr. Carpenter performed his work here with energy and 
fidelity, so diligently and thoroughly that the impress long abided. He 
was a beloved pastor. He now (1902) preaches occasionally, and is editor 
of a department in the Congregationalist. He is a man of antiquarian 
tastes, and is extensively and accurately informed in many lines. He m. 
May 1, 1862, Feronia Rice of Auburn, Mass. Children : 

1. George Rice, b. Labrador, Oct. 25, 1863, graduated Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1886, now Prof. Rhetoric, Columbia University, m. Mary Sey- 
mour, has one daughter. 

2. Charles Lincoln, b. June 17, 1867, a graduate and post-graduate of 
Scientific School, Dartmouth College, 1888, m. Catherine F. Sullivan of 
Charlestown, Mass., one child. 

3. William, b. Feb. 9, 1869, studied at Amherst, three years, graduated 
Harvard University, 1890, m. Catherine Hoyt of Xewfane, Vt. Sub-Mas- 
ter High School, Woonsocket, R. I. One son. 

4. Jennie Bradie, b. Nov. 14, 1871, graduate Mt. Holyoke Seminary, 
1896. 

5. Miriam Feronia, b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 21, 1881. 

CARSOX. 

John J. Carson, son of John Carson and Hannah (Austin) Cars:n, 
of Lyndeborough, b. Lyndeborough, March 3, 1816, lived on the Carleton 
farm in the South District, and on the farm now owned by his son in the 
West District, m. Sarah Hopkins, dau. of James and Azubah (Curtis) 
Hopkins. She was b. in Mont Vernon in 1816, and d. Mcnt Vernon. Nov. 
18. 1887, age 71 years. He d. Sept. 15, 1S96, age 80 years. Children all b. 
in Mont Vernon except Emily. 

1. Emily J., b. Jan. 16, 1843, Milford, m. *David E. Upton of Xew 
Boston, resides Xew Boston, had four children. 

2. *George J., b. Oct. 18, 1848. 

3. Harriet J., b. Oct. 19, 1852, m. June 24, 1^79. Ira A. Parker of 
Mont Vernon, d. June 26, 1881, Deering. 

4. *Frank, b. March 26, 1855. 

George J. Carson, son of John J. and Sarah (Hopkins) Carson, b. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 43 

Mont Vernon, Oct. 18, 1848, m. Laura A., dau. David D. and Sophronia 
(Dickinson) Clark, of Lyndeboro'. She was b. Lyndeboro', March 7, 
1852. Farmer, lives in Lyndeboro'. Children b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Roy Clark, b. Dec. 8, 1879. 

2. Cora Alice, b. Sept. 20, 1881, d. March 5, 1889. 

3. Hattie Marion, b. Aug. 13, 1883. 

Frank Carson, son of John J. and Sarah (Hopkins) Carson, b. Mont 
Vernon, March 26, 1855, m. Aug. 24, 1880, Eda M., dau. of Frank and 
Mary G. (Hooper) Carson. She was b. New Boston, July 21, 1862, 
farmer, res. West District. Ch. : 

1. Fred, b. Mont Vernon, April 14, 1881. 

Alexander Carson, brother of John J 1 . Carson, b. Lyndeborough, Dec, 
1822, settled in the South District, m. Dec. 23, 1S43, Margaretta, dau. 
James and Azubah (Curtis) Hopkins. She was b. Dec. 14, 1823. Ch : 

Twins. 

1. Sarah Helen, b. Sept. 30, 1844, d. Oct. 14, 1S67. 

2. Mary Ellen, b. Sept. 30, 1844, d. May 4, 1860. 

3. Martha Ann. b. Feb. 28, 1846, m. *Wallace D. Hooper. 

4. John Washington, b. Nov. 16, 1848, m. Julia Dodge of Frances- 
town, Dec, 1884. She was b. June, 1850, dau. Adoniram and Maria 
( Bixby) Dodge of Francestown, lives in Francestown. Have ch.. Ralph 
D., b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 23, 1886; Forrest G., b. Francestown, Jan. 18, 
1890. 

5. Abbie L.. b. June 9, 1854, d. Oct. 14, 1867. 

6. Alwilda, b. July. 1855, d. Oct. 16, 1867. 

7. Nettie M., b. Feb. 20, 1860, m. March 29, 189S, Nathaniel F. 
Hooper of Mont Vernon, one child. 

8. Theresa D., b. May 6, 1861, d. May 16, 1867. 

Asa Carson, b. Francestown, March 10, 1810, m. (1) Edah Cooper. 
She d. Sept. 3, 1858, m. (2) Miss Annette Lee. She d. Sept. 6, 1886, age 
47. He d. 

Children by first wife : 

1. Jacob W.. b. May 27, 1840, d. unm. 

2. Frank S.. b. Sept. 26, 1842. 

3. Alonzo S., b. May 15, 1845. 

4. Eugene S., b. August 10, 1849. 

5. Edwin H., b. Dec 26, 1855, lives Nashua, m. Miss Hall, dau. 
Samuel Hall. 

Frank S. Carson, b. Sept. 26, 1842, son of Asa and Edah (Cooper) 
Carson, m. Mary G., dau. of Nathaniel and Lucy (Carson) Hooper. Ch : 

1. Eda M., b. New Boston, July 21, 1862, m. Aug. 24, 1880, Frank 
Carson. 

2. Jessie Estella, b. Brooklyn. N. Y.. March 9. 1864, m. John Har- 



44 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

veil of Amherst, May 2, 1884, two children. She d. April 26, 1900 in 
Somerville, Mass. x 

CHAPTN. 

Rev. Stephen Chapin. b. Milford. Mass., in 1778, a graduate of Har- 
vard in 1804, a pupil in divinity with the famous Dr. Nathaniel Em- 
mons of Franklin, Mass.. his first settlement was in Hillsborough from 
1805 to 1809. He was Pastor of the Mont Vernon church from 1809 to 
Oct. 1818. Having embraced Calvinistic Baptist views he resigned his 
pastorate. After a three years' pastorate as a Baptist clergyman at North 
Yarmouth, Me., he was in 1822, called to a professorship in YVaterville 
College, Me., and thence to the presidency of Columbia College at Wash- 
ington, D. C. which he occupied many years. 

Mr. Chapin was a man of positive convictions and bold, unadorned 
and uncompromising in his style of preaching. His earnest, able preach- 
ing and stringent discipline made a deep impression upon his people. 

He m. Sally Mosher, adopted dau. of Rev. Daniel Emerson of Hollis, 
Dec. 21, 1809. They had children. 

George S. Chapin of Auburndale. Mass., graduate of Bowdoin Col- 
lege in 1893, was the principal of McCollom Institute from 1898 to 1900. 

CHEEVER. 

Rev. Ebenezer Cheever was ordained minister of the Congregational 
Church here, Dec. 8, 1819. He continued pastor until April 8, 1823, with 
an addition to the church in the meantime, of twenty-two members. He 
baptized thirty-nine children in less than three years. In the spring of 
1820, the first Sabbath School was organized here, being held in the 
schoolhouse and composed exclusively of children. After leaving here, 
Mr. Cheever was pastor of a church in W'aterford, N. Y., and at other 
places and d. in 1866, age 75 years, in New Jersey. He was married 
twice, his first wife dying in Mont Vernon. 

CLEAVES. 

Nathan Cleaves, b. July 11. 1748. came to Mont Vernon, and settled 
before the Revolution. He was a tailor by trade, and owned and oc- 
cupied the farm now Jesse S. Trow's. He d. Aug. 25. 1812, age 64. His 
wife. Sarah, d. July 1, 1817, age 67. His children were: 

1. *Dr. Nathan Cleaves, b. Mont Vernon. 

2. Betsey, b. Mont Vernon, m. Oct. 2. 1796. Samuel Clark of Hopkin- 
ton, had several daughters. 

3. ^Nathaniel, b. Mont Vernon. 1778. 

4. Dorcas, b. Mont Vernon, m. John Kelso of New Boston, had 
several children. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 45 

5. *Joshua, b. Mont Vernon. 

6. John, 1). Mont Vernon, lived with his brother Joshua, was never m. 

Dr. Nathan W. Cleaves, son of Nathan and Sarah Cleaves, b. Mt. 
Vernon, 1773, studied his profession with Dr. Benj. Jones of Lyndeboro", 
settled in Antrim in 1793, and d. there in 1807, age 33. His fever was 
caused by a ten-mile walk on snow shoes to visit a sick woman. He m. 
Jennie Hopkins of Antrim. Ch. : Dorcas W.,* m. James Jameson, June, 
1812, d. in 1848. She was the mother of Nathan W. C. Jameson, who is 
the father of Nathan C. Jameson of Antrim, a Democratic politician of 
much note. 2nd ch. Robert Hopkins, m. Anne Jameson, Sept. 24, 1818, 
lived where his father died, was killed by a fall, Dec, 1843, left five ch. : 
Dr. C. left four other ch. : Solomon, John, Luther and Calvin. 

Nathaniel, son of Nathan and Sarah Cleaves, b. Mont Vernon, m. (1) 
Hannah Bradford, April 10, 1794, m. (2) Relief, dau. of Dea. Ephraim 
Barker, Jan., 1806. He lived in Amherst many years. He d. in Mont Ver- 
non, Dec. 16, 1850, age 72. Children : 

1. Miranda, d. April, 1803, age 5 years. 

2. James Barker, b. Constable, N. Y., Sept. 7, 1820, d. Amherst, Nov. 
IS, 1S50, m. Joanna, dau. of Capt. Daniel and Dolly (Hastings) Harts- 
horn of Amherst. She was b. 1S24, m. (2) Torrey, he d. Waltham, 

Mass., April 9, 1867, one ch., Lucy. Nathaniel Cleaves had other children. 

Joshua, son of Nathan and Sarah Cleaves, b. Mt. Vernon, 1787, was a 
farmer, lived on his father's farm, m. Elizabeth Lincoln of Leominster, 
Mass. He d. Jan. 13, 1868, age 80. She d. Nov. 4, 1856, aged 72. Ch. b. 
Mt. Vernon : 

1. Elizabeth, b. 1808, d. Jan. 17, 1S40, age 32 years, 6 mos. 

2. Nathan, graduate Dartmouth College, studied medicine, located 
in Mexico, and at Rio Grande. Mexico, was shot by two negroes, Feb., 
1849. His age was 30. 

3. *Wm. Lincoln, b. April 11, 1821. 

4. Lydia Ann, b. June 8, 1823, m. June S, 1843, Charles B. Tuttle 
of Amherst, had seven ch. She d. Milford, July 26, 1866. 

5. Augusta, b. April, 1826, a teacher, m. Benj. C. Jones of Chicago, 
had one daughter, d. Chicago, June 5, 1894, age 68 years, 2 months. 

William Lincoln Cleaves, son of Joshua and Elizabeth (Lincoln) 
Cleaves, b. Mt. Vernon, April 11, 1821, farmer, lived on his father's farm 
also dealer in lumber, m. Dec. 8, 1856, Harriet, dau. Rufus and -Inn 
(Blanchard) Crosby of Milford. She was b. March 3, 1832 in Milford 
He d. Sept. 26, 1860. One child: 

1. William C, b. Milford, Jan. 12, 1861, farmer, res. with mother 
is unm. 



46 HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 

CLEMEXT. 

Jesse Clement, son of Jesse and Mary (Cram) Clement, b. Weare, 
Sept. 1, 1796. His grandmother Clement was the youngest daughter of 
Hannah Dustin, of Indian fame. He moved with his parents to Unity. 
X. H., in 1805 ; m. June 30, 1829, Eliza Glidden, who d. Sept. 10, 1891, age 
86 years. She was the dau. of Stephen and Elizabeth (Jones) Glidden of 
Unit}-, and was b. July 20, 1805. In 1832, Jesse Clement removed to 
Lowell, represented Lowell in the Massachusetts legislature in 1837, 
thence to Mont Vernon in 1844, then Lyndeboro'. In 1850 he sat in the 
Xew Hampshire Constitutional Convention as delegate from Lyndeboro'. 
In 1852 he was an efficient promoter of annexing the part of Lyndeboro' 
to Mt. Vernon, in which his farm was located. The place is now owned 
by Edward G. Averill. He d. July 28, 1858, age 62. Children: 

1. Harriet Celinda, b. Lowell, Dec. 8, 1830, m. *Henry Hiram Trow, 
Oct. 8, 1856, d. March 31, 1897. 

2. ^Stephen Glidden, b. Lowell, June 15, 1833. 

3. Henry J., b. Lowell, June 16, 1837, d. Sept. 15, 1840. 

4. Mary E., b. Lowell, Dec. 26, 1838, d. Sept. 16, 1840. 

5. Ellen J., b. Lowell, July 13, 1841, d. at Antrim, Sept. 30, 1870. 

Stephen Glidden Clement, son of Jesse and Eliza (Glidden) Clement, 
b. Lowell, June 15, 1833, m. (1) 1865, Susan M. Butler of Antrim, who 
d. Sept. 18, 1867, age 33, m. (2) Josiephine E., dau. of Trask W. and 
Hannah (Perkins) Averill, b. Sept. 23, 1843, in Mont Vernon. He moved 
here from Antrim in 1877. He lived on the farm in Xorth District, now 
occupied by Harry G. Blood. He d. here, Oct. 21, 1888. She m. (2) 
Sept. 23, 1892, Frank Brooks of Greenfield. He d. May 20, 1903, one ch. : 

1. Gertrude E., b. Antrim, Nov. 30, 1872, res. Melrose Highlands, 
Mass. 

Dr. Thomas R. Clement, b. Landaff, X. H., was taxed here from 1852 
to 1860, in East District, served in 8th X. H. Regt., 10th X. H. Regt, and 
18th Regt., in Civil War, m. May 2, 1855, Juliette, dau. Timothy and Bet- 
sey P. (Gay) Hartshorn of Amherst, now resides Osterville, Mass. 

CLOUTMAX. 

Capt. Thomas Cloutman, b. Marblehead, Mass., Oct. 1, 1761, moved to 
Mont Vernon, about 1800, d. Nov. 18, 1825. He lived where C. J. Smith 
does, farmer. He m. Sept., 1788, Susannah Haskell, b. Sept. 23, 1759, d. 
Jan. 31, 1838. Their children were: 

1. Susannah, b. Dec. 26, 1789, d. Nov. 27, 1794. 

2. Ruthy, b. Oct. 23, 1791, m. *Jotham Richardson. Dec. 1, 1814. 

3. Sukey, b. June 5, 1795, d. June 13, 1812. 

4. *Thomas, b. May 13, 1799. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERXON. 47 

Thomas Cloutman, Jr., son of Capt. Thomas and Susannah (Haskell) 
Cloutman, b. Marblehead, Mass., May 13. 1799, d. Mont Vernon, Nov. 8, 
1884, m. Jan. 23, 1822, Nancy, dau. of Calvin and Esther (Wilkins) 
Stevens. She was b. Feb. 11, 1800, d. Feb. 15, 1877. He lived on Clout- 
man farm (C. J. Smith's) farmer, moved into village, was a tavern 
koeper. Children were b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. Susan, b. March 13, 1823, m. May 30, 1850, *Daniel Porter Ken- 
dall. She d. Jan. 8, 1897. 

2. Nancy A., b. Oct. 26, 1824, m. Sept. 24, 1846, *William A. Stinson. 
She d. Oct. 18, 1898. 

3. Esther Stevens, b. Sept. 28, 1826, d. July 30, 1828. 

4. Esther Stevens, b. June 21. 1828, m. Charles Gray, Nov. 16, 1848. 
She d. Feb. 2, 1851, age 22 years, 8 months, leaving one daughter, Mary 
A., who m. *Thomas Winters and res. Milford. 

5. Ruthey Ellen, b. Feb. 20, 1830, m. *John F. Colby. 

6. Thomas Haskell, b. March 7, 1832, d. Dec. 8, 1833. 

7. Sarah Emeline, b. May 6, 1834, m. *William H. Conant. 

8. Mary, b. 1836, d. March 15, 1841, age 4 years, 10 months. 

9. Elizabeth H. D., d. Sept. 4, 1840, age 2 years, 6 days. 

10. Mary Elizabeth, b. Oct. 24, 1840, m. Nov. 24, 1870, Frederick 
Davis of Falmouth, Mass. Ch. : 1. Adolphus, b. Dec. 23, 1871, d. young ; 
2. Marian Elizabeth, b. June 9, 1873, m. June 3, 1896. Alden R. Palmer of 
Wellington, O., one ch., Lawrence, b. 1899. She d. at Mont Vernon. Sept. 
1, 1901; 3. Edith Frances, b. Oct. 11, 1880. 

COBURN. 

Josiah Coburn, b. Dracut, Mass., March 31, 1775, lived there until 10 
years of age, d. Mont Vernon, April, 1826, m. April 26. 1804, Judith, dau. 
of Dea. John and Judith (Weston) Carleton. She was b. Mont Vernon. 
July 8, 1783, d. Oct. 5, 1864. Lived on Beech Hill Road. Children were 
all b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Daniel Weston, b. March 11, 1805, d. Oct. 18, 1835. 

2. *George Clinton, b. July 14. 1806, d. Nov. 24, 1835. 
Twins. 

3. Sabrina. b. Sept. 29, 1807, d. Feb. 9, 1808. 

4. Servilla, b. Sept. 29, 1807, d. Dec. 29, 1807. 

5. Sabrina, b. Aug. 31, 1809, d. Feb. 9, 1867, unm. 

6. *John Carleton. b. July 21. 1811, d. Dec. 17, 1856. 

7. Emma Carleton, b. Dec. 10, 1812. d. Dec. 27, 1834. 

8. Hannah, b. July 21, 1815, d. Dec. 31, 1842. m. Charles C. Durgin of 
Gilmanton. No children. 

9. Clarissa Davis, b. April 29, 1818. She m. Geo. W. Burns of Mil- 
ford, had one dau., d. Nov. 3, 1843. 

10. Samuel, b. Dec. 31. 1820, d. March 20, 1841. He m. Laura Lam- 
kin of Jay, Me. 



48 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. ' 

11. Henry, b. Dec. 3, 1823, d. Jan. 30, 1895, at Strafford, N. H., be- 
came a spiritualistic doctor, had an adopted dau. 

12. ^Stephen Chapin, b. Nov. 19, 1825. 

George Clinton Coburn, son of Josiah and Judith (Carleton) Coburn, 
b. Mont Vernon, July 14, 1806, m. March 30, 1831, Mahala, dau. of Daniel 
and Betsey (Durant) Secombe. She was b. in Mont Vernon, July 27, 
1806. He was a worthy mechanic and a devout Christian. He d. Nov. 
24, 1835, ch. b. Amherst. 

1. George E., b. March 11. 1832, m. Ellen Davenport of Canton, 
Mass., May 21, 1863, d. Fitchburg. Mass., Feb. 22, 1881, two children. 

2. Sabrina Frances, b. Aug. 2, 1833, d. May 14, 1848. 

John Carleton Coburn, son of Josiah and Judith (Carleton) Coburn, 
b. Mont Vernon, July 21, 1811, d. Mont Vernon, Dec. IT, 1S56, m. July 6, 
1835, at Lowell, Julia Holbrook. She was b. Frankfort, Me., Sept. 27, 
1809, d. July 20, 1892, at Salina, Kan. Children all b. in Lowell. He lived 
in Auburn, N. Y. several years. 

1. Charlotte Emma, b. Nov. 22, 1839, d. Auburn, N. Y., April 21, 
1869. 

2. Julia Amanda, b. March 2, 1843, m. July 28, 1860, Rev. William 
Simpkins of Auburn, N. Y. They now (1902) reside in Salina, Kansas, ch : 
1. Albert' Gallatin, b. Auburn, N. Y., Nov. 28, 1870, d. Dec. 23, 1872; 2. 
Emma Coburn, b. Salina, Kas., Nov. 15, 1873 ; 3. Louise Holbrook, b, 
Salina, Kas., Oct. 30, 1876; 4. Florence Lee, b. Salina, Kas, May 2 a , 1881. 

3. Elizabeth Alden, b. June 10, 1850, d. June 17, 1S70. 

Stephen Chapin Coburn, son of Josiah and Judith (Carletrn) Cobuin, 
b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 14, 1825, moved to Milford in the fifties. He carried 
on a shoe store there many years. He was Representative from Milford 
from 1879 to 1883, five years' Selectman, being Chairman of the Board 
four years. He now (1902) lives on a farm in the south part of Milford. 
He m. Sept. 11, 1856, Ann, dau. of Aaron K. Putnam and Polly (Shat- 
tuck) Putnam of Wilton. She was b. Wilton, July 26, 1826, children b. 
Milford. 

1. Mary E., b. July 9, 1857, m. April 8, 1880, Albert A. Gilson of 
Milford, two children, res. Walpole, N. FI. 

2. Florence S., b. April 13, 1859, m. July 13, 1887, Wm. H. Whit- 
more, res. Cleveland, O. 

3. Grace P., b. Sept. 9, 1862, m. April 30, 1865, Geo. A. Mclntire, 
one child, res. Milford. 

4. S. Carroll, b. June 26, 1866, m. 1896, Belle Goodwin of Milford, 
one child, grocer in Milford. 

5. Charles H., b. April 4, 1874, druggist in Barton, Vt. 

CODMAN. 
Dr. Henry Codman, b. Middleton, Mass., Jan. 25, 1744, d. in Amherst, 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 49 

March 14, 1812. His wife, Agnes, d. Jan. 19, 1808, age 69. He practised 
medicine in Amherst. Children : 

1. Henry Codman, Jr., studied medicine, practised in Mont Vernon, 
where he d. July 31, 1806, age 29 years. He m. Feb. 19, 1796, Rebecca, 
dau. of Joseph Langdell. She m. (2) Thos. Hamlin, May 3, 1837, and d. 
May 5, 1855, aged 76. Her remains rest by the side of her first husband 
in Mont Vernon Cemetery. 

2. Catherine, d. June 10, 1781, age 2 years, 3 months. 

Nathan Codman, b. Hillsboro' Bridge, m. Hannah Cree of New Bos- 
ton. He d. Dec. 17, 1874. She d. Aug. 29, 1881. Children b. West Deer- 
ing, N. H. 

1. George N., b. July 11, 1867, res. Mont Vernon, laborer. 

2. Ida Jennie, b. Sept. 27, 1869, m. June 21, 1890, *Charles W. 
Blood. 

3. Harry W., b. March 9, 1873. 

COGGIN. 

Joseph Coggin, son of Joseph and Mary Coggin, b. Reading, Mass., 
March 26, 1740, m. Ruth Hopkins, moved from Wilmington to Mont 
Vernon about 1778 and settled on Potato Street, in the East District. 
Their children were : 

1. *William, b. Wilmington, Mass., March, 1767. 

2. *Joseph, Jr., b. Wilmington, 1771. 

3. Hannah, m. (1) Fairfield, m. (2) Fairfield, d. in New 

Boston. 

4. Ruth, m. Fairfield, settled and d. in New Boston. 

5. Sally, b. August 28, 1782, m. McMillen, d. in New Boston. 

William Coggin, son of Joseph and Ruth (Hopkins) Coggin, b. 
Wilmington, in March, 1767, lived on the Stiles' farm, on Potato Street in 
the East District, was a blacksmith and farmer, d. Mont Vernon, Sept. 18, 
1856, age 89 years, 6 months, m. (1) Susannah Haseltine. She d. Sept. 
20, 1835, age 65; m. (2) Mrs. Mary Reed. She d. Sept. 20, 1871, aged 85 
years and 3 months. His children were b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Susan, b. Mont Vernon. 

2. *Nathaniel, b. Mont Vernon, 1802. 

3. John, m. Lucinda Lund, was a furniture dealer in Nashua. 

4. Nancy, m. William Kelso of New Boston. 

Joseph Coggin, Jr., son of Joseph and Ruth (Hopkins) Coggin, b. 
Wilmington, 1771, m. Sept. 5, 1795, Betsey, dau. of Josiah and Mary 
(Low) Herrick of Amherst. She was b. in Wenham, Mass., May 7, 
1769, d. in Mont Vernon, April 6, 1846. He d. in Milford, Jan. 10, 1849. 
They settled on the Coggin homestead on Potato Street in the East Dis- 
trict, where they resided more than fifty years. Children all b. in Mont 
Vernon. 

1. William, b. July 22, 1790, m. (1) Atness Batchelder, Dec. 1, 1814, 
m. (2) Mrs. Sarah (Duncklee) Peacock. He d. in Nashua, May 17, 1864. 

2. *Daniel, b. June 23, 1792, m. (1) Rebecca Brigham of Goshen, m. 
(2) Elizabeth Briar. He d. in Milford, Aug. 24, 1872. 

3. Betsey, b. May 22, 1796, d. in Amherst, Sept. 28, 1881, unm. 

4. Fanny, b. April 27, 1799, m. Moses Foster of Milford, d. May 9, 
1842. 



50 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

5. *Luther, b. Aug. 16, 1801. 

6. Mary, b. May 23, 1805, m. Levi Duncklee, d. Milford, Dec. 4, 1871. 

Nathaniel Coggin, son of William, Sr., and Susannah Haseltine Cog- 
gin, b. Mont Vernon, 1802, moved to Milford in 1835, resided in the South 
part of the town, was a blacksmith and operated a sawmill, removed to 
Wilton in 1855, d. 1870, m. (l) 1832, Hannah, dau. of Isaac and Mary 
(Dodge) Peabody, b. New Boston, 1805, d. Milford, Dec. 14, 1853. He m. 
(2) Eliza H, widow of Shubael Shattuck. She was the dau. of John and 
Sarah (Holden) Knowlton, and was b. in New Ipswich, July 12, 1799. 
She d. Jan. 23, 1863. Children: 

1. Chas. Henry, b. Mont Vernon, July, 1835, is a mechanic, resides 
San Francisco, m. (1) Oct., 1857, Julia A., dau. Eldad and Mary (Peter- 
son) Sawtelle of Brookline, N. H., m. (2) Emily C, dau. of George W. 
and Clarissa D. (Coburn) Burns of Milford, Nov., 1866, m. (3) Hannah 
Wright, a widow, dau. of Daniel and Elizabeth (Davis) McAdam, Jan. 
1877. 

2. Isaac Clinton, b. Milford, 1837, is a musician in San Francisco, 
m. July, 1860, Clara, dau. of Lemuel and Rebecca (Shattuck) Hall of 
Brookline, N. H. 

Daniel Coggin, son of Joseph, Jr., and Betsey (Herrick) Coggin, b. 
June 23, 1792, at Mont Vernon, was a farmer in Milford, resided on place 
near road to Amherst, where he d. Aug. 31, 1872, m. (l) Rebecca Brig- 
ham of Goshen, m. (2) Elizabeth, dau. of Joseph and Jane (Kelly) 
Bryer (or Briar), Feb. 1, 1845. She was b. Boothbay, Me., June 13, 
1808. Children by first wife: 

1. Eunice B., m. Joseph Sanderson of Nashua, d. there, 1892. 

2. Eliza, m. a Mr. Black of Roxbury, Mass., d. there. 

3. Rebecca, m. a Mr. Coolidge of Somerville. 

4. Emily, m. a Mr. Bemis of Waltham. 

5. Joseph, m. Roselle Bundy. 

6. Henry. 

By second wife: 

7. Frank F., b. Milford, March 9, 1847, resides Lynn Centre, Mass., 
m. Ellen M. Holmes, has three children. 

Luther Coggin, son of Joseph, Jr., and Betsey (Herrick) Coggin, b. 
Mont Vernon, Aug. 16, 1801, d. Amherst, Jan. 18, 1877, m. (1) Mary Har- 
wood, Sept. 13, 1827. She was the dau. of John and Mary (Carlton) 
Harwood, and was b. in Mont Vernon. April 13, 1807, d. Nov. 4, 1859. He 
m. (2) Mrs. M. W. Warriner of Bedford, March 15, 1860. He settled 
in New Boston, where he resided several year?, thence he removed to the 
Fletcher tavern stand in Amherst, where he d. Children were: 

1. Mary Augusta, b. March 16, 1830, m. Sept. 23, 1854. 

2. Luther, Jr., b. Jan. 2, 1835, m. Mary L. Carleton, May 9, J 861 
lives in Amherst, one son. 

3. *John H., b. March 10, 1838. 

John H. Coggin, son of Luther and Mary (Harwood) Coggin. b. 
New Boston, March 10, 1838, m. (1) Harriet N., dau. of Daniel and Eliza- 
beth (Austin) Secombe. April 9, 1866. She was b. Nov. 9, 1838, d. Jan. 
8, 1882, m. (2) Mrs. Dell Scavey of Nashua, Oct. 23, 1882, resides on the 
Fletcher place in Amherst, formerly owned by his father. Children: 

1. Frederick Lampson, b. June 11, 1870. 

2. *George Whitfield, 1). Nov. 28, 1871. 




JOHN H. COLBY. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 51 

George Whitfield Coggin, b. Nov. 28, 1871, moved to Mont Vernon, 
1897, is a blacksmith, m. Sept. 30, 1895, Nellie A., dau. of John and 
Frances (Little) Murphy of Milford. She was b. Milford, March 31, 
1874, one child: 

1. Guy, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 23, 1897. 

Francis Coggin, son of William and Atness (Batchelder) Coggin, 
was b. in Mont Vernon, March 17, 1820. He moved to Nashua early in 
life. He spent much of his time before and since the Civil War in the 
South. He was a pioneer in the cotton business, and a heavy owner in a 
large number of mills. He also owned a controlling interest in the 
Augusta, Ga., Chronicle, one of the largest newspapers in the South, of 
which he was formerly editor. Prior to the Civil War he was a slave 
owner. He d. in Nashua, Jan. 19, 1903. He was m. but left no children. 

COLBY. 

John Colby, son of John and Prudence (Dane) Colby, b. Weare, 
April, 1801, m. April 29, 1831. Mary H. Holt of Lyndeboro'. He d. 
Nov. 5, 1849. She d. at her daughter's, Mrs. John M. Haggett in Wilton 
in 1880. Children b. in Bennington. 

1. Samantha A., b. March 7, 1832, m. Nov. 11, 1851, John M. Hag- 
gett. son of James and Charlotte (Merrill) Haggett of Lyndeboro'. She 
d. Boston, May 16, 1884, one child, Carrie A., b. April 30, 1858. 

2. *John Freeman, b. March 3, 1834. 

3. Augustus Grovesnor, b. May 23, 1838, m. Dec. 31, 1859, Sarah M. 
Ames of Milford. She d. Aug. 26, 1867. One child, Charles F., b. Jan. 
31, 1861, d. July 17, 1861. Mr. A. G. Colby attended the academy here, 
and lived some years in Mont Vernon. He enlisted in the army from Mil- 
ford in May, 1861, discharged for disability in Aug., 1861. He enlisted at 
Lowell in 1862 in Second Mass. Cavalry under General Butler. Was 
wounded in engagement at Port Hudson in summer of 1863, carried to 
hospital at Baton Rouge, La., where he d. Sept. 2, 1863. 

John Freeman Colby, son of John and Mary H. (Holt) Colby, b. 
Bennington, March 3, 1834, d. while visiting in Hillsboro', June 7, 1890. 
He m. Jan. 24, 1861, Ruthey E., dau. of Thomas and Nancy (Stevens) 
Cloutman. She was b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 20, 1830. For extended ac- 
count of John F. Colby, see Chapter on ''Prominent Men," in History 
Manuscript. Their children were : 

1. John Henry, b. Randolph, Mass., June 13, 1862, m. 1891, Annie 
E. Comeilus of Boston, is a Boston lawyer, spends his summers at Mont 
Vernon, one child, John. 

2. Charles Dane, b. Mont Vernon. June 30, 1865, d. Sept. 2, 1865. 

3. Arthur Stevens, b. Boston, March 23, 1869, d. Mont Vernon, Aug. 
25, 1889. 

COLE. 

John and Tyler Cole lived in South District. John Cole was killed 
at the Battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775. 

CONANT. 

Roger Conant, son of Richard and Agnes Clarke Conant, b. East Bud- 
leigh, Devonshire Co., England, baptized April 9, 1592, m. in London, Nov. 



52 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

1618 to Sarah Norton, emigrated with his brother, Christopher, arriving 
at Plymouth in July, 1623, he being a Puritan and Separatist did not like 
and after a year went to Nantasket Hull in 1624. The next winter, 
1624-1625, he was emplo} r ed by the Dorchester Co., to manage all their 
affairs in fishing and planting as agent, and Governor in the fall of 1625, 
and there may still be seen the remains of a rude fort on the west side of 
Gloucester Harbor, called by its constructors. "Fort Conant." In 1625 or 
1626 he had 200 under his charge, but the business proved unprofitable 
and he having heard of a place called Naumkeag, induced the company 
to close up at Cape Ann, and establish him at Naumkeag, which they did 
after a loss of 3,000 lbs. sterling. After a couple of years, he was super- 
seded by John Endicott, in 1628. who came over from England, with a 
company of emigrants, representing a new company, who had purchased 
the interest of the Dorchester Company. In 1635-1636 he moved over to 
Beverly, to a 200-acre farm, which had been granted him, and built a 
house, which stood on the east side of Cabot, near Balch Street. Jona- 
than Conant (5th generation) was probably the last of the name who 
lived in it. He sold the northern part of the homestead farm to Dr. 
Ingalls Kittredge, who m. his dau., Sarah. Dr. Kittredge built a brick 
house, now standing. Roger Conant d. Nov. 19, 1679, in the 89th year 
of his age, place of burial unknown. Children were : 

1. Sarah, d. in infancy. 

2. Caleb, b. London, came with his parents to Massachusetts, re- 
turned to England and d. there in 1663. 

3. Lot, m. Elizabeth Walton, and had sons, viz. : Nathaniel, John, 
Lot, William, Roger. 

Roger's son Roger, b. Salem, 1626, first white child b. there. 

Jonathan Conant, 5th generation from Roger (Jonathan, 4; Lot, 3; 
Lot, 2; Roger, 1), b. Beverly, Aug. 9, 1737.. He lived in Beverly on the 
Roger Conant homestead till about 1783, when he removed to a farm on 
Cheny Hill. In 1791 he sold the Cheny Hill Farm and removed to Am- 
herst (now Mont Vernon). On the breaking out of the Revolutionary 
War, he was chosen one of the Committee of "Correspondence and 
Safety." At the Lexington alarm he marched from Beverly to Boston 
under Capt. Peter Shaw, he was afterwards paymaster in Col. Francis' 
Regiment, and then in Col. Tupper's, serving four years or more. In 1787 
he was one of the selectmen of Beverly, Mass., and soon after removed to 
Mont Vernon, where he d. He was the second justice of peace in Mont 
Vernon. He m. Jan. 30, 1758, Mercy Lovett. He d. in 1820. Children 
were : 

1. * Jonathan, b. April 11, 1760. in Beverly. 

2. *Lot, b. June 18. 1764, in Beverlv. 

3. Joseph, baptized Sept. 28, 1766, d. young. 

4. *Israel, b. Nov. 15, 1767. 

5. Sarah, baptized June 3, 1770. m. *Dr. Ingalls Kittredge. 

6. Josiah, baptized July 7, 1776, supposed to have d. young. 

Jonathan Conant, 6th generation (Jonathan, 5; Jonathan, 4; Lot. 3: 
Lot, 2; Roger, 1). b. B verlv, Mass., April 11, 1760, moved to Mont Ver- 
non with his parents, v Vre he d. Oct. 28, 1829. In 1803 his name appears 
in list of inhabitants r " Amherst. In 1811 he settled in Antrim, N. H, 
where he remained un'.! 1816, when he returned to Mont Vernon. He m. 




WILLIAM COXAXT. 
Deacon from 1S32 to 1875. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 53 

Polly Baker of Wenham, Mass., who d. April 26, 1834, age 69 years. 
Children : 

1. *Israel Elliott, b. Oct. 6, 1789, in Mont Vernon. 

2. Mehitable, m. (1) *Wm. Marvell, m. (2) 1843, *Ezekiel Upton. 

3. Ruth, m. William Morgan of Beverly. 

4. Nancy. • £ 

5. Mary, m. Marshall. 

6. ♦William, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 31, 1802. 

7. Fanny, m. Feb. 24, 1828, Hiram Reed of Nashua. 

Lot Conant, 2nd son of Jonathan Conant, Esq., and Mercy (Lovett) 
Conant, b. June 18, 1764, in Beverly, moved to Mont Vernon with his par- 
ents, where he d. 1833. He m. Mehitable Woodbury, who d. Dec. 6, 1844, 
age 77. She united with Mont Vernon Church, May 15, 1797. Children: 

1. Jonathan, d. young. 

2. Charlotte, baptized Aug. 16, 1801, m. Hezekiah Wallace of Beverly 
and had children. 

3. Eliza, b. 1803, m. 1820, *Jesse Averill, Jr. 

Israel Conant, 6th generation, 3rd son of Jonathan and Mercy 
(Lovett) Conant, b. Beverly, Nov. 15, 1767, went to Mont Vernon with his 
parents but returned and settled in Beverly, was a cooper, had wheel- 
wright house and shop, which he built. It still stands on Federal Street. 
Joined Dane St. Church, 1820, d. 1845, m. about 1809, Elizabeth Chapman, 
dau. Capt. Isaac Chapman. In Aug., 1816, they lived in Mont Vernon. He 
m. (2) Mary Cross. He had one dau., Joanna, who probably was never 
married. 

Israel Elliott Conant, son of Jonathan Conant, Esq., b. Oct. 6, 1789, 
in Mont Vernon. He moved to Antrim with his parents in 1811, and about 
the close of 1816 to New Haven, Vt. He d. Vergennes, Vt., 1857. He m. 
Eliza Holt of Antrim, Nov. 3, 1815, had five sons and two daughters. One 
of his daughters, Mary, m. 1820, Augustus Marshall of Dunstable. 

Dea. William Conant, 7th generation, son of Jonathan and Polly 
(Baker) Conant, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 31, 1802, removed to Somerville, 
Mass. He was deacon of the Mont Vernon church, forty-three years. 
He was a prominent citizen and worked earnestly for the town's develop- 
ment along the best lines, and was among those, who sought to give the 
community an exceptional position in regard of those who sought the 
best things. He m. Hannah Fornis of Beverly, Sept., 1828, b. Nov. 25, 
1805. She d. Dec. 11, 1883. He d. at Somerville, Mass., Feb. 20, 1890. 
Children all b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. *William Henry, b. June 5, 1829. 

2. *Albert, b. Oct. 19, 1830. 

3. *Charles Edwin, b. June 30, 1832. 

4. *Walter Scott, b. June 8, 1834. 

5. John, b. March 1, 1836, d. April 8, 1836. 

6. *Harlan Page, b. March 3, 1837. 

7. Martha Ellen, b. Nov. 30, 1842, d. Somerville. Mass., May 18, 1884. 

8. Fanny Lovett, b. April 1, 1844, m. June 21, 1870, *Henry A. Ken- 
dall of Somerville, Mass., d. April 8, 1901. 

9. Marcella Eliza, b. Dec. 3, 1845, m. *Dr. Charles M. Kittredge, d. 
Fishkill-on-the-Hudson, Aug. 4, 1892. 



54 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Deacon William Henry Conant, 8th generation from Roger Conant, 
son of Dea. William and Hannah (Fornis) Conant, b. Mont Vernon, June 
5, 1829. He was deacon of the Congregational Church here since 1875, 
and was active in church matters. He was for many years a member of 
Conant Bros. Co. He d. May 3, 1903, he m. May 25, 1854, Sarah Emeline, 
dau. Thomas and Nancy (Stevens) Cloutman. She was b. Mont Vernon, 
May 6, 1834. Children b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Ellen Frances, b. Dec. 18, 1857, m. Sept. 30, 1885, *Col. William 
H. Stinson of Mont Vernon, res. Goffstown. 

2. Ada Emeline, b. Sept. 6, 1859, m. Jan. 6, 1884, *Francis C. Green- 
wood. 

3. Willie, baptized April, 1861, d. May 3, age 4 months. 

4. Cecil Franklin, b. Feb. 20, 1863, d. April 18, 1873. 

5. Mary Grace, b. March 24, 1865. 

6. Albert Fornis, b. May 6, 1869, m. Oct. 15, 1896, Beatrice E. Sy- 
monds of Salem, Mass., one daughter, resides in Boston. 

7. Freddie, b. Dec. 17, 1872, d. Aug. 16, 1873. 

8. Ruth Stevens, b. Nov. 26, 1876. 

Deacon Albert Conant, 8th generation, son of Deacon William and 
Hannah (Fornis) Conant, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 19, 1830, m. (1) Eliza 
Ann Beard, who d. Aug. 1, 1863, age 31 years, 7 months; m. (2) Susan 
Frances Bancroft, sister Dr. C. F. P. Bancroft. She was b. New Ipswich, 
Oct. 25, 1836, d. Charlestown, Mass., Jan. 30, 1885. Deacon Conant is a 
deacon in the Union Congregational Church, Boston, is a member of the 
firm of Conant Bros. Co., 73 Union Street, Boston. He has a summer 
residence in Mont Vernon. Children by first wife b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Isabel Eliza, b. May 23, 1859, m. George Greenwood, son of Dex- 
ter Greenwood of Hollis. " She d. East Orange, N. J., Sept. 2, 1890, age 
31 years, 4 months. 

2. Carrie Frances, b. Dec. 22, 1860, d. Dec. 27, 1860. 
Children by second wife b. Charlestown, Mass. 

3. Alice Bancroft, b. Oct. 19, 1868, m. April 20, 1899, Fred T. Wad- 
leigh of Milford, resides in Milford and has two sons. 

4. Annie Sanborne, b. Feb. 10, 1871, m. Nov. 20, 1901, William E. 
Horton of Boston, resides Boston. 

5. Harry Winthrop, b. Feb. 5, 1875, is a law student. 

6. John Bancroft, b. April 17, 1878, is an electrician. 

Deacon Charles Edwin Conant, 8th generation, son of Deacon William 
Conant, b. Mont Vernon, June 30, 1832, m. March 28, 1860, Marion Craw- 
ford Wallace of Manchester. She was b. in Antrim, May 28, 1835. He 
resides in Boston. Children b. Winchester. 

1. Charles Arthur, b. July 2, 1861, is a financial journalist. 

2. Grace Wallace, b. Sept. 8, 1864, m. Rev. Frederick H. Page, pastor 
of the Trinity Congregational Church, Lawrence, Mass. 

Deacon Walter Scott Conant, 8th generation, son of Deacon William 
Conant, b. Mont Vernon, June 8, 1834, d. June, 1900, New York City, 
buried in Mont Vernon. He was a Lieutenant in the War for the Union. 
For many years he was a manufacturer of wood, plush and leather boxes, 
and writing desks, in New York City, m. Mary Larkin Lewis of Boston. 
Children : 

1. Mabel Frances, b. Charlestown, Mass., June 1, 1867. 

2. Roger Lewis, b. April 1, 1873, at Jersey City, N. J., graduate of 
Columbia University, teacher in Porto Rico. 




WILLIAM H. CONANT. 
Deacon from 1875 to 1903. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 55 

Deacon Harlan Page Conant, 8th generation, son of Deacon William 
Conant, b. Mont Vernon, March 3, 1837. He is a member of Conant Bros. 
Co., Union Street, Boston, and resides in Somerville. He m. Feb. 16, 
1864, Sarah P. Chase of Boston. Children: 

1. Bertha Adams, b. Charlestown, Mass., Feb. 3, 1867. 

2. William Chase, b. Oct. 4, 1868, Charlestown, Mass., m. Miss 
Harwood of Decatur, 111. 

3. Helen Pearson, b. Nov. 11, 1870 at Charlestown, Mass. 

4. Sarah Florence, b. Somerville, Aug. 14, 1876. 

Joseph Conant, 8th generation (Ezra, 7; John, 6; John, 5; John, 4; 
John, 3; Lot, 2; Roger, 1), b. May 16, 1816 at Beverly, Mass., by trade a 
cabinet maker. He removed from Beverly to Mont Vernon and bought a 
farm in the East District, where he now resides. He m. Sept. 19, 1844, 
Abigail, dau. of John and Mary (Stewart) Elliott, b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 
9, 1826. Children: 

1. Abigail J., b. Jan. 31, 1847, m. Stephen F. Hathaway of Beverly. 

2. Mary, b. Dec. 23, 1848, resides with her parents, unm. 

3. Alethea, b. May 20, 1850, m. John W. Bell of Beverly. She d. 
Sept. 27, 1900 at Beverly. 

4. Joseph Frank, b. May 11, 1856, in business in Boston. 

5. Charles E., b. Dec. 23, 1858, d. Woburn, Mass., Oct. 23, 1888, left 
a widow and children. 

6. Josiephine, b. May 6, 1861, d. Sept. 4, 1861. 

7. Willard E., b. March 21, 1866, d. New York City, March 22, 
1893, was a teacher. 

COX. 

George Wilbert Cox, b. Upper Stewicke, Col. Co., Nova Scotia, July 
9, 1856, m. Sept. 24, 1881, at Wolfeville, King's Co., N. S., Evangeline 
Davidson, b. Wolfeville, May 23, 1861. He graduated at Acadia College 
in 1880, taught school a few years, was then in business, took a post- 
graduate course at Harvard University, graduating in 1895. He was 
principal of McCollom Institute, Mont Vernon, N. H., 1895 to 1898, went 
to take charge of Bellows Falls Schools, Vt, in 1898, is now superintend- 
ent of schools, Ware, Mass. One child : 

1. Laurie Wilbert, b. Londonderry, N. S., Aug. 18, 1883. 

CROOKER. 

James M., son Melzar and Abigail R. (Cox) Crooker, b. Amherst, 
Feb. 28, 1816, d. East part of Mont Vernon, April 3, 1888, m. Oct. 19, 1842, 
Sarah J. Smith, b. Augusta, Me., Jan. 15, 1817. Children b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Mary E., b. Oct. 5, 1843, d. March 9, 1846. 

2. Joseph H., b. May 23, 1845, d. Aug. 21, 1847. 

3. James Henry, b. Aug. 3, 1847, m. Julia Hartshorn, Feb. 18, 1873, 
resides in Pennsylvania. 

4. Olive J., b. Oct. 7, 1850, d. unm., April 26, 1870. 

5. Sarah Ann, b. Oct. 24, 1853, m. (1) Oct. 7, 1871, C. A. Lowd, m. 
(2) David Rhodes, Aug. 17, 1879, lives in Amherst. 

6. Clara M., b. Dec. 26, 1858, m. Jan. 17, 1882, Leander B. Barker, 
has one child. 



56 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

CROSBY. 

Joseph Fitch Crosby, son of Joseph and Sarah (Richardson) Crosby, 
b. Amherst, Sept. 16, 1819. He m. March 28, 1847, Helen M., dau. of 
James J. and Lucy W. (Burnham) Averill of Mont Vernon. She was b. 
March 15, 1827, d. Milfprd, Nov. 14, 1879. He moved to Mont Vernon 
in 1855, living on his father-in-law's farm 13 years, in the South District, 
then removed to Milford. He d. Milford, March 11, 1900. Children: 

1. Grace Helen, b. Mont Vernon, June 13, 1858. 

2. Catherine Belle, b. Mont Vernon, May 21, 1860, d. Oct., 1894. 

' CURTIS. 

Jacob Curtis (or Curtice), b. Boxford, Mass., m. Mary Stiles of 
Boxford, Mass., May 26, 1752, settled first in Boxford, whence they 
moved about 1757 to Mont Vernon, served in the Revolution, was a tax- 
payer here, in 1804 moved to Antrim. He d. 1829, age 70. Children b. 
Mont Vernon. 

1. Lemuel, a Revolutionary soldier, m. Mary Smith, Feb. 9, 1779, re- 
moved to Antrim in 1804, had six children. 

2. Stephen, b. 1755, a Revolutionary soldier, m. Abigail, dau. of 
William Small of Amherst. She d. Jan. 10, 1782. He removed to An- 
trim in 1784, and d. there in 1832, had seven children. 

3. Isaac Palmer, b. June 23, 1758, a soldier at "The Cedars," and at 
Bennington. 

4. Ebenezer, b. June 9, 1760, a soldier in the Continental Army in 
1781, m. Sarah Parker, Dec. 29, 1784. 

5. Elizabeth, b. March 8, 1762, m. Isaac Carter, July 10, 1787. 

6. Marv, b. April 15 ,1764. 

7. John, b. Jan. 29, 1766. 

8. Asaph, b. May 3, 1768, d. Jan. 4, 1769. 

9. Asaph, b. Jan. 15, 1770. 

10. Abel, b. July 8, 1772. 

11. Sarah, b. Oct. 28, 1774. 

Levi Curtis, son of Benjamin and Lydia Earle Curtis, b. Mont Ver- 
non, 1792, m. Lydia Kinson (aunt of Geo. Kinson), of Mont Vernon. He 
moved to Antrim, Feb., 1825, d. there in 1861, leaving eight children of 
whom the seventh was Andrew J., b. Antrim, 1833, m. Lucy N. Barrett of 
Hadley, N. Y., May 4, 1856. Had eight children, the sixth of whom was 
Stillman E., b. Oct. 22, 1866, m. Lucy G. Murdough of Hillsboro', res. 
Mont Vernon. Children : 

1. Homer E., b. Nov. 6, 1896. 

2. Mabel M., b. Aug. 9, 1898. 

CARR. 

Alexander M. Carr, son of Dea. James and Ann (Patterson) Carr, 
was b. in Antrim, Dec. 15, 1791, m. Hannah Mcllvaine, April 18, 1817, d. 
in Amherst, Jan. 28, 1869. She was b. Oct. 6, 1792, d. Bedford, July 11, 
1879. They lived in various places in Antrim and Bedford, lived in Mont 
Vernon about five years, first on the "David Stiles" place in the East 
District, and then on the place now owned by Miss Lizzie R. Parker. 
He moved from here to Amherst, where he d. Jan. 28, 1869. Children: 

1. Sabra G, b. 1818, m. Abram J. Twiss, lived in Mont Vernon and 
Manchester. 




ALBERT CONANT. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 57 

2. Lorenzo C, b. Antrim, m. Caroline Hastings, d. Amherst, where 
he had lived 36 years, Feb. 22, 1903, age 82 years. One son, Edward N. 

3. Elizabeth M., unm., lived in Bedford. 

4. Mark M., m. (1) Emma Ferson of Goffstown, m. (2) Mary A. 
Clement of Hillsboro', d. Manchester, 1872. 

5. Hannah J., m. Timothy Jones of Amherst. 

6. Alexander M. Jr., d. unm., age 25 years. 

DALAND. 

Samuel Daland, m. Oct. 25, 1842, Sophia Goodridge, adopted dau. of 
Sardis and Charlotte Goodridge Johnson. She was b. in Bedford, Mass. 
He lived for many years on the farm now of George C. Hadley, moved to 
Milford, where he d. Sept. 17, 1887, age 76. She d. May 13, 1899, age 74. 

DAVIS. 

Benjamin F. Davis, son of Rev. Joseph and Alphia (Goldsmith) 
Davis, b. New London, N. H., July 4, 1826, m. Sept. 22, 1859, Caroline S., 
dau. of John and Hannah (French) Averill of Mont Vernon. She was 
b. in Mont Vernon, Nov. 15, 1832. They reside in Mont Vernon. 

DEAN. 

George Dean was son of Nathaniel and Abigail Ellis Dean, of Ded- 
ham, Mass., b. Oct. 3, 1766, m. Ruthy Morse, of Canton, Mass., March 7, 
1800, and went to Francestown, N. H. to live. Mr. Dean was a farmer 
and miller by occupation and owned the saw-mill and grist-mill at Mill 
Village. In 1817 he moved to Hopkinton, and 1820 to Dunbarton ; May, 
1821, Mr. Dean moved to Mont Vernon, N. H, and bought the farm 
owned by the Rev. Stephen Chapin, directly south of the meeting house. 
Here he remained until his death, which occurred after a long and pain- 
ful illness of over five years, Aug. 29, 1834; Ruthy Morse Dean d. Sept. 
8, 1872, aged 91 years, 9 months. Caroline (their daughter), b. in 
Francestown, April 23, 1801, m. Capt. Pliny Whitney, of Milford, N. H., 
Oct. 23, 1823 and d. in Milford, May 8, 1886. George Ellis (their son), 
b. in Francestown, Oct. 18, 1808. George Ellis remained with his father 
on the farm in Mont Vernon, N. H., as long as he lived, and at the age 
of 24, was made Lieutenant of the 5th Regiment, N. H. Militia. June 11, 
1837, m. in Mont Vernon, Augusta Kendall, of Leominster, Mass., dau. of 
Asa and Lydia (Adams) Kendall, and went to Concord, Mass., entering 
the business of stove dealer and plumber. Mr. Dean was made a deacon 
of the First Congregational Church and Superintendent of the Sunday 
School. In April, 1850, Mr. and Mrs. Dean returned to Mont Vernon, 
N. H, and June 10, 1855, Mrs. Dean died suddenly in Boston while at- 
tending a meeting of the American Board. June 30, 1857, Mr. Dean m. 
(2) Alma Holt Bruce, formerly of Milford, N. H., and bought the home- 
stead of Asa Kendall, where he remained until he died. Mr. Dean was 
chosen Superintendent of the Sunday School, in which capacity he served 
for 35 consecutive years, also Deacon of the Church, which position he 
filled until his death. Deacon Dean was one of the 8 citizens of the town 
who formed the first board of trustees for the building of an academy, 
one of the building committee when McCollom Institute was built (for- 
merly Appleton Academy), three years later and always remained an 
active trustee and promoter of the cause of education. He filled many 
town offices and always maintained the honor and respect of his fellow- 



58 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

men. Deacon Dean was one of the self-made men of his generation, and 
of the grand old Puritan stock. He d. Feb. 26, 1891. Alma Holt Dean d. 
Dec. 31, 1891. Helen Augusta (their dau.), was b. in June, 1858, and d. 
Nov., 1858. Harriet Alma (2nd dau.), b. Sept., 1860. Resides in Boston, 
Mass. 

DEARBORN. 

Dr. Samuel Gerrish Dearborn, b. Aug. 10, 1827, at Northfield, N. H., 
son of Edmund and Sarah Dearborn, educated at Sanbornton Academy, 
and New Hampshire Conference Seminary at Tilton. Graduated at 
medical department of Dartmouth College in Nov., 1849, located in prac- 
tice at Mont Vernon, Feb., 1850, removed to Milford in June, 1853. While 
there he served one year, fall of 1861 to fall of 1862, in the Eighth New 
Hampshire Regt. of Volunteers in Mississippi and Louisiana, as surgeon. 
In summer of 1864 he served three months as surgeon in the 9th Corps 
Hospitals in front of Petersburg, Va. Later he was commissioned sur- 
geon of the new 18th Regt, New Hampshire Volunteers, but the war ended 
before the regiment left the state. During Grant's first administration he 
was U. S. Pension Examining Agent for the Milford district. In 1868- 
1869 he was one of the two representatives for Milford in the state legis- 
lature. May, 1873, he removed to Nashua. He was one of the most 
eminent physicians in New Hampshire. He m. Dec. 5, 1853, Henrietta M., 
dau. of Dea. Joseph A. and Maria J. (Bruce) Starrett of Mont Vernon. 
She was b. in Mont Vernon, Sept. 29, 1834, d. in Nashua, June 29, 1893. 
He d. Nashua, May 8, 1903. Children : 

1. Dr. Frank A., b. Milford, Sept. 21, 1857, a practising physician in 
Nashua, m. a Miss Clara K. Laton of Nashua, has one child. 

2. Dr. Samuel S., b. Milford, Jan. 30, 1872, graduated Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1894, graduated from its medical department in 1898, resides 
Nashua, m. Miss May Chandler, dau. of John D. Chandler, Esq., of 
Nashua. 

DIKE. 

Benjamin Dike, a Revolutionary soldier, was killed in battle at 
Bemis' Heights, Oct. 7, 1777. He m. Dorothy Stearns. She m. (2) 
William Hastings. Children, Benjamin and Dorothy Dike, were: 

1. Betty, b. Aug. 18, 1772. 

2. Samuel Stearns, b. July 5, 1774, m. Flanders. 

3. Benjamin, b. Oct. 10, 1776. 

Stephen Dike, probably a younger brother of Benjamin, was placed 
under the guardianship of Dr. Henry Codman, March 31, 1779, being then 
above fourteen years of age. He seems to have served in Col. Moses 
Kelley's regiment for the town of New Boston in 1779. He was a son of 
Benjamin Dike of Tewksbury. 

DODGE. 

Richard Dodge, one of two brothers (William and Richard), emi- 
granted from Somersetshire, Eng., in 1638, and settled in the north part 
of Beverly, Mass., near the line of Wenham. He was b. in 1602, and d. 
in 1671, leaving a widow, Edith. He had five sons and two daughters. 

Josiah Dodge, 5th generation (Jonathan, 4; Jonathan, 3; Edward, 2; 




SAMUEL G. DEARBORN, M. D. 




HEXRY F. DODGE. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 59 

Richard, 1), b. Beverly, June 23, 1745. He lived on the old Dodge farm 
on Purgatory Hill. He lived awhile at Beverly, and went to sea till four 
years, after he was married. He m. May 14, 1771, Ellinor Edwards of 
Wenham, Mass., whose mother's maiden name was Abigail Allen. From 
Beverly he moved first to Wolfeboro', N. H., but in 1772, bought land in 
Mont Vernon. Children : 

1. Abigail, b. Sept. 19, 1774, m. *Ezekiel Upton of Mont Vernon. 

2. Molly, b. 1776, m. William Montgomery, went to Walden, Vt. 

3. Eleanor, b. 1778, m. Thomas Needham, lived near Montpelier, Vt. 

4. *Allen, b. Jan. 18, 1780. 

5. Malachi, b. April 8,« 1784, d. unm. on homestead, March 31, 1854. 

Allen Dodge, 6th generation (Josiah, 5; Jonathan, 4; Jonathan, 3; 
Edward, 2; Richard, 1), son of Josiah and Abigail (Allen) Dodge, b. 
Mont Vernon, Jan. 18, 17S0, d. Mont Vernon, Jan. 13, 1863, m. (1) 
April, 11. 1808, Abigail Langdell, dau. of *Joseph Langdell. She was b. 
Feb. 25, 1782, d. Oct. 17, 1812. He m. (2) .Alary Upton of Mont Vernon. 
March 6, 1S27, he m. (3) widow Rachel Emerson of Swansea, N. H., 
with nine children, one of whom was Robert Emerson, a prominent 
citizen of Nashua. She was b. April 20 ; 1780, d. July 27, 1868. He lived 
on Purgatory Hill on the homestead. No children by last marriage. 
Children by 1st wife : 

1. *Henry Codman, b. Mont Vernon, March 7, 1811. 
Ch. by 2nd wife, b. Mont Vernon : 

2. Allen, b. Aug. 7, 1820, m. Abby Hildreth, d. March 13, 1852. 

3. Betsey Upton, b. March 12, 1822. 

4. Mary Ann, b. April 3, 1824, m. Harvey Mason of Nashua, one 
son. She d. Nov. 2, 1858. One son, Charles A. Mason, b. May 3, 1853, 
yet living. 

Henry Codman Dodge, 7 (Allen, 6; Josiah, 5; Jonathan, 4; Jonathan, 
3; Edward, 2; Richard, 1), son of Allen and Abigail (Langdell) Dodge, 
b. Mont Vernon, March 7, 1811, taught school some when young, was a 
farmer in his native town, through a long life, was selectman for some 
years and representative in 1865. He d. Feb. 12, 1897. M. June 14, 1836, 
Sophia M., dau. of Robert and Rachel Emerson of Marlboro', N. H. She 
was b. Jan. 23, 1814, d. June 9, 1898. He lived on Purgatory Hill, moved 
to South District. Ch. all b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. *Henry Francis, b. May 17, 1838. 

2. Abby Sophia, b. July 1, 1840, m. March 20, 1866, William M. 
Hall of Bradford, Mass., who d. Dec. 9, 1871. She d. Dec. 13, 1875. One 
son, William H., b. Dec. 2, 1866, who is m. and lives in Bellows Falls, 
Vt. 

3. Rachel Anna, b. June 27, 1842, resides with her brother, unm. 

4. Emily Francilla, b. Aug. 15, 1845. She was an accomplished wo- 
man and a poetess of merit, m. Oct. 21, 1874, Thomas Simpson of Law- 
rence, Mass. He d. Jan. 25, 1885. She m. (2) James Simpson (her 
brother-in-law), of New York City, April 6, 1887. She d. July 22, 1887. 
He d. 1894. The Simpsons were of the firm of Simpson, Crawford and 
Simpson, large dry goods dealers in New York City. Two ch. : 

1. Oswald, L, b. Nov. 12, 1877, is m. 

2. Emily M.. b. Oct. 31, 1879, is now Mrs. Hunt. 

5. Ella Maria, b. Dec. 4, 1849, d. unm., March 5, 1871. 

Henry Francis Dodge, 8th generation (Henry C, 7; Allen, 6; 



60 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Josiah, 5; Jonathan, 4; Jonathan, 3; Edward, 2; Richard, 1), son of 
Henry C. and Sophia (Emerson) Dodge, b. Mont Vernon, May 17, 1838, 
a farmer owning the homestead of his great grandfather, Joseph Lang- 
dell, in South District, received academic education, has held the office 
of selectman and representative, m. Jan., 1864, Laura Ruthy, dau. of 
William and Sarah (Smiley) Parker of New Boston, b. Dec. 20, 1844. 
Ch. b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. Flora Lillian, b. May 29, 1865, d. June 11, 1865. 

2. Fannie Laura, b. September 29, 1867, m. April 16, 1891, William 
D. Clark of Amherst, resides Amherst, and has two children. 

3. Clara Ella, b. Sept. 24, 1873, m. April 12, 1899, Fred A. Holt of 
Milford, resides Milford and has one ch. 

4. Allen Parker, b. Dec. 27, 1878, d. Jan. 12, 1879. 

5. Abbie Sophia, b. Sept. 6, 1880. 

DILLON. 

Lawrence Dillon, b. Middlesex Village, Mass., in 1837, came here 
with his family from Waterbury, Conn., in 1881, lived on the farm now 
occupied by Stephen Carpenter, removed to Waterbury, Conn., in 1887, 
where he now resides. He is a mechanic, m. Katherine, dau. of Pierce 
Holt of Lyndeboro'. She was b. in 1847. Children : 

1. Ulysses S., b. 1866, in Prospect, Conn., m. Nellie Humphrey of 
Waterbury, Conn., res. New Britain, Conn., is a tool-maker. 

2. Hattie S., b. Waterbury, Conn., 1868, m. E. Willis Bradley, lives 
Waterbury, Conn. He is not living. 

3. Walter, b. Waterbury, Conn., in 1872, is manager Boys' Club 
Work in Chelsea and Somerville, Mass. 

4. George, b. Waterbury, Conn., Aug. 20, 1875, is a mechanic in 
New Britain, Conn. 

5. Clara A., b. Jan. 1881, res. Waterbury, Conn. 

DOUGLASS. 

Daniel Douglass, m. Mehitable Johonnot of Goffstown. They lived 
in the valley in the East District. She d. Nov. 10, 1887, aged 80 years, 
10 months. Ch. probably b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. Sarah, m. a Hooper of New Boston, had ch. 

2. Peter, lives in Henniker. 

3. James, m. (1) Esther W. Smith, dau. James and Catherine 
(Caswell) Smith of Mont Vernon, m. (2) Emeline, dau. of John 
Stearns. He lives in New Boston. 

George Oscar Douglass, son of Peter and Elizabeth (Bennett) 
Douglass, b. Mont Vernon, July 3, 1860, m. Rose Raymond of New Bos- 
ton, Dec. 14, 1888. He resided East Dist, now res. Gorgeville. Ch. 
b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. Ida, b. June 1, 1889. 

2. Frances, b. June 1, 1890. 

3. Ethel, b. May 20, 1891. 

4. George, b. Feb. 19, 1893. 

5. Arthur, b. April 22, 1895. 

6. Daughter, b. April 14, 1897. 

DUNBAR. 
Stephen Dunbar, b. Peterboro', son of Rev. Elijah Dunbar of Peter- 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 61 

boro', m. March 26, 1833, Jane, dau. of William and Hannah (Jones) 
Bruce of Mont Vernon. She was b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 1, 1816, d. Feb. 
8, 1890. He was a member of the Fifth N. H. Regiment Volunteers. 
He d. Dec. 21, 1862, aged 54 years. He lived in Mont Vernon village 
a short time, was a resident of New Boston at time of death. They had 
several children, among them being Stephen H. Dunbar of Wilton, who 
m. for his second wife, Sarah E., dau. of Nathan and Sarah (Bruce) 
Richardson of Mont Vernon. 

DUNLAP. 

Thomas Dunlap, b. Antrim, Feb. 22, 1803, m. Mary B. Averill, dau. 
of Levi and Mary Averill of Mont Vernon. He d. Aug. 17, 1865. She 
d. June 18, 1874, age 70. They lived in Antrim. They had 13 children, 
of whom Jane, m. Asa B. Lyford of Lowell. 

Thomas, b. Aug. 30, 1821, m. Lucinda Eaton, dau. James Eaton of 
Antrim. He d. 1848. She m. (2) ^Albert C. French of Mont Vernon. 

DURANT. 

Benjamin Durant of Dracut, Mass., kept store in this village, failed 
about 1815, held the office of representative here, was selectman 6 years, 
representative 5 years, 1811, 1812, 1813. 1814, 1815. M. Jan. 15, " 1804, 
Betsey, dau. Isaac and Hannah (Cole) Weston. She was b. Mont Ver- 
non, 1779. 

DUTTON. 

David Dutton, b. Wilton, May 26, 1792, was a mechanic, engaged in 
clock-making, lived here many years, was an amiable and industrious 
man. He d. Medford, Mass., April 22, 1882, m. Delinda Saunders of 
Brookline. She d. March 29, 1862. She was b. Brookline, Jan. 31, 1793. 
Children b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. Mary Ann, b. Oct. 5, 1814, m. Nov. 13, 1838, *Franklin Otis 
Kittredge of Mont Vernon. She d. July 31, 1902. 

2. Harriet, b. May 12, 1826, m. Feb. 1845, *Ira Hill, d. Sept. 6, 
1875. 

3. *Andrew J., b. March 15, 1831. 

Andrew J. Dutton, b. Mont Vernon. March 15, 1831, went to Boston, 
1865, is a merchant in Boston. M. Oct., 1865, Mary Jane Atkins, b. 
Georgia, 1835. Children : 

1. Charles K., b. 1861, d. 1881. 

2. Belle Atkins, b. 1865, d. 1869. 

3. Annie Atkins, b. Oct. 26, 1869, m. Alfred H. Colby. 

ELLENWOOD. 

A Mr. Ellenwood from Lyndeboro', a stone mason, built the house 
(burnt in 1896) near Geo. C. Hadley's, and lived there several years in 
the forties. 

ELLIOT. 

John Elliot, b. Newburyport. June 6, 1789, d. Mont Vernon, May 
8, 1878, m. Feb. 14, 1814, Mary Stewart of Antrim who was b. Feb. 17, 



62 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

1790, d. Feb. 11, 1879, at Mont Vernon. He came here about 1813, and 
settled on a farm, one mile east of Mont Vernon village. Children b. 
in Mont Vernon. 

1. Thomas, b. Oct., 1814, d. Newport, N. H., March 3, 1890, 
left children. 

2. John, b. July 5, 1816, d. Nov. 20, 1833. 

3. James, b. Sept. 15, 1818, d. May 27, 1901, Westfield, Mass., left 
three children. 

4. Mary Jane, b. July 27, 1820, resides on the homestead, unm. 

5. Benjamin, b. Oct. 14, 1822, lives Cedar Rapids, Iowa, has one 
dau., who is m. and has three children. 

6. Abigail, b. Feb. 9, 1826, m. Sept. 19, 1844, *Joseph Conant, live? 
in Mont Vernon. 

7. Andrew, b. April 14, 1830, lived Salem, Mass., d. Goffstown, Jan. 
24, 1898, had two children. 

8. Samuel, b. Nov. 14, 1831, lived in Stockton, Cal., since 1853, has 
three children. 

9. John, b. April 2, 1835, lived in Watertown, Mass., 25 years, re- 
sided in Mont Vernon since 1875, on the homestead, unm. 

ESTEY. 

Jesse Estey came from Dunstable, Mass., about 1810, kept the Ray 
Tavern in the village several years. He returned to Dunstable and d. 
there. He was a prominent citizen there. He had several sons, among 
them was Capt. Augustus, who was b. in Mont Vernon and d. in Galena, 
111., Oct. 30, 1882, age 72 years. 

EMERSOX. 

Widow Rachel Emerson of Swansea, N. H., m. March 6, 1827, *Allen 
Dodge of Mont Vernon. Her children by first husband lived with her 
in Mont Vernon. She was b. April 20, 1780, d. July 27, 1868. Children 
b. Swansea : 

1. Mary A., b. 1807, m. June 5, 1839, *Augustus B. French, d. Mil- 
ford, May 16, 1880, four children. 

2. Abbie F., d. Jan. 12, 1863, aged 55 years. 

3. Lydia, b. Nov. 26, 1809, m. Nov. 9, 1842, . George A. Nutt of 
Amherst. He d. July 6, 1845, for several years prior to her death she 
lived with her sister, Mrs. H. C. Dodge. She d. Jan. 18, 1897. 

4. Rachel, b. Jan. 23, 1814, m. June 14, 1836. 

5. *Henry C. Dodge, d. Mont Vernon, June 9, 1898. 

6. *Joseph H., d. May 20, 1851, aged 35. 

7. Fanny L., d. Oct. 27, 1836, aged 18 years. 

8. Robert, b. June 1, 1824, learned the trade of a tailor in Amherst; 
was a merchant tailor in Nashua many years, d. there Feb. 13, 1903. 
He m. (1) Sept. 30, 1847, Frances H. Vaughan of Woodstock, Vt., who 
d. Dec. 29, 1859. He m. (2) Jan. 23, 1862, Hannah P. Bullard of Mil- 
ford. No children. 

Children of Joseph H. and T. Emerson. 

1. Abby F., d. Aug. 15. 1850, aged 4 years. 

:.'. George F., d. Aug. 21, 1850, aged 1 year, 5 months. 

FAIRFIELD. 
Henry M. Fairfield, son of Benj. and Eunice (McMillan) Fairfield, 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 63 

b. New Boston, came here from New Boston in 1870, lived on the farm 
opposite East School house, moved to Nashua in 1885 where he died. 
He m. Sabrina, dau. Samuel and Eliza (Moore) Leach of New Boston, 
served in 16th N. H. Regiment in Civil War, from New Boston. Ch. : 

1. Annie E., m. George W. Gross of Nashua, res. Nashua. 

2. Sarah, m. Arthur M. Cotton of Nashua, res. Nashua. 

3. Mary, m. Harry W. Spear of Nashua, res. Nashua, two children. 

4. Benjamin, railroad engineer, is married, lives in Nashua. 

5. Walter, res. in Lynn, is in the shoe business there, is married. 
Miss Sarah Fairfield, dau. Benj. and Eunice (McMillan) Fairfield, d. 

in Mont Vernon. Jan. 5, 1894, age 67 years, 6 months. She was a sister 
of Henry M. Fairfield. 

FARNUM. 

Lt. Joseph Farnum settled on the farm now of Wallace D. Hooper, 
shortly after the incorporation of Amherst as a town. He was lieutenant 
in Capt. John Bradford's Co. at Bennington in Revolutionary War, and d. 
in Mont Vernon, May 10, 1824, aged 78. He m. (1) Mary Lyon by whom 
he had eleven children, m. (2) Mrs. Tabitha (Weston) Wilkins Bald- 
win, widow of Capt. Daniel Wilkins, Jr., and Jesse Baldwin, 
and daughter of Ebenezer and Mehitable (Sutherick) Weston. She 
was b. March 31. 1742. d. Mont Vernon, Jan. 1820. Her dau. 
Abigail Wilkins m. Timothv Dix of Boscawen. and was the mother of 
Gen. John A. Dix of New York. He m. (3) Edith Smith. She d. Nov. 
12, 1862, age 88 years. Children bv 1st wife b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. Sally, b. June 22, 1766. 

2. Abigail, b. Dec. 22, 1767, m. Peter Abbott, Oct. 25, 1788. 

3. Mary. b. Jan. 19, 1770, m. Oliver, son of Dea. Oliver and Amy 
( Washer) Carlton, Sept. 24, 1789, had several children, moved to 
Acworth. 

4. Phebe, b. May 12, 1772, m. *Lambert Bradford. 

5. Joseph, b. March 4, 1774. 

6. Susannah, b. March 27, 1776, m. Zachariah Bemis of Westminster, 
Mass., Jan. 10, 1797. 

7. Thomas, b. Jan. 26, 1778. 

8. Asa, b. Feb. 1, 1780, m. Arethusa Lovejoy, April 14, 1803. 

9. Betty, b. March 24, 1784. 

10. Lucy. b. May 3, 1786, m. a Benj. Fassett. July 10, 1811. 

11. Martha, b. , m. *Silas Wilkins of Mont Vernon, Nov. 21, 

1810. 

Children bv 2nd wife b. in Mont Vernon : 

12. Gera, b. Feb. 26, 1795. m. Sophronia Bills, Oct. 17, 1817, d. Rox- 
bury, Mass.. April 14, 1864. 

13. John, b. Aug. 15, 1796, m. Betsey Robbins of Nelson, N. H., d. 
Brighton, Mass., Sept. 30, 1845. Children: 1. John Robbins, b. May 12, 
1823, at Nelson, N. H., d. Waltham, Mass. 2. Elizabeth Ann, b. June 14, 
1825, at Mont Vernon. 

Israel Farnum. m. (l) Phebe Sheldon, Feb. 15, 1787. She d. Dec. 
2, 1824. He m. (2) May 17, 1825, Susanna, dau. Asa and Susanna 
(Town) Farnum. She was b. March 22. 1772. He d. 1842. Children 
b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Phebe. b. March 31, 1788. m. July 10, 1811, Ebenezer Lamson of 
Mont Vernon. 

2. *Israel, b. June 8, 1790. 



64 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

3. Amos, b. May 17, 1792, d. Oct. 17, 1812. 

Israel Farnum, son of Israel and Phebe (Sheldon) Farnum, b. 
Mont Vernon, June 8, 1790, m. Catherine Talbot. She was b. April 
5, 1788, d. May 16. 1875. He d. Dec. 30, 1861. Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Amos, b. April 14, 1816, had a son, Geo. H. Farnum, b. Dec. 22, 
1839, enlisted in the army from Milford in Civil War. 

2. Sarah J., b. Dec. 25, 1818, m. Oct. 27, 1842, Josiah Swinnington of 
Mont Vernon, d. Mont Vernon, Jan. 28, 1879. Five children. 

FITZPATRICK. 

William Fitzpatrick, b. Newport, R. I., Dec. 3, 1874, came to Mont 
Vernon in 1889, and worked for William Ryan twelve years, is now a 
medical student. 

FLANDERS. 

Elijah Clark Flanders, b. Dorchester, N. H., April 20, 1820, d. Sept. 
11, 1901 at Mont Vernon, lived on a farm in the southeast part of the 
town, m. June 1, 1845, Lovicey H. Pollard of Canaan. She was b. 
Feb. 20, 1821. They moved to 'Mont Vernon, Nov., 1883. Children b. 
Canaan, N. H. : 

1. Julia A., b. March 2, 1846, unm. 

2. Augustus B., b. Nov. 9, 1850, d. July 28, 1863. 

3. Alice M., b. Oct. 9, 1853, m. Wallace G. Fogg of Canaan, one 
child, George. 

4. Middleton G, b. Feb. 20, 1856, is married and resides Mitchell, 
North Dakota, has children. 

FLETCHER. 

Dexter Fletcher, b. New Ipswich, April 19, 1799, d. Mont Vernon, 

April 13, 1883, m. (l) Miss Felt of New Ipswich, m. (2) Eliza of 

New Boston. No children. He lived several years on Edward G 
Averill's place in West District. 

George Howard Fletcher, b. East Washington, N. H., March 6, 
1844, m. 1866, Luthera C. Barney of East Washington, moved to Mont 
Vernon in April, 1873, lived here about five years, where Chas. Henry 
Trow lives, left to take a position in Taunton Insane Asylum. 

FLINT. 

Simeon Flint, b. May 16, 1782, in Amherst, m. Sarah, dau. of Dea. 
Jacob and Sarah (Lamson) Kendall, Aug. 20, 1804. She was b. Jan. 
17, 1784, m. (2) Aaron Wilkins, Jr., of Amherst, Sept. 16, 1824. She d. 
Sept. 14, 1861. Simeon Flint and wife settled in the easterly part of 
Mont Vernon. Children b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Simeon K., b. Feb. 5, 1805, d. Nov. 23, 1879. Moved to Wilton, 
was postmaster there. 

2. Nathan, b. Oct. 8, 1806. 

3. Grisey, b. Oct. 17, 1808, unm. 

4. Jacob, b. Dec. 8, 1810. 

5. Eliza, b. Feb. 18, 1813, d. Dec, 1814. 

6. Daniel K., b. May 15, 1815. 



HISTORY OF .MONT VERNON. 65 

FOLLANSBEE. 

John Follansbee, Sr., b. Londonderry, N. H., moved to Mont Ver- 
non in 1856, lived many years where Henry F. Dodge lives, where he d. 
in Aug., 1877, aged 86 years. He m. Mary Eastman of Londonderry. 
She d. March 6, 1880, age 83.. Their ch. b. Londonderry : 

1. Edwin, b. Londonderry, 1817, d. there, 1901. 

2. *John, b. Aug. 6, 1819. 

3. Frank served in the War for the Union and d. in a Southern 
prison. He m. Ruth Morse and had one dau., now Mrs. George Q. 
Andrews of Hudson. 

4. James. 

John Follansbee, Jr., b. Londonderry, Aug. 6, 1819, m. Mary L 
Nichols of Londonderry. She was b. Hudson, N. H., Aug. 17, 1824. 
She d. Mont Vernon, Feb. 13, 1875. He d. May 2, 1881, age 62. He 
lived where Henry F. Dodge does. He served as corporal in 8th N. H. 
Regiment in Civil War. Children : 

1. Mary Ann, b. Nashua, April 8, 1847, m. May 7, 1868, Edward A. 
Lawrence of Londonderry, d. Jan. 31, 1902. Lived in Nashua and Wilton, 
two children. 

2. Frances, b. Londonderry, Dec. 25, 1848, m. Jesse R. Wilkins r 
Oct. 14, 1871, three children, res. Milford. 

3. Sarah Eliza, b. Londonderry, Sept. 18, 1852, m. Pierce Perham 
of Milford, one dau., Ada F., b. March 20, 1873, m. 1896, Frank W. 
Richardson of Milford. She d. March 15, 1878. 

4. John Wesley, b. Sept. 20, 1858, m. Angeline Cheney of Lynde- 
borough, Sept. 6, 1887. 

FORSAITH. 

Charles Forsaith, b. Deering, m. Jan. 2, 1854, Almira L., dau. of 
Joseph and Sarah (Perkins) Trow. She was b. Mont Vernon, May 11, 
1830, d. Mont Vernon, April 13, 1897. Carpenter. He resides with his 
dau. Mrs. Pinkham at Hyde Park, Mass. Ch. : 

1. Caroline Frances, b. Oct. 30, 1854, m. Dec. 25, 1876, *William F. 
Pinkham of Nashua, resides Hyde Park. Mass., three children. 

FOSTER. 

Peter Foster, m. Lydia Farmer, Andover, Mass., 1787. He is said 
to have kept tavern in Mont Vernon. His wife d. in Lyndeboro' in 
1840, and was interred in the southwest corner of cemetery, near the 
Baptist Church in Hillsboro', where he had been buried some years 
previous. Their ch. were: 

1. Samuel, b. Oct. 22, 1787. 

2. *Isaac, b. Aug. 5, 1790. 

3. Betsev. m. a Mr. Abbott, b. Sept. 27, 1792. 

4. Lydia, b. Nov. 16, 1794, m. a Mr. Haines, d. in Hooksett, March 
9, 1893. v 

5. Abraham, b. July 3, 1797, went to New Orleans. 

6. Hannah, b. May 27, 1799, m. a Mr. Berry. 

7. Lucy, b. July 21, 1801, m. a Mr. Pike by whom she had one son, 
Peter F. Pike, m. (2) Oct. 23, 1836, Warren Williams of Mont Vernon. 
She d. Mont Vernon, May 2, 1892. 

8. Sarah, b. Tune 12, 1804, m. (1) Francis Murdough of Hillsboro'. 



<56 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

who d. Dec, 1841, m. (2) Mr. Abner Knowlton of Windsor; a widower. 
She had no children. She d. Mont Vernon, Sept. 10, 1890. 

9. Permelia, b. Aug. 20, 1806, m. April 7, 1829, *Dr. Jesse K. Smith. 
She d. May 13, 1880. 

Isaac Foster, son of Peter and Lydia (Farmer) Foster, b. Aug. 5, 
1790, lived here a few years in the thirties, afterwards in Hillsboro', 
again in Mont Vernon, d. Wilton, April 10, 1872, kept tavern, was a shoe- 
maker. He m. Feb. 1, 1821, Jane, dau. John and Jane Allds of Merri- 
mack. She was b. May 31, 1801, d. 1874. Children: 

1. Harriett J., b. Merrimack, April 16, 1822, m. Dec. 20, 1842, John 
F. Goss of Merrimack, six children, res. Milford. 

2. *Newell Dean, b. Merrimack, July 21, 1833. 
Twins. 

3. Adaline, b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 2, 1825, d. Feb. 14, 1829. 

4. Abraham, b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 2, 1825, d. Sept., 1826. 

5. *Charles Abraham, b. Mont Vernon, March 6, 1828. 

6. Isaac Newton, b. Hillsboro', Aug. 21, 1832, m. Lucy J., dau. of 
Leonard and Hannah (Foster) King. He had a tin-shop in Wilton with 
his two brothers. He d. Wilton, Jan. 16, 1885. 

7. Samuel Kimball, b. Nashua, Feb. 9, 1838, m. Jan. 4. 1861, Hattie 
E., dau. Jeremiah Hood, lived Wilton where he d. Nov. 10, 1892, had 
four children. 

Newell Dean Foster, son of Isaac and Jane (Allds) Foster, b. Mer- 
rimack, July 21, 1823, mechanic, m. Eliza M., dau. of Jesse, Jr. and Sarah 
(Leavitt) Averill, June 10, 1846. She was b. Mont Vernon, 1824, d. June 
5, 1852. He m. (2) Harriet Orcutt of Cambridge. He m. (3) May 3, 
1892, Mrs. Addie C. Leland of Bedford. He d. Wilton, May 7, 1893. 

Children all b. in Mont Vernon. 

Children by 1st wife : 

1. Charlotte, b. , m. John S. Locke of Rye Valley. Oregon, lives 

Oregon, two children : one son and one daughter. 

2. *George Barrett, b. 1849, d. . 

3. *Charles Woodbury, b. Aug. 8, 1851. 

N. D. Foster had two children by 2nd wife, Win. and Florence. 

Charles Abraham Foster, son of Isaac and Jane (Allds) Foster, b. 
Mont Vernon, March 6, 1828, m. (1) Clarinda J. Felch of Mason Vil- 
lage (now Greenville). She d. Milford, Feb. 11, 1870. He m. (2) June, 
1870, Marietta Brigham of Nashua. He d. Concord. N. H.. Jan. 12. 
1882, age 53. Children by 1st wife b. Mont Vernon. 

1. *Charles Alfred, b. March 23, 1854. 

2. Etta, b. Aug. 20, 1857, m. March 18, 1876, Hiram Searles, lived in 
Milford. d. Goffstown, Nov. 24, 1902, three children. 

3. Emma J., b. Jan. 1, -1860, m. June 8, 1876, *William Henry 
Marvell of Mont Vernon, had one child. 

George Barrett Foster, son of Newell D. and Eliza M. (Averill) 
Foster, b. Mont Vernon, 1849, m. Mary Frances, dau. of Elbridge and 
Hannah E. ( Philibrown) Foster, b. New Boston, May, 1851, d. Mont 
Vernon, Oct. 22, 1891. He d. Taunton, Mass., May 12, 1881, age 31 years, 
9 months, one child. 

1. Annie Parker, b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 17, 1880. 

Charles Woodbury Foster, son of Newell D. and Eliza (Averill) 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 67 

Foster, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 8, 1851, m. Sept. 15, 1875, Jane Thompson. 
He removed to Concord, June, 1877. He d. Concord, N. H., Jan. 20, 
1898. Children : 

1. Evelyn Jane, b. Mont Vernon, June 28, 1876. 

2. William Smith, b. Concord, Nov. 26, 1877. 

3. Arthur John, b. Concord, Jan. 27, 1880. 

Charles Alfred Foster, son of Charles Abraham and Clarinda J. 
(Felch) Foster, b. Mont Vernon, March 23, 1854, m. Oct. 21, 1886, Kate 
A. Garvin of Peterboro', has four children, lives in Hudson, N. H. 

FOX. 

John M. Fox, b. New Boston, March 5, 1836, son of Ephraim and 
Sarah (Parker) Fox, served in the War for the Union in the Second 
New Hampshire Regiment, moved here in 1857, thence to Milford and 
Amherst where he enlisted in 1861. He came back to Mont Vernon 
in 1864, and lived on a farm in the Southeast part of the town until 
1887, when he purchased of the Wood Bros, the village store stock of 
goods. In 1899 he purchased a grocery store in Rochester, N. H., re- 
turned to Mt. Vernon, 1903. He was a town clerk here 23 years, and 
Representative in 1890. He m. Esther D. Fairfield, dau. of' Benjamin 
Fairfield, Esq., of New Boston. She was b. New Boston, Julv 16, 
1830, Children: 

1. Frank, d. young. 

2. Eunice Abbie, b. Amherst, Jan. 9, 1864, resides at home, unm. 

3. William Henry, b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 25, 1868, m. Oct. 30, 
1895, Jessie Alice, dau. of Arthur A. and Lucretia (Rideout) Trow, b. 
Mont Vernon, Jan. 24, 1875, ch., Esther Abbie. b. Jan. 18, 1902. He 
resides in Mont Vernon and is a mechanic. 

FRENCH. 

Abraham French, b. Lyndeboro', 1777, m. Naomi Wilkins, dau. of 
Benjamin and Naomi (Smith) Wilkins, of Lyndeboro', April 5, 1803. 
They lived in the West District many years. He d. April 26, 1863, age 
86 years, 3 months. She d. Mont Vernon, Nov. 11. 1871, age 86 years, 
3 months. Children : 

1. Hannah, b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 9, 1804, m. Dec. 15, 1825, *John 
Averill, Jr. She d. Julv 10~ 1855. 

2. Albert Clinton, b. Mont Vernon, 1808, d. Milford, Sept. 1, 1878. 
age 70. He m. (1) Lucinda Eaton, dau. James Eaton of Antrim. She 
d. Feb. 11, 1848, age 32. He m. (2) Eliza Wilson of Weare, who d. 
Mont Vernon, July 29, 1892, age 81, children. 

Frank B., b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 9, 1849. came to Milford, 1867. 
dealer in coal, wood, ice, m. May 4, 1870. Addie, dau. of John H. and 
Naomi (Wilkins) McConihe, b. Bedford, April 7, 1846, ch. : 

1. Will R, b. Milford, May 15, 1873, in business with father, m. 
April 27, 1892, Nellie J., dau. Charles F. and Emeline W. (Smiths Holt 
of Antrim. 

Augustus B. French, son Josiah and Rebecca (Blanchard) French, b. 
Milford, March 16, 1815, tanner, d. Milford, Aug. 9, 1884. He m. June 
5, 1839, Marv A., dau. Robert and Rachel (Howard) Emerson. She 
was b. Marlboro', in 1807, d. Milford, May 16. 1860. Children: 



68 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

1. Mary A., b. Milford, Sept. 7, 1840, m. June 23, 1859, Albert H 
Mclntire of Milford, d. March 4, 1881. 

2. Hattie Lovica, b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 17, 1842, m. May 30, 1867, 
Geo. C. Farwell, res. Milford. 

3. James W., b. Milford, Aug. 31, 1844, d. Jan. 25, 1846. 

4. Helen L., b. Milford, Feb. 13, 1848, d. June 8, 1849. 

FRINK. 

Rev. Benson M. Frink, a native of Jackson, N. H., a graduate of 
Bangor Seminary, was settled here as Pastor of the Church two and 
one-fourth years from 1865 to 1867. He was subsequently settled in 
Portland, Me., Saco, Me., Beverly, Abington, and Shelburne Falls, Mass. 
He now lives at Brookfield, Mass. He had a wife and one child. For 
more extended account, see Ecclesiastical History in Manuscript of 
Town History. 

FULLER. 

Nathan Fuller, Jr., son of Nathan and Martha Fuller, b. Amherst, 
July 18, 1763, m. (1) Tamson Brown. She was b. Sept. 4, 1763, d. Sept. 
1814. He m. (2) Feb. 28, 1815, Betsey, dau. of Nathan, Jr., and 
Esther (Butterfield) Jones. She was b. Mont Vernon, April 25, 1777, 
d. Feb. 8, 1829. He came to Mont Vernon about 1815. was a retired 
farmer, lived in the house in village now owned by Dr. C. H. Hallowell, 
d. Aug. 31, 1840. Children by 1st wife b. Amherst. 

1. William B., b. May 15, 1786, d. Sept. 2, 1799. 

2. Tamson, d. Nov., 1803, aged 8 years. 

3. Tamson H., b. Aug. 27, 1804, m. *Matthe\v G. Rotch, d. Mt. 
Vernon, May 7, 1895. 

Ch. by 2nd wife b. Mont Vernon. 

4. Betsey, b. Feb. 9, 1816, m. Rufus Lounsbury, d. Rose Grove, 
Iowa, Jan. 26, 1871. 

GERRISH. 

Dr. Alfred A. Gerrish, 8fh and youngest son of Joseoh and Susan 
C Hancock) Gerrish, b. Franklin, N. H._, July 4, 1829. fitted for college 
at Meriden, N. H., studied his profession w'th Dr. Nnhum Wright of 
Gdmanton and Prof. E. R. Peaslee of Hanover, graduated at Bellevue 
Medical College, New York City, March, 1853, and immediately came to 
Mont Vernon as successor to Dr. Samuel G. Dearborn, and continued 
here in successful practice twelve years. In Tuly, 1865, he removed to 
Lowell. Lake Co., Ind., where he has since resided. For many years he 
has field the position of sure/eon for the Louisville, New Albany R. R. 
and its branches. He left an ample fortune. Dr. Gerrish was a bachelor. 
He d. Lowell, Ind., July 17, 1903. 

GILBERT. 

Adna A. Gilbert came from Francestown, was a carnenter by trade, 
lived several years with Tustin Richardson in South District (where 
C. O. Ins-alls now does), d. there, Dec. 3. 1883, aa;e 43. His 2nd wife 
was Martha, dau. John H. and Martha J. (Gilmore) Lindsey. After his 
death she m. Joseph Whittemore, res. Providence, R. I. Children by 
2nd wife : 




DEA. JAY M. GLEASON. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 69 

1. Charles, druggist, Providence, R. I. 

2. Frank. 

GILES. 

George B. Giles, b. Providence, R. I., lived in the South District, 

mechanic, m. Ann D. Chickering. He d. She d. Sept. 30, 1892, 

aged 78. Children : 

1. John EL, b. Mont Vernon, June 17, 1854, mechanic, res. Milford. 

2. Olive, singer, m., res. Wilton. 
Two other daughters. 

GLEASON. 

Jay Morton Gleason, son of Dr. E. V. and Almira H. Gleason, b. 
May 8, 1850, Dunham, Quebec, came to Mont Vernon in 1869, lives in 
village, is a farmer and ice-man, m. June 8, 1874, Mary C. dau. of Dea. 
Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Bruce) Mclntire of Lyndeboro'. She was 
b. Lyndeboro', Feb. 20, 1851. Children b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. Ernest Morton, b. June 5, 1875, m. Florence W. Gooding of 
Somerville, Dec. 29, 1902, Supt. of Schools in Unionville, Conn. 

2. Marion Elizabeth, b. Oct. 22, 1887. 

GOODRIDGE or GOODRICH. 

Lieut. Allen Goodridge or Goodrich, owned and occupied the farm, 
late of Joseph H. Tarbell, in the South District. He served in the War 
for Independence, and d. Mont Vernon, Oct. 27, 1805, age 56. He m. 
Sarah, dau. of Capt. Josiah and Sarah (Fitch) Crosby. She was b. 
April, 1756, d. Mont Vernon of spotted fever, Jan. 27, 1812. Children 
b. Mont Vernon. 

1. *Allen, b. 1782, d. Jan. 26, 1842, aged 60. 

2. Sarah, b. m. Wallingford of Claremont, two children, 

Sarah and Elizabeth. 

3. Fannie, m. Rev. Somerville, missionaries to the Indians of the 
West, had five children. 

4. Joseph, m. (l) Abigail Emerson, of Amherst, N. H. She was b. 
Sept. 26, 1795, d. Boston, Jan. 24, 1835, m. (2) her sister Rebecca Park- 
man Emerson, b. Feb. 13, 1800. He d. Waltham, Mass., April 28, 1881. 
By his 1st wife he had two daughters, A. Frances and Elizabeth, Frances 
m. William S. Houghton of Boston, one dau., Elizabeth Houghton of 
Boston. 

Twins presumably. 

5. Crosby lived in Mont Vernon, d. unm., at an advanced age. 

6. Sophia, not m. lived to advanced age. 

7. Betsey, d. Feb. 27, 1803, aged 9 years. 

Allen Goodrich, Jr., son of Lt. Allen and Sarah (Crosby) Goodrich, 
m. Mercy Emerson of Amherst, N. H., dau. Capt Nathaniel Emerson, 
March 20, 1814. She was b. Oct. 2, 1791. He lived on the homestead 
farm in the South District. He d. Jan. 26, 1842, age 60. She d. Dec. 
16, 1841, aged 50. Children b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Benjamin, b. 1815, m. April 4, 1839, Sophia, dau. Caleb and 
Rebecca (Converse) Boutell of Amherst. She was b. Dec. 26, 1812, 
d. Fairbanks, Iowa, Jan. 3, 1881. He d. Kier, Iowa, farmer. Children: 1. 



TO 1TTSTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Harriet, m. Owen Paine of Kier, Iowa. 2. William. 3. Ellen. 4. Sarah. 
5. Asa. 

2. Jarvis, b. Oct. 22, 1818, d. March 9, 1853, New York City, m. 
Mary J. Townsend of Waltham, Mass., May 30, 1849. 

3. Sarah, b. Oct., 1822, m. Sewell K. Kidder of Pittston, Me. 
Children : Frank, Charles, Eugene. She d. Nov. 5, 1849, in Waltham. 

4. Asa, b. Aug., 1824, d. unm, Feb. 11, 1852, in New York City. 

5. John Franklin, b. Aug., 1826, grad. Harvard College, 1849, d. 

June, 1863, Vicksburg, Miss., m. Morrison of New York. Ch. : 

Frank Trueman, Edward Everett, and Fannie m. Richard Crowther of 
Waterloo, Iowa, one son, Keith Crowther. 

6. Rebecca Frances, b. Aug., 1828, m. E. Wardwell Beal of Nelson, 
N. H. She d. March 24, 1865, in Waltham, Mass. Ch. : 1. Frank Ward- 
well; 2. Wm. Goodrich, m. Nettie L. Nichols of New Haven, N. Y., 2 
ch. : Lois and Wm. G. Beal. 

7. Mercy Ann Emerson, b. June 6, 1830, m. Augustus J. Beckwith, 
April 20, 1864, lives Waltham, Mass. Ch. : Mary F., b. Jan. 13, 1867, 
m. Charles D. Meserve of Hopkinton, Mass., lives Newton, Mass. 

GOULD. 

Stephen Gould, nephew Richard Gould of Topsfield, b. Topsfield, 
Mass., Feb. 6, 1754, d. 1825, at Hillsborough, m. Lydia Fuller of Middle- 
ton, Mass. She d. about 1810. They resided for some years on the farm, 
lately owned by Tames M. Crooker, in the east part of the town. They 
settled in Mont Vernon as early as 1785. About 1804 they removed to 
Hillsborough. Their ch. were : 

1. Elijah, b. Boxford, Mass., May 13, 1780, m. (l) Miss Bradford, 
dau. of Samuel and Annie ( Washer) Bradford of Hillsboro', had 3 
ch., m. (2) Hannah Chapman, Sept. 18, 1823, had ch., d. in Antrim. 

2. Stephen, b. Feb. 3, 1782, m. Polly Melendy of Amherst, d. Cam- 
bridge, Vt, Dec. 3, 1852, had 4 ch. 

3. Lydia, b. April 7, 1784, m. Aaron Smith called "Hatter Smith," 
of Mont Vernon, had 2 sons. 

4. Abner, b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 7, 1786, m. Almira Codman of 
Hillsborough, d. Hillsborough. He was taxed in Mont Vernon in 1813. 

5. Timothy, b. Mont Vernon, May 2, 1789, m. Clarissa Bradford of 
Hillsboro', in 1815, was a blacksmith, had 4 ch., lived and d. in Hillsboro'. 
Children: 1. Leonora B., b. 1816, m. Walter McKean of Nashua, had 4 
children; 2. Henry G, b. June, 1818, m. Miss Stratton of Bradford, had 
3 children, lived and d. in Hillsboro', in 1900; 3. John M., b. June, 1821, 
d. 1895; 4. Frederick W., b. 1827, m. Eliza Smith, sister of Gov. John B. 
Smith, had one son, George. He was Deputy Sheriff many years. He d. 
1901. 

6. Thaddeus, b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 3, 1791, m. Mary Ann Hitch- 
born of Boston in 1812. He settled in Boston as jeweller, and d. in 1840. 

7. Jonathan, b. Mont Vernon, June 21. 1799, m. Sabra Booth of 
Hillsboro', d. Hillsboro', Oct. 6, 1888, had 3 sons, the youngest of whom 
Edwin B. Gould is a lawyer in Nashua. 

Mrs. Mary Gould, widow of Major Gould of Lyndeborough, d. 1842, 
in Mont Vernon, age 86. Her first husband was Rev. Joseph Appleton 
of North Brookfield, Mass. She was the mother of Hon. William 
Appleton of Boston. Sarah H. (Appleton) Burnham, wife John Burn- 
ham, Mary A. (Appleton) Stevens, wife Asa Stevens, and Abigail E. 
(Appleton) Starrett, wife of David Starrett. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 71 

GREEN. 

George W Green, son of Amos and Ruth (^ Hastings) Green of Am- 
herst, b. Amherst, Aug. 21, 1807, m. (1) Oct. 6, 1838, Mary Upton of 
Mont Vernon, dau. of Ezekiel, Jr., and Abigail (Dodge) Upton. She d. 
April 29, 1841, age 36. M. (2) Hannah P., dau. of John Stearns. She 
was b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 28, 1817, d. Mont Vernon, July 11, 1900. He 
was a farmer and lived in the West District many years. He d. in Mont 
Vernon, 1881. Children by 1st wife b. Mont Vernon 

1. Addison, m. had ch., d. in Danville, N. H. 

2. Edward. 

Child by 2nd wife, b. Mont Vernon. 

3. Nancy J., b. Feb. 8, 1843, m. 1867. m. *G. Clifford Averill, d. 
Dec. 4, 1900. 3 children. 

Nathan Green, son of Amos and Keturah (Stewart) Green, b. Am- 
herst, July 15, 1778, m. Hannah, dau. of Joseph and Martha (Dodge) 
Trow, March 10, 1812. She was b. Mont Vernon, d. Boston, Sept. 8, 
1862, age 76. He d. Lowell, Jan. 15, 1857, age 78 years. He lived in 
Mont Vernon, Plattsburg, N. Y., and Lowell, Mass. Ch. : 

1. Antis, m. Luther Eastman, d. Bloomington. Til., July 12, 1873, 
age 61. 

Twins. 

2. *Cornelius, b. Sept., 1816, b. Mont Vernon. 

3. Cornelia, b. Sept., 1816, b. Mont Vernon. Cornelia m. 

Varney of Lowell, Mass., had three girls and one boy. One dau. Martha 
m. William Bancroft of Newton, Mass. 

4. Susan, m. Lewis Graves of Lowell. 

5. Levi, m. Libel Nutting of Westford, Mass., niece of Mrs. Amasa 
Brown. He d. Dec. 9, 1892, at Lowell. One son, Willie. 

Cornelius P. Green, son of Nathan and Hannah (Trow) Green, b 
Mont Vernon, Sept., 1816, d. Mont Vernon, Feb. 24, 1875, m. Achsah 
Haseltine of Springfield, N. H., b. April 4, 1816, one adopted dau., Vien- 
na, b. Sept. 16, 1861, m. *William P. Jenkins of Mont Vernon, Oct. 11 
1882. Cornelius P. Green was a farmer. 

Daniel H. Green, son of Edmund and Eliza (Withey) Green, b 
Milford, Oct. 3, 1836, m. 1865, Antionette, dau. William and Elizabeth 
(Cook) Walker of Brighton, Mass. She was the widow of his cousin 
Lived in Mont Vernon from 1871 to 1896. He was in the 2nd N. H. 
Regiment, d. Mont Vernon, Aug. 20, 1896. 

GREENWOOD. 

Francis C. Greenwood son of Dexter and Mary (Holden) Green- 
wood, b. Hollis, Nov., 1853, was for a number of years agent for firms 
in Boston and New York, who were in the West India fruit business, 
and about 1883 formed a connection in that trade in New York. In 1892 
he came to Mont Vernon, was in the summer-boarding business four 
years at Conant Hall, three years Bellevue Hotel and two years at Lin- 
coln Hall. He d. July 15. 1900. He m. Jan. 6, 1884, Ada E., dau, Dea. 
William H. and S. Emeline (Cloutman) Conant. She was b. Sept. 6. 
1859, res. Mont Vernon. Child b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Miriam Conant, b. Jan. 29, 1895. 



72 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

GURDY. 

William P. Gurdy, b. Bristol, N. H., Feb. 12, 1836, m. Dec. 24, 
1859, Adeline Caswell of Lowell, Mass., b. July 3, 1840. She d. Mont 
Vernon, April 28, 1900. He lived on the Peter Jones farm, in the south- 
east part of the town many years. Ch. : 

1. William C., m. Miss Burnham of Amherst, is a U. S. Postal 
Clerk, on the route between New York and Boston, has one son, Charles 
W. 

GUTTERSON. 

Charles H. Gutterson, son John and Martha (Sawtelle) Gutterson, 
b. Milford, Oct. 29, 1837, m. (1) March 21, 1865, Mary, dau. William and 
Sarah D. (Russell) Sheldon, b. Wilton, March 31, 1837, d. Milford, May 
17, 1876, m. (2) March 31, 1877, Mary E., widow James Langdell, and 
dau. Luke and Elizabeth (Langdell) Wilkins, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 10, 
1846. He has lived in Mont Vernon several years, mainly in the South 
District, farmer, ch. : 

1. Charles W., b. Aug. 25, 1868, d. March 18, 1869. 

2. Elmer Moody, b. Jan. 4, 1879, res. with his parents. 

HADLEY. 

Dr. Dewitt Clinton Hadley, son of Abijah and Mary (Whittemore) 
Hadley, b. Hancock, June 12, 1823, graduated Woodstock Medical Col- 
lege, 1850, d. Hancock, Feb. 11, 1859, m. Nov., 1851, Mary A. Haggett of 
Lyndeboro*. Ch. b. Hancock. 

1. *George C, b. Sept. 3, 1852. 

2. Andrew P., b. 1855, m. 1878, Clara Upton of Tyngsboro, Mass., 
lives in Tyngsboro and has two children. 

George C. Hadley, son of Dr. Dewitt C. and Mary A. (Haggett) 
Hadley, b. Hancock, Sept. 3, 1852, fitted for college at Francestown and 
New Ipswich Academies, m (1) Sept. 23, 1880, Mary F., dau. of William 
P. and Frances C. (Bartlett) Burnham of Milford. She d. Dec. 15, 1881, 
age 25 years. He m. (2) Lizzie A. Goss of Kingston, N. H., dau. of 
Henry S. and Martha Goss. He moved to Mont Vernon in 1882, is a 
farmer. Ch. b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. Bertha M., b. April 18, 1884. 

2. Alice M., b. April 21, 1886. 

3. Dewitt C, b. Nov. 15, 1888, d. Dec. 3, 1888. 

4. Lura A., b. Oct. 15, 1889. 

Gilbert Hadley, b. Goffstown, N. H., June 6, 1819, m. Nov. 11, 1851, 
Marv E. Wilson of Weare, lived on farm in East District. He d. Mont 
Vernon, June 12, 1891. She d. Mont Vernon, April 15, 1896. Ch. b. 
New Boston. 

1. William Fred, b. Feb. 10, 1854, lived on his father's farm in East 
District, moved to Gloucester, Mass., in 1897, was selectman three years 
in Mont Vernon, m. Oct. 2, 1882, Emma Babson of Gloucester, Mass. 
He d. Gloucester, Feb. 10, 1903. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. Ethel M., b. Feb. 
5, 1883, res. Gloucester; Edward B., b. Oct. 16, 1888, res. Gloucester. 

2. Frank Henry, b. Jan. 22, 1859, d. Goffstown, June 2, 1861. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 73 

HARTSHORN. 

John Hartshorn, b. Lyndeboro," lived on the farm owned by Maurice 
Herlehy in the South District several years in the thirties and forties. 
He m. (1) Susanah Curtis of Lyndeboro', by whom he had three ch. 
She d. Mont Vernon. He m. (2) Mehitable Carkin of Lyndeboro', no 
ch. She d. Feb. 19, 1881, aged 81 years. Ch. : 

1. Susan E. R., b. Hancock, Vt, Dec. 9, 1818, m. Rodney K. 
Hutchinson, Nov. 12, 1840, 5 children, d. Milford, Aug. 17, 1853. 

2. Sirepta J., b. Lyndeboro', June 21, 1826, m. after her sister's 
death, Rodney K. Hutchinson of Milford, Oct. 6, 1855, had 2 ch. She 
d. Nov. 2, 1901 in Milford. 

3. John, emigrated to Ohio, carpenter, was a captain in the Civil 
War. 

HARWOOD. 

John Harwood, b. 1777, d. Mont Vernon, Nov. 13, 1845, age 68, 
lived in the "old red house" west of the village, now owned by Estate 
•of William Stevens, m. April 4, 1799, Mary, dau. of Jeremiah and Lois 
(Hcyt) Carleton of Lyndeboro'. She was b. Aug. 3, 1779, d. April 18, 
1834, at Mont Vernon. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Hannah, b. Feb. 6. 1800, m. Nov. 28, 1837, *Joseph Trow, d. 
July 21, 1862. 

2. John, b. 1801, d. Littleton, Col., July, 1889, age 88 years, had 
two ch. b. Nashua, viz.: 1. Dr. John S. Harwood, a surgeon in the army 
d. in practice at Lowell. Mass. 2. Angeline, m. Henry Little. 

3. Joseph, b. 1802 or 1803, m. Nancy Perham of Lyndeboro', April 
7, 1837. He d. May 25, 1864, age 61. She afterwards m. Edward Fowle 
of Woburn, Mass., and d. there July 21, 1890, aged 73. She was b. April 
7, 1817. One dau., Mary Jane Harwood. b. Mont Vernon, d. Feb. 24, 
1862, age 23. 

4. *Kilburn. 

5. Mary, b. April 13, 1807, m. Sept. 13. 1827, *Luther Coggin. She 
d. Nov. 4, 1856. 

6. Lois Hoyt, b. 1811. m. *Clinton Roby of Mont Vernon, d. June 
11, 1857, age 46. 

Kilburn Harwood, son of John and Mary (Carleton) Harwood, b. 
Mont Vernon, m. Sally Buss of Wilton. They lived in Fitchburg, Mass., 
had three sons and one daughter, viz. : 

1. Junius of Fitchburg. 

2. Theresa, m. a lawyer. 

3. George. 

4. Kilburn, m. Sally Reeme, lives Decatur, 111., has three dau., viz. : 
1. Josephine, m. William C, son of Harlan P. and Sarah (Chase) 
Conant of Somerville, Nov. 9, 1893, lives Somerville, Mass.; 2. Kate C. ; 
?,. Mary Theresa. 

HAZEN. 

John Hazen, son of Horace and Betsey (Stevens) Hazen, b. Goffs- 
town, Sept. 10, 1853, bought the Odell farm in the West District in 1885 
where he has since lived, m. Dec. 22, 1880, Ida Abbie, dau. Calvin and 
Armindv J. (Tucker) Martin. She was b. Grafton, N. H., April 10, 
1860. Ch. 



74 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

1. Ida Belle, b. Goffstown, Feb. 9, 1884. 

2. Lizzie Annie, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 8, 1888. 

3. Arthur Martin, b. Mont Vernon, May 8, 1894. 

HERBERT. 

Rev. Charles D. Herbert, youngest son of Hon. George Herbert of 
Ellsworth, Me., was b. at that place, Sept. 18, 1818, graduated at Bow- 
doin College in 1841, and three years later at Bangor Theological Semi- 
nary. He was immediately ordained and went as a home missionary to 
the West. After several years in this service he returned to New Eng- 
land. He commenced preaching in Mont Vernon, July 5, 1850, as suc- 
cessor to Rev. Bezaleel Smith, and was installed pastor of the church 
on the 6th of Nov., following. He closed his pastorate here in April, 
1856, and shortly afterward was settled over the Congregational Church 
at West Newbury, Mass., remaining there until 1862. 

He had qualified himself for the practice of medicine, and for some 
years practised as a physician at Rutland, Mass., preaching at the same 
time. In 1878 he was recalled to West Newbury, and was again pastor 
there eight years. In 1887 he became pastor of the Presbyterian Church in 
Hebron, N. Y., which he resigned on account of ill health. He d. Oct. 
13, 1893, and was buried at Mt. Auburn, Mass., Oct. 17. In 1853 he m. 
Miss Sarah Flanders, dau. of Dr. Flanders of Durham, N. H. Two sons. 

1. George Herbert, Esq., of St. Paul, Minn. 

2. Rev. Charles E. Herbert, Esq., of Gahvay. N. Y. 

HERLEHY. 

David J. Herlehy, b. County Cork, Ireland, March 2, 1829, came to 
America in 1851, lived in Milford several years, bought the Milton Mc- 
Collom farm in the East District, and has resided there since Nov., 1865. 
He m. (1) Ellen Ahearn of Milford. She was b. in County Limerick, 
Ireland, July, 1834, d. Mont Vernon in 1868. He m. (2) Margaret 
Murphy of Milford. She d. Nashua, Dec. 15, 1895, age 52. Ch. by 1st 
wife b. in Milford. 

1. Mary A., lives in Mont Vernon, unm. 

2. Patrick H., m. lives in Nashua, has 4 children. 

3. Eliza Frances, d. April 16, 1883, age 22. 

4. Benjamin John, m., lives in Cambridgeport, Mass., has 3 ch. 
Children by 2nd wife b. in Mont Vernon. 

5. David, d. young. 

6. *Maurice, b. Jan. 24, 1873. 

7. James, b. March, 1875, lives Mont Vernon. 

8. Josephine, d. young. 

Maurice Herlehy, son of David J. and Margaret (Murphy) Herlehy. 
b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 24, 1873, is a laborer and farmer, residing in South 
District, m. Sept. 21, 1898, Minnie A. Regan of Maiden, Mass. Ch. b. 
Mont Vernon. 

1. Abbie Catherine, b. Nov. 12, 1899. 

2. Robert Everett, b. Feb. 8. 1901. 

3. Walter Cecil, b. Nov. 9. 1902. 

HERRICK. 
Josiah Herrick, son of Josiah and Joanna (Dodge* Herrick, b. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 75 

Wenham, Mass., Nov. 10, 1733, d. in Mont Vernon in April, 1799. He 
m. Mary Low of Ipswich, who d. in Oct., 1806, aged 71. They settled 
in Mont Vernon in the East District about 1781. Children : 

1. Mary, d. April 6, 1836, aged 80. unm. 

2. Joanna, d. in Milford, unm. 

3. Josiah, m. (l) Esther Tarbell, m. (2) Fanny Howard, March 
16, 1841. He settled in Antrim and d. there April 8, 1853, leaving no 
children. He was a soldier in the war for Independence. 

4. JLydia, b. April, 1765, m. John Cochran, Jr., of Amherst, Jan. 10, 
1803, d. Sept. S3, 1836, 2 children. 

5. William, b. Jan. 19, 1767, m. Elizabeth Kilman, settled in Essex, 
Mass., and d. there. 

6. Betsey, b. May 7, 1769, m. Sept. 5, 1795, *Joseph Coggin, Jr., d. 
Mont Vernon, April 6, 1846, 6 children. 

7. Daniel Low, b. Dec. 4, 1771, m. Hannah, dau. of Isaac and Han- 
nah (Cole) Weston, resided in Merrimack, and d. there. 

8. Jonathan, b. Jan. 22, 1774. 

9. *Toseph, b. Nov. 3, 1775. 

10. Sarah, b. Feb. 28, 1778, m. Ebenezer Weston of Amherst, 3 
ch., d. June 22, 1857. 

11. Hannah, b. in 1780, d. young. 

Joseph Herrick, son of Joseph and Mary (Low) Herrick, b. Wen- 
ham, Nov. 3, 1775, m. Mary Cox of Beverly, Mass., April 18, 1805. They 
settled in Beverly, rem. to Mont Vernon, lived in the East District, was 
a farmer, rem. to Antrim where he d. Jan. 18, 1833. Children were : 

1. Joseph, b. in March, 1806, was m., lived in Antrim, had ch. 

2. William Cox, b. in May. 1808, m. May 16, 1833, Sally Russell, 
lived in Nashua. Had one son, Fred, liquor dealer. Blackstone St., Bos- 
ton, d. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

3. Sarah Batchelder, b. Dec. 23, 1810. 

4. Samuel D.. b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 22, 1815, m. Dec. 12, 1841, 
Mary Elizabeth Abbott who was b. June 11, 1822. Lived in Beverly and 
Amherst, had 5 ch., d. Amherst, May 17. 1901. 

5. Josiah, b. Sept. 27, 1818. 

6. John, b. 1822, lived in Lyndeboro' and Peterboro', tanner, was m. 
twice and had ch. 

7. Harriet, b. 1825, m. William H. Gilmore of Hillsboro', lived in 
Hillsboro', Lower Village. 

Jonathan Herrick. son of Josiah and Mary (Low) Herrick, b. Wen- 
ham, Mass., Jan. 22, 1774, d. in Amherst, Aug. 28, 1858, m. Deborah Col- 
burn of Dracut, Mass. She was b. Jan. 10, 1779, d. Oct. 18, 1860. They 
resided in Merrimack, Mont Vernon and Amherst. He was one of the 
selectmen of Mont Vernon several years. Their ch. were : 

1. Mary C, b. Nov. 5, 1805, d. in Amherst, Dec. 12, 1871, unm. 

2. Nancy, b. Nov. 19, 1810, m. April 7, 1831, Levi J. Secomb, had 
2 ch. 

3. Fanny C, b. March 27, 1816. m. Dec. 11, 1850. Daniel F. Secomb 
of Amherst. She d. Sept. 7, 1859. 

4. Jonathan, b. June 26, 1822, d. in Francestown, Sept. 7. 1852, unm. 

HEYWOOD. 

Nathaniel Heywood was prominent in the organization of the north- 
west parish of Amherst (now Mont Vernon). He d. 1790. His will 



76 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

dated June 29, 1787, was presented for probate April 26, 1790. In it he 
names his wife, Annie and ch. 

1. Sarah, m. William Manning. 

2. Mary, m. Timothy Manning. 

3. Nathaniel. 

4. Abigail. 

5. Huldah, m. William Burnam. 

6. *Joshua, graduated at Dartmouth College in 1795, ordained and 
installed minister of Dunstable, Mass., June 5, 1799, d. there Nov. 11, 
1814, age 51, m. Lydia French of Boston, Jan. 27, 1800. 

7. *William. 

Rev. Joshua Heywood was a large man, dark complexioned, digni- 
fied and courteous in his demeanor, and respected by all who knew him. 
Dr. Loring said of him at Dunstable, Sept. 17, 1873, "Of minister here or 
elsewhere can higher praise be uttered, than of Joshua Heywood, who, 
recognizing the burdens, which pressed upon his people, declined to avail 
himself of any statute for his pecuniary advantage, refused to make the 
stipulation between him and his people, a matter of speculation and ap- 
pealed to their sense of honor to stand by the contract he had made 
with them, though it be to his own loss. 

William Heywood, son of Nathaniel and Annie Heywood, lived in 
the South District. He m. Ely Parker. Ch. 

1. Amy, b. April 15, 1791, m. Jan. 31, 1812, *Abial Wilkins. She 
d. Aug. 23, 1872. 

2. Lucy, b. July 9, 1795, m. March 6, 1827, John Town of Milford, 
d. Milford, Feb. 13, 1879, had 5.ch. 

HILDRETH. 

Edward Hildreth, son of Mrs. Eliza Wheeler, b. Amherst, June 19, 
1841, m. (1) Jane, dau. of Nahum and Keziah (Peabody) Bullard of 
Amherst, Aug. 30, 1864, m. (2) Jan. 1, 1894, Mrs. Isaphine (Jackson) 
Milliken, b. Bluehill, Me. Since 1868 (1902) he has lived in Mont Vernon. 
By 1st wife. 

1. Albert, b. Mont Vernon, Jan., 1874, lives Sharon, N. H. 

HILL. 

Timothy Hill m. Judith Sherwin. He lived on the farm lately oc- 
cupied by W. F. Hadley in the East District. Ch. b. in Mont Vernon 
probably. The sons were : 

1. Ralph. 

2. Samuel. 

3. *James. 

4. Calvin. 

5. Mary, m. William Dodge, Nov. 27, 1806. 

6. Sarah, dau., m. Alva Wilkins of Mont Vernon. 

James Hill, son of Timothy and Judith (Sherwin) Hill, b. Mont 
Vernon, m. Huldah Peabody of New Boston. He lived on his father's 
farm in the East District and d. there Jan. 8, 1852, age 61 years, 6 months. 
She d. Nov. 2, 1854, age 56 years. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. James, b. Jan., 1820, resides Maiden, Mass., m. Mrs. Jones of Mai- 
den. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 77 

2. *Ira, b. Dec. 18, 1821. 

3. Samuel Harris, m. a Miss Cram of Lyndeboro', lived and d. in 
Amherst, was an iron foundry man, had several ch. 

4. Deborah J., m. Amos Putnam of Milford, had 5 ch. 

5. William, b. 1827, was a merchant and prominent citizen in Til- 
ton, N. H., d. 1891. 

6. Mary, b. Sept. 7, 1826, m. *Charles Marvell, Oct. 16, 1851, d. April 
29, 1880. 

7. Granville, m. Harriet Whittemore, lived in Amherst, had 7 ch. 

8. Timothy B., b. June 22, 1832. 

9. Joseph was a merchant associated in business with his brother 
William, in Tilton, N. H., had 3 ch. 

10. _ Eliza, m. Mr. Mygatt of Nashua, had two sons, one of them, 
Harry, is a doctor in Franklin, N. H. 

11. Hiram, d. Wakefield, Mass., had 4 ch. 

12. Levi, unm. 

13. Abby, d. unm. 

Ira Hill, son of James and Huldah (Peabody) Hill, b. Mont Vernon, 
Dec. 18, 1821, m. Feb., 1845, Harriet, dau. of David and Delinda (Saun- 
ders) Dutton, b. Mont Vernon, Mav 12, 1826, d. Sept. 6, 1875. He m. (2) 
July, 1879, Arvilla J. Wilson, b. Weare, N. H., Dec. 3, 1825. He d. 
March 12, 1899. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Josephine Estelle, b. Dec. 18, 1847, d. Nov. 9, 1852. 

2. Clarence Latimer, b. Aug. 10, 1856, m. Annie F. Raymond of 
Dunstable, Mass., Sept. 3, 1882, lives in Reed's Ferry, Merrimack, N. H. 
Cooper. Ch. 1. Flora Estelle, b. Jan. 17, 1888; 2. Lillian Pearl, b. Feb. 
6. 1887. 

3. Cleon Mortimer, b. Feb., 1863, m. Eva Robinson of Dover, N. H. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 1. Hazel Maude, b. Feb. 23, 1887, d. Nov. 25, 1896; 
2. Chrystabel Florence, b. Aug. 25, 1890. 

4. George Edward, b. Sept. 19, 1865, m. Ida Shirley, dau. of Daniel 
C. and Julia A. (dickering) Shirley of Amherst. She was b. March 19, 
1871. They live in Amherst. 

Timothy Barrett Hill, son of James and Huldah (Peabody) Hill, b. 
Mont Vernon, June 22, 1832, m. Aug. 26, 1862, Janette, dau. of Joel and 
Lucinda (Averill) Duncklee of Milford. He has resided Amherst, Gard- 
ner, Mass., Milford, d. in Amherst, May 27, 1903. Ch. b. Amherst. 

1. Minnie B., b. March 14, 1864, m. Frank Boutelle of Milford. 

2. Annie L, b. Aug. 20, 1866, m. John G. Boutelle of Pepperell, 
Mass., one son. 

3. Katie, b. July 17, 1870, d. unm., July 29, 1891. 

Benjamin Franklin Hill, b. Brookfield, Mass., May, 1822, m. Hannah, 
dau. of Daniel and Cynthia (Wilkins) Smith. He d. Nov. 5, 1860, age 
66. She d. Dec. 1, 1866, age 68. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Rufus Franklin, d. Lowell. Mass., March 23. 1883, age 58. He 
m. Sarah Lawrence of Peterboro', 3 ch., viz.: Charles, Susan, Frank. 

2. Daniel S., d. Peterboro', Jan. 7, 1867, age 42, left 2 dau, m. (1) 
Ellen O'Donald of Peterboro', 2 ch.. Freeman and Caroline, m. (2) 
Caroline Stiles of Peterboro'. 

3. Maria F., b. Oct. 16, 1829, m. Jan., 1865, Benjamin F. Livingstone, 
d. Sept. 13, 1880. left 3 dau. 



78 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

4. Nancy E., b. Sept. 6, 1832, m. Dec, 1847, *Peter F. Pike of .Mont 
Vernon. 

William Orledge Hill, b. Meadville, Pa., March 22, 1846, m. Dec, 
1879, at Milford, Etta May, dau. of Clinton and Elizabeth (Bennett) May. 
She was b. Jan. 25, 1863. He purchased the Hartshorn house in the East 
District, living there several years, leaving here in 1894 for Manchester, 
supposed to live in Haverhill. He is not living. Ch. b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. Harry Orledge. b. Aug. 30, 1880. 

2. Arthur Cordell, b. Sept. 19, 1882. 

3. Fannv Cordell, b. July 6, 1885. 

4. Gilbert Townsend, b. May 1, 1891. 

HOLT. 

Ebenezer, son of Samuel and Hannah (Farnum) Holt, was b. in 
Andover, Mass., April 8, 1705, m. Mehitable Stevens, Dec. 4, 1729. About 
1750 they removed to Mont Vernon, where she d. May, 1805, aged 97. 
Their ch. all b. in Andover, were: 

1. *Ebenezer, b. Sept. 7, 1730. 

2. Mehitable, b. Sept. 3, 1733, m. James Holt, Jan. 2, 1755, d. March 
4, 1767. 

Twins. 

3. Mary, b. June 15, 1737, m. Darius Abbott, had 9 ch. 

4. Priscilla, b. June 15, 1737. 
Twins. 

5. Rachel, b. July 7, 1741, d. July 14, 1747. 

6. *Ezekiel, b. July 7, 1741. 

7. Reuben Holt, b. June 27, 1744, d. Landgrove, Vt., March 2, 1836, 
m. Lydia Small, had 6 ch. 

8. Hepsibah, b. June 13, 1747, m. William Hartshorn, no ch. She d. 
Amherst, Jan. 11, 1851, aged 103^ years. 

Ebenezer Holt, Jr., son of Ebenezer and Mehitable (Stevens) Holt, 
b Andover Sept. 7, 1730, m Lvdia, dau. of Moses and Sarah (Holt) 
Peabody. She was b. July 5, 1731. They settled on the farm now occu- 
pied by W. L. Robinson, in Mont Vernon, where he d. in April, 1805. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Rebecca, b. Sept. 7, 1752, m. Jonathan Lamson, March 14, 1782, 

6 2° n Sarah, b. 1757, m. Moses Peabody, May 25, 1786. She d. Mont 
Vernon, May 25, 1845, had 2 ch. 

Ezekiel Holt, son of Ebenezer and Mehitable (Stevens) Holt, b. 
Andover, July 7, 1741, m. Mary Stewart, dau. of Samuel Stewart, and 
55e? of David Stewart, who was County Treasurer from 1803 until 
1821. She was b. Sept. 2, 1749. Ezekiel Holt was a citizen of Mont 
Vernon in 1804. Ch. 

1. Elizabeth, b. July 8, 1773. 

Mary, b. Dec. 11, 1775. 

Sarah, b. Sept. 10, 1780. 

Ezekiel, b.. Aug. 19, 1782. 

David, b. Feb. 27, 1792. 



o 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 79 

Stephen D. Holt, b. Andover, Mass., July, 1822, m. Nov. 29, 1849, 
Joanna Augusta, dau. of Franklin and Mary (Spaulding) Hadley of 
Lyndeboro*. He d. Lyndeboro', April 25, 1876. Mrs. Hadley removed to 
Mont Vernon village with her three ch. in fall of 1877. Ch. : 

1. Charles Dexter, b. Francestown, Jan. 25, 1851, d. Mont Vernon. 
Oct. 4, 1881. 

2. Frances Augusta, b. Francestown, March 17, 1854, resides Mont 
Vernon, unm. 

3. George Franklin, b. Lyndeboro'. Aug. 6, 1856, carpenter, resides 
Mont Vernon. 

HOOPER. 

Wallace D. Hooper, son of Nathaniel and Lucy (Carson) Hooper, b. 
New Boston, Jan. 27. 1838. Mrs. Lucy D. (Carson) Hooper d. Dec. 
27, 1888, age 78. He came to Mont Vernon and bought the Fox farm, 
Jan., 1894. He m. (1) Mary Applebee. He m. (2) Martha Ann, dau. 
of Alexander and Margaretta (Hopkins) Carson. She was b. Mont 
Vernon, Feb. 28, 1846, m. May 9, 1878. Ch. by first wife: 

1. Nathanial Frank, b. Fort Warren, Boston, Nov. 20, 1868, farmer, 
res. Mont Vernon, m. 1898, Nettie, dau. of Alexander and Margaretta 
(Hopkins) Carson. She was b. Mont Vernon, has one dau., Lucy. b. 
1898. Ch. Lucy, b. Mont Vernon, March 30, 1898. 

Ch. by second wife : 

2. Wallace D„ b. April 17. 1879. d. July. 1879. 

HOPKINS. 

James Hopkins, m. (1) Mary Beard, m. (2) Mary Taylor of Hollis, 
ch. were b. in Mont Vernon. 
Ch. by first wife : 
1. A dau. 

Ch. by second wife : 

2. Sarah, m. David Marshall of New Boston, June 6, 1796. 

3. *James, b. June 10, 1781. 

4. Mary, b. March 15, 1783. d. unm., Feb., 1803. 

James Hopkins, Jr., son of James and Mary (Taylor Hopkins, b. 
Mont Vernon, June 10, 1781, m. Aug. 9, 1804, Azubah Curtis of Lynde- 
boro'. She d. Sept. 26, 1855, age 74. He m. (2) Mrs. Nancy Gould of 
Nashua. She d. 1857. He d. Sept. 26, 1862. He lived on the farm now 
owned by his son-in-law, Alexander Carson, in the South District. Ch. 
b. in Mont Vernon. 

1. David, b. Jan., 1805, m. (l) Mary Gould. She d. Aug. 12, 1870. 
age 52 vears, m. (2) Ede E., dau. Amos and Sarah (Whiting) Phelps. 
He d. Wilton, Oct. 13, 1888. 

2. Mary, b. Jan. 9, 1806, d. May 16. 1867, m. *Noah Hutchinson. 
Twins. 

3. *Jacob, b. March 12, 1809. 

4. John W.. d. July 29, 1811. 

5. James W., b. Feb., 1813, m. 1836, Mary Jane Patch. She was b. 
Antrim, 1818, d. Mont Vernon, 1863. He d. New Boston, Sept. 10, 1890. 
Thev had six ch.— five sons and one dau, Fannv. all b. in Mont Vernon. 

6 Sarah, b. 1816, m. *John J. Carson. She d. Nov. 18, 1887, age 71. 



80 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

7. Olive, b. Feb. 5, 1819, m. Thomas Carr Kidder, had two sons and 
four daughters, who grew up. She d. in Milford, June 16, 1894. 

8. Margaretta, b. Dec. 14, 1822, m. Dec. 23, 1843, *Alexander Carson. 

9. Harriet N., b. April 26, 1824, m. *Joseph H. Tarbell, Aug. 23, 
1844, res. Mont Vernon. 

Jacob Hopkins, son of James and Azubah (Curtis) Hopkins, b. Mont 
Vernon, March 12, .1809, d. Feb. 24, 1881, was a shoemaker, m. Mary 
Marhsall of New Boston, who d. Nov. 12, 1840, aged 38. Ch. 

1. Sarah A., d. June 7, 1843, d. young. 

2. John A., d. Oct. 26, 1854, age 17. 

HUMPHREY. 

Leander F. Humphrey, son of Franklin and Mary (Lane) Humphrey, 
b. Barnston, Canada, May 7, 1855, came to Mont Vernon from Manchester 
inl894, owns and operates the stage route from Milford to Mont Vernon. 
He m. Sept. 2, 1894, Cora E. Davis, dau. Freeman and Caroline (Ryan) 
Davis. She was b. Richford, Vt, Feb. 27, 1866. She came to Mont Ver- 
non from Manchester, m. 1894. Ch. 

1. Carl Lawrence, b. Jan. 19, 1902. 

HUTCHINSON. 

Elisha Hutchinson, a Revolutionary soldier, was b. at Middleton, 
Mass., Dec. 6, 1751, d. at Milford, Oct. 12, 1800, m. Sarah Buxton, Nov. 
10, 1772. She was b. at Middleton in 1751, d. Feb., 1828. They settled 
in that part of Amherst now Milford in 1779. Ch. 

1. Andrew, b. Feb. 1, 1775, m. Martha Rayment (or Raymond, sister 
of George Raymond, who was grandfather of Charles H. Ravmond), 
d. Milford, Oct. 22, 1862. 

2. *Jesse, b. Middleton, Feb. 3, 1778. 

3. Sarah, m. *William Marvell. 

Jesse Hutchinson, son of Elisha and Sarah (Buxton) Hutchinson, b. 
Feb. 3, 1778, at Middleton, m. Mary, dau. of Andrew Leavitt. She was b. 
Mont Vernon, July 25, 1785, was m. Aug. 7, 1800, d. Milford, Sept. 20, 
1868. He was a farmer, and lived in the North part of Milford on the 
Hutchinson farm, bought the Col. Burnham place in Milford, and d. 
there Feb. 16, 1851. Ch. b. in Milford. 

1. Jesse, b. Feb. 25, 1802. d. April 11, 1811. 

2. David, b. Oct. 11. 1803. 

3. *Noah, b. Jan. 26, 1805. 

4. Polly or Mary, b. June 7, 1806. 

5. Andrew B., b. Aug. 19, 1808. 

6. Zephaniah K, b. Jan. 6, 1810. 
Twins. 

7. Caleb, b. Nov. 25, 1811. 

8. Toshua, b. Nov. 25, 1811. 

9. Jesse, Jr., b. Sept. 29, 1813. 

10. Benjamin Pierce, b. Oct. 3, 1815. 

11. Adoniran Judson Joseph, b. March 24, 1817. 

12. Sarah Rhoda Jane, b. March 14, 1819. 

13. John Wallace, b. Jan. 4, 1821. 

14. Asa Burnham, b. March 14, 1823. 









■^^^^Ik^ 












ifl 1^. 


_^&j 


^■H 



NOAH B. HUTCHINSON. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 81 

15. Elizabeth, b. Nov. 14, 1824. 

16. Abigail (Jemina) (Abby), b. Aug. 29, 1829. 

Four of these children, three sons and one daughter, Judson, John, 
Asa and Abby, were the famous Hutchinson singers of the "Tribe of 
Jesse." 

John W. Hutchinson is the only member of the family surviving. He 
lives at Lynn Mass. 

Noah B. Hutchinson, son of Jesse and Mary (Leavitt) Hutchinson, 
b. Milford, Jan. 26, 1805, moved on to the Odell farm in South Dist. in 
1822, now occupied by his son, Appleton, and lived there many years. 
He d. March 10. 1873. He m. April 5, 1827, Mary, dau. James and 
Azubah (Curtis Hopkins), of Mont Vernon. She was b. Mont Vernon 
Jan. 9, 1806, d. May 16, 1867. Ch. 

1. Frances J., b. Milford, May 21, 1828, d. Oct. 25. 1833. 

2. *Andrew Buxton, b. Milford, July 9, 1830 

3. Matthew Bartlett, b. Milford, April 16, 1832, d. unm. March 11, 
1895, lived in Mont Vernon. 

4. Aaron Bruce, b. Mont Vernon Aug. 4, 1834, m. Dec. 31, 1868, 
Ellen, dau. of William W. and Lucinda (Hutchinson) Burns, of Milford. 
She was b. Aug. 5. 1848, d. Feb. 6, 1898. He lived in Milford, was a 
mechanic, d. there July 23, 1899. 

5. Ann Jane, b. Mont Vernon May 15, 1836, m. October 16, 1864, 
Daniel Sargent of Milford. 

6 *Lucius Bolles, b. Mont Vernon Jan. 6, 1839. 

7. David Judson. b. Mont Vernon July 21, 1842, m. Oct. 26, 1881, 
Mary J., dau. Luther B.* and Dorothy (Keyes) Phelps, of that city. Was 
a broker. Retired. Resides New York City winters and Mont Vernon 
summers. * 

8. Mary Victoria, b. Mont Vernon June 22, 18"45, d. South Orange, 
N. J., May 14, 1864. 

9. Chestina Augusta, b. Mont Vernon Oct. 5, 1847, m. Hazen F. 
Wooster of Canaan, N. H., resides there, has two son-. 

10. *Henry Appleton, b. Aug. 16, 1850. 

Andrew Buxton Hutchinson, son Noah B. and Mary l, Hopkins) 
Hutchinson, b. Milford, July 9. 1830, carpenter, resided South Orange. 
N. J., d. there June 24, 1890, m. Dec. 5 1857, Ellen T., dau. Rev. David 
and Jane (Kirkpatrick) Kline, of Glen, Gardner, N. J. Ch. 

1. Frank Stuart, b. April 29, 1870. d. Aug. 21, 1871. 

2. Florence K, b. Oct. 20. 1875. 

Lucius Bolles Hutchinson, son of Noah B. and Mary (Hopkins) 
Hutchinson, b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 6, 1839, left here for New York City 
in 1856, was. stock broker there, is now retired, resident of Mont Vernon, 
m. Jan. 6, 1864, Alice M., dau. Boynton Rollins, of New York City. Ch. 

1. Alice, b. June 22, 1867. m. Mr. Wallace. 

2. Mary, b. Aug. 28, 1871, m. Edw. Wendelstadt. 

Henry Appleton Hutchinson, son of Noah B. and Mary (Hopkins) 
Hutchinson, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 16. 1850, farmer and lumber dealer, 
resides on the homestead in South Dist., m. Oct. 14, 1871, Lucy J., dau. 
Luke and Elizabeth (Langdell) Wilkins, of Mont Vernon. Ch. b. Mont 
Vernon : 

1. Roy Wilkins, b. Aug. 4, 1872, m. (1) 1893, Katherine V. Welch of 



32 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Mont Vernon, one ch., Jean, b. 1894; m.(2) Mable Folsom of Greenville 
Me., resides South Framingham, Mass. 

2. Maude Lola, b. Oct. 22, 1872, m. May 21, 1896, Charles F. Isola 
res. Mont Vernon. 

3. Amy Victoria, b. March 28, 1878. 

4. Ethelle, b. May 21, 1880. 

5. Abby, b. Oct. 9, 1887. 

Rodney K. Hutchinson, son of Alfred and Lydia (Foster) Hutchin- 
son, b. Milford, Aug. 7, 1812. Was a carpenter, lived with his father-in- 
law, John Hartshorn, on a farm, now owned by Maurice Herlihy, in 
the South Dist., lived in Milford the greater part of his life, d. Milford, 
Jan. 24, 1890. M. (1) Nov. 12, 1840, Susan E. R., dau. *John and 
Susannah (Curtis) Hartshorn. She was b. Hancock, Vt, Dec. 9, 1818, 
d. Milford, Aug. 17, 1853. M. (2) Oct. 6, 1855, Sarepta J., a sister of his 
first wife, b. Lyndeboro, June 21, 1826, d. Milford, Nov. 2, 1901. Ch. b. 
Milford. Ch. by first wife: 

1. Alfred Alonzo, b. Jan. 7, 1842, carpenter, res. Milford, m. Jan. 6, 
1867, Hattie J. Fairfield of Hancock, one ch. 

2. Rodnev Lorenzo, b. Feb. 14, 1844, d. Aug. 27, 1847. 

3. Mary Olivia, b. Oct. 3, 1846, m. March 21, 1888, John C, son 
John C. and Mary Fifield, res. Candia. 

4. Susan Luella, b. Oct. 6, 1849, d. July 27, 1856. 

5. Viletta Jane, b. March 2, 1853, d. July 17, 1856. 
Ch. by second wife : 

6. Susan Viletta, b. Nov., 1857, m. April 28, 1880, George L., son of 
George and Melinda Y. (Bent) Parker, res. Nashua. 

7. John Curtis, b. Dec. 22, 1856, mechanic, res. Milford. 

8. Willie Ellsworth, b. Dec. 21, 1861, mechanic, res. Milford, m. 
Dec. 21, 1890, Florence E., dau. Frank J. and Esther (Fuller) Smith, 
of Milford. 

9. Grace B., b. June 7, 1866, m. Feb. 14, 1893, Charles A., son 
Charles and Laura A. (Hall) Baker, res. Milford. 

HOLLIS. 

Benjamin Hollis, shoemaker, came to Mont Vernon, from Braintree, 
Mass., in 1844, bought the house of Benjamin Nutter, then standing on 
the site where T. H. Richardson since lived ; lived here until 1848, when 
he sold to Newell D. Foster and removed to Weare, thence to District 
No. 8, in Amherst, where he d. March 1, 1864. His widow, Abigail Hollis, 
d. at Weare, April 10, 1885. Their only ch. 

Benjamin E., b. Braintree, Mass., November 16, 1833, removed from 
Amherst to Weare, Nov., 1865, m. Oct., 1887, Mrs. Harriet F., widow 
Alvah Buxton, keeps tavern in Weare. 

INGALLS. 

Charles Osmyn Ingalls, b. Hanover, N. H., May 5, 1862. Moved to 
Mont Vernon in 1894, farmer, owns and occupies the Justin Richardson 
farm in South Dist., m. Nov. 3, 1898, Hattie May, dau. of Daniel and 
Mary E. (Twiss) Richardson. She was b. Oct. 26, 1876, in Mont Vernon, 

Ch. 

1. Mary Elizabeth, b. Mont Vernon, April 28, 1899. 




LUCIUS B. HUTCHINSON. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 83 

IRELAND. 

William H. Ireland, b. Park St., Boston, Jan. 28, 1818, m. (1) Sarah 
A. Stone, b. Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 1, 1820, m. Dec. 5 1839. She d. 
Newton Centre, Mass., Sept. 21, 1889. He m. (2) Francy Laubner, Oct. 
7, 1890. She was b. Aug. 5, 1867, at Falkenstein, Bavaria, Germany. He 
d. at Newton Centre, February 16, 1900. He came from Newton, Mass., 
in the early forties to Mont Vernon and lived on a farm in the southeast 
part of the town. He returned to Newton in 1866. Ch. by first wife : 

1. William Ezra, b. Dec. 14, 1840, drowned in Mississippi River, La., 
July 26, 1864. 

2. *James Edward, b. Aug. 16, 1846. 

3. ^Charles Henry, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 10, 1850. 

4. Albert Frost, b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 12, 1852, m. April 12, 1896, 
Anna J. Richardson of Winchester, Mass., b. July 27, 1866, two ch. He 
was a large building contractor of the firm of C. H. and A. F. Ireland. 
D. Feb. 16, 1903. 

5. George W., b. June 3, 1854. d. June 2, 1858. 

6. Frank Fremont, b. Mont Vernon, July 8, 1856, drowned at sea, 
near coast of Japan, Sept. 12, 1885. He was mate of a large merchant 
vessel. 

7. Sarah Anna, b. Mont Vernon, June 3, 1859, m. June 18, 1883, 
Charles E. Kendall of Winchester, Mass., one son, Frank Dana, b. Aug. 
3, 1887. 

8. Irving Whitney, b. Mont Vernon, July 24, 1863, m. Dec. 8, 1886, 
Olive E. Knowles of Newton, has three ch., is a mill owner and resides 
in Newton Centre. Ch. by second wife b. Newton Centre. 

9. Josephine, b. Aug. 10, 1891. 

10. Francy, b. March 6, 1893. 

11. Frank Fremont, b. June 25, 1895. 

12. Wm. Henry, b. 1897. 

13. Helen, b. Dec. 16, 1899. 

James Edward Ireland, son of William H. and Sarah (Stone) Ire- 
land, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 16, 1846, m. Oct. 9, 1871, Louisa G. Morgan, 
b. Bournemouth, Eng. He was a gardener in Milton, taking charge of a 
gentleman's greenhouses and grounds. Ch. 

1. William Edward, b. July 31, 1872. 

2. George Albert, b. June 25, 1874. 

3. Agnes Freeland, b. March 11. 1876, d. May 30, 1880. 

4. Gertrude Harriet, b. Sept. 17, 1880. 

5. Frank R, b. Sept. 18, 1886. 

Charles Henry Ireland, son of William H. and Sarah (Stone) Ire- 
land, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 10, 1850, m. Sept. 23, 1879, Eliza J. Kendall 
of Winchester, Mass., b. Oct. 14, 1858. He is a large building contractor 
of the firm of C. H. & A. F. Ireland, Newton Centre, Mass. Ch. b. 
Newton : 

1. Marion K., b. July 6, 1880. 

2. Lawrence Stone, b. May 1, 1882. 

3. Mary Wyman, b. Oct. 9, 1884. 

4. Alice Helen, b. June 22, 1886. 

5. Ruth Linda, b. Jan. 12, 1889. 

6. Wallace Raymond, b. June 13, 1891. 

7. Grace Pearl, b. April 12, 1893. 



84 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

ISOLA. 

Charles F. Isola, b. Aug. 9, 1874, came from Pepperell in 1894. M. 
May 21, 1876, Maude L., dau. of Henry A. and Lucy (Wilkins) Hutchin- 
son. She was b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 22, 1873. He built a costly house 
in the South Dist., where he resides. 

JAQUITH. 

Asa Jaquith, b. 1792, Dec, son of Isaac and Prudence Jaquith, d. 
Nashua, May 19, 1871, m. Mary T. Noyes, dau. of Silas Noyes. She was 
b. Nov. 1806, d. Jan. 12, 1862. They resided for some years on the farm 
now owned by Charles E. Kendall in the East District. Ch. b. in Mont 
Vernon : 

1. Asa, b. Aug. 23, 1823, voted here in 1845 and 1846; was a mer- 
chant in Nashua, where he d. unm. 

2. Ebenezer, b. April 4, 1825, m. Ellen J., dau. of William and 
Naomi S. (Wilkins) Underwood, of Amherst. He d. Nashua, May 6, 
1870. 

3. Mary Ann, b. Oct. 26, 1820. m. April 6, 1854, Calvin B. Duscomb, 
d. Wilton, July 17, 1856. 

4. Almina, b. April 10. 1833, unm. 

5. Emeline b. Sept. 4, 1834, d. Oct. 2, 1854. 

Isaac Jacquith, father Asa Jacquith, d. Oct. 2, 1789, aged 47 years. 
Prudence, his wife, d. May 8, 1832, aged 84 years. Prudence their dau., 
and wife of John Bragg, d. May 8, 1827, aged 42 years. 

JENKINS. 

Micah Jenkins, b. in Andover, Mass., m. Betsey Mooar of Milford 
in 1810. She was b. Jan. 25, 1790, d. in 1825. They settled on the farm 
now occupied by Leander Barker. Ch. probably b. Mont Vernon: 

1. Osmore, b. December 3, 1815, watchmaker, resided in Plymouth 
and Boston, Mass. 

2. Deborah, b. April 13, 1819, m. Jotham Clark, resided in Granby, 
Mass. 

3. Luther, b. Aug. 27, 1822, m. (1) Putnam of Reading; 

m. (2) Putnam of Reading, resided in Reading. 

William Patten Jenkins, b. Milton, N. H., April 16, 1811, m. June 
16, 1836, Martha S. Rogers of Milton, lived in Hancock some years, 
Greenfield seven years and moved to Mont Vernon in 1871, where he d. 
June 12, 1884, aged 73. His wife d. at St. Louis, Mo., January 5, 1889, 
aged 73. Their ch. were: 

1. Mary Emilv. b. April 14, 1837, m. Oct. 28, 1865. Calvin E. Stock- 
bridge of Pelham.' She d. March 10, 1872. 

2. Harriette A., b. May 17, 1839, m. June 30, 1869, Charles S. Free- 
born ; resides St. Louis. 

3. Ellen M., b. March 21, 1841, m. Oct. 4. 1865, Milan E. Davis of 
Hancock, has five ch. 

4. Henry S., b. July 16, 1843, supercargo on a steamboat, d. at New 
Orleans, Aug. 16, 1874. 

5. Charles Albert, /b. July 21. 1845, m. Sarah L. Heath, January 1, 
1867; lives in MilfordfT farmer. Ch. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 85 

1. Nettie L„ b. Hancock, Feb. 7, 1870, m. Nov. 28, 1889, Edgar A. 
Littlefield of Wells, Me., res. Springfield, Mass. 

2. Hattie M., b. Bennington, Aug. 11, 1871, m. May 10, 1897, Frank 
Davis, res. Springfield, Mass. 

6. Elizabeth H., b. Aug. 12, 1847, m. June 4, :.:73, John M. Holt, 
lives in Haverhill, Mass. 

7. Addie F., b. July 10, 1853, m. Edward S. Foster of Leverett, 
Mass., Nov. 24, 1875. They lived here some years, returning to Leverett, 
Mass., in 1885 have four ch. 

8. Annie P., b. Ma->- 15, 1855, d. St. Louis, unm., Sept. 19, 1889. 
She was buried at Mont Vernon. 

9. William P., b. May 23, 1857, m. Oct. 11, 1882, Vienna, adopted 
dau. of Cornelius and Aihsah (Hr^eltine) Green, of Mont Vernon. She 
was b. Sept. 16, 1861. Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Annie May, b. July 16, 1883. 

2. Viola Ida, b. Mav 18, 1885. 

3. Eva Maria, b. Feb. IS, 1888. 

• 

TExNNISON. 

Rev. Edwin Jennison, b. Walpole, N. H., 1805, graduated Dartmouth 
College 1827, was minister at Walpole from 1831 to 1835. He was min- 
ister in Mont Vernon from 1836 until 1841. After a voyage to Europe 
he settled in Ashbumham, Mass., and was from 1847 to 1849 at Hopkin- 
ton, N. H. His frequent ill-health compelled his retirement from pastoral 
service. He located as a farmer in Alstead, N. H., supplying for a time 
one of the churches in that town, and from 1852 to 1854 the church in the 
adjoining town of Langdon, N. H. He d. in Conway, Mass., Dec. 5, 1887, 
age 82. He m. Miss Mary B. Shannon of Saco. Me, had ch. She d. 
Nov. 22, 1885, age 75 years. 

JOHNSON. 

Sardis Johnson, b. Jaffrey, N. H., moved here from Jaffrey, N. H., 
and lived many years on the farm now owned by George C. Hadley, 
where he d. April 22, 1865, age 69. His wife, Charlotte (Goodrich) John- 
son, d. Aug. 13, 1852, age 62. Their adopted dau., Sophia Goodrich, b. 
Bedford, Mass., m. Samuel Daland, lived on her father's farm moved to 
Milford where he d. Sept. 17, 1887, age 76. She d. Milford. Mav 13, 
1899, aged 74. 

Warren D. Johnson, b. Boston, March 28, 1843, d. Mont Vernon, 
Sept. 6, 1893. He was a member of the Fifth N. H. Regt. in Civil War. 
He came here from Danbury, N. H., in 1870. He was a laborer. He m. 
Jan. 1, 1870, Martha A. Brown, b. Wilmot, May 30, 1851. Ch. b. Mont 
Vernon. 

1. George F.. b. February 10, 1872, m. March 28. 1895, Carrie Avery 
of Francestown. 

2. James William, b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 28, 1876. teamster, res. 
Mont Vernon. 

George T. Johnson, son of Warren D. and Martha A. (Brown) John- 
son, b. Springfield, N. H., Feb. 10, 1872, m. (l) Carrie Avery of Frances- 
town, who d. Nov. 1, 1901, m. (2) 1902, Nellie Wyman of Francestown. 
He resides New Boston, is a laborer. Ch. 



86 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

1. Carl Avery, b. Francestown, June 23, 1897. 

2. Carrie Gladys, b. New Boston, Oct. 26, 1901. 

JONES. 

Nathan Jones and Elizabeth Coburn were m. in Dracut, Mass., in 
October, 1743, moved to the farm southeast of Mont Vernon village ( now 
owned by Sanborn P. Worthen) in 1760, where he d. Sept. 2, 1799. She 
was a dau. of Josiah and Sarah Coburn and was b. June 24, 1724. They 
had ten ch., of whom eight reached adult age : 

1. Elizabeth, b. Feb. 10, 1744, m. Matthew Parker of Litchfield June 
1763. They were the grandparents of the late Hon. James U. and Nathan 
Parker of Manchester. 

2. Thomas, b. March 20, 1746. 

3. *Nathan, b. Feb. 25, 1748. 

4. Rachel, b. Sept. 25, 1750, m. Jan. 2, 1772, Samuel Durant of Not- 
tingham, West, now Hudson ; d. 1786. 

5. Peter, b. March 1, 1753, d. young. 

6. *Timothy, b. July 27, 1755. 

7. Phinehas, b. Feb. 16, 1758, d. 1799, m. Sarah Hildreth, June 15, 
1784, had four ch. After his death she m. *James Smith. 

8. Mary, b. April 21, 1760, m. Levi Kimball of Landgrove, Vt. 

9. *Peter, b. June 16, 1762, in Mont Vernon. 

10. Dolly, b. March 21, 1765, in Mont Vernon, m. Dodge of 

New Boston. 

Nathan Jones, Jr., son of Nathan and Elizabeth (Coburn) Jones, b. 
Dracut, b. Feb. 25, 1748, d. in Mont Vernon, Nov. 6, 1813, m. Esther But- 
terfield. They settled on what was since known as the McCollom place, in 
the north nart of Mont Vernon (buildings not standing now). Ch. b. 
Mont Vernon were : 

1. Betsey, b. April 25, 1777, m. Feb. 28, 1815, Nathan Fuller of Am- 
herst, one dau. She d. Mont Vernon Feb. 8, 1829. 

2. Dorcas, b. March 22, 1779, m. John Farrington. 

3. Dolly, b. Oct. 17, 1781, m. John Trow. 

4. Serviah, b. Oct. 1, 1783, m. *William Lamson. 

5. *Nathan, b. July 10, 1787. 

6. Rhoda, b. May 21, 1790, m. James Pike, May 7, 1812. 

Timothy Jones, son of Nathan and Elizabeth (Coburn) Jones, b. 
July 27, 1755, d. in Amherst in spring of 1793, m. June 13, 1782, Elizabeth, 
dau. of Daniel Kendrick, of Hollis settled on a farm in the westerly part 
of Amherst near Mont Vernon line. After his decease his widow m. 
Andrew Leavitt of Mont Vernon. She d. May, 1818. Ch. 

1. John, m. and settled in New Boston, where he d. 

2. Bowen, d. at sea, never m. 

3. Betsey, m. *Edmund Batchelder of Mont Vernon, settled in 
Landgrove, Vt., d. in Peru, Vt., July 9, 1869, age 83 years three months. 

4. Rachel, m. Eben Batchelder, June 30, 1811, d. Amherst, Jan. 9, 
1863, age 76. 

5. Hannah insane many years, d. at Concord Insane Asylum Aug. 

12, 1847, age 55. , . 

6. Timothy Jones, Jr., b. July 28, 1793, d. June 24, 1882, m. (1) 
Sophia, dau. of Reuben Stearns, Dec. 18, 1821. She d. July 7, 1830, 
age 26. He m. (2) Hannah, dau. Alexander Carr, lived in Amherst, four 
ch. by first wife. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 87 

Peter Jones, son of Nithan and Elizabeth (Coburn) Jones, b. Mont 
Vernon, Sept. 9, 1762, d. Amherst, Oct. 11, 1842 m. Betsey Woodbury, 
dau. of Peter and Elizabeth (Dodge) Ray Woodbury, June 5, 1787. She 
was an aunt of Julge Levi Woodbury and was b. Feb. 9, 1770, d. April 3, 
1843. They settled on the frm occupied by his father, but removed 
thence to Amherst in 1825. Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Mahala, b. 1788, m. Feb., 1809, *Mark D. Perkins. She d. June 
24, 1843. 

2. *Levi, b. Jan. 9, 1790. 

3. Hannah, b. Nov. 20, 1793, m. December 1, 1814, *Capt. William 
Bruce, d. Tuly 18, 1870. 

4. Peter W., b. June 19, 1795, d. June 4, 1797. 

Nathan Jones, 3rd., son of Nathan, Jr., and Esther (Butterfield) 
Jones, b. Mont Vernon, July 10, 1787 d. 1820, m. Sarah Bancroft. After 
his death she removed to Belleville, Canada, West, and d. there 1876, 
age 87. Her remains were brought to Mont Vernon and buried near those 
of her husband. Ch. were : 

1. Nathan, 4th, lived in Belleville, Can., d. Ontario, April 22, 1892, 
age 47. 

2. Timothy. 

3. Adams. 

4. Sarah, m. John D. Nutter, resided Montreal. 

Col. Levi Jones, son of Peter and Betsey (Woodbury) Jones, b. 
Mont Vernon, Jan. 9, 1790, d. Amherst, Oct. 11, 1858, m. Sophia, dau. of 
Thomas Gilmore, June 11, 1815. She was a great-granddaughter of Rev. 
Daniel Wilkins of Amherst, and a cousin of Gen. John Adams Dix of New 
York. She was b. Jan. 27, 1796, d. April 13, 1875. They settled on the 
Jones homestead in Mont Vernon, bjut removed to Amherst in 1825. 
First four ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Peter Woodbury, b. March 30, 1817, m. Cynthia Marland Nov. 
14, 1841. She d. Sept. 20, 1870, age 50. No ch. He d. Amherst, Dec. 6, 
1886, age 69. 

2. Nancy R., b. February 2, 1819, d. Aug., 1826. 

3. Mary L., b. June 13, 1821, m. Elbridge F. Perkins, Jan. 31, 1854, 
d. Wilton. 

4. Abby D., b. April 29, 1823, m. James H. Parmalee of New York, 
Jan., 1848, d. Manchester, Jan. 24, 1881. 

5. George W., b. Feb. 2, 1825, was one of the city officers in Lowell, 
Mass., d. unm. in Amherst, Sept. 7, 1851. 

6. Thomas, b. Feb. 3, 1827, lived in Amherst, d. there unm. Feb. 15, 
1900; farmer. 

7. Nancy R., b. Jan. 18, 1829, d. Lowell, April 20, 1843. 

8. Charles R, b. March 12, 1831, d. Oct. 10, 1840. 

9. Harriet N., b. Jan. 15, 1833, m. Dr. William E. Rogers of West- 
boro, Mass., March 4, 1861. 2 ch. 

10. Jane M. W., b. April 3, 1835, m. Oct. 14, 1856, David R. Brant of 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

11. Amelia Frances, b. May 3, 1837, d. Oct. 10, 1840. 

12. Daniel G., b. Aug. 3, 1839, d. Aug., 1840. 

George Jones, son of , b. New Boston, m. 1831, Sarah, dau. 

of Samuel and Deborah (Atwood) Battles. He d. 1857, age 55. After 



88 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

his death his widow lived in Mont Vernon, d. Jan. 2, 1894, age 80 years. 
Ch. b. New Boston : 

1. *Solomon, b. March 15, 1836. 

2. Servilla, murdered at 16 yrs. of age, 1857. 

3. *Plumer. 

4. Sarah J., d. in infancy. 

5. Eliza J., d. in infancy. 

6. Rebecca, b. 1849, m. *Woodbur'y Averill. She d. March 23, 1885. 

7. Elnora, b. March 22, 1851, m. 1871, Alonzo Winn of Antrim, res. 
Mont Vernon. 

8. George Frank, b. July 4, 1854, m. April 3, 1889, Marianna, dau. 
Rufus Harvvood of Lowell. She d. Oct. 29, 1895 age 44 yrs. 

Bradley Jones, b. New Boston, Aug. 20, 1815, lived on the farm in 
East Dist. after his m. He built the house. Farm was known as the 
"Bradley Jones place." He was a carpenter. He d. Oct. 12, 1885, age 
70 yrs. M. Mary W., dau. Daniel and Deborah (Battles) Kendall, March 
7, 1843. She was b. Mont Vernon, April 30, 1820, d. May 18, 1882. Ch. 
b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Emma Jane, b. March 1, 1848, m. Feb. 4, 1879, George H. Board- 
man of Lowell, res. Lowell, one ch., Blanche G., b. July 11, 1881. 

2. Albert P., b. Aug. 31, 1851, d. Aug. 10, 1880. 

Plumer Jones, son of George and .Sarah (Battles) Jones, b. New 
Boston, m. Nancy M., dau. of Trask W. and Hannah W. (Perkins) Aver- 
ill. She was b. Mont Vernon, Ma- 21, 1838, d. Nov. 16, 1876, lived in 
house in East Dist., now burnt, on left-hand side, between James Brown's 
mill and Stiles place. His widow, after his death, m. his brother, Sol- 
omon Jones. Ch. 

1. Edwin Augustus, b. March 2, 1862, lived in Francestown, now 
res. Goffstown. 

Solomon Jones, son of George and Sarah (Battles) Jones, b. New 
Boston, March 15, 1836, lived in smaller house on the best farm in East 
District, moved to Lowell, where he now res., was a farmer, hunter and 
laborer. M. (1) his brother's, Plumer Jones, widow, Nancy M., dau. 
Trask W. and Hannah W. (Perkins) Averill. She was b. Mont Vernon, 
May 21, 1838, d. Nov. 16, 1876. He m. (2) July 7, 1877, Martha Cook, by 
whom he has ch. Ch. by first wife b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Annie Elletta, b. Sept. 10, 1867, m. Oct. 18, 1885, Frank Smith, 
son of Daniel H. and Mary J. (Holt) Smith, of Mont Vernon, res. Mont 
Vernon, two ch. 

2. Samuel Prescott, b. Jan. 3, 1870. 

3. Frank Eugene, b. April 30, 1874, d. Sept. 17, 1878. 

KEELER. 

Rev. Setb H. Keeler, graduate Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vt, 
was pastor at Windsor, Vt., So. Berwick, Me., and for many years at Calais, 
Me. From 1867 to 1875 he was settled at Mont Vernon. Removed to 
Somerville, Mass., in 1875, where he d. Sept. 26, 1886, aged 86 years. He 
m. a dau. of Peter Felt, of New Ipswich, where he taught in the Acad- 
emy, prior to his settlement as a minister. They had three ch., one son 
and two dau. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 89 

KENDALL. 

Capt. Thaddeus Kendall, son of Nathan and Rebecca (Colburn) Ken- 
dall, b. Amherst, Aug. 2, 1772, m. (1) Catharine, dau. of Robert Fletcher, 
Esq., Sept. 25, 1800. She d. April 27, 1801, age 22. m (2) Abigail, dau. 
Dea. Samuel and Abigail (Farwell) Wilkins, of Amherst, Nov. 13, 1808. 
She was b. April 30, 1773, :n Amherst, d. Moble, Ala., Sept. 27, 1853. 
He settled in Mont Vernon, where he was a merchant several years. 
While here he was interested in the militia and under his leadership and 
instruction the North West Parish (or Mont Vernon) Company became 
one of the best in the old Fifth Regt. Leaving Mont Vernon he settled 
in Vergennes, Vt. He d. in Burlington, Vt., in 1843. Their ch. were: 

1. *George Wilkins, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 22, 1809. 

2. Thaddeus Richmond, b. Mont Vernon. He m. Amanda Hutchins 
of Alabama, had several ch., two of whom are now living. He was a 
lawyer in Moble, Ala., also engaged in mercantile business there. He re- 
moved to Concord, N. H., thence to Binghamton, N. Y., where he d. 
Sept. 19, 1882. 

3. Catherine, b. Mont Vernon, m. William Rix in 1837. They had 
several ch., only two now living — two dau. (married) live near her in 
Royalton, Vt. She lived in Mobile, Ala., until the war of 1860 broke out, 
when she moved to Vermont. Mr. R. is dead. 

George Wilkins Kendall, son of Capt. Thaddeus and Abigail (Wil- 
kins) Kendall, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 22, 1809, d. en his ranch, "Post Oak 
Springs," near Boerne Kendall Co., Texas, Oct. 21, 1867. He learned 
the printer's trade while still a boy, which was a means for making a liveli- 
hood. From the age of 14 he earned his own living, pushing out far from 
civilization, seeking adventure and fortune. In 1837 he founded the 
New Orleans Picayune, a small, bright newsy sheet, that to this day exists 
and that for years was a power in the South and in all of its existence 
only suspended for a short time during the war of 1860-1865. The paper 
only passed out of the hands of the family after his death, when his 
share was purchased by a oartner, whose heirs still have possession. He 
served in the Mexican War with great credit. He was a member of Gen. 
Edmund Worth's staff. After the end of the Mexican War he traveled 
extensively in Europe. During his travels he married his wife, Adeline 
de Valcourt, a French lady, and for several years they lived in Paris, 
France. He came back to America in December, 1855. From that time 
until 1860 the winters were spent in New Orleans and the summers on a 
ranch in Texas, where he engaged in raising fine sheep, many of which 
were imported from France. During the War of 1860 he remained on 
the Texas ranch, taking: but little part in the conflict, the scarcity of men 
making it difficult to handle his large flocks of sheep, causing the Indians 
to grow very bold and for years making it dangerous to go about alone or 
unarmed. 

After the war he spent the winters again in New Orleans, the paper 
showing to a marked degree the interesting articles, editorials and letters 
from his most versatile pen. In 1866 he made a flying trip to his old 
home in New Hampshire, visited many of the old-home scenes, and also 
spent a couple of months in Europe. 

During the years he spent on the ranch he busied himself writing a 
History of the Mexican War and completed it but a few weeks prior to 
his death, which occurred after a short illness on Oct. 21, 1867, (the 
manuscript of said history is still in the hands of his heirs). 



90 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

George W. Kendall was a man of very strong character, a man that 
stood six feet, with regular features and a most affable manner. He had 
a keen sense of humor and had, perhaps, the widest range of friends of 
any man in his community or indeed wherever he might find himself. He 
was enthusiastically fond of Texas and never tired extolling its oppor- 
tunities, climate, etc., and was buried in the little cemetery in the town or 
village of Boerne, in Kendall Co., (named after him) in Texas, the state 
of his adoption. The printers from his paper erected to his memory a 
marble monument upon which are inscribed the following words : "He 
was a poet, journalist, author, and farmer, eminent in all." 

Ch. b. France: 

1. Georgina, b. 1851, m. a lawver, Eugene J. Fellowes (a native of 
New Orleans), son of Thomas and Irene (Panavar) Fellowes, Dec. 15, 
1873, at Binghamton, N. Y. Lived in Chicago, 111. Now resides Spokane, 
Wash. She is a highly educated woman, speaking several European 
languages. One son, Kendall Fellowes, b. Chicago, Oct. 14, 1879, served 
in Spanish-American War, is now engaged in insurance business in San 
Francisco, Cal. 

2. George Williams, b. 1853, d. 1878, unm. 

3. Caroline Louise, b. 1854, d. Texas, July 4, 1898, unm. 

4. Henry Fletcher, b. 1855, m. 1886, Mary A. Jordan, dau. W. H. 
(retired colonel 21st. Inf., U. S. A.,) and Marv Adiar, his wife, two ch. 
He graduated from West Point in 1878. He was promoted a major and 
assigned to the 12th cavalry. He served in the Spanish-American War, 
and is now stationed at Ft. Clark, Texas. 

Dea. Jacob Kendall, b. Litchfield, 1758, d. Mont Vernon, June 3, 1823, 
m. June 25, 1782, Sarah, dau. of Jonathan and Mehitable (Holt) Lamson, 
of Amherst. She was b. March 20, 1761, d. Aug. 10, 1847. They removed 
from Litchfield to Mont Vernon about 1783 and lived on the farm in the 
East District, now occupied by Walter Bohonan. Ch. were: 

1. *Amos, b. 1792, lived and d. in New Boston, Jan. 12, 1859. 
These ch. b. Mont Veronn : 

2. Sarah, b. Jan. 17, 1784, m. (1) Aug. 20, 1804, Simeon Flint of 
Mont Vernon, m. (2) Sept. 16, 1824, Aaron Wilkins of Amherst, d. Sept 
14, 1861. 

3. *Jacob, b. April 15, 1785, lived for a time on the farm now owned 
bv Daniel Richardson, had two dau., removed to Nashua and d. there. 

4. Elizabeth, b. Aug. 11, 1788. 

5. *Jonathan, b. Aug. 11, 1791. 

6. *Josiah, b. Jan. 21, 1797, m. Polly Lovett, of Amherst. 

Amos Kendall, son of Dea. Jacob and Sarah (Lamson) Kendall, b. 
1782, m. an Adams of Londonderry, lived in Mont Vernon and New Bos- 
ton, where he d. Jan. 12, 1859. Ch. 

1. Delilah. 

2. Sarah. 

3. David. 

Jacob Kendall, son of Dea. Jacob and Sarah (Lamson) Kendall, b. 
Mont Vernon, April 15, 1785, m. Ursula Jacquith, lived some years on 
the old Dr. Kittredge farm, now occupied by Daniel Richardson, moved to 
Nashua, where they both d. She d. 1873, age 82. He d. 1855. Ch. were : 

1. Louisa, lives Nashua, unm. 

2. Mary Ann, m. a Tyler, lived in Wilton. 



HISTORY OF MONT. VERNON. 91 

Jonathan Kendall, son of Dea. Jacob and Sarah (Lamson) Kendall, b. 
Mont Vernon, Aug. 11, 1791, m. Dec. 7, 1815 Phebe dau. of Nathan and 
Phebe (Smith) Flint, of Amherst. He lived on his father's farm in the 
East District. He d. Oct. 24, 1859. She d. May 11, 1881, at Concord. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Eliza, m. Benjamin Dodge of New Boston. 

2. Harriet, m. William Coffin of Concord. 

3. Marian, m. Dr. William P. Gambell of Boston, d. at Simeon F. 
Kendall's. 

4. *Simeon Flint, b. May 29, 1829. 

5. Charles A., m. Mary Hutchinson of Concord, lived Concord, one 
dau., Anna May. 

Josiah Kendall, son of Dea. Jacob and Sarah (Lamson) Kendall, b. 
Mont Vernon, Jan. 21, 1797, m. Polly Lovett of Amherst. After rearing a 
family in Mont Vernon he moved to Antrim, lived there some years, 
moved to Tamworth, where he and his wife d. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Elizabeth, d. young. 

2. Stephen Chapin, moved to Antrim in 1849 and engaged in the 
manufacture of doors, m. Alfreda Jackson of Tamworth, lives in Fitch- 
burg, Mass. 

3. Adoniram J., went to Antrim, m. 1857, Amanda Abbott, went to 
Nashua in 1857, then to Manchester, where he and his wife d., leaving a 
son, Frank E. 

4. John L., worked :ome years for Rev. D. J. G. Davis in Amherst, 
moved to Antrim, m. 1851, Christiana Lovejoy, enlisted in the army from 
Antrim, and was lost overboard on the Potomac. Wife and ch. are all 
dead. 

Simeon Flint Kendall, son of Jonathan and Phebe (Flint) Kendall, 
b. Mont Vernon, May 29, 1829, m. Sept. 20 1849 Mary C. Clark of Derry, 
b. July 24, 1828. He lived on the homestead, lived in Pennsylvania sev- 
eral years served in the war for the Union, and was wounded, returned 
to the farm in Mont Vernon, moved to Milford, where he d. Oct. 17, 
1895. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Frank Elmon, b. Aug. 10, 1850, m. Sarah Armstrong of Amherst, 
lives in Milford, is of firm of Ordway & Kendall, proprietors Livery 
Stable. 

2. Charles Edney, b. Nov. 20, 1853, m. Alice K. Dodge of Antrim, 
four ch., lives Milford, is of firm Kendall & Wilkins grocers and grain 
merchants. 

3. Edgar Irving, b. April 15, 1858, m. Miss Susan H. Kimball of 
Milford, Sept. 23, 1896, resides Milford is a lawyer, has one ch. 

Daniel Kendall brother of Dea. Jacob Kendall, b. Litchfield, Jan. 18, 
1760, d. Mont Vernon, Aug. 17, 1830. m. Sarah dau. Joseph and Patience 
(Bradford) Lovejoy. She was b. May 6, 1762, d. Aug. 14, 1847. He 
settled in 1785 on the farm owned afterwards by his son, Daniel, grand- 
son, D. Porter K, and lately owned by his great-grandson, W. H. Ken- 
dall, in East Dist. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. *Daniel, b. Oct. 26, 1789. 

2. Mary, b. June 3, 1792, d. Nov. 3, 1813. 

3. Sarah, b. July 26, 1794, m. *John Battles, d. March 6, 1858. 

4. Nathan, b. 1796, d. Aug., 1798. 

5. Alice, b. Aug. 1, 1800, m. *Reuben K. Batchelder, d. June 26, 1846. 



92 HISTORY QF MONT VERNON. 

6. Zaccheus Nathan, b. June 2, 1803, d. Johnson, Vt., March 29, 1888. 

7. *Ira, b. Jan. 9, 1805, d. March 20, 1863. 

Daniel Kendall, son of Daniel and Sarah (Lovejoy) Kendall, b. Mont 
Vernon, Oct. 26, 1789, lived on his father's farm, d. Aug. 31, 1870, 
m. Dec. 31 1818, Deborah, dau. Samuel and Deborah (Atwood) Battles, of 
Mont Vernon. She d. April 24, 1871. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Mary W., b. April 30, 1820, m. *Bradley Jones of Mont Vernon, 
March 7, 1843. Two ch. D. May 18, 1882. 

Twins : — 

2. *Daniel Porter, b. Jan. 3, 1823. 

3. Deborah J., b. Jan. 3. 1823, m. Alvin Chase of Milford, Oct. 18, 
1855. He d. Aug. 1863. She d. E. JafFrey, March 25, 1891. One dau., 
Jennie, b. Milford, May 26, 1857, m. June 28, 1882, at Mont Vernon 
Wm. Jacquith; has four boys; lives E. Jaffrey, N. H. 

Ira Kendall, son of Daniel and Sarah (Lovejoy) Kendall, b. Mont 
Vernon, Jan. 9, 1805, lived on the farm with his brother, Daniel, d. March 
20, 1863, m. May 10, 1832, Cyrene, dau. of Capt. John and Betsey (Batch- 
elder) Batchelder. She was b. Oct. 17, 1803, in Mont Vernon, d. Goffs- 
town, Dec. 16, 1872. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Emmeline, b. January 26, 1834, lives Goffstown, unm. 

2. Cyrene Elizabeth, b. Jan. 14, 1836, lives Goffstown, unm. 

3. Ira Kendrick, b. Jan. 26, 1838, m. March 29, 1864, Rebecca Warren 
of Goffstown, N. H, is a wealthy and prominent furniture manufacturer 
of Goffstown ; has represented the town. Ch. b. Goffstown. 

1. Frank Warren, b. October 16, 1866. 

2. Annie May, b. Jan. 14, 1869. 

3. Lewis B., b. May 25, 1877. 

4. Nathan Franklin, b. Dec. 22, 1840, enlisted Co. C, 16th N. H. Regt. 
Vol., d. Aug. 15, 1863. 

Daniel Porter Kendall, b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 3, 1823, settled on his 
father's farm, was representative in 1876, 1877, d. Aug. 27, 1891, m. May 
30, 1850, Susan, dau. Thomas and Nancy (Stevens) Cloutman. She was 
b. March 13, 1823, d. Jan. 8, 1897. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Andrew P., d. Sept. 23, 1854, age 3 yrs. 4 mos. 

2. Esther Cloutman, b. December 13, 1856, m. Sept. 26, 1882, Alonzo 
M. Carleton, has several ch., lives Goffstown. 

3. William Henry, b. June 10, 1859, m. June 19, 1901, Clara H. 
Blood of Wilton, is a lumber dealer and resides in Mont Vernon Village; 
is also deacon of the church. 

4. Andrew P., b. June 11, 1861, d. Aug. 25, 1876. 

5. M. Susie, b. Feb. 3, 1867, m. April 26, 1898, Arthur Temple, resides 
Mont Vernon. 

Asa Kendall, b. Leominster, Mass., June 10, 1778, m. Oct. 15, 1807, 
Lydia Adams of Townsend, b. Oct. 15, 1784, and sister of Dr. Daniel 
and Dea. J. S. Adams of Mont Vernon. Asa Kendall learned the sad- 
dler's trade off Ephraim Eager in his native town, and in 1799 succeeded 
his master in the business, which he carried on successfully until 1814, 
when he sold out, removed to Mont Vernon, and built the store, which is 
now part of the "Mont Vernon House," where he traded twenty years. 
In 1850 he removed to East Concord and resided in the family of his 




WILLIAM H. KENDALL. 
Deacon from 1891 (still serving, 1905). 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 93 

son, Henry A., where he d. Dec. 13, 1863. His wife d. March 9, 1873, aged 
88. Both were interred in Mont Vernon. Ch. b. Leominster. 

1. Augusta, b. June 26, 1808, m. May 31, 1837, George E. Dean, d. 
June 10, 1855. 

2. Henry Adams, b. Aug. 6, 1810, d. at Concord, March 27, 'l894; 
fitted for college at Kimball Union Academy, was ordained pastor of a 
Trinitarian Church at Dublin, N. H., June 2, 1840, m. May 27, 1844, Har- 
riet G. Appleton of Dublin, N. H. Ch. b. Dublin. 

1. *Henry Appleton, b. March 29, 1845. 

2. Samuel Adams, b. Dec. 27, 1846. 

3. Sarah Harriet, b. East Concord, May 17, 1851. 

Mary Ann Kendall, dau. Franklin Kendall, a sea captain, brother Asa 
Kendall, was b. Dec. 22, 1828. She was reared in family of Asa Kendall 
from seven years until her m., Aug. 8, 1848, to Wm. B. Richardson of 
Mont Vernon. She d. Newtonville, Mass., April 11, 1900. 

Henry Appleton Kendall, b. Dublin, March 29, 1845, fitted for college 
at Henniker Academy, graduated at Dartmouth College, 1866, m. June 
21, 1870, Frances L., dau. of Dea. William and Hannah (Fornis) Conant. 
She was b. Mont Vernon, April 1 1844, d. April 8, 1901. He lives in 
Somerville. Mass. Ch. b. Somerville. 

1. Gertrude Greenwood, b. Oct. 27, 1871. 

2. Franklin Conant, b. April 29, 1873. 

3. Marian Colby, b. April 5, 1879. 

4. Marcella Fornis, b. December 18, 1882. 

Mrs. Persis Kendall, mother of Asa Kendall, d. Nov. 15, 1829, aged 75. 

KIDDER. 

Thomas Karr Kidder, son of Ephraim and Betsey (Boffee) Kidder, 
born Lyndeborough, June 9, 1817. Was a farmer. Resided here in the 
forties and fifties in Centre and South District. He moved to Milford, 
where he d. Dec. 21, 1894. He m. Sept., 1839, Olive, dau. James and 
Azubah (Curtis) Hopkins, b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 15, 1819, d. Milford, 
June 16, 1894. Ch. 

1. Hattie Frances, b. Milford, Dec. 22, 1841, m. April 16, 1863, 
Charles E., son of Nathaniel and Susan (Duncklee) Stone, res. Milford. 

2. Newell Porter, b. Lyndeborough, Sept. 18, 1843, is a cooper and 
res. in Long Lake, Minn. 

3. Abbie Jane, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 12, 1846, m. April, 1865, Charles 
G. Burns of Milford, d. Jan. 20, 1866. 

4. Mary Ann, b. Milford, June 6, 1848, d. Milford, March 25, 1868. 

5. Eliza Ella, b. Mont Vernon, June 7, 1851, m. April, 1871, Lorenzo 
Cutter, of Milford, and res. in Webster, Mass. 

6. Charles, b. in Lyndeborough, Sept. 6, 1856, is a laborer, res. in 
Brookline. 

William L. Kidder, b. Billerica, Mass, April 13, 1775, m. Nov. IS, 
1798, Nabby Jenkins of Andover, settled in Mont Vernon. Ch. 

1. William Lambert, b. July 4, 1800. 

2. Nancy, m. 1834, Amos Batchelder, d. in Goffstown. 

3. Mahala, m. (1) Partridge; m. (2) Ambrose Smith, 1833, d. in 
Goffstown. 



94 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

4. Francis, m. Susan Richardson, Aug. 19, 1830, d. Aug. 19, 1830, 
in Mont Vernon. 

5. Charles, m. Gowing, lived in North Reading, Mass. 

William Lambert Kidder, Jr., b. July 4, 1800, d. in Amherst, Sept. 29, 
1860, m. Mary Jane, dau. Parker Richardson of Mont Vernon, April 19, 
1806, d. Amherst, August 27, 1880. He lived in Mont Vernon several 
years. Ch. 

1. Ann Mary, b. April 28, 1827, m. June 14, 1857, Joseph F. Johnson, 
who d. Ship Island, May 27, 1862, was in the 8th N. H. Regt.. 

2. Mary Jane, b. March 10, 1836, d. April 9, 1836. 

3. William Henry, b. June 22, 1837, m. Abby Burse of Shapleigh, 
Me., Nov. 26, 1868, machinst; res. Great Falls. 

4. Andrew Jackson, b. May 23, 1840, m. Katy Greenleaf; farmer, 
res. in Hudson. 

5. Emma Caroline, b. August 31, 1842, m. (l) W. H. Smith, Aug. 
24, 1860; m. (2) Reilly; m. (3) Eli A. Sawtelle; res. Amherst. 

6. Alfred, b. April 22, 1847, d. at Providence, R. I., unm. Aug. 17, 
1875. 

John Kidder, b. Hudson, N. H., came to Mont Vernon from Milford, 
m. Eliza Wilkins of Antrim. He removed to Nashua, thence to Sacra- 
mento, Cal., where he d. 

KIMBALL. 

Porter Kimball came from Mass., kept tavern in village several years, 
was representative in 1836, was postmaster 1823, moved to Lowell, m. (1) 
Mary, dau. Jonathan and Mary Davis of Westford, Mass. She d. Feb. 
26, 1820, aged 37 years. He m. (2) Fanny, dau. Dr. Zephaniah and Eliz- 
abeth (Stickney) Kittredge. She d. Sept. 16, 1821, age 22 yrs. Ch. by 
first wife buried Mont Vernon. 

1. Son, d. Sept. 22, 1812. 



2. 

3. Jonathan, d. Dec. 12, 1815, aged 9 days. 

4. Porter, d. Feb. 16, 1817, aged 20 days. 

5. Porter, d. April 16, 1818, aged 9 weeks, 3 days. 

6. John, d. June 20, 1819, aged 4 months. 

KINGSBURY. 

Rev. Nathaniel Kingsbury was ordained pastor here Nov. 8, 1823, was 
dismissed April 6, 1836. He was b. in Coventry, Conn., was a graduate of 
Amherst College. He removed to Wisconsin, where he d. at Prairieville, 
July 12, 1843, aged 48. His ministry here was prosperous, there being two 
great revivals, one in 1828, the other in 1831. He m. a Miss Dow oi 
Coventry, Conn., and had several ch. Ch. buried Mont Vernon. 

1. Mary R, d. June 29, 1833, aged 4 years. 

2. Dwight L., d. July 15, 1833, aged 8 months. 

3. Joseph, d. April 15, 1834, aged 8 months. 

KINSON. 

George Kinson, son of Ebenezer Kinson, b. Mont Vernon, April 1, 
1800, d. Amherst, Oct. 2, 1867, m. Dec. 5, 1825, Martha M. Walker, sister 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 95 

George Walker, Sr., of Amherst. She was b. New Ipswich, Jan. 20, 
1805. They settled in Amherst in 1830, where he carried on the black- 
smithing business, and was widely known as a skillful workman. He left 
six ch. His. sister, Mary Kinson, b. Mont Vernon, m. Feb. 20, 1812, 
Luther, son of Simeon and Catherine (Wyman) Blanchard of Milford, 
d. Milford, Feb. 19, 1853. Had nine ch. 

KITTREDGE. 

The first we learn of the Kittredges coming to this country was in 
1660, when Capt. John Kittredge fled from England to America. Capt. 
K. was in charge of a ship, which plied from England to some foreign 
port, and being of a surgical turn of mind, studied the medical receipts 
carefully. The tradition is that he began experimenting by breaking ani- 
mals' limbs, then setting them, seeing how fast he could get them to heal. 
One of his men broke an arm and the captain set it. Soon after this an- 
other man broke a leg and asked the captain to set it. The captain said 
he would "if he would take a room and place himself entirely 
in his care," which he did. He became very successful. It be- 
came known to the authorities and as the laws were very stringent at 
that time, allowing no one to practice without a medical diploma, it be- 
came necessary for him to leave England. He came to this country and 
settled in Billerica, Mass., Sept. 25, 1660. The name was formerly spelled 
Keteredge. He m. Nov. 25, 1664, Mary Littlefield. He d. Oct. 18, 1676. 
He had five ch., all sons. 

Solomon Kittredge, fifth generation from Capt. John Kittredge (Capt. 
John, 1; John, 2; John, 3; John, 4; Solomon, 5) b. Billerica, Mass., 
June 9, 1736, m. Tabitha Ingalls of Andover, May 14, 1755. They set- 
tled in Mont Vernon about 1766. He d. Aug. 24, 1792. She d. May 8, 
1794, age 59 years, 1 month, 14 days. He was a blacksmith and a promi- 
nent man in the parish. He was in the French and Indian War. Ch. 

1. *Solomon, b. 1755, Aug. 3. 

2. *Zephaniah, b. Aug. 24, 1757. 

3. Tabitha, b. July 28, 1758, m. Benjamin Sawyer, settled in Nelson, 
N. H. 

4. *Josiah, b. July 26, 1761. 

5. Phebe, b. June 5, 1763, m. Aaron Townsend. 

6. *Stephen, b. June 27, 1765. 

7. Lydia, b. Aug. 29, 1767, in Mont Vernon, m. Joshua Kittredge, 
Nov. 29, 1787. 

These ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

8. *Ingalls, b. Dec. 10, 1769. 

9. Betsey, b. Sept. 16, 1771, m. Wheeler of Nelson, d. Nov. 

9, 1865, age 94. She was the mother of the late Gilman Wheeler of 
Milford. 

10. Peter, b. Sept. 25, 1773. 

11. Asa, settled in Weare in 1803, was a ohysician, had five dau. 

12. Sallv, b. April 19, 1779, m. Abial Stickney of Tewksbury, Mass., 
d. Aug. 28,'l847. 

Solomon Kittredge, son of Solomon and Tabitha (Ingalls) Kittredge, 
b. Tewksbury, Aug. 3, 1755, m. (1) Anna Kittredge, Feb., 1777, by whom 
he had eleven ch. M. (2) Betsey Holt, April 13, 1815. He came to 
Mont Vernon with his parents, was a Revolutionary soldier, d. Mont 
Vernon, Oct. 22, 1845, age 90. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 



96 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

1. Solomon, b. Sept. 28, 1778. 

2. Anna, b. March 13, 1780. 

3. Lucy, b. Jan. 25, 1783. 

4. Thomas, b. March 25, 1785. 

5. *Josiah, b. Feb. 26, 1787. 

6. Jeremiah, b. Jan. 26, 1789. 

7. Harriet, b. July 13, 1791. 

8. Hezekiah, b. Jan. 25, 1793. 

9. *Zephaniah, b. April 15, 1795. 

10. Lucy, b. Feb. 8, 1797, m. Mr. Farrar, April, 1818. 
11 Betse}% b. July 15, 1799, rri. John Carter, Aug., 1818. 

Dr. Zephaniah Kittredge, son of Solomon and Tabitha (Ingalls) 
Kittredge, b. Billerica, Mass., Aug. 24, 1757, m. Elizabeth Stickney of 
Tewksbury, Mass. She d. Mont Vernon Aug. 6, 1851, aged 90. He was 
long and favorably known as a skillful surgeon and physician. During 
his professional career he lived on the farm now owned by Daniel Rich- 
ardson. He d. Aug. 17, 1843. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Betsey, b. May 18, 1782, d. Aug. 5, 1786. 

2. Abigail or Nabby, b. March 22, 1784, m. June 28, 1804, *Jesse 
Smith. She d. May 7, 1866. 

3. *Zephaniah, b. Sept. 15, 1785. 

4. Betsey, d. March 5, 1799, age 11 years. 

5. Nancy, b. 1790, m. March, 1808, Uriah Wilkins, son Aaron and 
Lydia (Smith) Wilkins, d. Howe, Vt, Jan. 10, 1832. 

6. Fanny, m. Porter Kimball of Mont Vernon. She d. Sept. 16, 
1821, age 22 years. 

Josiah Kittredge, son of Solomon and Tabitha ( Ingalls) Kittredge, 
b. July 6, 1761, came here with his parents, lived on the old poor farm, 
now owned by Edward Hildreth, which he owned and occupied many 
vears, m. Oct. 13, 1792, Mary Baker. She d. Sept. 16, 1828, age 66 years, 
3 months. 17 days. He d. May 23, 1850. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. *Josiah, b. Oct. 15, 1793. 

2. Timothy, b. May 15, 1795. 

3. Lovey, b. Jan. 28, 1797. 

4. Alvah, b. May 15, 1798, lived Boston Highlands, ch. George went 
to Bombay ; another son, Rev. Abbott E. Kittredge, pastor Madison Ave. 
Church, New York City, had three dau. 

5. Solomon, b. March 13, 1801, a graduate of Dartmouth College, 
was a minister ; settled in Indiana. 

6. Mary, b. Dec. 17, 1803, m. Sept. 27, 1827, Rev. Ephraim Clark of 
Peacham, Vt. They went as missionairies to the Sandwich Islands; 
had ch. 

7. *Charles B., b. July 4, 1806, clergyman at Groton and Westboro, 
Mass., graduated at Dartmouth College and Andover Theological Sem.; 
m. Miss Brigham, d. Nov. 25, 1884. 

Dr. Stephen Kittredge, son Solomon and Tabitha (Ingalls) Kittredge, 
b. Tewksbury, Mass., June 27, 1765, m. Mehitable Russell, Nov. 27, 1787. 
On the dav of marriage they went to Francestown to reside moved to 
Hancock, Oct., 1790, where he d. Otc. 6, 1806. His widow m. (2) Daniel 
Bickford in 1811, and removed to Sedgewick, Me. Dr. K. was a suc- 
cessful physician and highly respected in Hancock. He had 11 ch. His 
eldest dau. Gratia m. Dr. Peter Tuttle his successor in Hancock, Sept. 
9. 1808. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 97 

Dr. Ingalls Kittredge, son Solomon and Tabitha (Ingalls) Kit- 
tredge, b. Mont Vernon, Dec. 10, 1769, studied medicine with his elder 
brother, Zephaniah, first settled in Townsend, Mass., moved to Beverly 
in 1804, m. (1) Sarah, only dau. Jonathan and Mercy (Lovett) Conaot. 
She was baptized June 3, 1770, d. Beverly, Oct. 7, 1833. He m. (2) Lydia 
Smith. He d. at Beverly. He owned the farm and estate for several 
years which he sold to Capt. Timothy Kittredge in 1837, which is now 
owned by the heirs of Dr. C. M. Kittredge in South Dist. Their second 
son, Dr. Ingalls Kittredge, b. Townsend, Mass., June 30, 1798, prepared 
for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, graduated at Dartmouth Col- 
lege, 1820, and at Harvard Medical College 1823, settled in Beverly, m. 
Sept. 22, 1824, Augusta Smith, who d. Jan. 12, 1874. He d. at Beverly, 
Feb. 14, 1867. "He was a strong anti-slavery man always ready with his 
purse to aid the cause as well as to assist refugee slaves. George Latimer 
• and Fred Douglas ex slaves, were aided by him and introduced to Bev- 
erly audiences. He holds an eminent place in Beverly's history." He 
had seven dau. The eldest m. Charles W. Galloupe and had two dau. 
Another m. Edward Leech Giddings of the banking firm of Tower, Gid- 
dings & Co., Boston. 

Dea. Josiah Kittredge, son of Solomon and Anna (Kittredge) Kit- 
tredge, b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 26, 1787. He operated his uncle, Dr. Ingalls 
Kittredge's, farm many years, m. (1) Dec. 24, 1812, Hannah Mace. She 
was b. June 15, 1793, d. May 9, 1828. M. (2) Nancy Cochoran of Am- 
herst, Dec. 16, 1828. She was b. Aug. 16, 1798. d. Feb. 19, 1830, age 31 
years 11 mos. He m. (3) Sept. 2, 1830, Relief, dau. Capt. John and 
Betsey (Batchelder) Batchelder. She was b. Mont Vernon, Dec. 16, 
1796, d. July 19, 1868. He d. Aug. 7, 1836, aged 49. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

By first wife : 

1. Hannah, b. Sept. 28, 1815, d. young. 

2. Mary Ann, b. Nov. 8, 1818, m. Frank Lewis of Haverhill, Mass., 
had several ch., lived in Haverhill Mass. 

3. Franklin F., b. Sept. 28, 1820, m. Miss Richardson of Pelham, 
served in the Union Army in the War for the Union and d. in Iowa. 
One dau. 

4. Ingalls, b. Dec. 24, 1822, d. young. 

5. Elizabeth, b. Nov. 27, 1824, m. Oct. 1, 1844, Benjamin Perry of 
Stoneham, Mass., lives Stoneham, has three sons, the eldest of whom 
Walter S. Perry has been professor drawing, Pratt Institute. Brooklyn, 
N. Y., many years. 

6. Charles, b. July 31, 1827, d. July 15, 1828. 
Ch. by second wife : 

7. *Charles Alfred, b. Aug. 24, 1829. 
Ch. bv third wife : 

8. Nancy Maria, b. March 9, 1832, m. March 18, 1854, *Samuel N. 
Stevens. 

9. Harriet E., b. Sept. 22, 1834, unm., resides Stoneham, with her 
sister, Mrs. Perry. 

Zephaniah Kittredge, son Solomon and Anna (Kittredge) Kittredge, 
b. Mont Vernon, April 15, 1795, m. Nancy Manning. He lived on the 
farm in the North District, now occupied by his son, Henry J. Kittredge. 
He d. Sept. 20, 1876, age 81 years, 6 mos. She d. March 26, 1868, age 
68 vears, 9 mos. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 



98 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

1. Nancy Jane, b. Aug. 15, 1821, m. Jan. 1, 1849, *Albert D. Man- 
ning. She d. Dec. 18, 1897. 

2. Eliza, d. Aug. 31, 1845, age 21. 

3. Lucy Maria, d. Lowell, May 22, 1895, age 68, unm. Burial at 
Mont Vernon. 

4. Pamelia J., m. Charles E. Jackson of Tamworth, N. H., lives in 
Antrim, has three ch. 

5. *Henry J., b. March 1, 1830. 

6. *George W., b. Aug. 16, 1836, d. Nov. 1, 1869, age 33 years, 2 

months, 16 days, m. Flint, dau. John G. Flint of Antrim; lived 

Antrim. , 

7. Sarah Frances. Lived in Lowell, d. there Feb. 27, 1903, age 60 
years, 11 months. 

Zephaniah Kittredge, son of Dr. Zephaniah and Elizabeth ( Stickney) 
Kittredge, b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 15, 1785; m. Oct. 26, 1809, Mary, dau. 
of Noah and Mary ( Butterfield) Wheeler of Hancock (aunt of Charles 
James Fox of Nashua). She was b. Hancock, Feb. 1, 1788, d. Feb. 25, 
1880. He d. Aug. 3, IS?:;. He was a prominent and valuable citizen, was 
selectman live years, moderator five years, and representative in 1843. 
C"i. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Mary, b. Sept. 7, 1810, m. April 14, 1846, Amaziah Wood of 
Francestown, lived Francestown ; d. there Oct. 27, 1879 ; left two ch. 

2. *Franklin Otis. b. Nov. 28, 1813. 

3. *Zephaniah, 1). July 18, 1815. 

4. Charles K, b. Anril 11. 1817, d. Sept. 26, 1819. 

5. Sarah Fox, b. Sept. 4, 1820; educated Literary and Scientific 
Institution, Hancock ; taught in Hancock, Mont Vernon, New Ipswich, 
Charlestown, Mass., and St. Louis ; m. Eleazer Block of St. Louis, who 
d. in 1865, had one dau., who m. T. A. Meysenburg of St. Louis. 

6. Elizabeth, b. Oct. 10, 1823. d. unm., "Jan. 16, 1864. 

7. Abbie, b. April 3, 1827, m. April 27, 1849, Eben C. Batchelder of 
Milford, had six children, of whom one is living; res. Milford. 

Dr. Josiah Kittredge, son of Josiah and Mary (Baker) Kittredge, 
b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 15, 1793; practised in Pembroke, Concord and 
Nashua, N. H., and Boston, moved to Glastonberry, Conn., where he d. 
October 29, 1872. M. (1) Mary Blanchard, dau. David and Susannah 
(Lovejoy) Stewart of Amherst. She was b. there Feb. 20, 1803, d. 
Pembroke, N. H. He m. (2) Sarah Whiting French of Bedford, N. H. 
M. (3) Sarah Baylies Brigham of Grafton, Mass., May 7, 1844. Ch. by 
first wife : 

1. Mary Clark, b. Dec. 8, 1827. 
Ch. by second wife : 

2. Charles S., b. Jan. 6, 1833, in Pembroke, m. Maria Chase of Haver- 
hill, Mass., Oct. 20, 1864; resides Santa Barbara, Cal., has four ch. 

3. Sarah French, b. Nov. 15, 1834. 

4. Josiah Edward, b. Oct. 12, 1836, is a clergyman at Geneseo, N. Y., 
also a doctor of divinity, m. Tune 12, 1871, Emma McNair of Groveland, 
Mass., has four ch. 

Capt. Timothv Kittredge, son of Josiah and Mary (Baker) Kittredge, 
b. Mont Vernon, May 15, 1795, m. Frances Marsh of Sharon, Vt. She d. 
Aug. 28, 1870, age 62. He d. Feb. 10, 1870. He lived on his father's 
farm, afterwards sold it to the town for a poor farm (now owned and 




FRANKLIN OTIS KITTREDGE. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 



99 



occupied by Edw. Hildreth) and bought his uncle's, Dr. Ingalls Kit- 
tredge, farm, now owned by the estate of his son, the late Dr. C. M. 
Kittredge. He was a laborious and thrifty farmer. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Albert B., d. July 21, 1835, aged three years, nine mos. 

2. Mary Emeline. b. July 25. 1834, m. William Stearns of Amherst, 
Mass., a son of Pres. William Stearns of Amherst College; had several 
ch., one of their sons, Alfred E. Stearns, is principal Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass. She resides Amherst, Mass. 

3. Maria Francis, d. Feb. 20, 1S40, aged three years, six months. 

4. *Charles Marsh, b. April 30. 1838. 

5. George Dimick. fitted for college at Mont Vernon, graduated at 
Amherst College 1865. resided afterwards at New York City and Fishkill- 
on-the-Hudson. d. Andover, Mass.. March 6, 1S7T, age 36. Interred at 
Mont Vernon. 

6. Frances Adelia, b. Feb. 15. 1844, m. May 6, 1867, *Dr. Cecil F. P. 
Bancroft, d. Andover. Mass.. March 29, 1898. 

7. Maria Theresa, b. Dec. 1, 1850, teacher, res unm. Fishkill-on-Hud- 
son, N. Y. 

Charles Alfred Kittredge, son Dea. Josiah and Nancy (Cochran) 
Kittredge, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 24. 1829, d. Jan. 7, 1899; m. May 18, 
1853, Maria E. Chase of Lowell. She was b. May 29, 1829. He spent 
the greater part of his life in Lowell. Concord, Nashua, in which places 
he was grocer and meat man. He represented Nashua in the Legislature. 
A worthy and excellent man. Ch. 

1. Charles Warren, b. June 3 1854, d. infancy, aged 10 weeks. 

2. Adelaide Maria, b. May 4, 1856. is a physician, unm. 

3. Frank E.. b. Concord, X. H„ May 18, 1862. m. December 21, 
1887. Lizzie M. Coombs of Nashua, is a physician in Nashua. 

4. Frederic Lincoln, b. Jan. 18, 1865, m. Oct. 24, 1893. Marian Nevens 
nf Rochester, N. Y. ; lives in Rochester, N. Y. 

Henry J. Kittredge. son of Zephaniah and Nancy (Manning) Kit- 
tredge, b. Mont Vernon, March 1, 1830. M. (1) Mary Jane Chapman. 
She d. April. 1861. M (2) Jane Murray. April 21, 1862. She was b. 
Oct. 6, 1839, at Shimogue, N. B. 

Ch. by second wife b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Ida E., b. Jan. 19, 1864, bookkeeper in Nashua. 

2. Harriet, b. July 5, 1871, m. April 27, 1892. *Harry G. Blood of 
Mont Vernon; res. Mont Vernon. 

Franklin Otis Kittredge, son Zephaniah and Mary (Wheeler) Kit- 
tredge, b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 28, 1813, d. March 20, 19"02. For extended 
description see chapter on "Prominent Men" in Manuscrint History. He 
m. Nov. 13, 1838, Marv Ann, dau. of David and Delinda (Saunders) Dur- 
tnn. She was b. Oct.' 5, 1814, in Mont Vernon, d. July 31. 1902. Ch. b. 
Mont Vernon. 

1. Charles Franklin, b. Feb. 24. 1841, graduated Dartmouth College, 
1861, studied law with City Solicitor John P. Healey. Boston ; Representa- 
tive from Mont Vernon, 1867 ; is now a lawyer with a lucrative practice 
in Boston; m. Sent. 24, 1872. Adelaide F. Lee, dau. of David and Mary 
(King) Lee. of Barre, Mass. Ch. 

1. Mabel Lee. b. Jan. 8, 1874. m. Charles Dunn of Boston, has one ch. 

2. Florence Parmenter, b. March 12, 1876. 

3. Louise Pierce, b. April 1, 1878. 



100 HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 

4. Charles Lee, b. Mav 24, 1883, d. Jan. 26, 1896. 
(2.) Laureta E., b. June 23, 1843, m. Butler H. Phillips, res. Mont 
Vernon. 

Zephaniah Kittredge, son of Zephaniah and Mary (Wheeler) Kit- 
tredge, b. Mont Vernon, July 18, 1815; d. Tyngsboro, Mass., July 3, 1889. 
M. (1) March 19, 1840, Caroline Mclntire of Lyndeboro'. She d. Lowell, 
Mass., Aug. 4, 1878. He m. (2) Caroline F. Tapley of Lowell, Feb. 5. 
1885. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Ellen J., b. Jan. 24, 1841, m. April 10, 1865 (1), John F. Drury 
of Columbus, Ohio, by whom she had one son, William R. Drurv. She 
m. (2) Nov. 27, 1884, Oranius W. Burnham. They reside in Waltham, 
Mass. 

2. Darwin E., b. Jan. 15, 1846, m. Oct. 29, 1878, Amelia F. Filley. 
Mr. K. is in the boot and shoe business at Rochetser, X. Y. Ch. b. New 
Hampshire. Joseph P., b. Aug. 2, 1879 ; Frances, b. Sept. 12, 1881 ; Mary, 
b. Jan. 2, 1884. 

3. Harvey G., b. May 28, 1849, m. (1) June 15, 1870, Abbie S. Max- 
field of Chester, Vt. They had one son, Arthur M., who d. infancy. 
She d. Lowell, Mass., Nov. 17, 1872. He m. (2) Feb. 2, 1875, Julia A. 
Spalding of Chester, Vt. ; had two sons, Harry J. and Phillip H., both 
d. in infancy. He is a dentist in Waltham, Mass. 

4. Adna B., b. Oct. 31, 1851, is unm., is in the boot and shoe busi- 
ness at El Paso, Texas. 

Dr. Charles Marsh Kittredge, b. Mont Vernon, April 30. 1838, d. 
Mont Vernon, Aug. 19, 1896 ; fitted for college at Appleton Academy, 
graduated at Amherst College 1862, entered the army in Sept., 1862, re- 
signed his commission as lieutenant in the 13th N. H. Regt. in Nov., 1863 ; 
studied medicine with Dr. Edward Aiken of Amherst and at Hartford 
Retreat for the Insane, graduated Harvard Medical College in 1866; lo- 
cated Fishkill-on-the-Hudson in 1870, m. Dec. 5, 1869, Marcella Eliza, dau. 
Dea. William and Hannah (Fornis) Conant. She was b. Mont Vernon, 
Dec. 3, 1845, d. Aug. 4, 1892, at Fishkill. Ch. b. Fishkill-on-the-Hudson. 

1. William C, b. Xov. 28, 1870; d. Feb. 11, 1887. 

2. Charles Albert, b. April 26, 1872, a physician. 

3. Edward Walter, b. Oct. 2, 1873, d. July 29, 1874. 

4. Aida, b. Dec. 5, 1876, m. a Abbe. 

5. Harry Marsh, b. May 25, 1878. 

6. George Dimick, b. March 2, 1886. 

KEXXEDY. 

Michael Kenned}', servant and coachman, came here from Boston and 
lived with Mr. Henry Bishop on Joseph Conant farm, in the forties and 
fifties, several years. He returned to Boston, where he d. He was a 
man of property, which he left by will to the Catholic Church. 

La FOREST. 

Samuel Otis La Forest, of Spanish origin, lived here in the fifties 
He was a mechanic. He built the foundation and_main part of A. W. 
Bragg's house, and lived there. He moved to Boston, served in the 47th 
Mass. Regt. in Civil War. He m. Mary Harrington. She d. March 4, 
1885, age 67. They had several ch. 




CHARLES M. KITTREDGE, M.D. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 101 

LEACH. 

Capt. Lebbcus Leach came from Bridgewater, Mass., was a retired 
shipmaster, lived several years in the Campbell house, moved away about 
i'J75. He d. Newtonville, Mass., May 25, 1884, aged 85 years. He m. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Wheelwright, second wife (sister of James Bruce). Ch. 

1. John B., m. a Miss Bellows of Pepperell, Mass., lived in Mont 
Vernon several years. One son, Albert, who attended McCollom Insti- 
tute. 

2. Mary, m a Loring of California. 

3. Lebbeus. 

LAMSON. 

Samuel Lamson, b. Reading, Mass., Jan. 8, 1701. In company with 
Samuel Walton he settled on the Bryant Melendly place, a mile south of 
Amherst Village. Lamson afterwards removed to Mont Vernon, where 
he lived 25 years. In 1765 he removed to Billerica, Mass., where he d. 
about 1770. He m. Abigail Bryant, July 3, 1722. 

1. Abigail, b. Feb. 12, 1723, m. Joseph Ellenwood. 

2. Samuel, b. Oct. 24, 1724, m. Rebecca Crosby, Nov. 6, 1770. 

3. *Jonathan, b. Sept. 29, 1726. 

4. Rebecca, b. March 25, 1733. 

5. Sarah, b. 1739, said to have been the first child b. of English 
parents in Amherst, m. James Gage of Amherst, had 10 ch. 

Jonathan Lamson. son of Samuel and Abigail (Bryant) Lamson, b. 
Reading, Mass.. Sept. 29, 1726, d. Mont Vernon, Dec, 1815; m. Mehitable 
Holt. She d. Feb. 16, 1826, age 92. Ch. probably b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Mehitable, b. March 25, 1755, d. unm. in Nashua, April 18, 1844. 

2. *Jonathan, b. Aug. 10, 1756. 

3. Ebenezer, b. Aug. 20, 1759, d. June. 1760. 

4. Sarah, b. March 20, 1761, m. June 25, 1782, *Dea. Jacob Kendall; 
d. Aug. 10, 1847. 

5. Phebe, b. Jan. 9, 1763, d. Feb., 1773. 

6. Elizabeth, b. Nov. 17, 1767. 

7. Ebenezer, b. July 10, 1769, d. Jan. 18. 1770. 

8. *John, b. March 10, 1771. 

9. Jesse, b. Oct. 17, 1773. 

Jonathan Lamson, son Jonathan and Mehitable (Holt) Lamson, b. 
Mont Vernon, Aug. 10. 1756, m. March 14, 1782, Rebecca, dau. Ebenezer 
and Lydia (Peabody) Holt. She was b. Sept. 7, 1752. He served in the 
War for Independence. Ch. 

Ebenezer H. b. Dec. 23, 1784, m. July 10, 1811, Phebe, dau. Israel and 
Susanna (Farnum) Farnum. She was b. March 31, 1788. 

John Lamson, son of Tonathan and Mehitable (Holt) Lamson, b. 
Mont Vernon, March 10, 1771, d. Mont Vernon, Oct. 12. 1841, m. Cath- 
erine Harris. She was b. Jan. 27, 1771, d. Dec. 10, 1853. Ch. b Mont 
Vernon. 

1. Catherine, b. April 30, 1798, d. unm. at Groton, Mass., Feb. 26, 
1884. 

2. Hannah, b. Jan. 19, 1800, d. unm. Feb. 11, 1873. 

3. Mehitable, b. Aug. 25, 1802; d. unm. Nov., 1854. 



102 HISTORY OF- MONT VERNON, 

4. Betsey, b. July 24, 1805, m. Isaac Searles, June 27, 1824, had 
several ch., lived in Mont Vernon, d. March 18, 1884, at Milford. 

5. Sarah, b. July 23, 1807; m. (1) Otis Marshall of Chelmsford, 
Mass., Nov. 14, 1834; he d. Aug. 29, 1837. She m. (2) William Cutler 
of Billerica, Dec. 17, 1846. 

6. Levi Woodbury, b. July 13, 1813, d. in Amherst in July, 1856; 
m. Elizabeth Fuller of Lynn, Mass., had six ch. 

7. Lois, b. July 13, 1813, m. Joseph Marshall of Chelmsford, Mass., 
Oct. 10, 1836. 

8. John, b. Oct. 6, 1815. d. Oct. 6, 1821. 

William Lamson, (of Danish origin) emigrated to here in 1637 and 
settled in Hamilton, Mass. He had a son, William, who was the father 
of Jonathan Lamson of Hamilton, who was b. in 1720, d. Aug. 16, 1808. 
His wife, Anna (Whipple) Lamson, d. Aug. 29, 1791. William, the eldest 
of their ch., b. Hamilton, March, 1746, d. Mont Vernon, Nov., 1800; 
m. Mary Summers of Hamilton, Mass. She was b. July 31, 1746, d. 
Dec. 10, 1835. He settled on the farm now owned by his great-grandson, 
Frank O. Lamson, about the year 1770. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. William, b. Jan. 26, 1771, d. Oct. 5, 1775. 

2. Porter, b. April, 1773, d. Sept., 1775. 

3. Hannah, b. June 11, 1775, m. William Cogswell, May, 1794, d. 
Nov. 14, 1812. 

. 4. Mary, b. July 15, 1777, d. Dec. 4, 1803. 

5. Nancy, b. April 2, 1782, m. April 26. 1813, Nathan Smith of 
Templeton, Mass. ; d. Feb., 1855. 

6. *William, b. Feb. 15, 1785. 

7. *John Lummus, 1). July 15, 1787. 

Capt. William Lamson, son of William and Mary (Lummus) Lam- 
son, b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 15, 1785; m. Nov., 1807, Serviah Jones, dau. 
of Nathan, Jr., and Esther (Butterfield) Jones. She was b. Oct. 1, 1783, 
d. Jan. 10, 1851. He d. June 9, 1857. He inherited his father's farm. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. *William Osborn, b. Sept. 15, 1808. 

2. Mary, b. Aug. 17, 1810, d. num., March 15, 1893. 

3. Serviah. b. Jan. 15, 1815. m. Feb. 23, 1837, *Hiram Perkins. She 
d. March 1, 1871. 

4. Augusta, b. March 9, 1817, m. July 21, 1841, *Capt. Chester B. 
Southworth. She d. Manchester, Feb. 1, 1879. 

5. Adeline, b. Julv 25. 1821, d. unm., April 4, 1859. 

6 Nancy, b. Oct. 7, 1827, m. Nov. 10. 1857, * George W. Averill. 

John L. Lamson, son of William and Mary (Lummus) Lamson, b. 
Mont Vernon, July 15, 1787, m. Sept. 10, 1809, Nancy Bradford, dau. 
Enos Bradford of Mont Vernon. He settled on the farm, southeast of 
Mont Vernon Village, now owned by estate of E. C. Flanders. He d. 
March 5, 1878. Ch. 

1. *William, b. Mont Vernon, 1809, m. Sarah, dau. of David Starrett 
of New Boston. She was b. Aug. 12, 1811. He was engaged for many 
years in his earlier life in the glass manufacture at Pembroke N. H., 
whence he removed to Matamora, 111., opposite Peoria. He was there 
many years, subsequently removed Garden Grove, Orange Co., near Los 
Angeles, S. California, where he d. July 30, 1894 age 85. Ch. 

1. William Bradford, b. June 16, 1836, m. Aug. 24, 1865, Eveline 
Tunnell, brick mason, five ch., res. 




£»«* 




v^„ 





CAPT. WILLIAM O. LAM SOX. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 103. 

2. George Starrett, b. Suncook, N. H., June 18, 1839, m. Hattie 
Henderson of Fairbury iff., Dec. 26, I860; d. Feb. 21, 1879, at Hamilton, 
Mo., was cashier of Hamilton Savings Bank and Judge of Caldwell Co. 
Court, left one son and two dau. 

3. Justin \Y.. b. Suncook, May 21, 1841, Physician ; m. Susan M. 
Ritchey, Jan. 17, 1871, two ch., son and dau. 

4. Sarah Frances, b. May 1, 1843, m. Oct. 13, 1874, Samuel B. 
Everett, a farmer, had two sons. 

Capt. William Oshorn Lamson, son 1 of Capt. William and Serviah 
("Jones) Lamson, b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 15, 1808; farmer, resided oil 
homestead in North Dist., where he d. July 12, 1896. He m. Jan. 10, 1849, 
Mrs. Orinda F. (Odell) Upton, wid. Josiah Upton and dau. of Luther 
and Betsey (Green) Odell. She was b. Feb. 16. 1819, d. Nov. 24, 1874. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

Twins :— 

1. Harriet Frances, b. April 6. 1850; m. Aug. 31, 1870, Henry A. 
Kelso of New Boston ; one son, Walter L., b. Feb. 17, 1872. She ret. 
New Boston. 

2. Mariett Augusta, 1). April 6. 1850; res. Mont Vernon, unm. 
Twins : — 

3. Ella Theresa, b. Dec. 9, 1851, m. Oct. 22, 1875, H. E. Hardy of 
Manchester; d. childless, June 13, 1877. 

4. Ellen Orinda, b. Dec. 9, 1851, m. Dec. 25, 1871, Lendell Dodge or 
New Boston ; res. New Boston ; two ch. 

5. Ida Henrietta, b. Sept. 20, 1853, m. L. Woodbury Perham of Wil- 
ton, Dec. 31, 1874; has two ch. 

6. Frank Osborn, b. Oct. 20, 1858. 

Frank Osborn Lamson, son Capt. Wm. B. and Orinda F. (Odell) 
Lamson, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 20, 1858; m. Jan. 9, 1890, Marcia E.. dau. 
Dea. George G. and Mary E. (Home) Batchelder. she was b. Mont Ver- 
non, March 3, 1864. Farmer ; res. on homestead. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Albert Batchelder. b. Julv 31, 1891. 

2. Ella M„ b. March 5, 1895. 

3. William Osborn. 1). July 29, 1900. 

LANGDELL. 

William Langdell was an Englishman, settled in Beverly, Mass.. 
came to Mont Vernon with his son, Joseph. He m. Maria Wittredge of 
Beverly, Mass., had 5 sons, two of whom were lost at sea in one vessel. 
His wife d. 1816. He finally settled in New Boston with his son. Liver- 
more, who had settled there in 1771. and d. there in 1799. 

Joseph Langdell, son of William and Maria, settled Mont Vernon, 
1773, was selectman, removed to Wenham, Mass., in 1809, and d. there in 
May, 1829. aged 94. Ch. of Joseph Langdell, b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Lucy, b. June 27, 1774. 

2. Molly, b. April 27. 1776; m. John Bradford in April, 1798. He 
was an elder brother of Rev. E. P. Bradford of New Boston ; lived in 
Hillsboro and Peterboro, where he d. ; had six ch. 

3. Rebecca, b. April 13, 1778, m. Feb. 19. 1796, (1) Dr. Henry Cod- 
man, Jr.; m. (2) Thomas Hamlin. She d. May 5, 1855. 

4. Betsey, b. Nov. 15, 1780, m. Nov. 28, 1799,; John Ray, son of 
Ebenezer Ray. 



104 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

5. Abigail, b. Feb. 25, 1782, m. April 11, 1808, '"Allen Dodge, d. 
Oct. 17, 1812. 

6. Esther, b. May 14, 1783, m. June 5, 1807, Ebenezer Odell, Jr. 

7. *Ezra, b. March 5, 1785. 

8. Anna, b. March 9, 1788, m. Julv 2, 1810, Charles Cambridge. 

9. *Mark D., b. May 6, 1792. 

Ezra Langdell son of Joseph Langdell, b. Mont Vernon, March 5, 
1785 ; m. his cousin, Rebecca, dau. of Livermore Langdell of New Boston. 
She was b. March 20, 1792, d. Jan. 6, 1855. He d. Dec. 22, 1855. Ch. b. 
Mont Vernon. 

1 Aurelia, b. Aug. 13, 1810, m. *Charles Underwood, Oct. 8, 1829. 

2. Nancy B., b. Sept. 28, 1812 ; m. Daniel Ordway ; lives Francestown ; 
three ch. 

3. Lucy A., b. Aug. 6 1814, in. *Gilman Alcott, June 24, 1837. She 
d. March 12, 1838. 

4. Edward D., b. Aug. 2, 1816, lived in New Boston. 

5. Betsev, b. October 4, 1818. 

6. *Stephen Chapin, b. Sept. 9, 1820. 

7. Abby D., b. March 6, 1823, second wife Gilman Alcott. 

8. Mary F., b. April 6, 1829. 

9. Charles F., b. April 18, 1832, lived in Ohio. 
10. John, b. May 16, 1835, d. young. 

Mark D. Langdell, son of Joseph Langdell, b. Mont Vernon, May 6, 
1792, m. Lucy. dau. of Paul and Betsey (Woodbury) Whipple of New 
Boston, June 9, 1817. Was an inn-keeper. He d. Lyndeboro, Dec. 16, 
1859. She was b. April 12 ,1798, d. Dec. 29, 1880, at Wilton. Ch. 

1. James, b. Mont Vernon, May 27. 1818; m. Oct. 27, 1840, Mary, 
dau. of James and Lydia (Glover) Stearns of Amherst; had three sons; 
d. Lowell, where he lived, May 2, 1860. 

2. Elizabeth, b. Mont Vernon, March 13, 1820, m. (1) *Luke Wilkins, 
June 22, 1843; m. (2) Levi Curtis; d. Milford, May 28, 1897. 

3. Esther M., b. Mont Vernon April 8, 1822, m. Isaac Richardson of 
Milford, had two ch., d. Milford, Aug. 12, 1882. 

4. Lucy M., b. Mont Vernon, May 9, 1824, m. June 9, 1844, George 
E. Washer of Milford ; d. Milford, Jan. 14, 1871 ; no ch. 

5. Joseph, b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 30, 1826; lived Wilton, where he 
d. Aug. 9. 1893; left a family. 

6. Adaline, b. Amherst. July 15, 1828, d. Jan. 17, 1853, unm. 

7. Clarinda, b. Lowell, December 13, 1853, d. Amherst, Sent. 29, 1855. 

8. Hannah W., b. Lowell, March 15, 1835; m. Oct. 25, 1855, O. W. 
Butler of Lvndeboro. 

9. John D., b. Lowell, Feb. 14, 1837, d. Wilton, Aug. 5, 1892. 

10. William, b. Nashua Nov. 26, 1841, d. at Andersonville, Ga., Sept. 
25, 1864. 

Stephen Chapin Langdell, b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 9, 1820, d. Sept. 25, 
1895; m. Lucy B., dau. of James J. and Lucy W. (Burnham) Averill, 
1844. She was b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 4, 1816, d. Feb. 9, 1903. Ch. b. 
Mont Vernon. 

1. James A., b. Sept. 14. 1845, m. Mary E., dau. Luke and Elizabeth 
Langdell Wilkins, Dec. 15, 1869. She was b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 10, 1846. 
He was acidentally shot April 2, 1870. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 105 

2. Helen M., b. Nov. 8, 1846, m. March 25, 1874, *George Fred 
Turbell, one dau. 

3. Eunice B., b. March 31, 1851. m. August 21, 1869, Franklin E. 
Myers, b. North Adams, Mass., June 16, 1846 ; residence, Stoneham, Mass. 
No ch. 

4. Jennie A., b. Oct. 23, 1853, m. Feb. 15, 1873. William H. Pratt of 
Stoneham, Mass. He d. 1899; res. Stoneham; one dau. 

LEAVITT. 

Andrew Leavitt, b. in the vicinity of Exeter in 1752, d. in Amherst, 
Aug. 24, 1846, aged 94; m. (1) Sarah Hastings; m. (2) Elizabeth (Ken- 
drick) Jones, dau. of Daniel Kendrick of Hollis and widow of Timothy 
Jones; she d. May. 1818, aged 55. He m. (3) Mrs. Abigail 
(Rust) Hildreth, widow Jonathan Hildreth. She d. Feb. 12, 
1834, age 66. He learned the housewright's trade of Dea. Ephraim 
Barker, and came with him as a journeyman to Amherst before 
the commencement of the Revolution, and afterward carried on the busi- 
ness here until disabled bv age. He went to Amherst about 1800. He 
was present at the battle of Bunker Hill and was at Cambridge when 
Washington took command of the army. He was probably the last sur- 
vivor of the Mont Vernon soldiers at Bunker Hill. He lived in Mont 
Vernon many years, coming here about the time of the Revolution. He 
built the house commonly known as the "Dr. Smith House" in Mont 
Vernon Village. Nine oldest ch. b. Mont Vernon by first wife. 

1. Andrew, m. twice, served on board a privateer in the War of 
1812, was taken prisoner and confined in Dartmoor prison, England, d. in 
Marblehead, Mass. after his liberation, of disease contracted while in 
prison. 

2. Sarah, m. *Jesse Averill. The tradition is that she was a wonder- 
ful singer, with a voice of rare sweetness and remarkable power, though 
none of her descendants seem to have inherited this captivating gift. 
Following is an extract graphically describing the impression she made, 
from a letter of Prof. Reuben D. Muzzey (who, in his youth, was an 
attendant at the Mont Vernon Church) of Dartmouth College, written at 
Boston in 1862 to Rev. Dr. J. G. Davis of Amherst : 

"There was one charm, which was peculiar, connected with the wor- 
ship on that hill — it was the singing. There was a good choir, but the 
fascination came from a single voice, that of Miss Leavitt, an elder sister 
of Miss Leavitt, who afterward became the mother of the Hutchinson 
family, renowned in song. The choir of Mont Vernon Church met for 
practice on Sabbath morning, before the hour of worship. Miss Leavitt 
always sang the alto. How many times as striplings ascended the hill 
did we stop to drink in those rich and heavenly tones (oh, I can hear them 
now) which filled the whole atmosphere and seemed to come from an 
elevation far above that of the open windows. My dear sir, pardon my 
enthusiasm, I have since heard Madame Malibran, Madame Stontag, Jenny 
Lind and an oratorio in St. Xavier chapel from the choir of Pope Pius IX. 
on the evening of his coronation, and I have not yet heard a voice so 
rich and inspiring as that of Miss Leavitt. Does such a voice come as 
often as once in a century?" 

3. Mary, b. July 25, 1785, m. Aug. 7, 1800, Jesse Hutchinson of Mil- 
ford, d. in Milford, Sept. 20, 1868. She was the mother of 16 ch., among 
whom were the three brothers, Judson, John, Asa and one sister, Alby, 
who comprised the famous "Tribe of Jesse," who were renowned in 
Europe and America for their gift of song. 



106 HISTORY OF' MONT VERNON. 

4. John, b. April 16, 1787. d. Amherst, Aug. 13, 1862; m. Nov. 17, 
1816, Nancy Averill of Milford. She was b. March 24, 1793, d. Nov. 22, 
1854. They lived in Amherst and had four ch. , 

5. Betsey, d. unm. 

6. Benjamin was a painter, lived in Amherst, d. June, 1848, aged 54, 
m. (1) Clarissa, dau. Eleazer and Elizabeth (Bullard) Rhoads of Amherst, 
m. (2) Marv Ames, had five ch. 

7. William, m. Sarah Burnham, d. Nov. 28, 1872. 

8. Nathaniel, d. in California. 

9. Hannah, m. John Adams. 
Ch. by second wife b. Amherst. 

10. Roxanna, m. John Marvel! of Milford. 

11. Daniel Kendrick, removed to Carmell, Ohio, where he d. 

12. Nancy, m. Hiram Parker of Lexington, Mass., lived in Lowell. 
Mass. 

LEWIS. 

Rev. Thomas J. Lewis, b. Swansea, Wales. July 2, 1857. commenced 
preaching in Wales as a religious exhorter, at the age of 16 came to 
America in 1883, was student at Marietta College, Ohio, 1883 and 1884; 
was at Bangor Theological Seminary from 1884 to 1887, in which last 
year he was licensed to "reach. Traveled one year in Europe; was lo- 
cated in the ministrv two —nrs from 1888 to 1890 at South West Harbor, 
Me. From 1890 to" 1893 he was at East Andover, N. H. Commenced 
preaching at Mont Vernon, Oct. 21, 1894, closed his work here Dec. 5, 
1897. Is now (1902) preaching at East Andover, N. H. M. Anna J. 
Daniels, b. 1855. Ch. 

1. John Daniels, b. Wales, 1879. 

2. William Edward, b. Wales, Aug.. 1882. 

3. Gladys, b. East Andover, N. H., Dec, 1892. 

LIVINGSTONE. 

Samuel A. Livingstone, m. Dec. 7, 1815, Hannah, dau. Samuel and 
Lydia (Adams) Twiss. He was killed by falling from the tannery of 
Samuel Trull, Esq., in New Boston, Oct. 30, 1827, age 69. His wid. m. 
John Hills in 1836. He d. 1873. She was b. New Boston, July 17, 1793, 
d. Mont Vernon, Dec. 8, 1891. Ch. b. New Boston. 

1. Samuel F., b. Feb. 5. 1825, came to Mont Vernon when a lad 
and lived with John Battles, whose farm in the East District he ultimately 
owned. He m. ( 1) Feb. 20, 1859, Sarah J., dau. Galen and Sarah C. (Ames) 
Hamblett of Milford. She was b. Dracut, Mass., Nov. 30, 1834, d. Nov. 
16, 1877. He fn. (2) Mrs. Olivia (Haradon) Livingstone of New Boston. 
She d. May 11, 1902, aged 72 years, 10 months. He d. May 13, 1899. One 
son by first wife, Llewellyn H., b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 2, 1864, lives in 
Antrim. 

2. Benjamin, T. b. Jan. 6, 1827, served in the Union Army in the 
27th Mass. Regt. from Winchester, Mass., d. Chelsea, Mass., March 3, 1902. 
He m. Jan., 1865, Maria F., dau. Benjamin F. and Hannah (Smith) Hill 
She was b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 16, 1829; d. Sept. 13, 1880, at Chelsea, Mass 

3. Dau. Adeline L., m. Irving Battles of Woburn ; 2, Helen M., m 
Leonard S. Bean. 3, Isabel, m. Freeman D. Blake. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 107 

Charles A. Livingstone, son Col. E. W. Livingstone of Nashua," b. 
Nashua, was a blacksmith in Mont Vernon from April, 1876, until Sept. 
1883, when he removed to Lowell where he d. May 4, 1892, age 52 years. 
He was twice married. He had two daughters by his first wife and one 
son by his second wife. His second wife, Mrs. Clara L. Livinstone, d. 
Lowell, Mass., June 3, 1896, age 47 years. A daughter, Josephine E., d. 
Lowell, Nov. 17, 1885, aged 10 years. 

LOVEJOY. 

Joseph Lovejoy, a soldier of the Revolution, d. in Mont Vernon, Oct. 
18, 1814, aged about 80 years. He m. Patience, dau. of *William and 
Mary (Lambert) Bradford, July 9, 1761, she d. Amherst, May 1, 1826, 
aged about 85 years. He settled in Mont Vernon about 1761. Ch. prob- 
ably b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Sarah, b. May 6, 1762, fn. Feb. 14, 1786, *Daniel Kendall; d. Aug. 
14, 1847. 

2. Edith, b. April 7, 1764, d. young. 

3. Patience, b. April 1. 1766, m. Feb. 1, 1787, William Small of Am- 
herst; had 12 ch. ; d. Morristown, Vt, Oct. 18, 1851. 

4. Susannah, b. June 11, 1769, m. Feb. 9, 1796, David Stewart of Am- 
herst, had 7 ch. ; d. Amherst, Aug. 24, 1846. 

5. Pollv. m. James Dascomb, May 20, 1794; d. Wilton, Nov. 16, 
1851 ; 4 ch. ' 

6. Betsey, b. 1772, m. Oct. 10, 1794, *Benjamin Parker. She d. Am- 
herst, Sept. 25, 1839; 6 ch. 

7. Arethusa, m. Asa Farnum, May 25, 1803. 

8. Joseph, m. Mrs. Baker, d. Salem, Mass., Nov.. 1821. 

LOVEREN. 

Alvah Loveren. b. Deering, moved to Medford, Mass., came to Mont 
Vernon Village, where he d. He m. Matilda K., dau. Isaac and Pamelia 
(Stevens) Smith of Deering. She d. Mont Vernon, March 7, 1885, aged 
66. Ch. 

1. Alva Dexter, b. Deering, d. in infancy. 

2. Edgar H., b. Wendell, N. H., lives in Roxbury, Mass.; one ch. 

3. Arthur D., b. Medford, Mass., lives in Philadelphia ; has two dau. 

4. Altia. d. young. 

5. Charles D., b. Medford ; is not livnig. 

LORD. 

Rev. Charles E. Lord, son John P. Lord and nephew Nathan Lord. 
President Dartmouth College, was b. South Berwick, Me., was pastor of 
the church here from 1856 to 1861, afterwards in the ministry at Chester, 
Vt., was some years a professor in training schools for divinity. He 
retired about 20 years before his death and resided at Salisbury, Mass., 
where he d. Feb. 9, 1902, aged 85 years. He m. 1856, Miss Eunice Pike of 
Newburyport. No. ch. 

MANNING. 

Albert D. Manning, son Jesse and Eleanor (Morgan) Manning, b. 
Billerica, Mass Dec. 20, 1820; m. Jan. 1, 1849, Nancy J., dau. Zephanian 



108 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

and Nancy (Manning) Kittredge. She was b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 15, 
1821, d. Dec. 18, 1897. He settled on a farm in the North District in 
1854. Ch. 

1. Albert Haskell, b. Oct. 4, 1849, d. Sept. 23, 1866. 

2. Lucy A., b. Sept. 23, 1853, d. April 25, 1865. 

3. Walter C, b. Feb. 15, 1861, in Mont Vernon, m. Sept. 11, 1886, 
Olive Bailey of Lunenburg, Mass. He d. Lunenburg, April 12, 1896; one 
ch. 

Pearl Ethel, b. Sept. 28, 1887. 

Henry Manning, b. New Boston, Dec. 15, 1840 was a member of the 
4th N. H. Regt. in the War for the Union, came to Mont Vernon in 
1880 from Amherst, lived on the turnpike, moved to Milford in 1887, 
where he d. June 3, 1903 ; m. Oct. 2, 1867, Emily A. Braman of North- 
bridge, Mass. She was b. Grafton, Mass., June 1, 1849. Ch. 

1. Eugene H., b. Northbridge, Mass., Dec. 12, 1867, m. Miss Nettie 
Pond, lives Milford. 

2. Ruel D., b. Northbridge, Aug. 31, 1869, m. Miss Nellie Therrien; 
three ch. ; lives Milford. 

3. James O.. b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 13, 1871. 

4. Sadie M.. b. Amherst, June 19, 1874, d. Milford. March 11, 1892. 

5. Louise A., b. Amherst, Sept. 27, 1879: res. M'lfrd. 

6. Joseph, b. Mont Vernon, May 22, 1882; res. Milford. 

Elisha R. Manning came from north part of state, m. Julia A., dau. 
Mrs. Charlotte Brown. They lived with Mr?. Brown, where J. M. Glea- 
son now d-es. Mrs. M. d. Sept. 9, 1877, aged 56. A dau., Julia M., d. 
Feb. 24, 1853, aged 20 months. 

MARDEN. 

Nathan Marden, son of Lemuel and Hannah (Greenough) Marden, 
a bricklayer by trade, moved to Mont Vernon from New Boston. He 
built the house in village now occupied by Mrs. Ellen Starrett. He d. 
here May 16, 1833, age 56. He m. Oct. 11, 1806. Susanna, dau. Calvin 
and Esther (Wilkins) Stevens. She was b. in Hillsboro. March 4, 1789, 
d. Mont Vernon, Aug. 20. 1843. Ch. were: 

1. *Beniamin Franklin, b. New Boston, Sept. 7, 1807. 

2. *Nathan Richmond. 

3. Susanna m. Edwin M. Holt of Lyndeboro, Dec, 1834. They 
lived in Mont Vernon and Amherst. Three ch., viz: Cl) Frank, d. in 
army in 1861; (2) Addie M., d. July 30, 1873, age 27; (3) George E., b. 
Jan. 20, 1848, is of Nashua. 

4. *Wi!liam S., b. Nov. 22. 1820. 

5. Sarah C, b. 1824, m. Nov.. 1844, Peter W. Haseltine ; one son, 
Arthur. She d. Nov. 3. 1883, in Boston, aged 59. Was buried in Mont 
Vernon. 

Benjamin Franklin Marden, son of Nathan and Susannah (Stevens) 
Marden, b. New Boston, Sept. 7, 1807, moved to Mont Vernon when 
young, having lived in Wilton, was a shoemaker ; d. Mont Vernon, March 
25, 1891. He m. May 20, 1834, Betsey Buss. She was b. Wilton, Aug. 3, 
1810, d. Mont Vernon, Feb. 1. 1891. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Sarah Luthera, b. May 9, 1835, m. March 9. 1868, *George G. 
Averill of Mont Vernon, res. Mont Vernon. 







HON. GEORGE A. MARDEN. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 109 

2. Benjamin F., b. May 12, 1836, d. in infancy. 

3. Susan, b. June 23, 1837, d. Jan. 2, 1859. 

4. *George Augustus, b. Aug. 9, 1839. 

5. Franklin, b. March 31, 1841, m. May 16, 1883, Frances M. Biddle, 
dau. Barrack Biddle of Concord. She d. Oct. 15, 1885, age 43. Has re- 
sided in Concord and Manchester, was shoe dealer, now resides Mont 
Vernon. 

6. Maria Theresa, b. March 6, 1844, m. May 18, 1869, Capt. Elbridge 
Gerry Martin of East Boston. He was an efficient pilot, had summer res- 
idence in Mont Vernon. A very worthy man. He d. April 5, 1902. Ch. 
b. East Boston, where she resides. 1. Frank L., b. March, 1875 ; 2. Bertha 
V, b. March 20, 1878. 

7. Katherine H., b. Dec. 16, 1846, m. Nov. 27, 1873, Samuel Sewall 
of Lowell. She d. Aug. 27, 1886. Two ch., Harrv B., b. Aug. 9, 1875; 
Gertrude M-., b. Oct. 19, 1879. 

8. Wendell Phillips, b. May 6, 1850, m. Oct. 23, 1878, Malvina D., 
dau. of George L. Nutter of Concord, two ch., Edward L. and Mary, is 
a cashier in the Mass. State Treasury, resides Newton Centre, Mass. 

Nathan Richmond Marden, son of Nathan and Susanna (Stevens) 
Marden, m. 1839, Abby, dau. of Dea. Abel Fiske of Wilton. Lived in 
Francestown for more than fifty years ; was a shoemaker. Ch. 

1. Richmond Fiske of Marblehead. 

2. Sarah Caroline, m. R. P. Ordway of Francestown. 

3. Edwin S. of Lowell. 

4. Jennie M., m. Woodbury P. Hopkins of Francestown. 

5. William R. of New Hampshire Cavalry, d. in Annapolis, 1863, 
from disease contracted while prisoner. 

6. Charles N., of Lynn, has two ch. 

7. Abby S., m. Sewall L. Brown of Francestown. 

8. Hattie E., d. at nine years of age. 

9. Jessie F.. m. Wilton E. Osborne of Peterboro, N. H. 

William S. Marden, son of Nathan and Susanna (Stevens) Marden, 
b. Nov. 22, 1820, m. (l) Eunice Evans, 1844. She d. March, 1845. He 
m. (2) Harriet M. Trefry of Dedham in 1849. He lived Marblehead. 
Ch. by first wife. 

1.' William H., b. March, 1845. lives Marblehead. 

Ch. by second wife. 

2. Louis W., of Salem, Mass. 

3. Arthur of Portland, Me. 

George Augustus Marden, son of Benjamin F. and Betsey (Buss) 
Marden, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 9, 1839. Is editor Lowell Courier-Citizen 
and United States Sub-Treasurer, resides Lowell. For extended account 
see chapter on "Prominent Men," m. Dec. 10, 1867, Mary Porter, dau. 
Dea. David and Harriet (Nourse) Fiske of Amherst. She was b. 
Amherst, Dec. 9, 1841. Ch. b. Lowell. 

1. Phillio Sanford, b. Jan. 12, 1874, m. June, 1902, Florence, dau. 
Col. Edward Shirley of Goffstown, graduated Dartmouth, lives in Lowell, 
journalist. 

2. Robert Fiske, b. June 14, 1876, m. June 12, 1901, Ella L. Pote of 
East Boston, Mass., graduated Dartmouth College, is in the insurance 
business. 



110 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Samuel K. Marden of Newton, m. Aug. 14, 1836, Eliza Ann Young, 
dau. of Mrs. Young (sister of William S. Stinson), Sr. 

MARVELL. 

William Marvell or Marble, b. Lyndeboro, lived in South Dist. 
(where D. J. Hutchinson now does) m. (1) Sarah, dau. F.lisha and 
Sarah (Buxlon) Hutchinson of Milford; m. (2; Meh.'.able. dau. Jona- 
than and Polly (Baker) Conant. After his decease she moved here and 
became the second wife of Ezekiel Upton in 1843. Ch. by first wife: 

1. William, m. a Miss Whittemore of New Boston, lived Milford; 
no ch. 

Ch. by second wife. 

2. Eliot C, b. Feb. 9, 1809, m. Mary Marvell of Farmington, Me., 
settled in Farmington, Me. ; had five ch. 

3. Mary H., b. Feb. 3, 1811, m. James Proctor of Nashua, lived Lynn, 
Mass., four ch. 

4. *Elbridge, b. Feb. 23, 1813. 

5. Nancy, b. Aug. 23, 1815, m. (1) Frances Lynch of Milford; m (2) 
Beri Bennett of Brookline, no ch., d. Lowell, July 11, 1803. 

6. Caroline, b. Sept. 21, 1817, m. (1) Joseph Bright of Pelham ; 
m. (2) Peter Clark of Milford, May 23, 1878, d. Milford, Sept. 3, 1882. 

7. Maria F.,b.. June 21, 1820. 
9. *Charles, b. Feb. 6, 1822. 

9. John B., b. May 17, 1824, d. Sept. 15, 1861. 

10. Henry Franklin, b. Oct. 8, 1826, settled Farmington, Me. 

11. James, b. Sept. 20, 1828, m. Charlotte Butterfield of Ashburnham. 
Mass., no ch., res. Goffstown. 

Elbridge Marvell son of William and Mehitable( Conant) Marvell, 
b. Feb. 23, 1813, carpenter, d. Mont Vernon, Aug. 23, 1893; m. Nov. 17. 
1836, Mary, dau. of David and Mary (Averill) Smith, b. Mont Vernon, 
Nov. 22, 1808, d. Aug. 5, 1895. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Edwin A., m. Fanny Leach. He d. Oct. 26, 1872, age 30, 2 ch. 
b. Mont Vernon, (1) Caroline, m. Allie Austin, has two ch. ; (2) Walter 
Elbridge. 

2. Mary Caroline, d. Jan. 28, 1855, age 16 years, 6 mos. 

Charles Marvell, son of William and Mehitable (Conant) Marvell, b. 
Feb, 6, 1822, m. Mary Ann, dau. of James and Huldah (Peabody) Hill, 
Oct. 16, 1851. She was b. Sept. 7, 1826, d. April 29, 1880. Ch. b. Mont 
Vernon. 

1. *William Henry, b. Oct. 11, 1853. 

2. Helen, b. Nov. 22, 1855, m. Charles Searles, March 12, 1878, 
lived in Milford and Nashua, d. Haverhill, Dec. 27, 1899. 

3. George H., b. Sept. 26, 1859, d. Jan. 5, 1861, age 1 year, 5 mos. 

William Henry Marvell, son of Charles and Mary A. (Hill) Marvell, 
b. Oct. 11, 1853, Mont Vernon, m. June 8, 1876, Emma J., dau. Charles 
and Clarinda J., (Felch) Foster. She was b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 1, 1860. 

Josie Leona, b. June 11, 1877. m. Jan. 31, 1900, *Edward W. Trow, 
one son. 

MAY. 

Clinton S. May was a shoemaker and lived in the East District with 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. Hi 

his wife's people. He m. Elizabeth, dau. John H. and Polly (Johnnot) 
Bennett. She was b. March, 1839, d. Nov. 29, 1888. He d. May 18, 1877, 
age 47 years. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Etta, b. Jan. 25, 1863, m. 1879, *William O. Hill. 

2. Grace. 

3. Harvey. 

4. Harrie A., <1. June :i, 1877, aged 10 months 

McCOLLOM. 

Alexander McCollom, with wife Janet, came from Londonderry, Ire., 
and settled in Londonderry, N. H., about 1730. Had seven ch., the first 
Alexander, m. Elizabeth Mc Murphy, had five ch., of whom the fifth was 
Alexander, who retained the homestead in New Boston, m. 1787, Mary, 
dau. of Robert Patterson. He held the office of selectman in 1809 and 
1811, and was an energetic and industrious citizen. He purchased the 
Peter Jones farm in the North part of Mont Vernon in 1820, occupying 
it until his death, June 1, 1843, age 77. His widow, b. Nov. 12, 1772, d. 
Jan. 4, 1852, age 79. Ch. b. New Boston. 

1. John, b. April 30, 1788, m. Betsey Chase, settled in Claremont, d. 
Nov. 21, 1822; two ch. 

2. Robert, b. Nov. 24, 1789, d. unm. Batavia, N. Y., May 17, 1825. 

3. Elizabeth, b. Aug. 30, 1791, m. John McLane of Francestown. 
had ch. viz. Neil, Alexander, John, Charles, Rodney, Mary Isabel, Nancy 
Jane, George W., Elizabeth, Clara, Sarah, Helen, Marion and Robert E. 

4. Rodney, b. March 27. 1793, m. Naomi Wilson, had three ch. 

5. *Alexander, b. Feb. 5, 1795. 

6. Fanny, b. Nov. 5, 1796, d. unm. Clinton, Mass., April 6, 1882. 

7. A child b. March 12, 1798, d. young. 

8. Elbridge, b. July 19, 1801, m. Mary Jane, dau. Jonathan Harvey 
of Sutton, lived in Sutton, had three ch. 

9. *Milton, b. March 21, 1803. 

10. Mary, b. Jan. 5, 1805, d. Nov. 13. 1825. 

11. Haskell, b. March 19. 1807, m. and lived in Lancaster, Mass.: four 
ch. 

12. Clarissa, b. Oct. 27, 1809, m. Lemuel Marden of New Boston, no 
ch., d. June 12. 1876. 

13. George W. b. Jan. 14, 1812, d. Aug., 1814. 

14. George W., b. Sept. 20, 1814, m. Oct. 4, 1842, Mary Ann, dau. 
of Asa and Mary A. (Appleton) Stevens. He was in the banking busi- 
ness in Indiana and in real estate in New York City; in 1872 endowed 
Appleton Academy with $10,000, with the condition that the name be 
changed to McCollom Institute, which was done. He also endowed an 
Episcopal College with the same sum. He d. Sept. 4, 1878. His wife d 
1865. 

Dr. Alexander McCollom, son of Alexander and Mary (Patterson) 
McCollom, b. New Boston, Feb. 5, 1795, fitted for college under Rev. E. 
P. Bradford, New Boston, and with Prof. B. Towler, Bangor, Me., studied 
medicine at Baneor and Belfast, Me., and with Dr. Manning at Merri- 
mack, N. H. attended medical lectures at Bowdoin and Dartmouth, and 
was in practice successively at Windsor, Palmero and Pittston, Me., at 
which nlace he d. Nov. 10, 1884, having resided there for 23 years. He 
m. Oct. 19, 1830, a niece and adopted dau. of Dr. Abel Goodrich of Mer- 
rimack. Ch. 



112 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

1. Mary G., b. Sept. 21, 1831, m. Oct. 18, 1860, Dr. Edward Mead of 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

2. Abel Goodrich, b. Sept. 12, 1837, m. Aug. 4, 1861, Annie J. 
Davidson of Wiscasset, Me. Had one son, Edward, who fitted for col- 
lege at McCollom Institute, graduated at Harvard in 1892, is a teacher 
in New Jersey. 

Milton McCollom, son of Alexander and Mary (Patterson) McCol- 
lom, b. New Boston, March 31, 1803, d. Mont Vernon, Aug. 31, 1852; 
was an inn-keeper and farmer; lived where D. J. Herlehy lives in East 
District. He m. Sophronia, dau. of Joseph and Betsey (Perkins) Trow. 
June 18, 1829. She was b. Mont Vernon, June 4, 1806, d. Feb. 12, 1885. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Mary E., b. May 5, 1830, m. Dec. 20, 1860, *Daniel R. Baker. 
He d. July 25, 1879. 

2. *Charles R., b. June 1, 1833. 

3. *John Trow, b. July 28, 1835. 

4. Frances Evelyn, b. Dec. 26, 1845, m. June 17, 1868, *William S. 
A. Starrett of Mont Vernon, two ch. 

Charles R. McCollom, son of Milton and Sophronia (Trow) Mc- 
Collom. b. Mont Vernon, June 1, 1833, m. (l) Jan. 1, 1861, Sarah R. 
Richards of Goffstown, who d. Aug. 15, 1876, m. (2) Louise Rundlett of 
Bedford, March 13, 1878, is a carpenter, resides Goffstown. Ch. by 
second wife b. Goffstown. 

1. Sarah Louise, b. June 15, 1879. 

2. Marion Sophronia, b. .March 22, 1882. 

3. Alary Etta, b. Jan. 17, 1888. 

John Trow McCollom, son of Milton and Sophronia (Trow) Mc- 
Collom, b. Mont Vernon, July 28, 1835, is a carpenter and teamster and has 
always resided in town. M. (1) July 14, 1866, Emily J., dau. Dea. Joseph 
A. and Maria J. (Bruce) Starrett. She was b. Mont Vernon, Dec. 14. 
1846, d. April 4, 1867, m. (2) Mrs. Theresa M. (Smith) Christy, widow 
Dea. Sumner L. Christy of New Boston, and dau. of Isaac and Pamelia 
(Stevens) Smith. She 'was b. Deering, Oct. 25, 1835. Ch. by first wife b. 
Mont Vernon. 

1. Mary Belle, b. Feb. 18, 1867, painter, m. Feb. 18, 1902, Julius 
Wurdeman of Chicago. 

McCRILLIS. 

Albert B. McCrillis of Lyndeboro', m. Harriet E. Cummings. She 
was b. Hancock, July 30, 1824. After his death she moved to Mont Ver- 
non, where she d. Jan. 10, 1891. 3 ch. 

1. Ella, b. East Rindge, Nov. 19, 1848, m. George E. Boutell, 1868. 
resides Mont Vernon. 

2. Edwin A., m. April 29, 1891, Sarah W., dau. John Erastus- and 
Sarah J. (Whittemore) Bruce, was a merchant in Milford, d. Milford, 
Jan. 9, 1902. 

3. Harriet E., milliner, res. Nashua. 

McGOWN. 
Rev. Richard H. McGown, b. North Ellsworth, Me., May 13, 1850. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 113 

educated principally at the Easton State Normal School. Became a 
preacher of the Maine Methodist Conference, and as such was stationed 
at Dover, Tremont and Pembroke. March 7, 1882, he was ordained as a 
Congregational minister at Harrington, Me., was acting pastor at Tur- 
ner, Me., from Dec, 1883 to Nov., 1885, and at Mont Vernon from Dec, 
1885 to Feb. 26, 1888. Was two years each at Cornish, Me., and North- 
wood, N. H. Was pastor of a Congregational church in Everett, Mass., 
where he d. He m. Abby F. Rowe of Ellsworth, Me., ch. 

1. Ruth M., b. 1876. 

2. Ralph S., b. 1S77. 

3. Anna E., b. June, 1879. 

4. Roy, b. Dec. 4, 1880. 

McQUESTION. 

Hugh N. McQuestion, b. Merrimack, Feb. 14, 1805, lived on the 
farm where Martin L. Wheeler now lives in the East District, d. Feb. 13, 
1889, age 84; removed to farm near East School. He m. Sarah F. 
Hartshorn of Merrimack, April 2, 1829. She d. Oct. 18, 1877, age 72 
years, 11 months, 19 days. She was b. Oct. 29, 1804 % Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Henry N., b. Feb. 15, 1830, m. Hattie Hunt, enlisted in the Fifth 
N. H. Regt. in the Civil War, d. diseased, Newport News, Va., June 8, 
1862, one son, Fred. 

2. Thomas H., b. May 8, 1832. 

3. Nathan P., d. March 26, 1842, age 7 yrs., 5 mos. 

4. Harriet J., d. March 13, 1846, age 10 yrs., 2 mos. 

5. Sarah F., b. Feb. 23, 1844, m. May 8, 1873, Wm. W. Grafton, 
Friendship, Me., res. Milford, d. Milford, Nov. 12, 1886; one dau. 

6. Mary A., b. Feb. 2, 1846, d. unm. Milford, Dec. 19, 1893. 

Thomas H. McQuestion, b. Mont Vernon, May 8, 1832, son Hugh 
M. and Sarah F. (Hartshorn) McQuestion. Lived on his father's farm 
near East School in East District, d. there Aug. 26, 1896, m. July 4, 1861, 
Hannah P., dau. Stephen and Hannah Gage of Amherst. She was b. 
1838, res. Goffstown. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. George N., b. Dec. 2, 1862, m. Addie S. Grant of Goffstown, 
April 28. 1891, who d. April 30, 1897, m. (2) Nov. 28, 1900, Carrie A. 
Richards ; carpenter, res. Goffstown ; one ch., Ruth E., b. Nov. 16, 1892. 

2. William P., b. Sept. 1, 1867, m. Nov. 6, 1885, Edith Richards of 
New Boston : two ch.. Ethel and Geo. R., res. Merrimack. 

3. Bertha S., b. Dec. 13, 1868, m. Jan., 1885, Truman Parker, res. 
Lowell, Mass. 

4. Mary J., b. June 10, 1876, m. Dec 31, 1896, James E. Venio ; one 
ch., Arthur E., b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 23, 1897, res. South Weare, N. H. 

MILLS. 

Capt. John Mills, the first of the family of six generations to the 
present da}-, was b. in Scotland. He is first found in Amherst, N. H., 
where he was married and settled in the Northwest Parish (now Mont 
Vernon). He is mentioned twelve times in Secombe's History of Am- 
herst, and several times subsequently in petitions to prevent the settle- 
ment of a minister at Amherst Plain, insomuch as the Northwest Parish 
was without a Christian Church. On page 209 John Mills is mentioned 
as giving one shilling, four pence toward defraying the expenses of a 



114 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

delegate to the first Provincial Congress at Exeter. John Mills served 
in Col. John Hart's Co. at Crown Point in 1758, and in Col. John Goffe's 
Co. at Crown Point in 1760 in the French and Indian War. He was 
sergeant in Col. Reed's Regt, Capt. Crosby's Co. at Bunker Hill, was 
Second Lieut, in Col. T. Bedell's Regt. Dec, 1775. Joined army in New 
York to march northward to Canada, surrendered by Maj. Butterfield 
to the British and Indians at "The Cedars," was stripped and ran the 
gauntlet ; May 19, 1776, exchanged and went to Crown Point. John 
Mills was First Lieut, in Col. Stark's Regt., Col. John Bradford's Co., 
at Battle of Bennington, was first company to attack. He went to Rhode 
Island in 1778 under Col. Nichols and Col. Josiah Crosby. 

In autumn of 1781, Capt. John Mills led a company to Charlestown, 
N. H., to protect our frontier. The fighting done, Capt. John went to 
Winham, Vt., a place with which he was well pleased, having passed 
through it in his army marches, and settled with his family there for the 
rest of his life, dying in 1812, living there less than eight years. 

He came to Mont Vernon prior to the Revolution, and made a home- 
stead on the farm afterwards known as the Cloutman place, now occupied 
by Hon. Charles J. Smith. He lived here until about 1804, as there 
is no record of his living elsewhere. He was an active and prominent 
citizen of the then Northwest Parish. He m. Keziah Lyon about ]765. 
She d. in Windham, Vt., in 1824. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Abigail, b. Aug. 1, 1766. m. Witherspoon, lemoved to 

Maine, where she d. 

2. *Ebenezer, b. April 23, 1770. 

3. *John, b. April 24, 1772. 

4. Keziah, b. June 11, 1774, m. Jonathan Sherwin, moved to Land- 
grove, Vt., and d. there. 

5. Betsey, m. John Dudley, they removed to Windham, Vt. She 
afterward removed to Canada with her son and d. there. 

Ebenezer Mills, son Capt. John and Keziah (Lyon) Mills, b. Mont 
Vernon. April 23. 1770, m. Hannah W., dau. Ezekiel and Hannah 
(Washer) Upton of Mont Vernon, left his family with his son, Ebenezer. 
Jr., 20 3'ears of age, went to Bellows Falls, Vt., to work. While there 
he enlisted in the War of 1812 from Rockingham, Vt. He d. in the army 
at Burlington, Vt.. in 1812. His wife d. in Milford, Sept. 20, 1856, aged 
83 years. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. *Ebenezer. 

2. Abigail, m. Daniel Bullard of Hyde Park, Vt., had two boys and 
' three girls, and d. Hyde Park. 

3. Annie or Rosanna, m. John Bullard, lived in Mont Vernon, three 
ch., Abbie, Edward and John. 

4 *Ezekial, b. Feb. 23, 1800. 

5. Hannah, m. Dennis Holden of Milford. She d. Dec. 6, 1870. 
age 68 years. 5 months; six ch. *» w . « . 

6. Lavina, b. Dec. 3, 1805, d. April 6, 1889, m. *Asa Wetherbee of 
Mont' Vernon." May 1. 1824. Ch. 

7 Salome, b. April 27. 1807, m. Gary W. Ober of Hyde Park, Vt, 
d. Sept. 14, 1883. He d. Sept. 2, 1857. Ch. 

1 Hannah, m. James Hunt, has two ch. lives Montana. 

2. Emily, m. Geo. V. Tarleton, two ch., son Geo., res. Nashua. 

3' Harriet, d. at 18. 

4. Everett, m. Emma McCauley of New Boston, d. Suncook, one 

dau., Etta. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 115 

5. Jennie D., b. Aug. 6, 1840, m. Kneeland C. White, res. Mont 
Vernon. 

6. Helen L., b. July 25, 1842, m. (l) John Whipple of New Boston; 
m. (2) William Stevens of Mont Vernon, res. Mont Vernon. 

7. Alma J., m. Charles Spencer of Pittsford, Vt., d. Milford; one 
dau., Mabel A., lived Mont Vernon ; 14 years teacher. 

8. John, b. Feb. 2, 1810, m. (l) Sarah Putnam, dau. Aaron K. Put- 
nam of Wilton, 1835, lived in Wilton, came to Milford and engaged in 
boot and shoe manufacture till 1863, when he engaged in coopering and 
farming. Was a zealous antislavery man and Unitarian. His wife d. 
1855. By her he had one dau., Sarah, who m. Hon. Charles H. Burns 
of Wilton, and two sons. He m. (2) 1858, Alvina Davis of Temple, by 
whom he had three sons and one dau. He d. March, 1892. 

9. Aaron, b. April, 1812, m. Almira Bullard of Brookline, lived in 
Milford, was a boot manufacturer, farmer and cooper. He d. Aug. 5, 
1893. His wife d. July 24. 1S92. Six ch„ only one living now (1903), 
Mrs. Geo. V. Tarleton. 

John Mills, son Capt. John and Keziah (Lyon) Mills, b. Mont Ver- 
non, April 24, 1772, m. Ednah Wilkins. He went to Nova Scotia to work 
upon a church, received his pay and started for home, which he never 
reached, was presumably murdered for his money. The story handed 
down is that a body was found in the vicinity of Lowell, thought to b<* 
that of John Mills. Ch. were: 

1. Polly, b. Jan. 16, 1793. 

2. Hezekiah, b. Dec. 15, 1795. 

Ebenezer Mills, Jr., son of Ebenezer and Hannah W. (Upton) Mill* 
b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 4, 1792. enlisted from Rockingham, Vt., War of 
1812, m. ( 1 ) Lovia P. Holden of Brookline, N. H., lived in Grafton. Vt., 
where nine ch. were born. She d. June, 1829. He then lived in Herki- 
mer, N. Y.. coming to Milford in 1844, where he worked at his trade as 
a carpenter the rest of his days. He m. (2) Jan. 10, 1830. Fanny Paik 
of Grafton, Vt., had three sons by this wife. She d. in Milford, Aug. S, 
1864. aged 66 years, 8 months. Ch. bv first wife b. Grafton, Vt., all but 
oldest : 

1. Alphonse T., b. Weston, Vt., July 9, 1816, d. June 5, 1818. 

2. Ebenezer U., b. Grafton, Feb. 23, 1818. lived in Boston, Mass., 
from boyhood, m. Sarah Stevens in 1844, who d. 1883. He d. June 12. 
1882 ; one ch. 

3. Maria A., b. Feb. 15, 1819, m. Lucius W. Woodard of Stratton, 
Vt, d. Manhattan, Kan., Dec. 25, 1891; had four ch. 

4. Hannah, b. Oct. 16, 1820, m. John Mclntire of Waterboro, Me., 
about 1844. She lived in Wilton and Boston, where she d. April 10, 
1849 ; four ch. 

5. John Frank, b. June 22, 1822. Went to Boston, was hotel-keeper, 
was proprietor of the Parker House from 1872 to 1876. He d. April 9, 
1876. Wife d. Feb., 1864; eight ch. 

6. Zenophon E., b. Oct. 18, 1823. Went to Milford, N. H., m. Har- 
riet Russell Melzer of Milford, employed in J. & A. Mills shoe factory,, 
was a quarryman, served three years as private in Co. C, 8th N. H. Regt.„ 
N. H. Volunteers; four ch. 

7. Marion F., b. June 25, 1825, d. June 9, 1829. 

8. Corydon S., b. Nov. 10, 1826, followed the sea for nine years on 
a whaler, went to the California gold mines about 1850, m. and was 



116 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

killed Jan. 22, 1858, by a Uba mountain sliding. 
9. Loisa, b. Jan. 2, 1829, d. March 5, 1832. 
Ch. by second wife b. Grafton. 

T7^ 10- J L chn J Avery ' b - Dec - 14 ' 1830 ' m - Emma Wheeler. Had one son 
h.dgar who d. young. Was mill owner in Nashua and Manchester, and 
shoe dealer m Penacook, Medford, Mass., and Milford, where he d June 
20, 1899. One adopted dau., Harriet. J 

™ \\ 9 eOTge Ed S ar - b - ° ct - 27 > 183 3. followed sea seven years, lives 
Medford, Mass., m. Frances, dau. James and Mary J. (Patch) Hopkins 
of Mont Vernon; four ch. 

12. Henry Martin, b. Dec. 28, 1837, Lieut, in Co. C, Second N H 
Regt Vol., in Civil War, m. Nellie Jewett of Nashua, lived in Nashua 
and Lowell ; one son. 

Ezekiel Mills, son of Ebenezer, Jr., and Hannah W. (Upton) Mi'ls 
b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 23, 1800, m. Betsey Holt of Lyndeboro, lived in 
Windham, Vt, and in Milford, was Milfcrd tax collector 12 years, clerk 
in store and kept boarding house. His wife d. Jan. 3, 1869. He d" June 
18, 1881, Milford. Had two dau., Sarah R., m. Charles Buxton. 

MITCHELL. 

Joshua Mitchell, m. April 30, 1818, Mehitable Codman, dau. Thomas 
and Tabitha (Wilkins) Gilmore of Mont Vernon. They lived where A. 
W. Bragg does. He was a mechanic and moved to Woodstock, Vt., where 
thev d. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

' 1. Sarah Mehitable, b. Jan. 24, 1819. 

2. Thomas Gilmore, b. Nov. 19, 1820, a graduate of Dartmouth Col- 
lege, was a Congregational clergyman in Maine. 

NICHOLS. 

Jacob Nichols, son of Ensign S. and Sarah ( Dinsmore) Nichols, b. 
Londonderry. June 23, 1822. Mr. Nichols came to Mont Vernon about 
1859, lived on the Reilly place on the turnpike, then on the old poor farm. 
From 1867 to 1871 he lived on the farm in the South Dist., now owned 
by Daniel Richardson, then in the village where A. W. Bragg, now lives. 
He is a farmer, was formerly a merchant. Married (1) Sept., 1847, Ara- 
bella E. Y., dau. of Henry Demeritt. b. in Boston, Mass., Feb. 22, 1822, 
and d. in Mont Vernon, 'March, 1870; m. (2) Sept. 24, 1872, Georgia 
E. Hall, widow of James Hall and dau. of Gri^n and Elizabeth (Stevens) 
Wilson, b. in Nelson, Aug. 4, 1842, and d. in Milford, July 6, 1900. Ch. 

1. Fannie Arabella, b. in Manchester, Feb. 21, 1850, m. March 22, 
1877. Ellis H. Williams of Easton, Mass., and res. in Hyde Park, Mass. 

2. Henrv James, b. in Manchester, Jan. 7, 1854. is assistant cashier 
in Souhegan National Bank and res. in Milford : m. June 13, 1883, Nellie 
M. Newrmn, widow of Henry A. Newman ?nd dau. of George A. and 
Diana (Woods) Graves of Tambridgenort. Ma c s. 

3. Carrie Maud, b. in MiHord, May 22, 1874, m. June 28, 1891, Clar- 
ence A., s-n of John A. and Ella (Richards) Lovejcy of Milford; rei. in 
Concord Junction, Mass. 

NEWMAN. 

Moses Newman lived on James Reilly place, northeast of where Chas. 



HISTORY OF MOXT VERXON. 117 

H. Trow now lives, in Xorth Dist. He d. March 22, 1846. aged 70. His first 
wife, Polly, d. Aug. 21, 1825, age 40. His second wife, Abigail R., d. 
May 12, 1860, aged 77 years, 3 months. She was originally Abigail 
Haseltine (sister John Haseltine) of Amherst. She m. (1) Lt. John 
Weston, Seot. 27, 1802. He was killed by the falling of a mill-stone in 
1810. She had five ch. by Lt. Weston. She m. Moses Newman, Jan. 
31, 1826. 

XUTTER. 

Benjamin Nutter, son of John and Hannah (Dennett) Nutter, b. 
Barnstead. X. H, came to Mont Vernon in the thirties, engaged in the 
business of manufacturing organs. He removed to Belleville, Canada. 
He m. Sarah, dau. Benjamin X T athan and Sarah ( Bancroft) Jones. Ch b. 
Mont Vernon. 

1. George, m., not living lived in Bdleville Canada. 

2. Charles, m., lives Toronto, Canada. 

3. Annette, m. Booth, lived in Belleville. Canada, not living. 

John D. Nutter, son of John and Hannah (Dennett) Nutter, b. Barn- 
stead, N. H., 1811. He learned the trade of a cabinet maker in Rochester, 
N. H., and after attaining his majority came to Mont Vern n, where his 
elder brother, Benjamin Nutter had settled and engaged in the business 
of manufacturing .organs for nearly ten years. In 1844 he removed to 
Nashua and here pursued the same industry <ome four years, returning 
to Mont Vernon in 1848 and remaining until 1853, when he went to Attica, 
Ind.. and engaged in a banking business. In 1S55 he sold out his busi- 
ness and returned to X'ew Hampshire and for one or two years was a 
merchant at Xashua, removing thence to Montreal, where he resided 
some 31 years, extensively engaged in the lumber business. In 1S88 he 
removed to Maiden, Mass., where he d. Jan. 19, 1890, age 78 years. 
Aug. 8, 1844, he m. Harriet A., dau. Asa and Mary A. (Appleton) Stevens 
of Mont Vernon. She was b. Mont Vernon, May 22, 1821 ; res. Montreal. 

1. John Appleton, b. X T ashua, July 18, 1846. m. Katherine Howard of 
Hardwick, Mass., has five ch.. res. Montreal. 

2. Asa, b. Mont Vernon, d. unm. at 33 yrs. of age. 

3. Dr. William D., b. Montreal, m. Charlotte Bartlett of Maiden, 
res. Maiden, Mass., physician: one dau. 

O'BRIEN. 

John O'Brien, son of Patrick and Mary (Magner) O'Brien, born in 
Limerick, Ireland, in 1837. Was a farmer. Lned here about 15 years, on 
the Purgatory Road, in a house now burnt down. He removed to Mil- 
ford in 1870^ where he d., June 30, 1889. Married Catherine, dau. of 
James and Margaret (Fox) Ryan, b. in Country Cork, Ireland. Ch. 

1. James F., b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 15. 1856, d. here Dec, 1865. 

2. Thomas C. b. Mont Vernon, Aug., 1859, d. here Dec, 1861. 

3. John P.. b. Mont Vernon in 1860, d. here Jan.. 1862. 

4. Joseph T. b. Mont Vernon, July, 1862, res. Milford; is a farmer; 
m. Nov. 18, 1896, Mary A., dau. of Jeremiah and Anistatia (Splain) 
Calnan of Woburn, Mass. 

5. George N., b. Mont Vernon, May 15, 1867, d. Milford, April 4, 
1881. 

6. Mary F., b. Milford, Jan. 10, 1872. 



118 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

ODELL. 

William Odell was a resident of Souhegan West as early as 1759. 
Lived on the farm owned by John Hazen, in West District, d. March, 
1812, age 85. He m. Phebe Boutelle. She d. Jan. 24. 1817, age 85. Ch. 
were : 

1. Phebe, b. 1750, m. David Duncklee. She d. Jan. 6, 1839. 

2. * William, b. 1752. 

3. Martha, b. Aug. 6, 1754. m. John Lovejoy about 1775. 

4. Ebenezer, b. May 22, 1756, m. Sarah Johnson, May 29, 1782. 

5. John, b. Dec. 4, 1761, m. Edith Nourse, d. Nov. 5, 1844; nine ch. 

William Odell. Jr., son of William and Phebe (Boutelle) Odell of 
Amherst, b. 1752, d. Aug. 26, 1829, m. Susannah, dau. Capt Hezekiah and 
Hannah (Phelps) Lovejoy of Amherst. She was b. July 25, 1756, d. 
March 17, 1831. Lived on his father's farm. Ch. 

1. Susannah, b. Nov. 9, 1774. d. unm. Sept. 28, 1813. 

2. William, b. Feb. 23, 1777, d. Nov. 7, 1850; had three ch. 

3. Hannah, 1). Aug. 9, 1779, d. Feb. 11, 1781. 

4. Hannah, b. May :.>::. 1783, d. Jan. 5, 1830. 

5. *Luther. b. Sept 9, 1785. 

6. Betsey, b. Sept. 28, 1787, m. Jacob Hildretli. Jr., of Amherst, 
May 15, 1807, d. Aug. 27. 1850; five ch. 

7. Polly, b. Oct. 13, 1789, m. Henry Howard in 1809, d. Nov. 6, 1875; 
had 12 ch. 

Luther Odell. son William. Jr.. and Susannah (Lovejoy) Odell, b. 
Amherst. Sept. 9, 1785, lived on the farm now owned l>v John Hazen in 
West District, d. there July 6. 1862. He m. March 16. 1806, Betsey, dau. 
Amos and Keturah (Stewart) Green. She was b. Amherst, Oct. 15, 1783, 
d. Mont Vernon, Dec. 18, 186S. Ch. b. 

1. Charles, b. Amherst. June 5, 1806, m. Maria J. Roberts of Wake- 
field. N. H., June 24, 1834, d. Biddeford, Me. ; had eight ch. 

2. -William, b. Amherst, July 13, 1808. 

3. *Luther, 1). Amherst, July 18. 1816. 

4. Orinda Felton. b. Amherst, Feb. 19. 1819; m. (1) Josiah Upton, 
Jan. 2. 1842; m. (2) Jan. 10, 1849, *Capt William Osborn Lamson. ' She 
d. Nov. 24, 1874. 

5. Susan, b. Goft'stown. July 16, 1821, m. Nov. 15, 1845, Francis 
Brown of Lowell ; had two ch., a son and dau. 

6. Harriet, b. May 21, 1827, at Mont Vernon, m. Dec. 23, 1848, George 
Jones of Durham, N. H.; three ch. 

William Odell. 1). Amherst, July 13, 1808, son of Luther and B. 
(Green) Odell, lived on his father's farm in Mont Vernon, moved to 
Petrosky, Mich., where he d.. Jan. 10, 1884; m. Mary Ann Kingsbmy «f 
Dedham. Mass. She d. Mont Vernon, July 5, 1877. aged 59 yrs., 4 mos. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Mary, b. Jan. 13, 1838. d. Jan. 15. 1838. 

2. William, b. Dec. 1, 1842, d. same day. 

3. Luther, 1). 1S44, m. .Mrs. Green of Vermont, lives Petrosky, Mich. 

Luther Odell, son of Luther and Betsey (Green) Odell, b. Amherst, 
July 18, 1816. Lived in Mont Vernon, Lyndeboro, Bennington and Han 
cock, where he d. Feb. 13, 1887. He was a carpenter and built the body 
of the house in Mont Vernon Village, now occupied as a summer resi- 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 119 

dence by John F. Colby, m. March 21, 1844, Susan, dau. Jotham and Ruth 
(Cloutman) Richardson. 

1. Susan Annette, b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 12, 1845, d. Lyndeboro, Dec. 
24, 1859. 

2. William Haskell, b. Mont Vernon, April 22, 1848, m Josie S. 
Kimball of Bennington, Dec. 7, 1875, lives Bennington; ch. : (1) Fred 
Wilton, b. March 11, 1877; (2) Ethel May, b. Dec. 24, 18S2. 

3. Hattie Elizabeth, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 11, 1848. d. Wilton, Aug. 
15, 1864. 

Ebenezer Odell, Sr., d. 1824, age 75. 

Ebenezer Odell, Jr., m. Esther Langdell, June 5, 1807. 

ORDWAY. 

Daniel Ordway, b. Pelham, N. H., April 5, 1813, m. Nancy B., dau. 
Ezra and Rebecca (Langdell) Langdell. She was b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 
28. 1812. d She res. Francestown. He came to \'i nt Vernon rrh ■-<? 
one-half of the farm now occupied by George F. Tarbell, and lived there 
until 1859, when he purchased a farm in the east part of Francestown, 
where he resided until his death, April 19, 1900. He was a pious man 
and much respected. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Nancy. 

2. Frances Rebecca. 

3. Henrietta. 

PARKER. 

Lieut. Robert Parker and wife, Penelope, both from Andover, Mass., 
settled in the extreme south part of the town, where Charles H. Ray- 
mond did live, before the Revolution. He d. Mont Vernon, April, 1805, 
age 73. Ch. 

1. William, b. April 26, 17.57, Revolutionary soldier 

2. *Robert, b. Sept. 3, 1759 

3. Rachel, b. Oct. 19. 1761. 

4. Deborah, b. May 3, 1764 

5. *Benjamin. b. March 18. 1766 

6. Penelope, b. July 23, 1768. 

Robert Parker, son of Robert and Penelope Parker, b. Sept. 3, 1759. 
m. Sept. 11, 1783, Rebecca, dau. Dea. Oliver and Amy (Washer) Carle- 
ton of Mont Vernon. She was b. Jan. 21, 1764. They moved to Barre. Vt, 
from Mont Vernon in 1805 and d. there. He was a Revolutionary soldier. 
Ch. all probably b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Robert, m. Fanny Batchelder, dau. Ebenezer and Elizabeth T. S. 
Batchelder, May 29, 1806. She was b. July 8, 1785, moved to Landgrove, 
Vt. 

2. Stephen lived in Newport, N. H., was a highly respected and 
prominent citizen, was Representative from that town. 

3. Oliver. 

4. Carlton, settled in Andover, Mass., m. a Miss Abbott, left five 
ch. viz : Carlton, George H., Charles S., Mary and Martha 

5. George. 

6. John. 

7. Enoch. 



120 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

The daughters: 

8. Mary (Mrs. Damon of Pembroke Mass.). 

9. Lucy (Mrs. Hewitt of Bar re, Vt). 

10. Hannah (Mrs. Davis of Barre, Vt.) 

11. Emma, unm. 

12. Sarah, lived Brewer, Me 

Capt. Benjamin Parker, son Robert and Penelope Parker, b. Mont 
Vernon, March 18, 1766, d. Jan., 1826; m. Oct. 10, 1794, Betsey, dau. 
Joseph and Patience (Bradford) Lovejoy of Mont Vernon. She d. Am- 
herst, Sept. 25, 1859, was b. in 1772. Ch. 

1. Nancy, m. Moses B. Stewart of Amherst, May, 1825, d. Bluffville, 
111., Sept., 1855, aged 59 years, 4 months. 

2. Joseph, d. Dec. 26, 1823, aged 19. 

3. Arethusa, d. Sept., 1830, age 25. 

4. Thomas J., d. March 21, 1837, age 30, m. 

5. Lucretia, d. April, 1834, aged 18. 

6. Samuel, went West. 

Caesar Parker (of colored blood) was from Weare, lived in a small 
house in the South part of the town several years, m. Margaret Spear of 
Weare. She d. Feb. 24, 1854, age 85 yrs. ; had several ch. He d. 1855, age 
99 yrs. 

Nathaniel, b. 1802, went to live with David McCauley of Antrim in 
1809, became a respected citizen of the town, d. there unm. 

Humphrev Moore, d. June 28, 1861, age 53 years and 9 months 

Mark. 

Ross. 

There were two dau., one m. a Baptist clergyman of Newport, R. I. 

James, d. Dec. 4, 1839, age 27. 

Granville Parker came from Nelson, lived on the Joseph H. Tarbell 
farm and on farm now owned by Estate of E. C. Flanders, southeast of 
the village. He moved to Deering. He m. Elizabeth, dau. Elisha and 
Betsey (Temple) Swinnington of Mont Vernon. She d. 

Ira A., m. Harriet, dau. John J. and Sarah (Hopkins) Carson. She 
d. June 26, 1881, age 28. He m (2) Miss Case; lives Deering. 

Elbridge Parker, b. New Boston, March 27, 1815, son of William and 
Martha (Fox) Parker, m. Nov., 1844. Hannah Elizabeth Fillebrown, b. 
Lexington, Mass., July 29, 1819, d. Mont Vernon, March 11, 1898. They 
lived three years in Mass., then bought the John Fairfield farm in New 
Boston and lived there until 1885, when they moved to Mont Vernon. He 
d June 12, 1886. 

1. Henry Herbert, b. March 12, 1846, d. unm. May, 1871. 

2. Mary Frances, b. New Boston, May 27, 1851, m. Nov. 3, 1875, 
♦George N. Foster of Mont Vernon, who d. May 12, 1881. She d. Mont 
Vernon, Oct. 22, 1892; one dau., Annie P. Foster, b. Nov. 17, 1880. 

3. Charles A., b. Sept. 6, 1856, in New Boston ; lives Arlington, Mass., 
unm. 

4. Lizzie R., b. New Boston, Nov. 9, 1861, lives Mont Vernon, unm. 

PEABODY. 

r 

Col. Stephen Peabody, son of William and Rebecca (Smith) Peabody, 



HISTORY OF MONT VERXON. 121 

b. Sept. 3, 1742. m. Hannah, dau. of Thomas and Hannah ( Goffe) Chan- 
dler of Bedford, in 1763. She d. in Montpelier, Vt, Aug., 1826, age 79 
years. He was Adjutant of Col. Reed's Regiment in the Battle of Bunker 
Hill, aid to Gen. Stark at Bennington and Lieutenant-Colonel commanding 
a battalion sent to Rhode Island in 1778. The cellar of his large mansion 
on Purgatory Hill, one mile and one-half west of Mont Vernon Village 
can still be seen. He d. Sept. 19, 1780. Inscription on his tombstone in 
Mont Vernon Cemetery : 

"In memory of Col. Stephen Peabodv. who, after he had displayed 
his martial abilities in the service of his country d. at home, 1782, age 38. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Thomas, b. Feb. 15. 1764. m. (1) Sarah Perkins, March 10. 1785; 
m. (2) Mrs. Bird, a sister of Gen. James Miller. He settled in Vermont. 
Near the close of the war for Independence he was surgeon in a regiment 
commanded by Col. Evans. 

2. Dr. John, b. May 17. 1766, m. Keziah Hubbard, located Salem, Mass., 
had three ch. 

3. Hannah, b. July 2, 1768. m. *Enoch Carleton of Amherst ; had 
four ch. 

4. Rebecca, b. July 17, 1770. She was a physician and surgeon, m. 
Gen. Perlev Davis of Montpelier, Vt., Nov. 4, 1794, d. in East Montpelier, 
Feb. 5, 1853. 

5. Stephen, b. Aug. 23, 1772, m. Martha, dau. Joseph and Martha 
(Dodge) Trow of Mont Vernon, Dec. 6, 1795. She was b. March 13, 
1772. He was a physician in Orange, Vt. 

6. Asenath, b. July 25, 1774, d. March 15. 1777. 

7. Sarah, b. Dec. 2, 1776, d. suddenly on the day appointed for her 
marriage. 

8. Asenath, b. Dec. 14. 1779, m. Lewis Parker of Cambridge. Vt., d. 
March, 1846. 

Samuel Peabodv, son of Moses and Sarah (Holt) Peabodv, b. Sept. 
1, 1741, d. Mont Vernon, Aug. 6, 1814, m. Elizabeth, dau. Joseph Wilkins 
of Amherst. They settled in Andover, Mass., removed to Mont Vernon, 
1785. 

1. *Moses. 

2. Samuel, m. Huldah Stiles, June 11, 1790. d. June. 1825. 

3. John, m. Holt. 

4. Joseph, b. Oct. 3, 1770 d. Nov. 1, 1S53. m. (1) Olive Berry, Sept. 
4, 1800; m. (2) Anna Flint, Oct. 22, 1805. They settled in Middletown, 
Mas>.. where he was deacon in the church several years; had seven ch. 

5. Sarah, m. Damon, settled in Marshfield, Vt. 

6. Aaron, m. Edith Wilkins, d. in Mont Vernon, 1854, age S2. She 
d. 1863. aged 82. No ch. 

7. Jacob, m. Sally Wilkins. They settled in Milford.. Had a son, 
Horace, b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 28, 1814, lived in Milford. 

8. Joel, b. 1778, m. Elizabeth Wilkins, settled Middletown. Mass. ; 
five ch. 

Moses Peabodv, son Samuel and Elizabeth (Wilkins) Peabodv. d. in 
Mont Vernon, Nov. 4, 1842, m. May 25, 1786, Sarah, dau. Ebenezer and 
Lydia (Peabody) Holt. She was b. in 1757, d. Mont Vernon. May 25, 
1845. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Moses, m. Mary Marvell. He d. in the army at Burlington, Vt., 
in May, 1813. 



122 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

2. Lydia H., m. *Azel W. Burnham, 1818. 
Ch. Moses and Sarah H. Peabody : 

1. Keziah, m. Nahum Bullard, 1830. 

2. Mary Ann, b. July 2, 1812, m. April 19, 1830, Joshua F. Skinner 
of Amherst, lived Amherst, four ch., a dau. d. in infancy. 

PERKINS. 

John Perkins, the emigrant ancestor of the Mont Vernon Perkinses, 
was born in Newent, Gloucester, England, in 1590, sailed from Bristol, 
England, for Boston, Dec. 1, 1630. Rev. Roger Williams was a fellow 
passenger. Perkins had with him his family, consisting then of wife and 
five children. Landed in Boston. Lived there about two years, where 
another ch., Lydia, was born. Removed to Ipswich in 1633, became an ex- 
tensive land owner in Ipswich, appears to have been one of the leading 
men. Deputy to the General Court in 1636, d. 1654, age 64. His ch. 
named in his will were John, Thomas, Mrs. Eliabeth Sargent, Mrs. Mary 
Bradbury, Mrs. Lydia Bennett, Jacob Perkins. His wife, Judith Perkins, 
to execute will. 

Joseph Perkins (fifth generation from the first John Perkins, 1; 
Jacob, 2; John, 3; Thomas, 4; Joseph, 5;), son of Thomas and Elizabeth 
(Fowler) Perkins, b. Sept. 15, 1735, m. Emma Dodge of Beverly, May 12, 
1761. They resided in Beverly some years after their marriage. He was 
a tailor by trade. Probably came to Mont Vernon in 1776, not 1773, as 
Lydia, the youngest of his four daughters, was baptized in Beverly, Dec. 
10, 1775. He d. Mont Vernon, Dec, 1823. 

His third dau., Betsey, m. *Joseph Trow of Mont Vernon. She d. 
Aug. 22, 1851, age 83. His son, Capt. Joseph Perkins, Jr., b. Beverly, 
Mass., Feb. 6, 1761, d. Mont Vernon, Nov. 22, 1822, came to Mont Vernon 
with his parents when a lad. July 3, 1779, at 18, he enlisted in the army 
and served one year. While in the service he was on a privateer vessel, 
which was taken by the British and the crew was taken to England and 
confined in what was called the Mill Prison. While in prison he worked 
at his trade of tailoring, in which way he contrived to get some money, 
which made his lot more tolerable than that of many others. Tradition 
says that when he secured a guinea he would" cover it with cloth and sew 
it on his coat for a button. M. Hannah, third dau. of James and Hannah 
(Trask) Woodbury. She was b. Oct. 5, 1766, d. April 15, 1856. He d. 
Nov. 22. 1822. Ch. 1). Mont Vernon. 

1. Hannah, b. Aug. 10, 1783, m. Levi Ray, Jan. 19, 1804. 

2. *Mark Dodge, b. June 5, 1785. 

3. John Trask, b. Dec. 7. 1787, d. Mont Vernon, Jan. 16, 1859, una 

4. Lucretia. b. March 6, 1790. m. Jesse Woodbury of Weare, d. 1873. 

5. Joseph, b. March 13, 1794, d. Aug. 19, 1797. 

6. *Joseph, b. April 18, 1796. 

7. James Woodbury, b. March 6, 1797, d. March, 1802. 

8. * James Woodburv, b. April 17, 1798, m. Fanny Cochran of Ne\< 
Boston, dau. John Cochran, Esq., d. New Chester, Wis.. March 30, 1874. 

9. Sarah, b. April 20, 1800, m. March 22, 1825, *Joseph Trow, d. 
July 31, 1837; six ch. 

10. *Hiram, b. May 16, 1802. 

11. Solomon, b. March 2, 1804, d. March 19, 1804. 

12. Catherine, b. Sept. 15, 1805, m. May 4, 1826, Elijah Putnam, Jr., 
of Amherst; two ch. She d. March 18. 1884. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNOX. 123 

13. *Elbridge Fisk, b. Sept. 9, 1811. 

Mark Dodge Perkins, son of Capt. Joseph and Hannah (Woodbury) 
Perkins, b. Mont Vernon, June 5, 1785, lived for many years in the house 
now burnt, which stood below A. W. Bragg's. Was Deputy Sheriff many 
years; m. (1) Feb.. 1809, Mahala, dau. Peter and Betsey (Woodbury) 
Jones. She was b. 1788, d. June 24, 1843. He m. ( 2) Cynthia Johnson 
in 1842. She d. Feb. 19, 1867, aged 69. He d. Mont Vernon, July 22, 
1881. Ch. by first wife b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Betsey J., m. her second cousin, *Charles R. Beard, in 1829. She 
d. Dec. 26, 1850, aged 40 yrs. 

2. Abigail F., m. Au<r. 10, 1836, Zephaniah Hutchinson of Milford; 
had two ch. She d. Milford, April 20. 1848, aged 37. 

3. Maria, m. Bradbury. 

4. Hannah, m. Luke Beard, brother of Chas. R. Beard ; four ch. 
viz ; Albert. Horace, Emily, Luke. They lived in Wilton. 

5. Peter J., d. num. Aug. 10, 1843, aged 23. 

6. Harriet X., d. Aug. 30, 1828, age 5. 

7. Mahala, d. Aug. 23, 1828, aged 1 yr., 4 mos. 

8. Emily L., m. *J. H. A. Bruce. She d. June 19, 1860. aged 2« 
yrs., 9 mos. 

Joseph Perkins, son of Capt. Joseph and Hannah (Woodbury) Per- 
kins, b. Mont Vernon, April 18. 1796, owned and occupied the Perkins 
farm in the Xorth District; m. (1) Sally, dau. of Daniel and Granddau. 
of Dea. Daniel Smith. She d. June 4, 1830, age 32. He m. (2) Susanna 
B. Locke of Woburn, Mass. She was b. Xovember 15. 1803, d. Mont 
Vernon, May 10. 1867. He d. Oct. 21, 1877. Ch. all b. Mont Vernon. 

Ch. bv first wife : 

1. Hannah, b. April 24, 1816, m. *Trask W. Averill, April 9, 1835; 
eight ch. She d. May 2. 1849. 

2. James Woodbury, b. May 9, 1818, m. (l) Frances S. Brvant, 
July 9, 1837. She d. Nov. 3, 1S55. age 39. He m. ( 2 ) Mrs. Jane Loveren. 
She d. Jan.. 1873. He was a tin pedlar, lived in Amherst and Lowell, d. 
Lowell, Xov. 6, 1887. 

3. *Daniel Smith, b. Sept. 22, 1821. m. (1) Tan. 28, 1842, Emeline 
F. Crosby. She d. July 18, 1868, age 45. 

By second wife : 

4. Joseph Elbfidge, b. July 24, 1835, farmer, lived on his father's 
farm, m. April 6, 1862, Eleanor, dau. Jesse and Eleanor (Morgan) Man- 
ning. She was b. in Billerica, Dec. 13, 1841. d. June 29. 1902. He d. 
March 15. 1897 ; no ch. She m. after his death J. Henry Smith. 

5. *John Trask, b. June 28, 1839. 

Dr. James Woodbury Perkins, son of Capt. Joseph and Hannah 
(Woodbury) Perkins, b. Mont Vernon, April 17. 1798, was installed as 
minister in Warner, X. H.. March 4. 1840, dismissed in 1846. Fred Myron, 
Colby, in his sketch of Warner in History of Merrimack Co., character- 
izes him as having been an earnest, laborious and efficient pastor. He 
commenced his labors in Xooksett, Feb., 1846, was at Alstead, commenced 
preaching in Hillsboro in 1852 and at Deering in 1854. and finally left on 
account of ill health: was also a physician; m. Fanny, dau. John Cochran. 
Esq.. and Frances (Gove) Cochran of New Boston. He d. New Chester, 
Wis., March 30, 1874. A son, Charles, went West, established a paper 
and lived in Xew Chester, Wis., where his father died. 



124 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Hiram Perkins, son of Capt. Joseph and Hannah (Woodbury) Per- 
kins, b. Mont Vernon, May 16, 1802, owned and occupied the Lt. James 
Woodbury farm in the village many years ( now owned by Estate of Dr. 
C. M. Kittredge. He m. Feb. 23, 1837, Serviah, dau. Capt. William and 
Serviah (Jones) Lamson. She was b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 13, 1815, d. 
March 1, 1871. He d. Nov. 13, 1880. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Ann Augusta, b. Jan. 15, 1838, m. Nov. 27, 1862, *Clark Campbell. 
She d. Aug. 16, 1900. 

2. Mary F. B., b. Sept. 23, 1839, m. Feb. 15. 1866, Charles A. Hutch- 
inson, lived Hilton Head, S. C, and at Jacksonville, Fla., where they 
both d. March 25, 1872. Ch., Chas. Everett, b. Hilton Head, S. C, Nov. 
27, 1866, m., lives in Cal ; two ch. ; George M., b. Nov. 10, 1869, m. ; one 
ch. ; lives in Cal. 

3. Harriet Ida, b. Aug. 21, 1842, m. George W. Miller, Jan. 13, 1868, 
d. at Providence, R. I., March 1, 1869 ; one ch., Ada P., b. Providence, 
R. I., Feb. 14, 1869. 

4. Hiram Osborn, b. July 16. 1844, d. July 11, 1862. 

5. Elbridge Weston, b. Oct. 2. 1846. d. Oct. 3, 1847. 

Elbridge Fisk Perkins, son of Capt. Joseph Perkins, Jr., and Hannah 
(Woodburv) Perkins, b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 9, 1811, m. (1) Abby, dau. 
Abiel and Emma (Howard) Wilkins, Sept. 10, 1830. She d. Oct. 4. 1853. 
Lived in Amherst and Wilton. Was a merchant tailor. He d. July 19, 
1894. He m. (2) Jan. 31. 1854. Mary L., dau. Col. Levi and Sophia 
(Gilmore) Jones of Amherst. She was b. Amherst, June 13, 1821. Ch. 
bv second wife b. Wilton : 

1. Levi Woodbury, b. March 26, 1855, m. Oct. 14. 1880, Lenore C. 
Emerson of Wilton. 

2. Hattie Sophia, b. Nov. 26, 1860. 

John Trask Perkins, son of Joseph and Susanna B. (Locke) Perkins, 
b. Mont Vernon, June 28, 1839, m. April 18, 1860, Laura A., dau. of 
Nathan and Abisrail (Weston) Richardson of Mont Vernon. She d. 
Jan. 19, 1873, age 30 years. 11 months. He m. (2) Sept. 14, 1878, Mar- 
garet W. Currier of Newburyport, Mass., res. Westboro, Mass. He 
served in 13th N. H. Regt. in 'War of '61-'65. Ch. all by first wife b. 
Mont Vernon : 

1. John Ellsworth, b. June 10, 1862, m. Nov. 3, 1892, Catharine Laws 
at Breckenridge, Col. 

2. Nellie Grace, b. July 21, 1867, m. at Newburyport. Mass., Feb. 18, 
1892, Albert F. Swaine. 

3. Laura Etta. b. June 26, 1869, m. at Newburyport, Mass., Nov. 14, 
1894, Arthur F. Ingram. 

Daniel Smith Perkins, son of Joseph and Sally (Smith) Perkins, b. 
Mont Vernon, Sept. 22, 1821, m. Jan. 28, 1842, Emeline F, dau. Otis and 
Salome (Whipple) Crosby. She d. July 18, 1868, age 45. He resides 
Campton, N. H. Their ch. buried in Mont Vernon were: 

Joseph, d. 1845, age 4 yrs. 

Charles W., d. age 3 yrs., 6 mos. 

Eva F., d. at 18 mos. 

James W., d. July 24. 1851, age 3 yrs., 3 mos. * 

Harriet, d. July 27, 1851, age 17 mos. 

Daniel Otis, d. April 22, 1852, age 6 yrs., 3 mos. 

Harriet E. 

Willis C, d. City of Mexico. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 125 

Edward lives in Mexico, m. Mrs. Spencer of Boston; 10 ch. 

PIKE. 

Peter F. Pike, son (name not known) and Lucy (Foster) Pike, b. 
Dec. 25, 1824, painter, m. Dec. 30, 1847, Nancy E., dau. Benjmain F. and 
Hannah (Smith) Hill. She was b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 6, 1832. He 
served in the 13th N. H. Regt. in the War for the Union. He d. Sept. 
29, 1898. She res. Mont Vernon. Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Ella M., b. Aug. 20, 1848, m. (1) Edwin N. Gutterson of Amherst, 
June 6, 1867. m. (2) Richard Beach; d. Oct. 2, 1888. 

2. Almus W., b. April 7. 1851, d. April 29, 1865. 

3. Frank L., b. March 12, 1860, m. Nov. 27, 1884, Mary A. Haridon 
of New Boston. Thev reside in Milford. 

4. Alice B., b. Aug. 10, 1866, d. Jan. 29, 1867. 

5. George W., b. Oct. 30, 1868, m. Feb. 24. 1892, Lura B., dau. Ed- 
ward and Martha (Hardy) Colburn of Hollis. She was b. in Hollis, 
April 6, 1868. They reside in Mont Vernon. 

Ephraim Pike lived on Battle's place in East Dist., before the Battles 
came, was moderator in 1813 and 1815, m. Sept. 10, 1809, Nancy, dau. 
James and Mehitable (Woodbury) Ray. She was b. Mont Vernon, March 
24, 1791. 

PINKHAM. 

William F. Pinkham. b. Nashua, March 7, 1854. Has resided in 
Brideport, Ct. Lived here from 1890 to 1896. Now resides in Hyde 
Park, Mass. He is a civil engineer and speculator. He m. Dec. 25, 
1876, Caroline Frances, dau. Charles and Almira L. (Trow) Forsaith. 
She was b. Oct. 30, 1854. Ch. 

1. Ralph Howard, b. Jan. 16, 1880. 

2. Charles Forsaith, b. July 14, 1881. 

3. Henry Palmer, b. Mont Vernon. Jan. 16, 1894. 

PREBLE. 

Preble, b. Ossipee, N. H., d. Lawrence, 1850, age 51, m. Sally D. 
Barker of Marblehead. They lived here on the place now occupied by 
Charles J. Smith a few years in the forties. She now resides with her 
son Henry, in Lynn. Ch. 

Henry, b. Mont Vernon, 1844, shoe cutter, resides Lynn. 

PRENTISS. 

John Prentiss came from Salem, Mass., to Mont Vernon about 1816. 
He was a most excellent penman. He was a merchant here. Removed 
to Amherst in 1825, where he was cashier of the Farmers' Bank through 
the whole of its existence. He was town clerk there and postmaster 
some years during the time. His wife, Mrs. Azubah Prentis, played the 
organ "in the meeting house at Amherst several years. He d. in Clare- 
mont, March 2, 1868, aged 82 years, with his son, John J. Prentiss. Ch. 
were: 

1. Howard. 

2. John J., m. Mary Ann, dau. Hon. Edmund Parker; lawyer, set- 



126 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

tied in Henniker and Claremont; was speaker in the N. H. House of Rep- 
resentatives ; m. 1855. Lived in Chicago, 111., afterwards. 
3. Henry, d. young. 

PERHAM. 

Joel Frank Perham, son of Joel H. and Alice G. (Lynch) Perham, b. 
Wilton, Sept. 25, 1862, m. June .2, 1890, Annie E., dau. of Daniel H. and 
Mary J. (Holt) Smith of Mont Vernon. She was b. Mont Vernon, June 
30, 1869. No ch. He is a cattle dealer and farmer and lives in village. 

RAMSEY. 

Dr. John Ramsey came here from Greenfield, succeeded Dr. Rogers 
Smith, was taxed here in 1815, practised here a few years, m. Miss Davis, 
dau. Jonathan and Mary Davis of Westford, Mass. He returned \o 
Greenfield. Ch. probably b. in Greenfield. 

1. Margaret, m. (1) Dr. George W. Moore of Amherst. He d. 
Sept. 8, 1866. She m. (2) Dr. Leonard French of Manchester, June 25, 
1S67. 

2. John, farmer in Greenfield. 

3. William, res. Wisconsin. 

RAY OR REA. 

James Ray, Esq., was the only ch. of James and Elizabeth (Dodge) 
Ray of Beverly, where he was b.. May 1, 1759. His father d. shortly 
after his birth, leaving his mother a widow 17 years of age. In 1760 she 
m. Peter Woodbury and in 1773 the family moved to Mont Vernon, where 
James grew to manhood with his half-brothers, Levi, Jesse, Peter and 
Mark Woodbury. Here young Ray m. Mehitable, dau. James Woodbury, 
May 3, 1780. He was a noted inn-keeper and an active man in Mont 
Vernon. Trask W. Averill said that James Ray lived on the Dr. Adams 
place most of the time he lived here, and carried on the potash business, 
as well as keeping a tavern. In 1S17 he moved to Amherst and kept 
the hotel afterwards known as the Nutt tavern until Jan., 1827. He d. 
Amherst, Jan. 15, 1830, age 70. His wid. d. in Francestown, Feb. 4, 1858. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

1. James, b. July 9, 1780, m. Elsie Dana, April 26, 1810, lived on the 
New Boston road, had ch., d. April 2, 1857. 

2. John, b. Aug. 13, 1781, d. Nov. 25, 1781. 

3. Mehitable, b. April 15, 1783, d. Dec. 15, 1832, m. John Moor of 
New Boston, Aug. 25, 1804. One of her ch., Sabrina, was mother of 
Clark Campbell, Esq., of Mont Vernon. 

4. Levi, b. July 13, 1785, m. his cousin, Hannah Perkins of Mont 
Vernon, Jan. 9, 1804. 

5. Sabrina. b. Oct. 14, 1786, d. Dec. 11, 1802. 

6. Henry Hammond, b. Sept. 9, 1789, d. Feb. 20, 1829. 

7. Nancy, b. March 24, 1791, m. Sept. 10, 1809, Ephraim Pike. 

8. Frances W., b. Jan. 13, 1794, m. James W. Haseltine of Frances- 
town in 1814, d. Manchester, Dec. 12, 1877; had four ch. 

9. John T., b. Nov. 15, 1795, d. 1797. 

10. Elizabeth D., b. May 8, 1798, m. Newell Dean in Dec, 1828, d. 
Boston, Mass., July 7. 1858. 

11. Marv, b. May 31, 1800, d. Feb. 22, 1802. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 127 

12. Peter W., b. Dec. 5, 1802, lived in Salem, Mass. 

13. Horace, b. Nov. 5, 1807. 

RAYMOND. 

John Raymond of Beverly, b. about 1616, m. Rachel Scruggs, who d. 
1666. He m. (2) Mrs. Judith Woodbury, wid. William Woodbury, Jr. 
She d. 1702, aged 75. His ninth ch. and the first by his second wife was 
2Nathaniel, b. March 15, 1670, d. Jan. 8, 1749, m. Rebecca, dau. Lot 
Conant, b. Jan. 31, 1671, d. Dec, 1760. They had 10 ch., of whom 
3Nathaniel was the ninth, b. April 1, 1712, m. Martha Balch, Oct. 3, 1735. 
They had eight ch., of whom the sixth was Nathaniel, 4th generation, b. 
Beverly, May 8, 1749, m. Phebe Dodge, dau of Geo. Dodge, Hamilton, 
Mass. ' He d. Mont Vernon, 1800. He removed to Mont Vernon in 1773. 
He was a sailor. His wife d. Nov. 15, 1825, aje 70. He lived on Ray- 
mond farm in South Dist. Ch. 

1. Martha, m. Dea. Andrew Hutchinson of Milford, had sons, 
Nathaniel, Elisha and Stillman. 

2. Mary, m. Nov. 15, 1800, David Goodell and settled in Hillsboro, 
d. Antrim, 1864, aged 85; had two sons, George D. and Jesse R. Goodell. 
George D. was the father of Dr. John Goodell of Hillsboro and Jesse R. 
Goodell, the father of Ex.-Gov. D. H. Goodell, of Antrim. 

3. Sally, b. Jan. 26, 1781, m. Samuel Hartshorn of Lyndeboro, had 
six ch., of whom the first was Dea. Samuel, b. Feb. 25, 1810, d. Mason, 
Nov., 1846, was deacon Baptist Church, Lyndeboro, and Hancock. 

4. *George, b. 1783. 

5. *John, b. July, 1785. 

6. *Jesse, b. 1792. 

George Raymond, son of Nathaniel and Phebe (Dodge) Raymond, b. 
Mont Vernon, 1783, m. Dec. 19, 1809, Mary, dau. John and Polly (Brad- 
ford) Wallace of Milford. She was b. May 13 1785, d. Sept. 8, 1862. 
He was selectman, was representative in 1842 ; lived on the homestead in 
the South Dist., d. Dec. 14, 1853 Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Mary, b. Jan. 5, 1811, was teacher and principal of the Female 
Seminary in Hancock, m. Jan. 19, 1839, Rev. Dura D. Pratt of Nashua, 
d. Aug. 8, 1902, at Evanston, 111. 

2. Phebe B.. b. Sept. 13, 1812. m. Eugene Hutchinson of Milford, d. 
Nov. 13, 1837; one dau. 

3. George, b. Nov. 3, 1814, d. Aug. 9, 1818. 

4. *Andrew W., b. Oct. 19, 1817. 

5. Sally, b. Oct. 3, 1818, d. Oct. 14, 1819. 

6. *George, b. Aug. 9, 1820. 

7. Nancv, b. April 25, 1824, m. May 11, 1847, Dana W. Pratt of Pen- 
acook, N. H," d. Feb., 1871 ; one son, Charles D., who d. at Milford, N. H. 

John Raymond, son of Nathaniel and Phebe (Dodge) Raymond, b. 
Mont Vernon, July 23, 1785. m. Sally, dau. John and Polly (Bradford) 
Wallace of Milford. He d. April 22, 1850. They settled on the farm now 
of George F. Tarbell. In 1839 he sold his farm and moved to Union Co., 
Ohio, where he afterwards gave the name to the town of Raymond, where 
he and his wife, Sally, d. Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Nathaniel, b. Sept. 19, 1811, was taxed here five years until 1838. 
Went first to Raymond, Ohio, thence to Champaigne, 111., d. May 19, 1890. 

2. John Wallace, b. March 5, 1815, m. Feb., 1839, Lucinda Smart, d. 
Raymond, Ohio, June 30, 1841, without ch. 



128 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

3. *Robert Burns, b. May 2, 1824. 

Jesse Raymond, son Nathaniel and Phebe (Dodge) Raymond, b. 
Mont Vernon, 1792, m. Betsey Dale of Wilton, N. H. He d. July 14, 
1862. He lived on the farm in South Dist, now occupied by C. F. Isola. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

1. John Goodell, b. Sept., 1816. m. Oct. 8, 1839, Roxanna, dau. Alfred 
and Lydia (Foster) Hutchinson; m. (2) March 20, 1856, Abigail, dau. 
John and Rosanna (Mills) Bullard; m. (3) March 20, 1877, Mrs. Nancy 
J. (Cilley) Hill. He was a blacksmith, lived and d. in Milford, Jan. 14, 
1885. His ch. were Abbie, m. Albert Conant of South Lyndeboro, and 
David E. of Peterboro. 

2. David Goodell, d. Milford, Sept. 7, 1843, aged 24 years. 

Andrew Wallace Raymond, son of George and Mary (Wallace) Ray- 
mond, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 19. 1817, m. March 7, 1843, Abbie Stevens 
of Goffstown. She d. Feb. 23, 1883, age 65. He lived on the homestead, 
d. Julv 5. 1895. Ch. b. Mont Vernon: 

1. Marv Frances, b. Jan. 7, 1844, m. March 4, 1863, Dodge G. Hart- 
shorn of Milford, d. Milford, Aug. 17, 1899 ; one dau., Mrs. D. O. Handley 
of Milford. 

2. *Charles Henry, b. Feb. 21, 1846. 

3. *George Andrew, b. Julv 1, 1849. 

4. Abbie E.. b. Oct. 13, 1851, m. Walker. 

5. John W., b. April 6, 1857, m. April 14, 1886, Henrietta Colston; 
has two ch., lives in Concord, Mass. 

6. Dana Pratt, b. Dec. 23, 1859, d. March 8, 1870. 

George Raymond, son of George and Mary (Wallace) Raymond, b. 
Mont Vernon, April 9, 1820, lived in Antrim, Concord, N. H. ; lives Rock- 
bottom, Mass., m. Eleanor Pollard of Antrim. Ch. 

1. *Edwin Herbert, b. Aug. 18, 1849. 

2. Elsie A., b. Nov. 8, 1853, m. Nov. 30, 1882, Thomas J. Niles of 
Concord, N. H. 

Nathaniel Raymond, son of John and Sally Bradford Raymond, b. 
Mont Vernon. Sept. 19, 1811, was taxed here five years until 1838. Went 
first to Raymond, Ohio, thence to Champaigne, 111., d. May 19, 1890. Ch. 
of Nathaniel and his wife. Melissa, were : 

1. Josiephine, b. May 8, 1842, m. Sept. 29, 1868, William S. Maxwell. 

2. Sally, b. April 22, 1844, m. June 14, 1871, Jona B. Green. 

3. John E., b. Aug. 4, 1845, merchant Girard, Kan. 

4. Isaac S., b. Jan. 29, 1849. m. Oct. 27, 1875, Edith Eaton. 

Robert Burns Ravmond, b. Mont Vernon, May 2, 1824, son of John 
and Sally (Bradford) Ravmond, resides Monmouth, 111., m. Sarah Lock- 
wood 1846. Ch. 

1. George, b. Jan. 9, 1847, d. Oct. 17, 1867. 

2. Chas. W., of Monmouth, b. July 21, 1849, m. Dec, 1870 ; had two 
dau. Wife d. June, 1875. He m. (2) Hattie Hovier, Sept., 1879; has 
son and dau. 

3. Pratt, b. March 29, 1852, d. Aug. 15, 1869. 

4. David B., b. July 4, 1855, m. Dec., 1882, Alice Lake, one son. 

Charles Henry Raymond, son Andrew W. and Abbie (Stevens) Ray- 




CHARLES H. RAYMOND. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 113 

educated principally at the Easton State Normal School. Became a 
preacher of the Maine Methodist Conference, and as such was stationed 
at Dover, Tremont and Pembroke. March 7, 1882, he was ordained as a 
Congregational minister at Harrington, Me., was acting pastor at Tur- 
ner, Me., from Dec, 1883 to Nov., 1885, and at Mont Vernon from Dec, 
1885 to Feb. 26, 1888. Was two years each at Cornish, Me., and North- 
wood, N. H. Was pastor of a Congregational church in Everett, Mass., 
where he d. He m. Abby F. Rowe of Ellsworth, Me., ch. 

1. Ruth M., b. 1876. 

2. Ralph S., b. 1877. 

3. Anna E., b. June. 1879. 

4. Roy, b. Dec. 4, 1880. 

McQUESTION. 

Hugh N. McQuestion, b. Merrimack, Feb. 14, 1805, lived on the 
farm where Martin L. Wheeler now lives in the East District, d. Feb. 13, 
1889, age 84; removed to farm near East School. He m. Sarah F. 
Hartshorn of Merrimack, April 2, 1829. She d. Oct. 18, 1877, age 72 
years, 11 months, 19 days. She was b. Oct. 29, 1804. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Henry N., b. Feb. 15, 1830, m. Hattie Hunt, enlisted in the Fifth 
N. H. Regt. in the Civil War, d. diseased, Newport News, Va., June 8, 
1862, one son, Fred. 

2. Thomas H., b. May 8, 1832. 

3. Nathan P., d. March 26, 1842, age 7 yrs., 5 mos. 

4. Harriet J., d. March 13, 1846, age 10 yrs., 2 mos. 

5. Sarah F., b. Feb. 23, 1844. m. May 8, 1873, Wm. W. Grafton, 
Friendship, Me., res. Milford, d. Milford, Nov. 12, 1886; one dau. 

6. Mary A., b. Feb. 2, 1846, d. unm. Milford, Dec. 19, 1893. 

Thomas H. McQuestion, b. Mont Vernon, May 8, 1832, son Hugh 
M. and Sarah F. (Hartshorn) McQuestion. Lived on his father's farm 
near East School in East District, d. there Aug. 26, 1896, m. July 4, 1861, 
Hannah P., dau. Stephen and Hannah Gage of Amherst. She was b. 
1838, res. Goffstown. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. George N., b. Dec. 2, 1862, m. Addie S. Grant of Goffstown, 
April 28, 1891, who d. April 30, 1897, m. (2) Nov. 28, 1900, Carrie A. 
Richards ; carpenter, res. Goffstown ; one ch., Ruth E., b. Nov. 16, 1892. 

2. William P., b. Sept. 1, 1867, m. Nov. 6, 1885, Edith Richards of 
New Boston ; two ch., Ethel and Geo. R., res. Merrimack. 

3. Bertha S., b. Dec. 13, 1868, m. Jan., 1885, Truman Parker, res. 
Lowell, Mass. 

4. Marv J., b. June 10, 1876. m. Dec. 31, 1896, James E. Venio ; one 
ch., Arthur E., b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 23, 1897, res. South Weare, N. H. 

MILLS. 

Capt. John Mills, the first of the family of six generations to the 
present day, was b. in Scotland. He is first found in Amherst, N. H., 
where he was married and settled in the Northwest Parish (now Mont 
Vernon). He is mentioned twelve times in Secombe's History of Am- 
herst, and several times subsequently in petitions to prevent the settle- 
ment of a minister at Amherst Plain, insomuch as the Northwest Parish 
was without a Christian Church. On page 209 John Mills is mentioned 
as giving one shilling, four pence toward defraying the expenses of a 



114 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

delegate to the first Provincial Congress at Exeter. John Mills served 
in Col. John Hart's Co. at Crown Point in 1758, and in Col. John Goffe's 
Co. at Crown Point in 1760 in the French and Indian War. He was 
sergeant in Col. Reed's Regt., Capt. Crosby's Co. at Bunker Hill, was 
Second Lieut, in Col. T. Bedell's Regt. Dec, 1775. Joined army in New 
York to march northward to Canada, surrendered by Maj. Butterfield 
to the British and Indians at "The Cedars," was stripped and ran the 
gauntlet; May 19, 1776, exchanged and went to Crown Point. John 
Mills was First Lieut, in Col. Stark's Regt., Col. John Bradford's Co., 
at Battle of Bennington, was first company to attack. He went to Rhode 
Island in 1778 under Col. Nichols and Col. Josiah Crosby. 

In autumn of 1781, Capt. John Mills led a company to Charlestown, 
N. H., to protect our frontier. The fighting done, Capt. John went to 
Winham, Vt., a place with which he was well pleased, having passed 
through it in his army marches, and settled with his family there for the 
rest of his life, dying in 1812, living there less than eight years. 

He came to Mont Vernon prior to the Revolution, and made a home- 
stead on the farm afterwards known as the Cloutman place, now occupied 
by Hon. Charles J. Smith. He lived here until about 1804, as there 
is no record of his living elsewhere. He was an active and prominent 
citizen of the then Northwest Parish. He m. Keziah Lyon about 1765. 
She d. in Windham, Vt., in 1824. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Abigail, b. Aug. 1, 1766. m. Witherspoon, removed to 

Maine, where she d. 

2. *Ebenezer, b. April 23, 1770. 

3. *John, b. April 24, 1772. 

4. Keziah, b. June 11, 1774, m. Jonathan Sherwin, moved to Land- 
grove, Vt., and d. there. 

5. Betsey, m. John Dudley, they removed to Windham, Vt. She 
afterward removed to Canada with her son and d. there. 

Ebenezer Mills, son Capt. John and Keziah (Lyon) Mills, b. Mont 
Vernon, April 23, 1770, m. Hannah W., dau. Ezekiel and Hannah 
(Washer) Upton of Mont Vernon, left his family with his son, Ebenezer. 
Jr., 20 years of age, went to Bellows Falls, Vt., to work. While there 
he 'enlisted in the War of 1812 from Rockingham, Vt. He d. in the army 
at Burlington, Vt., in 1812. His wife d. in Milford, Sept. 20, 1856, aged 
83 years. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. *Ebenezer. 

2. Abigail, m. Daniel Bullard of Hyde Park, Vt.. had two boys and 
three girls, and d. Hyde Park. 

3. Annie or Rosanna, m. John Bullard, lived m Mont Vernon, three 
ch , Abbie, Edward and John. 

4. *Ezekial, b. Feb. 23, 1800. 

5. Hannah, m. Dennis Holden of Milford. She d. Dec. 6, 1870. 
age 68 years, 5 months; six ch. 

6. Lavina, b. Dec. 3, 1805, d. April 6, 1889, m. *Asa Wetherbee of 
Mont Vernon, May 1, 1824. Ch. 

7 Salome, b. April 27, 1807, m. Gary W. Ober of Hyde Park, Vt, 
d. Sept. 14, 1883. He d. Sept. 2, 1857. Ch. 

1 Hannah, m. James Hunt, has two ch. lives Montana. 

2. Emily, m. Geo. V. Tarleton, two ch., son Geo., res. Nashua. 

3. Harriet, d. at 18. 

4. Everett, m. Emma McCauley of New Boston, d. Suncook, one 

dau., Etta. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 115 

5. Jennie D., b. Aug. 6, 1840, m. Kneeland C. White, res. Mont 
Vernon. 

6. Helen L., b. July 25, 1842, m. (1) John Whipple of New Boston; 
m. (2) William Stevens of Mont Vernon, res. Mont Vernon. 

7. Alma J., m. Charles Spencer of Pittsford, Vt, d. Milford ; one 
dau., Mabel A., lived Mont Vernon ; 14 years teacher. 

8. John, b. Feb. 2, 1810, m. (1) Sarah Putnam, dau. Aaron K. Put- 
nam of Wilton, 1835, lived in Wilton, came to Milford and engaged in 
boot and shoe manufacture till 1863, when he engaged in coopering and 
farming. Was a zealous antislavery man and Unitarian. His wife d. 
1855. By her he had one dau., Sarah, who m. Hon. Charles H. Burns 
of Wilton, and two sons. He m. (2) 1858, Alvina Davis of Temple, by 
whom he had three sons and one dau. He d. March, 1892. 

9. Aaron, b. April, 1812, m. Almira Bullard of Brookline, lived in 
Milford, was a boot manufacturer, farmer and cooper. He d. Aug. 5, 
1893. His wife d. July 24, 1892. Six ch., only one living now (1903), 
Mrs. Geo. V. Tarleton. 

John Mills, son Capt. John and Keziah (Lyon) Mills, b. Mont Ver- 
non, April 24, 1772, m. Ednah Wilkins. He went to Nova Scotia to work 
upon a church, received his pay and started for home, which he never 
reached, was presumably murdered for his money. The story handed 
down is that a body was found in the vicinity of Lowell, thought to b<^ 
that of John Mills. Ch. were: 

1. Polly, b. Jan. 16, 1793. 

2. Hezekiah, b. Dec. 15, 1795. 

Ebenezer Mills. Jr., son of Ebenezer and Hannah W. (Upton) Mill*, 
b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 4, 1792, enlisted from Rockingham, Vt., War of 
1812, m. (1) Lovia P. Holden of Brookline, N. H., lived in Grafton, Vt., 
where nine ch. were born. She d. June, 1829. He then lived in Herki- 
mer, N. Y., coming to Milford in 1844, where he worked at his trade as 
a carpenter the rest of his days. He m. (2) Jan. 10, 1830, Fanny Park 
of Grafton, Vt., had three sons by this wife. She d. in Milford, Aug. 8, 
1864, aged 66 years. 8 months. Ch. bv first wife b. Grafton, Vt., all but 
oldest: 

1. Alphonse T„ b. Weston, Vt., July 9, 1816, d. June 5, 1818. 

2. "Ebenezer U., b. Grafton, Feb. 23, 1818, lived in Boston, Mass., 
from boyhood, m. Sarah Stevens in 1844. who d. 18S3. He d. June 12, 
1882; one ch. 

3. Maria A., b. Feb. 15, 1819, m. Lucius W. Woodard of Stratton, 
Vt, d. Manhattan, Kan., Dec. 25, 1891; had four ch. 

4. Hannah, b. Oct. 16, 1820, m. John Mclntire of Waterboro, Me., 
about 1844. She lived in Wilton and Boston, where she d. April 10, 
1849 ; four ch. 

5. John Frank, b. June 22, 1822. Went to Boston, was hotel-keeper, 
was proprietor of the Parker House from 1872 to 1876. He d. April 9, 
1876. Wife d. Feb., 1864; eight ch. 

6. Zenophon E., b. Oct. 18, 1823. Went to Milford, N. H., m. Har- 
riet Russell Melzer of Milford, employed in J. & A. Mills shoe factory, 
was a quarryman, served three years as private in Co. C, 8th N. H. Regt., 
N. H. Volunteers; four ch. 

7. Marion R, b. June 25, 1825, d. June 9, 1829. 

8. Corydon S., b. Nov. 10, 1826, followed the sea for nine years on 
a whaler, went to the California gold mines about 1850, m. and was 



116 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

killed Jan. 22, 1858, by a Uba mountain sliding. 

9. Loisa, b. Jan. 2, 1829, d. March 5, 1832. 
Ch. by second wife b. Grafton. 

10. John Avery, b. Dec. 14, 1830, m. Emma Wheeler. Had one son 
Edgar, who d. young. Was mill owner in Nashua and Manchester, and 
shoe dealer in Penacook, Medford, Mass., and Milford, where he d. June 
20, 1899. One adopted dau., Harriet. 

11. George Edgar, b. Oct. 27, 1833, followed sea seven years, lives 
Medford, Mass., m. Frances, dau. James and Mary J. (Patch) Hopkins 
of Mont Vernon ; four ch. 

12. Henry Martin, b. Dec. 28, 1837, Lieut, in Co. C, Second N. H. 
Regt. Vol., in Civil War, m. Nellie Jewett of Nashua, lived in Nashua 
and Lowell ; one son. 

Ezekiel Mills, son of Ebenezer, Jr., and Hannah W. (Upton) Mills, 
b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 23, 1800, m. Betsey Holt of Lyndeboro, lived in 
Windham, Vt, and in Milford, was Milfcrd tax collector 12 years, clerk 
in store and kept boarding house. His wife d. Jan. 3, 1869. He d. June 
18, 1881, Milford. Had two dau., Sarah R., m. Charles Buxton. 

MITCHELL. 

Joshua Mitchell, m. April 30, 1818, Alehitable Codman, dau. Thomas 
and Tabitha (Wilkins) Gilmore of Mont Vernon. They lived where A. 
W. Bragg does. He was a mechanic and moved to Woodstock, Vt., where 
they d. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Sarah Mehitable, b. Jan. 24, 1819. 

2. Thomas Gilmore, b. Nov. 19, 1820, a graduate of Dartmouth Col- 
lege, was a Congregational clergyman in Maine. 

NICHOLS. 

Jacob Nichols, son of Ensign S. and Sarah (Dinsmore) Nichols, b. 
Londonderry, June 23, 1822. Mr. Nichols came to Mont Vernon about 
1859 lived on the Reillv place on the turnpike, then on the old poor farm 
From 1867 to 1871 he lived on the farm in the South Dist., now owned 
by Daniel Richardson, then in the village where A W Bragg, now lives. 
He is a farmer, was formerly a merchant. Married (1) Sept., 1847, Ara- 
hella E Y dau of Henrv Demeritt, b. in Boston, Mass., Feb. 22, 1822, 
and d. 'in Mont Vernon, -March, 1870; m (2) Sept 24, 1872 .Georgia 
E Hall widow of James Hall and dau. of Gn*m and Elizabeth (Stevens) 
Wilson,' b. in Nelson, Aug. 4, 1842, and d. in Milford, July 6, 1900. Ch. 

1 Fannie Arabella, b. in Manchester, Feb. 21, 1850, m. March l 22. 
1877 'Ellis H Williams of Easton, Mass., and res. in Hyd e> Park, Mass. 

2 Henrv James, b. in Manchester, Jan. 7. 1854. is assistant cashier 
in Souhegan National Bank and res. in Milford; m. June 13, 1883 Nellie 
M Newm-m, widow of Henry A. Newman ?nd dau. of George A. and 
Diana (Woods) Graves of CambrHgenort. Ma«s. 

3 Carrie Maud, b. in Mil'ord, May 22 1874, m. June s 28, 1891, Clar- 
ence A., s-n of John A. and Ella (Richards) Lovejry of Milford; ret. in 
Concord Junction, Mass. 

NEWMAN. 
Moses Newman lived on James Reilly place, northeast of where Chas. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 117 

H. Trow now lives, in North Dist. He d. March 22, 1846, aged 70. His first 
wife, Polly, d. Aug. 21, 1825, age 40. His second wife, Abigail R., d. 
May 12, 1860, aged 77 years, 3 months. She was originally Abigail 
Haseltine (sister John Haseltine) of Amherst. She m. (1) Lt. John 
Weston, Sent. 27, 1802. He was killed by the falling of a mill-stone in 
1810. She had five ch. by Lt. Weston. She m. Moses Newman, Jan. 
31, 1826. 

NUTTER. 

Benjamin Nutter, son of John and Hannah (Dennett) Nutter, b. 
Barnstead, N. H., came to Mont Vernon in the thirties, engaged in the 
business of manufacturing organs. He removed to Belleville, Canada. 
He m. Sarah, dan. Benjamin Nathan and Sarah ( Bancroft) Jones. Ch b. 
Mont Vernon. 

1. George, m., not living lived in Belleville Canada. 

2. Charles, m., lives Toronto, Canada. 

3. Annette, m. Booth, lived in Belleville, Canada, not living. 

John D. Nutter, son of John and Hannah (Dennett) Nutter, b. Barn- 
stead, N. H., 1811. He learned the trade of a cabinet maker in Rochester, 
N.-H., and after attaining his majority came to Mont Vernon, where his 
elder brother, Benjamin Nutter had settled and engaged in the business 
of manufacturing organs for nearly ten years. In 1844 he removed to 
Nashua and here pursued the same industry some four years, returning 
to Mont Vernon in 184S and remaining until 1853, when he went to Attica, 
Ind., and engaged in a banking business. In 1855 he sold out his busi- 
ness and returned to New Hampshire and for one or two years was a 
merchant at Nashua, removing thence to Montreal, where he resided 
some 31 years, extensively engaged in the lumber business. In 1888 he 
removed to Maiden, Mass., where he d. Jan. 19, 1890, age 78 years. 
Aug. 8, 1844, he m. Harriet A., dau. Asa and Mary A. (Appleton) Stevens 
of Mont Vernon. She was b. Mont Vernon, May 22, 1821; res. Montreal. 

1. John Appleton. b. Nashua. July 18, 1846, m. Katherine Howard of 
Hardwick, Mass., has five ch.. res. Montreal. 

2. Asa, b. Mont Vernon, d. unm. at 33 yrs. of age. 

3. Dr. William D., b. Montreal, m. Charlotte Bartlett of Maiden, 
res. Maiden, Mass., physician ; one dau. 

O'BRIEN. 

John O'Brien, son of Patrick and Mary (Magner) O'BrK'n, born in 
Limerick, Ireland, in 1837. Was a farmer. Lned here about 15 years, on 
the Purgatory Road, in a house now burnt down. He removed to Mil- 
ford in 1870* where he d., June 30, 1889. Married Catherine, dau. of 
James and Margaret (Fox) Ryan, b. in Country Cork, Ireland. Ch. 

1. James F., b. Mont Vernon, Nov. 15. 1856, d. here Dec, 1865. 

2. Thomas C, b. Mont Vernon, Aug., 1859, d. here Dec, 1861. 

3. John P., b. Mont Vernon in 1860, d. here Jan., 1862. 

4. Joseph T. b. Mont Vernon, July, 1862, res. Milford; is a farmer; 
m. Nov. 18, 1896, Mary A., dau. of Jeremiah and Anistatia (Splain) 
Calnan.of Woburn, Mass. 

5. George N., b. Mont Vernon, May 15, 1867, d. Milford, April 4, 
1881. 

6. Mary F., b. Milford, Jan. 10, 1872. 



118 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

ODELL. 

William Odell was a resident of Souhegan West as early as 1759. 
Lived on the farm owned by John Hazen, in West District, d. March, 
1812, age 85. He m. Phebe Routelle. She d. Jan. 24, 1817, age 85. Ch. 
were : 

1. Phebe, b. 1750, m. David Duncklee. She d. Jan. 6, 1839. 

2. * William. 1). 1752. 

3. Martha, b. Aug. 6, 1754, m. John Lovejoy about 1775. 

4. Ebenezer, b. May 22, 1756, m. Sarah Johnson, May 29, 1782. 

5. John, b. Dec. 4, 1761, m. Edith Nourse, d. Nov. 5, 1844; nine ch. 

William Odell, Jr., son of William and Phebe (Boutelle) Odell of 
Amherst, b. 1752, d. Aug. 26, 1829, m. Susannah, dan. Capt Hezekiah and 
Hannah (Phelps) Lovejoy of Amherst. She was b. July 25, 1756, d. 
March 17, 1831. Lived on his father's farm. Ch. 

1. Susannah, b. Nov. 9, 1774, d. unra. Sept. 28, 1813. 

2. William, b. Feb. 23, 1777, d. Nov. 7, 1850; had three ch. 

3. Hannah, b. Aug. 9, 1779, d. Feb. 11, 1781. 

4. Hannah, b. May 23, 1783, d. Jan. 5, 1830. 

5. *Luther, b. Sept. 9, 1785. 

6. Betsev, b. Sept. 28, 1787, m. Jacob Hildrcth, Jr., of Amherst, 
Mav 15. 1807, d. Aug. 27. 1850; five ch. 

"7. Polly, b. Oct. i::. 1789. m. Henry Howard in 1809, d. Nov. 6, 1875; 
had 12 ch. 

Luther Odell, son William, Jr., and Susannah (Lovejoy) Odell, b. 
Amherst, Sept. 9, 1785, lived on the farm now owned by John Hazen in 
West District, d. there July 6, 1862. He m. March 16. 1806, Betsey, dau. 
Amos and Keturah (Stewart) Green. She was b. Amherst, Oct. 15, 1783, 
d. Mont Vernon, Dec. 18, 1868. Ch. b. 

1. Charles, b. Amherst, June 5, 1806, m. Maria J. Roberts of Wake- 
field, N. H., June 24, is:;4, d. Biddeford, Me.; had eight ch. 

2. * William, b. Amherst, July 13, 1808. 

3. *Luther, b. Amherst, Julv 18. 1816. 

4. Orinda Felton, b. Amherst, Feb. 19. 1819; m. (1) Josiah Upton, 
Jan. 2, 1842; m. (2) Jan. 10, 1849, *Capt William Osborn Lamson. She 
d. Nov. 24, 1874. 

5. Susan, b. Goffstown, July 16, 18.21, m. Nov. 15, 1845, Francis 
Brown of Lowell ; had two ch., a son and dau. 

6. Harriet, b: May 21, 1827, at Mont Vernon, m. Dec. 23, 1848, George 
Jones of Durham, N. II.; three ch. 

William Odell, b. Amherst. July 13, 1808, son of Luther and B. 
(Green) Odell, lived on his father's farm in Mont Vernon, moved to 
Petrosky, Mich., where he d., Jan. 10. 1884; m. Mary Ann Kingsbmy »f 
Dedham, Mass. She d. Mont Vernon, July 5, 1877, aged 59 yrs., 4 mos. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Mary, b. Jan. 13, 1838, d. Jan. 15, 1838. 

2. William, b. Dec. 1, 1842, d. same day. 

3. Luther, b. 1844. m. Mrs. Green of Vermont, lives Petrosky, Mich. 

Luther Odell, son of Luther and Betsey (Green) Odell, b. Amherst, 
July 18, 1816. Lived in Mont Vernon, Lyndeboro, Bennington and Han 
cock, where he d. Feb. 13, 1887. He was a carpenter and built the body 
of the house in Mont Vernon Village, now occupied as a summer resi- 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 119 

dence by John F. Colby, m. March 21, 1844, Susan, dau. Jotham and Ruth 
(Cloutman) Richardson. 

1. Susan Annette, b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 12, 1845, d. Lyndeboro, Dec. 
24, 1859. 

2. William Haskell, b. Mont Vernon, April 22, 1848, m Josie S. 
Kimball of Bennington, Dec. 7, 1875, lives Bennington; ch. : (1) Fred 
Wilton, b. March 11, 1877; (2) Ethel May, b. Dec. 24, 1882. 

3. Hattie Elizabeth, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 11, 1848. d. Wilton, Aug. 
15, 1864. 

Ebenezer Odell, Sr., d. 1824, age 75. 

Ebenezer Odell, Jr., m. Esther Langdell, June 5, 1807. 

ORDWAY. 

Daniel Ordway, b. Pelham, N. H., April 5, 1813, m. Nancy B., dau. 
Ezra and Rebecca (Langdell) Langdell. She was b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 
28. 1812. d. She res. Francestown. He came to xl m V-rnon rrh -e 
one-half of the farm now occupied by George F. Tarbell, and lived there 
until 1859, when he purchased a farm in the east part of Francestown, 
where he resided until his death, April 19, 1900. He was a pious man 
and much respected. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Nancy. 

2. Frances Rebecca. 

3. Henrietta. 

PARKER. 

Lieut. Robert Parker and wife, Penelope, both from Andover, Mass., 
settled in the extreme south part of the town, where Charles H. Ray- 
mond did live, before the Revolution. He d. Mont Vernon, April, 1805, 
age 73. Ch. 

1. William, b. April 26, 1757, Revolutionary soldier 

2. *Robert, b. Sept. 3, 1759. 

3. Rachel, b. Oct. 19, 1761. 

4. Deborah, b. May 3, 1764. 

5. *Benjamin, b. March 18, 1766 

6. Penelope, b. July 23, 1768. 

Robert Parker, son of Robert and Penelope Parker, b. Sept. 3, 1759, 
m. Sept. 11, 1783, Rebecca, dau. Dea. Oliver and Amy (Washer) Carle- 
ton of Mont Vernon. She was b. Jan. 21, 1764. They moved to Barre, Vt„ 
from Mont Vernon in 1805 and d. there. He was a Revolutionary soldier. 
Ch. all probably b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Robert, m. Fanny Batchelder, dau. Ebenezer and Elizabeth T. S. 
Batchelder, Mav 29, 1806. She was b. July 8, 1785, moved to Landgrove, 
Vt. 

2. Stephen lived in Newport, N. H., was a highly respected and 
prominent citizen, was Representative from that town. 

3. Oliver. 

4. Carlton, settled in Andover, Mass., m. a Miss Abbott, left five 
ch. viz : Carlton, George H., Charles S., Mary and Martha. 

5. George. 

6. John. 

7. Enoch. 



120 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

The daughters : 

8. Mary (Mrs. Damon of Pembroke Mass.). 

9. Lucy (Mrs. Hewitt of Barre, Vt). 

10. Hannah (Mrs. Davis of Barre, Vt.) 

11. Emma, unm. 

12. Sarah, lived Brewer, Me 

Capt. Benjamin Parker, son Robert and Penelope Parker, b. Mont 
Vernon, March 18, 1766, d. Jan., 1826; m. Oct. 10, 1794, Betsey, dau. 
Joseph and Patience (Bradford) Lovejoy of Mont Vernon. She d. Am- 
herst, Sept. 25, 1859, was b. in 1772. Ch. 

1. Nancy, m. Moses B. Stewart of Amherst, May, 1825, d. Bluffville, 
111., Sept., 1855, aged 59 years, 4 months. 

2. Joseph, d. Dec. 26, 1823, aged 19. 

3. Arethusa, d. Sept., 1830, age 25. 

4. Thomas J., d. March 21, 1837, age 30, m. 

5. Lucretia, d. April. 1834, aged 18. 

6. Samuel, went West. 

Caesar Parker (of colored blood) was from Weare, lived in a small 
house in the South part of the town several years, m. Margaret Spear of 
Weare. She d. Feb. 24, 1854, age 85 yrs. ; had several ch. He d. 1855, age 
99 yrs. 

Nathaniel, b. 1802, went to live with David McCauley of Antrim in 
1809, became a respected citizen of the town, d. there unm. 

Humphrev Moore, d. June 28, 1861, age 53 years and 9 months 

Mark. 

Ross. 

There were two dau., one m. a Baptist clergyman of Newport, R. I. 

James, d. Dec. 4, 1839, age 27. 

Granville Parker came from Nelson, lived on the Joseph H. Tarbell 
farm and on farm now owned by Estate of E. C. Flanders, southeast of 
the village. He moved to Deering. He m. Elizabeth, dau. Elisha and 
Betsey (Temple) Swinnington of Mont Vernon. She d. 

Ira A., m. Harriet, dau. John J. and Sarah (Hopkins) Carson. She 
& June 26, 1881, age 28. He m (2) Miss Case; lives Deering. 

Elbridge Parker, b. New Boston, March 27. 1815, son of William and 
Martha (Fox) Parker, m. Nov., 1844. Hannah Elizabeth Fillebrown, b. 
Lexington, Mass., July 29, 1819, d. Mont Vernon, March 11, 1898. They 
lived three years in Mass., then bought the John Fairfield farm in New 
Boston and lived there until 1885, when they moved to Mont Vernon. He 
d. June 12, 1886. 

1. Henry Herbert, b. March 12, 1846, d. unm. May, 1871. 

2. Mary Frances, b. New Boston, May 27, 1851, m. Nov. 3, 1875, 
♦George N. Foster of Mont Vernon, who d. May 12, 1881. She d. Mont 
Vernon, Oct. 22, 1892; one dau., Annie P. Foster, b. Nov. 17, 1880. 

3. Charles A., b. Sept. 6, 1856, in New Boston ; lives Arlington, Mass., 
unm. 

4. Lizzie R., b. New Boston, Nov. 9, 1861, lives Mont Vernon, unm. 

PEABODY. 

r 

Col. Stephen Peabody, son of William and Rebecca (Smith) Peabody, 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 121 

b. Sept. 3, 1742, m. Hannah, dan. of Thomas and Hannah ( Goffe) Chan- 
dler of Bedford, in 1763. She d. in Montpelier, Vt, Aug., 1826, age 79 
years. He was Adjutant of Col. Reed's Regiment in the Battle of Bunker 
Hill, aid to Gen. Stark at Bennington and Lieutenant-Colonel commanding 
a battalion sent to Rhode Island in 1778. The cellar of his large mansion 
on Purgatory Hill, one mile and one-half west of Mont Vernon Village 
can still be seen. He d. Sept. 19, 1780. Inscription on his tombstone in 
Mont Vernon Cemetery : 

"In memory of Col. Stephen Peabodv who, after he had displayed 
his martial abilities in the service of his country d. at home, 1782, age 38. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Thomas, b. Feb. 15, 1764, m. (1) Sarah Perkins, March 10, 1785; 
m. (2) Mrs. Bird, a sister of Gen. James Miller. He settled in Vermont. 
Near the close of the war for Independence he was surgeon in a regiment 
commanded by Col. Evans. 

2. Dr. John, b. May 17, 1766, m. Keziah Hubbard, located Salem. Mass., 
had three ch. 

3. Hannah, b. July 2, 1768, m. *Enoch Carleton of Amherst; had 
four ch. 

4. Rebecca, b. July 17, 1770. She was a physician and surgeon, m. 
Gen. Perley Davis of Montpelier, Vt., Nov. 4, 1704, d. in East Montpelier, 
Feb. 5, 1853. 

5. Stephen, b. Aug. 23, 1772, m. Martha, dau. Joseph and Martha 
(Dodge) Trow of Mont Vernon, Dec. 6, 1795. She was b. March 13, 
1772. He was a physician in Orange, Vt. 

6. Asenath, b. July 25, 1774, d. March 15, 1777. 

7. Sarah, b. Dec. 2, 1776, d. suddenly on the day appointed for her 
marriage. 

8. Asenath, b. Dec. 14, 1779, m. Lewis Parker of Cambridge. Vt., d. 
March, 1846. 

Samuel Peabody, son of Moses and Sarah (Holt) Peabodv, b. Sept. 
1, 1741, d. Mont Vernon, Aug. 6, 1814, m. Elizabeth, dau. Joseph Wilkins 
of Amherst. They settled in Andover, Mass., removed to Mont Vernon, 
1785. 

1. *Moses. 

2. Samuel, m. Huldah Stiles, June 11, 1790, d. June, 1825. 

3. John, m. Holt. 

4. Joseph, b. Oct. 3, 1770 d. Nov. 1, 1853, m. (l) Olive Berry, Sept. 
4, 1800; m. (2) Anna Flint, Oct. 22. 1805. They settled in Middletown, 
Mass.. where he was deacon in the church several years ; had seven ch. 

5. Sarah, m. Damon, settled in Marshfield, Vt. 

6. Aaron, m. Edith Wilkins, d. in Mont Vernon, 1854, age 82. She 
d. 1863, aged 82. No ch. 

7. Jacob, m. Sally Wilkins. They settled in Milford. Had a son, 
Horace, b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 28, 1814, lived in Milford. 

8. Joel, b. 1778, m. Elizabeth Wilkins, settled Middletown. Mass.; 
five ch. 

Moses Peabody, son Samuel and Elizabeth (Wilkins) Peabody, d. in 
Mont Vernon, Nov. 4, 1842, m. May 25, 1786, Sarah, dau. Ebenezer and 
Lydia (Peabody) Holt. She was b. in 1757, d. Mont Vernon, May 25, 
1845. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Moses, m. Mary Marvell. He d. in the army at Burlington. Vt., 
in May, 1813. 



122 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

2. Lydia H., m. *Azel W. Burnham, 1818. 
Ch. Moses and Sarah H. Peabody: 

1. Keziah, m. Nahum Bullard, 1830. 

2. Mary Ann, b. July 2, 1812, m. April 19, 1830, Joshua F. Skinner 
of Amherst, lived Amherst, four ch., a dau. d. in infancy. 

PERKINS. 

John Perkins, the emigrant ancestor of the Mont Vernon Perkinses, 
was born in Newent, Gloucester, England, in 1590, sailed from Bristol, 
England, for Boston, Dec. 1, 1630. Rev. Roger Williams was a fellow 
passenger. Perkins had with him his family, consisting then of wife and 
five children. Landed in Boston. Lived there about two years, where 
another ch., Lydia, was born. Removed to Ipswich in 1633, became an ex- 
tensive land owner in Ipswich, appears to have been one of the leading 
men. Deputy to the General Court in 1636, d. 1654, age 64. His ch. 
named in his will were John, Thomas, Mrs. Eliabeth Sargent, Mrs. Mary 
Bradbury. Mrs. Lydia Bennett, Jacob Perkins. His wife, Judith Perkins, 
to execute will. 

Joseph Perkins (fifth generation from the first John Perkins, 1; 
Jacob, 2; John, 3; Thomas, 4; Joseph, 5:). son of Thomas and Elizabeth 
(Fowler) Perkins, b. Sept. 15. 1735, m. Emma Dodge of Beverly, May 12, 
1761. They resided in Beverly some years after their marriage. He was 
a tailor by trade. Probably came to Mont Vernon in 1776, not 1773, as 
Lydia, the youngest of his four daughters, was baptized in Beverly, Dec. 
10", 1775. He d. Mont Vernon, Dec, 1823. 

His third dau., Betsey, m. *Joseph Trow of Mont Vernon. She d. 
Aug. 22. 1851, age 83. His son, Capt. Joseph Perkins, Jr., b. Beverly, 
Mass., Feb. 6, 1761, d. Mont Vernon, Nov. 22, 1822, came to Mont Vernon 
with his parents when a lad. July 3, 1779, at 18, he enlisted in the army 
and served one year. While in the service he was on a privateer vessel, 
which was taken by the British and the crew was taken to England and 
confined in what was called the Mill Prison. While in prison he worked 
at his trade of tailoring, in which way he contrived to get some money, 
which made his lot more tolerable than that of many others. Tradition 
says that when he secured a guinea he would cover it with cloth and sew 
it on his coat for a button. M. Hannah, third dau. of James and Hannah 
(Trask) Woodbury. She was b. Oct. 5, 1766, d. April 15, 1856. He d. 
Nov. 22. 1822. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Hannah, b. Aug. 10, 1783, m. Levi Ray. Jan. 19, 1804. 

2. *Mark Dodge, b. June 5. 1785. 

.".. John Trask, b. Dec. 7. 1787, d. Mont Vernon, Jan. 16. 1859. una 

4. Lucretia, b. March 6, 1790. m. Jesse Woodbury of Weare. d. 1873. 

5. Joseph, b. March 13, 1794. d. Aug. 19. 1797. 

6. *Joseph, b. April 18. 1796. 

7. James Woodbury, b. March 6. 1797, d. March. 1802. 

8. *James Woodbury, b. April 17, 1798. m. Fanny Cochran of Ne\< 
Boston, dau. John Cochran, Esq., d. New Chester, Wis.. March 30, 1874. 

9. Sarah, b. April 20, 1S00, m. March 22, 1825, *Joseph Trow, d. 
July 31. is:i7 : six ch. 

10. *Hiram, b. May 16, 1802. 

11. Solomon, b. March 2, 1804, d. March 19. 1804. 

12. Catherine, b. Sept. 15, 1805, m. May 4. 1826, Elijah Putnam, Jr., 
of Amherst: two ch. She d. March 18. 1884. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNOX. 123 

13. *Elbridge Fisk, b. Sept. 9, 1811. 

Mark Dodge Perkins, son of Capt. Joseph and Hannah (Woodbury) 
Perkins, b. Mont Vernon, June 5, 1785, lived for many years in the house 
now burnt, which stood below A. W. Bragg's. Was Deputy Sheriff many 
years; m. (1) Feb., 1809, Mahala, dau. Peter and Betsey (Woodbury) 
Jones. She was b. 1788, d. June 24, 1843. He m. (2) Cynthia Johnson 
in 1842. She d. Feb. 19, 1867, aged 69. He d. Mont Vernon, July 22, 
1881. Ch. by first wife b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Betsey J., m. her second cousin, *Charles R. Beard, in 1829. She 
d. Dec. 26, 1850, aged 40 yrs. 

2. Abigail F., m. Au<r. 10. 1836, Zephaniah Hutchinson of Milford; 
had two ch. She d. Milford, April 20, 1848, aged 37. 

3. Maria, m. Bradbury. 

4. Hannah, m. Luke Beard, brother of Chas. R. Beard ; four ch. 
viz; Albert, Horace, Emily, Luke. They lived in Wilton. 

5. Peter J., d. unm. Aug. 10, 1843, aged 23. 

6. Harriet N., d. Aug. 30, 1828, age 5. 

7. Mahala, d. Aug. 23, 1828, aged 1 yr., 4 mos. 

8. Emily L„ m. *J. H. A. Bruce. She d. June 19, 1860. aged 2« 
yrs., 9 mos. 

■ 

Joseph Perkins, son of Capt. Joseph and Hannah (Woodbury) Per- 
kins, b. Mont Vernon, April 18, 1796, owned and occupied the Perkins 
farm in the North District; m. (l) Sally, dau. of Daniel and Granddau. 
of Dea. Daniel Smith. She d. June 4, 1830, age 32. He m. (2) Susanna 
B. Locke of Woburn, Mass. She was b. November 15, 1803, d. Mont 
Vernon, May 10. 1867. He d. Oct. 21, 1877. Ch. all b. Mont Vernon. 

Ch. by first wife : 

1. Hannah, b. April 24, 1816, m. *Trask W. Averill, April 9, 1835; 
eight ch. She d. May 2, 1849. 

2. James Woodburv, b. May 9, 1818, m. (1) Frances S. Bryant, 
July 9, 1837. She d. Nov. 3, 1855, age 39. He m. (2) Mrs. Jane Loveren. 
She d. Jan.. 1873. He was a tin pedlar, lived in Amherst and Lowell, d. 
Lowell, Nov. 6, 1887. 

3. *Daniel Smith, b. Sept. 22, 1821, m. (1) Tan. 28. 1*42, Emeline 
F. Crosby. She d. July 18, 1868, age 45. 

By second wife : 

4. Joseph Elbridge, b. July 24, 1835, farmer, lived on his father's 
farm, m. April 6, 1S62, Eleanor, dau. Jesse and Eleanor ( Morgan) Man- 
ning. She was b. in Billerica, Dec. 13, 1841, cl. June 29, 1902. He d. 
March 15. 1897; no ch. She m. after his death J. Henry Smith 

5. *John Trask, b. June 28, 1839. 

Dr. James Woodbury Perkins, son of Capt. Joseph and Hannah 
(Woodbury) Perkins, b. Mont Vernon, April 17, 1798. was installed as 
minister in Warner, N. H., March 4, 1840, dismissed in 1846. Fred Myron 
Colby, in his sketch of Warner in History of Merrimack Co., character- 
izes him as having been an earnest, laborious and efficient pastor. He 
commenced his labors in Nook sett, Feb., 1846, was at Alstead, commenced 
preaching in Hillsboro in 1852 and at Deering in 1854, and finally left on 
account of ill health : was also a physician ; m. Fanny, dau. John Cochran, 
Esq., and Frances (Gove) Cochran of New Boston. He d. New Chester, 
Wis., March 30, 1874. A son, Charles, went West, established a paper 
and lived in New Chester, Wis., where his father died. 



124 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Hiram Perkins, son of Capt. Joseph and Hannah (Woodbury) Per- 
kins, b. Mont Vernon, May 16, 1802, owned and occupied the Lt. James 
Woodbury farm in the village many years (now owned by Estate of Dr. 
C. M. Kittredge. He m. Feb. 23, 1837, Servian, dau. Capt. William and 
Serviah (Jones) Lamson. She was b. Alont Vernon, Jan. 15, 1815, d. 
March 1, 1871. He d. Nov. 13, 1880. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Ann Augusta, b. Jan. 15, 1838, m. Nov. 27, 1862, *Clark Campbell. 
She d. Aug. 16, 1900. 

2. Mary F. B., b. Sept. 23, 1839, m. Feb. 15, 1S66, Charles A. Hutch- 
inson, lived Hilton Head, S. C, and at Jacksonville, Fla., where they 
both d. March 25, 1872. Ch., Chas. Everett, b. Hilton Head, S. C, Nov. 
27, 1866, m., lives in Cal ;. two ch. ; George M., b. Nov. 10, 1869, m. ; one 
ch. ; lives in Cal. 

3. Harriet Ida, b. Aug. 21, 1842, m. George W. Miller, Jan. 13, 1868, 
d. at Providence, R. I.. March 1, 1869 ; one ch., Ada P., b. Providence, 
R. I., Feb. 14, 1869. 

4. Hiram Osborn, b. July 16. 1844, d. July 11, 1862. 

5. Elbridge Weston, b. Oct. 2, 1846, d. Oct. 3, 1847. 

Elbridge Fisk Perkins, son of Capt. Joseph Perkins, Jr.. and Hannah 
(Woodbury) Perkins, b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 9, 1811, m. (1) Abby, dau. 
Abiel and Emma ( Howard ) Wilkins, Sept. 10, 1830. She d. Oct. 4. 1853. 
Lived in Amherst and Wilton. Was a merchant tailor. He d. July 19, 
1894. He m. ( 2 I Jan. 31. 1854. Mary L., dau. Col. Levi and Sophia 
(Gilmore) Jones of Amherst. She was b. Amherst, June 13, 1821. Ch. 
by second wife b. Wilton : 

1. Levi Woodbury, b. March 26, 1855,' m. Oct. 14. 1880, Lenore C. 
Emerson of Wilton. 

2. Hattie Sophia, b. Nov. 26, 1860. 

John Trask Perkins, son of Joseph and Susanna B. (Locke) Perkins, 
b. Mont Vernon, June 28, 1839, m. April 18, 1860, Laura A., dau. of 
Nathan and Abieail (Weston) Richardson of Mont Vernon. She d. 
Jan. 19. 1873, age 30 years. 11 months. He m. (2) Sept. 14, 1878, Mar- 
garet W. Currier of W-wburyport, Mass., res. Westboro, Mass. He 
served in 13th X. H. Regt. in War of '61-'65. Ch. all by first wife b. 
Mont Vernon : 

1. John Ellsworth, b. June 10, 1862, m. Nov. 3, 1892, Catharine Laws 
at Breckenridge, Col. 

2. Nellie Grace, b. July 21, 1867, m. at Newburyport, Mass.. Feb. 18, 
1892, Albert F. Swaine. 

3. Laura Etta, b. June 26, 1869, m. at Newburyport, Mass., Nov. 14, 
1894, Arthur F. Ingram. 

Daniel Smith Perkins, son of Joseph and Sally (Smith) Perkins, b. 
Mont Vernon, Sept. 22. 1821, m. Jan. 28, 1842, Emeline F, dau. Otis and 
Salome (Whipple) Crosby. She d. July 18, 1868, age 45. He resides 
Campton, N. H. Their ch. buried in Mont Vernon were: 

Joseph, d. 1845, age 4 yrs. 

Charles W., d. age 3 yrs., 6 mos. 

Eva F., d. at 18 mos. 

James W., d. July 24, 1851, age 3 yrs., 3 mos. 

Harriet, d. July 27. 1851, age 17 mos. 

Daniel Otis, d. April 22. 1852, age 6 yrs., 3 mos. 

Harriet E. 

Willis C, d. City of Mexico. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 125 

Edward lives in Mexico, m. Mrs. Spencer of Boston; 10 ch. 

PIKE. 

Peter F. Pike, son (name not known) and Lucy (Foster) Pike, b. 
Dec. 25, 1824, painter, m. Dec. 30, 1847, Nancy E., dau. Benjmain F. and 
Hannah (Smith) Hill. She was b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 6, 1832. He 
served in the 13th N. H. Regt. in the War for the Union. He d. Sept. 
29, 1898. She res. Mont Vernon. Ch. b. Mont Vernon: 

1. Ella M., b. Aug. 20, 1848, m. (1) Edwin N. Gutterson of Amherst, 
June 6, 1867, m. (2) Richard Beach; d. Oct. 2, 1888. 

2. Almus W., b. April 7. 1851, d. April 29, 1865. 

3. Frank L., b. March 12, 1860, m. Nov. 27, 1884, Mary A. Haridon 
of New Boston. They reside in Milford. 

4. Alice B., b. Aug. 10, 1866, d. Jan. 29, 1867. 

5. George W., b. Oct. 30. 1868, m. Feb. 24. 1892, Lura B., dau. Ed- 
ward and Martha (Hardy) Colburn of Hollis. She was b. in Hollis. 
April 6, 1868. They reside in Mont Vernon. 

Ephraim Pike lived on Battle's place in East Dist, before the Battles 
came, was moderator in 1813 and 1815, m. Sept. 10, 1809, Nancy, dau. 
James and Mehitable (Woodbury) Raw She was b. Mont Vernon, March 
24, 1791. 

PINKHAM. 

William F. Pinkham. b. Nashua, March 7. 1854. Has resided in 
Brideport, Ct. Lived here from 1890 to 1896. Now resides in Hyde 
Park. Mass. He is a civil engineer and speculator. He m. Dec. 25, 
1876, Caroline Frances, dau. Charles and Almira L. (Trow-) Forsaith. 
She was b. Oct. 30, 1854. Ch. 

1. Ralph Howard, b. Jan. 16. 1880. 

2. Charles Forsaith, b. July 14, 1881. 

3. Henry Palmer, b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 16, 1894. 

• 

PREBLE. 

Preble, b. Ossipee, N. H., d. Lawrence, 1850. age 51, m. Sally D. 
Barker of Marblehead. They lived here on the place now occupied by 
Charles J. Smith a few years in the forties. She now resides with her 
son Henry, in Lynn. Ch. 

Henry, b. Mont Vernon, 1844, shoe cutter, resides Lynn. 

PRENTISS. 

John Prentiss came from Salem, Mass., to Mont Vernon about 1816. 
He was a most excellent penman. He was a merchant here. Removed 
to Amherst in 1825, where he was cashier of the Farmers' Bank through 
the whole of its existence. He was town clerk there and postmaster 
some years during the time. His wife. Mrs. Azubah Prentis, played the 
organ in the meeting house at Amherst several years. He d. in Clare- 
mont, March 2, 1868, aged 82 years, with his son, John J. Prentiss. Ch. 
were: 

1. Howard. 

2. John J., m. Mary Ann, dau. Hon. Edmund Parker; lawyer, set- 



126 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

tied in Henniker and Claremont ; was speaker in the N. H. House of Rep- 
resentatives ; m. 1855. Lived in Chicago, 111., afterwards. 
3. Henry, d. young. 

PERHAM. 

Joel Frank Perham, son of Joel H. and Alice G. (Lynch) Perham, b. 
Wilton, Sept. 25, 1862, m. June. 2, 1890, Annie E., dau. of Daniel H. and 
Mary J. (Holt) Smith of Mont Vernon. She was b. Mont Vernon, June 
30, 1869. No ch. He is a cattle dealer and farmer and lives in village. 

RAMSEY. 

Dr. John Ramsey came here from Greenfield, succeeded Dr. Rogers 
Smith, was taxed here in 1815, practised here a few years, m. Miss Davis, 
dau. Jonathan and Mary Davis of Westford, Mass. He returned to 
Greenfield. Ch. probably b. in Greenfield. 

1. Margaret, m. (1) Dr. George W. Moore of Amherst. He d. 
Sept. 8, 1866. She m. (2) Dr. Leonard French of Manchester, June 25, 
1867. 

2. John, farmer in Greenfield. 

3. William, res. Wisconsin. 

RAY OR REA. 

James Ray, Esq., was the only ch. of James and Elizabeth (Dodge) 
Ray of Beverly, where he was b., May 1, 1759. His father d. shortly 
after his birth, leaving his mother a widow 17 years of age. In 1760 she 
m. Peter Woodbury and in 1773 the family moved to Mont Vernon, where 
James grew to manhood with his half-brothers, Levi, Jesse, Peter and 
Mark Woodbury. Here young Ray m. Mehitable, dau. James Woodbury, 
May 3, 1780. He was a noted inn-keeper and an active man in Mont 
Vernon. Trask W. Averill said that James Ray lived on the Dr. Adams 
place most of the time he lived here, and carried on the potash business, 
as well as keeping a tavern. In 1817 he moved to Amherst and kept 
the hotel afterwards known as the Nutt tavern until Jan., 1827. He d. 
Amherst, Jan. 15, 1830, age 70. His wid. d. in Francestown, Feb. 4, 1858. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

1. James, b. July 9, 1780, m. Elsie Dana, April 26, 1810, lived on the 
New Boston road, had ch., d. April 2, 1857. 

2. John, b. Aug. 13, 1781, d. Nov. 25, 1781. 

3. Mehitable, b. April 15, 1783, d. Dec. 15, 1832, m. John Moor of 
New Boston, Aug. 25, 1804. One of her ch., Sabrina, was mother of 
Clark Campbell, Esq., of Mont Vernon. 

4. Levi, b. July 13, 1785, m. his cousin, Hannah Perkins of Mont 
Vernon, Jan. 9, 1804. 

5. Sabrina, b. Oct. 14, 1786, d. Dec. 11, 1802. 

6. Henry Hammond, b. Sept. 9, 1789, d. Feb. 20, 1829. 

7. Nancy, b. March 24, 1791, m. Sept. 10, 1809, Ephraim Pike. 

8. Frances W., b. Jan. 13, 1794, m. James W. Haseltine of Frances- 
town in 1814, d. Manchester, Dec. 12, 1877 ; had four ch. 

9. John T., b. Nov. 15, 1795, d. 1797. 

10. Elizabeth D., b. May 8, 1798, m. Newell Dean in Dec, 1828, d. 
Boston, Mass., Julv 7, 1858. 

11. Mary, b. May 31, 1800, d. Feb. 22, 1802. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 127 

12. Peter W., b. Dec. 5, 1802, lived in Salem, Mass. 

13. Horace, b. Nov. 5, 1807. 

RAYMOND. 

John Raymond of Beverly, b. about 161C, m. Rachel Scruggs, who d. 
1666. He m. (2) Mrs. Judith Woodbury, wid. William Woodbury, Jr. 
She d. 1702, aged 75. His ninth ch. and the first by his second wife was 
2Nathaniel, b. March 15, 1670, d. Jan. 8, 1749, m. Rebecca, dau. Lot 
Conant, b. Jan. 31, 1671, d. Dec, 1760. They had 10 ch., of whom 
3Nathaniel was the ninth, b. April 1, 1712, m. Martha Balch, Oct. 3, 1735. 
They had eight ch., of whom the -sixth was Nathaniel, 4th generation, b. 
Beverly, May 8, 1749, m. Phebe Dodge, dau of Geo. Dodge, Hamilton, 
Mass. He d. Mont Vernon, 1800. He removed to Mont Vernon in 1773. 
He was a sailor. His wife d. Nov. 15, 1825, age 70. He lived on Ray- 
mond farm in South Dist. Ch. 

1. Martha, m. Dea. Andrew Hutchinson of Milford, had sons, 
Nathaniel, Elisha and Stillman. 

2. Mary, m. Nov. 15, 1800, David Goodell and settled in Hillsboro, 
d. Antrim, 1864, aged 85 ; had two sons, George D. and Jesse R. Goodell. 
George D. was the father of Dr. John Goodell of Hillsboro and Jesse R. 
Goodell, the father of Ex.-Gov. D. H. Goodell, of Antrim. 

3. Salh T , b. Jan. 26, 1781, m. Samuel Hartshorn of Lyndeboro, had 
six ch., of whom the first was Dea. Samuel, b. Feb. 25, 1810, d. Mason, 
Nov., 1846, was deacon Baptist Church, Lyndeboro, and Hancock. 

4. *George, b. 1783. 

5. *John, b. July, 1785. 

6. *Jesse, b. 1792. 

George Raymond, son of Nathaniel and Phebe (Dodge) Raymond, b. 
Mont Vernon, 1783, m. Dec. 19, 1809, Mary, dau. John and Polly (Brad- 
ford) Wallace of Milford. She was b. May 13 1785, d. Sept. 8, 1862. 
He was selectman, was representative in 1842 : lived on the homestead in 
the South Dist., d. Dec. 14, 1853 Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Alary, b. Jan. 5, 1811, was teacher and principal of the Female 
Seminary in Hancock, m. Jan. 19, 1839, Rev. Dura D. Pratt of Nashua, 
d. Aug. 8, 1902, at Evanston, TIL 

2. Phebe B.. b. Sept. 13, 1812, m. Eugene Hutchinson of Milford, d. 
Nov. 13, 1837; one dau. 

3. George, b. Nov. 3, 1814, d. Aug. 9, 1818. 

4. *Andrew W., b. Oct. 19, 1817. 

5. Sallv. b. Oct. 3, 1818. d. Oct. 14, 1819. 

6. *George, b. Aug. 9, 1820. 

7. Nancy, b. April 25, 1S24. m. May 11, 1847, Dana W. Pratt of Pen- 
acook, N. H., d. Feb., 1871 ; one son, Charles D., who d. at Milford, N. H. 

John Raymond, son of Nathaniel and Phebe (Dodge) Raymond, b. 
Mont Vernon, July 23, 1785. m. Sally, dau. John and Polly (Bradford) 
Wallace of Milford. He d. April 22, 1850. They settled on the farm now 
of George F. Tarbell. In 1839 he sold his farm and moved to Union Co., 
Ohio, where he afterwards gave the name to the town of Raymond, where 
he and his wife, Sally, d. Ch. b. Mont Vernon: 

1. Nathaniel, b. Sept. 19, 1811, was taxed here five years until 1838. 
Went first to Raymond, Ohio, thence to Champaigne, 111., d. May 19, 1890. 

2. John Wallace, b. March 5, 1815, m. Feb., 1839, Lucinda Smart, d. 
Raymond, Ohio, June 30, 1841, without ch. 



128 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

3. *Robert Burns, b. May 2, 1824. 

Jesse Raymond, son Nathaniel and Phebe (Dodge) Raymond, b. 
Mont Vernon, 1792, m. Betsey Dale of Wilton, N. H. He d. July 14, 
1862. He lived on the farm in South Dist, now occupied by C. F. Isola. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

1. John Goodell, b. Sept., 1816. m. Oct. 8, 1839, Roxanna, dau. Alfred 
and Lydia (Foster) Hutchinson; m. (2) March 20, 1856, Abigail, dau. 
John and Rosanna (Mills) Bullard : m. (3) March 20, 1877, Mrs. Nancy 
J. (Cilley) Hill. He was a blacksmith, lived and d. in Milford, Jan. 14, 
1885. His ch. were Abbie, m. Albert Conant of South Lyndeboro, and 
David E. of Peterboro. 

2. David Goodell, d. Milford, Sept. 7, 1843, aged 24 years. 

Andrew Wallace Raymond, son of George and Mary (Wallace) Ray- 
mond, b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 19, 1817, m. March 7, 1843, Abbie Stevens 
of Goffstown. She d. Feb. 23, 1883, age 65. He lived on the homestead, 
d. Julv 5, 1895. Ch. b. Mont Vernon: 

1. Marv Frances, b. Jan. 7, 1844, m. March 4, 1863, Dodge G. Hart- 
shorn of Milford, d. Milford, Aug. 17, 1899 ; one dau., Mrs. D. O. Handley 
of Milford. 

2. *Charles Henry, b. Feb. 21, 1846. 

3. *George Andrew, b. Julv 1, 1849. 

4. Abbie E.. b. Oct. 13, 1851. m. Walker. 

5. John W., b. April 6, 1857, m. April 14, 1886, Henrietta Colston; 
has two ch.. lives in Concord, Mass. 

6. Dana Pratt, b. Dec. 23, 1859, d. March 8, 1870. 

George Raymond, son of George and Mary (Wallace) Raymond, b. 
Mont Vernon, April 9, 1820, lived in Antrim, Concord, N. H. ; lives Rock- 
bottom, Mass., m. Eleanor Pollard of Antrim. Ch. 

1. *Edwin Herbert, b. Aug. 18, 1849. 

2. Elsie A., b. Nov. 8, 1853, m. Nov. 30, 1882, Thomas J. Niles of 
Concord, N. H. 

Nathaniel Raymond, son of John and Sallv Bradford Raymond, b. 
Mont Vernon. Sept. 19. 1811, was taxed here five years until 1838. Went 
first to Raymond. Ohio, thence to Champaigne, 111., d. May 19, 1890. Ch. 
of Nathaniel and his wife. Melissa, were : 

1. Josiephine. b. May 8, 1842. m. Sept. 29, 1868, William S. Maxwell. 

2. Sally, b. April 22.' 1844, m. June 14, 1871, Jona B. Green. 

3. John E., b. Aug. 4, 1845, merchant Girard. Kan. 

4. Isaac S., b. Jan. 29, 1849. m. Oct. 27, 1875, Edith Eaton. 

Robert Burns Ravmond, b. Mont Vernon, May 2, 1824, son of John 
and Sally (Bradford) Raymond, resides Monmouth, 111., m. Sarah Lock- 
wood 1846. Ch. 

1. George, b. Jan. 9, 1847, d. Oct. 17, 1867. 

2. Chas. W., of Monmouth, b. Julv 21, 1849, m. Dec, 1870; had two 
dau. Wife d. June, 1875. He m. (2) Hattie Hovier, Sept., 1879; has 
son and dau. 

3. Pratt, b. March 29. 1852, d. Aug. 15, 1869. 

4. David B., b. July 4, 1855, m. Dec., 1882, Alice Lake, one son. 

Charles Henry Raymond, son Andrew W. and Abbie (Stevens) Ray- 




CHARLES H. RAYMOND. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 129 

mond, b. Mont Vernon, Feb. 21, 1846, lives on homestead, farmer, has 
been repeatedly selectman of the town, representative in 1900, member 
of Constitutional Convention 1902; m. Oct. 8, 1868, .Matilda B. Pillsbury 
of Springfield, N. H. She was b. Feb. 2, 1843. Ch. b. Mont Vernon: 

1. Dana Charles, b. Feb. 15, 1870. 

2. Wallace Andrew, b. Dec. 14, 1872. 

3. Orie Matilda, b. Jan. 7, 1876, m. Jan. 7, 1903, John L. Bailey of 
Wakefield. Mass., res. Wakefield. 

4. Milon Henry, b. March 3, 1877, res. Mont Vernon. 

George A. Raymond, son of Andrew W. and Abbie (Stevens) Ray- 
mond, b. Mont Vernon, July 1, 1849, res. Milford, m. May 11, 1880, Josie 
A. Bailev of Milford, dau. Jos. P. and Lucy A. (Woodbury) Bailey, b. 
S. Weare, .March 31, 1862. Ch. b. Milford. 

Clarence A., b. Feb. 27, 1881, station agent Woonsocket, R. I. 

Grace B., b. May 31, 1884. 

Edwin H. Raymond, son of Geo. and Eleanor (Pollard) Raymond, b. 
Aug. 18, 1849, lives at Antrim, Stafford Co., Kansas, m. Sept. 10, 1876, 
Eva G. Wheeler of Iowa. Ch. 

1. Mabel, b. April 6, 1878, d. 1878. 

2. George L., b. Tan. 31, 1881. 

3. Wadsworth P., b. Oct. 27, -1882. 

4. Alary, b. Jan. 31, 1885. 

REED. 

Jesse Reed lived in the East Dist., d. Oct. 25, 1875, age 75 years. 9 
mos. His wife, Clarissa E., d. Nov. 23, 1860, age 59. Ch. 

George W. His wife, Abbie H. Reed, d. Oct. 5, 1866, age 23. 

REILLY. 

James Reilly, b. Burke, N. Y., m. Nancy S., dau. of Thomas M. and 
Sarah M. (Manning) Harvell of Amherst. Feb. 24, 1873. She was b. 
Amherst, Feb. 24, 1853. They lived several years in the North Dist. 
Moved to Milford in 1885, where they now reside; stone mason. Ch. 

1. Mary E., b. Aug. 22, 1873, "m. Nov. 26, 1892, Gustaf Hofinson 
of Milford, res. Milford, m. Sept. 29, 1901, Amelia Murray of Newton, 
Mass., lives in Somerville ; two ch. 

2. Thomas J., b. Aug. 1, 1875. 

3. Frederic, b. Aug. 12, 1881, m. Feb. 17, 1900, Margaret Pequignot 
of Milford ; res. Milford ; two ch. 

RICHARDSON. 

Parker. Richardson, b. Andover, Mass.. one of 10 ch., nine sons and 
one dau., m. May 12, 1789, Susannah, dau. of Nathan and Martha Fuller. 
She was b. April 4, 1770, d. March 22. 1S43. They lived chiefly on the 
Joseph Conant farm in the East Dist. He was a cabinet maker. Ch. b. 
Mont Vernon : 

1. *Jotham, b. April 23, 1790. 

2. Tamesin H., b. 1792, d. Dec. 7, 1815, m. Benj. H. Gage, settled in 
Lowell. A dau. m. a Norman Burnham and was the mother of William 
G. Burnham. 



130 HISTORY OF MONT VERNOX. 

3. Nancy D., b. Aug. 11, 1799, m. Nathan K. Seaton, Dec. 25, 1817, 
who was for many years employed in the Boston Custom House. He d. 
at Greenupsburg, Kv., March 11, 1859; no ch. 

4. Mary Jane, b. Dec. 31. 1801. rl. Jan., 1802. 

5. Mary Jane. b. April 19, 1806. m. April 25. I860, ••'William L. Kid- 
der, d. Aug. "27. 1880. 

6. Susan, b. Nov. 10, 1809, m. Aug. 19, 1830, Francis Kidder; had 
ch., Addison, Susan, Henrietta, and Maria. 

7. Nathan, twin, d. young. 

8. Charlotte, twin, d. young. 

Jotham Richardson, son of Parker and Susannah (Fuller) Richard- 
son, 1). Mont Vernon. April 23, 1790, m. Dec. 1, 1814, Ruthcy, dau. Capt. 
Thomas and Susannah (Haskell) Cloutman. She was b. Marblehead, 
Mass., Oct. :.':;. 1791. He d. Aug. 8, 1854. He lived the most of his life 
near Beech Hill. Ch. 1). Mont Vernon. 

1. *Nathan Fuller, 1). Jan. 5, 1816. 

2. *Thomas Haskell, b. May 19, 1817. 

:;. Mark A. b. Sept. 30. 1818, m. Lydia Martin, d. Mont Vernon, 
Jan. 26, 1886; one dau.. Carrie E., m. Augustus Nichols. He operated 
the poor farm in Arlington, Mass. 

4. *John C, 1). Jan. 12. 1821, lives Cambridgeport, Mass., has two 
5! >ns. 

5. -William B., b. Aug. 8, 1822. 

6. Susan, b. Nov. 3, 1823, m. March 21, 1844, *Luther Odell ; three ch. 

Nathan Fuller Richardson, son of Jotham and Ruthcy ( Cloutman) 
Richardson, b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 5. 1816, m. Abigail Tuttle, dau. ot 
"Thomas and Lucv (Wilkins) Weston. She was b. Mont Vernon, March 
4. 1815, m. in 1840. She d. Nov. 16. 1853. He m. (2) Lodema Semantha 
Butler of Antrim. He lived in the North Dist. on farm now occupied by 
Cleon M. Hill. He d. March 5, 1SS4. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

By first wife : 

1. Laura A., m. *John T. Perkins, d. Jan. 19, 1873, age 30 yrs., 11 
mos. 

2. Eveline Frances, d. umn. Wilton. Jan. 24. 1S84. age 35 yrs.. 4 mos. 

3. John Franklin. 
By second wife : 

4. Susan Inez. m. Frank M. Elliott of Milford. 

5. Estella. m. Benj. Chadwick. Marblehead, Mass. 

6. Mary Anna Evans, m. Frederic Hopkins of Greenfield. 

7. Emma Grace, m. Dalrymple of Marlboro. N. H. 

8. Clarence, m. Lula Sumner of Wilton, res. Milford. 

9. Mark Ambrose, m. Mytie Parker, lives in Francestown. 

Mark A., d. Oct. 14, 1858. age 4 yrs. 
Geo. H.. d. Sept. 9, 1854, age 9 mos. 

Thomas Haskell Richardson, b. Mont Vernon, May 19, 1817, d. Sept. 

21, 1890, m. Sept. 23. 1*43. Nancy B., dau. Capt. Wm. and Hannah (Jones) 
Bruce. She was b. Oct. 1. 1825. d. June 6, 1892. He kept one of the 
stores for many years. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

Ellen B., b. Dec. 1. 1847. m. *William Gage Burnham. She d. July 

22. 1887. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 131 

John C. Richardson, son of Jotham and Ruthey (Cloutman) Richard- 
son, b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 12, 1821, real estate business in Cambridgeport, 
Mass., m. Esther Bodwell of Danvers in 1852. Ch. , 

1. John Wilbur, pastor Centennial Baptist Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

2. Willis K.. lives at home, unm. 

William B. Richardson, son of Jotham and Ruthey (Cloutman) Rich- 
ardson, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 8, 1822, m. Aug. 8, 1848, Mary Ann Ken- 
dall dau. Franklin Kendall. She was b. Dec. 22, 1828 ; was depot master 
Newtonville. Mass., d. there Aug. 13, 1886. Was buried here. She d. 
Newtonville, Mass., April 11, 1900. Ch.. 

1. Catherine Augusta, b. July 0, 1850, d. Jan. 19. 1855. 

2. Alice Ware, b. Feb. 3, 1854, d. July 7, 1900, at Xewtonville, Mass. 
?,. Edward Austin, b. April, 1856. 

4. Lydia Adams, b. June 9, 1860. 

William Richardson, b. Billerica, Mass.. came here from Milford 
about 1820, lived on the farm (owned by C. O. Ingalls) near the big 
maple on the Milford road ; d. March 16, 1863, 84 yrs., 7 mos. ; m. Phebe 
Batchelder of Greenfield. She d. Feb. 20, 1866, age 82 yrs., 3 mos. Ch. b. 
Mont Vernon. 

1. William IT., d. May 5. 1845, age 23. unm. 

2. Justin E., b. March 23, 1823, lived on homestead, d. unm. Jan. 
12, 1890 

Daniel Richardson, b. New Portland, Me., Feb. 23, 1836, m. May 9, 
1857. Mary E.. dau. Dimon and Harrie ( Parmenter) Twiss. She was 
b. Antrim. June 20, 1838. He came here from Lowell about 1S68. Car- 
penter and farmer ; res. in South Dist. Ch. 

1. Albert D., b. Sept. 26, 1860, d. Nov. 20, 1872 

2. Willie F., b. Oct. 2, 1862, m. Feb. 4, 1S92. Anna G. Wheeler of 
Hollis. She d. March 7. 1901 in Mont Vernon. Carpenter. No ch. 

3. Cora Belle, b. April no. 1865, d. April 30, 1866. 

4. Augustine, b. Dec. 1. 1868, d. Dec. 21, 1868. 

5. Hattie May. 1>. Oct. 26, 1S76. m. Nov. 3, 1S9S. -Charles O. Ingalls; 
one ch. 

RILEY. 

Patrick Riley, b. Ireland, County Caban, m. there. His wife was b. 
in County Caban. Ire. They came to Mont Vernon in 1856 and lived in 
the big yellow house on the turnpike, moved to Winchester in 1881, where 
he d. Feb. 14, 1897, age 66. He worked in the tannery here and tannerv 
in Milford while living here. His wife d. July 22. 1898, age 57. Ch. b. 
Mont Vernon. 

1. Daniel, b. 1857, teamster, m., res. Somerville. Mass. ; has three ch. 

John, b. 1859, lives in Boston. 

Anna I., b. Oct. 1, 1861, unm., res. Winchester. 

Thomas, b. July. 1863. 

Bridget H., b. Feb.. 1865, m. Sept., 1899, James H. Cronin. res. 
Winchester, Mass. 

6. Mary F., b. June, 1867, grad. Salem Normal School, was Prin. 
Rum ford School, Winchester, is now Prin. Chapin School Winchester. 

7. James, b. July, 1873, m., lives in Maiden. 



132 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

ROBERTS. 

Benjamin F. Roberts, son of Samuel and Almira (Berry) Roberts, 
b. Peabody, Mass., July 5, 1859. came to Mont Vernon when young, farm- 
er and laborer, m. Feb. 2, 1884, Sarah E., dan. Samuel K. and Almira 
(Young) Russell of Nashua. She was b. Nashua. March 22, 1861. Ch. 
b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Clarence F., b. Sept. 2, 1884. 

2. Henry F., b. Jan. 20, 1886. 

3. Carrie B.. b July 18, 1887. 

4. Emma A., b. Nov. 12, 1888. 

5. Helen S.. b. Dec. 25, 1890. 

ROBINSON. 

Jesse Robinson of Bedford, Mass., b. Bedford. Mass., June 4, 1797, 
m. April 7, 1S27, Asenath Buttrick of Pelham. She was b. Pelham, April 
12, 1803, d. Dec. 28, 1880. He lived on Beech Hill, then on the farm now 
occupied by William Ryan. He d. Nov. 14, 1876. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Marion R., b. March 18, 1829, m. Feb. 24. 1850, Rev. Charles Pike, 
resided Waterbury. Conn., d. Sept. 6, 1887. 

2. *Jesse Orrin. b. May 9, 1830. 

3. Edwin Wallace, b. Feb. 12, 1832, m. Oct. 6, 1858, Caroline E. Nye 
of Littleton, Mass., res. Littleton, Mass. ; had three ch. ; d. Dec. 9, 1892. 

4. Mary Elizabeth, b. June 17, 1833, in. May 19, 1856, James M. 
Hutchinson of Wilton ; res. Wilton ; had five ch.. d. Oct. 27, 1896. 

5. Harriet Ann., b. March 1, 1836. m. Oct. 6, 1858. Henry Nye of 
Littleton, Mass., res. Worcester, Mass., has one ch. 

6. Sarah Jane. b. Dec. 15, 1839, m. Jan. 30, 1859, Frank Holcombe 
of Southwick. Mass., res. in Milford : has two sons, Dr. Chas. H. Hol- 
combe of Brookline and Newton Holcombe of Hollis. 

7. Charles Henrv, b. April 27, 1842, served in 13th N. H. Regt. in 
Civil War. d. unm. May 23, 1864. 

Jesse O. Robinson, son of Jesse and Asenath (Buttrick) Robinson, 
b. Mont Vernon, May 9, 1830, m. (1) April 30, 1858, Helen E., dau. 
Levi T. and Nancy (Herrick) Secomb of Amherst. She was b. July 13, 
1833, d. June 27. 1861. He m. (2) March 27, 1862, Laura Frye, b. Man- 
chester, Vt., May 14. 1827. He settled on the farm now occupied by his 
son in the East part of Centre Dist.. d. Nov. 20, 1887. His wid. res. on 
the farm with her son, Willie. Ch. b. Mont Vernon. 

Ch. by first wife : 

1. George Alfred, b. March 21, 1859, m. Feb. 6, 1883, Anna E. Proc- 
tor, dau. Jacob and Nancy S. Proctor of Marlboro, N. H. She was b. 
Marlboro. Feb. 9, 1856, resides Marlboro: 1 ch. 

2. Helen Elizabeth, b. May 11. 1861. res. Amherst, unm. . 
Ch. by second wife : 

3. Willie Lincoln, b. May 1, 1864, res. on homestead, unm. 

4. Jennie B., b. Oct. 7, 1865, milliner. 

ROBY. 

John Roby, b. Merrimack, 1743, m. 1771, Esther Blodgett of Chelms- 
ford, Mass., d Mont Vernon, June 8, 1826. They settled in Mont 
Vernon soon after their marriage on farm in East Dist.. now occupied by 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON, 133 

George F. Jones. She d. Dec. 21, 1810, aged 71 years. Ch. b. Mont 
Vernon. 

1. Lydia, d. num., North Chelmsford, Mass. 

2. *John, Jr., b. Sept. 7, 1776. 

3. Hannah, b. Sept. 7, 1779, m. Joseph Gilbert, Aug. 29, 1799, d. 
Francestown, Aug. 14, 1858. 

John Roby, Jr., son of John and Esther ( Blodgett) Roby, b. Sept. 
7, 1779 ; lived on homestead in East. Dist., d. June 1, 1856, m. Hannah 
Haseltine. She d. Oct. 30, 1860. aged 85.' Ch. b. Mont Vernon: 

1. Levi, b. Jan. 28, 1801, m. Louisa Trow, d. Nashua, April 16, 1855; 
three ch. 

2. Reuben, b. Jan. 5. 1803, d. May 5, 1805. 

3. Hiram, b. July 27, 1804, m. April 17, 1830, Rebecca Cummings, d. 
Nashua, June 7, 1868 ; left one dau. 

4. *Clinton, b. May 6, 1808. 

5. Hannah, b. Nov. 30. 1809, m. Asa McMillen, d. New Boston, Dec. 
21, 1861. 

6. Luther, b. July 21. 1813, d. Aug. 14, 1826. 

7. Ira Roby. b. Oct. 20, 1815, m. Hannah Wilkins of Merrimack, 
April 27, 1847. He d. Jan. 9, 1888. in Amherst. He lived on the farm 
now owned by C. E. Kendall in East Dist., was representative in 1862, 
moved to Amherst, where he d. Jan. 9, 1888. No ch. She d. March 12, 
1889. age 68. 

Clinton Roby, son of John. Jr. and Hannah (Haseltine) Roby, b. 
Mont Vernon, A lay 6, 1808, d. Oct. 25,' 1870. Lived on the homestead in 
East. Dist. He m. (1) Lois, dau. of John and Mary (Carleton) Haywood. 
She d. June 11, 1857, age 46. He m. (2) Sarah Jenkins of New Boston 
She d. May 5. 1868, aged 47 years. Ch. by first wife b. Mont Vernon. 

1. John Clinton, b. Aug. 10, 1835, m. Orinthia, dau. Thomas and Lucy 
(Stevens) Battles, March 14. 1861. Went to Illinois 1862. Res. Decatur, 
111. One son, Ira. b. Jan., 1874. 

2. Kilburn Harwood, b. Sept. 2, 1837. went West in 1858: lawyer 
and banker; res. Decatur, Til., m. Dec. 1, 1863, Anna Haworth of Wilming- 
ton, Ohio. b. Dec. 24. 1S39. Ch. 

1. Frank Clinton, b. June, 1865, m. Tda Worden, 1893. has a dau. 
Helen. 

2. Mary Lois, b. July, 1867, m. Frederic A. Brown of Tacoma. Wash. 

3. Kilburn H„ b. Oct. 10, 1872. 

4. Luther Edward, b. Feb. 10. 1874. 

5. Sarah Jane, b. Jan. 14, 1876. 

6. Anna Haworth, b. April 10, 1878. 

ROTCH. 

Matthew Griffin Rotch, son of Samuel and Susannah (Johnson) 
Rotch, b. Boston, Sept. 24, 1806, d. Mont Vernon, July 24, 1878; m. July 
7, 1835, Tamesin Hale, dau. Nathan and Tamesin (Brown) Fuller. She 
was b. Amherst, Aug. 27. 1804, d. Mont Vernon, May 7, 1895. He was a 
mechanic and lived in the village, in the house now "Syringa Cottage," 
owned by Hon. G. A. Marden. Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Maria Adelaide, b. Jan. 25, 1837, d. unm. Jan. 21, 1877; was a 
woman of good intellectual endowment, literary taste and fine education. 

2. Albert Atwood, b. May 5, 1840, d. Amherst, Dec. 10. 1890, m. 



134 HISTORY OF MOXT VERXOX. 

1859, Helen Reade, dau. of Dea. Edward D. and Mercy P. (Perkins) 
Boylston. She was b. Amherst, 1843. After his death she m> William 
Warren. He res. in Amherst, was editor Farmers' Cabinet and was in 
real estate business. Ch. 

William Boylston Rotch, b. Amherst, June 6, 1859, m. Oct. 17, 1882, 
Grace Marston, dau. Joseph W. and Susan C. (Hunt) Burnell of Wey- 
mouth. Mass. He is editor and proprietor of the Milford Cabinet; res. 
Milford ; one son, Arthur B. 

RUSSELL. 

Joseph Russell, b. Euston Sq., London, Eng., Jan. 20, 18(53, came to 
America in 1883 ; m. Ellen V. Connors, dau. of Jeremiah Connors of 
Manchester, N. H., Oct. 30, 1866 ; lived in Mont Vernon near Purgatory, 
from winter of J891-1892 to Dec. 1894, now resides Manchester. Ch. 

1. Jennie V., b. June 27, 1887. 

2. Joseph, b. Oct. 5, 1889. 

3. Sarah E,. b. Mont Vernon, June 15, 1891. 

4. Anna Frances, b. Mont Vernon, April 3, 1894. 

Walter Wood Russell, son of Walter and Caroline C. (Leonard) 
Russell, b. Watertown, Mass., May 27, 1835. teamster and farmer; lived in 
Watertown until 15 years of age, in Vermont 18 years, in Stowe, Mass., 
4 years, in Charlestown, Mass., almost 25 years ; came to Mont Vernon 
in 1S94; m. April 14, 1858, Mary M., dau. Joseph and Miry (Sloan) 
Beede. She was b. Wilmington, Mass., Nov. 12, 1837. Ch. 

1. Alice Shepard, b. Royalton, Vt, May 14, 1861, m. Frederick Ben- 
nett, lives in Waltham. 

2. Carrie L.. b. Stowe, Mass., Dec. 11. 1869 ; stenographer in Boston. 

Catherine T. (Bond) Russell, widow Walter Russell, d. Dec. 11. 

1887, age 84. She had lived with her dau., Mrs. Charles F. Stinson, sever- 
al years. She was the step-mother of Walter W. Russell. She was b. in 
Watertown, Mass.. May 14. 1803. 

Josiah Russell, Jr., b. Mason, Sept. 1, 1799, m. Ruby Wyman. Oct. 
8. 1826. She was b. Woburn, Mass., March 13. 1803. They lived in 
Derry. Lived in Mont Vernon several years in the thirties in the house 
in South Dist, now owned by estate Dr. C. M. Kittredge. He was select- 
man in 1835 and 1836. He moved to Amherst, d. at Lowell. Ch. 

1. Maria Louisa, b. Derry. Sept. 23. 1827. 

2. Almira Josephine, b. Derry. Sept. 28, 1830. 

3. Edwin, b. Mont Vernon. June 13, 1833. 

4. Albert Gallatin, b. Mont Vernon, April 3. 1$:;:,. 

RYAN. 

William Ryan, son of James and Margaret (Fox) Ryan, b. 
Kilworth, Cork Co. Ire.. 1834. came to America in 1856, settled in Mont 
Vernon, 1858; m. at Nashua, Oct. 28, 1856. Catherine Oates. 
She was b. in Bovle. Ire., d. Feb. 17, 1885, age 47. He m. 
(2) Mrs. Mary Burns of Manchester, April 29, 1886. She d. Jan. 26, 

1888, age 40. He m. (3) Ellen Murray. June 26, 1898. She was b. 
Ballynock, Ire., May 27, 1840. Ch. by his first wife : 

1. James, b. Lowell. Aug. 24, 1857, unm.. res. Mont Vernon. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 135 

2. Edmund, 1). Mont Vernon, July 18, 1859, res. Worcester, m. Bridget 
Magnir of Worcester ; one ch. 

3. John, h. Mont Vernon, Dec. 11, 1861, res. Boston. 

4. Wm. Bruce, b. March 12, 1864, d. Milford, May 26, 1887. 

5. Mary, b. June 1, 1866, m. Nov. 26. 1888, Thos. P. Garrity, d. Feb. 
21, 1896; two ch. 

6. Katherine, b. Aug. 12. 1875, m. Jan. 11, 1900, James Cassidy of 
Milford, res. Milford ; two ch. 

SAX BORNE. 

George E. Sanborne, b. Reading, Mass., April 2, 1827, fitted for col- 
lege at Andover, East Hampton and Monson, grad. Amherst College 1853, 
Andover Theological Seminary 1856, settled in Georgia, Vt., as pastor 
from 1856 to 1861 ; supplied at Portsmouth, came to Mont Vernon Dec. 
1861, installed pastor April 10, 1862, left in June in 1865 to accept a call 
at Northboro, Mass., left there to accept the superintendency 
of the Orphan Asylum, Hartford. In May, 1885, he was ap- 
pointed steward of Insane Retreat, Hartford, held that position until 
May, 1895. He m. June 10, 1858, Anna E., dau. Dea. John Knowlton of 
Portsmouth. X. H. ; no ch. He d. Hartford, Jan. 7. 1900. 

SANDERSON. 

Henry Sanderson, b. Beverly, Mass., Feb. 19, 1810, m. Mary Frances, 
dau. Amos and Mary W. (Hartshorn) Hubbard, March 18, 1841. She was 
b. Amherst, Oct. 26, 1816, d. Milford, Dec. 13, 1893. He settled in Mont 
Vernon on a farm in the East Dist. in the forties, moved to Milford in 
the eighties. He. d. there Dec. 13, 1888. Ch. 

1. Sarah Frances, b. May 26. 1843, m. Charles Lovejoy of Milford, 
July 1, 1865. d. Dec. 2, 1893; had three ch. 

2. Eliza A. H., b. May 17, 1845, m. March 19, 1866. Albert F. 
Boutell, res. Milford. 

3. Henrv Hubbard, b. Jan. 31. 1850, m. Helen Brown, 1881, res. 
Milford. 

4. Leander Calvin, b. Mont Vernon, March 19, 1852, carpenter, 
came to Milford as a young man, res. village, m. Sept. 8, 1888. Mary 
L., dau. of James and Betsey (McQuestion) Sanderson. She was b. Mil- 
ford, Jan. 7, 1859. Ch. 

Gladys B., b. Leominster, Mass., Aug. 17. 1889. 

SARGENT. 

Daniel Sargent, Jr., son Daniel and Charlotte (Winslow) Sargent, 
b. Goffstown, Aug. 14, 1823 ; lived here a few years in the later sixties ; 
came to Milford in 1844 from New Boston, quarryman, d. April 27, 1S74, 
m. (1) Aug. 31, 1846, Nancy E., dau. John and Betsey (Moore) Well- 
man, b. Lyndeboro, Feb. 24, 1823; m. (2) Oct. 16, 1864, Ann Jane. dau. 
Noah B. and Mary (Hopkins) Hutchinson: she was h. Mont Vernon, 
May 15, 1836 ; resides Milford. Ch. by first wife : 

Frank D., b. Milford, Oct. 29, 1853, d. Nov. 8, 1862. 

Ch. by second wife : 

Edwin D., b. Mont Vernon, Sept. 2, 1867, mechanic; m. Feb. 28, 1899, 
Bertha, dau. Sylvester S. and Nettie (Schlim) Osborn of Nashua. 

Mytie Ardelle b. April 21. I860, in. May 30, 1893, Frank G. Easter; 
res. Milford. 



136 HISTORY OF MONT VERNOX. 

Eva Bell, b. March 6, 1871. d. Milford, Dec. 28, 1875. 

Thomas Sargent, son of Enoch P. and Jane (Jameson) Sargent, 'b. 
Nov. 5, 1828, m. Nov. 12, 1853, Elizabeth B. Tenney of Goffstown. She 
was b. Goffstown, March 31, 1837. He lived in Amherst, came to Mont 
Vernon 1888 ; lived on the Edward Hildreth farm until 1893, when he 
moved to Bedford, where he now lives. Ch. 

1. Sarah Jane. b. New York, Nov. 16, 1858, m. William Schwartz, 
Dec, 1879; res. Bedford. 

:.'. George W., b. Goffstown, Nov. 19, 1861, d. Feb. 20, 1865. 

::. Cora F.. b. Manchester, July 5, 1866; m. Harry S. Bagley, Oct. 17, 
1887 : lives Manchester. 

4. *James W., b. Goffstown, April 19, 1870. 

5. John M., b. Goffstown, Jan. 19, 1874, m. Aug. 21, 1898, Hannah 
A. Chase of East Deering, N. H. ; two ch. ; res. Bedford. 

Orcutt J. Sargent, son of Dea. Enoch P. and Jane (Jameson) Sar- 
gent, b. Goffstown, Sept. 6, 1845 ; farmer ; lived on the Best farm in East 
Dist. several years ; moved to Milford in 1891. He m. Sept 25. 1871, 
Mary C, dan. Nathaniel and Charlotte C. (Buxton) Lawrence, b. Tyngs- 
boro, Mass., July 20. 1845. Ch. 

1. Tola L.. b. Templeton, Mass., July 17, 1873; m. March 5, 1892, 
Sidney A., son Chas. M. and Susan J. (Wilkins) Pond of Milford; d. 
Milford, Jan. 8, 1896. 

2. Edith B., b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 28, 1878; res. Milford. 

3. Flossie L, b. Mont Vernon, Sept. fi, 1882, d. Milford, Jan. 4. 1895. 

James W. Sargent, son Thomas and Elizabeth (Tenney) Sargent, b. 
Goffstown. April 19, 1870. m. Sept. 11, 1892, Emma Anderson. She was 
b. Germany; res. Bedford: has six ch. 

SECOMBE. 

Daniel Secombe. b. April 6. 1781, d. Jan. L2, 1846; settled on a farm 
in the Fast Dist., m. (l) Betsey Durant, July 23, 1805. She d. Oct. 12, 
1S26, age 42. He m. (2) Elizabeth Austin, b. Sept. 28, 1828. Ch. b. Mont 
Vernon : 

1. Mahala Jones, b. July 27, 1806, m. :;: George C. Coburn, d. April 23, 
1838 ; two ch. 

2. Nancy Durant. b. Sept. 27, 1812; d. Concord, Ian. 30, 1857, unm. 

3. Mary, b. March 11, 1814, m. Charles Austin ; lived in Lowell. 

4. Jane", b. Oct. 27. 1821, d. Concord, Nov. 22. 1846. 
By second wife : 

5." Daniel Andrew Jackson, b. Sept. 16, 1829, m. Oct. 17, 1861, Emily 
A. Glover of Franklin, Vt. He lived on the farm occupied by his wife 
and son, George, in south part of the town. He d. Aug. 16, 1880. One 
ch., George, unm. 

6. John, b. Aug. 21, 1833, d. Aug. 18, 1835. 

7. Charles, b. Jan. 16, 1836; lives Lowell, Mass., unm. 

8. Harriet Newell, b. Sept. 9, 1838, m. April 9, 1866, John H. Coggin 
of Amherst; d. Jan, 8, 1882; two ch. 

9. John, b. Feb. 20, 1840, d. Sept., 1844. 

SHEDD. 

Nelson E. Shedd, b. Hollis, Sept. 22, 1820. son Ebenezer and Betsey 



HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 137 

Shcdd ; came here from Nashua in 1846, where he was overseer in nv'li 
of Nashua Manufacturing Co. He m. at Nashua, Oct. 13, 1842, Fidelia, 
dau, Paul and Betsey (Woodbury) Whipple. She was b. in Barre, Vt., Aug. 
17, 1823, d. Mont Vernon. April 21, 1899. They lived on what is known 
as the Shedd farm on the turnpike in the West Dist. He d. Vineland, N. 
J.. March 25, 1885. She m. (2) Nathaniel Cutter of Jaffrey. Ch. b. 
Mont Vernon : 

1. Sarah F., b. Mont Vernon. Nov. 18, 1847; m. Jan. 22, 1S66, Milo 
R. Burnham ; four ch. 

2. Helen M.. b. June 9, 1849, d. Aug. 23, 1851. 

3. Frank, b. June 9, 1849. d. Aug. 28, 1851. 

4. Franklin W., b. July 3, 1852, m. Anna Gilgua. Nov. 28, 1872. He 
lived in South Dist. He d. May 17, 1876, leaving three ch. 

5. Celia M., b. July 17, 1855, m. Aug. 2, 1881, George W. Putnam; 
res. Lowell ; no ch. 

6. Henry Nelson, b. April 10, 1857, m. Oct. 4, 1886, Irene Christine 
of Washington, D. C. ; res. Philadelphia ; two ch. 

7. Clarence A., b. Nov. 26, 1860; res. New York City; in insurance 
business. 

SHATTUCK. 

Noah Shattuck, b. Brookline, X. H.. 1800. d. Aug. 7, 1843; m. Clarissa 
Saunders of Brookline ( sister of Belinda Saunders that m. David Dut- 
ton). He lived in the village in the house J. M. Fox now owns. She d. 
Sept. 8, 1843. Ch. all but Samuel b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Ingalls K.. 1). June 21, 1821 : lives in Hudson, trim. 

2. Quincy, b. May 16, 1S24. m. Mary Chase, d. Bristol. Vt. ; left one 
son, E .W. Shattuck of Bristol. Vt. 

3. Dau. b. Jan. 9, 1826, d. infancy. 

4. Milo. b. Sept. IS, 1827. d. Xew Britain, Conn., m. 

5. Pamelia, b. Jan. 10, 1829; m. May 26, 1858, George W. Trow, son 
of Jesse and Nancy (Cochran) Trow; lives Hudson, X T . H. 

6. Alfred, b. Sept. 22. 1831, m. (1) Roseanna Holden of Milford, m. 
(2) Mary E. Baker of Hudson; three ch. ; d. Nashua, Jan. 3, 1902. 

7. Alonzo, b. Tune 22, 1833, d. in San Francisco, Cal., unm. 

8. Samuel, 1). Xew Boston, d. Nashua, m. ; one ch. 

9. Wallace, b. Mont Vernon. Aug. 28, 1838, d. San Francisco, Cal. 

10. Henry K., b. Mont Vernon, enlisted in 13th X. H. Regt. in Civil 
War, d. diseased. Nov. 30, 1863. 

11. Edwin, b. Mont Vernon; lives Mont Vernon, num. 

STMOXDS. 

Benjamin Simonds, m. Alary, dau. of John and Mary (Bradford) 
Averill. Settled in Mont Vernon, rem. to Antrim in 179.'! and d. there 
in 1826. age 65. Four eldest ch. b. Mont Vernon.: 

1. Lucy, b. Jan. 30, 1784, m. Enoch Sawyer in 1802. d. June 7, 1853. 

2. Pollv. b. May 21, 17S7: m. Sept. 1, 1812, Robert Burns: d. Oct. 3, 
1857. 

:;. John. b. May 3, 1790. m. Sally B. Preston, Fell. 3, 1814; settled 
in Antrim; d. 1858. 

4. Sally, b. March 8. 1792. m. May 7. 1812, William D. Atwood : rem. 
to Hartland, Vt., d. in 1836. 

5. Benjamin, b. Antrim, June 5, 1796; m. Betsey Parsons of Windsor, 
d Antrim, Oct. 27. 1850. 



138 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

6. Nancy, b. Feb. 24. 1798, m. Simeon Buck, Dec. 29. 1818; d. in 
Windsor. 

7. Sabrina. b. Feb. 25, 1803, m. Simeon Buck: d. in Windsor. 

8. Mark, b. May 24, 1807, d. Nov. 1, 1807. 

SMITH. 

Cooler Smith, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Smith, b. April 9, 1709, 
m. Sarah, dau. Thomas and Eunice Burnham of Ipswich. Mass. They 
settled in Middleton, Mass. Ch. b. Middleton, Mass. 

1. Ezekiel. b. Tune 3. 1731. d. Nov. 19, 1737. 

2. Paltiah. b. Aug. 2, 1733; d. unm. 1762. 

3. Sarah, b. May 17. 1736, m. (1) Ozemiah Wilkins, m. (2) Daniel 
Wilkins of Sutton. 

4. * Aaron, b. April 24, 1738. 

5. Lucy, b. June 20, 1740, m. Aquila Wilkins of New London, X. H. 

6. Eunice, b. June 26, 1742; m. Abner Wilkins; d. in Middleton, Mass. 

7. Jemina, b. April 22, 1744, m. Enos Wilkins of Middleton. Mass. 

8. * Jacob, b. March 16, 1746. 

9. *David, b. Dec. 5, 1748. 

10. James, b. Feb. 14. 1750. 

11. Lydia, b. Nov. 9. 1755. m. Aaron Wilkins of Amherst; d. March 
25, 1837 : nine ch. 

12. Xaomi. b. April 25. 1757, m. *Benj. Wilkins; settled in Lyndeboro; 
d. May 11, 1850. 

Aaron Smith, son of Cooley and Sarah ( Burnham ) Smith, b. April 
24. 1738; m. (1) Mary Thomas; m. (2) Mrs. Bixby; settled in Mont Ver- 
non. A son. Aaron, known as "Hatter Smith." was a hatter, m. Lydia. 
dau. Stephen and Lydia (Fuller) Gould. She was b. April 7, 1784. After 
his death she went to Hillsboro. She fell over a stove and was burnt to 
death. He d. Feb. 5, 1840, aged 60, at Mont Vernon. They had two sons. 

Jacob Smith, b. March 15, 1746, son of Cooley and Sarah (Burnham) 
Smith ; lived on the place now owned by Rufus A. Averill on the turnpike ; 
.1 in Mont Vernon, July 12. 1842; m. Hannah Upton of Middleton, Mass. 
Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

1. *Daniel. 

2. *David, b. Oct. 9. 1782. 

3. Jeremiah, farmer in Mont Vernon, went to Barre. Vt., m. a 

French ; had ch. 

4. *Jacob. 

David Smith, son of Cooley and Sarah ( Burnham ) Smith, b. Dec. 5, 

1748; m. Sweetser; settled South Reading, now Wakefield, Mass.; 

four ch. David. Noah, Archibald, Adam. 

James Smith, son of Coolev and Sarah (Burnham) Smith, b. Mid- 
dleton. Mass., Feb. 14. L750; d. Mont Vernon, Jan. 29, 1831; m. (1) 
Moriah Rolfe of Middleton, Mass., in 1775. Removed to Mont Vernon in 
1778, where she d. in Dec. 1802; m. (2) April 14, 1S04, Mrs. Sarah ( Hil- 
dreth) Jones, wid. Phinehas Jones and dau. Ephraim and Elizabeth ( El- 
lenwood) Hildreth. She was b. June 6, 1765, d. Mont Vernon, Nov. 21, 
1-^42. He first settled on the farm on the turnpike now owned by R. G. 
Averill, where his sons, Jesse, James and Luther, were b. He then pur- 



HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 139 

chased the farm in the North Dist. now occupied by W. M. Gilson. Ch. 
by first wife: 

1. *Rogers. b. Middleton. Mass., June 12. 1776. 

2. Rebecca, b. 1778. Amherst; m. Maj. Robt. Christie, son Dea. Jesse 
and Mary (Gregg) Christie, of Xew Boston; d. X. B., Sept. 6, 1804; left 
four ch.. James. Mary. Jesse, Rebecca. They moved to Springfield, Clark 
Co., Ohio, where the sons were prominent citizens. 

3. *Jesse, b. Mont Vernon, April 5, 1781. 

4. *James, b. Mont Vernon. Feb. 8, 1784. 

5. *Luther, b. Mont Vernon, Dec. 27, 1786. 

6. Mary, d. infancy. 
Ch. by second wife: 

7. *Leander, b. Mont Vernon, Aug. 22, 1S08. 

Daniel Smith, son of Jacob and Hannah (Upton) Smith. He d. June 
22. 1857, age 85 yrs., 6 mos. ; m. his cousin, Cynthia, dau. of Daniel and 
Sarah (Smith) Wilkins of Sutton. She d. Aug. 8, 1864, age 84 yrs., 6 
mos. ; lived on his father's farm. Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

Hannah, m. May, 1822, Benj. F. Hill; d. Dec. 1, 1866, age 68. 

John, known as "Big John Smith," lived on his father's farm, place 
near turnpike now owned by R. G. Averill. He was a peddler ; m. Rebecca 
R. Hale of Bradford. She'd. Jan. 30. 1890, aged 82 years. He d. Oct. 2. 
1866, aged 64 years, 9 months; one ch., Elizabeth, b. Sept., 1833, m. *Wil- 
liam Upton of Mont Vernon. She d. Mont Vernon. Aug. 8, 1882. 

David Smith, son of Jacob and Hannah (Upton) Smith, b. Mont 
Vernon. Oct. 9. 1782. m. May) 16, 1805, Mary. dau. Daniel and Mary 
( Weston ) Averill. She was b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 26, 1783, d. Aug. 25, 
1864. He lived on the turnpike above the village near his brother Daniel's 
house. He d. May 1, 1862. Ch. b. Mont Vernon: 

1. Kilburn, 1). X'ov. 19, 1805, m. Maria Wood of Littleton, d. Lowell, 
Oct. 13. 1881. where he lived; one dau. 

2. Cynthia W., b. March 14. 1807. m. *John Smith: d. June 15. 1884. 

3. Mary, b. Nov. 22. 180S : m. Nov. 17, 1S36. *Elbridge Marvell ; d. 
Aug. 5, 1895. 

4. David Orrin, b. Aug. 8, 1811 ; m. Mary Stone of Antrim ; had two 
ch. ; was a blacksmith. He moved to Antrim in 1846, thence to Concord 
in 1852, where he d. Dec. 15. 1897. 

5. Emma Carleton, b. Aug. 19, 1813, d. num. Feb. 6, 1875, in Mont 
Vernon. 

6. nVilliam Harrison, b. Oct. 22, 1815. 

7. Richmond, b. Sept. 15, 1817 ; d. unm. at Concord, July 6, 1892 : was 
a successful speculator and lived in Concord. 

8. Mehitabel, b. May 7, 1821, m. Henry Ware of East Andover. X. H., 
d. there Dec. 10, 1898. 

9. Sabrina, b. June 28, 1823, d. 1825. 

10. Stephen Chapin, b. May 11. 1825; res. Boston; tailor; m. Augusta 
Straw of Lowell, d. Aug. 19, 1898; seven ch. 

11. Nancy Lovett, b. March 19, 182S. m. April 2. 1860, Henry L. 
Walkup ; res. Worcester, Mass. ; had two ch. 

Jacob Smith, son of Jacob and Hannah (Upton) Smith, b. Mont Ver- 
non ; lived on the turnpike, m. Katherine White of Lyndeboro : laborer. 

1. *James. 

2. Lewis, m. (1) Cynthia Mitchell: m. (2) Harriet, dau. John and 



140 HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 

Sarah J. (Hodgeman) Stearns; four ch. After his death she m. David 
Bumford of New Boston. Lewis Smith d. Feb. 14, 1886. aged 71 yrs. 

3. Samuel, lived in Orange, Vt. 

4. George, went West. 

.5. One dau. m. a Meder of Saxonville, Mass. 
There were four other dau. 

Dr. Rogers Smith, son of James and Moriah ( Rolfe ) Smith, b. Mid- 
dleton, Mass., June 12. 1776; studied medicine with Dr. Jones of Lynde- 
boro, commenced practice in Amherst ; removed thence to Mont Vernon, 
where he resided until appointed surgeon in army; afterward to Green- 
bush, N. Y., and Weston, Vt., where he d. March 25, 1845. He m. Jan. 
15, 1802, Sarah, dau. of Samuel and Sukey (Washer) Dodge. She was 
1). Sept. 18. 1779, d. Weston, Aug. 1840. He was a surgeon in the U. S. 
army in the War of 1812, and was stationed at Greenbush. N. Y. ; was 
town clerk and moderator. Ch. were : 

1. Samuel, b. Amherst. July 7. 1802. d. Sept. 24, 1804. 

2. *Asa Dodge, b. Amherst, Sept. 21, 1804; fitted for college at Kim- 
ball Union Academy. Meriden. graduated Dartmouth College, 1830; taught 
in Limerick Academy, Me., one year ; graduated Andover Theological 
Seminary. 1834 : was settled over the Brainard Presbyterian Church. New 
York City, afterwards pastor of the Fourteenth St. Presbyterian Church 
until 1863. He d. Hanover, Aug. 1877. He was eminent and popular as 
a preacher. 

In 1863 he was chosen President of Dartmouth College, as successor 
to Nathan Lord, D. D. Assuming this important trust at the age of 59 
he devoted himself for 14 years with unflagging industry and energy to 
the interests of the college. The period of his presidency is memorable in 
the college annals as one of the most successful in its history. By his 
personal efforts individuals of large means became interested in the col- 
lege and contributed liberally to its finances. His arduous and incessant 
labors seriouslv impaired his health and early in 1877 he resigned. He 
was a man of gracious and kindly manners and he impressed his person- 
ality upon his students, and his memory is cherished by them with warmest 
affection. 

Among eminent men who graduated during his ^residency are Ex- 
Gov. Frank S. Black of New York, Col. Melvin O. Adams, Hon. George 
Fred Williams, Hon. Samuel McCall of Massachusetts, Chief Justice Rob- 
ert M. Wallace of New Hamshire and many others. He d. Aug., 1877. 
He m. Sarah, dau. of John Adams, Esq., of North Andover, Mass. She 
d. Sept. 24. 1882. age 76. Ch. were : 

1. Dr. William T„ b. March 30, 1839, graduated Yale College, is 
Dean of the Medical Dept. of Dartmouth College; m. Miss Susan Kel- 
logg : res. Hanover, and has two ch. 

2. Sarah, unm., resides Hanover. 

3. Albert D., a retired merchant of New York Citv. 

4. Henry B., a graduate of Dartmouth College, is business manager 
of Scribner's Magazine. 

5. Harriet, m. a Mr. Bigelow. 

Ch. of Dr. Roeers and Sarah (Dodge) Smith continued: — 

3. Sarah, b. Mont Vernon. Aug. 21. 1806. m. (l) John Dale of Wes- 
ton, Vt., by whom she had one son. Geo. L. Dale: m. (2) Fliiah Munson 
of Wallins-ford. Vt. She d. Aug., 1851. 

4. Rebecca, b. Mont Vernon. Nov. 12. 1808. m. Cephas Dale of 
Weston, Vt. ; lived Wallingford, Vt. : had one dau.. Ellen. - 



HISTORY OF .MONT VERXOX. 14 1 

5. Annah R.. b. Greenbush, X. V.. m. Rev. Dennis Chapin, 1S40, a 
Universalist minister of Cambridge, N. Y. 

6. Horaee E., b. 181T in Weston, Vt. ; studied law at Broad Albin, 
X. Y., practised law in Boston, where he was partner of Henry M. Stan- 
ton : was a member of the Mass. Legislature; from 1879 to 1892 was dean 
of the law school at Albany, N. Y. ; was a member of the New York Con- 
stitutional Convention of 1876. He was the most eminent lawyer in Fulton 
Co., X. Y. He was married three times and had several ch. He resided 
at Johnstown, X. Y.. where he d. Oct. 19, 1902. 

Rev. James G. Smith, b. Dec. 22, 1805, went to Claremont when 
young to live with his uncle (McLaughlin) there, grew up with Method- 
ism there. He was granted a local preacher's license, April 8, 1826, at a 
quarterly meeting at Salem, X'. H. He preached at X'ashua and Man- 
chester, went to Portsmouth in 1838, was superannuated in 1847, since 
which time he resided at Plymouth, N. H., where he d. April 10, 1888. 
He preached constantly. ''He was an excellent singer, gifted in prayer, 
a strong and vigorous thinker, and expressed his thoughts with con- 
siderable force and effectiveness." He m. 1828, Mary Lathrop of 
Royalton, Vt., b. March 4, 1801, d. Nov. 26, 1879. Three ch., Joseph. 
Mary, and Col. Francis A. Smith, a graduate Wesleyan University, 
officer Union Army in Civil War, is now a successful lawyer in Es^-x 
Co., New York. 

Jesse Smith, son of James and Moriah (Rolfe) Smith, b. Mont 
Vernon, April 5, 1781, d. April 14, 1862; lived where Mrs. M. J. Blood 
now does, afterwards Bridge cottage, m. June 28. 1804, Abigail or 
X T abby, dau. Dr. Zephaniah and Elizabeth (Stickney) Kittredge of Mont 
Vernon. She was b. March 22, 1784, d. May 7, 1866. Carpenter. Ch. 
b. Mont Vernon. 

1. Jesse Kittredge, b. Oct. 29, 1804; m. April 7, 1829, Pamelia, dan. 
Peter and Lydia (Farmer) Foster. She was b. Aug. 20, 1806, d. Mont 
Vernon, May 13. 1880. He d. Dec. 24, 1851; a skilful surgeon and 
phvsician in Mont Vernon. Ch. 

2. Ambrose, b. Sept. 10, 1808. m. 1833, Mahala, dau. William L. and 

Nabby (Jenkins) Kidder, widow Partridge, Blacksmith, lived in 

Goffstown where he d. Oct. 29, 18S2. 3 ch., Chas. E., Perrv and Almira. 

3. *Norman, b. Oct. 13, 1811. 

4. Laurania, b. X T ov. 24, 1814, music teacher, d. unm. Mont Vernon. 
Jan. 19, 1887. 

5. James, b. Sept. 23, 1817, d. Sept. 27, 1818. 

James Smith, son of James and Moriah (Rolfe) Smith, b. Mont 
Vernon, Feb. 8, 1784; d. Mont Vernon, Sept. 26. 1809. m. Jan. 1. 1805. 
Susannah White of Lyndeboro'. Ch. were b. Mont Vernon. 

1. James G, b. Dec. 22, 1805. 

:>. Luther, b. Oct. 6, 1807. m. Mary, dau. John and Elizabeth 
( Moore) Eaton of Hillsboro' Bridge, X T . H. He was a foundryman, 
lived the greater part of his life in Manchester, where he d. March. 
1862. He had three ch.. two dau.. Emily and Ellen, d. young, one son, 
Edwin R. 

3. Moriah Rolfe. b. Jan. 11, 1810, d. infancy. 

Dr. Luther Smith, son of James and Moriah (Rolfe) Smith, b. Mont 
Vernon, Dec. 27, 1786; studied medicine with his brother. Dr. Rogers 



142 HISTORY OF MONT VERXOX. 

Smith, began practising at Hillsboro' Bridge, 1809, continued there until 
his death, Aug. 5, 1824. He m. July 22, 1817, Mary, dau. Dea. John and 
Judith (Weston) Carleton. She was b. Mont Vernon, Jan. 19, 1790. 
After her husband's death or from 1837 until her death, March 20, 1872, 
she resided in Mont Vernon. Ch. b. Hillsboro' Bridge. 

1. Mary Ellen, b. May 7. 1818. teacher, d. June 10, 1853, unm., in 
Chesterfield Co., Va., where she was teaching. 

2. *Charles James, b. Sept. 3, 1820. 

Capt. Leander Smith, son of James and Sarah (Hildreth) Smith, b. 
Mont Vernon, Aug. 22, 1808 ; was selectman and representative of Mont 
Vernon several years ; moved to Antrim in 1860, where he d. Dec. 22, 

1884. He m. Dec. 15, 1832, Sophronia, dau. Silas and Martha (Farnum) 
Wilkins. She was b. June 22, 1812. d. Antrim, Nov. 25, 1882. Ch. b. 
Mont Vernon : 

1. George W., b. April 19, 1835, d. in the army Oct. 15, 1863, being 
a soldier of the 16th X. H. Vol. 

2. Augusta, b. June 5, 1837, m. ( 1 ) Moses Carr of X T ewport, X. H., 
who d. in 1864; m. (2) William X. Conn of Antrim. July 26, 1877, where 
she now res.; one son by first m.. George M. Carr, b. X T ov. 6, 1864. 

3. Elbridge Franklin, b. Dec. 14, 1839, d. in the army at Xew Orleans, 
Dec. 15, 1862, member of the 8th X. H. Regt, Vol. 

4. James McCauley, b. Sept. 19, 1842, d. Antrim, July 15, 1865. from 
disease contracted in the army. meYnber 9th X". H. Regt. 

5. Emeline Willis, twin, b. Jan. 19, 1844, m. Chas. F. Holt of Antrim, 
Nov. 26. 1863; seven ch., d. Oct.. 1883. 

6. Emily Wilkins, twin, b. Jan. 19, 1844, m. Francis White of Bos- 
ton, X T ov. 7, 1865, lives in Boston ; has two sons. 

7. Arthur Linwood, b. July 29, 1885, m. Clara A. Conn of Antrim, 
Nov. 22, 1882, resides Antrim. 

William Harrison Smith, son of David and Mary S. (Averill) Smith, 
b. Mont Vernon, Oct. 22, 1815. He worked in the box shop and resided 
on the Wilkins place in the valley in East Dist., moved to Milford in 
1873, where he d. July 27, 1889. He m. Jan. 1, 1841, Lydia J., dau. of 
Timothy and Sally (Marshall) Baldwin. She was b. Mont Vernon. June 
30. 1816, d. Mont Vernon, April 20. 1868. Ch. b. Mont Vernon: 

1. Emeline M, b. Sept. 18, 1841. d. Aug. 13, 1847. 

2. Lenora A., b. Feb. 27, 1S45; res. Wilton, unm. 
:;. A. Josephine, b. Jan. 27, 1847; res. Wilton, unm. 

4. Marcella, b. March 13, 1856. m. Feb. 25, 1880, Dr. Geo. W. Hatch; 
res. Wilton, where she d. March 17. 1899; two ch., Fred and Lydia. 

James Smith, son of Jacob and Katherine (White) Smith, b. Mont 
Vernnn, m. Catherine, dau. Charles and Catherine (Xewton) Caswell. She 
was 1). Bandon. Vt. He lived in Francestown, afterwards in Mont Vernon 
in house now torn down (near Secombe's) in South Dist. He afterward 
lived in West Dist.. where he d. 1878. After his death she m. Aug. 26, 

1885. Augustus Johnson of Bennington. She d. Mont Vernon, Oct. 12, 
1901. age 81 yrs., 3 mos., 3 dys. Ch. 

1. Deborah, m. Henry H. Joslin, an enterprising farmer of Lynde- 
boro, has a large family of ch. ; res. Lyndeboro. 

2. Andrew, res. Bennington. 

3. Alvin, m. his cousin, dau. of Samuel Smith of Orange, Vt. ; two 
ch. ; is a rural mail-carrier and resides in Xew Boston. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 143 

4. James W., has resided in South Keene and Walpole, N. H., is 
m., has five ch. ; res. Gilmanton. 

5. Esther W., b. Nov. 25, 1853, m. (I) James Douglas, m. (2) *James 
C. Towne ; res. Peterboro. 

Dr. Norman Smith, son of Jesse and Nabby (Kittredge) Smith, b. 
Mont Vernon, Oct. 13, 1811. He grad. Vermont Medical College, Wood- 
stock, in 1843, and the same year established himself in the practice of 
medicine and surgery at Groton, Mass. He acquired a wide practice in the 
surgical branch of his profession extending over the northern part of Mid- 
dlesex Co., Mass., and the southern part of Hillsboro Co., in N. II. In 
April. 1861, at the outbreak of the Civil War he went out as surgeon of 
the 6th Mass. Regt. and was with it in its famous march through Balti- 
more, and during its first campaign of three months. In 1874 he went to 
Europe and passed one year attending medical lectures and hospital prac- 
tice on the continent. Returning in 1875 he resided in Nashua. He pur- 
chased a fine estate near Groton, Mass., where he closed his busy and use- 
ful life May 24, 1888. During his earlier years Dr. Smith was proficient 
in music, which he taught with great success. He was a member of the 
Mass. Medical Society and was a public-spirited citizen, prominent in what- 
ever promoted the welfare of the community in which he lived. In early 
life he united with the church in Mont Vernon, and was one of the oldest 
members of the evangelical church in Groton. He m. (1) May 1, 1838, 
Harriet, dau. John and Lydia Sleeper of Francestown. She d. Sept. 2, 
1839. He til. (2) Nov. 6, 1843, Adeline Sleeper, a sister of his first wife, 
who d. July 6, 1846. He m. (3) Sept. 22, 1847, Abby Maria, dau. Ephraim 
and Sarah (King) Brown of Wilton. She d. Juh< 17, 1852. He m. (4) 
Sept. 12, 1853, Sarah, dau. Solomon and Dorcas (Hopkins) Frost, who d. 
Dec. 4, 1856. He m. (5) Sept. 11, 1860, Mrs. Mary J. (King) Lee, wid. 
David Lee of Barre, Mass., dau. Daniel and Rebecca (Parmenter) King of 
Rutland, Mass. She d. 1901, in Boston. Ch. by first wife: 

1. Henry J., b. Aug. 26, 1836, d. Aug. 1858, at the age of nearly 19; 
a remarkably amiable and pious youth. 

Ch. by third wife 

2. Frank, b. Aug. 2, 1851, d. July 27, 1860. 
Ch. by fifth wife : 

3. Norman K., Sept. 28, 1868; res. Boston. 

4. Frederic L., Feb. 26, 1871; res. Boston. 

5. Laura K., Oct. 27, 1872; res. Boston. 

Honorable Charles James Smith, son of Dr. Luther and Man- (Carle- 
ton) Smith, b. Hillsboro Bridge, N. H., Sept. 3, 1820, attended the public 
schools until 1835 ; attended the Hopkinton, N. H., Academy three years 
and Milford Academy a few months. In Jan., 1839, he entered the law 
office of Albert Baker, Esq., (brother of Mrs. Mary (Baker) Eddy, the 
founder of Christian Science) at Hillsborough, and continued with him 
until Mr. Baker's death in Oct., 1841, pursuing the study of law and gen- 
eral literature. He subsequently spent a few months in the office of George 
Barstow, Esq., then at Hillsborough, but he never entered upon the prac- 
tice of law. From 1842 until 1853 he was for the larger part of the time 
occupied in school teaching in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, with 
the exception of three years, serving in 1846 as register of deeds for Hills- 
borough county and in 1850 and 1851 he was employed in the office of the 
U. S. military engineers at Boston. In April. 1853, he was aDpointed an 
inspector in the Boston custom house, holding the position until July, 1857 



144 HISTORY OF MONT VERNOX. 

He has sustained remarkable reverses of fortune, losing heavily in the great 
fires of Chicago and Boston, in the latter of which he was financially over- 
whelmed by the loss of over $40,000 in insurance stocks, owning 252 shares 
in 13 of what was, prior to the fire, the strongest companies in New Eng- 
land. Since 1873 he has been engaged in fire insurance, having an office in 
Boston several years. An historical sketch of his native town, entitled, 
"Annals of Hillsborough," from his pen, was published in 1841. He con- 
tributed to the History of Hillsborough County, published in 1885, the his- 
torical sketch of Mont Vernon. He has had a voting residence in Mont 
Vernon since 1842 and has held the offices q.f selectman four years, town 
clerk six years, moderator 16 years, and for over 20 years had" the super- 
vision of his schools. He was a representative in 1800 and 1861, member 
of the Senate in 1861! and 18(54, and of the Constitutional Convention in 
1876 and 1889. From 1845 to 1871 he resided with his mother in. the house 
now owned by the Dr. C. M. Kittredge Estate in South Dist. In 1871 he 
purchased the "Cloutman place" of Mrs. C. L. Wilkins, southeast of the 
village, where he now resides. June 6, 1878, he m. Mrs. Marguerite (Hay- 
mand) Burt of Plymouth, Mass. She was b. Feb. 15, 1847. Ch. b. Mont 
Vernon : 

1. Mary Ellen Rolfe, b. May 13, 1879, is a teacher. 

2. Edward Lorhair. b. Jan. 24, 1881, has a position with a publishing 
company in Lowell and Lawrence, Mass. 

3. Lelia Eugenie, b. Oct. 15, 1882, stenographer in Boston. 

4. Helen Adelaide, b. Oct. 1, 1884, d. Aug. 24, 1885. 

Mr. Smith's stepson, Charles J. Smith, Jr., b. Feb. 4, 1874, has resided 
in Somerville since 1889 ; is a foreman in a large teaming establishment in 
Boston; m. Feb. 6, L897 , Ada K., dan. John K. and Mary (Sexton) Stin- 
son of Somerville ; one ch. 

Dea. Daniel Smith, lived west of McCollom Hill in North Dist., m. 
(1) ; m. (2) Polly Carleton of Lyndeboro. He d. Sept. 1, 1829, age 80. 
His wife, Polly, d. June 13, 1847, age 59. Ch. by first wife b. Mont Vernon. 

1. William, a tanner, settled in Greenfield. His widow, Clara, m. 
Charles Richardson of Amherst. She d. July 16, 1863. 

Ch. by second wife b. Mont Vernon. 

1. *John, b. Sept. 12, 1809. 

2. Sarab, m. Asa Goodale of Antrim, a man of wealth ; one dau., 
Olive Jane, m. Melvin Temple of Windsor; had two ch. 

3. Mindwill, m. *Simeon Story, moved to Antrim, 1860; one ch. 

4. Hiram, m. Eliza Bertram, went from Antrim to Minnesota in 1854. 

John Smith, son of Dea. Daniel and Polly (Carleton) Smith, b. Mont 
Vernon, Sept. 12, 1809; m. Cynthia W., dau. of David and Mary (Averill) 
Smith. She was b. Mont Vernon, March 4, 1807, d. June 15, 1884. He 
lived in the village. He d. July 5, 1881. Ch. b. Mont Vernon: 

1. John Henry, b. Aug. 5, 1835, served in 2nd and 13th N. H. Regts. 
in Civil War, m. (l) Aug. 13, 1862, Almira Fletcber of Antrim, who d. 
June 29, 1861; m. (2) Mrs. Sarah R. Sargent, wid. William Sargent of 
Amherst and dau. Dea. Enoch and Jane (Jameson) Sargent. She was b. 
Goffstown, March 5, 1833, d. May 14, 1896. He m. (3) Mrs. Eleanor M. 
Perkins, wid. Joseph E. Perkins and dau. Jesse and Eleanor (Morgan) 
Manning, Sept. 6, 1900. She was b. Billerica, Mass., Dec. 13, 1841, d. June 
29, 1902. He m. (4) Nov. 22. 1902, Mrs. Bridget (Quinn) Gould. 

2. *Daniel Harrison, b. March 15, 1838. 

3. Emma Angeline, b. Oct. 11, 1840, d. unm. Sept. 12, 1881. 



HISTORY OF MONT VERNON. 145 

4. Charles Richmond, b. April 4, 1844, d. unm. June 29, 1901. 

5. Nancv Maria, b. Oct. 26, 1848, m. Russell Farrington ; res. near Liv- 
ermore Falls, Me. ; has two dau. 

Daniel Harrison Smith, son of John and Cynthia (Smith) Smith, b. 
Mont Vernon, March 15, 1838. He is a farmer and resides at the upper 
end of village at "Pine Grove Farm." He m. June 1, 1858, Mary J., dau. 
Daniel and Olive (Proctor) Holt of Milford. She was b. Milford, Jan. 
27, 1840. Ch. b. Mont Vernon : 

1. Richmond, b. July 11, 1863, m. Nov. 2, 1887, Jessie B. Nye. He is 
a meat and provision dealer in Boston ; res. in Dorchester, Mass., has 
one ch. 

2. *Frank, b. Aug. 20, 1865. 

3. L. Belle, b. Feb. 16, 1867, m. July 3,