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Full text of "History of Valparaiso, [Indiana] from the earliest times to the present"

&£fV 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01643 7979 

Gc 977.202 V24hx 

History of Valparaiso, 
C Indiana.! from the earliest 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/historyofvalparaOOvalp 



» - 



*# ^4a"^ /fO 



HISTORY 



OF 



VALPARAISO 



FROM THE 



Earliest Times to the Present, 



:e"3r ~&- oirriiziEKr, 



VALPARAISO : 

NORMAL PUBLISHING HOUSE. 



INDIANA COLLECTION 



Hi. IF 3 . IMI .A. 1ST -V X T_i T_j E , 

— DEAL£R IN — 

DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, HATS & CAPS, BOOTS & SHOES. 

NO. 3 MAIN STREET, VALPARAISO. 



WE MAKE MERCHANT TAILORINC A SPECIALTY. 



J. S. LOTJDERBACK, 
CITY BAKERY- 

F°ESH BREAD, PIES AND CAKES. 

Groceries and Provisions, Glans and 
Queensware, Wood and Willow Ware. 
No, 19 Main street. 

GO TO MRS. GREGG'S 

FOR YOUR 

MIIjIjIWrEIlY. 

Under 1st National Bank. 

Old Hat8 made new. Pattern Hats re- 
ceived every week. 

W. P. WILCOX, 

DEALER IN 

DBUGS, MEDICINES k HEMICALS, 

FANCY h TOILET ARTICLES, 

Sponges, Srushes, Perfumery, fto. 
Prescriptions carefully compound! d at 
all hours of the day and night. No. 2 
Academy of Mnsic Block. 

Ci. PODALL, 

DEALER IN 

FfJfiN!TUF£ OF AL.J- KiNps. 

BOOK CASES. CHAMBER St IIS, tfc. 

ADJOINING OPE A HOUSE. 

DALSON & HISfcR, 

LIVERY AN? FEED tTiiEL 1 . 

FRANKLIN ST.hHT. 

Nearly opposite Court lions-. Give 
us a call. 




McCORMIf'K & URBAHNS, 



DEALERS IN 



GROCFrlES & PROVISIONS. 

• VALPARAISO, IND. 

NO. 3 ACADEMY OF MUSIC BLOCE.. 

FRAN K COM M ER FO RD , 

ffrugyist <md gfaruuuiai. 

Has had 24 years experience. A 
large stock of Toilet Goods constantly 
on hand. Come and get a glass of 
Arctic Soda Water. Mr. W. D. 
Shelly, of the Normal Chemistry class- 
will be happy to see his friends a 
Commerford's. 

O -A.PL 3D S 



Visiting an*. Address C r's 

PRINTED AT THE 

NOR M A L P TJ B L I S H I N G H O F 8 E. 
CHAS. FERNEKES, 

^ MANUFACTURER AND WHOLESALE PF.AI.FR 



AW. VILLT^n'S LIVEUY AND 
• FEED STABLES. LaFmyettt St.. 
west of Gould House. Wheu you wmt 
the finest outfit iD the c.t.v call aud see 
me. Charges moderate. 



MG. AITSTIV. House. Sign Ca" 
• riage and Ornamental Painter. \c 
AH orders promptly attended to. Ovc- 
Agricultural wanrooms, east Main st. 

AV. LETBEN. deal^rin Fresh Bleats, 
• Corned Beef, Salt Pork. Smoked 
Meats. Sugar Cured Hams. Spice, 1 Beef 
and dealer in Live Stock. Cheaper for 
cash than any other house in the city. 
Two doors south of the Mutenger Office. 



c 

OS 

FEC 

TIONERY 

PALACE 

CHOKE 

CIG 

AR - 

8, 

AC. 

TO 

t 



CONEBCTf OITI B.Y ! 

The finest Ice Cream, Lemonade, 
Soda Water and Fruits. Als<>. n lnra;e 
stock of Toys. Yankee Nations, &c. 
No. 7 Main street. 

DR. ISAAC ROYD, 

THE OLD AND RELIABLE 

"D HI JXT T t m T . 

OVER VAII.S JEWELRY STORE. 

Office hours : From 7 to 12 A. M. and 
1 to 6 p. M. 

GOULD HOUSE, 

A. R. GOULD, Proprietor. 

First-class Saroele Rooms Handsome- 
ly furnished. 



OMNIBUS TO AND PROM THE DEPOT. 



eimiipifle store. 

STRAUSS & JOEI , 



• DEALERS DJ — 



Dry Goods, Clothing, Hats and Caps, Ladies' & Gent's Furnishing Gooas. 

We havp just received our new and elegant Spring stvles. Students . h-n'd ret fa'l to exanrre on- 
k. which is complete n every department, and prices suoh as to give univers 1 xat.sfa. tiou We will 
• eat p'eps.iro in showing our goods and prices. 



HISTORY 



OF 



VALPARAISO 



FROM THE 



Earliest Times to the Present, 



IBY ^_ CITIZEN. 

<j ; 7'7. £ ff 

VALPARAISO: 

NORMAL PUBLISHING HOUSB. 

J876. 



Men County Public Librarf 
Ft, Wayne. Indian! / . * 

TO 

ROWLAND STORY, 

l^rns Littbe Work is Aeffctionately Inscribed by 

THE AUTHOR. 



Issued in accordance with proclamation of President U. S. GRANT, and filed 
in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court. 



I have read the History of Valparaiso, by Hubert .1/. Skinner, and consider it to be well 

written, eind substantially as correct a history as could be compiled 
from the materia! available for sink a work. 

T. 1. /-'. CAMPBELL. 




1677773 

HISTORY OF VALPARAISO. 

CHAPTER I.-Chiqua's Town. 



N ALL the old years which rolled their course over Pottawat- 
tamie-land previous to 1833, the site of our city of Valparaiso 
was uninhabited by any permanent population, and unfre- 
'quently visited by white men. The site, however, is not 
devoid of historic interest. Across the northeast corner, bending to 
the southward, passed the old Sac trail, which formed the principal 
highway between the East and the West, leading over the isthmus 
between lake Michigan and the everglades of the Kankakee. Over 
this old trail roamed the wandering tribes of the forest for ages. Over 
this path, in 1681, probably passed the illustrious French voyageur, La 
Salle, as he hastened, a weary and foot-sore traveler, on his return from 
his unfortunate " IIeart-13reak Expedition" down the Kankakee. 
With but three companions, this celebrated explorer fled to the east- 
ward, over the wild prairies and through the forests. Just one hun- 
dred years later, in 1781, the Spanish army of Don Eugenio Pierre, who 
had come from St. Louis to conquer the lake region for the king of 
Spain, passed over the old trail, and in the region of Powell's Addition 
and North Valparaiso resounded the tread of the invading troops and 
waved the flag of Spain. 

Without the city proper, but within the suburbs, and but a mile to 
the eastward, is the site of the old Indian village known as Chiqua's 
Town. Like the other villages of the Aborigines, Chiqua's Town com- 
prised but little that was permanent in its character. The dwell- 
ings were of a temporary nature, being composed of skins or barks, 
and at times almost wholly disappeared, as the inhabitants were migra- 
tory in their habits. The village was frequently almost deserted, as 



CHIQUA'S TOWN 



the men and boys went out on their numerous hunts and excursions of 
various kinds. At other times the village presented a lively scene, as 
the hundreds assembled there on their return. The principal features 
which gave permanence to the location were the dancing ground, which 
was prepared with great care for its use, and the fields of corn which 
surrounded the spot and stretched away to the westward, within our 
present borders. These fields were cultivated by the squaws, a few of 
whom were always to be found at the village, engaged in their domestic 
work or in cultivating the fields. On the occasions which marked the 
return of the natives from their hunts and journeys, the old town was a 
scene of wild festivities. Whiskey was purchased of M. Bailly, a 
French trader of Bailey Town, and was drank in large quantities. The 
men joined in the dances, and the squaws played upon the rude musi- 
cal instruments which they possessed. A grand feast followed, and 
for several successive days and nights the participants in these festiv- 
ities resigned themselves to uninterrupted enjoyment. How long this 
spot had been thus held as a residence or rendezvous by the natives of 
this region is not known, but a high antiquity is indicated by its numer- 
ous graves and mounds. Early in this century it was known as such 
to the traders who traversed Pottawattamie land, and subsequently to the 
settlers who came to the vicinity in the early years of our country's his- 
tory. It received its name at that time from the chief, Chiqua, a 
Pottawattamie leader, who made the place his home, and held it subject 
to his control. 

The site of Valparaiso, together with nearly all of the land which 
now forms our county, was purchased of the natives by the United 
States in October, 1832, and in the following year families immigrated 
to the new territory thus opened up to them. Among the earliest set- 
tlers was Thomas Campbell, who came from New York in company 
with the family of his uncle, Adam S. Campbell. It was in May that 
this party of pioneers came in their wagon from the East. They paused 
for a time at Laporte, which then consisted of two log houses. Thomas 
and his uncle stopped during one night at the house of Isaac Morgan, 
which had been recently established upon the prairie, that still bears 
the name of its first occupant. On the morning of the 22d, the Camp- 
bells came on horseback as far to the west as the Tish-ka-tawk, where 
they paused at what is now called Campbell's Field. The site of the 
future city lay smiling in the warm spring sunshine, its undulating 
hills and valleys robed in verdure, and its streams sparkling in the light. 
On this morning, after some consultation, they decided to advance no 
farther to the westward. After returning to Laporte for Mrs. Camp- 
bell and the children, who had remained there while these explorers 
were selecting their location, the party took up their residence near 
Chiqua's Town. Thomas Campbell, then a young man about twenty- 
two years of age, had selected the locality of their halt near the Tish- 



EA11LY STRUGGLES. 9 

ka-tawk, as his future home. There, to-day, stands his elegant resi- 
dence, the largest mansion to be found in our county, and one of the 
most elegant of the many commanding structures of the city. 



CHAPTER n.-Early Struggles. 

LARGE number of immigrants came into the new region to 
^the west of Laporte in the following year, and established their 
r>^V|' homes upon the prairies. Among the early immigrants of '34 

was a Mr. J. P. Ballard, who erected the first building upon the 
site of our city. It was in the valley by the stream which flows beneath 
the Morgan street bridge, that this first cabin rose, and in the grounds 
which are now attached to Judge Talcott's residence on Water street. 
The building was a rude log cabin, but its location rendered it a pleas- 
ant home, and the events which transpired beneath its humble roof 
have attached to it a historic interest. During the next two years the 
tide of immigration poured into the region of our county with unceas- 
ing flow, and soon a very considerable population was scattered over 
the country. 

Early in the year '36 new county was formed by the General 
Assembly from the territory lying west of that of Laporte, and 
received the name of Porter, in honor of a naval commander of the 
war of 1812. Benjamin Saylor was appointed by the governor to the 
office of organizing sheriff, and in the election, which was held in 
March, the first Board of Commissioners were elected. The first meet- 
ing of these officers was held, by common consent, at the residence of 
Mr. Ballard, although the locality of the seat of government had not 
yet been determined upon. It was on the 12th day of April that the 
officers first assembled. There were present the commissioners,— 
Messrs. John Sefford, Benjamin N. Spencer and Noah Fouts, together 
with Messrs. Geo. Turner, the clerk, and Sheriff Saylor. Seated 
around a table in Mr. Ballard's kitchen, this first council began its 
labors in the establishing of a civil government. An old map of the 
survey lay before them. The first work of the officers was to arnftlge 
the division of the county into townships, and to order the elections of 
their officers. This work claimed the attention of the Board during 
the entire day, and it was not until the next evening that the labors of 
the first session were completed. The next month, the officers again 
met at Mr. Ballard's house, and continued in session during three days. 
Meanwhile, the question of the location of the county seat became the 
all-absorbing question of the day. No more fruitful field for specula- 
tion is ever offered to pioneers than in the location of the future city. 
There were many rival points which presented their claims to this dis- 



10 EAliLY STHUGGLES. 



tinction, and many rival land owners who exerted every influence in 
their power to direct the choice of the commissioners who had the mat- 
ter in charge. These commissioners were Messrs. Judah Learning, 
Matthias Dawson and W. L. Earl. The final contest lay between the 
two towns of Porterville and Portersville. both of which were myth- 
ical, so far as any real settlement was concerned, and were to be found 
only in the plats of their surveys. Porterville occupied a held imme- 
diately east of the old Catholic cemetery, west of Valparaiso, and Por- 
tersville, the site of our present city. The first was owned by a Mr. 
Wm. K. Talbott; the last, by Mr. John Saylor. The proprietor of 
Portersville was determined to win the day at any cost ; and this he 
did, but at a dear rate. He divided the town into ten shares, of 
which he reserved only one for himself, and distributed nine of the 
shares among his friends, by this means awakening a strong influence in 
favor of the town for the county seat. He then offered to present to 
the county all the streets and alleys, the court-house square and half 
the town lots. This princely offer serves to illustrate how determined 
was the struggle between the two mythical towns— mythical because as 
yet unbuilt and not even recorded, but existing only in the plans of the 
speculators. As soon, however, as the struggle had fairly begun, 
building enterprises began in the east town, as it seemed to win confi- 
dence from the start. 

The first houses of the town were generally built of lumber, 
instead of logs (as was usually the case in early towns of the far 
west) since the new county had, with rare enterprise, established saw- 
mills at the very start, and lumber was readily obtained. In the 
spring a rough board structure was erected by Cyrus Spurlock, the first 
Recorder of the county, on the site of the Academy of Music. There 
were two rooms in the establishment, the first being used as a saloon, 
where brandy was drank from gourds, and the rear apartment being 
appropriated by the family of the proprietor. At this building the 
Commissioners' Court met in June. The rear room, where their session 
was held, was a small, low-walled chamber, about twelve feet square ; 
and as the days were hot and sultry, the location may have been consid- 
ered favorable by the Board, in view of the convenient proximity of the 
Recoider's bar. Here, also, was the scene of the first wedding in the 
new town. It was on the fifth day of May. The parties were Rich- 
ard Henthorne and Jane Spurlock, and the ceremony was conducted 
by the Recorder, in his office. 

During the summer, John Saylor built a house where the Empire 
Block now stands, and Dr. Blachley erected another, just across the 
alley. 

In the fall, the " Tale of Two Cites " was told, and their fate 
decided. Portersville was selected by the commissioners as the county 



PORTERJSVILLE. 11 




seat, and was recorded, the plat bearing the date of October 31st. Mr. 
Talbott sadly rolled up his map of Porterville and placed it in his 
bureau drawer, where the mice soon destroyed the only existence 
the town ever had . 



CHAPTER Ill.-Portersville. 

UKING the Summer and Fall of '36, the young town of Por- 
tersville was the scene of active building enterprise. The 
court-house square was located in a grove which stood upon a 
gentle eminence, and was then, as now, considered to be the 
most beautiful square in the State. As soon as it became generally 
known that this town was to triumph over its western rival, speculation 
immediately began in lots. Those about the square were first taken 
and improved. Dr. Seneca Ball, who removed at this time from 
Laporte with his cousin, Jno. C. Ball, erected a small store building at 
the northeast corner, on Main street, where is now the well-known 
burnt district. Opposite, to the eastward, Mr. Jeremiah Hamill put up 
another small building, where he also kept goods for sale. A small 
structure was also built on Bryant's corner, and used for a carpenter 
shop, Mr. Robert Stotts being the proprietor. East of the square, Mr. 
Wm. Walker commenced the erection of a large tavern. Before he 
had completed it, he sold the property to Messrs. Sol. Cheney and Jno. 
Herr, who finished the building and kept a tavern in it. The 
building still stands on its original site, immediately north of the liv- 
ery stable of Dalson & Hiser, though turned half around, and with the 
end to the street. Late in the year was begun the north part of the 
Valparaiso House, which was completed during the following summer 
by Mr. Abraham Hall. The old building, greatly enlarged, still stands, 
though the greater part is now but a tenantless, mouldering ruin. 
When fully completed, it was a grand house for its early day, when 
lumbering coaches and the still more uncomfortable mover wagons 
were the only common modes of travel. South of the square, where 
now stands the residence of Mrs. Baker, was built a small residence 
by Mr. William Eaton, where Mr. Wm. Bishop first opened his store in 
the fall of this same year. To the westward, and on the next block, 
Mr. Spurlock put up a rude log cabin. There were no fences and no 
sidewalks, and streets were only designated by the paths which led 
through them, or by the marks of the surveyors. 

In October, the Circuit Court held its first session in the house of 
John Spurlock. Judge Samuel C. Sample held the " bench,'' which, 
m this instance, was a rush-bottomed chair, behind a deal table. It 
was a damp, chilly autumn day. with clouds which forboded rain. A 



12 VILLAGE LIFE. 



large number of persons were in from the country, however, and crowd- 
ed about and within the court-room. The venerable Judge Sample 
helped himself to a " snort" of brandy at the Recorder's bar, and was 
readv for business. Court was declared open, and the first cause 
called. The suit went by default, as the plaintiff did not appear. 
The grand jury, finding no convenient room for their deliberations in 
the house, passed over to the site of the T. G. Miller block on Main 
street, where their council was held under a burr oak tree. The rain, 
which had long been threatening, now fell ; but beneath the canopy of 
leaves of this council tree, the jurors continued their session. One of 
them started a fire of logs near by, and the genial blaze and heat im- 
parted some comfort to the cheerless rendezvous. 

Within the same year, the first liquor saloon was opened by Abraham 
Hall, in the Valparaiso House. In '37, the court-house was erected, 
on the site of the Frank Hunt block on Washington street. It still 
stands, occupying its original site, being now used as a saloon by Phil- 
lip Bayer. The jail was built at the same time by Sheriff Saylor, on 
Mechanic street, near Morgan. It was built of white oak logs, and 
was used for many years. The postoffice was kept in one of the office 
rooms in the first story of the court-house. Court was held in the 
large room above. 

In the winter of this same year, the name of the town was changed 
to that of Valparaiso. It happened that a party of old sailors from 
the South Pacific stopped, one night, at HalFs old tavern, and 
passed the evening in telling tales of the old Chilian seaport of that 
name. It was at old Valparaiso that the hero for whom our county 
was named, fought his famous battle on board the " Essex," and at the 
suggestion of the party of marines, the young county seat was appropri- 
ately named for the Spanish- American seaport. 



CHAPTER IV.-Village Life. 

ITHIN the year '38 was preached the Qrst sermon in Valpa- 
raiso. Rev. Elder Alpheus French conducted the services, and 
pVS the house of Win. Eaton, on Mechanic street, was the building 
thus hallowed by the first Christian worship. The most mem- 
orable event of this year was the trial of one Staves, who murdered a 
man in the north part of the county. The old court-house was crowd- 
ed from day to day as the trial progressed. The man was found guilty. 
and sentenced to be hung in June. The sentence was executed, and 
the murderer paid the penalty of his crime. The scaffold was erected 
near the alley south of the present High School building, and on the 
border of the street. Hundreds were present to witness this most 




VILLAGE LIFE. 13 



memorable scene, and saw the doomed man go to his death with his 
crime unconfessed, and protesting his innocence to the last. 

During the next year the Rev Dr. J. C. Brown and the Rev. Father 
Forbes were sent by their respective churches as missionaries to Val- 
paraiso and vicinity, and in '40 the Presbyterian and Methodist churches 
were organized at this place. The former congregation generally held 
their services in the court-house, until their church edifice was erected, 
and the other church, after a time, rented the brick basement of a 
frame building on the corner of Main and Lafayette strrets, where now 
stands the elegant Knights Templar's block of Mr. Fiske. In the year 
'40, T. A. E. Campbell, then postmaster of the town, took the census.. 
The village then contained about three hundred inhabitants. 

In '42 the Presbyterian pastor, Dr. Brown, succeeded, by his indomi- 
table energy, in erecting the large edifice still used by his congregation, 
upon one of the most beautiful sites imaginable, where now stands the 
residence of G. Bloch. The church building was afterwards removed 
to Jefferson street. Dr. Brown, Elder Jackson Buel, Elder Morgan, 
B. Crosby and others of the church, hewed the timbers and raised the 
beams with their own hands, and selected and set out the shade trees, 
laid out the walks, and in various ways added to the beauty and worth 
of the old church by their care and exertions. In '43, the first news- 
paper was established, and was edited and published by James 
Castle, whose office was on Bryant's corner. The paper was only 
twelve by sixteen inches in size, but was an interesting feature of the 
town. The early society of Valparaiso was in a high degree moral 
and refined ; and it is with no little pride that our citizens of to-day can 
point to those early residents, whose example has been left as a price- 
less legacy to the present generation. 

Of the men of the decade of the Forties day, who are no longer/to 
be found in our midst, we will mention a few names : Harlowe. S. 
Orton, the first attorney of the place, (now a leading jurist and states- 
man of Wisconsin.) resided at the dwelling which still stands on its old 
site just north of the Hamill House. His office was in the court-house. 
Mr. Chas. E. DeWolfe, now one of the wealthiest men of Michigan City, 
kept a variety store on Bryant's corner, and resided at the present home 
of Judge S. I. Anthony. Mr. Jno. D. Ross, another leading merchant 
of the place, erected the house now owned by Dr. James Newland, the 
original site being the corner of Mechanic and Franklin streets. Here 
he resided until '46, when he removed to Michigan. Mr. Wm. Tainter, 
who, with J. N. Skinner conducted the store of Wm. H. Goodhue, of 
Michigan City, and was a prominent citizen, lived near she site of the 
Baptist church until he removed to Wisconsin. Rev. Dr. Brown 
occupied the house of .Jno. Saylor for a time, and in '43 removed to his 
residence on Jefferson street. Dr. Brown now sleeps beneath the 
grand monument in the old cemetery, and his family still live in the old 



14 THE COBPOB ATE TOWN. 

mansion. General Robert A. Cameron, M. D., an editor and leading 
physician of the town, lived in the house now owned by J. W. Bradley, 
on Mechanic street. After the close of the war, in which he ably 
served, and the death of his estimable wife, General Cameron removed 
to Colorado, where he still resides. Dr. Seneca Ball, sometime Judge 
and Representative, lived on the corner north of his store, and oppo- 
site the Methodist church. This last structure was bnilt in '49, dur- 
ing the pastorate of Dr. J. G. D. Pettijohn, who lived diagonally oppo- 
site the Presbyterian church. Dr. Ball removed to Kansas, but 
returned and died in Valparaiso in '75. Elder Nathaniel R. Strong kept 
the first undertaker's establishment, in connection with a furniture 
store, at the southwest corner of the Square, and resided near the store. 
Mr. Strong long remained at his old home, one of our most prominent 
citizens. He removed to California in '7-5, and now resides in San Fran- 
cisco. Elder Jackson Buel, for many years one of our wealthiest and 
most influential business men, lived at the present residence of Mayor J. 
N. Skinner, and conducted a large blacksmithing establishment on the 
site of the Dresser store. Mr. Buel's family still reside in Valparaiso, 
in one of the beautiful residences of Washington street. The names 
of these gentlemen are associated with the pleasant and proud recollec- 
tions of the old days, and will long continue to be household words in 
the homes of the present generation. Whatever the tide of success 
and prosperity that may yet turn to Valparaiso, the old village days are the 
days upon which our citizens will ever look with greatest pleasure. 



CHAPTER V— The Corporate Town. 

HE TOWN of Valparaiso became incorporated by special act 
of the Legislature, in the year 1850. Obadiah Dunham was the 
first inspector of elections. The town remained incorporated 
during a period of fifteen years, at the end of which time it con- 
tained the requisite population for incorporation as a city. 

The town council generally met at the Recorder's office dining all 
this time. This assembly numbered six members. These were In - 
quentdy changed, a selections were held every year, and many of our cit- 
izens belonged to the number. In '54, the block now owned by Messrs. 
Hubbard Hunt and Cave Rodgers, was builtNby Messrs. Skinner and 
Mason, at the southwest corner of the Square."' *Fhis was the first brick 
block erected witfrm the town, and was built near a thicket of hazel 
brush. Other fine blocks were erected from time to time, and scarcely 
a year has since passed without witnessing the rise of one or more com- 
modious and substantial business houses. In '56. was a remarkable 




4 



1677773 

THE COBROBATE TOWN. 15 

catastrophe. A large block, which was owned by Messrs. Hughart and 
Salyer, gave way suddenly and fell. Singularly enough, none of the in- 
mates were killed, though a few were hurt. The same block, rebuilt 
much the same as before, now stands on the same site. 

The records of the council during the four Olympiads of the organ- 
ization are almost wholly devoid of interest, as only matters of minor 
importance claimed the attention of the councilmen, who were little dis- 
posed to be meddlesome or arbitrary in their measures. 

A number of district schools were established in various parts of the 
town, and as early as '54, a school of a higher grade, known as the Old 
Seminary, was built upon the brow of the Calkins Hill. It stood only 
three years, however. One evening in the fall of '57, the Old Seminary 
was seen wrapped in flames, which lit up the village in a splendid illum- 
ination, and it was speedily reduced to a6hes. No attempt at a high 
school was ever again made by the town council. 

In '53, the Pittsburg railway was completed to the town, opening up a 
highway to the world without. During the same year, the North- 
Western Indiana Conference met in the town, Bishop E. R. Ames 
presiding. This was a very marked event in our local history. The 
history of Valparaiso during this period is not the record found in the 
council book, but is told in relating the customs and manners of the 
community. The Valparaiso people made sociability prominent 
among their characteristics, and many and large entertainments were 
given at the residences of citizens. In religious observances and 
general piety, the people of Valparaiso were genuine descendants of the 
Pilgrims. Bells were tolled for church service, (as they are still); danc- 
ing, theatre and circus-going were placed under an absolute taboo ; 
promenading, newspaper-reading and general singing on the Sabbath 
were discountenanced. Among the invariable "institutions" of the com- 
munity were the court-yard picnics and the other celebrations of Indepen- 
dence Day. In the town square was a gathering each year of the young 
and old on the Fourth of July. The united Sunday schools headed 
the immense procession which marched through the streets and into 
the Square through the broad south gate. An old cannon, which wrs 
purchased by subscription for the purpose, boomed through all the hbtrfa 
of the day from sunrise until late at night. The General, who was us- 
ually marshal of the day, rode about on his white horse, his manly form 
being constantly seen and distinguished amid the crowd. Refresh- 
ments were served in the grove, and nothing was lacking to the enjoyment 
of the Fourth. Everything relating to the old celebrations is still 
pleasantly remembered by the citizens of our city. Even the old can- 
non was regarded as a sacred relic of the General and the Doctor and 
their celebrations, as long as it remained intact. 

As a frontispiece of this book is a view of Main street as it was in 
in ;")S. The view is from the northeast corner of the square. To the 



16 THE CORPORATE TOWN. 

left is the court house, with its aucient looking steeple, and surrounded 
by the old white fence. Beyond it stands the old "Washington Saloon," 
near which are a mover's wagon and a horseman. Much further down 
are other wagons, and the old sign post of the Gould House. The 
right side presents first the corner saloon of Jimmie Mc Laughlin, and 
next to this is the drug store of Hiram Loomis. A few steps further, 
several men are seen standing near the meat market of Capt, Ellithan 
Marshall and Mr Orson Starr. Next to this is the old grocery of Na- 
hum Cross, where farmers used to gather on market days and talk of 
crops, while sitting upon mackerel kegs and barrels. Above is a small 
portico with a large sign board, and in front, a team. Extending to 
the alley stands the old Empire Block, its stores being occupied by Lo- 
renzo Freeman on tha east, and Hiram Bickford on the west. Beyond 
the alley should appear the justice office of "Old Square Porter," which 
is indicated only by a few coarse marks. The two story frame struct- 
tire is the "Chicago Store" of the Calkins Brothers. Beyond this should 
appear the low bookstore of "Uncle Abe Isham," well known to every 
school boy of the old times. The large Union Block on the next street 
corner contains three stores. In the first of these is the large estab- 
lismentof J. N. Skinner. In the second is the store of William Powell 
and Stephen Bartholomew. On the corner stood, as it still stands, the 
Bryant drug store, and near it the sign of the bakery beneath. 
Another old land mark is the opposite building on Salyer's corner, where 
Mr. Gilbert A. Sayles held forth as hardware merchant. The two 
stores of the brick block beyond were held by G. Block on the east, and 
a Mr. D. Dillenbeck on the west. 

In '59 began the career of Valparaiso as an educational centre. On 
the summit which overlooks the town from the southeast, was built the 
Valparaiso Male and Female College, an institution of the Methodists. 
The first president was Rev. Dr. C. N. Sims, more recently of Baltimore 
and Brooklyn, now one of the most renowned on both continents, of all 
American pulpit orators. His residence was the house on Diagonal 
Avenue now occupied by Mr. J. E. C iss. For fourteen years the college 
continued, numbering among its faculty in iny of the most noted educa- 
tors of the State, and keeping up tuo social interests of the city by its 
large number of students from abroad. In the heart of the town was 
established another college, known as the Valparaiso Collegiate Insti- 
tute, under the control of the Presbyterians. The building was a 
beautiful airy structure. The faculty was composed of several distin- 
guished persons, among whom were A. Y. Moore, the author, Miss So- 
phie Loring, the missionary. Miss Tyler, and Prof. Benj. Wilcox— all 
widely known and everywhere esteemed. Commencement seasons were 
red letter days to the people of the town, which was, on these occasions, 
thronged with visitors from abroad, and bright with its continued 
festivities. 



THE CITY. 19 

Of the long, sad season of war, the story can never be told. 
Patriotic to the last degree, Valparaiso was prompt to answer the call 
for aid that came from the nation's supporters. Brave men, young 
and old, thronged to the battle fields, and equally brave women bade 
their loved ones farewell, and worked heroically at home to aid in saving 
the nation. There were scenes of sorrow and want and despair in our 
borders, which can never fade from the memory of those who beheld 
them. During the rebellion, the honor roll of Valparaiso was long and 
bright, and numbered scores of noble men and noble women whose hero- 
ic endeavor can never be adequately estimated. 

In '64 was begun the grand structure of the Academy of Music, 
which was completed the next year, and opened with a fair by the ladies 
of the Presbyterian church. Within this memorable year, at the time 
of the fall of Lincoln, a mob nearly succeeded in plunging the town into 
a carnival of bloodshed and riot. In the intense excitement of the 
time, a man named Palmer, a clerk in the store of F. W. Hunt, was 
wrongly accused of having used language disrespectful to the memory 
of tne martyred President, and scarcely escaped being hanged. The 
old corporation passed into history with this memorable year, and Val- 
paraiso received a city charter. 



CHAPTER VL-The City. 

MAYOR MERRIFIELD'S FIRST ADMINISTRATION. 

ALPARAISO became incorporated as a city under the general 
act of 'Go, and late in the year. The first meeting of the council 
was held on Dec. 2nd, in the northwest room of the Excelsior 
block, in the second story. Mayor Thomas J. Merrifield took 
the chair. The councilmen present were Messrs. T. A. Hogan, George 
Porter, J. C. Peirce, O, Dunham, A. II. Somers and A. W. Kellogg. 
Committees were appointed to design a corporate seal, prepare ordi- 
nances, procure books, etc. Mayor Merrifield made an address, recom- 
mending various measures. The council met five times during the first 
month of their organization. The work of the first council, which con- 
tinued only until the following May, was mainly confined to perfecJtiug 
the city organization and improving the streets. Stringent saloon and 
gambling laws were passed, and the early career of the young city was 
marked by general good order and improvement. 

MAYOR MERRIFIELD'S SECOND ADMINISTRATION. 

The record of the second council, which first met in May, marks an 
era of great importance in our city's history. In connection with the 
county, the city began the construction of extensive water works. 
Reservoirs of large capacity were built in the corners of the public 




20 THE CITY. 

Square, and a large hydrant was established in front of the court-house. 
The water was supplied through pipes running under ground from the 
Washington street spring, near the south railway. The engine house 
was a two story frame structure at the spring. The expense of the en- 
terprise was large, the cost being several thousand dollars ; but the in- 
vestment well repaid the enterprising city. On the 13th day of March, 
»38, the council ordered the issuing of bonds, to the amount of fifty thou- 
sand dollars, as a subscription to the Peninsular Kailway, in order to 
secure the passage of the road through the city. The railway is now 
known as the Chicago and Lake Huron road. The large woolen mills 
and the paper factory, of which the citizens feel justly proud, were built 
during '66 and '67, and manufacturing enterprises received general at- 
tention in the city. 

The year '66, marking the Centenary period of American Methodism, 
was celebrated by the Methodist congregation in a public manner. In 
the following year, the large tower and wing to the east of the old col- 
lege were erected. In the same year the boundaries of the city were 
enlarged by the incorporation of Institute Addition and Southwest Val- 
paraiso. 

MAYOR LYTLE'S FIRST ADMINISTRATION 

Was marked by continued enterprise. One of the first acts of the 
Council was to secure to the city the control of the Old Cemetery, and to 
establish a new one. To this end, the beautiful tract known as Maple 
Cemetery was purchased, and laid off in the most artistic and elegant 
manner. A Hook and Ladder company was organized, as the begin- 
ning of a fire department, and an engine house was built, east of the 
court-house square. The most marked event of 

MAYOR LYTLE'S SECOND ADMINISTRATION 

Was the purchase of the Valparaiso Collegiate Institute building for 
city school purposes, and the erection of a public school edifice which 
in size and elegance is unsurpassed in the State. The school here es- 
tablished was composed of various grades, embracing in its departments 
a course unsurpassed, perhaps unequaled, by that of any other graded 
school in Indiana. The First Addition to North Valparaiso was 
incorporated in '70. It was proposed to build a bridewell. This, how- 
ever, was never done, and the city still uses for this purpose the base- 
ment of the Merchant's Hotel. During the greater portion of the timet 
Mayor -Ly tie's office and the city council chamber were kept in the block 
of the Academy of Music. Within this year was commenced the pub- 
lication of the Valparaiso Messenger, a Democratic paper. 

MAYOR SKINNER'S FIRST ADMINISTRATION, 

Like his succeeding ones, was not marked by any enterprise which 
involved a large outlay of money. An enormous debt had been incur- 
red, and an era of strict economy now began. Public improvement of 
the streets, however, went steadily on. One of the most exciting events 
of '72 was the discovery of a probable case of murder, perpetrated 
near our city. No clue to the mystery was ever found, and opinions 



THE CITY. 21 

widely diverse are held upon the subject to-day. In '73 was established 
at Valparaiso the only Pin Factory west of New York, and one of but 
four at that time in the United States. A number of tine business 
houses were erected ; notably, those of Washington street. The North- 
ern Indiana Normal School was established in the buildings of the old 
V. M. & F. College, then discontinued, and has rapidly risen to the first 
rank in size among American educational institutions. The winter 
which followed was signalized by the Crusade, in which all the leading 
ladies of the city united. By this singular movement Valparaiso be- 
came one of the most noted of all the cities in the Union, receiving more 
attention from the press of the great cities east and west than any other 
locality, Lincoln city, Neb., perhaps alone excepted. In the midst of 
the intense excitement, Mayor Skinner and Mayor Silver, of these two 
cities, issued proclamations declaring that the city ordinances must be 
enforced. These had the effect to repress disorder, though the temper- 
ance cause was long actively advocated, and much good was effected. 

MAYOR SKINNER'S SECOND ADMINISTRATION 

Was marked by the completion of the north railway, in '74. The 
finances of the city were at the beginning in a deplorable condition, 
which arose from the deficit of the former Treasurer, Wm. Fox; but 
under the skillful management of Treasurer Harrold, and the judicious 
course of the Council, they were soon re-established upon a firm basis. 
During this year, the High School held its first commencement. Early 
in '75, the Council Chamber, which had hitherto been kept in the Excel- 
sior Block, was transferred to the brown stone block on Washington 
street, north of the First National bank. During this year was a de- 
gree of building enterprise hitherto unknown ; the Opera House of L. 
II. Fiske, immense school buildings, and a dozen business houses being 
erected in one season. Early in '76, the Fire Department was estab- 
lished by the city, consisting of four companies, with two engines, a 
ladder car, and hose cart. At the present time, in 

MAYOR SKINNER'S THIRD ADMINISTRATION, 

Which has recently begun, Valparaiso numbers about five thousand 
inhabitants ; including students, perhaps much more. The city limits, 
which do not nearly include the city geographically, last year contained 
more than 3500, by the census ; the suburbs, several hundreds more. 
The number of students from abroad, and of transient residents is very 
large. The city is widely noted for its schools. Of these, the Normal 
is the largest in the United States, having an annual enrollment of 
nearly 3000 students, and a term roll of 1320. The High School contains 
over 700 students and pupils, and is perhaps the best in the State. St. 
Paul's Academy has an attendance of about 300, and the Lutheran 
School, about 100. The city contains sixty substantial business houses 
of brick, many of these in large, elegant blocks, and more than half 
that number of frame. As a resort, Valparaiso is becoming more and 
more popular, and contains at the favorite seasons, large numbers of 
guests who come to enjoy the school commencements, and the festivities 
ever to be found at her neighboring beautiful lakes. 



22 



STATISTICS. 



CHAPTER VII -Statistics. 



Original Town, Laid out 

Haas' Addition, '• " 

Peirce'8 Addition, " " 

West Valparaiso, " •• 

Woodhull s Addition, " " 

North Valparaiso, " " 

Smith's Addition, " " 

Powell's Addition, '• " 

Institute Addition, " " 

Southwest Valparaiso, " " 

First Addition to North Valparaiso, " " 

UNINCORPORATED SUBURBS 

Hazel Hill, Hawkins's Hlil, 

Emmettsburg, Bellevue, 

CEMETERIES. 

Old Cemetery, 
St. Paul's, 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

William Drago, Chief Engineer. 



July 7th 1830 

April 8th 1854. 

April 18th 1854. 

May 13th 1854. 

April 5th 1856. 

May 9th 1859. 

July 18th 1859. 

July 28th 1860. 

March 30th 1864. 

November 2nd 1864. 

May 10th 1869. 



Campbell's Field. 
Irish Town. 



Old Catholic, 
Maple. 



Alert Company, 
Hose Company, 



No. 2 Company, 
Hook and Ladder Company. 



-O- 



T. A. Hogan. 



The First Council, (Organizing), 1865-GG. 

MAYOR. 

Hon. Thos. J. Merrifleld. 

OOUNCILMEN. 

J. C. Peirce, 

Geo. Porter, O. Dunham, 

A. W. Kellogg. 



A. H. Somers, 



Thomas G. Lytic, 



T. A . Hogan, 



Jno. B. Marshall. 

The Second Council, 18GG-G7. 

MAYOR. 

Hon. Thos. J. Merrifleld. 

COVNC1LMSX. 

O. Dunham, 



O. Dunham, 



T. A. Hogan, 



T. A. Hoiran, 



M: L. McClelland, 



J. C. Peirce. 

CLERK. 

Jno. B. Marshall. 
The Third Council, 18G7-G8. 

MAYOR. 

Hon. Thos. J. Merrifleld. 

COUNCILMEN' 

J as. Keeffe, 
A. L. Jones. 

CLERK. 

Jno. B. Marshall. 
The Fourth Council, 18G8-G0. 

MAYOR. 

Hon. Thomas O. Lytic. 

COUXCILMSM. 

James B. Hawkins, 



James KecflV, 



Joseph Peirce. 



Jas, B. Hawkins, 



Thos G. Lytle. 



Don A . Salyer. 

CLERK. 

Jame9 McFetrich; 



M. J. O'Brien, 



A. L. Jones, 



STATISTICS. 23 



The Fifth Council, 1869-70. 



MAYOR. 

Hon. Thomas G. Lytle. 

COUNCILMEN. 

M. L. McClelland, M. J. O'Brien, Don A. Salyer, 

T. A. Hogan, Clayton Weaver. 

j Simeon Pierce, 
{ A. L. Jones. 

CLERK. 

James McFetrich. 



The Sixth Council, 1870-71. 



MAYOR. 

Hon. Thomas G. Lytle. 

COUNCILMEN. 

A. L. Jones, Clayton Weaver, M. L. McClelland, 

Don A Salyer, C . A . Dick over, 

JT. A. Hogan, 
JS.S. Skinner. 

CLERK. 

Wm. Jewell. 

The Seventh Council, 1871-72. 

MAYOR. 

Hon. Thomas G. Lytle. 

COUNCILMEN. 

M. L. McClelland, Don A. Salyer, C. A. Dickover, 

Clayton Weaver, S . S. Skinner, 

J. H. McCormick. 

CLERK. 

Wm. Jewell. 



The Eighth Council, 1872-73. 

MAYOR. 

Hon. John N. Skinner. 



COUNCII.MEN'. 

Clayton Weaver. S. S. Skinner, J ohn H. McCormick 

Ephraim Vastbinder, Don A . Salyer, 

Michael Barry. 

CLERK. 

James Drapier. 

The Ninth Council, 1873-74. 

MAYOR. 

Hon. John N. Skinner. 

COUNCILMEN. 

Ephraim Vastbinder, Don A Salyer, Michael Barry 

Joseph Letherman, A. H. Somers, 

Clayton Weaver. 

CLERK 

James Drapier. 

The Tenth Council, 1874-75. 

MAYOR. 

Hon. John N. Skinner. 

COUNC1LM1 N. 

.'oseph Letherman, A. II. Somers, Clayton Weaver, 

D. F. Skinner, E. Vastbinder, 

Michael Barry. 

CLERK 

Henry Sievers. 

The Eleventh Council, -1875-76. 

MAY IK. 

Hon. John N Skinner. 

COt'XCM.MBX 

Simeon Pierce, E. Vastbinder, Michael Barrv, 

Joseph Jones, Clayton Weaver, 

L. A. Cass. 

CL HK. 

Henry Siovers. 



STUDENTS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOL 



WILL FIND AT THE 



small Clocks suited for their rooms. Also, a fine stock of Pen and Pocket Knives, and all styles 
of Watches and Jewelry. Every article warranted to be as represented. Watches and Jewelry 
repaired promptly. Call and satisfy yourselves. 









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.T. STEIIVEELI}, 

18 CLOSING OUT AT AND BELOW COST THE ENTIBE 
STOCK OF 

Clothing, IL.ts, Caps Ss Gent's Furnishing 
Geo as. 

4^* Call before it is too late. 



H. I. F. VVOSIKA, 

TAILOR & DRAPER,, 

VALPARAISO HALL BLOCK, 

Mr. Wosika is a student in the Norma] and would 
be pleased to take orders for Clothing from samples 
which he is always prepared to show. 

W. E. PliNTVEY, 

dtTTQKNMT &T L#W 9 

REAL ESTATE & LOAN BROKER. 

Proprietor of the only Abstract of Titles of 
Porter county. 



S> 



Lepell & Brother, 

MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN ALL KINDS 
— OV — 

FXJPt^TITXJPtE, 

P trior and, Clinmhpr Sella, Safnst, 

BUREAUS, CH-IRS, TABLES. 

EAST MAIN STREET, VALPARAISO. 

LAFORCJK BROS., 

BOGT Ar^D SHOE MAKERS. 

FANCY SHOES A SPECIALTY. 

Invisible p; tches put on and warranted. Repair- 
ing neatly doie. Over Bryant's Drug Stoie. 



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ZE^iESOTC^CSrlFS-jAJE^KS. 




J. W. McLELLAN, 

Photographic Artist on West Main Street. 

YALPARA1SO, INDIANA, 
Has reflated his Gallery and is now making, if possible, better work than 
ever before. 
PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE NORMAL FACULT\ FOR SALE 
HERE. J W Remember the plar-. 



— 



NEW PUBLICATIONS 

-OF THE- 

Normal Publishing House. 



HISTORY OF VALPARAISO, 

From the Earliest Times to the Present. 

BY A CITIZEN". 

An illustrated book, which gives a full and complete history of the place, em- 
bracing the original Indian village, the first settlement, the corporate town and tne city 



history of ustidi-A-it-a., 

By Hubert M. Skinner, A. M. , (Asb.) 

designed for use of public schools of all grades in Indiana. The conciseness of the 
work is such that it can be used in any school and mastered in a short time without 
supplanting any other studies : moreover, the subjects treated are of national rather 
than of sectional interest and importance. This book is kkplete_wit h_i .ni . 
and in every way adapted to the use of all the schools of the state. In order tc 
it within the reach ol all, the price of the work (substantial^ bound) has been placed 
at twenty-five cents. Copies ordered for examination with view of introduction 
are furnised at % off the regular price. 



he Xiitin ^eittetfce '== Jf formal ^ctlwit 

"Witn tli© Latin Syntax. 

(in Prospect) 
By W. II. IIolcomhe, J3. A., : : : : : HARVARD, 

_o£ 

THE NORMAL MIRROR FOR NEXT YEAR. 

Brignt and Glorious 

are the prosp <ts tor next year. We are promised contributions from the best educa 
tors fad the West. Our plan of selecting our matter from the actual work and allowing 
theoriesto tie experimented upon by the originators only, has given good success. The 
grcal call for back numbers is good evidence of the superiority of our magazine. Ar- 
raug' incuts are now lieing made by which the cditorialship will be divided into depart- 
ments, each of which will have a good editor at its head. All the work will be under® 
the supervision of B. F. Perrine. 

IJatYl $1.50 'Per Yeax>