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Full text of "The history of Warren, Rhode Island, in the war of the revolution, 1776-1783"

Class ^=" 8^ _ 

Book^_^ _ 

1 

CopyrightN^ 

COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT. 



THE 



HISTORY OF WARREN, 



RHODE ISLAND, 



IN THE WAR 



OF 



THE REVOLUTION, 1 776-1 783 



BY VIRGINIA BAKER. 



PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHOR, 

WARREN, R. I. 

I90I 



THE LIBRARV OF 
CONGRESS, 

Two Copits Received 

JUL. 11 1901 

Copyright entry 

CLASS^;l^XXc N» 

COPY 8. 



Entered according to the Acts of Congress at the Office of the Librarian 
of Congress, by Virginia Baker, on the 27th day of March, One Thous- 
and, Nine Hundred and One, CI 90 1,) at Washington, D. C. 






AUTHOK'S NOTE, 



The material composing this sketch has been col- 
lected from various sources. Among authorities 
consulted may be mentioned Rhode Island Colonial, 
and Warren Town Records, Arnold's "History of 
Rhode Island," Fessenden's "History of Warren," 
the "Spirit of '76," "Our French Allies," the "Diary 
of Col. Israel Angell," files of the "Providence Ga- 
zette," and Warren "JS'orthern Star," manuscript 
notes of Gen. G. M. Fessenden, and unpublished let- 
ters, doc^uments, etc., of the Revolutionary period. 
The author desires to express her gratitude to those 
persons wbo, by the loan of private papers, have as- 
sisted her in her work. 

Warren, March, 1901. 



THE HISTOEY OF WAEKEN, RHODE ISL- 
AND, m THE WAR OF THE REVOLU- 
TION^, 1776-1783. 
Ar the beginning of the Revolutionary War, War- 
ren, Rhode Island, was one of the most flourishing 
towns on the l^ew England sea-coast. Though 
within its limits agricultural pursuits were followed 
to some extent, the inhabitants were chiefly employed 
in the various branches of maritime trade. The 
building of vessels was an important industry, and 
the Warren ship-yards were justly noted for the 
variety and excellence of the craft launched from 
their stocks. Remote, indeed, were the regions un- 
penetrated by the hardy sailors of the little seaport, 
which was engaged in coasting, in the West India 
and merchant service, and in the whale fishery. To a 
community almost entirely dependent upon favor- 
able commercial conditions for its existence the 
breaking out of war with the mother country was a 
most alarming portent, threatening serious disaster 
if not ultimate ruin. 

The pioneer settlers of Swansea, Massachusetts, 
of which town Warren originally formed a part, 
were a strong and steadfast race of men, resolute, 
courageous, and liberty loving. The characteristics 
so marked in them descended to their posterity. 
ISTaturally, therefore, at the outset, the inhabitants 



6 THE HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE ISLAND, 

of Warren quietly but firmly resisted the oppressive 
policy of George III, though no people more fully 
realized the dangers that would beset them in the 
event of an open rupture with England. The sen- 
timents of the citizens were first openly voiced in 
January, 1774, when, following the example of N'ew- 
port and Providence, Warren held a public meeting 
to consider the tea question, at which the right of 
Parliament to tax the American colonies was em- 
phatically denied. When a few months later the 
odious Port Bill closed Boston harbor against all 
commerce, Warren was among the first localities in 
Rhode Island to render material assistance to the 
distressed town. It is a noteworthy fact that 
throughout the entire Revolutionary period the in- 
habitants of Warren acted unanimously in defend- 
ing their rights. Indeed, tradition asserts that but 
one native of the place was ever proved to have 
cherished Tory principles and, so far as can be as- 
certained, tradition in this instance is correct. 

Although a maritime community Warren could 
boast an honorable military record. The opening 
scenes of that terrible tragedy. King Philip's War, 
had been enacted within its limits. It had sent stal- 
wart sons to Louisburg and Crown Point. So when 
armed resistance to British misrule became neces- 
sary, the sturdy little seaport was not unprepared to 
do its share in the struggle for liberty. 



IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 7 

The news of the Battle of Lexington created in 
Rhode Island, as elsewhere, the most intense excite- 
ment. Thronghont the colony active preparations 
for military service were begun. Ammunition was 
distributed to all the towns, Warren's proportion 
being 24 pounds of powder, 38 pounds of lead, 
and 152 flints. The General Assembly voted 
to raise an "Army of Observation" to consist 
of 1,500 men. One regiment was enlisted in 
the counties of Newport and Bristol under Col. 
Thomas Church, William Turner Miller of Warren 
being appointed Lieutenant-Colonel. A committee 
of safety consisting of t^^•» members from Provi- 
dence and one from each of the other counties was 
appointed, and the several towns adopted such pre- 
cautionary measures as they deemed advisable. At 
a Town Meeting held in Warren, June 5, 1775, it 
was voted to purchase "six good guns" for the town. 
Fearing possible attack from the British fleet under 
Wallace which occupied the bay it was voted, Nov. 
20th, to keep a watch in the town and Daniel Cole 
and Samuel Miller were appointed to "decide how 
often each man should watch." Captain Ezra 
Ormsbee was selected to "have the care of sd. watch 
and to Notify the people when they should watch," 
and how many should "Stand upon the watch in one 
night." The penalty for refusing to watch was fixed 
at three shillings. Captain Ormsbee was required 



8 THE HISTORY OP WARREN, RHODE ISLAND, 

"to Provide wood for the sd. watch," and was em- 
powered to "furnish the watch house that is built in 
Bristol by the inhabitants of Warren and to build a 
Centrj Box." The watch house stood upon one of 
the elevations still known as "Burr's Hills," located 
on the east bank of Warren river and now included 
within the limits of that part of the town termed 
South Warren. It commanded a view of ISTarragan- 
sett Bay and the shores of Bristol and Barrington. 
During the previous year a "Trained Band" * had 
been formed in Warren, and there was also in the 
to^^m a company of "Alarm Men." Many members 
of the Alarm company were mere striplings. Some 
of the firearms that appeared at "trainings" had 
seen service at Crown Point and Ticonderoga. The 
men utilized as flints the Indian arrow-heads which 
abounded in the vicinity of Burr's Hills and along 
the shores of Belcher's Cove and the Kickemuit 
river. 

On January 12, 1Y76, about 250 British troops 
from Wallace's fleet landed on Prudence Island 
where they burned seven dwellings, dispersed a com- 
pany of minute men, and seized a number of sheep. 
On the following day reinforcements from Warren 
and Bristol proceeded in whaleboats and other craft 

♦The officers of the Trained Band, in 1775 were Amos 
Halle, Captain; John Ormsbee, Lieutenant; Smith Bo wen, 
Ensign. 



IN THS WAR OF THE) REVOLUTION. 9 

to the island and an action ensued which lasted three 
hours. The British were driven off with a loss of 
fourteen killed and several wounded, the Americans 
losing only four killed and one taken prisoner. On 
the next night two houses on Patience Island were 
fired bv the enemy. Fearing that Bristol might be 
attacked the troops Avere withdrawn from Prudence 
and stationed in that to^vn. The General Assembly 
appointed a committee to draft a memorial to Con- 
gress representing the inability of Rhode Island, 
"from its situation, smallness, and poverty" to defend 
itself, and praying for assistance. Sylvester Child, 
one of the Deputies from Warren, was a member of 
this committee. His colleagues were Deputy Gover- 
nor Bradford, Henry Ward, William Ellery, Joseph 
Bro\vii, Henry Marchant and Gideon Mumford. 

The seaboard towns now redoubled their precau- 
tions. In Town Meeting, Feb. 5th, it was voted 
that the To^vn Council of Warren should "make a 
list of all persons in the tovni who were not able to 
equip themselves with arms and accoutrements ac- 
cording to law." The Council reported only two in- 
dividuals who lacked the necessary equipment and 
the town supplied them with "two good firearms 
with bayonets and cartuch boxes." It was also voted 
to raise an Artillery company in the town, of which 
Daniel Fisk was chosen Captain and Benajah Cole, 
Lieutenant. On Mav 6th, the Toum Treasurer was 



lO THE HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE ISLAND^ 

ordered to "imploy Suitable Persons to make up the 
powder and Balls into Carteriges Belonging to the 
town stock as soon as Conveniently May Be" and all 
persons possessing lead or bullets were desired to 
bring them to the To^^'Il Treasurer who was directed 
to purchase them. It was voted also that "all the 
Militia and Alarm men should Bring their guns to 
the tow^n treasurer at or Before the fifteenth Day of 
this instant May in order that their Carteriges May 
be Made." 

The scarcity of provisions at this time had become 
a serious question. Common salt, alone, commanded 
six dollars per bushel. To prevent extortion the 
iGeneral Assembly at length took charge of this 
necessary commodity, and sold it to the various 
towns at six shillings per bushel. Warren's pro- 
portion was fifty bushels, and on July 1st William 
Turner Miller was appointed to divide the salt 
among the different families in town. It was voted 
that all persons who should neglect to make appli- 
cation for salt by July 12th should be refused a 
share, and the Town Clerk was directed to "Set up 
three advertisements in three Publick Places in the 
Town to Notify the inhabitants of the promises." 

The population of Warren at this time (1776) 
was 1,005 including slaves. The toTsm was required 
by law to furnish ten men for military service, but 
in September it was voted to increase the number to 



IN the; war of the revolution. II 

I 

twelve. Ten shillings were allowed to every sol- 
dier found able to "Equip himself With a Gun, 
Bayonet, and Cartuch Box," and ten shillings in ad- 
dition to each man for the "Use of a Blanket and 
I^apsack." In October the Deputies Avere requested 
to tender the Test Act to all male citizens, and the 
Town Clerk was directed to "make record of the 
number of Guns, Cartuch Boxes, Blankets, and 
Napsacks Belonging to the to\vn." William Tur- 
ner Miller was authorized to make a second distri- 
bution of salt, it being stipulated, however, that "Xo 
Person Be allowed to Receive Salt that Refused to 
Subscribe the Test Act." 

The appearance, on December 2d, of seven 
ships of the line and four frigates in the vicinity of 
Block Island caused widespread consternation 
throughout Rhode Island. The militia was at once 
called to arms. On December 8th, the enemy landed 
at Newport and took possession of the town. 
American troops were despatched to Tiverton, 
Bristol, and other points on the coast. Many in- 
habitants of Newport took refuge on the main land. 
The court records of Newport County were hastily 
transported to Warren, but the exposed situation of 
the town caused the Assembly to order the Clerk of 
the Court to remove them "to some safer place 
further distant from Rhode Island." 

At a later date a guard of sixteen men was sta- 



12 the; history op WARRE:n, RHODE ISLAND, 

tioned at Warren, and the row^galley Washington 
was sent to protect the entrances to Warren and 
Kickemuit rivers. On the 2d of April, 1777, an 
explosion occurred on board the galley by which 
eight lives were destroyed. The vessel was, how- 
ever, afterward repaired, schooner rigged, and put 
in service again. The bodies of the unfortunate vic- 
tims of this accident were buried on the west shore 
of Kickemuit river near the "narrows" of the 
stream, not far from the scene of the disaster. 

The Artillery company, which had previously 
been supplied with two field pieces, was furnished 
with drums, colors, and an ammunition cart. Re- 
cruiting was briskly carried on in the town and there 
was scarcely a household that had not one or more 
members engaged in military service. It must not 
be imagined that while the men of Warren devoted 
themselves to the cause of liberty, the women dis- 
played a less patriotic spirit. Though debarred from 
carrying muskets their hands were not idle, as the 
number of stout woolen stockings and other articles 
of clothing furnished by them to the troops amply 
testified. 

Provisions still continued scarce, while the in- 
crease of current expenses rendered necessary a pro- 
portionate increase of taxes. The poll tax which 
had been fixed at 6s. 5d. was raised to 12 shillings. 
A number of flat-bottomed boats for use of the state 



IN the: war of* the revolution. 13 

were this year constructed at the shipyard of Crom- 
well Child. These boats were destined to play an 
important part in the history of Warren. The cap- 
ture of the British General Prescott by Lieut. Col. 
William Barton in July, raised the hopes of Rhode 
Islanders, Warren being especially gratified at this 
brilliant achievement of one of her sons. An ex- 
pedition under Gen. Spencer against Bhode Island 
was planned and, in October, a number of boats, in- 
cluding those built at Warren, were collected at 
Tiverton. Unfavorable weather, however, delayed 
the execution of the scheme which was finally aban- 
doned. 

With the opening of another year (1778) a new 
danger confronted Warren. Small-pox, that scourge 
of the olden times, made its appearance. On Janu- 
ary 3d, it was voted that innoculation for the disease 
"be set up Within the Town," and Col. :N'athan Mil- 
ler was appointed "to Prepare an Innoculatory Hos- 
pital under the direction of the Council." The site 
selected for this hospital was a point on the right 
bank of the Kickemuit river a few rods north of the 
present pimiping station. It was also voted to fine 
any person receiving one ill of small-pox into his 
house the sum of £50. 

It being deemed expedient to attempt a second 
expedition against Rhode Island the flat-bottomed 
boats before alluded to, about seventy in number, 



14 THE HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE ISLAND, 

were brought up the Kickemuit river and moored 
near the stone bridge, to which point a quantity of 
tar and other stores was transported. Great secrecy 
was preserved in regard to their plans by the Ameri- 
cans. But, unfortunately, there lurked within their 
midst an enemy in disguise. The school master of 
Warren was an Englislmian named Holland, De- 
spite his nationality, he professed allegiance to the 
patriot cause, and was generally believed to be sin- 
cere in his professions. He discovered the designs 
of the Americans and found means to communicate 
his knowledge to Gen. Pigot, the commander of the 
British forces on Rhode Island, who at once deter- 
mined to frustrate the schemes of his opponents. 

On Monday, the 25th of May, a party of British 
and Hessians troops numbering about 500, under 
command of Lieut. Col. Campbell, were despatched 
by boat from N^ewport to Bristol where they arrived 
before daybreak, and landing near Peck's Rocks 
marched up Bristol I^J'eck towards Warren. On 
reaching the Gorham farm, they paused and raised 
a sheet from the chimney of the farm house as a 
signal to their shipping in the bay that all was well. 
They then resumed their line of march and entered 
Warren, rousing the terrified inhabitants with their 
loud huzzas for King George. At the centre of the 
town Campbell divided his forces into parties- One 
detachment was sent to guard Kelley's ferry in the 



IN THE WAR OP THE REVOLUTION. I5 

north part, while a second hastened to the foot of 
King, now Washington street, where was another 
ferry known as Carr's ferry.* The greater portion 
of the troops were, however, hurried through Mar- 
ket street to Kickemuit, where they piled the unfor- 
tunate flat-bottomed boats together and burned them 
with the row-galley Washington, and a quantity of 
tar, pitch, and other stores. They then set fire to 
two dwelling houses and a grist mill near the lower 
bridge. Tradition relates that the terrified miller 
when he saw his property about to be destroyed cried 
out, "Spare the mill, brothers !" "Brothers," re- 
peated one of the soldiers, "Do you call us that? If 
we are your brothers we shall do you a favor by tak- 
ing you out of this nest of rebels," and he beckoned 
to his companions who immediately made the poor 
miller their prisoner. In the attic of the Phinney 
farm house near the bridge a number of arms were 
concealed. The redcoats visited this house but fail- 
ed to discover the hidden muskets. A party of sol- 
diers approached the innoculatory hospital. Its in- 
mates, three in number, rushed to the windows and 
throwing them open shouted frantically, "Don't 
come here. We are sick with small-pox !" The soldiers 
at once hastily retreated. But their disappearance 
failed to reassure the panic stricken invalids. Terri- 

♦Seeing the red-coats at this ferry a man on the opposite 
shore of Barrington shouted wildly for "quarter," greatly to 
the amusement of the soldiers. 



16 THE HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODIJ ISI.AND, 

fied lest a second detachment of redcoats less afraid 
of disease should appear, they rushed from the 

ZZ Z^'^ r -^-^' "The Re^ilars have 
come! The Regulars have come!" At the stone 
bndge the, turned up the School House Road th 1 
:nto the Birch Swamp Road, still uttering the 
warning cry One of the good housewives of the 
neighborhood who was engaged in preparing break- 
fast heard the shouts. She looked from the tindow 
and recognmng the men grasped the situation.' 
Seizing the coffee-pot in one hand and a large bowl 
m the other, she opened the kitchen door and com- 
manding the men to halt inquired where they were 
going. "To Swansea to give the alarm," thev re- 
plied. "Well," she answei.d, "you doii'l go a'step 
farther until you have drank some coffee," and de- 
spite the expostulations of her family she compelled 
the not unwilling travellers to each swallow a bowl- 
lul of the smoking beverage. She then resumed her 
domestic labors, while the refreshed pilgrims con- 
tinued on to Swansea where their appearance creat- 
ed as much consternation as the Regulars themselves 
would have occasioned. Finding no place of refuge 
offered them, the weary sick men were forced to re- 
turn to Warren and re-enter the hospital. Strangely, 
their long journey was productive of no ill results 
either to them or any of the various persons with 
whom they came in contact during it. 



IN THK WAR OF THE) RIJVOLUTION. 17 

While the capture of the miller was being effected 
at the bridge, a scene of quite an opposite nature 
transpired in another part of Kickemuit. A trio 
of soldiers crossed some fields and approached the 
farm of Mr. Ephraim Cole. The sun was now high 
in the heavens, and Mr. Cole was hoeing in his corn- 
field. Himself unperceived, he espied the advan- 
cing redcoats. ISTot seeing any way of escape he 
quietly dropped behind a stone wall, hoe in hand. 
The soldiers reached the wall and were about to 
clamber over it when, suddenly, Mr. Cole sprang 
erect and brandishing the hoe in their faces ex- 
claimed in a voice of thunder, "Come on, my brave 
boys, and we'll have every lobster '^f 'em!" The 
astonished "lobsters," thinking a large party of 
Americans concealed behind the walls, turned in con- 
fusion and ran in different directions, Mr. Cole pursu- 
ing- them shoutinof, "March to the east'ard! Head 'em 
off to the west'ard !" JSTot daring to glance behind 
them the soldiers continued their flight. Two of 
them escaped, but Mr. Cole overtook the third and, 
as he afterwards drily remarked, "surrounded him 
and took him prisoner." 

Having completed the main object of the expedi- 
tion, the destruction of the boats, Col. Campbell 
marched his men back to the compact part of the 
town where terror and confusion reigned supreme. 
The citizens endeavored to protect their property, 



18 THK HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE ISLAND. 

but the overwhelming number of the enemy rendered 
their efforts futile. Many households were with- 
out male protectors as a large portion of the able- 
bodied men of the town were engaged elsewhere in 
military service. The Baptist meeting-house and 
parsonage and other buildings were burned to the 
ground, the powder magazine was blown up, and the 
privateer "General Stark," which stood ready for 
launching in one of the shipyards, was partially de- 
stroyed. Cattle and poultry were killed, stores and 
houses pillaged, and women and children terrified. 
The appearance of the marauders is described by 
Fessenden in his historical sketch of Warren. The 
British were attired in red coats, cocked hats, and 
small clothes, with shoe and knee buckles and a pro- 
fusion of gold lace. The Hessians wore huge fur 
caps and great boots, and the latter they utilized as 
receptacles for booty of every description. These 
German mercenaries rendered themselves particu- 
larly obnoxious to the townspeople. A party of 
them who had been wounded in a skirmish with some 
citizens visited the Burr Tavern on Main street. 
Mrs. Burr, the landlady, kindly dressed their 
wounds and they displayed their gratitude to her by 
destroying her dishes and furniture. At another 
house they fired several shots at the women and 
children whom they found assembled there. Five 
burly giants effected an entrance at the residence of 



IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 19 

Jesse Baker on what is now Water street bj dashing 
in the windows. Mrs. Baker was alone in the house 
at the time. They compelled her to mount a chair 
and from the upper shelves of the china closet to 
pass to them such articles as thev desired. ISTatural- 
ly as they addressed her in German she did not un- 
derstand their orders very readily, but she trem- 
blingly handed to them dish after dish each of which 
they dashed to the ground with oaths and laughter. 
In the midst of their sport an English officer sudden- 
ly made his appearance. At a glance he compre- 
hended the situation and raising a silver handled 
riding-whip, which Mrs. Baker recognized as the 
property of Col. JSTathan Miller, he struck the ring- 
leader of the party across the cheek cutting the flesh 
open. He then sternly ordered him and his com- 
panions to leave the house, and after they had dis- 
appeared courteously assisted the half fainting 
woman to alight from the chair, assuring her that he 
would protect her from further molestation — a 
promise he faithfully performed. jSTo other in- 
stance of forbearance on the part of the assailants is 
recorded, the officers, generally, rather encouraging 
than restraining their men in the work of devasta- 
tion. Some of the soldiers even went so far as to 
tear the brass rings from the fingers of the negro ser- 
vants. The guard posted at Kelley's ferry intercept- 
ed a respectable Irishman who was endeavoring to es- 



20 THE HISTORY OF WARREN^ RHODE ISEAND. 

cape from the town. They turned him around on his 
horse, set his wig and hat awry, and putting the muz- 
zle of a gun to his cheek compelled him to swear alle- 
giance to King George which he did with a very ill 
grace. Mr. Peter Cole, a prominent citizen, eluded 
capture by a clever ruse. Seizing a large butcher's 
knife, he rushed from his house along Main street 
brandishing his blade and crying, "I am Peter Cole 
and I don't care for a d — d soul!" The British 
soldiers, supposing him deranged, permitted him to 
pass through their midst unmolested. Other of the 
the townspeople were less fortunate and a number of 
prisoners were secured, among them Sylvester Child 
and his son-in-law Eev. Charles Thompson, a chap- 
lain in the Continental service who was then at 
home on a furlough. The family of Col. JSTathan 
Miller escaped by boat to Barrington, carrying with 
them valuable state papers which Campbell had 
hoped to secure. One of the British soldiers fired a 
shot at the boat which whistled close to the head of 
the Colonel's young daughter. The Miller resi- 
dence was ransacked, the soldiers expressing great 
regret that they had not captured the "fellow with 
the big boots" as they nicknamed Col. Miller.* 
They quenched their disappointment in a barrel of 
cider which they discovered in the cellar, first, how- 

*Col. Miller weighed upwards of 300 pounds. His boots 
held a bushel of corn each. 



IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 21 

ever, compelling a young slave girl whom they found 
hidden in the house to taste it as an assurance that 
it contained no poison. 

As the morning sun rose high, Col. Campbell, 
fearing the Americans would rally from the neigh- 
boring towns prepared to retreat, and the straggling 
squads of soldiers were called together on Main street. 
One detachment passing the home of the Tory 
schoolmaster cheered loudly, whereupon Holland 
emerged from the door and joined them.* Camp- 
bell placed his prisoners and their guards in the van. 
Behind them marched the Hessians, j^resenting an 
exceedingly grotesque appearance with articles of 
every description peeping and dangling from the 
wide tops of their huge boots. The English com- 
panies followed with Campbell himself at the rear of 
the procession. As the retreating column filed slow- 
ly along Main street, a party of ladies who were 
watching it from the windows of what is now the 
Fessenden Hotel espied, lagging far behind his com- 
rades, a diminutive individual encumbered with a 
large drum, and very much the worse for the numer- 
ous drams of West India rum with which he had re- 
galed himself. The ladies determined to make him 
their prisoner. One of them placing herself at the 
head of the party snatched a brass candlestick from 



*The house occupied by Holland is still standing on 
Church Street, just east of the Methodist Church. 



22 THE HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE) ISLAND, 

a table near bv, and, followed bj her companions, ran 
into the street. Pointing the candlestick at her vic- 
tim, she commanded him to halt. Pale with terror 
the little man staggered back exclaiming, "Don't 
fire, ladies ! Don't fire ! I surrender." The ladies 
surrounded him and triumphantly conducted him 
into the house where they locked him securely in a 
closet. He expressed great pleasure at being cap- 
tured, saying that he was exhausted with the weight 
of his heavy drum. 

Despite the precautions of the enemy messengers 
had early been despatched to Barrington, Providence, 
and other points to secure aid, and as Campbell be- 
gan the march towards Bristol a portion of Capt. 
Vial Allen'b company which had been stationed at 
Eumstick Point entered Warren. They were, how- 
ever, too few in number to render assistance. 
Shortly afterward Gen. William Barton, with a party 
of mounted troops in advance of a large body of in- 
fantry under Gen. Sullivan, appeared and hastened 
in pursuit of the foe, collecting a number of volun- 
teers along the route. Mrs. Williams, in her bio- 
graphy of Barton, states that as the doughty General 
galloped along he hailed Col. Campbell, daring him 
to single combat. "Come back you d — d coward," 
he shouted in thunder tones, "I am the man who 

took Prescott, and by if you will just step out 

of Youi' I'jrking place I'll hack you to pieces in less 



IN the; war op the revolution. 23 

time than it took to take him." Barton overtook the 
British near Bristol Ferry where he received a 
severe woimd in the leg from a musket ball. This 
accident and the insufficiency of his force induced 
him to abandon the pursuit. After repeating in 
Bristol the scenes enacted in Warren, the enemy re- 
embarked in their ship and set sail for ISTewport, 
barely in time to escape attack from Sullivan who ar- 
rived at Bristol shortly afterwards. 

The disastrous effect of this raid upon Warren 
cannot be adequately portrayed. Yet with praise- 
M'orthy courage and energy the citizens immediately 
resumed their labors in the cause of liberty. On 
June 1st it was voted to levy a tax of £900 for the 
to%\ni's use. The fortifications at Burr's Hills were 
strengthened and a watch stationed there during the 
day as well as at night, the town being further pro- 
tected by a guard boat placed at the entrance to the 
river by order of Congress. The privateer ''Gener- 
al Stark" was repaired and towards the last of June 
started on her first cruise. Gen. Sullivan had be- 
gun negotiations for release of the prisoners cap- 
tured at Warren and Bristol. Many of these were 
men too advanced in years to bear arms, who were 
treated with unnecessary harshness by their captors. 
Pigot signified his willingness to exchange them on 
the usual terms, but stated that if the exchange was 
not effected at once the prisoners would be removed 



24 the: history of warren, RHODE ISLAND, 

to 'New York. After a sharp correspondence the ex- 
change of several was arrano-ed, and three or four were 
released on parole. Among the citizens of Warren 
who were transferred to the Jersey prison ship were 
Rev. Charles Thompson, Caleb Turner, and James 
Maxwell. The privations endured bj those confined 
upon this foul and overcrowded vessel were of ihe 
most severe nature. Rev. Mr. Thompson after being 
detained in captivity for several weeks was given 
his freedom, but was never able to discover to wjiom 
he owed his release. 

The arrival of the French fleet in American waters 
early in July caused intense joy throughout the 
country. Immediately, however, the enemy began 
to send reinforcements from jSTew York to Rhode 
Island. On July 15th, 300 troops were landed at 
Newport. The Council of War fearing an attack 
on Providence called out half the military force of 
the state to serve for twenty days, ordering the re- 
maining half to hold themselves in readiness for 
action at a moment's notice. On the 29th D'Es- 
taing's fleet appeared in the bay and blockaded JSTew- 
port. On Augaist 9th Sullivan, with about 10,000 
troops, crossed from Tiverton to Portsmouth. On 
the 21st D'Estaing withdrew his ships. bu1; Sullivai, 
continued his preparations while awaiting the re- 
turn of the fleet. On the 29th the Battle of Rhode 
Island, which Lafayette pronounced "the best fought 



IN the; war of the revolution. 25 

action of the war," took place. To this ''Ehode Isl- 
and Expedition," as it was termed, Warren contri- 
buted its full quota of men. One company in Col. 
Miller's regiment was commanded by Captain Rob- 
ert Carr, a native of the town and a most zealous 
patriot. Warren Mason, a negro belonging to 
John Mason of Warren, was one of the slaves who ob- 
tained freedom by enlisting in the '^black regiment," 
which under the leadership of Col. Christopher 
Greene distinguished itself by three times repelling 
the furious attacks of the Hessian columns with the 
most desperate courage and determination. 

On August 31st the care of the troops on the eas- 
tern shore of !N"arragansett Bay was entnisted by 
Gen. Sullivan to the Marquis de Lafayette, who es- 
tablished his headquarters at Bristol. Toward the 
latter part of September he removed them to Warren 
where a portion of Varnum's brigade w^as stationed. 
Col. Israel Angell's regiment encamped in the fields 
on the eastern slope of Windmill Hill in the norther- 
ly part of the to^vn near the Kickemuit river. A 
little more than half a century ago a jDOst driven into 
the ground indicated the spot where Lafayette's 
marquee stood, just southeast of the ledge of rocks 
on the summit of the hill. On the farm of Mr. 
Henry Clark on the east side of Belcher's Cove are 
still to be seen the remains of earth works which it is 
said were thrown up under the supervision of the 



26 the; history of warren, RHODE ISLAND. 

marquis. The gallant French officer was very popu- 
lar with the townspeople, his frank and engaging 
manner winning all hearts. Tradition states that 
he was extremely partial to the old-fashioned "Rhode 
Island johnny-cakes" baked on a board at the hos- 
telry of Ebenezer Cole, famous throughout the 
colonies for its good cheer ; and that he and an Ameri- 
can officer once engaged in a "johnny-cake match," 
which he easily won, outstripping or rather out eat- 
ing his competitor by two or three cakes of more 
than ordinary size. Lafayette's stay in Warren was of 
short duration, the middle of October finding him in 
Philadelphia. , 

Though the enemy maintained great watchfulness, 
the privateers belonging to the seaboard towns man- 
aged to elude all vigilance and to constantly cross 
and recross the bay. In September the "General 
Stark" returned to Rhode Island, having captured 
two prizes, one a brig laden with cotton-wool and 
red-wood, the other a ship from Halifax bound for 
Jamaica and carrying a cargo of fish and spars. 
About the same time the schooner "Weasel," Mau- 
ran, master, another privateer sent out from Warren, 
succeeded in taking a brig of 140 tons which sailed 
from I^ew York with wood and provisions for the 
king's troops at Newport. , 

The winter of 17Y8-9 was a severe one. The 
camp at Windmill Hill was abandoned and the troops 



IN THE WAR OF the: REVOLUTION. 27 

were quartered in stores on the wharves and in pri- 
vate dwellings. On Christmas Eve the Warren river 
was completely frozen over, and Col. Angell excused 
his men from the nsual drill. A violent storm 
raged on the 26thj the baracks being filled with snow 
and huge drifts blocking the roads. On 'New Year's 
Day, Warren received the melancholy tidings of the 
wreck of the "General Stark." ]S[ineteen members 
of the ill-fated vessel perished by freezing. The 
extremely cold weather and the scarcity and high 
price of provisions caused great suffering among the 
poor. The inhabitants of the town numbered at 
this period 789, together with fourteen refugees 
from the county of JSTewport, some of whom were en- 
tirely dependent upon charity for support. The 
town treasury was nearly depleted, and in March it 
became necessary to hire the sum of $1,500 for the 
purchase of grain from Connecticut for the town's 
use. 

On March 11th, Daniel Cole, Joseph Smith, and 
William Barton were apj)ointed a committee to as- 
certain what persons had performed more than their 
proportion of military duty in the two expeditions 
against Ehode Island, and to allow such persons 
whatever sums of money they might deem were just- 
ly due them. In April the militia of the several 
counties were, by order of the Assembly, formed into 
brigades. Col. Nathan Miller being elected brigadier 



28 THi; HISTORY OF^ WARREN, RHODE ISLAND. 

of the counties of ISTewport and Bristol. As the 
enemy greatly outnumbered the American forces, 
and continued to make incursions upon the seaboard 
towns, it was deemed prudent to increase the guard 
at Warren, and August 4th Shubael Kinnicutt and 
l^athan Bardin were empowered to enlist twenty- 
six men to serve for twenty days. £300 was appro- 
priated to pay the guard, and Moses Turner was di- 
rected to "draught a petition to Gen. Gates for Ra- 
tions for Sd. Guard." This guard was stationed at 
points along the shore where it was feared the Brit- 
ish might attempt to make a landing. Fortunately 
Warren was destined to escape a repetition of the 
misfortunes which had befallen her the previous 
year. The South having become the seat of war it 
became necessary for Sir Henry Clinton to centralize 
his forces there, and on October 25th, to the unbound- 
ed joy of the suffering inhabitants of Rhode Island, 
the enemy evacuated ISTewport. 

As winter approached the weather became extreme- 
ly cold. Again was Warren river frozen completely 
over, and communication with Barrington was main- 
tained by crossing the ice on foot or in ox teams, 
rire-wood was very scarce, commanding twenty dol- 
lars per cord, and so insufficient was the supply of 
food that a famine seemed imminent. But it was not, 
alone, temporal privations that the people of Warren 
were forced to endure. There were spiritual hard- 



IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION, 29 

ships also. The destruction of their meeting-house 
had compelled the Society of Baptists to unite, tem- 
porarily, with the neighboring church of Swansea. 
The severity of the weather and condition of the 
country roads, however, prevented the regular atten- 
dance of church. But all trials of what nature so- 
ever were borne cheerfully, indeed, in many in- 
stances, heroic fortitude was displayed. 

Early in the simimer of 1780 active military 
operations were begun in anticipation of the arrival 
of the French fleet in Rhode Island. Washington 
asked for additional troops to co-operate with the 
allies, and a militia force was called out to serve 
for three months. Recruiting officers were appoint- 
ed for each to\^TL, those chosen for Warren being ISTa- 
than Miller, Sylvester Child, Daniel Cole, Robert 
Carr, and William Barton. On July 2d, the town 
voted that jSTathan Bardin and Edward Mason "be 
added to the Committe for Enlisting Soldiers," and 
on the same day it was ordered that "a Propper Per- 
son be appointed at the Expense of the Town to 
Carry Such Winter Clothing as the friends and Con- 
nections of Such Soldiers as May enter into the Con- 
tinental Service at the Present Campaign may pro- 
vide for them." De Corny, the French Commis- 
sary Greneral, having requested the General Assem- 
bly to repair the ferries between Providence and 
^Newport, a committee consisting of Hon. Wm. 



30 THE HISTORY OP WARREN, RHODE ISLAND. 

Bradford, Gen. Miller and Col. Joseph JSTiglitingale 
was appointed by the Assembly to confer with him 
were appointed by the Assembly to confer with him 
regarding "the accommodation of the expected arma- 
ment/' and Ephraim Bowen, the Depnty Quarter- 
master General, was empowered to draw £10,000 
from the state treasury for the purpose of making 
the necessary repairs at Providence, Warren, and 
Bristol. On July 10th, De Terney, with a fleet of 
twelve ships of war and thirty-two transports and 
six thousand troops under Count Rochambeau, ar- 
rived at JSTewport where, on the following day, the 
troops were landed. In August a dinner at the ex- 
pense of the state was given in honor of the allies. 
Gen. Miller was a member of the entertainment com- 
mittee. He was popular with the French officers 
owing to the fact that a strain of Huguenot blood ran 
through his veins. A warm friendship sprang up 
between him and Count Rochambeau with whom he 
exchanged rapiers. The Rochambeau weapon is 
now o\^'3ied by a descendant of General Miller. 

The work of raising the British vessels sunk in the 
harbor of ISTewport had begun in June. Cromwell 
Child i^urchased a portion of this wreckage which 
was transported on scows to Warren. Tradition 
states that Ebenezer Cole built a barn of some of the 
timbers, which was for many years a landmark in 
the town, and which the owner was very fond of 
pointing out to the guests who frequented his hos- 
telry. 



IN TPIE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION, 3 1 

On August 5 th, the town of Warren appointed 
Ezra Ormsbee to furnish the militia with camp fur- 
niture. He was directed to purchase "21 Mess Pots, 
21 Pails, 21 Mess Boles, 5 J^arrow Axes, 3 Baggage 
Carts and give his Receipt for the articles in Behalf 
of the Town." At the same time it was voted to 
raise $10,000 as a town tax. 

In October a detachment of French troops was 
quartered in Warren and remained there during the 
winter. These troops occupied during a portion of 
their stay the old camping place at Windmill Hill. 
They are said to have been admirably disciplined, and 
were very friendly with the neighboring farmers, 
whose wives supplied them with brown bread for 
which they displayed as great partiality as Lafayette 
evinced for Landlord Cole's Rhode Island johnny- 
cakes. 

In February, 1781, the Assembly, in expectation 
of the withdrawal of the French troops, called out 
twelve hundred militia to serve for one month under 
Brigadier General Miller. On March 6th, Gen. 
Washington arrived at jSTewport for the purpose of 
arranging with Rochambeau for the coming cam- 
paign. On the 10th the French fleet sailed and all 
but three hundred of the Rhode Island militia were 
dismissed. On the 13th Washington proceeded to 
Providence, passing through Bristol and Warren en 
route. In Warren he was entertained at the expense 



32 THE HISTORY OP WARRl^N, RHODE ISLAND. 

of the state at the famous hostelry of Shubael Burr, 
which, like its rival Cole's Tavejrn, was noted 
throughout ISTew England. Burr's Tavern was lo- 
cated at the corner of Main and King (afterwards 
Washington) streets. The room assigned to Wash- 
ington was a rather small apartment, but considered 
at the time a very elegant guest chamber. Burr's 
tavern, after standing for more than a century, was a 
few years since torn do^^m. 

On March 22d, the town voted to purchase 3-4 cwt. 
of sugar, 1-4 cwt. of coffee, and a bushel of rye meal 
for the '^ Soldiers Doing Duty on Ehode Island that 
Went from the Town;" John Child was directed 
to procure these articles. The depreciation of con- 
tinental currency caused the town to vote in June 
"that the Town Treasurer Receive no more old Con- 
tinental Money into the Treasury for Taxes Due 
from the Collector." The privateer sloop "George" 
of Warren, Thomas Champlin, master, was this 
month captured off Sandy Hook by Arbuthnot's 
fleet. In July Gen. Miller, wearied with his un- 
ceasing labors, tendered his resignation to the As- 
sembly, but at the earnest request of that body with- 
drewi it. In August he was appointed to proceed to 
l^ew York in "the flag-of-truce :N'ancy," for the pur- 
pose of arranging for the exchange of citizens of 
Rhode Island held prisoners by the enemy. His 
mission proved successful and, at a later date, the 



IN THE WAR OF* THE RE;V0I.UTI0N. 33 

released prisoners returned in a "flag" to Rhode 
Island. 

In August the schooner "Hunter" of Warren sail- 
ed for Virginia with provisions and hospital stores 
for the American trooj)s. In a letter addressed to 
his wife from "Off Jamestown in James River," and 
dated September 19, 1781, the captain, William Tur- 
ner Miller, predicted the fall of Cornwallis which oc- 
curred on the 17th of the following month. The 
tidings of the victory at Yorktown caused the most 
intense joy throughout Rhode Island. By the dis- 
play of flags, the ringing of bells, and the firing of 
cannon the people demonstrated their satisfaction. 
Several prisoners of war * were tranported from 
Yorktown to Rhode Island by the sloop "Abigail" of 
Warren, John Haile master. Thirteen of these 
prisoners were privates, the remainder were officers. 
Two negro servants accompanied the latter. 

*Among papers preserved by the descendants of Capt. 
Haile is a partial list of these prisoners as follows: 
"Capt. Steward, ] 

Lt. James Campbell, j 

Lt. Donald Campbell, )■ N. C. Loyalists. 

Ens'n Dugald Campbell. | 
Ens'n Donald Campbell, J 

^SK bST'- } 

Capt. Althouse, }^ N Y V 

Ens'n Althouse, i . . ., 

Lieut. Murphy, South C. Corpse, 
Lieut. Searjeant Kings, A Reg't., 
Mr. Ker, Comis'y. 
Corn't White, B. Legion, 
r Mr. Edwards, Comis'y." 



34 THE HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE ISLAND, 

The Assembly, in December, directed the several 
towns to prepare estimates of the damage inflicted 
in each by the enemy during the war. Warren's loss 
by the incursion of British troops on May 25, 1778, 
as a2:>praised by William Turner Miller, amounted 
to the sum of £12,101 ; 17s. ; 3d. 

The closing year of the war was a comparatively 
eventless one as regarded Warren. In March, Capt. 
David Barton was appointed to enlist the town's 
proportion of men for the continental army. The 
same month John Child was authorized "to purchase 
fifty-six yards of tow-cloth and eight pairs of stock- 
ings according to the act of the General Assembly 
and to deliver these articles to their use at East 
Greenwich." In October Gen. Miller requested the 
Assembly to furnish him v"ith a "flag" in v/hich to 
proceed to ISTew York for the purpose of obtaining 
the release of certain prisoners confined there. He 
was authorized to commission a vessel under Wm. 
Turner Miller for the purpose specified. 

The condition of Warren at the end of the war was 
a most unhappy one. Business was almost entirely 
prostrated, and many families were impoverished. 
The town treasury was nearly depleted. The loss of 
shipping amounted to 1,090 tons. Household after 
household mourned the loss of dearly beloved mem- 
bers. Many a man who had gone forth to do ser- 
vice for his country in the full glory of vigorous 



the: history of warren, RHODE ISLAND, 35 

manhood had returned the mere shadow of his former 
self. Young women had grown prematurely old 
under the too heavy burdens of anxiety, privation, 
and grief. The farma were neglected, the streets 
overgrown with grass, the ship-yards were deserted, 
the docks empty. But with the same courage and 
determination that had distinguished them in the 
darkest hours of adversity, the people instantly set 
about the bettering of their condition. The build- 
ing of vessels was resumed, the farms were tilled, 
shops were re-opened, a new church built, and in less 
than a decade after the signing of the treaty of peace 
at Paris, Warren was once more a busy and prosper- 
ous maritime town. 



APPENDIX. 



{From original, Fessenden Mss.) 



Koll of Capt. Ezra Ormsbee's Company of Militia 
in the Town of Warren, 1776. 

Sargant, Amos Haile, 

" Thomas Easterbrooks, 
<' Curtis Cole, 
" Gardner Mason, 

Corporal, William Child, 
" Jacob Sanders, 

" Oliver Salisbury, Jr., 
" Ichabod Cole, 

Drummer, 

Fifer, — 

James Child, 

^Cromwell Child, 

Samuel Miller, 

*William Salisbury, 

*Daniel Richards, 

*Joseph Kelley, 



38 THE HISTORY OF WARR^N^ RHODE; ISIvAND, 



Edward Eddy, 
*Jonatlian Salisbury, 
Jeremiah Child, 
*James Salisbury, 
Isaac Gorham, 
Jesse Baker, 
Georg Cogashell, 
William Lewis, 
Joseph Smith, 
Peleg Easterbrooks, 
Caleb Eddy, 
Haile Child, 
John Harding, 
Joseph Kelley, 
Daniel Kelley, 
Jonathan Bliss, 
Barnaby Luther, 
ISJ'athan Bowien, 
William Haile, 
Caleb Turner, 
Jeremiah Comstock, 
John Bowen, 2nd., 
Stephen Bowen, Jr., 
William Hoar, 
Samuel Wheaton, 2nd., 
Samuel Mason, 
Haile Barton, 
David Barton, 



Thomas Barden, 
Richard Barton, 
* Samuel Hicks, 
Hezekiah Buterworth, 
Gideon Luther, 
Elisha Finney, 
Richard Haile, Jr., 
Isaiah Cole, 
*rrederick Luther, 
James Mason, 
l^athan Haile, 
John O' Kelley, 
Edward Mason, 
Joseph Mason, 
Joshua Whiting, 
Whitfield Whiting, . 
Mial Luther, 
Job Salisbury, 
Perez Wheaton, 
William Hill, 
Amariah Cole, 
William Wheaton, 
John Bowen, 
Edward Kinnicutt, 
Sam'l D. Wolf, 
Caleb Miller, 
Job Miller, 
Rufus Chase, 



IN The war op the; revoIvUTion. 



39 



Level Maxwell, 
**Ebenezer Bosworth, 
James Bowen, 
Ellicksander Mason, 
Joseph McMilon, 
William Luther, 
William Arnold, Jr., 
Stephen Hicks, 
**Samson Sims, 
Caleb Salisbury, 
Joseph Barton, Jr., 
Daniel Easterbrooks, 
James Cole, 
Jonathan Carr, 
Barnard Ilaile, 
Edward Cole, 
Gideon Cole, 
Samuel Hicks, 2nd., 



John Haile, 

Benjamin Easterbrooks, 

2nd.. 
Warring Easterbrooks, 
William Miller, 
James Maxwell, 
Edward Easterbrooks, 
Jeremiah Joles, 
Barnard Salisbury, 
William Salisbury, 
John Cowin, 
John Sisson, Jr., 
Jolui Cole, 
Jonathan Towgood, 
Daniel Cole, Jr., 
Barnard Hale, Junh', 
Marmaduke Mason, 
Martin Easterbrooks. 



Roll of Captain Caleb Carr's Company, Col. Wm. 
Richmond's Regiment, Oct. 10, 1Y76. 
Caleb Carr, Captain, Thomas Pearse, 

Samuel Stevens, lieuten- Consider Tripp, 

ant, ISTathaniel Humphrey, 

Samuel Hicks, Ensign, Samuel Bosworth, 

*In the original muster-roll a line is drawn through these 
names. 

**Ebenezer Bosworth and Samson Sims were members of 
the crew of the privateer "Warren," which was captured by 
the enemy Dec. 29, 1777. They were committed to Mill 
Prison, Plymouth, Eng., June, 1778. 



40 the; history of warren, rhode; isivAnd, 



George Ox, 
Joseph Gladding, 
Gideon Hathaway, 
John Easterbrooks, 
Daniel Wardwell, 
Constant Church, 
Walter Durfee, 
David Luther, 
Caleb Miller, 
Esex Jones, 
John ISTorris, 
Amos Luther, 
Philip Carr, 
David Maxfield, 
Wheaton Turner, 
James Pike, 
Daniel Maxfield, 
Samuel Martin, 
JSTathaniel Wilson, 
Elisha Hathaway, 



Joseph Shana, 

John Pearse, 

Hail Child, 

James Bushee, 

Thomas Peck, 

Gideon Read, 

Joseph Turner, 

Wm. Read, 

Wilson Low, 

John E. Cedrup, 

Gideon Cole, 

i^athaniel Humphrey, 2d. 

]^athaniel West, 

John Sunday, 

Samuel Wheaton, 

Hicks West, 

Levi Cole, 

Asa West, 

Josej^h Hathaway, 

John More. 



{From original, Carr Mss.) 
A True List of all the Soldiers in the Town of 
Warren both in the Alarm and Militia who were 
Drafted the 28th day of Sep't'm., A. D. 17Y7. To 
Serve one Month from the First day of October En- 
suing the date above in my Company under the com- 
mand of the Hon'l. Major General Spencer, viz. : 



IN The; war of the rkvolution. 



41 



Men's Names Drafted. 



Their Substitutes. 



Where Subs. Belong-ed. 



Martin Luther 
Sylvester Child 
Benjamin Cole 
John Mason 
Benjamin Diman 
Shuael Burr 
Barnard Miller 
Daniel Cole 
James Miller 
James Child, 2d 
John Child, 2d 
Shubael Kinnicutt 
Marmaduke Mason 
William Barton 
Benjamin Barton 
Edward Gardner 



Jeremiah Jollea 
Joshua Turner 
William Meeker 
John Woodmansee 
Ebenezer Blauding- 
Samuel Viall 
Job Miller 
Esquire Pearse 



James Brown 
Daniel Bullock 
Joseph Mason 
Christopher Bowen 
Grindall Chase 
Joseph Thayer 



Bristol 

Palmer's River 
Rehobolh 
Swanzey 
Palmer's River 
Barring'ton 
Warren 
Rehoboth 



Barring-ton 

Rehoboth 

Warren 

Palmer's River 

Swansea 

Mendon 



Warren Militia who were added to my Company: 



Men's Names Drafted. 



Their Substitutes. 



Where Subs, belonged. 



Ichabod Cole 
Edward Mason 
James Child 
Gardner Mason 
William Il,ewis 
Benj. Cole, 2d 
Edward Eddy 
Jesse Baker 
James Maxwell 
Nathan Haile 
James Short 
Nath'l B. Whitting- 
John Child, 2d 
Richard Barton 
Richard Haile, Jr. 
Elisha Finney 
Thomas Burden 
Bennajah Cole* 
Johnathan Sissoat 
Cromwell Child, 2d 
Samuel Miller 
Samuel Burr 
Hezekiah Butterworth 



James Bowea 
Rufus Chase 
Joseph Allen 

Peter McMilliou 
Elisha Mason 
Nathaniel Cole 
George Brig-g-s 

Peter Richards 
Joseph McMillion 
Ephriam Cole 

Henry Peck 
Thomas Stevens 



James Chase 

John Bowen 
Anthony Thracher 



Warren 

Swansea 

Barring-ton 

Warren 
Palmer's River 
Swansea 
Newton 

Newport 

Warren 

Swanzey 

Rehoboth 
Newport 



Swanzey 

Warren 
Rehoboth 



♦Entered the Eleventh of the Month. 
t Sick Child, Abner Baker, 15 day. 

N. B.— All those with a hoag Stroke did their own Tower of Duty. 
Witness Dan'l Bradford, Capt. Alarm. 



42 THE HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE) ISLAND, 



{From original, Carr Mss.) 

A Muster Roll of Capt. Robart Carr's Company 
of Col. N"athan Miller's Reg't. of Militia now, in Ser- 
vice of the United States Engaged for the Term of 
Twenty Days after our arrival at Place of Rende- 
fuse. Taken to August 1, 1778. 



Robart Carr, Captain, 
Joshua Bicknel, 1st Lieu- 
tenant, 
Benjamin Bosworth, 2d, 

No. of Sargants. 
Nathan Bardeen, 
Thomas Pearse, 
Luther Cole, 
Esek Remington, 

No. of Corprols. 
John Linsey, 

No. of Privates. 
Ephraim Southard, 
Asel Grossman, 
Ezra Briggs, 
Sam'l Pearce, 
Wm. Arnold, 
Joseph Munro, 
Ambros Cole, 
Joseph Oldridge, 
Nath'l Philips, 



Joseph Vial, 
Thomas Swan, 
Joseph Moran, 

ran ?) 
Hezekiah Hicks, 
Negro Premous, 
John Childes, 
Samuel Bosworth, 
William Greene, 
Stephen Paine, 
Jehobad Carey, 
Sheapard Pearce, 
Joseph Enmierson, 
Sam'l Carpenter, 
Elijah Shaw, 
Sam'l Newman, 
Nath'l Smith, 
Jeames Hervey, 
Jacob Sanders, 
John In2:raham, 



(Man- 



IN THE WAR 01? THE REVOIvUTION. 43 

Sam'l Bowen, Aaron Knap, 

Joab Reede, Thomas Tempten, 

Amos Haile, Joseph Williams, 

Jeames Goff, Sam'l Allen, 

Wm. Munro, 3rd., Thomas Snmner, 

Thomas Gray, Joshna Tngrehara, 

Bristol Miller, Paul Mumford. 



(Warren men who were members of the Alarm 
Company of Bristol Comity in 1Y79 were: John 
Mason, Edward Gardner, Benjamin Barton, Daniel 
C^ole, Smith Bowen, Ebenezer Lnther, James Miller, 
Samuel Pearse, William Arnold, Ezra Ormsbee, 
John Kinnicutt, Barnard Miller, Jacob Sanders, 
Crnmel Child, Caleb Child, Sylvester Child, Mar- 
tin Lnther, Samuel Luther, Moses Turner, Shubael 
Burr, John Child, 2d., Caleb Carr, Samuel Wise, 
2nd., James Child, 2nd., Benjamin Cranston, Mar- 
maduke Mason, William Barton, John Wheaton, 
Joseph Eddy, Wm. Bliss.) 



{From original, Carr Mss.) 

Captain Robert Carr's Company of the Senior 
Class in the County of Bristol in Gen. Miller's Brig- 
ade, 1780. 

Men's ISTames. Benjamin Bosworth, 3d., 

Robert Carr, Capt., Ensign, 

Thomas Allen, Lieut., Luther Cole, Sergt., 



44 the; history of warren, rhode isi^and. 



Shubal Kinnicutt, Sergt., Moses Turner, 
Thomas Pearse, Sergt., John Child, 

John Haile, 
Parley How, 
Benjamin Cranston, 
Rufus Barton, 
William Barton, 
l^athaniel Heath, 
Henry Bowen, 
Samuel Allen, 
Josiah Vial, 
Samuel Bosworth, 
Matthew Watson, Jr., 
James Brown, 
Matthew Allin, 
Samuel Kint, 
Moses Tyler, 
Elkanah Humphrey, 
Joseph Smith, 
Consider Tripp, 
Solamon Townsend, 
JSTathan Bardeen, 
Samuel Hix, 
Luther Martin. 



Joseph Vial, 

Privitts. 
Jonathan Russell, 
Nathaniel Waldron, 
Anthony Vandoran, 
Jeremiah Ingraham. 
Hezekiah Monrow, 
Thomas Swan, 
Samuel Barker, 
Jeremiah Finney, 
Amos Haile, 
John Howland, Jr., 
Samuel Wardwell, 
William Wardwell, 
Stephen Smith, 
Ephraim Carey, 
William Lawless, 
Arehabel Monrow, 
James Miller, 
Jacob Sanders, 
Caleb Child, 
Samuel Luther, 

Fifteen of this Company belongs to Warren, 
Cole's Company, 16 of this Company belongs to 
Bristol Troop's Company, 15 of this Company be- 
longs to Barrington Viol Allen's Company. Total 
46. 



IN The; war of* the; revolution. 
{From original, Fessenden Mss.) 



45 



Tugiid, (Too- 



A List of Capt. Curtis Cole's Company in Cur'nl 
Nathan Miller's Eegiment. 1781. 

Thomas Easterbrooks, Samuel Fish, 
Leftenant, Jesse Baker, 

Ichabod Cole, Ensine, 
Edwar Mason, Sarjant, 
David Barton, 
Landon Col, 
Barney Luther, 
Jonathan Easterbrooks, 
William Luis, 
Benjamin Cole, 2d., 
Edward Cole, 



Crumil Child, 2d., 
Caleb Child, Jr., 
John Child, 2d., 
TsTathel B. Whitin, 
William O. Bron,, 



Simeon 

good,) 
Samuel Bur, 
John Bowen, 2d. 
N'athan Haile, 
Josif Mason, 
Josif McMilyon, 
William Bowen, 
John O. Killey, 
Joabe Millar, 
Barnot Haile, 
Ellick Sandas 

brooks, 
Eichard Haill, Jr 



Easter- 



Peter Keynolds, 
Jeremiah Comstock, 
Josier Bowen, 
Seth Snell, 
Jeames Cole, 
Caleb Turner, 
Jonathan Blis, 



(O'Brien,) Caleb Solberry, (Salis- 



bury,) 
William Luther, 
Jeames Graves, 
Jeames Goff, 
John Haill, 
John Cole, 
Jabez Luther, Jr., 



46 THK HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE ISLAND, 



John D. Wolf, 
Hezekiah Buterwork, 
Seth Cole, 
Elislier Finey, 
Jeames Shoart, 
Jeames Mason, 
John T. CUiild, 
Josif Tugud, 
Isack Cole, 
GaiT;er Mason, 
George Sisson, Jr., 
John Sisson Jr., 
Thomas Bnardin, 
Samnel Mason, 
ISTathan Bowen, 
Josif Killey, 
Daniel Killej, 
Jonathan Bowen, Jr., 
Benjamin Barton, Jr., 
John Thiirber, 
William Hoar, 
John Haill, 
Jonathan Haile, 
Lavil Maxwell, 
Thomas Parse, 
Ebenezer Cole, Jr., 
Thomas Cole, 
John Whetin, (When ton,) 
Abner Luther, 



Martin Easterbrooks, 
Daniel Easterbrooks, 
Abner Butter, 
Charles Collins, 
Gideon Luther, 
Beniah Cole, 
John Killey, 
Samuel Bowen, 
eleames Maxwel, 
Abrejn Butter, 
Holder Mason, 
Josif Eddy, 
John Brown, 
Josif Barton, 
Jonathan Carr, 
Filip Carr, 
Caleb Miller, 
Samuel Miller, 
Sylvester Haile, 
John Bowen, 
Caleb Hill, 
Edward Eddy, 
Caleb Cranston, 
Jerrimiah Child, 
Jeames Child, 
Barnot Solberry, 
Joarge ISTeals, 
**I^iclis Camil, 
Benjamin Bowen. 



♦Nicholas Cambell was a member of the "Boston Tea 
Party." 



IN The: war of the revoIvUTion. 47 



"VALUATION LIST" OF WARREN, R. I. 177S. 



168 Polls. 
14 slaves from 10 to 50 years of age. 
57 Horses. 
345 Horn Cattle including 40 oxen. 
340 Sheep and Goats. 
7 chaises. 
5 Wharfs. 
147 Ounces Plate. 
149 Hogs. 

2 Grist mills, one each wind and water. 
1 Distil House. 

1 Tan yard. 

3 Ship yards. 

2700 acres of land in the township. 
(176 acres wood and waste.) 
4600 bushels of grain. 

127 Barrels cider made. 
Amount total of debts owed $367. 
7 Acres orcharding. 

314 Tons English hay (cut.) 
Taxable value of real estate and personal $126,000. 
Total value cash and trading stock $15,000 and 
$14,800, all other personal. 



48 THE HISTORY 01^ WARREjN, RHODE) ISLAND, 

Keal estate $96,200. 

Personal $29,800. 

$126,000 total as above. 

2 slaves o^vned by Sylvester Child. 



2 " 


« 


John Child. 


2 " 


iC 


John Mason. 


2 " 


a 


Martin Luther. 


2 " 


a 


IsTathan Miller. 


1 " 


a 


Cromwell Child. 


1 " 


iC 


William LeAvis. 


1 " 


a 


Robert Carr..^ 


1 " 


a 


l^athan Whiting. 


1 " 


u 


John Haile. 


1 Chaise 


owned 


by John Child. 


1 " 


a 


James Miller. 


1 " 


a 


Wm. Lewis. 


1 " 


a 


Martin Luther.*^ 


1 " 


u 


Shubael Burr. 


1 " 


a 


George Coggeshall. 


1 " 


a 


ISTathan Miller. 


1 Wharf owned 


by Sylvester Child. 


1 " 


a 


Martin Luther. 


1 " 


a 


Cromwell & Caleb Child 


1 " 


(( 


:^\rathan Miller. 


1 " 


a 


Charles Collins. 


207 Dwelling Houses and other buildings. 


789 Inhabitants. 





IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 49 

SOUVENIRS OF THE REVOLUTION. 

There are in the possession of the Warren Artil- 
lery Company two field-pieces of peculiar historic in- 
terest. These guns are brass six-pounders, one hav- 
ing engraved upon it the name "Pallas," the other 
'"Tantae," while both bear the inscription "Stras- 
bourg, 1762." They were captured from the Brit- 
ish at the surrender of Burgoyne, Oct. 17, 1777, and 
were either given or transferred to the State of 
Rhode Island. They remained in the custody of 
the United Train of Artillery, Providence, from 1781 
until the "Dorr War," when they were presented to 
the Warren Artillery in recognition of the services 
of that company at Federal Hill, May 18, 1842. 

SHIPPING LOST DURING THE REVOLU- 
TION. 

Beside the privateers "General Stark," and 
"George," the following vessels belonging to War- 
ren were lost during the Revolution. Schooner 

"Roby," Kingsley, 100 tons, brig Mason, 120 

tons, sloop "United States," Coddington, 45 tons, 
schooner "Weasel" (privateer) Pain, 15 tons, 

brig , Mauran, 120 tons, schooner "Moses," 

Miller, 60 tons, sloop "Polly," Whiting, 45 tons, 
brig "General Wayne," Pearce, 120 tons, sloop 
"Abigail," Miller, 45 tons, schooner "Swordfish," 



5© THE HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE ISLAND, 

Collins, 120 tons, sloop "Rebecca," Champlin, 60 
tons, and schooner "Hunter," Crawford, 60 tons. 

{From original, Fesenden Mss.) 
An account of the Losses sustained by the Inhabi- 
tants of Warren by an Excurtion of the Enemy from 
Rhode Island, May 25, 1778. 

ACCOUNT OF PETER REYNOLD'S LOSS 
STISTAINED BY THE BRITISH TROOPS 
25TH OF MAY, 1778. 

1 Blacksmith's Vise — 5 gowns. ... £8 2 
25 yds. Toe Cloth whitened — 10 yds. 

Kersey 3 15 

9 yds. Sagatha — 1 pair Woman's 

Stays 2 11 

1 pair Cloth Shoes — one Axe — Coffe 

mill 1 10 

2 Silk Cloaks— 1 Looking Glass ... 3 3 
4 Table Cloths— 6 Towels 2 11 

1 Doz. Earthen Plates 1 Large Stone 

Platter 1 1 

Glasses, Cups, Saucers and Bowls .. . 12 

1-2 Doz. Aprons — 6 pairs Stockings. 3 12 
Shirts, Shifts, &c. — 3 pair Pillow 

Cases 3 

2 Petticoats — 2 pewter Plates and 

Porringer 2 



31 17 



IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 5 1 

EBENEZER BOSWOKTH'S LOSS. 

1 Suit :N'ew Broad Cloth Cloaths. . . 12 

2 Shirts — 1 Silver Spoon and 1-2 

Doz. Tea Ditto 2 2 

1 Pair Silver Buckles 18 



15 

JACOB SANDEKS' LOSS. 

2 Bed Blanketts— 1 Bed Broad Cloth 

Long Cloak £5 8 

1 Chinee Gown — 2 Lawn Aprons. . 5 5 6 

1 Lawn Handkerchiff — 1 Kenting 

Ditto 15 

1 Check'd Handkerchiff— 1 Pr. Silk 

Stockings 1 7 

1 Great Coat— 1 Hollen Shirt 2 18 

1 Gun — 1 Teapot — 1 pair Sheets . . 3 8 

Children's Go^vns — 1 Curtain 2 Caps 18 6 

1 Towel — 2 pillow cases 5 

Damage done his house bj Explosion 

of the Magazine 12 

1 yard Gauze — 1 Pair Buckles 2 

Handkerchiffs 1 14 

1 pair Silk Gloves 3 yds. Kibbon — 

1 porringer 9 2 



34 8 



52 THE HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE ISLAND, 

:n'athaatiel b. whitii^g's loss. 

50 Paper Dollars— 1 Cutlass £4 7 

WILLIAM T. MILLER'S LOSS. 

1 Gun 1 pair Leather Breeches .... £3 

1 Dressed Calf Skin— 1 pair Stays 18 

1 Table Cloth— 2 Jacketts 7 

1 Sword— 1 ax 2 2 

Tea Cups and Saucers 3 

6 10 

RUFUS WHITTAKER'S LOSS 

as Per Bill £60 7 

DAISTIEL COLE, ESQ.'S, LOSS. 

2 Pair Shoes £0 12 

1 Grind stone 12 

2 Pair Stockings 10 

2 Pillows 4 

6 Check'd Handkerchiffs 8 

1 Pair good Deerskin Breeches. ... 1 16 

7 Pair Stockings good 1 10 

1 new Linning Sheet 10 

1 Pair pillow cases 4 

3 good Shifts 1 16 

4 yds. 'New Linning Cloth 8 

1 Stock and Buckle Silver 12 

1 Lawn Handkerchiff 3 

9 05 



IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 53 

EEBEKAH SHELDON'S LOSS 

as Per Bill 9 15 6 

THE BAPTIST MEETING HOUSE 

Valued at 630 6 4| 

THE PARSONAGE HOUSE 

Valued at 309 8 11^ 

EBENEZER COLE, ESQ., LOSS BY THE 
ENEMY. 

350 Paper Dollars 26 5 

2 Hollen Shirts — 1 Linning 2 2 

5 Silk Handkerchiffs 1 10 

2 Linning Ditto 4 

2 pair Stockings 12 

1 Sword— 1 Cannister & Tea 1 1 

31 14 

BELONGING TO THE TOWN. 

3 Muskets — 3 Cartoush Boxes 4 10 

EBENEZER COLE, JUN'E, LOSS 

as per Bill 5 4 

LEAH HANDY'S LOSS 3 12 

ELISHA PHINNEY'S LOSS ... 85 6 

SAMUEL LUHTER'S LOSS.... 14 11 

DEACON BENJAMIN COLE'S LOSS 

as per bill 52 10 



54 THE HISTORY OF WARRKN, RHODE ISLAND, 

MAKTII^ LUTHEK'S LOSS. 

27 yards Hollen 6 15 

1 Frock 16 

1 Shirt— 2 Handkerchiffs 15 

1 Silk Gown 3 12 

1 Frock 9 

Damage done the Desk 12 

1 Broad Ax 15 

13 14 
BENAJAH COLE'S LOSS. 

1 Sheet I^Tew 10 

JAMES CHILD, 2D'S., LOSS. 

3 New Sheets £1 10 

WIDOW ABIGAIL HILL'S LOSS. 

One Silver Table Spoon 12 

1 Hollen Apron— 1 Check'd Ditto. . 12 

1 pair Gold Sleeve Buttons 14 

1 Hollen Handkerchiff 4 

1 Check'd Handkerchiff 3 

1 Black Belong Handkerchiff 6 

1 Beticoat — 1 porringer 6 6 

1 Cannester & Tea 4 6 

1 yard Black Ribbond 1 

1 Fair Shears 2 

8 5 



IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 55 

l^ATHANIEL HILL'S LOSS. 



I pair Cotton Stockings . 

6 Gallons Rum 

1 Pair Tavlor's Shears. 






6 





1 


16 








6 






2 8 



Loss sustained by :N'ATHA:N' MILLER, May 25, 
1778, when the Enemy made an Excursion from 
N^ewport to Burn the Boates and destroy the Maga- 
zeen. 

3-8 of a Privateer 125 Tuns set on fire 

the whole loss £900 the 3-8 £337 10 

1 Hogshead W. I. Rum in the Store 

adjoining the Magizeen 240 

1 Sword and Hanger 30 

3 small Arms 10 

4 Silver Tea Spoons 1 

7 Shirts 25 

6 Pairs Stockings 9 

1 Pair Buck Skin Breeches 9 

1 Paire Hollen Sheets 3 

3 yards & 1-2 New Linning Hollen 4 
1 pair Gold Sleeve Buttons belonging 

to Caleb 2 

1 Gold Ring 1 

1 Pair Paste Buckles ■ S 















16 





16 





























4 





16 





12 








J 



56 THE HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE ISLAND, 

1 Black Handkerchiff— 2 Silk and 

Cotton Ditto 3 4 

3 Pair Pillow Cases 2 8 

701 6 

(Consolidated at 4 for one 175 6 

SAMUEL MILLER'S LOSS. 

4 Hollen Shirts 3 10 

4 Pairs Silk and Worsted Stockings 1 16 

5 8 

The Mill belonging to SMITH 
BOWEN and SAMUEL PEARSE 

at Kickemuit £88 12 

SMITH BOWEN'S LOSS OUT OF HIS HOUSE. 

35 Skeins yam £1 3 4 

1 Silver Watch 6 

2 Axes 1 7 

2 Saws — 4 Chizzels 1 4 

2 Guns— 1 Sword 7 10 

9 Sheets 3 7 6 

7 Pillow Cases 14 

3 fine Shirts 1 16 

4 other Shirts 1 16 

3 Shifts 1 16 



IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 57 

2 Table Cloths 16 

4 Towels— 6 Handkerchiifs 1 16 

5 Aprons — 24 pair Stockings 7 15 

3 Gowns 6 

2 Petticoats — 1 Jacket 2 5 

1 Pair Buckles 15 

1 pair Gloves — Children's Clothing 2 

1 Looking Glass — 2 Basons 16 

2 plates — 2 porringers 6 

2 Quart Pots — 1 punch Bowie 18 

50 10 
CEOMWELL CHILD, CALEB CHILD & MOSES 

TURNER'S LOSS 
as apprised by Samuel Pearse & Shu- 
bel Kinnicutt on the 24th of Dec, 

ITTS £8450 18 6 

Lawful Paper Money which Consoli- 
date 6 and 1-2 for one 1300 

ALLIN COLE'S LOSS 

as per Bill 18 4 

SYLVESTER CHILD'S LOSS 

as per Bill 100 1 

The Damage done the Other Half 
of the GEX. STARK, PRIVA- 
TEER, not Charged in any bill be- 
fore 112 10 



58 THE HISTORY OI' WARREN^ RHODE ISLAND. 

JAMES CHILD'S LOSS. 

Two Beds— 4 Blankets £10 10 

Four pair Sheets — Six pe^vter plates 3 7 
4 Pewter Porringers — one Copper 

Tea Kittle 1 9 6 

4 Pillow Cases — Two pair Leather 

Breeches 2 8 

1 Coat— 3 Jaeketts 4 16 

Shirts 3 Silk Handkerchiffs 2 5 

2 Shifts— five Children's Shirts 2 17 

5 Children's Gowns — 2 pair Shoes. 2 5 

1 Frying Pan — one Warming Pan . . 18 

3 Pewter Plattei-s — one Looking Glass 18 
15 ponnds Candles — Twenty pounds 

Beef 17 

30 lbs. Pork— three lbs. Sugar 17 3 

2 lbs. Coffe — one Barrel Soap 1 5 

1-2 Bushel Meal 1 6 

1 Silk Cloak— five yds. silk 3 14 

6 yards Hollon — thirty skeins yarn 2 16 

4 yards Drab— 6 yds. Toe Cloth . . 118 
1 Bonnet — Two Pewter Basons .... 16 

1 Quart Pot — 1 pint ditto 9 

1 Milk Kittle— one Coffe Pot 11 

1 Bowie — one Earthen Platter 8 

9 Earthen Plates — one Teapot 10 

15 Pe^vter Spoons — 3 Earthen Tea- 
pots 9 3 



IN the; war of THE REVOLUTION. 59 

1 Sett Tea Cups & Saucers 

6 Bowls for Coffc 

3 Case Bottles — 18 Eound ditto . . 

1 Case Knives and forks 

Rasors — 1 yarn Coverlid 

2 Lawn Aprons — Baby's Cloathes, 

50 19 8 

EICHARD HAILE'S LOSS 
as pr. Bill 9 17 

JAMES BUSHEE'S LOSS. 

54 Squares Glass 1 17 G 

Other Damage to the House 3 






3 








4 


6 





11 


3 





3 





1 


7 





1 


18 






4 17 6 



JOHN HARDBT'S LOSS 

1 Pair Pillow Cases ... 

1 Bed 

1 Calico Gown 

1 Pair Stays 

1 Velvet Jacket 

1 Teapot — half Barrel pork 



BARNARD SALISBURY'S LOSS 

RUFUS BARTON'S LOSS 

CALEB CARR'S LOSS 






4 





3 


15 





3 








1 


4 





2 








3 


8 





18 


11 





95 


16 





9 


9 


6 


5 


17 






6o THE HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE ISLAND, 

REV'D CHARLES THOMPSON'S LOSS 

Saddle and curb bridle just bouglit. . 3 
Two Bever Hatts one wore a little, the 

the other not wore 4 

Two new Hollen Shirts and seven 

new Hollen stocks 3 10 

pair of new lather Boots of the first 

rate 2 2 

Three home made shirts half wore . . 15 

four pocket handkerchiefs 2 8 

twelve pair stockens all wore some. . 2 8 

One flannel gown 15 

two home made shirts wore some. . 12 

two Check Aprons 8 

One lawn henkerchief 5 

four lawn and cambric caps 9 

two pairs stockens 6 

pair of cloth shews 5 

Childrens cloaths the whole I judge 

at the lowest computation could 

not be less than 3 

Bab J things to the amount of 1 10 1 

2 yds. and 1-4 of linning 11 

1 yd. of home made broad cloth .... 6 

2 yds. ticking 6 

five pair of sheets half wore 5 

two pair of pillow caises 9 

two table cloaths one cersy the other 

Diaper 18 



IN the; war of the R^VOI^UTION. 6 1 

four cersj towels 8 

two caises of knives and forks 8 

Onfc Dozen of Mettle Spoons <) 

four pewter porringers 6 

one Quart Bason 4 6 

one pewter plait 1 6 

one set of china 15 

four small Delph boals 4 

two pairs of common beaker glasses . 3 

warming pan 10 5 

large frying pan 4 

one pair brass candlesticks 9 

one large Iron Dish Kittle 12 

Iron tea kittle 6 

two Cedar washing tubs 15 

Milkpail water pail and canny pail . . 7 2 
One Barrel full and firken half full 

of sope 1 4 

four Cider Barrels almost as good as 

as new 12 

one pounding tub with 160 weight 

of beef 3 12 

one pounding tub with 180 weight 

of pork 6 

two bushels of indien and one of ry 

meal 9 

flower perhaps no more than 14 

weight 6 



62 the; history of warren, RHODE ISLAND, 

Three chiezes about eight pounds 

each 16 

Three pounds of butter 3 

a firken with six pounds of ho^s 

fat 6 

six pounds of candles 6 

a new icder firken with 30 weight of 

shuger 1 2 

Coffee twelve pounds 14 

fifty weight of flax 2 

Eio'ht pounds of wool 6 

pair of Cotton Cards 5 

two common cheirs 6 6 

beadstead and whale sinew, cord. ... 1 4 

two large brown stone pots 3 

one large white stone pot for butter . 4 

one Dozen chunk bottles 9 

Cloaths brush, harth brush and flore 

brush 9 

Six milk pans 4 quarts apeace. ... 4 

two ginn gugs 1 

one black gug held 3 quarts 1 2 

two earthen pots 1 6 

bread trough common size 8 

paire of seal skin saddle bags 18 

two large cloathes baskets 6 

One Iron candlestick and pair of 

snuffers 4 



IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 63 

1 cord of wood 1 

Snuffers 4 

Barrel of sand 4 

Pair of steel spnrs G 

four flower barrels 6 

6Y 14 3 

The REV'D ERASMUS KELLEY 
lost almost all his furniture which 

cannot be Estimated at less than £G0 

JOB MILLER'S LOSS 139 

CALEB SALISBURY'S LOSS. . 12 

MARY SIMS' LOSS 11 10 

Total Loss £12,101 17 03 

THE "GEIsTERxiL STARK." 

The privateer "General Stark" was a sloop of 
about 130 tons burden and mounted 14 guns. She 
was owned by Lebaron Bradford, Benjamin Pearce, 
Samuel Browne, ISTathan Miller, and Cromwell 
Child. Her officers and crew, were Benjamin 
Pearce, Captain ; Josiah Church, 1st Lieut. ; Dan'l 
Scovil, 2d. Lieut. ; Chris. Prince, Master ; Jno. Bart- 
lett. Surgeon ; Edmund Tiley, P. Master ; Simon De- 
Wolf, P. Master; Benjamin Fry, Officer of Marines, 
and 2nd. M. ; Geo. Viall, Boatswain ; Jona Carr, Car- 
penter, Benj. Cranston, Sen'r, Thos. Tripp, Master's 
Mate; Peter McMillen, Jno. Wilbur, Nathan San- 



64 THE HISTORY OF WARREN^ RHODE ISLAND, 

ders, Caleb Hill, James Allen, Alexander Mason, 
Wm. DeWolf (boy,) Augustus Sanders, Warren 
Easterbrooks, Preserved Alger (boy,) James Bowen, 
Thomas Cole, Wm. Gorham, John Bowen, Haile 
Child, Lenox Bullock, Geo. Shaw, Pomp Gardner, 
Cuff I^ixon, :N'elson Miller, Wm. Brown, Caleb Mil- 
ler, Jos. Rhodes, Jared Holmes, Isaac Babcock, 
Jun., David Brown (boy,) Paul Burdick, Henry 
Champlin, James Hancox, P. Master; James W. 
Brayton, Peleg Hancox, Gilbert Thomas (boy,) Wil- 
liam Easterbrooks, Joshua Palmer, P. Master; Wil- 
liam Sheffield, Joshua Gladding, Andrew Cheese- 
borough, Josiah Sanborn, George Welles, Wm. 
Hammet, Elisha Tilton (boy,) Solomon Daggett, 

Daggett, Daniel Babcock, Collinji's York, Jun., 

Gardner Stanton, Jos. Brand, Josiah Wardwell, Ste- 
phen Andrews, Preserved Briggs, Thomas Finney, 
David Latham, Sylvester Haile, Lairs Crandall, 
John Burdick, Robert Fisto (boy,) ISTathan Brand, 
Prize Master. 



LETTER OF WILLIAM TURNER MILLER. 

"Hunter off James To\^'n in James River 
Virginia, September 19, 1781. 
'T)ear Lydia — I arrived here three days agoe after 
being 15 days at Sea and the Rest of the time which 
hath Elapsed since the 25 of august in the Chessa- 



IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 65 

peek, we had Some pretty Rough Weather at Sea but 
we all arrived safe but Ru'fus Barton's vessel which 
parted from the fleet in a Gale of Wind on the 10th 
day of our passage as near as I can Remember and 
we have not heard from him Since but presume they 
have Returned to Rhode Island, there is now Lying 
in the Harbor, the Hunter — the Delight — the Lydia 
— the Molly and two other Small Vessels that Sailed 
with us from Rhode Island. Captain James Mar- 
tin's Vessell is at Cape Charles about 100 miles from 
hence but he is here himself all the people are in good 
health and High Spirits belonging to the fore men- 
tioned Vessells. I unloaded wjiat hospital Stores I 
had on board yesterday and am Lying to wait for 
orders where to Land my Provisions — and it is Im- 
possible for me to tell when that will be as the Event 
of a battle between the Two Armies may decide the 
matter so that the time and place for Landing the 
provisions be better known. Lord Cornwallis Lies 
on a Neck of Land between this and York River 
with about 6 Thousand Troops besides Re- 
fugees and Negroes perhaps to the amount of 
3 Thousand and more which they Say are so badly 
Armed and Disciplined as can Render him but little 
Service. Gen. Roshambeau and the Marquis are 
Said to have an Army of about 20 Thousand good 
Troops and I think from all Circimistances that 
Cornwallis must fall but I believe he will fight first 



66 THE HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE ISLAND, 

he hath a Large number of Transports in York 
River but they will not avail him to make his escape 
for Count DeGrass and Count Barrass with their 
Combined fleets Lies in the Chessapeek in both fleets 
is 35 Sail of the Line besides Frigates and they have 
Sent Ships up to block York River which puts an 
Effectual Stop to the British bv water. There were 
a few days agoe 27 Ships of the British Line seen just 
at the Mouth of the Chessepeek who I dare say wish 
to come in with Safety but the French appear to wish 
for no better Sport than to meet them. 

The French Captured Two British Frigates who 
attempted to come in while I Lay in sight of them 
about a week agoe. I hope to be able to Load my ves- 
sell with Corn home on my own account as Corn here 
could be purchased for Six Shillings pr. Barrell 
(which is five Bushells) my hogshead of Rum I 
have sold part of for Two Dollars a gallon and make 
no doubt I shall Dispose of the Rest as well. I ex- 
pect Caj^t. Stephen Olney on board to Dine with me 
to-day it is impossible to tell you when to Look for 
me home I wish it may be within one month but don't 
be Impatient if it be Two. I am my dearest your 
most Efl'ectionate & Loving Husband, 

WILLIAM T. MILLER. 



IN THD WAR 01? THK REVOLUTION. 67 

ANCIENT LANDMAEKS. 

The Baptist meeting-house destroyed by the Brit- 
ish troops was located near the site of the present 
stone church at the corner of Main and Miller 
streets. It was a plain wooden structure, having up- 
on the roof a cupola surmounted by a vane. With- 
in the cupola hung a bell, bearing the date 17G4. 
This bell was bought in England and paid for with 
tobacco, and was generally styled the "tobacco bell." 
In this meeting-house was held the first commence- 
ment of Rhode Island College, now Brown Univer- 
sity, which was originally situated in Warren. 
South of the meeting-house stood the parsonage built 
by subscription in 1765 and designed for the Rev. 
James Manning then pastor of the church and his 
successors. The cost of the parsonage was £4630 
"old tenor." 

The building at the corner of Main and Market 
streets, now occupied by the Warren Bank was, in 
1778, one of the finest residences in the town and 
was painted a peach-bloom tint. When the powder 
magazine on the opposite corner blew up this house 
was considerably damaged. Among other houses 
still standing in Warren which were built prior to the 
Revolution, are the Gen. Miller house, at the foot 
of Miller street., the Baker house, comer Water and 
Baker streets, the brick house at the corner of Water 
and Church streets, the Hail house, comer Washing- 



68 THK HISTORY OF WARREN, RHODE ISLAND, 

ton and Water streets, the old Ormsbee house, located 
on the west side of Main street between Broad and 
Wheaton streets, and the Bo wen house at the junc- 
tion of Water and Main streets. Some of the farm- 
houses in the east part of the town are probably old- 
er than the houses in the compact portion. Cole's 
Hotel erected in 1762 was destroyed by fire in 1893. 
This building was one of the most interesting land- 
marks of Warren. 



FRANKLIN PRESS COMPANY 

PRINTERS 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



^JVQS'-it. l^OX