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Full text of "History of West Virginia, old and new, in one volume, and West Virginia biography, in two additional volumes"

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LIBRARY 

WEST VIRGINIA 

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HISTORY 

OF 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Old and New 



WEST VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY 

By Special Staff of Writers 



VOLUME III 

BIOGRAPHICAL 



ILLUSTRATED 



THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Inc. 

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK 

19^3 



Ai>PAl.iUit 

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Library 
West Tlrgiiiift University 



Copyright 1923, 

by 

The Amemcan Historical Soctett, Inc. 



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History of West Virginia 



Hon. I. Grant Lazzelle. The career of Hon. I. Grant 
lazzelle, judge of the Circuit Court, is strongly entrenched 
n the history of the jurisprudence of Monongalia County. 
The City of Morgantown, which witnessed the beginning of 
lis professional career in 1889, offered a promising field 
or the young man of twenty-seven years, and the citizens 
vho have watched his advancement have never had cause 
regret the faith they placed in his energy, enthusiasm 
ind ability. He has grown into his opportunities, has 
fashioned his resources to his needs, and has reflected 
iignity, sincerity and genuine worth upon a profession 
■or which he is singularly and even admirably equipped. 

Judge Lazzelle was born on a farm in Cass District, 
lear Morgantown, May 10, 1862, and is a representative 
n the fourth generation of an honored pioneer's family of 
VIonongalia County. The Lazzelle family, as the name 
night intimate, is of French stock, and was founded in 
ijnerica during Colonial days. Thomas Lazzelle, the great- 
;randfather of the Judge, was born near the City of Phila- 
lelphia, married Hannah Becli, of Pennsylvania, and a 
ihort time after marriage he and his wife came to the bor- 
lerland of Virginia and settled on Government land in 
^ass District of what is now Monongalia County, West Vir- 
jinia. Thomas Lazzelle was a pioneer farmer, and was 
ilso the first Methodist preacher of his district. 

Thomas Lazzelle, the younger, son of Thomas Lazzelle, 
vas born in Cass District in 1788, and became a large 
'armer and stock-raiser and one of the prominent and in- 
luential men of his locality. He married Miss Rebecca 
Bowlly. 

I James Lazzelle, the son of Thomas Lazzelle, the younger, 
ivas born on the old Lazzelle homestead December 25, 1810, 

Iind followed in his father 's footsteps as to a choice of 
vocations, likewise becoming a successful farmer and raiser 
[i)f livestock. He was a man held in high esteem in his 
!ommunity and took an active interest in civic affairs, al- 
;hough not a seeker of public oflBce. He married Miss 
Eleanor Courtney, of Monongalia County, who died in 1896, 
md Mr. Lazzelle 's death occurred the following year. 
^ong their children was Judge Lazzelle of this review. 

L Grant Lazzelle received his early education in the 
jublic schools, following which he attended the University 
)f West Virginia, from which he received his Bachelor of 
\rts degree in 1883 and his Bachelor of Laws degree in the 
rear following. He did not immediately enter upon the 
Dractice of his profession, taking up teaching instead, and 
from 1884 for four years was engaged in educational work, 
luring which period he was principal of the Kingwood, 
West Virginia, and LaGrange, Arkansas, public schools. 
He entered the practice of law at Morgantown in 1888, 
is senior member of the firm of Lazzelle and Stewart, which 
issociation continued until the senior member was elevated 
:o the Circuit Bench in 1921. Great ability, unusual nat- 
aral resource and firm belief in the best tenets of his pro- 
fession enabled Judge Lazzelle to make himself a factor 
to be reckoned with, and in the course of his career as a 
awyer many of the most important cases in Monongalia 
bounty received his support. In 1894 he was appointed 
nay or of Morgantown to fill a vacancy, a position in which 
te served during that year, and in 1897 was elected prose- 
jjuting attorney of Monongalia County, an office in which 



he served for four years. His splendid record in these two 
capacities was a helpful factor when he became, in 1920, 
the candidate of the republican party for the ofBce of 
judge of the Circuit Court, and he assumed the duties of 
this position January 1, 1921. In addition to ability and 
experience Judge Lazzelle possesses in marked degree the 
judicial temperament, and during the comparatively short 
time that he has been on the bench has won the esteem 
of the members of the Monongalia bar and the confidence 
of the people in general. 

On September 23, 1891, Judge Lazzelle was united m 
marriage with Miss Norah H. Jackson, daughter of Joseph 
Jackson, of Kingwood, West Virginia, and to this union 
there were born two sons: Donald Grant, born February 
3 1894, now a practicing attorney of Morgantown; and 
Eugene, born January 25, 1897, who died November 30, 
1902. Judge Lazzelle is esteemed for his many admirable 
qualities of heart and mind, and his thorough knowledge 
of the theory and practice of law and his wise interpre- 
tation thereof, and for a public-spiritedness that has ever 
prompted a sane and practical interest in those measures 
which tend to greater happiness, stabiUty and good gov- 
ernment. 

Donald G. Lazzelle. One of the leading professional 
men of Morgantown is Donald G. Lazzelle, a lawyer of 
sound judgment, and a citizen of honest purpose and 
enterprising effort. He is a member of a sturdy old county 
family, and other good fortune has been his, in the way 
of honored parentage, educational advantages and social 
opportunities. He was born at Morgantown, Monongalia 
County, West Virginia, February 3, 1894, and is a son 
of Hon. I. Grant Lazzelle, judge of the Circuit Court 
of Monongalia County. _ . „ , „ 

In the public schools of his native city Mr. Lazzelle 
continued a student until he was graduated from the high 
school in 1913, with decision already made as to his future 
career The profession of law undoubtedly offers a very 
attractive field to the ambitious young man of studious 
habit and disciplined mind, especially when inheritance 
nlays a part. Mr. Lazzelle has the example of a. distin- 
guished father. He then entered the West Virginia Uni- 
versity, where he completed a course m law and was 
graduated from that institution io 1919, and in June of 
that year was admitted to the bar. 

As a loyal son, Mr. Lazzelle returned to his native 
city to start his professional life, and was associated with 
the law firm of Lazzelle & Stewart until January 1, 1921, 
when he entered independent practice. It is the expressed 
opinion of many of the older members of the Monongalia 
bar that very seldom have young lawyers shown such a 
mature grasp of the letter of the law and such thorough- 
ness and accuracy of judgment. He has forged rapidly 
to the front in his profession, and commands universal 
confidence, in recognition of his legal ability and his per- 
sonal probity. , ^^ . , i, 

Mr. Lazzelle married in 1918 Miss Mildred Price, daugh- 
ter of William E. and Elizabeth E. (Mack) Price, old 
residents of Morgantown, and they have two daughters: 
Louise, born March 19, 1919; and Mary Jean, born Sep- 
tember 5, 1920. 



6^8748 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



Mr. Lazzelle is interested in politics to the extent of 
earnest, good citizenship, and is an active member of the 
Chamber of Commerce. He belongs to the Monongalia 
County Bar Association and the West Virginia State Bar 
Association. He is a member of Morgantown Lodge No. 
4, A. F. and A. M.; Morgantown Commandery No. 18, 
Knights Templar; and Osiris Temple, Mystic Shrine. Per- 
sonally he is genial and comjianionable, and belongs to 
the Country Club. 

Judge George W. Atkinson. A life of public service, in- 
volving some of the highest honors that can be conferred by 
state or nation — former governor of West Virginia and 
former judge of the Federal Court of Claims — has been that 
of Judge Atkinson. Most significant is the fact that he has 
retired from his public career possessing in magnified degree 
the affection and est<>em of the people of his home state. 
This esteem was justified by his character. It can be said 
of him as of few other men that he never abused the con- 
fidence so completely reposed in him during all the years 
lie was in public ofiiee. 

Judge Atkinson was born on a farm along Elk River in 
Kanawha County, June 29, 1845, son of James and Miriam 
(Rader) Atkinson. He was carefully educated, and his 
scholarship is attested by degrees representing graduation 
from several higher institutions and also honorary degrees 
conferred as tokens of his public services. He graduated 
A. B. from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1870, and Master 
of Arts in 1873, and in 1874 graduated in law from Howard 
University at Washington. He received the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree from Mount Union College in 1885, pro 
merito, and honorary degrees have been conferred upon him 
by De Pauw University, U. S. Grant University, University 
of Nashville, Ohio Wesleyan University and West Virginia 
University. 

He was admitted to the bar in 1875, and from the first has 
been active in civil and political affairs. Before he took up 
law practice he was a member of the Charleston Board o£ 
Education, in 1869-71, and was postmaster of that city from 
1870 to 1876. He was a United States internal rev.enue 
agent from 1876 to 1880, and in 1881 was appoiuted United 
States marshal for the District of West Virginia, serving 
four years. His conduct in that office was accorded special 
commendation by the Department of Justice. In the mean- 
time Judge Atkinson had become a resident of Wheeling, 
and in 1888 he was elected to represent the First Congres- 
sional District in Congress, serving as a member of the 
Fifty-first Congress from 1889 to 1891. He declined re- 
election. He was engaged in the practice of law at Wheel- 
ing until 1896, and in that year came to him the distinctive 
honor of being elected governor of West Virginia on the 
republican ticket, the first republican to hold that ofSce 
since 1871. His term of governor ended in 1901. As gov- 
ernor his administration was an effective one in every 
department requiring his executive ability, and these results 
were accomplished in part by his practical and diplomatic 
method of handling conflicting interests and disposing of 
party and personal quarrels. Possibly no other governor 
of West Virginia ever left office with so great a degree of 
esteem from his party and citizens generally. 

Soon after the close of his term as governor he was 
selected in 1901 as United States district attorney for the 
Southern District of West Virginia. He served in that office 
until April 15, 1905, when he was named by President 
Roosevelt a member of the United States Court of Claims. 
When he retired from this court after eleven years of serv- 
ice, on April 17, 1916, he received the grateful tributes of 
many men prominent in the life of the nation, who united 
in paying their respects to the high quality of his work on 
the Federal Bench and to his personal character as well. 

Early in his life Judge Atkinson became a member of 
the Masonic order, and he was grand master of the Grand 
Lodge of the state in 1876-77, and for twenty years, 1885- 
1905, was grand secretary. Judge Atkinson from youth 
has been an earnest Christian, and one of the prominent 
lay members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, being lay 
delegate to the National Conference of 1876 and to that of 
1888. He has been one of West Virginia's most popular 



and widely sought public speakers, and besides his appear- 
ance in political campaigns he has done much platform work, 
lecturing on literary, religious and Masonic subjects. He is 
author of an impressive list of works, including : ' ' History 
of Kanawha," 1876; "West Virginia Pulpit," 1878; 
' ' After the Moonshiners, ' ' 1879 ; ' ' Revenue Digest, ' ' 1880 ; 
"ABC of the Tariff," 1882; "Don't, or Negative Chips 
from Blocks of Living Truths," 1886; "Prominent Men of 
West Virginia," 1895; "Psychology Simplified," 1897; 
' ' Volume of Public Addresses ' ' and a ' ' Volume of 
Poems," and more recently he was author of the "Bench 
and Bar of West Virginia," published in 1919 by the 
Virginia Law Book Company of Charleston. 

December 2, 1868, Judge Atkinson married Miss Ellen 
Eagan, of an old Kanawha County family. She died in 
1893, the mother of five children. On June 24, 1897, Judge 
Atkinson married Mrs. Myra Hornor Camden, widow of the 
late Judge G. D: Camden of Clarksburg. 

Kindly by nature, generous to a fault, true to his friends 
and his convictions, knowing no distinction in rank among 
men, except that marked by character. Judge Atkinson 
is a splendid type of the sturdy American boy grown to 
a man of influence and still, at the age of seventy-seven, 
exercising an influence for good in his home state. 

Harry P. Camden. Among the distinguished men of 
this state Harry P. Camden is entitled to a prominent 
place. His professional ability and standing give him rank 
among the foremost lawyers of the state, and his achieve- 
ments in other lines make him conspicuous among men. 

Harry P. Camden was born at Weston, West Virginia, 
September 8, 1858. He is the son of T. B. Camden and 
Susan Holt Camden, and he owes much to these sturdy 
parents of good stock. His lineage runs back to the Cam- 
dens and the Spriggs of Montgomery County, Maryland, 
on the father's side, and to the Holts and the Wilsons 
of Pennsylvania on the mother's side, all of whom are of 
Revolutionary stock. One uncle on the father's side was 
twice elected United States senator from the State of West 
Virginia, and another uncle, on the mother's side, was 
judge of the Supreme Court of West Virginia for many 
years. 

The subject of this sketch was educated in the common 
schools of this state, and later attended for two years a 
preparatory school at Norwood on the James River, in the 
State of Virginia, and from there he went to the Uni- 
versity of Virginia at Charlottesville. For two years he 
was a student in the academic department of the University 
and was graduated in 1878-79 and in 1879-80 in several 
branches of study. As a member of the class of history 
and English literature for the year 1879-80 he was awarded 
the honor of having his. graduating essay adjudged the best 
essay written by the class, and he had as competitors such 
students as Charles W. Kent, who afterward became pro- 
fessor of History and English Literature at the University. 
Mr. Camden 's essay was published in the first issue of 
the University Magazine for the year 1880, and the same 
issue of the magazine contained complimentary announce- 
ment of the fact that Thomas Woodrow WUson had re- 
ceived the orator's medal and the magazine medal for the 
same year. 

In the year 1880 Mr. Camden entered the law class of 
the University of Virginia, without any previous prepara- 
tion, and he achieved what has been accomplished by few 
students under the same conditions, and that was the 
making of his degree of Bachelor of Law, under Prof. 
John B. Minor and others, in one scholastic year. 

After graduating in law he first located in Charleston, 
West Virginia, where for five or six years he practiced 
his profession, most of the time in partnership with Gen. 
C. C. Watts. He made his mark at the bar, even in that 
early day. 

Later, at the instance of his uncle, Senator J. N. Camden, 
he came to Parkersburg to assist him in taking care of 
the legal end of the many large enterprises which he was 
then promoting, and after these were firmly established he 
entered into partnership in the practice of the law with 
the late John A. Hutchinson, a leading lawyer of the bar 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



3 



at Parkersburg, and remained with him until his death, at 
which time he fell heir to the large practice that had been 
built up by Hutchinson & Camden. 

In 1896 Mr. Camden was made general counsel of the 
Ohio River Railroad Company, and for about nine years 
and until this road was sold to the B. & O., he success- 
fully and satisfactorily guided the legal destiny of this 
company, and always with conspicuous ability. One promi- 
nent member of the local bar, who had had experience in 
the same line of legal work, paid Mr. Camden the compli- 
ment of saying that he was the best counsel the Ohio 
River Railroad Company ever had, and it had had some able 
lawyers for counsel. 

Mr. Camden is still in active practice and has justly 
earned the enviable reputation of being one among the 
leading lavpyers, not only of the local bar, but of the 
state. At the present time he is attorney for the estate 
of J. N. Camden, deceased, the Union Trust & Deposit 
Company, the Wood County Bank, the Cairo Oil Company 
and the Parkersburg-Ohio Bridge Company. 

Mr. Camden has been active at all times as a public 
spirited citizen outside of his profession, and has always 
taken an interest in the welfare and progress of the city 
in which he lives. For years he was a director of the 
Parkersburg Board of Commerce and was recognized as one 
of the most active and most valuable members. He was 
made chairman, some years ago, of a committee to devise 
ways and means for constructing a bridge over the Ohio 
River at Parkersburg, and he evolved and formulated the 
plan for financing the project, and it is due in great 
measure to the services, advice and activities of Mr. Camden 
that Parkersburg now boasts of one of the handsomest 
bridges over the Ohio River from Pittsburgh to Cincinnati. 
He is president of the Parkersburg-Ohio Bridge Company, 
as well as attorney for the company. 

Mr. Camden married Juliette Graham Blackford in Feb- 
ruary, 1899, and they have three children, Harry P., Jr., 
Mary V. and Graham Blackford Camden. He is aSiliated 
with the Episcopal Church, and in politics is of the demo- 
cratic faith. 

Johnson Newlon Camden. One of West Virginia's 
most eminent citizens, a business man, financier and public 
leader, was the late Johnson Newlon Camden. 

He was born in Lewis County March 6, 1828, and died 
at Parkersburg April 25, 1908, at the age of eighty years. 
He was the oldest son of John Scribner and Nancy (New- 
lon) Camden. In 1838, when he was ten years of age, the 
family moved to Braxton County, and he grew up there 
in the rural backwoods and became proficient in the arts 
and sports of that district, being a skilled hunter, fisher- 
man, and guiding a canoe with all the expertness of a 
native Indian. In this way he acquired his first practical 
knowledge of the mineral resources of the state, in which 
subsequently he played so prominent a part in the de- 
velopment. He made good use of limited opportunities to 
gain an education, and subsequently spent two years in 
an academy. He was deputy clerk of the Circuit Court of 
Braxton County under his uncle, Col. Willi.Tm Newlon, and 
at the age of eighteen was appointed a cadet in the West 
Point Military Academy, but resigned two years later to 
begin the study of law. He was admitted to the bar in 
1851, and served as commonwealth attorney for Braxton 
County and later for Nicholas County. 

In a few years he gave up the practice of law to look 
after his growing interests acquired by the purchase of 
large tracts of wild land in Braxton and Nicholas counties. 
He established his home at Weston in 1853, and the 
following year was made assistant in a branch of the 
Exchange Bank of Virginia. Four years later he again 
resumed the practice of law and the work of developing 
his lands. He had made some experiments in the pro- 
duction of oil from cannel coal, but was soon diverted from 
this enterprise by hearing of the petroleum resources in 
Wood County. He began operating in that field when 
there was only one oil well, and soon had a company 
organized to drill and brought in a well that produced 
oil more rapidly than it could be stored or shipped. Much 



of the oil from this pioneer well was transported by flat- 
boats down the Little Kanawha River, and it is said that 
the first week's operations yielded the company $23,000. 
That was the beginning of a feverish oil boom in that 
section. The outbreak of the Civil war shortly afterward 
brought about a general suspension of work in the West 
Virginia oil fields, though Mr. Camden did not allow his 
interest to lapse. He and the Rathbone brothers developed 
some additional leases in the oil belt, and at the same 
time he became identified vrith others in providing a finan- 
cial organization to give more extended banking facilities, 
out of which the First National Bank of Parkersliurg was 
formed. Mr. Camden became its first president. During 
subsequent years it is said that he owned an interest in 
every oil producing belt in West Virginia with one excep- 
tion. From oil production he and his associates in 1869 
entered the refining branch of the industry, erecting large 
storage tanks and a refinery at Parkersburg. Soon after- 
ward the West Virginia fields began to decline, the great 
bulk of production being in Pennsylvania, and in order 
to secure crude oil for the refinery Mr. Camden became 
associated with the Standard Oil Company, then in its in- 
fancy. He became a director in the company and had 
charge of its West Virginia and Maryland combinations. 
The business at Parkersburg was continued under the 
name of the Camden Consolidated Oil Company, and the re- 
finery at times manufactured 300,000 barrels of oil yearly. 
Later the refining interests were removed to the seaboard, 
and Mr. Camden was responsible for the consolidation of 
the refineries at Baltimore under the Baltimore United Oil 
Company, a million dollar corporation of which he was 
president. 

Without doubt Senator Camden was one of the fore- 
most men in vision, executive planning and practical ad- 
ministration in developing the mining, manufacturing, com- 
mercial and agricultural interests of West Virginia. In 
1882 he helped organize the Ohio River Railroad Company, 
which built the line from Wheeling to Huntington, now a 
part of the Baltimore & Ohio. He later organized and 
built a railroad from Fairmont to Clarksburg, opening a 
great coal field, and subsequently extended its facilities to 
important timber regions of the state. This was one of 
the first of an extensive system of narrow gauge railroads 
that furnished a network of transportation for the pro- 
ductive resources of the state. With Henry Gassaway 
Davis he was interested in the building of the West Vir- 
ginia Central Railroad, now the Western Maryland. He 
was president of the Monongahela River and the West 
Virginia and Pittsburgh railroads, and at different times 
was identified with many of the financial and industrial 
corporations that have been powerful in West Virginia. 

The responsibilities and honors of politics and public 
affairs could hardly have been avoided by a man of such 
prominence. He was a leader in 1867 in the movement to 
remove the political disabilities from the citizens who had 
given their support to the Confederacy. In 1868 he was 
nominee of the conservative party for governor. While 
continuing his eflforts to repeal the disfranchising clause 
of the State Constitution, he was equally open in his ad- 
vocacy of recent amendments to the Federal Constitution, 
and this stand prevented his nomination for governor by the 
democratic party in 1870. He was again nominated in 
1872, but was defeated by a combination of democrats with 
the republicans who were seeking to defeat the new State 
Constitution. In 1880 he was almost unanimously nominated 
by the democratic caucus for the United States Senate, and 
was elected by the Legislature of that year. He was one 
of the able men in the Senate while the democratic party 
was ascendant in national affairs during the 'SOs. While 
he was not reelected, he was able to name his successor, and 
subsequently he was offered the nomination for governor, 
but declined. His last political honor came in 1893, when 
he was chosen to the United States Senate to fiU the un- 
expired term of Senator Kenna, and he served from Janu- 
ary 28, 1893, to March 4, 1895. He was a delegate to 
the Democratic National Convention in 1868, 1872 and 
1876. 

Senator Camden in 1858 married Anna Thompson, dangh- 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



ter of George W. and Elizabeth (Steenrod) Thompson, 
of Wheeling, where her father was a man of public promi- 
nence. Senator Camden and wife had two children. The 
son, Johnson Newlon Camden, is a prominent leader in 
agricultural and stock raising affairs in Central Kentucky, 
married into one of Kentucky's oldest and most distin- 
guished families, and recently served a brief term as a 
member of the United States Senate. The daughter of 
the late Senator Camden, Annie, became the wife of Gen. 
Baldwin Day Spilman. 

William Alexander MacCorkle, who was the ninth 
citizen to hold the office of governor of West Virginia, has 
been a member of the Charleston bar for over forty years 
and is a member of the law firm of Chilton, MacCorkle, 
Clark & MacCorkle.. 

He was born at Lexington, Virginia, May 7, 1857, son of 
William and Mary (Morrison) MacCorkle. He graduated 
in law from Washington and Lee University in 1879, was 
admitted to the bar the previous year, and began practice 
at Charleston in 1879. The law firm of Chilton, MacCorkle 
& Chilton was organized in 1897. 

Governor MacCorkle is a democrat. He was elected and 
served as prosecuting attorney of Kanawha County from 
1880 to 1889. His service as governor extended from March 
4, 1893, to March 3, 1897. Some years later he was 
elected a member of the state Senate, serving from 1910 
to 1914. 

Governor MacCorkle is well known as a writer and is 
author of "Some Southern Questions," "The Monroe 
Doctrine," "The Book of the White Sulphur," and many 
addresses and articles upon economic subjects. 

October 19, 1881, he married Isabelle Goshorn, of Charles- 
ton. 

Reese Blizzard. Considering the broad range of his 
services and activities Reese Blizzard, of Parkersburg, has 
lived an exceedingly busy life, and his friends have many 
times admired the wonderful energy which he has put into 
his undertakings. He is one of West Virginia 's distinguished 
lawyers, formerly a circuit judge, and has also been a con- 
structive factor in the larger business affairs of the state. 

Judge Blizzard was born in Nicholas County, West Vir- 
ginia, October 17, 1864, son of James and Elizabeth (Gill) 
Blizzard. His maternal grandfather came to this country 
from Ireland. His paternal grandfather, Alexander Bliz- 
zard, came from Scotland. His wife was a Campbell, also of 
Scotch ancestry and related to Alexander Campbell, founder 
of Bethany College, West Virginia. Alexander Blizzard 
made his home in New Jersey. James was one of his three 
sons, one of whom went to Ohio and the other to Indiana, 
while James settled in Greenbrier County, West Virginia. 
He was a clergyman of the Methodist Protestant Church, 
though his duties were only local. The greater part of his 
life was spent in West Virginia, and he was a private sol- 
dier in the Confederate army and wounded in the battle of 
Shiloh. He died in 1889 and his widow in 1907. James 
Blizzard's first wife was a daughter of Rev. A. T. Morrison, 
of Nicholas County, and she became the mother of ten chil- 
dren. His second wife, Elizabeth Gill, was the mother of 
thirteen children. 

Reese Blizzard lived in Nicholas County until he was thir- 
teen, and thereafter made his home with his parents in 
Gilmer County until he reached his majority. Following 
that he spent some time in Calhoun County, and eventually 
came to Wood. County. His education was the product of 
common schools, and the Glenville Normal School at Glen- 
ville in Gilmer County. Among the experiences by which he 
made a living and prepared himself for bigger things he 
taught school, worked on a farm, clerked in a store, was as- 
sistant in the circuit clerk 's office and carried mail. He read 
law at Glenville with the firm of Linn & Withers, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1886. Beginning practice at Grants- 
ville, he was soon recognized as a man of superior powers in 
the law and his practice came to extend all over Central West 
Virginia. Ten years after his admission to the bar he was 
elected circuit judge of the Sixth Judicial Circuit in 1896. 
The circuit was composed of the counties of Gilmer, Calhoun, 



Roane, Jackson and Clay. As judge of that court he made 
the court a purely business machine, and attracted the atten- 
tion of the entire state by the rapidity with which he trans- 
acted the business of the court. He was only reversed twice 
by the Supreme Court during his entire term of office — a 
record never made by any other judge in the state. Judge 
Blizzard served only four years of his eight-year term, re- 
signing midway to remove to Parkersburg and engage in 
the general practice of the law. 

In 1901 he was appointed by President McKinley United 
States district attorney for the State of West Virginia. 
Soon after this the state was divided into two districts, and 
Judge Blizzard was made district attorney for the Northern 
District. He was reappointed by President Roosevelt, and 
had charge of all matters in his district under the Federal 
Department of Justice until 1910. For ten years he was at- 
torney for the Street Railway Company of Parkersburg. 
He has served as attorney for the Little Kanawha Syndicate 
Properties, and in that capacity directed the condemnation 
proceedings for the right of way from the Pennsylvania state 
line to Fairmont for the Buokhannon & Northern Railroad. 
Judge Blizzard is president of the Parkersburg Commercial 
Banking & Trust Company, president of the Parkersburg 
Ice Company, president of the Oil & Gas Company, and has 
many other business interests too numerous to mention. His 
chief hobby outside the practice of law is farming, and his 
home is on a beautiful suburban place at Parkersburg. He 
has given considerable attention to the breeding of pure , 
bred livestock, chiefly horses. Judge Blizzard has been 
directly connected with the building of five fair grounds in 
West Virginia, the last one being at Parkersburg, said to 
be the best in the state. He was president of the Parkers- 
burg Fair Association for many years. | 

In politics he has always been a loyal republican. The ' 
five counties in the Sixth Judicial Circuit had a normal 
democratic majority of 1,372. In that circuit he was elected 
to the judgeship by 819 majority. 

In 1904 Judge Blizzard was in the storm center of the 
politics of West Virginia. The late A. G. Dayton, W. P. 
Hubbard, George C. Sturgiss and Judge Blizzard were 
agreed upon as a committee to make recommendations to 
the Legislature for the enactment of laws after the storm 
produced by the report of the West Virginia Tax Com- 
mission. 

As a member of this committee Judge Blizzard proposed 
many laws that had not been recommended by the tax com- 
mission and which were afterward enacted as laws by the 
Legislature. As a result, leaseholds for oil, gas and coal 
have been taxed ever since. The fees of state officers, and 
especially that of secretary of state, amounting to $60,000 
per year, has been turned into the state treasury. Capitation 
taxes have been collected by the assessor when assessment is 
made. This has netted the state treasury something like 
$100,000 per year. In all, more money has been turned into 
the state treasury as a result of these recommendations than 
was turned in as a result of the recommendations of the 
State Tax Commission. 

But the real character and public interest of the man was 
more clearly shown in the ownership and editorial manage- 
ment of the Parkersburg Dispatch News, a daily newspaper, 
than in any other phase of Judge Blizzard's life. It was in 
this that his independence and fearlessness were displayed in 
a most remarkable degree. 

He was one of the earliest, if not the very earliest, pro- 
gressive republicans in West Virginia. As editor of the 
Parkersburg Dispatch News he was a most unwavering advo- 
cate of Roosevelt 's principles and policies. In some matters 
he was in advance of Roosevelt. While he stoutly opposed 
strikes as a means of settling differences between capital and 
labor, he even contended that capital was worse than labor 
for making conditions which brought about strikes. His 
doctrine was that if the great body of the people knew that 
labor would not strike it would be much more friendly to 
labor, and that if labor would put into politics the money 
it put into strikes in properly setting itself before the public 
that it would, with the masses favoring it, be able to enact 
laws which would prevent capital from being unfair. He 
constantly proclaimed that the insignificant number of 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



capitalists and the small number of organized labor ought 
not to be permitted to disturb the great body of the people; 
and that the people^ being disinterested and fair should make 
such laws as would prevent the great body of the public from 
being disturbed, harassed and injured by a fight between 
capitalists, composed by not more than five per cent of the 
people, and organized labor, constituting not more than 
fifteen per cent of the people. He urged that at the be- 
ginning of the existence of civilized man capital and labor 
began the settlement of their differences by the same method 
that two bullies employ by trying which are the stronger. 
It has settled nothing: it has constantly become worse. 
That the real solution of the problem is in eliminating the 
difference between capital and labor by making the great 
masses both capitalists and laborers. That there was no 
law, moral or divine, which of right would constitute one 
man a laborer and another a capitalist. That, without revo- 
lution or seriously disturbing business, and by a system of 
inheritance and income taxes, the enormously few estates of 
the country, composing ninety per cent of its wealth, could 
in twenty-five years redistribute ninety per cent of the 
wealth of the country; and that the money thus derived 
should be employed in paying all of the exi:)enses of educa- 
cating all of the children of the country ; and iu the con- 
struction of our permanent public roads, thus relieving the 
masses of the great burden of taxation ; that the same au- 
thority which voted out of existence the liquor power because 
it was against the public interest could, with the same 
license, redistribute the enormous holdings of the few, be- 
cause such holdings are against the public interest. 

His first wife was Lillie Stump, who died in 1896. The 
four children by that union were Reese, Jr., Roy, Pearl and 
Ethel. Judge Blizzard then married Fannie Holland, and 
they have three children, named Paul, Pansy and Fannie. 
Two of his sons, Reese, Jr., and Paul, made creditable 
records during the World war, both seeing service abroad. 

By a system of strenuous exercises and by using milk as 
the greater part of his diet, Judge Blizzard has rebuilt a 
constitution worn by work that, fifteen years ago, seriously 
threatened his life, and he is now a stronger and more 
rugged man and capable of performing much more labor 
than he has been since he was thirty years of age. 

Geokge M. Ford, state superintendent of free schools, 
was born at Kasson, Barbour County, West Virginia, Janu- 
ary 7, 1871. He attended the rural schools, the Fairmont 
State Normal School and the West Virginia University, 
graduating from the latter institution in 1892 with the de- 
gree of A. B., and in 1896 with the degree of LL. B. Since 
his graduation he has practiced law at Princeton, Mercer 
County, and at Welch, McDowell County, and has held 
school positions as follows: Principal of Terra Alta Puli- 
lic Schools, principal of Grafton High School, principal of 
Benwood graded and high schools, principal of the Concord 
State Normal School, head of the department of economics 
and American history, Marshall College; superintendent of 
Bluefield schools, including the rural schools of Beaver 
Pond District, Mercer County; superintendent of Brown's 
Creek School District, McDowell County; teacher in the 
State Normal School at Glenville and superintendent of 
Dunbar Schools, Dunbar, West Virginia. 

On December 22, 1897, he married Miss Annie L. Linn, 
of Keyser, Mineral County. She was born at Frostburg, 
Allegheny County, Maryland, both of her parents being na- 
tives of Scotland. The four children of their marriage are: 
Margaret Buchanan, Jemima Elizabeth, Annie Laurie Linn 
and Frederick Wayne. 

He comes from a family that has taken an active part 
with combatant forces in every military conflict waged in 
this country, including the French and Indian Wars. He 
is a son of Frederick G. W. and Jemima Elizabeth (Hebb) 
Ford. His father was born near Petersburg, Virginia, now 
in Grant County, West Virginia, and his mother, in Bar- 
bour County, West Virginia. His father was a soldier of 
the Union during the Civil war. He served with Company 
F, Fifteenth West Virginia Volunteer Infantry, as second 
lieutenant, first lieutenant and as captain. 

George M. Ford began his military career May 12, 1911, 



when he was commissioned captain in the Second Infantry, 
West Virginia National Guard. He organized that com- 
pany and had command of it during the first encampment 
held at Kanawha City, as a part of the Third Battalion. 
During that encampment he earned his reputation as an ex- 
pert rifleman, and has made a high rank in every consecu- 
tive practice since then. In July, 1912, the Third Battalion 
was called to Paint Creek in Kanawha County, for service 
in the momentous strike troubles that had begun a short 
time before. He commanded his company in the Cabin 
Creek mining district during this strike. 

On December 1, 1914, he received a commission as major 
in the Adjutant General 's Department, but resigned June 
19, 1916, to again accept a captaincy in the Second In- 
fantry, West Virginia National Guard, answering the call 
of the President for Mexican border service. He was as- 
signed to the command of Company M, and was stationed 
at Camp Wilson, San Antonio, from September, 1916, until 
he was mustered out of this service March 24, 1917, at 
Huntington, On April 3, 1917, he answered the call of 
the President for World war service. The designation of 
his regiment was changed to the One Hundred and Fiftieth 
U. S. Infantry and attached to the Thirty-eight Division. 
His company was stationed at Marytown on the Norfolk 
and Western Railway until September, 1917, and in that 
month his regiment was mobilized with the Thirty-eighth 
Division at Camp Shelby, Mississippi, remaining there in 
training during the winter and following spring. In Sep- 
tember, 1918, Captain Ford took command of the Third 
Battalion of the One Hundred and Fiftieth Infantry and 
was transferred to France, going by way of Camp Mills, 
New York, to Liverpool and Southampton, lauding at La 
Havre October 23, 1918. On November 3rd the infantry 
regiments of the Thirty-eighth Division were broken up 
and made replacement troops, and he was relieved of the 
command of his battalion and ordered to report to the 
Ninetieth Division, then in service on the front line in the 
Argonne. He reported at the village of Sassey sur Mouse 
and was assigned to the Three Hundred and Fifty-eighth 
Infantry and immediately reported to Col. Edmund M. 
O'Leary at Mouzey, and was assigned to the command of 
B Company, then lying at LaBlane Fontaine, one-half 
kilometer south of Stenay. On the night of November 9th, 
while under bombardment, Captain Ford was gassed at 
Verdun. Following the armistice he went with the Army 
of Occupation. His division headquarters were at Bern- 
castle on the Moselle River, regiment headquarters at Daun. 
In January, 1919, he was transferred to the Thirty-seventh 
Division, then under orders for return to the United States, 
and with this division he sailed from Brest the latter part of 
March, 1919, landing at Newport News April 2, 1919. He 
was honorably discharged from the United States Army at 
Camp Lee, Virginia, April 25, 1919, and two days later re- 
sumed work in the classroom as teacher in the State Nor- 
mal School at Glenville. 

Captain Ford is affiliated with the Masonic Order, the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the Sigma Chi frater- 
nity. 

In the primary election of May, 1920, he was chosen as 
the republican candidate for state superintendent of free 
schools. He was successful in the November election and 
entered upon the discharge of his duties, as state superin- 
tendent of free schools, on March 4, 1921. 

At the annual meeting of the State Educational Associa- 
tion which convened in Huntington November 3rd to 5th, 
1921, Superintendent Ford was elected president of the as- 
sociation, without opposition, for the ensuing year. 

Capt. Simon C. Boord. A distinctly modern profession, 
at the same time an indispensable asset to commercial or- 
ganizations and individual business men, is that of the 
certified public accountant. One of the best known in this 
profession in West Virginia is Capt. Simon C. Boord, of 
Fairmont, who is an especially well known expert on all 
phases of cost accounting and the coal and lumber industries. 

Captain Boord was born at Farmington, Marion County, 
West Virginia, February 8, 1883, son of William and Alcinda 
(Snoderly) Boord. His parents were also born in Marion 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



County, each representing pioneer families in this section of 
the state. The mother now lives at Watson, West Virginia, 
where the father died in June, 1920. 

Captain Boord spent his early life on a farm, but at the 
age of nine years, in 1892, his parents moved to Watson, 
where his father was in the service of the Gaston Gas Coal 
Company, now the Consolidation Coal Company. 

Captain Boord attended public schools at Watson, the 
Fairmont State Normal School, and also began his working 
career with the Gaston Gas Coal Company at Watson. 
Later he was employed by the Fairmont Coal Company at 
Fairmont, then by the Federal Coal & Coke Company at 
Grant Town, West Virginia, and subsequently with the 
United States Coal & Coke Company (a subsidiary of the 
United States Steel Corporation) at Gary, West Virginia. 
Later he was employed as auditor for the Wisconsin Steel 
Company's coal and coke operations at Benham, Kentucky. 

Captain Boord received most of his training in public 
accountancy from the Walton School of Commerce, Chicago, 
Illinois. In 1915 he located at Fairmont, and has since, 
with the exception of a portion of the war period, carried on 
an extensive practice as a public accountant. In 1917 he 
passed the C. P. A. examination and was given a license to 
practice as a certified public accountant. He has handled a 
large amount of difficult accounting problems for glass, coal 
and lumber corporations in this state. 

In April, 1918, Captain Boord entered the government 
service as a civilian in the cost accounting branch of the 
Construction Division of the army, with headquarters at 
Washington. He had charge of all traveling cost accountants 
in that division, and was a member of the committee ap- 
pointed by Chief of Division to revise and rewrite the Cost 
Accounting Manual. November 7, 1918, he was com- 
missioned captain in the Quartermaster Corps and assigned 
to the Organization and Method Section of the administrative 
branch of the Construction Division, in which he continued 
until his discharge on December 26, 1918, after which he 
resumed his professional work at Fairmont. 

In a professional way Captain Boord represented the 
Northern West Virginia coal operators in their hearing before 
the Federal Trade Commission on their petition for an 
increase in the selling price of their coal. He also repre- 
sented the Northern West Virginia operators in their hearing 
before the Bituminous Coal Commission appointed by Presi- 
dent Wilson. Captain Boord is a member of the National 
Association of Cost Accountants, and is a past president of 
the Association of Certified Public Accountants of West 
Virginia. He served three years as a member of the National 
Guard of this state, and is now a reserve captain in the 
Quartermaster Corps. He is a member of the American 
Legion, West Virginia Department. Captain Boord is 
affiliated with Fields Lodge No. 832, A. F. and A. M., at 
Poor Fork, Kentucky, is a member of the Kentucky Con- 
sistory of the Scottish Rite and Kosair Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine at Louisville. 

Frank Butler Trotter, A. B., A. M. During an ex- 
tended period Frank Butler Trotter has been identified 
with the University of West Virginia at Morgantown, of 
which he has been president since 1916. In this time he 
has been known and highly regarded not only for his learn- 
ing, skill, executive ability and assiduity as an educator, 
but also for the urbanity of his manners, his literary taste 
and talent, and as a brilliant member of local social circles. 
It is the judgment of his co-laborers in the field of educa- 
tion in the retrospect of what he has accomplished that 
he has impressed himself upon the life and institutions 
of the community in a manner alike creditable to him- 
self and productive of lasting benefit to the people of the 
state. 

President Trotter was born in Washington County, Ohio, 
February 27, 1863, a son of James and Elizabeth (Stock) 
Trotter. His paternaJ grandfather, Eobert Trotter, a 
native of Ireland, immigrated to the United States in 1821 
and settled first in the State of New York. Subsequently 
he went to Crawford County, Pennsylvania, and later re- 
moved to Ohio, locating first in Columbiana County and 
removing thence to Washington County, where he spent 
the remainder of his life. James Trotter, father of Doctor 



Trotter, was born in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, Mareli 
14, 1827, and died at Aurora, West Virginia, May 26, 1914. 
He was but a boy when his parents removed from Pennsyl- 
vania to Ohio. The mother of Doctor Trotter was born 
in Columbiana County, Ohio, the daughter of Henry and 
Minerva Stock, who were of German descent. 

Frank Butler Trotter was a boy of thirteen years when his 
parents removed to West Virginia. His early education 
was acquired in the common and private schools of Preston 
County, West Virginia, and he began teaching in the public 
schools of that county when he was in his twentieth year. 
He received his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts de- 
grees from Roanoke College, Virginia, and did graduate 
work at Harvard. After teaching in public and private 
schools for a period of six years he became professor of 
Latin and modern languages at Wesleyan College, Buck- 
hannon. He was first professor of Latin at West Vir- 
ginia University, then dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences, and from 1914 to 1916, acting president. He 
was elected president in 1916 and has occupied that posi- 
tion to the present. 

While the strenuous times of the World war occurred 
during Doctor Trotter 's administration, causing unsettled 
conditions generally, the university has grown in every re- 
spect, not only in the student enrollment, faculty member- 
ship and buildings, but also in additions to the curriculum, 
athletics and student activities. He is now rounding out 
his seventh year of service to the state. Within that time 
appropriations have increased from $360,000 in 1914 to 
nearly $3,000,000 in 1921. The enrollment has increased 
from 796 in 1915 to 2,248 in 1921, and the faculty has 
been enlarged from 122 in 1916 to 174 in 1921. Four new 
buildings have been added to the institution and three 
more are assured at this time. The university has Ijecome 
widely known throughout the state and greatly popularized 
among the people. The highest educational standards have 
been maintained and an unflagging responsibility assumed 
for safeguarding the character and inculcating the right 
ideals of the students. 

Doctor Trotter has succeeded in connecting the university 
with the state as a whole and has extended the advantages 
of education to every citizen in even the most remote com- 
munities. This has been accomplished mainly through the 
high school, extension departments, teachers' institutes 
and the students themselves. Doctor Trotter has an ex- 
tensive acquaintance throughout the state and a broad 
knowledge of schools and school conditions. This knowl- 
edge was acquired partly through his position at Buck- 
hannon and partly through his former connection with 
the university as a member of the committee on classifica- 
tion and grades. As a guardian of the people 's treasury. 
Doctor Trotter has shown remarkable ability to economize 
and to get full, faithful service out of his staff. Putting 
himself in the parents' place, he has assumed the responsi- 
bility of safeguarding the character of each and every 
student enrolled on the books of the institution. He has 
insisted upon the highest standards of scholarship and has 
demanded the best conditions of morality. A leading and 
active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Doctor 
Trotter was a delegate to the General Conference of that 
denomination during the years 1900, 1912 and 1916. He 
is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Gamma Delta 
fraternities. Doctor Trotter, though a thorough educator, 
is much more than a professional drudge. His compre- 
hensive education, his wide acquaintance with literature 
and his social qualities have made him a favorite in so- 
ciety. He is an entertaining speaker, with a rich flow 
of humor, which makes him much sought for on occasions 
of public hospitality. 

On August 22, 1895, Doctor Trotter was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Lillian List Steele. 

Frederick Ernest Delbeidge is secretary of the vari- 
ous Masonic bodies in the City of Clarksburg, Harrison 
County, with official headquarters in the local Masonic 
Temple. He was born at Bristol, England, August 2, 1868, 
and is a son of William and Ann (Luke) Delbridge, who 
came to the United States when he was a child of three 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



years and who established their home at Weston, Lewis 
County, West Virginia, whence they later removed to 
Shinnston, Harrison County. The son Frederick E. re- 
ceived his youthful education in the public schools of 
Shinnston, and as a youth he worked three years as an 
assistant to his father, a stonecutter by trade and voca- 
tion. He then turned his attention to learning telegraphy, 
and as a skilled telegraph operator he was employed several 
years in the Clarksburg office of the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company. He resigned this post to accept his 
present position as secretary of the various Masonic organi- 
zations in Clarksburg. The fine Masonic Temple in which 
he maintains his office was erected in 1913 by the Clarks- 
burg Masonic Building Company, a corporate organiza- 
tion formed by local members of the Masonic fraternity. 
Mr. Delbridge has shown marked ability in handling the 
manifold details of his administrative work, which involves 
his service as secretary of the following named organiza- 
tions: Hermou Lodge No. 6, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, which was chartered in 1867 under the dispensa- 
tion of the Grand Lodge of West Virginia, but the original 
Virginia charter of which was obtained in 1814, its mem- 
bership in 1921 being 636; Clarksburg Lodge No. 155, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, which received its 
charter in 1919 and which now has a membership of 200; 
Adoniram Chapter No. 11, Royal Arch Masons, with West 
Virginia charter granted in 1873, but with original charter 
by the Grand Chapter of Virginia under date of December 

15, 1871, its membership in 1921 being 574; Clarksburg 
Commandery No. 13, Knights Templars, which was chart- 
ered May 10, 1900, and which recorded in 1921 a member- 
ship of 465. In the local jurisdiction are also two Scottish 
Eite bodies that receive similar secretarial service on the 
part of Mr. Delbridge, these being Mizpah Lodge of Per- 
fection No. 5, chartered October 21, 1913, and having in 
1921 an enrollment of 1,087 members; and Clarksburg 
Chapter No. 5, Knights of the Rose Croix, which, after 
working two years, received its charter October 20, 1921, 
its membership being 736. In addition to the local Masonic 
Club, of which Mr. Delbridge likewise is secretary, his indi- 
vidual affiliations run the fuU gamut of both the York and 
Scottish Rites, in the latter of which he has received the 
thirty-second degree, besides being a member of Nemesis 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine in the City of Parkersburg. 
He has been a close student of the history and teachings 
of the time-honored fraternity and finds great satisfaction 
in his various Masonic affiliations, as well as his adminis- 
trative service. He and his wife hold membership in the 
Presbyterian Church in their home city and are popular in 
the representative social circles of the community. 

In 1909 Mr. Delbridge wedded Miss Bessie M. Shuttle- 
worth, a member of one of the oldest and best known 
families of Harrison County, which has been her home from 
the time of her birth. 

Hon. Edwin Maxwell. One of West Virginia's most 
gifted native sons was the late Hon. Edwin Maxwell, who 
as lawyer, judge and legislator impressed his abilities on the 
early state government and a wide range of important affairs 
for a period of half a century. His home for many years 
was at Clarksburg, a community that cherishes his memory 
and in which his son Haymond has attained most marked 
distinction as a lawyer and judge. 

Edwin Maxwell was born at Weston, Lewis County, July 

16, 1825, son of Levi and Mary (Haymond) Maxwell. His 
father was a successful farmer of Lewis County. His mother 
was a daughter of Colonel John Haymond, of West Virginia. 
Edwin Maxwell was the oldest of four children, the others 
being Rufus, John and Mary Jane. 

While a youth on his father's farm his associations with 
nature and practical work gave him lessons invaluable in 
later years. From an early age he showed an independence 
and initiative that enabled him to rise above circumstances 
of a very modest education and achieve his own opportunities 
for greatness. He never had the advantages of a college 
training, but the love of books and knowledge was innate. 
With exceptional natural qualifications for the law he began 
to study under his uncle, Lewis Maxwell, and in 1848, at 
the age of twenty-three, was admitted to the bar. Five years 



later, in 1852, he located at West Union in Doddrige County, 
and subsequently served that county two terms as prosecut- 
ing attorney. At the beginning of the Civil war he espoused 
the Union cause, and in 1863 was elected on the Union ticket 
to the first State Senate of West Virginia. He was one of the 
very resourceful and able leaders in that party until after the 
close of the war. In 1866 Governor Boreman appointed him 
attorney-general of the state. In the fall of 1866 he was 
elected judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals, and he was 
with this court until December 31, 1872, and in that time 
many cases of great importance involving the interpretation 
of the early statutes of the state came before him for decision. 
In 1880 Judge Maxwell was republican candidate for judge of 
the Supreme Court of Appeals, and in 1884 was candidate of 
the republican and greenback parties for governor. In that 
campaign he was referred to as "Old Honesty." In 
1888 he was elected to the State Senate and in 1892 to the 
House of Delegates. His last political honor came in 1902, 
when he was in his seventy-eighth year. He was elected a 
member of the House of Delegates, and while at his post of 
duty at Charleston he contracted pneumonia and died Febru- 
ary 5, 1903. A period of forty years had intervened from his 
first service in the Legislature of West Virginia and his last 
legislative service. He imparted his wisdom in legislative 
ability to the making of some of the soundest laws of the 
state. For fifty-four years he ranked as one of the foremost 
lawyers of the state, and his associates have repeatedly testi- 
fied to his comprehensive knowledge of the law, and, above all, 
to the dignity and depth of his character. 

In 1872 Edwin Maxwell married Loretta Shuttleworth, 
who died in 1905. Her father. Colonel John Shuttleworth, 
was one of the prominent citizens of West Virginia. The two 
sons of Edwin Maxwell and wife were Edwin Maxwell, Jr., 
and Haymond Maxwell. 

Judge Haymond Maxwell, son of Edwin and Loretta 
(Shuttleworth) Maxwell, had the prestige of his father as an 
example, and since completing a liberal education has rapidly 
achieved honors both in his practice as a lawyer and on the 
bench. He was born at Clarksburg, October 24, 1879, was 
educated in the public schools, completed his literary educa- 
tion in West Virginia University in 1900, and received his law 
degree from the same source in 1901. He immediately began 
practice at Clarksburg, and in 1905 was elected on the repub- 
lican ticket to the House of Delegates. May 7, 1909, eight 
years after he entered practice, he was appointed judge of the 
Criminal Court of Harrison County, serving until December 
31, 1912. In 1912 he was nominated and elected judge of the 
Circuit Court for the district comprising Harrison and Lewis 
counties, and at the close of his first term of eight years he was 
reelected, in 1920. 

Judge Maxwell in 1905 married Miss Carrie Virginia 
Maxwell, daughter of Porter and Columbia (Post) Maxwell, 
of Harrison County. Their five children are: Edvrin, Hay- 
mond, Jr., Carrie Virginia, Emily Frances and Porter Wilson 
Maxwell. 

Smith Blaie has devoted himself vrith singular fidelity and 
efficiency to his duties as cashier of the Bank of Jacksonburg 
for over fifteen years. This is one of the prosperous banking 
institutions of Wetzel County. It was organized in 1903, 
being opened for business January 1, 1904, under a state 
charter. This bank has a capital of twenty-five thousand 
dollars, surplus and profits of fifteen thousand dollars and 
average deposits of two hundred and twenty-five thousand 
dollars. The president is L. E. Lantz. The Board of Directors 
comprise L. E. Lantz, S. J. Kilcoyne, of Mobley, W. R. 
Mclntyre and S. J. Mclntyre, of Alvy, A. L. Chambers, 
G. B. Meredith and W. T. Price, of Smithfield, A. G. Higgin- 
botham, of New Martinsville, F. M. Willey and John M. 
Lowe, of Jacksonburg, and W. B. Lowe, of Coburn. 

Smith Blair, the cashier, was born at West Union in 
Doddridge County October 4, 1882. His father, Jackson V. 
Blair, is one of the prominent lawyers of long standing at 
West Union. He was born in Harrison County, West Vir- 
ginia, in 1853, and as a young man removed to Doddridge 
County, where he taught school and married. In 1872 he 
began the study of law at West Union under Judge Stuart, 
was admitted to the bar, and has practiced with great success 
for over forty years. He once made the race for Congress 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



against Blackburn 6. Dovener as a democrat. He is an active 
member of the Baptist Church and a thirty-second degree 
Scottish Rite Mason and a member of Osiris Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine at Wheeling. He was judge advocate on 
Governor Fleming's staff. Jackson V. Blair married Miss 
Ella M. Smith, who was born at Smithton in Doddridge 
County in 1860. She was the mother of eight children: Julia, 
wife of P. M. Ireland, an attorney of the West Union bar; 
Smith; William Eldridge, of Detroit, Michigan; Nan Morgan, 
wife of George C. Crouse, of West Union, who has charge of 
the leasing department in West Virginia for the Hope Natural 
Gas Company; Jackson V., Jr., a revenue officer in the income 
tax department at Huntington, West Virginia; George Neely, 
in the bonding department of Le Fever & Company, stock 
and bond brokers at Akron, Ohio; Francis K., employed by 
the Portland Atlas Cement Association at Parkersburg; and 
Marion, a high school student at West Union. 

Smith Blair was educated in the public schools of West 
Union, in Bethel Military Academy at Warrenton, Virginia, 
and finished his preparatory course in West Virginia Univer- 
sity at Morgantown. He left Morgantown in 1901, and during 
1902 kept up some special studies in the high school at West 
Union. In the same year he became clerk in a store at Pine 
Grove, and subsequently entered the Bank of Pine Grove as 
teller. With several years of banking experience he was 
chosen cashier of the Bank of Jacksonburg in 1905, and has 
held that post continuously and almost throughout the 
existence of the institution. 

As a banker he was able to do much work to assist the 
Government at the time of the war, particularly in the sale 
of Liberty Bonds. He is a democrat, a member of West Union 
Lodge No. 56, A. F. and A. M., has attained thirty-two 
degrees in the Scottish Rite in West Virginia Consistory No. 1 
at Wheeling, and is a member of Osiris Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine at Wheehng. 

At Leesburg, Virginia, in 1908, Mr. Blair married Miss May 
Caldwell Powell, daughter of William L. and Fannie (Cald- 
well) Powell, her mother still living at Leesburg. Her father 
was a farmer there. Mrs. Blair is a graduate of Marshall 
Seminary of Winchester, Virginia. They have two children: 
Smith, Jr., born July 3, 1913, and William Powell, born 
February 14, 1915. 

Hon. Samxtel B. Montgomery, of Kingwood, grand 
keeper of records and seals of the Knights of Pythias of 
West Virginia, has for years represented the voice and 
leadership of liberalism and progressiveism in West Vir- 
ginia. It is doubtful if there is a better known man in 
the state, taking all classes of population into consideration. 

The experiences of his own life admirably qualified him 
for the breadth of sympathy and knowledge of humanity 
which are among his prominent characteristics. A native 
West Virginian, he was born in Barber County May 15, 
1876, and two years later his parents established their home 
at Independence in Preston County. His people were poor 
but of very sturdy mountaineer stock. Four generations of 
the Montgomerys have lived among the hills of West Vir- 
ginia. The remote ancestor of this family was Rogers de 
Montgomerie, a Norseman who accompanied the army of 
William the Conqueror to England in the eleventh century. 
A subsequent member of the family settled in Ireland and 
was made an esquire and given a grant of land. Two of 
Rogers de Montgomerie 's descendants arrived at the port 
of Philadelphia in 1729, one of them settling at Baltimore, 
and from him sprang the West Virginia branch of the 
family. 

The father of Senator Montgomery was Adam Montgom- 
ery, who with his brother Michael and cousins John, Samuel 
and Asberry joined the Seventh West Virginia Infantry at 
the time of the Civil war. John was captain of Company H, 
and this company took part in the engagements at Antietam, 
Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and the Wil- 
derness and in others of less importance, and they helped 
make the regiment famous as the Fighting Seventh. At 
Antietam, Asberry was killed and Adam Montgomery was 
wounded so badly that he was discharged. The effects of 
his war service were so severe that he was hardly able to 
resume the duties and burdens of civilian life afterward. 



and he had been a partial invalid for years when he died 
May 16, 1889, at the age of forty-four. On December 11, 
1863, Adam Montgomery married Susan Digman, who was 
descended from sturdy mountain stock of strong character, 
and she was a fitting helpmate for such an upright man as 
her husband. They became the parents of eleven children: 
John, Sarah, Sophronia, Nancy, Mary, Samuel B., Berta, 
William, and three that died in infancy. 

This brief record of the family indicates some of the cir- 
cumstances that surrounded the childhood and youth of 
Samuel B. Montgomery. At Newburg he attended common 
schools and select schools, but at the age of eleven was 
earning money selling papers, as delivery boy, and at other 
forms of common labor. When he was thirteen his father 
died, and thereafter his responsibilities were increased as 
the mainstay of his widowed mother and the younger chil- 
dren of the household. This enforced daily grind deprived 
him of certain other advantages, but it also developed in 
him a devotion to duty to the fatherless and the helpless 
and taught him the principles of loyalty to those who toil, 
and to this class of citizenship he has been insistent in his 
sympathy and aid during his mature manhood. He gave 
up all thought of further education when his father died, 
and six days of labor in a week was hardly long enough to 
provide the necessities for his mother 's household of younger 
children. With his older brother he was soon working in 
the yards of the Newburg Orrel Coal & Coke Company, be- 
ginning as coke drawer, then as day laborer on tipple, later 
as boss of a gang of Italians, and also mule driver with the 
Monongah Coal & Coke Company, now the Consolidation 
Coal Company. In these occupations he acquired his first 
impressions of the hardships of the miners for whom he 
was destined to spend his after life in an effort to improve, 
and about that time he joined his first labor union, the 
United Mine Workers of America. 

The year following his acceptance into this union he 
went into the service, in 1896, of the Baltimore & Ohio 
Railway as a brakeman on the Parkersburg Branch and 
later on the Cumberland Division. Sickness caused him to 
leave the railroad service, and his next work was as an at- 
tendant at the Second Hospital for the Insane at Spencer, 
where he subsequently became night watchman. 

When only twenty years of age he commenced his politi- 
cal career. He grew up in a republican atmosphere, 
though his father had been a Union democrat. He cast 
his first presidential vote for William McKinley, and in 
1896 he made his first political speech for Major McKinley. 
This speech was delivered at Evansville in his home county, 
and it made such a good impression that the local manage- 
ment put him on its program as a speaker throughout the 
rest of the campaign. In 1898 he supported as a delegate 
in the Roane County Republican Convention the candidacy 
of Governor Atkinson for the United States Senate. That 
fall he campaigned over the county in behalf of Gen. Romeo 
H. Freer and the rest of the republican ticket. Returning 
to Preston County in 1899, he located at Tunnelton and was 
on the republican delegation from the county the next year 
to the state convention. He spoke in Lewis, Taylor and 
other counties that fall, and was himself elected to the of- 
fice of justice of the peace for the Kingwood District. 
This was his first political ofBce. In 1902 he was elected 
mayor of Tunnelton, serving during 1903, and was again 
elected in 1908, having in the meantime been a member of 
the town council in 1905-06. Mr. Montgomery resigned as 
justice of the peace in 1903, when President Roosevelt ap- 
pointed him postmaster of Tunnelton. 

In the state campaign of 1904 he was the successful nom- 
inee of his party for state senator from the Fourteenth 
District, composed of Tucker, Preston, Mineral, Grant and 
Hardy counties. Though opposed by the county, state and 
federal leadership he was elected by a large majority, ex- 
ceeding that of the national ticket. 

As a member of the Senate Mr. Montgomery acquitted 
himself well, and his efforts helped in the enactment of 
laws which made the state richer and its government bet- 
ter. He voted in the Senate for the 2 cent fare law, the 
eight hour telegraphers' bill, and for the bill submitting 
the prohibition amendment to the people; was a fearless 




^(M^H^ iJ.J/l^jyCty'^^ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



exponent of all reform and labor measurea. The well-known 
Montgomery statutory Attorney Bill, credited to his au- 
thorship, diverted the fees of foreign corporations from the 
office of the secretary of state to the state treasurer, sav- 
ing not less than $20,000 a year to the state. He fathered 
the Corrupt Practices in Elections Act and fought it to 
victory over the protests of its opponents. He framed and 
sucet-eded in having a bill passed fixing a penalty for tres- 
pa.ssing and cutting timber on lands without the owner 's 
consent, a measure opposed by the railroads and other 
corporations. Besides supporting the prohibition amend- 
ment measure he pushed through the Senate, with the aid 
of the Protestant Ministerial Association, the bill known as 
the Sunday Closing Act, the most drastic anti-liquor legis- 
lation yet passed, and he voted for an amendment to the 
license law prohibiting the shipment of liquor from wet 
into dry counties. He raised his voice in great earnestness 
against the guard system around which had grown up the 
coal police, warning the Senate that a grave error was be- 
ing committed and that dire results would follow — a pre- 
diction verified four years later when the miners revolted 
against the execution of the law, with great consequent loss 
of life, entailing the establishment of martial law and a 
heavy expense required before peace was restored. Sena- 
tor Montgomery aided in the passage of a law against the 
sale of narcotic drugs, a law to raise the salaries of school 
teachers, and another bill making it an offense to work 
minors of both sexes under the age of fourteen years in 
mines and factories during the free school term. He voted 
for the state wide primary election law, and was the only 
republican in the body who cast a ballot for the initiative, 
referendum and recall. In 1905 and again in 1907 he led 
the fight in the Senate for a production tax on oil and gas, 
and was one of two members of his party who appealed 
to the Senate in those years to submit an amendment to the 
State Constitution granting the franchise to women. While 
in the Senate Mr. Montgomery served on the committees of 
mines and mining, and labor, and was embodied to preside 
over the Senate during the regular session of 1907 and the 
special session of 1908. 

His record in the Senate was such as to cause him to be 
singled out by the corporations for defeat in the next cam- 
paign. Nevertheless he was a delegate to the Republican 
State Convention and helped write the party platform. In 
December following President Eoosevelt appointed him a 
special agent in the Department of Commerce and Labor. 
He resigned to study law and labor problems in the Uni- 
versity of West Virginia, and began practice at Kingwood. 
In 1912 he was chosen a delegate at large to the Eepublican 
National Convention in Chicago. He had declared himself 
for Colonel Eoosevelt 's nomination in 1910, and as the West 
Virginia member of the Platform Committee with Governor 
Herbert Hadley of Missouri. George A. Knight of Cali- 
fornia, and William Draper Lewis of Pennsylvania he con- 
tested with the reactionaries for control of the committee 
and attempted to have adopted the progressive program that 
was subsequently written into the progressive party plat- 
form. He was elected chairman of the Republican 
Executive Committee of Preston County that summer, but 
championed the Eoosevelt and progressive party both with 
tongue and pen throughout the following campaign. 

In October, 1912, he was elected permanent chairman of 
the Citizens ' Organization of West -Virginia, a body dele- 
gated with the duty of making a sociological survey in line 
with a proposal in the House of Delegates following the coal 
miners' strike on Paint and Cabin Creeks. As chairman 
Mr. Montgomery went before the people of the state in the 
election that fall and declared for the abolishment of the 
mine guard system, for the abolishment of child labor, for 
a workmen 's compensation law, for legislation prohibiting 
water power monopoly, for a state pension for widowed 
mothers in destitution, for the initiative, referendum and 
recall and for the legal right of miners to belong to a 
union. Proposed amendments to the Constitution providing 
for the establishment of the minimum wage, the initiative, 
referendum and recall, and state pension for widows were 
defeated by a close vote. The legal right of a miner to 
belong to a union was recognized by the state government, 



and a law greatly restricting the granting of water power 

privileges was enacted. 

While engaged in the practice of law at Kingwood, Mr. 
Montgomery was appointed state commissioner of labor for 
West Virginia by Governor Henry D. Hatfield, and served 
through the administration of Governor Cornwall, his term 
ending February 28, 1921. As labor commissioner he suc- 
ceeded J. H. Nightingale. Under his department came the 
inspection of factories and the enforcement of the Cliild 
Labor Law, and he was also exofficio commissioner of 
weights and measures. During the World war he had addi- 
tional duties as director of the U. S. Public Service Reserve, 
which had the mobilization and distribution of labor em- 
ployed on war contracts. He had the decision in declaring 
what were essential industries for the successful prosecution 
of the war, and in conjunction with the War Labor Board 
the closing down of plants deemed unnecessary in war 
times. He was frequently called to Washington, and as the 
representative of West Virginia in Labor Councils was 
asked to consultations at the White House and the Depart- 
ment of Labor, and every labor conference called by the 
President included an invitation to Mr. Montgomery. He 
also acted as representative of the secretary of war and navy 
in inspecting all workshops where war contracts were let as 
to hours of employment and general health of employes. 
During the war the enforcement of the Federal Child Labor 
Law was intrusted to the commissioner, and his permits 
were accepted by the Child Labor Bureau without question. 

His range of duties went greatly beyond these formal 
responsibilities. He took an active part in the speeding up 
program, and because of his ability as a public speaker and 
knowledge of labor economics and his influence among the 
crafts he was one of the men most in demand at Liberty 
Loan drives and mass meetings to increase production, and 
in conferences between employer and employe to bring about 
team work in cooperation. During his four years as com- 
missioner with special reference to the war period there 
was not a serious industrial disturbance, and this in no small 
measure was the result of his tact, diplomacy and stand for 
a square deal. 

In 1920 Mr. Montgomery made the race for governor of 
West Virginia. He was a candidate in the primaries of 
the republican party, and later he campaigned independ- 
ently, his nomination receiving the endorsement of the non- 
partisan league. 

The magnetism of Senator Montgomery 's personality is at 
once apparent. On the speaker's platform he radiates the 
sincerity of his conviction, and is known throughout the 
state as a brilliant political and fraternal speaker. His 
address on West Virginia and its future before the West 
Virginia Editorial Association, his discourse on the "writ 
of injunction and the right of free speech" before the 
State Federation of Labor, and his lecture on "John 
Wesley" are perhaps the best known among his formal 
literary and oratorical efforts. 

For many years Mr. Montgomery has taken a prominent 
part in fraternal work. He joined the Knights of Pythias 
November 26, 1901, as a charter member of McKinley Lodge 
at Tunnelton, and began a rapid advancement as an honor 
man in the order. He reached the summit of Pythian dis- 
tinction at Elkins when in September, 1910, he was installed 
as grand chancellor. His splendid efforts in that ofiBce were 
rewarded by his selection as grand keeper of records and 
seals at the Wheeling meeting on August 18, 1911. When 
he took over the work of this office in 1911 there were 173 
lodges in the state, with a membership of 13,505. In the 
fall of 1921 West Virginia had 268 lodges, with a total 
enrollment of 40,000. Mr. Montgomery is a member of 
Shiraz Temple No. 29, D. O. K. K As a Pythian orator 
he is in great demand all over the Supreme Domain. 
Among his ablest Pythian efforts, which he has been called 
on to repeat on many occasions, was his Fraternal Memorial 
address delivered in the Methodist Episcopal Church at 
Fairmont, West Virginia. Sunday, June 21, 1914, under 
the auspices of Marion Lodge, Knights of Pythias, he 
delivered the oratorical address, April 26, 1919, in the 
State Armory, Charleston, West Virginia, commemorating 



10 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



the 100th anniversary of American Odd Fellowship and the 
100th anniversary of Washington Lodge No. 1, I. O. O. F., 
of Baltimore, Maryland, which was established April 26, 
1819, and which was the beginning of American Odd Fellow- 
ship. He is affiliated with Kingwood Lodge No. 107, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Woodmen of the World, 
Invincible Council No. 147, Junior Order United American 
Mechanics at Tunnelton, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks No. 308, Grafton, West Virginia, and is 
a member of Kanawha Lodge No. 1444, Loyal Order of 
Moose, Charleston, West Virginia. He has served three 
terms as vice president of the Laymen's Assneiatinn of fi" 
West Virginia Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of the Oakland District. He is a member of the 
Beta Theta Pi Chapter of West Virginia University, and 
belongs to the American Academy of Social and Political 
Science of Philadelphia, the Southern Sociological Congress 
of Nashville, the National Conservation Congress, the Na- 
tional Geographic Society of Washington and the National 
Popular Government League. 

On February 29, 1896, Senator Montgomery married Miss 
Grace K. Orr, daughter of the later Maj. and Mrs. U. N. 
Orr. Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery have one son, William 
Newton, born July 8, 1900. On his eighteenth birthday he 
enlisted in the marines, joining the Eighteenth Company, 
Fifth Regiment of the Second Division, and three months 
later going to France. He served near enough the front 
to hear the big guns of the contending armies, and after 
the armistice he went with his command into Germany 
and along the Rhine, stationed near Coblenz and Rodenbach. 
After eight months of duty he was honorably discharged 
and given an excellent service medal without a demerit. He 
is now a sophomore in West Virginia University at Morgan- 
town. The only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery is 
Susan, a graduate of Kingwood High School, also a gradu- 
ate of Dean Academy at Franklin, Massachusetts, and now 
a student in West Virginia University. 

A. C. Blair, M. D. Member of one of the old and prom- 
inent families of Ritchie County, son of a distinguished 
lawyer, A. C Blair early in his career chose the medical 
profession as his calling and for thirty years has practiced 
with notable success in the county, his home being at Harris- 
ville. 

Doctor Blair was born July 27, 1863, son of R. S. and 
Rachel (Core) Blair. His father was born near Parkersburg, 
West Virginia, in Wood County, February 21, 183.5, son of 
David and Elizabeth (Beeson) Blair. David Blair was 
born in Blair County, Pennsylvania, in 1794, and was an 
early settler in Wood County, West Virginia. In 1817 he 
married Elizabeth Beeson, of a prominent family of Union- 
town, Pennsylvania. David Blair was cashier of the First 
State Bank of Parkersburg. He died at Portsmouth, Ohio, 
of cholera, in April, 1835. The late Robert S. Blair was left 
an orphan when about four weeks old, was reared by his 
aunt, Ann Gardener, acquired a common school education, 
was apprenticed to learn the saddler's trade and subsequently 
received an appointment to the Virginia Military Institute, 
from which he graduated. On returning to Harrisville he 
studied law in the office of Cyrus Hall, and for a long period 
of years he was known as one of the ablest lawyers of the 
Ritchie County bar, in which he is succeeded by his son, 
R. S. Blair, Jr. The father served as prosecuting attorney 
of Ritchie County, being elected on the democratic ticket. 
He was an active member of the Methodist Church. His 
wife, Rachel Core, was born in Tyler County, West Virginia, 
August 29, 1842. They had four children: Dr. A. C. Blair; 
Robert S., Jr.; Miss Elizabeth C; and Harry C, who saw 
service in the World's war and is now practicing medicine 
at Reeder, Wetzel County. 

Dr. A. C. Blair grew up at Harrisville and attended school 
there and the Bethel Military Academy in Virginia. After 
returning home he took up the study of medicine, and in 
1891 graduated M. D. from the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons at Baltimore. Doctor Blair has devoted thirty 
years to the work of his profession and has every reason to 
be satisfied with his reputation as a professional man and as 
a quiet and influential citizen of Harrisville. 



December 21, 1903, Doctor Blair married Miss Vernie 
E. Curtis. They have four children: Corena R., born 
October 30, 1904, a student in high school; Robert J., born 
November 4, 1906; Lulu M., born April 9, 1908; and Nannie 
A., born August 28, 1910. The family are members of the 
Methodist Church and Doctor Blair is a democrat. He 
owns a fine home on Main Street in Harrisville and also has 
a farm of ninety-four acres. 

Mrs. Blair was born in Randolph County, West Virginia, 
April 29, 1880, daughter of Milton J. Curtis, who was born 
in Randolph County October 22, 1838. Her mother was 
Mary Williams, who was born in Highland County, Virginia, 
September 30, 1843, daughter of Mary (Rowe) Williams. 
Thomas Curtis, father of Milton J., was born in Baltimore, 
Maryland, and was an early settler in Randolph County, 
West Virginia, where he became a merchant. 

Robert S. Blair. Tlje name Blair has been one of the 
most prominent in the bar of Ritchie County for over half 
a century. The present legal representative of the name, 
Robert S. Blair, Jr., has practiced there for thirty years or 
more, and has maintained the high reputation accorded to 
his honored father. 

Mr. Blair was born in Harrisville November 19, 1865, 
son of R. S. and Rachel C. (Core) Blair. His mother was a 
daughter of George A. Core. R. S. Blair, Sr., was born at 
Parkersburg February 24, 1835, son of David and Elizabeth 
(Beeson) Blair. David Blair's father came from Ireland. 
Elizabeth Beeson was a daughter of Jacob Beeson and a 
granddaughter of the pioneer settler at Beesontown, now 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania. R. S. Blair, Sr., was left an 
orphan at the age of three weeks, and was reared by his 
grandmother Beeson and his aunt, Ann Gardener. At the 
age of twelve he was apprenticed to learn the saddler's trade, 
and subsequently General Jackson secured him an appoint- 
ment to the Virginia Military Institute, where he remained 
four years. He graduated under Stonewall Jackson. After 
leaving there he came to Harrisville, clerked in a store, and 
while in the office of Judge Cyrus Hall studied law and was 
admitted to the bar. For many years thereafter he had an 
extensive practice in all the State, Federal and other courts. 
He died January 21, 1892. He was a democrat all his life. 
R. S. Blair, Sr., and wife had four children: Dr. A. C. 
Blair, born July 27, 1863, in practice at Ellenboro, Ritchie 
County; Robert S., Jr., born November 19, 1865; Catherine 
E., born November 21, 1867; and Dr. H. C. Blair, born June 
22, 1886, now at Reeder, West Virginia. 

Robert S. Blair, Jr., grew up at Harrisville, attended the 
public schools there. Bethel Military Academy in Virginia, 
the University of West Virginia, and graduated in law from 
the University of Virginia and was admitted to the bar at 
Charlottesville. For a time he was with the legal depart- 
ment of the Crescent Iron Works of Virginia, and then joined 
his father as a partner about six months before his father's 
death. During the past thirty years Mr. Blair has carried 
on an extensive practice in all the courts of his section of the 
state. He has satisfied his ambitions within the strict limits 
of his profession, but has also at different times been active 
in the democratic party and in 1916 was the democratic 
nominee for the State Senate, being defeated by only thirty- 
one votes in a district normally republican by 1,500. 

In December, 1896, Mr. Blair married Mary E. Wolfe. 
They have one daughter, Mary R., born January 22, 1916. 

Daniel Carson Louchert, M. D. To the credit of 
Dr. Daniel Carson Louchery of Clarksburg is a record of 
forty-two years of active practice as a physician and surgeon, 
and an earlier record of a prominent educator. 

Doctor Louchery and Doctor Fleming Howell, now of 
Oakland, Maryland, are the only survivors of the original 
organizers of the Harrison County Medical Society, about 
1887 or 1888. Other men prominent in the early history of 
the said society were Dr. A. L. Hupp, Dr. D. P. Morgan, 
Doctor Hill of Bridgeport, Dr. William Late and Dr. A. O. 
Flowers, who was the first doctor admitted after the society 
was organized. 

Daniel Carson Louchery was born on a farm near Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, June 2, 1845, only son and child of 
Daniel and Rhoda (Miller) Louchery. Daniel Louchery 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



U 



was born in Pennsylvania, March 29, 1816, and died June 
27, 1845. His father, James Louchery, was a native of Mary- 
land, and was the son of a Revolutionary soldier. The name 
Louchery was originally "Loughrey", of Scotch Presbyterian 
stock. Rhoda Miller, the mother of Doctor Louchery, was 
born in Marion County, West Virginia, May 31, 1824, and 
died September 4, 1866. She was the daughter of David 
and Nancy (McGee) Miller, also of Scotch ancestry. Right 
after the death of her first husband she was married to John 
Riley, and by that union had four children. 

Daniel Carson Louchery grew up with his mother on a 
farm, and had poverty to contend with in his youth and hia 
advantages were largely of his own seeking. He attended 
the subscription schools at Boothsville, West Virginia and 
one year at Doctor White's Academy at Fairmont. In 
18G4 he enlisted in the Union Army, serving until the close. 
He was mustered out June 10, 1865. After the war he con- 
tinued his education until he was qualified for teaching. 
On December 25, 1866, he married Mary Catherine Lynch. 
He married only a few months after the death of his mother. 
Mrs. Louchery was born in Harrison County November 4, 
1849, daughter of John P. and Zipporah (Farris) Lynch. Mr. 
and Mrs. Louchery attended school together for two years 
after their marriage, and for one year she was his pupil 
while he was teaching. Doctor Louchery completed his 
literary education in Southwestern Normal School at Leb- 
anon, Ohio, and for one term had attended the West Virginia 
Agricultural College and was also a student in Ohio Univer- 
sity at Athens. Partly in the intervals of his own student 
life he did his effective work as a teacher for twelve years. 
The last five years of that period he was superintendent of 
city schools at Clarksburg. During 1870-71 he was county 
superintendent of schools of Harrison County. 

Doctor Louchery acquired his medical education in the 
University School of Medicine of Maryland at Baltimore, 
where he graduated March 6, 1880. For twenty-two years 
he was engaged in the practice of medicine at Salem, West 
Virginia, and since 1901 has been located at Clarksburg. 
For many years his practice has been in special lines, par- 
ticularly eye and ear diseases, and in preparation for his 
specialty he attended many clinics and post graduate courses 
in New York and Philadelphia. He was a student in the 
Manhattan Eye and Ear Infirmary at New York, also 
attended the Polyclinic, The New York Eye and Ear In- 
firmary, New York Post Graduate Hospital and the Phila- 
delphia Polyclinic. Doctor Louchery is a member of the 
West Virginia State Medical Society, the American Academy 
of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology and a member of 
the American Medical Association. He is a repubUcan 
and a member of the Methodist Church, and has been a lay 
delegate to the West Virginia Conference. 

Doctor and Mrs. Louchery had four children: Mrs. 
Zeppa L. Clark; Edna E., wife of Doctor Ogden; Charles 
W., a prominent Clarksburg attorney whose career is sepa- 
rately noted in this pubUcation; and Lucy Virginia, who died 
at the age of sixteen. 

Charles W. Loucheet. The Harrison County bar is 
made up of men of recognized ability in the law, some abeady 
long experienced and eminent, and others who, although not 
old in the profession, have many times demonstrated their 
possession of the qualities and unmistakable talent that are 
part of the equipment of every successful lawyer. One of 
the latter class, who has a substantial record and extensive 
practice, is Charles William Louchery, a representative citi- 
zen as well as prominent attorney of the City of Clarksburg. 

Mr. Louchery was born at Salem in Harrison County, 
West Virginia, March 9, 1888, and is a son of Dr. Daniel 
Carson and Alary Catherine (Lynch) Louchery. Doctor 
Louchery was born in Marion County, West Virginia, June 
2, 1845, his father, Daniel Louchery, was born in either 
Greene or Fayette County, Pennsylvania, and his father, 
James Wilham Carson Louchery, at that time spelled Lough- 
rey, was the son of a Revolutionary soldier. The great- 
grandfather of Charles W. Louchery was born in Maryland, 
and in early manhood settled in Western Pennsylvania, 
then moved to what at the present time is Marion County, 
West Virginia. For generations the Louchery family has 



been known and held in high regard throughout this section 
of country. 

Daniel Louchery, the grandfather, removed with his 
family to Harrison County before his marriage. Daniel 
Carson Louchery for some years after the close of the war 
between the states, in which he served as a soldier in the 
Union Army, taught school and later became superintendent 
of the schools of the City of Clarksburg and county super- 
intendent of schools for Harrison County. In the mean- 
while he had studied medicine in the School of Medicine 
in the University of Maryland, and after qualifying as a 
physician, practiced at Salem for some years and then came 
to Clarksburg, where he is still engaged in active practice. 
He married Mary Catherine Lynch, who was born in Har- 
rison County, a daughter of John Perry Lynch and a grand- 
daughter of Hiram Lynch, all of Harrison County. Doctor 
and Mrs. Louchery have had four children: Zeppa, Lucy, 
Edna and Charles WilUam, Lucy being deceased. Mrs. 
Louchery is intelligently interested, Uke her husband, in 
public affairs, and both are identified pohtically with the 
republican party, and both are faithful members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Charles W. Louchery had pubUc school advantages at 
Clarksburg, then entered the West Virginia Wesleyan Col- 
lege and was graduated from the seminary department in 
1907. Three years later he received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts from the West Virginia University at Morgantown, 
and from the same university the degree of LL, B. in 1911. 
His preparation for the law went stili further, and in 1913 
he received the degree of LL. B. from the University of 
Wisconsin, at Madison, and following this he entered upon 
the practice of law at Clarksburg. Well grounded in every 
branch of the law, he has successfully handled a number of 
important cases before the courts and is retained as counsellor 
by business concerns that have learned the wisdom of at all 
times having at command the sound judgment and trained 
legal faculties of an able and honorable attorney. 

Mr. Louchery married May 24, 1917, Miss Mildred Belle 
Lamberd, who is a daughter of Charles E. and Belle (Johnson) 
Lamberd, well known residents of Clarksburg. Mr. and 
Mrs. Louchery have one son, Daniel Lamberd Louchery. 
They have a wide social circle, and Mr. Louchery belongs 
to the fraternal order of Elks. An earnest citizen consistently 
concerned in the welfare of his city, coimty, state and country, 
he is not slow to recognize the claims made on his time, 
attention and means, but politically has never consented 
to allow his republican friends to present his name for pubUc 
office. 

William P. Stitel. To know aught of the history, civic 
and industrial, of the City of Wheeling, West Virginia, 
implies high recognition of what the name of Stifel has 
here signified in connection with normal development and 
progress. He whose name introduces this paragraph is 
president of J. L. Stifel & Sons, which concern here con- 
ducts an extensive manufacturing enterprise as printers of 
cotton goods — a business that was founded by his father in 
1835 and that is one of the most important industries of 
the city at the present time. He is president also of the 
Wheeling Fire Insurance Company, the only fire insurance 
corporation in West Virginia. 

J. Louis Stifel, father of WiUiam F., was born and 
reared in Wurtemberg, Germany, where he learned the 
trade of calico printing, and where he became manager of 
a large manufactory in this line. He came to the United 
States in 1833, and in 1835 became one of the pioneer 
manufacturers at Wheeling, then little more than a vil- 
lage in the western part of Virginia. In 1837, at Steuben- 
ville, Ohio, he wedded Barbara Becht, a native of Darm- 
stadt, Germany. On coming to Wheeling Mr. Stifel estab- 
lished a small calico-printing shop at the corner of Main 
and Ninth streets, and six years later he purcnased the 
property at this location. There he erected and equipped 
a larger plant, and with the passing years the industry has 
constantly expanded in scope and importance. The sons, 
Louis C. and William F., were thoroughly trained in all de- 
partments of the business, in which they became partners 
after the close of the Civil war. The honored father retired 



12 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



from active connection with the business in 1878, and he 
was one of the venerable citizens and honored pioneer 
business men of Wheeling at the time of his death, in 1882. 
The two sons continued to be associated in the control of 
the business until Louis C. met a tragic death in a street- 
car accident in 1899. In his calico-printing and indigo 
work the father at first conducted all operations by hand, 
and at the time of his retirement in 1878, his calico- 
printing plant was the largest establishment of its kind 
in the Central States. Mr. Stifel was a strong Union man 
in the period of the Civil war, and was a member of the 
convention whose action brought out about the separation 
of the present State of West Virginia from Virginia, inci- 
dental to that war. He was a man of prominence and 
influence in Wheeling, liberal and public-spirited, and 
served as a member of the Board of County Commissioners. 
He was one of the organizers and original directors of 
the National Savings Bank of Wheeling, which later was 
consolidated with the Wheeling Savings Bank, and he served 
a number of years as president of the institution. He was 
concerned in the organization of the Benwood Iron Works, 
now a part of the Wheeling Steel Corporation's holdings, 
and he continued a stockholder in the same until his death, 
besides which he was a director of the Belmont Bridge Com- 
pany and a stockholder in the company that gave to Wheel- 
ing improved railroad facilities. Mr. Stifel never returned 
to Germany, was a most loyal and appreciative American 
citizen, and he brought his father to this country after the 
death of the mother, the venerable father having passed the 
remainder of his life at Wheeling. Mr. Stifel and his wife 
were earnest members of the Evangelical Protestant Church, 
and he was one of the founders of the church of this de- 
nomination in Wheeling, besides being one of the most 
liberal contributors to tlie erection of the original church 
edifice, which is now the Presbyterian Memorial Mission, on 
Eighteenth Street, the fine modern edifice of the church 
itself being at the corner of Twenty-second and Chapline 
streets. Mrs. Stifel passed to the life eternal in the year 
1875. Of the children the eldest was Louis C, of whose 
death mention has already been made ; William F., of this 
review, was the second son; Amelia became the wife of 
Frederick Linke and died at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; 
Matilda, the wife of Louis Demmler, likewise died in that 
city; Charles F., formerly engaged in the tanning business 
at Pittsburgh, is now living retired in that city; George E. 
is a merchant at Wheeling; Dr. Albert F., who was grad- 
uated in a leading medical institution in Germany, was one 
of the most able and popular physicians and surgeons 
in the City of Wheeling at the time of his death, when but 
thirty-eight years of age, and his two sons likewise are 
physicians of ability, Richard being engaged in practice 
at Cleveland^ Ohio, and John at Toledo, that state. 

The original firm title of J. L. Stifel & Sons is retained 
in the continuing of the industrial enterprise founded by 
J. L. Stifel, and Edward and Henry Stifel, sons of the 
late Louis C, as well as Arthur, son of William F. Stifel, 
are now interested principals in the industry. Edward 
Stifel went to Germany and gained practical experience in 
the same factory with which his grandfather had been con- 
nected as a youth. Henry also attended school and gained 
business experience likewiss in Germany. Arthur Stifel 
was graduated in Cornell University and also in a textile 
school in the City of Philadelphia. 

William F. Stifel has been a resident of Wheeling from 
the time of his birth, and in all the relations of life has 
well upheld the prestige of the family name. He has been 
connected with the business founded by his father since 
he was a lad of sixteen years, and the concern now gives 
employment to 200 persons, while the average shipments 
of bleached fabrics and dyed prints are several car-loads 
daily, the output being sold to jobbers and clothing manu- 
facturers. The present modern plant was erected in 1899, 
and is one of the most important industrial institutions in 
the city and state. Mr. Stifel is one of the original stock- 
holders and directors and the present president of the Wheel- 
ing Fire Insurance Company, specifically mentioned on other 
pages, and he is a director of the Wheeling Steel Corpora- 
tion, the Wheeling & Belmont Bridge Company, the 
Superior Coal Company, the Wheeling Sanitary Manufac- 



turing Company, and the Fostoria Glass Company, Mounds- 
ville. West Virginia. He was reared a democrat, but _ in 
his young manhood was strongly opposed to the secession 
movement that culminated in the Civil war. He has been 
one of the liberal and progressive citizens of his native 
city and has done all in his power to further its civic and 
material advancement and prosperity. He was born in a 
house that stood on the site of his present beautiful home, 
and the date of his nativity was August 12, 1840. 

As a young man Mr. Stifel wedded Miss Emma Schan 
dein, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and her death occurred 
thirty-two years later, in 1908. She is survived by two 
children, Arthur and Flora, the latter being the widow of 
P. K. Witmer, of Des Moines, Iowa. In 1912 Mr. Stifel 
married Miss Etta McFadden, a sister of Richard McFad- 
den, of Moundsville, this state, in whose personal sketch, 
on other pages, is given record concerning the family. 

The Whesxing Fire Insurance Company is one of the 
old and substantial institutions of West Virginia, dates its 
inception back more than half a century, has a splendid 
record of service and is the only fire insurance company in 
the state. It was incorporated in 1867, as the German 
Fire Insurance Company, and with a capital of $100,000, 
operations having been instituted on the 5th of July of 
that year. Of the original capital all was paid in, and 
safe and conservative policies have attended the enterprise 
during the long years of its progressive history. In 1905 
the capital of the corporation was increased to $200,000. 
Its premiums from the time of organization to 1921 ag- 
gregate $5,830,030; losses paid, $2,857,688; dividends in 
stock, $90,000; cash dividends, $76,000. The insurance now 
in force aggregates $46,600 000, and the company is licensed 
to do business in eighteen different states of the Union. The 
present handsome and modern building of the company was 
erected in 1907, and represents a valuation of $85 000. 

In the course of its long and successful record the Wheel- 
ing Fire Insurance Company has had but two presidents. 
John Oesterling, the first president, continued the incumbent 
of this ofBce until his death in 1883, when he was succeeded 
by William F. Stifel, who has since continued the executive 
head and who is the subject of the personal sketch pre- 
ceding. Fidelius Riester was secretary of the company more 
than forty years, and after his death, September 16, 1919, 
was succeeded by the present incumbent, O. E. Strauch, 
who entered the service of the company in 1907 in the posi- 
tion of cashier, from which he was advanced in turn to that 
of assistant secretary and then secretary. William V. 
Fischer, the present assistant secretary and an insurance 
man of broad experience, has been associated with the com- 
pany since 1918. 

Jacob Frederick Straight, who maintains his residence 
and business headquarters in the City of Fairmont, Marion 
County, is a successful coal operator and dealer in coal lands 
in this section of the state, and is a scion of the fifth generation 
of the Straight family in this county, with whose civic and 
material development and progress members of the Straight 
family have been identified since the early pioneer days. 

Mr. Straight was born at Barrackville, Marion County, 
January 3, 1877, and is a son of William L. and Mary (Ice) 
Straight. William L. Straight was born on a farm on Paw 
Paw Creek, this county, and he was seventy-four years of 
age at the time of his death in 1913. He was a son of Jacob, 
who was a son of Peter, the latter having been a son of Jacob 
Straight, the pioneer, who was killed by the Indians on the 
Fort Hill farm on Straight's Run, about four miles from the 
present city of Fairmont. Mary (Ice) Straight was born 
at Barrackville, and, like her husband, continued a resident 
of Marion County until her death, she having passed away 
in 1913, at the age of sixty-seven years. She was a daughter 
of William Bayles Ice and Dorothy (Straight) Ice, her father 
having been born on Buffalo Creek, near Barrackville, on 
the farm taken up by his father, Adam Ice, who was the first 
white child born west of the Allegany Mountains in what 
is now West Virginia. He was a son of Abraham Ice, one 
of the very first settlers in the present Marion County. 

Jacob F. Straight acquired his youthful education in the 
public schools of Barrackville, and from the age of ten years 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



13 



itil he was about twenty years old he resided in the home 
his paternal uncle, Edgar P. Straight. He continued hia 
lucation by attending the State Normal School at Fairmont 
veral terms, and thereafter he was graduated in the 
[ountain State Business College at Parkersburg. In 1900 

■ began work as clerk for the Fairmont Coal Company, 
^th which he continued his association until 1909, when 
I resigned the position to which he had been advanced, 
at of chief clerk of the billing department. He then 
rmed an alliance with William E. Watson and, under the 
tie of the Rosebud Fuel Company, they purchased a coal- 
ining plant at Rosebud Station on the Short Line Railroad 

■ Harrison County. Two years later, in 1911, they pur- 
lased also the mining property of the Monroe Colliery 
ompany, adjoining the original property, and the combined 
itput of the two mines averaged about 600 tons daily. 

191.3 Mr. Straight became identified with the organization 
the Fairmont & Cleveland Coal Company, with mines an 
ivesville, Marion County, known as the Parker Run Minet 
e contnued his connection with this corporation until, 
inuary 1, 1919, when he sold the greater part of his holdings 
William E. Watson, who is now president of the Fairmont 
Cleveland Coal Company, the Rosebud Fuel Company's 
•operty having been sold in 1917 to the J. M. McDonald 
oal Mining Company of Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. Straight 
,as secretary and treasurer of the Fairmont & Cleveland 
loal Company from its organization until January, 1919, 
(hen he sold his interest therein, as noted above. At the 
resent time he is giving the major part of his time and atten- 
on to the buying and selling of coal lands in the Fairmont 
id adjoining districts. Since January, 1919, he has been 
director of the Fairmont Trust Company. His capitalistic 
^sources when he came to Fairmont did not exceed $1,000, 
ad he is today rated as one of the substantial and successful 
usiness men of this city. He still owns all of the land which 
ime to him as a heritage from his parents. He is a membSr 
f the Fairmont Chamber of Commerce, is affiliated with 
le local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
(Iks and the Knights of Pythias of Fairmont, and he and his 
ife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
outh. 

September 9, 1914, recorded the marriage of Mr. Straight 
ad Miss Ethel Stump, of Philippi, Barbour County, her 
ither, Marcellus Stump, being now a resident of Gilmer 
'ounty and her mother being deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
traight have two children: Jacob F., Jr., born February 
7, 1918, and William Marcellus, born February 9, 1919. 

Leandek Troxell has been a resident of Weston forty 
ears, came to manhood here, was in the railroad service 
nd nearly twenty years ago entered the office of the county 
lerk as deputy, is now elected head of that office, and by 
is long official service and his private character is one of 
he best known men in Lewis County. 

Mr. Troxell was born in Washington County, Maryland, 
une 2, 1868, son of John P. and Ellen (Jenkins) Troxell. 
lis father was born in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, December 
, 1832, and his mother in Warfordsburg in the same state 
anuary 24, 1833. John P. Troxell grew up on a farm, had 
. Hmited education in private schools, and at the age of fifteen 
legan learning the tailor's trade. He followed that trade as 
. business and occupation for forty years. His home was 
n Hancock, Maryland, until he removed to Weston, West 
/^irginia, in 1882. Here in addition to merchant tailoring 
le conducted a general store. He was a very popular busi- 
less man and citizen, was a vestryman for many years in 
he Episcopal Church, filled all the chairs in the Knights 
)f Pythias and was instrumental in having a lodge of that 
)rder established at Weston. Of his eleven children four 
ire still hving: S. J. Troxell, of Fort Worth, Texas; Leander; 
^liss Rose; Ella, wife of A. B. Berry, of Morgantown, West 
rtrginia; Emma, and who is now deceased, was the wife of 
i.. L. Dyer. 

Leander Troxell was about fifteen years of age when the 
amily moved from Maryland to West Virginia. He finished 
lis grammar and high school education at Weston and then 
mtered the service of the Baltimore & Ohio Railway Com- 
pany. For a number of years he was billing clerk and left 
.hat work to become deputy county clerk in 1903. He was 



deputy for twelve years, and was thoroughly qualified by 
his familiarity with the records and efficiency in the routine 
duties of the office when he was elected county clerk in 1914. 
In 1920 Mr. Troxell was honored by election for another term 
of six years. At the end of his present term he will have 
served in the county clerk's office for twenty-four years. 

June 12, 1890, Mr. Troxell married Miss Mary Wheatley, 
who is a graduate of the Clarksburg High School. They have 
five children: Mildred, a graduate of the Weston High 
School; Hornor, a graduate of high school and of the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh; Robert, a high school graduate, and 
now in business with the firm of T. P. Wright & Company; 
while the two younger children are John and Charlton. Mr. 
Troxell is a member of the Episcopal Church, is affiliated 
with Weston Lodge No. 43, Knights of Pythias, and Mrs. 
Troxell is a member of the Eastern Star. 

Robert Sidney Reed has been successfully engaged in 
the practice of law in the City of Fairmont, Marion County, 
since 1914, and is one of the representative members of the 
bar of his native county. He was born at Boothsville, this 
county, June 3, 1886, the eldest of the children of Robert 
L. and Eva (Briscoe) Reed. After profiting by the ad- 
vantages of the public schools of his native town Mr. Reed 
entered the State Normal School at Fairmont, in which he 
was graduated in 1908. In 1911 he received from the Uni- 
versity of West Virginia the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and 
in the year 1913 he was graduated in the law department 
of the institution, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
After his graduation he was for one term a teacher in the 
Stjite Normal School at Glenville, and he was identified with 
business enterprise for somewhat more than a year there- 
after. In 1914 he was admitted to the bar, and he has since 
been actively engaged in the practice of his profession at 
Fairmont. He is a member of the Marion County Bar 
Association, the West Virginia Bar Association and the 
American Bar Association. He is affiliated with the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, the Phi Kappa Psi college 
fraternity and the democratic party, of the principles of which 
he is a loyal advocate. 

Boyd H. Reed, brother of the subject of this sketch, was 
born at Boothsville September 29, 1888, was graduated in 
the State Normal School at Fairmont, and is now engaged 
in bu.siness at Morgantown, Monongalia County. The 
maiden name of his wife was Kelsey Brown. 

Mr. Reed is a representative of the third generation of the 
family in Marion County, his father having been born in 
this county February 23, 1844, and having here died Novem- 
ber 3, 1916. He was a son of Joseph and Minerva (Lowe) 
Reed. Joseph Reed was born in Fayette County, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1817, and was the original representative of the 
family in Marion County, West Virginia. He was attending 
school at Smithfield, Fayette County, at the time when 
General La Fayette, in his visit to the nation which he had 
aided in gaining independence, called at the school and 
incidentally took young Reed by the hand and said to him: 
" You are too young to know who I am, but you will remember 
me in after life." Joseph Reed was about twenty years of 
age when he came to Marion County, and, a tanner by trade, 
he here established and operated a tannery at Boothsville. 
He was a son of Reason and Elizabeth (Fordyce) Reed, both 
natives of Fayette County, Pennsylvania. Reason Reed 
was born June 23, 1792, and died in 1873. He was a tailor 
by trade, and the most of his life was passed in his native 
county. As a soldier in the War of 1812 he was with the 
American forces at Detroit, Michigan, when that city was 
surrendered by General Hull. He was a son of Hugh Reed, 
the family name of whose wife was Somers. Hugh Reed 
was a son of Joseph Reed, who, in all probability, was born 
near Altoona, Pennsylvania, the lineage tracing back to 
English origin. Reason Reed was born and reared in the 
Protestant faith but married a wife who was a communicant 
of the Catholic Church, to which he transferred his member- 
ship, he having been buried in a Catholic Cemetery at 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 

Robert L. Reed, father of the subject of this review, was 
for fifty years a merchant in Marion County — first at 
Monongah and thereafter at Boothsville. He was a demo- 
crat in politics and at the time of the Civil war his sympathies 



14 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



were with the cause of the Confederate States.' BotVhe and 
his wife were Protestants in religious faith. Mrs. Reed was 
born at Mineral Wells, Wood County, this state, April 1, 
1S61, and she now resides at Fairmont. She is a daughter 
of Warwick and Sarah (Blakeney) Briscoe, her father having 
been a clergyman of the Methodist Church and having been 
for many years a circuit-rider in what is now West Virginia, 
with headquarters at Charleston. He was a son of Isaac 
Briscoe, and the maiden name of his mother was CaUahan. 
Mrs. Sarah Briscoe was a daughter of Joseph and Polly 
(Atkinson) Blakeney, and her mother was a representative 
of the same family as is ex-Governor Atkinson of this state. 
Minerva (Lowe) Reed, paternal grandmother of the subject 
of this sketch, was a daughter of Cephas and Eleanor (Hughes) 
Lowe and a granddaughter of Robert and EUzabeth (Swear- 
ingen) Lowe. Robert Lowe was born and reared in England 
and upon coming to America first settled in Maryland, whence, 
in 1808, he came to what is now West Virginia and settled in 
the present Marion County, which was then a part of Harri- 
son County, Virginia. The wife of Cephas Lowe was a 
daughter of Thomas and Ann (Moore) Hughes. Thomas 
Hughes was born in Union County, New Jersey, in 1768, a 
son of Thomas, Sr., who was a native of Wales, whence he 
went to Scotland, from which country he came to America 
and settled on the present site of Rahway, Union County, 
New Jersey. 

The above named Elizabeth (Swearingen) Lowe was born 
in Maryland, the daughter of Charles and Susannah (StuU) 
Swearingen. Charles Swearingen was born in Washington 
County, Maryland in 1735, and became a lieutenant-colonel 
in the Revolutionary war. He was a son of Van and Elizabetji 
(Walker) Swearingen, and a grandson of Thomas Swearingen 

and Jane ( ) Swearingen. Van Swearingen was 

born in Somerset County, Maryland, in 1692 and died there 
in 1801, having lived in three centuries. The father of 
Thomas Swearingen was Gerret Van Swearingen, who was 
born in Holland in 1636. He immigrated to America in 1657, 
and settled in what is now New Castle, Delaware. Later 
he moved to the Western Shore of Maryland, and there 
married Barbarah de Barrette, who was born in Vallenciennes, 
France. In 1669 by an act of the General Assembly of the 
Western Shore of Maryland, they were naturalized as Amer- 
ican citizens. 

B. Walker Peterson, president of the DoUar Savings & 
Trust Company of Wheeling, represents a family that has 
been prominent in the City of Wheeling almost a century. 

His grandfather, Dr. Daniel Peterson, was of old New 
England Colonial stock and served as surgeon's mate in 
Colonel Stark's Regiment of the Continental Army in the 
Revolution. 

The father of the Wheeling banker was WUliam F. Peter- 
son, Sr., who was born at Boscaweu, New Hampshire, in 
1798, and moved to Wheeling in 1824. He was a merchant 
and was also one of the first life insurance agents west of 
the Allegheny Mountains. He did a large business as a 
dealer in land. He was a whig politically, and at the begin- 
ning of the Civil war became a republican. He was a 
member of the Congregational Church and the Masonic fra- 
ternity. William F. Peterson, Sr., died suddenly at Logans- 
port, Indiana, in 1866. He married Sarah Gibson, who was 
bom at Concord, New Hampshire, in 1815, and died at 
Wheeling in 1885. She was connected with the Emerson 
family of New England, whose most conspicuous member was 
Ralph Waldo Emerson. William F. Peterson and wife had 
seven children, but only two enjoyed sufScient length of 
life to win for themselves positions in the world. Besides 
B. Walker Peterson the othes.was W. F. Peterson, Jr., and 
these brothers were closely associated in their business 
activities as the firm of W. F. and B. W. Peterson for many 
years. W. F. Peterson, Jr., died at Wheeling at the age 
of sixty-eight. 

B. Walker Peterson was born at Wheeling, October 26, 
1852. He attended private schools in his native city, grad- 
uated from Bethany College in Brook County in 1870, with 
the A. B. degree, and was a member of the Theta Delta 
Chi college fraternity. Mr. Peterson was trained for the 
engineering profession, graduating in 1873 from the Rens- 
selaer Polytechnic Institute at Troy, New York, with the 



degree Civil Engineer. In the same year Bethany College 
conferred upon him the degree Master of Arts. For fifteen 
years he engaged in his profession as a civil engineer, and 
for seven years of that time held the post of city surveyor 
of Wheeling. He also became interested in the manufac- 
turing industry at Wheeling, and in 1897 succeeded P. B. 
Dobbins as cashier of the Dollar Savings Bank, as noted 
in the history of that institution elsewhere. For fifteen 
years Mr. Peterson has been president of the Dollar Sav- 
ings & Trust Company. He is also president of the War- 
wood Tool Company, and president of the Ohio Valley Gen- 
eral Hospital at Wheeling. He is an old-line republican, a 
vestryman in the Episcopal Church, a member of the Twi- 
light Club of Wlieeling, and is afiiliated with Bates Lodge 
No. 33, A. F. & A. M., and with the Scottish Rite Consist- 
ory. 

In October, 1885, at Cadiz, Ohio, Mr. Peterson married 
Miss Nannie Moffett, daughter of Fulton and Mary 
(Dewey) Moffett, both now deceased. They have two chil- 
dren. W. Fairfield Peterson, born March 5, 1890, is a grad- 
uate mechanical engineer from Sibly College of Cornell Uni- 
versity and is now engineer for the Baltimore Dry Docks 
& Ship Building Company at Baltimore. He marrieil 
Marjorie Miller, of Milwaukee. The daughter of Mr. Peter- 
son is Nancy Dewey, born February 8, 1892, and the wife ' 
of Joseph DuBois HoUoway. Mr. and Mrs. HoUoway reside 
at Pittsburgh, and he is vice president and eastern pur- ' 
chasing agent of the Superior Tube Company. 

Statue op Ethan Allen, Public Library, Wheeling 
Mr. Peterson bought and had placed in the Wheeling 
Public Library a beautiful replica of a statue of Ethan 
Allen, the original of which was executed by the sculptor 
L. F. Meade. This statue in the Public Library is of Car- 
arra marble. On the front of the pedestal is the following 
inscription: "Ethan Allen, who in demanding and receiv- 
ing the surrender of Ticonderoga in the name of the Great 
Jehovah and the Continental Congress sounded the keynote 
of the spirit of the Colonies and their subsequent union. 
So mote it be. Amen." On another side is the following 
dedication: "This ideal of one of the heroes of the war 
for independence is given to the Wheeling Public Library , 
in memory of Dr. Daniel Peterson, Surgeon 's Mate, Colonel 
Stark's Regiment, Colonial Forces, and his son, W. F. 
Peterson, Sr., who came to this community in 1824." 

Dollar Savings & Trust Company, a Wheeling institu- 1 
tion, probably the largest in point of financial resources in I 
the state, has a noteworthy history among West Virginia 
banks. 

The old DoUar Savings Bank was the first institution of 
its kind in Wheeling, having been organized in 1887, with 
Nathan Day Scott as president and P. B. Dobbins, cashier. 
Other directors were E. Buckman, George Hook, C. P. 
Brown, James B. Taney, Alfred Paull, Peter Cassell, W. J. 
W. Cowden, George Zoeckler, Sr., William Goehring, A. T. 
Young and Bernard Klieves. The early success of the in- 
stitution was largely due to the careful guidance of Mr. 
Dobbins, who lost his life in a railroad accident in 1897. 
He was succeeded by B. Walker Peterson, who soon after 
he accepted that post issued a circular that tells some es 
sential and interesting history: "On the 11th day of April, 
1887, the Dollar Savings Bank of Wheeling opened its doors 
for business and began its mission of encouraging thrift 
among the citizens by offering them an opportunity to put 
aside safely small gums of money earning interest, yet avail- 
able at any and all times. It was the first institution of 
this kind in Wheeling, and its growth shows that its pro- 
jectors not only recognized and supplied an urgent public 
want, but have so judiciously and liberally administered 
its affairs as to deserve its continued popularity and pros- 
perity. In its career it has suffered but one misfortune in 
which the whole community shares — the loss by most untime- 
ly death of P. B. Dobbins, the founder, whose pet child this ' 
institution was and under whose fostering care and strong 
guidance it has grown to its present sturdy health and ' 
proportions. His memory will ever be cherished in the most i 
high and affectionate esteem. And the rule established and 
exemplified by him in the Dollar Savings Bank, in treating 




/h%u^^ic.^ (n^l^^^^'^r^^ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



15 



all, from the smallest to the largest depositor or borrower, 
with unvarying and equal courtesy and consideration, will 
be strictly adhered to in all its future dealings." 

The Dollar Savings Bank enjoyed not only inward growth, 
but from time to time has consolidated with it other vig- 
orous financial institutions. One of these was the old Wheel- 
ing Title & Trust Company, organized in 1889, with Henry 
M. Russell as president and Thomas O'Brien, Sr., as secre- 
tary, the latter soon being succeeded by Louis F. Stifel, 
who remained as secretary of the Trust Company and later 
of the Trust Department of the consolidated banks until 
his death in February, 1913. He was a man of great busi- 
ness and financial ability, had the faculty of making and 
keeping friends, and was an able adviser to the customers 
of the Trust Department. 

The Dollar Savings Bank was consolidated with the 
Wheeling Title & Trust Company in May, 1903, at which 
time the present name of the Dollar Savings & Trust Com- 
pany was adopted by the latter company. In January, 
1918, the City Bank of Wheeling, which was founded by 
Henry K. List and continued by his family, was consoli- 
dated with the Dollar Savings & Trust Company, bringing 
to the institution added resources of great value. 

At the end of the first year the old Dollar Savings Bank 
had on deposit $176,000. Twenty-five years later its de- 
posits aggregated more than $4 000,000, while in May, 1921, 
the total deposits were considerably over $9,000,000. At 
that time the resources of the institution totaled more than 
$12,000,000. 

As the business and resources of the bank increased its 
building quarters were from time to time remodeled and 
enlarged and finally, on August 1, 1911. the company entered 
its new home, an exclusive bank building, of classic style 
of architecture, regarded as one of the handsomest and one 
of the best equipped banking homes in the Ohio Valley. 

A number of Wheeling 's men of most substantial achieve- 
ments, business integrity and character have served the 
Dollar Savings & Trust Company as officials or directors. 
The executive officers in 1921, when the bank celebrated its 
tenth anniversary in its new home, were: B. W. Peterson, 
president; N. B. Scott and Bernhard Klieves, vice presi- 
dents; Robert Hazlett, vice president and secretary; W. H. 
Tracy, assistant secretary; H. E. Laupp, trust officer; A. S. 
List, chairman of the Board of Directors. Other directors 
were: W. H. Abbott, Dr. G. Ackermann, J. A. Blum, J. C. 
Brady, D. A. Burt, Charles H. Copp, H. E. Fields, Dr. W. a. 
Fulton, Kent B. Hall, J. B. Handlan, Andrew S. Hare, 
Edward Hazlett, Robert Hazlett, Nelson C. Hubbard, D. C. 
List, Jr., George Maxwell, Charles Menkemeller, Lee C. 
Paull, T. S. RUey, Joseph Speidel, Jr., W. E. Weiss, N. P. 
Whitaker, R. R. Kitchen and John J. Jacob. 

Columbus T. Bartlett, former county court clerk of 
Taylor County, has devoted twenty years or more of his active 
life to the sales and other interests of the wholesale grocery 
business in West Virginia. 

His grandparents were Thomas T. and Jemimah Bartlett, 
who settled at Webster in Taylor County prior to the Civil 
war, their home being on the banks of the little run alongside 
which the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad was constructed after 
they established their home there. They finally moved to 
Barbour County, and the grandfather died at his home on 
Pleasant Creek at the age of eighty-four. His children were: 
Mary, who married William Lake; Matilda, who became the 
wife of Lloyd Chenoweth; Virginia, who married Green 
Carter; Elizabeth, who married Shadrach Cole; Eppa G.; 
David; Benjamin; Joseph and Josephine, twins, the latter 
becoming the wife of W. H. Davis; and Sarah, who married 
C. M. Davis. 

Eppa G. Bartlett, father of Columbus T., was reared at 
Webster, was a merchant for a short time at Simpson, for 
many years operated a sawmill for the manufacture of 
lumber in Taylor and Barbour counties, and finally returned 
to his farm on Pleasant Creek in Barbour County, where he 
died in 1894, at the age of fifty-two. He married Henrietta 
Bartlett, daughter of Hamilton and Catherine (McKinney) 
Bartlett. She died in Fairmont in September, 1918, at the 
age of seventy-one. Their children were: Columbus T.; 



Camden H., of Fairmont; Lee T., who died unmarried in 1900 
and is buried at Simpson; Hattie, Mrs. J. Bert Exline and a 
resident of Belington, West Virginia. 

Columbus T. Bartlett was born on Pleasant Creek, near 
the Taylor-Barbour County line, but since early boyhood 
has been a resident of Taylor County. He finished his edu- 
cation in West Virginia College at Flemington under the 
direction of that able educator Professor Colgrove, and then 
for several winters taught school. He left that to engage in 
what has proved the chief business of his life, the wholesale 
grocery trade. For six years he was traveling salesman for 
the Joseph Speidel Grocery Company of Wheeling, and left 
that firm to join another well known grocery house, the 
Hornor-Gaylord Company of Clarksburg. He was on the 
road for this firm continuously thirteen years, until called 
away by the duties of public office. 

In November, 1914, Mr. Bartlett was elected clerk of the 
County Court, and on January 1, 1915, succeeded Hayward 
Fleming in that office. His term of six years included the 
World war period, involving many extra duties in connection 
with the work of the Draft Board and other war movements. 
While he was in office one document for record was filed 
containing $2,720 in revenue stamps, marking a record in 
this county of that kind. 

Soon after leaving office Mr. Bartlett returned to his old 
home at Webster, and has since resumed his service with the 
Clarksburg wholesale grocery house as an adjuster of accounts 
and claims. He has for years been an active worker in the 
democratic party, casting his first presidential vote for 
Cleveland in 1888. As a traveling man he became affiliated 
with the United Commercial Travelers, and formerly was 
a member of several fraternities, but his membership is now 
confined to Masonry. He is affiliated with Mystic Lodge 
No. 75, F. and A. M., at Grafton, the Royal Arch Chapter 
of the same city, and West Virginia Consistory No. 1 of the 
Scottish Rite at Wheeling. 

May 30, 1885, in Taylor County, he married Miss Minnie 
St. Clair, who was born in that county February 27, 1865, 
daughter of Thomas B. and Drusilla (Shaeffer) St. Clair, the 
former also a native of Taylor County and the latter of Penn- 
sylvania. The other St. Clair children were: James W., of 
Albany, Indiana; Loretta, of Harrison County, widow of 
Jackson Findley; Arlington, of St. Clairsville, Ohio; Osee, of 
Simpson; and Semei, of Martins Ferry, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bartlett have three married daughters and a number of 
grandchildren. Grace, who married Robert Senior, of Toron- 
to, Canada, is the mother of Jauneta, Robert Paul and June 
Genevieve. Ottie Ruth married Clinton W. Fawcett, of 
Fairmont, and their children are Clinton Robert, Charles 
Thomas and James Howard. Gladys Dove, the youngest 
daughter, is the wife of Earl Waller, of Webster. 

Irvin Oda Ash. Talent and natural qualification for the 
work of teaching the young recruited Irvin Oda Ash into 
educational ranks at an early age, and though he is still a 
young man he has every reason, aside from the financial one 
which can never be a strong motive in the teacher's career, 
to remain steadfast in his devotion to perhaps the greatest 
service the individual can give to his generation. 

Mr. Ash, who is superintendent of schools at Shinnston in 
Harrison County, was born near Middlebourne, Tyler County, 
West Virginia, March 8, 1887, and spent his early life on a 
farm. He is a son of Daniel Wesley and Rebecca (Woodburn) 
Ash, who were also natives of Tyler County. His father was a 
farmer, had a record as a Union soldier in the war, and died 
at the early age of forty-three, in 1888, when his son Irvin 
was an infant. The widowed mother is still living, and she 
made many sacrifices to properly rear her three children to 
mature years. These children are: Otto D., Alice M. and 
Irvin Oda. 

Irvin Oda Ash acquired his early education in public schools, 
and taught his first term of school at the age of seventeen. 
His work continued in the rural schools for one or more terms 
each year until he had completed a service of five years. 
From what he had been able to earn and save from rural 
school teaching he continued his own education to higher 
levels. His high school education was acquired in his native 
county. From 1910 to 1914 he was a student in West Vir- 
ginia University, from which he received his A. B. degree in 



16 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



1914. He put in every vacation in some work that would 
replete his meager purse. After graduating he taught in the 
High School at Middlebourne two years, 1914-16, and he then 
entered the University of Nebraska, where he won his Master 
of Arts degree in 1917. He also profited by another year o 
post graduate study in the University of California. On 
returning to his home state Mr. Ash was principal of the Clay 
County High School, 1918-19, and was superintending prin- 
cipal of the schools of St. Mary's in 1919-21. Mr. Ash assumed 
his duties as superintendent of the schools at Shinnston in 
the fall of 1921. 

He is a member of the West Virginia State Educational 
Association and of the National Educational Association. 
In 1916 he married Miss Nettie Bailey Lanham, a native of 
Ritchie County. She was reared in Tyler County, and for 
several years was a teacher in the public schools there, and is 
actively associated with her husband as a teacher in the 
Shinnston schools. 

William A. Meredith is one of the successful publishers 
of West Virginia, began his apprenticeship as a printer's devil 
in an office at Philippi, and from a printer's case his experience 
broadened into the larger field of editorial and business 
management. He is editor and publisher of the Shinnston 
News. 

His family has been an honored one of this state for more 
than a century. His American ancestor, William Meredith, 
came from South Wales about 1800, and after residing a few 
years in Hagerstown, Maryland, came to what is now Marion 
County, West Virginia. William Meredith married Hannah 
Powell, and they had a son William, who married Harriet 
Clayton. Rev. Clinton B. Meredith, son of William and 
Harriet (Clayton) Meredith, married Marion Maxwell, a 
native of Harrison County, and daughter of Amos Maxwell. 
They are the parents of the editor and publisher at Shinnston. 

Rev. Clinton B. Meredith is a native of West Virginia and 
one of the permanent ministers of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. He has been in active work with the West Virginia 
Conference since 1881, and has a creditable record of service 
in several pastorates. He and his good wife now reside at 
Morgantown. They were the parents of ten children. 

William A. Meredith was born in Ten Mile District, Harri- 
son County, March 9, 1882. Like the other children, he 
attended school in the different localities where his father 
resided as pastor, and, therefore, had frequent changes of 
environment during his youth. He acquired a good common 
school education, and while his father was pastor of the 
church at Philippi he began his apprenticeship in a local news- 
paper office. He remained in Philippi when the duties of the 
church called his father elsewhere, and he continued work at 
the printer's trade until 1902. In that year he first became 
identified with the newspaper interests of Shinnston, as 
manager of the News. About five years later he bought this 
weekly newspaper, and continued its publication until 1910, 
when he sold out and, going to Salem, bought the Salem 
Herald. He had active charge of this other Harrison County 
newspaper until 1913, when he sold out and again bought the 
property of the Shinnston News, and under his management 
the paper has had a steady increase of circulation and in- 
fluence. He also conducts a successful job printing business. 

Mr. Meredith is a republican and has served as county 
committeeman of his party. He is a thirty-second degree 
Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, and a member of the 
Methodist Church. In 1910 he married Miss Eva B. Robin- 
son. Her father, Thadeus Robinson, was a farmer in the 
vicinity of Shinnston. The three children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Meredith are: Madeline, William and Thadeus. 

Benjamin Bassbl Jarvis, a native of West Virginia, and 
the son of William L. Jarvis and Mary Martha (Stout) 
Jarvis, was born at the country home of his parents, situated 
on the waters of Brushy Fork, near the village of Quiet Dell, 
Harrison County, West Virginia, and was the youngest of a 
family of six children, namely: Celia T., Louise, Meigs Jack- 
son.'Arnold Brandley, Paul V. and Benjamin Bassel. 

His grandparents on the paternal side were Jesse Jarvis, 
and Sarah'(Werniger) Jarvis, of Jarvisville, Harrison County, 
West Virginia, and on the maternal side, James M. Stout and 



Celia (Bassel) Stout, of Quiet Dell, Harrison County, West [ 
Virginia. 

Benjamin pursued the duties of a farmer boy in Harrison 
and Barbour counties for about sixteen years, with the excep- 
tion of about three years, which were spent in the City of • 
Vernon, Texas, between the age of five and eight years. 

At the age of seventeen he entered the West Virginia 
Business College at Clarksburg, West Virginia, and upon theil 
completion of a business course accepted a position as book- 1 
keeper for a lumber company, which occupation he followed I 
for a few years, when he entered Broaddus College at Clarks- 
burg, West Virginia, and from there entered West Virginia 
Wesleyan Seminary at Buckhannon, West Virginia. 

After leaving the Seminary he was engaged in the lumber 
business for about four years, after which time he entered the 
Law School at the West Virginia University at Morgantown, 
West Virginia, and graduated with the class of 1909. 

On October the second, 1909, Benjamin Jarvis married 
Grace Caroline Biddle, of New Castle, Pennsylvania, the 
daughter of Frank W. Biddle and Elizabeth (Marquis) Biddle. 

Shortly after their marriage they moved to Oklahoma City, 
Oklahoma, where they resided for about three years, and dur- 
ing this period he was in the employ as an accountant of a 
large lumber dealer, after which time he and his wife moved • 
to Clarksburg, West Virginia, where he soon entered the 
practice of law. Outside of the practice of law he became 
interested in investments and promotions of coal, oil and gas 
companies. 

Politically Mr. Jarvis is a democrat and a great believer 
of the .Teffersonian democracy. He is greatly interested in 
fraternities and clubs, being a Master Mason and member oi 
Hermon Lodge No. 6 of Clarksburg, West Virginia, and 
member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elk? 
Clarksburg Lodge No. 482, a member of the Greek lettei 
fraternity, Sigma Chi, from Mu Mu Chapter, at the Univer- 
sity of West Virginia, Morgantown, West Virginia, a member 
of the Clarksburg Country Club, and the Allegheny and 
Cheat Mountain Clubs. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Jarvis were born three children, nameh : 
Jackson M., born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Decemler 
27, 1911, Donna Louise, born August 10, 1913, and Elizabeth 
Biddle, born June 18, 1918, in the City of Clarksburg, Wt st 
Virginia. 

Harvey G. Van Hoose is a practical mining man, oper 
ator and executive, with wide experience in the coal field? 
of East Kentucky as well as West Virginia. For some 
years past he has been president of the Winifrede-Thacker 
Coal Comp.my, whose mine is located one mile west of 
Nolan, on the Norfolk & Western Railroad in Mingo County. 
Mr. Van Hoose resides at the mining property. This mine 
was opened in 1916, and he was orgamzoT of the company. 

Mr. Van Hoose was born in Ironton, Ohio, June 2.5, 1875,' 
son of Moses D. and Mary (Adkins) Van Hoose. His! 
father, a native of Lawrence County, Kentucky, was a' 
pioneer in the coal developments of Eastern Kentucky. For 
many years, beginning in early manhood, he was associated* 
with Big Sandy coal fields. He opened the Peach Orchard,' 
one of the first mines opened in Eastern Kentucky, long 
before railroads were built through that section and when' 
the coal was shipped in barges on the Big Sandy and Ohio 
rivers. The Peach Orchard Mine was opened by the Great' 
Western Mining Company. After many years with the} 
Peach Orchard property Moses D. Van Hoose removed to 
Knox County, Kentucky, and was with the North Jellico 
Coal Company, at first as mine foreman and then superin- 
tendent of mines. From Jellico he removed in 1906 to 
Herrin, Hlinois, where until his recent retirement he con- 
tinued to be associated with mining operations. He is now 
living at Herrin, at the age of seventy-two. His wife was 
born in Elliott County, Kentucky, and died in 1919, at the 
age of sixty-six. Both were active Methodists. Moses D. 
Van Hoose represented Lawrence and Boyd counties in the 
Kentucky Legislature in 1889-90, and was chairman of the 
committee on mines and mining and geological survey. He 
has been active in democratic politics and served as chair- 
man of the county committee. He is a member of the 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



17 



lasons and Odd Fellows. Their six children, four 80ns and 
wo daughters, are aU associated in some way with the 
lines and mining industry. William, the oldest child, is 
line manager at Christopher, Illinois; Harvey G. is the 
jcond child; Jeff is mine manager at Herrin, Illinois; E. 
lee is an operator at Cartersville, Illinois; Jennie is the 
'ife of R. A. Bowling, commissary manager at Harlan, 
Kentucky; and Ruth is the wife of Earl Cormor, mine elec- 
•ieian of Herrin. 

Harvey G. Van Hoose acquired his early education in 
awrence County, Kentucky. He has been a constant 
;udent, his reading covering a wide range of technical, 
lining and general subjects. In 1912-13 he was a member 
f the first examining board of mine inspectors in the State 
f Kentucky for applicants for positions for mine foremen, 
his board was under the auspices of the University of 
Kentucky, which had established courses in mining. Mr. 

an Hoose took these courses himself, and to his reading 
ad studying he has added years of practical experience. 
[e is a recognized authority on coal mines. At the age of 
!n years he began work in mines as a trapper boy, and has 
eld every position in and outside of mines up to president 
f mining companies. He was for a number of years, until 
915, general manager and treasurer of the Peach Orchard 
[ine. In the latter year he was made superintendent of 
tajestic Collieries Company, Majestic, Kentucky, where he 
jmained five years. He then took over the active manage- 
lent of the Winifrede-Thacker Coal Company's mine in 
[ingo County. 

In 1896 Mr. Van Hoose married Bessie Frank, daughter 
f Conrad Frank, of Ashland, Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. 
an Hoose kept their home at Ashland for many years, 
heir only son, Harold, acquired his early education in the 
ihools of Ashland, was a member of the Students' Army 
raining Corps, and is now in the class of 1923 at Rush 
[edical College, Chicago. Mr. Van Hoose is a member of 
le Methodist Church at Nolan, is independent in politics, 
nd is aflSliated with the Blue Lodge, Chapter, Commandery 
nd Mystic Shrine, Ashland, Kentucky. 

Martin Van Bxtren Criggeb is one of the mining execu- 
ves of Mingo County, being superintendent of the Wygarb 
[ining Company's property on Tug River, two miles below 
/■illiamson. This mine was opened and has been in opera- 
on since 1904. L. E. Armentrout is president of the 
Wygarb Company. 

Mr. Crigger was born at Speedwell, Wythe County, Vir- 
inia, April 29, 1885, son of Joseph H. and Mary Hicks 
rigger. His father was born in Wythe County, Virginia, 
I 1853, and is now living in Fries, Grayson County, that 
;ate. Mary Hicks was a native of Illinois, and died in 
504, at the age of forty-seven. Joseph H. Crigger spent 
n active life as a fajmer, is a Methodist, an enthusiastic 
jpublican, and is affiliated with the Eedmen and I. O. 0. 
. fraternities. He and his wife had two children, Martin 
nd Carrie, the latter the wife of James L. LaRne, of Pries, 
irginia. 

Martin Van Buren Crigger, whom his friends always 
now as Van, acquired a public school education in Wythe 
ounty, Virginia. He has carried his education into mature 
ears, being a reader and a student of mining and technical 
orks. At the age of sixteen he began service for the Nor- 
olk & Western Railroad Company and construction work 
1 the coal fields. For three years he was a foreman, and 
'as then employed as engineer at the power plant of the 
r. S. Coal and Coke Company at Gary, McDowell County, 
'hree years later he went to Rawl, Mingo County, as elec- 
riciau for the Crystal Block Coal and Coke Company, and 
t the end of three years was promoted to mine superin- 
andent, and continued in that capacity for the CrystJil 
ompany for four years. At the end of that time he bought 

farm in Jackson County, Ohio, but in a brief time had set 
aide his ambition for agriculture as a permanent vocation, 
nd a year later returned with renewed enthusiasm to the 
oal mining industry. It was at that time that he became 
uperintendent of the Wygarb Mine in Mingo County. 

In 1908 Mr. Crigger married a former schoolmate, Miss 
)eneie Jones, daughter of George W. Jones, of Speedwell, 
Vol. m— 8 



Wythe County, Virginia. They have five children, four sons 
and a daughter: Hubert, Eugene, Van, Jr., Catherine and 
Price. Mrs. Crigger is a member of the Methodist Church. 
He is active in the fraternities of Elks and Masons, being 
a member of the Lodge and Chapter at Williamson, the 
Knights Templar Commandery at Huntington, Wheeling 
Consistory and Charleston Temple of the Mystic Shrine. In 
politics he is a republican. 

Reginald P. Eobosson, vice president of the Davis Na- 
tional Bank at Piedmont, Mineral County, was born at 
Flintstone, Maryland, on the 14th of October, 1881, and is 
a sonof Dr. Thomas P. and Virginia (Bell) Robosson, both 
likewise natives of Maryland, where the former was born 
at Flintstone and the latter at Piney Grove, a daughter of 
Josiah Bell. Doctor Robosson passed his entire life in 
Allegany County, Maryland, and was one of the oldest and 
most revered citizens and leading physicians and surgeons of 
that country for many years prior to his death, which 
occurred at Flintstone in 1913, when he was seventy-three 
years of age, his widow being now a resident of Cumber- 
land, Maryland. Doctor Robosson gained his professional 
education in the medical department of the University of 
Maryland, and as a young man he was able to render an 
appreciable amount of professional service in connection 
with the Civil war, as a surgeon. He was in full sympathy 
with the cause of the Confederacy, was a democrat in poli- 
tics, was affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and was a zealous communicant of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, as is also his widow, members of the 
Robosson family having erected the first Episcopal Church 
in Allegany County, Maryland. Of the children of Dr. 
Thomas P. and Virginia (BeU) Robosson the following are 
living: Charles T., of Flintstone; Mrs. J. B. Humbird, of 
Cumberland; Mrs. L. D. Bridges, of Hancock, all in Mary- 
land; Mrs. R. D. Witherspoon, of Mercersburg, Pennsyl- 
vania; William F., of Cumberland, Maryland; Miss Grace 
L., of that city; Reginald P., of this review; and Mrs. 
Hattie B. WoliPord, of Flintstone. The Eobosson family 
was founded in the Flintstone District of Allegany County, 
Maryland, in the early pioneer days, and the family there 
acquired ownership of extremely large tracts of land. Dr. 
Thomas P. Robosson was the only child of his parents, and 
in all of the relations of life he well upheld the prestige of 
an honored family name. 

After having fully profited by the advantages of the 
public schools of his native town Reginald P. Robosson com- 
pleted a course in a business college at Cumberland. After 
his graduation in this institution he assumed a clerical 
position in the Second National Bank of Cumberland, with 
which he continued his connection fifteen years and won 
advancement to a responsible executive position. TTpon 
severing his association with this institution he came to 
Piedmont, West Virginia, was elected vice president of the 
Davis National Bank and assumed active direction of the 
same on the 1st of January, 1918. His thorough experience 
in banking and his progressive executive policies have done 
much to advance the interests of this solid and well ordered 
financial institution of Mineral County. He is a republican 
in politics, is affiliated with the Elks and the Knights of 
Pythias, and is a communicant of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, in the faith of which he was reared. He was 
active in promoting the sale of Government bonds and 
furthering other patriotic measures in the World war period, 
and while under the draft he was duly registered and classi- 
fied in A-1, he was not called into military service. Mr. 
Robosson 's name is still enrolled on the list of eligible 
bachelors in Piedmont. 

Alexandee E. Small is a successful and progressive 
contractor and builder in his native city of Martinsbnrg, 
Berkeley County, and in direct and collateral lines is a 
representative of well known pioneer families of this county. 

Mr. Small was born at Martinsbnrg, West Virginia, on 
the 26th of September, 1887. and is a son of Wendell Seibert 
Small and Margaret Ann (Burr) Small. Wendell Seibert 
Small was born on a farm near Berkeley Station, this 
county, in 1842, n son of John Carson Small, who was born. 



18 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



on a pioneer farm in Hedgeville District, this county, in 
1801, it being virtually assured that the latter 's father was 
born in Pennsylvania, of the stanch old "Pennsylvania 
Dutch ' ' stock, he having been the pioneer representative of 
the family in what is now Berkeley County, West Virginia, 
where he reclaimed a farm from the wilds and where he 
passed the remainder of his life. John Carson Small here 
engaged in farm enterprise on land which he inherited from 
his father, and prior to the construction of railroads he used 
to drive with team and wagon to Baltimore, Maryland, 
to market his surplus farm products, several days having 
been required to make the trips back and forth. On his old 
homestead farm is now situated the production plant of the 
Security Lime & Cement Company, one of the important 
industrial concerns of this section of the state. John C. 
Small remained on his farm until his death, at the venerable 
age of eighty-nine years. He married Sarah Mong, who 
was born on a farm about three miles west of Martinsburg, 
in the year 1806, a daughter of John and Mary (Painter) 
Mong, the latter 's mother having been a Seibert. The 
Small, Mong, Carson, Painter and Seibert families all figure 
prominently in the pioneer history of Berkeley County. Mrs. 
Sarah (Mong) Small died at the age of sixty-seven years. 
The names of her children are here recorded: Mary Ellen, 
Ann Rebecca, Lucinda Catherine, James Henry, Reuben 
Wiser, John Mong, Susan Virginia, Wendell Seibert, Sarah 
Jane, William Hunter and Emma Elizabeth. The religious 
faith of the family has been that of the Lutheran Church. 
James H., Reuben W. and John M. Small were loyal soldiers 
of the Confederacy in the war between the states. 

Wendell S. Small was reared on the old home farm, and 
as a youth he learned the carpenter's trade, at which he 
became a skilled workman. After working for a number of 
years as a journeyman he engaged in contracting and 
building in an independent way, he having continued his 
association with this line of business enterprise until his 
death, in his sixty-eighth year. At Martinsburg, West Vir- 
ginia, he was a member of Equality Lodge No. 44, A. F. and 
A. M., and was affiliated also with the Royal Arcanum. He 
was a devout communicant of the Lutheran Church while 
his wife was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. Mrs. Small was born about one mile east of Shen- 
andoah Junction, Jefferson County, a daughter of William 
and Mary Ann (Porterfield) Burr and granddaughter of 
James and Nancy (McGary) Burr. James Burr was a son 
of Peter and Jane (Calhoun) Burr. On the maternal side 
Mrs. Small was a granddaughter of William and Mary 
(Williamson) Porterfield. Mrs. Small died at the age of 
fifty-five years. Her children were five in number: Eugene 
is a carpenter and builder at Martinsburg; Nan Burr is in 
the Government employ at Washington, D. C. ; Wendell S. 
is a rural mail carrier in Berkeley County; May is the wife 
of William H. Johnson; and Alexander R. is the immediate 
subject of this sketch. 

Alexander R. Small gained his youthful education in 
the public schools of Martinsburg, and as a lad he began to 
assist his father, under whose direction he learned the 
carpenter's trade with much thoroughness. He continued 
his association with his father until he established himself 
independently in business as a contractor and builder, and 
he is one of the successful representatives of this line of 
enterprise in his native city. His basic Masonic aflSliation is 
with Equality Lodge No. 44, A. ¥. and A. M., and he is 
affiliated also with the Lodge of Perfection, fourteenth de- 
gree, and with Tuscarora Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

Thomas Jonathan Jackson Woteing has for over 
twenty years been a prominent figure in the citizenship of 
Morgantown, where he has enjoyed an extensive and busy 
practice as a civil and mining engineer. 

He was named for his father's great commander in the 
Civil war, Stonewall Jackson, and was born in Frederick 
County of the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, November 
7, 1868, son of John Henry and Martha Virginia (Hall) 
Wotring. His great-grandfather was General Wotring, who 
commanded the German Army at Berlin, and for his activ- 
ities in promoting a federation of German states, an object 



achieved many years later by Bismarck, he had to lew 
that country and came to America about 1812, settling 
North Carolina, where he invested his fortune in extensr 
land purchases. Some years later he moved to West Vi 
ginia and settled on Horse Shoe Run in Preston Count 
where he bought upwards of 25,000 acres of land and whe 
he lived the rest of his life. His son Abram Wotring w 
born in Preston County and devoted his active years to t 
cultivation of a large farm of about 500 acres. He marrii 
Elizabeth Felton, who was a great-granddaughter of Lo: 
Pelton of England. John Henry Wotring was born 
Preston County in 1844, and as a young man began wo: 
for his brother, then general superintendent of the Nort 
western Turnpike in the Shenandoah Valley. While th 
engaged, in 1862, at the age of eighteen, he enlisted 
Company K of the Thirty-third Virginia Regiment, Stor 
wall's Brigade, and served until wounded at the secoi 
battle of Manassas. Thereafter he served as provost mi 
shal of Shenandoah County until the close of the war. T 
year following the return of peace he operated a saw m 
in Frederick County, and then for six years devoted 1 
attention to his farm. In 1876 he was elected coud 
treasurer of Frederick County, and filled that office twel 
years, dying while still in office, in 1888. 

His wife, Martha Hall Wotring, was born in Frederi 
County, Virginia, in 1844, daughter of James B. and V 
ginia (Rosenberger) Hall, and a granddaughter of Ca! 
Hall, a native of Philadelphia and an early settler of t 
Shenandoah Valley. Caleb Hall was a half brother , 
Lyman Hall, one of the signers of the Declaration of Inc 
pendence. James B. Hall was born in Frederick Coun 
Virginia. Martha Hall Wotring died in 1918. 

Thomas Jonathan Jackson Wotring grew up on 1 
father's farm and found work to do there until 1892. 
that year he joined an engineering crew in field work 
Botetourt County, Virginia, at Roanoke, and by study a 
practice perfected his knowledge of the profession. In If 
he returned to Frederick County, and in 1898 joined 
mother, who the preceding year had located at Morgantov | 
Here Mr. Wotring engaged in the work of his professi. 
and for five years from 1899 was engineer in the employ I 
the Standard Oil Company at Morgantown. Following tl' 
he was a mining engineer with the Ross Engineering Ccl 
pany, and for one year was with DeMoins Utt, gene 
engineer. He then formed a partnership with Clarence I 
Cox, under the name of Cox & Wotring, general engine 
at Morgantown. Seven years later he bought out 
partner, and since then Mr. Wotring has continued in 
profession under his own name, doing a general engine 
ing work, largely in the service of mining corporations, 
is a member of the American Society of Engineers and i ' 
Lutheran. 

Rev. Jonas Barrett Chamberlin, who has given -: 
and successful service as a clergyman of the United Bn 
ren Church but who has been identified with business rn 
prises in the period of his residence at Martinslii 
Berkeley County, was born at Winchester, Fredeir 
County, Virginia. His father, Abraham Chamberlin, I 
born in Hampshire County, that state, August 11, 1S2L; 
son of Jonas Chamberlin, born in Frederick County, ' 
ginia, January 13, 1774. The latter 's father, Jonas, 
was born in England and came to America in company t 
two of his brothers, one brother, Joseph, having settled 
Pennsylvania and the other in Massachusetts, they hau 
been members of an old and prominent family in Birm: 
ham, England. Jonas Chamberlin, Sr., settled in Frede i 
County, Virginia, where he passed the remainder of his 1: 
his religious faith, that of the Society of Friends, whicl( 
opposed to warfare, having prevented him entering milit 
service in the War of the Revolution. He was a gradi 
of Oxford University, and after coming to America he 
gaged in the manufacturing of silk hats for the gentry 
that period. Jonas Chamberlin, Jr., engaged in the ms 
facturing of scythes in Hampshire County, Virginia, wJ 
he continued to reside until his death, February 20, It 
His wife (Ann Bane) was born in that county Septeni 
11, 1787, a daughter of English parents who were pion< 



< 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



19 



of Mineral County. By marriage the Bane family was 
connected with that of which General Morgan, the Eevolu- 
tiduary patriot and officer, was a member. Jonas Chamber- 
lin and his wife were members of the Society of Friends. 
Mrs. Chamberlin died June 9, 1825. Their children were: 
Margaret, Mary, .Joseph Morgan and Abraham. 

Abraham Chamberlin received his early education under 
the direction of private tutors, and as a man of fine mental- 
ity and mature judgment he became influential in com- 
munity affairs and was called to various offices of public 
trust. In the Civil war period he was sheriff of Hampshire 
County, Virginia, a position which he held at the time of 
tlie formation of the new state, of which he became one of 
til.' iirst county sheriffs under the new regime. He was 
int. rested in mercantile business, and he ever commanded 
uii.|ualified popular esteem. His death occurred June 15, 
liiuT. He married Elizabeth Ann Barrett, who was born in 
Freilerick County, Virginia, where her parents, of English 
lineage, passed their entire lives. The death of Mrs. Cham- 
berlin occurred May 20, 1901. Her children were four it 
nunil)er: Jonas Barrett, Mary (Mrs. Joseph Martin), 
Nancy Jane (Mrs. C E. Liller) and Joseph. The parents 
were liirthright members of the Society of Friends, to the 
nraeious faith of which they adhered until the close of their 
liv..s. 

Jdsejih Barrett Chamberlin attended the rural schools, a 
state normal school in Virginia and the Shenandoah Acad- 
I my at Dayton, Virginia. In his youth he became a mem- 
lier of the United Brethren Church, and after due prepara- 
tion was ordained a clergyman in the same at Winchester, 
Virginia, in 1893. Thereafter he held pastoral charges at 
Wiiirhester, Virginia, and Martinsburg, West Virginia, and 
in Washington, D. C. In the meanwhile he took a special 
eouise in Columbian University (now George Washington 
University), at the national capital, with the intention of 
engaging in foreign missionary work, but impaired health 
frustrated his plans, and since establishing his permanent 
home at Martinsburg he has been identified with various 
business interests. He is treasurer of the Farmers & Me- 
chanics Mutual Insurance Company, a director and a mem- 
ber of the finance committee of the Old National Bank of 
Martinsburg, and a trustee of the local Kiwanis Club. 

At the age of twenty-five years Mr. Chamberlin was 
united in marriage with Miss Maude C. Earmon, who was 
born in Eockingham County, Virginia, a daughter of New- 
ton and Corinne (Sheets) Earmon, the latter likewise a 
native of Rockingham County. Her father, Strother Sheets, 
was born in that county, March 10, 1821, and his wife 
whose maiden name was Frances Shirley, was born in 
Augusta County, Virginia, July 9, 1822, of Colonial an- 
cestry. Mrs. Chamberlin passed to the life eternal on the 
17th of November, 1917, and is survived by two daughters, 
Minnie G. and Carrie E. 

Herbert E. Hannis, who was a lieutenant of field artil- 
lery during the great war, was born and reared in Martins- 
burg, and completed a liberal education in the law before 
the war, and when he left the service he returned home to 
practice and shortly afterward was elected prosecuting at- 
torney of Berkeley County. 

The Hannis family is descended from Andrew Hannis, a 
native of Scotland, who came to America in Colonial times 
and established his home in Philadelphia. He was buried 
in Christ Churchyard in that city. The name Hannis has 
been a prominent one in Philadelphia in all subsequent 
generations. The grandfather of the Martinsburg lawyer 
was Henry Stites Hannis, a native of Philadelphia. He 
owned and operated the Hannis Distillery in Philadelphia. 
He married a Miss Poole, of English descent. 

Herbert E. Hannis, Sr., a native of Philadelphia, where 
he was reared and educated, at the age of eighteen moved 
to Martinsburg, where his father had acquired the Nadeu- 
bousch Distillery, and he took an active part in its manage- 
ment until his death in 1906. Herbert E. Hannis, Sr., mar- 
ried Susan Gardner, a native of Berkeley County and resi- 
dent of Martinsburg. She represents the old Gardner and 



Showejs families of Berkeley County, her father having 
lieen John Gardner. 

Lieutenant Hanuis was one of eight children, was 
educated under private tutors, and took both literary and 
law courses in Washington and Lee University. He re- 
ceived his degrees A. B. and LL. B. from that university, 
and supplemented his law course in Columbia University 
at New York. 

Mr. Hannis in August, 1917, entered the United States 
service, was trained at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indian- 
apolis, was commissioned first lieutenant of field artillery, 
and was on duty for a time at Camp Funston in Kansas, at 
Camp Jackson, South Carolina, and from Camp Dix, New 
Jersey, went overseas and was with his command in all its 
activities in France until March, 1919. He then returned 
to the United States, was at Camp Upton on Long Island 
for a brief time, and was then assigned special work at 
Washington, D. C. In July, 1920, he resigned and received 
his honorable discharge, and returned home to find that 
his friends had nominated him as republican candidate for 
prosecuting attorney of Berkeley County. In November 
of that year he was elected to office, and now devotes all 
liis time to its duties. 

Mr. Hannis is one of the very popular public officials of 
Berkeley County. He is a memlier of several bar associa- 
tions, the American Legion Post, and is affiliated with 
Martinsburg Lodge No. 778, Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks, and Washington Lodge No. 1, Knights of Pythias. 

Ernest L. Luttrell. A lawyer of exceptional ability 
and well matured powers and experience, Mr. Luttrell has 
been a member of the Berkeley County bar, and while he 
has had official responsibilities during the greater part of 
the time since his admission he has also built up an exten- 
sive general practice. His offices are in the Shenandoah 
Bank Building at Martinsburg. 

Mr. Luttrell was born on a farm thirteen miles northwest 
of Winchester, in Frederick County, Virginia. His father, 
Charles W. Luttrell, was born near Collinsville, in the same 
county, on December 3, 1855. The grandfather was Lewis 
Luttrell, a native of the same county, and the great-grand- 
father was .John Luttrell, also a native and life-long resident 
of Frederick County, where his ancestors settled when they 
came from England in Colonial times. Lewis Luttrell grew 
up on the farm, inherited a portion of the old homestead, 
but subsequently sold it and farmed as a renter. He died 
at the age of sixty-nine. The maiden name of his wife was 
Elizabeth Dick, a native of Frederick County and daughter 
of Richard Dick, a farmer and woodsman of that section. 

Charles W. Luttrell was reared on a farm. His ambition 
led him to make the most of his advantages in the local 
schools, and at the age of twenty-one he began teaching 
and was a factor in local educational circles for five years. 
From Frederick County he moved to Berkeley County, was 
clerk in a general store at Glengary and later at Ganotown, 
and in 1906 bought property at Nollville, where he was in 
the mercantile business until January, 1921. At that date 
he sold out and is now retired at Martinsburg. He served 
as postmaster at De Haven in Frederick County, and was 
assistant postmaster at Glengarry and postmaster at Gano- 
town, both these appointments coming during Grover Cleve- 
land 's administration. In 1881 Charles W. Luttrell married 
Julia P. De Haven, a native of Frederick County. Her 
father, James De Haven, owned and operated a flour mill 
on Green Spring Creek in Frederick County. Charles W. 
Luttrell and wife had two children, Elston M. and Ernest 
L. The parents are active members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, and the father has been on the 
official board of the church. Charles W. Luttrell is very 
conspicuous for his religious work, to which he has devoted 
much of his time and means. He is sincerely interested in 
every movement for the betterment of his fellow man. 

Ernest L. Luttrell received a rural education during his 
early years, later attended Shepherd College, and from there 
entered West Virginia University, where he took a brief 
academic course and then continued in the law school until 
graduation in 1910. Mr. Luttrell has done all his practice 



20 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



as a lawyer at Martinsburg. In that city he became asso- 
ciated with A. B. Noll, and served four years as assistant 
district attorney under Mr. Noll and later four years under 
District Attorney W. W. Downey. Mr. Luttrell in 1919 
formed a partnership with Decatur Rogers, and this firm is 
recognized as one of the strongest in Berkeley County. 

In 1912 Mr. Luttrell married Ida Lillian Eice, who was 
born in Jefferson County, daughter of William M. Eice, a 
farmer near Shepherdstown. Mr. and Mrs. Luttrell had two 
children, Edna Marie and Ernest Glenville. Mr. Luttrell 
is affiliated with Equality Lodge No. 44, A. F. and A. M., 
with the thirty-second degree Scottish Eite Masons, is a 
member of Washington Lodge No. 1, Knights of Pythias, 
and the D. O. K. K. branch of that order, and is a member 
of the Loyal Order of Moose and the Patriotic Sons of 
America. 

Charles G. Smith was in the railroad service, later in 
the public utility business, but is best known in the City 
of Martinsburg, his home, as a merchant, being proprietor 
of one of the larger mercantile concerns there. 

He was born at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, a son of 
Joseph Cheston Smith and grandson of David and Maria 
(Spangler) Smith. His family connections have been in 
Maryland and West Virginia since pioneer times. The 
family history is an interesting one, including a number of 
prominent characters, and it is told in more complete detail 
in the individual sketch of Harry Fenton Smith, a cousin 
of Charles Q., and also a resident of Berkeley County. 

Joseph Cheston Smith, father of the Martinsburg mer- 
chant, was reared and educated at Frederick, Maryland. As 
a young man he came to Virginia, and during the war be- 
tween the states was in the United States service, in the 
Quartermaster's Department. After the war he returned to 
his father 's farm, on which Anteitem Station is now located, 
farmed there for a few years and in 1871 located at Mar- 
tinsburg, where he was in the employ of the Baltimore & 
Ohio EaUroad Company, and continued in that service for 
about forty years. He died at Harpers Ferry in 1916. His 
wife was Louisa Spangler, a native of Harpers Ferry. Her 
father, Emanuel Spangler, was born in Scotland and one of 
three brothers to come to America. His brother John settled 
at Martinsburg. Emanuel Spangler was an expert mechanic. 
Prior to the beginning of the Civil war he was an employe 
at the Government Arsenal at Harpers Ferry, making locks 
for guns. After the arsenal was burned he was transferred 
to the arsenal in Bridesburg, a suburb of Philadelphia. 
At the close of the Civil war he returned to Harpers Ferry 
and lived there until his death. Emanuel Spangler married 
Elizabeth Bussell, a native of England. Her brother was 
at one time prominently associated with OberUn College at 
Oberlin, Ohio. 

Charles G. Smith was the oldest of three children. His 
brother Harry S. became an electrical engineer, and in that 
capacity went to South Africa, where he died. The only 
daughter, Emma Brent, married Eev. John Sneidikar. 

C. G. Smith was educated in Martinsburg, and at the 
age of sixteen entered the employ of the Cumberland Valley 
Eailroad Company as a messenger boy and as an apprentice 
to learn telegraphy. During this period his salary was $6 
a month. After a year he was made joint city ticket agent 
and manager of the telegraph office, and was in the service 
of the railroad for a period of ten years. After resigning 
he assisted in organizing the Edison Electric Illuminating 
Company, and was manager of that important public utility 
for five years. When he retired he bought a mercantile 
business formerly conducted by his father-in-law, consisting 
of a stock of general merchandise on North Queen Street. 
He had been in the business only a short time when he ex- 
panded his enterprise by purchasing the commissary of the 
Standard Stone and Lime Company 's Quarry and also the 
commissary of the Crawford Woolen Company and another 
general store on South Queen Street. To this growing and 
flourishing business he has given strict attention and has 
made an unqualified success as a merchant. He is also a 
director in the old National Bank and chairman of its 
executive committee, also a director of the Berkeley Woolen 
Company of Martinsburg, West Virginia. 



In 1906 Mr. Smith built the substantial residence now 
occupied by his family on South Queen Street. At the age 
of twenty-four he married Miss Minnie Belle Bowers, a na- 
tive of Martinsburg and daughter of John A. and Lucy 
(Orem) Bowers. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have one son, Charles 
Granville, Jr., and their only daughter died in infancy. 
They are members of the Trinity Episcopal Church, of which 
he is a vestryman. He is afiiliated with Robert White Lodge 
No. 67, A. F. and A. M., has been an official in the lodge 
for thirteen years, and is a member of Washington Lodge 
No. 1, Knights of Pythias, and of Martinsburg Lodge No. 
778, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is also 
a member of the Martinsburg Rotary Club. 

Hon. Joseph Henry McDeemott. The builders of em- 
pires have their counterparts in the men who establish, 
organize and develop vast commercial and industrial enter- 
prises that make communities centers of thriving trade and 
carry their names to various other parts of the world. Such 
men must possess many qualities. Their insight into business 
conditions must be keen and far-reaching, their knowledge 
of men profound, and their ability to grasp opportunities, 
unlimited. Without commercial and industrial interests no 
community progresses, for such enterprises are the very life 
of a city. The investment and attraction of capital, the 
employment of labor, and the consequent opening of new 
avenues of endeavor to meet newly-created demands, all 
infuse blood into the veins of a section and endow it with 
renewed vigor and strength. Morgantown is an excellent 
example of the above statement, and one of the men who 
has been largely responsible for the desirable condition oC 
affairs now existing in this thriving community is the Hen. 
Joseph Henry McDermott, a leading operator in the oil 
and gas industries, and a man whose connection with pol- 
itics has made his name nationally kjiown. 

Mr. McDermott was born near Meadville, Crawford 
County, Pennsylvania, July 28, 1871, a son of Thomas and 
Samautha (Johnson) McDermott. Thomas McDermott was 
born in Canada, a son of John and Mary (Kennedy) Mc- 
Dermott, the former a native of Eoscommon and the lat- 
ter of Sligo County, Ireland. His father was a pioneer 
lumberman of Ontario, having a residence ou Georgian 
Bay in that province, where John and Mary McDermott 
passed the remainder of their lives. 

Thomas McDermott came to the United States for the 
purpose of becoming a Union soldier during the war be- 
tween the states, and enlisted at Buffalo, New York, in 
1865. Before he got to the front, however, hostilities had 
ceased, and after he had received his honorable discharge 
he engaged in the lumber business near Meadville, Penn- 
sylvania, making staves which he shipped to Titusville, 
Pennsylvania, where they were converted into oil barrels. 
In 1876 he entered into contract work in the Bradford 
(Pennsylvania) oil fields for ten years, and was afterwards 
engaged in contracting in Butler County, Pennsylvania, and 
at Pittsburgh and Little Washington, that state, and then 
came to Mount Morris, West Virginia, whence he came to 
Morgantown in 1889. Going from Morgantown to Fair- 
mont in his later years, he died at the latter city in 1911, 
after some years of retirement. His widow, who still makes 
her home at Fairmont, West Virginia, was born in Beaver 
County, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Samuel and Nancy 
(Laughlin) Johnson, she being a member of the old and 
jirominent Laughlin family of Pennsylvania. 

Joseph Henry McDermott attended the public schools of 
his native community, and at the age of fifteen years joined 
his father in the latter 's business, continuing with him in 
all of his operations until the elder man's retirement, when 
the son assumed the responsibility of the entire operations. 
At the present time, however, he confines his gas and oil 
operations to the Monongalia County fields, with other in- 
terests in California. He is president and owner of the 
J. H. McDermott Company, president of the Moore Tex 
Oil Company, president of the New York and California 
Oil Company and president of the Armor Cord Rubber 
Company of Morgantown, operating in California, and holds 
financial interests in other companies. 

In the domain of politics and public affairs Mr. McDer- 





' ^^A^j^^'^i^^^^pn^^r- 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



21 



iott is one of the leaders of the republican party of West 
irginia and of the nation. In 1904 he waa elected to the 
i^est Virginia Senate, serving in the sessions of 1905, 1906, 
!)07 and 1908, and was president of that body in 1907. He 
las a Taft presidential elector in 1908, receiving seventy- 
iven votes more than any other man on the entire repub- 
jjan ticket, either state or national. He was elected a 
ember of the Republican National Committee for West 
irginia in 1918, and re-elected in 1920, and continues a 
ember of that organization. He has been active in state 
jlitics since the time of United States Senators Nathan 
. Scott and Stephen Elkins, and managed the campaign 
■ United States Senator David Elkins when the latter was 
rving in France. 

Mr. McDermott is a member of the DuQuesne Club, of 
ittsburgh; the Edgewater Country Club, of Charleston, 
'est Virginia; and the Country Club, of Morgantown. He 
so holds membership in Union Lodge No. 4, Free and Ae- 
ipted Masons, of Morgantown, and has received all tiic 
igrees up to the thirty-second, including the Scottish and 
ork Rites and Knights Templars in West Virginia. He is 
member of the Mystic Shrine and one of the few living 
jiarter members of the Scottish Eite in this state. 
Mr. McDermott served as quartermaster general with 
le rank of captain on Governor Atkinson 's staff at a 
me when the staff was a part of the National Guard, 
ollowing Governor Atkinson 's term as governor, Mr. Mc- 
ennott was made a member of the brigade staff, with the 
ink of captain, and Governor Dawson appointed him one 
'. five captains to serve as the governor 'a military ad- 
sory board. 

Mr. McDermott married Miss Louise Jane McLane, the 
iughter of Dr. Charles H. McLane, a well-known physician 
id surgeon of Morgantown, and to this union there have 
;en born two children : Jane and Joseph H., Jr. 

Harry Bank. As a man of affairs or as a patriotic 
tizen no one is better or more favorably known in Mc- 
owell County than Harry Bank, a department store owner 
ho went into business there on an exceedingly modest scale 
id has kept that business growing and prospering in 
•oportion to the general development of this locality. 

Mr. Bank was born in Russia, April 15, 1872, of Jewish 
irents, Kamper and Sarah Bank. He acquired his educa- 
on in old country schools, but did not know a word of 
nglisk when he came to the United States at the age of 
iventeen. For three years he lived in Baltimore, and in 
lat city he laid the foundation for his Americanism. While 
itting in his days working and learning the methods of an 
merican store, he spent hours at night studying to equip 
mself with a knowledge of English. Then, about 1891, 
>. Bank came to Kimball and made an unpretentious start 
I a general merchant. Being cautious, very reliable in all 
s dealings, he has built up a department store that handles 
1 the merchandise required in this community. Because 
: his high standing as a man of affairs and his thorough 
isiness integrity Mr. Bank has been widely sought as an 
Ivisor and co-operator in movements affecting the welfare 
lE his section. He was appointed a member of the Gov- 
•nor's staff. Among other extensive interests in this 
igion he is a director of the First National Bank of 
!imball and a large stockholder in the Safly Pocahontas 
oal Company. 

In 1895, at Baltimore, Mr. Bank married Miss Ida Miehel- 
)n. They have four children, Sadie, Bernard, Marie and 
tta. Sadie is the wife of Jack Leibmau, of Welch. 

Mr. Bank is a Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner and a 

ember of the Elks. Everyone in this part of McDowell 
ounty respects the ability and relies implicitly upon Mr. 
ank's high character and good judgment He is a man 
ho has come up through struggles, and few men with the 
ivantages of birth and education in America have gone 
irther along the highway to real substantial success than 
lis Kimball merchant. 

John H. Bane, cashier of the Clark National Bank at 
forth Fork, McDowell County, took np business very early 



ia his life, has had a wide and varied experience, and for 
nearly twenty years has been connected with banking. 

Mr. Bane was born at Bell Springs, Pulaski County, 
Virginia, May 26, 1877, and is of old Virginia stock of 
English and Scotch descent. His parents, John H. and 
Elizabeth E. (Lloyd) Bane, were both born in Virginia, his 
father being a substantial lEarmer in that state. For many 
years he was a deacon in the Baptist Church. John H. 
Bane acquired a common school education, and was not 
privileged to attend school after he was fourteen. Follow- 
ing that he worked on the farm, clerked in a general store 
at Bell Springs, and divided his time between the store and 
the farm until he was about twenty. During the next two 
years he did clerical work in the general oflBces of the Nor- 
folk & Western Railroad at Roanoke, and from there came 
to West Virginia and established himself in the retail 
grocery business at Welch. After about two years he 
disposed of the store and, returning to Virginia, engaged 
in the general mercantile business at Christianburg. At 
the end of the third year he gave up his store to accept the 
position of assistant cashier in the First National Bank of 
Christianburg. He was with that institution four years, and 
there laid the foundation of his training as a banker. He 
was next cashier of the First National Bank of PinevUle, 
West Virginia, two years, and in 1914 came to the Clark 
National Bank at North Fork as cashier. He is also a di- 
rector of the bank. During the war he was a leader in 
promoting the success of all the loan drives and also the 
drives for the Red Cross and Salvation Army in his com- 
munity. 

Mr. Bane married Miss Mary Myrtle Conner, of Floyd, 
Virginia, in 1911. Her parents, Rev. David D. and Alice M. 
(Pugh) Conner, are natives of Virginia and her father is 
a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bane's children are Elizabeth Josephine, John H., 
Jr., and David E. The family are members of the Baptist 
Church and Mr. Bane for a number of years has been super- 
intendent of the Sunday school and a deacon in the church. 
He is treasurer of the Masonic Lodge and Chapter at North 
Fork. 

Leslie C Fowlkes has been a progressive factor in the 
business affairs of Keystone, McDowell County, for the 
past ten years, and the greater part of that time has been 
an executive officer in the First National Bank of Keystone. 

Mr. Fowlkes was born September 1, 1888, on a farm near 
Chatham, Virginia, son of W. A. and Nannie (Yates) 
Fowlkes, also native Virginians. His father was a success- 
ful farmer in that locality, and for two years he had charge 
of all construction and maintenance work on roads and 
highways in his district. He was an active member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Leslie C. Fowlkes grew 
up in the country, attended common schools there and in 
Chatham, and completed a regular business course, includ- 
ing stenography and bookkeeping, in the Piedmont Busi- 
ness College of Lynchburg, Virginia. 

Soon after completing his business college education, in 
1912, Mr. Fowlkes came to Keystone, West Virginia, and 
for the first eighteen months divided his time between book- 
keeping and stenographic work for Attorney Partlow and 
the bank. Since then all his time has been taken up by 
his duties in the bank, where for one year he was book- 
keeper and in 1915 appointed assistant cashier. In July, 
1917, he was made cashier, and during the period of the 
World war he had to perform all the detail as well as gen- 
eral business management in the absence of the employes 
who went into the service. The First National Bank of 
Keystone is one of the most prosperous institutions in 
McDowell County, has a capital of $50,000, surplus and 
undivided profits of $70,000, and deposits of over $500,000. 
The president of the bank is D. E. French, of Bluefield. 

In 1915, at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Mr. Fowlkes mar- 
ried Miss Catherine Rish, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Rish, natives of Pennsylvania. They have two children, 
Leslie C, Jr., and John William. Mr. Fowlkes is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. In Masonry 
he is affiliated with Algoma Lodge at North Fork, Howard 



22 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



Chapter at North Fork, the Knights Templar Commandery 
at Bramwell and Beni-Kedem Temple of the Mystic Shrine 
at Charleston. He is also aflSliated with the Knights of 
Pythias and in politics is rather independent, though nor- 
mally he votes the democratic ticket. 

McHeney Tabor, M. D. The earnest and skillful labors 
of Dr. McHenry Tabor as a physician and surgeon have 
been applied to the benefit of the important coal mining 
communities of McDowell County. He is held in the highest 
personal as well as professional esteem in the coal mining 
town of Grumpier, which is located on a branch of the Nor- 
folk & Western Railway, connecting with the main line at 
North Fork. 

Doctor Tabor was born at Camp Creek, Mercer County, 
West Virginia, August 15, 1885, and is of Old Virginia 
ancestry, more remotely of Dutch and Irish origin. His 
parents were George and Olive (Worrell) Tabor, the former 
a native of Tazewell and the latter of Carroll, Virginia. 
His father served in a Virginia regiment under General 
Wise during the war between the states. After this serv- 
ice he returned to his farm and later for fifteen years was 
in the general merchandise business. He was an active 
member of the Christian Church. 

McHenry Tabor attended the common schools in Mercer 
County, finished his work in the State Normal at Athens in 
1905, and took his medical course in the Medical College 
at Eichmond, Virginia, where he graduated in 1910. For 
six months he was an interne in the City Hospital at Eich- 
mond, and then began his work in the West Virginia coal 
fields. For some seven or eight years he handled a very 
successful general practice at Glenalum, and in 1918 came 
to Grumpier in charge of the medical work for the Zenith 
mines of the United Pocahontas Coal Company. During the 
World war he made two attempts to get into the army 
service, but the authorities said that he could not possibly 
do a greater or more patriotic work than he was doing as 
a mining physician. Doctor Tabor ib a member of the 
County, West Virginia State and American Medical Asso- 
ciations, is a Eoyal Arch and Knight Templar Mason and 
Shriner, and a member of the Episcopal Church. 

Tn 1915, at Glenalum, he married Miss Elizabeth L. 
Mitchell, daughter of Daniel and Fannie (Loving) Mitchell, 
of Abingdon, Virginia. Her father was a banker and died 
in March, 1921, at the age of seventy-eight. Mr. and Mrs. 
Tabor have one daughter, Nancy Overton. 

Drury D. Moran. One of the ablest, most successful 
and most forceful lawyers engaged in the practice of civil 
law in Wyoming County is Drury D. Moran, of Mullens. 
Quiet, determined and industrious, and at the same time a 
brilliant and original speaker, he possesses a convincing 
directness which makes him a remarkable advocate and a 
strong citizen. He has likewise been prominent in public 
life, as well as in business, and at present is at the head 
of several leading enterprises of Pineville and Mullens. 

Mr. Moran was born on Pinnacle Creek, within five miles 
of the present site of Mullens, January 27, 1880, and is a 
son of Stephen H. and Hortense (Evans) Moran. Stephen 
H. Moran was born in Floyd County, Virginia, in 1855, and 
was seventeen years of age when he went to Raleigh County, 
West Virginia. When eighteen years old he went to Pin- 
nacle Creek, was married at that time, and settled down to 
a life which was devoted to agricultural pursuits and con- 
tracting in timber. He became an extensive landholder, had 
one of the best farms in his region, and was known as the 
most extensive farmer in the upper end of the county. He 
handled large lumber contracts, buying and selling timber, 
and cleared the right-of-way through Wyoming County for 
the Virginian Eailroad and for the Winding Gulf branch 
of that line. Mr. Moran was a democrat in politics. He 
was a man of the strictest integrity and a faithful member 
of the Primitive Baptist Church, in the faith of which he 
died in August, 1918. He was not old enough to see serv- 
ice in the war between the states, but two of his brothers 
fought as Confederate soldiers in that struggle and met 
death on the battlefield. Mrs. Moran survives her husband 
and resides on the old home place. Their children were as 



follows : Eli, who is carrying on operations on the ol 
home farm; Drury D., of this review; John, who is a mil 
foreman at the Alph Pocahontas Mine; Meda, the vrife c 
Bailey Mills, a miner at Beckley; Hulda, who died at tli 
age of thirty-six years, as the wife of Thomas Shrewsberr; 
of Wyoming County; Vina, the wife of Joseph Wood, 
Wyoming County farmer; Martha, the wife of Wetsel Ai 
derson, a miner; Mazy, the wife of Everett Green, an en 
ploye of the Virginian Eailroad; and Ida, the wife of Penf 
Spence, of Wyoming County. 

Drury D. Moran received his early education in the Wi' 
oming County schools, following which he taught scho(l 
for three years. In 1901 he joined Company M, Twentj - 
ninth United States Infantry, studied and taught mathttt 
matics at Fort Sheridan, and in 1902 was sent to the Phi|' 
ippine Islands, where he was an instructor in mathematic' 
He received his honorable discharge at sea, while on h 
return to the United States, and on his return to West Vi 
ginia became a clerk in a grocery store at Mullens, fo 
lowing which he opened the first soft drink factory at th 
place. During the Taft administration he served as pos 
master at Mullens, and then commenced the study of la? 
He was a student at the State University from 1913 to 191i 
and in February, 1916, was admitted to the bar. He hs 
since been engaged in a constantly growing practice, mal 
ing a specialty of civil eases. His business connections ai 
prominent and important, and he is president of the Wyon 
ing County Bank at Pineville, vice president of the Wyon 
ing Ice and Bottling Company at Mullens, and president c\ 
the Wyoming Theatre Company at Mullens. 

Soon after his return from the State University, Mr. M(| 
ran became chairman of the Republican County Exeeuti^j 
Committee of Wyoming County, and in the fall of 1918 we' 
elected to serve in the West Virginia House of Delegate 
where he was chairman of the military committee and 
member of the following committees: Judiciary, electioi 
and privileges, private corporations and joint stock con 
panics, roads and internal navigation, claims and grie'i 
ances and mines and mining. In the recent election he wj| 
the nominee of his party for the Circuit judgeship, h\ 
the democratic vote in Mingo County caused his defeat. M I 
Moran is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fp 
lows, and he and Mrs. Moran belong to the Baptist Churc j 
Early in the World war he was admitted to the Plattsbui , 
Officers Training Camp, but while there was stricken will 
appendicitis, which incapacitated him for service. 

On October 7, 1905, Mr. Moran was united in marriajr 
with Miss Mattie L. Williams, a daughter of A. E. William! 
a well-known and successful agriculturist of Wyomiiii 
County. I 

Stuart G. Aldhizer is one of the younger bankers i 
the state, is cashier of the First National Bank of Kimba 
and his associates and friends regard him as one of the coi 
ing men in the financial affairs of his native state. 

Mr. Aldhizer was born at Broadway, Virginia, Octob i 
1, 1894, of an old Virginia family and of Welsh and Iri 
ancestry. His parents, George S. and Alice A. (Mooii 
Aldhizer, were both natives of Virginia. His father was o 
of the early settlers of Broadway, made his start in t 
drug business, but eventually that became a side line 
his varied enterprises as banker and manufacturer. He 1 
came president of the bank at Broadway, and operated 
flour and feed milling establishment. For a number 
years he was a member of the council, but never accept^ 
the office of mayor. He was a deacon in the Baptist Chur' 
and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, i 

Stuart G. Aldhizer had a common and high school edud 
tion at Broadway, graduating from high school in 191 
Hiff higher education was acquired in the Eichmond Ci 
lege, a Baptist institution, now the University of Eic 
mond, where he finished his course in 1915, but did n 
graduate, owing to the death of his older brother. In th 
year he became bookkeeper for the McDowell Nation) 
Bank at Welch, West Virginia, and subsequently was pi 
moted to teller. 

He left his duties with the bank to enlist on Decemb 
15, 1917, joining the Aviation Corps at Kelly Field j 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



23 



Texas, and remained there in the ground school of instruc- 
tion for eight months. He was then transferred to the 
Field Artillery at Camp Taylor, Kentucky, was in training 
eleven weeks, and on November 28, 1918, after the signing 
of the armistice, he accepted his discharge instead of a lieu- 
tenant's commission. Eeturning to Welch, he resumed his 
duties as teller in the bank, and seventeen months later 
came to Kimball as cashier of the First National Bank. 
He is also one of the directors of the bank, and his personal 
popularity is an important factor in the prosperity of the 
institution. 

Mr. Aldhizer is a member of the Baptist Church, is a 
Eoyal Arch and Knight Templar Mason and Shriner and 
exemplifies a thorough progressiveness in all community af- 
fairs. 

William Barrick. A finer example of the West Vir- 
ginia mountaineer type, of perfect physical manhood, with 
a physical and moral courage that has never been daunted, 
resourceful, skillful, at all times adequate for his per- 
formance and duties, it would be difficult to conceive than 
that illustrated by William Barrick, manager of the Tide- 
water Coal & Coke Company of Vivian. 

Mr. Barrick has lived in and around mines, and has done 
the practical work of the miner and the mining official since 
he was a boy. He was born in Mineral County, West Vir- 
ginia, September 25, 1874, son of George G. and Nannie 
W. (Matthews) Barrick, the former a native of West Vir- 
ginia and the latter of Richmond, Virginia. George G. 
Barrick was likewise a coal miner and one of the first in 
West Virginia, becoming associated with the Davis Coal 
& Coke Company. William Barrick acquired a common 
school education in Mineral County. At the age of fifteen 
he went to work with his father around the mines, and did a 
varied routine of duties, cleaning up around the track, car 
oiler, and in other capacities until he was made a regular 
miner. Then came advancement through all the grades of 
promotion in and around a coal mine, and he is master of 
practically every detail of mining technique. By 1897 he 
was mine foreman for the Thomas Mine in Tucker County 
and of the Davis Coal and Coke Company, serving in this 
capacity four years. Subsequently he was foreman for the 
Oakland Coal & Coke Company in Preston County. His 
next work was at Weaver, where he was foreman of the 
No. 1 Mine of the Maryland Smokeless Coal & Coke Com- 
pany, and on being promoted to general mine foreman had 
six mines under his direction. When the Davis Coal & Coke 
Companies bought these properties he remained with the 
corporation as superintendent of mines. On leaving Weaver 
Mr. Barrick accepted an invitation to take charge of some 
coal operations at Raton, New Mexico, and on returning 
East spent about four years at Lowmoor, Virginia, and then 
joined the Berwind White Coal & Mining Company, the 
largest operators in West Virginia, as superintendent of 
operations. He was with this concern nine years, and in 
that time he opened and developed five coal properties in 
addition to those being operated when he joined the com- 
pany. Since 1918 Mr. Barrick has been located at Vivian 
in McDowell County as superintendent of mines for the 
Houston Colliery Corporation and the King -and Tidewater 
Coal & Coke Companies. Mr. Barrick, his associates say, is 
the only real native born West Virginian who has reached 
his high responsibilities in the coal industry as a result of 
his own unaided efforts. He has with him his two sons, 
and they resemble him in many particulars. 

Mr. Barrick stands six feet one inch high, weighs about 
200 pounds, and his carriage and appearance reveal him 
the perfect athlete he is. As a boy he was a great hunter, 
a perfect shot with the rifle, and his owns sons have emu- 
lated his skill in these directions. 

In 1896, at Thomas, West Virginia, Mr. Barrick mar- 
ried Mary Frances Conner, daughter of John and Minerva 
Conner. Her father was a farmer and carpenter. The six 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Barrick are William R., George 
M., Willard Virginia, Joseph Benjamin, Travis Earl and 
Frances Adelaide, while another daughter, Ruth, died at the 
age of ten months. William married Miss Ellen Straughan, 
of Bluefield, daughter of James A. Straughan, superintend- 



ent of coal mines at HeUier, Kentucky. William Barrick 
was a member of the Students Army Training Corps at 
Morgantown during the World war, and had orders for over- 
seas duty when the armistice was signed. The son George 
attended the Greenbrier Military Institute aud took a min- 
ing course at West Virginia University and was given a 
first class certificate as mine foreman and mine rescue 
and first aid. The son Joseph is a student in the Virginia 
School of Technology. Travis is attending Emery and 
Henry College of Virginia. The family are members of 
the Baptist Church and Mr. Barrick is a Royal Arch Mason 
and Odd Fellow. Mr. Barrick is the sort of man to at- 
tract attention aud admiration everywhere, but particularly 
when he is observed at his post of duty. A brief acquaint- 
ance reveals the fact that he is one of the best educated 
men in this section of the state. This is largely due to the 
habit of reading which he derived as a boy from his mother, 
who was a school teacher and who influenced his choice of 
good books. Mr. Barrick 's main hobby is baseball, and 
wherever he has had his duties in mining circles he has or- 
ganized and maintained a ball club, and some of the teams 
with which he played and managed established a fine rec- 
ord in the different coal mining sections of West Virginia. 

William A. Creager learned banking in Cincinnati, and 
for a number of years has been associated with the First 
National Bank of North Fork, McDowell County. He is 
cashier of this iustitution, one of the largest and strongest 
in the county, with total resources of over $1,000,000. It 
'yas a capital of $100,000, and its surplus and undivided 
profits account nearly equals the capital. 

Mr. Creager was born at Loveland, Ohio, March 22, 1873, 
son of Leamon and Mary Kelly (Alcoke) Creager, natives of 
Ohio. Through his father he is of Pennsylvanian German 
ancestry, while his mother was of old Virginia stock of 
English descent. Leamon Creager served in the Home 
Guards of Ohio during the Civil war, spent his active life as 
a farmer, and was never in politics to any extent. 

William A. Creager acquired a common and high school 
education at Loveland. For several years he worked on a 
farm, clerked in stores, and on account of failing health 
went West, to Oregon. He was in Oregon when the Span- 
ish-American war broke out, and he then joined the Sec- 
ond Oregon Regiment of Volunteers, with which command 
he went to Manila and for eleven months was in that city 
doing hospital work as acting steward. 

Mr. Creager in 1907 entered the employ of the Fifth Na- 
tional Bank of Cincinnati in the transit department, and 
was with that institution for five years. With this thor- 
ough metropolitan experience in banking he came to North 
Fork, West Virginia, in 1912 as clerk and bookkeeper for 
the First National Bank. He was soon promoted to as- 
sistant cashier, and since March, 1916, has been cashier. He 
is an able banker, a conservative business man, and is re- 
garded as one of the ablest citizens of his community. 

September 1, 1921, at Tazewell, Virginia, Mr. Creager 
married Miss Jane A. Thompson, whose father ia a promi- 
nent dentist of that place. 

WUiKiN B. Stevens, M. D. Considered either as a busi- 
ness man or professional man there are few individuals in 
McDowell County who have a broader and heavier program 
of responsibilities than Doctor Stevens, whose home is at 
Eckman. Doctor Stevens came into this locality a number 
of years ago as assistant to H. D. Hatfield, then chief sur- 
geon of Miners Hospital No. 1 at Welch. When Doctor 
Hatfield became governor of the State of West Virginia 
Doctor Stevens remained as his logical and well qualified 
successor, and he has since taken on numerous other duties. 
He is practically the ofiicial and unofficial head of all the 
medical and welfare activities of a large group of mining 
corporations, and is undoubtedly one of the most popular 
men with all classes in this section of the state. 

Doctor Stevens was born at Milltown, Alabama, May 14, 
1877, and his early life was in an environment where he 
was practically compelled to put forth his best efforts in 
order to secure preparation for the career he had chosen. 
His parents, Joseph H. and Martha Jane (Blackburn) 



24 



HISTOEY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



Stevens, were natives of Alabama, the former of English 
and the latter of German ancestry. Joseph H. Stevens was 
a farmer and cotton gin proprietor, and the latter indus- 
try was the chief support of his family. He was a very 
active member of the Christian Church. Wilkin B. Stevens 
acquired a common school education in Milltown, also at- 
tended the academy which took the place of a high school 
there. He was twelve years of age when his father died, 
and that threw upon his shoulders much of the work per- 
formed by his father, all of which he did in addition to 
going to school. He did all the bookkeejjing for the cotton 
gin. By the time he was twenty-one he had finished a 
course in the Milltown Academy, and the following year 
he operated the cotton gin. Out of his savings he entered, 
in 1899, the Maryland Medical College at Baltimore, and 
was graduated M. D. in 1904. The following eighteen 
months he was assistant to Doctor Gundry iu the Eelay 
Sanitarium near Baltimore. 

Prom there he came to Bramwell, West Virginia, to 
take up mining practice as assistant to Dr. W. E. Whitman 
in 1905. This work was in connection with the Booth 
Bowen Coal & Coke Company, Caswell Creek Coal & Coke 
Company, Buckeye Coal & Coke Company. On April 1, 1909, 
Doctor Stevens became assistant to Dr. H. D. Hatfield at 
Kimball. Doctor Hatfield was elected governor in 1912, 
and Doctor Stevens succeeded him in charge of all tlie work 
of the Pulaski Iron Company, Empire Coal & Coke Com- 
pany, Bottom Creek Coal & Coke Company, Tidewater Coal 
& Coke Company, Kink Coal Company, Cirrus Coal & Coke 
Company. In addition to this he has since been delegated 
the medical work of the Houston Coal & Coke Company, 
Keystone Coal & Coke Company, the Carswell operation of 
the Houston Colliery Company. He is now at the head of a 
well organized medical and surgical staff, with five assist- 
ants, and he has personal supervision of the medical work 
for all the various properties. He not only has charge of 
the practical work but the medical supplies for all the va- 
rious companies. 

Doctor Stevens is a director of the First National Bank 
of Keystone and is president of the First National Bank 
of Kimball. He was one of the organizers and the first 
president of the latter bank. He is a Scottish Rite Ma- 
son and Shriner, an Elk and a member of the Baptist 
Church. 

In Philadelphia in 1909 Doctor Stevens married Miss Bo- 
setta Barlow Davidson, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Hockinson) Davidson. Her parents were born in Penn- 
sylvania. Doctor and Mrs. Stevens have three children, 
Joseph Blackburn, Richard Wilkin and Ethel Jane. 

Hon. George A. Herold, of Cowen, is in 1922 representa- 
tive of Webster County in the House of Delegates of the 
West Virginia Legislature, and is one of the substantial 
business men and influential citizens of this section of the 
state, besides which his is the distinction of being a scion 
of one of the sterling pioneer families of that part of Vir- 
ginia that now constitutes the commonwealth of West Vir- 
ginia, the new state having not been formed until about a 
decade after his birth, which occurred on a farm in Nicho- 
las County, August 23, 1855. Mr. Herold is a son of An- 
derson C. and Talitha (McClung) Herold, the former of 
whom was born in Pocahontas County, in December, 1825, 
and the latter of whom likewise was born in what is now 
West Virginia, the year of her nativity having been 1827. 
After their marriage the parents established their residence 
on a pioneer farm in Nicholas County, on Muddlety Creek, 
and there the father developed one of the best farm prop- 
erties in the county, his substantial financial success having 
been furthered by raising and dealing in live stock. He 
was one of the honored and representative citizens of Nich- 
olas County at the time of his death, in March, 1914, and 
his widow passed away in 1921, when in her ninety-third 
year, both having been most zealous members and liberal 
supporters of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and 
Mr. Herold having been unwavering in his support of the 
cause of the democratic party. Of their six children the 
eldest is Lanty W., who is a prominent farmer in Nicholas 
County and who has served as a member of the County 



Court; John M. likewise is a representative farmer of that 
county, as is also Henry W., who has achieved marked suc- 
cess in the raising of live stock of superior types and who 
has served as sheriff of his native county; George A., of 
this review, was the next in order of birth; Fielding D. re- 
mains on the old homestead and is a successful agricultur- 
ist and stock-grower; and Charles P. is a substantial mer- 
chant and farmer at Muddlety in Nicholas County. 

George A. Herold was reared on the old homestead farm, 
and that he made good use of his early educational advan 
tages is shown in the fact that for ten years he was a suc- 
cessful and popular teacher in the free and the select schools 
of his native county. For six years he was engaged iu the 
general merchandise business at Hookersville, Nicholas 
County, as a member of the firm of Herold Brothers, and 
he then erected a store building at Herold, Braxton County, 
where he developed a prosperous mercantile enterprise, be- 
sides buying and shipping live stock and continuing his ac- 
tive association with farm industry. In the early '90s Mr. 
Herold disposed of his mercantile interests and removed 
to Webster County, where he has continued in the general 
merchandise business, besides which he is the owner of ii 
valuable landed estate of 3,000 acres, located in Webster, 
Braxton and Nicholas counties. He was for ten years 
president of the First National Bank at Webster Springs, 
the county seat, and gave six years of loj'al and progressive 
service as a member of the County Court. He has been an 
active factor in the councils and campaign work of the dem- 
ocratic party, and as a candidate on the party ticket he was 
elected representative of the county in the Lower House o( 
the State Legislature in the fall of 1920, his work in this 
connection having been marked by characteristic loyalty and 
by earnest promotion of wise legislation of constructive 
order. While a member of that law-making body he intro- 
duced the eugenics bill, health certificate before marriage, 
which carried in the House fifty-eight for, and twenty 
against. The Senate made a slight amendment ami voted 
solidly for it with the exception of one vote. The commit- 
tee on rules kept it off the special calendar before the lower 
body could concur with the Senate on the amendment until 
the Legislature closed, thereby defeating his bill. He is ex- 
ceptionally proud of having introduced that bill. Mr. Her- 
old and his wife are most zealous members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, to whose support he has been a lib- 
eral contributor, having given a donation of $1,000 to the 
Centenary Fund, and $2,000 to the Educational Fund. He 
has been specially prominent in Sunday school work for 
fully thirty years, during the major part of which period he 
has served as superintendent of the Sunday school. 

Mr. Herold chose as his wife Miss Lillie Viola Hill, daugh- 
ter of the late John Hill, of Nicholas County, and of the 
nine children of this union three are deceased: Rose P. is 
the wife of James N. Berthy, Jr. ; Walter H. was the next 
in order of birth and resides in Webster County; Mamie R. 
is the wife of Joseph McQueen; Ernest H. is married, and 
he and his wife maintain their home at Cowen; and Mary 
Louise and Ruth Virginia remain at the parental home. 

Harry E. Flesher, through almost half the life of the 
institution has- been superintendent of the West Virginia 
Industrial School for Boys at Pruntytown. He began teaching 
when a boy. 

The history of the school is sketched by Dr. Callahan else- 
where in this publication. However, it may be stated here 
that it was established by legislative act of 1889, and located 
at Pruntytown, Taylor County donating for the purpose, 
buildings and property that had formerly been used for the 
old county seat. The name Reform School was changed to 
the present title in 1913. The school was opened July 1, 
1890, and the successive superintendents have been C. C. 
Showalter, David Shaw, J. 0. Gluck, O. E. Darnall, and 
D. S. Hammond, who was succeeded in 1907 by Mr. Flesher, 
whose service covers a period of fifteen years. In recent years 
the state has pursued a more intelligent and liberal policy 
toward such institutions. Since Mr. Flesher became super- 
intendent the farm area has been increased from that of 
170 acres to two thousand, and the population of the school 
has almost doubled, it being now about four hundred. There 




-^£y(K ^ ^..^A-if^ 



3-l(^ 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



25 



IB a ten-month school, with graded courses of study, conducted 
by trained woman teachers. An appropriation of $100,000 
has been made available for a new central school building to 
be erected in 1923, and the construction of a superintendent's 
home makes available additional facilities for the boys. 
Farming is the primary industrial occupation of the school, 
but opportunities are being increased for mechanical training. 
There is no competition with free labor, except as it may come 
in the manufacture of material for state use. Nearly every- 
thing required by the boys is made in the school, including 
shoes, clothing, flour, plumbing, plastering and painting. 

Harry E. Flesher was born near the village of EUenboro, 
Ritchie County, March 28, 1872, and represents one of the 
very old families of the state. His great-great-grandfather, 
Henry Flesher, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and 
for his services located a grant of eight hundred acres of land 
in Lewis County. After settling there he was shot by Indians, 
but recovered. He was buried within what is now the city 
limits of Weston. He had numerous sons and daughters, the 
descent coming down through his son Adam and his grandson 
Isaac. Crayton Flesher, a son of Isaac and father of Superin- 
tendent Flesher, was one of four brothers who fought on the 
Union side in the Civil war, the others being Adam, Porter 
and Hamden. All survived except Hamden, who was killed 
in a battle in Pocahontas County, and his body now rests in 
the National Cemetery at Grafton. Crayton and his younger 
brother, Adam, as youths walked from Janelew to Parkers- 
burg, where the former apprenticed himself as a carpenter 
and the latter as a saddler and harness-maker. They were 
journeymen at their trades when the Civil war came on. 
After the war Crayton Flesher was a farmer, merchant and 
building contractor in Ritchie County, and died in 1879. 
He married Harriet R. Taylor, daughter of J. T. Taylor, of 
Pleasants County, and she is still living at Williamstown. 
Her six sons were: Clinton W., an attorney at Gassaway, 
West Virginia; Harry E.; Thornton E., a farmer near Marietta 
Ohio; Forest F., in the oil fields of Louisiana; Okey J., con- 
nected with the automobile industry at Jackson, Michigan; 
and Crayton O., who was drowned when a young man. 

Harry E. Flesher was about seven years old when his 
father died, and he had to develop a sense of personal respon- 
sibility very young. He had little more than a common- 
school education himself when he taught his first term of 
country school at the age of fifteen, and he continued teaching 
while attending the Fairmont State Normal School, and 
sometime after completing his work there was formally grad- 
uated in 1897. From rural schools he took charge as principal 
of the high school at Keyser for eight years, and for two years 
was superintendent of schools at Kingwood, just prior to 
becoming superintendent of the state institution at Prunty- 
town. 

He is a republican voter without participation in politics, 
is a Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, a past noble grand of 
the Odd Fellows and past chancellor of the Knights of 
Pythias, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
He presides at all the church, Sabbath School and chapel 
lervices at the school. February 13, 1912, in Middlesex 
County, Virginia, he married Miss Martha Johnston Glenn, 
who was born and reared in that county, daughter of Richard 
M. and Ann Maria (Blake) Glenn. The children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Flesher are: Martha Glenn, born in 1913; Harry Edgar, 
born in 1914; Bettye Games, born in 1917; and James Lakin, 
born October 15, 1921. 

Walter Elbbbt Leach, county superintendent of schools 
n Taylor County, made a conscious choice of educational 
vork early in his career, and in a measure was directed into 
.hat vocation through traditions of learning and schools 
nherent in his family. Mr. Leach has been identified with 
he educational activities of Taylor County now for nearly 
twenty years. 

He was born in Pleasant District, Barbour County, Jan- 
lary 16, 1884. The Leach family belongs to a period of 
>ioneering in the Shenandoah Valley of old Virginia. Grand- 
ather Enoch Leach left that valley and moved to Taylor 
!3ounty, West Virginia, was a farmer, possessed a fair educa- 
ion, and died in Calhoun County of that state. He reared 
wo sons and four daughters. His son Elias Leach was eight 



years old when the family came to West Virginia and he 
served three years as a Union soldier, enlisting in Barbour 
County in the 17th West Virginia Infantry. He received 
promotion while in the army to captain. After the war he 
devoted his life to his farm, and died in 1911, at the age of 
seventy-four. He had served as a member of the County 
Board of Education, was a stanch republican, and member 
of the Methodist Church. He married Cinderella Gall, whose 
people were among the first settlers of Barbour County, their 
home being near Philippi, on farms. Mrs. Elias Leach is 
living at Webster, West Virginia. She was the mother of 
nine children, seven of whom reached mature years and five 
are living: Mrs. Margaret Felton, of Taylor County; Mrs. 
Ehzabeth A. McNemar, of Taylor County; Mollie B., wife of 
Floyd Talbott, of Berryburg, West Virginia; Hollis D., of 
Wendel; and Walter E. 

Walter E. Leach spent his boyhood near the hamlet of 
Pleasant Creek, and in the intervals of school attendance 
worked on the farm. He completed a high school course in 
Grafton and at the age of twenty-one began teaching in the 
country districts of Taylor County, and later attended the 
FairmontNormal School. From 1905 he kept steadily at his 
work in the schoolroom until elected county superintendent, 
and in that time had been principal of schools in the com- 
munities of Simpson, Wendel and Webster. On his highly 
creditable record as an individual school administrator he 
made his race for office in 1918. He was nominated at the 
republican primaries and elected as successor of Roy J. 
Martin, taking office in July, 1919. 

Mr. Leach began his administration with a substantial 
program for the securing of better buildings and better school 
equipment, and since then four new buildings have been 
erected and completely equipped. He has insisted upon 
teachers following out the course of studies adopted by the 
State Board of Education, has striven for better physical 
conditions, for better qualifications of teachers, and has done 
something toward encouraging common school graduates to 
continue their work in high school. Numerous teachers meet- 
ings are held for the discussion of practical subjects, and 
through two extension classes opportunities have been pro- 
vided for the teacher to advance and improve and prepare 
for credits in the State Normal Schools. Mr. Leach is a 
thorough school man, and the subject of education is at once 
his vocation and his hobby. 

He is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America, the 
Loyal Order of Moose, and he has been a member of the 
board of the Methodist Episcopal Church, his wife being also 
a Methodist. December 31, 1905, in Taylor County, he 
married Miss Emma B. Haddix, a native of Barbour County, 
and daughter of John W. and Savanna (Keller) Haddix. 
Mrs. Leach graduated from high school in her native county, 
and after attending the Fairmont State Normal School began 
teaching and is still carrying some work as an educator in 
Taylor County. Mr. and Mrs. Leach have two children, 
Wauldron Dowden and Blaine Harold. 

Clotd M. Crane, representing one of the oldest and best 
known families of Preston County, has given his best years 
to commercial work, chiefly as a commercial salesman, and 
as such he is known all over an extensive territory adjacent to 
the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. Mr. Crane lives at Terra 
Alta and is proprietor of the Highland Cottage, one of the 
much frequented summer homes of the mountain city. 

Mr. Crane was born about three miles from Albright, upon 
the mountain, June 21, 1868, son of John Calvin Crane, one of 
the successful farmers and stockmen of that region. Cloyd M. 
Crane is a brother of Frank Crane, of Albright, and under his 
name more of the particulars are given concerning this family 
in Preston County from the beginning of its settlement. 

Cloyd M. Crane left the farm at the age of seventeen, after 
having acquired a public school education, and after teaching 
a term of country school near Albright he became a clerk at 
Bruceton Mills for Isaac Armstrong & Son. A short time 
later he returned to Albright and with James Posten bought a 
general merchandise store. He continued this business for 
two years and then established another store at Elkins of the 
sam* character. Finally the Albright store was burned, and 
after disposing of the plant at Elkins Cloyd M. Crane became 



26 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



manager of a company store at Terra Alta. Later he went 
into Randolph County, where he was store manager for the 
McClure-Mabie Company, then for their successors, the 
Whitmer-Lane Lumber Company. It was from this service 
that Mr. Crane graduated into his career as a commercial 
salesman on the road. For two years he represented the 
Piedmont Grocery Company, opening up new territory along 
the Baltimore & Ohio between Piedmont and Grafton. Dur- 
ing that time he was under the management of the well known 
sales manager M. J. Crooks. Leaving that firm Mr. Crane 
returned to Terra Alta, and from this point travelled on the 
road for the Pugh & Beaver Grocery Company until their 
Terra Alta house was sold to the Whittaker Grocery Com- 
pany, and since then he has been one of the leaders on the 
sales force of that company. 

For a number of years Mr. Crane has found both pleasure 
and profit in the business of accommodating the tourist 
traffic at Terra Alta. He has a generous home on top of the 
mountain, where he opened his doors to the friends and 
acquaintances who sought this beautiful spot for their summer 
vacations. Highland Cottage was built by William Kolk- 
horst, but he failed in the enterprize, and Mr. Crane bought 
the uncompleted property, finished it and at times has en- 
larged it until the home and surrounding cottages now afford 
accommodations for seventy-five guests. The season here 
opens in June and continues until Labor Day. 

Mr. Crane grew up in a republican home, cast his first 
presidential ballot for Benjamin Harrison, and has worked for 
his party without an undue degree of partisanship or exhaust- 
ing himself as a campaigner. In 1912 he was nominated and 
elected to the House of Delegates, and in the session beginning 
in January, 1913, he was under Speaker George and his house 
colleague was Senator Cobun of Masontown. He was made 
chairman of one committee, was a member of the labor com- 
mittee and was particularly interested in securing the election 
of a man from his section of the state for the United States 
Senate and also in securing some legislation upon the hotel 
question, and concerning the prohibition law of the state. 
Mr. Crane, to the best of his judgment, performed his duties 
for one term, and that satisfied his aspirations as a legislator. 
He was reared a Methodist, and is president of the Board of 
Trustees of the Terra Alta Church. He is affiliated with the 
Masonic Lodge and Chapter, the Commercial Travelers and 
several other fraternal orders. 

In Preston County Mr. Crane married Miss Lena Feather, 
daughter of Michael E. and Mary (Albright) Feather, both 
representing some of the prominent family names of Preston 
County. Her maternal grandfather was Michael Albright. 
Mrs. Crane was born near Cranesville, one of three children, 
the other two being Bert C. Feather, of Pittsburgh, and Pearl, 
wife of Ed Harner, a farmer near Greensburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Mr. and Mrs. Crane have two accomplished daughters. 
Jessie is the wife of Russell L. Smith, of Pittsburgh and has 
two children, Billie and Barbara Lee. Miss Willard Crane is 
a graduate of the Pittsburgh College for Women and is a 
teacher in a private school at Stamford, Connecticut. 

William Hubert Pentont. The people of Tunnelton 
know and respect William H. Pentony for the industry and 
faithfulness that have carried him through younger years of 
considerable struggle, for the success he has made as a mer- 
chant and business man, and his true citizenship at all times. 

Mr. Pentony was born in Lyon District of Preston County, 
between Reedsville and Gladesville, March 28, 1875. His 
father, Thomas Pentony, was born in Ireland in 1842. As a 
young man he came to the United States, and in Preston 
County he married Matilda Jane Snider, whom he first met in 
Pennsylvania. Her parents were John S. and Susan (Fast) 
Snider, the former a farmer in West Virginia who lived in 
Taylor County until moving to the Lyon District of Preston 
County. Thomas Pentony died in 1898 and his widow on 
January 1, 1921. Of their children the only two now living 
are William H. and Lena, the latter the wife of Luther Helms, 
of Birds Creek, or Irish Ridge, Preston County. 

William H. Pentony spent his early youth on the home 
farm and left there at the age of seventeen with only a com- 
mon school education. Away from the farm his first employ- 
ment was with the Watson Coal Company. For four years he 
was employed by that and other mining companies in the 



vicinity of Fairmont. Day labor furnished him a wage of a 
dollar and a quarter a day, and in 1898 he returned to Tunnel- 
ton, still depending upon day wages and frequently working 
for $1.15 per day. For one year he was also one of the 
proprietors of a livery business. For ten years Mr. Pentony 
continued as a worker in the local mines and in 1909 became 
associated with A. H. Halbritter, under the firm name of 
Halbritter & Company, and they bought the mercantile 
business of T. R. Shay. In April, 1917, Mr. Halbritter retired 
and since then Mr. Pentony has been the sole proprietor of 
what is now a very prosperous and well stocked establishment, 
one that has been developed from a small enterprise, its suc- 
cess being chiefly due to Mr. Pentony's concentrated energies 
as a merchant and his personal integrity. Mr. Pentony 
acquired his original capital for this business by borrowing a 
thousand dollars on some property he owned. That was his 
only source of credit. He has improved the corner where his 
business is located, is now one of the stockholders of the 
Tunnelton Bank, also a director in the same, was one of the 
organizers of the Raccoon Valley Coal Company, and he 
owns farming land in Lyon District, including part of the 
place where he was born and reared, and owns one of the best 
pieces of residence property in Tunnelton. He is also a stock- 
holder in the Glass Casket Company at Altoona, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Through his property management and business Mr. 
Pentony has contributed his services in a public way to the 
development of Tunnelton. He has not been in politics for 
office but some years ago, during the coal miners strike, he 
consented to serve as chief of police, and rendered valuable 
service in combating the general disorder that prevailed for a 
time. He is a stanch democrat, cast his first presidential vote 
a quarter of a century ago, and has attended congressional 
conventions. He helped nominate Junior Brown for Congress, 
and he was the first democrat to .represent this district since 
the days of Willis L. Wilson. Mr. Pentony is a charter mem- 
ber of Tunnelton Lodge, Knights of Pythias, and during the 
twenty-one years since its organization he has missed only 
two meeting nights when possible to be there. He is also 
affiliated with Aurora Lodge, No. 43, F. & A. M., at New- 
burg, has taken the Perfection degree in Clarksburg, and the 
other Scottish Rite degrees at Wheeling. 

At Tunnelton in April, 1903. Mr. Pentony married Miss 
Irma Maud Ashby, who was born at Austen, Preston County, 
August 15, 1883, daughter of Frank and Elizabeth (May) 
Ashby. Her parents were born near Fellowsville, Preston 
County, and her father was a Union soldier with a West 
Virginia regiment and was wounded while on duty. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Ashby were: Delia, who married 
Henry Wright and is deceased; Minnie, wife of Clinton 
Stevens, of Hiora, West Virginia; William D. and Albert R., 
of Tunnelton; Pearl, who died in young manhood; Charles, of 
Hiora; Mrs. Pentony; and Elizabeth, wife of H. D. Zinn, of 
Tunnelton. 

Mrs. Pentony was reared at Austen, Newburg and Tunnel- 
ton and acquired a public school education. Their home 
circle of children comprise six: Hilda Vivian, a student in the 
State University of West Virginia; Justus M., a sophomore, 
and Thelma C, a freshman, in the Tunnelton High School; 
Thomas D., John F. and Blanche Eleanor. 

Joseph Frank Smith, who is more familiarly known by 
his second personal name, is successfully conducting a hotel 
in the Village of Cowen, Webster County, and is also the 
owner and operator of a well improved farm in this local- 
ity. He was born in Pleasants County, West Virginia, 
August 4, 1866, and is a son of George L. and Margaret 
E. (Frink) Smith, both natives of what is now Preston 
County, this state, where the former was born in 1842 and 
the latter in 1841, each having been reared on a pioneer 
farm in that county. After their marriage the parents re- 
mained on a farm in Preston County until their removal to 
Pleasants County, where George L. Smith purchased a farm,' 
and he and his wife passed the remainder of their lives on 
this homestead, he having accumulated and developed a val- 
uable farm estate of 285 acres and his prosperity having 
represented the results of his own energetic and well or- 
dered activities. He and his wife were zealous members 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



27 



)f the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he was specially 
ictive in the work of its Sunday school. Mr. Smith was a 
italwart republican in politics, and was loyal and public- 
ipirited as a citizen, he having served as a member of the 
ichool board of his district. He survived his wife by many 
fears and was about fifty-six years of age at the time of 
lis death. Of their seven children there are living at the 
ime of tliis writing, in the spring of 1922: Joseph F., of 
his sketch, the youngest of the number; William H., a 
prosperous farmer near Cleveland, Ohio; and Mary, who is 
.he widow of James Riggs and resides at St. Marys, Pleas- 
mts County, West Virginia. All of the other children at- 
;ained to maturity. 

The home farm on which he was bom was the stage of 
;he youthful activities of Joseph Frank Smith, and his early 
iducational discipline included that of the high school at 
3t. ]SIarys. He initiated his independent career when he 
mas but sixteen years of age. He was employed in connec- 
tion with the construction of the railroad line from Parkers- 
5urg to Kenova, where he served as superintendent of the 
vork, and he continued his association with this line of 
•ailroad development about eight years. He purchased a 
ot in Buckhannon, erected a house on the same and finally 
!old the property at a distinct profit. After severing his 
;onnection with railroad construction he purchased the 
Summit Hotel at Cowen, and later he purchased a tract of 
imber land. He cut and manufactured the timber on this 
and, made development on the tract and eventually sold 
■,he same for farm usages, his financial returns from the va- 
•ious activities and the sale having been very appreciable. 
Ee is now the owner of the oldest farm in this section of 
;he county, and has made the same one of the model places 
)f this part of the state, the while he has here become a 
eader in the breeding and raising of Hereford cattle, im- 
proved Duroc-Jersey hogs, Shropshire sheep and White Leg- 
lorn poultry. His landed estate in Webster County com- 
irises 300 acres. His original hotel at Cowen was destroyed 
Dy fire, and he then purchased the Central Hotel, which he 
las since successfully conducted. In connection with farm 
industry and business activities Mr. Smith has gtood expo- 
lent of progressiveness, and the same may be said of his 
ittitude as a citizen, for he is always ready to lend co- 
jperation in the furtherance of measures and enterprises 
projected for the general good of the community. 

Mr. Smith has had much of leadership in connection with 
ihe councils and campaign activities of the republican 
Darty in Webster County, and has served as chairman of 
its executive committee for this county. When he was made 
the party nominee for county sheriff he was defeated by 
jnly thirty-two votes, in a county that at that time gave a 
normal democratic ma.i'ority of 400 votes. In the Masonic 
fraternitv Mr. Smith is affiliated with Camden Lodge No. 
107, A. F. and A. M.; Sutton Chapter No. 29, R. A. M. ; 
Sutton Commandery No. 16, Knights Templars; and Osiris 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine in the City of Wheeling. 

In 15(94 Mr. Smith wedded Miss Dora E. Vance, who was 
reared and educated in Webster County. They have three 
i-hildren: Hosea A. is a graduate of the University of West 
Virsinia ; Ruth K. graduated from the State Normal School 
at Fairmont, and is, in 1922, in the extension department of 
agriculture in connection with the University of West Vir- 
ginia 3t Morgantown; and Joseph F., Jr., is a student in 
Augusta Military Academy at Fort Defiance, Virginia. Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith are active members of the Methodist Epis- 
conal Church, of which he is serving as a member of the 
official board. 

MorTNDSviLLE PUBLIC LiBRART. The Moundsville Public 
jibrary is an institution of which the progressive little City of 
Houndsville. Marshall County, is justly proud. It was estab- 
ished in 1917 by the Teachers' Club, under the leadership of 
tfrs. Frank T. Fulton, to whose initiative and zealous efforts, 
a an organizer and later as president of the Library Board, 
he success of the institution is largely due. 

In addition to the Teachers' Club various other organiza- 
ions have eciven moral and financial aid to the library, espe- 
ially the Woman's Club and the Tuesday Arts Club, both of 
rhich have made annual donations to the institution from its 



inception, and are still lending their support, the Woman's 
Club being the first organization in the city to promise en- 
couragement and a definite sum to the promoters. 

Through the efforts of the Library Board several hundred 
dollars have been subscribed annually by generous citizens, 
these last mentioned donations making by far the most im- 
portant source of income to supplement the fund raised by a 
city tax levy which is now imposed for library purposes. 

The library now has a collection of 3,000 volumes, in the 
assortment of which especial attention is given to the needs of 
young people, while the general service is of excellent order. 
Mrs. Ida Hankins is the loyal and efficient librarian, ever 
working to make the library play its proper part in the com- 
munity life of the city. The library is open daily from 2:30 
to 9 P. M., and is the center of much of the cultural life of 
Moundsville and Marshall County. 

Rev. William Gottlob Ulfert. As head of one of the 
large congregations in Wheeling and the examplar of exalted 
ideas of Christianity, perhaps no one has done more in a con- 
structive way in organizing and promoting the essential in- 
fluences of the Christian Church in that city than Rev. Mr. 
Ulfert, pastor of St. John's Evangelical Protestant Church. 

Rev. Mr. Ulfert was born at Landsberg, Brandenburg, 
Germany, May 18, 1854, son of William G. and Ida (Wilski) 
Ulfert. His father died in Germany in 1888, and his mother 
at the age of eighty-two. William Gottlob Ulfert had a 
broad and liberal training, attending college at Landsberg. 
and at the age of twenty-four graduated from the University 
of Berlin, where he studied theology, philology and oriental 
languages. For one year he was a private preceptor on the 
island of Rugen, and he also taught a year in his home 
college at Landsberg. 

In 1880 Rev. Mr. Ulfert came to the United States and on 
May 22, 1880, was ordained as an Evangelical minister. In 
August of that year he took his first pastorate at Aetna, 
Pennsylvania, and on November 1, 1884, was installed as 
pastor of St. John's Evangelical Protestant Church at 
Wheeling. His ministry here is now approaching its fortieth 
anniversary, and these four decades have represented a re- 
markable progress and material prosperity in the church and 
constant and unremitting duties on the part of the pastor, 
whose life has been to a singular degree a great consecration 
to the ministry of service. 

St. John's Church is an historic institution of Wheeling. 
Some of the old German settlers of that city organized it in 
1835, the first services being held in North Wheeling. In 1836 
the building on Eighteenth, near Jacob Street was erected 
and was in use until 1869. This old building is still standing, 
now being used as a mission house for the First Presbyterian 
Church. In 1871 their church on the site of the present 
Baltimore & Ohio passenger station was finished, and was the 
home of the congregation just forty years. When they gave 
up this place of worship at the request of the railroad com- 
pany, ground was secured at the northwest corner of Chapline 
and "Twenty-second streets, where the beautiful new church 
and parsonage were erected at a cost of $120,000.00. The 
church auditorium has a seating capacity of six hundred, and 
there are also suitable office, choir, Sunday School and lecture 
rooms, and ample kitchen and dining room facilities in the 
basement. The auditorium is handsomely and richly 
furnished, containing beautiful memorial windows. The 
services of the church alternate in the English and German 
languages. Many of the elders of the congregation still 
prefer to listen to God's word associated with the recollec- 
tions of their youth. The greater part of the active members 
today are descendants of the original congregation. In 
1884, when Rev. Mr. Ulfert became pastor, the congregation 
was comparatively weak in numbers, but for a number of 
years past it has been one of the strongest congregations in 
the city. Its communicants now represent 550 families, 
besides about 200 single persons not included in the family 
enumeration. The loyalty of the membership is a source 
of constant inspiration to the pastor. One of the prominent 
ministers of Pittsburgh, Rev. William K. Geese, received 
his early religious training as a boy in St. John's Church. 

Rev. Mr. Ulfert is an honored member of the Evangelical 
Protestant Church of North America, affiliating with the 
branch having headquarters at Pittsburgh. He is a thirty- 



28 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



second degree Scottish Rite Mason and is chaplain of Wheeling 
Lodge No. 5, F. & A. M. 

January 18, 1883, he married Miss Marie Heinrici, who 
came to Wheeling as a child with her parents. Rev. Charles 
and Emma Heinrici. Her father for some years was pastor 
of St. Paul's Church in Wheeling. Mr. and Mrs. Ulfert 
have two children: William Karl Ulfert, a Wheeling physician 
and surgeon, and Martha, wife of Dr. William Elmer Hodgson, 
of McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 

James Henry Bowman grew up in the industrial life of 
the Wheeling District, as a boy was a glass worker, and is 
now engineer of the Wheeling Corrugating Department of 
the Whitaker-Glessner Company. 

Mr. Bowman was born at Wheeling January 25, 1888. 
James Bowman, his father, was born near Greggsville in 
Ohio County, West Virginia, in 1839, and has spent all his 
active life as a coal miner. He retired in 1917 and since 
1889 his home has been at Bridgeport, Ohio, across the river 
from Wheeling. He is an independent in politics and is a 
loyal and faithful member of the Church of God. James 
Bowman married Susan Ann Peyton, who was born in West 
Virginia. They became the parents of eight children. 
Jessie, the oldest, is the wife of John Dunfee, lives at Bridge- 
port and has a daughter, Ethel, born in 1904. The second 
child, Atha Virginia, was first married to Everett J. Stead, 
by whom she has a daughter, Virginia, born in 1911, and she 
is now the wife of John Roberts and lives at Cleveland, 
Ohio. The third of the family is James Henry Bowman. 
The fourth, John, a hot mill worker living at Bridgeport, 
married Catherine Burgman, and their three children are, 
Elaine, Ruth and John. Mina, is the wife of Ralph Roan, 
chief draughtsman for the General Electric Company at 
Huntington, West Virginia, and their three children are 
Donnas, Theoan and Theodore. Glenna, the sixth child, 
is the wife of Albert Prince, but has no children. The two 
youngest of the family, both unmarried and at home, are 
Andrew, chief clerk in the Construction Department of the 
Whitaker-Glessner Company, and Mabel, cashier of the 
Better Store at Wheeling. 

James Henry Bowman acquired his education at Bridge- 
port, completing the sophomore year in the high school 
there. At the age of twelve he began working during the 
summer vacations in the Crystal Glass factory at Bridge- 
port. When he left high school, at the age of fourteen, he 
continued steady employment in this glass factory until he 
was eighteen, becoming an expert in the trade. As a means 
of self advancement he has completed and received two 
diplomas for engineering courses with the International 
Correspondence School of Scranton, Pennsylvania, and also 
completed a course of business management with the same 
school. In 1906 Mr. Bowman entered the employ of the 
American Sheet and Tin Plate Company, the Etna Works 
at Bridgeport, and for eighteen months was employed in 
matching and pair heating. For about a year he was with 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company as car repairer, 
brakeman and fireman. From July, 1909, to March 1910, 
he was with the Imperial Glass House at Bellaire. At the 
latter date Mr. Bowman entered the service of the Whitaker- 
Glessner Company as tracer in the engineering department, 
and since September 22, 1919, has been engineer of the 
Wheeling Corrugating Department. His official duties 
are with the Wheeling plant at the east end of Seventeenth 
Street. 

Mr. Bowman is a republican, a Presbyterian, is affiliated 
with Bridgeport Lodge No. 181, F. & A. M., and also with 
Penny Tent, Knights of the Maccabees. He is a stock- 
holder in the Bridgeport Savings & Loan Company, and he 
owns a home at 611 Main Street there. 

December 14, 1911, at Bridgeport, Mr. Bowman married 
Miss Neva Jane Burke, daughter of Frank and May (Pool) 
Burke. Her mother lives at Bridgeport. Her father was 
a police officer in that city and was accidently killed by a 
freight train in 1912. Mr. and Mrs. Bowman have two 
children: Eleanor Marie, born July 19, 1915, and Richard 
Thomas, born September 28, 1918. 

Gborqb Talbott Buchanan is postmaster of Wellsburg, 
having been assistant postmaster under his father, the late 



Talbott H. Buchanan. Four generations of the Buchana 
family have been represented in the Northern Panhandl 
of West Virginia. 

They are Scotch Highlanders, Robert Buchanan comin 
here and locating on a farm in Brooke County when his so 
Robert, grandfather of the Wellsburg postmaster, was a la( 
They acquired land in Independence Township, and Robei 
lived there until his death at the age of seventy. His so 
Thomas lived out his life on the same farm. Talbott K 
Buchanan was born on the old homestead in 1864, and i 
was his home until he sold the place in the early '80s an 
moved to Wellsburg. Here he was in the wholesale grocer 
business under the firm name of Brown and Buchanan unt 
the death of Mr. Brown about 1895. Soon afterwardii 
Talbott H. Buchanan became deputy sheriff. He wa 
deputy at the time of the noted trial of Van Baker. Bake 
was the first man ever sentenced to life imprisonment fror 
Brooke County. Later Talbott H. Buchanan engaged i 
the insurance business, and soon after the election of Presiden 
Wilson was appointed postmaster of Wellsburg and fille 
that office until his death on Easter Sunday, 1917. Th 
site of the present Post Office was secured during his admin 
istration. He was a vestryman and warden of Christ 
Episcopal Church, and his widow is very active in churc 
affairs. He married Julia Burley of Moundsville, also c 
an old Scotch family prominently connected with othe 
West Virginia families. She is living in her fiftieth year. 

George Talbott Buchanan, only child of his parents, wa 
born at Wellsburg May 28, 1890. He acquired a pubH 
school education, and was about twenty-three years of ag 
when he became assistant postmaster under his father. Hi 
father was succeeded by Henry Zilliken, who died on ChrisI 
mas Day, 1917, and in May, 1918, George T. Buchanan wa 
appointed his successor, receiving his commission unde 
Wilson's second administration. The Wellsburg Post Offic 
building was completed ready for occupancy in Decembei 
1916, costing about $80,000.00. The appropriation for th 
Federal Building at Wellsburg was secured while the lat 
W. P. Hubbard was in Congress. The Post Office ha' 
fifteen employes, with four rural carriers. Mr. Buchana 
is also official custodian of the building. Soon after hi 
appointment as postmaster he was called to the colors, o 
August 3, 1918, and was in service at Camp Lee and For 
Moultrie, South Carolina. He had an active part in all Ih 
loan drives, though the Victory Loan was made while li 
was in the army. His office well upheld its share of respoii 
sibility in the sale of stamps. 

July 23, 1919, Mr. Buchanan married Jane Simpsor 
She was born at Pittsburgh, but as a child was taken to Han 
ilton, Canada, where her father, George A. Simpson, for 
number of years has been sales manager for the Canadia 
Steel Company. Mrs. Buchanan is an active member c 
church and social clubs at Wellsburg. Mr. Buchanan is 
past master of Wellsburg Lodge No. 2, F. and A. M., i 
affiliated with West Virginia Consistory No. 1 of the Scottis 
Rite, Osiris Temple of the Mystic Shrine and a member c 
the local team of nine members doing the work of two c 
the degrees of the Scottish Rite. He is a vestryman an^ 
treasurer of Christ Episcopal Church. 

Ori.o a. LUCA.S is the vice president and general manaj^c 
of tlie Fulton Manufacturing Company, which conducts on 
of the leading industrial enterprises at Riehwood, Nichola 
County. He was born at Morley, Michigan, October 1 'i 
1888, and is a son of Alexander and Ida J. (Dodge) Lina^ 
both likewise natives of Michigan, where the former iv;i 
born at Carlton Center, Barry County, September 6, IS.'if 
and the latter, at Saginaw, December 21, 1865, the res|'ci: 
five families having been founded in the Wolverine Stat 
in the pioneer period of its history. Alexander Lucas, 
son of Thomas and Sarah Lucas, was reared on a pionee 
Michigan farm, and as a youth he became identified wit 
railroad operations, with which he continued to be active! 
associated for a period of twenty-three years. He the 
engaged in farm enterprise in an independent way, an. 
since his retirement he and his wife have maintained thei 
home in the beautiful little City of Coldwater, judicial cen 
ter of Branch County, Michigan, where his wife is an eai 




C/,C^, ^C^--«-«:^-««-<j^ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



29 



nest member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Of their 
four children the first born, Myron H., is deceased; Orlo A. 
of this sketch, was the next in order of birth; Miss Eeva c! 
remains at the paternal home; and Lester M. is, in 1922 
a student in the University of Michigan. ' 

In the public schools of Michigan Orlo A. Lucas contin- 
ued his studies until his graduation from the high school, 
and thereafter he continued his residence in his native state 
until July, 1905, when he established his residence at Kich- 
wood, "West Virginia, where he became a stockholder and 
office executive of the Fulton Manufacturing Company, of 
which he is now vice president and general manager, his 
experience in this connection having covered the various 
practical details of the manufacturing. H. H. Steele is 
president of the company, and W. B. Headley is its secretary 
and treasurer. The board of directors includes the execu- 
tive officers and also Mrs. H. H. Steele and Herbert J 
Beadle. 

Mr. Lucas is actively affiliated with the Masonic f rater- 
aity, in which he is a member of Kichwood Lodge No. 122 
A.. i\ and A. M.; Richwood Chapter No. 37, E. A. M • Sut- 
;on Commandery No. 16, Knights Templars; Beni-Kedem 
remple. Mystic Shrine, in the City of Charleston; and the 
West Virginia Consistory of the Scottish Kite at Wheeling, 
u which he has received the thirty-second degree. He is a 
jast noble grand of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
md IS a republican in political proclivities. His wife holds 
nembership in the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Lucas married Miss Mary S. Meadows, of Richwood, 
md they have two sons, C. Arnett and John E. 

Harry G. Camper, M. B., initiated the practice of his 
)rofessiou by becoming a member of the medical and sur- 
rical staff of the miners' hospital that is now West Vir- 
tinia St^te Hospital No. 1 at Welch, McDowell County, 
le continued his effective service as house surgeon at this 
lospital for a period of two years, and then engaged in the 
;eneral practice of his profession at Welch, where he has 
eveloped a professional business and established a reputa- 
lon that mark him as one of the representative physicians 
nd surgeons of McDowell County. In 1912 he graduated 
rom the Baltimore Medical CoUege, which is now the medi- 
al department of the University of Maryland, and after 
tus receiving his degree of Doctor of Medicine he soon 
ame to Welch, as noted above. He has taken post-gradu- 
te courses in the medical schools of the University of 
'enusylvania, Johns Hopkins University and the University 
f Maryland, and while thus at the University of Pennsyl- 
ania he devoted his entire time to the study of anatomy, 
fe is a specially skilled and resourceful surgeon and gives 
pecial attention to surgical practice. He is serving in 
921-2 as county coroner and as a member of the West Vir- 
inia State Board of Medical Examiners. The doctor keeps 
illy in line with the advances made in medical and sur- 
ical science, is a close student and is affiliated with the 
merican Medical Association, the Southern Medical Asso- 
dtion, the West Virginia State Medical Society and the 
icDowell County Medical Society. He is a Knight Tem- 
lar and Scottish Kite Mason, and is affiliated also with the 
cal lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
oth he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
hurch. Doctor Camper is recognized as one of the lead- 
g surgeons of this part of the state, and his private offices 
•e the best equipped in McDowell County. 
At Norfolk, Virginia, in 1914, Doctor Camper was united 

marriage to Miss Lena Harrell, daughter of J. J. and 
llzabeth Harrell, both natives of North Carolina. Doe- 
r and Mrs. Camper have no children. 
Of English and German lineage. Doctor Camper was born 

Salem, Virginia, June 29, 1884, and is a son of John H. 
id Mary Elizabeth (Morgan) Camper, the former a native 

Virginia and the latter of what is now West Virginia, 
ihu H. Camper, a scion of a family early founded in Vir- 
nia, became a successful farmer and merchant, served as 
unty magistrate and was influential in community affairs 

Salem, Virginia, where he continued his residence until 
J death. He was a zealous member of the Presbyterian 
lurch, as was also his wife. He was a captain in the 



Eleventh Virginia Regiment of the Confederate service in 
the Civil war, took part in many engagements, was severely 
wounded in one of his knees, an injury from which he never 
fully recovered, and after being captured he was held a 
prisoner of war at Washington, D. C, and at Johnson's 
Island in Lake Erie. In later years he vitalized his inter- 
est in his old comrades by means of his active affiliation 
with the United Confederate Veterans. 

Doctor Camper continued his studies in the public schools 
of Salem, Virginia, until he had profited fully by the ad- 
vantages of the high school, and he then entered medical 
college, as recorded in a preceding paragraph. Of his ca- 
reer since that time adequate outline has already been en- 
tered in this review. 

Gut E. Mastin has found in his native county ample 
opportunity for the achieving of worthy success and pres- 
tige in connection with business enterprise of important 
order, and is the efficient cashier of the Virginia Bank of 
Commerce, one of the leading financial institutions in the 
City of Princeton, Mercer County. He was born in this 
county on the 15th of April, 1886, and is a son of William 
E. and Louisa N. (Karnes) Mastin, the former of whom 
was born in North Carolina and the latter in Mercer County, 
West Virginia, where the Karnes family has long been one 
of prominence. William E. Mastin was not only a suc- 
cessful farmer, but he gave fifty-three years of most effec- 
tive service as a teacher in the public schools. During the 
entire period of the Civil war he was in the mail service of 
the Confederate government. His commission as a maU 
carrier is retained by his son Guy E., who values the same 
as a family and historic heirloom. His service as a carrier 
of mail was attended by much danger and hardship inci- 
dental to the war, and he made a remarkable record of 
faithful and successful service. He was eighty-two years 
of age at the time of his death, and his wife survived 
him six years. His father and grandfather were natives 
of Ireland, and after coming to America the grandfather 
served as a soldier not only in the War of the Revolution 
but also the War of 1812. 

Guy E. Mastin attended the public schools of Mercer 
County until he was fourteen years old, when he became 
clerk in a general store. After serving four years in this 
capacity he assumed a clerical position in the Princeton 
Post Office, in which he eventually won promotion to the 
position of assistant postmaster. He continued his con- 
nection with the Post Office for a total period of fourteen 
years and then, in 1917, became cashier of the Virginia 
Bank of Commerce, in which office his personal popularity 
and executive ability have been potent in furthering the 
upbuilding of the institution. He is affiliated with the 
Knights of Pythias and the Loyal Order of Moose, is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and his 
wife holds membership in the Presbyterian Church. Her 
father. Rev. R. E. Redding is now pastor of the Presby- 
terian Church at Ocean, Virginia. 

In 1911 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Mastin and 
Miss Fannie Redding, then a resident of Greenbrier County, 
West Virginia, and they have two children, Naomi and 
Frances. 

Statements already made in this context show that Mr. 
Mastin is eligible for affiliation with the Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, and in connection with th< 
service of his paternal great-grandfather as a Revolution- 
ary soldier it is interesting to record that that doughty war- 
rior was in the same boat with General Washington in the 
historic crossing of the Delaware River. The father of 
Mr. Mastin served as a fifer in the Mexican war. 

Mrs. Charlotte M. Evans, a resident of the Pruntytown 
fommunity of Taylor County, represents three prominent 
camily names of the county. She is a descendant of the 
Windle and Fleming families, while her husband's people 
were among the first pioneers to conquer the wilderness 
of West Virginia. 

Her paternal grandparents were Thomas J. and Charlotte 
(Muse) Windle. The former, a native of Pennsylvania 
and of Quaker stock, came to Upshur County near Buck- 



30 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



hannon about 1857, and finally moved to Taylor County, 
be and his wife being buried at Simpson. He was a noted 
stock drover as well as farmer, buying stock over a large 
section of the state. His children were Lewis H.; Mary, 
who became the wife of James B. Fleming, of Taylor County; 
Annie, living near Webster, widow of Marshall Lake; Thomas 
H., who died in Braxton County; and John M., of Greenbrier 
County. 

Lewis H. Windle, father of Mrs. Evans, is now a retired 
farmer in the Webster community of Taylor County. He 
was born in Philadelphia May 1, 1843, and was fourteen 
years old when his parents settled in Upshur County. He 
finished his common school education there, and in the first 
year of the Civil war joined the Union Army in the First 
Virginia Volunteers. He was in the command of General 
Goff and also in Rosecrans' Corps. He was in the battle 
of Philippi and other campaigns in West Virginia and later 
in the heavy fighting in old Virginia. After the war he became 
a butcher, was then connected with coal mining, but the 
last thirty years of his active career were devoted to the 
practical side of farming. 

The first wife of Lewis H. Windle was Olive Fleming, 
daughter of Minor S. Fleming and member of the distinguished 
Fleming family whose record is given more completely on 
other pages of this publication. When she died she left 
three children: Mrs. Charlotte M. Evans; Zonia May, who 
died at Grafton, wife of Scott Dawson; and Gussie, who is 
the wife of Charles Withers and lives on the Minor Fleming 
farm near Simpson. For his second wife Lewis Windle 
married Nancy Mason, daughter of Benjamin Mason, but 
there were no children by this union. 

Charlotte M. Windle was born in the Rural Dale locality 
of Upshur County, but from infancy was reared near Flem- 
ington in Taylor County, where she acquired her public 
school education. At the age of nineteen she was married 
to John S. Evans. 

This branch of the Evans family was founded by Samuel 
Evans, who was born in Wales about 1700, and at the age 
of twenty came to the American colonies, accompanied by 
his father, Richard ■ Evans. He settled near Hagerstown 
or Frederick, Maryland. By two marriages he was the father 
of twenty-two children, his son Richard being killed while 
fighting the British in the Revolutionary war. His son 
Edward, born about 1730, in Maryland, and died about 
1820, also had a mihtary record of great interest to his de- 
scendants. He was one of Washington's soldiers in 
the Braddock campaign of 1755. Through the influence 
of Washington he was granted in 1772 for his service a tract 
of land in Monongalia County. He was at Fort Augusta 
in 1765, and Suffel's history mentions him as a volunteer 
in the Revolution. He was among the Monongalia militia 
paid off at Fort Pitt. He settled in Monongalia County 
probably in 1779 or 1780. At that time Edward Evans 
was one of those who received a portion of land allotted 
by General Washington in pursuance of a proclamation of 
Governor Dunmore in December, 1772. In 1780 he made 
a declaration that he was a member of the "Old Virginia" 
regiment in 1756, this confirming his allotment. The records 
of old Augusta County show the allotment and give further 
proof of his service in the French and Indian war. His old 
powder-horn, carried through the war for independence, 
is now owned by R. E. Campbell of Georgetown, Ohio, and 
bears the monogram "E. E. " and date September, 1775. 

The children of the pioneer Edward Evans were: Eleanor, 
who married Robert Patton; Hugh; Catherine, who became 
Mrs. Jeptha Wilkins; Samuel, who married Harriet Wilson; 
and Priscilla, who became the wife of John Wilkins. The 
son Hugh was born in 1769 and died in Preston County in 
1873, when well past the century mark. He was at one 
time sheriff of Preston County. He married Sarah Thomas. 
Of their seven children Samuel, born in 1800 and died in 
1889, married Sarah Means, and of their eight children the 
last survivor was Isaac Evans of Fetterman. 

Hugh Evans, also a son of Samuel and Sarah (Means) 
Evans, was born in 1830 in the Evansville community of 
Preston County, and became a resident of Fetterman in 
Taylor County. He was in the Government service as a 
butcher during the Civil war, but his active years were de- 



voted to farming. He was sheriff of Taylor County, and 
widely known as a citizen. He died at the age of forty-two. 
His first wife was Mary Am-na Shroyer, daughter of Jacob 
and Sarah (Miller) Shroyer, and the only child of that union 
was John S. Evans. By his second wife, Mary Jean Jones, 
he had a daughter, Mary, now Mrs. Cleophus Woodford, 
of Grafton. 

John Shroyer Evans was born at Fetterman in Taylor 
County January 26, 1856, and secured his early education 
there and at Knottsville. After his marriage to Miss Char- 
lotte Windle March 13, 1887, he concentrated his efforts 
upon the farm where Mrs. Evans now lives. Stock and 
dairy farming was his chief work, and he improved one of 
the most attractive places along the Grafton-Pruntytown 
Pike. He died at his home here July 21, 1910. He had 
served on the local Board of Education, was trustee of the 
Fetterman Methodist Episcopal church and was a democrat 
in politics. John S. Evans was thrice married. First, in 
1878 to Dora, daughter of James Allen and Mary Ellen 
(Ford) Bartlett. She died in March, 1880, but this union 
was blessed with one daughter. Myrtle. On May 9, 1882, 
he married Susan, daughter of John and Sallie (Curry) 
Sinsel. Her death occurred in November, 1883. His 
daughter Myrtle completed her home school education and 
became the wife of O. L. Scranage. Their present home 
is on a portion of the home farm, and Gladys, their eldest 
daughter, is now a student of West Virginia University. 

Mrs. Evans has given her life to her children and her 
nome. Her daughters are leaving their mark and influenee 
on West Virginia education, and her only son besides carrying 
on the activities left by his father has a record of service 
in the World war. Mary, her oldest daughter, was educated 
in the Broaddus Institute, West Virginia University, and is 
a graduate of the Fairmont State Normal, and is now prin- 
cipal of the West Virginia Industrial School for Boys. Lulu 
is a graduate of the Grafton High School and the Fairmont 
State Normal, attended summer sessions of West Virginia 
University, and is one of the teachers in the First Ward 
school of Grafton. Sallie Evans, after graduating from the 
Grafton High School and getting her A. B. degree from the 
State University, taught four years, and then married Frank 
E. Lyon, of Michigan, and is now living in Ontario, Canada. 
Harriet, a graduate of the Grafton High School and of Mar- 
shall College of Huntington, was a teacher in Grafton three 
years before her marriage to C. B. Shingleton of Clarksburg, 
West Virginia. Their present home is in Charleroi, Pennsyl- 
vania, and they are the proud parents of one baby daughter 
Charlotte Ann. Alma supplemented her high school course 
at Grafton with two years in the University, taught a year 
in rural schools and then became teacher of French and Latin 
in the Harrisville High School. Ohve Ada, a graduate of 
the Grafton High School and the West Virginia Wesleyan 
College, had a year and a half of teaching experience, and is 
now the wife of L. F. Damron, of Huntington. Annie 
Laurie, the youngest daughter, completed the high school 
course at Grafton in 1921 and is now taking nurses' training 
in the Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Hugh Evans, the only son, grew up at the old home farm 
and early took an interest in the dairy and stock. He was 
educated in the Pruntytown public school and had a commer- 
cial course at Grafton. At the beginning of May, 1918, he 
volunteered, was assigned to Company A of the 40l8t Engi- 
neers, was trained at Richmond, Virginia, and Fort Ogle- 
thorpe, Georgia, and from Long Island went overseas on 
the transport Leviathan, the converted liner Vaterland 
After landing at Brest the 40l8t Engineers were sent to 
Charms, then to Le Mans for equipment, and were engaged 
in construction of pontoon bridges just behind one of th( 
advanced lines when the armistice was signed. The regiment 
was under the direct command of Major General Alexander, 
commander of the Forty-second or Rainbow Division. 
Hugh Evans became a sergeant in his company. His fartheal 
east was in Belgium, forty miles from Brussels. Februarj 
22, 1919, he sailed from St. Nazaire, France, on the U. S. S. 
Mongolia, arriving at New York March 7th, was at Cam] 
Merritt where the contingent was broken up, and he wai 
sent to Camp Meade for discharge. He left Camp Mead< 
March 29th, and arrived at Grafton late the same day 



► 



I 



I 




trr-f^ 'Ht^o^i'^l^c-^i?! 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



31 



Jince the war he has been handling the responsibilities of the 
lome farm. He is vice commander of Taylor County Post 
'Jo. 78 of the American Legion. 

General Thomas Bartlett, funeral director, head of 
he Bartlett and Bolin Company of Grafton, has spent the 
;reater part of his active life in commercial lines, and has 
>een a resident of Grafton over a dozen years. 

He was born in Pleasant Creek District, Barbour County, 
)ctober 9, 1878. His grandfather, Thomas Bartlett, was 
I, native of Taylor County, and spent his last years on Pleasant 
>eek in Barbour County. His wife was Jemimah Bartlett, 
iind their children were: EflSe G.; David; Benjamin; Matilda 
!)henowith; Mrs. Elizabeth Cole; Sarah, who married C. M. 
Javis; Virginia, who married Greenberry Carter; Mary, 
Tho married William Lake; Mrs. Josephine Davis and Joseph, 
wins. 

I Joseph Bartlett, father of the Grafton business man, and 
!iow a retired farmer at Bridgeport, was born near Webster, 
■Vest Virginia, February 10, 1857. He married Laura J. 
imith, daughter of Jehu Smith. Their children are: General 
rhomas; Ithamer J., of Fairmont; W. Howard, of Bridgeport; 
5thel, wife of Herman Shutts, principal of the high school 
.t Masontown; Mrs. Eva Stewart, of Bridgeport; Zada, at 
Bridgeport; Bruce E. and Orbit J. of St. Albans. 

G. T. Bartlett spent the first fourteen years of his life on 
lis father's farm in Pleasant Creek District, after which the 
amily lived a few years near Simpson in the Court House 
District and then near Webster in the same district. His 
ncreasing strength was utilized on the farm while getting 
.n education in the local schools, and he also attended the 
■"airmont State Normal two years and did one year of pre- 
)aratory work for the law in West Virginia University, 
■"or three years he was one of the well qualified teachers in 
he Knottsville and Flemington districts, and abandoned 
chool work to become an employe of the Fairmont Coal 
Hompany, beginning at the bottom and performing such 
luties as mule-driving, car-greasing and coal-dumping. 
ie barely escaped with his life in a mine accident, and 
•bruptly left the work to seek a position in the New England 
Store at Watson. The following year he learned many of 
he fundamentals of merchandising. About that time the 
•"airmont Coal Company absorbed the John A. Clark Coal 
!l!ompany, and Mr. Bartlett was transferred to manager 
if the company store at Chiefton. Altogether he gave his 
ervice to the company for seven years, and left to engage 
n the furniture and undertaking business at Bridgeport. 
Ie was there a year, and then established himself in a similar 
ine at Grafton. About twelve years later the furniture 
lepartment was discontinued, and the Bartlett & Bolin 
Company now employs all its resources for undertaking. 

Mr. Bartlett is a graduate of the Eckels Embalming School 
if Philadelphia. In the thirteen years since he entered the 
)rofession many changes have been introduced in the technic 
ind facilities, ranging from horse-drawn hearses to a com- 
)lete automobile equipment. In 1914, at 314 Walnut Street, 
VIr. Bartlett erected a modern business house, 24 by 80 feet, 
i three-story brick building, including chapel and other 
acilities for e.\pert service in this line. Mr. Bartlett is a 
)ast president of the Funeral Directors Association of West 
i'^irginia, and has appeared on the program at a number of 
ts sessions. 

He has likewise been a factor in the business organizations 
)f Grafton, beginning with the old Board of Trade, and is 
I director and vice president of the Chamber of Commerce. 
?raternally he is a past chancellor of Friendship Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, past noble grand of Grafton Lodge No. 
il, I. O. O. F., and in Masonry is affiliated with St. John 
Lodge No. 24, F. & A. M., at Shinnston, Grafton Royal 
Vrch Chapter, is present eminent commander of DeMolay 
3ommandery, K. T., a member of Osiris Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine, and is also taking the Scottish Rite work 
it Wheeling. He is a member of the Moose and Red Men, 
8 a director of the Rotary Club, and was reared a Baptist. 

While living at Chiefton he married, on January 12, 1902, 
Vliss Maud B. Saurborne, who was born at Camden on 
3auley, West Virginia, February 21, 1885, and is a graduate 
if the Weston High School. Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett have 



two children, Mildred, born October 15, 1904, and G. Thomas, 
Jr., born October 6, 1913. 

Hon. Joseph Moeeland. One of Morgantown 's best loved 
citizens, one of the state 'a ablest lawyers, was the late Judge 
Joseph Moreland. He practiced law over forty years, and 
in addition to his attainments as a lawyer he filled a num- 
ber of offices of trust and responsibility and was particularly 
iDterested as an official in the welfare and progress of the 
university. His modest deportment, his kindness of heart 
and his true benevolence marked him as a gentleman, while 
his strong intellect, directed in the channels of law and edu- 
cation, gained him eminence as one of the distinguished men 
of his day and locality. Though death closed his active 
career some years ago, his influence even yet is potent among 
those with whom he was associated. 

Judge Moreland was a native of Fayette County, Penn- 
sylvania. His family had settled there two generations 
before his birth. His first American ancestor was Alex- 
ander Moreland. William Moreland, son of Alexander, was 
an American soldier in the war of the Revolution, and after 
the close of that struggle was a member of the Crawford 
Expedition against Sandusky. For his military services 
he was given a grant of land below Connellsville in Fay- 
ette County, on the Youghiogheny River. 

John Moreland, son of William and Agnes (Huston) 
Moreland, became owner of the family homestead near 
ConnellsTiIle. On that property in 1842 he manufactured 
the first coke ever made in Fayette County. Barges were 
used for the shipment of the coke, and on account of his 
interest in water transportation John Moreland was famil- 
iarly known by the title of captain. In 1850 a fleet of his 
barges was sunk in the Ohio River at Wheeling. That put 
an end to his enterprise as a coke manufacturer, an in- 
dustry for which he could see no future. No other attempt 
was made to manufacture coke in Fayette County for eight 
years. Capt. John Moreland married Priscilla Rogers, 
daughter of William and Nancy (Halliday) Rogers, and 
great-granddaughter of Lieut. John Rogers, who lost his 
life while a soldier of- the Revolution. 

The late Judge Joseph Moreland was a son of Capt. John 
and Priscilla Moreland, and was born near Connellsville, 
Fayette County, May 26, 1842. He was attending the old 
Monongalia Academy at Morgantown in 1861 when the 
outbreak of the Civil war caused him to return to his home 
in Pennsylvania. In 1866 he graduated from Washington 
and Jefferson College in Pennsylvania, and the following 
year returned to Morgantown with his widowed mother. 
Here he read law in the oflSces of Brown and Hagans, and 
after admission to the bar remained in Morgantown and 
practiced law here until his death. He early attracted no- 
tice as a hard working, earnest and thoroughly well in- 
formed lawyer, and his reputation eventually extended be- 
yond his home district into many of the courts of the 
state. In the course of his active career he had some 
prominent associates. At one time he was a member of 
the firm Willey and Moreland. later of Hagans and More- 
land, and subsequently formed a partnership with S. F. 
Glasscock and for several years the firm was Moreland and 
Glasscock. Later Judge Moreland was associated with his 
son in the firm of Moreland and Moreland, and finally was 
head of the firm of Moreland, Moreland and Guy. Judge 
Moreland frequently referred to his partnership with the 
distinguished West Virginia statesman, Hon. Waitman Wil- 
ley, from 1873 to 1884, as a relationship of the greatest 
personal congeniality as well as professional success. Dur- 
ing his long and successful career Judge Moreland handled 
some of the most notable cases in the records of the local 
courts. Under all circumstances he was regarded as a 
worthy opponent by the ablest lawyers with whom he was 
associated, and many times he gained the admiration of the 
bar for his adroit handling of a case that he accepted only 
from a sense of profossional duty and that could add noth- 
ing to his reputation or his purse. 

Judge Moreland passed his seventieth birthday still ac- 
tive as a lawyer and giving little evidence of failing abil- 
ity. He continued at work until his death in 1913. Out- 



32 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



side of his profession he was not a seeker of public hon- 
ors, but public responsibilities naturally attach themselves 
to a man of his character and standing as a lawyer. For 
a long number of years he gave Morgantown an efficient 
administration as mayor, and for a number of terms was 
on the City Council. In 1887 he was appointed to fill an 
unexpired term as prosecuting attorney. He frequently 
was appointed special judge, and in 1882 Governor Jack- 
son appointed him a member of the Board of Regents of 
the University of West Virginia. His interest in educa- 
tion and the welfare of the University made the duties of 
this oflSce particularly attractive to him, and he capably 
served the University as Regent for many years. 

Judge Moreland was a member of the Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, was affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, Delta Tan Delta college fraternity, and 
had numerous other relations with professional, civic and 
social bodies. He was public spirited and charitable, and 
was many times sought as an advisor and leader in move- 
ments affecting the public weal. Personally Judge More- 
land was unassuming in manner, sincere in friendship, 
steadfast and unswerving in his loyalty to the highest ideals 
emplar of some of the finest qualities that distinguish the 
of character. A host of friends regarded him as an ex- 
citizen in both his public and private relationships. 

From his personal friendships and home life he undoubt- 
edly derived his chief hajipiness, regarding these always 
as the durable satisfactions of life. On October 26, 1875, 
Judge Moreland married Miss Mary E. Brown, daughter 
of Thomas and Eleanor Suter (Smith) Brown. Her pa- 
ternal grandfather, James Brown, was an Irishman who 
came to America about the close of the Revolutionary war. 
Her maternal grandfather, Alexander Smith, was a prom- 
inent banker and merchant of Georgetown, Maryland, later 
the District of Columbia. Thomas Brown, father of Mrs. 
Moreland, was a lawyer by profession, and practiced with 
his brother William G. Brown at Kingwood, West Vir- 
ginia. William G. Brown at one time was a member of 
Congress from West Virginia. Mrs. Moreland possessed 
many personal qualities and charms that enriched the life 
of her home and the many friendships that fiourished there. 
Her death in 1910 was widely mourned. Judge and Mrs. 
Moreland had two children. The daughter, Eleanor Brown 
Moreland, born May 31, 1877, is a teacher of science in 
the Elkins High School. 

The son, James Rogers Moreland, who has taken for his 
guide the honorable example of his father, was born at 
Morgantown December 9, 1879. He was educated in the 
public schools, the West Virginia University, where he 
graduated A. B. in 1901, and the following year received 
his law degree. Admitted to the bar in June, 1902, he 
was for over ten years an active associate with his father 
in practice, first in the firm of Moreland and Moreland 
and then in that of Moreland, Moreland and Guy, and 
since the death of Judge Moreland he and the other sur- 
viving partijer, Mr. Robert E. Guy, continue their asso- 
ciation. This firm has a large and important practice, and 
the members of the firm are accounted among the leaders 
of the bar of Monongalia County. While his chief ambi- 
tion is to acquit himself creditably in the law, Mr. More- 
land has acted from a sense of public duty and for some 
years_ was a member of the City Council of Morgantown, 
and in 1914 enjoyed the unique honor of being elected as 
a democrat to the House of Delegates from Monongalia 
County. He was the first democrat elected on the county 
ticket of Monongalia County since 1876. 

In addition to his law practice Mr. Moreland has a num- 
ber of business and financial interests, being a director of 
the Bank of the Monongahela Valley of Morgantown, as 
was his father before him, and is otherwise largely in- 
terested in the coal development and business interests of 
the community. He is a member of the Monongalia County 
Bar Association, the West Virginia State Bar Association, 
and has served three times as president of the West Vir- 
ginia State Society of the Sons of the Revolution. He 
is a member of the Kappa Alpha college fraternity, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Rotary Club of 
Morgantown. He is an elder in the Presbyterian Church, 



superintendent of its Sunday school and for two years ^ 
president of the Monongalia County Sunday School As 
elation. 

September 1, 1904, Mr. Moreland married Miss Ethel 
Finnicum, daughter of Albert D. and Sarah (Lyle) Fir 
cum, of Hopedale, Harrison County, Ohio. Four child 
have been born to their marriage: Joseph Albert, b( 
August 11, 1907; James Rogers, Jr., born May 10, 19! 
William Alexander, born April 21, 1916; and Robert L; 
liorn February 6, 1921. 

Mrs. Moreland takes a great interest in social, edu 
tional and political problems. She is at present a meml 
of the West Virginia Child Welfare Commission, ohj 
man of the Department of Applied Education of the W 
Virginia Federation of Women's Clubs, chairman of 
Child Welfare Department of the West Virginia Leaj 
of Women Voters and vice chairman in charge of ■ 
women's work of the Democratic State Executive Comn 
tee of West Virginia. 

Robert Gillespie Dakan has developed at RosI 
Rock, Marshall County, a large and prosperous gene 
merchandise business, in which he is now associated w 
his sons Josept E. and George B., under the firm name 
R. G. Dakan & Sons. Mr. Dakan was born at Glen East 
this county, November 3, 1861, and is a son of John M. a 
Eliza (Terrell) Dakan, the latter's father, Amos Terr 
having been an influential citizen of his day in Pleas! 
Valley, Marshall County. John M. Dakan passed his enl 
life in Marshall County and was eighty-two years of age 
the time of his death. His father, William Dakan, ca 
from Pennsylvania and became a pioneer settler in Marst 
County, the Terrells likewise having come from the . 
Keystone State, and the wife of Amos Terrell having beei 
member of the old and prominent Braddock family of Pei 
sylvania. Amos Terrell reclaimed and developed one 
the excellent farms of Marshall County, and was one of I 
expert hunters of wild game in this section in the early da 
he having died at the age of seventy-eight years. John 
Dakan learned and followed the carpenter's trade, and la 
he engaged in farm enterprise, besides conducting a gene 
store at Rosbys Rock. For a number of years he ci 
ducted a hotel at Weston, Lewis County, and he passed i 
closing years of his life in the home of his son Robert . ' 
of this sketch, his wife having preceded him to eternal r 
by about three years and having been about eighty ye 
of age at the time of her death. John M. Dakan was left 
orphan in early youth, and he depended upon his own 
sources in making his way in the world. He was a man 
sterling character and ever commanded unqualified popu 
esteem. Of his children eight attained to years of maturi 
and of the number two sons and four daughters are living 
1921, the elder of the two sons being Joshua, a resident 
Limestone, Marshall County. 

Robert G. Dakan gained his early education in the comm' 
schools of his native county and as a boy began to assj 
in his father's store. In 1878 he went with his parents 
Weston, and there he assisted in his father's hotel until 18! 
when he returned to Rosbys Rock and became clerk in t 
general store of William Lutes, whose daughter he Ia1 
married. He has continued his active association with t 
mercantile business at this place during the long interveni 
years, and now has the distinction of being the oldest mi 
chant on the Fourth Division of the Baltimore & Ohio Rs 
road, between Wheeling and Grafton. In 1882, when Si 
Dakan purchased the business of his father-in-law, hi8 w 
one of three stores at Rosbys Rock, the other two havi 
been conducted by S. J. Elliott and L. G. Martin, both 
the other stores having eventually been purchased by & 
Dakan, who consolidated the stocks of goods with that 
his original establishment. He has been a successful buj 
and shipper of grain and live stock, besides which he 
associated with Mr. Cox, of Cameron, in the buying and shi 
ping of wool upon an extensive scale, the firm having shipp 
more than 300,000 pounds in the season of 1921, and 
average annual expenditure for wool being $100,000. F 
several years Mr. Dakan was a member of the firm of Dab 
& Sivert, which conducted a store at Moundsville. T 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



33 



I mercantile trade of R. G. Dakan & Sons at Rosbys Rock 

, ha8 grown to large volume and extends over a wide radius 

of country tributary to this thriving village. The two sons 

were admitted to partnership in 1917. Mr. Dakan has been 

prominent in the local councils of the democratic party, and 

was his party's nominee for sheriff of the county, but was un- 

I able to overcome the large republican majority. For the 

i past twenty years he has served as delegate to the state 

I conventions of his party in West Virginia. 

I At the age of twenty-one years Mr. Dakan married Miss 

I Elizabeth J. Lutes, and of their four children the eldest son, 

1 Henry G., died at the age of thirty-two years, he having 

[ had active charge of his father's farm at the time, and his 

j widow and four sons being still on the farm, the sons being 

, Harold, Robert, Lawrence and Howard. Bessie, eldest of 

the children, is the wife of C. E. Bonar, of Lisbon, Ohio; 

and Joseph E. and George B. are partners in their father's 

mercantile business. Jo.seph E. married Rhea Gorby, and 

they have one son, Joseph E., Jr. George B. married Miss 

Eliza KuU, and they have one son, George Bruce, Jr. 

John A. Grieb, M. D. While for a quarter of a century 
f he has been ever responsive to the heavy demands made 
I upon his time and energy in his profession as a physician 
and surgeon, Dr. Grier has contrived time to serve the com- 
munity of Sistersville in various relationships that involve 
' the performance of duty with scarcely proportionate honor 
' and insignificant financial reward 

Doctor Grier has an interesting relation to the name and 
I founding of Sistersville. His grandmother was Delilah 
Wells, who was born and spent all her life at Sistersville. 
' She and her sister Sarah owned two adjoining farms, on which 
■ was laid out the town of Sistersville, named in their honor. 
' Delilah Wells married Robert Grier, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, where his family was established in Colonial times 
on coming from Scotland. Robert Grier moved to Monroe 
' County, Ohio, when a comparatively young man, was 
a farmer, and later one of the first merchants at Sistersville, 
I where he also owned and operated a grist mill. He and his 
I wife reared five sons and one daughter, all now deceased. 

Prather Grier, father of Doctor Grier, was born in Monroe 

j County, Ohio, in 1834, and as a young man removed to 

^ Parkersburg, where he married. He owned a large amount 

[ of land in the river bottoms near Parkersburg, and made 

i farming his chief vocation. He died at Parkersburg in 1883. 

In politics he was a democrat and was an influential member 

\ of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Prather Grier 

I married Sarah West, who was born in Monroe County, Ohio. 

} in 1834 and died at Parkersburg in 1884. She was one of 

the most zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal 

Church, South, at Parkersburg. She became the mother 

I of four children: Mary, who died at the age of thirty-six, 

wife of Frank Clark, who is a farmer in West Virginia, opposite 

Racine, Ohio; Charles W., in the real estate and automobile 

business at Roswell, New Mexico; Dr. John A.; and Frank 

C, who died at the age of twenty. 

John A. Grier was born on his father's farm in Wood 
County, near Parkersburg, February 26, 1870. He attended 
the public schools of his native county, spent one year in the 
Morgantown preparatory school, and in 1892 graduated 
Bachelor of Science from West Virginia University. He 
received his M. D. degree in 1894 from the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons at Baltimore, and has since gone back 
to Baltimore a number of times for post-graduate courses 
and clinical experience. While in university he was a mem- 
ber of the Phi Kappa Psi college fraternity. Doctor Grier 
began practice at Ravenswood, West Virginia, but in 1896 
I located at Sistersville, where for many years he has had an 
exceptionally heavy practice in medicine and surgery. His 
oflSces are in the Review Building on Wells Street. Doctor 
Grier for the past eight years has been health oflBcer of 
Sistersville, served four years as coroner of Tyler County, 
and for twelve years has had a prominent part in the educa- 
tional advancement of the community, serving as president 
I of the Sistersville School Board and is president of the Sisters- 
; ville School and Public Library. 

Doctor Grier is a democrat, is past master of Phoenix 
'. Lodge No. 73, A. F. and A. M., past high priest of Sistersvills 
i Chapter No. 27, R. A. M., and is a thirty-second degree 



Scottish Rite Mason in West Virginia Consistory No. 1 at 
Wheeling, and is a member of Nemesis Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine at Parkersburg. He is president of the Masonic 
Temple Association at Sistersville. Doctor Grier, who has 
never married, is a member of the Tyler County, West Vir- 
ginia State and American Medical Associations, the Sisters- 
ville Country Club, and during the war was interested in 
all the drives, and spent much time instructing Red Cross 
classes. 

EzBAi W. Talbott has been a river man nearly all his 
active life, had steamboat runs over all the great rivers of 
the Mississippi basin, but for a number of years past has been 
permanently located at Sistersville, where he is proprietor 
of the Wharfboat. 

Mr. Talbott was born in Missouri, but is a member of 
an old family of the Upper Ohio Valley. His grandfather, 
Richard Talbott, was born in Brooke County, West Virginia, 
and spent most of his life there, having a farm. He died 
at Proctor, West Virginia. Richard Hardesty Talbott, 
father of E. W. Talbott, was born in Brooke County in 1824, 
was reared there, established his home in Wellsburg as a 
young man, and became a steamboat official. In 1848 he 
removed to Pike County, Missouri, near the Mississippi 
River, and owned a large farm there. In 1866 he returned 
to West Virginia, established his home in Marshall County 
on a farm, and in 1866 moved to the vicinity of Sistersville, 
buying a farm across the river in Monroe County, Ohio. 
He lived on this farm until his death in 1883. He was a 
democrat in politics and a member of the Cumberland 
Presbyterian Church. Richard H. Talbott married Mary 
Wells, who was born at Wells Bottom in Marshall County, 
West Virginia, in 1834, and died at Sistersville in 1908. 
She was the mother of eight children: Rolla, a farmer who 
died in Pike County, Missouri, at the age of thirty-two; 
Charles P., who died on the homestead farm in Monroe 
County, Ohio, at the age of fifty-three; John R., a farmer at 
North Jackson, Ohio; Ezbai W. ; Frank M., now living on 
the old homestead in Monroe County; Dora Virginia, wife 
of Frank D, McCoy, a retired merchant at Sistersville; 
Mary, who became the wife of George Durham, for many 
years a cashier of the Tyler County Bank of Sistersville, and 
who died at Garden City, New York, where his widow still 
lives; and Lucian Hardesty, owner and operator of a public 
garage at Sistersville. 

Ezbai W. Talbott was born in Pike County, Missouri 
October 29, 1860, and was six years of age when the family 
returned to West Virginia. He attended the public schools 
of Sistersville, Duff's Business College in Pittsburgh, and the 
high school at New Martinsville, West Virginia. Leaving 
school at the age of twenty-one, Mr. Talbott became a mate 
on steamboats plying on the Ohio, Mississippi and Missouri 
rivers, and later took out papers as a captain. For many 
years he was on the river as a steamboat man, well known 
in river transportation circles, but most of the time kept 
his home at Sistersville, though he also lived at other places 
along the river. In 1908 Mr." Talbott bought the Wharfboat 
at Sistersville, and this has been his chief interest ever since. 
He also became part owner and manager of the Sistersville 
Ferry Company, owning the ferry between Sistersville and 
Fly, Ohio, and he is still financially interested in this company. 
Mr. Talbott is a director of the First-Tyler Bank & Trust 
Company of Sistersville. 

A well thought of and public spirited citizen, he was a 
member of the Sistersville City Council six years. He votes 
as a democrat, is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and 
owns one of the modern homes of the town, at 419 Wells 
Street. 

In 1897, in Monroe County, Ohio, Mr. Talbott married 
Miss Nettie May Witten, daughter of James and Frances 
(Bridgeman) Witten, now deceased. Her father was one 
of the famous river pilots of his day, and conducted a number 
of the well known river steamers up'and down the Ohio and 
Mississippi from Pittsburgh to New Orleans. Mr. and Mrs. 
Talbott have two daughters, Mary Frances, wife of Sam 
Fisher, part owner of the Paden City Glass Company and a 
resident of New Martinsville, and Miss Camilla, who grad- 
uated from a college at Jenkinstown, Pennsylvania. 



34 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



Sam Hissam is one of the older residents of the Sistersville 
community. In early life he was a teacher in Tyler County, 
then in the railway mail service, until oil development on 
his farm gave him private interests requiring hii supervision. 
Mr. Hissam is still an oil producer and active farmer, and 
has shared in the public responsibilities of the county and is 
now postmaster of Sistersville. 

The Hissam family is of English ancestry and has been 
in America since Colonial times. His grandfather, Thomas 
Hissam, was a native of Westmoreland County, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he grew up, learned the trade of shoemaker 
but also followed farming. In Westmoreland County he 
married a Miss White, who was born on the ocean during 
a four months voyage while her parents were coming from 
Ireland. Shortly after his marriage Thomas Hissam moved 
to Tyler County, West Virginia, and lived out his life here 
as a farmer and worker at his trade. His son, William 
Hissam, was born in Tyler County in 1824, and spent all 
his life as an industrious farmer and was one of the respected 
members of his community. He died in 1907. He was a 
democrat and a leader in the Christian Church. His first 
wife was Elizabeth Weekly, who was born in Tyler County 
in 1834 and died in 1906. His second wife was Frances 
Malson, a native and life-long resident of Tyler County, 
and they reared a family of five children. Elizabeth Weekly 
Hissam was the mother of five children: Elijah C, a farmer 
who died at Coryopolis, Pennsylvania, in 1919, at the age 
of sixty-three: Samantha, who died at East Liverpool, Ohio, 
wife of Sam Winning, a cooper by trade, who died at Sisters- 
ville; Margaret, who died at Cornwallis in Ritchie County, 
West Virginia, in 1879, wife of Harvey M. Weekly, a farmer 
still living in Ritchie County; Harvey B., employed in a rubber 
factory in Akron, Ohio; and Sam. 

Sam Hissam was born on a farm a mile south of Sisters- 
ville October 5, 1865, and secured his early advantages in 
the rural schools, attended several summer normal schools 
at Sistersville and Middlebourne, and at the age of twenty- 
one was given his first opportunity to teach in a district 
school in Tyler County. Altogether he taught seven terms 
of country school, for one term was principal of the Middle- 
bourne graded school, and another term was teacher of the 
grammar room at Sistersville. After passing the civil service 
examination Mr. Hissam in 189.5 was appointed a substitute 
in the railway mail service, in 1896 was given his first regular 
appointment, and turned over his school to the then county 
superintendent, Thomas P. Hill, who finished out the term. 
Mr. Hill is now an attorney at Middlebourne. Mr. Hissam's 
first assienment was on the run between Wheeling and 
Garrett, Indiana, but two years later he was transferred to 
the Pittsbureh and Kenova Railway post office, and was on 
this run until he resigned May 25, 1907. 

For a number of years Mr. Hissam had owned a farm of 
a hundred and forty acres at Dry Run in Tyler County. 
This came within the area of oil prospecting, and after oil 
was developed on the farm Mr. Hissam sold the property in 
1907, though retaining his oil royalties. A number of wells 
were drilled there and one is still producing. In 1907 Mr. 
Hissam bought another farm of two hundred and fifty acres 
on Middle Island Creek, six miles south of Sistersville, and 
he still owns and operates this property. In connection with 
farming he was for about two years rather extensively 
engaged in the lumber business, buying tracts of standing 
timber in Tyler County and having it cut, logged and sawed. 
He was in this business from 1917 until the fall of 1919. 

In 1910 Mr. Hissam was elected commissioner of the 
County Court, and filled that office six years with credit. 
August 29, 1919, he was appointed postmaster of Sistersville, 
his name standing first on the list of the classified _ civil 
service. In 1905 the Town Council of Sistersville appointed 
him assessor, an office he filled one year, and at the same 
time was deputy county assessor. 

Mr. Hissam is a democrat, is an elder in the Christian 
Church of Sistersville, a member of Sistersville Lodge No. 
333, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Kiwanis Club 
and the Sistersville Country Club. He owns a modern home 
on Cemetery Road. During the war he was a participant 
in every drive, being a member of the committee for the 
first Liberty Loan drive in Union District, and district 
chairman of all the other loan campaigns. He was chairman 



of the Little Buffalo School District for the Y. M. C. A. 
drive, was captain of a team for the Red Cross campaigns, 
was a member of the Tyler County Council of Defense, and 
a Four Minute speaker. He and Mrs. Hissam used their 
car almost constantly in some of the many phases of patriotic 
endeavor during this period. 

March 28. 1889, at Sistersville, Mr. Hissam married Miss 
Eunice M. Calhoun, daughter of John C. and Jane (Clark) 
Calhoun. Her father, now deceased, was a steamboat 
engineer for many years. Her mother lives with Mr. and 
Mrs. Hissam. Mr. and Mrs. Hissam have an interesting 
family of eight children. The oldest, Paul B.,_was a soldiei 
boy, and his record is given a paragraph by itself. Grace 
is the wife of Ira W. Moore, an oil field worker in Tylei 
County; Bernice is the wife of Garnett H._ Hadley, an oil 
field worker living near Sistersville. Eugenie is the wife ol 
Neil E. Riggs, a glass worker at Sistersville. Ellen is a 
student in the Sistersville High School, while the youngei 
children are Benjamin L., born March 1, 1908; George R., 
born June 9, 1911, and Sam, born June 12, 1915. 

Paul B. Hissam, who was born June 4, 1894, enlisted in 
January, 1917, before America entered the war with Ger- 
many. He was first sent to Fort Leavenworth, then to| 
Camp Jackson and Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, then I 
to Camp TTpton on Long Island, and in July, 1918, embarked i 
for overseas, going to France by way of England. He wa 
in the Field Signal Corps with the Second Army Corps, and 
was brigaded with the British on the San Quentin and Cam- 
brai sectors. He remained there until the armistice was 
signed, and was returned home in April, 1919, and mustered 
out with the rank of corporal at Camp Dix, New Jersey. 
He now lives at Falcon, Kentucky, being assistant foreman j 
for the Petroleum Exploration Company. | 

I 
Hugh H. Steele is an influential figure in connection with i 
the industrial and general business activities of the thriv- 
ing little City of Richwood. Nicholas County, where he is 
president of the Fulton Manufacturing Company, manu-l 
facturers of clothespins and butter dishes. 1 

Mr. Steele claims the old Keystone State of the TTnion as- 
the place of his nativity, his birth having occurred at Ham-) 
mond, Tioga County, Pennsylvania, on the 27th of June, 
1879. He is a son of Frank and Emmer (Hammond) Steele, 
both likewise natives of Pennsylvania, where the former was 
born at Mountain Lake, Bradford County, January 22, j 
1855, and the latter was born March 10, 1855, at Ham-' 
mond. The Hammond family has been one of prominence 
in Pennsylvania since the day of William Penn, and in its 
honor the native place of the sub.ieet of this sketch was 
named. Frank Steele became successfully engaged in the' 
lumber business at Hammond, Pennsylvania, and developed' 
a prosperous enterprise also as a carpenter and builder. He I 
and his wife still reside at that place, both being members 
of the Baptist Church, and he is a republican in politics. 

Of their five children two died in earlv childhood. Of' 
the three surviving children Hugh H., of this review, is the 
eldest; Robert is a successful physician and surgeon engaged 
In practice in thg City of Chicago; and Marmierite, who 
holds a position in one of the Government offices 5n the 
Citv of Washington, has supplemented her high-school edu- 
cation by attending Georgetown TIniversitv. 

After profiting by the advantages of the public schoolsj 
of his native state Hugh H. Steele completed a course Ini 
business college, and at the age of sixteen years he initi' 
ated his connection with railroad work, with which he con- 
tinued to be identified ten vears. He then took a positioi 
with the Locke Insulator Company at Victor, New York, 
and later he held a responsible position in the general of- 
fices of the Dodge Clothespin Company at Codersport. Penn- 
svlvania, where he remained thus engaged until 1912. He 
then came to Richwood, West Vir<nnia. and took a minoi 
office position with the Fulton Manufacturing Company 
with which he won advancement to the office of secretary 
and of which he has been the president since June 22, 1921 
He has played an influential part in the upbuilding of the' 
substantial business of this corporation, and is one of the 
vital and progressive citizens and business men of Rich-, 
wood. His political allegiance is given to the republican, 




^^ 



^/V/^^^^ii^r— 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



35 



party, he has received the thirty-second degree in the Scott- 
ish Kite of the Masonic fraternity, and he and his wife are 
zealous members of the Presbyterian Church at Kichwood, 
in which he is serving as a deacon. 

On the 16th of January, 1906. was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Steele and Miss Breunle, who likewise was 
born and reared in Pennsylvania, and the one child of this 
union is a daughter, Eileen C, who was born December 5, 
1907, and who is, in 1922, a student in the Richwood High 
School. 

Charles Lester Broadwater is one of the most prom- 
inent figures in the educational affairs of "West Virginia 
today. He is a comparatively young man, now in the prime 
of his usefulness, and has been teaching and engaged in edu- 
cational administration for twenty years. 

Mr. Broadwater, who is principal of the Tyler County 
High School at Middlebourne, was born near Harrisville in 
Ritchie County, West Virginia, September 26, 1883. The 
Broadwaters are an old Colonial Virginia family, coming 
from Broadwater Parish, Sussex County, England, about 
1630. The first immigrant, Charles Broadwater, who received 
a patent of 40.000 acres of land in Virginia, brought over a 
shipload of immigrants. His patent is on record at Rich- 
mond, Virginia. In 1754 one Charles Broadwater furnished 
i horse for the Braddock campaign. This same Charles 
was elected vestryman in the Episcopal Church and at the 
same time that George Washington was elected to a like 
oflSce, 1765. The vote is recorded in the Episcopal History 
of Virerinia for twelve vestrymen, Washington being fifth 
with 265 votes, and Charles Broadwater being sixth, with 
254 votes. Mr. Broadwater is represented by ancestors in 
the Revolution and the War of 1812. The great-grandfather 
)f Charles L. Broadwater served at the defense of Fort Mc- 
Henry when the British attacked it in 1814. He emigrated 
'rom Virginia to Western Maryland on account of dislike of 
slavery. He was the ancestor of the West Virginia Broad- 
yaters. His grandfather was Peter Broadwater, who was 
)orn in Garrett County, Maryland, in 1823, and as a young 
nan moved to Ritchie County, West Virginia, where he 
narried and became a farmer. He was accompanied by 
■wo brothers, who also became West Virginia farmers, one, 
Jefferson, settling near Pennsboro, and the other, Ashford, 
in McKim Creek in Tyler County. The first wife of Peter 
Broadwater, who died near Harrisville in 1860, was Love 
Taylor, a lifelong resident of Ritchie County. His second 
rife, grandmother of Charles L. Broadwater, was Fannie 
Halone, who was born near Harrisville, the daughter of 
I'ames Malone, at one time a representative in the Virginia 
louse of Burgesses. 

Charles Broadwater, father of Charles L., was born near 
larrisville October 27, 1857, and has spent all is life in 
hat community, an industrious and respected farmer. He 
still on his farm between Harrisville and Ellenboro. He 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a 
epublican in politics. Charles Broadwater married Miss 
liza Wagner, who was born near Harrisville and died in 
887. Her two children were: Charles L. and Ellis A. The 
ttter was born in 1885 and died on the homestead farm in 
907. The second wife of Charles Broadwater was Emily 
Patton, a native of Ritchie County, where she died in 
901. She was the mother of four children, the oldest being 
ennie, wife of J. Fred Starr, a painter and carpenter at 
[arrisville. The second, Hayward S., now in the hardware 
usiness at Mannington, was a non-commissioned ofiicer in 
le Intelligence Service of the Three Hundred and Twentieth 
ifantry, Eightieth, or Blue Ridge, Division, spending a 
ear in France, and took part in the battle of Arras with the 
nglish and in the St. Mihiel and Argonne campaigns. He 
as also a sharpshooter, and was mustered out with the rank 
corporal. The third child, Fannie, is the wife of George 
[core, a farmer near Harrisville, and Bernard B. now lives 
ith his father. Charles Broadwater in 1904 married for 
8 third wife Miss Lizzie Maxwell, a native of Preston 
ounty. 

Charles Lester Broadwater spent his youth on his father's 
rm and his early advantages were supplied by the rural 
hools of Ritchie County. In 1907 he graduated in the 



academic and normal courses from Marshall College at 
Huntington, paying his expenses through Marshall College 
and through his subsequent university career by his own 
ea,rnings. In 1913 he received his A. B. degree from West 
Virginia University, and was a member of the Sigma Chi 
fraternity there. He was also president of the senior class. 
Later, by several terms of residence study, Mr. Broadwater 
won the Master of Arts degree from Columbia University of 
New York City in 1918. 

He taught his first school at Smithville in Ritchie County 
in 1900. For four years he was in rural school work in 
Ritchie County, and from 1907 to 1911 was principal of the 
high school of New Martinsville, and from 1913 to 1918 was 
principal of the Mannington High School. Mr. Broadwater 
has been principal of the Tyler County High School since 
1918. This is a high school of the first class, has a teaching 
staff of eleven, and a scholarship enrollment of 193. 

Mr. Broadwater's unusual qualifications were strongly 
urged during his candidacy for the republican nomination 
for state superintendent of schools in 1920. He is a mem- 
ber of the National Education Association and the State 
Education Association. He is president of the Northwestern 
Teachers Association of West Virginia, 1921-22. 

During the World war Mr. Broadwater was chairman of the 
Speakers Bureau of the western end of Marion County, 
chairman of the Four Minute men of Mannington, and 
employed all his personal talents to support the Government 
and the local campaigns for the various causes. He is a 
republican, a member of the Official Board of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church at Middlebourne, and since 1911 has been 
a member of Wetzel Lodge No. 39, A. F. and A. M., at New 
Martinsville. He is also a member and was manager in 1913, 
of the West Virginia University Dramatic Club. 

August 23, 1913, at New Martinsville, he married Miss 
Helen V. Williams, daughter of Evan A. and Emma (Moore) 
Williams, residents of Middlebourne, where her father is a 
dairyman. Mr. and Mrs. Broadwater have three children: 
Charles L., Jr., born November 26, 1914; Daniel W., born 
May 9, 1917; and Eugene S., born December 7, 1918. 

Orrin Brtte Conawat, a Middlebourne attorney and 
prosecuting attorney of Tyler County, represents an Ameri- 
can and English lineage embracing men and women of the 
highest distinction for four centuries or more. 

Conaway is a form of spelling adopted by the founder of 
the Virginia line, though other branches of the America fam- 
ily have followed the more usual spelling, Conway. Another 
variant of the name is Conweye. The derivation is from 
"Con" a Celtic word meaning head or chief, and "wy" a 
river. The original form of the name was therefore Conwy. 
In North Wales there is a river and a town called Conway. 
Sir Edward Conway was knighted in 1596 for prowess in 
Spain, where he was deputy governor. He was Baron Con- 
way of Ragley, Warwick, and Viscount Conway of "Conwa 
Castell" in Wales. Sir Edward married Dorathe, heiress 
of Sir John Tracy. Lord Conway of Ragley was a friend 
of Penn and of Henry Moore, a Platonist who spent much 
of his time in Ragley, which he called a center of devotion 
and a paradise of peace and piety. Lady Conway was said 
to be a sister of the Earl of Nottingham. 

Lancaster and Spottsylvania counties, Virginia, have 
always been strongholds of the Conways. Edwin Conway 
or Conaway, as he wrote his name, came to Virginia in 1640 
from Worcester County, England. Sometimes he also spelled 
his name Conneway. He appears in the Northampton 
Records in June, 1642, as "Mr. Edwyn Conway, Clarke 
(clerk) of this Com." He married in England Martha 
Eltonhead of Eltonhead. His second wife was a sister or 
near relative of the well known John Carter of the Carter 
family, and descendants of this line of Conways have it all 
their own way when seeking admission to patriotic societies. 
In the various generations the family held in turn every office 
in the gift of the people. Edwin Conway was the third clerk 
of Northampton County, and while he wrote a bad hand "it 
was not so bad as Thomas Cooke's, another clerk." Edwin 
died in Lancaster County in 1675. 

Edwin second, born in 1654, married two wives, Sarah 
Fleete and Elizabeth Thompson. From Edwin and Eliza- 



36 



HISTOEY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



beth descended James Madison, president of the United 
States. Nellie Conaway or Eleanor Rose Conway, as some 
historians name her, was of the fourth generation from 
Edwin. She was a daughter of Francis Conway and mar- 
ried at the age of eighteen Colonel James Madison, and 
their son was president of the United States. She died at 
Montpelier in 1829, lacking two days of being a hundred years 
old. Martha Thompson, who married James Taylor, was 
mother of Frances Taylor, who married Ambrose Madison, 
grandfather of the President. This is the Taylor family 
which gave another president to the United States. 

Eltonhead Conaway, daughter of the Virginia pioneer, 
Edwin, married Henry Thacker, who was clerk of the Vir- 
ginia Council. The Thackers were large land owners in 
Virginia, and Colonel Edwin Thacker, born in 1695, was a 
burgess sheriff of Middlesex County and a vestryman of 
Christ Church. 

Colonel Edwin Conaway, of the third generation, was 
prominent in state and church, a member of the House of 
Burgesses for many years. He was born in Lancaster County 
and married Anna Ball, half sister of Mary Ball, mother of 
Washington. The marriage papers of Anna Conaway, daugh- 
ter of Colonel Edwin, are preserved in Virginia Archives and 
are interesting documents. The father's consent to her 
marriage is given in a paper of some length and its seal dis- 
plays the arms of the family. Of this coat of arms some one 
ha5 written: " It indicates a branch of Lord Conway's family, 
replanted and grown to another tree and requiring Arms of its 
own for legal purposes." 

Another family of Conways not descended from Edwin 
of Lancaster was also in Virginia. The two families have a 
common origin. Edwin of Lancaster descended from the 
Lords Conjvay who traced back to that Edwin Conway who 
married Anna, daughter and heiress of Richard Burdett of 
Warwick. One of the King's Commissioners for Virginia, 
1609-20, was Sir Edward Conway, and associated with him 
was Captain Thomas Conway. They were probably brothers. 
Two of the name, and brothers, who settled in North Carolina 
were related to the Marquis of Hertford. The Pennsylvania 
branch of the family claims William Conway, born in the 
Valley of the Clyde, Wales, and who came to America before 
1770, was a soldier in the Revolution and married Ruth 
Adams, a native of Pennsylvania. Of this line were Dr. 
Thomas Conway and William, who married Isabella Armour, 
of Irish descent. New England also had its Conways. One, 
William Conway, born in Camden, Maine, in 1802, was a 
sailor for forty years. 

The Conways in all generations have been stanch patriots. 
Among those in the Revolution were Lieutenant Joseph, a 
near relative of Nellie Conway Madison; Lieutenant James 
and General Henry, who received for services to the State of 
Virginia 4,666% acres of land. New Jersey's representative 
in the war was Lieutenant Colonel John Conway. 

Among marriage connections of the Southern branch of the 
Conways are the families of the Fitzhughs, Blackwells, Stan- 
nards, Spanns and Daniels. The distinguished author Mon- 
cure Daniel Conway, who at the age of eighteen wrote a 
pamphlet entitled "Free Schools in Virginia" that was pro- 
nounced a masterly argument and undoubtedly influenced 
the establishment of such schools in the state, was a native of 
and represented a prominent branch of the Conway family in 
Stafford County, Virginia, and his mother was a daughter of 
John Moncure Daniel, who served as surgeon general in the 
War of 1812 and was a granddaughter of Thomas Stone, one 
of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Some 
branches of the Conways claim royal descent from Edward I 
through the Byrds, Beverleys and Nevilles. One Conway will 
directs that forty shillings be paid "Mr. David Currie if he 
will read my burial; I would not have a funeral sermon." 

There must have been just one black sheep in the Conway 
family, since in a will one member is cut off by his father with 
the traditional shilling. The coat of arms of the Conway 
family, preserved in several documents in the Virginia State 
Archives, is recorded: " Sable on a band argent, cotised ermine, 
a rose, gules, between two amulets of the last." Crest: "A 
Moor's head, sidefaced proper, banded round the temples, 
argent and azure." The motto: "Fide et amore." 

The Conaways have been in Tyler County, West Virginia, 
for several generations. Eli Conaway was born in that county, 



and spent his life there as a farmer. He married Perthena A. 
RufiFner. Their son, Charles I. Conaway, was born in Tyler 
County in 1844 and died in 1894, and during his active life 
was both a merchant and farmer. He married Elizabeth 
Virginia Stealey. 

Orrin Bryte Conaway, fifth of the ten children of his 
parents, was born in Tyler County June 21, 1879. He 
attended the public schools, graduated in 1900 from West 
Virginia Wesleyan College at Buckhannon and subsequently 
entered West Virginia University at Morgantown, from which 
he received his A. B. degree in 1903 and his LL. B. degree in 
1906. Since his graduation Mr. Conaway has been indus- 
triously engaged in professional work at Middlebourne. He 
has served as mayor of that town, and is now in his third 
term as prosecuting attorney of Tyler County. 

Mr. Conaway is member of the Phi Kappa Psi college 
fraternity, and has served on the Official Board of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. March 8, 1911, at Middlebourne, he 
married Maude K. Carpenter, daughter of J. S. and Frances 
(Kramer) Carpenter. Mr. and Mrs. Conaway have had two ; 
children: Helen K., born January 11, 1912, and died February , 
8, 1920, and Orrin Bryte, Jr., born February 14, 1918. | 

Albin H. Smith is a native of Tyler County, where during i 
his young manhood he taught school, later graduated in! 
pharmacy, for a number of years has been in the drug business : 
and is now proprietor of the leading drug store of Middle- 
bourne. 

He was born at Wick in Tyler County July 23, 1889. His 
grandfather, Henry Smith, was born in Pennsylvania in 1814, 
and was an early day farmer in the Frew community of Tyler 
County where he lived until his death in 1896. Finton A. 
Smith, better known to his friends as "Bose," is a resident of 
Frew, where he was born March 9, 1854, and his home all his 
life has been at Frew and Wick. He is a skillful house painter 
by trade, and has performed that essential service for many 
years, including much work in Middlebourne and vicinity. ; 
He is a republican in politics. Finton A. Smith married Missi 
Maggie Robinson, who was born at Wick April 20, 1863., 
They became the parents of five children: Olive, wife of 
J. Kenneth McCoy, a druggist at Fairview in Marion County;; 
Albin H.; Gertrude, who died at the age of nine years; Missj 
Floy, a graduate nurse in charge of a ward in the Ohio Valley] 
Hospital at Wheeling; and Frank H., an apprentice druggistl 
under his brother. 

Albin H. Smith was educated in the rural schools to the age 
of seventeen. He taught one year at Blue and for three years : 
in his home district at Frew. In 1912 he graduated with the 
degree Ph. G. from the Valparaiso University School of Phar- 1 
macy. He then returned to West Virginia and clerked in ai 
drug store at Fairview in Marion County until stricken with 
typhoid fever three weeks later. After recovering he was 
for three years a drug clerk in the Opera Drug store at Sisters- 
ville, then for three months in George Phillips' store at St 
Marys in Pleasants County, and after that did relief work in; 
Fayette and McDowell counties until 1915. In that year Mrj 
Smith removed to Middlebourne, and for four years was 
associated as an employe with the drug store of Charles D. 
Eastman. He then bought a half interest in the store and in 
December, 1920, became full proprietor and is now at the 
head of a prosperous business. 

Mr. Smith is a republican, a member of the MethodisI 
Episcopal Church, and is affiliated with Middlebourne Lodge 
No. 34, F. and A. M. In June, 1915, at New Martinsville, h< 
married Miss Nina White, daughter of Hamilton and Florindi 
(Hall) White. Her parents now live at Sister.sville and hei 
father is a veteran Union soldier. Mr. and Mrs. Smith havi 
three children: Harold Eugene, born March 4, 1916; Charlei 
A., born in 1917; and Maurice F., born August 24, 1919. 

Joe Williams is founder and publisher of the Pleasant 
County Leader, the second oldest but the largest newspape: 
in point of circulation and influence in Pleasants County an( 
in fact one of the best edited journals in that section of th 
state. Mr. Williams has been a citizen of invaluable influenc 
in St. Marys, is a former representative of Pleasants Countj 
and was also postmaster of St. Marys for a number of yean 

His family were pioneers in Greenbrier County, West Vii 
ginia, going into that mountainous section from old Virginia 
His grandfather, Joseph Williams, was born in 1800, owned 




<d6< ^\Mtafyi'. 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



37 



'arm, but spent a large part of his time hunting. He died in 
jreenbrier County in 1884. His wife was a Miss Brown, a 
lative of the same county, who died in Kansas. James M. 
iVilliams, father of the St. Marys editor, lived all his life on 
)ne farm in Greenbrier County, where he was born in 1837 
ind died in 1909. He was a soldier in the Union Army. At 
irst he was a scout attached to the forces of General George 
Orook. Later he joined Captain Andrew W. Mann's Company 
lif State Guards from Greenbrier County, being enrolled 
!n the Company December 1, 1864, and discharged July 1, 
i865. This service was a particularly hazardous one in the 
.ffo Man's Land between the Union and Confederate lines, 
.nd he had a full share in that strenuous campaigning. He 
ras a republican in politics and a member of the Baptist 
!!hurch. James M. Williams married Lavina McMillan, who 
Fas born in 1838 and died in 1905, spending all her Ufe in 
Jreenbrier County. They became the parents of seven chil- 
Iren: John R., who died on the Williams homestead at the 
:ge of thirty, having taught school for a number of years; 
■Jellie Frances, wife of Moffat May, a farmer, stock raiser and 
limber dealer living near White Sulphur Springs, West Vir- 
inia; Luelle, wife of Rev. S. A. Mondy, a clergyman of the 
idventist Church near Macon, Georgia; Joe; Mrs. Maggie 
Sums, who died on the old home farm; Emra, a farmer at 
tlyrtle Creek, Oregon; Mrs. Cassie Christian, whose husband 
perates a part of the Williams homestead. 

Joe Williams, who was born January 20, 1873, Uved on the 
»rm to the age of eighteen and acquired his early education 
n the rural schools of Greenbrier County. For two years 
,e worked for N. S. Bruffey in a store at FalUng Spring in 
ireenbrier County, and then as clerk for W. H. Overholt at 
he same place about two years. During 1894-95 he attended 
.lichaels University at Logausport, Indiana, taking a business 
ourse, and in the fall of 1895 began in connection with jour- 
alism at Sistersville as an employe of J. H. McCoy on the 
)aily Oil Review. 

On September 12, 1898, Mr. Williams moved to St. Marys 
nd established the Pleasants County Leader, of which he has 
ince been proprietor and editor. He owns the Leader Build- 
ig and the entire plant, and has one of the best equipped 
ewspaper offices in this section of the state, including hnotype 
lachines, cylinder press, etc. It is a republican paper, cir- 
ulating throughout Pleasants and surrounding counties, and 
as an extensive mailing list to all the oil sections of the 
ountry. 

Mr. Williams was postmaster of St. Marys from 1905 to 
913. He was reappointed by President Taft, but the demo- 
ratic Senate refused to confirm him for a third term. He was 
ity treasurer in 1914-15, and in November, 1918, was elected 
a the republican ticket to represent Pleasants County in the 
tate Legislature. He was one of the very useful members in 
iie sessions of 1919-20. As a member of the educational com- 
littee he helped frame the present school code. He was chair- 
lan of the committee on executive offices and libraries, and a 
lember of the committees on election and privileges, insur- 
nce and Virginia debt. 

Mr. Williams affiliates with the Presbyterian Church, is a 
ast master of St. Marys Lodge No. 41, F. and A. M., a 
'.ember of Sistersville Chapter No. 27, R. A. M., Mountain 
tate Commandery No. 14, K. T., Nemesis Temple of the 
lystic Shrine at Parkersburg, and St. Mary's Chapter No. 31 
r the Eastern Star. During the war he made the Pleasants 
iounty Leader an effective source of influence and publicity 
)r the Government and every patriotic cause associated with 
le winning of the war, and was personally active in the 
arious drives in his locality. Mr. Williams owns a modern 
ome at 501 First Street and is also owner of a baseball park 
t St. Marys. 

In 1899 he married Miss Eloise Bachman, daughter of Cap- 
iin Martin and Margie E. (Miller) Bachman, now deceased, 
ler father, who was a lumber manufacturer at St. Marys, 
jrved as a captain in the Union Army during the Civil war. 
Ir. and Mrs. Wilhams have four children: Nellie, born 
ugust 19, 1902, is in the junior class at West Virginia Uni- 
ersity; and the three younger children, all attending high 
:hool, are Doris, born in June, 1905; Joe, born in August, 
.906, and Mazie, born in May, 1908. 



Majob Ulysses A, Knapp had completed his law studies 
when America declared war on Germany, and when his 
class graduated and a degree was assigned him by West 
Virginia University he was attending the First Officers 
Training Camp. The two succeeding years he was in active 
service, spending a year in France, and after his discharge 
he began practice at Fairmont, where he has already 
achieved recognition as a very able and thorough lawyer. 

Major Knapp was born on a farm in Fayette County, 
Pennsylvania, November 9, 1886, but is related to several 
old West Virginia families. His grandparents were Henry 
and Margaret (Markley) Knapp. Henry Knapp was born 
in New York State and as a young man removed to West 
Virginia and married Margaret Markley, a native of Bar- 
bour County, this state, and daughter of Christian and 
Margaret (Shockley) Markley. Charles F. Knapp, father 
of Major Knapp, was born in Barbour County, West Vir- 
ginia, November 19, 1853, but in early life removed to 
Pennsylvania. He married Nancy A. Thomas, who was 
born in Fayette County Pennsylvania, October 10, 1854, 
daughter of George and Nancy (Umble) Thomas, both 
natives of Pennsylvania. George Thomas was born in Mary- 
land, son of Jacob Thomas and grandson of Alexander 
Thomas. Alexander Thomas was a native of Wales and 
founder of his branch of the family in America. After 
his marriage Charles F. Knapp settled on a farm in 
Fayette County, Pennsylvania, but in 1897 removed to 
Fairmont, West Virginia, where he and his wife now re- 
side. 

Ulysses A. Knapp was about ten years of age when his 
parents located at Fairmont. Here he acquired a common 
school education and at the age of thirteen he went to work 
in the Bank of Fairmont, remaining there two years. He 
was then in the engineering department of the Consolidation 
Coal Company, but in intervals of employment, and paying 
his way through his earnings, he attended the city schools 
and the Fairmont Normal School. After his university 
preparation he entered West Virginia Law School, and 
graduated in 1917 as president of his class. 

Major Knapp reported to the First Officers Training 
Camp at Fort Benjamin Harrison at Indianapolis, May 13, 
1917. He received his commission as captain August 15th, 
and was assigned to the command of Company H of the 
Three Hundred and Twenty-ninth Infantry, Eighty-third 
Division. He was kept in the home camp, training and in 
other duty until June 12, 1918, when he sailed for over- 
seas, landing at LaHavre July 1st, and was in command 
of the Second Battalion of the Three Hundred and Twenty- 
ninth Regiment from August 15 to November 26, 1918. 
He was attached to the general headquarters as rifle in- 
structor of the Third Corps School at Clamecy, Nievre, from 
November 27, 1918, to April 1, 1919, and was range officer 
and assistant range officer of the D'Auvons Range at 
LeMans from April 1, 1919 to July 1, 1919. He was 
commissioned major of infantry May 14, 1919. July 19th 
he sailed from Brest, landing in New York City July 29th, 
and received his honorable discharge at Camp Sherman, 
Ohio, August 16, 1919. 

While still in the service and while at home on leave of 
absence Major Knapp was admitted to the West Virginia 
bar, in April, 1919, and soon after leaving the army he 
began practice at Fairmont 

Major Knapp is a very popular citizen and is affiliated 
with the democratic party. In 1920 he won the democratic 
nomination as a candidate for the House of Delegates. 
When L. C. Musgrove, candidate for prosecuting attorney, 
withdrew from the campaign, he was unanimously chosen by 
the County Committee to fill the vacancy on the ticket, and 
made a very active and spirited campaign against the heavy 
odds that ended in a general republican landslide that 
year. Major Knapp is a member of the American Legion, 
the Order of Elks, Knights of Pythias and Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and also belongs to the Kiwanis 
Club and the Phi Sigma Kappa college fraternity. 

John L. Hissom. Many residents of Tyler and Pleasants 
counties recall when John L. Hissom was one of the most 



38 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



popular school men in these sections, and his last school work 
was done at St. Marys. When he left the school room he 
took up the lumber business and now has the only business of 
the kind in Pleasants County, and has an e.xtensive trade both 
retail and wholesale. In other ways Mr. Hissom has been a 
man of leadership and influence in this section of the state. 
His ancestry is English, but members of the family have 
been in this country since Colonial times. They first settled 
in old Virginia, where Mr. Hissom's grandfather, David, was 
born. As a young man he went to the Ohio Valley and for 
many years lived on a farm in Monroe County, Ohio, but 
spent his last days in Tyler County, West Virginia. He was a 
veteran of the War of 1812. His wife was a Miss Bowen, a 
native of Ohio. Their son, William S. Hissom, was born in 
Monroe County in 1828, and for many years conducted his 
farm in that county, but in 18S8 moved to Tyler County, West 
Virginia, and continued farming there until his death in 1900. 
He was active in the Methodist Episcopal Church and a 
democrat in politics. He married in Monroe County, Sarah 
A. Hubbard, who was born at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, in 
1832, and died in Tyler County in 1890. Their children were 
six in number: Manford C, a farmer in Clarington, Ohio; 
Oscar E., a steamboat mate who died at East Liverpool, 
Ohio, in 1916; John L; Alvin D., a farmer in Tyler County; 
Hattie Elizabeth, who died in Tyler County, wife of Robert 
O. Cathers, a farmer; and Ephraim T., a farmer who died in 
Tyler County in 1900. 

John L. Hissom was born in Monroe County June 28, 1862, 
and was reared and educated there. He attended rural 
schools, a normal school at Woodsfield, and in the winter of 
1884 taught his first winter term in Mount Zion School in his 
native county. The following four years he was in the Mount 
Aetna School in the same county, after which he came to West 
Virginia, and during 1889-90 presided over the Star School in 
Tyler County, for one term was principal of the school at 
Friendly, and for six terms was teacher of Oak Grove. His 
first teaching in Pleasants County was one term at Pleasants 
Ridge, and then for three years he was principal of the graded 
schools at St. Marys. For a year after he retired from 
educational work Mr. Hissom was editor of St. Marys Oracle, 
the oldest paper in Pleasants County. 

Then, in 1903, he established his present business as a 
retail and wholesale dealer in lumber, and carries a complete 
and well selected stock of lumber and building materials, 
owning his offices and yards at Barkwill and Court streets. 
Mr. Hissom is also a stochkolder in the Pleasants County 
Bank and is a stockholder and secretary of the United Tele- 
phone Company at St. Marys. He owns considerable real 
estate, including his modern home on Court Street and a farm 
in Tyler County. 

Mr. Hissom acted for two years as a member of the City 
Council at St. Marys. He is a democrat, a steward in the 
Methodist Protestant Church, is a past grand of St. Marys 
Lodge No. 22, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and a 
member of the Knights of the Maccabees. It should also be 
said to his credit that during the war he used his financial 
means to support the Government and took part in the various 
local patriotic drives. Moreover, one of his sons was fighting 
the German Kaiser in France. 

In 1S85, in Monroe County, Mr. Hissom married Miss Eva 
Wright, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Wright, now de- 
ceased. Her father was a farmer. Mrs. Hissom died in Tyler 
County in 1889, and was survived by two daughters: Miss 
Nellie T., who died at the age of thirty-one, and Nora D., 
wife of Jack B. Horner, a mill worker at Washington, Penn- 
sylvania. In 1891, in Tyler County, Mr. Hisson married Miss 
Lottie J. Craig, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Craig, now 
deceased. By this marriage Mr. Hissom has two sons, William 
C. and Olin S. William, who was born June 20, 1892, was 
educated in the schools at St. Marys and is associated with 
hisf at her in business. He married Ethel Adams, a native of 
Pleasants County, and their three children are Kathryn, born 
January 17, 1913; Billie, born September 10, 1915, and 
Charles, born July 4, 1919. The second son, Olin, was in 
France twelve months with the Expeditionary Forces, partici- 
pated in the Argonne Drive, and was mustered out with the 
rank of sergeant. He now is connected with the lumber 
business. 



William Edward Clovis. During the past seven years 
Mr. Clovis has devoted his entire time and energies to a very 
successful and prosperous automobile business as an author- 
ized agent for the Ford car in Pleasants County. His career 
altogether has been one of well directed effort in different 
lines. He has been a teacher, is former sheriff of Pleasants 
County, and probably is as well known over the county as any 
other citizen. 

His family has been in West Virginia for several generations. 
The name Clovis was transplanted to Pennsylvania in Colonial 
times from Southwestern Virginia. His great-grandfather, 
Conrad Clovis, was born in Pennsylvania, and from that 
state moved his family to Hebron, West Virginia, where he 
lived out his life as a farmer. The grandfather of William E. 
Clovis was Solomon Clovis, who was born in Monongalia 
County, West Virginia, in 1818, but spent nearly all his life 
in Pleasants County and was a cabinet maker by trade. He 
died in 1876 and is buried at Hebron. His wife was a Miss 
Wrick, a native and life long resident of Pleasants County. 
Amos Clovis, their son, was born near Hebron August 13, 
1854, and since 1885 has been a resident of Maxwell in 
Pleasants County. He was a merchant in early life, and 
since then has been a leading farmer and still owns two farms 
at Maxwell. He is a republican and an active member of the 
Church of Christ. Amos Clovis married Martha Jane Flem- 
ing, who was born near Fairmont, West Virginia, July 15, 
1856. William E. is the oldest of their children. Dr. Elijah 
Ellsworth is one of the state's prominent physicians and is 
now superintendent of the State Tuberculosis Sanitarium at 
Terra Alta. Cora Elizabeth is the wife of Homer F. Simonton, 
Circuit Court clerk of Pleasants County. Harry T. is an oil 
refiner at St. Marys, and the youngest, Maurice Lawrence, 
is in the drug business at Huntington. 

William Edward Clovis was born at Hebron, Pleasants 
County, November 7, 1876, and acquired a rural school 
education there. He finished his education in the Fairmont 
State Normal, which he attended altogether for five terms. 
He was granted an opportunity to teach school at the age of 
eighteen, and the first year he taught in the Jonestown School 
of his native county. Then for two years he had charge of the 
French Creek School, one year in the Ruckman School on Cow 
Creek, and his last year was spent in his home school at Nine 
Mile. After leaving the schoolroom Mr. Clovis was deputy 
county assessor one year. For some time he cherished an 
ambition to become a physician, and with that in view he 
entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, 
but on account of ill health had to give up those plans after 
the first year. From 1901 to 1908 Mr. Clovis conducted a 
mercantile business at Adlai in Pleasants County. In the fall 
of 1908 he was elected sheriff, and on January 7, 1909, re- 
moved to St. Marys and was the chief law officer of the local 
courts through the four year term ending in 1914. During 
1913-14 Mr. Clovis was a member of St. Marys Hardware 
Company, but in the meantime he had taken the agency for 
the Ford cars, and since 1914 has made this his primary busi- 
ness. He is the authorized agent in Pleasants County for the 
Ford automobile, trucks and tractors, and has done the 
biggest business in that line of any automobile agency in this 
section of the state. It is estimated that he has sold at least 
ninety per cent of all automobiles bought in the county. 
During 1920-21 he erected a handsome public garage at the 
corner of Washington and Third streets. The garage in 80x80 
feet, two stories, and built of brick and concrete. Mr. Clovis 
is also a director of the First National Bank of St. Marys 

He still retains a deep interest in educational progress and 
since July 1, 1919, has been president of the Board of Educa- 
tion in St. Marys. He is an elder in the Church of Christ, 
is a republican, and during the war was a "fourminute" 
speaker and a worker in behalf of all local patriotic causes. 
April 16, 1899, at Gibson in Pleasants County, Mr. Clovis 
married Miss Mary Varner, daughter of George W. and 
Angelia V. (Daniel) Varner, now deceased. Her father was a 
minister of the Church of Christ. Mrs. Clovis received a 
normal school education and prior to her marriage was a 
teacher in Pleasants County for four years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Clovis have five children, and have given all of them liberal 
educational advantages. Eunice Madge, the oldest, born 
March 4, 1900, is a graduate of the St. Marys High School and 




C(/^<0:^,9n^L.^^^x._sL^^>u.i,^ 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



39 



the Fairmont State Normal, and is now teacher of the fifth 
grade in the local public schools. Cora Edith, born October 
23, 1901, graduated from the same schools as her sister and 
now has charge of the first grade in the St. Marys public 
school. The only son, George A., was born October 25, 1903, 
and is now a student in Marietta College in Ohio. The two 
younger children are Martha Virginia, born November 15, 
1906, a student in high school, and Mary Edna, born Novem- 
ber 21, 1910. 

John B. Watson, M. D. For over thirty years Dr. Watson 
was performing his duties as a physician and surgeon, and 
most of that time has been a resident of St. Marys, his native 
town, in which he grew up and in which he has won the recog- 
nition of old time friends and associates, both in a professional 
capacity and as a high minded citizen. 

Dr. Watson was born at St. Marys May 5, 1862. His 
grandfather, John Watson, was born in England in 1807 and 
as a young man came to America and settled on a farm near 
St. Marys, where he married Rosanna Barker, a native of 
Pleasants County. John Watson was a millwright, and he 
and his wife spent the rest of their years in and around St. 
Marys, where he died in 1894. The son, Andrew J. Watson, 
was born in Pleasants County in 1840 and was for a number 
of years identified with merchandising at St. Marys. In 1881 
he removed to East Liverpool. Ohio, where he lived practically 
retired until his death in 1917. He was a democrat, and a 
member of the Methodist Protestant Church. His wife was 
Miss Charlotte Core, who was born in Harrison County, 
West Virginia, in 1838, and died at East Liverpool, Ohio, in 
October, 1920. Dr. Watson is the oldest of their large family 
of children; Mamie, who lives at East Liverpool, is the widow 
of William Good; Joseph C. was an oil well driller and died at 
East Liverpool in 1920; Mrs. Flora F. Griffin lives at Toronto, 
Ohio, where her husband is foreman in a pottery plant; 
William A. is foreman for the Newell Street Railway Company 
at East Liverpool; Iva is the wife of William Lawson a farmer, 
at East Liverpool; Charles is a motorman with the Newel 
Traction Company at East Liverpool; Virdie lives at East 
Liverpool, where her husband is employed in one of the pot- 
tery plants; and Andrew J. is a motorman for the Newell 
Traction Company. 

John B. Watson spent his early life in Pleasants County 
and attended rural schools up to the age of thirteen and at 
that time began earning his own way. He was employed by 
his father in shaving staves and also worked in the timber 
until he was twenty-one. He came to manhood with a vigor- 
ous constitution but only a common school education. He 
began the study of medicine under his uncle. Dr. Joseph B. 
Watson, at St. Marys, and subsequently entered the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, where he grad- 
uated in 1887. After graduating for nine and a half years 
Dr. Watson practiced at Lawrence in Upshur County, and 
since then has performed his professional work at St. ^larys. 
His offices are on Second Street. Since 1920 he has been 
county health officer and is a member in good standing of 
the State and American Medical Associations. Dr. Watson is 
a democrat, has filled all the lay offices in the Methodist 
Protestant Church, and is affiliated with St. Marys Lodge No. 
41, A. F. and A. M., St. Marys Camp No. 20 Knights of the 
Maccabees, St. Marys Lodge No. 22, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and also belongs to the Knights of Pythias and 
the Tribe of Ben Hur. 

In 1889, at Friendly, West Virginia, Dr. Watson married. 
Miss Linnie F. Williamson. Two children were born to their 
marriage: Sue Mary, who died at St. Marys at the age of 
twenty-seven, was the wife of Dr. Jed C. Wilcoxen, a St. Marys 
dentist. The only son, Dr. J. Loomis Watson, graduated 
Doctor of Dental Surgery fr m the University of Pittsburgh 
and was in the Student Army Traim'ng Camp at Pittsburgh 
during the war. He is now practicing his profession at Pitts- 
burgh. 

Mrs. Watson is a daughter of Friend C. Williamson, who 
was born in Tyler County, West Virginia, in 1842, and lived 
there all his life. He had various business interests, and was 
an extensive dealer in fruit. The town of Friendly in Tyler 
County was named for him, and he was living in that com- 
munity when he died in 1911. He was a democrat and was 
one of the leading members of the Methodist Protestant 



Church in his vicinity. He was also a Mason. Friend C. 
Williamson married Adelia Thorne, who was born in Jackson 
County, West Virginia, in 1844, and is now living at Friendly. 
Mrs. Watson was educated in the public schools of Friendly, 
and before her marriage was a milliner and dressmaker. 

James William Stuck has practiced law as a member of the 
Doddridge County bar for over thirty years. With a general 
practice has gone a public-spirited participation in public 
affairs, and his record of efficient service in several important 
offices is an honor that his friends do not allow him to forget. 

He was born at Central Station, Doddridge County, April 6, 
1861, son of Lorenzo D. and J. Cinthe (Ruley) Stuck. His 
father, who was born near Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and was 
reared in that state, early in life entered the railroad service, 
and came to Doddridge County while helping build the Balti- 
more and Ohio through that county. He remained here and 
continued his service with the railroad company until about 
1900. He died at the age of eighty-four and his wife, a native 
of Ohio, lived to be eighty. Their children were James 
William, Charles, Edward L. (deceased), Blanche and Nellie 
(deceased). 

James William Stuck spent his early life at Central Station. 
After completing a high school education, he taught school 
for six years, and at the same time was diligently pursuing his 
law studies. He qualified for and was admitted to the bar in 
1889. His first public honor came before he took up practice. 
In 1888 he was the republican party candidate for the House 
of Delegates from Doddridge County, and was elected and 
then reelected. These two terms of legislative service early in 
his professional career furnished him a valuable experience as 
well as an opportunity to look after the interest of his con- 
stituents in Doddridge County. In 1892 he was elected coun- 
ty prosecutor, and served in that office two years. For eight 
years Mr. Stuck served as a member of the Board of Directors 
for the State Deaf, Dumb and Blind Institute at Romney. 
He was first appointed to the board by Governor Atchinson. 
Other offices of honor and trust have been conferred upon 
him, and at one time he was assistant Secretary of the First 
Senate. 

For the past twelve years Mr. Stuck has given the Hope Gas 
Company much of his time, serving in the company's right of 
way and damage department. He married in 1882 Emma 
Benninger, daughter of Jacob Benninger, of Doddridge Coun- 
ty. Six children were born to their marriage, and the five 
now living are: H. C, R. N., Ethel, Beulah and Georgia. 
The daughter Genevieve is deceased. 

Judge Winfield Scott Meredith, judge of the Circuit 
Court of Marion County, has been an active member of the 
bar at Fairmont forty years. At the time he was admitted 
to the bar he was enjoying some congenial and useful rela- 
tions as a teacher in the public and normal schools of the 
state, and in his case there was no waiting period bridging 
over his career as an educator and that of a lawyer. Judge 
Meredith has been a prominent factor in West Virginia 
affairs for many years. 

Through four generations the Meredith family has been 
identified with the development of the northern section of 
the state. In the latter years of the eighteenth century 
there lived in South Wales a prosperous and hard working 
silversmith, Thomas Meredith. About 1800, seeking a 
ch.nnge of fortune, he immigrated with his family to 
America, spending a short time at Hagerstown, Maryland, 
and then coming to what is now Marion County, West Vir- 
ginia, locating on a farm in the Paw Paw District. He 
soon removed to another farm in Monongalia County, and 
for a number of years was busily engaged in its farming 
and stock raising activities. Becoming dissatisfied with 
that section of the state, he went on a homeseeking tour 
through Canada, and while there died without making 
permanent arrangements for a new home. 

His son, William Meredith, was born in Wales, was three 
years of age when brought by his parents to America, and 
he grew up in West Virginia and as a young man cleared 
a farm on the Monongahcla River near Smithtown in 
Monongalia County. Later removing to Marion County, he 
bought a farm of 300 acres on Pickett's Creek, and there 
lived, a man of industry and influence, until his death on 



40 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



February 13, 1869, at the age of seventy-two. For fifteen 
years he was justice of the peace,, was deputy sheriff sev- 
eral years, and for one term president of the County Court 
of Marion County. His wife was Hannah Powell, daughter 
of John Powell and a native of Monongalia County. 

The thu-d generation was also represented by William 
Meredith, who was born near Smithtown in Monongalia 
County November 17, 1824, and lived to the advanced age 
of eighty-six, passing away in 1910. By trade he was a 
wagonmaker, and also successfully engaged in other enter- 
prises. From 1866 to 1887 he was a lumber miller in Harri- 
son and Ritchie counties, was a building contractor, a 
farmer, and held the office of justice of the peace in Wirt 
County. Governor Pierpont commissioned him a captain 
of militia. April 13, 1845, William Meredith II married 
Harriet Wilson. Her father, William H. Wilson, was a 
Marion County farmer and served as a soldier in the War 
of 1812. 

Winfield Scott Meredith is a son of William and Harriet 
(Wilson) Meredith and was born in Marion County August 
13, 1855. He grew up in the atmosphere of the CivU war, 
but had better than the average educational advantages. 
He attended Salem Academy in Harrison County, and 
graduated with the class of 1879 from the Fairmont State 
Normal School, subsequently taking post-graduate work 
there. He had been a teacher in the Normal school a year 
before he graduated, and for one year was principal of 
the public schools at Cherry Camp. One of his preceptors 
at the Normal School was Dr. J. G. Blair, who died in 1879, 
and Judge Meredith was elected by the board to conduct 
his classes until they were graduated. For three years 
Judge Meredith was principal at Palatine, now a ward of 
Fairmont City, and for two years was princijjal of the 
Mannington grade .schools. 

In the meantime he was diligently studying law, beginning 
under Judge James Morrow Jr., of Fairmont. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1881 and in 1888 admitted to practice 
before the West Virginia Supreme Court. Judge Meredith 
in 1882 was elected prosecutiug attorney of Marion County 
to fill an unexpired term, and was then re-elected for a 
full term of four years. For many years he has been one 
of the recognized leaders of the republican party in his 
section of the state. In 1908 he was elected a member of 
the State Senate, taking his seat January 1, 1909, for a 
term of four years. That was the year of the memorable 
deadlock, when fifteen republican senators and fifteen demo- 
cratic senators failed to agree as to the admission of some 
elected republicans. A republican caucus was in session 
fifteen days. Judge Meredith being its chairman, and when 
these republicans were threatened with arrest for not taking 
their seats and permitting the organization of the Senate, 
Judge Meredith and his followers avoided arrest by going 
to Cincinnati, where they remained about a week and 
then returned, after which the organization was completed 
with a republican as president of the body. Judge Meredith 
became chairman of the Judiciary Committee. 

With this exception Judge Meredith was engaged in a 
growing and important private law practice until January 
1, 1921, when he went on the bench as judge of the Circuit 
Court of Marion County. He was elected on the republican 
ticket in November, 1920. When he went on the bench 
Judge Meredith resigned as a director of the People's 
National Bank of Fairmont and severed all his official 
relations with other corporations. 

Judge Meredith is a member of the West Virginia Bar 
Association and in 1918 was a delegate to the annual con- 
vention of the American Bar Association. During the 
World war he was active in Draft Board work, the Red 
Cross and Liberty Bond campaigns, and as a "Four Min- 
ute" man made numerous addresses all over the country. 

In 1883 he married Dora Swisher, daughter of B. F. 
Swisher, of Fairmont. She died in 1886, leaving two sons: 
Dana S., who was born in 1884 and died in 1910; and 
Aubrey W., who was born in 1885 and died in 1915, having 
graduated from the Fairmont High School, attended the 
Fairmont State Normal, and in 1910 graduated LL. B. from 
West Virginia University and was coming into a successful 
practice as a lawyer at the time of his death. The second 



wife of Judge Meredith was a daughter of the late Sylvanus 
Hall, of Fairmont. She died leaving no children. In June, 
1914, Judge Meredith married Frances Dent, who was born 
at Ironton, Ohio, daughter of H. C. Dent. They have one 
son, Winfield Scott Meredith, Jr., born January 6, 1916. 

Isaac .Taylor Peters, M. D., has the sterling character- 
istics and the technical knowledge and skill which make 
for maximum success in the exacting profession of his 
choice, and he is established in active general practice at 
Maybeury, McDowell County. In an important mine prac- 
tice he is associated with his older brother, Dr. E. F. 
Peters, in whose personal sketch, on other pages of this 
work, is given adequate record concerning the family his- 
tory. 

Doctor Peters was born at Camp Creek, Mercer County, 
West Virginia, January 3, 1890, and is a son of Joseph and 
Mary Alice (Ellison) Peters, the father having been born 
in Virginia and the mother in West Virginia. Joseph 
Peters was a successful teacher prior to his marriage, and 
tliereafter became a prosperous merchant and influential 
citizen of Mercer County, where he served many years as 
county assessor. 

After leaving the public schools, Doctor Peters entered 
the Concord State Normal School, at Athens, West Vir- 
ginia, 1906, and in this institution he was graduated in 
1910. He taught one term of rural school and then was 
made superintendent of the schools of the North Fork and 
Elkliorn districts in McDowell County, an office of which he 
continued the incumbent two years. In 1918 he was gradu- 
ated in the Medical College of Virginia, at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. In 1913, the New Medical College of Virginia con- 
solidated with the University College of Medicine under the 
name of The Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, and 
has nothing to do with the school at Charlottesville. In his 
senior year he served as an interne in the Memorial Hospi- 
tal at Richmond, and after receiving his degree of Doctor 
of Medicine he passed seven months as an assistant in the 
Johnston & Willis Sanitarium in that city, where he gained 
further fortifying experience. For the ensuing ten months 
he was associated in practice with Dr. R. V. Shanklin, at 
Gary, West Virginia, and since that time he has maintained 
a professional alliance with his brother, at Maybeury. He 
has in connection with' his practice a well equipped oper- 
ating room and also a limited number of beds for the im- 
mediate accommodation of patients who may require same 
prior to being taken to regularly constituted hospitals. 
Doctor Peters is an active member of the McDowell County 
Medical Society, and holds membership also in the West 
Virginia State Medical Society and the American Medical 
Association. He is a republican in political adherency, is 
affiliated with the Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery 
bodies of York Rite Masonry, as is he also with the adjunct 
organizations, the Mystic Shrine and the Order of the 
Eastern Star, besides which he is a member of the Kniglits 
of Pythias. 

In 1920, at Huntington, this state, was solemnized the 
marriage of Doctor Peters to Miss Lillian V. Davis, daugh- 
ter of John L. and Dora (Rhodes) Davis, Mr. Davis being 
engaged in business as a real estate dealer, timber operator 
and contractor. The only child of Doctor and Mrs. Peters 
died in infancy. 

Stephen T. Bird, D. D. S., a prominent and popular 
Princeton dentist, has been in the practice of his profession 
there for over ten years, though for two years of this time 
he was absent on army duty. Pew men attached to the 
Expeditionary Forces saw and participated in more strenu- 
ous scenes along the battle front than Doctor Bird. 

He was born at Athens in Mercer County, July 8, 1883, 
and is of Scotch-Irish ancestry and of Old Virginia stock. 
His parents, J. S. H. and Elizabeth S. (Vermillion) Bird, 
were both born in Virginia. His father was a farmer, and 
in the Civil war became a Confederate soldier in a Vir- 
ginia regiment under the command of General Breckenridge. 
He served until captured, and then remained at Fortress 
Monroe until the close of the war. After taking the oath 
of allegiance he returned home and resumed his work as a 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



41 



civilian on the farm. He kept in close touch with public 
affairs, for many years served on the school board, and 
was an active member of the Baptist Church. 

Stephen T. Bird acquired a common school education at 
Athens, and supplemented this by attending the State Nor- 
mal College there, graduating in 1904. The next two years 
he was a clerk for the Borderland Coal & Coke Company 
and the Thaeker Coal & Coke Company, and in 1906 he be- 
gan the study of dental surgery at Central University of 
Kentucky at Louisville, spending his vacations again in the 
service of the coal and coke companies. He graduated in 
1909, and after one year of practice at Bluefield estab- 
lished his home and office at Princeton, in 1910, and has 
since achieved a splendid reputation for proficiency in his 
chosen calling. 

His war record is one deserving special attention. Prob- 
ably no man in West Virginia knows more of the realities 
of modern warfare than Doctor Bird. June 10, 1917, he re- 
ceived a commission as first lieutenant in the Dental Corps, 
but as a matter of fact he performed the duties of a dentist 
only while in the rest areas in France, and while on front 
line duty he was exposed to all the dangers and performed 
all the services required of regular physicians and surgeons 
at the battle front, chiefly in first aid. July 14, 1917, Doc- 
tor Bird was called to duty, being sent to Washington, D. C, 
and assigned to the Sixth United States Engineers of the 
Third Division. November 3rd he received orders for over- 
seas duty and sailed December 3, 1917, arriving at St. 
Nazaire, France, December 24, 1917. He was with the 
Sixth Engineers in the Haute Marne sector on construction 
work for a month, and his regiment was then put on the 
British front on the Somme River with the Fourth British 
Army Division. Here it was that Doctor Bird had his first 
experience at the front giving first aid to the wounded, and 
for days was under constant fire. He continued with the 
British command until June 5, 1918, and then returned to 
the Marne and was assigned to the French Third Army 
Corps, and finally the Sixth Engineers were restored to their 
place in the Third American Army. On July 15, 1918, be- 
gan the big battle as the Aisne-Marne defensive, when for 
three successive days the Germans made their last great 
effort to break through. The critical day was July 18th, 
and from then until August 14th the battle became known 
and was properly described as the Aisne-Marne offensive of 
the allies. All this time Doctor Bird was at the front, and 
the sights and scenes in which he participated are to him 
like a maze of horror, and yet they present an accurate 
picture of the realities of war. After the offensive' Doctor 
Bird and his command were put in the rest area at Gondre 
Cour until September 4, 1918, were then moved over to the 
St. Mihiel sector and after three days participated in the 
Meuse-Argonne phase, there relieving the Seventy-ninth 
Division on September 29, 1918. Doctor Bird was in the 
Argonne fighting until October 1st, and was then returned 
to the rest area at Barleduc, where they remained until the 
signing of the armistice, November 11th. During the Ar- 
gonne action Doctor Bird was wounded and for eleven days 
was in a hospital. A few days after the armistice was 
signed the Third Division started on its long hike into Ger- 
many and Doctor Bird was on the march from about No- 
vember 15, 1918, to Christmas, when they reached their 
destination at Ochtendung. Here he remained until April 
21, 1919, when he received an order to join the Thirty-sec- 
ond Division for home, and he went to Brest with the Second 
Battalion of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Infantry, 
sailed out of Brest May 3rd, arrived at Hoboken May 9th, 
and after a week in Camp Mills went to Camp Meade, 
where he received his honorable discharge and returned to 
Princeton. During the war Doctor Bird participated in 
field duty during five major operations of the allied armies. 
Doctor Bird is uiunarried, is a member of the Missionary 
Baptist Church, is a Eoyal Arch and Knight Templar Ma- 
son and Shriner, a member of the American Legion, a char- 
ter member of the Princeton Country Club, and profes- 
sionally is affiliated with the State and American Dental 
Societies, and the Mercer, Mingo and McDowell Counties 
Dental Society. 



Hon. Edwahd Cooper, who represented the Fifth West 
Virginia District in Congress throughout the period of the 
World war, is a lawyer by training and early profession, 
but for over twenty years has devoted his time and ener- 
gies to the business of coal operator, and is one of the best 
known in the Pocahontas field in Mercer County. His home 
is in the Town of Bramwell, located on the branch of the 
Norfolk & Western Railroad, near Bluestone Junction. 

Mr. Cooper was born February 26, 1873, at Treverton, 
Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, son of John and 
Maria (Padbury) Cooper. His parents were both born in 
England, and immediately after their marriage came to 
the United States, about 1863, during the Civil war times, 
and lived for a number of years in Pennsylvania. John 
Cooper had been foreman in coal mines in England, and he 
resumed the same work in this country. He was born in 
1838. He was a regular miner in Pennsylvania, but was 
soon promoted to foreman. In 1872 he removed to West 
Virginia and began opening mines in the New River coal 
fields along the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, first at Quine- 
mont and later at Cooper, near Bramwell. Here he devel- 
oped the first Pocahontas coal mines in West Virginia, 
and the first Pocahontas coal shipped from a West Virginia 
operation was mined and shipped by John Cooper. He was 
one of the successful coal operators of his time, and was 
also president of the Bank of Bramwell when he died in 
1898. He was active in the cause of the republican party 
as a layman, and was one of the first masters of the Ma- 
sonic Lodge at Bramwell and had attained the thirty-third 
supreme honorary, degree in Scottish Rite Masonry. 

Edward Cooper was the second son in a family of six 
children, and has spent practically all his life in Mercer 
County. He attended a private school at Pocahontas, Vir- 
ginia, for three years, and then entered Washington and 
Lee University, where he took three years in the academic 
course and spent two years in the law department, gradu- 
ating in law in 1893. Mr. Cooper actively practiced at 
Bramwell for two or throe years, but in 1898, at the death 
of his father, gave up his profession and took charge, along 
with his brother, Thomas H. Cooper, now deceased, of the 
coal properties at Cooper. His interests as an operator 
have become widely extended, and he has been a director 
in some of the most prominent mining corporations in the 
Pocahontas field, including Mill Creek, Coaldale, McDowell, 
Crystal, the Pocahontas Consolidated Company and the 
Flat Top Fuel Company. 

Mr. Cooper for a number of years has been a leader in 
the republican party in his section of the state. He was a 
delegate to the Chicago National Convention in 1912, where 
he supported the nomination of Mr. Roosevelt. In 1914 he 
was elected a member of the Sixty-fourth Congress, and 
re-elected in 1918. As a business man of wide experience, 
a successful coal operator, he was able to do a great deal 
of valuable work for the Government while in Congress, 
and during the period of the war. 

On October 5, 1895, Mr. Cooper married Frances Doug- 
lass Smith, of Lexington, Virginia, daughter of James K. 
and Fannie (Douglass) Smith. Mr. and Mrs. Cooper have 
two children, Edward, Jr., born October 19, 1897, and 
Frances Douglass, born October 5, 1902. Edward, Jr., vol- 
unteered in the Marine Corps at the declaration of war 
against Germany, and having been trained in the Culver 
Military Academy of Indiana he was at once made a drill 
sergeant, and was assigned to duty throughout the war 
period at Paris Island, South Carolina. 

Mr. Cooper and family are Presbyterians. He is a Royal 
Arch and Knight Templar Mason and Shriner, a member 
of the Elks and the Moose, and belongs to the Shenandoah 
Club of Roanoke, Virginia, the Bluefield Country Club, 
Mercer County Country Club and the Falls Mills Hunting 
and Fishing Club, also the Pinechest Shooting Club of 
Thomasville, North Carolina. Mr. Cooper was for eight 
years a member of the town council of Bramwell, a posi- 
tion he now occupies. 

Harry Bowen is a leading operator in the Pocahontas 
fields of Mercer County, his home being at Simmon Station, 



42 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



Freeman Post Office, half a mile from BramweU. He has 
been active in the coal industry forty years and in later 
years has acquired widening interests in other affairs. 

Mr. Bowen was born October 14, 1860, at Ashland, 
Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, son of Jonathan P. and 
Hannah (Evans) Bowen, the latter a native of Pennsyl- 
vania. Jonathan Bowen was less than a year old when his 
parents landed in this country on coming from Wales. 
Jonathan Bowen went to work with his father in coal mines 
when a mere boy, and with the death of his father he be- 
came the real head of the family at the age of twelve 
years, supporting them by work as a miner, and from this 
humble station reaching responsibilities as mine foreman 
and superintendent while in Pennsylvania. In 1885 he re- 
moved to West Virginia, joining Mr. Booth as a partner 
in the Booth-Bowen properties, which had been opened in 
1884 by Mr. Booth and were pioneer developments in the 
Pocahontas field. Jonathan Bowen was a Union soldier in 
a Pennsylvania regiment and for many years was a member 
of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Harry Bowen acquired a common and high school educa- 
tion in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, graduating from 
high school at the age of sixteen. His association with the 
muling industry began as utility boy, and he also worked 
in the blacksmith 's shop, and finally became company 
blacksmith for the Beading Coal & Iron Company, a cor- 
poration with wliich he remained for seven years. 

In February, 1887, Mr. Bowen came to West Virginia 
to take charge of his father's business, and has therefore 
been a resident of Mercer County thirty-five years. He still 
has the management of the Booth-Bowen mines and opera- 
tions, and is also vice president of the Bank of Bramwell. 
Mr. Bowen is a Royal Arch and Knight Templar Mason, 
also a Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, and has held all 
the chairs in the Blue Lodge and is a past high priest of 
the Chapter and past eminent commander of the Knights 
Templars. He is a member of the Bluefield Country Club 
and the Shenandoah Club of Roanoke, Virginia. 

Mr. Bowen has achieved a gratifying share of material 
prosperity, and the inspiration for his work has been his 
home and family. He has reared and liberally provided for 
his own children, and is very proud of his seven grandchil- 
dren. In 1881, at Mahanoy City, Schuylkill County, Penn- 
sylvania, he married Miss Harriet Hopkinson, daughter of 
Joseph and Klizabeth (Howard) Hopkinson. Her parents 
were both born in England. The children born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Bowen are Elizabeth, now deceased, Jonathan, Ethel, 
Joseph and Hedley. Jonathan married Miss Stanger and 
is living at Bramwell. Joseph, who married Elizabeth 
Pritchard, has four children, named Joseph, Ethel, William 
and Ann. Hedley, whose home is at Freeman, West Vir- 
ginia, married Mary Blanton, and their three children are 
Harry, Hedley and Virginia. 

Captain Rollo J. Conley, a veteran of two wars, and 
for many years a prominent officer in the West Virginia 
National Guard, is a Fairmont lawyer, and has practiced 
his profession in that city since 1909. 

Captain Conley is a member of an old Pittsburgh family, 
but was born during the two years that his parents lived 
in Fulton, Illinois. His birth occurred March 27, 1874. He 
is a son of Joseph X. and Marietto (Gay) Conley, a grand- 
son of Joseph and Mary (McRoberts) Conley, and great- 
grandson of Hugh Conley. Joseph Conley was for many 
years in the drug business at Pittsburgh, where he died in 
1854. Joseph X. Conley, who was born at Pittsburgh April 
21, 1851, learned the drug business and for several years 
continued in that line in the West. On returning to Pitts- 
burgh he resumed the same line of business. While in the 
West he married Marietta Gay, a native of Connecticut and 
daughter of Rev. William Gay, who for fifty-nine years 
was a Presbyterian minister. 

Rollo J. Conley was educated in the city schools of Pitts- 
burgh, in Slippery Rock State Normal School in Pennsyl- 
vania, and finally in the law department of West Virginia 
University. On leaving normal school he entered the rail- 
way mail service. He was in the employ of the Government 
fourteen years, and for the last several years devoted his 



leisure time to the study of law in the offices of Judge 
W. S. Meredith of Fairmont, rounding out his studies with 
a course in West Virginia University Law School. He was 
admitted to the West Virginia bar in 1909, and since that 
year has been gaining a steadily increasing practice in his 
profession, and has relations with a number of prosperous 
business undertakings. He is secretary-treasurer of the 
Willetts Clay Company, secretary-treasurer of the Hall 
Garage Company, vice president of the Acme Book Com- 
pany, secretary of the Martin Brothers Drug Company, and 
director of the Fairmont Building and Loan Association. 

Captain Conley has a highly creditable record as a 
soldier. At the time of the Spanish-American War he ob- 
tained a leave of absence from the mail service and en- 
listed in the Tenth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry. As a buck private he spent fifteen months in the 
Philippines, where he was on duty during the Philippine 
insurrection. On the return trip home his regiment was 
given shore leave in Japanese ports. Captain Conley in 
1912 entered the West Virginia National Guards as a 
private in Company H of the First Regiment and after 
various promotions was made judge advocate general, with 
the rank of major. In 1918 Captain Conley resigned from 
the National Guard and accepted a commission as cap- 
tain in the Quartermaster's Department of the National 
Army, and in that capacity spent one year in France. He 
returned home in August, 1919, and was mustered out. 
Captain Conley was one of a party of 150 members of the 
American Legion which visited the battlefields of France 
and Belgium during the summer of 1921. Everywhere they 
went they were feted, and were received with welcome by 
both high and low, being entertained by the municipal 
authorities of many cities, and also by King Albert of 
Belgium, President Millerand of France and Marshall Foch 
and others. Captain Conley is a past commander of Heint- 
zelman Post No. 17 of the American Legion, and is judge 
advocate general of the West Virginia Department of Vet- 
erans of Foreign Wars. 

Fraternally he is affiliated with Fairmont Lodge No. 9, 
A. F. and A. M., Fairmont Commandery, Knights Templar, 
Mountain City Lodge, Knights of Pythias, Fairmont Lodge 
of Elks, the Kiwanis Club and the Chamber of Commerce. 
He and Mrs. Conley are members of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

November 21, 1899, Captain Conley married Georgia E. 
Hall, daughter of Sylvanus W. Hall of Fairmont. The 
four children of their marriage were: Virginia, born April 
23, 1901, died July 12, 1901; Joseph, born August 28, 1902; 
Frank, born January 11, 1907; and Rollo Hall, born No- 
vember 10, 1912. 

Harry Clay Hadden has made for himself excellent rep- 
utation and worthy success in connection with mercantile 
enterprise in the City of Princeton, Mercer County, where 
he is head of the firm of H. C. Hadden & Company, one 
of the representative establishments of the city. 

Of Scotch and Irish ancestry, Mr. Hadden was born at 
Oakdale, Pennsylvania, in January, 1878, and is a son of 
Alexander A. and Agnes K. (Jackson) Hadden, the former 
of whom was born in Ireland and the latter in Pennsyl- 
vania. The Jackson family came from Scotland and settled 
at South Fayette, near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in an 
early day. Alexander A. Hadden was reared in his native 
land and came to the United States about 1875. He be- 
came a mine superintendent in the coal fields of Pennsyl- 
vania, and was an expert mine man. He died in 1910. His 
wife died in 1906. 

After attending the public schools of his native town and 
also Oakdale Academy at the same place, Harry C. Had- 
den found employment, and in the meanwhile attended night 
school in Duff 's Business College, Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he gave special attention to the study of 
bookkeeping and business English. After completing his 
course lie studied surveying, and for eighteen months he 
worked as a surveyor. He then entered the employ of the 
Pittsburgh Coal Company and afterward the Boomer Coal 
& Coke Company, in which the late Marcus A. Hanna, of 
Cleveland, Ohio, was one of the interested principals, and 



I 



IIISTOEY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



43 



in the interests of this corporation he came to Boomer, 
West Virginia, where the company controlled coal mines. 
In 1909 he came to Princeton and engaged in the general 
merchandise business on a modest scale. Prom this nu- 
cleus, with fair and honorable dealings and effective serv- 
ice to patrons, he has developed the substantial and well or- 
dered business of Hadden 's Reliable Department Store, 
which in every sense merits its title of ' ' reliable. ' ' Here 
are handled dry goods and kindred lines, as well as ready- 
to-wear apparel for women and children. The success 
which has attended the enterprise is the more gratifying to 
record when it is recognized that Mr. Hadden has depended 
entirely upon his own ability and efforts in making his 
way to the goal of prosperity. He is a loyal member of 
the Princeton Business Men 's Club, is a charter member 
of the Princeton Country Club, is afaiiated with the Blue 
Lodge, Chapter and Commandery of the York Kite of the 
Masonic fraternity, and also with the Mystic Shrine, and 
he and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian 
Church, of which his first wife likewise was a "zealous mem- 
ber. 

In 1901 Mr. Hadden wedded Miss Frances J. Scott, of 
Monongahela, Pennsylvania, and she is survived by three 
children: Mildred, Harry and Josephine. In February, 
1918, was recorded the marriage of Mr. Hadden and Miss 
Edna French Lipps, daughter of David M. Lipps, who was 
born in the State of Virginia. The one child of this sec- 
ond marriage is a son, Earl. 

Egbert Lee Ddgan. In the handling of ready-to-wear 
garments for both men and women, as well as furnishing 
goods of the most select lines, Mr. Dugan has established 
one of the most modern and attractive mercantile empori- 
ums in the City of Princeton, and the effectiveness of its 
service is shown in the substantial and appreciative pat- 
ronage accorded. 

Mr. Dugan was born at Greeneville, Greene County, Ten- 
nessee, May 16, 1878, and is a son of Douglas and Sally 
(Buck) Dugan, both natives of Virginia. The father was 
engaged in the livery and transfer business at Greeneville, 
Tennessee, at the time of his death, when he was only 
thirty-five years of age and when his son Eobert L. was 
a lad of eleven years. 

Robert L. Dugan gained his early education in the pub- 
lie schools of his native place, and he was little more than 
a boy when he took, a position as clerk for the Colonial 
Coal & Coke Company at Dorchester, Virginia. Two years 
later he entered the employ of the Louisville Coal & Coke 
Company at Goodwill, West Virginia, and after a year of 
service in this connection he passed a year in the employ 
of the Hiawatha Coal & Coke Company. He then came to 
Princeton and opened a general store, the stock of which 
included hardware and groceries, as well as dry goods and 
other general lines. After conducting this enterprise four 
years Mr. Dugan gave about seven years to the manage- 
ment of the dry-goods store which he here established. 
After selling this latter store and business he returned to 
Tennessee, whore he purchased a farm and resumed his ac- 
tive alliance with the basic industry under the influence of 
which he had been reared. At the end of one year he found 
that he had mistaken his predilection for farming as a 
vocation, and he sold the farm property and returned to 
Princeton, where on the 16th of January, 1920, he opened 
his present fine mercantile establishment, the success of the 
business being conserved alike by his personal popularity 
in the community and the general recognition of the fact 
that the best of service is ever assured when he is at the 
head of a business enterprise. In September, 1921, E. S. 
McNear became interested in the business, but Mr. Dugan 
continues its executive head and resourceful and progres- 
sive manager. 

Mr. Doigan is affiliated with the Blue Lodge, Chapter and 
Commandery bodies of York Rite Masonry, and also with 
the Mystic Shrine, is a loyal and valued member of the 
Princeton Business Men 's Club, and he and his wife hold 
membership in the Missionary Baptist Church. 

At Goodwill, this state, in 190-5, was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Dugan and Miss Mittie B. Brazie, daughter of 



A. W. and Mittie Brazie. Mr. and Mrs. Dugan have no 
children. The paternal grandfather of Mr. Dugan was one 
of the old-time stage drivers in Virginia. 

George W. Lazenby. During the greater part of his 
business career George W. Lazenby has been a wholesale 
grocer, and is still active in that line as manager of the 
Princeton Wholesale Grocery Company. His friends speak 
of Mr. Lazenby as a genius in commercial lines, and one 
who by remarkable energy and foresight has built up a 
fortune when still only in the meridian of his years. 

He was born in Bedford County, Virginia, October 19, 
1873, and is of Virginia ancestry. The grandfather on his 
father's side was Irish and his great-grandfather in the 
maternal line was German. He is a son of H. L. and Eliza- 
beth (Grounds) Lazenby, natives of Virginia. His father 
was a wheelwright at Hendricks Store, Virginia, also post- 
master there for a number of years, and was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

George W. Lazenby secured a common school education 
in Bedford County. Since the age of seventeen he has 
been working for himself, and all his accumulations have 
been due to his own work and management. He learned 
business clerking in a general store at home for three 
years. Another three years he clerked in a general mer- 
chandise store at Bedford City. From there he removed 
to Bluefield, West Virginia, and for three years was asso- 
ciated with the Flat Top Grocery Company. Leaving that 
concern, he established a wholesale grocery business now 
known as the Jeffrey-Matthews & Company. His next loca- 
tion was at Graham, Virginia, where for a year and a half 
he was with Walter & Company, wholesale grocers. After 
this was consolidated with the Flat Top Grocery Company 
at Bluefield Mr. Lazenby transferred his headquarters to 
Princeton, where he organized the Princeton Wholesale 
Grocery Company. This is an incorporated company and 
does a business of more than $700,000 annually. Mr. 
Lazenby is treasurer and manager of the company. 

In 1898, in Franklin County, Virginia, he married Miss 
Jennie Dudley, daughter of P. S. and Nellie P. (Newbill) 
Dudley, natives of Virginia. Her father is a farmer. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lazenby have seven children: Florence, Louise, 
Dorothy, George W., Jr., Dudley, and Keith and Kennith, 
twins. All are still in the home circle. Mr. Lazenby and 
family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. He is a Royal Arch Mason and Elk, and a member 
of the Princeton Business Men's Club. 

K. Edward Thornton has shown marked abilty in the 
development of industrial enterprises of important order 
and is now a leading exponent of the real estate business 
at Princeton, Mercer County, with secure standing as one of 
the representative citizens of his native county. 

Mr. Thornton was born in Mercer County in December, 
1860, and is a son of William M. and Eliza J. (Hatcher) 
Thornton, both natives of Virginia, where the respective 
families were established in an early day, the lineage of the 
Thornton family tracing back to stanch Scotch-Irish origin. 
William M. Thornton became one of the prosperous farm- 
ers of Mercer County, and also did considerable work as a 
photographist. In the Civil war he was a gallant soldier 
of the Confederate service as a member of the Seventeenth 
Virginia Infantry, under command of Colonel French. In 
an engagement near Clarks, West Virginia, he received a 
minor wound in his left arm. He and his wife were earnest 
and zealous members of the Baptist Church, and Mrs. 
Thornton was deeply interested in educational matters and 
in furthering the social welfare of her home community. 

The schools of his home district afforded B. Edward 
Thornton his preliminary education, which was supple- 
mented by his attending the Concord State Normal School 
at Athens, Mercer County, and by a course in the Spencerian 
Business College in the City of Washington, D. C. There- 
after he taught three terms in the rural schools of Mercer 
County, and then turned his attention to the mercantile 
business, of which he became one of the most progressive 
and successful representatives in this section of the state, 
he having had at one time five stores in various towns in 



44 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



Mercer, Summers and McDowell countiea. In 1898 he 
opened a clothing store at Bluefield, and later he sold this 
business to his brother, who still conducts the same. At 
North Fork and Athens and also at Princeton he estab- 
lished clothing and men's furnishgoods stores, and at 
Willowton and Lerona he conducted general stores. AU of 
these enterprises proved successful under his vigorous and 
careful management, and in 1910 he sold all of these in- 
terests and has since been a leader in the handling of real 
estate in his native county. He is the owner of much 
valuable realty in the county, and in addition to controlling 
a general real estate business that is of broad scope and 
importance he incidentally developed a prosperous insur- 
ance business, which he sold in 1917. His operations are 
conducted under the title of the Thornton Land Company, 
and he has done much to advance civic and material develop- 
ment in Mercer County. Mr. Thornton is a progressive and 
loyal citizen, is an active member of the Princeton Business 
Men 's Club, is affiliated with the Blue Lodge and Chapter 
of the Masonic fraternity, and he and his wife are active 
members of the Missionary Baptist Church. In 1884, at 
Wykel, Monroe County, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Thornton and Miss Launa Broyles, daughter of 
Augustus and Rebecca Broyles. Mr. and Mrs. Thornton 
have the enviable distinction of having one of the largest 
and finest families of children in West Virginia, their chil- 
dren being as follows: Samuel C, Minnie E., Cora D., Clark 
M., Frank E., Eay S., Fred L., King N., Mae B., Effie H., 
Edward B., Buna L., Harry B. and Ben Hatcher. Samuel 
married Mabel M. Carr and they reside at Princeton; 
Minnie is the wife of J. M. Hines, of this city; Cora is the 
wife of George E. Hilsheimar, of Princeton; Clark M., who 
is engaged in the practice of law at Princeton, married 
Katherine Duling and in the World war period he was a 
musician with the Headquarters Company of the Fifty- 
seventh United States Infantry at Camp Logan, Texas; 
Frank E., who is not married and a resident of Princeton, 
made a splendid record as a member of the United States 
Marine Corps in the period of the World war; Eay S. gained 
a commission as second lieutenant in the United States 
Army in the World war; Fred L. was in service with the 
merchant-marine of the navy and made one voyage to Brest, 
France, before the close of the war; and King N. was in a 
naval training school at the time when the war came to a 
close. In the patriotism and loyal service of his sons Mr. 
Thornton has further reason for pride in his remarkable 
family of children. 

Frank E. Thornton. As a picture of actual warfare in 
France one of the most instructive experiences is the Marine 
Corps service record of Frank E. Thornton, one of the sons 
of R. E. Thornton of Princeton. It was for the purpose of 
presenting such a picture in this publication that the record 
was obtained in Mr. Thornton's own words, and so far as 
space permits it is published with only slight abbreviation. 

He enlisted at Washington June 6, 1917, spent three 
months at Norfolk, and then did intensive training at 
Quantico, Virginia. He was transferred to the Seventieth 
Machine Gun Company, First Battalion of the Marines, 
and in October, 1917, qualified as a sharpshooter. This 
command left New York for overseas December 11th, and 
reached St. Nazaire, France, December 29th. For some- 
thing over two months they were undergoing intensive drill 
and training on French soil, and on March 11th Frank 
Thornton was appointed acting signal sergeant. About 
that time his organization was changed from the First 
Machine Gun Battalion to the Seventy-seventh Company, 
Sixth Machine Gun Battalion, Fourth Brigade of the Ma- 
rines, Second Division. They experienced their first real 
warfare in the third line trenches near Verdun on March 
20th, and soon afterward Frank Thornton was detached 
to do liaison and dispatch running and subsequently for ob- 
servation work in the front lines near Verdun. Then, on 
the last day of May, he and his comrades started for the 
big battle near Chateau Thierry and were thrown into the 
front line at Belleau Woods, northwest of Chateau Thierry. 



The following description is in Mr. Thornton's own lan- 
guage : 

' ' At this point the Germans were making a final effort to 
reach Paris, but the Marines stopped them and started 
them on the march toward Berlin. At this time all we sig- 
nalmen were informed that from now on we would also be 
runners (considered the most dangerous work in all war- 
fare). I continued to be a runner during the remainder 
of the war, being placed in every attack with the Marines. 
I was wounded twice and gassed slightly twice, but never 
left the front lines while the Marines were there. This 
was one of the hardest periods in the war for us. The 
first three days' fighting in Belleau Woods was done on 
empty stomach, our supply train failing to get our food 
to us, and none of us could have gotten any sleep for the 
first two or three nights. For fifteen days the battle raged 
without chance for rest or sleep of any kind, and for 
twenty days more, although the fighting was lighter, it was 
not to be compared with the first fifteen days. 

"On June 10th my major ordered me to go with him into 
the front line to do a little observation work. While we 
were there the Germans came close to us and one of them 
threw a hand grenade at us, striking Major Cole (in my 
opinion the bravest and best oflScer that ever went over the 
top, and also an expert machine gun officer) killing him al- 
most instantly and tearing him almost to pieces. He never 
gained consciousness. 

"On June 11th we were ordered to get ready to make 
another big drive. We were to go to a certain place oppo- 
site the German lines, but in some way forty-eight of us 
were lost in the fog, found a break in the lines, and ad- 
vanced about half a mile too far, which put us more than 
a quarter of a mile behind their lines. The Germans found 
their line was broken and closed in, cutting us off from our 
own troops. Too late we realized where we were. In a 
few minutes our own artillery began to send over a bar- 
rage. Luck seemed to be with us at this time; we were 
just below the embankment of the road leading north out 
of Lucy, and by lying flat close to the bank, all the shells 
that cleared the top of the bank went over us into the hol- 
low below, none of us getting killed. To add to the dis- 
comfort of being placed under the shellfire of our own 
troops, the Germans found that we were there and began to 
fire at us with their machine guns. As soon as the barrage 
was over we decided to try to get back to our own lines, 
but the Germans had closed up the gap through which we 
entered. Again we were lucky, for the Germans who occu- 
pied the gap through which we had formerly passed as soon 
as they saw us coming toward them from the rear thought 
they had been trapped, and we went back with 101 of them 
to our own lines. 

' ' Just after this I had one of the most exciting experi- 
ences during the war. I was sent on a run parallel to the 
lines, and while I was passing through a small patch of 
woods I caught sight of a German crossing an open place 
with an American officer whom he had captured. I could 
not bear to see a thing of this kind. I ran to the edge of 
the wood, took a pop shot towards him. I didn 't try to hit 
him, for he was directly between me and the American offi- 
cer. I was afraid I would hit the officer instead of the 
German. I fired the shot near the head of the German, and 
this had the right effect. He turned his head and saw me 
coming in a run toward him, threw up his hands and said 
' camerad. ' I took him prisoner, got his helmet and sent 
it home for a souvenir, also I got some post cards which 
he had, and saved them to this day. Although we took 
hundreds of prisoners after this, this one is the only one 
I captured single handed, and the officer I had succeeded 
in getting from this German was killed later the same day 
in battle. The battle raged for several days, but we al- 
ways gained ground." 

On July 5th they were relieved, more than half of the 
men of his organization having been either killed or wounded. 
Then on the 18th of July they were sent to the front near 
Soissons. "We were informed that the Germans had 
planned an attack to begin at 4:45. When they started over 
we met them and caused them to retreat. In the early part 




ayhue^ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



45 



of tlid fight we captured all of their artillery except one 
piece. Our artillery had blown the bridges to pieces across 
the river, and when they arrived there and found the bridges 
gone they had to leave their guns and make their own es- 
cape the best they could. On this same day the Germans 
sent over hundreds of bombing planes, a more tormenting 
method of warfare than their artillery had ever been. We 
had advanced nine or ten kilometers before the day closed, 
and this victory was considered a complete success. ' ' 

From early in August until the close of the war the 
First and Second Divisions were considered shock troops 
and were thrown to points of hardest iighting. Early in 
September this organization went to the Toul front and on 
September 11th occupied the front line against the posi- 
tions the Germans had held for four years. ' ' We realized 
that they were confident that they were so well fortified 
that it would be impossible for us or any other troops to 
take it, but all this added to the determination on the part 
of our troops to show them that we would not fail. One 
'clock on the morning of September 12 started with one 
of the largest, if not the largest, barrage that was ever 
thrown over into the German lines. This lasted for four 
solid hours, and at 5 A. M., when our artillery began to 
lift the barrage, we started ' over the top, ' following right 
behind our barrage, driving the Germans out of the trenches 
they had held and which they were so confident they could 
hold. By noon we had advanced nine kilometers and entered 
Thiaucourt, but we did not halt there. We kept on the 
march forward for several kilometers, repulsing several 
counter attacks made by the Germans to gain some of their 
lost ground, and we were engaged in a number of hotly 
fought battles." 

Toward the close of September the Marines were sent to 
the Champaign front east of Eheims. "We repeated for- 
mer battles here, and went 'over the top' on October 2d. 
This contest lasted for eight days, and here also we had 
some of the hardest fighting of the whole war. The allies 
had tried for days to get the Germans off Mount Blanc, but 
had failed. The Marines were called to help them out. 
(At this time the First and Second Divisions were consid- 
ered the best shock divisions.) After some hard fighting 
we finally succeeded in driving the Germans from Mount 
Blanc, and on the 9th day of October we were relieved by 
the Thirty-sixth Division." 

Then after another period of rest and replacement his 
command was ordered, on October 24th, to the Meuse- 
Argonne front, where on the 27th they relieved the Forty- 
second Division. "On the first day of November, 1918, at 
3 'clock P. M., we started our last big drive of the war, 
and the first day we advanced about twelve kilometers. We 
had hard fighting every day for the next eight days, but 
gained ground all the time, and finally reached the Meuse 
River. We were ordered to take the heights northeast of 
the Meuse River, and on November 10th, at 7 o'clock P. M., 
we went ' over the top ' again. This battle, as we saw it, 
was the worst, and it seemed the most nearly uncalled for 
of any battle of the whole war, for we knew that the armis- 
tice was going to be signed, but by order of the general 
commander of the Fifth Army Corps we 'went over the top.' 
After an all night fight with everything against us, as the 
advantage in position the Germans had, we being on a 
level plain while they were on the heights overlooking it, 
and a bright moon shining on us, we finally took the heights 
northeast of the river at the big sacrifice of about 300 
killed and several hundred wounded." 

After the signing of the armistice Frank Thornton was 
on the march into Germany, crossing the Rhine on Decem- 
ber 13th, and remaining in German territory until July, 
1919. On August 4th he arrived in New York harbor, par- 
ticipating in the parade of the Second Division in New 
York and later with the Marines in parade at Washington, 
where they were reviewed by President WUson. On Au- 
gust 13th he received his honorable discharge and started 
for home. 

This is a most impressive service record and can hardly 
be made more so by noting the ofiScial honors bestowed upon 
him. January 6, 1919, he was decorated with Croix de 



Guerre for bravery in Belleau Woods, and on March 21st 
received a similar clasp for his work on the Champaign 
front. Later he received from the American Government 
a "Good Conduct Medal," a "Victory Medal," and the 
' ' French Froisguerre. ' ' 

A. J. Dalton. There are some individuals who are 
able to develop to the highest possible degree of effi- 
ciency the possibilities and potentialities of their char- 
acters, so that whatever they seek to attain is reached and 
successfully passed. To such men there is no such word 
as fail, and their characteristics are of such a nature as to 
create respect and inspire confidence. When circumstances 
place them in command of large interests they are able to 
direct them wisely and capably. In this connection mention 
is due A. J. Dalton, one of the largest coal operators of 
Huntington and a man of unerring business judgment, 
practical views and great energy, as well as unquestioned 
integrity. He is in control of extensive interests, in the 
handling of which he has shown an inclination to safe- 
guard the welfare of all concerned with their operation. 

Mr. Dalton was born June 5, 1874, in Pittsylvania 
County, Virginia, a son of Patterson and Mary (Adams) 
Dalton. Patterson Dalton was born in Virginia, and spent 
his entire life in Pittsylvania County, that state, where he 
applied himself to agricultural pursuits until his early 
death, June 3, 1874. He was a democrat and a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Dalton mar- 
ried Miss Mary Adams, who was born in 1S27. in Pittsyl- 
vania County, and survives him as a resident of Altavista, 
Campbell County, Virginia. They were the parents of four 
children: Hester, who is the wife of Samuel T. Patterson, 
a farmer of Altavista, Virginia; Dinnie, the wife of Will 
Walton, also a farmer of that community; Berry, twin of 
A. J., who was a miner and died in 1896, at Thacker, West 
Virginia; and A. J. 

A. J. Dalton was born two days after his father died, 
and as his mother was not left with any great amount of 
means he was denied the pleasures that are the natural 
right of youth and had none of the advantages of other 
lads. His schooling was confined to six months' attendance 
of the school at Pittsylvania, yet he was naturally so quick 
and intelligent that the training he received, meagre though 
it was, served as a foundation upon which he later built a 
superstructure of information through extensive reading, 
observation and self teaching. When he was only nine 
years of age he started to work on the farm of an uncle, 
C. T. Adams, with whom he remained three years, then en- 
tering the service of the L. & D. Railroad Company as 
water boy, at a wage of 75 cents a day. By this time he 
was a lad large and strong for his age, and after six months 
he succeeded in getting a position as laborer with a section 
gang, being thus employed for two years. At the age of 
fifteen years he came to Elkhorn, West Virginia, and after 
spending some time in working on the right-of-way for the 
railroads, obtained a position on the mine tipples. His 
next natural step was to become a miner in the coal mines, 
and as such dug coal for three years. 

Mr. Dalton was always willing, energetic and intelligent, 
and through exercising his natural qualities he secured ad- 
vancement to the post of slate boss of the mines, a posi- 
tion which he filled for six months. He then returned to 
railroad work, with the Norfolk & Western, braking for six 
months during the dangerous days of hand-brakes and link- 
and-pin couplers, long before the modern automatic devices 
were invented. He managed to pass through this appren- 
ticeship without serious accident, and was promoted to loco- 
motive fireman, and after six months went to Deadwood, 
South Dakota, where he fired on the Burlington Railroad 
for six months. While at Deadwood he also worked in the 
Homestead gold mines for a short time. Returning to Elk- 
horn, West Virginia, he was made assistant mine foreman, 
and was next promoted to foreman, later to superintendent 
of mines and still later to general superintendent of Lynch- 
burg, Eureka, Powhatan, Elkridge and Peerless mines at 
Elkhorn. He remained in this capacity until 1913, when 
he removsd to the Guyandotte field of Logan County, West 



46 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



Virginia, having acquired a lease on 29,000 acres. He went 
to that community to develop these coal lands, and is still 
engaged in developing and operating them. 

At this time Mr. Dalton is president and director of 
the Main Island Creek Coal Company, operating twenty- 
three mines in Logan County, with a capacity of 3,000,000 
tons a year; president and a director of the Omar Coal Com- 
pany, at Omar, Logan County, with Omar mines Nos. 1 and 
2, having a capacity of 360,000 tons per annum; president 
and a director of the Middle Fork Mining Company, oper- 
ating mines Nos. 1 and 2 at Chancy, which have a capacity 
of 300,000 tons per annum; president and a director of 
the Procktor Coal Company, with mines at Armisdale, West 
Virginia, having a capacity of 360,000 tons a year; presi- 
dent and a director of the Procktor Eagle Coal Company, at 
Robinette, West Virginia, with a capacity of 120,000 tons 
a year; president and a director of the Mandanay Coal 
Company, also at Eobinettej with a capacity of 60,000 tons 
a year; and president and a director of the Procktor Win- 
fred Coal Company at Armisdale, with a capacity of 120,000 
tons a year, all of the foregoing being in the Guyan Valley. 
He is also president and a director of the No. 5 Block Coal 
Company at McNeer, Logan County, capacity 180,000 tons 
per annum ; president and a director of the Madison Coal 
Company in Boone County, this state, capacity 120,000 tons 
per annum; and president and a director of the Superior 
Eagle Coal Company at Jeffrey, Boone County, capacity 
60,000 tons per year, the last three companies being situ- 
ated on the Little Coal River. Mr. Dalton owns several 
of the above-mentioned coal companies outright, and has 
coiitrnlling interests in all the others. His offices occupy 
the third floor of the Eobson-Prichard Building at Hunt- 
ington. 

Mr. Dalton is also president of four oil companies, of 
which three are operating in Kentucky and one in Wyom- 
ing. He is president of the Dalton-Kelly Real Estate Com- 
pany of Huntington, president of the Dalton-Kelly Real 
Estate Corporation of Altavista, West Virginia, and presi- 
dent of the Huntington Coal Sales Company of Huntington. 
J. A. Kelly is a full partner in aU of Mr. Dalton 's business 
operations. Together they own a modern residence at the 
corner of Thirty-first Street and Third Avenue, a fine home 
surrounded by a five-acre lot. In addition thereto they are 
the owners of much realty at Huntington, and seventy-five 
acres of town lots at Altavista, where they also have a fine 
home. 

Mr. Dalton is unmarried. He is a democrat in his polit- 
ical views, but has been too busy with his business affairs 
to enter public life, although he has been a supporter of 
worthy movements of a civic character and those which have 
tended toward the betterment of education, religion and cit- 
izenship. His religious faith is that of the Roman Cath- 
olic Church. As a fraternalist he is a life member of Blue- 
field (West Virginia) Lodge No. 1.59, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, and also holds membership in the 
Guyandotte Club and the Guyan Country Club, both of 
Huntington. 

Fred Lewis, who is giving most effective service as road 
engineer of Gilmer County, with ofBce headquarters at Glen- 
ville, the county seat, was born in Randolph County, West 
Virginia, on the 7th of March, 1875, and is a son of Oliver 
H. P. and Elizabeth F. (Mills) Lewis, both likewise natives 
of that portion of Virginia that now constitutes the state 
of West Virginia. The father was born in Marshall County, 
on the 20th of March, 1836, and his death occurred April 
30, 1917. The mother was born in Randolph County, 
December 15, 1848, and passed to the life eternal on the 4th 
of July, 1900. Oliver H. P. Lewis was reared on a farm 
in Randolph County, received the advantages of the com- 
mon schools and an academy, and as a young man he gave 
excellent service as a teacher in the rural schools. He 
eventually became one of the substantial farmers of Gilmer 
County, and here served twenty years as county surveyor. 
He was a stanch democrat, and an active member of the 
Christian Church, while his wife was a member of the 
Methodist Protestant Church. Of the eight children six are 
living at the time of this writing, in 1922: Jessie is the 



wife of T. C. McQuain; Warren is a farmer near Cos 
Mills, Gilmer County; Fred, of this review, was the nes 
in order of birth; Scipio is a farmer in Gilmer County 
Miss Clemmie likewise maintains her home in this county 
and Edna is now Mrs. Schulte, of Grove, Doddridge Count; 
One child died in infancy and Sidney died at the age c 
twenty years. 

The home farm in Gilmer County was the stage of th 
childhood activities of Fred Lewis, and as a boy he bega 
to contribute his quota to its work. After having profite 
by the advantages of the public schools he entered the Stal 
Normal School at Glenville, in which he was graduated £ 
a member of the class of 1897. Thereafter he took a spi 
cial course in civil engineering at the University of Wei 
Virginia, and after leaving this institution he did succes 
ful service in the surveying of railroads, as well as of coi 
and timber lands. Thereafter he served as assistant cashii 
of the Glenville Banking & Trust Company until 1920, whe 
the County Court appointed him to his present office, that c 
road engineer of the county. In this office he is giving a 
administration that is doing much to further the improv 
ment and proper maintenance of the roads of Gikni 
County, and incidentally he is adding greatly to his pri 
fessional prestige as a civil engineer. He was appointc 
to fill an unexpired term, and his service was such that 1 
was appointed resident engineer in Gilmer County, havir 
charge of all construction work in the county for the Sta 
Road Commission. 

Mr. Lewis is aligned loyally in the local ranks of tl 
democratic party, is a past master of Gilmer Couni 
Lodge No. 118, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; is 
past noble grand of Glenville Lodge, Independent Order ( 
Odd Fellows ; and is serving as the first worthy patron ( 
the newly established Chapter of the Order of the Eastei 
Star at Glenville, of which his wife likew.ise is a prominei 
member, she being also an active member of the Presb; 
terian Church at Glenville. June 11, 1902, recorded tl 
marriage of Mr. Lewis and Miss Ann Wilson Norris, wl 
was graduated in the State Normal School at Glenville ar 
also attended the University of West Virginia, she havir 
been a popular teacher in the public schools prior to b 
marriage. Of the five children of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, oi 
daughter. Ruby, born May 21, 1904, died in infancy. Tl 
names and respective birth dates of the four surviving chi 
dren are here recorded : Mary Louise, September 5, 190J 
Fred, Jr., February 12, 1909; Ann Wilson, March 5, 191f 
and Elizabeth F., January 10, 1917. 

William J. Elliott, cashier of the First National Bar 
of Princeton, has been identified with the mining distrii 
of the state for a number of years as an accountant wil 
mining companies, and has had a progressive series of r 
sponsibilities in the industrial and commercial affairs ( 
Mercer County. 

Mr. Elliott was born in Ashe County, North Carolin 
August 13, 1877, son of Monroe and Mary (Hamm) Elliot 
and of Scotch and Irish ancestry. His father was born i 
North Carolina and his mother in Virginia. His gram 
father Elliott lived to the age of 103 years and his gram 
mother Elliott to 107. Several of the family, particular 
on his mother 's side, were in the Civil war as Conf edera' 
soldiers. His father's uncle, Nathaniel Price, was on Ge: 
Wade Hampton's staff. Monroe Elliott was a farmer ai 
Baptist minister, and closely identified with church ar 
educational affairs. 

William J. Elliott acquired a common school educatic 
through the limited facilities of log cabin schools in tl 
farming district of Western North Carolina, and much ( 
his study he accomplished at night by the light of a woe 
fire. In 1894 ho graduated from a high school at Lansin; 
North Carolina, and for three following years taught schoo 
In 1897 he spent two terms in a business college at Solitud 
North Carolina, and with that qualification entered -upo 
his business career as an accountant and bookkeeper. Con 
ing to West Virginia at Maybeury, he became bookkeep* 
for the Shamokin Coal & Coke Company for two years an 
then for a year did bookkeeping for the Wareagle Coal 
Coke Company, Papoose Coal & Coke Company, and ti 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



47 



Margarett Mining Company. He spent another year with 
the Crystal Coal & Coke Company at Crystal, West Virginia, 
and was then appointed general superintendent in charge 
of the plant of the Hiawatha Coal & Coke Company, and 
held that position four years, in the meantime becoming 
interested in banking. He left the Hiawatha Company to 
become cashier of the Bank at Matoaka, and in 1917 was 
elected sheriflp of Mercer County. Mr. Elliott gave the 
county a highly efficient service as a sheriff for four years. 
While in the office he became financially interested in and 
was elected a director of the First National Bank of 
Princeton, and on leaving office he became cashier. 

Mr. Elliott married at Matoaka in 1907 Miss Ada God- 
frey, daughter of James A. and Mary (Miller) Godfrey, of 
West Virginia. They have four children: Godfrey, Eucy 
May, Frances Nell and Mary Ruth. The family are mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Elliott is a Royal 
Arch and Knight Templar Mason and Shriner, and is 
affiliated with the Elks, Knights of Pythias and Loyal 
Order of Moose. He is a member of the Business Men 's 
Club of Princeton and a charter member of the Princeton 
Country Club. 

Johnson H. Lilly, one of the leading business men and 
citizens of Princeton, laid the basis of his business career 
as proprietor of a portable sawmill industry, but for a 
number of years past has been at the head of a real estate 
organization at Princeton that has played a prominent part 
in the constructive development of that city. 

Mr. Lilly was born at Camp Creek, West Virginia, De- 
cember 4, 1877, and is of French ancestry. His parents, 
Daniel and Mahala (Wood) Lilly, were both born in West 
Virginia. His father is a farmer and for many years has 
been a leader in the Primitive Baptist Church and is church 
clerk at the present time. 

Johnson H. Lilly attended the common schools, and his 
subsequent achievement was the result of an active contact 
with the world of affairs and men. He began earning his 
own living at the age of eighteen, and for eleven years he 
was proprietor of and operated a portable sawmill plant. 
During that time he cut approximately 2.5,000,000 feet of 
lumber. When he gave up the sawmill business he located at 
Princeton, about 1906, and began the buying and selling of 
real estate. Out of these operations he has since organized 
and incorporated the Lilly Land Company, of which he is 
president and general manager, with H. E. DeJarnett as 
secretary and treasurer. This is an organization with all 
the facilities for a general real estate business, but their 
specialty is the subdivision of city property. Their opera- 
tions in all departments have reached a value of more than 
$500,000. 

In 1899, at Dunn, West Virginia, Mr. Lilly married Sarah 
E. Lilly, daughter of Lee H. and Elizabeth (Harvey) 
Lilly, of West Virginia. They are a family distantly re- 
lated to that of Mr. Lilly. Her parents were farmers and 
her father was a soldier in the Civil war. The three children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Lilly are: Pearl, born in 1900; Ernest, 
born in 1905; and June, born in 1920. Mrs. Lilly is a 
member of the Primitive Baptist Church. Mr. Lilly was 
one of the organizers and is a charter member of the Prince- 
ton Country Club, is a member of the Princeton Business 
Men's Club, and has been a member of the board of di- 
rectors of the Bank of Princeton since 1918. 

Samuel R. Holeotd, M. D., who is engaged in practice 
at Athens, Mercer County, is not only one of the leading 
physicians and surgeons of his native county but has also 
gained in his profession a reputation that far transcends 
mere local limitations. He has served as president of the 
West Virginia State Medical Society, and was for three 
years superintendent of the State Hospital at Spencer, the 
institution having had 700 inmates during the period of his 
administration, which was marked by efficiency and by 
earnest stewardship both professionally and in a humanita- 
rian way. While he has not specialized in mental cases, he 
is a recognized authority in connection with the care and 
treatment of the insane and feeble-minded. During the 
period of the nation's participation in the World waf 



Doctor Holroyd was in active service in recruiting and ex- 
amining physicians for service in the Medical Corps of the 
United States Army, and this work took him into all parts 
of West Virginia. He is now a member of the Board of 
Censors of the West Virginia State Medical Society, is an 
influential member of the Mercer County Medical Society 
and holds membership also in the American Medical Associa- 
tion. 

Doctor Holroyd was born on a farm in Mercer County, 
West Virginia, June 18, 1868, and is a son of William and 
Sarah (Conklin) Holroyd, both of whom were born and 
reared in England, where their marriage was solemnized at 
Manchester in 1847. The father was a_ skilled woolen-mill 
operator and as such was engaged for a time in the City of 
Philadelphia. He then came to what is now West Virginia 
as a missionary clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. He served as chaplain of a Confederate regiment 
in the Civil war, with commission as captain, and in Mercer 
County he and his noble wife established their home and 
reared their chOdren. Rev. William Holroyd was a man of 
sterling character and fine mentality. He labored long and 
earnestly in aiding and uplifting his fellow men, and his 
influence rested as a benediction upon all with whom he 
came in contact. James F., a brother of Dr. Samuel R. 
Holroyd, was for forty-two years an able and revered in- 
structor in the Concord State Normal School at Athens, 
and in the main building of the school is a tablet in his 
honor, the same having there been placed by the alumni of 
the institution. He was county superintendent of schools 
for Mercer County four years and for five years was 
librarian at the normal school at Athens, he having been the 
incumbent of this position at the time of his death, when 
venerable in years. 

In 1888 Dr. Samuel R. Holroyd graduated from the 
Concord State Normal School at Athens, and in 1890 he 
graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
the City of Baltimore, Maryland, with the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine. In 1906 he took a post-graduate course at 
Johns Hopkins University in the same city, and later he 
did effective post-graduate work in leading medical institu- 
tions and hospitals in New York City, Cleveland, Philadel- 
phia, Cincinnati and Chicago. After his graduation he 
engaged in practice in his old home town of Athens, and 
here he has continuously maintained an office, although his 
work has involved his absence from this community at in- 
tervals of greater or less duration. He here resumed the 
active practice of his profession in October, 1921. The 
doctor, has been especially zealous in the service of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, especially in the organ- 
izing of churches and the erection of requisite church build- 
ings throughout this section of West Virginia. Incidentally 
he has served simultaneously as trustee of five different 
churches of this denomination, and he is now a trustee of the 
church at Athens. For eleven years he was a member of the 
board of directors of the State Hospital at Huntington, 
and in this capacity he gave close attention to the construc- 
tion and equipment of the buildings of the institution. He 
was formerly vice president of the Bank of Athens, a posi- 
tion which he finally resigned. As a member of the County 
Board of Highways he assisted in laying out and construct- 
ing many of the roads of Mercer County, and he has served 
also as a member of the Board of Education at Athens for 
many years. A signally busy, conscientious and useful life 
has been that of this honored physician, who holds inviolable 
place in the confidence and esteem of all who know him. 
The doctor has a great fondness for fine horses and dogs, 
and he is the owner of White Ranger, the dog that won 
the American derby at Louisville, Kentucky, in 1921. 
Doctor Holroyd has passed all official chairs in the Blue 
Lodge and Chapter of York Rite Masonry, is now grand 
scribe of the West Virginia Grand Chapter of Royal Arch 
Masons, and he is affiliated also with the Knights Templars 
and the Mystic Shrine, as well as with the Elks and the 
Knights of Pythias. As a fancier of dogs he takes special 
pleasure in the fox chase, and his sane, vigorous and helpful 
attitude marks him as a man among men and as a citizen 
of prominence and influence in the community. His pro- 
fessional affiliations include also his membership in the 



48 



HISTORY OF WEST VIKGINIA 



American Psychological Association, and he is a charter 
member of the Princeton Country Club. 

On the 26th of October, 1893, at Gap Mills, Monroe 
County, Doctor Holroyd wedded Miss Blanche Appling, 
daughter of R. C. and Sudie (Neal) Appling, the former a 
native of Virginia and the latter of what is now West 
Virginia. Doctor and Mrs. Holroyd have three children: 
Trevor is a salesman in the employ of the Emmons-Hawking 
Company of Huntington; Danise is the wife of Clyde 
Mitchell, of Spencer, this state; and Samuel K., Jr., re- 
mains at the parental home. Mrs. Holroyd is an earnest 
and zealous member of the Presbyterian Church, and she is 
the gracious and popular chatelaine of their attractive and 
hospitable home at Athens. 

William L. Thomas is president and manager of the 
Nicholas Hardware & Furniture Company, which controls a 
large and prosperous wholesale and retail business, the 
headquarters establishment being in the City of Richwood, 
Nicholas County, with branch stores at Adrian, Upshur 
County, and Heaters, Braxton County. 

Mr. Thomas was born at Alton, Upshur County, this state, 
on the 1st of November, 1880, and is a son of Alexander B. 
and Teresa (Vance) Thomas, both natives of Virginia. 
The former was born in Nelson County, February 24, 1845, 
and the latter was born February 8, 1848. Alexander B. 
Thomas was young when he accompanied his parents on 
their removal to what is now Upshur County, West Vir- 
ginia, where the family home was established on a farm on 
French Creek. There he was reared to manhood under the 
conditions marking the middle pioneer period, and there his 
marriage occurred on November 26, 1868, his wife having 
been a child at the time of her parents' removal to Upshur 
County. After his marriage Alexander B. Thomas estab- 
lished his home on a tract of 100 acres of land at Panther 
Gap, Upshur County, only two acres of the land having 
been cleared. There he reclaimed and improved one of the 
fine farm properties of Upshur County, and on this old 
homestead he and his wife still reside, both being members 
of the United Brethren Church, and his political allegiance 
being given to the democratic party. Of the ten children 
Wellington, Hugh and John reside in Upshur County; Eliza 
is the wife of M. L. Wolfe, a farmer near Parkersburg, 
Wood County; Pearl is the wife of Doctor Simons, a rep- 
resentative physician in Upshur County; William L., of 
this sketch, was the next in order of birth ; French resides 
at Clarksburg and Charles at Alderson, this state; Wirt is 
a resident of the State of Washington ; and Isa is the wife 
of C. B. Talbott, who is manager of the Adrian store of the 
Nicholas Hardware & Furniture Company. 

Reared on the old home farm and afforded the advan- 
tages of the public schools of his native county, William L. 
Thomas continued to be associated with his father in the 
work and management of the farm until he had attained 
to the age of twenty years, and for the ensuing seventeen 
years he was actively identified with railroad service, in 
which he rose from a subordinate position in the office of 
a station agent to be station agent at Richwood. He con- 
tinued his incumbency of this position until he became one 
of the organizers of the Nicholas Hardware & Furniture 
Company, of which he is president and general manager. 
He is also a director of the Richwood Banking & Trust 
Company and secretary and treasurer of the Nicholas Lum- 
ber Company, in which he is majority stockholder. His 
vital progressiveness is further shown in his being a stock- 
holder also of the Beaver Lumber Company. Mr. Thomas 
"has had no ambition for public office or political activity, 
but is a loyal supporter of the cause of the democratic 
party. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which latter he is 
a past noble grand. He married Miss Myrta McKinney, of 
Braxton County, and they have a winsome little daughter, 
Virginia E. 

William John Pritchabd learned mining in Wales, and 
for some years had the role of an ordinary miner in the 
Pennsylvania fields. His long and commendable career of 
industry has brought him a position among the leading 



operators and mine owners in the Pocahontas fields of 
Southern West Virginia. 

Mr. Pritchard, whose home is at Bramwell, Mercer 
County, was born at Llandovey, Wales, in March, 1863, and 
his parents were also natives of the same country. Mr. 
Pritchard had a limited education in Wales, and was about 
eighteen when he came to America in 1881. For several 
years he was a coal miner in the Pennsylvania fields near 
Wilkes-Barre, and rose to the responsibility of mine foreman 
there. In 1889 he came to West Virginia and went to work 
for the pioneer in the development of the Pocahontas coal 
fields, the late John Cooper. Under Mr. Cooper he be- 
came mine foreman, and remained with him about three 
years. His next period of service was with the Algoma 
Coal and Coke Company as mine foreman, and was there 
superintendent until this company sold its properties. 

Mr. Pritchard on leaving the Algoma Company became 
general manager of the Thomas Coal Company and opened 
their properties, and for a number of years has been gen- 
eral manager of all the Thomas coal interests, distributed 
among the Crystal Coal and Coke Company, Thomas Coal & 
Coke Company and Flat Top Coal and Mining Company. 
Mr. Pritchard also controls and is president of three impor- 
tant properties in Kentucky, the Superior Harlan Coal 
Company, Virginia Fuel Company and Algoma Block Coal 
Company. In West Virginia he is president of the Burn- 
well Coal and Coke Company and the Long Flame Coal 
Company. 

After devoting his tireless energies for almost forty years 
to the heavy work of the coal industry Mr. Pritchard came 
to a serious breakdown in physical health, and at the pres- 
ent writing many of his responsibilities have been assumed 
by his son, W. E. Pritchard. Mr. Pritchard is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, and is affiliated with the 
Masonic Lodge and the Bluefield Country Club. In 1888, 
at Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, he married Miss Ann Harris 
Thomas, whose parents also came from Wales. Mr. and 
Mrs. Pritchard became the parents of seven children : Mar- 
jorie, who has two children by her first marriage, named 
William and Florence Becker, is now the wife of Newton 
Roberts, secretary and treasurer of the Thomas interests 
there. William Edward, the oldest son, is now acting man- 
ager for his father. He is a Royal Arch Mason, and by 
his marriage to Romaine Thornberry, of Wayne City, West 
Virginia, has two children, Romaine and William. Elizabeth 
is the wife of Joseph Bowen, of Simmons, West Virginia, 
and their children are Joseph, Ethel, William Henry and 
Ann. David Thomas Pritchard, who is a Knight Templar 
Mason and Shriner, married Glenna Pack, daughter of J. C. 
Pack, of Bramwell. The next child, Daniel Harris Pritch- 
ard, is unmarried, lives at Cincinnati, and is a Scottish Rite 
Mason and Shriner. Robert Campbell Pritchard is a Royal 
Arch and Knight Templar Mason, also a Scottish Rite 
Mason and Shriner, and married Mary Harmon, of Taze- 
well, Virginia. The youngest child is Thomas Harold 
Pritchard, unmarried. 

Fred Douglas Padbukt is chief clerk for the Pocahontas 
Fuel Company at Link Branch, McDowell County, the gen- 
eral superintendent of the mining operations here being 
Richard S. Whitehead, of whom individual mention is made 
on other pages. 

Mr. Padbury was born at* Cooper, Mercer County, this 
state, in the year 1893, and is a son of Joseph Henry and 
Fannie (Pickering) Padbury. Joseph H. Padbury was borr 
in Shropshire, England, November 10, 1858, a son of Josepl 
and Martha (Wortcn) Padbury, the father having been ar 
operator in an iron-rolling mill and having died when Josepl 
H. was a child of eleven months. Joseph H. Padbury at 
tended school until he was fourteen years old, when hi 
entered upon an apprenticeship to the trade of carpente: 
and joiner. He thus served seven years, according to thi 
old English rule, and he continued to work at his trade t 
his , native land until he was twenty-three years of ag( 
when, with the money which he won by defeating an Englis 
champion in a foot race, he defrayed the expenses of hi 
voyage to the United States. He worked at his trade i 
New York City about nine weeks, and then came to Coopei 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



49 



est Virginia, and entered the employ of John Cooper, the 
oneer in coal mining in the Pocahontas field. From 1883 

1886 Mr. Padbury had charge of all building and general 
rpenter work for Mr. Cooper, who had married a sister 

Mr. Padbury. In 1886 he returned to New York, and in 
B City of Brooklyn, that state, he followed his trade eight 
ars. He then returned to Cooper, West Virginia, where 

assumed charge of all construction and timber work about 
e Cooper properties. He is now the only living pioneer 

the Pocahontas coal fields, he having been here at the 
itiation of mining operations. Mr. Padbury is prom- 
ently afliliated with Ihe various bodies of the York and 
ottish Rites of the Masonic fraternity, in the latter of 
lich he has received the thirty-second degree, besides being 
member of the Mystic Shrine. 

In 1886, in the State of New York, was solemnized the 
jrriage of Joseph H. Padbury and Miss Frances Picker- 
g, who likewise was born in England and who was thir- 
Bn years old when her father, Thomas Pickering, came 
th the family to the United States. Mr. and Mrs. Pad- 
iry became the parents of four children: Thomas Henry 
ed at the age of thirty-three years; Walter Leslie mar- 
;d Myrtle Perdue and they reside at Graham, Virginia; 
ary is the wife of George K. Norman, of Coaldale, Mercer 
)unty; and Fred D., of this review, is the youngest of 
e number. 

After completing three years' work as a student in the 
gh school at Bramwell, Fred D. Padbury was for two 
lars in the employ of the Pocahontas Fuel Company. He 
en completed an effective course in the Dunmore Business 
)llege, Staunton, Virginia, in which he was graduated in 
ily, 1914. He then became payroll clerk for the Poea- 
intas Fuel Company at Maybeury, he having since been 
Ivanced to the office of chief clerk and being in line for 
at of superintendent. 

January 28, 1918, Mr. Padbury entered the United States 
rmy for service in the World war. He was first sent to 
ort Leavenworth, Kansas, but about a week later was 
ansferred to Camp Jackson, South Carolina, where he 
iceived four months' training. He passed the ensuing 
iree months at Camp Wadswortb, that state, and July 7, 
(18, he sailed with his command for the stage of war. He 
nded in Liverpool, July 21st, and from Southampton 
ossed to La Havre, France, whence he went to the front. 
e was at Somme during the entire conflict with the Hin- 
jnburg forces, and took active part in the constant fighting 
lat continued until the signing of the armistice, he having 
len under fire for three months. November 15, 1918, he 
ent with his command to a rest camp in France, and on the 
th of March, 1919, he sailed for home. He landed in 
hiladelphia on the 22d of that month, and two weeks later 
iceived his honorable discharge at Camp DLx. Mr. Pad- 
iiry is affiliated with the Blue Lodge, Chapter and Com- 
landery organizations of the Masonic fraternity, and he 
nd his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
hurch, South. 

December 28, 1920, recorded the marriage of Mr. Pad- 
ury and Miss Willie Gertrude Sale, daughter of Elsie and 
lunice Sale, of Mercer County, and they are popular 
gures in the social life of their home community. 

William W. Wood, general manager of the Chattaroy 
lining Company 's operations at the station called Hatfield, 
n the Norfolk & Western Railway's main line in Mercer 
iounty, is another of the men of this locality who has spent 
is entire career in the coal mining industry and who has 
een the architect of his own fortune. His career has been 
n active and at times even a strenuous one, and out of his 
rperiences, which have been varied, he has brought the con- 
Insion that hard work pays and that straightforward 
ealing brings the best results. 

Mr. Wood was born February 18, 1880, at Eoanoke, Vir- 
inia, a son of W. G. and Anna P. (Thrasher) Wood, na- 
ives of Virginia. On the paternal side he traces his an- 
estry back in Virginia to the year 1697, when the first 
?ood of this branch of the family immigrated to the 
iolonies from England, and on the maternal side he comea 
f good old Holland stock. W. G. Wood, a college graduate 



and man of superior intellect and education, follows the 
vocation of farming and is likewise prominent in public and 
political affairs, in which he has interested himself for many 
years. His integrity, honesty and impartiality have been 
so well established in the minds of his fellow-citizens that 
he is frequently called upon to act as arbiter in disputes, 
even when not holding office, and as counsellor and guide 
in business and domestic matters. 

William W. Wood attended the country public schools and 
the National Business College, Eoanoke, Virginia, and after 
his graduation from the latter, in 1901, started to work 
with the Houston interests, and thereafter for twenty years 
remained with the same concern at various places where 
operations were being carried on. For about six years of 
this time he served as superintendent for the Houston inter- 
ests at the Maitland shaft, and for about three years was 
superintendent at Keystone. When he left this concern, 
January 1, 1921, he moved to Bluefield, the site of his home 
at this time, and took charge of the Lowvolatile Consoli- 
dated on the New River, remaining in the same capacity 
until October 15, 1921. At that time, as Mr. Wood puts it, 
he "graduated as superintendent of the closed shop," and 
October 16, 1921, became general manager of the Chatta- 
roy Mining Company's operations at the station called 
Hatfield, on the main line of the Norfolt & Western Rail- 
way, where he has remained to the present. Mr. Wood has 
operated all through the miners' troubles, and says he has 
' ' never had any strike. ' ' 

In 1906, at Eoanoke, Virginia, Mr. Wood was united in 
marriage with Miss Geneva Layman, daughter of William 
M. and Nannie (Weeks) Layman, natives of Virginia and 
agricultural people. Mr. and Mrs. Wood are the parents of 
one child, Anna B., who is attending school. They are 
consistent members of the Presbyterian Church, to the 
movements of which they subscribe generously. Mr. Wood 
is a Mason of high standing, having attained to the Knight 
Templar degree and the Mystic Shrine. 

Manuel F. Toreegeosa, M. D. A mining physician and 
surgeon at Ashland in McDowell County, Doctor Torregrosa 
is one of the brilliant young men in the profession in South- 
ern West Virginia and has earned a very successful place 
and a large degree of esteem in the community where his 
professional labors have been performed during the past 
five years. 

Doctor Torregrosa is a Porto Rican by birth and repre- 
sents some of the old Spanish families of that island. He 
was born at Las Marias Island, Porto Rico, April 2, 1891. 
His parents, Manuel F. and Juanita (Rodriguez) Torre- 
grosa, were also natives of Porto Rico. His father owned 
a large drug business prior to the Spanish-American war, 
but on account of war conditions and also a long illness of 
typhoid fever, he lost most of his property. After the war 
he was made inspector of customs and later chemist for the 
Island at San Juan. Subsequently he was in the drug busi- 
ness at Lajas and was also appointed a justice of the peace. 
He died in 1903. 

Manuel F. Torregrosa began his education after Porto 
Rico came under the American flag. He attended the com- 
mon and high schools, and in 1907, at the age of sixteen, 
came to the United States and entered William and Mary 
College in Virginia. He quickly proved himself one of the 
most thorough scholars and also one of the most popular 
students. of the institution. As a result of his first year's 
work he won the Philo Bennett scholarship, endowed by 
William Jennings Bryan. During his second year, therefore, 
he paid his expenses at William and Mary with the pro- 
ceeds of this scholarship. After two years of general 
college work he entered the University College of Medicine 
at Richmond and graduated M. D. May 29, 1913. After 
graduation he was an interne in the City Hospital of Rich- 
mond. Doctor Torregrosa after securing his diploma went 
back to Porto Rico, but in October, 1914, returned to the 
United States and for nine months was company physician 
for the W. M. Ritter Lumber Company at Hurley, Virginia. 
He was then engaged in general practice at Kent Stores, 
Fluvanna County, Virginia, until April, 1916, and following 
that was located at Williamsburg, Virginia. In December, 



50 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



1916, he came to Eckman, West Virginia, with Dr. J. Clark 
Killey, and in October, 1917, began his duties at Ashland 
for the Ashland Coal & Coke Company. Ashland is an 
important coal mining town on a branch of the Norfolk & 
Western Eailway running from North Fork. He has been 
a very busy man in this community, and his services to an 
essential industry were considered more important than 
anything he could do in the army, since his applications for 
active duty were rejected. Doctor Torregrosa is a member 
of the County, West Virginia State and American Medical 
associations, and is a member of the Phi Rho Sigma medical 
fraternity. He is also a member of Algoma Lodge, A. F. 
and A. M., of North Fork, Zenith Lodge No. 213, I. O. O. F., 
and Burks Garden Lodge No. 57, K. of P. 

At Norfolk, Virginia, July 11, 1914, he married Miss 
Frances Timberlake, of Williamsburg, daughter of John 
Corbett and Missouri (Blassingham) Timberlake. John 
Corbett Timberlake, father of Mrs. Torregrosa, was a 
colonel in the Confederate army, serving through many 
hard-fought battles during the Civil war. He was taken 
prisoner and served one year in the Johnston Island prison 
and two years in Lake Erie prison. His name appears on a 
monument erected for Confederate officers at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania. Doctor and Mrs. Torregrosa are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

Julius A. de Gruyter, It would be difficult to name a 
man who has been busier and more useful in the affairs of 
Charleston during the last thirty years than Julius A. de 
Gruyter. His career to a noteworthy degree has been de- 
voted to the public service — honest, competent and efficient. 
He is now in his second term as postmaster of Charleston, 
administering the business of the largest postoffice in vol- 
ume of revenues in the State of West Virginia. 

Mr. de Gruyter was born at Christiansburg, Montgomery 
County, Virginia, January 9, 1864. His father, M. F. de 
Gruyter, was a native of Holland, was educated in Heidel- 
berg University of Germany, and after coming to this coun- 
try he served in the Confederate war as a major on Gen- 
eral Echols' staff. He married Julia P. Crockett, of Mar- 
met, Kanawha County, where she was born, daughter of 
John B. Crockett, of Kentucky, and of the same ancestry as 
the famous David Crocket. John B. Crockett was a farmer 
and salt manufacturer in Kanawha County, and died at the 
age of eighty. M. P. de Gruyter was a commercial sales- 
man, lived at Covington, Kentucky, for a number of years, 
with business interests in Cincinnati, and in the early '70s 
moved to Charleston. He finally lost all his property and 
died at the age of sixty-six. His widow lives with her son 
Julius at the age of eighty-seven. There were two other 
children: Josephine, who died at the age of forty-three, 
wife of L. E. Fuller; and Ferdinand J., who among other 
experiences prospected for gold in the Northern Alaska 
fields and who died at Charleston at the age of sixty-one. 

J. A. de Gruyter acquired most of his education in the 
public schools at Charleston, and his work in the public 
service began soon after he left school. Jn 1885, at the 
age of twenty-one, he was elected city recorder, serving two 
terms. He was clerk of the council and police judge as 
well under Mayor James H. Huling and Mayor Joseph L. 
Fry. In 1889 he became superintendent of the Charleston 
water works. This plant had been put in operation in 1886. 
Mr. de Gruyter was a capable man to have the management 
of the water works for fourteen years, until 1903, and not 
only had charge of operations, but all extensions to the 
service. While still superintendent of the water plant he 
was elected mayor in 1895, and served two terms, four 
years. At the time he was first elected Elk City, now known 
as the West Side, was annexed to Charleston. His term as 
mayor was marked by some notable public improvements 
for that era, including the paving of several miles of street, 
the construction of sewers, and the building of the Charles- 
ton General Hospital. 

On leaving the water works in 1903 Mr. de Gruyter es- 
tablished a fire insurance agency, and was in that busi- 
ness until 1915, when he was appointed postmaster of 
Charleston, through the influence of Senator William E. 
Chilton. He began his duties as postmaster in July, 1915, 



two years before the post office building of Charleston ha 
been completed. Since Mr. de Gruyter took charge of tl 
post office its business has increased 250 per cent, an 
amounts to over $400,000 a year, larger than any oth( 
city in West Virginia, and in proportion to the populatic 
it is one of the most profitable post offices in he Unite 
States. The post office now has 110 employes, includiii 
thirty city carriers and five rural carriers. Mr. de Gru; 
tor's present term as postmaster expires in February, 192 
He has always been active in the democratic party in tl 
state, and has been a delegate to a number of local ai 
state conventions. He is a deacon of the First Presbyteria 
Church. Outside of his work his time and interest have bee 
concentrated on his home life. Mr. de Gruyter at differei 
times has donated to the Charleston Public Library an a| 
gregate of about 200 volumes, including the bound volum( 
that represented his collection of the numerous copies < 
Puck for seventeen years. 

In 1889 Mr. de Gruyter married Mary V. Noyes, who: 
father, W. A. Noyes, was an old time merchant of Charle 
ton and member of an old family of the city. The foi 
children of Mr. and Mrs. de Gruyter are: Elizabeth, Mr 
C. M. McVay; Julius A., Jr. state agent for the New Yoi 
Life Insurance Company of Charleston; Julia L., wife ( 
William J. Harvey; and Mary Noyes, twin sister of "Jul! 
living at home. 

Inghim Myers. While he owns a large farm and directs i 
diversified activities, Ingrim Myers, of Pine Grove, has be( 
actively identified with some phase of the oil industry sim 
early youth. He has helped build hundreds of miles of pi] 
line, both in West Virginia and in the Far West. Mr. Mye 
is one of the most successful men of Wetzel County, ai 
enjoys particularly high esteem at Pine Grove. 

He was born near Centerville in Tyler County, West Vi 
ginia, October 1, 1872. His grandfather, Enoch Myers, Wi 
born in Maryland in 1797, and spent the greater part of h 
life as a farmer at Moscow Mills, near Cumberland, thi 
state. Though in advanced years he joined the Union Arn 
at the time of the Civil war. When he retired from his far 
he removed to Pleasants County, West Virginia, and died ne; 
Willow Island in that county in 1879, at the age of eighty-tw 
His son, William Myers, was born near Cumberland Januai 
7, 1837, was reared there and as a young man moved 
Tyler County, West Virginia, where he spent his active li 
engaged in farming. He lived retired on his farm four mil 
north of Centerville until his death February 24, 1922. Du 
ing the Civil war he was a captain of the Home Guards 
Tyler County, and was called out to repel Morgan's rai 
getting as far as West Union in Doddridge County. He was 
republican and a very active member of the United Brethn 
Church. Captain Myers married in Tyler County Nancy ( 
Thomas, who was born near Centerville in 1839, and died ( 
the home farm December 16, 1911. They became the paren 
of a large family of children: Henry E., owner of a large bot 
of land on which he does a successful business as a cattle mi 
and sheep raiser five miles east of Centerville; Mary, wl 
died at the age of eighteen; Susan, whose first husband w 
John Tustin, a farmer, and she is now the wife of Jac< 
Thomas, a farmer living three and a half miles north 
Centerville; Robert, who died when three years of age; Agn« 
wife of Albert Nichols, a farmer at Walker Station in Wo( 
County; James Sheridan, a foreman for the Pittsburg & We 
Virginia Gas Company, living a mile south of Jacksonbur 
Emma J., widow of William Stone, who at the time of h 
death was deputy sheriff at New Martinsville, where si 
makes her home; Ingrim; William S., a merchant at B 
Moses, his home being a mile east of Middlebourne; Neas( 
George, a farm owner, an oil ganger for the Eureka Pi| 
Company, and now president of the County Court of Wetz 
County, his home being at Porters Falls; Miss Fannie, ; 
home; David Winfield, an oil and gas operator near We 
Union; and John W., who is superintendent of the Gladstoi 
Oil & Refining Company and a resident of Shrevepoi 
Louisiana. 

Ingrim Myers spent his early life on his father's farm ai 
acquired his education in the rural schools of Tyler Count 
After he was fifteen he worked two years on the farm, and 
1889, at the age of seventeen, entered the service of tl 




fi^^^^i^^ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



51 



Eureka Pipe Line Company, beginning in the Eureka oil 
fields of Pleasants County. In 1895 he was transferred as 
field foreman for this company to the Wetzel County field at 
Smithfield, and in 1902 the Eureka Company, a subsidiary of 
the Standard Oil, transferred him to California, where he 
superintended the laying of an eight-inch pipe line from 
Bakersfield to San Francisco, a distance of three hundred 
miles. After this work was finished he returned East, and for 
the Standard Oil Company laid a six-inch pipe line from 
Somerset, Kentucky, to Licking River, a distance of a hun- 
dred and ten miles. In 1904 he resumed work with the 
Eureka Pipe Line Company at Pine Grove as field foreman 
continuing until January 1, 1905. 

On August 4, 1904, Mr. Myers was nominated for sheriff of 
Wetzel County on the republican ticket, and on the 6th of 
November had the distinction of being the first republican 
ever elected sheriff of the county. He was chosen by a major- 
ity of sixty-six over the democrat, D. H. Cox, who had 
formerly been sheriff. Mr. Myers served the constitutional 
term of four years, from 1905 to 1909, his official residence dur- 
ing this time being at New Martinsville. After leaving this 
county office he resumed his residence in Pine Grove, and is 
looking after his extensive interests as an oil producer, farmer 
and general business man. His farm comprises five hundred 
acres at the edge of Pine Grove, and he operates it as a diver- 
sified proposition, largely devoted to cattle growing. He is an 
oil producer in the Pine Grove and Porter's Falls fields of 
Wetzel County, is a stockholder and director in the First 
National Bank of New Martinsville, and besides his farm owns 
two hundred acres of coal lands in the county. His home is a 
modern residence on Main Street in Pine Grove. 

Besides his official record as sheriff of Wetzel County Mr. 
Myers was for four terms mayor of Pine Grove, and a number 
of terms a member of the City Council. He is affiliated with 
Mannington Lodge No. 31, A. F. and A. M., Fairmont Chap- 
ter No. 6, R. A. M., Fairmont Commandery No. 6, K. T., 
Osiris Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Wheeling, and White 
Lily Lodge No. 49, Knights of Pythias, at Smithfield. During 
the war he was registrar of the Draft Board, helping to fill 
Out questionnaires for recruited men, and was also a leader in 
the various drives in his district. 

On August 12, 1902, at Pine Grove, he married Miss Kitty 
Vandyne, daughter of Jonathan D. and Captolia (Carpenter) 
Vandyne. Her mother lives at Reader, West Virginia. Her 
father, a farmer, died near Pine Grove in 1913. Mr. and Mrs. 
Myers had five children: Bessie, who died when two and a 
half years old; Mildred, born January 6, 1906; Webster, born 
July 19, 1908; Ingrim, Jr., born August 1, 1911; and Charles 
Blaine, born November 8, 1915. 

Thomas Lee Morgan is the druggist at Pine Grove, a suc- 
cessful young business man, of well balanced initiative, and 
his work and interests are closely linked with the general wel- 
fare of his community. 

Mr. Morgan was born at Pine Grove September 21, 1886. 
He comes of a branch of the Morgan family that on leaving 
Wales settled in Pennsylvania in Colonial times. This branch 
of the Morgan name included the noted Indian fighter Levi 
Morgan, and of the same ancestry was General John Morgan 
of the Confederate Army. The grandfather of the Pine 
Grove merchant was John William Morgan, who was born on 
Morgan Run in Wetzel County in 1820, that Run being named 
for his father. John W. Morgan was a farmer there, but in 
middle life removed to Pine Grove and owned and operated a 
flour and saw mill. He died there in 1896. His wife was Miss 
T. Petrick, who was born near Shinnston and died at Pine 
Grove. Frank Ferdinand Morgan, father of Thomas L. 
Morgan, was born September 8, 1848, at the head of the North 
Fork of Fishing Creek, on Morgan Run in Wetzel County, 
grew up there, but as a young man removed to Pine Grove, 
where he married and where for many years he has engaged 
in farming. He still owns his place of four hundred acres in 
that vicinity. FFor several terms he was county surveyor of 
Wetzel County, and now does considerable business as a civil 
engineer for oil and gas companies in the Wetzel County 
fields. He has served a number of terms as councilman and 
mayor of Pine Grove, and for many years has been on the 
Official Board of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a 
democrat, is affiliated with Wetzel Lodge No. 39, A. F. and 



A. M., and is a fourteenth degree Scottish Rite Mason in 
West Virginia Consistory No. 1 at Wheeling. His wife bore 
the maiden name of Martha Virginia West and was born on a 
farm near Pine Grove, September 23, 1861. To their mar- 
riage were born eight children: Cordelia, wife of Sam J. 
Dulaney, proprietor of a livery business at Pine Grove and 
former mayor of that city; Pearl, wife of Paul D. Galvin, an 
oil well driller and contractor living at Pine Grove; Vashti, 
wife of Ralph W. Hall, a druggist at Paden City, West Vir- 
ginia; Thomas L. ; Don Franklin, who was a druggist and died 
of influenza in 1918, at the age of twenty-eight; Liss, wife of 
Morris Francis, a clothing merchant at New Martinsville; 
Georgia, wife of Earl Clancy, a general merchant at Smith- 
field in Wetzel County; and Gladys, wife of Lesley JoUiff, a 
machinist at Pine Grove. 

Thomas L. Morgan grew up at Pine Grove, graduated from 
high school in 1906, spent one year in the School of Pharmacy 
at Scio, Ohio, and in 1908 graduated Ph. G. from the Western 
University of Pennsylvania at Pittsburgh. While in college he 
was a member of the Phi Delta Chi fraternity. After grad- 
uating he spent one year in a drug store at Charleston, West 
Virginia, and then returned to Pine Grove and bought the 
business of his brother-in-law, R. W. Hall. He owns both the 
store and the building, and has developed the best drug busi- 
ness in the western part of Wetzel County. Among other 
business interests he is treasurer of the Sago Oil Company of 
Ohio and Secretary-treasurer of the Superior Red Ash Fuel 
Company of Bluefield, West Virginia. 

Mr. Morgan is a member of the City Council of Pine 
Grove, is treasurer of the Methodist Episcopal Church, is a 
democrat, and is affiliated with Wetzel Lodge No. 39, A. F. 
and A. M., has attained the thirty-second degree in West 
Virginia Consistory No. 1, and is a member of Osiris Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine at Wheeling. He is also a past chancellor 
of Sylvan Lodge No. 130, Knights of Pythias, and is a member 
of the West Virginia Druggists Association. 

In 1916, at Wheeling, he married Miss Eloise Williams, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Evan A. Williams, residents of 
Middlebourne, where her father is a dairy farmer. Mrs. 
Morgan is a graduate of Marshall College at Huntington 
with the A. B. degree. They have two children: Virginia 
Lee, and Franklin Evan. 

Gilbert B. Meredith. While by no means an old man, in 
fact only in the prime of his usefulness, Gilbert B. Meredith 
has had a veteran's experience in the oil industry, and has 
been a worker in several of the prominent West Virginia 
fields and for leading oil and pipe line corporations for a third 
of a century. He is field superintendent for the Hope Natural 
Gas Company, with home at Smithfield. 

Mr. Meredith was born at Alma in Tyler County May 7, 
1872. Meredith is a Scotch name, but the family has been in 
America since Colonial times. His grandfather, David 
Meredith, was a native of Noble County, Ohio, was a minister 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church and when in middle life 
he moved to Tyler County, West Virginia, and carried on the 
work of the ministry there until his death at Alma in 1888. 
His son, Absalom P. Meredith, was born near Fairmont in 
Marion County in 1837, and was a boy when his parents 
moved to Tyler County, where he was married and where he 
followed farming at Alma until 1890, In that year he moved 
to another farm at Center Point in Doddridge County, and 
continued farming until his death in 1906. He was a republi- 
can, a very active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and was affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
During the Civil' war he served in the Union Army the last 
three years, enlisting in the Seventh West Virginia Infantry, 
in Company A. He was present at the second battle of Bull 
Run, at Gettysburg, and a number of other engagements and 
was once taken prisoner. Absalom P. Meredith married Miss 
Catherine Riley, who was born near Sistersville in Tyler Coun- 
ty in 1839, and died at Weston in 1911. The children born to 
them were: Charles, a building contractor at Spencer, West 
Virginia; Laura, twin sister of Charles, is the wife of John 
Kelly, an employe of the Carter Oil Company, living at Pike 
in Ritchie County; Jennie A. is the wife of John W. Horner, a 
farmer near Pennsboro in Ritchie County; Gilbert B. is the 
next in age; James A., Supreme Judge of West Virginia,' lives 
at Charleston, West Virginia; Rufus D., twin brother of 



52 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



James, is an oil well driller at Bartlesville, Oklahoma; Emma 
is the wife of Campbell Martin, manager of the Gasoline plant 
of the Carter Oil Company at Pike in Ritchie County; 
William H., a resident of Brownwood, Texas, and leaser for 
the Atlantic Refining Company; and Emery, an oil and gas 
well driller living at Newark, Ohio. 

Gilbert B. Meredith grew up on his father's farm in Tyler 
County, and his education in the common schools ended when 
he was fourteen. He soon afterward went to work in the old 
Turkey Foot oil field of Hancock County. The first summer 
he was waterboy on the pipe line. This was followed by an 
experience as a general roustabout, and he remained in that 
field six years, and in 1892 started as a day laborer with the 
Eureka Pipe Line Company at Smithfield. Four years later 
he became a roustabout for the Flaggy Meadow Gas Com- 
pany, and when the interests of this company were taken 
over by the Hope Natural Gas Company in 1902 he was 
made a gang foreman, but soon worked up to the responsi- 
bilities of field superintendent, and has held that post for 
this corporation eighteen years. Under his supervision are 
a hundred and fifty employes. Mr. Meredith superintends 
the drilling of wells and the laying of pipe lines in the Wetzel 
District and is also in charge of a compressing station at 
Wallace. His business headquarters are near the Baltimore 
& Ohio Depot at Smithfield. He is also a director of the 
Bank of Jacksonburg, owns a modern home at Smithfield 
and is owner of some land in Texas. 

Mr. Meredith is one of the influential republicans of this 
section of the state. Since 1920 he has been a member of 
the Republican County Committee and prior to that for 
four years was a member of the Congressional Committee 
of the Second District. He is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church and is affiliated with Mannington Lodge 
No. 31, A. F. & A. M., Fairmont Chapter No. 9, R. A. M., 
West Virginia Consistory No. 1 of the Scottish Rite at Wheel- 
ing, Osiris Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Wheeling, and is 
a past grand of Smithfield Lodge No. 308, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. During the war he cast all his influence and 
much of his working time in behalf of the Government to 
promote the sale of Liberty Bonds and assist in all the other 
patriotic drives in his community. 

At New Martinsville he married Miss Alice E. Hassig, 
daughter of Jacob and Rebecca (Smith) Hassig, both de- 
ceased. Her father was a farmer in Tyler and Wetzel 
counties. Mr. and Mrs. Meredith have three children: 
Catherine, born November 14, 1902, a graduate of the 
Smithfield High School and now a teacher in the public 
schools of that city; Doyle W., born March 17, 1904, a junior 
in the Smithfield High School; and Bruce, born September 
17, 1905, a sophomore in high school. 

William Carlin is one of the most substantial citizens of 
Wetzel County. Through his active career he has been a 
farmer, surveyor and civil engineer, identified with oil develop- 
ment, owns valuable oil royalties, and has widely extended 
farm and land interests both in West Virginia and elsewhere. 

Mr. Carlin's home is at Smithfield, and he was born near 
the present site of that town March 27, 1857. His father 
Patrick Carlin, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, in 1818, 
and came to the United States about 1844. He had first 
landed in the West Indies. Among early experiences he 
helped build a levee on the Mississippi River, then came up 
the Ohio to Wheeling, was married at Steubenville, Ohio, 
and for three years was employed in turnpike construction 
in Wetzel and Marshall counties. He then bought land and 
settled down to the life of a farmer in Wetzel County, and 
died at his home near Smithfield in 1868. He was a derno- 
crat and a devout Catholic. His wife was Catherine Kil- 
coyne, who was born in County Mayo in 1829, and they 
had known each other in the old country. She was a girl 
in Ireland during the great famine of 1846, and she came to 
the United States about 1854. Her death occurred on the 
old homestead on Arches Fork in 1918. Of her children 
William was the oldest; Miss Mary lives on the old home farm 
on Arches Fork; Dora, living on her farm near Smithfield, 
is the widow of William Wyatt; Miss Sarah lives on the home 
farm; Patrick for many years has been a farmer and merchant 
at Arches Fork; John is an extensive farmer and cattle raiser 
near Smithfield. 



William Carlin had some exceptionally good influences in 
his home, though his parents were far from being wealthy. 
Most of his education was derived from his mother's instruc- 
tion. Altogether he attended free school in Wetzel County 
only eight months. His apt intelligence, the reading of good 
books and home study have brought him an education far 
above the average. It is said that Mr. Carlin has the best and 
largest private library of any citizen in Wetzel County. 
During his youth he was brought face to face with the serious 
responsibilities of life, and until he was twenty-eight he re- 
mained on the home farm, assisting in earning a living for the 
family. He was only eleven years of age when his father died. 
Mr. Carlin was early led to the study of surveying, being very 
proficient in mathematics, and since the age of twenty-seven 
has done a great deal of work as a civil engineer in Wetzel 
County. He has surveyed and mapped large sections of 
the county. In 1894 he became interested in the oil fields 
of Wetzel and Doddridge counties, beginning as a leaser and 
has since come into the possession of some valuable oil 
royalties. 

Mr. Carlin's home is the most modern residence in Smith- 
field, in the southeastern part of that town. It stands on 
the edge of his large farm of eight hundred acres. Besides 
operating this farm he owns four other farms in Wetzel 
County, the total acreage being fourteen hundred acres, and 
he also has a half section of land in Borden County, Texas, 
and owns an interest in a tract of 43,000 acres on the San 
Juan River near Vera Cruz, Old Mexico. He was a stock 
holder in the Empire Bank of Clarksburg. 

Mr. Carlin is a democrat, a member of the Catholic Church 
and Clarksburg Council No. 872, Knights of Columbus. He 
was on practically all the committees for the sale of bonds 
and raising of funds for the war, and used his own name and 
credit to the limit in behalf of the Government. 

In 1885, in Wetzel County, Mr. Carlin married Miss 
Margaret Ann Wyatt, daughter of Andrew J. and Elizabeth 
(Morris) Wyatt. Her father was a Wetzel County farmer. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Carlin were born seven children: Leo, 
who attended the Fairmont State Normal School and holds 
the degrees A. B. and LL. B. from West Virginia University, 
was during the war in charge of the Trades Department for 
South America at Washington, is now a professor in the law 
school of West Virginia University and has re-written one 
of the standard law text books. Miss Dora, the second child, 
and Miss Cora are graduates of the Young Ladies Seminary 
at Parkersburg and live at home. Katherine and William 
are also still in the home circle. Patrick, who finished his 
education in the Fairmont State Normal School, was in the 
draft during the war and is now owner of a public garage 
at Smithfield. The youngest child is John Carlin. 

William S. Johnson was re-elected state treasurer of 
West Virginia in 1920, and his second term in office is a 
compliment to his sound business ability and the efficiency 
with which he has administered the great responsibilities of 
handling the financial affairs of the state. 

To his present honorable position Mr. Johnson has come 
through a career that presents few extraordinary instances 
but has been a steady struggle on the part of a normally 
ambitious, self reliant and thoroughly honest character. He 
was born in Fayette County, where he still resides, in 1871, 
son of Miles and Caroline (Woodrum) Johnson. His early 
life was spent on a farm. As a boy he went to live with 
his grandparents. His grandfather. Rev. William Johnson, 
was a farmer and local Methodist minister, a wise, good 
man of splendid natural attainments, who afforded the very 
best of influences for the developing character of his grand- 
son. The latter lived in the country and worked on the 
farm, attended school only two months each year, and the 
sum total of his school advantages was extremely limited. 
He had an ambition to teach, and by attending local teach- 
ers' institutes passed the required examination and was 
granted a first grade certificate. Mr. Johnson taught in 
Fayette County for about ten years. In 1902 he was elected 
county superintendent of schools of Fayette County, hold- 
ing that office four years. 

While still county superintendent he was elected in 1904 
a member of the State Senate from Fayette County. He 




M.^\^iA:u^tCiy>i^^ 



HISTOKY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



53 



IS re-elected in 1908, and sat in the upper branch of the 
gislature from Fayette County for eight years. 
Mr. Johnson was nominated by the republican party for 
lie treasurer in 1916, and in 1920 had no opposition for 
3 nomination and began his second term March 5, 1921. 
is doubtful if any preceding state treasurer has made as 
e a record for efficiency and faithful and expeditious 
ndling of the affairs of this office as Mr. Johnson. He 
s insisted from the first that the business of the office 
)uld be conducted on the principles demanded by any pri- 
te corporation. His office force is organized and its work 
rried out with this idea steadfastly in view. He has in- 
3ed his personal ideas into the office personnel, and has 
introduced equipment and machinery for systematizing 
d expediting his work and saving labor. In the treas- 
;r's office are such labor saving machines as a signagraph 
r signing checks, bookkeeping and posting machines, add- 
r machines, mimeograph machines, all of the electrically 
crated type, and a machine for cancelling state bonds and 
ipons. 

The disbursements of the state treasurer 's office run 
im $15,000,000 to $20,000,000 annually. The best evi- 
nce of business-like administration can be found in the 
iord that not a cent has been lost to the state through 
office and every cent handled can be accounted for. Mr. 
dnson while state treasurer has been especially well known 
:ause of his aggressive fight against the antiquated de- 
sitory law of West Virginia, a law copied from old Vir- 
lia more than half a century ago. The system has re- 
ined unchanged, an incubus on the efficient and business- 
e handling of state finances, and only the exceeding care- 
'ness of a state treasurer like Mr. Johnson has avoided 
ivy losses that are inseparable from the risks involved 
the law itself, in spite of all vigilance exercised by offi- 
Is. Mr. Johnson while state treasurer has studied and 
lected data from practically every state in the Union 
3 also from private corporations illustrating the best 
ans of handling finances, and out of this wide study and 
5erience he has prepared bills for proposed laws, thus 
icing the responsibility for the present system squarely 
to the Legislature. 

&.t the annual convention of the State Auditors and 
easurers Association of the United States held in At- 
itic City in October, 1921, Mr. Johnson was elected sec- 
J vice president. He was also honored by being invited 
deliver an address on the subject "How and by Whom 
ould Public Funds Be Deposited. ' ' 

MCr. Johnson is a member of the Methodist Church, and is 
iliated with the Knights of Pythias, Elks and Moose. He 
Tried Miss Ernie Young, who was born and reared in 
arleston. Mr. Johnson has his official residence at 
arlcston, but his home is at Mount Hope in Fayette 
unty. 

Arthur L. Chambers was born and reared in Western 
ansylvania, as a youth went into the oil districts as a 
mper and for a quarter of a century has been one of the 
ponsible men in the oil production activities of Wetzel 
unty, West Virginia. He resides and has his business 
idquarters at Smithfield and is superintendent of the 
ith Penn Oil Company. 

Mr. Chambers was born at Butler, Pennsylvania, June 28, 
)6. His father, James H. Chambers, was born at Mill- 
e. New Jersey, in 1809, was reared there, learned the trade 
blacksmith, and followed that occupation all his active life, 
was married at Orbisonia, Pennsylvania, and in 1848 left 
re and removed to Butler, where he lived until his death 
1881. He was a republican and a member of the Metho- 
t Episcopal Church. James H. Chambers married Susanna 
iffer, who was born in Eastern Pennsylvania in 1815 and 
i at Butler in 1881. A brief record of their children is as 
lows: John, a painter by trade who died at Allegheny, 
linsylvania, aged sixty-two; Mary, who died at Greenville, 
linsylvania, aged sixty-eight, wife of Perry Dehart, a 
ner who also died there; Samuel, a farmer who died at 
n City, Pennsylvania, aged sixty-three; Florence, wife of 
irge W. Campbell, an oil well worker at Baldwin, Penn- 
'ania; Jennie, of Van Buren, Indiana, widow of Andrew 



J. Campbell, who was a worker in the oil fields of that district; 
Charles, a farmer who died at Parkers Landing, Pennsylvania, 
at the age of thirty; Sarah, of Clarion, Pennsylvania, widow 
of Curtis W. Elder, a farmer. 

Arthur L. Chambers, eighth and youngest of this family, 
acquired a public school education at Butler and also took 
an academic course in Grove City College of that state. He 
left college at the age of twenty and forthwith entered the 
Kossuth oil field of Clarion County as a pumper. He was 
there two years, then worked in a similar capacity in the 
Connoquessing field of Butler County, and was in that dis- 
trict until he came to Smithfield in January, 1897. The 
first two years he was a pumper for the South Penn Oil 
Company, then for three years field foreman, and since then 
has had the responsibilities of superintendent of the Wetzel 
District, in charge of all the practical operations involved 
in the production and lifting of oil to the surface. His 
offices are on Smith Avenue, and he has under his supervision 
eighty employes and has had as high as three hundred men 
working under him. 

Mr. Chambers is a republican and a member of the Epis- 
copal Church. Fraternally he is affiliated with Wetzel 
Lodge No. 39, F. & A. M., at New Martinsville, Fairmont 
Chapter No. 9, R. A. M., Fairmont Commandery No. 6, 
K. T., West Virginia Consistory No. 1 of the Scottish Rite 
at Wheeling, Osiris Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Wheeling, 
and is a past chancellor of White Lily Lodge No. 94, Knights 
of Pythias. He is a director in the Bank of Jacksonburg. 
His only living son was in the army during the war, and Mr. 
Chambers did more than his share of home work, especially 
in the Red Cross relief activities. He is deeply interested in 
educational affairs, and for six years was president of the 
Board of Education of Grant District, and during that time 
built new schools at Pine Grove, Jacksonburg, Mobley and 
Smithfield. 

June 20, 1891, at Youngstown, Ohio, Mr. Chambers mar- 
ried Miss Cora Dillaman, daughter of George W. and Phoebe 
(Byers) Dillaman, now residents of Meadville, Crawford 
County, Pennsylvania, where her father is a farmer. The 
two children born to Mr. and Mrs. Chambers were Ersie 
Ray, who died at the age of four months and fourteen days, 
and Charles Roland. 

Charles Roland Chambers was born April 4, 1895, and 
joined the National Guard at Fairmont before America 
entered the war with Germany. He was mustered into 
active service in April, 1918, was commissioned a second 
lieutenant, was in training at Hattiesburg, Mississippi, and 
went overseas, reaching France October 10, 1918. He was 
a casual officer stationed at Le Mens, and returned March 
29, 1919. For two weeks he was held in hospital at Hoboken 
as a diphtheria carrier, and for four months was in the Walter 
Reed Hospital at Washington before his discharge. He is 
is now a resident of Cameron, West Virginia, being a book- 
keeper for the South Penn Oil Company. 

J. Friend Allet is cashier of the Bank of Pine Grove, 
was in early life a teacher, and is prominently and widely 
known in the citizenship of Wetzel County, which he also 
represented a term in the State Legislature. 

Mr. Alley was born at Pine Grove March 17, 1891, and at 
the age of thirty has achieved a substantial position in the 
affairs of that community. His great-grandfather. Jack 
Alley was the pioneer of the family in West Virginia. He 
was a minister of the Baptist Church and settled in Marshall 
County from Pennsylvania. The grandfather, Thomas H. 
Alley, was born in Marshall County in 1826, and the greater 
part of his life was spent near Pine Grove in Wetzel County, 
where he died in 1908, at the age of eighty-two. He married 
Mary Steele, a native of Greene County, Pennsylvania, who 
died at Pine Grove. Isaac B. Alley, father of the Pine Grove 
banker, is a resident of that community. He was born in 
Marshall County in 1859, and was a small boy when his 
parents moved to Pine Grove, where he was reared and mar- 
ried and where he has been known as a substantial farmer. 
He is now practically retired. He has served on the Town 
Council of Pine Grove, is a democrat, a member of the Meth- 
odist Church and Sylvan Lodge No. 130, Knights of Pythias. 
He married Louisa Headley, who was born in Wetzel County 
in 1864 and died at Pine Grove in 1894. The four children 



54 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



of their marriage were: Miss Jessie, at home with her father; 
Joe, a stationary engineer living at Pine Grove; J. Friend; 
and Mary Jane, wife of George W. Hawkins, a stationary 
engineer at Pine Grove. 

J. Friend Alley was educated in the public schools of Pine 
Grove, and in 1915 graduated from the Elliott Commercial 
School of Wheeling. In the meantime, at the age of nineteen, 
he began teaching, for two years his work was in the rural 
schools, and for one year he was a teacher in the grade school 
of Pine Grove. After finishing his commercial college 
course in the fall of 1915 he entered the Bank of Pine Grove 
as bookkeeper. In November, 1916, he was elected a mem- 
ber of the House of Delegates from Wetzel County, and dur- 
ing the session of 1917 he was a member of the committees 
on prohibition and temperance, education, county, districts 
and municipal corporations, private corporations and joint 
stock companies, and agriculture. In December, 1916, 
Mr. Alley resigned from the bank and for a short time was 
bookkeeper for the South Penn Oil Company, but in 1917 
returned to the Bank of Pine Grove as cashier, and has been 
to a large degree the responsible officer of the bank ever since. 

The Bank of Pine Grove was established under a state 
charter in 1902. It was a very prosperous institution, the 
capital stock being $25,000.00, surplus and profits S6,000.00, 
and deposits averaging $200,000.00. The personnel of the 
officers are: H. A. JoUiffe, president; F. F. Morgan, vice 
president; J. Friend Alley, cashier; while the other directors 
are Joe Alley, H. H. Roome, L. M. Billingsley, B. L. Morgan, 
P. J. Garvey, J. L. Simpson, S. J. Dulaney, all of Pine Grove, 
and J. U. JoUiffe, of Weston. 

As a bank official Mr. Alley was very active in promoting 
the filling of the quota of his community for patriotic pur- 
poses during the war. He spent much of his time in selling 
Liberty Bonds and helping the Red Cross drives. He is a 
democrat, a Methodist, and is affiliated with Wetzel Lodge 
No. 39 A. F. and A. M., Sylvan Lodge No. 130, Knights of 
Pythias, of which he is past chancellor, and Pine Grove 
Lodge No. 460, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

June 25, 1919, at Pine Grove, he married Miss Alice Haw- 
kins, daughter of Ralph R. and Sarah (Daugherty) Hawkins, 
the latter now deceased, and the former a resident of Pine 
Grove. He is a retired oil well pumper and now has a pen- 
sion from the company that employed him many years. 
Mrs. Alley also finished her education in the Elliott Com- 
mercial College at Wheeling. They have two children, 
Norman Gregory, born April 17, 1920, and Jack Roger, 
born February 1, 1922. 

Charles W. Sinnett is giving an excellent administration 
as postmaster of Auburn, Ritchie County, and is one of the 
well known and distinctively popular citizens of his native 
county, his birth having occurred at Washburn, this county, 
June 27, 1873. In Ritchie County were also born his par- 
ents, John P. and Helen V. (Stanley) Sinnett. The father 
was here born in the year lS47,where he was reared on a farm, 
and though he was a mere boy at the time of the outbreak 
of the Civil war, his youthful loyalty to the cause of the 
Union prompted him to enlist in the Tenth Virginia Infantry, 
with which he continued in service until the close of the war. 
After his return home he continued his active alliance with 
farm enterprise until he turned his attention to lumbering 
operations as the owner of a sawmill. With this line of 
business he continued his associations for many years prior 
to his death. He and his wife were zealous members of the 
Indian Creek Baptist Church, he was a stalwart republican, 
and was a valued and appreciative member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. Of the six children Charles W., of 
this review, is the eldest; Alberta is deceased; Mary E. is 
the wife of Floyd Jones; Eliza May is the wife of O. H. 
Waller; Clarence M., an oil-well driller by occupation, 
resides at Harrisville, judicial center of Ritchie County; and 
Clinton L. resides at Burnt House, this county, he having 
been a member of the United States Navy and having been 
in the aviation service of the nation in the period of the World 
war. 

Charles W. Sinnett remained on the home farm until he 
was nineteen years old, and that he had profited by the 
advantages of the public schools is evidenced by the effective 
service which he gave as a teacher in the rural schools for 



four terms. He became identified with the operation of 
saw mill, and later was a partner in the operating of a flo 
mill also at Auburn, besides which he acquired skill ai 
worked at the carpenter's trade. In 1914, after civil-servi 
examination, he was appointed postmaster at Auburn, 
which village he has maintained his residence since ISJ 
and his administration has fully justified his appointme 
to this office. He owns the building in which the Post Offi 
is established, and has given the same a modern equipmei 
so that the service facilities are of the best. He also ow 
and occupies one of the attractive homes of the villa; 
Mr. Sinnett is a staunch republican, and in a fraternal w 
is a past chancellor of Auburn Lodge No. 47, Knights 
Pythias, which he represented in the Grand Lodge of t 
state in 1909-10. His wife is an active member of t 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

In 1905 Mr. Sinnett married Miss Laura J. Watson, a; 
of this union six children have been born, all of whom a 
living except the youngest. The names and respective birt 
dates of the children are here recorded: Lois, January 1 
1906; Lora, April 11, 1908; Helen, October 27, 1910; Jo 
Willard, January 28, 1912; Harmon E., September 11, 191 
and May, who was born January 8, 1921, and died Janua 
12, 1921. 

John L. Rtmer is one of the leading merchants of t 
thriving village of Auburn, Ritchie County, where he is al 
vice president of the Auburn Exchange Bank, one of t 
substantial and well ordered financial institutions of t 
county. He was born in Gilmer County, this state, Decemfc 
17, 1869, and is a son of W. W. and Phoebe J. (Patto 
Rymer, the former of whom was born in Highland Coun1 
Virginia, in 1840, and the latter of whom was born in wh 
is now Gilmer County, West Virginia, in 1850. The fatt 
was reared and educated in what is now West Virginia, 1 
parents having first settled in Lewis County and later havi 
removed to Gilmer County, where he was reared to maturif 
After his marriage W. W. Rymer settled on a farm ne 
Auburn, Ritchie County, and he is now one of the veneral 
and honored citizens of Gilmer County. He has been a m 
of productive industry and has been loyal to all civic duti 
and responsibilities, his political faith being that of t 
democratic party. Of the six children the subject of tl 
review is the eldest; N. E. is serving, in 1921, as county cle 
of Gilmer County; Miss Mary S. remains at the parent 
home; Howard E. is deceased; Dosia L. is the wife of Albc 
West, of Glenville, Gilmer County; and William I. has acti 
management of the home farm of his parents. 

While the activities of the old homestead farm ma 
demands upon much of the time and attention of John 
Rymer in the period of his boyhood and early youth, he d 
not fail to profit also by the advantages offered in the pub 
schools, besides which he later took a course in the Mounta 
State Business College at Parkersburg. In his independe 
career Mr. Rymer has continued his appreciative allian 
with farm industry, and is now the owner of a well improvi 
farm of seventy-five acres near Auburn. He has conducti 
a well equipped general merchandise store at Auburn siii| 
the year 1910, and is one of the progressive merchants ai 
loyal and liberal citizens of this village. He is a stani 
democrat, and is past chancellor of Auburn Lodge No. 'i 
Knights of Pythias, his wife being a member of the Pythi* 
Sisters and also an active member of the Methodist Episcoj 
Church. 

In 1914 Mr. Rymer wedded Miss Dell S. Sommerville, 
Auburn, she being a native of Ritchie County. Mrs. Ryn, 
graduated from the Mountain State Business College, a 
in 1912-13 she served with marked ability as cashier of i 
Auburn Exchange Bank, she having been at that time 1 
only woman bank cashier in West Virginia. Mr. and M 
Rymer have no children. 

Hon. George William McCauley. One of the leadi, 
promulgators of corporation law of Eastern West Virgi 
is George William McCauley, of Moorefield, the grea 
part of whose career has been passed in Hardy Coub 
Mr. McCauley is not only prominent in the ranks of his p- 
fession, but is likewise active and influential in the raij 
of the democratic party and at various times has hi 




J^.lh 



Trj^la^ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



55 



chosen the incumbent of public oflScea, in which he has es- 
tablished an excellent record for faithful and capable serv- 
ice. 

Mr. MeCauley was born November 30, 1868, at Sedan, 
Hampshire County, the family moving when he was one 
3-car old to Hanging Rock (now Mc-Cauley Post Office), 
Hampshire County, West Virginia. He is a son of Elias 
and Susan (Baker) MeCauley. His paternal grandfather, 
Addison MeCauley, was a resident of Hampshire County for 
many years, and, it is believed, devoted himself uuinter- 
rujitedly to agricultural operations in the vicinity of North 
River Mills. He married a Miss Millslagle, and among their 
children were: Lemuel, George and Elias. Elias MeCauley 
was born near North River Mills, Hampshire County, April 
19, 1821, and secured a rural school education that en- 
abled him to teach school prior to the outbreak of the war 
between the states. During that struggle he had a brief 
connection with a Confederate militia regiment, and the 
fact that he took no greater part in the war is probably 
due to his operation of a mill, at Sedan, the continuance of 
which was deemed desirable by the military chiefs. Some 
time after the war Mr. MeCauley came to Hardy County 
and established the family home at what was then known as 
Hanging Rock, but which is now known as MeCauley Post 
Offii'e, named in his honor. He was first engaged in the 
milling business, following which he established a general 
merchandise store and gradually assumed other business 
connections, of growing importance, which he maintained 
for a number of years. In the evening of life he passed 
these responsibilities on to other shoulders, and died Au- 
gust 10, 1908, at MeCauley. He was politically a demo- 
crat, with strong and well-defined convictions, but did not 
seek political favors, and his only public positions were 
those of postmaster, justice of the peace and member of 
the board of education. In his later years he united with 
the Presbyterian Church. He had no connection with fra- 
ternal orders. Mr. MeCauley married Miss Susan Baker, 
who was born on Baker's Run, Hardy County, May 10, 1830, 
a daughter of Abraham and Mary Ann (Wise) Baker. Mrs. 
MeCauley passed away at the home of the family at Mc- 
Cauley February 19, 1912. Those of their children to 
grow to maturity were as follows: Aaron Baker, whose life 
was spent at MeCauley as a teacher, and who died at the 
home of his uncle, Aaron Baker, in Grant County, in 1897 ; 
Rebecca, who married John B. Russell and died September 
6, 1906, at MeCauley; Isabel Lee, who became the wife of 
Dorsey F. Brill and resides at Richwood, West Virginia; 
George William, of this review; and Sallie C, who mar- 
ried Benjamin B. Baughman and died at MeCauley, Feb- 
ruary 9, 1917. 

George William MeCauley spent his boyhood in general 
work around the home place, in the mill and at the store. 
Fishing and frog-hunting constituted a part of his boyhood 
diversions, and his first educational training was gained in 
the four-month schools of his period, that being the length 
of the winter term. By the time he was seventeen years 
of age he had gained sufficient education to teach, acquired 
a certificate, and obtained a school in the country, near Mc- 
Cauley. During 1887 and 1888 he attended the Shenandoah 
Normal College, Virginia, in the meantime continuing to 
teach for six years in the counties of Hardy, Hampshire and 
Grant, as the possessor of a No. 1 certificate. He tauglit 
his last term in Grant and Hampshire counties, teaching 
a four-month term in each in the same year, and aban- 
doned the schoolroom as a teacher in 1891. 

At that time Mr. MeCauley secured a position as mana- 
ger of the Alliance Store at Rio, Hampshire County, and 
there continued for three years. During this time he con- 
ceived the idea of studying law and began reading Black- 
stone. In June, 1894, he gave up his position at the store, 
and in the fall of the same year went to Morgantown, 
where he took a course in law at West Virginia University, 
taking a two-year course in one and graduating as a mem- 
ber of the class of June, 1895. During his college days 
Mr. MeCauley was a member of the Parthenon Literary 
Society, and participated in the debates and literary work 
of the weekly programs of the society. Returning to his 
home at MeCauley he spent two or three months, but in 



August, 1895, came to Moorefield to engage in the practice 
of his profession. At that time the young lawyer was with- 
out a library, funds or any other asset save his right to prac- 
tice, his knowledge of the law and his keen determination 
to win. It was then that he found a generous friend in 
the old lawyer of the town, Mr. Carr, who fathered him 
and allowed him to share his office with liim for a time. 
It was thus he passed through the probationary stage, get- 
ting into practice slowly but surely, and finally gaining a 
reputation as a pleader that secured him public confidence. 
He was urged to become a candidate for the office of prose- 
cuting attorney in 1896, against one of the old lawyers of 
the county and the then incumbent of the office. He yielded 
to the urging and won the election, succeeding Benjamin 
Dailey, and subsequently held the office for three terms, or 
twelve years, after which he declined to be a candidate. 
The condition of society during that time seems to have 
been healthful as far as crime was concerned, and there 
was no difficulty in convicting those who broke the liquor 
laws. Only two murders were committed during the period, 
and both slayers were sent to the penitentiary. 

Retiring from the office of prosecuting attorney, Mr. Mc- 
Cauley resumed the private practice of law, but, it seemed, 
was not destined to keep out of public office, for in 1911 he 
was elected to the West Virginia House of Delegates and 
served under Speaker Wetzel in a democratic House. He 
was made chairman of the committee on federal relations 
and a member of the judiciary committee. Among his la- 
bors during that term was the introduction of a bill pro- 
viding for a tax on oil and gas, which he succeeded in 
passing through the House, although it failed of passage 
in the Senate. He was re-elected for the terms of 1913-15, 
during which both Houses were republican, and Mr. Mc- 
Cauley took part on the floor of the House in the legislative 
matters ]broposed. He was a member of the judiciary com- 
mittee. In 1917 he declined to be a candidate, but, at the 
request of Governor Coruwell, ran for another term in 1919 
and served in the House that winter. He felt that he had 
acquired aU the honors possible as a member of that body 
after being given the nomination for the speakership by 
his party and being made minority leader of the House, 
and would not seek the place again voluntarily, but was 
urged so strongly that he finally consented and was elected 
in 1920, being made the minority leader of the democratic 
party in the House in 1921. He was in the minority all 
through his legislation service and could do no more than 
speak on the floor of the House and in the committee rooms. 
Mr. MeCauley was a modest officer of the Democratic Na- 
tional Convention at Baltimore and witnessed the bringing 
about of the nomination of President Wilson. Convention 
work at home has not been followed up closely by him as 
a delegate, although he helped to nominate Judge Brown 
for Congress and saw him elected to that body from the 
Second District. 

Mr. MeCauley continues to be engaged in the practice 
of his profession and is attorney for the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railway Company, the Winchester & Western Rail- 
road Company, the South Fork Lumber Company, the Win- 
chester Lumber Corj oration and Moore, Keppel & Company, 
large lumber concerns of Hardy County, and the South 
Branch National Bank, of which he is vice president and 
a member of the board of directors. During the World 
war he was a member of the Hardy County Draft Board. 
In 1897 Mr. MeCauley united with the Southern Presby- 
terian Church at Moorefield, and after serving several years 
as a deacon was advanced to an eldership in the church, 
which he still retains. He has represented the Moorefield 
congregation in Winchester Presbytery several times, and 
was its commissioner in the General Assembly at Atlanta, 
Georgia, in 1913, and that at Durant, Oklahoma,, in 1918. 

On March 23, 1898, Mr. MeCauley married at Washington, 
D. C, Miss Eleanor Clements, of the national capital, who 
was born and reared at Georgetown, D. C. and was edu- 
cated in the Catholic convent at Frederick City, Maryland. 
She was a daughter of William Delesdernier and Eleanor 
(0 'Donnoghue) Clements. For a number of years prior 
to her death, which occurred December 8, 1920, Mrs. Mc- 
Cauley was unable to take part in community affairs as car- 



56 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



ried on by the ladies of Moorefield because of physical dis- 
ability, but remained loyal to the Catholic Church, the 
faith of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. McCauley had one son: 
William Delesdernier, born July 3, 1900, who is a student 
of law at West Virginia University, in which he was for- 
merly an S. A. T. C. student. 

Walter Lee Johnston, M. D., is established in the suc- 
cessful general practice of his profession in the thriving 
industrial City of McDowell, in the county of the same 
name. In addition to his specifically private practice as a 
physician and surgeon he is retained as official physician 
of the Eoauoke Coal & Coke Company, the Arlington Coal 
& Coke Company, the Gilliam Coal Company and the Indian 
Eidge Coal & Coke Company. His practice is now of such 
broad scope that he has Doctor Steel as his assistant, and 
where patients require hospital service he has recourse to the 
Miners' State Hospital No. 1 at Welch, the Bluefield Sani- 
tarium and St. Luke's Hospital at Bluefield. The doctor 
shows a fine sense of stewardship in his profession and 
maintains afiiliation with the McDowell County Medical 
Society, the West Virginia State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. 

Doctor Johnston was born at Princeton, Mercer County, 
West Virginia, April 27, 1872, and is a son of James Ed- 
ward and Ellen Elizabeth (Wall) Johnston, the former of 
whom was born in Virginia and the latter in what is now 
West Virginia. James E. Johnston, a farmer by vocation, 
served as a loyal soldier of the Confederacy during the 
CivU war. He was a steward in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, of which his wife likewise was a devoted 
member. The lineage of the Johnston family traces back 
to Scotch and Irish sources, and its first American repre- 
sentatives settled in Virginia in the Colonial period of our 
national history. 

The public schools of his native county afforded Doctor 
Johnston his early education, and he was a lad of sixteen 
years at the time of his father 's death. After completing 
his studies in the Princeton schools he was a student in the 
State Normal School at Athens until 1888, and for three 
years thereafter he was a clerk in a general store at Oak- 
vale. He carefully conserved his earnings and utilized his 
savings in defraying the expenses of his professional educa- 
tion. He entered the College of Medicine of the University 
of Virginia, this department being in the City of Eiehmond, 
and there he was graduated as a member of the class of 
1899 and with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He has 
made McDowell the central stage of his professional service 
from the time of his graduation, and has gained high stand- 
ing as an able and resourceful physician and surgeon and as 
a broad-minded and progressive citizen. 

December 26, 1901, recorded the marriage of Doctor 
Johnston and Miss Nellie F. Keating, daughter of John J. 
and Ann (Canfield) Keating, both natives of Pennsylvania. 
Mr. and Mrs. Keating reside at Eckman, West Virginia, 
and he is successfully engaged in the wholesale grocery 
business. Doctor and Mrs. Johnston are communicants of 
the Catholic Church and in politics he is a stanch democrat. 
The only child, Walter Broughton Johnston, is, in 1922, a 
student in the high school at North Pork. 

Hakbt a. Henthoen is secretary for Morris Watts and 
shipping agent for the Pocahontas Coal Sales Company in 
the coal business, with headquarters at Gilliam, McDowell 
County, and is one of the vital and popular young men here 
concerned with business enterprise. 

Mr. Henthorn was born at Toronto, Jefferson County, 
Ohio, March 25, 1893, and is a son of Jesse and Mary 
(Allen) Henthorn, both likewise natives of the old Buckeye 
State, where the father has long been successfully engaged 
in road and bridge construction work as a contractor. 

After attending the public schools of Monroe County, 
Ohio, Harry A. Henthorn continued his studies in a normal 
school in the same county. For three years thereafter he 
was a successful teacher in the schools of Monroe County, 
and he then came to Wheeling, West Virginia, and entered 
the Elliott Commercial College, in which he completed a 
thorough course, which included stenography, typewriting 



and general commercial instruction, besides which he took 
a secretarial course, his graduation having occurred in 1914. 
After leaving this institution he became pay-roll clerk for 
the Glenalum Coal Company at Glenalum, Mingo County, 
and three months later became secretary to Mr. Watts at 
Eckman, McDowell County, where he remained five years, 
since which time he has held his present responsible position 
at Gilliam, this county. 

The political allegiance of Mr. Henthorn is given to the 
democratic party, he is afBliated with the Masonic frater- 
nity, and he and his wife hold membership in the Baptist 
Church. 

December 21, 1915, in Monroe County, Ohio, was solem- 
nized the marriage of Mr. Henthorn and Miss Eska Ekle- 
berry, daughter of Albert Ekleberry, a substantial citizen 
of that county. The two children of this union are Harry 
A., Jr., and Beatrice Pearl. 

Joseph C. Lawson, M. D., is one of the veteran and 
honored representatives of his profession in Ritchie County, 
where for nearly forty years he has been engaged in active 
general practice at Auburn, with a parallel record of able 
and effective stewardship in his profession and as a citizen. 
The Doctor was born in Harrison County, Virginia, May 11, 
1852, about a decade prior to the time when his native county 
became a part of the new state of West Virginia. He is a 
son of Theophilus and Elizabeth (Bailey) Lawson, the former 
of whom was born in Harrison County, January 15, 1823, 
and the latter in Taylor County, September 16, 1830. 
Theophilus Lawson was a son of Elias and Mary (Teter) 
Lawson, who were born in the eastern part of Virginia and 
who migrated in an early day to what is now Harrison 
County, West Virginia, where they settled on a pioneer farm 
near Bridgeport. On this old homestead Theophilus Lawson 
passed the period of his boyhood and early youth, and he 
continued as one of the substantial exponents of farm enter- 
prise during his entire active career, both he and his wife 
having continued to reside in Harrison County until their 
deaths and both having been earnest members of the Metho- 
dist Protestant Church. Mr. Lawson was a strong Union 
sympathizer in the Civil war period, and was one of the early 
members of the republican party in his community. Of the 
eight children all but one attained to maturity, and of the 
number four are living, in 1921, Dr. Lawson of this sketch 
being the eldest of this number; Rachel is the wife of Jacob 
Marple; E. W. is a substantial capitalist and banker at 
Kansas City, Missouri; and Mary B. is the wife of Arthur 
A. Gather, of Clarksburg, West Virginia. Dr. Silas B., Ida 
A., Kittle and John B. are deceased. 

Dr. Joseph C. Lawson was reared on the old home farm 
and his youthful ambition led him to carry his early studies 
far beyond the curriculum of the local schools, as he gave his 
attention to the study of Latin, higher mathematics and other 
branches. In preparation for his chosen profession he en- 
tered the historic old Jefferson Medical College in the City 
of Philadelphia, and after receiving therefrom his degree 
of Doctor of Medicine he was engaged in practice at Bridge- 
port, Harrison County, near the old home, until 1884, when 
he established his permanent residence at Auburn, Ritchie 
County, which has been the central stage of his earnest and 
able professional labors during the long intervening period. 
He is one of the oldest and most revered members of the 
Ritchie County Medical Society and is also a member of the 
West Virginia State Medical Society. The Doctor is a stock- 
holder in the Auburn Exchange Bank, is a trustee of the local 
Methodist Protestant Church, is a past master of the lodge 
of Free and Accepted Masons at Auburn, past chancellor 
of the local lo ge of the Knights of Pythias, and is affiliated 
also with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party. 

June 14, 1887, recorded the marriage of Dr. Lawson and 
Miss Araminta Bush, who was born in Gilmer County but 
reared in Ritchie County. Of the six children of Doctor and 
Mrs. Lawson one died in infancy; Willie graduated from 
Broaddus Institute and is now the wife of Rev. L. E. Oldaker, 
a clergyman of the Methodist Protestant Church; Adrian H. 
was afforded the advantages of the State Normal School at 
Glenville, and he represented his native state as a gallant 
young soldier in the World war, in which connection he was^ 




7r?i'^z..^-;<7 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



57 



in active service in France for one year; Leon K., a graduate 
of the State Normal School at Glenville, is, in 1921, a student 
in the University of West Virginia; Kathleen, who likewise 
attended the normal school at Glenville and also Fairmont 
State Normal School; and Carleton is a graduate of the 
Morgantown, West Virginia, High School. 

Henry J. Stralet, cashier of the Auburn Exchange Bank 
in the village of Auburn, Ritchie County, was born in Lewis 
County, this state, on the 19th of May, 1872, and is a son 
of L. H. and Martha M. (Langford) Straley, both likewise 
natives of that county, the father having been born at 
Jauelew, January 24, 1846, and the mother at Weston, the 
county seat, February 28, 1853. The parents were reared 
on farms in their native county, received the advantages of 
the common schools, and their marriage was solemnized 
January 1, 1871. Thereafter they resided on a farm on Free- 
mans Creek, Lewis County, until 1890, when they sold the 
farm and removed to a farm on Cove Creek, that county. 
In 1911 they sold this place and removed to Harrison County, 
Ohio, where the father passed the remainder of his life, his 
death having occurred October 22, 1921, and where the 
widowed mother still maintains her home. L. H. Straley 
was a man of sterling character, achieved success in connec- 
tion with farm industry, was a staunch democrat and was 
affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. His religious faith 
was that of the Baptist church, of which his widow likewise 
is an earnest member. They became the parents of nine 
children, all of whom survive the honored father, and of the 
number the subject of this sketch is the eldest. The second 
son is F. Sylvester; Tilden L. resides at Adena, Ohio, and is 
a carpenter by trade and vocation; James C, who is super- 
intendent of the public schools of Madelia, Minnesota, is 
a graduate of the University of Wisconsin and also of the 
Kansas State Normal School at Emporia; Walter K. is in 
the oil fields of California; John M., now a resident of Colum- 
bus, Ohio, served as a second lieutenant in the United States 
Army at the time of the World war; Jessie is the wife of Rev. 
J. A. Young, pastor of the Baptist Church at St. Marys, 
West Virginia; Guy, who graduated from the high school at 
Scio, Ohio, is now a prosperous farmer; and Willa is the wife 
of J. E. Eminger, of Clendenin, Kanawha County, West 
Virginia. 

Henry J. Straley was reared to the sturdy discipline of 
the farm and remained at the parental home until he attained 
to his legal majority. In the meanwhile he had profited 
fully by the advantages of the public schools, and at intervals 
he continued his effective service as a teacher for fourteen 
years. In the meanwhile he was actively identified with 
farm enterprise, to which he continued to give his attention 
until April, 1918, when he assumed his present position, 
that of cashier of the Auburn Exchange Bank, the other two 
executive officers being J. T. Hall, president, and J. L. 
Rymer, vice president. Besides these officers the directorate 
of the bank includes also J. E. Legett, Chester Williams, 
F. H. Gray, A. N. Watson, John R. Powell, James Reed, 
M. S. Gaston. The capital stock of the institution is $25,000. 

Mr. Straley gives his political allegiance to the democratic 
party, he and his wife are members of the Baptist Church, 
he is a past chancellor of Auburn Lodge No. 47, Knights 
of Pythias, and is affiliated also with Harmony Lodge No. 
59, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 

September 29, 1897, recorded the marriage of Mr. Straley 
and Miss Ida J. Goff, who was born in Ritchie County, 
May 30, 1872. Mr. and Mrs. Straley have six children: 
Vera, Velma, Willa, Hazel, Harry and Heber. The eldest 
daughter is a graduate of the Mountain State Business College 
in the City of Parkersburg. 

William H. Davis. Sometimes the greatest prosperity of a 
populous city depends upon specific industries for which its lo- 
cation may particularly favor it, manufacturing building up 
one section, shipping another, the cultivation of the vine or the 
growing of fruits another, or mining contributing to still 
another, all of these attracting wealth and bringing inde- 
pendence. One of the leading factors in bringing prosperity 
to the City of Morgantown has been the location here of 
the tin plate plant of the United States Steel Corporation, of 
which plant William H. Davis is the efficient and energetic 



manager. Mr. Davis is likewise prominently identified with 
the financial interests of the city, being president of the 
Commercial Bank of Morgantown, and as a citizen has 
evidenced his public spirit in his support of movements 
which have attracted the attention and interest of citizens 
of enlightened and progressive views. 

Mr. Davis is a native of Wales, and was born December 
18, 1864, his parents being the late William R. and Sarah 
(Crates) Davis, both natives of the same country, where 
the mother died. William R. Davis was a coal miner by 
vocation, and in his native land was a foreman and super- 
intendent of mines. In 1864 he came to the United States, 
and after coming to this country spent the most of his life 
in the West, being the owner of a farm near Osage City 
Kansas. He died at the home of his son William at Elwood' 
Indiana, at the age of seventy-eight years. ' 

The educational advantages of William H. Davis were 
somewhat limited in his youth, as he was called upon to go 
to work when he was only fourteen years of age in the tin 
plate mills of Wales. This experience was of the utmost 
value to hun, as he learned the business from the bottom 
up, and mastered all the details of each stage of the man- 
ufacture of this product as he won advancement from po- 
sition to position. In 1892, following the passage of the 
McKmley Tariff Bill, Mr. Davis came to the United States 
and went to work in the tin plate mill of Reed and Leeds 
at Elwood, Indiana, the first independent plant in the coun- 
try. After spending a few years as a roller he was made 
foreman, and several years later, when the mill was taken 
over by the United States Steel Corporation, was made 
superintendent of the corporation's Gas City (Indiana) 
plant. Later he was transferred to the Cleveland, Ohio, 
plant, and made manager, and subsequently went to the 
Farrell, Pennsylvania, plant, in the same capacity. In 
May, 1917, he was made manager of the Morgantown plant, 
a position which he still retains. All of these plants be- 
long to the United States Steel Corporation. Mr. Davis 
is one of the best informed men in his line in the country, 
and is an executive of ability and forceful personality. 

In 1917 Mr. Davis was one of the organizers of the 
Commercial Bank at Morgantown, and was a member of 
its first Board of Directors, which, at its first meeting, 
elected him to the presidency of the institution, a position 
which he has retained to the present. He has directed the 
affairs of the bank in a thoroughly capable manner, com- 
bining conservatism with progressive tactics in a way that 
has contributed materially to the bank's prosperity. He 
is a member of Morgantown Lodge No. 4, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; is a thirty-second degree Mason, and a 
member of Osiris Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine, of Wheeling, West Virginia; and like- 
wise holds membership in the Elks Lodge at Sharon, Penn- 
sylvania, and the Masonic and Country Clubs of Morgan- 
town. He is a Presbyterian in religion, and in politics gives 
his allegiance to the republican party. 

On December 25, 1893, Mr. Davis married Miss Alice 
Williams, daughter of John Williams, of Elwood, Indiana, 
and they have three children: Inez, Wilton H. and Mary 
Alice. 

Hon. Michael K. Duty, lawyer and business man of 
Pennsboro, has by his varied public service become one of the 
best known citizens of West Virginia. He has been in both 
Houses of the Legislature, has been mayor of Pennsboro, and 
was at one time county superintendent of schools of Ritchie 
County. 

Michael K. Duty was born on a farm in Tyler County, West 
Virginia, December 8, 1855, son of A. W. and Hannah E. 
(Jones) Duty, also natives of Tyler County. They were 
reared on farms in that county, and the father was a com- 
petent teacher and later a very successful business man, con- 
ducting a store at Centerville for many years. A. W. Duty 
was a Union soldier, being sergeant major in the 14th West 
Virginia Infantry. While in the war he was captured and 
spent six and a half months in Andersonville Prison. For 
thirty years he held the post of magistrate in his home county, 
was an active republican and a member of the United Brethren 
Church. A. W. Duty and wife had six children, five of whom 



58 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



are now living. Michael K.; J. W. Duty, an oil worker in 
Harrison County and who has held the office of magistrate; 
Ellen J., wife of Joseph Geesey, living in Ohio; E. T. Duty in 
the oil business at Highland. Ritchie County; and D. D. Duty, 
postmaster of Wellsville, Ohio. 

Michael K. Duty spent his early life at Centerville, West 
Virginia, attended the common and high schools there and 
later the State Normal School at Fairmont. Then followed a 
number of years of experience as teacher and school adminis- 
trator, and for twelve years he was principal of the public 
school at Pennsboro and served one term as county super- 
intendent of schools. Mr. Duty graduated in law from the 
University of Arkansas, and as a lawyer he has practiced in 
several counties of West Virginia and is still active in his pro- 
fession. He is owner of the line of railroad between Penns- 
boro and Pullman. He is a stockholder in the Citizens 
National Bank and has a large amount of property interests 
including town real estate and farm lands. 

Mr. Duty was elected and served five terms as mayor of 
Pennsboro. In 1912 he was elected a member of the House of 
Delegates, serving in the Thirty-first and Thirty-second 
Legislatures. In 1916 he was elected to represent the Third 
District in the State Senate, and was an active member in the 
Thirty-third and Thirty-fourth Legislatures. In the session 
of 1919 he was chairman of the Virginia debt committee, and 
was member of the important committees on judiciary, rail- 
road, prohibition and temperance and others. 

In Masonry Mr. Duty is well known over the state through 
his two terms as grand lecturer of the West Virginia Grand 
Lodge. He is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason 
and he is a past master of Harmony Lodge No. 59, A. F. 
and A. M., and member of Odell S. Long Chapter No. 25, 
R. A. M. In December, 1897, Senator Duty married Miss 
Lora Crumrine. They reared one child in their home, Delsie 
Woostle, now the wife of Clyde Maxwell. 

James B. Wilson, M. D. Born and reared on a farm near 
Pennsboro, after completing his medical education Doctor 
Wilson returned to his home community to practice, and for 
nearly thirty years has been one of the competent physicians 
and surgeons in this locality. 

His birth occurred on a farm three miles south of Penns- 
boro February 11, 1806. He is a son of Leroy P. and Vir- 
ginia S. (Rinehart) Wilson, the former born in Ritchie County 
in 1832 and the latter at Oakland, Maryland, in 1839. The 
mother is living at the age of eighty-three. Leroy Wilson had 
a common school education, excelled in mathematics, and 
for a number of years followed surveying, though his m in 
business was farming and cattle raising and dealing. He was 
a man of unusual business ability and a leader in public 
affairs in Ritchie County. He was elected as a democrat to 
several local offices, was president of the Board of Education 
and president of the Ritchie County Fair Association. He was 
especially prominent as a student of Masonry, and for a time 
was district deputy grand lecturer of the Grand Lodge. He 
was a past master of Harmony Lodge No. 59, A. F. and A. 
M., for nine years and was a thirty-second degree Scottish 
Rite Mason. Leroy Wilson was the father of twelve children, 
ten of whom are living. Archie J. is a merchant at Harrisville; 
Molly, died when about six years of age; Dr. James B.; Miss 
Agnes, a graduate of the Fairmont State Normal School and 
a teacher; Anna, wife of S. H. Hamilton, of Pennsboro; B. F. 
Wilson, who is located at Bowling Green, Kentucky, in the 
oil business; Minnie, deceased, was the wife of S. M. HofF, of 
Huntington, West Virginia; Zilpha, who is a graduate of 
medicine and is now the wife of a Presbyterian minister in the 
State of Washington; Susan is the wife of A. L. Davis of 
Charleston, West Virginia; Lee is in the oil business, with 
home at Wichita Falls, Texas; J. Marsh is an oil field worker; 
and Okey lives in Texas and is in the oil industry. 

Dr. James B. Wilson spent his early life on the farm, 
acquired a common school education and was a teacher for 
several terms. He began the study of medicine in the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, and in 1893 graduated M. D. from the 
University of Louisville, Kentucky. He then returned to 
Pennsboro, and has had a large practice in that part of 
Ritchie County ever since. He is a member of the County, 
State and American Medical Associations, and is local sur- 
geon for the Baltimore & Ohio Railway. 



Doctor Wilson is a director of the First National Bank of 
Pennsboro and is owner of considerable real estate in that 
town and Clarksburg. He is a democrat and, like his father, 
is interested in Masonry, serving three terms as master of 
Harmony Lodge No. 59, A. F. and A. M., and is also affiliated 
with the Royal Arch Chapter, Knight Templar Commandery 
and Shrine. He and Mrs. Wilson are members of the Presby- 
terian Church. Doctor Wilson's first wife was Alice Sherwood 
of Baltimore, Maryland. By this marriage he has a son, 
Sherwood, who is a graduate of high school. Doctor Wilson 
for his second wife married Olive Bond, of Clarksburg, West 
Virginia. 

Benjamin F. McGinnis has been one of the busy pro- 
fessional and business men of Pennsboro for a number of 
years. He was an attorney by education and practiced law for 
a number of years, but for the past five years his chief duty 
has been as cashier of the Farmers and Merchants Bank of 
Pennsboro. This is one of the older banking institutions of 
Ritchie County, beginning business in 1898. 

Mr. McGinnis was born on a farm in Ritchie County in 
1883, son of Benjamin and Alice (McCullough) McGinnis. 
His father was born in Greene County, Pennsylvania, in 1835, 
had a common school education, in 1852 came to West Vir- 
ginia and after his marriage settled on a farm in Ritchie 
County, near EUenboro. His wife was born in Doddridge 
County, West Virginia, and is now living in the village of 
EUenboro. She is an active member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. Benjamin McGinnis was a Union soldier 
throughout the four years of the Civil war, and was an active 
member of the Grand Army Post. He took a prominent part 
in republican politics, was elected county assessor in 1868, 
was chosen a member of the West Virginia Legislature in 
1872, in 1884 was elected a member of the County Court, 
and in 1902 was again elected to the Legislature. He died in 
1914. There were three children: Benjamin F. ; Miss Sadie 
E.; and John W., a graduate of Marshall College Normal 
School at Huntington and a farmer in Ritchie County. 

Benjamin F. McGinnis spent his early life on the farm near 
EUenboro, attended school there, and in 1908 graduated from 
West Virginia University Law School. In the meantime he 
had taught two years in country districts of his home county. 
Mr. McGinnis had a successful general practice as a lawyer at 
Pennsboro until business interests crowded him out of the 
profession. During 1015-16 he built the McGinnis Hotel at 
Pennsboro, and in 1917, about the time America entered the 
war with Germany, became identified with the management 
of the Farmers and Merchants Bank as cashier. He is also a 
director of the bank and a director of the First National Bank 
of Pennsboro. Mr. McGinnis is a republican, a member of the 
School Board at Pennsboro, a Knight Templar and thirty- 
second degree Scottish Rite Mason, being a member of Wheel- 
ing Consistory No. 1, also a member of Odell S. Long Chapter, 
R. A. M., of which he is a Past High Priest, and belongs to 
Nemesis Shrine, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Parkersburg, West 
Virginia. He and Mrs. McGinnis are members of the Meth- 
odist Church, and he is a trustee of the church. Mr. McGinnis 
married Miss X. A. Price, of Morgantown, a graduate of the 
high school of that city. They have four children: Frederick 
D., now in high school, Benjamin A., Virginia E. and Mary 
Louise. 

C. B. Summers was born and reared on a farm in Ritchie 
County, has always been more or less interested in farming, 
though his chosen career is banking, and he is the experienced 
and well qualified cashier of the first National Bank of Penns^ 
boro. 

Mr. Summers was born near Pullman in Ritchie County, 
October 13, 1885, son of Elijah and Agnes M. (Lowther) 
Summers, the former born near Pullman and the latter in 
Tyler County, West Virginia. They were reared on farms, 
had common school educations, and after their marriage in 
Tyler County Elijah Summers returned to his farm neat 
Pullman and lived there until his death. The mother is still 
living. They have been active members of the Methodist 
Protestant Church and Elijah Summers was a republican and 
filled an unexpired term as a member of the County Court. 
He was the father of five children: Iva, wife of Alf Starr, oi 
Birmingham, Alabama; C. B. Summers; Hazel, formerly a 




(ZsrLX'-y cjut^ 



HISTO'RY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



59 



acher, now a stenographer at Birmingham, Alabama; O. B. 
jmmers, who is married and lives on the home farm; and 
eorge L., a mechanic in the Ireland Garage at Pennsboro. 
C. B. Summers during his youth on the old homestead at 
ullman attended the common schools and later graduated 
om the Mountain State Business College at Parkersburg. 
3r several years he lived at Parkersburg and Racine, Ohio, 
lending two years as an employe of the First National Bank 
id for four years was connected with a firm of produce 
!alers. On returning to Ritchie County he entered the First 
ational Bank of Pennsboro, and had a working experience in 
'ery department until he was appointed cashier in 1921. 
he First National Bank of Pennsboro is one of the substan- 
il institutions of the county, has resources of over half a 
illion, and the officers are: A. O. Wilson, president; Bert 
radford and R. W. Elder, vice presidents; Okey E. Nutter, 
tive vice president and former cashier; the directors being 
B. Wilson, B. F. McGinnis, M. M. McDougal, J. J. Ken- 
dl and 0. B. Summers. 

Mr. Summers besides his banking interests owns a half 
terest in 375 acres of land near Pullman. He is a republican, 
member of the Knights of the Maccabees, and is a past 
and and present secretary of Pennsboro Lodge No. 175, 
[dependent Order of Odd Fellows, and also a member of 
le Encampment. Mrs. Summers is a member of the Meth- 
list Episcopal Church. He married July 4, 1911, Miss Agnes 
pbes. Their two daughters are Deane and Madeline. 

Robert Talbott, of Fairmont, Marion County, is execu- 
ve head of Robert Talbott & Company, owners of the 
gnes Coal Mine, two and one-half miles distance from 
owesville, in Monongalia County, and is one of the suc- 
issful coal operators of West Virginia. 
Mr. Talbott was born in the City of Philadelphia, Penn- 
Ivania, May 20, 1852, and is a son of Dennis and Julia 
Sullivan) Talbott, both natives of Ireland, where their 
arriage was solemnized and whence they came to the 
nited States in 1851. In this country Dennis Talbott 
as first employed in connection with railroad construction, 
id eventually he became a contractor in this line of work, 
fter the close of the Civil war he came to West Vir- 
inia to fulfill a contract in connection with the eonstruc- 
on of the old Cumberland Valley Railroad, and in the 
eanwhile the family home was established at Martinsburg, 
lis state. He did not long remain in West Virginia, and 
pon his return to Pennsylvania he established his resi- 
;nee at Boiling Springs, near Carlisle, he having been 
)r two years engaged in carrying out a railroad-construc- 
on contract in that section of the state, and the next 
vo years having been given to a contract on the Tuscarwas 
ailroad in Ohio, now a part of the Baltimore & Ohio 
fstem. 

Robert Talbott gained his early education in the schools 
f the various places where the family resided in connection 
ith the father 's contracting business, and even as a boy 
e began to work with his father. After the completion 
E the above mentioned contract in Ohio he began to take 
iarge of operations as a boss on the construction work, 
od finally he became the virtual director of operations, 
lough his father continued to retain an interest in the 
usiness. For a term of years the family remained to- 
ether, and the father and sons were associated in the eon- 
■acting business, the parents moving about from place to 
lace, as contracts were taken, until they grew venerable 
1 age. After leaving Ohio the Talbotts completed a con- 
ract on the Johnstown & Cambria Railroad (now a part 
f the Pennsylvania system), and about this time Robert 
"albott formed a partnership with James A. Bennett, under 
he title of Bennett & Talbott, contractors. The first con- 
ract of the new firm was for the construction of two miles 
n the Pennsylvania Railroad branch from Brownsville to 
Iniontown, Pennsylvania; the next work was in the build- 
ig of a branch line from Redstone, Pennsylvania, to the 
lant of the H. C. Frick Coal Company; and subsequent 
ontracts in turn were on a Pennsylvania Railroad branch 
t Mount Pleasant and the construction of two mDes of 
oad for the same corporation at Greensburg, that state. In 
884 the firm completed a contract for the construction of 



a portion of a branch of the Fairmont, Morgantown & 
Pittsburgh Division of the B. & 0. Railroad. Thereafter 
operations were directed to the building of coke ovens at 
various points in Pennsylvania. The firm next took up a 
contract in the construction of the tunnel at Out(-rop, 
Pennsylvania, and later did similar tunnel construction near 
Cumberland, Maryland, and Punxatawney, Pennsylvania, for 
the Buffalo & Rochester Railroad, and at Wliitehall and 
Thomas, that state, for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 
the next contract being for a tunnel for the latter road 
at Patterson's Creek Cut-off, near Cumberland, Maryland. 
Next was carried out a grading and tunnel contract at 
Flushing, Ohio, and the next four years were given to the 
building of tunnels and to other construction work at Otis- 
ville. New York. In 1909 the firm returned to West Vir- 
ginia and entered upon important contracting work for the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The firm built the tunnel at 
Tunnelton and two tunnels and two bridges at Magnolia 
Cut-off. The original firm is still in existence, Mr. Bennett 
maintaining his home at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, and 
Mr. Talbott at Fairmont, West Virginia. 

In 1917 Mr. Talbott entered the eoal-operating industry 
by purchasing a farm in Grant District, Monongalia County, 
and there opening a mine. In May of the following year 
he sold this mine and then opened another mine on the 
same tract, this being known as the Agnes Mine and being 
successfully operated by the firm of Robert Talbott & 
Company. Later Mr. Talbott purchased a half interest in 
the North Fairmont Coal Company, but he has disposed 
of this interest. He is a director of the Home Savings 
Bank of Fairmont and is one of the vigorous and substan- 
tial figures in the industrial activities of this section of 
West Virginia. He is a communicant of the Catholic 
Church, and is a democrat in politics. Mrs. Robert Talbott 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

Mr. Talbott married Miss Carrie M. Hood, who was 
born on the farm which her husband purchased in Grant 
District, Monongalia County, and which is still owned by 
him, her father, John S. Hood, having there followed farm 
enterprise for many years. James Paul, eldest of the chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Talbott, is now (1922) twenty-seven 
years old and is a member of the firm Robert Talbott & 
Company; Robert M., aged twenty-four years, became a 
member of the Coast Artillery and was on the battle front 
with the American Expeditionary Forces in France at the 
time the signing of the armistice brought the World war 
to a close, he being now associated with Robert Talbott & 
Company; Agnes 6. is- a student at the West Virginia 
University. 

Moses H. Davis has been one of the most useful and public 
spirited citizens of Ritchie County for half a century. His 
business has been chiefly farming, but his interests have ex- 
tended from the farm to some of the business affairs of his 
county, and he has capably served in a number of offices of 
trust, being one of the members of the County Court at this 
time. 

Mr. Davis represents an old West Virginia family, but was 
born in Shelby County. Ohio, July 18, 1848, son of James B. 
and Jane (Hoppins) Davis. His father was born in Harrison 
County, West Virginia, in 1816, while his mother was a 
native of Shelby County, Ohio. James B. Davis was reared 
in Harrison County, and as a young man removed to Shelby 
County, Ohio, where he married and where he followed the 
wagon maker's trade at Jackson Center. His wife died there 
in 1852. Both were members of the Seventh Day Baptist 
Church. They were the parents of the following children: 
Abner J., Granville and William Henry Harrison, all of whom 
are deceased; Eli, who became a soldier in the Union Army 
and was killed in action on October 19, 1864; Elizabeth J., 
widow of Lewis F. Randolph, of Rhode Island; Moses H.; 
and Jesse, who died in infancy. 

Moses H. Davis lived at Jackson Center, Ohio, until he 
was about nine years of age. In 1857 his father returned to 
West Virginia and settled at New Milton in Doddridge 
County. His father lived to venerable years, passing away 
July 2, 1902. M. H. Davis was reared in Doddridge County 
in the midst of the woods, acquiring only a common school 



60 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



education. At the age of fifteen he began learning the tanner'* 
trade, working seven years as an apprentice, and altogether he 
followed that as a business for twenty-seven years. In the 
meantime, in 1870, the year he married, he located in Ritchie 
County, and continued working at bis trade at White Oak for 
several years. Later he bought a farm, and farming has con- 
stituted the bulk of his business activities ever since. He 
owns 380 acres, representing the labor and investment of his 
best years. Since 1902 Mr. Davis has made his home in 
Pennsboro. 

March 24, 1870, he married Miss Mary E. Young, who died 
January 3, 1922. They became the parents of six children, as 
follows: Nettie, wife of O. F. Wren, and they have three 
children; Jennie D., wife of Ellis Prunty, and they have eight 
children; Claude C, who was a teacher and now a farmer in 
Braxton County, married Ada Berry and has four children; 
Elosia, widow of Scott Maxwell, and one son was born to 
them; R. M. Davis, a coal operator of Morgantown, West 
Virginia, married Fannie Wilson, and they have two children: 
and Blanche, wife of John Doyle, and they are the parents of 
one son. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

Mr. Davis is a director of the Farmers and Merchants 
Bank of Pennsboro and is a stockholder in the Penn Window 
Glass Company. As a republican he has been prominent in 
his party and in all matters a£fecting the progress of his 
county. He has served as a member of the Board of Education 
as city councilman and city treasurer of Pennsboro. and has 
sat as a member of the County Court of Ritchie County since 
1918. 

Victor F. Cooper has been a member of the Ritchie 
County bar for fifteen years, is one of the able business lawyers 
of the county, and has taken a growing interest in the a£fairs 
of his community at Harrisville. 

Mr. Cooper was born on his father's farm in Gilmer Coun- 
ty, West Virginia, May 4, 1873, son of Charles S. and Mary 
J. (Hall) Cooper, natives of the same county, where they were 
married November 7, 1867. His father was born April 29, 
1844, and his mother was born March 10, 1845, and died 
July 21, 1886. She was a member of the Baptist Church at 
Auburn. Charles S. Cooper was a resident of Gilmer County 
at the time of his death. He acquired a common and sub- 
scription school education, and after his marriage began 
clearing away the woods from a tract of land and eventually 
improved and cultivated a farm of one hundred and seven 
acres. He was a member of the Roseville Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, and a democrat. Of eleven children, nine are 
living: Miss Cora, a graduate of the State Normal School at 
Glenville, who also took work in the State University and has 
been a successful teacher; Malana, a graduate of the Glenville 
State Normal School and was a teacher until her marriage 
to Homer Adams; Victor F., who is the third in age; Homer 
E., a graduate of Columbia University, receiving his Ph. D. 
degree from that University and is an instructor in the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh; Everett R., a graduate of the Glenville 
Normal and of the College of Physicians and Surgeons at 
Baltimore, now practicing medicine at Troy, West Virginia; 
Edna, wife of Porter G. Nutter, of Gilmer County; Sidney 
W., a civil engineer in Missouri; Eric J., living on the home 
farm with his father; and Grover C, a graduate of the Glen- 
ville State Normal, formerly a teacher and now a mail clerk 
on the B. & O. Railway. Those deceased were Okey J., who 
was a merchant at Newberne, West Virginia, and Price W., 
a graduate of West Virginia University, who died in the 
Philippines, where he was a teacher. 

Victor F. Cooper lived on the farm until he was twenty-one, 
and while there he helped in the clearing and improving as 
well as the routine work of the fields. He acquired a common 
school education, taught school, graduated from the Glenville 
State Normal, and for four years was superintendent of free 
schools in Gilmer County. He is also a graduate of the Law 
School of West Virginia University, and since his admission 
to the bar in 1907 has been in practice at Harrisville. Besides 
general practice, he is attorney for the People's Bank of 
Harrisville, is local attorney for the Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
way, and attorney for the Farmers and Merchants Bank of 
Pennsboro, the Auburn Exchange Bank and the Pennsboro 
Wholesale Grocery Company. 



On September 15, 1908, Mr. Cooper married Miss Phrant 
Zink. She is a graduate of the Peabody Normal College anc 
of the West Liberty State Normal School of West Virginia 
and has been a very successful teacher and is now teaching 
one of the departments in the Harrisville schools. Mr. anc 
Mrs. Cooper have two children: Marcella and Victor Z 
Mrs. Cooper is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
He is affiliated with Gilmer County Lodge No. 118, A. F 
and A. M., and is a past chancellor of Auburn Lodge No. 47 
Knights of Pythias. 

Todd W. Keith, M. D., a physician and surgeon at Harris- 
ville, was born just forty years ago on a farm near that towi 
and friends and acquaintances of his youth and manhood 
have learned to appreciate his services and character either as 
a teacher or as a medical man. 

He was born November 13, 1882, son of Adam and Eliz' 
abeth (Alkire) Keith, the former a native of Noble County 
Ohio, and the latter of Ritchie County, West Virginia. Adan 
Keith grew up on a farm in Noble County, had a public 
school education, and after his marriage in Ritchie Count) 
settled on a farm two miles from Harrisville. They lived then 
for a number of years and then sold and bought their farm t 
mile and a half north of Harrisville, where they are stili 
living, active members of that community. They belong tc 
the Methodist Protestant Church and the father is a democral 
and Odd Fellow. There are six children in the family: Todc 
W., Clyde, a traveling salesman living at Point Pleasant 
Roka, wife of Walter Curry, living near Harrisville; Wanda 
wife of John Pointer; Jemima, wife of Wesley Taylor; and 
Emma. 

Dr. Todd W. Keith spent his early life on the farm, and 
while there attended the common schools. He is a graduate ol 
the State Normal School at Huntington, and in the meantime 
he had taught, and he continued teaching some time aftei 
completing the normal course. Doctor Keith finished his 
literary education by two years in West Virginia University, 
and took his medical course at the University of Louisville, 
Kentucky, where he graduated M. D. in 1916. He began 
practice at Selbyville in Upshur County, but since June, 1920, 
has enjoyed a growing and successful practice at Harrisville. 
During the World war he volunteered his services in the 
Medical Corps, was commissioned a first lieutenant, and was 
stationed for duty at Camp Meade. He is a member of the 
County, State and American Medical Associations. 

Doctor Keith married Delia Huldeman, a graduate of the 
Harrisville High School. Doctor and Mrs. Keith have one 
daughter, Lucile. They are members of the Methodist 
Protestant Church. He is a democrat, and is affiliated with 
the Rock Cave Lodge of Masons. 

J. W. Cole, superintendent of the Harrisville public schools, 
has been an earnest worker in the cause of education in West 
Virginia for nearly a quarter of a century, and his record is 
a commendable one both as a teacher and as a school adminis- 
trator. 

He was born at Cameron, West Virginia, November 25, 
1875, son of John and Mary J. (Cole) Cole. His parents were 
both natives of County Down, Ireland, his father born 
November 12, 1829 and his mother on December 25, 1836. 
They were reared and married in Ireland, and in 1855 came 
to America and settled in Washington County, Pennsylvania, 
near Hickory. Somewhat later but before the Civil war they 
removed to Marshall County, Virginia, now West Virginia, 
buying a farm at Sand Hill. Later that was traded for the 
present homestead located four miles south of Cameron, 
where Mrs. Mary J. Cole is still living. In the course of years] 
they developed a model farm from the one hundred and one| 
acres in the homestead. Both parents were active members ofj 
the Presbyterian Church, and the father voted as a republicanJ 
Their ten children all reached mature years: Sarah, who is a 
successful physician in Kansas and owns and operates a sani'^ 
tarium; Mary J., wife of W. L. Barr, of Olathe, Kansas; Misfl 
Elizabeth; Miss Hannah, a trained nurse; Miss Anna, on 
Harrisville; William J., at home; David A., deceased; Misal 
Alberta, at home; J. W.; and Miss Ida, at home. I 

J. W. Cole spent his early life on the farm in Marshalll 
County and supplemented his common school education inl 
the West Liberty Normal School, where he graduated, andl 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



61 



iter graduated A. B. from West Virginia State University at 
lorgantown. Mr. Cole taught his first school in 1898. He 
aught seventeen terms, and prior to assuming his duties as 
jperintendent of schools at Harrisville in 1920 he had been 
iiperintendent of schools in Fayette County and principal 
f the high school four years in his home town of Cameron, 
nd also one year at Flemington, West Virginia. 

Mr. Cole on April 9, 1911, married Elsie B. Lowden, who is 
Iso a successful educator. She took her normal work in 
le Slippery Rock Normal School of Pennsylvania. She 
lught before her marriage, and she is now teaching one of 
le grades in the Harrisville schools. Mr. and Mrs. Cole 
ave three children: Mary E., born January 30, 1912; Walter 
i'^., born September 8, 1913; and John W., born January 
1, 1916. Mr. and Mrs. Cole have their membership in the 
irst Presbyterian Church at Cameron, and he is affiliated 
ith the Cameron Lodge No. 17, A F. and A. M., and Cam- 
•on Lodge No. 36, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His 
olitical support is given to the republican party. 

Samuel Boakdman Beown. Distinguished as author, 
iucator and scientist, Samuel Boardman Brown, A. M., 
ho is a member of the faculty of the University of West 
irginia and known to scientists the country over, for 
iventy-nine years has filled the chair of geology in this 
reat institution of learning. To the scientific knowledge 
nd researches of Professor Brown the university owes its 
riceless collection of fossils and minerals, that under his 
lasterly arrangement and classification reveal without 
ords the whole geological history of West Virginia. 
Samuel Boardman Brown was born March 5, 1860, in 
reston County, West Virginia, with which section of coun- 
■y his people have been identified for generations. His 
arents were Granville and Elizabeth (Watson) Brown. 
This branch of the Brown family was founded in 
merica by one William Brown. In 1726 WOliam Brown 
iceived from Lord Fairfax a grant of 312 acres of land 
sar Dumfries, Prince William County, Virginia, which 
nd, situated six miles from Manassas, remained in the 
Dssession of his descendants until 1825, almost 100 years, 
lis eldest son, William Brown (2), in 1756 married Eliza- 
5th Buckner, and to that union were born four children, 
le of whom bore the name of Thomas. 
Thomas Brown, son of William and Elizabeth (Buckner) 
rown, was born in Prince William County, Virginia, Sep- 
imber 7, 1760. He served as a soldier in the Revolution- 
ry war, and in recognition of his services drew a pen- 
on after 1832 during the rest of his life. In 1785 he 
arried Anna Ash, and in 1805 he purchased a large tract 
L land, comprising 578 acres, situated near Kingwood in 
reston County, Virginia. He was survived by children. 
Samuel Byrne Brown, son of Thomas and Anna (Ash) 
rown, was born in Prince William County, Virginia, in 
r93. He served as a soldier in the War of 1812. In 1820 
5 married Permelia Zinn, and they reared a family of chil- 
ren, one son bearing the name of Granville. Samuel B. 
Town spent the rest of his life in Preston and Monongalia 
)unties, mainly following agricultural pursuits. 
Granville Brown, son of Samuel Byrne and Permelia (Zinn) 
rown, was born near what is now Gladesville, Preston 
ounty, January 6, 1832, had educational privileges and 
ter taught school. When the war between the states came 
1 he volunteered for service in the Union Army, and was 
immissioned first lieutenant of a company in the Four- 
enth West Virginia Infantry, later transferred to the 
ourth West Virginia Cavalry, and was mustered out in 
S65 from the Seventeenth West Virginia Infantry. He 
id two brothers, William and Lycurgus, who also served 
ith the West Virginia troops, and a cousin, Bailey Brown, 
as the first Virginia soldier to give up his life in defense 
: the Union, being killed in action at Fetterman, near 
rafton, May 22, 1861, on the day preceding the settle- 
ent of the question of the secession of West Virginia, 
ra'nville Brown married Elizabeth Watson. 
Samuel Boardman Brown spent his early years on his 
ither 's farm in Preston County, and attended the neighbor- 
)od schools, later had other educational advantages in 



preparation for college and then entered the West Virginia 
University, from which he was graduated with the degree 
of A. B. in 1883. In the same year he took courses in 
natural history at Washington, D. C, and in Harvard Col- 
lege, coming under the instruction of such competent men 
as Professors Shaler and Davis. For two years afterward 
Professor Brown conducted a private school at Martinsburg, 
West Virginia, in which he taught mathematics and lan- 
guages, and he recalls with some pride the fact that one of 
his pupils was Hon. Newton Baker, who afterward became 
a man of national importance as Secretary of War. 

In 1885 Mr. Brown was elected principal of the Glen- 
ville (West Virginia) Normal School, where he continued 
until 1890 when he resigned in order to accept a still more 
congenial position as assistant professor of geology in the 
University of West Virginia, in 1892 taking his present 
chair as a member of the faculty. Before that time and 
ever since he had given much time to geological research, 
making geology his specialty among the sciences, with all 
of which he is more or less familiar, and he has a large 
amount of literary output on this subject to his credit. He 
has written numerous papers and scientific pamphlets in 
relation to the geology of West Virginia, and wrote that 
portion pertaining to the minerals and productions of the 
book entitled "West Virginia's Agricultural Resources and 
Possibilities, ' ' published under the authority of the West 
Virginia State Board of Agriculture for distribution at the 
Jamestown Centennial. Professor Brown is the author also 
of a text book on geography that is in use throughout the 
state. He is a valued member of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, and probably would find 
himself with little leisure remaining if he responded to 
every urgent request for scientific papers or addresses. 

On June 17, 1890, Professor Brown married Miss Luella 
Butcher, who is a member of an old Virginia family of 
note and military prominence. She is a daughter of James 
Evan Butcher, and a granddaughter of John Anderson 
Butcher, who served in defense of Norfolk, Virginia, in the 
War of 1812. He was a member of Captain Davidson's 
company, to which Samuel Byrne Brown also belonged. 
The family belongs to the Episcopal Church. Professor 
Brown owns valuable city property at Morgantown and is 
a director in the Second National Bank. 

Oliver A. Flesher is one of the prominent young businees 
men of Harrisville, Ritchie County, a druggist, a graduate 
pharmacist, and member of an old family of West Virginia. 

He was born on a farm near Hebron in Pleasants County 
September 23, 1883, son of William H. and Mary J. (William- 
son) Flesher, the former a native of Lewis County and the 
latter of Pleasants County. William H. Flesher when a boy 
moved to Tyler County, acquired a common school education 
there, and after his marriage settled on a farm in Pleasants 
County. When he sold the farm he moved to Pennsboro, 
was in the livery business and remained there until his death. 
He and his wife were active members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and he was affiliated with the Masonic 
Order and was a republican. Of the twelve children of the 
family six are living: Eli, of Pennsboro; Louisa, wife of N. A. 
Steele, of Clarksburg; John W., of Parkersburg; G. S., of 
Cairo; Oliver A.; and Alice, wife of Ferdinand Wery, of 
Clarksburg. 

Oliver A. Flesher spent the first eight years of his life on the 
farm, and he acquired his early education in the schools of 
Pennsboro and Cairo. He is a graduate pharmacist from the 
University of Pittsburgh, and he followed his profession as 
a prescription clerk for various establishments until 1909. 
In that year he bought his present drug business at Harris- 
ville, and as a pharmacist he is one of the most skillful repre- 
sentatives of his profession in Ritchie County. He is a good 
business man and owns a large store building and well 
equipped establishment. 

February 7, 1917, Mr. Flesher married Orpha Adams, of 
Harrisville. They are members of the Baptist Church, and 
he is one of the trustees. Mr. Flesher is a past master of 
Harrisville Lodge No. 98, A. F. and A. M., and is a member 
of Odell S. Long Chapter No. 25, R. A. M. In politics he is 
a republican. 



62 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



Caltin F. Brown, who is giving a very efficient adminis- 
tration in the office of postmaster of the City of Harrisville, 
judicial center of Ritchie County, was born on his father's 
farm on Hughes River, one and one-half miles east of Harris- 
ville, and the date of his nativity was June 5, 1873. He is a 
son of John M. and Eliza (Collins) Brown, the former of 
whom was born in Lewis County, this state, in 1840, and the 
latter of whom was born in Indiana. The father was reared 
on a farm in his native county, where his early education was 
obtained in subscription schools, and he was a gallant young 
soldier of the Union in the Civil war, in which he served three 
years, as a member of Company M, Sixth West Virginia 
Volunteer Infantry. He received an injury which partially 
disabled him the remainder of his life. After the close of the 
war John M. Brown married and settled on a farm, but he also 
continued to follow his trade, that of miller, during the 
remainder of his long, useful and worthy life. He was a 
staunch republican, served two terms as assessor of Ritchie 
County, was affiliated with the Grand Army of the Republic 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and both he and 
his wife were consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Of the three children lona, now deceased, became 
the wife of John M. Wagoner; May is the widow of John L. 
Harris; and Calvin F., of this sketch, is the only son. 

Reared on the home farm and afforded the advantages of 
the public schools, Calvin F. Brown early learned the miller's 
trade under the direction of his father. In addition to follow- 
ing this trade he has been employed in the oil fields of West 
Virginia, first as a tool-dresser and later as a driller of wells. 
He served four years as deputy sheriff of his native county, 
under Sheriff John Hulderman, wh se daughter Laura he 
wedded on the 16th of April, 1904. His service as postmaster 
of Harrisville has been marked by a fine stewardship and a 
desire to give to the local pubhc the best possible service. 
Mr. Brown is a republican of inflexible loyalty, i a past master 
of Harrisville Lodge No. 98, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, besides being affiliated with Odell S. Long Chapter 
No. 59, Royal Arch Masons, and with the local camp of the 
Woodman of the World. His wife is a member of the Meth- 
odist Protestant Church. Mr. Brown is the owner of a valu- 
able tract of sixty-two and one-half acres of land, lying partly 
in the corporation limits of Harrisville. Mr. and Mrs. Brown 
have three children; John H., Mary E. and Lester C. 

Joseph N. Sharpnack, the efficient and popular county 
clerk of Ritchie County, was born in Wirt County, this state, 
on the 12th of August, 1868, and is a son of William H. and 
Catherine C. (Smith) Sharpnack, the former born in Wetzel 
County, this state, (then Virginia), April 15, 1842, and the 
latter in Venango County, Pennsylvania, in 1844. She was a 
child when her father, Sinclair Smith, came with his family 
to Wirt County, West Virginia, where she was reared and 
educated and where her marriage was solemnized. William 
H. Sharpnack represented West Virginia as a valiant young 
soldier of the Union in the Civil war, he having continued 
with his regiment until the close of the war and having then 
returned to West Virginia, where he gave many years of 
effective service as a teacher in the public schools, his peda- 
gogic activities having continued until his death in 1912, and 
his wife having previously passed away in 1906. Both were 
earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. 
Sharpnack was a stalwart republican, and he served a number 
of years as postmaster at Freeport, Wirt County. He was 
actively affiliated with the Grand Army of the Republic. Of 
the two children of the family Joseph N., of this review, is the 
elder, and Minnie C. is the wife of R. C. Marshall, of Cairo, 
Ritchie County. 

Joseph N. Sharpnack received the advantages of the public 
schools, and thereafter he worked in a store in his native 
couniy. In 1897 he took a position as clerk in a general store 
at Cairo, Ritchie County, and later he served as cashier of the 
Bank of Cairo. In 1910 he removed to Harrisville, the 
county seat, and initiated his service as deputy county clerk, 
of which position he continued the incumbent until 1914, 
when he was elected county clerk, an office in which he has 
since continued his careful and effective service, he having 
been re-elected in November, 1920. He has purchased an 
attractive residence property since removing to Harrisville, 
and the same constitutes the family home. He is a republican 
n politics, is affiliated with the Blue Lodge and Chapter of 



the Masonic fraternity at Fennsboro, this county, and h 
wife is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Churcl 
In 1904 Mr. Sharpnack wedded Miss Mabel C. Mitchel 
of New Matamoras, Ohio, a daughter of Joseph and Mary I 
(Schwartz) Mitchell. Her father was an ex-soldier of a 
Ohio regiment during the Civil war, and was prominent in tt 
PoUlIcs of Washington County. He died in 1907. The moth( 
of Mrs. Sharpnack still survives, her residence being in Ne 
Matamoras. Mrs. Sharpnack is a popular figure in the repn 
sentative social activities of Harrisville. 

Stlvestek O. Phuntt has made in his profession a recoi 
that marks him as one of the representative members of tl 
bar of Ritchie County, where he is established in active gei 
eral practice at Harrisville, the county seat. He was born o 
a farm in this county, July 17, 1878, and is a son of Marsha 
N, and Flora (Lawson) Prunty, both hkewise natives of th 
county, with whose civic and material development an 
progress the respective family names have been long an 
prominently identified. The parents received the advantagf 
of the common schools, and the mother attended also th 
State Normal School at Fairmont. Marshall N. Prunty ws 
for many years engaged in successful farm enterprise nea 
Oxford, this county, and he and his wife now reside in th 
village of Pullman, likewise in Ritchie County. He is 
democrat, and he and his wife hold membership in the Mett 
odist Episcopal Church. Of the eight children all but one ar 
living: F. O. is a contractor and also engaged in the oil an 
general production business at Blackville, Oklahoma; Anna i 
the wife of John Long, a locomotive engineer, and they resid 
at Fairmont, West Virginia; Jessie is the wifeof H.B. Lowthei 
a civil engineer, and they reside at Salem, this state; May i 
the wife of Everett Nay, of Pullman, Ritchie County; Raj 
mond is a farmer in this county; Marshall E. is a minin 
engineer at Fairmont; and the subject of this sketch is th 
oldest of the number. 

Sylvester 0. Prunty passed his childhood and earlier yout 
on the home farm and in the meanwhile profited fully b; 
the advantages of the public schools of his native countj 
Later he graduated from the Regent School, White Plains 
New York, and in preparation for his chosen profession h 
completed a course in the law department of the Ohi( 
Northern University, in which he was graduated with th 
degree of Bachelor of Laws. After his admission to the ba 
he was engaged in practice in the village of Cairo, Ritchl 
County, four years, and he then, in 1911, transferred his resi 
dence and professional headquarters to Harrisville, the count; 
seat, where he has since built up a large and representative 
law business. He served two terms as mayor of Cairo, an< 
for three terms was mayor of Harrisville, his administratio) 
in this city having been signally progressive and effective 
He is a leader in the local councils and campaigns activitie 
of the republican party in Ritchie County, and is now a mem 
ber of the Board of Education of Harrisville. He is affiliate( 
with the Masonic fraternity and the Independent Order o 
Odd Fellows. Mr. Prunty is a director of the People's Banl 
at Harrisville, is a stockholder in the First National Bank o 
this city, and he is a stockholder also in each of the follow 
ing named corporations: Kansas & Gulf Oil Company 
Central Mexican Oil Company, Imperial Ice Company ai 
Parkersburg, the National Woolen Mills in that city anc 
other corporations. He has real estate holdings not only ai 
Harrisville but also in the City of Washington, D. C. 

Habet Sandebs, senior member of the representative real 
estate and insurance firm of Sanders & Miller, in the City 
of Morgantown, Monongalia County, was born at MaidsH 
ville, this county, and is a representative of old and hon-j 
ored families of the county, the Sanders, Millers and 
Houstons. John Sanders was the founder of the family ia| 
Monongalia County, where he purchased land and established 
a homestead at Maidsville, Cass District, on the Monongahela 
River, about five miles below Morgantown. He here made 
settlement about the opening of the nineteenth century 
He was born in the State of Delaware, and represented that 
commonwealth as a patriot soldier in the war of the Bevola 
tion. He enlisted in Captain McOlement's company, Seconc 
Delaware Regiment, commanded by Col. Henry McNeil, auo 
saw much of active field service in the great conflict foi 
national independence. John Sanders became one of the 




^^^^^^^^^^^..^^W:^^!^'^^^ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



63 



irominent and influential citizens of what is now Mononga- 
ia County, West Virginia, developed a fine farm property 
,nd was prominent in community affairs of a public order, 
le having served as tax collector for a number of years, 
n 1823 he visited Richmond, the capital of the then great 
lomain of Virginia, on official business, and then returned 
o Delaware to attend to some personal business, his death 
laving there occurred in that year, while he was at the 
lome of kinsfollc of his wife. In 1800 he married Esther 
Jriffin, daughter of Samuel and Mary Griffin, she having 
leen born in Kent County, Delaware, February 2, 1781, and 
laving died at the old Sanders homestead at Maidsville 
Fanuary 2, 1815. Her father, Samuel (III) was of the 
hird generation in direct descent from Samuel (I), who 
ame to America, probably in the latter part of the seven- 
eenth century, and settled in Delaware, where his death 
iccurred in 1759. 

John Sanders (II), son of John and Esther (Griffin) 
?anders, was born on the old homestead farm at Maids- 
dlle, in 1805, and there his death occurred in 1872. His 
irst wife, Elizabeth, was a daughter of Purnell and Mary 
'Tumbleston) Houston. Purnell Houston was born in 
Somerset County, Maryland, February 1, 1755, and was a 
routhful soldier in the war of the Revolution. In 1790 he 
•ame to what is now Monongalia County, West Virginia, 
ind settled on a pioneer farm near Fentress, where his 
leath occurred March 3, 1835, his wife having passed away 
lanuary 1, 1830. Elizabeth (Houston) Sanders was born 
February 23, 1802, and remained in the old homestead at 
Maidsville until her death. John Sanders (II) later 
narried Sarah Hunt, and she likewise died at Maidsville. 

James Sanders, son of John and Elizabeth (Houston) 
Banders, was born on the ancestral homestead at Maids- 
ville, December 2, 1832, and there his death occurred Febru- 
iry 19, 1917. In his youth he learned the tanner's trade, 
and for more than twenty-five years he owned and operated 
i tannery at Maidsville, besides which he was for a number 
of years engaged also in the timber business. He served 
as president of the Board of Education of Cass District, was 
a staunch democrat and he and his wife were earnest mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He married Sarah 
Jane Miller, who was born July 26, 1839, and whose death 
occurred November 29, 1916. She was a daughter of 
Amherst and Sarah (Lock) Miller. Amherst Miller was 
born in 1805, a son of James and Sarah (Messenger) 
Miller and a descendant of William Miller, who came from 
England and settled at Northampton, Massachusetts, where 
he passed the remainder of his life. The Sanders, Millers, 
Locks and Houstons were all represented by patriot soldiers 
of the Continental Line in the war of the Revolution. 

Harry Sanders, son of James and Sarah Jane (Miller) 
Sanders, was born at Maidsville April 16, 1876. He re- 
ceived the advantages of the public schools of his native 
county and early began to assist in the work of his father's 
farm and tannery. He thus continued until he was nine- 
teen years of age, and thereafter he was for two and one- 
half years a student in the University of West Virginia. 
He left this institution in 1900 and engaged in the real 
estate and insurance business at Morgantown, where later 
he formed a partnership with Charles E. Miller, the firm 
of Sanders & Miller having since maintained recognized 
leadership in the real estate and insurance business in the 
city and county. The members of this progressive firm 
organized the Morgantown Security and Development Com- 
pany, and of the same Mr. Sanders is the president. 

Mr. Sanders is an active member of the Morgantown 
Chamber of Commerce, and is a trustee of Athens Lodge 
No. 36, Knights of Pythias, in which he has passed the 
various official chairs. He is a zealous member of the 
First Methodist Episcopal Church at Morgantown, and is 
a member of its official board. 

December 25, 1901, recorded the marriage of Mr. Sanders 
and Miss Mildred Lenora Hewitt, daughter of Abram S. 
and Mary (Crago) Hewitt, of Maidsville, and of the three 
children of this union the names and respective birth-dates 

are here entered: Sarah Frances, September 16, 1902; John 

Vernon, June 22, 1904; and William Albert, February 10, 

1912. 



Thomas Gooch Tickle, M. D., is one of the able and 
representative physicians and surgeons of the younger 
generation in McDowell County, with residence and pro- 
fessional headquarters at Lick Branch, where he is official 
physician and surgeon for the Pocahontas Fuel Company. 
Further distinction is his by reason of the loyal service 
which he gave in the great World war. 

Doctor Tickle was born at Bluefield, Mercer County, West 
Virginia, January 29, 1891, and is a son of Stephen and 
Mary (Gooch) Tickle, he having been two years old at the 
time of his father 's death. Stephen Tickle was a native of 
West Virginia, as is also his widow, and he became one of 
the leading merchants and influential citizens of Bluefield, 
in which city he continued to reside until his death. He 
was affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and was a zealous 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, as is his 
widow. Doctor Tickle is of Scotch and English lineage and 
is a representative of families founded in Virginia in the 
Colonial period of our national history. 

In 1910 Doctor Tickle graduated in the high school in 
his native city, and thereafter he completed a two years' 
academic course in the University of West Virginia. He 
then entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at 
Baltimore, Maryland, and in this institution he was gradu- 
ated in 1916, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. For 
six months thereafter he served as an interne in St. Luke's 
Hospital at Bluefield, West Virginia, and he then returned 
to Baltimore, where for six mouths he held the position of 
assistant superintendent of the Gundry Sanitarium. The 
ensuing eighteen months found him engaged in general 
practice at Keystone, West Virginia, where he served also 
as physician and surgeon for the Keystone Coal & Coke 
Company. When the nation became involved in the World 
war Doctor Tickle subordinated all personal interests to the 
call of patriotism and on the 18th of August, 1917, en- 
listed and was sent to Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, where he 
remained six weeks and where he gained commission as first 
lieutenant in the medical corps. Thereafter he passed about 
six months at Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, and in 
June, 1918, he arrived with his command at Brest, France. 
He went to the front as a member of the First Army Corps 
of the American Expeditionary Forces, and as surgeon with 
the Fifty-third Pioneer Infantry took part in the historic 
St. Mihiel and Argonne campaigns, his command having 
been constantly on the move and having endured the 
maximum tension of the great conflict. After the signing 
of the armistice Doctor Tickle was transferred to the 
Goundie Court Replacement depot, and about three weeks 
later became a surgeon at the camp at Tours, where, on the 
22d of February, 1919, he received his commission as 
captain. About four months later he was sent to Marseilles, 
and August 18th of that year he arrived in the port of New 
York City. He received his honorable discharge at Camp 
Lee, September 4, 1919. After his return to Bluefield, West 
Virginia, he went to Bramwell, this state, where he remauied 
five months, as assistant to Doctor Tanner, physician for 
the Pocahontas Fuel Company, Booth-Bowen Coal & Coke 
Company and the Buckeye Coal & Coke Company. From 
Bramwell Doctor Tickle removed to Lick Branch, where he 
has since been physician and surgeon for the Pocahontas 
Fuel Company, with a well equipped office and operating 
room, besides a dispensary. His hospital patients are sent 
to State Hospital No. 1 at Welch, St. Luke 's Hospital or the 
sanitarium at Bluefield, in consonance with their wishes. 

Doctor Tickle is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, has become a member of the Mercer County 
Medical Society and the West Virginia State Medical So- 
ciety, is affiliated with the Phi Sigma Kappa and the Kappa 
Psi college fraternities, and is an appreciative member of 
the American Legion. 

Richard S. Whitehead is superintendent for the Poca- 
hontas Fuel Company in mining operations in McDowell 
County at Lick Branch station on the Norfolk & Western 
Railroad, the postoffice being Switchback. 

Mr. Whitehead was born in Nelson County, Virginia, 
April 29, 1877, and is a son of Kincaid and Frances Ann 



k 



64 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



(Lovin) Whitehead, both likewise natives of Nelson County. 
Dr. Kinkaid Whitehead was little more than a boy when he 
entered the Confederate service in the Civil war, as a 
member of a Virginia regiment. He was wounded in the 
right arm, and as a result was captured and held a prisoner 
at Point Lookout until the close of the war, he having been 
eighteen years of age when he entered the army. After the 
war he studied dentistry, and he long held prestige and 
honor as one of the leading dentists in Nelson County, 
Virginia. 

Richard S. Whitehead attended the public schools of his 
native county until he was fourteen years old, when he be- 
gan work for himself, he having depended upon his own 
resources since that early age. He came to Switchback, 
West Virginia, and entered the service of the Pocahontas 
Fuel Company. He was door boy or trapper at the mine, 
was oiler, track man, driver, miner, mine foreman, and 
finally, by loyal and efficient service, won promotion to his 
present responsible position with this industrial corporation. 
After remaining five years in the employ of the Pocahontas 
Fuel Company Mr. Whitehead was for eight years in the 
employ of the Pulaski Iron Company. He then returned to 
Switchback and resumed his connection with the Pocahontas 
Fuel Company. He has worked his way from the bottom, 
has gained thorough knowledge of all details of coal mining 
and is an efficient and valued executive, besides having the 
confidence and good will of the employes working under his 
supervision. He is a democrat, and he and his wife hold 
membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

At Graham, Virginia, in 1897, Mr. Whitehead wedded 
Miss Hattie Wimmer, who was born and reared in Tazewell 
County, that state, a daughter of Isaac and Martha Wim- 
mer. Mr. and Mrs. Whitehead have a fine family of eight 
children, namely: Raymond Clyde, Oliver Francis, Rosa C, 
Madeline, Jack, Ruth, Ethel and Thomas. Raymond, Oliver 
and Rosa are married, the home of Raymond being at Blue- 
field and his vocation being that of a miner. 

Jairus Collins is a resident and business man of Bram- 
well, Mercer County. His interests have been centered in 
this section for riearly thirty years. He came here with a 
widely diversified experience in the coal and iron industry, 
and for many years he has been one of the prominent coal 
operators and is treasurer and active director of the Poca- 
hontas Operators Association, chosen on account of his 
efficiency in haadling all matters affecting the operators in 
this field. 

Mr. Collins was born in Clayton, Alabama, December 14, 
1859, son of Hartwell and Louisa (Williams) Collins, na- 
tives of Alabama and of English ancestry. The maternal 
grandfather was Buckner Williams. Hartwell Collins al- 
ways regarded Alabama as his home state, but before the 
Civil war he was in the wholesale hardware business in New 
York City. When Alabama seceded he sold out and returned 
and joined the Confederate army, and was all through the 
war as quartermaster of the Twenty-ninth Alabama Regi- 
ment. He then returned to New York and resumed busi- 
ness, where he continued until the "Black Friday" of 
1873 inaugurated the country-wide panic. He then re- 
turned to Alabama. He was a prominent Mason. 

Jairus Collins had his early education interfered with 
on account of the war and the financial panic noted above. 
He attended subscription and private schools at Clayton and 
Midway, Alabama, and began contributing to his own main- 
tenance at the age of twelve. Beginning at fifteen, he 
served three years as clerk in the office of the registrar in 
chancery. At eighteen he became bookkeeper for S. Waxel- 
baum and Brother at Macon, Georgia, being with that firm 
four years. Shortly after he reached his majority Mr. 
Collins became auditor for the Tennessee Coal & Iron Com- 
pany at Ensley, Alabama, and his work has been in that 
same general line now for forty years. After four years 
with the Tennessee company he was for five years auditor 
for the Ensley Coal, Iron & Railway Company at Sheffield, 
Alabama. In 1893 he came to the West Virginia coal 
fields, serving as auditor three years of the Collins Colliery 
Company of Glen Jean, and then removed his headquarters 



to Bramwell as general manager for the Greenbrier Coal i 
Coke Company of McDowell and the Louisville Coal & Cok 
Company of Goodwill. He is still an active official in thesi 
corporations, being treasurer, and is financially interestei 
in other corporations. He was one of the organizers of th 
Pocahontas Operators Association, with headquarters a 
Bluefield, and has been the active representative of thes 
operators in handling several strikes in the Pocahonta 
fields. 

Mr. Collins is a democrat, and at one time was candidat 
for the State Senate on that ticket. He is treasurer, vestry 
man and junior warden of the Episcopal Church at Bram 
well, is a life member of Bluefield Lodge No. 269, Benevo 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, and a member of th 
Bluefield Country Club. 

In 1902, at Bramwell, he married Miss Blanch Dudley 
daughter of Andrew J. Dudley. They have two children 
Jairus, Jr., a student in Washington and Lee Universit; 
at Lexington, Virginia; and Virginia C, attending the Kno: 
School at Cooperstown, New York. 

Walter R. Thurmond is a son of Joseph S. Thurmon( 
of Alderson, and for the past ten years they have beei 
associated in the development and operation of some o 
the important coal properties of Logan County. Th 
principal operations are on Rum Creek and are conductei 
by the Argyle Coal Company and the Thurmond Coal Cora 
pany, of which companies Walter R. Thurmond is genera 
manager and treasurer. 

The grandfather of Walter R. Thurmond was Capt. W. D 
Thurmond, who came from Amherst County, Virginia, t 
Fayette County, West Virginia, in 1844, and opened up ; 
home and farm in the midst of the woods. Captain Thui 
mond was the actual discoverer of coal in the New Rive 
field. He uncovered a vein of coal near the surface whil 
plowing in his garden. Subsequently he acquired quite : 
large acreage of coal land in that vicinity, which is noi 
operated under lease by the Berwind interests. This Ian 
is in the heart of the famous New River coal field. Captai; 
Thurmond held a captain's commission in the Confederat 
army under General Echols, and was on scouting duty i: 
Virginia and West Virginia. Capt. W. D. Thurmond wa 
born in 1820 and died at the age of ninety in 1910. 

Joseph Samuel Thurmond, long prominent in the politic 
and the coal industry of West Virginia, was born in Fayett 
County, May 9, 1855. He grew up on the home farm, at 
tended the common schools and also Shelton College a 
Saint Albans when that school was conducted by Dr. P. E 
Reynolds, who afterwards became president of West Vii 
ginia University. Joseph S. Thurmond taught for severs 
years in the public schools of Fayette County, later becam 
a civil engineer and farmer and still later entered active! 
the coal mining industry. For years he carried heav; 
responsibilities in the development of the New River field 
and subsequently in Logan County, being president of th 
Thurmond Coal Company and the Argyle Coal Companj 
mentioned above. Joseph S. Thurmond is one of the demc 
cratic leaders of the state, served as the first mayor of th 
Town of Thurmond, was elected to the House of Delegate 
from Greenbrier County in 1914, was re-elected in 1916, wa 
chosen speaker of the House at the following session, am 
was again elected in 1918. 

Joseph S. Thurmond married Betty Eippetoe, daughter o 
Rev. A. N. Rippetoe of Nicholas County, West Virginis 
She died in 1900, and of her four eons and two daughter 
Walter R. is the oldest. 

Walter R. Thurmond was born at the old Thurmon, 
homestead in Fayette County, April 30, 1881. He acquire 
his early education in the local schools, and in 1898 entere 
the preparatory department of the University of West Vii 
graduating Bachelor of Science in 1905. Soon after leavin 
universitv Mr. Thurmond became an engineer in the Ne" 
River coal field, and in 1912 he and his father began the; 
operations in Logan County, and since that date he has ha 
active charge of the Thurmond Coal Company and tl 
Argyle Coal Company. Mr. Thurmond was president of tl 
Logan Coal Operators Association in 1921, and was recentl 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



65 



re-elected to that post. He is chairman of the Logan 
County Democratic Committee and a member of the Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee of the state. 

In 1907 he married Innis Dils, daughter of I. A. Dils, of 
Fayette County. They have two children : Sarah Elizabeth, 
now in the first year of high school, and Fred Wait, in 
the sixth grade of the grammar school. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thurmond are members of the First Baptist Church of 
Logan and he is clerk of the church. 

E. Eeece Baker is one of the representative business 
men and progressive citizens of Morgantown, Monongalia 
County, where he is a leading general contractor and is also 
president of the General Woodworking Company. He is a 
native sou of West Virginia and is a representative of the 
third generation of the family in Monongalia County. His 
father, James Clark Baker, was born in the Pierpont settle- 
ment in Union District, this county, in 1850, and was there 
reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm. James C. 
Baker became a prosperous farmer in Grant District, this 
county, where he remained until 1899, when he removed with 
his family to Morgantown, the county seat, where he has 
since continued in successful business as a contractor and 
builder. His wife, whose maiden name was Cornelia Bell 
Potter, was born at Laurel Point, Grant District, this 
county, in 1852, and they have three children: Rex, a 
carpenter by vocation and a resident of Morgantown; E. 
Reece, the immediate subject of this sketch ; and Rap P., 
in the employ of the Bell Telephone Company at Morgan- 
town. 

E. Eeece Baker was born on the home farm at Laurel 
Point, Grant District, this county, May 22, 1884, and his 
initial experience of practical order was in connection with 
the activities of the farm. He profited by the advantages 
offered in the public schools of the locality, and in 1903 
he left the farm and initiated an apprenticeship to the 
carpenter 's trade of one year, in the employ of Elridge 
Tucker, a contractor at Morgantown. He then went to work 
for R. A. McCreery as foreman, and remained with him 
about five years. In his early period of apprenticeship, 
when he became associated with Mr. Tucker, Mr. Baker 
received five dollars a week for his services. In 1912 he 
engaged independently in contracting and building, and 
his ability and effective service soon gained to him secure 
standing as one of the leading contractors in this line at 
Morgantown. Here he has erected many of the finest resi- 
dences in the city, among them the modern houses of 
George C. Baker, A. R. Whitehill, David Eeger, DellRoy 
Richards and others. He erected also the Cox & Baker 
Block on High Street, the public-school building at Maids- 
ville, this county, and many other structures attest his skill 
and effective working policies in his prosperous business. 

Mr. Baker is affiliated with Morgantown Union Lodge 
No. 4, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and in the 
Scottish Rite of Masonry he has received the thirty-second 
degree, beside holding membership in the Mystic Shrine and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is a vital and 
progressive member of the local Kiwanis Club, and he and 
his wife hold membership in the First Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

Mr. Baker wedded Miss Nona Dell Mercer, who was born 
at Fairmont, this state, a daughter of William O. Mercer, 
and the three children of this union are: Nellie Myrle, 
James William and Raymond Guy. 

Valentine Hatfield. A leading representative of the 
coal mining industry in Mingo County is found in the per- 
son of Valentine Hatfield, a man of extended and varied 
experience who is looking after the land and timber holdings 
of the United Thaeker Coal Company, and likewise known 
as a prominent and influential citizen of Burch, also known 
as Rockhouse. Mr. Hatfield was bom in what is now 
Mingo County, but then Logan County, West Virginia, in 
April, 1868, a son of ElUson and Sarah Ann (Staten) Hat- 
field, and a member of an old and honored family of 
Virginia. 

Ellison Hatfield, a native of Virginia, as was his wife, 
fought valiantly as a private in an infantry regiment of 



Virginians during the war between the North and South, his 
commanding general being Robert E. Lee. With the fall of 
the Confederacy and the subsequent cessation of hostilities 
he returned to his home, bearing the marks of six wounds 
on his body and also with a record for faithful, brave and 
loyal service, which included his capture by the enemy at 
the battle of Gettysburg. Leaving his native state after 
his marriage, he repaired to Logan County, West Virginia, 
and there continued to be engaged in agricultural pursuits 
during the remainder of his life. He was every active in 
the work of the Baptist Church and was a man universally 
respected and esteemed in his community. 

Valentine Hatfield attended the common schools of Mingo 
County, but his education was somewhat curtailed, as he was 
still a youth when he assumed life's responsibilities on his 
own account, being but eighteen years of age at the time 
of his marriage. Adopting the calling of his father, that 
of an agriculturist, he applied himself assiduously to this 
line of activity and became the owner of a goodly property. 
Some years ago he became identified with the United 
Thaeker Coal Company, subsequently acted as their pur- 
chasing agent in the acquirement of many of the properties 
of this concern, and for the past fifteen years has been 
superintending the interests of this concern in this region 
in regard to the land and timber requirements of the com- 
pany. This company has extensive holdings in the Pigeon 
Creek community, where it is known as an important enter- 
prise, giving employment to large numbers of men. 

In November, 1886, in Mingo County, Mr. Hatfield was 
united in marriage with Miss America Hatfield, who, al- 
though of the same name and living but eight miles up 
Pigeon Creek, belonged to another family, a daughter of 
Madison and Nancy (Ferrell) Hatfield. Mr. Hatfield was 
an agriculturist and a Confederate veteran of a Virginia 
regiment. Eight children were born to this union: Madi- 
son, who died May 4, 1906; Joe, an attorney of Williamson, 
who married Retta Damron; James Elva, a physician, who 
married Helda Fola ; Matilda, who married Lon Mahon, a 
general merchant of Rockhouse; E. Couse, who married 
Pearl Cary; Verdie, who married Thomas Varney, a car- 
penter of Rugland, West Virginia; Sarah, who married 
G. U. Curry, a carpenter of Burch; and Edna, who married 
Charles Osborn, a civil engineer with the United Thaeker 
Coal Company. Mr. Hatfield, while not being a seeker after 
public honors, has been willing to discharge his respon- 
sibilities as a citizen, and has served as a justice of the 
peace and as a member of the Mingo County Court. He has 
an excellent record as a official, a business man and a 
citizen, and is held in high esteem by his fellow citizens. 

Lee Otis Hill, M. D., is established m the general prac- 
tice of his profession at Camden on Gauley, Webster County, 
and the scope and representative character of his practice 
clearly denotes the high estimate placed upon him in the 
community. 

Doctor Hill was born in Nicholas County, this state, 
February 23, 1881, and is a son of John and Rebecca 
(Radcr) Hill, both likewise natives of that county, where 
they were reared and educated and where their marriage 
was solemnized. John Hill continued as one of the sub- 
stantial citizens and representative farmers of Nicholas 
County until his death, in 1921, and his widow still remains 
on the old homestead farm. Mr. Hill was a man of sterling 
character and marked individuality, was a democrat in poli- 
tics and was an active member of the Baptist Church, as is 
also his widow. Doctor Hill is one of the four children who 
survive the honored father; Viola is the wife of George W. 
Herold, of Cowen, Webster County; Agnes is the wife of 
Dr. D. P. Kessler, of Weston, Lewis County; and Mintie is 
the wife of W. E. Gardner, of Cowen. 

As a boy Doctor HiU began to assist in the various 
activities of the home farm, and in the meanwhile he made 
good use of the advantages offered in the local schools. 
He later attended normal school at Summersville and 
Marshall College at Huntington, West Virginia. After 
completing his literary studies he was soon able to follow 
along the line of his ambition, as shown in his entering 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons in the City of 



66 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



Baltimore, Maryland, in which institution he wag graduated 
as a member of the class of 1905 and with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. The village of Camden on Gauley has 
continuously been the stage of his successful professional 
activities, and here he has built up a substantial and repre- 
sentative practice. He is a member of thg Webster County 
Medical Society, the West Virginia State Medical Society 
and the American Medical Association. The democratic 
party receives his loyal allegiance, and in the Masonic 
fraternity he is afiiliated with Camden Lodge No. 107, 
A. P. and A. M.; Sutton Chapter No. 29, B. A. M.; and 
Sutton Commandery No. 16, Knights Templar. 

In 1903 was solemnized the marriage of Doctor Hill and 
Miss Jennie S. McCue, who attended Marshall College and 
had been a successful and popular teacher prior to her 
marriage. Doctor and Mrs. HiU have two children: George 
and Robert, the elder son being, in 1922, a student in the 
high school. 

John R. Gakeett. After a career of successful achieve- 
ment as a representative of farm enterprise in Gilmer 
County Mr. Garrett is now living retired in the Village of 
San Fork, this county. His high place in popular esteem 
is shown by the fact that he has served as sheriff of the 
county and also as a member of the County Court. 

Mr. Garrett was born in Virginia, in October, 1845, and 
was about four years of age when his parents came to what 
is now Gilmer County, West Virginia, where they settled on 
a farm in 1849. The father here passed the remainder of 
his life, and the mother was a resident of Upshur County 
at the time of her death. He whose name initiates this 
review is a son of Isaac and Sarah (Burgess) Garrett, and 
the respective families were founded in Virginia many 
generations ago. Stephen Garrett, a member of the family 
of which John R. is a representative, was a gallant soldier 
of the patriot forces in the War of the Revolution, and 
Isaac Garrett was a soldier in the War of 1812. Isaac 
Garrett and his wife were earnest members of the Baptist 
Church, and in politics he wag a stanch democrat. Of their 
six children the subject of this sketch is the youngest, and 
he is now the only one surviving. 

John R. Garrett was reared on the pioneer farm in Gilmer 
County and gained his early education in the old-time 
subscription schools. He continued a member of the family 
circle at the parental home until the time of his marriage, 
in the autumn of 1865, and thereafter he was actively en- 
gaged in lumbering operations in this section of the state 
for the long period of twenty-two years, besides which he 
has been concerned also with farm industry, in connection 
with which he gained substantial success. In 1898 Mr. 
Garrett was appointed deputy sheriff of Gilmer County, 
under Sheriff Jacob Moore, and after serving in this ca- 
pacity six years there came a consistent recognition of his 
efficiency, in that in 1904 he was elected sheriff. He gave 
a vigorous administration and retired from office at the 
close of the year 1908. In 1912 he was again elected sheriff, 
and his second term was completed in 1917, since which year 
he has lived virtually retired. Prior to his first election 
to the office of sheriff he had served six years as a member 
of the County Court and six years as a member of the 
Board of Education at Glenville. Mr. Garrett is a stock- 
holder in the Kanawha Union Bank at Glenville, and served 
as a director of the same for two years. He is still the 
owner of valuable farm property and other real estate in 
Gilmer County. His political allegiance is given to the 
democratic party and he is an active member of the Baptist 
Church. The supreme bereavement in his life came when 
his loved and devoted companion of years was summoned to 
eternal rest on the 13th of March, 1920. 

On the 21st of September, 1865, wag solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Garrett and Miss Drusilla Stout, who was born 
and reared at Stout's Mills, Gilmer County, and of the 
seven children of this union five survive the devoted mother: 
Horace is a farmer and merchant of Gilmer County; John 
and Homer are successful farmers of this county, as is also 
Grover, who likewise conducts a general store in the Village 
of Gilmer, and Lovie is the wife of W. D. Keith, of San 
Pork, this county. 



JosiAH Melvin Ripple, Je., who is one of the progressive 
merchants in the City of Martinsburg, Berkeley County, 
was born at Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, October 11, 1883, 
and is a son of Josiah Melvin Ripple, Sr., and Virginia 
(Smeltz) Ripple. The father was born at Marlowe, Berk- 
eley County, Virginia (now West Virginia), and was a son 
of William Ripple, who is supposed to have been born in the 
same county, where the family was founded when this sec- 
tion of West Virginia represented the western frontier of 
Virginia. William Ripple was a man of superior education 
and was for many years a successful teacher in the schools 
of Berkeley County, he having been a venerable and honored 
citizen of Marlowe, this county, at the time of his death. 
Josiah M. Ripple, Sr., gained much of his youthful educa- 
tion under the effective tutorship of his father, and through 
apprenticeship he became a skilled workman at the trade of 
carriage maker. In connection with his trade he was for 
several years foreman of the Thrush & Stoughs carriage 
factory at Hagerstown, Maryland. He was successful in his 
business activities, and from 1904 until his death, in 1910, 
he lived virtually retired at Martinsburg. His marriage 
to Miss Virginia Smeltz was solemnized in 1880, and Mrs. 
Ripple still maintains her home at Martinsburg. She was 
born in Rockingham County, Virginia, as were also her 
parents, John and Susanna (Dinkle) Smeltz, the former of 
whom died at the venerable age of eighty-eight years and 
the latter of whom passed away at the age of sixty-nine 
years. Their children were eight in number. John Smeltz, 
whose father was a successful planter and slave-owner in 
Rockingham County, Virginia, was there reared and edu- 
cated, and after the close of the Civil war he came to 
Berkeley County, West Virginia, where he became a sub- 
stantial farmer and where he passed the remainder of his 
life on his old homestead farm, not far distant from the 
road leading from Marlowe to Williamsport. 

Josiah M. Ripple, Jr., the only child of his parents, gained 
his preliminary education in rural schools and thereafter 
attended the public schools and also a business college at 
Hagerstown, Maryland. Thereafter he made a record of 
marked success as a traveling salesman for the Hess Car- 
riage Company, which he represented in the states of Penn- 
sylvania, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and Tennessee. 
After having been thus engaged five years he engaged in 
the book and stationery business at Martinsburg, and in 
1920 he purchased the building in which his well equipped 
store is now established, on South Queen Street. The Mar- 
tinsburg Bank formerly occupied a part of the building, 
and since its removal to other quarters in 1922 Mr. Ripple 
has utilized the entire ground floor of the building of his 
substantial and constantly expanding business. He is a 
director of the Shenandoah Valley Bank & Trust Company, 
and is one of the loyal and progressive members of the 
Martinsburg Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Ripple is a re- 
publican in political allegiance, he and his wife are com- 
municants of St. John 's Lutheran Church in their home 
city, and he is affiliated with Martinsburg Lodge No. 778, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; Washington 
Lodge No. 1, Knights of Pythias; Aghar Temple No. 226, 
Dramatic Order Knights of Khorassan; and the local camp 
of the Woodmen of the World. 

In 1910 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Ripple and 
Miss Claudia May Schill, who was born and reared at Mar- 
tinsburg, a daughter of George W. and Mary Ellen Schill. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ripple have one son, Melvin Harold. 

Raymond Moses Davis, coal operator and broker at 
Morgantown, Monongalia County, is one of the vital and pro- 
gressive young business men of this city and is a native son 
of West Virginia. He was bom on a farm eighteen miles 
south of Pennsboro, Ritchie County, January 28, .1882, and 
is a son of Moses H. and Mary Ellen Davis, who now reside 
at Pennsboro, the father having been born in Ohio and the 
mother in West Virginia. On the home farm Raymond M. 
Davis was reared to adult age, and that he profited fully by 
the advantages afforded in the public schools is shown by 
the fact that as a youth of only sixteen years he passed the 
required examination that gained to him a teacher's certifi- 
cate of the second class. The youthful pedagogue then bent. 




^/:^^^^^«-e?c.''<£--- 



y^ </At^e^ 



^■9 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



67 



is energies to securing a school in which to put bis ac- 
lirements to practical test. He walked three miles to the 
ip of a hill for conference with one of the school trustees 
ho was working in a clearing. Upon making application 
1 this trustee the latter, after a careful survey of the ap- 
icant, said, ' ' Boy, you should be in school instead of trying 
I teach." Thereafter Mr. Davis rode on horseback through 
1 parts of his native county in search of a school, but his 
3uth caused him to be unsuccessful in his quest, with the re- 
lit that he abandoned his pedagogic ambition and entered 
le employ of the Eureka Pipe Line Company in Ritchie 
ounty. He continued three years in the employ of this com- 
iny at nominal wages, and in the meantime learned from an 
jerator at the company 's headquarters the rudiments of 
legraphy. Until he had attained to his legal majority 
T. Davis sent his wages to his parent-s, and at the age of 
penty-one years he entered the Mountain State Business 
allege at Parkersburg, and he paid his own way while 
arsuing his studies in this institution eight months. There- 
fter he passed about three months in the railroad oflice 
; Pennsboro, after which he went to New Martinsville, 
fetzel County, where for a short time he held the position 
' telegraph operator at the station of the Baltimore & 
hio Railroad. He next engaged in the hotel business at 
ennsboro, on borrowed capital, and two years later he 
lid the hotel business at a good profit, marking this suc- 
issful issue by marrying and going with his bride to 
alifornia. There he passed two years as a street-car con- 
jctor in the City of Los Angeles, and in 1907 he and his 
ife returned to West Virginia and established their resi- 
;nce at Reedsville, where he became station agent and 
ilegraph operator for the M. & K. Railroad, at a salary 
L $35 a month. In January, 1908, he was transferred to 
Ibright, at increased salary, and there he continued his 
irviees until 1911, when he was promoted train dispatcher 
id relief agent at Morgantown, in which city he has 
nee maintained his home. Here he was promoted agent, 
perator and dispatcher at the Sabraton yards of the M. 

K. Railroad, and in 1917 he was advanced to the posi- 
on of train dispatcher. This oflSee he resigned July 15, 
)18, and permanently retired from railroad service. In 
le meanwhile he had invested his savings in the timber 
usiness in Braxton County, and after a period of three 
jars he sold his interests in this line at a good profit, 
a January, 1918, Mr. Davis and Ernest H. Gilbert, who 
ad long been associated in railroad service and who had 
ained considerable knowledge of the coal industry through 
andling large shipments from the mines, organized the 
lavis Coal Company, a partnership concern, and they have 
ince continued as successful coal operators and brokers. 
a 1919-20 they purchased eight different mines in the 
[organtown District, the same having an approximate 
utput capacity of 4,000 tons daily, and under normal con- 
itions the annual brokerage business of the firm involves 
ie handling of 1,000,000 tons of coal. Messrs. Davis and 
■ilbert have won success entirely through their own ability 
nd efforts and have made for themselves secure vantage- 
round as reliable, progressive and substantial young busi- 
ess men. 

Mr. Davis married Miss Fannie Wilson, who was born 
t Pennsboro, Ritchie County, a daughter of Sherman V. 
nd Alice (Broadwater) Wilson. Mr. and Mrs. Davis have 
wo children: Alice Irene, born April 6, 1908, and Mary 
largaret, born June 30, 1913. 

Charles M. Gates, the executive head of the Gates 
Juilding & Construction Company, with headquarters at 
Villiamson, Mingo County, is one of the alert and progres- 
ive men who are playing a prominent part in the civic and 
naterial advancement of this section of the state, his asso- 
iate in the business being his brother, Darwin R., of whom 
ndividual mention is made in a sketch immediately follow- 
ng this. 

Charles M. Gates was born at Scottdale, Pennsylvania, 
)ctobcr 17, 1870, and is a son of William Michael and 
Barbara (Willson) Gates, both likewise natives of the old 
ieystone State, where the father was long and actively 
dentified with coal mining. William M. Gates served as a 



gallant soldier of the Union during the Civil war, he having 
been a private in the Two Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, which was a part of the Fifth Army 
Corps. He took part in many engagements, including the 
historic battles of Antietam and Gettysburg. After the war 
he was engaged in burning charcoal for use in iron furnaces, 
and in 1872 he became a coal miner in Pennsylvania, a 
vocation which he followed during the rest of his active 
career. After the death of his first wife he married Emma 
B. Holt. 

Charles M. Gates attended the public schools of Pennsyl- 
vania about three years, and was but nine years old when he 
became a trapper in a coal mine. With the passing years 
he made consecutive advancement, became a skilled miner, 
served as mine foreman, later became mine superintendent 
and finally became general manager of the Crystal Black 
Coal Company of Mingo County, West Virginia. In 1917 
he established his residence at Williamson and engaged in 
the real estate business, in connection with which he spe- 
cialized in the handling of coal mines and other coal prop- 
erties, besides handling improved and vacant city realty. 
In connection with this enterprise he found it expedient to 
do much building in order to sell properties to advantage, 
and in September, 1921, he became associated with his 
brother Darwin R. in the organization of the Gates Build- 
ing & Construction Company, of which he is president. The 
company, with the best of facilities and management, is 
developing a large and substantial business in building and 
general construction work in Mingo and adjoining counties. 
In the furtherance of the business Mr. Gates is preparing 
to establish headquarters in the City of Huntington, though 
he will continue his residence at Williamson. He is a pro- 
gressive and able business man and a sterling citizen who 
has achieved marked success, the while he has always com- 
manded unqualified popular esteem. He has received the 
thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite of the Masonic 
fraternity, in which he is also a member of the Mystic 
Shrine, and he is afiiliated also with the Elks and is a 
member of the Kiwanis and Coal City clubs of WUliamsoiL 
He and his wife are members of the i?aptist Church. 

In 1896, in Pennsylvania, Mr. Gates wedded Miss Agnes 
Glenn, and her death occurred in December, 1916. The 
children of this union are: Clark Ray, Austin J. W., 
Katherine A., Thomas D., Pee Jay, Bertha L. and Edith 
Clark. Clark R. and Thomas D. are engaged in the cattle 
business at Montrose, Colorado. 

On the 21st of May, 1920, was recorded the marriage of 
Mr. Gates and Mrs. Lucille Gilbert (Cox) Pitzgibbons, a 
widow with one son, Henry, who now bears the name of 
Henry Fitzgibbons Gates. Mrs. Gates was born and reared 
in Kentucky and is a daughter of J. P. and Catherine Cox, 
of Henderson, that state. 

Darwin R. Gates, who is associated with his brother 
Charles M. as one of the principals in the Gates Building 
& Construction Company at Williamson, Mingo County, was 
born in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, March 3, 1890, 
and is a son of William M. and Emma B. (Holt) Gates, 
adequate record concerning the family being given in the 
preceding sketch of the brother, Charles M. Gates. 

The early education of Darwin R. Gates included that 
of the high school, but he was compelled to leave school at 
the age of sixteen years, owing to the death of his father. 
He was reared in his native county, and there he gained his 
early experience in coal mining. After acting as mule- 
driver in the mines for one year he served two years as 
weighing boss, and he then came to West Virginia and 
entered the employ of the United States Coal Corporation, a 
subsidiary of the United States Steel Company. He was 
employed one year as assistant mine foreman at Gary, Mc- 
Dowell County, and six years as mine foreman, and in 1917 
he was made mine superintendent for the Wigarb Mining 
Company at Goodman, where he remained until 1921, when 
he engaged in the automobile business at Williamson. Four 
months later he sold his interest in this enterprise and be- 
came associated with his brother in the real estate, building 
and general construction business, as noted in the preceding 
outline of the career of his brother. Mr. Gates is affiliated 



68 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



with both York and Scottish Kite bodies of the Masonic 
fraternity, and also with the Mystic Shrine, is a member of 
the Kiwanis Club at Williamson, and he and his wife hold 
membership in the Baptist Church. 

June 3 1914, at Indiana, Pennsylvania, Mr. Gates wedded 
Miss Delia Jennie Hess, daughter of Frank and Sarah 
(Wheeler) Hess, both natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. and 
Mrs. Gates have two children, Leona Wahneta and Delia 
Eleanor. 

Newell Kellogg Pratt, superintendent of the Big 
Sandy Colliery of the Solvay Collieries Company at Big 
Sandy McDowell County, has been in the employ of this 
industrial corporation since 1907, save for a period of some- 
what more than a year, during which he was in service with 
the Young Men's Christian Association in France in the 
World war. . 

Mr Pratt claims the old Empire State as the place ot his 
nativity, his birth having occurred at Delphi Falls, New 
York on the 27th of December, 1882. He is a son of 
Frank F. and Rose (Holbrook) Pratt. Frank F. Pratt has 
been associated with farm industry throughout his entiro 
active career, and resides with one of his sons on the fine 
old homestead farm near Cazenovia, Madison County, New 
York he being sixty-five years of age at the time of this 
writing, in the winter of 1921-2. His wife died in 1913, at 
the age of fifty-five years. Of the two children the subject 
of this review is the younger, the older son, Ashley, having 
the active management of the old home farm. The Pratt 
family was one of prominence and influence in Madison 
County, New York, from the Colonial period, prior to the 
War of the Bevolution. in which representatives of the name 
served as patriot soldiers, one having held the rank of 

lieutenant. ^ •, ■ ..i. rv,. 

Newell K. Pratt attended a private school in the City 
of Syracuse, New York, and thereafter continued his studies 
in a seminary at Cazenovia until he had attained to his legal 
majority. Thereafter he was associated for one year in 
the work and management of the home farm, and he then 
took a position in the receiving teller's department of the 
Irving National Bank, New York City. He thus remained 
in the national metropolis until 1907, when he came to West 
Virginia and became script clerk at Marytown for the 
Solvay Collieries Company. Six months later he was trans- 
ferred to the Big Sandy Colliery and advanced to the posi- 
tion of chief clerk. Later he returned to Marytown, and 
served as chief clerk to J. C. Eawn, general manager of the 
company, and of this position he continued the incumbent 
until 1917, when he was assigned to the purchasing depart- 
ment at Huntington. In 1918 he went to France as secre- 
tary of the Young Men's Christian Association, and was 
assigned to the position of accountant and financial secre- 
tary of the Vannes Area. He remained in France some- 
what more than a year, and in the meanwhile the armistice 
brought the war to a close. Upon his return he became cbief 
clerk to the general superintendent of the Edgewater Coal 
Company, subsidiary company of the Solvay organization, at 
Hellier, Kentucky, and in August, 1920, returned to the 
Big Sandy Colliery, where he served as assistant superin- 
tendent until the 1st of the following December, when he 
was promoted to his present office, that of superintendent. 
He is affiliated with the lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons at Welch, the county seat, and with the chapter of 
Eoyal Arch Masons at Northfork. He is a repubhcan m 
political allegiance, and is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, in the faith of which he was reared. 

LOEELLE Vernon Eeeb, deputy collector of internal reve- 
nue at Charleston, and division chief of that division, is one 
of the old-time newspaper men of the state, and for a 
quarter of a century was identified with the editorial man- 
agement of the Preston Republican, removing from Terra 
Alta to Charleston following his appointment in the internal 
revenue service. ,-,!.■»,■ 

Mr. Reed was born at Lebanon, Laclede County, Missouri. 
May 25, 1867. His father is a minister of the Church of 
the Disciples, and has served as pastor of many churches 
of that denomination. L. V. Reed finished his education in 



the Christian College at Ash Grove, Missouri, and first came 
to West Virginia in 1894. His headquarters were a1 
Wheeling, and for a year or so he had been associated as a 
salesman with the S. J. Clarke Publishing Company and the 
Goodspeed Publishing Company of Chicago. He repre 
sented these publishing houses in Missouri, Iowa, Wiscon 
sin, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Chicago. He is a Presbyteriai 
and a Mason. 

In 1S96 Mr. Reed removed to Terra Alta and becam< 
editor of the Preston Republican. In 1899 he bought thi 
paper, and continued it as ovmer and editor from 1899 ti 
1921. 

Mr. Reed was not a stranger to Charleston when he move( 
his home here, since he has held several ofiicial position 
involving duty at the state capitol. For several years hi 
was secretary of the State Board of Control, with office a 
Charleston, and he also served as clerk to the finance com 
mittee of the House of Delegates. He was appointe( 
deputy collector of internal revenue in October, 1921, am 
shortly afterward he moved his family from Terra Alta t 
Charleston. His jurisdiction comprises the counties o 
Kanawha, Boone, Putnam, Raleigh, Greenbrier, Clay, Moe 
roe, Fayette, Pocahontas and Summers. 

The Reed family has been well represented in the publi 
life of West Virginia for several years. Mrs. Reed had 
prominent part in the republican state campaign of 192 
and is one of the most influential workers among the newl 
enfranchised element of the state. Mr. and Mrs. Reed hav 
three interesting children. Virginia is the wife of G. I 
Silcott, of Columbus, Ohio. The only son, O. Edward Reee 
is a graduate of Columbia University, and now has charg 
of the publicity department of the Mergenthaler Linotyp 
Company at New York City. Miss Dolly Gray Reed is 
student "in the University of Ohio at Columbus. 

George S. Gochenour, M. D. That important service 1 
humanity which can only be rendered by the capable an 
conscientious physician and surgeon has been the work 1 
which Dr. George S. Gochenour has devoted his time an 
ability in Hardy County for over thirty years. The seer 
of his activities of a professional nature is not far distai 
from the locality of his birth and the region in which h 
family has played an influential role for over a century. 

Doctor Gochenour was born at Maurertovra, Shenandoa 
County, Virginia, August 2. 1857. His grandfather, Jon; 
than Gochenour, spent his life as a farmer at Maurertow: 
where he is buried. He married a sister of Elder Georj 
Shaver, and their children were Isaac, George, Sallie, A; 
nie and Eliza. George spent his life at Tom's Brook : 
Shenandoah County; Sallie married Henry Bater, remove 
to Ohio during the Civil war, and spent her life there 
Annie married Samuel Maphis, and both lived in Shena 
doah County until their deaths; Eliza married Crafte 
Beydler, of Shenandoah County, and during the war th( 
moved to Jerico, Missouri, where she died recently, the la 
survivor of this generation of the family. 

Isaac Gochenour, father of Doctor Gochenour, was al 
a native of Shenandoah County, and spent his life there ; 
a farmer. As a member of the Church of the Brethren 1 
was conscientiously opposed to war, and when the Confe 
erate authorities began taking members of the church in 
the army by force he left his home and went to Pennsj 
vania, remaining there until the close of hostilities. I 
returned home just two days before the surrender of Ge 
eral Lee's army and was immediately arrested by Confe 
erate authorities, who started him to Richmond, but I 
neighbors and friends, with whom he had spent his life, i 
terposed and raised $1,000 in cash, which they paid to i 
lease him, the penalty for failure to serve in the Soiithe 
Army. Isaac Gochenour always lived as a private citize 
but was very active in the work of the church, being lead 
of the church music and a splendid singer. He died 
1871, when only forty-two years of age. _ 

He was survived many years by his widow, who died 
1894. Her maiden name was Eliza Riednour. Her gran 
father was a native of Germany, and while serving as i 
ofl^cer in the German army he met at some point on the coa 
of Scotland the young lady who subsequently became 1 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



69 



wife. They came to America, settled in Shenandoah County, 
where he followed farming, and lived there until his death. 
He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and was a man of 
powerful build and splendid physique, being a giant in 
stature. At one time three of his young great-grandsons, 
including Doctor Gochenour, were playing with his trousers 
and had no difficulty in inserting their bodies within the 
generous girth of that garment. The wife of this old time 
settler of Shenandoah County survived him many years, 
and she never wore glasses and when in advanced years 
she plied a cambric needle with the ease and dexterity of a 
woman in middle life. 

The father of Eliza Riednour was Dr. Henry Riednour, a 
noted tooth extractor. He also remained loyal to the Union, 
and some of the neighbors and friends laid in wait for him' 
with loaded guns and pistols, but he escaped their am- 
bush, went to Illinois, .ioined a TJnion resriment and was in 
service until the close of the war. His command came 
through his Virginia home region several times, and he 
visited his family, so that he was not altogether removed 
frnm_ them. After the war he returned and spent the rest 
of his life in Shenandoah County, where he was horn in 
1802 and died about 1887. Eliza was the oldest child of 
Doctor ■Riednour. The home in which .she reared her chil- 
dren was one put tocether vpith nails made by a blacksmith, 
one of the homes built during the dnvs of the Indians on 
the Virginia frontier Her children were: 'Pannie. who be- 
came the wife of Elder B. W. Neff. of Mount .Jackson, 
Virginia; H. H.. who for sixteen vears was a frei<Tht con- 
ductor on the Baltimore & Ohio T?nilroad and was Itilled 
.inst after the settlement of a strike on that road; .Tnhn J. 
on the old hnmestpnil -,t Maurertown ; and George Shaver, 
the MoorefieTd phvsician. 

Dr. Oeorge S. Gochenour spent his early life in the rural 
community where he was born, attended the country schools, 
and his duties were with the farm until past his maiority. 
He had spent much of the time with his Errandfather, Doc- 
tor Kiednour, and this probably influenced him in the choice 
of medicine as his profession. When ready for colle<re he 
went to B.iltimore and entered the old Baltimore Medical 
College, receiviuff his first diploma there in 1889. Later, 
when that institution was merged vpith the TTniversity of 
Maryland, the school issued him a new diploma. For the 
last year while he was a stndent he was assistant resident 
physician of the Maryl.nnd General Hospital, and after 
graduating he became resident physician to fill the unex- 
pired term of the regular physician. He also did some 
general practice while in Baltimore, and left that city, with 
the promise of success and considerable distinction before 
him, in order to keep the hii'her altitude and a climate more 
beneficial to him in West Virsrinia. In 1889 he located at 
Mathias in Hardy County, and remained there until 1898, 
when he moved to the county seat, Moorefield, where he 
has now enioyed an extensive private practice for nearly 
a onarter of a century. 

During the World war Doctor Gochenour was commis- 
sioned by the Government a member of the Volunteer Med- 
ical Service Corps, authorized by the Council of Defense. 
He was later sworn in as assistant physician of the draft 
board, and only awaited the vncnncv in the office made by 
the inability of the resriilar aprinintep to serve. For sev- 
eral years he has bef>n citv health officer and is a member 
of the County and State Medical Societies, and for years 
has been vice president of the Hardy County Bank. Doctor 
Gochenour was a member of the council at Moorefield for 
a number of years, has always voted as a democrat, is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, is master 
nf^ Moorefield Lodsre No. 29, A. F. and A. M.. and is a 
thirty-second degree Scottish Bite Mason and Shriner. 

Doctor Gochenour married in Shenandoah County Miss 
Alice V. Shaver, daughter of Elder Samuel A and Annie 
CGood') Shaver. She was born March 4. I860 and died 
February 11. 1887. the mother of two sons, Ernest and 
Harry Lee. The latter died in infancy. Ernest Gochenour 
has made a distin.tniished record as an educator, is a gradu- 
ate of Roanoke College and of Princeton TTniversity. was 
formerly teacher of social science in the TTniyersity at 



Porto Bico, later professor of Spanish in Wentworth Mili- 
tary Academy at Lexington, Missouri, and is now gen- 
eral superintendent of the Spanish department in the high 
schools of Birmingham, Alabama. 

Doctor Gochenour 's second wife was Miss Mollie E Gar- 
rett, daughter of We.stfall and Eliza (Chrisman) Garrett 
bhe was born in Hardy County where she died in 1912 
leaving a son, Garrett StoufTer Gochenour, born June 16 
1895. He is a graduate of Roanoke College and of Colum- 
bia Umversity of New York, was in the service of the navy 
during the World war, being discharged April 1, 1922 and 
13 now an efficient engineer in an aluminum plant at Niag- 
ara Falls. ^ 

,oo2^^°,.^- ^O^'INS, M. D. A resident of Charleston since 
18Sb, Doctor Robins for a quarter of a century performed 
an invaluable and extensive service as a physician and 
and surgeon, largely as company physician for coal corpora- 
tions, directing and attending to the medical care, sanitary 
safeguards provided for mining towns and districts. Doctor 
Bobms has since retired from the active business of the 
profession, but is still prominently identified with the coal 
industry and with financial affairs at Charleston. 

He was born at Elysburg, Northumberland County Penn- 
sylvania, in 1861. He represents an old line of solid Eng- 
lish ancestors. One of his forefathers was a Colonel Robins 
on the staff of Cromwell. Prior to the Revolutionary war 
the Robins family settled in Northumberland County Penn- 
sylvania. His great-grandfather, Aaron Robins, was' a land 
owner and merchant in that county, while the grandfather 
Dr. Joseph C. Robins, was a graduate of the University of 
Pennsylvania and a physician. Three of his sons followed 
the same profession, though Harvey S. Robins, father of 
Dr. Joseph E.. was a merchant in Pennsylvania. 

Joseph E. Robins graduated from Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege in Philadelphia in 1883. and for several years prac- 
ticed at Mount Carmel, Pennsylvania. On coming to 
Charleston, West Virginia, in 1886, he became surgeon for a 
number of the coal companies in the New River coal fields. 
Subsequently he represented several large coal corporations', 
and during a busy twenty-five years had thousands of miners 
and their families under his care. Doctor Robins is one of 
the distinguished men in his profession in the state. For 
nineteen years he was a member of the State Board of 
Health and for several years its president. For thirteen 
years he was a member of the National Guard of West Vir- 
ginia, and was chief surgeon during the period of martial 
law, 1912, on Paint and Cabin creeks, serving viath the rank 
of major. He has been retired from medical practice now 
for several years. 

His connection with the coal industry of West Virginia 
and Kentucky involves large financial interests. He is a 
stockholder or director in a number of coal companies. He 
was formerly president of the National City Bank of 
Charleston, which was merged with the present Charleston 
National Rank, of which he is vice president. This is the 
largest National Bank in the state. 

During the war with Germany Doctor Robins was a mem- 
ber and examining surgeon for' the Charleston Draft Board. 
The duties of this office kept him busy for many months, 
literally day and night. The tremendous volume of work 
accomplished by the board, and its generally high record 
of efficiency, were due not only to the individual exertions 
of the three members but to the extra help employed by 
them, an employment made possible chiefly through sub- 
stantial contributions of money on the part "of Doctor Rob- 
ins and his two associates. 

The outstanding civic interests of Doctor Robins is his 
work in behalf of education in Charleston. He has been a 
member of the Charleston Board of Education since 1915. 
He was elected president of the board in 1919 and reelected 
in 1921. The half dozen years of his membership have been 
coincident with a remarkable degree of progress in the 
material and educational equipment of the Charleston 
schools. The city now has a magnificent high school and 
many grade schools, and the board now has a building pro- 
gram involving the expenditure of more than half a million 
dollars in 1922 and for two or three years following. 



70 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



Doctor KobiiiB has three eMldreu: His daughter Madge 
is the wife of Mr. Kemp Littlopage, of Charleston, His 
older son, Dr. Joseph E. Robins, Jr., pursued a literary 
course in the University of West 'S'irgiuia and graduated 
in the medical department of the University of Cincinnati, 
is now practicing medicine. The younger son, Hugh Barbec 
Robins, was a literary student of the University of Penn- 
sylvania and now is a student of medicine in the University 
of Cincinnati. 

James Madi.son Smith. The special business of writ- 
ing insurance has grown to enormous proportions, and this 
lias come about not entirely because the people have come to 
.a realization of the necessity for proper protection, but in 
a large degree because of the efforts of the men engaged in 
this line of eiulcavor, who are educating the masses to an 
appreciation of the benefits accruing from insurance. This 
line of business demands many characteristics not demanded 
in other avenues. The successful insurance man must not 
only know his own business thoroughly, but be a competent 
judge of iiuman nature, be possessed in marked degree of 
that faculty which enables him to speak clearly and con- 
vincingly to his possible client, and to be able to place the 
insurance witli a reliable company which will conserve the 
interests of the insured. Of the able insurance brokers of 
Mingo County one who is also known as a successful oper- 
ator in real estate and a man of iironiinence and influ- 
ence in his city is James JIadison Smith of Williamson, sen- 
ior member of the Smith-Pool Agency. 

Mr, Smith was born February 5, 187S, in Pike Countj', 
Kentucky, a son of Andrew J. and Mary (Staten) Smith, 
natives o'f Kentucky, and a descendant of an old Virginia 
family of Irish origin. Andrew J. Smith was identified 
with the timber business, in getting out logs, or what would 
be known today as a logger. While he was not in the Civil 
war, he had an uncle, for whom he was named, who met his 
death in the battle of Turkey Creek. Andrew J. Smith was 
active in the work of the Baptist Church and a man of in- 
tegrity and sound principles. 

The country schools of Pike County, Kentucky, furnished 
James Madison Smith with his educational training, and 
when he was eighteen years of age he went to work hauling 
logs with a team from a mill on Pigeon Creek to Warn 
Cliff, a railroad iioint, wlience they were shipped. He fol- 
lowed this kind of work for six months, and when A. B. 
Crumb failed he lost his employment and one of his horses. 
With the proceeds of the sale of his remaining horse hr 
went to school, and was able to .secure a teacher 's certifi- 
cate, which he utilized in educational work in Pike County 
for six years. He then embarked in tlie grocery business, 
but after a short experience disposed of his holdings to ad- 
vantage, as lie thought, only to be painfully enlightened 
to the contrary when the purchaser failed to pay. To make 
a new start Mr. Smith came to Williamson and secured a 
position as clerk in the grocery of W. R.- Cranshaw, witli 
whom he remained from May 1 to July 4, when he was 
taken down with typhus fever and it was not until Decem- 
ber 29 that he was again aide to resume work. Undiscour- 
aged by this series of misfortunes, he accepted a position 
as bookkeeper in the laundry at Williamson, which failed at 
the end of his fourth mouth of employment. Mr. Smith, 
however, had always been provident and saving, and at this 
time had accumulated the sum of $ll-"i, with which he pur- 
chased a small grocery business. Through good manage- 
ment and untiring industry he built up a good business, 
which he sold at the end of three years to W. L. French 
and went to Nolan, where for four months he was associated 
with W. M. Thompson. Later, at the same place, he was 
identified with G. K. Blackburn, but a short time later re- 
turned to Williamson, where he again entered the grocery 
business and continued therein until July, 1908. Selling 
out, he went to Nelson County, Virginia, where he pur- 
chased a farm and carried on agricultural operations, but 
at the end of his third year disposed of his land and again 
.ame back to Williamson, where in lOlli he purchased a 
furniture store. After conducting it for two years he sold 
this enterprise and embarked in the real estate business, 
in which he has been engaged to the present. In 1916 he 



took in Mr. Pool as a partner, under the style of the Smith- 
Pool Agency, and since then insurance has been a big fea- 
ture of the business. Mr. Smith has made his name synony- 
mous with integrity and upright principles, and has gatii- 
ered about him a large clientele, who have the utmost con 
fidence in his judgment and reliability. 

In July, 1907, Mr. Smith was united in marriage at Will 
ianison with Miss Laura Leslie, daughter of Amos and 
Bettie (Millard) Leslie, natives of Kentucky, and to this 
union there have been born three children: Mary Eliza- 
beth, Robert Harrison and James E. By a former marriage 
Mrs. Smith is tlic mother of one sou, "William R. Hendricks. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith attend the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He holds membership in the Masons, the 
Odd Fellows, the Kiwanis Club and the Coal City Club, 
ill all of which he is popular. 

Bantz W, Craddock, of Glenville, judicial center of 
Gilmer County, is one of the representative members of 
the bar of his native town and county, and the pojiular es- 
timate here placed upon him is vouchsafed in the fact that 
he is serving as prosecuting attorney of the county at the 
time of this writing, in 1922. 

Mr. Craddock was born at Glenville on the 22d of No- 
vember, 1887, and is a son of .loseiih M. and Vergie B. 
(Wooddell) Craddock, the former of whom was born at 
Glenville, in 1863, and the latter of whom was born in 1864. 
The father received the advantages of the schools of his 
native county, and as a young man tauglit four terms in 
the rural schools. He founded the Glenville Stranger, of 
which he continued the editor and publisher for twenty 
years. He is now one of the influential citizens of Clarks- 
burg, Harrison County, and formerly served as mayor of 
that city. He is a staunch democrat and a liberal supporter 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of which his 
wife is an earnest member. Of the six children the eldest 
is Winnie, who is the wife of O. M. Ewing; Bantz W., of 
this sketch, was the next in order of birth; Eula is the wife 
of J. C. Ewing; Ava is the wife of C. C. Stanard; M. 
Pauline is the wife of C. E. Elliott; and Thelma D. is the 
wife of J. C. Crews. 

In the public schools of his native village, Bantz W. Crad- 
dock continued liis studies until his graduation, and in Jan- 
uary, 1907, he took a clerical position in the Kanawha 
Union Bank, in which he continued his service until the 
autumn of the following year, when he entered the law de- 
partment of the University of West Virginia. In this in- 
.stitution he was graduated as a member of the class of 
1910, followed by his adini'^sion to the bar of his native 
state. He served his professional novitiate by practicing 
one year at Martinton, and since July, 1911, he has been 
established in professional work in his native village of 
Glenville. His ability and personal ]iopularity soon en- 
abled him to build up a rejiresentative ])ractice, and he con- 
tinued his general professional work until 1916, when he 
was elected prosecuting attorney of the county. He made 
an admirable record in this office, and in 1920 he was re- 
elected for a second term of four years. 

Mr. Craddock is a loyal advocate of the principles and 
policies of the democratic party, is a past master of Gil- 
mer County Lodge No. 118, .\iicient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, and has received the eighteenth degree of the Scottish 
Rite of Masonry, besides being aflBliated with the Order of 
the Eastern Star, the Knights of Pythias, the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Knights of Maccabees, the Jun- 
ior Order of United American Mechanics, and two college 
fraternities. Sphinx and Phi Sigma Kappa. His wife holds 
membership in the Order of the Eastern Star and also in 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

December 5, 1913, recorded the marriage of Mr. Crad- 
dock and Miss Hallie J. Whiting, who had been a student 
in the State Normal School at Glenville and who had been 
a successful and popular teacher in the public schools prior .; 
to her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Craddock have three chil- 
dren: Bantz W., Jr., Marjorie E. and Samuel N. 

Charles Stuart Waugh. The importance of the practi- ' 
cal railroad contractor and highway constructor is very ' 




iU^-;73.CU^-?.< 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRQINIA 



71 



well demonstrated in the recognition he is receiving in 
every community, for through the medium of his efforts 
are localities developed and communities put in touch with 
the outside -world. While unfortunately there are some who 
take unfair advantage of their position, the majority of 
the men who are engaged in this line of work handle deals 
of such magnitude that it would be strictly to their disad- 
vantage to carry through anything but aboveboard trans- 
actions. Southwestern West Virginia has advanced very 
largely through the work of this class of men, and one who 
has been instrumental in developing Mingo and several 
other counties of this region is Charles Stuart Waugh, who 
now makes his headquarters at Williamson. 

Mr. Waugh was born June 12, 1878, at Orange, Virginia, 
a son of Charles A. and Sallie (Jones) Waugh, natives of 
Virginia, a member of an old family of the Old Dominion 
State, and of English and Scotch ancestry. His father, a 
contractor in railroad construction, was also an extensive 
agriculturist in Virginia, and was active in civic affairs 
and political matters. Likewise he took a helpful part in 
the work of the Methodist Episcopal Church and served as 
steward. 

The graded and high schools of Orange, Virginia, fur- 
nished Charles Stuart Waugh with his primary education, 
following which he pursued a course of study at the Vir- 
ginia Polytechnic School, which he left before graduation, 
in 1896_. At that time he took up railroad construction 
work with the Eliason & Rhodes Company, and remained 
with that concern for two years, then joining the Einehart- 
Dennis Company, with which he remained about one year. 
At this time Mr. Waugh embarked in business on his own 
account at Oakvale, West Virginia, his iirst contract calling 
for some double track work for the Norfolk & Western 
EaUway from Oakvale to Glen Lyn. This occupied about 
a year and one-half of time, after which he continued fur- 
ther work for the same line. During this time he made his 
main headquarters at Orange, Virginia, although he always 
had headquarters likewise at the scene of his operations. 
Eventually Mr. Waugh transferred his main headquarters 
to his present location at Williamson, West Virginia, where 
he is engaged in general construction work, principally per- 
taining to railway construction and heavy highway work. 
He is possessed of fuU equipment, including steam shovels, 
graders, etc., of a most modern character, and his contracts 
generally call for in excess of $100,000 each. Mr. Waugh 
is likewise a coal operator, owning and operating the West 
Williamson coal properties, which are quite extensive in 
size. His reputation in the business world is that of a 
thoroughly capable, aggressive and reliable business man, 
and his standing in the community is an influential one. 

In 1903, at WythevUle, Virginia, Mr. Waugh was united 
in marriage with Miss Margaret Porter, daughter of Steven 
and Maggie (Crocket) Porter, natives of Virginia and ag- 
ricultural people. Mr. Porter is active in politics at Wythe- 
ville. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. ' 
Waugh: Charles S., Porter E., Margaret W., Esther, Stu- 
art A., Julia and Lee. Of these Charles S. and Porter E. 
are attending the military school at Waynesborough, Vir- 
ginia, while Margaret W. is one of the brightest pupils at 
the State Deaf and Blind Institute of Virginia. The fam- 
ily belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. 
Waugh is a Chapter and Knight Templar Mason, a member 
of the Mystic Shrine and an Elk, and also holds member- 
ship in the Kiwanis and Coal City Clubs. 

William Boggs Andeeson. The high awards that are 
attainable in character and influence through a life of 
industry and probity, guided and regulated by a sense of 
Christian obligation, are illustrated in the career of William 
Boggs Anderson, for many years an agriculturist of Pendle- 
ton County. Possessed of more than ordinary industry, he 
entered upon his life work in young manhood and never 
failed to carry out the obligations laid upon his willing 
shoulders nor to follow up opportunities that opened before 
him with steadiness and industry, gaining step by Bt«p the 
rare fruits of well-directed enterprise, until he found him- 
self in a position where he was independent financially and 
held in high esteem by his fellowmen. 



Mr. Anderson was born September 7, 1861, in Pendleton 
County, and belonged to a family that originated in Scot- 
land, the first American ancestor of which was his great- 
grandfather, who came from Glasgow, Scotland, in the first 
years of the United States as a republic. The grandfather 
of William Boggs Anderson, William Anderson, was born in 
ISOO, at Woodstock, Virginia, and served as a drummer boy 
there during the War of 1812. When he attained mature 
years he became a business man, and at Woodstock followed 
merchandising for some years. Like his two wives, who 
were sisters, he was possessed of marked literary taste, and 
owned a splendid home library. He was a member of the 
Virginia Constitutional Convention and a prominent man 
generally in the State of Virginia, which he left in 1831 to 
cross the mountains into Pendleton County, settling on the 
South Fork of the South Branch of the Potomac Eiver, 
where he owned and carried on extensive operations on a 
large plantation. His son, David Crawford Anderson, estab- 
lished a school for boys in Pendleton County, and although 
it was located far from any communities which boasted of 
populations of any considerable size he made it something 
of an educational center for the youths of the county. He 
was a college-bred man himself, and in addition to teaching 
in his own school, was an instructor in a classical school at 
Franklin, and later in one at Moorefield. William Ander- 
son rounded out his career on his plantation, where he died, 
and his body was interred in the cemetery near Franklin 
with others of the family. His first wife was Bachel White, 
of Greenbrier County, Virginia, and the six children who 
were born to them were as follows: Mary, who died as a 
maiden; David Crawford, the educator and founder of the 
boys' school noted above, who married Louisa Boggs and 
died in 1891; William Henry, who died young; Junius 
Brutus, the father of William B. ; Robert Allen, who joined 
the ' ' gold rush ' ' to California in 1849 and died in the gold 
fields; and PhUip Williams, who was a physician and sur- 
geon throughout life and died at Charleston, West Virginia. 
For his second wife William Anderson married his first 
wife's sister, Mrs. Alice (White) Hupp. The White sisters 
were highly educated women, their father being Valentine 
White, the proprietor of a school for girls at Warm Springs, 
Virginia. Valentine White married a Miss Rhodes, a lady 
from Wales, and one of their daughters, PoUy White, mar- 
ried John Cowardin, of Richmond, Virginia, one of their 
sons, James Cowardin, being editor of the Richmond Dis- 
patch during the war between the states. Mrs. Rachel 
(White) Anderson died July 19, 1831. The issue of William 
Anderson and his second wife was a son, Samuel, who 
passed his life in the main at Franklin, as a farmer, and 
died unmarried. 

Junius Brutus Anderson, the father of William Boggs 
Anderson, was born November 19, 1824, and was educated 
by private tutors who came to visit his father's home for 
the purpose of instructing the children. He became one 
of the early merchants of Franklin, and during the war 
between the states engaged in the manufacture of grey 
goods for uniforms for the Confederate soldiers. He died 
August 9, 1870, and was buried in the family lot at Frank- 
lin. Mr. Anderson married Miss Margaret Boggs, a daugh- 
ter of Gen. James Boggs. She was a faithful member of 
the Presbyterian Church and a pioneer of the Franklin 
congregation, and she passed away in that faith July 22, 
1894, aged over sixty-one years, having been born May 5, 
1833. 

Sallie Anderson, the oldest child of Junius B. and Mar- 
garet Anderson, is now Mrs. Cunningham and a resident of 
Franklin. She was born in this old country town in 1858, 
and completed her education at Fairfax Hall, Winchester, 
Virginia, from which she was graduated in 1881, subse- 
quently taking a post-graduate course in art. She estab- 
lished a boarding school for girls at Franklin, growing into 
it rather easily and unintentionally, until she found herself 
at the head of a popular and useful institution and con- 
tinued its life for seven years. She then gave up literary 
school work and took up art, giving over her entire time to 
instructing her pupils in oil painting and pastel work. Her 
paintings have attracted widespread attention and have 
received much favorable comment from critics. Many of 



72 



HISTOOBY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



them grace the walls of leading homes all over this region. 
On May 4, 1893, she was uuit^^d in marriage with Eliacum 
Cunningham at Edinburg, Virginia, while she was tcacliinfr 
for a short time at Winchester. Mr. Cunningham was born 
July 2, 1853, in Pendleton County, and acquired his educa- 
tion in colleges in Virginia and elsewhere as he could provide 
the means to further his studies. He taught school for a 
number of years in Lewis County, this state, and after read- 
ing law for five years with William H. H. Flick, of Franklin, 
was admitted to the West Virginia bar. Soon after his 
marriage to Miss Anderson he established his home at 
Beverly, West Virginia, where he followed his profession 
during the rest of his life, dying in December, 1901. He 
was active in democratic politics, and was frequently an 
official in the State Senate, where he served as reading clerk 
and clerk. He never campaigned in his own behalf. Mr. 
Cunningham was at first a warm supporter of William Jen- 
nings Bryan for the presidency, and while he lost some of 
his admiration for the Nebraskan he always remained loyal 
to the democratic cause. In May, 1902, Mrs. Cunningham 
resumed her connection with her native town, where she has 
continued her work in art and is an active member of the 
Presbyterian Church. She has not cared to exercise her 
right of franchise as a voter, but has raised no objection to 
others voting if they wish to do so. 

William Boggs Anderson was reared in a commercial 
atmosphere, his father being a merchant, but when he en- 
tered upon his serious career adopted agriculture and stock- 
raising as his own pursuits. His education was secured in 
the public schools, and as a young man he taught school for 
a time, but soon abandoned the educational profession for 
the pursuits of the farm and became the owner of valuable 
lands in Randolph and Pendleton counties. He contributed 
much to the development of the several communities in 
which he was located by improving his own estates, and 
liecame known as one of the large operators of Pendleton 
County. Mr. Anderson 's chief stock in cattle was of the 
Hereford strain, and he took particular pride in the pro- 
duction of live stock, constantly seeking to better the breed 
of his herds. While agriculture was his chief concern, he 
also had some exiierience in commercial affairs, having con- 
ducted a hardware store at Franklin for many years. He 
was also one of the directors of the Farmers Bank of Frank- 
lin. Politically he was a stanch democrat and manifested 
a strong interest in polities and political campaigns, being 
often a delegate of his party to conventions. No fraternity 
ever won his favor. He was a member of the board of 
deacons of the Presbyterian Church, and died in that faith 
March 16, 1920. He is survived by a brother, Charles, who 
is a farmer on the South Fork of the South Branch of the 
Potomac River; and four sisters: Mrs. Sallie Cunningham, 
of Franklin; Mrs. J. J. Roberts, of Culpeper, Virginia; 
Miss Alice Anderson, of Franklin; and Mrs. Lucy Headley, 
also of Franklin. One brother, Dt. Walter, died at Franklin 
while engaged in the practice of dentistry. 

At Franklin, December 6, 1899, Mr. Anderson married 
Miss Catherine Dyer, a native of Pendleton County and a 
sister of Dr. Osceola Dyer, of Franklin. She was orphaned 
by the loss of her father when she was a child, and her girl- 
hood was spent at the home of her uncle, John McClure, 
who married Rebecca J. Skidmore, a sister of Mrs. Ander- 
son 's mother. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Anderson: J. McClure, one of the young farmers of the 
Franklin community, who registered for the World war 
but was not called into active service, and he married Miss 
Marguerite Boggs, a daughter of Hugh Boggs; Effie 
Harness, who is a high school student at Franklin; and 
William Dyer, who has just completed his graded school 
work. 

The Anderson home, standing upon a conspicuous site at 
Franklin, was erected by Mr. Anderson, and goes far toward 
teaching the present generation his character and the 
manner of man and citizen he was. 

Chables Franklin Ruttencutteb was born and reared 
in Pleasants County, and since early manhood has been a 
man among men, efficient in bis private business, known for 
bis integrity and wholesome personality, and it was largely 



on the score of his individual character and fitness that he 
was cho-sen to the office of sheriff, which he is now filling. 

Daniel Ruttcncutter, his grandfather, was a native of 
Germany. When he came to America as a young man he 
settled in Tyler County, West Virginia, and after reaching 
there he married a young woman who had come with him 
from Germany on the same ship. From Tyler County he 
moved to Middle Island Creek in Pleasants County. While 
he owned a farm, he was by trade a cabinet maker and one 
of the old time artistic masters of that trade. He madf 
a great deal of hand made furniture, some examples of whicli 
are still in existence, showing not only sturdincss but artistic 
lines. This old couple reared a family of eight children, and 
their descendants comprise the only Ruttencutters in the 
United States. 

Abraham Burkhart Ruttcncutter, father of the sheriff 
was born in Tyler County June 8, 1834, was reared there 
and in Pleasants County, was married in the latter county, 
and since his marriage his home has been at St. Mary's, 
For a number of years he owned and operated a water grist 
mill at Sylvan Mills, for thirty years was proprietor and land- 
lord of the leading hotel of St. Mary's, and eventually con- 
fined his attention to the ownership of a livery business 
He has been retired since 1901, and now, at the age of eighty- 
seven, makes his home with his son Charles F. He served 
a number of terms on the City Council, is a democrat, and 
since boyhood has been an active member of the MethodisI 
Protestant Church. He has for forty years been a membei 
of St. Marys Lodge No. 41, A. F. and A. M., and for twenty 
years has affiliated with St. Marys Lodge No. 22, Inde 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. Abraham B. Ruttencuttei 
married Christine M'atson, who was born on Middle Islanc 
Creek in Pleasants County in 1841 and died at St. Meryi 
in 1896. She was the mother of the following children 
Belle, wife of George W. Hutchinson, of Parkersburg,Wes( 
Virginia, Mr. Hutchinson being a sub-divisional manager foi 
the International Harvester Company, having charge of th( 
agencies of this corporation in a number of counties; Mary 
who died at Covington, Kentucky, in November, 1920, wife 
of John C. Watts, a locomotive engineer with the Louisville 
and Nashville Railroad; John Daniel, superintendent of oi 
leases for a corporation at Tulsa, Oklahoma; Joseph A., £ 
Louisville & Nashville Railway conductor at Covington 
Kentucky; Blanche, wife of John M. Brightwell, a loco 
motive engineer with the Louisville & Nashville Railroad 
with home at Louisville; Bessie, who died in infancy; anc 
Charles F., who is the youngest. 

Charles F. Ruttcncutter who was born at St. Maryi 
August 22, 1881, acquired a high school education in hii 
native city, but at the age of seventeen left school and weni 
to work in the St. Marys oil fields. For fifteen years he wai 
in the oil district, turning his versatile talents to nearly everj 
phase of oil production, and for a time had charge of prac 
tically all the production in Pleasants County for the firn 
of Bennedum & Trees. Mr. Ruttcncutter has been ai 
individual oil producer for the past fifteen years and own; 
some of the productive wells in the St. Marys field. Hii 
chief business interests, however, is the St. Marys flourin( 
mill, which he bought in 1913. This mill is on Washingtoi 
Street and has a capacity of seventy-five barrels per day 
He also owns an ice house near the depot, which suppliei 
St. Marys and vicinity with ice for domestic purposes, anc 
he also has a retail coal business. Mr. Ruttcncutter is i 
stockholder and director in the Pleasants County Bank ol 
St. Marys. 

For several terms he was a member of the City Council 
He was elected high sheriff in November, 1920, and began 
his four year term January 1, 1921. His election was ir 
the nature of a personal triumph. In that year even old 
time democratic strongholds went republican. Pleasants 
County gave the republican ticket an average majority oi 
225, but Mr. Ruttcncutter was chosen sheriff by a margii 
of 125 votes. He is a member of the Baptist Church, assis- 
tant superintendent of the Sunday School, is affiliated witb 
St. Marys Lodge No. 41, A. F. and A. M., Sistersville Chaptei 
No. 27, R. A. M., Mountain State Commandery No. 14, 
K. T., West Virginia Consistory No. 1, Scottish Rite, a( 
Wheeling, St. Marys Chapter No. 31 of the Eastern Star, 
and NemesiB Temple of the Mystic Sbrine at Parkersburg, 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



73 



le also belongs to St. Marys Lodge No. 22, Independent 
)rder of Odd Fellows, and St. Marys Tent No. 20, Knights 
if the Maccabees. During the war Mr. Ruttencutter had 
harge of all the Red Cross drives in his district, and assumed 
he responsibility of seeing that these drives filled the quota 
md was equally interested in the success of the Liberty Loan 
,nd other campaigns. 

Mr. Ruttencutter owns one of the substantial homes of 
)t. Mary's, on Creel Street. He married in 1901 Miss Lida 
Walton, daughter of John and Lida (Le Bearon) Walton, the 
atter now deceased. Her father lives at Pittsburg, is a 
teamboat engineer, and well known among Ohio River men. 
iheriff and Mrs. Ruttencutter have two children. Lucille, 
lorn in December, 1902, is a graduate of the St. Marys High 
School and now a sophomore in West Virginia University. 
iJharles Abraham, born in July, 1907, is a junior in the high 
chool. 

D.4NIEL Pierce Hendrickson, a native of Grant County, 
West Virginia, when young became Clerk of the Courts of 
jrant County, in the year 1880, and served continuously as 
:)Ierk of the Circuit and County Courts of the County until 
Fanuary 1st, 1921. 

He has held several other public offices, and has been 
lonnected with many of the business interests of the 
ounty. 

''. TowNSON Hall was born on a farm on which stands 
oday the thriving village of Auburn, Ritchie County, the 
late of his nativity having been March 13, 1855. It is 
ateresting to record that he is now one the representative 
xponents of farm industry in his native county and that he 
3 president of the Auburn Exchange Bank, to the executive 
rffairs of which he gives much of his time. 

Mr. Hall is a son of E. M. and Tacy J. (Jeffrey) Hall, the 
ormer of whom was born September 1, 1829, and the latter 
i'ebruary 28, 18.3.3, at West Union, Doddridge County. 
D. M. Hall was a boy at the time of his parents' removal to 
litchie County, where his early education was gained in the 
ub.scription schools. His wife was reared and educated 
n Doddridge County, and after their marriage they resided 
or a number of years on a farm in that county. Mr. Hall 
hen became a progressive farmer in Ritchie County, and also 
onducted a general store at Auburn. After selling his store 
le passed the remainder of his life on his farm, he having 
lecome the owner of a fine estate of 200 acres and having 
leen a leader in agricultural and live-stock industry in 
litchie County. He and his wife were zealous members of 
he Baptist Church, in which he was a local minister, and his 
)olitical support was given to the democratic party. Of 
heir fine family of twelve children only three are living in 
922, and of this number the subject of this review is the 
:ldest: William F. is a resident of Fort Collins, Colorado; 
foseph S. is a successful ranchman and banker in the State 
if Colorado; and Tacy. who was the wife of Jerome Brake, 
if Harrisville, Ritchie County, died March 25, 1922. 

J. Townson Hall remained at the parental home until he 
lad attained his legal majority, and in the meanwhile he 
lad made good u.se of his educational advantages, as shown 
ly the fact that he was successfully engaged in teaching in 
he rural schools for four terms. He has continued as a suc- 
essful representative of farm enterprise in his native county 
md is the owner of a well improved farm of 200 acres — the 
lid homestead on which he passed his childhood and youth. 
Be has been actively concerned in the upbuilding of the 
lubstantial business of the Auburn Exchange Bank, of which 
le was one of the organizers and of which he is the president. 
Chough loyal and public-spirited and a staunch advocate of 
he principles of the democratic party, Mr. Hall has had no 
lesire for public office of any kind. He and his wife are 
ictive members of the Baptist Church at Auburn. 

In April, 1877, Mr. Hall wedded Miss Amanda V. Ward, 
vho was born on a farm in the Bonecreek District of Ritchie 
bounty, December 7, 185.3, a daughter of Martin C. and Mary 
r. (Gaston) Ward. Mr. and Mrs. Hall have five children. 
?. Guy who resides with his parents, has one son, Arza, and 
;he maiden name of his wife was Edith Wade. Lyda is the 
ffife of Charles Acklin, and they reside in the State of Colo- 
■ado. They have two children, Theodore and Wesley. Porter 



F. lives on a farm in Colorado. Alma is the wife of James 
Dalton and they also reside on a farm in Colorado. They 
have four children living, Arnold, Herbert, Le Roy and 
Mona. They also had a little daughter, Lola, who was 
drowned at the age of eighteen months. Carr, who married 
Nerdie Bernard, lives in Gilmer County, West Virginia. 

John Gabbiel Jacob. In that unlimited usefulness 
exercised by a newspaper publisher and editor, and only less 
as a business man, John Gabriel Jacob was one of the most 
prominent members of the Jacob family at Wellsburg. The 
pioneer settlement and achievements of the family group 
as a whole are described in other sketches in this publication. 
The American ancestor of the family was John Jacob, Sr., 
who came from the Isle of Wight to Maryland about 1665, 
and who died October 26, 1702. 

John Gabriel Jacob, who was born at Wellsburg, October 1, 
1826, was the oldest son of Samuel and Mary Ann (Shryer) 
Jacob. His father was a farmer, a noted raiser of fine sheep 
and cattle, owning a large farm one half mile east of Wells- 
burg. He was cashier of the Wellsburg National Bank for 
over forty years. 

John G. Jacob was educated in Washington College at 
Washington, Pennsylvania. He graduated with the class 
of 1847, a class somewhat famous on account of the number 
of its members who afterward became prominent, one of 
them being James G. Blaine. Soon after graduation John 

G. Jacob made a trip to New Orleans, floating down the 
Ohio and Mississippi rivers by flat boat loaded with goods 
produced in this section. On reaching New Orleans he sold 
his stock and the flat boat at a good profit and returned by 
steamboat to Wellsburg, after resisting a strong temptation 
to continue his trip to the gold fields of California, where the 
first discoveries had been made and which were attracting 
nearly every young man of adventuresome disposition who 
could get away from the routine of the East. With the pro- 
ceeds of his flat boat venture John G. Jacob purchased a half 
interest in the Wellsburg Transcript, a newspaper then owned 
by Metcalf & Smith. Only a short time later, in 1849, Mr. 
Jacob, with the aid of his father, bought the remainder, chang- 
ing the name to the Wellsburg Herald, under which name he 
edited and published it for nearly fifty years. He was an 
able and fearless writer, and in the period immediately pre- 
ceding the Civil war his editorials had a far reaching influence. 
He was an ardent abolitionist, and his editorials in a news- 
paper published in slave territory were widely copied. 
Through his newspaper he had much to do with molding 
sentiment and holding the people of his section loyal to the 
Union. 

John G. Jacob as an editor warmly espoused the cause of 
Abraham Lincoln as candidate for the President, and was a 
delegate to the convention at Chicago which nominated the 
great emancipator in 1860. He served on the committee 
on credentials as the representative of the Virginia delega- 
tion. He was a supporter of all public improvements, 
especially of the substantial sort, and could always be found 
on the right side on all moral questions. He was an early 
advocate of prohibition of the manufacture and sale of 
intoxicating liquors, and for many years his paper bore at 
the head of its editorial column the inscription "An Inde- 
pendent Republican Newspaper favoring prohibition." 

In 1895 Mr. Jacob relinquished active control of the 
Herald, turning it over to his son and retiring to his suburban 
home, but still retaining his active intere.st in local affairs as 
well as in the broader affairs of the state and nation. 

In October, 1903, at the age of seventy-seven, Mr. Jacob 
died from an attack of pneumonia, and two days later his 
remains were laid beside those of his beloved wife, who had 
preceded him in death just ten days before. 

Carl Kellet Jacob, Wellsburg lawyer and former mem- 
ber of the West Virginia Legislature, is one of the younger 
representatives of this distinguished family of the Upper 
Panhandle of the state. He is a grandson of Samuel Jacob, 
who was born in 1802 and lived in Wellsburg from the age 
of sixteen. In 1832 the Wellsburg Bank was organized as 
a branch of the old Bank of Northwestern Virginia, and he 
became its cashier and served in that capacity for over 
forty years, being with the institution when it acquired one 



74 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



of the first national charters in the state. While his interests 
were centered in the bank, he made his home on his farm a 
mile from Wellsburg. Rose Hill farm comprised six hundred 
acres, and was the breeding ground of Merino sheep and 
Shorthorn cattle. He died there in 1884, at the age of 
eighty-two. 

Samuel Jacob married Mary Ann Shryer, and they were the 
parents of three sons. A separate sketch appears of the oldest, 
John G. Jacob, the veteran publisher of the Wellsburg 
Herald. The youngest was Zachariah, who was cashier of 
the Wellsburg National Bank until his death in 1905. 

The second son was Daniel F. Jacob, who was born at 
Wellsburg June 15, 1832, and lived all his life in that city, 
where he died July 31, 1921, when in his ninetieth year. Quite 
early in his career he took part of his father's stock farm, 
became owner of most of it, and lived there, continuing the 
breeding and raising of sheep as long as that was a profitable 
industry. He was a republican, never held a public office, 
and was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. He married Lydia Kelley, who died when her 
youngest son, Carl Kelley, was an infant. There were two 
other sons, Samuel, who died at the age of eighteen, and 
Daniel F., Jr., who is still at the old homestead. 

Carl Kelley Jacob was born near West Liberty, West 
Virginia, and he was reared by his aunt, Susan Jacob, on the 
old farm. He graduated from Washington and Jefferson 
College with the class of 1895, received his law degree at West 
Virginia University in 1899, and has been one of the busy attor- 
neys at Wellsburg for over twenty years. He has served as city 
solicitor since 1904. He is a director and chairman of the 
finance committee of the Wellsburg National Bank, an insti- 
tution in which the family had been interested since it was 
started in 1832. Mr. Jacob in 1907 served as a member of 
the State Legislature, representing Brooke County, and 
among other committees was a member of the cities and 
towns committee. 

He married Miss Bertha Jones, daughter of William Jones, 
of Wheeling. Their three children are: Bettie, Helen and 
Bertha. 

William Pinckney Haller though only forty years of 
age has had an almost continuous association and worked 
in connection with the coal niinini; and other industrial 
affairs of Southern West Virginia for nearly thirty years. 
He is especially well known in Mercer County, being auditor 
of the Matoaka Electric Power Company, of the Pawania. 
the Algonquin and Wright Coal Companies, his home and 
business headquarters being in the village of Matoaka. 

Mr. Haller was born at Huntington, West Virginia, Fol> 
ruary 5, 1882, son of William .T. and Margaret (Hat- 
field) Haller. His father, who died in 1912 at the age 
of fifty-eight, entered the employ of the Chesapeake and 
Ohio Railroad Company as a young man in the cai)acity 
of telegraph operator at Hawk's Nest. Subsequently he 
joined the motive power department, was promoted to 
master mechanic, and at intervals served in that capacity 
at Richmond, Huntington and Cincinnati. For a time he 
was master mechanic of the Illinois Central Railroad with 
headquarters at Memphis. William J. Haller was a demo- 
crat in politics, for many years enjoyed membership in 
the Masonic fraternity and belongs to the Pi-otestant 
Episcopal Church. He was born at Wytheville, Virginia, 
son of Dr. William P. Haller. Mrs. Margaret (Hatfield) 
Haller was born at Barboursville, West Virginia, and 
continues to reside at Huntington. She is an earnest 
communicant of the Protestant Episcopal Church. Of her 
three living children the oldest is John J., an employe 
of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad Company at Hunt- 
ington. The only daughter is Mrs. W. T. Smith of Hunt- 
ington. 

William P. Haller acquired his public school educa- 
tion at Huntington and Kenova, West Virginia, and at 
Memphis, Tennessee. When he was twelve years old he 
went to work in the oflSces of the Norfolk and Western 
Railroad at Kenova. A year later he was assigned to 
clerical work in the coal fields. For a time he had charge 
of supplies for the Pond Cre*k and Island Creek Coal 
Companies, during the period of construction work in 
1908. Since 1915 his home has been at Matoaka. In addi- 
tion to being auditor of tlie Matoaka Electric Power Com- 



pany and the coal company above mentioned, he is asso 
ciated with the Mutual Building & Investment Company 
the Odd Fellows Building Corporation and the Matoaki 
Cemetery Company. He has served as secretary-treasure 
of the Matoaka Board of Trade and the Matoaka Busines 
Men's Club, and in 1919, he gave a very vigorous an( 
progressive administration as mayor of this little industria 
city. 

Sir. Haller is a democrat, is a member of the Protes 
tant Episcopal Church, and is affiliated with Bailey Lodgi 
No. 137, F. and A. M. at Rock, West Virginia, he being i 
Royal Arch Mason, a nicmlicr of Athens Chapter No. 2( 
Athens, West Virginia, is a past chancellor commande: 
and keeper of records and seals of the Knights of Pythiai 
and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellowi 
and the Loyal Order of Moose. 

In 1909 he married Miss Marie Tuma Curtin, daughter o: 
Patrick Curtin of Wytheville, Virginia. They have om 
son and three daughters. 

August N. Powers. One of the interesting industrie 
of West Virginia is the St. Marys Pearl Button Companj 
located in Pleasants County. The superintendent of thi 
industry is August N. Powers, who has had a wide experienc 
in gathering the raw material and in manufacturing pea: 
button stock, and came to West Virginia from his nativ 
state of Indiana. He was born at Rockport, Indiana. Angus 
17, 1887. In the paternal line his ancestry originated i 
England and settled in old Virginia in Colonial times. Hi 
grandfather, Isaac Newton Powers, was born in Virginia i 
1833, but spent nearly all his active life as a farmer in Warric 
and Spencer counties in Southern Indiana. He serve 
throughout the Civil war on the Union side. He died a 
Tennyson, Indiana, in 1905. His son, William Powers, wa 
born in Warrick County in 1865, lived during his youth i 
that and in Spencer County, and then went to Rockporl 
Indiana, where he married and for many years owned an< 
operated a grist mill and a grocery store. He has live^ 
retired since 1909. In politics he is a democrat. Williar 
Powers married Pauline Kline, who was born in New Yor! 
City in 1869. They have two children, August N. an( 
Elizabeth Hannah. The latter is the wife of Stanley I 
Murray, owner of a button factory at Rockport, Indiana 
but widely known all over the United States for his breedin; 
kennels, where he breeds full blooded Pointers. 

August N. Powers was educated at Rockport, attendin: 
the high school during the Junior year. He left school i) 
1906 and for five seasons played professional ba.seball. H 
was a star pitcher in the Virginia League. Kansas State Leagu 
and Blue Grass League. For one year he did work with i 
surveying crew in Indiana, and then became associated witl 
the Dalton Adding Machine Company in the milling and drill 
ing department at Poplar Bluff, Missouri. After a year am 
a half in the factory lie spent another year in Cincinnati fo 
the same firm. 

Mr. Powers took up the button industry in 1915 with th( 
Harvey Chalmers & Sons Company. He was on the roa( 
as purchaser of raw material for this company a year and i 
half, traveling out of Rockport, Indiana, and covering th 
principal sources of supply through Southern Illinois, Southeri 
Indiana, Western Kentucky and portions of Tennessee 
Following that for six months Mr. Powers conducted a buttoi 
factory of his own at Rockport, Indiana, and in 1917 cami 
to St. Marys, West Virginia, to accept his post as superin 
tendent of the Pearl Button Company. The plant and office^ 
of this company are in the north end of town, along the Balti 
more & Ohio Railway. Gathering their raw materials fron 
a large section of country, they manufacture pearl buttoi 
blanks, which are shipped entirely to button factories a 
Amsterdam, New York. A valuable by-product is crushet 
shells for poultry and agricultural lime, and this materia 
is shipped all over the United States. It is a business em 
ploying a hundred and ten hands, and is one of the promineni 
assets of St. Marys industrial prosperity. 

Mr. Powers votes as a democrat, is a trustee of the Pres- 
byterian church, is a member of the Independent Order ol 
Foresters at St. Marys, St. Marys Chapter No. 31 of th< 
Eastern Star, and at Rockport, Indiana, has membership it 
Spencer Lodge No. 112, F. and A. M., Rockport Lodge 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Encampment 



HISTOEY OP WEST VIKQINIA 



75 



degree and the Rebekahs. He is a member of the Commercial 
Travelers of Utica, New York, and is first vice president of 
St. Marys Board of Trade. 

In 1917, at Rockport, Mr. Powers married Miss Estella 
Pearl Connor, daughter of Charles C. and Anna (McDaniel) 
Connor, residents of Rockport, where her father is super- 
intendent of the Rockport Pearl Button Company. Mr 
and Mrs. Powers have one daughter, Dorothy Connor, born 
Julys, 1921. 

Richard Ashville Farland is a Clarksburg banker 
cashier of the West Virginia Bank, and to that line of busi- 
ness he has devoted his youth and adult manhood. Apart 
from the value of the work he does and has done his name 
serves to recall one of the most historic families in this section 
of the state. 

He was born in Clarksburg February 22, 18S0. His father, 
Joseph T. Farland, and his grandfather, Zebulon S. Farland, 
were both natives of Tappahannock, Virginia, where Joseph 
was born July 19, 1849. As a young man he came to Clarks- 
burg, and on October 20, 1875, in Christ Episcopal Church 
of that city, married Mary Thorne, and a few years later 
began his permanent residence in the city. Joseph T. 
Farland built up a prosperous coal business, and was head 
of the Farland Coal and Coke Company. He continued in 
this business until his death, on December 11, 1892. 

Mrs. Mary (Thorne) Farland, still living, was born at 
Wilsonburg, Harrison County, October 4, 1857, daughter 
of Ashville B. and Margaret (Wilson) Thorne. Her mother 
was a daughter of Josiah Davisson and Mary (Martin) 
Wilson, and a granddaughter of Col. Benjamin Wilson. 
Col. Benjamin Wilson served as an aide-de-camp, with the 
rank of lieutenant,, to Lord Dunmore in the expedition against 
the Shawnee Indians in 1774, and during the Revolutionary 
war was a captain in 1777-8 and a colonel in 1787 of force.-^ 
engaged against the Indians on the frontier. Colonel Wilson 
built and maintained what is known as Wilson's Fort in 
Tygart's Valley. He was author of the historj- entitled 
"Lord Dunmore's War." His distinctions did not end with 
his military service, since he was a member of the Virginia 
Assembly in 1783-4-5-6, and a delegate to the Virginia con- 
vention in 1788 which ratified the United States Constitu- 
tion. Again, from 1790 to 1794, he was a soldier in the 
Federal service for the protection of the frontier settlers 
against the Indians. 

Ashville B. Thorne, maternal grandfather of the Clarks- 
burg banker, was born in Monongalia County, Virginia, non- 
West Virginia, August 8, 1826, and died at Clarksburg 
November 19, 1913, in his eighty-eighth year. His wife, 
Margaret Wilson, was born at Wilsonburg in Harrison 
County January 13, 1829, and died at Clarksburg November 
20, 1920. She was the last survivor of the original Wilsons 
of Harrison County. 

Joseph T. and Mary (Thorne) Farland were active mem- 
bers of Christ Episcopal Church of Clarksburg, and reared 
their children in the same faith. These children were three 
in number: Frances F., who married Charles R. Powell, of 
New York City; Richard A.; and Margaret Elizabeth, wife 
of Clair P. Sutter, of Clarksburg. 

Richard A. Farland, who on account of his maternal 
incestry is a member of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, acquired a good common school education during 
liis boyhood, attended West Virginia University two years, 
ind gave up the idea of completing a university career because 
jf the shortage of funds, which made it advisable for him to 
50 to work. Soon afterward he became an errand boy in 
the old Traders National Bank of Clarksburg. When the 
Union National Bank was organized by the consolidation of 
the Traders National and Peoples Banking & Trust Company, 
Mr. Farland continued with the new bank and was in its 
service until October 1, 1909. At that date he began his 
iuties as cashier of the West Virginia Bank of Clarksburg, 
» position he holds today. The only interruption to his 
sxperience as a banker came in the period between October, 
1900, and January, 1902, when he was credit man for Arm- 
itrong, Crislip, Day & Company, wholesale grocers of Clarks- 
burg. 

Mr. Farland is a member of Hermon Lodge No. 6, A. F and 
\. M., Clarksburg, West Virginia, and a member of Clarks- 



burg Lodge No. 482, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
of which he is treasurer. He has been treasurer of the Clarks- 
burg Chamber of Commerce, and has acted as treasurer 
for the local Salvation Army organization. On July 24, 
1913, Mr. Farland married Mies Grace Simpson, a daughter 
of Irwin and Mary (Sutter) Simpson, of Punxsutawney, 
Pennsylvania. They have one son, Joseph S. Farland, born 
August 11, 1914. Mr. and Mrs. Farland are members of 
Christ Episcopal Church. 

Dan B. Fleming was in the ranks of West Virginia's 
educators for twelve or fifteen years, and resigned as city 
superintendent of schools at St. Marys to become cashier of 
the Pleasants County Bank. 

Mr. Fleming was born at Ravenswood in Jackson County, 
West Virginia, November 15, 1885. The Flemings are of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry, and his grandfather, Bartholomew- 
Fleming, settled at Ravenswood in 1820. He was a native 
of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. He spent his active 
career at Ravenswood, where he established a ferry and was 
one of the first merchants. His wife was Hannah Warth, 
who was born near Ravenswood and died there. They were 
the parents of six children: Oscar, who became a farmer and 
died in Meigs County, Ohio; George P., a retired wharf 
master at Ravenswood; Miss Carrie, of Ravenswood; Mrs 
Emma Polsene, a widow living at Ravenswood; Henry C; 
and Winfield S., a general contractor in Denver, Colorado. 

Henry C. Fleming was born at Ravenswood June 30, 
1845, and has spent all his life there. For many years he 
has been the leading photographer in that section of the 
state. He was for several terms a member of the City 
Council, is a democrat, a member of the Masonic fraternity 
and a supporting leader in the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. Henry C. Fleming married Lillian Rhodes, who was 
born at Cottageville, Jackson County, in 1851. She is the 
mother of three children: The oldest, Jessie, is the wife of 
Max E. Polsene, a musician at Ravenswood; James is in the 
internal revenue service at Parkersburg; and Dan B. is the 
youngest. 

Dan B. Fleming graduated from the Ravenswood High 
School in 1904. He subsequently spent a winter term in 
Marietta College of Ohio, and for two years taught in Ravens- 
wood, spent one year in the schools of Mason County, and in 
1910 graduated from JMarshall College, the State Normal at 
Huntington. Following his graduating Mr. Fleming was 
teacher of mathematics and science in the high school of 
St. Marys one year, was then elected and served four years 
as principal of the high school, and was next promoted to 
superintendent of city schools and had charge of the admin- 
istration of the city school system until 1920. 

In January, 1921, Mr. Fleming was elected cashier of the 
Pleasants County Bank. This bank was established in 
1897, being opened for business on March 17th. The first 
president was Newton Ogden, who afterward was state 
treasurer of West Virginia; the first cashier was Mr. Isaac 
Reynolds. This bank has a capital of seventy-five thousand 
dollars, surplus and profits of twenty thousand dollars, and 
deposits approximating five hundred thousand dollars. The 
bank is under a state charter and has occupied its modern 
bank home, a structure of stone and brick, since 1901. The 
present officers of the bank are: O. C. Barkwill, president; 
P. S. Tarbox, of Oil City, Pennsylvania, vice president; 
Dan B. Fleming, cashier; Evert L. Burk, assistant cashier; 
while the directors are O. C. Barkwill; C. F. Ruttencutter, 
sheriff of Pleasants County; Dan H. Reynolds of Parkers- 
burg; Dr. George H. Gale of Newport, Ohio; E. H. Morgan, 
C. C. Schauwecker, George Phillips and T. J. Taylor of St. 
Marys, and Lou Wells of Bens Run, West Virginia. 

During the last years of his educational work Mr. Fleming 
was, during the summers of 1919-20, superintendent for the 
Redpath Chautauqua Bureau, covering Kentucky, Ohio, 
Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Illinois and Wisconsin. During 
war time he was secretary of the Pleasants County Chapter 
of the Red Cross, made many speeches throughout the 
county in behalf of all the auxiliary war organizations, and 
gave much of his time to this patriotic duty. Mr. Fleming is 
a democrat, is a trustee and steward of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South, and is affiliated with St. Marys Lodge 
No. 41. A F. and A. M., Sistersville Chapter No. 27, R. A. M., 



76 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



West Virginia Consistory No. 1 of the Scottish Rite at Wheel- 
ing, Nemesis Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Parlcersburg, and 
St. Marys Tent No. 20, Knights of the Maccabees. Mr. 
Fleming built his new home on Fourth Street in 1921. He 
married in St. Marys August 2, 1914, Miss Ruth Sayre, 
daughter of Edward A. and Ella (Gist) Sayre, residents 
of St. Marys. Her father was formerly cashier of the Pleas- 
ants County Bank and one of its organizers. Mrs. Fleming 
is a graduate of the local high school. They have one daugh- 
ter, Katherine Eleanor, born May 11, 1915. 

Jesse Earle Rilet, superintendent of city schools of 
St. Marys, was at one time probably the youngest teacher in 
West Virginia, qualifying for his first school when he was 
only fifteen. He has been alternately a student and teacher 
ever since, is a Master of Arts from Bucknell University, 
and has an enviable record as a teacher and school admin- 
istrator. 

Mr. Riley was born in Taylor County, West Virginia, 
near Bridgeport, March 27, 1888. In the same vicinity was 
born his father, James Riley, in October, 1848, and the 
grandfather also bore the name James and was born in old 
Virginia in 1828. The Rileys came from Ireland and were 
Colonial settlers in Virginia. James Riley, Sr., as a young 
man moved to the vicinity of Bridgeport, was married there, 
and lived his life as a successful farmer. He died in 1913. 
James Riley, Jr., learned a mechanical trade, but for the 
greater part of his active life owned and managed an extensive 
farm near Bridgeport and since 1921 has lived retired at 
Shinnston in Harrison County. He is a democrat, and a 
very active member of the Baptist Church. He married 
Louisa Withers, who was born in old Virginia in November, 
1850. Their family consisted of eight children: Effie, wife 
of Jonah Currey, a flour miller at Bridgeport; Leola, who 
died at Enterprise, West Virginia, in 1909, aged thirty-five, 
wife of Jesse Anderson, a farmer near Boothsville, West 
Virginia; Charles, a farmer who died near Bridgeport in 1908, 
at the age of thirty-three; Leonard, a mechanic and contractor 
at Shinnston; Marion, a general contractor at Shinnston; 
Ora, wife of Minor Currey, who is in the lumber business at 
Shinnston; Jesse Earle; and Truman, a general contractor at 
Bridgeport. 

Jesse Earle Riley attended the rural schools of Taylor 
County, graduated from Broaddus Institute, then located at 
Clarksburg, with the class of 1909, and received his A. B. 
degree from Bucknell University at Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, 
in 1914, and won his Master of Arts degree from the same 
institution in 1916. He was a member of the Kappa Sigma 
fraternity at Bucknell. During 1915 Mr. Riley also took 
special work in history and economics in West Virginia Uni- 
versity at Morgantown. As a youth of fifteen he was ap- 
pointed to preside over a rural school in Taylor County, 
and taught in rural districts four years. In 1914 he became 
an instructor in Latin and registrar of Broaddus Institute, 
remaining there a year. For two years he was teacher of 
science in the high school of Portsmouth, Ohio, then super- 
intendent of schools at Harrisville, West Virginia, two years, 
principal of the high school of New Martinsville two years, 
and in June, 1921, came to his present duties as superin- 
tendent of city schools of St. Marys. St. Marys has a well 
organized school system, there being six schools, a staff of 
twenty-five teachers, and a scholarship enrollment of seven 
hundred. 

Mr. Riley is a member of the West Virginia State Educa- 
tional Association, and during the war had an effective part 
in stimulating patriotism and teaching Americanism in the 
schools and was also a worker in the various war drives at 
Harrisville. He is a democrat in politics, a member of the 
Baptish Church, and is affiliated with Shinnston Lodge No. 
24, F. and A. M. Mr. Riley is a stockholder in the Riley 
& Riley Company, general building contractors at Shinns- 
ton, an organization in which the active members are his 
brothers, previously mentioned. 

At Washington, D. C, in 1917 Mr. Riley married Miss 
Ethel Heiter, daughter of James O. and Daisy (Kleckner) 
Heiter, residents of Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Riley 
is a graduate of the Domestic Science Department of Bucknell 
University, and for one year before her marriage was dietitian 
in the university. The three sons of Mr. and Mrs. Riley 



are William, born July 27, 1918, John Warren, born Februar 
3, 1920, and Ellwood Withers, born November 20, 1921. 

Henry S. Smith is vice president of the First Nations 
Bank of Richwood, Nicholas County, in which city he i 
also superintendent of the Cherry Kiver Boom & Lumbe 
Company, one of the important industrial corporations o 
this section of the state. 

Mr. Smith was born in the State of Maryland, Septembt 
15, 1874, and is a son of Dr. Albert H. and Agnes I 
(Bradley) Smith, the former of whom was born in the Stal 
of New York, in 1836, and the latter of whom was born i 
the State of Delaware, where she was reared and where h« 
early educational advantages included those of Newai 
Academy. Dr. Albert H. Smith was reared on a farm i 
the old Empire State and received his early education in tl 
common schools of the period. He was a youth when 1 
became a resident of Delaware, where he took a full court 
and prepared himself for the dental profession. After h 
marriage he established himself in practice at Rising Sui 
Maryland, and there he continued in the successful practii 
of lus profession until within two years prior to his deat' 
which occurred in 1920, his wife having passed away i 
1897. Of their four children the eldest is George A., wl 
is treasurer of the Baker-Whiteley Coal Company at Bait 
more, Maryland; A. Bradley, a printer by trade and voci 
tion, is in the employ of the great Curtis Publishing Con 
pany in the City of Philadelphia; M. Adeline, whose deal 
occurred in 1919, was a graduate of the Friends Norm; 
Institute at Rising Sun, Maryland. 

Henry S. Smith, the last in order of birth in the fami 
of four children, was reared at Rising Sun, Marylan 
where he supplemented the discipline of. the public schoo 
by a course of study in the Friends Normal Institute, £ 
excellent institution conducted under the auspices of tl 
Society of Friends. In the autumn of 1888 he assumed tl 
position of stenographer and bookkeeper in the offices i 
the Susquehanna Water Power & Paper Company, wii 
which corporation he continued his connection until Jul 
1897, when he entered the employ of the Beaver Creek Lui 
ber Company at Davis, Tucker County, West Virginia. ] 
1902 he resigned his position with this company and r 
moved to Richwood, where he became paymaster for tl 
Cherry River Boom & Lumber Company, he having bei 
advanced in 1911 to the office of assistant superintender 
and the year 1920 having recorded his promotion to h 
present responsible office, that of superintendent. 

Mr. Smith is known and honored as one of the loy 
and progressive citizens of Richwood, and he has given effe 
five service in local offices of trust. He was city record 
two terms, has given several years of service as a memb 
of the auditing committee of the city government, and h 
been for ten years a member of the Board of Educatio 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party, ai 
in the Masonic fraternity his affiliations are with Richwo( 
Lodge No. 122, A. F. and A. M., of which he is a pa 
master; Richwood Chapter No. 97, R. A. M., of which 1 
is a past high priest; Sutton Commandery No. 16, Knigh 
Templar; and Beni-Kedem Temple of the Mystic Shrine 
the City of Charleston. Mrs. Smith, her two daughters ai 
the elder son hold membership in the Presbyterian Church 
Richwood. 

On the 16th of October, 1900, was solemnized the ma 
riage of Mr. Smith and Miss Flora L. Collins, who was bo: 
and reared in Hampshire County, West Virginia, and tl 
children of this union are four in number: Mildred j 
and Dorothy O. graduated from the Richwood High Scho 
and are, in 1922, pursuing higher studies in a school 
Beechwood, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania; William A. is 
the sixth grade of the public schools at Richwood, ai 
Henry Bradley is the youngest of the number. 

Newton Jasper Keadle, the genial and popular pos 
master of the City of Williamson, Mingo County, is fami 
arly known as "Doc" Keadle, and has been an influenti 
figure in Mingo County from the time of its creation 
1895, Governor McCorkle having appointed him the fii 
sheriff of the new county and the ensuing popular electii 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



77 



having retained him in the office, in which he served aix 
consecutive years. 

Mr. Keadle was bom at Madison, Boone County, West 
Virginia (then Virginia), on the 27th of April, 1860, and 
is a son of Maj. Jamea W. and Harriet B. (Kessinger) 
Keadle, his father having been a major in the Confederate 
service in the Civil war, in which he was captured, and was 
held as a Union prisoner at Fort Delaware. His death in 
1865 resulted from illness contracted while in the army, 
and his widow having died in 1869, their son Newton .1. 
was doubly orphaned when a mere boy. The old home of 
the parents was in what is now Monroe County, West Vir- 
ginia. 

After the death of his mother the present postmaster of 
Williamson was taken into the home of one of his aunts 
at Welston, Jackson County, Ohio, where he remained and 
attended school until he was fourteen years of age. There- 
after he was employed on farms and around the blast fur- 
naces in that section of Ohio until his return to his native 
town, where he learned the printer's trade in the office of 
the Coal Eiver Eecord. In 1887 he established the Logan 
Democrat at Logan, judicial center of the county of that 
name, and he continued as editor and publisher of this 
paper one year. He served also as city marshal of Logan, 
and while a resident of that place became also a local offi- 
cial in the internal revenue service. Upon the erection and 
organization of the new county of Mingo, formerly a part 
of Logan County, Mr. Keadle was appointed its first sher- 
iff, as previously noted, and after his retirement from 
this office he was elected county tax assessor, in which posi- 
tion he served three and one-half years. He then resigned 
to take the appointment as postmaster of Williamson, the 
county seat, in 1910, under the administration of President 
Taft. lie continued his service as postmaster until after 
the election of President Wilson, when he was succeeded 
by a democratic incumbent. Thereafter he served as state 
probation officer until the resumption of re|)ub!ican adminis- 
tration of the Government, when he was reappointed post- 
master at Williamson, in 1921. His present administration 
is proving as efficient and popular as did his former regime 
in this office, and more than this need not be said. Mr. 
Keadle has been steadfast and loyal in his allegiance to the 
republican party, and has been prominent in its councils 
in this section of the state. He was active in support of 
the various patriotic movements in the World war period, 
and gave four of his sons to the nation's service in that 
connection. He and his wife are active members of the 
Baptist Church in their home city. 

In 1889 Mr. Keadle wedded Miss Lucy Miller, who was 
born in Logan County, this state, a daughter of Judge 
Miller, who was a leading lawyer and jurist in that county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Keadle became the parents of a fine family 
of ten children, all of whom are living: Eoy H. entered 
the nation's aviation service shortly after the tlnited States 
became involved in the World war. He was transferred to 
the American Relief Administration and was on the battle 
lines in Prance, caring for and assisting in the removal of 
wounded soldiers, his headquarters having been in the 
City of Paris and his service having covered a period of 
twenty-two months. After the World war he became a 
clerk at the Williamson Post Office. Okey P., an attorney 
in the office of a leading law firm of Williamson, went 
overseas with the Pittsburgh Railway Construction Regi- 
ment, which established headquarters at Tours, France. 
Mingo P. became a member of the Tlnited States Heavy 
Coast Artillery and was stationed on Fisherman's Island 
in Chesapeake Bay. Alonzo received his preliminary train- 
ing at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, received commis- 
sion as first lieutenant, was later promoted a captain and 
was then assigned to duty to Company B, Three Hundred 
and Seventeenth Infantry, in connection with the accept- 
ing of troops for overseas service. He is now captain in 
the West Virginia Militia. Emmet, eldest of the sons, is 
deputy sheriff of Mingo County. John S., the youngest 
son, is attending the public schools. There are four daugh- 
ters: Lucy is employed in the First National Bank of 
Williamson ; Katharine is a teacher in the public schools of 
this city; and Mary and Virginia are still attending school. 



Reese G. Bailey has become one of the influential fig- 
ures in the coal-mining industry in Mingo County, and, 
with headquarters at Williamson, the county seat, he is 
president of the BaUey Pond Creek Coal Company and the 
Bailey Thacker Coal Company, the mine of the former 
company being on Pond Creek in Pike County, Kentucky, 
one mile distant from Williamson. The mining operations 
of the BaUey Thacker Coal Company are carried on within 
the corporate limits of Williamson. 

Mr. Bailey claims the historic Old Dominion State as 
the place of his nativity and is a representative of families 
there founded many generations ago. He was born on his 
father 's farm in Tazewell County, Virginia, February 15, 
1877, and his parents, George C. and Eliza C. (Gillespie) 
Bailey now reside in the City of Richmond, that state, the 
father having retired after many years of successful asso- 
ciation with farm industry and the tanning business. 
George C. Bailey is now (1922) seventy-eight years of age 
and his wife sixty-eight, both being members of the Meth- 
odist Church. Mr. Bailey gave four years of loyal service 
as a Confederate soldier in the Civil war, since the close of 
which he has continuously given his allegiance to the re- 
publican party. Of their ten children all are living except 
one, the subject of this sketch having been the second in 
order of birth. 

The public schools of his native county afforded Reese G. 
Bailey his early education, which included a course in the 
Tazewell High School, which he attended until he was 
nineteen years of age. Thereafter he was in the employ 
of the United States Bridge Company, his service being in 
connection with the construction of the crib or wooden 
work on bridges erected for the Norfolk & Western Rail- 
road. He continued in the employ of this company nine 
years and did much work in connection with the extension of 
the lines of the Norfolk & Western into the coal fields of 
West Virginia, his final service having been in the capacity 
of bridge foreman. Mr. Bailey next became actively asso- 
ciated with coal mining, and for six years was a contractor 
in getting out coal for the Springton Coal Company on 
Widemouth Creek, near Matoaka, Mercer County. As a 
contractor for the American Coal Company he passed the 
ensuing eleven years in coal production on Cram Creek, 
Mercer County. During this latter period he was also en- 
gaged successfully in contract mine-construction work. In 
1919 Mr. Bailey transferred his field of operations and 
came to the Mingo District, where he purchased the busi- 
ness and property of the Black Diamond By-product Coal 
Company. Later he organized the two companies of which 
he is now president, and both are in successful production 
of coal. In the World war period Mr. Bailey served as a 
member of the United States Fuel Administration, and was 
influential in creating a large production of coal — a work 
of major importance in that climacteric period. His eldest 
son, W. Gruver Bailey, entered the United States Army in 
June, 1919, and is serving in the coast artillery at the 
present time. Mr. Bailey is a progressive and liberal citi- 
zen, takes active interest in public affairs in his home county 
and city, and is a staunch advocate of the principles of the 
republican party. 

In the year 1896 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Bailey and Miss May Hawkins, daughter of Thomas Hawk- 
ins, of Tazewell County, Virginia, and the children of this 
union are four sons and four daughters. The attractive 
family home, known for its generous hospitality, is in the 
City of Williamson. 

Edmund A. Starling. The experience and viewpoint of 
the practical miner belong to Edmund A. Starling, though 
his apprenticeship in the humbler roles was remarkably 
short. For a number of years he has been one of the very 
efficient mine superintendents in Eastern Kentucky and 
Southern West Virginia. 

Mr. Starling is now general superintendent of the Guyau 
Mining Company at Wilbum in Logan County. He has 
charge of the operations in four seams, the two upper seams 
being mines No. one and two of the Island Creek, and the 
lower seams No. one and two of the Eagle mines. These 
mines are situated on the west bank of the Guyandotte 



78 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



Kiver, and 500 feet of belting conveys the coal over the river 
to the tipple. The average output of the mines is 1000 
tons daLy, but the capacity is 3000 tons. Mr. Starling took 
charge of these mines in April, 1921. 

He was born at Louisville, Kentucky, September 11, 1887, 
son of Judge Edmond A., Sr., and Mariam (Gallagher) 
Starling. His father was a native of Hockinsville, Ken- 
tucky, and his mother of Louisville. E. A. Starling, Sr., 
who died in 1912, at the age of fifty-two, was a coal operator 
at Pineville in Bell County, Kentucky, and built the first 
coke oven there. He was a pioneer in the coal production 
of Eastern Kentucky, moving to Pineville from Louisville. 
He served as county judge of Bell County, and was active 
in politics both there and in Louisville, being a republican. 
He was vice president of the Mingo Coal and Coke Company 
at Middlesboro, Kentucky. He was a member of the Episco- 
pal Church and a Mason and Elk. Mrs. E. A. Starling is 
an unusually able business woman, and has given particular 
evidence of that ability since the death of her husband. 
She owns a chain of eighteen dairy lunch rooms in Pitts- 
burgh. Besides her son Edmund A. there is a daughter, 
Shirley, wife of Carl A. Simmon, who is chief engineer for 
the Westinghouse Company of Pittsburgh. 

Edmund A. Starling acquired a high school education at 
Louisville, and took special work in civil and mining engin- 
eering at Saint Mary 's College at Saint Mary 's, Kentucky. 
At the age of eighteen he left school to go to work in the 
mines of Eastern Kentucky, at Yellow Creek in Bell County. 
His first work was greasing cars at fifty cents a day, and 
he worked as trapper boy for seventy-five cents a day. He 
drove mules in the mines, worked on the tipple, loaded coal, 
operated machinery and motors, and in the course of a few 
years had graduated into the responsibilities of mine super- 
intendent and mine owner. During the World war he 
owned and operated mines in Bell County and subsequently 
became manager of the Elkhorn Coal Corporation 's proper- 
ties at Fleming in Letcher County. From there he came 
to West Virginia. While in Kentucky he opened the mines 
of the Wisconsin Steel Company at Benham in Harlan 
County. 

Mr. Starling married Miss Lula Shisler, daughter of 
Judge Lenoard Shisler, of Pineville, Kentucky. They were 
married in 1912. Mrs. Starling is a Methodist, while Mr. 
Starling is a member of the Episcopal Church and is affili- 
ated with the Elks Lodge. He is an independent in politics. 

The Eagle Manufacturing Company is to be recorded 
as one of the important and well ordered industrial concerns 
of the state and is located at Wellsburg, Brooke County, the 
business having been established in 1894 and the company 
having been incorporated under the present title in 1897. 
In 1894, attracted by the abundant supply of natural gas to 
be found at Wellsburg, Harry W. Paull, now president of the 
company, here began manufacturing operations with a mod- 
est plant that was a subsidiary of the Wheeling Stamping 
Company. Within a short period Mr. Paull became as- 
sociated with his two brothers, James and Samuel O., in the 
purchase of the plant and business, and at the time of the 
ineorijoration of the company Cliarles B. Ott, of Wheeling, 
became actively identified with the business, he having since 
continued as vice president of the company, of which James 
Paull is treasurer and Samuel O. Paull secretary. The per- 
sonnel of the official corps remained unchanged from the 
time of the incorporation until W. C. Jacob, of Wellsburg, 
became associated in the business as assistant secretary of 
the company. He is a son of the late J. G. Jacob, one of the 
pioneer newspaper editors of West Virginia. W. C. Jacob 
married Elizabeth Paull, a sister of the PauU brothers 
of the Eagle Manufacturing Company. 

In the initial period of operation, employment was given 
to a force of about thirty-five men, and the output was 
confined exclusively to glass linings for Mason fruit-jar 
caps, or liners. The plant at the beginning was in a build- 
ing 150 feet square, the same having been erected for the 
purpose to which it was thus applied. The great manufac- 
turing plant of this progressive corporation now covers 
about 1% city blocks, additions to the same having been 



made from time to time, in consonance with the conseeutiv 
expansion of the business. About one-half of the building 
are three or four stories in height, the floor space coverei 
approximating 300,000 square feet. 

The company is now engaged in the manufacture o 
illuminating glassware and stamped-metal lubricating oil 
containers, and each department operates on an extensiv 
scale, as is evident when it is stated that the compan 
now retains a force of about 500 employes, many of whoi 
are skilled operatives. 

The glassware products are sold to jobbers and th 
stamped-metal products to railroads and wholesale hare 
ware trade. The export trade of the company is likewia 
one of importance, and is of a constantly cumulative ter 
dency. 

The men who have been the dominating forces sine 
its organization in the upbuilding of tliis splendid indus 
trial enterprise have the satisfaction of knowing that whil 
they have furthered their individual success, they hav 
also contributed distinctly to the industrial and commercij 
prestige and prosperity of the line little city in which the 
maintain their home. 

Harry W. Paull, president of this company, James Paul 
the treasurer, and S. O. Paull, the secretary, are all son 
of the late Judge James Paull, a distinguished lawyer wh 
served on the bench of the West Virginia Supreme Cour 

Harry W. Paull was born at Wheeling, West Virgini: 
and was reared in the City of Wellsburg, West Virgiui; 
He has fully demonstrated his initiative and executiv 
powers in connection with the upbuilding of tlie busines 
of the company of which he is president, he having becom 
the active manager of the manufacturing enterprise s 
its inception. He is a vital and progressive citizen wh 
takes loyal and helpful interest in all things tending t 
advance the civic and industrial welfare of his home cit; 
is a democrat in politics, and he and his wife hold men 
bership in the Presbyterian Church. He married Mis 
Louise B. Beall, daughter of Col. C. H. Beall, and the on 
child of this union is a daughter, Virginia B. 

James Paull, treasurer of the company, was born i 
Wheeling and completed his education at Wooster Unive: 
sity, at Wooster, Ohio. He was for several years secretar 
of the Wheeling Stamping Company, and was later or 
of those instrumental in the establishing of the Eag^ 
Manufacturing Company at Wellsburg, and to his financii 
ability the company is greatly indebted for its success. B 
married Miss Mariana Jacob, a daughter of J. G. Jaeol 
and the two children of this union are John J., who ; 
employed in the ofl&ce of the Eagle Manufacturing Con 
pany, and James, Jr., who is a college student at the tin: 
of this writing in Washington and Jefferson College. 

Samuel O. Paull, secretary of the Eagle Manufacturin 
Company, is the youngest of the three brothers identiUe 
with the Eagle Manufacturing Company, and was born i 
Wheeling in the year 1869. He there initiated his businei 
career in the capacity of bookkeeper in the ofliee of tl 
Wheeling Stamping Company, with which he continued h 
alliance until he joined his brothers in the organizatio 
and incorporation of the company. He is the active hea 
of the metal stamping department of the Eagle Manufai 
turing Company, and it is largely due to his initiati\ 
and enterprise that this department has reached its preset 
proportions and success. His wife. Celeste, is a daughter c 
Dr. E. E. Worthen, who was for sixty years engaged i 
the practice of dentistry in the City of Wheeling. M 
and Mrs. Paull have no children. 

Charles B. Ott, the executive head of the illuminatin 
glassware department of the Eagle Manufacturing Con 
pany, was born in the City of Wheeling, and there he w£ 
reared and educated. As a youth he became associate 
with his father's hardware business in that city, and lat( 
he was identified with a mercantile enterprise in the Cit 
of Omaha, Nebraska, where he remained until he came t 
Wellsburg, West Virginia, and became one of the stocl 
holders of the Eagle Manufacturing Company, of whic 
he has since continued as vice president. Mr. Ott is 
bachelor. 




^^^?TJ^fe^-^ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



79 



Jonathan Corblet Powell, prosecuting attorney of 
Pleasants County, is now in his second term, and his record 
8 a most interesting and unusual one. He was elected 
jrosecuting attorney before he finished his law course in the 
State University, and early in his first term turned over the 
■esponsibilities of the office to his assistant and for practi- 
:ally two years was in the uniform of an army officer, so that 
luring more than half of his term he was prosecuting attorney 
n name only. 

Mr. Powell was born in Pleasants County November 9, 
1892. and evidently his range of experience for a man of thirty 
aas been exceptional. His grandfather, Jonathan Powell, 
was born in England in 1831, and as a young man came to 
American and settled in Monongalia County, West Virginia. 
He was a farmer, timberman and steamboatman. In 1867 
le bought land in Pleasants County, and two years later 
ocated on that land, near the mouth of Sugar Creek, making 
lis home on this place until his death, which occurred May 
!4, 1917. He owned a large amount of land, carried on 
jxtensive operations as a farmer, and also did a large business 
13 a timberman. He was a democrat and a member of the 
Methodist Protestant Church. Jonathan Powell married 
Minerva Summers at Little Falls in Monongalia County, 
There she was born in 1840 and died at the old homestead 
n Pleasants County in March, 1916. She was the mother 
)f four children: Alice, wife of Theodore Birkhimer, a mer- 
;hant at Cloverdale, Pleasants County; James B., a merchant 
it Federal. West Virginia; Thomas B., a merchant at Parkers- 
3urg; and George B., a farmer and merchant at Sugar Valley, 
[Vest Virginia. 

James B. Powell, father of Attorney Powell of St. Marys, 
vas born in Monongalia County August 23, 1857, and is still 
iving at Federal, near the old homestead in Pleasants 
bounty. He acquired a common school education in Monon- 
galia and Pleasants counties, was married in the latter county, 
ind has followed farming. He owns a farm in Lafayette 
District, and is also a merchant there and a stockholder in 
he Pleasants County Bank of St. Marys. James B. Powell 
s a democrat, and is a trustee and active supporter of the 
Methodist Protestant Church. He married Miss Alice 
Fennie Lucas, who was born in Pleasants County August 24, 
[869. Two sons were born to their marriage. The older, 
Edmond Perry, died September 14, 1913, at the home farm 
it the age of twenty-six. 

Jonathan Corbley Powell was reared on the farm of his 
ather. attended rural schools, completed a business course 
n a business college at Marietta, Ohio, in 1908, during 
1909-10, was a student in the preparatory department of 
West Virginia University at Morgantown. and finished his 
iterary education in the Fairmont State Normal School in 
1912. In 1913 he entered West Virginia University, law 
iepartment. graduating LL. B. with the class of 1917. 

Mr. Powell was first honored with the office of prosecuting 
ittorney of Pleasants County in November, 1916. He was 
naugurated January 1, 1917, and at once appointed an assis- 
ant to conduct the office until June 17, 1917, when, having 
;raduafed. he took personal charge. In the meantime 
\merica had entered the war with Germany, and, his appU- 
■ation being accepted, he entered the Second Officers Training 
3amp at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, August 24, 1917. 
He was in training there and was commissioned second 
ieutenant November 23, 1917, being ordered to report to 
:.he Eighty-fourth Division at Camp Taylor, Kentucky, and 
ivas assigned to Headquarters Company of the Three Hundred 
md Thirty-sixth Infantry. April 22, 1918, he was trans- 
erred to Camp Gordon at Atlanta, being made an instructor 
n the Infantry Replacement Troops in the Manual of Courts 
Martial in the Smoke, Gas and Flame School, Second Divi- 
sion. June 17, 1918, Lieutenant Powell was transferred to 
Camp Hancock, Augusta, Georgia, school of machine gun 
5re, and on July 25, 1918, was promoted to the rank of first 
ieutenant and assigned as a company commander and in- 
structor in the Fourth Officers Training School in Machine 
Gun work at Camp Hancock. He also instructed in the 
Dranches of manual of court martial and in the machine 
;un work and in the gas, flame and smoke school and was 
instructor in hand grenades. His work at Camp Hancock 
was of a very arduous nature, and he was exceptionally 
pfted for the varied duties to which he waa assigned. 



Lieutenant Powell received his honorable discharge Feb- 
ruary 6, 1919, and at once returned to St. Marys and took 
over the duties of prosecuting attorney in person. November 
3, 1920, he was re-elected for another term of four years, his 
term running from January 1, 1921, to January 1, 1925. 
Mr. Powell is a republican, and a member of the County and 
State Bar Associations. He is a stockholder in the Archer 
Cord Tire & Rubber Company at Minneapolis. Among 
other real estate he owns at St. Marys is a handsome stucco 
residence, which he completed for his own family in 1921. 
Mr. Powell is present noble grand of St. Marys Lodge No. 
22, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

July 20. 1918, at Augusta. Georgia, he married Miss Lillian 
Grey Hackney, daughter of James M. and Martha J. (Grey) 
Hackney, of Morgantown, where her father is a contracting 
carpenter. Her father graduated A. B. from West Virginia 
University in 1892. Mrs. Powell is a graduate of the 
Morgantown High school and was in the junior class of West 
Virginia University when she was married. She had also 
taught three terms in the Morgantown public schools. Mr. 
and Mrs. Powell have two daughters, Rosemarv. born April 
27, 1919, and Margaret Grey, born October 13,"l921. 

Hiram Hutson. There is scarcely a better known citizen 
of Doddridge County than Hiram Hutson, who has lived here 
all his life, has gained the confidence and respect of an increas- 
ing circle of friends and associates, has been a teacher and 
farmer, and recently was re-elected without opposition to a 
second term as clerk of the County Cou't. 

He was born on a farm in Doddridge County July 14, 1877, 
son of Jimison and Ellen (Law) Hutson, and a grandson of 
Winter and Sarah (Davis) Hutson. Both Jimison and Winter 
Hutson were natives of Harrison County and moved to 
Doddridge County when Jimison was two j'cars old. Jimison 
Hutson was for over eighty years a resident of Doddridge 
County, a successful farmer, and died at the age of eighty- 
three years and eight months. He never had a physician 
attend him in illness until within three months of his death. 
He was a republican in politics and an attendant of the 
Methodist Church. His first wife. Ellen Law, was a native 
of Harrison County, daughter of William Law. She died at 
the age of fifty-five. The second wife of Jimison Hutson was 
Eleanor Stackpole. He was the father of eight children by 
his first marriage and two by the second. 

Hiram Hutson had the environment of a farm during his 
youth and early manhood. After completing his education in 
the public schools and at Salem College he began teaching in 
1895, and for upwards of twenty years his time was divided 
between teaching and the management of his own farm. He 
kept his residence on his farm until 1914, in which year he 
was elected for his first time as county clerk. He was in office 
six years, and in that time made such a record of efficiency 
that in 1920 he was reelected without having any opposition 
from the democratic party. Mr. Hutson is a local leader in the 
republican party of Doddridge County, a member of the 
Baptist Church and is affiliated with the Masonic Order and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

In 1898 he married Miss Virginia McDonald, a native of 
Taylor County, and a daughter of Nathan and Mary Mc- 
Donald. 

William J. McElhiney. While his early training as a 
banker was acquired at Baltimore, Mr. McElhiney's working 
interests in that field for the past decade have been in West 
Virginia. He is especially well known in Doddridge County, 
where he is cashier of the First National Bank of West Union. 

Mr. McElhiney was born May 25, 1884, at St. Joseph, 
Missouri, son of William J. and Jlary (Watkins) McElhiney. 
His father was born at Annapolis, Maryland, and his mother, 
near that city. For only a brief time his parents lived in 
Western Missouri, and they then returned to their native 
state, so that William J. McElhiney, Jr., was reared at Balti- 
more. He finished his education in a Friends private school 
of that city, and after school went into the service of a Balti- 
more banking institution. 

On coming to West Virginia Mr. McElhiney was connected 
with the first National Bank of Fairmont until 1913, when he 
became and has since served as cashier of the First National 
Bank of West Union. He married in 1910 Miss Eliza Jones, 



80 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



who was reared at Cincinnati. They have three children: 
William J. Ill, Richard Garrett and Thomas Watkins 
McElhiney. 

Wade Linger is superintendent of school for Lewis County, 
a capable and progressive educator, and has devoted his 
talents with singular energy and fidelity to the great cause of 
education. 

Mr. Linger was born in Lewis County April 24, 1886, son of 
Henry and Sarah E. (Smith) Linger. His father was born 
in Lewis County February 11, 1839, and his mother was born 
in the same county December 15, 1849. Both are now de- 
ceased. They had only the advantages of the local schools, 
and after their marriage located on a small farm and gave 
their lives to the routine of home and farm and the rearing 
and training of their children. Both were faithful members of 
the Methodist Protestant Church, and the father was a 
democrat. Of twelve children nine are still living, Philip L., 
David H and Marion C, all farmers; Clara B., wife of W. B. 
Curtis; Mandeville, of Parkersburg, where he is a teacher in 
the public schools; Ida. wife of C. C. Sharp; Warren, a teacher 
in Wood County; Wade; and Preston, in the railway mail 
service on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. 

Wade Linger spent his youth on the home farm and as 
one of a large household bore his share of its duties in addition 
to making the best possible use of his opportunities in the 
common schools. He is a graduate of a State Normal School 
of West Virginia, taught several terms of country school and 
was principal of the Roanoke graded school until his election 
as county superintendent of schools for Lewis County in 
1918. Mr. Linger was chosen for a four year term, and in 
spite of some difiBculties in the way of progressive school 
administration during the reconstruction period he has done 
much to improve the schools individually and collectively. 
He is unmarried, is a member of the Methodist Protestant 
Church, a republican in politics, and a charter member of the 
local lodge of Foresters. He is also a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, the Pythian Sisters, the Junior Order of the 
United American Mechanics, and the Grange. 

Royal J. Byeum. One of the largest concerns in the 
country supplying industrial housing is located at Wheel- 
ing, the R. L. Byrum's Sons Company, a group of enter- 
prising young men who have perfected their organization 
to a point where they are able to supply housing facilities 
almost to the extent of an entire town in the briefest 
period of time. 

The secretary of the R. L. Byrum's Sons Company is 
Royal J. Byrum, who was born in Kansas City, Kansas, 
November 17, 1885. His grandfather, Eli Byrum, was 
a native of South Carolina and as a boy went to Randolph 
County, Indiana, where his parents were pioneers. He 
had a large farm in Eastern Indiana, and lived there the 
rest of his life. His second wife was Lucinda Fields, 
who was born and died in Randolph County. The Byrums 
are of old English stock. Three children of Eli and Lu- 
cinda Byrum are still living. Robert L. ; Enoch E., a 
clergyman of the Church of God living at Anderson, In- 
diana; and Noah H., who is treasurer of the Gospel 
Trumpet Publishing Company at Anderson, Indiana. 

Robert L. Byrum was born in Randolph County, In- 
diana, in 1856, was reared and married in that county, 
spent his early life on the farm, and at the age of twenty 
became a carpenter contractor. In 1884 he moved to Kan- 
sas City, Kansas, where he followed his trade, but later 
returned to Indiana and was located at Marion in Grant 
County until 1899. In that year he moved to Moundsville, 
West Virginia, and in 1908 established his home at Mar- 
tin's Ferry, across the river from Wheeling. He is still 
active in his business as a contractor, and is director and 
treasurer of R. L. Byrum's Sons Company. He began vot- 
ing as a democrat, but in later years has been a republican. 
He is an active supporter of the Church of God. Robert 
L. Byrum married Mollie J. Mangas, who was bom in 
Randolph County, Indiana, in 1858. Royal J. is the old- 
est of their five sons. Russell R., the second, is managing 
editor of the Gospel Ti-umpet Publishing Company at An- 
derson, Indiana. The other three sons are all officials of 
the R. L. Byrum's Sons Company, Ralston E. being presi- 



dent, Leo v., vice president, and Don J., general superin- 
tendent. These sons reside at Wheeling. 

Royal J. Byrum was educated in the public schools of 
Indiana, attended high school at Moundsville, West Vir- 
ginia, and up to 1904 was a student in the Wheeling 
Business College. For 1% years he was assistant secre- 
tary of the Wheeling Board of Trade and then became 
assistant to the manager of the Wheeling Traction Com- 
pany, continuing in the service of that corporation for 
twelve years. July 19, 1917, he became secretary of the 
R. L. Byrum's Sons Company. There is only one other 
industrial housing firm in West Virginia that vies in ex- 
tent of business with the R. L. Byrum's Sons Company. 
This company specializes in the building of miners' homes, 
and its service contracts for that work cover nearly all 
the important mining fields in Ohio, West Virginia and 
Western Pennsylvania. The company's offices are in the 
Wheeling Bank & Trust Company Building. 

Royal J. Byrum is a republican, a member of the Church 
of God. and was a participant in all the local drives for 
funds during the World war. He owns a modern home at 
409 Wheeling Avenue in Pleasanton. Wheeling. April 28, 
1906, at Moundsville, he married Mary R. Peters, daugh- 
ter of Thomas and Lydia (McKeen) Peters. The parents 
live at Moundsville, where her father is a mine fire boss. 
Mr. and Mrs. Byrum have four children ; Bernard R., 
bom February 23, 1908; Dorothy M., born October 28, 
1909; Robert, born March 15, 1915; and Royal J., Jr., 
born January 14, 1921. 

William J. S. Harmer. Prosperity is not only a matter 
of material possessions, but, even better, of that happiness 
which results from doing for others. It is prosperity of this 
kind that is reflected in the career of William J. S Harmer, 
at the head of the oldest established business in Shinnston. 
With two exceptions he has lived longer in that, his native 
town, than any resident still there. 

He was born at Shinnston February 13, 1856. His father 
came to Shinnston in 1852, and in the same year established 
himself in business as a waeon-maker and undertaker. The 
chief service of the undertaker at that time was to provide 
the casket. William J. S. Harmer as a boy became an appren- 
tice to his father and learned the trade of wagon-maker and 
the profession of undertaking. When his father died his will 
contained a provision that his son, William, buy and continue 
the old established business. It was in compliance with 
that request that W. J. S. Harmer became proprietor and has 
continued the business up to the present time. Within his 
own experience have come about and have been introduced 
into his establishment at Shinnston many of the most im- 
portant advances in the undertaker's art. He has kept his 
service apace with the demands of the time and he has pro- 
vided the facilities and service of a high class funeral director, 
and many times has virtually taken the place of the minister 
in reading the burial service and delivering the general sermon. 
This part of his work is not merely professional, but the pro- 
ceeds from an honest Christian character and conduct main- 
tained since boyhood when he was converted and became 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He early 
began the performance of official duties in his church, and for 
fifty-six years has been a regular attendant at Sunday School, 
having failed to attend such service only three Sundays, 
when providentially hindered. For thirty years he was 
superintendent of the Sunday School. This is a record such 
as few West Virginians can exhibit. 

Mr. Harmer on January 15, 1880, joined thelndependent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and from that date has been a zealous 
member of the fraternity. He has also rendered public 
duty as a citizen, holding a number of offices, including three 
terms as street commissioner, two terms as assessor, a number 
of terms on the City Council and five terms as mayor of 
Shinnston. In politics he has always been a republican. 

The life of Mr. Harmer has been an exceedingly active 
one, and exemplary in every relationship. His word is 
regarded as good as his bond, and he has always maintained 
the strictest regard for honesty and the keeping of a promise. 

Mr. Harmer is descended from an old and highly respected 
American family. His great-grandfather, Jacob Harmer, 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. After doing his 



HISTOlRY of west VIRGINIA 



81 



uty as a patriot soldier he located at Germantown, Pennsyl- 
ania. His son, Jacob Harmer, Jr., was born at Philadelphia, 
ennsylvania, January 23, 1794, and died at Winchester, 
irginia, March 8, 1868. He married Eliza Tyson Ham. 
heir children were: Benjamin Tyson, Peter Ham, Emily 
usan, James Albert, Theodorick S., John E., Edgar R., 
lary J., Anna Virginia, Joseph J. and William H. H. 

Benjamin Tyson Harmer, the father of the Shinnston 
usiness man and citizen, was born January 1, 1824, and died 
lecember 4, 1890. He lived at Shinnston from 1852 until 
is death, and in that time he exerted the influence of a high 
laracter and a busy life upon the community. He was an 
;tive member and trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
IT thirty-six years, was a veteran member of the Odd Fellows, 
irved at one time as president of the County Court and was 
republican. 

He married Margaret Shepler, and their children were: 
enjamin Tyson, WiUiam J. S., James Albert, Lloyd M., 
lary Virginia, Harvey Walker, Charles Leslie and Elizabeth. 

On June 17, 1880, William J. S. Harmer married Ida Susan 
urry. She was born near the Natural Bridge in Amherst 
ounty, Virginia, August 7, 1859. The children born to the 
arriage of Mr. and Mrs. Harmer are: Frank Roscoe, who 
ied at the age of nine years; Ella C, who died when six 
jars old; Josephine, born October 16, 1888; Edgar J., born 
ine 11, lS91;andBeulah, born July 13, 1894. 

Edgar J. Harmer, now associated with his father in busi- 
;ss at Shinnston, in the firm of William J. S. Harmer and 
jn, was a volunteer in the great war, joining the Naval 
eserve Corps May 7, 1918. He was in training for a time 
id was then detailed to the Medical Officers' Armed Guards 
; Newport News, Virginia, and served there until his honor- 
jle discharge on February 3, 1919. 

F. S. SuDDARTH, M. D. The able service of the physi- 
an and surgeon has been only part of the record Doctor 
jddarth has made since becoming a resident of Grafton 
penty years ago. His resources and influence have in a very 
tal sense been contributed to the community's institutions 
id commercial advancement. 

Of an old Virginia family, he was born at Monterey, High- 
nd County, February 4, 1871. William Suddarth, his 
•andfather, lived at Charlottesville, and his mother was a 
3ter of General Sumner, one of the brilliant officers of the 
evolution. William Suddarth married a Miss Mann, and 
ley had four sons. Two of them became soldiers of the 
nion, James, now living at Clarksburg, West Virginia, and 
)seph, a resident of Kingfisher, Oklahoma. 

Frank Suddarth, father of the Grafton physician, was 
)rn in Albemarle County, and when he was about six years 

age his father removed to Upshur County. He was living 
lere when the Civil war broke out, and, differing from his 
TO brothers on the issues of that conflict, he volunteered in 
le Confederate Army, joining the Upshur Grays, under 
olonel Higginbotham. He was wounded at Rich Mountain 
id again at the Wilderness, but came out of the army with 
3 serious afflictions. After his marriage he remained in 
ighland County, engaged in farming in the country border- 
g the beautiful Shenandoah Valley, and died there in 1906, 
; the age of seventy-four. 

His wife, Susan Frances Seiver, a native of Highland 
ounty, was the daughter of James Seiver, a full-blood 
:otchman and a tailor by trade. She died in April, 1874, 
!ed twenty-nine, leaving three children: Ada, wife of Albert 
'agner, of Monterey, Virginia; Doctor Suddarth; and 
rchibald, of California. 

In common with other enterprising youth bent on making 
imething of themselves, and without the facilities of wealth 
; their command. Doctor Suddarth had problems to solve 
I soon as he was old enough to appreciate them. He 
;tended public schools, a normal school in Virginia, and then 
itered the National Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio, 
here he had the fortune to come under the influence of that 
riUiant educator, Professor Holbrook, then in charge there, 
fter graduating in 1891 Doctor Suddarth returned to his 
Dme state, and for seven years bestowed his talents on 
laching. His last work in that line was done in the country 
shools of Highland County. 

In the meantime be was making progress in private studies 



needed in his medical college course, and also carried on work 
in the medical department of the University of Virginia, 
where he graduated in 1897. For five years he looked after 
his growing practice at Williamsville in his native state, 
and part of the time was county health officer. Leaving 
there, he was in New York a student for five months in the 
Post-Graduate School of Medicine, and with this additional 
training to supplement his practical experience he established 
himself in Grafton in 1902. Here his professional interests 
have had a widening scope of service. He was one of the 
builders, with Dr. R. H. Powell, of the Grafton City Hospital. 
For four years he was president of the Grafton Board of 
Education. The other members of this board, which anlong 
other things accomplished the monumental task of building 
the new high school, were N. F. Kendall and O. Jay Fleming, 
local bankers, and W. A. Beavers and G. W. Steele. 

Doctor Suddarth has proved his faith in Grafton to the 
extent of his capital and enterprise. He built several homes 
on the West Side, is a director in the Taylor County Bank, a 
stockholder and president of the Grafton Mercantile Com- 
pany, and formerly had interests in other commercial 
enterprises of the city. On the outside he has done much 
in coal development, was formerly vice president of the 
Fairmont Coal Company, is now vice president of the Fort 
Grand Coal Company, is president of the Suddarth Coal 
Company, and owner of some undeveloped coal lands. 

Coming of a democratic family, he has been satisfied to 
vote in the same political faith. He is an elder in the Preoby- 
terian Church, and in Masonry is a past high priest of the 
Royal Arch Chapter, past eminent commander of the Knights 
Templars, and a member of Osiris Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine at Wheeling. In Bath County, Virginia, December 
10, 1903, he married Miss Eddie McClintic, daughter of 
William and Hettie (Montgomery) McCHntic, she being second 
in their family of six sons and three daughters, three of the 
sons being now deceased. Mrs. Suddarth finished her educa- 
tion with a course in kindergarten training at Washington, 
and was a teacher until her marriage. Doctor and Mrs. 
Suddarth have two children: Gertrude, a student in Fairfax 
Hall, Virginia; and Glen, in the Grafton schools. 

Alfred A. Holt, a native of Grafton, has been one of the 
enterprising business men of that city for a number of years. 
In continuous experience he is one of the oldest druggists, and 
has a number of other interests that have their share in making 
that one of the important centers of commerce in West 
Virginia. 

Mr. Holt, who was born March 15, 1875, represents a 
prominent family. He is the second child of James W. and 
Anna J. (Jordan) Holt. His father, whose record is given in 
more detail elsewhere, was the Henry Watterson of the news- 
paper profession in Taylor County. 

Alfred A. Holt finished his education in the Grafton High 
School in 1896, and then became assistant postmaster under 
his father. He was in that office six years, and then during an 
interval, while developing some plans for independent busi- 
ness, he spent several months in the employ of Armour & 
Company. He then joined with Harry Magill and Dr. W. B. 
Stuck in the purchase of the property of the Grafton Drug & 
Chemical Company. On establishing a retail store on the 
West Side he retired from the former business, but subse- 
quently again became its owner by purchase, and directed 
its affairs until it was acquired by Dr. Stuck and Fred B. 
Watkins. 

Mr. Holt now devotes his chief time to his growing and 
prosperous retail drug business on the West Side. The build- 
ing in which this is located, erected by him in 1912, is a three- 
story brick, with two business rooms and four apartments. 
It was not regarded as a profitable investment at the time, but 
it proved so with the increasing population and the great 
demand for living quarters. Most of the capital Mr. Holt put 
into this building he acquired through an investment and 
enterprise in the lumber regions of Greenbrier County, where 
he was one of the stockholders in the Maryland Lumber 
Company, which manufactured lumber for the jobbing and 
wholesale trade. 

Mr. Holt inherits his politics from his father, who was 
one of the active republicans of the county and exercised a 
great influence in making Taylor County a stronghold of that 



82 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



party. He cast his first presidential vote for McKinley in 
1896 and his last for Harding in 1920. Fraternally he is a 
past chancellor of Grafton Lodge, Knights of Pythias, has 
been a delegate to the Grand Lodge, and is a member of the 
Moose and Elks. He was reared in the faith of the Lutheran 
Church. 

In Taylor County August 28, 1904, Mr. Holt married Miss 
Lena Hazel Leonard, daughter of William B. and Lucy 
(Thorn) Leonard. Her father, who has been a life-long resi- 
dent of Taylor County, is passenger car foreman for the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad at Grafton. Mr. and Mrs. Holt 
have one daughter, Alice Margaret, born in 1916. 

Ray M. Parrish, president of the Parrish Realty Company 
of Grafton, has been a resident of West Virginia over twenty 
years, and his business interests have had an increasing scope 
and range of importance. Outside of his private affairs he has 
exercised a decided influence for good in the community of 
Grafton, his public spirit being one of the reliable assets in 
any concerted movement for the common welfare. 

He was born in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, January 9, 
1879. His father, Robert Parrish, was born in Potter County 
of the same state March 12, 1850, was reared there and 
acquired a liberal education, being a graduate of one of the 
Pennsylvania state normals. He was a cheese-maker in Craw- 
ford County, then an oil field worker, and gradually drifted 
into the lumber industry. For a time he was a merchant in 
Jefferson County of his native state, where he organized a 
trust company. His home is now at Reyuoldsville, Pennsyl- 
vania, and he continued active in business until past the age 
of seventy. His first wife, Effie Scott, a daughter of C. D. 
Scott, was born at Spartansburg, Pennsylvania, and died in 
1894. Her children were: Ray M.; Fern, wife of J. S. Howard, 
of New York; Leah, wife of Virgil Martin, of Gallipolis, Ohio; 
Florence, the widow of George H. Pryor, of Martins Ferry, 
Ohio; and Otis Everett, of Grafton. Robert Parrish by his 
second marriage, to Carrie Fleming, has two children, Frank 
and Olive, the former a graduate of Allegheny College and 
now a sophomore in the law department of the University of 
Michigan; while Olive is teacher of English in the high school 
at Kittanning, Pennsylvania. 

Ray M. Parrish spent his youth and acquired his public 
school education in Crawford, Warren and McKean counties, 
had four months of high school work at Marionville and a 
business college course at Warren, this constituting the broad 
basis of his business training and experience. A valuable 
asset to him as a real estate man was a year's course in the 
Sprague Correspondence School of Law at Detroit. 

The successive steps in his early business career included 
a brief service with Elisha K. Kane, a lumber manufacturer 
at Kane, Pennsylvania, and in February, 189S, leaving Forest 
County, he came to West Virginia as bookkeeper for the 
Clarion Lumber Company in Taylor County. At the end of 
the first year he was promoted to manager, conducting the 
business four years. This was followed by an independent 
venture as a lumber manufacturer, associated for a year with 
E. L. Sawyer. Selling out, he returned to the Clarion Lumber 
Company, which transferred him to the management of the 
plant at Manquin, King William County, Virginia, where he 
remained twenty-one months. 

On his return to Grafton he engaged in the printing busi- 
ness, organizing and operating the Eclipse Printery in associ- 
ation with U. S. Huggins for two years. Mr. Parrish then 
became associated with his father and with C. A. Yeager, 
under the firm name of Parrish & Yeager, in the real estate 
business at Marlinton, Pocahontas County, specializing in 
timber lands. A year later Mr. Parrish returned to Grafton, 
and under the name R. M. Parrish began his operations in the 
local real estate field and also handling insurance. The Par- 
rish Realty Company was incorporated in August, 1913, Mr. 
Parrish being president and owner of the majority of the 
stock. His brother Otis E Parrish, has been in the firm since 
1918, and is secretary-treasurer of the company. 

With every organized effort since he came to Grafton, with 
a view to promoting the commercial and civic welfare, Mr. 
Parrish has been associated. He was a charter member of the 
old Board of Trade, the predecessor of the former Business 
Men's Association, and was secretary of the board. Then 
came other organizations, including the Chamber of Com- 



merce, and the reorganization of this body was largely duf t 
his personal influence and leadership. He is president of th 
Chamber of Commerce, which is now engaged on a broadl 
constructive program for the advancement of Grafton an 
vicinity. 

Mr. Parrish was chairman of the finance committee an 
member of the water committee of the Grafton City Coui 
cil some ten years ago, when the contract was let for the ne 
water works and the city park purchased as a water plar 
site; this has since been improved for a public park, bathin 
and recreation center. Mr. Parrish is a republican, w£ 
chairman of the county campaign committee in 1916, was 
delegate to the state convention at Wheeling where delegat( 
to the national convention were chosen, and was a member ( 
the congressional committee of the Second District whe 
W. G. Conley was the party candidate. 

Mr. Parrish married at Wheeling, in 1901, Miss Rosal 
Thayer, daughter of John R. Thayer, a retired farmer i 
Grafton and one of the county's earliest and best know 
citizens. Mrs. Parrish died in October, 1911, leaving thr( 
children, Helen, Coral and Hubert. December 25. 1919, M 
Parrish married, in Taylor County, Miss Helen Crickei 
berger, a native of Giles County, Virginia. Her father. Re 
P. T. Crickenberger, is a Lutheran minister of Grafton. H( 
mother was member of the Payne family, and her matern 
grandmother was an Early, Mrs. Parrish being a great-niei 
of General Jubal Early. Mr. Parrish attends the Bapti 
Church, and while he is not a member he is in thorough syn 
pathy with the church and organized religious endeavo 
Mrs. Parrish is a member of the Lutheran Church, of which hi 
father is the pastor. 

Merton a. Stbert is a leader in the moving-pictur 
theatrical business in Marshall County, West Virginia, an 
is recognized as one of the most vital and progressiv 
business men and loyal citizens of Moundsville. Here h 
owns and conducts two modern theaters of this type, th 
Strand and the Park, and at McMeohen, this county, h 
owns and operates the Midway Theater. The Park wa 
opened in 1912, with a seating capacity of about oO( 
which has since been increased to 750. The seating ca 
pacity of the Midway is 553. Mr. Sybert erected th 
Strand Theater in 1920, at a cost of $100,000, inchulini 
equipment, and this fine modern amusement resort wa 
opened to the public on November 15th of that year, th 
house having a seating capacity of 1,050. Mr. Sybert i 
financially interested also in theaters at Marietta an 
Cambridge, Ohio, under the title of the C. & M. Amuse 
ment Company. Mr. Sybert made his initial appearanc 
in the theatrical field in 1910, when he became the opei 
ator of a house at Marietta, Ohio. In 1912 his capitalist! 
resources were less than $1,000, and he not only lost th 
amount which he thus invested but also a position tlia 
was yielding him $1,500. He retained his confidence i 
the possibilities for successful amusement enterprise a 
Moundsville, and as soon as he was able to eliminate oom 
petition of adverse order he made rapid advancement, ovei 
came obstacles that presented and made his way fornnn 
to the goal of substantial success. 

Mr. Sybert is president of the Moundsville Chamber o 
Commerce, a director of the local Rotary Club, and in th 
Masonic fraternity he has completed the circle of both th 
York and Scottish Rite bodies. He is a past master o 
Phoenix Lodge No. 73, Ancient Free and Accepted Ma 
sons, at Sistersville, this state, and is also a past liigl 
priest of the Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, at that pl.ace 
He is a member of Nemesis Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., a 
Parkersburg, West Virginia. He has been influential ii 
the councils and campaign activities of the democrati 
party within the period of his residence in West Virginia 
and in 1920 was his party's nominee for the State Senate 
in which connection he made a vigorous campaign in i 
district that has a large normal republican majority, whicl 
he succeeded in reducing materially, though he failed o 
election, as he had anticipated. 

At SistersvUle was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Sy 
bert and Miss Laura Blankensop, of Martin's Ferry, Ohio 
and she is a popular figure in the social activities o 
Moundsville. 




^^.^ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



83 



Mr. Sybert_ was born in Armstrong County, Pennsyl- 
.nia, and _ his early educational advantages were those 

the public schools. As a boy he began to assist in his 
ther's mercantile establishment, and as a youth he held 
r several years the position of assistant postmaster at 
ivingston, Montana. In 1895 he opened a retail grocery 

Sistersville, West Virginia, and later he became city 
lesman for a wholesale grocery company at Marietta, 
lio. He finally found his maximum potential when he 
reeted his energies into his present field of enterprise, 

which he has gained both success and high reputation. 

Jedbdtah Waldo Robinson, member of the Grafton law 
m of Warder & Robinson, has practiced law in his native 
unty sixteen years, and in his capacity as a good lawyer and 
iblic-spirited citizen has achieved no little prominence in the 
mmunity and its affairs. 

Mr. Robinson was born in the county, near Grafton, June 
. 1881. and he bears a family name that has enjoyed honor- 
ile standing for many years. His grandfather. William 
ibinson, was born in Barbour County, was a farmer and 
oemaker, was routed out of his native community by Con- 
ierate raiders at the time of the Civil war, and remained in 
lylor County until some time in the seventies, when he re- 
rned to Barbour County, where he died in 1897. when about 
irenty years of age, and is buried at the Taylor's Drain 
^metery. His wife was Mary Sayre, and their children were: 
ank P., whose record follows; Mrs. Isaac Means, of Evans- 
!le. West Vireinia; Rev. John S., of Fairmont; Mrs. T. A. 
ilson, who died in Barbour County; Mrs. Thomas Allen, 
10 died in Iowa; Charles W., of Fairmont; Miss Mary, who 
;d at Charleston; Mrs. S. H. White, of Clarksburg; and 
dee Ira E., former judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals, 
d now commissioner of war minerals in the Department of 
e Interior at Washington. 

Frank Pierce Robinson, father of the Grafton attorney, was 
rn in Barbour County November 5, 1852, had a common 
bool education, and having been trained to farming he has 
llowed it aa a permanent career. His home has been near 
•afton for over forty years. While without professional 
terest in politics, he served on the county text-book board 
d the district board of education, and in 1912 was elected 

a republican to the County Court, serving six years, and 
iring the last two years was president of the Court. 
His father's farm was the environment of J. W. Robinson 
r a number of years. He attended country schools, grad- 
ted from the Grafton High School at eighteen, and then 
tered West Virginia University, where he pursued both the 
erary and law cour.ies, receivine his A. B. degree in 1905 
d the LL. B. degree in 1906. While in Morgantown he was 
osen editor of the University weekly paper, and was a 
ember of the "Mountain," fthe English club'), the only 
holarship and honor society of the University at that time, 
e was also a member of the Sigma Nu fraternity. 
He was admitted to the bar in Taylor County in 1906 and 

the bars of other counties later, then to the Supreme Court 

Appeals of the state, and also the Federal District and 
ircuit Courts and the Circuit Courts of Appeal for the third 
id foTirth circuits. He had the good fortune to begin prac- 
!e with the distinguished lawyer, his uncle, Hon. Ira E. 
obinson, and when the latter, in October, 1907, began his 
ng service on the bench, his practice remained with his 
sphew and Hugh Warder, the firm of Warder & Robinson, 
his firm has an extensive general practice in all the state 
id federal courts and are attorneys for the Baltimore & Ohio 
ail road. 

The work done by Mr. Robinson as a citizen is indicated by 
entioning the fact that he served as president of the Grafton 
hamber of Commerce, of which he is a director; is director 
id former president of the Y. M. C A.; is a member of the 
)od roads advisory committee of Taylor County, delegated 
ith the duty of assuring the wise expenditure of the proceeds 

the million dollar bond issue for the construction of good 
lads; and is secretary of the Grafton Rotary Club. He gave 
8 first presidential vote to Roosevelt in 1904, and has been 
eadfastly a republican, though hardly in politics at all. He 

a member of the Official Board of the Methodist Episcopal 
hurch. During the war he found opportunity to render some 



useful service in connection with the various drives and 
auxiliary organizations. 

In Taylor County, September 1, 1909, he married Miss 
Sarah Poe. She was born in this county June 21, 1879, daugh- 
ter of Ed M. and Amelia (Williams) Poe. Mrs. Robinson ac- 
quired a commercial education, and is active in the D. A. R., 
in the Chamber of Commerce and other community 
movements. Their three children are: William, born in 1910; 
James, born in 1914; and Charles, born in 1917. 

Chahlbs W. Steel, assistant cashier of the First National 
Bank of Grafton, has been a worker in the financial circles of 
that city for twenty years, and has taken an effective part in 
affairs of local citizenship as well. 

He was born at Fetterman, Taylor County, May 19, 1880. 
His family has been represented in the service of the Baltimore 
& Ohio Railroad for a long period of years. His grandfather, 
Charles Steel, was an Englishman, who entered the employ of 
the Baltimore & Ohio when a young man and continued with 
it until his death. He was for many years mason foreman for 
the road. He died when about seventy-five years of age, and 
is buried at Grafton. His wife, Sarah J. MacDonald, was a 
native of Virginia, and of their ten children the following lived 
to mature years: George Walter; James E.; William, who 
naade his home in New York City, was an electrician, and 
died at Fetterman, West Virginia; Albert Lee, whose home the 
greaterpart of his life was in New York City, was also an 
electrician, was one of the first operators of a biograph, an 
early phase of the moving picture machine, and he lost his 
wife at sea, being washed overboard while traveling between 
Portland, Maine, and New York; and Mrs. C. C. Schuster, 
who has lived for many years in New York City but is now a 
resident of Logan, West Virginia. 

James Edward Steel, father of the Grafton banker, was born 
at Woodstock, Virginia, and was ten or twelve years old when 
his parents moved to West Virginia. He learned his father's 
trade and early entered the Baltimore & Ohio service, became 
company foreman, then transferred to the train service, and 
for the past twenty years has been one of the efficient loco- 
motive engineers of the company, with headquarters at Graf- 
ton. His first wife was Mary E. Nuzum, of the well known 
family of that name in Grafton. She died in 1895, ChaHes W. 
Steel being her only child. The second wife of James E. Steel 
was Agnes B. Gardner, who was born in Belfast, Ireland, of 
Scotch parentage, and lived for a time at Belfast, and came 
to the United States from the vicinity of Bedford, England, 
where she had been visiting a sister. 

Charles W. Steel acquired his early education at Fetterman, 
in an old schoolhouse that during Civil war times has been 
used as a Government hospital. He also attended a private 
business college at Grafton, leaving to begin work at the wage 
of three dollars a week as office boy for the Joseph Speidel 
Grocery Company at Grafton. Five years later, when he left 
that company, he was doing the work of salesman and all- 
round man in the office. With this training and record of 
efficiency he went into the Grafton Banking & Trust Company 
in 1903. Here he was promoted to assistant cashier, and was 
with the company fifteen years. In 1918 he became assistant 
cashier of the First National Bank. 

At all times he has regarded his citizenship as a duty, and 
never more so than during the World war period. He was 
secretary of the County Council of Defense and treasurer of 
all the local war organizations. Mr. Steel is the oldest in 
point of continuous service among the members of the Board 
of Education. He is a democrat in politics, a member of the 
Rotary Club, and since childhood has been a communicant 
of St. Matthias Episcopal Church. Since he was twenty-one 
years of age he has been a member of Friendship Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, of which he is a past chancellor, and has 
represented the lodge in Grand Lodge at Wheeling an Elkins. 
In Masonry he is a past master, past high priest and past 
eminent commander of the York Rite bodies at Grafton, is 
orator of the eighteenth degree of the Scottish Rite, and is a 
member of Osiris Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Wheeling. 

At Grafton, in June, 1909, Mr. Steel married Miss Viola 
Louise Miller, of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, a daughter of 
Henry J. and Elizabeth (Dittme) Miller. Her father is a 
native of Holland, who crossed to this country when a child. 



84 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



He became a pioneer steel mill worker in the mills at McKees- 
port. Her mother is a native of McKeesport. All of their 
eleven children are still living, Mrs. Steel being the third 
youngest child. She was educated in the public schools. 
Mr. and Mrs. Steel have one son, Charles W., Jr., born 
November 8, 1910. 

Ole Everett Wyckoff, one of the ablest members of the 
Grafton bar, has depended on his own exertions for the success 
he has achieved. He started with the advantage of a good 
and honorable name, one that has been identified with West 
Virginia for considerably more than a century, and with this 
continent antedating the independence of the United States of 
America. The first members of this family on coming to this 
country settled on Long Island, then new Amsterdam, in 1637. 
His great-grandfather, William Wyckoff. was living in Hardy 
(now Grant) County as early as the time of the war of 1812. 
He was a soldier in that conflict, serving in Captain Neville's 
company of the Sixth Virginia Militia, at the expiration of 
which term he reenlisted. Except for this military duty he 
devoted his years to farming, and about 1840 moved to what is 
now Taylor County. He was laid to rest in the family burying 
ground in the Court House District of that county. His first 
wife was Catherine Michael, who left two children, Alfred and 
Rachel, the latter dying in infancj'. His second wife was Mary 
Shillingberg, and to this union were born fifteen children. 

One of them was Samuel Wyckoff, who was born in Hamp- 
shire County April 24, 1825, and was fifteen years old when 
the family moved to Taylor County. His life was quietly 
spent in the rounds of his agricultural work, his home, his 
worship as a Baptist, and voting as a republican. He married 
Mary Ann St. Clair, daughter of Thomas St. Clair and mem- 
ber of another family of ancient residence in West Virginia. 
They had eight children: Harriet, wife of John Hannegan; 
Daniel B., noted below; Columbus; Susanna, who married 
Meigs Day; Claudius; Henrietta, who became the wife of 
Ellsworth Day; Charles; and Samantha, who married Leon- 
idas Bord. 

Daniel B. Wyckoff was born near the village of Simpson, 
Taylor County, December 22, 1849. Conditions were such 
that beyond the country schools he had no opportunity for 
education, and for a number of years he lived at Tyrconnell, 
Taylor County, clerking in stores and finding other employ- 
ment. He also did coal mining for a time, but for nearly a 
quarter of a century his duties have been as a supervisor for 
the West Virginia Hospital for the Insane at Weston, though 
he has retained his home at Grafton for more than thirty 
years. He is a republican in politics. On June 13, 1872, ho 
married Susan Virginia Bayly, a daughter of Usher S. and 
Jane (Stevens) Bayly. Their family of children consist of the 
following: Myrtle, wife of M. Edgar Coffman, of Cumber- 
land, Maryland; Nettie, wife of Cornelius J. Burnside, of 
Pittsburgh; Ole Everett; Adelaide, who married William P. 
Sample, of Grafton; Harry G., of Fairmont; Holmes V., of 
Wheeling; Samuel B., who died at the age of three years; 
Frank Hite, who died at the age of two years; Claire, who be- 
came the wife of W. G. Menear, of Grafton; and Paul R., of 
Fairmont. 

This consecutive account of the family now narrows down 
to the individual career of 0. E. Wyckoff, of Grafton. He was 
born at Tyrconnell, Flemington District, Taylor County, 
September 6, 1878, and in that community at an early age he 
went to work in the mines. His educational equipment con- 
sisted of what he had gained while attending the Flemington 
District public schools and two terms in the old West Virginia 
College near there. Later he attended the West Virginia 
University. He taught school in the villages of Tyrconnell 
and Flemington, and subsequently for a year was principal of 
the Fetterman School. While teaching he carried work in 
the summer normals at the University, also began reading 
law, qualifying for admission to the University Law School, 
where he finished his course and in May, 1904, was admitted 
to the bar. 

Mr. Wyckoff has made his success in the law without form- 
ing a single partnership alliance. He has always been in gen- 
eral practice. He recalls with considerable amusement his 
first case. It was as counsel for a negro charged with felonious 
assault, and the trial resulted in a verdict for simple assault 
and a short jail sentence. The negro after his release prom- 



ised his attorney to go to work and pay the fee. To encourage 
him as far as possible, Mr. Wyckoff gave him some of the old 
clothes from his scanty wardrobe and a quarter of a dollar 
and that was the last he ever saw of this first client. 

For some years Mr. Wyckoff has had a growing share ol 
corporation work. He is retained as counsel for the Tayloi 
County Bank, the Bank of Flemington and several large cor 
porations, and represents other business concerns and estates 
In the early years of his practice he was city attorney of Graf 
ton two terms, and has performed the duties of referee ir 
bankruptcy since appointed to that office by Judge Dayton 
He has done some political work for his friends and his party 
the republican, but he has never given his friends any en 
couragement when sounded as a possible candidate. 

Mr. Wyckoff helped organize the Taylor County Bank anc 
the Bank of Flemington. He is president of the Graftor 
Rotary Club, a director of the Chamber of Commerce, anc 
exerted himself without stint in behalf of home work to aid ir 
winning the great war. He was chairman of the Legal Advis 
ory Board of Taylor County and also one of the "four-minute' 
speakers. He is a member of the First Baptist Church anc 
belongs to several fraternal orders. 

In Taylor County July 12, 1905, he married Miss Maym< 
Bailey, who was born in the same community as her husband 
one of the three children of Marshall and Anna (Clark' 
Bailey. Mrs. Wyckoff was born October 26, 1880. Thej 
have one son, Everett Bailey, born July 21, 1906, and s 
remarkable specimen of young physical manhood, standing 
six feet, two inches tall. He is proficient in his studies and is s 
member of the class of 1923 in the Grafton High School. 

William B. Stuck has devoted a large share of his activt 
years to the drug business at Grafton, and is one of th( 
prominent drug men of the state. His business is known as the 
Grafton Drug & Chemical Company. 

Dr. Stuck, as he is always known, was born at Palatine 
now part of the City of Fairmont, Marion County, March 30 
1860. His grandfather, Stephen Stuck, who married a Miss 
Hall, was a brother of iVIatthias Stuck, of Terra Alta, and s 
record of that branch of the family and its earlier generations 
is given elsewhere in this publication. 

Squire H. Stuck, father of Dr. Stuck, was a native ol 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and settled in Marion County 
West Virginia, a few years prior to the Civil war. He was a 
miner by early training and experience, and at Fairmont h( 
became boss or foreman of the old Rainey and Ore coal mine! 
there. Although he had a family of eight children, he was one 
of the first to enlist in the LTnion Army when the Civil wai 
came on, serving in Company G of the Fifteenth West Vir- 
ginia Cavalry. He was in the war until the end, with the 
Army of the Potomac, and among other battles was at Gettys- 
burg, Cedar Creek and Winchester. He was never wounded 
or captured. After the war he resumed coal mining, but about 
1875 moved to Taylor County and spent the rest of his life 
on a farm near Grafton, where he died in 1905, at the age ol 
eighty-six. He was a republican voter, and was a devout 
Methodist, helping build the first church of that denomination 
at Palatine, and for many years was superintendent of the 
Sunday School. He married Mary Jane Green, a native of 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania, who died in 1896. A brief record 
of their children is: Elizabeth, of Fairmont, widow of William 
Wallace; Lottie, widow of Nathan Hall, lives with a daughtei 
in Ohio; Miss Laura, deceased; Nancy, who married Harry 
Butler and died at Fairmont; James W., who is identified with 
gold and silver mining in Sierra County, New Me.xico; Eli L., 
a resident of Fairmont; William B., and Lawrence A., who 
died at Fairmont, leaving a wife and two children. 

During the first fifteen years of his life William B. Stuck 
lived with his parents at the toll gate on the pike at Fairmont, 
and some of his first recollections were connected with the 
passing of soldiers back and forth over that road. He came tc 
manhood on the farm in the suburbs of Grafton. He possessed 
a country school education, and when he left home he went tc 
McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and entered the sheet mill ol 
W. D. Woods & Company, who had the reputation of making 
the best sheet-iron in the country. He learned the trade and 
worked there four years, until illness compelled him to returi 
home. After recovering, instead of resuming his trade, he 
became one of the promoters of and partner in the Graftoi 




Jr /^ ^^^ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



85 



Drug and Chemical Company. While his first partner left 
ho businesa and it has changed management four times, Dr. 
ituck has been with it practically without interruption. This 
ompany is one of the large stockholders In the United Drug 
Company of Boston. Mr. Stack is a member of the Druggists' 
Association of West Virginia and the United Druggists Asso- 
iation. 

In Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, in 1889, Dr. Stuck mar- 
led Miss Katie B. McClurg, daughter of John McClurg, who 
vlth his wife was a native of Scotland and on coming to the 
Juited States settled around Pittsburgh and McKeesport. 
^Irs. Stuck was born at McKeesport, one of a family of six 
laughters and one son, the others still living being the wife of 
3r. Cope, John McClurg of California, and a sister who 
iH-ently died was the wife of I. N. Scott, a prominent stair 
lullder of Pittsburgh. Dr. and Mrs. Stuck have three chil- 
Ircn. Mary Agnes is the wife of C. O. Brown, of Blueville, 
Paylor County, and has a son, Donald. The two younger 
hlldren are Mary Elizabeth and William B., Jr. The latter 
:raduated from high school in 1922. The daughters also 
;raduated from the Grafton High. Mary Agnes graduated 
.'ith high honors from Sadler's Business College, Baltimore, 
ihile Mary E. graduated from Clarksburg Business College. 

Frank L. Matson, M. D. As a youth and young man 
Joctor Matson was in the railroad service, but finally be- 
;an preparation for a professional career, and for the 
last fifteen years has carried on a busy practice as a 
ibysieian and surgeon at Hundred in Wetzel County. 

Doctor Matson was born at Watts Flats in Chautauqua 
^Jounty, New York, December 12, 1878. In the paternal 
ino he is of Scotch ancestry. His grandfather was a 
lative of New York State and an early farmer at Watts 
riats, where he lived out his life. His wife was of Irish 
meestry. James E. Matson, father of Doctor Matson, 
ipent all his life at Watts Flats, where he was born in 
.840 and died in 1895. He was a merchant, for twenty 
'ears was postmaster, was a republican in politics and 
vas aflSliated with the Methodist Episcopal Church and 
he Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He was three 
imes married. By his second wife he had a daughter, 
?earl, now deceased. His third marriage was with Miss 
Slvira E. Hayes, who was born at Wattsburg, Pennsyl- 
'ania, in 1860, and is now living at Canton, Ohio. Her 
;wo sons are Frank L. and James E., the latter an agent 
'or the East Ohio Gas Company at Uhrichsville, Ohio. 

Frank L. Matson acquired his grade school education 
u Watts Flats. About the time he completed school he 
earned telegraphy, and for five years was an operator with 
;he Erie Eailroad, the first two years acting as relief 
jperator on different stations on the First Division. The 
ast three years his service was chiefly at Saegerstown, 
Pennsylvania, as operator, though much of the time he 
ipent in the train dispatcher's office at Meadville. 

Doctor Matson first came to West Virginia in 1900 as 
telegraph operator at Pine Grove in Wetzel County for 
;he Hope Natural Gas Company. He was there two years 
ind filled a similar position one year at Uniontown in 
Wetzel County. In 1903 he entered the University of 
Lionisville, and diligently pursued his medical studies until 
le graduated M. D. in 1906. After graduating he prac- 
ticed a year at Littleton in Wetzel County, and since then 
las had his home and offices at Hundred. For the past 
?ight years he had been local surgeon for the Baltimore & 
Dhio EaUway Company, for five years has served as city 
wealth officer, and has a large private clientage both as a 
physician and surgeon. His offices are on Eailroad Street, 
)ppo3ite the depot. 

Doctor Matson is a republican, has served one year on 
the City Council of Hundred, is a member of the Meth- 
jdist Episcopal Church and is affiliated with Littleton 
LK)dge No. 131, A. F. and A. M., West Virginia Consistory of 
the Scottish Eite at Wheeling, Osiris Temple of the Mystic 
=!hrine at Wheeling, Hundred Lodge No. 200, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and Hundred Lodge No. 84, Knights 
of Pythias. He is a member of the Marshall County Med- 
ical Society and the State and American Medical associa- 
tions. During the war ho was a worker in all the local 
irives for the sale of bonds and other patriotic causes. 



In June, 1910, at Wellsburg, West Virginia, Doctor 
Matson married Miss Emma Jane Kelley, daughter of 
James A. and Annie (Thompson) Kelley. Her mother 
died in 1921, at Wellsburg, where her father resides. Mrs. 
Matson, who is a graduate of the WeUsburg High School, 
is the mother of one son, Frank Lloyd, Jr., born June 28. 
1912. 

William Patton Beane, M. D. The leading physician 
and surgeon of Keystone, MeDoweli County, is Dr. William 
Payton Beane, whose work here for ten years has earned 
him all the honors that can possibly be accorded the skill- 
ful, conscientious and thorough practitioner. 

Doctor Beane was born December 5, 1878, at Bed Boil- 
ing Springs, Tennessee, son of John and Martha E. (Leon- 
ard) Beane, natives of the same state. His ancestors were 
largely Irish, and the families have been represented in 
Tennessee, North Carolina and Virginia. John Beane was 
a farmer, later a merchant, for eighteen years held the of- 
fice of justice of the peace, and was a member of the Ma- 
sonic Order and the Christian Church. 

William Payton Beane acquired a public school education 
in his native county, and as ho could not look to his par- 
ents for further help in the matter of education he de- 
pended upon himself and his labors. For thirteen years 
he alternately taught and studied, attended a normal school 
at Bowling Green, Kentucky, and by the exercise of great 
thrift and saving and by helping another he helped him- 
self so that he was able to take three years in the University 
of Tennessee Medical School at Nashville. He finished his 
course at Memphis, graduating M. D. in 1912. During his 
junior and senior years he spent much time in clinics and 
hospital work at Nashville and Memphis. 

After graduating Doctor Beane removed to McDowell 
County in 1912 and for three months did relief work in 
the Welch District. He then located at Keystone and be- 
gan general practice. While he is not a specialist, his skill 
in handling children's diseases is especially acknowledged. 
He does a great deal of work in the Bluefield Sanitarium, 
St. Luke's Hospital at Bluefield, and in the Miners Hospi- 
tal No. 1 at Welch. He has admirable personal qualifica- 
tions for his profession, and the determined struggle he 
made in his early years has given him a quality that does 
not recognize defeat and his resourcefulness in handling 
the problems of disease is well known. 

Doctor Beane in 1913, at Keystone, married Mrs. Alice 
Mae (Peery) Winston. Mrs. Winston by her former mar- 
riage has two sons, Charles and Eoy, Charles being a truck 
driver for the Tazewell Lumber Company. Doctor and 
Mrs. Beane are members of the Christian Church, and he is 
affiliated with the Masonic Lodge. He is a member of the 
McDowell County, West Virginia State and American Medi- 
cal Associations. 

John M. Herold, Jr., cashier of the First National Bank 
of Webster Springs, the judicial center of Webster County, 
was born in Nicholas County, West Virginia, April 20, 
188.5, and is a son of Charles F. and Laural L. (Hutchin- 
.son) Herold, both likewise natives of Nicholas County, 
where the former was born in 1861 and the latter in 186;!, 
both having been reared under the influences of farm life 
and both having received the advantages of the common 
schools of their native county, where they still maintain 
their home, the father being not only a successful farmer 
of Nicholas County but also owning and conducting a gen- 
eral store. Charles F. Herold is a democrat in politics, is 
affiliated with the Masonic Blue Lodge at Summersville, 
and he and his wife are active members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. Of the nine children seven are 
living: Howard, a graduate of the Massey Business Col- 
lege at Louisville, Kentucky, is a resident of Clarksburg, 
West Virginia; John M., of this review, is the next younger; 
Elmer, who is at the parental home, was a member of the 
Seventy-ninth United States Infantry in the World war and 
served with the American Expeditionary Forces in France, 
where he was at the front on the Argonne sector and also 
took part in other conflicts; Bascom L., who likewise is 
now at the parental home, served in the World war as a 



86 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



member of the Three Hundred and Thirteenth Machine Gun 
Battalion, which was at the front and took part in a num- 
ber of important battles in France, as a part of the Eighti- 
eth Division; Misses Lulu and Bernice and also the young- 
est son, DelmaSj are members of the parental home circle. 

The influences and vitalizing activities of the home farm 
compassed the childhood and early youth of John M. Herold, 
Jr., and his preliminary education was acquired in the local 
schools. Thereafter he was graduated in the commercial 
or business department of Morris Harvey College, and he 
then continued his active association with the work and 
management of the old home farm for a period of ten 
years. In December, 1907, he became bookkeeper in the 
First National Bank of Webster Springs, and one year 
later he was advanced to the position of assistant cashier, 
of which he continued the incumbent seven years. He has 
since been the cashier of the institution and has been a re- 
soiirceful executive in the upbuilding of its substantial 
business and making it an effective conservator of the in- 
terests of the community. The personnel of the oflBcial 
corps of the bank is as here noted: E. H. Morton, presi- 
dent; Dr. 8. P. Allen, vice president; John M. Herold, Jr., 
cashier; and W. H. McCutcheon, assistant cashier. In ad- 
dition to the president and vice president the directorate 
of the institution includes also T. M. Hicks, H. B. Nichols 
and O. C. Ferrell. 

Mr. Herold has had no desire for special political activity 
but is a loyal supporter of the cause of the democratic 
party. He is affiliated with Addison Lodge No. 116, A. F. 
and A. M., and his wife is an active member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, South. 

September 15, 1909, recorded the marriage of Mr. Her- 
old and Miss Ida Miller, who was born at Webster Springs 
and who received the advantages not only of the public 
schools of this village but also those of the Mountain State 
Business College at Parkersburg. Mr. and Mrs. Herold 
have four children: Charles (a student in the Junior High 
School), Ruthj Marjorie and John M., II. 

Will L. Wooddell has so applied his professional ability 
and constructive energies as to gain secure vantage-ground 
as one of the prominent and successful members of the 
bar of Webster County, where he is established in practice 
at Webster Springs, the county seat. 

Mr. Wooddell is a scion of sterling old Virginia ancestry 
and was born at Greenbank, Pocahontas County, West Vir- 
ginia, on the 14th of March, 1876, a son of William J. and 
Martha J. (Gum) Wooddell, both natives of Virginia, where 
the father was born in Rockingham County. William J. 
Wooddell was long numbered among the honored and influ- 
ential citizens of Pocahontas County, West Virginia, where 
he became a successful merchant and farmer, where he 
served two terms as county sheriff and where he was twice 
elected representative of the county in the House of Dele- 
gates of the State Legislature, his political allegiance hav- 
ing been given to the democratic party. Both he and his 
wife were active members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. Of their children the eldest is Margaret, 
who is the wife of Dr. M. H. Dyer, a representative physi- 
cian in the City of Charleston; Anna is the wife of Arthur 
Sheets, of Harrison County; Virgie is the wife of J. N. 
Craddock, a former mayor of Clarksburg, this state, she 
having formerly served as police matron in that city; Clara, 
who is the widow of J. Lee Conrad, attended the University 
of West Virginia and is now a popular teacher in the pub- 
lic schools at Clarksburg; Nettie is the vrife of H. C. Thur- 
mond, a retired lawyer and the present (1922) mayor of 
Webster Springs; Mattie is the wife of W. S. Wysong, of 
whom specific mention is made on other pages, she being 
a graduate of the West Virginia State Normal School at 
Glenville and having been a successful teacher prior to her 
marriage; Bantz S. is clerk of the County Court of Webster 
County; James W. is manager of the Waldo Hotel at 
Clarksburg; and Will L., of this review, is youngest of the 
number. 

After having profited by the advantages of the public 
schools of Webster Springs, where the family home was es- 
tablished when he was a boy, Will L. Wooddell pursued 



higher academic studies by attending the State Normal 
School at Glenville. In 1900 he graduated in the law de- 
partment of the University of West Virginia, his reception 
of the degree of Bachelor of Laws having been virtually 
coincident with his admission to the bar of his native state. 
He forthwith engaged in active general practice at Webster 
Springs and he has been an outstanding figure in his pro- 
fession in this county, owing to his exceptional ability as 
a trial lawyer and his mature judgment as a counsellor. 
Since 1906 he has maintained a professional partnership 
with Senator Morton. He served two terms as prosecut- 
ing attorney of Webster County, and has been active and 
influential in the local councils of the democratic party. 
Mr. Wooddell is affiliated with Elk Fork Lodge No. 116, 
A. F. and A. M. ; Sutton Chapter No. 129, R. A. M. ; and 
Sutton Commandery No. 16, Knights Templars. Both he 
and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. 

Mr. Wooddell wedded Miss Marguerite Miller, who was 
born and reared in Webster County and whose youthful 
education included a course in the State Normal School at 
Fairmont. Mr. and Mrs. Wooddell have four children: 
Holt is a successful teacher in the public schools of Web- 
ster Springs at the time of this writing, in 1922 ; Gordon is 
a student in the University of West Virginia; Marguerite 
is a graduate of the normal department of the Webster 
Springs High School; and Maurice is a student in the local 
high school. 

Bantz S. Wooddell has shown naught of apathy or des- 
ultory interest in his prolonged service as a public execu- 
tive in Webster County, and is giving a most circumspect 
and effective administration as county clerk, to which office 
he was elected in November, 1920, and the duties of which 
he assumed January 1, 1921. In 1908 he was appointed dep- 
uty sheriff of the county, and after serving four years in 
this position he was for six years the incumbent of the 
position of deputy county clerk, in which connection he 
made a record that marked him as a most eligible candi- 
date for the office of county clerk, to which he was elected 
on the democratic ticket. 

Mr. Wooddell was born at Greenbank, Pocahontas County, 
West Virginia, on the 8th of February, 1871, and is a son 
of William J. and Mattie J. (Gum) Wooddell, who removed 
to Webster Springs, judicial center of Webster County, 
when he was a lad of nine years. In the attractive village 
that is now his home Mr. Wooddell was thus reared to 
adult age, his educational work having in the meanwhile 
been carried forward in the public schools. Here also he 
served a practical apprenticeship to the printer's trade, the 
intricacies and mysteries of which he compassed in due 
course. After working for some time in the offices of the 
Webster Springs newspaper which had afforded him his 
training in the "art preservative of all arts," he was em- 
ployed at his trade in the City of Charleston. Later he 
returned to Webster Springs, where he acquired a financial 
interest in the Webster Echo, with the publication of which 
he continued his active association until 1908, when he 
was appointed deputy sheriff, as previously noted in this 
context. He has been continuously in public service in the 
county since that year, and this fact in itself bears signifi- 
cant evidence of his executive efficiency and his personal 
popularity. As may be inferred from a previous statement, 
Mr. Wooddell is a stalwart advocate of the principles of 
the democratic party, and in the Masonic fraternity he is 
affiliated with Addison Lodge No. 116, A. F. and A. M. ; 
Sutton Chapter No. 29, R. A. M. ; and Sutton Commandery 
No. 16. Knights Templars. 

April 18, 1899, recorded the marriage of Mr. Wooddell 
and Miss Gertrude Curry, and she passed to the life eter- 
nal in 1912, four children surviring her: Craddock C, 
who was born in April, 1900, and who is now in the avia- 
tion service of the United States Government at Manila, 
Philippine Islands; William B. is, in 1922, attending the 
Webster Springs High School; and the younger children 
are Ruth and June. For his second wife Mr. Wooddell 
wedded Miss Sallie M. Killow, of Oakland. Maryland, and 
they have three children: Mary Helen, Kathryn and Jo- 



HISTOEY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



87 



jph Hopwood. Mrs. Wooddell is a popular figure in the 
jcial life of her home community, and is an active mem- 
er of the local Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

David Walter Ndxl is a member of the firm Funk & 
Full, contractors in the drilling of oil and gas wells, 
heir headquarters are at Hundred in Wetzel County, 
luring the eleven years this firm has been operating in 
7esl Virginia it is claimed for them that they never 
lugged a hole and never moved a rig until the well was 
rilled. Mr. Null, of this firm, has had a wide experi- 
nce in the oU fields of the East and West, covering all 
le years since early youth. 

He was born in Greene County, Pennsylvania, September 
4, 1882. His father, David NuU, still living at his home 
ear Deep Valley in Greene County, was born in West- 
loreland County, Pennsylvania, in 1839, and as a young 
lan went to Greene County, where he married and where 
uring his active life he conducted an extensive farm and 
id much business as a carpenter. He is now retired and 
i a democrat in politics. David Null married Lizzie 
Vright, a native of Deep Valley, and she died at the old 
ome there. She was the mother of the following children: 
lary, wife of Lloyd Strope, president of the First Na- 
ional Bank of Cameron, West Virginia; James H., an oil 
nd gas weU contractor living at Garrison, Pennsylvania; 
jucy, wife of Burns Lemley, a native of Ned, Pennsyl- 
ania; Rachel, wife of Joe Sellers, a farmer near Deep 
''alley; Eva, wife of James Murphy, a merchant, stock 
lealer and prominent business man at Littleton, West Vir- 
;inia; David Walter, the subject of this article; Miss 
jotta and Miss Ada, still at home with their father. 

David Walter Null attended the rural schools of his 
lative county in Pennsylvania, and his activities were 
dentified with his father's farm until he was eighteen. 
Since then he has been in some phase of the oil industry, 
fhe first three years he was a tool dresser in the Deep 
/^alley field. During 1905 he began drilling in the Bartles- 
dlle field of Oklahoma, but in 1906 became identified with 
he drilling operations in the Wetzel County field near 
lundred. In 1910 he formed his present association with 
Hr. Funk, and they have conducted an extensive business 
IS reliable contractors for the drilling of oil and gas 
veils, and have a large capital employed in their tools and 
lutfits and the operating expenses. His partner is Thomas 
i. Funk, and they own their ofiiee building on Wetzel 
Joad. 

Mr. Null is also president of the Wetzel Natural Gas 
company. He owns one of the best homes in this vicinity, 
ocated three-quarters of a mile west of Hundred, and has 
;wo other dwellings nearby. Mr. Null is a democrat, and 
luring the World war responded with his means and in- 
luence in behalf of every patriotic drive. 

January 17, 1906, at Bartlesville, Oklahoma, he mar- 
•icd Cecile Virginia Eiggs. Mrs. Null was born at Lewis- 
ion, Idaho, but represents an old West Virginia family 
md she graduated from the high school at St. Marys, this 
state, in 1905. Her father, Arthur Perry Eiggs, was born 
Dear St. Marys in Pleasants County in 1841, was reared 
find married there, conducted a farm, and was a leading 
man in the democratic party of the county. He served 
as county commissioner and road supervisor. Twice he 
removed to the Far West, and he homesteaded a claim near 
Lewiston, Idaho, proving it up before he sold it. His 
daughter, Mrs. Null, was the first white child born in 
Nez Perce County, Idaho. Mr. Biggs is affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. During the Civil 
war he was a Southern man in sympathies, was a member 
of the Home Militia, and he received a silver cup for pro- 
tecting Judge Jackson of Parkersburg from an attack by 
Northern men. Mr. Eiggs married India Barker, who was 
born at Sylvan Mills in Pleasants County, December 9, 
1851, and is now living at Holiday, Oklahoma. Mr. and 
Mrs. Null are the parents of six children: David Arthur, 
born November 8, 1906; Eugene Jennings, born March 2, 
1908; Vaughn Aubrey, bom May 12, 1911; Neill Nathan, 
born August 9, 1912; Orville Milton, born June 13, 1918; 
and Annond Walter, born June 4, 1920. 



John Newton Casey. The entire industrial career of 
John Newton Casey has been passed in the employ of the 
Chesapeake & Ohio EaUroad Company, with which sys- 
tem he has advanced steadily to a position of importance. 
Starting in a minor capacity about eighteen years ago, 
his fidelity, industry and general ability have combined 
to gain him consecutive promotions and he is now chief 
car distributor at Huntington. 

Mr. Casey was born at Irouton, Ohio, April 4, 1887, and 
is a son of John Newton and Minerva (Wright) Casey. 
His grandfather, John Casey, spent the greater part of his 
life in Lawrence County, Kentucky, where he was engaged 
in extensive agricultural operations and where his death 
occurred prior to the birth of his grandson. He married 
Mary Justice, who also died in Lawrence County. John 
Newton Casey, the elder, was born at Fallsburg, Lawrence 
County, Kentucky, July 13, 1843, and was reared in the 
vicinity of Ironton, Ohio. When the war between the states 
came on he enlisted in the Union Army, in a West Vir- 
ginia volunteer infantry regiment, with which he served 
throughout the period of the struggle, and participated in 
numerous engagements, being with General Sherman's 
troops on their famous ' ' march to the sea. ' ' He was 
within ten feet of General Sherman when he gave that his- 
toric command: "Turn, boys! Turn, we are going back. 
We wiU gain the ground we slept on last night, or there 
will be blood shed. ' ' Mr. Casey had an excellent military 
record, and after receiving his honorable discharge returned 
to the community of Ironton, Ohio, where he became a 
pioneer blacksmith. He spent the remainder of his life 
there, engaged in following his trade, and died at Lawrenca 
Furnace, Ohio, a suburb of Ironton, February 12, 1887. 
He was a republican in his political views, and as a church- 
man acknowledged the Christian faith. At Louisa, Ken- 
tucky, he married Miss Minerva Wright, who was born at 
Grayson, Kentucky, July 12, 1860, now a resident of Iron- 
ton. They became the parents of four children: Harry, 
an apprenticed machinist at Irouton, Ohio; Mary, who re- 
sides with her mother; John Newton; and Dr. Chester A. 
Casey, who is novif a prominent physician and surgeon at 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

John Newton Casey, the younger, attended the public 
schools of Ironton, Ohio, leaving school in 1903. In the 
same year he commenced his connection with the Chesapeake 
& Ohio Eailroad Company, starting as bUl clerk in the 
offices at Ironton, Ohio. Later he was promoted to the po- 
sition of cashier, and this was followed by his advancement 
to the post of assistant agent at Eussell, Kentucky. In 
August, 1913, he was transferred to Huntington, West Vir- 
ginia, where he acted as ticket agent until July, 1917, and 
was then promoted to be chief clerk to the chief car dis- 
tributor. In May, 1918, he was appointed car distributor 
at St. Albans, West Virginia, and January 1, 1919, was 
made night chief car distributor at Huntington. On Jan- 
uary 1, 1921, he was advanced to be chief car distributor 
at Huntington, the position which he holds at this time. 
His offices are situated on the third floor of the passenger 
depot of the Chesapeake & Ohio Eailroad, on Seventh Ave- 
nue, between Ninth and Tenth streets. Mr. Casey is a 
thorough railroad man, and, having worked his way up 
through the various departments, has a comprehensive 
knowledge of details. He has found little time to devote 
to matters outside of the immediate line of his work,_ but 
takes a good citizen 's interest in civic affairs and politics, 
and votes the republican ticket. His religious affiliation is 
with the Christian Church. Mr. Casey is a thirty-second 
degree Mason, and a member of Huntington Lodge No. 53, 
A. F. and A. M., West Virginia Consistory No. 1, of 
Wheeling, and Beni-Kedem Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., at 
Charleston. He owns a pleasant and comfortable residence 
at No. 614 Fifth Street, one of Huntington's modern 
homes. 

On September 6, 1916, Mr. Casey was united in marriage 
at Mobile, Alabama, with Miss Marie Eichey, a graduate 
of Marshall College, Huntington, and a daughter of Will- 
iam C. and Mollie (Darling) Eichey, residents of Hunting- 
ton, where Mr. Eichey is identified with the Varnum Eealty 



88 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



Company. Two chUdren have come to Mr. and Mrs. C&sej: 
Mary Kloise, born May 17, 1918; and Anna Mazine, born 
November bO, 1919. 

Deapeb C. Hoovek ia, in 1922, serving his third consecu- 
tive term as a deputy sherilf of Webster County, main- 
tains his residence at Webster Springs, the county seat, 
and is the owner of a well improved farm in the county. 
Mr. Hoover was born on a farm in this county, August 
30, 1873, and is a son of William H. and Jerusha (Mc- 
Elvaine) Hoover, both natives of what is now West Vir- 
ginia, the father having been born in Braxton County, on 
the 14th of March, 1«45, and the latter having«been born 
in Webster County, in 1842, and here her death oc- 
curred in 1909. William H. Hoover was reared on the 
old home farm of his parents in Braxton County, and 
gained his youthful education in the subscription schools 
of the locality and period and by ambitious application to 
study at home. He read much and with discrimination, 
gained broad information and was a specially apprecia- 
tive student of history during the entire course of his life. 
After their marriage he and his wife lived on a farm in 
Braxton County about two years, and then came to Web- 
ster County, where he purchased the excellent farm which 
continued the stage of his productive enterprise until the 
iilose of his life, in 1890. He was a man of mature judg- 
ment, and thus wielded no little iniiuence in community 
affairs of public order. His political faith was that of 
the democratic party, and he was at one time a candidate 
for the State Senate, his defeat being compassed by the 
political exigencies implied in the large republican major- 
ity given normally in the district at that time. He served 
under Sheriff P. F. Duffy as a deputy sheriff of Webster 
County and was also a member of the board of education 
of his district, both he and his wife having been zealous 
members of the Methodist Protestant Church. Of the thir- 
teen children two died in infancy and eight are living in 
1922. 

Draper C. Hoover has reason to congratulate himself 
for having received in his boyhood and youth the sturdy 
discipline of the farm, for he was seventeen years of age 
at the time of his father 's death, and his training had for- 
tified him for the responsibilities which thus fell upon him 
in the management of the home farm for his widowed 
mother, with whom he remained until he had attained to 
the age of twenty-seven years and who was the object of 
his deep filial solicitude until her death. He has never 
severed his allegiance to the great basic industries of ag- 
riculture and stock-growing, and still maintains a general 
supervision of his valuable farm near Cowen, Webster 
County, besides which he is a director of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Cowen, of which he was formerly vice presi- 
dent. He is unwavering in support of the principles of 
the democratic party, and is affiliated with Cowen Lodge 
No. 176, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he 
is a past noble grand and which he represented in the 
Grand Lodge of the state in 1898. 

In January, 1900, Mr. Hoover wedded Miss Ella Payne, 
of Webster Springs, in which village she was reared and 
educated, she having been a popular teacher ia the schools 
of her native county prior to her marriage. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hoover became the parents of four children, of whom 
the first-born, Fred C, died at the age of five years; 
Leo F. graduated in the Webster Springs High School 
and is now a successful teacher in the public schools of 
this village; Wealthy is attending the home high school 
and Lillian, the autocrat of the parental home, is three years 
old. 

James W. White. That Mr. White is a citizen of maxi- 
mum progressiveness and influence in Webster City, judicial 
center of Webster County, needs no further voucher than 
the statement that here he is serving as postmaster and is 
also editor, publisher and active manager of the Webster 
Eepublican, a weekly newspaper that is an effective expo- 
nent of local interests and of the principles of the repub- 
lican party. 

Mr. White was born at Kingwood, Preston County, West 



Virginia, on the 2d of December, 1858, and is a son of John 
N. and Malinda J. (Feather) White, both likewise natives 
of Preston County, where the respective families were 
founded in the pioneer days, when that section was on the 
frontier of the western part of Virginia. John N. White 
was reared under the iutluences and conditions of the pi- 
oneer days, and in his youth learned the carpenter trade, to 
which he continued to devote his attention at Albright, Pres- 
ton County, until the Civil war began. Hig loyalty to the 
Union was signalized by his prompt enlistment in 1861 as a 
member of a regiment of West Virginia volunteer infantry, 
and he continued in active service, with a record of valor 
in numerous battles and minor engagements, until he was 
captured by Confederate forces and incarcerated in historic 
Andersonville Prison, the hardships of which he endured un- 
til his death, which there occurred in 1864. His widow sur- 
vived him many years, both having become earnest 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church long prior to 
the separation of the bodies of the denomination in the 
North and the South, incidental to the CivU war. They 
became the parents of four children: Letitia is the wife of 
William K. Shaffer, a representative teacher at Morgan- 
town; James W., of this review, was the next in order of 
birth; Joseph C. is a prosperous farmer in Upshur; and 
Mrs. Eliza Forsythe is deceased, as is also her husband. 

The schools of his native county afforded to James W. 
White his youthful education, and there also he served 
his apprenticeship to the printer's trade, which as a jour- 
neyman he thereafter followed in various newspaper oltices. 
He became associated with E. M. Heermans as one of the 
editors and publishers of the Preston County Journal at 
Kingwood, and after a period of ten years he sold his in- 
terest in this paper and became editor and publisher of the 
Preston Leader and New Era. With this paper he contin- 
ued his active alliance until 1910, when he purchased the 
plant and business of the Webster Eepublican, of which he 
has since been editor and publisher and which has been 
brought to a high standard under his vigorous and pro- 
gressive management. While a resident of Kingwood Mr. 
White there served two years as postmaster, besides which 
he represented his native county two terms in the Lower 
House of the State Legislature. He has been a resolute 
and resourceful advocate and supporter of the principles and 
policies for which the republican party has ever stood spon- 
sor in a basic way, and has done much to advance its local 
interests, both through his newspapers and his activity in 
its councils and campaign work. At Kingwood he still re- 
tains affiliation with Preston Lodge No. 90, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, and he is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. The maiden name of Mrs. White was 
Nettie F. Graham, and she likewise was born and reared in 
Preston County. They had children: Martha J., a gradu- 
ate of Shepherd College, ia the wife of William B. Snyder, 
of Shepherdstown, West Virginia, and Kathleen, who is 
deceased. Mrs. White, the mother of these children, died 
February 1, 1896. On March 5, 1921, Mr. White married 
Mrs. Helen Purinton Liady, of New York City, but a na- 
tive of Preston County, West Virginia. 

Geoeoe W. Jackson is giving most effective service as 
clerk of the Circuit Court for Webster County, and is one 
of the popular citizens of Webster Springs, the county 
seat. He was born in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, 
October 18, 1883, and is a son of William A. and Nannie 
B. (Brant) Jackson, both likewise natives of that county, 
where the former was born in 1861 and the latter in 1862, 
each having been reared on a farm and each having re- 
ceived the advantages of the local schools of the period. 
They still reside on the farm upon which they established 
their home at the time of their marriage and which is the 
stage of successful agricultural and live-stock industry, 1 
William A. Jackson being the owner of a valuable landed ' 
estate of 320 acres and having become one of the repre- i 
sentative agriculturists and leading stock-growers of his j 
native county. His political allegiance is given to the dem- 1 
ocratic party, and both he and his wife are members of the • 
Baptist Church. Of the seven children all are living except; 
one: Henry C. is a graduate of the Dunsmore Business) 




^^t't^ut.y^ T<^''<^ocCi^£^t--^p___ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



89 



College at Lewisburg, judicial center of Greenbrier County; 
Naomi is the wife of W. P. Via; (Jeorge W., of this sketch, 
was the next in order of birth; Gordon is a successful 
farmer in his native county; and Jennie and Clowny remain 
at the parental home. 

In the public schools of Greenbrier County George W. 
Jackson continued his studies until his graduation from the 
high school at Lewisburg, and thereafter he graduated also 
from the Doinsmore Business College, besides which he took 
a course in the Moore School of Telegraphy in the City of 
Cincinnati, Ohio. Thereafter he served as telegraph opera- 
tor and relief agent in the employ of the Chesapeake & 
Ohio Eailroad Company. He was for nine years with Mc- 
Graw on the narrow-gauge line, was a station agent eight 
years, and for one year wag treasurer of the narrow-gauge 
railroad. He was appointed postmaster of Webster Springs 
under the administration of President Wilson, and after 
retaining this office five years and four months and giving 
a most satisfactory administration he was, in the autumn of 
1920, elected Circuit Court clerk for Webster County, the 
duties of which office he assumed January 1, 1921. He is 
the owner of one-half interest in the Webster Echo, a dem- 
ocratic weekly paper published at Webster Springs, and 
is a stockholder in the People 's Store, a leading mercan- 
tile concern of this village. Mr. Jackson has wielded much 
influence in connection with the councils and campaign 
work of the Webster County contingent of the democratic 
party. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South, of which he is a steward, and he is a 
past master of Addison Lodge No. 116, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons. 

On the 4th of July, 1906, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Jackson and Miss Virgie Cool, and they have two 
daughters: Helen, born December 22, 1916, and Jean, born 
November 10, 1920. 

Judge Samuel D. Littlepage was born at "Greystone, " 
the Littlepage Mansion, west of Charleston, Kanawha Coun- 
ty, West Virgini.T, on February 14, 1856. He was the fourth 
son of Adam B. Littlepage, Sr., and Eebecca Wood Little- 
page, and one of their seven children. His father, Adam 
B. Littlepage, Sr., was a native of Virginia, of an old Vir- 
ginian ancestry, more remotely Scotch-English, and was one 
of the early settlers in Knn.nwha County, West Virginia, in 
the late 30 's. He first settled at Maiden, Kanawha County, 
at that time a part of the State of Virginia. Later, in the 
early 40 's, he moved down the Kanawha River to a jioint 
west of the Elk Eiver, and there completed a home, known 
as "Greystone," in which he lived until the outbreak of 
the Civil war. 

Rebecca Wood Littlepage, the mother of Judge Samuel 
D. Littlepage, was a daughter of the sturdy mountaineer 
Woods family, part of which family lived near the mouth 
of Coal River, Kanawha County, West Virginia. 

Adam B. Littlepage, Sr., was a type of character peculiar 
to the southwest mountain section of West Virginia. At 
the outbreak of the Civil war he and his oldest son, John 
Littlepage, enlisted in the Confederate army. Adam B. 
Littlepage was killed in the army early in the war, and 
John Littlepage served throughout the conflict. At the 
death of his father another son, Charles Littlepage, the 
next oldest, ran away from home to take the place of his 
father in the Confederate army. 

During the war the devastation by both the Federal 
army and Confederate army left the widow and the 
seven children of Adam B. Littlepage, Sr., with nothing 
but the land and home acquired by him — reduced from 
prosperity and plenty to actual want. The family clung 
together and sought to re-establish their fallen fortunes. 
The five boys remained on the farm and that, with their 
several efforts, together with the guiding genius and un- 
faltering spirit of their mother, provided a livelihood for 
them all. 

Two of the boys, Adam B. Littlepage, Jr., and Samuel 
D. Littlepage, were inseparable. By dint of their efforts 
and unfailing courage they acquired enough funds and a 
country school education with which to enable them to 
take up the study of their chosen profession, the law. 



Judge Samuel D. Littlepage first studied law under the 
late Judge James Ferguson at his home at Charleston, West 
Virginia, and having earned enough money to pay his way 
he entered Washington and Lee University, and ttere com- 
pleted his studies of law. He was admitted to the Charles- 
ton bar in 1886. 

In 1887 Judge Littlepage and Miss Mary Kemp were 
married. His wife was a daughter of a Confederate sol- 
dier, Burrell Thomas Kemp, living at Albany, Georgia, 
who had served throughout the Civil war. Three children 
were bom to them, a son, Burrell Kemp Littlepage, and two 
daughters, Mrs. Eebecca Littlepage Wood and Mrs. 
Charles Littlepage Donnally. 

Judge Littlepage was a democrat of the old school. He 
was defeated on his party ticket for circuit clerk in 1884 in 
Kanawha County. A few years later he was elected and 
served a term as assessor of Kanawha County. In 1912 
he was elected circuit judge of the Tenth Judicial Circuit 
of West Virginia, composed of the counties of Kanawha 
and Clay. Between 1910 and 1912 he and his son were 
partners in the general practice of law at Charleston. The 
partnership was dissolved when he went upon the bench. 

Judge Littlepage was known for his unceasing, untiring, 
prompt, and fair discharging of his judicial duties on the 
bench. He had the rare faculty of successfully delving 
to the bottom of legal controversies submitted to him, 
and seemed gifted with the ability to arrive at just deci- 
sion of the merits of the case, even more as a man than 
as a jurist coldly applying the technical gauges of the 
law. He gained' the love and respect alike of members 
of the bar practicing before him, litigants submitting their 
causes to him, and the masses of the people who had placed 
him in the judgeship, which he held at his death, in a 
manner seldom, if ever, equaled as a tribute paid to any 
public man in the State of West Virginia. 

He was possessed of a force of wUl and self-reliance 
and a courage above the average. In whatsoever undertak- 
ing he engaged his strong personality was a large factor, 
and his perseverance brought to him his success in life 
under conditions that would have discouraged a less sturdy 
and determined character. He feared no antagonist and 
was unfaithful to no client or trust. He was of a cheerful 
and optimistic disposition, and possessed a courtesy and 
gallantry typical of the old school of Southern gentlemen. 

Having spent his childhood and early manhood outdoors 
in a sparsely settled community at a time and in a section 
where the use of a gun was treated as a necessary part 
of an education, it was but natural that his inclination 
throughout his life should be toward the great outdoors. 
He was an ardent hunter and fisherman, and gained from 
Nature a vision in his early years by his communion with 
her in her visible forms, that was materialized in his 
after life, not only in a love for his fellow men, but for all 
living creatures. 

He was imbued with a spirit of kindliness that was not 
the least of the qualities that drew all living things to 
him as their friend. He was a Mason and a member of 
the First Presbyterian Church. 

His home, the family mansion "Greystone," was ac- 
quired by him in 1898 from the other heirs, after the 
death of his mother. His never-failing kindnesses and 
courtesy, his hospitality, and his standing as a man of 
integrity in his community where he lived brought to his 
home from all walks of life those who, because of his 
qualities, held for him a deep and true affection — and they 
were legion. 

Judge Littlepage was an indefatigable worker. He had 
no set hours for applying himself to the duties of the 
judgeship, which he held immediately preceding his death. 
His seemingly untiring efforts in that respect were the 
immediate cause of his death. His steady application to 
the duties of his office finally told upon what had been 
an iron constitution. Possessed of a great physique — he 
was six feet in height and 200 pounds in weight — he did 
not realize the limitations placed upon all men, and in 
1916, as a result of excessive application to his duties, he 
suffered a collapse. On August 19, 1917, at Atlantic City, 
New Jersey, where lie had gone seeking relief and rest, 
he died. He was buried at Charleston, West Virginia, and 



90 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



two years later his wife, Mary Kemp Littlepage, followed 
him, in death his companion as faithfully as in life. His 
death was a loss not only to the bar, but to the commu- 
nity, and his epitaph is written more truly and fittingly 
in the hearts of his friends and acquaintances than could 
be recorded upon paper or stone. 

BURRELL Kemp Littlepage, son of the late Judge Samuel 
D. Littlepage, whose record precedes this, has taken up the 
same profession that his father followed, and has an ex- 
tensive practice at Charleston. 

He was bom in Charleston, West Virginia, June 28, 1888, 
was educated in the Charleston public schools and in St. 
John's Manlius Military Institute at Syracuse, New York. 
He studied law in the University of West Virginia, receiv- 
ing the LL. B. degree in 1911 and his literary degree in 
1910. He was admitted to the bar and began practice in 
Charleston in 1910, entering practice as a member of the 
firm Littlepage and Littlepage, the other member being the 
late Judge Samuel D. Littlepage. 

He served as member of the City Council from 1914 to 
1916. In 1916 he received the democratic nomination for 
prosecuting attorney of Kanawha County, and in spite of 
the fact that the county gave a large normal republican 
majority he was elected. He served four years, beginning 
January 1, 1917. He was the youngest prosecuting attorney 
the county ever had. He administered the ofSee vrith the 
heaviest normal routine of duties in the state, and also with 
the increased burdens imposed by the war period as U. S. 
Government appeal agent for three boards in the county. 
Since retiring from oflSce he has been engaged in general 
practice as a member of the firm Byrne, Littlepage & Linn 
at Charleston. The thoroughness and efficiency of his work 
as a lawyer and his fidelity to the interest of his clients 
have won for him an exceptionally large and valuable 
practice. 

Mr. Littlepage married Miss Madge K. Bobins, of Charles- 
ton, daughter of Dr. J. E. Robins, one of the eminent busi- 
ness men of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Littlepage and their 
children reside in "Greystone, " the old stone mansion in the 
suburbs of Charleston which has been the home of the 
Littlepage family for four generations. 

Waitman T. Talboit, engaged in the successful prac- 
tice of law at Webster Springs, judicial center of Webster 
county, not only has standing as one of the able members 
of the bar of his native state but has also given effective 
service as a representative of Webster County in the House 
of Delegates of the State Legislature, in which he made a 
characteristically loyal and effective record and in which he 
served during six or more sessions. 

Mr. Talbott was born in Barbour County, West Virginia, 
on the 28th of September, 1868, and is a son of William W. 
and Sarah (Simons') Talbott, both likewise natives of that 
county, where the former was born in 1832 and the latter 
in 1839. The parents passed their entire lives in Barbour 
County, where the father developed and improved an excel- 
lent farm near Berryburg, and became a leading exponent 
of agricultural and live-stock industry, as well as a citizen 
of influence in community affairs of public order. He was 
a staunch democrat, and both he and his wife were zealous 
members of the Missionary Baptist Church, in which he 
served as a deacon. William W. Talbott was a son of Rob- 
ert Talbott, who was a pioneer farmer in Barbour County 
and who there served as sheriff prior to the Civil war, four 
of his brothers having participated in that fratricidal con- 
flict as loyal soldiers of the Confederacy. Of the eleven 
children of William W. and Sarah (Simons) Talbott all 
except one are living at the time of this writing, in the 
snring of 1922 : Salathiel M. is a farmer in the vicinity of 
Harriman, Idaho; Dr. L. W. is a successful physician and 
surgeon at Elkins, West Virginia; Elem D. is engaged in 
the practice of law at Elkins; Abraham I. is a member of 
the police department of Kansas City. Missouri; Florence 
is the widow of Garnett Hudkins ; Fitzhugh Lee is in the 
employ of the Government in the Yellowstone National 
Park; William P. is a farmer near Berryburg, Barbour 
County; Waitman T., of this sketch, was next in order of 



birth; Virginia is the widow of E. H. Grim and resides at 
Philippi, Barbour County; and Robert D. is a prosperous 
farmer in that county. 

Waitman T. Talbott passed his childhood and earlier 
youth on the old home farm which was the place of his 
birth, and his public-school discipline was fortified by a 
course in the West Virginia State Normal School at Fair- 
mont. After leaving that institution he finally entered the 
law department of the University of West Virginia, in 
which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1895 
and with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was forth- 
with admitted to the bar of West Virginia and has since 
been engaged in the practice of his profession at Webster 
Springs, as one of the leading members of the bar of Web- 
ster County. In a fraternal way he maintains affiliation 
with Addison Lodge No. 86, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons. 

November 21, 1900, recorded the marriage of Mr. Tal- 
bott and Miss Addie B. Greynolds, of Beverly, Randolph 
County, and they have three children: WiUiam R., Mil- 
dred and Kathryn, the two older children being members 
of the class of 1923 in the high school at Webster Springs. 

Samuel Geeenbekey Williamson, secretary, treasurer 
and general manager of the laeger Motor Company at 
laeger, McDowell County, was born in Berkeley County, 
West Virginia, March 28, 1894, and is a son of Samuel 
Johns and May B. (Ditto) Williamson, the former of whom 
likewise was born in Berkeley County and the latter of 
whom was born in Washington County, Maryland. 

Samuel Johns Williamson, who died in his native county 
in 1904, at the age of thirty-five years, gained a liberal edu- 
cation largely through private study and through the me- 
dium of correspondence schools and a business college at 
Louisville, Kentucky. As a youth he became a successful 
teacher in the rural schools, and thereafter he served eight 
years as a teacher in the high school at Martinsburg, West 
Virginia, in which connection he drove daily a distance of 
seven miles to and from his home farm. At the time of 
his death he had a contract to teach mathematics in the 
Concord State Normal School at Athens, West Virginia. 
His father, Samuel Johns Williamson, was born in Berke- 
ley County, Virginia (now West Virginia), and there passed 
his entire life as a farmer, his homestead place having been 
a part of a tract of land granted to the Johns family in 
1753, the patent to the property having been signed by 
Governor White, then chief executive of the Old Dominion 
commonwealth or colony. This historic instrument is now 
in the possession of the subject of this sketch, by whom it 
is valued as a family heirloom. Samuel J. and May B. 
(Ditto) Williamson are survived by two sons and two 
daughters, aU of whom are graduates of the Shepherds 
College State Normal School of Virginia. As descendants 
on the maternal side of Capt. John Miller the two daughters 
are members of the Society of the Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. Mrs. May B. (Ditto) Williamson graduated 
from Berkeley Female Seminary, and thereafter was for one 
year a teacher in that institution. The religious faith of 
the Williamson family for generations was that of the Pres- 
byterian Church, but Samuel J. and May (Ditto) William- 
son were active members of the Methodist Protestant 
Church. He was a republican in political adherency. Mrs. 
Williamson survived her husband by about fourteen years, 
and was fifty-one years of age at the time of her death. 

Samuel G. Williamson gained his earlier education in the 
rural schools of his native county, and in 1912 he gradu- 
ated from the Shepherds College State Normal School. He 
taught in the school of his home district when he was a 
youth of eighteen years. In 1913 he attended the summer 
school of the University of West Virginia, as did he also 
the sessions of 1915 and 1916. He did successful work as 
a teacher in the high school of Leetown, Jefferson County, 
West Virginia, and in 1917-18 gave similar service in the 
high school at Welch, McDowell County. 

On the 15th of May, 1918, he entered the military serv- 
ice of the United States in connection with the World war. 
He received preliminary training in the City of Richmond, 
Virginia, where he remained three months. He was then 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



91 



ent to Camp Taylor, Kentucky, where after artillery train- 
ig be was commissioned second lieutenant. He remained 
t Camp Taylor until he received his honorable discharge, 
nd he is now commander of the Three Hundred and Twen- 
^-fifth Ammunition Train, Keserve Corps. 

After his discharge from the army Mr. Williamson be- 
anie principal of the high school of laeger, and in 1921 
e assumed his present position, that of secretary, treas- 
rer and manager of the lacger Motor Company, which has 
tie local agency for the Ford automobiles. Mr. Williamson 
! a republican, a member of the Presbyterian Church, and 
! affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Delta Tau 
)elta college fraternity. He is one of the progressive and 
opular young business men of laeger. 

Arch C. Wagnek, D. D. S., a young man of the sterling 
haractcr and professional ability that augur well for suc- 
essful achievement, is one of the representative dental 
ractitioners of McDowell County, with residence and of- 
ce in the Village of laeger, he having been for two years 

valued member of the McDowell County Dental Clinic, 
'he doctor was graduated in the dental department of the 
ledical College of Virginia, in the City of Richmond, on 
lie 16th of June, 1919. In the World war period he gained 
pecial training and valuable experience in the regimental 
ifirmary of the Three Hundred and Seventeenth United 
tates Infantry, and after receiving his discharge he re- 
urned to the college at Richmond and became a member of 
he Medical Reserve Corps. After his graduation Dr. Wag- 
er was engaged in practice for a few months in his native 
ounty of Highland, Virginia, where he worked with a 
ortable dental outfit. He then came to McDowell County, 
Pest Virginia, where he has since continued in successful 
ractiee. Since becoming a member of the County Dental 
llinic he has visited nearly every school in the county, the 
'ork of this clinic being largely in the examination of and 
irecting the care of the teeth of children, a matter of 
lajor importance. The doctor maintains affiliation with 
he Masonic fraternity, Knights of Pythias, Junior Order 
rnited American Mechanics, and the Xi Psi Phi college 
paternity. 

Doctor Wagner was born on a farm near Monterey, 
[jghland County, Virginia, March 16, 1895, and is a son 
f James A. and Lou Ida (Suddarth) Wagner, who still 
aside on their fine homestead farm in Highland County, 
'here their circle of friends is coincident with that of their 
cquaintances. Doctor Wagner was reared on the farm and 
ained his preliminary education in a private school. For 
our years thereafter he walked four miles night and morn- 
ig to attend high school, and after his graduation he was 
ngaged in teaching in the rural schools for two years. 
[e then began his preparation for his chosen profession, as 
Iready noted in the preceding paragraph. The doctor is 
ne of the loyal and progressive citizens of McDowell 
'ounty, has here won a host of friends and he still permits 
is name to be enrolled on the list of eligible young bache- 
)rs in the county. 

Thomas M. Hicks has been successfully engaged in the 
eneral merchandise business at Webster Springs, Webster 
ounty, since 1905, has a modern and well equipped estab- 
shment, and his policies have been such that he has devel- 
ped a substantial and prosperous enterprise. 

Mr. Hicks was born in Braxton County, West Virginia, 
anuary 15, 1877, and is a son of Thomas F. and Mariah 
Berry) Hicks, both now deceased, the father having been 
orn in Nelson County, Virginia, in 1839, and the mother 
aving been born in what is now West Virginia, in 1846. 
'he father engaged in farm enterprise in Braxton County, 
'hence in 1877 he removed with his family to Nicholas 
ounty, where he continued as a successful agriculturist 
nd stock-grower until his death, he having been a citizen 
t influence and having held various offices of public trust 
1 that county. He was a democrat in politics, and both he 
nd his wife held membership in the Baptist Church. They 
ecame the parents of ten children: Bettie is the wife of 
I. A. Boso; Bertie is the wife of O. F. Williams; Lee is a 
regressive farmer in Wood County, this state; James H. 



is a resident of the State of Oklahoma; Nora is the wife of 
James N. Walker; Ida is the wife of H. D. Walker; Thomas 
M., of this sketch, was next in order of birth; Ernie is a 
jiopular teacher in the schools of Greenbrier County; Lovie 
is the wife of C. W. Robertson; and John D. is a resident 
of Greenbrier County. 

Thomas M. Hicks was an infant at the time of the 
family removal to Nicholas County, where he was reared on 
the home farm and received the advantages of the public 
schools, his studies having been thereafter continued in one 
of the normal schools of the state and he having been a suc- 
cessful teacher in the schools of Nicholas and Webster 
counties prior to establishing his present business at 
Webster Springs. He owns the building in which his busi- 
ness is conducted, and also owns and occupies one of the 
attractive homes of the village. He is a democrat, and he 
and his wife are zealous members of the local Baptist 
Church, in which he is a deacon. He has been a valued 
member of the Board of Education during virtually the 
entire period of his residence at Webster Springs, and he is 
a director of the local banking institution. In the Masonic 
fraternity his basic affiliation is with Addison Lodge No. 
116, A. F. and A. M., of which he is a past master, and he 
is a member also of the local Chapter of Royal Arch 
Masons, as is he also of the Commandery of Knights 
Templars and of the Temple of the Mystic Shrine in the 
City of Charleston. 

In 1898 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hicks and 
Miss May Stanard, who likewise was born and reared in 
this state and who attended normal school prior to her 
marriage. Of the four children of this union the eldest is 
Areta, who attended the University of West Virginia for 
three years and who is, in 1922, a teacher in the Junior 
High School at Webster Springs; Dana M. graduated from 
the Webster Springs High School and attended the State 
University eighteen months; Elma is a student in high 
school; and Mary Lee is in the third grade of the local 
schools. 

Henbt _ W. Armstrong, general superintendent of the 
Cherry River Boom & Lumber Company at Richwood and. 
Gauley Mills, Nicholas County, has effectively proved his 
ability and resourcefulness in the directing of industrial 
enterprise of broad scope and importance, and as a business 
executive and loyal citizen he commands high esteem in the 
state of his adoption. 

Mr. Armstrong was born at Horncastle, England, March 
9, 1856, and is a son of John and Sarah (Wilson) Arm- 
strong. In addition to availing himself of the advantages 
of the schools of his native place Mr. Armstrong attended 
school in Germany during a period of three years. There- 
after he was identified with the grain business in England, 
where he was thus associated with a large commission firm 
in this line of enterprise for eight years. In 1880 he came 
to the United States and became actively identified with 
lumbering operations in West Virginia. At Bayard, Grant 
County, he operated a sawmill several years, and in the 
meanwhile he gained thorough experience in all details of 
the lumber business. In 1893 he became superintendent of 
the Richwood plant and business of the Cherry River Boom 
& Lumber Company, and his efficiency and progressive 
policies eventually led to his advancement to his present 
office, that of general superintendent with this important 
corporation. Mr. Armstrong was one of the organizers and 
incorporators of the First National Bank of Richwood, and 
he has served continuously as its president, Henry S. Smith 
being its vice president, John D. Rake, its cashier, and the 
other members of the board of directors are Dr. James 
McClung, Joseph Tincher, Mr. Feuerherm and T. L. Space. 
Mr. Armstrong is a republican in political sentiment and 
adherency, and his wife is an active member of the Presby- 
terian Church in their home city of Richwood. Her maiden 
name was Mary Hamil. Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong have no 
children. 

John 8. Cooar is distinctively one of the leading mem- 
bers of the bar of Webster County, of which he is serving 
as prosecuting attorney at the time of this writing, in 1922, 



92 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



and his lojaltj to his native county and town, Webster 

Springs, the county seat, has been signallj manifested in 
his cuutiuuous centering of his activities and interests in 
the community that has represented his home during his 
entire iite thus far. 

Mr. Cogar was born at Webster Springs and his early 
edu>:atioa was acquiied in the public schools of his native 
county. That he made good use of his advantages is shown 
by the fact that at the age of seventeen years he became a 
successful teacher, as principal of the village schools of 
Webster Springs, his entire pedagogic service having been 
rendered in his native town. In consonance with his well 
formulated ambition he hually entered the law department 
of the University of West Virginia, in which he was gradu- 
ated as a member of the class of lii92 and with the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws. He soon afterward opened an oihce 
at Webster Springs, and in lS9'i he here formed a pro- 
fessional partnership with Senator £. H. Morton, with wnom 
he continued his alliance until 1^96, when he was elected 
prosecuting attorney of the county. At the expiration of 
his teim in this olhce he was nominated, at the democratic 
senatorial convention held at Weston, as candidate for 
representative of the old Tenth Senatorial District in the 
State Senate, and, notwithstanding the tact that the district 
was strongly republican, he made so effective a campaign 
and has such secure place in popular esteem in the district 
that the republican majority was cut down by two-thiids in 
the ensuing election, in which his defeat was compassed 
by a small majoiity. In 19U4 he was made the democratic 
nominee for representative of Webster County in the House 
of Delegates of the West Virginia Legislature, to which he 
was elected by a substantial and gratifying majority. He 
served during the sessions of 1904-5 and made a character- 
istically effective record in the advancing of constructive 
legislation and the conserving of the interests of his con- 
stituent district. He has since given his exclusive attention 
to the work of his profession, and in November, 1920, he 
was again elected prosecuting attorney of the county. 

The year lS9a recorded the marriage of Mr. Cogar and 
Miss Emma L. Koozer, of Clearfield City, Pennsylvania, and 
they have two daughters. Beatrice, whose educational ad- 
vantages included those of the Webster Springs High 
School, the West Virginia Wesleyan College, the University 
of West Virginia and Columbia University, New York City, 
is at the parental home and is a popular figure in the 
representative social and cultural activities of the com- 
munity. The younger daughter, Lillian Lee, is the wife 
of Mendham Parmlee Wilson, of Augusta, Georgia, and is 
a specially talented musician, in both vocal and instrumental 
interpretation. 

Chables S. Bridges is giving effective service as station 
agent for the Norfolk & Western Kailroad at laeger, Mc- 
Dowell County, and is one of the progressive and popular 
men of this community. He was born in Wythe County, 
Virginia, March 14, 1870, and was there reared on his 
father's farm. He is a son of John B. and Prances M. 
(Long) Bridges, the former of whom was born in Wythe 
County, Virginia, in 1825, and the latter of whom was born 
in North Carolina, in 1829. The father died in 1899, aged 
seventy-four years, and the mother passed away in 1915, at 
the venerable age of eighty-six years. They became the 
parents of three sons and two daughters: William K., the 
eldest son, died in his native county at the age of twenty- 
four years; Henry B. was thirty-four years of age at the 
time of his death; the elder daughter, Mrs. Jennie E. 
Moore, is a resident of Max Meadows, that state; and Mrs. 
B. L. Hudson, the younger daughter, resides in Pulaski 
County, Virginia. 

Charles S. Bridges gained his early education in the 
schools of his native county and while still a boy he learned 
telegraphy at Max Meadows, a station on the line of the 
Norfolk & Western Bailroad. He has continued in the 
service of this railroad for the long period of thirty-one 
years, and has been a representative of the company in the 
coal producing districts of West Virginia since 1891. He 
was. first located at Eoderfield, when that place was the 
terminus of one of the branches of the Norfolk & Western 



and as telegraph operator and station agent he has been 
employed at many different points touched by this railroad 
system. He was station agent five years at Cedar Blutf, 
and thereafter he was agent at Welch, county seat of Mc- 
Dowell County, four years. Since 19U4 lie has held his 
present post in the thriving industrial Town of laeger. He 
has been actively identified with the development of this 
village and served as its first mayor after its second organ- 
ization. In the World war period he was chairman of the 
McDowell County Draft Buard No. 2. He is a democrat 
in political allegiance. In the Masonic fraternity he is 
affiliated with Uie Blue Lodge at laeger, having been the 
first worshipful master and is the present worshiplul master, 
with the Chapter of Koyal Arch Masons at Northfork, the 
Couimandery of Knights Templars at Bluefield, and the 
Temple of the Mystic ishriue at Charleston. His wife is 
a member of the Baptist church and the remainder of the 
family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 

In 1899 Mr. Bridges wedded Miss Callie Thomas, of 
Pulaski County, Viigmia, and they have four children: 
Kathleen is the widow of Dr. Harry T. Bauer, a prominent 
dentist, who was engaged in the practice of his profession 
at laeger, West Virginia, at the time of his death; Mar- 
garet, who has been employed as clerk for the Norfolk & 
Western Kailway for tiie past five years; Louise, who 
remains at the pareutal home; and Charles W., who is now 
his father 's efficient office assistant, was formerly in the 
employ of the First National Bank of laeger. 

Heverting to the career of Joliu B. Bridges, father of the 
subject of this review, it is to be recorded that he was a 
pioneer in scientific horticulture in Wytiie Couuty, Viigmia, 
where he developed the fine New Kiver Nursery, in which 
he raised all kinds of fruit trees and small fruits, and which 
he successfully conducted until the time of his death. He 
was a gallant soldier of the Confederacy in the Civil war, 
and took part in many engagements, including a number of 
major battles. He was a stanch democrat, was affiliated 
with the United Confederate Veterans, and he and his wife 
were earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 

Joseph P. Hatfield is giving characteristically efficient 
service as clerk of the Circuit Court for Miugo County, and 
is one of the popular citizens of Williamson, the couuty 
seat. He was born at Meador, this county, July 17, 1888, 
and is a son of Floyd and Esther (Staten) Hatfield, the 
former of whom was born on Guyon Kiver, near the present 
site of Gilbert, this county, then a part of Logan Couuty, 
Virginia, September 4, 1846, and the latter of whom was 
born where the Village of Sprigg, this county, is now estab- 
lished, the year of her nativity having been 1851. John 
Hatfield, father of Floyd, was a representative of a family 
founded in Virginia in the Colonial era, and upon coming 
to what is now West Virginia in the pioneer days the 
abundant supply of wild game led him to make permanent 
location, he having been a nimrod of marked skill and great 
enthusiasm, and his son Floyd likewise having become a 
crack shot. Floyd Hatfield gave two years of loyal service 
as a gallant young soldier of the Confederacy in the Civil 
war, and his active career has been one of close association 
with farm industry, both he and his wife being now vener- 
able and honored pioneer citizens of Mingo County and 
both having long been zealous members of the Christian 
Church, in which he has held various official positions. His 
political allegiance is given to the democratic party. Of 
their eleven children nine are living, and of the number the 
subject of this sketch was the ninth in order of birth. 

The public schools of his native county afforded Joseph 
P. Hatfield his early education, and that he made good 
use of bis advantages is shown by the fact that when eight- 
een years of age he became a successful teacher in the 
rural schools. By his pedagogic service he earned the funds 
that enabled him to complete a course in the Concord State 
Normal School at Athens, in which he was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1916. He taught seven years in the 
rural schools of Mingo County, served one year as assistant 
principal of the laeger High School, was assistant prin- 




^^g^i^^i'.^^^^^l^^ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



93 



pal of tbe JIatewan Iligh School one year, and for one 
■ar served as supervisor of the schools of Lee District. In 
•20 he was elected circuit clerk of the county, on the 
■mocratic ticket, and his able executive service has fully 
istilied his election. His brother Alexander, formerly n 
)pular teacher, is now his deputy in the office of circuit 
erk. The sister Mary is the wife of Toler Sipple, of Red 
icket, this state. Six of the children of the family at- 
nded the Concord Normal School. 

Mr. Hatfield is affiliated with the Masonic Blue Lodge at 
lacker. Lodge of Perfection No. 4, Scottish Rite, in the 
ty of Huntington, where also he is a member of the 
nights of the Rose Croix, he having received the thirty- 
eond degree of the Scottish Rite in the Consistory at 
heeling, and his maximum York Rite affiliation is with 
e Conimandery of Knights Templars. He is an active 
3mber of the Christian Church and his wife of the Baptist 
lurch. 

On the 12th of June, 1917, was solemnized the marriage 
Mr. Hatfield and Miss Elizabeth Adair, daughter of 
arvey and Nancy Adair, of Panther, McDowell County, 
rs. Hatfield and her husband were fellow students at the 
incord Normal School, and, like him, she taught school to 
y the expenses of her course in this institution, she having 
en for eleven years a successful and popular teacher in 
e public schools. Mr. and Mrs. Hatfield have one son, 
illiam Adair. 

Guy B. Young has found in his native county ample 
portunity for successful achievement in the work of his 
ofessicn, is one of the able and representative members 

the bar of Gilmer County, and is engaged in active 
actice at Gleuville, the county seat. He was born on a 
rm near Troy, this county, September 26, 1874, and is a 
1 of Capt. A. B. and Elizabeth (Hanger) Young, the 
rmer of whom was born April 2, 1832, in what is now 
irrison County, West Virginia, and the latter of whom 
IS born near Staunton, Virginia, in 1840. The parents 
;eived excellent educational advantages, as gauged by the 
mdards of locality and period, and the father became 
successful teacher in the subscriptions schools of the 
y. Capt. A. B. Young went forth as a loyal soldier of 
; Confederacy when the Civil war was precipitated on the 
tion, and was captain of a company in the command of 
n. "Stonewall" Jackson. He lived up to the full ten- 
n of the conflict, and in battle was three times wounded, 
'ter the close of the war he settled on a farm near Troy, 
Imer County, and with the passing years he achieved 
astantial success as an agriculturist and stock-grower. 
I added to his farm property until he had a valuable 
;ate of 300 acres, and he remained on the homestead 
rm until 1902, when he sold the place "and purchased a 
rm of 450 acres in Wirt County, where he passed the re- 
linder of his life. He was a stanch democrat, and he 
■ved from 189(5 to 1900 as county assessor of Gilmer 
unty. He was affiliated with the United Confederate 
tcrans and his religious faith was that of the Methodist 
otestant Church, his first wife having been a member of 
! Presbyterian Church. He was twice married, and be- 
ne the father of seventeen children. Of the six children 

the first marriage, five are living at the time of this 
iting, in 1921: Jacob W. is engaged in the mercantile 
siness at Newell, Hancock County; Rev. J. Arthur Young 
s graduated in a theological seminary in the City of 
uisville, Kentucky, and is a clergyman of the Baptist 
urch; Warren D. is a merchant at Palestine, Wirt 
unty; Guy B., of this sketch, was the next in order of 
■th; and George H., who is a mechanic by vocation, re- 
es in the City of Parkersburg, this state. 
The childhood and early youth of Guy B. Young were 
npassed by the influences and discipline of the home 
rm, and after leaving the public schools he entered the 
ite Normal School at Glenville, in which he continued his 
idies until his graduation. In preparation for his chosen 
jfession he entered the law department of the University 

West Virginia, in which he was graduated as a member 

the class of 1903 and vdth the degree of Bachelor of 
,ws. He was forthwith admitted to the bar, and in the 



same year he initiated the practice of his profession at Glen- 
\t11o, where he has since continued his law business, much 
of which is in connection with his service as legal ri'pre 
seutative of the South Penu Oil Company. Mr. Young is a 
democrat in political allegiance, and he served for a time 
as deputy county clerk of Gilmer County. He was formeily 
engaged in farm enterprise near Glenville, and is at the 
present time owner of royalty interests on several farms 
in this county. He is affiliated with the Junior Order 
United American Mechanics, and he and his wife hold 
membership in the Baptist Church. 

Mr. Young married Miss Love H. Fling, whose education 
included a business course and who had held a position as a 
skilled stenographer for one year prior to her marriage. 
Mr. and Mrs. Young have four children: Guy Bayard, Jr., 
Donald Bell, Maynard Fling and Mary Elizabeth. 

William Reynold Hurst, organizer and executive head 
of the firm of W. B. Hurst & Company, which conducts 
one of the foremost real estate and insurance agencies in 
the City of Williamson, Mingo County, was born at Dingess, 
this county, October 2, 1897^ and is a son of William Alex- 
ander Hurst and Cynthia Freelove (Thomas) Hurst, the 
former of whom was born in Carroll County, Virginia, 
March 1, 1868, and the latter of whom was born at Burkes 
Garden, that state, October 16, 1868, a daughter of John 
L. Thomas. The marriage of the parents was solemnized 
at Gray, Mingo County, West Virginia, in 1896. 

The lineage of the Hurst family traces back to English 
origin, and the original American progenitor settled in 
Loudoun County, Virginia, in the early Colonial period. 
The family has been for many generations one of prom- 
inence and influence in Carroll County, Virginia, and there 
William Hurst, greatgrandfather of the subject of this 
review, was born in the year 1798. He became an extensive 
planter and slaveholder, and continued his residence in his 
native county until his death, in 1891, at the patriarchal 
age of ninety-three years. His son, Jesse T., was born on 
the old home plantation in Carroll County in October, 1836, 
and at the inception of the Civil war he went forth in de- 
fense of the Confederacy, as a member of the Twenty-ninth 
Virginia Infantry. At the battle of Seven Pines, in 1862, 
he was wounded, but after his recovery he continued his 
active service in the army until the close of the war. He 
served as justice of the peace in Carroll County for a full 
half century, and has long been numbered among the pro- 
gressive and successful farmers of that county. Though he 
is now (1922) eighty-six j-ears of age he retains splendid 
phy.sical and mental vitality, as does also his wife, whose 
maiden name was Keturah Smith and who was born in 
April, 1836. They became the parents of eleven children, 
of whom the son William Alexander is the father of him 
whose name initiates this sketch. 

William A. Hurst was reared on the fine old homestead 
farm which was the place of his birth and received his 
youthful education in the schools of his native state. As a 
youth he taught school during the winter terms, and worked 
on the farm in the intervening summer seasons. From 1890 
to 1893 he was a guard at the Virginia State Penitentiary 
at Richmond, and he then, in 1894, established himself in 
the general merchandise business at Gray, Mingo County, 
West Virginia. In 1896 he transferred his business and 
residence to Dingess, this county, and in 1902 he removed 
with his family to War Eagle, to enter the coal business. 
In 1904 he removed to Williamson, where shortly afterward 
he organized the Hurst Hardware Company, which was in- 
corporated with a capital of $5,000, and pt which he became 
the president. This company developed a wholesale and 
retail hardware business that reached an average of $175,- 
000 a year. From 1908 to 1913 Mr. Hurst served as sheriff 
of the county, an office in which he made a record that has 
not been excelled by that of any other who has been the 
incumbent of the office. In 1914 he became associated 
with M. T. Persinger in the organization of the Persinger 
Hardware & Furniture Company, with a capitalization of 
$250,000, this corporation having taken over the business of 
the Hurst Hardware Company. Mr. Hurst became president 



94 



HISTOKT OF WEST VIRGINIA 



of the new company, and continued hia service in this posi- 
tion until bis death, this concern now controlling an average 
annual business of approximately $1,000,000. Mr. Hurst 
was one of tiie organizers of and was the first president of 
the Day and Night Bank of Williamson, was president of 
the War Eagle Coal Company and the Winifrede Land Com- 
pany, and was a stockholder and director in many other 
important business and industrial corporations in this 
section of the state. He was an uncompromising supporter 
of the cause of the democratic party, was a Scottish Bite 
Mason and an Elk, and was an elder of the First Presby- 
terian Church of Williamson. Of him the following ap- 
preciative estimate has been given : " As a man he was 
kindly and affable, and hia generosity knew only the bounds 
of his opportunity to extend the same. He was a self-made 
man, and thus his large and worthy success in life is the 
more pleasing to contemplate. Probably no man in Mingo 
County had a greater number of sincere friends than did 
William A. Hurst, and he knew virtually every man in the 
county. Mr. Hurst met a tragic and instantaneous death in 
one of the most terrible wrecks that ever occurred on the 
lines of the New York Central Kailroad, he having been 
one of twelve persons killed, and 110 having been injured. 
Mr. Hurst had gone to Buffalo, New York, and was pre- 
paring to accompany his sou William B. and the latter 's 
wife back to Williamson, the son and his wife having been 
on their wedding tour. On the morning of July 1, 1919, the 
family party, which included Mrs. James W. Peters, of 
Williamson, an aunt of William B. Hurst, boarded the New 
York Central train No. 41 for Columbus, Ohio. Eeserva- 
tious had been made in the rear Pullman car of the train, 
which was compelled to make a stop at Dunkirk, New York, 
in order to repair an overheated journal on the rear Pullman. 
Flagmen sent out to stop the through train No. 7, known 
as the Westerner, which did not make stops at Dunkirk, 
failed to arrest the incoming flyer, which collided with 
and telescoped the rear Pullman of train No. 41, it having 
been estimated that the Westerner was moving at the rate of 
fifty-five miles an hour at the time. A scene of terror 
followed, the engine of No. 7 ran under and overturned the 
rear sleeper of the No. 41 train, and the escaping steam 
from the engine scalded virtually all occupants of the 
sleeper, while smoke added its suffocating fumes to the 
horror. In this wreck William Alexander Hurst was in- 
stantaneously killed. Mrs. William E. Hurst was painfully 
scalded all over her left side, and received a deep cut just 
above her right ankle; Mrs. Peters escaped with minor 
bruises and scalds, but, as a result of the shock, she fell 
down some steps after arriving at her home, fractured her 
right hip and became permanently crippled; William E. 
Hurst received concussion of the brain and was made un- 
conscious, was lightly scalded and one of his knees was badly 
bruised. Mrs. William E. Hurst has recovered from her 
injuries save that her right leg remains very weak and her 
right ankle habitually turns or falls over when she is walk- 
ing. The remains of the loved father were brought home 
for interment, and the entire community was not only 
shocked by his tragic death but also manifested a deep 
sense of personal loss and bereavement." 

William E. Hurst attended the public schools at War 
Eagle and the old academy at Williamson. In 1905 he 
lost his hearing from an attack of spinal meningitis, and 
in 1906 he received a few months of instruction from a 
private teacher. In the following year he entered the 
Pennsylvania Institution -for the Deaf and Dumb at Mount 
Airy, Philadelphia, where he remained until June, 1910, 
and covered grade and high school work. From the fall of 
1910 to June, 1912, he attended the Wright Oral School in 
New York City. In June, 1912, he became associated with 
the Hurst Hardware Company, and in his activities as clerk, 
drifer of teams, shipping clerk and assistant bookkeeper he 
proved that his physical infirmity was slight handicap to 
progress. Mr. Hurst continued in the employ of the com- 
pany until it was merged with the Persinger Hardware & 
Furniture Company, and he then, in February, 1915, en- 
gaged in the real estate and insurance business, of which 
he has continued one of the progressive, representative and 
successful exponents at Williamson to the present time. He 
is the only surviving child of his parents, the other son. 



Frank, having died at birth, in 1902. The widowed moth 
who was Freelove Thomas, of Emery, Virgiuia, still ma; 
tains her home at Williamson, she being a zealous memt 
of the First Presbyterian Church, as are also her son a 
his wife. 

On the 16th of June, 1919, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvan 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hurst and Miss Etl 
WUes, a daughter of William F. Wiles, a representati 
citizen of Tunnelton, West Virginia. 

John R. Thater, a resident of Taylor County for more th 
half a century, now a retired farmer at Grafton, was 
efficient business man while on the farm, and at one time v 
one of the foremost representatives and leaders among ^ 
agricultural interests of the state. 

He was born in Marion County February 20, 1850. ] 
father, Franklin Thayer, was born near Williamsport, Mas 
chusetts, in 1803, and came from that state to West Virgii 
He married Nancy Mason, daughter of John Mason, and 
their marriage were born ten children: Mrs. Amanda Hoov 
who died near Helena, Montana; Caroline, a resident of Bu 
hannon, widow of George R. Latham, who held the rank 
colonel in the Union Army, later was a congressman, and v 
appointed by President Johnson to a foreign post in Austral 
Cordelia, who married Lindley Ray, of Fairmont, both n 
deceased; Luary, of Grafton, widow of Martin Miller; Mill 
J., who died at Salina, Kansas; Nancy, who married H 
White and died at Oswego, Kansas; Frank, Miss Mary a 
Stephen, all of Grafton; and John R., the youngest. 

When John Ralph Thayer was six years old his pare: 
moved to Nuzum's Mill, now the site of Hammond, W 
Virginia, and in 1864 came to Taylor County and settled ni 
Grafton. John R. Thayer grew up in a time and place wh 
little attention was paid to the subject of education, and m 
of his advantages were acquired in the public schools 
Grafton. As a youth he did work in a brickyard, offbear: 
brick, also worked as tail sawyer in a sawmill, and for t 
years was an Illinois farm band in Marshall County, gett: 
sixteen dollars a month and board. On his return to W 
Virginia he did farm labor at Knottsville, near Grafton, 
two years, following which he was again a tail sawyer 
Grafton, worked in a planing mill, and bought and sold luml 
for the plant. While thus employed he married, and sc 
afterward settled down to his vocation as a farmer. 

Beginning with some land provided by his wife's fatl 
in the Haymond settlement near Grafton, he bought oti 
land and accumulated and improved a farm of two hundi 
and fifty acres, getting two hundred of it under cultivati( 
Crops were marketed almost altogether through livesto 
which was the main business of the farm, raising cattle, hor 
and sheep. In connection with farming, Mr. Thayer 
twenty years was, local agent for the McCormick Harves 
Company, and he also sold the J. I. Case harvesting, threshi 
and road-making machinery. 

From his own business his interest went out to the welfi 
of the community and gradually to all movements for i 
advancement of country life. As a member of the Board 
Education of the Fetterman District his service might well 
gratefully remembered. He had a hand in the erection o: 
new schoolhouse at Thornton, and was the moving spirit ii 
strenuous campaign for two new schoolhouses in the Hi 
mond settlement. This involved an education of pul 
opinion from the ground up, and it was due to his persistij 
advocacy that the community finally came over to his way 
thinking, and secured a modification of the board's plan 
one schoolhouse in favor of two. Mr. Thayer early espoui 
the cause of the Farmers Alliance when it spread here fr 
the Southwest and West, and he took a prominent part in 
organization work. He was elected county president > 
Taylor County and then vice president of the state orgi 
ization, refusing the office of president. Of the ten thousai 
members of the Alliance enrolled in West Virginia, his p' 
sonal influence and effort were responsible for at least th< 
thousand. 

The Alliance was not essentially a political moveme: 
and when it became evident that ita aims could only ' 
achieved by political action the organization was larg; 
merged with the people's party, and Mr. Thayer natun; 
had a prominent place in the new party's organization j 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



95 



^est Virginia. He was offered the nomination for governor 
m its first state ticket, but accepted inotead the nomination 
or state senator. In the second campaiarn there was a fusion 
)etween the populists and democrats, and though the results 
yere not altogether successful Mr. Thayer received the 
lomination of both parties for the House of Delesates. Since 
he decline of the people's party he has had no official part in 
)olitics. His independence of mind is indicated in the mixed 
ecord he has made as a voter. His first presidential ballot 
rent to General Grant, he supported .lames G. Blaine, voted 
or Bryan twice, once for Colonel Roosevelt, and twice for 
Hr. Wilson. By appointment Mr. Thayer is now serving as 
ury commissioner and county coroner. 

Mr. Thayer married Miss Bertha Kincaid, only daughter of 
Hoses and Nancy (Knotts) Kincaid. She was born and reared 
it Knottsville, Taylor County, attended the State University 
ind two terms at the Fairmont State Normal. Mr. Thayer 
vas reared in the Methodist faith, but took up Christian 
(cience for the benefit of his wife's health, and both became 
lonverts. She profited wonderfully from the treatment, and 
ler life was prolonged many years after hope had been aban- 
loned. She died July 9, 1917. There were two daughters, 
losalee, deceased, was the wife of Ray M. Parrish, of Grafton, 
;nd she is survived by three children. The other daughter, 
Hiss Iva, is the companion of her father. 

Frank Bennett has been one of the moat popular residents 
if Grafton for many years, and is former county assessor and 
low county court clerk of Taylor County, and prior to that 
lad charge of the city electric light plant. 

He was born in Clinton District, Monongalia County, June 
, IS?.?, son of William and Mary f Jacobs^ Bennett. William 
?ennett was born at Sheffield, England, where his father was a 
irick-maker, and came to the TTnited States at the age of six- 
een, his parents locating at Birmingham, Pennsylvania, but 
ventually removing to West Virginia, and they are buried in 
he Simmers Cemetery in Monongalia County. Their chil- 
Iren besides William were: Timothy, a resident of Morgan- 
own; Albert, deceased, a Monongalia County farmer, whose 
laughter is the wife of Governor Ephraim F. Morgan; Ann, 
rho died in Pittsburgh, wife of Abraham Kay; and Sarah Ann, 
fho married Elijah Jacobs and is living at the Flats, near 
Horeantown, nearly one hundred years old. 

William Bennett also learned the trade of brick-maker, 
7hich he followed until he took up farming as his regular 
'ocation. He had a good education and remained a student 
he rest of his life, and was noted in his community for his 
.bility to sustain an argument on a wide variety of topics. 
le was a republican, and he and his wife were devout in their 
eligious duties and saw to it that their children always 
.ttended church and Sunday School. William Bennett died 
n 1903. when almost eighty, and his wife died five years later, 
ilso in her eightieth year. Their children were: Mrs Priscilla 
jwyn, deceased; Annarrie, wife of W. H. Gwyn, living near 
he old Bennett home in Monongalia County; Nelia, un- 
narried and at the old homestead; Joseph, operator of the 
lome farm; and Frank. 

Frank Bennett grew up on the farm in Monongalia County, 
md completed his common school education there. For one 
'ear he farmed for himself, and soon after his marriage took 
lis bride to Grafton, where he entered the service of the 
Baltimore & Ohio in the carpenter shops, building engine 
iabs. Five years of his career were given to that line of work, 
following this he was put in charge of the electric light service 
or the City of Grafton. He handled this department with a 
are degree of skill and tact, and through all the fourteen years 
16 never missed'a payday through absence from duty. At 
he same time he was a sub-mail carrier for the city post 
iffice. 

Having been a resident of Grafton almost twenty years, 
ind having gained a wide acquaintance throughout the coun- 
ty, he consented to put his name and qualifications before the 
)eople as candidate for county assessor. He was nominated 
n the primaries, and in the fall of 1916 ran ahead of his party 
;icket. making a record vote for a single candidate. He 
lerved his four-year term, and then became candidate for 
iounty'clerk, being elected by a maioritv of 2,018 votes over 
lis democratic competitor. He succeeded C. T. Bartlett in 
iffice, and began'his official term in January, 1921. 



Mr. Bennett is an active member of the Grafton Chamber 
of Commerce. He is a past chancellor of the Knights of 
Pythias, past noble grand of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and a member of the Improved Order of Red Men. 
He is one of the trustees and deacons of the Grafton Baptist 
Church. 

In Marion County, June 14, 1896, Mr. Bennett married 
Miss Etta Summers, who was born near Mt. Nebo in that 
county and reared on the farm there. Her parents. David and 
Frances (Shuttlesworthi Summers, were reared in the same 
county. She was a child when her father was killed by the 
kick of a horse. Her mother is still living at the old home- 
stead. Besides Mrs. Bennett the surviving children are: 
James, of Fairmont; Emma, wife of David Downey, of Pitts- 
burgh; Luther, on the home farm; Camden, of Fairmont; 
Albertus, a farmer at Gladesville, Preston County; William, 
who died in Marion County, leaving a family; and Ollie, who 
died in Grafton, the wife of William G. Lake. 

Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Bennett the oldest is 
Ethel, wife of Clarence D. Arnett, of Fairmont. Robert is 
chief clerk for the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company of Fetterman. 
Lauda is the wife of Coy H. Hardman, of Fairmont. Dottie 
and Sarah Olive are students in high school at Grafton, while 
the younger children are named Roger Gordon, Charles 
Edward and Marjorie. 

William Bernard Crotse was at one time train dispatcher 
and trainmaster for the Baltimore & Ohio, and after retiring 
from the railroad service he returned to his home city of 
Grafton, where he has built up and is still active in a business 
of general insurance. He is the present chairman of the 
Taylor County Democratic Central Committee. 

He was born in Reno District of Preston County July 31, 
1867. His father, Thomas Cruise, was born in Dunmore, 
County Galway, Ireland, and married there Mary Kenny. 
They cros.sed the Atlantic in a sailing vessel, and spent succes- 
sive stages in Baltimore, Green Springs and Sykesville. He 
did construction work for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, also 
excavating work and contracted a portion of the tunnel con- 
struction at Tunnelton. At that point he retired from the 
railroad service and spent the rest of his life as a farmer there. 
Thomas Cruise possessed a liberal education, early became 
an American citizen, was interested in American affairs and 
was affiliated with the democratic party. He died at Tunnel- 
ton January 30, 1900, at the age of eighty-six, and his widow 
passed away August 12, 1904. aged seventy-six. Their chil- 
dren were: Catherine, of Cumberland, Maryland, widow of 
Thomas Dorsey, one of the old engineers of the Baltimore & 
Ohio; Miss Annie, of Fairmont; Agnes, wife of Judge Hay- 
mond, of Fairmont; William B.; John T., who spent his 
active life as a telegraph operator and died April 16, 1906; 
and Ellen, wife of James S. Hunt, of Tunnelton. 

William Bernard Cruise, who has never married, lived the 
first fifteen years of his life on his father's farm near Tunnel- 
ton, attending the common schools, and at thirteen bep-an the 
Btudv of telegraphy with his brother-in-law, then the Baltimore 
& Ohio onerator at Tunnelton, now Judge Haymond of Fair- 
mont. He succeeded his relative as operator at Tunnelton, 
and two years later was promoted to the duties of train dis- 
patcher at Grafton, where he began his work July 6, 1885, 
when only eighteen years old. In 1896 Mr. Cruise was trans- 
ferred to Cumberland, Maryland, and made chief train dis- 
patcher and then trainmaster of the Baltimore & Ohio division 
between Cumberland and Grafton. After a time he resigned, 
and returning to Grafton entered the insurance business and 
has developed an extensive general agency, handling all kinds 
of insurance and surety bonds. 

Mr. Cruise has worked for the upbuilding of Grafton 
through the Chamber of Commerce and other organizations, 
and is one of the well known leaders of the democratic party 
in the state, having served as county chairman for ten years. 
He was a delegate to the state convention of 1904 which 
nominated John J. Cornwell for governor, and has attended 
many of the local and state conventions since. He served as a 
clerk in the State Senate through appointment by Senator 
Kidd. ""Mr. Cruise is an exalted ruler of the Elks and was a 
factor in building at Grafton one of the best homes of that 
order in the state. He is also affiliated with the Loyal Order 
of Moose and the Knights of Columbus. He is Taylor County 



96 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



cbairman and member of the state committee of the Woodrow 
Wilson Foundation, a movement to raise a million dollar 
fund to be used for awards or rewards to the individual or 
group that has rendered, within a specified period, most 
meritorious service to democracy, public welfare, hberal 
thought, or peace through justice. Mr. Cruise was chairman 
of the local Draft Board for Taylor County for 1917-1919, 
during the World war. 

Harry Friedm.in, secretary of the Grafton Board of 
Education, has been one of the successful attorneys of that 
city for a number of years, his activities having been in 
particular evidence in the commercial field of the law. 

He was born in Lewiston, Maine, and was a year old when 
his parents moved to Grafton in 1884. His father, Faibel 
Friedman, who was active in the clothing busine.ss at Grafton 
thirty-seven years, was born in the province of Saxe-Meinin- 
geu, Germany, September 8, 1846, was liberally educated, and 
came to the United States in 1865. Later he returned, and at 
Bad Kitzingen, Bavaria, married Fannie Goodman, who was 
born in that part of Bavaria February 2S, 1846, daughter of 
Faibel and Sarah Gutnian or Goodman. The surviving chil- 
dren of these parents are: Simon .J., a Grafton merchant; 
Alma, wife of Ralph Rothchild, of Richmond, Virginia; Max, 
a Grafton merchant; Jo.seph, in the insurance business at 
Baltimore; Harry; and Jacob H., a clothing merchant at 
Richmond. 

Harry Friedman, who is unmarried, grew up in the atmos- 
phere of a mercantile business but early decided to employ his 
talents in a profession. His first teacher in the public schools 
was Miss Amanda Abbott, now dean of the city public school 
teachers, and he graduated from high school in 1901. This 
was followed by the general literary course in West Virginia 
University, from which he graduated in law with the LL. B. 
degree in 1906. Admitted to the bar, he tried his first case in 
court at Grafton, and has had an increasing share in the civil 
and commercial law work of this district. 

Mr. Friedman has carried some of the burdens and expense 
of political work in the county, was candidate for prosecuting 
attorney in 1916, was a delegate to the last democratic con- 
vention at Wheeling, and was a spectator of the dramatic . 
proceedings in the Baltimore convention of 1912 when Mr. 
Wilson was first nominated. Besides his duties as secretary 
of the Board of Education Mr. Friedman is a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce, and is prominent in fraternal affairs. 
He is a past master of Mystic Lodge No. 75, A. F. and \ M., 
is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, 
and member of the Elks, Modern Woodmen of America and 
Loyal Order of Moose, and the college fraternity Sigma Nu. 

C. L. Bitter, president of the Rock Castle Lumber Com- 
pany, has been actively identified with lumber manufacture 
in West Virginia since early youth, and the organizations 
of which he is directing head comprise one of the largest 
individual groups of capital and resources in the lumber 
industry of the state. 

Mr. Eitter, whose home has been at Huntington for 
twenty years and whose active associations with the life and 
affairs of that city proclaim him at once a man of prom- 
inence, was born at Muney, Pennsylvania, October 6, 1865. 
His father, Daniel S. Ritter, was born in Lycoming County, 
Pennsylvania, D'ccember 27, 1828, and died at Milton, that 
state, April 11, 1913. During his long residence in Lycom- 
ing County he was a farmer, a hotel proprietor, held the 
ofBce of overseer of the poor and county supervisor. He 
was a democrat and a member of the Lutheran Church. His 
wife was Catherine Cramer, born in Lycoming County in 
1833 and died at Muncy in 1901. The oldest of their chil- 
dren is Dr. William E., a physician and surgeon at White- 
wood. Virginia; C. L. Ritter is the second in age; John is 
a trader living at Williamsport, Pennsylvania; the youngest, 
Mazie, died in childhood. 

C. L. Ritter acquired a common school education in 
Lycoming County, attended the Williamsport Seminary, and 
the first twelve years of his life were spent on his father's 
farm and after that he lived with his parents at Muncy 
and Williamsport until he was nineteen. For two years he 
was in the mercantile business at Muncy, and in 1889 came 
to West Virginia and entered the lumber business at Oak- 



vale on East River. His lumbering interests subsequent! 
took him into McDowell County and also to Clay County, i 
both of which counties he was a manufacturer, and in 19C 
he removed his headquarters to Huntington. The Roc 
Castle Lumber Company, C. L. Eitter and other lumbi 
companies, of which he is president have mills in seven 
parts of the state, and the business is both mauufaeturin 
and wholesale. 

Of his business associations that are more immediatel 
identified with Huntington are the Central Realty Con 
pany, of which he is president, also has interests in tli 
Standard Printing & Publishing Company and with th 
Watts-Ritter Company, wholesale dry goods; is vice pres 
dent of the Huntington Land Company ; has importar 
interests in the Kenna Land Company ; is president of th 
Empire Furniture Company, furniture manufacturers, i 
a director of the First National Bank of Huntington. H 
has some valuable property interests, including his ofBc 
building, known as the Ritter Building, on Fourth Avenui 
a three-story structure, owns a half interest in the sb 
stoiy building at the corner of Tenth Street and Fourt 
Avenue, a half interest in the two-story business house o 
the opposite corner of Tenth Street and Fourth Avenue 
and is a half owner of the Orpheum Theater Building. 

Mr. Ritter is a republican, a member of the Luthera 
Church, and is affiliated with the Guyandotte Club of Hun 
ington, the Country Club, and during the World war W8 
chairman of the Cabell County Chapter of the Red Cros 
and gave time and means to the support of the Governmer 
during that period. 

His home is one of the best residences on Ritter Hil 
In 1910 he purchased Eitter Hill, and was instrumental i 
securing Eitter Park, part of which was given by him to th 
city. He was quite active in opening up Ritter Hill as we 
as Eitter Hill Addition. He married at Huntington i 
1902 Miss Mabel McClintoek, who is a graduate of Mai 
shall College at Huntington. Mr. and Mrs. Ritter hav 
three children: Charles Lloyd, born March 3, 1904; Wi 
Ham Randolph, born December 31, 1905, and Don M( 
Clintock, born April 24, 1908. Charles Lloyd and Williai 
Randolph are students in Adirondacks-Plorida School, whil 
Don McCintock Ritter is attending St. Christopher's Scho( 
at Richmond, Virginia. 

Mrs. Ritter was born in Dempseytown, near Oil Citi 
Pennsylvania. May 9, 1880, a daughter of Cliarles A. an 
Adeline (Richey) McClintoek, of whom extended mentio 
is made in the sketch of Herbert D. McClintoek. Mri 
Eitter is a member of the First Presbyterian Church. Dui 
ing the war she was active in Red Cross work, being a 
the head of the teaching force of surgical dressings fo 
two years. She is a member of the Woman 's Club and a 
active member of Buford Chapter, D. A. E., having been it 
regent for two years. 

Lee Earl Bennett is business manager of the Grafto 
Sentinel, and has been associated with that stanch old Wes 
Virginia newspaper the greater part of the time since he ws 
released from army service. He is one of the younger men 
bers of an old and prominent family in Taylor County, a moi 
complete record being published on other pages. 

He was born at the old county seat, Pruntytown, Novemb« 
1, 1892, and during his boyhood was a pupil in the grad 
schools there. He had two years of high school work i 
Grafton and also a commercial course, and then took charge ( 
his father's paint store. He left that to become deputy sheri 
under his father, serving through the four-year term, and ale 
had charge of the office during the term of Sheriff Melvi 
Newlon until called to the colors. 

As a selective service man he was enrolled for duty i 
Company F. Fortieth Infantry, in the Fourteenth Divisioi! 
His first assignment was at Fort Sheridan, near Chicago, the 
at Camp Custer, Michigan, and after the signing of th 
armistice the regiment was ordered to Camp Sherman, Ohit 
for guard duty. He was discharged there as a first-claii 
private, and he resumed civilian life March 1, 1919. as a cleri 
in the accountants office of the Baltimore & Ohio Division t 
Grafton. Soon afterward he joined the business departmet 
of the Sentinel as bookkeeper, and since 1921, has bee, 
business'manager. I 



HISTOEY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



97 



Mr. Bennett is finance officer of Taylor County Post of the 
American Legion, is a member of the Chamber of Commerce 
and belongs to the Methodist Protestant Church. September 
7, 1917, Mr. Bennett married Eileene Burdett Batson, only 
child of G. H. A. and Lucy Maud (Burdett) Batson. She was 
born at Pruntytown, March S, 1893, and was educated in the 
grade schools there and had two years in the Wesleyan College 
at Buckhannon. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett have a daughter, 
Georgeanna, born July 29, 1918, and a son, Louis Lee, born 
February 21, 1922. 

Mrs. Bennett's family is an old and conspicuous one in 
the Pruntytown community. Her great-grandfather, James 
Batson, came from Loudoun County, Virginia, in pioneer 
times, was a shoemaker by trade, and followed that occu- 
pation during the rest of his active life at Pruntytown. He 
married Sarah Rawlings, and both are buried at Pruntytown. 
Their children were: Elizabeth, who became the wife of 
Lamkin Newlon and lived in Taylor County; Thomas, a 
saddler who followed his trade at Pruntytown and later 
returned to his home in old Virginia, where he died; John W., 
whose record follows; James W., who was a shoemaker and 
later a farmer; Mary Jane, who married Christian Core and 
lived in Pruntytown and later in Grafton, where she died; 
Calvin Emery, who was a shoemaker, later in the coal busi- 
ness and died at Flemington; Susan B., who married Milton 
Holland and lived in Monongalia and Marion counties, dying 
in the latter; Washington Randolph was a soldier of the 
Union Army, an early stage-driver between Fairmont and 
Morgantown, later a teamster at Fairmont, where he died. 

John W. Batson, grandfather of Mrs. Bennett, was a native 
of Loudoun County and a small boy when the family came 
to Pruntytown, where he learned the shoemaker's trade and 
worked at it as long as he was able. He died there in 1913, 
at the venerable age of eighty-eight. He was active in the 
Methodist Protestant Church, was a strong partisan of the 
great whig statesman Henry Clay, and an equally ardent 
follower of Abraham Lincoln in politics. John W. Batson 
married Elnora Kunst, who died in 1920. Her father, 
G. H. A. Kunst, was a native of Germany, came to the 
United States many years before the Civil war, and spent 
his hfe at Pruntytown, where for many years he was an active 
merchant. Of the four children of John W. and Mrs. Batson 
the two survivors are George H. A. and Mrs. John W. 
Newlon of Keyser, West Virginia. 

George H. A. Batson is a native of Pruntytown, his birth 
occurring on the property of Charles E. Bunner. He at- 
tended a subscription school and then the public school, and 
during vacation spent most of his time around a village store, 
an association that caused him, when he decided that the 
time had arrived for a permanent vocation, to become an 
employe in the store of C. F. W. Kunst at Grafton. A few 
years later he joined the store of John H. Kunst at Prunty- 
town, and for ten years was connected with the West Virginia 
Reform School, now known as the Industrial School for 
Boys, at Pruntytown. He was steward and subsequently 
assistant superintendent of that institution. 

Politically he has always voted as a republican, has been 
a party worker in Taylor County and has been a delegate 
in numerous local and congressional conventions. He is 
one of the Official Board of the Pruntytown Methodist 
Protestant Church and is a Scottish Rite Mason. 

In Taylor County Mr. Batson married Miss Lucy Maud 
Burdett, who is also a native of Pruntytown, and daughter 
of James Burdett. 

J. Frank Cox throughout his active career of thirty years 
has given his skill and energies to one industry, the Wheeling 
Mold & Foundry Company, of which he is now shop super- 
intendent. 

Mr. Cox was born in New Martinsville in Wetzel County, 
West Virginia. February 13, 1876, son of James M. and 
Mollle (Ruddick) Cox. He is a descendant of three notable 
old families in the West Virginia Northern Panhandle. The 
Cox family had early settlement in Brooke County, and he 
is also connected with the Woods family of Ohio County 
and the Cresap family of Marshall County, his paternal 
grandmother being Jane Cresap Cox, who was also a great- 
aunt of Mrs. Hannah O. Cresap Cox. Reminiscent of the 
Woods family influence in this district is Wood Street in 



Wheeling and also the former suburban town now incor- 
porated portions of Wheeling known as Woodsdale, Wood- 
lawn and Edgewood. J. Frank Cox married a member of 
the Cresap family, a name that recalls the earliest recorded 
history in the Upper Ohio Valley. Thomas Cresap was a 
representative of the Ohio Company in building its first forts 
and storehouses on the western slope of the AUeghenies. 
Michael Cresap, a son of Thomas, was one of the group of 
pioneers who were associated with Fort Fincastle, predecessor 
of Fort Henry at Wheeling. Members of both the Cresap 
and Cox families were present at the signing of the treaty 
with the Indians on Piqua Plains near the old town of Chilli- 
cothe, Ohio. 

James Franklin Cox's mother had lived in Keokuk, Lee 
County, Iowa, and her sou's education was begun in the pub- 
lic schools of Keokuk. He also attended school inMarshall 
County, West Virginia, and spent one year, 1890-91 at 
Linsley Institute at Wheeling. Soon after leaving school 
Mr. Cox began his apprenticeship as a machinist with the 
Wheehng Mold & Foundry Company. He was one of the 
first employes of the company and is now the oldest in years 
of service of any employe or official of the industry. For 
a number of years he was a draftsman with the company 
and now has the responsibilities of machine shop superin- 
tendent. Mr. Cox is also a director of the Fulton Bank & 
Trust Company in Wheeling. 

In politics he is non-partisan. He is a member of the 
Masonic Club of Wheeling and is affiliated with Wheeling 
Lodge No. 5, F. and A. M., and West Virginia Consistory 
No. 1 of the Scottish Rite at Wheeling. He also belongs 
to Wheeling Lodge No. 114, Knights of Pythias. Mr. Cox 
is a member of St. Matthew's Episcopal Church. October 
22, 1902, at Cresap's Bottom in Marshall County, he mar- 
ried Hannah O. Cresap, daughter of Quincy and Elizabeth 
Cresap, of Cresap's Bottom and Moundsville. Her ancestor, 
Michael Cresap, above noted, surveyed some of the first 
lands along the bottoms of the Ohio River, and some of these 
lands are still in the hands of the Cresap and Washington 
heirs. Mr. and Mrs. Cox have an interesting family of seven 
children: E. Jane Cox, a student in West Virginia University 
at Morgantown, Jessie R., James F., Mary F., Robert C, 
Charles Q. and Michael Cresap Cox. 

Lee Bennett, a former sheriff of Taylor County, is a 
plasterer, contractor and business man of Gxafton, where 
he has spent practically all his years since early childhood. 
A more popular and substantial citizen of the county it 
would be difficult to find. 

The family was established in Taylor County by his 
grandfather, Reuben Bennett, a native of Virginia and a 
farmer by occupation. He died about 1878, aged eighty- 
one, surviving his wife about a year. Her maiden name 
was Martha Carder. Reuben Bennett was strong in his 
Southern sympathies, but two of his sons wore the blue 
and two the grey during the Civil war. His children were: 
Elias; Calvin and Frank, the Union soldiers, who spent 
their last years in the West; William, who also died in the 
West; Thomas, who died near Industrial, West Virginia; 
John, a resident of Taylor County; Tabby, who married 
Noah Carter and died in Barbour County; Ann, who be- 
came the wife of Frank Goodwyn and died in Taylor Coun- 
ty; Jane, who married Everett Scott, and lived and died 
in the West; and Elizabeth, who died unmarried. 

Elias Bennett was born in Taylor County and as a young 
man left his family to enlist in the Confederate Army, 
serving from the beginning to the end of the struggle. 
After the war he settled on a small farm at Vicksburg, 
Mississippi, and died there in February, 1866, aged forty 
years. While in the South he married Margaret J. Six, 
daughter of a Southern planter. Lee Bennett, who was born 
at Vicksburg, February 19, 1865, was the youngest of three 
children and the only one to grow up. 

After the death of his father his mother came to West 
Virginia and established her home with Reuben Bennett 
in Taylor County. She lived at Pruntytown many years, 
and finally went *o live with her son in Grafton, where she 
died, September 30, 1921, when almost eighty-one. She was 
an active member of the Baptist Church, was well educated 



98 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



and had taught in the South before the war and did some 
teaching in Taylor County. On coming up from the South 
she brought, among other effects, the pocketbook and Tes- 
tament that had been carried by her husband through the 
war, and these are carefully preserved by her son, Lee. 

Lee Bennett had a farm training and attended the rural 
schools of the Booths Creek District. At the age of eigh- 
teen, in the intervals of farm work, he began learning the 
trade of plasterer, and for many years he wielded the trowel, 
hawk, darby and brush as the principal implements of his 
life work. After his four years' service as sheriff he again 
resumed the tools of his trade, and is still a contractor su- 
pervising the work of several mechanics, though most of 
his time is devoted to his paint, oil and varnish store on 
Main Street in Grafton. 

When he was elected sheriff in 1912 Mr. Bennett broke 
a custom in local politics that had kept a republican in the 
office of sheriff for twenty-eight years. He made the race 
against big odds, and gave a thoroughly efficient adminis- 
tration. He succeeded Sheriff Hefner, and was in turn 
succeeded by Melvin Newlon. Mr. Bennett cast his first 
presidential vote for Cleveland in 1888 and has always done 
his duty at the polls and has since helped elect two demo- 
cratic presidents. He is a member of the Grafton Chamber 
of Commerce, is a past noble grand of Taylor Lodge No. 
23, I. O. O. P., at Pruntytown, and has been a delegate to 
the Grand Lodge at Huntington, and is also a member of 
the Woodmen of the World. 

In Taylor County, January 21, 1891, Mr. Bennett mar- 
ried Miss Annie M. Bunner. Her mother was a Miss War- 
der. She was born at Martins Ferry, Ohio, April 15, 1870, 
and was reared in Taylor County, where her father died 
when she was a child. The other children of her parents 
were Charles, of Pruntytown; Oeie; and Margaret, wife of 
William Hall, of Seattle, Washington. Mr. and Mrs. Ben- 
nett have three children. Lee E., connected with the Sen- 
tinel Publishing Company of Grafton, married Ileen Bat- 
son, and has a daughter, Georgianna. Euby married C. L. 
Kimmel, of Morgantown, and has a daughter, Catherine 
Virginia. Hazel is the wife of J. D. Sisler, of Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, and they have a daughter, Jeanne Susan. 

George W. Anderson, M. D. A native of Wetzel County, 
now doing an extensive practice as a physician and surgeon 
at Littleton, Doctor Anderson was in early life a teacher, 
and his career has shown him to be possessed of excep- 
tional abilities for professional service. 

He was born near Wileyville, Wetzel County, November 
19, 1872, youngest of the fifteen children of William H. 
Anderson and the only one of this large family born in 
Wetzel County. AH the others were natives of Belmont 
County, Ohio, where William H. Anderson was born, March 
29, 1820. He was a farmer, a Union soldier in the Civil 
war, and also taught school a number of terms both in Bel- 
mont County and in Wetzel County, West Virginia. In 
1870 he moved to Wetzel County, locating on a farm near 
Poster, in 1871 went to Postlethwait Eidge near Wiley- 
ville, and from there in 1883, removed to the vicinity of 
Smithfield, where he died in January, 1895. He began his 
voting as a democrat but later became a republican, and 
was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
William H. Anderson married Lucinda Your, who was born 
in Belmont County, Ohio, September 21, 1826, and died at 
Middlebourne, Tyler County, West Virginia, November 29, 
1916, at the age of ninety, having retained her faculties 
to a remarkable degree in advanced years. She was the 
mother of fifteen children. Among the children who sur- 
vived infancy were: Hannah, who died in Belmont County, 
aged seventy-two, wife of David Eutter, a school teacher 
and farmer who died near Saulsbury in Wood County, West 
Virginia; John R. was a merchant and died in Wetzel 
County in 1897; Isaac L. is a farmer in West Virginia; 
Samuel is an oil field worker in Texas; Mary, twin sister 
of Samuel, lives at Earnshaw, her first husband having 
been Harvey Mahoney and she is now the widow of Lindsa 
Anderson; Amy lives at Parkersburg, widow of Ebenezer 
C. Horner, who was a farmer; Margaret lives on her farm 
in Wetzel County, vridow of John Postlethwait; Katherlne 



is the wife of Friend Eutter. The names of other childr 
who died in youth were Gasper, Elizabeth, William a 
Lnclnda. 

George W. Anderson was reared in the atmosphere of 
farm in Wetzel County, attended rural schools and spe 
two years in the Fairmont State Normal School, concludi: 
his work there in 1896. Doctor Anderson was an apt s( 
dent from early childhood, and at the age of fourteen w 
granted a license to teach and at that time taught a tei 
of rural school in Wetzel County. Altogether he taug 
eleven terms in the country districts of the county, and w 
in the schoolroom until 1900. After that until 1904 
was in the oil fields of Wetzel County, and then began 1 
serious preparation for the medical profession. The fii 
two years he attended the Central University School of Mf 
icine at Louisville, Kentucky, another year was in the mei 
cal department of the University of Louisville, and 
finished in the Hospital Medical College, the medical sch( 
of Central University of Kentucky, graduating M. 1 
July 30, 1908. In the same year he began practice 
Burchfield in Wetzel County, a year later moved to Unic 
town, where he practiced nine years, and since 1919 h 
had his home and offices at Littleton. He does all his s> 
gical work and is a recognized specialist of ability in d 
eases of children. Doctor Anderson owns his modern hoi 
and ofBces on the public road in the eastern part of Litt 
ton and also has a farm seven miles west of Littleton, i 
proved with good house and other buildings. Doci 
Anderson is the present city health officer of Littleton, a 
is a member of the County, State and American Medi( 
associations. He did much home work during the war, a 
he also passed the examination for duty in the Medi( 
Corps, but by order of the Government remained at Litt 
ton to help combat the influenza epidemic, which taxed ; 
his powers and energies for several months. 

Doctor Anderson is a republican and is affiliated wi 
Polsom Lodge No. 261, Independent Order of Odd Felloi 
is also an Encampment degree Odd Fellow, and is a me 
ber of Littleton Lodge No. Ill, Knights of Pythias. A 
gust 19, 1900, in Wetzel County, he married Miss Jessie 
Toothman, daughter of Jesse S. and Susan (Snider) Tool 
man, the latter deceased. Her father is a retired farm 
at Hundred. Doctor and Mrs. Anderson had three ch 
dren: Howard, who died at the age of three months a 
one day; Gail, born July 13, 1902, graduated from t 
West Liberty State Normal School in 1920, and is ni 
doing post-graduate work there; and Clair SherriU, bo 
March 4, 1911. 

Arthur Trask Post, M. D., is a prominent Harris 
County physician and surgeon, has been engaged in 1 
professional work for fifteen years, and he brought to 1 
profession thorough training and preparation and unusu 
talent for success in that exacting vocation. Since movii 
to Clarksburg to practice Doctor Post has had his office 
one location, but is now established in the third oflSce buil 
ing. the Prunty Building, which stands on the site of ti 
earlier buildings destroyed by fire. 

Doctor Post was born at Jarvisville, Harrison Counl 
January 26, 1880. This is one of the oldest families 
Harrison County, represented here by five successive genei 
tions. His great-grandfather, Isaac Post, and his grar 
father, Jacob Post, were both natives of Harrison CounI 
George Washington Post, father of Doctor Post, died 
1919, at the age of seventy-five. He was a man of abili 
and sterling character, achieved success as a farmer a 
commanded the respect and confidence of all who knew hi 
He married Margaret A. Yerkey, and both were born a 
reared in the vicinity of Good Hope, Harrison County. T 
widowed mother is still living at the old homestead at Jarv 
ville. She is an earnest member of the United Brethr 
Church. George W. Post was a republican in politics. J 
their four children Doctor Post is the second in age al 
the others are Theresa Viola, Asa Gael and Sophroii 
Esther. 

Doctor Post spent his boyhood days and early beoaii 
active on a farm, attended public schools and graduated i 
1901 from Salem College with the degree Bachelor ! 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



99 



edagogy. Salem College in 1907 conferred upon him the 
Bgree Bachelor of Science. Doctor Post taught school two 
3ars, in 1905 completed his medical studies in the Uni- 
!rsity of West Virginia and then entered the medical 
jpartment of the University of Maryland at Baltimore, 
here he graduated Doctor of Medicine in 1907 and in the 
ime year received a similar degree from the University of 
^est Virginia. While in Baltimore he became a member of 
le Phi Beta Pi fraternity, in which society he was at all 
mes a very active member. At Morgantown he was a 
ember of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity, had a permanent 
irt in athletics, has a "life pass" to all athletic events, 
]d was a member of the football team in the memorable 
)ntest between West Virginia University and Washington 
id Jefferson College in 190.3. After graduating in 1907 
octor Post took charge of the practice of Dr. J. S. Maloy 
: Shinnston, durinsr the illness of Doctor Maloy. He 
mdled the professional work in that community until 
octor Maloy recovered, ten months later, and then came 
I Clarksburg and opened his office on West Main Street, 
octor Post has built up a larse and representative follow- 
ig and has kept in touch with all the advances made in 
edicine and surgery by attending clinics in surgery at 
hicaso, Cleveland. New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore, 
id also the clinics of the famous Mayo Brothers at 
ochester, Minnesota. 

Doctor Post is a member of the West Virginia and 
merican Medical associations, served as president in 1922 
: the Harrison County Medical Society and is a member 
■ the regular staff of St. Mary's Hospital at Clarksburg, 
octor Post is a republican, he and wife are members of 
le Prfsbvterian Church, and he is a thirty-second de?ree 
;ottish-Pite Mason and Shriner. a member of the Bene- 
)lent and Protective Order of Elks, the National Masonic 
lub. the Clarksbursr Country Club, the Assembly Club, the 
llcffheny Snortman 's Association, the Cheat Mountain 
lub, the Clarksburg Chamber of Commerce and the Kiwanis 
lub. 

Doctor Post married in 1912 Miss Edna Lenora Siers. 
heir home is at 2.32 Daisv Street in Clarksburg. They are 
ie parents of five children, George Winfield, Margaret 
'atherine, Eleanor Edna. Laura Jean and Julia Anne. 
For all the busy professional duties of his mature career 
octor Post keeps in close touch with the interests and 
ssocintinns of his voiith. He is still an enthusiast on foot- 
sll. follows all college and amateur sports, and is one of 
le influential alumni of the University of West Virginia 
id also Salem College. Much more than the average 
tizen, he also keens in touch with the work done by the 
larksburg High School. While his own children are getting 
leir education in the grammar schools. Doctor Post is 
Wording financial and other encouragement to a young man 
5w enrolled in the University of West Virginia and takes 
!al paternal interest in his progress. This is onlv an -in- 
:ance of many acts of practical kindness Doctor Post has 
lown to vonng people whose financial means do not measure 
D to their ambitions. Doing good is a never ending 
leasure with Doctor Post. 

Thomas Collins Thornbttrg was for a number of years 
I the railroad service, became a traffic manager, and out 
f his long experience has founded and developed at Hunt- 
igton the Thornburg Traffic Bureau, a highly specialized 
nd technical organization with a clientele embracing many 
i^e-st Virginia business and industrial concerns. 

Mr. Thornburg is a member of an old family of Cabell 
ountv. but was bom at Pichmond. Virginia, Anril 6 1892. 
he Thornburgs are of Scotch ancestrv. and settled in 
'irginia in Colonial times. His grandfather. Collins U. 
Tiornburg, was born in West Virginia in 1834. was a 
ioTieer farmer of Cabell County, and while he was away 
?rvinCT in the Confederate armv during the Civil war his 
ne old homestead, located at what is now Cuyandotte. was 
nrned and destroyed by the Federals. That is how the 
amilv property was swept awav during the war. Collins 
r. Thornburg recovered his early losses during subsequent 
ears, and continued his life as a farmer near Huntington 
ntil his death in 1899. He married Nora MUler, who was 



born near Cincinnati in 1840, and is still living at Hunting- 
ton past the age of four score. AU her children, four boys 
and three girls, are living, namely : Harry C. ; Miss Lyda, 
a teacher in the public schools of Huntington; Charles, a 
merchant in the State of Iowa; Edgar, secretary and treas- 
urer of the Foster-Thornburg Hardware Company of Hunt- 
ington; Frank, a traveling salesman with home at Hunting- 
ton ; Frances, twin sister of Prank, an employe of the 
Mercereau Hawkins Tie Company of Huntington; and 
Mrs. Nora Tarbrough, wife of a traveling salesman living 
at Huntington. 

Harry C. Thornburg, who was born at Martinsburg, West 
Virginia, in 1866, has spent all his active life in railroad 
service. He was reared near Huntington, and lived for 
several years at Richmond, Virginia, where he married and 
where he was in the service of the Chesapeake & Ohio Kail- 
road as a machinist. He has been with the same railroad 
ever since, removing to Huntington in 1900, and in 1916 was 
promoted from machinist to foreman of the roundhouse and 
is still on duty. Harry C. Thornburg is a democrat, a 
member of the Johnson Memorial Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, of Huntington, and is affiliated with Reese 
Camp No. 66, Woodmen of the World, and Huntington 
Lodge No. 313, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Harry C. Thornburg married Belle Hartwell Turner, who 
was bom at Richmond, Virginia, in 1872. The oldest of 
their children is Thomas Collins. Rosa, the second in age, 
is the wife of John Vaughan, a jewelry merchant at Louisa, 
Kentucky. Mamie, the youngest child, is the wife of Earl 
Branham, who is connected with the Du Pont Powder Com- 
pany and lives at Huntington. 

Thomas Collins Thornburg acquired a public school educa- 
tion at Huntington, and has lived in that city since he was 
eight years of age. He left school at the age of sixteen 
and began his service with the Baltimore & Ohio Railway 
Company as a messenger boy. He possessed the special in- 
tellectual qualifications that opened the way for rapid 
advancement in the complicated subject of rates and tariff, 
and while still at Huntington he was promoted to rate clerk. 
In 1914 he was transferred, with an advance of salary and 
as rate clerk, to Fairmont, and in 1917 went to the Cleve- 
land, Ohio, headquarters of the Baltimore & Ohio, as chief 
rate clerk. He resigned this position in 1919 and became 
traffic manager at Cleveland for the Ohio Chemical and 
Manufacturing Company. 

In 1920 Mr. Thornburg returned to Huntington and 
established the Thornburg Traffic Bureau, of which he is 
sole owner. This bureau performs the important service of 
freight audit bureau and the handling of nearly every sub- 
ject involving freight transportation for business interests. 
The bureau looks after a large volume of business before 
the Interstate Commerce Commission and the Public Service 
Commission. The offices of the bureau are in the Lewis- 
Samson Building on Fourth Avenue in Huntington. 

Mr. Thornburg is a democrat, a member of the Johnson 
Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the West 
Side Country Club of Huntington. He married in that city 
in 1913 Miss Mae Bland, daughter of John H. and Edna 
May Bland, resident of Huntington, where her father is a 
retired building contractor. Mrs. Thornburg is a graduate 
of the Huntington High School with the class of 1911 and 
also a graduate of Marshall College. To their marriage 
were born four children: Thomas Collins, Jr., born May 30, 
1914; Edna Hartwell, who died at the age of eighteen 
months; James Lewis, bom December 13, 1919; and Edgar 
Horace, bora May 7, 1921. 

John S. Dana. Among the men prominently identified 
with the mercantile and financial interests of Charleston, 
as well as with the social life of the city, few have gained 
a higher reputation for ability and keenness of discernment 
than John S. Dana, vice president of the wholesale dry 
goods concern 'of Abney-Barnes Company. Mr. Dana is also 
not unknown to public life, and in each avenue of activity 
is accounted a constructive and helpful citizen. 

Mr. Dana was born near Charleston, June 28, 1879, a son 
of J. E. and Maria A. (Swiff^ Dana, natives of New York. 
His father, who fought as a Union soldier during the Civil 



100 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



war, came here immediately after receiving his honorable 
discharge to investigate the coal fields. He started the 
Campbell's Creek Coal Company, of which he ran the oper- 
ating end, while his brother, S. F. Dana, had charge of the 
office at Cincinnati,' Ohio. Mr. Dana continued in charge 
of the operations of this company for a period of forty 
years, and then retired to his comfortable home at Charles- 
ton, of wliich city he was appointed postmaster, a position 
in which he served four years. He is now living in his home 
at Palm Beach, Florida. Mrs. Dana, to whom he was mar- 
ried at Bichfield Sjjrings, New York, died in 1914. 

John 8. Dana attended the public schools of Charleston, 
and after doing some preparatory work pursued a course at 
Princeton University, from which he graduated with the 
class of 1903, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In 
that year he returned to Charleston, where he joined the 
Abney-Barncs Company, wholesale dry goods merchants, of 
which he is now vice president. This company is now the 
largest concern of its kind in the Kanawha Valley, and has 
always adhered to the same line. It started as a small 
retail store some time after the close of the Civil war, but 
lias been gradually developed into an enterprise which has a 
place among the city's leading concerns. It has sixty-live 
employes and twenty road salesmen, in addition to house 
salesmen, and during the nineteen years that Mr. Dana has 
been with the company he has seen its sales increase 600 
per cent. The present officers are: W. 0. Abney, presi- 
dent; E. A. Barnes, treasurer; and John S. Dana, vice 
president. Mr. Dana was also one of the original organ- 
izers of the Union Trust Company, which opened its doors 
for business May 5, 1913. The officials of this concern, of 
which Mr. Dana is a director, are : William O. Abney, 
president; A. B. Kooutz, vice president; Charles Ward, 
vice president; H. P. Brightwell, cashier; and directors, 
Roman Pickens, J. S. Dana, E. L. Boggs, James A. Holley 
and H. M. Bertolet. This institution is one of the strongest 
in West Virginia and owns one of the finest bank and office 
buildings in the state. Mr. Dana is also a partner in the 
brokerage firm of Hardy-Dana Company, members of the 
New York Stock Exchange. He is a stanch republican in 
his political views and for several years has been one of the 
constructive and working members of the city council, in 
which body he is serving as chairman of the finance com- 
mittee. He has been a constant supporter of worthy civic 
movements, and his name is found regularly on the list of 
worthy charities. 

Mr. Dana was united in marriage at Charleston with Miss 
Cynthia Abney, born in this city, a daughter of F. W. 
Abney, one of the founders of the firm of Abney-Barnes 
Company. To this union there have been born four children, 
namely: Francis, Arnold, Adelaide and John S. 

Rev. E. M. Hicket gave thirty years of earnest and con- 
secrated service in the Catholic parish of St. Xavier's 
Church at Parkersburg, and brought to bear in his sacred 
office a most glowing and buoyant personality, the finest of 
intellectuality, the deepest human sympathy and tolerance, 
and the full measure of consecrated devotion to the aiding 
and uplifting of his fellow men. Father Hickey and his 
work meant much in Parkersburg, and in offering in this 
publication a tribute to his memory it is deemed but con- 
sistent to quote liberally, but with slight paraphrase, from 
the appreciative estimate that appeared in the Parkersburg 
Sentinel of October 12, 1909, the day of the death of the 
loved priest' and citizen. 

"No death in Parkersburg in recent years has caused 
such universal sorrow and regret in this community as that 
of Rev. Father E. M. Hickey. Father Hickey 's life and 
services in Parkersburg are knovni to all. For thirty years 
he has labored in the vineyard of the parish of Parkers- 
burg, and there have been fruitful results. He was highly 
educated, the master of many languages, a deep thinker, 
eloquent and flowery, and broad-minded and liberal. He 
was beloved by the members of his church and was es- 
teemed and respected by everyone, of whatever creed and 
of whatever condition of life, as there were no class dis- 
tinctions in his friendships, but a kindly salutation and a 
pleasant word were on his lips for everyone. 



"Father Hickey was in the seventy-second year of 1 
age. He was a native of Catskill, New York, where he vi 
born August 12, 1837, and it was there he spent his earl 
years and received his preliminary education, which w 
acquired in the parochial school. Later, after he had ( 
cided to enter the priesthood, he took a full course at ! 
Mary's Seminary in the City of Baltimore, Maryland^ amo 
his classmates having been the late Cardinal Gibbons, lo 
one of the most distinguished dignitaries of the church 
the Western Continent, the two having always remain 
close friends. After concluding his course at St. Marj 
Father Hickey went to Rome, where he spent several ye£ 
in study. 

"Father Hickey was ordained to the priesthood on C 
tober 5, 1860, in the cathedral at Newark, New Jersey, a 
had he lived one more year he would have celebrated t 
fiftieth anniversary of his ordination. During the Ci 
war he served as chaplain of a New Jersey regiment, a 
at the close of the war he returned to New Jersey, whe 
he was stationed for some time thereafter. He was a me: 
ber of the faculty of the Catholic college at Orange, th 
state, and his lectures in this institution attracted wi 
attention. They were deep and logical and were mastc 
pieces of beautiful phrasing and diction. 

"In 1878 Father Hickey was transferred to Newberi 
West Virginia, and this small parish was enriched by 1 
presence. In November, 1880, he was transferred to t 
Parkersburg Parish, where he succeeded Rev. Father H. 
Park, who had presided over the destinies of this pari 
for a period of nearly thirty years and who was kno\ 
all over the state. For nearly thirty years Father Hicki 
has labored earnestly and zealously for the spiritual wi 
fare of his large flock, and has spent much of his time ai 
efforts in advancing the work of the church. Broad-minde 
charitable and with a loving nature. Father Hickey had 
good word for everyone. In his makeup there was utt 
absence of bigotry and prejudice, and thus he won frien 
and admirers wherever he moved, regardless of denomin 
tional religious lines. He frequently took part in civ 
gatherings, and was always heard with pleasure and prof 
Father Hickey was survived by a brother and two sister 
Charles Hickey, of Newark, New Jersey; Mrs. Mary Crc 
ton, of New York City; and Mrs. Sophia Norton, who hi 
been his constant home companion for years." 

In all that represents the higher ethics of human li 
and all that represents the finest conceptions of spirituali 
and Christian faith as expressed in service. Father Hick- 
stood forth as a noble and commanding figure, and his nar 
and memory shall long be revered in the city and pari 
in which he long lived and labored to goodly ends. 

■ Creed 0. Newlon is one of Grafton's veteran busine 
men. He has been in the city and its business life mo 
than forty years. His individual activities serve to empl 
size the record of a family that for four or five generatio 
has borne its share of business, civic, political and milita 
duty in old Virginia and West Virginia. The family h 
tory, though it can be told only briefly, is a record of mo 
than ordinary experience and achievement. 

The record may properly start with the greatgrandfath 
of the Grafton business man. His name was William Ne 
Ion. In 1799 he moved with his family from Lancast 
County, Pennsylvania, to Fauquier County, Virginia, 
married a Miss Martin, probably a native of Lancast 
County. They had six children: James, whose record fi 
lows; Elijah, who died near Bentonsport, Iowa; Willia 
who died in Loudoun County, Virginia; John, who nev 
married and died in Loudoun County; Tamer, who pro 
ably never married; and Debbie, who married Mr. Cart 
and spent her life in Loudoun County. 

James Newlon, representing the next generation, w 
born at Shepherdstown, Maryland, August 14, 1782. ( 
March 1, 1807, in Fauquier County, Virginia, he marri- 
.Tane Adams, and for a number of years they lived ne 
Culpeper Court House. In 1824 they came to West V:|t 
ginia, locating in what was then Harrison County, nc" 
Taylor County, and near Pruntytown. After his sJ 
Charles went to Webster to take charge of a mill and stoiil 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



101 



James Newlon purchased his son's home in Pruntytown, 
and they lived there the rest of their days. He died March 
28, 1867. His wife was born in Fauquier County in Feb- 
ruary, 1791, and died February 12, 1882. 

Charles Washington Newlon, son of James and father 
of Creed O., was born near Culpeper Court House, Vir- 
ginia, in 1816, and was about eight years of age when the 
family came to the frontier community of Pruntytown and 
to the farm on Fairmont Pike. Charles W. Newlon ac- 
quired a limited education and as a youth learned the tailor 
trade. By self study he educated himself far beyond the 
point to which his school advantages took him, and he exer- 
cised the qualities of a line mind by acquiring wide infor- 
mation on many subjects and developed great fluency as 
a public speaKer. He became prominent in polities and 
public affairs. He was the second clerk of Taylor County, 
and he held the oflSces of Circuit and County Court clerk. 
About 1856 he was elected to the Virginia Senate, being 
chosen on the democratic ticket, and remained a member 
of the Virginia government through a portion of the war. 
He was opposed to secession, but when Virginia went out 
of the Union he diclared himself a loyal citizen like Gen- 
eral Lee and other strong men of the town. One service 
he performed during the war was securing the exchange 
of Maj. Nathan Goff, a Union officer held by the Confed- 
erates as a hostage for Major Armsey of the Southern army, 
and that possibly saved the lives of both of these officers. 
After the war he seems to have retired from politics for 
some years. Later he was elected mayor of Grafton, and 
in 1876 was chosen to the West Virginia Senate. He re- 
mained loyal to the democratic party after the war, and in 
spite of this handicap ho defeated the republican nominee 
and served one term in the Senate of the new state. He 
really possessed the qualifications of a safe leader in poli- 
tics and affairs. About the close of his term in the Sen- 
ate he gave up his business as a merchant at Grafton and 
moved his family to Buckhannon, where he helped organ- 
ize the Buckhannon Bank and was its cashier until his 
death in February, 1889. Before the Civil war and while 
a resident of Taylor County he joined, in the spring of 
1859, David Elliott and G. H. A. Kunst in the co-partner- 
ship of Elliott, Newlon and Company. This firm erected 
a four-story flouring mill and sawmill in Webster, and with 
the management and conduct of this and his mercantile 
business Charles W. Newlon was connected until the out- 
break of the war. 

Charles W. Newlon was a church worker, probably never 
missed a church service, and he and F. M. Durbin and John 
^W. Hull promoted and organized the First Methodist 
Protestant Church in Grafton. He was licensed to preach, 
but probably never officiated in this capacity with the excep- 
tion in the absence of the pastor. He was never at a loss 
to make a good speech, and had a large vocabulary and 
a very fine diction. He joined the church when about six- 
teen years of age, and probably as a consequence of his 
devotion to church he never became a member of any 

i fraternity. 
Charles W. Newlon married Christina Margaret Earl. 
The home of the Earl family was Randolph County, Vir- 
igiuia, at Beverly, where her father, Archibald Earl, was an 
extensive landowner and farmer and justice of the peace. 
Archibald Earl was born at Winchester in the Valley of 
iVirfinia. and was a strong Southern man over the issues 
!of the Civil war. He married a Miss Buckey, of Beverly. 
I Christina Margaret was one of eleven children, the others 
•being: John, Elias, Jefferson, Archibald, Creed. Mrs. Lu- 
icinda Leonard, Mrs. Anzina Crawford, Mrs. Sallie Ann 
[Harper, Mrs. Maiia Ward and Mrs. Elizabeth Barlow. Mrs. 
.Charles W. Newlon died at Buckhannon two years after 
the death of her husband, at the age of seventy-three. Her 
.children were: Doctor Granville A., who practiced his pro- 
Jfession in the vicinity of Buckhannon, where he died; Doc- 
tor Charles W., Jr., who died at Grafton; Jefferson Earl, 
\ who was a merchant and died at Buckhannon ; Creed Owens ; 
' James Lee, who died at Grafton while a Baltimore and Ohio 
.Railway conductor; and Ida, who resides at Parkersburg, 
jWife of Charles W. McCormick. 
^ It now remains to take up the individual record of Mr. 



Creed O. Newlon. He was born at Pruntytovrn, Taylor 
County, February 17, 1851. He was about ten years of 
age when the Civil war broke out. At that time his parents 
followed the Southern army from Fetterman south, and 
though but a child he witnessed with them the first battles 
of the Civil war fought in West Virginia, these battles be- 
ing at Philippi and Rich Mountain. He received his first 
schooling in his native community, and during the war 
attended the Bock Bridge Academy, Brownsburg, Virginia. 
The close of the war found the family living at Rock Bridge 
Baths on North River. Soon afterward his father returned 
to Western Virginia, to take possession of what remained 
of his property, and after disposing of his interests he 
gathered his family together and took them to Texas. The 
trip southwest was made by railroad to Parkersburg, by 
lioat to New Orleans, thence by another boat up Red River 
to Jefferson. Texas. While in New Orleans his father pur- 
chased a Wheeling made wagon and at Jefferson, Texas, 
bought a pair of horses and harness and drove two hun- 
dred miles west into Texas to Fort Worth. He remained 
there aboiit a year, and in the meantime became convinced 
that he was in a country too wild for permanent habita- 
tion, and accordingly traded his team and some other prop- 
erty for land in Randolph County, West Virginia. The 
party with whom he made the trade conveyed the family 
as far as Millican, then the terminus of a railway, and 
from there they traveled by train to Houston, by steam- 
boat down Buffalo Bayou to Galveston, and thence by boat 
over the Gulf to the mouth of the Mississippi River and 
up that river two hundred and ten miles to New Orleans. 
Here another boat received the family of eight Newlons, 
and they came up the Mississippi and Ohio through Cin- 
cinnati, where they transferred to another boat bound for 
Parkersburg. Leaving the river, they traveled by train to 
Grafton, having been absent only a year, but having had 
exxieriences of travel and change that would hardly be for- 
gotten by a boy of fourteen or fifteen years. From Graf- 
ton the family went on to Volga, Barbour County, by wagon, 
remained at old Burnersville a year and then returned to 
Grafton. 

In the meantime Creed O. Newlon had picked up con- 
siderable knowledge of mechanical trade, did work as a 
carpenter, was a merchant for a brief time at Grafton, and 
then took up the plumbing business and performed the first 
public plumbing job in the city. He now ranks as the 
oldest plumber of Grafton. For over nineteen years he 
was manager of the Grafton Gas and Electric Light Com- 
pany. He then resumed business for himself, operating a 
foundry and machine shop, and in connection doing business 
in electrical and plumbing goods. He continued the ma- 
chine shop until 1919. and he is still active in business on 
Latrobe Street, handling plumbing supplies and mining and 
machine supplies. 

Mr. Newlon was chairman of the Water Commission that 
installed the first water system of Grafton, and he was 
formerly a member of the School Board. He has rather 
avoided polities beyond voting as a democrat, and he claims 
to have profited from his father's long experience in pub- 
lic affairs to the extent of steering clear of political 
burdens. 

October 29. 1873, at Grafton, Mr. Newlon married Miss 
Katie B. Barbee, a native of Grafton and daughter of 
Joseph and Jaekalina (Smith) Barbee. Mrs. Newlon died 
in August. 1898. She was the mother of six children: Owen 
E., a plumber at Marietta, Ohio; Floyd A., master mechanic 
of the Texas and Pacific Railway at Big Springs, Texas; 
Ethel N., of Columbus, Ohio, widow of T. Frank Cotton; 
Bertha K., wife of AUen T. Hodges, of Elkins, West Vir- 
ginia; Ella-May, wife of Everette McDaniel. of Columbus, 
Ohio; and Albert Joseph, a machinist of Marietta, Ohio. 

The soldier representative of the family in the great war 
is Owen E. Newlon, who volunteered in April, 1917, giving 
up a high salaried position and declaring that he was volun- 
teering for the emergency of the war, and at the termina- 
tion of which he wished to be discharged so as to re-enter 
civil life. He was assigned to Battery C of the Seventy- 
sixth Field Artillery of the Third Division, was trained 
at Fort Ethan Allen, Burlington, Vermont, and at Camp 



102 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



Shelby, TTattieshnrp, Mississippi, went overseas from New 
York and was on the front line at the Battle of Chateau 
Thierry and until the close, being never absent from his 
post of duty an hour. He was cited at Mousay, France, 
for distinprnifhed service, was promoted to Bergeant of his 
company, and the morning following the sisning of the 
armistice he and his regiment started vpith the Army of 
Occupation for the T?hine. The people of Coblenz declared 
thnt the Seventv-sixth Field Artillery was the finest body 
of men they had ever seen. When he went into the service 
Owen Newlon knew personally the one hundred ninety-eight 
men of his battery, and when the war ended there were 
onlv thirty-five of his old acquaintances left in the active 
personnel. 

October 1, 1901, Mr. Creed Newlon married Miss Katie 
B. Miller, of New Hope. Kentucky, where she was bom, 
daughter of William B. and Mollie Miller. She is the old- 
est of a family of five daughters and one son. Her father 
was a farmer and is now deceased, and her widowed mother 
occupies the old home farm with her unmarried son and 
two unmarried daughters. William B., Jr.. and Misses Sallie 
and Florence Miller. The married daughters besides Mrs. 
Newlon are Mrs. Sudie Peterson and Mrs. Lula May. 

Mr. Creed Newlon has become aflRliated with all branches 
of Masonry, being active in the Koyal Arch Chapter, the 
Knights Templars Commandery and the Mystic Shrine, and 
has served as secretary of his lodge for twentv-two years. 
He is a past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias, and is 
a Grand Lodge representative and deputy grand chancellor 
of that order. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

WiiiLiAM Pearl McCtre represents the younger generation 
of one of the old land holding families of West Virginia, and 
while he has kept in close touch with land and agricnltnre, 
his associations for a number of years have been those of an 
energetic business leader and man of affairs at Morgan- 
town^ Mr. McCue is in the insurance and real estate busi- 
ness and is general manager of the Hope Eealty Company 
of Morgantown. . 

His birth occurred on the old McCue homestead m 
Nicholas Countv. West Virginia, December 25, 1883. His 
parents were Kyle B. and Martha (Whitman) McCue. His 
grandparents were John and Mary (Burr) McCue._ The 
McCiies were north Irish Scotch people who. on coming to 
America, settled in old Virginia. Kyle B. MeCue was born 
in Nicholas Countv in 18.53. and is still active in business 
affairs, being known throughout that section of the state 
as one of the largest land ovmers and stock men. He has 
about 2,nnn acres of land in Nicholas County and has made 
a successful business of stock raising. He has been honored 
with a number of local offices, including membership in the 
Countv Court and school director. 

William P. McCue lived with his father on the home 
farm nntil 1902, when he was nineteen. In the meantime 
he attended the public schools and was also a student in 
the West Virginia Wcsleyan Seminary, now the Weslevan 
TJniversitv at Buckhannon] On leaving the farm he attended 
West Virginia TTniversity. and left there to return to 
Nicholas Countv and take charge of a 600-acre farm which 
he had inherited from his grandfather McCue. He remained 
in charge of this property for a year, and then returned to 
Morgantown and became associated with William E. Price 
in the furniture business. He had active charge of the 
firm's interests nntil 1916, in which year he became local 
agent for the Northwestern Life Insurance Company and 
has since built up a splendid business in insurance and also 
in real estate. He organized the Hope Bealtv Company, 
which he now manages, and was also identified with the 
organization of the Smith-McCue Coal Company, and was 
one of the organizers and has since been a director of the 
Hnion Bank & Trust Company. 

Other affiliations that betoken his wholesome interest in 
the life and affairs of his home city are: Morgantown 
Union Lodge No. 4. A. F. and A. M., Morgantown Chapter 
No. 14, Tt. A. M., Morgantown Commandery No. 18. K. T., 
Morgantown Lodge of Perfection No. 6 of the Scottish 
Bite. West Virginia Consistory No. 1 and Osiris Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine at Wheeling; Morgantown Lodge No. 



411, Benevolent and Protective Order of 151118; Monon^a 
hela Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows: Kiwanii 
Club. Chamber of Commerce; and the First Baptist Church 
On December 27, 1907, Mr. McCue married Edith Price 
daughter of William E. and Elizabeth Price, of Morgan 
town. Her death occurred in Mav. 1909. shortly after th( 
birth of her son, William Price McCue. who was born Apri 
24, 1909. September 25, 1913, Mr. McCue married Ann! 
Burke, who was born in Greene County, Pennsylvania 
daughter of Justus South and Esther (Boss) Burke. Thi 
three sons of this marriage are: Bobert Burke and Bichar( 
Burke twins, born October 7, 1914, Bichard dving at birth 
and John Burke McCue, born December 19, 1916. 

Benjamin F. Bone, M. D., who is engaged in the prac 
tice of his profession in the City of Moundsville Marshal 
County, has unequivocal prestige as one of the leading phy 
sicians and surgeons of this section of the state and hai 
gained specially high reputation as a skilled surgeon. Hii 
success has been on a parity with his professional ability 
and his personality has gained to him a host of stand 
friends in the county of his adontion. The doctor has iden 
tified himself most fully with local interests and owns an( 
occupies one of the finest homes in Moundsville. 

Doctor Bone was bom at Mount Pleasant. Ohio, Octobei 
4, 1875, and is a scion of one of the honored pioneer fnmi 
lies of the old Buckeye State. His paternal grandfathei 
came to the United States from Haling Island, Eno-land 
and was a resident of Ohio at the time of his death, ii 
1S79, when seventy-six years of age. His brother. Bev 
Henry Bone, was for forty years pastor of the Methodis' 
Church at Martin 's Ferry, Ohio. A maternal uncle o: 
Doctor Bone was Dr. Nathaniel R. Coleman, who served ai 
president of the Ohio State Board of Health and held othei 
positions of influence in connection with public affairs. Th( 
Coleman family was founded in Ohio in the early pioneei 
period of its history. 

After completing the curriculum of the high school Doctoi 
Bone entered the medical department of George WashingtOT 
University, at Washington, District of Columbia, and aftei 
receiving his degree of Doctor of Medicine he came to Wes' 
Virginia and engaged in practice at Tunnelton, where h( 
also held the position of railway surgeon. Later he wai 
engaged in practice at Fairmont until 1908, when he cam( 
to Moundsville, where he had charge of the prison hospital 
under the administration of Governor Dawson. He confinei 
his attention largely to office and surgical practice, is i 
valued member of the staff of the Revnolds Memorial Hos 
pital. and just prior to the signing of the armistice whicl 
brought the World war to a close he had been accented foi 
service in the Medical Corns of the United States Army 
At the inception of the movement to send medical unit 
to the stage of warfare Doctor Bone had tendered his^ serv 
ices but at that time there was no requisition for his aic 
in this capacity. 

Doctor Bone is liberal in politics and gives his suppor" 
to men and measures rather than being constrained by stric 
partisan lines. He has received the thirty-second degrei 
in the Scottish Bite of the Masonic fraternity and ii 
affiliated also with the Mvstic Shrine. He is a directoi 
of the City and Countv Bank at Moundsville. and in a pro 
fessional wav is actively identified with the Marshall Counti 
Medical Society, the West Virginia State Medical Society 
and the American Medical Association. His chief diver 
sion is found in annual hunting trips in Northern Michi<i-ai 
on the shores of Lake Superior, where he maintains a cabii 
as a domicile for use in hunting seasons of deer. He hai 
several fine trophies of the hunt, including snlendid deei 
heads. He has also maintained a summer home for th( 
past ten years at Lake Odessa. Michigan, where the farnili 
spend the summer, and the fishing is very good. His wife 
whose maiden name was Mvrtle G. Harr is a dancrhter o) 
the late and honored Dr. Wayne Harr. of Fairmont. Wes( 
Virginia. The three children of this union are Mar<ra'-et 
who" is. in 1921, a student in the University of Wost Vir 
pinia. she having been previously graduated in Washinprtoi 
Seminary, at Washington Pennsylvania; Dorothy, like hei 
sister graduated from high scliool and is now a student ii 




._^^Q,?^Tl 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



103 



the State University; and George, who graduated from the 
Linsly Military Academy of Wheeling, West Virginia, is 
now attending Washington and Jefferson College. 

Grafton Ecucators. The dean of the educational forces 
of Grafton is Miss Amanda Abbott, who has been continu- 
ously in the service of the schools of that city since 1877. 
In any account of the school workers of the city her name 
easily stands first. 

Her grandfather was Abner Abbott, who came with his 
wife from King and Queen County, Virginia, and settled 
in what is now Lewis County, between Weston and Buck- 
hannon. He acquired a large tract of land and was much 
interested in public affairs. He was a judicial officer attend- 
ing court at Weston at a time when the country was new 
and aU travel was by wagon or horseback. Once his son 
accompanied him to court and returned home with the 
horses. During the week Squire Abbott remarked that if 
he had a horse he would go home. One of the attending 
lawyers put a horse at his disposal. On the way he was 
thrown off, his head striking a stone or stake, and he was 
instantly killed. After his death his lands, due to a flaw 
in the title, were lost to his heirs. He had married Fannie 
Price, also a native of Virginia, and daughter of a slave- 
holder. But Squire Abbott was opposed to slavery, and 
in line with his convictions he returned a negro boy given 
his wife by her father. Mrs. Fannie Abbott spent her last 
years with a son in Missouri. Her children were: James, 
who became a resident of Missouri; John and Jacob, who 
remained in West Virginia; Vernon, whose record follows; 
and Patricia, or Pattie, who died in Missouri. 

Vernon Abbott was born in what is now Lewis County, 
June 23, 1820. He acquired a common school education, 
learned the trade of plasterer, developing a -high degree of 
artistry in the handling of such material, and did a con- 
tracting business. His mind was active and led him to 
study and reading as a permanent taste. He was a keen 
student of political conditions, was an intense patriot and 
republican, but announced as a result of his experience in 
politics his conviction that Grover Cleveland would win the 
election of 1884. 

His home for many years was at Fairmont, where he 
aied in 1890. His first wife was Priscilla VanZandt. The 
children of this marriage were: William E., who served 
as a Union soldier ; Lee Roy, a lawyer, now deceased ; and 
Fannie, who became the wife of J. C. McKinney and reared 
her family at Fairmont. The second wife of Vernon Abbott 
was Mrs. Mary (Toothman') Price, who died in September, 
1911, aged eighty-four. She was the mother of: Miss 
Amanda; Alice, of Fairmont; Millard, who died in Fair- 
mont; Ida, who for ten years had charge of the depart- 
ment of history in the Fairmont State Normal School and 
the last two years was dean of women ; Luther, a merchant 
at Grafton and a leading Taylor County citizen; James H. 
and Thomas Bruce, twins, deceased; and Clarence V., con- 
nected with the Diomestic Coke Company of Fairmont. 

Miss Amanda Abbott was born at Fairmont, acquired her 
first advantages in a subscription school there, later attended 
public school, and graduated from the Fairmont Normal in 
1873. Throughout her life she has been an active member 
of the Methodist Protestant Church, and year after year 
taught the primary class in the Sunday School, thus broad- 
ening the scope of her influence beyond the schoolroom in 
behalf of the character building among the young. Her 
first teaching was done as a substitute in Fairmont under 
Professor T. C. Miller. She became a regular teacher in 
the Newburg schools, and from there came to Grafton in 
1877, t-aking charge of the primary grade in one of the six 
rooms of the old Central Building. The two years she spent 
in Newburg were under Principal Bowman. Her coming 
to Grafton was at the invitation of Marion Durbin, then 
president of the school board, the other two members being 
Arthur Sinsel and John Deck, all men of constructive ideals 
in molding the educational program of the city. Some 
li the little children to whom she directed her first saluta- 
tion in 1877 are now grandfathers or grandmothers of pupils 
in her primary class. There has been no interruption to 
ithis service for which she has dedicated her life and her 



highest talents. Grafton has grown and expanded greatly 
as a city and in its schools. The Central Building was the 
only schoolhouse in Grafton proper when she came, but 
other schools have come in with the coalescing of several 
districts comprised in the limits of the present city, and 
the city now has a total of seven brick school buildings, 
beside the parochial schools. For forty-four years Miss 
Abbott has had the primary work in the new or remodeled 
Central Building. 

Among her old pupils who have achieved some special 
distinction are Howard H. Holt, editor and proprietor of 
the Grafton Sentinel ; Harry A. Abbott, cashier of the Graf- 
ton Banking & Trust Company; Harry Friedman, lawyer 
and secretary of the Grafton Board of Education; Max 
Friedman, a leading business man; and Miss Grace White, 
who teaches in the eighth grade of the public schools. 

With education as her chosen life work Miss Abbott has 
accepted many opportunities to make her experience avail- 
able to the teaching profession, and is widely known over 
the state through the associations of teachers. She has 
attended a great many of the State Associations, and she 
was present at the first regular meeting of the Round Table 
at Fairmont, and has since attended every annual meeting 
of the Monongahela Branch of the Round Table. 

Miss Abbott is well informed concerning the educational 
administration of the Grafton schools. The first principal, 
at a time when West Grafton and Fetterman were separate 
school entities, was Patrick O 'Brien. The first winner of 
the Peabody medal or graduate of the Grafton schools was 
Florence Jaco. O'Brien was followed by U. S. Fleming, 
who gave the schools a regular curriculum, permitting 
graduation as a prescribed course. Following Fleming came 
Professor Jack Wilkinson, who remained six years. He wag 
an excellent disciplinarian and an all-round school man. 
Hayward Fleming, his successor, was an exemplar of thor- 
oughness in school work, and that characteristic followed 
him in other lines of work. He was followed by J. S. Corn- 
well and by Professor Gorby. 

Professor Humphrey, who had been a high school princi- 
pal at Fairmont, did some efiicient work the two years he 
was at Grafton and proved his ability both in the adminis- 
trative and the teaching departments. It was a congenial 
work here, and he has been a strong man in educational 
affairs since in the state. 

When he left Morgan Brooks, principal of the high 
school, took his place as acting superintendent. He was a 
good teacher, possessed a splendid personality, and since 
leaving Grafton has been in school work at Buckhannon. 

Since 1914 the superintendent of the Grafton schools has 
been Mr. Burns. From the first he has been the embodi- 
ment of the educational progress, and in addition to what 
he accomplished in behalf of the present high school he has 
achieved results in coordinating and increasing the effi- 
ciency of the schools in every grade and department. 

Joshua Whitehair has long been known as a man of 
great energy, sound business ability and civic spirit, en- 
gaged in farming and the livestock business near Terra 
Alta, and member of one of the old and substantial fami- 
lies of Preston County. 

He was born in that community, February 2, 18.56. His 
grandfather, George Whitehair, was a native of Germany 
and came from Luxemburg in company with some relatives, 
the Nine family, which also became well represented in 
Preston County. George Whitehair married Polly Mc- 
Gruder, a native of Ireland. Their children were : John, 
a shoemaker, who died at Rowlesburg; Christopher, who 
though a civilian was taken prisoner by the Federal troops 
and died while at Camp Chase, Columbus. Ohio; George, 
who spent his life on a farm near Eglon in Preston County; 
Isaac, who lived on a farm in Salt Lick; Josias, who 
moved to Delaware County, Indiana, where he spent the 
rest of his life; Fannie, who married Henry Broman and 
moved to Ohio; Margaret and Polly, who left the old home- 
stead as young women and did not afterward keep in touch 
with the family. The second wife of George Whitehair was 
Margaret Strawser, and the three children of this union 
were: Fyedelany, who lived for a time in Indiana and then 



104 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



settled in Washijigtou State; Mary, who married Minor 
Whitehair in Indiana and died in Delaware County; and 
Susann, who died at Salt Lick as Mrs. Henry Messenger. 

Daniel Whitehair, another son of George Whitehair, was 
born on Salt Liek, near Amber.sburgj more than a hundred 
years ago, and lived in that community as a farmer until 
shortly after the Civil war, when he moved to the Terra 
Alta locality, establishing his home about two miles north- 
west of the little city, on the mountaintop. Daniel White- 
hair never had any educational advantages, and with this 
handicap he acquired a competency as a farmer, lived in- 
dustriously and ratl>er uneventfully, never concerned him- 
self with church or politics, merely voting as a democrat. 
His wife was Sarah Messenger, daughter of Edmund and 
Eliza (Mason) Messenger. The Messengers came from 
Maine to Preston County in pioneer times. The children 
of Daniel Whitehair and wife were: Charlotte, who mar- 
ried Francis Nine near Sunnyside, Maryland ; Edmund, of 
Philippi, West Virginia; Emily E., who became the wife 
of Samuel Freeland and died in Preston County; Elijah, 
a farmer at the old homestead; Joshua; Charles, of Davis, 
West Virginia; Sjieneer, a farmer near Terra Alta; Grant, 
a farmer near Albright; George, a farmer in Delaware 
County, Indiana; Nancy, wife of Gilbert Metheny, of Terra 
Alta; Malinda Jane, who died at Terra Alta, wife of Wal- 
ter Guthrie; Amanda, Mrs. Lawrence Wright, of Delaware 
County; and Louisa, who died as the wife of Chris Nordiek. 

Joshua Whitehair attended the first free schools estab- 
lished on Salt Lick, and was about ten years of age when 
his parents moved to the Terra Alta community. Here he 
continued to attend country schools, and at the same time 
gained an experience of the hard work of the farm, clear- 
ing off the timlior, making staves and crossties and now 
and then cutting a few sawlogs. He was an aid to his 
parents until past his majority, and after his marriage he 
settled on a portion of the homestead, living there until 
1894, when he moved to his iiresent place, which had been 
settled by members of the Messenger family. Here for 
nearly thirty years Mr. Whitehair has been vigorous in the 
iirosecution of his farming enterprise, but is most widely 
known as a buyer and shipper of livestock. As a young 
man for several years hebuteliered lambs for a hotel at 
Terra Alta. Later he bought stock for D. B. Zimmerman 
of Somerset County, Pennsylvania, for ten years, was then 
local buyer for the firm of Eden & Company of Baltimore, 
and later he and his sons used their own capital for the 
business and for a number of years have been shippers of 
stock to the Baltimore and Pittsburgh market.s. 

Any worthy movement or interest of the community Mr. 
Whitehair regards as his own. He has been trustee of the 
local schools, has served as road lio.ss, votes for the best 
man in local politics, and in national affairs is a democrat. 

Mr. Whitehair has reared a fine family of children and 
has a number of grandchildren. April 25, 1878, he mar- 
ried Phoebe Ellen Garner, daughter of William R. and 
Nancy (Ridcnour) Garner. The Garner children were: 
Eva, deceased wife of Thomas B. Jackson; Julia A., who 
married William Taylor ; Phoebe Ellen ; Mary who married 
David Everly; John A., Andrew, William and Wesley 
Garner. 

The oldest of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Whitehair 
is William, living at Terra Alta, and by his marriage to 
Isa Kclley is the father of a son, Hugh Kelley. John White- 
hair, associated with his father in the stock business, is 
unmarried. Enzer, a prominent stock dealer near Terra 
Alta, married Annie Dumire, and their children are Roy, 
Grace, Blanche and Earl. Bruce is a farmer at Kalispell, 
Montana. Mintie is the wife of Ora Teets, of Cranesville, 
and they have a son, Bruce. F. Arch, associated with his 
father in the stock business, is unmarried. Nancy married 
Walter Childs, of Kingwood, and they have a son, Willis. 
T. Rowland, the youngest, now in the stock business at home, 
finished his education at Ashland College, Ashland, Ohio, 
and for six years was a teacher in the public schools. 

The son Bruce Whitehair left home as a .young man and 
went to Montana, where he was in the railway mail service 
until he volunteered and in ]91S went to France and was 
assigned to duty in the army mail service at Paris. He 



resumed his work with the postal department after his 
return to the United States, and then bought a farm near 
Kalispell, Montana. 

T. Rowland Whitehair is also an ex-service man, enter- 
ing the army in April, 1918, and training at Camp Meade 
as a member of the One Hundred and Fifty-first Company. 
He was soon discharged, in May, 1918, and then resumed 
work as a teacher, but since 1919 has been in the stock 
business. 

Albert Lafayette Lohm, member of the Clarksburg Ian 
(ivni, Neff & Lohm, brought to his career at the bar some 
unusual associations and advantages derived from a work- 
ing contact with leading men of affairs in other lines. He 
has been extremely successful as a lawyer, and his firm is 
one of the ablest represented in the Harrison County Bar, 

Mr. Lohm was born at Keyser, Mineral County, West 
Virginia, May 9, 1884, one of the five children of George 
W. L. and Ella R. (Shaw) Lohm. His father was a native 
of Jefferson County and his mother of Taylor County. The 
Lohm family was established in America several generatioii> 
ago from Germany, and many of the name still live around 
Shepherdstown in Jefferson County. The Shaw family i.« 
of Scotch ancestry, one of the oldest in Taylor County, and 
Robert Shaw was a pioneer settler at Grafton. 

George W. L. Lohm has spent his active life as a rail 
road man. When Albert Lohm was twelve years of age 
the family moved to Oakland, Maryland, where his parents 
still live. The son acquired a high school education in 
Maryland, graduated at the age of sixteen from the Oak- 
land High School, and the following year attended a l]usi- 
ness college at Cincinnati. For one year he was private 
secretary to the general passenger agent of the Pittsburgh 
& Lake Erie Railroad at Pittsburgh. He left the railroad 
service to enter the law department of the Univer.sity of 
West Virginia at Morgantown, and completed his course 
in 1906 and was admitted to the liar thnt year. In 1907 
he became private secretary to Hon. William P. Hubbard 
of Wheeling, member of Congress from their First Con- 
gressional District of West Virginia. Mr. Lohm was with 
Mr. Hubbard during his two terms in Congress, and saw 
much of the life and affairs of the capital city. While in 
Washington he jiursued post graduate studies in law at 
George Washington XJnivcrsityj from which he was grad- 
uated LL. B. in 1909. 

Since 1911 Mr. Lohm has given his entire time to the 
liractice of law, in association with Mr. Carl W. Neff. In 
1917 he was appointed United States commissioner for tlie 
Federal District Court at Clarksburg, and performed the 
duties of that office until May, 1921. 

Mr. Lohm has also earned prominence in the republican 
party of West Virginia. In 1912 he was a delegate to the 
State Republican Convention, and was chairman of tlie 
committee on credentials, a special compliment to a man 
of his years. He belongs to the County and State Bar as- 
sociations, and in Ma.sonry is a member of the K. C. C. H. 
in Scottish Rite and is venerable master of Mizrah Lodge 
of Perfection No. .5. He is a Presbyterian. 

November 16, 1916, Mr. Lohm married Miss Mary Gene 
vieve Harrison, of a distinguished West Virginia family 
Her great-grandfather. Judge William A. Harrison, canu 
from Prince William County, Virginia, and established his 
home at Clarksburg in 1821, just a century ago. Slie if 
Hie only granddaughter of Hon. Thomas W. Harrison, wht 
at one time was a judge of the West Virginia Suprenu 
Court. She is the only daughter of Hon. Samuel R. Har 
rison, former banker and clerk of the United States Cir 
euit Court at Clarksburg. Mrs. Lohm completed her edu 
cation in Wheaton Seminary in Massachusetts. They havt 
one son, John Harrison Lohm, born May 9, 1918, on hi: 
father's thirty-fourth birthday. 

Guy B. Patterson. One of the important industrial 
enterprises at Cameron, Marshall County, is that of tb 
Patterson Gla.ss Manufacturing Company, of which Gu\ 
B. Patterson is secretary and treasurer and George B. Pat; 
terson is the president. This concern represents a -reor; 
ganization of the Marshall Window Glass Company, whioli 




c==^^- --^iik:^^^^^^^^ 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



105 



was promoted by Guy B. Patterson and which erected the 
manufacturing plant at Cameron in the year 1901 The 
; original company gave employment to seventy-five opera- 
tives in the manufacturing of window glass, and Mr Pat- 
, terson was secretary of the company from its inception 
until its reorganization under the present title in 1906 
since which time he has been secretary and treasurer! 
The substantial enterprise now entails the retention of 
about 150 men, and the capacity of the manufactory is 
now about double that of the original. The pay roll of 
the company averages about $5,000 a week, and this has 
significant bearing on the commercial prestige of Cameron 
the sand utilized at the factory being obtained from Berke- 
ley Springs, Morgan County, and the limestone from 
Martinsburg, Berkeley County. The employes are num- 
bered among the substantial and valued citizens of Cam- 
eron, many of them being highly skilled artisans and being 
the owners of home properties in the community. The 
plant IS modern in all equipments, including continuous 
furnace provision instead of the more common individual 
fire pots. Here are manufactured excellent grades of win- 
dow glass, and there is a constant and ready demand for 
the output of the factory. 

Guy B. Patterson was born at Barnesville, Belmont Coun- 
ty, Ohio, and is a son of George B. Patterson, who is 
president of the Patterson Glass Manufacturing Company 
and who has maintained his residence at Cameron for the 
past fifteen years. Gny B. Patterson has been associated 
with the operation of the plant of the Eastern Ohio Glass 
Company in his native town of Barnesville, and there fa- 
miliarized himself with all technical details of manufae- 
turiug, as well as with the general office detaUs connected 
with the business. He has brought his experience into 
most effective play in developing the substantial and pros- 
perous business of the company of which he is now secre- 
tary and treasurer, and one of the vital and progressive 
business men of this section of West Virginia. Mr. Pat- 
terson and his father own the gas well which supplies their 
factory and also other industrial plants at Cameron, and 
he IS vice president and a director of the Bank of Cameron. 
Mr. Patterson married Miss Alta Parriott, daughter of 
Samuel Parriott, who was formerly engaged in the hotel 
business at Cameron and who was one of the most success- 
ful and popular hotel men in this section of West Virginia. 
After his retirement from active business Mr. Parriott 
continued to reside at Cameron until his death. Mr. and 
Mrs. Patterson have two sons, George Beniamin and 
Samuel. 

.ToHN Spurgeon Carper, D. D. S. About one year after 
receiving his honorable discharge as first lieutenant in the 
Dental Corps of the United States Army, in which he had 
been_ m service in France. Doctor Carper established him- 
self m the practice of his profession at Morgantown, where 
he has a finely equipped office, with the most approved fa- 
cilities and accessories in both laboratsry and operating 
departments, and where he has built up a substantial and 
represpiitntive practice. 

Doctor Carper was born on a farm in Roane County, this 
state, on the 9th of January, 1887, and is a son of Clif- 
ton_ H. and Prussia (Stackhouse) Carper, the former a 
native of Virginia and the latter of what is now West 
Virginia. The father gave his entire active career to farm 
enterprise, and his death occurred October 5, 1902, his 
widow being now a resident of Charleston, the capital' city 
of West Virginia. 

The first nineteen years of Doctor Carper's life were 
passed on the farm, and in the meanwhile he profited by 
the advantage afforded in the public schools. He was for 
two years a student in the high school at Gassaway, Brax- 
ton County, and thereafter attended the State " Normal 
School at that place for an equal period. He next made a 
successful record as a teacher, his work having been in two 
schools, and in 1910 he entered the Ohio College of Dental 
Surgery at Cincinnati, in which he was graduated May 12, 
1914, with the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. In 
the same year he engaged in the practice of his profession 
in the City of Charleston, where he continued until the 



nation became involved in the World war, when he subordi- 
nated all personal interests to enter into patriotic service 
On the 5th of October, 1918, Doctor Carper enlisted in the 
Dental Corps of the United States Army and was sent to 
Camp Lee, Virginia, where, six months later, he was com- 
missioned a first lieutenant. From Camp Lee he was trans- 
ferred to Camp Upton, New York, and four months later 
he was ordered to France as a casual officer in the Dental 
Corps. He continued in active duty in France for a period 
of ten months, and on May 30, 1919, sailed for home. He 
was mustered out and received his discharge at Camp Dix 
New Jersey, and he still is a member of the Dental Re- 
serve Corps, in which his commission as first lieutenant will 
expire January 10, 1922. 

Upon leaving the army Doctor Carper engaged in the 
practice of his profession at Gassaway, Braxton County, 
but a year later he transferred his professional headquar- 
ters to Morgantown, in which city he has built up an ex- 
cellent practice. He is a member of Gassaway Lodge No. 
196, Knights of Pythias^ and is actively identified with the 
Morgantown Chamber of Commerce. 

Doctor Carper married Miss Madge Virginia Snyder, 
daughter of Jackson and Mary (Burke) Snyder, of Gilmer 
County, this state, and the one child of this union is a 
daughter, Mary Gertrude. 

Dayton P. Runner. The Runner family has been in 
Monongalia County for considerably more than a century. 
They have been substantial farmers, and Dayton P. Run- 
ner, of the present generation, has found in farming a 
satisfying as well as a profitable business. He conducts 
a dairy farm four miles east of Morgantown, in Morgan 
District. 

He was born August 1, 1861, on an ad,ioining farm, and 
is a son of William Runner and a grandson of Henry Run- 
ner. William Runner was a native of Frederick County, 
Maryland, and was a boy when the family came to West 
Virginia, about 1815, and settled on a farm in Morgan 
District. WiUiam Runner learned the carpenter's trade, 
but for the most part farmed. He lived for many years 
near Morgantown and had owned several pieces of property, 
including the farm adjoining the present home of his son 
Dayton P. Here he died about 1881, at the age of eighty- 
three, while his brother, Lewis W., survived him twenty 
years. 

Dayton P. Runner was reared and educated in Monongalia 
County and at the age of twenty went out to Colorado. 
After a year he returned, and for forty years his efforts 
and energies have been well extended in the rural com- 
munities around Morgantown. His home has been at his 
present location for eighteen years. He has 108 acres, the 
principal business being dairying. He has a good herd of 
cows, including some high grade Jerseys, and retails bot- 
tled milk to customers. His average production is about 
fifty gallons daily. Mr. Runner is a member of the Board 
of Education in his district, is a republican and belongs 
to the Methodist Protestant Church at Mount Union. 

At the age of twenty-five he married Jennie Sinder, who 
grew up in the same locality as her husband. She was a 
child when her father, Clark Snider, died, and her mother, 
Maria Chisler, died at the age of fifty. Without children 
of their own Mr. and Mrs. Runner have cared for four 
boys and girls. One of them, W. 0. Flunim, is now a part- 
ner with Mr. Runner. Clara Snider, a niece of Mrs. Run- 
ner, has been in their home for the past eight years and 
is attending high school. 

Mr. Runner has brought his land to a high state of fer- 
tility and his methods of cropping have produced satisfac- 
tory yields of the grains on land that many of the old 
timers considered suitable for grazing purposes alone. 

D. Alton Jackson, representing an old and honored 
business family of Preston County, is a lumber manufac- 
turer at Rowlesburg and has been effectively identified with 
the business and civic affairs of that locality for a dozen 
years. 

Mr. Jackson was born at Kingwood, October 23, 1881. 
His grandfather was a Pennsylvanian, early identified with 



106 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



the iron furnace industry in that state, but for many years 
made his home in Monongalia County, West Virginia. He 
was twice married, was the father of twenty-four sous and 
three daughters, and of these only one now survives, Mrs. 
Anabell Menear of Kingwood. 

Daniel K. Jackson, father of the Eowlesburg business 
man, was a child of his father's second marriage, to Miss 
Fleming. Daniel E. Jackson was born and reared in Monon- 
galia County, had a practical education, and as a young 
man entered the Union Army as a private soldier of the 
Fourteenth West Virginia Infantry. He served three years 
with the Army of the Potomac, and among other engage- 
ments participated in the battle of Antietam. He was 
twice wounded, in one engagement having an ear drum 
bursted and was once shot in the thigh. He suffered from 
his wounds the rest of his life. While he became a mem- 
ber of the G. A. E. after the war, he attended only a few 
of its reunions. His life for half a century was devoted 
to merchandising at Kingwood, where he began as a gen- 
eral merchant, later conducted a hardware store, but finally 
returned to general merchandising. He was a successful 
liusiness man and interested in progressive development. 
He was associated with the promotion of the Tunnelton, 
Kingwood & Fairchanee Eailway, now the West Virginia 
Northern, and from 1888 to 1892 was high sheriff of Pres- 
ton County, succeeding A. Staley Shaw in that office. Soon 
after leaving the office of sheriif he was appointed deputy 
I'uited States marshal by Captain Thompson, and also 
.served under Marshal C. D. Elliott. Altogether he spent 
eight years in that service. While engaged in official duties 
his mercantile business was carried on by his sons. 

Daniel R. Jackson by his activities and character was 
one of the best citizens of Preston County. He died July 
6, 1920, at the age of seventy-six. He was a Methodist and 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias. His wife was Rachel 
G. Martin, sister of J. Ami Martin, a native of Preston 
County, who became well known in business affairs at Mor- 
gantown. The children of Daniel R. Jackson and wife 
were: Charles M.; Hoy B.; D. Alton; Mildred M., wife 
of M. L. Jackson, of Kingwood; Vernon F., of Kingwood; 
Gertrude Vance, of Morgantown and George Di. West Vir- 
ginia pays a special tribute to George D. Jackson, who was 
the first native son of the state killed in the World war. 
He was at the front in France as a lieutenant when he paid 
the extreme sacrifice, and his body now lies in the ceme- 
tery at Kingwood. 

D. Alton Jackson grew up at Kingwood, attended the 
public schools, and left school to go to work as a clerk 
in his father 's hardware store. He learned the business 
there by diligent application for seven years. His next 
service was with the Austen Coal & Coke Company at Aus- 
ten in Preston County, where for seven years he was man- 
ager of the company store. Then followed a period as a 
salesman on the road for the Miller-Clark Grain Company, 
with headquarters at Fairmont. Mr. Jackson in 1909 lo- 
cated at Eowlesburg, which he now regards as his perma- 
nent home. For two years he was on the road as a sales- 
man for the Eowlesburg Grocery Company. He then en- 
gaged in the hardware business for a few years, but sold 
his stock and has since been a lumber manufacturer. 

The Eowlesburg Lumber Company was organized by Mr. 
Jackson and W. B. Bowman. They are essentially manu- 
facturers rather than dealers, and their mills are located 
on Cheat River, above Eowlesburg. They cut large quan- 
tities of hardwood lumber and also have a planing mill for 
finished product. While most of this lumber is sold locally, 
some of it is exported through jobbers. 

Mr. Jackson is a republican, although not giving much 
of his time to politics. He served as deputy sheriff under 
Sheriff Schaeffer, and has been a member of the Council 
and mayor of Eowlesburg. Mr. Jackson is a member of 
the Masonic Lodge at Newburg, the Eoyal Arch Chapter 
at Grafton, also the Knights Templar Commandery there 
and is a member of Scottish Rite Consistory and Osiris 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Wheeling. 

September 21, 1901, at Marietta, Ohio, Mr. Jackson mar- 
ried Miss Jessie Augusta Spahr. She is a sister of the 
editor of the Kingwood Argus. Her father, Jesse Spahr, 



was a tanner by trade and spent all his life in Preston 
County. Judge Spahr married Rebecca Gibson, and Mrs. 
Jackson is one of their seven children still surviving. 

Charles Russell Huston. Morgantown, his native city, 
has been the scene of the varied experiences and achieve- 
ments of Charles Russell Huston, an active business man 
for over thirty years, and for many years president of 
the Morgantown Savings & Loan Society. 

Mr. Huston was born in Morgantown, February IS, 1865, 
son of Samuel P. and Louise (Murphy) Huston. His 
greatgrandfather, Peter Huston, was a native of Ireland, 
and about the close of the American Revolution came to 
America and established his home in Somerset County, 
Pennsylvania. His son. Chambers Huston, was born in 
Somerset in 1809 and died in 1889. He followed the in- 
dustry and trade of carpenter, and was a member of the 
Methodist Church. His wife was Margaret Pritts, who 
died in 1896. Their third sou was the late Samuel P. 
Huston, who was born in Somerset County, January 3, 1835, 
and died in Morgantown, West Virginia, in 1912. He also 
learned the carpenter 's trade, and moved to Morgantown 
in 1858. For many years he had an extensive business as 
a building contractor over that section of West Virginia. 
He was a leader in the Methodist Church and superintend- 
ent of its Sunday school and was an Odd Fellow. March 1, 
1861, he married Louise Murphy, and they celebrated their 
golden wedding anniversary. Her death also occurred in 
1912. They had three children: Chauncey W., Charles 
Russell and Louise. 

• Charles Russell Huston acquired a public school educa- 
tion at Morgantown and spent two years in the University 
of West Virginia. Leaving college at the end of his sopho- 
more year, he took up the trade of sheet metal worker and 
roofer, and from 1883 became a contractor in the roofing, 
sheet metal and heating business. For twenty-six years 
he was active in that line, with an organization capable o£ 
handling the largest contracts. He finally sold the busi- 
ness in 1911. 

Mr. Huston has been identified with the Morgantown Sav- 
ings & Loan Society since a few years after its organiza- 
tion, was a director, and since 1900 has been its presi- 
dent. He is also a director and one of the executive com- 
mittee of the Bank of Morgantown^ and has been interested 
in several local industries and is now department mauagei 
at the Saberton plant of the American Sheet & Tin Plate 
Corporation. 

Mr. Huston and family are members of the First Meth 
odist Episcopal Church and he was for many years treas- 
urer of the Sunday school. In December, 1905, he mar- 
ried Miss Beula B. Hubbard, daughter of Mrs. Eva Hub- 
bard, of Morgantown, formerly of Wheeling. Mr. and 
Mrs. Huston are the parents of three children: Charles 
Russell, Jr., born January 15, 1907; Louise, born Janu 
ary 19, 1909; and Helen, born May 17, 1911. 

Howard G. Gilger. Born and reared close to the his 
torio center of the original petroleum production oi 
America, Howard G. Gilger has been a worker in the oij 
fields since early youth, and for many years has had 
prominent associations with the West Virginia oil and gas 
industry. He is a contractor, and for many years has had 
his home at New Martinsville. 

He was born in Venango County, Pennsylvania, Novem 
ber 20, 18S9. The Gilger family is of German origin anc 
was established in Pemisylvania in Colonial times. Hi; 
grandfather, Jonas Gilger, was born in Bucks County, tha 
state, in 1784, but spent the greater part of his life ii 
Clarion County, where he owned a large amount of land 
He died in Clarion County in 1868. He reared a famU; 
of seven sons and seven daughters, all now deceased. Joua 
Gilger, Jr., father of Howard 6., was born in Clarioi 
County in 1822, and returned to his native county to spem 
his later years at St. Petersburg, where he died in 188S 
As a young man he took up farming, and became a cattl 
drover to the eastern markets. As a railroad contracto 
he built the Allegheny Railroad from the mouth of Clario 
Eiver to Fulton, Pennsylvania. From 1870 on, his bus: 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



107 



ess interests were in the oil districts of Venango and Me- 
v^ean counties. He was a contractor with his teams and 
Iso a jobber in coal and other supplies for the oil fields, 
onas Gilger was a republican, served as a member of the 
Ichool Board in Richland Township of Venango County, 
nd was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
le married Hettie Dreibbelbis, who was bom in Berks 
!ounty, Pennsylvania, in 1822, and died in Venango County 
II 18S2. Her ancestors were also German and identified 
pith the Colonial period of Pennsylvania. Her father, 
acob Dreibbelbis, was born in Berks County in 1786 and 
ied in Venango County in 1869, having been a pioneer 
armer in the latter county. He reared a family of four 
ons and four daughters. The children of Jonas and Het- 
ie Gilger were: Samuel, a farmer in Venango County; 
Sarah, who died in Venango County at the age of sixty, 
rife of Samuel Martz, a farmer; Wesley, a farmer, who 
lied in Venango County at the age of sixty-two ; Frances, 
f St. Petersburg, Clarion County, widow of John Mor- 
;an, who was an oil operator; Clara, widow of William 
iheiry, a farmer near Franklin in Venango County; Oliver, 
. farmer, who died at Garrettsville, Ohio, aged forty-nine 
ears and six months; Howard G. ; Delia, wife of Martin 
riortimer, an oil well driller and contractor living at North 
}altimore, Ohio; and John Edward, of Cement, Okla- 
loma, a superintendent of oil properties. 

Howard G. Gilger grew up in Venango County and at- 
ended the rural schools there to the age of sixteen. His 
vorking career began as a pumper in the Clarion County 
lil fields. Two years later he removed to McKean County, 
vas a pumper there, and from that was made a superin- 
endent of the E. H. Jennings oil interests. This work 
tept him in McKean County until 1894, when he was 
ransferred to West Union, Doddridge County, West Vir- 
ginia, and continued as Mr. Jennings' superintendent there 
intil 1900. Since then for twenty years he has been a 
lontractor in the drilling of oil and gas wells, and has 
)perated his outfits over many of the prominent West 
iTirginia fields, including Springtown in Doddridge County, 
hen at Salem, then at Richwood Run on Fishing Creek 
md at Steels Run in Wetzel County. His operations have 
covered the oil and gas fields of the counties of Wood, 
Ritihie, Harrison and Marion. Mr. Gilger has had his 
ionic at New Martinsville since 1903, and owns a modern 
-esidi'nce at 235 Locust Street. His principal interests as 
an nil well pumper are now in the fields of Wetzel and 
Marion counties. 

Mr. Gilger is a republican, served a term on the City 
Council at West Union, is affiliated with the Methodist 
Episcopal Church and fraternally is a member of Friend- 
ship Lodge No. 56, A. F. and A. M., at West Union; 
Clarksburg Chapter No. 11, R. A. M.; Clarksburg Com- 
mandery No. 13, K. T.; and Osiris Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine at Wheeling. 

In 1891, at Clean, New York, he married Miss Flora 
Steele, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Steele, now de- 
ceased. Her father was an oil field contractor. Mrs. Gil- 
ger died in McKean County in the spring of 1894. Her 
only surviving child is Miss Delia, who is a graduate of 
the" Martinsville High School and the West Liberty State 
Normal School and is a popular teacher in the schools of 
Martinsville. In 1898, at Cumberland, West Virginia, Mr. 
Bilger married Miss Mary A. Johnson, daughter of Jo- 
<eph and Hattie (Weekley) Johnson, the latter now liv- 
ing at Bakersfield, California. Her father was a native of 
Columbus, Ohio, was a miner in that state and died at 
Nelsonville, Ohio, in 1876. Mr. and Mrs. Gilger became 
lie parents of ten children: Hazel, the oldest, born Octo- 
ler 11, 1898, is a graduate of the New Martinsville High 
School and the Normal Department of Wesleyan College 
It Buckhannon, and after teaching three years in Wetzel 
bounty was married to Mr. Joseph Henry, a teacher now 
ocated at Woodland in Marshall County, West Virginia. 
The second child, Garnett, died at the age of one year. 
Sov, born November 23, 1901, is a graduate of the Mag- 
lolia High School at New Martinsville and a teacher at 
'iney in Wetzel County. The younger children are: Earl, 
)orn' January 20, 1903; Virginia, bom December 8, 1904, 



a senior in the Magnolia High School; Fred, born Octo- 
ber 7, 1906, in the freshman year of high school; Doris, 
born February 20, 1908; Betty, born November 14, 1909; 
Joe, born April 2, 1911 and Phyllis, born June 22, 1914. 

James S. Hunt has been a resident of Tunnelton almost 
seventy years and through long service as a mechanic, mer- 
chant, banker and public spirited citizen has well earned 
the high esteem he enjoys. 

Mr. Hunt was born at Paw Paw, West Virginia, Janu- 
ary 25, 1850, son of Robert and Margaret (Cunningham) 
Hunt. Nine months after his birth his parents came 
to West Virginia and while the first tunnel was being con- 
structed at Tunnelton his father established his home there. 
Both parents were natives of Ireland, were married after 
coming to the United States, and for several years lived 
in Allegany County, Maryland, where Robert Hunt was 
employed on public works. After locating at Tunnelton 
he kept a store and also managed a small farm. He was 
a democrat in politics, and died in 1872 when about sixty- 
seven years of age. His widow died ten years later when 
past eighty. 

James Sylvester Hunt, only child of his parents, grew up 
at Tunnelton, acquired a subscription school education, and 
learned the principles of merchandising from his father. 
On leaving home he worked in the Baltimore & Ohio shops 
at Piedmont and learned something of the boilermaker 's 
trade and then went out to the Pacific Coast and for two 
and a half years was employed in a boiler shop at San 
Francisco and worked on the construction of the then fa- 
mous Palace Hotel. In 1876 he came back across the plains 
to West Virginia, and at Tunnelton resumed his connec- 
tion with his home community by various activities, the 
principal ones including a clerkship with the Austen Coal 
& Coke Company under Manager Charles Jessup, followed 
by a long service of sixteen years with the mercantile firm 
of Shaffer & Bonafield. Following this long employment 
Mr. Hunt set up in business for himself as a merchant, and 
has one of the leading places of business in Tunnelton. 

Mr. Hunt helped organize the Tunnelton Bank which 
began business in 1903 and has capital stock of $50,000, 
a generous surplus, and deposits of over $500,000. Mr. 
Hunt has been one of the directors from the time the bank 
opened, later was elected vice president, and succeeded Mr. 
Gibson on his death as president. Mr. Hunt, in 1919, was 
also an active factor in the organization of the Tunnelton 
Freeport Coal Company and is its president. 

Community affairs have always made a claim upon his 
time and interests and assistance. For a number of years 
he was member of the Tunnelton Council and was in that 
body when the charter for the Telephone Company was 
granted. He voted the democratic ticket regularly until 
1908, and frequently attended conventions as a delegate. 
In 1908 he supported William Howard Taft for presi- 
dent, and has since attended republican conventions. Mr. 
Hunt was reared in the Catholic Church, and has not af- 
filiated with any fraternities. 

In October, 1889, near Tunnelton, he married Miss Ella 
Cruise, who was born and educated in that community, 
daughter of Thomas and Mary (Kenny) Cruise. Her father 
spent practically all his life in the service of the Baltimore 
& Ohio Railway, and was a pensioner of the road when he 
died in 1902 at the age of eighty-three. Her mother died 
in 1906 when past eighty. Mrs. Hunt was the youngest of 
her parents' children, the others, now living, being Agnes, 
who married Judge William S. Haymond of Fairmont; 
Catherine, wife of Thomas Dorscy of Cumberland, Mary- 
land; Miss Annie of Coalton, West Virginia; and William 
B. of Grafton. 

Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Hunt. James William, 
the oldest, was a sergeant during the war, was with the 
Eleventh Division ready for overseas duty when the armis- 
tice was signed, and is now in the service of the Liberty 
Trust Company of Cumberland, Maryland. He is an A. B. 
of Rock Hill College, Maryland, and took post-graduate 
work at the University of Pennsylvania. Thomas E., the 
second son, was for four years deputy revenue collector 
under the Wilson administration and is now an instructor 



108 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



in the Tunnelton public schools. He attciuleii Rook Hill 
College, and is a graduate of Fairmont State Normal 
School. Robert E. is store manager for the Albright Smoke- 
less Coal Comi^anj' of Tunnelton. He attended Rock Hill 
and St. John's College, Annapolis, Maryland. The young- 
est of the family is John A. Hunt, a sophomore in the 
Tunnelton High School. 

Melvin Newlon, now principal of the Tyrconnell School, 
has been long and favorably knoivn in Taylor County as 
an educator, farmer and jiublic official. He recently re- 
tired from the office of county sheriff, and was also county 
assessor. 

Mr. Newlon was born near the Village of Simpson in 
Taylor County, June 2, 1873, son of Alfred and Elizabeth 
(Yates) Newlon. His mother was a daughter of Martin 
L. Yates, member of an old family of the county. Alfred 
Newlon was born in Taylor County spent his life in the 
Simpson community as a farmer, and was one of the hon- 
ored old soldiers of that community. At the time of the 
Civil war he joined the Third West Virginia Infantry and 
later the Sixth West Virginia Cavalry. For three and a 
half years he was with his regiment fighting the Con- 
federates, and for a year after the war was out on the 
plains fighting Indians in Kansas, Wyoming and Nebraska. 
While never wounded, he suffered exposure from freezing 
weather, and this injured his health and made him prem.a- 
turely old. In politics he was an uncompromising republi- 
can and a member of the Baptist Church. 

Alfred Newlon was killed while driving a wagon over a 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad crossing in April. 1901, when 
just sixty years of age. His wife died in 1910. They 
were the parents of two sons and seven daughters. Five 
of the daughters are living: Lucy, wife of Homer Selvey, 
of Grafton; Nancy L., wife of Charles Davis; Hallie. wife 
of Gail Goodwin; Gertrude, who married Harry McCay; 
and Miss Effie, of Grafton. The sons are Melvin and Del- 
let, the latter a former county superintendent of schools of 
Taylor County and a farmer. 

Melvin Newlon in his early youth was a farmer and coal 
miner. He had an ambition to rise above his environ- 
ments, and he secured a liberal education in old West Vir- 
ginia College and Wesleyan University at Buckhannon. At 
the age of eighteen he taught his first term of school in 
the Fetterman District. For fourteen consecutive terms 
he taught in the Court House District. When not teaching 
he worked about coal mines, driving mules or digging coal 
in the summer season. It was at the conclusion of his 
sixteenth term of school work that he became a regular 
employe of the Grafton Coal and Coke Company, and later 
of the Maryland Coal Company of West Virginia, and was 
in the service of these corporations for a number of years. 
From this business he was called into politics by the vote 
of his fellow citizens and was elected on the republican 
ticket to the office of county assessor in 1912, succeeding 
Luke Haymond in office. In 1916 he was elected sheriff to 
succeed Lee Bennett, and began his four year term in 
January, 1917. He was sheriff of the county during the 
World "war, but the term of his administration was peace- 
ful and orderly, and at the end of four years he turned 
over the office to W. J. Mays, and soon afterward resumed 
school work as principal of the Tyrconnell School. 

Mr. Newlon is an enthusiastic republican, casting his first 
presidential vote for McKinley in 1896. He is affiliated 
with Flcmington Lodge No. 152, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, Wendel Lodge No. 126, Woodmen of the 
World, and since the age of fourteen has been a mem'ber 
of the Baptist Church. In Taylor County, November 27, 
1000, he married Miss Gertrude M. Lake. She was born 
in the Simpson community, daughter of H. A. and Belle 
(Davis) Lake. Her mother was a daughter of Mack Davis, 
an old hotel man of Simpson, who came from Virginia. 
Mrs. Newlon was the oldest of three children, the other 
two being James A. and Dakota Lake, of Simpson. Mrs. 
Newlon was a pupil of her husband while he was getting his 
early experience as a teacher. Mr. and Mrs. Newlon have 
three children ; Roy M., a graduate of the Grafton High 
School, and now teaching his second term at Wendel; Edith 



Belle, member of the class of 1923 in the Grafton High 
School; and Martin L., at home. 

George M. West. While he laid the foundation of his 
business experience in Pittsburgh, the commercial associa- 
tions of Mr. West in Clarksburg have been as a dealer in 
hay, grain, feed and other commodities, and at the same 
time he has exerted a helpful influence in the progress and 
advancement of the community welfare. 

Mr. West was born in Washington County, Ohio, Novem- 
ber 28, 1876, a son of Samuel and Phoebe Ann (Davis) 
West, his father a native of England and his mother of 
Ohio. His father is still living, a retired miller and mer- 
chanf, and for many years was in business at New Mata- 
moris, Ohio. 

After graduating from high school at New Matamoris 
and completing a commercial college course in Pittsburgh, 
George M. West remained in that city for three years, as- 
sociated with his brother, W. C. West, in the feed business. 
On selling out to his brother he came to Clarksburg in 
1900, and, beginning as a feed merchant, has steadily in- 
creased the scope of his enterprise until he has an estab- 
lishment both for retail and wholesale trade, covering a 
large territory adjacent to Clarksburg, and is a dealer 
in hay and grain and general building supplies including 
lime, plaster, cement, sewer iiipe^ etc. His present office, 
warehouse and place of business was erected in 1910. Mr. 
West is also president of the Universal Concrete Products 
Company, whose plant is at New Martinsville, West Vir- 
ginia, and he is a director of the Community Savings and 
Loan Company of Clarksburg. 

He is a well known member of the Clarksburg Chamber 
of Commerce and socially is affiliated with the Country, 
Rotary, Allegheny, Cheat Mountain and other clubs. He 
is a republican, a Methodist and fraternally is a Knight 
Templar and thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and 
Shriner and an Elk. 

In 1902 Mr. West married Miss Myrtle Ferguson, who 
was born and reared in Harrison County, West Virginia. 
Her father, James Ferguson, was of an old family of Har- 
rison County. Her mother was a daughter of W. W. Bog- 
gess, a name also prominent in Harrison County. Mrs. 
West is a member of the Presbyterian Church, belongs to 
the Eastern Star Chapter, and for several years has been 
active in civic and social affairs. 

Guy Cvrleton M.^cTaggart is now in his third term as 
county superintendent of schools of Pleasants County. He 
began his career as a teacher at the age of eighteen, has 
had a successive and successful experience as a teacher in 
a number of districts in the county, and he brought to his 
office as county superintendent not only the qualifications 
of an able educator but a thorough knowledge of school 
conditions of this section. 

Mr. MacTaggart was born in Grant District of Pleas- 
ants County, .lanuary 23, 188.5. He is.of Scotch ancestry. 
His grandfather, Hugh MacTaggart, was born in Scot- 
land in 1819. son of William and Jennie MacTaggart, who 
three years later, in 1822, came to America and settled on 
Short Creek near Wheeling, but after a few years moved 
to Willow Island in Pleasants County, where William Mac- 
Taggart acquired a large amount of land and engaged in 
the sheep industry on an extensive scale. He and his wife 
died at Willow Island. Hugh MacTaggart grew up there, 
married and then removed to the vicinity of Eureka in 
Pleasants County, where he carried on his operations as a 
farmer. He died at his home near Eureka in 1909, at the 
age of ninety. His wife was Dicinda Phillips, a native of 
Ohio. William P. MacTaggart, father of Superintendent 
MacTaggart, was born May 21, 18.54, near the farm where 
he now resides, located a mile and a half west of Eureka. 
Farming has been his life occupation and from it he has 
provided amply for himself and family. He owns both a 
hill farm and river farm. He is a republican, and a leader 
in the Bapti.st Church of his home community. William P. 
MacTaggart married Ida Virginia Rhymer, who was born 
at St. ^Marys. October 20, 1855. Of their children Guy 
Carleton is the oldest. The second, William Carey, died 




LJ. c/^ o(^^ 




HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



109 



at the age of nine years. Grace is the wife of Winton E. 
White, a farmer at Point Pleasants in Mason County. 
Miss Maude is at home. Laura, a former teacher, is now 
ittending the Mountain State Business College at Parkers- 
3urg. Miss Mary teaches the Wolf Run School in Pleas- 
ants County. Miss Dicie is at home. Georgia is the wife 
yi Ralph A. Smith, an employe of the Octo Gas Company 
It Flushing, Ohio. 

Guy Carleton MacTaggart was educated in the rural 
schools of Pleasants County and the public school at St. 
Marys. He left school at the age of eighteen, and his 
first work as a teacher was done in the Spice Run School. 
Then followed a term in the Raven Rock School, two terms 
it Mount Olive, his home school, three terms at Eureka 
and cue term at Belmont, all in Pleasants County. 

Mr. MacTaggart, in Novemlier, 1912, was elected county 
superintendent of schools to fill a vacancy caused by the 
leath of his predecessor. For that reason he began his 
iluties immediately, and in 1914 was elected for the full 
four year term and in 1918 for a second full term, run- 
ning from 1919 to 1923. His offices are in the Graded 
School Building on Washington Street in St. Marys. He 
has under his supervision seventy-six schools, seventy-six 
teachers, with a scholarship eurolLnient of 2,500. 

He is a member of the State Educational Association 
and Ohio Valley Round Table, and keeps in touch with 
all the progressive movements in educational affairs. He 
was a member of the County Council of Defense at the 
time of the war, a Four-Minute Speaker, and did all the 
work he could for the successful prosecution of the war. 
He is a republican, a member of the Baptist Church, is 
affiliated with St. Marys Lodge No. 41, F. and A. M., 
Sistersville Chapter No. 27, R. A. M., Mountain State Com- 
mandery No. 14, K. T., and Nemesis Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine at Parkersburg. 

Mr. MacTaggart 's home is at Eureka, where he owns a 
modern residence. He married at Eureka, November 29, 
1917, Miss Judith A. Ruckman, daughter of Aaron and 
Rhoda (Outward) Ruckman. Her mother died in 1916 
and her father is a farmer at Eureka. 

Orion Lee Lazear. Many years ago, when Sistersville 
was just coming into prominence as an oil center, a group 
of young men of enterprise, under the name of Lazear 
Brothers, took hold of a small business as dealers in feed 
and grain, and while death has removed one member of 
the firm the old title is still continued, with Orion Lee 
Lazear as the active manager of a business that now cov- 
ers a wide scope, including flour and feed manufacturing, 
ice and the handling of other commodities. 

Orion Lee Lazear was born in Tyler County, West Vir- 
ginia, January 22, 1878. The Lazears have been in Tyler 
County for over eighty years. It is a family, as the name 
indicates, of French stock, and the name was transplanted 
to America shortly after the Revolution. For a number 
of years representatives of the name lived in Greene Coun- 
ty. Pennsylvania. The grandfather of 0. L. Lazear was 
Joseph Lazear, a native of Greene County, where he mar- 
ried Mary Gray, of the same county. In 1838 they left 
their farm in Greene County and moved to Tyler County 
and spent the rest of their lives on a large farm on Mid- 
dle Island Creek, seven miles east of Sistersville. Among 
the children of this pioneer couple who reached mature 
years were Clark, Franklin and John W. 

John W. Lazear was born in Greene County in 1837, and 
was an infant when the family moved to Tyler County. 
He was reared and married there, became a successful 
farmer, served six years as member of the Board of Edu- 
cation of Union District, and for one term was a mem- 
ber of the Tyler County Court, serving in this office six 
years. He was a republican and was a prominent worker 
in the Protestant Methodist Church. He married Nancy J. 
Strouss, who was born at Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in 1842, 
and is still living at Sistersville. Her parents were Wil- 
liam and Margaret (Oliver) Strouss, and her father for 
many years was a mate on an Ohio River steamboat. John 
W. Lazear, who died in 1900, was the father of a family 
of ten children: Joseph S., who was in the livery busi- 



ness at Mannington, West Virginia, and stiU had his home 
there when he died at Wheelmg in 1918, at the age of 
fifty-two; William M., who was one of the firm of Lazeai 
Brothers at Sistersville, where he died in 1909, at the age 
of forty-one; Nora, who died in Sistersville in 1909, aged 
thirty-nine, was the wife of Arza E. Underwood, a flour 
miller, who died at St. Mary's, West Virginia; Ida, wife 
of Lewis M. Thomas, a farmer at Kirkersville, Ohio; Jesse 
F., who was a teaming contractor and lived near Cameron, 
West Virginia, but died in the hospital at Wheeling in 
1899, at the age of twenty-seven; George W., a wholesale 
dealer in hay and coal at Mount Vernon, Ohio; Orion Lee; 
James H., a farmer at Kirkersville, Ohio; John B., in the 
furniture and undertaking business at Mannington; and 
Ira F., a traveling salesman, with home at Wheeling. 

Orion Lee Lazear lived on his father's farm until he 
was nineteen years of age. In the meantime he attended 
the rural schools and a subscription school at Middlebourne. 
For 2y2 years he worked for his brother William at Man- 
nington, and then he and his brothers William and George 
W. bought a small feed and grain business at Sistersville 
from its former proprietor, S. W. Lawrence. This was 
the beginning of the firm Lazear Brothers. In 1906 Wil- 
liam and O. L._ bought out their brother George, and at 
the death of William, in 1909, his widow succeeded to his 
interests, but Orion L. has continued as active manager, 
and through successive developments has made Lazear 
Brothers a firm of the highest financial standing in this 
section of the state. The firm owns the plant and offices 
at 406 Diamond Street. In 1901 they bought from Ben- 
jamin Showalter, a retail ice business, and since then 
Lazear Brothers have supplied Sistersville with practically 
all the ice for domestic purposes. In 1917 Mr. Lazear 
bought from E. Roome the Riverside Mills, an old milling 
establishment on Water Street, with a capacity of thirty- 
five barrels of flour per day, and doing a custom business 
in the grinding of feed and meal. 

Besides this extensive business Mr. Lazear is secretary 
and treasurer and a stockholder of the Sistersville Under- 
taking Company. Lazear Brothers are stockholders in the 
Oil Review Publishing Company of Sistersville. 

Mr. Lazear has done his modest part in community af- 
fairs, serving two years on the City Council, votes as a 
republican, is a member of the Presbyterian Church, is a 
past master of Phoenix Lodge No. 73, A. F. and A. M.; 
member of Sistersville Chapter No. 27, R. A. M.; Moun- 
tain State Commaudery No. 14, K. T. ; Nemesis Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine at Parkersburg; and is a past ex- 
alted ruler of Sistersville Lodge No. 333, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. 

In 1901, at Mannington, Mr. Lazear married Margaret I. 
Enoch, daughter of Nathan and Frances (Hopkins) Enoch, 
now deceased. Her father was an oil field worker. Mrs. 
Lazear died in January, 1909, at Sistersville, leaving two 
children: Nancy F., born February 15, 1904, now a student 
in the Mount de Chantal Academy at Wheeling, and Paul, 
born December 26, 1908. On April 9, 1913, at Sistersville, 
Mr. Lazear married Miss Anna R. Morrisscy, daughter of 
Jack and Mary Elizabeth Morrissey, now deceased. Her 
father was also an oil field worker. 

EzEKiEL Dean Gardner, who is established in the plumb- 
ing and tinning business in his native city of Martinsburg, 
Berkeley County, was here born on the 9th of August, 1867, 
and he is a son of John P. and Emma (Showers) Gardner. 
John F. Gardner was born at Smithsburg, Washington 
County, Maryland, a son of George Gardner, who is sup- 
posed to have been born at Reading, Pennsylvania, the latter 
having been a son of one of two or three brothers who came 
from Holland to America in the Colonial period of our 
national history and established residence in Pennsylvania. 
George Gardner learned the weaver 's trade, at the time 
when weaving was done by hand. He lived for a number 
of years at Smithsburg, Maryland, and then came to Mar- 
tinsburg, Virginia (now West Virginia), where he died at 
the age of eighty-four years. The maiden name of his 
wife was Getzendanner, and she was reared at Frederick, 
Maryland. She preceded him to the life eternal. 



110 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



John F. Gardner received good educational advantages, 
and as a young man lie taught school on Stephen Street at 
Martinsburg until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he 
engaged in the provision business, to which he here gave his 
attention until his death, at the age of fifty-two years. His 
wife was a daughter of Ezekiel Showers, who was an early 
settler in Berkeley County, where he purchased a large tract 
of land, including that now comprising Green Hill Cemetery, 
an appreciable portion of his landed estate being now 
within the city limits of Martinsburg. Mr. Showers erected 
and equipped a woolen mill on Tuscarawas Street, and this 
he operated successfully in addition to his farming enter- 
prise. His wife, whose maiden name was Susan Sibert, was 
a member of the well known family of that name in this 
section of West Virginia. Mrs. Emma (Showers) Gardner 
died at the age of sixty-seven years. Her children were 
six in number: Susan, Hannis, Kate (who died young), 
John Franklin (deceased), Ezekiel Dean, and Eoberta Lee 
(died at the age of twenty-five years). 

Ezekiel D. Gardner gained his early education in the 
public schools of Martinsburg, and as a youth he served 
an apprenticeship to the carpenter's trade. After follow- 
ing this trade for a time he established himself in the 
plumbing and tinning business, in which he here continued 
until 1904, when he was elected sheriff of the county. Upon 
the completion of his term of four years he was renamed 
for a similar period as a clerical assistant in the office of 
the sheriff, and next served four years as deputy sheriff. 
At the expiration of this last period he resumed business 
in the plumbing and tinning line, in which he has continued 
with excellent success. Mr. Gardner is affiliated with 
Equality Lodge No. 44, A. F. and A. M.; Lebanon Chapter 
No. 1, E. A. M. ; Palestine Commandery No. 2, Knights 
Templars; the Lodge of Perfection; Osiris Temple, Mystic 
Shrine, at Wheeling; and also with the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles. 

At the age of thirty years Mr. Gardner married Miss 
Mary Cecelia Sullivan, who was born and reared at Martins- 
burg and who is a daughter of Michael and Elizabeth Sulli- 
van. Mr. and Mrs. Gardner have two children: Louise 
Marie and John Frederick. 

Roger Earl Watson, who is engaged in the successful 
practice of law at Martinsburg as one of the able and repre- 
sentative members of the l)ar of Berkeley County, has the 
distinction of being the only person born ui the old home- 
stead of Gen. Charles Lee, a Revolutionary officer, at Lee- 
town, Jefferson County, West Virginia, the date of his 
nativity having been February 10, 1886. 

The lineage of the Watson family traces back to stanch 
English origin, and the name has been one of prominence 
in the history of Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia, 
in connection with both civic and material development and 
progress. From Scotland, via England, James Watson with 
three brothers came to America prior to 1740, and settled in 
St. Mary 's County, Maryland. He married Mary Greene, 
who, according to family tradition, was a sister of Gen. 
Nathaniel Greene, the distinguished Revolutionary officer. 
James Watson bought land near Port Tobacco, Charles 
County, Maryland, where he developed the fine estate known 
as Chestnut Ridge. By marriage the Watson family became 
related to Charles Carroll of Carrollton, another dis- 
tinguished figure of the Revolutionary period. Numerous 
representatives of the family were identified with early 
Indian conflicts, and members of the family also gained 
fame as scouts and soldiers of the patriot forces in the war 
of the Revolution. Among the numerous children of James 
and Mary (Greene) Watson were three sons, Joseph, 
Zephaniah and James Greene, and through one of these sons 
the subject of this review is a descendant of James Watson, 
one of the three original representatives of the family in 
America. 

John James Watson, father of him whose name initiates 
this article, was born in what is now Jefferson County, West 
Virginia, August 15, 1836, his father, James Watson, hav- 
ing been born in Maryland, and who eame thence to Vir- 
ginia and developed a large farm estate in the vicinity of 
Leetown, Jefferson County, he having been the owner of a 



goodly number of slaves. He was somewhat more thai 
seventy years of age at the time of his death. The maidei 
name of his wife was Elizabeth ShauU, and their childrei 
were ten in number, namely : Benjamin, George, John J. 
Ephraim, Charles, Snowden, Joseph, Daniel, Lydia an( 
Elizabeth. 

John J. Watson was reared on the old homestead, and a' 
the inception of the Civil war he entered the Confederati 
service, in which he participated in the first battle of Bui 
Run and many other important engagements, besides whicl 
he served for a time as courier between Generals Lee ant 
Jackson. He was wounded in the forehead, and bore thi 
scar until his death. In the last year of the war he was i 
member of Clark's Cavalry, and he was its last survivor 
He was present at the surrender of General Lee, his servic( 
having covered the entire period of the war. After the wai 
he was for twenty-five years engaged in mercantile businesi 
at Cliarles Town, Jefferson County, and he then removed t( 
Martinsburg, where he continued a few years in the sam( 
line of enterprise, and then retired from active business 
his death having here occurred November 1, 1921. Hii 
wife survives him, her maiden name having been Ella Vir 
ginia Rogers. Her birth occurred in Jefferson County, sh( 
being a daughter of Isaac and Drusilla (Nicely) Rogers 
The only child is Roger Earl, immediate subject of thii 
sketch. 

In 1904 Roger E. Watson graduated from the Martins 
burg High School, as president of his class, and in the sann 
year he entered the University of West Virginia, where hi 
took a course in the department of chemistry. For tw( 
years, from 1906, he was engaged as a chemist with thi 
H. C. Friek Coke Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
and he then entered the law department of the University 
of West Virginia, in which he was graduated in 1910, hi 
having been president of his class in the junior year. Aftei 
receiving his degree of Bachelor of Laws, with concomitan 
admission to the bar of his native state, Mr. Watson openet 
an office at Martin.sburg, where he has developed a sub 
stantial and representative law practice and gained securi 
vantage-ground as a resourceful trial lawyer and conserva 
tive counsellor. He has been active in local campaigi 
service of the democratic party, and is one of the loya 
and progressive citizens of the fine little city that is thi 
judicial center of Berkeley County. Mr. Watson is affiliatec 
with the Pi Kappa Alpha and the Theta Nu Epsilon fra 
tcrnities of the University of West Virginia, and as ai 
undergraduate in that institution he was active in athletii 
affairs, he having been assistant manager of the basebal 
team in 1910 and manager of the second team of that year 

Mr. Watson married, July 4, 1919, Miss Catherine Me 
Harg, of Boston, Massachusetts, the one child of this unioi 
was Roger Edward. 

C. Warden Pippen has devoted considerably more thai 
half his lifetime to the business and profession of life in 
surance. Ho is a man of unusual achievements in that call 
ing, which demands the broadest qualifications of industry 
resourcefulness and commercial integrity. 

Mr. Pippen, who is general agent in West Virginia foi 
the Massachusetts Life Insurance Company, was born a' 
Baltimore, Maryland, in 1884, son of Charles Edward am 
Roberta 0. (Hamill) Pippen. His father, a native oi 
Gloucester County, Virginia, moved to Baltimore when i 
young man and married there a daughter of Robert Wardei 
Hamill, who owned and operated the first steam flour mil 
in Baltimore. 

C. Warden Pippen acquired a good general education ii 
the public schools of Baltimore, and finished his third yea 
in the City College of Baltimore. He was only seventeei 
when, in 1901, he gained his first practical knowledge o 
the life insurance business as a clerk in the Baltimore offic 
of the New York Life Insurance Company. He was ther 
two years, and then removed to Atlanta, Georgia, and be 
came assistant cashier for the Mutual Life Insurance Com 
pany. Subsequently he went to Nashville, Tennessee, a 
cashier for the same company in that city, and later wa 
transferred to Washington as superintendent of agent! 
The eleven years he spent with the Mutual Life were th 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



111 



period in which his powers were developed and in which 
his reputation became widely extended as a successful insur- 
ance man. He then formed a new connection with the 
Massachusetts Life Insurance Company of Springfield. This 
company sent him to Charleston as general agent, and he 
established his office and home in the capital city in 1914. 
Mr. Pippen is general agent for the entire state except ten 
counties. 

Mr. Pippen brought to his new duties at Charleston the 
knowledge and resources acquired by years of toil, ex- 
perience and training, and in this state he has added to his 
reputation as an insurance producer. Every year the busi- 
ness credited to his Charleston headquartjjrs has shown a 
gratifying increase. It is especially worthy of note that 
in the year 1921, a year of anti-climax to practically every 
business and industry in point of volume as contrasted with 
the years of war inllation that succeeded, the West Virginia 
agency was one of only fifteen agencies in the Union to 
show an increase in volume of insurance business for the 
Massachusetts Life Company over the record of the previous 
year. 

Mr. I'ijipen is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, 
Kanawha Country Club, Elks, and has the honor of being 
secretary of the Lions Club of Charleston. He assisted in 
organizing tliis club on September 30, 1921. Its member- 
ship embraces a representation of what may well be called 
the best of strong, vigorous, active citizenship of Charleston, 
men of high character and devoted to the best interests of 
the city. Mr. Pippen married Miss Blanche Watson, of 
Baltimore. Their two children are: Gretchen B. and Jean 
Ann Pippen. 

Jacob W. G.\trell is closely associated with some of the 
primary business interests of the Eastern Panhandle, par- 
ticularly those involved in the handling and storage and 
also the production of the most distinctive output of this 
region — fruit. He grew up in the cold-storage business, and 
the Rothwell-Gatrell Company, of which he is president, is 
one of the larger concerns of this kind at Martinsburg. 

Mr. Gatrell was born in Martinsburg, a son of Charles 
Anthony Oscar Gatrell and grandson of Charles Gatrell. 
Charles Gatrell, who was born in 1807, was a native of 
either Jefferson or Berkeley County, and his ancestors were 
pioneers here. Owing to the early death of his father 
Charles Gatrell had to become a wage earner to assist in the 
support of an invalid sister and a blind mother. The best 
wages he could earn was 6 cents a day. His industry and 
long continued application to work brought him a reason- 
able degree of prosperity, and after rearing his family he 
bought a home in Shepherdstown, where he spent his last 
days and died at the advanced age of ninety-four. He 
married a Miss Leshorne, whose people were early settlers 
of Berkeley County, and she died some years before her 
husband. 

Charles Anthony Oscar Gatrell was born on a farm in 
Berkeley County in 1845, and during his youth learned the 
trade of miller. He spent practically all his active life as a 
miller at Martinsburg, where he died at the age of seventy- 
two. He married Emma Eliza Hess, who was born at the 
family homestead then located at the corner of Queen and 
West Race streets in Martinsburg, daughter of David H. 
and Mary (Cline) Hess. The Hess family is represented 
elsewhere in this publication. Mr. Jacob Gatrell and his 
sister, Maud, are the only living children. His sister and 
her mother occupy the old home in Martinsburg. 

Jacob W. Gatrell was educated in Martinsburg, and the 
industrious habits of his family have earned him a career 
of usefulness and success. He worked at different lines as a 
boy, and at the age of twenty-three he went with the Roth- 
well Cold Storage Plant. He learned that business in every 
detail, was advanced to general manager, and eventually 
became a large stockholder. In 1921 he reorganized the 
business as the Kothwell-Gatrell Company, of which he is 
president and general manager. This plant has storage 
capacity for 50,000 barrels of apples, manufactures thirty- 
five tons of ice daily and supplies ice to the city in addition 
to refrigeration for the storage plants. 

Mr. Gatrell married Louise I. Hanshew, a native of Mar- 



tinsburg and daughter of Allen and Bernice Hanshew. The 
four children of Mr. and Mrs. Gatrell are Ann, Jacob W., 
Jr., Louise and David. Mr. Gatrell was reared a Lutheran. 
Among other business interests he is vice president and 
treasurer of the Rothwell Farm and Orchard Company, is 
president and general manager of the Pomona Orchard 
Company, and is a stockholder in the Imperial Orchard 
Company. He is affiliated with Tuscarora Lodge No. 24, 
Modern Woodmen of America. 

Walter Smith Sugden, after graduating in law, located 
at Sistersvilie, West Virginia, and in that rapidly grow- 
ing center of the oil industry is found abundant demands 
upon his professional talent. Mr. Sugden is associated as 
attorney or in other official relations with a number of the 
corporations that give distinction to Sistersvilie as a com- 
mercial center, 

Mr. Sugden was born at Amsterdam, New York, April 9, 
1880. His father, James T. Sugden, a prominent New 
York manufacturer, was born in Yorkshire, England, Oc- 
tober 5, 1837, and was about twenty years of age when he 
came to the United States. In 1860 he established his 
home in Amsterdam, New York, where he had charge of 
the spinning department in carpet mills, and later became 
a manufacturer of knit underwear. He established and 
built up a very large industry of that kind at Amsterdam. 
He was in every way a most substantial citizen, giving 
liberally of his time and means to causes outside his im- 
mediate business. He was a member of the Board of 
Water Commissioners of the City of Amsterdam and su- 
pervised the building of the first city waterworks. He was 
president and for twenty-two years member of the Board 
of Education. He was for forty-seven years a vestryman 
in St. Ann's Episcopal Church and was affiliated with 
Welcome Lodge of Masons. Although a resident of Amster- 
dam, at the time of his death, April 18, 1921, he was visit- 
ing in Sistersvilie. . James T. Sugden married Elizabeth 
L. Smith, who was born at Thompsonville, Connecticut, De- 
cember 19, 1849, and is now living with her son in Sisters- 
vilie. Walter S. is the oldest of her three children. The 
second, May, died at the age of eight years. Gilbert Taylor 
lives at Lockport, New York, and is president of Wester- 
man & Company, Incorporated, manufacturers of bar iron. 

Walter Smith Sugden attended the public schools of 
Amsterdam, graduating from high school in 1898. He 
] repared for university in Phillips Academy at Andover, 
Massachusetts, graduating in 1899, and then entered Har- 
vard Universit}', where he graduated A. B. in 1903 and 
received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1906. 
Mr. Sugden took a prominent part in student activities, 
and most of the old followers of university football recall 
him as one of the star players for the Crimson and also 
selected as one of the "All-American team." While in 
university he was a member of the Institute of 1770, a 
sojihomore club, the Dickey Club, the Hasty Pudding Club, 
and Theta Nu Epsilon. 

Mr. Sugden removed to Sistersvilie, West Virginia, in 
1906. He had other interests to engage him for a time, 
and on January 12, 1910, was admitted to the bar and 
has since been active in a law practice, largely in corpo- 
ration law. He is a member of the law firm of Kimball 
& Sugden, formed in 1910. This firm is chief counsel for 
Petroleum Exploration, organized under the laws of the 
State of Maine, with headquarters at Sistersvilie; for the 
Wiser Oil Company of Sistersvilie, Amity Gasoline Com- 
pany of Sistersvilie, Western Petroleum Exploration of 
Sistersvilie. The firm is local counsel for the Baltimore 
& Ohio Railway Company, the American Oil Development 
Company of Pittsburgh, the Barnsdall Corjioration of New 
York city, and are attorneys for the First Tyler Bank & 
Trust Company of Sistersvilie. The offices of the firm are 
in the Thistle Building. 

Mr. Sugden is individually a vice president of the Agnew 
Torpedo Company, Columbia Oil Company of West Vir- 
ginia, secretary of the Oil Review Publishing Company of 
Sistersvilie, and a director of the Wiser Oil Company, 
Amity Gasoline Company, Petroleum Exploration, and First 
Tyler Bank & Trust Company. 



L 



112 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



He votes as a republican and was a delegate from the 
Fourtli Congressional District to the National Convention 
in Chicago in 1912. He has served the past four years 
as city attorney of Sistersville. Mr. Sugden is registrar 
and a vestryman in St. Paul's Episcopal Church; is a 
member of Phoenix Lodge No. 73, A. F. and A. M.; Sisters- 
vUle Chapter No. 27, B. A. M. ; Mountain State Com- 
mandery No. 14, K. T.j West Virginia Consistory No. 1 
at Wheeling; and is a past potentate of Osiris Temple of • 
the Mystic Shrine at Wheeling. He is also a member of 
Sistersville Lodge No. 333, Benevolent and Protective Or- 
der of Elks, and the Kiwanis Club. Mr. Sugden had lit- 
tle time to devote to profession or business affairs during 
the war, since he was an associate member of the Legal 
Advisory Board of Tyler County, a Four Minute Speaker, 
chief of the Tyler County Division of the American Pro- 
tective League and chairman of the Publicity Committee 
for the County Chapter of the Eed Cross. 

In 1916, at New Matamoras, Ohio, Mr. Sugden married 
Miss Rachel E. Hutchison, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John 
M. Hutchison, residents of Monroe County, that state, 
where her father is a fanner and farm owner. Mrs. Sug- 
den, who died in 1918 at Sistersville, is survived by one 
daughter, Elizabeth Jane, born January 21, 1918. 

John H. Zirkle. Member of an old Barbour County 
family, John H. Zirkle was at one time a newspaperman at 
Philippi, and while in the Government service came to 
Maitinsburg, where for the past thirteen years he has prac- 
ticed law with success and honor and is also the present 
city recorder. He is a descendant of one of three Zirkle 
brothers who came out of Germany in Colonial times and 
settled in Virginia. 

His grandfather was Daniel Zirkle, who was born in 
Eockingham County, Virginia, in 1805, and married Cath- 
erine A. Will, who was born in Shenandoah County, Vir- 
ginia, in 1816. About 1836 Daniel Zirkle moved with his 
family to what is now Barbour County, and settled near the 
Town of Philippi. He was a farmer, and in the days before 
railroads took his surplus products to Baltimore and Phila- 
delphia with four-horse teams, a trip that required several 
weeks when the roads were bad. On returning he loaded his 
wagons with merchandise. Daniel Zirkle died December 18, 
1868, at Philippi in Barbour County. His wife died March 
3, 1841, just two weeks after the birth of her son, Jacob 
Zirkle. 

Jacob Zirkle, father of John H., was born in Barbour 
County, February 17, 1841, and was reared on a farm. On 
August 23, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, of the Fifteenth 
West Virginia Infantry, and served in all the campaigns 
and battles of that regiment until the final surrender. He 
was once slightly wounded in the shoulder. He participated 
in the battles of Cloyd Mountain, New River, Middlebrook, 
Lexington, Lynchburg, Berryville, Hall Town, Opequon, 
Fishers Hill, Cedar Creek (first and second battle), Hatch- 
er's Run, Petersburg, Rice Station, and was at Appomattox 
and in many other skirmishes besides. He received his 
honorable discharge June 14, 1865. After the war he 
resumed farming, having inherited the old homestead in 
Valley District, and became a large land owner and a very 
prosperous and influential citizen. He celebrated his eighty- 
first birthday in February, 1922, and is now living with his 
oldest son, A. D. Zirkle, at Philippi. 

In Barbour County, August 27, 1865, Jacob Zirkle mar- 
ried Rebecca Schleuss, who was born in Shenandoah County, 
Virginia, April 4, 1842, daughter of Andrew and Sarah F. 
(Carter) Schleuss. Her father was born in Maryland in 
1809, and her mother in Rappaliannock County, Virginia, in 
1824. The Schleuss family removed to Barbour County in 
1842, and her father died December 18, 1864. Jacob and 
Rebecca Zirkle were church members from early youth, 
being reared in the United Brethren Church, but later joined ■ 
the Methodist Church. Jacob Zirkle was class leader for 
about twenty-five years. His wife died May 17, 1917, and 
was buried in Fraternity Cemetery at Philippi. 

These worthy parents had a famOy of ten children: 
Andrew D., born August 6, 1866, and living at Philippi; 
Mary F., born October 25, 1867; and died December 15th, 



following; Roxanna, born April 15, 1869, now living neai 
Garden City; Kansas; Charles I., born March 20, 1871, als( 
living at Garden City; Daniel O. L., born February 26, 1873 
and died March 1, following; John H., the Martinsburj 
lawyer; Lorenzo Dow and Davit T., twins, born August 10 
the former living at Garden City, Kansas, and the lattei 
died February 28, 1879; WUliam Luther, born Decembe: 
25, 1880, now living at Moundsville, West Virginia; an( 
Simon Elijah, born April 18, 1883, a resident of Gardei 
City, Kansas. 

John H. Zirkle was born on the home farm near Philippi 
December 17, 1874, and the labor of the farm was the firs 
item in his practical experience. He attended the frei 
schools there until he was eighteen, and then entered wha 
is now Wesleyan College at Buckhannon, where he com 
pleted a three year college course. Then for three years hi 
taught school, the first school being a mile from Belington 
in his native county. He left the schoolroom to purchasi 
a half interest in the Philippi Republican of Barbou: 
County, and was junior editor of that paper for eight years 
He gave up newspaper work when assigned to a Govern 
ment position as storekeeper and gauger, his first assign 
ment being at Jarrett's Distillery at Grafton, and later h 
was transferred to the Hannis Distillery at Martinsburg 
where he served eleven years, until removed after the elec 
tion of Woodrow Wilson. 

While in the Government service at Martinsburg Mr 
Zirkle studied law by correspondence courses and later tool 
the lectures at West Virginia University, also passed hi 
law examination there and was admitted to the bar ii 
1909. For a number of years he has had an extensiv 
practice in all the courts of his district. While in Philipp 
he was for two years city recorder, and since 1915 he ha 
been city recorder and auditor of Martinsburg. Mr. Zirkl 
is active in republican politics, is affiliated with Equalit; 
Lodge No. 44, A. F. and A. M., at Martinsburg, with th 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he and his wif 
are members of the First Methodist Episcopal Church. 

In 1901, at Philippi, he married Miss Grace Ice, daughte 
of Judge William T. and Columbia (Jarvis) Ice. He 
father was for several years judge of the Circuit Cour 
in the district comjirising Barbour, Preston and Raudolpl 
counties. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Zirkle wer 
born four children: Robert, now employed by the Martins 
burg Paid City Fire Department; Fred, in the eighth grad< 
of the grammar school; Willard and Elizabeth Columbia 
both deceased. 

Walter J. L.\mbert, first vice president of the Citizen 
Bank of Martinsburg, Berkeley County, was born at Fred 
erick City, Maryland, on the 15th of July, 1850. He is i 
son of Frederick Lambert, presumably a native of Vii 
ginia. The original American progenitors came from Eng 
land in an early day and settled in the historic Oh 
Dominion State. Frederick Lambert became a representa 
live merchant at Frederick City, Maryland, his store am 
residence having been at the west end of Patrick Street 
The maiden name of his wife was Catherine Lambright, shi 
having been born and reared in Frederick City, where sh 
and her husband continued to reside until their deaths 
Tliey became the parents of the following sons and daugh 
ters: David, Michael, William H., Charles O. (served thre^ 
terms as mayor of Martinsburg, West Virginia), John C. 
Harriet A., George Dallas (served as a member of the cit; 
council at Martinsburg, West Virginia, and was a soldie 
in the Civil war three years) , Thomas F., Lewis E., Walte 
J., Franklin P. (died at the age of four years), and Emmi 
J. The daughter Harriet became the wife of Walter H 
Keedy, who served as a soldier of the Union in the Civi 
war. Mr. and Mrs. Keedy became the parents of six chil 
dren, namely: Eugene, Mary, Laura, Naomi, Mabel am 
Emma, the latter of whom died in infancy. Emma J 
Lambert became the wife of Charles E. Zieler, now deceased 
and she now presides over the domestic economies and socia 
regime of the home of her brother, Walter J., subject o 
this review. 

In his youth Walter J. Lambert attended the excellen 
schools conducted by Professor James English at Fredericl 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



113 



?ity, Maryland, and he early manifested distinct native 
alent as a trader, he having been a lad of tvirelve years 
lid when he entered the employ of Augustus Fraley, a 
lealer in horses and other live stock, for whom he bought 
nd sold with remarkable judgment for a youth of that 
nmiature age. Mr. Lambert was fourteen years old when 
le eame to Martinsburg, West Virginia, to enter the employ 
f his brothers, George D. and Charles O., who had here 
stablished themselves in the provision liusiness. He con- 
inued to be thus associated with his brothers until they 
issolved their partnership. Thereafter he was for three 
ears in the employ of his brother George D., who then 
onsolidated his business with that of his father-in-law, 
Andrew Grazier. After remaining for a time with this new 
rm Walter J. Lambert engaged in the provision business in 
n independent way. Three years later he turned his atten- 
ion to the restaurant business, with which he continued to 
IB successfully identified a few years, in the meanwhile 
aving been successful also as a local buyer and shipper of 
ive stock. Mr. Lambert was one of the organizers of the 
Jitizens Bank of Martinsburg, and has been a member of 
ts directorate from the time of its incorporation, besides 
rhich he has given effective executive service as its first 
ice president, an office of which he is the incumbent at the 
ircsent time, his mature business judgment and effective 
ounsel having been a potent influence in connection with 
he development of this substantial financial institution. 
Ir. Lambert has made judicious investments in Martins- 
urg real estate, and was the owner of the local operahouse, 
iihich was destroyed by fire in 1920. He is a member of 
tobert White Lodge No. 67, Ancient Free and Accepted 
lasous, Martinsburg Lodge No, 778, Benevolent and Pro- 
ective Order of Elks, and of Washington Lodge No. 1, 
fuights of Pythias. 

Mr. Lambert has taken deep and heljiful interest in the 
welfare of the fine little city that has long represented his 
ome, and while he has had no desire for public office he 
as been at all times a liberal and pi-ogressive citizen — one 
rho has inviolable place in the esteem and good will of the 
ommunity. Mr. Lambert is a bachelor. 

Lewis H. Thompson. It is possible to characterize justly 
Ir. Thompson 's position in Martinsburg as that of a man 
f affairs. In private business he has prosecuted his in- 
erests with a vigor and judgment that have earned some- 
hing more than ordinary success. At the same time he has 
eeognized the claims of citizenship, and has been efficient 
nd competent in public office. Organized movements and 
nstitutions which are the source of Martinsburg 's best 
ame before the world have profited from his wise leader- 
hip and influence. 

Mr. Thompson is a native of Martinsburg. His great- 
rand father, Joseph Thompson, was born in County Down, 
reland, but of Scotch ancestry, and brought his family to 
Lmerica and became a pioneer in Berkeley County. He 
erved as a soldier in the War of 1812, and for these serv- 
2es was granted land in Iowa. He died at the age of 
eventy-eight, transmitting the vigor of his mind and bo<ly 
his descendants. His son James Thompson was twelve 
ears of age when brought to America. He possessed the 
ssential talents of the scholar, and it is said that before 
e came to America he had read the Bible through three 
imes. He learned the trade of weaver, and that was his 
hief occupation during his active life. He died at the age 
f eighty. 

Samuel J. Thompson, father of the Martinsburg business 
aan, was a soldier in the Confederate army, being with 
'. E. B. Stuart's command until wounded. Following the 
?ar he entered the service of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
Jompany and was a passenger conductor until late in years 
.e resigned and lived retired until his death at the age of 
ighty-three. He married Sally Reed, whose father, James 
\ Reed, was born in Martinsburg in 1818, and was the 
on of a weaver who owned and operated a mill on East 
ohn Street. James F. Reed succeeded to the ownership 
f the mill, and also operated another mill a mile and a 
alf west of Martinsburg. James F. Reed married Ann 
inyder. Sally Reed Thompson died at the age of sixty- 



seven, after rearing a family of ten sons and three 
daughters. 

In this last family Lewis H. Thompson was next to the 
youngest son. While growing up at Martinsburg he at- 
tended the city school, and at the age of seventeen became 
a clerk in the store of Thompson & Tabler, remaining with 
that firm five years, and for three years was with his 
l:rotlier James F. He then engaged in business with his 
hrotlier Benjamin, and subsequently became sole proprietor 
and still conducts a high class men 's furnishing store. 
However, that business is only one of several important 
affairs in which he is interested as a stockholder and execu- 
tive. He is vice president of the Slienandoah Bank and 
Trust Company, was for a number of years a director of 
the Bank of Martinsburg, is president of the Cherry Run 
Orchard Company, is president of the Martinsburg Fruit 
Exchange and for several year.s was president of the 
Business Men 's Association and is a director of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

Mr. Thompson was for six years a member of the City 
Board of Affairs and for six years a member of the City 
Council, and during that time was also city treasurer. A 
prominent democrat, he has been chairman of the County 
Democratic Committee, a member of the Congregational 
District Committee and has attended as a delegate a number 
of local, district and state conventions. 

At the age of twenty-one Mr. Thompson married Alice A. 
Grimes, a native of Martinsburg, and daughter of Harry 
and Julia Grimes. They have two children, Ethel Amelia 
and LaGardc Jones. Ethel Amelia is the wife of Capt. 
Hugh C. Parker, of the United States Army. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thompson are members of the Baptist Church, and for 
twenty-two years he served as superintendent of the Sun- 
day school. 

Brice Leonard Holland while not one of the oldest 
men is one of the oldest citizens of Logan, and has been a 
factor in the expanding business affairs of that community 
more than twenty years. He has perhaps the oldest and 
largest business in real estate, insurance and bonds in the 
town, and is also vice president of the Bank of Logan. 

Mr. Holland was born near Morgantown, West Virginia, 
October 20, 1S77, son of Capt. W. C. and Agnes Jane 
(Selby) Holland. The Holland family were pioneers in and 
around Morgantown. His parents were both natives of 
Monongalia County. The mother is now living at Parkers- 
burg, where the family located in 1907. Captain Holland, 
who died there in 1910, at the age of seventy-five, was a 
well-to-do farmer and engaged in the timber business on the 
Monongahela River. He was always interested in politics 
as a matter of good government, was a republican, and for 
a number of years held the post of justice of the peace, 
and was on the school board and in other official positions. 
Captain Holland and five brothers were Union soldiers, and 
his service began at the opening of hostilities and con- 
timied until the close of the war. He was in many battles, 
including Gettysburg, was twice wounded and for a time 
was a prisoner of war at Liliby Prison. His youngest 
brother entered the service at the age of fourteen years as 
a bugler. Captain Holland was a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic and a high degree Mason, and he ami 
his family were Baptists. They had a family of four sons 
and three daughters. The oldest, B. O. Holland, who died 
at the age of fifty years, was a pioneer merchant at Logan, 
being a member of the firm Moore & Holland, held the 
office of postmaster a number of years, and was deeply in- 
terested in the general development of the Guyon Valley 
and was one of the first republican voters in the community. 
The second child, Sally, is the wife of John Ball, who for 
several terms served as sheriff of Wyoming County. The 
third child, Fannie, is the wife of Judge Blizzard, of Park- 
ersburg. Frank C. is in the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness at Mullins in Wyoming County. Bruce Leonard is the 
next in age. Fred is an accountant in Baldwin Tool Works 
at Parkersburg. 

Bruce Leonard Holland acquired his early education in 
district schools and also attended school at Grantsville in 
Calhoun County. Soon after leaving school he came to 



114 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



Holland, and for eight years was assistant postmaster under 
his brother. In 1906 he was commissioned by the governor 
of West Virginia to transcribe the records pertaining to that 
part of Logan County which went to form the new County 
of Mingo. This was a task that required eighteen months, 
and its performance gave him perhaps a wider and a more 
intimate acquaintance with the people and affairs of Logan 
and Mingo counties than was possessed by any one in this 
section. 

Many years ago Mr. Holland began selling life insurance, 
and his insurance business has since taken on a broad and 
general scope, representing some of the strongest companies 
in fire and life, marine, mining and all other branches of 
insurance service applicable to such an industrial community 
as Logan County. He is also connected with several bond- 
ing companies. While in this business he began dealing in 
real estate, and his knowledge and experience of real estate 
give some vital facts indicating the growth of the com- 
munity. A number of years ago he paid $600 for one tract 
(if land for which he has since been offered $60 000. Among 
other properties owned by him is the Jefferson Hotel at 
Logan. He was one of the organizers of the Bank of 
Logan, which started business in 1920, and of which he is 
vice president and member of the discount board. This 
bank has had a rapid growth, its deposits aggregate $800,- 
000, and these deposits also reflect the prosperity of this 
mining community, since the larger part of the deposits are 
made by miners. Mr. Holland is also a stockholder in the 
First National Bank. 

He inherits the interest of his father in public affairs, 
is one of the leading republicans of the county and a 
number of times has been chosen chairman of the county 
committee. In 1903 Mr. Holland married Kittie F. Ald- 
lidge, daughter of John F. Aldridge and a niece of Judge 
Wilkinson of Logan. They have three children: Paul, 
who just completed his high school course, has proved a 
very able assistant to his father in business, and is now 
continuing his education in Yale University ; Max S., now 
thirteen years of age and in his first year in high school; 
and Mary L. 

William Frazier Naret is one of the leading representa- 
tives of real estate enterprise and fire and casualty insurance 
business at Morgantown, judicial center and metropolis of 
Monogalia County. He was bom at Buffalo, Putnam Coun- 
ty, this state, October 25, 1876, and is a son of Dr. Edward 
and Rhoda F. (Frazier) Naret. Edward Naret was born in 
the City of Paris, France, in 1823, and there his educational 
discipline included the study of law. He was nineteen years 
of age when he came to the United States in 1842, and later 
he returned to his native land, where he devoted about 
two years to the study of medicine. He then came again 
to the United States, and he continued his studies in the 
medical department of the University of Pennsylvania until 
he there received his degree of Doctor of Medicine. He 
then engaged in the practice of his profession at Gallipolis, 
Ohio, and there was solemnized his first marriage. Later 
he met in the City of Philadelphia some Frenchmen who 
owned land at Buffalo, West Virginia, and who wished to 
sell the property. The doctor purchased the land and re- 
moved to that place, where several French families had 
established their homes. There he continued in the prac- 
tice of his profession until his death in 1876, and he long 
was known and honored as one of the influential citizens 
of that community. His first wife died, and at Buffalo 
he was united in marriage with Miss Ehoda F. Frazier, 
who was born and reared in what is now Putnam County, 
this state, a daughter of WUliam Frazier, who came with 
one of his brothers from another part of Virginia and 
settled in Putnam County, which was at that time a part of 
the Old D'ominion State. The locality where he settled 
became known as Frazier 's Bottoms. Mrs. Naret sur- 
vives her husband and still resides in her native county. 

William F. Naret obtained his youthful education in the 
public schools of his native place, and in the fall of 1892 
he entered the preparatory department of the University 
of West Virginia, where he continued his studies until he 
entered the agricultural department of the University, in 



which he was graduated in 1898, with the degree of Bach- 
elor of Agriculture. In 1900 he received from the uni- 
versity the supplemental degree of Master of Arts, he 
having previously received a fellowship in the university. 

In 1900 Mr. Naret became associated with the Alleghany 
Orchard Company at Martinsburg, this state, where he 
remained about one year. Thereafter he was employed in 
a drug store at Morgantown for a period of about two 
years, and he then became associated with Curtis K. Hayes 
in the real estate and insurance business in this city. About 
two years later he purchased the business and formed the 
Hayes-Miller corporation to continue the same. Three years 
later he became the sole owner of the substantial and 
prosperous business, which he has since continued success- 
fully and in an individual way under his own name. Mr. 
Naret handles city, suburban and farm realty, and his 
transactions have been of broad scope, the while his repu- 
tation constitutes one of the most valuable assets of his 
business. He is also representative of a number of leading 
fire and casualty insurance companies and has a repre- 
sentative clientage in his underwriting business. He is also 
secretary of the Fair-Mor Coal Company, the coal mines 
of which are situated near Fairmont, Marion County, though 
most of the stockholders in the company are residents of 
Morgantown. Mr. Naret is financially interested in several 
Morgantown industrial enterprises, and is one of the liberal 
and broad-gauged citizens of Monongalia County. He is a 
member of the local Kiwanis Club and is affiliated with 
Morgantown Lodge No. 411, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and with Athens Lodge No. 30, Knights 
of Pythias. 

William Smith Snyder is a native of Martinsburg, and 
was an active business man of the city for twenty years or 
more, but now gives his time chiefly to the management of 
his private property interests. He is member of one of the 
substantial old families of the Eastern Panhandle. 

Mr. Snyder was born at Martinsburg, January 28, 1858. 
His grandfather, John Snyder, at one time was a resident of 
Chillicothe, Ohio, and from there came to Virginia, lived for 
a time in Jefferson County, and then established his perma- 
nent home at Martinsburg. He was a hatter by trade, and 
he served as a constable in Martinsburg. He had three 
sons. Two of them, .John and Daniel, were shoemakers at 
a time when shoe making was a manual trade and all boots 
and shoes were made to order. John Snyder continued the 
business of custom shoemaker in Martinsburg for many 
years, and was also a member of the official board of the 
Methodist Church. All business houses of the city were 
closed during his funeral. Daniel Snyder specialized in the 
making of women's shoes. His son removed to Baltimore 
and for many years was in business in that city. 

Samuel Snyder, father of William Smith Snyder, learned 
the trade of carpenter and followed that occupation. He 
was a Union sympathizer when the war broke out between 
the states, removed to Pennsylvania and was soon stricken 
with diphtheria, and died in May, 1861, soon after return- 
ing home. He married Mary A. P. Legg, who was born at 
Annapolis, Maryland. Her father was a farmer in Mary- 
land, and on leaving the farm lived with her at Annapolis. 
Mrs. Mary Snyder was left a widow with three small 
children, named Clara W., who subsequently married Wil- 
liam Eouark, Maggie O. and William Smith. William 
Smith was only three years old when his father died. The 
mother kept her children together and carefully reared and 
educated them, and she died at the age of sixty-two. She 
and her husband were active members of the First Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

William Smith Snyder attended the city schools, and 
early sought a useful occupation that would provide his self- 
support. He learned the tinner's trade at the age of 
twenty, established himself in business as a tinsmith, and 
that was the active business line he followed. Mr. Snyder 
has made numerous investments in local real estate, and 
his accumulating interests in this field give him property 
that requires much of his time. 

At the age of twenty-five he married Emma Susan 
Shaffer, who was born at Martinsburg, daughter of Jacob 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



115 



and Isabella (Burnett) Shaffer. Her grandfather, John 
Shaffer, was born in 1795 and was a sou of Peter Shaffer, 
a Pennsylvania soldier in the American Revolution. John 
Shaffer was an early settler of Martinsburg, and a wagon 
manufacturer whose place of business was at the corner of 
West King and South Raleigh streets. He married Sally 
Curtis. The father of Mrs. Snyder was the lirst superin- 
tendent of tlie Martinsburg Water Works, and contiiuied in 
that official capacity for forty years. The maternal grand- 
parents of Mrs. Snyder were Archibald and Eve Burnett. 

Mr. and Mrs. Snyder, who are members of the First Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, reared five children. Edith May, 
the oldest, is the wife of A. D. Darby and has two children, 
named Ruth May and Albert D., Jr. Roland Sliaffer, the 
oldest son, entered the United States service in the World 
war, was first stationed at Kelly Field, near San Antonio, 
Texas, and was at Chanute Field, near Champaign, Illinois, 
until the close of the war. The third child is Hattic Webb. 
The fourth, Mary Isabella, is the wife of Roy Harrison and 
has two children, Isabella and Margaret. William Stanley, 
the younger son, also is an ex-service man, and was stationed 
at Camp Lee until the close of the war. He attended 
Washington and Lee University and West Virginia Uni- 
versity, and is now a clerk in the office of the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad at Cumberland, Maryland. 

Charles S. Trump. Prominent among the younger 
generation of legists at the Berkeley County bar is found 
Charles Samuel Trump, who has already displayed profes- 
sional ability of a high order and has made rapid strides 
in his calling. Mr. Trump is a veteran of the World war, 
in which he suffered wounds, and is an energetic, forceful 
and capable representative of the kind of citizenship which 
in recent years has brought West Virginia pirominently to 
the forefront in various avenues of endeavor. 

Mr. Trump was born at Martinsburg, West Virginia, 
January 18, 1891, and is a son of Rev. Charles Trump, a 
native of Carroll County, Maryland, born in 185.3. The 
grandfather of Mr. Trump was George Trump, born in 
1807, in Carroll County, Maryland, being a son of Frederick 
Trump, also a native of Carroll County, whose father was 
Von Johannes Trump, who was born in Holland in 1736 and 
came to America during Colonial days, settling in Maryland 
and fighting with the Colonial forces during the War of the 
Revolution. He died in 1815, while his wife, Catherine 
Schloegel, who was born in Holland in 1738, died in 1823. 
Frederick Trump was a merchant in Carroll County, Mary- 
land, and spent his entire life there. He married Elizabeth 
Krantz, who was born in the same county and died in 1888, 
aged seventy years. Cornelius Trump, a great-uncle of 
Charles S. Trump, was a soldier in the Union army during 
the war between the states, and was captured and for a time 
confined in Libby Prison. 

Rev. Charles frump took an academic course at the West- 
ern Maryland College, Westminster, Maryland, and after 
graduation therefrom entered the Lutheran Seminary at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, being graduated from the theo- 
logical department of that institution. At that time he 
located at Harpers Ferry, as pastor of the Lutheran Church 
there, and in adilition to his ministerial duties engaged in 
teaching school. After two years Reverend Trump removed 
to Centerville, Pennsylvania, where he was pastor of the 
old stone church of the Lutheran faith located there, and in 
1888 resigned that pastorate to accept a call to St. John's 
Lutheran Church at Martinsburg. Here he labored faith- 
fully and effectively until his greatly-mourned death in 
October, 1919. He married Eva Schick, who was born at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and she survives him as a resi- 
dent of Baltimore, Maryland. She reared five children: 
Harold, Mary B., S. Elizabeth, Charles Samuel and Frank 
M. Mr. Trump's maternal great-grandfather was John 
Lawrence Schick, Sr., who died in 1834. He married Susan 
Holtzworth, of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in November, 1819. 
He was born in Duerscheim, Germany, January 22, 1793, 
and came from there to America, September 20, 1818, and 
settled in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. His son, John Lawrence 
Schick, the maternal grandfather of Mr. Trump, married 
Sarah Welty. He was born December 25, 1822. When he 



was a young child his parents moved to Gettysburg, Penn- 
sylvania, where he died in 1913, aged ninety-one years. He 
was a strong Unionist, and while he never served in the war 
he gave liberally to the cause. He served many years as 
treasurer of the Gettysburg Battlefield Memorial Associa- 
tion. 

Charles S. Trump attended the public schools of Martins- 
burg, completing his high school course at the East Hijjh 
School, Columbus, Ohio, following which he enrolled as a 
student at West Virginia University, Morgantown, where 
he completed an academic course of one year and then en 
tered upon a three-year law course. He was still iit the 
university when the United States became embroiled in the 
World war, and in 1917 he enlisted in the United States 
service, being first stationed at Camp Benjamin Harrison, 
Indiana, where he was commissioned a second lieutenant and 
assigned first to the Eighty-third Division, from which 
he was transferred to the Thirty-seventli Division and later 
to the Seventy-ninth Division, with which he went overseas 
in December, 1917. Going to the front in France, he par- 
ticipated in various skirmishes and battles until the seveje 
engagement at Montfaucon, which the Americans captured 
September 27, 1918, when he was wounded. He was at once 
sent to a base hospital, in which he was still confined when 
the armistice was signed, and as soon as he had suffi iently 
recovered was placed in charge of Blois Casual Company 
No. 311 and returned to the United States. U|ion his ar- 
rival he was assigned to duty at Camp Upton, where he 
remained until August 13, 1919, and was then honoraldy 
discharged. Returning to the university, he resumed h s 
studies and was graduated in 1920 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Admitted to the bar, he at once com- 
menced following his profession at Martinsburg, where he 
has since built up a large and lucrative practice. 

On March 30, 1917, Mr. Trump was united in marriage 
with Miss Rose Lee LaVelle, who was horn at Uniontown, 
West Virginia, daughter of Thomas M. and Susan LaV^elle, 
and to this union there have been born two children, Belle 
Lee and Jeanne LaVelle. Mr. and Mrs. Trump belong to 
St. John's Lutheran Church. He is a member of Washing- 
ton Lodge No. 1, Knights of Pythias, and the American 
Legion. 

Wilson Porterfield Spekow. The Sperows were one of 
the many families that moved down from Pennsylvania and 
.joined in the very early settlement of the Shenandoah 
VaUey in what is now Berkeley County. They were here 
before the Indians had dejiarted, and shared in the struggles 
and vicissitudes of making the country habitable. Some five 
or six generations of the family have lived here and one of 
the youngest is represented by Wilson Porterfield Sperow, a 
prominent school man living in Martinsburg. 

He was born at Bedington in Berkeley County, son of 
John Wilson Sperow, gramison of George O. Sperow and 
great-grandson of George Sjierow, who died on the farm 
which he owned and occujiied in Hedgesville District. Ho 
had a family of six sons and two daughters: Brown, 
George 0., Henry V., Cromwell S., James, Peter S., Kate 
and Sallie. George O. Sperow was born in Hedgesville 
District, acquired a farm in Palling Water District, and 
when he finally left the farm he moved to Martinsburg. 
where he died at the age of seventy-eight. His wife was 
Mary S. Riner, who was born in Falling Waters District, a 
daughter of Henry and Poll.y (Conchman) Riner. She died 
at the age of sixty-nine, mother of four children : Heniy 
Riner, John Wilson, Anna May and Hester. 

John Wilson Sperow is now a resident of Martinsburg. 
He was born on a farm in Falling Waters District, grew up 
there and received a rural school education, and at the age 
of twenty-two bought the home farm and gave his time to 
its management and cultivation until 1911, when he moved 
to Martinsburg. Since then he has been a traveling sales- 
man, though he still owns and manages the farm. He was 
elected a member of the State Legislature in 1911, and was 
a member of some of the important committees during his 
term. He and his wife are members of Trinity Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, at Martinsburg. John Wilson 
Sperow married Sallie A. Porterfield, who was born on a 



116 



HISTORY OF WEST VIRGINIA 



farm in Falling Water District. Her father, Alexander 
Robinson Porterfield, is now eighty-eight years of age, 
sturdy and useful in spite of his long life, and is still 
living on the farm where he was born December 24, 1833. 
He was a son of William and Polly (Rush) Porterfield, and 
both the Porterfield and Rush families were early settlers of 
Berkeley County. Alexander R. Porterfield was an active 
farmer before the Civil war, and had slaves to operate his 
plantation. He married Susan B. Small, who was born In 
Opequan District of Berkeley County, daughter of John and 
Sallie Small. John Wilson Sperow and wife reared two 
children, Wilson Porterfield and Dora Vivian. The latter 
is the wife of Daniel Franklin Dennis and has a daughter, 
named Margaret Katherine. 

Wilson Porterfield Sperow received his first educational 
advantages in Bedington. He pursued a four-year course 
in the Shepherd College State Normal, graduating in 1914 
with the A. B. degree and in 1916 received the Master of 
Arts degree. His career as a teacher has been in connection 
with some of the larger schools of this section. He taught 
in the Martinsburg High School until he answered the call 
to the colors in 1918. He was a sergeant and remained at 
Camp Meade until honorably discharged in December, 1918. 
On returning home he was an employe of the old National 
Bank at Martinsburg until the fall of 1919, when he began 
his duties as principal of the Bunker HUl High School. 

On March 20 1920, Mr. Sperow married Lillian Henrietta 
Sites, who was born in Pendleton County, West Virginia, 
daughter of Dr. Johnson McKee and Isabella (Kile) Sites. 
Her father was a practicing physician in Martinsburg for 
many years, and is now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Sperow are 
members of the Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
He is afliliated with Equality Lodge No. 44, A. F. and A. 
M., Lebanon Chapter, R. A. M., Palestine Commandery No. 
2, K. T., Washington Lodge No. 1, Knights of Pythias, 
Azhar Temple No. 226, D. O. K. K. He is past moderator 
of the Potomac Valley Round Table, a teachers organiza- 
tion, and is a member of the Rotary Club at Martinsburg. 

Hon. William Herepokd McGinnis has been a prominent 
practitioner at the Raleigh County bar for more than forty 
years, and during a large portion of that period has been 
a leading figure in public life, having served for six years 
as a member of the State Senate and also having occupied 
other positions. His public service has been of great prac- 
tical value to his community, and in his home city of Beck- 
ley, as well as elsewhere, he is accounted a leading and 
formidable corporation lawyer. 

Senator McGinnis was born on Marsh Fork of Coal River, 
thirty miles northwest of Beckley, Raleigh County, West 
Virginia, and is a sou of Hon. James Hereford and Mary 
(Williams) McGinnis. James H. McGinnis was born on 
the Nibert place, on the Guyandotte River, Logan County, 
this state, in 1827, and died at Beckley in 1907. He was a 
son of Pyrrhus McGinnis, a native of Frederick County, 
Virginia, who was a pioneer of Logan County and a mer- 
chant there for many years. In about 1850 Pyrrhus Mc- 
Ginnis brought his family to Raleigh County and settled 
on Marsh Fork, where he established a mercantile business, 
as he did in several other parts of the county. He was a 
successful merchant and accumulated several thousand 
acres of land, some of which was located near Beckley. He 
found time to engage helpfully in school work, and was also 
a faithful member of the Methodist Church. When seces- 
sion raised its head Mr. McGinnis, a man of positive views 
and the courage to voice his opinions, at once took a stand 
in favor of the Union, and during the war between the 
states was shot at by a Southern sympathizer at Beckley. 
Two of his sons, Achilles and T. J., were soldiers in the 
Seventh West Virginia Cavalry, the former holding the 
rank of first lieutenant. Mr. McGinnis lived to see his 
principles vindicated, dying at Beckley in 1874. 

James Hereford McGinnis was educated in the common 
schools, and as a young man became a school teacher, a vo- 
cation which he followed ten years, during which time he 
studied law and was admitted to the bar at Barboursville, 
West Virginia. It was his desire to enter the army at the 
outbreak of the war between the states, but he was severely 



afflicted with rheumatism at the time and thus was prevented 
from service. Following the war he was one of the few that 
could take the test oath, and was a partner of Hon. Sam 
Price of Lewisburg, war governor of West Virginia, who 
was barred from practice because he could not take the 
test oath, but who was not excluded from acting as coun- 
sel. Later Mr. McGinnis practiced law all over West Vir- 
ginia. A man of great natural ability, fine presence and 
magnificent oratorical powers, no one could present a case 
in better manner to a jury, and as a result his practice, 
general in character but slightly tending toward criminal 
eases, was large and important. He had an office at Fay- 
etteville for many years, but Beckley was his home. Mr. 
McGinnis was a raconteur of parts, and his stories were 
much relished by his fellow Masons and others with whom 
he was wont to gather in a social way. An ardent repub- 
lican, he served as prosecuting attorney in several counties, 
and in 1888 was elected to Congress, but was counted out, 
and before a Congressional contest could be settled Con- 
gress had adjourned, thus preventing him from acting in 
the national lower body. Mr. McGinnis married Miss Mary 
Williams, who was born in 1830 and died in 1917, a daugh- 
ter of William Williams, who came from North Carolina 
and settled on Johns Creek in Pike County, Kentucky, 
where his daughter was born. She was a life-long Meth- 
odist. The children born to James H. and Mary (Will- 
iams) McGinnis were: Virginia, the wife of T. K. Scott, 
of Beckley; Nancy, who died in young womanhood; Mary, 
the widow of John F. Davis, residing at Beckley; Sallie, 
who died at the age of eight years; James H., Jr., who died 
in childhood; Martha, the wife of W. R. Lilly, an attorney 
of Logan; J. Douglas, an attorney of Beckley; and William 
Hereford. 

William Hereford McGinnis attended the local schools 
and as a young man adopted the vocation, temporarily, of 
school-teaching. After several terms spent in the rural 
schools in 1879 and 1880 he attended Concord Normal 
School and then took up his duties as his father 's amanu- 
ensis. While thus engaged he improved the opportunity to 
study law and was admitted to the bar at Hinton while at- 
tending court there. For years he was associated with his 
father in practice, as he was also with Judge John H. 
Hatcher from 1905 until Judge Hatcher ascended the bench 
in 1921, or for a period of sixteen years. During the last 
ten years Senator McGinnis has devoted his attention almost 
exclusively to court practice, has a large and prominent 
clientele, and is attorney for many of the corporations, coal 
companies and railways here. The dean of the Raleigh 
County bar, he was elected prosecuting attorney in 1892, 
and served in that otfice for four years. In 1902 he was 
elected to the West Virginia Senate, in which body he 
served six years, and was a member of many of the most 
important committees. He was one of five democrats in 
the Senate and was the nominee of his party for president 
of the body. Had he occupied that position he would have 
succeeded the governor in case anything had happened to re- 
move him from the gubernatorial office. He has been a 
democrat since the attainment of his majority, and at one 
time knew ' ' every voter in the county and his dog. ' ' He 
is president of the Raleigh County Bar Association, a di- 
rector in the Bank of Raleigh, a Methodist in his religious 
faith, and fraternally is alfiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has been a delegate to 
the Grand Lodge at various times. He has witnessed and 
participated in the entire development of Beckley, as at the 
time that he commenced the practice of law here the com- 
munity was a mud-road town, without railroads or other 
modern conveniences, consisting of a blacksmith shop, post 
office and court house, scattered around which were the 
primitive homes of the residents. 

In 1891 Mr. McGinnis was united in marriage with Miss 
Sallie Holroyd, a daughter of William Holroyd, of Athens, 
Mercer County, West Virginia, and to this union there 
have been born four children: James Hereford; William 
Holroyd; Mary Nan, the wife of W. W. Goldsmith, an at- 
torney of Beckley; and Sarah E., residing with her parents. 
James Hereford McGinnis is a graduate of Washington 
and Lee University, and is now associated with his father 
in the practice of law at Beckley. On April 15, 1917, he 





"^v — ^^^ 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



117 



volunteered his services to the United States and trained at 
the First Officers' Training Camp, where he secured a sec- 
ond lieutenant 's commission. He was assigned to duty 
with the Twelfth Machine Gun Battalion, and was on the 
battle lines of Chateau Thierry and Argonne Forest and 
with the Army of Occupation in Germany. During his 
service he was slightl.v gassed on one occasion, and at 
Chateau Thierry, for gallantry in action, was promoted first 
lieutenant and received a numlicr of citations. William Hol- 
royd McGinnis volunteered in February, 1918, was assigned 
to the same command as liis brother, and advanced from 
private to sergeant. He was on the battle lines of St. Mi- 
hiel, Chateau Thierry and Argonne Forest, and received 
the Distinguished Service Cross for the rescue of two 
wounded comrades. He was at the Officers ' Training Camp 
at LaMons, France, when the armistice was signed. Mrs. 
McGinnis is a Methodist, and the children have been reared 
in the faith of that church. 

Fleming C. Leitwich, a represeiitati\c nicmlier of the 
bar of the City of Huntington, claims the Old Dominion 
State as the place of his nativity and is a scion of a family 
that was there founded in the Colonial days, the original 
American representatives having come from England. Col. 
William Leftwieh, great-grandfather of the subject of this 
review, served as a patriot soldier and otlicer in the Revolu- 
tion, in which he was a general of Virginia troops. Jabez 
Leftwieh, grandfather of Fleming C, was born in Bedford 
County, Virginia, in 1791, and died in Giles County, that 
state, in 1875. The ma.ior part of his life, however, was 
passed in Montgomery County, Virginia, where he was an 
extensive planter and slaveholder prior to the Civil war. 
He well upheld the military and patriotic prestige of the 
family name by his service as a captain in the War of 1812. 
and thereafter he ever continued to be known as Captain 
Leftwieh. His wife, whose maiden name was Martha Early 
and who was a cousin of the distinguished Confederate 
officer. Gen. Jubal A. Early, was born in Bedford County, 
Virginia, in 1795, and died in Giles County, that state, in 
1875, the same year in which her husband died. 

Tubal W. Leftwieh, father of him whose name initiates 
his sketch, was born in Bedford County, Virginia, in 1838, 
and died in Madison, Boone County, West Virginia, in 190.T. 
He was reared in Montgomery County, Virginia, and his 
marriage occurred in Giles County, that state, where he con- 
tinued activities as a farmer and carpenter until 1895. He 
then came to Madison, West Virginia, where he passed the 
remainder of his life. He was originally a democrat and 
later a republican, and in Giles County he served many 
years as justice of the peace. He served as first lieutenant 
in the Thirty-sixth Virginia Infantry, Confederate, during 
the entire period of the Civil war, took part in many engage- 
ments, including the second battle of Manassas and that of 
Winchester, and was thrice wounded. He and his wife were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. In 
Giles County, Virginia, he married Mary Porterfield, and 
there her death occurred in 1875. Everett, eldest of the 
children of this union, who died April 3, 1922, was a leading 
lawyer at Williamson, West Virginia ; Pemlierton Lee died 
at the age of eighteen years; Fleming C, of this sketch, was 
next in order of birth; Jennie is the wife of Sidney A. 
Albert, of Pizgah, North Carolina; Charles W., a traveling 
salesman and a veteran of the Spanish-American war, resides 
at Madison, West Virginia; May is the wife of Andrew J. 
Bradley, of Peytona, West Virginia; Miss Mary is a resi- 
dent of Madison, this state; and William P. is a resident of 
Nallen, Fayette County. 

For his second wife Tubal W. Leftwieh married Miss 
Louisa Snodgrass, who was born in Giles County, Virginia, 
in 1853, and whose death occurred in 1898. They are sur- 
vived by four children: Marvin E., of Moundsville, West 
Virginia; Lela, wife of Gaylord Berry, present postmaster 
at Madison, this state; Margaret, wife of William A. Clen- 
dennen, a farmer near Peytona, 

Fleming C. Leftwieh was born in Giles County, Virginia, 
April 17, 1866, and there attended rural and select schools. 
He remained on the home farm until he was twenty years 
old, when he came to Madison, West Virginia. He taught 



school three years, and in the meanwhile took up the study 
of law. He was admitted to the bar in 1889, and thereafter 
was engaged in practice at Madison until 1910, when he 
removed to the City of Huntington and assumed charge of 
the legal departments of the Big Creek Development Com- 
pany, the Yawkey & Freeman Coal Company and the Pond 
Fork Coal Company. Of the two corporations last men- 
tioned he is now secretary, treasurer and legal adviser, and 
in his general practice he has secure prestige as one of till- 
able and successful members of the bar of this section of 
the state. He is a director of the Huntington Banking & 
Trust Company, the Madison National Bank, the VanZandt- 
Leftwich Auto Supply Company of Huntington, and the 
Miller Casket Company of this city. His professional and 
business offices are maintained at 1211 First National Bank 
Building. 

Mr. Leftwieh is a stalwart advocate of the principles of 
the republican party, and while a resident of Booiie County 
he served as prosecuting attorney from January 1, 1897, 
to January 1, 1901, besides which he was postma.ster at 
Madison under the administration of President Benjamin 
Harrison. In 1908-9 he represented the Eighth Senatorial 
District — Boone, Kanawha and Logan counties — in the State 
Senate. He is a past master of Odell Lodge No. 115, A. F. 
and A. M., at Madison; is affiliated with Tyrian Chapter. 
R. A. M., at Charleston, where also he is a member of 
Kanawha Commandery No. 20, Knights Templars, and Beni- 
Kedem Temple of the Mystic Shrine, while in the Scottish 
Rite he has received the thirty-second degree in the Con- 
sistory at Wheeling. He is a past grand of Boone Loilge 
No. 170, I. 0. O. F., at Madison, and is a member of 
Huntington Lodge No. 13, B. P. O. E. Mr. Leftwieh is a 
member of the West Virginia Bar Association and in his 
home city holds membership in the Giiyan Country Club. 
He was active in the furtherance of local patriotic measures 
in the World war period, and as a member of Draft Board 
No. 2 gave much time to the enrollment of young men for 
the nation's service. 

December 20, 1893, recorded the marriage of Mr. Leftwi<-li 
and Miss Minnie Stollings, daughter of the late Col. Joe E. 
and Ella (Croft) Stollings, of Madison. Colonel Stollings, 
with whom Mr. Leftwieh was a.ssociated in the practice of 
law for a number of years, was a Confederate colonel in the 
Civil war, Mrs. Leftwieh attended the Concord Normal 
School at Athens, and was a successful teacher in the schools 
of Boone County prior to her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Left- 
wieh have but one child. Miss Ruby, who remains at the 
parental home and is a popular figure in the social life of 
Huntington. Miss Leftwieh received the best of educational 
advantages, including those of Marshall College, at Hunting- 
ton, Barboursville College, at Barboursville, this state, and 
Fairmont Seminary, Washington, D, C. 

George Arthi'k Mohler, A contributing factor to thi> 
business prestige of the City of Bcckley and the surround- 
ing territory is the bottling works of the Raleigh Coca- 
Cola Company, situated at Mabscott. This important busi- 
ness enterprise is under the management of George Arthur 
Mohler, a man of capacity and experience, who is also 
manager of the plant at Mullens. He has been identified 
with this line of work ever since entering upon his business 
career, and his advancement therein has been well merited. 

Mr. Mohler Was born at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, March 
26, 1886, and is a son of Albert Curtis and Ellen (Memin- 
ger) Mohler, of Pennsylvania Dutch ancesti-y. Albert C, 
Mohler was a tanner in his native state of Pennsylvania, 
where he resided until 1900, in that year removing to Iron 
Gate, Virginia, He conducted a tannery at that place un- 
til 1917, when he took up his residence at Petersburg, West 
Virginia, and there is the proprietor of the same kind of 
an establishment, Mr, Mohler is widely known for his in- 
tegrity in business matters, and has the reputation of a 
sound, reliable and public-spirited citizen. He and his 
worthy wife are the parents of two sons: James H,, who 
is in charge of the dairy farm of the Hersehey Candy 
Company at Hersehey, this state; and George Arthur. 

George Arthur Mohler attended the graded schools of 
Harrisburg, following which he entered high school at Clif- 



118 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



ton Forge, Virginia, and was then given a clerical position 
by the Clifton Forge Ice and Bottling Works. There, by 
industry and fidelity, he worked himself to the position of ' 
assistant manager, and in 1919 was called to Beckley to 
take his present position. This plant was originally estab- 
lished in 1906 and was acquired by the present owners March 
5, 1919. The president of the concern is L. M. Hogg, of 
Huntington, West Virginia; C. P. Nair, of Clifton Forge, 
Virginia, is vice president; C. P. Nair, Jr., of the same 
place, is secretary; and A. C. Ford, of Clifton Forge, is 
treasurer. The business is a very extensive one and has 
grown considerably during the management of Mr. Mohler, 
who has effected a number of changes in system and equip- 
ment that have contributed to the concern's prosperity. 
The product of this plant is of the highest class and finds 
favor with the dealers over a large contiguous territory. 

In October, 1912, Mr. Mohler was united in marriage with 
Miss Florence E. Lackey, daughter of Dr. Harry Lackey, 
a practicing physician of Clifton Forge, and to this union 
there have been born four sons: George Arthur, Jr., Edgar 
L., Harry C. and Eobert S. Mr. Mohler has been active in 
religious work, being a deacon of the Presbyterian Church 
and superintendent of the Sunday School at Tiel School- 
house. He also takes a keen and helpful interest in civic 
affairs, although he has never sought public office. His po- 
litical beliefs make him a supporter of the candidates and 
principles of the republican party. Mr. Mohler is a popu- 
lar member of the local Kiwanis Club. 

David D. Ashworth, who participated in some of the 
actual fighting in France as a lieutenant of infantry, has 
been a member of the West Virginia bar for half a dozen 
years, compiled a record of good service in the educational 
field, and is the present prosecuting attorney of Raleigh 
County, with home at Beckley. 

He was born at Ghent in that county. May 10, 1889, son 
of Charles V. and Ida (Lilly) Ashworth. His paternal 
grandfather, Armistead A. Ashworth, was a minister of a 
Primitive Baptist Church, and had charge of many congre- 
gations in Virginia and West Virginia and was widely 
known in church circles. He lived to be ninety-four years 
of age. Charles V. Ashworth, who was born in Grant 
County, Virginia, in 1854, moved to West Virginia in 1877, 
and was a farmer and teacher, conducting a number of 
rural schools in Baleigh County. In 1908 he moved to 
Mansfield, Missouri, where he is now living, and his later 
years have been given to the service of a Primitive Bap- 
tist Church as a minister. He has also served as a justice 
of the peace in Mansfield. He had two brothers who were 
Confederate soldiers. Ida Lilly, first wife of Charles V. 
Ashworth, was born in Raleigh County in 1857, and died 
in 1893. The second wife of Charles V. Ashworth was Esta, 
daughter of George Broyles, of Monroe County. By the 
first marriage there were six sons and four daughters, David 
p. being the eighth child. The oldest, Dr. R. A. Ashworth, 
is physician at the State Penitentiary at Moundsville, West 
Virginia. Ezra is in the lumber business and a farmer in 
Raleigh County. John enlisted in the Regular Army at the 
age of eighteen, has risen from the ranks to captain of 
infantry and is now located at Topeka, Kansas. L. L. 
Ashworth has the Ford agency at Pocahontas, Virginia. 
Joseph is a mine superintendent at Shady in Raleigh County. 
Of the daughters, Maude, who died in 1906, at the age 
of twenty-six, was the wife of H. W. Hicks, of Marion, 
Virginia. Lilly B. is the wife of T. S. McKinney, and they 
live on the Ashworth homestead. Alice, who died in 1913, 
at the age of twenty-five, was the wife of Dan Griffith. 
Charlotte is the wife of George McKinney. Charles Ash- 
worth by his second marriage has one daughter, Lula. 

David D. Ashworth received his first instruction in the 
grade school of Ghent. Later he attended the Beckley In- 
stitute, graduated in 1913 from the Concord State Normal 
School, and during 1913-15 was a student of law at West 
Virginia University. He was admitted to the bar No- 
vember 9, 1915. In the meantime and afterward he pur- 
sued a successful career as a teacher and school man. He 
taught ten terms of school. During 1909-10 he was super- 
intendent of the Sandy River District in McDowell County. 



He was also principal of the Eccles High School. In 1919- 
20 he was superintendent of the Town District of Raleigh 
County. At that time the Beckley High School was in 
course of construction, and it was finished under his super- 
vision and is one of the finest schools in the state. Between 
terms of school Mr. Ashworth clerked in stores, and one 
summer was clerk in the Raleigh County Bank. He also 
served as deputy sheriff under W. L. Foster. 

Offering his services as a volunteer, Mr. Ashworth in Au- 
gust, 1917, entered the Second Officers' Training Camp at 
Fort Benjamin Harrison, and was commissioned a second 
lieutenant of infantry. For some months he was on duty 
as an instructor in Camp Dodge, Iowa, and August 14, 1918, 
went overseas, reaching France September 3. He was at 
the front lines and part of the time on the battle front from 
October 3 until the signing of the armistice November 11. 
He was in the Meuse-Argonne district, and was promoted 
to first lieutenant soon after going to France. He was 
once slightly wounded, and had the unusual experience of 
having two canteens shot from his shoulder, and his com- 
rades spoke of him as the man who could not keep a can- 
teen. After the armistice he went with the Army of Occu- 
pation to Weitersburg, near Coblenz, where he remained 
until May 3, 1919. He received his honorable discharge 
from active duty June 8, 1919, but still retains a commis- 
sion as a first lieutenant in the Reserve Corps. 

Mr. Ashworth was elected prosecuting attorney of 
Raleigh County in the fall of 1920, and entered the office 
January 1, 1921. He has given a splendid account of him- 
self in this splendid office. He is a member of the cham- 
ber of commerce at Beckley, is a Master Mason and Knight 
of Pythias, and in politics is a republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the Missionary Baptist Church, and Mrs. Ashworth 
is a Lutheran. 

On June 25, 1919, he married Miss Martha Kellmau, of 
Des Moines, Iowa. She is a graduate of Drake University 
of Des Moines. They have one daughter, Harriet Ruth. 

J. Hugh Miller. One of the important factors in busi- 
ness and banking affairs of Beckley is J. Hugh Miller, 
cashier of the Raleigh Banking and Trust Company. He 
has been prominently interested at Beckley and elsewhere 
in a number of enterprises which have benefited by his good 
judgment and energetic management, and his participation 
in civic affairs has served to add impetus to worthy move- 
ments established for the general welfare. 

Mr. Miller was born on a farm in Rappahannock County, 
A'irginia, August 2, 1864, a son of James N. and Catherine 
(Payne) Miller. James N. Miller was born in 1838, in Rap- 
pahannock County, Virginia, and as a young man adopted 
farming as his vocation. During the war between the states 
he enlisted in Colonel Mosby 's command in the Confederate 
service, and fought with that famous organization through- 
out the four-year struggle. He returned then to his farm, 
where he died at the age of seventy-three years, after a 
useful, honorable and successful career. He was a democrat 
in politics, and his religious faith was that of the Baptist . 
Church, to which also belonged his wife, who was born in 
Fauquier County, Virginia, and died at the age of seventy- 
three years, one year after the death of her husband. They 
had three sons and seven daughters, the sons being: J. 
Hugh; Frank, who died at Cheyenne, Wyoming, as a rail- 
road employe; and W. R., who was traveling freight agent 
for the Chesapeake & Ohio RaUroad at the time of his death. 

J. Hugh Miller grew to manhood on the home farm and 
attended the rural schools and the graded schools of Wood- 
ville, Virginia. Later he spent six months at Westminster 
College, Maryland, and in 1885 came to Hinton, West Vir- 
ginia, as clerk and station agent for the Chesapeake & 
Ohio Railroad, which was then little more than a streak 
of rusty rails, while Hinton was only a small village. After 
remaining with the railroad for thirteen years Mr. Miller 
came to Beckley to become cashier of the old Bank of Ral- 
eigh. Five years later he went to Thurmond, as cashier of 
the Bank of Thurmond, which during the time he was there 
became the National Bank of Thurmond of which he re- 
mained the cashier. In 1921 he returned to Beckley and 
became one of the organizers of the Raleigh Banking and 



HISTORY OP WEST VIRGINIA 



119 



Trust Company, of which he has since been cashier. This 
has already become one of the leading financial institutions 
of Ealeigh County and stands high in public confidence and 
favor. 

In 1902 Mr. Miller was united in marriage with Miss 
Jane Anderson, born in Iowa, a daughter of Archie Ander- 
son, a mine foreman who met his death in a mine explo- 
sion. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. MOler: 
John R. and Mary E., who are attending Beckley High 
School; J. Hugh, Jr., who is attending the graded school; 
and Cora Ann. Mr. Miller is a Baptist in religious faith 
and his wife, a Methodist. He is well known in Masonry, 
belonging to the Blue Lodge at Beckley, the Chapter at 
Thurmond and the Shrine at Charleston, and also holds 
membership in the Loyal Order of Moose, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Kiwanis Club, the Beckley Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Young Men's Club. A democrat in his po- 
litical views, he has taken an active interest in the success 
of his party and in civic affairs, and while residing at 
Thurmond served as mayor of that city. 

Edgar W. Smoot, M. D., one of the skilled physicians 
and surgeons, and a member of the staff of the Danville 
Hospital and a veteran of the World war, is specializing 
with remarkable success in children's diseases, with offices 
at Madison. He was born in Boone County, March 29, 
1870, a son of Daniel and Mary Alice (Atkins) Smoot, 
both of whom were born in West Virginia. Doctor Smoot 
comes of English and Dutch descent, the Smoot family be- 
ing an old one in Virginia and the Atkins family is also 
prominent in Virginia. 

D. J. Smoot, son of William and Martha Smoot, was 
born near Ballardsville, Logan County, Virginia, now Madi- 
son, West Virginia, November 10, 1843, and died February 
7, 1918. He served in the Confederate Army in the com- 
pany known as the Logan Wildcats, was at Appomattox 
when Lee surrendered, and received an honorable discharge, 
which he prized very highly. He married Mary Alice At- 
kins on January 17, 1867. To this union were born five 
children, three sons and two daughters: W. W. Smoot, of 
Danville, West Virginia; Dr. E. W. Smoot, of Madison, 
West Virginia; D. A. Smoot, of Danville, West Virginia; 
Mrs. W. W. Hall, of Stallings, West Virginia ; and Mrs. M. 
J. Hopkins, of Sumner, Ohio. There are nine grandchil- 
dren. Mr. Smoot was a democrat in politics, always active 
in support of the principles in which he believed, and was 
twice elected clerk of the County Court of Boone County. 
He was a member of the Baptist Church, having united 
with that organization thirty-five years ago, and lived a con- 
sistent Christian life. He belonged to the Order of Odd 
Fellows, American Mechanics and Improved Order of Eed 
Men. He is survived by his wife and children, all of whom 
were with him at his death. 

From childhood Doctor Smoot possessed the ambition to 
fit himself for the medical profession, and in order to ob- 
tain the money necessary for his long courses first pre- 
pared himself for that of teaching by supplementing his 
common-school training with two terms at the State Nor- 
m