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Full text of "History of the Woodbridge Township Stadium and School System"

HISTORY 

OF THE 

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSfflP 
STADIUM 

AND 

SCHOOL SYSTEM 




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bOUVEMlK 

STADIUM WEEK, JUNE 27 to JULY 4, 1936 

PRICE 50 Cents 
















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HISTORY 

OF THE 

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP 
STADIUM 

AND 

SCHOOL SYSTEM 




Drawing by Anna Lauiitzen 
Pen and ink by John Dockstader 




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HISTORY OF THE 
WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP STADIUM 



/'\' I'J.MICK 1. \'i: 



Tlu' atlik-tic stailiuni niovciiR-nt. stark-d nine \-fars 
a,i;i> 1)\ the W'ooDHRiiKiE Leabkr, accelerated by tlie 
WOiiDKRiDGE Journal three years ago and placed in- 
in ^cciring position Ijy the Leader-Journal, \Yoon- 
iiRiiHa'. Independent and Perth Amboy Evenini; 
Xi:\\s this year, is Hearing its acropolis. 

And, wliether iir nut it is pnt across with a sharper 
thump than expecte<I depends greatly mi hnw well 
the pul)hc Ixilsters the closing events of the drive lor 
fnnds hy the s])onsors of the gigantic ])roject. 

The struggle for a township stadium has been a 
long, drawn out one. For nine years a hue and cry has 
gone up at stated intervals. Each time the subject 
melted away and died a natural death. 
Jolly Rogers Plant Seed 

P,ack in 1927 Woodbridge boasted of as tine a 
semi-pro football team that ever graced a gridiron 
in this state. High school football, at that time, lack- 
ed the color and s]>irit of the present day scholastic 
game. Something was sorely needed to supplant this 
condition and it was with this purpose in mind that 
a group of spirited athletes banded together and form- 
ed the Jfjlly Rogers Club. 

k^)r the mere love of the game, nothing else, a 
dozen or so former Woodbridge high school pigskin 
artists decided that the club needed a football eleven. 
Windsor J. Lakis, sports writer for the Woodbridge 
Leader that year and sports editor of the Leader- 
Journal today, was designated as manager of the 
newly formed team and was instructed to arrange 
bookings with the best ])ossible ojiposition the state 
atiforded. 

The team, with but two weeks of practice, started 
out on a gridiron campaign that drew state-wide puh- 
licitv. In nine games played, the Jolly Rogers earned 
eight victories and were defeated only once and then 
b\- a single touchdown. The combine was the talk of 
the town .... the Counts' . . . the Static. 

That was nine years ago. Today, the Jolly Rogers 
are forgotten men. But one thing this writer has not 
forgotten is the fact that it was the Jolly Rogers' team 
that planted a seed we all ex])ect to see burst into 
!)loom this Fall. 

After its splendid gridiron cam])aign. the Jolly 
Rogers were accorded a football ban(|uet in appre- 
ciation of their excellent performance. Such men as 
"Chuck" Caldwell, Princeton varsity center that 
\'ear; Dean Metzger, of Rutgers: William A. Ryan, 
township mayor at that time, and others attended the 
dinner. The main topic of discussion concerned the 
immediate need of an athletic field. 

The stadium seed was planted at this attair .... 
and it was given plenty of water. Among those who 
did much to nurse the seed along were : Mark D. Mc- 
Clain, chairman of the stadium sponsors in 1928; Mr. 
Ryan, Earl Carlisle, George Nelson, Theodore X. 
O'Brien, Leland Morgensen, Wasne T. Cox, Irving 
Reimers, Rov Anderson, George Balint, K. \'. Hoff- 



vour 
"stop 



man, Rand.all Lee. A. H. Bowers. Maxwell I, 
.\. L. Savwell, (ieorge Merrill, Mr. Lakis and 
writer. P.ut. imforseen elements popped u]) t( 
the seed's growth. 

J'xioiii h'riie-a'cd hy the Leader 
- Three years later an effort to give Woodbridge 
Township a numici|)al stadium was boomed ])y the 
Woodljridge Leader. The campaign befitted a can- 
didate seeking a public office. In fact, one couldn't 
tell whether Mayor Ryan was running for re-election 
or the stadium .seeking the office. But again the splen- 
did idea became another of those many "air castles." 
The trouble seemed to be that, although the stadium 
plan was favored by the majority, words were domi- 
nant over action. 

Journal Provides Real Piiiieli 

The stadium thought lay in an embryonic state 
until 1933. That year the Woodbridge Journal came 
across the seed. A fertilization period followed. Sud- 
denlv the semen showed signs of life. Here was the 
cue to "take off." And, there was a "take off!" The 
Journal's shot jolted the township. With the rever- 
beration still alive the Leader and Independent ad- 
hered to the cause. 

Blast followed blast in an effort to register a quick 
victory. The drive was high-pressured to such an ex- 
tent that the stadium idea began to click. At that time. 

however, the township and country as well — 

was undergoing one of the worst stages of the de- 
pression. 

This writer and Mr. Lakis went into lengthy de- 
tail in numerous articles explaining a procedure that 
would have given the townsliip an athletic field with- 



JAMES S. 
WIGHT 



CHAIRMAN 
BOARD OF 

DIRECTORS 
STADIUM 

COMMISSION 




HISTORY OF STADIUM AND SCHOOLS 




MISS IRENE TOBIAS, OF FORDS 
QUEEN OF THE STADIUM 

out cost to tlie taxpayers. And, the stadium could 
have been a reality at that time if it hadn't been for 
a few lame ducks who squal)l)led (iver the selection of 
a site. 

The stadium would have been erected through a 
CWA project fund. l)ut while the wrangle over a suit- 
able site was going on the CWA went out of existence 
— and so did the stadium drive. 

Stadiuut Commission Is Born 

In November, 1934, Harry M. Gerns, then town- 
ship committeeman, called to arms representatives of 
all civic, social and service organizations of the town- 
ship. An informal meeting was held in the Municipal 
building. Those famous cards we hear so much alxnit 
were placed on the table. The gathering meant busi- 
ness .... real business. When that initial session ad- 
journed, an organized unit walked away but was 
.scheduled to return a week later. 

For a month and a half the group, with Mr. Gerns 
as temporar}' chairman and this writer, secretary, met 
weekly. A carefid study and thorough investigation 
was made regarding possible methods to be utilized 
in raising the necessary funds to construct the sta- 
dium. 

Finally in January, 1935. with plans, by-laws and 
what-have-you to work with the group formally or- 



ganized itself into the present day Woodbridge 
Township Stadium Commission, Inc. 

Stephen L. Hruska was selected president of the 
Commission .... other officers included Konrad 
Stern, vice president ; Arthur C. Ferry, secretary, 
and Charles R. Brown, treasurer. John H. Love, 
William C. Messick, Frank W. Kirkleski, Asher 
Fitz Randolph, Harry M. Gerns and Dr. C. How- 
ard Rothfuss comprised the board of directors. The 
balance of the membership had James Ranchman, 
Raymond Howell, the late John H. Concannon, 
Frank Rankin, Harry Lager and this writer . 

Little did this group of civic-minded men know 
what they would go through. Weeks of turmoil and 
nerve-wracking sessions .... difficulties with outly- 
ing sections of the township over proposed sites .... 
tiresome caucuses with township officials night after 
jiight in an effort to ol)tain recognition and full co- 
'operation. All went to make the travel of the Com- 
mission as miserable as possible. 

Continued co-operation of the \\'oodbridge Lead- 
er-Journal .Woodbridge lnde])endent and I'erth Am- 
boy Evening News did much to help the Commission 
gain its points with township officials who finally 
granted the Commission's request to take over ten 
acres of land bordering on the Super-highway near 
the Clover Leaf intersection in lieu of back taxes. 

With the ground already acquired, the Commis- 
sion members settled down to negotiate the most diffi- 
cult portion of the project — the raising of $10,000. 
This episode of the greatest drama ever enacted in 
the history of the township proved to be a headache 
never to be forgotten by the sponsors. 

A benefit moving picture performance started the 
drive off with enough funds to care for immediate in- 
cidentals such as printing, corporation ])apers and 
etc. An amateur boxing show staged at the Wood- 
bridge Speedway in July, 1935, barely pulled itself 
out of the red. The automoliile and diamond ring 



MISS 

SYLVIA 

DUNHAM 

OF FORDS, 

LADY 

IN 

WAITING 




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Established 1890 

Main Office: 189-195 New Street, 
Phone: 2400 NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 

PAUIM MILK Helps Man Lengthen the Span of Life! 


WOODBRIDGE LUMBER COMPANY 

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE NATIONAL 

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RE-ROOF - REPAIR - REMODEL 

PAY LATER 

WoodbridRp 8-0125 


WOGLOM STATIONERY 

204 Smith Street 
PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 


Tcl. WoodSridge 8-0770 FUR STORAGE 

WOODBRIDGE FUR SHOP 

LOUIS TOKE, Prop. 
BETTER MADE FURS 

Repairing 522 Amboy Avenue 
Restyling WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 


RELIABLE AUTO REFINISHING CO. 

QUALITY AUTOMOBILE BODY AND FENDER 
REPAIRING 

CARS PAINTED $25 

402-4 New Brunswick Avenue 
PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



HTST( )RY OF STADIUM AND SCHOl )LS 




AMERICAN LEGION BAND 



drawing was anotlier fund-raising attcni])t that just 
"pidled throiigli." 

Hardship afted hardsliip followed the footsteps 
of the Commission members. Innuendos of misman- 
agement of funds were even aimed at the men who 
were sacrificing their everything to provide the town- 
ship with a sorely needed atliletic field. At times, 
members threatened to dissolve the Commission and 
quit the whole thing. Only courage prevented that. 

January of this year found the organization enter- 
ing its second year in its fight with outside rumblings 
and against odds of every possible kind. 

The "Big Push" Fs Launchcil 

Mr. Hruska was again elected ])resident as were 
Messrs. Stern and Brown re-elected to their respect- 
ive offices. James Ranchman succeeded Mr. Ferry to 
the secretaryship following the latter's declination of 
the renomination. The late D. Harry Ford was named 
as financial secretary, while the board of directors in- 
cluded James S. Wight, Maurice B. Sullivan, James 
Catano, and Messrs. Ferry, Gerns, Randolph and 
Dr. Rothfuss. 

The aforementioned, present day officers drew 
and continue to receive the wholehearted support of 
the following members : Dr. H. Belafsky, James Reid, 
Harry M. Gerns, Nichcjlas A. Frisco,' John Marku- 
lin, Sr., Joseph Klein, Mark D. McClain. Eugene 
Schreiner, Anthony A. Aquila, John Markulin.Jr., 
A. Neiss, Ernest L. Link, A. Rankin and this writer. 

However, the untiring efi'orts of the Commission 



members failed to produce the desired result. So, on 
March 26, 1936, the services of Edward Jordan, pro- 
fessional promoter of Ridgefield P'ark, X. J., were 
engaged. Two weeks later, April 2. Mr. Jordan as- 
sumed full charge of the raising of $10,000. 

His first important step was the enlistment of the 
aid of the art classes in the high school in developing 
a standard poster to lie used for publicity jjurposes. 
With prizes to the winners, the stunt was a sure-fire 
success . 

Then followed the "Queen of the Stadium" con- 
test and the "Guess What Time the Clock Stopped" 
event — all money-making, publicity stunts that took 
the township like that fellow Grant grabbed Rich- 
mond. 

The big finale, for which all previous undertak- 
ings were builder-uppers, is the gigantic "Stadium 
Shows" now being presented on the site of the fu- 
ture stadium. The "show" — a combination rodeo- 
circus-carnival-lair project — and the publication of 
this souvenir book are the two major portions of the 
entire promotion to reach the goal. Whether or not 
this objective is attained still remains to be seen. 

One thing certain, however, and that is the drive 
was one of the greatest disphns of determination the 
township has ever witnessed. In all its 267 years, 
Woodbridge Township has had but three major 
events — the acquisition of the charter in 1669, the 
dedication of the Memorial Municipal Building in 
1924 and the efficacious Stadium Drive in 1936. 



WOODBRIDGE DEVELOPMENT 

OWNERS AND DEVELOPERS 



CO. 



ST. GEORGE'S HEIGHTS 

ADJOINING STADIUM PROPERTY 

CHOICE BUSINESS & RESIDENCE LOTS 

Thomas L. Hanson, Pres., 1060 Broad St., Newark, N. J. 
R. L. Clare, Secy., 212 Rector St., Perth Amboy, N. J. 



Heyden Chemical Corporation 

MANUFACTURERS OF FINE CHEMICALS 

FOR THE 

DYE and MEDICINAL TRADES 



FORDS, N. J. 
GARFIELD, N. J. 



NEW YORK 
CHICAGO 



COMPLIMENTS OF 




W. Z. Barrett., D. D. S. 


GET THAT V-8 FEELING 


M. Traiman, D. D. S. 




WOODBRIDGE NEW JERSEY 


IT'S GLORIOUS 


Gilbert O'Neil. D. D. S. 
R. Deutsch, D D. S. 
FORDS NEW JERSEY 


DORSEY MOTORS, Inc. 



SECURITY STEEL EQUIPMENT COKI^UKATION 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



( STEEL 

STEEL OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

DESKS, FILING CABINETS, STORAGE CABINETS, SHELVING 

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FOR BANKS AND PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS 

A TOWNSHIP INDUSTRY AT AVENEL 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE WOODBRIDGE 
TOWNSHIP SCHOOL SYSTEM 



/>\' TOHX H. I.O\K 



In 1894 the scliodl laws of Xew jtTsev were 
amended abolishing the old form of sciiool districts 
each with its three trustees and substituting therefor 
the township as the school unit. 

Under tlie provisions of Chapter 335, Section 16 
of the new law an election, was held in the old 
Masonic Hall on Green Street. Woodbridge. for the 
purpose of electing nine trustees of schools for the 
township, the following gentlemen being the success- 
ful candidates out of a field of twenty-two aspirants 
for the honor: Mr. Howard X'alentine. Mrs. C. B. 
Smith. Mr. Joshua Liddle, Mr. Casimer W. Boyn- 
ton. Mr. John Lockwood. Mr. Joseph W'. Savage, Mr. 
John H. Hilsdorf, Mr. Charles B. Demarest and Mr. 
John Correja Jr., the first president being Mr. How- 
ard Valentine and the first clerk of the lioard, Mr. 
Charles B. Demarest. 

One of the first acts of the newly organized board 
was to number the schools. 

They then proceeded to draw up a budget for the 
coming year which amounted to $3000 including 
teacliers' and janitors" salaries, fuel repairs and sup- 
plies and text books and pupils' supplies. The assessed 
valuation of all school propertv at this time was 
$35,150. 

Included within tlie new district were the follow- 
ing .schools : 

Woodbridge No. 1, a twelve-room lirick structure. 
Blazing Star Xo. 2 (Carteret) on old four-room 
frame school: Washington No. 4 (Six Roads), a 
dilapidated affair ; Locust Grove No. 5 and Iselin 
No. 6, all three being one-room buildings and a two- 
room frame school at Fairfield (Fords). 

Of all these structures, the only one in use at the 
present time is the old Iniilding on School Street. 
Woodbridge, with its addition of four-rooms erected 
in 1903 at a cost of $13,000 including furnishings. 
Blazing Star No. 2 at Carteret was torn down and 
replaced with the present building in the Chrome sec- 
tion now enlarged; Rahway Neck is a private resi- 
dence. Six Roads school was sold and then wrecked ; 
Locust Grove No. 3 stands by the wayside near the 
golf course and is used as a Sunday school ; Iselin 
school went U]5 in flames and Fairfield (Fords) after 
being moved from its old site went the same way as 
old Iselin. 

Principals of schools at that time were — Mr. 
George W. Gamble at No. 1, Miss M. J. McCurdy at 
No. 2. Miss Carrie O. Jacques at No. 3, Miss E. Ella 
Baker at No. 4, Miss Rachael Folsom at No. 5 and 
Mr. William Spencer at No. 7. 

In September, the Visitation Committee of the 
Board reported a total enrollment of 482 ciiildren. 

In May. 1895. Mr. John H. Love was unanimous- 
ly elected principal of .School No, I to commence tlie 
following September. 

Reports soon began to come in from members of 
the Board regarding the increased enrollments at 
various points in the district, indicating tiiat the popu- 



lation had commenced a steady growth and that ad- 
ditional school accommodations would soon be re- 
quired. The great problem of building schools to 
keep pace with the increased population had com- 
menced and has continued from that time until the 
]>resent althougli the last building to be erected was 
Strawberry Hill in 1931. 

In the light of the preceding history, when one 
views the Woodbridge School System with its splen- 
did, modern fire-proof buildings including one of the 
finest high .school structures in the State with a total 
\'aluation of over two million dollars, its cor])s of 200 
teacliers and a total enrollment of over si.x thousand 
pu])ils it may Ije seen what tremeiulous development 
has taken place within the township, within the last 
forty years and the enormity of the task that has been 
faced and liandled so efficiently by the succeeding 
boards of education that have served the township 
fluring those years. 

Not only has this development been physical. Init 
tlie demands of the rapidly changing times have been 
met in improved and increased curricula demanding 
new and improved equipment to keep pace therewith. 

The present high scliool is a development from 
olfl School No. 1 which originally housed all grades 
including a small group of about twenty or thirty 
higji school students working in a three-year course. 

It is interesting to learn from the records of the 
trustees of that school that 1881 marked an import- 
ant epoch in .school policy when tlie following motion 
was passed : 

"Resolvefl: that we give to tlie children complet- 
ing the course of study in the school a Certificate of 
Graduation'" and the first pupils to receive sucii certi- 
ficates were — Sidney Pearson. Sadie Brewster, Clara 
Melick and Lulu Bloodgood. 

The idea of centralizing the schools began to 
l)ud about the year 1900 when an item of $300 was 
inserted in the budget for tlie transportation of schol- 
ars of the liigher grade from Carteret to Woodbridge 
Higii School. Although this item was rejected by the 
voters at the election none could forsee the great oak 
that would grow from such a little acorn. At tiie pres- 
ent time the budget item for school trans])ortation is 
over $26,000. 

One of the most advanced steps in progressive 
polic}- ever taken by the Board of Education was its 
decision to unify the .schools of the township under 
one administrative head, tiie principal of No. 1 being 
appointed unanimouslv .Supervising Principal over 
all of the schools in 1900. 

Medical inspection was introduced in 1908; 
manual training in 1909 and the first truant ofticer 
appointed in the same year. 

The first unit of the present high school build- 
ing on Barron Avenue was commenced in 1910, Gov. 
Franklyn Fort laying the corner stone, and opened 
in September 1911 with John H. Love as the princi- 

{CuntiiiiicJ on payc 9) 



Perth Ar 


nboy National Bank 


PERTH AMBOY 


N. J. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


HISTORY OF 
SCHOOL SYSTEM 

(Continued from page 8} 
pal. The original co.st inclufling 
land, building, furniture anil 
tHjuipnient was $70,000. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


HAMPTON CUTTER 


I'revious to this time ver\' little 
attention had heen paid to athle- 
tics as such although sporadic 
/oiithall teams had heen organized 


GARCIA- GRANDE 


FIRE CLAYS 


and had played games with Perth 
.\nilHj\- and with Battin High at 






l^lizaheth. .-\ home-made gymna- 
sium was .set-up in the attic of 


CIGARS 


WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 


(,ld .\(). 1 in lyOU, the apparatus 
heing constructed of iron pipe do- 
nated for the purpose. 

l'iasketl)all was introduced a 
little later in the same location, 
tlu' first match game heing played 
there with Perth Amhoy. The 
real interest dis])layed l)y the 
Hoard in athletics was Jul\' 17. 
I'Ml, when .Mr. Frank C. Ryder 
( Ciiiitiiuted till p(7(/e 11 } 




Tel. Woodbridge 8-0549 

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Co. 

Electric Arc & Acetylene Welding 

447 Amboy Avenue 

WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 


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Phone: Woodbridge 8-0840 

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41 Main St. Woodbridge, N. J. 


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.E PUBLISHING CO 


MPANY, Inc. 


_ 


Printers of This History 



IIISTl )\<\ ( il' STADII'M AXI) S( I h )( )|,S 




WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPARTMENT 



a\'1':x]-:l woaiax's cll'p- 



The Woman's Clulj of Avenel was organized in 
November, 1920, as a Ijranch of the Woodhridge 
W.onian's Ckib but later became federated as a se]m- 
rate unit. Mrs. E. H. Boynton of Woodljridge and 
Mrs. H. J. Baker of Avenel, were the organizers and 
much credit is due them and the first officers of the 
club for the wonderful welfare and civic work which 
the club has always been very active in. 

It has been very instrumental in all imprcivenients 
of the town. Through its efforts in 1930 the wading 
pool and playgrounds situated at the end of Park 
Avenue was begun and has been much appreciated by 
the residents as it has one of the liest attendance rec- 
ords of the township. 

In welfare work the club from its earliest days 
has been very active, having paid insurance and hav- 
ing taken care of a funeral in one family, clothing 
younger members, making layettes, providing fuel and 
food for many others. 

For two years the clul) supi)orted a milk fund 
under the direction of Mrs. Artiiur Lance which took 
care of many needs. It held community Christmas 
parties for the children for a numljer of years. 

The Avenel Public Library was first started in 
the club and held for a number of years in the mem- 
bers' homes. 

The clul) has lieen handicapped bv uncertain meet- 
ing places, having met at different intervals in the 
Progressive Club of past years, the .schoolhouse, the 
Republican Headquarters, in the members' homes, in 
the firehouse. Now it is planning to meet in the 
schoolhouse during the coming year. 

Twelve was the number enrolled at the first meet- 
ing having steadily increased during the years til! now 
there are fifty members listed. The first officers were : 
Mrs. H. J. Baker, president; Mrs. F. E. Barth, sec- 
retary, and Mrs. L. C. Wyler, treasurer. Mrs. Baker, 
Mrs. Barth and the only other charter memlier Mrs. 
Charles Siessel were recently made life meml)ers. 

The present officers are: President, Mrs. Thomas 



Th(jm])scin: first vice-president, Mrs. William .\. 
Barth ; second vice-president, Mrs. Frederick Beck- 
ley ; recording secretary, Mrs. Dirk P. DeYoung : 
corresponding secretary, Mrs. A. Kaplan, and treas- 
urer. Mrs. l^'red Pirause. 

The chairmen include: Literature, Mrs. .Arvid 
Winquist ; American Home, Mrs. Frank Barth ; Pub- 
licity, Mrs. William Barth; Welfare, Mrs. Charles 
Siessel ; Ways and Means, Mrs. C. N. Van Leer ; 
Program, Mrs. F"rederick Beckley; Hospitality, Mrs. 
Merwin Jones; Membership, Mrs. William Kuzmi- 
ak ; Gardens, Airs. John Azud ; Junior Councilor. 
Mrs. P. L. Coupland : Girls Club Councilor, Airs. 
William Perna, and International Relations and Le- 
gislation, Mrs. R. G. Perier. 



THE JANET GAGE CHAPTER D. A. R. 

The Janet Gage Chapter D. A. R. was organized 
on January 20th, 1924, with a membership of eigh- 
teen. The officers appointed were: Regent, Mrs. 
Frank R. \'alentine ; vice-regent, Airs. William 
Tombs, recording secretary. Airs. John E. Brecken- 
ridge ; corresponding secretary. Airs. H. J. Baker, 
Jr.; treasurer. Airs. AL Irving Demarest; librarian. 
Miss Alittie Randf)lph ; registrar, Aliss Laura Brod- 
head. 

Janet Gage, for whom the Chapter was named, 
was a resident of Woodlsridge during the Revolution- 
ary W^ar. She was a very patriotic women and, with 
the assistance of an old colored man, prepared and 
erected the first Liberty Pole in the town, and raised 
the Flag. 

When the Charter was received, in Decemlx-r, 
1924, there were thirty-one names enrolled. 

Toda_\' our organization has a membership of fifty- 
eight. The officers are : Regent, Airs. Ernest 
Moft'ett : vice-regent, Airs. A. R. Bergen ; recording 
secretary, Airs. J. AI. Coddington; corresponding 
secretary, Airs. T. R. Jones ; treasurer. Airs. W . Leon 
Harned ; registrar, Mrs. John Kreger ; historian, 
Mrs. Konrad Stern: chaplain. Airs. H. A. Tappen; 
librarian. Airs. C. R. Chase. 



10 



THE PERTH AMBOY GAS UGHT CO. 



222 Smith Street 



PERTH AMBOY 



NEW JERSEY 



AS ONE OF THE 

PIONEERS 

OF THE 

STADIUM MOVEMENT 

THE 

LEADER-JOVRNAL 

EXTENDS 

ITS HEARTIEST 

CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

MEMBERS 

OF THE 

STADIUM COMMISSION 



LEADER-JOURNAL 

104 Main Street 
WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 

"PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY 
MC-RNING" 



HISTORY OF 
SCHOOL SYSTEM 
( Continued from pacjc ^ ) 
w as a]i]>nintcd high school physi- 
lal instructor. This gentleman, in 
adilition to his regular physical 
tr.aining work, organized a tine 
f(iotl)all team and a l)asehall team 
which commenced to ])la\' on tin- 
I'arish House field. .Athletics ma\' 
lie said to date from that time. 

In 1917 Physical Training in 
the schools was made compulsory 
throughout the State hy .Act of 
Legislature. Athletics all over the 
country has now come to he con- 
sidered an integral part of ever\- 
high school scheme of education. 

The tremendous growth in 
high school enrollment during the 
]>ast few years has hrought into 
tlie educational fold thousands of 
ho\s and girls who are at an age 
that demands an outlet for their 
energies such as athletics affords 
( Continued on page 7.v) 



Amboy 
Hardware 



Frigidaire 

Easy Washer 
Delco 

Oil Burners 



Supplies for 
Factories 

Plumbers 
Contractors 



313 Madison Avenue, 
PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 



Raritan Mercantile Corporation 



PERTH AMBOY 
READY MIXED CONCRETE 



SAND — GRAVEL — STONE 
MASON'S and BUILDING MATERIALS 




WOODBRIDGE FIRE COMPANY NO. 1 



The W'oodbridge Fire Company Xo. 1 was fdrni- 
ed October 28th, 1897, and the first officers were as 
follows: J. V. Freeman, president; W. S. Anness, 
financial secretary ; J. H. Leisen, treasurer ; F. J. 
Flanagan, secretary; David A. Brown, chief; John 
Thompson, assistant chief. 

The following is the list of chiefs in order of 
their terms : 



David A. Brown 
Jr)lni Thompson 
Fred A. Hughes 
C. F. Tin"ner 
R. A. Hirner 
Howard Valentine 
Lawrence Moore 
H. B. Mawbey 
B. A. Dunigan 
Otto Kath 
Frank R. \'alentine 
William I'rall 
Walter Peterson 
John Bergen 
H. C. Turner 
William (jilliam 



E. W. Sattlcr 
Peter A. Peterson 
Peter Greiner 
Leo E. Goriss 
Charles Mc Cann 
Alfred Markowsky 
Fredinand Kath 
W. Leon Harned 
Edward Melick 
\\ illiam Allgaier 
Lewis Zehrer 
Fred Mawbey 
William Messick 
James Catano 
Fred Zehrer 
Albert Hunt 



The f(]Il(iwing is the Hst nf the present officers: 
President, Charles Brown ; vice-iiresident. Leon Mc- 
Elroy ; treasurer, Ernest Hunt; recording secretary. 
William Messick; financial secretary, Edward .Satt- 
ler ; chief. Thomas F. Kath ; first assistant chief. Jolm 
Haborak ; second assistant. \\'illiam Prion. Charles 
Brown has been president of this company from 1917 
to 1936, (19 years). 



Thomas F. Kath 



SEWAREX PAR]-:XT-TEACHER 
ASSOCIATIOX 

Twelve year ago, on September 25th, 1924. twen- 
ty-two mothers and teachers of the Sewaren School 
met and formed a Parent-Teacher Association. The 
following officers were elected : President, Mrs. Char- 
les Lewis; vice-president. Miss Margaret Lockwuod; 
secretary, Aliss Grace Campljell ; treasurer. .Mrs. 
John Lahey. 

This Association has functioned continuously 
since its beginning, and. through its etYorts, has made 
possible a numlier of interesting projects wliich have 
benefitted the children, teachers, school and commun- 
ity of Sewaren. 

The present officers consist of: Mrs. Herliert 
Rankin, president ; Mrs. William Baran and Miss 
Margaret Lockwood. vice-presidents; ]\Irs. Joseph 
Skarda. secretarv and Mrs. Russel Solt, treasurer. 



12 



''AT YOUR SERVICE" 




The Beautiful New Lorraine 


Levins Sporhng Goods Co. 


Super Service Station 

LORRAINE OIL COMPANY 


ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 


Green Street and Rahway Ave. 


185 Smith Street PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 


WOODBRIDGE, N.J. 






HISTORY OF 




COMPLIMENTS OF 


SCHOOL SYSTEM 

{ Continued jrom page U ) 




HART PRODUCTS 

CORP. 


imdcr jiroper guidance. The gen- 
eral public is beginning to realize 
this and money is being voted by 
ta\i)ayers or raised in other vvay^ 
fur the construction of athletic 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

NITE- CRAFT 


helds and the liuikhng of stadi- 
ums. The demand for such provi- 


CORPORATION 




sicin in W'oodbridge Township is 




WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 


natural and no doubt the necessity 
generally admitted. 

If the ]>resent efforts to secure a 
held and stadium in the township 
dn not culminate in success, then 
it may be many years before an- 




Kalas Construction Co. 




460 New Brunswick Avenue 
FORDS NEW JERSEY 


other attempt is launched and in 
the meanwhile the thousands of 
grcjwing youth within the town- 
shi]) will be denied the privilege 
of such an addition to \\'ond- 
hridge Community life. 


A FRIEND 


< i>>ii"i.mi.:\'i's OP- 

PUBLIX DRUG STORE 

I'lH- ■■oiiilliir lt< .-<ti>iis i>r 


MICHAEL RIESZ 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 


I <i.llllU 'iiKl Dili 

95 Main St. Woodbrid?e, N. J. 




Fords Nat'l. Bank Bid?. 
Telephone 3714 FORDS N. J. 


Compliments Of 


WOOD BROOK FARM 


DAIRY PRODUCTS 


CALL METUCHEN 6-0360 



13 



HISTORY OF STADIUM AND SCHOOLS 




OFFICERS OF ISELIN FIRE COMPANY 

Officers and leading members of Fire Company No. 1 of Iselin, District Nine in the township's 
volunteer fire protection system, the shown here. In the first row, from left to right are: Albert 
Roloff, an ex-chief; Richard Roloff, assistant chief; Frank Burgisser, chief, and Andrew Sedlak, 
ex-chief. Standing are: Frank Reedy, trustee; Daniel Reynoldr., secretary; Frank Coper, president; 
Herbert Williams, former secretary, and Michael Mastrangeio, ti'ustee. Among other members of 
the company is Henry King. 



HISTORY 

OF THE 

SEWAREN REPUBLICAN CLUB 

Incorporated 

/> V Li'cv J. La Farr, Srrrrfary 

Sewaren for years had a j^rdiip i)f l(>\-al Rfpuhli- 
can leaders who "carried on" for the party practically 
as a club. It was obvious to these leaders that the 
formation of an association with regular officers was 
necessary .therefore plans were made which resulted 
in the organization of the Sewaren Republican Club 
on May 19. 1932. The object being to promote the 
interests of the Republican Party in \\'oodl)ridge 
Township generally and in Sewaren specifically. A 
meeting at this time was presided over by Mr. Char- 
les Wiswall, acting as temporary chairman, who ex- 
plained that there seemed to be the need for an or- 
ganization in Sewaren to further the interests of the 
various political candidates. It was decided to elect 
the permanent officers immediately, and Mr. D. V. 



Rush was unanimously electecl jiresident. Other offi- 
cers chosen were: Mrs. I*". J. .Xdanis. vice president; 
Mr. F. H. Turner, treasurer, and Mrs. F. J. La Farr, 
secretary. 

Rallies, card parties, dinners, P)ingii ])arties and 
all the various activities ])articipate(l in by a live po- 
litical organization have been successfully carried out. 

Regular meetings are held on the last Tuesday of 
each month except December, July and August when 
the club mav be called in session by the President. 

On December 9, 19.^.^, ])lans were completed to 
become an incorporated club and trustees were elect- 
ed as follows: NIrs. b'meline S. Keifer. Mr. H. B. 
Rankin. Mr. H .D. Clark, Mr. F .H. Turner and Mr. 
Ever Everson. 

The articles of incor])oration were signed by the 
following club members: Mr. D. V. Rush, president; 
Mrs. F .J. LaFarr, secretary. Mr. George Lufifbarry 
and Mr. John Ellems. Mr. Ernest W. Nier acted as 
witness and the acknowledgements were taken by Mr. 
F. H. Turner as Notarv Public. 



14 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

JEFFERSON MOTORS 

Oldsmobile & Chevrolet Dealers 
PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 


The Puritan Dairy Products Co. 

SPECIAL DELIVERY SERVICE 

Adclph J. Gottstein 
Phone Wdbg. 8-1565-M 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

HOLBROOK HAT COMPANY 

223 Sheridan Street PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

STERN & DRAGOSET 

INSURANCE 

Phone 8-0150 
97 Main St. 
Christensen Bidg. Woodbridge, N. J. 


COMPLIMKNTS 
OF 

SHKT.T. 



15 



IfrSToRV OF STADTl'M AND SCHOOLS 



YOUXG REI'UBLICAN CLUB OF A\"EXEL 

Four years ago on April IL 1932. Miss Helen 
Tuttle organized the Young Repuljlican Club of Av- 
enel. the first in Middlesex County. This organiza- 
ti(in. startin;^ with a small griiup of civic minded 
\i>un;.^' men and wcjmen who wished to jiromote and 
maintain the intelHijent and prcigressive princi])k-s of 
the Rei)ublican Party ; and, to sponsor men and wom- 
en best qualified fur ])ublic office in order to insure 
sound legislation and competent administration, has 
grown steadily — today it is recognized all over the 
county. Officers elected at the first meeting were : 
Miss Helen Tuttle. president; Howard Greenhalgii, 
vice-president; Herman Stern, secretary, and Char- 
les .Siessel, Jr., treasurer. 

A birthday ]jarty in the .\venel School on April 
10. 1933. with State, Cdunty and local speakers, en- 
tertainment and dancing came as a fitting climax to 
the years" activities — the first annual dance at the 
Sewaren Land and \\'ater Club ; the appointment of 
Miss Helen Tuttle and Iilalph Wheeler to the County 
Young Republican Executive Committee; the or- 
,";anization of a successful basketball team under the 
leadership of Ned I'omeroy ; and. the rallies and par- 
ties held in cooperatinn with the Avenel Parish Hous^ 
Re])ul)lican Club. 

During the second year, when Miss Helen Tuttle 
was placed on the Young Republican Campaign Com- 
mittee of the State and Ralpii Wheeler was elected 
Young Republican Ccjunty ciiairman, the club heicl 
socials for its members, card parties and its annual 
dance. It cooperated with the .\venel Parish House 
Republican Club in sponsoring a minstrel, outings, 
rallies, and in electing Republican candidates to the 
Township Committee. At Christmas toys and candv 
were distributed to the needy children of Avenel. 

Distinction was again achieved during the third 
year when Miss Audrey Bird and Herman Stern 
W'ere respectively elected vice-chairman and treasurer 
of the County ^'oung Republicans. Activities similar 
to those of the ])receding year were succesfullv s]»n\- 
sored. 

Last year, politically, was the banner vear. Mem- 
bers were recognized for their ability and given im- 
portant posts by the Third Ward Republican Organi- 
zation. Herman Stern was chairman of the Campaign 
Committee and Charles Sajl)en, jr., who had charge 
of the Third Ward Republican Outing, was secre- 
tary with Andrew Dragoset serving on the Finance 
Committee. Mrs. Helen Tuttle Rasmussen and Her- 
man Stern were respectively appointed Associate- 
Chairman and P'inance Chairman of the County 
Young Republicans. In addition to sponsoring events 
similar to those of former years, the club went on 
record as supporting the Woodbridge Township Sta- 



dium Commission, as endorsing certain qualified men 
for public office, and as opjjosing the grade crossings 
and the increase in gas rates. 

This year Mrs. Helen Tuttle Rasmussen was re- 
elected for the fifth time. Under her leadership, the 
other officers; Charles Sajben, Jr.. first vice-j^resi- 
dent ; Mrs. Dorothy Stocker. second vice-president ; 
Miss Helen Schoedler. secretary ; Alexander Kettler. 
Jr.. treasurer, and Ernest Kettler, financial secretary; 
together with the other members of the Young Re- 
publican Club of Avenel will continue the work of 
their predecessors in giving a helping hand, in pro- 
moting loyalty to the government and in supporting 
the Constitution of these United States of America. 



PRIDE OF XEW JERSEY COUNCIL NO. 243. 
SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF LIBERTY 
Pride of New Jersey Council No. 243. Sons and 
Daughters of Liberty organized on August 7th. 1929, 
with a total membership of 57 and Mr. Henry F. Nie- 
banck serving as councilor of the organization. The 
council was instituted on the above date by Mrs. Ber- 
tha Holenian who at that time was State Coiuicilor 
for the State of New Jersey. 

As the years have gone by. the council has pro- 
gressed very rapidly and has gained wide recognition 
in the State. Also at the recent State Convention it has 
had the honors of having a National Representative 
elected. This council has always been very active in 
the Township whenever called upon to ser\e fcir such 
outstanding movements such as the Stadium move- 
ment. 

It is a pleasure for this council to offer our con- 
gratulations to all concerned in making this Stadium 
drive a great success and we will, under the leadership 
of the present councilor of the organization, do all in 
our power to make this drive a success. 



ERNIE NIER REPUBLICAN CLUB 
Tlie Ernie Nier Republican Club was organized 
in the year of 1933 witii Mr. James S. Wel)b serv- 
ing as president. The club lias served in the Third 
Ward fourth polling district as an organization to 
help make the fourtli district a clean and fruitful place 
to live. When the club was first organized the mem- 
bership numbered 35 and at the present time under 
the leadership of Mr. R. Sprague the retiring presi- 
dent the membership numbers fifty. Such personal- 
ities as Mr. Webb. Mr. Thergeson, Mr. Sprague. Mr. 
C. R. Davis and Mrs. Fred Linn, the new ])resident. 
the club has worked for the benefit of the comnumity 
and will continue to do so in the future. The Ernie 
Nier Republican Club wishes tlie Stadium Commis- 
sion and those behind the drive a great deal of suc- 
cess. 



16 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

Smith Tractor & Equipment Co. 


r<'lci>li<Mi<-: « OoilIirlilBc S-ll4;l 
If ilx K<M.d l.> Km .KMl I'lni «<■( i( lu-re 

THE HY-WAY-DINER 

WM. I'AI'I'AS. I'ri.i>. 
AM, BAKIi\(; DOM-. Amboy Avenue 
ON PKEMISES IMiore lloiHl 1 

WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 


riiim,.: \\ i.ri.lui- s-177:! 

HERBERT A. SCHRIMPF 

STHKTI IIAI, STKEL null OH.X.VM EM'AI, 
lUOV \VOItK 

Converv Blvd. and Ritter Ave. 
PERTH AMBOY. N. J. 


I'lioiK-: U Ihriitm- s- 1 UT 

PETER MILANO'S SCHOOL 

STAGE and BALL ROOM DANCING 

Music Furnished For All Occasions 

AKW iinil .SKCOXn HAMJ l,\ STH I M ICM'S 

AMPl.IKIKItS mill KLKfTHIC (JIITAUS 

Fl»l« SALK <>r HE\T 

18 Main Street WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 


JOS, ANDRASCIK, Inc. 

Groceries, Meats & Vegetables 

562 St. George Ave. WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 


ABARRY IRON AND STEEL COMPANY 

980 - 1000 State Street, Perth Amboy, N. J. 

QUALITY STEEL 
Telephone for Quick Service -- PErth Amboy 4-1203 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

ALBERT LEON & SON 

PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 


JERSEY TIRE CO., Inc. 

147 New Brunswick Ave., Perth Amboy. N. J. 

I'll I'crdi \iiilM>v ^-ITT.". 177(1 

Dis'l'ltllll I'OIIS Ol- 
l\.'ll.>->l>riiiuli<'lil rir.-» - Ivi'UliKiliir It-friut-rillorn - 

\\, .,,.<■ < ...l.rs - nrn.-rN - i;i-.lrl,. \V..,lier.s - 

A|i|>liiiiii'i-s - flillt'o mill II. (. \. lliulioN . Phllvo 

l'!lll«-ri.-.N - .Vntif Hu<!ii-.s of .VII >l<ikc-» lii.itlllipd nnil 

J>frvli-»-<l Uj Kii.-dir.v Tniliipd Sfr\ let- Mru. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

SOL RUBINSTEIN 

PERTH AMBOY NEW JERSEY 



nrsT( my < )i- STADiu^r and schools 



3Rn WARD \VO:\IEX'S RKPUBLICAN CLUB 

The Third \N'ard Women's Republican Club of 
Woodhiidge Township was organized Januarj', 1934, 
at Hiram's Farm, Avenel, N. J. 

The object of this organization was to i)roniute 
Republican spirit among the women and other or- 
ganizations of the Repuljlican Party. 

Election of officers for that year were: Mrs. Lucy 
La Farr, president; four vice-presidents, Parish 
House, Mrs. Ella Linn ; Port Reading, Mrs. Florence 
Redd: Sewaren, Mrs. I'juily Kiefer : .\venel, Mrs. 
Edna Hanson; financial secretary, Mrs. Sophie 
Brookfield, Woodbridge ; recording secretary, Mrs. 
Jean Peterson, Avenel ; treasurer, Mrs. Mary Sasso, 
Port Reading. 

Mr. Herbert Rankin of Sewaren was rumiing at 
this time for Freeholder and the women of the Third 
W'ard Republican Club were behind him strong. 

Mrs. Lucy La Farr re]iresented our Club at the 
luncheon given by the United \\'omen"s Republican 
Club of Middlesex Count)' at the Hotel Woodrow 
Wilson in New Brunswick, May 10th, 1934. 

In Se])tember, 1934, the organization joined tiie 
United Women's Republican Club of Middlesex 
County. 

January 1935 election of officers for the coming 
year was held; and a large card ])art\- was planned 
ifor the club. Mrs. Lillian Ouinn being chairman. 

In March the club endorsed two bills which came 
before the Senate, Bill No. 54 - No. 205. 

In \])ri] Mr. George Miller gave a very interest- 
ing talk on Tax Sales, and endorsing Governor Hofif- 
man's Ta.x Sale. 

In May 1935, the club endorsed Mayor Greiner 
for re-election. 

In August a get-together meeting was held at 
Lliram's Farm at which time the following guests 
were present : Mayor Greiner, Committeeman Ernest 
Nier, Road Engineer Clarence Davis, Mr. Ernest 
Berger and Mr. Merrill Mosher. 

In October, 1935, a Tea was given in honor of 
Mrs. Marian Clark, running for the Assembly, and 
all candidates and their wives were invited to attend. 
Mrs. Hofifman was present to represent the Governor 
— Mrs. Theresa Holsworth, Mrs. Isele, Mrs. Martin 
and many other distinguished speakers including our 
Mayor. 

In January, 1936, new officers were elected for 
the coming year: Mrs. La Farr, president; four vice- 
preidents, Mrs. Norma Davis, Parish House; Mrs. 
Florence Redd, Port Reading ; Airs. Lillian Ouinn, 
Sewaren; Mrs. Elizabeth Berger, Avenel; recording 



secretary. Mi's. Jane Bernard, .\venel ; financial sec- 
retary, Mrs. Sophia Brookfield. Woodbridge; treas- 
urer. Miss Nicolina Lombardi. Port Reading. 

A set of resolutions were sent to the LTtility Com- 
cission and W^oodbridge Townhip Committee regard- 
ing the raising of the gas rates by the Perth Amboy 
Gas Company in the homes of the Township mem- 
bers. 

A meeting was held at Hiram's Farm at whicii our 
guest speaker was Miss Dolly Madison, National vice 
chairman of the A^oung Republican Clubs, and also 
organizer of the Young Republican Cluli of Avenel. 
Also many other prominent speakers were present. 



WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP 

BUSINESSMEN'S ASSOCIATION 

The first meeting of the businessmen of Wood- 
Tiridge was held on August 31. 1932, at the Memor- 
ial Municipal building. Lawrence F. Campion opened 
the meeting and appointed Mrs. Louis Cohen as act- 
ing secretary. Over thirty businessmen were present 
at the initial meeting. 

At the second meeting of the organization the fol- 
lowing officers were elected : President, Peter Vogel ; 
vice president, Louis Toke ; secretary, Mrs. Louis 
Cohen; treasurer, Lawrence F. Campion. 

Since its organization the business group has i^een 
very active in civic affairs. Annually it sponsors a 
Hallowe'en parade, it donates to units like the Red 
Cross and the Tuberculosis league and has been one 
of the most ardent sup]3orters of the stadium move- 
ment. Just recently the businessmen sponsored a thea- 
tre party, the entire proceeds of which was turned 
over to the Stadium Commission. Mrs. Martha Zet- 
tlemoyer was chairman of the event. 

The ])resent officers of the \\'oodbridge Townshi]) 
Businessmen's Association are: 

President, Fred G. Baldwin ; vice president, Dr. 
W. Z. Barrett; secretary. Miss Ruth Wolk; treasur- 
er, Joseph Cohen. 



18 



KELLNER BROTHERS, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

QUALITY BOLOGNA and SAUSAGES 

HAMS, BACON and LUNCH SPECIALTIES 

Elizabeth and Huntington Sts. 

PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 

ALBERT DEMCHAK CHARLES HARNED 

Tel. Perth Amboy 4-0326 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



FRANK VAN SYCKLE 



ERESOS CANDY SHOPPE 

HOMK MADK CA.MJIIOS mill UK < Ui;A>I 

WK sKiivi'; 1,1 \<iii;s 

\\ _■ l><-li»CT (u riciilcN - riir(U-« - So.-i.llpN 



Phone Woodbridge 8-0020 

El Sparr Spring Beverages 



68 MAIN STREET 
riiii.ii 



WOODBRIDGE 



292 Smith Street 



WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 



WOODBRIDGE HARDWARE CO. 

KELVINATORS 

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS PAINT 

74 Main Street WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 

A\ ooillM-iilui- ,S-0(l!»l! 



WARR COAL & SUPPLY CO. 



(nil For Oiir S.ic.illl Ulll.-s 
'l'|.|. \\ .>,>.ll,ri,l::c S-I(r.)<l 

EAK TRUCKING CO. 

Stone, Sand, Gravel, Cinders 

and Excavating 

447 Amboy Avenue 

WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 

SUNNYSIDE MARKET 

PRIME MEATS & POULTRY 
98 Main Street 
WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 
rt-li-iiiioiii-: ^\ iMMii.riiiui- s-i':t!io 

(. K \l l'1IA.\, I'r.ii.. 

ALEXANDER TOBIAS 

DRY GOODS — NOTIONS 

Shoes and Haberdashery 

FORDS, N. J. 

THOMPSON'S, Inc. 

I'l.omsrs 

73 Main St. Woodbridge, N. J. 

'IVIcpliiiii-: W iiiiilliriiliit' S-IHIS7 

L. B. GRAND 

."ic 10c TO $L00 STORES 

8.5 Alain Street 

WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 



JOHN J. BITTING 

"BLUE COAL" 
33 Main St. Woodbridge, N. J. 



■Ii'li- <■: W oi.ill.ri.lm- S-O.-.O." 

SERVICE HARDWARE CO. 

Hardware. Paints.- Oils & Glass 

SI l'i"i,li:s i-oit 

Plumbers, Factories & Contractors 

— \\V: MAKI-. Ki;^s — 

81 Main St. Woodbridge, N. J. 



'l'cl<-|ilu>ii<- \\ iioillirlilKi- s-I|:E!I 

ANNA FEIERTAG 

GROCERY & MEAT MARKET 

97 Woodbridge Avenue 

SEWAREN, N. J. 



RAYMOND JACKSON 

DRUGGIST 
WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 



iK'iii-. W ooillirlilKc s-ir^l!) 

Hackett's Service Station 
orioN i>\^ mill M<;iri' 

.(iiiiiliiril Ai-i-i>iiiilN Ai'i'i-iiti-il Urn 

Super Highway No. 25, 

A I ViiMirl SIreol 

AVENEL. N. J. 
19 



ANDREW KATH 

GROCERIES & VEGETABLES 

60 Woodbridge Avenue 

SEWAREN, N. J. 

riiciHs: •«■ ii.iKijre s-l:;4(i— s-i:;4l. 

Christensen's Dept. Store 

"A SAFE PLACE TO BUY" 

97 Main St. Woodbridge, N. J. 

Phone 8-0084 

l-hoiii.: \\ ■•iiilliriilKr s-Mli:: 

E. NIELSEN 

Painting, Decorating and 

Paperhanging 

IIOI siO SI'U X'i IMi 

l<:>liiiiii(rN <:iiiiM:i (;i\rii 

145 Avenel St. AVENEL, N. J. 



Szorko Tavern 

304 Fulton Street 
WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 

Tel. 8-0065 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
FRANK RACZ 

303 Fulton Street 
CAFE WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 



We Want The Stadium 




-^ ^s^ 



CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH 

HEADQUARTERS 

The GROSS Boys 

(m:\ik»\ui> s\i.i;s < «(hi'.( 

"ALWAYS ON THE GO" 

688 New Brunswick Avenue FORDS, N. J. 

437 Amboy Avenue at Washington Street 

PERTH AMBOY. N. J. 

iMiuiifs: 1*. \. 4-<>r,(m — (»r.oi 


Telephone 8-0741 JOHN ALMASI, Prop. 

JOHN ALMASI TRUCKING CO. 

GENERAL TRUCKING & EXCAVATING 

CINDERS, GRAVEL and SAND 
298 Main Street WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 


MAYOR 
A. F. GREINER 


ROBBINS-RANKIN LUMBER CO. 

412 Johnstone Street 
PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 

Telephone: 4-0637 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

IRVING DRESS CO. 

309 Fulton Street WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 


L BRIEGS & SONS 

CLOTHIERS 

PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 


WOODBRIDGE FLOWER SHOP 

Railway and Crampton Avenues 

WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 

Tel. 8-1222 F. T. D. MEMBER 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 


JOHNSON & DEALAMAN, Inc. 

CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 

60 Marshall Street NEWARK, N. J. 


ROBINS INN 

187 Amboy Avenue 
WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 


TUREK'S TAVERN 

BEER - WINE - LIQUORS 

BOAT - DOCK SERVICE 

Cliff Road SEWAREN, N. J. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

A FRIEND 


ALDERNEY DAIRY COMPANY 

965 West Grand Street 
ELIZABETH, N. J. 

MILK ICE CREAM 

Elizabeth 2-5754 



Perth Amboy 4-1320 

JOSEPH CHRIST, JR. & CO. 

JERSEY'S LARGEST CREDIT CLOTHIERS 

$1.00 A Week Will Clothe The Family 
161 Smith Street PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

EUGENE SCHREINER 

GROCER and BUTCHER 
55 Cutter's Lane WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

VULCAN DETINNING CO. 

SEWAREN NEW JERSEY 

LOUIS BANKS' 

MUNICIPAL SERVICE STATION 

WASHING - GREASING - STORAGE 

TIRES - TUBES 

10-12 Main Street and 30 Amboy Ave. 

WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 



J. BLAKE 

STATIONERY 
100 Main St. Woodbridge, N. J. 



DRAKE'S 

ST a'I'iom;io - «;iti:i:i'i\<; ( \iti)s 
iiikI i>\ri:\r iiiodk i \ los 

i:sliil>lislM-il SiiK't' IS70 
58 Main St. Woodbridge, N- J. 

\\<ti><lliri<m<- S-l'l.-.ll 



Fords Hardware Co., inc. 

HARDWARE and PAINTS 
511 New Brunswick Ave. 
FORDS, NEW JERSEY 

< t(>ii'i,i>ii;\'i's oi' 
MIDDLESEX BARREL CO. 

Convery Blvd. 
PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 

IS AIXMt "KV S \>ll Kl, 111:1 



riK^iii-: IN'i'th \iiili<>> 4-4:;s.~> 

AMBOY PAPER & SUPPLY 

COMPANY, Inc. 

597 New Brunswick Avenue 

PERTH AMBOY. N. J. 

RARITAN GLASS CO. 

<;i. \ss < oNi'it \< 'I'oits 

419 New Brunswick Ave. 

PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 

Tel. 4-14-4S 



'i'(.|<':iiii>ii<. s-iii.'7 

D. J. RYAN CO., Inc. 
II vitnw VKio - 1*1,1 >iiti><; - i> \i\'i' 

(lil.N mill I'. Mist- l'rl■i^.llill^s 
45 Main St. Woodbridge, N. J. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

IRA R. CROUSE 
LUMBER CO. 



JASPER BROS. 

■I'.-l. \\ ••■Mlliriilur s-l'.!.-,l- 
96 Main St. Woodbridge, N. J. 

( <nii'i.nii;N IS ok 
MIDDLESEX TAVERN 

.iosi':iMi <; \|. \ii> \. i>ro|i. 

Main Street and Amboy Ave. 

WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 

BUSY BEE MARKET 

MEATS - poultry" 

VEGETABLES 

87 Main St. Woodbridge, N. J. 

W Oixlliriilm- s-i>7:t!) 

ACME STUDIO 



163-165 Market Street 
PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 



( ii>iiM,i >ii':\'i's OI' 
NORWOOD TIRE CO. 

PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 

\ <iiM>il Fri-iiil . \n iIoiii-nI >I tTclinii I 

L. R. PETOLETTI 

"YOUR DRUGGIST" 
ISELIN NEW JERSEY 



Phone Perth Amboy 4-2887 

Lund's Service Station 

RADIOS - BATTERIES - TIRES 

and ACCESSORIES 

555 New Brunswick Ave 

FORDS, N. J. 



JOSEPH MAYER 

245 Fulton Street 
WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 



OFFICE: 447 PEARL STREET 

WOODBRIDGE TAXI 
And YELLOW CAB 

8-0200 



COLLEGE TOWN 

FOOD STORE 

Groceries - Meats - Vegetables 

iM,-<;ooi>-'i'iii\<is-'ro-i': vr 

Oak Tree Road ISELIN, N. J. 
i>. \Mti:ii. 1 11. 



THE ISELIN 5 & 10c 
and HARDWARE STORE 

Dry Goods - Shoes - Crockery 

Paints & House Furnishing 

Oak Tree Road ISELIN, N. J. 



Tel. MEtuchen 6-0309-J 

COOPER'S DAIRY 

r. i:. < «>ori;it, rr<>i>. 

PURE MILK FROM OUR OWN 
TUBERCULIN TESTED COWS 



1)I:LI\ KISKD DAILV 



Middlesex Ave. 



ISELIN, N. J. 



MORRIS MEAT MARKET 

HIGH-GRADE MEATS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES 

GROCERIES 
Phone Metuchen 6-1344 ISELIN, N. J. 

\\ ii<Mll>rl<lKc s-(Hi.-.4-.l 

WILLIAM KUZMIAK 

EVERYTHING IN DRY GOODS & NOTIONS 

A LITTLIO |i101'.\I:TMI:.\T .STlll;i:' 
85 Avenel Street AVENEL, N. J. 














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