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Full text of "History of Wyoming"

Gc M. L. 

978.7 
B285h 
V.2 
1698217 



REYNOLDS f-n.^—rRicAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



/ 



3 1833 01066 8983 



HISTORY 



OF 



WYOMING 




ib..AJ.± k 



J^OLUME II 

CHICAGO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1918 



1698217 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



JOSEPH MAULL CAREY. 

Hon. Joseph Maull Carey has been identified with the development of Wy- 
oming from pioneer times and has left and \\ill leave the impress (if liis ability 
and individuality indelilily upon the history of the state. In whatrwr .aiLuity he 
has acted since arri\ int^ m \\ ydming he has done his work well ; i-]ie(i:ill\ may we 
in this respect consider his ser\ ices as United States attorney. United Stales terri- 
torial judge, mayor of Cheyenne, member of congress, United States senator and 
governor of the state of Wyoming. 

He is a descendent of English and Scotch families who arrived in America 
during an early period of the colonization of the new world. His grandfather, 
Joseph Carey, who married Margaret, the daughter of Robert Hood, was en- 
gaged in agricultural and business pursuits all his life and passed away at IMilton, 
Delaware, in 1838 and was buried at St. I leorges' Chapel, one of the oldest 
Episcopal churches on the Delaware peninsula. 

His father, Robert Hniul Carey, the son of Joseph and Margaret (Hood) 
Carey was born in Miltim, Delaware, in 1811 and followed all liis manhood, 
mercantile and agricultural pursuits. He died in 1891 in the same house in which 
he had been born eighty years before. His wife was Susan Pitt Davis, daughter 
of Robert Davis, born in 1813 and died in 18S1. They are buried in the Carey 
lot in the Methodist Churchyard Cemetery at Milton, Delaware. 

Joseph M. Carey, the subject of this sketch was born on January in, 1843, at 
Milton, Delaware, and was the third son in a family of five boys and two girls. 
He pursued his education in public and private schools and in teaching a country 
school. He entered the Port Edward Collegiate Institute at Fort Edward, New 
York and afterwards attended Union College, Schenectady, New York, remaining 
there until the end of his sophomore year in 1865. He was made honorary 
chancellor of that college in 1804 and with the honor came the degree of Doctor 
of Laws. Mr. Carey became a citizen of Pennsylvania in iS(i3, ininiediately 
taking up the study of law in the office of B. F. Temple, of I'liiladclphia, after- 
wards continuing his studies in the same city under the direction of W. L. Dennis 
and Henry Flanders. He matriculated at the same time in the law department of 
the University of Pennsylvania from which he was a graduate with the class of 
1867. He located immediately for the practice of his profession in Philadelphia. 

In 1866, 'Sir. Carey made political speeches in PennsyKania. first .^peaking 
at Reading, Pennsylvania, with Governor Geary then making a can\ass for his 
second election for governor of that state. That year Air. Carey cast his first 
vote. In 1868, under the direction of the chairman of the republican state com- 
mittee of x\'ew Jersey, Mr, Carey spoke in many towns in Xew Jersey. 

In 1869, when \\'ynming was organized as a territory, Mr. Carey was appointed 
the first United St.ites .ittdrnt}- for the newly created territory. In 1872, when 
he was less than t\\eni\ -eight years of age, he was appointed by President 
Grant an associate justice of the supreme court of the territory. He retired 
from judicial office and the practice of law in 1876, ha\ing, however, in the 
meantime made a most excellent record upon the bench by the fairness and impar- 
tiality of his decisions, which were liased upon a comprehensive knowledge of 
the principles of jurisprudence and ability to accurately apply those principles. 



6 HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 

He was present and took part in all the details of the organization of the 
new government of \\'yoniing territory as provided for by the act of congress. 
After the counties were organized he was employed by the several county gov- 
ernments, where county attorneys had not been elected, to prosecute all territorial 
cases arising in such counties during the first year of the territorial government. 

He early realized the resources of Wyoming and was one of the leaders 
in the development of live stock raising in this section of the country. In the 
undertaking he became associated with his brother, R. Davis Carey, of Phila- 
delphia, and later his brother. Dr. John F. Carey, in business in Wyoming. 
Subsequently he bought out the interests of his brothers. 

In 1885 he originated and helped to organize the Wyoming Development 
Company for the reclamation of lands between the Sybille and Laramie rivers 
and Chugwater creek in the then Laramie county, of which compan}- he was 
elected president, and later he became the president of the Wheatland Industrial 
Company, all of which has contributed to the settlement of what is known as 
the Wheatland Colony. This colony is perhaps the best object lesson of what 
can be done through irrigation for the development of the arid lands in Wyo- 
ming. The firm of J. M. Carey & Bro., subsequently the corporation of J. M. 
Carey & Bro., has led to substantial progress and improvement of this state 
as well as to the building of a great business. They erected some of the best 
blocks in Cheyenne and the city's progress is attributable in no small measure 
to their efforts. 

He was present and participated in all the early meetings of the Wyoming 
Live Stock Association. He was for a number of years president of the asso- 
ciation. This association became the greatest organization of its kind in the 
world. At one time it had a membership representing fully $200,000,000.00 
investments in the business. It became active not only in Wyoming but also 
in the adjoining states of Colorado and Nebraska and in the territories of Utah, 
Idaho, IMontana and Dakota. This association has continued to grow, and the 
great business it today carries on for the protection of those interested in the 
live stock business can only be comprehended by an examination of its records. 

At the same time, Mr. Carey continued a most active and helpful factor in 
public life. In 1880 he was chosen mayor of Cheyenne and continued in this 
office for three terms, making a record by the prompt, efficient and business-like 
manner in which he discharged his duties. Among other things, he secured 
legislation, notwithstanding great opposition, to build a residence water and 
sewer system for Cheyenne. He secured the cooperation of the then three 
banks of Cheyenne to carry the indebtedness of the city until he could dispose 
of the bonds with friends in the east. 

In 1884 he was elected delegate to the Forty-ninth Congress, and he served 
in this capacity also in the Fiftieth and Fifty-first Congresses. In 1890 he was 
elected the first United States senator, which position he held until 1895. It 
was Mr. Carey who wrote the bill and the report thereon for the admission of 
Wyoming as a state in the Fiftieth Congress. In this work he had the continual 
support of the people of the territorv. He procured for the state much legisla- 
tion during his service in the United States house of representatives and senate. 
That of first importance was the passage of the bill for the admission of Wyo- 
ming as a state, and second, the law since known as the "Carey Act." under 
which so much has been accomplished, notablv in Idaho, Colorado. Montana 
and Wyoming. This law. since in active operation, has contributed in a marked 
measure to the development of great irrigation work in the states enumerated, 
and the reclamation of large acreages in each of these states. He also secured 
legislation for the erection of government buildings at the capitals of ^^'voming, 
Idaho and Nevada. He secured the necessary legislation for the establishment 
of all the land offices of this state except those at Cheyenne and Evanston, notably 
at Douglas. Sundance. Buffalo and Lander. He procured much other land 
legislation. 

Mr. Carey represented the territory and state of \\'yoming for twenty years 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 7 

on the republican national committee. He was commissioner of the territory 
of \\'yommg at the World's Fair held at i'hiladelphia, 1876. Mr. Carey was 
governor of the state of Wyoming for the term commencing January i, 191 1, 
and ending 191 5. During his term as governor there was a great deal of impor- 
tant legislation enacted and the manner in which he discharged the duties of the 
office was thoroughly appreciated by the people of Wyoming. He especially 
took an interest in the penal and charitable institutions and for the impi-ovement 
of the condition of the inmates of these institutions. He exercised his parole 
and pardon powers as, it is said, no preceding governor had done. 

He used the veto power to curb unnecessary laws and appropriations, yet 
there was more satisfactory legislation to the people during his term than during 
any other like period. He was asked to run again for governor or to become 
a candidate for United States senator. He declined to let his name be used 
again in connection with either position, saying, "There are many others in the 
state who are entitled to consideration," and that it was not necessary that 
anyone should be contiiuied in office all the time and that there was no man 
whose position could not be filled. 

On the 27th of September, 1877, Governor Carey was united in marriage 
to Miss Louisa David, of Dubuque, Iowa, whose people had become residents 
of Cheyenne in 1876. Her father, Edward C. David, was surveyor general 
of the territory of Wyoming. Two children were born of his marriage : Rob- 
ert Davis and Charles David Carey. The elder is a graduate of Yale University 
of the class of 1900 and is now at Careyhurst, being manager of the cattle 
interests of J. :\I. Carey & Bro. The younger son was also educated at Yale in 
the Sheffield course and lives at Cheyenne. Both of the sons have homes in 
Wyoming but are largely -interested financially with their father in the cor- 
poration of J. M. Carey & Brother. 

W^ell descended and well bred. Joseph M. Carey in his active life record 
has reflected credit upon the family name. Nature endowed him with keen 
sagacity and intellectual force, and with the passing years he has wisely utilized 
his time, his talents and his opportuifities. The steps in his orderly progression 
are easily discernible. He early proved himself an able lawyer and learned 
judge and he becajne one of the builders of the Western Empire. An eminent 
American citizen has said : "In all this world, the thing supremely worth having 
is the opportunity coupled with the capacity to do well and worthily a piece of 
work, the doing of which shall be nf \ital sjonificance to mankind." The oppor- 
tunity came to Mr. Carey and the lapacitv was his. The combination has 
resulted most beneficially for Wyoming and the outcome of his efforts has 
been a most tangible factor in molding the material development and the political 
history of the state. 

He may be truly called "the grand old man of Wyoming." 



DON L. WAKEMAN. 



Don L. Wakeman, engaged in the practice of law at Gillette, was the first 
white child born in what is now Crook, Weston and Campbell counties and was 
ushered into this world near Beulah, Crook county, July 30. 1882, a son of 
tdgar C. and Frances (Mulholland) Wakeman. The father was a native of 
Wisconsin and the mother of Oregon and they were married in South Dakota. 
They became residents of W^yoming in the year 1879 residing continuously in 
Crook county engaging in ranching arid stockraising. The mother departed 
this life in 1910 but the father is still living near ^loorcroft at this time. To 
this union two sons were born : Don L. Wakeman and Edgar E. ^^'akeman, 
now associated together as the well known law firm of \\'akeman & \\"akeman, 
of Gillette, Wyoming. 

Don L. Wakeman, the elder son, has spent practically all his life in Wyoming, 



8 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

remaining upon the father's ranch during his boyhood and youth. After acquir- 
ing a pubhc school education he pursued his school work at the State Normal 
School at Spearfish. South Dakota, later graduated from the Business College 
at Grand Island, Nebraska, and ultimately entered upon the study of law grad- 
uating in 1904 with degree of LL. B., being admitted to practice in this state in 
1906. This same year he opened an office for the practice of law at Newcastle, 
Wyoming, where he remained for about a year and then moved to Gillette, where 
he has since resided. He has continuously followed his profession and by dili- 
gence and perseverance has built up a large practice gaining the reputation of 
being one of the leading lawyers in northeastern Wyoming. He has also, in 
association with his father and brother, large ranch interests near Moorcroft in 
Crook county, Wyoming. 

In 1906 ■Mr. \\'akeman was united in marriage to Miss Maud Pearson, a 
native of South Dakota, to which union ha\e been born four children, Don L., 
David Neil, Harold E., and Ruth Frances. 

Both parents are members of the Episcopal church, and thev are held in high 
esteem by their many friends and acquaintances. 

Mr. Wakeman is an independent in politics and is now serving on his second 
term as county attorney of Campbell county. Prior to taking this office, he was 
United States commissioner for eight years. He is also deeply interested in 
educational affairs having served for several years on the local school board and 
to his untiring eft'orts is due, in a large measure, the effectiveness and advance- 
ment of the public school system in his locality. 

Mr. Wakeman"s political and professional duties have ever been discharged 
with marked capability and fairness and he is highly regarded both as a man and 
a citizen throughout the state. By reason of what he has accomplished in pro- 
fessional circles and his unswerving loyalty to his home community and state 
he is generally considered one of the prominent men of this state. 



HON. JOHN E. OSBORNE. 

Hon. John E. Osborne, who was governor of \\'yoming and was appointed 
assistant secretary of state of the United States by President Wilson, is now 
concentrating his eft'orts and attention upon important business interests in 
Rawlins. 

He was born in Essex county. New York. He attended the public schools 
of New York and afterward became a student in the University of \'ermont, 
from which he was graduated on the completion of a medical course. Attracted 
by the opportunities of the growing west, he made his way to Rawlins in the 
early '80s and entered upon practice as a surgeon for the Union Pacific Railroad 
Company. He also became interested in sheep raising and banking and now 
owns much valuable real estate in Wyoming, including buildings and lands. He 
organized and is president of the Osborne Block Realty Company, which owns 
the Osborne building and the Miller block, two of the largest business and office 
buildings in Rawlins. 

Gifted by nature for leadership. Mr. Osborne had been a resident of Wyoming 
for only a brief period before he became a prominent factor in the public life 
of the community, and three years after his arrival in Rawlins was elected as 
the second mayor of the city and occupied that position for two terms. In 
1892 he was chosen governor of Wyoming and in 1896 further political honors 
were accorded him in his election to congress. He was appointed by Governor 
Moonlight chairman of the penitentiary building commission at the time of the 
erection of the present penal institution at Rawlins. In 1913 he was appointed 
the first assistant secretary of state of the United States and served during Presi- 
dent Wilson's first administration, after which he found it necessary to tender 
his resignation on account of failing health. Before his removal to Washington 




(S^ 



T 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 11 

to assume the duties of the office he assisted in organizing and became president 
of the Rawlins National Bank, which position he resigned to take up his abode 
in the national capital. After his return to Rawlins he became the first vice 
president of the bank and is thus connected with the institution at the present 
time. He aided in organizing the Stockman's State Bank of Medicine Bow, of 
which he is a director, and he was also recently elected a director of the Citizens 
National Bank of Cheyenne. Largely interested in sheep raising, he is president 
of the Osborne Live Stock Company, operating most extensively in connection 
with that industry in Wyoming. He is heavily interested in real estate and his 
judicious investments have placed him among the capitalists of Wyoming. 

In 1907 Governor Osborne was united in marriage to Miss Selina Smith a 
native of Kentucky and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John P. Smith, who were 
also born in that state. Governor and Mrs. Osborne have one child, a daughter, 
Jean Curtis, who was born in Kentucky, December 6, 1908. Their home is one 
of the most beautiful and substantial residences in Rawlins. 

In Masonic circles Mr. Osborne is well known, having taken the degrees of 
lodge, chapter, council and commandery, and he is also a member of Korein 
Temple. A. A. O. N. M. S. He likewise has membership with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. He has traveled extensively, making trips to foreign 
lands, and in all sections of the globe he has collected rare curios and works 
of art. He has been especially interested in ancient Egyptian relics and in addition 
to his fine collection of that character he has many curios obtained in his own 
state. 



JOHN MILLIKEN. 



John Milliken, conducting a transfer, livery and automobile business at 
Hanna, was born in County Down, Ireland, February 2^, 1854, a son of William 
Milliken, a representative of an old family of County Down, who became a 
Presbyterian clergyman and spent his entire life in his native country. He 
wedded Mary Boyd, also a native of County Down, and she, too, remained a 
resident of the Emerald isle until called to the home beyond. She became the 
mother of a large family and four of the children are still living. 

John Milliken was educated in the schools of his native county and in the 
night schools of Carbon, Wyoming, where he took up his abode on coming to 
America in the fall of 1874, when a young man of about twenty years. Before 
he crossed' the Atlantic he had been employed in the coal mines of Scotland 
and on coming to the new world he thoroughly understood the work of mining 
and sought the opportunities ofifered in the mining districts of the west. He 
obtained employment along that line in Carbon county, Wyoming, and continued 
to devote his attention to mining until 1880. He then entered the hotel and 
saloon business and also engaged in dealing in horses. He made five trips 
overland in 1880 from Nezperce, Idaho, — trips that were full of hazardous and 
trying ordeals. He and his associates purchased horses from the Xez Perce 
Indians and on reaching cities of any size would sell what they could and 
then continue their journey. Mr. Milliken made drives of this kind with Frank 
Herzel, who was in the same business. Mr. Milliken continued his travels as 
far east as Montgomery, Alabama, and sold and handled upwards of ten thousand 
hcnses. In 1914 Mr. ^Iilliken entered his present line of business, in which he 
has since liecn actively and continuously engaged. He has a transfer, livery and 
auto business and he is also engaged in raising horses, in addition to which he 
conducts a ranch of one hundred and sixty acres in Carbon county, having 
secured this as a homestead claim during the '70s. Llis l)usiness affairs are care- 
fully and wisely directed and are bringing to him a substantial measure of profit. 

In 1882 Mr. Milliken was united in marriage to Miss Hannah Sutton, a native 
of England, who was brought to America in her infancy by her parents, who 
took up their abode in Illinois and afterward removed to Carbon, ^^'yoming, 



12 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

where they were pioneer residents. The father is now a resident of Sutton. 
Nine children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. MiUiken : !Mary, who is the wife 
of Oscar Peterson, of Kemmerer; William S., who is head clerk in the Union 
Pacific Coal office at Hanna ; Annie, who is the wife of Qiarles Gibbons, of 
Bangs, Wyoming; Marguerite, the wife of E. F. Hill, a registered pharmacist 
living at Grace, Idaho ; Robert, who is Jissociated with his father in the transfer 
business ; Agnes ; James ; John ; and Dorothy. 

Politically Mr. jMilliken is a stanch republican and has filled the office of 
road supervisor for six years, his term ending in December, 1916. He has ever 
taken an active interest in politics and keeps thoroughly informed concerning the 
vital questions and issues of the day. He belongs to the Masonic lodge, to the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and to the Presbyterian church and is loyal 
to the teachings and purposes of these organizations. His life has been well spent 
and he is greatly esteemed by all who know him. He came to America a poor 
boy but he possessed the substantial qualities of perseverance and adaptability 
end he has used his time wisely and well, so that as the years have gone on he 
has gained for himself a substantial place among the representative residents of 
Carbon county. 



HON. HENRY GORDON BALCH. 

Hon. Henry Gordon Balch was recognized as one of the foremost men of 
Wyoming of his day. He had much to do with the upbuilding and development 
of the state, where for a quarter of a century his enterprise, his progressiveness 
and his energy contributed largely to the material advancement of the state. 
He was born September 15, 1853, in Dedham, Massachusetts, a descendant of 
one of the prominent old New England families whose identification with that 
section of the country dates back to early colonial days. His parents were Joseph 
and ]Maria (Hallet) Balch. The father was for years the president of the 
Boylston Insurance Company and was well known in financial and business 
circles in Boston. He reared an excellent family, among his sons being Dr. 
Franklin Balch, an eminent member of the medical profession; George Hallet, 
who succeeded his father as the president of the Boylston Insurance Company 
and so remained until the company liquidated ; Joseph, a prominent broker of 
Boston ; and Henry Gordon. 

The last named was educated at Roxbury Latin School, and owing to bron- 
chial trouble, from which he suft'ered in young manhood, he came west on the 
advice of the family physician, who believed that a higher altitude would prove 
beneficial, as the result proved. In 1876 Mr. Balch arrived in Albany county 
and the following year was joined by his boyhood companion, D. C. Bacon. 
They entered into business relations together with J. M. Carey, later governor 
of Wyoming. They embarked in the cattle business on the ranch long known 
as the Riverside, and being independent and full of energy, the two young men 
bought out Mr. Carey's interest and continued their operations in stock alone. 
They readily adapted themselves to the business and with genuine Yankee shrewd- 
ness' introduced new methods of management that proved highly successful. From 
the beginning they prospered and extended their interests as the large means 
which were available to them readily permitted. They acquired other ranches 
and herds of cattle in Montana. In 1888 they divided their ranch and stock 
interests, Mr. Bacon taking the Riverside ranch and Mr._ Balch the Montana 
property. The latter went to Billings. Montana, and remained there for a time 
and later removed to Salt Lake, where he lived for about one year. He and 
his friend, Mr. Bacon, were the prime movers in the organization of the Laramie 
National Bank in 1881, Mr. Balch becoming the president of the bank upon its 
organization. In 1895 this institution was consolidated with the Wyoming Na- 
tional Bank, the combination becoming the First National Bank of Laramie, of 







i/lAAA.^ 





HISTORY OF WYOMING 15 

which Mr. Balch became the first president and continued its executive head 
to the time of his death. He had also become interested in banking in Salt Lake, 
where he established the Commercial National Bank, now the Continental Na- 
tional Bank of that city. He was extensively interested likewise in the First 
National Bank of Rock Springs, Wyoming, and at one time was president of 
all three of these associated banks. As he became absorbed in the banking 
business he gradually ceased his active operations in the stock industry, although 
to the last he had many interests in that line, as he had in various other business 
enterprises. In fact, Mr. Balch at the time of his death was so extensively 
interested in many business projects that his sudden demise distinctly disturbed 
the business affairs of the city and county more than had ever previously been 
felt in Laramie by the death of an individual. Among his varied interests, he 
was president of the Rock Springs Coal Company, with which he had been 
connected from its inception. 

Mr. Balch died at his residence on Thornburg street in Laramie, February 
3, igoi. For several months he had not been feeling well but he never com- 
plained, for it was not his nature to do so. The labors of the legislative session, 
following upon the many days of work on the board of county commissioners 
closing up his term of office as chairman of the board, an arduous trip to the 
state institutions and to Salt Lake, with its legislative excursions, and finally 
a severe cold contracted in Cheyenne, these were the conditions that led up to 
the fatal illness of ^Ir. Balch. On the day of his burial all the business houses 
and public schools of the city were closed in respect to his memory. It was a 
public funeral because Mr. Balch was a public man, and there was so great a 
desire among all the people to express their sorrow through attendance at the 
funeral that the preference of the family for privacy at this moment was put 
aside. Both houses of the state legislature adjourned on that day and, with 
Governor De Forest Richard, came to Laramie in a body to pay their respect 
for the last time to an honored fellow member. 

Although ^Ir. Balch disliked political activity, he nevertheless answered the 
call of the people when it came and he served with honor and distinction in 
every position in which the voice of the people placed him. He served as county 
commissioner for two terms in the '80s and again was chosen to that position 
in 1898. As chairman of the board he was fearless and energetic to a degree 
that was realized by only such persons as came in contact with him in his official 
capacity. He felt that it was his duty to give his county the best service that 
he was capable of doing and to administer public affairs with the same care- 
fulness that he managed his own 'interests. He was never afraid to do what 
he thought was right and even felt a pride in the momentary antagonism he some- 
times created by his firmness in dealing with matters of taxation and other 
things of vital importance to the community. He had the courage of his con- 
victions, and it was said of him by an intimate friend of twenty-five years' 
acquaintance, "You always know exactly where to find H. G. Balch." 

In the old territo'rial legislature Mr. Balch served for one term with credit. 
He was elected to the state senate in the fall of 1900. He did not want the 
office but consented to become a candidate because he thought it was his duty. 
In the senate he was regarded as an authority on finance and county afifairs and 
was looked upon with respect and admiration and personal liking by all his 
associates in the legislature. In politics he was ever a stanch repulilican. Not- 
withstanding his very retiring nature, Mr. Balch made hosts of friends and these 
he had "grappled to his heart with hoops of steel." In his friendship and even 
in his acquaintance he was, as in his business, faithful, honest and true. Prob- 
ably no man of his time had more personal friends than Mr. Balch. His 
kindness of heart was often in evidence by acts of generosity that were known 
only by the recipient. His fine rearing was ever in evidence. He never paraded 
it, but he could not hide it. He was the same wherever you found him, and 
respect was instinctively given him. He was fond of whist and at the time of 
his death was president of the Laramie Whist Club. 



16 HISTORY OF \\'YO.AlIXG 

Bishop Talbot said of Mr. Balch, that while he was not a church man, yet 
he was as much of a Christian man as it was possible to be. At the time of his 
death the Laramie Republican said of him editorially: "One of the foremost 
men of the state has been removed. For twenty-five years the life of Henry G. 
Balch was devoted to the material progress of \\'yoming. As a ranchman he 
studied improved methods and achieved success beneficial alike to himself and 
his fellows. As business man and banker he was courteous, obliging and just; 
as public official he was incorruptible, painstaking, energetic, thoughtful, the 
interests of the public being guarded with even greater fidelity than his own. 
As friend, companion, adviser, husband, father, he was a charming, lovable man. 
The entire commonwealth mourns the loss of a great man." 

In St. Matthew's Episcopal church in Laramie on the 15th of January, 1889, 
Bishop Talbot performed the marriage ceremony of Mr. Balch and Mrs. Alfred 
\\'. Crandell, formerly Harriett Emily Crowe, a native of Troy, New York, 
and a daughter of Levi and Anna ( Charlesworth) Crowe, both of whom were 
natives of England. ]\Irs. Crandell came to Laramie in ^87, her husband being 
connected with the Union Pacific Railroad to the time of his death, at which 
he left two daughters, Anna Charlesworth and Ethel Mercelia, the former resid- 
ing in Laramie with her mother, while the latter is the wife of Dr. James Allan 
Ballard, formerly of Hay ward, Wisconsin, but now a lieutenant in the United 
States Medical Corps, doing duty in France. To Mr. and Mrs. Balch were born 
a son and a daughter, twins, Gordon Henry and Marjory Hallet. The son was 
graduated from Harvard with the class of 19 12 and was for some time private 
secretary to Lars Anderson, L'nited States minister at Brussels, Belgium, but 
not liking the diplomatic service, he became connected with the Boston banking 
house of Stone & Webster in the security department. He is now a lieutenant 
in the hydro-aeroplane service of the United States navy. He had been actively 
interested in aviation for some time prior to joining that branch of the service. 
The daughter, Marjory Hallet, was educated in ^Irs. MacDuffie's School in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, after which she traveled around the world with her 
mother and subsequently gave her services to the Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital in preparation for Red Cross work. She was married at Jamaica Plains, 
Boston, October 20, 1917, to John Earl Cunningham, of Baltimore, a graduate 
of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who for one and one-half years 
was in France, serving as an ambulance driver. He is now connected with the 
great shipbuilding project at Hog Island, New Jersey. 

Mrs. Balch, a most estimable lady, has since her husband's death spent a 
number of years in the east, covering the period of her son's and daughter's 
educational training, and later she tra\-eled in various countries and around the 
world. She now resides in Laramie. 



HOX. JOHN L. BAIRD. 

In many ways Hon. John L. Baird has left the impress of his individuality 
upon the history of ^\'yoming. Not only has he served as treasurer of the state, 
but has been connected with various business interests which have had to do 
with its material development and upbuilding and he has been an active factor 
in advancing legislation highly beneficial to the commonwealth. He is now 
president of the First National' Bank of Newcastle and is a prominent stockman. 

He was born in Lafayette county, Wisconsin, on the 12th of October, 1857. 
and is a son of John F. and Amanda J. (Criss) Baird. He was educated in the 
public schools of his native countv and in the State Normal School at Platteville, 
Wisconsin, being thus accorded liberal educational opportunities which well qual- 
ified him for life's practical duties and responsibilities. He was reared to farm 
life, early becoming familiar with the labors that fall to the lot of the agricul- 
turist, and in 1876 he left the middle west for the Black Hills, locating at Dead- 



HISTORY OF \\'YOMING 19 

wood. South Dakota, where he served as a clerk in a mercantile establishment for 
two years. On the expiration of that period he developed a telephone system 
in the Black Hills, with which he was identified until 1884, when he came to 
Wyoming, settling at Sundance. There he concentrated his efforts and attention 
upon stock raising and ranching and in 18S8 he established himself in the mer- 
cantile business in Sundance. The following year he removed to Newcastle, 
where he opened a branch store, and he also became identified with the banking 
business, organizing the First National Bank, of which he was made cashier. 
In 1904 he was elected to the presidency of the institution and has since served 
in that capacity. His activities in the field of banking have constantly extended 
and. he is now also president of the Bank of Upton. His wide experience and 
close study have given him thorough familiarity with all phases of the hanking 
business and he most carefully safeguards the interests of depositors by the 
methods which he follows in the management of the institutions of which he 
is the head. He is also extensively engaged in the live stock business in Weston 
county and is heavily interested in oil development work in the state. 

In politics Mr. Baird is a stalwart republican and has served as county treas- 
urer of Crook county, filling the position from 1887 until 1889. He was also 
county treasurer of Weston county from 1899 until 1903 and for eight years 
served as a member of the city council of Newcastle. In 1905 he was elected 
to represent his district in the Wyoming state senate, where he served for a four 
years' term, and in 191 1 he was made the candidate of his party for the office 
of state treasurer, to which he was elected and thus became custodian of the 
public funds of the commenwealth for four years. Over the record of his official 
career there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil and his efficiency 
has been of great worth to the state. Fraternally i\Tr. Baird is a thirty-second 
degree Mason, holding membership in \\'yoming Consistory, No. i, A. & A. S. R., 
of Cheyenne, and he is also identified with Kalif Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of 
Sheridan. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias lodge and also to the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, and his pronounced traits of character are those which 
make for personal popularity as well as for public prominence. 



CASSIUS M. EBY. 



Cassius M. Ebv is a prominent attorney of Laramie to whom opportunity has 
ever been the call to action. With no special advantages at the outset of his 
career, he turned his face toward the future, and imbued with a laudable ambi- 
tion, he has advanced steadily toward the goal of success, making for himself a 
creditable place in the ranks of the legal profession in his adopted state. 

Mr. Eby comes to Wyoming from the middle west, his birth having occurred 
in Cass county, Michigan, July 31, 1862. His father, Peter Eby, was a native 
of Ohio and a representative of one of the old families of that state of Swiss 
origin. In the latter part of the sixteenth century his ancestors emigrated from 
Switzerland to Germany and thence made their way into England, whence came 
the founder of the American branch of the family, Theodoras Eby, who arrived 
in the new world about 172^ and settled in Pennsylvania. The great-great- 
grandfather of Cassius M. Eby was a soldier of the .\mcrican army in the 
Revolutionary war. His descendants became early settlers of \'irginia and also 
of Stark county, Ohio. Peter Eby, the father, was born in the latter state and 
removed thence to Michigan when a youth of eighteen years. He followed 
agricultural pursuits in ^lichigan and was quite successful in the conduct of his 
farm. His political endorsement was given to the wliit; |i,irt\' until its dissolu- 
tion, when he juined the ranks of the republican ]iarty and b-canie one of its 
active supporters. He died in Cass county, Michigan, in October, 1892, when 
he had reached the age of seventy-two years. His wife bore the maiden name 
of Margaret Miller and was also a native of Ohio, of German descent. She 



20 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

became the mother of three children, of whom a dau^rhter died in infancy. The 
brother, Elias Eby, is a resident of Boulder, Colorado. 

The other member of the family is Cassius M. Eby of this review, who 
began his education in the rural schools of Michigan and pursued his more 
advanced literary course in the Valparaiso (Ind.) University, from which he was 
graduated with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1889 and with the Bachelor of 
Science degree in 1887. He also won the LL. B. degree in 1891, having com- 
pleted a course in the law department of the University of Valparaiso, supple- 
mented by post-graduate work in the University of Michigan. His early life to 
the age of eighteen years was spent upon his father's farm and his first essay 
in professional activity was made in the schoolroom. He devoted four years 
to the profession of teaching in the schools of Cass county, Michigan, and after 
preparing for the bar entered upon the active practice of law, opening an office 
in Cassopolis, Michigan, where he remained until 1903. He then removed to 
the west, settling first in Boulder, Colorado, where he remained until 1910, 
when he went to Laramie, where he has since remained in active and continuous 
practice. His position at the bar is a recognized one. He prepares his cases 
with thoroughness and skill, and his devotion to his clients' interests is pro- 
verbial. During the eight years of his connection with the Laramie bar he has 
been accorded a very gratifying clientage. He belongs to the Wyoming State 
Bar Association and enjoys the goodwill and high regard of his colleagues in 
the profession. 

In Cass county, Michigan, in 1883, Mr. Eby was united in marriage to Miss 
Eva Shelhamer, a daughter of Aaron and Mary (Dibble) Shelhamer, who be- 
longed to one of the old pioneer families of ^Michigan. To Mr. and Mrs. Eby 
were born three children : LeRoy, now deceased ; Eugene D. ; and JNIabel 
Evelyn, the wife of A. R. Lauk, whom she married on the 12th of August, 
1917. All of the children were born in Michigan. Having lost his first wife by 
death, Mr. Eby was again married, April 21, 1913, in Hutchinson, Kansas, his 
second union being with Miss Estelle Hitchcox, a native of Michigan and a 
daughter of Harvey and Emorette Hitchcox. The Hitchcoxs were also one of 
the pioneer families of the Wolverine state. The father of Mrs. Eby is now 
deceased. v 

In his political views Mr. Eby is a republican and while living in Michigan 
he served for six years, from i8y2 until 1898, as circuit court commissioner and 
was also prosecuting attorney of Cass county from 1896 until 1900. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Masons. He became a member of Baccus Lodge, F. & 
A. M., and also of Kingsbury Chapter, R. A. M., in Michigan, and he is a 
member of the Eastern Star in Laramie. His religious faith is indicated by his 
membership in the First Baptist church, in which he has served as a trustee and 
as deacon. For four years he filled the position of superintendent of the 
Sunday school and in religious work he has taken a very active and helpful 
part, doing all in his power to promote the growth of the church and extend its 
influence. His life is actuated by its teachings and therefore his entire career 
has measured up to high standards. 



L. W. CLELLAND. 



L. W. Clelland, filling the office of county clerk of Converse county and 
making his home in Douglas, was born in Ohio on the 13th of December, 1847, 
a son of William. A. and Betsy (Ricketts) Clelland. The father was a cabinet 
maker by trade and in 1849 he left his Ohio home en route for Council Bluffs, 
Iowa, after which he was never heard from again. His wife died when their 
son, L. W., was three months old. The boy was thus left an orphan when but 
two years of age. He pursued his education in the public schools of Ohio and 
at an early age went to work on a farm, being thus employed until he came to 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 21 

the west in 1881. Attracted by the opportunities which he beUeved might be 
secured in this section of the country, he made his way to Wyoming, setthng at 
Wagon Hound creek, where he turned his attention to stock raising. In this 
venture, however, he lost all that he had saved. Undiscouraged, he nevertheless 
started again in the live stock business and is making good in the undertaking. 
Losses at times seem a great blow but in realty may be counted a substantial 
gain, for in addition to the strength and capability which the individual pre- 
viously possessed he adds an experience that has been a valuable asset and 
the new combination of strength, capability and experience ofttimes constitutes 
the broad foundation upon which is built substantial success. Thus it has proven 
in the case of Mr. Clelland and by determined effort, perseverance and capable 
management he has steadily worked his way upward, being today one of the 
substantial residents of Converse county. 

His fellow townsmen, appreciating his worth and ability, have several times 
called Mr. Clelland to positions of trust and responsibility. In 1902 he was 
chosen county treasurer and occupied the position for four years. In 1906 he 
was elected to the office of county clerk and served in that capacity for four 
years. In 1910 he was chosen to represent his district in the state legislature and 
in 1912 became the candidate of his party for the state senate but lost the 
election by a single vote. In 1916 he was once more elected county clerk, a fact 
indicative of the confidence and trust reposed in him by the people of his home 
county, who had tested his ability, efficiency and his devotion to the general good. 

On the 25th of February, 1873, Mr. Clelland was united in marriage to Miss 
Olive L. Guthrie. Fraternally he is a Mason and has attained the Knight Templar 
degree of the York Rite. His political allegiance has always been given to the 
democratic party and he has been found true and loyal to every trust reposed 
in him. Those who know him, and he has a wide acquaintance, entertain for 
him warm personal regard by reason of his social nature, his genial disposi- 
tion and his manv admirable traits of character. 



.ALEXANDER KEMP DE J.ARNETTE, M. D. 

Although a comparatively young man Dr. Alexander Kemp De Jarnette has 
already made for himself a recognized place among the physicians and surgeons 
of Sheridan, Wyoming, where he is now located, enjoying a gratifying prac- 
tice. Dr. De Jarnette well merits the clientage which is accorded him, for while 
undertaking his medical studies he has seriously occupied himself with the 
problems of the profession and has become efficient along lines of general 
medicine. 

He is a Missourian by birth, his native city being Rich Hill, where he was 
born January 31, 1889, a son of James Kemp and Nancy Florence De Jarnette. 
After having completed his preliminary studies he entered the University of 
Louisville with the intention of making the practice of medicine his life work 
and became a student in the medical department of that university at Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. On June 8, 1916, he received his degree and subsequently 
located in Sheridan, considering that the great west of this country would hold 
for a young physician greater opportunities than the east. Although Dr. De 
Jarnette has been established in \\'yoming for only a few years he has made for 
"himself a respected place in the profession, for he always closely follows the 
highest ethics and standards of the same. His colleagues have readily welcomed 
him among them and the general public has come to know him and many have 
sought his services, which have always been rendered efficiently. He has re- 
mained a student and is interested in the latest discoveries and procedures along 
medical lines and keeps in contact with these through reading and also by 
attending experimental cases. He brings to bear upon the investigations and 
solutions of professional problems a highly trained intellect and skill in scientific 



22 HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 

thinking, and his earnest efforts have borne fruit, for while he has gained a 
number of grateful patients whom he has successfully treated, he has also estab- 
lished and added to his professional prestige. 

Dr. De Jarnette is a democrat and gives faithful support to the candidates 
and measures of the party. He has, however, never sought political office for 
himself, preferring to give his time to his professional duties. In the profes- 
sional and social circles of Sheridan he is decidedly a welcome addition and 
although he has been located here for only a comparatively short time he has 
already gained a great many friends, who appreciate him for his sterling quali- 
ties of character and the interest which he takes in all measures which are under- 
taken for the moral, mental and material betterment of the community. 



DA\'ID ALLEX REA\"ILL. 

Wyoming has reason to be proud of the high rank of her bench and bar. Her 
attorneys, well trained, have on the whole maintained high professional standards 
and their ability would enable them to cross swords in forensic combat with the 
ablest lawyers in any section of the country. Moreover, this is a profession in 
which advancement must depend upon individual merit, and that David Allen 
Reavill has steadily advanced is due to his comprehensive knowledge of the law 
and ability to accurately apply its principles to the points in litigation. 

He was born in Flat Rock, Illinois, May ii, 1865, a son of A. J. and Martha A. 
(Seaney) Reavill. The father was likewise born in Illinois and was of French 
descent. The grandfather was David Reavill, a descendant of a French soldier 
who came with Marquis de Lafayette to America to aid the colonists in their 
struggle for independence. Pleased with the country and its prospects, he took 
up his abode in Delaware and his descendants have since been loyal and patriotic 
citizens of the republic which their ancestor aided in establishing. A. J. Reavill 
became a successful stock man and farmer of Illinois, where he resided throughout 
his entire life, passing away at Flat Rock on the 13th of March, 1898. at the age 
of sixty-four years. In politics he was a stanch democrat and figured as one of 
the leaders of his party in the state, and for twelve years he represented his 
district in the house of representatives and in the senate of the general assembly 
of Illinois. He was one of the active workers who placed John M. Palmer in 
the United States senate. He was also a prominent representative of Masonry in 
early life, taking a helpful part in promoting the mterests of the craft. His wife 
was a native of Crawford, Illinois, and a daughter of John A. Seaney, who 
became one of the early settlers of Crawford county, where he took up his abode 
about 181 7, the year before the admission of the state into the Union. The 
maternal ancestors came from North Carolina and were of Irish lineage. The 
death of IMrs. A. J. Reavill occurred in the old home in Illinois in 1903, when she 
had reached the age of sixty-five years. She had become the mother of nine 
children, five of whom are still living, namely: John D.. a resident farmer of 
Crawford county, Illinois ; Charles IXIcClellan, who also follows farming in that 
county; David A., of this review; Palmer Seymour, who is living in St. Louis, 
Missouri, and is now connected with the Brown Shoe Company but was formerly 
engaged in the practice of law ; and Dora, the wife of Professor ]\Ielville T. Cook, 
professor of biology in Hanover University at New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

David .Allen Reavill was educated in the district schools near Flat Rock, Illi- 
nois, and spent two years in the preparatory department and four years in the 
collegiate department of De Pauw University at Greencastle. Indiana, from which 
he was graduated in 1887, winning the degrees of Master of Arts and Bachelor 
of Philosophy. He afterward took up the study of law in the office of Ex-Gov- 
ernor Palmer of Illinois, of whom his father was a warm personal friend. For 
a vear he continued his reading under Governor Palmer at Springfield and for a 
similar period was a student in the law school of the State University of Michigan, 



HISTORY OF \\'VOMING 25 

after which he was admitted to the bar in Wyoming in 1889 and entered upon 
active practice at Rock Springs, where he has since actively followed his pro- 
fession save for a period of four years, from 1893 until 1897, when he was a 
resident of Logan, Utah, where he engaged in law practice. He first came to 
Rock Springs, January -19, 1889, and with the exception of the interval indicated 
has been continuously identified with the work of the courts. His clientage is 
extensive and of an important character and he has been connected with many of 
the leading cases which have been tried in this section of the state. He prepares 
his cases with great thoroughness, never failing to give a careful study of every 
question relative to the points in litigation, and his presentation of his cause is 
always strong, logical and convincing. His arguments never fail to impress court 
and jury and seldom fail to gain the verdict desired. 

On the 14th of January. 1892, Mr. Reavill was married in Robinson, Illinois, 
to Aliss Claudia Olwin, a native of that state and a daughter of Judge Jacob C. 
and Anna Olwin, both deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Reavill have become parents of 
two children: Tobey Olwin, born in Robinson, Illinois, September 29, 1892, a 
graduate of Harvard College, in 1916; and Robb Afton, born in Logan, Utah, 
November 30, 1893. She graduated from Wellesley College in 1918. 

Politically Mr. Reavill is an earnest dem.ocrat and has taken an active part in 
politics, greatly desiring the success of his party because of his firm belief in its 
principles as factors in good government. He stands for all those interests 
which are a matter of civic virtue and of civic pride and has cooperated in many 
mo\ements wRich have been of great benefit to the community. He served as 
city attorney of Logan, Utah, for two years, has been city attorney of Rock 
Springs and was county attorney for Sweetwater county for three terms, covering 
a period of six years. In 1899 he served for a short term as state senator from 
Sweetwater county but was unseated on contest. He belongs to the Phi Kappa 
Psi and he is identified with the Wyoming State Bar Association and the American 
Bar Association. In his profession he has made a most creditable record, holding 
to high standards, careful at all times to conform his practice to the advanced 
ethics of law work. 



HOX. J. ROSS CARPENTER. 

Hon. J. Ross Carpenter is actively and prominently identified with important 
business and public interests. He is the president of the Federal Land Company 
and also of the Carpenter Live Stock Company of Cheyenne. At the same time 
he has been a director of public thought and opinion as one of the leading repre- 
sentatives of the democratic party in Wyoming and he is representing his state 
on the democratic national committee. 

He was born near Monmouth, Illinois, on the 7th of August, 1867, a son of 
George D. and Margery ( Pollock ) Carpenter. The father was a Kentuckian 
by birth, while the mother \vns a native of Ohio. George D. Carpenter removed 
to Indian Territory, wlurr h<- parsed the remainder of his days. His family 
numbered two sons and two .lau^lUcrs. 

J. Ross Carpenter, who wa.-. the third in order of birth, acquired his education 
in the public schools of Illinois and of southern Kansas and also in Monmouth 
College of Monmouth, Illinois, while later he became a law student in the 
National University at Lebanon, Ohio. Returning to the west, he engaged in 
ranching in western Kansas from 1887 until 1901 and in the following year he 
turned his attention to the land business and to live stock raising, making his 
lieadquarters at Des Moines, Iowa. There he continued until 1906 and during 
that period he also engaged extensively in handling timber lands in both the 
north and south. In 1906 he removed from Des Moines to Wyoming, taking 
up his abode near Burns. In 11)05 the Federal Land Company Avas organized 
and in 1909 the Live Stock Company was formed. Of both of these companies 



26 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

J. Ross Carpenter has been president and general manager since their organiza- 
tion. The Federal Land Company acquired one hundred and forty-six thousand 
acres of land, which they sold to settlers, thus bringing many, people to Wyoming 
and greatly advancing the permanent development of the state. This company 
founded the towns of Burns and of Carpenter and has ever put forth effective 
effort to promote the welfare and upbuilding of the district in which it has 
operated. Mr. Carpenter takes a special interest in the breeding of shorthorn 
cattle and of Percheron horses, and his business interests in that direction have 
become extensive and important, contributing much to the improvement of the 
grade of stock raised in the state. In 1910 he removed to Cheyenne, where his 
home has since been maintained. 

On the 15th of September, 1887, Mr. Carpenter was united in marriage to 
Miss Fannie Russell, a daughter of the Rev. W. H. Russell, of Henderson 
county, Illinois. Their children are : Arthur R., who is engaged in business with 
his father ; Minnie, the wife of Captain Frank G. Clark of the United States 
Army, by whom she has one child, Frank G., Jr.; and Betty, born in May, 1907, 
who is now a pupil in the public school at Cheyenne. 

In his political views Mr. Carpenter has always been a democrat and from 
191 1 until 1915 he served as a member of the Wyoming state senate, during 
which period he was connected with much constructive legislation having to 
do with the advancement of various material interests of the state. Since 1910 he 
has been a member of the national democratic congressional committee from 
Wyoming and he was chairman of the democratic county central* committee of 
Laramie county from 1914 until igi6. He has served as secretary of the state 
board of farm commissioners and he is interested in all that has to do with 
the upbuilding of the region in which he makes his home. He belongs to the 
Industrial Qub and at all times he can be counted upon to further any plan 
or project for the general good. His purposes will bear close investigation and 
his actions always measure up to high standards. 



JUSTICE WILLIS \'AN DEVAXTER. 

One of those who have reflected honor upon the state of Wyoming is Willis 
i\^an Devanter, justice of the supreme court of the United States. He was 
born at Marion, Indiana, on the 17th of April, 1859, and is a son of Hon. Isaac 
and Violetto Maria (Spencer) \'an Devanter. His father was for many years 
a distinguished and successful lawyer in Indiana. 

Justice Van Devanter received his education in the public schools of his 
native town and in Asbury (now De Pauw) Uni\ersity and in the law school of 
Cincinnati College, graduating from tlie latter with the class of 1881. He re- 
ceived the degree of LL. D. from his alma mater (De Pauw University) in 
1911. 

Justice Van Devanter practiced his profession at Marion, Indiana, from 1881 
until 1884, associated with his father and Hon. John W. Lacey, afterward chief 
justice of the supreme court of Wyoming. Attracted by the opportunities of 
the west, he came to Cheyenne in July, 1884, and at once entered upon active 
practice and has ever since made his home in the state save as his official duties 
have temporarily taken him elsewhere. It was he who, in 1886, drafted the bill 
under which the capitol building in Cheyenne was erected, the University at 
Laramie started and other state institutions established. His practice in Wyo- 
ming was very extensive, taking him into every county. At that time many of 
the county seats were remote from railroads, so that he was often required 
to make long journeys by stage coach. He was associated in practice from 1887 
until 1889 with Hon. Charles N. Potter, now chief justice of the supreme court 
of Wyoming, and from 1891 until 1897 with Hon. John W. Lacey. 

It was but natural that a man of his capacity, learning, ability and public 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 29 

spirit should be called upon for public service. In 1886 Justice Van Devanter 
was appointed by the governor of the state as a member of "the commission which 
prepared and published the Revised Statutes of 1887. In the latter year he was 
made city attorney of Cheyenne and in 1888 was elected a nicmlier of the terri- 
torial house of representatives, acting as chairman of the ju'lu;i:iry committee. 
In August, 1889, President Harrison appointed him chief justice df the supreme 
court of Wyoming, in which office he served until statehood. While chief justice 
of the territory he was the trial judge of the first judicial district, embracing 
the counties of Laramie, Crook, Converse and W/eston as they then existed. He 
presided at the first term of court ever held in W'eston county and at that term 
presided at the trial of a man who was convicted for shootiiig Hon. Frank W. 
IMondell, then mayor of Newcastle and now representative in congress. At the 
first state election he became chief justice of the supreme court of the state but 
soon afterward resigned to resume the active practice of the law. 

Justice Van Devanter has always been a keen and intelligent observer of 
the things taking place in the world. His outlook has always been broad. He 
has appreciated and understood the tendencies of his time. " He took an active 
interest in political afl:'airs. He served as chairman of the republican state com- 
mittee from 1892 until 1895, was a delegate to the national republican conven- 
tion and a member of the republican national committee in 1896. He became 
assistant attorney general of the United States and was assigned to the interior 
department, thus serving from 1897 until 1903. In the latter year he became 
United States circuit judge for the eighth circuit and remained upon that bench 
for seven years. In December, 1910, he was appointed associate justice of the 
supreme court of the United States by President Taft and took his seat in that 
court on the 3d of January. 

On the loth of October, 1883, Justice Van Devanter was united in marriage 
to !Miss Dollie Burhans, a daughter of W'inslow Paige and Rachel Ann (Dor- 
man) Burhans, of Ionia, Michigan. They have two sons, Isaac and Winslow. 
who are now serving as officers in the war with Germany. Justice \'an Devanter 
is a man of marked personal characteristics who has the faculty of placing any- 
one in his presence at ease. The simplicity and beauty of his daily life, as seen 
in his home and family relations, constitute an even balance to his splendid 
judicial ability and characteristics. 



CHARLES G. KENDALL. 

One of the best known and most popular residents of Sweetwater county, 
Wyoming, is Charles G. Kendall, of Rock Springs, who is a member of the 
state senate and is also an active factor in commercial circles of his city, being 
president and manager of the National Clothing Company, a business which 
he has de\ eloped to large and gratifying proportions and which receives the 
patronage of the best class of citizens in this section of the state. 

Charles G. Kendall is a native of Wisconsin. He was born April 13, 1877. 
a son of Nelson and Agnes Kendall, who were also natives of the Badger state. 
the former of Irish descent, while the latter was of German lineage. They 
remained residents of Wisconsin during their entire lives. The father followed 
the occupation of farming, devoting his attention always to that pursuit save 
during the period of the Civil war. when his patriotic spirit was aroused by the 
attempt to overthrow the Union and he joined the army, serving with a Wis- 
consin regiment at the front during the period of hostilities between the north 
and the south. He died in the year 1889 and is still survived by liis wife, who 
is a resident of Wisconsin. In their family were eight children : Mrs. Max 
Brown; Rev. William Kendall; Frederick; Otto, who is now with the United 
States Navy; Bertha; Mrs. Josephine Miller; and Mrs. Leona Smelser. 

Charles G. Kendall was the fourth in order of birth of this familv and in 
Vol. n— 2 



30 HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 

his boyhood days he attended the public schools of his native state. He started 
out in' the Jjusiness world at an early age, being employed along mercantile lines 
at Richland Center, Wisconsin, where he continued to work until 1898. when 
the Spanish-American war was inaugurated and he responded to the country's 
call for troops to render military aid. He became a member of Company A 
of the Fifteenth Infantry of the United States Volunteers and served throughout 
the entire period of the war, after which he received an honorable discharge. 
He then sought the opportunities of the west, making his way to Rock Springs, 
Wyoming, where he secured a position with the Union Pacific Coal Company 
in the store department. He was thus employed for five years and at the end 
of that time he secured a position with Beeman & Neuber Mercantile Company, 
with whom he continued for ten years. In March, 1914, he bought out the 
National Clothing Company and has since conducted the business, having one 
of the well equipped men's' clothing establishments of Sweetwater county. He 
carries a large line of ready-to-wear clothing and haberdashery, and his trade 
has reached gratifying proportions. His store is well stocked and his business 
methods are such as will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. 

On the 26th of March, 189S, Mr. Kendall was united in marriage to Miss 
Annie Roberts, of Rock Springs, and they have two children. Leona, who was 
born in Rock Springs in 1900, is now attending school in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, where she was graduated from the high school. The son, Darwin Kendall, 
born in Rock Springs in October, 1906, is also in school in Los Angeles. 'Sir. 
Kendall has established his family in a most attractive home in that city in 
order to give his children excellent educational opportunities amid pleasant 
surroundings. 

Fraternally Mr. Kendall is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks and for many years has been connected with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He is also numbered with the Knights of The Maccabees and 
is loyal to the teachings of these different organizations and the purposes on 
which they are based. His political endorsement has always been given to the 
republican party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and he has 
been an active worker in its ranks, doing everything in his power to promote its 
growth and insure its success. For eight years he filled the office of city treasurer 
of Rock Springs, his reelection being proof of his fidelity to duty and the con- 
fidence reposed in him by the public. He was then called upon for still more 
important political service, being elected to the senate, in 191 5. As a member of 
the senate he has gi\'en careful and thoughtful consideration to all the vital 
questions which come up for settlement. He stands loyally for whatever he 
believes to be for the best interests of the community and the commonwealth 
at large and he does not hesitate to oppose any measure which he believes to 
be detrimental to the general welfare. In his public service he has subordinated 
personal ambition and self-aggrandizement ,to the general good and has placed 
the public welfare before partisanship. 



HON. HUGH L. PATTON. 

On the records of official service in Natrona county appears the name of 
Hon. Hugh L. Patton, who is filling the position of sheriff and who has occupied 
many other places of public honor and trust, at one time representing his district 
in the legislature. 

He was born in Detroit, Michigan, July 20, 1861. a son of Thomas and Agnes 
(Woodburn) Patton. The father was a native of Ireland, while the mother was 
born in Ohio, in which state they were married. They afterward removed to 
^Michigan, where the father spent his remaining days, his death occurring in 
1864. His widow survived him for a very extended period and passed away 



32 HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 

in Kansas in 1909. The}' were the parents of four children, two of whom are 
living. 

After the death of his father Hugh L. Patton lived with his grandfather 
until he was ten years of age, at which time he and his mother removed to Iowa, 
where he largely acquired his education in the common schools. In 1878, when 
a youth of seventeen years, he went to New Mexico, where he remained until 
1882. He then went to the territory of Washington and in 1883 he arrived in 
Buffalo, Wyoming, having since lived in this state. In 1889 he removed to 
Casper, where he now makes his home, and with the development and progress 
of the city he has been closely, actively and helpfully associated. He was the 
first city marshal of Casper, occupying that position for a year, and again was 
called upon to aid in preserving public peace and order, being elected county 
sheriff in 1894 for a four years' term. He served until 1898 and then resigned 
in order to aid his country, which had become involved in war with Spain. He 
went to the front as a first lieutenant of Company K of the Second Volunteer 
Cavalry, with which he was connected for six months. On the expiration of 
that period he returned to Casper and in 1908 his fellow townsmen called upon 
him to represent them in the state legislature, where he ser\'ed for one term. In 
1912 he was appointed United States marshal of Wyoming. He made a most 
creditable record during his two years' incumbency in that office and in the fall of 
1914 he was again chosen for the position of sheriff', in which capacity he is now 
serving, having for a third time been called to this office, the duties of which 
he has ever discharged with promptness and fidelity. He has also served as a 
member of the city council and has exercised his official prerogatives in support 
of many well devised plans and measures for the city's improvement and the 
upholding of civic standards. He has always voted with the republican party, 
being an untiring worker in its ranks because of his firm belief in its principles 
as factors in good government. Aside from his official duties Mr. Patton is 
well known as a business man, being extensively interested in the sheep and cattle 
industry in Wyoming. His landed possessions are large and important and 
along these line's he is contributing in substantial measure to the material devel- 
opment of the state. 

In 1891 Mr. Patton was united in marriage to Miss Belle Stroud, who was 
born in Nebraska, and they have become parents of two daughters : Laura, who 
died at the age of thirteen years; and Irma, who is a graduate of the Casper 
high school and is now a college student in Washington, D. C. Mrs. Patton and 
her daughter are members of the Episcopal church. 

Fraternally Mr. Patton is an Elk, an Odd Fellow and a Mason and in the 
last named organization he has taken the degrees of both lodge and chapter. He 
exemplifies in his life the beneficent spirit of the craft which is based upon a 
recognition of the brotherhood of mankind and the obligations thereby imposed. 
He is today widely known as one of the prominent public figures in Natrona 
county, his activities having much to do with shaping its history and directing 
its policy. He is actuated in all that he does by a marked public spirit and Casper 
numbers him among her most valued residents. 



PETER GORDON, 



Peter Gordon, Jr., who is serving for the second term as mayor of Kem- 
merer. was born in Elginshire, Scotland, on the 6th of October, 1871. His 
father, Peter Gordon, was also a native of the land of hills and heather and in 
the year 1872 he sailed with his family for the new world. For a few years 
he resided in the city of Boston, Massachusetts, and then removed to Canada, 
whence he eventually came to Wyoming, arriving in this state in 1885. He first 
located in that section of Uinta county which eventually became Lincoln county 
and there he was connected with railroad interests, being active along that line 



HISTORY OF \\-YOMlNG 33 

of business until 1888. He then turned his attention to merchandising, in which 
he was actively engaged for a number of years, and is now living retired, enjoy- 
ing a rest which he richly merits and well deserves. He still makes his home 
in Kemmerer and has reached the age of seventy-four years, but his wife passed 
away at Fossil, Wyoming, in June, 1898. In their family were five children, 
James, ]\Irs. Maggie Watson, ]\Irs. Elsie Collipriest and Mrs. Annie Hanak. 

The youngest of the family is Peter Gordon of this review, who in his boy- 
hood days attended the public schools of Ontario, Canada, until he reached the 
age of fourteen years, when he came with his parents to Wyoming. In this 
state he entered railroad service and later embarked in business with his father 
at Fossil, where he continued for some time in mercantile lines. He arrived in 
Kemmerer in 1902 and established a retail liquor business, which he has since 
successfully conducted. 

On the 19th of December, 1892, at American Falls, Idaho, Mr. Gordon was 
united in marriage to Miss Lillian Robinson, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. B. 
Robinson of that place. They have become parents of nine children, five of 
whom are living: Marie, who was born in Pocatello, Idaho, in 1897, and is a 
graduate of the high school of Kemmerer; Josephine, who was born in Pocatello 
in 1899 and is now a second year pupil in the high school; Thelma, who was 
born in Kemmerer, in 1905 ; James, born in McCammon, Idaho, in 1903 ; and 
Agnes, born in Kemmerer in 1908. 

Mr. Gordon has been quite active in community affairs and is serving as vice 
president of the Chamber of Commerce, heartily cooperating in its plans and 
purposes for the upbuilding of the city and the extension and improvement of 
its trade conditions and relations. For five years he filled the office of city clerk 
and was then elected mayor of Kemmerer, in which position he made so credit- 
able a record that he was reelected and is now serving for the second term. He 
stands very high in business and political circles and is known as a representa- 
tive citizen, alert to every interest that tends to advance the welfare and pro- 
mote the growth of his municipality. 



JOSEPH R. SULLIVAN. 

Joseph R. Sullivan has engaged in the practice of law in Laramie since 1910 
but has been an active representative of the bar in Wyoming since 1908, follow- 
ing his admission to the bar subsequent to his graduation from law school. He 
was born in O'Neill, Nebraska, June 20, 1880, a son of James and Tohanna 
(Dunn) Sullivan, both of whom were natives of Ireland and came to America 
in childhood, settling first in Michigan, where they were reared and married. 
They afterward removed to Nebraska, becoming pioneer settlers of O'Neill, 
Holt county. They made the trip overland to that state and the father became 
a very active factor in the upbuilding and development of the section in which 
he settled, being regarded as one of its most respected and valued citizens. He 
died in Holt county in 1904, but is still survived by his widow, who yet makes 
her home in O'Neill. 

Joseph R. Sullivan, who was the seventh in order of birth in a family of ten 
children, attended the schools of O'Neill and was graduated from the higti 
school. Desiring to enter upon a professional career, he then became a student 
in the Creighton University at Omaha, Nebraska, in which he pursued his more 
specifically literary course, winning the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1904. He 
then entered upon the study of law and was graduated from the law department 
in ir)o8. He located for practice in Casper, \\'yoming, where he remained during 
1908 and then removed to Cheyenne, continuing as a member of the bar of that 
city for eighteen months. In loio he arrived in Laramie, where he opened an 
office, and in the intervening period he has steadily advanced until he now occu- 
pies a position of leadership among the attorneys of Wyoming. In connection 



34 HISTORY OF \VY(3A11XG 

with his law practice he is a director of the L,aramie- Albany ^.lutual Building 
Association. 

On the 29th of November, 1909, in Omaha, Nebraska, Air. Sullivan was 
united in marriage to Miss Amy Burn, a daughter of Bernard and Anna Burn, 
who were early residents of that city. Air. and Airs. Sullivan have become the 
parents of three children: Joseph, who was born in Laramie in 191 1; John, in 
1913 : and Bernard, in 1915. The family are communicants of the Roman 
Catholic church. 

In politics Air. Sullivan is a democrat and served as a member of the house 
of representatives during the twelfth general assembly. He has been prosecut- 
ing attorney since 1916 and is recognized as one of the active democratic leaders 
of Albany county and of the state. He has done splendid work in the legisla- 
ture, in which he is now serving for the second term, giving thoughtful and 
earnest consideration to all the vital questions which have come up for settle- 
ment. He belongs to the Chamber of Commerce, of which he is one of the 
directors, and there is no plan or movement for the benefit of the city which 
does not receive his endorsement and cooperation. 



HON. WILLIAAI HELAIUS HOLLIDAY. 

No biography such as this work defines in its essential limitations can serve 
to ofl:'er fit memorial to the achievements of William Helmus Holliday, who 
through the period of his residence in Wyoming, covering a half century, has 
been most closely associated with the commercial and political development of 
the state and with many important events which have figured prominently in 
connection with its annals. Strong and purposeful, forceful and resourceful, 
Mr. Holliday has directed his efforts along lines which have contributed not 
alone to individual success but also to the welfare and development of his state. 

He was born in Green township, Hamilton county, Ohio, May 21, 1843, 
a son of Eli and Annetta (Bogart) Holliday. The father was also a native 
of Green township, Hamilton county, while the mother was born on Long 
Island. This Holliday family was among the early settlers of that section of 
Ohio, the first of them to locate there being John Holliday, the grandfather of 
William H. Holliday. The family floated down the Ohio river on a flatboat — a 
common means of travel in that period, making the trip in 18 10, in which year 
they took up their abode in Hamilton county. They disembarked at Cincinnati 
and he took up land on what was known as the Symmes Purchase. Eli Holli- 
day emigrated westward from Ohio in 1858, accompanied by his family, and 
settled in Douglas county, Illinois. In 1863 he removed to Jackson county, that 
state, and subsequently became a pioneer settler of \\'yoming, where his death 
occurred in 1868. His widow long survived him and passed away in Laramie 
in 1893. 

They were parents of a family ol six children, of whom William li. Holli- 
day was the second in order of birth. He spent the first fifteen years of his 
life in his native state and then accompanied his parents on their removal west- 
ward. He remained under the parental roof until 1865. when he left the family 
home, then in Jackson county, Illinois, and started for Colorado. He spent 
about two years in the Rocky mountains, in the vicinity of Denver, and in Sep- 
tember, 1867, joined a sawmill outfit going to what is now Albany county, 
Wyoming, an outfit owned by the firm of Alason & .Allen, of Fort Collins, Colo- 
rado, and to be used in getting out lumber to aid in the building of Fort Russell. 
The sawmill was located a few miles south of Sherman, on Dale creek. This 
work of Mr. Holliday marked the beginning of his connection with the lumber 
business, which in I'S-o he entered on his own account as a lumber manu- 
facturer, remaining in the vicinity of Sherman until 1873, when he took up 
his residence in Laramie, where he has since resided. He is prominently known 




1698217 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 37 

as one of the foremost business men in the state along the line to which his 
activity has led. He is now the president of the W. H. Holliday Company, 
in which connection he has developed one of the foremost manufacturing, build- 
ing and merchandising interests in Wyoming. This company, from a modest 
beginning, has had a remarkable growth, due to capable management and an 
extremely high standard of commercial integrity that has always been main- 
tained. The activities of Mr. Holliday in other fields have also contributed to 
industrial and commercial progress, constituting large elements in the upbuilding 
of city and commonwealth. He has bent his efforts to administrative direction 
and executive control and has carefully guided the destinies of various business 
projects, avoiding all unwarranted risks which lead to failure and carefully 
utilizing those qualities which safeguard every business undertaking. 

On the 5th of May, 1869, Mr. Holliday was united in marriage to Miss Emily 
R. Coykendall, of Fort Scott, Kansas, who passed away in Laramie, June 19, 
1887. He afterward wedded Sarah E. East, of Laramie, on the 20th of Feb- 
ruary, 1897. The children born of the first marriage are: Catharine, the wife 
of H. R. Butler, of Laramie ; Guy R., who is manager of the hardware depart- 
ment for the W. H. Holliday Company and who married Mayme Kennedy, of 
Laramie; Albert E., who has charge of the furniture department of the W. H. 
Holliday Company and who married Mary George, by whom he has three 
children, W. H., Lucy E. and Albert E. ; Lois E., who is the wife of L. E. 
Chandler, of Laramie ; Elizabeth C, who gave her hand in marriage to Harry 
George, of Laramie, and they now reside in Pullman, Washington; Ruth, a 
resident of California ; and Margaret, the wife of Carl Raife, of Rawlins, 
Wyoming. By his second wife Mr. Holliday has two daughters, Mary Ethel 
and Helen East, both of whom are students in the University of Wyoming. 

Mr. Holliday has figured very prominently in the public life of the community, 
and has been called upon to serve in a number of official positions. In 1871 
he was defeated when a candidate for the state legislature but in 1873 was elected 
a member of the lower house and in 1875 received endorsement of his first 
term's service in the general assembly in an election to the territorial council. 
Again in 1877, in 1884 and in 1888 he was elected to represent his district in 
that same body and ni 1880 he was defeated on a tie vote. He was a candidate 
for delegate to congress in 1882. He was made a delegate to Washington in 
1890 to assist Judge J. j\L Carey then delegate in congress in procuring state- 
hood for Wyoming and in this mission was successful. In 1892 he was elected 
to represent his district in the state senate, where he served until 1896. He 
was again chosen to that office in 1908 and served until 1916. In 1894 he was 
the democratic candidate for governor, the republicans carr\'ing the state in that 
year. He was a member of the democratic national committee from 1896 until 
1900 and he was a delegate to the democratic national convention at Denver 
in 1908. In 1904 he was made a member of the Wyoming commission at the 
St. Louis exposition and he is again representing his district in the upper 
house of the general assembly. He has been president of the Carnegie Library 
Association ever since it was organized and with every worthy project for the 
upbuilding and development of his city and his state he has been closely and 
helpfully associated. The record of few men in public life in Wyoming has 
extended over so long a period and none has been more faultless in honor, 
fearless in conduct or stainless in reputation. He has been guided by the 
highest sense of conscientious obligation in the performance of his public duties, 
ever placing the general welfare before partisanship and the benefit of the state 
before personal aggrandizement. He has always been a warm friend and strong 
advocate of better education, never failing to act as a champion to any move- 
ment or measure having for its object the betterment or improvement of the 
schools, and he was for eight years chairman of the senate committee on edu- 
cation. In his fraternal relations he is a Mason. 

As a business man his ready adaptability, his recognition and utilization of 
opportunities and his keen sagacity have figured in placing him in the front 



38 HISTORY OF WYO-AIING 

ranks of successful manufacturers and merchants, and although he has now 
passed the seventy-fifth milestone on life's journey, he yet remains an active 
factor in the commercial world, being the head of the W. H. Holliday Company 
of Laramie and thus controlling one of the most important manufacturing and 
merchandising interests of the state. 



JOSEPH B. MARTIN. 



Joseph B. Martin, who is filling the position of county clerk in Uinta county, 
has a notable record of successful achievement — the result of indefatigable 
effort and untiring industry. Innumerable difficulties and obstacles have con- 
fronted him as he has progressed along life's highway but in the end he has 
come ofif conqueror and is today one of the most valued and representative citi- 
zens of his section of the state. 

He was born in Nottingham, England, June 24. 1849, and is a son of Joseph 
and Martha (Wilson) Alartin. The father remained in his native land to the 
time of his death, which occurred in 1850, and had engaged in mining. The 
mother remained a resident of England until 1880 and then crossed "the Atlantic 
to the new world, making her way to Utah, where she took up her abode at 
Woods Cross. She had but two children, the daughter being Mrs. Mary H. 
\'incent, now living in Salt Lake City. 

Joseph B. Martin was the elder child and at the age of ten years, when other 
boys were devoting their time and attention to the mastery of the branches of 
learning taught in the public schools, he was at work in the coal mines and up 
to the time that he reached the age of thirty-three years he was unable to read 
or write his own name. Coming to realize the value, the need and importance 
of an education, he began buying books and studying. He mastered the alphabet 
and continued his studies until he is now a man of liberal education, keeping 
in touch through broad reading with the leading questions of the day. While 
engaged in pursuing his studies he continued his work in various capacities in 
connection with coal mining and his increasing ability won him advancement 
until step by step he worked his way upward, serving as mine boss, as fire boss 
and in other connections with mining operations for forty-three years. He had 
come to America from England in 1881 and made his way westward to Evanston, 
Wyoming. He began to work in mines at Almy, \\'yoming, and after a time 
took up land but never gave much time to ranching. Gradually he acquired a 
competence rising to better positions and then entered public life, and his achieve- 
ments should serve to encourage and inspire others who must start out as he 
did without advantages of any kind. His career proves that the road to advance- 
ment is ever open to the man of energy and ambition and his record proves that 
while success tauntingly plays before the dreamer and slips away from the slug^ 
gard, it yields to the man of resolute purpose. 

In February, 1873, Air. Martin was united in marriage to Aliss Ann West, 
of South Nornianton, Derbyshire, England, a daughter of Joseph and Selina 
(Ball) West, who spent their entire lives in England. The death of Mrs. 
Martin occurred September 22, 1917, and was the occasion of deep and wide- 
spread regret among her many friends as well as to her immediate family. By 
her marriage she had become the mother of thirteen children, of whom four 
have passed away. The others are: Jose M., who was born in England in 1880 
and was. educated in the public schools of L'inta county, \\'yoming. and in the 
Agricultural College of Utah. He is now married, resides upon a ranch in Uinta 
county and has seven children. Mary H., bom in England, was educated in 
the schools of \\'yoming, is the wife of Alvin Hutchinson and has six children, 
Selina. born in England in 1881, attended the schools of Uinta county, W^'o- 
ming, has become the wife of James E, Peterson and has six children, tohn ^^^ 
is married and has five children. George, born in Almy. Wvoming. is married 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 39 

and has two children. j\lrs. Alice Whittaker, also born in Almy, has one child. 
Thomas E., born in Uinta county, is now in the national army. Louis, born in 
Uinta county, is in the employ of the Union Pacific Railroad Company. Annie 
is acting as housekeeper for her father. Of the four children who have passed 
away three died in infancy and Minnie, who was born in 1874, died in Uinta 
county in 1884. 

Mr. Martin is a leading member of the Mormon church in Evanston and has 
held high positions in the church, in the work of which he is actively and help- 
fully interested. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he, 
served as justice of the peace at Almy. In 1904 he was elected county treasurer 
and occupied that position for four years and was again elected in 1910 and served 
another term of four years. In 1914 he was elected county clerk of Uinta county 
and is now serving for the second term in that position. His frequent reelection 
to office indicates his marked efficiency, capability and fidelity. He has been a 
school trustee of districts No. 5 and 20, and his lack of early advantages in 
that direction has perhaps been the means of making him a most stalwart cham- 
pion of the public school system. In this connection he does everything in his 
power to advance the interests of the schools and raise the standards of educa- 
tion. At all times he stands for progress and impnnement, and his own life 
record is indicative of what may be accomplished through individual effort and 
honorable purpose. 



H. P. ALLEN. 



Among the efficient officers of Converse county is H. P. Allen, who is now 
serving on the board of county commissioners and is thus taking active part in 
shaping the business interests of the county. He is now largely retired from the 
management of personal business interests although in former years he was con- 
nected with various interests. There is no phase of pioneer life in Wyoming 
with which he is not thoroughly familiar, for he first came to the state as a 
freighter in the early '80s and engaged in freighting at a period when the work 
of progress and civilization had scarcely been begun within the borders of the 
state. 

He was born in \ irginia, November 25. i860, a son of Hugh A. and Mary 
E. (Driscoll) Allen, both of whom have now passed away. In early days the 
family removed westward to Lawrence, Kansas, where the parents continued 
to make their home until they w?ere called to their final rest, the father following 
the occupation of tanning. In the family were two children, H. P. Allen having 
a sister. 

In the public schools of Kansas, H. P. Allen began his education, but he had 
to go to work when a boy and since that time has depended entirely upon his 
own resources, being indeed a self-made man in the truest and best sense of 
the term. He made his way to the west when sixteen years of age, taking up 
his abode at Denver, Colorado, after which he engaged in freighting to W^yom- 
ing. He was identified with the freighting business in this state until 1887, 
making trips between Rockcreek and Buffalo, Wyoming. In that year he turned 
his attention to the livery business at Douglas and is still owner of his livery 
barn, but disposed of his horses and equipment in 1912. While in the livery 
business he also engaged in ranching, raising stock and sheep for five years, 
after which he disposed of his interests in that connection. He has made judi- 
cious investments in property and from his holdings derives a substantial annual 
income. 

On the 23d of September, 1889, Mr. Allen was united in marriage to Miss 
Edith McAllister, a native of Illinois. Their marriage was celebrated in 
Nebraska, although both were living in Douglas at the time. They have become 
the parents of four children: ^'e^na, wdio is the wife of R. Swan; Doris, who 



40 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

is deputy clerk at the courthouse in Douglas ; Robert, who is a student in the 
Wyoming University; and Harvey, who completes the family. There is also 
one grandchild. 

Mr. Allen has on several occasions been called to public office, his fellow 
townsmen recognizing his efficiency, capability and public spirit. He served as 
a member of the city council of Douglas for five years and was called to the 
office of mayor, in which capacity he served for four years, giving to the city a 
business-like and progressive administration that brought about various prac- 
tical reforms and resulted in the adoption of progressive measures. He is now 
serving as county commissioner and is making an excellent record in this posi- 
tion. The Wyoming that he knows today is in sharp contrast with the Wyoming 
with which he became familiar in the early 'Sos. At that time not a railroad 
had penetrated into this region, the Indians were numerous, the white settlers 
few and the most farsighted could not have dreamed of the changes which were 
to occur as the seeds of civilization were planted on the western frontier and in 
time bore rich fruit. He has ever taken an active part in advancing the work of 
general progress and improvement and well deserves mention among the hon- 
ored pioneers and valued citizens of Converse county. 



HOX. A. M. NICHOLS. 

Hon. A. AI. Nichols, a foremost business man of Newcastle, where he is 
engaged in general merchandising and is also prominently known as the president 
of the Newcastle National Bank, was born in Osage, Mitchell county, Iowa, on 
the 9th of August, 1871, a son of Melvin and Almeda (Cooper) Nichols, both 
of whom are natives of Illinois, where they were reared and married. Soon 
afterward they removed to Iowa, settling in Mitchell county, and afterward they 
became residents of Audubon county, that state, there remaining until April, 
1887, when they came to Wyoming, settling at Douglas. Two years afterward 
they established their home in Sundance and Mr. Nichols, who was a minister 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, has contmued to make his home in Sundance 
to the present time. Four years after he became a resident of that city he resigned 
from the ministry and for the past quarter of a centur}- has practiced law. 

A. M. Nichols was educated in the high school of Audubon. Iowa, returning 
to that state in order to complete his education. He later took up newspaper 
work on the Audubon Times and suliscquently came to the west for his employers, 
to work on the Rowdy West, which they established in Douglas, Wyoming. Two 
years afterward Mr. Nichols joined the force of the Sundance Gazette, with 
which publication he was identified for three years, and in 1892 he removed to 
Newcastle, where he purchased an interest in the News-Journal and was identified 
with the conduct of that paper until 1898. He then took up a homestead in 
Weston county, which he occupied and cultivated for three years, on the expira- 
tion of which period he again became a resident of the city. In igoo he founded 
his present mercantile- liusincss. which he has developed into one of the most 
important commercial enterprises of Wyoming. He has a large and splendidly 
appointed store, carries an extensive line of goods and his patronage has steadilv 
increased. He still retains his ranching interests and in partnership with F. W. 
Mondell. member of congress, owns the Oil Creek ranch, on which they are 
extensively engaged in the raising of cattle. Since 1900 'Sir. Nichols and Mr. 
Mondell have been associated in their business operations and for some years 
were active in the field of railroad construction work. In 1917 Mr. Nichols 
became the dominant factor in the organization of the Newcastle National Bank, 
of which he was made president, and already the institutioti has become one 
of the strong financial concerns of this section of the state. Its business policy 
is a substantial one and will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny, while 
the experience of the men at the head of the bank augurs well for its future. 




^^"^^^ 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 43 

On the 24th of December, 1891, Mr. Xichois was united in marriage to :\Iiss 
( )rpha Ogden, a daughter of the Rev. David Ogden, who was one of the first 
preachers to enter the Black Hills. To Air. and Mrs. Nichols have been born 
four children, three of whom are living: Lloyd A., who is a graduate of the 
( Jhio Wesleyan University and a licensed embalmer and who is the vice presi- 
dent of the A. M. Nichols Supply Company: Dwight O., who is now in the 
Reserve Officers training camp at Lincoln, Nebraska : and Glen L., who is attend- 
ing the Newcastle high school. 

In politics Mr. Nichols is a republican and that he is a prominent and influ- 
ential resident of his city is indicated in the fact that he is the present mayor 
of Newcastle and in 1899-1900 he served as a member of the board of county 
commissioners. He was elected to represent his district in the state legislature 
at the fall election of 1908 and served throughout the tenth general assembly, 
during which time he became widely known as the author of the high license 
bill. He was connected with much other constructive legislation and at all times 
stood for progress and improvement in affairs having to do with the welfare 
and upbuilding of the commonwealth. Fraternally he is connected with New- 
castle Lodge, No. 13. A. F. & .-\. M.. and has attained the thirty-second degree 
of the Scottish Rite in Cheyenne Consistory. No. i. A. & A. S. R.' He is likewise 
identified with Kalif Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Sheridan, and he and his 
wife are members of the Order of the Eastern Star. Mr. Nichols is also con- 
nected with Pythagoras Lodge, No. 15, K. P.. of Newcastle, and with several 
minor organizations. He is a member of the Newcastle Commercial Club and 
is in hearty sympathy with all of its well defined plans and measures .to advance 
the upbuilding of the city and extend its trade relations. He and his family 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and sterling worth of character 
has gained Mr. Nichols a foremost position in the regard of his fellow towns- 
men, while indefatigable enterprise, keen sagacity and sound business judgment 
have placed him in the front ranks in commercial and financial circles of A\'eston 
county. 



GILBERT TAYSON. 



Gilbert Tayson. filling the office of county treasurer in Lincoln county and 
a valued and popular resident of Kemmerer, was born at Afton, Wyoming. May 
30, 1891, being the sixth in order of birth among the four sons and three daughters 
who constituted the family of Abraham J. and Hannah (Nield) Tayson. The 
father is a native of Iowa and a descendant of John Tayson, who came from 
Wales. Abraham J- Tayson has devoted his life to farming and stock raising and 
in 1889 removed westward from Iowa to Wyoming, where he engaged extensively 
in raising stock. In 1916 he served as committeeman from Wyoming on the 
national democratic committee and is now serving as a member of the central 
committee of his county. He is quite active in politics and is a man of con- 
siderable influence in count}- and state, his opinions carrying weight among the 
leaders of the party. His wife, also a native of Iowa, is of English lineage, her 
parents having been born in London, England, whence they came to the new 
world and established their home in the Hawkeye state. 

Gilbert Tayson became a student in the Fielding Academy at Paris, Idaho, 
after attending the public schixils until njoj. He devoted four years to the 
mastery of his course in th;it institini(in ;[nil was then graduated with the class of 
1911. His early life was sjient upmi tin- liiniie farm and range and he became 
familiar with all the experiences and duties that fall to the lot of those who 
engage in general agricultural pursuits or stock raising upon the range. When 
twenty years of age he started out to earn his own livelihood and his first posi- 
tion after leaving home w:^^ th-at of a salesman with the Burton Mercantile 
Company of Afton, \\'yoniing, with whom he remained for two years. He 



44 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

then went abroad as a missionary of the Church of the Latter-Day Saints and 
was absent for two and a half years in Great Britain, spending much time in 
the Nottingham and London districts of England. He, however, practically 
visited every county in England and Wales, engaged in the work of the church, 
and his efforts there were a pronounced success. On his return to Afton he 
was approached by party leaders who wished him to become a candidate on the 
democratic ticket for the office of county treasurer. He consented and was 
elected to the office in November, 1916, assuming the duties of the position on 
the 1st of January, 1917. He has proven a faithful custodian of the public 
funds and his record is one which deserves and receives the high commenda- 
tion of the general public. He has always been interested in political and civic 
problems and has labored persistently and earnestly to advance the general wel- 
fare along lines which he believes will work for permanent good. 

On the 29th of November, 1916, in the Temple at Salt Lake City, Mr. Tayson 
was united in marriage to Miss Lita L. AIcBride, a native of Oakley, Idaho, and 
a daughter of Aaron and Caroline (Larson) McBride, representatives of one 
of the old families of Idaho of English descent. The McBrides were very promi- 
nent in England, where the ancestral records can be traced back to the tenth 
century, and such records indicate that the first of the family in England went 
to that country with William the Conqueror. Mr. and Mrs. Tayson have 
become the parents of a son. Howard M., who was born in Afton, Wyoming, 
August 30, 191 7. 

Mr. Tayson is identified with the Chamber of Commerce at Kemmerer and is 
a supporter of all the well devised plans and purposes of that organization to 
extend the trade relations of the city and to uphold its interests. He has been 
a hfelong member of the Church of the Latter-Day Saints and was second coun- 
selor to Bishop Reginald Evans of the Kemmerer ward. Widely and favorably 
known in Lincoln county, he is found loyal to every interest entrusted to his 
care, whether of a public or private nature, and his many sterling traits of 
character have gained him the genuine regard and warm friendship of many 
with whom he has been brought in contact. 



CYRUS BEARD. 



Cyrus Ileard, judge of the supreme court of Wyoming, who upon the bench 
has proved himself as the peer of the ablest representatives of the court of last 
resort during the histor}' of the state, was born in \'enango county, Pennsylvania, 
August 13, 1850, a son of Thomas and Mary (McKinley) Beard. The father was 
a farmer by occupation and removed with the family to Iowa in the spring of 
1865, spending his remaining days in that state, where he passed away in the 
eighty-ninth year of his age. His wife is also deceased. In the family were four 
sons. 

■ Cyrus Beard, the third in order of birth, acquired his education in public and 
private schools and in the Iowa State LTniversity, from which he was graduated in 
1874 on the completion of a law course. He first practiced in \\'ashington, Iowa, 
where he remained until 1878, after which he went to Harlan, Iowa, where he 
continued until 1890. He then removed to Evanston, Wyoming, and entered into 
a partnership with former Senator C. D. Clark, and there he resided until 1897, 
after which he returned to Iowa and engaged in the practice of law in partnership 
with Governor L. M. Shaw as a member of the firm of Shaw, Kuehnle & Beard. 
That association was maintained until August, 1900, when Judge Beard took up 
his abode in Evanston, Wyoming. Locating there he continued in practice from 
1900 until 1904. He was elected to the bench in the latter year and entered upon 
his duties as one of the supreme judges of the state. In 1912 he was reelected to 
the office, so that his incumbency will continue until January. 1921. 

His decisions indicate strong mentality, careful analysis, a thorough knowledge 




CYRUS BEARD 



46 HISTORY OF WYO^IIXG 

of the lav,- and an unbiased judgment. The judge on the bench fails more fre- 
quently perhaps from a deticiency in that broad mindedness which not only com- 
prehends the details of a situation quickly and that insures a complete self-control 
under even the most exasperating conditions, than from any other cause ; and the 
judge who makes a success in the discharge of his multitudinous delicate duties is 
a man of well rounded character, finely balanced mind and of splendid intellectual 
attainments. That Judge Beard is regarded as such a jurist is a uniformly 
accepted fact, and he well merits the high honor which was conferred upon him 
by his elevation to the highest court of appeals. 

Judge Beard has been married twice. In 1875 he wedded Miss Nora E. 
Willson. who died in 1893. Their children were: Mary, now the wife of W. 
W. Pefley: Clare E.. the wife of George W. Daiber; and Arthur A., heutenant. 
Twenty-third Regiment. United States Engineers. In 1896 the Judge was again 
married, his second union being with Miss Frances B. Birkhead. 

Judge Beard is a Protestant in religious belief. In politics he is a republican 
and served as mayor of Evanston. Fraternally he is identified with the MasOns 
and is a past grand commander of the Knights Templar of Wyoming. He has 
attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and is regarded as a most 
valued and worthy exemplar of the craft. 



RAYMOXD BARBER, M. D. 

Dr. Raymond Barber, a physician and surgeon of Rawlins who is district 
surgeon for the Union Pacific Railroad Company, was born in Doylestown, Penn- 
sylvania, June 12, 1875, a son of Elliston P. Barber, who is a native of the Kev- 
stone state and a representative of one of the old families of New Jersey. The 
founder of the family in America came to the new world at an early period in 
its colonization. The father was a successful coal dealer in Doylestown for 
many years, conducting a business of large and profitable proportions, but is now 
living retired. He wedded Mary Gargis Rich, who was also born in Pennsyl- 
vania and belonged to one of the old families of that state of English origin. She 
died at the age of thirty-four years. In the family were four children, two of 
whom have passed away, while those still living are : Raymond, of this review ; 
and \\'illiam H., who is residing in Eaton, Colorado, where he is cashier of the 
Eaton National Bank. 

Dr. Barber mastered the branches of learning taught in the public and high 
schools of Doylestowai, Pennsylvania, where he was graduated with the class of 
1895. Following his graduation he became associated with his father in the coal 
trade but at length determined to turn his attention from commercial to profes- 
sional interests and in igoo matriculated in the Jefterson Medical College at 
Philadelphia, where he completed the full course of study and was graduated with 
the M. D. degree in 1904. He then served for one year as an interne in the 
/Samaritan Hospital at Philadelphia and thus put his theoretical knowledge to 
the practical test, gaining that broad and valuable experience which only hospital 
practice brings. At the end of that time he came west to, Wyoming, making 
his way to Cheyenne to visit his vtncle. Dr. Amos W. Barber, now deceased, who 
was at that time one of the old-time residents of Cheyenne and a prominent 
physician of the city. This and the opportunities which the west offered caused 
Dr. Barber to locate in Wyoming and on the '25th of September, 1905, he 
arrived in Rawlins, where he entered upon active practice, in which he has since 
continuously and successfully engaged. He has not concentrated his efforts 
along a single branch of the profession but has continued in the general practice 
of medicine and surgery and his business has reached extensive proportions, 
while the results that have followed his efi'orts have been most satisfactory to 
his patients. Broad reading and investigation keep him in touch with the trend 
of modern professional thought and progress and the most scientific methods 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 47 

are utilized in his care of the sick. He served as county health officer under 
the administration of Governor Brooks, being appointed in 1907 and continuing 
in the position until Governor Carey went into office. He was physician to the 
penitentiary from iqo/ until 19T i and during Governor Kendrick's administra- 
tion also served. He is now the county physician and is also the district surgeon 
for the Union Pacific Railroad Company and surgeon for the Utah Construc- 
tion Company. In addition he is accorded a large private practice and ranks 
with the leading physicians of western Wyoming. 

In New York city, on the 20th of January, 1912, Dr. Barber was united 
in marriage to Miss Gertrude CJardner, a native of Michigan. Her father died 
during her childhood and her mother, Mrs. Florence J. Gardner, who was one 
of the early residents of Rawlins, now makes her home in Xew York city. Dr. 
and Mrs. Barber have a very beautiful residence in Rawlins and occupy a promi- 
nent position in social circles. 

In politics the doctor is a republican, while fraternally he is a prominent 
Mason, belonging to lodge, chapter, consistory and Mystic .Shrine, being a past 
potentate of Korein Temple, A. A. O. X. M. S. He is also connected with 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and the Phi .Mpha Sigma, a medical 
fraternity of Philadelphia. His interests are broad and varied and upon all 
questions of vital importance he keeps abreast with the thinking men of the age. 
Those who know him, and he has a wide acquaintance, esteem him as a man 
of high purpose, while in all matters of citizenship he is recognized as a man of 
public spirit and in his profession, actuated by advanced ideals, he is making his 
work of great worth to his fellowmen. 



CHARLES M. FREEMAN, M. D. 

Dr. Charles M. Freeman, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in 
Rock Springs, has made for himself a creditable position among the physicians 
and surgeons of \\'yoming who have intimate knowledge of the scientific prin- 
ciples which underlie their work and who are most careful to conform their 
practice to the highest professional ethics and standards. 

He was born in I'.rant county, Ontario, Canada, in the village of Scotland, 
January 5, 1850. His father, William Freeman, also a native of Ontario, repre- 
sented one of the old Canadian families of English lineage founded in America 
by Isaac Freeman, who on leaving England took up his abode in Canada. \\'illiam 
Freeman was a successful farmer of that country and died in Brantford in 
18S9, at the age of seventy-six years. His wife, who in her nnidenhi md was 
^lary Smith, was born in Ontario, Canada, and was also of I'.n-li-h lineage, 
early representatives of her family residing near Hamilton, Ontanu. Mrs. h'ree- 
man passed away March 17, 1917, at the notable old age of ninety-six years. 

Dr. Charles M. Freeman, who was the fifth in a family of six children, pur- 
sued his education in the public schools of his native town of Scotland and in 
the colksiate institute at Brantford, thus acquiring a liberal literary education 
to ser\e .1- thi- h.i-is of his professional knowledge. He prepared for the prac- 
tice of niedicuH- as a student in Trinity University at Toronto, Canada, where 
he was graduated with the class of 1882. He then crossed the liorder into the 
United States, establishing an office in JMuskegon, Michigan, where he entered 
upon his chosen life work. There he remained for six years and on the expira- 
tion of that period removed to Rochester, New York, where he spent eleven 
years. He then determined to locate in the west and made his way direct to 
Rock Sjirings, \\'yoming, where since the ist of January, 1899, or fo'' ^ period 
oi more than eighteen years, he has been engaged in acti^-e and successful general 
practice. He has done excellent work in this connection, keeping in touch with 
modern scientific researches and discoveries, and while he does not hastily 
abandon old and time-tried methods, he is ever willing to take up new ideas 



48 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

which his judgment sanctions as of value in professional service. He belongs 
to the Wyoming State IMedical Society and the American Medical Association, 
and he enjoys the goodwill and confidence of his professional colleagues and 
contemporaries. 

On the 5th of September, 18S5, Dr. Freeman was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth Cobban, a native of Ontario and a daughter of Air. and Mrs. Mathew 
Cobban, both of whom were of Scotch descent and have now passed away. Dr. 
and J\Irs. Freeman have become the parents of two children who are living: 
Marie M., the wife of L. C. Ferguson, a civil engineer residing in Provo, Utah ; 
and Gladwyn C, who is living in Rock Springs. 

Politicallv Dr. Freeman has given his support to the democratic party and 
is an interested worker in its ranks because of his firm belief in its principles 
and policy. He is now serving as a member of the city council of Rock Springs 
and is also deputy county health officer of Sweetwater county. Fraternally he 
is connected with the Elks, the Eagles, the JNloose, the Woodmen of the World 
and the Modern Woodmen of America, and is a loyal follower of these organiza- 
tions, which are based upon a recognition of man's obligations to his fellowmen. 
He has developed his native powers through the exercise of eft'ort and his life 
record is an indication of the fact that activity does not tire but gives resisting 
power. He concentrates his attention in large measure upon his professional 
interests and discharges his duties with a sense of conscientious obligation that 
has been productive of excellent results. He is now the family physician in 
many of the best households of Rock Springs and his labors have been attended 
with a gratifying measure of success. 



HON. OTTO GRAMM. 



Closely interwoven with the commercial and industrial development of Lara- 
mie and with the political history of the state is the name oi Hon. Otto Gramm, 
who has been a prominent factor in the mercantile and manufacturing interests of 
his city and has been honored with the position of state treasurer of A\'yoming, 
in which office his record reflected credit and honor upon the people who honored 
him. 

He was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, November 11, 1846, a son of the late Moses 
Gramm, a native of Germany, who came to America in early life and settled in 
Chillicothe, Ohio, where he followed mercantile pursuits, there residing until his 
death. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Helen Limie, was also a native 
of Germany and has departed this life. In their family were five children. 

Hon. Otto Gramm, who was the eldest, acquired his education in the public 
schools of his native city and when eight years of age. upon the death of his 
parents, went to live with relatives, Mrs. M. A. Tritscheller becoming his foster- 
mother. He made his initial step in the business world as an employe in a drug 
store and learned the business, to which he largely devoted his time and atten- 
tion from the age of ten years until 1888, when he was elected county treasurer 
of Albany county, \\'yoming. He had become a resident of Laramie on the 1st of 
February, 1870, arriving here a comparative stranger with but one acquaint- 
ance, Dr. J- H. Finfrock, who was a pioneer druggist of the city, being the 
second to engage in that line of business in Laramie. Mr. Gramm purchased 
Dr. Finfrock's drug store and conducted it successfully until 1888, when he was 
elected to the offices of county treasurer and probate judge of Albany county, 
filling the dual position for six years in a most satisfactory' manner. In fact, 
the excellence of his service recommended him for higher political honors and 
he was nominated as a candidate for state treasurer, to which ]iii-iiiiiii In- \y;is 
elected for a four years' term. Almost from the moment of his arri\,-il m \\ ymiiing 
he took a very active part in promoting its business development and in ad\ ancing 
its public interests. For eight years he was in charge of the Laramie Rolling Mills 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 51 

Company, of which he was one of the organizers. He also organized the first 
fire department and was its first chief. He continued to act in that capacity for 
many years during the period when this was a vohmteer fire department and at 
length he organized and equipped the present department, making it a paid depart- 
ment. This was but one of the many activities which he put forth for tli^ benefit 
and upbuilding of his city. In fact, his aid and cooperation can always be counted 
upon to further every measure or movement for the general good and he has taken 
the initial step in connection with many projects which have been of the greatest 
benefit to Laramie. 

On February 21, 1914, he organized the Fox Park Timber Company, which 
company's plant is situated on the line of the C. W. and E. Railroad, where they 
are engaged in the manufacture of railroad ties, mine props, etc., while at Lara- 
mie is located that company's sawmill where they produce manufactured lumber, 
the logs coming down on the line of the C. W. and E. Railroad. Mr. Gramm is 
the principal owner in this company and has been its president ever since its 
organization. 

His political endorsement has always been gi\en to the republican party, of 
which he is a most stalwart champion, never faltering in his allegiance thereto. 
He has been a member of the state central cummittee and has served as chairman 
of the county central committee for uKiny years. He has always taken a very active 
part in politics and has done much to mold public thought and action, his opinions 
at all times carrying weight in party councils. 

On the nth of November, 1909, Mr. Gramm was married in Lincoln, Ne- 
braska, to Mrs. Hannah Durlacher, a native of Germany. In fraternal circles 
]\lr. Gramm has also figured prominently. He is identified with the various Ma- 
sonic bodies, including the blue lodge, chapter, commandery and consistory, and 
he belongs to the Knights of Pythias, the Loyal Order of Moose, the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles and the Improved Order of Red Men. He is a past grand com- 
mander of the Knights Templar of Wyoming, a past grand chancellor of the 
Knights of Pythias of the state and a past grand high priest of the Grand Chapter 
of Masons. In fact, he has been active in all its various organizations. In a 
word, Mr. Gramm is fitted for leadership, a fact which his associates speedily 
came to recognize and put him in the position for which he is so splendidly qual- 
ified. In all that he does he has been actuated by the most intense public spirit 
and loyalty and his devotion to any trust reposed in him is pronounced. His 
name is carved high on the roll of Wyoming's illustrious and honored citizens. 



RAYMOND BENJAMINE WEST. 

Since tlie ist of January, IQ06, Raymond Benjamine West has been engaged 
in the practice of law at Basin and has been accorded a liberal clientage which 
has constantly grown both in volume and importance, connecting him with 
many of the leading cases tried in the courts of his district. He was born in 
Nebraska City, Nebraska, January 25, 1875, and is a son of Dempsey Carlyal 
and Anna E. West. In the State University of Nebraska he pursued his prep- 
aration for the bar and was graduated on the 13th of June, 1901, with the LL. B. 
degree. He then entered upon practice after being admitted to the Nebraska 
bar on the 13th of June of that year. He was also admitted to practice at the 
bar of Wyoming in October of the same year and on the following 19th of June he 
came to Codv. On the ist of July, 1902. he removed to Meeteetse, where he 
engaged in general merchandising until July i, 1905. On the ist of January, 
1906, he entered upon the practice of law at Basin and on the 1st of January. 
191 1, was elected county attorney, which position he filled until the 1st of 
January, 1913, carefully protecting the legal interests of the county during that 
period. In his practice he has won for himself very favorable criticism for the 
careful and systematic methods which he has followed. He has remarkable 

Vol. n— s 



52 , HISTORY OF WYOMING 

powers of concentration and application and his retentive mind has often excited 
the surprise of his professional colleagues. As an orator he stands high, espe- 
cially in the discussion of legal matters before the court, where his comprehensive 
knowledge of the law is manifest and his application of legal principles demon- 
strates the wide range of his professional acquirements. The utmost care and 
precision characterize his preparation of a case and have made him one of 
the successful attorneys of Bighorn county. 

At North Platte, Nebraska, May 27, 1908, Mr. West was married to Miss 
Nora Davis Fenwick and to them have been born two children: Helen Eliz- 
abeth, born April 3, 1909; and Margaret Lucile, August 4. 191 1. The parents 
are communicants of the Episcopal church and take an active interest in its 
work and progress. 

Mr. West belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken high 
rank. He is now a past master of Temple Lodge, No. 20, A. F. & A. M., of 
Basin; has membership with the Knight Templar commandery at Sheridan; 
and is a member of Kalif Temple. A. A. O. N. M. S. He likewise belongs to the 
Basin Chamber of Commerce and was president thereof in the year 1917, co- 
operating heartily in all of its well defined plans and projects for the upbuilding 
of the city, the extension of its trade relations and the upholding of its civic 
standards." His political allegiance has always been given to the republican 
party but he has never sought office outside the strict path of his pro- 
fession. His military record covers service as sergeant of Company A, of the 
Third Nebraska Regiment during the Spanish-American war and as captain 
of Company D, of the Third Wyoming National Guard, in which regiment he 
was afterward promoted to the 'rank of major, continuing in that connection 
until he resigned in January, 19 15. His interests are wide and varied and he is 
actuated in all that "he does by a spirit of progress and improvement that has 
brought excellent results. 



HON. JOHN A. RINER. 



Hon. John A. Riner. who since 1890 has sat upon the bench of the L'nited 
States district court at Cheyenne, became a resident of that city in 1879, at which 
time he opened a law office. Through the intervening period he has been connected 
with the profession as legist or jurist and his developing powers and pronounced 
ability have gained for him the place of prominence which has so long been ac- 
corded him. 

A native of Ohio, he was born in Preble county in 1850, his parents being John 
and Mary (White) Riner. The father, also a native of the Buckeye state, was 
a millwright by trade. He remained a resident of Ohio until 1868, when he es- 
tablished his home in Butler county, Iowa, where he passed his remaining days, his 
death there occurring in 1889. His wife was of New England birth and in her 
early girlhood removed from her native state of Vermont to Preble county, Ohio, 
where she was reared to adult age. There she was married and made her home 
until 1868, when with her husband and family she went to Iowa, where she passed 
away in 1897. 

Judge Riner, spending his boyhood days under the parental roof, attended 
the public schools, dividing his time between the duties of the schoolroom, the 
pleasures of the playground and such tasks as were assigned him through parental 
authority. In young manhood he reviewed the broad field of business and de- 
termined upon the practice of law as a life work. He then became a student in 
the law department of the State University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and was 
there graduated as a member of the class of 1879. He turned to the west as a 
fruitful field in which to begin his professional career and made his way to 
Cheyenne, ^^'yoming, where he at once ojiened an office. Advancement at tlie bar 
is proverbially slow and yet no dreary novitiate awaited him. His practice steadily 




HON. JOHjST a. RINER 



54 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

grew and in 1881 he was elected city attorney, the duties of which he discharged 
most satisfactorily to all concerned until the expiration of his term. In the mean- 
time his private practice continued to develop and his ability became widely recog- 
nized through the capable manner in which he conducted his cases and the many 
favorable verdicts which he won for his clients. When there was a vacancy in the 
office of United States district attorney he was prominently mentioned for the 
position and in recognition of his talents and his powers received the appointment 
m 1884. He at once entered upon the discharge of his duties in that connection 
and served for one year. In 1886 he was elected on the republican ticket to the 
Territorial Council and was actively connected with the passage of several most 
important legislative measures, thus leaving the impress of his individuality and 
public spirit upon the history of the state. He also served as president of the 
council during the session. Retiring from the legislature he resumed his practice 
of law, which in volume and importance had become second to none in the state. 
After a year he was elected to the general assembly, this time becoming a member 
of the state senate, although he resigned before the legislature convened, in order 
to accept the appointment of United States district judge, which came to him on 
the 22d of September, 1890. He has since served upon the bench — a period of 
almost twenty-eight years. His long continuance in the office stands as incon- 
trovertible proof of the fairness and impartiality of his rulings and of his com- 
prehensive knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence which underlie his 
decisions. His opinions have been reversed in a notably few instances and he is 
regarded as one of the ablest jurists of the west. 

In 1882 Judge Riner was united in marriage to Miss May Jillich, of Ohio, and 
they have become parents of four children: Ida M., Gertrude, Dorothy and 
John A. 

In his fraternal relations Judge Riner is a Mason and has attained the thirty- 
third degree of the Scottish Rite and the Knight Templar degree in the York Rite. 
He is also affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, with which he has been identified 
for a number of years. In politics he has been a lifelong republican and he has 
ever been a close student of those vital questions which are regarded by the think- 
ing men of the age as of the greatest importance — questions that ha\e to do with 
the sociological and economic as well as political situation of the country. In 
manner ever most courteous, he is nevertheless firm and unyielding in all that he 
believes to be right. Whatever he has done in his entire career at the bar has 
been for the best interests of his clients and for the honor of his profession. 
Among the jurists of Wyoming there is perhaps none whose record in office has 
covered a longer period and the record of none has been more faultless in honor, 
fearless in conduct or stainless in reputation. 



JOHN McNAMARA. 



Much has been written concernmg the relative importance of various lines 
of business or of various kinds of official service, but when one stops to thought- 
fully consider the situation, it must be recognized that the faithful performance 
of duty in every particular adds to the stability and strength of the whole. The 
old saying that a chain is no stronger than its weakest link might be well applied 
to the' official activities of the body politic. Each public officer has a part to 
perform and delinquency in any regard must weaken the entire system under 
which government business is carried on. 

Actively identified with the mail service in Wyoming is John McNamara, 
who is filling the office of postmaster at Kemmerer and who is prompt, faith- 
ful and reliable in the discharge of all of his duties. He was born in Rutland, 
Vermont. March 28, 1869, and is a son of Michael and Mary McNamara, both 
of whom were natives of Ireland. The father came to America in 1850 and 
took up his abode in the Green Mountain state, where he engaged principally 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 55 

in railroad work. He afterward became a resident of New Sharon, Iowa, 
removing westward to that state in the early '70s and becoming one of the 
pioneers of the region in which he located. He is now living retired. His 
wife crossed the Atlantic from the Emerald isle in her girlhood days and she, 
too, became a resident of Vermont, settling near Rutland, where she formed 
the acquaintance of Air. McNamara, who sought and won her hand in marriage. 
They had a family of five children, who were called upon to mourn the death 
of the mother when in 1894 she passed to the home beyond. 

John McNamara was the fourth in order of birth in that family and was 
educated in the public schools of New Sharon, Iowa, having been but a few 
years old when the family home was established at that place. He was only 
twelve years of age when he started out to earn his own living. He took up the 
study of telegraphy and became a train dispatcher at the age of sixteen years, 
being stationed at Keithsburg, Illinois. He filled the position for a year and 
worked along that line until 1913, serving as chief train dispatcher on various 
roads. In 1890 he came to Wyoming, first establishing his home at Green River, 
where he entered the employ of the Union Pacific Railway Company. In 1908 
he became a citizen of Kemmerer and was train disj^atcher for the Oregon Short 
Line Railway Company until March i, 1914. when he was appointed to the posi- 
tion of postmaster of Kemmerer by President Wilson. He has since filled the 
office and has made an excellent record by the prompt and capable manner in 
which he has discharged his duties, faithfully performing every task that devolves 
upon him in this connection. 

At Rock Springs, W'yoming, on the 3d of April, i8()3. Mr. McNamara was 
married to Miss Theresa Mueller, a native of St. Louis, Missouri, and a daughter 
of Steven and Susan Mueller. They have become parents of four children : Mary, 
who was born at Green River, Wyoming, August i, 1897; James, born at Green 
River, April 25, 1900; and Frances and Theresa, twins, who were born at Poca- 
tello, Idaho, December 15, 1905. 

Mr. McNamara has always given his political allegiance to the democratic 
party and is a firm advocate of its principles. He is a Mason and holds mem- 
bership in the blue lodge at Kemmerer, the Knights Templar commandery at 
Green River and the Mystic Shrine at Rawlins. He is also identified with the 
Chamber of Commerce and is in entire sympathy with the work of that organi- 
zation in behalf of the city and the extension of its trade relations and the ad- 
vancement of its civic standards. He was reared a Catholic and the family are 
communicants of St. Patrick's parish. Mr. McNamara deserves much credit 
for what he has accomplished, as he started out in the business world at a salary 
of thirty-five dollars per month and has steadily worked his way upward by 
reason of his persistency of purpose, his capability and his trustworthiness. 



ARTHUR J. ROSIER. 



Arthur L Rosier, who is filling the position of prosecuting attorney of Carbon 
county and" makes his home in Rawlins, was born in West Union, Todd county, 
Minnesota, October 31, 1880, his parents being Thomas R. and Helen M. (W^ol- 
cott) Rosier, both of whom were natives of the state of New York and removed 
westward to Minnesota at an early day. The father there engaged in farming and 
also devoted much time to inventions, producing a number of inventions in con- 
nection with farm machinery. He also brought forth the Rosier fire extinguisher, 
a product of his inventive genius, which was manufactured at Omaha, Nebraska. 
The active control of his luisiness afl:"airs, combined with his marked skill and 
ingenuity, made him at one time a very wealthy man. He died October 4, 1912, at 
the age of sixty-seven years, and is still survived by his widow, who resides on 
a homestead thirteen miles southeast of Torrington, Wyoming. She has reached 
the age of seventy years. In their family were five children : Thomas R.. who is 



56 HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 

living in Livingston, Montana ; Xellie, the wife of Charles E. Ulrich, of Los 
Angeles, California; Mrs. Edward Krause, whose home is in Appleton, Wiscon- 
sin; and Harold ^^^, living at Torrington. Wyoming. 

Arthur J. Rosier, the otlier member of the family, was the third in order 
of birth and in his boyhood attended the public schools of Sioux Falls, South 
Dakota, while later he became a student in the State University at Vermilion, South 
Dakota, where he spent three years. He next entered the night school of the 
University of Minnesota as a law student, pursuing a special course in law, cover- 
ing three years, at the end of which time he was admitted to the bar upon exam- 
ination before the supreme court of Montana on the 6th of June. 1906. In July 
of that year he began practice at Butte, Montana, where he remained until Sep- 
tember, 191 1. On the 30th of October of that year he was admitted to practice in 
the courts of Wyoming and opened an office in Rawlins, where he has since re- 
mained, devoting his time and attention to his professional duties. He belongs 
to both the Montana and to the Wyoming State Bar Associations. He is now serv- 
ing for the second term as prosecuting attorney of Carbon county, having been re- 
elected to that office in November, 1916. He always prepares his cases with great 
thoroughness and care, is clear in his reasoning, logical in his deductions and his 
arguments are characterized by great strength. He has also served as court com- 
missioner of Carbon county and in addition to his professional duties he has 
enjoyed a growing private practice and is now attorney for the First State Bank 
at Baggs, Wyoming, and for the Stock Growers Bank of Saratoga, Wyoming, 
as well as for a number of private concerns. 

On the 15th of June, 1914, Mr. Rosier was married in Denver, Colorado, to 
Miss Grace G. Arthaud, of Burwell, Nebraska, who comes from one of the old 
families of Garfield county, that state. They have one child, Jean Helen, born in 
Rawlins, September 3, 1917. 

Fraternally Mr. Rosier is a Mason of high rank, having become a member 
of the Mystic Shrine. He is also connected with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks and with the Improved Order of Red Men. His political endorsement is 
given to the republican party, but he has never sought office outside the strict path 
of his profession, preferring to concentrate his energies upon law practice, recog- 
nizing the fact that the law is a jealous mistress and would have the undivided 
attention of her followers if she crowns them with success. He prepares his cases 
with great thoroughness and he possesses a law library of rare value. His office 
equipment is most comprehensive and in preparing a case for the court he looks 
up every authority bearing upon the question and therefore enters the court well 
qualified for defense as well as for attack. 



FRANCIS S. KING. 



The name of Francis S. King is synonymous with the development ami 
improvement of the sheep industry in America. There is no resident of Wyo- 
ming who has done as much to improve the grade of sheep raised and the 
methods followed as he. His work, therefore, has been of untold value a.'' a 
factor in promoting the material prosperity and upbuilding of the state, and 
the story of his life is a most interesting one. He was born on the Isle of 
Man in 1867, a son of the Rev. William and Elizabeth ( Stocker) King, the 
former an eminent minister of the Methodist church and the founder of the 
Jersey Ladies' ColIeEre on the island of Jersey. He died in Kent in 1882. leaving 
a widow and ten children, eight sons and two daughters, all of whom yet survive 
and who are mentioned in connection with the sketch of Joseph Hall King on 
another page of this work. 

Francis S. Kin?, the eldest of the brothers, came to America in 1884. when 
a youth of seventeen years. He had j^reviously attended school at \'ictoria 
College on the island of Jersey. On reaching American shores he went to 



HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 59 

Nemaha county, Nebraska, where lived his uncle, and later he started tor 
Wyoming, arriving in Laramie in 1884. He was employed for a time in con- 
nection with the sheep business and soon purchased a half interest, thus enter- 
ing into partnership with Paul Pascoe. The next November he took a band of 
o\er three thousand wethers to Nebraska for wintering. At Hillside, Wyoming, 
they were caught in a four days' blizzard and two of his assistants were frozen 
to death. The sheep, however, escaped, and Mr. King and his other assistants 
continued on to Nebraska. From that point he has made steady progress in 
the sheep industry and there is no man who has done more for its development 
in Wyoming and in fact in the entire country. The following spring he pur- 
chased a large flock of sheep on credit. These he herded himself. The price 
of mutton was at that time very low — less than anything else produced, so Mr. 
King would rise before day and take his mutton to town by daylight. His 
business methods resulted in forcing the butchers to pay a fair price. The first 
sheep which he raised were Merinos. His brother. Herbert j. King, usually 
known as Bert, joined him when a youth of seventeen years, F. S. King per- 
suading his brother to come to the new world, and a few years later they were 
joined by another brother, Joseph H. King, who had at that time just completed 
college. 'F. S. and J. H. King cut logs and with the help of F. A. Blake, father 
of Judge Blake, built the old King homestead, the brother mixing the plaster, 
while ^Ir. King of this review put it on. Through this period in his life Mr. 
King felt the beneficial influence and assistance of Airs. Blake, who was a fine 
specimen of womanhood and did more for the young men of the country than 
almost anyone else. She lived to be more than ninety years of age. She took 
the place of a mother to Mr. King and in fact devoted practically all of her time 
to aiding others. She was the head of the church movement in her locality and 
of the \\'oman's Relief Corps, and she was everywhere known throughout the 
district as Mother Blake, which was a term of endearment, indicating the filial 
aifection felt for her by the young men whom she had mothered. The first 
land which F. S. King took up was east of the range, and to his original 
holdings he added from time to time until he secured one hundred and twenty 
thousand acres by deed and lease, this not including the government range. The 
brothers in their early business relations maintained their interests as a copart- 
nership with equal shares. Later the business was reorganized under the name 
of King Brothers Company. They were continuallv studying new methods to 
improve their flocks, and F. S. King went to California for ewes, shipping a 
number of ewes to \\'yoming. They had always the best stock, using thorough- 
breds only for the upbuilding of their flocks. They left no stone unturned 
which would promote their knowledge and advance the interests of the sheep 
industry, and F. S. King frequentlv attended conventions in order to gather 
information concerning his chosen life work. He visited the principal flocks 
of the United States every year, usually purchasing a few of the best sheep 
of each flock visited and thus building up a herd of great merit and individual 
superiority. 

Having determined to gradually work into nothing but registered sheep, the 
herd was started by purchasing a son of the Champion Merino ewe and ram 
of the Chicago World's Fair, and numerous other noted rams and ewes. With 
these as a foundation, and by careful selection each vear from the best flocks 
in .America, a stud flock of noted sheep was gathered together, and soon this 
flock was taking most of the prizes at all of the prominent state fairs. Bv 
careful mating and selection, the size of carcass as well as fleece was increased. 
Realizing that the Rambouillet family was the coming sheep for the west, Mr. 
Kinsr turned his attention to the exclusive breeding of this family of Merinos, 
and in a few vears it was generally conceded that his flock was the leading 
Rambouillet stud in .\merica. The development of the Rambouillet by Mr. King 
had been so extensive that it created much comment, and its result in the 
upbuildins of the western flocks was so apparent that the department of agri- 
culture of the Cnited States, through the help of Senator Warren of Wyoming, 



60 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

obtained the passage of a law appropriating a sum of money to carry on experi- 
ments in conjunction with tlie University of Wyoming on the King ranch to 
develop the Rambouillet for the benefit of the western sheepmen. Mr. King 
was selected by the department to travel in company with a department man 
and select the ewes and rams to be used for the experiment, and for many 
years Mr. King selected the sheep that were bought by this government. After 
two years of work in conjunction with the University of Wyoming, the depart- 
ment of agriculture decided to carry on the work by itself with the cooperation 
of King Brothers. The department was given ire^ use of the barns, feeding 
sheds, as well as lambing pens, of this ranch and :\Ir. King devoted much time 
to help the department in this work. At this time, it having become evident to 
thinking sheepmen that a half-blood type of sheep was necessary to obtain the 
best results from much of the western range, Mr. King undertook the task of 
crossing the several types of English long-wooled sheep on pure-bred Rambouil- 
lets, and checking up' the results. It was soon found that a cross of either the 
Leister or Lincoln on the Rambouillet would produce more per head than any 
other cross, also they were hardy and most suited for the range. The depart- 
ment of agriculture became interested in this work of Mr. King and began a 
like experiment, and in a few years came to the same conclusion. 

This matter having become a prominent part of discussion at the sheep con- 
ventions throughout the western country, and as it was known that in New 
Zealand a similar experiment had been conducted by noted breeders there many 
years previous, with like results, and as in New Zealand there had been bred 
up through fifty years" hard work a breed of sheep founded on this cross, meas- 
ures were taken to pass a bill through congress to send over a commission to 
look into the capabilities of this breed and if found of value to import some for 
the use of the department of agriculture in its experiment work on the King 
ranch. Mr. King was selected by the National Wool Growers Association to 
represent the sheepmen of the country on this commission, and on it being decided 
that the bill was faulty as passed by congress, Mr. King, on the request of the 
national association and the government, paid his own expenses and donated 
his time for this trip. Having been furnished with letters of introduction from 
the government and the different sheep associations of the country, Mr. King, 
in companv with Mr. Marshall, head of the sheep and goat investigation depart- 
ment of the United States, sailed to New Zealand and Australia, and were 
made the guests of the governments over there. Six months was devoted to 
the study of the Corriedale, as the new breed was named, also to the visiting 
of the several Alerino studs over there, as well as close investigation into the 
manner of putting up wool under the Australian system, and its adaptability to 
this coimtry. 

About one hundred Corriedales were purchased for the department of agri- 
culture and Mr. King was so deeply impressed with the value of the Corriedale 
that when in New Zealand he made arrangements to import several hundred for 
himself. 

Upon his return he took up this question with his brothers, and upon their 
deciding that they would not care to enter upon this line of breeding but would 
devote themselves to the Rambouillet, Mr. King decided to sell his interest to 
his brothers and devote his time to breeding Corriedales for the benefit of the 
western range men, and also to importing some Wanganella Merinos to cross 
on the Rambouillet. Whilst visiting the principal studs of Rambouillets in 
Australia and viewing sheep valued in some cases at ten thousand dollars a head, 
Mr. King decided that they could be crossed with advantage on the American 
Rambouillet, which is larger but does not have the length of staple or quality 
of fleece of the Australian Rambouillet. Mr. King has on the way a son of 
Perfection, a ten thousand dollar ram, as well as a flock of ewes from the same 
stud. These sheep are valued at from five hundred to five thousand per 
head. If the experiment is as successful as Mr. King believes it will be, he 
will donate many of them to the Rambouillet Association, of which he is president. 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 61 

In founding his Corriedale flock, Mr. King obtained only the best; and the 
first sheep imported by him took the championship for both ram and ewe at 
the San Francisco exposition. The stud rams were the best rams of the grand 
champions of New Zealand, and the ewes the best obtainable. 

There are now some three hundred registered Corriedales on the ranch that 
have been imported, as well as many that have been raised on the ranch from 
these imported sheep. Mr. King also has brought over the first South Devons 
that have been exported from England, and is building up a very fine, pure-bred 
stud of these sheep and also a cross on the Rambouillet that will make its effect 
on the western flocks. They are very large, early maturing sheep, with a long 
staple fleece of light shrink, with a good saw-tooth crimp. The ranch selected 
by Mr. King for this work is located close to Cheyenne, consists of about ten 
thousand acres of deeded land, whilst feed lots have been obtained around Monte 
Vista in Colorado and Wheatland, Wyoming, for wintering the lambs, and 
suitable summer range has been rented close to the home ranch, as well as 
pasture on the national forests. The home ranch has been equipped with 
modern sheds, all facing south, fronted with glass and divided into suitable 
pens for lambing and breeding. New bunk houses have been built, and water 
has been laid through the buildings, every pen having its own hydrant as well 
as feed troughs and hay racks. Electric light is used throughout and every 
modern invention has been utilized. The house is a modern, up-to-date bunga- 
low with every convenience that can be obtained in a town house, it as well as 
the garage being heated by vapor, and electric light, cooking and other uses 
being installed. 

For shelter from storm and sun, over five thousand trees have been planted 
on this ranch since Mr. King parted with his brothers in 1915, and every efl^ort 
has been made to make the ranch both valuable as a breeding farm as well as 
attractive as a home. There are three stations of the Union Pacific on the land, 
whilst the Colorado & Southern has a station only three miles from the north- 
west corner, and as the ranch reaches within three miles of Chey§nne, the risk 
of loss is reduced to a minimum, and its accessibility for inspection of the stock 
is ideal. 

Wyoming produces over eight pounds of wool per sheep, more than any other 
state in the Union, and much of this is no doubt owing to the work of the King 
Brothers. Francis S. King is the principal owner of the business conducted 
under the name of the Wyoming Corriedale Sheep Company, being the president, 
with Wallace C. Bond of Cheyenne as secretary. If one may judge of the future 
by the past and by the wonderful development of his flocks up to date, it will 
not be unreasonable to prophesy that this sheep ranch will become the greatest 
in the United States. 

Mr. King has seven children, having been twice married. His eldest son, 
Francis W., when war was declared, joined the Oregon Coast Artillery and won 
a medal for shooting. He became a member of the Fifteenth Company of 
Wyoming Troops and was made sergeant at Fort Stevens, Oregon. Arthur is 
the second son of the 'family and is with his father in business. When he was 
twelve years of age, at Ogden, Utah, his father gave' him the best ram, ewe 
and ram that he raised and sheared, and at the National Wool Growers' Asso- 
ciation he won first prize against his father, having picked out the ewe him- 
self. The other children are still in school. For his second wife Mr. King chose 
Mrs. M. E. Fisher, of Cheyenne, who had two sons and a daughter by a 
previous marriage. The latter, Dorothy, is with her mother and is a high school 
student. 

While the name of King has undisputed possession of the field as the synonym 
for the most progressive sheep raising in the country, Francis S. King is also 
known in other connections outside of business. He has done much to further 
the interests of the state. He was for twelve years a member of the general 
assembly of Wyoming as the representative of Albany county and was chairman 
of the public buildings committee and also chairman of the ways and means 



62 HISTORY OF WYU.MIXG 

committee. He is one of the distinguished Masons of Wyoming and was at 
one time grand master of the state. He has also taken the degrees of the chapter, 
the commandery and the Mystic Shrine and the honorary thirty-third degree 
has been conferred upon him. He is likewise connected with the Knights of 
Pythias, while Mrs. King has represented the state of Wyoming in the supreme 
lodge of the Pythian Sisters and is also a member of the Eastern Star. He is 
widely known all over the world among sheep growers and has probably done 
more for the sheep industry of Wyoming than any other man, but there are other 
qualities which ha\f made for his personal popularity. He is widely known 
and has the sterling traits which in every land and clime awaken confidence and 
regard, and as a legislator he has left the impress of his individuality upon the 
historv of the commonwealth. 



ALBERT D. CHAMBERLIN. 

Albert D. Chamberlin is now living retired at Douglas. He came to Converse 
county before the town was laid out and through the intervening period has 
been closely associated with the development and conduct of several of its impor- 
tant business interests — interests which have contributed in substantial measure 
to the upbuilding of the district. x\t the present time he is enjoying a rest 
which he has truly earned and richly deserves, for his success in former years 
now supplies him with all of the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. 

[Massachusetts claims Mr. Chamberlin as a native son. He was born in Dalton 
on the 25th of June, 1841, a son of Albert S. and Martha (Mitchell) Chamberlin. 
The father was a paper manufacturer, conducting business along that line for 
many years. He reached the advanced age of eighty-four, as did his wife, and 
they reared a family of two sons and one daughter. 

Albert D. Chamberlin, after mastering the branches of learning taught in the 
elementary grades of the public schools, continued his studies in the Hinsdale 
Academy of Massachusetts, the same school from which Senator F. E. Warren 
was graduated. He also attended a Methodist school located at Jonesville, New 
York. \\"hen his textbooks were put aside Albert D. Chamberlin began work in 
his father's paper mill and was thus employed until after the outbreak of the 
Civil war, when he became a sailor, joining the navy. He served for about one 
year and was honorably discharged in 1865. While in the service he was engaged 
in looking for blockade runners along the coast. 

.\fter leaving the navy Mr. Chamberlin returned home and embarked in 
business on his own account in the manufacture of paper, operating a mill from 
1869 until 1881 and conducting a profitable and growing business. He then 
removed to the west, settling first at Goshen Hole, and in 1886 he came to what 
was then Albany county, now Converse county. Douglas had not been founded 
at that time but the town was laid out on the ist of August of that year and 
Mr. Chamberlin established a lumber yard, carrying on the business successfully 
for about five years. He then turned his attention to coal mining at Inez, Wyo- 
ming, with DeForest Richards, afterwards governor of Wyoming, but during 
the three years in which he operated in the coal field he lost all that he had 
previously saved. He next turned his attention to the sheep industry, in which 
he was engaged from 1893 until 1912, or for a period of seventeen years, when 
he sold out. In the meantime he had been appointed to oiRfice and had served 
as register of the land office from i8g6 until 1909. He is still the owner of a 
\aluable ranch property on which he is raisins; cattle, but the active work of 
carrving on the ranch is left to others, while Mr. Chamberlin is enjoying well 
merited rest. 

In 1889 Mr. Chamberlin was united in marriage to j\Iiss Jennie McReynolds, 
of Nebraska, and they occupy an enviable position in social circles in Douglas 
and have a large number of warm friends throughout Converse county. Mr. 




^^^-^ 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 65 

Chamberlin is a Mason of the highest rai.k, the honorary thirty-third degree 
having been conferred upon him in recognition of the important service which 
he has rendered to the craft. In poHtics he is a repubhcan and was the first state 
senator elected from his district. He has thus been closely associated with public 
interests as well as with the establishment of business enterprises in Con\erse 
county and at all times his efforts have been an effective force in bringing about 
modern-day progress and improvement. His influence has always been felt as a 
strong, steady, moving force in the social, moral and industrial life of the com- 
munity. However, he prefers a (|uiet place in the background to the glamour of 
publicity. There is no doubt, however, as to his worth as a citizen and his con- 
tribution to the development of the city and county, and the name of no man 
is more closely associated with the welfare and interests of Douglas than that 
of Albert D. Chamberlin. 



JOHN W. HAY. 



John W. Hay is one of the best known and most substantial citizens of the 
state of \\'yoming. His rise from a modest position to a place among the lead- 
ing bankers and stock raisers of the west might seem to be phenomenal and yet 
a careful analysis of his career shows that his progress has been the result of 
close application, indefatigable energy and persistency of purpose guided by a 
laudable ambition. 

A nati\e of Illinois, he was born in Fairfield, September ii, 1864, a son of 
Lawrence P. and James (Borah) Hay, the former a native of Kentucky, while 
the latter was born in Illinois. The father removed to Illinois in early life and 
there he spent his remaining days. He was one of the pioneer settlers of Fair- 
field, and although he had been educated for the profession of the law in Louis- 
\ille. Kentucky, he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits after becoming 
a resident of Illinois, taking up his abode upon a farm near Fairfield. His atten- 
tion was successfully given to the work of tilling the soil until after the outbreak 
of the Ci\il war. when feeling that his first duty was to his country, he enlisted 
in tS()i and was mustered out at Washington, D. C, in 1863, after four years' 
military service in defense of the Union cause. He participated in many hotly 
contested engagements, in which he proved his valor and his loyalty and, winning 
promotion from time to time, he held the rank of lieutenant colonel at the time 
of his discharge. His wife died in Fairfield, Illinois, in 1905, after which Mr. 
Hay became a resident of Ohio, where he passed away in IQ07. In their family 
were ten children. 

John W. Hay, who was the seventh in order of birth, spent his youthful days 
upon the old homestead farm in Illinois, dividing his time between the duties of 
the schoolroom, the pleasures of the playground and the work of the fields. He 
early became familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for 
the crot:)s, but at length he determined to follow some other line of business than 
agriculture and upon leaving home he took up the study of telegraphy and later 
was emploved at various noints in California and in Arizona. Eventuallv he 
became telerrraph operator for the Union Pacific Railroad Company at Medicine 
Row, W\<)niins'. and subseauentlv was made train dispatcher, chief dispatcher 
and train master, which position he filled for a number of years, his record being 
most creditable by reason of lii< systematic efforts. He was next made a-;sistant 
superintendent for the Union P.-icilic a^ Chevenne. \\'yoniin':;-. with jurisdiction 
over the district from Chevenne to ( )o-den. Utah. In igoo Mr. llav left the rail- 
road service and removed to Rock Springs, where he took up the li\-e stock busi- 
ness, havine a larp'e ranch in Sweetwater county. In the inter\eninCT years he has 
become one of Wyomine's most prominent and successful live stock men, his 
interests in that direction increasing rapidh' owing to his careful manag-ement and 
his wise investments in stock. A man of forceful and resourceful abilitv. he has 



68 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

ministry, he was made a deacon in 1891 and ordained to the priesthood of the 
Protestant Episcopal church in 1893. He served as rector of Grace church at 
Ottawa, Kansas, in 1891 and 1892 and through the succeeding year was pro- 
fessor of ethics and also chaplain of Bethany College at Topeka, Kansas. From 
1893 until 1895 he was professor of Xew Testament Exegesis in the Kansas 
Theological School and was then called to the position of rector of St. Paul's 
church of Leavenworth, Kansas, where he remained until 1897, also acting 
during that period as chaplain at the United States penitentiary. He was rector 
of St. Alatthew's church at Wheeling, West Virginia, from 1897 until 1899 and 
in the latter year accepted a call from the Holy Apostle's church of Philadelphia, 
with which he was identified for a decade. In 1902 he was elected to the bish- 
opric of Salina, Kansas, but declined. He was consecrated bishop of Wyoming 
on the 6th of May, 1909, and has since been a resident of Cheyenne. 

Aside from his work as rector at different places. Bishop Thomas served as 
lecturer on pastoral care in the Philadelphia Divinity School from 1902 until 
1905. He is a member of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 
of Philadelphia, and belongs to Delta Kappa Epsilon. He has membership in 
the Twilight Club of Wheeling, West Virginia, in the D. K. E. Club of New 
York, in the Sons of the .American Revolution, in the Industrial Club of Chey- 
enne, Wyoming, and in the Cheyenne Country Club. In Philadelphia he was a 
member of the Union League and of the Delaware Country Club. 

Bishop Thomas was married June 4, 1896, to Miss Edith Ellsworth Prince, a 
daughter of Colonel Edward Prince of the Seventh Illinois Cavalry and after- 
ward a resident of Quincy, Illinois. 

Bishop Thomas, by appointment of the governor, is a member of the Peace 
Centenary Commission; of the National Security League; of the Naval League; 
and of the Washington Convention called to discuss the question of how to 
"Win the War for Permanent Peace." 

He is also a member of the board of missions of the Protestant Episcopal 
church and has been elected upon its executive committee. In 191 7 he acted as 
university preacher for Leland Stanford Junior University, and in 1918 for 
Princeton University. 

The Bishop is the president of the council of domestic missionary bishops 
of the Protestant Episcopal church and is the chairman of the committee on 
survey of the Province of the Northwest. For the past four years he has been 
the president of the A\'yoming State Sunday School Association. He is also 
president of the Bishop Randall Hospital, Lander. Wyoming, and of the Cathedral 
Home for Children, Laramie, Wyoming. 



ORLANDO E. BRADBURY. 

Orlando E. Bradbury is a well known representative of financial interests in 
Uinta county, being cashier of the First National Bank at Evanston and. more- 
over, he is one of the native sons of the city in which he resides. His record 
stands in contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet is never without honor 
save in his own country, for in the place of his nativity Mr. Bradbury has 
worked his way steadily upward along business lines and has gained the warm 
regard and unqualified confidence of his fellow townsmen. 

He is a son of the late Albert Edward Bradbury, a native of \'ermont. who 
came of English ancestry, the family having been founded in America at an early 
period in the colonization of the new world. Albert E. Bradbury was reared and 
educated in Connecticut and at the age of seventeen years left home, making his 
way to the Pacific coast by way of Cape Horn. He first settled in San Francisco, 
having gone to California by reason of the gold excitement, hoping that he might 
win fortune in the mines. He afterward removed to Portland. Oregon, or rather 
to the site of the present city, which at that ime had scarcely been begun. He had 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 69 

a contract for clearing timber on what is now the heart of that beautiful city. He 
took the contract on condition that he was to receive a portion of the land for 
his pay, but he did not regard it as of sufficient value to recompense him for his 
labor and he therefore did not continue the work of clearing. He turned his 
attention instead to other activities. In California he had been engaged in placer 
mining and in Portland he became connected with the Huntleys, who conducted 
stage hnes. being pioneers in that business in various sections of the west. During 
his time with the company he established stage lines from Helena, Montana, to the 
Missouri river. He remained with the Huntleys and in the latter '70s. they estab- 
lished large interests in Montana in connection with sheep raising, but during the 
hard winter of 1876 their flocks were practically destroyed and their large fortune 
was thereby lost. On the opening of the Oregon Short Line Railroad Mr. Brad- 
bury became a contractor on the construction of the road from Granger, \\'yoming, 
to a point west and in that undertaking continued as an associate of John H. 
Ward until the completion of the road. He next became manager for the Rocky 
Mountain Coal & Iron Company of Almy, Uinta county, and was thus engaged 
for a number of years. His next business connection made him assistant general 
manager of the Union Pacific Coal Company, with headquarters at Cheyenne, 
where he remained for four years. On the expiration of that period he retired 
from business life after long and prominent connection with interests which have 
led in substantial measure to the development, upbuilding and progress of the 
west. He continued a resident of Evanston from the days when it was a tent 
city to the time of his demise, which occurred January 19, 1916, when he had 
reached the age of se\enty-five years. He had lived to see remarkable changes 
throughout the west during that period. Evanston had become a city of beautiful 
homes and important business enterprises, with all of the advantages and opportun- 
ities found in the cities of the older east. In politics Mr. Bradbury was a stanch re- 
publican and at one time served as treasurer of Sweetwater county. He was also 
the builder of the courthouse at Green River and he took an active interest in 
all that pertained to general progress and improvement, giving his lii\al aid and 
support to all those interests which are a matter^of civic virtue and of ci\ ic [iride. 
He ranked with Wyoming's most honored and valued citizens and nianv iniblic 
offices were tendered him, including the position of governor, but he declined to 
become a candidate, preferring that his service should be done as a private citizen. 
His work, however, was of a most farreaching, resultant and beneficial character 
and his name is inseparably interwoven with the history of Wyoming's progress 
and development. He was a thirty-second degree Alason and in his life exemplified 
the beneficent spirit of- the craft, which is based upon a recognition of the broth- 
erhood of mankind and the obligations thereby imposed. Albert E. Bradury was 
united in marriage to Miss Roella Dodge Kidder, a native of Massachusetts and a 
representative of one of the old families of that state of English descent. She 
is still living and three of her four children survive, namely: Silas Huntlev. who 
is a resident of Rigby, Idaho: X'alorus A., who is living in New ^■ork city: and 
Orlando E,. of this reviewf. The eldest of the family was a daughter. Alaude 
A. Bradbury, who died at the age of three years. 

Orlando E. Bradbury was educated in the public schools of Evanston and of 
Salt Lake City, Utah, and in the Rensselaer Institute at Troy, New York, a 
polytechnic school from which he was graduated in 1907 with the degree of Civil 
Engineer. He started out independently upon his business career in 1907 in 
connection with the engineering department of the Union Pacific Coal Company, 
with which he continued until 191 3. He then became cashier of the First National 
Bank of Evanston, which ofiice he has since continuously filled, making an excel- 
lent record in this position. He is a courteous, popular and obliging official, ex- 
tending the courtesies of the l>ank to its patrons to an extent that will not hazard 
the interests of the depositors. He has closely studied banking questions since 
becoming connected with financial affairs in Evanston and his work is proving 
highly satisfactory to the institution and to the public at large. He is a director 
of the bank and he also has im])ortant cattle interests in Uinta countv. He is like- 



70 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

wise a director of the Scofield Coal Company and is recognized as a young man 
of sound business judgment, alert, energetic and determined. 

On the 20th of June, 1912, Mr. Bradbury was married in Rock Springs, Wy- 
oming, to Miss Louise Henkel, who was born in Green River, Wyoming, and is 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig Henkel. ^ilr. and Mrs. Bradbury have 
become the parents of two children: Dorothy, who was born in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, March 3, 1914: and A. E., who was born in Evanston, May i, 1917. The 
family occupy an enviable social position and the hospitality of the Bradbury home 
is greatly enjoyed by an extensive circle of friends. 

In politics Air. Bradbury is an active and earnest republican whose opinions 
carry weight in the coiuicils of the party and who from 1912 imtil 1916 served as 
state senator, doing important work in the upper house of the Wyoming General 
Assembly. He gave earnest thought and consideration to all questions which 
came up for settlement and was identified with much constructive legislation wiiich 
has lieen of great benefit to the commonwealth. He, like his father, is a prom- 
inent Mason, holding membership in the lodge, the chapter, the consistory and 
the Mystic Shrine. Liberal educational opportunities were accorded him, jjut it 
is a well known fact that notwithstanding the advantages offered in youth, the in- 
dividual must essentially determine and shape his own character. Utilizing the 
chances which came to him and actuated at all times by laudable purposes and 
high ideals, Orlando E. Bradbury has steadily ad\-anced and is today regarded 
as one of the foremost residents of Evanston by reason of his business ability, his 
political activity, his public spirit and his genuine personal worth. 



HON. JOHN W. LACEY 

Hon. John W. Lacey, senior partner in the law firm of Lacey & Lacey, of 
Cheyenne, and at one time chief justice of Wyoming, was born in Randolph 
county, Indiana, October 13, 1848, a son of the Rev. Henry J. and Elizabeth 
(Thompson) Lacey. The father was a Methodist minister and reared a family 
of four sons and three daughters. Well descended and well bred. Judge Lacey 
had the advantages offered in a home of culture and refinement. 

He pursued his education in the public schools of various towns in which 
the family lived owing to the custom of itinerant ministry in the Methodist church 
at that period. Later he entered DePauw University of Indiana and was gradu- 
ated therefrom with the class of 1871. He took up the profession of teaching, 
which he followed for a short time, but regarded this merely as an initial step 
to other professional activity and began reading law under the direction of Isaac 
Van Devanter, of Marion, Indiana, who lemained his preceptor until he was 
admitted to the bar in 1875. Prior to 1875 he had read law at intervals in the 
office of William O'Brien of Noblesville, Indiana. It has been said that a 
lawyer's experience should be as broad as the universe, for he has to do with 
every phase of life. Judge Lacey brought to the starting point of his career 
certain rare gifts — eloquence of language and a strong personality. He, moreover, 
had back of him experience as a soldier of the Civil war. He was only fifteen 
years of age when he enlisted for active service at the front, becoming a member 
of Company F of the One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Indiana Infantry in 1863. 
He was mustered out the following year but later in that year reenlisted, becoming 
d member of Company B of the One Hundred and Fifty-second Infantry, with 
which he served until the close of the war. His training, too, at home had been 
of that kind which develops character and self-reliance. He entered upon the 
practice of his profession in Marion, Indiana, where he remained until 1884, 
when he was appointed by President Arthur to the position of chief justice of 
Wyoming and served in the highest judicial office of the territory until 1886. 
In November of that year, having resigned his position upon the bench, he entered 
into partnership with W. W. Corlett and Judge John A. Riner under the firm 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 73 

style of Corlett, Lacey & Riner. Following the death of i\Ir. Corlett the part- 
nership was continued under the firm name of Lacey & Riner and so existed 
until the junior partner was appointed United States district judge m 1890. Later 
Mr. Lacey entered into partnership relations with his hrother-in-law, Willis Van 
De\anter, who is now a justice of the United States Supreme Court, and was 
thus associated until 1897, but is now senior partner in the firm of Lacey & 
Lacey, a firm that ranks with the foremost practicing at the bar of Cheyenne. 
Nature endowed him with some of those qualities indispensable to the lawyer — a 
keen, rapid, logical mind plus the business sense and a ready capacity for hard 
work. An excellent presence, an earnest, dignified manner, marked strength of 
character, a thorough grasp of the law and the ability to accurately apply its 
principles are factors in his eiifectiveness as an advocate. 

In 1878 Judge Lacey was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Van Devanter, 
daughter of Isaac \'an Devanter, and to them have been born six children: Her- 
bert \'.. an attorney of Cheyenne ; Walter M., M. D., and a captain in the United 
States service at Fort Riley, Kansas ; Ruth, the wife of W. H. Barber, of Eaton, 
Colorado ; Elizabeth, instructor in economics in the L'niversity of Nebraska : 
Louise, teaching home economics in the Colorado Agricultural College at Fort 
Collins : and Margaret. 

In 1874 the degree of A. M. was conferred upon Judge Lacey by his alma 
mater, De Pauw University, and in 19 14 he received the degree of LL. D. from 
the University of Denver. In his political views he is a republican and upon all 
the vital questions of the day keeps abreast with the best thinking men of the 
age. Fraternally he is a Mason and has taken the degrees of the commandery 
and of the consistory. A resident of Cheyenne since 1884, he has done much 
to uphold public stability and to advance the standards of citizenship in relation 
to municipal and commonwealth afifairs. 



EDWIN M. CONANT. 



Edwin M. Conant, who is filling the office of county clerk and is also serving 
as clerk of the district court in \\'ashakie county, makes his home in Worland. 
He was born in Waupun. Wisconsin, December 22, 1876, and is a son of William 
T. and Agnes M. (Frazier) Conant. the former a native of the state of New 
York, while the latter was born in England. It was in the year 1855 that they be- 
came residents of \Msconsin, where they are still living, and in that state they 
reared their family of eight children, seven of whom survive. 

Edwin M. Conant passed the period of his boyhood and youth under the par- 
ental roof and divided his time between such duties as parental authority assigned 
him. and the work of the schoolroom and the pleasures of the playground. He 
passed through the elementary branches of learning and was graduated from 
the high school at Waupun, Wisconsin. He continued his residence in that state 
until he had reached he age of about twenty-seven years, when he sought the 
opportunities of the west and in 1903 arrived in Wyoming, taking up his abode in 
Washakie county. Here he was first appointed to the position of county clerk 
in 191 1 and the following year was elected to the office, in which capacity he has 
since served by reelection, covering a period of seven years. He has also been 
clerk of the district court and in his dual position has discharged his duties in the 
most systematic, prompt and capable manner, the results achieved for the benefit 
of the county being most satisfactory. His political endorsement is given to the 
republican party. \Miile active in office, he has also concentrated his attention in 
partial manner upon business afifairs and is now the owner of two good ranches 
in northern Wyoming. 

In 1906 Air. Conant was married to Miss Katherine Frisby, a native of Mis- 
souri, and they have become parents of two children: Donald R.. who was born 
July 15. 1907: and Agnes V.. born December 24, 1910. 



74 HISTORY OF WYO.AIING 

Both 'Sir. and Mrs. Conant are members of the Congregational church and are 
loyal adherents of its teachings. They occupy an enviable position in social circles 
and their home, which is one of the line residences of Worland, is the abode 
of a warm-hearted hospitality which is greatly enjoyed by their circle of friends — 
a circle that is almost coextensive with the circle of their acquaintance. 

The name Conant has long been prominently connected with the history of 
\^'yoming, for A. A. Conant, an uncle of Edwin M. Conant, became one of the 
first settlers of Fremont county. He died at Basin in 1904. He had been one 
of the prominent men of his section of the state, honored and respected by all 
who knew him. and most of all where he was best known. 



HON. EARL WARREN. 

Hon. Earl Warren is bearing his part in directing the public affairs of Wyo- 
ming as a member of the state legislature. In business circles he is also well 
known, being engaged in farming and live stock growing and in the purchase 
and sale of farm lands at Riverton, Wyoming. The steps in the orderly pro- 
gression which has brought him to his present business and political prominence 
are easily discernible. 

A native of Missouri, he was born in Pettis county, September 25, 1872, a 
son of Robert William and \'ictorene (Durrill) Warren, both of whom were 
also natives of Pettis county, where they resided until 1898. They then remo\ed 
to Texas, taking up their abode near Houston, and in iqog they became residents 
of Riverton. Wyoming, where the mother is now living, the father having passed 
away December 18, 1917. 

Earl Warren acquired his education in public schools of Missouri and in the 
Central Business College at Sedalia, that state, while later he became a student 
in the University of Missouri at Columbia. When his education was completed 
he took up the occupation of farming and cattle raising in Alissouri and was 
thus engaged until 1894, when he went to Texas, where he turned his attention 
to cotton and rice growing. He afterward located in Houston, where he was 
prominently engaged in colonization work, and in 1909 he came to Riverton 
valley. Wyoming, where he secured under a twenty year lease one thousand acres 
of Indian land under ditch at .Arapahoe. In the intervening years he has brought 
this land to a high state of cultivation. While en route to W'yoming he first 
made his way to St. Louis and bought and shipped to Wyoming a carload of 
horses. He arrived at his destination ahead of the horses, built a corral for 
them and was ready to receive them when they reached this place on the 15th 
of March. Two months and a week later he had completed his house and barn 
and had seven hundred and forty acres of land broken and planted to grain. 
He filed on a homestead on reaching Wyoming and in subsequent years he has 
added to his holdings by purchase from time to time, acquiring adjoining land 
until he now has extensive property interests. Practically all of his land is 
under irrigation and is very productive, responding readily to the care and labor 
which he bestows upon it. He annually gathers rich harvests as a reward for 
his industry and capable management, and in all that he does he displays a 
most progressive spirit. In 1014, prior to any oil development in Fremont county 
outside of the Lander fields. Mr. Warren took oil leases on four thousand acres 
of Indian land at Pilot Butte, thirty-two miles northwest of Riverton, and 
organized the Hall Oil Company for the development of these lands. This com- 
pany began drilling and in December. 191 5, brought in the first producing well 
in tile Pilot Butte district. From the beginning Mr. AA'arren has been secretary 
of the company, active in the control of its affairs, and in the management of 
its interests he displays the same spirit of enterprise and progressiveness that 
has characterized him in all of his undertakings. 

In 1898 Mr. \\'arren was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth C. Rerry, of 




HON. EARL VVAEREN 



76 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

Odessa, Missouri, and to them have been born three children, Mary O., Earl 
and Robert W., who is usually known as "Billy." The parents are members 
of the Christian church and are prominent in the social circles in which they move. 
Mr. Warren is a democrat in his political views and in 1912 was elected to 
the board of county commissioners, serving for a term of two years. In 1914 
he was appointed a member of the state fair commission and was in charge of 
the agricultural department when the first permanent buildings on the fairgrounds 
were erected. In 1916 he was elected to represent his district in the state legis- 
lature and took a very prominent part in promoting legislation in behalf of the 
state highways and state-wide prohibition. He stood at all times for progress 
and improvement and was connected with much constructive legislation which 
has proven of great worth to the commonwealth. While a stalwart advocate of 
party principles, he has ever subordinated partisanship to the general good and 
self-aggrandizement to the interests of the entire community. In a word, he 
is a loyal, public-spirited and patriotic citizen and the part which he has played 
in the development of his community and in upholding the high standards of 
the commonwealth has been a helpful and important one. 



JOHX W. STRYKER. 



No history of Wyoming would be complete without extended reference to 
John W. Stryker, one of the pioneer merchants of Laramie, who has been identi- 
fied with the city since 1877 and throughout the entire period has been connected 
with its commercial interests. For many years he has figured as a factor in the 
successful development of the trade of the W. H. Holliday Company, of which 
he is the secretary and treasurer and in which connection he has aided in building 
up one of the largest enterprises of its kind in the state. His life record indi- 
cates what can be accomplished by determined purpose and indefatigable energy, 
for he started out in the business world empty-handed and is today in possession 
of a comfortable competence. 

He was born in Birmingham. Ohio. July 21. 1852. His father, Abraham H. 
Stryker, was a native of New York and a representative of one of the old fam- 
ilies of the Empire state of Dutch descent. The founder of the American branch 
of the family settled at New Amsterdam, now New York, in the early part of 
the seventeenth century and later representatives of the name were among the 
pioneers who contributed to the development and upbuilding of Ohio. Abraham 
H. Stryker became an attorney at law in the Buckeye state and during his later 
years resided in Atchison, Kansas. He had been a partner of Governor Click of 
Kansas while the latter was a resident of Sandusky, Ohio, and on his account re- 
moved to Kansas. He became a very prominent factor in democratic circles while 
living in Ohio, doing much to shape public thought and opinion during war times. 
He passed away in Atchison, Kansas, in October, 1880, at the age of fifty years. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Henrietta Wood, was a native of Ohio 
and a representative of one of the pioneer families of the state of English lineage. 
She died in Ohio in 1853 when but twenty-five years of age, and of her two chil- 
dren one passed away in infancy. 

The surviving son, John W. Stryker, pursued his education in the public 
schools of Ohio and in Oberlin College to the age of fourteen years, when he 
started out to provide for his own support and since that time has been dependent 
entirely upon his own resources, so that whatever success he has achieved is 
the direct result and reward of his labors. He was first employed as chain man 
with a surveying party in eastern Kansas, engaged in the survey of the Atchison 
& Nebraska Railroad. His next position was that of clerk in a hardware store 
in Atchison, Kansas, which was his initial experience in mercantile lines. He re- 
moved from .•\tchison to Netawaka. Kansas, and there engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits through the winter of 1872-3. He then came to ^^'yoming in January. 1873, 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 77 

casting in his lot with its pioneer settlers. He located first at Medicine Bow, where 
he remained until March, 1877, when he arrived in Laramie, with the interests 
and upbuilding of which he has since been actively and prominently identified. 
Here he found employment with the firm of Trabmg Brothers, then the leading 
merchants of Wyoming, and continued with that firm untiJ March, i8<So, when 
he became associated with VV. H. Holliday. That association has since been main- 
tained and through all the intervening period, covering thirty-seven years, he has 
been an active factor in the further growth and development of the enterprise. 
The business was originally established on Railroad street and was begun on a 
comparatively small scale but has since been developed into the largest general 
merchandise establishment in the state of Wyoming. They carry an extensive 
line of hardware, groceries, furniture and other things, and their patronage has 
reached most gratifying proportions. They have ever exercised the utmost care 
in the personnel of the house, in the selection of goods, in the treatment rendered 
customers and in the business methods employed and thus their trade has con- 
stantly grown through the excellent service which they have rendered to the 
public and through the capable management of their interests. ]\Ir. Stryker 
has also been engaged in the undertaking business since 1880 and has developed 
one of the most important business concerns of the kind in the state. He has a 
fine building erected expressly for this purpose, containing a beautiful chapel, and 
with all other equipment of a modern undertaking establishment of the present 
day. 

On the 3d of December, 1878, in Hartford, Connecticut, Mr. Stryker was 
united in marriage to Miss Lura L. Jacques, a native of Rome, Georgia, and 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs.C. W. Jacques, who have passed away. Mr. 
and Mrs. Stryker have become the parents of three children, two of whom are 
living: Donna Rena, the wife of D. N. Sudduth. who is a prominent stock raiser, 
residing at North Park, Colorado, being president and general manager of The 
Canadian Land and Live Stock Company, of which J. W. Str\ker is secretary 
and treasurer; and Jennie Iris, the wife of Clifford Sawyer, living in Colorado. 
There are also six grandchildren, the Sudduth family having four — Iris, June, 
John S. and Neal, while the Sawyer family has two children, Florence and 
Clifford. 

In politics Mr. Stryker follows an independent course, voting according to 
the dictates of his judgment. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and also 
of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He belongs to the Chamber of Com- 
merce and is interested in all those forces which have to do with the upbuilding 
and welfare of the city, giving his aid and support to all interests which are a mat- 
ter of civic virtue and of civic pride. His business record should serve to inspire 
and encourage others, for it shows what can be accomplished through individual 
effort and determination. Starting out in life empty-handed, obstacles and diffi- 
culties in his path have seemed but to serve as an impetus for renewed effort and 
concentration on his part and his close application and persistency of purpose, 
guided by sound judgment, have made him one of the foremost representatives of 
commercial interests in the state. 



OLUF JEFSON. 



Commercial enterprise in Kemmerer finds a worthy representative in Oluf 
Jefson, who is the manager of the Blyth-Fargo-Hoskins Company. In all that he 
"does he is actuated by a spirit of progress and advancement and his experience 
along commercial lines has made him well qualified for the onerous and responsible 
duties which devolve upon him in this connection. 

He was born in Bloomingdale, Wis., May 9. 1881, a son of the late John 
Jefson. who was a native of Norway and came to America in young manhood, 
arriving during the decade of the '60s. He settled in Wisconsin, where he con- 



78 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

tinned to make his home until his death, which occurred in Bloomingdale, that 
state, in 1900, at the age of sixty-nine years. He was a successful farmer, wisely 
and carefully directing his business interests, so that substantial results rewarded 
his labors as the years passed. In politics he was a stanch republican and took an 
active interest in advancing the growth and promoting the success of his party. 
He held at all times to high civic standards and he was a devout Christian man, 
holding membership in the Lutheran church. His widow still occupies the old 
home in Wisconsin. She too. is a native of Norway and came to America with 
her parents in her childhood days, the family home being established in \'ernon 
county, Wisconsin, where she was reared, educated and married. 

Oluf Jefson was the ninth in order of birth in a family of ten children. He 
acquired a public school education in his native city and afterward attended the 
\'alparaiso ( Ind. ) University, from which he was graduated on the comple- 
tion of a commercial course. His early life to the age of twenty-one years was 
spent upon the home farm. He then entered mercantile circles, securing a clerk- 
ship, in which capacity he served for two years. He afterward completed a two 
years' college course and removed to North Dakota, being employed in a general 
store in Ledgerwood, that state. He next removed to Green River, Wyoming, and 
was connected with the office of the Morris Mercantile Company, remaining there 
for four years. He later became associated with the Blyth-Fargo-Hoskins Com- 
pany in the capacity of bookkeeper and since the ist of September, 1917, has been 
general manager, in which connection he is directing the policy of the store, which 
is enjoying a growing trade. He won his present position by reason of his merit 
and ability. The Blyth-Fargo-Hoskins Company has the largest general mer- 
cantile establishment in Lincoln county. The company was organized in 1903 
and the firm employs on an average eleven people and carries a complete line of 
groceries, clothing, dry goods and other general merchandise. Mr. Jefson is 
thoroughly acquainted with the trade and its possibilities and is proving most 
capable in his present position as general manager, wisely directing the interests 
of the house. 

In his political views ^Ir. Jefson has always been a stalwart republican, sup- 
porting the party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. Frater- 
nally he is a Mason of high rank. He has taken the degrees of lodge, chapter, 
commandery and Mystic Shrine and he exemplifies in his life the beneficent 
spirit of the craft. He also belongs to the Chamber of Commerce, of which he 
was one of the organizers, and he is interested in all of its plans and projects for 
the upbuilding of the city, for the extension of its trade relations and the upholding 
of its civic and municipal standards. He is a man of high personal worth, en- 
joying the confidence and goodwill of his fellow townsmen, all of whom speak 
of him in terms of warm regard. 



HON. BRYANT BUTLER BROOKS. 

The specific and distinctive office of biography is not to give voice to a man's 
modest estimate of himself and his accomplishments, but rather to leave a per- 
petual record establishing his character by the consensus of opinion on the part 
of his fellowmen. Throughout Wyoming, the Hon. Bryant Butler Brooks is 
spoken of in temis of admiration and respect. His life has been so varied 
in its activities, so honorable in its purposes, so farreaching and beneficial in its 
eft'ects that it has become an integral part in the history of city and state. He 
has exerted an immeasurable influence upon matters rf public policy, upon busi- 
ness life as a financier and ranchman, in social circles by reason of a charming 
personality and unfeigned cordiality and in politics by reason of his public spirit 
and devotion to the general good as well as his comprehensive understanding of 
the questions afl'ecting state anl national welfare. He is now identified with 
the interests of Casper as president of the Wvoming National Bank of that citv 
and he has important connections with ranching and stock raising. 




/d /d /l-frT^^, 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 81 

Air. Brooks was born in Bernardston, Massachusetts, February 5, 1861, a 
son of Silas Newton and Melissa (Burrows) Brooks. The father was a promi- 
nent manufacturer of farm implements and a leading business man of Massa- 
chusetts. He was also active in political affairs there and was called upon to 
represent his district in the state legislature. In 1871 he removed to Chicago 
and became a member of the firm of Sargent, Greenleaf & Brooks, lock manufac- 
turers. Both he and his wife were descendants of early New England pioneers 
who took an active part in the Indian wars and in the Revolutionary war. 

In his youthful days Bryant B. Brooks was a pupil in the Powers Institute 
at Bernardston, JMassachusetts, and continued his education in a Chicago high 
school and also in a business college. He was graduated from the high school 
as a member of the class of 1878 and from the business college in 1879. Almost 
immediately afterward he came to the west and rode the range over central 
Wyoming from 1880 until 1883. He concentrated his attention upon cattle rais- 
ing in the early '80s but afterward became associated with all kinds of live stock 
growing, including sheep and horses as well as cattle. In 1883 he settled per- 
manently on the Big Aluddy at the foot of the Casper mountain and has since 
been engaged in stock raising and ranching on an extensive scale. He has large 
holdings and on his ranch are found big herds of cattle as well as large flocks 
of sht-ep and many horses, so that he has become one of the leading representa- 
tives of the live stock interests of the state. He was one of the first to practice 
irrigation and carry on ranching on a large scale in central Wyoming. A man 
of forceful and resourceful ability, his activities have covered a wide range and 
ha\'e been a source of value in the development of the natural resources of this 
state and the extension of its trade relations. Something of the breadth of his 
interests is indicated in the fact that while conducting important ranching proj- 
ects he is also the president of the Cole Creek Coal Company, is president of 
the Chihuahua Lumber & Manufacturing Company of Mexico, president of the 
B. B. Brooks Company, ranching and stock raising, president of the Wyoming 
National Bank and president of the Consolidated Royalty Oil Company. 

On the loth of March, 1886, at Alexandria, Nebraska, Mr. Brooks was 
joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Naomi Willard, a daughter of Judge L. D. 
\\'illard. Their children are five in number, as follows : Jean, who is now 
the wife of Dr. H. R. Lathrop, of Casper; Abby, who gave her hand in marriage 
to R. H. Nichols, a practicing attorney of Casper; Lena N. ; Mary Melissa; and 
Silas N., who is now serving in France with an aviation corps. 

Mr. Brooks and his wife are members of the Episcopal church. He is one 
of the most prominent representatives of Masonry in Wyoming, the honorary 
thirty-third degree having been conferred upon him. He has held many stations 
in various Masonic bodies and he also has membership in the Odd Fellows lodge 
at Casper, the Elks lodge at Cheyenne and in the Mystic Shrine at Rawlins. 

In politics he has always been an active republican and one who has done 
important work for his party in this state. He was appointed one of the com- 
missioners to organize Natrona county and in 1892 he was elected to the second 
Wyoming state legislature, in which he took active part in promoting many con- 
structive measures. He was a delegate at large to three national republican 
conventions and took most active part in the work of the St. Louis convention 
which nominated William McKinley. He was again made a delegate to the 
national conventions of 1904 and of 1908, both sessions being held in Chicago. 
In 1904 he was elected governor of Wyoming to fill the two years' unexpired 
term of Governor Richards, who died in office. At the close of the term he 
was reelected to the position and served from 1907 until 191 1, so that his con- 
nection with the office of chief executive of the state covers six years. His 
administration was marked by many constructive measures for the benefit of 
the commonwealth. He was made a delegate to the first national conservation 
congress and he is interested in all those great projects which have to do with the 
development of the natural resources of the great west and, in fact, with all 



82 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

those things which bear upon the progress, stabihty and pubHc prosperity of 
state and nation. He is a man of well rounded character, finely balanced mind, 
and of splendid intellectual attainments. 



TOE E. R. KOEHLER. 



Since Joe E. R. Koehler has taken charge of the Orpheum Theatre at Sheri- 
dan, ^Vyomi^g, this enterprise has taken on a new lease of life and has con- 
tinuously gained in the favor of the public. Mr. Koehler has had a considerable 
amount of experience in the theatrical field and the many new ideas which he 
has instituted in the plan of running the theatre are largely responsible for its 
present prosperous condition. 

Mr. Koehler was born in Youngstown, Ohio, October i6, 1876, a son of 
Rudolph and Marie Koehler. In the public schools of his native city he ac- 
quired his education and when old enough laid aside his textbooks in order to 
make his own living. In his earlier years he joined the United States Navy and 
served faithfully, rendering service to his country until he was honorably dis- 
charged with the rating of carpenter's mate of the second class. Later in life 
he came to Sheridan. Wyoming, and became connected with the Orpheum 
Theatre. The enterprise had far failed of success under the management of 
several other parties who had been in charge before Mr. Koehler took hold. 
However, since he has been at the head of the organization the theatre has 
been very much improved and is a ver\' popular attraction, well patronized 
by the public. It is in every way up-to-date and the photo plays presented 
to the public are of the latest and of the most interesting kind, and selected 
by the best of taste. 

On the 14th of September. 1909, at Great Falls, Montana, Mr. Koehler 
married Miss Clara Louise Coleman, a daughter of T. H. and Lavina Coleman, 
and both he and his wife are well liked and popular in the social circles of 
Sheridan. Both take part in the moral and material upbuilding of their city 
and their efforts have been beneficial and have borne good results. 

Politically Mr. Koehler is a republican, thoroughly believing in the policy 
of protective tariff. Along social and fraternal lines he belongs to Sheridan 
Lodge, No. 520. B. P. O. E. He also has membership in the Rocky Mountain 
Screen Club of Denver, Colorado, and through this connection often receives 
valuable suggestions in regard to his theatre attractions. 



NEPHI J. DE LONEY. 

Nephi J. De Loney. who in 1916 was elected to the ofiice of county as- 
sessor of Uinta county by a verj- large majority as the candidate of the repub- 
lican party, was born !March 28, 1881. in the city of Evanston, where he still 
makes his home, his parents being Charles and Clara J. (Burton) De Loney, the 
former a native of ^lichigan, while the latter was boni in England. The mother 
came to America with her father at an early day and settled at Piedmont. 
Wyoming, crossing the plains with some of the early emigrants. At the time 
of the Civil war Charles De Loney espoused the cause of the Union enlisting 
as a volunteer in a Alichigan regiment and serving as a private throughout the 
entire period of hostilities between the north and the south. After receiving 
an honorable discharge and being mustered out in Michigan he resolved to 
try his fortune in the west and made his way to Wyoming, where he entered the 
employ of the Union Pacific Railroad Company, working in the timber. After 
the opening of the railroad he located at Beartown and subsequently removed 
to Evanston, where he first conducted a barber shop in a tent. The town was 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 83 

just being established and the conditions were those which one meets in pioneer 
communities. Mr. De Loney continued to work at the trade for several 
years and afterwards engaged in the liquor business. Through all the inter- 
vening years he has been a prominent factor in the public life of the com- 
munity and in its business circles. He was for four terms chosen to represent 
his district in the territorial legislature and after the admission of Wyoming 
into the union he served for two terms as a member of the state senate. Later 
he was appointed to the position of supervisor of the Teton forest reserve 
and he built the first house at Jackson, Wyoming. He now conducts most of 
the important business interests of Jackson. He was the founder of both 
Evanston and Jackson and remains active in the business of the latter place 
although he is now seventy-eight years of age. He was married in Evanston 
and his wife is still living at the age of sixty-five years. Their children are: 
;\Irs. Clara Mills, of Evanston; Richard, who has passed away; Mrs. Hannah 
Cook, also deceased; William C, living in Jackson, Wyoming; Nephi J., of 
this review; Joseph, deceased ;■ Herman ; Mrs. \'iola Lunbeck and Mrs. Frances 
Clark, all of Jackson, and James, who is a member of the national army. 

Nephi J. De Loney spent his boyhood days largely as a pupil in the public 
schools of Evanston and then worked for his father, being employed for a 
time in his store at Jackson. Later he entered the accounting department of 
the Union Pacific Railroad Company, with which he was associated from 1899 
until he was elected to his present position as county assessor in igi6. He 
was chosen to this office by a very large majority as the candidate of the 
republican party, the large vote being indicative of his personal popularity 
and the confidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen. 

Mr. De Loney was united in marriage to Miss Alae Stonebreaker, a native 
of Hoytsville, Utah, the marriage being celebrated in Evanston, November 23, 
1901. Mrs. De Loney is a daughter of John P. Stonebreaker, of Hoytsville, 
who was one of the pioneer settlers of that section of L'tah. ]\Ir. and Mrs. 
De Loney have become the parents of four children : Claire, who was born 
in 1903; Charles, in 1905; Lucille, in 1912; and Burton, in 1914. The two 
older children are in school. 

The parents are members of the Mormon church and fraternally Mr. De 
Loney is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Wood- 
men of the World. He is very widely and favorably known throughout this 
section of the state and enjoys the high regard, confidence and good will 
of all with whom he has been associated. He has always been a resident of 
Wvoming and in his life displays the spirit of western enterprise and progress. 



HON. LOREN W. EMLER. 

Hon. Loren W. Emler has been accorded high position by his fellow citizens, 
having been chosen to the chief office within their power to confer. He is now 
mayor of Rawlins and is giving to the city a businesslike and progressive admin- 
istration characterized by needed refonns and improvements. He has closely 
studied public questions and is working along lines of progress that are producing 
excellent results. 

He was bom in Ward, Colorado, August 5, 1872. a son of Daniel Emler, who 
was a native of Ohio and belonged to one of the old families of that state, of Ger- 
man lineage. He became a stationary engineer and, removing to the west, cast 
in his lot among the pioneer settlers of Colorado about the year 1871. He took 
up his abode in Boulder county and there engaged in his chosen avocation, con- 
tinuing his residence in Colorado until his death, which occurred in 1880, when 
he was thirtv-six years of age. He passed away, however, in St. Louis, IMissouri. 
He had become afflicted with quicksilver poisoning and was taken to St. Louis 
for treatment, but death claimed him. He had married Delia Hall, a native of 



84 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

Ohio and of English descent. She long survived him and passed away in Boulder, 
Colorado, in 1915 at the age of seventy-one years. 

Hon. Loren W. Emler, their only child, was educated in the public and high 
schools of Boulder, pursuing his studies to the age of sixteen years, when he 
started out to earn his own living and entered upon an apprenticeship to the 
plumber's trade, with which business he has since been identified. He became 
an expert workman in that line and on the ist of March, 1906, he removed to 
Rawlins, where he immediately became connected with the J. A. Bennett Hard- 
ware Company, with which he has since been identified. He also has other busi- 
ness interests, for he is conducting a ranch at IMeeker, Colorado. Thoroughness 
characterizes everything that he undertakes and his business efforts have been 
followed by excellent results. 

At Grand Junction. Colorado, on the 15th of December, 1910, Mr. Emler was 
united in marriage to Miss Grace Beemer, a native of that place, her parents being 
pioneer settlers of Grand Junction. In his political views Mr. Emler has always 
been a democrat and worker in support of the party and for the advancement of 
civic interests. He closely studies the vital questions and issues of the day eft'ect- 
ing the welfare of city and state, and his progressive spirit led to his nomination 
to the office of mayor of Rawlins, to which position he was elected in 191 6, so 
that he is now the chief executive of the city — an important position in this era 
of national crisis, when his duty involves not only the direction of the ordinary 
affairs but all those questions which have to do with the suppression of anti- 
American spirit. He is proving adequate to the situation and has the support 
of the best people of the city. Fraternally he is connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, having been made a member of the organization at 
Boulder, Colorado, twenty-three years ago. He has filled all of the offices 
in the subordinate lodge and is a loyal advocate of the purposes of the organiza- 
tion. 



ALEXANDER BROWN HAMILTON, M. D. 

Dr. Alexander Brown Hamilton is one of the pioneer physicians of Laramie 
and throughout the entire period of his practice in the city, covering a quarter 
of a century, he has maintained a foremost place in public regard as a skilled and 
competent physician and surgeon. 

He was bom in Rouseville, Pennsylvania, January 3, 1861, a son of the late 
David Hamilton, who was also a native of the Keystone state and a representa- 
tive of an old Pennsylvania family of Scotch-Irish lineage. The family was 
founded in America at an early period in the development of the new world and 
representatives of the name participated in the War of 1812. David Hamilton 
became a successful agriculturist of Pennsylvania, where he resided to the time 
of his death, which occurred October 25, 1909, when he had reached the age of 
seventy-nine years. In politics he was an active republican, working untiringly 
for the success of his party yet never seeking office as a reward for party fealty. 
His religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church. He married Susan 
Offutt. a native of Pennsylvania and a representative of one of the old families 
of that state of English descent founded in America prior to the Revolutionary 
war. A representative of this branch of the family was a brother-in-law of 
Captain James Cook, the famous explorer of Australia and the South Sea, and 
discoverer of the Hawaiian Islands, where he was murdered. Oft'utt and Cook 
were sailors together in their younger years. Mrs. Hamilton passed away in 
April, 1905, at the age of seventy-five years. By her marriage she had become 
the mother of nine children, seven of whom are yet living. 

Dr. Alexander B. Hamilton, who was the third in order of birth and is the 
onlv one living in Wyoming, pursued his education in the Grove City College 
of Grove City, Pennsylvania. His early life to the age of nineteen years was 




^ ^ J¥^ 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 87 

spent upon the home farm and he then started out on his own account, taking 
up the profession of teaching, which he followed in Lawrence county, Penn- 
sylvania, through two winter terms in iSSi and 1882. He regarded this, how- 
ever, merely as an initial step to other professional labor, for it was his desire 
to become a member of the medical profession and with that end in view he 
entered the Western Reserve Medical Department at Cleveland, Ohio, and was 
graduated therefrom with the M. D. degree in March, 1886. He immediately 
entered upon active practice at Garland, Pennsylvania, where he continued until 
the fall of 1892, when he removed to Youngstown, Ohio, but there remained 
only until the spring of 1893, when he heard and heeded the call of the west 
and made his way to Laramie, where he has since lived, being continuously 
engaged in practice during the intervening period, covering a quarter of a cen- 
tury. He was one of the pioneer physicians of the city and his ability brought 
him prominently to the front, a position which he has always been able to main- 
tain by reason of his wide reading, his close study and his investigations, which 
have kept him in touch with the most advanced and progressive methods manifest 
in the practice of medicine and surgery. He belongs to the Albany County 
Medical Society, the Wyoming State Medical Society and the American Medical 
Association. He also has other business interests, being vice president and one 
of the directors of the First State Bank of Laramie. 

On the loth of September, 1885, Dr. Hamilton was united in marriage at 
Plaingrove, Pennsylvania, to Miss Margaret E. Martin, a native of the Keystone 
state and a daughter of the late Thomas and Maria (Jordan) Martin, who 
were representatives of prominent Pennsylvania families and have both passed 
away. 

In public affairs Dr. Hamilton has taken an active and helpful interest and 
his efforts have contributed in marked degree to general progress and advance- 
ment. He is treasurer of the Albany County Free Public Library and he has 
cooperated in many movements that have had to do with intellectual progress. 
For the past seven years he has served on the executive board of the University 
of Wyoming. Politically he maintains an independent course, voting according 
to the' dictates of his judgment, and religiously he is connected with the First 
Presbvterian church. He stands as a splendid example of a self-made man. 
He worked his own way through college and through the medical school, and his 
advancement is due entirely to his own efforts, his laudable ambition and his high 
purpose. He stands not only as one of the leading representatives of his profes- 
sion but also as one of the most prominent factors in connection with public and 
civic matters in Laramie and is widely and favorably known throughout the 
entire state. 



CLARENCE A. SLONAKER. 

Clarence A. Slonaker is one of the enterprising business men of Douglas, 
where he is conducting business in the ice and coal trade and also has a 
transfer line. He was born in Pennsylvania on the ist of ,\pril. 1867, and 
is a son of John P. and Mary Slonaker. He acquired his education in the 
public schools of his native state, passing through consecutive grades to the 
high school, and in young manhood he devoted his attention to various lines 
of" business. He was employed in a store in the east for fourteen >ears and 
when thirty-five years of age he bade adieu to friends in that section of the 
country and made his way westward, for he believed that better business oppor- 
tunities might be secured in this section of the country. Douglas. Wyoming, 
became his destination and here he worked for a luimber of years. Even- 
tually he turned his attention to the ice trade and gradually developed his inter- 
ests until he now handles ice and coal and also conducts a transfer business. 
His interests along these various lin^s have constantly grown and developed 



88 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

and his patronage is now extensive, making his business one of the profitable 
enterprises of Douglas. His equipment includes ten teams and one auto 
truck and he employs twelve men. 

In November, 1891, Mr. Slonaker was united in marriage to Miss Belle 
Chambers and they have become the parents of five sons and three daughters, 
namely : Thomas Urie, Ollie, John, Charles, Clarence, Helen, Thelma and Vic- 
toria, all at home with the exception of Thomas Urie, the eldest, who is serv- 
ing his country in the United States Navy. 

In his political views Air. Slonaker is an earnest democrat and while not 
a politician in the commonly accepted sense of office seeking, he has served 
as county treasurer of Converse county for four years, and was a most faith- 
ful custodian of the public funds. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons 
as a member of the lodge at Douglas and he also belongs to the Commercial 
Club. He is interested in civic movements that have to do with the welfare 
and upbuilding of Douglas and is devoted to the best interests of his adopted 
state. A spirit of progress has actuated him at all points in his career and 
he is classed with the valued and representative citizens of Converse county. 



HON. FRANK L. HOUX. 

Hon. Frank L. Houx, secretary of state for the second term and acting gov- 
ernor of Wyoming, has in many ways left the impress of his individuality upon 
the history of the state, not only as its chief executive but also as the pro- 
moter of those material interests which take cognizance of the natural resources 
of the state, leading to its settlement and upbuilding. He has studied closely 
many of the problems of Wyoming and 'has been active with those who have 
done much toward promoting its irrigation projects, thus greatly enhancing 
the productiveness of the land. 

A native of Missouri, he was born in Lexington on the 12th of December, 
1854, and is a son of George W. and Fannie (Price) Houx. The father was a 
farmer by occupation and served for four years in the Confederate army under 
General Price, who was an uncle of his wife. Both Mr. and Mrs. George W. 
Houx have passed away. They had a family of three sons and three daughters. 

Governor Houx, who was the second in order of birth, was educated in pri- 
vate schools of Alissouri and also had the benefit of instruction in a high school 
and in a business college, attending Shaw's Business College at Kansas City. 
He afterward took up the study of law, reading in the office of John S. Blackwell, 
of Lexington, Missouri, but did not complete his course. Afterward he turned 
his attention to commercial pursuits, in which he was engaged for ten years, and 
in 1886 he went west to Montana, where he engaged in the live stock business 
for ten years. He then removed to Cody, Wyoming, where he took up his abode 
on the i6th of June, 1896. Here he has since made his home and it is in the 
vicinity of Cody that his business interests largely center. In 1901 Hon. Frank 
L. Houx was elected the first mayor of Cody,' while from 1902 to _ 1903 he 
served as police judge. For the terms from 1905 until 1909 he was again elected 
to the office of mayor. For a time he was associated with Colonel William F. 
Cody, better known as Buffalo Bill, in the construction of the Cody canal and 
in the settlement of the lands which then were under their united interests, and 
these enterprises constituted an important element in the growth and progress 
of that section of the state. Recognizing the possibilities for development in that 
section of the state, he has put forth most earnest eft'orts to advance its up- 
building and his labors have been farreaching and resultant. 

Endowed by nature with qualities that work for leadership, Frank L. Houx 
has been called upon to serve in many public positions of honor and trust. He 
was the first mayor of Cody and later' again occupied jhe position for four years. 




HOX. FRANK L. HOUX 



90 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

thus largely directing the policy of the city during its formative period. In the 
tall ot igio he was elected secretary of state, the first and only democrat ever 
chosen to the office in Wyoining. After four years' service he was reelected 
in 1914, so that he is now occupying the position for the second term, which 
extends until 1919. When Governor John b. Kendrick was elected to the United 
States senate, Frank L. Houx, as secretary of state, became governor and is 
therefore the chief executive of Wyoming at the present time. 

Governor Houx has been married twice. He first wedded Miss Augusta 
Camp in 1875 ^""^ ^^ ^^6 she passed away. Their children were: Carrie P., 
now the wife of Joseph Newell; Florence, the wife of Richard Alarlow : and 
Earl. In 1898 Governor Houx was again married, his second union being with 
Miss Ida Mason Christy, a daughter of Joseph and Hannah Christy, and the 
children of this marriage are Christy, Vera, Mercedes, and Thora. 

Governor Houx has always given his political allegiance to the democratic 
party and has been one of the most active workers in party ranks in his state. 
He has closely studied the vital and significant problems of the age and keeps 
abreast with the best thinking men in their attitude concerning the questions 
which have to do with the welfare and upbuilding of cotumonwealth and country. 
Fraternally he is a Royal Arch Mason and his religious faith is that of the 
Presbyterian church. He is fond of fishing, hunting and other phases of out- 
door life, to which he turns for needed rest and recreation. In manner he is 
genial, afifable and kindly, and his cordiality is unfeigned, for he feels a deep in- 
terest in his fellowmen and their welfare and believes that every citizen should 
have a chance to develop the best that is in him. 

For the last eight years he has been very active in prison reform and has made 
resultful efforts for the benefit of the condition of the convicts. In order to 
keep informed in regard to the conditions prevailing in the prisons, he has kept 
in close touch with the warden and has for a length of time been a member of 
the board of pardons, of which he is now chairman. He has been a forceful 
advocate of prohibition for many years and has been active in bringing about 
temperance conditions and molding public opinion in regard to the adoption 
of this important measure. He has made numerous speeches for the cause and 
especially one of his lectures is famous that is based upon his personal experiences 
during his long years of residence in the west. 

An enumeration of the men of the present generation in Wyoming who have 
won honor and public recognition for themselves and at the same time ha^■e 
honored the state to which they belong would be incomplete were there failure 
to make prominent reference to the one whose name initiates this review, for in 
every connection he has borne himself with such signal dignity and honor as 
to gain the respect of all. He is not only a political leader but has been and is 
distinctively a man of affairs and one who has wielded a wide influence. A strong 
mentality, invincible courage, a most determined individuality have so entered 
into his makeup as to make him a natural leader of men and a director of opinion. 



JOHN G. RUMSEY. 



A spirit of enterprise seems a part of the very atmosphere of the west. 
There is continually opportunity which is a call to action and a spur to ambi- 
tion. The constant growth of the district offers splendid chances for business 
development and success is being continually won by the men of sagacity and 
industry. To this class belongs John G. Rumsey, who is now the president and 
manager of the Stock Growers' ?ilercantile Company of Rock Springs. 

He was born January 29, 1856, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a son of the 
late James M. Rumsev, who was a native of New Jersey and was of English 
descent, the family, however, having been founded in .America at an early 
period by James Rumsey, the inventor of the first steamboat in association 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 91 

with George Washington and Benjamin Franklin. The trial of this boat was 
made on the Potomac, after experiments on a pond on his farm in \'irginia. 
He came to America prior to the Revolutionary war and his descendants were 
among those who participated in the struggle for independence, one of the 
family serving as a colonel in the immediate command of Wa^hingtdu. and a 
letter written to this colonel by General Washington is now in ]ioss(.>sion of 
his descendant, John G. Rumsey of this review. James M. Rnmsey became a 
successful dry goods merchant of Portsmouth, Ohio, removing from Pennsyl- 
vania to the Buckeye state prior to the Civil war. The business was conducted 
under the firm name of James M. Rumsey & Company and at one time was 
the largest wholesale dry goods enterprise in the state. At the time of the 
outbreak of hostilities between the north and the south James M. Rumsey 
put aside all other considerations and went to the front, serving for ninety 
days. F'ollowing his return he continued a factor in the commercial inter- 
ests of Portsmouth and there developed a business of large and gratifying 
proportions. He carried forward to successful completion whatever he under- 
took and in his vocabulary there was no such word as fail. His interests and 
activities contributed to the material progress of the community in which he 
lived. In 1897 he removed to the west, taking up his abode in Denver, Colo- 
rado, where he lived retired, enjoying the fruits of a well spent life until called 
to the home beyond. He was born July 29, 1829, and had reached the age of 
seventy-four years when called to his final rest in Denver in 1903. In early 
manhood he had wedded Harriett A. Gaffy, who was born in Xew York city, 
November 18, 1832, and belonged to one of the old families of the Empire 
state, her father Ijeing Captain John S. Gaffv, who through three administra- 
tions was connected with the L'nited States custom house in New York. Prior 
to that time he was a ca])tain on the Hudson river on one of the boats of the 
Stevens Steamship Fine, which also owned a number of ocean-going vessels. 
The Gafifys were of Irish descent and in the maternal line the ancestry was 
Scotch. Mrs. Rumsey is still living and makes her home at Rock Springs. By 
her marriage she became the mother of seven children, four of whom survive, 
namely: John G. ; Eliza \\'., a resident of Rock Springs; James M., who is a 
banker of Rawlins and is also a well known stock man of Wyoming: and 
William T., who is yet living in Rock Springs. 

John G. Rumsey was quite young when his parents removed from Phila- 
delphia to Ohio, so that his education was acquired in the public schools of 
Portsmouth and later he entered Princeton College, in which he pursued his 
course to the junior year. At the age of eighteen he started out to provide 
for his own support and has since been dependent entirely upon his own re- 
sources, his progress being the result of unfaltering industry and laudable am- 
bition on his part. He served an apprenticeship in the mammoth mercantile 
establishment of A. T. Stewart & Company of New York city, the predecessors 
of the establishment of John \\'anamaker. That store at the time was the 
largest in the world, having over four thousand employes. There Mr. Rumsey 
remained for four years and later he entered the employ of the Markley- Ailing 
Company of Chicago, wholesale hardware dealers, with whom he continued 
for three and a half years. He was afterward general manager for United 
States Senator George L. Shoup of Idaho, being associated with him in gen- 
eral merchandise interests at Bonanza. Idaho, for a period of three years. 

Mr. Rumsey's identification with Wyoming dates from the ist of t^ecemlier, 
IQ06, when he arrived at Fort Steele and became general manager for the 
CosgrilT Brothers Company, with whom he continued until the 4th of March, 
1907, when he removed to Rock Springs and in connection with others pur- 
chased the business in which he is now engaged and which was then conducted 
under the name of Tim Kinney & Company. This was one of the first mer- 
cantile establishments in the state. On the 4tli of March, 1907, the business 
was incorporated under the style of the Stock (Growers' Mercantile Company 
and from that time has been one of the successful and growing commercial 



92 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

interests of Wyoming and is today the most extensive general mercantile estab- 
lishment in the state conducting both a wholesale and retail business. The 
ofificers of the company are : John G. Rumsey, president ; W. H. Gottchie, of 
Rock Springs, vice president ; J. W. Hay, secretary ; while Mr. Rumsey is also 
the treasurer. As the executive head of this enterprise he has done much to 
shape its policy and control its interests. The company has ever been most 
careful concerning the personnel of the house, the line of goods carried, the 
treatment rendered customers and the methods followed. The reputation of 
the house for integrity and reliability is an unassailable one and in all that 
they undertake here the officers are actuated by a spirit of progressiveness that 
has brought good results. Mr. Rumsey is also president of the J- K. Moore 
Company at Fort \\'ashakie and is the president of the Arapahoe Trading 
Company of Arapahoe, Wyoming. He is a man of marked business ability, 
forceful and resourceful, and carries forward to successful completion what- 
ever he undertakes. The steps in his orderly progression are easily discernible. 
Obstacles and difficulties in his path have seemed but to serve as a stimulus 
and an impetus to renewed effort on his part and he has ever been watchful of 
all indications pointing to success in the lines of his trade and he meets every 
emergency that arises with the confidence that comes from a right conception 
of things and an habitual regard for what is best in the exercise of human 
activities. He now occupies an attractive home in Rock Springs, where his 
mother also resides, being hale and hearty at the age of eight-five years and 
keenly interested in current events. Mr. Rumsey delights in surrounding her 
with all of the comforts of life, thus repaying her in filial care for her devo- 
tion to him in his youthful years. 

In his ])olitical views Mr. Rumsey is a republican, while his religious faith 
is that of the Episcopal church. Fraternally he is an Elk and a thirty-second 
degree Mason and has crossed the sands of the desert with the Xobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. 



ROBERT H. HOMER. 



Robert H. Homer, a prominent figure in banking circles and a gentleman of 
liberal culture, "well descended and well bred," is president of the Albany County 
Bank of Laramie and in other connections has been a leading factor in the devel- 
opment and progress of his adopted city and state. He was born in Boston, 
Massachusetts, May i6, 1849, ^"d is a representative of one of the oldest families 
of that state of English lineage. The family was founded in America by Captain 
John Homer, who came to the new world in 1672. He owned a sailing vessel and 
on board his ship came from Great Britain to the new world when twenty-five 
years of age. He took up his abode in Boston and his descendants have since 
been found in Massachusetts and have also scattered to other sections of the 
Union. He married Margery Stephens and passed away in Boston, November i, 
1717, leaving six sons and two daughters. 

The father of Robert H. Homer was the late Peter Thatcher Homer, who was 
born in Boston, February 22, 1804, and was a successful dry goods merchant and 
importer of his native city. At the age of twenty-one years he became a member 
of the dry goods firm of B. F. .\dams & Company and spent many years in 
England as the representative of that firm, purchasing goods direct from the 
mills and otherwise looking after the foreign trade. He thus became intimately 
acquainted with many of England's leading manufacturers and representative 
people. In time, through changes in the personnel of the firm, the style of Homer, 
Adams & Company was assumed and their house was one of the leading com- 
mercial enterprises of New England. Mr. Homer was also prominent in railway 
building in that section of the country, was actively identified with manufacturing 
interests and was the founder of a large number of corporations which con- 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 95 

tributed in marked measure to the business development and substantial prog- 
ress of his city and state. He was a stanch democrat in politics and was at one 
time a candidate for congress as the opponent of Hon. Robert C. Winthrop, who 
was elected. During the third term of Governor John A. Andrews, in 1863, Mr. 
Homer was made a member of Governor Andrews' council and thus served 
through the Civil war, representing the first Massachusetts district as councillor. 
He was very active in affairs bearing upon the welfare of state and nation and 
became widely known throughout the entire country. He died in 1S86 at the 
age of eighty-two years and his remains were interred in Mount Auburn ceme- 
tery in Boston. His father was a soldier of the War of 1812 and witnessed the 
fight between the Shannon and the Chesapeake. He, too, was active in affairs 
which had to do with the upbuilding of commonwealth and country. The mother 
of Robert H. Homer bore the maiden name of Caroline Bunker and was a daugh- 
ter of William J. Bunker, of New York, a representative of one of the old fami- 
lies of the Empire state and of English descent. Mrs. Homer passed away three 
months prior to the death of her husband. In their family were four children, 
three of whom are still living: Anna B., who is a resident of Boston; Margaret, 
the wife of Charles Davis, of that city; and Robert H., of this review. One son, 
William Homer, is deceased. 

Robert H. Homer obtained his education in the public schools of Boston, 
which he attended until he reached the age of seventeen years and then started 
out in the business world in connection with the diy goods trade, representing 
the firm of Harding, Converse & Gray, with which he continued for three years. 
He next went abroad and was in France during the period of the Franco- 
Prussian war. On his return from Europe he removed to the \vest, settling in 
Albany county, Wyoming, in August, 1871. Here he turned his attention to the 
business of stock raising and ranching and he became one of the most prominent 
ranchmen of the state. He is the owner of Flag Ranch, one of Wyoming's finest 
ranch properties, splendidly equipped. The exceptionally attractive residence 
thereon, shown elsewhere in this work, was planned and constructed under the 
personal direction and supervision of Mr. and Mrs. Homer. It was built entirely 
of home products, constructed of materials found on the ranch, save the windows 
and doors, and is artistic in design, workmanship and furnishings. Mr. Homer 
has witnessed many of the events which figure on the pages of Wyoming's history 
in early times and has vivid recollection of those trying and turbulent border 
days. His reminiscences of the state during its formative period are most inter- 
esting. Not only did he become prominently connected with ranching and stock 
raising, but has extended his efforts into other fields with good results. He 
became one of the incorporators of the Laramie National Bank and was at one 
time president of the Wyoming Bank of Laiamie, both of which have since been 
absorbed by the First National Bank of Laramie. Mr. Homer became president 
of the Albany County National Bank in January, 1901, and has since occupied 
that position, covering a period of sixteen years, during which time he has 
largely shaped the policy of the institution. He has ever recognized the fact 
that the bank is most worthy of support which most carefully safeguards the 
interests of its depositors, and in the conduct of his business he has furthermore 
displayed keen discrimination and sound sagacity. 

On the 26th of February, 1888, in Providence, Rhode Island, Mr. Homer 
was united in marriage to Miss Belle Stuart White, a native of Dorchester. Massa- 
chusetts, and a descendant of Peregrine White, the first child bom after the land- 
ing of the Pilgrims from the Mayflower, while through the Stuarts she comes 
of an old New England family of Scotch lineage, being a descendant of Maria 
Stuart. Her grandmother in the maternal line was Susan Moies, who at the 
time of her death was the oldest member of the Congregational Board of New 
England and a confrere of Dr. Constantine Blodgett, a noted Congregational 
divine. Mrs. Homer is a lady of refinement, cultured and well bred, whose 
education has been supplemented by extensive travel, bringing broad general 
information. She has readily adapted herself to western life and during her long 



96 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

residence in Wyoming has become endeared to hosts of warm friends, Mr. and 
Mrs Homer occupying a very enviable position in the leading social circles of their 
section of the state. 

Air. Homer gives his political endorsement to the democratic party and served 
as a member of the legislature of W^yoming from 1877 until 1883, or for three 
terms of two years each, during which he gave thoughtful consideration to all 
the vital questions which came up for settlement and left the impress of his 
mdividuality and ability in large measure upon the laws of the state. He is 
prominently known in club circles throughout the country, holding membership 
in the Somerset Club of Boston, the Boston Athletic Club, the Boston Country 
Club, the Reform Club of New York city and the Rocky Mountain Club of New 
York city. He holds membership in the Unitarian church in Laramie and he is 
interested in all those forces which have to do with the uplift of the individual 
and the betterment of the community. 

He is interested in those things which have cultural value in the lives of men 
and he has greatly enjoyed travel, with the opportunities which it brings. In 
company with Mrs. Homer, he has traveled extensively over Europe and in fact 
has visited almost every country on the face of the globe, making several trips 
around the world and having personal acquaintance with the distinguished men 
of many countries. He was a national commissioner in Paris during the World's 
Fair held there in 1900. His ranch home, which he occupies,, nine miles south 
of Laramie, contains a rare and valuable collection of art and other treasures 
gathered from all parts of the universe, suggesting the artistic tastes of both 
Mr. and Airs. Homer. This is a source of great interest and pride to the owner 
and to the citizens of the community. 

Mr. Homer is indeed a most highly cultured gentleman of innate refinement, 
is a magnetic speaker and is widely known for his lovable character. He has the 
faculty of placing all at ease in his presence and there is one point in his career 
to which the old settlers refer with pride — that as a financier or business man he 
has always been the same genial, courteous gentleman whose ways are those of 
refinement and whose word no man can question. 



A. D. KELLEY. 



A. D. Kelley is one of the well known representatives of commercial enter- 
prise in Cheyenne, being president of the Kelley Alercantile Company. Under that 
name he is successfully engaged in the wholesale and retail grocery business. 

He was born in Indiana on the 2d of February, 1858, and is a son of Francis 
M. and Jane ( Burge ) Kelley, the former a native of Ohio, while the latter was 
born in Kentucky. A. D. Kelley pursued his education in the public schools of 
Indiana and of Nebraska, the fam.ily having removed to the latter state when 
he was but seven years of age and before there was a railroad west of the Missis- 
sippi river. He feels, however, that his most valuable lessons have been gained in 
the school of experience. He has tried to benefit by each new experience that has 
come to him and by reading and study he has greatly broadened his knowledge. 
For a year he engaged in teaching school, after which he made his way to the 
Black Hills during the gold excitement in that section of the country. He was 
there engaged in prospecting and freighting for two years. On the i6th of Feb- 
ruary, 1878, he came to Cheyenne and was employed in a grocen,' store for four 
years, during which period he carefully saved his earnings, ambitious to some day 
engage in business on his own account. He then felt that his capital justified him 
in taking the step and he at once established the wholesale and retail grocery house 
which he has since conducted, his business steadily growing as the years 
have gone by and as this section of the country has become more and more thickly 
settled. He is today active in control of his interests as the president of the Kelley 
Mercantile Company and in this undertaking has met with very substantial and 




A. D. KELLEY 



98 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

gratifying success. He is also manager of the National Brokerage Company, is 
president of the Plymouth Rock Oil Company and vice president of the 
Chevenne Building & Loan Association, and has been a member of its board since 
its organization or for over seventeen years.. The last named organization has 
done much for the improvement and upbuilding of Cheyenne and Air. Kelley 
may well be proud of his connection with it. Through this means many have been 
able to gain homes which otherwise they would probably not have secured and the 
stability and substantial growth of Cheyenne has been greatly augmented in this 
way. 

On the nth of February, 1878, Mr. Kelley was united in marriage to Miss 
Alargaret Moran and to them have been born the following children: Frank A., 
who died at the age of twenty-seven years; Ed. J., who is manager of the retail 
Kelley Mercantile Company ; Grace G. ; Mrs. Flora M. Ott, wife of Julius F. Ott, 
manager of the wholesale house of the Kelley Alercantile Company; and Mrs. 
Hazel J. Hutchison, wife of James Hutchison. 

Air. Kelley votes with the republican party and has been quite prominent in 
its ranks, serving as city treasurer of Cheyenne, as sheriff of Laramie county in 
1 89 1 and 1892 and as a member of the territorial legislature in 1884, before the 
admission of Wyoming into the Union. In 1893 he was chosen to repre- 
sent his district in the state legislature for a two years' term, and was reelected 
in 1895 and served to 1897. He was speaker of the house during the last session in 
which connection he rendered rulings that were strictly fair and impartial. He 
was identified with much constructive legislation and he has always stood for 
progress and improvement in public affairs, taking an active interest in all that 
pertains to the welfare of city, state, and nation. Evidence thereof is the fact that 
he is chairman of the Liberty Loan Committee, having done important and re- 
sultant work in this connection. Fraternally he is a Mason of high rank, having 
attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. He is also connected 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He 
has membership in the Industrial Club and for eight years was president of the old 
Commercial Club. He is a broad-minded man of big ideas, unfaltering in 
enterprise, determined in purpose and actuated at all times by marked devotion to 
the general good. 



HORACE R. CHRISTMAS. 

Horace R. Christmas, of Kemmerer, has figured prominently in connection 
with law practice and with political affairs in Lincoln county and is now a 
member of the law firm of H. E. & H. R. Christmas, enjoying an extensive 
practice at the bar of his district. 

He was born in Grand Haven, Michigan, January 28, 1882, and is a son of 
Horace E. and Margaret J. (Leggett) Christmas. The father was a native of 
Alton, England, and in young manhood crossed the Atlantic to the new world. 
He had pursued his early law studies in England and he continued his prepara- 
tion for the bar after becoming a resident of Michigan, being admitted to prac- 
tice in that state and later in Wyoming. He has since been very prominent in 
legal circles in Wyoming and is numbered among the representative and honored 
lawyers of Lincoln county. He has one of the largest and finest law libraries 
to be found in his portion of the state and has well appointed law offices. His 
practice has always been of an important character and has constantly grown 
and developed with the settlement of this section of the state. He has received 
the appointment of United States commissioner and is filling the position at 
the present time in connection with his professional activities and duties. For 
ten years after his removal to the west he was in the service of the Union 
Pacific Coal Company at Rock Springs, Wyoming, which position he resigned 
to accept that of assistant cashier in the First National Bank of Rock Springs. 



HISTORY OF ^^■Y(1-MIXG 99 

He acted in that capacity until 1894, when he was admitted to the bar of Wyom- 
ing and entered upon the practice of his chosen profession. In October. 1898, 
he took up his abode in Kemmerer and upon the incorporation of the city was 
chosen city attorney. He also became city attorney of Dianiondville upon its 
incorporation. 

Mr. Christmas has figured prominently in connection with the \\'yoming 
National Guard and has been very active in military circles. He holds a com- 
mission with the rank of colonel. Colonel Christmas was married in Michi- 
gan to Miss Margaret J. Leggett. of Grand Haven, and they became the par- 
ents of eight children, of whom Horace R. of this review is the eldest. The 
others are: J. A., living in Kemmerer; C. A., who is engaged in the drug 
business in Kemmerer; Mrs. \V. J. Witherspoon, whose husband is a hard- 
ware merchant of Kemmerer; and "Margaret. Alarjorie, Frank M. and Cornelia, 
all of whom are at home. 

In his boyhood days Horace R. ( 'hristmas was a pupil in the schools of 
Rock Springs. \\'yoming. and ciimiiuK<l liis (.■ihication under private instruc- 
tion until he entered the University of \\ yuninii;. while subsequently he became 
a student in the University of Michig.m at Ann Arbor. There he pursued his 
law course and was graduated with the class of 1908. He then returned to 
his father's home in Kemmerer and entered into partnership with his father 
under the present firm style of H. E. & H. R. Christmas. They ranlc with 
the leading attorneys of \\'yoming. The young man had the benefn ni the 
experience and training "of his father and thus started upon lii> profes>ional 
career under exceptionally favorable circumstances. They are both members 
of the \\"yi)niing I'.ar Association and of the American IJar Association. 

On the i_'th nf September, lyij. Mr. L'hristmas was united in marriage 
10 Miss Fugenia Stayner. of Salt Lake City, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles F. Stayner, who are still residents of Salt Lake City. The father is a 
well known instructor in music and a prominent composer, having published 
many fine compositions. 

Fraternally Mr. Christmas is a thirty-second degree Mason and is also 
identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks at Rock Springs. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and he was called upon to 
represent his district in the state legislature in 191 1. He has also served as 
district court connuissioner and his record is in harmony with that of his 
honored father, who has long figured as one of the prominent citizens of 
Wyoming. The firm ranks among the foreiuost lawyers of the state and the 
record of the young man has added new lustre to an untarnished family name. 



CHARLES D. SPALDING. 

Charles D. Spalding, cashier of the .\lbany County National Bank at Laramie, 
is one of the best known men in banking circles in southern \\'yonn'ng, and while 
but little past middle age has been for more than a ([uarter of ,1 century identified 
with the city's financial institutions, thus acquiring a 1)usines> pre^tige as well as 
a personal acquaintance equalled by very few men in Laramie. 

He was born in Bloomington, Illinois, February 25, 1872. a son of Charles W. 
and Annetta (Dawson) Spalding, who were natives of Kentucky and of Illinois 
respectively. Soon after the Civil war the father removed to Illinois, having pre- 
viously served through the war as a member of an Illinois ^•nlnnteer regiment, in 
which he made an exceptionally good record for fidelity and bravery. He was 
afterward a well known government einploye in the United .States [inst office at 
Bloomington, 111. He became a pioneer of Laramie, served as cnunt\- clerk of 
Albany county and his last days were passed here. He was born in 1S35 and had 
therefore reached the age of seventy-three years when in igoS he was called to 
the home beyond. His widow is still living and is a resident of Laramie. They 



100 HISrORY OF WYOMING 

were the parents of three children: George Spalding, who resides in Omaha, 
Nebraska; Irene Spalding, who is deceased; and Charles D., of this review. 

The last named was the eldest of the family and was a little lad of but four 
summers when in 1876 his parents removed to Laramie, becoming pioneer citi- 
zens here. He attended the public schools of Laramie and afterward entered 
the preparatory department of the University of Wyoming, subsequent to which 
time he made his initial step in the business world. For a time he was in the 
employ of his father, who was county clerk of Albany county, and in 1890 he 
became identified with the banking business, entering the Wyoming National 
Bank, with which institution he was connected until 1895. He was afterward 
with the First National Bank until lyoo in various departments and became con- 
nected with the Albany County Bank as assistant cashier, being elected to the 
position of cashier in 1903. He has capably filled this office ever since and has 
come to be regarded as one of the ablest men in his capacity in the city. He is 
a courteous and obliging official, extending the assistance of the bank wherever 
possible but never exceeding the point where the interests of depositors or stock- 
holders might be jeopardized. He is thoroughly familiar with every phase of 
banking and his work in this connection has done much for the success of the 
institution. 

On the /th of September, 1898, in Laramie, Mr. Spalding was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Allie Crumrine, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eli Crumrine, who 
were natives of Pennsylvania and came to Wyoming in 1886. Mr. and Mrs. 
Spalding have one child, Charles C, who was born in Laramie in 1902 and is 
now a high school pupil. 

The parents are consistent members of the Episcopal church and Mr. Spalding 
is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is serving on the 
board of trustees of the State University, and his aid and influence can always 
be counted upon to further any plan or project for the public good. Starting out 
in life without any special advantages, he has constantly worked his way upward 
and stands high in financial circles. Moreover, the esteem and good will of his 
fellow townsmen is cordially extended him, for his has been an upright life and 
he possesses a genial, social nature that makes for personal popularity. 



HON. CHARLES N. POTTER. 

Hon. Charles N. Potter, chief justice of Wyoming, who since January, 1895, 
has been a member of the supreme court of the state, his present term to continue 
until 1Q18, when he will have occupied this position of high judicial preferment 
for twenty-three years, is one who by an unassailable record has reflected credit 
and honor upon the people of the state who have honored him. 

He was born in Cooperstown, New York, October 31, 1852, a son of George 
VV. and Mary J. (Marcellus) Potter. After acc|uiring a public school education, 
completed by graduation from the high school at Grand Rapids, Michigan, with 
the class of 1870. he took up the study of law in the University of Michigan and 
won his LL. B. degree with the class of 1873. He then entered upon law practice 
in Grand Rapids, where he remained until 1876, and in March of that year he 
arrived in Cheyenne, Wyoming, having been a resident of Michigan from 1854 
until 1876, or for a period of twenty-two years. For forty-two years he has 
made his home in Wyoming and has left the impress of his individuality and 
ability in marked manner upon the records of the state. Entering upon the prac- 
tice of law, he was not long in winning distinction at the bar and was also called 
to leadership in connection with political and public aiifairs. From 1890 until 
1892 he served as secretary of the republican state central committee of Wyo- 
ming, covering the first state campaign. In 1889 he had been chosen a member 
of the Wyoming constitutional con\ention and thus took active part in framing 
the organic law of the commonwealth. He had been a resident of Wyoming 



J 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 103 

for only a brief period when he was first called to public office, being appointed 
city attorney of Cheyenne in 1878 and reappointed in 1879 and again in 1880. 
In 1889 he was again appointed to that office. He was county and prosecuting 
attorney of Laramie county from 1881 until 1883 and later he served, as previously 
indicated, as a valued member of the constitutional convention. After he had 
for two years been secretary of the Wyoming state republican central committee 
he was made delegate from Wyoming and chairman of the delegation to the 
republican national convention held in Minneapolis in 1892. In February, 1891, he 
became attorney general of the state of Wyoming and occupied that position 
until January, 1895. At this time he became a member of the supreme court 
of Wvoming by election, having been chosen for the supreme bench at the general 
election in November, 1894, and he has ever since sat upon this bench of last 
resort. Still higher honors came to him on the 9th of December, 1897, when 
he becaiuc chief justice. He was reelected at the general election in 1902, again 
becoming chief justice in April, 1905, and was reelected in 1910 and again 
became chief justice in 1915. 

On August 22, 1877, at Muskegon, Michigan, Justice Potter was married 
to Miss Bessie C. Ireland, a daughter uf James and Elizabeth (Slater) Ireland, 
and to them were born three children, two sons who died in childhood, and a 
daughter, Ada, the widow of Walter B. Dunton, late of Rock Springs, Wyoming, 
who died May 4. 1917. 

Tudge Potter's interest in community afifairs is indicated by his active service 
as a member of the Cheyenne Board of Education, on which he served from 1888 
until 1897, and he was also president of the Cheyenne Industrial Club from 1910 
until 1913. He is a Mason of high standing, the honorary thirty-third degree 
having been conferred upon him. He belongs to .\cacia Lodge, No. 11, A. F. & 
A. M., of Cheyenne, is a past grand master of the grand lodge of Wyoming and 
was secretan,- of the Past Grand Masters' Association in 191 1 and 1912. He 
is likewise past grand chancellor of the Wyoming Grand Lodge of Knights of 
Pythias and is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the 
Woodmen of the World. Since coming to the west he has made his home in 
Cheyenne and his activities have had much to do with shaping the interests and 
molding the historj' of the entire state. 



FRANK GATCHELL. 



Frank Gatchell, a civil engineer practicing as a member of the firm of Burritt 
& Gatchell. was born in North Dakota on the 20th of October, 1881, a son of 
P. A. and Harriet O. (Ostrander) Gatchell. the former a native of Maine, while 
the latter was born in the state of New York. At the time of the Civil war the 
father responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting in the First Maine 
Hea\-y Artillerv, with which he served until the close of hostilities. ]iarticipating 
in a numl)er nf hotly contested engagements. He afterward remo\-ed westward 
to Nel)r,•l-l^a am! fur a time resided in North Dakota, but in i8()3 liecame a resi- 
dent of Sheridan, Wyoming, where he engaged in newspaper pulilication. He 
was also registrar of the land office at Buffalo for four vears and he and his 
wife still make their home in Buffalo, where they are highlv esteemed bv all 
who have been brought in contact with them. They had a family of six children, 
of whom four are yet living. 

Frank Gatchell was a young lad when brought by his parents to Wyoming 
and in the public schools of Buffalo he pursued his early education, completing 
a course in the high school, after which he became a student in the Highland 
Park Academv of Des ^Moines. Iowa, from which in due course of time he was 
graduated. He studied civil engineering while in that school and afterward came 
to Buffalo, where for twelve years he occupied the position of county engineer. 
He was later appointed chief engineer for the Wyoming Railway and acted in 



104 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

that capacity for four years. He then began the private practice of his pro- 
fession in Buffalo, where he has since remained, and has secured a good clientage 
in his chosen field of labor, practicing now as a partner in the firm of Burritt & 
Gatchell. Constant demands are made upon his time and energies in a profes- 
sional connection and his work is conducted along the most practical and scien- 
tific lines. 

In 1903 ]\Ir. Gatchell was united in marriage to :Miss \\"inona Munkres, who 
was born in Colorado in 18S1 but was only fifteen months old when her parents 
removed with their family to ^Vvoming. She has become the mother of two 
children: Joris O., who was born' July 22, 1904: and Harriet Sibyl, born Octo- 
ber 19, 1906. 

Mrs. Gatchell is a member of the Episcopal church and fraternally Mr. 
Gatchell is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. They are 
pleasantly situated in Buft'alo and in addition to his property in the city Mr. 
Gatchell owns eighty acres with a nice summer home three miles from Buffalo. 
He is most attractively and pleasantly located, with an interesting family, with a 
good business and with many friends who enjoy his companionship and who 
entertain for him warm regard. 



E. S. LAUZER, M. D. 



Dr. E. S. Lauzer is recognized as a capable physician and surgeon, suc- 
cessfully practicing at Rock Springs, but his fellow townsmen have also recog- 
nized the fact that he is qualified for leadership in public affairs and have called 
upon him to assume the reins of city government. He is now filling the position 
of mayor, in which connection he is exercising his official prerogatives in support 
of many well defined plans and projects for the general good and is giving to 
his city a businesslike administration. 

Dr' Lauzer is a native of Minnesota, his birth having occurred in Hutchin- 
son, January 29, 1882, his parents being Simon and Anna (Tmey) Lauzer, both 
of whom are natives of Bohemia, whence they came to America in 1857. Mr. 
Lauzer's study of his adopted land, its conditions and its interests led him 
to espouse the cause of the Union at the time of the Civil war and he became 
a member of Company A of the First United States Infantry. He won rank 
as a non-commissioned officer and rendered active service to his adopted land 
in her hour of peril, participating in many hotly contested engagements, in 
which he proved his valor and his loyalty. In days of peace his attention was 
given to agricultural pursuits and he became a well known farmer of Minnesota, 
where he devoted many years to the work of tilling the soil. At the present 
time, ho\vc\'cr. he is living retired, occupying a beautiful home in Alinneapolis, 
where he and his wife are now able to enjoy all of the comforts and 'many of 
the luxuries nf life. They reared a family of six children: Emily; Anna; Abby; 
Fred; Joseph; and E. S., of this review. 

The" last named was the third in order of birth. He began his education in 
the public schools of Hutchinson, Minnesota, passing through consecutive grades 
to his graduation from the high school with the class of 1901. His advanced 
studies were pursued in the University of Nebraska, where he completed his 
medical course in 1905. winning the professional degree. Immediately after- 
ward he came to Rock Springs, Wyoming, being sent by the Union Pacific Rail- 
road Company, where he entered upon the active duties of his profession under 
the supervision of Dr. R. X. Reed, surgeon for the Union Pacific Railway & 
Coal Company at Rock Springs. He remained in that connection for two 
years and then entered upon the private practice of medicine, in which he has 
since continued, being recognized as one of the leading physicians not only of 
his city but of this section of the state. He has a very large and lucrative prac- 
tice and is splendidly qualified to cope with the intricate problems that con- 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 105 

tinually confront the physician because he has been a close and discriminating 
student of the profession, reading broadly, thinking deeply and keeping in touch 
with advanced professional thought, research and scientific investigation. He 
is now physician and surgeon for the Wyoming Coal Company, the Lion Coal 
Company and the Central Coal & Coke Company of Rock Springs and he is a 
member of the Wyoming State and the American Medical Associations. 

On the i8th of June, 1914, Dr. Lauzer was united in marriage to Mrs. Anna 
(Geise") Miller at Sidney, Nebraska. Mrs. Lauzer is a daughter of Mr. and 
Airs. Louis Geise, the former a pioneer settler of Nebraska and an associate 
of Colonel William F. Cody, better known as Buffalo Bill. He acted as Indian 
scout under Colonel Codv and experienced many of the hardships and privations 
of pioneer life in the west. By her former marriage Mrs. Lauzer had a 
daughter, Alabel Frances Miller, who was born in Saratoga in looi, and is now 
a student in Brownell Hall at Omaha, Nebraska. She is as dear to the Doctor 
as though she were his own child. 

Dr. Lauzer is well known in Masonic circles, having taken the degrees of 
the York Rite and of the Mystic Shrine. He is also connected with the Elks 
lodge at Rock Springs. His i)olitical endorsement is given to the republican 
party and he has served as county physician and surgeon of Sweetwater county, 
while in 1916 he was elected to the office of mayor of Rock Springs, in which 
connection his fellow townsmen speak of him in terms of admiration and high 
regard by reason of his faithful performance of the duties that de\olve upon 
him. He is public-spirited and cooperates earnestly in all plans to advance the 
interests of the city, to extend its trade relations and to uphold and advance its 
civic standards. Guided in life by most creditable principles, he has made for 
himself an en\iable name and place in both professional and business circles. 



N. R. GREENFIELD. 



N. R. Greenfield, a well known and ])rominent representative of the legal 
fraternity in Carbon county, practicing at Rawlins, formerly filled the office 
of prosecuting attorney of the county and through the period of his residence 
here has always been accorded a gratifying private practice that has constantly 
grown in volume. 

A native of Illinois, Mr. Greenfield was born at Freeport on the 24th of 
February, 1874, a son of Frederick and Etta (Poppen) Greenfield, who became 
residents of Illinois in the early '50s, settling near Freeport. The father devot- 
ed his life to farming for a considerable period and then removed to Lexington, 
Nebraska. He was also engaged in general agricultural pursuits in that state, 
where he continued to reside until 1902, when he removed to South Dakota, 
where he continued to make his home until called to his final rest. He passed 
away near Huron, South Dakota, in 1912, at the age of seventy-six years, while 
his widow survived until 1914, and was seventy-five years of age at the time of 
her demise. They had a family of twelve children. 

N. R. Greenfield, who was the sixth in order of birth, spent his boyhood 
largely in acquiring an education, supplementing his early training, received in 
the district schools, bv a course in the high school at Lexington, Nebraska, where 
he was graduated with the class of 1893. He then took up the profession of 
teaching, which he followed for three years in that state and later he became 
a student in the Nebraska State University at Lincoln, where he completed a 
course in law as a member of the class of 1897. ^e located for practice in Lex- 
ington, Nebraska, where he remained until March, 1899, and then came to 
Rawlins. He has since been one of the foremost representatives of the bar in 
this city. A liberal clientage has been accorded him and he has won numerous 
cases of importance, many of which have rested upon in\-olved and intricate 
legal problems, for which he has found ready and correct solution. His devo- 



106 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

tion to his clients' interests is proverbial and he never forgets that he owes a 
Still higher allegiance to the majesty of the law. He served as county attorney 
of Carbon county from 1905 until 191 1 and made an excellent record during his 
incumbency in that office. He belongs to the Nebraska State Bar Association 
and the Wyoming State Bar Association and has been a member of the state 
board of law examiners. He has likewise become identified with mining inter- 
ests in the west and is director of a number of mining and oil corporations of 
Wyoming. 

In August, 1902, at Rawlins, Mr. Greenfield was united in marriage to Mrs. 
Minnie (Carr) Kelly, widow of L. C. Kelly. Fraternally Mr. Greenfield is well 
known as a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and as a 
Mason of high rank. He has taken all of the York and Scottish Rite degrees 
up to and including the thirty-second degree in the consistory and he has filled 
various offices in the order, while in 191 7 he was a delegate to the Imperial 
Council at Minneapolis. His political allegiance has always been given to the 
republican party but he does not seek nor desire office outside the strict path 
of his profession, preferring to concentrate his efl:'orts and attention upon his 
law practice. He is the owner of a splendidly equipped law office and law 
library and he is a man of rare business ability as well as of marked profes- 
sional skill, having won for himself a position of distinction in connection with 
a profession where advancement depends entirely upon indi\idual merit and 
power. 



HON. W. P. RICKETTS. 

A record of notable achievement is that of Hon. W. P. Ricketts, who, starting 
out in the business world in a humble capacity, has steadily worked his way 
upward. In the spring of 1875 he came to Wyoming, then a youth of seventeen 
years, and for some time he rode the range. Gradually he was advanced to 
positions requiring executive force and keen discernment, and eventually he 
embarked in the cattle business on his own account, becoming in the course of 
years one of the prominent cattlemen of the state. In other connections, too, he 
has figured prominently, being one of the democratic leaders of Wyoming. 

A native of Kentucky, lie was born on the 9th of February, 1859, and is a 
son of T. B. and Mildred P. (Turner) Ricketts. The family came to Missouri 
in i860 and settled near Liberty, where the father engaged in teaching in the 
country schools and also followed the carpenter's trade. The mother passed 
away when her son W. P. was about seven years of age, leaving a family of 
three children, but the two daughters are now deceased. The father died on 
Thanksgiving day of 1917 at the advanced age of ninety years. 

W. P. Ricketts was reared to young manhood in Missouri, where he attended 
the countn,- schools, and later became a high school student at Independence. 
Missouri, pursuing his studies there for two years. He acquired a better educa- 
tion than most boys of the neighborhood because of the fact that his father was 
a teacher and was much interested in educational progress, realizing the value of 
intellectual training as a preparation for life's practical and responsible duties. 
In 1875, when about seventeen years of age, W. P. Ricketts left home and made 
his way westward to Fort Collins, Colorado, where he arrived about the middle 
of February. He went to work in a flour mill there but in the spring of the 
same year removed to Cheyenne, Wyoming, and entered the employ of the Sea- 
wright Brothers Cattle Company, operating fifty miles north of Cheyenne. He 
worked at everything that a cattleman has to do. including riding the range, cow 
punching, etc., and was in the employ of the company for eleven years, regarded 
as one of its most caoable and trusted representatives. In the spring of 1886 
he went to work for the North American Cattle Company as foreman and when 
in 1888 that company consolidated with the Western Union Beef Company, 




7j;fry^<CuZ^ 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 109 

Mr. Ricketts entered the employ of the company as general superintendent for 
Wyoming and Montana. He remained in that connection until 1898, in which 
year the company closed out their business, and Mr. Ricketts purchased their 
holdings and equipment and embarked in the cattle business on his own account. 
That he has prospered is indicated by the fact that he is today ranked with the 
most prominent cattlemen of northern Wyoming. He is the owner of the Sun- 
nyside ranch, located thirty-five miles north of Gillette, in Campbell county. 
This is one of the most modern and splendidly equipped ranches in that part of 
the country. The buildings are large and substantial, furnishing ample sheUer 
for grain and stock as well as for the men employed on the ranch, the farm 
machinery is of the latest improved pattern and everything about the ranch indi- 
cates the progressive spirit and practical methods of the owner, who is now 
extensively and successfully engaged in the raising and breeding of both horses 
and cattle. 

Mr. Ricketts was united in marriage to Miss Nettie C. Wilson, a native of 
Hot Springs, South Dakota, on the 20th of January, 1893, and she passed 
away on the 2d of January, 191 1. In politics Mr. Ricketts has always been a 
stalwart democrat since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and during 
the session of 191 1 he represented his district in the house of representatives. 
When Campbell county was organized in 1912 he was elected chairman of the 
board of county commissioners and served in that capacity in a most acceptable 
manner for four years, being the first incumbent in the position and doing much 
to systematize the work of the office and to establish the policy of the county 
through the exercise of his ofiicial duties. The great English statesman, Glad- 
stone, one said: "Believe me when I tell you that thrift of time will repay you 
in after life a usury of profit beyond your most sanguine dreams and that waste 
of it will make you dwindle alike in intellectual and moral stature beyond your 
darkest reckoning." Every man as he approaches middle life realizes the truth 
of these words of England's great scholar and statesman, but Mr. Ricketts did 
not wait for middle life to become cognizant of the spirit of those words. From 
his young days he has displayed a spirit of thrift that has made for success in life 
with him. There have been few idle hours in his career. "America," declared 
the philosopher Emerson, "is another name for opportunity," and the opportuni- 
ties that have surrounded W. P. Ricketts he has wisely utilized and improved 
and now stands among the foremost business men of northern Wyoming and as 
one of the honored citizens of the state. 



JAMES G. STANLEY. 



Tames G. Stanley, acti\-ch- ensjac'erl in tlie practice of law at Casper, was born 
at Gary, South Dakota, IMarvli }, 1 SS 1 . a s,,,, <.f William H. and Rebecca (Aiken) 
Stanley. He supplementL-d In- iiulilu ^chn,,] training by study in Black Hills 
College at Hot Springs, South Dakota, and in the University of Minnesota at 
Minneapolis, from which he was graduated with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 
1902. With broad literary training to serve as a foundation on which to rear 
the superstructure of professional knowledge, he entered the Columbian Law 
School at Washington, D. C, and was graduated with the Bachelor of Laws de- 
gree in 1904. 

He has since concentrated his attention upon his practice and as the years 
have passed he has won a clientage that is large and of a distinctively representa- 
tive character. He prepares his cases with great care and his presentation 
shows wide research. In no instance has his reading been confined to the limita- 
tions of the questions at issue; it has gone beyond and compassed every con- 
tingency and provided not alone for the expected but for the unexpected, which 
happens in the courts quite as frequentlv as out of them. His logical grasp of 
facts and orincinles of the law api)licable to them has been another potent element 



110 HISTORY OF WYOMJXG 

in his success and a remarkable clearness of expression and adequate and pre- 
cise diction enable him to make others understand not only the salient points of 
his argimient, but his every fine gradation of meaning and this may be accounted 
one of his most conspicuous gifts and accomplishments. During the period of 
his residence in Lead, South Dakota, he served as city attorney from 1908 until 
1917 and was a delegate from South Dakota to the republican national conven- 
tion held in Chicago in June, 1916. These facts are indicative of his prominence 
in the community and his influence over public thought and acton. He became 
a resident of Casper in 1917 and has already built up a practice of gratifying 
proportions. 

On the 2d of August, 191 1, Mr. Stanley was married in Springfield, South 
Dakota, to Miss Edith Stevens, a daughter of George Stevens, and they have 
one child. Alary Edith. 

Mr. Stanley belongs to the Hamilton Club of Chicago, which is one of the 
strong republican organizations of that city. Fraternally he is a Alason and 
also an Elk and exemplifies in his life the beneficent principles upon which 
these orders are based. 



WILLIAAI EDWARDS CHAPLIN. 

^^'illiam Edwards Chaplin is numbered among those who framed the organic 
law of the state as members of the constitutional convention of Wyoming. He 
is also a prominent citizen and newspaper man of the state, well known as the 
editor of the Laramie Republican, one of the most progressive republican papers 
of the west. 

He was born in Omaha, Nebraska, February 25, i860, a son of Edwards Hast- 
ings and Helen Constance ( Stillman ) Chaplin, who were pioneer people of 
Omaha, having removed to that city from a farm in Illinois. They had gone 
to Illinois from Ohio in 1845 and thus step by step made their way westward. 
The father was born in Urbana, Ohio, and the Chaplins were of English descent. 
One of the early representatives of the name was Benjamin Chaplin, who settled in 
Massachusetts at an early period in its colonization, and the town of Chaplin was 
named in his honor. He married Sarah Edwards, a daughter of Timothy Edwards 
and a granddaughter of Rev. Jonathan Edwards, one of the early and distinguished 
clergymen of New England. The line of descent comes down through Ben- 
jamin Chaplin, Jonathan Edwards and Edward Hastings to William Edwards 
Chaplin of this "review. In the early years of the nineteenth century Jonathan 
Edwards Chaplin removed to Ohio' and his son, Edwards Hastings Chaplin, 
was born in Ohio, March 21, 1822. The latter was reared to manhood in that 
state and after mastering the elementary branches of learning went to New Eng- 
land to continue his studies in Yale University of New Haven, being there 
graduated with the class of 1845. He afterward became a resident of Swan, 
^^'arren county, Illinois, and in 1856 he removed westward to Nebraska, settling 
near Omaha. There he spent the remainder of his days, his death occurring 
on the I2th of February, 1873. In 185 1 he had married Helen Constance Still- 
man, who died April 9, 1872. They were the parents of five children, all of 
whom have passed away with the exce])tion of \\'illiam Edwards Chaplin of 
this review, who was the youngest. 

To the age of thirteen years W. E. Chaplin remained in Omaha, Nebraska, 
and in 1873 came with a brother and sister to Wyoming, settling at Laramie. He 
was then apprenticed to Colonel E. A. Slack, a pioneer publisher of _\\'yoming. 
in order to learn the printer's trade. He entered the colonel's office in Laramie 
on the Laramie Dailv Inde])endent. In 1876 Colonel Slack removed to Cheyenne 
and established the Chevenne Daily Sun, which was later merged into the Daily 
Leader of todav. Mr. Chaplin, however, remained in Laramie until the fall of 
1876, when he joined Colonel Slack in Cheyenne and worked on the Sun until 




^^^LLIAM e. chaplin 



112 HISTORY OF WYOAILXG 

1878. Late in that year he returned to Laramie, where he was employed in con- 
nection with the pubhcation of local papers until the spring of 1881. In that 
year the celebrated Bill Nye established The Boomerang, which later became 
so widely known, and Mr. Chaplin became its first foreman, as well as a stock- 
holder in the paper. In 1883 he obtained a larger interest in the paper, with 
Alark Jennings and George A. Garrett as his associates, while Mr. Nye with- 
drew. In 1886 Mr. Jennmgs sold his interest to others and the new lirm style 
of McKee & Chaplin was assumed. This firm continued the publication of the 
paper until 1890, when The Boomerang was sold to a syndicate of Albany county 
democrats, headed by X. E. Corthell. Since that time The Boomerang has been 
conducted as a democratic paper. In August, 1890, the firm of McKee & Chaplin 
established the Laramie Republican and a year later the junior partner pur- 
chased the interest of Mr. McKee, since which time he has had as partners Frank 
Spafford and James Mathison. These three own the paper today and Mr. Chap- 
lin is its editor. It is one of the leading dailies of the state, with a wide circu- 
lation, and it has been an influencing factor in molding public opinion in Wyo- 
ming. 

On the 14th of February, 1882, Mr. Chaplin was united in marriage to ]\Iiss 
!May Ralston and they have become the parents of two children : Thomas Ed- 
wards, of Laramie ; and Mazie, the wife of Wilkie Collins, cashier of the Douglas 
National Bank of Douglas. Wyoming. Mrs. Chaplin was a daughter of John 
and Anna (Hall) Ralston, both now deceased. 

Air. Chaplin has taken quite an active interest in politics. In 1885 he was 
made a member of the Laramie city council and in 1894 served as mayor of that 
city. He was registrar of the United States land office in i8q8 under President 
McKinley and was reappointed, serving under the administrations of Presidents 
Roosevelt, Taft and Wilson, to October i, 191 5, or for a period of seventeen 
and a half years altogether. During that extended incumbency he had to remain 
in Cheyenne, where he erected his handsome home on Central avenue, but his 
legal residence was and still is in Laramie. The diversity of his business interests 
and connections, however, has caused him to divide his time about equally between 
Laramie and Cheyenne. He served in 1889 as a member of the constitutional 
convention of Wyoming and has displayed a public-spirited devotion to the 
general good that has been farreachine and beneficial in its effects. He has 
twice been honored with the presidency of the AX'yoming Press Association and 
is a well known figure in newspaper circles throughout the west. Mr. Chaplin 
was supreme representative of the grand lodge of the Knights of Pythias of 
Wyoming for twenty years and he is a member of the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks. He is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution and a 
past president of the order. Patriotism has ever been one of the marked char- 
acteristics of the family, and in Mr. Chaplin it finds expression in unfaltering 
loyalty to every cause which he believes will prove of public benefit. He has 
striven eagerly and earnestly to uphold the welfare of community, commonwealth 
and country, and his life has been characterized by high standards of citizenship. 



CHARLES W. DE KAY. 

Among the native sons of Laramie who have won prominence in the busi- 
ness circles of the city is Charles W. De Kay, the cashier of the First State 
Bank. He is honored and respected by all, not alone by reason of the success 
he has achieved but also owing to the straightforward business policy that he 
has ever followed, and though important interests are under his direction, he 
always finds time to cooperate in plans and measures for the general good 
and in all things is a public-spirited citizen. 

His father, the late Thomas Willett De Kay, was a native of Indiana and 
came to Wyoming in 1868. casting in his lot with the Laramie pioneers. He 
became one of the first lumber merchants of the city and remained in busi- 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 113 

ness here until his death, which occurred in 1874, when he was but twenty- 
seven years of age. He had married Tillie Wagner, a native of Missouri and 
a representative of one of the old families of that state who came of German 
ancestry. Mrs. De Kay had removed to Laramie with her brother. Henry Wag- 
ner, who was a pioneer merchant of the city, and here the marriage of the 
parents of Charles W. De Kay was celebrated. To them were born two chil- 
dren, the younger being Etta, who is now the wife of John Sandgren, of 
Laramie. The mother is still living in Laramie and is now the wife of H. L. 
Reger. By her second marriage she has two daughters: Katie, who is the wife 
of B. B. Hanger, a resident of Denver, Colorado ; and Beulah, who is the wife 
of W. C. Weigel, who is located at Omaha, Nebraska. 

Charles W. De Kay pursued his education in the public and high schools of 
Laramie, being graduated on the completion of the high school course as a 
member of the class of 1S87. He then made his initial step in the business 
world, his first position being that of an employe in the rolling mills of the 
Union Pacific Railway Company, .\fter a short time, however, he became 
a messenger boy in the store of his uncle, Henry Wagner, with whom he con- 
tinued for three years, serving in a clerical capacity during the latter part 
of that period. Subsequently he was made timekeeper in the master mechanic's 
office of the Union Pacific Railroad Company, continuing with that corpora- 
tion for thirteen years. On the expiration of that period he turned his at- 
tention to the banking business, with which he became identified as bookkeeper 
in the First National Bank of Laramie. He remained with the bank from 1898 
until 1913, a period covering almost fifteen years, and during the latter years 
of his connection with the institution served as assistant cashier. In June, 1913, 
he entered the First State Bank of Laramie as assistant cashier and in January, 
1916, was advanced to the position of cashier, which position he yet fills. Long 
experience in banking well qualifies him for the onerous duties that devolve 
upon him and which are most capably discharged to the satisfaction of all of 
the directors and stockholders of the institution. He is a courteous and obliging 
official and is ever willing to extend the assistance of the bank to its patrons to 
a point that will not hazard the interests of the depositors. 

On the 17th of April, 1902, Mr. De Kay was united in marriage in Laramie 
to Miss Mabelle Land, a native of Canada and a daughter of S. E. and Jennie 
CEmory) Land. They have two children: Emory Willett, who was born in 
Laramie, April 24, 1903 ; and Charles Gordon, born May 29, 1905. 

In his political views Mr. De Kay is a democrat and fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He is identified with the Chamber of Commerce and 
at one time he was a member of the school board of Laramie, while in other 
ways he has been active in civic matters. He is of the Episcopalian faith 
and his upright life has been guided by the teachings of the church. In a 
word he is a typical American citizen, interested in material, social, intellec- 
tual, political and moral progress and neglectful of his duties in none of these 
relations. Laramie may be proud to number him among her native sons by 
reason of the excellent record which he has made, and in that city not to know 
Charles W. De Kay is to argue one's self unknown. 



AUGUST F. NEUBER. 



August F. Xeuber is classed with the representatives of commercial enter- 
prise and business leadership in W'yoming, being the president of the Beeman 
& Neuber Mercantile Companv of Rock Springs. He was educated in the 
schools of his native country, but at the age of eighteen years bade adieu to 
friends and native land and sailed for the new world, attracted by the broader 
business opportunities which he believed he could secure on this side of the 



114 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

Atlantic. He arrived in America in 1876 and made his way at once into the 
interior of the country, settUng in Geary county, Kansas. There he was first 
employed at farm work and followed agricultural pursuits for several years. 
Later he secured a position as a clerk in Kansas and subsequently acquainted 
himself with all branches of merchandising. His first business venture on 
his own account was made in Nevada, Missouri, where he began merchandising. 
There he conducted a store successfully for three years, at the end of which 
time he sold his interests and removed to Evanston, Wyoming, where he ar- 
rived in 1803. He was there employed by the Beckwith Mercantile Company, 
one of the pioneer commercial concerns of the state. They conducted a num- 
ber of branch stores throughout Wyoming and their position was one of leader- 
ship in mercantile circles. Mr. Neuber continued at Evanston for ten years 
and in 1903 removed to Rock Springs, where in connection with Newell Bee- 
man, A. E. Bradbury and A. B. Quinn, he formed a partnership and estab- 
lished the present business, which in point of volume of trade in this line is 
the largest in the city. They carry an extensive stock of dry goods, clothing, 
shoes, furniture, rugs, etc., having a well appointed department store. Their 
establishment covers a space of sixty by one hundred and seventy-five feet and 
they employ on an average of eight salespeople annually and at times their 
sales force exceeds that number. The business is constantly developing along 
substantial and gratifying lines and the success of the enterprise is due in no 
small measure to the efforts and ability of Islr. Neuber, who also conducts a 
department store at Idaho Falls under the name of the Neuber & Berry Com- 
pany. Mr. Neuber is the president of the Beeman & Neuber Mercantile Com- 
pany of Rock Springs, is the principal stockholder in the undertaking and 
conducts the business under his supervision. His is the policy which directs 
the interests of the house and the success of the undertaking is attributable in 
large measure to his efforts. He is a sagacious and farsighted business man, 
alert to every opportunity opened in the natural ramifications of trade, and 
through the simple weight of his character and ability he has come into im- 
portant commercial connections. 

Politically Mr. Neuber is a republican but is not an office seeker. He came 
to America a poor boy, anxious to make the most of his opportunities, and as 
the years have gone on his efficiency and determination have brought to him a 
measure of success that is most substantial. He is now justly classed with 
the self-made men of Rock Springs. 



JOSEPH T. KLODT. 



Joseph J. Klodt, a rancher living at Newcastle, Wyoming, whose well directed 
interests and acti\ities have brought him a substantial measure of success, was 
born in Milton, \"an lluren county, Iowa, October 14, 1S77, 'I's parents being 
Anthony and Lena (Knecht) Klodt, the former a native nf ( iermany, while 
the latter was born in .\ustria. The father left German\' in ycmng manhood 
and became a resident of Iowa during the pioneer epoch in its history. There 
he followed farming for many years and passed away in that state in 1 909, 
while his widow survives and still makes her home in Ottumwa, Iowa. The 
father had come to America in the late '40s, leaving Germany because of the 
political strife existing there during that period. To him and his wife were 
Ixirn eight children, and all are yet living, namely: Peter J., who resides on 
the old homestead farm in Van Buren county, Iowa ; Frank H., who lives on 
a ranch near Billings, ^Montana; Joseph J., of this review: Theresa, twin sister 
of Joseph and now the wife of George Emanuels, a resident of Marshalltown, 
Iowa: William A., who is living upon a farm near Ottumwa, Iowa: Albert A., 
who has removed to the west and is now on a ranch near Lewiston. Montana ; 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 117 

George, who with his brother Peter occupies the old home place in Iowa : and 
Elizabeth, who lives at home with her mother. 

Joseph J. Klodt, whose name introduces this review, acquireil his early 
education in the district schools of Van Buren county and in the pul)lic schools 
of Mihon, and when not occupied with his textbooks gave hi> assistance in 
the development of the home farm. When his education was conipletetl he 
concentrated his entire time and attention upon the farm work and thus con- 
tinued until he reached the age of twenty-one. In 1900 he remo\ed westward, 
settling in Converse county, Wyoming, where he was employed for a year by 
H. L. Reed of that place. He also spent one year in the employ of Joe Gans, 
both prominent sheep men of Converse county. From 1902 until 1906 he was 
associated with S. C. Holts in the sheep business, and in 1906 they entered 
into partnership with J. L. Baird and continued in that connection until 1908, 
at which time Air. Klodt disposed of his interests to his partners and engaged 
in the sheep business independently. In 1910 he organized the IMush Creek 
Land and Live Stock Company, a sixty thousand dollar corporation, which 
owns at this time over two thousand acres of land in \Veston county, more 
than twelve hundred head of cattle and more than five thousand head of sheep. 
The officers of the company are : Joseph J. Klodt, president and manager ; 
Mrs. Joseph J. Klodt, secretary and treasurer ; and Julius Knecht, vice president. 
Mr. Klodt is also a director and stockholder in the Newcastle National Bank, a 
director in the Newcastle Drug Company and secretary and treasurer of the Wyo- 
ming Transfer & Machine Company. He also has large interests in the Buck 
Creek oil field and other oil interests. In a word, he has extended his efforts into 
various fields and his activities have been a most potent force in bringing about 
the material development and progress of Weston county as well as the promotion 
of his own interests. He has one of the finest bungalows in the town of New- 
castle, which was completed at a cost of over twelve thousand dollars. His 
success has enabled him to enjoy all of the comforts and many of the luxuries 
of life. His advancement in a business way has been the direct result of his own 
labors, which have been most intelligently put forth. 

In Salt Lake City. Utah, on the 8th of October, 1907, Air. Klodt was united 
in marriage to Miss Nina L. Kelley, a native of Minnesota, who spent her girl- 
hood days in Athens, Tennessee, and in California and who completed her edu- 
cation in Grant L'niversity at Athens, Tennessee. To Air. and Mrs. Kludt has 
been born a son, John J., whose birth occurred in ^^'eston county, \\ yoming, 
September 15, 1908. 

In his political views Air. Klodt has always been a stalwart republican since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise, but has never been a politician 
in the sense of office seeking. He has always preferred to give his untiring 
attention to his business afifairs, working persistently and earnestly to provide 
a good living for his family, and as the years have passed on his purpose has 
been accomplished. 



LESLIE B. AIAGOR. 



Leslie B. Alagor, county clerk of Carbon county, and ex officio register of 
deeds, makes his home in 'Rawlins, in which city he was born on the 9th of 
March, 1881, a son of the late Richard C. Alagor. a native of Wisconsin, and 
a (grandson of Henry C. Alagor, who was the founder of the American branch 
of the family, coming to the new world from England during the early part 
of the nineteenth centurv. He was one of the pioneer residents of Wisconsin, 
where he engaged in farming and mining, and at one time he owned an 
extensive lead mine in that state. His last years were spent in Rawlins, where 
he departed this life in 1902 at the notable old age of eightv-three years, his last 
davs being spent in the home of his son. Richard C. Alagor, who had come 



118 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

to Rawlins in 1880 and was engaged in general merchandising. That busi- 
ness he followed successfully during the greater part of his life and was 
one of the progressive merchants and valued citizens of Rawlins, where he 
passed away in 1901 at the age of fifty-seven years. He was a stalwart 
advocate of democratic principles but never sought or filled public office, yet 
he took a most active interest in civic affairs and lent the weight of his aid 
and influence to every cause which he believed would further public progress 
or advance the general interests of his community. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Grace Roberts and was a daughter of Henry and Grace Roberts, of 
Galena, Illinois, where they settled at an early period in the development of 
that section of the country. They, too, were of English lineage. The death of 
Mrs. Richard C. Magor occurred in Galena, Illinois, in 1897, when she was forty- 
eight years of age. She had a family of seven children, all of whom are liv- 
ing in Wyoming with the exception of one. The family record is as follows: 
Jennie R. is the wife of William F. Hopkins and resides in Encampment, 
Wyoming. Henry C. makes his home in Cheyenne. Grace is the wife of X. L. 
France, of Rawlins. Leslie B. is the fourth in order of birth. Edith is the 
wife of Charles E. Bates, of Rawlins. Richard A. is deputy county clerk and 
makes his home in Rawlins. Marguerite is the wife of D. J. Smith, of Denver. 

Leslie B. Magor was educated in the public schools of Rawlins and when 
sixteen years of age started out to earn his livelihood, being first employed in 
the Wallace grocery, where he remained for eighteen months. He was after- 
wards with the Cullen Commercial Company for a period of about six years 
and during two years of that time was manager of their branch store at Wam- 
sutter, Wyoming. Before entering into connection with the Cullen Commer- 
cial Company, however, he spent five years in the employ of John A. Donnell, 
a general merchant. In 191 2 Mr. Magor was elected to the office of county 
clerk and is now serving for the third term, his reelections being an indication 
of his ability, fidelity and the confidence reposed in him by the public. He is 
very prompt and capable in the discharge of his duties, conscientiously meeting 
the obligations that devolve upon him, and that his record is an unassailable 
one is shown by his repeated elections. 

On the 9th of December, 1903, in Rawlins, Mr. Magor was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Martha A. Dailey, a daughter of L. C. Dailey, and they have 
become the parents of three children: Leslie D., who was born in Rawlins, 
November 9, 1904; Grace Elizabeth, bom October 27, 1907; and Phyllis Jane, 
bom April 5, 1910. 

Fraternally Mr. Magor is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Loyal Order of Moose and 
with the Masonic fraternity. He has made his own way in the world and his 
success is due entirely to his efforts and perseverance. He is everywhere 
spoken of in terms of high regard and his official record is an unassailable 
one, proving highly satisfactory to his constituents. 



HON. CHARLES W. RINER. 

Hon. Charles W. Riner is now serving as a member of the state senate of 
Wyoming and is actively identified with commercial interests in Cheyenne as man- 
ager of the Wyoming Feed & Fuel Company and as a real estate and insurance 
agent. He was born in ]\Iiddleto\vn, Ohio, in 1854, a son of Henry and Elizabeth 
(Christman) Riner, both of whom lived to the very advanced age of ninety years. 

Their son, Charles W. Riner, began his education in the public schools and 
also attended an academy at Seven Mile, Ohio, from which in due course of time 
he was graduated. His health failing, he removed to the west in 1870 and took up 
his abode in Cheyenne. After two years, having regained his health, he accepted a 
clerkship with the firm of Pease & Taylor, with whom he continued for nine years. 




HON. CHARLES W. RINER 



120 HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 

His sister was then appointed to the position of postmaster of Cheyenne and Mr. 
Riner acted as assistant postmaster, continuing to occupy the position for four 
years. While in the postoffice he entered into partnership with 5larsliall Johnson 
and later William R. Schnitger, establishing their present business under the name 
of the Wyoming Feed & Fuel Company. Their trade has grown with the devel- 
opment of the city and the business enterprise has proven a profitable one. Air. 
Riner is a man of energ\' who carries forward to successful completion whatever 
he undertakes. His plans are well formulated and his systematic methods and 
honorable dealing are factors in his growing success. 

In 1878 Mr. Riner was united in marriage to Miss Delia Stanley, who passed 
away in 1879. For his second wife he chose Miss Mary Clark and their children 
were: Harry, who is a first lieutenant of the \\'yoming National Guard, now in 
France; and Clarence, who is a captain in the Marine Corps, awaiting call for 
service abroad and now acting as adjutant of the post at Mare Island. ^Ir. Riner 
was again married to Miss Kate Davis and they have become the parents of two 
children, Florence and Flizabt'th. 

Mr. Riner is a Congregationalist in religious belief. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Masons and has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish 
Rite, while with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine he has crossed the sands of the 
desert. He is also connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and 
with the Knights of Pythias. His political allegiance has always been given to 
the republican party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and he 
is now serving as state senator and in this connection he is giving thoughtful and 
earnest consideration to all the vital questions that come up for settlement. He 
fornKrl\ ser\ ed as a member of the territorial legislature and has been prominent 
in municipal affairs, acting as mayor of Cheyenne for four years and as a member 
of the city council for nine years. He also was supervisor of county assessors 
for two terms. When the new federal building was being erected in Cheyenne he 
filled the position of distributing agent. He was also state enumerator for the 
1900 United States census. 

He is a man of genuine personal worth and marked ability, widely known and 
held in the highest esteem by all. Everywhere his acquaintances speak of him 
in terms of high regard, for he has the qualities that make for leadership in public 
affairs, while his social traits of character rrc those which make for [lersonal 
popularity. 



ERNEST W. HOLMES. 

.\niong the progressive business enterprises which are contributing to the 
uiibuilding and development of Kemmerer is that of which Ernest W. Holmes 
is i)n)prietor. The business is conducted under the name of Kemmerer Soda 
ISottling ^^'orks and has become one of the important productive industries of 
the city. 

Mr. Holmes is a western man by birth and training and has the characteristic 
spirit of western enterprise and progress. He was born in Central City, Ne- 
braska, November 9, 1879, a son of S. J- Holmes, now a resident of Rock 
Springs, Wyoming, who came to America from Sweden in 1879 and took up 
his abode near Central City, Nebraska, where he successfully engaged in farm- 
ing. In 1884 he removed to Rock Springs and for years was connected with 
the Union Pacific Coal Company but is now living retired, enjoying a rest which 
he has truly earned and richly deserves. He married Josephine Freeman, a 
native of Sweden, who came to America in 1879 with her husband. Her death 
occurred in Rock Springs, December 24, 1916, when she was sixty-six years of 
age. and her demise was deeply regretted not only by her immediate family but 
by many friends. 

F'rnest W. Holmes was the eldest in order of birth in a family of fi\e chil- 



HISTORY OF WYO-AIIXG 121 

dren, all of whom are living. Spending his youthful days under the parenial 
roof, he attended the public schools of Rock Springs and thus became well 
qualified for life's practical and responsiljle duties by his thorough educational 
training. Upon attaining his majority he started out in the world on his own 
account. Severing home ties, he went to Spring A'alley, where he engaged in 
mining, there remaining for a1)out eighteen months. He afterward ser\ed as 
engineer in the mines at Cumberland, where he continued for eiglii vcir^. and 
through the succeeding the years he was engineer in the coal mine^ at Irinnier, 
Wyoming. He next entered' his present field of business, establishing the Kem- 
nierer Soda Bottling ^^'orks in 1914. He began the business in a small way but 
has developed it to a large and profitable enterprise. He was the pioneer soda 
water manufacturer in l.iiiculn counl\- ;md with the passing years his trade has 
steadily grown tintil it 1- mic n\ large and gratifying proportions. He has 
always based Ins mkccs-^ u\nin the excellence of his product and the integrity 
of his business methods. 

On the 20th of August, 1904. in Rock Springs, Air. Holmes was united in 
marriage to Miss Alathilda Ackerson, a native of Sweden and a daughter of the 
late Olaf Ackerson, also a native of Sweden, who died in Rock Springs in 
November, igo8, at the age of fifty years. He came to America in 1890. 
His wife bore the maiden name of Maria Larson and is still living at Rock 
Springs. To Mr. and Mrs. Holmes ha\e been born li\e children: Edna, who 
was born in Cumberland, June 23, 1905; Marie, lii.ni in Cumberland. January 
28, 1907; Ethel, born in Frontier, \\'y()niing, l"eliruar\- jS, i<)<k): b'.arl, ])orn in 
Frontier, May 6, 191 1 ; and Jack, brirn in Kemnierer, Augitst 15, 191C. 

Mr. Holmes votes with "the republican partv and tor the past four years 
he has been chief of the fire department of Kennnerer. I'raternally he is con- 
nected with the Loyal Order of Moose and his religious faith is that of the 
Lutheran church. These associations indicate something of the nature of his 
interests and the rules which govern his conduct. His life has been spenf^well, 
for he has made good use of "his time, his talents and his opportunities. Start- 
ing out in the world a poor boy, he was actuated by a laudable ambition to 
advance and today he is at the head of an extensive business in Kemmerer. 
owning his plant and his home, which are the visible evidences of a life of 
well directed energy and thrift. From his plant he ships his j.rdducts to all 
neighboring counties, also to Idaho and to Utah, his annual sales amounting to 
sm-en thousand dollars. His advancement in a business way should serve as a 
source of inspiration and encouragement to others, showing what may be 
achieved through persistent energy wisely directed. 



DA\'ID L. DARR. 



David L. Darr, president of the Bighorn County Bank of Basin, has been 
identified with the business development of northwestern \\'yoming since August. 
1897, or for a period of more than twenty-one years. He was born in Ipava, 
Fulton county, Illinois, January 7, 1856, a son of G. B. and Harriet (Meredith) 
Darr, who were nativesof Pennsylvania and were of Pennsyhania Dutch stock. 
Both' the father and mother were the youngest children in large families and 
David L. Darr is the seventh in order of birth in a family of eight chddren. The 
father removed westward with his family and followed blacksmithing and farm- 
ing as a life work. Both he and his wife died in Nebraska, the former at the age 
of eighty-one vears and the latter when seventy-six years of age. 

David L, E)arr acquired a public school education in Illinois and w as reared to 
farm life, early becoming familiar with the dulies and labors that tall m the hit of 
the agriculturist. He continued to wcirk in the fields until twenty-twn \ears of 
age, when he became connected with general merchandising at Redliird, Nebraska. 
Two vears later he was elected county treasurer of Holt county, Nebraska, and 



122 HISTORY OF WYOMING ' 

served in that position for two terms or four years. He became associated with 
a bank at O'Neill, Nebraska, in which he occupied the position of cashier for 
six years, and then disposed of his interest in the bank and built a flour mill 
at the same place which was destroyed by tire two years later. The insurance 
was far less than the loss, so that he was financially much embarrassed. In 
1894 he removed to Westplains, Missouri, where he again took up the occupa- 
tion of farming but with poor success and in 1896 he returned to the northwest. 
He was employed in connection with the lumber business until August, 1898, 
when he removed to Basin and assisted in organizing the Bighorn County 
Bank, of which he took charge as cashier, holding that position until January, 
191 3, when he was elected to the presidency. He is also an official in the First 
State Bank of Kane, Wyoming, and an officer and director in the Basin Hall 
Company, the Basin Building Company and in the Torchlight Company. These 
interests are contributing to the material development of the community and 
Mr. Darr is thus actively connected with business enterprises which have to do 
with general progress and prosperity while at the same time they contribute to 
individual success. As the years have passed he has prospered and is now the 
owner of real estate in Basin and vicinity besides being a stockholder in several 
corporations and business enterprises elsewhere. 

In ^lay, 1891, at Redbird, Nebraska, Mr. Darr was united in marriage to 
]\Iiss Ella Jones, a daughter of Thomas W. Jones. They have two children : 
Jessie L., the widow of Judge G. M. Cleveland, of Hot Springs, South Dakota; 
and Mazie V., the wife of M. B. Rhodes, a banker of Kane, Wyoming. 

In politics Mr. Darr has always been a straight republican and has taken an 
active and helpful interest in politics since living in Wyoming. He served as 
county treasurer from January, 1886, to January, 1890, and was for three terms 
mayor of Basin, giving to the city a businesslike and progressive administration. 
He belongs to the Masonic lodge and since 1879 h^^s been an Odd Fellow, holding 
most of the offices in that order and belonging to all of its branches. He has 
been grand master and grand patriarch and has represented both the grand lodge 
and grand encampment in the Sovereign Grand Lodge. He has likewise been 
grand treasurer for both of these branches for the last four years and is promi- 
nently and widely known in the organization. He is greatly interested in good 
government, local, state and national, and is not generally a convert to the many 
so-called reforms, having lived to see that most of them have been illusionary. 
He stands, however, for progress and improvement, guided by sound judgment, 
and his cooperation can at all times be counted upon to further any movement 
which he believes will benefit community, commonwealth or country. 



HILLIARD S. RIDGELY. 

Hilliard S. Ridgely, a prominent member of the Wyoming bar, was born on 
a farm near Siam, Taylor county, Iowa, October 16, 1874. a son of Eli and 
Olive (Allen) Ridgely. There were eight children, six boys and two girls, and 
the subject of this sketch is the third child and the second son of the family. 
His father and three of his father's brothers served in the Union army during 
the Civil war, and three uncles on his mother's side of the house likewise fought 
for the preservation of the Union. 

His father was a homesteader in Lincoln county, Nebraska, and in the early 
'90s removed with his family from the homestead to North Platte, the county 
seat, where Mr. Ridgely was graduated from the high school. Taking up the 
study of law, he entered the law offices of Wilcox & Halligan. Later he was 
admitted as a student of law at the College of Law, University of Nebraska, 
■where he was graduated, receiving the degree of LL. B., June 10, 1897. He 
at once entered the active practice of his profession and was elected county attor- 




^J^:^^>7^^^ 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 125 

ney of Lincoln county, Nebraska, the fall of 1898, and was reelected in 1900 
by an overwhelming majority. 

At the expiration ot his second term as county attorney, Mr. Ridgely removed 
from North Platte to Cody, Wyoming, where he was Colonel W. F. Cody's 
(Buffalo Bill) personal representative and attorney for a number of years. Upon 
the Burlington Railroad building from Frannie south through the Big Horn 
basin, he removed to Basin, the county seat, where he built up a large and lucra- 
tive practice. In 191 1 he was appointed United States district attorney for the 
district of Wyoming by President Taft. This necessitated his removal to Chey- 
enne, where he has since resided and where he enjoys a large practice. Mr. 
Ridgely is considered one of the leading criminal lawyers of the state of Wyoming. 
As United States district attorney he discharged the duties with marked prompt- 
ness, fidelity and ability. 

In politics Mr. Ridgely is of the republican faith and in 1908 was one of the 
delegates at large from the state of Wyoming to the republican national conven- 
tion at Chicago. This convention nominated William Howard Taft as the repub- 
lican candidate for president, and he was elected at the November election fol- 
lowing. Mr. Ridgely was one of the original Taft men in Wyoming and was 
active in his behalf before as well as after the convention. 

In 1914 Mr. Ridgely was the republican candidate for the office of governor 
against the democratic nominee, Hon. John B. Kendrick. It was a close race, 
but the democrats had fused with the progressives that year and carried the state, 
and Mr. Ridgely was defeated by a small majority. At the close of the campaign 
he withdrew from active politics and is devoting his time and energy to the 
practice of the law. As a lawyer and business man he is successful, and as a 
citizen and friend he is popular. 

On the 2 1 St of June, 1899, at North Platte, Nebraska, Mr. Ridgely was united 
in marriage to Miss Evea J. Fenwick. To this happy union have been born three 
children : Lucile, Fenwick and Hilliard. 

In religious faith Mr. Ridgely is a Presbyterian and fraternally is a Scottish 
Rite Mason, a member of the Mystic Shrine and also of the Knight Templar 
commandery. He is likewise connected with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is a member of the 
Industrial Club. 



ALEX. NISBET. 



Alex. Nisbet. registrar of the United States land office at Evanston, was 
born in Knightswood, Dumbartonshire, Scotland, January 27, 1865, a son of 
Alexander and Isabella ( Porterfield ) Nisbet, who were also natives of the 
land of hills and heather. The father was a coal and iron stone miner, de- 
voting his life to that pursuit. He passed away November 28, 1887, at the 
age of fifty years, after which his widow came to America in 1891, making 
her way direct to Almy, Wyoming, where she resided for a few years. She 
then returned to Scotland but again came to this state in 1898 and soon after- 
ward took up her abode in Salt Lake City, Utah, where she departed this 
life in 1914 at the age of seventy-seven years. In the family were twelve 
children. 

Alex. Nisbet, who was the fifth in order of birth, was educated in the 
public schools of Knightswood and remained a resident of his native land 
until he reached the age of twenty-three years, when he determined to estab- 
lish his home in America, attracted by the better business opportunities which 
he believed to be existing on this side of the Atlantic. In 1888, therefore, he 
bade adieu to his native land and made his way to the United States. After 
reaching American shores he traveled westward across the continent to Ohio, 
where he engaged in coal mining, and in 1889 he came to Wyoming, first 



126 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

settling at Almy, where he was employed as coal check weighman in No. 7 
coal mine by the Union Pacific Coal Company. He represented the miners 
as check weighman and continued in that position until 1894, when he be- 
came chief deputy county clerk of Uinta county. He served from 1895 until 
1903 and from 191 1 until 1914 again occupied that position. He was city 
treasurer of Evanston from 1907 until 191 1 and on the ist of February, 1915, 
he took charge of the United States land oflfice as registrar, his incumbency 
in the position to continue until the ist of February, 1918. At that time he 
was reappointed for another term of four years and continues in the position. 
He has made an excellent record as a public official, being true and loyal to 
the trusts reposed in him, and prompt and faithful in the discharge of his 
duties. His record is most commendable and should serve as a source of 
inspiration and emulation to others. Mr. Nisbet is recognized as a stalwart 
champion of the democratic party and his position upon any important ques- 
tion is never an equivocal one. He stands fearlessly for what he believes to 
be right and gives clear utterance to his opinions. He filled the position of 
county chairman of the democratic central committee and was secretary of 
the central committee of Uinta county for five terms. He also was chosen 
a member of the democratic state central committee from Uinta county for 
two terms and his opinions have carried weight in the councils of his party. 

On the 24th of June, 1892, Mr. Nisbet was married in Almy, Uinta county, 
to !Miss Maggie Campbell, a native of Scotland and a daughter of Mr. and 
Ivlrs. John Campbell. They have become the parents of fi\e children, of 
whom two. however, have passed away. Those living are : Alexander C, 
residing in Evanston; Matthew M., a yeoman of the United States Na^y, now 
at San Francisco ; and Maggie, who is also in Evanston. 

Fraternally Mr. Nisbet is connected with the Knights of The Maccabees 
and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He was reared in the Presby- 
terian faith, to which he has always adhered, and is a trustee of the church 
in Evanston. His has been a well spent life, true to every manly principle 
and actuated at all times by high and honorable purposes. He started out in 
the business world a poor boy. He left home and came to America in order 
to provide a home for the family, which purpose he accomplished. He was 
the head of the family for some time after his father's death, and he has 
fully met every obligation, filial and otherwise, that has devolved upon him. 
His genuine worth is widely recognized, for he has ever been true to the ties 
of home and friendship, has been progressive and reliable in business, and 
loyal and public-spirited in citizenship. 



e:^[il krueger. 



Emil Krueger, a progressive business man of Rawlins, where he is engaged 
in the manufacture and sale of saddlery, harness and automobile goods under 
the firm style of the Knox & Tanner Company, was bom in Shelbyville, Ken- 
tucky, August II, 1870, a son of the late Louis A. Krueger, who was a native 
of Germany but came to America in the early '60s, and settled in Kentucky, 
where he engaged in the shoe business. He lived there for many years but in 
1890 removed to Wyoming, taking up his abode in Rawlins, where he again con- 
ducted a shoe store until about two years prior to his death, which occurred on 
the 29th of November. 191 5, when he was seventy-three years of age. His wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Caroline Knodle, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and was also of German lineage. She, too, passed away in Rawlins. In their 
family were three children, the eldest being Rev. Fred Tevis Krueger. a Metho- 
dist clergyman, now located at Windsor, Colorado. The daughter. Flora H., has 
until a recent date been principal of the high school of Rawlins, which position 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 127 

she occupied for fifteen years, and is now engaged in government service at 
Wheatland in Xormal preparatory work. 

The other number of the family is Emil Krueger, who was educated in the 
public schools of Denver. Colnrado, and who at the age of nineteen years started 
out in business on his own accuunt, serving an apprenticeship al the harness and 
saddlery trade. He thoroughly mastered the business in Denver, Colorado, and 
afterward worked as a journeyman until 1905, when he became mana- 
ger and principal stockholder of the Knox & Tanner Company of Rawlins, Wyo- 
ming, manufacturers of and dealers in saddlery, harness and cowboy outfits. 
They also handle automobile gnnds. Ihe laisiness has grown steadily and has 
become one of the large commercial ccncerns of the city and of this section of 
the state. In fact their trade o'ertuiis tliat of aii}- other of similar character in 
Carbon county, their annual sales amounting to si.xty thousand dollars. Their 
success has been based upon thorough workmanship in the line of goods car- 
ried, fair prices and earnest efforts to please their patrons. 

On the 30th of April, 1895. Mr. Krueger was united in marriage to JMiss 
Katie Scultetus, a native of Cincinnati. Ohio. They have become parents of 
three children : Louis Tevis, who was born in Ohio ; Karl Emil. born in Colo- 
rado ; and l-'lora llelle, born in \\yomiiig. 

Politically Mr. Krueger is a repulilican and while not an office seeker he 
keeps in touch with the vital questions and issues of the day and is ever ready 
to support his position by intelligent argument or by his ballot. He belongs to 
the Benevolent Protectixe Order of Elks, the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and the Modern \\'oodnien of America and is a past exalted ruler of the 
Elks lodge in Rawlins. His religious faith is that of the Methodist church and 
its teachings guide his life in all of its relations. He has ne\er deviated from 
what his judgment would indicate to be right and honorable between himself and 
his fellowmen and his success in life has been reached by his sterling qualities of 
mind and a heart true to every manly principle. 



W. W. CROOK, ^I. D. 



A notable career is that of Dr. \\'. ^\^ Crook of Cheyenne, who is still 
activelv engaged in the practice of medicine although he has now passed 
the eightv-first milestone on life's journey. His life has been one of great 
usefulness to his fellowmen through his professional activity and at all times 
he has kept in touch with the trend of nioilerii thought and progress regarding 
the practice of medicine and surgery. 

A native of Kentucky, he was born in the little country town called Spill- 
man's Store, in Madison county, on the 20th of October. iS^'i. and there 
resided until he reached the age of twelve years, when he accompanied his 
parents on their removal to ^Missouri. They traveled by team and wagon 
across the country to Puchanan county. ^lissouri, where they took up their 
abode upon a farm. Dr. Crook remained at home through the period of his 
youth, attending school whenever possible and aiding in the development of 
the old homestead. He was thus early trained to the work of the farm, 
becoming thoroughly familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and 
caring for the crops. In 1855 he started out in business on his own account 
and from that time forward has been dependent entirely upon his own 
resources. In 1857 he taught school at Easton, Kansas, and later he returned 
to Missouri, taking the teachers' examination at Chillicothe, which he suc- 
cessfully passed, obtaining a first-class certiiicate. He then taught school in 
Livingston county, ^lissouri. but he believed that there was comparatively 
little future outlook for one in that profession and resolved to turn his atten- 
tion into other professional directions. He took up the study of medicine 
privately and in due time qualified for the active practice of medicine and sur- 



128 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

gery. In 1861 he returned to Kansas and in July of that year established his 
home and opened an office at Council Grove, Kansas, there entering upon 
active practice. Several years later, having carefully saved his earnings, he 
was able to enter the University of Iowa, in which he pursued the four years' 
course in medicine and thus became splendidly qualified for professional activity. 
He was graduated from that institution and during the succeeding ten years 
practiced m Doniphan, Kansas. In 1875 he removed with his family to Wyoming 
and in 18717 took up his abode in Cheyenne, where he has since made his home. 
Throughout the intervening period his broad reading and careful study have 
kept hmi in touch with the trend of advanced thought and investigation having 
to do with medical and surgical practice. He has been an earnest and dis- 
criminating student, and while he does not hastily discard the old and time- 
tried methods, he is always ready to take up any new idea which his judgment 
sanctions as of value in treating disease. He has ever been most careful in 
the diagnosis of his cases and has seldom been at error in foretelling the out- 
come of any case. In 1902 he was elected to the presidency of the Laramie 
County Z^Iedical Association. He also belongs to the Wyoming State Medical 
Association and is an earnest and zealous member of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. Moreover, he is a clear and forcible writer on professional topics and has 
contributed many interesting and valuable articles to medical magazines and 
journals. 

On the 25th of May, 1864, was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Crook 
and Miss Miranda H. Kirby, of Louisville, Kentucky. As the years have gone 
on they have become parents of six children, but all have passed away with 
the exception of the eldest daughter, Fannie, who is the wife of Dr. O. K. 
Snyder, of Cheyenne. 

In public affairs and political interests Dr. Crook has manifested consid- 
erable activity. In 1870 he was elected mayor of Doniphan, Kansas, and 
gave to the town an excellent administration that took cognizance of its needs 
and its opportunities. He has not held office since coming to Wyoming, pre- 
ferring to concentrate his time and attention upon his professional duties, yet 
he has stood by all of those interests which are substantial elements in public 
progress and improvement in city, county and state. He is still actively engaged 
. in the practice of his profession, although he has now reached the age of eighty- 
one years. While he has long since passed the Psalmist's allotted span of three 
score years and ten, he nevertheless remains active and alert. Old age need 
not necessarily suggest idleness nor want of occupation. There is an old age 
which grows stronger and brighter morally and mentally as the years go on 
and gives out of its rich stores of wisdom and experience for the benefit of 
others. Such is the record of Dr. W. W. Crook, of whom it may well be said, 
in the words of \'ictor Hugo, that though 

"The snows of winter are on his head. 

The flowers of spring are in his heart." 



JOSEPH WILLIAM TODD. 

Joseph William Todd, a prominent figure in city and state, makes his home 
in Buffalo, where he has filled the office of mayor, and he has also been repre- 
sentative of his district in both the house of representatives and the senate. He 
has thus had much to do with shaping public thought and action and promoting 
useful legislation. 

He was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, a son of Shennan P. and Clarisse J. 
(Compton) Todd. The father was born in Michigan, while the mother's birth 
occurred in Ohio. Removing westward during the early boyhood of their son, 
Joseph W. Todd, he pursued his education in the schools of Buft'alo and after 
putting aside his textbooks became interested in ranching and the raising of live 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 131 

stock and his business affairs in that connection have been of growing extent 
and importance. His affairs have been most carefully and wisely directed, his 
investments judiciously placed, and his success is the direct outcome of his close 
application and indefatigable energy. Aside from his ranching interests he is 
the vice president of the Stock Growers' Bank of Buffalo and is well known in 
financial circles in his section of the state. 

In Buffalo, on the 30th of June, 1902, Mr. Todd was united in marriage to 
Miss Hildah E. Anderson, who at one time was county clerk of Johnson county. 
They have become the parents of four children : Sherman Avery, Carrie Marie, 
Martha Anna and Josephine Emmeretta. 

The religious faith of Mr. and 2^Irs. Todd is that of the Congregational church 
and he is identified with various fraternal organizations. In Masonry he has 
attained high rank and is a member of the Mystic Shrine. He is also connected 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He belongs to the Shrine and to the Elks 
lodge of Sheridan, while his other connections are with the orders in Buffalo. 
Since attaining man's estate Mr. Todd has given unfaltering allegiance to the 
republican party and its principles, and has labored earnestly to advance its 
interests. In 1907 he was elected to represent his district in the Wyoming house 
of representatives and filled that position for two terms. In May. 1913, he 
became mayor of Buffalo and for four years served as chief executive of the 
city, to which he gave a businesslike and progressive administration characterized 
by various needed reforms and improvements. He avoided useless expenditure 
and also equally useless retrenchment, which so often hampers progress, and 
steering his course evenly between the one and the other, he accomplished much 
for the city. In 1914 he was elected to represent his district in the state senate 
and in 1917 was chosen president of the senate, where he presided with dignity, 
his rulings being strictly fair and impartial. 

He is a close and discriminating student of public problems having to do 
with the welfare of state and nation and his position upon any vital question is 
never an equivocal one. He stands firmly for what he believes to be right and 
his efforts in behalf of Wyoming's welfare have been far reaching and effective. 



B. T. STEFFEN. 



B. J. Steft'en, who is engaged in the drug business at Douglas, ranks with 
the wide-awake, alert and enterprising merchants of the town, recognizing the 
fact that efficient and satisfactory sen-ice must be the basis of his success. He 
is a comparatively young man, his birth having occurred on the 20th of Septem- 
ber, 1883, in Atalissa. Iowa, his parents being John J. and Louisa E. (Ireland) 
Steffen. The family came to Wyoming in 1885, when he was but two years of 
age, settling at Silver Cliff, where the father engaged in the drug Ijusiness. 
After some years he removed to Douglas and purchased the drug store of C. D. 
Broadbeck, which he continued to conduct with growing success until his 
demise, when his son, B. J. Steffen, took over the business, which he has since 
owned and conducted. 

To the public school system of Wyoming, B. J. Steffen is indebted for the 
early educational advantages he enjoyed. He attended the Lusk school and in 
1 891 he came with the family to Douglas, being at that time a lad of eight 
years. He has since been identified with the city and its interests. He re- 
• ceived his business training under the direction of his father and in 1914 won 
a certificate as a registered pharmacist. At his father's death he succeeded to the 
business and is now proprietor of the oldest drug store of Douglas, the business 
having been established and conducted at the same location since 1891. He has 
a well appointed store, carrying a large and carefully selected line of drugs and 
druggists' sundries, and his business methods, which are based upon thorough 



132 HISTORY OF WYO-^IIXG 

reliability and earnest effort to please his patrons, have won for him a very 
liberal and well deserved patronage. 

Mr. Steffen was united in marriage to Aliss Ethel Cook, a daughter of A. D. 
Cook, and they have become the parents of three daughters. In politics Mr. 
Stefifen is a republican. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has 
taken the degrees of lodge and chapter, and in his life he exemplifies the 
beneficent spirit of the craft, which is based upon a recognition of the brother- 
hood of mankind and the obligations thereby imposed. He belongs to the Com- 
mercial Club and cooperates in all of its well defined plans and projects for the 
improvement and upbuilding of his city and the extension of its trade relations. 
When leisure permits he enjoys a hunting or a fishing trip, but he regards his 
business as his first interest and concentrates his energies upon its successful 
conduct. 



HOX. L.WVREXCE R. BRESNAHEX. 

Eor half a century Hon. Lawrence R. Bresnahen has been a resident of 
Cheyenne, ha\ing arrived ui)on the site of the city when there was scarcely a 
building to indicate that there \\a> any thought of developing a town in this 
locality. Through all of the intcrx ciiing jjeriod he has been closely associated 
with its growth and substanti:d dewlopment. His name is interwoven with its 
political records, with the establishment of its waterworks, with the framing of 
the city charter, with the erection of the capitol building and various other 
interests which are epochal in the records of Cheyenne. Five times he has 
been called upon to act as chief executive, and over the record of his public 
career there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil, for he has ever been 
actuated by the utmost fidelity to the public good and, moreover, his ability has 
enabled him to recognize the opportunities before the city in the way of sub- 
stantial improvement. 

Mr. Bresnahen is a native of Ireland, his birth having occurred at Clummell 
in 1850. The father died in Ireland before his son Lawrence reached the age 
of seven years, at which time he and his mother crossed the Atlantic to the new 
world and established their home at Phelps, in Ontario county, New York, 
where he became a pupil in the public schools. He was sixteen years of age 
when he put aside his textbooks in order to start out in the world independently. 
He severed home ties and, turning his face to the west, traveled toward the 
setting sun in company with a youth of about his own age. They had resolved 
to seek their fortunes in the far west and made their way to Julesburg, Colorado, 
which was then a frontier town. His financial condition rendered it imperative 
that Mr., Bresnahen obtain immediate employ nunt and he secured a situation 
in the meat market owned by the firm of MiHiir \ Staiitim. 1 le proved capable 
and loyal to his employers, who in 1867 sold their Im^iiu^s to him. In X^ovember 
of that year he removed his establishment to Cheyemie, Wyoming, erecting one 
of the first buildings in the city. Through all the intervening period, covering 
more than half a century, he has been closely associated with its active business 
enterprise and its financial development. His business interests have been wisely 
and carefully conducted and have brought to him a gratifying measure of success. 
Moreover, he has seen and utilized the chances for furthering the upbuilding 
of his adopted city and his work in this connection has been most farreaching 
and resultant. No man in Cheyenne has done more for the improvement of 
the city or to uphold the interests and stability of Wyoming. In 1876 he was 
elected mayor of Cheyenne, being called to the office in a most important year 
in the city's history — the year in which the patent for the town site was issued 
by the L^nited States. The place was just beginning to outgrow its original 
boundaries and to put off its characteristics as a frontier town and it was largely 
through the able, farsighted and unremitting endeavor of Mayor Bresnahen Jhat 




HON'. LA\\'REXCE R. BRE8XAHEN' 



134 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

the city waterworks plant was kept out of the hands of corporations and 
became the actual property of the municipality. In public affairs, as in his 
private business interests, he has readily discriminated between the essential 
and the non-essential and has been able to readily recognize the difiference between 
the more important phases of any situation and its incidental or accidental cir- 
cumstances. He has therefore utilized what has seemed best to him for the 
development of the city and at all times his activities have upheld those interests 
which are a matter of civic virtue and of civic pride. He was selected as one 
of the able committee of twelve to prepare the new city charter for Cheyenne in 
1S78 and immediately after the adoption of the charter he was again elected 
to the office of mayor, being made the candidate of both the democratic and 
republican parties. In a word, his public course had been such as to win for 
him the endorsement of all fair-minded and progressive citizens. Five times 
he has been chosen to serve as chief executive of Cheyenne arid his administra- 
tion in each instance has been characterized by many needed reforms and 
improvements. At the time of the construction of the state capitol building 
he was chairman of the second capitol building commission having charge of 
the matter and took upon himself the duties of superintendent of construction. He 
sacrificed his own personal interests in order to give his time and attention to 
the building commission. At a meeting held January 17, 18S8, the following reso- 
lution was unanimously adopted : "Resolved, that the commission desires to 
place itself on record as being grateful in the highest degree to L. R. Bresnahen, 
the chairman and superintendent of construction, for his zeal, energy and skill 
manifested in behalf of the capitol : that to him the people are indebted in large 
measure for the thoroughness of the work performed on both the east wing 
and the west wing of said capitol. J- C. Baird, Secretary of the Second Capitol 
Building Commission." 

During Mr. Bresnahen's last administration as mayor, in the years 191 1 and 
1912, Cheyenne's new and excellent water system was completed at a cost of 
one million dollars. During the same term when the city council passed a twenty- 
year franchise bill giving the telephone company largely increased rates for its 
service to the people. Mayor Bresnahen vetoed the bill and succeeded in having 
a new ordinance presented in which he secured such important concessions in 
rates as to make a saving to the citizens of Cheyenne of about thirty thousand 
dollars per year. In addition to this he required the company to take their 
poles from the streets and put their wires underground. The company also 
agreed to supply the city departments with the free service of twenty-five 
phones during the existence of their franchise. 

Mr. Bresnahen is the owner of a fine stock ranch, comprising about two 
thousand acres of land, which is situated a short distance from Cheyenne and 
he is there extensively engaged in handling stall-fed cattle. In this undertaking 
he is associated with his nephew, John Smith, and the partners have met with 
marked success in this field of activity. Mr. Bresnahen has not only seen 
opportunities for judicious investment in real estate himself, but has also recog- 
nized the opportunities for the city in that direction. While he was mayor of 
Cheyenne he had Judge McLaughlin draw up a bill to be forwarded to Hon. 
W. R. Steele, then congressional delegate, authorizing the city to purchase si.x 
hundred and forty acres of land about a mile and a half north of Cheyenne. This 
tract is now very valuable and forms the base of the city's water supply. In 
1876 he secured a large tract of land in the eastern part of Cheyenne which 
has since been developed into Lake Minnehaha Park. In a settlement with the 
railroad company in 1876 he obtained a deed to four blocks of land now con- 
verted into the beautiful city park in the heart of Cheyenne and also secured land 
for cemetery purposes without cost to the city. In 1891 and i8q2 he built the 
Central Avenue viaduct and the Snyder Street subway and completed the water 
system. All of the lands which he thus acquired are now very valuable, adding 
much to the revenue and the wealth of the city. ^Ir. Bresnahen has displayed 
notable prescience and sagacity in dealing with public affairs, ever looking beyond 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 135 

the exigencies of the moment to the opportunities of the future. He has exerted 
an immeasurable influence on the city of his residence; in business life as a pro- 
gressive man and promoter of extensive commercial and agricultural enter- 
prises; in social circles by reason of a charming personality and unfeigned cor- 
diality ; in politics by reason of his public spirit and devotion to the general 
good as well as his comprehensive understanding of the questions afifecting munic- 
ipal, state and national welfare. A modern philosopher has said : "Not 
the good that comes to us, but the good that comes to the world through us, 
is the measure of our success." And judged by this standard alone, Mr. Bres- 
nahen has been a most successful man, for Cheyenne owes much to his efforts 
and his public spirit, and in the management of her municipal interests he has 
indeed contributed riiuch to the world's good. 



R. HOWARD EMBREE. 

R. Howard Embree is a well known representative of commercial activity in 
Kemmerer, where he is associated with trade relations as the vice president of 
the Kemmerer Hardware & Furniture Company and president of the Up-to-Date 
Auto Company. The steps in his orderly progression are easily discernible and 
along the lines of consecutive effort he has reached his present creditable position. 

He was born in Berea, Kentucky, September 20, 1889, a son of W. N. and 
Laura (Fee) Embree, the former a native of Pennsylvania, while the latter was 
born in Kentucky, in which state they were married. During the period of the 
Civil war W. N. Embree was in the telegraph service of the federal govern- 
ment and was connected with General ]\IcClellan's staff as scout and for a time 
was with ^IcClellan's Third Army Corps in Mrginia. He was twice taken prisoner 
while on active duty and for a period was confined in Libby prison. After the war 
he came to the west as telegraph operator for the Oregon Short Line and the Union 
Pacific Railroad Company. Later he turned his attention to merchandising at 
Devon, Pennsylvania, where he passed away in 1891. His widow survived him 
for more than a decade and spent her last days in Kentucky, where she departed 
this life in 1902. In their family were seven children: Mrs. Charles Rathbun, 
living in Kemmerer; Mrs. G. N. Miles, whose home is in Denver, Colorado; 
Hallie F.. of Los Angeles ; W. D., who is assistant district attorney of New York 
city; R. B., who was killed in a railroad accident at Omaha; Edwin R., secre- 
tary of the Rockefeller Foundation in New York city; and R. Howard, who was 
the sixth in order of birth. 

In his boyhood days R. Howard Embree attended school in Wyoming and 
afterward became a student in Berea College at Berea, Kentucky, where he was 
graduated with the class of 1902. Later he became connected with the Thomas 
Edison exploring party in northern Canada in search of nickel mines. Two years 
were spent in exploration work, after which he returned to Wyoming and engaged 
in sheep raising in Lincoln county. He carried on ranching as a member of the 
firm of Rathbun & Embree for six years and then disposed of his interests in that 
connection and took up his abode in Kemmerer, where he became connected with 
the hardware and furniture trade as a partner of Albert P. Heitz. With the or- 
ganization of the Kemmerer Hardware & Furniture Company he was chosen vice 
president and has since served in that capacity. The business has been built 
up to extensive proportions and the firm is most careful in the personnel of the 
house, in the standard of goods carried and in the treatment rendered patrons. 
Its progressive business methods have brought a growing patronage that is most 
gratifying. Further developing their interests, the three partners in the firm 
organized the Up-to-Date Auto Company for the sale of Overland and Ford 
cars and they also maintain a garage, this branch of their business has also 
proven notably successful. The partners are young men of marked enterprise. 



136 HISTORY OF ^^■YO.MIXG 

resourcefulness and ability and their intercuts are most intelligently directed, 
so that success has come to them in gratifying measure. 

On the 26th of February, 1911, Mr. liniljree was united in marriage to Miss 
^lary Scott, of Kemmerer, a daughter of Air. and Mrs. Thomas Scott and a 
graduate of the University of Wyoming. Two children have blessed this mar- 
riage: Norris, who was born November 25, 191 1; and Ralph, born September 

2-j, I9I4. 

In politics Mr. Embree is a republican and from 1912 until 1916 he served 
as coroner of Lincoln county. He deserves much credit for what he has accom- 
plished, for he has advanced steadily through the force of his own character and 
his close application and determination. He worked his way through school, 
providing for the expenses of his college course, and he chose as his alma mater 
Berea College, which was founded by his maternal grandfather, John G. Fee, 
who was one of the early abolitionists of the south and a member of one of the 
wealthy southern families, who became known as one of the most prominent edu- 
cators in all that section of the country. In the paternal line Mr. Embree comes 
of Quaker ancestry, the family having been founded in New England at an 
early period in the development of the new world. Back of him is an honorable 
ancestry and his lines of life have been cast in harmony therewith. He has made 
good use of his time, his talents and his opportunities, and has become an im- 
portant factor in those things which lead to the substantial development of the 
west, as he holds at all times to high standards of manhood and citizenship. 



CHARLES H. WORLAXD. 

Charles H. Worland, a leading stockman of Washakie county, is the founder 
of the town of Worland and one of the most jirominent business men of northern 
Wyoming. It is said that "Opportunity knocks but once." Whether this be true 
or not, -Air. Worland determined that ojiportunity would not have to knock but 
once with him ; that he would utilize his chanco w hen it came, and it is this readi- 
ness and alertness on his part that has constituted the basis of his growing fortune. 
He was born in Missouri, where his parents had located in pioneer times. There 
he was reared and educated and in early manhood he made his way to the Pacific 
coast by the way of Cape Horn, making the voyage on a sailing vessel. After 
reaching his destination he engaged in the live stock business in California until 
1886 or 1887, when he removed to Nevada, where he continued in the same busi- 
ness until 1898. In that year he came to Wyoming. His entire active life has been 
])assed in the west and he has been a typical frontiersman, bravely and resolutely 
meeting ail the hardships and privations incident to the settlement of a new coun- 
try. After making his way to this state he took up his abode on a homestead 
across the river from the present town of Worland. He proved up on that home- 
stead in 1904. The previous year he established a half-way house between 
Basin and Thermopolis and there also conducted a livery barn. His roadhouse 
was known to and is spoken of by all the cattle and sheep men of this part of the 
state, being regarded as an oasis on the de.-sert, as it was the only place where 
travelers could be entertained over night or procure a meal between the two towns. 

Mr. Worland's business enterprises were of a character that met public needs 
and (U'luaiids and thus his interests prospered. He was early identified with ir- 
rigation ijroljlems. the Bluff canal and the Bighorn projects. He recognized the 
fertility of the soil if water could but be added and his etTorts in connection with 
irrigation interests have been of the utmost worth and value to this section of the 
state. He also secured the establishment of a postoffice at \\'orland. In June, 1906, 
the town of \\'orland was removed to the east siile of the river, its present location, 
and Mr. Worland took up his abode there the fcillnwing vear but still owns the old 
homestead on the other side of the river and is still actively engaged in busiiiess. 
associated with his son, Charles C, under the style of the W & \\' Live Stock 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 139 

Company, they being among the pioneers in the development of the oil industry 
in northern Wyoming, particularly in the Grass Creek and Elk Basin fields and 
later in the Warm Springs field, and are also in the live stock business. Whatever 
C. H. Worland has undertaken he has carried forward to successful completion. 
Coming into a new country, he has studied its possibilities for development and has 
so utilized his chances that splendid results have accrued. 

Charles H. Worland was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Brown, a native 
of California, and their family numbered two children, a daughter and a son. 
The daughter, Berenice, is the wife of D. R. Finlayson, a mining engineer, now- 
located in Clarksdale. Arizona, and to them have been born two children, a son 
and a daughter. 

Mr. Worland votes with the democratic party but has never been an office 
seeker, preferring to do his public service in other connections than as an official. 
Washakie county regards him as one of her foremost citizens and Wyoming has 
beci^me indebted to him in considerable measure for his efliorts in promoting the 
upb.iilding of the northern section of the state. He is ever frank and straight- 
forward in all his dealings and in unusual measure he enjoys the respect and regard 
of those with whom he comes in contact. 



N. E. CORTHELL. 



N. E. Corthell. a distinguished member of the Laramie bar, who has been 
prominently identified with various public and private interests as well, and ranks 
with the honored and representative citizens of the southern section of the state, 
was born in Cattaraugus county. New York, November 14, 1861, a son of 
Lathrop V. and Phebe (Morris) Corthell. who were also natives of the Empire 
state, the father being a well known and highly respected farmer of New York. 
He remained there up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1909, when he 
had reached the age of seventy-seven years. His widow survives and is now a 
resident of Twin Falls county, Idaho. In their family were six children, one of 
whom has passed away, while those who survive are : N. E., of this review ; Ed- 
ward ; Ernest: Mrs. Alargaret Ringert ; and Mrs. Leila Rutherford. The mem- 
ber of the family that has passed away was Mrs. Belle Robinson. 

N. E. Corthell. after attending the public schools of his native county, entered 
the Ten Broeck Free Academy at Franklinville, New York, from which he was 
graduated on completing the classical course in 1879. ^t '^^'^s in that year, when 
a youth of eighteen, that he made his way westward to W'yoming, since which 
time he has lived in Laramie. He entered the law office of Colonel S. W. Downey, 
who directed his reading, and in i88_^, after thorough preparation, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar. He remained in Colonel Downey's office for four years there- 
after and then entered upon the private practice of law, having had valuable ex- 
perience with his preceptor, so that he was splendidly qualified for the onerous 
t'uties of the profession when he entered upon active practice. Through the 
intervening years his clientage has steadily increased in volume and importance 
and he is today one of the able members of the Laramie bar, his name figuring 
prominently in connection with much important litigation that has been tried in 
the courts of the state. He served as prosecuting attorney in Albany county in 
1887 and 1888 and aside from his work in the strict path of his profession he has 
become well known in other connections, being a director of the Albany County 
National Bank of Laramie and a director in various other business projects and 
enterprises in which he holds stock. In a word a number of the important 
business concerns of the city have profited by his cooperation and benefited by 
his support. 

On the 30th of June, 1885. Mr. Corthell was united in marriage to Miss 
Eleanor Ouackenbush, of Laramie, who belonged to a prominent Wisconsin 
family. Seven children have been born of this marriage. Mrs. Evelyn Hill, who 



140 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

was born in Laramie and is a graduate of W'ellesley College at Wellesley, Massa- 
chusetts, became the wife of Professor John A. Hill, now a captain in the United 
States army, and has three children, Robert, John and Ross, all born in Laramie, 
^ilorris. the second of the family, now a lieutenant in the army, is a native of 
Laramie, a graduate of the city schools and is married and resides in Laramie. 
Miriam, who was graduated from the university, is the wife of Thayer Burgess 
and resides in Utica, New York. Gladys completed the university course in 
Laramie, her native city, and has become the wife of \Mlbur A. Hitchcock, by 
whom she has one child, Wilbur. Robert, born in Laramie, is now a marine in 
the United States navy. Huron D., a former student in the Alassachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology at Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he was pursuing the civil 
engineering course, is a member of the Twenty-third Regiment.of United States 
Engineers. Irving was graduated from the university at Laramie in 19 17, and is 
now a lieutenant in the United States infantry. 

In his political views Mr. Corthell is a democrat, having supported the party 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. Aside from filling the office 
of prosecuting attorney he was a member of the school board from 1900 until 1903 
and in the latter year became a member of the board of county commissioners, in 
which office he served for a four years' term. His course has ever been marked 
by genuine and unfaltering devotion to the public good. He is a broadminded 
man who looks at questions from the standpoint of a progressive and enlightened 
citizenship and his endorsement of a measure is sure to secure for it a large fol- 
lowing. His personal career in its business relations has also been marked by 
steady advancement and he is today one of the prosperous citizens of Laramie, 
having made judicious investment in ranch property in this section. He is among 
the most highly respected and valued residents of this part of the state. 

In a profession where advancement depends entirely upon individual merit 
he has made a creditable name and place for himself. He has won ven.- favor- 
able criticism for the careful and systematic methods which he has followed in the 
preparation and in the presentation of his cases. He throws himself easily and 
naturally into the argument. There is a self-possession and a deliberation which 
indicate no straining after' effect. On the contrary, there is a precision and 
clearness in his statements, an acuteness and strength in his arguments which 
speak a mind trained in the severest school of investigation and to wliich the 
closest reasoning is habitual and easy. 



LEOPOLD KABIS. 



Leopold Kabis, as a young man, arrived in Cheyenne on the loth day of Sep- 
tember, 1867, which was then a part of Dakota territory, and he is today one of a 
very few living who were here at that early date. Mr. Kabis may be called the 
longest continuous resident of Cheyenne now living. From time to time he was 
identified v.'ith various business enterprises, each change in business indicating 
a forward step in his career and utilization of v.-ider opportunities. 

Of late years he established, owned and operated the Kabis Cafe for more 
thnn ten years. At present he is engaged in fire insurance and general brokerage 
business, and has been since 1909. He is thoroughly familiar with the value of 
commercial paper and his study of financial interests of the country has led liim. to 
make most judicious investments, not only on his own account but on behalf of 
his manv acquaintances. 

Mr. Kabis has been quite prominent in connection with public afifairs throughout 
the entire period of his residence in Laramie county. He was the first clerk of 
Laramie county, elected to that office which he filled from 1870 to 1872. He was 
city clerk and assessor of Cheyenne during the same period of time. In 1891 he 
was "lected as a member of the state senate entering upon a four years term in that 
position, being the first and second sessions of the state legislature, during which 




HOX. LEOPOLD KABLS 



142 HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 

time he was instrumental in framing much constructive legislation that has con- 
stituted an element in the later progress of the state. In 1892, while still a mem- 
ber of the state senate, Air. Kabis was a candidate for governor. The convention 
was held at Rock Sprnigs, Wyoming, there being three candidates for the office, 
and at length ]\Ir. Kabis withdrew, as also did the other two candidates, and 
the nomination went to John E. Osborne, who was elected. Mr. Kabis was 
adjutant general of Wyoming under Governor John E. Osborne, and was also 
United States deputy revenue collector from 1894 to 1899. It was while he was 
in the revenue service that he exposed the Chinese registration frauds in 1896, 
thus rendering signal service to his commonwealth. He has always voted with the 
democratic party from the first time he voted to the present time, and has stood 
loyally and firmly to those interests and measures which he has become convinced 
are for tiie best interest of the general public. 

Fraternally Mr. Kabis is also widely and prominently known. He is a past grand 
master of the Indejjendent Order of Odd Fellows, and the only living member of 
the organization that was present at the time the grand lodge was organized in 
Wyoming in 1873, and has been a member of Cheyenne Lodge, Xo. i, of the Order 
of Odd Fellows since 1868, and is now the oldest living member of that order here. 
He is also a past chancellor commander of the Knights of Pythias, having been 
affiliated with that order since 1872. He is a life member of the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, having become a member of that order in Denver, Colorado, 
Lodge. Xo. 17, in 1896. He is a past exalted ruler of and is a charter member of 
Cheyenne Lodge, Xo. 660, B. P. O. E. 

1 lis qualities, characteristics, and ability along various lines have called him to 
leadership in connection with Inisiness, political and fraternal interests, and today 
he justly nuiks with the prominent, honored and representative men of Wyoming. 



HARRY H. HIME. 



Harry H. Hime. who since the fall of 1906 has been identified with the 
Basin State Bank at Basin, Wyoming, filling the position of cashier and mana- 
ger at the present time, was born in Indianola, Iowa, yiay 24, 1879, a son of 
Beneville and Elizabeth (Ferguson) Hime, who were pioneers of Iowa, taking 
up their abode in that state when the work of progress and development was in 
its initial stage. 

Harry H. Hime, spent his youthful days under the parental roof and at the 
usual age began his education there, passing through consecutive grades to his 
graduation from the high school at Indianola with the class of i8l}6. He also 
pursued a short business course. In early life he learned the printer's trade, which 
he followed at diflFerent periods in Iowa, Colorado and Wyoming, and in 1904 
he l)ecame manager of the Bighorn County Rustler. In 1906, however, he en- 
tered into active connection with the State Bank of Basin and has been a factor 
in the conduct and successful management of the bank since that time. In fact, 
its policy has been largely directed by him and he has made the institution one 
of the strong financial conc^erns of this part of the state. 

On the 9th of Xovember, 1910. 'Sir. Hime was married to Miss Florence B. 
O'Xeil. a daughter of James and Rachel O'Xeil. She accompanied her parents 
on their removal westward from Warren, Indiana, in 1908, the father bringing 
his family to \^%•oming at the time of the opening up of the oil and gas fields, 
in which he was interested. Mr. and Mrs. Hime have become parents of a 
son, James Beneville, now five years of age. 

The religious faith of the parents is that of the Presbyterian church. In 
political belief Mr. Hime is a repul)lican but not an active party worker, al- 
though he served as deputy county clerk (if kSighorn county in I<P5 and 1906, 
but resigned to accept a position in the Basin State Bank and since that time has 
never sought or desired political preferment. He does not hesitate to support 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 143 

plans and measures for the general good, however, and in that way is a most 
public spirited citizen, giving his aid and influence to all movements which are 
calculated to advance the welfare of communitv. countv and commonwealth. 



WILLIAM C. CL'XXIXGTOX, D. D. S. 

I-'or thirty years Dr. William C. Cunnington has actively engaged in die 
practice (if dentistry and since iqo8 has maintained an office at Kemmerer, where 
a lilicral patronage is accorded him. lie was born in Callodan, Ontario, Canada, 
March Ui, 1854, a son of John Cunnington, who was also a native of Canada 
and a representative of one of the old families of that country of English and 
Irish lineage. The paternal grandfather, \\'illiam Cunnington, was the founder 
of the American branch of the family, crossing the Atlantic to Canada during 
the early part of the nineteenth century and casting in his lot with the pioneer 
settlers of Ontario. He hewed his own logs to be used in building a house and 
in the midst of the wilderness developed a farm, performing the arduous task 
of cutting down the trees and preparing the land for cultivation. As the years 
passed on, he won success in his farming operations. His son John after- 
ward became a pioneer settler of Waterloo, Iowa, where he took up his abode 
in 1868. Later he again heard and heeded the call of the west, removing to Clay 
county, Nebraska, establishing his home near Sutton, where he followed farm- 
ing until 1892. In that year he took up his abode in Evanston, Wyoming, where 
he carried on stock raising and farming, there passing away July 16, 1916, at the 
notable old age of eighty-nine years and one month. He retired from active 
business life about ten years prior to his death but continued in business for a 
much longer period than many men. Such a record should put to shame many 
a man of less resolute spirit who grows weary of the struggles and trials of busi- 
ness life and relegates to others the burdens that he should bear. The well spent 
years of Mr. Cunnington won him the substantial fruits of labor and in his last 
days he was thus enabled to enjoy all of the comforts and some of the luxuries 
of life. He married Janette McDonald, a native of Canada, who is of Scotch 
descent and still survi\es, occupying the old homestead at Evanston. She is re- 
markably well preserved for a woman of her age, having reached the eighty- 
second milestone on life's journey. 

Dr. Cunnington of this review was the eldest of a family of ten children, 
nine of whom are still living. He was educated in Waterloo, Iowa, attending 
the public schools, and afterward he pursued a course in the Chicago Dental 
College, but long before he entered upon preparation for the profession he had 
begun to earn his living in other ways. His early life was spent upon the home 
farm and at the age of seventeen he started out independently, working as a 
farm hand for neighbors in Nebraska. He also rode the range as a Nebraska 
cowboy for six years. At length, however, he determined to devote his life 
to professional activity and began preparation for the practice of dentistry in 
Chicago. Following his graduatiim lie opened an office in Sutton, Neliraska, 
where he remained for seven months, and in the spring of 1887 he removed to 
Evanston, Wyoming, where he continuously and successfully practiced for 
twenty-one years. On the expiration of that period he established an office in 
Kemmerer, where he located July 5. 1908. Through the intervening period, 
covering more than nine years, he has remained in active and continuous practice 
in Kemmerer and is the dean of the dental profession in this section of the state. 
He is splendidly qualified for high professional achievements. He possesses 
marked mechanical skill and ingenuity in the operative work and underlying all of 
his labors is a broad knowledge of the scientific phases of dentistry brought to 
light by the latest investigation and research work. 

Dr. Cunnington was married February 14. 1889, to Miss Annie Faulkner, a 



144 HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 

native of Evanston, and they have two children : Pearl, the wife of I!. J. F.arnes, 
of Evanston ; and Mrs. J- C. Colvin, also of Evanston. 

Dr. Cunnington votes with the republican party and for two years he served 
as county coroner of Uinta county. He has also been a member of the city 
council of Kemmerer and is much interested in political and civic matters, doing 
everything in his power to advance high standards of citizenship. For six years 
he occupied the position of state dental examiner, his appointment to that office 
indicating clearly his high professional standing. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks at Rock Springs and with the 
Independent Order of Odd I'ellows at Evanston. His religious faith is that 
of the Methodist church. He belongs to the Kemmerer Chamber of Commerce 
and cooperates heartily in all of its well defined plans and measures for the up- 
building of the city and the advancement of its interests along material, intellec- 
tual, social, political and moral lines. 



WILLLKM D.\LEY, 



There is probably no better known of the real pioneers of Wyoming living 
today than \\illiam Daley. of Rawlins. Xot of the pioneers who followed the 
railroad into the country, but one of those who cast their fortune with that por- 
tion of the western frontier now the state of \Vyoming before the Union Pacific 
was anywhere near the present borders of the state. During the more than fifty- 
two years of his identification with the growth and development of this country 
he has not only been an eye witness but a participant in the stirring events of 
the various periods of its history, with an experience and distinction that few 
living today can claim. 

William Daley was born June 13, 1844. at St. Johns, Xew P)runswick, being 
one of a family of nine children, whose parents were Richard and Eliza (Daley) 
Daley, both natives of Ireland, but who in early life emigrated to Canada and 
became residents of Xew F)runswick, where the father engaged in farming and 
stock raising throughout his active life. \\'illiam Daley attended the public schools 
of his native country, later taking up the trade of shipbuilding, a business that 
was extensively carried on in that locality, and which he followed at Black 
River and other shipbuilding points. In the spring of 1866 he was one of a 
party that left Xew Brunswick for the Rocky mountain country in the States. 
They reached St. Joseph. Missouri, by rail, then went up the Alissouri to Xebraska 
City, where young Daley entered the emplovof a freighting outfit owned by 
Coe & Carter — that was carrying freight to Fort Mitchell. Shortly after reach- 
ing the latter place he hired out to another freighting concern — A. C. P.eckwith, 
Joe Sanders and Judge Kinney, who were taking sutler's supplies and other 
material to Fort Phil Kearney, then building on the Bozeman trail. This meant 
a journey of nearly three hundred miles across country, along which there was 
not a white resident save at the forts, and much of the distance was through a 
country infested by hostile Indians. Fort Phil Kearney was reached in midsum- 
mer of 1866, and there ]\Ir. Daley entered the employ of the government, working 
at his trade. It is an important chapter in the history of this section of the west : 
these events surrounding Fort Phil Kearney during its erection and the first 
rear of its existence. These events are not only a matter of government record, 
but have been faithfully described bv able writers who, like Mr. Daley, were 
living at the fort during this time. "Army Life on the Plains." by Frances C. 
Carrington Ogio), is largely given to a description of tl' ?e events during a part 
of the time that Mr. Daley was there. 

Fort Phil Kearnev was one of the posts erected < <ong a new wagon road 
through the Powder River countrv around the Big Horn mountains, with the 
object of shortening the route to Montana. This project was bitterly opposed 
by Red Cloud, a leader of the voung warriors of the northern Sioux and the 




4l^^k^ ^A 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 147 

other principal chiefs. In June, 1866, a conference had been held at Fort Lara- 
mie, where an effort was made to have these chiefs yield the privilege of peace- 
ably establishing- the new road with military posts along the route. These 
negotiations crinie to an abrupt end when the government decided to go ahead 
with the plan regardless of its opposition by the tribes whose best hunting 
grounds were to be inNaded and who were quick to perceive that it meant prac- 
tically the permanent adxini of ihe while man. The leading chiefs left the 
council with their adherents, returned to their own country and with a strong 
force of warriors began a vigorous and relentless war against all whites, citizens 
as well as soldiers, who attempted tc occupy the route in question. Fort Phil 
Kearney seemed to be the post that more than any other was the object of attack- 
by these savages. All during the summer and fall of 1866 while the work of 
building the fort was being pushed as rapidly as possible, scarcely a day passed 
but what some one of the fort attaches or members of the garrison was wounded 
or killed by the Indians from ambush. The wood train, the sawmill crew or 
those at work in the hay field, were constantly in danger of their lives since their 
work was not within the confines of the fort. The hay field (four miles dis- 
tant) was picketed the entire distance. It is doubtful if ever a post on the 
western frontier was continually harassed during the period of construction as 
was that of Fort Phil Kearney. With the completion of the structure, flag 
raising day came on October 31st. The flagpole (pronounced by Gen. Carring- 
ton, the commander, as being the handsomest in America) stood one hundred 
and twenty-four feet high and was largely the product of William Daley's 
mechanical skill. The flag at its top that day was the first full "Garrison Flag" 
that e\er floated between the Platte and Montana, and Mr. Daley had the honor 
of hoisting it for the first time. In his address en that occasion. General Car- 
rington referred to the "beautiful pole, perfect in detail as if wrought and finished 
in the navy yards of New York, Philadelphia or Boston." The subsequent events 
connected with the life at Fort Phil Kearney during the remaining period of 
Mr. Dalev's stay there are fullv mentioned elsewhere in this work and include 
the fight of December 6, when Lieutenant Bingham and Sergeant Bowers were 
among the slain, also the Fetterman Massacre on December 21, which ranks as 
one of the most tragic events in the Indian warfare of the west. 

In Tanuary, 1867, Mr. Daley was included among a number that were trans- 
ferred "from Fort Phil Kearney to other posts and on the 23d of that rnonth the 
party, with an escort of forty infantry and twenty cavalry, together with many 
empty wagons that were to return from Fort Reno with supplies for Fort Phil 
Kearney, all under the command of Lieutenant Alpheus H. Bowman, started from 
Fort Phil Kearney. This was probably one of the most strenuous journeys 
ever undertaken by a military party in the state. Deep snow, immense drifts, 
bitter cold during which the 'mercury congealed in the bulb, and at every halt 
precaution — necessary to prevent a surprise attack by the Indians! \'ery few, 
if any member, of the party -there was but who suffered more or less exposure. 
At Mud Springs Mr. Daley was severely attacked by snow blindness, which com- 
pletely deprived him of his sight, and was accompanied by excruciating pain for 
several days. The entire journey to Fort McPherson. which was Mr. Daley's 
destination, was one ever to be remembered. The thousands and ihnusands of 
buft'alo seen on the journey caused even the veteran plainsmen to admit they 
had never before seen these animals so numerous. 

Mr. Dalev was employed at his trade in the rebuilding of Fort McPherson 
until he went into business for himself in delivering wood to the Union Pacific 
road, employing his own team in the work. Later going to Cheyenne, he entered 
the emplov of the Union Pacific, working at his trade of carpenter, and before 
long was eiven charge of a gang. Mr. Daley was present at Promontory Point, 
Utah, in 1869, when "the completion of the Union Pacific Railway was celebrated. 
From 187 1 to 1877 he was assistant superintendent of buildings and waterworks 
for the company between Chevenne and Ogden. In the latter year he left the 
emplov of the railroad and located in Rawlins, where he engaged in the contract- 



148 HISTORY OF WYO-AIIXG 

ing and lumber business, as well as becoming the first furniture dealer in the 
city. His business also included retail ice and coal. These projects were profit- 
ably conducted, and as his capital increased he became connected with other lines. 
About 1882 he became connected with the ranch business, first with a desert claim 
of two hundred and eighty -acres, from which modest beginning the great Daley 
ranch of today is the outgrowth. Until 1892 his ranch interests were confined to 
cattle and horses, since when the sheep industry has been extensively followed. 
From time to time Mr. Daley has relinquished his interests other than ranching 
and banking. The former have attained e.xtensive proportions and the Daley 
ranch now includes about twenty-four thousand acres, and the Red Desert prop- 
erty about forty thousand acres, with Table Rock as headquarters. These inter- 
ests have been incorporated as The William Daley Company, with William Daley 
as president and William ^^'. Daley as general manager. The Daley ranch, four- 
teen miles west of Rawlins along the line of the Union Pacific Railroad, is one 
of the finest ranch properties in this section of the west. The stock barn, a 
modern structure eighty-eight by one hundred feet, is one of the largest in the 
state. The station of Daley's Ranch on this line was named for it. During 
the presidential campaign of 1900, Theodore Roosevelt and a party of fifty-two 
other prominent men of national and state reputation were over-Sunday guests 
of Mr. Daley at the ranch. Several years later, while Mr. Daley was the guest 
of President Roosevelt in \\'ashington, when presented to IMrs. Roosevelt, the 
president remarked : "This is the gentleman you have heard me speak of and 
at whose home in Wyoming I had the grandest dinner I ever sat down to." 

In the latter '805, in conijiany with I. C. Miller, J. C. Davis, John ^^■. Hugus 
and others, Mr. Daley organized \hv First National Bank of Rawlins and was 
for some years a director (jf iliat iii-iitution. Later he disposed of his interests 
therein, and on January i, 1899, was one of the organizers of the Rawlins State 
Bank, which on June 9, 1900, became the Rawlins National Bank. ]\Ir. Daley 
served as vice president until 1913, when he became president, a relationship 
that he has since maintained. The Rawlins National Bank was organized with 
a fifty thousand dollar capital, which has since been twice increased and now 
stands at one hundred thousand dollars. Its growth has been steady and con- 
tinues, and it now ranks with the strongest and best managed financial institu- 
tions in the state. Mr. Daley's connection with banking institutions in Rawlings 
has not only been marked by their substantial growth and progress but has 
extended through a longer period than that of any of his contemporaries. 

On December 15. 1871, Mr. Daley was united in marriage at Salt Lake to 
Miss Rhoda S. Tilden, born at Allegany, Cattaraugus county. New York, on 
July 14, 1854, a daughter of Samuel J. and Loretta (Bywater) Tilden. The 
father was a cousin of Samuel J. Tilden, who was, in 1876, presidential candidate 
on the democratic ticket. The father of Mrs. Daley was engaged in the lumber 
business in dift'erent sections of the west, having migrated there with his family 
before the Union Pacific was completed across the- state of W'yoming. Mr. and 
Mrs. Daley have become the parents of six children. Their eldest, William W., 
born in Evanston, Wyoming, is a graduate of the high school of Rawlins and 
has since been extensively engaged in stock raising in this state, where he is 
well known and has served in the state senate. He married ^liss Margaret E. 
Edwards, of Rawlins, on the 12th of January, 1901. She is a daughter of William 
and Rose Edwards and was born at Woodstock, Ontario. By her marriage she 
has become the mother of a son, Percy Edward, who was born in Rawlins, No- 
vember II, 1902, and is now attending high school irj his native city. The second 
of the family is Mrs. J. A. Hobbs. who was born in Rawlins, where her husband 
is a well known merchant. They have two sons, William A. and Harry J. Hobbs. 
Etta M. Daley became the wife of E. F. Steward and has one child, Edgar Perce, 
who was born in Rawlins. Perce E. Daley, born in Rawlins, graduated from 
the high school and is now in the Engineering Corps of the United States Army. 
Florence, now Mrs. G. B. Weller, born in Rawlins and a graduate of the high 
school, has become by her marriage the mother of three children, George B., 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 149 

Rhoda and Ruth. John R., born in Rawhns and a graduate of the high school, 
is now engaged in the brokerage business in Sacramento, Cahfornia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daley are members of the Episcopal church and are promi- 
nent in the social circles of the city, having nianv warm friends throughout 
Rawlins and this section of the state. William Daley is one of the best known 
^lasons in the state. He was the first Master Mason raised in Evanston Lodge, 
U. D., ^March 14, 1876: wor>hi|)fnI master, Rawlins Lodge, 1882; grand master, 
Alost \Vorshipful Grand Lod^c, iSSS; i^rand treasurer from 1899 to the present 
time; Chapter, Royal Arch, May 9, 188(1; Knight Templar, Ivanhoe Commandery, 
1886; Eminent Commander. Ivanhoe Commandery, Knights Templar, 1892; 
Grand Commander, Wyoming, 1889-90; A. A. Scottish Rite. 1894; elected K. C. 
C. H. February, 1897; Potentate. Korein Temple, .\. .\. ( ), X. Mystic Shrine, 
1896-97; honorary life member, Imperial Council, \. A. ' •. X. ?\l\stic Shrine, 
1916; Emeritus Member Imperial Council, A. A. 1 1. X. M\>tic Shrine, 1916; 
October 30, 1912, he was made honorary member uf Medinali Temple, A, A. O. 
N. iM. S., of Chicago, Illinois. 

For two terms he served as mayor of Rawlins and was for two terms a 
member of the W\'oming territorial council ; while for several terms he repre- 
sented his district in the state legislature and has left the impress of his indi- 
viduality, ability and public spirit upon the laws of the state. Mr. Daley has 
been one of the "wheel horses'" of the republican party in Wyoming for a great 
many years and has twice declined to become the party's candidate for governor. 
However, he has worked and contributed toward the success of the party at all 
times. He is a self-made man, who owes his advancement entirely to his indi- 
vidual effort, merit and ability. On removing to the west his cash capital was 
less than one dollar, while at the present time he has become one of the important 
factors in the business circles of the state, ranking very high in connection with 
banking interests, and at the same time has found opportunity to render valuable 
jniblic service to the commonwealth. Forty-two years after the flag-raising inci- 
dent at Fort Phil Kearney a reunion of the survivors of those present on October 
31, 1866, was held on the site of the old fort. The services on this occasion 
were most appropriate and included the hoisting by ]\Ir. Daley of the identical 
flag that forty-two years before he had unfurled to the breeze at Fort Phil 
Kearney. This flag had in the meantime been presented to him by General Car- 
rington. the commander of the fort, and is yet in Mr. Daley's possession as a 
most cherished souvenir of a period in Wyoming's history of which there are but 
very few survivors. 

His acquaintance has included the prominent men of Wyoming for fifty 
years and today there are few men in the state in public or private life who 
are anv better known. He is well preserved in mind and body, considering all 
he had to undergo in his early days but his natural robust physique has helped 
him greatlv, for as a young man of twenty-one he weighed two hundred and 
thirty-five pounds, standing si.x feet three and one-half inches. 



HON. GEORGE E. BRnniER. 

Hon. George E. Brimmer is a member of the law firm of Brimmer & Brim- 
mer, of Rawlins, Wyoming. He was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, April 10. 
1870, and is a son of E. C. and Ada (Crysler) Brimmer, the former a native 
of Massachusetts, while the latter was born in Canada. E. C. Brimmer re- 
mained a resident of Massachusetts throughout his entire life. His wife has also 
passed awav. They were the parents of six children, of whom George E. was 
the second in order of birth. 

At the usual age he became a public school pupil in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, 
and after mastering the branches of learning there taught he became a student 
in Columbia L'niversity, where he pursued his law course and was graduated 



150 HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 

with the class of 1901. He then began practice at Glens Falls, Xew York, where 
he continued until 1905. when he removed to Rawlins, where he has since je- 
mained, practicing as a member of the tirm of Brimmer & Brimmer. He belongs 
to the Wyoming State Bar Association and the breadth of his interests is indi- 
cated in his connection with the American Academy of Political Science. In 
addition to his other interests Mr. Brimmer is identified with the First National 
Bank of Rawlins and with live stock corporations. 

On the 24th of February. 1910, in Baltimore, Maryland, ;\Ir. Brimmer was 
married to Miss Anna Gould, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. K. Gould, of that 
city. They have become the parents of three children: Xancy, who was born 
in Rawlins in 1911 : John Godfrey, born in 1915; and William Nicholson, in 1917. 

Mr. Brimmer is prominent in Masonic circles. He has taken the degrees 
of the Consistory and York Rite, and is a past commander of Ivanhoe Com- 
mandery, K. T. He is deputy grand master A. F. & A. ^M., and he is identified 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 



HON. HENRY ASA COFFEEN. 

Hon. Henry Asa Coffeen was one of the honored pioneer settlers of Wy- 
oming who contributed much to the development of the state in its material 
upbuilding and also to the establishment of its political policy. Actuated by 
a public-spirited devotion to the general good, he labored earnestly and ef- 
fectively for the best interests of the commonwealth and his efforts were far- 
reaching and beneficial. 

Mr. Coffeen was born in Gallia county, Ohio, February 14, 1841, and was 
a representative of one of the oldest New England families, being a direct de- 
scendant of Captain John Coffeen, who was born at Topsfield, Alassachusetts, 
and was a son of ^Michael Coff'een, a native of Ireland, who belonged to a wealthy 
family of that country. At the age of si.xteen. while in college in Dublin, he was 
enticed on board a vessel bound for America, where in due time he arrived. At the 
age of twenty years he married and settled in Topsfield, Massachusetts, where he 
reared a large family of children, of whom Captain John Coffeen was the eldest. 
In early manhood John Coffeen became master and owner of a coasting vessel, 
which a little later was wrecked. About that time he married Susanna Goldsmith, 
a native of Boston, and removed to Middletown, Connecticut, where he resided 
for four years. He then went to Ringe, New Hampshire, where he remained 
for fourteen vears and assisted in organizing the town and developed a new 
farm there. In 1768 he went to \'ermont and for two years and three months 
his was the only family residing at what has since become the city of Cavendish. 
It was in June, 1769, that he took up his abode there. Following the outbreak 
of the Revolutionary war he was appointed captain of militia in 1775 and he 
represented his town in the state legislature in 1781, 1785 and 1786. He was 
also a member of the convention which signed the revised Declaration of Inde- 
pendence of \'ermont and which framed the constitution of that state. He 
reared a large family of children, many of whom partook of his own enterpris- 
ing and adventurous disposition and became pioneers in the west. He died 
respected and lamented, leaving a long line of descendants to mourn his 
departure. 

The pioneer spirit has ever been manifest in the family. Henry Asa Coffeen 
was but a young lad when his parents removed from Ohio to become pioneer set- 
tlers of the state of Illinois. The family home was established at Homer and 
there Henry A. Coff'een was reared, meeting with all the hardships and privations 
incident to the irettlement of the frontier. On the twenty-fourth anniversary 
of his birth he was married. 

In the meantime he had completed a course in the public schools near his 
home and he had continued his education in Butler College of Indiana, while 




O/Ly ^4-^^ 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 153 

subsequently he became a student in Abingdon College of Abingdon, Illinois. 
In his studies he displayed special aptitude and made a splendid record. His 
course attracted the attention of prominent educators of that period and following 
his graduation he was offered the chair of natural science in Hiram College of 
Ohio, at which time James A. Garfield, afterward president of the United States, 
was president of the institution. A warm friendship sprang up between 
the two men that was broken only by death. Mr. Coffcen, after severing his 
connection with Hiram College, became one of the organizers of the Eastern 
Illinois College, in which he also filled the chair of natural science. He afterward 
became a lecturer and when the Lyceum was a form of popular education he 
traveled extensively in connection with Lyceum work, visiting most of the larger 
cities of the United States as a public lecturer. Throughout his entire life Mr. 
Coft'een was a close student of questions of the day and of the trend of public 
thought and progress, and with the organization of the Knights of Labor he 
became one of the prominent men of that society and was elected to a position cor- 
responding to that of vice president. He became one of the most efficient national 
lecturers of the organization, occupying the position for two years, but his opinions 
concerning strikes and boycotts dift'ered so radically from other leaders of the 
society that he resigned. His interest in the west led him to remove from Danville, 
Illinois, to Wyoming, in April, 1884, at which time he took up his abode in the Big 
Horn country, and after completing arrangements for the reception of his family 
he was. five months later, joined by his wife and children. .As previously stated, 
Mr. Coffeen was married on the twenty-fourth anniversary of his birth, to Miss 
Harriet Newell King and to them were born three children : Mrs. Hallie C. Gillette ; 
Mrs. Mabel Telander; and Herbert A. Coffeen, who has passed away since his 
father's death. The daughters yet reside in Sheridan. The wife and mother 
passed away June 4, 1901, and on the 28th of June, 1904, Mr. Coffeen was again 
married, his second union being with Mrs. Alice Dwight of Denver. 

W'ith his arrival at Big Horn, Mr. Coffeen at once became identified with 
its business and public interests. He at first turned his attention to merchan- 
dising and afterward became owner of a ranch. At that time it was believed 
that the town of Big Horn was the coming city of northern Wyoming and 
Mr. Coffeen decided to make it his permanent place of abode, but within three 
years Sheridan had so far outstripped its neighbor in the race for metropolitan 
honors that Mr. Coffeen decided to remove to the larger place, and in 1887 
established his mercantile business in .Sheridan, where he continued to make his 
home until his demise. He was a man of marked business enterprise, of keen 
sagacity and notably sound judgment and his commercial interests were most 
carefully, wisely and successfully conducted. As he prospered in his undertakings 
and his financial resources increased he made extensive investments in real estate. 

The worth of his character, his ability and his public spirit was soon manifest 
and it followed as a logical sequence that Mr. Coff'een's services were sought 
in connection with the public interests of his city and state. He was made a 
member of the state constitutional convention which framed the organic law 
of ^^'voming, in reference to which a contemporary biographer has written: "It 
was in this position that he performed a service for the state that, had the 
remainder of his life as a statesman been void of results, this alone should 
accord him a niche in the hall of fame and cause his memory to be honored bv 
all residents of the commonwealth, for it was due to his eft'orts perhaps more 
than to those of any other one person that the equal suffrage section of the 
territorial constitution was written into the constitution of the new state. Many 
opposed this section and the fight was bitter. Not alone did ^Mr. Coffeen stand 
for the recognition of women, for there were other brilliant men who fought 
nobly for the cause. But the contest was so close that, had one man wavered, 
the cause must have been lost, and because he stninl hnn, Mr. Coft'een deserves 
the gratitude and respect of every citizen of the state, witiiout regard U'> iiolitical 
affiliation. Another section written into the \\'}oming state constitution was 
with regard to the tonnage taxation on the coal output. This was a new idea at 



154 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

that time and it was strongly opposed. Mr. Coffeen did not claim that he origi- 
nated the idea, but he led the fight for its adoption and won." In 1892 Mr. Cof- 
feen was chosen as the second representative of the state of Wyoming in con- 
gress. Again we quote: "Being of the minority party and the only democrat 
from this state ever elected to congress, he remained but one term, but during 
his service in Washington he proved himself to be an able statesman and made 
an enviable record. His services in assisting to secure the location of Fort 
Mackenzie in Sheridan placed the citizens of this city under lasting obligations 
to him. During his term he also secured the passage of a bill establishing a 
federal court in Sheridan, but the law never became operative until last fall. 
During his term Congressman CoiTeen made the first speech ever heard in congress 
advocating reclamation of semi-arid lands along the lines that have since laeen 
put in practice, and which has added millions of acres of rich and valuable lands 
to the wealth of the country. Many give to him the credit of being the father of 
the present reclamation idea, for his speech on this subject was made August 
15, 1894, and in it he advocated many of the laws since passed and now in force." 
Years before Air. Cofteen represented Wyoming in the national halls of legisla- 
tion he had resided in Danville, Illinois, which was also the home town of Hon. 
Joseph Cannon, ex-speaker of the house of representatives. In the early '80s 
there was a triangular contest for congress between Cannon. Mr. CoiTeen and 
General John Charles Black, all residents of Danville. The last named became 
the candidate of the democratic party for congress at that time. Mr. Cannon 
won the election. A decade afterward, when Mr. Cofifeen was sent to congress 
as the representative of Wyoming, he there met his two competitors of former 
years. "Uncle Joe" and General Black, who were also members of the house at 
that time. 

The death of He'nry A. Cofifeen occurred December 8, 191 3, and in his passing 
Wyoming mourned the loss of one of its most honored and valued citizens. He 
had alwaVs been a tireless seeker after truth, a deep thinker and a great reader, 
and his library of theosophical and religious works as well as metaphysical and 
philosophical literature, was ]iroliablv as complete as any in the state. He was 
also a writer of much more than average ability, his introduction to the Aquarian 
Gospel of Jesus the Christ, by Levi, published both in America and London, 
havine a large circulation. In early manhood he had been editor of a paper in 
Danville, Illinois, and afterward had edited a Chicago magazine known as the 
Cosmos. He ever kept in touch with the great political, sociological and economic 
questions of the age. and in Wyoming was recognized as one who largely directed 
and molded public thought and opinion. 



GEORGE E. PEXTOX. 



Among the rapidly developing business interests of Evanston is that con- 
ducted under the name of the Bear River & Scofield Coal Company, of which 
George E. Pexton is the president. He was born in \'ernon. New York, Sep- 
tember 23, 1863. and is a son of George Pexton, a native of England, who came 
to America in 1850 and settled at \'ernon. where he has followed the occupation 
of farming quite successfully. His political allegiance has always been given 
to the republican party and George Pexton, Sr.. has ever taken an active interest 
in its work, supporting all those measures which he deems of value in advancing 
the growth and promoting the prosperity of his community. He has held to 
high civic standards and maintains his interest in community affairs, although he 
has reached the advanced age of eighty-nine years. He still resides upon the 
old home place at \'erncn. his birth having occurred in May. 1829. He married 
Catherine Rivenburerh, a native of the state of New York, born near Troy, and 
descended from Dutch ancestry that was originally established in the Mohawk 
valley. Mrs. Pexton passed away in 1894, at the age of sixty-five years. In 




<^trt/l^^ 



156 HISTORY OF WYO^riXG 

their family were three children : Lorenz R., who is residing in \^ernon. New 
York; George E., of this review: and Sidney A., who makes his home in Chicago. 

George E. Pexton, spending his boyhood and youth in his native city, acquired 
his education in the public schools, passing through consecutive grades to the 
high school. He started out independently when twenty-four years of age. His 
youth had been passed upon the home farm and he early became familiar with 
the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. In 1887 he sought 
the opportunities offered in the great and growing west, making his way to 
Evanston, Wyoming, where he became engaged in mercantile lines. He carried 
on business in that way until 1893 and was also connected with the hotel business 
in Evanston and in Ogden, Utah. He became largely interested in the meantime 
in coal mining and is now president of the Bear River & Scofield Coal Company, 
which is operating extensively in this section of the country, having valuable 
mining properties. He is also a director of the First National Bank and is the 
owner of the Z Bar ranch, located in Uinta county. His business investments 
have been most judiciously made and his sound judgment and enterprise have 
constituted the broad basis upon which he has built the superstructure of his 
substantial success. 

In 1S93, in Evanston, Mr. Pexton was united in marriage to Miss Annie S. 
Saunders, a native of Salt Lake City, Utah. They have two sons, George 
Ellsworth and Sidney Vernon. 

Politically Mr. Pexton is an earnest republican, giving stalwart support 
to the party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and doing 
everything in his power to advance its success. He is recognized as one of the 
leading and influential residents of his part of the state and in fact is pfomi- 
nently known throughout Wyoming. He was made vice president of the state 
commission to the St. Louis and to the Portland expositions and since 1902 he 
has been Wyoming's representative on the republican national committee. Fra- 
ternally he is a Knight Templar Mason and is also connected with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. His religious faith is that of the Episcopal church 
and he is serving as one of its trustees. In a word, his interests are broad and 
in every connection of life he has borne himself with such signal dignity and 
honor as to gain him the respect of all with whom he has been associated. He 
has been and is distinctively a man of affairs and one who has wielded a wide 
influence. A strong mentality, an invincible courage, a most determined indi- 
viduality have so entered into his make-up as to render him a natural leader of 
men and a director of opinion. 



WILLIAM H. DA\-IS. 



William H. Davis is a well known figure in banking circles in eastern Wyoming 
and is now one of the chief executive officers of the First National Bank of 
Douglas, holding the position of \ice president in that institution; He has closely 
studied financial problems and recognizes the fact that the bank is most worthy 
of credit and support that most carefully safeguards the interest of its depositors. 
jMr. Davis has worked his way steadily upward since entering into banking 
connections in a clerical capacity. 

He was born in Alinnesota on the 25th of October, 1870, and is a son of 
Daniel P. and Sarah E. (Drake) Davis. The public schools afl:'orded him his edu- 
cational privileges, the family removing to the vicinity of Harrison, Nebraska, in 
the year 1887, their home being near the Wyoming line. Mr. Davis afterward took 
up the profession of teaching and his ability in that direction was such that he 
was chosen county superintendent of schools in Nebraska. He also gave his 
attention in early manhood to the newspaper business for a time and since 1899 
has been connected with banking, at which time he secured a clerical position 
in the First National Bank at Harrison, Nebraska, in which institution he was 



HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 157 

advanced to the position of cashier, so serving until 1916, and he is still vice 
president of that bank. In the year mentioned he was called to the vice presi- 
dency of the First National Bank of Douglas and he is also the vice president 
of the \'an Tassell Bank. The First National Bank of Douglas is a thriving 
and progressi\e institution. Something of the nature of its business is indicated 
in its statement which was issued November 20, 191 7, at the close of its fiscal 
year and wliich is as follows : 

Resources Liabilities 

Loans, discounts 8552,292.83 Capital stock ■ $ 75.000.00 

Bonds and securities 158,105.94 Surplus and undivided 

Real estate 1 1.595-39 profits 73-943-5 1 

Cash and e.xchange 263,158.06 Circulation 75,000.00 

Deposits 761,208.71 

$985,152.22 . 

$985,152.22 

The officers and directors of this bank are: C. F. Coffee, W. H. Davis, T. C. 
Rowley, C. F. Maurer. F. \\'. Clarke, jr.. and Theo Pringle — names which indi- 
cate the strength of the institution. 

On the 2ist of March, 1894, Air. Davis was united in marriage to Miss Wanda 
Pontius and to them have been born three children : Dee P., Clarence V. and 
Mercy E. Mr. Davis votes with the republican party, of which he is a loyal 
adherent. He has taken the degrees of the blue lodge in Alasonry, is connected 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Woodmen of the World and 
the Modern Woodmen of America. His religious faith is that of the Methodist 
church and to its teachings he is ever loyal, his belief actuating him in all busi- 
ness and public as well as private relations of life. He therefore commands the 
respect and confidence of all with whom he has been associated. 



C. P. SCOTT. 



C. P. Scott, vice president and manager of the Rock Springs Lumber Com- 
pany and also actively engaged in business as a contractor, was born in Lincoln 
county, Missouri. March 10, 1866, a son of John and Julia (Cummings) Scott. 
The father is a native of Ireland and remained in that country to the age of 
seventeen years, when he crossed the Atlantic to the new world, becoming a resi- 
dent of Ohio. Subsequently he removed westward to Lincoln county, Missouri, 
where he engaged in farming and still makes his home, although he has for 
some years lived retired in the enjoyment of a well earned rest, as he has now 
reached the eighty-eighth milestone on life's journey. His wife also survives and 
is seventy-eight vears of age. In their family were thirteen children, eleven of 
whom survive: James T., a resident of St. Louis, Missouri; John T., who makes 
his home in Lincoln county, Missouri ; W. P. and R. E., who are also living in 
Lincoln county, that state ; Allen, who is located in Crook county, Wyoming ; 
Ella, also of Crook county, this state; Minnie, who became the wife of Gonza 
Mudd and died in Crook county, W^yoming, in June, 1917: Mrs. Julia O'Brien, 
living in Lincoln county, Missouri ; Mrs. Celia \'. Falicy, whii-.c home is in 
Cheyenne, Wyoming; Airs. Georgia Cook, of St. Louis, Missouri; Clara, located 
in Lincoln county, Missouri; C. P., of this review; and one who died in infancy. 
C. P. Scott was the second in order of birth in this family. In his boy- 
hood days he attended the public schools of his native county, after which he 
secured a position with the Iron Mountain Railway Company in the bridge and 
building department and while thus employed traveled extensively over their 
system. He remained with the company for two years and then went to St. 
Louis, Alissouri, where he took up contract work, continuing in business in that 
city for four years. Returning to Lincoln county, Missouri, he was there en- 



158 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

gaged in building and contracting for six years and on the expiration of that 
period entered the retail lumber business, which he carried on for four years. 
He then left Alissouri to become a resident of Rock Springs, Wyoming, in igo8, 
and became associated with the Rock Springs Lumber Company, in which con- 
nection he is conducting a business of large and gratifying proportions, his 
patronage steadily growing. He also does contract work and both branches of 
his business are proving profitable. 

In February. 1902, in Lincoln county, Missouri, Mr. Scott was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary (iertrude Mattingly, a daughter of W. R. and Anna E. 
( Mudd I .MattiiiL;!), win.) were also residents of Lincoln county, Missouri. Mr. 
and .Mrs. Sc(Jtt h;i\e Ijcconie the parents of two children, Retah, who was born 
in Lincoln county. Alissouri, in 1903, and is now attending school in Cheyenne, 
this being her second year in convent work there ; and William, who was born in 
Lincoln county. IMissouri, in 1905 and is a pupil in the schools of Rock Springs. 

Fraternally Mr. Scott is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks and is serving as a trustee of the local lodge. He is also a trustee of the 
South Side Catholic church of Rock Springs, of which he and his family are 
communicants. His political support is given to the democratic party and he is 
now serving as a member of the city council, taking active part in furthering 
the best interests of the community. He is a self-made man and one who de- 
serves much credit for what he has accomplished, as he has worked persistently 
and earnestly since starting out in the business w(jrl(l. His labors have brought 
good results and today he is one of the well known and valued representatives 
of commercial and industrial activity in his adopted city. 



HOX. HER]\I.\N B. G.^TES. 

Wyoming on the whole has been fortunate in the class of men who have oc- 
cupied her public positions. They have usually been devoted to the general welfare 
and qualified by innate ability and experience for the duties that have devolved 
upon them. In his present position as state treasurer Hon. Herman B. Gates is 
adding to the stability of the state, while his record reflects credit and honor upon 
his constitutents. 

.A. native of Illinois, he was born in Auburn, January 7, 1884, a son of Jacob 
A. and Susan ]\I. ( i'.allou) Gates. The father was a farmer by occupation and 
went to Illinois from the south. He served in the Confederate army during the 
Civil war and he passed awav when his son Herman was but a year and a half old. 
The mother is still living and in the family were four children but two sisters 
died in infancy. 

Herman B. Gates, who was the third in order of birth, acquired a public 
school education in Auburn, Illinois, passing through consecutive grades to the 
high school and he then completed a business course. In 1902 he removed to the 
west with Thermopolis, \\'voming. as his destination, and became bookkeeper in 
the First National Bank, which position he occupied for three years. He was 
afterward assistant cashier and eventually he became one of the organizers of the 
First National Bank at Worland, Wyoming. He was made cashier upon the 
organization in 1906 and afterward, in 1910, was elected to the vice presidency 
of the bank and later was made its president. Lie thus became widely known in 
financial circles and his broad experience, ability and enterprise brought him prom- 
inently to the front as a logical candidate for the office which he is now filling. 
He was elected in 1914 to the position of state treasurer for a four years' term 
and is a most capable custodian of the public funds, thoroughly familiar with the 
complex problems which devolve upon him in this connection. At one time Mr. 
Gates served as director of the. Hanover Canal Company, which was engaged in 
building canals in the Worland" district, and later he was one of the directors of 
the LTpper Hanover Water Association, a farmers' organization which took over 
the canal from the construction company. At present he is vice president and a 



HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 161 

director of the Western Xational Life Insurance Company, a Wyoming corpora- 
tion with headquarters in Cheyenne. For a time also Mr. Gates was engaged in 
ranging cattle, pursuing this business for about three years in the Thermopolis 
district, on Kirby creek, known as the Black Mountain country. 

On the 28th of August, 1908, Mr. Gates was married to Miss Nellie Foster, a 
daughter of A. L, Foster, of Iowa. Since becoming a resident of Wyoming, Mr. 
Gates has made judicious investment in property in this state. He is interested 
in beet farming and in stock raising and is one of the directors of the sugar com- 
pany owning and operating a factory at Worland, Wyoming, having been instru- 
mental in the establishment of the plant there. He is fond of hunting and fishing 
and enjoys various phases of outdoor life. 

Fraternally he is connected with the ]\Iascns as a Knight Templar and as a 
representative of the consistory and the Mystic Shrine. He is a Protestant in 
his religious faith. In politics he has always been an earnest republican and in 
191 1 was elected to the state legislature, where he took active part in furthering 
through legislative enactment many of the best interests of Wyoming. He has 
always been devoted to the welfare of the state and has been particularly active 
in advancing the development of Worland and the Big Horn basin, having seen 
the town grow from nothing to a city of fifteen hundred. Twice he has acted 
as its mayor in 1910 and 191 1 and at all times his aid and cooperation can be 
counted upon to further local progress or advance the welfare of the state. 
Broad-minded and public-spirited, his labors have been productive of great good 
and at the same time he has carefully and wisely directed his private business 
affairs, so that suljstantial results have accrued. His home is at Worland. 



GUY U. SHOEMAKER. 



Guy U. Shoemaker is the postmaster of Laramie and one of the promment 
and influential residents of that city. He was born in Elliott, Iowa, April 27, 
1882, a son of the late Charles E. Shoemaker, who was a native of Ilhnois and 
belonged to one of the old families of that state. His ancestors came originally 
from^Pennsylvania and were of German descent. The founder of the American 
branch of the family was one of six brothers who were among the earliest Dutch 
settlers of New Amsterdam and later representatives of the name became pioneer 
residents of Pennsylvania. Some of the family participated in the Revolu- 
tionary war. Charles E. Shoemaker, the father of Guy U. Shoemaker, was a 
successful Iowa farmer for many years, establishing his home in Alontgomery 
county, that state, in 1880. There' he resided for a considerable period, after 
which he removed to Adams county, where his death occurred in 1908, when 
he had reached the age of forty-eight years. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Elizabeth Unangst, is a native of Pennsylvania and a representative of 
an old Pennsylvania Dutch family. She still survives and is now residing in 
Corning, Adams county, Iowa, in 'the old home which she has so long occupied. 
By her marriage she became the mother of nine children, five sons and four 
daughters. 

Guy U. Shoemaker is the eldest of the family and. spending his bovhood days 
under the parental roof, he acquired his education in the public schools of Corn- 
ing, Iowa, passing through consecutive grades to the high school. In early man- 
hood or at the age of twenty he left the home farm upon which he had been 
reared and started out in the business world on his own account. He took up the 
profession of teaching, to which he devoted his energies from 1902 until 1908, 
following that profession in Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota, after which he 
removed to \\'voming. Prior to locating in Nebraska he spent one year in study 
in the Barnes' Commercial College at Denver, Colorado, in which he pursued 
a special course. 

It was in 'Sla.x. 1908, that Mr. Shoemaker arrived in Laramie a comparative 

Vol. II— 8 



162 HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 

stranger. He there entered the employ of the Union Pacific Railroad in the 
freight department and continued in that position for a year. He afterward 
became associated with the W. H. Holliday Company as bookkeeper in the gen- 
eral office and continued with the firm for almost four years. Later he was 
with the Pacific Life Insurance Company as district manager and followed 
the insurance business until June i, 1917, when he assumed the duties of 
poi-tmaster. to which he had been appointed by President Wilson. He is a 
stalwart democrat in politics and for the past four years has been very active 
in political and civic matters in Laramie. He was elected to the office of mayor 
of the city in November. 1914, and served for one term, at the end of which 
time he received public endorsement of his administration in a reelection. He 
remained the chief executive of the city until he resigned to accept the position of 
postmaster, in which office he is displaying the same spirit of loyalty and the 
same methods of tlioroughness and promptness which characterized his work as 
mayor. 

On the 20th of June, 1908, ^Ir. Shoemaker was united in marriage, at Sidney. 
Nebraska, to Miss Anna Gunderson, a native of that state and a daughter of 
Amund Gunderson, who belonged to one of the pioneer families of Nebraska. 
Mr. and Mrs. Shoemaker have one daughter, Loma Ellen, who was born in 
Laramie, November 25, 1914. 

Fraternally Mr. Shoemaker is a Mason, an Elk and a Knight of Pythias. 
He attends the Presbyterian church and he belongs to the Chamber of Commerce. 
His interests are broad and varied, touching the welfare of society in many 
ways, and he stands at all times for progress, improvement and advancement. 
His course has been steadily upward and he now occupies an enviable posi- 
tion in the regard of his fellow townsmen. 



GEORGE H. PAUL. 



George H. Paul, a representative of the Wyoming bar, practicing at Riverton, 
with a clientage that is extensive and of an importaiU character, was born in Cov- 
ington, Indiana, a son of George W. and Esther E. Paul. The father practiced 
law in the Hoosier state for about half a century and helped to frame the laws of 
Indiana during that period, becoming recognized as a potent force in shaping 
public thought and opinion along various lines. 

George H. Paul pursued his education in the Wabash College of Indiana and 
prepared for the bar, after which he was admitted to practice. He came to River- 
ton in November, 1906, lived in a tent for two months and opened his law office 
in 1907. Later he was appointed city attorney, in which capacity he served for 
several years. He was admitted to the bar of Wyoming, October 11, 1907, and 
has since practiced in Riverton. All days in his career have not been equally 
bright. Advancement at the bar is proverbially slow and there usually comes a 
time to every young practitioner when he must patiently abide his time, content 
with lesser cases and smaller fees. But as the years passed on Mr. Paul dem- 
onstrated his ability to handle important legal problems and today is in control 
of a splendid general practice. His wife stood with him through all the hard- 
ships of pioneering and through her assistance and encouragement they managed 
to weather the hard times, believing in the possibilities of this section of the 
country. That they made iin mistake in casting in their lot with the people of 
Riverton has been pro\cn in the years which have since come and gone. In 
his professional career Mr. I'aul has been retained in many of the important cases 
of this county. No one better knows the necessity for thorough preparation and 
no one more industriously prepares his cases than he. He is always courteous 
and deferential toward the court, and kind and forbearing toward the adversary. 
Fie examines a witness carefully and thoroughly but treats him with a respect 
which makes the witness cfrateful for his kindness and forbearance. His analysis 



164 HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 

of the facts is clear and exhaustive; he sees without effort the relation and 
dependence of the facts and so groups them as to enable him to throw their 
combined force upon the points they tend to prove. It is these qualities that 
have ifiade him one of the most successful lawyers in Fremont county. 

In Ohio, in 1904, Mr. Paul was married to Miss Emma Dallas. They are 
members of the Alethodist church and in his political views Mr. Paul is a 
republican. Well pleased with the west, he has passed through the pioneer epoch 
to the period of modern-day progress and prosperity. Today he is not only 
actively engaged in the practice of law, with a large clientage, but is also inter- 
ested in a number of corporations, together with oil interests, farm lands and 
property in the town of Riverton, and his labors have met a just and merited 
reward. 



HERBERT TAYLOR HARRIS, M. D. 

Dr. Herbert Taylor Harris is one of the distinguished physicians and surgeons 
of northwestern \\'yoming, being now successfully engaged in the practice of 
medicine and surgery at Basin. Liberal college and university training have well 
(lualihed him for the onerous and responsible duties that devolve upon him in this 
connection and he is continually promoting his knowledge and efficiency by wide 
reading and study and yearly post graduate work. 

Dr" Harris is a native of Illinois. He was born in Piasa. December 27, 1879, a 
son of William Johnston and Louise A. (Braley) Harris, the former a native of 
h'rankford, (Jnttirio, Canada, while the latter was born in Franklin, New Hamp- 
shire. The father was also a physician, devoting his entire life to the practise of 
medicine, and Dr. Herbert T. Harris was therefore, as it were, "to the manner 
born." He pursued his early education in the Wentworth Military Academy, 
from which he was graduated' with the class of 1897. He afterward attended the 
Creighton Medical College at Omaha, Nebraska, winning his M. D. degree upon 
graduation with the class of 1902. The following years he went abroad for study 
and for two years was a post graduate student in the University of \'ienna. 
Austria, and at London. England. 

Upon his return to the L'nited States in 1905 Dr. Harris came to Wyoming and 
entered upon the practice of his profession, in which he has since been constantly 
and successfully engaged. From 1905 until 1908 he was chief surgeon to the 
Sheridan Coal Company at Dietz and in the latter year he opened an office in 
P>asin, where he has since practiced. He is half owner of, and surgeon to, the 
Basin Hospital, Inc., and in addition he has a large private practice which makes 
ci;iistant demands upon his time and energies. He is also interested in ranching, 
in banking and in the development of the oil fields and his investments have been 
iuiHciously made. 

( )n the 27th of June, I(p6. in Carlinville, Illinois, Dr. Harris was united in 
marriage to Miss Cornelia Ryder Burton. A. B.. R. N., a daughter of Frank W. 
P.urton. an eminent lawyer and jurist, and of Anna (Robertson) Burton. To Dr. 
and Mrs. Haris has been born a son. Burton, whose birth occurred September 3, 
1907. 

In his political views Dr. Harris is a democrat, having supported the party 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise, but he has never been a poli- 
tician in the sense of office seeking and the only public positions which he has 
held have been in the strict path of his profession. Since 1910 he has been a 
member of the Wyoming state board of health, of which he was president, a 
fact that indicates his high professional standing. He is also city physician and 
county health officer of Basin and Bighorn county, respecti\ely, and he is the 
president of the Bighorn County Library Association. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Masons, while along strictly professional lines he is identified 
with the Northwestern Wyoming Medical Society, of which he was one time 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 165 

the president; the Wyoming State Me(Hcal Society, the American Medical As- 
sociation and the American College of Surgeons. Holding to the highest profes- 
sional standards, he has made his work of great value and benefit to his fellow- 
men, and colleagues and contemporaries speak of him in terms of the highest 
regard. 



THOMAS A. TAMES. 



It is a trite saying that there is always room at the top, but few men really seem 
to comprehend just what this means, or else they lack the ambition to put forth 
the persistent elifort that leads to success. Since starting upon his business career, 
however, Thomas A. James has steadily progressed and the steps in his orderly 
advancement are easily discernible. He has made wise use of his time, his 
talents and his opportunities. His entire career has been characterized by 
devotion to the duties entrusted to him and in later years by a most wise and 
careful use of the opportunities that have come to him. It is these qualities which 
have brought him to the presidency of the Superior Lumber Company of Rock 
Springs, in which connection he is controlling business interests of considerable 
extent and importance. He is a western man by birth, by training and preference 
and in his life displavs the enterprising spirit which has always been the dom- 
inant factor in the upbuilding of the great empire west of the ^lississippi. 

He was born in .Salt Lake City, Utah, .\ugust 12, 1865, and is a son of Thomas 
J. James, who was a native of Wales and in 1X5(1 left that little rock-ribbed country 
to become a resident of America. He diil not tarry on the Atlantic coast but 
immediately emigrated to the western section of the country, traveling overland 
by wagon train and becoming one of the pioneers of Utah. He was a carpenter 
and builder, and followed his trade successfully in that state throughout the re- 
mainder of his life, being called to his final rest in Salt Lake City in 1914, when 
he had reached the venerable age of seventy-nine years. His wife, who in her 
maidenhood was Elizabeth Newton, was a native of England, having been born 
in Manchester. She came to the new world with her parents during the latter 
part of the '50s and they also settled in Salt Lake City, where she formed the 
acquaintance of Thomas J. James, who sought her hand in marriage. To them 
were born nine children, of whom Thomas A. is the eldest. Mrs. James passed 
away many years before the death of her husband, departing this life in 1882, at 
the comparatively early age of thirty-nine years. 

Thomas A. James acquired his education in the public schools and his thorough 
training well qualified him for life's practical and responsible duties. Facing 
the business world, he turned to the trade which had occupied the attention and 
energies of his father, serving an apprenticeship at carpentering and after master- 
ing the business working as a journeyman for some time. He ad\anced in that 
connection until he was made foreman by the Union Pacific Railway Coal Com- 
pany and continued to serve in that way for a period of twenty years. It is well 
known that those who remain in the employ of a large corporation for an extended 
period are possessed of excellent qualifications for the position which they occupy, 
and that Mr. James was with the Union Pacific for two decades is indicative 
of his ability, fidelity and efficiency. He became a citizen of Rock Springs, Sep- 
tember 16, 1885, and with the exception of a period of two years has resided 
in the citv continuously since. It was during 1904 and 1005 that he made his 
home in Cassia county, Idaho, where he was engaged in farming. . At the end 
of that time, however, he sold his land there and returned to Rock -Springs. In 
1907, in connection with Victor Smith, Mr. James entered the lumber business 
and established what was then known as the Smith-James Lumber Company. 
This was a partnership concern and the business was thus continued for three 
years, at the end of which time it was incorporated under the style of the Superior 
Lumber Company, with Mr. James as the president and general manager. From 



166 HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 

the beginning their patronage has steadily increased and the business of the 
company is today very extensive and gratifying. They have now gained a place 
of leadership among the prominent lumber concerns of Sweetwater county. 

At Rock Springs, in 1890, Mr. James was joined in wedlock to Miss Mar- 
garet Syme, a native of Scotland and a daughter of James and Margaret (Holden) 
Syme, who were early settlers of Rock Springs, where they took up their abode 
in 1882. Her father is now deceased. To Air. and Mrs. James have been born 
si.x children, of whom five are still living: Thomas Irvin; \'iola, who was born 
in Rock Springs, September 15, 1895 ; Cecil, whose birth occurred in Rock Springs, 
March 14, 1900; Edwin James, who was born in Rock Springs, May i, 1905; and 
Leah, born in Rock Springs, February i, 191 1. The eldest child of the family 
died in infancy. 

Mr. James exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and meas- 
ures of the republican party and has been an active worker in its ranks. He 
has served as a member of the ctiy council for three terms and has utilized his 
official prerogatives to advance many interests of public concern and benefit. 
He stands at all times for those interests which are of most worth in the civic 
life of the community. He belongs to the Church of the Latter-Day Saints and 
is one of its presiding elders. Thoroughness characterizes him in all that he does 
and it has been by reason of his close application and unfaltering enterprise in 
business that he has steadily advanced. Shakespeare has said. "There is a tide 
in the afl:"airs of men which taken at the flood leads on to fortune." That ]\Ir. 
lames recognized the opportune moment is indicated by his growing success and 
"as the years have passed on he has steadily progressed until he is now one of 
the leading representatives of the lumber trade in his section of the state, con- 
trolling important interests as the president of the Superior Lumber Company. 



EDW.-VRD W. STOXE. 



Edward W. Stone, the efficient and popular mayor of Cheyenne, whose admin- 
istration is actuated by a public-spirited devotion to the general good, ranks, too, 
as a self-made man in the acquirement of business advancement and success. He 
was born in Belpre, Ohio, in February, 1862, a son of Loring and Johanna Stone. 
He acquired a common school education and afterward spent some time as 
a student in Oberlin College of Ohio, but the lure of the west was upon him and. 
hoping to find better opportunities and advantages in this new and growing sec- 
tion of the country, he made his way to Wyoming in 1884, arriving in Cheyenne 
on the I St of January. He sought a place in which to build his fortune, anxiously 
ever looking to the "future. He secured employment with J. S. Collins & Com- 
pany in the harness and saddlery business and remained with that house for 
several years. He was afterward in the employ of A. D. Kelley, a grocer of 
Cheyenne, and some time later entered into partnership with Pitt Convert and 
purchased the business of Mr. Kelley, which they conducted for a number of 
years but eventually sold out, having in the meantime won a substantial measure 
of success in that undertaking. In fact, they had one of the large and well 
appointed grocery stores of the city and enjoyed a gratifying patronage. On dis- 
posing of the grocery store Mr. Stone aided" in the organization of the Citizens 
National I'ank, which was incorporated in 1906 and of which he became the 
cashier. He served in that capacity until 1917, when he was elected to the vice 
presidency of the bank and is now its second executive officer. The bank has 
steadily p'rospered and expanded and is today one of the strong financial institu- 
tions of the state. Mr. Stone, as cashier and vice president, has contributed 
much to this result. He is thoroughly conversant with every phase of the bank- 
ing business and from the outset recognized the fact that the bank is most 
worthv of patronage which most carefully safeguards the interests of its depos- 




EDWARD W. STONE 



168 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

itors. His progressiveness therefore has been tempered by a wise conservatism 
that has produced excellent results. 

In i8S8, at Belpre, Ohio, Air. Stone was united in marriage to Aliss Mary- 
Harrison, a daughter of Captain Jack Harrison, a steamboat man. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Stone is a Knight of Pythias and has filled 
various otfices in the local lodge and has also served as grand chancellor of the 
state. He is likewise a prominent Mason, connected with both rites, having 
attained the Knight Templar degree of the York Rite and the thirty-second degree 
of the Scottish Rite. Lioreover, the honorary thirty-third degree has been con- 
ferred upon him. He has filled most of the chairs in the order and has been a 
most earnest worker in its behalf. Possessing a retentive memory, he has been 
able to easily acquaint himself with the various rituals and forms of work, so 
that in an official position he has been most efficient. Mr. Stone is a member of 
the Country Club and also of the Commercial Club of Cheyenne. He is fond of 
fishing and outdoor sports but never allows such things to interfere with his 
business duties nor the faithful performance of official service which he has 
undertaken. 

In politics he is an earnest republican and at the first election after the admis- 
sion of the state he was chosen county treasurer of Laramie county. He was 
later elected to the state senate and subsequently was again chosen to represent 
his district in the upper house of the general assembly and twice acted as presi- 
dent of the senate. In the fall of 1917 he was elected mayor of Cheyenne, which 
position he is now filling, and his administration is one which is giving imiform 
satisfaction. As an assemblyman he gave the most thoughtful and earnest con- 
sideration to all the vital questions which came up for settlement and lent the 
weight of his aid and influence to many progressive measures. 

He is a self-made man in the truest and best sense of the term. He has 
essentially formulated and given shape to his own character. While he has 
prospered in his business career, he has not made the attainment of material 
success the sole end and aim of life. On the contrary, he has ever been cognizant 
of his duties toward his fellowmen and to the community at large, and patriotism 
has been one of his marked characteristics — a patriotism that has been manifest 
in tangible effort for the general good. He is widely known throughout the state, 
his friends are manv and he is honored and respected by all. The record of few 
men in public life in Cheyenne has extended over a longer period and none has 
been more faultless in horior. fearless in conduct or stainless in reputation. 



B. V. KOONTZ. 



The machinery of government must be carefully controlled if public stability 
is to be maintained and progress augmented. Among those who have been chosen 
to handle the public interests of Washakie county is B. V. Koontz, now filling the 
office of sheriff, and his record in that position is characterized by the utmost fear- 
lessness and capability in the discharge of his duties. 

A native of North Carolina, he was born on the 14th of April, 1878, and is 
a son of John and Cornelia (Colvard) Koontz, both of whom were natives of 
Xorth Carolina, in which state they are still living. They became the parents of 
a familv of eleven children, eight of whom survive. 

B. \'. Koontz passed the period of his youth in North Carolina and acquired 
his education in its public schools. In fact, he continued his residence in the Old 
North state until 1905, at which time he had reached the age of twenty-seven 
vears. He then determined to trv his fortune in the west and made his way to 
Wyoming, settling first in Sheridan county. In igo6 he arrived in Washakie 
county, where he has since lived, and during the intervening period his fellow 
townsmen have come to regard him as one of the valued and representative citi- 
zens of his part of the state. In 1Q16 he was elected to the office of sheriff and 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 169 

is now acting in that capacity, making a most creditable record by the prompt 
and systematic manner in which he discharges his duties. He is also interested 
in oil lands in Wyoming and is actively connected with the cattle business, and 
in addition he owns eighy acres of irrigated land in the state. 

yir. Koontz has always voted with the democratic party and is a firm believer 
in its principles. When not in office, however, he has given the major part of 
his time and attention to business affairs and investments and whatever success he 
has achieved is the direct and merited reward of his own labors. He came to the 
west with little capital and is today the owner of valuable interests in Washakie 
county. He has made wise use of his time and opportunities and the careful di- 
rection of his business interests and investments has been one of the strong and 
salient features in winning for him his present day substantial success. 



JOSEPH IREDALE. 



Among those men who have been factors in the substantial growth and steady 
development of Rock Springs and of Wyoming, none have perhaps manifested 
a more active or helpful interest in the work of general improvement than Joseph 
Iredale, who is engaged in the automobile and garage business but who never 
fails to find time to advance general interests, cooperating heartily in all those 
plans which have to do with the benefit and upbuilding of city or state. 

He was born in ]\Iaryport, England, August 3, i860, a son of John and 
Matilda (Cooper) Iredale, who were also natives of that country, whence they 
came to America with their family in 1870 and settled in Stark county, Ohio, 
near Canton, where the father took up the business of steam engineering. He 
was a close personal friend of Major William McKinley, afterward presiclent of 
the United States. !Mr. Iredale continued a resident of Ohio for several years 
and later became a resident of Iowa and of Kansas, while in 1878 he removed 
to Carbon county, Wyoming. He always followed the business of steam en- 
gineering, being active along that line until his death. He passed away in 
Rock Springs in 1906, at the age of sixty-seven years. In the family were 
six sons and four daughters, of whom Joseph Iredale was the eldest. 

In the public schools of Ohio, Joseph Iredale pursued his education and later 
took up the machinist's trade, which he learned under the supervision of his 
father and grandfather, gaining expert knowledge along that line. His father 
had served an apprenticeship under Archibald Cooper, the maternal grandfather 
of Joseph Iredale and a well known locomotive engineer of that day who had 
come to America in i860. After mastering his trade ^Ir. Iredale continued to 
work along tliat line in Ohio and in Wyoming. He came with his father to 
Carbon county, this state, and later was employed in the Union Pacific machine 
shops at Rawlins but in 1882 took up his abode at Rock Springs, where he en- 
tered the employ of the Union Pacific Coal Company as engineer in the machine 
shops, continuing to act in that capacity until 1906. He resigned his position to 
accept the postmastership at Rock Springs and he filled the office from 1906 
until 191 5. He then resigned and established himself in the automobile and 
garage business, conducting his interests under the name of the Iredale Garage, 
which is now the leading establishment of the kind in Rock Springs. He has 
built up a business of large and substantial proportions, having a well equipped 
plant, and his trade has steadily increased as the years have gone by. 

In 1887 Mr. Iredale was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Paterson, of 
Rock Springs, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John L. Paterson, who were pioneers 
of Rock Springs, where the father is still living at the age of eighty-eight years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Iredale have become parents of three children : Fulton C, who 
was born in Rock Springs in 1892 and was graduated from the public schools, 
is now a thorough auto machinist and is in business with his father. Hazel, 
born in Rock Springs in 1894, was graduated from the public schools and the 



170 HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 

University of Wyoming and is now the wife of O. C. Johnson, a resident of 
Laramie. Lucille, born in Rock Springs in 1895, is a high school graduate and 
is the wife of F. A. Carlson. 

Politically Mr. Iredale is a republican and is recognized as one of the leaders 
in the local ranks of his party and in fact has had much influence over political 
thought and action in the state. F'or three terms he has been a member of the 
state legislature and for two terms has represented his district in the state sen- 
ate. As a member of the general assembly he has given the most thoughtful 
and earnest consideration to all vital questions coming up for settlement and 
has lent the weight of ItIs aid and influence to all those measures which he has 
believed of benefit to the state and has opposed with equal firmness and determin- 
ation all interests which he has deemetl ill achised legislation. In community 
affairs his labors, too, have constituted important elements of public progress 
and improvement. For eight years he was chief of the Rock Springs volunteer 
fire department and he is now president of the Rock Springs school board. 

His life record is a splendid illustration of the fact that no matter what the 
ad\antages or opportunities one has in youth, he must essentially formulate, 
determine and give shape to his own character. This Mr. Iredale has done 
and with the passing years his developing powers have brought him to a posi- 
tion of leadership not only in the business circles of his adopted city but in con- 
nection with the public interests of the state, and at all times he stands for prog- 
ress and improvement, his devotion to the general good being an unquestioned 
fact in his career. 



HON. TOHX McGILL. 



Hon. John McGill, of Laramie, was one of the well known pioneer settlers of 
Wyoming familiar with every phase of frontier life. He was for a long period a 
well known cattleman of southern \\'yoming but afterward lived retired, enjoying 
the fruits of his former toil until death claimed him, March 15, 191S. 

He was born in Lennoxshire. Scotland, July 16, 1846, a son of Quintin and 
Jessie (Allen ) Alcl^iill. who were natives of the land of hills and heather, where 
they spent their t-ntire lives, the father devoting his attention to the iron working 
trade. They passed away in Scotland at an advanced age after rearing a family 
of eight children. 

John McGill, who was the eldest of that family, pursued his education in the 
public schools of Scotland and remained a resident of that country until he 
reached the age of twenty years, when, attracted by the opportunities of the new- 
world, he crossed the Atlantic to Canada, where he was employed in various lines 
of business at several points in Canada until 1868. In May of that year he 
crossed the border into the United States and made his way westward to Cheyenne, 
Wyoming, since which time he was a resident of this state. For a time he was 
in the employ of Sprague, Da\is & Company, engaged in the manufacture of 
ties for the Union Pacific Railroad Company, and he continued in that line of 
work for about ten }ears. At the end of that time he established a ranch on the 
Big Laramie and turned his attention to stock raising, including cattle and sheep, 
in which business he continued successfully until he sold out in 191 5. In the 
meantime he had become one of the leading cattlemen of his section of the state, 
having large herds, and his business affairs were wisely and successfully con- 
ducted. As the years went on his financial resources increased as the result of 
close application and the intelligent direction of his labors and investments and 
thus he came into possession of a handsome competence that enabled him to retire. 
He removed to Laramie and purchased property, and there he then made his 
home. He was a director of the Albany County National Bank and all his invest- 
ments were most judiciously placed. 

On August 25, 1875, in Laramie, Wyoming. Mr. McGill was united in marriage 




%dy^ho^i<Xlj 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 173 

to Helen Patrick Owens, who passed away November 23, 1902, leaving four 
children. Thomas A., who resides in Albany county, is very successfully con- 
ducting a cattle ranch. He married Nora Rose Dodge and has three children, 
Mary Helen, Eva Agnes and Owens Dodge, the last born in May, 11)17. 1 he 
second in the family, Margaret Owens, is now Mrs. William Ir\inc. iier husband 
being a successful ranchman of Albany county. Jessie A. is the widow uf Oscar 
C. Soward, of Laramie, and has two children, Hortense Helen and Ida Margaret. 
Helen Owens, who completes this family, resides at home. On December 6, 1905, 
in Laramie, ^Ir. McfTill was again married, his second union being with ]\Irs. 
Fannie M. Settele. widow nf Luuis 1'. .Sfttelc :inil a daughter of James Marsh, who 
was the first lessee of the W vdiiiing ^talo penitentiary. The demise of Mrs. Fannie 
M. Alcliill occurred I'ebruary 25, lyio, and she left two children, Frances Eliza- 
beth and John Ouintin. The present Airs. McGill previous to her marriage on 
October 14. 1014. was Miss Emma Bear, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Bear, 
of Fulton, Illinois. 

In politics Air. AIcGill maintained an independent course. His value as a 
citizen was widely recognized and again and again he was called upon to serve 
in positions of public honor and trust. He was a member of the last territorial 
council and for six terms he represented his district in the state senate, being a 
member of the first state senate after \\'yoming"s admission into the L'nion. He 
gave careful consideration to the vital questions which came up for settlement and 
left the impress of his individuality for good upon many measures which had to 
do with the welfare and progress of the state. He served as president of the 
senate one term and was a member of the constitutional convention. For twelve 
years he filled the office of county commissioner and exercised his right of 
franchise in that connection for the benefit of his county in ways that have been 
most resultant and beneficial. Up to the time of his death he served as tax com- 
missioner. His religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church and he was 
a Mason having attained high rank in the Scottish Rite, belonging to the consis- 
tory. He was also a member of the Alystic Shrine and his life was a most faith- 
ful exposition of the teachings and purposes of the craft. As one of the pioneer 
settlers of Wyoming, Mr. McGill was widely known. He left home when a young 
man of twenty years without capital and became one of the prosperous residents 
of his adopted state. There was no phase of the pioneer development of this sec- 
tion of the state with which lie was not familiar and his reiuiniscences of the 
early days were interesting. co\ering the period when Wyoming was largely an 
open range and the cattlemen still rode at will over the country. He lived to 
witness remarkable changes as the years passed and he profited by conditions, 
wisely using his time, talents and opportunities until he became one of the well- 
to-do men of Laramie, honored and respected by all who knew him by reason of 
an ujiricdit life. 

\'\'iiii Air. McGill, who passed to the <rreat beyond Alarch 15. iqt8. there went 
to his reward one of those men whose life hisrory was part of the history of his 
state and community. He not onlv wrought for himself, but he labored for the 
benefit of others and he left hi< impress for good upon the annals of his commcn- 
wealth. He died in Denver. ('.il(ir,nl(i. while undergoing a surgical operation and 
his death was a shock to his famil\- which is hard for them to bear. Expressive 
of the high esteem in which Mr. AlcGill was generally held is an editorial which 
appeared one day after his demise. Alarch 16, 1918, in the Laramie Republican and 
which is appended to this sketch in full. The Laramie Republican writes of Mr. 
AIcGill's nchievemenls and virtues as a citizen as follows: 

"The death of TToii. John McGill has removed one of Wyoming's foremost 
citizens. During almost half a century he has been a conspicuous figure in the 
public life of the state. Born in Scotland and descending from sturdy stock of 
that rugged country, he was a man of iron. Sickness rarely troubled him and the 
doctors" found him a poor customer. When he decided to change his residence to 
America his first choice was the old and forbidding climate of Nova Scotia. Later 
he decided to take up his residence in Wyoming, settling at Tie Siding, where he 



174 HISTORY OF WYO.AIIXG 

swung the axe and worked in the timber. From this employment he turned to 
ranchnig, taking up land some forty miles north of Laramie, and there he raised 
his family, giving much of his time and his energy to matters pertaining to the 
public welfare. 

"As a private citizen his life was incorruptible. He was a good husband and 
a kind father. His neighbors profited by his example and precept. He aided 
them in their private affairs and in the transaction of their public business. In 
turn, they called upon him to represent them in various official positions. He 
served them as member of the legislature in several sessions. He was a countv 
commissioner and as such stood for econoiny and the wiping out of the county 
debt. During his service on the county board taxation was kept low and the 
people got value for every dollar expended. 

"Perhaps John McGill's greatest work was done in the legislature, where he 
served both in the house and senate. As senator he conducted Albany county's 
side of the controversy over the location of the agricultural college and never 
yielded an inch of the rights that he believed belonged to our people. On one 
occasion the representatives of Fremont county carried the bill for the location 
of the college at Lander clear through the house and it was up for consideration 
in the senate when Mr. iMcGill moved its indefinite postponement at an opportune 
time and it was killed. 

"Mr. McGill was the author of the anti-gambling law and was always found in 
keen opposition to vice and immorality. 

"In the early years of his residence in Wyoming he was an ardent supporter 
of the republican party, but in the later years of his life became estranged from 
that party and accepted office at the hands of the democratic administration, being 
first appointed to the position of state tax commissioner by Governor Joseph M. 
Carey in 191 1. He was reappointed by Governor Kendrick in 1915 and was hold- 
ing the position at the time of his death. He was an advocate of equality in tax- 
ation and at all times used his official power to bring about a level rate of taxation 
among all the counties. 

"His life work was the stock business, in which he was eminently successful 
in the management of both cattle and sheep. He had the faculty of making wise 
investment of his surplus and was largely interested in the Albany County Na- 
tional Bank and the First State Bank of this city. He leaves an ample fortune 
to his heirs and the priceless legacy of a steiling character." 



F. H. HARRISON, M. D. 



Dr. F. H. Harrison is today the oldest physician in \\'yoming in years of con- 
tinuous connection with the medical profession. He practices at Evanston, 
where he has remained since 1872. He has not only been identified with the 
science of medicine and surgery, however, for as a pioneer he has been active in 
manv of these movements which have led to the upbuilding and development of 
the state. He is familiar with all phases of Indian warfare and with all phases 
of frontier life and the history of Wyoming is to him an open book, for he has 
been a most active participant in events which figure most prominently in its 
annals. 

He was born in Toronto, Canada, April 2, 1842, and is a son of William and 
Mary (O'Connor) Harrison. The father was a native of England and in his 
boyhood davs made the voyage across the briny deep to Canada, settling near 
Toronto, where he engaged in farming, there maintaining his residence until 
his death, which occurred in 1849, when his son. Dr. Harrison, was a little lad 
of but seven years. The mother was born in Wexford, Ireland, and in child- 
hood became a resident of Canada, where she was married and continued to reside 
until called to the home beyond in 1904. She had at that time reached the eighty- 
fourth milestone on life's iournev. In the familv were five children, of whom 




)R. F. H. HAERISDX 



176 HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 

one daughter died at the age of sixteen years. The others are : \\'ilham, who is 
living in Brampton, Canada ; John, also located at Brampton ; and Nicholas, who 
still lives in Canada. 

The other member of the family is Dr. F. H. Harrison, of this review, who 
in his youthful days was a pupil in the public schools of Canada and afterward 
took up the study of medicine in Xew York city, matriculating in the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1866. 
His collegiate training was comprehensive and thorough, and thus well equipped 
for professional duties, he made his way westward to Colorado, crossing the 
plains w illi team anil wagon. He took up his abode at Gilpin, where he remained 
for a year and a half, and in November, 1867,. he removed to Cheyenne, Wyoming, 
where he practiced for a short time. He was afterward with the Union Pacific 
grading camps in his professional capacity and continued with the road until the 
line was extended to Evanston. He then went to the South Pass mines, where 
he followed mining for two and a half years, but in 1872 returned to Evanston, 
where he has since been in constant practice. Entering upon professional duties 
in this state in 1867, he is today the oldest physician in Wyoming. Through the 
intervening period of a half century he has kept in touch with the trend of modem 
professional thought and progress, acquainting himself with those discoveries 
which scientific investigation has brought to light. He is a well informed phy- 
sician and one thoroughly skilled in all departments of medical and surgical 
practice. In the early days he went through all the experiences that come to the 
frontier physician. He fought in many of the Indian wars and was with the 
posse in the Wind River campaign, in which P.lack Bear, the chief of the Arapa- 
hoes, was killed. The summer's sun and w inter's cold could not deter him from the 
faithful performance of his duties and at times he would ride for miles and miles 
over wind swept districts, facing the storms of winter, yet he never hesitated when 
his professional service was needed. He belongs to the Wyoming State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. Aside from his active connec- 
tion with the profession he has also extended his el¥orts into other fields and is 
now president of the Evanston National Bank, president of the Ev?.nston Drug- 
Company, a director of the Evanston Electric Light Company and president of 
the Harrison Stock Growing Company of Uinta County. In business affairs he 
has displayed sound judgment and unfaltering enterprise and his cooperation with 
any project has constituted an element in its growing success. 

On the 1st of January. 1875. Dr. Harrison was married to Miss Marv Creed, 
of E\anston, a daughter of 'Sir. and Mrs. James Creed, formerly of Dixon, Illi- 
nois. They have become the parents of three children who are still living and lost 
one son, James Francis, who died in 1914 at the age of thirty-seven years, while 
acting as manager of the Evanston Drug Company. Those who surx'ive are: 
Alary, who was born in Evanston in 1880 and is a graduate of the high school and 
of the Notre Dame Academy at South Bend, Indiana ; Helena, who was born in 
Evanston in 1884 and is a graduate of the high school of that city; and Frederick 
William, who was born in i88g and is also a graduate of the Evanston high school. 
He is now in business witli hi- father. 

Dr. Harrison is lonneetr.l through fraternal relations with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellow- and with the Masons. In the latter organization he has 
taken the degrees of lodge, chajjter and commandery. His political endorsement 
is given to the democratic party and he has several times been called upon to 
serve in positions of honor and trust. For four years he filled the offce of county 
commissioner and for six years was county treasurer of Uinta county. For one 
term he served in the second territorial legislature and at all times his aid and in- 
fluence have been given on the side of right, progress, reform and im]iro\ement. 
He is today one of the most \alued and prominent citizens of \\'\i)niing, standing 
very high in professional oiicles. and no story could contain inure exciting or in- 
teresting chapters than eiiul<l l)e found in the life record of Dr. llarrisnn if space 
would permit this to be written in detail. His memory goes back to the time when 
this entire region was but sparsely settled, when the Indians were more numerous 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 177 

than the white men, when the land had not been reclahned for the purposes of 
civihzation but remained in the primitive condition in whi^ it came from the 
hand of nature. His life activities constitute a connecting link between the primi- 
tive past and the progressive present and no history of Wyoming would be com- 
plete without his record. 



S. C. VANSKIKE. 



Throughout most of his life S. C. \'anskike has been identified with the 
banking business and is mnv assistant cashier of the Bank of Glenrock at Glen- 
rock. Wyoming. He is a naiixc nf Xclnaska, his birth having occurred in llreeley 
county, Alarch 2. i(S8y. his |jarLiUs 1)ciiig Charles and Carrie (Scott) N'anskike. 
The father was a natixe of Indiana, while the mother was born in Nebraska, 
where they are still living. They have become the parents of seven children, six 
of whom survive. 

S. C. \'anskike spent the days of his boyhood and youth under the parental 
roof anil licgan his education at the usual age as a pupil in the common schools 
of Scotia. Nebraska, there passing through consecutive grades to the high school, 
while sul)sci|uently he became a college student and thus was well qualified for 
life's practical and responsible duties. When his textbooks were put aside he 
turned his attention to the banking business, which he followed in Scotia, Nebras- 
ka, until August, lyi". when he removed to Glenrock to become assistant cashier 
of the Bank of Glenrock. 

The bank was organized on the 5th of June, 1917. with A. A. Spaugh as 
the president and was capitalized for fifteen thousand dollars. Air. \'anskike 
brought broad experience to bear in the performance of his present duties and 
his efforts are contributing to the growing success of the institution, wliieh has 
already become well established on a firm and substantial basis. He is a cour- 
teous and obliging official, doing everything in his power to please the patrons 
of the bank to a point that will not hazard the interests of the institution. 

In 1910 Mr. A'anskike was united in marriage to Miss Ella Sautter and to 
them have been born two children. Cecil and Zola M. 

Mr. X'anskike lielongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and to the 
Royal Neighbors. His pdlitical endorsement is given to the democratic party and 
he and his wife are meniliers of the Methodist Episcopal church. They have 
already won many warm friends during the period of their residence in Wyoming 
and he is regarded as a \aluable acquisition to the business circles of Converse 
county. 



FRANK G. ABEL. 



Frank G. Abel is sole proprietor of the Kemmerer Cigar Factory and is one of 
the representative business men of Lincoln county. He was born in Newport. 
Kentucky. December 17. 1859. a son of the late Henry Abel, a nati\e of Germany, 
who came to America in the early '50s, settling in Newport. Kentucky where he 
engaged in the manufacture of horseshoe nails. He was t|uite successful in the 
conduct of that industry and remained an active factor in the business circles of 
Newport throughout his remaining days. He passed away in 1S84. at the 
age of seventy-six years, while his wife died at the age of tifty-three years. She 
bore the maiden name of Sophie River and was a native of Germany, coming with 
her husband to the L'nited States. Their family numbered five children, of whom 
Frank G. was the third in order of birth. 

In the public schools of his native city Frank G. Abel pursued his education and 
when a }outh of fourteen began earning his living, serving an apprenticeship at the 



178 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

cigar maker's trade. He afterward followed that pursuit as a journeyman for a 
number of years. He came to Wyoming on the 117th of April, 1914, and estab- 
lished his present business at Kemmerer and is today conducting the only cigar 
manufacturing establishment in Lincoln county. He manufactures on an average 
of ten thousand cigars per month and confines his attention to the local trade. 
His chief brand is called the "Lincoln County Booster." He maintains the highest 
standards of excellence in the processes of his manufacture and that the factory 
is conducted along modern scientific and sanitary lines is indicated in the fact that 
he welcomes visitors at all times, allowing them to fully inspect the work that is 
being carried on. From the beginning his trade has shown a steady and satisfac- 
tory increase and is still growing. 

On the 17th of December, 191 1, Air. Abel was united in marriage at Ogden, 
Utah, to Miss Hattie Baer, a native of Peru, Indiana. Politically Mr. Abel is a 
democrat where national questions and issues are involved but casts an independ- 
ent local ballot, supporting the men whom he regards as best qualified for the 
offices they seek. Fraternally he is connected with the Order of Owls. He con- 
centrates his time and attention largely upon his business aiTairs and by capable 
management, close application and indefatigable energy has won a gratifying 
measure of prosperity. 



HON. JACOB M. SCHWOOB. 

Hon. Jacob Al. Schwoob is a resident of Cody, where he is well known as 
vice president and manager of the Cody Trading Company, but his interests have 
been far from local. Although he was the first treasurer of the town of Cody 
and its mayor, he has also been a most important factor in shaping the history 
of the state, and served most ably and creditably in the council chambers of the 
commonwealth, taking active part in the business transacted through legislative 
enactment. His course has ever been above suspicion. The good of the state 
he placed before partisanship and the welfare of his constituents before personal 
aggrandizement. He always commanded the respect of the members of the 
house and senate, and at home, where he is best known, he inspires personal 
friendships of unusual strength, all who know him having for him the highest 
admiration by reason of his good qualities of heart and mind. 

'Sir. Schwoob is of Canadian birth. He was born on the 8th of July, 1874, 
in \\'ellandport, Ontario, Canada, a son of William H. and Elizabeth (Steward) 
Schwoob. He was educated in the public schools of St. Thomas and in the 
collegiate institute of that place, after which he became identified with the hotel 
business in Buffalo, New York, where he remained from 1892 until 1898. In 
1897 he became a naturalized American citizen. 

It was in October, 1S98, that Mr. Schwoob became a resident of Cody, 
where he embarked in merchandising as a jiartner in the Cody Trading Company, 
of which he became manager. This is one of the most important mercantile 
enterprises of the state, conducting an extensive business which is wisely directed 
through the management and control of Mr. Schwoob, who is a man of keen 
discernment, of sound judgment and of indefatigable energy. His plans are 
always well defined and take cognizance of both the incidental and accidental 
circumstances of a case as well as its more important features. He therefore 
knew what to eliminate and what to retain and in thus discriminating between 
the essential and the non-essential he has carried his interests forward to notable 
success. He also became interested in promoting irrigation projects, including 
the Lakeview Irrigation Company oh the south fork of the Shoshone river. 

Mr. Schwoob is perhaps even more widely known through his official con- 
nections than in business life. He was called to office in Wyoming when elected 
the first treasurer of the town of Cody in 1900. In 1903 he was chosen mayor 
(if the citv for a two vears' term and in 190=; he was elected from Bighorn 




StL^/ yn-JUL^nj-^A- 



HISTORY OF WYO.AirXG 181 

county to the Wyoming state senate, where he was continued by reelection for 
eight years. He was president of the senate in 191 1. In the session of 1909, 
Mr. Schwoob and Charles E. Hayden, as well as D. E. Hallister and Dr. W. S. 
Bennett, created Park county, Wyoming, carrying through the house and senate 
the bill which resulted in the organization of the county. 

Fraternally Mr. Schwoob is well known as a prominent Mason, having attained 
the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in the Wyoming consistory, the 
Knight Templar degree in the commandery, while with the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine he has crossed the sands of the desert. He is also identified with the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and he is regarded, by reason of his business 
associations, his political activity and his fraternal connections, as one of the 
foremost men of the Big Horn country. 



PALMER I. BLACK. 



Business enterprise and commercial stability find expression in the life 
record of Palmer J- Black, who is the president and manager of the P. J. Black 
Lumber Company of Cheyenne. His business affairs are always wisely and 
sagaciously directed and his efforts are attended with a substantial measure of 
success that has made him one of the well-to-do residents of Laramie county. 

He was born in Windsor, Nova Scotia, on the i8th of February, 1857, and is 
a son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Mitchell) Black. The father was a farmer 
by occupation and in following that pursuit provided for the support of his 
family, which numbered five sons and two daughters. 

Palmer ]. Black, who was the third in order of birth, acquired his education 
in the public schools of Windsor but put aside his textbooks at the age of fifteen 
vears in order to learn the carpenter's trade. In 1873 he crossed the border into 
the LTnited States and took up his abode in Boston, Massachusetts, where he 
worked at carpentering for about nine years, or until 1882. He then removed 
to the west, being attracted by its boundless opportunities, and locating in Chey- 
enne, he again worked at the carpenter's trade for a decade, being thus employed 
from 1882 until 1892. He then began contracting and building, in which busi- 
ness he was active until 1901, and during that period he erected various sub- 
stantial structures of the city which have added much to its improved condition. 
In 1901 he purchased the business of the Hurd Lumber Company, which he con- 
ducted under the firm style of Black & Clark from 1901 until 1904. He then 
established the P. J. Black Lumber Company in 1905 and incorporated the busi- 
ness in 1913, since which time he has been president and manager. This com- 
panv not only conducts a large and profitable business at Cheyenne, but has also 
established a branch yard at Grover, Colorado, that is now managed bv a son 
of Mr. Black. 

On the 14th of April, 1883, occurred the marriage of Palmer I. Black and 
Miss Leonora B. Meese. They have two children, Norman R. and C. Arthur, the 
latter his father's associate in business. There is also one grandchild. 

In religious faith Mr. Black is a Congregationalist. His political endorse- 
ment is given to the republican party and he has been an active and earnest 
worker in its ranks, doing ever>'thing in his power to promote its growth and 
extend its influence. He served as a member of the Wyoming house of repre- 
sentatives from 1895 until 1897 and was a member of the \\'voming state senate 
from 1897 until iqoi and again from 1903 until 191 1, so that through an ex- 
tended period he has been closely associated with the legislative interests of 
Wyominc: and has had much to do with the enactment of various beneficial laws. 
Fraternally Mr. Black is a Mason. He has taken the thirty-second degree of 
the Scottish Rite, having been identified with Wyoming consistory since 1886, 
and he is also a member of the ]\Iystic Shrine. He likewise has membership with 



182 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is a most public-spirited citizen, 
one that subordinates partisan interests to the public good and self-aggrandize- 
ment to the welfare of the community. Those who know him, and he has a wide 
acquaintance, esteem him highly as a man of genuine worth. He is distinctively 
a man of affairs, outside of business interests, and has wielded a wide influ- 
ence, being numbered among the directors of public thought and action in his 
state. 



RIGHT REV. PATRICK A. McGO\ERX. 

Right Rev. Patrick A. McGovern, bishop of Cheyenne, was born in Omaha, 
Nebraska, October 14, 1872, a son of Patrick and Alice (McGearty) McGovern. 
Accorded liberal educational advantages, he was graduated with the Bachelor of 
Arts degree from Creighton University at Omaha, Nebraska, with the class of 
1891. Having determined upon the priesthood as a life work, he completed his 
theological course in Mount St. Mary's Seminary at Cincinnati, Ohio, and took 
holy orders in 1895. He at once entered upon the active work of the church, 
being assigned to duty as priest of St. Philonien's cathedral at Omaha, his native 
parish. There he remained from 1898 until 1907, when he took charge of St. 
Peter's church in Omaha, continuing to officiate in that parish until 1912. 

Bishop McGovern was also prominent in connection with many civic affairs 
during thai period and was especially active as a member of the board of directors 
of the Associated Charities. He was appointed by Pope Pius X to preside over the 
diocese of Cheyenne, being made bishop on the i8th of January, 1912. He was 
consecrated on the nth of April of that year and is now directing the interests 
of the church in Wyoming, where his labors are being attended with excellent 
results. He has studied the problems of the church from every possible stand- 
point and his directing hand has led to the substantial growth and development of 
the church in the many communities which come under his jurisdiction. 

A very interesting and exhaustive article on the history of the diocese has been 
furnished through the kindness of Bishop McGovern and appears in another 
part of this work. 



EDWARD T. STOREY. 



Edward T. Storey, until recently filling the position of office manager with 
the P. J. Black Lumber Company, but now city commissioner of Cheyenne, is 
one of Wyoming's native sons and the spirit of western enterprise is manifest in 
his career. 

He was born in Laramie, this state, July 2, 1887. a son of William and 
Anna (Smith) Storey. His father and mother were married in Laramie in 1883. 
The former has engaged in railroad work and is still active in railroad service, 
virith which he has been connected for thirty-five years. The mother is also 
living and has reared a family of six sons, of whom Edward T. of this review 
is the second in order of birth. 

In the public schools Edward T. Storey began his education and attended 
the Cheyenne high school. He then attended and was graduated from the Chey- 
enne Business College, having completed the course with the class of 1906. He 
worked for the Union Pacific Railroad Company in a clerical capacity for a time 
and afterward was engasjed in the United States government survey work in 
the summer of 1907, aiding in making the boundarv line northward. In the 
fall of 1908 he became connected with the Union Pacific Coal Company and was 
thus associated for a vear, after which he acceiited the position as office manager 
with the P. ]. Black Lumber Company. He filled this responsible ])osition uiUil 




BISHOP PATRia^; A. McGOVERX 



184 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

recently making himself thoroughly familiar with the work of the office and 
capably directing the interests under his control. He now acts as city commis- 
sioner, his former varied experiences well qualifying him for the onerous duties 
of the position. 

In religious faith Mr. Storey is a Catholic and he has attained the fourth 
degree of the Knights of Columbus. He is also connected with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, of which he is a past exalted ruler. In politics he is 
a democrat and has been elected to the office of city commissioner by the largest 
vote ever given a candidate to that position. He enjoys outdoor life, especially 
hunting and fishing, but he allows nothing to interfere with the faithful per- 
formance of his official duties. He is widely known in Cheyenne and his record 
as a man and citizen commends him to the confidence and goodwill of those with 
whom he has been associated. 



ANDREW McMICKEN. 



Andrew McMicken is recognized as one of the distinguished representatives 
of the Wyoming bar, practicing at Rawlins. In no profession is there a career 
more open to talent than that of the law and in no field of endeavor is there de- 
manded a more careful preparation, a more thorough appreciation of the absolute 
ethics of life or of the underlying principles which form the basis of all human 
rights. Unflagging application and intuitive wisdom and determination to fully 
utilize the means at hand are the concomitants which insure personal success and 
prestige in this great profession, which stands as a stern conservator of justice; 
and it is one into which none should enter without a recognition of the obstacles 
to be overcome and the battles to be won, for success does not perch on the 
fortune of every person who enters the competitive fray, but comes only as the 
direct result of capacity and unmistakable ability. Possessing all the requisite 
qualities of the able lawyer, Andrew McMicken has made for himself a prom- 
inent place at the Wyoming bar, practicing now as senior partner in the firm of 
McMicken & McMicken of Rawlins, successors to the firm of McMicken & Bly- 
denburg. 

He was born on McMicken avenue in Cincinnati, Ohio, November 13, 1851, 
a son of the late Andrew McMicken, a prominent lawyer and banker of that 
city and a direct descendant of Charles McMicken, who settled in Cincinnati in 
1732, when the city was but a tiny village. The McMicken family is of Scotch 
origin and was early founded in Pennsylvania. Representatives of the name 
participated in the Revolutionary war with the American army and the family 
became one of distinction and prominence in Pennsylvania and in Ohio. Andrew 
McMicken. Sr.. was married April 20. 1844, to Anna R. McDowell, a daughter 
of Joseph J- McDowell, a leading citizen of Cincinnati and member of congress, 
in which he served for two terms. His father was a Revolutionary war soldier 
and member of the Continental Congress and belonged to a distinguished fam- 
ily of Fairfax county, \'irginia, of Scotch descent. The IMcDowells were exten- 
sive planters and large slaveholders in the Old Dominion. The Mc]\Iicken fam- 
ily has ever been characterized by marked patriotism and loyalty. During the 
Mexican war Andrew McMicken, Sr., organized a company, of which he became 
major, but the company was not accepted for active service. He passed away in 
1893 and his wife, Mrs. Anna R. McMicken, died at Westwood, Ohio, in 1890 
at the age of sixty-six years and was laid to rest in Spring Grove cemetery, where 
so many members of the McMicken family are buried. A very prominent member 
of the familv was Charles McMicken, granduncle of Andrew McMicken of this 
review, one of Cincinnati's wealthy and well known philanthropists, the founder 
of McJNIicken University, now the University of Cincinnati. Upon his death he 
endowed this institution with the sum of eight hundred thousand dollars, an enor- 
mous amount in those frugal times of the past. He was so deeply imlnied with 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 185 

the importance of the cause of education that he even sent educators to Liberia 
to establish schools in that country to teach the natives. The city of Cincinnati 
erected in his honor a monument at a cost of ten thousand dollars, which was 
placed in the Spring Grove cemetery, where his remains were interred and where 
all of his ancestors are buried. It was a public recognition of the value of his 
contribution to the general welfare and upbuilding of his city, where he exerted 
a marked influence over many events that have left their impress upon the history 
of that community. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew McMicken, Sr., 
were born nine children, of whom four have departed this life, while the living 
are : Mrs. Benjamin P. Runkle, widow of the late lienjamin P. Runkle. a noted 
Civil war commander, who resided in Highland county, Ohio, where .Mrs. Runkle 
still makes her home; Andrew, of this review; Mary, the wife of William M. 
Strowbridge, of Cincinnati; and Jennie, who resides with her sister, Airs. Strow- 
bridge; and Lucy Belle Hine, of Portland, Oregon. 

Andrew McAIicken pursued his education in Jameson's private academy at 
Keokuk, Iowa, and spent two years in study at Princeton before entering the Cin- 
cinnati Law School, from which he was graduated with the LL, P.. degree as a 
member of the class of 1872. He entered upon the practice of his chosen profes- 
sion at Atchison, Kansas, where he remained for several years, and then returned 
to Cincinnati, where he entered the county prosecutor's office as an assistant. He 
spent four years in that connection, al tlic end of which time ill heahh prompted 
him to resign and he sought a changr nf cliniaie, returning to the wtst. I-Hr eight 
years he was engaged in the cattle bu^iiKss, >pcnding much of his time on the trail 
and on the range, and in the outdoor life fully recovered his health. He came to 
Wyoming in 1881, arriving in Rawlins on the 5th of Alarch, and through the in- 
tervening period to 1889 became thoroughly familiar with every phase of ranch 
life. He then reentered upon the practice of law, in which profession he has since 
been continuously and successfully engaged. For a considerable period he prac- 
ticed in connection with Judge Blydenburg as a member of the firm of ]\IcMicken 
& Blydenburg, but at the present time is senior partner in the firm of McMicken 
& McMicken. While he was well grounded in the principles of common law when 
admitted to the bar, he has continued through the whole of his professional line 
a diligent student of those elementary principles that constitute the basis of all 
legal science and this knowledge has served him well in many a legal battle before 
the superior and appellate courts, where he has successfully conducted many cases. 
He always prepares his cases with great care. If there is a close legal point in- 
volved in the issue it is his habit to thoroughly examine every authority within 
his reach bearing upon the question and this makes him a most dangerous adver- 
sary. When he comes to the discussion of the most intricate questions before the 
court it is perhaps then that his greatest powers as a lawyer show to the best ad- 
vantage. With a thorough knowledge of the subjects he discusses and of the - 
legal principles applicable to them, his addresses before the courts are models of 
clearness and logic. 

Mr. McMicken has always affiliated with the democratic party and is of the 
Jeffersonian type. He has ever taken an active part in support of the principles in 
which he believes and is regarded as one of the party's councillors. On various 
occasions he has been a candidate for office. In 1890 he was its candidate for the 
state senate. He led the ticket, receiving a vote far in advance of the normal dem- 
ocratic vote, but was defeated, and again he went down with the entire ticket when 
a candidate for county prosecuting attorney, losing, however, only by the small 
margin of forty-four votes, notwithstanding the fact that the county is over- 
whelmingly republican. He was also defeated as a candidate for the Constitu- 
tional Convention and yet the fact that he has always run ahead of the party vote 
is indicative not only of his personal popularity but also of the confidence reposed 
in him as a citizen and the recognition of his professional ability and power. He 
served as county prosecutor of Carbon county for two terms, winning at the first 
election over his opponent by six hundred and fifteen votes and at the second elec- 
tion by a majority of three hundred and fifteen votes. He also served as city attor- 



186 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

nev of Rawlins, being elected in 1893 and continuing in the office for a number of 
years, during which time he revised the major portion of the city ordinances. He 
afterward again served as city attorney from 1908 until 1914. As county pros- 
ecutor he successfully convicted more than fifty criminals, who were sentenced to 
the state penitentiary, and while he was city prosecutor he collected for Rawlins 
many thousands of dollars in fines and jail sentences for violators and during his 
entire term of office as city and county prosecutor he had only three cases reversed 
and holds the unchallenged record of being the ablest prosecutor the county of 
Carbon has ever had in all of its history. He has been connected with many 
notable cases, being attorney for the defense in the trial of T. O'Hama. a Jap- 
anese, charged with murder and convicted in May, 191 6. and sentenced to the death 
penalty on the 28th of October. Mr. McMicken entered the case in September, 

1916, after it had been defended by other lawyers and sentence had been passed. 
He reopened the case by appeal to the supreme court, the latter granting a new 
trial, in which Mr. McAIicken succeeded in proving the innocence of his client, 
who was coni]iI<Ltfl\- \ indicated and discharged. 

Mr. McMicken was married in Rawlins to Miss Helen Cannon and they have 
become the parents of two children: Andrew Revelle. who was graduated from 
Harvard with the LL. B. degree in June, 1916. and who on the ist of November. 

1917, became a member of the new firm of McMicken & Mc^NIicken ; and Ann 
Helen, who is at home. 

Mr. McMicken is prominent in Masonic circles. He has filled all of the chairs 
in the Blue Lodge save that of worshipful master and has attained high rank in 
the order, being now a past illustrious potentate of Korein Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine. He has also taken the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite. He 
belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, of which he 's ? past exalted 
ruler." and he has been chancellor commander of the Knights of Pythias. 

Attracted to the west for the benefit of his health, he has found here a splendid 
field for professional activity and has become a prominent factor in the develop- 
ment, progress and upbuilding of the section in which he has located. Like his 
ancestors, who were builders of Cincinnati, he has become one of the builders, of 
a growing and enterprising western city, his eflforts along many lines being far- 
reaching and beneficial. All who know him attest his worth in public connections 
and recognize the fact that he has carved his name high on the keystone of 
Wyoming's legal arch. 



NATHANIEL KIMBALL BOSWELL. 

No tale of fiction can match in strangeness or in interest the life record of 
Nathaniel Kimball Boswell. perhaps the best known among the old pioneers 
living todav in W'voming. Not tn know Mr. I'.oswell in this state is to argue one's 
self unknown, and he commamls the liigliest respect and confidence of all with 
whom he has been brought in contact. He served as the first sherift" of .\lban\- 
county and was among "the best known of the old-time cattlemen of the state. 
After nearlv sixty years on the plains he has never lost the refinement that came 
with his boyhood environment. Every experience of pioneer life is familiar to 
him and he 'relates the story of the early days in a most interesting manner, cajia- 
ble of holdinsr the attention of his auditors for hours. 

Nathaniel Kimball Boswell was born in Haverhill, New Hampshire. Novem- 
ber 4. 1836, and has therefore passed the eighty-first milestone on life's journey. 
His parents were John and Lucinda (Pike) Boswell, both of whom were natives 
of New Hamnsbire, where they spent their entire lives. The father was a descend- 
ant of a well known Scotch family that was established in .America in early 
colonial times. The mother was also a representative of an old New England 
family of Scotch and English lineage. They became parents of twelve children. 
six sons and six daughters. 




NATHANIEL K. BOSWELL 



188 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

Nathaniel K. Boswell in early life attended the schools of Haverhill, New 
Hampshire, and at the age of seventeen years he went to Michigan and afterward 
to Wisconsin, where he engaged in the lumber business. While at work on 
Green Bay, Wisconsin, on the 4th of December, 1857, in an open ^Mackinaw 
boat, the boat was capsized. Three men were in the boat on a trip to an island 
in Green Bay to cut timber. Two of the number were drowned and Mr. Boswell, 
the other occupant of the boat, saved himself by climbing on the boat and after 
fifteen hours reached land. As a consequence of the exposure, however, he 
suffered a hemorrhage of the lungs and on the advice of an eminent specialist of 
New York city he came to the west in order to live in the open. In 1857 ^^ l^^^ 
Wisconsin and proceeded to Davenport, Iowa, from which point he began the 
overland trip to Boulder, Colorado. He remained in the vicinity of Boulder for 
a short time and then with five companions proceeded to inspect the country, 
living out of doors. He went to Gilpin county, Colorado, where he engaged in 
mining and in the lumber business, remaining there for eight years, during which 
time his health was fully restored and he became verj- vigorous and robust. In 
1867 he removed to Cheyenne, ^^'yoming, and opened the first drug store of 
the city, conducting the business from 1868 until 1870. At the same time he 
carried on a drug store in Laramie, which was the first establishment of the kind 
in that city. He had traded a mining claim for a stock of drugs, but having no 
experience as a druggist he employed clerical assistants to aid him in the conduct 
of the business, in which he remained for four years. In the meantime he did 
government contract work and was also appointed the first sherift' of Albany 
county, which at that time had a length of four hundred miles. He likewise 
engaged in ranching, raising cattle and horses. He still owns his ranch prop- 
erty and is conducting the business on an extensive scale. While acting as sheriff 
of Albany county Mr. Boswell became famous as a menace to the bad men of 
the countn.' and did much to put down the lawlessness of this section of the 
western country. For a number of years he filled the office of deputy United 
States marshal and again was a bulwark of defense on the side of law and order. 

In 1857 Mr. Boswell was married in Elkhorn, Wisconsin, to Miss Martha 
Salsbury, who was born in the state of New York and died in Laramie in 1896. 
She was a daughter of Mr. and J\Irs. Roswell Salsbury and to the marriage was 
born one child, Minnie A., who was born in Laramie and pursued her educa- 
tion in the public schools and in the University of Wyoming. She married C. 
D. Oviatt. Mr. Oviatt has been a member of the state legislature for the last 
two terms and is a well known cattle rancher of Albany county, prominent in 
business and public life. To Mr. and Mrs. Oviatt have been born two children : 
Clarence, who is attending the University of Wyoming at Laramie ; and Martha, 
also a student in that school. 

Mr. Boswell is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He was one of the first 
representatives of the order in Colorado and aided in organizing the first Masonic 
lodge both of Colorado and of Wyoming. At different times he has been con- 
nected with the Masons of Cheyenne and of Laramie. 

His life record reads like some tale of fiction, there are so many exciting ex- 
periences and interesting events in connection therewith. As sheriff in the early 
days he was possessed of not a shadow of fear and on many occasions has faced 
famous gunmen, outlaws and bandits and horse and cattle thieves. He never 
undertook to arrest a single man but what he accomplished his purpose. On 
one occasion he had an encounter with a noted character by the name of Jack 
Watkins, who was not a criminal in the usual sense of the term but was most 
lawless when intoxicated. He was a remarkable shot and could hit any object 
he desired and he was known to be as brave as he was reckless. Mr. Boswell was 
at that time deputy LTnited States marshal and also sheriff of Albany county. 
Wliile visiting Judge Jones in Cheyenne who was his friend and later was dele- 
gate in Congress, Jack Watkins was on one of his proverbial sprees and was 
shooting up the town. He especially delighted in shooting out the lights in a 
noted dance hall. The judge called Mr. Boswell's attention to the fact and re- 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 189 

quested that he go and arrest Watkins, but as this was not his territory he de- 
clined. He was then, however, deputized as a United States marshal and papers 
were handed him, giving him the authority to assist the sheriff of Laramie county, 
located at Cheyenne, who was sent with Air. Boswell but was apparently afraid 
of Watkins. As the two men approached the side street they saw two fellows 
facing each other with drawn revolvers, having an argument. The Laramie 
sheriff urged Mr. Boswell to arrest Watkins, one of the men. In the excitement 
Mr. Boswell had mistaken a deputy sheriff for Watkins and pounced upon him, 
while Watkins walked away and entered a grocery store. On learning his mis- 
take Mr. Boswell followed Watkins, who covered Mr. Boswell with two revolvers 
and told him not to approach nearer or he would kill him. Without the least 
hesitation Air. Boswell told him that he would not fire and that if he did five 
hundred men would riddle him with shot. He then proceeded to read the warrant 
to him, after which Watkins said: "Who in hell are you anyway?" Mr. Bos- 
well told him, whereon the criminal ejaculated, "So you are Boswell. I heard 
about you and I like your nerve. Now, if you will protect me from this mob I 
will submit to arrest." On being assured that Air. Boswell would do so Watkins 
handed over his gun and accompanied him toward the jail. On the way, how- 
ever, the mob followed and three men, having secured lariats, demanded the 
prisoner. At this Air. Boswell handed the prisoner his revolver again and so 
great was the fear of this remarkable shot that the crowd scattered in all direc- 
tions. After this no further difficulties occurred and the man was put in jail, 
but was immediately released after giving bond. Ever afterward Air. Boswell 
had a true friend in Watkins, whom he arrested dozens of times afterward, but 
the man never resisted, always going peaceably along. 

About the 23d day of April, 1868, the Union Pacific began the sale of lots 
in Laramie. The survey of the town had been made some months before. This 
was the terminus of the great national highway and every man had money enough 
to buy a lot in Laramie and anxiously awaited the event. For a month prior 
to the sale there had been camped on the plains around the new townsite from two 
to three hundred people in tents and many more sleeping in the open. With 
the sale of lots began the settlement of Laramie and the rapidity of its growth 
may be conjectured from the fact that within one week from the day the first 
lot was sold over four hundred lots had been sold and in less than two weeks h\e 
hundred buildings were being erected, buildings of all designs and descriptions. 
On the lOth of May, 1868, the first train came into Laramie and discharged its 
freight, which included all manner of household goods and building materials, 
Jew peddlers with fancy goods and packs, crockery, cook stoves, wines, liquors, 
cigars, and riding on flat cars in the midst of their household eft'ects were men, 
women and children. In about three months Laramie had grown to a popula- 
tion of five thousand, including about one thousand strong, earnest, daring men 
ready to face any danger or undertake any perilous task if they could "in hon- 
orable manner better their fortunes and win homes for their families. There 
were about a thousand more who were ready to adopt any policy, honorable or 
otherwise, that the balance might wish. There were a few good noble women but 
the majority of the population were gamblers, thieves, highwaymen, ruthless cut- 
throats and women of the underworld. Such was the beginning of l^iraniie and 
Mr. Boswell as a citizen and as an official stood for law and order, right and 
justice, and by his bravery did nmch toward developing the high standards of citi- 
zenship which have long characterized the old capital. 

His is indeed a notable career and there is no phase of western pioneer life 
and experience with which he is not familiar. He has known personally most 
of the noted men in this section of the west and is a personal friend of Theodore 
Roosevelt and other eminent people who have visited this section of the country. 
He has always been a great horseman and his life in the open has undoubtedly 
been one of the strong features in preserving his rugged health. His acquaintance 
is indeed broad and he is respected in the highest measure by all with whom 
he has come in contact. His life history if written in detail would present a 



190 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

most accurate picture of the development of this section of the country. Though 
he has met many lawless men the innate refinement of his nature has been pre- 
served and his high standards of life have been maintained. He has long been 
regarded as one of the foremost ranchmen of his section of the country and 
there have come to him "the blest accompaniments of age — honor, riches, troops 
of friends.'' 



ROBERT WALKER HALE, M. D. 

Dr. Robert Walker Hale, of Thermopolis, whose high professional standing 
is indicated in the fact that he is now occupying the presidency of the W'yoming 
State ^ledical Society, his position, moreover, indicating the warm regard enter- 
tained for him by his professional colleagues and contemporaries, was born in 
Scotland county, Missouri, near the town of Downing, July 24, 1869, being the 
youngest in a family of ten children whose parents were Lewis and Sarah Hale, 
natives of the state of Tennessee. On the ist of January, 1849, they left their 
native state and removed to Missouri, traveling by boat down the Ohio river to 
Cairo, Illinois, thence by flatboat up the Mississippi to Canton, Missouri, where 
they landed because of the fact that they had no funds with which to travel 
farther. The father cut cordwood in order to get money to purchase provisions 
and when he had done so walked to northern Missouri, where he borrowed an ox 
team and a lynch pin wagon and returned for his mother and grandmother, who 
had accompanied him, and a negro woman whom they had brought with them. 
They located near the old homestead upon which Dr. Hale was born and after a 
few years made selection of their present home and have since resided on that 
farm, covering a period of about sixty-two years. Mr. Hale was one of the pioneer 
settlers of that region, experiencing the hardships and privations incident to 
pioneer life. He was of Scotch-Irish descent and of the hardy pioneer type. He 
supported the family by working for fifty cents per day, accepting his pay in meat, 
grit and the food that could be had in those days, scarcely ever receiving any 
money for his work. The clothes of the family were home made. Mrs. Hale 
weaving the cloth. In the course of time Mr. Hale acquired five hundred acres 
of land and it was upon that farm that the Doctor was born and worked until 
he had attained his majority, it being the law at that time that a man was not a 
man until he reached his twenty-first year. The school advantages ofifered farm 
boys in those days were in many instances very limited. It was necessary to 
clear the timber from the home farm and this made much hard work for the 
father and sons, there being three brothers older than Dr. Hale. Farming, as it 
was done in those days brought out all there was in a boy. The Doctor was drilled 
in that work from early life and at the age of twenty-one years he was strong, 
rugged and active. As his older brothers took up their abode upon the home farm 
there was not room for him and it became necessary for him to leave home arid 
choose some other line of work. He decided upon the medical profession and in 
September. 1890, he entered the Missouri Medical College at St. Louis, Missouri, 
and on March 27, 1893, was graduated from that institution with high honors. 

After returning home for a short visit Dr. Hale located in Macon county, 
Missouri, at a coarmining town called Ardmore, where he spent the first year and a 
half of his professional career. He was in the employ of the Kansas & Texas 
Coal Company. On the 7th of October, 1804, he bade good-bye to his parents and 
friends and boarded the train for Sheridan, Wyoming, where he arrived on the 
evening of the 9th. When the Doctor left home his mother asked him if he in- 
tended to return. She had buried all of her children at that time but three sons and 
she felt that she was almost giving up another one in having him go so far. Four 
daughters and one son of the itamily had been victims of tuberculosis. The 
mother mav have thought Dr. Hale feared the disease and, not wishing to speak 
of it to her! was going west on that account. Among the last words which she said 



HISTORY OF WYOAIIXG 193 

to him when alone were: "My boy. no matter where you go, no difference where 
you are, ahvays do right and the world will respect you."' On the way to the 
train the father .said: "Did you ever think of connecting yourself with a good 
secret order? In your business it would do you no harm." The father himself had 
been an honored member of the Masonic fraternity for over forty years. This 
advice Dr. Hale heeded and fully appreciated in later years. His father con- 
tinued : ";\Iy son, if you never return to live among us. I wish to say to you. never 
make an agreement you know you cannot keep. Keep your credit above reproach 
and you will never see the time you cannot get all the financial aid necessary to 
properly conduct your business. Be- honest, be faithful, be true." Mr. Hale was 
a man of sterling integrity whose word was ever as good as his bond. Early in 
life he inculcated in his children the necessity of being honest. His advice was 
ever found to be useful and Dr. Hale in later years has come to a full appreciation 
of the fact that no man was ever born of better parents or received better advice. 
His father and mother were truly types of their time. Like giant oaks of the 
forest, they set examples worthy of all mankind. The father spent seventy-eight 
years in a most useful career and the mother still survives, having reached the 
age of eighty-six in September, 191 7. 

Arriving in Sheridan. Wyoming, Dr. Hale was advised to visit the Big Horn 
basin with a view of locating there. He rode a cow pony over the Big Horn 
mountains by way of Dome lake and to Hyattville, to Bonanza and to Otto, where 
he decided to locate and engage in practice. He returned to Sheridan, ordered his 
books, instruments and supplies shipped at once and while waiting for them to 
arrive the snow fell to such a flepth that he could not cross the mountains that fall, 
for it was late in October. Pie then reshipped his supplies to Billings. Montana, 
and found on arriving there that the only way to get into the basin was by freight. 
In ihii-c (la\< nian\- ]ieoplc from the basin went to Billings for their winter sup- 
pli(--. I luring the time he waited to catch a freight outfit he was invited to visit the 
B:llin<^- ( 'lull in c(ini|iany with Dr. J. H. Rhinehart. He visited the club and made 
the ,ic(|ii,Lintance of such men as Otto Frank, who was then the owner of the 
Pitchfinl< I'.ittle Company on the Greybull river in Wyoming, above Meeteese; 
Henry I.ovell, who owned the M. L. Cattle Company on the lower Big Horn 
river, anrl manv others of that type who had helped make this country habitable. 
They employed many men in the conduct of their cattle ranches and many of 
their punchers were afterward patients of Dr. Hale. In conversation with the 
Doctor in Billings Air. Lovell gave him some discouraging advice by saying: 
"Youns man. you will star^-e in the Big Horn basin trying to practice medicine. 
Se\eral doctors have located there and all have given it up." After waiting seven- 
teen da\ s Dr. Hale was able to get a freighter to load his goods and thev started 
for the l)asin. It was cold by this time, about the ist of November. Dr. Hale 
had ne\er camped out and slept on the ground in the snow but had hitherto oc- 
cupied a feather bed. After eight days of travel he landed twenty-five iniles above 
the present site of Codv and after a month got a man to take his goods to Otto. 
He purchased a pony that the owner called Twenty and paid twenty dollars for 
him. a pony that at one time belonged to the Seventy-one outfit that in the early 
davs ranged its herds on the Powder river. Long before the time of this transac- 
tion the pnnv had been given his freedom and turned out on the range to make 
food for the covotes. Dr. Hale, havine faith in his friend, who had been so kind 
as to hnul him from Billines, aslcing him to li\e with his f.aniilv until he could 
get to Otto, believed the ponv was a bronco but he soim I'roved his age and it 
required three davs to make the journev from the ranch to Otto. The pony gave 
out and one dav Dr. Hale met a man who was gfoins to where Twentv had ranged 
and the latter eave the mm live dollars to take the pony back and turn him out 
so he could die among- friends. .Soon a man came alonff who loaned Dr. Hale a 
horse called Cronpv that afterward made man^• notable trios and carried the Doctor 
across the Bad Lands in the Bie Horn basin to see manv a sick or injured oatient. 
A horse of that kind seemed almost human. It would graze around wherever 
you drooned the reins and was never known to l)uck. Croppy could swim a river 



194 . HISTORY OF WYOMING 

like a duck. He would also raise his head high in the air, strike a long, swinging 
lope and carry his rider at the rate of ten miles per hour for hour after hour, never 
seeming to tire or to weary after his trip to the bedside of a suffering mother or 
a sick child or a crippled cow puncher. Dr. Hale certainly appreciated the use 
of that animal and the kindness of the owner who had loaned him. From the 
head waters of the Big Horn river and its tributaries this horse carried the Doctor 
from east to west, north to south, where his services were needed. For two 
years he alone covered that part of the great American desert on the back of the 
horse in answer to the call of duty. 

Dr. Hale did not starve, as Mr. Lovell had predicted, for he did not belong 
to the type of men who starve. I-ater he made the acquaintance of Hon. J. L- 
Torrey, who was then president of the Ei^ibar Cattle Company, located on Owl 
creek, above ThermopoHs. Colonel Torrey said: "Tf you need any assistance in 
your work, a horse or men when you are trying to reach the bedside of a sick 
man or woman or an injured puncher, use the whole Embar outfit if you need it 
and if you kill a horse under such circumstances it is already paid for."' This one 
incident alone will account for the fact that men and women coming from the east 
to the west seldom care to return to their native state. During the years of his 
residence in the basin, from 1894 until 1917. these acquaintances made under such 
circumstances, have lasted in many instances and are valued beyond price. 

Dr. Hale located in Otto and as there were only a few log shacks and no ac- 
commodations to be secured it became necessary to accept what he could get. Lou 
Blakesley edited the Otto Courier in one of these log huts, his family lived in 
another, 'and Mr. Blakesley offered the Doctor sleeping room in the Courier office, 
so he accepted it. The room was twelve by sixteen feet, the roof was of dirt, the 
walls were daubed with mud. It seemed that the mud supply ran short, for there 
were many spaces where one could see through, it being unnecessary,' to go to the 
door or window to know who was passing. You could look out between the logs. 
The door was made with upright boards and lacked several inches of reaching the 
floor. The bed was a tick of straw, none too smooth, but it was the only thing 
that the Doctor could secure. When morning came the bed was shoved under the 
case containing the type used in the printing of the Courier. True to western 
hospitalitv, no charge was made for the use of this bedroom. The Doctor was in- 
vited by i\Ir. lUakesley to take his meals with them and did so. .All of this un- 
solicited hospitality was much appreciated by him and showed the goodwill of 
the people, who were glad to have a doctor locate among them. Frank S. Wood 
built a drug store building for the Doctor in the summer of 1896, it being the 
first frame building of the town, and the establishment became the first pioneer 
drug store of the basin. 

On the 28th of September, 1898, Dr. Hale was married to Eltie May Faust, of 
Otto, who lived only until August 25, 1899. In October of that year the Doctor 
returned home to visit his parents and on the night of the 17th the drug store 
and his residence were destroyed by fire. Nothing was saved. The building was 
uninsured and the labor of years was thus lost in a few moments. The Doctor 
afterward returned to Otto,' closed up his business and in May, 1900. removed 
to Thermopolis. where he has since resided. The day following his arrival in 
Thermopolis, May 13th, IMartin McGrath, who was then mayor, appointed him 
city health officer and this position he has filled since ^lay. 1900. and as long as 
Thermopolis was a part of Fremont county he was appointed from time to time 
to act as county health officer. \\'hen Hot' Springs county was organized he was 
appointed by the state board as county health officer. Dr. Hale was again mar- 
ried December 24, 1905, when Coral B. Bowman, of Macomb, Illinois, became 
his wife. Soon after taking up his residence in Thermopolis, Dr. Hale organ- 
ized the Thermopolis Pharmacy, which he successfully conducted until 1906. when 
he sold the drug .store to devote his entire time to the practice of his profession. 
He built up a splendid practice, which at times involved making some of the 
longest, hardest calls to distant points ever made by any physician in the state. 
He handled the work on the construction of the Burlington Railroad from Kirby 




RESIDENXE OF ROBERT W. HALE 



196 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

to Thermopolis and at the same time was company physician for the Crosby 
coal mines and the Wyoming Sulphur Company, besides doing much work both 
in Thermopohs and the surrounding country. While thus engaged he had' found 
time to make frequent visits to his parents and to the post-graduate schools of 
the eastern cities. He has never been a candidate for office, although frequently 
declining nominations when offered them by his friends. He has been closely 
identitied with Thermopolis and has invested extensively in its real estate. He 
owns a splendid residence and an interest in a business house, besides much 
residence property. 

Dr. Hale has identified himself with the Modern Woodmen Camp, the Knights 
of Pythias and with Malta Lodge, No. 17, A. F. & A. M., at Thermopolis. He 
has taken the degrees of the York Rite and of the Mystic Shrine. In politics 
he is a democrat and, true to the religious faith of his ancestors, he believes 
in the doctrines of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, of which his parents 
were members before the Civil war. He has enjoyed the honor of appearing 
before various select audiences to deliver addresses upon a number of questions. 
At the present time he is a member of the county board of selection and draft, 
is a member of the state medical board of sanitation, is health officer for Hot 
Springs county and was by appointment the first county physician. He is a mem- 
ber and president of the State Aledical Committee of National Defense and was 
appointed by Governor Kendrick on the state board of medical examiners. At 
Douglas on the 9th of May, 1917, the highest honor that can be bestowed upon 
a physician in his state was given to Dr. Hale when he was chosen president of 
the Wyoming State Medical Society, an honor fully merited by reason of his 
personal worth and marked professional attainments. 



OVE H. PETERSON. 



Ove H. Peterson is proprietor of the Rawhns Music House, a dealer in 
pianos and high grade phonographs, specializing in the Edison line. His busi- 
ness has shown a constant development and steady growth and his is today one 
of the leading music houses in this section of the state. Thoroughly familiar 
with everything that has to do with the trade, Mr. Peterson has closely studied 
the wishes of the public and his enterprising methods have brought to him a 
substantial patronage. 

A native of Denmark, he was born in Copenhagen, August 15, 1883. a son 
of the late I. H. Peterson, who was a native of Denmark, where he engaged 
in merchandising. He continued his residence in Copenhagen until called to 
his final rest, passing away in 1901, when he had reached the age of sixty 
jears. He was a ver\' successful merchant and took an active part in public 
afl'airs, being recognized as a man of considerable influence in national politics. 
He married Ann Margaret Hanson, a native of Denmark. She became the 
mother of five children. 

Ove H. Peterson, who was the third in order of birth, pursued his education 
in the national schools of Denmark and under private instructors in leading 
cities of Germany. He specialized in the study of instrumental music and 
was graduated with high honors in piano. During his residence of four years 
ill Germany he was also studying the German system of mercantile and busi- 
ness pursuits and on the expiration of that period he returned to Denmark, 
where he entered his father's store, there remaining for a year. The oppor- 
tunities of the new world, however, attracted him and, crossing the Atlantic 
to the United States, he arrived in New York city in June, 1901. He did not 
tarry on the Atlantic coast, however, but made his way direct to Rawlins, where 
he had relatives and friends living, his primary inducement to making Raw- 
lins his choice of a place of residence being that an uncle was a resident of 
this city^ On his arrival he secured employment with the firm of Hugus & 



HISTORY OF W-YOMING 197 

Company, proprietors of the leading general merchandise establishment of the 
city, the predecessors of the Ferguson Mercantile Company. Mr. Peterson re- 
mained with that house for a year and from 1901 until 1907 he was traveling 
over the United States, also spending eight months of that period abroad, visit- 
ing hi.-> old home, also London, Paris and Berlin. Upon his return to America 
he again took up his abode in Rawlins and became identified with his uncle, 
Jim Hanson, in the stock raising business, the latter being one of the most 
extensive sheep, cattle and horse raisers in this section. Mr. Peterson re- 
mained with his uncle as ])ri\ate secretary until 1914. when he established his 
present 1)UMiiess. in which he has since been continuously and successfully en- 
gL'ged. Thi'- was the first cxclusi\e music house established in Carbon county, 
if not in western Wyoming, and his trade covers the entire western part of 
the state. Not only does he handle pianos of high grade manufacture but also 
the Edison Diamond Disc phonograph and has an Edison laboratory, being a 
licensed representative of those interests in this section of the country. He 
is also engaged in teaching music and has organized the Rawlins High School 
Band. In a word he is one of the most prominent figures in musical circles in 
this city and has done much to develop musical taste and promote the standards 
of musical education in this section. 

On the 7th of June, 1916, Mr. Peterson was united in marriage in Colo- 
rado Springs. Colorado, to Aliss Lois Derby Wallace, a native of Omaha, Nebras- 
ka, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Wallace, prominent people of Den- 
\er. 'Mr. and Mrs. Peterson have become the parents of a daughter, Ruth H., 
who was born in Rawlins, Julv 20, 191 7. 

Mr. Peterson maintains an independent course in politics 1iut li;i> Ijecome 
a recognized factor in connection with public interests and Sdcial acii\ities in 
Rr.wHns. He is a member of the Lutheran church and his influence is always 
on the side of those interests which have cultural value and lift the individual 
f-'om the drudgery of everyday business life, thus broadening his interests and 
augmenting his powers. While Mr. Peterson was most liberally educated ere 
he left Europe, he had attained comparatively little financial .-tamlinq- when 
he came to the new world and sought the business opportunities here ofli'ered 
in order that he might advance in that way. His progress is due tu his own 
efforts and perse\erance. He is more than satisfied with Wyoming as a place 
of residence, bel'e\ing that the state has a great future, and he is contributing 
in substantial measure to the upbuilding and development of Rawlins, his ef- 
forts constituting a valuable contribution to those interests which must ever 
prove a balance to commercial activity if a well rounded development is to 
result. 



D. LE BAR. 



J. D. Le Ear, owner of the Le Bar Garage at Douglas, where he is handling 
the Ford car, was born in Pennsylvania in 1882, a son of Hiram and Eliza- 
beth Le Bar. He began his education at the usual age as a pupil in the public 
schools of the Keystone state and after attending high school spent one year 
in a military academy and one year in college. He is a graduate of the Lafay- 
ette Military Academy and with liberal education as a preparation for life's 
practical and responsible duties he entered upon his business career. In young 
manhood he was associated with Austin Nichols & Company, wholesale grocers 
of New York, and eventually he removed westward to Idaho, where for three 
years he was engaged in mining. He then came to Wyoming, settling at 
Douglas, and between the years 1908 and 191 1 gave his attention to the con- 
tracting business. In the latter year he established his garage and that his 
business has grown to be one of extensive proportions is indicated in the fact 
that he today employs twelve men, most of whom are skilled mechanicians and 



198 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

are thus able to care for his constantly growing trade. He is likewise the 
agent in Converse county for the Ford car and his annual sales reach a large 
figure. His business affairs have been carefully and intelligently directed and 
his sound judgment and keen sagacity have brought to him deserved success. 

Mr. Le Bar is a Mason and also an Elk. He belongs to the Commercial 
Club and is interested in all that has to do with the welfare and progress 
of his city and the extension of its trade relations. He has never been an 
office seeker but is much interested in the state and its development, and his 
cooperation can at all times be counted upon to further any plan or measure 
for the upbuilding of his city or the promotion of the welfare of the state. 



SAMUEL CORSON. 



Samuel Corson has long been prominently identified with business, political 
and fraternal interests in Wyoming and since the '80s has made his home in 
Cheyenne, where he is now living retired from business save for the supervision 
which he gives to his invested interests. This freedom from business cares allows 
him leisure for activities along other lines and he has been a most active cooperant 
factor in many movements which have to do with the public welfare and with 
the advancement of fraternal interests. 

He was born in Girvan, Scotland, June 16, 1857, a son of the Rev. William 
and Aitcheson (Dobbie) Corson. The father was a clergyman of the Estab- 
lished Church and Samuel Corson was reared amid the environment of a cul- 
tured home. His education was begun in the schools of his native town and 
he afterward attended the Dumbarton Academy of Scotland. Subsequently he 
became a clerk for the firm of John Orr Ewing & Company, cotton manufac- 
turers of Glasgow, with whom he remained for eight years, thus making his 
initial step in the business world. He was afterward connected with Handasyde 
Dick & Company, an East India mercantile house, for two years and came to 
the United States in 1883, when a young man of twenty-six. He located first 
in Kansas City, where he occupied a clerical position with the Fort Scott & Gulf 
Railroad for a brief period. He then removed to Cheyenne, where he entered 
the employ of the Union Mercantile Company, becoming a stockholder and sec- 
retary and treasurer, and in that connection he continued for a quarter of a 
century, being thus closely associated with the commercial interests of the city. 
His enterprise and progressiveness contributed much to the development and 
growth of the business, which became one of the most profitable mercantile 
interests in Cheyenne. As he prospered in his undertakings Mr. Corson made 
extensive and wise investment in interests which are now bringing to him a 
substantial financial return and enable him to live practically retired from busi- 
ness, giving his attention only to the supervision of his personal investments. 

In March, 1888, ^Ir. Corson was united in marriage to ^liss Mary Gray, 
returning to Scotland for his bride, and to them were born the following chil- 
dren: William A., who is now second lieutenant in the Three Hundred and 
Fourth Field Artillery, serving in France ; Samuel, Jr., who is now a junior in 
the Cheyenne high school and a sergeant in the cadet corps : and Mary Gray, 
who died at the age of six years on April 8. 1895. Mr. and Mrs. Corson hold 
membership in the Presbyterian church, in which he has served as session clerk 
and as elder for many years. They take an active interest in the church work 
and cooperate heartily in all of its plans for reaching and uplifting mankind. 

Mr. Corson turns to fishing and hunting for recreation. He is a man of 
social nature and has become a most prominent member of the Masonic fraternity 
in Wyoming, being one of the few residents of the state upon whom has been 
conferred the honorary thirty-third degree. He is a past grand master of the 
Grand T-odee of \\'yomine, A. F. (S: A. M.. and a past high priest of the (^rand 
Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of W'yoming. and a past grand commander of 




ZL^'-^^^^c ^' 



HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 201 

Ihe Grand Commaiidery, Knights Templar, of Wyoming. Since January i, 1914, 
he has been secretary of the Scottish Rite bodies in Masonry. 

His pohtical activity has been actuated by an earnest desire to uphold the best 
interests of city and state. He served for three years as a member of the city 
council of Cheyenne and in 1900 he became county commissioner. In 1895 he 
was elected to the state legislature and served for one term as a member of the 
lower house, while for two terms he represented his district in the state senate. 
He was an active working member on the floor of the house, did important com- 
mittee service and was connected with much constructive legislation looking to 
the development of the state and the safeguarding of its interests. Throughout 
his entire life he has never been content to choose the second best but has held 
to the highest standards, his aid and influence being always on the side of those 
activities which make for progress and improvement in the affairs of men. 



LAURENCE E. EXGSTRUM. 

Laurence E. Engstrum, a jeweler engaged in business in Evanston, where his 
enterprise and progressive spirit are bringing to him a substantial measure of 
success, was born November 12. i8gi, in the city in which he still resides. His 
father, Victor .\. pngstrum, was a native of Sweden and came to America with 
his parents when hve" years of age, the family home being established in Omaha, 
Nebraska, where Air. Engstrum was reared and educated. He entered upon an 
apprenticeship as a coppersmith and after thoroughly acquainting himself with 
the business, in 1873 removed to Wyoming, establishing his home in Evanston 
among the first settlers. Here he entered the employ of the Union Pacific Rail- 
way Com]3anv, working in the shops as a coppersmith and occupying that position 
until 1878. He then took up an apprenticeship under W. H. Parpe, who was 
the pioneer jeweler of the city, having opened his store in 1875, and this store 
he operated until his death, when Mr. Engstrum fell heir to the business and 
continued successfully in the jewelry trade until his demise, which occurred in 
1914, when he had reached the age of fifty-six years. In early manhood he 
married Miss Charlesphene Hammer, a native of Salt Lake City, Utah, and a 
representative of one of the pioneer families of that state and of Wyoming 
her parents having settled in Uinta county, Wyoming, in 1869 or 1870. Mrs. 
Engstrum was reared and educated in Evanston and in this city her marriage 
was celebrated. She still makes her home in Evanston, where she has a very 
wide acquaintance and is held in the highest esteem by all who know her. By 
her marriage she became the mother of seven children, of whom the following 
are yet living: Beulah. who is the wife of W. X. Osborne, a mining engineer 
of Phoeni.x, Arizona: Beatrice, the wife of H. P. Cummock, whose home is in 
Los Angeles, California : Laurence E., of this review ; and Dorothy Sybil. 

Laurence E. Engstrum is indebted to the public school system of Evanston 
for the educational opportunities which he enjoyed. He started out to earn 
his own living when a youth of seventeen years and entered upon an apprentice- 
ship to the jeweler's trade vmder the direction of his father, who gave him 
thorough and systematic training in the work, so that he gained a comprehensive 
knowledge of the business. He also attended the Winter School of Watch- 
making and Engraving at Chicago, Illinois, and thus supplemented his early 
training and experience. He was graduated from that institution in 1914 and 
upon his father's death he succeeded to the ownership of the jewelry store iri 
Evanston, which he has since continuously and successfully conducted. It is 
not only the pioneer establishment of this kind in the city but is today the 
leading jewelry store of this section of the state. Mr. Engstrum carries a large 
and well selected line of jewelry and precious stones and is capable of doing 
the most efficient repair work. ' His business methods are thoroughly reliable 



202 . HISTORY OF WYOMING 

and progressive and his close application and earnest desire to please his patrons 
have been the salient features in the development of his growing trade. 

On the 22d of February, 191 5, Mr. Engstrum was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Frances Kirtland, a native of Michigan and a daughter of James 
and Annie (Sales) Kirtland. 

In politics Mr. Engstrum has always maintained an independent course, 
voting for n.ien and measures rather than fur jiarty. Fraternally he is identi- 
fied with .Evanston Lodge, No. 4, A. F. & A. M., and is a worthy exemplar 
of the teachings of the craft. His entire life has been passed in Evanston and 
the circle of his friends is almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance, 
showing him to be a man of genuine worth whose life record will bear the 
closest investigation and scrutinv. 



DAVID V. BELL. 

David \'. Bell is occupying a position requiring marked executive force and 
administrative ability, being superintendent of the L'nion Pacific Railway's water 
companies, in which connection he directs the efforts and activities of about forty 
workmen. In retrospect one may see him a poor boy, struggling to gain a foot- 
hold in the business world. From his initial step, however, he has steadily pro- 
gressed owing to his individual eft'orts, fidelity, earnestness and strong purpose, 
and today his position is an important one, ranking him with the representative 
business men of Wyoming. He makes his home at Rock Springs and from 
that point directs the important interests under his supervision. 

He was born June 14. 1863, near Elizabeth Furnace, in Blair county, Penn- 
sylvania, and was the eldest in a family of nine children, eight of whom are still 
living. Their parents were John Pierce and Agnes (Greenland) Bell, who were 
also natives of the Keystone state. The Bell family was founded in Pennsylvania 
at an early period in its development, the progenitor of the family in America 
arriving in Pennsylvania during the early part of the seventeenth century, at 
which time he took up his abode in what is now Blair county. John Pierce Bell 
was a successful farmer and during the early excitement following the discovery 
of gold in Colorado he made his way to that state. He was born in 1835 and 
had reached the age of seventy-six years when death called him. His wife was 
bom in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and represented one of the old families 
of the state of English lineage. She died in the vear 1887, at the age of forty- 
five years. 

David V. Bell acquired a public school education, attending the schools in 
Antis township, Blair county, Pennsvlvania, and the high school at Huntingdon, 
from which he was graduated in 1880. After completing his course there he 
started out to earn his own livelihood, his first employment being that of a clerk 
in a general store at Elizabeth Furnace. This line of work was not to his liking, 
however, and a little later he entered the employ of John Whitehead & Company 
in engineering lines at Elizabeth Furnace. He served a three years' apprentice- 
ship as an engineer and in mechanical work and afterward foMnwed his trade 
there until July, 1883, when lie came to the west, attracted by the opportunities 
of this great and erowins; section of the country. It was in th-'t venr that he 
made his way to Fort Steele, A\'voming, where he spent the winter and then 
removed to Rawlins and later to Oil City. In the latter place he went with the 
first steam drilling outfit for oil in the state. He was emploved bv the old 
Central Association in drilling oil wells, remaining in that service during 1884 
and 1885. He was also active in the Seminole minine countrv in 188^. and from 
1886 until 1880 he was engaeed in well drilling and in mining pursuits in this 
state. In 1880 he returned to Rawlins, where he became an employe of the 
Union Pacific Railway Company in well drilling. He has since been connected 
with the company, covering a period of twenty-nine years — a fact indicative 




DAYIB V. BELL 



204 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

of'his capability, his faithfulness and of the confidence reposed in him. He has 
drilled oil wells in Albany, Carbon, Lincoln, Uinta, Johnson and in fact two-thirds 
of the counties in the state, and has thus been most actively and helpfully con- 
nected with the development of the oil industry, which is today one of the impor- 
tant sources of wealth in Wyoming. He was likewise one of the organizers and 
stockholders of the Wyoming Supply Company of Rawlins. He is today super- 
intendent of the Union Pacific Railway's water companies, comprising the Rat- 
tlesnake Creek Water Company, the Green River Water Works Company and 
the Union Pacific Water Company, in which connection he has charge of forty 
workmen. He is thoroughly familiar with various phases of mechanical life 
and engineering projects, and his pronounced ability has enabled him to advance 
step by step until he now occupies a position of leadership in his chosen field of 
labor. 

Mr. Bell has been married twice. On the loth of June, 1881, in Tyrone, 
Pennsylvania, he wedded Miss Anna Kelley. a native of the Keystone state and 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elijah G. Kelley, who were early settlers of Penn- 
sylvania. Mrs. Bell passed away March 21, 1882, at Barre Forge, Pennsylvania, 
when but twenty years of age, at the time of the birth of her son, David V., Jr. 
On the i8th of September, 1893, in Rawlins, Air. Bell was again married, his 
second union being with Miss Mamie Alorrison, a native of Pennsylvania and 
a daughter of Roselle and Sarah (Bell) Morrison, the former now deceased. 
The mother is a representative of an old Pennsylvania family of Butler county, 
that state. To Mr. and Mrs. Bell have been bom eight children: Orin R., who 
was bom at Mountain Home, Idaho, August 22, 1894; Carl Simpson, whose birth 
occurred at Rawlins, Wyoming, January i, 1897; Agnes, who is now attending 
the State University ; Dorothy ; Elizabeth ; and Edna, Ada and Margaret, the last 
three born in Rock Springs, Wyoming. 

Mr. Bell was made a Mason, January 18, 1891, in Rawlins, Wyoming, and 
since that time he has taken the degrees not only of the lodge but also of the 
chapter, the commandery and the Mystic Shrine. His life is an exemplification 
of the faith and practices of the Alasonic fraternity, which is based upon a recog- 
nition of the brotherhood of mankind. He is a man of many sterling qualities, 
possessed of ability in a business way, displaying fidelity to every cause which he 
espouses and to all of the duties of life. He holds friendship inviolable and by 
reason of his personal traits, his cordiality and his sincerity he has won a circle 
of friends almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. 



W. D. CURTIS. 



W. D. Curtis is the leading produce broker of the state of Wyoming and 
is accounted one of the most progressive residents of the city of Laramie. In 
a v/ord, he is a typical western man, alert, energetic and progressive, display- 
ing those sterling traits which have ever been a dominant factor in the rapid 
and substantial upbuilding of this section of the country. Mr. Curtis is a native 
of Kansas, his birth having occurred in Paoli on the 28th_of August, 1886. He 
is a son of C. N. and Rosa Curtis, who were also natives of the Sunflower 
state, v.hence thev removed to Leadville, Colorado, where the mother still 
lives. 

W. D. Curtis, who was the only child of their marriage, attended the schools 
of Leadville, Colorado, after which he learned the business of assaying. He 
continued in Leadville for a time as an assayer and then turned his attention 
to the produce commission business, in which he was actively engaged in 
Leadville for nine years. On the expiration of that period he removed to 
Cripple Creek, Colorado, where he continued in the same line of business for a 
year. He next came to Laramie as manager for the Lawrence-Hennesy Fruit 
Conipanv, conducting their interests in Laramie until 1914. when he decided 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 205 

to embark in business on his own accovnit and did so. He has met with a 
substantial measure of success during the intervening period, for he had already 
become widely known, and soon secured a liberal patronage. He is today re- 
garded as one of the most prominent and successful brokers in this section of 
the west and is the only broker in his line in Wyoming and the state's only 
member of the Fruit Jobbers' Association of America. In business affairs his 
judgment is sound, his discrimination keen and his enterprise unfaltering. What- 
ever he undertakes he carries forward to successful completion, for his energy 
and enterprise allow him to brook no obstacles that can be overcome by per- 
sistent and earnest effort. 

On the loth of May, 1905, Mr. Curtis was united in marriage to Miss Lillian 
Tracey, of Denver, Colorado, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Tracey, now 
living in Longmont, that state. Mrs. Curtis holds membership in the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church and they are well known socially. 

In politics Mr. Curtis maintains an independent course, voting for men and 
measures rather than for party. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks and has taken the Royal Arch degree in Masonry, 
being also a member of the consistory and a Shriner. He is a very active, valued 
and prominent member of the chamber of commerce and is now serving on its 
executive committee. He does everything in his power to promote the welfare, 
growth and progress of the city, to extend its trade relations and to advance 
its improvements along all civic lines. He is indeed a stalwart champion of 
the west, its opportunities and its possibilities and his study of the situation 
enables him to speak with authority upon the question. He is a man pos- 
sessed of many sterling qualities and characteristics. Self-made in every respect, 
his advancement is attributable entirely to his individual efforts. He stands for 
nothing but Iionest dealing and through straightforward business methods and 
unfailing enterprise he has built up a large and profitable produce brokerage 
business, selling only to the wholesale trade. 

His record should serve to inspire and encourage others, showing what may 
be accomplished when there is a will to dare and to do, and when effort is 
based upon honorable principles. 



GEORGE P. HARVEY. 

George P. Harvey, who is actively engaged in the real estate and insurance 
business as senior partner of the firm of Harvey & Harper, is also prominent in 
community affairs, serving at the present writing as chairman of the board of 
county commissioners of Uinta county. He makes his home in Evanston, where 
he has lived for twelve years or more. 

He was born in Villisca, Montgomery county, Iowa, May 19, 1867, and is 
a son of William and Agnes (McCulloch) Harvey, both of whom came to 
America from Scotland and were early pioneers of Iowa. Mr. Harvey fol- 
lowed railroad building and spent his remaining days in Iowa, where he passed 
away in 1867 at the age of thirty-three years. His widow long survived and died 
at Fort Bridger, Wyoming, at the age of seventy-three years. She had re- 
moved westward to this state in 1886 and continued to make her home within 
its borders until called to her final rest twenty-three years later. In the family 
were five children: W. H., now a resident of Carter, W'yoming; R. B., living at 
]\Iountainview, Wyoming; Mrs. Belle Marchesseault, of Montana; George P.; 
and Mrs. Ethel Hamilton, of Robertson, Wyoming. 

George P. Harvey attended the common schools of Iowa and was a youth of 
sixteen years when he came to Wyoming, after which he was employed near 
Cody on the Carter ranch, working as a cowboy for several years. He subse- 
quently took up his abode at Fort Bridger, Wyoming, where he engaged in the 
live stock business on his own account, there remaining until 1903, when he dis- 



206 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

posed of his interests in that connection and turned his attention to merchandising 
in Carter, where he remained for two years. On the expiration of that period he 
disposed of his store and stock of goods and removed to Evanston, since which 
time he has been identified with a number of the important business enterprises 
of the city. In 1914 he concentrated his eftorts and attention upon the manage- 
ment of the business of the Overhead Lumber Company and was thus engaged 
until February i, 1918, when he severed that connection and embarked in the 
real estate and insurance business as a member of the firm of Harvey & Harper, 
the junior partner being his son-in-law. They specialize in the handling of 
ranch and live stock property and are meeting with well merited success in their 
undertakings. 

At Fort Bridger, on the 30th of April, 1895, Mr. Harvey was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Hattie Hendrie, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. \V. N. Hendrie, who 
were pioneer people of this state. Two children have been born of this mar- 
riage : Nellie, who was born in 1907 and is now attending school in Evanston : 
and Mrs. Dora Harper, the elder daughter, who was born at Fort Bridger in 
1896. She, too, was pupil in the public schools of Evanston, where she still 
makes her home. By her marriage she has become the mother of one child, 
Marjorie Harper. 

In his political views Mr. Harvey is a stalwart democrat and has been a 
recognized leader in the ranks of his party in Uinta county. He served as county 
clerk for four years, from 1910 until 1914, and at the present writing, in 1918, 
is chairman of the board of county commissioners. He has also been a member 
of the school board and the cause of education finds in him a stalwart champion. 
Fraternally he is a [Nlason and an Odd Fellow, loyal to the teachings of these 
organizations, and he is equally true to his professions as a member of the Pres- 
byterian church. He has worked his way upward entirely through his own ef- 
forts and is a self-made man who has depended upon his individual labors since 
reaching the age of thirteen years. Step by step he has progressed until he is 
now at the head of a successful business enterprise and he is well known among 
the prominent and representative citizens of his section of the state. 



ROBERT E. FITCH. 



The memory of Robert E. Fitch forms a connecting link between the primitive 
past and the progressive present in Wyoming, where he settled in pioneer times. 
Through the intervening period he has taken an active and helpful part in pro- ' 
moting the work of progress and development in many ways and he is now well 
known in business circles in Laramie as a dealer in real estate and insurance. 

He was born in Walton, Delaware county. New York, September 16, 1843, 
a son of Cvrenus and Isabella (Graham) Fitch, the former a native of Con- 
necticut, while the latter was born in Scotland. The father removed to the state 
of New York, where he engaged in business along mechanical lines to the time 
of his death. In the family "were six children, of whom Robert E. was the 
voungest. 

In bovhood davs he attended school in the village of Walton, New \ ork, 
and afterward in Plainfield, Illinois. He was left an orphan by the death of his 
parents when but nine years of age and he then went to work for an uncle. 
Tames R. Graham, who was a resident of Plainfield. A year or two later he 
joined an emigrant train en route for the west, crossing the Mississippi river at 
Comanche. Illinois, on a rope ferry. He made the trip in company with his uncle 
and eventually they reached Tama county, Iowa, where they located on govern- 
ment land. Mr. Fitch remained with the uncle for eight years and experienced 
the hardships and privations of pioneer life in that state, aiding in the arduous 
task of developing a new farm. Following the outbreak of the Civil war his 



208 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

patriotic spirit was aroused and he joined the army, enHsting with the boys in 
blue of Company G, Fourteentli Iowa Infantry, with which he served for three 
years. He participated in the battle of Shiloh and while at the front was captured 
and was sent to L:bby Prison, where he remained for eight months, suffering all 
the hardships of southern prison life. At length he received his discharge but he 
reenlisted, joining the One Hundred and Thirty-second Illinois Infantry, with 
which he continued until the end of the war, making a most creditable record by 
his bravery on the field of battle and his unfaltering loyalty to the cause which 
he espoused. When the country no longer needed his military aid he returned to 
his old home in Tama county, Iowa, remaining there and in Belle Plaine, Iowa, 
for three years. Feeling the need of better educational advantages than he had 
thus far received, he then entered the State University at Iowa City, where he 
spent five years in study, being graduated with the class of June, 1872, having 
completed the literary course and also won the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy 
and JVIaster of Arts. Thus splendidly qualified by liberal intellectual training for 
life's practical and responsible duties, he came to Wyoming, taking up his abode 
in Laramie in the fall of 1872. For ten years he had charge of the public schools 
of the city as superintendent and did much to develop the school system upon a 
safe and substantial basis, contributing in marked measure to the advancement 
of educational standards and to the benefit of the curriculum. He next took up 
ranching and sheep raising, in which he continued successfully for six years, when 
his health failed and forced him to abandon that occupation. He then turned his 
attention to the real estate, insurance and loan business, in which he has continued 
from 1889 till the present time. The same spirit of persistency, determination, 
ready adaptability and close application which characterized him in other relations 
has won for him success in his present field and he is today one of the prominent 
real estate men of Laramie, thoroughly conversant with the property upon the 
market and correct in its valuation. He has promoted many important sales 
and is one of the leading real estate men of Laramie. 

On the nth of August, 1874, in La Grange, Missouri, Mr. Fitch was united 
in marriage to JMiss Lida Eaton, a daughter of the Rev. Edwin and Alartha 
(Austin) Eaton, the former a Baptist clergyman who was a chaplain in the 
United States na\ y. Mrs. Fitch was born in Xorwalk, Huron county, Ohio, a 
graduate of the Uni\-ersity of Iowa, having completed her course there in the 
same year in which Mr. I- itch was graduated. She was a member of the Laramie 
school board at the time of her death. They became the parents of two children, 
E. E. and Robert G. Fitch. The latter, who is assistant cashier of the Albany 
County National Bank, married ]\Iiss Willie V. Downey, of Laramie, a daughter 
of Mr. and jMrs. S. W. Downey, who were pioneers of this state. They have 
become parents of three children: Virginia D., Robert G., Jr., and Dorothy. The 
elder son is mentioned elsewhere in this work. Mrs. Fitch died February 6, 1918, 
in Laramie, her death causing great sorrow to her immediate family and calling 
forth sincere regret among her many friends. 

Mr. Fitch has always given his political allegiance to the republican party, of 
which he is a stalwart' advocate, and he served as state senator during the first 
and second sessions of the general assembly of Wyoming in 1890 and in 1892. 
He proved a valued member of the upper house through his support of many 
progressive measures which have been of benefit to the state and he was identified 
with much constructive legislation during those periods. He has also been justice 
and police judge of Laramie for six years, was county coroner for eight years and 
has held other local offices. He is a member of the Congregational church 
and is serving also as president of the board of trustees of the Baptist church and 
has done much to further their interests and upbuilding in many ways. He 
belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has filled all the chairs of the lodge, 
including that of master. He likewise holds membership with the Grand Army 
post and belongs to Phi Kappa Psi, a Greek letter fraternity. He also is a 
member of ^^^'oming Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution. 

Mr. Fitch stands ver>' high in public regard. He has been identified with 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 209 

those phases of life which have figured most prominently in connection with 
Wyoming's development and progress — its ranching interests, its educational sys- 
tem, its public offices, its fraternal organizations and its churches. In a word, 
his aid and influence have ever been given on the side of progress and advance- 
ment and he stands for those things which work for the uplift of the individual 
and the betterment of the community. 



GEORGE EWER, Jr. 



George Ewer, Jr., was the builder of the first brick building on the east side 
of Main street in Evanston and from the earliest period of his connection with 
the city has been an important factor in furthering those projects which have 
had to do with its substantial upbuilding and improvement. He is now pro- 
prietor and editor of the Wyoming Times and is a well known representative 
of journalistic interests in the state. 

He was born in Birmingham, England, January 15, 1870, and is a son of 
George and Jane (Xeal ) Ewer, who are likewise natives of England, where 
they remained until 1877 and then severed the ties that bound them to their 
native land. Crossing the Atlantic, they first took up their abode at Morgan, 
Utah, where the father was employed by the Union Pacific Railroad Company. 
Later he engaged in w'ork at the painter's trade and at an early period in the 
development of Evanston there took up his abode and followed his trade, being 
long connected with painting in the city. Since 1902, however, he has lived 
retired and he has now reached the age of seventy-five years. His wife is 
eighty-one years of age. They were the parents of seven children, four of 
whom are yet living: Mrs. Mary Schopp, of Evanston; Mrs. C. B. Cater, of 
Salt Lake City; George, Jr., of this review; and Mrs. Frank Brown, also living 
in Evanston. 

George Ewer, Jr., was but seven years of age when his parents crossed the 
Atlantic and after acquiring a public school education in the city in which he 
now makes his home he began work in the postoffice under E. S. Hallock, who 
was postmaster of the city and also principal of the school. For a year Mr. 
Ewer was thus employed, after which he secured a position with the Coopera- 
tive Grocery Company and later was connected with the Beckwith, Ouinn Gro- 
cer}' Company and spent eight years in that way. lie was ihcn engaged as an 
apprentice in the printing business with Wilson Dillon on the Evanston News, 
and at the end of that time became one of the proprietors of the People's Store 
of North Evanston under the firm name of Kirby & Ewer. Subsequently he 
was connected with J. F. Loudin. formerly of Lander, on the News Register. 
He afterward entered the employ of William Shaft'er on the Uinta Herald, at 
Evanston, and later was with the Wyoiuing Press, of which G. A. McArthur 
was editor. Eventually he bought out the Press and continued the publication 
of the paper alone for eight years or until 1910, when he sold the business and 
plant to J. T. Booth and purchased the Wyoming Times from J. U. Allard. 
He has since owned and edited this paper, which is a six-column quarto weekly, 
published on Thursdays. It has an extensive circulation and, in connection 
therewith, an excellent job printing business is carried on. The plant is thor- 
oughly modem in even.- particular, having the latest style presses and equip- 
ment, and the business has reached substantial and gratifying proportions. 

On the I2th of ^rardi, iN.)^, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Ewer and 
Miss Mary P. Cain, a dau.uhiL-r of John and Annie Cain and a native of eastern 
Indiana. They have become parents of seven children. Esther Annie, who 
was born in Evanston, was graduated from the public schools and is the wife 
of James W. Palmer, of Evanston, by whom she has two children, Elmer James 
and Warren Palmer, Jr. George W'.. born in Evanston, and Elmer C, born in 
Evanston, are both graduates of the high school. Benjamin F., Bernard H. and 



210 HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 

Zelma X., all born in Evanston, are attending school. Eleene M. completes the 
family. 

In his political views Air. Ewer is a stalwart republican, giving loyal sup- 
port to the party and doing all in his power to promote its success. Fraternally 
he is a Master Mason and he is also connected with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Knights of the Alaccabees. Air. Ewer manifests a most 
progressive spirit in all that he undertakes and his devotion to the general wel- 
fare is a recognized feature of his career. As previously stated, he built the 
first brick building on the east side of Main street in Evanston. This was in 
1907. He also built the present substantial business block in which he is pub- 
lishing his paper, utilizing the second floor as his printing office, while the lower 
story is occupied by stores. He is sole owner of these two buildings, which 
occupy a quarter of a block, and he also, owns other valuable rental property, 
residences and business blocks. His new home, costing a substantial fortune, 
is one of the nice residences of Evanston. From his judicious investments in 
real estate he secures a gratifying annual income. 



JOHN DWTGHT WOODRUFF. 

John Dwight Woodrufl:, grower of sheep and cattle and also interested in 
real estate, mmes and oil, making his home at Shoshoni, was born in the state 
of New York, December 20, 1846, a son of John and Lucinda (Dimick) Wood- 
ruff, who removed to Illinois, where they spent their remaining days. They 
had a family of eight children, of whom four are now living. 

John Dwight Woodruff crossed the plains in 1862. He left Belvidere, Illinois, 
with a four-horse team early in the spring and arrived at Denver; which was then 
a small place, on the 4th of July. He remained in Colorado until the spring of 
1867 and then went to Fort Laramie. From there he traveled to the South Paer 
gold fields and in the spring of 1868 he joined the Big Horn expedition and 
eventually reached Bozeman, Montana, in the fall of that year. He spent several 
years in prospecting, in trapping and in acting as guide. He then followed the 
stampede to the Black Hills in the spring of 1875 and he acted as guide for the 
Sheridan military expedition from Fort Washakie to the Little Big Horn. The 
next year he guided the Captain Alix military expedition from Fort Washakie 
to Fort Custer. In the summer of 1878 he located on Owl creek with the first 
herd of cattle that was taken to the Big Horn basin. He also built the first 
house in the basin and there continued cattle raising until 1882, when he closed 
out cattle and in 1883 engaged in the sheep business on an extensive scale. 

In the spring of 1883 Air. Woodruff' was united in marriage to Aliss Josephine 
Doty, of Green Bay, Wisconsin, and they became the parents of three sons : 
Dwight J., who is now engaged in the garage business in Shoshoni ; and Fred 
D. and Leon, both of whom have passed away. 

Mr. \\'oodruft' gives his political endorsement to the republican party and he 
served as a niemlici- of the state senate of Wyoming for Fremont county during 
the first and third sessions. He has occupied several minor political positions, the 
duties of which he has intelligently discharged. In Alasonry he has attained 
high rank, having taken all of the intermediate degrees from the lodge up to the 
Shrine. He has filled most cf the chairs in the order and exemplifies in his life 
the beneficent spirit upon which the craft rests. One of the first settlers of what 
is now Wyoming, there is no phase of its history with which he is not familiar. 
The history of the early development of Wyoming would be incomplete without 
his record, for from the earliest founding of the town of Lander and the earlier 
development of Fremont county he has been a prominent factor in its substantial 
growth and improvement. When ^^'yoming was cut off from the advantages and 
comforts of the east by the long, hot stretches of sand and the high mountains he 
made his way across the plains, braving all the trials and hardships of pioneer 



V 



(2) . X?. ^^W^/^. 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 213 

life in order to make a home in this state, rich in its. resources yet unclaimed from 
the dominion of the red men. Tales of heroism have been the theme of song and 
story throughout the ages, and the bravery of the man on the battlefields has 
stirred the souls of men through all times. , All honor to such a one, and yet his 
heroism is no greater or his daring more pronounced than that of the honored 
pioneers of the west. 



FRANK LESLIE CRIE, D. D. S. 

Dentistry is unique among the professions. In most lines of professional 
activity one must be thoroughly trained in a science, but in dentistry one must 
have not only broad scientific knowledge but must also possess mechanical skill 
and ingenuity to perform the multitudinous delicate duties which occur in con- 
nection with the care and preservation of the teeth. Well qualified for the work 
that devolves upon him in this connection, Dr. Frank Leslie Crie. of Rock 
Springs, has won the liberal support of the public and the hearty endorsement 
of professional colleagues and contemporaries. He is among the men to whom 
the opportunities of the great and growing west have proved irresistible. Al- 
most the width of the continent separates him from his birthplace, for he is a 
native of Maine, having been born in Criehaven on the 17th of July, 1862. 

His father, Robert F. Crie, was likewise a native of the Pine Tree state, 
where his ancestors, who were of Scotch lineage, settled at a very early day. 
The founder of the family in America came to the new world with the troops 
of King I leorge at the time of the Revolutionary war and served in the English 
navy, being discharged at Castine, Maine, after the war was over. Pleased 
with the new world and its opportunities as he became acquainted with them, 
he decided to remain and thus the family was planted on the soil of the new 
world. Robert F. Crie became connected with the fishing industry in ]\Iaine, 
thus following a pursuit to which his ancestors gave their attcntidu. He lived 
and died in the Pine Tree state. His birth occurred on Maiinicus inland and 
during much of his life he resided on the island of Criehaven. He wedded 
Harriett A. Hall, a native of Appleton, Maine, and also a representative of one 
of the old families of that state of English lineage, the ancestral line being traced 
back to Ebenezer Hall, who was killed by the Indians during the period of the 
Revolutionary war when on Matinicus island. He. too, was identified with the 
fishing industry. Mrs. Crie. the nidther of the Doctor, reached the very ad- 
\anced age of eight\-eight \cars on the _pth of October, 1917, and still makes 
her home in Criehaven. Maine. 

Dr. Crie was one nf ,1 family of fi\-e children, lieing fourth in order of 
l)irth His early eihuation w.is ar(|nire(l in private schools on his nati\e island, 
liis youthful days lu-ing -pent ;iiniil the environment of a fishing \illage. so 
that he early liecanie familial" with \ari(ius phases of seafaring life. He did 
not desire to continue in th- nciuii.ilion t<i wliicli his ancestor^ had gi\ en their 
attention but became iinlmed with the ambition t(.) enter upun a piaifessioiia! 
career and with that end in view matriculated in the Elaltimore Cullege ni Dental 
Surgery at Baltiinore, Maryland, from which lie was graduated with the D. D. S. 
degree in 1897. He had been but seventeen years of age when he started out 
to provide for his own support and as there was little choice of employment at 
the place of his nativity he, too. took up the fishing business, which he fol- 
lowed until 1884, when laudable amljition prompted him to further his educa- 
tion by pursuing a commercial course in the Rockland Business College. He 
then accepted a position as bookkeeper with the firm of R. Fred Crie & Com- 
pany at Rockland, Maine, remaining there for a period of two years. He after- 
ward spent one year in Florida in an orange grove and on the expiration of 
that period removed to Burt county. Nebraska, where he was engaged in farm 
work for a year. He afterward spent two years as a student in a dental office 



214 HISTORY OF WYOUIXG 

in Oakland, Nebraska, receiving instruction from Dr. A. T. Withers, and while 
acting as his assistant he determined upon dentistry as a life work. Thus im- 
proving each opportunity that came to him, he gradually reached the point 
where he became interested in a professional line and at that time he entered 
the college at Baltimore, from which he was graduated, as previously stated. 

Dr. Crie began practice at .\insworth, Nebraska, where he continued suc- 
cessfully for a year. He afterward located at various points in the west but 
eventually took up his abode in Rock Springs on the 20th of June, 1907. Since 
then he has continuously practiced in Rock Springs and he displays marked 
ability in general dental work and in dental surgery. He has a well appointed 
office equipped with the latest improved facilities to aid in the care of the 
teeth and his practice has reached extensive proportions. His work is in 
keeping with the most advanced and scientific methods of the profession and 
constant study and investigation keep him thoroughly informed concerning the 
progressive steps made by the members of the dental fraternity. 

On the 17th of Februan,', 1892, Dr. Crie was married in Ainsworth, Ne- 
braska, to Miss Madge M. Remy, a native of Indiana and a daughter of the 
late William H. and .Anna Alatilda (Essex) Remy. They were representatives 
of an old Indiana family, the father of Irish, Welsh and French descent, while 
the mother was of Pennsylvania Dutch and English lineage. Dr. and Mrs. Crie 
have become parents of two children, a son and a daughter: Robert R., who was 
born in Pender, Nebraska, December 23, 1892; and Frank Marie, who is the 
wife of Percy R. Candlin. She was born in Rockland, Maine, August 31, 1895, 
and is now a resident of Kersey, Colorado. 

Dr. Crie and his wife are members of the Methodist church and fraternally 
he is connected with the ^Modern Woodmen of America. They occupy an envi- 
able social position and the hospitality of their own home is greatly enjoyed by 
their many friends. Dr. Crie belongs to the Colorado State Dental Association, 
the Wyoming State Dental Association and the National Dental Association. He 
made his own way through college and thus displayed the elemental strength of 
his character. He attributes much of his success to the assistance and encour- 
agement of his wife. His individual efforts, however, have enabled him to over- 
come obstacles and difficulties and to make steady advance in a calling where 
success is the direct reward of individual merit. 



WILLIAM F. HAMILTON. 

Important business projects have been promoted and controlled by William 
*F. Hamilton, now one of the prominent ranch men living at Douglas. He was 
born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, January 12, 1850, a son of William 
R. and Annie (Hamilton) Hamilton, who although of the same name were not 
related. The father was a farmer, real estate man and foundryman, devoting 
his life to those various pursuits. Both parents have passed away. 

William F. Hamilton pursued a public school education and afterward attended 
the New Athens (Ohio) College. When his text-books were put aside he took 
up the occupation of farming in the east and was thus engaged until his removal 
westward in 1879. Arriving in Wyoming in that year, he turned his attention 
to the sheep industry, taking up his abode on a sheep ranch. He lived on the 
old government farm, fourteen miles north of Lnramie, and he brought the 
first sheep across the Platte river into Wyoming in 1880. He homesteaded 
what was known as the Eighty-Six Homestead and resided thereon for six years, 
becoming one of the early residents of that section of the state. When the 
Chicago & Northwestern Railroad was built through that section of the country 
he took up his abode in Douglas in 1886 and since that period has made his 
home in the city, from which point he has directed his sheep interests. He laid 
out the Hamilton addition to Douglas and has been a most potent factor in 




WILLIAil F. HAMILTOISr 



216 HISTORY OF WVOMIXG 

bringing about the substantial development, progress and upbuilding of the sec- 
tion of the state in which he lives. He is engaged in ranching on an extensive 
scale and he has studied closely every point bearing upon the practical develop- 
ment and improvement of the region. Realizing what it would be to the district 
to have an adequate water supply, he became the originator of the La Prele dam 
and reservoir project, resulting in the building of a dam one hundred and thirty- 
six feet high and the construction of one hundred miles of ditch, whereby twelve 
thousand acres of land have been brought under cultivation. In this undertaking 
he was associated with Dr. Wilson and B. J. Erwin, the three men planning and 
carrying forward to successful completion a project which has been of untold 
value and worth to this section of the state. With many affairs of importance 
to the community Mr. Hamilton has been closely and helpfully associated. At 
one time he was postmaster of Douglas and at every period of his residence in 
the city, covering thirty-two years, he has stood for progress and improvement 
along lines that have produced splendid results. 

In September, 1883, ^Ii"- Hamilton was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
\'incent, formerly of Pennsylvania and of Ohio, and their children are : Martha, 
the wife of D. D. Caley; Artie V., the wife of John Le Bar, who is engaged 
in the automobile business in Douglas ; George R., who is engaged in ranching : 
James H., who is with the United States army in France: and William S., who 
is in the United States navy. 

In his political views Mr. Hamilton has been a stalwart republican since age 
conferred upon him the right of franchise, and in this connection it may be 
mentioned that his father was one of the organizers of the underground rail- 
road through Pennsylvania to conduct the escape of the negroes to the north. 
Fraternally Mr. Hamilton of this review is connected with the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He is fond of hunting and outdoor life, to which he turns 
for rest and recreation. He has made himself a most creditable place in business 
circles in this section of the state and as one of the pioneer settlers his memory 
forms a connecting link between the primitive past and the progressive present. 
There was no house here at the time of his arrival and he built the first dwelling 
in this section of the state. He can tell the ston,' of everv phase of frontier life 
in this locality by reason of personal experience and his reminiscences of the 
early days are most interesting. In the work of general improvement he has 
indeed been an important factor, realizing the opportunities before the district and 
at all times utilizing these opportunities in the best possible way for the upbuild- 
ing of the community as well as for the advancement of his individual success. 
Another proof of his patriotic and public spirit may be found in the fact that he 
is one of the organizers and is president of the One Hundred Per Cent American 
Club of Douglas, Wyoming. 



wtllia:\i c. kinkead. 

\\'i!liam C. Kinkead, a Chevenne attornev who has engaged in the practice 
of law since 1894 and thus brings twenty-three years' experience to the solu- 
tion of legal problems which now confront him in the care of his extensive 
practice, was born in Knoxville, Iowa, in April, 1869, a son of Lemuel and 
Mary J. (Zuck) Kinkead. The father was also a prominent attorney who 
devoted his life to law practice, but both he and his wife are now deceased. 

Their son, William C. Kinkead, spending his youthful days under the parental 
roof, acquired a public and high school education in Knoxville. Iowa, and after- 
ward entered the Universitv of Iowa for the study of law. having determined 
upon law practice as his life work. He completed the full course and was 
graduated with the class of 1894, after which he opened an office in his native 
citv. there remaining for thirteen years. But the opportunities of the great 
and growing west attracted him and in 1907 he removed to Cheyenne, where 



HISTORY OF WVOMIXG 217 

he has now been engaged in practice for eleven years. He has much natural 
ability but is withal a hard student and is never contented until he has mastered 
every detail of his cases. He believes in the maxim: "There is no excellence 
without labor" and follows it closely. He is never surprised by some unex- 
pected discovery by an opposing lawyer, for in his mind he weighs every point 
and fortifies himself as well for defense as for attack. He convinces by his 
concise statements of law and fact rather than by word painting and so high is 
the respect for his legal aljility and integrity that his assertions in court are 
seldom questioned. 

On the 4th of January, igoS, Air. Kinkead was united in marriage to Miss 
Clare Button and they have two sons, Robert Button and Tom Harrington. The 
religious faith of the parents is that of the Episcopal church and Mr. Kinkead 
is a Mason of high standing, belonging to the consistory and to the Mystic 
Shrine. He is much interested in Wyoming and its development and cooperates 
in all well defined plans and pur]wses for its upbuilding. Along strictly pro- 
fessional lines he has cimnrction with the W'voniiiig and with the American 
Bar Associations. He lla^ ni;i(k- stcad\ ]jnigress in his profc^sidn and what- 
ever he does is for the best interests of his clients and fi)r the hcmor of his 
chosen calling. No man gives to either a more unqualified allegiance and these 
qualities have won for him the admiration and respect of all who know him. 



WILLIAAI J. WITHERSPOOX. 

Xo history of Kemmerer would be complete without extended reference to 
the Kemmerer Hardware iS; Furniture Company, of which William J. Wither- 
spoon is the secretary and treasurer and in which undertaking he is associated 
with Albert P. Heitz and R. Howard Embree. The three are most progressive 
and enterprising young men and their well defined plans are being carried for- 
ward to successful completion. They are today at the head of one of the most 
important commercial enterjjrises of their section of the state and are now 
actively engaged as well in the automobile trade. 

Mr. Witherspoon is a native of Sumter, South Carolina. He was born on 
the nth of Xovember, 1888, of the marriage of S. il. and Elizabeth (Mont- 
gomery) Witherspoon, who are also natives of that state, where the family has 
resided for many generations. The parents of William J- Witherspoon still 
make their home at Sumter and the father has devoted his life to agricultural 
pursuits. To them have been born eight children : Hugh, yet a resident of 
South Carolina; Robert and lames, wlm are living in Salt Lake Citv. Utah; 
Joseph, of South Carolina; Samuel. wIki is now with the I'nited States army in 
France; Mrs. Mary Muldrow. uf Snutli Carolin;i; Annie Laurie, at home; and 
William J., who was the fourth in order of birth. 

In his boyhood days William J. Witherspoon devoted his attention largely 
to the acquirement of a public school education in his nati\e town. On remov- 
ing to the west he made his way to Salt Lake City, Utah, where he entered the 
banking business, with which he was connected for three and a half years. He 
then removed to Kemmerer, Wyoming, and became associated with the Kem- 
merer Coal Company, with which he remained for three years. He also spent 
three years in the employ of the Frontier Supply Company and later became as- 
sociated with the Kemmerer Hardware Cotupany. After four years he pur- 
chased stock in the business and was elected secretary and treasurer of the 
Kemmerer Hardware Company, with Air. Heitz as the president and Air. Em- 
bree as the vice president. This undertaking has proven one of the important 
commercial interests of the city, and still further extending their labors, the 
three partners of the company organized the L'p-to-Date Auto Company, of 
which Mr. Witherspoon became the secretary and the active manager. The com- 



218 HISTORY^ OF WYOMING 

pany handles both the Reo and the Ford cars and maintains a well equipped 
garage in addition to handling all kinds of automobile accessories and supplies. 

In September, 1912, Mr. Witherspoon was united in marriage to Miss Marion 
Christmas, a daughter of Colonel and Mrs. H. E. Christmas, the former a promi- 
nent attorney of Kemmerer. They now have two children: Robert, born in 
1914; and Francis, born in 1917. 

Mr. and Mrs. Witherspoon hold membership in the Episcopal church and 
fraternally he is connected with the Masonic lodge. In politics he is an inde- 
pendent democrat. He usually votes with the party but does not consider himself 
bound by party ties. He is one of the best known and most popular voung busi- 
ness men of Lincoln county and aside from his business has those qualities which 
have won for him the warm friendship and kindly regard of all with whom he 
has been associated. 



THEODORE DIERS. 



Theodore Diers, cashier of the Citizens State Bank at Sheridan, was born 
at Seward, Nebraska, December 4, 1880, his parents being Herman and Annie 
(Schulte) Diers. The father removed to Nebraska from the state of Iowa in 
1869 and the following year established a general merchandise store in the town 
of Seward. In the same year he was married to Annie Schulte and both are 
still residents of Seward, being numbered among the highly respected people of 
that city. 

Theodore Diers acquired a public school education in Seward and afterward 
attended the Lincoln Business College at Lincoln, Nebraska. He started upon 
his business career as bookkeeper in the First National Bank of Seward when 
seventeen years of age and two years afterward was elected to the position of 
assistant cashier. In 1909 he came to Wyoming, where he- opened the Clearmont 
State Bank in the town of Clearmont and in August of that year was employed 
as cashier. In Alarch, 1910, he removed to Sheridan and assisted in the organi- 
zation of the Citizens State Bank, of which he has since been cashier. In 1912 
he was elected president of the Clearmont State Bank and still continues in that 
capacity. He is also treasurer of the Sheridan Building & Loan Association 
and is thus actively interested in financial affairs in his section of the state. 

Mr. Diers is identified with several fraternal organizations. He is identified 
with the Masons as a member of the lodge, chapter, commandery and Mystic 
Shrine and he is prominently known in the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, 
having been a past exalted ruler of Sheridan Lodge of Elks in 191 3 and district 
deputy grand exalted ruler of Wyoming in 1916. His political allegiance is given 
to the democratic party and in 1912 he was elected to the lower house of the 
Wyoming legislature, where he made so creditable a record that in 1914 he was 
elected state senator from Sheridan county and served in the sessions of 1915 
and 191 7. In .August of the latter year he was appointed federal food admin- 
istrator for the state of Wyoming by President Wilson, and he is a member of 
the Wyoming State Council of National Defense, standing stanchly for those 
interests which uphold the national policy in this period of stress when America 
is bearing her part in the effort to save the world for democracy. 



LAWRENCE E. ARMSTRONG. 

Lawrence E. Armstrong, actively engaged in the practice of law at Rawlins, 
was born in Jackson, Ohio, October 21, 1868, and was the eldest of the ten 
children of Washington and Salletha (Dyson) Armstrong, both of whom were 
natives of the Buckeve state, where thev continued to reside throughout their 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 221 

entire lives. The father devoted his attention to farming, but at the time of 
the Civil war put aside all business and personal considerations to respond to 
the country's call for troops, joining the Second Ohio Heavy Artillery as a 
private for three years' service, thereby demonstrating his unfaltering loyalty. 
He died in Ohio in 1887 but his widovv' is still living in Jackson, that state. 

In his boyhood days Lawrence E. Armstrong became a pupil in the public 
schools of Jackson county, Ohio, and afterward pursued a preparatory course 
in the National Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio, from which he was 
graduated with the class of 1891. Later he attended Ohio University and won 
the Bachelor of Philosophy degree in 1894. He then took up the profession of 
teaching in 1895 and was identified with the schools of Rawlins and of Carbon 
county, Wyoming, for three years, but he regarded teaching merely as an 
initial step to other professional labor and in 1901 completed a course in the 
law department of Columbia University, which institution in the previous year 
had conferred upon him the Master of Arts degree. In 1901 he opened a law 
office in Rawlins and through the intervening period has built up a large practice 
that ranks him with the leading attorneys of the state. Mr. Armstrong has 
made steady progress in his law practice and his success in a professional way 
affords the best evidence of his capability. His devotion to his clients' interests 
is proverbial. 

On the 29th of April, 1903, in Denver, Mr. Armstrong was united in marriage 
to Miss Katherine Bingner, a daughter of H. G. and Anna Bingner. They have be- 
come parents of three children : John Reuel, who was born in Rawlins in 1904 and 
is now attending high school; L. E., who was born in 1906; and Anna, born in 
1916. 

Mr. Armstrong is a Mason, connected with both the York and Scottish Rites, 
and he enjoys the highest regard of his brethren of the fraternity because of 
his close conformity to its advanced ethical standards. He has social qualities 
which render him popular and he is held in the highest esteem throughout Raw- 
lins and wherever he is known. For four years he was a resident of Denver, 
where he was engaged in the investment business, but with the exception of that 
period he has continuously devoted his attention to his profession since his ad- 
mission to the bar and his ability has brought him to a creditable standing among 
the lawyers of his adopted state. 



HENRY D. BALLARD. 



Henry D. Ballard, operating extensively and successfully in the real estate 
held in Douglas, was born in Allegany county. New York, in 1842, a son of 
Aloses R. and Eliza (Beecher) Ballard, both of whom have passed away. They 
lived, however, to an advanced age and reared a family of eleven children. 

In the public schools Henry D. Ballard began his education, which he con- 
tinued in the Iowa City University. He afterward concentrated his efforts and 
attention upon general agricultural pursuits, which he successfully followed until 
January 25, 1916, when he removed to Wyoming. For a number of years he 
also conducted a commercial college at Lincoln, Nebraska, having removed to that 
state in 1910. Upon coming to Wyoming he opened a real estate office in Doug- 
las and has since negotiated many important realty transfers. He has thor- 
oughly informed himself concerning property values in his city and county 
and has gained many clients by reason of his honorable business methods and 
his progressiveness. In addition to his real estate business he is conducting a 
ranch which he owns. While throughout his entire life he has largely concen- 
trated his efforts and attention upon his business affairs, at the time of the Civil 
war he put aside all business and personal interests in order to espouse the cause 
of the Union and for a brief period was with a cavalry company, after which 



222 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

he joined Company A of the Twenty-third Iowa Infantry, with which he saw 
about three years of active service on southern battlefields. 

On the 2d of November, 1884. Mr. Ballard was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary M. Corcoran and to them have been born a son and a daughter. Mr. 
Ballard has ever been a great student of history and he is much interested in 
Wyoming and its development, contributing in active and helpful measure to 
the work of progress and improvement. His religious faith is that of the Uni- 
tarian church and fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks. In politics he is a republican and he is a broad-minded man 
who looks at all important questions without partisanship and stands at all 
times for progress and improvement. He maintains pleasant relations with his 
old military comrades through his membership in the Grand Army of the Re- 
public and he is as true and loyal to his country in days of peace as when he 
followed the stars and stripes upon the battlefields of the south. 



\\ARREN RICHARDSON. 

Warren Richardson, one of the county commissioners of Laramie county 
and widely and favorably known thro.ughout the county and especially in 
Cheyenne, where he makes his home, was born on the 30th of October, 1864, in 
Indianapolis. Indiana, a son of Warren and Mary A. (Kabis) Richardson. The 
father was a man of prominence in the communities in which he lived. He 
filled the office of county clerk in 1874 and was a city councilman of Cheyenne, 
during which time he did much toward developing the beautiful park system of 
the city, and was also county superintendent of schools. He was likewise well 
known as an author and in financial circles through his connection with the First 
National Bank of Cheyenne and his activities thus contributed to the material 
development and upbuilding of the district in which he lived. His last days 
were spent in Seattle, Washington, where he passed away in March, 1908. His 
widow survives and is now living in Cheyenne, Wyoming. 

Warren Richardson, born in Indiana, became a resident of Wyoming in 1869, 
the family home being established at Cheyenne, where he pursued a public and 
high school education, making good use of his opportunities in that direction and 
thus laying a substantial foundation for his success in later life. In his youth- 
ful days he began learning the printer's trade and after working in that way for 
a time' turned his attention to ranching and the live stock business. Through all 
the intervening years to the present he has been an active factor in the develop- 
ment of Laramie county along various lines. He has been not only associated 
with its live stock interests but has been frequently called upon to serve in 
positions of public honor and trust. He is now chairman of the board of county 
commissioners of Laramie county for a term of four years that will extend from 
IQ15 until 1919. He is a most active factor in promoting the good roads move- 
ment and is the consul for Laramie county in connection with the Lincoln High- 
way project, of which he is heartily in favor. He has closely studied the question 
of good roads and is a stanch advocate of every practical movement to improve 
the highways, recognizing how beneficial this is when judged from the stand- 
point of economics, of utility and of comfort. Mr. Richardson originated the 
idea of a combined city and county building and under his regime the beautiful 
building was begun and almost completed. He is watchful of every indication 
that has to do with the upbuilding and progress of his community in any way 
and he has become associated with the work of developing the oil regions of the 
state, having been active in this field for thirty years, his labors' having been 
carried on in the Salt Creek and Big Muddy districts. 

Mr. Richardson is a stalwart champion of the republican party. Fraternally 
he is a prominent ]\Iason, belonging to Wyoming Consistory, No. i, A. .A. S. R.. 
and he is also identified with Korein Temple, A. .A. O. N. M. S., of Rawlins. 









' Ji^ll^^m^Mi '^•^'~' 





W AKKKN Hll IIAKDSON 



224 HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 

He has membership with the Elks Lodge, No. 660, and Phoenix Lodge, No. 144, 
Woodmen of the World. He is thus well known in fraternal circles and is in 
hearty sympathy with the beneficent spirit which underlies these organizations. 
He enjoys hunting and fishing and indulges his taste for those sports when leisure 
permits but places business and official interests first and is making a most credit- 
able record as county commissioner, giving to the county as chairman of the 
board a most efficient and progressive and businesslike administration, during 
which many thousands of dollars of back taxes were collected and the county 
put on a cash basis for the first time in many years. 



CHESTER E. HARRIS, M. D. 

Dr. Chester E. Harris, associated in the ownership of the Basin Hospital at 
Basin, Wyoming, with Dr. Herbert T. Harris, was born in Algiers, Indiana, 
September 6, 1881, his parents being James Finley and Josephine Harris", the 
former also a physician. With the removal of the family to Ogden, Illinois, he 
continued his education in the schools of that city until graduated with the 
class of 1897. He afterward entered the preparatory school of the University 
of Illinois, which he attended in 1898 and 1899. He then became a student in the 
Lhiiversity of Illinois and won his Bachelor of Arts degree upon graduation with 
the class of 1902. The following year his alma mater conferred upon him the 
Master of Arts degree and in 1906 he completed a medical course in the State 
University of Illinois, winning his M. D. degree at that date. He was then 
a member of the house staff of the Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago from 
1906 until 1908 and through hospital experience gained that broad knowledge 
and efficiency which can never be as quickly acquired in any other way as in 
hospital work. He afterward opened an office in Chicago, where he remained 
in active practice from 1908 until 1912. In the latter year he removed to Basin, 
Wyoming, to become joint owner with Dr. Herbert T. Harris of the Basin 
Hospital, which they have since conducted. In the same year he was made 
county physician of Bighorn county and has since served in that capacity. 

In Chicago, Illinois, on the 14th of April, 1910, Dr. Harris was united in 
marriage to Miss Adriana \'an Eenenaam, a daughter of Dick \'an Eenenaam 
and Rica (Vyan) Van Eenenaam. Dr. and Mrs. Harris have one child, Frances 
Josephine. 

' In his political views Dr. Harris is an earnest republican and in 191 5 was 
elected coroner of Bighorn county, which position he is now filling. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and along strictly 
professional lines he has membership with the Northwestern Wyoming Aledical 
Society, of which he is the vice president, the W'yoming State Medical Society, 
and the American Medical Association. Through the meetings of these different 
organizations he keeps in touch with the trend of modern scientific thought, inves- 
tigation and progress and readily adapts progressive ideas to the needs of his pri- 
vate practice. 



HON. EDWARD E. JOHNSON. 

Hon. Edward E. Johnson, filling the dual position of justice of the peace and 
police judge of Rock Springs, was born in Aladelia, Minnesota, June 26, 1866, 
his parents being Eric and Cenia ( Iverson) Johnson, both of whom were natives 
of Norway, whence they crossed the Atlantic to the new world, first establishing 
their home in Illinois. They afterward became pioneer residents of Minnesota, 
where the father engaged in farming until his death, which occurred in 1894. His 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 225 

widow still survives and is yet a resident of Minnesota. In their faniiiy were nine 
children, seven sons and two daughters. 

Edward E. Johnson, who was the second in order of birth in that family, pur- 
sued his education in the public schools of Minnesota and afterward removed to 
Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where he resided for four years, working along various 
lines in order to provide for his support. In 1892 he arrived in Ruck Springs, 
after which he was employed by the Union Pacific Coal Company and aKo as a 
switchman by the Union Pacific Railway Company, spending his time m that man- 
ner until 1902, when he was made justice of the peace, in which capacity he has 
since continued, making an excellent record by the fair and impartial manner in 
which he discharges his duties. In 191 o he was elected police judge of the city and 
is now occupying those offices, his excellent record being indicated by his long re- 
tention in these positions. 

On the 19th of January, 1895, Judge Johnson was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma Walter, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Noah Walter, of Rock Springs, and 
they have become the parents of two children: Bessie, who was born in Rock 
Springs in 1896; and Clarice, born in 1901. The former is a high school grad- 
uate and has also pursued a business course, while now she is with the Stock 
Growers Mercantile Company. The younger daughter is a student in high school. 

Fraternally Judge Johnson is connected with the Eagles, in which he is filling 
the office of treasurer, and with the Loyal Order of Moose, in which he is serving 
as secretary. His political endorsement is given to the democratic party, which he 
has supported since age conferred uiion him the right of franchise. Judge 
Johnson is held in high regard in the comnnmity in which he makes his home not 
only by reason of his loyalty and fi(k-lit\ in business but also by reason of a gen- 
uine personal worth that has won for him wiik- popularity. 



JOSEPH L. WICKS, M. D. 

Dr. Joseph L. Wicks, a physician and surgeon of Evanston and vice president 
of the Stock Growers Bank of that city, was born in Polk. Ashland county. Ohio, 
December 24. 1870. his father being the late Christian Wicks, who was a native of 
Ohio and a descendant of one of the old Pennsylvania families of German lineage. 
Christian Wicks was a carriage builder by trade and resided for many years in 
Ashland county. Ohio, there remaining until called to his final rest. He was quite 
successful in his business aft'airs and thus left to his family a comfortable com- 
petence when in February, 1899, he passed away at the age of sixty-four years. 
His wife bore the maiden name of Sarah Summers and was bom in Ohio, her 
death occurring in Polk. Ashland county, in May, 1913, when she had reached the 
age of seventy-two years. By her marriage she had become the mother of six 
children. 

Dr. Wicks, who was the fifth in order of birth, acquired a public school edu- 
cation in his native county and afterward became a student in Heidelberg Uni- 
versitv at Tiffin, Ohio. Later he entered the Starling JMedical College at Columbus, 
Ohio, in 1894, spending a year in that institution. In 1896 he entered the Ohio 
Medical University at Columbus and was graduated therefrom on the 5th of April, 
1898. He first entered upon the active work of his profession in Fairfield. Ohio, 
where he continued for six months, after which he removed to the west, making 
his way directly to Evanston, Wyoming. He arrived in that city an entire stranger 
on the 24th of December. 1898, and entered upon active practice, being first asso- 
ciated with Dr. R. Harvey Reed, of Rock Springs, who was superintendent of 
the Wyoming State Hospital. After three months' service there Dr. Wicks re- 
turned to Evanston and has since been in continuous and active general practice, 
in -^hich he has met with a substantial measure of success. He belongs to the 
Wyoming State and the American Medical Associations and something of his high 
professional standing is indicated in the fact that he was for several years elected 



226 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

to the office of treasurer of the former and at one time was chosen as its president. 
His colleagues and contemporaries accord him high professional standing and the 
public has given expression of its confidence in his ability in the liberal patronage 
accorded him. Aside from his profession he is well known in financial circles 
as vice president of the Stock Growers Bank. 

On the 28th of June, 1899, in Columbus, Ohio, Dr. ^\'icks was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Erma A. List, a native of Ohio and a daughter of George and Alice 
(Aid) List, early residents of Ohio and representatives of old families of Pennsyl- 
vania. Dr. and Mrs. Wicks have become parents of two children, both born in 
Evanston: Josephine, born July 22. 1902; and Lucille, born May 13, 1913. 

Politically Dr. Wicks is a republican and for two years he filled the office of 
coroner, to which jinsilion he was elected in 1900. He also serves as county health 
officer, having occupied the position since 19CO. and he was a member of the 
state board of health from HjOi) until 1910. He has always taken an active in- 
terest in politics and in civic matters and he served from 1913 until 1917 as a mem- 
ber of the city council of Evanston, exercising his official prerogatives in support 
of many well defined plans and measures for the public good. He is a prom- 
inent ^lason, belonging to lodge, chapter, commandery and Mystic Shrine, being 
identified witli the temple at Rawlins. He has filled all of the chairs in lioth the 
chapter and commandery and is a loyal exemplar of the craft. 1 lis family is con- 
nected with the Presbyterian church. 

Dr. ^^'icks and his wife occupy an enxiable position in social circles and enjoy 
the warm regard of all with whom they have been brought in contact. He holds 
to liigh standards in professinnal service and by reason of his laudable ambition 
he has made steady protjre-- almi'^ professional lines and today ranks with the 
most skilled and able phvsician> ami -urgeons not onlv of Evanston but of all west- 
ern \\'vomino. 



ROBERT R. ROSE. 



Robert R. Rose, county attorney of Lincoln county and owner and publisher 
of the Kemmerer Camera, is a well known and valued citizen of Kemmerer. 
with the public interests of which he has been closely and helpfully associated 
for a number of years. He is a western man and the spirit of western enter- 
prise and progress finds exemplification in his career. 

He was born at Tripp. South Dakota, October 15, 1880. His father, William 
H. Rose, is a resident of Denver. Colorado, and a native of the state of Xew 
York. His ancestors had settled there prior to the Revolutionarv- war, the family 
having been founded in America by \\'illiam Rose, who was of English birth. 
He was one of a family of seven brothers, all of whom served in the* Revolu- 
tionary war. William H. Ro^e, father of Robert R. Rose of this review, was 
reared and educated in the Empire state and afterward went to Wisconsin in 
i860. He was there living at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war and 
responded to the country's call for troops., serving at the front for three years 
with the Twenty-third Wisconsin Infantry or until hostilities had closed. His 
father, W. W. Rose, was also a member of the same regiment. After the war 
William H. Rose returned to Wisconsin but soon removed to Iowa and later to 
South Dakota, where he continued his residence until 1889. He then went to 
Denver. Colorado, where he engaged in the fire insurance business, in which he 
continued for twenty-three years, becoming one of the best known and most 
successful representatives of fire insurance in that city. He is now living retired, 
enjoying the fruits of a well spent life and marked business enterprise. In 
])olitics he always affiliated with the republican party from the time that age 
conferred upon him the right of franchise until i8gfi. when he joined the ranks 
of the democratic party. He wedded Maria Huntington, a native of Canada 
and a direct descendant of Samuel Huntington, who was one of the signers 



228 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

of the Declaration of Independence. She is also living and of their family of 
eight children seven yet survive. 

Robert R. Rose was the seventh in order of birth among their children. The 
public schools afforded him his educational opportunities and after attending 
the high school of Denver he continued his studies in the University of Denver, 
there preparing for the practice of law, and in due time he was graduated with 
the class of 1906, at which time the LL. B. degree was conferred upon him. 
Prior tcr that date, however, he was associated with his father in the fire insur- 
ance business and later continued for several years in the same line of business 
on his own account, representing several of the large eastern companies. After 
his graduation he devoted his attention to the conduct of an insurance agency 
in Denver until 191 1, when he entered upon the practice of law in Denver, con- 
tinuing there until 1914. On the 19th of April of that year he arrived in Kem- 
merer, where he opened an office and has since been engaged in active practice. 
He is an able lawyer, with a mind naturally analytical, logical and inductive, 
and his clear reasoning constitutes one of the forceful elements in his growing 
success at the bar. He is most devoted to the interests of his clients and never 
fails to give a thorough preparation before he enters the court, so that he is 
well qualified for defense as well as for attack. Aside from his duties as a 
member of the bar he is engaged in newspaper publication, being the owner and 
editor of the Kemmerer Camera, a weekly journal which is regarded as the lead-- 
ing paper of Lincoln county. ^Ir. Rose is also a director of several local busi- 
ness corporations and his activity and enterprise are constituting an important 
element in the continued growth and development of this section of the state. 

On the 25th of July, 1913, at Colorado Springs, Colorado, Mr. Rose was 
married to IMiss Eleanor \'irginia Bronaugh, a native of Illinois and a daughter 
of Perry S. and Martha (Burke) Bronaugh. The father is now a resident of 
Auburn, Illinois, but the mother has passed away. She was a representative 
of an old Kentucky family of Irish lineage, while the Bronaugh family comes 
of French ancestry. ]\Ir. and ]\Irs. Rose have one son, Robert Arthur, who was 
born in Chicagfi. Illinois, November I. 1915. 

Politically Mr. Rose is a democrat, taking a somewhat active interest in the 
work of the party, and he is now filling the position of county and prosecuting 
attorney of Lincoln county. He belongs to the Wyoming State Bar Association 
and he is a member of the Kemmerer Chamber of Commerce, which he aided 
in organizing. His membership relations extend to Albert Pike Lodge, Xo. 117, 
A. F. & A. M., of Denver, Colorado, from which he was demitted to Kemmerer 
Lodge, No. 33. He is a loyal follower of the craft, believing heartily in its prin- 
ciples concerning the brotherhood of mankind. He is likewise a member of 
St. James Episcopal church at Kemmerer and the teachings of that denomination 
have been a guiding force in his life. Mr. Rose is a man of sterling worth, of 
marked strength of character, of keen intellect, of progressive spirit, and by reason 
of his inherent power and his laudable ambition he has worked his way upward 
steadily, advancing step by step and at each point in his career gaining a broader 
outlook and wider opportunities, which he has eagerly utilized. His position, 
as established by the consensus of public opinion, is with the highly honored and 
representative journalists and lawyers of western \\'yoming. 



THOMAS H. SIMPSON. 

Thomas H. Simpson is the president and treasurer of the Laramie Grocery 
Company of Laramie, Wyoming, and his business record is one which should 
serve to inspire and encourage others, for he is of that splendid type of a self-made 
man which is distinctly a product of American conditions, American opportunities 
and American enterprise and hard-headed common sense. Starting out to provide 
for his own support when a youth of thirteen, his course has been marked by 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 229 

steady progress, for he has wisely utilized his time, his talents and his opportuni- 
ties. A modern writer has trcnchantlx expressed it that "Success depends upon 
a time-table, not upon a maji." In other words, every community holds its oppor- 
tunities but the one who sees and utilizes these chances is the individual who 
attains success. Not all days in the career of Thomas H. Simpson have been 
equally bright, but with unfaltering courage he has pushed his way upward and 
each forward step has brought him a broader outlook. 

He was born on the island of Campobcllo, in New Brunswick, Canada, July 
15, 1862, and is a son of the late James D. Simpson, who passed away in New 
Brunswick in 1875, when forty-four years of age. He was a native of Nova 
Scotia and was of Scotch descent. For years he was a seafaring man and in his 
later life liecame connected with the fishing industry. He married Lydia Mitchell, 
a native of Campobello, who long survived him, her death occurring in March, 
1914, when she had reached the advanced age of eighty-three years. .She was 
the mother of eleven children, ten of whom were born of her first marriage and 
one by her second. 

Thomas H. Simpson was the fifth in order of birth in her family. He was 
educated in his native country but his opportunities were somewhat limited, for 
when a youth of thirteen he faced the necessity of providing for his own main- 
tenance. Starting out to earn his livelihood, he was first employed at fishing and 
became connected with his father in the fishing industry, which he followed after 
his father's death. He then left Canada and crossed the border into the United 
States, making his way to Wyoming. He settled in Laramie in 1879, then a youth 
of seventeen years and a comparative stranger in this section of the country. 
However, he had a sister, Mrs. Delina McKenzie, living in Laramie, she and her 
husband having been pioneer settlers of the city, but both are now deceased. After 
reaching Laramie Mr. Simpson was employed by W. L. Kidd, a pioneer merchant, 
and subsequently was in the employ of James D. Bannon, a pioneer groceryman 
of the city. He likewise spent one season in the employ of Phil Mandel, a pioneer 
ranchman, for he desired a change of occupation and wanted to enter outdoor 
life. He acted as foreman of the ranch during that period and later he was in 
the grocery house of Mr. Bannon for a year. In 1882 he became connected with 
the Trading Commercial Company of Laramie, with which he remained for fif- 
teen years, working his wav upward from the humble position of de!iver\' clerk 
to that of manager of the business, which was the largest mercantile enterprise 
in the state. In iStjN Mr. Simpson resigned his position and organized the Laramie 
Trading Company, incorporating the business in 1901. Prior to that date it had 
been conducted as a partnership affair but on the incorporation Mr. Simpson 
liecame president and treasurer, with Herman Hegewald as vice president and 
Tlowarrl R. Intjham as secretary. Mr. Simpson also extended his acli\itie-- into the 
field of l.ianking. becoming the first president of the First State B.ink <>{ Laramie, 
which he aided in organizing and incorporating. He is thus a pnmiinent figure in 
commercial and financial circles and as such is contributing much to the devel- 
opment and upbuilding of his city. 

In Laramie, in 1887, Mr. Simpson was united in marriage to Aliss Tennie E. 
Welch, a native of Michigan and a danoliter of Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Welch, who 
were early residents of the Wolverine st.ite lint have now passed away. Mr. and 
Mrs. Simpson have two living children: Fdn.i, who is the wife of .A. W. Rover, 
a shoe merchant of Laramie : and Harry T.. who is a traveling salesman. 

Mr. Simpson votes with the re])ublican party and is a firm belie\er in its prin- 
ciples. At one time he ser\ed as a member of the city council of Laramie but has 
not been an active office seeker, preferring to do his duties to the public as a 
private citizen. Fraternally he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the 
World. His religious faith is that of the Fjiiscopal church and he is serving as 
one bi its vestrymen. His chief diversion comes through fishin<: and hunting 
and when leisure permits he indulges his love of those sports. His time and atten- 
tion, however, have been most largely concentrated upon his business affairs and 



230 HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 

steadily he has advanced. Fortunate in possessing character and ability that 
inspire confidence in others, the simple weight of these characteristics have 
carried him into important connections. 



TvIOSES PATRICK KEEFE. 

Prominent in the business circles of Cheyenne is Moses Patrick Keefe. who 
is the owner and general manager of the National Lumber Company and is thus 
active in controlling important interests. A native of Ireland, he was born on 
the 25th of September, 1853, a son of Alichael and ^Margaret (Quinn) Keefe. 
The Keefe family is an old one in Ireland and the father was a man of much 
influence there. He stood for the people as against the landlord system, but was 
always loyal to his government. However, he was for a time e.xiled from Ireland 
and spent that time in England, Scotland and America, but was later permitted 
to return to his native land to spend his remaining days. Both he and his wife 
have now passed away. They became the parents of four daughters and six 
sons, but only two of the daughters are now living, namely, Mrs. McGarvev, of 
Cheyenne, Wyoming, and Mrs. Lyons, of Boston, while the only surviving son of 
the family is the subject of this review. 

Moses P. Keefe was the sixth in order of birth. He was educated in Ireland 
but left school at the age of thirteen years and learned the building trade in his 
native country. He remained a resident of the Emerald isle until he reached 
the age of seventeen years, when he crossed the Atlantic alone to the new world 
and became a resident of Decatur, Illinois. He was also in Chicago at the time 
of the great conflagration in October, 1871. He was actively employed there 
at mechanical work and was foreman for two big companies of those days — 
Gould i\: Company and Call & Kraft. Leaving the middle west, he made his 
way to Cheyenne, Wyoming, during the money panic in Chicago in 1873, but in 
the year after returned and remained until 1876. He then again came to Chey- 
eime. At the time of the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia he heard of the 
Custer massacre, which determined him to come to Wyoming and take up his 
permanent abode in order to aid in reclaiming the region for the purposes of 
civilization He spent the fall and winter of 1876 and 1877 at Deadwood in the 
Black Hills of South Dakota, after which he returned to the Big Horn countr\-, 
remaining at Fort McKinney and at Fort Laramie until June, 1877. He worked, 
by the day. at the building trade until he began business on his own account. In 
1879 he went to Leadville, Colorado, but afterward returned to Cheyenne and 
opened a shop for the conduct of a contracting business, in which he was con- 
tinuously engaged from 1879 until 1914. Through the intervening period of 
almost forty years he has contributed in marked measure to substantial growth 
and improvement of the city. He built the main portion of the state capitol 
building, most of the public schools of Cheyenne, also the Methodist and Pres- 
byterian churches, the Knights of Pythias block, the First National Bank build- 
ing, the ^^'yoming Trust & Savings' Bank building, the Catholic cathedral and 
other substantial structures. He built half of Fort Russell and as a contractor 
he continued an active factor in promoting the improvement of the city until 
1914. He also built Fort Crook near Omaha, a million dollar contract, and more 
recently built Fort Omaha, Fort Meade and has done other government work at 
Fort Robinson. He was likewise the builder of the post at Spokane. Beginning 
with Tanuary, 1899, he was for eighteen months in Cuba with General Brooks 
and remodeled a number of Spanish buildings, making them sanitary. All of 
his government service and fort work are highly satisfactory. In 1910 he estab- 
lished the National Lumber & :\Iill Company and has a complete planing mill, 
equipped to do all kinds of mill work. His plant covers the greater portion of 
two city blocks. It is the largest plant in Wyoming and its equipment is thor- 
oughly modern. 



HISTORY OF WVOMJXG 233 

In October, 1877. Mr. Keefe was united in niarrriage in Chicago to Miss Eliza 
daynor Kevvley, a daughter of James Kewk-v, one of the very old settlers of 
Chicago, arriving at that location" when Fort Dearborn was still standing. Mrs. 
Keefe passed away in Marcli, i,S<)3. She had become the mother of seven chil- 
dren, five daughters and iwu Mnib, of whom Elmer J. is now associated with 
his father in 1)usiness. l^jr his second wife, seven years later, Mr. Keefe chose 
Miss Elizabeth Tilton, a daughter of Meese Tilton, of old Virginia stock that 
half a century before removed to Kansas and became pioneers of tl-Kit state. Mr. 
and Mrs. Keefe ha\e two sons anrl a daughter. 

In politics Mr. Keefe is a republican and served as a member of the ninth 
asseml)ly of the territmial leui-,l;iture in iSNn. lie has been county commissioner 
for two terms and a nienil.er uf the city council for a number 'of terms. He 
was also mayor of Cheyenne for two years, in 1902 and 1903, Init while he has 
always made an excellent officer through the prompt and faithful discharge of 
his duties, he prefers home life to the activity of political office. While he was 
mayor of Che\eiine ihe tirst Cranite Springs dam was built. It supplies the 
largest part of ( I'.wniie with its water. It hdlds over one billion two hundred 
million gallons. Mr. Keefe superimcmled it^ Imilding and the construction work- 
was most carefully and conscienti(iUsl\ diuie It is .said to be one of the finest 
dams in the world. Fraternally Mr. Keef ■ i^ a IMason of high rank. He has 
taken all the various degrees up to and including the thirty-second degree in the 
Scottish Rite and he has crossed the sands of the desert with the Nobles of the 
AI> Stic Shrine. He is also connected with the Knights of Pythias and with the 
Independent Order of ( )dfl Fellows. He belongs to the Industrial Club and to 
the CheA'enne Club rnid there is no phase of public life or development in the 
community in which be is not interested. He stands at all times for progress 
and inijarovenient and his elTorts along business and official lines and as a private 
citizen have all contributed to the growth, development and upbuilding of this 
section of the state. He is a man wholly self-made, possessed of fine executive 
abilitv, and will always "deliver the goods." He is respected and honored by 
all who know him and most of all where he is best known. 



LEROY E. FOSXER, IsL D. 

Dr. Eerov E. Fosner, a phvsician and surgeon practicing at Evanston, where 
he is also conducting the Woodlawn Hospital, is a native son of Indiana, his birth 
having occurred in Rochester, Fulton countv. that state, on the nth of .\ugust. 
iS8o,'"his parents 1,eiiig I'llis .-uid I'niina 1 Rea.leri I'osner. both nf whom were 
natives (if l.aneaster cnunt\, ! 'eiiiis\ K aiiia, where they were reared, educated and 
married. Removing westward, they tuuk ui.i their abude in Indiana when that was 
still a frontier state ami the father there engaged in farming thmuglidut his re- 
maining days, his death occurring in Fulton couiUy in iSXS, when he was but 
twentv-nine years of age. Flis widow still resides in Rochester and is now fifty- 
four years of age. In their family were three children : Mrs. Fred Izzard, living 
in Lewistown, Montana; Mrs. D. 'O. McCoy, a resident of Indianapolis, Indiana; 
and Eerov F. 

Throudi the period of his vouth Dr. Fosner was a pupil in the ]iublic schools 
of Rochester, Indiana, and in the Rochester Normal University, in which he pur- 
sued a course in. the scientific department and also a course in the conmiercial 
department. Fie v.-as graduated on the einniiletion of the former in igo4 and on 
the completion- of his commercial cnurse ni ii;o6. He resolved after a careful 
consideration of the broad field of liusine-s and the opportunities offered along 
many line- in enneent'.ite hi- effurts and attention upon a professional career, and 
with thai end in \ iew he eiuered the Indiana State Lmiversity as a medical student 
and was grailuatetl on the completion of a four years' course with the class of 
IQII. He began practice in connection with the state government service at 



234 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

Meadow Creek, Washington, and had charge of the government hospital which 
was maintained in connection with the North Yakima reclamation project. He 
there remained until October 5, 1913, at which date he arrived in Evanston and 
opened an office for the private practice of his profession. He has since been one 
of the resident physicians of the city and has inade substantial progress as a 
physician and surgeon. On the 14th of May, 1914, he opened the W'oodlawn 
Hospital at Evanston, which is thoroughly modern in its equipment and in the 
methods there followed. There is now capacity for fifteen patients and the most 
thorough and scientific care is given to these. Dr. Fosner keeps in touch with the 
trend of modern thought and investigation having to do with the practice of 
medicine and surgery and his pronounced ability has gained him the wide recogni- 
tion of his colleagues and contemporaries. He is serving as county physician 
of Uinta county and he belongs to the Wyoming State Medical Association and 
the American Medical Association. 

Dr. Fosner was married to Mrs. E. B. Hoen, the widow of Henry Hoen and 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Stone. ]\Irs. Fosner was born in Fort Wayne, 
Indiana, and the marriage was celebrated in Ogden, Utah, in November, 1913. Dr. 
Fosner is a Mason, affiliated with Lodge No. 282, A. F. & A. M. of Campbells- 
burg, Indiana, and the Chapter No. 90, R. A. M.. at Rochester, Indiana, and he is 
also connected with the encampment of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at 
Evanston, Wyoming. He is widely known because of his high professional attain- 
ments and his growing skill, and his fellow townsmen and his professional col- 
leagues attest his worth both as a man and as a representative of the medical 
profession. 



GEORGE W. ACE. 



George W. Ace, actively engaged in the furniture, hardware and undertaking 
business at Rock Springs, was born near Scranton, in Wyoming county, Penn- 
sylvania, July 8, i860, a son of John and Christiana (Jennings) Ace. The mother 
was born in Pennsylvania, but her people were from Lancastershire, England. 
The paternal grandfather came from Germany and took up the occupation of 
farming as a life work, and the father was born in Monroe countv, Pennsylvania. 
On leaving the east he removed to Hastings, Nebraska, where he devoted his 
attention to general agricultural pursuits throughout his remaining days. Both 
he and his wife passed away in Hastings, his death occurring in 1899, while 
Mrs. Ace departed this life in 1894. In their family were seven children, five 
of whom are yet living: ]\Irs. Rose Kintner, a resident of Pennsylvania; William, 
who has made his home at Rock Springs since 1S83 : Mrs. Alice Kintner, also of 
Pennsylvania ; Norman, living in eastern Colorado ; and George W., of this review, 
who was the fourth in order of birth. The oldest daughter died near Wilkes- 
Barre, Pennsylvania, in 1906, and the youngest son in 1898, at the age of twenty- 
eight years, in Hastings, Nebraska. 

At the usual age George W. .\ce became a pupil in the public schools of 
Pennsylvania and his educational training there was supplemented by a year's 
study in Nebraska following the removal of the family to the west. He after- 
ward worked upon his father's farm until he attained his majority and then 
started out in life on his own account. He made his w^ay to Butte, Montana, 
and was employed in the Anaconda mines for a year. He afterward returned 
to Nebraska, where he engaged in farming for eight years and then sold his 
interests in that state. Subsequently he took up his abode in Oregon and devoted 
his attention to farming south of the city of Albany for four years, on the expira- 
tion of which period he became a resident of Rock Springs in 1897 and turned 
his attention to the furniture and undertaking business in connection with his 
brother. He bought out the business in 1909 and has since conducted his com- 
mercial interests on an extensive scale. He has one of the largest stores of 




JDR. AND MRS. GEORGE W. ACE 



236 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

furniture and undertaking goods in Rock Springs and Sweetwater county, and 
his business has reached extensive and gratifying proportions. 

At Rock Springs, on the 23d of Xovember, 1909, Mr. Ace was united in 
marriage to Harriet A. (Lockwood) Kemp, whose father was killed in the 
Civil war when the daughter was only about two years of age. By a former 
marriage Mr. Ace had three children. Roy, born in Hastings, Nebraska, was 
graduated from the high school of Rock Springs and is now married and resides 
in San Pedro, California, where he is in the employ of the Standard Oil Com- 
pany. Edna, born in Hastings, Nebraska, was graduated from the Rock Springs 
high school and is now married and resides in Los Angeles, California. Geneva, 
born in Albany, Oregon, resides in Long Beach, California. 

Mr. Ace is a prominent Mason, belonging to the York Rite as well as to the 
Mystic Shrine. He is very active in Masonic circles and is a prominent repre- 
sentative of the craft, exemplifying in his life the beneficent spirit upon which 
it is based. He is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Woodmen of the World, the Modern Woodmen 
of America and the Eastern Star. His political endorsement is given to the 
republican party but he has never been an office seeker, preferring to concentrate 
his time and energies upon his business afl^airs. His religious faith is that of 
the Congregational church, in which he has served as treasurer for five years. 
He has traveled extensively over this country and is a broad-minded and cultured 
gentleman who by thrift and industry has reached a high and creditable position 
iu Rock Springs' business circles. 



F. S. KING BROTHERS COMPANY. 

The F. S. King Brothers Company of Laramie is the one Wyoming industry 
that is the foremost of its kind in America, enjoying not only a national reputa- 
tion but one that extends to every country on the face of the globe where the wool 
and sheep industry is represented in any degree of modern development. The 
history of this company is but a record of the perseverance, application and 
clean, businesslike methods of three brothers — Francis S., Herbert J. and Joseph 
H. King — during the period of their respective identification with the business. 
Jts modest beginning is well remembered by the older residents of Albany county, 
while the early struggles of the King brothers as young men make their subse- 
quent success a well earned reward. Superior men in every way, they would 
have made a success of any business that they might have taken up. In the sheep 
business each one seemed to fit into a different branch of the work and thus the 
brothers constituted a most formidable combination, working toward results that 
had to bring success. 

Francis S. King was the first of the brothers to become connected with the 
sheep industry in Wyoming. This was in the middle '80s, when he entered the 
employ of Paul Pascoe, an old-time sheep man operating in what is now Albany 
county. Mr. King gradually acquired an interest in the flock and in 1888 was 
joined by his brother, Herbert J., who had come direct from England. The two 
brothers had individual and partnership interests with Mr. Pascoe at different 
times until 1892, when they severed connections with him and branched out in 
the business together under the style of King Brothers. In the meantime, or in 
the year i8gi, their younger brother. Joseph H., had come from England and 
entered their employ. In 1895, Joseph H. King acquired an interest in the busi- 
ness and in 1898 a partnership was formed under the style of F. S. King Brothers, 
the business being so continued until June 30, 1904, when it was incorporated as 
the F. S. King Brothers Company, with Francis S. King as president, Herbert J. 
King as vice president and Joseph H. King as secretary and treasurer. The firm 
name has ne\er since been changed but the personnel of the firm changed in 
1915, when Herbert J. and Joseph H. purchased the interest of their brother. 



HISTORY OF WYOAIIXG 237 

Francis S., who retired from the business, since which time Herbert J. has been the 
president, with A. C. Jones as vice president and Joseph H. King as secretary and 
treasurer. 

As range sheep men originall)', the King brothers had given considerable 
more attention to breeding and its results than the average sheep man of that 
time, and noting the beneficial results achieved, they gradually went into the breed- 
ing business, i'hey first bought Glide ewes in California and select Merino ewes 
from Oregon, breeding them to Shattuck and King Merino rams. Their first 
flock header ram was McKinley, bred by Shattuck & King and sired by Shattuck 
& King's "Chance," the grand champion at the World's Columbian Exposition in 
Chicago in 1893, while McKinley's dam was Lady Burwell, also grand champion 
at Chicago in 1S93. Merino blood predominated among these breeders until lyoi, 
when at the Omaha exposition they purchased their hrst Rambouillet ram, Ray 
R. 25, whose sire and dam were born on the water en route to America with a 
German importation to the Chicago World's Fair. This ram was crossed with the 
best Merino blood, producing a large increase in size and a smoothness in body, 
show^ing marked progress in breeding and established beyond all question of 
doubt the advantage and desirability of the Rambouillet blood. Ever on the alert 
to secure the best breeding, they purchased at the St. Louis exposition in 1904 the 
first prize yearling Rambouillet ram, Lockwood and Markham No. 11, and from 
A. E. Green, of Orchard Lake, Michigan, who had the grand champion Ram- 
bouillet ewe at the St. Louis exposition, they bought a number of ewes, as well 
as from A. A. Wood & Son of Saline, Michigan. Others of this same strain were 
purchased as the foundation of their registered flock. From time to time the 
finest ewes from the best breeders in the world have been added, coming from 
such flocks as Lockwood, Markham, Chapman, Eager, Owen, Lincoln, Moore, 
Bates and Wyckoff. When the latter flock was discontinued they purchased all 
the young ewes it contained. Among the noted rams that have been used in 
building up their Rambouillet flock was A. A. Wood & Son, No. i, sire of Kaiser, 
grand champion at all the leading fairs of the country ; and Beaconsfield Wycofl:' 
No. 76-, undefeated ram of America and probably as grand an animal of his 
strain as ever lived, never being defeated in the show ring. At Denver, in 1908, 
he was awarded the championship over all breeds. At the National Wool Growers' 
Association in Helena, ]VIontana, the same year he was grand champion. He 
weighed three hundred and twenty-eight pounds and clipped as high as forty-two 
pounds. As a sire his record for getting prize winners has never been equalled. 
Among the animals sired by Beaconsfield, were Hercules, a two-year-old prize ram 
at the Seattle exposition that was sold to the United States government for twelve 
hundred and fifty dollars ; Johnny Bull, for whom an oiTer of fifteen hundred 
dollars was refused ; Lion ; King'sModel ; Laramie Boy, twice grand champion at 
the Chicago International Stock Show ; Wyoming Boy, also a grand champion at 
the International Stock Show. The high character of Beaconsfield as a sire will 
be shown when it is recorded that nine thousand dollars worth of his yearling 
rams were sold in one season. 

On the death of the great Beaconsfield, representatives of the King Brothers 
Company scoured the country in search of an animal to replace him. The search 
resulted in the purchase of Ben Hur, a two-year-old and grand champion of the 
year and sire of every prize winner at the Michigan State Fair that year. Ben 
Hur proved a noted sire, among his get being Thickset, King's Chief, Longfellow, 
Ben Hur, Jr. Of these animals. Thickset was the grand champion at Chicago 
in 1913 and was the sire of Thickset, Jr. and Pride of the ^^'est who was the first 
prize yearling at the Chicago International Stock Show in 1916, as well as being 
the first prize aged ram at the same show in 191 7. Pride of the West was also 
sire of first prize pen of lambs get of sire, first prize ram and ewe lamb and cham- 
pion ram and ewe at the Chicago International Show in 1917. Twenty-five hun- 
dred dollars has been refused for Pride of the West and seven hundred dollars 
was refused for his first ram lamb. 

At the sale of stock in Salt Lake City in .\ugust, 1917, King's Big Chief, the 



238 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

largest Rambouillet ram on record, sold for thirteen hundred dollars. He weighed 
four hundred pounds, was five feet eight and three-fourths inches long, three feet 
six inches high and six feet seven inches girth. 

The King Brothers Company for a number of years only showed its stock 
at smaller fairs, their first display being at Sheridan. Wyoming, in 1903, the 
first Wyoming State Fair, where big competition was encountered, and there they 
won a silver cup. The next year, at the St. Louis World's Fair, their wool exhibit 
won a gold medal for every fleece shown. In 1910 they first showed at the Chi- 
cago International Stock Show, getting five firsts and two seconds also champion 
ram, champion ewe and champion flock. When they first showed at big eastern 
state fairs their exhibit was referred to before its arrival as the "sagebrush flock." 
It was not thought possible to raise the superb animals in Wyoming that they were 
to exhibit. Those older eastern exhibitors went down to defeat and the "sage- 
brush flock" captured the ribbons. At the San Francisco exposition in 1915 they 
won twenty-nine first premiums, also winning grand champion B. ram and ewe, 
get of sire. Flock Reserve Champion C, ram and ewe ; also premium championships 
for breeder and exhibitor ; and they have been consistent winners at all the leading 
state fairs for many years. 

The business of this company has kept abreast of every advance in sheep breed- 
ing. Its buildings have been constructed in the most modern way and in some 
instances embody features original with the company and not utilized elsewhere. 
Their holdings include thirty thousand acres of deeded land and twenty thousand 
acres of leased land, which extensive holdings have developed from the original 
homestead taken up by Francis S. King. The business methods of the company 
have always been the most straightforward and reliable arid they have ever en- 
Joyed an unassailable reputation for the highest integrity. During the past 
eighteen years the company has bent its energies and spared no expense in devel- 
oping a Rambouillet sheep that would in form, fleece and hardiness fill the wants 
of the western sheep man. By a careful selection of sires that have descended 
from noted ancestors, mating them with ewes of large, robust frame, the com- 
pany has produced a strain that has made itself felt throughout the country. 



HON. JACOB A. DELFELDER. 

If one were asked to express in a single word the most prominent and salient 
characteristic of Hon. Jacob A. Delfelder it might be done in the word helpful- 
ness, for there is no man who has contributed more largely to the development 
of Riverton and Fremont county than he, and his helpfulness has been of a char- 
acter that the sociologist says is of greatest worth to the world, the kind that heljis 
the individual to help himself. He has ever striven to improve conditions having 
to do with the development and upbuilding and the advancement of business ac- 
tixity in county and state and is regarded as an authority upon the subject of 
irrigation and water rights as wells as an authority upon sheep raising. His 
labors have ever been of a character in which the public is a large direct and 
also indirect beneficiary. 

Mr. Delfelder was born in Effingham, Kansas, January 11, 1871, a son of 
Frederick and Anna (Wagner) Delfelder. both of whom were natives of Ger- 
many. On coming to this country they settled in Illinois and afterward removed 
to Eflingham, Kansas. The father had been educated for and was ordained to 
the ministry of the Lutheran church but never followed that vocation. On set- 
tling in Kansas he took up the occupation of farming and became one of the 
leading agricuhurists and prosperous residents of that section of the state. He 
is now living retired in Atchison and his wife also survives. 

Their son. Jacob A. Delfelder, was the fourth in order of birth in a family of 
eight children. He was reared upon the homestead farm and acquired his educa- 
tion in the country schools. He worked during the summer months and attended 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 241 

school in the winter seasons. At an early age he took up the study of the science 
of dehorning cattle and in due time became an adept in that work. After leaving 
the country schools he went to Atchison, Kansas, where he attended the Atchison 
Business College, from which in due time he was graduated. He paid his way 
through college with money which he earned in dehorning cattle. 

In 1892 Mr. Delfeldcr came to Wyoming with the idea of turning his attention 
to dehorning cattle but on reaching this state found that the cattlemen of Wyoming 
were not interested in that, so that he had to seek employment along other lines. 
He then turned his attentimi m vliecp rai-^ing in L'inta cdunty. Iteing tirst eni])loyed 
])y AI Pomeroy, of l''.\-a'i^ti m. wnh wlumi he remained f(]r three nmnths. He 
then removed to Freniunl enmilN and l^.r twn year- \\a- ni tlie emplii\ uf I )a\id 
Sweeney. In the fall of lSw4 he engaged in the sheep Ijusincss im hi> own account 
in connection with Austin llunce, forming the tirm of Bunce i!:t Delfeldcr, which 
was maintained until lyio, when, upon the death of Mr. Bunce, .Mr. Delfeldcr 
])urchascd his partner's interest from the heirs and has since continued his opera- 
tions independently. At the present time he has about twenty thousand head of 
sheep and about two thousand head of cattle, together with about five hundred 
head of horses, his stock being pastured upon an extensive ranch of two thousand 
acres of irrigated land, beside a large acreage of pasture land and range. Mr. Del- 
feldcr is now the president of the Xational Sheep Company and also of the 
Diamond C Sheep Company and there is no man in the state who has done more 
to improve conditions that affect sheep raising than he. On the 8th of May, 1903, 
he was appointed by Governor Chatterton to the position of state sheep commis- 
sioner, at which time over ninety per cent of the sheep in Wyoming were scabby, 
and through his efforts, with the assistance of the commissioners, they eradicated 
the disease in less than two years. He served on the board altogether for about 
ten years and his efforts were most valuable and effective in promoting the sheep 
raising interests of the state by the improvement of conditions. He was also the 
originator and is a director of the Xational Wool House and Storage Company of 
Chicago, Illinois. 

.\side from his e.xtensive sheep raising and other live stock interests Mr. Del- 
felder is president of the Farmers State Bank of Powell, Wyoming, vice presi- 
dent of the First State Bank of Riverton, a director of the Farmers State Bank 
of Worland and a stockholder and director in a number of other large financial 
institutions. In business matters his judgment is sound, his insight keen and his 
enterprise unfaltering. He is also interested in some realty companies and what- 
ever he undertakes he carries forward to successful completion. 

It is but natural that a man of Mr. Delfelder's business ability and devotion 
to the public welfare should be called upon to ser\e in public office. In 1913 he 
was elected to the house of representatives and while in the state legislature was 
the father of a number of important bills. He was instrumental in securing the 
])assage of the Smith Levers bill and he introduced the bill that was the cause of 
the Wyoming central irrigation in\estigation. He is an authority upon the 
subject of irrig.itidu, which he has studied from every possible standpoint, and 
he does not lieliexe in a monopoly of water rights. Riverton, recognizing his 
genuine worth and public spirit, elected him to the office of mayor and for four 
years he served as chief e.xecutixe of the city. On the 14th of "Slay, 1918, he was 
again elected to that position without opposition, as he had been during his previ- 
ous terms of office. He would not accept the position in any other way, for he 
wants to feel that he has the whole-hearted support of the public and must feel 
that his efforts for the benefit of the city will not be hampered. He wishes to do 
things in his own way — and the public recognizes that his wa\ i- tlie liest way. 

On the 19th of October, 1910, Mr. Delfeldcr was united in ma mage to Miss 
Evelyn Hartman and they now have a son, William W., w hu is attending the 
Todd Seminary for Boys, at Woodstock, Illinois. 

Fraternally Mr. Delfeldcr is a Mason and has attained the Knight Templar 
degree of the York Rite and has also taken the degrees up to and including the 
thirty-second of the Scottish Rite. He likewise belongs to Korein Temple of the 



242 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

Mystic Shrine and his hfe exempHfies the beneficent spirit of the craft. He occu- 
pies a most beautiful and modern home in Riverton and its warm-hearted hospi- 
tahty is known throughout the countryside. He employs a great many people on 
his ranches and it is characteristic of Mr. Delfelder that he is always as courteous 
and genial to the laborers upon the ranch as to any heavy stockholder or official 
who is associated with him in his business interests. He is a big man in spirit and 
interests, broadminded, alert, energetic, ever actuated by a spirit of progress and 
looking ever toward the attainment of higher ideals and results. His adopted 
county and state have indeed profited by his labors, which have ever been of a 
most practically resultant character. 



HON. FEXIMORE CHATTERTON. 

Hon. Fenimore Chatterton has long occupied a central place on the stage of 
public activity in Wyoming. His entire record reflects credit and honor upon 
the state that has honored him. He was at one time chief executive of Wyoming, 
is now one of the prominent attorneys and business men of Fremont county 
and has been identified with many interests and movements which have left 
an indelible impress upon the history of the state. Tangible evidence of 
his public spirit is found not only in the legislative records but also in con- 
nection with many projects which have been carried forward to successful 
completion and which constitute important elements of public welfare. His 
career is illustrative of the opportunities that are furnished in America to 
ambitious young men. He had no financial advantages at the outset of his 
career but was fortunate in that back of him was an ancestry honorable and 
distinguished and he is happy that his lines of life have been cast in harmony 
therewith. 

He was born in Oswego, New York, July 21, i860, a son of German H. and 
Ama (Mazuzan) Chatterton, both of whom were natives of \'ermont and repre- 
sentatives of early New England families. The Chatterton family was established 
on American soil in the year following the first trip of the Mayflower to the 
new world in 1620. Members of both the Chatterton and Mazuzan families 
participated in the Revolutionary war and in the War of 181 2. German H. 
Chatterton occupied a college professorship in early manhood and subsequently 
was admitted to the bar. devoting many years to the practice of law. Later he 
was ordained to the Presbyterian ministry and did missionary work on the 
western frontier, building many churches through Iowa and the middle western 
states. He is still living and now makes his home in Green\ille, New York, at 
the age of eighty-seven vears. having retired from active business and pro- 
fessional connections. His life has been one of farreaching influence and 
benefit. His wife passed away in the year 1864. 

Fenimore Chatterton, whose name introduces this record, was educated m 
the public schools and in Columbia College at Washington, D. C., followed by 
a course in law in the University of Michigan, from which he received his LL. B. 
degree in 1891. In January, 1878, he removed to the west to win a fortune 
if possible. For six months he remained in Chicago and then continued his 
journey to the Iowa wheat fields, where he earned enough money to meet the 
expenses of a course in the State Normal Institute there. He afterward se- 
cured a teacher's certificate, but before he had entered upon active work as 
a teacher he was offered a position in connection with a mercantile house of 
Fort Steele, Wyoming, the proprietor, Mr. Hugus. conducting both a wholesale 
and retail general merchandise business. He was also at the head of a bankmg 
institution "at Fort Steele, which was the principal trading ooint of Carbon county. 
The county boundary then extended from the Colorado line to Montana and the 
mercantile companv covered in its business operations a wide territory, conduct- 
ing an extensive trade, while the banking business, too, drew its patronage from 




^^^^^^^^77^ 



HISTORV OF \\-YO.MIXG 245 

throughout the entire county. Tlie business opportunity offered Mr. Chatterton 
looked good to him and he accepted the proffered position. Five years later 
-Mr. Hugus, wishing to retire from business, turned his entire interests over to 
-Mr. Chatterton, accepting the latter's note for thirty-two thousand dollars. With 
characteristic energy .Mr. Chatterton bent his energies to the conduct and further 
development of the business and his labors were attended with such success that 
within five years he had discharged all of his financial obligations and had 
established his interests on a firm financial basis. He was thus identified with 
commercial activity in the state for a number of years, building up a trade 
of large and gratifying proportions. In iS88, howeve'r, he sold the business and 
was elected to the offices of probate judge and county treasurer, serving in the 
dual capacity until i8go, when he resigned to become a candidate for the first 
state senate. He was elected to the office and reelection continued him in the 
position for two terms. It was after his connection with the upper house 
of the general assembly for one term that he returned to the east and com- 
pleted his law studies in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he 
was graduated with the class of 1891. The following year he opened a law 
office in Rawlins and entered upon a successful career as a representative of 
the bar, remaining in active practice there until 1899. During this time he 
served for two terms as county and prosecuting attorney and in 1898 he was 
elected secretary of state. His powers and his abilities proving adequate to 
every demand that was made upon him -in public service, he was continually 
advanced from one position of trust to another until in 1903 he succeeded 
Governor DeForest Richards in the office of chief executive of the state. 

In 1906 Mr. Chatterton removed to Riverton and was instrumental in 
forcing the Northwestern Railroad to build its branch through to Lander. He 
had secured the right of way and the concessions for the railroad, and with the 
water rights in his possession and a contract with the state for the reclamation 
of three hundred thousand acres of the ceded portion of the Wind River Indian 
reservation. Mr. Chatterton organized the \\"yoming Central Irrigation Com- 
pany and proceeded to put this land under irrigation, and the Northwestern 
was pleased to make terms with him and buy his right of way. Since the com- 
pletion of this contract Mr. Chatterton has been engaged in the practice of law 
and is also identified with the development of the oil industry and with farm- 
ing interests, owning an irrigated farm of five hundred acres which has been 
brought under a high state of cultivation and to which all modern improvements 
and accessories ha\e been added. He is a man of sound business judgment, 
readily recognizing opportunities that others pass heedlessly by and utilizing such 
opportunities not only to the benefit of his own fortunes but to the ujjbuilding 
of the general prosperity as well. 

In 1900 Mr. Chatterton was united in marriage to Miss Stella Wyland, of 
Des Moines, Iowa, and to them have been born two daughters, Eleanor and 
Constance. Mr. Chatterton and his family are communicants of the Episcopal 
church. His political allegiance has always been given to the republican party 
and in fraternal relations he is widely known. He is the only man in Wyoming 
who is the past state grand officer in every branch of Masonic work. Me belongs 
to Rawlins Lodge, No. 4, A. F. & A. M.; to Ivanhoe Commandery, No. ,^, K. T., 
of Rawlins: to Wyoming Consistorv, No. i, A. & A. S. R. : and to Korein Tem- 
ple, A. A. O. N. M. S. 

His interests and activities have indeed been broad and varied. He has 
had much to do with shaping the history of the state. While undoubtedly he is 
not without that honorable ambition which is so powerful and useful as an 
incentive to activity in ptiblic affairs, he regards the pursuits of private life 
as being in themselves abundantly worthv of his best eft'orts. His is a noble 
character — one that subordinates personal ambition to public good and seeks 
rather the benefit of others than the aggrandizement of self. His is a con- 
spicuouslv successful career. Endowed by nature with high intellectual C|uali- 
ties. to which are added the discipline and embellishments of culture, his is a 



246 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

most attractive personalit}-. Well \ersed in the learning of his profession and 
with a deep knowledge of human nature and the springs of human conduct, 
with great shrewdness and sagacity and extraordinary tact, he is in the courts 
an advocate of great power and influence. Both judges and juries always hear 
him with attention and deep interest. 



HOX. JOHN HAYS. 



Hon. John Hays, one of the most prominent cattle men of Fremont county, 
was born in Lexington, Kentucky, on the 3d of July, 1861, a son of Columbus 
C. and Emalme G. (Fletcher) Hays, both of whom are natives of Lexington, 
Missouri, and are still living, the former having reached the age of about eighty- 
three years, while the mother is now about seventy-tive years of age. They 
make their home in Loveland. Colorado, where they have continued since 1871. 
The father was a ranchman during the years of his active business life, but for 
some time has lived retired, enjoying the fruits of his former toil. 

John Hays, whose name introduces this review, was reared upon a cattle 
ranch and as soon as he was old enough to sit astride a horse he began riding 
the range. As early as his twelfth year he had some calves of his own and his 
experience as a cattle man was thus begun. When about twenty years of age 
he took his father's cattle, also a neighbor's cattle and some of his own, and 
ranged his stock through the mountains for three years. He then engaged in 
the butchering business in Loveland. Colorado, and was identified with that 
business until 1891. During that period he also continued to have cattle upon 
the range. In the year mentioned he removed to Lander and in 1892 he 
opened a butchering business in the city, continuing active along that line until 
1897, when he disposed of his establishment. He then became associated with 
Lieutenant H. A. Sievert of the United States army in the conduct of extensive 
cattle interests under the firm style of Sievert & Hays. In 1915 Mr. Hays pur- 
chased the interest of his partner and has since conducted the business inde- 
pendently. He is today one of the most prominent cattle men of Fremont county 
and it is said by those who are authority upon the question that he has some 
of the finest herds of cattle to be found in the state. He handles high grade 
Here fords and runs about seven hundred head. He thoroughly understands 
every phase of the cattle business and his activities are most wisely and care- 
fully directed. He is also the president of the Dubois State Bank of Dubois. 
^^'yoming. 

In November, 1885, Mr. Hays was united in marriage to Miss Oliie E. Card, 
of Loveland, Colorado, by whom he has five children, as follows : John C. who 
is a graduate of the Colorado State Agricultural College and is now county 
agricultural agent of Natrona count}-, Wyoming: Mabel, the wife of Richard 
Hays, who resides on a claim in Fremont county. \\'yoming; and Pauline. Helen 
and Max, all at home. 

Mr. Hays is a demitted member of Loveland Lodge, No. 36. I. O. O. F. In 
politics he is a stalwart deinocrat and in November. 1916. was chosen to repre- 
sent his district in the state legislature, but became ill at the opening of the 
session and was advised by his physician to return home. As a consequence he 
could not serve. He had previously refused to accept any political preferment 
and in fact throughout his entire life he has concentrated his attention and efforts 
upon his business aft'airs. which have been attended with gratifying success owing 
to his close application, his keen sagacity and unfaltering enterprise. He is today 
the owner of one thousand acres of deeded land and also has twenty-seven thou- 
sand acres of Indian land under lease. Resourceful and forceful, capable of 
managing extensive interests, he has so directed his aflfairs that he has advanced 
step by step in his business career and is today one of the most prominent cattle 



HISTORY OF VN'YOMIXG 249 

men of Fremont county, active in the conduct of an industry that has been one 
of the most important sources of the upbuilding, development and prosperity of 
the state. 



JOHN HENRY YOUNG, M. D. 

Dr. John Henry Young has won well merited recognition as an able physician 
and surgeon of Rock Springs. On the physician are made many demands. If a 
lawyer is brusque and crabbed, it is accepted as a fact that he is concerned with 
complex and involved problems; if the minister holds himself aloof, it is believed 
that he is absorbed in questions that are beyond the ken of the ordinary individ- 
ual; but the physician must always be courteous, sympathetic, interested and at 
the same time must fail not in the performance of any duty that devolves upon 
him in his professional capacity. Meeting all of these requirements and basing 
his success upon a thorough knowledge of the principles of medicine and surgery, 
Dr. John Henry Young has made for himself a creditable position as one of the 
practitioners of Rock Springs. 

He was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, February I, 1873, ''"d is the fifth in 
order of birth in a family of seven children, fixe of whom are yet living. Their 
parents were John S. and .\ra Ann ( l\i>,'cr 1 ^■(Jung. both of whom were natives 
of Ohio. The paternal ancestors came fidni 1 'cnnsylvania and the family is ori- 
ginally of Scotch and English lineage. The father was l)om June 13, 1831, and 
has now reached the age of eighty-six years, making his home in b'airhcld county, 
Ohio. He was a successful farmer during the ye.irs of his active business life 
but is now living retired, enjoying the fruits of a well spent life. During the Civil 
war he took part in quelling the Morgan raids into Ohio and was a stalwart de- 
fender of the Union cause. His life has ever been well spent, and although passed 
on a quiet plane, his worth to his community has been recognized by those with 
whom he has been associated and he has been accorded the confidence and good- 
will of all who know him. His wife was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, and her 
family, of German lineage, was founded in the Buckeye state at an early period 
in its development. The death of Mrs. Young occurred April 10, 1902, at the 
old home in Ohio, when she was sixty-five years of age. 

Their son. Dr. Young, acquired his early education in the schools of Carroll, 
Ohio, and afterward matriculated in the Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware. 
His early life to the age of sixteen years had been spent upon the home farm, 
where he early became familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring 
for the crops. His first professional activity was along the line of teaching and 
he engaged in educational work in Fairfield county, Ohio, for five and a half years 
but regarded this merely as an initial ste]) to other professional labor. He became 
imbued with the desire to Ijecome a member of the medical profession and 
with the attainment of that entl in view he entered the medical department of the 
Ohio State University, from which he was ,<.;ra(luatc(l in 1900, the M. D. degree 
being at that time conferred upon him. h'ulldw ini; his graduation he sought the 
opportunities of the west and located at Ruck Springs. Wyoming, where he be- 
came associated in practice with Dr. R. Harvey Reed of the Wyoming State 
Hospital. There he continued for a year, after which he removed to Cumberland, 
Wyoming, where he acted as company physician and surgeon for the Union 
Pacific Railway Coal Company's mines. His service there covered a period 
of five years and on the death of Dr. Reed he became ilixision surgeon for the 
Union Pacific Railway Company and surgeon for the I'nion Pacific Coal Com- 
pany. He is still physician for 'the latter and is also engaged in private practice 
in Rock Springs. While he has always continued in the general ])ractice of his 
profession, he has specialized in surgery and has displayed marked ability in that 
direction. He is thoroughly conxersant with anatomy and the component parts 
of the human body, is very careful in diagnosis, is calm and resourceful in times 



250 HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 

of excitement, and with a cool head and stead}- hand he has been enabled to per- 
form man}' important surgical operations that have been attended with notable 
■success. In addition to his practice in connection with these corporations and his 
private practice he is also examiner for a number of old-line insurance companies, 
including the Union Mutual, the JMutual Life, the Pennsylvania Mutual and 
others. 

On the 19th of Xovember, 1903, in Fairfield county, Ohio, Dr. Young was 
married to Miss Xancy May LSoyer, a native of the Buckeye state, born in Win- 
chester, and a daughter of ^Marcus and Sarah (Dowdel) Boyer, representatives of 
an old Pennsylvania German family. The father is now deceased. Dr. and 
Mrs. Young have two children : Henry Marcus, born in Cumberland, Wyoming, 
July 22, 1906; and John Kiger, born in Rock Springs, Wyoming, May 3, 1908. 
In the maternal line the children are of Revolutionary war descent, for the grand- 
father, Henry Kiger, was a son of a Revolutionary war soldier. 

Dr. ^'uuug votes with the republican party, and while not a politician in tlie 
usually acoopK-d sense of office seeking, he served as county health officer. Fra- 
tenialiv he is a Mason of high rank, having taken all of the degrees of both the 
York and Scottish rites save the honorary thirty-third degree. He belongs to the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is popular in these different organiza- 
tions. Trials and obstacles have beset Dr. Young in his career. It was with diffi- 
culty that he obtained his education, for he had little financial assistance. His 
record proves that no matter what the advantages that the individual has in the 
way of acquiring education and making a start in life, he must eventually shape 
and determine his own character. Xever faltering in the pursuit of his purpose. 
Dr. Young has steadily advanced and following his graduation his progress has 
been continuous and gratifying. He belongs to the Rock Springs Medical Society, 
the Wyoming State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, and 
through the meetings of these organizations he is kept informed concerning the 
most advanced thought and purposes of the profession. In a word he keeps 
abreast with the latest scientific researches and disco\eries, and while he does not 
hastilv discard old and time-tried methods, he is ever ready to take up any new 
idea which his judgment sanctions as of value in his chosen life work. The re- 
sponsibilities which devolve upon the physician are heavy liut Dr. Young is prov- 
ing adequate to every demand made upon him and his position as a physician and 
surgeon is such a one as many an older practitioner might well envy. 



DAX SULLI\'AN. 



Dan Sullivan is well known in business circles at Kemmerer as proprietor of 
plumbing, heating and sheet metal works. He was born January 18, 1858. in Mc- 
Gregor, Iowa, a son of Daniel and Margaret (Hines) Sullivan, who were natives 
of Ireland and of the state of Xew York respectively. The father crossed the 
Atlantic to the new world when a young man of nineteen years, in the latter part 
of the '40s, and first settled in Ohio. He had followed civil engineering in his 
native country. After living for some time in Ohio he removed westward to Iowa 
and later to Omaha, Nebraska, where he engaged in the lumber business, taking 
up his abode in that city in 1869. There he resided to the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1897, when he was seventy years of age. He had been quite 
successful in business, his lumber trade increasing with the growth of the city. 
He was actively interested in educational affairs there and served as a member of 
the school board of Omaha for many years. His political endorsement was given 
to the democratic party and he cooperated in all well defined plans and measures 
for the general good, whether accomplished through political or other channels 
His wife, although born in the state of New York, was reared, educated and mar- 
ried in Zanesville. Ohio, and was of Irish descent. She departed this life in 1902. 
at the age of sixtv-five years. 



HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 251 

Their son, Dan Sullivan, was the third in order of birth in a family of ten 
children, of whom but four are now living, and he is the eldest among the sur- 
vivors. He was educated in the public schools and in Rathburn's Business Col- 
lege of Omaha, Nebraska, pursuing his studies to the age of eighteen years, 
when he started out to provide for his own support, entering upon an apprentice- 
ship to the sheet metal trade under the direction of the firm of Milton Rogers & 
Son. He continued to follow the trade for twenty years and then also took up the 
plumbing and heating business. After working for others for a time he embarked 
in business on his own account, having carefully 'sa\ed his earnings until his in- 
dustry and economy had brought him sufficient capital to enable liim to take an 
independent step. He was identified with business on his own account in Omaha, 
in Deadwood, South Dakota, in Sheridan, W yoniint;, and in Rhyolite, Nevada, be- 
fore removing to Kemmerer. On coming in W \(iniing he first settled in Sheri- 
dan but has been a resident of Kemmerer since hjo; and through the intervening 
period has been continuously engaged in the plumbinb, heating anil sheet metal 
business, being the oldest in his line in the city where he makes his home. He 
was also the pioneer in that field in Sheridan. His excellent workmanship, his 
business enterprise and his careful management have enabled him to build up a 
trade of large and gratifying proportions and his activities are bringing to him well 
deserved success. In fact such is his reputation in this field that his business now 
extends over a territory of seventy-five miles in breadth, covering western Wyo- 
ming and portions of Idaho. He has been called upon to install plumbing and 
heating plants and do sheet metal work in connection with the public schools and 
many other public buildings in this section of the country. 

Mr. Sullivan holds to the religious faith of the family and is a communicant of 
St. Patrick's Roman Catholic church of Kemmerer. He maintains an independent 
course in politics but always stands for progress and improvement in public affairs 
and is identified with the Chamber of Commerce, which has put forth many 
eft'ective measures to advance the general good. Those who know him esteem him 
as a man of personal worth as well as of business ability and he is classed with the 
representative citizens of Lincoln county. 



ELIAS MOSHER. 



Elias Mosher, dealer in men's clothing, furnishings, shoes and haberdashery at 
Rawlins, has a well equipped and well stocked establishment and enjoys a merited 
reputation for the integrity of his business methods and his fair dealings, his 
reputation in this direction being known from coast to coast. His high standards 
have made him popular wherever he is known and he has a circle of friends 
almost coextensive with the circle of his ac(|uaiiitance. Mr. Mosher is of Rus- 
sian birth, his natal dav being December jn, iSi.,,. His father, Meilach Mosher, 
remained a resident of Russia until 1902, when he cr(.)ssed the Atlantic and set- 
tled in New York, where he engaged in the fur business to the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1916. His wife, Mrs. Slava Mosher, passed away the previous 
vear. 

Elias ]\Iosher is the eldest of their three children, all of whom survive. He 
acquired his early education in the schools of his native country and when twenty- 
one years of age came to the new world, settling first in Superior, \Msconsin, 
where he was emploved by the Webster Manufacturing Company, a chair man- 
ufacturing concern. He worked in the factory 'and later became a traveling repre- 
sentative for the house, with which he continued for about five years. He was 
then transferred to Kansas Citv and traveled with that city as his headquarters, 
representing the Furniture Manufacturing Syndicate. He later removed to 
Gillett, Colorado, where he entered the men's furnishing goods business, conduct- 
ing a store until 1901. He then sold his interests in that city and removed to 
Rawlins, where he established business in a small way. Today he has one of the 



252 HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 

finest stores in the state and enjoys an extensive trade, but more than that, he en- 
joys a well earned reputation for the thorough reliability of his methods. He has 
never been known to take advantage of the necessities of his fellownien in any 
trade transaction and his reasonable prices and earnest desire to please his patrons 
have won for him a very gratifying patronage which is growing year by year. The 
increase in his trade has necessitated the enlargement of his quarters and he has 
now doubled the space of his original store, making it unquestionably the finest 
equipped store in the state in this line. He has installed showcases of the latest and 
most modern style of manufacture and attractive fixtures of all kinds, and the 
tasteful arrangement of his store is one of the elements in his growing success. As 
the years have passed and he has prospered in his undertakings he has invested 
in bank stocks and other projects in the county and state, which add materially 
to his income and place him as one of the foremost business men of Rawlins. 

Air. Mosher has been married twice. He first wedded Miss Estelle Clendenney 
and they had a son, Albert, born Atigust 2^, lyoi. at Gillett, Colorado, and now a 
student at Culver Military Academy. Mrs. Mosher died November 13, 1903, in 
Gillett. Colorado. For his second wife Mr. Mosher chose Miss Doris M. Larson. 
of Rawlins, by whom he has the following children: Helen E., born in Feb- 
ruary, 1907; Sarah D., born in January, 1912; and Frances F., born in September, 

1914- 

Fratemally he is connected with the MaMin> and with the Elks and in the 
former organization he has attained tht- ihirtv-^ccond degree of the Scottish Rite 
and has also become a Xoble of the M\>uc Slirine. In politics he votes with 
the republican party where national issues are involved but casts an indepen- 
dent local ballot. Starting out in life a poor boy, aiding in the support of his 
parents, Mr. Mosher has steadily worked his way upward and step by step has ad- 
vanced to the goal of prosperity. As the architect of his fortunes he has builded 
wisely and well and the history of his life should serve as a source of inspiration 
and encouragement to others, showing what may be accomplished through indi- 
vidual eft'ort. 



\MLLIAM WALLACE GLEASON. 

William Wallace Gleason was living retired in Cheyenne at the time of his 
death, .April 16. 1918, when he was seventy-six years of age. It was not until 
he reached the age of seventy-two tiiat he put aside active business cares, having 
controlled important interests as secretary, treasurer and general manager of the 
Warren Live Stock Company. 

He was born in Worthington, Hampshire county, Massachusetts, on the 5th 
of December. 1841, his parents being Darwin and Martha (Brewster) Gleason, 
the latter a descendent of ancestors who came to the new world as passengers on 
the Mavflower. The father was a farmer by occupation and engaged in the meat 
business. Both he and his wife have now passed away, the latter ha\ing died when 
her son, Vv'illiam Wallace, was yet a boy. He was the eldest in a family that 
numbered also seven daughters. 

William W. Gleason was educated in the public schools and in an academy in 
the east and later spent but three months during the winter seasons in school, 
while in the summer he had to work, assisting his father and he continued in that 
line of work until he reached the age of thirty-five years. He became a member 
of the firm of D. Gleason & Son -and he was on the meat wagon from the age of 
sixteen. On the ist of July. 1883. he arrived in Wyoming and entered into 
partnershi]) with Senator Warren in forming the Warren Live Stock Company, of 
which he became the secretary, treasurer and general manager. They operated 
extensively and successfully and Mr. Gleason was thus engaged until he reached 
the age of seventy-two years, when he retired. Although he was still quite active 
in his later years he left business cares largely to others. 












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All;. AND MRS. WILLIAM W. GLEASON 



254 HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 

On the 14th of December, 1S70, ^Ir. Gleason was united in marriage to Miss 
Amelia H. Lyman, who died m 1877, leaving two children, Herbert Darwin and 
Ashley Lyman. On the 13th of October, 1880, Mr. Gleason was again married, 
his second union being with Julia Gould Se\ery, and they had one son, Frank 
Hubbard. The sons were associated with their lather in business, acting as fore- 
men of ranches, but they have now sold all of their interests in the cattle industry. 

j\lr. (_Tlcason was a Protestant in religious faith. His political support was 
given to the reimljlican party and he served as a member of the city council. 
He was ever deeply interested in the public welfare and gave his aid and coopera- 
tion to many movements looking to the beneiit and upbuilding of city and state. 
He always abstained from the use of liquor and tobacco and was a well preserved 
man until the end. In his last years he enjoyed a well earned rest, his former 
activities having sujiplied him with all of those things which add to the comforts 
of life. His demise caused imt only deep sorrow to the family but also widespread 
regret among his many friends, who sincerely appreciated his high qualities of 
character, and in him his community lost a stalwart, public-spirited citizen. His 
remains were interred at Hinsdale, Massachusetts. 



JOHN STANSBURY, 



John Stansbury, engaged in the active practice of law in Douglas as senior 
partner in the firm of Stansbury & Stansbury, was born in Devonshire, Eng- 
land, on the 14th of April, 1862, a son of John and Susan (Roberts) Stansbury. 
The father was a miner and in 1869 came with his family to the United States, 
settling in the oil regions of Pennsylvania. Both he and his wife have passed 
away. 

John Stansbury, whose name introduces this review, was educated in the 
schools of Pennsylvania, having been a little lad of but seven years at the time 
of the emigration of the family to the new world. He started to work in the 
coal mines of the Keystone state when a boy of but eiglit years and was thus em- 
ployed from 1870 until ^lay i, 1891. His educational advantages were therefore 
necessarily quite limited, but he was ambitious, recognizing the fact that advance- 
ment and success depend upon the individual and not upon his environment or 
what is seemingly his opportunity. \\'hile working in the mines he took up the 
study of mining engineering under the direction of the Scranton Correspondence 
School. He also began the study of law privately at night and eventually com- 
pleted arrangements whereby he pursued a full course of study in the law depart- 
ment c)f the L'nixersity of Michigan. While a student there he would spend his 
\-acati(iii jieridds in work in the mines in order to get money with which to pay 
his tuition and meet the other expenses of his university course. He was grad- 
uated at Ann Arbor with the class of June, 1891. and began the practice of law- 
in Braidwood, Illinois, where he had previously worked in the coal mines for 
eleven years. On a visit there during the Easter holidays he had been elected city 
attorney before his graduation by a large majority over his opponent, and he con- 
tinued to practice law in Braidwood until 191 3, when he removed to Wyoming 
with Douglas as his destination. His son, \\'illiam M., had pre\iously graduated 
from the law department of the Universit\ of Illinois and in iQio had opened an 
office in Douglas, where in 1913 he was joined by liis father and the present firm 
of Stansbury & Stansbury was organized. Mr. Stanslmry of this review was 
in the employ of the government from ^hircli 18. 181)7. until April i, 1913, in a 
legal capacity with 1he department of justice, repre-^enting the Indians in the 
Indian depredation claims. He is now concentrating his efforts and attention 
upon the practice of law and such is his careful preparation that he is never sur- 
prised by some unexpected discovery by an opposing lawyer, for in his mind he 
weighs every point and fortifies as well for defense as for attack. He has con- 
ducted imijortant litigation and he has much natural ability but is withal a hard 



HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 255 

student and is never content until he has mastered every detail of his cases. He 
believes in the maxim, "there is no excellence without labor" and follows it closely. 
On the 2d of February. 1X82, Mr. Stansbury was united in marriage to Miss 
INfary Paden and to ihein li;i\t_- Ijeen born four sons and a daughter: Lawrence, 
who is a [ihysician practicing at Joliet. Illinois: George, a dentist who follows his 
profession in I'eoria. Illinuis; Harry, a student in the Chicago University: William 
Morris, who is associated with his father in the practice of law; and Alia, the wife 
of H. H. Shaffner. 

Mr. Stansbury is strong and positive in his rcpulilicanism but his party fealty 
is not grounded on partisan prejudice and i> the roult of close study of the situa- 
tion and a firm belief in the justice and \aluc nf the cause which he espouses. Of 
the great issues which divide the two parties, with their roots extending down to 
. the very bedrock of the foundation of the republic, he has the true statesman's 
, grasp. He has arrived at his conclusions as a result of what may be called his 
post-graduate studies in the school of affairs. Such men, whether in office or out, 
are the natural leaders of whichever party they may be identified with, especially 
in that movement toward higher politics which is common to both parties and 
which constitutes the most hopeful political sign of the period. Mr. Stansbury 
has never been an office seeker but has served as chairman of the republican county 
central committee and has been a member of the school board, the cause of educa- 
tion finding in him a stalwart champion. Fraternally he is a Mason of high rank, 
having reached thi' Knight Templar degree in the York Rite, while with the 
Xobles of the .Mystic Shrine he has crossed the sands of the desert. He belongs 
to the Elks lodge at Albuquerque, Xew Mexico, and for thirty-three years has 
been a member of the Knights of I'ythias. lie is fond of athletics and this keeps 
him young in body and spirit. He is greatly interested in the state and its devel- 
opment and his cooperation can be counted upon at all times to further plans and 
measures for the general good. In the face of obstacles which would have utterly 
discouraged and disheartened many a man, with no educational advantages at the 
outset of his career, Mr. Stansbury has steadily progressed until he is today recog- 
nized not only as an able lawyer but as a broad-minded man with whom association 
means expansion and elevation. 



F. M. WARD. 



F. M. Ward, attorney at law practicing in Buttalo, is a native of South Dakota. 
He was born on the 25t'h of June, 1889, a son of Michael and Mary ( Mc(~irane ) 
Ward, the former a native of Ireland, wdiile the latter was 1)i)rn in Massachusetts. 
They were married in Nebraska and remo\ed to South Dakcjta where the father 
devoted his life to merchandising until his death, which occurred in 1891. His 
widow survives and is now living in Nebraska. They had a family of five chil- 
dren, all of whom survive. 

F. M. Ward was reared and educated in Nebraska, being indebted to the public 
school system for the early educational ojjportuniiics wliich he enjoyed. He 
passed through consecutive grades to his graduation from tlie high school and he 
is also a graduate of the Creighton College of Law at < >ni,ili,i. Ndna-ka, ha\ ing 
completed his course there as a member of the class of \n\- Attcr tbu> prcparinL; 
for the bar he entered upon the practice of his profession in Xrliraska. where he 
remained for four years, and in April, 19 17, he removed to I'.uft'alo, Wyommg, 
where he has since engaged in active practice in association with James L. Cald- 
well, tmder the firm style of Caldwell & Ward. Already he has made for himself 
a creditable jiosition in professional circles in Johnson county and has won very 
favorable criticism bv reason of the thoroughness with which he prepares his cases 
and the strength with which he presents his arguments. _The firm of Caldwell & 
Ward now occupies a very prominent position at the Buffalo bar and is accorded 



256 HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 

a liberal clientage, connecting them with much important litigation heard in th" 
courts. 

In his political views Mr. Ward is a democrat but is not a politician in 
the sense of office seeking. Already he has gained many warm friends during the 
period of his residence in Wyoming and the circle is constantly increasing 
as the circle of his acquaintance broadens. 



BERTRAXD N. MATTHEWS. 

Bertrand X. Matthews, county prosecuting attorney of Uinta county and a 
well known resident of Evanston, entered upon his professional career well 
qualified for active work at the bar and is making for himself a most creditable 
position in this connection. He was born in Devonshire, England, March i8, 
1873, and is a son of William H. and Emeline ( Tucker j Matthews. William 
H. Matthews was superintendent for the Great Western Railroad Company in 
Newton Abbott, Devonshire, England, and in the year 1885 he bade adieu to 
friends and native country and sailed for the new world alone. Having sent 
for his family, they made their way westward and became residents of Evanston, 
Wyoming, but afterward removed to Salt Lake county, Utah. 

Bertrand N. Matthews was the seventh in order of birth in a family of 
fourteen children. In his boyhood days he attended Catholic parochial schools 
of England and at the age of twelve years came to the new world, after which 
he was a pupil in the graded schools of Utah, and eventually he was graduated 
from the State University of Utah on the completion of an academic course 
in the class of 1899. He had determined upon the practice of law as his life 
work and in preparation for the profession read law at every available oppor- 
tunity and also acted as assistant to Judge William R. Hall during his spare 
time while attending school. He took up the profession of teaching in Utah 
and followed it for ten years, proving a capable educator, imparting readily and 
clearly to others the knowledge that he had acquired. He then pursued a course 
of law lectures on the Pacific coast, after which he came to Uinta county, Wyo- 
ming, and accepted the position of principal of the high school at Lyman, where 
he remained for two years. On the expiration of that period he successfully 
passed the bar examination with a very excellent mark of efficiency and was 
accordingly admitted to practice on the nth of September, 1916. In the fall 
of the same year he became a candidate for the office of county attorney of 
Uinta county, was elected and is now acting in that capacity. At the same 
time he engages in the private practice of law and in his professional work 
displays the same thoroughness that ever characterized his efforts in the educa- 
tional field. He is advancing steadily in his chosen profession, winning a cred- 
itable name and place for himself at the Uinta bar. 

On the ist of June, 1901, ^Ir. ^Matthews was united in marriage to Miss 
Anastasia Martin, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Martin, of Salt Lake 
county, Utah, where her father is a well known rancher and stock raiser. 
Mrs. Matthews passed away on the 19th of June, 1904, leaving two children : 
Miss Theo Matthews, who was born in Salt Lake City, March 10, 1902; and 
John B., who was born in Salt Lake City, December 25, 1903. On the 19th 
of August, 1906. ]Mr. Matthews was again married, his second union being with 
Miss Frances Smith, of Los Angeles, California, a daughter of Mr. and Airs. 
William H. Smith, who were pioneer residents of Beaver county, Utah. The 
children of this marriage are: Thelma J., who w^as born in Salt Lake City, 
June 16. 1907: Gilbert B., born in Salt Lake City, August 28, 1908; Lucille, 
born in Salt Lake City, May 23, 1910 : Immanuel A., bom in Lyman, Wyoming, 
May 18. 1915: and Dorothy, born in Evanston, July 5, 1917. 

Mr. Matthews is an elder in the Mormon church and has filled various other 
positions in the church, in the work of which he is deeply and actively interested. 




BERTRAND X. MATTHEWS 



258 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

He is chairman of the Industrial Order of American Patriots and is identified 
with the Woodmen of the \\'orld, in connection with which he is widely known. 
He is at present identified with the democratic party and is state comrnitteeman 
from Uinta county. He is actuated in all that he does by a spirit of enterprise 
and progressiveness and laudable ambition has pointed out to him the way 
whereby he has attained his present enviable position in the legal circles of Uinta 
county. 



LOUIS B. WESTHOLDER. 

Louis B. Westholder is one of the prominent florists of western Wyoming, 
with headquarters at Evanston. His business extends over a wide territory, for 
he has agencies and branches in various towns of this section of the state. He 
is thoroughly familiar with all the scientific phases of his work and this knowl- 
edge, added to practical experience, has won for him a very substantial measure 
of success. 

Mr. Westholder was born in Teutopolis, Effingham county, Illinois, on the 
2ist of September, 1889, a son of Dr. C. A. Westholder, who is a native of 
Germany and came to America in 1882, at which time he took up his abode in 
Indianapolis, Indiana. There he engaged in the practice of his profession. He 
was born and reared in Hamm, Germany, and pursued his education in a uni- 
versity in Westphalia and in other leading educational institutions of that country. 
After becoming a resident of Indianapolis he continued in the practice of medi- 
cine and surgery in that city for ten years, after which he was made physician and 
surgeon at the Roman Catholic college and convent in Teutopolis, Illinois. There 
he remained for ten years, after which he removed to Minnesota, where he has 
since resided. He is now living retired, enjoying the fruits of a well spent life, 
his home being in Albany, Minnesota. His wife. Mrs. Lydia Westholder, is also 
a native of Germany, in which country they were married. Twelve children 
were born to them, eight sons and four daughters, of whom nine are living. 

Louis B. Westholder, who was the sixth in the family and is the eldest of the 
living sons, was educated in the parochial schools of St. Michael, Minnesota, and 
in St. John's University at Collegevilie, Minnesota, where he pursued a two years' 
course. He then started out to provide for his own support when a youth of 
seventeen years and made his way to the west, first settling at Cheyenne, Wyo- 
ming, where he was employed as a florist, having thoroughly acquainted himself 
with the business through four years' experience along that line in Iowa and 
Alinnesota. He worked for a time as a journeyman and remained in the employ 
of others for two and a half years. During two years of that period he con- 
tinued his residence in Laramie, after which he removed to Evanston, where he 
took up his abode in June, 191 3. He immediately entered upon business here 
on his own account but started out in a small way. He first rented window space 
in one of the local stores and from that small beginning has developed what is 
one of the largest florist establishments in the state. He specializes in cut flowers, 
funeral designs and potted plants and he is conducting a modern and well equipped 
store on Main street in Evanston and also an equally attractive establishment on 
South Front street in Rock Springs, Wyoming. In addition to this he has agen- 
cies at Kemmerer, Cokeville. Cumberland, Diamondville, Frontier, Saratoga, En- 
campment, Rawlins, Superior and Green River and also at numerous other 
points. He is perhaps the best and most widely known man in the florist busi- 
ness in the state and he has an established clientele in Idaho, Montana and Utah. 
He likewise siiecializes in nursery and landscape work, in which he is an ex- 
pert. He is familiar with all the best methods of propagating flowers and pro- 
ducing the best florist and nursery stock, and his intelligently directed effort has 
brought to him a measure of success that is most gratifying. 

Mr. ^^■estholder was married in Evanston on the 4th of August, 191 5, to ^liss 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 259 

Frances Martin, a native of Almy, Wyoming, and a daughter of Thomas and 
Isabelle Alartin, who were pioneer people of Uinta county. Air. and Airs. West- 
holder have one child, Louis, who was born in Evanston, December 31, igi6. 

In his political views Mr. Westholder has always been a republican, keeping 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day, yet has never been an 
oiifice seeker. His religious faith is that of the Runian Catholic church and he 
belongs to the Knights of Columbus. He is likewise connected with the Knights 
of The Maccabees and the Woodmen of the World. I lis career has been marked 
by steady advancement from the time when he started out to provide for his 
own support. He is more than satisfied with Wyoming as a field of labor, believ- 
ing that the future holds much in store for the state, and his personal career 
demonstrates the possibilities for successful accomplishment here. His opinions 
have come to be largely regarded as authority upon anything connected with flori- 
culture in the state, for his broad experience and study have given him expert 
knowledge. 



lOHN R. DOTY. 



Alive to every interest and opportunity that develops in the natural ramifica- 
tions of trade, John R. Doty has won for himself a creditable place in commercial 
circles of AX'yoming, being manager of the Rawlins Mercantile Company. He is 
also actively identified with the sheep and cattle industry of this state and he 
possesses the firmness of purpose and the indefatigable energy that enable him to 
carry forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. 

He was born in Rochester, Cedar county, Iowa, March 11, 1863, a son of John 
and Mary A. ( Smith ) Doty, both of whom were natives of the Hawkeye state, 
where they spent their entire lives. The paternal grandfather, John Doty, was one 
of the first settlers of Iowa and was closely identified with the pioneer develop- 
ment of that state. His son, John Doty, engaged in merchandising and farming 
there, being actively connected with business interests to the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1863. His wife was reared and educated in Iowa and has been 
a resident of the state to the present time. In the family were two children, the 
elder being Dow D. Doty, who was born in Rochester, Iowa, in January, 1861, and 
is now a resident of Fort Collins, Colorado. 

John R. Doty attended the public schools of Rochester, Iowa, and later con- 
tinued his education in the Keokuk (la.) Business College. When his commer- 
cial course was completed he became connected with mercantile interests at 
Cotnuil I '.lull's. Iowa, where he remained until 1883, when he removed to Wyo- 
ming, c^talili>hing his home in Cheyenne. Later in 1887, he came to Rawlins and 
turned his attention to the cattle business, in which he has been actively engaged 
to the present time. In i8g8 he once more entered mercantile circles and in 
March, 1900, was one of the organizers of the Rawlins Mercantile Company, 
which started business on a small scale but has rapidly developed its interests 
until the trade j)laces the establishment in the front rank of the leading mercan- 
tile interests of \\'yoming. This is largely due to the efiforts and business ability 
of Mr. Doty, who' has been treasurer, secretary and manager since its organiza- 
tion and is a man of keen discernment and sound judgment. His sagacity and 
diligence have combined to make him a most forceful factor in trade circles and 
his labors have been attended with gratifying results. He is president of the 
Freeland Live Stock Company, which has its headquarters in Rawlins. He also 
organized, and has ever since'been president of the Freeland Cattle Company of 
Pass Creek, Wyoming. 

On the 13th of January, 1887, Air. Doty was married in Aluscatme, Iowa, 
to Miss Eliza Mardock, a daughter of Air. and Airs. Henry Alardock, and they 
have become parents of one child. Alary C, who was born in Rawlins in 1892. 



260 HISTORY OF WYOAIING 

She was graduated" from the RawUns high school and from the \\'estern College 
of Toledo, Ohio. 

Mr. Doty is a charter member and trustee of the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks in Rawlins and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
His political allegiance is given to the democratic party but he does not seek nor 
desire office, preferring to concentrate his efforts and attention upon other inter- 
ests. He has worked his way upward entirely through his own efforts and de- 
serves great credit for what he has accomplished, for, although obstacles and 
difficulties have barred his path, he has persevered in his purpose and has be- 
come one of the prominent business men of Wyoming, controlling important mer- 
cantile interests at Rawlins and being connected with large sheep and cattle 
interests in the state. Persistency of purpose has won for him well deserved 
success and he is now with merit enjoying life's prosperity. 



WILLIAM A. HOCKER. AI. D. 

The progressive west constitutes an irresistible attraction to many men of en- 
terprise who recognize the fact that the opportunities in a growing country are 
limitless. Professional activity here finds full scope and, moreover, the spirit of 
enterprise manifest by the citizens demands that the professional man be one 
thoroughly capable and in touch with the latest advancements of scientific investi- 
gation. Such a one is found in Dr. William A. Hocker, now a successful physician 
and surgeon of Kemmerer, Lincoln county. 

He was born in Lincoln county, Kentucky, February 7, 1848. His father, the 
late Tilman Hocker. was also a native of Kentucky and a representative of one 
of the family came to the new world prior to the Revolutionary war and settled 
in X'irginia. while early ancestors of Dr. Hocker participated in the struggle for 
of its old families of Scotch Irish lineage. The founder of the American branch 
independence and in the \\'ar of 1812. His father, Tilman Hocker, was a suc- 
cessful planter and slave owner of Kentucky until after the Civil war, when he 
removed to Cass county, Missouri, where he resided to the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1890. when he was seventy years of age. His entire life had 
been devoted to general agricultural pursuits. His political allegiance was given 
to the democratic party and he held membership in the Campbellite church, of 
which he was a devoted adherent. He was a most widely known and honored citi- 
zen in the county in which he lived, enjoying the goodwill and warm regard of 
all with whom he was associated. He married Sarah W. Morrison, a nati\e of 
Kentuck}- and of Scotch descent. She passed away at the age of sixty years. In 
their family were nine children, one of whom has passed away, while the li\ing 
are four sons and four daughters. 

Dr. Hocker, who was the second in order of birth, pursued his education in 
Lincoln and Pioyle counties of Kentuckv and at Danville, Kentucky, and attended 
Central College, from which he was in due time graduated. He started out to 
provide for his own support when a youth of sixteen years, following the close 
of the Civil war, which caused heavy financial losses to the familv and necessi- 
tated his making a start in life. Even during the Civil war he had worked as a 
sub-contractor with his uncle, James M. Hocker, who was providing the federal 
army with horses, and by his work in that connection Dr. Hocker provided ample 
means with which to secure his medical education. Desiring to follow a pro- 
fessional career, he decided upon the practice of medicine as a life work and with 
that end in view entered the Bellevue Medical College of New York city, from 
which he was graduated in 1868, his degree at that time being conferred upon 
him. He afterward served as an interne in the EJelievue Hospital for a- year and 
a half and thus gained that broad and valuable experience which only hospital 
practice can bring. He then removed to Harrisonville, the county seat of Cass 
county, Missouri, where he entered upon actixe practice, remaining there for five 




, CL^ (^/-ir-(Ly-^<-^ 



HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 263 

years. He next located at Evanston, Wyoming, changing his place of residence 
on account of his wife's health. He continued at Evanston until 1898, when he 
took up his abode in Kemmerer, where he has since remained in active and suc- 
cessful practice. His patronage is extensive and is the public recognition of his 
ability. He belongs to the American Medical Association and keeps in touch 
with the latest researches and investigations of the profession. He is the present 
county health officer of Lincoln county, in which position he has served for the 
past four years. He is also surgeon for the Union Pacific and the Oregon Short 
Line Railroads, acting in these capacities during his residence in Kemmerer, and 
he was also surgeon for the Union Pacific at Evanston. 

On the i6th of June, 1873, in Harrisonville, Missouri, Dr. Hocker was united 
in marriage to Miss Alice Reynolds, a native of that state, who in her childhood 
was left an orphan by the death of her parents. To this marriage nine children 
have been born, of whom five daughters and two sons are yet living, namely • 
Rcibert. who is a graduate of the Kansas City (Mo!) Dental College and is now 
engaged in the practice of dentistry in Kemmerer; W'oodie, who is the wife of F. 
A. Manle\-. \ice president and general manager of the Union Pacific Coal Com- 
pany at Omaha; Edith, the wife of Frank G. Lauder, living in Tucson, Arizona; 
Effie, the wife of W". T. Davies, a resident of Miami, Arizona; \'irginia, who is 
acting as housekeeper for her father; Florence, the wife of Paul Comer, of Kem- 
merer; and Reynolds W., who is a graduate of the Kansas City Dental College 
and is also engaged in the practice of his profession. 

Fraternally Dr. Hocker is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, also with the Knights of The ]\laccabees and the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks. He likewise belongs to the Commercial Club of Kemmerer and co- 
operates in all of its well defined plans and purposes for the upbuilding and 
development of the city with whose interests he is now so closely allied. He gives 
his political endorsement to the democratic party and has been one of its active 
and prominent workers. He served for one term as a member of the territorial 
legislature and was twice elected county commissioner, serving as chairman of 
the board for two years. He was also for two terms mayor of Kemmerer and 
exercised his official prerogatives in support of many progressive measures, 
giving to the city a businesslike administration in which he brought about many 
practical reforms and improvements. He was also registrar of the I'nitcd States 
land office at Evanston during the second administration of President Cli\ eland, 
and was superintendent of the State Insane Asylum at Evanston for fuur _\e;a-s. 

He has thus played an important part in the public afl:'airs of his section of the 
state and at all times his influence has been given on the side of advancement, his 
labors being most resultant. At the same time he has held to the highest pro- 
fessional standards and he is the loved family i)hysician in many a household in 
this section of the state. He holds to the highest ethical standards and at all times 
he is keenly interested in anything that tends to bring to man a key to the com- 
plex mystery which we call life. 



PAUL WIENPAHL. 



Among the enterprising business men of Rock Springs is numbered Paul 
W'ienpahl, a well known jeweler and watch expert, who was born in Kamen. 
Germany, July 4, 1880. a son of William and Louise (Reihl) Wienpahl, who 
have spent" their entire lives in Germany, where the father was engaged in the 
manufacture of mining lamps but is now living retired, still making his home in 
Kamen. He was a prominent business man of that locality, his lamps being sold 
all over the world. He is now sixty-seven years of age. His wife passed away 
in 191 5, her death being occasioned by grief caused by the war. In their family 
were five children: William, who is still a resident of Germany; Helena; Paul, 



264 HISTORY OF WYOAIIXG 

of Rock Springs, Wyoming; Ella; and Robert. The sons with the exception of 
Paul of this review are active in the war with the German army. 

Paul Wienpahl, the third in order of birth, attended school in Kamen, Ger- 
many, pursuing his education until he left the high school at the age of fifteen 
years to take up the watchmaking trade as an apprentice in his native city. He 
served in the Germany army for two years, according to the military regulations 
of the country, and in 1907 he crossed to London, England, where he worked 
at the jeweler's trade for several years. In June, 191 1, he came to America and 
took up his abode in Boise, Idaho. Later he accepted a position in Salt Lake 
City and in 1915 he purchased a jewelry store in Rock Springs. Today he has 
the leading jewelry establishment in his section of the state and he is regarded 
as one of the best watchmakers in Wyoming. He is bending every effort toward 
the development of his trade and the upbuilding of his business and his labors 
are being attended with substantial results. 

On the 9th of June, 191 1, in Kamen, Germany, Mr. Wienpahl was united 
in marriage to Miss Constance Mary Develin, who was born in Brighton, England, 
and they have one child, Paul de Velin, who was born in Rock Springs, March 
6, 1916. Mr. \\'ienpahl has become a naturalized American citizen, but in poli- 
tics maintains an independent course. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Masons and his religious belief is that of the Protestant church. Mr. Wienpahl 
did not come to the new world with the intention of remaining in spirit a resident 
of Germany. On the contrary' he is a loyal American in every particular and 
is a well educated, broad-minded man who commands and merits the respect of 
all with whom he comes in contact. He has made for himself a creditable place 
in the business circles of his community and is highly esteemed by all who know 
him. 



WILLIAM C. DEMING. 

William C. Deming came to Wyoming in March, 1901, from Warren, Ohio, 
to assume the editorship of the Wyoming Daily Tribune. From the time of his 
arrival, he took a broad view of state affairs and began to make the Tribune 
a state paper rather than a local institution. 

In November, 1902, the first general election after his arrival in Wyoming, 
he was elected a member of the seventh legislature and was an active member 
of that body. He was chairman of the committee on education and did a great 
deal toward revising and improving laws affecting public schools. His most 
important bill was that for a state depository law, which although defeated, 
became an issue in succeeding elections. Mr. Deming carried on an educational 
campaign and brought about the enactment of the law in 1907. Under the act 
all state, county and city funds draw interest. 

He was appointed by Governor De Forest Richards a member and secretary 
of the Wyoming commission to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis 
in 1904. He held the same position by the appointment of Governor B. B. Brooks 
at the Lewis and Clark Exposition a't Portland in 1905. 

In 1906. in addition to his duties as editor of the Tribune, he began a propa- 
ganda for the settlement of the semi-arid lands in Wyoming by farmers and 
the cutting up of big ranches into farms. He spoke and wrote about it fre- 
quently. The movement has succeeded beyond the expectations of the most hope- 
ful and removed the last lingering doubt of the skeptics. Due to the local 
committee of which he was chairman, which made experiments on land owned 
by himself and fellow members near the city, has grown up the department of 
farming and agriculture in Wyoming. Mr. Deming is regarded as the "father 
of the dry farming" movement in this state. His faith, persistence and the years 
of publicity he gave it overcame both doubt and prejudice and made arid farming 
secure. 











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266 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

In 1907 he was appointed receiver of public moneys in the United States 
land office at Cheyenne by President Theodore Roosevelt, was reappointed by 
President William H. Taft and served three months under President Woodrow 
Wilson. This brought him in close daily touch with the new farmer. 

After retiring from this office, he made an extensive trip abroad, returning 
to Cheyenne, where he resumed the editorship of the Wyoming Tribune and the 
Wyoming Stockman-Farmer, the latter a stock and farm paper with a large cir- 
culation in Wyoming and adjoining states. 

W. C. Deming was born at Alount Olivet, Kentucky, on December 6, 1869, 
his father being Osmer S. Deming, a native of New York and a prominent lawyer. 
His mother, Leona Rigg Deming, was a native of Kentucky. 

Mr. Deming combines in himself many of the characteristics of both sections. 
He is a descendant of John Deming, the "Settler'' who came to Wethersfield, 
Connecticut, about 1635. He is a graduate of Allegheny College, JMeadville, 
Pennsylvania, having received the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Master of 
Arts. He has been admitted to the bar both in the state of Kentucky and Wyo- 
ming and was editor of the Warren Daily Tribune at Warren, Ohio, several years 
before coming west. He is still the president of the company which owns and 
publishes that paper. He is a member of the American Bar Association and the 
National Arts Club of New York city. 

He organized the Deming Realty Company and the Tribune Building Com- 
pany, which own and conduct valuable real estate holdings in the city of Cheyenne. 
He has been identified with every active movement looking toward the growth 
of Wyoming and its capital city for eighteen years. His greatest achievement, 
however, is that which resulted in the converting of Laramie county from a 
grazing, cattle and sheep pasture to the sections of beautiful farms. 

Through his personal influence and editorship, Wyoming has adopted much 
progressive legislation, notably a primary election law, workmen's compensation 
act, public utilities statute and an independent judiciary. 

i\Ir. Deming is a thirty-second degree Mason and a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 

At Warren, Ohio, in June, 1907, he was united in marriage with Zell P. Hart. 



JOHN RALPH ]\L\ROUIS, M. D. 

Dr. John Ralph Marcjuis is engaged in the general practice of medicine at 
Kemmerer, where he is also conducting a private hospital. He has followed his 
profession there since 1909, in which year he completed his preparation for the 
practice of medicine and surgery by graduation from the Nebraska College of 
IMedicine. 

He is numbered among the native sons of Nebraska, his birth having occurred 
in Stromsburg. Polk county. May i. 1879, his parents being Joseph and Sarah 
( Timmons) Marquis, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. 
The father came of Scotch-Irish ancestry but the Marquis family was founded 
in the Kevstone state at an early period in its development. He was reared and 
educated in Pennsylvania and in young manhood removed westward to Iowa, 
where he was in the railroad service for a time. He afterward took up his abode 
in Nebraska in the latter '60s and became one of the pioneer settlers of Polk 
county, where he was engaged in farming and in the live stock business. He 
follovved that pursuit for many years. He was a Civil war veteran, enlisting 
with an Iowa company at the time of the hostilities between the north and the 
south, and he participated in Perry's raids in Missouri. He died in Leavenworth, 
Kansas, at the advanced age of eighty-one years, passing away on the 9th of 
March, 1916. His wife was also of Scotch-Irish descent. She is still living and 
now makes her home in Kemmerer at the age of seventy-three years, her birth 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 267 

having occurred in April, 1845. By her marriage she became the mother of six 
children, of whom John Ralph was the second in order of birth. 

In the country schools of his native county Dr. Marquis began his education 
and afterward attended the Fremont Normal School at Fremont, Nebraska, from 
which he was graduated with the Ph. G. and B. S. degrees in 1905. His early 
life had been spent upon the home farm and he became familiar with all the 
duties and labors incident to the development of the fields and the care of the 
crops, for in his boyhood his time was divided between the duties of the school- 
room, the pleasures of the playground and the work of the fields. Before he en- 
tered the normal school he took up the profession of teaching in Boyd county 
and also continued his work as an educator at several other points in Nebraska. 
After his graduation from the Fremont Normal School he determined upon the 
practice of medicine as a life work and then entered the Nebraska College of 
Medicine, from which he was graduated with the M. D. degree in 1909. He 
completed his course there in May and on the 13th of June he arrived in Kem- 
merer. On the 4th of July he received his state license to practice and has since 
been engaged in the active work of his profession save during the fall of iqh 
and the spring of 1912, which periods he spent at Queen's University at Kings- 
ton, Ontario, doing post graduate work to further advance his efficienc\- in his 
profession. He has continued successfully in the general practice of medicine 
and surgery and he also conducts a private hospital with accommodations for 
ten patients. He established the hospital on the c)th of September, 1917, and it 
is known as the Marquis Hospital. It is modern in every detail and its equip- 
ment is of the most advanced kind, so that patients there receive the utmost care 
and attention possible, with all facilities to advance speedy recovery and aid na- 
ture and science in the elTort to restore health. 

Dr. ]\Iarquis is a republican in his political views and in 191 5 he served as 
mayor of Kemmerer, giving to the city a business-like and progressive adminis- 
tration. He is a young man possessed of those qualities which ensure success 
and advancement. It was by teaching pharmacy and materia medica that he 
worked his way through the uni\ersity. thn> displaying the determination that 
will ever enable him to overcome obstacles and difficulties in his path and carry 
forward to successful completion what he undertakes. He holds to high profes- 
sional standards, closely observing the ethics of the medical fraternity and readily 
adopting the most advanced scientific methods which promise to prove efficient 
factors in medical and surgical practice. 



EVERETT L. WOODFORD. 

Business enterprise finds expression in the career of Everett L. Woodford, 
who is the secretary and treasurer of the Woodford Clothing Company of Lara- 
mie. He is imbued in all that he undertakes with the spirit of progress and his 
well defined plans and purposes have carried him steadily forward to success. 

He was born in Agency, Iowa, A])ril 2. 1S80. and is a son of the late N. A. 
Woodford, who was a native of that state and belonged to one of the old families 
of Iowa of English descent. He devoted his life to merchandising and became a 
pioneer merchant of Wapello county, Iowa, where he resiik-d in the time of his 
death, which occurred in the spring of 1898. when he wa^ -ixiy-nine years of 
age. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Eliza Day, was a native of Ohio and 
represented one of the pioneer families of that state of English and Scotch lineage. 
Mrs. Woodford is still living, residing upon the old homestead in Iowa. By her 
marriage she became the mother of five children. 

Everett L. Woodford, the youngest of the family, was educated in the public 
and high schools of Iowa and 'in the Spaulding Business College of Kansas City, 
Missouri. At the age of eighteen years he made his initial step in the business 
world and was first employed in his father's store. After his father's death he 



268 HISTORY OF WYOAIING 

continued to conduct the business for a time and then closed it out and removed 
to Kansas City, Missouri. Following his graduation from business college he 
followed bookkeeping in Kansas City for a year and subsequently returned to 
Iowa, settling in Ottumwa, where he engaged in clerking in a clothing store for 
two years, thus gaining initial experience along the line in which he is now en- 
gaged. He afterward went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he was employed 
by Wyman, Partridge & Company, wholesale dealers in dry goods. He remained 
with the firm for four years in the house and then went upon the road as a 
traveling salesman, representing the company in that capacity for six years, dur- 
ing four years of which time he traveled over Nebraska, Wyoming, Idaho and 
Colorado. He became impressed with the west and its opportunities and par- 
ticularly with Laramie and in 1909 he established his present business in Laramie 
under the firm name of the Drew Clothing Company. H. A. Drew being his part- 
ner in the undertaking. In 1912 Mr. Woodford took over Mr. Drew's interests, 
at which time he severed his connection with Wyman, Partridge & Company, 
for whom he had continued to travel up to that date. He then reorganized his 
business under the name of the Woodford Clothing Company, of .which he is 
the secretary and treasurer, with Mrs. J. J. Woodford as the president and E. D. 
Woodford as the vice president. He has since been active in the control and 
management of the business, the firm carrying a large stock of clothing and 
haberdashery. In fact this is the leading store of the kind in this section of 
Wyoming, if not in the entire state. The business has been a pronounced success 
from the start, due in large measure to the efforts and attention of Everett L. 
Woodford, who is a representative young merchant, alert, energetic and wide 
awake to every possibility opened in the natural ramifications of trade. 

On the 28th of July, 1908, at Minneapolis, Minnesota, Mr. Woodford was 
united in marriage to Miss June Johnson, native of Minnesota, and a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. John B. Johnson, who were of Norwegian birth. Mr. and Mrs. 
Woodford have become the parents of two sons: Charles Day, who was born in 
Laramie. May 21, 1910; and John Sheridan, born September 25, 1913. 

The parents are members of the First Presbyterian church and they occupy 
an enviable social position in Laramie. Mr. Woodford is a progressive republican 
and fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
He belongs to the Chamber of Commerce and stands for all those projects put 
forth by the organization for the benefit and upbuilding of his adopted city. He 
is a man of keen discrimination and sound judgment, and his executive ability 
his excellent management and his long experience have brought to the concern 
with which he is connected a large degree of success. The safe, conservative 
policy which he inaugurated commends itself to the judgment of all and has se- 
cured to the company a patronage which makes the \ohnne of trade transacted 
of great importance and magnitude. 



CHARLES C. RATE. 



Among the well known and prominent representatives of the sheep industry 
in Wyoming is Charles C. Rate, living at Shoshoni. He has engaged in this 
business since attaining his majority and long experience and close study of the 
question have well qualified him for the successful conduct of his interests. 

Iowa claims him as a native son, his birth having occurred in Cedar county, 
August 13, 1878, his parents being John and Eliza (Collins) Rate. The father 
was a native of England, while the mother was born in Ohio, but their marriage 
was celebrated in Iowa. They removed westward to Wyoming in 1886, casting 
in their lot with the pioneer settlers of this state, where they spent their remain- 
ing days, both having now passed away. In their family were five children, of 
whom four are yet living. 

Charles C. Rate was reared in Wyoming and obtained a common school 




a-t^p^ 




270 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

education. He was a lad of but eight years at the time the family arri\ed in 
the west. After reaching- adult age he became connected with the sheep 
industry, in which he has since engaged. He has found the business both 
congenial and profitable and he is today the owner of extensive landed holdings, 
upon which he has large flocks of sheep, near Shoshoni. He is also interested in 
oil lands in this locality and his business connections are of a character which 
have contributed to general progress and prosperity as well as to his individual 
success. Moreover, he is a director of the Shoshoni State Bank. He is a man 
of keen discernment and sound judgment, possesses honesty of purpose and every- 
day common sense — a quality which is too often lacking in the conduct of business 
affairs. 

In 1908 Mr. Rate was united in marriage to Miss Bessie Schaefer, a native 
of Nebraska, and to them has been born a son, Henry Charles. 

The parents are loyal members of the Episcopal church, doing all in their 
power to further its growth and e.xtend its influence. Mr. Rate votes with the 
republican party and is now serving as a member of the city council, exercising 
his ofiicial prerogatives in support of all progressive plans and measures for 
the general good. Fraternally he is connected with the Alasons and is in thorough 
sympathy with the purposes of the craft. Living in Wyoming for nearly a third 
of a century, he has witnessed practically the entire growth and development 
of the section of the state in which he makes his home. 

It is a well known fact that it is the enterprise and character of the citizens 
that enrich and ennoble a commonwealth, and that the progress of a community 
is not due so much to the machinery of government or the men who occupy the 
public offices as to the business men who are utilizing the natural resources of a 
country and are creating beneficial results by opening up possibilities for trade, 
thereby advancing civilization. In the latter connection Charles C. Rate has 
become well known and his position among the leading sheep men of Wyoming 
is an enviable one. 



JOHN WILLIAMSON PRICE, M. D. 

Dr. John \\'illiamson Price, actively engaged in the practice of medicine and 
surgery in Wyoming, was born in Lake county. Tennessee, December 12, 1878, 
a son iif William T. and Amanda Louise (Oursler) Price, who were also natives 
of Tennessee, where lived the grandparents and the great-grandparents of Dr. 
John Williamson Price. 

The father of Dr. Price was a well known cotton planter of Tennessee and 
also engaged in the real estate business at Collierville, where his death occurred 
in 1903. His widow survives and yet makes her home in that place. In their fam- 
ily were six children: J. G., now living in Dyersburg, Tennessee; Mrs. J. W. 
Lynch, a resident of Collierville, where her husband is cashier in the "bank ; 
Frances, Laura and Willie, all of Collierville ; and Dr. Price of this review, who 
is the eldest of the family. 

In his boyhood days John Williamson Price was a pupil in the public schools 
of his native city and also attended the Bellevue high school at Collierville, subse- 
quent to which time he entered Milligan College and still later supplemented his 
broad literary learning by professional study. Having determined to make the 
practice of medicine his life work, he became a student in the Memphis Hospital 
Medical College from which he was graduated with the class of 1903. He took 
post graduate work in Chicago in 191 5 and again in 1917 and throughout his pro- 
fessional career he has kept in close touch with the trend of modern scientific 
thought and investigation. He utilizes the results of the latest research work and 
discoveries in his practice, readily discriminating between the essential and the 
nonessential in all that has to do with his professional activity. He entered upon 
the active practice of medicine in Marvell, Arkansas, in 1903, and there resided 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 271 

for a decade, removing to Laramie on the ist of May, 1912. In the intervening 
period covering about six years, he has built up an extensive practice. He be- 
came the associate of Dr. William Harris, with whom he remained until February, 
1917, when he became associated with Dr. R. M. Leake, formerly of Collierville, 
Tennessee. Dr. Price has served as city physician of Laramie and is surgeon for 
the Colorado, Wyoming & Eastern Railway Company; at the same time he 
enjoys a large private practice and is widely known in professional connections. 
Fie belongs to the Albany County Medical Society and to the Wyoming State 
Medical Society. Aside from his professional work Dr. Price has other business 
interests, one of which is the Hutton Lake Oil and Gas Company, of which he is 
vice president. He served as a member of the Albany county exemption board 
during the year 1917. 

On the 5th of February, 1904, in ^Memphis, Tennessee, Dr. Price was united 
in marriage to Miss Viola V. Sanderlin, of Collierville, Tennessee. Iloth, Dr. 
Price's family, and that of his wife are among the old families in that section of 
Tennessee and date back to the early part of the past century, when they emi- 
grated there from Virginia. They have one child, Amanda Louise, who was born 
in Collierville, Tennessee. August 2, 1906, and is now attending the University of 
Wyoming as a pupil in the training school. Dr. Price is deeply interested in the 
cause of education and for two years served as a member of the school board of 
Laramie. He is actuated by a spirit of progress and improvement in all that he 
does and advances steadily step by step not only in his chosen profession but in 
public connections as well. He possesses a social nature that makes for personal 
popularity and he has gained an extensive circle of friends during the period of 
his residence in Wyoming. 



PETER S. COOK. 



Peter S. Cook, one of the well known business men of Cheyenne, where he is 
conducting a plumbing and heating establishment, was born in Aberdeen, Scot- 
land. March 2j, 1859, a son of David and Helen (Smith) Cook. The father 
was engaged in the insurance business and both he and his wife spent their en- 
tire lives in Scotland. The father has passed away but the mother is still living. 

Reared in the land of hills and heather, Peter S. Cook pursued his education 
in the grammar schools of Scotland and after his textbooks were put aside began 
learning the plumber's trade in that country. In order to further advance his 
education he also attended nitjht school, having come to a recognition of the fact 
that thorough intellectual training; is one of the most vital preparations for life's 
practical and responsible duties, lie left his native country when twenty years 
of age, crossing the Atlantic to the LTnited States. He landed at Boston, where 
he remained for three years, and then sought the opportunities of the west, ar- 
riving in Denver in 1883. He spent six months in that city and on the ist of 
September of the same year came to Cheyenne, where he was employed for a 
brief period as a journeyman. In 1884, however, he embarked in business on 
his own account and today is the oldest representative of the plumbing and heat- 
ing business not only in the city but in the state of Wyoming. From the beginning 
he" has enjoyed substantial success, his trade steadily gmwiiii^ with the increase 
in the population of Cheyenne. He has worked in his line on the state capitol, 
on the First National Bank, the Plains Hotel and most of the important business 
blocks of the city and has also installed the plumbing and heating systems in 
manv of the best residences of Cheyenne. 

In Septemlier. iSSh, Air. Cook was united in marriage to Ali^s Mary Brown 
and to them have Iieen Imrn live children, Elizabeth, Robert, \\ illi.mi, David and 
Louis, but the last named was killed in a street car acei<leiit when twenty-five 
vears of age, 

Mr, Cook has been a stalwart champion of the republican party since liecom- 



272 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

ing a naturalized American citizen and has done effective and active work in its 
behalf. He has become one of the recognized local leaders in party ranks and 
for two terms he served as mayor of Cheyenne. It was while Mr. Cook was 
mayor of Cheyenne that the city water system at a cost of over one million dol- 
lars was installed. It is considered one of the best water works in the entire 
country and no small credit is due Mr. Cook for his efficiency and tireless energy 
in looking after the progress of the work during the construction period, his 
many years of experience making his efforts particularly valuable to the city. 
He also represented his district in the state legislature as a member of the house 
for one term and also as a member of the senate for one term and has thus been 
connected with much important constructive legislation looking to the develop- 
ment of the interests of the state and the safeguarding of public aft'airs. Fra- 
ternally he is a very prominent Mason, the honorary thirty-third degree having 
been conferred upon him, and he has also become a member of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and with the Wood- 
men of the World and he has membership in the Industrial Club. In a word, 
he is one of the prominent and influential residents of Cheyenne who for more 
than a third of a century has been closely identified with the city along the lines 
of material, political and social progress. All who know him — and he has a 
wide acquaintance — attest his high personal worth and his progressive citizen- 
ship. 



w. J. McLaughlin. 



W. J. McLaughlin, one of Riverton's most prominent citizens, is vice president 
and a director of the Wyomont Company, a million dollar corporation, formed 
for the manufacture of potash and sulphur and for the handling of copper prop- 
erties. He is also vice president and a director of the Hall Oil Company, vice 
president and a director of the Wyoming Tie & Timber Company and is occupying 
the same official positions in four other corporations. The nature and variety of 
his interests jjlace him in a conspicuous position in business circles, his ability 
being recognized by his colleagues and contemporaries. Power grows through the 
exercise of eft'ort and in the conduct of increasingly important interests Mr. 
McLaughlin has reached a position of leadership, in which his influence is marked, 
while his efforts are far reaching in results. 

A native of Pennsylvania, he was born in Johnstown, September 9, 1853, a son 
of George and Catherine L. (Gordon) McLaughlin, the father a native of Scot- 
land, and the mother of Pennsylvania. The father came to the new world as a 
youth with a brother and in this country he met his future wife. They were mar- 
ried in the Keystone state and took up their abode in Johnstown, where Mr. 
McLaughlin became a contractor and builder. It was he who built the canal from 
Tohnstown to Pittsburgh. He was drowned when his son, _W. J. McLaughlin, 
"was but ten months of age. The mother, however, kept her little family of three 
sons and a daughter together, carefully rearing them to manhood and woman- 
hood, providing for them in every possible way that a devoted mother could do. 

W. J. McLaughlin was educated in the public schools of JohnstjDwn, where he 
resided until his twenty-fourth year. In 1877 ^^ '^^'^"^ ^^^s*^ ^° Kansas and for 
ten years was engaged in farming in Rooks county. In 1887 he removed to 
Allia'nce. Nebraska, where he accepted a contract on the construction of the Bur- 
lington Railroad from that point to Sheridan, Wyoming. He located his family 
in Newcastle. Wyoming, and after the completion of his contract accepted another 
contract with the Burlington Railroad to furnish the company with ties. He then 
went to the Black Hills 'of South Dakota, removing his family to Spearfish, that 
state, and for some vears he was engaged in getting out ties for the railroad com- 
pany. In 191 1, however, he returned to Wyoming, and after spending two years 
in .Sheridan took up his abode in Riverton. where he accepted a contract with the 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 275 

Northwestern Railroad Company to furnish them a half million ties a year for ten 
years. While conducting his tie business he became identified with the Hall Oil 
Company and was made a member of the board of directors and vice president of 
the company. He contributed materially to the success of the corporation and to 
the development of the oil resources of the state. Recognizing the opportunities 
in this direction as the indications were that a large tract of Wyoming land was 
underlaid with oil, he assisted in organizing four other oil companies, of which 
he is the vice president and a member of the board of directors. He has been a 
dominant factor in the organization of the Wyomont Company, of which he is also 
vice president and a director. In these connections he is bending his efforts to ad- 
ministrative direction and executive control and the results achieved have been 
highly satisfactory to the companies with which he is identified. 

On the 28th of December, 1876, in Braddock, Pennsylvania, Mr. McLaughlin 
was united in marriage to Miss Edintha Johnston, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 
and to them have been born founchildren, namely: Leo E., who is associated with 
his father in various business enterprises; Ethel M.. the wife of Melvin McCoy, 
of Riverton ; Ray F., who is also his father's business associate ; and Grace A., 
the wife of George Boland, of Riverton. Mrs. McLaughlin holds membership in 
the Methodist church. 

Mr. McLaughlin gives his political allegiance to the republican party and 
fraternally he is well known as a Mason, having attained high rank in the order. 
He belongs to Riverton Lodge, No. 26, F. & A. M. ; to Spearfish Commandery, 
K. T. ; and to Black Hills Consistorj', No. 3, A. & A. S. R. He is also a member 
of the Naja Temple. A. A. O. N. M. S., of Deadwood, South Dakota. His equip- 
ment for life's practical duties was good and he soon passed on to positions of 
executive control, subsequently bending his energies largely to organization, to 
constructive efforts and administrative direction. Possessing broad, enlightened 
and liberal-minded views, faith in himself and in the vast potentialities for develop- 
ment inherent in his country's wide domain, his has been an active career, in which 
he has accomplished important and farreaching results, contributing in no small 
degree to the expansion and material growth of the state, from which he himself 
has derived substantial profit. 



ISIDOR KASTOR. 



Isidor Kastor, one of the progressive business men of Evanston, dealing in 
men's clothing, was born in Bavaria, Germany, on the 13th of May, i860, and 
is a son of S. Kastor and Babetta Kastor, who spent their entire lives in their 
native land. The father was there engaged in merchandising and both he and 
his wife are now deceased. The mother bore the maiden name of Babetta Allen- 
berg and was a native of Bavaria. There were four children of that marriage, of 
whom Isidor is the eldest. 

In his boyhood days he attended the public schools of his native country and 
in 1883, when a young man of twenty-three years, determined to try his fortune 
in the new world. Accordingly he crossed the Atlantic and made his way into 
the interior of the country, settling first in Arkansas. In 1885. however, he ar- 
, rived in Wyoming and took up his abode in Evanston, where he established one 
of the first mercantile enterprises in Uinta county. He has built up a splendid 
business as a dealer in men's clothing and furnishings, and although he started 
the business on a small scale, he has today an extensive and profitable trade. He 
occupies one of the finest business block's in Evanston and his store is equal to 
that to be found in any city in the state. 

On the 2qth of December, 1889, iMr. Kastor was married to Miss Fannie 
Lewis, a daughter of Mr. and Airs. I. N. Lewis, who were pioneer settlers of 
Wyoming. They have four children. Louis, who was born in Evanston in 
November, 1890, and is a graduate of the public schools here, is married and now 



276 HISTORY OF vVYOAlIXG 

resides in Kemmerer. Selma, bom in Evanston in 1892, attended the Conserva- 
tory of Music at Boston, Massachusetts, and also studied music in Europe. She 
was a teacher of languages in the high school at Evanston, and has become the 
wife of M. L. Katz, an attorney of Worcester, ^Massachusetts. Shirley, born in 
Evanston in 1895, was graduated from the high school and is now in business 
with his father. He is also a graduate of a commercial school at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. Bertha, the youngest of the family, was born in Evanston in 1905 and 
is still in school. 

Mr. Kastor is a thirty-second degree Mason, prominent in the order, and 
he is also connected with the Woodmen of the World and the ^Modern Woodmen 
of America. His political endorsement is given to the republican party and he- 
served as mayor of his city from 1914 until 1916, having been elected on the 
citizens' ticket. He was also a member of the board of education for six years 
and at all times he stands for progress and improvement in relation to those 
interests which have to do with the upbuilding and welfare of his community, his 
county or the commonwealth. He is, judged from a business standpoint, entirely 
a self-made man and he deserves much credit for what he has accomplished. 
Starting out empty-handed, he has so utilized his opportunities that he has ad- 
vanced steadily step by step and is today one of the foremost merchants and lead- 
ing citizens of Uinta county. 



WILLIAM F. MECU.M. 



William F. IMecum, attorney-at-law of Douglas, who for more than a third 
of a century has been actively engaged in practice, was bom on the loth of 
January, 1856, in Henry county, Illinois, a son of Charles B. and Frances Helen 
(Richards) Mecum. The father was descended from French and Irish ancestry, 
while the mother came of Welsh and English lineage. The great-grandfathers 
on both sides, however, were reared in the new world. Charles B. Mecum was 
numbered among the California Argonauts who in 1849 made their way to the 
Pacific coast in search of the golden fleece. He afterward returned to Illinois, 
where he made his home for a considerable period, but eventually removed to 
Iowa. He was a well to do farmer and stock man. In the family were three 
sons and two daughters. 

William F. Mecum, who was the eldest of the family, after completing his 
education by a high school course in Illinois, took up the profession of teaching. 
He was nineteen years of age when the family removed to Iowa and later he 
turned his attention to the study of law, devoting three years to the mastery 
of the principles of jurisprudence in the office and under the direction of the firm 
of McDufl:"y & Howard at Jefferson, Iowa; and with Norris Brown, of Omaha, 
Nebraska, who had also been a law student at the same time, was admitted to the 
bar on the ist of September, 1883. The two young men then formed a partnership 
under the firm name of Mecum & Brown and opened a law office at Perry, Iowa, 
where Mr. Mecum remained until April, 1886, when he left the middle west and 
came to Wyoming, settling at Fort Fetterman. Mr. Mecum was the first attornev 
to take up his abode in Douglas, going there on June g, 1886. He afterward 
removed to Grand Island, Nebraska, where he practiced law one and a half years 
and then was in the hotel business, coming back to Douglas, Wyoming, in the 
spring of 1895. He then taught school three years, after which period he filled 
the office of county attorney for three two-year terms. He was the first justice 
of the peace elected and the first police judge of the city. He also served as 
under sheriff with J. T. Williams, who was then occupying the position of sheriff. 
Mr. Mecum filled that position for a year and a half and he also acted as prin- 
cipal of the schools of Douglas in an early day, for at that period there was not 
much business for an attorney, as there were about fifteen attorneys here wait- 
ing for business, the county seat being at Laramie City, a distance of about one 




WILLIAM F. MECUM 



278 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

hundred and forty miles away. With the settlement of the county, however, his 
clientage increased and has long since enjoyed a good practice which has con- 
nected him with much of the m:portant litigation heard in the courts of his 
district. Few lawyers win a larger percentage of their cases before either judge 
or jury than does -\lr. ,Mecum. He convinces by his concise statement of law and 
facts rather than by word painting, and so high is the respect for his legal ability 
and integrity that liis assertions in court are seldom questioned. 

Mr. Mecum was united in marriage on the 25th of December, 1888, at Grand 
Island, Mebraska, to Miss Kate G. Koush, a daughter of David "S. and Sarah 
M. Roush, and their children are: Grace E., now the wife of Elmer Clark, 
residing at Douglas; Frances H., the wife of R. F. Bower, of Worland; Jessie 
L. ; Clara A. ; and Verna H. The family occupy an enviable position in social 
circles and their home, one of the most beautiful in the town, is noted for its 
warm-hearted hospitality. Mr. and Mrs. Mecum hold membership in the Meth- 
odist church. 

Judge Mecum is fond of athletics and his interest therein has been a factor 
in maintaining his excellent health. He belongs to the Commercial Club and fra- 
ternally is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party and he keeps well informed on the 
questions and issues of the day but has never been an office seeker. He prefers 
to concentrate his undivided thought and attention upon his professional interests 
and duties. He gives to his clients a service of great talent, unwearied industry 
and broad learning, but he never forgets that there are certain things due to the 
court, to his own self-respect and, above all, to justice and the righteous admin- 
istration of the law which neither the zeal of an advocate nor the pleasure of suc- 
cess permits him to disregard. 



WILLIAM GIBSON. 



Among those who are active in connection with the conduct of commercial 
interests in Basin is numbered William Gibson, who is proprietor of a furniture 
and undertaking establishment, which he is successfully conducting. He was 
born in Scotland, July 12, 1864, and is a son of George and Alary (Hutchinson) 
Gibson, who were also natives of the land of hills and heather, where they 
spent their entire lives, never coming to the new world. They had a family of 
thirteen children, eight of whom are yet living. 

William Gibson was reared and educated in Scotland, there remaining until 
he reached the age of twenty-three years, when he bade adieu to friends and 
native country and sailed for the new world with Canada as his destination. 
He remained in that country for three years or until 1890, when he came to the 
United States, settling first in Rawlins, Wyoming, where he engaged in the 
sheep business. In 1896 he made his way westward to the Big Horn country 
and ran sheep in the Big Horn basin until 1902, when he sold his interests in 
that connection in order to concentrate his efforts and attention upon commer- 
cial interests. He then established a clothing store, which he conducted until 
1907, when he sold out but later turned his attention to the furniture and under- 
taking business, in which he has since been engaged at Basin, having a well ap- 
pointed store in which he carries a large and carefully selected line of goods. 
His business methods, which are thoroughly reliable, and his unfaltering enter- 
prise have been the chief sources of his growing success. In addition to his 
mercantile interests he is the vice president of the Bighorn County Bank and 
he is also a member of the Basin Hall Company, of which he is the treasurer. 

In 1902 Mr. Gibson was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Keith, a native 
of Indiana, and to them have been born the following children : Lester H., who 
is attending high school ; Frederick W., at school ; Alberta, who is deceased ; and 
Richard K. Mrs. Gibson is a member of the Seventh Day Adventist church. 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 279 

The family occupies an attractive residence in Basin and Mr. Gibson also 
owns a brick store building in the city and a fine farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres not far distant. His political allegiance has always been given to the repub- 
lican party and he is now serving for a second term as a member of the city 
council of Basin. In 1910 he was appointed postmaster under President Taft 
and served for four and a half years. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has filled all of the chairs in the local 
lodge. He is also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. He is actu- 
ated in all that he does by a spirit of enterprise and progress that never stops 
short of the successful accomplishment of his purpose. 



ABRAHAM CRAWFORD. 

Abraham Crawford, attorney at law, actively engaged in practice in Evans- 
ton, was born on the 9th of September, 1870, in Renfrewshire, Scotland, a son 
of Jeremiah Crawford, who was likewise born in the land of hills and heather 
and who came to America in 1896. Making his way westward, he took up his 
abode at Almy, Uinta county, Wyoming, where he lived retired to the time of 
his death, which occurred November 30, 1901, when he had reached the age of 
sixty-four years, the month of his birth having been Febniary, 1837. His wife 
bore the maiden name of Janet Reid and she, too, was a native of Scotland. She 
accompanied her husband to the United States and passed away November 20, 
1912, at the age of seventy-four years, her birth having occurred in August, 
1838. The children of their marriage were ten in number, six sons and four 
daughters, eight of whom are yet living, Abraham being the seventh in order of 
"birth. 

Abraham Crawford pursued his early education in the public schools of 
his native country and later matriculated in Glasgow University. It was his 
mother's wish that he should become a Presbyterian minister and to that end 
he was given liberal educational advantages. He continued in the university for 
several years but at length determined to follow some line of business and' sev- 
ered home ties, leaving Scotland for the new world. On the 23d of June, 1893, 
as a passenger on the steamship City of Rome, a vessel of the Anchor Line, he 
landed at New York and thence made his way directly westward to Evanston, 
Wyoming, where he arrived on the 28th of June. He secured employment in 
the mines at Almy and gave his attention to coal mining tmtil May, 1899, during 
which time he took up the study of law and perfected himself for his chosen 
profession. He then removed to Mercur, Utah, where he was employed along 
metal lines, and while thus engaged he continued his legal studies and was ad- 
mitted to practice before the supreme court of Utah on the 12th of February, 
1900. After having been elected city marshal of Mercur and serving in the 
position for a time he went to Nevada, where he engaged in mining and pros- 
pecting, continuing active along the latter line until 1907. He then returned to 
Almy, Wyoming, and again worked in the mines until 1908, when he removed 
to Evanston. He was then elected county attorney of Uinta county and served 
in that capacity for two years, after which he was reelected in 1912 and again 
in 1914, so that he served' altogether in that office for a period of six years. At 
the same time he continued in the private practice of his profession and his 
record is most creditable by reason of the fact that he has been untiring in his 
devotion to the interests of his clients, nor does he ever forget that he owes a 
still higher allegiance to the majesty of the law. The thoroughness with which 
he prepares his cases and the clearness of his arguments are salient features in 
his growing success. 

On the 2d of October, 1890, in Scotland, Mr. Crawford was united in 
marriage to Miss Maggie Bella Gray, a native of Scotland and a daughter of 
William and Janet (Tennant) Gray, the former now deceased. Air. and I\Irs. 



280 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

Crawford became the parents of seven children : Janet, Alaggie, William, Abra- 
ham, Annie and Maud Ethel who were twins, the latter dying seven weeks after 
birth, and one who died unnamed in infancy. The wife and mother passed 
away February 9, 1914, at Evanston, when forty-five years of age, her birth 
having occurred March 25, 1869. On the 21st of December, 1916, Mr. Craw- 
ford was again married, his second union being with Miss Agnes Hurst, a 
native of Scotland and a daughter of William and Sarah (Rankin) Hurst, the 
former now deceased. 

Mr. Crawford is connected with the Royal Highlanders and is a past grand 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His military record comprises serv- 
ice as a sergeant in the Home Guard of Evanston. From the age of eleven years 
Mr. Crawford has been dependent upon his own resources. His ambition and 
his initiative have enabled him to work his way steadily upward. He was 
employed in the mines of Scotland in his youthful days and was afterward 
connected for many years with mining interests in Wyoming and Utah but at 
length, actuated by a laudable ambition to enter upon a professional career, he 
took up the study of law and since his admission to the bar has made rapid 
progress in his profession. In politics he is a republican and was elected second 
vice president of the Wyoming State Bar Association at Their last meeting. 



JOHN E. MEAD. 



John E. Mead, of Newcastle, one of the prominent cattle and sheep men of 
Wyoming, operating in Weston and Niobara counties of this state and also in 
the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation of South Dakota, is a native son of Iowa, 
his birth having occurred in Harrison county on the 31st of October, 1870. His 
father was a native of Scotland who, having left the land of hills and heather 
in 1850 and sailed for the new world, finally located in Iowa in the early '50s, 
where he was afterward married to Emma O'Neill, a native daughter of Iowa. 
Subsequent he removed to Nebraska and later became a resident of South 
Dakota, establishing his home at Hot Springs, where he spent his remaining 
days, his death there occurring in the early '90s. 

John E. Mead, whose name introduces this review, pursued his education 
in the district schools, acquainting himself with the common branches of learning 
which constitute the foundation for all educational progress or business success. 
As early as his nineteenth year he became interested in a partnership with his 
father in the live stock Inisiness in Nebraska, afterward removing to the Hot 
Springs country of South Dakcita. where he was engaged in sheep raising. He 
operated a sheep ranch in th:,t section for three years and then trailed his flocks 
over the border into Weston county, Wyoming. He has since been identified 
with business interests in this section and not only is he engaged extensively in 
raising sheep, but also cattle, and his business affairs are wisely, carefully and 
profitably conducted. He is a man of determined purpose, diligent and pro- 
gressive, and his well controlled interests have brought to him a gratifying meas- 
ure of prosperity. 

Mr. Mead was married to Miss Marie Baker of Boyd, Wyommg, m 1907, 
and to them have been born two children, Keith and Frances. 



ALFRED F. STOTT. 



Alfred F. Stott, filling the position of postmaster in Douglas, was born in 
Milton, New York, on the loth of December. 1868, and is a son of Charles E. 
and Elizabeth (Place) Stott, in whose familv were four daughters and two 
sons, Alfred F. being the youngest child. The pul)lic schools of Poughkeepsie, 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 283 

New York, afforded him his early educational privileges and his studies were 
continued in the public schools of Brooklyn, where he passed through consecu- 
tive grades to the high school, from which in due course of time he was gradu- 
ated. He made his initial step in the business world as an employe of the Chem- 
ical Bank of New York, but ill health at length compelled him to seek a better 
climate and he went to Florida, where he remained for three years. In 1890 
he removed westward to Colorado and while living in Douglas county, that state, 
filled the position of county sheriff in a most creditable and acceptable manner 
and also made an equally enviable record as postmaster at Castle Rock, serving 
(luring the second administration of President Cleveland. In the fall of 1907 
Air. ."-^tott arri\ed in Wyoming, where he has since made his home. Locating in 
Douglas, he secured a clerkship in a general merchandise store and occupied 
that position until appointed postmaster of Douglas. He has since occupied the 
position and is very thorough, systematic and methodical in the care of the mails 
and in the performance of all the duties connected with the office. 

On the 17th of July, 1895, Mr. Stott was united in marriage to Miss Alma 
Calkins and they are the parents of two sons and a daughter : Charles E., who 
is with the United States Signal Corps as a member of the regular army ; Helen 
E. ; and Alfred F., Jr. The religious faith of the family is that of the Episcopal 
church and Mr. Stott also has membership with the Woodmen of the World and 
with the Royal Highlanders. His political endorsement is given to the demo- 
cratic party and he has been an active and earnest worker in its ranks, believing 
firmly in its principles. He is interested in all that has to do with the welfare 
and progress of his city and state, and his influence is ever on the side of ad- 
vancement and improvement. As a public official and as a business man he has 
l)ecome widely known in Douglas and the sterling traits of his character have 
won for him a large circle of warm friends. 



WALTER A. MUIR. 



Walter A. Muir, occupying an enviable position as a representative of the 
bar at Rock Springs, is one of the substantial citizens that Pennsylvania has 
furnished to Wyoming. He was born in Scotthaven, Westmoreland county. 
November 6, 1885, a son of David M. and Christina (McQuarrie) Muir, of 
whose family of eleven children ten are yet living. 

Walter A. Muir was the tenth in order of birth in that household. Both of 
his parents were nati\-es of Scotland. The father came to America in 1866, 
settling first in Maryland, where he engaged in mining. Lie afterward returned 
tn Scotland and sc\'rral vears l;'ter again came to the new world. He took up 
his abode at that time in Pennsylvania, where he resided imtil 1886, when with 
his f.-unilv he removed to the west, establishing his home in Rock Springs, Wyo- 
ming, where he resided for three decades, departing this life October 2". 1916, at 
the age of seventv-six years. During the period of his residence in this state 
he was engaged in coalmining and in ranching and was, quite successful in the 
conduct of his business aft'airs. His political allegiance was given to the repub- 
lican party and he took an active interest in the political situation of the coun- 
try, doing' all in his power to promote the growth and advance the success of 
his party. He stood at all times for those interests which are a matter of 
civic virtue and civic pride and he rendered valuable service to his community 
as a member of the police force of Rock Springs. He also served as county 
coroner and was a member of the school board, the cause of education ever 
finding in him a stalwart champion. His religious faith was that of the Pres- 
byterian church and he was a devout Christian, his religion constituting one of 
the strong elements in his life and guiding him in all of his relations with his 
fellowmeii. His wife was born near the estate of Sir \\'illiam Wallace, in 
the highlands of Scotland. Thev were married in the land of hills and heather 



284 HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 

and Mrs. !Muir accompanied her husband to the new world. She, too, passed 
away in Rock Springs, her death occurring in 1909, when she was sixty-five 
years of age. They gave to their children excellent educational opportunities 
and lived to rear ten of their children and see them become useful members of 
society. 

Walter A. Muir was only about a year old when the family home was 
established in Wyoming, so that practically his entire life has been passed in 
Rock Springs, where at the usual age he became a public school pupil, passing 
through consecutive grades to his graduation from the high school. He pur- 
sued an academic course in the Nebraska State University and then entered 
upon the study of law, winning the LL. B. degree upon graduation from the 
Denver University in the class of 1909. Immediately following his graduation 
he returned to Rock Springs, where he entered upon the private practice of 
law, and in 1909 he formed a partnership with T. S. Taliaferro under the firm 
style of Taliaferro & Muir. They have continued in the general practice of 
law and their clientage has become extensive and of an important character. 
They have been connected with much litigation that has elicited wide public 
attention. From the outset of his career Mr. Muir has recognized the necessity 
for thorough preparation and never enters the court room until he has thor- 
oughly studied his case from every- standpoint, preparing for defense as well 
as for attack. His devotion to his clients' interests is proverbial and his ability 
is attested by the liberal practice accorded him. 

On the 4th of June, 1914, Mr. Muir was married in Rock Springs, Wyoming, 
to Miss Mary L. Devlin, who was born in Carbon, Wyoming, a daughter of 
Felix and Mary Devlin, who were pioneer settlers of this state. The father 
was a Civil war veteran and subsequent to the conflict between the north and 
the south he sought the opportunities of the west and became identified with the 
development of Wyoming. To Mr. and Mrs. Muir has been born a son, Walter 
Joseph, whose birth occurred in Rock Springs, March 4, 1915; and a daughter, 
Marion Louise, bom February 24, 191 8. 

Mr. and Mrs. Muir occupy an attractive home in Rock Springs, where they 
have an extensive circle of warm friends. In addition to his property here he 
is part owner in a ranch and large herds of cattle, being secretary- and treasurer 
of the Muir Cattle Company, a Wyoming corporation. His political endorse- 
ment is given to the republican party and he is one of the active workers in 
its ranks. He has served as county prosecuting attorney, being called to that 
office Tanuary- i, 191 3, for a two years' tenn, and he is the present city attorney 
of Rock Springs. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks, while along strictly professional lines he has membership with 
the Wyoming State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. He 
is largely a self-educated as well as a self-made man and he partially provided 
for his expenses while pursuing a course in the university. He entered upon 
a profession where advancement depends entirely upon individual merit and 
ability and from the outset of his professional career has made steady progress 
owing to his close study, his analytical powers and his inductive reasoning, corn- 
bined with' the clearness and cogency of his arguments when he presents his 
cause to the. courts. 



EDWIN P. TAYLOR. 



Edwin P. Taylor, commissioner of labor and a prominent citizen of Cheyenne, 
was born in Fort Sanders, Wyoming. August 3, 1876, a son of Andrew and Annie 
(Blake) Tavlor. The father came to the west as first sergeant under Captam 
Pollock to protect the railroad builders against the Indians and spent his last days 
at Fort Sanders. His wife has also departed this life. In their family were two 
sons and five daughters. 




EDWIN P. TAYLOR 



286 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

Edwin P. Taylor, who was the youngest child, pursued his education largely 
in the school of experience, for he had little opportunity to attend school during 
his youthful days. He learned the printer's trade in the office of the Boomerang 
and of the Cheyenne Leader and Tribune, after which he went upon the road as a 
printer. In 191 1 he was made chief of the fire department of Cheyenne and 
occupied that position for six years, or until the ist of March, 1917, when he 
was appointed by Governor Kendrick to the office of commissioner of labor, in 
which position he is now serving. He became the first labor commissioner of the 
state, the office having been created in that year. 

In religious faith Mr. Taylor is a Catholic and he has attained the third degree 
in the Knights of Columbus. In politics he maintains an independent course, 
supporting men and measures rather than party. His military service covers 
connection with the Light Artillery Volunteers of Wyoming from May until 
November in the Spanish-American war. His entire life has been passed in 
Wyoming and thus for forty-two years he has been an interested witness of the 
growth and development of the state and its progress along many lines. His 
memory goes back to a period when the settlements were comparatively few 
within the borders of the state and the work of progress and improvement seemed 
scarcely begun. As the years passed, however, marvelous changes occurred and 
Mr. Taylor has at all times borne his part in the work of general transformation 
and improvement. 



FRANK SUMNER BURRAGE. 

Frank Sumner Burrage, secretary of the board of trustees, and registrar of 
the University of Wyoming and secretar\- to the president, which important 
position he has filled for ten years, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, October 
23, 1872, a son of George Francis and Elizabeth (Hammond) Burrage, who were 
likewise natives of that state, the former having been born in Leominster and 
the latter in Fitchburg. His ancestors were among the prominent early New 
England families and the ancestral line is traced back to a very early epoch in 
the colonization of New England. Representatives of the name served in the 
Revolutionary war. His father was for many years a well known business man 
of Boston, Massachusetts, and is now living in San Jose, California. His wife 
passed away in that state. In their family were three children, the sisters of 
Frank S. Burrage being: Mrs. \\'alton, living in Cheyenne; and Mrs. Frank 
Johnston, whose home is in Rawlins, Wyoming. 

Frank S. Burrage was the eldest of the family and in his boyhood days he 
became a pupil in the public schools of Boston, while later he entered farvis 
Hall at Denver, Colorado, from which in due course of time he was graduated. 
That institution was a boys' boarding school and he received thorough training 
there, completing the academic course by graduation with the class of 189 1. He 
afterward returned to New England and entered Trinity College, of Hartford, 
Connecticut, where he won the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1895 and was honor 
man in history and economics. He was also a member of the Phi Beta Kappa 
society and of the Psi Upsilon fraternity. Following the completion of his 
course in Hartford he returned to Denver, where he engaged in teaching in 
Jarvis Hall for two years. In January, 1898, he went to Cheyenne, where he 
acted as tutor to the' son of Governor Charles Carey, whom he prepared for 
college. He then entered Judge Carey's office and there remained until 1901, 
when he returned ea,st as far as Detroit, Michigan, where he had charge of the 
Hammond building, of the Hammond estate, for four years. In 1905 he again 
came to Wvoming and accepted the ])nsition of cashier of the Laramie Repub- 
lican, with which he was identified until ii)o8. Since that time he has been con- 
nected with the I'niversity of \\'yoming, becoming secretary of the board of 
trustees. In 1912 he was made registrar of the institution and secretary to the 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 287 

president and has now filled this important position for five years. He is splen- 
didly qualified by educational training and broad experience for the duties that 
devolve upon him, duties which he is discharging with marked capability. 

On the J5th of Septenilier. i<)oS, Mr. Uurrage was married to M'iss Mary 
\'incent McClelland, of I'hiladcljihia, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Rev. and 
Mrs. James h'arley McClelland, representatives of a well known \cw >ork family. 
Mr. and Airs. Burrage have become parents of two children: Xaiicv. who was 
born December 12, 1910, in Laramie and is now attending the Cnncrsity train- 
ing school; and Elizabeth, who was born August 17, 1917. 

Mr. Burrage has always given his political allegiance to the republican party 
and he keeps thoroughly informed concerning the vital questions and issues of 
the day. His religious faith is that of the Episcopal church. 



LLOYD E. KLXDALL, M. D. 

Dr. Lloyd E. Kindall, chief surgeon and superintendent of the Lincoln County 
Miners Hospital at Kemmerer, bases his professional activity upon comprehensive 
preparation and wide subsequent study. He is today one of the best informed 
young physicians of the state and has the respect and confidence of colleagues, 
contemporaries and the general public. 

He was born in Cleveland, Iowa, March 22, 1890, a son of Axel F. Kindall, a 
native of Sweden, who came to America with his parents when a lad of eight 
years, in 1872, his birth having occurred in March, 1864. The family home was 
established in Wapello county, Iowa, and the grandfather of the Doctor was the 
founder of the American branch of the family. He devoted his life to agricultural 
pursuits and his son, Axel F., was reared upon the home farm, early becoming 
familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot of those who devote their 
attention to the tilling of the soil. The public schools of Wapello county afl;orded 
him his educational privileges and after reaching man's estate he turned his 
attention to general merchandising, which he successfully followed in Iowa until 
1902, when he removed to Colorado, settling at Denver. He was there division 
store manager for the Colorado Supply Company and in 1910 he embarked in 
business on his own account at I'aonia, Colorado, where he engaged in general 
merchandising. He resided there until his death, which occurred on the 3d of 
Xovcnibcr, 11)14. He was a devout Christian and an active church worker both 
in the Lutheran and Alethodist churches and did everything in his power to 
advance civic standards, but his business affairs prevented him taking an active 
part in public aiTairs and he always declined to become a candidate for office, 
although frequently solicited to do so. His business affairs were carefully and 
wisely conducted and brought to him a gratifying measure of success. He mar- 
ried Alatilda Ahlstrom, a native of Sweden, who had come to the new world when 
a young girl with an aunt, settling in Iowa, where she met and married Mr. 
Kindall. Thev became the parents of six children, five of wdiom are yet living, 
and Mrs. Kindall still makes her home in Denver, Colorado. 

Lloyd E. Kindall, who was the second in order of birth in the family, pursued 
a public school education in Iowa and attended high school in Colorado, after 
vv'hich he became a student in the University of Colorado, from which he was 
graduated with the AI. D. degree as a member of the class of 191 3. From the 
age of sixteen years he has been dependent upon his own resources, for at that 
time he accepted a position in a mercantile house of Pueblo, Colorado. He has 
done all branches of work in mercantile lines, from service as delivery boy to that 
of manager of a department, but he preferred a professional career and after 
preparing for the practice of medicine he entered upon a nine months' service as 
interne in the L. D. S. Hospital at Salt Lake City, Utah. He afterward spent 
another vear as interne in the hospital of the Southern Pacific Railway Company 
at San Francisco, California, and thus gained the comprehensive knowledge and 




UNC'OLN COUNTY ftHNERS HOSPITAL, KEMMERER 



290 HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 

broad experience which only hospital practice brings. He next became surgeon 
and superintendent of the Lincoln County Miners Hospital at Kemmerer, assum- 
ing charge on the ist of September, 1915. Here he has since remained and has 
rendered most eti'ective and valuable service. He also conducts a very large 
private practice in Kemmerer and throughout the surrounding country, and is a 
physician and surgeon of marked ability, keenly interested in the profession and 
putting forth every effort that will promote his efficiency. He is most careful in 
the diagnosis of his cases and seldom if ever at fault in foretelling the outcome 
of disease. He is also surgeon for the Oregon Short Line Railroad from Granger, 
Wyoming, to Alontpelier, Idaho. 

On the i6th of August, 1916, Dr. Kindall was married in Berkeley, California, 
to Miss Katherine P. Hall, a native of New England and a daughter of Charles R. 
and Mary Hall. Politically Dr. Kindall maintains an independent course. Fra- 
ternally he is a Alason, having taken the degrees of the blue lodge at Kemmerer. 
He also belongs to the chapter and to the Mystic Shrine. He likewise belongs to 
the Kemmerer Commercial Club and to St. Clark's Episcopal church. Along 
strictly professional lines he is connected with the American Aledical Association. 
Dr. Kindall's large practice is due in measure to his individual effort, his laudable 
ambition and his persistency of purpose. He is now concentrating his eft'orts 
and attention upon the Lincoln County Miners Hospital, which was established 
in .-Kpril, 1913. After a time Dr. William A. Whitlock took charge and remained 
as chief surgeon and superintendent until he was succeeded by Dr. Kindall. The 
buildings of the hospital and the Xurses'^Home were erected at a cost of thirty- 
three thousand dollars, the site being donated by P. J. Ouealy. The grounds 
include ten acres beautifully situated on the outskirts of the city on a natural 
building site. The board of directors numbers twenty-one people, including ten 
miners, ten representative citizens not interested in mining and the chief surgeon 
and superintendent. The Lincoln County Hospital was built by contributions of 
the miners and citizens of Kemmerer and is maintained by the miners. The 
buildings, the equipment and the services of physicians and nurses, all speak the 
last word in modern scientific achievement in the field of medicine and surgerj' 
and Dr. Kindall as superintendent maintains the highest possible service, his 
efforts being thoroughly satisfactory to the board of directors. He is a most 
progressive man and his pronounced ability has brought him to the responsible 
position which he now occupies. 



IVAN S. TONES. 



Ivan S. Jones, whose large practice is the best evidence of his high profes- 
sional attainments, has been actively identified with the bar of Lincoln county 
since 1906. He has spent the greater part of his life in this state, although he 
is a native of Emerald, Ohio. 

He was born February 7, 1879, a son of James W. and Frances A. (Huyck) 
Tones, both of whom are natives of Williams county, Ohio. They removed to 
Wyoming in 1884 and settled at Green River. The father had previously come 
to this state in 1871 and was engaged in railroad work for the Union Pacific 
and the Oregon Short Line Railway Companies for about a year. In 1872 he 
returned to Ohio and there engaged in railway work, while later he was em- 
ployed in a similar way in Iowa and in Indiana. As stated, he again came to 
Wyoming in 1884, at which time he took up his abode at Green River and en- 
gaged in ranching and stock raising. .\t length he disposed of his interests 
in this state and is now living retired in Santa Cruz, California, enjoying the 
■fruits of his former toil in a well eamed rest. He was born in the year 1847, so 
that he has now passed the seventy-first milestone on life's journey. His wife 
was born, reared, educated and married in Ohio and is with her husband in 
Santa Cruz. She has reached the age of sixty-nine years. In their family 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 291 

were six children, two of whom have passed away, while those Hviiig are Merrill 
W., Glenn R., Earl M. and Ivan S. One son, Paul, died in Green River, Wyo- 
ming, while the other son, Harry, passed away in Ohio. 

Ivan S. Jones was the third in order of birth in his father's family and 
in his youthful days pursued his education in the schools of (.ireen River, having 
been a little lad of but five years when the family home was there established. 
After his school days were over he took up railroad work in the employ of 
.the Union Pacific and Oregon Short Line Railroads and spent four and one- 
half years in that way. He then turned his attention to stock raising and ranch- 
ing and while thus engaged devoted his leisure hours to reading law. for a 
laudable ambition prompted him to jM-ejiare fur a professional career. After 
thorough preliminary reading he was admitted to the bar in 1906 and has since 
successfully followed his profession in Kemmerer, where he at once opened 
a law office. In the intervening period of about twelve years he has made 
steady and satisfactory progress and from the beginning of his practice he 
has been unusually prosperous in every respect. The success which he has 
attained is due to his own efforts and merit. The possession of advantages is 
no guarantee whatever of professional success. This comes not of itself nor 
can it be secured without integrity, ability and industry. Those qualities he 
possesses to an eminent degree and he is faithful to every interest committed 
to his charge. Throughout his whole life, whatsoever his hand finds to do, 
whether in his profession or in any other sphere, he does with his might and 
w'ith a deep sense of conscieiuious obligation, lie was the first countv prose- 
cuting attorney of Lincoln county. 

On the i6th of October, i\:oj. Mr. Jones was united in marriage to Miss 
Ruby Bugher, of Kemmerer, a daughter of Dr. John C. Bugher, of Big Piney, 
Wyoming. They have become parents of four children: Alice, who was born 
in Kemmerer in igoS; Ruby Kathryn, born in 1911 ; Eunice, in 1913: and \'ir- 
ginia, on the 7th of Septetnber, 19 17. 

In addition to his practice Air. Jones has becunie extensively interested in 
oil lands in Lincoln county and his judiciuus in\'esinienis will no doubt put him 
far beyond the pale of want. He, nioreiixer, stands as (me nf the most success- 
ful practitioners of Lincoln county and is widely known and highly respected. 



JOHN K. BURN HAM. 



John K. Burnham, filling the position of county treasurer of Bighorn 
county and making his home in Basin, is a native of the neighboring state of 
L'tah, his birth ha^■i^g there occurred March 3, 1S7N. liis jiarents were Charles 
C. and Hannah (\'awdryl Burnham, the latter a native of England, while the 
former was born in Illinois. In 1850 the father came to the wi-.t. -eiiling in 
Utah after crossing the jilains with ox teams. The mother wall-;ed fnmi the 
Missouri river to Salt Lake (/ity in the early 'Oos, and they became pioneer 
settlers of that locality, where they were married. To Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. 
Burnham were born se\en children, six of whom are now living. The mother 
passed away in April, 1917, but the father still survives and now makes his home 
in Lovell. Wyoming. 

John K. i3urnham was reared and educated in Utah, where he attended the 
common schools and also the State University. In 189S he removed to Arizona, 
where he resided for three years, and in 1901 he came to ^^'yoming. taking up 
his abode in Bighorn county. He spent three years in the United States navy 
department, after which he returned to Wyoming, and he is now actively identi- 
fied with official interests in Bighorn county and also with agricultural inter- 
ests. 

His political endorsement has always been given to the republican party 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and in 1914 he was elected 



292 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

upon its ticket to the office of county treasurer, in which he made so creditable 
a record that he is now serving for the second term. He has also been town 
treasurer of Lovell, Wyoming, and he is the owner of one hundred acres of 
valuable irrigated land near that place. He is leading a busy and useful life and 
his activities have made him one of the valued and representative residents of 
his section of the state. Aside from acting as county treasurer he is also doing 
work as an auditor at various points in Wyoming. 



HON. COMMODORE PERRY MEEK. 

Hon. Commodore Perry Meek, a retired rancher and stock man, born in 
Maysville, Missouri, on the 12th of May, 185 1, is a son of Richard and India 
Ann Meek, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. The father followed 
farming throughout his entire life and passed away in Missouri in 1864. The son 
was reared to young manhood in his native state and acquired a common school 
education such as was afforded by the country schools of that day. He assisted 
in the work of the home farm until he reached the age of twenty years and in 
1 87 1 he made his way westward, landing at Cheyenne, Wyoming, which was then 
a territory. He began work at driving a bull team and was engaged in freight- 
ing between Cheyenne, Red Cloud, Fort Robinson, Fort Fetterman and old Fort 
Laramie. In 1876, when gold was discovered in the Black Hills, he made his 
way to Custer, at that time the only town in the Black Hills district. He re- 
mained there for a short period but afterward returned to Cheyenne, where he 
loaded up his freight team and then freighted to Custer, where he unloaded his 
stock for his employers. Once more he made the trip to Cheyenne and in fact 
made several trips between that place and the Black Hills. On some of his trips 
he encountered Indians and had a number of "scraps" with them between Hat 
Creek and Custer. He reached the latter place in May, 1876, with fourteen freight 
teams — all bull teams. Gold had just been discovered at Deadwood, South 
Dakota, and the people were leaving Custer for that place. There was no road 
from Deadwood to Custer except what had been made by single wagons and 
pack outfits and many interesting experiences occurred at that time which Mr. 
Meek relates in a most entertaining manner. On one occasion a large freight- 
ing outfit had just arrived in Custer and Mr. Meek was with it. While niost of 
the outfit layed off for two or three days to rest up, he decided to go on, having 
had some experience in the mountains. He pulled out with his teams four or 
five miles ahead of the others and got in five days ahead of them. He had many 
hard hills to climb and the roads, such as they were, were very bad, especially 
through the mountains. The first road ever built into Deadwood was a toll 
road known as Boulder Hill and Mr. Meek had to pay seventeen dollars toll 
tax for his six-yoke bull teams, going in and out. Deadwood at that time — May, 
1876, — was a wilderness. There was nothing there but a few log cabins and 
all heavy timber where the streets of Deadwood are today. He had to drag logs 
out of the way in order to get'to some of the cabins to unload some freight. He 
was the driver of the first bull team that was driven up the streets of Deadwood. 
Later in the summer of 1876 he returned to Cheyenne, loaded up his team and 
drove to Fort Fetterman on the North Platte river, freighting from Medicine 
Bow on the Union Pacific Railroad the rest of the summer. In the fall of 1876 
he made one trip to Fort Reno, on Powder river, and in the winter of 1876 he 
returned to the Black Hills, where he prospected until the spring of 1877. At 
that time he went on a prospecting expedition into the Big Horn mountains, where 
he spent the summer and then went west to Camp Brown, a distance of about 
four hundred miles. He returned to the Black Hills, as the Homestake mine 
had just been discovered by two Frenchmen. This they later sold to Senator 
Hearst of California for eighty thousand dollars. Mr. Meek went to^ work 
in what was called a segregated mine, known as Old Abe and owned by Scotcli- 




'^..a^yy^yy^l^^te^-1^ 



l^Z^. '7'^tM^ 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 295 

men, Messrs. Terry and Broadie. He hauled the first ore that was brought out 
of the Homestake mine. It was brought up in a wooden bucket hauled up by a 
windlass by two men, dumped out and hauled by wagon to Terry, a distance of 
two miles, to a ten stamp mill. After his experiences there Mr. Meek devoted 
his time to ranching and stock raising and owns now more than sixteen hundred 
acres of deeded land and over a thousand head of cattle. His ranch is located at 
Lodge Pole, in Weston county. In 1908 he removed to Upton, where he has 
since lived retired, spending his winter months, however, away. 

In 1909 Mr. Meek was united in marriage to Mrs. Mary Emma Brown, a 
native of Illinois. They have traveled extensively, gaining that liberal knowledge 
and exjjerience which only travel can bring. Mr. ^leek is a member of Sundance 
Lodge, No. 9, A. F. & A. M., and his wife is a member of the Eastern Star. His 
active interest in promoting its success and securing the adoption of its principles. 
He served as a member of the state legislature for two terms, covering 1913 to 
1915. He and his wife are members of the First Church of Christ Scientist at 
Boston, Massachusetts, and Mrs. Meek is a practitioner. The life story of Mr. 
Meek, if written in detail, would furnish many a thrilling incident. His ex- 
periences in the Black Hills are most interesting, his reminiscenses presenting a 
clear picture of conditions that existed at the time when there were no roads 
into the district and when the traveler had to follow the old rails. Mr. Meek bore 
his part in the early mining development of the region and his eiTorts have been a 
contributing factor to the progress of the mining industry in the northwest and 
also a factor in the agricultural development of Crook county. He is honored by 
all who know him and most of all where he is best known, showing that his 
life record has ever been a straightforward one. 



ROSCOE H. ALCORN. 

Roscoe H. Alcorn, owner and editor of the Rawlins Republican and widely 
known as a leading representative of journalistic interests in Wyoming, was 
born January 10, 1888, in Jewell, Kansas, a son of the late William J. Alcorn, 
who was a native of Kentucky and a representative of one of the old families 
of that state, of Scotch-Irish descent. The father followed mercantile pursuits 
and at the time of his death, which occurred December 24, 1912, was manager 
of the Cullen Commercial Company at Rawlins. He took up his abode in this 
city in 1901 and during the eleven years of his residence here won very favorable 
criticism for the policy which he pursued in business affairs and for his upright 
life in other connections. It was therefore a matter of deep regret when he 
passed away at the comparatively early age of forty-seven years. He married 
Pearl Ransford, a native of Kansas and a daughter of Benjamin Ransford, who 
was one of the pioneer farmers and successful business men of the Sunflower 
state. At the time of the Civil war he responded to the country's call for troops, 
enlisting in defense of the Union, serving with Company F of the Fourteenth 
Iowa Infantr>' throughout the entire period of hostilities. He participated m 
the battles of Shiloh and Fort Donelson and being taken prisoner, was sent to 
Libby prison, from which he later made his escape. At the battle of Shiloh 
he was slightly wounded. It was after the close of the war that he took up a 
homestead in Jewell county, Kansas, where he resided until 1894. He then 
removed to Pomona, California, where he still makes his home, and is now 
retired from active business, enjoying the fruits of a well spent life. He re- 
mained on his Kansas farm for twenty-three years and was thus closely con- 
nected with the agricultural development of that state. He holds membership 
in the Grand Army of the Republic and thus maintains pleasant relations with 
the Boys in Blue, with whom he marched over the battlefields of the south 
Mrs. Alcorn is residing in Rawlins and by her marriage became the mother of 
six children. 



296 HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 

Roscoe H. Alcorn, the first in order of birth, attended the pubHc and high 
schools of Rawlins, and also became a student at Wesleyan University, of Salina, 
Kansas, where he continued until his senior year in 1910. Prior to entering col- 
lege, however, he served a four years' apprenticeship to the printing trade in 
Rawlins and after leaving college became editor of the Rawlins Republican, in 
which position he has since continuously remained. He has been owner and 
editor of the paper since 191 1. The Republican was established in 1888 and one 
of its first editors was George Perry, now a well known banker of Sheridan, 
Wyoming. During the intervening years the ownership has changed on various 
occasions btit during no period of its career has the Republican enjoyed a more 
substantial standing or made more gratifying progress than under the present 
management with Mr. Alcorn as owner and editor. He has given to journalistic 
questions close and careful study, seeking to make his paper both the molder 
and mirror of public opinion. The Republican is ever found as the champion 
of well devised plans and measures for the general good and has taken the 
initial step in advancing many ideas which have proven of great benefit in 
connection with the upbuilding and progress of the city. When Mr. Alcorn 
took charge the paper had a paid circulation of about six hundred copies and 
this number has been increased to fifteen hundred and fifty copies per week. It 
is accorded a good advertising patronage and a considerable job printing busi- 
ness is done in the office, so that the enterprise is proving one of substantial 
profit. As the name indicates, the paper upholds republican policies in politics, 
being a stanch champion of the principles of the party. The business was 
incorporated in 1901 and through the intervening years the paper has continued 
to progress along lines that have led to substantial results. 

Mr" Alcorn is a member of the Wyoming Press Association and also of the 
International Typographical Union. He has always voted with the republican 
party and has made a close and discriminating study of the questions and issues 
of the day. His opinions concerning politics -and other vital questions are 
trenchantlv expressed, his reasoning is clear and his logic convincing. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, with the ^lodern 
Woodmen of America and with the Masons. His religious faith is that of the 
Methodist church. 

It is largely through individual eft'ort that ^Ir. Alcorn has reached his 
present position in journalistic and business circles. It is true that he had 
liberal educational opportunities, pursuing a college course in journalism, but 
all those who have trained in such do not attain success. There is often times a 
lack of adaptability which is a source of partial failure. Mr. Alcorn, however, 
has readily and wisely used the powers which he developed and is today one of 
the leading newspaper men of western W'yoming, while in matters of citizen- 
ship he ranks high as the champion of all those interests which are working for 
the general good and which look beyond the exigencies of the moment to the 
possibilities and opportunities of the future. 



LYMAN H. BROOKS. 



Prominent among the enterprising, progressive and successful business men 
of Sheridan is Lyman H. Brooks, "the president and general manager of the 
Sheridan Companv and also the president of the L. H. Brooks Realty Company. 

He was born Jilay 5, 1856, in Sherbrooke, in the province of Quebec, Canada, 
a son of Samuel T. and Lucy (Mills) Brooks. His education was acquired in 
St. Tohnsburv Academy at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, for in 1862, when but six 
years of age, he was taken by his parents to northern \'ermont, where the period 
of his school life was passed. After his education was completed he was em- 
ployed at St. Johnsbury by the Fairbanks Scale Manufacturing Company, with 
which he was connected from 1870 until 1880. He became a resident of the 






■/[^ 



298 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

west in 1880 and took up his abode in what is now Sheridan county, \\^yoining, 
where he engaged in ranching and in the Hve stock business for twenty-nine 
years or until 1909. In the meantime he also became identified with other busi- 
ness interests in Sheridan, becoming a member of the hardware firm of Brooks 
& Diefenderfer, his active connection with the business continuing from 1892 
until 1903. He has also been general manager of the Sheridan Lumber Company 
since 1903 and in 1909 he organized and became president of the L. H. Brooks 
Realty Company and has since been in active control of its interests. He is a 
progressive, farsighted and sagacious business man, recognizing and utilizing op- 
portunities and so directing his efforts that success in substantial measure has 
come to him. He is a director and was one of the organizers of the Bank 
of Commerce of Sheridan, which was established in 1892, and he is a director 
of the Sheridan Street Railway Company, and is president of the Grandview 
Addition Company of Sheridan. His business connections are thus extensive and 
prominent and have contributed in substantial measure to the upbuilding and 
development of the city as well as to the advancement of his individual fortunes. 

Since 1912 Mr. Brooks has served as a trustee of the Wyoming State Uni- 
versity. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he repre- 
sented his district in the general assembly from 1895 until 1897. He had 
become a naturalized American citizen in 1877 and throughout all the intervening 
years he has stood loyally for what he believes to be best for the interests of 
county, commonwealth and country. 



J. P. FOLGER. 



J. P. Folger, receiver at the United States land office in Evanston, was born 
in Pickens county, South Carolina, August 4, 1870, a son of Alonzo M. and 
Elizabeth (Burdine) Folger, who were also natives of South Carolina and rep- 
resented one of the old families of the south, located there since a very early 
period in the colonization of the new world. Peter Folger landed in Nan- 
tucket, Massachusetts, in 1635 and was the first of the family in the United 
States. Both Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo Folger are still residents of South Carolina. 
The father has engaged in business not only as a planter and farmer but has 
also prepared for medical practice and is a well known physician and surgeon 
of his locality. He yet occupies the old homestead in Pickens county and is 
now eighty-two years of age. At the time of the Civil war he was a member 
of the Medical Corps. His wife was born in 1842 and has therefore passed the 
seventy-fifth milestone on life's journey. 

J. P. Folger was the third son in their family of seven children. In his 
boyhood days he attended the public schools of Pickens county to the age of 
fifteen years and then began studying telegraphy, becoming an operator for 
the Southern Railway Company in South Carolina. In 1888 he went to Ari- 
zona for the Santa Fe Railroad Company, where he acted as telegraph operator 
and station agent at various points. In 1892 he arrived in Wyoming, settling at 
Green River, where he occupied the position of chief train dispatcher for the 
Union Pacific Railway Company. Later he removed to Kemmerer, where he also 
served as train dispatcher and as assistant superintendent, remaining at that place 
from 1902 until 1914, when he came to Evanston to accept the position of receiver 
at the United States land office and has since acted in that capacity. One of his 
strong characteristics is his fidelity to any trust reposed in him and he is there- 
fore making an excellent record in this position, as he also did while representing 
the railroad companies in telegraph service. ^Mr. Folger has also occupied other 
official positions and twice was made mayor of Kemmerer. having been elected 
in 1906 and again in 1912, so that he occupied that position for two terms of two 
years each. He was also a member of the city council of Kemmerer for several 
terms and was county clerk of Lincoln county, making an excellent record in all of 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 299 

these different positions by the promptness, faithfulness and capability which he 
displayed in the discharge of his duties. 

On the 8th of April. 1896, Mr. Folger was united in marriage to Miss Marie 
Mockler, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Mockler, representatives of a pio- 
neer family. Mr. and Mrs. Folger have become parents of five children : Anna, 
who was born in Green River in 1898 and is a graduate of the Evanston high 
school; Alfred, who was born in Green River in 1900 and attended the high school, 
while at the present time he is a clerk in the First National Bank of Evanston; 
Patricia, who was born in Green River in 1902 and is now a high school pupil ; 
Gerald, who was born in Green River in 1904 and is attending the high 
school; and J- P-. who was born in Kemmerer in 191 1 and is pursuing his studies 
in the public schools of Evanston. 

Mr. Folger is well known as a representative of the Masonic fraternity, belong- 
ing to lodge, chapter and commandery. He is one of the best known and most pop- 
ular citizens of Evanston and this section of the state, standing high in public 
regard by reason of his record in connection with railway service and by reason of 
his record in public office. 



HARRY G. PARKER. 



Harry G. Parker, senior partner in the firm of Parker & Stafford, dealers in 
hay, feed and grain at Rock Springs, was born at Coalburg, Ohio, July 21, 1886, a 
son of Henry Stephen and Lucy Jane (Williams) Parker, both of whom were 
natives of Liverpool, England. Coming to America in early life, they settled in 
Coalburg, Ohio, and the father there engaged in coal mining until September, 
1888, when he sought the business opportunities offered in the great and growing 
west. He made his way to Rock Springs, Wyoming, and took up mining, but at 
the present time he is superintendent of the State Hospital. His wife also sur- 
vives and the family circle is yet unbroken by the hand of death, for the four 
children are yet living, namely. Mrs. Ada Ramsey, Mrs. William Kellogg, Harry 
G. and Blanche, all at Rock Springs. 

Harry G. Parker was but two years of age when he removed from Ohio to 
Wyoming and at the usual age he became a pupil in the public schools of Rock 
Springs, and later continued his education in the Utah Agricultural College at 
Logan, where he devoted two years to a commercial course. He was afterward em- 
ployed by the American and Pacific Express Companies at Rock Springs, continu- 
ing in that connection for three years, at the end of which time he became an 
employe of the J. P. McDermott Company. After two years spent in that way he 
resigned and embarked in business on his own account in partnership with A. Staf- 
ford under the firm style of Parker & Stafford, dealers in hay, feed and grain. 
The business was estabiished May 21, 1914, in a small way but has grown steadily 
and has now developed to large proportions through the able management of Mr. 
Parker and his associate in the enterprise. He is a man of sound business judg- 
ment, of unfaltering industry and of keen sagacity, and his efforts have resulted 
in building up a gratifying business, his trade equalling if not exceeding that of 
all dealers in his line in this part of the state. 

On the loth of September. 1910, at Rock Springs, Mr. Parker was united in 
marriage to Miss Margaret Travis, of Rock Springs, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter Travis. Her father was killed in the Hanna explosion about seven years 
ago. Two children have been born to Mr. and Airs. Parker: Henry Stephen, who 
was born in Rock Springs, September 14, 1912; and Peter, born November 15, 

1914- 

Mr. Parker votes with the republican party and m 1913 was a candidate for 
the office of county clerk of Sweetwater county but failed of election by a very 
narrow margin. Fraternally he is a Master Mason and loyally adheres to the teach- 
ings and purposes of the craft. He ranks with the representative young business 



300 HISTORY OF WYOAIING 

men of his adopted city, a city, however, in which almost his entire life has been 
passed. He has therefore witnessed much of the growth and development of 
Rock Springs and rejoices in what has been accomplished as the work of progress 
and improvement has been carried forward. Since attaining man's estate he has 
supported all measures and movements for the general good and his worth both 
as a man and citizen is widely acknowledged. 



ALBERT E. STIRRETT. 

Among the recent additions to the Wyoming bar is Albert E. Stirrett of 
Casper, who brought to the performance of his professional duties here wide 
experience, gained as an attorney in South Dakota and this experience was 
based upon thorough training in the law department of the University of Colo- 
rado. He is thus well equipped for onerous and responsible professional duties 
and it is a recognized fact that he is most loyal to the interests of his clients. 

He was born in Uttoxeter, Ontario, Canada, October 4, 1885, a son of Robert 
and Olixia Stirrett. In the acquirement of his education he entered the Uni- 
versity of Colorado as a law student, having determined upon the practice of 
law as a life work, and on completing the regular course the LL. B. degree was 
conferred upon him in 1910. He has since engaged in the practice of law 
and from 19 13 to 191 6 was state's attorney of Lawrence county. South Dakota, 
making an excellent record during his four years' incumbency in that position. 

On the 24th of May, 1913, in Deadwood, South Dakota, Mr. Stirrett was 
united in marriage to Miss Edith A. AlcPherson, a daughter of D. A. McPherson, 
and they have become parents of two children, Donald Elmer and Robert Mc- 
Pherson. 

In religious faith Mr. Stirrett is an Episcopalian, while fraternally he is 
connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His political endorse- 
ment is given to the republican party and he keeps well informed on the questions 
and issues of the day, supporting his position by intelligent argument. His 
time and attention, however, are concentrated upon his professional duties. He 
ranks high in the discussion of legal matters before the court and his applica- 
tion of legal principles demonstrates the wide range of his professional acquire- 
ments. The utmost care and nrecision characterize his preparation of a case 
and have made him one of the successful lawvers of the west. 



HARRY P. HYNDS. 



Harry P. Hynds is proprietor of the Plains Hotel, one of the leading hostelries 
not only of Cheyenne but of Wyoming. In the conduct of this business he fol- 
lows the most progressive methods of hotel management and his enterprise has 
made his establishment most popular with the traveling public. Success has at- 
tended his efforts, as is illustrated by the fact that he has recently erected one 
of the finest fireproof buildings of the city. 

Illinois claims Mr. I lynds as one of her native sons, his birth having occurred 
in Morris, that state, on the 22d of December, i860, his parents being Martin 
and Jane (U'llale) Hynds. At the usual age he became a pupil in the public 
schools of Morris and afterward attended the Normal Night School of that city. 
In early life he began learning the blacksmithing trade, which he followed at 
Morris and also in Chicago. At length he determined to try his fortune in the 
west, for it seemed to him that better business opportunities might be secured in 
a section of the country where competition was not so great but where there was 
every prospect of growth and advancement. In the fall of 1882, therefore, he 
made his way to Cheyenne, Wyoming, where he engaged in blacksmithing on his 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 303 

own account. At his shop the horses that drew the stage to the Black Hills of 
South Dakota were shod. He conducted business under a partnership relation, 
the firm name of Elliott & Hynds being assumed. This connection was continued 
until 1886 and Mr. Hynds then turned his attention to various other business in- 
terests, being so engaged from 1886 until 1910. He became actively interested in 
mining and has been connected with the development of the mineral resources of 
the state for many years. He has ever watched his opportunities for judicious 
investment and has at all times improved his chances in that connection. Lately 
he has become extensively interested in the development of the oil fields and his 
investments have brought to him a notable measure of success. In 1910 he or- 
ganized hotel interests under the name of the Plains Hotel Company but of the 
business he is sole owner. He leases the building which he occupies, but the 
furnishings are his and he is conducting one of the best hotels in Cheyenne. He 
also built the Capital Grill and he is now erecting a five-story steel and concrete 
fireproof structure for store and office purposes at the corner of West Lincoln 
highway and Capital avenue, its advantageous location insuring him a ready 
rental of the property. 

On the nth of April, 1901, Mr. Hynds was married to Miss Xell McGuire. 
Mr. Hynds greatly enjoys hunting and fishing. His religious faith is that of the 
Catholic church. He is an honorary life member of the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks. He has membership in the Industrial Club of Cheyenne and is 
interested in all of its plans and purposes for the advancement of the city's inter- 
ests. His political allegiance is given to the republican party. With many ques- 
tions of public importance he is thoroughly familiar and he has been actively 
identified with the good roads movement, having served as president of the 
Laramie County Good Roads Association in 1913 and 1914. He has held nu- 
merous appointments whereby he has represented Wyoming in national con- 
ventions and he is ever alert to the opportunities for upbuilding the state, for ex- 
tending its trade relations, for advancing its natural resources and for upholding 
those interests and activities which have made Wyoming a great commonwealth, 
equal in its opportunities and advantages to the older states of the Union. 



DANIEL C. BUNTIN. 



Daniel C. Buntin occupies a prominent position on the stage of business activity 
in Laramie, where he is well known as president of the Laramie W'ater Company. 
He was born in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1875 and was educated in private schools 
and in a university of the south, while for a time he was also a student in Van- 
derbilt University,' from which he was graduated in 1899 with the LL. B. degree. 
Liberal educational advantages thus qualified him for life's practical and respon- 
sible duties. He has been a resident of Laramie since 1908 and through the inter- 
vening period has been closely identified with development projects and with the 
work of upbuilding, throughout this section of the state. Realizing the oppor- 
tunities of the country and'the possibilities for men of enterprise, he has become 
a factor in work that has contributed much to the material development of the 
state. He was the builder of the James Lake irrigation system, which was executed 
at a cost of a half million dollars. He colonized that district and sold land to the 
value of about one and a half million dollars. Again the call of opportunity was to 
him the call to action and he became the promoter of the Laramie \\'ater Company, 
concentrating his efforts upon the building of its plant, which work was carried 
through at a cost of two million dollars. He also has twenty thousand acres of 
land on which he is extensively engaged in the raising of sheep, cattle and other 
live stock. He became the vice president of the Tallmadge-Buntin Land Company, 
which was organized for the puropse of conducting a general land and immigra- 
tion business— to deal in large and small tracts of alfalfa, wheat, corn, cotton, 
timber, sugar beets, fruit and general farm and ranch land. In other words, to 



30i HISTORY OF WYOMING 

conduct a general wholesale and retail land and immigration business in the south 
and in the west. This company opened its offices in the Railway Exchange budd- 
ing of Chicago and from that point conducted its interests. To his work in this 
connection Mr. Buntin brought broad experience. He was the vice president of 
the First Savings Bank & Irust Company of Nashville, Tennessee, and general 
manager of the Realty Company, also of Nashville. The latter is a stock com- 
pany that owned and promoted West Nashville, which has grown to be a city of 
large proportions, in which are located twenty-nine mills and factories, employ- 
ing five thousand men. He promoted many other projects in Nashville and in the 
south, including the building of the great Arcade store and office building, which 
was erected at a cost of a half million dollars. Mr. Buntin personally owns and 
controls a large interest in that building and is a stockholder in many of the banks 
in Nashville and other business projects there. He became the associate of E. R. 
Tallmadge and others in promoting the railroad from Canyon City, Texas, to 
P^lainview, Te.xas, and now controls all town-sites along that line. He has exten- 
sive holdings and large interests in the southwest and is considered one of the 
successful young financiers of the country. Turning his attention to Laramie, he 
recognized its possibilities and his etl'orts in this connection have been equally 
etifective and valuably resultant. 

On the I2th of June, 1901, Mr. Buntin was united in marriage in Nashville, 
Tennessee, to Miss Elsie Caldwell, a native of that city and a daughter of James 
E. and Mary W. Caldwell. Her father is the president of the Fourth-First 
National Bank of Nashville. Mr. and Mrs. Buntin have two children: Thomas 
Craighead, who was born in .\.!-;li\ ille. March 15, 1902; and ^lay Winston 
Caldwell, who was born in Nasluillc in 1914. The parents hold membership in 
the First Presbyterian church of .Nashville. 

yir. Buntin is a member of the Chamber of Commerce of Laramie and he is 
identified with various social organizations and clubs throughout the country. He 
belongs to the Chicago Athletic Club ; to the Hermitage, of Nashville, of which he 
was formerly president ; to the Nashville Golf & Country Club and to the Noelton 
Golf (& Country Club of Nashville, of which he was formerly vice president. 
Well descended and well bred, he is a gentleman whom it is a pleasure to meet, 
for he has the happy faculty of placing anyone at ease who enters into conversa- 
tion with him. He is a man of splendid judgment, quick action, remarkable execu- 
tive ability, and in all things is actuated by a spirit of determination that knows 
no such word as fail, for he recognizes the fact that when one avenue of oppor- 
tunity seems closed he can carve out other paths that will reach the desired goal. 
His efforts, important and extensive in proportions, have constituted a most effec- 
tive force in promoting development and progress in various sections of the 
country, for he has in marked degree all of those qualities which characterize the 
far-sighted financier and the clear-headed executive. 



OLE MOSSBERG. 



Ole Mossberg, who is filling the office of sheriff of Sheridan county was 
born in Sweden on the 12th of August, 1867, and is a son of Olaf and Carolina 
(Johnson) Mossberg, who were natives of the same country. The father is now 
deceased but the mother is living and yet makes her home in Sweden. They had 
a family of ten children, seven of whom are still living. 

Ole Mossberg, whose name introduces this review, spent the days of his 
boyhood and youth in Sweden and is indebted to its educational system for the 
advantages which he received in that connection. Fie came to America in 1889, 
when a young man of twenty-two years, believing that he might have better 
opportunities to win a fortune on this side of the Atlantic. He first settled in 
Iowa but resided in that state for only a brief period and in the fall of i8go 
removed to Omaha, Nebraska, where he resided until 1893. In the latter year 



306 HISTORY OF WVO-MIXG 

he came to Sheridan, where he engaged in the stock business in the employ of 
T. L. Kimball. He then began farming on his own account and followed agri- 
cultural pursuits for a year but later entered the employ of William Cody as a 
horse breaker. In the spring of 1896 he helped to establish a colony of twenty-five 
German families near Cody. He continued in active connection with Mr. Cody 
until 1897 and in the following year he entered the service of Senator Kendrick, 
with whom he continued for two years. He then worked in the cattle business 
for the Hardin & Harskin Cattle Company, for some time and in 1901 accepted 
a position on the police force of Sheridan, serving in the capacity of patrolman 
for three years. He next entered the employ of the United States government 
as a forest ranger and after working in that capacity for a year was appointed 
deputy sheriff of Sheridan county in 1905 and so continued for six years. He 
then again went upon the police force and was employed in that way for two 
years. In 1915 he was elected to the office of sheriff' and made so creditable 
a record in the position that he was reelected and is now serving for the second 
term. 

In 1903 Mr. Mossberg was united in marriage to Miss Helga Johnson, a 
native of Sweden, and to them was born a daughter. Margaret, who passed 
away at the age of three years. Mr. and Mrs. Mossberg are devoted members 
of the Lutheran church and his political allegiance is given to the republican 
party. He stands fearlessly at all times for what he believes to be right and he 
discharges his public duties without fear or favor. He is loyal to the frust 
reposed in him and has made a creditable record as a public official. 



CLYDE \-. R.\U 



Clyde \'. Rau, manager, secretary and treasurer of the Cokeville Mercantile 
Company at Cokeville, Lincoln county, was born in Fairfield, Nebraska, Decem- 
ber 27, 1890, and is one of the enterprising young men who have recognized 
the opportunities of the west and have become identified with one of the grow- 
ing cities of Wyoming, his labors contributing in substantial measure to its 
progress and improvement. 

He is a son of Charles F. Rau, a native of Illinois and of German descent. 
The great-grandfather of Clyde \'. Rau was the founder of the family in 
America, coming to the new world in the early part of the nineteenth century. 
The family home was established in Illinois during the pioneer epoch in the 
development of that state and Charles F. Rau was reared and educated in 
Illinois, establishing his home at a later period, however, in Fairfield, Nebraska, 
in the latter part of the '80s. He there successfully engaged in farming and in 
the live stock business but is now living retired. He married Fairie Hoskins, a 
native of Iowa and a representative of one of the old families of Illinois of 
French and English lineage. Mrs. Rau passed away in 1906 at the age of thirty- 
nine years. In the family were three children, one of whom has passed away, 
the survivors being Clyde \'. and Lucille. 

In the public schools of Fairfield. Clyde \'. Rau began his education and 
afterward continued his studies in the high school of Lincoln, Nebraska, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 191 1. On leaving that state he re- 
moved to Kemmerer, Wyoming, where he took up his abode in 191 2. There 
he was employed in the store of the Blyth-Fargo-Hoskins Mercantile Company, 
Mr. Hoskins of that firm being an uncle of Air. Rau. He continued there for 
three years, learning the mercantile business in all of its different phases, and 
he afterward spent eighteen months at Fossil as representative for the same 
firm. He acted as manager of the store at that place until January, 1917, when 
he came to Cokeville, having become a stockholder in the Cokeville Mercantile 
Company, of which he is now the manager, secretarj- and treasurer. This busi- 
ness was established in 1903 and the company has by far the largest commercial 



HISTORY OF \\-YO-AIIXG 307 

enterprise of this character in their section of Lincohi county. They employ five 
sales people in the conduct of the business, which has reached large and sub- 
stantial proportions. They carry an extensive line of general merchandise and 
the business is being carefully directed by x\Ir. Rau, whose previous experience 
well qualifies him to manage the interests under his control. 

On the Kjtli I'f May. 11)15. in KcnmKTcr, ^Ir. Rau was married to Miss 
Mabel (;<i<ldanl, a nati\e .)f L'inta county, W vuniini;, and a (laughter of Harry 
Goddard. wIid \va> oi linglish liirth. .Mr. and Mr-.. Rau l^ne a daughter, Fairie 
Marie, born in Kemmerer, June 19, 191(1. 

In his political views Mr. Rau is a republican, while fraternally he is a 
Mason, belonging to the lodge at Kemmerer. He exemplifies in his life the 
beneficent spirit of the craft, which is based on a recognition of the brotherhood 
of man and the obligations thereby imposed. In business his >ucccss is flue to his 
own efforts. He has always worked diligently since making his initial step in 
the business world and his close application and energy ha\e brought to him 
growing success. Moreo\er, he is regarded as a valuable acquisition to the 
business circles of Lincoln county, for he is a most progressive and enterprising 
voting man, watchful of all opportunities pointing to success and of all indica- 
tions leading to the future development and upbuilding of this section of the 
state. 



WALLACE C. BOND. 



Wallace C. liond, who has rendered important consular service to his country 
and who is now actively identified with the business interests of Cheyenne, where 
he is handling insurance and real estate, bonds and live stock, is possessed of that 
strong quality of perseverance that stops not before reaching the successful attainr 
ment of his purpose. His plans are always well defined and carefully executed 
and he is regarded as a most valuable addition to the business interests of Chey- 
enne. A native of Louisville, Kentucky, he was born on the 29th of January, 
1875, and is a son of George H. and Jane (Redman )Bond. The father was 
engaged in the wholesale nursery business and now resides at Sydney, .Australia. 
The mother, however, has passed away. 

Wallace C. Bond, the eldest of a family of six children, is indebted to the 
ptiblic and high schools of New Brunswick, Xew Jersey for his educational privi- 
leges to some extent, although on account of delicate health he could not attend 
school as other children did and much of the time had a private tutor. In young 
manhood he acce|ite(l a clerical position with the Ninth National Bank of New 
York and in iSijd he removed westward to Cheyenne. Here he turned his atten- 
tion to ranching and to newspaper work, in which he was engaged for three years, 
or until the ist of January, 1899, when he became private secretary to Governor 
De Forest Richards, and at the death of the governor acted for a short time as 
private secretary to Acting Go\emor Chatterton. In 1904 he became owner and 
editor of the Cheyenne State Leader, succeeding his father-in-law, E. A. Slack, 
in the management of the paper. In 1907 he was appointed consul to Aden, Arabia, 
and in 1908 was transferred to the consulship at Karachi, India. In 1909 further 
promotion came to him in his appointment as consul general at Copenhagen, Den- 
mark, where he remained until 1911, when he resigned his position and returned 
to Cheyenne. He then estabhshed an insurance, real estate and bond business, in 
which he has prospered, having an exten-i\e clientage. He also handles live stock 
on an extensive scale and his business interests have been so careftilly and intelli- 
gently directed that success in large measure has rewarded his efforts. 

On the 19th of October, 1899. Mr. I'.ond was united in marriage to Miss Harriet 
Louise Slack, a niece of John Al. Palmer, at one time Lnited States senator and 
governor of Illinois. ^Mr.and IMrs. Bond hold membership in the Episcopal church 
and fraternally he is a Mason. He has taken the Knights Templar degree of the 



308 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

York Rite and the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. He js a past com- 
mander of Wyoming Commandery, a past master of Kadosh Consistory of Wy- 
oming and a past master of Acacia Lodge, No. i, F. & A. M. He belongs to the 
Industrial Club and he gives his political allegiance to the republican party. 

Air. Bond is modest and unassuming in manner, but the public recognizes his 
worth as a business man and attests his valuable service in consular positions. Those 
who know him, and he has a wide acquaintance, entertain for him warm regard 
and Cheyenne has reason to be proud that he has cast in his lot here, for his deter- 
mined purpose, his ready adaptability and his business enterprise are contributing 
much to the material progress of the city, while at all times he stands for those 
iiUerests which feature in the public welfare and which support affairs of civic 
\'irtue and of civic pride. 



ARTHUR ERNEST LANE, M. D. 

Dr. Arthur Ernest Lane, a physician and surgeon of Laramie, whose success 
in practice came as the result of his comprehensive and accurate knowledge of the 
scientific principles of medicine and surgery, combined with his human interest in 
the welfare of his fellowmen, was born in Cheyenne, Wyoming, February 6, 1872. 

His father, William W. Lane, a resident of Cheyenne at the present time, is 
a native of Illinois and belongs to one of the old pioneer families of that state. 
Later the parents became identified with the pioneer development of Wyoming, 
where William W. Lane took up his abode in 1867. During the period of his 
active business life he was a carpenter and builder, but is now living retired, 
enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly merits. He is a Civil 
war veteran, having served at the front as a member of the First Iowa Cavalry 
as a noncommissioned officer. For three years he was engaged in active duty 
in defense of the stars and stripes and he now proudly wears the little bronze 
button that proclaims him a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party, which has always been the 
party of reform and progress and which was the defense of the Union during 
the dark days of the Civil war. He has never sought or desired public office 
as a reward for party fealty, yet he has ever been most loyal in all matters of 
citizenship. He married Miss Ellen Flaherty, a native of Ireland, who came 
to America with her parents when a little maiden of thirteen years, the family 
home being established in Jersey City, New Jersey, while subsequently a removal 
was made to Omaha, Nebraska. It was there that Mr. and Mrs. Lane became 
acquainted and were married, and Mrs. Lane passed away in Cheyenne, May 14, 
1917, when seventy-six years of age. In the family were but two children, Arthur 
Ernest and Charles E., the latter still a resident of Cheyenne. 

Dr. Lane, whose name introduces this review, was educated in the public 
and high schools of Cheyenne and after graduating from the high school entered 
the government mail service, in which he was employed for fourteen years. He 
desired, however, to become connected with professional activity and took up 
the study of medicine, entering the University of Nebraska, from which he was 
graduated with the M. D. degree as a member of the class of 1905. Following 
the completion of his course there, he spent one year in the Jennie Edmondson 
Hospital at Council Bluffs, Iowa, and thus put his theoretical knowledge to the 
practical test and gained that broad and valuable experience which only hospital 
practice can bring. He located for the private practice of his profession in 
Percival, Iowa, where he remained for eighteen months, and then removed to 
Tingley. Iowa, where he also spent a year and a half. On the expiration of that 
period he came to Laramie, where he has since remained in active and successful 
practice. He holds to the highest standards in his profession and annually takes 
post graduate work in Omaha and in Chicago, thus keeping in touch with the 
most advanced thought and methods of the profession. He is active in the 




DR. ARTHUR E. LANE 



310 HISTORY OF \VYO:\IIXG 

general practice of medicine and surgery and his labors have been attended with 
most excellent results. He belongs to the Albany County Medical Society and 
also to the Wyoming State Medical Society. 

( )n the 24th of June. 1905. Dr. Lane was married at Council Bluffs, Iowa, 
to Miss Marie Mills, a native of England and a daughter of Joseph and Fannie 
(Xorthcott) ^lills, who were also of English birth. Her father is now deceased. 
By a previous marriage Dr. Lane has one daughter, A'illette M., who resides in 
Pagosa Springs. Colorado. 

Dr. Lane has manifested the same spirit of loyalty and fidelity that charac- 
terized his father in the Civil war by his enlistment for service in the Spanish- 
American war in 1898. He became a member of the Fifty-first Iowa Infantry, 
with which he went to the Philippines, doing active duty as a private. Since 191 1 
he has been serving with the rank of captain in the Officers' Medical Reserve 
Corps. His political endorsement is given to the republican party and he filled the 
position of city and county health oflicer for four years, from 191 3 until 1916 
inclusive. I<"ratcrnally he is identified with the Elks, the Masons., the Odd Fellows, 
the Woodmen of the \\'orld and ^Modern Woodmen of America. He belongs to 
the Chamber of Commerce and is in hearty sympathy with all of its well defined 
plans and measures for the upbuilding of the city, the extension of its business 
connections and the upholding of its civic standards. Actuated by laudable 
ambition and characterized by determined purpose. Dr. Lane has steadily 
worked his way upward and occupies an enviable position in the regard 
of his fellow townsmen, while in professional circles he has the esteem and re- 
spect of colleagues and contemporaries. 



E. PAUL BACHELLER. 



Wyoming is distinguished for the high rank of her bench and bar and the 
opportvmities of a growing state are continually attracting to her young men of 
ability and enterprise, recognizing that the professional field is not yet overcrowded 
and that there will come a chance to prove their ability. Such a one is E. Paul 
Bacheller, who with liberal educational training as a foundation for his profes- 
sional career, has entered upon law practice at Casper and has already made for 
himself a creditable position as a representative of the bar of that city. 

He was born in Potsdam, New York, July 21, 1892, a son of Charles O. and 
Amanda M. Bacheller, the former an own cousin of Irving Bacheller, the Ameri- 
can author, historian, poet and novelist, whose works are so widely read. Charles 
O. Bacheller is now a Montana rancher and lives in Los Angeles. California. His 
wife bore the maiden name of Amanda Jacobs and her parents resided near 
Quebec. Canada. The Bacheller family was founded in America by representa- 
tives of the name who were religious dissenters and came from England in the 
early part of the seventeenth century. The name is one of the oldest in Eng- 
land and can be traced back to a very early period. The coat of arms of the 
Bacheller family is a matter of record in the hall of records in England. In the 
direct line of descent appear many illustrious names. E. Paul Bacheller of this 
review is a nephew of the Hon. L. P. Hale, counsel for the interstate commerce 
commission for the state of New York, and is a brother-in-law of the Hon. H. 
Benjamin Chase, counsel for the excise commission of the state of New York. 
There is an extended genealogical history of the Bacheller familv which has been 
compiled by Frederick Pierce. 

E. Paul Bacheller acquired his early education in the Potsdam Normal School 
at Potsdam, New York, where he was in attendance for ten years. He afterward 
entered the Northern Normal School at Aberdeen, South Dakota, from which he 
was graduated in June, 1913. Later he became a student in the University of 
Montana at Alissoula, where he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in 191 5. He won the Bachelor of Laws degree in 1916, being graduated 



HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 311 

with high honors, receiving a prize for the highest scholarship given by the Amer- 
ican Law Book Pubhshing Company. In July of that year he entered upon the 
practice of his chosen profession in Miles City, Montana, as an associate of the 
Hon. George W. Farr, and in April, 1917, he removed to Casper, Wyoming, where 
he became associated in the practice of his profession with R. H. Nichols. They 
have been accorded a liberal clientage which has connected them with considerable 
important litigation. 

In additon to his law practice Mr. Bacheller is extensively interested in Wy- 
oming oil and is secretary of the Universal Exploration Company, also of the 
\\'estern Crude Oil Company and the Bantry Oil Company. A young man of keen 
discrimination, alert and enterprising, he has made for himself a creditable place 
in business circles and belongs to that class of progressive young man who are 
contributing in marked measure to the upbuilding and de\elopment of the west. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party. 



C. P. WASSUNG. 



C. P. Wassung, the efficient postmaster of Rock Springs, where he has re- 
sided for more than a third of a century, started out in the business world when 
a lad of thirteen as a messenger boy in the employ of the Western L'nion Tele- 
graph Company in Massachusetts. He was born on the 2d of September, 1862, 
in Springfield, Alassachusetts, a son of Philip and .-Kunie (Able) Wassung, the 
former a native of Germany. The father came to America during the latter part 
of the '40s, crossing the Atlantic in one of the old-time sailing vessels. He took 
up his abode in Sjiringfield, Massachusetts, where he resided to the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1870, when he was thirty-seven years of age. He was 
there engaged in the furniture business and was quite successful in the conduct 
of his comnicrcial interests. His wife was a native of Gerniantown, Pennsylvania, 
and of S\\is> lineage, her people having settled in the i\e\>tone state at an early 
period. -Mrs. Wassung passed away in 1902 at the age (if sixty-five years. She 
had reared a family of five children, four of whom are yet living, namely : C. 
P.; Arthur, a resident of Johnstown, New York; Annie, the wife of William M. 
Francis, of Atlanta, Cieorgia; and John B. Hubler, a half-brother, residing in 
New York city. Lillian died in infancy. 

C. P. Wassung was educated in the public schools of his native city and started 
out to pro\ide for his own support when only thirteen years of age, securing a 
position as messenger boy with the Western Union Telegraph Company in his 
native city. He later obtained employment in the Railwav Clearing House in 
Boston and occupied a clerical position there, while subse(|uently he was with the 
Boston & Maine Railroad in the auditing department. He next became connected 
with the New York & New England Express Company at Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, and later became a clerk in the ^lassoit House, which was the leading 
hotel of Springfield. There he remained until November, 1883, when he deter- 
mined to try his fortune in the west and made his way to Rock Springs, where 
he arrived on the 20th of that month. He then entered the employ of the Beckwith 
& Ouinn Mercantile Company and that he was cai)al)le is indicated in the fact that 
he was retained in the service of that coni])anv fur nine wars. He was after- 
ward with the Union Pacific Coal Company nf Rock Spring> in the general offices, 
there continuing for twenty-one years, se\ering his connection at the time that 
he was appointed postmaster by President Wilson. He took office on the ist of 
IMarch, 1914, and has since been active in that iiosition. He discharges his duties 
with marked promptness and fidelity, having thoroughly systematized the work of 
the office, and to the general public he gives entire satisfaction by his prompt and 
faithful manner of caring for the interests committed to him. His political en- 
dorsement has always been given to the democratic party and he has been acti\e 
in its ranks. Aside from serving as postmaster he occupied the position of city 



312 HISTORY OF WYO-AIIXG . 

clerk for one term and for two years he was a member of the school board. He 
has always done everything in his power to further the interests and promote the 
welfare of city, state and nation, and his efforts in behalf of community interests 
have been particularly effective, far reaching and beneficial. 

On the loth of August. 1887. in Rock Springs, Mr. Wassung was united in 
marriage to Miss Nellie A. Menough. a native of Chillicothe, Ohio, and a daugh- 
ter of H. F. Menough. a representative of one of the old families of the Buckeye 
state. Mr. and Mrs. Wassung have become the parents of seven children, but 
three of the number have passed away. Edith having died in childhood, while 
Arthur has also been called to his final rest, and one' child died unnamed in in- 
fancy. The others are: Ruth, the wife of Archibald Flora; Howard M., who is 
serving as sergeant in Squadron One Hundred and Two of the Aviation Corps ; 
George B., who is with the freight department of the Union Pacific Railroad 
Company at Rock Springs ; and Charles P., who is still in school. 

Fraternally Mr. Wassung is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks and wa^ fdrmcrly treasurer of his lodge, lie was reared in the Unitarian 
faith but his family arc members of the Episcopal church. His has been an active 
and well spent life, upright and honorable in all relations, and whatever success 
he has achieved or enjoyed is attributable entirely to his indefatigable industry and 
perseverance. Those who know him, and he has a wide acquaintance, esteem 
him highly for his genuine personal worth and he has a circle of friends in Rock 
Springs almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. 



HON. MELVIN NICHOLS. 

Hon. Melvin Nichols is now serving for the third term as county and prose- 
cuting attorney of Crook county and makes his home at Sundance. He is a 
broad-minded man of most liberal education who has been a close student of 
the leading i)olitical, economic and sociological problems of the day, in connec- 
tion with which he has kept abreast with the best thinking men of the age. By 
reason of his broad study and ability he has become a leader of public thought 
pnd opinion in the community in which he resides and has left the impress of 
his individuality in considerafjle measure upon the history of his adopted state. 
Other writers have termed him "the leading attorney of Crook county." 

Mr. Nichols was born in Aurora, Illinois, November 9, 1844, a son of John 
and Mary (Chase) Nichols. The father was a native of Burlington, A'ermont, 
born October i, 1808, and his father was one of the minutemen of the Revolu- 
tionary war, being connected with the troops who in that section of the country 
were known as the "Green Mountain Boys." Mary (Chase) Nichols, the mother 
of Melvin Nichols, was Ijorn near Salem, Massachusetts. March 26. 1809. and 
in early girlhood attended the same school as Benjamin Butler, while John Nichols 
was a playmate in early life of Erigham Young and Stephen A. Douglas. 
Throughout the period of his manhood he was identified with agricultural pur- 
suits and after many years' residence in Illinois he passed away in Aurora on 
the 2ist of December. 1863. 

Melvin Nichols had mastered the branches of learning taught in the public 
schools of his native city and was ready to enter college when he enlisted for 
service in the Civil war. becoming a member of Company H. Sixty-fifth Regiment 
of Illinois Volunteer Infantry, on the 12th of iNIarch. 1862. After two years' 
service he reenlisted on the 31st of March, 1864, at Knoxville, Tennessee, in the 
same company and regiment to serve for three years, and was finally mustered 
out, reaching home on the ist day of August, 1865. He had participated in 
many hotly contested battles in which his regiment took part, and was captured 
at Harpers Ferry in September, 1862, in what was known as Colonel Miles' 
surrender. 

For a few months after returning home Mr. Nichols aided in the work of 




/hjJiyzl^.^ 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 315 

his father's farm, but soon abandoned the plow to take up study in preparation 
for the ministry. He devoted about ten years of his Hfe to preaching and then 
became a law student in the office and under the direction of Jake Koder, of 
Monroe. Iowa. After thorough preliminary reading he was admitted to the 
bar in March, 1877, and since that time has devoted his attention largely to the 
practice of law. He came to Wyoming on the 27th of January, 1887, and for 
three years thereafter was engaged in law practice in Douglas, when he removed 
to Sundance on the 9th of August, 1889. Through the intervening period of 
almost thirty years he has been prominently identified with the profession in 
Sundance and is regarded as one of the most prominent attorneys of northern 
Wyoming. His practice has always been large and of an important character. 
He has been engaged in thirty-seven homicide cases, either as prosecutor or on 
the defense. The offices which he has filled have largely been in the direct line 
of his profession. He is now serving for the third term as county and prosecuting 
attorney, having been first elected in 1890. He was afterward appointed to fill 
out an unexpired term left vacant by the appointment of J. L. Stotts to the 
bench. In igi6 he was again elected to the office, in which he is now serving. 
His political activity has extended to the state legislature. Always an uncom- 
promising republican, he was nominated on the party ticket in 1896 for repre- 
sentative to the house and was elected. In 1900 he was chosen to represent his 
district in the state senate and was there instrumental in securing the passage of 
the present anti-gambling law. Wyoming was the first territory to adopt woman's 
suffrage and the last state to prohibit legalized gambling. At the next election 
he was again a candidate for the office, but was defeated, largely because of his 
activity on the side of the anti-gambling bill. He never falters, however, in sup- 
port of what he believes to be right, and his position upon any vital question is 
never an equivocal one. He stands fearlessly for plans and measures which he 
believes will advance the interests of the state along material, political and moral 
lines, and his standards of citizenship are most high. 

On the 7th of October, 1866, Mr. Nichols was united in marriage to Miss 
Almeda R. Cooper, of Kingston, Illinois, and to them have been born four 
children : Horace W., living in Boise, Idaho ; A. M., who is a bank president 
and president of the A. M. Nichols Supply Company of Newcastle, widely rec- 
ognized as one of the prominent business men of northern Wyoming; Eva E., 
the wife of Hon. A. V. Eichelberger, of Emmett, Idaho; and Bertha Aree, the 
wife of Joe Lytic, one of the prominent newspaper men of northern Wyoming. 

Mr. Nichols is widely known in ]\Iasonic circles, holding membership in Sun- 
dance Lodge, No. 9, A. F. & A. M. ; Wyoming Consistory, No. i, A. & A. S. R. ; 
and Kalif Temple. A. A. O. N. M. S., of Sheridan. Gifted by nature with marked 
powers as an orator and debater, he has again and again been called upon to 
make public addresses and lectures and to debate on almost every subject of 
interest to the jieople among whom he has lived. At any and all times he is 
ready to handle any subject assigned to him. for his reading is most broad and 
comprehensive and his memory most retentive. He is recognized as a forceful 
and convincing speaker. When plans were being made for the national con- 
vention of the Grand Army of the Republic at Portland, Maine, they advertised 
for a speaker who could speak on any subject at a moment's notice, and Mr. 
Nichols was recommended for the occasion. He is one of the most prominent 
and progressive men of the state, one of its ablest lawyers and capable legislators. 



AXEL H. TOHNSON. 



The opportunities offered in America to men of foreign birth is well illustrated 
in the record of Axel H. Johnson, who is manager of the Lincoln Lumber Com- 
panv at Cokeville. His entire business career has been marked by steady progress 
and as the architect of his fortunes he, has builded wisely and well. 



316 HISTORY OF W YO.MIXG 

He was born Alay 19, 1884, in Linkoping, Sweden, a son of John Johnson, 
who was also a native of that country, where he successfully followed farming, 
making his home in the province of Linkoping. To him and his wife. Mrs. Lovise 
Johnson, were born eight children. 

Axel H. Johnson, the fourth in order of birth in that faniil\-. acquired his edu- 
cation in the schools of his native country and spent his youth upon the home 
farm, early becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and 
caring for the crops. He worked with his father until sixteen years of age, when 
he started out to provide for his own support and entered upon a five years' ap- 
prenticeship to the carpenter's trade, which brought to him a comprehensive 
knowledge of the business with broad experience in all departments of building. 
At length he determined to try his fortune in America, believing that he might 
have better opportunities on this side the Atlantic than in the old world. In u;)©". 
therefore, he sailed for the United States and after landing on American shores 
made his way direct to Rock Springs, Wyoming, where he was employed by Victor 
Smith, a well known builder, for five years. On the expiration of that period he 
remuxed tn I'okexille to take charge of the interests of the Lincoln Lumber Com- 
pany, of which he is one of the stockholders and the manager. He is thus closely 
associated with the business interests of this growing town and his ability and 
enterprise are proving substantial factors in the development of the trade. 

Mr. Johnson has voted with the republican party since becoming a naturalized 
American citizen, having taken out his final papers in Green River in 191 3. He 
belongs to the Loyal Order of Moose and his religious faith is that of the Luther- 
an churcli. He certainly deserves much credit for what he has accomplished. It 
is nn i;i^\ ihin^; to sever home ties and separate one's self from all those interests 
and a~>'iciatinn> with which he has hitherto been connected and then start out in 
a new country, with the language and customs of which he is unfamiliar. Such a 
course, however, Mr. Johnson followed, actuated by the laudable purpose of win- 
ning success in a business way. and he is not only realizing his ambition but has 
become recognized as one of the valued and substantial citizens of Cokeville. 
where he has won many friends, who esteem him highly for his genuine jjersonal 
worth as \vell as for his business enterprise. 



JUDGE WILLIAM C. MEXTZER. 

Judge William C. ^leiitzer. who is occupying the bench of the first Wyoming 
judicial district, to which position he was called in 1913 for a six years' term, 
was born near \\'arsaw, Indiana, October 13, 1867, a son of Cyrus and Nancy 
(Erb) Mentzer. The father was a farmer by occupation but has now passed 
away. The mother, however, is still living. In their family were three sons 
and two daughters, of whom William C. was the youngest. 

The family removed to Iowa during the early childhood of William C. Ment- 
zer, who there pursued his education in the public schools of Pleasantville until 
after he had completed the high school course. He then entered Drake Uni- 
versity in preparation for the bar and was graduated at Des Moines \vith the 
LL. B. degree as a member of the class of 1896. He also won the LL. B. de- 
gree from the University of Nebraska in 1895. He located for the practice 
of law in Knoxville, Iowa, in 1896 and there remained an active representative 
of the profession for twelve years, or until igo8. At the time of the Spanish- 
American war his spirit of loyalty and patriotism was aroused and he responded 
to the country's call for troops, becoming a second lieutenant of the Fifty-first- 
Iowa \'olunteer Infantry, in which command he was promoted to the rank of 
captain and regimental adjutant. He saw active service in the Philippines and 
thus rendered valuable aid to his country. When his military assistance was no 
longer needed he returned to the United States. 

Mr. Mentzer then again took U]i his abode in Knox\ille. Iowa, where he 




WILLIAM C. MEXTZER 



318 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

remained in active practice until 1908, when he removed westward to Cheyenne, 
Wyoming, and became a member of the firm of Donzelmann, Kinkead & Mentzer, 
which firm ranked with the most prominent attorneys of the west. Later he 
practiced as a member of the firm of Kinkead & Mentzer, enjoying a most lib- 
eral clientage. He has always been careful to conform his practice to a high 
standard of professional ethics, never seeking to lead the court astray in a matter 
of fact or law. nor endea\oring at any time to withhold from it the knowledge 
of any fact appearing in the records. He has ever treated the court with the 
studied courtesy that is its due and never has he indulged in malicious criticism 
of the jury because it arrived at a conclusion in the decision of a case different 
from that which he hoped to hear. Calm, dignified, self-controlled, he gives to 
his clients a service of great talent, unwearied industry and rare learning, but 
he never forgets that there are certain things due to the court, to his own self- 
respect and, above all, to justice and a righteous administration of the law 
which neither the zeal of an advocate nor the pleasure of success permit him 
to disregard. 

At times Mr. Mentzer has been called upon for important public service. 
He acted as clerk of the committee on military aft'airs in the national house of 
representatives at Washington in 1897 and 1898, save for the period of his 
active service in the Spanish-American war. In 1900 he was county attorney 
of Marion county, Iowa, and from 1900 until 1902 was city attorney of Knox- 
ville, Iowa. Following his removal to Cheyenne he concentrated his attention 
upon the private practice of his profession until 1912, when he was elected 
judge of the first judicial district of Wyoming and has since sat upon the bench, 
his term of office extending to 1919. 

On the i8th of Xovember. 1902, Mr. Mentzer was united in marriage to 
Miss Maude Gilson, of Knoxville, Iowa, and to them have been born two chil- 
dren, Frances and William (.'., Jr. 

Mr. Mentzer is a repuldican, always giving stalwart support to the party 
because of his firm belief in its principles. He belongs to Phi Delta Theta, a 
college fraternity, and to Phi Delta Phi, a legal fraternity. He has attained the 
thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in ]\Iasonry, belonging to Wyoming 
Consistory. No. i, at Cheyenne, and he is also connected with the \\'oodmen 
of the World. His religious faith is indicated in his membership in the Presby- 
terian church. He is fond of various phases of outdoor life, particularly of 
horseback riding and of golf, but has had few leisure hours in which to indulge 
his taste along those lines. His vacations are largely spent on his Wyoming 
ranch, where he engages in raising beef cattle. He has, however, felt that his 
law duties demand the greater part of his time and attention, and in this con- 
nection he has achieved high distinction which he well deserves. 



HAYES R. GROO. 



Business enterprise in Evanston finds a substantial representative in Hayes R. 
Groo, who is the treasurer and manager of the Evanston Hardware Company and 
is thus actively connected with the commercial interests of the city. He was 
born October 9, 1877, in Salt Lake City, Utah, a son of Orson H. and Martha 
(Richards) Groo. The father was born in the state of New York and was 
descended from one of the old families of that locality that was founded in 
America prior to the Revolutionary war. Some of his ancestors took part in the 
struggle for independence. 

Orson H. Groo was reared and educated at Grooville in the Catskill mountains 
of New York and came to the west about i860, being among the pioneer settlers 
of Utah. In 1870 he removed to Uinta county, Wyoming, settling on the Bear 
river, eight miles from Cokeville, and there he was extensively engaged in the 
raising of live stock. He is now a resident of Montpelier, Idaho, and is there con- 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 319 

nected with the Oregon Short Line Railway. He married Martha Richards, a 
native of Salt Lake City, Utah, and a daughter of SamuelW. Richards, who was 
among the first of the Mormon pioneers that settled in Salt Lake City and was 
the church historian for many years. He was very prominent not only in church 
work but in politics in Utah and he went as a missionary from his church to 
England. In other ways he was a man of marked influence in his community 
and did much to mold public thought and opinion. His daughter, Mrs. Groo, 
is still living. By her marriage she became the mother of three sons, of whom 
Hayes R. is the eldest. The others are : Richard, living in Montpelier, Idaho ; 
and Russell, whose home is also at Montpelier. 

Hayes R. Groo was educated in the district schools of Uinta county and in the 
public schools of Montpelier, Idaho. He spent his early life to the age of 
fourteen years on his father's farm and then started out to provide for his own 
support. He was first employed as a stenographer by the Oregon Short Line Rail- 
road Company at Pocatello, Idaho, and continued in the railroad service for 
several years. He next entered the law office of John Ilagley, of Montpelier, 
Idaho, and at about that time Mr. Bagley was elected attorney general of the state. 
Mr. Groo then entered the collection department of the Consolidated Wagon & 
Machine Company at Montpelier and there received his first experience along 
mercantile lines. He afterward became connected with the Mountain Trading 
Com])any at Diamondville, Lincoln county. Wyoming, and while with that corpor- 
ation thoroughly learned all branches of nirichaiiili-iiiL;. ^prnding seven years in 
connection with that business. Prom Dianioiuhillc lie went to Cukcvillc and be- 
came actively associated with Thomas Snetldon, ijeorge E. Pexton and O. H. 
Brown in purchasing the business of the j. W. Stoner Mercantile Company. Mr. 
Groo was made manager of the business and so continued for about a year, when 
owing to illness in the family he was obliged to make a change and accordmgly 
became connected with the operation of the Marcus Daly estate at Hamilton, Mon- 
tana. He remained in that region for two and a half years in charge of the elec- 
tric light company and the interests of the water works and the town site com- 
pany. 1 lis well directed activities added very materially to the business and to his 
commercial training as well. In 1910 he returned to Wyoming as business man- 
ager for the Gunn-Ouealy Coal Company, with headquarters at (hum, and re- 
mained with that company until June, icji6, when he became connected with the 
Evanston Hardware Company as manager and treasurer. He has since been ac- 
tively and continuously engaged in the business, which was established in 1910 
and in point of size is the largest individual hardware enterprise in the western part 
of the state. ,Mr. Groo is an alert, energetic man closely studying every ques- 
tion that bears upon the profitable conduct of the interests under his direction, and 
his intelligently managed affairs have brought to the company a very substantial 
measure of success. 

In Montpelier, Idaho, on the nth of February, igoo, Mr. Groo was married to 
Miss Annie Blanche Chapman, a native of Logan, Utah, and a daughter of the 
late William W. Chapman, who was a railroad engineer on the Oregon Short 
Line, traveling from Green River to Montpelier. His service card with the road 
dated from 1881. To Mr. and Mrs. Groo have been born four children: Helen 
Louise, who was born in Montpelier, Idaho, July 16, 1902: Maxine, born in Mont- 
pelier, August 15, 1904; Hayes R., born in Diamondville, Wyoming, June 6, 1908; 
and Ruth Margaret born May 18, 191 7. 

Mr. Groo has always given his political endorsement to the republican party 
and is thoroughly informed concerning the leading questions and issues of the 
day but does not seek nor desire office. He is not remiss in the duties of citizen- 
ship, however, but cooperates heartily in the plans and purposes to advance the 
welfare and promote the progress of citv and state. He was made a Mason in 
Hamilton, Montana, and is still affiliated with Ionic Lodge, Xo. 38, F. .^ A. M. 
He likewise has membership in the Royal Arch chapter and in the Knights Tem- 
plar commanderv at Rock Springs and i's a Xoble of the Mystic Shrine at Rawlins. 



320 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

He is also identified with the Knights of Pythias at Montpeher, Idaho, and his 
reHgious faith is that of the Episcopal church. 

His career has been marked by steady progress since he started out in the busi- 
ness world a poor boy. He is truly a self-made man and deserves all the credit 
which that term implies, for it has been through his strength of character and his 
persistency of purpose that he has worked upward. At the same time his course 
has been characterized by high and honoralile principles and worthy motives. He 
has never deviated from what his judgment has sanctioned as right between him- 
self and his fellowmen and the integrity of his actions and the uprightness of his 
motives have never been seriously questioned. 



FR.\XK HAWKINS VAUGHAN. 

Frank Havvkins \'aughan is prominently known as the president of the 
Cheyenne Creamery and as the president of the State Dry Farm Board. He is 
now practically living retired from business, leaving the management and con- 
trol of the creamery to his sons, but his work in this connection has been of 
farreaching benefit and importance to the community, for he was the pioneer 
in the establishment of the creamery and dairy business in this section of the 
state, a work that has been of the utmost worth to the farmer, as the creamery 
now pays about two hundred thousand dollars annually to agriculturists of this 
locality. 

Mr. \'aughan is a native son of Xew England. He was born in South Pom- 
fret, Windsor county, \'ermont, July 2^,. 1852, his parents being Chauncey and 
Luvia (Perrin) \'aughan. the father devoted his life to farming, to dairying 
and to blacksmithing and was a well known agriculturist of the Green Moun- 
tain state, but both he and his wife have now passed away. 

Frank H. \'aughan, after mastering the branches of learning taught in the 
public schools, continued his education in a normal school in \'ermont and in 
young manhood he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and dairying, 
thus gaining the initial experience which has prepared him for his success in 
later life. He continued in the east in that connection until 1887, when he 
resolved to try his fortune in the w^est and made his way to Fremont. Nebraska, 
(vhere he purchased a dairy. In 1902 he sold his interests there and came to 
Cheyenne for the purpose of engaging in the dairy business. He met with dis- 
couragement at the hands of the grocers and all of the residents of the commu- 
nity except E. W. Stowe. While there were many cattle raisers, they did not 
raise cows and there had been no attempt to use dairy products. In 1902, how- 
ever, Mr. X'aughan located in the Taylor block and established his creamery 
interests, first churning about three hundred pounds. From the outset the busi- 
ness proved a success and the first year he sold fifty thousand pounds of butter. 
In iqo3 liecause of the increase of his business he had to remove to a new 
location and rented the Tilden block at a cost of five thousand dollars. Orig- 
inally he conducted his business under the name of the Excelsior Creamery and 
on the 1st of January, 1904, incorporated it under the name of the Cheyenne 
Creamery wath a capital stock of ten thousand dollars. At that time he was 
using an investment of one hundred thousand dollars in the business and selling 
his products to the amount of over a quarter of a million dollars annually. In 
1904 he also engaged in a small way in handling milk and now uses five wagons 
in the delivery of dain' products, selling five hundred gallons of milk and eighty 
gallons of cream each day. In igoS he further extended the scope of his 
busmess by beginning the manufacture of ice cream and this branch has also 
proven a source of gratifying profit. The gross business will now run about 
four hundred thousand dollars and he employs forty people in the manufacture 
of butter, in the handling of dairy products and 'in the manufacture of ice 
cream. His work has not only been a source of individual profit but has con- 



HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 323 

stituted one of the important commercial interests of Cheyenne. It has been 
even more than that, however, for with the coming of Mr. X'aughan to Cheyenne 
he began to educate the ranchers and show them the possibiHties of dairying. 
He sold them separators and although it was hard, uphill work at first, even the 
grocers being ditificult to convince, he persevered and notwithstanding the fact 
that they at first hesitated about handling the butter of his creamer} he soon 
demonstrated that his products were of such excellent quality that a great 
demand would be created. The creamery is now paying to the farmers two 
hundred thousand dollars a year and the growth of the business is further shown 
by the fact that they now make over five hundred thousand pounds of butter 
per year. All their cream is received from Wyoming ranches and only a small 
part' from other sources within the state. \Vhen they began their creamery 
liusiness its opening was quite extensively advertised and they naturally expected 
the farmers to bring a liberal supply of cream, but their surprise and disap- 
pointment was great when only one can was brought in by Alartin \\'illardsen, 
of Granite Canyon. From this beginning their enormous dairy and creamery 
business of today has developed. . 

On the 14th of March, 1885, Mr. \'aughan was married in Woodstock. 
Windsor county, A'ermont, to Miss Lilla Pratt, and to them have been born two 
sons : Harold, of whom more extended mention is made on another page of 
this work : and Stanley. The latter was born in April, 1893, in Fremont. 
Nebraska, and in the pursuit of his education attended the common schools and 
the University of Colorado. He came with his parents to Wyoming and has 
since been connected with the creamery business, being thoroughly familiar with 
its details and of invaluable assistance to his father in directing its executive 
in connection with his brother Harold. He was married on October 14, igi6. 
at Glenrock, to Miss Edna Smith, a daughter of Edward and Eleanor Smith, of 
Glenrock. 

Frank H. \'aughan is a Congregationalist in religious faith. In politics he 
is a republican and has served as a member of the city council. He is much 
interested in all that has to do with the welfare and progress of the municipality 
and of the state. He is now practically living retired from business but con- 
tinues to advise his sons concerning the management and conduct of the cream- 
ery. For the past three years he has not been in the best of health. In April, 
191 5, he suffered from a shock of paralysis but recovered partially. Soon there- 
after a second shock came, it affecting his throat, interfering with his power 
of speech. His interest in matters of public concern has not abated, however, 
and he has studied the possibilities of the state for agricultural development 
and has become thoroughly informed concerning conditions, with a knowledge 
that has led to his election to the presidency of the State Drv Farm I^loard. 
Those who know- him. and he has a wide acquaintance, speak of him highly as 
a business man, as a citizen and as a friend. He is loyal in every relation of 
life, faithful to every cause which he espouses and throughout his entire career 
has been actuated by a spirit of enterprise and progress. 



ROY MONTGOMERY 



Rov Montgomery is one of the foremost cattle and horse raisers of Campbell 
county and is also proprietor of the Gillette Hotel in the citv of (iillette. In fact 
he has been one of the dominant factors in the upbuilding of the city and of his 
further success, viewed in the light of his past performances, there can be no 
reasonable doubt. 

He was born in Schuyler county, Illinois, on the 14th of Septenil)er, iS-;, and 
after masterine the lessons taught in the graded and hieh schonls of Daviess 
county, Missouri, he took up the study of law and was admitted to T)ractice at the 
state bar of Kansas. He never entered upon the active work of the profession. 



324 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

however, but his knowledge of law has been of immense value to him in the con- 
duct of his business affairs in subsequent years. He then came to Wyoming, 
establishing his home at Sundance, and for ten years he rode the range. During 
this time he was getting together a small bunch of cattle of his own and then he 
took up his abode in Gillette and has since been closely and prominently identified 
with the business interests and with the upbuilding of this section of the state. 
During the period of his residence in Gillette he has conducted a hotel and has 
also continued in active connection with cattle raising. For some time he con- 
ducted the Montgomery Hotel, one of the best furnished hotels in the state, having 
charge thereof for five years. He sold out that business in 191 5 and for two years 
was not associated with hotel management but in 1917 opened the Gillette Hotel, 
which he is now successfully conducting. He is one of the prominent cattle men 
of Campbell county, running from twenty-five hundred to three thousand head, 
his interests in this connection being perhaps surpassed by only one other in the 
county. He also has extensive investments in oil lands and from his oil properties 
is deriving a gratifying income. He likewise gives attention to horses and 
has six or seven hundred head upon his range. His business interests are wisely 
and carefully managed, his investments judiciously made and his enterprise and 
determination have brought to him a measure of success that is most substantial. 
In 1903 Mr. Montgomery was united in marriage to I\Iiss Anna Warkow, of 
Lincoln, Nebraska. He is a democrat in his political views and for years was 
a prominent factor in the councils of the party, his opinions carrying weight among 
party leaders. He served for two terms as mayor of Gillette but has not been 
active as a seeker after office, preferring to concentrate his efforts and attention 
upon his business affairs, which have grown to large proportions and which place 
him among the representative and prominent men of the state, contributing much 
to the material development of Campbell county and of Wyoming. 



PERCY M, CROPPER. 



Percy M. Cropper, one of the proprietors of the Casper Daily Press and 
Casper Record, published at Casper, Wyoming, was born July 29, 1881, in Mazo- 
manie, Dane county, Wisconsin, his parents being William M. and Mary (Wals- 
ter) Cropper. He acquired a common school education and afterward took up 
the study of law, to which he devoted his leisure hours for several years while 
employed on a Chicago newspaper. Much of his life, however, has been devoted 
to journalistic work. Before he was eighteen years of age he became police 
reporter at the old Maxwell Street police station in Chicago for the City Press 
Association and later he was employed on the Chicago Examiner and the 
Chicago Inter Ocean. He came west in 1904, going first to Utah, where he 
secured a position on the Salt Lake Herald. He was afterward engaged in the 
irrigation business in Emery county, LUah, and for a time devoted his attention 
to the brokerage business in .Salt Lake City, but again entered the newspaper 
field as financial editor of the Deseret News of Salt Lake, retaining that position 
for a number of years. He became engaged in the oil business in Wyoming, 
holding large interests in the Casper Embar Petroleum Company, and he is now 
an officer in the Casper Trust Company and has many business interests in 
Utah. In November, 1917, he became associated with others in the purchase 
of the Casper Daily Press and Casper Record, which papers he is now publish- 
ing. The papers have been incorporated as the Casper Press-Record Publishing 
Company, ]\Ir. Cropper being vice president and business manager. He is 
one of the best known journalists of this section of the country and also a 
representative business man, identified with various- interests which have had 
to do with the upbuilding and development of the west. 

In Salt Lake, Utah, on the 12th of September, 1908, Mr. Cropper was united 




PERCY M. CROPPER 



326 HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 

in marriage to Miss Mildred J. Hansen, a daughter of Air. and Mrs. O. C. 
Hansen, and they have one son, John Samuel, born September 25, 1914. 

Although interested in politics and civic affairs, Mr. Cropper has always 
preferred to stay in the background and has not cared to occupy public office. 
However, his aid and inHuence are given in support of various projects for the 
general good and his business efforts have largely been of a character that have 
contributed to general improvement as well as to individual success. He is a 
tirm belie\-er in the west, recognizing its countless opportunities and its unde- 
\clopcd resources, and he has done much to further its interests in many ways. 



\'ICTOR J. FACIXELLI. 

\iitiii- J. I\icinclli, cashier of the Xorth Side State Bank at Rock Springs, was 
Ikth 111 l\i\n, in the Tyrol, in Austria, December 4, 1887, a son of Albert and 
KailuriiKi I l\ii>-,i I l~acinelli, both of whom were natives of Austria, where they 
remainetl until 1888 and then crossed the Atlantic to the new world, taking up 
their abode near Joliet, Illinois, where the father engaged in mining. In 1889, 
however, he removed to Wyoming and came tirst to Rock Springs, wdiere he 
engaged in mining for se\eral years. He later entered the mercantile business, 
which he conducted for a time ami then sold out, turning his attention to the retail 
liquor business. He died in .-\pril, icjo8, at the age of fifty years, and is still sur- 
\ive(l by his widow, who makes her home in Rock Springs. They had a family of 
four children, all of whom are living: Rose; Serafina, who is a teacher in the high 
school; Thomas Paul, a high school student; and \"ictor J., who is the eldest. 

\'ictor J. Facinelli was only a year old when brought by his parents to the new 
world. He attended the local schools and at the age of fifteen years became a 
student in the State University at Laramie, where he pursued his studies for three 
vears. In June. igo6. he accepted a position in the First National Rank of Rock 
Springs as messenger boy and during the six years of his connection with that 
institution he rose to the position of assistant cashier. On the 15th of August, 
1912, he became one of the organizers of the North Side State Bank, which he 
opened, and with the management and conduct of which he has since been closely 
associated. He has seen the assets of the bank grow to a million dollars in five 
years' time. In connection with his active work as cashier of the North Side State 
liank. ]\lr. Facinelli is a stockholder of the First National Bank of Rock Springs, 
also a director of the Miners' State Bank of Superior, \\'yoming. and is the princi- 
pal stockholder of the Labarge Live Stock Company. He is likewise a director 
of the Rock Springs Lumber Company and is secretary of the Rock Springs Fuel 
Company. 

In religious faith Mr. Facinelli is a Roman Catholic. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Elks lodge at Rock Springs and has served as exalted ruler. He 
is a firm believer in the state and its future development, and his loyalty to its 
interests is indicated in the fact that his investments have all been placed in busi- 
ness projects of ^^ yoming. 



JOSEPH R. HYLTOX, AI. D. 

Dr. Jose]3h R. Hylton. engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at 
Douglas, bases his growing success upon thorough collegiate training and later 
study and investigation, which keciis him in touch with the trend of modern 
scientific thought and progress. 

.■\ native of Kansas, he was liorn in l*llk county, on the 30th of January. 1883, 
a son of T. W. and Mattie (Moore) Hylton. He pursued his education in the 
])ublic and high schools until he hail completed the course in the latter and then 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 327 

entered Cotner University at Lincoln, Nebraska. He thus gained a broad literary 
education to serve as a foundation upon which to rear the superstructure of pro- 
fessional knowledge, and entering Bennett Medical College of Chicago, he pur- 
sued the full course there and was graduated with the class of 1906. Thinking 
to find better business opportunities in the west, he came to Douglas, Wyoming, 
where he has since been practicing with success. His patrons have constantly in- 
creased in number and the nature of his business has constantly grown in impor- 
tance. He is now serving as city physician. 

On the loth of August. 1909, Dr. Hylton was united in marriage to Miss Ora 
Davis and their children are: Roy H., Helen L. and Janice. Dr. Hylton finds 
recreation in rifle shooting, at which he has gained considerable proficiency. His 
political endorsement is given to the democratic party and he is serving as a mem- 
ber of the state central committee from Converse countv. His opinions carry 
weight in the councils of his party and at all times he keeps in touch with the trend 
of jjolitical thought. Fraternally he is a Mason of high rank, having attained the 
thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in the Consistorv, and he is also a 
Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He belongs to the Commercial Club and cooperates 
in all that has to do with the welfare and improvement of Douglas. Along pro- 
fessional lines his connection is with the Wyoming State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association, and thus he keeps thoroughly informed concerning 
the latest discoveries and theories of the profession. He went to the Mexican 
border as captain of the medical corps of the \\'yoming Infantry in the summer 
of 1916 and he is now assigned to duty as major of the ordnance department, 
with the state troops of Wyoming. He is a young man of pronounced ability, 
broad-minded and public-spirited, having made for himself a creditable position 
in professional ranks, while he has become a recognized leader in democratic 
circles and in other connections which have much to do with shaping public thought 
and action. 



PANEL R. GANIARD. 



Danel R. Ganiard is a representative business man who has readily utilized 
the opportunities that have come to him and by reason of his indefatigable in- 
dustry and ready adaptability has steadily worked his way upward. He is now 
manager for the Western Auto Transit Company at Rock Springs and although 
he has made his home in that city for only six years he is recognized as one of its 
wide-awake and progressive business men. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, 
April 29, 1885, and is the eldest in a family of three children whose parents were 
Myron A. and Emily (Ross) Ganiard, both of whom were natives of the Empire 
state, the father having been born in Rochester, while the mother was a native 
of Brooklyn. The father engaged in business along mechanical lines in the east 
and afterward removed to East Moline, Illinois, where he still resides. 

Danel R. Ganiard pursued his education in the public schools of the state 
of New York and mastered the branches taUght in the high school at Pough- 
keepsie. New York. He started out to provide for his own support when a 
youth of nineteen years, entering upon an apprenticeship to learn the machinist's 
trade. He completed his full term of indenture and gained a comprehensive and 
accurate knowledge of the business, which he followed as a journeyman for five 
years. He was afterward associated with his father in systematizing the business 
of the Iowa Dairy Cream Separator Company at Waterloo, Iowa, where he re- 
mained for two years. He was also employed to systematize the interests of the 
Lisle Manufacturing Company at Clarinda, Iowa, and subsequently he removed 
to Topeka, Kansas, where he was connected with the Smith Automobile Com- 
pany as general foreman of the machine shop and engine assembly. He con- 
tinued in the latter place for two years and on the expiration of that period re- 
moved to Rock Springs, Wyoming, where he arrived in the fall of 191 1. He 



328 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

then became connected with the company which he now represents, being mana- 
ger for the Western Auto Transit Company. After four months with the com- 
pany he was advanced to his present position and he is also one of the stock- 
holders of the business, which was established and incorporated in 1910 with 
J. W. Hay as president, J. H. Anderson, vice president, T. S. Taliaferro as 
secretary and treasurer, and D. R. Ganiard as manager. Mr. Ganiard's thorough 
training along mechanical lines and his later experience in salesmanship have well 
qualified him for the onerous duties which devolve upon him in connection with 
the development and upbuilding of the business which he is now actively con- 
trolling and which is meeting with a substantial measure of success. 

In 1906, in Brooklyn, New York, Mr. Ganiard was married to Miss Grace 
Beal, a native of Fort Dodge, Iowa, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Beal, 
representatives of one of the old families of that state. Mr. and Mrs. Ganiard 
became the parents of four children, one of whom has passed away, Marjorie, 
who died in Rock Springs and who was the third in order of birth. The others 
are : Emily G., who was born in Waterloo. Iowa ; Robert, born in Topeka, Kansas ; 
and Lois, born in Rock Springs. 

The religious faith of the parents is that of the Episcopal church, of which 
they are loyal adherents. Mr. Ganiard gives his political endorsement to the 
republican party and while not an office seeker he keeps well informed concern- 
ing the vital questions and political problems of the day and does all in his 
power to insure party success. His attention, however, is mainly concentrated 
upon his business interests, and his progress and prosperity are the direct result of 
his close application and indefatigable effort, intelligently directed. 



ERNEST GEORGE BURDETT. 

Ernest George Burdett, proprietor of a leading grocery establishment in the 
progressive city of Evanston, displaying in the conduct of his business interests 
the spirit of marked enterprise and advancement which has characterized the 
upbuilding of this city and the development of western Wyoming, was born April 
II, 1S80, in Evanston, his parents being James and Sarah J. (Lethbridge) Bur- 
dett. both of whom were natives of England, whence they crossed the Atlantic 
to America, and on the ist of October, 1870, became residents of Piedmont, 
\\'yoming. The father engaged in railroad work in connection with the con- 
struction of the Union Pacific and on the loth of January, 1875, he came to 
Evanston, where he entered the employ of the firm of Blyth & Pixley, with 
whom he remained for sixteen years. He then entered into business on his own 
account as a partner in the firm of Dawson & Burdett, an association that was 
maintained for sixteen vears, at the end of which time Mr. Burdett sold out and 
organized the Burdett Mercantile Company, conducting business under that style 
from 1910 until 191 5, when he once more disposed of his business. Since then he 
has lived retired in the enjoyment of a rest which he has truly earned and richly 
deserves. He has now passe'd the Psalmist's allotted span of three score years and 
ten, having reached' the age of seventy-two. while his wife is living at the age of 
sixty-nine years. They had a family'of thirteen children, of whom four died in 
infancy, while nine are still living: Alma J.; Mrs. P. G. Matthews; Jim; William 
H., who is clerk of the district court ; Charles L. ; Frank J., a resident of Sho- 
shone, Idaho ; Lorenzo ; and Laurina. 

Of this family Ernest George Burdett was the seventh in order of birth. His 
boyhood and youth were largely devoted to the acquirement of a public school 
education in Evanston, where he was graduated from the high school with the 
class of 1897. He then spent two years in his father's employ, after which he 
traveled in England, engaged in mission work in that country for two ye;irs. Re- 
turning to his native land, he acted for three years as clerk in the county court- 
house and was promoted to the position of chief deputy county clerk, in which 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 329 

capacity he continued for three years. He then embarked in business with his 
father, with whom he was associated until they sold their interests. In 1915 
Mr. Burdett of this review established the Burdett grocery store, which is now 
one of the leading commercial interests of Evanston. He carries a large stock 
of staple and fancy groceries and enjoys an extensive trade which is steadily 
growing as the country round about becomes more thickly settled. He is also 
the secretary and treasurer of the Stahley Land & Li\e Stock Company, in 
which connection he is extensively engaged in raising cattle and .sheep, the com- 
pany being capitalized for one hundred thousand dollars. He is likewise a director 
and the secretary of the Uinta County Fair Association and he does everything 
in his power to stimulate an interest in progressive farming and stock raising, and 
in the improvement of all lines of business leading to the substantial improve- 
ment and development of this section of the state. 

On the 23d of September, 1903, Mr. Burdett was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie Hortense Spence, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Spence, of Salt 
Lake City. Six children have been born of this marriage : Ernest J., born in 
1904; Harold, in 1906; Marion S., in 1908; Benjamin, in 1910; Carl G., in 
1914; and Geneva Hortense, born November 29, 1916. The four eldest children 
are now in school. 

The parents are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 
and Mr. Burdett is superintendent of the Woodruff State Sunday schools. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and he stands for progress and 
improvement in everything that has to do with the welfare and upbuilding of 
city, county or commonwealth. He ranks with Evanston's representative busi- 
ness men, occupying an enviable position in public regard by reason of a well 
spent life, fidelity to high standards of business and loyalty in citizenship. 



WILLIAM R. LOWHAM. 

William R. Lowham, filling the office of sheritf in Uinta county, discharging 
his duties without fear or favor and thus making a most excellent record as a 
public official, was born December 4, 1872, in London, Canada West, a son of 
Michael Lowham, a native of Ireland, who went to Canada in 1871 and was 
there engaged in railroading. In 1873 he removed to Wyoming and established 
his home at Rock Springs, where he acted as section foreman for the Union 
Pacific Railroad Company for twenty-five years. He is now retired, enjoying 
a rest which he has truly earned and richly merits. He has been a resident of 
Evanston for the past twenty years and is numbered among its worthy and 
respected citizens. His political endorsement is given to the democratic party, 
which he has supported since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. 
He married Miss Eliza Burns, a native of Dublin, Ireland, in which country they 
were married. They became the parents of ten sons and one daughter. 

William R. Lowham, the eldest of the family, was educated at Hilliard, 
Wyoming, and started out to provide for his own support when a youth of six- 
teen years. He was first employed by the Union Pacific Railway Company, 
beginning work on the section. From that humble position he advanced to 
engineer and devoted thirteen years to service in that connection with the Union 
Pacific. He was then elected to the office of sheriff of Uinta county in 1912 
and made such an excellent record that he was re-elected and was again chosen 
for the third term. He is still serving in that capacity, owing to his second 
re-election, and he has made a most efficient officer, discharging his duties with 
marked promptness and fidelity. His name has become a menace to evildoers 
and conveys a feeling of safety to all law-abiding citizens. 

On the 6th of July, 1903, Mr. Lowham was married in Evanston, Wyoming, 
to Miss Elizabeth A.' Banner, a native of England and a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Samuel A. Banner, who were pioneer settlers of Coalville, Utah. To 




WILLIAM E. LOWHAM 



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332 HISTORY OF WYOxMING 

Mr. and Mrs. Lowham were bom the following children: Ellen Lucile, born 
October 30, 1905; Benjamin Richard, born February 3, 1907; Wesley Samuel, 
born January 29, 1909; George William, born December 6, 1912; and Clarence 
Leo, born August 18, 1916. All are yet at home. 

Fraternally Air. Lowham is connected with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and he also has membership with the Brotherhood of Locomotive Fire- 
men and Engineers. His religious faith is that of the Episcopal church and his 
life is guided according to its teachings. His political support is given to the 
republican party and in former years he was one of the active workers in its 
ranks but more recently has not been active in politics, as he does not care to 
have politics interfere in any way with the faithful performance of his duties. 

He is a self-made man whose prosperity has been won through earnest effort 
and close application. Since 1888 he has conducted a ranch covering an entire 
section of land in Uinta county, and thereon he is engaged in the raising of 
cattle and horses. He gives supervision to his interests in that connection in 
addition to discharging the duties of his office and is regarded as a wide-awake, 
alert and progressive business man as well as an official whose fidelity to duty is 
above question. 



RAYMOND E. ROBE. 



A well known and prominent figure in commercial circles in Laramie is Ray- 
mond E. Robb, who is manager of the J. C. Penney Company, one of the leading 
dry goods establishments in the southern part of the state. He was born in Monte 
\'ista, Colorado, January 17, 1890, and is a son of Robert E. and Florence (Col- 
lins) Robb, both of whom were natives of Iowa. At an early date they removed 
westward to Colorado, settling in IMonte Msta, where the father engaged in 
the cattle business and in general agricultural pursuits. He still makes his home 
there, he and his wife being attractively located in ]\Ionte Msta. They had a 
family of two children, the daughter being Ethel Mae, now a resident of Denver. 

The son, Raymond E. Robb. who is the eldest, spent his boyhood in Monte 
Yista, Colorado, where he attended school, while later he became a student in the 
high school at Pueblo, Colorado, completing his course there in 1909. He next 
entered the University of Colorado, spending one year as a student in the academic 
department, and on the expiration of that period he entered the employ of the 
Humane Remedy Company at Des Moines, Iowa, with which he was connected for 
a year. Later he returned to Colorado, settling in Del Xorte, where he engaged 
in the dry goods business for two years. On disposing of his interests there he re- 
moved to Laramie and became identified with the dry goods trade of this city as 
an employe of the J. C. Penney Company. Advancing step by step as his ability 
and worth became recognized, he was made manager in 191 7 and is now thus prom- 
inently identified with one of the leading commercial interests of this city. Long 
and varied experience well qualified him for the position and his efforts are con- 
tributing in marked degree to the success of the business. 

On the 28th of October, 1910, in Boulder. Colorado, ]\Ir. Robb was married to 
Miss Ethel M. Hill, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Hill, of Des Moines, Iowa. 
They have become parents of two children : Constance \'irginia, who was born in 
Del Norte. Colorado, May 28, 1913; and Sarah Beatrice, who was born in Del 
Norte, September 21, 1914. 

The parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and they have 
won an enviable position in social circles during the period of their residence in 
Laramie, the hospitality of the best homes being cordially extended them. In his 
political views \lr. Robb maintains an independent course, while fraternally he is 
connected with the Knights and Ladies of Security. He is today regarded as one 
of the rc[)resentative young business men of Laramie, standing high in commercial 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 333 

circles and holding equal rank as a citizen. Alert and energetic, he is ready to im- 
prove every opportunity that comes his way and his ability is attested by his col- 
leagues and contemporaries. 



CHARLES BOSEN. 



Charles Bosen. iiroprietor of the Bosen plumbing shop in Sheridan, was born 
in Denmark, .March i, i8()7, and is a son of Christian and Margaret (Hanson) 
Bosen, who were likewise natives of Denmark, spending their entire lives in 
their native country. They had a family of nine children, of whom seven are 
living. 

Charles Bosen was reared and educated in Denmark and came to America in 
1891, when a young man of twenty-four years. Crossing the Atlantic, he first 
settled in Indiana, where he resided for a year and then sought the opportunities 
of the growing west, making his way to Wyoming. He spent one year in Gillette 
and afterward removed to Sheridan, where he worked in various ways for 
several years. Later he learned the plumbing business, which he has since fol- 
lowed, and making steady advancement in this connection he is now at the head 
of a profitable business. 

He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, holding membership 
in Lodge No. 19, in which he has filled all of the chairs. His political allegiance 
is given to the democratic party and he has never been an office seeker, preferring 
to concentrate his time and eft'orts upon his business interests, and gradually 
through his own efi^orts he has worked his way upward and is today at the head 
of one of the important business concerns of his adopted city. 



WILLIAM R. GRIER. 



William R. Grier, secretary and treasurer of the Grier Lumber Company of 
Cheyenne, was born in Peoria, Illinois, on the 23d of October, 1869, and is a son 
of D. P. and Anna ( McKinney ) Grier. The father, who was long engaged in the 
grain business, was known as General Grier, having won his title by active service 
as a volunteer in the Civil war. He had joined the army during the early period 
of hostilities between the north and the south and was made colonel of the Sev- 
enty-seventh Infantry. Later he won promotion to the rank of brigadier general 
in the Thirteenth Army Corps. His last days were passed in St. Louis, where 
he departed this life in 1891, and his widow, surviving him, is yet making her 
home in St. Louis. They had a family of five sons and two daughters, of whom 
William R. was the third in order of birth. The oldest of the family is now de- 
ceased. 

William R. Grier pursued his education in the public schools of St. Louis, in 
the Washington University and in Smith Academy. He pursued all branches of 
manual training and was graduated from the manual training school. He after- 
ward spent a short time with an engineering corps in Kansas and in 1889 he re- 
moved westward to Denver, since which time he has made his home in the western 
country. He spent some time at Cripple Creek, Colorado, and later removed to 
Cheyenne, since which date he has been located here, controlling his wide inter- 
ests. He makes his home in Cheyenne and is well known in the business circles 
of this citv as the secretary and treasurer of the Grier Lumber Company. He 
is a man of keen sagacity and unfaltering enterprise and has readily recognized 
opportunities for judicious investment along business lines. His interests have 
thus been broad and he has carried forward to successful completion whatever 
he has undertaken. He brooks no obstacles that can be overcome by persistent 



334 HISTORY OF VvYOMlXG 

and earnest effort, and his indduiitable energy and enterprise have brought about 
the successful fulfillment uf his plans. 

On the 6th of May, ib'gd, Mr. (irier was united in marriage to Miss !Mary 
Stewart, of Denver, and their children are : Ralph Stewart, who is receiving teller 
in the First National Bank of Cheyenne; Margaret, who is a high school gradu- 
ate and is now a student in the Denver University; Mary E. ; Susan H. ; and 
Anna McKinney. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church. In 
social circles they occupy an enviable position and the hospitality of their home 
is greatlv enjoyed by their many friends in Cheyenne. Air. Grier is a republican 
in his political views and fraternally he is well known, being connected with the 
Woodmen of the \\'orld, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Hoo Hoos, 
a prominent lumber organization. In 1917 'Sir. Grier was president of the Moun- 
tain States Lumber Dealers' Association, an organization which has been in exis- 
tence for about sixteen years, and he was the first president ever elected from 
Wyoming. He feels that he has made no mistake in turning his attention to 
the west and directing his eft'orts in the midst of its activities. As the years have 
gone on he has steadily progressed and each forward step has brought him a 
broader outlook and wider opportunities. 



ROBERT B. FORSYTH. 

On the roster of officials in Wyommg appears the name of Robert B. Forsyth, 
who is filling the position of state auditor. He was born in Xewburg, Ontario, 
Canada, on the 12th of May, 1874, and is a son of James and Margaret (Stuart) 
Forsyth, the former a farmer by occupation. The parents have passed away. 
They reared a family of four sons and four daughters, of whom Robert B. was 
the youngest. 

In the schools of Canada, Robert B. Forsyth pursued his education. He 
attended the high school at Harrowsmith, Ontario, and also a business college. 
He afterward learned telegraphy and for ten years devoted his time and energies 
to railroad work. On the expiration of that period he became bookkeeper for 
the Union Pacific Coal Company at Rock Springs, Wyoming. He acted for a 
time as head bookkeeper and later was appointed manager of the store. At a 
subsequent period he engaged in merchandising in connection with the J. P. 
McDermott Company, acting as secretary of the company. Thus step bv steo 
he worked his way upward, becoming more and more closely connected with 
the management of important business interests. After five years he was elected 
auditor and in 1910 he removed to Cheyenne to make his home in the capital 
city in order to discharge his duties at this point. In 1914 he was re-elected to 
the office for a second term of four years, so that he is the present incumbent in 
the position. 

Mr. Forsyth was married Slay 12, 1895, to Miss Mary Ludvigsen of Rock 
Springs, and they have become parents of two sons, Donald and Stuart., the 
former now assistant deputy insurance commissioner. Mr. and Mrs. Forsyth 
are consistent members of the Episcopalian church and socially they occupy an 
enviable position. 

In politics Mr. Forsyth has long been a stalwart republican and upon the 
ticket of that party was elected to his present position. He has also held the 
offices of treasurer and mayor of Rock Springs and he represented Sweetwater 
county in the state senate for a period of four years. His opinions have carried 
weight in the councils of the party and he has done everything in his power to 
further its interests and promote its success because of his firm belief in the 
efficacy of its platform as a factor in good government. Fraternally he is a 
Mason of high rank, having attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish 
Rite, while with the Nobles of the IMvstic Shrine he has crossed the sands of 




ROBERT B. FORSYTH 



336 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

the desert. He is also identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
and he belongs to the Industrial Club of Cheyenne. He is fond of outdoor 
life, especially of hunting, and turns to that pursuit for recreation. He is a very 
public-spirited man, interested in the state and its development, and his coopera- 
tion can always be counted upon to further any plan or measure for the general 
good. He has ever regarded a public office as a public trust and it is a well known 
fact that no trust reposed in Robert B. Forsyth has ever been betrayed in the 
slightest degree. 



WILLIAM MORRIS STANSBURY. 

William Morris Stansbury, prominently known as a member of the bar of 
Douglas since 1910, was born on the 5th of October, 1882, in Braidwood, Illinois, 
a son of John and ]\Iary Stansbury. mentioned elsewhere in this work. He ac- 
quired a common school education in Braidwood and afterward became a high 
school pupil in Joliet, Illinois. He also attended the University of Illinois and 
there pursued his law course, having determined upon law practice as a life 
work. Having thus thoroughly qualified for a professional career, he took up 
the active work and in 1910 removed to Douglas, WS'oming, where he has since 
been a well known representative of the bar. Three years later he was joined by 
his father and under the fimi style of Stansburv' & Stansbury they have since 
continued in practice and a liberal clientage is accorded them which has con- 
stantly grown in volume and importance as the years have passed by. 

On the i8th of July, 1912, in Douglas, Wyoming, Mr. Stansbury was united 
in marriage to Miss Florence Reid, a daughter of Charles and Eliza Reid. They 
now have two children, Janet Elizabeth and William Morris, Jr. 

The religious faith of the parents is that of the Congregational church and 
fraternally Mr. Stansbury is connected with the Masons and with the Woodmen 
of the World. In politics he is an earnest republican and for three terms filled the 
office of town clerk of Douglas, his reappointments being proof of the capability 
and efficiency which he displayed in the discharge of his duties. In 1916 he was 
elected police justice and is now occupying that position. He is identified with 
the Commercial Club and the Douglas Good Roads Club and is thus active in 
support of many movements which have to do with the welfare and upbuilding 
of this section of the state. He stands for progressiveness in all things and his 
activities have been farreaching and resultant. 



PATRICK HENRY HEALY. 

Patrick Henry Healy, connected with commercial interests in Rawlins, where 
he is engaged in merchandising as proprietor of a variety store, was born in 
Peoria. Illinois, May 26, 1869, a son of Daniel Healy, who was a native of 
Ireland but came to America at the age of sixteen years and first took up his 
abode in Peoria, Illinois. He had pursued his education in the schools of his 
native country and in young manhood he followed the trade of blacksmithing, 
which he learned after arriving in the new world. He continued to devote his 
energies to that pursuit throughout his entire life. About 187 1 he removed west- 
ward from Omaha, Nebraska, and took up his abode in Rawlins, where he con- 
tinued to make his home until called to his final rest in 1900, when he had reached 
the age of seventy-three years. During all the period of his active life he was 
employed at the blacksmith's trade in the shops of the Union Pacific Railroad 
Company. His political endorsement was given to the democratic party and his 
religious faith was that of the Roman Catholic church. He married Ann Denn, 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 337 

a native of Ireland, who came to the United States in young girlhood. They 
had a family of thirteen children, seven of whom are living. 

Patrick H. Healy, the fifth in order of birth, was less than two years of age 
when the family home was established in Rawlins, where he became a pupil in 
the public schools, passing through consecutive grades until at the age of six- 
teen years he left school in order to provide for his own support. He was first 
employed as an apprentice at the printer's trade, serving a four years' term of 
indenture, during which time he gained a thorough and comprehensive knowledge 
of the business. He was afterward connected with various pursuits and in 1899 
he entered the cigar, tobacco and confectionery business, which he conducted suc- 
cessfully until April. 1912. He then sold his store and in December, 1914, estab- 
lished his present business, opening a variety store, which he has since carried 
on. He conducts the only exclusive variety store in Carbon county and has 
developed a trade of large and satisfactory proportions. His business methods 
are such as commend him to the confidence and support of the public and his 
patronage has constantly grown until his annual sales now reach a gratifying 
figure. 

At Peoria, Illinois, on the 14th of October, 1914, Mr. Healy was united in 
marriage to Miss Anna Bertha Carter, a native of that state and a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Carter, of an old and prominent Illinois family. Mr. and 
Mrs. Healy have become parents of one child. Ruth Garner, who was born in 
Peoria, Illinois, November 16, 191 5. 

In his political views Mr. Healy is a democrat, having supported the party 
since reaching adult age. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and also with the Red Men and his religious faith is 
that of the Catholic church, his connection being with St. Joseph's parish in Raw- 
lins. There are no esoteric phases in his life and the secret of his success is not 
hard to find. He started out in life a poor boy but early recognized the fact that 
industry wins and industry became the beacon light of his life. Working dili- 
gently and persistently, allowing nothing to deter him in carrying out his honest 
purposes, he has advanced step by step and has reached a creditable place in 
commercial circles in his adopted city. 



DAVID G. THOMAS. 



The subject of this sketch was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 2, 
1857, a son of the late John F. and Margaret (GriiSths) Thomas. Both parents 
were natives of Wales, and on leaving that scenic country, crossed the Atlantic 
to the new world, arriving in America during the early '50s. They met and 
were married in Pennsylvania and after a few years removed to New Haven, 
West Virginia, and their last days were spent in Macon county, Missouri. Dur- 
ing the Civil war Mr. Thomas served as a member of the Home Guard at Syra- 
cuse, Ohio. Throughout his entire life he engaged in coal mining and in this 
manner provided for his family, which numbered twelve children. 

David G., the eldest of that family, attended for a few months the public 
schools in Fulton county, Illinois ; but from the age of ten years, he had been 
employed in the mines of that state and of Missouri, until on attaining his ma- 
jority his health having failed, he sought it in the mountainous regions of Wyo- 
ming, arriving in the then territory, March 11, 1878, taking up his abode in 
Rock Springs where he at once became connected with the coal mining interests. 
He served in various capacities in connection with mine operations, and he has 
been with the Union Pacific Coal Company all of said time, save for a period 
of about sixteen years, six of which were spent as the state inspector of coal 
mines, two years as county and prosecuting attorney of Sweetwater county, and 
six years as prosecuting attorney of Uinta county. Giving up the practice of 



338 HISTORY OF \\'YO.MIXG 

law, at the solicitation of the general manager of the Union Pacific Coal Com- 
pany, who invited him to become mine superintendent at Rock Springs. 

In May. 1893, Mr. Thomas was married in Bevier, Macon county, Missouri, 
to ]\liss Elizabeth E. Jones, a graduate of. the State Normal School at Kirksville 
and a teacher in the public schools of Bevier. She was the daughter of David W". 
and Elizabeth Jones. They have become the parents of one child, Myfanwy 
Thomas, who was born March 8, 1894 in Rock Springs, and was graduated from 
the Wyoming State University and from Leland Stanford Junior Uni\-ersity, 
and is the wife of Doctor John H. Goodnough. of Reliance, Wyoming. 

Politically Mr. Thomas is a republican, was a member of the last territorial 
legislature, was for one term the mayor of Rock Springs, is at present a mem- 
ber of the slate board of examiners for mine inspectors, a director of the North 
Side State Bank, and a member of the school board of Rock Springs. 

Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias of which order he is 
a past supreme representative and with the ^Masonic order, having reached the 
Knight Templar degree in the York Rite and the thirty-second degree of the 
C'onsistory in the Scottish Rite, and is a noble of the Mystic Shrine. 

. During his leisure hours he has found time to write verse and is the author 
of a publication entitled. "Overland and Underground," which has met with 
commendation and approval among the rank and file generally. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas are both identified with the Presbvterian faith. 



W. D. McKEO: 



W. D. McKeon is the vice president of the Newcastle National Bank and 
the secretary and manager of the Newcastle Land & Live Stock Compani,-, oper- 
ating extensively in the sheep and cattle industry, their interests being surpassed 
by those of few individuals or corporations in the state of Wyoming, Mr, 
McKeon in these connections displays marked discernment, executive ability 
and unfaltering enterprise and his activities are of a nature that contribute to 
the material progress and upbuilding of the section in which he resides. 

He has always remained west of the Mississippi river, his birth having occurred 
in Springfield, Missouri, on the 14th of June, 1869, his parents being Dennis and 
Mary ( Livingstone ) McKeon, the former a native of Ireland, while the latter 
was born in Penns\'lvania. The mother came of Revolutionary war stock, being 
a direct descendant of the Livingstone who administered the oath of office to 
(ieorge Washington when he was inaugurated president of the United States. 
Dennis McKeon was a young man when he crossed the Atlantic to the new 
world and shortly after he responded to the country's call for troops to aid in 
the preser\-ation of the Union, enlisting in a New York regiment for active 
service in the Civil war. He went to the front under General Lyons. He had 
landed in the United States in 1863 in company with his brother-in-law, Patrick 
Carroll, who also enlisted and was shot through the breast at the battle of Shiloh, 
He was left for dead on the field, but crawled to the river where the wounded 
were being transported across, was picked up among the other injured men 
and finally recovered from his wounds. Dennis McKeon, after about two years' 
active service, was honorably discharged in 1865, the war having been brought 
to a successful termination. He located in the vicinity of Springfield, Missouri, 
where he was married, and there continued to make his home until his death, 
which occurred about 1912. His widow still survives and is vet living in Spring- 
field. 

W. D. McKeon, of this review, was educated in the public schools and in 
his youthful days he learned the blacksmith's trade in the railroad shops at 
Springfield, Missouri. In 1889, when a young man of twenty years, he left 
home to enter upon his business career, going to Texas, where he rode the 
range for two years, and in the fall of 1891 he came to \\'yoming and through 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 341 

the succeeding five years was employed at blacksmithing in the shops of the 
L'nion I'ncific Railroad, working along the entire line of the road through Wyom- 
ing. During this period, however, or in 1896, in company with John F. Hittle, he 
established business on his own account in a small way, placing a herd of cattle 
at the head of Green river, in Fremont county. He then resigned his position 
with the railroad company, in order to give his entire attention to his live stock 
business. About this time he sold his cattle holdings to his partner, Mr. Hittle, 
and organized the Green River Land & Live Stock Company, which was incor- 
porated with Mr. McKeon as secretary and manager. He concentrated his entire 
attention upon the interests of the company, which engaged in sheep raising only 
until 1906, when they formed the Newcastle Land & Live Stock Company, which 
absorbed the former company. The newly formed corporation handles sheep, 
cattle and horses and has developed into one of the important live stock companies 
of the state. They control in the neighborhood of four hundred thousand acres 
of land, on which they range some twenty-five thousand head of sheep and from 
ten to fifteen thousand head of cattle. Care and attention to their interests, 
wisdom in the care of their flocks and herds and enterprising methods in the 
conduct of their business have brought to them a very substantial measure of 
success. 

In 1896 Mr. AIcKeon was united in marraige to Miss Emily Bransfield, of 
Evanston, Wyoming, and to them have been born five children, of whom four 
are living, Mary Irene, Maurice J., Emily C. and William D. 

In his political views Mr. McKeon is an earnest republican and in 1896 he 
was elected to the office of treasurer of Green River. Under the administration 
of Governor Brooks he was appointed to the position of state sheep commis- 
sioner of the northern district of Wyoming, but political honors and offices have 
had little attraction for him, as he had always preferred to concentrate his efforts 
and attention upon his individual interests. However, he is never neglectful of 
the duties of citizenship nor unmindful of the obligations that devolve upon 
him in that way, and he stands for all that is progressive and worth while in the 
public life of the community. Fraternally he is connected with the Modern 
Woodmen of America and both he and his wife are members of the Catholic 
church. His life is indicative of what may be accomplished through industry 
and perseverance and may well illustrate to others what may be gained through 
earnest individual eiTort. 



T. B. YOUNG. 



Starting out in life with a common school education as his equipment, work- 
ing in the coal mines in his early youth amid constant danger, it would seem that 
there was little business outlook 'for J- B. Young, but ambition and determina- 
tion will eventually come to the front, and believing that his future depended 
upon his own efforts, Mr. Young so directed his labors_ that in the course of 
years he was able to start out upon an independent financial career. He further 
qualified for life's practical and responsible duties by close study and the read- 
ing of good books and thus he continually broadened his knowledge and pro- 
moted his efficiency. At length he determined to leave the mines and with the 
money which he liad saved he established a small confectionery store in Rock 
Springs. The business grew and expanded and his activities were extended to 
still other lines. One after another branch was added until he is now at the 
head of an extensive trade and ranks with the leading general merchants not only 
of Rock Springs but of his section of the state. His trade covers a wide terri- 
tory and his business is most satisfactory. 

'Mr. Young is a native of Scotland. He was born at Gorebndge. December 
14, i86fi, a son of George and Katherine (Black) Young, who came to America 
in the spring of 1888, making their way westward to Walsenburg. Colorado. The 



Vol. n— IT 



342 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

father engaged in mining and in 1890 removed to Rock Springs, where he con- 
tinued in the same line of business. He died in 1899 ^t the age of seventy-three 
rears, while his wife passed away in 1898. In their family were fifteen children, 
six sons and nine daughters. 

J. B. Young, the tenth in order of birth, attended the schools of Scotland 
during the period of his youth and afterward took up coal mining in that coun- 
try, facing the mnny dangers incident to mining coal at that period, when life 
was not safeguarded as it is at the present time. He continued in coal mining at 
Rock Springs until 1897, when he established business on his own account in a 
small wav and has since developed his interests until he now has one of the 
largest and most important general mercantile establishments in this part of the 
state. He began with a small stock and a limited capital but he based his activi- 
,ties upon industry, determination and indefatigable energy and those qualities 
have constituted an excellent foundation upon which to build the superstructure 
of success. 

On the i2th of February, 1906, Mr. Young was married to Miss Maude L. 
Rhodes and they have become parents of two children : George Xephi, who was 
born in Rock Springs in 191 1 : and Hannah Catherine, who was born ni Janu- 
ary, 1915. 

Mr. Young votes with the republican party and in 1892, again in 1894 and in 
1896 was elected on that ticket to represent his district in the state legislature. 
He has also served as a member of the city council and has been a member of 
the school board of Rock Springs, standing at all times in support of progressive 
measures which have to do with the upbuilding and development of the com- 
munity ill which he li\es and of the commonwealth in general. He belongs to 
the Church of Latter-Day Saints and is first counsel to the bishop. His busi- 
ness record is characterized by continuous advancement owing to well defined 
plans carefully executed. His career has been marked by an orderly progression 
and each forward step has brought him a broader outlook and wider opportuni- 
ties, which he has wiselv utilized. 



JOHN KOSHIR. 



John Koshir, engaged in the dry goods business at Rock Springs, is a native 
of Austria. He was born on the 5th of January, 1869, and is a son of Michael 
and Agnes Koshir, who were likewise natives of that country, where they have 
spent their entire li\es, the father being still engaged in farming there. In the 
family were five children. 

John Koshir in his boyhood days attended the schools of Austria and for 
three years was in the Austrian army, rising to the rank of sergeant. He was 
then discharged, after which he remained for a year with his parents and on the 
expiration of that period came to the new world, attracted by the broader 
business opportunities which he believed he might secure on this side of the 
Atlantic. He located first at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he was employed 
in connection with railroad work and also in the mines. There he remained until 
1898, in which year he removed to the west with Rock Springs as his destina- 
tion. He arrived in Sweetwater county on the 27th of August of that year and 
secured employment in No. i mine, where he worked until July 5, 1904. In the 
meantime, however, ambitious to engage in business on his own account, he 
carefully saved his earnings until his capital was sufficient to enable him to 
establish a dry goods store. He began with a very small stock of goods, which, 
however, he has increased in order to meet the growing demands of his trade 
and he today has a large and well appointed store. He began business in a 
room ten by twenty-five feet and today occupies a building fifty by one hundred 
and fifty feet, having a very complete stock of new merchandise, representing 
the latest output of the manufacturers. He also owns the building in which 




JOHN KOSHIR 



344 HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 

he conducts his business and in addition he is the owner of one of the niosti 
attractive modern residences of Rock Springs, erected at a cost of ten thousand 
dollars. His business methods have been most progressive and his enterprise 
and persistency of purpose have carried him steadily forward to the goal of 
success. 

On the 13th of January, 1900, Mr. Koshir was united in marriage at Rock 
Springs to Miss Mary Zust. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party, of which he is a stanch champion. In 1909 he was elected to the state 
legislature and was again chosen to represent his district in the general assembly 
in 1915. He has given careful consideration to the vital questions which have 
come up for settlement and his reelection to office is proof of the confidence 
reposed in him by his fellow townsmen and their recognition of his public 
spirit. 

Mr. Koshir is numbered among the self-made men of Sweetwater county. 
He arrived in Rock Springs with a cash capital of but fifty cents and today he 
is one of the prosperous residents of the city, his success being indicated not 
only in his mercantile establishment but also by his investments in real estate, 
which are considerable. Whatever he undertakes he carries forward to success- 
ful completion and he has never had occasion to regret his determination to 
come to America, for here he has found the opportunities which he sought and 
in their utilization he has advanced steadily, step by step, to the goal of success. 



CLIFFORD C. SMITH. 

Clifford C. Smith is manager for the Golden Rule Mercantile Company and 
in this connection is conducting one of the leading commercial enterprises of 
Evanston. His business is growing steadily as the result of well defined plans 
and purposes which are intelligently executed. He has ever recognized the fact 
that satisfied patrons are the best advertisement and he has therefore put forth 
earnest desire to please his customers, while at the same time he has been thor- 
oughly reliable in all of his dealings. 

He was born October 27, 1877. at Upper Jay, New York, a son of Henry G. 
and Elizabeth (Williams) Smith. The father, now deceased, was a native of 
Massachusetts and represented one of the families of that state of Scotch lineage. 
The founder of the family in the new world was Galushia Smith, who upon 
coming to America settled on Cape Cod. Later representatives of the name re- 
moved to New York when that section of the country was yet sparsely settled. 
Henry G. Smith became a successful merchant of L-pper Jay, New York, where 
he was reared, educated and spent his entire life, passing away in 1909 at the 
age of fifty-four years. His political endorsement was stanchly given to the 
democratic party and he did everything in his power to promote its success and 
to uphold high civic standards. He was called upon to fill various public of- 
fices, the duties of which he discharged with marked promptness, capability and 
fidelity. His religious faith was that of the Methodist church and he was a 
devout Christian. His wife was born in the Empire state and was descended 
from one of its old families of Scotch lineage. One of the great-great-grand- 
fathers of Clitiford C. Smith was a Mohawk Indian chief. His wife had come 
to .America in young girlhood and became the wife of the chief. Mrs. Smith, 
mother of Cliltord C. Smith, is still living and now makes her home in Denver, 
Colorado. By her marriage she had a family of three children, namely : Clifford 
C. ; H. Vernon, who is engaged in ranching in the Red River valley at Torring- 
ton, near Casper, Wyoming; and Caroline, who is with her mother in Denver. 

Cliiiford C. Smith is indebted to the public schools of Plattsburg, New York, 
for the educational opportunities which were accorded him. He mastered the 
branches that constituted the curriculum, including work of the high school, and 



HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 345 

then started out to earn his own hving when a youth of fourteen years. He 
was first employed at clerical work along mercantile lines in his native city and 
afterward engaged in business on his own account as a dealer in dry goods, 
groceries and other lines, devoting his attention to the business at Upper Jay, 
New York, from 1906 until igo.S inclusive. He then disposed of his business 
on account of the ill health of his wife and removed to the west, hoping that 
a change of climate would pro\e beneficial. He located in Denver. Colorado, 
where he entered the employ of 1'. J. McEnery. a dealer in men's furnishings. 
He continued in that position for four and a half years and then resigned pre- 
paratory to remo\ing to Wyoming, where he arrived on the ist of December, 
19 1 3, taking up his abode in Kvanston. He became connected with the Golden 
Rule Mercantile Company as a clerk and worked his way steadilv upward, 
being advanced from one position to another of larger responsibility until he 
became manager and a member of the firm. He has thus directed its interests for 
the past three years and is today at the head of one of the leading mercantile 
enterprises of the west. The Golden Rule store is the expression of the spirit of 
western progress which has dominated the upbuilding of the country and the 
establishment is one of the best in the state. It is modern in every particular 
and a complete line of goods is carried, while something of the volume of trade 
is indicated in the fact that the companv emplovs on an average fourteen sales 
people and occupies store space which on one floor is one hundred and twenty- 
five by fifty feet and on another floor two himdred and fifty-one bv one hundred 
and twenty-five feet. The store faces on both Main and Front streets, extend- 
ing from one thoroughfare to the other. The business has assumed gratifving 
proportions and the underlying feature of its present day success and prosperity 
is the enterprise, business judgment and ability of Mr. Smith. 

On the 6th of June, 1902. Mr. Smith was married in Kingston. Xew York, 
to Miss Agnes Lahey. a native of the Empire state and a daughter of Air. and 
Mrs. Martin Lahey. now deceased. Two children were born to Air. and Airs. 
Smith: ClilTord, who was born January 3. 1904. in the Empire state and died 
in February of the same year; and Madeline E.. who was born at Upper Jay, 
Xew York. December 25, 1906. 

The religious faith of the parents is that of the Alethodist church, to the 
teachings of which they loyally adhere. Mr. Smith is a democrat in his political 
views and is a stanch advocate of the party but has always declined to become 
a candidate for office. He feels that the pursuits of private life are in them- 
selves abundantly worthy of his best efforts and he has so concentrated his 
efforts and attention upon his interests that the Inisiness under his control has 
constantly developed and grown. He coordinau-s seemingly diverse interests 
into a harmonious and unified whole and he nm^i readily discriminates between 
the essential and the nonessential in all bu-nic^.^ transactions. Today his estab- 
lishment has almost doubled in size and in \olume of trade since he assumed 
control and its growing success is the direct outcome of his labors. 



GEORGE W. FATTERSOX. 

George W. Fatterson. attorney at law and court stenographer for the second 
judicial district of Wyoming, has been a resident of Laramie for almost twenty 
years and has become most widely and favorably known during this period. He 
was born in Fort Collins. Colorado, July 21. 1880. an only son in the family of 
Arthur H. and Marion (W'atrous) Patterson. His parents were early settlers 
of that section of Colorado. The father was one of the three landowners who 
donated the site for the Colorado State Agricultural School and his old home- 
stead is now the site of the main building of that institution. 

George W. Fatterson was reared at Fort Collins and acquired his early edu- 
cation in the schools there. In August. 1899, he came to Laramie, where he 



346 HISTORY OF WYOAIIXG 

concluded his literary studies by attending the University of Wyoming for five 
years. He had taken a course in shorthand at the Colorado State Agricultural 
School, supplemented by additional instruction in stenography through corre- 
spondence schools as well as home study, so that when appointed court stenog- 
rapher on the 1st of October, 1905, he was fully capable of filling the important 
position, in which he has since continued. Pie ranks today as one of the most 
competent and efficient men in his line in the state. He has always been a close 
student, possesses notable energy and laudable ambition and has thereby from 
time to time given his leisure to preparation for the practice of law. He pursued 
the course of the Blackstone Law School in Chicago and in April, 1918, was ad- 
mitted to the bar. 

On the 3d of October. 1906. in Laranfie, Air. Patterson was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Dorothy Reed, a daughter of W. H. Reed, at one time paleontolo- 
gist of the University of Wyoming. Mrs. Patterson was graduated from the 
University of Wyoming in the class of 1904 and later successfully taught school, 
Ijecoming' principal of the schools at Meeteetse, Wyoming, while for a period she 
also taught in the schools of Cheyenne. 

In politics Mr. Patterson is a stanch democrat and takes a keen interest in 
the success and growth of his party. He is a valued citizen of Laramie, with 
great faith in its future, and has whenever opportunity offered made investment 
in real estate and has built four attractive residences in this city, three of which 
he has sold. He has a host of friends here — friends who admire him greatly 
by reason of his cordial manner, his clean life, his uniform courtesy and his up- 
rightness of character. 



DA\"ID XIMMO. 



David Nimmo, president of the Union Mercantile Association of Cheyenne, 
and thus actively connected with commercial interests of the city, spent the first 
twenty years of his life in Scotland, the land of crag and glen, of mountain 
peak and mountain lake, of lowland, heath and plain. Of liberty, poetry and 
song, whose heroes and whose sons have honored Britain's flag on every field, 
from Waterloo, the Crimea and Lucknow to the Marne and Ypres. 

Mr. Ximmo was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on the 19th of September, 
1870, his parents being David and Mary (Baird) Nimmo. The father was a 
cattle dealer, devoting his life to that business, and both have now passed away, 
the mother's death having occurred in 19 17. Their family numbered seven chil- 
dren, four sons and three daughters, of whom David was the third in order 
of birth. 

Spending his youthful days under the parental roof, David Nimmo profited 
by the instruciinn hr received in the graded schools of Scotland and in the school 
of experience he .iKm learned many valuable lessons. He continued in Scotland 
until about twenty years of age, when he bade adieu to friends and native country 
and crossed the Atlantic to the new world. He did not tarry on the Atlantic 
coast but made his way direct to Cheyenne and in connection with his brother. 
.\lexander Nimmo. engaged in the meat business for a period of seventeen years, 
or until 1907. With the Hofi'mans. ex-Governor Brooks and Richardson Broth- 
ers of Cheyenne he is interested in the Chihuahua Lumber Company of Mexico 
and, because of it. went to Mexico, where he remained for a short time. After- 
ward he returned to Cheyenne and purchased, in connection with others, the 
business conducted under the name of the Union ^Mercantile Association. He 
was elected president of the company, in which capacity he is still serving, and 
is now largely directing the interests and activities of the organization which, 
wisely and intelligently controlled, is bringing substantial success to the stock- 
holders. 'Mr. Nimmo is also still interested with his brother in ranching, under 




DAVID NIMMO 



348 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

the name of the Nimmo Live Stock Company, and together they have stock 
ranches on Horse creek and on Bear creek. 

In August, 1S94, was celebrated the marriage of David Nimmo and JNIiss 
Helen L. Kingham, a native of England. Their living children are Mary, Ethel, 
Helen. Thomas Bruce, Jean and John. Two sons, William and David, are 
deceased. The religious faith of the parents is that of the Episcopal church. 

Mr. Nimmo votes with the republican party, has served as a member of the 
city, council and is now one of the city commissioners. Thoroughly imbued with 
the American «spirit, he puts forth every effort to advance the interests of the 
city and state with which his affairs are allied. By persistent efTort in business 
he has pushed his way to the front and his record is creditable alike to the city 
and to the land of his adoption. 



JAMES P. ROSENBERG. 

James P. Rosenberg is actively identified with public interests in Lincoln 
county, filling the position of deputy county assessor and that of city clerk of 
Kemmerer. He is also well known in business circles as a representative of 
insurance interests. 

He was born in Westchester, New York, January 17, 1859, and is a son of 
John and Eliza ( Mattingly ) Rosenberg, the former a native of Hamburg, Ger- 
many, while the latter w^as born in Windsor, England. They came to America 
as young people and settled in the state of New York, where the father en- 
gaged in educational work, conducting a boys' school at Westchester, New 
York, for some time. Later he removed to San Antonio, Te.xas, where he was 
in charge of St. Mary's College. He later became an Episcopalian minister 
and while acting as pastor of a church at Portland, Oregon, he was called to 
his final rest, his death occurring in 1889, when he was sixty-four years of 
age. He was a gentleman of liberal education and culture, with whom asso- 
ciation meant expansion and elevation. During the period of the Civil war he 
had responded to the call of his adopted country for military aid and enlisted 
in a regiment of New York \'olunteers, in which he was made assistant quarter- 
master, serving in that connection throughout the entire war. He long survived 
his wife, who passed away in the Empire state in 1865. In their family were 
four children : George, now living in Portland, Oregon ; Ernest, who is located 
at Seattle, Washington ; Fred, who died at Brenham, Texas ; and James P., who 
was the second in order of birth. 

Reared in an atmosphere of culture and refinement, well descended and 
well bred, James P. Rosenberg has made for himself a creditable position in 
connection with those activities which have occupied his attention during the 
period of his manhood. As a boy he was a pupil in his father's school in New 
York at Westchester and also attended the grammar school and the military 
school at Portland, Oregon. He then took up the study of engineering but did 
not complete his course in that direction. He afterward went to eastern Oregon 
on account of his health and while there he was employed in various lines of 
engineering work and at mining. He likewise engaged in teaching school for 
a time and afterward removed to Wyoming, where he spent a number of years 
as a cowboy in the employ of prominent cattlemen of the state. While thus 
engaged he drove cattle across the states of Idaho, Oregon and Wyoming and 
many times over the plains where the city of Kemmerer now stands. He took 
up his aliode in Kemmerer to assume charge of one of the large coal mines of 
the place as superintendent and at length resigned his position in that connec- 
tion to assume the duties of editor of the Kemmerer Camera, a weekly paper, 
which had a wide circulation. He continued to edit this paper until it changed 
hands, spending three years in editorial work. He was then elected justice of 
the peace and in addition to performing the duties of that office he opened and 



HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 349 

conducted a real estate office, continuing successfully in that field for eighteen 
years. In 1915 he was appointed city clerk and in 1916 was elected to the of- 
fice, which position he is now tilling in connection with his duties along other 
lines. He is capable and resourceful and has i)r(i\cn his loyalty to the general 
welfare in several public offices. He served fur the second term as deputy 
sheriff of Fremont county and has been deput\ assessor of Lincoln county for 
one term. He was also water commissioner for a number of years and he 
has made a most excellent record by his marked fidelitv to the general good. 
His political allegiance has always been given to the de'mocratic party and he 
keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day. 

On the 20th of September, 1893, Mr. Rosenberg was united in marriage to 
Miss Annie E. Clifford, of Soda Springs, Idaho, who passed away in August, 
1914. She was of English lineage, her parents ha\ing been born in England. 
By that marriage there were six children. CliiTord, born in Soda Springs, Idaho, 
in 1894, attended the public schools of Kemmerer and is now working in that 
city. Bert, born in Soda Springs in 1895, is now with the United States Army 
as a member of Company D, One Hundred and Forty-seventh Machme Gun 
Battalion, at Camp Mills. Jessie E., born at Soda Springs in 1897, attended high 
school and is now at home. LeRoy, born at Soda Springs, November 11, 1898, 
is also at Camp Mills as a member of Company A and is acting clerk to the 
major of his regiment. He was formerly deputy clerk of the court and assis- 
tant editor of the Kemmerer Camera. Ralph, born in 1903, is a sophomore in 
high school. William, born in 1908, is a pupil in the graded schools. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rosenberg hold membership in the Episcopal church and 
socially are prominent in the community where they make their home. Mr. 
Rosenberg was formerly identified , with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks and he now has membership with the Woodmen of the World. He is a 
self-made man who has worked his way upward entirely on his own account. 
He drove cattle through the states of Oregon, Idaho and Wyoming in 1877 and 
1878 and saw some very exciting times. He has lived to witness remarkable 
changes as the work of progress and civilization has been carried forward and 
he stands today with those who have been most active and helpful in bringing 
about the changes leading to modern day progress, improvement and prosperity. 



MRS. ZELA M. :\IURPHY. 

Mrs. Zela M. Murphy, of Basin, is filling the position of county clerk in 
Bighorn county and her systematic work and efficiency have made her a most 
valuable incumbent in the office. Mrs. Murphy is a native of Sedalia, Missouri, 
and a daughter of Harlow A. and Maria L. (Linnabary) Longshore, both of 
whom were natives of Ohio, where they were reared and married. In 1876 they 
removed westward to Missouri, where they lived for a year and later took up 
their abode in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The father was a ship contractor and 
died at Jacksonville, Florida, in the year 1896. The mother survived him for a 
long period and passed away on the 14th of March, 1917. In their family were 
three children. Mrs. Zela ^L Murphy, however, is today the only surviving mem- 
ber of the family. 

"She was reared and educated in. Paris, Illinois, where she attended the com- 
mon schools, and later she had the benefit of instruction in a Chattanooga acad- 
emy in Tennessee. In 1900 she came to Bighorn county, Wyoming, where she 
devoted her attention to the profession of teaching for one term. In 1901 she 
gave her hand in marriage to William W. Alurphy, a native of Harrison county, 
Iowa, who had removed to Wyoming in 1898 and settled on a ranch near Lovell. 
Later he engaged in the insurance and real estate business at Lovell and even- 
tually removed to Basin, \\here he is still engaged in the same line of business. 



350 HISTORY OF WYO.MIXG 

It was in the year 1909 that Mrs. Murphy was elected county treasurer of 
Bighorn county and occupied that position for two terms. In 1914 she was 
elected county clerk, so that for a number of years she has been continuously in 
public office. Prior to her official service she acted as assistant cashier in a bank 
at Lovell for four years. She is a member of the Woman's Club of \\'yoming, 
also has membership with the Royal Neighbors and Mr. Murphy is identified with 
the Alodern Woodmen of America. They are widely and favorably known in 
Basin, where the hospitality of the best homes is freely accorded them. }ilrs. 
Murphy's official record is indeed creditable and enviable, as is indicated by the 
fact tliat she has four times been chosen to public office here. 



REV. JOHN F. MORETON. 

Rev. John F. Moreton, pastor of St. Mary ^Magdalen's Roman Catholic 
church at Evanston, is a native of Rhode Island. He was born on the 6th of 
June, 1S89, in Warren, that state, a son of William and Rose A. (Burke) ^lore- 
ton. The father is a native of Wales and about 1880 came to America. He 
is now residing in Providence, Rhode Island, and has devoted his life to the busi- 
ness of a silversmith. His wife is a native of England and to them were born 
eleven children, five sons and six daughters, of whom nine are yet living. 

Rev. John F. Moreton was the fourth in order of birth in that family. He 
acquired his early education in the public schools of Providence, Rhode Island, 
and afterward attended the Christian Brothers College at Providence, Rhode 
Island, from which he was graduated with the class of 1908. He later spent 
one year in La Salle Academy, where he engaged in post-graduate work, and 
having qualified for the priesthood, he entered St. Mary's Seminary in Baltimore, 
Mary-land, in 1909 and continued with his studies until November, 1914. His 
ordination services were conducted by the Rt. Rev. Bishop P. A. McGovern. 
, His first assignment was that of assistant pastor in the cathedral and his first 
pastorate was at Evanston, where he took up his duties in January', 1915. Since 
that time he has been in active and continuous service at Evanston and he also 
conducts a mission at Fort Bridger. He has done excellent work since arriving 
in Wyoming and the different lines of church activity are well organized. Father 
Moreton has a brother, Joseph ]\Ioreton, who is now studying for the priesthood, 
and his sister Rose has taken the vows and is known as Sister Romanus of the 
Order of !Mercy. She is located in Providence. The parents are devout mem- 
bers of the Catholic church and reared their family in the faith, to which all 
have closely adhered. 



FRED E. PLACE. 



Fred E. Place was reared and educated in the Pine Tree state and when a 
young man he left New England for the west. He came to Wyoming when it 
was a territory, and worked as a cowboy on the range and later settled on 
Bates creek, where he took up a claim and engaged in the live stock business on 
his own account, devoting his attention to that pursuit until 1903, when he took 
up his abode in Casper. He then concentrated his attention upon surveying and 
in 1910 was elected to the position of clerk of the district court which office 
he continued to fill until 1917, when he resigned. 

In his political views Mr. Place has always been a stalwart republican and 
has exerted considerable influence over political thought and action. He was 
one of the first county commissioners of Natrona county, serving in that of- 
fice for one term, and as clerk and as commissioner he made a most creditable 
record for devotion to the eeneral sood. Fraternallv he is well known as a 



■: f 




HISTORY OF \\'VOMIXG 353 

Mason, belonging to Casper Lodge, Xo. 15, F. & A. AI. He is also a member 
of the Royal Arch Chapter and of the Order of the Eastern Star. He likewise 
has membership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with the 
Woodmen of the World. 

There is no phase of pioneer life in this section of Wyoming with which 
he is not familiar. He has lived here since this district was largely an open 
range and the cowboy was a picturesque figure as he rode over the country 
after stray herds of cattle. He has lived to see remarkable changes as the years 
have gone on and has borne his part in the work of general improvement and 
advancement. 



ERXEST SUXDIN. 



Ernest Sundin is one of the business men of Rawlins who has had a re- 
markable rise, advancing step by step from a hunilile environment to a place 
among the prosperous and prominent ranchers of the state. He is also the 
owner of the Depot Garage in Rawlins. 

He was born in Sweden. May i, 1863, a son of John and Josephine Sundin, 
who are also natives of that country and there have spent their lives, the father 
engaging in merchandising at Oscarheim. He is still residing there, but his 
wife passed away in 1902 at the age of seventy-eight years. In their family were 
ten children. 

Ernest Sundin, who was the tenth in order of birth in that family, attended 
the schools of Sweden and later assisted his father in the conduct of mercantile 
interests, but favorable reports reached hun from time to time concerning the 
opportunities of the new world and awakened in him a desire to tpy his fortune 
on this side of the Atlantic. Accordingly in 188 1 he severed home ties and 
sailed from his native land for America, taking up his abode in Illinois near 
Chicago. He was there employed for a year at farm labor and in 1882 made 
his way westward to Denver, where he worked for three years, accepting any 
employment that would yield him an honest living and enable him to gain a 
start. In 1885 he arrived in Rawlins, then a western frontier city, giving little 
promise of what the future held in store. He opened a barber shop, which he 
conducted successfully for a number of years, and with his accumulated sav- 
ings at length purchased a sheep ranch. He then disposed of his barber shop 
in order to concentrate his attention upon the sheep industry. His ranch is 
located in Carbon county and from the start he has made a success of this 
venture. His flocks have increased until he is now one of the most prominent 
sheep men of this state and the present high price of wool makes his a most 
profitable business. He is also connected with a number of commercial enter- 
prises in Rawlins and his cooperation is eagerly welcomed liecausc of his well 
known Inisiness judgment and keen sagacity. He establi>hc(l his parage in 1914 
and. like his other ventures, this has proven very profitable, lie is also a director 
in the Stock Growers Xational Bank of Rawlins and is a director and stock- 
holder of the Ferris Hotel Company. 

In April, 1886. Mr. Sundin was married to Miss Margaret Myre. of Laramie, 
and they have two ch'1(h-cii : LeRoy. born in Rawlins in 1SS7; and Clift'ord, born 
in 1892. Both snns are high school graduates and tlu eliler i> now assistant 
cashier of the Stock (, rower., Xational Bank of Rawlins, while die younger son 
is in business with his father. The former married Miss Rena Measure, of 
Rawlins, and they have one child, Ralph. Clifford Sundin wedded Miss Ruth 
Clemmons, of Colorado Springs. 

Mr. Sundin is well known as a prominent Mason and as a member of the 
:\Ivstic Shrine. He is always loyal to the teachings of the craft and the pur- 
poses which underlie the organization. He is also connected with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. His political allegiance is given to the republi- 



354 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

can party, which he has supported since he received the right of franchise. He 
served as justice of the peace for a number of years and was chairman of the 
board of county commissioners for several years. He is loyal and progressive 
in all matters of citizenship and while his business affairs have constantly grown 
and developed he has ever found time to aid in measures and movements for 
the general good. 



HANS LARSEN. 



A record of continuous advancement and successful achievement is that of 
Hans Larsen, who is well known as a lumber dealer and as a contractor and 
builder of Rawlins. He was born May 19, 1867, in Jetsmark, Denmark, a son 
of the late Lars Christian Swenson, who was also a native of Denmark, where 
he followed agricultural pursuits throughout his active life. He passed away 
in 1908 at the age of seventy-eight years. His wife died in Jetsmark in 1884 
at the age of fifty years. They were the parents of two children, the daughter 
^larie being still a resident of Denmark. 

Hans Larsen was the other member of the family and was educated in the 
public schools of Jetsmark to the age of fourteen years, when his textbooks 
were put aside and he began to earn his own livelihood. He was first appren- 
ticed to the carpenter's trade, serving a four years" term of indenture, after 
which he followed the trade for several years in his native country. He then 
emigrated to the new world, crossing the Atlantic in 1887, and making his way 
to Nebraska City, Nebraska, ere he terminated his journey. There he engaged 
on section work on the Burlington & Missouri Railroad, working at the time 
the company, built its first bridge across the Missouri river at Nebraska City. 
He was employed on the construction of the bridge and continued to work for 
the railroad company for eighteen months. He then went to Nysted, Nebraska, 
and there attended school for one winter's term, thus completing his education. 
He afterward removed to Rawlins, where he arrived in April, 1889, being at 
the time a comparative stranger. On his arrival he took up carpentering, which 
he followed as a journeyman for two years, and then entered the contracting 
business on his own account. He has since been active along that line and 
many important contracts have been awarded him, so that he has been closely 
associated with building operations in Rawlins. He is today the leading con- 
tractor of this section of the state, having a very extensive patronage. He 
erected the Elks' building in Rawlins and was a subcontractor on the high 
school building, on which he did all of the stone and cement work. He fur- 
nished the stone for building the postoffice at Cheyenne, the Ogden ( Utah ) 
postofiice and other important structures of the state. The stone material which 
he used has been supplied from quarries which Mr. Larsen owns and which 
are located in Carbon county, close to the city. There is no phase of building 
operations with which he is not familiar and his activities along that line have 
been of an important character. He likewise conducts a hardware store and 
lumberyard and in the latter is found every kind of building material, his 
business by reason of its volume and importance making him the leading dealer 
in that line in his section of the state. 

Mr. Larsen was married in Rawlins. Wyoming, to Miss Mary Schmidt, a 
native of Germany, who came from Schleswig-Holstein, which was at one time 
under Danish government. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Larsen: 
Louis Christian, trained at American Lake. Washington, training camp, for 
active military duty and now in France, a member of the Twentieth Engineers 
of Forestry; Katherina, who is the wife of C. L. Haynes, a resident of Rawlins; 
Lorenze Peter, who is a carpenter and works with his father in Rawlins ; Henry 
.Schmidt, who is attending the Rawlins high school ; John William, also attend- 
ing high school ; and Elsie Marie, who is still in the public schools. The eldest 




HANS LABSEN 



356 HISTORY OF WVO.AIIXG 

son spent three years in the University of \\'yoming, leaving in the senior vear 
for mihtary duties. 

PoHtically Mr. Larsen is a democrat and served for one term as mayor of 
Rawhns, while for six years he occupied the position of city trustee. He was 
twice a candidate for the state legislature. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Elks, the Odd Fellows and the Woodmen of the World and his religious faith 
is indicated by his membership in the Lutheran church. He came to America 
on borrowed capital, a poor boy, and today he is one of the substantial and 
progressive men of Carbon county, respected by all, not alone because of what 
he has achieved^ but also by reason of the straightforvvard business principles 
which he has ever followed in his undertakings. 



HON. JOHN C. FRIEND. 

The fortunes of war brought Judge John C. I'riend to ^^'yoming and choice 
has continued him as a resident of this state. Having enlisted for service in the 
Civil war as a member of an Ohio regiment, his command was ordered m the 
western frontier and he became so interested in this section of the ct)untr\- that 
he decided to remain and has since been one of the honored settlers of \\ yoniing. 
He is acquainted with every phase of pioneer life in this part of the country 
and has lived to see the remarkable changes which have occurred as the years 
have passed on. In fact, he has borne his full share in the work of general 
progress and development and is today one of the honored and valued citizens of 
Rawlins, where he is serxing as justice of the peace and as notary public and is 
also engaged in the conduct of an insurance agency. 

He was born in Chandlerville. Cass county. Illinois, July i6, 1847, and is a 
son of Ezekiel Friend, a nati\e of I'enn>yl\ania. The founder of the American 
branch of the family was John I-'riend, who came from Prussia in 1790 and set- 
tled in the Keystone state, taking u\) his abode at Germantown, near Philadel- 
phia. He was a baker by trade and after coming to the new world followed 
merchandising. In 1830 he migra.ted westward with his family, taking up his 
abode in Cass county, Illinois, and later he became a resident of ]\Iason county, 
Illinois, where he followed farming until his demise, which occurred in i860, 
when he was between seventy-five and eighty years of age. 

Ezekiel Friend was reared and educated in Philadelphia and took up the pro- 
fession of medicine as a life work, preparing for active practice as a student 
in the University of Pennsyhaiiia, from which he was graduted on completing 
a course in the medical department. He then accompanied his parents to Illi- 
nois, where he entered upnn tlie practice of medicine and surgery and also devoted 
a portion of his time to farming. He remained in Mason county from 1854 to 
the time of his death, his life's labors l)eing ended in 1892, when he was seventy- 
eight years of age, his birth having occurred in 1814. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Mary Ann Elizabeth Rhea and was a native of Kentucky. She was 
descended from a family of Scotch descent that was represented in \'irginia and 
in Kentucky from early pioneer times. The death of Mrs. Friend occurred in 
Illinois in 1849 at- the birth of the younger of her two children. 

Judge Friend of this review, the only surviving member of the family, spent 
his youthful days upon the old home farm in Illinois to the age of sixteen years, 
when he started out to provide for his own support, but any personal ambition 
that he may have had was put aside, for the country needed his services and 
his patriotic spirit was aroused. He was a youth of but sixteen years when 
on the 3d of August, 1863, he enlisted at Benton Barracks as a member of 
Company G, Eleventh Ohio Cavalry, with which he served for three years. His 
regiment was sent to the west and he participated in the battle of Platte Bridge, 
Wyoming, on the 24th of July, i86_s. ^^'ith his company he was then sent to 
Fort Laramie in September, 1865. Before this in the summer of 1864 he was 



HISTORY OF WYO-MIXG 357 

stationed at Deer Creek and also at Platte Bridge. The command was also sta- 
tioned for a time at Sweetwater Bridge and at other points in the state in order 
to suppress the uprisings of the Indians. During this period Judge Friend par- 
ticipated in a number of engagements with the Indians but was never wounded. 
After leaving the arm)' he continued in the west learning the vocation of a teleg- 
rapher, and was first stationed for tclegra])h duty at Deer Creek. Wvoming. He 
was later at Horseshoe and arrived at the former place on the 6th of Au-u-t. 1866, 
and was there when the ranch and buildings were destroyed bv the Induins. In 
the following winter he went to Horseshoe and he continued in the telegraph 
ser\ice for ten years. Subsequently he settled at Big Laramie, where he spent 
the winter of 1867, and was at Shennan in 186S. He then went east, but in 
1869 returned to Rawlins, where he continued in telegraph work, taking charge 
of the Rawlins office in 1870 and continuing in that capacil\ for two years. Later 
in connection with others, he opened the Rawlins jjaint mines, slii]>ping the ore 
to Salt Lake. He was associated with W. M. Masi. bibn C. Dyer, Harry Roach, 
P. T. De\-ald and others, who were the original lucatDrs (it their placer mining 
claim. In this business they were quite successful and .Mr. I'riend was identified 
with mining interests for a number of years, or until railroad freight rates 
became so e.xorbitant that the owners of the mine and others incorporated the 
Raw'ins Metallic Paint Company and the product of the mine was then manu- 
factured into mineral paints. In 1874 Judge Friend sold one carload of paint to 
Sidney Dillon, president of the L'nion Pacific Railway Company, which was 
shipped to the east, and was the first used on Brooklyn bridge. The business 
was carried on for a number of years ])ut eventually the plant was destroyed by 
fire. Judge Friend conducteil his mining claim until 1882, when he sold the prop- 
erty to the L'nion Pacific Railwa\' I'onipany that has since further developed it. 
Later he entered the fiekl of journalism and was a partner of W. T. Shaffer in 
the establishment and ]iu1ilication of the first paper in Carbon county in 1878, 
called the Carbon County News, judge l-'riend remaining active in the conduct 
of the paper for a short period. 

In public affairs Judge Friend has long figured prominently. He served in the 
second, third and fifth territorial legislatures of Wyoming, first representing 
Carbon county in the house in ^>^Ji. lie represented Carbon and Sweetwater 
counties in the eotined in 1X7:; .ind again represented Carbon county in the house 
in 1877. He ha^ ,ilso filled the office of deputy county clerk and deputy county 
treasurer, acting in those capacities for many years. He has been a most earnest 
and star.ich supporter of the deiuocratic party, doing everything in his power to 
promote its growth and extend its influence. In Noveiuber, 1879; he purchased 
the Carbon County Journal, of which he was editor and manager, conducting tnat 
paper until September, 1892. The following year he went to Casper, where he 
was manager and editor of the Derrick for three months, and from 1807 until 
1903 he was employed in the shops of the Union Pacific Railro;id Company. 
At the latter date he was chosen for the office of city luarsnal al Kawlins and 
continued to act in that capacity until 1907. In 1908 he was elected ju-tice of 
the peace and with the exception of two years spent in travel he has since served 
as presiding judge over the justice court, in which he has ren.lered decisions 
strictly fair and impartial, "winning him golden opinions from all sorts of 
people." He has also engaged in the insurance business since 1912 and writes 
a considerable amount of insurance each year, thus adding materially to his 
income. 

On the 7th of August, 1882, in F\aiiston, Wx.miing. Judi^c iM-iend was 
united in marriage to Miss Leah Welch, a nati\e of ( li^.len. Ctah, and ;i daugh- 
ter of Charles and Elizabeth ( Newey ) \\eleh. who were of a pioneer family of 
Utah. Mrs. Friend passed away in Rawlins. February 4, 1894, at the age of 
thirty-three years. By her marriage she had Ijecome the mother of five children, 
four'of whom are living. The eldest, Claude Edward, who was born in Rawlins, 
passed away in St. Louis, Missouri, where he was then residing. The others 
are: Margaret Elizabeth, the wife of J. H. Jacobucci, manager of the Rawlins 



358 HISTORY OF WYOAIIXG 

electric light plant and a dealer in automobile supplies; Alabel Grace, the wife 
of Harley Williams, an automobile dealer residing at Big Timber, Montana ; Fred 
Cleveland, who is connected with the Union Pacific at Rawlins; and James 
Eugene, who is general foreman for the Texas & Pacific Railroad and resides 
at Baird, Texas. 

Fraternally Judge Friend is connected with Custer Post, No. i, G. A. R., at 
Laramie, and also belongs to the Knights of Pythias, being for many years the 
representative of the local lodge in the grand lodge. As an honored veteran of 
the Civil war. he is widely known and even more widely as one of the pioneers of 
Wyoming. For fifty-five years he has resided in this state. It seemed that the 
work of progress and development had scarcely been begun at the time of his 
arrival. In fact, he came to subdue the Indians, who were a menace to all life 
and property on the western frontier at that time. He has witnessed all of the 
changes which have occurred and the work that has been done toward reclaim- 
ing this region for purposes of civilization. A marked transformation has been 
wrought and in the de\elopment of the county Judge Friend has taken an active 
and helpful part. Those who know him esteem him highly and he has a very 
extensive circle of friends. Xo history of Wyoming would be complete without 
reference to him because of the important part which he has played in promoting 
the development and upbuilding of Wyoming. 



EDWARD I\"IXSOX. 



The history of Wyoming or that of any state is the record of the lives of 
those people whose activities have had to do with its upbuilding and develop- 
ment. Judged by this standard, there are few, if any, men living in Wyoming 
today whose life record constitutes a more important chapter on the pages of 
Wyoming's history than does that of Edward Ivinson, pioneer banker, philan- 
thropist and a most honored and beloved resident of Laramie. 

He was born on the St. Croix River Estate, West Indies, September 20, 1830, 
his parents being Thomas J. and Sarah ( Hewiston) Ivinson. The father was 
born in Cumrew, England, and from there went to the West Indies, where he 
became a well known sugar planter, spending his remaining days in that group 
of islands, his death there occurring in 1850, when he had reached the age of 
sixty-six years. 

Edward Ivinson was educated in England at Craft-House Academy, Bramp- 
ton, and on entering upon his business career there served an apprenticeship at 
the dry goods trade. He came to America when a young man and in X^ew York 
city was in the employ of Lord & Taylor, well known importers and merchants 
in the wholesale and retail dry goods trade. After a few years in New York, 
Mr. Ivinson removed to the west, settling in Evansville, Indiana, where for some 
time he was paymaster for the Evansville & Crawfordsville Railroad. It was 
while acting in that capacity that he was presented on the 3d of November, 
1857, with a handsome solid gold watch and chain by the employes of the road. 
He treasures this timepiece highly, even though it is more than sixty years since 
it was presented to him, and while it is of considerable intrinsic worth, its value 
as a matter of sentiment would be difficult to estimate. 

Previous to locating in Wyoming, Mr. Ivinson was for a time connected with 
mercantile interests and also with the cotton trade in Memphis, Tennessee. Sub- 
sequently he became interested in the business of contracting for supplies for 
camps along the Union Pacific line, which was then building. In 1867 he went 
to Cheyenne, Wyoming, and in February, 1868, arrived in Laramie, at which 
time trains were not yet in operation for passengers. Mr. Ivinson erected a 
store building on the lot adjoining what is now the Albany County Bank on 
Second street, and soon afterward ofl^ered a general line of merchandise to the 
shifting population of a "thirty-day town," as most of the towns springing up 




^^^^^^^l^'t^-^i^C-^^ 



//t ./uj A i(/A/i/of rf ///A //^n r 



u/rfi/- 




y / ( j/.ji 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 363 

at that time were then called. In addition to merchandising he was engaged in 
the tie business, furnishing ties for the Union Pacific Railroad. Whatever he 
undertook he carried forward to successful completion, for in his vocabulary 
there was no such word as fail. :\Ir. Ivinson disposed of his mercantile interests 
and in 187 1 established the first private bank in Laramie, which he conducted 
two years. This he later merged into the Wyoming National Bank, in which he 
was the prime mover and became the sole proprietor. In later years, when the 
Wyoming National was absorbed by the First National Bank, Mr. Ivinson was 
one of the heavy holders in the latter institution and its president for a number 
of years. In fact, under his careful and able management it became one of the 
foremost financial institutions in the state. Mr. Ivinson was for eighteen years 
president of the Merchants National Bank of San Diego, California, in which 
city he was extensively interested along business lines, maintaining a winter resi- 
dence there for a number of years. Since 1916 he has retired from active 
business to the extent that retirement is possible for one of his wonderful activity 
and extensive private interests. 

On the 2ist of April, 1854, in Jersey City, New Jersey, Mr. Ivinson was 
united in marriage to ]\Iiss Jane Wood, a native of West Riding, Yorkshire, 
England. This happy event in his life contributed largely to his success, as he 
was most fortunate in his selection of a wife. I'heirs was largely an ideal com- 
panionship. Whatever was of interest to one was of vital importance to the 
other. Their plans and purposes relative to everything that came into their lives 
were freely discussed and they worked together for the accomplishment of given 
ends, the sound judgment and keen insight of Mrs. Ivinson often supplementing 
and rounding out the business experience of her husband. Thus as the years 
passed on their mutual love and confidence increased as they shared together 
in the joys and sorrows, the adversity and prosperity which checker the careers 
of all. They celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary on the 21st of April, 
[904, when at }kIaennerchor Hall they held a reception for their friends, and 
later a banquet was served in the Union Pacific Hotel. This was a most impor- 
tant social event in the life of the city, and the high esteem in which they were 
helfl is shown by the large number of people who were present on that occasion. 
On the 21st nf April, 1914, their sixtieth wedding anniversary was celebrated, 
when more than two hundred and fifty citizens of Laramie and the state called 
to pay their respects and express their happy felicitations to this worthy couple, 
who for six decades had traveled life's journey as man and wife, gatherinsj all 
that was best and noblest from their experiences and shedding around them 
much of life's sunshine. Mrs. Ivinson had come to Laramie in May, 1868, a 
few months after her husband, and was a passenger on the first regular passenger 
train into the city. She was a woman of great force of character and strong 
individuality. From the first she assisted in the work of the church in Laramie, 
in the organization of the first Sunday school and in the first lodge among 
^vomen. having become a charter member of the Rebekah Lodge of Laramie. 
Her philanthropies were broad, her benevolences many and yet so unostentatious 
was her giving that many times only she and the recipient knew of the kind act. 
She was always prominent in the charity work of the community and had her 
part in e\ery movement that had for its object the uplift of her fellowmen and 
the upbuilding of the city. When death called her on the 9th of Novembdr. 
1015, one of the local papers said editorially: "The death of ]\Irs. Edward 
Ivinson on Tuesday has caused sorrow all over the city and county. Few 
persons have more closely associated their lives with the intimate life of the 
community than have she and her Inisliand. They came when the city was so 
new that there was not a wooden building here, and with the exception of brief 
intervals they have made their abiding place here. It can be truthfully said of 
Iioth that thev brought their whole lives into the midst of the living here 
and long ago became a part and parcel of the great throbbing heart of the city. 
Mrs. Ivinson will be sadly missed. Her cheery smile, her kindly word of greet- 
ing, lier indomitable spirit of having a prominent part in every undertaking that 



364 HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 

made for the betterment of the comnuinity, her desire to alleviate suffering, and 
above all, her disposition to see that the city was properly regarded by the 
transient visitor, have made her a woman that can ill be spared at this time. 
Her individuality asserted itself on many occasions. Nothing was ever started 
that would tend to help in the social, religious, intellectual and economic for- 
warding of the people toward a higher goal that she was not interested in, and 
if she was not personally associated with the movement, her aid, her counsel 
and her purse were often at the call of those who were. Mr. Ivinson has tilled 
an important place in the city's growth and everybody who respected and revered 
his wife is extending to him the wish that his life may be spared many years. 
To the members of the family the community owes a certain debt of gratitude 
and there is not one of us who will not wish for the bereaved husband and 
daughter every good gift within the power of the Most High to bestow. As 
the community will miss the wife and mother, so will it bestow upon those left 
behind the benisons of well wishes and earnest prayer for their guidance and 
comfort." Only those who have suffered such bereavment could understand 
the loss to Mr. Ivinson, so closely was his life and that of his wife intertwined 
in their interests, their activities and their ideals. Her splendid counsel, sound 
advice and inspiration were of great help to her husband. They were perfectly 
at one in their plans for philanthropy and as a memorial to his wife he erected 
the Ivinson Hospital in Laramie, making it one of the leading institutions of the 
kind in the state. 

He has been prominently identified with philanthropic work, has been treas- 
■ urer of the State Union and very active in church work. He erected the tower 
on St. ^Matthew's Episcopal church of Laramie and installed therein the chimes 
and clock. According to the terms of his will, his beautiful residence in Laramie 
will be given to the state as an old ladies' home upon his death. His improve- 
ments upon the Episcopal cathedral alone have cost thirty-five thousand dollars. 
He has given most generously to aid the needy aside from his splendid benefac- 
tions to the Old Ladies' Home and the Ivinson Hospital and is continually 
extending a helping hand to those who need assistance or encouragement. This 
is done not from any sense of duty but from the keenest interest in the welfare 
of his fellowmen. Xo man more fully recognizes the teaching of the brother- 
hood of man and throughout his entire life, although his business interests and 
cares have been many, he has ever found time to go about doing good. \'arious 
other interests have profited by the efforts, energy and co-operation of Mr. 
Ivinson, who has been a inember of the board of trustees of the University of 
Wyoming since it was created and who was the first treasurer of the university, 
in the affairs of which he has ever taken a most active and helpful part. 

Mr. Ivinson was an early member of Laramie Lodge, No. 2, I. O. O. F., 
and has filled all the offices in that lodge. In the church, too. he was called to 
official position, serving for many years as senior warden in St. Matthew's Epis- 
copal church. His association with Laramie dates from its earliest inception 
and covers connection with almost every enterprise of importance to the city, 
whether commercial, religious or social. He has always been prominent in 
aft'airs of the state, though not as a politician or seeking such reward, but as a 
business man and citizen. At any time that he has become active in political 
aft'airs it was been at the request of his friends, ^^'hile never holding important 
office, his advice has been sought by those who have, and he has had not a little 
to do with shaping that activity which resulted in separating from what was 
then Dakota the territory of Wyoming and which has led in time to the develop- 
ment of the state, admitted to the Union in 1890. For more than half a century 
he has also been a well known figure in the financial circles of Wyoming and 
thus his life along many lines has been of great worth to the community. 

In his eighty-eighth year, hale and vigorous, with a keen appreciation for a 
fishing or hunting excursion, in which it has been his custom for many years to 
indulge with success that bespeaks skill in both. ^Ir. Ivinson yet spends many 
pleasant hours in the pursuit of those things which are of interest to him. His 



HISTORY OF \\-YOMIXG 365 

has been notably the career of a successful man. He overcame difficulties and 
obstacles by unfaltering perse\erance and unabating energy and step by step 
he advanced until he attained a position of wealth. The most envious could not 
grudge him his success, so worthily was it won and so honorably has it been 
used. \Vhile his success in a business way should encourage others, showing what 
may be accomplished through indixiilual ftTorf. as he started out in life empty- 
handed, his high sense of personal h.ni.ir, liis integrity and fidelity to obligations 
to others should serve also as an in-.pnaii<iii to 'his'fellowmen. The world is 
better for his having lived and the love which is entertained for him throughout 
Wyoming is but the logical result of his upright life and his brotherly spirit. 



MATT MUIR. 



For more than a third of a century Matt Muir has been a resident of \\'yo- 
ming. He is now living retired at Rock Springs, enjoying the success which 
has come to him as the merited reward of his labors and judicious investments. 
There is particular satisfaction in reverting to his life history, since his mind 
bears the impress of the historic annals of the state from the early pioneer 
days, and, from the fact that he has ever been a loyal son of the republic and 
has attained to a position of distinctive prominence in the thriving little city 
in which he has so long made his home. Thirty-seven years have passed since 
he arrived in Wyoming and cast in his lot with its pioneers. People of the pres- 
ent period can scarcely realize the struggles and dangers which attended the 
early settlers, the heroism and self-sacrifice of lives passed upon the borders of 
civilization, the hardships endured, the diiificulties overcome. These tales of the 
early days read almost like a romance to those who have known only modern 
prosperity and conveniences. To the pioneer of the early days, far removed 
from the privileges and conveniences of the older east, the struggle for exis- 
tence was often a stern and hard one and these men and women must have 
possessed indomitable energy and sterling worth of character as well as marked 
physical courage when they thus voluntarily selected such a life and success- 
fully fought the battles under such circumstances as prevailed in the west. Mr. 
Muir was long connected with the development of the coal resources of the 
state and his activities along that line eventually brought to him the success 
which enabled him to live retired and yet enjoy all the comforts and conveniences 
that go to make life worth the living. 

He was born in .Mleganv county, Maryland. April 15, 1856, and is a son of 
John and Mary (Craig) Aluir, who were natives of Scotland. They came to 
America in the early '50s, settlitig in Tenns\l\ania. The voyage to the new world 
was made on one of the old-time sailing vessels and later they became i-e-^idents 
of Allegany county, Maryland, where the father engaged in coal mining, -pend- 
ing his last days in that locality, where he passed away after a residence there 
of forty-nine years. His wife also died in the same county in March. 11)15, 'it 
the notable old age of ninety-six years. In their family were nine children, of 
whom Matt ]Muir was the fifth in order of birth. His brothers and sisters who 
are still livins are: Mrs. Jennie Hradburn and \\'illiani Muir. both of A\iiom are 
residing in Allegany county. Maryland; Mrs. H. H. -\tkinson. also living in that 
ceunty; and Robert and iJavid, both of whom reside in Rock Springs, Wyoming. 

In his boyhood ]\Iatt Muir attended the country schools of his native county 
and after his textbooks were put aside worked in the coal mines of Maryland 
and was thus employed until he left home at the age of twenty years. He made 
his way direct to Cheyenne, \\"yoming, and for several years was employed on 
the ranch of Carl Lefler. He was afterward in the employ of Rose Brothers, 
ranch.men of Cheyenne, and still later went to Carbon county, where he worked 
in the coal mines. He was also engaged in coal mining in Rock Springs and his 
time was thus passed until 1878. In 1879 he went to Leadville, Colorado, where 



366 HISTORY OF \\YO-MIXG 

he was employed until 1880, when he returned to Rock Springs and again took 
up the work of mining coal here. He opened up and operated several fine coal 
mines, his activities constituting an important factor in the development of the 
natural resources of the state in this connection. He then sold out to the Union 
Pacific & Central Coal & Coke Company. For twenty-five years he had been a 
factor in the coal trade and his spirit of enterprise had been a valuable element 
in the work of improvement in the coal fields. During the early period of his 
residence in Sweetwater county Mr. Muir resided a few miles from the town 
of Rock Springs and many times he could have killed elk and antelope from 
his doorway — a fact indicative of the unsettled condition of the country. He 
has lived to witness many changes as the work of progress and improvement has 
been carried steadily forward. He is now living retired, having recently sold 
out his last coal mine. 

On the 22d of September. 1881. Mr. Muir was married to Miss Christina 
Shea, a daughter of Peter and Katherine ( Gehan ) Shea, representatives of a 
well known family of Maryland. Mr. Shea was a railroad conductor at an 
early day and laid some of the first rails on the line of railroad built to Balti- 
more, Maryland. To Mr. and Mrs. Muir were born nine children, three of 
whom have passed away: Eifie, who died at Rock Springs at the age of seven- 
teen years ; Ike, who died in 1908 at the age of nineteen years ; and Mrs. Xellie 
Harris, who died in 1913, leaving two children, ?klattie Muir and Christina Muir, 
both of whom were born in Rock Springs. The other members of the Muir fam- 
ily are: Carrie, who was born at Rock Springs in January. 1883, and is now the 
wife of \Mlliam Reid. a resident of Ogden, Utah; John, who was born in Rock 
."springs in 1884; Peter, born July 4, 1887, and now married to Emma Wiggins, 
Ijy whom he has one child, Peter ^luir, Jr.; Mrs. Mary Craig Rossen, who was 
born in Rock Springs in 1889: !Matt, Jr., born in Rock Springs in January, 1894, 
and who married Miss Emily Lundgren, of Laramie, by whom he has one 
child, Robert Matthew, born in Laramie in November, 19I7; and Christina, who 
was born in Rock Springs in 1899 ^"d is attending school. 

Mr. Muir belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Loyal Order of Moose. He has been called upon to serve in 
several local offices, filling the position of county assessor, to which he was first 
elected in 1890, and afterward was reelected. He has also been water commis- 
sioner. His activities have long been a factor in the development and progress 
of his section of the state. He was among the few courageous frontiersmen 
who dared to locate within the borders of Wyoming while the work of progress 
and improvement yet remained in the future and when there was little promise 
of early development. In the years which have since followed he has not only 
witnessed a most wonderful transformation but has largely aided in the labors that 
ha^e changed this section from a wild tract of land into a splendid commonwealth. 
He is now living retired, enjoying a well earned rest which is the merited reward 
of a long and honorable business career. 



HARRY JOSEPH DE\TNE. 

Harry Joseph Devine, devoting his attention to the practice of law in 
Douglas, with a large clientage that has connected him with much important 
litigation heard in the courts of his district, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
on the 6th of April, 1886, a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Higgins) Devine. 
The mother is now deceased, but the father survives. In their family were 
three sons and a daughter, Harry J. being the youngest child. 

.■\fter mastering the elementary branches of learning he continued liis studies 
in the preparatory department of Marquette College at i\Iilwaukee, Wisconsin, 
and won the Bachelor of Science degree upon graduation from Marquette Col- 
lege. He then entered upon the study of law at Georgetown I'niversity in 




HAREY J. DEVINE 



368 HISTORY OF WYO.AIIXG 

Washington, D. C, and was graduated with the class of 1909. Having thus 
qualified for the practice of law, he entered upon the active work of the 
profession in connection with the firm of Ouarles, Spence & Quarles at Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, doing investigation work for them for two and a half years 
and thus gaining broad and valuable experience in connection with a firm that 
ranks very high at the Wisconsin bar. In 1913 he arrived in Douglas after a 
year's residence at Glenrock, ^Vyoming. He has now made his home at Douglas 
for about five years and within that perfod has become well established as an 
able attorney, his success resulting from the efficiency which he has displayed 
in handling his cases and in meeting the attacks of the opposing counsel. He 
is also the owner of the Record, Abstract & Title Company. 

On the 29th of August, 1916, Mr. Devine was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Elizabeth Wallace and they have a son, Harry Joseph, Jr. The religious 
faith of the parents is that of the Catholic church and ]\Ir. Devine is connected 
with the Knights of Columbus, in which he has taken the third degree. He is 
fond of outdoor life and is much interested in the national game of baseball. 
In politics he is a republican and is thoroughly conversant with the leading 
questions and issues of the day, recognizing at all times the duties and obliga- 
tions as well as the privileges of citizenship. He is a trustee and the secretary 
of the high school board and is a stalwart champion of the cause of public 
education. In fact, he stands for all that has to do with progress and improve- 
ment along the lines which work for the benefit of the individual and the 
community at large, and in all public connections he is actuated by a marked 
devotion to the general good. 



T. BLAKE KENNEDY, 



T. Blake Kennedy, of the firm of Matson & Kennedy, long active and prom- 
inent members of the Cheyenne bar, was born in Commerce, Oakland county, 
Michigan, on the 4th of April, 1874, a son of Thomas B. and Mary ( Blake 1 
Kennedv, both of whom have now passed away. He was the youngest child 
in a family of five sons and three daughters. 

In the public schools he began his education, which was continued in a col- 
lege course at Franklin College of New Athens, Ohio, where he won the Bachelor 
of Arts degree. He then went east to Syracuse, New York, for the study of law 
and was graduated with the class of 1897. He located for practice in Syracuse, 
entering into partnership with one of his classmates, R. N. Matson, organizing 
the firm of Matson & Kennedy, which relation has been continued to the present 
time save for a brief period when Judge Matson was upon the bench. They re- 
mained in Syracuse from 1898 until 1901 and then sought the opportunities of 
the growing west, becoming residents of Cheyenne. The record of the firm is 
certainly unique. From the beginning of their law practice they have been 
associates, their interests having always been closely allied. They are now largely 
spei.-i:iii;'iii,^; in nil liti,i;ati(in and for this purpose maintain an office in Casper. 
T1k\ ai\' I ^|jiii;ill\' well (|iialihed for corporation practice and their business in 
this ilircction is cxlcnsixe and important. For a period of ten years Air. Ken- 
nedy was referee in bankruptcy for the state of Wyoming, serving in that 
important position from 1903 to 1913. 

On the 8th of February. iqo6, Mr. Kennedy was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna H. Lyons. Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to Cheyenne Lodge, No. 
I, A. F. &"A. M., of which he is a past master, and he is also grand master 
of the grand lodge at the present time. He has attained the thirty-second degree 
of the Scottish Rite and has crossed the sands of the desert with the nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. In the Elks lodge he is a past exalted ruler and he is identi- 
fied with the Order of the Eastern Star and with the Woodmen of the \\'orld. 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 369 

His membership relations likewise extend to the Industrial Club. He is fond of 
outdoor sports and particularly of golf. 

His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he has served 
his party in the capacity of a county chairman, and as secretary and vice chairman 
of the state central committee, but he has never sought or held political office. 
His attention on the whole has been given to his professional interests, which 
have constantly developed in volume and importance. Few lawvers ha\e made a 
more lasting impression upon the bar of the state, both for legal ability of a 
high order and for the individuality of a personal character which impresses itself 
upon a community. His colleagues and contemporaries manifest the highest 
consideration for him as a colleague owing to his integrity. diL^nii}. impartiality 
and the strong common sense which has marked his character both as a lawyer 
and as a man. 



FRED C. SHUMAKER. 



Fred C. Shumaker is a partner in the firm of Shumaker & Markley, agents 
for the Ford cars at Laramie. He was born in Fullerton, Nebraska, April i, 
1885. a son of A. M. and Josephine (Newman) Shumaker. The father was a 
native of Pennsyhania and in early life removed westward to Nebraska, settling 
in Fullerton, which was then a frontier town. There he engaged in the cattle 
business and afterward in merchandising, becoming one of the representative 
and progressive business men of that locality. During the period of the Civil war, 
however, he put aside all business and personal considerations and in response to 
the country's call for troops went to the front, serving in defense of the Union 
throughout the entire period of the war and throughout his entire life he mani- 
fested the same spirit of loyalty to his country that he displayed when he fol- 
lowed the stars and stripes on southern battlefields. He died in 1909 and his widow 
is still living in Fremont, Nebraska. They were the parents of four children, of 
whom Fred" C. is the eldest. The others are: Floyd N., who is now a captain of 
the Royal Flying Corps of London. England ; E. C., who is a well known banker 
of Mead. Nebraska ; and Jose])hine. who is li\ing in Fremont, Nebraska. 

In his boyhood days Fred C. Shumaker attended the schools of his native city 
and continued his education at the Uni\ersity of Nebraska. Subsequently he went 
to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he entered the State University in 1902. He 
devoted two years to the study of law and medicine there but decided that he 
preferred a commercial rather than a professional career and accepted a position 
as traveling salesman in connection with the introduction of automobiles, type- 
writers, and stocks and bonds. He represented various firms and developed sales- 
manship of a high order. At length he determined to take up his abode in 
Laramie and here opened a Ford agency, since which time he has engaged in the 
sale of the Ford cars, being now senior partner in the firm of Shumaker & 
Marklev. Thev have developed a business of extensive and gratifying propor- 
tions, selling many cars, and today they are numbered among the most successful 
of the automobile dealers of Wyoming. 

In Tune, 1906, Mr. Shumaker was united in marriage to Miss Lucille Lee, of 
Silver "Creek, Nebraska, who i)asscd away at Palm Beach, Florida, in 1912. She 
was a daughter of :\lr. and Mr-^. C. H. Lee. residents of Silver Creek, Nebraska, 
her father being a well known cattleman there. In 1914. in Columbus. Nebraska, 
Mr. Shumaker was married to Miss Grace Hill, a daughter of Mr. and :\Irs. 
C. L. V. Hill. 

Fraternally Air. Shumaker is connected with the :Masons and with the Elks, 
while his religious faith is indicated by his membershiii in the Episcopal church. 
He is today well known in Laramie as a progressive and enterprising business 
man, ready to 'meet anv emergencv or embrace any legitimate opportunity that 
will extend his trade relations'] He has the high regard of his brethren of the 



370 HISTORY OF WYOMIXG 

fraternities with which he is connected, the respect of those with whom he has 
had business relations and the friendship of those whom he meets in social cir- 
cles. 



T. M. RUMSEY. 



While a resident of Rawlins, J. M. Rumsey in his activities has been by no 
means limited to the confines oi the city. His interests have covered in large 
measure the chief industries and business enterprises of the state and have been 
important features in the progress and prosperity of Wyoming. He is now the 
president of the Stock Growers National Bank, of Rawlins, but is identified as 
well, in large measure, with various other corporate interests which have to do 
with the progress of the state and its substantial advancement. 

He was born in Portsmouth, Ohio, March 4, 1862, a son of J. 2>l. and 
Harriet A. (Gaft'ey) Rumsey. His father was a well known tutor, preparing 
pupils for Princeton University. In his later years he became a prominent 
wholesale drygoods merchant of Portsmouth, Ohio. 

J. ^I. Rumsey pursued his education in public and private schools of his 
native state and entered upon his business career as a bill clerk, and advanced 
to assistant credit man with the Reid-AIurdoch Company of Chicago, where he 
remained from 1875 to 1883. The lure of the west, however, caught him, and 
in 1884 he became a resident of Rawlins, where he accepted the position of 
cashier and confidential man with the J. W. Hugus Company, which was 
engaged in the banking business that eventually developed into the First National 
Bank in 1909. From the period of his arrival here. ]\Ir. Rumsey has been 
closely, prominently, and helpfully associated with the banking interests of 
his city. In 1907 he organized and became president of the Stock Growers 
National Bank of Rawlins, and since 1910 he has been president of the First 
State Bank of Baggs, Wyoming. He is also identified prominently with the 
sheep and cattle industry of the state, and since 1910 has operated extensively 
under the name of the Carbon County Sheep & Cattle Company. 

He is also president of the Knox-Tanner Saddlery Company, a director of 
the Baggs (Wyoming) Investment Company, a director of the American Bank- 
ers Insurance Company of Chicago, president of the Saratoga Hot Springs 
Company, president and a director of the Carbon County Wool Growers Asso- 
ciation, a director of the Mid-West Real Estate & ^Mortgage Bond Company of 
Chicago, Illinois, a director of the American Petroleum Company of Wyoming, 
and a factor in the successful development and conduct of other interests which 
have had much to do w^ith promoting the prosperity of the state. He is a 
forceful and resourceful business man, possessing sound judgment and keen 
discrimination, and readily discriminates between the essential and nonessen- 
tial factors in every business situation. His high standing in business circles 
is indicated by the fact that he was president of the Wyoming Bankers Associa- 
tion in 1914-15 and at the same time was president of the Wool Growers Asso- 
ciation of Wyoming. 

On the i6th of April, i8go, in Springfield, Ohio, i\Ir. Rumsey was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary E. C. Ramsey, a daughter of Dr. Josiah Ramsey and 
Emma (Gower) Ramsey of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Rumsey have become the 
parents of two children: Jean Harriet, born in Springfield, Ohio, in 1892; and 
Elizabeth M. born in Springfield, Ohio, in 1896. The elder daughter is a gradu- 
ate of \'assar College, Poughkeepsie. New York, and on the 9th of June, 1917, 
she became the wife of Claude M. Thompson, a graduate of Purdue University 
of Indiana, the wedding being celebrated in St. Mark's church in Denver, Colo- 
rado. Mr. Thompson is also a graduate of the Sheffield Scientific School of 
Yale University of the class of 1910, having completed the civil engineering 
course, and is now superintendent of construction with the Union Pacific Railway 
Com]5any, his eft'orts in that direction covering the territory from Cheyenne to 




J. M. EUMSEY 



372 HISTORY OF WYO-AIIXG 

Kansas City, Missouri. He is recognized as one of the -most efficient engineers 
in the Union Pacific service, as stated in a letter written by the president of that 
road. 

The younger daughter, EHzabeth M., is a graduate of Miss Emma Willard's 
School for Girls, at Troy, New York, a school that was endowed by Mrs. Rus- 
sell Sage. She completed the course at the head of her class and was recog- 
nized as one of the brightest students that had ever attended that school. She 
was also graduated with high honors from the William Currier School of 
Expression in Boston, Massachusetts. She possesses natural talent as an actress 
and has been offered many remunerative positions to appear before the foot- 
lights, but has always declined, preferring to remain in the attractive home of 
her parents in Rawlins. She is now pursuing a course in bookkeeping and 
shorthand at Denver, so as to be of assistance to her father in the conduct of 
his business affairs. 

Mr. Rumsey is a prominent Mason, having attained the thirty-second degree 
in the Scottish Rite, and he was grand master in 1903. He was also grand 
commander of the Knights Templar Commandery of Wyoming in 1890 and is 
past eminent commander of Ivanhoe Commandery, K. T., and served as the 
chief officer in 1896. He is likewise a past high priest of Wyoming Oiapter, 
No. I, R. A. M., of Rawlins, and is a life member of Rawlins Lodge, No. 
609, of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Rumsey is today one of the wealthy men of \\'yoming, occupying a 
most prominent position in business and banking circles. His start in life was 
a modest one, although he had as a basis a broad college training. Readily 
recognizing the opportunities which have come to him and utilizing them with 
discrimination, he has gained a place among the strongest factors in the man- 
agement of interests which have not only had to do with the development of his 
private fortune but with the progress of the state. 



JOHN H. CAMERON. 



John H. Cameron, filling the position of postmaster at Evanston. was born 
December 14, 1S58. in Nova Scotia, a son of the late Roderick Cameron, who was 
a native of that country and of Scotch descent. The father was a successful 
farmer and continued to devote his life to agricultural pursuits until his labors 
were ended in death in i86<). when he was sixty-six years of age. He married 
Susan McDonald, a iiatiw nf Xova Scotia and of Scotch lineage. She, too, has 
passed away, her di-atli lucmriiiL;' in 1886, when she was sixty-eight years of age. 

John H. Cameron wa-- the tenth in order of birth in a family of eleven chil- 
dren. He is indebted to the public school system of his native country for his 
educational opportunities. His early life was spent upon the home farm and he 
soon became familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the 
crops. When a youth of fifteen years he started out to earn his own livelihood 
and was then apprenticed to learn the carriage builder's trade, which he followed 
for about four decades. He first came to the United States in 1873. settling at 
Providence. Rhode Island, where he continued to make his home until 1883, when 
he removed westward with Salt Lake City, Utah, as his destination. There he 
followed his trade until he came to Wyoming, settling in Evanston. He entered 
the carriage and wagon making business on his own account, becoming a pioneer 
in that line, and he continued to successfully conduct the business until 1913. In 
March, 1914, he assumed the duties of postmaster, which position he has since 
continuously and capably filled. 

On the 23d of November, 1887. ]\Ir. Cameron was married in Salt Lake City, 
Utah, to Miss Mary A. Scholes, a native of Salt Lake and a daughter of George 
and Man,' (Spencer) Scholes, both of whom have passed away. Her father was 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 373 

one of the pioneers of Utah of 1847. ^J^'"- ^"d ^Irs. Camerton have become tlie 
parents of a daughter, Marguerite S., who was born in Salt Lake Citv, August 
14, 1891. 

Mr. Cameron votes with the democratic party and has given his support 
thereto since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He has taken an 
active interest in poHtics and in civic affairs and in 1897 entered upon the duties 
of treasurer of Uinta county, which position he filled for a two years' term. He 
was also a member of the city council of Evanston for twelve years and while in 
office did everything in his power to advance the welfare of his citv, to bring 
about needed reforms and improvements and to uphold high civic standards. His 
life has ever been actuated by honorable principles and worthy motives and has 
been directed in accordance with the teachings of the Presbvterian church, of 
which he is a most consistent member, serving at the i>r(.-riit tinii- as one of the 
elders of the church. His record is proof of the fact that succc-> and an honored 
name may be won simultaneously, for though he started out in life a poor boy, 
he has worked his way upward and yet has never deviated from those principles 
which govern strict and unswerving integrity. 



FRANK T. TERRY, 



Prominent among the energetic, far-sighted and successful business men of 
Laramie is Frank J. Terry, a clothier and furnisher of men's wearing apparel. 
\\'atchful of every opportunity jiointing toward success, he has so directed his 
interests and eff'orts as to win substantial results, while at the same time his inter- 
ests have been of a character that has contributed to public prosperity and ad- 
vancement. 

A native of Ohio, Mr. Terry was born in Cardington on the 12th of August. 
187 1, and is a son of Chauncey E. Terry, who was likewise a native of the 
Buckeye state. The first American ancestor of the family was one of the ;\Ia\- 
flower passengers. After residing for some time in New England representatives 
of the name went to Long Island and George B. Terry, the grandfather of 
Frank J. Terry, was the first of the family to settle in Ohio. His son, Chauncey 
E. Terry, as a young man, learned and followed blacksmithing. In later years 
he became a successful carriage manufacturer of \'an Wert, Ohio, where he con- 
ducted a profitable business. His political endorsement was given to the repub- 
lican party, in which he took an active interest, doing everything in his jiower to 
promote its growth and ensure its success. He served as sheriff' of Morrow 
cnunt\- anil made an excellent record in office. At the present time he is living 
ret]rr(l, rv^iding upon his farm in ]\Iorrow county, that state. He married Clara E. 
Torrey, who was also born in Ohio and was of Scotch descent, her jjarents having 
settled in Ohio in pioneer times. She also survives. 

Frank J. Terry was the eldest in a family of ten children and at the usual 
age began his education in the public schools of Cardington, Ohio, passing through 
consecutive grades to the high school. He started out in the business world 
when a youth of eighteen years and was first engaged in the conduct of a 
restaurant in Cardington, which business he carried on successfully for three 
years. He then sold out and accepted employment in the clothing store of Joseph 
Kohnheimer at Cardington and in that connection became acquainted with all 
branches of the clothing trade, acquiring e.xperience that has been of the greatest 
value to him since his" arrival in Laramie. He took up his abode in Laramie 
on the 30th of June, 1900. and entered the employ of W. H. Frazee, a leading 
clothier of this city, for whom he became buyer and manager of the clothing de- 
partment. He continued with Mr. Frazee for eleven months and then entered into 
business with C. H. \\'oodruft' under the firm style of Woodruff' & Terry. The 
partnership between them continued for some time and the business was after- 
ward incorporated under the style of the Woodruff' & Terry Clothing & Shoe 



374 HISTORY OF WYO^iIIXG 

Company, ^Ir. Terry acting as secretary and treasurer, with Mr. \\'odnifl: as 
president. The business was continued under that style until 1904, when the cor- 
poration was changed, Mr. Woodruff selling his interest to C. J. Vaguer. The 
firm style of Terry & \'agner was then asstmied and the' business was so con- 
tinued until 191 1, when Mr. Terry sold his interest to Mr. \'agner and for a year 
was engaged in no active business. In 1912 he removed to Baker, Oregon, and 
opened a ladies' ready-to-wear clothing store, continuing the business until l-"eb~ 
ruary, 1913. He then sold out and returned to Laramie, where he ])urchase(l his 
present store from E. Mosher, of Rawlins, \\'yoming. This is by far the finest 
store of the kind in the state. He carries a very extensive stock of men's clothing 
and furnishings and the store is most attractive in its arrangement. The business 
methods of the house commend it to the patronage of the public and he has thus 
won for himself a most prominent and enviable position as a leading merchant 
of Laranfie. 

Mr. Terry was married at Mount Gilead, Ohio, to Miss Isabel Talmage, a 
native of Ohio and a daughter of F. A. and Alargaret ( Ivnox) Talmage and a 
relative of the renowned Dr. Talmage, the eminent divine. Mr. and Airs. Terry 
have one son, Richard Talmage, who was born in Laramie, J\Iay 31, 1908. 

In religious faith Mr. .ind Airs. Terry are Episcopalians and he is a vestry- 
man of St. Matthew 's cailu-dral. He belongs to the ISenevolent Protective Order 
of Elks and also has nicnilicrship in the Chamber of Commerce. In politics he 
is an earnest re])ul)lican Ijut when urged to become a candidate for office has 
always declined, preferring to concentrate his attention upon his business affairs, 
which, wisely directed, have brought him to the creditable position which he 
now occupies. I lis interests have always been most capably conducted. Tireless 
energv, keen perceplinn. honesty of purpose, a genius for devising the right thing 
at the right time, joined to every-day commonsense, are his chief characteris- 
tics. Justice has ever been maintained in his relations to patrons and em|)loyes. 
He has been watchful of all the details of his business and of all indications 
pointing toward prosperity, and from the beginning has had an abiding faith in 
the ultimate success of his enterprise. Moreover, he is a public-spirited citizen. 
giving his cooperation to every movement which tends to promote the moral, in- 
tellectual and material welfare of his adopted state. 



JESSE L. LAKE. 



Evanston, a most enterprising and progressive city, has drawn to it many 
men who were seeking for favorable opportunities, and here Jesse L. Lake has 
found the chance to exercise his industry and initiative, which are his dominant 
qualities. He is today conducting a profitable and growing business as proprie- 
tor of the Evanston Steam Laundry. 

Born in Nappanee, Indiana, on the 12th of June. 1S76. he is a son of the late 
John Lake, who was a native of Ohio and was a descendant of one of the old 
Virginia families of Scotch lineage that was founded in America about the 
time of the close of the Revolutionary war. Representatives of the name 
became early residents of Ohio and later removal was made to Indiana, where 
John Lake became a successful farmer. He resided in Elkhart county, that 
state, until his death, which occurred in 1882, when he was forty-five years of 
age. His wife bore the maiden name of Susan Winders and she, too, was born 
in Ohio, belonging to one of the old families of that state that came originally 
from Connecticut and was of English ancestry. Mrs. Lake passed away in 
1896, at the age of sixty years. By her marriage she had but two children, Jesse 
L. and Cora, the latter the wife of O. L. Mast, now living in San Diego, 
California. 

Jesse L. Lake, spending his youthful days under the parental roof, pursued 
his "education in the public schools of Nappanee, Indiana, and started out to 




JESSE L. LAKE 



376 HISTORY OF ^\■YO^^XG 

earn his own livelihood when a young man of twenty years. He was first 
employed in the Troy Steam Laundry at Elkhart, Indiana, and there learned all 
branches of the business, continuing with the firm for four years. He next 
entered business on his own account, in 1901, at W'arsaw, Indiana, where he 
conducted what was known as the Troy Laundry for three years, meeting with 
substantial success during that period. He then disposed of his interests there 
and removed to the west, making his way to Helena, ^Montana, where he 
conducted the Fort Laundry for five years. During the succeeding three years 
he was at Randolph, Nebraska, and in November, 1912, he removed to E\-anston, 
Wyoming, where he purchased his present business from Isherwood & Bodine. 
The establishment was conducted under the name of the Evanston Laundry. It 
had been incorporated but in volume of business was small compared to the 
present trade enjoyed by Mr. Lake, who has today one of the leading steam 
laundries of Wyoming. It is equipped wilh everything necessary in this line, 
the machinery is new and modern and the work turned out is of the highest 
grade. Mr. Lake is employing on an average of eight people and his trade is 
largely local, for Evanston and the surrounding district accords him a volume 
of business that taxes the laundry to its full capacity. 

In Elkhart, Indiana, on the 30th of May, 1901, Mr. Lake was united in 
marriage to ^liss Maude Kinnaman, a native of Indiana and a daughter of 
John and Josie Kinnaman. who were representatives of old families of that state. 
Her father is now deceased but her mother is yet living. ;\Ir. and Mrs. Lake 
have become the parents of a daughter, Grace, who was born 'Slay 30, 1914. 

In his political views Mr. Lake is a republican but has never been an office 
seeker. Fraternally he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He is widely and favorably known in Evanston and is fully satisfied with the 
opportunities which have been accorded him here. Gradually working his way 
upward, he is now at the head of a profitable business which has resulted from 
his close application and indefatigable energy, and he believes that with the chances 
that \\'yoming affords any man can win success if he has the determination and 
perseverance to pursue a course that has been intelligently marked out. 



RE\". JOHN F. SUGRUE. 

Rev. John F. Sugrue, pastor of the Church of the Seven Dolors at Rock 
Springs, was born February 7, 1884, in County Kerry, Ireland, a son of Michael 
Sugrue, a native of that country, who is still a resident of County Kerry, where 
he has been active along scientific lines, especially in connection with observatory 
work. He married Frances O'Connor, also a native of the Emerald isle, and 
they became the parents of nine children, of whom Father Sugme, of this 
review, is the eldest. All of the others are still living and are yet residents of 
Ireland. 

Rev. John F. Sugrue began his education in the parochial schools of his native 
country and afterward attended St. Brendan's College, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1902. That school is located at Killarney, Ireland. He afterward became 
a student in ^laywroth College of Dublin and was there ordained to the priest- 
hood by the Most Reverend, Archbishop \\'illiam \\'alsh, on the 20th of Tunc. 
1909. 

Following his ordination Father Sugrue came to America, arriving in October 
of that year. He made his way direct to the west with Denver as his destina- 
tion and soon afterward was assigned to duty at Glenwood Springs, where he 
remained for three years as pastor of St. Stephen's Roman Catholic church 
under Father Joseph Carrigan. He afterward became assistant pastor in St. 
Patrick's church under Rev. Luther D. T. O'Dwyer, there continuing for a vear. 
He next became pastor of the Church of the .Se\en Dolors of Rock Springs, 
where he has remained since February, 1914. The membership at the time he 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 377 

♦ook charge was about thirty-five families and today the parish membership has 
grown to sixty families. The church is in good working order and excellent 
results are being achieved through the efforts of Father Sugrue. Fraternally he 
is connected with the Knights of Columbus and with the Catholic Order of Forest- 
ers. His political endorsemciU is given to the rei)ublic<ui party. He is a man 
of liberal education, doing excellent work among his parishioners. 



BENJA.MIX FI. SMALLEY. 

A city does not depend so much upon its oftice holders, or even upon its 
machinery of government, as upon its businc--- iiKii for its upbuilding and devel- 
opment. Prominent among the energetic, larsighted and alert merchants of 
Cokeville is Benjamin H. Smalley, now president of the Reynolds, Smalley & 
Larson Company, engaged in general merchandising at Cokeville. 

He was born in Jefferson, Ashtabula county, Ohio, September 17, 1872. His 
father, the late Imri Smalley, was a native of X'ermont and was descended from 
one of the old families of that state, of English lineage, founded in America 
prior to the time when the colonies threw oft' the yoke of British oppression 
and established the American republic. He was distantly related to General 
Ethan Allen, whose "Green Mountain Boys," under the direction of their com- 
mander, won fame at the battle of Ticonderoga in the Revolutionary war. Iinri 
Smalley became a successful merchant of Jefferson, Ohio, where he resided 
until his death, which occurred in 1890, when he had reached the age of fifty- 
four years. He manifested the same spirit of patriotism and loyalty that char- 
acterized his ancestors and at the time of the Civil war joined the Union army, 
serving with the Ninth Ohio Cavalry with the rank of sergeant. Later he was 
drawn to act as one of the president's bodyguard and served as such through- 
out the remainder of the war. The family have in their possession several 
valuable mementoes — articles that previously belonged to President Lincoln. They 
also have a dagger that was found outside the Ford Theater after President 
Lincoln was assassinated and which is supposed to have been the weapon carried 
by Booth when he committed the dastardly deed that cost the life of the chief 
executive. In politics Mr. Smalley was a stalwart republican, as was his father, 
Horatio Nelson Smalley. Mr. Smalley was married to Lucy Ann McNutt, who 
was born and reared in Lennox, Ohio, and who passed away in 1889, at the age 
of fifty-two years. By her marriage she becaiue the mother of six children, four 
of whoiu are liviuL;'. \\illiam Walter, born July 15, 1859, was the eldest of the 
family. He was (.■ijiicated in the public schools of Jeft'erson and started out in 
the business wurld w lu 11 a youth of seventeen years. In 1887 he removed to 
Wyoniinij, locating in Laramie, where he was engaged in electrical work, learn- 
ing the liiisiness in principle and detail. He then engaged in electrical work in 
Laramie for fifteen years, and on the expiration of that time removed to Evans- 
ton, \\\ I lining, where he took charge of the interests of the Evanston light plant, 
continuing; ni iliat position for four years. He next went to Cumberland, Wyo- 
ming, where lie was employed by the Union Pacific Coal Company for eight 
years, after which he established his home in Cokeville, where he engaged in 
electrical work for eight years. He was then appointed to the position of 
deputy sheriff' and is now serving in that capacity. His political support has 
always been given to the democratic part\- and he has been a prominent factor 
in community affairs, both in a liu^ine-- wav and as a political leader. The 
second in the familv is Kate Smalle\, who lieoame the wife of W. C. Bancroft, 
of Bayonne, New Jersev. Elizabeth is the deceased wife of C. F. Rosebaugh, 
who resides in Cleveland, Ohio. Benjamin H. is the next of the family. Glenn 
Stuart, the youngest of the living: children, is a resident of Springfield, Missouri. 
David Allen, who was the third member of the family, has passed away. 

Benjamin H. Smalley was educated in the public schools of Jeft'erson, Ohio. 



378 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

and remained a resident of that state until iie reached the age of eighteen year?, 
when he started for the west, taking up his abode in Evanston, Wyoming, in 
the summer of 1891. 'Jliere he was employed along electrical lines and served 
also as assistant postmaster for eighteen months. He remained in Exanston for 
two years and subsequently rode the range for five years in L'inta and Lincoln 
counties. He was afterward connected with W. S. Post, of Kemmerer, in 
mercantile lines, as a clerk, obtaining his first experience in merchandising at 
that place. He was afterward at Fossil, where he was manager of a branch 
store for ^Ir. Post for two years. On the expiration of that period he accepted 
the management of the Blyth-Fargo-Hi:-.lxin> ^luie at Granger. He continued 
there under the firm name of Smailey iS; Mci\ay for about six years, when he 
sold his interest in the business to Cos,L;riH Umilu-rs and removed to Cokeville 
to become manager of the Cokeville AUrcaniilo Company. He continued in 
that connection until the present business w .;> otahlished. at which time he joined 
j\lr. Larson and Mr. Reynolds in organiznij; the Reynolds, Smailey & Larson 
Company for the conduct of a general mercantile enterprise. He was chosen 
president of the company, with Mr. Larson as \ice president and Mr. Reynolds 
as secretary, treasurer and manager. Mr. Smailey is also one of the directors 
of the Cokeville Light & Power Company, which he organized. He is thus 
actively identified with the interests of his adopted city and is contributing in 
substantial measure to its continued growth along mercantile and other business 
lines. 

On the 15th of June, igoi, in Kemmerer. Mr. Smailey was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Anna Wood, a native of Wyoming, who was born at Twin Creek. 
Uinta county. Her parents were Harry and Sarah ( Sutton ) Wood, the latter 
a daughter of William Sutton, one of the pioneer coal miners of Twin Creek. 
Roth of her parents are now deceased. 

Mr. Smailey votes with the republican party, which he has supported since' 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise. At one time he was postmaster 
of Cokeville, occupying the position for seven years, and for six years he also 
served as postmaster at Granger. Frateni.illy he i- a well known Alason, having 
become a member of the lodge at Kemmerer, >ince which time he has joined the 
Royal Arch Chapter at Gxeen River, He belongs to the Episcopal church, in 
which he is serving as trustee, and its teachings guide him in all of the relations 
of life. He is highly esteemed as a man of genuine personal worth as well as 
of marked business aJDility and enterprise, and he has many warm friends through- 
out Lincoln county, who entertain for him genuine regard. 



MCTOR TUCKER JOHXSOX. 

\ ictor Tucker Johnson, an able attorney of Thermopolis, who is making 
a specialty of corporation and oil and mining law, was born March 25, 1881, in 
Centralia, Boone county, Missouri, a son of John .\. and Eliza Mildred Johnson. 
The father is now deceased but the mother "is still living. In their family were 
four children, all of whom survive. 

Mctor T. Johnson, after attending the Centralia high school, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1899, took up the study of electrical engi- 
neering, to which he devoted two years, from 1900 until 1902. in St. Louis, 
Missouri. In the latter year he became a student in the University of Missouri 
and enrolled in the law department, having determined to make the practice 
of law his life work. He won his LL. P>. degree from the University of ]\Iis- 
souri in 1905. He was admitted to practice by the supreme court of that state 
and by the United States circuit court of appeals at St. Louis in 1905. The 
following year he was admitted to practice by the supreme court of Wyoming 
and located in Thermopolis. where he has engaged in the practice of law to the 
present day, makin.<r a specialty of corporation law and of law relating to oil 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 381 

and mining property. His practice has become extensive and of an important 
character and he is thoroughly versed along those hnes on which he is now 
concentrating his attention. He has also become connected with many oil com- 
panies as an investor and has been very successful in his oil ventures in the 
Grass Creek, Elk Basin and Warm Springs oil fields. He was one of the pro- 
moters of the oil industry in these various sections and has contributed much 
to the development and progress of the state through his operations along these 
lines. He is serving as director or in other official connection with various oil 
corporations. 

On the 1st of September, 1917, Mr. Johnson was married to jMiss Joy Steel, 
a daughter of Air. and Mrs. Chester Steel, of Robinson, Illinois. 

His religious faith is that of the Christian church ; his political belief that of 
the democratic party. He was elected the first county and prosecuting attorney 
for Hot Springs county, Wyoming, occupying the position from 1912 until 1915. 
In the following year he was made a delegate to the national democratic conven- 
tion held in St. Louis and he was chairman of the legal advisory board to the 
military draft of Hot Springs county in 1917. He stands for progressiveness 
in all that has to do with the public welfare and gives his active aid and support 
to many measures for the general good. In a word, his labors can always be 
counted upon to further the material, intellectual, social and moral progress of 
his community. 



OSC.\R NOAH ANDERSON. 

With the substantial development and upbuilding of Sheridan, Wyoming, 
Oscar Noah Anderson has been prominently and actively identified for a num- 
ber of years. He is a native of Sheridan, Illinois. His father, Erasmus Ander- 
son, was born in Stavanger. Norway, and came with his parents to the new 
world when but two years of age, the family home being established in Leland, 
Illinois. After attaining man's estate he wedded Ellen Peterson, who was born 
at Leland, Illinois, and who passed away in Lincoln, Nebraska, in August, 1904. 
Mr. Anderson survives and now makes his home in Sheridan, \\"yoming. 

Oscar N. Anderson, accompanying his parents on their removal to Nebraska, 
was graduated from the high school at Aurora. Nebraska, in 1895 and in the 
following year he entered the Nebra>ka State I'niversity, where he spent three 
and a half years as a student. He wnuld have graduated as a member of the 
class of 1902, but came to Sheridan, Wyoming, tor a summer vacation the 
previous year and never returned to finish the university course. He had become 
a member of the Kappa Sigma, a Greek letter fraternity, during the period of 
his student days in the University of Nebraska. While a resident of Sheridan 
he has been engaged in the real estate, abstract, insurance and loan business and 
has been one of the directors of the Sheridan Building & Loan Association since 
its organization six years ago. He is thoroughly conversant with the real estate 
market, knows the property that is for sale and is correct in placing valuation 
thereon. He also conducts an abstract business and writes a considerable amount 
of insurance annually. 

On the i6th of May, 191 1, IMr. Anderson was married in Billings, Montana, 
to Miss Julia Belle Boehne, a daughter of Alfred Herman and Elizabeth M. 
Boehne, the latter at one time national president of the Woman's Relief Corps. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have been born two children: Philip Craig, a lad 
of three and a half years : and Ruth Ellen Anderson, about a year and a half old. 

Mr. and Mrs. Anderson hold membership in the Presbyterian church and 
fraternally he is connected with the IMasonic lodge and chapter and with the 
Eastern Star. He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
For the past four years he has been one of the directors of the Sheridan Com- 
mercial Club, ITis political allegiance is given to the republican party and he 



382 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

was deputy county clerk of Sheridan county, Wyoming, from 1908 until 1909, 
but retired from that position to enter the real estate business, in which he iias 
since been an active and prominent factor. He stands loyally for all that has 
to do with the general welfare and upbuilding of his community and is one of 
the prominent and progressive citizens of Sheridan. 



PHILIP MANDEL. 



Philip JMandel passed his eighty-third milestone and then "the weary wheels 
of life at length stood still." As the day with its morning of hope and promise, 
its noontide of activity, its evening of successful and completed effort, ending in 
the quiet and rest of the night, so was the life of this good man, who was ever 
honored as the first settler in the Laramie valley and one of the oldest residents 
of the state. 

He was born in Alsace, France. October 2, 1834, and there spent the first 
fifteen years of his life, after which he severed home ties and came to the new 
world. He was a youth of but twenty years when he arrived in Wyoming, taking 
up his abode in the Little Laramie valley, where he lived the life of a frontiers- 
man "in the simple, peaceful v^'ay of men who have wrought long and well." A 
visitor to the beautiful city of Laramie, with its attractive homes, its substantial 
business houses, its well kept streets and evidences of a modern, progressive 
civilization cannot understand the conditions of the country into which Mr. Man- 
del came. Not a house marked the site of the capital city and the most far- 
sighter could not have dreamed of the changes which were soon to occur. He 
bravely faced every condition of pioneer life, met all of its hardships and priva- 
tions and continued his work of converting a wild and undeveloped region into 
one of fertility, the abiding place of many happy, contented and prosperous 
people. After a time he went to the little village of Mandel, where he erected 
a stage station, and the log cabin that marked the station on the overland trail is 
still to be seen on the Lawrence ranch. "There he lived and conducted his 
affairs," writes the Laramie Republican, "meeting the pony express as it hurried 
across the country, giving a change of horses, the meal wished for and a word 
of cheer and a fond farewell as the driver of the pony express sped with his 
packages toward the setting sun. The Mandel stage station was known from 
ocean to ocean, and Mr. Mandel himself became a fixture in the landscape, always 
at the front door, always ready to hid the speeder good morning, always ready to 
lend a hand. In 1859 he was in Utah, fighting the Indians and helping 
to wrest the glowing west from the hand of the red man. He returned to Mandel, 
again took his place in the lonely cabin and filled his mission and fulfilled his 
destiny as it had been pointed out to him." 

Mr. Mandel was married in Cheyenne. Wyoming, to Mrs. Alexander, a widow, 
whose maiden name was Jennie Louise Campbell, born in Norfolk, \'irginia. and 
he and his wife established their humble home, and as the years passed two 
daughters came to them. Katherine married William Lasher and still resides in 
Laramie, her home being at No. 412 Grand avenue. She has two sons : Philip 
Mandel. born November 30, 1902: and Ronald, born July 6, 1904. Margaret, 
now Mrs. Charles Hopkins, is located in Los Angeles, California, and has a 
daughter, Xorrine. At length the wife and mother passed away, the death angel 
calling her while she was in Mercy Hospital at Denver. 

A few years prior to his death Mr. Mandel gave up the life of a ranchman 
and spent the latter years in the city, passing away at the home of his daughter, 
Mrs. Lasher. He "was always cheerful, always contented, but never willing to 
say much about himself. T amount to so little that nobody will care.' he would 
say when asked to recount some of his experiences that they might be set down 
when the end came." This was the innate modesty of the man. He never felt 
that he had made much of a contribution to the world's work, but others recog- 




PllllJi' MAXDEL 



384 HISTORY OF V^'YO^IIXG 

nized what he had done as the pioneer settler of this section of the state, ^^'e 
again quote from the local paper, which said : "i\Ir. IMandel, although confined 
to the house for most of the time recently, had not been seriously ill, and yes- 
terday expressed the wish that he could go to his ranch home once again. He 
went to his room as usual yesterday, his daughter caring for his needs, and 
retired. This morning when she went to visit him, as is her wont the first thing 
after herself arising, she found him in the last sleep, death having come, pre- 
sumably, about midnight, the old man passing from life to death with never a 
struggle or a pain — just the being gathered to his fathers like a babe on its 
mother's breast. It was a shock for the daughter, of course, but her heart swelled 
as she gazed upon the peaceful face of her father, a smile of content resting 
on the dear features, his hands lying idly, his heart having ceased its beating 
as a clock w'ill stop its ticking. The end had come and the life went out like 
the falling of the leaves from the trees, like the dropping of the petals from the 
rose. It was the end of one of the most remarkable lives this valley has ever 
seen marking the passing of our really oldest oldtimer. * * * fhe passing of 
Philip Mandel marks the cutting down of the number of early comers who have 
made history momentously in this valley. He came when only the red man was 
a resident here and he lived to see the valley that was then a wilderness blossom 
as the rose — to see his lonely cabin of the pioneer days, set in the midst of soli- 
tude, now surrounded by prosperous ranches and enlivening scenes. N. K. 
Boswell and Edward Ivinson are here, R. E. Fitch and W. H. Holliday are left 
w^ith us. and there be others that knew the land w'hen it was new to all of them. 
It is with a feeling of sadness that we are to write 'finis' against the name of one 
of the first and one of the best known that made this the home of refinement, and 
happiness, and contentment, with no enemy of any man lurking behind the hill, 
ready to snuf¥ out the life of those who have striven to reclaim the state." 
He died October 22, 1917., at his residence in Laramie. 



THO:\IA.S A. READY 



Thomas A. Ready is manager and one of the proprietors of the Murphy- 
Ready Company of Rawlins, Wyoming, and of Fort Collins, Coloradp. This 
company is extensively and successfully engaged in dealing in men's furnishing 
goods and clothing and has built up a trade at each center that is extensive 
and substantial. 

Mr. Ready was born in Prince Edward Island. August 2, 1872, and is a son 
of Richard and Mary (Condon) Ready, both of whom were natives of Prince 
Edward Island, where they were reared, educated and married. The father 
has followed farming as a life work and is still living at the place of his nativity, 
but the mother has passed away and was buried in Prince Edward Island. They 
had a family of six children.- of whom Thomas A. is the third in order of birth. 
Two of the number are now deceased. The others are: Airs. Joe Hughes. 
Millicent and James A., who are still living in Prince Edward Island. 

In his boyhood days Thomas A. Ready attended the schools of his native 
isle, after which he became an apprentice to the tailor's trade, with \vhich he 
became thoroughly familiar, mastering the business in every detail. He then 
followed the trade in his native country until iSgi, w-hen he resolved to try his 
fortune in the west and made his way to Rawlins. Wyoming. A year later he 
established himself in business on his own account and later developed his 
interests into the present business enterprise, conducted under the name of the 
Murphy-Ready Company. He is one of the prominent merchants of Rawlins 
and is at the head of one of the finest stores of the kind in the state. The 
business was established in 1894, ]\Ir. Ready becoming the associate of P. J. 
Murphy, who is the active manager of the Fort Collins branch of the business, 
while ^Fr. Ready continues in control of the Rawlins establishment. Purchasing 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 385 

in large quantities, they are able to buy ad\antageously and their stores present 
all that is latest and best in workmanship and in style, both in clothing and haber- 
dashery. 

Mr. Ready is a Catholic in religious faith, holding membership in St. Joseph's 
church at Rawlins, and he is identified with the Knights of Cohnnbus, which 
draws its menibershii) onl}- from tlie penple of that faith. His political allegiance 
is given to the republican party a;id in ii)i(i lu* wa'- cluwen as a city trustee of 
Rawlins. He started (lut in business in a UKJclest way, has worked upward 
without assistance and has now reached a position of prominence in commercial 
circles. He is a believer in \\'yoming and its future and is glad to identify his 
interests with the state, feeling that the opportunities are limitless here. His 
course should suggest to young men the chances that are before them — chances 
that lie before any and that may be utilized with good results. 



FR.\XK CROXFORD. 



Frank Croxford, a wide-awake and alert business man of Evanston, acting as 
manager for the Reed Brothers Harness Company, was born in Pleasant Grove, 
Utah, April 5, 1884, a son of William and Ihinnah ( Lovesdale ) Cro.xford, who 
were natives of England and came to .\mcrica in middle life, following their 
marriage. The father engaged in the meat business and spent his last days in 
Utah, passing away at Pleasant Grove in igofi. The mother survives and is 
now living at Magna, Utah. Their family numbered two children, the younger 
being Blanchard Croxford. 

Frank Croxford attended school in Utah, completing a high school course 
at Pleasant Grove, after which he removed to Uinta Basin and began work 
as an apprentice to the harnessmaking trade. He removed to Evanston in 
-August. IQ16, in order to take charge of the interests of the Reed Brothers 
Harness Company of Ogden. Utah, and now as manager is in control of one 
of the leading stores of this kind in western \\'yoming. Mr. Croxford came to 
Evanston for the purpose of developing the business with a view to later pur- 
chasing it. 

On the 8th of .August, igo8, Mr. Croxford was married to Miss Minnie Taylor, 
a daughter of Alma and Celia Taylor, who were pioneer settlers of Uinta Basin 
but have now passed away. Air. and Mrs. Croxford have become the jiarents 
of three children: \'aughn, born in Uinta county in IQ13: Owen, in IQ14; and 
Reed, in December, 1916. 

In politics Mr. Croxford is a democrat but has never been an aspirant for 
public office. He belongs to the Alormon church and is interested in all that has 
to do with the material and moral progress of his conmiunity. In a business way 
he has advanced steadily through his individual efforts, capably meeting his 
responsibilities and at all times improving the opportunities that have come to 
him. He has made for himself a creditable jiosition in the commercial circles of 
Evanston. 



FRANK X. C.ARROX. 



Frank X. Carron, a civil and mining engineer who is now superintendent of 
Water Division Xo. 4, with headquarters at Rock Springs, was born in Towanda, 
Pennsylvania, September i, 1884, a son of James and .\imie ( Bennis ) Carron, 
the former a native of Canada, while the latter was born in Pennsylvania. In 
young manhood the father removed to the Keystone state, where later he became 
buver for a large hide and wool house at Towanda. Subsequentlv he rcmo\ed 
to Xewark, Xew Jersey, where he now resides with his daughter. His wife, who 



386 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

was reared, educated and married in Pennsylvania^ passed away in 1892, at the 
age of thirty-nine years. In their family were seven children: Mrs. Nellie Cos- 
tello, who died in Towanda, Pennsylvania, in 191 1; Robert E., who is a first 
lieutenant with the One Hundred and Forty-first Field Artillery, U. S. A., now 
stationed at Camp Mills, Ohio; Mrs. Florence Florshee, of Newark, New Jersey; 
James, who is now with the United States forces in France ; Frank X., of this 
review ; and two who died in infancy. 

Frank X. Carron was the fourth in order of birth in that family. In his boy- 
hood he attended the parochial schools of Towanda and following his graduation 
he entered upon preparation for the engineering profession, taking postgraduate 
work in St. Agnes Academy. He began the practice of his chosen profession in 
connection with the Lackawanna Coal Company of Pennsylvania, with which he 
was identified for four years. He afterward became superintendent of the Kan- 
awha Coal Company of Spring Hill, West Virginia, and a year later he became 
associated with C. P. Collins, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, with whom he re- 
mained for five months. On the expiration of that period he removed to Colo- 
rado, where he was connected with irrigation engineering projects for a year. 
Removing to Kentucky, he followed railroad engineering for six months and then 
returned to Colorado, where he again spent two months. In 1909 he arrived in 
Rock Springs, Wyoming, where he entered into business relations with the Union 
Pacific Coal Company, with which he was thus associated until June, 1917. He is 
now engaged in private practice as a civil and mining engineer and on the ist 
of September, 1917, he was appointed superintendent of Water Division No. 4. 
He also is proprietor of the Commercial Hotel, a newly furnished commercial 
men's headquarters at Rock Springs, which is liberally patronized. He stands 
very high in professional circles, his long experience and close study making him 
a man of marked ability in his chosen field. He is enabled to speak with authority 
upon many involved and important engineering projects and his standing is fur- 
ther indicated in the fact that he belongs to the American Institute of Mining 
Engineers. 

On the 2d of January, 1914, in Salt Lake City, Mr. Carron was united in 
marriage to Mrs. Clara (Kuske) Walling, a daughter of Charles and Julia 
Kuske, of Olivia, Minnesota. By a former marriage Mr. Carron had a daughter, 
Gladys, who was born in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, in 1905 and is now attend- 
ing school in Rock Springs. 

Fraternally Mr. Carron is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks. His is a most creditable career and one which indicates clearly what 
may be accomplished by determined efl^ort and unfaltering perseverance on 
the part of the individual, for Mr. Carron worked his way upward entirely 
on his own account and studied by candle light while serving as an appren- 
tice with the Lackawanna Coal Company of Pennsylvania. Within four years 
when with that company he had advanced to the superintendency and today he is 
prominently connected with engineering projects in the west, being engineer for 
a number of coal mining companies in Sweetwater county. He is one of the 
representati\e and honored residents of Rock Springs and his life record should 
ser\e to insiiire and encourage others, showing that success is not a matter of 
genius, as held by some, but is rather the outcome of clear judgment, experience 
and indefatigable energy. 



LAURITZ MARTINUS SORENSEN. 

A prominent figure in musical circles of Wyoming is Lauritz Martinus Soren- 
sen, who now makes his home in Lovell. He was born in Grenaa. Denmark, 
December 22, 1866, a son of Lars and Matilda (.Andersen) Sorensen. The mother 
has passed away but the father is living in Utah at the venerable age of eighty- 
five years. He has been a meml)er of the Church of Latter-Day Saints since 




LAURITZ M. SORENSEN 



388 HISTORY OF WYO.AIIXG 

1856 and has held a number of very responsible offices in the church, the duties 
of which he has performed with marked credit. 

Lauritz M. Sorensen pursued his education in Copenhagen, Denmark, in 
Berlin, Germany, in Boston, Massachusetts, and in other cities of the United 
States, coming to this country when but a youth, before the emigration of 
his father and mother. For a while he had a very hard time of it, but he com- 
pleted courses in violin, band work and public school music and throughout his 
entire life he has devoted his attention to musical interests and to the art of 
teaching music and leading choirs, concerts and bands and he has conducted a 
number of opera companies, bands and choirs with success. In the spring of 
1908 he started upon a trip through Europe which continued until the spring 
of 1910 and he had some most enjoyable experiences during that period. He 
was in charge of a choir of about riinety members and by reason of the 
attractive concerts which he gave was invited to dine with members of the royal 
family. 

At Vernal, Utah, on the 8th of January, i8g8. Professor Sorensen was united 
in marriage to Miss Dezzie McCurdy, a daughter of Albert and Christine (Bon- 
ner) McCurdy. Her mother was born on the Atlantic ocean under the Stars and 
Stripes. To JMr. and Mrs. Sorensen have been born six children, a daughter 
and five sons, namely, Havana Matilda, Elmer Martinus. Lloyd Frederick, Clive 
Albert, Earl Christmas and Elmo Robert, but Elmer ]\Iartinus, the second in 
order of l)irth. is deceased. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sorensen are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of the 
Latter-Day Saints. His political allegiance is given to the republican oarty and 
all of his life until his arri\al in Wyoming has been devoted to music and to 
church work, but he is now ser\ing for the fifth term as town treasurer and 
water commissioner in Lovell. Since his arrival in Wyoming he has organized 
a number of bands, one of which he conducted at the State Fair of Wyoming 
in 191 7. His study along musical lines has been most broad and comprehensive 
and the development of his native powers and talents has brought him to the 
front rank among the leading musicians of the state. Through his connection 
with the art he has done much to advance musical tastes in Wyoming, his work 
being of the utmost value along those cultural lines which constitute a balance 
to the intense commercial activity of the present. 



L. A. ZANE. 



L. A. Zane, who is engaged in general merchandising at Basin, was born 
in Cass county. Michigan, Fel)ruary 24, 1861, a son of Isaiah and Alartha (Par- 
ker) Zane. both of whom were natives of Ohio. They removed to Michigan at 
an early period in the development of that state and there the mother passed 
away, but the father long survived, his death occurring in Basin. To them 
were born seven children, five of whom are yet living. 

L. A. Zane was reared and educated in Michigan and in the fall of 1879 
started westward. After spending a winter in Iowa he continued his journey 
in the spring of 1880, with Wyoming as his destination, and first located at 
Sheridan, where he engaged in the live stock business until 1892. He then dis- 
posed of his interests there and removed to Colorado, where he remained until 
1896. In that year he returned to Basin and established a general mercantile 
store, which he has since conducted, covering a period of twenty-two vears. 
He is one of the oldest merchants in this section of the state and his business 
is the result of close application, indefatigable energv and keen sagacity. He 
is now enjoying a very liberal patronage and his succi-ss i^ well deserved'. 

In 1885 Air. Zane was united in marriage to Miss Amanda E. Hardee, a 
native of Iowa and a daughter of O. P. and Eliza Hardee, the former yet living, 
while the latter is deceased. 



HISTORY OF \\YO.MIXG 389 

In politics Air. Zane is a democrat and for twelve years has served as a 
member of the city conncil, taking active and helpful part in promoting the 
interests and welfare of the communit\ ihrnugh the exercise of his official pre- 
rogatives. Fraternally he is connected with the .Masonic lodge and also with 
the Independent Order of C )dd h\'ll(i\vs and he likewise belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of America. His w'liv \^ a member uf the Order of the Eastern Star. 
They occu])\- an attractixe resiik'iice in I'.asin and in addition to that property, 
Mr. Zane owns an excellent attire Imilding. 

He was one uf the lir>t residents ni" I'.asin and has long been actively and 
prominentl\- identitied \\ ilh its hi^tury. lie is familiar with all the prominent 
events which ha\c had tn do with >hapmg it^ records and promoting its growth 
and at all times he has given active aid and influence to plans and movements 
for the public good. His worth is widely acknowledged and those who know 
him entertain for him the warmest regard. 



CHARLES D. (lUNXELL. 

Charles B. Gunnell, a pharmacist of Evanston, whose well appointed drug 
store is one of the leading commercial establishments of the city, was born on the 
4th of February, 1882, in the city where he still makes his home. 

His father, Frank Gunnell, a native of Illinois, came to Wyoming in 1872, 
when a young lad of seventeen years, casting in his lot with the pioneer settlers 
of this section of the state. He was a machinist by trade and followed that busi- 
ness for several years in the employ of the Union Pacific Railroad Company. 
He then took up the profession of engineering and has been in acti\e service with 
the Union Pacific Railroad since that date. Flis father, Dr. William Ciunnell. was 
also a pioneer of Evanston, practicing his profession among the early settlers, 
he and Dr. F. H. Harrison being the two first physicians of the city. He was 
a Civil war veteran, having served at the front during the hostilities between 
the north and the south with an Illinois regiment, holding the rank of quarter- 
master sergeant. In tracing the ancestral history of the family it is learned that 
representatives of the Gunnells settled in Illinois in pioneer times and previous 
to that were residents of Pennsylvania. In fact, the family was established on 
American soil previous to the Revolutioiiar>- war. in which some of the ancestors 
of Charles B. Gunnell participated. \Mierc\er the family have lived they have 
taken active part in public afifairs and have at all times stood for progress and 
improvement, ever manifesting public-spirited citizenship. 

The father of Charles B. Gunnell was a member of the state legislature of 
Wyoming, serving during the years 1913 and 1914. His political allegiance 
has always been given to the republican party, of which he is a stanch advocate. 
His father, Dr. Gunnell, passed away in 1880 at the age of seventy years and 
was laid to rest in the Evanston cemetery. The mother of Charles B. Gunnell 
bore the maiden name of Delia Sturgis and was born in Salt Lake City, her 
parents being pioneer settlers of that place. Mrs. Gunnell was reared and edu- 
cated there and by her marriage became the mother of three children, of whom 
Charles B. is the eldest, the others being: ]\Iinnie, now the wife of H. M. Lewis, 
a resident of Evanston ; and Harold, who also makes his home in Evanston. 

In the attainment of his education Charles B. Gunnell pursued his studie.": 
in the schools of his native citv and in preparation for his professional career 
entered the Northwestern Univcrsitv at Chicago, Illinois, from which he was 
graduated with the class of ic)02. winning the Ph. G. degree. Following his 
graduation he returned to Evanston and entered business on his own account. He 
started with a small stock of drugs and druggists' sundries but has developed 
his trade to its present extensive proportions. He has today oiie of the largest 
pharmacies in his section of the state and his business is continually growing. 
It is the oldest business in continuous existence in this line in Evanston and from 



390 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

the beginning his trade has constantly increased, his success being due to his earn- 
est efforts to please his patrons, his reasonable prices and his straightforward 
dealing. 

On the 20th of September, 1909, in Evanston, Mr. Gunnell was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Emily H. Isberg, who was born at Medicine Bow, Wyoming, her 
parents being pioneer settlers of this section of the state. Her brother, William 
H. Isberg, was the first white male child born at Medicine Bow. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gunnell have become the parents of one child, Francis B. 

The religious faith of Mr. and Mrs. Gunnell is that of the Episcopal church, 
to the teachings of which they loyally adhere. He is also well known in Masonic 
circles, having attained the Knight Templar degree in the Albert Pike Com- 
mandery, and he is also a Xoble of the Mystic Shrine. He likewise belongs to 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His political endorsement has always 
been given to the republican party and he served for six years as a member of 
the state board of pharmacy through appointment of Governor Brooks. He has 
never been an aspirant for office in the usual sense, however, preferring to con- 
centrate his time and energies upon his business affairs, which have been wisely 
and carefully directed and have brought to him a substantial measure of success. 
He is a man of substantial worth — an opinion endorsed by all of his fellow towns- 
men, who entertain for him the warmest regard by reason of his well spent life, 
his business enterprise, his loyalty in citizenship and his devotion to the ties 
of friendship. 



JOSEPH HALL KING. 



Joseph Hall King, secretary and treasurer of the F. S. King Brothers Com- 
pany of Laramie and one of the prominent and representative residents of that 
cit)', was born August 28, 1874, in Barnsley, Yorkshire, England, a son of the 
Rev. William and Elizabeth (Stocker) King. 

The father was a prominent ^lethodist clergyman and was the founder of 
the Jersey Ladies' College on the island of Jersey. His daughter, Elizabeth 
Sarah, was the first student on the records of that institution. Rev. King was 
also chairman of the west riding in Yorkshire for the liberal party. He died in 
Kent in 1882, when but little past middle age. At his death he left a widow, who 
prior to her marriage was Miss Elizabeth Stocker, and their eight sons and two 
daughters, all of whom are now living and have attained creditable positions in 
various walks of life, reflecting the excellent home training which they received 
as well as their superior individuality. The record of the sons and daughters is 
as follows. William F. is connected with the Bristol branch of the National 
Provincial Bank of England. Frank S. is living in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Herbert 
J. is mentioned elsewhere in this work. Joseph H. is the next of the family. 
Harry is an expert chemist of England. Arnold was formerly manager of the 
Wolverhampton branch of the National Provincial Bank of England but is now 
an officer in the British army, doing service in Mesopotamia. Edward R. is a 
well known sheep commission man of Colorado, residing at Monte Vista. Ben- 
jamin Gregory was formerly representative on the London Coal Exchange of 
the Staffordshire collieries and is now a purchasing agent for the British govern- 
ment. Elizabeth Sarah is the wife of Edmund Searle and resides in Cornwall, 
England. Evelyn resides at the old homestead, which is maintained by the 
various members of the family. The mother lived to the age of sixty-two years, 
passing away in 1898. 

Joseph Hall King had good educational advantages. He attended the gram- 
mar schools, then prepared for college at boarding schools and concluded his 
preparatory work in Kingswood school at Bath, Somersetshire. L^p to this time 
his preparation had been for Oxford, but the presence in America of two older 
brothers. Frank S. and Herbert T.. caused Joseph H. King to decide upon trying 




xj^^< ^ '^^ . 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 393 

his fortunes in the new world, and to better fit himself for such a move, he took 
a practical course in general agriculture on a farm in England. In June, 1891, 
he started for the United States, Laramie, Wyoming, being his objective point. 
There he became connected with his brothers, Frank S. and Herbert J., who 
were in the sheep business with Paul Pascoe. Mr. King of this review became 
an employe of his brothers, who in 1892 separated their interests from those 
of Mr. Pascoe and as King Brothers conducted business on their own account. 
Joseph H. King continued as an employe with them until 1895, when he secured 
an interest in the business. In 1898 a partnership was formed under the style 
of F. S. King Brothers and was so continued until June 30, 1904, when the busi- 
ness was incorporated as the F. S. King Brothers Company, with F. S. King 
as the president, Herbert J. King as vice president and Joseph H. King as 
secretary and treasurer. The business continued in that way until 191 5, when 
Herbert J. and Joseph H. purchased the interest of Frank S., at which time 
Herbert J. King became the president, A. C. Jones vice president and Joseph 
H. King secretary and treasurer. They continued the firm name of the F. S. 
King Brothers Company, however. Their business is one of extensive propor- 
tions and they have won for themselves a most creditable place among the 
prominent sheep raisers of the state. 

On the 14th of June, 1906, in Laramie. Mr. King was united in marriage to 
Miss Estelle V. Abrams, a daughter of Ludolph and Sophia (Bath) Abrams, 
who were pioneer residents of Laramie, of whom further mention is made else- 
where in this work. Mr. and Mrs. King went to Europe on their wedding trip, 
visiting his old home and the scenes amid which his boyhood days were passed. 
They have become the parents of one son, Joseph D., who was born in Laramie, 
October 23, 1913. 

In politics Mr. King is a stanch republican, and while not an office seeker 
or politician in any sense of the term, he takes a keen interest in the success 
of his party and does all in his power to secure the adoption of its principles. 
Fraternally he is a Mason of high rank, belonging to lodge, chapter and com- 
mandery at Laramie and to Korein Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Rawlins. 
He is also a Scottish Rite Mason, having attained the thirty-second degree in 
the consistory at Cheyenne, and he is a past grand commander of the Grand 
Commandery of Wyoming Knights Templar. He is also a vestr>'man of St. 
Matthew's Episcopal church at Laramie. 

He stands as one of the foremost citizens of Laramie, interested in its prog- 
ress and ready at any time to further any good movement or project that tends 
to benefit the community along the lines of material, intellectual, social and moral 
progress. He has frequently been called upon to judge stock at various big state 
and international fairs, but has just as often declined. Since his marriage he 
has resided in Laramie, his home being at Seventh and Thornburg streets, and 
he and his wife enjoy the friendship and kindly regard of all with whom they 
have been brought in contact. 



WALTER K. SHOEMAKER, D. D. S. 

Dr. Walter K. Shoemaker is one of the younger representatives of the dental 
profession in Laramie. In his practice, however, he is demonstrating his thorough 
familiarity with the most scientific principles of the profession, combined with a 
mechanical skill and ingenuity that renders his work most effective, proving 
highly satisfactory to his many patrons. 

He was born in Denver, Colorado, March 28, 1891, a son of J. M. and 
Malinda (Walter) Shoemaker, who were natives of Ohio, the father having 
been born near Massillon, while the mother was born in Stark county, that 
state. It was in the year 1889 that J. ~M. Shoemaker removed westward to 
Denver, Colorado, where he engaged in railroad work, being connected with the 



394 HISTORY OF \\"YO.MI\(3 

freight department of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad. He is now with the 
Colorado Fuel & Iron Company, having devoted the greater part of his life to 
railway serxice. To him and his wife have been born two children, the daughter 
being Miss Laura Shoemaker, who became the wife of I. A. Sprong and resides 
in Denver. 

Dr. Sh'X'maker was the elder of the two children and in his boyhood attended 
the ]iuMic --cIiikiIs of Denver. cimtinuinL; his education in the West Denver high 
school, fniin which he was graduau-d with the class of 1911. He then took up 
the stud) of dcntistr)-. matriculating in the Colorado College of Dental Surgery, 
from which he was graduated in 1914. He located in Laramie, where he has 
since built up a lucrative practice and is today one of the leading representa- 
tives of the profession in the city. He has a splendidly equipped office, supplied 
with all modern appliances to facilitate dental work and his mechanical skill, 
combined with his broad scientific knowledge, makes him a most capable repre- 
sentative of the profession. 

On the 20th of August, 191 1, Dr. Shoemaker was married to ^liss Mildred 
C. Sprong, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John A. Sprong, of Denver. They have 
become parents of two children : Richard Walter, born in Denver, November 
26, 1913; and Roger Sprong, born in Laramie, June 14, 1915. 

Dr. Shoemaker is a Master Mason, an association which indicates the rules 
which govern his conduct, making him a man whom to know is to esteem and 
honor. He is also a member of the Xu Chaj^ter of the Psi Omega dental fra- 
ternity. He is of a social disposition and genial nature, and readily wins friends 
wherever he goes. In his profession he has made rapid progress, for he holds 
to the highest professional standards, observing closely the ethics of the pro- 
fession, and his skill and ability are winning for him a constantly growing 
practice. 



WILLIAM E. DIXXEEX. 

William E. Dinneen is proprietor of the Lincoln Highway Garage at Cheyenne 
and is engaged in handling the Reo and Hudson cars, in which connection he has 
developed a substantial business. He was born in Kansas on the nth of March, 
1861, and is a son of Maurice and Margaret (Williams) Dinneen. The family 
came to Wyoming in 1879, arriving in Laramie county on the 15th of May. The 
father turned his attention to the live stock business and homesteaded in this 
state, thus becoming actively identified with the pioneer development. He con- 
tributed much to the early progress of the state through his agricultural and 
live stock interests and always stood for the substantial upbuilding of Wyoming. 
During the period of the Civil war he served for a short time at the front in 
defense of the Lhiion. Both he and his wife have now passed away. 

U'illiam E. Dinneen was the second in order of birth in a family of two sons 
and two daughters. He acquired his education in the public schools and spent 
his youthful days with his father upon the ranch, having been a lad of eighteen 
years when he came with the family to ^^'voming. He continued to assist in the 
development and impiovement of the ranch until he attained his majority, when 
he began contracting in connection with the Express Company, devoting four 
years to that business. He then engaged with his brother, ]Maurice, in the 
grocery business in Cheyenne, establishing and conducting a store for fourteen 
years, during which period they built up a large and gratifying trade. While 
thus engaged. William E. Dinneen also turned his attention to the livery business. 
which he followed for eight years, having begun the automobile business before 
giving up the livery. In the meantime his brother had passed away. He later 
sold his grocery business, which had been developed until it was one of the 
largest establishments of the kind in the state. He then concentrated his efi'orts 
and attention upon the automobile business and with its growth he determined 



396 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

to withdraw from the livery business, and sold out to Henry Hoffman. He 
erected the building that he now occupies — a modern brick garage, which is splen- 
didly equipped. He has a line showroom for the display of the Reo and Hudson 
cars, which he handles, having the agency for the Hudson in two counties and 
for the Reo in five counties. Something of the growth and extent of his business 
is indicated in the fact that he now employs fifteen men. His patronage is very 
gratifying and his activities are bringing to him a very substantial annual income. 

In 1890 Air. Dinneen was united in marriage to Aliss Kittie Tierney and to 
them have been born the following named : Roy, who is engaged in the automo- 
bile business in Casper; Maurice, a law student who is now with the United 
States army; Margaret, the wife of C. H. Hutchinson; William J., a student in 
the Naval Academy of the United States ; and Nan, at home. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church and Mr. Din- 
neen has become identified with the Knights of Columbus as a fourth degree 
member. He is also a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the 
Woodmen of the World and of the Industrial Club. He is interested in com- 
munity affairs and for six years he served on the frontier committee. Those 
who know him regard him as a public-spirited man, interested in community 
and state aft'airs to the extent of giving active aid and co-operation to all move- 
ments for the general good. His worth as a man, as a citizen and as a business 
man is widely acknowledged. 



WILLIAM DAVID BRENNAN. 

William David Brennan, assistant general manager at Cheyenne for the Union 
Pacific Coal Company, is a man of marked executive ability and keen business 
discrimination combined with unfaltering enterprise. Lie is thus well qualified 
for the onerous and responsible duties which devolve upon him in his present 
connection. He was born in Malone, New York, October 29, 1877, a son of 
William D. and Laura C. (Smith) Brennan, both of whom have passed away. 

After acquiring a public school education, William D. Brennan spent one year 
as a student in the University of Minnesota and then went east to enter Yale, 
being graduated from the Shefiield Scientific School of the Yale University as a 
member of the class of 1900. Thus well qualified by thorough scientific training 
for important duties along the line of his chosen profession, he spent nine 
months in the engineering department of the city of Boston, and on the ist of 
February, 1901, became connected with the engineering department of the Union 
Pacific Coal Company at Rock Springs, Wyoming. He was active in the worl< 
of opening the mines at Cumberland and did much to promote the growth an:l 
development of the camp there. He was also the engineer and superintendent 
at the opening of the camp at Superior, where his labors were concentrated from 
1906 until 1912. In the latter year he came to Cheyenne as general superin- 
tendent of the company and from that position has been advanced to assistant 
general manager, with added responsibilities and duties. He is now directing 
his efforts to administrative direction and executive control and his labors are 
productive of excellent results. He is thoroughly familiar with all conditions 
bearing upon the utilization and development of the coal resources of the state 
as controlled by the Union Pacific Company and his labors are proving a sub- 
stantial element in the success of the business. 

On the 3d of July, 1905, Mr. Brennan was united in marriage to Miss Blanche 
AlcCoy, a native of Mansfield, Ohio, and they have one child, Elizabeth L. 
Mr. and Mrs. Brennan are consistent members of the Presbyterian church, taking 
an active interest in its work and contributing generously to its support. 

His political endorsement is given to the republican party. Fraternally he 
is an Elk and a Mason, having attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish 
Rite. He also belongs to the Industrial and the Country clubs and he has those 



HISTORY OF WYOMING 397 

traits of character which make for personal popularity. An eminent American 
statesman has said : "The strongest men of the country are those who have 
been born and reared in the east and have sought the opportunities of the west 
for the development of their business careers." Such is the record of William 
D. Brennan, who with the broad scientific training aft'orded by Yale has brought 
his knowledge to bear in solving the problems of the west in the utilization of 
its mineral resources, especially in the coal field. Collegiate training and prac- 
tical experience have made him splendidly qualified for his present duties and his 
capability places him with those men who are proving most important factors 
in the upbuilding of the state. 



CHARLES EARL CADY. 

Charles Earl Cady is well known in commercial circles in Laramie as a mem- 
ber of the Star Grocery Company. He was born October 22, i88g, in Chapman, 
Nebraska, and was the second in order of birth in a family of three children 
whose parents were Alva V>. and Mary (Linden) Cady. The father was born 
in Nebraska and represents one of the pioneer families of that state, of English 
and Irish lineage. In 1907 he removed to Laramie and is now agent in this 
city for the L'nion Pacific Railway Company. His wife was also born in Nebraska 
and represents one of the old families of Grand Island. 

Spending his youthful days under the parental roof, Charles Earl Cady was 
educated in the public schools of his native state and in the LTniversity of Wyo- 
ming, in which he pursued a business course. In the meantime, however, he 
had made his initial step in the business world, starting out to earn his living 
when a youth of but twelve years. He was first employed by the LTnion Pacific 
Railroad Company in Nebraska as a call boy, and on the removal of the family 
to Laramie he was advanced to a clerical position and remained in connection 
with the railroad company until 1908. It was subsequent to that time that he 
continued his education by pursuing his business course. Later he secured a 
position with the Gem City Grocery Company, by which he was employed for 
two years, on the expiration of which period he formed a partnership with 
Henry W. Jensen and organized the Star Grocery Company. They began busi- 
ness in a small way but from that humble beginning have developed one of the 
leading stores of the kind in this section of the country, carrying a stock fully 
five times as large as that with which they started out. Their establishment is 
thoroughly attractive in its appearance and arrangement and in the line of goods 
carried, while the business methods of the house are such as commend the com- 
pany to the support of the public. They employ five people and their store occu- 
pies a building eighty by eighty feet. It is thoroughly modern in equipment and 
up to date in every particular. 

On the 8th of July, 1914, Mr. Cady was united in marriage to Miss Wilburta 
Knight, a native of Wyoming and a daughter of the late Wilbur Clinton Knight, 
who was state geologist of the University of Wyoming for manv vears and was 
one of the pioneers of this section of the country. Her mother bore the maiden 
name of Emma Holvell and is now filling the position of dean of women in the 
University of \\'yoming. Mr. and ]\Irs. Cady have become the parents of two 
children: Mary Elizabeth, born in Laramie, April 14, 1916; and Charles Earl, 
who was born October 5, 1917. 

Mr. Cady has always been a stalwart advocate of republican principles and 
he stands for progress and improvement in all matters that have to do with the 
general welfare of his city and state. He belongs to the Chamber of Commerce 
and is in hearty sympathy with its well defined plans and measures for the 
upbuilding of Laramie and the extension of its trade relations. He is a member 
of one of the college fraternities and his religious faith is evidenced in his mem- 
bership in the First Presbyterian church. ]Mr. and Mrs. Cady occupy an enviable 



398 HISTORY OF WYOMING 

social position and are highly esteemed in those circles where intelligence and 
genuine personal worth are accepted as the passports into good societ)-. He 
has become an important factor in business circles in Laramie and his success 
is well deserved, for in him are embraced the characteristics of an unbending 
integrity, unabating energy and industry that never flags. 



JAMES MORGAN. 



James Alorgan, secretary and treasurer of the United Mine Workers of Dis- 
trict No. 22. was born in \'ienna. ( )hio, on the 8th of November, 1876, his parents 
being Ed and Margaret ( Wciri Mnrgan. On leaving the Buckeye stale the fam- 
ily removed to Golorado and :iftcr\\ard to Wyoming, settling at Glenrock, where 
they became identitied with coal mining interests. The mother is still living 
and Mr. Morgan also has one brother and one sister surviving. 

In the public schools of Colorado and Wyoming, James Morgan pursued his 
education and in the school of experience has learned many of life's valuable 
lessons. From the age of sixteen years he followed mining and is therefore 
familiar with every phase of the business of taking the coal from the ground and 
preparing it for the market. Moreover, he is thoroughly familiar with existing 
labor conditions and he believes thoroughly that the interests of the miners must 
be protected by organized efl:'ort. In 1905 he was elected to his present position 
as secretary and treasurer of the United Mine Workers of District No. 22 and 
has been nine times reelected to that position in a district which has about eight 
thousand members, organized in thirty-five local societies. 

On the 26th of April, 1904. Mr. Morgan was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Begley and to them have been born five sons : Ed, James, Arthur. William 
and Robert. 

r^Ir. Morgan is a Protestant in religious faith and in politics he maintains an 
independent course. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the IMasons, having attained the 
thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. He is intefested in all that has to do 
with the welfare and progress of his community and his state and is a public- 
spirited citizen and highly respected man, enjoying the goodwill and confidence 
of all with whom he has been associated. 



DAVID YOUNG 



David Young, junior partner in the firm of Adams & Young, grocers, and a 
leading and substantial business man of Buffalo, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, 
on the i2th of June, 1868. He spent his boyhood and youth in that picturesque 
region which was the home of Burns, and with whose history many an interesting 
song and story is intervowen. He acquired his education in the public schools 
of his native country and on attaining his majority he resolved to try his