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Full text of "History of the Yakima Valley, Washington; comprising Yakima, Kittitas, and Benton Counties .."

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HISTORY 



of the 



Yakima Valley 

Washington 



Coiiijyrisiiig 



Yakima, Kittitas and Benton 
Counties 



Illustrated 



VOLUME II 



THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING CO. 
1919 



1369773 




STEINWEG 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



W. L. STEIXWEG. 

Honored and respected by all, there is no man who occupies a more enviable 
position in the financial and business circles of Yakima than \V. L. Steinweg, the 
president of the First National Bank of North Yakima. This is due not alone to 
the success which he has achieved but also to the straightforward business policy 
which he has ever followed and to his active and resultant efiforts to cooperate in 
the upbuilding of the community in which he has made his home. He was born in 
Baltimore, Maryland, September 30, 1852, and is a son of Charles and Henrietta 
Steinweg, who, leaving the Atlantic coast in 18SS made their way to San Francisco, 
California. The father was a wagon maker and wheelwright by trade and he and 
his wife continued to make their home at the Golden Gate until they were called 
to their final rest. 

W. L. Steinweg was but three years of age at the time of the removal of his 
parents to San Francisco and his education ' was acquired in its public schools. He 
afterward removed to Bellingham Bay, Washington, and occupied the position of 
secretary to the superintendent of the mines of the Bellingham Bay Coal Company. 
Later he had charge of the property of that corporation for a number of years 
after the mines were abandoned. He came to Yakima in 1886 to accept the position 
of cashier of the bank with which he is now identified and through the intervening 
period, covering more than three decades, he has been a most prominent factor in 
the successful management and conduct of what is today recognized as one of the 
strongest financial instituions of this section of the state. It was organized as the 
First National Bank of Yakima in the old town of Yakima, and upon the founding of 
North Yakima in 1885 was reorganized as the First National Bank of North Yakima 
and removed to the new town. It was originally founded as a private bank by 
Judge Whitson. In 1886 the officers were: J. R. Lewis, president, who was at one 
time circuit judge and is now deceased: and A. W. Engle, cashier. The latter was 
formerly of Seattle and later of EUensburg and ultimately of Yakima. Washington, 
and was the first state bank examiner. He now resides in Seattle. The vice-presi- 
dent of the institution was Edward Whitson and the directors, in addtion to the 
officers, were Charles and J. H. Carpenter, who were pioneer settlers and have now 
passed awaj'. In the year 1886 W. L. Steinweg became cashier and thus entered 
into active relations with the management and control of the bank. Following the 
retirement of the first president, Edward Whitson served as chief executive officer 
of the institution and was succeeded by W. M. Ladd, while on the 14th of January, 
1908, Mr. Steinweg was elected to the presidency and on the 10th of July, 1912, C. R. 
Donovan became cashier as the successor to A. B. Cline. The old building occupied 
by the bank was removed to the corner of Second and East Yakima streets and in 
1888 the present brick building was erected. It was fifty by one hundred feet and 
since that time a room has been added, making the bank fifty by one hundred and 
twenty-five feet and two stories in height. The upper floor is used for offices. The 
bank is today capitalized for one hundred thousand dollars and has surplus and 
undivided profits of almost one hundred and eighty-two thousand dollars, while its 
deposits have reached three and a quarter million dollars. The bank is a member 
of the Federal Reserve system and is the oldest and largest bank in central Wash- 
ington. The policy which has been maintained is one which has ever borne the 
closest investigation and scrutiny. The officers have recognized the fact that the 
(1) 



6 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

bank is most worthy of patronage that most carefully safeguards the interests of 
depositors and its course has at all times been above suspicion. Moreover, it has 
done much through judicious loans to advance business enterprise and prosperity in 
this section of the state and results achieved have been most satisfactory. Thirty- 
two years' connection with the bank makes the institution a monument to the enter- 
prise and ability of W. L. Steinweg. 

In the year 1876 Mr. Steinweg was united in marriage to Miss Susanna Engle, 
of Xew Jersey, who passed away in 1895. Eleven years later, or in 1906, he mar- 
ried Ida H. Sharkey, of North Yakima. The children of the first marriage were 
William Engle and George Woolman, both of whom have passed away. 

Fraternally Mr. Steinweg is connected with Masonry, belonging to Yakima 
Lodge, Xo. 22, A. F. & A. M., and to the Rose Croix. In politics he is a republican, 
while his religious faith is that of the Christian Science church. He is a man of 
progressive citizenship and the place which he occupies as a factor in the upbuilding 
and development of Yakima can scarcely be overestimated. 



JOHN E. SHANNON. 

John E. Shannon, of Yakima, prominently and successfully identified with the 
agricultural and horticultural interests of the valley, was born in Coshocton, Ohio, 
•August 14, 1860, a son of Isaac N. and Cassandra (Endsley) Shannon. The parents 
were natives of Ohio, where they spent their entire lives. There the father followed 
the occupation of farming. He was a son of Isaac Shannon, Sr., and his grandfather 
was born on the Shannon river in Ireland. He came to the L'nited States prior 
to the Revolutionary war. One of the representatives of this family was numbered 
among the signers of the Declaration of Independence. The grandfather of John 
E. Shannon took up a homestead in Ohio and thereon resided until his death. The 
family has ever been noted for patriotic loyalty as well as progressiveness in busi- 
ness. Several of the uncles of John E. Shannon of this review served as soldiers 
of the Civil war. 

In the public schools of Ohio, John E. Shannon acquired his education and 
when not busy with his textbooks assisted in the work of the home farm. When his 
schooldays were over he concentrated his efiforts and attention upon farm work 
in that state until 1880, when he removed westward to Colorado, where he resided 
until 1884, being there engaged in civil engineering. Between the years 1884 and 
1893 he resided in Wyoming, where he also practiced the profession of civil engi- 
neering, being actively engaged on irrigation and railway projects. With his re- 
moval to the far northwest in 1893 he purchased a home in Yakima and engaged 
in loaning money. In 1895 he purchased forty acres of land two and three- 
quarters of a mile west of Yakima and at once began its improvement. He planted 
an orchard there and afterward sold a part of that place but later purchased other 
land and now has seventy-eight acres in all, of which thirty-eight acres is planted to 
fruit trees, including apples, pears, peaches, apricots and plums. He also engages to 
some extent in the raising of hay and grain and his business interests have been 
most wisely and carefully conducted, his course at all times being characterized by 
unwearied industry and unfaltering determination. He has his own cold storage and 
packing plant and in addition to raising he also buys fruit and is one of the big 
fruit producers and shippers of this section of the state. He became a charter mem- 
ber of the Yakima County Horticultural L'nion and was one of the. organizers of 
the Yakima Valley Fruit Growers' .Association but in recent years has conducted 
his business independently of such organizations. His long experience has enabled 
him to speak with authority upon the subject of fruit raising in the Yakima valley. 
He has closely studied every phase of the business and that his ideas are practical 
and progressive is at once indicated in the success which has come to him. 

On the 22d of December, 1887, Mr. Shannon was united in marriage to Miss 
Faith Luckey, of Iowa, by whom he has had three children, namely: Clinton, who 
is married and is a fruit grower of Yakima county: Harold E., at home; and Fern, 
who is deceased. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 7 

Mr, Shannon and his family are members of the Methodist church and are 
people of prominence in Yakima, occupying an enviable social position. Mr. Shannon 
has built a beautiful home on his ranch and its hospitality is greatly enjoyed by 
all who know them. In politics he has ever been a republican but never an office 
seeker, although he served for three terms as county engineer of Johnson county, 
Wyoming. Since coming to the west he has preferred to concentrate his entire 
efforts and attention upon his business interests, and the development of his orchards 
has placed him among the most successful and prominent fruit raisers of this 
section of the state. 



HOX. RALPH KAUFFMAN. 

Hon. Ralph KaufFman, a distinguished member of the bar of Ellensburg whose 
extensive practice connects him with much of the important litigation heard in the 
courts of his district, is also identified with ranching interests in this state and, 
moreover, has been a most helpful factor in the war activities which have so recently 
engaged the attention of the country. Mr. KaufTman is a native of Pennsylvania. 
He was born in Mechanicsvillc, that state, on the 14th of October, 1860, a son of 
Isaac B. and Sybil A. (Merklin) KaufFman. The family was established in Pennsyl- 
vania during early colonial days. The mother's people were French and settled in 
Pennsylvania in 1711. When the Revolutionary war was inagurated representatives 
of the name valiantly espoused the cause of the colonies and assisted in winning 
.'American independence. Isaac B. Kaufifman was a lieutenant of the Xinth Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry during the Civil war and was killed while defending the interests of 
the L'nion at the front. His widow always remained true to his memory, never 
marrying again, and she passed away in Pennsylvania in 1909. She had but two 
children, the younger being Isaac, a banker of Pennsylvania, who died in 1905. 
In both the paternal and maternal lines are found many names that figure promi- 
nently upon the pages of history. Mr. Kaufifman of this review is a cousin of Regi- 
nald Wright KaufFman, the poet, and. also of James Lee KaufTman, professor of 
.'American law in the Imperial University at Tokio, Japan. 

After completing a public school education Ralph Kaufifman passed the en- 
trance examination for West Point and was named an alternate but did not have 
the opportunity of becoming a student at the military school. Determining upon 
the practice of law as a life work, he then entered the University of Pennsylvania, 
in which he completed a law course in 1886. He was president of his class there and 
was not only a most thorough student but also a popular representative of the school. 
In the same year he came to the northwest, making his way to Portland, Oregon, 
and there he assisted in organizing a loan and trust company. In 1887 he came 
to Ellensburg as a representative of that company and the following year he or- 
ganized the Ellensburg Xational Bank, of which he remained the cashier until 
1^90. He then resumed tlie active practice of law in connection with Mitchell 
Gilliam, who later removed to King county, Washington. Mr. Kauffman continued 
in active law practice alone from that time until 1895, when he entered into partner- 
ship with J. E. Frost, with whom he was associated for a decade. Mr. Kauffman 
was then appointed state tax commissioner. He practiced law alone until 1907 
and in March of that year he was appoined judge of the superior court, to which 
office he was elected in 1908 and re-elected in 1912. He was again a candidate for the 
office in the fall of 1916, but on that date was defeated. He then resumed the private 
practice of law. in wliich he has since continued, and his clientage is now extensive 
and of a distinctively representative character. Few men are . more thoroughly 
informed concerning the principles of jurisprudence or are more accurate in the 
application of these principles to the points in litigation. For two terms Mr. KaufF- 
man served as city attorney, nor have his business activities been confined to pro- 
fessional lines alone, for he has large holdings of ranch lands in this part of the 
state, owning two hundred and fifty acres under irrigation. He was one of the pro- 
jectors of the Cascade irrigation canal and he has been a close student of the water 



8 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

problems of the northwest and of all that has to do with the substantial develop- 
ment of this section of the country. 

Moreover, Mr. Kauffman has been a prominent factor in public life as a trustee 
of the State Xornial. in which position he served for several years, and as a school 
director. His political endorsement has always been given to the republican party 
and he is actuated in all that he does by a marked devotion to the general good. 

Mr. Kauflfman was married November 24, 1888, to Miss Lida D. Stayman, a 
daughter of Milton C. and Mary Jane (Bailey) Stayman. of Winchester, Virginia. 
The children of this marriage are: Dorothy, the wife of Lieutenant Howard L. 
Lewis of the United States army; and Charlotte, the wife of Lieutenant Harold A. 
Mallum also of the United States army. 

The religious faith of the family is indicated by the membership of Mr. and 
Mrs. Kauffman in Grace Episcopal church, in which he is serving as senior warden. 
He has been most helpful along the lines of war activities. He was chairman of 
the Kittitas County Legal -Advisory Board to advise and aid in the draft registra- 
tion and he is chairman of the Kittitas County Chapter of the American Red Cross, 
having served in that capacity since its organization. His activities in behalf of 
war work have been far-reaching and resultant and his public-spirited citizenship 
stands as one of the pre-eminent traits of his character, his devotion to the public 
good being manifest in his law practice, in his official service and in every relation 
where his activities have touched the general interests of society. 



HOX HEXRY JOSEPH SXIVELY. 

Hon. Henry Joseph Snively is a distinguished member of the Y'akima bar and one 
of the recognized leaders of the democratic party in the state. In fact, through 
his political activity and his incumbency in office he has done much to shape the 
afifairs of the state, his influence always being on the side of progress, development 
and improvement. What he has accomplished represents the fit utilization of the 
innate powers and talents with which nature endowed him. He has recognized and 
readily utilized the opportunities which have come his way and his popularity as a 
man and the faith reposed in him by his fellow townsmen have been indicated by the 
fact that on various occasions he has been the only nominee on the democratic 
ticket elected to office. 

Mr. Snively is a native of Virginia. He was born on the 17th of .August, 1856, 
and is a son of Ambrose and Elizabeth (Harritt) Snively. The father is a native 
of Germany but came to the L'nited States with his parents when but six weeks 
old. Reared to manhood in Virginia, he there engaged in contracting and building, 
which he followed at various places in the Old Dominion. He now makes his 
home in Grafton, West Virginia. 

Reared in the south. Hon. Henry Joseph Snively of this review was graduated 
from the University of West Virginia with the class of 1877 and then entered upon 
his law course at the University of Virginia where he took the degree of Bachelor 
of Law in 1879. He afterward practiced lavv' in West Virginia for seven years and in 
1886 he arrived in North Yakima, where he has since followed his profession. He is 
recognized as one of the distinguished and eminent members of the bar of central 
Washington. As a lawyer he is sound, clear-minded and well trained, felicitous and 
clear in argument, thoroughly in earnest, full of the vigor of conviction, never 
abusive of his adversaries and imbued with the highest courtesy and yet a foe worthy 
of the steel of the most able opponent. He has other interests outside of his pro- 
fession, for in 1912 he established and now owns the Kennewick flouring mill and his 
investments include large stock ranches in Yakima and Benton counties. In all 
business affairs he has displayed sound judgment and keen discrimination, carrying 
forward to successful completion whatever he has undertaken. 

In politics Mr. Snively has been a most active democrat, one of the party 
leaders in the state. He was nominated' for the office of district attorney for the 
district comprising Yakima and Kittitas counties in 1886 and was elected by a large 
majority against the Hon. C. B. Graves, who was later judge of the district court. 




HON. HENRY J. SNIVELY 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 11 

In 1S88 Mr. Snively was reelected over Walter M. Milroy and on each occasion was 
the only successful democratic nominee on the ticket. While serving as district 
attorney he was appointed by Governor Semple a member of the code commission 
to formulate a code for the laws of the territory and did active and valuable work in 
that connection. This code was later revised by W. Lair Hill and is known as 
the Hill code. In 1S9U Mr. Snively was the democratic candidate for attorney general 
of Washington, but with the others of his ticket was defeated. In 1891 he was 
elected to represent his district in the state legislature, being the only democrat 
to receive a majority at that election. In 1892 he was elected a delegate to the 
national democratic convention held at Chicago and at the request of the national 
campaign manager seconded the nomination of Grover Cleveland for the presi- 
dency. In -August. 1892, his party made him its standard bearer in the state elec- 
tion and as candidate for governor of Washington he ran live thousand votes ahead 
of his ticket but was defeated by a few hundred votes by the republican candidate, 
John H. McGraw. In 1897 Mr. Snively was appointed by Governor John R. Rogers 
a member of the state board of control, having the management of all the state 
institutions except the University and the Agricultural College, in which capacity 
he served for four j'ears. Since 1900 he has concentrated his efforts and attention 
upon the practice of law, but does not cease to feel the deepest concern in those 
questions of public import which affect the welfare, the sociological and the economic 
development, of the state. 

Mr. Snively was married in 1881 to Miss Elizabeth H. Martin, of Grafton, West 
Virginia, a daughter of Luther and Anna M. (Harrison) Martin. The father, who 
was a lumberman, was born in West Virginia, while the mother's birth occurred in 
the District of Columbia. She was a descendant of the James River Harrisons. Mrs. 
Snively was born in Virginia in 1858 and was graduated from the Pittsburgh Female 
College. To Mr. and Mrs. Snively have been born three children, Janie M., born 
in Grafton, West Virginia, January 12, 1883, is the wife of Dr. Edmond S. West, of 
Yakima; Jessie H., born in Grafton, July 30, 1885. is the wife of Dr. A. F. Campbell, 
of Yakima, and has two children, W. F. and Henry J. Henry J. Snively, Jr., the young- 
est of the family, was born in North Yakima, January 25, 1900, and is now manager of 
his father's stock farm. The family attend the Episcopal church and in social circles 
of the city occupy a very prominent position. The famil_v residence was built in 
1888 by Colonel Hewlett and later was remodeled, being one of the finest homes 
of the state. 

Mrs. Snively takes a very prominent interest in church work and in the lead- 
ing social movements of the city and both Mr. and Mrs. Snively exert much in- 
fluence over public thought and he has left the impress of his individuality upon 
many movements and measures which have had to do with shaping the policy and 
progress of the commonwealth. 



GEORGE DOXALD. 



It was the consensus of public opinion that the death of George Donald "marked 
the passing of one of the best known and most substantial citizens of Yakima." 
He was prominently known in business circles as a bank president, rancher and 
railroad and ditch builder and through the extent and breadth of his activities and 
interests contributed in most marked measure to the development, upbuilding and 
progress of Yakima and central Washington. He had been closely associated with 
the management of the Yakima National Bank since 1892 and aided in its organiza- 
tion four years prior to that time. He was liorn in Canada in 1859, a son of John 
and Jane Donald, who were natives of Scotland but who crossed the Atlantic to 
Canada when young people. The father died in the year 1870, but the mother sur- 
vives and is now living in Yakima. 

George Donald was indebted to the public school system of his native country 
for the educational opportunities which he enjoyed. He was a youth of nineteen years 
when he crossed the border into the United States, becoming a resident of Chicago 
in 1878, at which time he was employed by the Grand Trunk Railway Company. 



12 HISTORY OF YAKIMA \ALLEY 

In 1881 he started westward by stage from Bismarck. South Dakota, and after travel- 
ing eleven days and nine nights finally reached Montana, where he was witli the 
Northern Pacific Railway Company, following the building of its line to Yakima in 
1884. He was afterward engaged in railway contracting and was closely identified 
with the development of railway systems in the west to the time of his demise. 
He built the Lewiston extension, also the Farmington branch, two coal roads on 
the western slope, and he built the North Yakima & VaUley Railroad, making his 
home all during this period in Yakima. He also built the Zillah. Moxee, White Swan, 
Naches and Cowiche branches and in fact all the branch lines in the Yakima valley. 
He likewise built the first large irrigation ditch in the valley in 1889. known as the 
Kiona canal, and was later connected with the construction of the Sunnyside canal 
besides furthering many other irrigation projects. He developed several ranches 
and thus contributed in marked measure to the progress and upbuilding of his sec- 
tion of the state. 

Mr. Donald's connection with the banking interests of Yakima dated from May 
1888, when he became one of the organizers of the Yakima National Bank, of which 
H. S. Rowe was elected president, A. B. Weed vice president and Mr. Donald the 
cashier. The bank was located on Yakima avenue, between First and Second 
streets. In 1892 Mr. Donald was elected to the presidency and Mr. Weed and Mr. 
Rowe retired. J. D. Cornett then served as cashier from 1892 until 1908, or for a 
period of sixteen years, when he was succeeded by Frank Bartholet, who has since 
occupied that position. L. L. Thorp is vice president of the bank, and George E. 
Stacy and Edwin D. Clark assistant cashiers. The directors of the bank were 
George Donald. J. D. Cornett, L. L. Thorp, W. I. Lince, C. F. Myer. P. A. Bounds. 
Mary M. Donald, Frank Bartholet and A. H. Sinclair. In 1894 the bank's statement 
showed deposits of one hundred and eighteen thousand five hundred and eighty-two 
dollars. Ten years later, or in March, 1904, the deposits had increased to six hundred 
and two thousand nine hundred and fifty-one dollars and the bank's statement of 
1917 shows deposits amounting to two million, three hundred and forty-two thousand 
four hundred and forty-six dollars. The bank was originally capitalized for fifty 
thousand dollars but this was increased to one hundred thousand dollars in 1917 
and the institution has a surplus of more than one hundred thousand dollars, while 
its capital and surplus amounts to two hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars. 
The bank has been continuously under the same management. In 1903 the present 
building at First street and Yakima avenue was completed — a two-stroy structure 
seventy-five by one hundred and thirty feet, the building including the hardware 
store which adjoins the bank. President of the institution for more than a quarter 
of a century, Mr. Donald was the chief factor in establishing its policy, directing 
its activities and promoting its success. 

On the 17th of September. 1885, Mr. Donald was united in marriage to Miss 
Clara Burch and to them was born a son, George, now living in Tacoma, where he 
is employed in a bank. On the 14th of September, 1904, Mr. Donald wedded Miss 
Mary Di'tmars and they had four children: Jessie Mary, now twelve years of age; 
Jean, ten; Allen, eight; and Remsen, two. 

Fraternally Mr. Donald was connected with the Masons and attained the Knight 
Templar degree. He was also a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks and he was one of the organizers of the Yakima Commercial Club, of which 
he twice served as president. A republican in politics, he was a delegate to the 
national convention at Chicago in 1904 and he put forth every possible effort not 
only to promote the success of his party but to advance the welfare and progress of 
the community in which he lived. He was keenly interested in war activities and the 
governor appointed him a member of the State Council of Defense, making him 
chairman of the transportation department. He rendered valuable aid in that con- 
nection and suggestions which he made in his official capacity pertaining to the uni- 
fication of the railroads of the northwest were considered and to some extent acted 
upon by the highest authority. All through the period of the war he was alert to 
the issues of the times and he was one of the first Yakima citizens to take an active 
part in organizing the war drives, giving himself unsparingly to the work of the 
State Council of Defense. He was also greatly interested in the campaign to mduce 
thrift among the American people and was county chairman for the War Savmgs 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 13 

Stamps drive and organized the campaign to put the war stamps into every home. 
His own personal subscriptions to the Liberty Loan and stamp drives were very 
large. All who knew Mr. Donald bear testimony to his sterHng worth and pro- 
gressiveness in business and his many admirable qualities. He did not have the 
extended circle of friends that many claim, but his friends were very close to him 
and at all times he held friendship inviolable. His demise occurred on the 4th of 
March, 1919. 



ALEXANDER E. McCREDY. 

Alexander E. McCredy, a banker and capitalist of VVapato and a most progressive 
and representative business man of the Yakima valley, comes to this district from 
Yamhill county, Oregon, where he was born on the 3d of May, 1868. He is a son 
of William A. and Elizabeth B. (Beanian) McCredy, the former a native of Ohio, 
while the latter was born in Missouri. 

A public school education, acquired by Alexander E. McCredy in his native 
state, was supplemented by collegiate training at McMinnville, Oregon, and by a 
course in a business college at Portland, Oregon. He then became identified with 
live stock interests of Klickitat county, where he remained from 1880 until 1893. 
In the latter year he removed to the Yakima valley and here turned his attention to 
the sheep and cattle industry. In 1902 he was appointed by Secretary of the In- 
terior Hitchcock as Indian post trader at Simcoe, which was later named VVapato 
and at which point a postoffice was established with Mrs. McCredy as postmistress. 
In 1905 Mr. McCredy laid out the townsite of Wapato. since which time he has 
been closely associated with the development and progress of the district. On the 
9th of April, 1906, he established the Wapato State Bank, which was nationalized on 
the 19th of May, 1908, as the First National Bank. He has remained at the head 
of the institution as president since its inception, bending his efforts to administrative 
direction and executive control. This is but one feature of his business, however, 
for he is identified with many activities. It was Mr. McCredy who established tli'c 
Post Traders Store, now conducted under the name of the Hub Mercantile Com- 
pany and of which he remained treasurer until 1916. His efforts in behalf of Wapato 
have been far-reaching and beneficial. He began the development of the townsite on 
an eighty-acre tract by a special act of congress and later another eighty acres was 
added the following year. Mr. McCredy purchased the land and organized the 
Wapato Development Company, of which he has since been the secretary and 
treasurer. Good lots were sold at from one hundred to five hundred dollars and 
some of these lots that brought five hundred dollars in the beginning have ad- 
vanced in price to fifteen hundred dollars. He became one of the organizers of the 
Yakima Trust Company and figures prominently in financial as well as in real estate 
and commercial circles. .A considerable portion of his landed possessions he is 
carefully cultivating, and his home at Wapato is one of the most beautiful in the 
valley. 

In 1900 Mr. McCredy was married to Miss -Mice Barge, a native of Illinois but a 
resident of Yakima at the time of her marriage. She is a daughter of Professor B. 
F. Barge, who was the first president of the State Normal School at Ellensburg. 

Mr. McCredy is a charter member of Wapato Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and has 
taken the Scottish Rite degrees, while of Afifi Temple of the Mystic Shrine he is a 
life member. He has also passed through the York Rite, being identified with 
Yakima Chapter, No. 21, R. A. M., and Yakima Commandery, No. 13, K. T., going 
up in the first classes in each organization. He is likewise a life member of the Elks 
Lodge No. 318 of Yakima and he belongs to the Yakima Country Club. His political 
endorsement is given to the republican party. His activities have covered a wide 
scope. Opportunities which others have passed heedlessly by he has recognized 
and developed and his labors have been a most potent force in bringing about desired 
results. Any one meeting Mr. McCredy face to face would know at once that he 
is an individual embodying all the elements of what in this country we term a 
"square" man — one in whom to have confidence, a dependable man in any relation 



14 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

and any emergency. His quietude of deportment, his easy dignity, his frankness 
and cordiality, with a total absence of anything sinister or anything to conceal, 
foretoken a man who is ready to meet any obligation of life with the confidence and 
courage that come of conscious personal ability, right conception of things and an 
habitual regard for what is best in the exercise of human activity. 



CHARLES R. DONOVAN. 

For almost a quarter of a century Charles R. Donovan has been identified with 
financial interests in Yakima, first in connection with public service and later as a 
representative of banking interests. In July, 1900, he entered into relations with the 
First National Bank, of which he is now the cashier. Mr. Donovan is of Canadian 
birth. He was born in Chatham, Ontario, on the 4th of May, 1869, and is a son of 
James and Sarah Donovan. In 1889 the parents removed with their family to 
Tacoma, Washington. The father died October 31, 1918, and had engaged in the 
bakery business in the east but was living retired at the time of his death. His widow 
is still a resident of Tacoma. 

' Charles R. Donovan acquired a public school education in his native country 
and supplemented it by a course in a collegiate institute. He afterward pursued a 
commercial course in Tacoma and thus acquainted himself with modern business 
methods. In 1892 he removed to North Yakima and was with the Prosser Falls and 
Priest Rapids Irrigation Company until 1894. From 1895 until 1900 he acceptably 
and creditably filled the position of deputy county treasurer and it was his record in 
that connection that secured him a position in the First National Bank, which he 
entered in July, 1900. Steadily working his way upward in that institution, .he was 
elected its cashier on the 10th of July, 1912, and has since served in that capacity. 
He is alert, energetic and progressive and is doing much to further the success of the 
bank. 

On the 3d of May. 1899. Mr. Donovan was married to Miss Anna M. Ditter, a 
daughter of Henry and Katherine Ditter. Their children are: Mary; Anna; Agnes; 
Katherine, deceased; Ursula; Charles J.; and Alfred. The religious faith of the fam- 
ily is that of the Catholic church and Mr. Donovan is identified with the Knights of 
Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters and the Knights of The Maccabees. In 
politics he maintains an independent course, voting according to the dictates of his 
judgment with little regard to party ties. He has served as city treasurer of Yakima 
for ten years, filling the position until the cotnmission form of government was 
adopted, and his military service covers connection with the Washington National 
Guard. He is a typical resident of the northwest, ever watchful of opportunities 
pointing to progress along the lines of benefit for the individual and for the com 
munity. 



JOHN S. GABBARD. 



While one of the more recent arrivals in Cowiche, John S. Gabbard has already 
made for himself a creditable place as a successful ranchman. He was born in 
Owsley county, Kentucky. November 24, 1887, a son of Michael and Mary A. (Man- 
gan) Gabbard, the former a native of Kentucky, while the latter was born in Jones- 
borough, Ireland. The father was a son of Isaac Gabbard, who was a pioneer set- 
tler of Kentucky and who had five sons who served in the Union army. The family 
came of German ancestry and has figured very prominently in connection with public 
events in Kentucky. Michael Gabbard devoted his life to general agricultural pur- 
suits in Kentucky and after reaching manhood he wedded Mary A. Mangan, a 
daughter of Hugh and Ann (McKinley) Mangan. The McKinleys came from Jones- 
borough. Ireland, and the father of President McKinley came from the same place. 
Hugh Mangan, the grandfather of Mr. Gabbard of this review, started for California 
in 1849, attracted by the discovery of gold on the Pacific slope, but was never heard 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY IS 

frnm again. His daughter, Mrs. Gabbard, is still living and now makes her home 
with her son in Yakima count}'. 

John S. Gabbard obtained a public school education in his native state and con- 
tinued to devote his attention to farming in Kentucky until October, 1917, when he 
came to the northwest and purchased forty-one acres of land on Naches Heights. 
He is here engaged in raising hay, potatoes, wheat and corn and is meeting with 
good success in "the cultivation of his fields. He is also engaged in raising hogs. 

On the 28th of April, 1911, Mr. Gabbard was married to Miss Laura B. Ever- 
sole, a native of Kentucky and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Eversole, who 
were farming people of that state. Mr. and Mrs. Gabbard have become parents of 
three children: Hugh Mangan, Beulah Marie and Robert Emmett. 

The religious faith of the fatnily is that of the Methodist church and to its teach- 
ings they loyally adhere, doing all in their power to promote the growth of the 
church and extend its influence. In politics Mr. Gabbard is a republican and keeps 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day but does not seek nor desire 
public office. His aspirations are in other directions. He has already made for 
himself a creditable position among the ranchmen of the Cowiche district and the 
qualities which he has displayed in the conduct of his business aiifairs argue well for 
the future. 



F. A. WILLIAMS. 



F. A. Williams, a banker and capitalist residing at Toppenish, was born in Wa- 
basha county. Minnesota, in 1860. a son of Zachariah and Ann (Elsey) Williams, both 
of whom were natives of England, whence they came to the new world when young 
people. They were pioneer settlers of Minnesota, removing with ox teams to that 
state about the year 1840. and for a considerable period they were closely identified 
with the development and upbuilding of Wabasha county. The father has now passed 
away, but the mother is still living in Spokane at the advanced age of eighty-eight 
years. She is a most wonderfully preserved woman for one of her age, her intel- 
lectual faculties remaining unimpaired and she keeps in close touch with the hap- 
penings of the day. 

F. A. Williams acquired a public school education in his native state and started 
upon his business career as an employe in a mercantile establishment. The year 
1884 witnessed his arrival in Washington, at which time he located in Ellensburg 
and there embarked in business, organizing the Williams-Smithson Company, a hard- 
ware concern. In later years he has extended his activities into various other fields. 
He came to Toppenish in 1898 and on the 1st of -August of that year organized the 
Toppenish Trading Company, which was incorporated in 1908. In the latter year 
they removed to a new location, having a building one hundred and forty by one 
hundred and ten feet. It is two stories and basement in height and theirs is the old- 
est mercantile establishment of the city. Mr. Williams started the business under a 
government license, his being the only store allowed in Toppenish at that time. He 
has always conducted a department store, carrying all lines of merchandise, and as 
the years have passed on the trade of the house has constantly grown. At the time 
the Imsincss was started Mr. Williams did inost of the shipping of the produce 
raised in this section. Land was leased to white people for the first time in the 3'ear 
in which Mr. Williams took up his abode in Toppenish. He became the pioneer 
merchant of the town and with the development and upbuilding of the city has been 
continuously identified throughout all the intervening years. With the settlement of 
the district his trade steadily grew until it has now assumed most gratifying and 
extensive proportions. Mr. Williams remains the president of the company, with 
Z. Y. Coleman as vice-president and general manager and William McGowan as 
secretary and treasurer. The name of Mr. Williams has long been synonymous 
with most progressive mercantile interests yet he has not confined his attention to 
this field of activity alone. He has been the president of the first National Bank 
of Toppenisli since it was organized and he is also a director of the First X'ational 
Bank of Zillah. He is likewise a director of the Traders' State Bank of Toppenish 



16 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

and is tlioroughly familiar with every phase of the banking business and with many 
problems that are continually arising in connection with banking interests. He is 
the owner of a fine orchard of eighty acres and he also has one thousand acres de- 
voted to diversified farming. It is to his agricultural interests that he is now devot- 
ing most of his time and attention. Mr. Williams purchased the second tract of land 
that was sold by the government off the Yakima reservation and all of his land is 
on the reservation near Toppenish. He farms altogether fifteen hundred acres and 
is therefore classed with the leading agriculturists of the state. He has likewise ven- 
tured into the newspaper field and is now the owner of both papers of Toppenish — 
the Toppenish Review and the Toppenish Tribune. 

In 1887 Mr. Williams was married to Miss Clara Lynch, a daughter of Samuel 
Lynch and a sister of J. Lynch, the former Indian agent. Mrs. Williams passed away 
in 1898, leaving a son Paul, who is now a student in the University of Washington. 

In his fraternal connections Mr. Williams is an Elk, belonging to Lodge No. 318 
of Yakima. His political endorsement is given to the republican party and he is a 
most loyal citizen who is now putting all of his investments into Liberty Bonds. He 
cooperates in every possible way in the support of the government in this crisis .in 
the world's history and his aid and influence are always given on the side of those 
projects which are a matter of civic worth. His business career cannot fail to elicit 
admiration and praise from those who know aught of his history. Starting out in 
life without any particular advantages, he early came to a realization of the fact 
that industry is the sure foundation upon which to build success. He early learned 
that success is as a will-o'-the-wisp before the dreamer but surrenders its treasures 
to the man of resolute spirit and determination. Another fact of which he early 
became cognizant was that honesty is the best policy and thus he has combined 
industry and integrity in his career to the attainment of results and position which 
are most enviable. 



HENRY BLATCHFORD SCUDDER. 

The name of Henry Blatchford Scudder is inseparably interwoven with the 
record of Yakima. He took the initial step in many works of progress in the com- 
munity and always stood for advancement and improvement. He figured promi- 
nently in agricultural and financial-circles and was ever recognized as a high type of 
.A.merican manhood and chivalry. He was born in Brookline, Massachusetts, June 
18, 1844, a son of Charles William and .Alicia Harriet (Blatchford) Scudder. the latter 
being a daughter of Henry Blatchford, who was a minister of the Presbyterian 
church. The Scudder ancestral line is traced down from John Scudder of Barnstable, 
Massachusetts. Born in England in 1619, he in 1635, came from London to America, 
and located first at Charlestown, Massachusetts: in 1640 he moved to Barnstable, 
Massachusetts, the home of his descendants. The Blatchfords were also of an old 
colonial family that settled in New York, and one of the well known representatives 
of this family was Judge Blatchford, a distinguished jurist. The line is traced back 
to the Rev. Samuel Blatchford, of England, and his son, the Rev. Henry Blatchford, 
was the father of Alicia Harriet Blatchford, who became the wife of Charles William 
Scudder. For many years the parents of Mr. Scudder were prominent and well 
known residents of Brookline, Massachusetts, where they remained until called to 
their final rest. 

Henry Blatchford Scudder was a pupil in the Latin School of Boston under the 
Rev. Phillips Brooks. He afterward continued his education in the Phillips Acad- 
emy at Andover, Massachusetts, and in Williams College. Following the outbreak of 
the Civil war he responded to the country's call for troops and enlisted as a member 
of Company A, Forty-fifth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, and while on active 
duty at the front was wounded in the head. He remained with his regiment, how- 
ever, until the close of the war. When the country no longer needed his military aid 
he returned to the north and secured employment in the Middlesex (Mass.) mills, 
and working his way upward in that connection became manager of the woolen mills 
operated under the name of the Dudley Hosiery Mills. Subsequently he returned to 




HENRY B. SCT'DDER 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 19 

Brookline, Massachusetts, where he owned the Allston Mills, near Boston, on what 
is now Commonwealth avenue. Eventually he sold out his business there and in 
April, 1888, came to Yakima with his family. In December, 1887, in association with 
C. E. Hubbard, of Boston, he had invested in farm lands, purchasing six hundred 
acres on the Moxee four miles east of Yakima, and from that time until his death 
was identified with the most progressive measures leading to the substantial devel- 
opment and improvement of this section of the state.' Before leaving the east he 
shipped some Holstein cattle to the Yakima valley, which were the first to be brought 
to this part of the country for dairy purposes. He assisted in putting down the first 
artesian well in Yakima county. He had one of the best dairies in the state, conducted 
along the most scientific lines, and his business reached extensive proportions. About 
1893 he opened a real estate office in Yakima which since his death has been con- 
ducted by his son-in-law, C, A. Marsh. In that connection he built up a business of 
large extent, negotiating many important realty transfers which led to the upbuilding 
of the city as well as to the promotion of his individual prosperity. Mr. Scudder 
was also one of those who developed the electric railway and the heating plant at 
Yakima and for many years he served as a director of the First National Bank. He 
erected the Barnes-Woodin building and there seemed to be no line of beneficial 
activity in Yakima with which he was not more or less closely associated. 

On the 21st of .April, 1866, Mr. Scudder w^as united in marriage to Julia Randolph 
Perry, who comes of an ancestry equally honored and distinguished as his own. She 
is a daughter of Oliver Hazard and Elizabeth Anne (Randolph) Perry, the former a 
son of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, the hero of the battle of Lake Erie. They 
were residents of Newport- Rhode Island, and the father of Mrs. Scudder served as 
a lieutenant in the United States navy until 1847, when he turned his attention to the 
woolen manufacturing business, becoming one of the prominent manufacturers of 
New England. He was descended from Edward Perry, who came to America in 
1650 and was of Quaker faith and a man of prominence in the new world. Freeman 
Perry served in the Revolutionary war and was assistant secretary of state of Rhode 
Island, while Christopher Champlain, a relative of his wife, also aided in the struggle 
for American independence. Captain Christopher Raymond Perry, father of Com- 
modore Oliver H. Perry, served on a man-of-war from 1780 until 1783. Commodore 
Oliver Hazard Perry, who was born in 178S and died in 1819, was a naval com- 
mander in the War of 1812, whose laconic message, "We have met the enemy and 
they are ours," has gone down in history. He was the father of Oliver Hazard Perry, 
who was born in 1815 and passed away in 1878. True to the record of his ancestors, 
he, too, responded to the call of his country for military aid and was a veteran of 
the Mexican war. He married Elizabeth Anne Randolph, a descendant of William 
Randolph, of Yorkshire, England, who wedded Mary Isham and on coming to 
."America settled at Turkey Island, Virginia, since which time the name of Randolph 
has been closely associated with the history of the south. Peyton Randolph, of 
Milton, Virginia, wedded Lucy Harrison, a daughter of Governor Harrison of Bran- 
don, and their son, Richard Kidder Randolph, became the father of Elizabeth Anne 
Randolph, who married Oliver Hazard Perry. 

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Scudder were as follows: Mary Mosley, who died 
in December, 1913; Marshall Sears, who served with the rank of captain in the 
Spanish-.\merican war and is now a captain in the Three Hundred and Sixty-first 
Regiment of the Ninety-first Division, on active duty in France; .Alice Blatchford; 
Anne Randolph; Lucy Randolph; Bessie Perry; and Randolph Perry, a commander 
in the United States navy. 

In his political views Mr. Scudder was a stalwart republican but always refused 
office. He took a most active interest in public affairs, however, and gave his earnest 
support to all measures and movements for the general good. His cooperation could 
at all times be counted upon to further any plan for public progress along material, 
intellectual and moral lines. He passed away July 20, 1917, and in his death Yakima 
lost one of her most valued citizens. He had not only been closely associated, with 
her material development but with her moral progress as well. He was one of those 
who established the Episcopal church of Yakima, for which Edward Potter, brother 
of Bishop Potter, of New York, drew the plans, and the communion service for the 
church was given by the Rev. Leonard K, Storrs, of Brookline, Massachusetts. Mr. 



20 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Scudder was a most aetive. earnest and helpful worker in the church as the years 
passed b\' and for a long period served as senior warden. It is not difficult to speak 
of him, for his life and his character were as clear as the sunlight. No man came 
in contact with him but speedily appreciated him at his true worth and knew that he 
was a man who cherished not only a high ideal of duty but who lived up to it. He 
was not an idle sentimentalist but a worker. He was at the head of large business 
interests, which he managed successfully, yet it was his rule to set apart some 
time each day for the labors of love to which he was so devoted. 



CYRUS E. SANDERSON. 

One of the prominent orchardists and farmers of the Yakima valley is Cyrus E. 
Sanderson, owner of a valuable and highly improved property which is the visible 
evidence of his well directed energy, thrift and progressive spirit. Mr. Sanderson 
was born in . Jacksonville. Illinois. January 26, 1861. his parents being Cyrus and 
Charlotte Sanderson, both of whom have passed away. The father w-as a cabinet- 
maker by trade. He was born in Maysville, Kentucky, and in young manhood went 
to Illinois, where he met and married Charlotte D. Alosley, whose birth occurred in 
Ogdensburg, Xew York. 

Cyrus E. Sanderson obtained a business college education and afterward entered 
a grocery store in Jacksonville, Illinois, as a clerk. Subsequently he was connected 
with a shoe store and in 1887 he removed to Lincoln, Nebraska, where he again 
engaged in clerking. In 1890 he established business on his own account in Lin- 
coln, forming a partnership in the shoe trade. There he remained until 1909, when 
he sold out and went to Europe, where he continued for a year. The following year 
was spent in Cuba and in 1912 he arrived in Yakima, since which time he has been 
identified with the development and progress of this section of the state along 
agricultural and horticultural lines. He and his brother, Henry Sanderson, pur- 
chased thirty acres of orchard and incorporated their interests under the name of 
Sanderson Brothers. In 1913 they built their residence, having one of the finest in 
the valley. There is a beautiful fountain, on the grounds and they have twenty- 
five acres planted to apples and five acres to pears. They have a fine frostproof 
dry storage plant and packing house with a capacity for ten thousand boxes of fruit 
and their orchards yield twelve thousand boxes of apples per year. They have 
closely studied to develop their orchards by planting the fruits best adapted to soil 
and climate and they produce some of the finest fruit that is sent from Washington 
to the east. Mr. Sanderson, was one of the organizers of the Yakima Fruit Growers' 
Exchange and served as its president for several years. This later was merged into 
the Yakima County Horticultural Union. He also assisted in organizing the Fruit 
Growers' Exchange, which has since passed out of existence. He has taken a most 
helpful part iu organizing the fruit growers in order to fully protect their interests 
in the northwest and devoted about three years of his life to that work. 

On the 5th of April, 1891, C. E. Sanderson was united in marriage to Miss 
Jennie Marine, a native of Muncie, Indiana. They are members of the Methodist 
church and he is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America, the Royal Ar- 
canum, and a number of other orders. In politics he is an independent republican, 
for while he usually supports the principles of the republican party, he does not 
consider himself bound by party ties and casts his ballot according to the dictates 
of his judgment. 



HENRY SANDERSON. 

Henry Sanderson, a partner of his brother, Cyrus E. Sanderson, in extensive 
and important fruit raising interests in the Yakima valley, was born in Jacksonville, 
Illinois. December 29, 1866. He is a high school graduate and after his school days 
were over he became actively engaged in the shoe trade in connection with his 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA WXLLEY 21 

brother, C. E. Sanderson, whose sketch is given above. Together they came to 
Yakima in 1912 and purchased land, since which time they have carried on an ex- 
tensive and protitable liusiness as orchardists. They erected a ' commodious and 
beautiful double residence upon their land and they are concentrating their efforts 
upon the further development and care of their orchards. 

On the 21st of November, 1888, Henry Sanderson was married to Miss Lillie 
G. Smith, of St. Louis, Missouri. He. too, is a member of the Modern Woodmen of 
America and also ri( the Royal Highlanders, the Royal Arcanum and the Fraternal 
Union. His religious faith is indicated by his connection with the Presliyterian 
church and in politics he maintains an independent course. The Sanderson family 
have long been personal friends of William Jennings Bryan and his family, with 
whom they became acquainted during their residence in Jacksonville, Illinois. The 
Sanderson brothers occupy an enviable position in the business circles of the 
Yakima valley, for they are actuated in all that they undertake by a spirit of enter- 
prise that never stops short of the successful accomplishment of their purpose, and 
the methods which they have ever pursued are those which measure up to the high- 
est standards of integrity and reliability. 



HON. GARRISON W. HAMILTON. 

The legal fraternity of Benton county is prominently represented in Hon. Gar- 
rison W. Hamilton, who since 1905 has practiced in Prosser, Washington. Thorough 
study at one of the best known law schools of the country and long experience are 
the foundation stones upon which his reputation has been erected. He now has a 
large clientage in Prosser ^nd vicinity and stands high in the regard of the public, 
in the estimation of his professional confreres and before the courts. He was born 
in Lewisville, Ohio, March 26, 1854, his parents being Jacob H. and Maria (Robin- 
son) Hamilton, both of whom passed away in Ohio, where the father followed agri- 
cultural pursuits throughout his life with considerable success. 

Garrison W. Hamilton was reared under the parental roof and in the acquire- 
ment of his primary education attended the schools of the neighborhood and other 
institutions in order to prepare himself for college. Entering Mount L'nion College, 
he was graduated from that institution in the. class of 1877 with the degree of Ph. 
B. Having surveyed the various careers open to a young man in business or pro- 
fessional life,' he decided on the profession of the law as best suited to his tastes 
and inclinations and for that purpose entered the Law School of Cincinnati, from 
which he was graduated in 1880. He then located for practice at Woodsfield, Ohio, 
and there continued for twenty-two years, building up a reputation for ability, re- 
liability and trustworthiness. The far west always having held attractions for him, 
he decided to come to Washington, selecting as his field or labor Spokane, where 
he maintained an office for about three years. Then perceiving a field or greater 
possibilities in the newly opened Yakima valley, he came to Prosser in 1905 and has 
remained here ever since. His practice is of an important character and he has been 
connected with many of the better known cases which have come up before the 
courts of this district. On account of his ability he has naturally risen, so that today 
he is numbered among the most prominent lawyers of Yakima county. His legal 
learning, his analytical mind and the readiness with which he grasps the points in 
an argument, all combine to make him one of the best lawyers before the courts. 
Besides Mr. Hamilton is well versed in legal precedence and ably builds up his cause 
upon his knowledge. 

In 1885 Mr. Hamilton wedded Miss Emma Bircher, of Summerfield, Ohio, and 
to this union were born three children. Dr. B. J. Hamilton, a graduate of the Chicago 
College of Medicine, is a well known physician of Detroit, Michigan, where he enjoys 
a large practice. Flora J. is the wife of J. Kelly De Priest, of Prosser; and they are 
the parents of one child. Miss Marie Hamilton, the youngest of the family, is at 
home. In 1910 the family circle was broken by the hand of death when Mrs. Hamil- 
ton passed away. On April 27, 1912, Mr. Hamilton was again married, his second 
union being with Nellie J. Lundquist, of Prosser, and they have a son. Orris Lee. 



22 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

They are popular in the social life of their city and maintain a hospitable fireside 
for their many friends. , , , 

In his political affiliations Mr. Hamilton is a democrat and has been auite active 
in party ranks not only locally but also as far as the state at large is concerned. Dur- 
ing the term of 1906-7 he served in the state legislature, making his opinion felt upon 
the floor of the house and in committee rooms and well representing the interests of 
his constituents. He is now prosecuting attorney of Benton county. While in Ohio 
he served as judge of the probate court of Monroe county for six years, his continu- 
ance in office indicating the confidence his constituents had in his ability, fairness and 
impartiality Mr. Hamilton is a member of the Benton County and State Bar Asso- 
ciations and takes an active part in their proceedings. Fraternally he is a member of 
the Masonic order, belonging to the blue lodge in Prosser, and also is a hfe member 
of Zanesville (Ohio) lodge No. 14, B. P. O. E. He has always taken a deep interest 
in the development and progress of his city and the Yakima Valley and has ever been 
ready to lend his ability and means to worthy projects. He owns an excellent farm 
property near Prosser, which he has developed from the sagebrush and which yields 
a gratifying addition to Jiis income. He takes great pride in this farm, which largely 
through' his own labors and own ideas has been created out of the wilderness. 



DAVID LONGMIRE. 



\mong- the earliest and most honored pioneers of the Yakima vall^- is David 
Longmire\'ho during his long connection with agricultural interests here has greatly 
contributed toward the development and upbuilding of the district and whose career 
has indeed been an unusual one, for it reaches back to the days of the Indians, and 
he experienced all of those hardships which were connected with the early days of 
frontier life For nearlv fifty years he has been a resident of Yakima county and is 
therefore thoroughly familiar with the history of the valley from its primitive condi- 
tion to its present-day progress. o , r, , . 
\ native of Fountain county, Indiana. Mr. Longmire was born May i>, 1M4, 
a son of James and Susan (Neisley) Longmire. The father, a native of Indiana, was 
born March 17. 1820, a son of George Longmire, who was a native of Georgia The 
latter was one of the early pioneers of Indiana and participated in the War of Ibl-, 
taking part in that conflict under General Harrison. Later the family removed to 
Illinois where the grandfather died on the 6th of Januaiy, 1868. Throughout his life 
he had' followed the occupation of farming. James Longmire largely spent his boy- 
hood in Indiana, but on the 6th of March, 1853, decided to take his chances in the 
newer country of the west and by the water route proceeded to St. Joseph. Missouri. 
There he bought ox teams and by that mode of travel came to Washington. Septem- 
ber 20, 1853, marked the date of his arrival at Wenas creek, m the \akima valley. 
Mr Longmire of this review, who was then a boy of nine years, accompanied his 
parents on this hazardous trip and he still remembers the time when he went 
through Omaha, or rather passed the site upon which now stands Omaha before a 
house was built thereon. The Missouri river was crossed near Council Bluffs on a 
steamboat which was run by a half-breed Indian called Bar Pee. On the \\ enas 
they made their camp and the Longmire train was the first to camp in this valley 
and theirs were the first wagons ever to come into Benton, or what is now \ akima 
countv. which was then not organized. Breaking camp, they went on to the Puget 
Sound, arriving there on the 10th of October, 1853. Theirs was the first wagon train 
to cross the Cascades and also the first to cross the Columbia river at another place 
than The Dalles, which was the regular crossing. From the Wenas they went up the 
Naches and over the Cascades and as there was no road the journey was fraught 
with hardships and difficulties, yet they succeeded in making it in less than a montn. 
Subsequently the father engaged m the cattle business at Yelm Praine, in Thurston 
county However, his business pursuits were often interrupted by calls to arm on 
account of Indian uprisings and he participated in the Indian wars of 1855 and iSsO 
Few were the settlers in that district but the Longmires did not lose hope but on 
■ the contrary vigorously took up the work of colonization and built a home. the 




DAVID LONGMIRE 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 25 

father, a man of more than ordinary intelligence and purpose, readily participated in 
public affairs and represented Thurston county in the territorial legislature in 1857 
and later in 1865 he drew up the bill for the organization of Yakima county, although 
it was presented for passage by the representative from Klickitat county. As his 
prosperity increased James Longmire acquired much land in Yakima county on the 
Wenas. thus becoming a prosperous and substantial citizen, and it was he who located 
the famous Longmire Springs at Paradise valley, in the neighborhood of Mount 
Rainier. In fact he and "Uncle Billy" Packwood were early explorers of the Mount 
Rainier country. In 1883 the father started a hostelry at Longmire Springs, which 
then was the farthest point to the northwest which could be reached by an estab- 
lished trail. August 16, 1883, was a remarkable day in his career, for it was on that 
date that James Longmire made the ascent and reached the top of Mount Rainier. 
It was, upon this trip that they found the well-known springs and shortly thereafter 
they started to build a two-log house there, which was completed in the fall. The 
proprietary rights to the springs are still vested in the family and these springs are 
now known all over the world, a fine hotel having been erected there. As above in- 
dicated, the father was very active in public affairs and through his incessant and 
energetic labor and prophetic vision foresaw and anticipated many things which he 
tried to turn into realities to the profit of a later generation. For many terms he sat 
in the territorial legislature, thus devoting time and effort to the general cause of 
civilization. He was a democrat in his political affiliations and loyally upheld the 
principles of that party. His death occurred September 12. 1897, and in him the 
state of Washington lost one of its foremost citizens, who blazed the trail for those 
who came after him and helped to plant the seeds of civilization under conditions 
which would have tried the most resolute man. However, Mr. Longmire steeled 
himself against vicissitudes, and having complete faith in the future of the common- 
wealth, went ahead with his projects unerringly and unceasingly until success 
crowned his labors. The mother of our subject had passed away four days before 
the western trip was undertaken, but in 1848 the father had married Virindia 
Taylor, of Indiana, who has also since passed away. She was a daughter of Jacob 
and Xancy Taylor. In the father's family were eleven children, of whom David 
Longmire of this review was the second in order of birth. The eldest in the family 
was Elcaine Longmire. who for many years successfully engaged in ranching at 
Longmire Springs and passed away Jime 21, 1915. The third in order of birth was 
Tillatha, who married Robert Kandle, now living retired in Yakima, Washington. 
John A. Longmire is a rancher of Thurston county, this state. Laura Ann married 
Charles Longmire, of Yakima. Melissa was the wife of L. N. Rice and they resided 
on the old homestead in Thurston county. She is now deceased. Martha married 
Joseph Conine, a resident of Thurston county, who about ten years ago was a mem- 
ber of the legislature. Mrs. Conine has passed away. Robert is sheriff of Pierce 
county. Washington. Frank, the next in order of birth, is deputy sheriff of the 
same county. George is engaged in ranching in the Wenas valley in Yakima county. 
The eleventh of the family, James William, died at the age of fourteen years. 

David Longmire spent his early boyhood days under the parental roof in Indiana 
and in that state he began his education by attending school in a log schoolhouse. 
He was nine years of age when removal was made to this state and here he con- 
tinued his education in Olympia. attending school there from 1855 until 1857. while 
his father was a member of the territorial legislature. In 1858 he went to school 
at Chambers Prairie, but in 1859 Mr. Longmire, Sr., succeeded in having a log school- 
house established near his ranch and David Longmire completed his education there. 
L'pon laying aside his textbooks he continued along agricultural lines with his father 
in Thurston county but in 1871 removed to Yakima county, where he preempted land 
on the Wenas. It was during these days that the Indians were yet very troublesome 
and often attacked the white men, looking upon them as intruders. Many are the 
experiences which Mr. Longmire is able to recount relative to this period and in this 
connection it may be mentioned that he was in that party which went forth to cap- 
ture and punish those Indians who had so treacherously murdered the Perkins fam- 
ily. Of this record he may well be proud, as he assisted in bringing to justice some 
of the most desperate and degenerate characters among the red men and thereby 
aided in teaching a lesson which did much toward making conditions less dangerous 



26 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

for the white settlers. Later Mr. Longmire took up a homestead and it is upon this 
property that he now resides. Forceful and resourceful, he has ever followed pro- 
gressive methods and has made his farm one of the most valuable in the neighbor- 
hood, erecting suitable and commodious barns, building a fine residence and institut- 
ing other facilities and equipment which denote twentieth century development in 
agricultural lines. As his income increased he acciuired more land until he now owns 
four hundred and eighty acres of irrigated land as well as several thousand Acres of 
range land. In later years, however, he has given much of this property to his 
children, in fact he has built seven fine farm homes tor them and his family still 
lives near the old home place. It was in 1883 that Mr. Longmire built a fine resi- 
dence on the Wenas which then was one of the most pretentious in the Yakima val- 
ley and still remains as one of the landmarks here. In order to build this house he 
had to send to Tumwater, by way of Olympia. for sash and doors, the difficulties 
besetting the early home-builder being more readily understood if it is recalled 
that no railroads then existed. Besides general agricultural pursuits, Mr. Longmire 
has also given much attention to live stock and has become one of the large stock 
raisers of the valley. Moreover, he was one of the first orchardists here, planting 
his first orchard in 1872. .\lthough he thus gave great impetus to an industry that 
is now very important to the valley and proved the suitability of climate and soil 
for that purpose, he never went into orchardizing commercially. 

On the 12th of September, 1869, David Longmire was united in marriage to 
Elizabeth Pollard, of Thurston county, Washington, a daughter of A^a and Tillatha 
(Taylor) Pollard, who in 1864 came by ox team to Washington from Iowa, taking 
up their abode in Thurston county and being numbered among the pioneer settlers 
of this state. After nineteen years of happy married life Mrs. Longmire passed away 
November 16, 1888, and on the 23d of December, 1890, Mr. Longmire married Mrs. 
Lizzie ( Lotz) Treat, a daughter of George and Katherine Lotz, natives of Germany. 
Mr. Lotz came to Washington in 1851, during the early days in pioneering, his wife 
following him in 18SS, for they had been married in Germany previous to that time. 
She brought with her her three children, one of whom died while she was en route. 
Mr. Lotz was a cabinetmaker by trade but he turned his attention to farming after 
coming to this state, locating in Thurston county. There he died in 1895, being sur- 
vived by his widow until 1901. To the first marriage of Mr. Longmire were -born the 
following children: Alice, who married A. J. Lotz, a successful rancher of the Wenas 
valley, by whom she has five children, of whom four are daughters: Asa and Walter, 
both of whom died in infancy; Martha, who married C. C. Porter, a rancher on the 
Tieton, by whom she has two sons and five daughters: Burnetta, tlie wife of B. F. 
Small, a rancher of the Wenas valley, by whom she has a son. Clarence: David E., 
also engaged in ranching in the Wenas valley and who is mentioned more exten- 
sively on other pages of this work; George B., who is ranching in the Wenas valley 
and is married and has two daughters; and James Guy, who is a rancher in the same 
locality and is married and has one child. Of the second marriage of Mr. Longmire 
was born a son, Roy Bryan, who is in the L'nited States army. He is married and 
has a son, Donald Roy, three years of age. Mrs. Lizzie Longmire had three children 
by her marriage to Mr. Treat. A. E. Treat, the eldest, is a rancher residing near 
Wapato with his wife and daughter. Harvey C. a resident of Tacoma, is also mar- 
ried and has two children. The other, Oliver R. Treat, died at the age of eighteen 
months. 

Mr. and Mrs. Longmire enjoy the highest regard and esteem in their neighbor- 
hood and in fact throughout the Yakima valley, where they are widely known. Both 
being members of distinguished pioneer families, their lives have been closely con- 
nected with the growth which has made this valley one of the most prosperous in the 
state. They are members of the Christian church, in the work of which they are 
actively and helpfully interested. 

-'Mong political lines Mr. Longmire is a democrat and follows the party's lead 
as far as national politics are concerned, but in local affairs prefers to give his sup- 
port to the man whom he considers best fitted to the office to which he aspires, irre- 
spective of party affiliation. He has ever been deeply interested in public issues and 
in fact has promoted numerous measures which have proven of great benefit to the 
general public. He has served as justice of the peace, ever dispensing fair and impar- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 27 

tial judgments, and twice has held the position of county commissioner, doing every- 
thing in his power to make Yakima county one of the best governed within the state. 
Many are the projects which he has promoted in order to bring his county to the 
front by instituting public improvements which would be of benefit to the county 
along material as well as ideal lines. Fraternally Mr. Longmire is a Mason, having 
been a member of the blue lodge since 1883, and the principles which underlie this 
organization have guided him in his conduct toward his fellowmen. There is nothing 
surprising in the success which he has achieved as it is the outcome of energy and 
industry, applied to opportunities which were within the reach of all those who 
came here as pioneers, yet he has shown besides these qualities the foresight which 
IS necessary in launching enterprises of the right kind at the right time and place 
and the conviction of being on the right road and thus bringing them to a satisfactory 
end. He stands today as one of the most prosperous and substantial citizens, and 
looking back in retrospect to the days of the Indians, he has the satisfaction of feel- 
ing that he has had a great part in bringing about the prosperous conditions which 
now prevail. 



FREDERICK A. WUSSOW. 

Frederick .A. Wussow, whose ranch of forty acres in the Cowiche valley is devoted 
to fruit raising and to the production of hay and garden products, was born in Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, .\ugust 4, 1880, a son of Frederick and Emma (Hahm) Wussow, 
who were pioneer settlers of Milwaukee, where the father engaged in the livery and 
undertaking business for a number of years. His parents were also numbered among 
the early residents of that state. Frederick Wussow, Sr., is still a resident of Mil- 
waukee, but his wife has passed away. 

I'^-ederick A. Wussow acquired a public school education in his native city and 
afterward took up the trade of horseshoeing, developing expert skill and ability in that 
connection. He had a blacksmith sliop at Burlington, Wisconsin, and afterward at 
Milwaukee. In 1909 he came to Yakima and purchased twenty acres of land in the 
Cowiche valley, to which he afterward added by purchase until he became the owner 
of a forty-acre tract. He now has twenty-eight acres planted to orchards, largely 
raising apples and pears, while the remaining twelve acres is devoted to the produc- 
tion of hay and garden products. He has built a fine home upon his place and the 
improvements which he has put thereon and the manner in which he has cultivated his 
land have greatly enhanced its value as well as its fertility. Since coming to the west 
he has also conducted a blacksmith shop in Yakima, where he carried on business for 
four years and was recognized as an expert horseshoer. 

On the 6th of October, 1906, Mr. Wussow was married to Miss Hulda Hafmeister. 
who was born in Milwaukee, a daughter of William Hafmeister. 

Mr. Wussow has an interesting war record inasmuch as he is a veteran of the 
Spanish-.'Vmerican war. He enlisted in the Third LTnited States Regiment at the time 
of the difficulty with Spain and he served in the campaign against the Chippewa 
Indians in Minnesota in 1898. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias 
and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church 
and politically he maintains an independent course. His life has not been marked by 
any spectacular events but his course has been that of a substantial citizen who is 
progressive and enterprising in business and loyal to the best public interests. 



WILLIAM F. MORGAN'. 

William F. Morgan, actively and successfully identified with the farming interests 
of the Yakima valley, was born in Warrensburg, Missouri, on the 6th of June, 1871, a 
son of Robert S. and Minerva (Mason) Morgan. The father was born in Pennsyl- 
vania and at the time of the Civil war responded to the country's call for troops, en- 
listing in the Tenth Missouri Infantry, witli which he served from 1861 until 1864, and 

(2) 



28 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

during that period he was wounded. His wife was born in Missouri and for a number 
of years they resided in that state. In the spring of 1886 they came to the Yakima 
valley, where Mr. Morgan purchased a homestead right from "Doc" Morris, securing 
one hundred and sixty acres of land, constituting the northwest quarter of section 21. 
it was all sagebrush and dry land without irrigation when it came into his posses- 
sion. With characteristic energy he began its development and improvement and he 
was very active in establishing irrigation in this section of the state. He put in a mile 
extension of the Hubbard ditch, covering twelve acres of his land, and thereon he 
engaged in gardening. He also followed the carpenter's trade in Yakima and through 
carrying on both occupations made a good living. Later the Congdon ditch was built 
and all of his farm was thus watered. About 1890 he started a small orchard, to which 
he furnished water by a w'indmill. After the ditch was completed the orchard was 
extended, fruit trees being planted which soon came into bearing and gave another 
proof of the fact that the soil was admirably adapted to horticulture. Robert S. 
Morgan became the pioneer commission man of Y'akima, selling not only his own 
produce but that of his neighbors and finding a market for the Yakima produce in the 
mining districts of the Cascades. He built the first produce warehouse in Yakima 
and continued actively in the business to the time of his death. He also shipped the 
first alfalfa from the Yakima valley, sending it to the coast. Mr. Morgan remained an 
honored, valued and respected citizen of Yakima until called to his final rest on the 
10th of August, 1909. He is survived by his wife, who yet makes her home on the old 
home ranch. They had a family of ten children, nine of whom reached adult age, 
while eight are living. 

William F. Morgan was the second in order of birth. He acquired a public school 
education and was a youth of sixteen years when the family home was established in 
the Yakima valley, after which he devoted his time and attention to work upon the 
ranch with his father. Later he took charge of the ranch in connection with his brother 
Robert and afterward he purchased the southwest forty acres of his father's prop- 
erty and cleared and improved the tract. He has since sold ten acres of this and 
now ow'ns thirty acres, of which twenty-two acres is planted to orchard, including 
apples, pears and cherries. On the remainder he raises some alfalfa and also diver- 
sified crops. He has had close association with his father in all of his fruit raising 
and his broad experience and wide knowledge are of great value to him in the further 
conduct of his business. 

On the 8th of February. 1894. Mr. Morgan was married to Miss Anna Dunn, a 
daughter of Captain Robert Dunn, one of the pioneers of Yakima county, and their 
children are: Mabel, who attended Washington State College at Pullman for two 
years; and Harold and Ethel, both of whom are now pursuing a college course. 
Mr. Morgan is identified with the ISIodern ^^'oodmen of America and the family 
are loyal members of the First Christian church of Yakima. In politics he is a re- 
publican and has served as road supervisor, while for five years he was one of the 
school directors. For almost a third of a century he has resided in the valley, wit- 
nessing the greater part of its development and upbuilding. Associated with his 
father he became one of the pioneers in horticulture in this section of the state. His 
progressive spirit has led to the attainincnt of most gratifying results and a visit to 
his orchards in bearing season is always one of great delight. 



JOHN ANDISOX BALMER. 

John Andison Balmer has for two years been mayor of Cle Elum and his ad- 
ministration of public affairs has been most beneficial to the town. He is perhaps 
even more widely known as a florist, for his reputation in this connection has brought 
him an extensive acquaintance throughout the northwest. He has the distinction 
of being the only florist devoting his attention exclusively to roses in Washington. 
A native of Northumberland county, England, he was born on the 10th of April, 
1856, a son of Thomas and Margaret (.Andison) Balmer, both of whom passed away 
in England, where the father had carried on business as a horticultulist. 

John A. Balmer acquired a grammar school education in his native country and 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 29 

in 1879, when twenty-three years of age, came to the new world, settling at South 
Amboy, New Jersey, where he became orchid grower for George Such, owner of the 
finest orchids, pahiis and flowering plants in America at that time. In November, 
1879, Mr. Bahner removed to Watcrtown, New York, where he became manager 
for Charles Hart, florist- In 1881 he established his home in Pekin, Illinois, where 
he began business on his own account as a florist, but the enterprise did not prove 
profitable. He then returned to England and while in that country was married. 
Not long afterward he once more made his way to the new world and took up his 
abode in Danville, Illinois, where he conducted business as a florist for a year and 
a half. Later he went to Paris, Illinois, where he again engaged in business as a 
florist, and a year later he removed to Vincennes, Indiana, where he resided for 
eight and a half years, continuing in the same line. At the end of that time he 
was ofTered the position of horticulturist at the Washington State College and 
accepted in May, 1894. He held that position until February, 1900, when he removed 
to Cle Elum and established a big rose hothouse. He has forty thousand square 
feet of glass, with eighteen thousand square feet of actually planted area. His plants 
include eighteen thousand rose bushes under glass. He burns over eight hundred 
tons of coal per year to keep his greenhouses at an even temperature. He is the 
only exclusive rose grower in Washington and is the second largest producer of this 
"queen of flowers" in the state. He ships extensively to Butte, Spokane, Seattle, 
Tacoma, Grays Harbor and all intermediate points, making daily shipments and 
selling almost exclusively to the wholesade trade. He employs four men constantly 
besides having additional help from time to time. He has closely studied everything 
that has to do with the successful propagation and growing of beautiful roses and 
his business is conducted along the most scientific lines. In 1919, owing to a dis- 
ease of roses, he temporarily changed to the raising of hothouse tomatoes and ex- 
pects to place forty thousand pounds on the market. 

On the 28th of October, 1882, Mr. Balmer was united in marriage to Miss Alice 
Jane -Atkinson, a daughter of John and Margaret (Scarth) Atkinson, both of whom 
have passed away. To Mr. and Mrs. Balmer have been born five children. John 
.'\tkinson, who is residing in Tacoma. where he is employed in the shipyards, is mar- 
ried and has four sons. The next three children of the familj' died in infancy. Jes- 
mond Dean is a lieutenant with the artillery forces in France, having been a student 
in the University of Washington up to the time of his enlistment for service with the 
American army. He is still in Germany and has been in several engagements, being 
gassed twice. 

Mr. Balmer and his family are members of the Episcopal church and his politi- 
cal allegience is given to the republican party, which elected him to the office of 
mayor of Cle Elum in 1916. In this connection he has done most important work. 
He has cleaned up the police department and has instituted various needed reforms 
and improvements which have resulted greatly to the benefit of the city. He has 
also serveil on the school board and was very active in promoting the interests of the 
schools- He has been a very successful man in business, a most creditable public 
official and is a man of interesting personality whose genuine worth commands for 
him the respect, confidence and admiration of all with whom he has been brought in 
contact. 



CARL P. SUTORIUS. 

Carl P. Sutorius is one of the founders of the Sclah Mercantile Company and 
as such figures prominently in the commercial circles not only of Selah but of the 
valley. In this connecaion, in a period of ten years he has developed a business of 
extensive and gratifying proportions. He was a young man of twenty-seven years 
when he founded the business, for he was born in Lawrence. Kansas, on the 9th 
of February, 1882, a son of Charles -A. and Carrie (WalrufT) Sutorius, the former a 
native of Germany, while the latter was born in Kansas and was a daughter of John 
WalrufI, who was likewise born in Germany and became one of the pioneer settlers 
of the Sunflower state. Charles A. Sutorius arrived in Kansas during his boyhood 



30 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

days and was there reared and married. He was a jeweler and watchmaker by trade 
and carried, on business along those lines for many j-cars. He has now departed this 
life, while his wife resides in Chicago. 

Carl P. Sutorius acquired a public school education in Kansas City and during 
his youthful days had a newspaper route there. It was in that way that he earned 
the money necessary to enable him to continue his course in the Kansas City schools. 
He left home when a boy of fifteen years and has since been dependent entirely upon 
his own resources and labors. For three years he was employed by the Armour 
Packing Company in Kansas City and subsequently removed to Omaha. Nebraska, 
where he engaged in the retail sheet music business. Later he went to Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, where he successfully conducted business along the same line, and later 
he started in the sash and door business in that city. He eventually became a city 
salesman and was later with the St. Paul & Tacoma Lumber Company. The year 
1905 witnessed his arrival in the northwest, at which time he made his way to Tacoma 
and w-as with the same lumber company in that city for five years. He afterward 
became purchasing agent and auditor for the yards of the company in the Yakima 
valley and was thus engaged until 1909, when, desiring that his labors should more 
directly benefit himself, he became one of the organizers of the Selah Mercantile 
Company. In this undertaking he was associated with H. R. Blackwell and the 
business was established on the 15th of August, 1909, succeeding the Selah Trading 
Company, which had been instituted in 1907. The Selah Mercantile Company was 
incorporated in 1914 and in 1915 Mr. Blackwell sold his interest to Frank W. Clark, 
who was the president of the company and resided in Yakima until his death, Decem- 
ber 7. 1918. Mr. Sutorius is the executive treasurer. The company began business 
with a stock worth eighteen hundred dollars and had a very small store. Something 
of the rapid and substanital growth of their trade is indicated in the fact that they 
now carry a stock of general merchandise valued at twenty-five thousand dollars, 
dealing in everything that a rancher needs. The growth of their business is due to 
their thoroughly reliable methods, their enterprise and their earnest desire to please 
their cust9mers and today theirs is the leading store in Selah. 

On the 28th of August, 1908, Mr. Sutorius was married to Miss Josephine Clark, 
a daughter of Frank W. and Kate A. Clark. Her father was born in Lawrence, Kan- 
sas, while his parents were en route to Colorado, and later he became a pioneer 
resident of Tacoma, Washington, and occupied the position of general manager for 
the Tacoma Smelting Company. In 1913 he removed to Yakima and was the execu- 
tive secretary of the Red Cross of the Yakima valley at the time of his death. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Sutorius have been born two children, Clark and Helen. 

Fraternally Mr. Sutorius is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. He also belongs to the Selah Commercial Club, of which he w-as secretary 
and treasurer for three years. In politics he maintains an independent course, con- 
centrating his efforts and attention upon his business affairs, which, wisely directed, 
have placed him in the front rank among the representatives of commercial inter- 
ests in Selah. 



CHESTER ADGATE COiXGDOX. 

Chester Adgate Congdon, lawyer and capitalist, who first visited the Yakima 
valley in 1887 and made investment here in 1889, was born in Rochester, New York, 
on the 12th of June, 1853, his parents being Sylvester Laurentius and Laura Jane 
(Adgate) Congdon. He was descended in the paternal line from James Congdon. 
a Quaker, who came from England about 1640 and settled in Rhode Island, becoming 
the founder of the family in the new world. The line of descent comes on down 
through his son John, John (II), John (III), and his second wife, Dorcas Huntley, 
and through Hannibal and Mary (Satchwell) Congdon, who were the grandparents 
of Chester A. Congdon. The latter's father was a minister of the Methodist church. 

In the public schools of Elmira and Corning, New York, Chester A. Congdon 
acquired his preliminary education, which was supplemented by study in the East 
Genesee Conference Seminary at Ovid, New York. His collegiate work was done 




CHESTER A. CONGDON 




FORMER RESIDENCE OF CHESTER A. COXGDOX 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY ^,^^^^-35 

at Syracuse University, from which he was graduated in 1875 with the degreec of 
Bachelor of Arts. He studied law under the preceptorship of Hiscock, GifTord & 
Doheny at Syracuse, Xew^ York, and in 1877 was admitted to the bar of that state. 
After admission to the bar in New York state, Mr. Congdon taught school for about 
a year in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, before he went to St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1879, 
where he was admitted to the bar of that state and and there established himself 
in the practice of law. In 1892 he removed from St. Paul to Duluth, becoming a 
member of the law firm of Billson & Congdon as the partner of William W. Billson. 
In 1893 they were joined by Judge Daniel A. Dickinson and the firm style of Billson, 
Corgdon & Dickinson was adopted. On the death of the judge in 1902 the surviving 
partners resumed their original firm title and thus continued until 1904, when both 
retired from active practice. 

In the meantime Mr. Congdon had extended his efforts to various lines of com- 
meicial, industrial and financial enterprise in his adopted city. He became a prom- 
incn: figure in connection with the development of the iron and copper mining 
resources of the Lake Superior country and at the same time his advice and as- 
sistance were sought by many business and financial institutions on the directorate 
of which his name never appeared. He was general counsel of the Oliver Mining 
Company before its consolidation with other companies, now forming the United 
States Steel Corporation. He was also the president of the Chemung Iron Company 
and the Canisteo Mining Company, the vice-president of the American Exchange 
National Bank of Duluth and a director in the Calumet & Arizona Mining Company, 
the Hedley Gold Mining Company, the Greene Cananea Copper Company, the Mar- 
shall-Wells Hardware Company, the Gowan-Lenning-Brown Company and various 
other banking, mining and jobbing enterprises which claimed his attention and prof- 
ited by his cooperation and direction. He also became interested in agricultural pur- 
suits, making extensive investments in farm lands in the northwest. He first came 
to the Yakima valley on a tour of inspection in 1887 and in 1889, in association with 
several old friends, formed a syndicate which in connection with the Ontario Land 
Company made investment in land adjoining North Yakima, afterward platting the 
Capitol addition and also lands to the south of it. This syndicate, of which Mr. 
Congdon was a member, and the Ontario Land Company also furnished the money 
for the construction of the Yakima Valley canal. The first investment amounted 
to thirty-five thousand dollars, which was used in the acquirement of the aforemen- 
tioned property, while seventy-five thousand dollars were invested in dry lands, at 
Wide Hollow and Xob Hill. The Yakima Valley canal aforementioned was built 
in 189-; for irrigating all of Xob Hill, and in 1898 or 1899 Albert S. Congdon, a brother 
of our sul>ject. took charge of this undertaking, which was the second large irriga- 
tion project of the valley. The Sunnyside Canal project had been launched before 
Mr. Congdon's first visit to Yakima but had encountered diiificulties and was idle 
at the time he Ijecame interested in Yakami Valley projects. After carefully inves- 
ti;2ating its affairs Mr. Congdon decided not to take hold of this enterprise because 
in his opinion there were better lands available for development than those under 
the Sunnyside and also for the reason that he was not entirely satisfied with the suffi- 
ciency and validity of the Sunnyside water right. It is a fact anyhow that the Sun- 
nyside Canal project has gone through reorganization since 1889 and that the Yakima 
Valley Canal Company is, if not the only one, one of the very few that has never had 
to be reorganized. The Northern Pacific Railroad urged him to undertake the Sun- 
nyside project, but he gave his attention to the irrigation of the upper valley on Nob 
Hill. This system irrigated three thousand acres at first and later was extended to 
irrigate thirteen hundred acres additional. It was built to irrigate the land owned 
by the syndicate and the Ontario Land Company, most of which land, in which he 
had an interest, had been sold by 1905, in which year Mr. Congdon began to buy the 
land which became his ranch. ,\ large part of the present ranch consists of property 
which he and his associates sold some years before, after the completion of the canal, 
and which he later bought back. Mr. Congdon was so fond of the Yakima Valley 
that he wanted to have some interest here which would require his attention once 
or twice a year, and with the sale of the last of the land which he and his associates 



36 HISTORY OF YAKIMA \ALLEY 

had criginally acquired, his excuse for visits here was more or less worn out. There- 
fore he personally acquired properties which now constitute one of the fine ranches 
of the valley. 

With the advent of Mr. Congdon in the business circles of the northwest he 
became a very active supporter of all those interests which he believed of value and 
benefit to the state. He was very active in the state capital fight in 1889 and gave 
land for the capitol site. When it was decided that Olympia should be the capital 
of Washington, he, with others, gave the park site to the city of Yakima, but upon 
the refusal of the city to improve the park, the land reverted to the Ontario Land 
Company, which had made the donation at the beginning. The large landed inter- 
ests of Mr. Congdon were developed and much of the property sold, but he kept or 
bought back enough so that he was owner of more than nine hundred acres. He 
had more than three hundred and seventy-five acres in fruit, while the balance was 
farm land. He developed one of the largest Aberdeen-.-\ngus cattle herds in Amer- 
ica, his stock being shown all over the United States at the various cattle exhibits, 
winning prizes everywhere. 

In 1914 Mr. Congdon erected a beautiful home, built all of native stone. It is 
the largest private residence in the valley and regarded one of the show places in 
Washington. While it is not consciously patterned after any special style of building, 
its design largely resembles that of the large Mexican houses. It is a story and a 
half, built around a court, and is erected on the edge of a bluff, requiring a good deal 
of retaining wall and thus to some extent having the appearance of an old war castle. 
Mr. Congdon was a great traveler and considered the Yakima Valley the best agri- 
cultural district of the world. He spent much of his time here and did as much as 
any ether man for the development and upbuilding of this section of the state. He 
contributed quietly and unostentatiously but most generously to all public projects 
for good, including churches, nor did he confine his efforts alone to the Yakima Val- 
ley. He became a heavy investor at Tacoma, Grays Harbor, South Bend, Raymond 
and other points in Washington. He was a personal friend of the officials of the 
Northern Pacific Railway, including President Hannaford, and he cooperated with 
the railroad company in the improvement of many localities. In 1913 he built a 
seveiity-thousand-dollar storage and packing plant in order to house the fruit raised 
in the district and he developed one of the largest' orchards under individual owner- 
ship in the northwest. 

On the 29th of September, 1881, at Syracuse, New York, Mr. Congdon was mar- 
ried to Miss Clara Hesperia, a daughter of the Rev. Edward Bannister, a clergyman 
of San Francisco, California, and to them were born seven children: Walter Ban- 
nister, Edward Chester, Marjorie, Helen Clara, John, Elisabeth Mannering and 
Robert Congdon. The family circle was broken in the death of Mr. Congdon in 
St. Paul, Minnesota, on the 21st of November, 1916. His life had been one of great 
activity and usefulness. He had been called to various offices of trust and responsi- 
bility, serving from 1881 until 1886 as assistant United States attorney for the dis- 
trict of Minnesota, as a member of the Minnesota house of representatives from 1909 
until 1913, and from 1903 until his death he was a member of the Duluth charter 
commission. Minnesota in 1916 made him a member of the republican national cen- 
tral committee and his opinions carried weight in the councils of the party. He was 
a member of various professional, historical, scientific, social and fraternal societies 
and associations. He had membership with the Kitchi Gammi, Northland Country, 
Commercial and Duluth Boat Clubs, all of Duluth; the Minnesota Club of St. Paul; 
the Minneapolis Club of Minneapolis; the University Club of Chicago; the Duquesne 
Club of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: the Bankers Club of New York; the Commercial 
Club of North Yakima; and with various college fraternities, including the Upsilon 
Kappa, Psi Upsilon, Theta Nu Epsilon and Phi Beta Kappa. A contemporary biog- 
rapher has said of him: "Those who really knew Mr. Congdon found in him a man 
of tender heart and warm, human sympathies. His philanthropy was general and 
quite well known, although he sought to keep it under cover ?nd shrank from pub- 
licity in this regard. He was a close student of government and state policies, a foe 
of waste and inefficiency, a friend of political progress as he saw it, a champion of 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 37 

clean pu1)lic life and sound government. He was always the good citizen, eager to 
have his part in every forward movement in directions that he judged to be wise." 
The northwest has reason to be grateful to him for what he accomplished in connec- 
tion with her upbuilding. He was acquainted with most of the old-time men of 
prominence in this section of the country. The Yakima Valley — its growth, its 
development and its beautification — it is said was his hobby; yet it was more than 
that because he always expected to derive profit as well as pleasure from his activi- 
ties Iktc. l^nfortunately, he did not see his ranch return a profit to him. but this 
was largely for the reason that at the time of his demise many of the trees were yet 
too young. Though an idealist, there was yet sufficient business man in him to 
expect interest on his investments here and undoubtedly the fine ranch, in spite of 
the large investment in improvements, will turn out to be a successful enterprise 
even from a monetary standpoint. Mr. Congdon was known nationally in financial 
circles, being recognized as a man of wonderful business judgment, but there were 
also qualities which endeared him to those who came within the circle of his com- 
panionship, knowing and loving him not for what he accomplished but for what 
he was. 

THE YAKIMA VALLEY BANK. 

The Yakima Valley Bank, one of the strong moneyed institutions of the city 
of Yakima, was established in June, 1902, by Miles Cannon, who became the presi- 
dent, Arthur Coffin, vice-president, and Stanley Coffin, cashier, with ,E. E. Streitz as 
assistant cashier. .A change in the personnel of the officers occurred in 1904, when 
O. A. Fechter was elected to the presidency. The following year Charles Heath be- 
came the cashier, with Charles S. Mead as the vice-president. The bank occupies a 
building at the corner of First street and Yakima avenue and owns a property that 
it will soon occupy on Yakima avenue between First and Second streets, where 
stands a two-story stone building with a fifty foot frontage. The bank was estab- 
lished with a capital stock of seventy-five thousand dollars, sixty per cent of 
which was paid in. This was increased to one hundred thousand dollars in 1908 
and the entire stock was paid in. The directors are Charles Heath, O. A. Fechter, 
J. E. Shannon, C. S. Mead and L. O. Janeck, who became a director in 1906. The 
bank enjoyed a splendid growth in 1917 and in 1918 its capital and surplus amounted 
to one hundred and eighteen thousand dollars and its deposits to one million, four 
hundred and seventy-one thousand, three hundred and ninety-two dollars and seven- 
ty-nine cents. In 1915 the bank's statement showed deposits of five hundred and 
eighty-eight thousand dollars, with a capital and surplus of one hundred and thirteen 
thousand dollars. The increase in deposits is indicative of the growth of the busi- 
ness and of the substantial policy followed by the institution — a policy which com- 
mands the respect and confidence of the general public. 



WALTER R. ROWE. 



Among the younger agriculturists of the Yakima valley is Walter R. Rowe, of 
Naches, who now devotes his attention to orcharding, being successful along this 
line. A native of Indianapolis, Indiana, he was born May 21, 1884, a son of William 
and Linnie (McCormick) Rowe, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter 
of Indianapolis. The mother comes of a pioneer family there, her people being 
among the first settlers of that city, and a monument to a member of the family was 
recently erected in Indianapolis. The father of our subject was for many years con- 
nected with the rolling mill business in that city and later in life also with banking. 
In 1893, however, he sold out and came to Yakima, where Mrs. Rowe had in 1889 
taken up a ranch on the lower Xaches and proved up on the property. There the 
family settled in 1893, tlie ranch comprising two hundred acres, but one hundred 
acres of this was given in exchange for water rights. The father developed his 
ranch and there passed his remaining days, his death occurring in 1900. His widow 
survives and now resides in Yakima. 



38 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Being nine years of age when the family removed to Washington, Walter R. 
Rowe received his early education in Indianapolis and subsequently attended public 
school in this state. He then attended Washington State University at Pullman for 
two years and at the end of that time returned to the ranch, which he bought in 
1906. Fifty acres of the ranch are in apples and ten acres are devoted to pears, 
peaches, cherries and other small fruits. Mr. Rowe has erected modern buildings 
upon the ranch and has his own packing house with a storage capacity for twenty 
thousand boxes. 

On the 19th of December. 1906, Mr. Rowe was married to Miss Jessie Mead, a 
native of Iowa and a daughter of Charles Mead, who about 1898 removed to the 
Yakima valley, taking up the occupation of ranching. Mr. and Mrs. Rowe have a 
daughter and a son: Helen, eight years of age; and Charles, aged six. 

Mr. Rowe is a Mason, being a member of Xaches Lodge No. 211, F. & A. M., 
and also having passed the chapter and Scottish Rite degrees. He is also a member 
of Yakima Lodge Xo. 318, E. P. O. E. In his political affiliations Mr. Rowe is a 
republican. He is also a member of the Yakima County Horticultural L^nion. 



WILLIAM ALFRED STEWART. 

William .Mfred Stewart, a progressive agriculturist of Yakima county, has a 
highly productive farm on the Cowiche which is largely devoted to the raising of 
hay, grain and potatoes, while he also conducts a dairy. For many years his family 
has been connected with the development and upbuilding of the west. Mr. Stewart 
came to Yakima county at the age of eighteen years and has since resided here con- 
tinuously. 

Mr. Stewart is a native of Oregon, his birth having occurred in Marion county, 
August 29, 1860. His parents were J. T. and Charlotte Loretta (Barter) Stewart. 
The father was a native of Carlisle. England, born in 1829, and was only six months 
old when he was brought by his parents to Canada. Later the family removed to 
New York and in 1885 crossed the plains to California from Iowa, in which state 
they had been located for some time, making the trip by ox team, and there the 
father engaged in mining. Late in the '50s another removal took them to Oregon, 
where J. T. Stewart engaged in farming and stock raising, also starting the first 
woolen mill in the stale at JefTerson. In 1878 he came to Yakima county, taking np 
land on the .Ahtanum and later acquiring a homestead on \ob Hill. To the cultiva- 
tion of this land he gave his close attention for twenty-four years, retiring at the 
end of that period with a gratifying income to Yakima, where he passed away in 
October, 1912. In 1854 he had married Charlotte L. Barter, who crossed the plains 
with him to California and made the removal to Oregon. She died in 1864. She had 
two children by a former marriage and four by Mr. Stewart. In 1865 Mr. Stewart 
married Deborah Coker, by whom he had eleven children. She died in September, 
1908, being survived by her husband for four years. 

William .'\. Stewart spent his boyhood days in Oregon, where in the acquirement 
of his education he attended the public schools. He was eighteen years of age when 
the family removed to the Yakima valley and here he began his independent career 
by taking employment at farm work, being thus engaged for several years. For 
six years he then was engaged in the candy business in Seattle but in 1889 bought 
eighty acres on the Cowiche, which then was covered with sagebrush. He built a 
home there but in 1890 sold out and removed to Whatcom county, Washington, where 
he successfully cultivated land for about six years. At the end of that period he 
located in Woodland, Washington, where for three years he successfully operated a 
dairy, but in 1900 he returned to Yakima county and bought fifty acres of land on 
the Cowiche but of this he sold thirty acres in 1911. He raises hay, grain, beets 
and potatoes and also conducts a successful dairy, thus deriving gratifying returns 
from his enterprises. He has always followed progressive methods and has made 
many improvements upon the place, also instituting up-to-date equipment and thus 
making his farm very valuable. For his dairy he keeps high grade full blooded Hol- 
steins. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 39 

On October 17, 1888, Mr. Stewart was united in marriage to Miss Alice Smith, 
who was born in Albion, Edwards county, Illinois, August 4, 1865. Her parents, 
W. G. and Caroline (Davis) Smith, were natives of Herefordshire, England, the 
latter born .April 11, 1825. They were married in England and in 1865, the same 
year in which tlieir daughter was born, came to the United States, locating in Illinois. 
In 1870 they removed to Wilson county, Kansas, and eleven years later, inl88l, 
came overland to Washington, going first to Issaquah, whence they made their way 
to Seattle and thence to Bellingham, Whatcom county, in the fall of 1882. There 
the father homesteaded and for twelve years gave his attention to his land but in 
lf:94 the family removed to Woodland, Washington, where Mrs. Smith passed away. 
Mr. Smith now lives retired in the enjoyment of a comfortable competence, at the 
age of eighty-six years. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart have seven children: Grace, who 
married Clarence Hobbs, a rancher in the Cowiche district, by whom she has two 
sons; Edgar Mayo, also a rancher in that locality, who has a wife and three chil- 
dren; Chester Earl, a rancher in the same district, who is married and has one child; 
Cecile May, the wife of E. G. Hart, who follows ranching in the Cowiche district; 
Charles Alfred, who is serving his country in the United States army; .-Vlvin Leroy, 
at liome; and William Clarence, aged fifteen, who is also at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart have manj' friends in Cowiche and vicinity, all of whom 
speak of them in the highest terms. Both are valued members of their community, 
in the moral and material upbuilding of which they take a laudable interest. Mrs. 
Stewart is a member of the Baptist church, to the work of which she is sincerely 
devoted. Politically Mr. Stewart is independent, giving his support to the candi- 
dates and measures that he considers of the greatest value to the majority. Frater- 
nally he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of .\merica, and, being deeply inter- 
ested in educational matters, he has served for several years as clerk of the local 
school board, exerting his efforts in every way to promote school facilities and raise 
the standard of education in his district. A pioneer agriculturist of the state and a 
son of one of the early settlers, his career is closely connected with the upbuilding 
of this commonwealth and by promoting his own interests he has contributed toward 
general prosperity. His memory reaches back to the days when the Yakima valley 
was still a wilderness and he has therefore witnessed all of the wonderful changes 
that have transformed this section into one of the richest agricultural districts in the 
country. 



FRANK B.ARTHOLET. 

Throughout his entire life Frank Bartholet has been connected with the banking 
business and is now the cashier of the Yakima National Bank. He has contributed 
through .close application, indefatigable energy and progressive methods to the suc- 
cess of the institution in no small degree and he is thoroughly familiar with every 
phase of the banking business at the present time. He was born in Shakopee, Minne- 
sota, on the 17th of March, 1868, and is a son of Joseph and Anna M. (Mcchtel) 
Bartholet, who in 1875 left Minnesota and removed westward with their family to 
Salem. Oregon, where they resided until 1879. In that year they came to Yakima and 
the father owned and conducted the second hotel of the city, remaining at its head to 
the time of his retirement from active business life. Both he and his wife have now 
passed away. 

Frank Bartholet was but seven years of age when the family left Minnesota and 
came to the Pacific northwest, so that his education was acquired in the public schools 
in this section of the country, his studies being completed in Yakima. When his text- 
books were put aside he made his initial step in the business world by securing em- 
ployment in the First National Bank at Yakima, of which he became head bookkeeper. 
Upon the organization of the Yakima National Bank he accepted a position as head 
bookkeeper in that institution and was elected its cashier in 1908. He has so since 
served and the record which he has made as a bank official is a most creditable one, 
showing the conscientiousness with which he meets every obligation devolving upon 



40 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

him and the care and thoroughness with which he safeguards the interests entrusted 
to him. 

In 1892 Mr. Bartholet married Miss Flora Haas, of Spakone. Washington, who 
died in 1901, leaving a son, Urban C, serving in the Spruce division of the United 
States army. On the 5th of August, 1903, Mr. Bartholet was united in marriage to 
Miss Edith McDonnell, of Tacoma, and their children are: Donnell, Juliana, Catherine 
and Mary Elizabeth. The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church 
and Mr. Bartholet holds membership with the Knights of Columbus and also with the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In politics he maintains an independent course, 
voting according to the dictates of his judgment. He stands for progressiveness in 
public afifairs of the community and gives his aid and influence to all measures and 
projects which he believes of public worth. 



WILLIAM PERRY SAWYER. 

William Perry Sawyer is the owner of Elmwood I'arm, an attractive ranch that 
occupies historic ground near Sawyer Station, in the center of the Parker bottoms 
district. He has an attractive residence, built of stone to the second story and 
then of wood. It stands on a hill overlooking the road, commanding a splendid view 
of the surrounding country, with the snowy caps of Mount Adams and Mount 
Rainier dominating the landscape. 

Mr. Sawyer comes to the west from Boston, Massachusetts, where his birth 
occurred September 19, 1851. He is a son of Humphrey and Barbara (Perry) 
Sawyer, natives of New Hampshire and of Boston, Massachusetts, respectively. 
His ancestors were of the same family as Commodore Perry and both the Sawyer 
and Perry families have been represented in America from early colonial times. The 
father. Humphrey Sawyer, on leaving Massachusetts, settled in Alden, Wisconsin, 
about 1856. There he engaged in farming but later conducted a hardware business 
at Stillwater, Minnesota, where he located in 1870. 

In his boyhood days William Perry Sawyer obtained a public school education. 
After the removal of the family to Stillwater, Minnesota, he entered the hardware busi- 
ness, in which he continued for many years, or until 1889. Eventually he came to 
Yakima and purchased the business of the A. B. Weed Hardware Company, conducting 
his store as senior partner of the firm of Sawyer & Pennington until 1892. He then 
withdrew from commercial connections and purchased two hundred and twenty acres 
of land on Parker bottoms. At that time he raised some hops but now has seventy-five 
acres in fruit trees, mostly apples and pears. He has his own warehouse and packing 
house and all of the equipment necessary for the care of the trees and of the fruit. He 
built upon the place one of the finest homes in Yakima county, completed in 1911. 
Near-by stands a little log cabin built in 1864 by J. P. Mattoon, who homesteaded the 
land upon which Mr. Sawyer now resides. Just back of the house was an old 
Catholic mission, which was used for three or four years until the new^ one was 
built on the .Ahtanum, and thus from the days of early settlement in this section of 
the state the ranch has been used for the purposes of civilization 

On the 9th of October, 1883, Mr. Sawyer was married to Miss Alice M. Brown, 
who was born in Iowa in 1858, a daughter of John and Maria (Grant) Brown, who 
were natives of England and became residents of Iowa in 1854. The father was a 
very prominent farmer of Iowa, devoting his attention to the raising of grain and 
stock. In 1873 he and his family returned to England, where they spent two years, 
but the lure of the new world was upon them and they again became residents of 
Iowa, where both passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Sawyer became the parents of six 
children, but the first-born, Linley, died in infancy. Beulah. the second of the family, 
became the wife of Herman Holmquist, a rancher on Parker Heights. John Edwin, 
of the United States Marines, enlisted on the second day after war was declared and 
went to France in February, 1918. He has been through all the active fighting, was 
badly gassed and was in a hospital for several weeks but is now again on active duty 
with the army of occupation, his record being one of which his parents have every 




WILLIAM P. SAWYER 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 43 

reason to be proud. Harriet Marie, the next of tlie family, is the wife of Earl Cheney, 
of Shosone, Idaho, and they have three children. Horace died in infancy. Shirley 
Emma, who completes the family, is in school. 

Mr. Sawyer is a member of Yakima Lodge, Xo. 24, A, F. & A. M., and served on 
the board that built the Masonic Temple of Yakima, being the one who planned the 
building and supervised its erection. With the exception of the L'nited States gov- 
ernment building in the city of Yakima, it is today the best building in the Yakima 
valley. In fact it is the finest Masonic Temple on the Pacific coast, being a reproduc- 
tion of the inner chamber of King Solomon's Temple and the only one extant. The 
keystone in the arch over the entrance to the elevator lobby was taken from the 
ancient quarries of Jerusalem, from which the stone for King Solomon's Temple 
is also supposed to have been secured. This building cost two hundred thousand 
dollars. Mr. Sawyer also was one of the trustees who built the Yakima Street Rail- 
way and no doubt did more than any other man toward giving Yakima its present 
street car system. His religious faith is that of the L^niversalist church, while his 
wife has membership in the Episcopal church. In politics he is a republican and is 
now serving for the third term as a member of the state legislature, his reelection 
being indicative of his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in him by his 
fellow townsmen as well as of the excellent record which he has made in legislative 
service. He is one of the most prominent men of the valley, an active champion of 
the good roads movement, of educational interests and of all things affecting the 
public welfare. He has maintained in his life an even balance between private busi- 
ness interests and matters of public concern, his ready support of every public interest 
constituting an element in the county's progress and upbuilding. 



JUDGE JOHN B. DAVIDSON. 

Judge John B. Davidson, serving for the second term as judge of the superior 
court at EUensburg and since 1883 a valued and representative member of the Wash- 
ington bar, was born near Rochester, Indiana. March 14, 1860, a son of Stephen and 
Catharine B. (Brown) Davidson, the former a native of Ohio, while the latter was 
born in Abbeville, South Carolina. The Davidson family is of Scotch ancestry. The 
father was a son of Andrew Davidson, whose father came to America from Scotland 
prior to the Revolutionary war, crossing the Atlantic about 1760, when sixteen years 
of age, at which time he took up his abode in Pennsylvania. Later representatives 
of the name became pioneer settlers of Ohio and thus aided in advancing the trend 
of western civilization. The father of Judge Davidson was a farmer by occupation 
and removed to Indiana, where he passed away in 1877. His wife, coming to the 
west, died at the home of her son. Judge Davidson, in EUensburg in 1897. 

An academic training followed Judge Davidson's completion of a public school 
course and later he entered the Michigan State University at Ann Arbor. He was 
also for a time a student in the Valparaiso University at Valparaiso, Indiana, and 
he began reading law in Rochester, Indiana, with M. L. Essick, a leading member 
of the bar at that place. Subsequently he became a law student in Indianapolis, In- 
diana, and in 1883 was graduated from the Albany Law School of New York. His 
craining was thus thorough and comprehensive and well qualified him for the active 
duties of the profession. 

In the same year Judge Davidson removed to the northwest, attracted by the bet- 
ter opportunities which he believed he could secure in this great and growing section 
of the country. He made his way to Yakima county, was admitted to the bar the 
same year and then located in EUensburg, Washington, where he has since followed 
his profession. At different times he has been called upon for public service. He 
filled the position of city treasurer, was also city attorney and in 1889 was elected 
mayor of EUensburg, in which connection he gave to the city a business-like and 
progressive administration, characterized by various needed reforms and improve- 
ments. In 1896 he was called upon for judicial service, having been elected judge of 
the superior court, after which he served upon the bench for four years. He then 
retired and resumed the private practice of law, but in 1916 was recalled to that office 



44 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

and is the present incumbent. His rulings are strictly fair and impartial, based upon 
the law and the equity in the case, and his work upon the bench is characterized by 
a masterful grasp of every problem presented for solution. In addition to his work 
as lawyer and judge he has conducted a line ranch which he owns. 

On the 31st of March. 1886, Judge Davidson w-as married to Miss Jean C. 
Schnebly. a daughter of D. J. and Margaret A. (Painter) Schnebly. Her father was 
at one time editor of the Oregon Spectator and he afterward established the Ellens- 
burg Localizer in 1883 and conducted the paper successfully until his death in 1901. 
To Judge and Mrs. Davidson have been born three children: Philip A. was educated 
at the University of Washington and is now a resident of Seattle; Mary V. was edu- 
cated at Sweet Brier, Virginia, and also pursued a two years' course in art at Berke- 
ley, California, and one year in general interior decorating and designing in New 
York city; she is now the wife of F. A. Kern, an attorney of Ellensburg; Margaret 
A., a teacher in the State Normal School at Ellensburg, was graduated from the 
University of Washington and also from the Emerson College of Oratory at Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Fraternally Judge Davidson is connected with the Elks Lodge No. 1102. of 
which he is a past exalted ruler. His political allegiance has always been given to the 
democratic party and it has been the recognition of his public-spirited devotion to 
the general good that has occasioned his being called to office at various times. 
His recall to the bench is positive proof of the confidence which the public has in his 
judicial fairness. 



FRED A. HALL. 



Fred A. Hall, who dates his residence in the Yakima valley from 1899. is now 
the owner of an excellent fruit ranch pleasantly and conveniently situated two and 
a half miles west of the city of Yakima- He was born in Lasalle county, Illinois, 
April 26, 1867, a son of S. A. and Harriett A. (Beardsley) Hall. The father was a 
farmer by occupation and at one time served as postmaster of Tonica, Illinois. In 
the year 1902 he came to the northwest, settling in Yakima county, where he again 
gave his time and attention to farming, being thus busily occupied until, having 
acquired a handsome competence, he retired from business life. He is now enjoy- 
ing a well earned rest, being surrounded by the comforts of life. In 1916 he was 
called upon to mourn the death of his wife, who passed away on the 6th of July of 
that year. 

Liberal educational opportunities were accorded Fred A. Hall, who in 1892 was 
graduated from the L'niversity of Illinois with the Bachelor of Science degree. He 
then entered the drug business at Tonica. Illinois, and remained one of the mer- 
chants of that place until 1899, when he sought the opportunities of the northwest. 
Coming to Yakima, he entered the Richey & Gilbert Company, assisting in the 
conduct of their various interests. For three years he lived at Toppenish but in 1904 
purchased his present fruit ranch two and a half miles west of Yakima and built 
thereon an attractive residence, substantial barns and all the necessary outbuildings 
needed for the care of his fruit and his stock. He has an orchard of forty-two acres, 
mostly planted to apples, and his place is regarded as one of the good fruit ranches 
of the valley. 

On the 17th of October, 1894, Mr. Hall was married to Miss Luella S. Richey, 
a daughter of James and Anne (Hamilton) Richey, of Tonica, Illinois, who came 
to Yakima county in 1900. her father having been a member of the Richey & Gilbert 
Company which he organized. Mrs. Hall passed away September 28, 1907, leaving 
three children: Thorland, who was born July 30, 1896, and who at the age of twenty- 
two years was serving as a member of the United States army being in camp when 
the armistice was signed; Isabelle, who was born May 29, 1900; and Burton Augustus, 
May 31, 1902. On the 26th of June, 1909, Mr. Hall was again married, his second 
union being with Frances Gray Chace, of Chicago. 

Mr. Hall is a member of the Sons of Veterans, his father having been a soldier 
of the Civiil war, a member of Company I, Eleventh Illinois Infantry, with which 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 45 

he served until discharged on account of sickness. Fred A. Hall is also identilied 
with the Modern Woodmen of America, the Mystic Workers and with the Grange. 
He and his family are members of the Congregational church and they occupy an 
enviable social position. In politics he is a republican but not an office seeker. He 
belongs to the Yakima County Horticultural Union and by reason of his progres- 
siveness and enterprise has gained a place among the prosperous fruit raisers of this 
section of the state. 



FLOYD C. DAY. 



.\ valuable fruit farm of twenty-five acres, located on the upper Xaches, bespeaks 
the progressive methods which have resulted in the prosperity that is now enjoyed 
by Floyd C. Day, who is numbered among the well known and successful orchardists 
of his neighborhood. A native of Ilion, New York, he was born January 10, 1874, a 
son of George and Margaret (Chappelle) Day, both natives of the Empire state. 
For many years the father did contract work for the Remington Arms Company 
but is now deceased, as is his wife, who was born at Schuyler Lake, Xew York. 

Floyd C. Day was reared under the parental roof and in the acquirement of his 
education attended public school until old enough to start out in life for himself. In 
1893, at the age of nineteen years, he began to learn the jewelry business, becoming 
very proficient along that line. It was in 1906 that he came to the west, locating at 
first in the fast growing city of Seattle, where he filled a position with the well-known 
firm of L. L. Moore & Company for some time. He later had a repair business in 
Seattle, until 1914 when another removal brought him to Yakima county. Perceiv- 
ing the great opportunities here presented along fruit raising lines, he acquired 
twenty-five acres on the upper Xaches and now has eleven acres of this tract in 
apples and pears, while the balance is in pasture and plow land. He has closely 
studied modern methods in regard to scientific fruit cultivation and has made a num- 
ber of valuable improvements and installed the necessary equipment, tlius deriving 
a gratifying income from his efforts. His barns and outbuildings are up-to-date in 
every respect and a modern residence has been erected as the outward evidence of 
his prosperity. 

On July 23, 1902, Mr. Day was united in marriage to Miss Evanelle Ely, who 
like her husband is a native of Ilion. Xew York, and is a daughter of .Arthur and 
Ida (Rhodes) Ely. To Mr. and Mrs. Day has been born a daughter, Margaret, aged 
fifteen, and a son, Rhodes, who is six years old. Mr. and Mrs. Day are popular and 
valued members of the younger social set in their neighborhood and have many 
friends in Xaches. 

Politically Mr. Day is a republican but not strictly bound by party ties, often 
voting independently as the occasion demands or candidates appeal to him because 
of their ability or qualities. Along his line of occupation he is a member of the 
Yakima County Horticultural L^nion and in this connection gives and often receives 
valuable information. Through his efforts along horticultural lines Mr. Day has 
not only attained to a substantial position individually but has greatly assisted in 
forwarding movements in that line of industry in his valley. There is great credit 
due him for what he has achieved, as in the best sense of the word he is a self-made 
man. 



EDWIX PORTER DITEMAX. 

Edwin Porter Diteman, whose ranch property is situated near Outlook, was 
born in .\roostook county, Maine, September 3, 1865, a son of Wallace and Eliza 

( Linton ) Diteman, both of whom were natives of Nova Scotia. Subsequent to their 

marriage they crossed the border into Maine, establishing their home in Aroostook 

county, where the father engaged in farming and where both he and his wife passed 
away. 



46 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

To the public school system of his native state Edwin P. Diteman is indebted 
for the educational opportunities which he enjoyed. During vacation periods and 
after his school days were over he farmed with his father until he reached the age 
of twenty-two years and then went to Minnesota. In the fall of 1888 he arrived in 
Yakima and was employed on a dairy ranch with his brother through the first 
winter. He worked for wages for a few years and then returned to Maine, where 
he continued for a year and a half. On the expiration of that period he once more 
came to Yakima county, where he lived for two years and then again spent a year 
and a half in the Pine Tree state. The lure of the west, however, was upon him 
and he returned to Yakima county, where he worked for wages. He devoted seven 
years to the logging contract business for the Cascade Lumber Company and for a 
few years was connected with the sheep industry as a partner of his brother. In 
May, 1917, he bought seventy-six and a half acres of land pleasantly and conveniently 
situated two and three-quarters of a mile northwest of Sunnyside. Upon this place 
he has a good house and substantial barns and raises large crops of hay and corn. 
He also raises cattle and hogs, and in the cultivation of his fields and in the raising 
of his stock he is meeting with success. 

On the Uth of April. 1894, Mr. Diteman was united in marriage to Miss Jennie 
Alinda Tingley, who was born in Aroostook county, Maine, a daughter of Ernest 
Herbert and Elizabeth (Tilley) Tingley. The father was born in New Brunswick, 
May 24, 1851, and the mother was also a native of that country. They removed to 
Maine during childhood, however, and the father was a farmer in that state. The 
mother has now passed away. To Mr. and Mrs. Diteman have been born eight 
children, as follows: Leatha, who is the wife of Earl DeFrece, a resident of Centralia, 
Washington; Annie, who is deceased; Wallace R.; Roy; Mae; Curtis; Linley, who 
has passed away; and Ernest. 

Mr. Diteman is a republican in his political views, but though loyal and pro- 
gressive in matters of citizenship, has never been active in public life, preferring to 
concentrate his efforts and attention upon his business aflfairs. 



THOMAS FEAR. 



Thomas Fear, deceased, became a resident of Yakima county when much of its 
land was still unclaimed and undeveloped and took up a tract from the government 
six miles west of the city. He afterward purchased other land and continued one of 
the active farmers and stock raisers of the district to the time of his demise, which 
occurred on the 1st of March, 1916, He was born in England, February 22, 1852, a 
son of William .-Mfred Fear. The father was also a native of England and in the 
schools of that country Thomas Fear pursued his education, remaining in the land 
of his birth until 1873, when, at the age of twenty-one years, he crossed the Atlantic 
;o the new world. A year later his father also made the trip to the United States. 
They settled first in Colorado, where the father took up government land. In the 
year 1876 Thomas Fear arrived in Yakima county and entered a claim from the gov- 
ernment six miles west of the city of Yakima. With characteristic energy he began 
the development of that place and later he bought land on the Cowiche and in many 
other places. He becarne one of the large landowners and stock raisers of this sec- 
tion of the state and in 1908 he built a beautiful home upon his place, which he con- 
tinued to occupy to the time of his demise. 

On the 2d of January, 1898, Mr. Fear was married to Miss Aimee Reynolds, of 
Yakima, a daughter of J. W. and Susan E. Reynolds, who came to Yakima county 
in 1883. H'er father passed away in 1913 and her mother died in 1914. Mr. Reynolds 
was born in Missouri and for a year was a resident of Kansas before he started 
across the plains in 1879. He first went to Oregon and from that point removed to 
the Yakima valley. In this section of the country he purchased a farm and con- 
tinued a resident of Yakima county until his demise. To Mr, and Mrs, Fear was 
born a son, Thomas Reynolds, whose birth occurred December 17, 1899, and who is 
now in the United States navy as a seaman. He was for two years a student in 
Pullman College and is a graduate of a business college at Yakima. 




THOMAS FEAR 




MRS. AIMEE REYNOLDS FEAR 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 51 

In his political views Mr. Fear was a democrat and his religious faith was that 
of the Episcopal church, while fraternally he was connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He was a man of striking appearance and personality — hon- 
orable, upright and respected by all who knew him, and in his death Yakima county 
lost one of its most valued 



CHARLES HEATH. 



The banking fraternity of Yakima finds a worthy representative in Charles 
Heath, cashier of the Yakima Valley Bank, who came to his present position in 
1905. He was born in Wisconsin in January, 1864, and is a son of Charles H. and 
Eliza Heath, who in the year 1874 left Wisconsin and removed to Iowa, where they 
established their home on a farm, the father devoting his attention to general agri- 
cultural pursuits throughout his remaining days, both he and his wife dying in Iowa. 

Charles Heath was a lad of but ten years when the family went to the Hawkeye 
state and there he acquired his education. Attracted by the opportunities of the 
west, he made his way to Park City, Utah, in 1890 and was there engaged in the 
banking business. He dates his residence in Yakima from 1905, in which year he was 
chosen cashier of the Yakima Valley Bank. He has since acted in that capacity 
and through the intervening period of thirteen years has contributed in marked 
measure to the development and upbuilding of the business of the bank. He has 
closely and thoroughly studied every phase of the banking business and his efforts 
have been a contributing factor to the success of the institution. 

In 1895 Mr. Heath was married to Miss Millie Getsch, a native of Iowa, and to 
them has been born a daughter, Dorothy, who is now a senior in the high school. 
Fraternally Mr. Heath is a Mason, belonging to Uinta Lodge No. 7 of Park City, 
Utali, of which he is a past master. He is also a past master of Yakima Lodge No. 
14, A. F. & A. M., having been master when the lodge first occupied the new build- 
ing here. He is likewise connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
In Masonry he has attained the Knight Templar degree and has crossed the sands 
of the desert with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. His political endorsement is 
given to the republican party and he is a stanch supporter of its principles but has 
never sought or desired oflice as a reward for party fealty. He prefers to do his 
public service as a private citizen and at all times his aid and cooperation are given 
on the side of advancement and improvement. 



LAWRENCE E. JOHNSON. 

Among the financiers of the Yakima valley none enjoys a higher reputation than 
Lawrence E. Johnson, president of the First National Bank, to which oflice he was 
called in 1908. The rapid growth of this institution is largely due to the business 
foresight, natural ability and unfailing watchfulness of its president, who gives most 
of his time to the interests of this enterprise. 

Mr. Johnson was born in Greene county, Illinois, February 6, 1877, a son of Lee 
.■\. and Margaret (Search) Johnson, who went to Oregon in 1883, locating in Albany, 
and in 1885 removed to Sherman county, that state, where the father engaged in 
farming. In 1889 he entered the Methodist ministry and was in Spokane in 1890, 
whence he was transferred to Waitsburg in 1893. Desiring to better fit himself for 
the work, he then attended the Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois, there 
taking a three years' course. He later served as pastor of the Methodist Episcopal 
church in Walla Walla for several years, after which he retired from holy orders and 
moved to Sunnyside in 1902, engaging in the hardware business there until 1912, 
when he proceeded to Portland. Oregon, where death claimed him on January 5, 
1914. His widow survives and resides at Sunnyside. Lee A. Johnson was one of the 
most prominent men in the development of the Yakima valley, which greatly bene- 
fitted through his stimulating activities. For several terms he represented his dis- 



52 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

trict in the state legislature, always ably representing his constituency in the halls 
of legislation and securing for them those measures which he considered of great- 
est value. He was a candidate for congress but was not successful. For many 
years he was a regent of Pullman College and was acting in that capacity at the 
time of his death, the cause of education finding in him a warm champion. In finan- 
cial circles he was equally well known, being the organizer of the First National 
Bank of Sunnyside, of which he was the first president, and he also served as vice- 
president of the Scandinavian Bank of Portland, Oregon. He was a forceful and 
resourceful man of unabating energy, extraordinary foresight and one who always 
achieved what he set out to do, yet he was a man of kind heart who was eve^, ready 
to help a struggling traveler on life's journey and assist those less fortunate than 
liimself, contributing liberally to charitable and benevolent purposes, and his memory 
will long live among the people of the valley. 

His son, Lawrence E. Johnson grew up among the refining influences of a Chris- 
tian home and in the acquirement of an education attended the public schools of 
.■Mbany, Oregon, and Spokane. Washington. Desiring to better his opportunities 
in practical life, he then entered the Spokane Business College, from, which he was 
graduated. Fully prepared to take up the arduous burden of making a living, he then 
secured a position in the First National Bank of Waitsburg, with which he remained 
for four years, from 1894 to 1898, thus thoroughly acquainting himself with banking 
methods and practices. His next position was with the Moro Mercantile Company 
at Moro, Oregon, where he again made use of all opportunities to learn the details 
of that line of business, at the end of which time he became assistant cashier and 
later cashier of the Merchants Bank at Waitsburg. In 1903 he went to Sunnyside 
a? cashier of the Sunnyside Bank but sold his interest in that institution in 1905. 
His next position was witli the First National Bank of Ritzville, Washington, of 
which h.- v,;i- tor a short time cashier and which was sold the same year. In .August, 
1905, Mr. Johnson came to Kennewick, connecting himself with the Exchange Bank 
at that time. This bank was established in 1903 by Howard S. Anion as a private 
bank and it was the first institution of its kind in Kennewick. In 1905, upon his 
arrival in this city, Mr. Johnson acquired the interest of Howard S. Amon and he 
and W. R. Amon became the owners. In December, 1907, however, the First Na- 
tional Bank was organized as successor to the Exchange Bank and its first officers 
were: W. R. Amon, president; and L. E. Johnson, cashier, our subject having suc- 
ceeded C. F. Breighthaupt as cashier of the Exchange Bank. In 1908 W. R. Amon 
disposed of most of his stock to Mr. Johnson and others, and L. E. Johnson was 
then elected president of the institution, J. L. Johnson becoming cashier at that 
lime. In 1918, however. E. C. Tweet succeeded him. T. M. Fine has been vice- 
president since 1908. The present bank building, which was erected in 1908, is thor- 
oughly modern in every respect and adequate to the needs of the institution. It 
has large, well protected vaults and the counting rooms are nicely furnished and 
conveniently arranged for the customers. The growth of the institution may be 
gleaned from the fact that the first capitalization of the Exchange Bank was ten 
thousand dollars. When it was nationalized this stock was raised to the sum of 
twenty-five thousand dollars and in 1910 the capital was increased to fifty thousand 
dollars. The resources of this highly reliable lianking enterprise are now over six 
hundred thousand dollars and its deposits exceed five hundred thousand dollars. As 
the head of the institution Mr. Johnson is proving a banker of eminent qualities, 
watchful in every way of the interests of stockholders and depositors alike. While 
he follows conservative methods as regards the investments of the bank, he is ever 
ready to extend the credit of the institution to those who are able to furnish good 
reason for such and ample security in order to help hem in heir business or facilitate 
farming enterprises. He is consedered one of the financial leaders of the Yakima 
valley and his advice is frequently sought in regard to investments in real estate, 
stocks, bonds and other securities. He does not stand aloof but comes in contact 
with anyone who desires to see him, ever willing to render his valuable services 
when asked. In building up this institution Mr. Johnson has not only built for him- 
self but has greatly contributed toward the development of his secion, as it is well 
recognized that a strong financial enterprise is one of the mainsays in growth and 
prosperity. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 53 

In 1900 Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Ada Fine, a daughter of 
T. M. Fine, of Walla Walla, and to them have been born three sons; Ward, who is 
sixteen years old; Lawrence Glenn, aged fourteen; and Robert Lee, one and a half 
years old. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Johnson is well known as a member of Kennewick 
Lodge No. 153, F. & A. M.. of which he has served as master, while his religious 
faith is that of the Methodist church. His wife is a member of the Episcopal church. 
In his political views he is a republican and has long been a dominent factor in the 
councils of his party. In 1907 his fellow citizens elected him to the highest position 
within their power, that of mayor, and he served for two terras in that position. 
His administrations were fraught with progressive measures and movements, many 
of which were originated by him and which have been of the greatest benefit. It 
would take some time to enumerate the manifold public and semi-public duties and 
offices with which Mr. Johnson has been connected but among them may be men- 
tioned that he is a past president of the Kennewick Commercial Club, in which he 
has always taken a great interest and which organization has accomplished much 
by reason of his initiative. He is a director of the Columbia Irrigation District and 
is also president of the White Bluflfs Bank. He has ahvays cooperated in all efforts 
undertaken for the benefit and improvement of the valley, his county and city, of 
which he has become one of the most prominent business men and financiers. He 
is greatly admired for his sterling qualities of character and the high morale which 
underlies all his business transactions. His friends in Kennewick are many and he 
is regarded by them as an e-xample of true American manhood. He is a patriotic 
American in the best sense of the word and has built not only for himself but for 
those who honor him as a valued citizen. 



BERNARD N. COE. 



Bernard N. Coe is the oldest merchant in Grandview in length of connection 
with the town. There were but four other stores when he established his business 
here and all have passed out of existence. Mr. Coe has throughout the entire period 
conducted a well appointed drug store, enlarging his stock in accordance with the 
growth and development of the community and carrying a line of goods fully equal 
to public demands, expressing the spirit of western enterprise in all that he under- 
takes and does. 

Mr. Coe is a native of Virginia. He was born at Falmouth, that state, on the 
11th of October, 1857, a son of the Rev. William G. and Annie M. (Armstrong) Coe, 
both of whom were natives of Baltimore, Maryland. The father was a son of Alfred 
B. Coe and he, too, was born in Baltimore. The mother was a daughter of James 
L. Armstrong, a native of New York. The Rev. William G. Coe was a minister of 
a southern Methodist church and passed away in Virginia in 1877. His widow long 
survived him, her death occurring in 1900. 

Liberal educational opportunities were accorded Bernard N. Coe, who attended 
the Washington and Lee University of Virginia and also the Randolph-Mason Col- 
lege. He afterward prepared for his chosen life work by a course in the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy, from which he was graduated with the class of 1881. He 
served his apprenticeship with the firm of J. Brown Baxley & Son of Baltimore, 
remaining in their establishment for eleven years. He afterward engaged in clerk- 
ing until he came to North Yakima in June, 1890, and he worked for several of the 
old-time druggists of Yakima, including the firm of Allen & Chapman, also Alex- 
ander D. Sloan and C. C. Case. He afterward was the owner of a drug store at Cle 
Elum for eight months and on the 15th of January, 1907, he came to Grandview and 
opened a drug store in a little frame shack. The town had been established only 
the previous year. He has seen jack rabbits and coyotes come right into the town. 
Sagebrush was all around and the conditions were those of a wild western frontier. 
Today the town is situated in the midst of a fine orchard and farming country and 
the work of progress and development has been carried steadily forward until this 
is one of the most attractive sections of the valley. 

(3) 



54 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

On the 18th of August, 1897, Mr. Coe was married to Miss Lela V. Baisley, who 
was born at Baker, Oregon, a daughter of Samuel B. and Addie (WarfieldJ Baisley, 
who removed to Oregon in 1866, making the overland trip. The father was a rancher 
and mining man. To Mr. and Mrs. Coe were born two children but the elder died 
in infancy. The surviving daughter, Marie, now seventeen years of age, is at home. 

Mr. Coe is a member of the Modern Brotherhood of America, also of the Elks 
lodge at Yakima and he attends the Presbyterian church. His political endorsement 
is given to the democratic party and for one year he served as deputy county clerk 
at Yakima. Otherwise he has never sought or filled public offices, preferring to con- 
centrate his energy and attention upon his business aiTairs, which are wisely and 
carefully directed. Since opening his store in Grandview his business has steadily 
increased with the growth of the community and he has an establishment which is 
well appointed in every particular, while his thoroughly reliable business methods 
have secured for him the confidence and liberal support of the public. 



A. B. SNIDER. 



A. B. Snider was elected to the presidency of the First National Bank of Sunny- 
side on the 1st of April, 1918. Previously, however, he had been identified with bank- 
ing interests in the state, so that he brought to his present position wide experience 
and accurate knowledge. He is a man of marked progressiveness and enterprise 
and since starting out in the business world on his own account has made steady ad- 
vancement. He was born in Ontario. Canada, April 19, 1885, a son of T. B. and 
Magdalene (Groff) Snider, who in 1890 removed to northwestern Iowa, where the 
father engaged in the milling business at Sanborn. 

A. B. Snider acquired a high school education and made his initial step in the 
business world as bookkeeper in a bank at Beaver Creek, Minnesota. He was after- 
ward for two years in charge of his father's mill in Nebraska. Later he returned to 
the bank and subsequently again took up milling. The year 1910 witnessed his ar- 
rival in Washington, at which time he settled at Lacrosse, where he was assistant 
cashier in the private bank of Scriber, Lyons & Moore. There he remained for six 
months, at the end of which time the bank was sold. Mr. Snider then engaged in 
the real estate business at Lacrosse for two and a half years and in 1913 went to 
Colton as cashier of the Colton State Bank. He was identified with that institu- 
tion until the 1st of April, 1918, when he came to Sunnyside to accept the presi- 
dency of the First National Bank and he is now active in directing its business. His 
long experience has thoroughly qualified him for the responsibilities which devolve 
upon him in this connection. He is remodeling the bank building, putting in new 
fixtures, and under his guidance the business of the bank has already shown a sub- 
stantial and steady increase. 

On the 4th of June, 1913, Mr. Snider was united in marriage to Miss Jeannette 
A. Jones, of Iowa, and they have a son, Norman W. Mr. Snider and his wife belong 
to the Presbyterian church and in social circles occupy an enviable position, having 
made many warm friends in Sunnyside. 

In politics Mr. Snider maintains an independent course. He has been a helpful 
assistant in various war activities and while at Colton had charge of the Liberty Loan 
and Red Cross drives, doing effective work in putting the community over the top. 



JOHN HENRY MORGAN. 

John Henry Morgan, who has devoted his life to educational interests and is 
now -principal of the high school at EUensburg, was born in Rutherford county. North 
Carolina, a son of Daniel and Catherine (Cochran) Morgan, who were also natives 
of North Carolina, where the father followed the occupation of farming as a life 
work ,thus providing for the support of his family. Both he and his wife have passed 
away. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 55 

John Henry Morgan supplemented his public school education by study in a 
private academy and was afterward graduated from the Furman University of South 
Carolina as a member of the class of 1879. In the same year he sought the oppor- 
tunities of the northwest, making his way to Walla Walla, Washington. He took up 
teaching in the country schools of this state and as his ability became recognized 
he was called to the principalship of the schools of Dayton, where he served for a 
year. He then accepted the position of principal of the schools at Waitsburg, where 
he remained for four years, and on the 25th of May, 1887, he came to Ellensburg and 
for four years was principal of the public schools of this city, during which time 
he also served as county superintendent of schools. In 1893 he became head of 
the department of mathematics and vice-principal of the State Normal School at 
Ellensburg and continued in the dual position until 1916. Since then he has held 
the head professorship of mathematics in the high school and is now principal. He 
is regarded as one of the ablest educators of the state, having for many years been 
prominently identified with the schools of W'ashington. He has ever displayed 
marked ability in imparting clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he has 
acquired and he has ever held to the highest standards of his profession. He served 
as superintendent of schools for Walla Walla county and also for Kittitas county 
and served as superintendent of schools for the territory of Washington during the 
last term before the admission to the ITnion. He has likewise been a candidate for 
state superintendent of schools on three different occasions but met defeat. 

On the 2Sth of February, 1891, Mr. Morgan was married to Miss Margaret 
Bradshaw Hawkins, of Tacoma, a daughter of H. T. Hawkins. Nessa Margaret 
Morgan, their only child, is a graduate of the State Normal School of Ellensburg 
and is now teaching in the schools of Tacoma. She is also a graduate of the Pratt 
Institute of New York. 

Mr. Morgan is a Mason, belonging to Ellensburg Lodge, No. 39, A. F. & A. M. 
He also has membership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Wood- 
men of the World and the Knights of Pythias. His political endorsement is given 
to the democratic party and he has been a close student of the vital questions and 
problems of the day. He has served in the city council and also as mayor of the 
city of Ellensburg. He was secretary of the library board from its beginnig and did 
the corresponding with Mr. Carnegie at the time the donation was received. He is 
still a member of the board. Since 1898 he has been an active member of the National 
Educational Association and is also a member of the state board of education and 
president of tiie Washington Educational Association and also of he Educational 
Council. Flis life has ever been characterized by devotion to the public good and 
along professional lines and as a citizen he has put forth every effort to advance the 
welfare of his fcllowmen. He has many admirable qualities which have made him 
greatly beloved, so that his circle of friends is almost coextensive with the circle of 
his acquaintance in Washington. 



CHARLES YERGEN. 



Charles Yergen first visited the Yakima valley in 1900 but did not become a 
permanent resident until 1905. He was born in Germany, July 28, 1874. a son of 
William and Ernestine (Pretzel) Yergen, who in 1880 left their native country and 
came to the new worlds settling in Minnesota. There they remained until 1905. when 
they removed with their family to Yakima county. Washington, and William Yergen 
and his son Charles then purchased land two miles west of the city of Yakima, be- 
coming owners of a ten-acre tract. La.ter they added five acres to their original pur- 
chase and now have an excellent property of fifteen acres, of which twelve acres is 
planted to fruit. They specialize in apples, peaches and cherries. They have greatly 
improved the place through the erection of an attractive modern residence, sub- 
stantial barn and other buildings, and all of the equipments of the model farm prop- 
erty of the twentieth century are found upon their land. 

On the 15th of November, 1899, Mr. Yergen was united in marriage to Miss 



56 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Olga Schwarzkopf, of Minnesota, by whom he has five children, namely: William, 
Arnold, Annie, Walter and Irvin. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the German Lutheran church. In 
political belief Mr. Yergen is a republican but has never sought or desired office, 
preferring always to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his business affairs. 
In addition to fruit growing he raises Jersey cattle and rents eight and one-half 
acres of land near his home place. He also has been very successful in raising hay 
as well as fruit and is regarded as one of the prominent and leading farmers ot the 
community. He is likewise a stockholder in the Yakima Savings & Loan Associa- 
tion, in which his sons also have stock. 



ROBERT S. MORGAN. 

A third of a century ago Robert S. Morgan came to the Yakima valley and 
through the intervening period to the time of his death, which occurred in 1909, was 
closely associated with its development and progress. He secured a homestead claim 
and for a long period was engaged in the raising of vegetables and in the conduct of a 
commission business and took the initial step along many lines which have led to the 
further development and upbuilding of this section of the state. He was born in 
Camden, Pennsylvania, January 24, 1847, and acquired a public school education. 
With the call of the country to arms he enlisted in 1862, although but a youth of fif- 
teen years, joining Company E of the Tenth Missouri Infantry, with which he served 
until the close of hostilities, participating in many hotly contested engagements in 
which he proved his valor and his loyalty. After the war he resumed his residence 
in Missouri and there for more than two decades was actively engaged in farming. 
In March. 1886, however, he severed his connection with the middle west and came 
to Yakima county, where he took up a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty 
acres three miles west of the city of Yakima, on the Tieton drive. Mrs. Morgan and 
all her children, nine in number, also made the long and hazardous trip, arriving here 
in August, 1886. The homestead was a tract of arid land, all covered with sagebrush, 
and it hardly seemed possible to transform it into productive fields and fine orchards. 
He located upon this farm, however, in .^pril, 1887, and began its development and 
improvement. In 1894 the Congdon canal was built and thus water was supplied to 
the entire farm. The land proved to be naturally rich and productive when water 
was added and even before the completion of the Congdon ditch Mr. Morgan had 
begun the raising of vegetables and entered actively into the commission business. 
He shipped the first carload of alfalfa from the valley and he built the first produce 
warehouse in Yakima. He was the pioneer commission merchant of the city and 
the work which he instituted has set a pace for many others whose labors along this 
line have constituted a valuable factor in the development, upbuilding and prosperity 
of the state. 

On the 2Sth of December, 1868, Mr. Morgan was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie M. Mason, who was born in Owen county. Indiana, September 28, 1848, a 
daughter of Joseph T. and Mary (Darby) Mason, who removed to Missouri in 1851, 
after which the father was there identified with farming to the time of his death, and 
his wife also passed away in that locality. To Mr. and Mrs. Morgan were born the 
following named: Leola M., who passed away at the age of twenty-two years; 
William F., who is a ranchman of the Yakima valley and is married and has three 
children; Robert H., who is married and operates a ranch near Selah; Ida M., who 
is the wife of Frank Jordan, who is engaged in ranching on the .\htanum river and 
by whom she has three children; Nora A., who gave her hand in marriage to Albert 
Dean, a clothing merchant of Yakima, by whom she has a daughter; Flora E., who 
wedded Teunis Wayenberg. a farmer living at Moxee City, by whom she has two 
children; Carrie, who is the wife of John L. Willett. a ranchman, by whom she has 
one son; Harry A., who is engaged in ranching in Yakima county and who is mar- 
ried and has one child; Leslie V., who is also married and has one child; and Lydia 
M., who died at the age of seven years. 

Mr. Morgan was a republican in his political views and an active worker in the 




EGBERT S. MORGAN 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 59 

party but not an office seeker. His religious faith was that of the Methodist church 
of which he was long an active and consistent member, and his widow holds mem- 
bership in the same church. He was one of the organizers of the first Methodist 
Sunday school in Yakima and for many years served as its superintendent. He passed 
away in the faith of that church August 10, 1909. honored and respected by all who 
knew him. His course was ever characterized by the highest principles of integrity 
and the most advanced standards of citizenship. He was constantly extending a 
helping hand to the needy and his aid and cooperation were most heartily given to 
any movement that was for the benefit of the individual or for the community at 
large. 



RUSSELL J. THOMPSON. 

The Naches valley of the Yakima district has made immense forward strides 
in the last few years, during which the peculiar adaptability of soil and climate 
in regard to orcharding was discovered. Since that time many valuable orchards 
have sprung up and many are the enterprising horticulturists who are now 
deriving large returns from this line of activity, to which considerable acreage in 
the valley is now devoted. It is characteristic of men of the west that they will 
always look for the latest methods and best machinery and equipment in order to 
further their efforts and this quality has been the outstanding feature of the pros- 
perity that has come to the Yakima valley in this line of business activity. 

Among these enterprising orchardists is Russell J. Thompson, who was born 
at Howard Lake, Minnesota, October 7, 1884. He is a son of W. D. and Mary 
E. (Terrell) Thompson, the former born in Nashville, Tennessee, and the latter 
in Vienna, Ohio. In the 70s the parents removed to Minnesota, becoming pioneers 
of that state, and there the father continued in agricultural pursuits until 1898, 
when he came to the Yakima valley, acquiring eighty acres on the upper Naches. 
Of this tract he and his sons planted forty-five acres to fruit and as the years 
passed the property became very valuable and the family now derives a most 
gratifying income therefrom. In 1915 W. D. Thompson retired from active work 
and he and his wife removed to California, turning over the land at that time to 
his two sons, Russell J. and Leslie J. The father was always a leader in the dis- 
tricts in which he resided. He was ever ready to embrace new discoveries and 
assisted in getting the first telephone system established in this district, while he 
also did valuable work in securing rural free delivery routes. Moreover, he was 
deeply interested in the good roads movement and his enterprise is further indicated 
in the fact that he was one of the first in this section to own an autoiriobile. He 
did valuable work in regard to horticultural development in the Yakima valley, as 
he successfully established one of the first orchards planted here. 

Russell J. Thompson spent his boyhood days under the parental roof in Minne- 
sota, where he attended the public schools, and removed with his family to the 
Yakima valley when fourteen years of age. After completing his preliminary educa- 
tion he rounded out his preparation for life's ardous duties at the State University 
at Pullman. He then returned to the home farm and assisted his father in the 
development of the property, so continuing until the land was divided. Mr. Thomp- 
son now has twenty-one acres of orchard in apples and prunes, has up-to-date 
buildings for storing his fruit and has also built a fine home. He is typical of 
the progressive western horticulturist and is now in the enjoyment of a large 
income. 

On June 30, 191S, Mr. Thompson was united in marriage to Miss Pearl Hager- 
man, a native of Minnesota and a daughter of John Hagerman, who about 1907 
removed to Yakima county, where he engaged in farming. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson 
have two daughters: Lucille Mary and Margaret. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Thompson is a republican, in the principles of 
which party he thoroughly believes. Fraternally he is connected with the Loyal 
Order of Moose, while along the line of his occupation he is a metnber of the 
Grange and also of the Yakima County Horticultural Union, thus being in touch 



60 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

with other men in the same line of business and keeping up-to-date in regard 
to the latest methods by an exchange of opinions. Mrs. Thompson is a valued 
member of the Christian church, in the work of which Ijoth she and her husband 
helpfully assist. Mr. Thompson has ever readily co-operated in public movements 
undertaken for the general welfare and particularly along lines of fruit raising 
has greatly contributed toward the development of horticulture, wdiich promises to 
bring to the Yakima valley millions upon millions of dollars. 



WILLIAM IRVING HUXTABLE. 

The fine home of William Irving Huxtable is situated only about a mile west 
of Yakima. Here he has twenty acres of land planted to fruit and his is one of 
the attractive properties in his section of the state. Mr. Huxtable is a native of 
Tazewell county, Illinois. He was born March IS, 1857, of the marriage of Wil- 
liam and Barbara (Robinson) Huxtable, the former a native of England and the 
latter of Scatland. They came to America with their respective parents in child- 
hood days, the Huxtable family taking up their abode in Illinois in 1838. The 
Robinson family also settled there in pioneer times. In 1883 William Huxtable 
and his wife removed to Adams county, Nebraska, where he engaged in farming 
until his life's labors were ended in death in 1904. His wife passed away when she 
had reached the age of seventy-six years. 

After mastering the branches of learning taught in the public schools William 
Irving Huxtable started out in farm life, purchasing school land in Nebraska. 
In 1894, however, he made his way to the coast, establishing his home at Hemet, 
California, where he was engaged in fruit farming until 1899. In that year he 
came north to Yakima, where he arrived in October, and in 1901 he purchased 
twenty acres of land a mile west of Yakima, upon which he has since resided. 
He planted this to fruit, specializing in peaches, and he is today one of the largest 
peach growers of the county. Upon his place he erected a fine modern residence, 
large and substantial barns and made all other necessary improvements, and his 
is now one of the fine ranch properties of 'the district. In addition to his home place 
he has a seventy-acre tract planted to apples and peaches and he has made a close 
study of everything that pertains to fruit growing in this section. He knows the 
needs of the soil, the best methods of protecting his trees and the results achieved 
are most gratifying. 

Mr. Huxtable was married to Miss Charlotte M. Wells, a native of Illinois, 
and they became parents of five children: Mary B., the widow of W. Ross Stewart, 
by whom she had two children, now making her home with her parents; Ora De 
Witt, a farmer who married Edith Cole; Philo I., who is farming with his father in 
Yakima county and married Lola Hopper, by whom he has a son, Robert, now 
five years of age; Elsie, the wife of G. P. Labberton, of Yakima, by whom she has 
two sons; and Orpha, the wife of John I. Preissner, a mining engineer living on 
Vancouver Island. 

Mr. and Mrs. Huxtable are members of the Baptist church. He has served on 
the school board and the cause of education finds in him a warm friend. In fact, 
actuated by a progressive spirit, he stands for all that pertains to the progress 
and upbuilding of the community along intellectual, social, material and moral lines. 



ROBERT BRUCE MILROY. 

Robert Bruce Milroy has the distinction of having been a member of the first 
law firm of Yakima, where he Ijegan practice in 1884, but long previous to this 
time he had seen central Washington, for he was a messenger in the Indian serv- 
ice in 1873 and has passed through the valley. He was born in Rensselaer, Indiana, 
September 25, 1859, has back of him an ancestry honorable and distinguished and is 
fortunate that his lines of life have been cast in harmony therewith. His grand- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 61 

lather was General Samuel Milroy, who served with the rank of major general 
in the War of 1812 and also in Indian wars. The father was General R. H. Milroy, 
a distinguished veteran of the Mexican and Civil wars and a promoter of civiliza- 
tion upon the western frontier. He was born in Indiana in 1816, his father having 
settled in that state in 1S09. The date of General R. H. Milroy's birth preceded the 
admission of Indiana into the Union by a year. In early manhood he took up the 
practice of law and became an able attorney. The military spirit of his father, 
however, was a dominant characteristic in the son and he became a captain in the 
Mexican war. In days of peace he gave his attention to a large law practice in 
Indiana and was serving as judge when the Civil war broke out. He had watched 
with interest and studied closely the progress of events in the south and on the 
7th of February, 1861, he issued the first call for troops in the United States. Few 
so clearly saw or understood the situation as he. When the news came that the 
south had fired upon the flag at Fort Sumter, he however, had only two recruits, 
but he at pnce went to the courthouse, rang the bell and before breakfast his entire 
company was raised. He had served with General Lew Wallace in the Mexican 
war, of whom he was also a classmate, and their friendship was one that existed 
tlirough life. General Milroy's training in the Mexican war well qualified him for 
the duties which he now assumed in connection with the defense of the Union. 
He was made colonel of the Ninth Indiana Infantry and his regiment went to the 
front with the first Indiana troops. The first man killed from the state was John 
Boothroyd, who was a member of Colonel Milroy's regiment. On the 1st of 
September, 1861, Colonel Milroy was promoted to the rank of brigadier general 
and in March, 1863, was raised to the rank of major general, ranking from Novem- 
ber 23, 1862. He served until the close of the Civil war and in May, 1863, was 
presented by the Twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry with a sword worth one thousand 
dollars. The scabbard was silver and the sword was a Damascus blade with 
jeweled hilt set with diamonds and other precious stones., There were three other 
swords also presented to him at various times in his life. Such was his known 
bravery, valor and qualities of leadership that Jefferson Davis offered one hun- 
dred thtnisand dollars for General Milroy, dead or alive, and the rebel legislature 
of Virginia offered twenty-five thousand dollars. He was known as "the old gray 
eagle." Four horses were shot from under him in battle. At the battle of Win- 
chester in 1863 he was caught by Lee's troops, numbering ninety thousand, and his 
own soldiers numbered but six thousand. He had orders to "hold on" and then 
the wires were cut. He "held on" for three days and then cut his way out. He 
was blamed by some historians for not getting out before, but the point was that 
he obeyed orders and historians who have investigated the circumstances have for 
him only words of the strongest commendation for his courage, his loyalty and his 
obedience. 

General Milroy was a very prominent and honored resident of Indiana through- 
out the period in which he made that state his home. In 1872, however, he removed 
westward to Olympia, Washington, to become superintendent of Indian affairs in 
the northwest and remained in the Indian service until the office was abolished. He 
was then put in charge of all the agencies on the Sound. In 1882 he came to Yakima 
as agent of (he Yakima reservation, having charge of all the Indians from the 
Columbia river north to Wenatchee and an exceedingly broad territory surround- 
ing. He was the first man dismissed on account of "offensive partisanship" by 
Grover Cleveland. He was a stalwart republican and made a few political speeches 
in the east while on a visit there. He liocame as prominent and influential in the 
vve<-t as he had been in the east and at all times and under all circumstances he was 
a most progressive citizen, his aid and influence being given on the side of advance- 
ment and improvement. He began the building of the branch railway from Olympia 
to Tenino and he had the Piute ditch dug on the Indian reservation, this being 
one of the first irrigation projects of the Yakima valley. He was the first person 
who started the allotment of lands in severalty to the Indians, which course he 
pursued in the '70s before any legislation to that effect had been enacted. He 
was one of the first to advocate taking the Indian children and educating them in 
order to civilize them and he assisted in establishing the Forest Grove Indian 
school, later called the Chemawa School. He believed that the Indians should own 



62 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

their land and have educational privileges. He was a very close student of the 
problems of the red men and did all in his power to secure justice to them in their 
treatment by the government. He passed away at Olympia, March 30, 1890, the city 
thus losing one of its most eminent residents, one whose career had not only 
reflected credit and honor upon the state in which he made his home, but upon 
the whole nation. His contribution to the world's work had been most valuable 
and his ability was attested by distinguished men throughout the country. 

The name of Robert Bruce Milroy is also interwoven with the history of the 
Yakima valley. He acquired his early education in the public schools of Indiana and, 
in the west, at Olympia. He afterward became a student in the Territorial Uni- 
versity of Washington at Seattle and then entered the United States Naval Academy 
at Annapolis. He next became a student at Hanover College of Indiana and pursued 
his law course in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. In 1884 he came to 
Yakima to visit his father and in March, 1885, he opened a law office in North 
Yakima in connection with his brother, W. J. Milroy, theirs being the first law 
firm of the city. Later they built the first two-story building on Yakima avenue 
and in it maintained their law office. They were accorded a liberal clientage and 
Robert B. Milroy remained an able and prominent member of the Yakima bar 
until 1897, when he went to Alaska, where he resided for twelve years. He was 
engaged in mining for two years at Dawson and later he opened a law office in 
Nome, where he continued in the active and successful practice of his profession 
until 1901. In 1902 he again took up mining and afterward divided his time be- 
tween mining and law practice until 1908, when he returned to the United States, 
and in 1909 once more became a resident of Yakima. Here he has practiced con- 
tinuously since and is now occupying the office of police judge. He was also assist- 
ant attorney general of Washington under the first attorney general, W. C. Jones, 
in 1892. He is a lawyer of marked ability and comprehensive knowledge and has 
left the impress of his individuality and professional powers upon the legal history 
of the state. 

On the 28th of May, 1889, Mr. Milroy was united in marriage to Miss Pauline 
Whitson, a daughter of Judge Curtis W. Whitson, who was a member of the 
supreme court of Idaho. 

In politics Mr. Milroy has ever been a stalwart republican and for sixteen 
years in all has served as chairman of the county central republican committee, 
.^side from the offices which he has held in the strict line of his profession, he was 
a member of the state legislature in 1894. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. There is perhaps no man who has a more 
intimate or accurate knowledge concerning the history of this section of the state 
and he is one of the best known citizens of the Yakima valley, enjoying the good- 
will, confidence, honor and trust of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



FIDELIO KING HISCOCK. 

Fidelio King Hiscock, who departed this life in 1917, was closely associated with 
the agricultural development of the Yakima valley and his worth as a man and citi- 
zen was widely acknowledged. He was born in Syracuse, New York, April 15, 1869, 
a son of Senator Frank and Cornelia (King) Hiscock, who were representatives of 
prominent old New York families. The father became an attorney who exercised 
marked influence over public thought and action. He not only attained prominence 
at the bar but also was called upon to represent his district in congress and in the 
United States senate. He was born at Pompey. New York. September 6. 1834, a son 
of Richard and Cynthia (Harris) Hiscock. His education was acquired at Pompey 
Academy and in 1855 he was admitted to the bar. He served as district attorney of 
Onondaga county. New York, from 1860 until 1863, and in 1867 was made a member 
of the state constitutional convention of New York. His fellow townsmen apprecia- 
tive of his able powers and marked ability, called upon him to act as their repre- 
sentative in congress from 1877 until 1887, so that he sat in the forty-fifth to the 
forty-ninth congresses. In 1887 he was elected a member of the United States senate 




FIDELIO K. HISCOCK 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 65 

for New York and remained a member of the upper house for six years. His politi- 
cal allegiance was always given to the republican party. After his retirement from 
office he practiced as senior member of the law firm of Hiscock, Doheny, Williams 
& Cowic, and he was also a director of the Bank of Syracuse and the Syracuse Savings 
Bank. He belonged to the Union League Club and to the Republican Club of New 
York. He married Cornelia King, of Tully, New York, on the 22d of November, 
1859, and passed away June 18, 1914. 

His son, F. K. Hiscock of this review, accorded liberal educational advantages, 
was graduated from Cornell University in 1891 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
In the same year he determined to try his fortune in the west, thinking that better 
opportunities were here ofifered for the development of enterprise and ambition. 
-Accordingly he arrived in Tacoma in that year and soon afterward made his way to 
the Yakima valley, where he purchased an interest in a ranch in connection with 
R. L. McCook. They had one hundred and sixty acres of land and he later purchased 
one hundred and twenty acres individually. He utilized his land in the production of 
large crops of hops and hay, having extensive hop vineyards, and the careful man- 
agement of his interests brought to him a very substantial measure of success. 

On the 22d of October, 1910, Mr. Hiscock was married to Miss Anne Randolph 
Scudder, a daughter of H. B. Scudder, mentioned elsewhere in this work. The death 
of Mr. Hiscock occurred January 29, 1917. He had made for himself a most credit- 
able and enviable position in the public regard of his community. He was a member 
of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, also of the Commercial Club and of the 
Country Club. His political allegiance was given to the republican party, in which 
he was an active worker but not an office seeker. His religious faith was that of the 
Episcopal church. His life was one of intense and well directed activity, which made 
him widely known, and his record at all times measured up to the highest standards. 
The worth of his work was widely acknowledged and it seemed that he should have 
been spared for many more years of usefulness, for he was in the prime of life when 
called to the home beyond. 



STANLEY E. GOODWIN. 

Among the native sons of Kittitas county still living within its borders, identi- 
fied actively with its farming interests, is numbered Stanley E. Goodwin, who is 
today a well known and highly respected resident of the district in which he makes 
his home. He was born January 17, 1881, in Kittitas county, a son of Thomas B. 
and Sarah (Cumberland) Goodwin, who were natives of Indiana. They became 
pioneer settlers of California and upon leaving that state removed to Oregon. It 
was during the 70s that they arrived in Kittitas county, casting in their lot with 
the pioneer settlers who were braving the hardships and privations of frontier life 
in order to reclaim this region, rich in its natural resources, for the purposes of 
civilization. The father purchased land and also took up government land ten miles 
north of Ellcnsburg, adding to his possessions until his holdings aggregated one 
thousand acres, of which over five hundred acres are under cultivation. He at 
once began the development and imjirovement of the farm and his labors were 
most resultant in transforming the place into rich and productive fields, from 
which he annually gathered good harvests. He erected thereon a fine residence, 
also built large and substantial barns, secured the latest improved machinery to 
facilitate the work of the fields and in every way carried on his farming interests 
along most progressive lines. In 1894 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his 
first wife, after which he later married Jennie Cumberland, a sister of his first 
wife, who still survives him, his death having occurred on the 15th of April, 1917. 
A more complete sketch and portrait of Thomas B. Goodwin is to be found else- 
where in this work. 

Stanley E. Goodwin acquired a pulilic school education and when not busy with 
his textbooks assisted his father in the work of the home ranch until he reached the 
age of twenty-two years. He then rented his father's place in connection with his 
brother Aubrey and later Stanley E. Goodwin rented it alone. ,'\t a subsequent 



66 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

period he purchased a ranch and is now the owner of one hundred and forty acres 
of land, which he acquired in 1915. His place is devoted to the raising of grain and 
hay and is an excellent ranch property, well equipped and improved. He employs 
modern scientific methods in the further development of the farm and that his 
lahors are of practical character is indicated in the excellent harvests which he 
annually gathers. 

On the 18th of February, 1904, Mr. Goodwin was married to Miss Edna Dun- 
can, a daughter of James F. Duncan, of Thorp, Washington, where he located at 
an early period in its development. Mr. and Mrs. Goodwin have a son, Marshall 
Clay, born April 24, 1905. 

In politics Mr. Goodwin maintains an indepnedent course, voting for men 
and measures rather than for party. His father was quite active and prominent in 
political affairs and at one time served as a representative in the state legislature. 
Stanley E. Goodwin, however, prefers to concentrate his efforts and attention upon 
his business interests and is today numbered among the bore progressive of the 
young farmers of Kittitas county who are numbered among its native sons. 



LINDEN McCULLOUGH. 

Linden McCullough, superintendent of schools at Ellensburg, in which con- 
nection he is introducing many improved methods of education, was born in Lexing- 
ton, Illinois, May 30, 1881, a son of James Vance and Mary (Power) McCullough, 
both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. They removed westward to Illi- 
nois about 1858 and there the father followed the occupation of farming. The 
mother has now passed away, while Mr. McCullough is at the present time living 
retired from active business life. 

Linden McCullough acquired a public school education, completed by a high 
school course in Illinois, after which he entered the Lake Forest University of 
that state, finishing his course there by graduation with the class of 1904. Since 
then he has taken summer work at the University of Chicago, at the University of 
Washington and at the University of Oregon. Throughout his entire life he has 
remained a close and discriminating student, reading broadly, thinking deeply and 
at all times progressing along educational lines. He engaged in clerical work from 
1904 until 1909 in Chicago and then, leaving the metropolis of the middle west, 
made his way to New Bridge, Oregon, where he took up the profession of teach- 
ing. He afterward went to Baker City, Oregon, where for two years he occupied 
the position of teacher of history in the high school. He then became superintend- 
ent of the schools at Roslyn, Washington, in which position he continued from 
1912 until 1916, and through the succeeding scholastic year he was superintendent 
of the schools at Lagrande, Washington. In 1917 he accepted the superintendency 
of the schools at Ellensburg, where he has since remained, and his labors here 
have been most effective, far-reaching and beneficial. He established a special 
night school for instruction in commercial branches at the high school building of the 
city. This was in 1917 and in 1918 his night school was broadened in its scope 
until it covers all the studies of the high school course for those who have had to 
be absent. Instruction is also given in radio buzzer work, in automobile repairing 
and machine shop work, together with other courses. Among the students are 
fifteen boys who are working part of the time, under the provision of the Smith- 
Hughes bill that provides for regular studies part of the time and work during 
the remainder of the time. The same plan will be worked out in connection with 
the Northern Pacific Railway machine shop and the car repair department. The 
school formulates the plan for the evening work, which is in many respects different 
than any in the state and indicates a decided improvement upon methods followed 
elsewhere. 

On the 12th of June, 1911, Mr. McCullough was married to Miss Mildred 
Hazeltine, of Canyon City, Oregon, a daughter of G. S. and Emma (McCollom) 
Hazeltine. Mr. and Mrs. McCullough have four children: Robert, Mabel, Ruth 
and Marjorie. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 67 

In his fraternal connections Mr. McCuUough is a Mason, belonging to the 
blue lodge at Lexington, and he is also identified with the Elks lodge at Baker City, 
Oregon. His political endorsement is given to the democratic party and his religious 
faith is that of the Presbyterian church. A broad-minded man, recognizing the 
opportunities of his profession, he is constantly putting forth effective effort to 
advance the interests of the young and make education a thorough and practical 
training for life's responsible duties. 



JAMES J. WILEY. 



One of the foremost ranchers of Yakima county is James J. Wiley, who repre- 
sents very important interests in that line, his property being located at what 
is now Wiley City. This town, natned in honor of the family, was founded in 
1910 on part of his land. James J. Wiley was born in Wabasha county, Minne- 
sota, September Zl, 1863, a son of Hugh and Mary Ann (Tufft) Wiley, the father 
a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and the mother of Quebec, Canada. 
The grandfather was James Wiley, of Pennsylvania, and his son, Hugh' Wiley, 
father of our subject, became one of the pioneers of Minnesota, where he took up a 
homestead on the present site of the city of Plainview. It seems, however, that 
conditions in that state did not meet up with their expectations and in October, 
1866, Mr. and Mrs. Wiley arrived in Oregon, having made the trip via New York 
and the isthmus of Panama. In 1868 they came by team to Yakima county and 
here the father took up a homestead on the Ahtanum upon which James J. Wiley 
now lives. The Wileys were among the first few white families to settle in this 
valley. Hugh Wiley was thus closely connected W'ith the history of the white 
race in this county from its beginning. He assisted in building the first school- 
house and in order to assure the children of the settlers of some kind of an educa- 
tion paid two-thirds of the teacher's salary. He also assisted in organizing the 
first church in Yakima county. He was a strict member of the Presbyterian church, 
to" which faith he was deeply devoted. Throughout the remainder of his life he 
gave his attention to ranching and to the live stock business and passed away 
January 1, 1884, being survived by his widow, who lives in Wiley City. It was 
Hugh Wiley who opened the first canon road to The Dalles, Oregon, and his name 
is in other connections identified with pioneer movements. Mr. and Mrs. Hugh 
Wiley were the parents of nine children: W'illiam, who is engaged in ranching on 
the Ahtanum; Wallace, who is closely associated with our subject in his ranching 
and live stock interests; James J., of this review; John, who also is ranching on 
the Ahtanum; Isabel, who married Norman Woodhouse, a retired farmer who now 
lives in Wiley City and is connected with the telephone business; Charles, who w'as 
married and is now deceased; Martha, who for seventeen years has been a mission- 
ary in China; Annie, the wife of W. F. Achelpohl, an attorney of St. Charles, Mis- 
souri; and George. 

James J. Wiley was reared amid pioneer conditions and after attending the 
rural schools took a course at the Columbia Commercial College at Portland in 
1884. Having completed his education, he, with his brother Wallace, then gave their 
entire attention to the development of the home ranch and so continued until about 
1892, when they organized the Wiley Land & Stock Company. I'nder this name 
they are now operating seven thousand acres of land, of which one thousand acres 
are in hay and grain, a very substantial income being derived tlieretroni. while the 
remainder is range land. Their cattle interests are of the greatest importance as 
annually a large number of shorthorns are made ready for the market. Moreover, 
they are large horse raisers, breeding standard and draft horses. It thus has come 
about that in the course of years Mr. Wiley has become one of the largest and 
most prosperous ranchers of the west. He and his brother Wallace still conduct 
their extensive interests together and their co-operation has proved of the greatest 
benefit to them individually. They are business men of rare acumen and, moreover, 
close students of local conditions, thus getting the best out of their land. Mr. 
Wiley is also thoroughly informed in regard to live stock and keeps in touch with 



68 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

the latest discoveries and methods in regard to that Hne. In 1911 he built a handsome 
new residence at Wiley City which is now the family home. 

On January 17, 1900, Mr. Wiley married Rosalie Ward, a daughter of B. F. 
and Eliza J. (Sartan) Ward, the former born near Boston, Massachusetts, and the 
latter near St. Louis, Missouri. In 1867 the parents made their way to Wyoming, 
of which state they became pioneers. Mrs. Rosalie Wiley was the first white child 
born at Lander. Wyoming. Mr. and Mrs. Wiley have five children, Malcolm, 
Madeline, Marguerite, Gordon and Clifford. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wiley are numbered among the most influential and respected 
people of their neighborhood, both taking part in all movements undertaken on 
behalf of the general welfare along material as well as moral and intellectual lines. 
Mrs. Wiley is a devoted member of the First Presbyterian church, in the work of 
which she is deeply interested. Her husband belongs to Yakima Lodge, Xo. 318, 
B. P. O. E.. and in politics is a republican but not desirous of holding office, pre- 
ferring to give his undivided attention to his large farming interests. Coming of 
one of the honored pioneer families of the district, he adds new laurels to a family 
name that has long been distinguished here for reliabilitj-. enterprise and loyalty 
to state and nation. 



ORLA L. FRENCH. 



A picture of rare interest and beauty is that presented by the region surround- 
ing Yakima in the fruit-bearing season. Hundreds of acres have been transformed 
into fine orchards or, brought under the plow, are producing large crops of various 
kinds. Actively identified with the work of tilling the soil — a work which must 
precede all industrial or commercial activity — Orla L. French has made for himself 
an enviable position in business circles. He was born at Flushing, Michigan, Sep- 
tember 23. 1861, a son of G. A. and Harriet French. The father was also a native of 
Flushing, being the first white child born there, his natal year being 1840. He was a 
son of Henry H. French, who settled in Michigan in the '30s. After arriving at 
years of maturity G. A. French wedded Harriet Woodruff, a native of Ohio, and as 
the years passed he continuously and successfully devoted his attention to general 
farming. His death occurred in 1897 and his widow passed away in Yakima in 1906. 

After acquiring a high school education in his native state Orla L. French re- 
moved to Minnesota when twenty-three years of age and purchased three hundred 
and twenty acres of land. There he carried on farming until January 3, 1900, when 
he came to the Pacific northwest and for tvyo years rented a stock farm in Yakima 
county. Upon his arrival in this state he also purchased sixty-six acres of land on 
the .\htanum and has since given his attention to the raising of diversified crops, 
also hay, fruit and live stock. He has ten acres in orchards two miles southwest 
of Yakima, raising thereon fine apples, pears, peaches and grapes. The fruit pro- 
duced is not only of splendid size but is equally fine in flavor and commands the 
highest market prices. The progressiveness of his methods, the systematic manner 
in which his work is carried on and the unfaltering industry and enterprise which 
he displays in the operation of his farm have made him one of the leading agri- 
culturists and fruit growers of this section of the state. 

On the 2d of March, 1888, Mr. French was married to Miss Millie A. Lyman, 
a daughter of O. G. and Katherine (Wheeler) Lyman. They have become the 
parents of five children: Goldie, the wife of Charles Woerner, of Granger, Wash- 
ington, by whom she has six children; Lera, who is the wife of Charles Peterson, 
of Yakima, and the mother of three children; Harold, a rancher on tlie Tieton; 
Esther, at home; and Milo, who is fourteen years of fage. 

Mr. French is well known in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being a 
past noble grand of Yakima Lodge No. 22, of which he is now serving as a trustee. 
He is also overseer of the Grange and he is a loyal member of the Methodist church. 
In politics he is a republican where national questions and issues are involved, 
but at local elections casts an independent ballot. He served as township treasurer 
while in Minnesota but has never been a politician in the sense of office seeking, 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 69 

preferring to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his business affairs and 
thus provide a comfortable living for his family. He is a member of the Yakima 
County Horticultural Union and during the period of his residence in the north- 
west he has won an enviable place among the successful farmers and fruit raisers 
of his section. He has upon his place a plant for packing his fruit and his farm is 
thoroughly modern in its equipment in every respect. 



E. W. R. TAYLOR. 



Among the pioneers of Prosser is numbered E. W. R. Taylor, who is half 
owner of a large flour mill in this city which he has now operated for nearly a 
third of a century. From a small beginning it has become one of the large industrial 
enterprises of the neighborhood and he derives therefrom a gratifying income, so 
that today he is numbered among the prosperous men of the valley. He was born 
in Lucas county, Iowa, May 12, 1859, a son of George S. and Nancy Rebecca 
(.McLaughlin) Taylor, both natives of Indiana. They removed from their native 
state of Iowa at an early day in the development of that state. Thence they crossed 
the plains in the primitive style of the pioneer in 1866, making their way to Washing- 
ton, and remained in Walla Walla for a few months, whence they removed to 
Seattle, which remained their home for a year. The year 1867 found them in Selah, 
Washington, and at the time of their arrival only eight families were located in the 
valley. George S. Taylor took up land here and gave his continued attention to 
agricultural pursuits and live stock dealing with good results until death claimed 
him, his demise occurring as the result of an accident. His widow survived until 
1916. Mr. Taylor, Sr., took a very prominent part in the public life of the valley, 
being an ardent exponent of democratic principles. For one term he represented 
Yakima, Klickitat and Kittitas counties in the state legislature, and his word and 
opinions were of great weight with his confreres. In his position he was able to do 
much good for his constituency and many measures which were passed through 
the legislature on account of his arduous representation have brought such good 
results that the benefit from them is apparent to this day. 

E. W. R. Taylor removed with his parents to Washington when but seven 
years of age and is therefore numbered among the early and honored pioneers of 
this state. Amid the new surroundings of residence he received his education in the 
schools of the neighborhood and after putting aside his textbooks began to assist 
his father in the farm work, becoming thoroughly acquainted with agricultural 
methods and values. He was then engaged in the live stock business with his 
father until the age of twenty-four, when he struck out for himself and proved up 
on a homestead claim. In 1888 he came to Prosser and bought a primitive little 
flour mill there which under his able management has grown until it is today an 
industrial enterprise of vast importance to all the surrounding farmers. For thirty 
years Mr. Taylor has been a resident of Prosser and during that period has built 
up a reputation in private and commercial life which stands second to none, his 
word being as good as his bond. Mr. Taylor also conducted a general store in his 
city, where he carried well assorted lines of goods, his fair dealing and honorable 
methods securing to him a large custom. This business he owned for over twenty 
years. It was established in 1890, but in 1910, on account of his other interests, he 
sold out. He also had a store of the same kind in Yakima which he owned for 
two years, from 1895 until 1897. The mill, to the operation of which he now gives 
his whole attention, is one of the oldest in the valley and was built in 1887, just 
a year before he became the proprietor. It has a capacity of two hundred barrels 
per day, and is therefore one of the largest of its kind in this part of the state. A 
very high grade of flour is turned out and the farmers of the neighborhood who have 
dealings with Mr. Taylor are as one in their agreement as to his fair treatment 
of all. 

E. W. R. Taylor has been married twice. His first union was with Miss "Annie 
Sutton, of Yakima, and to them were born six children, namely: Pearl, who mar- 
ried Harry Forsyth and is now residing in California; Arthur, who has the active 



70 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

management of the mill; Roy, who is also associated with his father in business, 
acting in the capacity of miller; Claude, who is serving his country in the United 
States army: Edna, the wife of Fred McNeil, of Prosser; and George, who is a 
member of the United States Ambulance Corps, No. 570, and is now doing duty in 
Italy. The death of Mrs. Taylor caused deep sorrow not only to her immediate 
family but also to the many friends whom she had made in Prosser and the neigh- 
borhood. Mr. Taylor later contracted a second union with Miss Mae Widby, of 
Prosser, and both are popular members of the social set of their town. 

Mr. Taylor has always taken a deep and lasting interests in the upbuilding 
of his community, of which he is one of the honored pioneers, and this interest finds 
documentary evidence in the fact that he is serving at present as president of the 
Prosser Commercial Club, whose projects for expansion and growth in industrial 
and agricultural ways he largely promotes. In politics he is a democrat but with- 
out desire for office, preferring to do his duty as a citizen at the ballot box. The 
religious faith of the family is that of the Baptist church and fraternally Mr. Tay- 
lor is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which organization 
he has many friends. He is a man of sterling character who by his honorable 
dealings has reached a state of prosperity to which he is fully entitled and none 
can grudge him his labor's fruits which he has so honorably attained. 



JAMES A. KARR. 



While several years have been added to the cycle of the centuries since James 
A. Karr passed from this life, his influence is yet felt and his memory cherished by 
all who knew him. He was for many years a most prominent citizen of Washington, 
contributing in marked measure to the development and upbuilding of the state. He 
became an investor in lands in the Yakima valley which are still being further devel- 
oped and improved through the efforts of his son, Arthur T. Karr, who is now the 
manager of the Karr estate. 

A contemporary writer has said of James A. Karr: "The history of Hoquiam 
and of the Grays Harbor country cannot be better told than by detailing many of 
the incidents of the life of James A. Karr, who lived until November, 1914, to te.l 
the tale of the wonderful development of this section of the country, his memory 
forming a connecting link between the primitive past and the progressive present. 
Fifty-seven years have come and gone since he filed upon a claim in Chehalis, now 
Grays Harbor, county, in 1860, being then a young man of twenty-six years. Until 
that district emerged from pioneer conditions much of his life had been spent upon 
the frontier, for Indiana had taken on statehood only eighteen years before he was 
born on Little Indian creek, not far from Martinsville, Indiana, on the 18th of 
September, 1834. His earliest recollections are of playing on the sand on the bank 
of that creek with his little sister, who died after he left home. He has no memory 
of his father, save as he saw iiim in death, the grief of his mother impressing this 
sight indelibly upon the mind of the three-year-old boy. However, he remembers 
his grandfather Karr, a fine type of the Irish gentleman, dressed like a squire in 
leggings and hunting coat. After the death of the father the family removed from 
place to place and was subjected to many hardships. Later the mother married 
a Mr. Storick and again the family moved, settling on a good farm in St. Clair 
county, Illinois, not far from St. Louis. There was much hard work to be done 
in the further clearing and cultivating of the land and the Karr brothers did their 
full share. Mr. Karr, however, recognized that as stepsons they had little chance 
in life because of a lack of education and that they would always have to depend 
upon severe manual labor. He often expressed a desire to attend school but re- 
ceived no assistance from Mr. Storick, although his mother encouraged the idea. 
At length, feeling that if he obtained an education it must be through his own 
efforts, he left home at the age of fourteen years and hired out for the summer at 
a wage of five dollars per month. At harvest time a man who could swing a 
cradle or who could bind after the cradle was paid a much better wage than the 
regular farm hand, and Mr. Karr proved that he could bind as well as men of twice 




A.MES A. KARR 




MRS. ABKiAIL KARR 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 75 

or thrice his years. Accordingly he_ did work of that character, earning at first a 
dollar and afterward a dollar and a quarter per day, and the money thus gained 
was used in buying books and clothing, while by working on Saturdays and morn- 
ing and night to pay for his board, he was able to attend school for several months 
that winter. He afterward entered upon an apprenticeship to the brickniakers' trade 
and the money which he earned through the summer months in that way enabled him 
to again attend school in the winter. One of his teachers, John Leeper, a graduate 
of McKendree College of Illinois, proved an inspiration to him and assisted him 
in every possible way in his studies. For six years Mr. Karr continued working 
in the summer and attending school in the winter, and finally, with a partner, he 
established and operated a brickyard, in which he won a measure of success that 
enabled him to pay his board and devote an entire year to study, in which time he 
acquired a knowledge of algebra, natural philosophy and astronomy. He was par- 
ticularly interested in the first named and his fellow students often called upon 
him to assist in solving their problems. After that year he taught school for a 
term and then, inclined to the study of medicine, he spent some time in a drug 
store. All these experiences not only proved to him a means of earning a living 
at that period but gave him a fund of knowledge upon which he called in his later 
pioneer experiences in the northwest. He became one of the first school teachers 
and one of the first brickmakers of Chehalis county when some years later he es- 
tablished his home in the Grays Harbor country. 

"In 1852, following the discovery of gold in California, Mr. Karr and his 
brother decided to go to the mines, as this would enable them also to see something 
of the world. Returning to Indiana, Mr. Karr, who was then twenty-one years 
of age, settled his mother's estate, his share thereof being about five hundred dollars, 
which furnished the brothers the capital for their trip. Proceeding to New York, 
they took passage on a steamer bound for Panama, crossed the Isthmus and thence 
proceeded northward to California, where they spent three years in the mines. They 
made Nevada City their headquarters but they did not find the expected fortune 
and in 1858, attracted by the Fraser river excitement, started north as passengers on 
the Anne Perry from San Francisco to Whatcom. There they purchased a small 
boat to go from Bellingham Bay to the Gulf of Georgia and thence up the Fraser 
river. Point Roberts extended into the gulf in a southeasterly direction for quite 
a distance. South of this point the water was quiet but on the river side there was 
a strong surf driven on by the northwest wind. However, they decided to land on 
the north side in order to be ready to make the start up the river, but while so 
doing their boat filled with water and their provisions received a soaking, although 
little damage resulted. Proceeding up the river, they stopped at Fort Yale for a 
week or more in September, 1858, and there purchased Sockeye salmon from the 
Indians, which furnishfed them many an appetizing meal when the fish was fried in 
butter. 

"As the winter was coming on and there seemed to be no prospect of getting 
gold, the brothers returned southward, accompanied by their partner, John C. Gove, 
who became one of the pioneer settlers near Seattle. Purchasing their partner's 
interest, they started back to the Sound and at Olympia sold their boat, proceeding 
on the trail with their packs. They spent the night on Mound Prairie at the home 
of a Mr. Goodell, whose son Ed had just been helping to make a survey of the land 
at Grays Harbor. He told of the country and of the river called Hoquiam, Mr. 
Karr and his brother retaining a distinct remembrance of this. However, the 
brothers proceeded to Portland to spend the winter and there entered the employ 
of Colonel Frush. who was building streets, for which purpose he hauled gravel 
from the Willamette river bars. In securing the gravel the brothers were able to 
earn three dollars per day and later they cut Cordwood, for which they were paid 
a dollar and a half per cord, and by working steadily they could earn three dollars 
per day in that way. In the spring James A. Karr ran the steam ferry across the 
Columbia, while his brother drove a team, but they never abandoned the idea of 
returning to Grays Harbor and in August made preparations for a trip into the 
new country. Returning to Olympia, they purchased cloth from which they made 
a tent, and also laid in supplies for the trip. Proceeding on their way, they stopped 
for a time at the ranch of 'Blockhouse' Smith at Cedarville and there proceeded 



76 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

to make a canoe. The cedar tree which they selected for the purpose split, so they 
secured a green cottonwood growing beside the river. They hewed this out and, 
wishing to hasten the work, they piled the canoe full of branches of vine maple, to 
which they set fire, but found that they had burned a hole in the cottonwood. A 
thin board, oakum and pitch repaired the damage, and packing their supplies in 
the canoe, they started down the river, after two days reaching Cosmopolis, which 
was the metropolis of this country. The district was largely an unsettled and un- 
developed region, the Metcalfs living at Montesano and the Scammons at Wyn- 
oochee, which was the county seat. From that point they proceeded to Hoquiam, 
rounding Cow Point and so coming into the mouth of the river. They landed where 
the first schoolhouse was afterward built, near the present site of the Hoquiam sash 
and door factory, and proceeding at once to the upland, Mr. Karr found a level 
green bench which dropped abruptly into the tidal prairie, where the grass grew 
tall among the scattered forest trees and a spring of clear water issued from the 
hillside. So attractive was the site that Mr. Karr decided to make it his home, 
while his brother chose a site across the river. Then they began building a cabin 
of hemlock logs, chinked with dirt and soft sandstone. Inventive ingenuity was 
brought into play to protect their cabin and its supplies during their absence. The 
usual latchstring hung out, but instead of opening the latch, as was customary, when 
it was pulled it only shut the more tightly. But another string with a little block 
of wood attached was brought out further on and the end concealed with soft earth. 
It was this string that opened the door, but it would not be noticed by anyone who 
was not accustomed to such an arrangement. However, one day when the brothers 
were absent from home, Captain Winsor, a well known frontiersman, called. Used 
to all kinds of pioneer devices, he soon discovered their arrangement and he and 
his party entered the house, built a big fire and prepared a meal from supplies which 
they found. After they were gone the fire in some way spread to the timber, burn- 
ing away the mantel and doing some damage to the interior, but fortunately the 
wet hemlock logs of which the cabin had been built proved fireproof, so the Karrs 
found their home only somewhat dismantled. They had met Captain Winsor and 
his friends, who told them of their visit but little dreamed of the result of their 
self-obtained hospitality. 

'■.\s time passed on, the brothers continued the work of clearing and develop- 
ing their places and in 1860, after making a trip to Olympia accompanied by .'\ustin 
Young, James A. Karr established a brickyard at Cosmopolis, hoping thus to obtain 
ready money by supplying the commodity which the community greatly needed. 
He was not only associated in this undertaking with his brother but was also 
joined by Austin Young, Ed. Campbell and David Byles. They furnished brick for 
the government barracks at Chehalis Point and when the buildings were abandoned 
after the war, Mr. Campbell bought one and moved it to Hoquiam, where it still stands 
on the east side of the river. The brick manufacturers furnished brick for many of the 
fireplaces in the early homes and the income which they acquired enabled the Karr 
brothers to secure many needed supplies. 

"Olympia was a small village of about four or five hundred people when in 
March, "i860, Mr. Karr went there to enter his claim, which he secured as a pre- 
emption, the homestead law having not then been passed. When Chehalis county 
was formed James A. Karr was elected its first auditor and filled the office for 
twelve years. There was no salary attached to the position but the incumbent was 
allowed fees and three dollars per day for full time. In the winter of 1860 Mr. 
Karr taught the first school at Cosmopolis in a little building erected from lumber 
brought from Cedarville, while his own brickyard supplied the brick for the fire- 
place and chimney. He had twelve or fifteen pupils, for several families, including 
the Metcalf. Goodell, Smith, Byles and Young families, were then living in the 
neighborhood. Christmas of that year was celebrated at the home of Mr. Goodell, 
with speaking, singing and a general good time. The families of the neighbor- 
hood gathered and the invitation was also extended to the soldiers stationed there. 
It was feared that the Indians, knowing that war was in progress among the whites 
of the north and the south, might go upon the warpath, so that a garrison was 
maintained at Chehalis Point and a blockhouse was erected at Cedarville. In the 
winter of 1861-2 Mr. Karr engaged in teaching at Montesano and as there was little 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY n 

money in the neighborhood he was largely paid in cattle, so that when he was ready 
to develop his farm he had quite a small herd of excellent cattle. In the winter of 
1862-3 he taught at Mound Prairie. It was there that he had first heard of Grays 
Harbor when stopping at the Goodell home in 1859. One of the sons, Ed Goodell, 
had in the meantime married and removed to Forest Grove but Mr. Karr met him 
again at the close of the school term in 1863. 

"It was an occasion that, seemingly trivial, proved a most momentous one in the 
life of Mr. Karr, for Mr. Goodell showed him the picture of an attractive looking 
young lady, saying that he would give him the picture if he would take it to the 
original. In a spirit of fun Mr. Karr took the picture and about that time, desiring 
to see his brother on business matters and thinking that he might find work at 
harvesting or masonry and thus bring in money needed for carrrying on the farm 
at Hoquiam, he started for the place where his brother was working, not far from 
Hillsboro, between Portland and Forest Grove, Oregon. In the course of a con- 
versation with a woman with whom his brother boarded Mr. Karr chanced to say 
that he had the picture of a very nice looking girl. On seeing it the woman ex- 
claimed: 'Why, I know her! That's .^bbie Walker and she is teaching at Hills- 
boro, only about a quarter of a mile away.' She proposed that they visit the school- 
house about the time the school would be closed. This plan was carried out and 
Mr. Karr walked with the young lady to her boarding house, which was some dis- 
tance from the school. The old-time pioneer hospitality was extended him by the 
people of the house and after remaining there through the night he next day ac- 
companied the young lady to school and they planned a ride together to her home 
at Forest Grove, where they spent the following Saturday and Sunday. The ac- 
quaintance progressed rapidly and when Miss Walker spoke of making a trip east 
of the mountains to visit the scenes of her childhood near Spokane, Mr. Karr re- 
plied that it would be a long, tedious journey and he wanted her to go to Hoquiam 
with him. An immediate marriage was agreed upon and was celebrated at the 
Walker home September 14, 1863, the bride's father, the Rev. Elkanah Walker, be- 
ing the officiating clergyman, assisted by Rev. Chamberlain, of Portland, who was 
then visiting at their home. The wedding trip consisted of a visit to the State Fair 
at Salem and a trip to Mound Prairie. 

"Mr. Karr was engaged to teach the Little Rock school that winter and in the 
spring he went to the farm to start the work, his wife remaining to finish out the 
two months of school. In the latter part of March he returned and accompanied 
his wife down the river to the homestead which they occupied for forty years. They 
earnestly undertook the task of developing the place and the labors of both were 
soon evident in its transformation and improved appearance. The first year they 
had ten cows and batter constituted their chief export. Mr. Karr remained con- 
tinuously upon the farm save for the years 1875, 1882 and 1893, when he repre- 
sented his district in the state legislature. As a member of the legislature he care- 
fully considered the vital questions which came up for consideration and gave his 
support to many measures which have been far-reaching in their beneficial effects. 
The journals of the house of the territorial legislature show that Mr. Karr had been 
a most active agent in the educational interests of the state, was on the committee 
of education and introduced the bill providing for a common school system. He was 
one of the leading champions of legislation establishing and supporting the State 
University. Chehalis was a republican county, but as it did not contain enough 
people to form a district, the legislature resorted to gerrymandering when the demo- 
crats were in power and Chehalis was attached at various periods to different dis- 
tricts. It was first joined to Pierce, and although a republican stood no chance of 
winning, Mr. Karr made speeches throughout Pierce county, which was strongly 
democratic. .'\t that time he was defeated, but when Pierce and Chehalis counties 
were again joined, Mr. Karr received a large majority in Pierce and said that he 
thought the speeches he made several years before must have just begun to take 
effect. He always kept in close touch with the questions and issues of the day from 
the time when he acted as secretary of the first political meeting held in Grays 
Harbor in 1860, on which occasion Governor Stevens was in the midst of his cam- 
paign for delegate to congress. 

"Mr. Karr actively continued the work of the farm and for ten years the family 

(4) 



78 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

lived in the original log cabin, although some additions and improvements were 
added thereto. In 1874 he planned to build a new home, bringing lumber from 
Elma, doors and window sash from Tumwater and brick from a schooner that had 
carried its cargo from Portland. Mr. Karr quarried the stone for two fireplaces 
from the bluff across the river and secured shingles at Montesano. When ma- 
terials were thus assembled a story and a half house was erected, facing the south 
and overlooking the waters of the bay. It was a period when the settlers had to 
depend upon their own labor for nearly all supplies and Mr. Karr undertook the 
task of tanning leather, at first using smartweed and other ingredients from the 
east, but he discovered the astringent properties of hemlock and alder bark and 
from those made in tanning materials. After producing leather this was cut up and 
shaped into boots and shoes for the family, Mr. Karr making the lasts and pegs, 
and the shoes, it is said, 'made up in durability for what they lacked in elegance.' 
All garments, even those for the boys, were homemade and raincoats were made of 
unbleached cotton soaked in linseed oil. Mr. Karr's former experience as a drug 
clerk enabled him to provide remedies for his family when there was no physician 
near at hand and not infrequently he was called upon to prescribe for his neighbors. 
He contributed to the social enjoyment of the community by his violin music, having 
studied in Nashville, Illinois, and afterward in Nevada City, California. While 
teaching at Cosmopolis he gave instruction in music as well as in the common 
branches. It was at Mr. Karr's suggestion that a trail was opened from Elma to 
Olympia over which horses and cattle could be driven, and this trail proved the 
predecessor of the stage road when a stage line brought the community into seem- 
ingly close connection with the capital. Later Mr. Karr and Mr. Campbell were 
owners of a big shovel-nosed canoe, with which they took their farm produce up 
the river in the fall, finishing the journey by wagon, and on the return they brought 
with them provisions to last for a year. They had little trouble with the Indians 
in that locality, although when the Modoc war was in progress it seemed that there 
might be an uprising at Grays Harbor. 

"Mr. and Mrs. Karr became the parents of twelve children: Mary Olive is the 
wife of H. L. Gilkey, who was cashier of the First National Bank of Southern 
Oregon at Grants Pass, Oregon. Beatrice Abigail gave her hand in marriage to 
H. B. McNeill, of Aberdeen. Elkanah Walker has passed away. Cyrus James is 
captain of one of the merchant marines on the -Atlantic. Henry Anderson, twin 
of Cyrus, died at the age of fourteen years. Phoebe Rose is the wife of John Snow, 
manager of ship yard at Vancouver, British Columbia. John Ross, a twin of Phoebe, 
is a resident of Yakima. Ruth is now the wife of J. S. McKee, of Hoquiam. She 
is the only woman member of the State Council of Defense and is the first woman 
regent of the University of Washington. William Hay is deceased. Eunice Viola 
resided with her mother in North Yakima until the latter's death. Levi Zebulon, 
the next of the family, is a resident of Seattle, .-\rthur Thompson Karr resides at 
Yakima. On the 14th of September, 1913, at North Yakima, Mr. and Mrs. Karr 
celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. 

"Mr. and Mrs. Karr gave their children good educational opportunities. School 
was held during the summer months, and when the term was over the big family 
living room at home was converted into a schoolroom, with homemade desks, and 
the parents acted as instructors to their children until the older sisters were able 
to assume the task of teaching. Mr. Karr was advanced in his ideas concerning 
education and believed firmly that girls should be given the same chance as boys 
and accordingly his daughters received as good educational advantages as his sons. 
Three daughters graduated from the University of Washington and Mrs. McKee has 
a Master of .^rts degree and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, admission to which 
is gained only by high scholarship. Mr. Karr took a great deal of pride in Mrs. 
McKee's fine scholastic record. In winter a society was formed which was prac- 
tically a parlimentary law club — the first on the Harbor— and Mr. Karr acted as 
president. His children received training therefore along that line and the instruc- 
tion has proven valuable in later years. With the passing of pioneer conditions the 
Karr farm, owing to the progressive spirit of the owner, took on all of the im- 
provements of modern times and through his business ability Mr. Karr won very 
substantial success, his estate becoming valuable. In 1904 the family removed to 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 79 

Yakima, where his last years were spent and where his widow passed away Novem- 
ber 9, 1918. He died of apoplexy on the night of November 4, 1914. He had been 
keenly interested in the general election which took place on the preceding day and 
particularly in the fate of the prohibition law, had voted and seemed in his usual 
health. He was a stanch republican in his political belief and fraternally was a 
Mason and a charter member and past master of the Hoquiam lodge of that order. 
Although there were many happy memories of early times, he looked back with no 
sigh of regret to the past but rejoiced in the progress of the present and kept in 
touch with the trend of modern thought. He had passed the eightieth milestone on 
life's journey when called bj' death, but old age need not suggest as a matter of 
course idleness and want of occupation. There is an old age which grows stronger 
and brighter mentally and morally as the years go on and gives out of its rich stores 
of wisdom and experience for the benefit of others. Such was the record of James 
A. Karr." 



MRS. ABIGAIL KARR. 

Mrs. .\bigail Karr, wife of James A. Karr, whose record is given above, passed 
away on the 9th of November, 1918, at the advanced age of seventy-eight years. She 
was the first white girl born within the limits of the present state of Washington, 
to survive infancy. Mrs. Karr was the second child of her parents. Rev. and Mrs. 
Elkanah Walker, missionaries, who crossed the plains in the second company brought 
across by Marcus Whitman in 1838. In the spring of 1839 Rev. Walker and his 
associate, the Rev. Gushing Eells, established a mission at Tschimakain meaning 
"the place of springs") not far from the present city of Spokane. Here on May 
24, 1840, Abigail was born. The place is still known as Walker's Prairie. The chief 
anxiety of these pioneer parents was that tlieir children must grow up without 
other companionship than that of the Indians. The mothers banded themselves 
together in what was known as "The Maternal Association" for the express pur- 
pose of keeping fresh in their own minds the ideals and standards of their far away 
New England home. This was the more necessary when we reflect that it required 
usually a year for mail from the east to reach these far away places. Mrs. Walker 
who kept a diary of these days, gives many interesting glimpses of the primitive 
methods of living necessitated by pioneer conditions. Here Mrs. Karr spent the 
first seven years of her life. 

When Dr. Whitman was massacred in November, 1847, the terrible news came 
swiftly to the little group of people at Tschimakain. Great anxiety was felt as it 
was reported that the Gayuse Indians were coming on to murder the two families 
at Tschimakain. The men of the station felt that they must be away at times to 
aid in the search for the murderers and to do scout duty. Needless to say these 
anxious times made a great impression on the seven-year-old child, to whom thus early 
tragedy came close. The Flatheads, who were attached to the Tschimakain mission, 
waited upon the people of the mission and told them that the bad Indians could 
not reach them except over their dead bodies. In this confidence they rested and 
in the end met no harm, though they remained at the station until spring. Then 
they went for a time to old Fort Golvillc and still later they were accompanied to 
Oregon City, then the metropolis of the west, Ijy a company of soldiers. When a 
few years ago the Historical Society of the state unveiled a monument at Walker's 
Prairie to Messrs. Eells and Walker, one of the soldiers who formed this escort 
was present and gave a vivid description of the party as they started overland for 
Oregon City. 

"Mrs. Karr spent her girlhood here and at Forest Grove, where she received 
her education. Among her earliest teachers was Professor Thomas Gatch, a pioneer 
educator of the northwest, who for many years was president of the University 
of Washington. Upon reaching young womanhood Mrs. Karr took up the work 
of teaching and while acting in that capacity she met James A. Karr, the pioneer 
resident of Hoquiam, who sought her hand, in marriage. The wedding was cele- 
brated September 14. 1863, and their wedding journey consisted of a trip by team 



80 HISTORY OF YAKIMA \ ALLEY 

to Olympia. They spent the first winter of their married life at Little Rock, where 
Mr. Karr was teaching the village school. In the spring of 1864 they took up their 
abode upon the old homestead, which now constitutes the north half of Hoquiam, 
and thereon they resided for four decades or until 1904, when they removed to 
Yakima. 'There Mr. and Mrs. Karr celebrated their golden wedding in 1913 and a 
year later Mr. Karr passed away. By request of the State Historical Society the 
special pictures of Mr. and Mrs. Karr taken at that time will be presented to the 
society to be placed in the pioneers' corridor. 

"While living upon the homestead at Hoquiam the twelve children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Karr were born, eleven of whom reached adult age and eight were present at 
the fiftieth anniversary of their parents' marriage together with many grandchildren. 
Notwithstanding the manifold duties which devolved upon her in the care of her 
household and the rearing of her children, Mrs. Karr took the deepest interest in 
things intellectual and ever kept in touch with the trend of modern thought and 
progress even to the end of her days. She was a broad reader and discussed most 
intelligently many questions bearing upon the welfare of community, state and 
nation. She belonged to the Congregational church, to the Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union, to the Order of the Eastern Star and the Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. Her grandfather had been a minute man in the war for inde- 
pendence and the same patriotic spirit was ever manifest in Mrs. Karr, who after the 
United States entered the great world war devoted long and happy hours to Red 
Cross work. She had early become most skillful in knitting and she employed her 
time in knitting for the soldiers, shaping many an article of comfort for them. She 
lived to know that the signing of the armistice would soon come, recognizing that 
the world had thus been saved from the militarism of Prussia to benefit by the 
democratic principles that recognize the rights of all mankind. She was a lovable 
woman, her life enriched by broad experiences and liberal study and most of all by 
that deep human sympathy which was constantly manifest in a hand extended to 
assist others. She was ever indeed a helpmate to her husband and an inspiration 
to her family and friends, and 'her good works follow her.' " 



GEORGE BIEHN. 



Substantial equipment for fruit raising, combined with sound judgment and 
keen discrimination in the management of his business affairs, has won for George 
Biehn a most gratifying measure of success as an orchardist. He was born in 
Kenosha county, Wisconsin, November 26, 1856, a son of Henry and Margaret 
(Meyers) Biehn, both of whom were natives of Germany but came to the new world 
in childhood and were here married. The father was a farmer by occupation and 
followed that pursuit for many years in Wisconsin, where his death occurred. The 
mother survives and is now living in Racine, Wisconsin. 

George Biehn, mastering the branches of study taught in the public schools of 
his native state, completed a course in the high school at Kenosha. Wisconsin, after 
which he concentrated his efforts and attention upon farming to the age of nineteen 
years. He then started out in commercial circles, securing a clerkship in a store, and 
afte-ward he engaged in the conduct of a general store and grocery business of his 
own at Racine, where he remained until February, 1890. He then removed to the 
northwest and for a few years was a resident of Tacoma, Washington, during which 
time he was connected with the house of A. S. Johnson & Company, dealers in paints. 
In 1894 he removed to Yakima and opened a branch store for A. S. Johnson & Com- 
pany. In the same year he purchased ten acres of land in the Selah valley and he 
was the first to use water under the Selah-Naches ditch. There were only four or 
five houses in the valley at that time. At a subsequent period Mr. Biehn purchased 
forty acres additional and later he sold a part of this land but still retains twenty- 
eight acres. He took up his abode upon the ranch in 1896 and has nearly the entire 
tract planted to orchard, raising apples, pears, peaches and prunes. He built a fine 
hop house that is now used for a fruit packing house and everything about his place 



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GEOBGE BIEHN 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 83 

is indicative of his care and supervision and his progressive spirit. In 1909 he 
erected one of the fine homes of the district and is now most pleasantly situated. 

In 188.T Mr. Biehn viias married to Miss Mary L. Johnson, a daughter of Samuel 
and Amelia Johnson, of Racine, Wisconsin, who were pioneer settlers of the north- 
west. Mr. and Mrs. Biehn have the following children; Edward, who is with the 
Yakima Valley Fruit Growers Association and makes his home in Yakima; Georgia, 
at home; Jerome, who is a member of the United States army; Byron, who is with 
the United States navy on the transport Leviathan; Gertrude, at home; Thelma, at 
home; and Stanley, thirteen years of age. 

Mrs. Biehn is a member of the Episcopal church but Mr. Biehn was reared in 
the I,utheran faith. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and to 
the Woodmen of the World. In politics he maintains an independent course. He 
has served as postmaster of Selah for a year and was school clerk for eight years 
but has had little time or inclination for public office as his developing business affairs 
have made constant demand upon his energy. He has been keenly interested in 
everything pertaining to fruit raising interests in this section and for four years he 
was a director of the Selah Irrigation District. He was also one of the organizers 
of the Yakima County Fruit Growers Association and assisted in organizing the 
Selah Fruit Products Company. What he has undertaken he has carried forward to 
successful completion and has for more than two decades been numbered among the 
representative farmers and orchardists of this part of the state. 



WILLIAM L. SHEARER. 

With the development and upbuilding of Toppenish, William L. Shearer has been 
closely associated. He served for a considerable period as its postmaster, has 
been identified with its commercial interests and at all times has worked for general 
improvement as well as individual success. Mr. Shearer was born in Monroe county, 
Missouri, October 31, 1862, a son of Joseph Mathew and Hester (Kennett) Shearer, 
who were natives of Kentucky and pioneer settlers of Missouri. The mother has 
now passed away, while the father is living retired, having put aside the active 
cares of business life. 

William L. Shearer, having acquired a public school education, started in the 
business world as a messenger boy for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 
Company and was thus employed from 1876 until 1890. He then came to Wash- 
ington and for fourteen years was in the service of the Northern Pacific Rail- 
way Company. In 1896 he arrived in Toppenish, having been appointed to the 
position of station agent, in which capacity he continued until 1904, when he left 
the railroad employ and in 1905 opened the first drug store of the town. This he 
conducted for about a year and then sold out. It was in 1906 that he organized 
the Yakima Produce & Trading Company in connection with A. W. McDonald and 
George Plank. They began the development of a large farm, having seventeen 
hundred acres of land which they have transformed into rich and productive fields, 
annually yielding very substantial harvests. This is devoted to diversified farming 
and stock raising and both branches of the business are proving profitable. In the 
meantime Mr. Shearer had served as postmaster of the city, having been appointed 
in 1898 and continuing in the office until Septcmlier, 1913. He took the office when it 
paid but seven dollars per month and remained with it until it was paying twenty- 
three hundred dollars a year. With the substantial development of the Yakima 
Produce & Trading Company, they bought out the Richey & Gilbert hardware 
store in 1914 and now conduct an extensive business in the line of shelf and heavy 
hardware and implements. Mr. Shearer was one of the pioneer business men of 
the town and since his earliest connection with its commercial interests has been 
a most active factor in its growth and upbuilding. His activities have been of a 
character that have contributed to public progress as well as to individual success 
and his worth as a citizen is widely acknowledged. 

On the 1st of January, 1890, Mr. Shearer was married to Miss Emma Hoffman, 
a native of Eagleville, Missouri, and a daughter of Robert and Rebecca Hoffman, 



84 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

of Illinois, who removed to Missouri in pioneer times. Mr. and Mrs. Shearer 
have become parents of four children; Paul, who is manager of the implement 
business owned by his father; Preston, who is now with the United States army, 
having been examined six times in order to get into the- service before he was 
accepted; Fred, who is a student in the University of Washington; and Helen, a 
little maiden of eleven summers, who completes the family. 

Mr. Shearer is an exemplary member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to 
Toppenish Lodge, No. 187, A. F. & A. M., and he has also taken the degrees of 
the Scottish Rite. He belongs to the Toppenish Commercial Club, of which he 
formerly served as president. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party and for three years, from 1914 until 1916 inclusive, he was mayor of Toppen- 
ish, giving to the city a businesslike and progressive administration in which he 
introduced many improvements and brought about various reforms. He has also 
been school director for twenty years. He made the first boundary lines for the 
first school district in the Yakima Indian reservation in 1898 and has served on 
the school board continuously since save for a period of three years. The cause 
of education finds in him indeed a stalwart champion and one whose labors have 
been most effective and beneficial. He is constantly reaching out along lines that 
look beyond the exigencies of the moment to the further development and upbuild- 
ing of this section of the state and he has accomplished much of great worth to 
town and community. 



MRS. ANN E. SYKES. 

Mrs. Ann E. Sykes is the first and only postmaster that Grandview has had. 
She was appointed to the position with the founding of the town in 1906 and has 
continuously served, making a most creditable record in the office. She is a native 
of Keithsburg. Illinois, and a daughter of George and Eliza Jane (Osborn) Pitman, 
the latter a daughter of Alexander Osborn, who was the third white settler in 
Knox county, Illinois, and the first white man to be married in that county. George 
Pitman, the father of Mrs. Sykes, was a native of Indiana and cast in his lot with 
the pioneer settlers of Illinois, where he was married. Thus two of the old families 
of the state were united. The maternal grandfather served in the Black Hawk 
war, which occurred in 1832 and settled the question of Indiana supremacy in that 
state. He lived there at the time when deer and other wild animals haunted the 
forests and both the Osborn and Pitman families participated in the work of re- 
claiming the region for the purposes of civilization. George Pitman was a farmer 
and live stock dealer and his daughter Ann was reared under the parental roof upon 
the old homestead farm in Illinois. 

At Cadillac, Michigan, she became the wife of Noah Sykes, who was a mill- 
wright and turner by trade. They removed from the Mississippi valley to Everett, 
Washington, where Mr. Sykes operated the Everett Turning Works, continuing 
active in the business there until 1904, when he met death by accident. He was a 
leading member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and also a prominent 
and influential member of the Congregational church, in which he served as deacon 
and was also a tenor singer in the choir. He was a man of many admirable traits 
of character and his sterling worth endeared him to all with whom he came in 
contact. The best traits of his character, however, were reserved for his own 
fireside and his loss came as a telling blow to the members of his household. 

In 1906 Mrs. Sykes came to Grandview. The town was established in that 
year and she became the first postmaster. She had had previous experience along 
this line at Coledale, Illinois, where she and her husband conducted a country store 
and had the postoffice for five years. She has remained continuously as postmaster 
of Grandview, covering a period of more than twelve years, so that her connection 
with postofiice affairs has extended over more than seventeen years. She erected 
the building which is now occupied by the postofiice and she at first had to carry 
the mail from Mabton. In order to supplement the postofiice salary in the early 
days she took in roomers. She was supporting her mother, who still lives with 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 85 

her at the advanced age of ninety-eight years. Mrs. Sykes conducted the postoffice 
for two years before it paid anything and she did not receive a salary for five 
years. The business of the office, however, has continually grown with the develop- 
ment of the surrounding country. Mrs. Sykes lived at Grandview for a year before 
a general store was established. She has therefore witnessed the entire upbuilding 
of the town and has been deeply interested in everything pertaining to its progress 
and development. She has given her political support to the democratic party and 
her religious faith is that of the Congregational church. She has been a brave, self- 
reliant woman, capable and resourceful, and is very popular among the people of the 
community. 



HOWARD GARRISON. 

■ Howard Garrison, who after four years' connection with the office of sheriff is 
resuming the practice of law in Ellensburg, was born in Centralia, Illinois, January 
25, 1875, a son of S. C. and Elizabeth Garrison, the former a farmer by occupa- 
tion. The son obtained a public school education and through the period of his 
boyhood and youth engaged in farming with his father and continued to assist in 
the development of the fields until he had reached the age of twenty-five. He was 
desirous, however, to concentrate his efforts and attention upon a professional 
career and with that end in view became a law student in uhe Northern Illinois 
College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1902. He practiced in 
Centralia from 1903 until 1906 and afterward in Springfield, Illinois, from 1906 until 
1909. In the latter year he came to the west and after living in several places 
removed to Ellensburg, Washington, in August, 1910, and entered upon the practice 
of law, in which he continued successfully until 1912. He was then appointed 
deputy sherifif and thus served until 1914, when he was elected to the office of 
sheriff and again was chosen for that position in 1916, so that he was associated 
with the sheriiT's office altogether for six years. With the close of his term in 1918 
he is now returning to the practice of law. 

On the 14th of February, 1906, Mr. Garrison was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie Levesmeier, of Carbondale, Illinois. Their children are Howard B, and 
Mildred May. Mr. Garrison belongs to Elks Lodge No. 1102 of Ellensburg. His 
political allegiance is given to the democratic party, which he has always faithfully 
supported, being a firm believer in its principles. He has acted as chairman of the 
local exemption board and he has been greatly interested in everything that has 
had to do with the promotion of war activities and the support of the federal govern- 
ment during the great crisis in the world's history. 



HERBERT P. PRESTON. 

Herbert P. Preston, actively engaged in the milling business at Toppenish, was 
born in Waitsburg, Washington, December 21, 1874. His father, William G. Pres- 
ton, came to this state in 1861, when it was still a part of the territory of Oregon. 
He made his way to Walla Walla and was there engaged in the freighting business 
until 1865. He afterward established the first flour mill in the west in Waitsburg, 
Washington, in 1866, bringing the machinery around Cape Horn. The new venture 
proved a successful one and he continued the operation of the mill until his death, 
which occurred February 20, 1916. He was also interested in mercantile business; 
was director of the Merchants Bank of Waitsburg and the Schwabacher Company 
of Walla Walla; was identified witli the Puget Sound Dressed Meat Company and 
was much interested in farming and stock raising. In 1869 he wedded Matilda Cox, 
who survives him and now makes her home in Walla Walla. 

Herbert P. Preston, spending his youthful days under the parental roof, acquired 
a public school education and assisted his father in the mill until he reached the 
age of seventeen years, when he entered into connection with the grocery trade as 



86 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

an employe of the Schwabacher Company at Walla Walla. He continued there 
for many years and afterward went to Baker City, Oregon, where he conducted a 
grocery store for four years. He then went upon the road as traveling salesman 
for the Cudahy Packing Company, which he represented in Oregon, Washington 
and Idaho for five years. On the expiration of that period he turned his atten- 
tion to the brokerage business in Seattle, where he remained for six years, and 
in 1917 he built a flour mill at Toppenish, which he is now successfully conduct- 
ing. This mill has a capacity for one hundred tons of alfalfa chopped for stock 
feed, that amount being turned out every twenty-four hours. He also makes other 
kinds of stock feed and manufactures rolled oats and barley, together with barley, 
oat and corn ilour. The business is one of the substantial productive industries of 
the section and employs twenty-five men. 

On the 21st of December, 1912, Mr. Preston was married to Miss Corinne C. 
Hays, of Baker City, Oregon. He is well known as a member of the Elks lodge 
in Walla Walla and he belongs to the Commercial Club of Toppenish and to the 
Chamber of Commerce at Seattle. His business activity in various places has made 
him widely known and his enterprise has placed him among the leading and repre- 
sentative citizens of Washington. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party and he is conversant with all the vital questions and issues of the day, but he 
does not seek nor desire office, preferring "to concentrate his eflorts and attention 
upon his business affairs. From time to time he has extended his activities, which 
have brought him into connection with many important interests. He is now a 
director of the American Savings Bank & Trust Company of Seattle and he has large 
farming interests at Walla Walla. He is also interested in a number of flour mills, 
including such plants at Waitsburg, Washington, and Athena, Oregon, and he is a 
stockholder in a number of banks. He has displayed sound judgment in his invest- 
ments and in all business transactions has quickly discriminated between the essential 
and the non-essential. Fortunate in possessing character and ability that inspire 
confidence in others, the simple weight of his character and ability has carried him 
into important relations with large commercial and financial enterprises. 



JOSEPH THEODORE STEENBERGEN. 

Joseph Theodore Steenbergen is the owner of one of the valuable ranch prop- 
erties of the Selah valley, having forty-seven acres of rich and productive land, 
largely devoted to the raising of apples. He comes to the northwest from Kentucky, 
his birth having occurred in Barren county on the 27th of August, 1868, his parents 
being William and Elizabeth (Gillock) Steenbergen, both of whom were natives of 
the Blue Grass state. The father was a son of Joseph Steenbergen, who was also 
born in Kentucky. William Steenbergen followed the occupation of farming for 
many years but is now living retired, still makng his home in his native state. His 
wife, however, has passed away. 

Joseph T. Steenbergen, after mastering the branches of learning taught in the 
public schools, took up farming as a young man and later was engaged in the 
lumber business in California in 1889. He afterward became identified with the hotel 
business in that state and in 1900 went to Alaska, devoting his attentions to mining in 
vraious sections of that country. Three times he made and lost a fortune, but 
with undaunted courage he persisted and eventually discovered the Engleside mine 
at Nome. A month later he was offered seventy-five thousand dollars for this prop- 
erty but he worked it out. In 1910 he left Alaska with the money earned in his 
mining operations in that country and came to the Yakima valley, where he pur- 
chased forty acres of land in the Selah. Subsequently he added seven acres to the 
original tract and he has the place all in orchard, largely devoted to apples and 
pears. His land is also seeded to alfalfa and an air of neatness and thrift pervades 
every part of the ranch and indicates the supervision of a practical and progressive 
owner. He has a fine home upon the place, also a large and substantial barn and 
every needed facility to promote his fruit raising interests. 

On November 27, 1912, Mr. Steenbergen was married to Miss Sue Dobson, who 




JOSEPH T. STEENBERGEN 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY &9 

was born in Kentucky, a daughter of John Dobson. Their marriage was celebrated 
in her native state and they have become parents of two daughters; Helen, born 
September 27, 1915, and Ruth, born November 17, 1917. 

Mr. Steenbergen is a well known Mason, holding membership in Yakima Lodge, 
No. 24, F. & A. M., while in the Scottish Rite he has attained the thirty-second 
degree, and he is also a member of the Mystic Shrine of Seattle. His name is like- 
wise on the membership roll of Yakima Lodge, No. 318, B. P. O. E., and of the 
Yakima Commercial Club. His wife is a member of the Baptist church. His 
political endorsement is given to the democratic party but never has he been an 
aspirant for office. In matters of citizenship he is not remiss but prefers that his 
public service shall be done as a private citizen. His life's experiences have been 
broad and varied. He has visited many parts of the globe and many lands. During 
1911 he went to South America, spending some time in Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador, 
where he engaged in prospecting and also in touring the country generally. He 
crossed the Andes to the headwaters of the Amazon, traveling on pack mules for 
eight hundred miles. He made the trip over Mount Sarata at an altitude of seven- 
teen thousand feet. His extensive travels have convinced him that he prefers the 
Yakima valley to any other section that he has visited and, concentrating his efforts 
and attention upon the development of his business affairs, he is now engaged 
in the raising of very high-grade fruit and is the owner of one of the finest fruit 
ranches of the valley, fitted with splendid modern equipments. 



CHARLES H. NEWELL. 

It is a trite saying that there is always room at the top, yet there are few who 
attain leadership. The great majority are content to remain in a mediocre condi- 
tion, lacking the ambition or the energy that would bring them to the front. Charles 
H. Newell, however, does not belong to that class. He is a man of marked enterprise 
and keen sagacity in business affairs and, moreover, his record is that of unwearied 
industry. Starting out in life, he has eagerly utilized the opportunities which 
others have passed heedlessly by and in the course of years he became the fore- 
most dealer in horses in the state of Washington. Eventually he became a resident 
of Toppenish and with its upbuilding and development has since been closely asso- 
ciated, while at the same time his business interests extend to various other districts. 

Mr. Newell was born in Holmesville, Ohio, September 20, 1847, a son of Samuel 
and Mary Newell. The father went to California in the year 1849, attracted by the 
gold discoveries in that state, and there passed away. In 1859 the family left Ohio 
for Lawrence, Kansas, later went to Linn county, that state, and subsequently 
crossed the plains by team to Colorado, where Mrs. Newell became the wife of 
E. A. Hopkins. In 1864 they resumed their westward journey, traveling across 
the country to The Dalles, Oregon. In the same fall they settled in Washington 
county, Oregon, where they lived until 1871 and then removed to Klickitat county, 
Washington, where they took up a homestead claim which included the present 
site of the city of Goldendale. There both Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins passed away, 
the former in 1878, while the latter died in 1897. 

Charles H. Newell obtained a public school education in Oregon and after- 
ward entered the live stock business, in which connection his name has become 
widely known throughout the northwest and in other sections of the country. At 
times he has owned more horses than any other man in the state of Washington. 
He shipped the first train load over the Northern Pacific Railroad and as a member 
of the firm of Hoxter & Newell owned an extensive ranch near Goldendale. He has 
owned, bought and sold over one hundred thousand head of horses and has been 
doing business over the Yakima valley since 1871. He rode the ranges in this district 
when there were practically no settlers in this part of the state. He leased land 
from the Indians on the Yakima reservation as early as 1879 and has had lands in 
the district continuously since. In 1901 he came to Toppenish and built the first 
livery barn in the town. In 1902 he built the first hotel here and in 1908 he com- 
pleted a modern hotel, which is a fine cement structure containing fifty-five rooms. 



90 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

It was erected at a cost of fifty thousand dollars and is one of the best hotels in 
the valley. Mr. Newell and his partner. R. J. Davis, of Tacoma, own more than 
five hundred acres of land on the Yakima Indian reservation, devoted to general 
farming, and also have a large hay ranch. In addition to that property they lease 
several hundred acres beside. Their business interests are of a most extensive 
and important character and place them among the men of affluence in the district. 

In 1876 Mr. Newell was united in marriage to Miss Mary Wren, of Washington 
county, Oregon, a daughter of Michael Wren, who settled in that state in the '40s. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Newell has been born a son, Harold, who is now on his father's 
ranch in the summer seasons, while in the winter months he attends school. 

Mr. Newell has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows since 
attaining his majority and he also has membership with the United .Artisans. His 
political endorsement is given to the republican party. He does not seek to figure 
in any public light outside of business, concentrating his efforts and attention 
thereon, and as the years have passed he has developed his business affairs to 
mammoth proportions. Carlyle has said, "The obstacles in the paths of the weak 
become stepping stones for the strong," and this has been proven in the case of Mr. 
Newell, who has regarded difficulties in his path as an impetus for renewed effort 
on his part — effort that has brought him continually nearer and nearer to the goal 
of desired success. 



ERNEST WOODCOCK. 

Ernest Woodcock, who has been prominently identified with land development 
in the Yakima valley and is now well known as a leading fruit grower and capital- 
ist of the city of Yakima, was born in Williamstown, Massachusetts, October 23, 
1871, a son of Fenn B. and Frances (Taylor) Woodcock, who in 1876 removed 
westward from New England to Forest Grove, Oregon. They lived on Fuget 
Sound for a year and in 1878 came to the Yakima valley, locating seven miles west 
of the city of Yakima, the journey being made by wagon. The father purchased 
land the following year and a brother of Ernest Woodcock took up a homestead 
adjoining that place two years later. The father continued to devote his atten- 
tion to agricultural interests upon his claim to the time of his demise, which oc- 
curred in 1897, making a specialty through that period of dairying and the cattle 
business. 

Ernest Woodcock was but five years of age at the time of the removal to the 
northwest and in the public schools of this region he pursued his early education, 
which was supplemented by a course in Whitman College, from which he was 
graduated with the class of 1895. He afterward attended Columbia College for 
a year and then returned to Washington. He was married in 1896 to Miss Mary- 
Hunt, of Walla Walla, after which he conducted Eeles Academy at Colville, Wash- 
ington, for a year. His wife died that year and Mr. Woodcock returned home 
after the death of his father and conducted the ranch, also teaching in the Wood- 
cock Academy at Ahtanum, a school which had been established by his father. He 
afterward became principal of the academy and was thus closely and actively identi- 
fied with educational interests for seven years. On the expiration of that period 
he turned his attention to the land business in connection with Charles H. Hinman 
and organized the Yakima Realty & Inves.tment Company, which is still in existence 
and which his been one of the potent forces in the development and improvement 
of this section of the state. They planted si.K hundred acres to fruit, after which 
they sold some of the tract and kept the remainder. Mr. Woodcock has since 
engaged in land development work and has developed a large acreage for various 
purposes. The firm established the town of .Ahtanum and has conducted business 
under the name of the .Ahtanum Lumber & Produce Company for a time. 

In 1896 Mr. Woodcock was married to Miss Mary Hunt, of Walla Walla, who 
passed away in March, 1897, and in 1900 he wedded Etha Henderson, who was a 
graduate of Woodcock Academy and for one year was a student at Whitman Col- 
lege. Her father was James Henderson, of Yakima. By his first marriage Mr. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 91 

Woodcock had a son, Marion, now twenty-one years of age and manager of the 
Ahtanum Lumber & Produce Company. He is a graduate of the high school of 
North Yakima. 

Fraternally Ernest Woodcock is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks and in politics he is a progressive republican. His religious faith is indi- 
cated by his membership in the Congregational church of Ahtanum, which held 
its forty-fifth anniversary on the 29th of April, 1918. His has indeed been an active 
and useful life, characterized by laudable ambition and actuated by high and honor- 
able purposes, and the worth of his work is acknowledged by all who know aught 
of his career. 



LEONARD E. SMITH. 

Leonard E. Smith is the owner of forty acres of land on the Cowiche. He was 
born in Will county, Illinois, January 26, 1872, a son of Joseph and Elizabeth 
(Sampson) Smith, both of whom were natives of Nottinghamshire, England. They 
came to the United States about 1853 and cast in their lot with the pioneer settlers 
of Will county, Illinois, where the father engaged in farming to the time of his 
death. The mother afterward made her home with her son Leonard and there 
passed away. 

In the public schools of his native county Leonard E. Smith pursued his educa- 
tion and through vacation periods and after his school days were over assisted 
in the work of the home farm until he had reached the age of twenty-four, when 
he left Illinois and removed to Iowa. He was then engaged in farming in Winne- 
bago county of the latter state, until March, 1902, when the opportunities and ad- 
vantages of the northwest attracted him and he made his way to Washington. Ar- 
riving in Yakima county, he purchased forty acres of land on the Cowiche and 
now has two acres planted to fruit. He conducts a dairy business and is engaged 
in the raising of hay and cattle, specializing in graded Jerseys. The various branches 
of his business are carefully conducted and his enterprise and energy are bringing 
to him merited success. 

On the 22d of January, 1896, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Ella Hassell, who 
was born in Iowa, a daughter of William and Emily Hassell, who came to Yakima 
county in 1903. The father died in 1917, but the mother survives and is still living 
in Yakima. They were farming people of this district. Mr. and Mrs. Smith be- 
came the parents of three children, but have lost two, Floy, the eldest, and Donald, 
the youngest, who died in infancy. The second child, Leonard, is at home. The 
family attend the Methodist church and Mr. Smith gives his political support to 
the republican party, keeping well informed on the questions and issues of the 
day. so that he is able to support his position by intelligent argument. He has 
never regretted his determination to come to the northwest, for he here found the 
opportunities which he sought and in their utilization has reached a desirable posi- 
tion as a business man and rancher. He is energetic and determined, working per- 
sistently and diligently as the years go by, and his efforts have brought excellent 
results. 



RALPH B. WILLIAMSON. 

Ralph B. Williamson, a member of the Yakima bar since 1911 and specializing 
in his practice in irrigation and water right law, in which he has acquired a more 
than state wide reputation, comes to the northwest from Iowa. He was born in 
Tama, Iowa, July 31, 1879, a son of Thomas L. and Kate Williamson. The father, 
who devoted his life to the banking business, is now deceased. 

The son acquired a public school education in his native state and in the pur- 
suit of his more specifically literary educationl he attended Cornell College of 
Iowa. He next entered Harvard University for a course in law, which he com- 



92 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

pleted by graduation with the class of 1905. Removing to the northwest, he 
located at Portland, Oregon, where he remained for a short time, and later he 
spent five years in the reclamation service of the United States government as a 
representative of the legal department. In 1907 he came to Yakima while still 
engaged in that work, but in January, 1911, he opened a law office and entered 
upon the private practice of his profession. In 1913 the firm of Williamson & 
Luhman was organized and has since continued. He has made a specialty of 
irrigation law and has been identified with much of the most important of recent 
water law litigation. 

On the 5th of August, 1908, Mr. Williamson was married to Miss Helen M. 
Scott, of Yakima, a daughter of W. H. Scott, and to them have been born two 
children: Richard Scott, whose birth occurred November 16, 1909; and Mary Helen, 
born August 31, 1914. 

Fraternally Mr. Williamson is a Mason. In 1915 he was president of the 
Yakima Commercial Club and under his direction many projects of the organization 
were satisfactorily completed and new ones incepted. His political allegiance is 
that of the republican party and for a number of years he 'was a member of the 
water code commission of the state. He assisted in drafting the code adopted by 
the legislature of 1917 and was largely instrumental in securing the passage of 
this act, generally believed to be one of the most important pieces of economic 
legislation passed by the legislature. There are few men who have equaled him 
in the extent of his experience and research in connection with questions relative 
to water rights and irrigation interests and his knowledge of law relative thereto 
enables him to speak with authority upon disputed questions of that kind. He 
takes a lively and earnest interest in matters pertaining to the public welfare, and 
is a permanent member of the legal advisory board appointed by President Wilson 
for Yakima county. 



A. B. FOSSEEN. 



A. B. Fosseen, familiarly and affectionately known as Ben, is an alert and 
energetic business man and one who holds to advanced ideas in the treatment of 
employes and of the general public. He is dealing in building supplies at Yakima 
and has gained a very substantial trade during the seven years of the existence of 
the firm — a trade that has come to him as the merited reward of persistent effort, 
earnest desire to please his patrons and straightforward dealing. His career is one 
which should certainly receive the thoughtful consideration of young men who start 
out empty-handed as Mr. Fosseen has done and who desire to work their way 
upward through legitimate business methods. 

Mr. Fosseen was born in Leland, Illinois, on the 6th of October, 1876, a son 
of Osman and Isabel Fosseen. The father was engaged during his active business 
career in various lines, following farming and merchandising at difTerent times, but 
eventually he retired and died in the year 1915. 

After completing his education in the University of Minnesota and thus becom- 
ing well equipped by thorough educational training for life's practical and responsible 
duties, A. B. Fosseen entered the lumber business in Minnesota and was there 
engaged until 1908, when he removed westward to Washington, making Yakima 
his destination. Here he entered the employ of the Hellison Lumber Company, 
with which he was connected until the 1st of January, 1911, when he established the 
firm of A. B. Fosseen & Company. It had long been his ambition to organize a 
company where fair play would be given vnployes and he has taken some of these 
in as members of the firm as fast as their ability has been proven. In this way and 
by his straightforward treatment of them, his fairness and his justice, he has built 
up a wonderful loyalty among the men in his service. He has always believed that 
honorable success is founded upon straightforward dealing with debtor and credi- 
tor alike, upon fairness to employes and by capable service to customers. When the 
bu.siness was organized Mr. Fosseen became president and treasurer, with H. F. 
Luhman as secretary, and both continue in office to the present time. W. E. Coleman 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 93 

is now vice president, with F. B. Siiicel as treasurer. Neither Mr. Luhman nor 
Mr. Sincel are directors of the company, the board consisting of Mr. Fosseen, Mr. 
Coleman, A. E. Rassmussen, VV. C. Rider and Eck Baughn. All are active in the 
business with the exception of Mr. Luhman, and Thomas S. Smiley and F. B. 
Baker are also stockholders in the concern. This company deals in building sup- 
plies, irrigation supplies, paints, oils, pumps, motors, coal, brick and cement and 
spraying supplies. They were tirst located in the Clcgg building and then on A 
and First streets. In 1917 they erected a large building, one hundred by one 
hundred feet, at the corner of Yakima and First streets. This is a one-story and 
basement structure with cement floor and has beautiful ofiices. The building is 
constructed of hollow tile and brick. The company is capitalized for thirty-five 
thousand dollars and now employs from twelve to twenty men according to the 
season. The prosperity of the undertaking may be attributed to three factors, 
namely; low cost of operation, volume of business and best grades of material 
obtainable. 

On the 22d of January, 1908, Mr. Fosseen was married to Miss Florence Vance 
Xeal, of Fargo, North Dakota, and they now have one son, Neal Randolph. Mr. 
Fosseen is a prominent representative of Masonry, ever loyal to the teachings and 
purposes of the craft. He belongs to the lodge and has attained the thirty-second 
degree of the Scottish Rite, while with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine he has 
crossed the sands of the desert. He also is a member of the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, of the Commercial Club, the Country Club, the College Club 
of Seattle and Beta Theta Pi, a college fraternity. His political alegiance is given 
to the republican party and he served as secretary of the district exemption board. 
Mr.' Fosseen commands the highest respect of all who know him. He has many 
splendid qualities; not the least of which is his quick recognition of worth in others. 
He judges men by worth, not by wealth, and sterling traits of character can always 
win his regard. His course has never been such as to make him sacrifice his self- 
respect but on the contrary has gained for him the loyal friendship and admiration 
of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



LEONARD TALBOTT. 

Leonard Talbott, who for four years served as postmaster of Toppenish, was 
born in Bement, Illinois, March 6, 1867, a son of Jefferson M. and Amanda Tal- 
bott, both of whom passed away in Illinois, where the father had devoted his life 
to the occupation of farming. 

Leonard Talbott acquired a public school education in his native state and after- 
ward became a telegraph operator, devoting twenty-five years of his life to service 
of that kind. In 1892 he removed to the northwest, making his way first to Montana, 
where he was agent for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company for three years 
at Billings and seven years at Red Lodge. In 1905 he came to Toppenish, Wash- 
ington, and was appointed railway agent for the Northern Pacific Company at this 
place. He continued in that position until 1908, when he entered the furniture busi- 
ness on his own account, conducting his store for six years. He sold out, however, in 
1914 and was appointed postmaster, in which capacity he served until his death 
September 20, 1918. 

In 1892 Mr. Talbott *was married to Miss Sadie F. Fox, of Mazeppa, Minne- 
sota, and to them was born a son, Robert F., whose birth occurred in Montana 
in 1896 and who is a graduate of the Toppenish high school, having completed the 
course in the first class to graduate therefrom — a class of but two members. He 
is now serving with the One Hundred and Sixty-first Infantry of the United States 
army and is in active duty in France. 

Mr. Talbott belonged to Toppenish Lodge, No. 178, A. F. & A. M., of which he 
was a past master at the time of his death, and he was regarded as a most loyal 
adherent to the tenets and purposes of the craft. He also belonged to the Knights 
of Pythias lodge, of which he was a past chancellor. In the Toppenish Commercial 
Club he was an active and earnest member and served as its president in 1910 and 



94 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

1911. His political allegiance was given to the democratic party and he was an 
earnest worker in its ranks. He served as the first mayor of Toppenish in 1907 
and was reelected to that position in 1909. His administration was of a practical 
and businesslike character and greatly promoted the interests of the town. When 
he came to Toppenish there were only a few houses in the place and its population 
was very small, but through the intervening years it had grown rapidly and Mr. 
Talbott was closely associated with its development and progress in many ways, 
at all times proving himself a loyal and public-spirited citizen. 



H. C. DAVIS. 



H. C. Davis, of Yakima, is a man of well balanced activities and powers 
and his intelligently directed efforts have brought him to a creditable and enviable 
position in financial circles of his city, for he is now the president of the Central 
Bank & Trust Company. He was born in Bellaire, Ohio, on the 21st of August, 1872, 
a son of T. C. and Sarah J. Davis, who in 1884 removed with their family to south- 
eastern Kansas, where the father purchased land, but failure overtook them there and 
a later removal was made to St. Clair county, Missouri, where the family home was 
maintained for twelve and a half years, during which period the father with the as- 
sistance of his sons engaged in farming. In 1902 the family came to the Yakima 
valley and the father again gave his attention to general agricultural pursuits up to 
the time of his retirement from active business life. 

H. C. Davis acquired his education in the public schools of Kansas and Missouri 
and upon the removal of the family to the northwest began working for wages. He 
was ambitious, however, to engage in farming on his own account and as soon as 
possible purchased some land. This he later traded and also at different times bought 
land until he is today the owner of a very fine ranch near Granger, Washington, 
which he has carefully developed and improved. He had thereon a fine herd of 
pure blooded Holstein cattle but sold these in 1918. In 1913 he held a sale of fifty- 
seven head of cattle, which brought the largest average price of any such sale held in 
this section of the country, an average of four hundred and sixty-two dollars per 
head. In fact the price was greater than had ever seen paid for any herd of cattle 
of that size in the world at the time. Mr. Davis has done much toward improving the 
grade of cattle raised in the Yakima valley and has thus contributed materially to the 
prosperity of the section. In the east he had largely devoted his time to stock feed- 
ing, and although he is no longer engaged in stock raising, he still keeps his land. 

At the present time Mr. Davis concentrates his efforts and attention upon the 
banking business, having become president of the Central Bank & Trust Company, 
which was organized on the 11th of, June, 1910, taking ever the old Farmers & Mer- 
chants Bank on the 8th of July of the same year. The latter had been organized 
August 12, 1907, by Philip .A.rmbruster, who became president, J. R. Marshall vice- 
president, and C. E. Eraser, cashier, while other directors were L. .A. Dash, F. A. 
Morgan, Orvis McCullough and Lee C. Delle. The capital stock was thirty thou- 
sand dollars, all paid in. The bank was located at the corner of Second avenue and 
Yakima street and in 1910 a removal was made to the corner of Fourth avenue and 
Yakima. In January, 1917, another removal was made, on which occasion they re- 
turned to the old location at Second avenue and Yakima, buying the building, which 
is a two-story structure one hundred and forty by fifty feet. The bank is splendidly 
equipped with mahogany fixtures and with the latest fireproof and burglar-proof 
vaults and safes and everything to protect the interests of depositors and of the bank. 
In 1910. upon the reorganization of the business under the name of the Central Bank 
& Trust Company, George C. Mitchell became the president, Ernest Woodcock vice- 
president, E. A. Beekman temporary secretary, with Charles H. -Mien, S. Grant Smith, 
G. H. Grotewohl and William Wiley as directors. R. S. Wickersham afterward 
became cashier and secretary but not a director. On the 4th of October, 1915, fol- 
lowing the resignation of Mr. Mitchell, W. R. Philips was chosen to the presidency 
and on the 4th of October. 1915, A. B. Hood was elected cashier and W. E. Gitchell 
became assistant cashier. On the same date G. C. Waller was elected treasurer. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 97 

Another change occurred in the presidency when Mr. Philips resigned and D. L. 
Biiren was chosen to fill the vacant position on the 20th of September, 1916, at which 
date W. F. Gitchell was elected cashier. In January, 1916, H. C. Davis became one 
of the directors of the bank and on the 1st of September, 1917, was elected to the 
presidency. Mr. Woodcock has remained as vice-president and on the 1st of Sep- 
tember, 1917, E. S. Rowe, of Sandpoint, Idaho, was made cashier. The present 
directors are W. E. Coumbe, E. B. Marks. Ernest Woodcock, H. C. Davis and E. S. 
Rowe. The Central Bank & Trust Company was organized with a fully paid-up 
capital of fifty thousand dollars. The bank's statement of July 7, 1910, showed its 
resources to be one hundred and twenty-eight thousand seven hundred and forty- 
three dollars and eighty-nine cents, while the statement of December 30. 1916, showed 
the resources to be two hundred and six thousand four hundred and thirty-five dol- 
lars and that of December 24, 1918, indicates a notable growth, for the resources at 
that date amounted to more than five hundred and seven thousand dollars. To 
his duties as president Mr. Davis brought keen discernment, sound business judg- 
ment and unfaltering energy and he is proving his right to rank with the leading 
financiers of the city. 

On the 12th of February, 1895, Mr. Davis was married to Miss Sarah J. Baxter, 
who was born in Texas but was reared in Missouri, a daughter of Hale Baxter. The 
children of this marriage are: Opal J., twenty-one years of age; Elmer B., eleven 
year? of age: H. C, Jr.; and Koy. who has passed away. 

Fraternally Mr. Davis is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and his prominence in the society is indicated in the fact that he has served for four 
tertns as noble grand. He is also an active member of the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks. In politics he is a democrat where national issues and questions are 
before the people but at local elections he casts an independent ballot. He has been 
a candidate for the state legislature and the state senate and although the district nor- 
mally has a republican majority of over six thousand, he ran within one hundred 
and sixteen votes of election — a fact indicative of his personal popularity and the 
confidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen. He deserves much credit for 
what he has accomplished in a business way, as his entire career has been actuated 
by a spirit of progress that has benefited the community as well as promoted his 
individual interests. 



CHARLES H. HIXMAX. 

Charles H. Hinman, a prominent fruit man of Yakima, who is now manager 
of the Fruit Growers' Association, was born in Missouri, January 7, 1871, a son of 
Henry V. and Jane L. Hinman. His parents removed to Kansas in 1873 and after 
twenty years' residence in the Sunflower state came to Washington in 1893, settling 
in Kittitas county, while subsequently they came to Yakima county. The father 
was register of the land office and passed away in Yakima in 1905, but the mother 
still survives. 

Charles H. Hinman acquired a public school education in Kansas and supple- 
mented it by study in the Kansas State .Agricultural College. He taught school 
in Washington for twelve years, becoming one of the successful and able educators 
of the state, imparting readily and clearly to others the knowledge that he had ac- 
quired. In 1902 he took up his abode in Yakima and became clerk in the land 
office. While thus engaged he devoted his leisure to the reading of law and en- 
tered the active practice of the profession as a land attorney, in which connection 
he remained for several years. He afterward turned his attention to the real 
estate business in connection with Ernest Woodcock and has contributed much 
to the development of the countryside through the planting of orchards and the 
sale of property well adapted to fruit production. He joined the fruit growers' 
organization as a charter member and for about two years served as its president, 
while in 1917 he became manager for the association and is now filling that re- 
sponsible and important position. 

In 1911 Mr. Hinman was united in marriage to Mrs. Caroline Satterwhite, of 



98 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Sunnyside, Washington. He has four children, two by a former marriage: Charles 
Lee, who is now in the State University; and Lorene. The children of his second 
marriage are Carroll and Charlene. 

Mr. Hinman is connected with the Woodmen ot the World and the Knights 
of Pythias. In politics he is a republican, and while not a politician in the sense of 
office seeking, he has served as county superintendent of schools in Kittitas county. 
He belongs to the Presbyterian church and to the Commercial Club and his activi- 
ties and interests have always been along lines which have been far-reaching in 
purpose and result. He stands for public benefit and has done much to bring about 
progress and improvement in the Yakima valley. 



JOHN M. MEEKHOF. 

John M. Meekhof, a substantial and esteemed citizen of Yakima county, owns 
and operates a fruit farm two miles west of the city of Yakima. He was born in 
Holland on the 3d of April, 1860, a son of Mynerd and Bertha (Tallen) Meekhof 
and it was in that country that the father passed away. 

John M. Meekhof spent the first twenty years of his life in the land of his nativ- 
ity and then emigrated to the United States in 1880. Making his way into the interior 
of the country, he located near Cadillac, Michigan, where he began farming and was - 
thus actively and successfully engaged for many years. In 1909 he removed to the 
northwest and on the 5th of December of that year took up his abode on Whidbey 
Island, Washington. Subsequently he located in Everett, this state, and later spent 
a short time at Duval, Washington, while for a brief period he resided in Seattle. 
He next rented a large farm near Rainier, Washington, the cultivation of which 
claimed his time and energies until September, 1914, when he came to Yakima county 
and purchased a twenty-acre tract of land near Eugene. Later he purchased eighty 
acres of land near Wiley City where he was engaged in general agricultural pursuits 
for a year. During these years he was for some time near Snohomish and also in 
Tolt, Washington, where he had an hundred acre farm. In February, 1918, he dis- 
posed of the property and bought a small fruit farm two miles west of Yakima, where 
he now owns an attractive residence and is successfully carrying on his fruit-growing 
interests. 

In 1890 Mr. Meekhof was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Von der Heide, 
of Michigan, by whom he has four children, as follows: Jacob, who follows farming 
near Prosser; Bertha, at home; Mynerd, who is also yet under the parental roof but 
operates a farm near Prosser in association with his brother, Jacob; and Henrietta, 
at home. 

In politics Mr. Meekhof is a stanch republican, exercising his right of franchise 
in support of the men and measures of that party. He belongs to the Dutch Re- 
formed church of Moxee and guides his life by its teachings. Coming to the new 
world in early manhood, he eagerly availed himself of the opportunities for advance- 
ment offered on this side of the Atlantic and as the years have passed has won well 
merited prosperity, at the same time gaining the friendship and high regard of those 
with whom he has been brought in contact. 



PETER F. BESSESEN. 

Peter F. Bessesen, who is filling the position of assistant postmaster at Toppe.n- 
ish, was born near Portland, Oregon, on the 9th of September, 1888, a son of Sjur 
and Barbara Bessesen, both of whom were natives of Norway. In the year 1884 
they became residents of Oregon, and the father, who devoted his early life to sail- 
ing, afterward became a farmer of that state. He passed away February 7, 1896. 

Peter F. Bessesen acquired a public school education while spending his youth- 
ful days in his mother's home. After the death of her first husband she became the 
wife of J. M. Hildreth, who died in 1911, and later she married N. G. Van Dusen. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 99 

In 1903 the family went to Yakima, where Peter F. Bessesen attended the high 
school. When his school days were over he took up the occupation of farming in 
connection with his stepfather and also conducted a large dairy. At a subsequent 
period he engaged in the meat business and in other lines and at one time he and his 
stepfather. Mr. Hildreth, conducted a butcher shop in the old town of Yakima, which 
they opened in 1902. there carrying on business until 1907. In the latter year they 
removed to Toppenish and Mr. Bessesen conducted a meat market in this town 
until 1912 and at the same time was identified with other business interests. He en- 
tered the post office in 1912 in the capacity of letter carrier and later was retained 
for inside work, while in 1917 he was appointed to the position of assistant postmas- 
ter and is now acting in that capacity. 

On the 10th of March. 1910. Mr. Bessesen was united in marriage to Miss Maude 
Calkins, of North Yakirna, and to them were born four children: Ivan Sjur and 
Pauline Peter, both of whom died of scarlet fever; Jack Peter F. ; and Ralph Alonzo. 

Mr. Bessesen is a member of the Loyal Order of Moose and also of the Fores- 
ters of America. His political views are in accord with the teachings and principles 
of the republican party and his religious faith is that of the Methodist church. He 
has spent his entire life in the northwest and has therefore been a witness of its 
wonderful growth and development. He has lived to see remarkable changes in the 
Yakima valley during his connection therewith and through the conduct of busi- 
ness interests has contributed in no small measure to its growth and success. 



THOMAS J. DONNELLY. 

An up-to-date eighty acre farm, well irrigated and highly productive, stands 
as evidence of the industry and foresight of Thomas J. Donnelly, a successful agri- 
culturist near Tieton. He was born in St. Louis, Missouri. December 16, 1873, a 
son of Patrick and Rose (Parland) Donnelly, natives of Ireland, who as young people 
emigrated to New York, where they were married, and thence removed to St. Louis. 
In 1874 they went to Klickitat county. Washington, taking up government land near 
the old block house, and there the father entered the sheep business. In 1887 they 
came to the Cowiche valley, in Yakima county, where Mr. Donnelly bought the 
Kelly ranch of one hundred and sixty acres. Closely confining himself to his 
farming interests, he derived a good annual return from his labors and was enabled to 
add to his holdings from time to time until he had accumulated over thirteen hun- 
dred acres of land. He gave up the sheep business in 1886 as the ranges were 
gradually taken up, then engaging in the cattle business and also in general farm- 
ing. In later life he retired in the enjoyment of a handsome competence and died in 
Yakima, being survived by his wife, who later married Benjamin Juru, a resident 
of Fruitvale. 

Thomas J. Donnelly was reared amid pioneer conditions and early in life be- 
came self-reliant. In the acquirement of his education he attended the public schools 
and subsequently assisted his father with the ranch work, thus laying a good foun- 
dation for his subsequent career. Later he took up an eighty acre homestead and 
engaged in dry farming, as the-re was no water. When the Tieton irrigation project 
came into being and the land could be supplied with plenty of water his interests 
improved wonderfully and he now has his farm nearly all under cultivation. His 
fine home, excellent barns, modern machinery and up-to-date equipment bespeak his 
prosperity and the progressive methods which he has ever followed. Besides raising 
hay and grain he gives close attention to stock, being very successful along this 
line. 

On the 12th of February, 1899, Mr. Donnelly was united in marriage to Miss 
Efific Elliott, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Elliott, well known pioneers of 
Cowiche, who are now deceased. To this union have been born two children, 
Edwin and Myrtle. 

Mr. Donnelly is independent in regard to political affairs, preferring to follow 
his own judgment and supporting measures and candidates irrespective of party 
issues. Although not an active politician, he is, however, well informed on all 

(5) , . 



100 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

public questions, especially in regard to his locality, and has ever supported worthy 
movements undertaken for the betterment of the community. He is interested in 
the moral as well as material development and has done much toward bringing 
this about. He enjoys a high reputation among the agriculturists of his district and 
has many friends here. 



PETER BAGLEY. 



More than a quarter of a century has passed since .Peter Bagley became identi- 
fied with the mining interests of Kittitas county and in this connection he has made 
steady progress until in 1913 he was appointed to his present responsible position 
■ — that of general superintendent of the mines of the Northwest Improvement Com- 
pany at Cle Elum and Roslyn. He was born in Ireland, December 26, 1863, a son 
of James and Katherine Bagley, who came to the United StA-tes in the year of his 
birth. They made their way to Illinois and the father was connected with the build- 
ing of the Union Pacific Railroad until 1869. He then located in Seattle and through 
the intervening period the family has been identified with the northwest. Later he 
was at Newcastle, Washington, and while there working in the mines met an acci- 
dental death. His widow survived and passed away in Seattle. 

When a lad of but twelve years Peter Bagley began working in the mines at New- 
castle and later was employed in a similar way at Seattle for three years. He came 
to Roslyn in 1891, so that for twenty-eight years he has been a resident of this 
locality and throughout the entire period has been identified with its mining inter- 
ests. In 1901 he was advanced to the position of foreman of the Dip mine at 
Roslyn and in 1910 was made district superintendent, having charge over three 
mines. Promotion again came to him in 1913. when he was made genera! superin- 
tendent of the Northwest Improvement Company's mines at Cle Elum and at 
Roslyn. His work in this connection is of a most important character and his duties 
are discharged with thoroughness, system and notable ability. 

In 1887 Mr. Bagley was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Barrett, of Newcastle, 
Washington, and their children are as follows: Nellie, the wife of Otto Albers, a 
resident of Chehalis, Washington; Margaret, the wife of John Lewis, of Roslyn; 
Rose, the wife of Walter Grimm, a resident of Chehalis but now serving in the 
United States army; Kate, the wife of Leonard Ackerman, who makes his home 
in Tacoma but is now on active duty in France with the United States army; May 
and E. J., both at home. 

Mr. Bagley exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures 
of the republican party but supported Grover Cleveland for the presidency when 
elected the second time. He is connected with the Foresters and with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. His has been an active life in which he ha!» 
thoroughly mastered every task assigned him and his knowledge of every phase q' 
the mining business has brought him prominently to the front in this connection, 
for he has been ambitious, energetic and thoroughly reliable and his many substan- 
tial qualities have therefore gained for him promotion to his present place of re- 
sponsibility. 



PRESSON BROTHERS. 

The house of Presson Brothers is among the best known mercantile establish- 
ments of Yakima county, their store being in Mabton, where they carry a complete 
and well assorted line of general merchandise. The store was established in 1910 
under the name of King & Presson, the original founders being: Arthur King, presi- 
dent, and A. C. Presson, secretary and treasurer. B. F. Presson bought an interest 
in 1911, and became secretary and treasurer, and in November, 1916, the interest 
of Mr. King was acquired by the Pressons, when A. W. Presson became a member 
of the firm and the name was changed to that of Presson Brothers. Their estab- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 101 

lishmcnt has a ground space of fifty by eighty feet and is one of the most modern 
in the valley. They carry complete lines of the various articles generally to be found 
in larger mercantile establishments and these goods are very carefully selected. 
While the highest quality is maintained, the prices are always at a comparatively \ovf 
level, the firm contenting itself with a reasonable profit. In their contact with cus- 
tomers the greatest politeness is maintained and it is seen to that every patron of 
the house goes away satisfied and pleased. The most honorable business standards 
maintain in the establishment and their methods are above reproach. They are 
modern and progressive young business men of considerable experience and it is 
therefore but natural that the name of Presson Brothers has become one of the 
best and most favorably known in Mabton and Yakima county. 

Their parents, I. N. and L. V. (Johnson) Presson, originally came from Ten- 
nessee, whence they removed to Missouri in 1879. There the father was for many 
years successfully engaged in farming and the nursery business, but in 1910 he and 
his son, A. C. Presson, came to Mabton and this has remained his home ever since. 
The wife and mother passed away several years ago in Missouri. In April, 1918, 
A. C. Presson enlisted in Company I, Quartermasters Corps, and is at present sta- 
tioned at Camp Meigs, Washington. He is to be highly commended for so readily, 
responding to the call of his country in order to fight the common enemy in Europe. 

Both B. F. and A. W. Presson are married and each has a family of three chil- 
dren. Both are democrats and faithfully support the principles and candidates of the 
party although neither is desirous of holding office. However, they are always inter- 
ested in matters pertaining to the development of this section and are ever ready to 
give their support to measures undertaken to promote the interests of Mabton and its 
inhabitants along material, moral and intellectual lines. 



GEORGE F. McAULAY. 

George F. McAulay, who for more than fifteen years has been an active practi- 
tioner at the bar of Yakima, was born in Caseville, Michigan. October 9, 1870, a son 
of Arthur K. and Nancy T. (Fisher) Mc.A.ulay. In 1895 the family removed to 
Baker, Oregon, where the parents resided until 1912 and then became residents of 
Yakima, where the father passed away in 1914. The mother, however, is still living. 
Mr. McAulay had devoted his life to the occupation of farming. 

In the public schools of his native state George F. McAulay pursued his early 
education and later attended the Ohio Northern University from which he was grad- 
uated in the class of 1895 with the degree of B. A. In preparation for a profes- 
sional career he entered the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and won his 
Bachelor of Laws degree upon graduation with the class of 1902. He then prac- 
ticed for a short time at Baker. Oregon, but in the fall of that year removed to 
North Yakima, where he has since made his home and has continuously followed his 
profession, winning a place among the leading lawyers of the valley. He prepares 
his cases with great thoroughness and care and his practice is extensive and of an 
important character. At no time has his reading ever been confined to the limitations 
of the questions at issue; it has gone beyond and compassed every contingency and 
provided not alone for the expected but for the unexpected, which happens in the 
courts quite as frequently as out of them. His legal learning, his analytical mind, 
the readiness with which he grasps the points in an argument, all combine to make 
him one of the capable lawyers of the Yakima valley. 

In 1897 Mr. McAulay was married to Miss Annie M. Bankerd, of Lewisburg, 
Ohio. Their children, five in number, are John H., Annie, Jean, Martha and Agnes. 

Fraternally Mr. McAulay is connected with Yakima Lodge No. 24, F. & A. M., 
and with Rose Croix Chapter, in which he has attained the eighteenth degree of the 
Scottish Rite. He is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church and for 
many years has served as trustee and also as president of the board of trustees. He 
is also a trustee of the Young Men's Christian Association and takes an active inter- 
est in all of those uplifting influences which work for the benefit of the individual. 
In politics he is a democrat and has served as chairman of the democratic county 



102 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

central committee of Yakima county. For three years he served on the Yakima 
Board of Education. In June, 1917, he left Yakima for Brazil, South America, in 
behalf of a syndicate of local men who hold landed interests in that country, the 
immediate purpose for going being the investigation of titles and economic condi- 
tions. He traveled in several Brazilian states and came in contact with many of the 
representative men of that country. He arrived home in February, 1918. He belongs 
to the Washington State Bar Association and to the Yakima County Bar Associa- 
tion and his interests and activities are always directed along lines which tend to 
advance the material, intellectual, social and moral progress of the community. 



MATTHIAS F. STANTON. 

Death often removes from our midst those whom we can ill afford to lose — 
those whose life activity has been of such worth that it seems they should be spared 
for years to come. A deep feeling of regret swept throughout Yakima county when 
it was learned that Matthias F. Stanton had been called to the home beyond. He 
was a native of Indiana, his birth having occurred near Laporte on the 2d of Febru- 
ary. 1837, his parents being William and Anna (Fosher) Stanton. His father was 
born near Liberty, Indiana, May 5, 1807, and his mother's birth occurred in the 
same locality on the 14th of March, 1803. M. F. Stanton's father belonged to an old 
eastern family of English descent. 

Having arrived at years of maturity, Matthias F. Stanton married Felicia E. 
Whitlock, a native of Oregon and a daughter of Mitchell and Malvina (Engle) 
Whitlock, the former a native of Missouri, while the latter was born in Illinois. 
Mrs. Whitlock was a daughter of William Engle, who brought his family to the 
northwest in 1845, settling in Clackamas county, Oregon, as one of the earliest of its 
pioneer residents. In that state he remained till the time of his death, passing 
away in Marion county, Oregon. Mitchell Whitlock took up his abode in Marion 
county, Oregon, in 1845, having made the long and arduous journey across the 
plains, and he and his wife were married in Clackamas county. Their home, how- 
ever, was established just across the line in Marion county, and there they continued 
to reside until called to the home beyond, his death occurring in 1898, while his 
widow survived until 1906. 

Matthias F. Stanton and Felicia E. Whitlock were married in Oregon on the 
21st of October, 1869, and in the following month removed to Yakima county, 
where Mr. Stanton had previously taken up government land on the Ahtanuni in 
1868. They were among the first setttlers of the region. The work of development 
and improvement had scarcely been begun and there was little to indicate the 
rapid changes which were soon to occur and transform this into a populous and 
properous district. All mail and supplies had to come from The Dalles, Oregon, 
a distance of one hundred miles. Mr. Stanton engaged in freighting and other 
lines of work and also gave much time and attention to the development of his 
ranch, while later he engaged in the cattle business. His persistency of purpose 
and his unfaultering energy constituted the basic elements in his successful busi- 
ness career. He continued to reside in the Yakima valley until the time of his death, 
which occurred on the 29th of September, 1902. He was active as a supporter of 
the republican party in early days but later maintained an independent political 
attitude. He was a member of the Christian church, guiding his life according 
to its teachings, and his worth was widely acknowledged. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Matthias F. Stanton were born five children: Daisy, who 
died at the age of sixteen years; Anna M., at home; Matthias, who is a rancher on 
the Ahtanum; Percy, who is operating the home farm; and Esther, who became the 
wife of Frank W. Brown, a rancher on the Cowiche. Matthias Stanton is a native 
son of Yakima county, having been born on the Ahtanum, June 14, 1877. He 
married Florence E. Merritt, of Yakima county. 

Matthias F. Stanton is survived by his widow, a woman of chirming personality 
who has resided in the valley since early pioneer days and has therefore witnessed 




MATTHIAS F. STANTON 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 105 

the entire growth and development of this region. The name of Stanton has ever 
been an honored one in the district and is inseparably interwoven with events and 
business interests which have left an unmistakable impress upon the history of 
this region. 



H. A. BOOSE. 



H. A. Boose, cashier of the First National Bank of Sunnyside, was born in Penn- 
sylvania, March 6, 1873, a son of John R. and Mary (Turner) Boose, who are still 
living in the Keystone state, where the father is engaged in the insurance business. 
The son acquired a public school education there and, making good use of his oppor- 
tunities, qualified for teaching, which profession he took up in Pennsylvania. He 
devoted nine years to teaching, six years of which were passed in his native state 
and three in Illinois. He came to Washington in 1900, settling at Sunnyside, and 
here purchased wild land. He developed and improved a fine farm of forty acres, 
at which time there was no town here. In 1907, however, he became identified with 
the banking interests of Sunnyside but still makes his home upon the farm. 

The First National Bank of Sunnyside was organized in December, 1906, and 
opened the following March. The first officers were: Lee A. Johnson, president; 
C. M. Scott, cashier; R. C. McCredie, assistant cashier; and H. M. Lichty, vice 
president. In 1914 Mr. Johnson passed away. R. C. McCredie was president from 
1913 until 1915, when he was succeeded by F. J. Taylor. Otto K. Strizek was presi- 
dent from 1915 until September, 1917, when F. E. Langer succeeded to the position 
and served until April, 1918, when A. B. Snider became the president. Mr. Scott 
continued to act as cashier until 1911, when R. C. McCredie was elected to the posi- 
tion and continued to serve in that capacity until 1913. Mr. Boose then became the 
cashier and has since continued in the office, covering a period of five years. His 
close application, unflagging enterprise and uniform courtesy have been salient fea- 
tures in the continued success of the bank, which is capitalized for fifty thousand 
dollars. The company purchased the present corner and the building now occupied. 
Today the bank has a surplus of sixty-five hundred dollars, undivided profits of 
almost five thousand dollars, and its deposits amount to three hundred and sixty- 
eight thousand dollars. Mr. Boose is putting forth every possible efifort to aid in 
the upbuilding of the bank and make it what it is today — one of the strong financial 
institutions of this part of the state. 

On the 20th of October, 1898, Mr. Boose was married to Miss Nora A. Fike, a 
native of Illinois, and they have four children, Grace, Earl, Harold and Maurice, the 
last named being nine years of age. 

Mr. Boose's political allegiance is given to the republican party and while he has 
never been an office seeker he has served on the board of education and acted as its 
clerk. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Presbyterian church. 
He is a man of genuine personal worth as well as business ability, and his many 
sterling traits of character and his loyalty in citizenship have gained him an en- 
viable place in the regard of his fellow townsmen. 



LEON CHARRON. 



Leon Charron is the owner if a highly cultivated tract of land of fifty-five acres. 
He was one of the pioneers in the district in which he makes his home and originally 
had a ninety-five acre tract of land but sold forty acres of this for the townsite of 
Moxee, for the town had not yet sprung into existence at the time of his arrival in 
that locality. Mr. Charron is a native of Canada. He was born in Montreal, October 
5, 1852. a son of Louis and Aurelia Charron, both of whom passed away in Canada. 

Through the period of his boyhood and youth Leon Charron remained in his 
native country and was twenty-five years of age when in 1877 he took up his abode 
at Seattle, Washington. He spent two years on the western coast at that time 



106 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

but in 1879 returned to Montreal, where he lived until 1880, when he went to Crook- 
ston, Minnesota. For two decades he continued to make his home in that state and 
ill 190O he came to Yakima county. In the intervening period of eighteen years he 
has been engaged in farming. He located on the Moxee, where he purchased ninety- 
five acres of land, but afterward furthered the development and improvement of 
the district through the sale of forty acres for the townsite. He still owns town 
property and yet retains possession of fifty-five acres of his original tract, which is 
devoted to the production of hay, potatoes, sugar beets and other crops. This was 
all wild land when it came into his possession and it scarcely seemed that nature 
could so quickly respond to the labors of man, but irrigation and efifort have wrought 
most wonderful results, making this a highly productive region. 

In 1880 Mr. Charron was married to Miss Corinne Brussard, a native of Canada, 
who in her girlhood days became a resident of Minnesota, where she passed away 
in 1885. The children of that marriage are: Eli, who is engaged in ranching on the 
Moxee, where he has one hundred acres of land; Lucien, who is married and has 
three children, two daughters and a son, residing with him upon his ranch of forty 
acres on the Moxee: Leo, who rents his father's place; and Louis, deceased. In 
1889 Mr. Charron was again married, his second union being with Corrine Jubuc, 
who is also a native of Canada and went to Minnesota in her girlhood days. The 
children of this marriage are: Valentina, the wife of Albert Captistan, a rancher on 
the Moxee, by whom she has two daughters; Emma, the wife of Arthur Stmars, a 
ranchman, by whom she has one son; Maria, Ida and Rose, all at home; and Louis, 
who is in college. 

The parents are members of the Holy Rosary CathoHc church. Mr. Charron was 
one of its founders and has been most active in its work and generous in its support. 
Mr. Charron has long been closely identified with the development and progress of 
his section of the state and has made valuable contribution to the work of upbuild- 
ing and improvement. He is now the owner of one of the excellent ranch properties 
of the district, upon which he has a fine artesian well eight feet in diameter and 
thirteen hundred feet in depth, from which comes a flow of water yielding thirty- 
five hundred gallons per minute. This well furnishes Moxee with its water supply. 
The water is of the purest quality and the well is the finest in the valley. Mr. Charron 
has always displayed the most progressive spirit in the development of his property 
and at the same time has cooperated heartily in all plans and movements for the 
general good. 



ELLIOTT M. SLY. 



The Kennewick Produce Company's report for 1917, published in 1918, shows 
that this remarkable cooperant enterprise closed the year's business with over a half 
million dollars transactions. Its wonderful success must be ascribed in large measure 
to the business foresight, ability and experience of Elliott M. Sly, the manager. Mr. 
Sly is a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Lockport, September 3. 1869, 
and he is a son of Eugene R. and Emma J. (Spicer) Sly, the former a well known 
manufacturer. The parents now make their home in Michigan. In April. 1908, 
Elliott M. Sly came to Kennewick, where he followed farming for a year and then 
was elected to the position of manager of The Produce Company, which he has ever 
since ably filled. 

In June, 1896, Mr. Sly was united in marriage to Miss Ethelyn V. Seegmiller, of 
Michigan, and to them have been born three children: William, aged twenty-one, 
who is now serving his country in the United States marines; Randolph, aged sev- 
enteen; and Eugene, aged eleven. 

In his political aftiliations Mr. Sly is a republican, but the enormous amount of 
work which he does in connection with The Produce Company prevents him from 
taking an active part in political affairs although he is always interested in public 
matters, especially those pertaining to the growth and development of the great 
commercial institution of which he is executive. 

The Produce Company of Kennewick, Washington, was established in 1905 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 107 

by a number of agriculturists as the Kennewick Fruit Growers Association in order 
to facilitate the selling of fruit. The first officers were: O. L. Hanson, president; and 
\Y. E. Cruikshank, secretary and treasurer. In their business they specialized in 
the handling of strawberries and so continued for four years. In 1909 Elliott M. Sly 
was elected manager of the organization and they then began to handle all kinds of 
fruit and also started selling feed and poultry supplies. In April, 1910, the name was 
changed to the Kennewick Fruit & Produce Company and they built a warehouse in 
Kennewick having a floor space of seventy by one hundred feet. A great many of 
these improvements and expansions must be attributed to the unabating energy and 
executive ability of Mr. Sly. In 1912 they moved into the building which they now 
occupy and which they erected. It is well constructed and fully adapted to the 
purpose for which it was intended. At the end of 1910 the organization discontinued 
the fruit business and became entirely a mercantile institution and in 1915 the name 
was changed to The Produce Company. The main building of the company is fifty 
by one hundred and twenty feet and comprises a basement and two stories. There 
is also a warehouse seventy by one hundred feet, a machinery building fifty by one 
hundred and twenty-five feet and several other structures. Branches are maintained 
at Prosser, White BlufTs, Finley and Pasco. To further indicate the scope of their 
activities it may be mentioned that they are interested in the grocery, feed, seed, 
poultry supply, fruit growers supply, farm implement and a number of other lines of 
business. Between 1917 and 1918 the gross merchandise sales of the four coopera- 
tive stores amounted to five hundred and eleven thousand dollars, while the total for 
the year 1918, reached six hundred and forty thousand dollars. It may be of interest 
to many to here note that during this year the war tax item alone amounted to six 
thousand, six hundred dollars. Among the interesting items are the sums which 
the company paid the farmers for eggs, butter and other farm produce. These 
amounted to sixty-three thousand three hundred and sixty-two dollars and fifty-nine 
cents, not including hay in carload lots, which brings the total to seventy-five thous- 
and five hundred and sixty-two dollars and ten cents. One item among the farm 
produce is especially notable and should therefore be mentioned — that of eggs, 
which amounted to tWenty-nine thousand five hundred sixty-three dollars and six 
cents. In addition the company paid forty-four thousand and forty-one dollars and 
forty-two cents to local business firms for merchandise and equipment. 

The Produce Company publishes an interesting paper under the name of The 
Produce Company News, which is issued monthly and has a circulation of over three 
thousand. It is not only filled with news items of direct interest to the farmers in a 
vocational way but has many other interesting articles in its columns. The president 
of the company is C. C. Williams. F. H. Lincoln is treasurer and assistant manager, 
while E. M. Sly acts as secretary and manager, he being at the head of all the various 
departments of the organization. The continuous prosperity of the company is 
due to cooperation and Mr. Sly has been a great factor in keeping together the many 
heads who belong to the organization and coordinating influences and forces seem- 
ingly representing opposing points. Great credit is therefore due him and his un- 
tiring efforts are appreciated by all who know aught of his work. 



L. H. KUHN. 



L. H. Kuhn, cashier of the First National Bank of Zillah, was born in Shelby, 
Iowa, January I, 1883. His parents, Robert E. and Emma V. (Williams) Kuhn. 
removed to Emerson in 1883 and there the father organized the Emerson State Bank 
and also laid out the town. He continued to reside at that place until 1900, when 
he established his home at Lincoln, Nebraska, where his remaining days were passed 
and where his widow still resides. 

L. H. Kuhn completed his education at the Western Reserve Academy at Hud- 
son. Ohio, and for a few years was a resident of Lincoln, Nebraska. In 1905 he came 
to Tacoma and entered into active association with the National Bank of Com- 
merce, in which he spent two years in a clerical capacity. Subsequently he was with 
the Northwest Trust & Savings Bank of Seattle for a year and a half and in 1909 



108 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

he came to Zillah, where he has since been identified with the First National Bank, 
which was established in December. 1909. with J. D. Cornett as president, R. D. 
Herod as vice-president. J. H. Bartley, cashier, and L. H. Kuhn, assistant cashier. 
The last named succeeded to the cashiership on the 9th of January, 1910, and has 
since acted in that capacity, while H. H. Green has been vice president since 1911. The 
bank is capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars. It has had a successful exist- 
ence, the business steadily growing. The building occupied was built especially for 
the purpose used, the bank occupying the first floor, with office rooms above. 

In October. 1913, Mr. Kuhn was married to Miss Eva Munson, of Tacoma, and 
they have one child. Robert Munson. In his fraternal relations Mr. Kuhn is a Mason 
and an Elk. He belongs to Yakima Lodge No. 318, B. P. O. E., to Meridian Lodge 
No. 196, A. F. & A. M.. of Zillah, of which he is a past master, and that he has at- 
tained high rank in the order is indicated in the fact that he is one of the Nobles of 
Afifi Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Tacoma. His political endorsement is given to 
the republican party and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the 
Presbyterian church. He is actuated in all that he does by high principles and his 
many sterling traits of character have gained him the warm regard of all with whom 
he has been associated. Prompted by a progressive spirit, he gives earnest aid and 
support to all measures for the general good and his work for the city has been 
efficiently resultant. 



LORENZO D. ALLEN. 

Lorenzo D. Allen not only has valuable farming interests near Granger which 
require his constant attention but he has also served as supervisor of drainage dis- 
trict No. 27 since it was organized. A native of Marion county, Iowa, he was born 
July 19, 1871, and is a son of L. D. and Eliza (Mills) Allen, the former a native of 
Wales and the latter of Williams county. Ohio. When quite a young man the father 
arrived in New York but did not long remain in the eastern metropolis, removing to 
Iowa, of which state he became a pioneer farmer. There he devoted his efforts to 
agricultural pursuits until death claimed him. His wife passed away in Minnesota. 

Lorenzo D. Allen was reared in Marion county, Iowa, early becoming acquainted 
with agricultural labors and methods, and in the acquirement of his education he 
attended the schools near his father's farm. He remained at home until he was 
twenty-seven years of age, largely operating the farm, but at that time started out 
for himself as his mother had died. His enterprising spirit is evident from the 
fact that from the early age of seventeen he had been buying land, but he always 
made his home with his mother, his father having died when he was only twelve 
years of age. In the meantime the family had removed to Morrison county, Minne- 
sota, where Mr. ./Mien of this review became a successful farmer. Having heard 
many favorable reports in regard to the advantages which awaited one in the Yakima 
valley, he in 1902 decided to make the change and came to Yakima county, where he 
at first rented land for five years. He then was enabled to acquire title to forty acres 
of raw land, which was covered with sagebrush and located a mile north of Granger. 
I->om this wild tract he has developed a fine ranch which now yields him a comfort- 
able annual income. In 1906 he built a fine brick residence, the first in his part fii the 
county, which has since remained the family home. He has ever used progressive 
methods and new ideas in raising his produce, which largely consists of hay and 
corn, and he also operates a dairy and thus augments his income. He has specialized 
in corn for the last sixteen years, developing ".Mien's Pride," which is in great 
demand throughout the valley, and he has sold nine tons for seed. 

On the 17th of June. 1898, Mr. Allen was united in marriage to Mary Backosky, 
a native of Wisconsin, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Vensel Backosky, who re- 
moved to Minnesota in the '90s. To this union were born five children: George, Eva. 
Hazel. Mary and Henry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen are highly respected in their neighborhood and they have 
mar;y friends in and near Granger. In his political affiliation Mr. Allen is a repub- 
lican and the confidence and trust reposed in him by the public have found expres- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 111 

sion in his election to the position of supervisor of drainage district No. 27, in 
which official position he has served since the district was organized. There is 
great credit due him for what he has achieved in life, as he began his business 
career empty-handed and is now numbered among the prosperous agriculturists 
of Yakima county. 



EMIL MEESKE. 



Emil Meeske is a well known and prosperous orchardist of the Yakima valley, 
residing two and one-half miles west of the city of Yakima, where he owns a valu- 
able tract of land comprising ten acres. His birth occurred in Germany on the 30th 
of August, 1865, his parents being Louis and Lottie Meeske, who emigrated to the 
United States in 1880 and took up their abode in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where they 
remained for three years. On the expiration of that period they removed to Sauk 
Rapids, Minnesota, where the father passed away. The mother accompanied her son 
Emil on his removal to the northwest in 1901 and continued a resident of Yakima 
until called to her final rest. 

Emil Meeske spent the first fifteen years of his life in his native country and de- 
voted his youthful days to the acquirement of an education. In 1880 he came with 
his parents to America and preparatory to entering the business world he learned 
the carpenter's trade, which for many years he successfully followed in Minnesota. 
It was in 1901 that he decided to come to Washington, arriving in Yakima on the 
20th of June of that year, while in 1902 he purchased ten acres of land on Summit 
View which he planted to apples, pears and peaches. He conducted the orchard most 
successfully until disposing of it in 1912, and two years later he bought his present 
place of ten acres situated two and one-half miles west of Yakima, nine acres thereof 
being now planted to apples, pears, peaches and plums. Prosperity has attended his 
undertakings as a horticulturist and the value of his property is considerably en- 
hanced by a handsome new residence which he erected thereon. 

In 1897 Mr. Meeske was united in marriage to Miss Clara Wischnefski, of Minne- 
sota, by whom he has four children, namely: Marie. Louis, Lillie and Carl. All are 
still under the parental roof. Mr. Meeske gives his political allegiance to the demo- 
cratic party, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Lutheran 
church. His life has at all times been governed by high and honorable principles 
and his many friends recognize in him a man of genuine personal worth and many 
excellent traits of heart and mind. 



SIMON W. SHAFER. 

Simon W. Shafer, who since the fall of 1917 has cultivated forty acres of land 
four miles northwest of Sunnyside, was born in McLean countv, Illinois. June 12, 
1893, a son of W. I. and Betty (Thomas) Shafer. The maternal' grandfather of Mr. 
Shafer was Samuel Thomas, a veteran of the Civil war. The father is a native of 
Eureka, Illinois, and a son of Simon Shafer, who was born in Pennsylvania and re- 
moved to Illinois during the pioneer epoch in its history. In 1905 he came to the 
northwest, settling in Yakim^ county, after which he lived retired in Sunnyside until 
his demise. His son, W. I. Shafer, became a farmer in Illinois and there followed 
agricultural pursuits until the spring of 1908. when he brought his family to Yakima 
county and purchased forty acres of land three and a half miles northwest of Sunny- 
side, whereon he resided until 1916. He then sold that property and bought forty 
acres under the Outlook pumping plant. It was then a tract of wild land but he has 
brought it all under a high state of cultivation, has built a good home thereon and 
added many other modern improvements, together with all the equipment of the 
model farm of the twentieth century. His wife was born in Indiana and they are 
numbered among the highly esteemed residents of the community in which they 
make their home. 



112 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Their son, Simon \\". Shafer. acquired a public school education and farmed with 
his father until he reached the age of twenty years, when he started out upon his 
business career by renting land, which he continued to cultivate for two years. Dur- 
ing that period he carefully saved his earnings until his industry and economy had 
brought him sufficient capital to enable him to purchase forty acres four miles north- 
west of Sunnyside, of which he became the owner in the fall of 1917. During the 
intervening period of two years he has engaged in the raising of hay, corn, potatoes 
and wheat upon his place and also conducts a dairy business. 

On the 10th of January, 1917, Mr. Shafer was married to Miss Joyce Clapsaddle, 
who was born in LaSalle county,' Illinois, a daughter of Frank J. and Etta (Car- 
penter) Clapsaddle, the former a native of Dekalb county, Illinois, while the latter 
was born in LaSalle county. Her father was a son of Andrew Clapsaddle, a native of 
Herkimer county, Xew York, who became a resident of Illinois when it was a frontier 
state, there taking up government land upon which not a furrow had been turned 
nor an improvement made. He at once began to develop the property and thus con- 
tributed to the progress of the section of the state in which he lived. The maternal 
grandfather of Mrs. Shafer was Ethan Carpenter, who was born in Westchester 
county, New York, and also became a resident of Illinois in pioneer times. The 
parents of Mrs. Shafer came to Yakima county in 1910 and purchased sixty acres of 
land four and a half miles northwest of Sunnyside. There the father carried on 
farming until the spring of 1918 but now makes his home in the city. He made a 
specialty of raising fine seed corn in addition to carrying on the work of general 
farming. Mr. and Mrs. Shafer have become parents of a daughter, Barbara Delle, 
born December 2, 1917. Both are members of the Christian church and are highly 
esteemed in the community where they make their home. They are young people 
of sterling worth and well merit the high regard which is uniformly accorded them. 



HEXRY HUNTINGTON LOMBARD. 

Henry Huntington Lombard is a well known real estate dealer and capitalist of 
Yakima. Real estate activty in the west has not only included the purchase and 
sale of property and the promotion of realty transfers for others but has included 
as well the development of large tracts of land, adding greatly to the prosperity of 
various regions. Henry Huntington Lombard is the senior partner in the firm of 
Lombard & Horsley, a firm that was established in 1889 and which has developed 
its interests until it has won a place among the foremost real estate dealers of the 
Yakima valley. The width of the continent separates Mr. Lombard from his birth- 
place, for he is a native of New Bedford, Massachusetts. He was born February 2, 
1865, a son of Henry H. and Eunice K. Lombard. The ancestral line is traced back 
to Thomas Lombard, who arrived at Cape Cod. Massachusetts, in 1623. At the time 
of the Revolutionary war I Colonel Richard Lombard responded to the cause of the 
colonists and aided in winning American independence. Rev. Solomon Lombard, a 
Congregational minister, removed to Gorham, Maine, and became the first repre- 
sentative of the ministry in that state. He was the founder of the branch of the 
family from which Henry Huntington Lombard is descended. Solomon Lombard 
became a prominent judge in the colony. For generations the family was repre- 
sented in New England, but in 1869 Henry H. and Eunice K. Lombard removed to 
Iowa and it was in the public schools of that state their son, Henry H., acquired his 
education. He was a lad of but four years at the time of the removal to the west 
and his boyhood and youth were therefore largely passed in Iowa. In 1887, when 
twenty-two years of age, he went to Topeka, Kansas, and for two years was em- 
ployed by the Santa Fe Railroad Company. In March, 1889, he arrived in Yakima 
and it was in the same year that he entered into partnership with 'Frank Horsley, 
organizing the firm of Lombard & Horsley. They engaged in the furniture business, 
buying out the establishment of A. H. Reynolds & Company, and were active in that 
line until 1909, when they sold out. In 1904 they became actively interested in de- 
velopment work in the construction of the Union Gap ditch and organized the Union 
Gap Irrigation Company, which purchased the Fowler ditch and developed the 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 113 

Parker Heights district, which they sold in 1909 after expending two hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars on improvements. They developed over five hundred acres of 
fruit land and still farm more than four hundred acres of this. They have since 
sold and developed large tracts of land throughout the district and now have the 
Beulah tract. They are conducting a general investment and developing business 
and the interests of Mr. Lombard have reached extensive and gratifying proportions. 
He has seen the possibility for work along this line and has put forth every effort 
in his power to promote the growth and settlement of the state through the utiliza- 
tion of its natural resources. Energetic and far-sighted in business, he has carried 
forward his interests to successful completion and though he started out in life 
empty-handed, he has made for himself a place among the capitalists of the Yakima 
valley. 

On the 26th of June, 1906. Mr. Lombard was married to Miss Aimee Porter, of 
Roseland, Washington, and their children are George Porter, Henry H., Creede 
Wilson, Eunice, Janet and Richard. 

Fraternally Mr. Lombard is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks and he has membership in the Commercial Club. In politics he is a repub- 
lican and in 1908 he served as mayor of Yakima, giving to the city a businesslike and 
progressive administration, and at all times he has stood for progress, development 
and improvement in this section of the state and has contributed much to its growth. 



E. W. AND H. C. CRANDALL. 

E. W. and H. C. Crandall are owners of twenty acres on Naches Heights which 
they are carefully cultivating and bringing to a high state of fertility. The brothers 
are representatives of old New England families. E. W. Crandall was born in Dane 
county, Wisconsin, November 28, 1863, a son of Silas H. and Harriett N. (Stillman) 
Crandall. The father's birth occurred in Montville, Connecticut, while the mother 
was born in Allegany county, New York. The former was a son of H. B. Crandall, 
who was born at Waterford, Connecticut, in 1798, and in 1838 removed to Rock 
county. Wisconsin. There he took up government land where Milton Junction now 
stands and continued to reside thereon to the time of his death. The house which 
stood upon the old homestead is still owned by his daughter. The maternal grand- 
father of the Crandall brothers was John C. Stillman, of New York, who went to 
Rock county, Wisconsin, in the fall of 1839 and he, too, cast in his lot with the ear- 
liest settlers, aiding in reclaiming a wild and undeveloped region for the purposes of 
civilization. The parents of E. W. and H. C. Crandall were married in Wisconsin and 
began their domestic life upon a farm in that state, where they continued to reside 
until called to their final rest, occupying the old homestead property throughout the 
entire period. They were among the highly respected residents of that community, 
closely associated with its agricultural development. 

E. W. Crandall. spending his youthful days under the parental roof, acquired a 
public school education and was early trained to the work of the fields, becoming 
familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. He pur- 
chased land in North Dakota but never removed to that state and continued in active 
identification with the farming interests of Wisconsin until 1908, when he came to 
Yakima county, where he rented land for seven years. Subsequently he spent one 
year on the Parker Bottoms and for six years was in the employ of L. O. Meigs. In 
the fall of 1917 he purchased twenty acres of land on Naches Heights and now has 
nine acres in apples, while the balance is plow land. He has built a house upon this 
place and is rapidly transforming it into one of the most valuable and highly produc- 
tive ranch properties of the district. 

H. C. Crandall, the younger brother, was born in Rock county. Wisconsin, May 
20. 1868. The brothers have always been associated in their farming interests and 
have won a very creditable position among the representative agriculturists of the 
region in which they live. They have never married and they always looked after 
their mother, who for twenty years was an invalid. Their sister Minnie acts as their 
housekeeper, managing household affairs while the brothers concentrate their efforts 



114 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

and attention upon the development of the farm. In their political views they are 
republicans and their aid and influence is given to all plans and measures for the 
general good. They have reached a very creditable position as ranchmen of the dis- 
trict and what they have undertaken they have accomplished. They follow progres- 
sive methods in their farm work and their energy and enterprise are producing re- 
sults greatly to be desired. 



WILLIAM J. TAYLOR. 

No history of the Kittitas valley would be complete without extended reference 
to William J. Taylor, who has lived in this section from pioneer times and whose 
rame is connected with many of the early events which have shaped the annals of 
this region. Mr. Taylor was born in Marion county, Oregon, September 28, 1852, a 
son of Melville and Cyrena (McDonald) Taylor, both of whom were natives of Mis- 
souri. The father was a son of John Taylor, a cousin of Zachary Taylor, at one time 
president of the United States. The grandfather was born in Kentucky and became 
a pioneer settler of Indiana, whence he afterward removed to Missouri. In 1847 he 
crossed the plains, making his way to Marion county, Oregon. He traveled with 
wagon and ox team, following the old-time trail and meeting with many hardships 
and difficult experiences while en route. His son William had crossed the plains in 
1845 with Dan Waldo and they took up government land side by side in Marion 
county. The grandfather secured a donation claim and at once began the develop- 
ment and improvement of the place, which he continued to successfully farm to the 
time of his death. He had a family of six sons and one daughter, all of w^hom be- 
came residents of Oregon. 

Melville Taylor, father of William J. Taylor, was a charter member of the 
Marion county lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, He, too, was asso- 
ciated with the early pioneer development and progress of Marion county and in 
later life he removed to Lane county, Oregon, where he continued to devote his at- 
tention to general agricultural pursuits until he passed away in .^.ugust. 1914, when he 
had reached the venerable age of eighty-six years. His wife started across the 
plains from Missouri with her parents, who were accompanied by their seven chil- 
dren, and all died while en route save two of the daughters and one son, being vic- 
tims of the cholera. This was in the year 1849. Mrs. Taylor and the other two chil- 
dren continued on their way to Oregon, where the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Taylor 
was afterward celebrated. Mrs. Taylor passed away on the 8th of November, 1894, 
at the age of sixty-one years, ten months and twenty-five days. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Melville Taylor were born seven children, of whom William J. is the eldest. The 
others are: James Sylvester, who is engaged in ranching on the Hood river in Ore- 
gon; Cordelia, the widow of James Gore and a resident of Vancouver, B. C; Joseph, 
a dentist who practices his profession in Vancouver, Washington: Clarence, who is 
ranching in Lane county, Oregon: Frank, who owns and operates a ranch near 
Corvallis, Oregon; and Elvin, who is living on the old homestead. 

William J. Taylor acquired a public school education in one of the little pioneer 
temples of learning on the western frontier. The building was constructed of logs 
and was furnished after the primitive manner of the times. He had to walk three 
miles to this school. He was fourteen years of age when he started out in the busi- 
ness world on his own account, going to Seattle, Washington, which at that time 
contained only two stores. In the fall of 1870 he made his way to Yakima county, 
traveling on horseback from Seattle and bringing with him the first negro that was 
ever seen in Yakima county. He bore the name of Johnson and he took up a ranch 
near where Ellensburg now stands. 

At the time of his arrival here William J. Taylor had a cash capital of but twenty 
dollars. With all of the early events which have left their impress upon the history 
of Ellensburg and the Kittitas valley he was closely associated, either as a witness 
or as an active participant therein. He assisted in building the second store in El- 
lensburg in the spring of 1872. He also aided in building the first house in the Kitti- 
tas valley constructed of lumber, it standing on the old Smith ranch. He assisted in 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 115 

whipsawing the lumber for the first lumber floor in the valley. It was rough lumber 
and they had a dance upon it and danced it smooth. After coming to this district 
Mr. Taylor worked lor three years on the Bull ranch and for three years on the 
Smith ranch. He then succeeded in getting some horses and cattle of his own and 
through all the intervening period has been connected with the live stock business. 
He purchased his first ranch in 1877 but afterward traded the property for a horse 
and saddle. About the same time he bought the right to another tract of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres four and a half miles northeast of Ellensburg, which he owned 
until the '90s and then sold. 

On the 16th of January, 1877, Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to Mary Grewell, 
a native of Chariton, Iowa, and a daughter of Thomas and Melinda (Dixon) Grewell, 
the former a native of Ohio, while the latter was born in Illinois. They became pio- 
neer settlers of Iowa and after living there for some time removed to the northwest 
in 1863, making the journey with ox teams across the country to Vancouver, Wash- 
ington. The father, however, died while en route. The mother afterward married 
again and in 1873 accompanied her second husband to Ellensburg, where they en- 
gaged in ranching southeast of the city. To Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have been born 
three children: Archie, who died at the age of three years; Minnie, the wife of Pete 
Mitchell, residing in Ellensburg; and Frank, who is filling the office of deputy sheriff 
of Kittitas county. He married Emma Abraham and has three children. Mrs. Taylor 
taught the first school in Denmark, then Yakima, now Kittitas county, in 1876-77. 

In his political views Mr. Taylor has always been a stalwart democrat but not 
an office seeker. He has done much active work in behalf of the welfare and pro- 
gress of the county, however, as a private citizen and has contributed in substantial 
measure to the upbuilding of the section in which he lives. He took the first bunch 
of horses across the Cascades to Seattle for sale and from early days to the present 
time has been a prominent figure in connection with the stock raising interests of the 
Kittitas valley. His business afTairs have been wisely and carefully conducted and 
his sound judgment is manifest in the success which has come to him. He has indeed 
witnessed many changes during the period of his residence here. The district was 
wild and undeveloped at the time of his arrival. The trees stood in their primeval 
strength and the open lands were covered with the native grasses and brush. There 
was little to indicate that a wonderful transformation would soon be wrought. Mr. 
Taylor and other pioneer settlers, however, recognized the advantages of the region 
and. acting upon the dictates of their faith and judgment, they settled here and have 
lived to see this district take its place with the most populous and prosperous dis- 
tricts of the state. They certainly deserve much credit for what they have accom- 
plished in the way of general improvement and development and the names of Mr. 
and Mrs. William J. Taylor are written high on the list of honored pioneers. 



THOMAS H. HOWAY. 

Thomas H. Howay, successfully conducting a hardware and furniture business 
in Grandview, was born in St. Clair county, Michigan, June 26, 1868, a son of Henry 
and Elizabeth Howay, who were natives of Canada. They became pioneer settlers 
of Michigan, where the father engaged in business as a contractor and builder. Both 
he and his wife have passed away. 

Thomas H. Howay pursued a high school education at Yale, Michigan, and 
started in the business world as a clerk in a hardware store before his schooldays 
were over. He continued to clerk and work for others for some time and later con- 
ducted business on his own account at Memphis, Michigan. Subsequently he spent 
two years in the employ of T. B. Rail Company at Detroit, Michigan, and in 1897 
he came to Washington, making his way to Seattle, where he secured a position with 
the Seattle Hardware Company." After clerking there for two years he represented 
the house upon the road as a traveling salesman throughout the northwest for a 
period of eleven years and for six years more was manager of the sporting goods 
department. In May, 1910, he came to Grandview, where he bought out A. G. Holli- 
day, the first hardware merchant of the town. He now occupies a building fifty by 
one hundred and fifty feet and carries an extensive line of shelf and heavy hardware, 



116 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

furniture and implements. The business has reached substantial proportions, due to 
the enterprising methods and thorough reliability of the owner. 

In 1900 Mr. Howay was married to Miss Margaret Cavan, who was born in Paris, 
Ontario, a daughter of Michael and Agnes (Torrance) Cavan, both of whom have 
now passed away. The children of this marriage are: Thomas Cavan, who is at- 
tending the Moran School for Boys; Dorothy, a high school pupil; and John Henry, 
eleven years of age, who is a most enterprising and energetic boy. He has earned the 
money to buy four fifty-dollar Liberty Bonds and has thirty dollars in War Savings 
Stamps. In order to do this he worked in a printing office, picked apples, turned off 
the lights in the town and in fact did anything that would enable him to turn an 
honest penny. It is certainly a splendid record for a boy of his years. 

Mr. Howay belongs to the United Commercial Travelers and is a member of the 
Presbyterian church. In politics he is a Roosevelt republican and is a public-spirited 
and progressive citizen, interested in all that has to do with the welfare, upbuilding 
and progress of community, commonwealth and country. In business he is a self- 
made man and a successful merchant, one who is contributing in substantial meas- 
ure to the commercial development of his adopted town. 



REV. CONRAD BRUSTEN. 

Conrad Brusten, S. J., pastor of St. Joseph's Catholic church of Yakima, was 
born in Germany in 1863 and came to the United States in 1889, when a young man 
of twenty-six years. He afterward attended St. Louis University and was or- 
dained to the priesthood in St. Louis, Missouri, on the 27th of June, 1900. He sub- 
sequently taught philosophy in Spokane for a year and in 1902 and 1903 was super- 
ior at St. Regis Mission, at Colville, Washington. In 1903 and 1904 he was again 
in St. Louis, where he pursued postgraduate studies, and from August until De- 
cember, 1904, he was located in Seattle. On the 11th of the latter montli he came 
to Yakima, being assigned to the pastorate of St. Joseph's church, of which he 
has since had charge. 

This church grew out of the Old Mission. It was established on the Ahtanum 
in 1871. but a new church was organized in Yakima City in 1878 and in 1885 was 
removed to North Yakima. It is today the oldest church of the Yakima valley. 
The present house of worship was completed in December, 1905, and in 1910 the 
school building was erected. The boys' school gives instruction from the fifth 
grade work up to the high school and has an attendance of eighty-five. St. Joseph's 
Academy was established as an Indian school in 1887, but now has all white pupils 
to the number of three hundred. St. Elizabeth's Hospital, also an auxiliary of the 
church, was established in 1889 and in 1913 a splendid new hospital building was 
erected, equipped with everything necessary for the conduct of the most advanced 
surgical work. St. Joseph's parish numbers fourteen hundred communicants. The 
work of the church has been thoroughly organized and under the direction of 
Father Brusten has been carried steadily forward. His labors have indeed proven a 
power in the development of Catholic interests in the Yakima valley. 



FRANK HORSLEY. 



Frank Horsley is a member of the firm of Lombard & Horsley, in which con- 
nection he has taken most active and helpful part in promoting development work in 
the Yakima valley. He was born in Muscatine county, Iowa, April 16. 1856, and is 
a son of William and Laura (McGill) Horsley. The mother died in Iowa and the 
father afterward came to Yakima, while his last days were spent in California, where 
he passed away at the age of ninety-five years. He was born in England and came 
to the United States when a youth of eleven. His life was devoted to farming and 
thus he provided for his family. 

Frank Horsley is indebted to the public school system of Iowa for the educa- 




REV. COXRAD BRUSTEN 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY lig^ 

tional opportunities which he enjoyed, and in his youth and young manhood he gave 
his attention to farm work, while later he took up the fruit and produce commission 
business in Des Moines, Iowa, gaining considerable knowledge of horticultural inter- 
ests in this way. In July, 1889, he arrived in Yakima and entered into partnership 
with H. H. Lombard in organizing the firm of Lombard & Horsley. They purchased 
an established furniture business and continued active in that line for a number of 
years but before closing out their interests in that connection they turned their 
attention to the real estate business and development work. Through all the inter- 
vening period they have been active in that field and have developed a large tract 
of fruit land and have thus contributed in great degree to the material growth and 
improvement of the valley. Their efforts have been conducted along most progres- 
sive lines and scientific methods have been employed in the cultivation and propaga- 
tion of their orchards. Their work has been a strong element in promoting the value 
of properties in this locality and as the result of their labors they have won a sub- 
stantial measure of success. 

In 1887 Mr. Horsley was united in marriage to Miss Angenette Lombard, a sis- 
ter of his partner, H. H. Lombard. She died on the 27th of June, 1915, and Mr. 
Horsley afterward wedded her sister, Sue M. Lombard, on the 25th of October, 1917. 
The children of the first marriage are; William H., now residing in Seattle; and 
Frank Sears, sixteen years of age. 

Mr. Horsley is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and also 
with the Knights of Pythias lodge, in which he has filled all of the chairs. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and he served for four years as 
county commissioner, making an excellent record in the office. He is now a member 
of the school board and he stands at all times for progress and improvement in pub- 
lic affairs, to which end he is a member of the Commercial Club, actively cooperating 
in all well defined plans and measures for the general good. He has gained a wide 
acquaintance during the long period of his residence in Yakima, covering almost 
thirty years, and throughout the entire period the integrity of his business methods 
has never been questioned, while his enterprise and insight are recognized as salient 
features in the growth and upbuilding of this section of the state. All who know 
him speak of him in terms of warm regard both as a business man and citizen and his 
record at all times measures up to high standards. 



FRANK J. TAYLOR. 



Frank J. Taylor, of Sunnyside, Washington, is one of those men who by their 
labors have greatly contributed toward the development of the Yakima valley along 
various lines. He still owns a fine farm, which is run by his son, and also is prom- 
inently connected with banking interests, but most of his time is devoted to the man- 
«^ement of the local telephone company. A native of Iowa, he was born in Fayette, 
October 5, 1866, a son of Milton M. and Hessie M. (Crawford) Taylor, both of whom 
have passed away, the former in Iowa, while the latter's death occurred in Sunnyside, 
Washington. They were among the honored pioneer people of their neighborhood 
in Iowa and the father filled a pulpit of the United Brethren church. 

Frank J. Taylor was reared amid the influences of a refined home and under 
the guidance of good Christian parents. After having absorbed an ordinary school 
education he attended a business college in Des Moines, Iowa, and then took up the 
occupation of farming, in which he was successfully engaged in his native state 
"until 1904. The far west, however, had attractions for him and he therefore in 1904, 
severed home ties and removed to the Yakima valley, buying sixty acres of land 
i:ear Sunnyside, which under his direction has been brought to a high state of cul- 
tivation. The property is now very valuable, as all modern improvements have been 
instituted and the latest facilities in machinery have been installed thereon. The 
buildings are in excellent condition and everything about the place shows the pro- 
gressive methods which Mr. Taylor has always followed. The farm is devoted to 
various lines of agriculture and is now under the management of his son, Fred' 
Dewey. 



120 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

For many years Frank J. Taylor has been connected with the local banking busi- 
ness, being a director of the First National Bank of Sunnyside. He served as presi- 
dent for one year and is now holding the position of vice-president, his business 
ability and sound judgment having been of great importance in the growth of the 
institution. In 1905 he was one of the main factors in the organization of the Farm- 
ers Independent Telephone Company, which in 1907 was incorporated as the Sunny- 
side Telephone Company. On July 1, 1917, the City Telephone Company was or- 
ganized, which is owned by the Valley Telephone Company and the Sunnyside Tele- 
phone Company. Mr. Taylor is manager of both the Sunnyside Telephone Company 
and the City Telephone Company and the excellent service which is furnished by 
these institutions is largely due to the unremitting attention which he gives to these 
business interests. His entire time is taken up with his duties in this connection and 
he has received the warm commendation of the people of the neighborhood on ac- 
count of the excellent service furnished. 

On the 2d of April, 1890, Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss Addie 
Wilbur, also a native of Iowa, and to this union two children were born: Blanche, 
now the wife of Harold Elliott and they reside on their ranch near Sunnyside; and 
Fred Dewey, born in 1898, who is now in full charge of his father's farm. 

Mr. Taylor has always taken a most laudable part in all movements undertaken 
in the interests of his community as a member of the Sunnyside Commercial Club. 
Fraternally he belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and his religious be- 
lief is that of the Methodist church. In his political views he is independent, giving 
his support to those candidates whom he regards most worthy of office regardless 
of party affiliation. He has many friends in the valley, all of whom speak of him in 
terms of the highest admiration and respect, recognizing in him a successful business 
man of the highest qualities of character. 



WILLIAM THRUSH. 



The efiforts of William Thrush along orcharding and general agriculture in the 
Yakima valley have been exceedingly satisfactory and he now owns valuable prop- 
erty near Granger, six acres of whicl^ are in orchard, while the rest is devoted to 
hay, corn and potatoes. He also conducts a small dairy and derives from this a 
gratifying addition to his income. A native of Nebraska, he was born in Dodge 
county, June 8, 1861, and is a son of Charles and Martha (Reese) Thrush, the former 
a native' of England and the latter of Wales. Shortly after their marriage which 
was performed in England, they Came to the United States and a few years later, 
in 18.S6, went to Omaha, Nebraska, which city at that time consisted of two log 
shanties. For one year they remained in the wilderness on the Missouri but subse- 
quently they removed to Florence, Nebraska, where Charles Thrush built the first 
house. In 1858 they proceeded on their westward course, starting for Salt Lake City, 
Utah, but stopped at Genoa, Nebraska, where they remained for a short time. They 
then went to Dodge county of which they became pioneers, as in those days Indians 
and buffaloes were still plentiful. There the father not only became a promment 
rancher but also prospered in the freighting business. He took up a homestead and 
in addition bought land from the Union Pacific Railway Company, to the cultiva- 
tion of which property he devoted the remainder of his days, both he and his wife 
dying in that county. Mr. Thrush was a minister in the Church of Latter-day Saints 
but never devoted his whole time to that work. 

William Thrush of this review grew up on his father's place in Dodge county, 
Nebraska, amid the conditions of the western frontier. Many were the privations 
which the family underwent but in the school of hardship he developed a strong and 
good character. He early became acquainted with agricultural methods and in the 
acquirement of his education attended the public schools of his neighborhood, con- 
tinuing with his father until he was twenty-five years of age. At that time he 
rented land and engaged in its cultivation until he came to the Yakima valley in 
1903, having heard manv favorable reports in regard to this district. He acquired 
title to twenty acres of land two miles north of Granger, which was seeded to alfalfa. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 121 

He has since greatly developed this property, has erected thereon a comfortable resi- 
dence and has given considerable attention to fruit raising, now having a profitable 
orchard of six acres, while the remainder of his land is devoted to hay, corn and 
potatoes. Live stock interests are also represented in his interests, as he conducts 
a small dairy. 

On the 26th of March, 1902, Mr. Thrush was married to Miss Harriet Moore, a 
native of Nebraska and a daughter of J. P. and Ida L. (Fox) Moore, natives of 
Indiana, who during pioneer days settled in Nebraska. Mrs. Moore has passed away 
but her husband survives and is still a resident of that state. To Mr. and Mrs. Trush 
have been born a son and a daughter: William P., and Hazel June, who are attending 
high school. The latter is quite proficient in music and with her talent often delights 
the friends of the family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thrush have made many friends since coming to Granger and all 
who know them speak highly of them. He has given his aid and co-operation to 
measures of public importance which he considers worth while and is in every way 
a public-spirited citizen and a valuable addition to his district. In politics he is in- 
dependent, following his own judgment rather than party lines. He is a valued mem- 
ber of the Modern Woodmen of America. 



L. O. MEIGS. 



L. O. Meigs, a well known attorney of Yakima, was born on Grand Manan 
island. Canada. April 28, 1879, a son of Lorenzo E. and Mary E. (Wormell) Meigs. 
The father was a millwright and shipbuilder, who in the '60s removed to California 
but afterward returned to Canada, although he later again became a resident of Cali- 
fornia and once more went to Canada. In 1890 he made his way to the Palouse coun- 
try of Washington. 

L. O. Meigs acquired a public school education in Canada and in Washington 
and afterward attended the State College of Washington, while in 1902 he completed 
a law cpurse in the L^niversity of Michigan at Ann Arbor. He then located in Yakima 
in the same year and has since followed .his profession in this city. For a time he 
practiced as a member of the firm of McAulay & Meigs. They have been joined by a 
third partner, forming the present firm of Preble, McAulay & Meigs. 

In 1902 Mr. Meigs was married to Miss Laura M. Crawford, a daughter of P. L. 
Crawford, of Oakesdale, Washington. The children of this marriage are: Doris, 
eleven years of age: and Robert C, aged Five. 

Fraternally Mr. Meigs is widely known as an exemplary representative of Ma- 
sonry. He has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and he is now 
venerable master of Yakima Lodge of Perfection No. 11, and is orator of the Rose 
Croix. He is also a past exalted ruler and life member of Elks Lodge No. SIS, and ' 
is very prominent in both organizations. He also belongs to the Modern Woodmen 
of America. In politics he is a recognized leader in the ranks of the republican party 
and was speaker of the house of representatives in the regular and special sessions 
of 1909, having been elected to represent his district in the general assembly. He has 
served for a term as a member of the city council of Yakima and has occupied the 
position of city attorney for three years. While the practice of law has been his 
real life work, he has become heavily interested in fruit lands and has given much 
attention in recent years to the propagation of apple orchards, realizing the possi- 
bilities for the cultivation of that fruit in this state. 



LE ROY W. TAYLOR. 

Le Roy W. Taylor, who since 1910 has been the cashier of the First National 
Bank of Wapato, was born in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, on the 6th of December, 1872, 
a son of M. M. and Ella H. (Hare) Taylor, who were pioneer settlers of that state. 
The father engaged in the milling business and in 1884 left Iowa for the northwest, 

(6) 



122 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

making Tacoma, Washington, his destination. In later years he became prominently 
identified with financial interests in this state and was president of the Washington 
National Bank of Tacoma. In 1898 the family went to Alaska and the father con- 
ducted a store in the Atlin district, there remaining until 1903. In that year lemoval 
was made to Connell, Washington, where M. M. Taylor opened the Franklin County 
Bank. He was president of this institution, which was later called the Connell Na- 
tional Bank, and after some^ time was sold to the Union Securities Company. Mr. 
Taylor figured prominently for many years as a banker of the northwest but is now 
living retired in Yakima. His wife passed away in December, 1916. 

L. W. Taylor supplemented his public school education, acquired in Tacoma, by 
further study in Washington College. He was with his father in ."Maska and after- 
ward in the bank at Tacoma and thus received thorough business training and ex- 
perience. He afterward became cashier of the Connell National Bank. His father 
owned the townsite of Connell and established the town. It was in October, 1909, 
that Mr. Taylor of this review came to Wapato as assistant cashier of the Firsts 
National Bank and served in that capacity until 1910, when he was elected to his pres- 
ent position. As the bank's cashier he has proved a most capable, courteous and 
obliging official. He is always ready to extend credit whenever it will not endanger 
the interests of depositors, for he has recognized that the bank is the most worthy of 
credit which most carefully safeguards the interests of its depositors. 

On the 28th of June, 1905, Mr. Taylor was married to Miss May Inman, of Con- 
nell, Washington, and they have made many friends during the period of their resi- 
dence in Wapato. Mr. Taylor is a member of Wapato Lodge No. 171, A. F. & A. M., 
of which he is a past master. He also belongs to Yakima Lodge No. 318, B. P. O. E. 
and is treasurer of the Wapato Commercial Club. His political endorsement is 
given to the republican party and he is a recognized leader in its local ranks. He is 
now serving for the second term as mayor of Wapato and for several years was a 
member of the city council, having at all times exercised his official prerogatives 
in support of valuable plans and measures for the general good. His religious faith 
is that of the Episcopal church. He is widely and favorably known both as a busi- 
ness man and citizen, and his cooperation has been of the greatest value and worth 
in the upbuilding of the city along financial and civic lines. In addition to his other 
interests he has a fine fruit and stock farm on the Columbia river and his invest- 
ments have been most judiciously and profitably made. 



FRED T. HOFMANN. 

Fred T. Hofmann, who is filling the position of county clerk of Kittitas county 
and makes his home in EUensburg, has long been identified with public service here 
and his record is one over which there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil, 
for he has always been most loyal to the interests entrusted to his care. He was born 
in Portage, Columbia county, Wisconsin, January 15, 1881, a son of Fred F. and 
Bertha Frieda Hofmann, both of whom were natives of Columbia county, where they 
were reared and married. The father is now engaged in the hotel business at Wa- 
basha, Minnesota, where he has resided for some time. 

Fred T. Hofmann pursued his early education in the public schools of La Crosse, 
Wisconsin, and was afterward graduated from the high school at Wabasha, Minne- 
sota. He then entered the hotel business there and was actively engaged along that 
line until July, 1905. Subsequently he became connected with the National Cash 
Register Company as salesman, traveling in Washington, and he thus represented 
that corporation until 1907. He came to EUensburg in .August, 1908, and was em- 
ployed by the dining car department of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company as 
manager of the eating house at this place for a year. In 1909 he was appointed to 
the position of deputy county auditor and acted in that capacity for two terms. He 
was next elected city clerk of EUensburg and occupied the office from January, 1913, 
until January, 1915, or for two terms, and later was elected county clerk, in which 
position he is now serving for the second term. His record in office is a most cred- 
itable one and his loyalty to duty is one of his marked characteristics. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 123 

On the 23d of April, 1908, Mr. Hofmann was united in marriage to Miss May- 
belle A. Dorrance, of Swanville, Minnesota, a daughter of John A. and Cynthia E. 
Dorrance. The children of this marriage are Helen Marion, Dorothy Blanche and 
Elsbeth Maybelle. 

Mr. Hofmann is well known in fraternal circles. He belongs to the Elks lodge 
No. 1102 at Ellensburg, also to Wapahasa Lodge, No. 14. A. F. & A. M., and to the 
Royal Arch Chapter. Both he and his wife are members of the Congregational 
church of Lake City. Minnesota, and both are stanch supporters of the republican 
party. Mr. Hofmann served as county clerk and ex-officio clerk of the superior 
court. At the beginning of the war he volunteered for service in France, but was 
rejected on account of defective hearing. He was afterward accepted by the Y. M. 
C. A., but was not called for active service. As her husband had enlisted, and having 
three children to take care of, Mrs. Hofmann then made the run for county clerk, 
and was elected by the largest majority of any candidate having opposition. 
Both are very prominent in musical circles and are deeply interested in the art. 
Mr. Hofmann has conducted what is known as Hofniann's Orchestra for several 
years and in which he plays the violin. His wife is a fine pianist and also a vocal- 
ist of more than ordinary ability. They are very protninently and favorably known 
in Ellensburg, occupying an enviable position in social circles. 



EDWIN H. KIELSMEIER. 

Comparatively speaking Edwin H. Kielsmeier is yet a young man, but has 
already become one of the prosperous horticulturists of the Zillah district in the 
Yakima valley. He was born in Manitowoc. Wisconsin, January 5, 1883, and is a 
son of Henry and Anna (Gaterman) Kielsmeier, pioneer farmers of Wisconsin. 
In 1890 the family removed to Denver, Colorado, and there they remained for ten 
years, the father being connected with railroad work as car inspector. In 1901 he 
removed to Hancock county, Iowa, but in December of the same year the family 
came to Yakima county, where he bought forty acres of land three and a half miles 
southeast of Zillah. which at that time was all sagebrush. He immediately set him- 
self to the task of clearing the land and bringing the same under cultivation, trans- 
forming the raw land into fertile fields. In 1905 he built a fine residence and made 
other valuable improvements upon his property. In 1910. he and his wife removed 
to Los Angeles. California, where they now live retired. In their family were two 
children, Edwin H. and Ruben, the later being engaged in business in Los Angeles. 
He married and has two children. 

Edwin H. Kielsmeier was but a young boy when the family removed to Denver 
and in that city he received his public school education. He subsequently assisted 
his father in farming and remained with him until twenty-four years of age. He then 
bought sixteen and a half acres adjoining his father's farm, seven acres of which he 
planted to orchard, while the balance is plow land. He now has a substantial farm- 
house and barns upon his place and in addition to operating his own land rents 
his father's ranch, which has an orchard of twenty-two acres upon it, the remainder 
also being plow land. The orchards are devoted to apples, peaches and pears, while 
four acres are in grapes. Mr. Kielsmeier has thoroughly studied the subject of 
orcharding and applies the latest methods and ideas to his labors with surprisingly 
satisfactory results. He has instituted up-to-date equipment to facilitate the work 
and in every way handles the property in a businesslike manner. He now resides 
on his father's farm. 

On December 22, 1905, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Kielsmeier and 
Miss Ida Durham, a native of Faribault, Minnesota, and a daughter of Isaac W. 
and Mary (Gutcheff) Durham, who in March, 1902. came to the Yakima valley. 
Mr. Durham acquired ten acres of land near our subject's place, which is devoted 
to fruit raising. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kielsmeier are members of the Christian church, to which faith 
they are devotedly attached. He is a member of the Grange, and his political affili- 
ation is with the republican party. He is one of the foremost fruit raisers and 



124 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

packers of his section of the valley and upon his place there are two packing houses, 
which are thoroughly equipped in order to facilitate the disposition of the fruit. In 
every way Mr. Kielsmeier is an up-to-date and energetic business man who ever 
follows honorable methods and in the course of years he has made many friends in 
business as well as in private life. 



REUBEN A. AND ARCHIE E. HAYS. 

The Hays brothers, composed of Reuben A. and Archie E.. are actively identi- 
fied with the farming and fruit raising interests of Selah The former was born in 
Champaign county. Illinois, October 21, 1870, and the latter was born in Montgomery 
county, Indiana. February 24, 1875. Their parents were George W. and Martha Jane 
(Burns) Hays, who in 1876 removed from Indiana to Mattoon, Illinois, where they 
resided for a quarter of a century. In 1901 the family came to the northwest with the 
Yakima valley as their destination. They purchased thirty-five acres of land in the 
Selah valley and in 1908 added to this a tract of fifteen acres, making fifty acres in all. 
Of this place forty-five acres is planted to orchard, the family specializing in the 
production of apples, pears and cherries, of which they annually harvest good crops 
and make extensive shipments. 

To Mr. and Mrs. George W. Hays were born nine children: Herman, who is 
a rancher living near Zillah. Washington; Reuben A. and Archie who run the old 
home place: Alva, who is engaged in ranching near Zillah and has a wife and one 
child: Lawrence., who is engaged in the fruit business in Yakima and has a wife 
and two children; Syvflla, the wife of Harry Morgan, a rancher living on Nob hill; 
Stella, the wife of Foster Barnsley, a rancher of Valley, Washington; Fay, at home; 
and Emma, who died at the age of two years. The mother is a member of the 
Seventh Day Adventist church. The family is one of prominence in the community, 
where for eighteen years they have made their home. Throughout this entire 
period the Hays brothers have been identified with the development and progress 
of this region along horticultural lines. They were young men at the time of their 
arrival and at once became active factors in the development of the home place, which 
they are still operating. They have developed one of the leading ranches of the 
county, devoted to orcharding. Their land and their trees are always kept in excellent 
condition, scientific methods being manifest in the care of both, and the crops 
produced are therefore most gratifying. 

Fraternally Archie E. Hays is connected with the Knights of Pythias. Both 
brothers vote the republican ticket but have never sought office, although in matters 
of citizenship they manifest a public-spirited devotion to the general good. 



AUSTIN MIRES. 



There are names that cannot be effaced from the pages of history; work that 
has left an ineradicable impress upon modern progress and future development; 
activity that has directed the trend of events and shaped the standards of present 
day life in the Yakima valley, and such has been the record of Austin Mires, lawyer 
and statesman, of EUensburg. He was born in Parrish, Des Moines county, Iowa, 
February 11. 1852, a son of John Harris and Anna (Deardorff) Mires. The father's 
family comes of French ancestry and the line is traced back to Peter and Catherine 
(Cought) Mires, who \yere the parents of Andrew Mires, born March 16, 1766. He 
married Susanah Livingston, whose birth occurred March 10, 1769, and was a 
representative of one of the old colonial families. Their son, Solomon C. Mires, 
grandfather of Austin Mires of this review, was born in Morgantown, Virginia. 
April 30, 1788, and in young manhood went to Ohio, casting in his lot with the 
pioneer settlers in the vicinity of Zanesville. He served as a soldier in the War 
of 1812, participating in the battle of Tippecanoe. In his later life he removed to 
California, where his remaining days were passed. He wedded Mary Bates, a rela- 



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AUSTIN MIRES 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 127 

live of Edward Bates, of Missouri, who was a member of President Lincoln's 
cabinet, and they had a family of nine children. After the death of his wife, Solomon 
Mires wedded a Mrs. Slaughter and they had three children. For over a third of 
a century he was a member of the Methodist church. 

John Harris Mires, father of Austin Mires, was born in Licking county, Ohio, 
near Newark, January 8, 1823. At an early day he went to Iowa and after having 
worked on the Mississippi river for a short time as pilot on a steamboat, settled in 
Des Moines county, that state, whore he engaged in farming until 1853. He then 
crossed the plains to Oregon, settling in what is now Douglas county, where he 
carried on general agricultural pursuits until his death in the year 1886. He married 
Mrs. Anna (Deardorff) Byars, widow of Flemming Byars and a daughter of John 
and Catherine ( Harshbarger) Deardorff, while the latter was a daughter of Christley 
and Barbary (Ammcn) Harshbarger. John Deardorff. whose name was originally 
Dierdorff, was born in Bedford county, Virginia, April 26, 1779, and his wife was born 
in Virginia on the 6th of October, 1781. They were married in the Old Dominion in 
1804 and afterward removed to Ohio, while subsequently they became residents of 
Indiana and afterward of Iowa, making their home on a farm at the Parrish post- 
office near Burlington, in Des Moines county, where their remaining days were 
passed. There Mrs. DeardorfT died in 1871. By her marriage she liad become the 
mother of twelve children, of whom Anna, who was born in Ohio, September 18, 
1817, became the wife of J. H. Mires. It is of interest to know that the ancestry of 
the Harshbarger family can be traced back four hundred years to Switzerland. 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Mires began their domestic life upon a farm in Des Moines 
county, Iowa, ten miles west of Burlington and a half mile from her father's place. 
In 1853, however, they made the long journey across the plains w-ith ox teams, leav- 
ing their old Iowa home on the 30th of March and arriving at Milwaukee, Oregon, in 
September. At that time Austin Mires was a little more than a year old. In June, 
1854, the parents removed with their family to the I'mpqua valley and settled on a 
farm eight miles west of Oakland, in what is now Douu;las county, the father pur- 
chasing the possessory right from Bob Stewart, giving him two yoke of oxen and a 
wagon in payment. The parents remained upon that place until called to their final 
rest. Mr. Mires passing away on the 3d of .April. 1888, while his wife died January 
IS, 1894. She had been married prior to her marriage to John Harris Mires, her first 
husband having been Flemming Byars, to w-hom she gave her hand in marriage Sep- 
tember 13, 1838. They had five children: William Henry, born July 7, 1839; Rebecca 
Frances, born November 29, 1840: Mary Katherine, born October 3, 1842: Elizabeth 
Barton, born January 14, 1845; and David Nathan, who was born January 13. 1847. 
and died April 8, 1848. The husband and father passed away March 30, 1848, and it 
was on the 27th of March, 1851. that Mrs. Byar? became the wife of J. H. Mires. 
This marriage was blessed with six children: Austin, born February 11, 1852; Benton, 
born September 26, 1853; Anna, born July 11. 1855; Margaret, born September 23, 
1857; Addie, June 15. 1859; and John Solomon, February 20, 1863. 

Austin Mires acquired his early education in the L^mpqua Academy at Wilbur, 
Oregon, from which he was graduated with the class of 1876. He also attended 
Christian College at Monmouth. Oregon, when that institution was under the super- 
vision of T. F. Campbell, and later he engaged in teaching for several years in Doug- 
las county, Oregon. For about a year he was employed in a printing office at Rose- 
burg, Oregon, and for three years was United States railway mail agent on the route 
from Portland to Roseburg, Oregon, when the latter was the terminus of the Oregon 
& California Railroad, now the Southern Pacific. Resigning that position in Sep- 
tember, 1880, he went immediately to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he pursued a full 
law course in the Michigan State LTniversity, winning the LL. B. degree on March 
29, 1882. While pursuing his studies there he served as private secretary to Thomas 
M. Cooley, then dean of the law department of the university and chief justice of the 
supreme court of Michigan. 

In .\pril. 1882, Mr. Mires returned to his old home in Oregon and immediately 
entered into partnership with W. R. Willis at Roseburg in the practice of law. On 
the meeting of the state legislature in the fall of 1882 he was elected chief clerk of 
the state senate of Oregon and served in that capacity through the term. In the 
following spring he removed to Ellensburg, Washington, where he has since engaged 



128 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

in the practice of his profession. Throughout the intervening period Mr. Mires 
has been active in promoting the interests and shaping the policy of Ellensburg and 
of the valley. When the city was incorporated in 1886 he was chosen its first mayor 
and his service in behalf of the municipality was so satisfactory to the general public 
that he was reelected for a second term. When the Northern Pacific Railroad was 
being built through the county in 1885 and 1886 he acted as local attorney and as- 
sisted in securing the right of way through Kittitas county. When the Ellensburg 
National Bank was organized he was chosen its vice-president and attorney and 
served in those positions for six years. He was again called to public ofifice when on 
the 14th of May, 1889, he was elected a delegate to the constitutional convention that 
met at Olympia on the 4th of July of that year and framed the present constitution 
of the state. He was made chairman of the committee on water and water rights 
and served also as a member of the committee on judicial article, of which Hon. 
George Turner, afterward United States senator, was chairman. On the 22d of 
July, 1890, he was appointed by Governor E. P. Ferry, a member of the board of 
equalization and appeal for the state of Washington and continued in the ofifice for 
three terms. This board was created by legislative act and constituted a special 
court, having to do with all applications for the purchase of state tide lands and also 
heard and determined all contests and controversies pertaining thereto. This board 
was abrogated by the legislature of 1894. 

From President McKinley, in the fall of 1899, Mr. Mires received appointment to 
the position of supervisor of census for the second district of the state of Washing- 
ton and continued to act in that capacity while the census was being taken in 19(_K). 
Governor McBride appointed him in February, 1904, a member of the commission 
to draft an irrigation code for the state. He was appointed in 1904 to fill out the 
unexpired term of prosecuting attorney of Kittitas county to succeed his law part- 
ner, C. V. Warner, and at the regular election in November. 1904, was chosen to that 
office for the full term of two years as the candidate of the republican party. Re- 
fusing to again become a candidate, he retired from the position in January, 1907. 
For six successive years he was connected with the office of prosecuting attorney for 
Kittitas county. During seven terms he has served as city attorney of Ellensburg, 
has been city treasurer three terms and school director for one term. His ofificial 
activities have covered a broad scope and at all points he has proven his loyalty to 
his country and her best welfare. Mr. Mires has ever been a stalwart champion of 
the republican party and was a warm admirer of Theodore Roosevelt and the policies 
which he advocated. 

During all these years Mr. Mires has continued in the private practice of law and 
his clientage has been large and distinctively representative in character. He has 
followed his profession in both the superior and supreme courts of his state and has 
become the possessor of a law library of over a thousand volumes, with the contents 
of which he is thoroughly familiar. He also has in his home an extensive general 
library. His real estate and mining interests are valued at about twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars. In 1912 he served as a presidential elector, supporting Roosevelt and 
aiding in carrying the state for that year. His life has indeed been one of great ac- 
tivity and usefulness. In the constitutional convention he was responsible for article 
17. section 1, Declaration of State Ownership. "The state of Washington asserts its 
ownership to the beds and shores of all navigable waters in the state up to and 
including the line of ordinary high tide in waters where the tide ebbs and flows; and 
up to and including the line of ordinary high water within the banks of all navigable 
rivers and lakes." In 1918 Mr. Mires became a candidate for the republican nomina- 
tion for congress but was defeated. 

On the Sth of March, 1884, Mr. Mires was married to Mary L. Rowland, who 
was born in McMinnville, Oregon, May 24, 1862, a daughter of Jere T. and Hester 
E. (Simmons) Rowland. On the 8th of August, 1871, they arrived in the Naches 
valley of Washington and took up their abode on a squatter's claim. Mrs. Mires 
attended school in Oswego, Oregon, in 1872 and 1873. In 1874 the family home was 
established near the town of Robbers Roost, now Ellensburg, where Mr. H. H. 
Davies, her stepfather, took up a homestead. In 1877 Mrs. Mires made a trip ori 
horseback over the Cascade mountains requiring seven days and forded the Yakima 
river three times within that period and also forded the Snoqualmie river thirty-three 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 129 

times. On her return trip she took a steamer from Seattle to Tacoma, then pro- 
ceeded by train to Kalama and by steamer of Portland, Oregon, from which city she 
proceeded by steamer to The Dalles. From that point she traveled by freighting 
wagon to Ellensburg, being twelve and a half days in completing the trip. In 1880 
she made another trip over the Cascade mountains on horseback, but the trails were 
better then and the time required was but three and a half days. Thus both Mr. and 
Mrs. Mires have been closely identified with the pioneer development of the north- 
west and have witnessed almost the entire growth and progress of this section. To 
them have been born three children: Anna Wanda, who was born October 14, 1885, 
and is the wife of Edward George, living at Olympia, Washington; John Rowland, 
who was born October 14, 1885, and is a graduate of the Oregon Agricultural Col- 
lege, while at present he is practicing the profession of civil engineering at Astoria, 
Oregon; and Eve Helen, who was born June 2, 1893. She is a graduate of the State 
Normal School at Ellensburg, Washington, and is now successfully teaching in 
Ellensburg. 

Fraternally Mr. Mires is connected with the Masons, which order he joined at 
Ann Arbor, Michigan, and he also has membership with the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and with the Red Men. Such in brief 
is the life history of Austin Mires. Those who read between the lines, however, 
will glimpse the picture of pioneer life and conditions in Washington that existed 
during his boyhood days. He worked on the farms in the Umpqua valley, attended 
the rural schools, chopped wood, broke horses, hunted deer, taught school, worked 
in a printing office in Roseburg, cooked for the United States surveyors and served 
for three years as United States railway mail agent. Such experiences brought him 
up to the point where he entered upon the study of law and made his initial step in 
the practice of his profession, since which time his advancement has been continuous. 
Not only has he acted as an interpreter of the law in the application of legal prin- 
ciples to points in litigation in the courts but has aided in framing the organic law 
of the state and in many ways has left the impress of his ability and his individuality 
upon the history of Washington. He is honored wherever known and most of all 
where he is best known and in the community where he lives he enjoys in an unusual 
degree the respect, confidence and esteem of those amid whom he has lived for 
many years and who have been daily witnesses of his career — a career that has 
brought him out of humble surroundings to a place of prominence as one of the 
honored and representative men of the state. 



E. WILBUR HEDDEN. 

E. Wilbur Hedden is the owner of a pleasant home, situated in the midst of a 
five-acre orchard, which he also owns, and in connection with the cultivation of his 
property he is manager of a ten-acre orchard belonging to W. D. Cammack. Mr. 
Hedden was born in Orange. New Jersey, on the 27th of February, 1858, a son of 
Morris and Martha (Norman) Hedden. The father was a contractor and both he 
and his wife have passed away. 

The son acquired a public school education and made his initial step in the 
business world by becoming actively connected with the lumber trade in New York 
city, where he remained for ten years. He afterward devoted three years to news- 
paper work in New York and subsequently spent a decade in the life insurance 
business in the eastern metropolis. His identification with the Yakima valley dates 
from 1910, at which time he made his way to the coast on a visit. He was so well 
pleased with the country, its opportunities and its prospects, that he purchased five 
acres of orchard, upon which he erected a modern residence. He has since given 
his attention to the further development and improvement of his place and has also 
acted as manager for the W. D. Cammack orchard of ten acres. He is raising apples 
and pears and produces fine varieties of both. He is a man of ready adaptability, 
which has enabled him to turn from urban interests and become a successful fruit 
raiser. He is now a member of the Yakima Valley Fruit Growers' Association, 



130 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 



which he joined upon its organization, and he has several times served as president 
of his local district. 

In 1882 Mr. Hedden was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary M. Crane, who passed 
away in 1913, leaving a son, Morris, who is a chemist with the Crown Willamette 
Paper Company. On the 24th of January, 1917, Mr. Hedden was again married his 
second union being with Miss Alice M. Young, of Minneapolis. They are consis- 
tent members of the Presbyterian church, doing all in their power to promote the 
growth of the church and extend its influence. Mr. Hedden gives his political 
endorsement to the republican party, being a firm believer in its principles as 
factors in good government. There have been no spectacular phases in his career, 
but he has worked earnestly and persistently since starting out in the business world, 
and as there has been no waste of time or opportunity in his career he has made 
steady and substantial progress. 



JULIUS T. HARRAH. 

Actuated by a spirit of enterprise in all that he has undertaken, quick to rec- 
ognize and utilize opportunities, Julius T. Harrah has become one of the capitalists of 
the northwest. His investments in this section of the country are large and promi- 
nent among his holdings is the Commercial Hotel in Yakima. The story of his life 
is the story of earnest endeavor intelligently directed and the steps in his orderly 
progression are easily discernible. Mr. Harrah is of South American birth. He was 
born in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on the 8th of June, 1884, a son of George and Thamazinha 
(Messiter) Harrah, the latter a daughter of the British ambassador to Brazil. The 
former was a civil engineer who went to Brazil at the age of nineteen years. He was 
born in Philadelphia, in 1840 and was a son of Charles J. Harrah, a prominent 
banker, who was the organizer of the Midvale Steel Company, was president of the 
Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company, controlling the street car system of that city, 
and otherwise prominently connected with the business interests and development 
of Philadelphia. The Metropolitan Opera House of that city now stands on the 
site of the old family homestead.' His son, George Harrah, made the trip from 
Philadelphia to South America on a sailing vessel. He became a civil engineer and 
built the first tunnel in Brazil. He was also the builder of several railroads and 
erected depots at various large towns of that country. In later life he went to 
Havana, Cuba, where he erected a palatial residence containing fifty-seven rooms 
and there his remaining days were passed, his death occurring in 1908. He became 
the second largest stockholder of the two leading railways of Brazil and was other- 
wise prominently identified with the development and upbuilding of that country. 
His family numbered four children who are yet living, two sons and two daughters. 
Mr. Harrah, whose name introduces this review, acquired his education largely 
through twelve years' study in Europe — in London, Paris, Heidelberg and other 
points of the old world. On coming to the United States it was with the expecta- 
tion of settling at Detroit, but in 1909 he made his way westward to visit the Seattle 
exposition. He became interested in the northwest and decided it was the best 
place in the world. He then began investing in this section of the country, puchas- 
ing orchard land, and he built a beautiful summer home with swimming pools and 
everything necessary for the promotion of comfort and happiness. In fact this is 
one of the finest summer homes of the United States. In familiarizing himself with 
conditions in the northwest, Mr. Harrah recognized the fact that Yakima needed 
better hotels. He was charged five dollars for a beefsteak at one of the hotels and 
he decided that this section of the country needed a better deal in hotel management 
and conduct if visitors were to be drawn to the city. He therefore purchased a half 
interest in the Commercial Hotel in 1911, the year in which it was started, and he 
later bought out the interest of the others and is now sole proprietor. The building 
was completed in that year and contains one hundred and sixty rooms, of which 
sixty-five are with bath. The dining room will seat five hundred and thirty-five 
people at one time. There is a large banquet room and fine ballroom which will 




JULIUS T. HAERAH 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 133 

accommodate seventy-five couples, and there are seven excellent sample rooms. One 
of the interesting features of the hotel is the handsome bridal chamber. Moreover, 
the hotel is noted for its splendid cuisine, u-hich makes it very popular with travel- 
ing men and automobile parties. Mr. Harrah is now remodeling and refurnishing 
this splendid hotel. In connection therewith is operated the best equipped laundry 
of the city and the hotel furnishes employment to about seventy-five people. 

Mr. Harrah's investments in the northwest amount to over five hundred thou- 
sand dollars and he has extensive interests elsewhere. The town of Harrah was 
named in his honor and its growth as a market place is indicated in the fact that 
in the past year it shipped more freight than Kennewick. Mr. Harrah has developed 
over two hundred acres of fine land in the vicinity of Yakima and is also prominently 
known as a breeder of fine Holstein cattle and fine Morgan horses. The fruit pro- 
duced in his orchards is unsurpassed throughout the valley, seventy-six per cent of 
it being of extra fancy variety. His orchards are largely devoted to the raising of 
winesap apples. 

On the 7th of June, 1906, Mr. Harrah was married to Miss Constance Raymond, 
of Xew Jersey, who was born in Massachusetts and is a daughter of Charles Henry 
Raymond, of New York. The children of this marriage are: George, who was born 
in Havana, Cuba, February 27, 1907; June, born December 9, 1910, on the ranch in 
Yakima county, and Jule, born June 22, 1915. 

Mr. Harrah is a member of Yakima Lodge, No. 24, .A. F. & A. M., and has 
attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in Tacoma Consistory, No. 
3. He is also a Shriner of Afifi Temple. He is a life member of the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks and is one of the largest stockholders in the Masonic 
Temple Association Building. He is the president of the Automobile Club and 
president of the Country Club and is one of the trustees of the Commercial Club. 
He also belongs to The Willows, a hunting club with grounds twenty miles south of 
Yakima. His political allegiance is given to the republican party. He is an en- 
thusiastic motorist and has driven his cars over eight hundred thousand miles. Dur- 
ing the period of his residence in the northwest he has become thoroughly familiar 
with every phase of the development of the Yakima valley and has made valuable 
contribution to the work that has been done. 



GUY O. SHUMATE. 



Guy O. Shumate, a well known member of the Yakima bar, was the first city 
attorney under the commission form of government and is a recognized leader in 
democratic circles in his county. He was born in Sioux City, Iowa, on the 1st of 
July, 1877, and is a son of Edgar H. and Nora J. (Andrew) Shumate. The father, 
who devoted his life to the occupation of farming and to the profession of school 
teaching, has now passed away, but the mother survives and makes her home in 
Oklahoma City. 

Guy O. Shumate was a young lad when his parents removed from Iowa to 
Ohio and in the public school of the latter state he pursued his elementary educa- 
tion, while later he became a student in the Lebanon (Ohio) Normal school. He 
afterward attended the State University of Oklahoma, where he pursued a law 
course and was then admitted to the bar in Oklahoma City on the lOth of February, 
1908. For a year thereafter he practiced there but was attracted by the opportuni- 
ties of the northwest and in 1909 came to Yakima, where has since maintained 
his office. He continues in the general practice of law and he is most thorough in 
the preparation of his cases and clear and strong in their presentation. He has 
been connected with much important litigation and the court records bear testimony 
to his ability in the number of favorable verdicts which he has won. 

On the 30th of September, 1903, Mr. Shumate was married to Miss Annie J. 
Brooks, of Yakima, and they have become the parents of an interesting little family 
of three children: Mildred, Lorraine and Irene. Mr. and Mrs. Shumate are well 
known socially and the hospitality of the best homes is freely accorded them. Mr. 



134 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Shumate belongs to the Masonic fraternity and is also an active member of the 
Elks lodge. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party and he served 
as city attorney of North Yakima for three and half years, being the first one to 
hold that office under the commission form of government. He is now chairman 
of the democratic county central committee and does everything in his power to 
promote the success of his party. He belongs to the Commercial Club and his 
aid and cooperation can always be counted upon to further any of its progressive 
projects. 



W. O. SANDERS. 



When the well developed home property of W. O. Sanders came into his posses- 
sion it was covered with sagebrush. With determined purpose and characteristic 
energy he began its development and the transformation which he has wrought is 
notable, for he today has a valuable and well improved property that annually pro- 
duces large crops. Mr. Sanders was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, October 
14, 1872, a son of Madison and Amy (Mitchell) Sanders, both of whom were natives 
of Pennsylvania and have passed away. The father devoted his life to the occupation 
of farming and in following that pursuit provided for his family. 

W. O. Sanders obtained a public school education and in 1888 took up the 
printing business. Later he became agent for the Adams Express Company and oc- 
cupied that position for si.x years. At a subsequent period he spent two years as as- 
sistant cashier of the Citizens National Bank of Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, and then 
again gave his attention to the printing business. The year 1905 witnessed his arrival 
in Yakima, at which time he entered the employ of the Yakima Daily Republic and 
was associated with that paper until 1912. He was next with the Yakima Bindery 
for three years, in charge of the printing department, but wishing to benefit by the 
opportunities offered in connection with the productivity of the soil in this region, 
he purchased twenty acres of land on Naches Heights in 1912 and planted six acres 
to apples, while the remainder is plow land, devoted largely to the raising of hay 
and grain. He took up his abode upon this ranch in 1915 and has since built an 
attractive home thereon. The place today bears no resemblance whatever to the 
tract of land which came into his possession and which at that time was all covered 
with sagebrush. In 1918 he bought ten acres adjoining his original purchase. He has 
been very successful in the development and improvement of his place and his labors 
have been productive of excellent results. 

On the 15th of October, 1895. Mr. Sanders was united in marriage to Miss Ger- 
trude Clutter, who was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Sanders is a 
member of the Baptist church. Mr. Sanders gives his political allegiance to the 
republican party and is prominent in community affairs, serving at the present time 
as president of the Naches Heights Commercial Association. He is interested in 
all that has to do with the welfare and progress of the community in which he lives 
and cooperates heartily in any well devised plan for the general good. 



AUBREY CHESTER GOODWIN. 

Aubrey Chester Goodwin, who follows farming near Thorp, is one of the native 
sons of Kittitas county. He was born upon the old Goodwin homestead May 20, 
1884, a son of Thomas B. and Sarah (Cumberland) Goodwin, who are mentioned 
elsewhere in this work. He acquired a public school education and in his youthful 
days engaged in ranching with his father. He afterward rented his father's farm in 
connection with his brother Stanley and subsequently they purchased farm land, 
which they cultivated together for a time, but eventually Aubrey C. Goodwin sold 
his interest to his brother. He afterward leased the old home place, which he con- 
tinued to cultivate for two and a half years. He next conducted a livery stable in 
Ellensburg, where he lived for two years, and later he was engaged along various 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY t35 

lines for a few years. He afterward again took charge of the home farm, which he 
then conducted for two years, and in 1918 he purchased fifty-eight acres of land a 
mile west of Thorp. Upon this place he has a fine house and large, substantial barns 
and in fact his is one of the well improved properties of the neighborhood. He is 
engaged in raising grain and hay and his business affairs are wisely and systemati- 
cally conducted, bringing him substantial success. 

On the 1st of May, 1907, Mr. Goodwin was married to Miss Ethel McMillan, of 
Ellensburg, and they are widely and favorably known in the section of the county 
in which they make their home. In politics Mr. Goodwin is a democrat where 
national questions and issues are involved but at local elections casts an independent 
ballot. He has always preferred to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his 
business affairs and he is a representative of a family that has always been identi- 
fied with progressive farming. His father brought the first car load of farm machin- 
ery into the Kittitas valley, shippinR it to The Dalles, Oregon, and hauling it by 
team the rest of the way. His stock included the first headers and binders ever 
used in the district. Throughout all the intervening years the Goodwin family have 
stood in the vanguard of progressiveness along' all those lines which have to do with 
agricultural development and their worth as citizens is widely acknowledged. 



ED J. AUMILLER. 



For a quarter of a century Ed J. Aumiller has lived in the Yakima valley, where 
fie is successfully engaged in farming, his attention being divided between the 
production of fruit and the raising of alfalfa and corn. He was born in LaSalle 
county, Illinois, on the 28th of April, 1872, a son of William and Anna (Markell) 
Aumiller. The father was a carpenter, came to Yakima in the year 1894 and now 
follows farming near the city. His wife passed away in 1912. 

After completing a high school education in Illinois, Ed J. Aumiller learned the 
carpenter's trade and was employed along that line in connection with the buildings 
of the World's Columbian Exposition at Chicago in 1893. In the latter part of that 
year he made his way to Yakima and has since been identified with the northwest. 
In 1896 he purchased twenty acres of land three miles southwest of the city of 
Yakima and at once began its improvement. In the intervening years he has steadily 
carried forward the work of development, but after a time he sold ten acres of his 
land. He now has five acres planted to apples, pears and cherries and" his orchards 
are in excellent bearing condition. The remainder of his land is devoted to the 
raising of alfalfa and corn. 

On the 2Sth of December, 1900, Mr. Aumiller was married to Miss Laura Wright, 
a native of London, England, and a daughter of Mathew and Emily Wright, who 
crossed the Atlantic to Canada during the girlhood days of Mrs. Aumiller, who some 
years afterward came to Washington, To this marriage have been born seven chil- 
dren, Mabel, Esther. Florence, Clarence, Lucille, Grace and Robert. Mrs. .Aumiller 
is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Aumiller votes with the republican party but has never been an aspirant for 
office. During the twenty-five years of his residence in the Yakima valley he has 
witnessed much of its development, growth and progress. He has seen its arid lands, 
on which nothing grew but sagebrush, transformed into rich fields and productive 
orchards and has long borne his share in the agricultural development of the district. 



MICHAEL SCHULLER. 

A valuable property of eighty acres on the Tieton stands as a monument to the 
life activities of Michael SchuUer, who was one of the progressive and enterprising 
agriculturists of his neighborhood. .\ native of Wisconsin, he was born in March, 
1862, and was a son of Michael and Mary Schuller, pioneers of that state. There he 
was reared and received his education, early in life becoming acquainted with agri- 



136 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

cultural methods. In 1888, at the age of twenty-six years, he decided to move west- 
ward in order to profit by the opportunities presented in a newer country and came 
to Yakima county, Washington, where he worked for wages. Saving his earnings, 
he began operating rented land and in 1898 he and his wife bought eighty acres and 
also homesteaded eighty acres on the Tieton. To the cultivation of this property Mr. 
SchuUer devoted himself industriously, ever following progressive methods until he 
made this one of the valuable farms of the neighborhood. He built a handsome resi- 
dence, erected suitable barns, instituted modern machinery, and added other neces- 
sary equipment. After his death Mrs. Schuller sold half of the property but still 
retains eighty acres. 

On June- 4. 1891, Mr. Schuller was united in marriage to Ann Sleavin, a native of 
New York, and a daughter of Andrew and .A.nn Sleavin, who in 1863 removed from 
the Empire state to Minnesota, locating in Winona county, where Mr. Sleavin took 
up agricultural pursuits, there passing away. His widow and the rest of the family 
subsequently came to Yakima county in 1888, and in this district she resided for many 
years. She died October 1, 1916. To Mr. and Mrs. Schuller were born six children: 
Mary, deceased; .Angela; at home; Edward, who is now serving in the United States 
army; Nicholas Joseph, at home; Francis, deceased; and Theresa, at home. 

Mr. Schuller was a devoted member of St. Joseph's Catholic church, which his 
widow and the remaining members of the family now attend. He was much inter- 
ested in the higher things in life, particularly in educational progress, serving as 
school director in his district and thus instituting a number of improvements which 
have been of great benefit to the community. In his political affiliation he was a 
democrat and ever true to the principles of that party although he was not a politi- 
cian in the commonly accepted sense of the word, preferring to devote himself to 
his farming and his family. In his death the family lost a beloved husband and 
father and many lost a sincere and faithful friend. He was ever moved by the most 
honorable principles and his word was as good as his bond. There was nothing in 
his life of which he might ever need be ashamed, but on the contrary there were 
many acts which could be cited as being of great credit to him. However, Mr. 
Schuller was a modest man and was content in his own assurance of having pursued 
a righteous course in life. It is therefore but natural that he is greatly missed by 
those who knew him and who venerate his memory. As a pioneer he contributed 
toward material upbuilding along agricultural lines and thus made possible the pros- 
perous conditions that now maintain in the Yakima valley, while as a citizen he was 
ever loyal to American ideals and American standards. 



THOMAS E. GRADY. 

Thomas E. Grady, a member of the Yakima bar, who since December, 1917, has 
filled the office of city attorney, was born in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, November 
19, 1880, a son of Thomas and Eliza Grady. The father has devoted his life to the 
occupation of farming but since 1907 has lived retired in Yakima, enjoying a well- 
earned rest. 

Thomas E. Grady, spending his youthful days under the parental roof near 
Chippewa Falls, acquired a public school education, passing through consecutive 
grades to the high school. He also attended business college and later entered the 
University of Minnesota for the study of law, as he had determined to make the 
practice of the profession his life work. He completed the course there and was 
graduated with the class of 1904. In looking about for a favorable field of labor he 
decided upon the northwest and in June, 1905, arrived in Yakima and was appointed 
deputy prosecuting attorney. After serving for a brief period as court reporter he 
took up private law work and has been engaged in general practice, although he has 
held several other offices in the strict path of his profession. In March, 1911, he was 
appointed judge of the superior court and was elected to the office in 1912, serving 
continuously until 1917. He made a most excellent record upon the bench by the 
fairness and impartiality of his decisions and his course was at all times character- 
ized by a masterful grasp of the problems presented for solution. In December,. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMxA. VALLEY 137 

1917, he was appointed city attorney and is now acting in that capacity. No one 
better realizes the necessity for thorough preparation of cases, and his legal learn- 
ing, liis analytical mind and the readiness with which he yrasps the points in an argu- 
ment all combine to make him one of the able lawyers practicing at the Yakima bar. 

On the 3d of June. 1908, Mr. Grady was united in marriage to Miss Alice M. 
Beane, of Spokane, and to them have been born three children: Thomas E., who was 
born July 22, 1911; James E., born December 11, 1916; and Howard M., born Febru- 
ary 12, 1918. 

Mr. Grady is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is a 
past exalted ruler. He was also district deputy of the Grand Lodge for eastern 
Washington. He likewise has membership in the Commercial Club and is thoroughly 
in sympathy with its purposes concerning the upbuilding of Yakima and the develop- 
ment of its civic welfare. His political allegiance has always been given to the re- 
publican party and aside from the offices already mentioned that he has filled he has 
served as a member of the city council of Yakima. He belongs to that class of 
young men who are upbuilding the west and whose labors have been of far-reaching 
and beneficial effect. 



A. C. WALLIN. 



A. C. Wallin now lives largely retired upon a valuable farm property of twenty 
acres in the upper Naches valley which he bought in 1909, ten acres of which are 
devoted to orcharding, but he is still active in the affairs of this world, appearing to 
be much younger than his age would indicate. Although past seventy-for years of 
age he still retains his mental and physical vigor to a remarkable degree. He is an 
honored veteran of the Civil war, having served in that memorable conflict from 
August, 1862, until its close. He participated in a number of the most noted engage- 
ments of the war and the loyalty which he gave to hist country in times of stress has 
remained with him throughout his life. Outside of his agricultural interests Mr. 
Wallin has also been quite successful as a teacher, thus contributing to educational 
development in the district in which he lived. 

-A native of Brooklyn. New York, he was born August 14. 1844, and is a son of 
Richard and Harriet (Gale) Wallin, natives of Kidderminster, England, the father 
born May 11. 1819, and the mother on the l7th of February of the same year. When 
nineteen years of age they were married and subsequently came to the United States. 
The father was a carpenter by trade. Perceiving greater opportunities in the then un- 
developed middle west, he removed in 1857 to Crawford county, Wisconsin, taking 
with him his nine children. There he took up one hundred and sixty acres of gov- 
ernment land and this tract he farmed until death claimed him. Four of his sons, 
including our subject, voluntarily served in the Civil war. 

A. C. Wallin was reared under the parental roof in Brooklyn and in that city 
largely received his education, removing with the family to Wisconsin when thir- 
teen years of age. After laying aside his textbooks he assisted his father but on 
the 11th of August, 1862, enlisted in Company A, Thirty-first Wisconsin Infantry, 
and he still has in his possession his original enlistment papers. Through the suc- 
ceeding years until the close of the war he served bravely and unflinchingly, stoutly 
performing his duties. He went through the siege of Atlanta, was at Sandysville 
when that engagement was fought and participated in Sherman's march to the sea 
and in the battle of Bentonville, North Carolina. After the close of the war he re- 
turned to Wisconsin, where he took up farm work during the summer season and 
attended normal school at Whitewater, Wisconsin, during the winter months. He 
also went to Chicago, where he took a commercial course. Being thus well prepared 
for teaching, he turned his attention to that profession and for twenty years acted 
as principal and superintendent of schools at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. He then 
became connected with railroad work, acting in the capacity of accountant for the 
Wisconsin Western Railway for eleven years. He was next for two years engaged 
in the abstract business on his own account but at the end of that time came to 
Yakima county, taking up his home on the farm which was cultivated by his sons 



138 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

and which he had acquired in 1909. This property comprises twenty acres on the 
upper Naches, ten acres of which are devoted to orchard. The residence on the place 
has been remodeled and modern improvements have been installed throughout, so 
that the property is now considered one of the most valuable of the district. 

On the Sth of September, 1883, Mr. Wallin was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
E. King, a native of Mansfield, Ohio, and a daughter of L. O. and Sarah (Beldon) 
King, the family being numbered among the pioneers of that state. The Kings are 
of Revolutionary stock and long occupied a prominent position in the city of Cleve- 
land. To Mr. and Mrs. Wallin were born four children: Oscar K., who follows agri- 
cultural pursuit-6 on the upper Naches and is married: Jennie B., who married E. W. 
Bailey, an agriculturist, also located in the upper Naches valley; Mary E., a resident 
of Seattle; and Helen H., a trained nurse, being a graduate of the Deaconess Hospital 
of Spokane. 

Oscar K. Wallin, who was born November 30,. 1884, is one of the leading and 
most successful orchardists of his section, having devoted much study to that line 
of business. He received an excellent education, rounding out his ordinary school 
course by two years' attendance at the University of Wisconsin. Being impressed 
with the great opportunities offered in the Pacific coast country, he then made an 
extensive trip over the west, in the course of which he came to the Yakima valley. 
Here he selected a ranch which his father bought and which under his able man- 
agement has become a valuable property. He married Aline Ross, of Delavan, Wis- 
consin, a highly cultured lady, who was at the time of her marriage a teacher in the 
schools of Sioux City, Iowa, in which position she was employed for two years. 
Oscar K. Wallin shipped the first carload of seed corn ever sent out from Yakima 
county in 1917, most of which he raised on his own land. This statement indicates 
along which line of agricultural endeavor he gives his closest attention. He received 
for this carload twenty-eight hundred dollars. 

A. C. Wallin is a charter member of P. W. Plummer Post No. 37, G. A. R., in 
which he has held all the chairs. Since 1870 he has been a member of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to Crawford Lodge No. 98, of Wisconsin, and 
also having held all of the offices in that organization. He is very prominent in the 
Masonic fraternity, belonging to Lodge No. 106, A. F. & A. M., of Prairie du Chien, 
W'isconsin, and also to the chapter. He is a past master of the lodge, having held 
the office of master for five years, and he has ever been very active in Masonic work, 
the principles underlying that organization guiding him in his conduct toward his 
fellowmen. Along political lines Mr. Wallin votes independently, giving his support 
to the candidates whom he considers best qualified irrespective of party issues, in 
fact Mr. Wallin has not voted a straight ticket for years. In 1918, however, he voted 
the straight republican ticket, being largely inflcnced in his action by the seemingly 
uncalled-for pressure exerted upon the public in favor of the democratic organization 
from administrative headquarters. To all worthy movements which have been under- 
taken in any of the districts in which Mr. Wallin has lived he has ever given his 
unqualified support, readily supplying means and effort in order to bring about mate- 
rial and mental growth. He has not only become a substantial citizen who now en- 
joys life in rest and comfort, but has also rendered service to his county in times 
of peace as well as in times of war. His son now ably represents the interests of the 
family, his name standing high among the successful men of the Naches valley, where 
many of those who know him are proud to call him friend. 



WILLIAM H. HARRISON. 

One of the foremost factors in promoting the interests of a community is real 
estate dealing and William H. Harrison, president and manager of the Sunnyside 
Land & Investment Company, is therefore one who has greatly contributed toward 
the upbuilding of his district. The business was organized by C. E. Woods and 
Elza Dean, who later sold out to A. G. Flemming and E. B. Jones. Subsequently it 
was acquired by M. G. Duncan and Oliver Dean, after which George Irish purchased 
it. In September, 1908, William H. Harrison became president and manager; A. G. 




WILLIAII H. HARRISON 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 141 

Flemming, vice-president, and H. L. Miller secretary and treasurer, the latter buying 
into the business in April, 1909. The Sunnyside Land & Investment Company, as its 
name indicates, buys and sells land, including not only farming properties but also 
city plats, and is largely engaged in loaning money, mostly upon real estate security. 
This part of the business is very important and in this way the company has assisted 
many agriculturists of the neighborhood to successfully tide over hard times. Its 
principles are of the highest and its methods are exemplary. 

William H. Harrison was born in Marion, Iowa, in 1878, his parents being 
Thomas and Sarah (Waters) Harrison. The family removed to Sunnyside, Wash- 
ington, in March. 1900, buying wild land and also taking up a homestead claim near 
Sunnyside. This property the father developed and there continued to make his 
home until he passed away. 

Mr. Harrison of this review had a public school and business college education 
and in the fall of 1899 came to Sunnyside, preceding the family and taking up a home- 
stead on the 30th of October, 1899. He greatly improved this place, which he sold 
in 1908, at which time he became head of the Sunnyside Land & Investment Com- 
pany, but also continued in farming until 1917, in which year he sold his ranch. 

On the 14th of August, 1912, Mr. Harrison was united in marriage to Miss 
Genevieve Persis Searle, of Minnesota, and to this union has been born a son, 
William H., Jr. In his political views Mr. Harrison is a republican, while fraternally 
he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In the financial life of 
the town he also has a part, being a director of the Sunnyside Bank. He also belongs 
to the Sunnyside Commercial Club, in whose progressive movements he takes an 
active part. All projects, for the upbuilding of his locality and the welfare of the 
public receive his heart}' support and he is ever ready to aid in furthering the ma- 
terial, moral and intellectual development of the district. 



LOUIS H. DESMARAIS. 

Louis H. Desmarais, now identified with the farming interests at Moxee City, 
was born on the St. Lawrence river sixty miles east of Montreal, Canada, February 
2, 1871, a son of Israel and Sophia (Desmarais) Desmarais. His parents removed to 
Crookston, Minnesota, in 1881, when he was a lad of ten years, and there the father 
engaged in farming until November, 1900, when he came to the Yakima valley and 
took up his abode on the Moxee river. He bought fifty acres of land but afterward 
sold that property and purchased ten acres on Nob Hill. This he planted to fruit 
and successfully developed his orchard but afterward sold out. His last days were 
spent in the home of his son, Louis H., and there he passed away in August, 1917. 
His widow survives and is yet living with her son. 

Louis H. Desmarais, a lad of ten years at the time the family home was estab- 
lished in Minnesota, acquired his education in the public schools of Canada and of the 
United States. He assisted his father from early boyhood in the work of the farm 
and afterward became actively engaged in ranching. While still living in Minnesota 
he purchased land and there carried on agricultural pursuits until 1900, when he came 
to Washington. Reaching the Yakima valley he purchased thirty acres of land and 
afterward disposed of that property. In 1901 he bought sixty acres east of Moxee 
City and has extended the boundaries of the farm until it now embraces one hundred 
acres. He had the entire place planted to hops at one time, becoming one of the 
most extensive hop raisers of the Yakima valley, and in the cultivation of that crop 
he met with substantial success. He is now engaged in raising corn and other cereals 
in addition to hops and has a splendidly improved ranch property, equipped with sub- 
stantial buildings and well kept fences and the best farm machinery. 

On the 27th of November, 1899, Mr. Desmarais was united in marriage to Miss 
Regina Crevier, a native of Canada, and to them have been born seven children: 
Beatrice, Henry, Maurice, Rachel, Irene, Phillip and Andrew. The parents and 
children are all members of the Holy Rosary Catholic church, in which they have 
taken an active part while generously contributing to its support.. 

In his political views Mr. Desmarais is a republican but not an office seeker. He 



142 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

has always preferred to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his business affairs 
and aside from ranching he assisted in organizing the Moxee State Bank in 1914 
and has since been its president. 



HOWARD LLOYD MILLER. 

Among the successful real estate men of the Yakima valley is Howard Lloyd 
Miller, who was born in Lanark, Illinois, July 7, 1883, and is a son of Joseph E. and 
Emma B. (Harrington) Miller, both of whom are still residents of that state. The 
father has been engaged in the implement and coal business for the past twenty- 
eight years at Milledgeville. 

H. Lloyd Miller received his education in the public schools of his native city 
and was graduated from the high school there in 1901. At the age of eighteen he 
began his business career, becoming connected with a dry goods store at Milledge- 
ville, where he conducted business on his own account. In 1906 he disposed of his 
interests in that city and removed to Pendleton, Oregon, in the following year, but 
as he did not find the prospects of that town favorable he did not locate there and 
came to Sunnyside in the same year. In April, 1909. he bought an interest in the 
Sunnyside Land & Investment Company, of which he has since been secretary and 
treasurer. This enterprise, which is largely engaged in the buying and selling of farm 
properties but also deals in city land, has greatly prospered through his business 
ability, foresight and advanced methods. Another department of the business is 
their large loan agency. 

On the 15th of August, 1906, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Ruth A. 
Deets and to this union has been born a son, Howard Lloyd, Jr., who is now six 
years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Miller are popular among the younger social sets of 
the valley and their hospitable home is ever open to their many friends, who find 
much pleasure in gathering at their fireside. 

Outside of his connection with the Sunnyside Land & Investment Company 
Mr. Miller has other interests which prove him to be one of the foremost business 
men of his section of the state. As vice president of the North Coast Lumber Com- 
pany his ability is of great importance to the successful direction of this enterprise 
and he is also secretary of the Hillcrest Improvement Company. He is a republican 
and steadfastly supports that party, in whose principles he thoroughly believes, but 
has never had the time nor felt the inclination for public office, preferring to do his 
duty as a citizen at the ballot box. Fraternally he is a member of the Yakima 
lodge of Elks No. 318. He has always taken a deep interest in the development of 
his section and is a valued member of the Sunnyside Commercial Club. Moreover, 
the affairs of his state and nation are dear to his heart and he now plays an im- 
portant part as chairman of the Community Council of Defense, giving much of his 
time to all efforts made for winning the great World war. 



MISS KATHRYN SEVERYNS. 

Among the prominent citizens of Prosser who are efficiently serving in an 
official capacity is Miss Kathryn Severyns, who now holds the important position of 
county auditor of Benton county, the duties of which office she assumed on the 
1st of January, 1919. She is a daughter of J. H. and Mary (Francois) 
Severyns, both of whom were natives of Belgium and came to the United States in 
early life. They located in Custer county, Nebraska, where Mr. Severyns took up a 
homestead in the early '80s and he continued to devote his attention to the develop- 
ment of the same until 1893, when the family removed to California, where he passed 
away. In 1901 Mrs. Severyns with her four sons and her daughter Kathryn came to 
Prosser, which has remained their home ever since. The sons are: Andrew, an 
attorney at Port Angeles, Washington; Joseph, who is serving in the United States 
navy; William, a well known attorney of Seattle; and John, who is engaged in the 
hay and grain business at Sunnyside. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 143 

Miss Severyns was graduated from the high school at Prosser with the class of 
1910 and subsequently took a commercial course in Spokane in order to thoroughly 
fit herself for a career as a business woman. After completing her education she 
returned to Prosser and became a member of the stafi of the county auditor. In 
due course of time she was made deputy auditor and so faithfully and ably did she 
discharge her duties that she was elected auditor in the fall of 1918. She had prev- 
iously become thoroughly acquainted with every detail of the office, so that she is 
now abundantly able to handle the business affairs of that position independently. 
She is very popular with the public: has always proved obliging and helpful; and 
is fully entitled to the confidence reposed in her. In the social circles of her city 
Miss Severyns is well known and well liked and wherever she goes she makes friends 
who thoroughly appreciate her ability. She is a pleasant, entertaining .young lady 
of social graces, who never fails to enliven any society. 



HOWARD F. BLEDSOE. 

Howard F. Bledsoe has long been identified with commercial interests in Ellens- 
burg, where he is now conducting a grocery store and also dealing in automobile 
supplies and accessories. He was born in Colorado, Texas, October 27, 1883, a son 
of Henry and Mary Bledsoe. The father died at Fort Worth, Texas, in the year 1888 
and the mother now lives with her daughter, Mrs. A. B Dunning, in Kittitas county, 
Washington. 

Howard F. Bledsoe pursued his education in the public schools and afterward 
took a complete commercial course with the International Correspondence Schools. 
He started upon his business career as clerk in a dry goods store at Alvarado, Texas, 
and afterward went to St. Louis, Missouri, where he was associated with the Ely- 
Walker Dry Goods Company. Later he located at Las Vegas, New Mexico, where 
he again engaged in clerking, and subsequently he settled at Seattle. In October, 
1907, he arrived in Ellensburg, where for a year he occupied a position as clerk in 
the store of C. L. Collins. He also spent a similar period with the Hub Clothing 
Company and in September, 1909, he purchased a grocery store in connection with 
George Pearson, with whom he was thus identified until November. 1910, when Mr. 
Pearson sold out. Mr. Bledsoe was then alone in business until March, 1913, when 
he admitted Lenox Wilson to a partnership and the association has since been 
maintained. They are proprietors of a well appointed grocery store, carrying a large 
and carefully selected line of staple and fancy groceries, for which they find a ready 
sale by reason of their fair prices, their honorable dealing and their earnest efforts 
to please their patrons. They also carry a line of automobile supplies and accessor- 
ies and their trade in that connection is gratifying. 

On the 22d of .\ugust. 1909, Mr. Bledsoe was united in marriage to Miss Vera 
De Weese, of Ellensburg, a daughter of the Rev. William De Weese, and their chil- 
dren are four in number: Esther, Charles, Keith ^nd Helen. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Methodist church, and both Mr. 
and Mrs. Bledsoe are highly esteemed as people of sterling worth, while the hos- 
pitality of the best homes of the locality is freely accorded them. Mr. Bledsoe votes 
with the democratic party and his interest in community affairs is manifest in his 
membership in the Chamber of Commerce. He stands for all that is progressive in 
relation to the public welfare and cooperates heartily in all those plans and meas- 
ures which are a matter of civic virtue and of civic pride. 



GEORGE E. GIFFIN. 

George E. Giffin, who since 1910 has been identified with the drug trade in 
Grandview and is now owner of a well appointed store, was born in Covington, 
Ohio, July 25, 1874, a son of John V. and .-Knna (Young) Giffin, the former a native 
of Hamilton county, Ohio, while the latter was born in Van Wert county, that state. 

(7) 



144 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

The paternal grandfather, Samuel B. Giffin, was a native of Pennsylvania but became 
a pioneer settler of Ohio, where he followed the occupation of farming. His son, John 
V. Giffin, was a carriage manufacturer, and both he and his wife are now deceased. 

George E. Giffin, after acquiring a public school education, attended the Ohio 
Normal University at Ada, Ohio, from which he was graduated with the class of 
1893. He started upon his business career by serving a two years' apprenticeship at 
the drug trade in Columbus, Ohio, after which he engaged in clerking until 1897, when 
he purchased a drug store in that city. The following year he entered the United 
States army, in the hospital service, and was on active duty in that connection for 
three years, spending two years of the time in the Philippines and witnessing the 
entire struggle that has become known as the Spanish-American war. He was 
made acting .hospital steward. 

Following his return to his native land Mr. Giffin in 1901 opened a drug store 
in Columbus, Ohio, where he conducted business until 1907, when he came to Wash- 
ington and for eight months was located at Chesaw. In February, 1908, he pur- 
chased a ranch near Grandview and resided thereon for a year. He afterward spent 
three months in Reno, Nevada, and subsequently six months in Columbus, Ohio. He 
then went to Pasco, Washington, where he lived for a few months, after which he 
purchased a drug store at Spirit Lake, Idaho, where he remained for nearly a year. 
He next resided at Medford, Oregon, for three months, after which he returned to 
Grandview in 1910 and engaged in clerking in a drug store until March, 1911, when 
he purchased the store of which he has since been proprietor. He has also retained 
the ownership of the ranch and has five acres planted to orchard, while the re- 
mainder is devoted to diversified farming. This place he rents and from it obtains a 
substantial income. 

On the 9th of June, 1903. Mr. Giffin was married to Miss Xellie Burris, who was 
born in Columbus, Ohio, a daughter of L. T. and Sadie (Shull) Burris, the former 
now a retired railway conductor formerly connected with the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company. 

Fraternally Mr. Giffin is a blue lodge and chapter Mason and is a past master 
of Grandview Lodge No. 191. His religious faith is that of the Methodist church and 
in these associations are found the rules which govern his actions and control his 
attitude toward his fellowmen. In politics he is a republican and in 1916-17 he served 
as mayor of Grandview and for several terms has been on the board of aldermen. 
.■\s a public official he has exercised his prerogatives in support of many plans and 
measures for the general good and at all times is actuated by a public-spirited devo- 
tion to the best interests of his community. He is highly esteemed as a merchant, 
as a citizen and as a man, having a wide circle of friends in this community. 



GEORGE MILLDRUM. 

George Milldrum, a citizen of worth living near Yakima, was born on the 24th 
of February. 1842, in England, a son of Thomas and Jane (Richards) Milldrum, both 
of whom have passed away. Mr. Milldrum was engaged in mining and engineering 
in his native country. In 1882 he came to the United States and took up his abode in 
Miner county. South Dakota, where he secured government land and developed and 
improved a farm. He resided thereon until 1915, when he came to Yakima county, 
but he still owns his South Dakota farm. Seven times since making his initial trip 
to the new world he has crossed the .\tlantic, visiting his old home in England and 
renewing his acquaintance with the friends of his youth and early manhood. In 
his home place Mr. Milldrum has seven and a half acres and he also owns two and 
four-fifths acres on Orchard avenue. His land is planted to orchard and he raises a 
variety of fruit, all of excellent size and flavor, readily finding a profitable market. 
His land is highly cultivated and therefore very valuable. 

Mr. Milldrum was united in marriage to Miss Mary .\nn Odgers, a native of 
England, and they became the parents of ten children. The mother passed away and 
later Mr. Milldrum wedded Jean Richards, who was also born in England. There 
was one child by that marriage. The children of Mr. Milldrum are as follows: 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 145 

George, who is living in Alberta, Canada, northwest of Edmonton; Thomas, who is 
a clerk, living in Alabama; Mary Annie, living in California; Richard, deceased, and 
Joseph, who follows farming on the Tieton, in Yakima county. The others have 
passed away. 

Mr. Milldrum is a member of the Christadelphian church, which was founded by 
Doctor Thomas soon after the Civil war. He has always been a great student of the 
Scriptures, reading the Bible many times, and his entire life has been guided by its 
teachings, while at all times he has endeavored to closely follow the Golden Rule. 



JAMES HENDERSON. 

James Henderson, who makes his residence in Sunnyside, is one of the success- 
ful business men of Mabton, where he conducts a profitable drug store. Moreover, 
he has been engaged in agricultural and horticulural pursuits and in that manner 
has contributed toward development in those two industries. He was born at Fox 
Lake, Wisconsin, January 10, 1868, of the marriage of John and Isabel (Sanderson) 
Henderson. When our subject was two years old they removed to Minnesota, taking 
up their home near Willmar, where the father successfully followed agricultural pur- 
suits until his death. His wife has also passed away. 

James Henderson spent his boyhood days in Minnesota under the parental roof 
and received his first lessons in an old-fashoned log schoolhouse near his father's 
home. Subsequently he improved his education by a high school course. He then 
served an apprenticeship in Minnesota as a druggist and successfully passed the 
examination before the state board in January, 1894, taking active charge of a drug 
store at Paynesville which he had owned for some months previous. He came to 
Sunnyside in March, 1894, and here established the first drug store in February, 1895, 
in the conduct of which he was very successful until disposing of the same in 1906. 
He then retired from active business afifairs for about two years, devoting his time 
to the management of his property, but in October, 1908, returned to his old occu- 
pation and acquired the drug store owned by .-Mexander & King at Mabton and has 
conducted the same ever since with growing success. He carries a complete line 
of the best drugs and also has a stock of such sundries as are usually carried in 
stores of this kind. His prescription trade is large and the public appreciates the 
fact that prescriptions filled at his store are always carefully compounded. Although 
Mr. Henderson is counted among the business men of Mabton he still maintains his 
residence in Sunnyside, the latter town having now been his home ofr over twenty- 
three years. 

On -August 27, 1892, Mr. Henderson married Miss Isabel Brown, of Paynesville, 
Minnesota, and to this union were born the following children: Marion, who is with 
the First National Bank of Yakima; Blanche, at home; Bernice, now in Ellensburg; 
.\my, who is attending high school; and Ruby, who assists her father in his busi- 
ness. Mr. and Mrs. Henderson are well known in Sunnyside and Mabton and their 
hospitable home is always open to their many friends. 

Mr. Henderson has always taken a very laudable part in all affairs pertaining 
to public improvement and the cause of education has been especially dear to his 
heart, he having served as a member of the school board for many years. He was 
the first mayor of Sunnyside, giving the city a beneficial administration out of which 
has grown much good. At present he is serving as game commissioner of Yakima 
county. He is a large landowner but does not farm his property, confining himself 
to a general supervision thereof. He it was who in 1894 planted one of the first 
orchards in the Sunnyside country and in fact he is numbered among the honored 
pioneers of his section. He is very fond of hunting and his reputation as a sportsman 
and taxidermist among his neighbors is the highest and he has the largest private 
collection of mounted birds and other animals in the state of Washington. It is of 
the greatest interest to all who arc students of outdoor life and is greatly admired 
by his many friends and those who come from afar to view it. Fraternally Mr. Hen- 
derson is a member of the Elks Lodge No." 318, of Yakima, and the Modern Wood- 
men of -America, while his political allegiance is given to the democratic party. The 



146 HISTORY OF YAKIMA \"ALLEY 

family attend the Episcopal church, in the work of which they take an active and 
helpful interest. As one of the honored pioneers of Yakima county Mr. Henderson 
has many friends among its population and all who know him speak of him in terms 
of high regard and deep respect, conceding his superior qualities as a man and a 
citizen. 



FRED E. THOMPSON. 

One of the important business enterprises of Yakima is the Thompson Ftuit 
Company, of which Fred E. Thompson is the president. Actuated in all that he 
does by a progressive spirit, he is constantly reaching out along broadening lines 
that result to the benefit and upbuilding of the community as well as to the advance- 
ment of his individual success. Mr. Thompson is a western man by birth, training 
and preference and in his life displays the enterprising spirit which has been the 
dominant factor in the upbuilding of this section of the country. He was born near 
Tacoma, Washington, on the 29th of May, 1863, a son of L. F. and Susanna (Kin- 
caide) Thompson. The father was born in Jamestown, New York, while the mother 
was a native of Hannibal, Missouri, and they were married in Steilacoom, Washing- 
Ion, in 1857, having become pioneers upon the Pacific coast. The father made his 
way to California in the year 1849, attracted by the gold discoveries on the Pacific 
coast. The mother was a daughter of William Kincaide, who arrived in Washington 
with his family in 1853, when his daughter was about fifteen years of age, having 
made the journey across the plains from Hannibal, Missouri. In the year 1852 L. Y. 
Thompson had removed from California to Washington and became the owner of 
one of the first and probably the first sawmill on the Puget Sound. This was de- 
stroyed during the Indian war of 1855. Later he became the pioneer hop grower 
ot the Sound country turning his attention to that industry in 1863, when he planted 
five acres to hops. He became a large hop grower and dealer and very successfully 
conducted his business along that line. Later he turned his attention to real estate 
and banking and became one of the prominent factors in financial circles in the state. 
He was a member of the first legislature of Washington territory and was the young- 
est representative in that body. Later he served as a member of the state legislature 
at the first session after the admission of Washington to the Union, at which time he 
was the oldest member. He was born in 1827 and passed away in 1905, while his 
w-idow survived until 1916. He had always given his political allegiance to the 
repiiblican party and was a very prominent factor in its ranks in the early days. 
In fact he left the impress of his individuality upon the history of the state in 
connection with its development along many lines. 

Fred E. Thompson pursued his education on the coast and attended a business 
college in San Francisco. Like his father, he became interested in the hop business, 
taking up the work in the spring of 1884 and continuing therein until 1891. In No- 
vember, 1888. he purchased farm property in the Yakima valley and in 1891 established 
his home in North Yakima. Becoming interested in the question of fruit raising, he 
started an orchard and was one of the first commercial orchardists of the Yakima 
valley. Mr. Bicknell having planted two acres to peaches the previous year. Mr. 
Thompson, however, planted ten acres to peaches and apples and planted the first 
Elberta peach tree and the first D'Anjou pear tree. He also set out the first Rome 
Beauty apple tree, all these being planted in 1889. He has constantly enlarged his 
orchards since that time and when he sold, his original place in 1904 he had devel- 
oped one hundred and ten acres in fruit growing. In 1906 he organized the Thomp- 
son Fruit Company, which now owns one hundred and sixty acres in fruit in the 
Parker bottoms. They are the largest fruit growers in the northwest, having extensive 
orchards of peaches, pears and prunes. Mr. Thompson is also interested in the 
Cascade Orchard Company, which was organized in 1910 and has three hundred and 
twenty acres of land. He is likewise connected with the Sunset Orchard Company, 
which was organized in 1912 and_ cultivates eighty acres planted to apples, pears and 
crabapples. He does an extensive business in marketing fruit as well as in raising. 
He shipped the first carload of fruit ever sent from the Yakima valley across the 




FRED E. THOMPSON 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 149 

Mississippi river, this being about 1893 or 1894. The company employs twenty-five 
men throughout the entire year and two hundred and twenty-five people in the har- 
vest season. In 1917 they produced over one hundred and fifty-five carloads of 
fruit or about two thousand tons. The work of Mr. Thompson has been of the 
greatest possible benefit to this section of the state, showing what can be accom- 
plised through the utilization of the natural resources of the state when scientific 
methods of orcharding are employed. He closely studies every phase of the busi- 
ness, knovv's the nature of the soil, the needs of the trees and the best methods of 
spraying and caring for the fruit in every possible way. 

In 1893 Mr. Thompson was married to Miss Veola Kirkman, of San Francisco, 
and they have one daughter, Hazel, who is a graduate of the Berkeley university 
and is now assistant superintendent of schools in Yakima. Mr. Thompson belongs 
to the Masonic Fraternity and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he 
gives his political allegiance to the republican party. His position of leadership as 
a fruit grower of Yakima valley has made him widely known throughout this and 
other sections of the state and his e.xample has been followed by many to the profit 
of the individual and the benefit of the commonwealth. 



DAVID C. REED. 



David C. Reed, manager of and one of the partners of the Yakima Title Guaranty 
& Abstract Company of Yakima, is also prominently known as one of the chief pro- 
moters of the splendid public school system of the city. In fact, no history of Yakima 
would be complete without e-xtended reference to him, so important a part has he 
played in relation to the development of the educational system. He arrived in this 
city in 1906. although he has been a resident of the Pacific coast from 1879, having 
been a youth of eighteen years when he removed westward to California. 

Mr. Reed was born in Homewood, Pennsylvania, on the 6th of January, 1861, a 
son of John and Isabella (Craig) Reid, who were natives of Scotland and came to 
the United States in 1852. The father spelled his name Reid, but his son adopted the 
orthography which he now uses. The father was a soldier of Company C, of the One 
Hundred and First Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and died in .An- 
dersonville prison. He had a family of ten children and two of his sons were also 
soldiers of the Civil war, Walter J. serving as orderly sergeant with General Kearney 
and later with General Meade. He was wounded at the battle of Gettysburg. He 
became a prominent resident of the northwest, arriving in Yakima in 1878, taking 
up a claim from the government near what are now the fair grounds of the city. 
As the years passed he played a very prominent and important part in shaping public 
thought and action and his influence was ever on the side of progress and improve- 
ment. He served as mayor of Yakima and gave to the city a businesslike and pro- 
i>ressive administration. Later his fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth, 
ability and public spirit, called upon him to represent the district in the state senate 
and he was a member of the upper house of the general assembly when death called 
him in 1908. The otlier brother who was a soldier of the Civil war was James C. 
Reid. who died in the prison at Salisbury, North Carolina, ere the war was brought 
to a successful close. Another son of the family, John Reid, came to the Yakima 
valley with his brother Walter in the year 1878. He, too, became a prominent factor 
in the public life of the community, serving as secretary of the State Fair .Associa- 
tion and at one time as mayor of the city, so that the name of Reid is most honorably 
interwoven with the history of Yakima. The mother died in Pennsylvania. 

David C. Reed was but four years old at the time of his father's demise and his 
early education was acquired in the Soldiers' Orphans' School at Lniontown. He 
afterward worked his way through Duflf's College and through the University of 
California, and throughout his entire life he has remained a man of studious habits, 
constantly promoting his knowledge through reading and research. It was in the 
year 1879 that he made his way westward to California, where his sister Isabel, lived, 
and there he took up the profession of teaching, which he followed in that state for 
twenty-seven years, becoming recognized as one of its most eminent and able educa- 



ISO HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

tors. It was in California that he attended the Los Angeles Xormal School and he 
also became a student in the Throop Polytechnic Institute at Pasadena, from which 
he was graduated in 1898, in order that he might know the real value of manual 
training. He also pursued a course in kindergarten work and he was thus able to 
speak with authority on these questions when later he became a prominent factor in 
connection with the public schools of Yakima. While still a resident of California he 
served as principal of the schools 6f Redding and of Yreka and later became super- 
intendent of public schools at Eureka, California, and county superintendent of 
schools in Plumas county. For ten years he occupied the responsible position of 
superintendent of schools at Redlands, California, and thus made valuable contribu- 
tion to the educational development of that state during the twenty-seven years of 
his connection with its public school system. In 1906 he arrived in Yakima to accept 
the superintendency of the schools of this city, in which capacity he continued until 
1911, and during his connection with the ofifice various school buildings were erected, 
including the high school, the Lincoln, Garfield, McKinley, Fairview and Summit View 
schools. Practically all of this work was done under the immediate direction of 
Mr. Reed and during his superintendency the attendance of the high school increased 
from one hundred and fifty to five hundred, while the number of teachers was in- 
creased from forty-eight to ninety. It was Mr. Reed who was instrumental in intro- 
ducing the commercial course, also domestic science, manual training, the agricuIturaJ 
course and the arts course, thus making the high school most efficient in its scope 
and purposes. The graded schools also more than doubled in attendance during his 
superintendency and he ever had the ability to inspire teachers and pupils under him 
with much of his own zeal and interest in the work. While in California he organized 
many of the manual training schools of the southern part of that state and all 
acknowledge that he laid the foundation for the present splendid school system of 
Yakima of which every citizen is justly proud. He was also a member of the library 
board of Yakima when the public library Was built. 

In 1911 Mr. Reed gave up school work to enter into active connection with the 
Yakima Title Guaranty & Abstract Company, which had been organized in 1906 by 
J. O. Cornett. George S. Rankin, W. J. Reed, Sylvester Peterson, E. G. Peck. H. 
Stanley Coffin, H. M. Helliesen and W. L. Lemon. Of these Mr. Peck became the 
president, Mr. Peterson the vice-president, secretary and manager, and Mr. Lemon 
the treasurer. They first had their offices at No. 7 North First street but in 1908 
the company erected a building at the corner of A and Second streets and has since 
occupied it. In 1910 H. H. Lombard was elected to the presidency and so continues. 
David C. Reed became the secretary in 1911 and in 1917 was made both secretary 
and manager, so that he is the active executive officer of the business. In 1912 W. J. 
Aumiller became treasurer and in 1912 I. H. Dills was elected vice-president. The 
corporation is capitalized for one hundred thousand dollars. It guarantees titles to 
real estate and has very complete records of Yakima county property. The business 
has been developed to extensive proportions and the company has today over fifty 
leading citizens of Yakima among its stockholders. 

In 1897 Mr. Reed was married to Miss Jean MacMillan, of Carnegie, Pennsyl- 
vania, and their children were: Emily Judson, now a student at Smith College in 
Massachusetts; and Jeannette, deceased. 

The family attend the Presbyterian church and Mr. Reed also belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Commercial Club. In the Masonic order he is well known as a member of 
lodge, chapter, commandery and Mystic Shrine and he is a past master of the lodge 
with which he held membership in California. His political endorsement is given 
to the republican party but the honors and emoluments of political office have had no 
attraction for him. Outside of his professional duties and his business he has pre- 
ferred to choose the point at which he would render service to the public. He has 
taken an active part in promoting moral as well as intellectual progress in the com- 
munity and has been most active in bringing about the erection of the Young Men's 
Christian Association building at Yakima. His life has ever been characterized and 
actuated by the highest principles and ideals. He is continually extending a helping 
hand, not in that indiscriminate giving which fosters vagrancy and idleness, but in 
intelligently directed eflfort to assist his fellowmen. He gives liberally when material 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY ISI 

aid is needed, but he also makes it his purpose to stimulate the pride, ambition and 
self-reliance of the individual by speaking an encouraging word. He is known as 
one of the best loved men of Yakima. 



EUGENE R. CRAVEN. 

Eugene R. Craven is the owner of a valuable farm property of one hundred and 
eighty-three acres, in the midst of which stand a fine residence and substantial barns, 
while all of the equipment of the farm is thoroughly modern and indicates his pro- 
gressive spirit. Mr. Craven is a native of Curtis, Nebraska. He was born April 4, 
1888, of the marriage of Sylvester and Emma Alice (Jessup) Craven, who were na- 
tives of Indiana but went to Iowa at an early day and afterward became pioneer set- 
tlers of Nebraska. In 1889 they removed to Puyallup, Washington, where the father 
engaged in the butchering business. He afterward went to EUensburg and he now 
makes his home on the Columbia river. His wife, however, passed away in 1901. 

In the same year Eugene R. Craven made his way by train to Toppenish, Wash- 
ington, and then walked a distance of sixteen miles to Outlook. He worked for 
wages for six years and then, feeling that his experience was sufficient to justify him 
in engaging in business on his own account, he rented land and at a later period he 
also rented land on the Yakima Indian reservation. In 1913 he went to British Colum- 
bia but later returned and it was then that he took up his abode on the reservation. 
In this way he gained his start. In 1918 he bought two hundred acres of land four 
and a half miles northwest of Sunnyside but has since sold seventeen acres, so that 
he now has one hundred and eighty-three acres, constituting one of the valuable 
farm properties of that section. He is now most pleasantly and attractively located, 
having a beautiful home and a splendidly developed farm and is successfully engaged 
in the cultivation of hay, grain, corn and alfalfa and also raises stock. 

On the 27th of February, 1909, Mr. Craven was united in marriage to Miss Lillian 
M. Burlingame, a daughter of E. H. and Louisa C. (Smith) Burlingame, the former 
a native of Minneapolis, while the latter was born in California. The paternal grand- 
father, Hiram Burlingame, in pioneer times took up a homestead covering what is 
now the center of Minneapolis. In 1862 he removed to California, where his last 
days were spent. It was in the Golden state that the parents of Mrs. Craven were 
married and about 1892 they made their way to the Palouse country of Washington 
and about 1895 came to Yakima county. The father engaged in farming here for 
two years and then returned to California but after a short time again came to 
Yakima county and purchased the ranch now owned and occupied by Mr. Craven. 
It was then a tract of wild land, which he developed and improved, converting it 
in,to one of the best ranches in the valley. He is now engaged in farming near Top- 
penish and makes his home in that city. To Mr. and Mrs. Craven have been born 
three children: Carol, Donald and Gordon. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Craven give their political allegiance to the democratic party. 
He is recognized as one of the successful and prominent young ranchers in his sec- 
tion of the county, carefully and intelligently directing his interests so that sub- 
stantial results accrue. 



CHESTER C. CHURCHILL. 

Chester C. Churchill, president of the EUensburg Telephone Company, with four- 
teen hundred subscribers over the Kittitas valley, was born in Harrisburg, Oregon, 
July 18, 1871, a son of George Henry and Sarah C. (Reed) Churchill, who were na- 
tives of Illinois and of Indiana respectively. Coming to the west in early life, how- 
ever, they were married in Oregon. The father was a son of Willoughby Churchill. 
who brought his family to the northwest in 1851, crossing the country by wagon and 
ox team to Oregon. His wife died at The Dalles, Oregon, ere they reached their 
destination. Mr. Churchill took up government land and began the development of 



152 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

a farm, whereon he continued to reside until his death. His son, George Henry 
Churchill, passed away in eastern Oregon in 1885. He had followed stock raising 
in that section of the state for a number of years and was a representative business 
man of the locality. His wife was a daughter of Eli A. Reed, who brought his fam- 
ily across the plains to Oregon about 1855 and in later life removed to EUensburg, 
where his death occurred. 

Chester C. Churchill in young manhood became actively identified with the 
live stock business. In 1887 his mother brought the family to the Kittitas valley 
and they became identified with the live stock industry in this region. Chester C. 
Churchill afterward obtained a farm of his own and continued the possessor thereof 
until 1916, when he sold the property. He is still, however, engaged in buying and 
selling stock and has long been recognized as one of the prominent live stock dealers 
of this section of the state. In 1908, however, he was associated with John N. Faust 
in the purchase of the plant of the Pacific Telephone Company at EUensburg and 
reorganized the business under the name of the EUensburg Telephone Company. 
.'\t the time of the purchase there were only five hundred subscribers but today there 
are more than fourteen hundred, located throughout the Kittitas valley. The pres- 
ent officers of the company are: C. C. Churchill, president and manager: and Mr. 
Faust, secretary and treasurer. They liave rebuilt the entire system, making it 
thoroughly modern in every respect, and they give excellent service to their patrons. 

In 1896 Mr. Churchill was united in marriage to Miss Amelia Hauser, a daughter 
of Tillman Hauser, one of the early pioneers of Washington. Their children are 
Eunice, Doris, Lois and George, all at home. 

Mr. Churchill is a prominent Mason, belonging to EUensburg Lodge No. 39, 
A. F. & A. M., also to the Royal Arch Chapter and to Temple Commandery No. 5, 
K. T., of which he is now the eminent commander. He is also identified with the 
Mystic Shrine and is a most loyal follower of the craft, believing firmly in its teach- 
ings. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he is one of the 
active workers in its local ranks, his opinions carrying weight in its councils. His 
business affairs have been wisely and carefully managed and as president of the 
EUensburg Telephone Company he has made for himself a creditable place in con- 
nection with one of the public utilities, the value of which is most widely recognized. 



WILLIAM T. CARPENTER, M. D. 

Dr. William T, Carpenter, who engages in the general practice of medicine in 
Toppenish but specializes in surgery and the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, 
nose and throat, was born in North Carolina in 1868, a son of George and D. D. 
(Woodward) Carpenter. The father devoted his life to the occupation of farming in 
order to provide for his family and was thus engaged to the time of his demise. His 
widow still resides in North Carolina. 

Doctor Carpenter acquired his early education in the schools of his native state 
and supplemented the public school course by study in Albemarle Academy. He 
afterward entered the Southern College of Pharmacy, at Atlanta, Georgia, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1897, and he is also a graduate of the South- 
ern College of Medicine and Surgery of the class of 1898. Having thus qualified for 
onerous professional duties, he located for practice in South Carolina but afterward 
gave up professional labor and traveled over the west. He located ultimately at San 
Francisco, California, but did not practice there. In 1907 he entered the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of Chicago for a further course in medicine and was gradu- 
ated with the class of 1910 from this institution, which is the medical department of 
the University of Illinois. Doctor Carpenter in 1908-9 was assistant in the medical 
department of the University of Chicago under Professor Santee in histological work 
in neurology. For two years he was assistant to Professor H. O. White in anatomy 
in the University of Illinois, and also for two years assisted John M. Lang, M. D., 
in his clinic in the University of Illinois in gynecology and also assisted Walter C. 
Jones, professor of surgical pathology in the University of Illinois, for two years. 
Following his graduation in 1910, he removed to the northwest, settling at Spokane. 




DR. WILLIAM T. CARPENTER 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 155 

Later lie was located for a time at Ellensburg. Washington, and he afterward pur- 
sued post-graduate work in the Chicago Eye, Ear, Xosc and Throat Hospital in 1917. 
In the same year he opened an office in Toppenish, where he has since remained, and 
although he continues in the general practice of medicine, he specializes in surgical 
cases and in the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. He is splen- 
didly qualified along these lines and his efforts are productive of excellent results. 
Doctor Carpenter has complete, and in every way, up-to-date equipment, including 
an X-ray machine to facilitate his professional labors. His ability is acknowledged 
by his colleagues and contemporaries in the profession and he is at all times keenly 
interested in everj'thing that tends to bring to man the key to the complex mystery 
which we call life. 

In 1903 Dr. Carpenter was married to Miss Mary F. Heaton, of Spangle, Wash- 
ington, and they now have an interesting little daughter, Vivian Flavilla. Doctor 
Carpenter belongs to the Masonic fraternity, also to Elks Lodge Xo. 1102, at Ellens- 
burg, Washington, to the Woodmen of the World and the Modern Woodmen of 
.America. He has membership in the Toppenish Commercial Club and is interested 
in everything pertaining to the welfare and progress of his community. Along 
strictly professional lines his connections are with the Yakima County Medical So- 
ciety, the Washington State Medical Society and the American Medical .-Kssociation 
and thus he keeps in close touch with the trend of modern professional thought and 
progress. He reads broadly, thinks deeply and is constantly promoting his ability 
through study and today occupies a creditable position among the medical practi- 
tioners of his section of the state. 



JOHN B. WILLARD. 

For more than three decades John B. Willard has been a resident of the Yakima 
valley and is devoting his time and energies to the further development and im- 
provment of a forty-acre homestead on the north fork of the Cowiche. The excellent 
condition of the place indicates his enterprise, industry and determination. He was a 
young man of about twenty-seven years when he removed to the northwest, his birth 
having occurred in Marshal! county, Indiana, January 21, 1861, his parents being 
James Edward and Ann Eliza (Lewis) Willard, the former a native of Xevv York, 
while the latter was born in Indiana. James E. Willard was a son of Ezra Willard. 
who was born in Xew York and who took his family to Indiana at an early day. 
Farming has been the occupation of the family for many generations. In 1872 the 
parents of John B. Willard removed to Kansas, taking up a homestead claim in Rice 
county, and subsequently they went to Oklahoma, becoming pioneer residents of 
(jrant county, where both now reside. 

John B. Willard acquired a public school education and in 1881 went to Colorado 
where he engaged in prospecting, working in the mines through three summers, the 
winter months during that period being spent at home. Later he took up farming 
on liis own account in Kansas and in 1888 he came to Yakima county, where he 
entered government land on the Cowiche. He then turned his attention to stock 
raising and the dairying business and later he rented two different farms. Subse- 
quently he purchased a forty-acre homestead on the north fork of the Cowiche, 
whereon he now resides, and his attention is given to the raising of wheat, oats, corn, 
potatoes and hay. He annually harvests excellent crops, having a fine ranch. He 
has built a good home and large barns upon the place and everything in his sur- 
roundings indicates his progressive spirit, his keen business sagacity and his un- 
faltering enterprise. 

On the 21st of March. 1887, Mr. Willard was married to Miss Addie Davis, who 
was born in Hardin county, Illinois, a daughter of Isaac and Catherine (Hufford) 
Davis, who in 1874 removed to Kansas but in 1888 came to Yakima county, where 
the father purchased land and also took up a homestead on the Cowiche. He has 
now passed away, but the mother survives and resides in Yakima. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Willard have been born eleven children: Laura, the wife of Bert Daggett, a rancher 
on the Cowiche, by whom she has one child; Floyd, who is a member of the United 



1S6 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

States army; Ellis, who married Verna Van Hoy and is a rancher on the Cowiche; 
Stella, deceased; Guy, a rancher on the Cowiche, who married Nellie Thompson and 
has one child; Grace, who is the wife of Richard Roley, a rancher on the Cowiche, 
and has one child; Helen, James, Claude, Ruth and Emard, all at home. 

In his political views Mr. Willard is a republican and he has served as road 
supervisor. He has also been a member of the school board and the cause of educa- 
tion finds in him a stalwart champion, as he believes that every opportunity should 
be accorded the young to acquire a good education and thus provide for life's prac- 
tical and responsible duties. As a business man he has proven his right to be classed 
with the representative ranchers of his section of the state, for his carefully directed 
labors have brought to him substantial success. 



ERWIN S. SIMON. 



Erwin S. Simon, identified with the horticultural interests of Yakima county, was 
born in Renville county, Minnesota, August 17, 1879, a son of John B. and Mary L. 
(Linse) Simon, who were early settlers of Minnesota. In the year 1915 they came 
to Yakima county, Washington, and began ranching on the Tieton. 

Spending his youthful days under the parental roof, Erwin S. Simon acquired a 
high school education, supplemented by further study in a normal school. At the 
outbreak of the Spanish-American war he enlisted for active service as a member 
of Company C, Twelfth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, in 1898 and was mustered out 
in 1899. He afterward learned the machinist's trade, which he continued to follow 
for fourteen years at Brainerd. Minnesota, but attracted by the opportunities of the 
rapidly developing northwest, he made his way to this section of the country and 
purchased four acres of land two and a half miles from the city of Yakima. Upon 
this place he is engaged in raising apples, peaches, pears and cherries and is meeting 
with good success in his undertakings. 

In 1902 Mr. Simon was married to Miss Elizabeth Fisher, of Minnesota, a 
daughter of C. M. B. Fisher, and she passed away in 1910, leaving three children: 
Clifford, Russell and Dorothy. In June, 1915, Mr. Simon was again married, his 
second union being with Miss Luella A. Reeck, of Minnesota, daughter of Rev. A. 
Reeck, and they have one child, Marcelle Gladys. 

Mr. Simon is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, also of the 
Brotherhood of American Yeomen and the International Association of Machinists. 
The family attend the German Evangelical church. Politically Mr. Simon casts an 
independent ballot, not caring to ally himself wth any party or to subject himself 
to the dictates of party leaders. He has worked diligently for the attainment of his 
success and is now the owner of a valuable property devoted to horticulture. 



ZENAS Y. COLEMAN. 

Commercial enterprise in Toppenish finds a worthy representative in Zenas V. 
Coleman, who comes to the LTnited States from across the border, his birth having 
occurred in Scotstown, Canada, on the 12th of August, 1872. His parents were 
William and Flavilla (Knapp) Coleman, the former a native of Canada, while the 
latter was born in Maine. Mr. Coleman had lived in the United States for about 
twelve years prior to his marriage. Subsequently he returned to Canada, where the 
birth of his son Zenas occurred, but when the boy was only about a year old the 
parents once more came to tlie United States and settled upon a farm in New Hamp- 
shire. At a subsequent date they again went to Canada, where they lived for two 
years and then became residents of Michigan about 1883. They continued to make 
their home in that state until 1891, w^hen they started for the far west with Seattle, 
Washington, as their destination. The father was a farmer by occupation and fol- 
lowed that pursuit in the various localities in which he made his home. His death 
occurred in Seattle and his widow is still living. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 157 

Zenas Y. Coleman obtained a high school education in Michigan and when his 
textbooks were put aside secured a clerkship in a store. In fact he began clerking 
while still in high school, being thus employed at Stanton, Michigan, where he re- 
mained in clerical work until 1896. He afterward spent two years as a clerk in 
Chicago and in 1898 he came to Washington, making his Way to Yakima, where for 
three years he was in the employ of the Henry H. Schott Company. He next took 
charge of the business of the Moore Clothing Company, remaining as manager for 
three years, and subsequently he was half owner of a shoe store in Yakima. There 
he remained until 1908, when he sold his interest in that business and removed to 
Toppenish. In the meantime or in December, 190S, he had been appointed register 
of the United States land office by President Roosevelt and served in that connection 
until 1908, when he resigned. 

With his removal to Toppenish, Mr. Coleman purchased an interest in the Top- 
penish Trading Company and became vice president and general manager, in which 
connection he has since continued. The firm has built up a business of large pro- 
portions and Mr. Coleman has been most active in producing this result. He applies 
himself with thoroughness and earnestness to the work and puts forth every effort 
to please his patrons, while his reliable business methods as well as his progressive- 
ness have constituted an important force in the development of the business. 

On the 16th of August. 1899, Mr. Coleman was married to Miss Edith M. Moore, 
who had been a schoolmate in Stanton, Michigan. They became the parents of five 
children but three of the number died in infancy, those still living being: Zenas Y., 
Jr., now twelve years of age; and Katherine, a little maiden of eight summers. 

Mr. Coleman is well known in fraternal connections. He belongs to Yakima 
Lodge No. 318, B. P. O. E., of which he is a past exalted ruler, is a member of Toppen- 
ish Lodge No. 178, A. F. & A. M., of which he is now serving as master and he 
has also taken the degrees of the Scottish Rite of Masonry in Yakima. He likewise 
belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Yakima and to the Toppenish 
Commercial Club, of which he served as president in 1915 and 1916. His political 
endorsement is given to the republican party. He has been a member of the school 
board of Toppenish and has served as a member of the state fair board by appoint- 
ment of Governor Meade. At all times he manifests a public-spirited devotion to the 
general welfare and has cooperated in large and active measure with movements 
and projects put forth to benefit community and commonwealth. In public life, as in 
business affairs, he is actuated by a progressivencss that knows no bounds and he 
attacks everything with a contagious enthusiasm that easily wins the cooperation 
and support of others. 



EDMUND G. TENNANT. 

Edmund G. Tennant, who has made valuable contribution to the development 
and improvement of Yakima through his extensive real estate operations, was born 
in Canada on the 24th of May, 1865, a son of Wesley and Sarah (Glasford) Tennant. 
The father has now passed away but the mother is living, making her home with her 
daughter at Des Moines, Iowa, at the age of eighty-four years. The father was en- 
gaged in the investment business for a long time. In 1870 he removed with his 
family to Des Moines, Iowa, and subsequently took up his abode in Guthrie Center, 
Iowa, in later life, there passing away in 1913. 

Edmund G. Tennant was but a little lad of five years when the family home 
was established in Iowa and to the public school system of that state he is indebted 
for the educational opportunities which he enjoyed. In his early boyhood he began 
selling papers and thus earned his first money. He was also employed as an office 
boy in Des Moines and afterward as delivery boy in connection with a grocery store 
of that city. On attaining his majority he left home and went to North Dakota, 
where he took up a homestead claim, to the development and improvement of which 
he devoted his energies until 1889, when he sold that property and sought the oppor- 
tunities of the northwest. Making his way to Washington, he was for a time identi- 
fied with the lumber business on the coast but returned to Iowa in 1890 and entered 



158 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

mercantile business at Anthon, where he remained for four years. He later removed 
to Hartley. Iowa, where he carried on meichandising for three years, but eventually 
sold out there and went to Alaska in the spring of 1897. He continued in th?.t coun- 
try for five years, actively engaged in mining and in the lumber business. He estab- 
lished the first sawmill in the Atlia mining district in British Columbia and he was 
the owner of mines in the Forty Mile district on Jack Wade creek. He carried on 
merchandising on the Yukon river and was the builder of a hotel at Skagway, 
Alaska. He took the first linen, china and silver into a hotel at that point, Skagway, 
and thus he was closely identified with the development of Alaska along many lines. 
At length, however, he disposed of his interests in that country and in 1901 came 
to Yakima, where he continued in the hotel business, leasing the Bartholet hotel, 
which he conducted for three years. He also purchased much property here and in 
1904 sold the hotel in order to concentrate his efforts and attention upon the real 
estate business, buying a large amount of property and putting many additions upon 
the market. He developed the Modern addition of sixty acres, which he divided into 
lots and on which he erected medium priced residences. He later improved the New 
Modern addition of twenty acres, upon which moderate priced homes were built. 
He also built houses on the West and North Modern addition, covering twenty 
acres. He developed the South Park addition of twenty acres, putting in improve- 
ments on all of these and erecting buildings, and he likewise developed the Highland 
additon of ten acres, the Richland addition of ten acres and a one-hundred-acre tract 
devoted to suburban homes, each with one acre of ground. He was likewise one 
of the partners in the firm of Tennant & Miles, having an eighty acre tract divided 
into acre lots and the Fairview tract of twenty acres. Still another phase of the 
real estate business claimed his attention, for he developed the Selah ten-acre tracts 
in the Selah. covering several hundred acres. This is all now fine orchard. Mr. Ten- 
nant has platted and sold several thousand acres of land and has become one of the 
largest real estate operators in the valley. His labors have resulted in bringing 
many thousands of people into the country, thus greatly advancing its upbuilding 
and prosperity. Moreover, he is farming today over twelve hundred acres of irri- 
gated land himself and he is now selling the Elliott Heights addition of twenty acres 
and building thereon modern bungalows. He is the president of the Louden Land 
Company that owns the bungalow addition to Yakima. 

In November, 1890. Mr. Tennant was married to Miss Maude E. Thompson, of 
Ithaca, Michigan, and they have an adopted son, Edmund G. Mr. Tennant votes 
with the democratic party and he has membership with the Commercial Club of 
Yakima. He also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks and is a charter member of the Arctic Brotherhood. His 
activities have taken him into various sections of the .'\merican continent and have 
been wide in scope, useful in purpose and most resultant. His labors have been of 
the greatest value in promoting the development and progress of this section ot the 
state. Possessing broad, enlightened and libera! minded views, faith in himself and 
in the vast potentialities for development inherent in his country's wide domain and 
specific needs along the distinctive lines chosen for his life work, his has been an 
active career in which he has accomplished important and far-reaching results, con- 
tributing in no small degree to the expansion and material growth of the Yakima 
valley and from which he himself has derived substantial benefit. 



REUBEN J. HICKOK. * 

.\ tine tract of thirty-five acres one mile east of Zillah bespeaks the prosperity of 
Reuben J. Hickok, who now has twenty-four acres of this land in apples. He is not 
only prominent in fruit raising, along which line he has been very successful, but 
he also runs his own packing house and thus derives an extra profit from his under- 
taking. A native of Clay county, Nebraska, he was born February 1, 1880, and is a 
son of John G. and Bertha (Olson) Hickok, the former a native of Ohio and the latter 
of Norway. They were early settlers of Nebraska but in 1888 made their way to 
Washington, going to Snohomish. Seven years later, in 1895, the family arrived in 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 159 

YakimcL county and here the father .-ngagtcl in draying at Zillah. which city is still 
his home. He also has a small orchard there. 

Mr. Hickok of this review in the acquirement of his education attended the pub- 
lic schools and subsequently assisted his father until he reached his majority, when, 
in 1901, he took up a homestead claim one mile east of Zillah, comprising one hun- 
dred and sixty acres. All of this was sagebrush. He made a number of valuable im- 
provements here and also instituted modern equipment, thus demonstrating his ideas 
in regard to farming. Later, however, he sold all but thirty-five acres and twenty- 
four acres of this tract is now in apples and he derives a very gratifying income from 
his orcharding. He has not only built a substantial and handsome home but also has 
its own packing house, thus facilitating the shipment of fruit and a storage cellar 
with a capacity of six thousand boxes. 

On September 9, 1900, Mr. Hickok was united in marriage to Miss Leona D. 
Dunham, a daughter of George B. Dunham, the Dunhams being numbered among 
the pioneer families of Yakima county, located on the .\htanum. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Hickok were born three children: Lloyd, Ralph and Wilda. 

The family is highly esteemed by all who know them as they are people of genu- 
ine worth who are ever ready to give their aid to worthy measures undertaken on 
behalf of the general public. Fraternally Mr. Hickok is a member of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows and has held all the chairs in the subordinate lodge and is 
a member of the Grand Lodge. Politically he is a republican but has never found 
time, nor has he the inclination to participate in public afTairs, preferring to do his 
duties as a citizen in his private capacity of voter. There is great credit due him for 
what he has achieved, as he has transformed a tract of wild land into a productive 
orchard which is today one of the valuable estates of Yakima county. 



ALFRED R. GARDNER. 

The Courier-Reporter of Kennewick is one of the foremost newspapers of the 
Yakima valley, having a circulation exceeding eleven hundred, largely in the eastern 
part of Benton county. Its continued growth must be largely ascribed to .Alfred 
R. Gardner, one of the best known and most successful newspaper men and editors 
of this part of the state. A native of Oregon, he was born in Wallowa county, 
January 31, 1884, and is a son of James P. and Mattie J. (Shaver) Gardner. His 
parents were among the pioneers of Oregon, having removed to that state about 
1878 from Kansas by the overland route and having also been among the pioneer 
farming people of the Sunflower state. The father was a native of Wisconsin and 
the mother was born in Kentucky. James P. Gardner died in 1905, but his widow 
survives and makes her home in Walla Walla, Washington. He followed agricul- 
tural pursuits throughout most of his life but in his later years, while at Enter- 
prise, Oregon, he established a private investment and loan business, from which 
he derived a gratifying income. 

.A.lfred R. Gardner was reared under the parental roof and in the acquirement of 
his education attended the public schools of his neighborhood and was graduated in 
such good standing that he received a free scholarship to Whitman Academy, from 
which he was graduated in the class of 1905. The printing and publishing business 
having always held attractions for him, he then began work for the Walla Walla 
Union as a proofreader in 1906 and there remained for four years. In .April, 1909, 
he came to Kennewick and acquired an interest in the Kennewick Reporter, of 
which he became editor. He formerly had been news editor of the L'nion and the 
Statesman of Walla Walla. The Reporter had been founded by Scott Z. Hender- 
son, who is now an attorney of Tacoma, and Mr. Gardner acquired an interest in 
the paper in June, 1909, later buying it outright. On April 1, 1914, he joined the 
publishers of the Kennewick Courier and incorporated the two papers under the 
name of the Kennewick Printing Company, E. C. Tripp acting as president and 
having charge of the printing department. R. E. Reed is vice-president and has 
charge of the linotype department, while A. R. Gardner is secretary and treasurer, 
in charge of the editorial department. The Kennewick Courier was established 



100 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

March 21 , 1902, and the Reporter, January 24, 1904, the founder of the Courier being 
E. P. Greene. It was first called the Columbia Courier. Since the consolidation 
the Courier-Reporter has had a very successful career, its circulation increasing 
from year to year. It is an eight page, six column weekly, all home print, and has 
a circulation of eleven hundred, which largely covers the eastern part of Benton 
county. In its editorial policy it has always stood for progress and development 
and its editorials have ever excited favorable comment because of their trenchant, 
forceful style and have done much good in bringing about improvements. The 
news columns are lively and interesting and there is seldom an item of interest 
that is overlooked by the editorial department. It is a readable home paper, which 
fact is evident in that it finds its way to eleven hundred families. The equipment 
of the Courier-Reporter is thoroughly modern and up-to-date, including the most 
improved linotypes and presses and other appurtenances pertaining to the modern 
printing and publishing establishment. 

On May 24, 1908, Mr. Gardner was united in marriage to Miss Mabel Kirkland, 
of Enterprise, Oregon, a daughter of A. P. and Louise (Clarke) Kirkland, both 
Oregon pioneers, the latter a native of that state, while the former removed there 
while yet a boy. To Mr. and Mrs. Gardner has been born one child, Jean, three 
years of age. 

Mr. Gardner is always interested in progress and development, which he not 
only promotes through his newspaper, but he also serves as secretary of the Com- 
mercial Club of Kennewick, of which he is an ex-president. In his political affilia- 
tions he is a republican, steadfastly standing for the principles of the party but 
without ambition for office. Fraternally he is a member of the Knights of Pythias 
and the principles of brotherhood underlying this organization guide him in his 
conduct toward his fellowmen. Mr. Gardner must be considered one of the most 
valuable citizens of his part of the state, doing much toward making it a better 
place in which to live. 



WLLIAM H. REDMAN. 

William H. Redman is now living retired in Yakima but for many years was 
active and prominent in business and through intelligently directed effort won the 
success that now enables him to rest from further labors. He was born in New- 
bern, Indiana, on the 6th of December, 1848, a son of Lucian G. and Mary (Adams) 
Redman. The mother was a native of Maryland, but her mother with two brothers 
and a sister located in Indiana in pioneer times and in the '30's went to Iowa, casting 
in their lot with the pioneer settlers of that state, which had not yet been organized 
as a territory. Later they returned to Indiana and it was in the Hoosier state thai 
Mary .\dams became the wife of Lucian G. Redman. The latter was a son ol 
Reuben Redman, a native of Kentucky, who in 1832 removed to Columbus, Indiana. 
Lucian G. Redman learned the business of cutting and tailoring, devoting his 
early manhood to that trade, but afterward he purchased a farm five miles east o 
Columbus, Indiana, taking up his abode thereon in 1850. For many years he con 
tinned to cultivate and develop the property, remaining there until his later life, when 
he retired from active farm work, enjoying a well earned rest to the time of his 
death. 

William H. Redman acquired a public school education and then attended 
Hartsville College, of Indiana. He taught school as a young man and thus provided 
for his college course. He also worked on farms through the summer seasons and 
after completing his college training he became a civil engineer, having studied 
surveying at Hartsville College and also further augmenting his ability in that 
direction by private study. He became city and county engineer at Columbus, Indi- 
ana, and later was engaged in railway engineering work. He was advanced until he 
had served as chief engineer of three different railroads. He served as division 
engineer of the Nickle Plate Railroad on thirty-six miles of double track and has 
done engineering work on eleven different railway Hues. In 1888 he came to Wash- 
ington, making his way first to Tacoma and later in the same year arrived in Yakima. 




WILLIAM H. REDMAN 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 163 

After taking up is abode in this city he was chief engineer of the Toppenisli, Sim- 
coe & Western Railway. The road was built over a route to which Mr. Redman 
had very serious objections, feeling that conditions existed that were not at all 
favorable for the selection of that route. He built seventeen miles of the railway, 
however, as the choice of route did not lay with him. Mr. Redman was also for 
twelve years in charge of Indian irrigation projects on the Yakima Indian reserva- 
tion and was in charge of the construction of the reservation canal. His engineering 
work has been of a most important character, contributing much to the development 
and upbuilding of this section of the country, and he deserves great credit for what 
he has accomplished. 

Mr. Redman has also done important work in other connections. He was elected 
and served for five terms as mayor of Yakima. In politics he is a stalwart republi- 
can and was nominated by that party for the office of mayor. At the first election 
it was conceded that he received a majority of two, but on a recount the result was 
declared a tie. This was for a short six weeks' term, at the end of which Mr. Redman 
was formally elected mayor and continued in the office for four terms in all. giving 
to the city a most progressive administration. He closely studied municipal needs 
and opportunities and his labors were productive of most beneficial and gratifying 
results. He studied the problems of the city with the same thoroughness that he 
gave to engineering problems and his labors wroughts for results that were of great 
value to Yakima. He was a member of the first city cominission, when the city 
had adopted the commission form of government. In connection with his other 
work Mr. Redman assisted in the construction of the Selah ditch. Mr. Redman has 
also been very successful at orcharding. At the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at 
St. Louis he exhibited an apple grown in his orchard weighing forty-eight ounces. 
This was the largest apple ever exhibited and he was awarded a gold medal for it. 
Unfortunately the medal was later stolen from Mr. Redman. 

It was on the 4th of July, 1882, that Mr. Redman was married to Miss Carrie 
Kinsley, of Angola, New York, who passed away in Yakima, May 29, 1889. In 1892 
he wedded Carrie Bickroy, of Macon, Missouri. There is one son of the first mar- 
riage, Dwight Raymond, who is now a designing engineer in the United States In- 
dian irrigation service. By the second marriage there were two children but the 
younger died in infancy, the surviving one being Ralph Harrison. 

Fraternally Mr. Redman is a Mason, belonging to Yakima Lodge, Xo. 24, F. 
cS: A. M. He was forinerly a member of the Commercial Club. He has been widely 
known and prominent in this section of the country for many years and was very 
active in business and professional circles but is now living retired, enjoying a rest 
which he has truly earned and richly merits. His course has at. all times marked him 
as a progressive and valued citizen and his personal characteristics have brought him 
the friendship and high regard of many. 



ARCHIE B. MARSHALL. 

Archie B. Marshall, actively engaged in the grocery business in Grandview since 
1916, has built up a trade of large and gratifying proportions and is accounted one 
of the most enterprising and progressive merchants of the town. He comes to the 
west from Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred in Indiana county, that state, on 
the 27th of June, 1858, a son of Archibald and Mary A. (Wadding) Marshall, both 
of whom were natives of Indiana county. The father devoted his life to the occu- 
pation of farming until his labors were stayed by the hand of death. His widow 
survives and is yet living in the Keystone state. 

Archie B. Marshall completed his education in the Glade Run Academy of 
Pennsylvania and in early life became familiar with the occupaton of farming, but 
desirous of entering commercial circles, he established a grocery store at Punxsu- 
tawney, Pennsylvania, and afterward was proprietor of a store at Indiana, Penn- 
sylvania. The year 1906 witnessed his removal to the northwest. He made his way 
first to Oregon and in 1907 came to Grandview, Washington, where he purchased 



164 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

twenty acres of orchard land, thirteen acres of which had been planted to fruit. 
Later he sold this place, disposing of it about 1908. He afterward spent another 
year in the east, but the lure of the west was upon him and he returned to Grand- 
view, where he had his home. He bought seven and a half acres of orchard land 
near Grandview and later he spent the year 1915 in the grocery business in Yakima. 
-\gain he returned to Grandview, where he has since been engaged in the grocery 
trade and has the largest store of the town. He also purchased another grocery 
store in Grandview and conducts both establishments under the name of ."V. B. 
Marshall & Son. He is liberally patronized and is regarded as a forceful and 
resourceful business man whose progressive spirit is manifest in the gratifying 
success which has attended him. 

In 1887 Mr. Marshall was united in marriage to Miss Emma Diven, who was 
born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Frank Diven, a farmer. Mr. 
and Mrs. Marshall are the parents of two children: Earl, who died at the age of 
two years: and Fred D., who married Gladys Evans and is in business with his father. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marshall are members of the Presbyterian church and he gives 
his political allegiance to the Republican party. He was active in township affairs 
in Pennsylvania, filling a number of offices, and has served as a member of the 
town council of Grandview. He belongs to the Business Men's .Association and is 
a most alert and energetic man who has been very active as an orchardist, con- 
ducting other orchards besides his own. He has become expert in that line and 
his experience and knowledge enable him to speak with authority upon the subject 
of fruit raising in the Yakima valley. He established the grocery store for his 
son and in both branches of business he is meeting with well merited and well 
deserved success. 



ROY P. BULLAN. 



Roy P. BuUan is actively identified with farming interests in Yakima county 
as manager of the Bullan estate. He was born in Crookston, Minnesota, on the 
26th of April, 1885, a son of Jesse P. and Maria A. (Tubbs) Bullan, who were natives 
of Michigan and of New York respectively. They removed to Minnesota in 1882 
and the father was there engaged in farming until 1901, when he made his way to 
the Pacific northwest, settling in Yakima county, where he purchased twenty-five 
acres of land two miles west of the city of Y^akima on Nob Hill. He planted his 
land to fruit trees and after a time sold thirteen acres of his property. In his 
fruit-raising interests he met with success, having been very careful in the selection 
of his nursery stock and in the care of his trees and the preparation of the soil. 
He was a man of excellent business ability and of unfaltering energy. At the time 
of the Civil war, however, he put aside all business and personal considerations and 
responded to the country's call for troops. He was living at that time in Wisconsin' 
and he joined Company A of the Third Wisconsin Cavalry, with which he served 
from 1861 until 1865, participating in a number of hotly contested engagements 
and proving his loyalty and valor on various southern battlefields. He died on the 
19th of September. 1917, having for a number of years survived his wife, who passed 
away on the 21st of July, 1904. Both were consistent members of the Methodist 
church and their sterling worth gained for them the high regard, confidence and 
good will of all with whom they were brought in contact. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Bullan were born seven children: Edith, who died at the age 
of two years; Eva M., the wife of E. B. Himmelsbach, of Yakima county; Clara E., 
the wife of E. E. Hanna, deceased; Mamie A., living on Nob Hill, who became the 
wife of A. W. Brewer, who was killed in a street car accident; Russell J.; Ruby E., 
at home; and Roy P., of this review. 

The last named acquired a public school education and became an active assis- 
tant of his father in the work of the ranch. He soon familiarized himself with the 
best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the trees as well as the harvesting of 
the crop and placing it upon the market and since his father's death he has acted 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 165 

as executor of the estate. He is an alert, energetic and progressive young business 
man and his labors have brought him substantial success. 

Mr. Bullan is a member of the Grange and is interested in the work of that 
organization for the dissemination of knowledge that is of benefit in promoting the 
agricultural and horticultural development of the state. His political views are in 
accord with the principlss of the republican party and his religious faith is that of 
the Methodist church. 



FRANK D. CLEMMER. 

Frank D. Clemmer. filling the position of county clerk, and ex-officio clerk of 
the superior court, of Yakima county, where he has made his home since December, 
1891, was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, on the 31st of May. 1868, a son of 
Abraham G. and Elizabeth Clemmer. The mother died about 1876, when thirty-five 
years of age, and the father afterward married and removed to the west in 1897, 
taking up his abode in Yakima. His last days were spent in retirement from busi- 
ness in the home of his son, Frank D., with whom he continued until called to his 
final rest. 

Frank D. Clemmer, following the completion of his public school education, 
entered the creamery business in Pennsylvania and was connected therewith for 
two years. He then turned his attention to harboring, which business he followed 
for twenty years. In December, 1891, he arrived in Yakima and became identified 
with a barber shop, purchasing an interest in the business of Pat Jordan in 1896. 
He carried on the business until 1910, when he sold his interests. He was then 
called to public office, being elected constable, and he served in that position for 
six years or until 1916, when he was elected county clerk and ex-ofificio clerk of the 
superior court. He took the office in January, 1917, for a two years' term. 

On the 2d of November, 1899, Mr. Clemmer was united in marriage with Miss 
Minnie I. Sherwood, of Yakima, who was born in Minnesota and is a daughter of 
C. A. Sherwood, who came to Yakima in 1892. They have three children; Lenore, 
Ruth and Frances. 

Mr. Clemmer belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and to the 
encampment and in the subordinate lodge has filled all of the chairs. He was a 
delegate to the state convention of the order at Bellingham in 1902. He likewise 
has membership with the Woodmen of the World and was a delegate to its national 
convention in Denver in 1902 and in Los -Angeles in 1905. For eight years he served 
as secretary of the local camp of Woodmen and he also occupied the poaiton of 
secretary of the Barbers' LTnion of Yakima for several years. In 1896 he went to 
San Francisco, where he pursued a course in Hcald's Business College, from which 
he was graduated in 1897, thus further qualifying for life's practical and responsible 
duties. For the past twenty years he has been a member of the Commercial Club 
of Yakima and is interested in all of its well defined plans and projects for the 
upbuilding of the city and its improvement along all those lines which are a matter 
of civic virtue and civic pride. He votes with the republican party and his religious 
faith is that of the First Church of Christ. He is well known as a substantial and 
representative citizen of Yakima and enjoys the high respect, confidence and good 
will of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



CHARLES WILEY. 



Agricultural interests of more than ordinary importance were for years repre- 
sented by Charles Wiley, a member of the famous pioneer family which has been 
most helpfully and intimately connected with the history of development in Yakima 
county. Mr. Wiley was born March 7, 1873. He was a native of Yakima county 
and a son of Hugh and Mary Ann (TufFt) Wiley, natives of Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, and Quebec, Canada, respectively, who are mentioned more exten- 

(8) 



166 HISTORY OF YA'KIMA VALLEY 

sively in connection with the sketch of James J. Wiley, a brother of our subject. 

Charles Wiley was carefully reared by his parents for life's arduous duties. In 
his youth he became thoroughly acquainted with pioneer conditions, which then 
maintained in Yakima county, and thus his life's work was closely connected with 
the early history of the county to its present state of wonderful development. In 
the acquirement of his education he attended Woodcock Academy and subsequently 
ranched in the Ahtanum district until his death. In 1904 he acquired one hundred 
and forty-five and a half acres on the Ahtanum which were partially improved and 
to the cultivation of which he gave his further attention, becoming prominent in the 
stock and dairy business. He closely studied along this line and became in fact 
a leader of dairy interests in his section of the state, also being very progressive in 
general farming. He instituted many new methods which set an example to other 
agriculturists and thus not only attained individual prosperity but greatly con- 
tributed toward making this one of the richest sections of the state. 

On the 22d of February, 1905, Mr. Wiley was united in marriage to Miss Ellen 
M. Fear, a native of England, who with her parents came to the United States in 
1889 when she was but a child. The family located on the .\htanum, in Yakima 
county, and Mrs. Fear passed away in Yakima on December 4, 1890. Mr. Fear 
has successfully followed agricultural lines and is now a resident of Yakima. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Wiley were born two children: Cecil Albert, whose birth occurred 
on the 20th of February, 1906; and Stanley Charles, born March 7, 1908. 

Mrs. Wiley is a member of the Congregational church and interested not only 
in church work but also in all movements undertaken on behalf of the uplift of the 
human race. She is charitably inclined and ever ready to extend a helping hand to 
those whose life's course is not made easy and thus she is greatly beloved because 
of her qualities of heart and mind. 

Mr. Wiley was a republican and ever stood up for the principles of that party, 
steadfastly supporting its candidates. In his passing on November 15, 1916, when 
but forty-three years of age, Yakima county lost one of its most enterprising agri- 
culturists and a man who was ready to give his aid to every movement that was 
worth while. His death was not only a great blow to his immediate family, who 
lost in him a devoted husband and father, but also to many friends, all of whom 
had come to appreciate his highmindedness and loyal character. His memory will 
live as a benediction to all who knew him and his work along agricultural lines 
stands as a monument to his enterprise and industry, being a part of the prosperity- 
creating development in Yakima county that in turn makes for better and higher 
and more perfect conditions for the enjoyment of life here. 



FRANK CARPENTER. 

Frank Carpenter, -president of the Cle Elum State Bank, was born upon a tarm 
near Girard, Illinois, June 5, 1871, a son of Charles and Lottie (Peak) Carpenter. 
The father, a native of Iowa, was a son of a pioneer settler of that state. He 
crossed the plains to California in 1864 and spent three years in that state and in 
Oregon, after which he returned to Illinois by way of the Isthmus of Panama. He 
then settled near Girard, Illinois, where he resided until 1906, when he came to Cle 
Elum, Washington, where he is now living retired. He assisted in opening the first 
coal mine at Girard, Illinois, and was there engaged in merchandising as well as 
being a mine owner and operator. His wife was born in Illinois. 

Frank Carpenter acquired a public school education in his native state and in 
September, 1888, became connected with the United States land office at Lamar, 
Colorado, where he remained for five months. He then went to Pueblo, Colorado, 
where he was with an abstract firm for two months, and on the 30th of April, 1889, 
he arrived in Tacoma, Washington. On the 9th of May of the same year he became 
messenger boy in the Merchants National Bank of Tacoma and remained with that 
institution until 1893. He was afterward employed along various lines of business 
until 1896, when he went to Spokane, Washington, and was connected with W. H. 
Adams & Company, commission merchants, for a period of two years. In 1898 he 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 167 

became a resident of Libby, Montana, where he took a position as accountant with 
the Northwest Mining Corporation of London, having charge of the business in his 
line in connection with the Snowshoe mine of Libby, Montana. There he continued 
until 190L In 1902 he again became connected with the banking busiess as cashier 
of the Bank of Edwall in Washington, with which he was associated until October 
31, 1904, when he came to Cle Elum and organized the Cle Elum State Bank. This 
was the first banking institution to become a permanent factor in the business life 
of the town. The Cle Elum State Bank was opened November 2. 1904, the first 
officers being: Frank Carpenter, president; Thomas L. Gamble, vice-president; and 
R. R. Short, cashier. The bank had an authorized capital stock of twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars, with fifteen thousand dollars paid in, and at the end of the first 
year they had only twenty-nine thousand dollars on deposit. From that time for- 
ward, however, the business steadily grew and at the end of the second year they 
had eighty-five thousand dollars on deposit. In 1906 they erected a substantial brick 
building, in which the bank w^as soon comfortably housed. In 1908 Mr. Gamble 
passed away and the following year Henry Smith was elected to the vice-presidency 
of the bank, continuing in the office until his death in 1915. In 1916 he was succeeded 
by William Rees, who is still in that position. Walter J^ Reed was elected a director 
in 190,T but has also departed this life. The other directors aside from the president 
and vice-president are M. C. Miller. Joseph Smith and Charles Carpenter. Today 
the Cle Elum State Bank has a paid in capital stock of fifty thousand dollars, with 
a surplus of ten thousand dollars and undivided profits of about five thousand dollars, 
while its deposits amount to almost eight hundred thousand dollars. The capital 
stock was increased in 1909 and was all paid in at that time. Mr. Short retired as 
cashier in March, 1905, and L. R. Nelson succeeded him. In 1906 the bank estab- 
lished a branch, known as the Roslyn Branch of the Cle Elum State Bank, with 
D. G. Bing as its first cashier. He was sujcceeded by L. R. Nelson as cashier and 
in July, 1918, Joseph Smith was appointed to the position. A modern brick bank build- 
ing was erected at Roslyn in 1908. 

On the 3d of June, 1908, Mr. Carpenter was married to Miss Norah Carr, a 
native of Girard, Illinois, and a daughter of Harmen and Margaret (Bowersox) 
Carr, natives of Miami county, Ohio. The father opened the first exclusive clothing 
and men's furnishing goods store in Girard, Illinois, in 1868, in which business he 
remained until he passed away in 1897. Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter were schoolmates, 
so that their acquaintance dated from early life. They have one daughter, Margaret. 

Fraternally Mr. Carpenter is a Mason, belonging to Cle Elum Lodge No. 139, 
A. F. & A. M., and he also has membership with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks, while his wife is a member of the Universalis! church. In politics he is a 
republican and he served as mayor of Cle Elum. for a year. He has been chairman 
of the Liberty Loan drives here, doing splendid work in that connection, raising 
the quota for the town during the honor week. He is interested in the promotion 
of every public enterprise that has for its motive the upbuilding of the community 
and the betterment of humanity. This characteristic with marked patriotism entitles 
him to stand in the class of the highest type of .American manhood. 



W. N. Ll'BY. 



W. N. Luby, a horticulturist and a merchant of Wapato, whose business inter- 
ests are wisely, carefully and successfully directed, was born in Oconto, W'isconsin, 
on the 29th of January, 1873, a son of William and Mary Luby, who in the year 1904 
became residents of Seattle, Washington, where the father passed away, while the 
mother still lives there. Mr. Luby was a real estate dealer and land operator and 
was recognized as a representative business man of his community. 

After mastering the branches of learning taught in the public schools W. N. 
Luby entered the employ of the Bank of Ironwood at Ironwood, Michigan, where 
he served as assistant cashier. Later he was with Armour & Company for ten 
years as traveling auditor, traveling out of Chicago, and in 1905 he arrived in 
Wapato, where he erected the first building on the new townsite. He afterward 



168 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

organized the Wapato Trading Company and built a one-storj- frame building thirty 
by eighty feet. This has twice been rebuilt in the intervening period and the busi- 
ness block is now fifty-five by one hundred and twenty-five feet, one storj' and 
basement. It is utilized as a department store, Mr. Luby handling a large and 
attractive line of ladies' and men's ready-to-wear clothing, dry goods, hardware and 
groceries. Something of the volume of his business is indicated in the fact that 
he now employs from eight to ten people. In 1913 he was joined by his brother, 
C. J. Luby, who is now a partner in the business, and they rank with the leading 
and representative merchants of this part of the state, characterized in all that they 
do by a spirit of enterprise and progressiveness. Mr. Luby is also the owner of a 
fine fruit ranch of eighty acres, devoted to the raising of apples, pears, peaches and 
apricots. 

Mr. Luby is a member of the Elks lodge. No. 318, of Yakima, also of the Wapato 
Commercial Club, of which he served as president for two terms, covering 1916 and 
1917. His political alegiance is given to the republican party, of which he has ever 
been a stanch advocate. He is recognized as a man of genuine worth, standing for 
all that is progressive in citizenship and also for all projects and interests which have 
to do with civic progress and improvement. As a citizen he has co-operated in many 
plans that have been directly beneficial to Wapato. 



PHIL A. DITTER. 



Phil A. Ditter has throughout his entire business career, which began when he 
was but thirteen years of age, been identified with mercantile interests and is today 
at the head of the oldest retail business of Yakima. The story of his thrift and enter- 
prise is an inspiring one and should serve to encourage others. He was born in 
Shakopee, Minnesota, May 11, 1868, a son of Henry and Katherine (Mechtel) Ditter, 
who were pioneer residents of Yakima, where they arrived on the 23d of July, 1884. 
The father was a native of Baden, Germany, but was a lad of onh- fifteen j-ears when 
he came to America, making his way at once to Fond du Lac. Wisconsin, where he 
was reared to manhood. After attaining his majority he removed to Minnesota and 
was there united in marriage, in 1867, to Miss Katherine Mechtel. Before North 
Yakima had been founded Mr. Ditter removed to the west, traveling by stage from 
The Dalles to Yakima City and later removing to North Yakima when the latter 
place was founded. There he remained to the time of his death and was ever one of 
its most loyal and progressive citizens. He was engaged in merchandising from an 
early age, although about sixteen years before his demise he turned his interests over 
to his sons and retired from active business. Subsequent to his arrival in the north- 
west he joined the firm of Hoscheid & Bartholet, proprietors of a general store in 
Yakima city. It was the first dry goods establishment of Yakima and had been 
founded several years before by Peter T. Gervais. After a year's connection with the 
business Mr. Ditter purchased the interests of his first partners and remained for 
two and a half years at Yakima City. He removed the business to North Yakima 
in the fall of 1888 and opened a store in the west half of the First National Bank 
building, for which he paid a rental of fifty dollars per month. He began dealing in 
dry goods, men's furnishings and shoes, in a building twenty-five by eighty-two feet. 
He remained in active connection with the business until January, 1893, and then 
turned it over to his two sons, Phil A. and Joseph E. Retiring from active life, he 
then spent his remaining days in the enjoyment of a well earned rest until called to 
his final home on the 29th of November, 1908. He had for about three years sur- 
vived his first wife, who died in 1905. He was highly esteemed as a most enter- 
prising and progressive citizen as well as a merchant and was an active democrat 
but did not seek or desire office. His religious faith was that of the Catholic church 
and he was an active member and communicant of St. Joseph's church and also an 
interested member of the Knights of Columbus. His family numbered three chil- 
dren, the two brothers previously mentioned and a sister, Anna, who became the 
wife of Charles R. Donovan, cashier of the First National Bank. He belonged also to 
the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin and to St. Joseph's Central Verein. After losing 




HENRY DITTER 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 171 

his first wife he was married at Port Townscnd to Miss Bessie March, who survives 
him. Those who knew him entertained for him the warmest regard for he had 
proven himself a man of genuine worth in business, in citizenship and in the relations 
of private life. 

Phil A. Ditter acquired his education in public schools and also in a Sisters' 
school of Minnesota. He started work when a boy of thirteen years in his father's 
store and has been identified with mercantile interests since that time. Prior to 1893 
the firm of which he is now a member conducted business under the name of Henry 
Ditter but since that date has been carried on under the style of Ditter Brothers. 
In 1901 they erected their new store building between Second and Third streets, on 
East Yakima avenue. It is a two-story and basement structure fifty by one hundred 
and thirty feet and they also own a fifty-foot frontage lot east of the store and ex- 
pect to enlarge their building after the war. They now carry an extensive line of 
dry goods and ladies' ready-to-wear clothing and their stock includes all that the 
latest market affords. Theirs is the oldest retail business in Yakima, having been 
in existence for a Q.uarter of a century. Ditter Brothers employ the most progres- 
sive methods in the conduct and management of their business and have thus fol- 
lowed in the footsteps of their father, who was so long an honored and respected 
merchant of the city. 

Phil A. Ditter was married on the 13th of June, 1894, to Miss Mary A. Duffey, 
of Minnesota, and their children are: Henry J., twenty-one years of age, residing in 
Seattle; -Amor P.. who is a student in Gonzaga University of Spokane: and Berna- 
dine A., at home. Two other children died in infancy. 

Mr. Ditter has membership with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and, 
like his father, is identified with the Knights of Columbus, having held all of the 
chairs in the local organization. He has likewise filled all of the offices in the 
Catholic Order of Foresters and again Hkc his father is a communicant of St. Joseph's 
Catholic church. He has been active in associated charity work and was one of 
the organizers of the Associated Charities of Yakima, and has served as president 
for five years. In politics he is an independent republican and he belongs to the 
Commercial Club, in which he has served on the governing board. He is actuated in 
all that he does by a spirit of enterprise and progress that falters not in the face of 
obstacles and difficulties but is constantly seeking out new, improved and progres- 
sive methods whereby he may reach the desired goal. His establishment is an im- 
portant factor in the commercial circles of Yakima, where the name of Ditter has 
long been an honored one. 



JOSEPH E. DITTER. 



The name of Ditter has long been an honored one in commercial circles in 
Yakima and for a quarter of a century Joseph E. Ditter has been associated with 
his brother in the ownership and conduct of a business with which their father had 
previously been long connected. Joseph E. Ditter was born in St. James, Minnesota. 
December 6, 1871, a son of Henry Ditter, who is mentioned at length in connection 
with the sketch of Phil A. Ditter on another page of this work. 

Spending his youthful days under the parental roof, Joseph E. Ditter acquired 
a public and parochial school education and received his initial business training 
in his father's store and under the father's direction. He thoroughly mastered busi- 
ness principles and in 1893 took over the business, the father in that year turning 
over his interests to his sons. Henry Ditter had long been a most active and prom- 
inent figure in commercial circles and the splendid qualities which he displayed 
throughout his entire mercantile career seem to have descended to his sons, who 
have been his most worthy successors. They are both men of marked business en- 
terprise, keen discernment and indefatigable energy and these qualities are com- 
bined with straightforward dealing. They have always followed constructive meas- 
ures in the conduct of their business and have built up their interests according to 
the most advanced commercial standards. 

In April, 1901, Joseph E. Ditter was united in marriage to Miss Alma L. Schanno, 



172 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

a native of The Dalles, .Oregon, and to them have been born four children: Harold, 
Florence, Edward and Joseph. 

Fraternally Mr. Ditter is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks and also with the Knights of Columbus and in the latter organization has filled 
all of the chairs. He likewise has membership with the Catholic Order of Foresters 
and is a member of St. Joseph's Catholic church. His political allegiance is given to 
the republican party and he keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the 
day, diligently and earnestly supporting every measure or movement that he believes 
will prove of public benefit. He is a member of the Country Club and has a wide 
acquaintance in Yakima, where he has made his home for so many years and where 
his course at all times has measured up to the highest standards. 



■ CHARLES H. FORBES. 

Charles H. Forbes dates his residence in Yakima county from 1905 and is 
identified with its horticultural interests and development. He was born in Ver- 
ona township, Faribault county, Minnesota, August 22, 1858, a son of Benjman F. 
and Sophronia Forbes, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of New 
York. They were married, however, in Wisconsin and in the year 1857 removed 
westward to Minnesota, casting in their lot among the pioneer settlers of that 
state. The father devoted his attention to farming there until the outbreak of the 
Civil war, when he responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting in Company 
D, Ninth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment, with which he served until the 
close of the war. He continued to make his home in Verona township to the 
time of his death, which occurred in 1902. • 

Charles H. Forbes was still comparatively young when he took charge of the 
home farm and his early training and experience were along' that line, for when 
but a boy in years he became familiar with the work of the fields. He continued to 
follow farming in the middle west until 1905, when he sold his property, embrac- 
ing two hundred and forty acres of land. He then made his way to Yakima, Wash- 
ington, and purchased a house and lot at No. 116 South Tenth avenue. For two 
years he continued to reside in the city and during that period was engaged in 
the hay trade. In 1907 he purchased ten acres of land two and one half miles south- 
west of Yakima and has since replanted a considerable portion of this. He has 
six acres in apples, pears, peaches, plums and cherries and his orchards are in ex- 
cellent bearing condition. He built the barn upon his place and has in other ways 
greatly improved the property. His mother now lives with him and has reached 
the age of eighty-two years. 

In politics Mr. Forbes is a prohibitionist, having long been a stanch supporter 
of the prohibition cause. His religious faith is that of the Baptist church and his 
sterling worth of character has gained for him the high esteem and warm regard of 
all with whom he has been brought in contact throughout the period of his residence 
in this section of the country. 



WILLIAM M. McGOWAN. 

William M. McGowan, the secretary and treasurer of the Toppenish Trading 
Company and an active factor in the continued development of its business, was 
born in Huron county, Ontario, Canada, in 1871, a son of Robert and Isabella (Cum- 
mings) McGowan, who in the year 1889 came to the northwest, settling at Salem, 
Oregon. The father was a farmer by occupation. 

Public school opportunities qualified William M. McGowan for the practical 
duties of life. In his youthful days he was employed in various ways and in 1889 
accepted a position with the Wells Fargo Express Company at Salem, Oregon. 
In 1891 he removed to Portland, Oregon, and afterward was with the banking depart- 
ment of the express company, remaining in that connection until the company sold 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 173 

out to the United States Bank in 1905. Mr. McGowan was afterward identified with 
the United States National Bank of Portland until the fall of 1906, when he removed 
lo Everett, Washington, where he embarked in business on his own account as a 
dealer in mens' and women's clothing and furnishings. In June, 1907, he came to 
Toppenish, where he entered into active connection with the Toppenish Trading 
Company, which was incorporated in 1908. He was elected its secretary and treas- 
urer and has since served in this dual position, covering the period of a decade. 
Through the intervening years he has bent his energies to administrative direction 
and executive control and in all things he has advised a constructive policy in busi- 
ness, ever recognizing the fact that satisfied patrons arc the best advertisement. He 
has not feared competition because of the reliable business- methods of the company, 
displayed in the conduct of the business, and the growth of the trade has been 
most substantial. Mr. McGowan has also been vice president and one of the direc- 
tors of the Traders Bank since its organization in 1908 and is likewise a director of 
the First Xational Bank.. 

On the 1st of November, 1899, Mr. McGowan was married to Miss Ella Pohle, 
a native of Salem, Oregon. He belongs to the Toppenish Commercial Club and gives 
hearty endorsement to all of its well defined plans for the advancement of the city's 
business interests and for the promotion of its civic welfare. In politics he is a 
republican, and while he has never sought for desired political office he has served 
for six years on the school board and has done everything in his power to further 
the interests of the schools in this locality. His religious faith is that of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church and he has been a devoted follower of its teachings, doing 
all in his power to promote the moral progress as well as the material development 
of the community in which he makes his home. 



CLARENCE S. PALMER. 

Clarence S. Palmer has been identified with the livery business in EUensburg 
for a third of a century and throughout the entire period has enjoyed a large patron- 
age which was a profitable one until the automobile cut in on the business. He was 
born near Norwich, Connecticut, March 26, 1856, a son of Stephen R. and Emeline 
(Vanote) Palmer. The parents, removing westward in 1857, settled in Illinois, 
where they lived for a decade, and in 1867 removed to Menomonie, Wisconsin. 
There the father followed the occupation of farming throughout his remaining 
days, both he and his wife passing away in that state. At the time of the Civil 
war, he put aside all business and personal considerations and responded to the 
country's call for troops, valiantly aiding the Union cause on various southern 
battlefields. 

On the 16th of April, 1877, Clarence S. Palmer, then a young man of twenty-one 
years, left home and started for the Black Hills, where he spent four months. He 
afterward went to Cheyenne, Wyoming, and was engaged in railway construction 
work in that locality for a few months. He then devoted two years to freighting 
between Colorado Springs and Leadville, driving an eight-mule team. The year 
1879 witnessed his arrival in New Mexico, where he was employed on construction 
work on the Sante Fe Railroad. He subsequently returned to Colorado Springs 
and rode the range as a cowboy for one summer. On the expiration of that period 
he returned to Leadville, where he engaged in hauling ores through the winter, and 
then again made his way to New Mexico, where he remained for a year, devoting 
his attention to railway work. He afterward spent a winter in the vicinity of Den- 
ver and subsequently made his way to Pocatello, Idaho, where he arrived about 
1881. He was again engaged in railway construction work in that locality until 
he went to Pendleton, Oregon, where he lived for a short time. Making his way 
northward, he settled at Ainsworth, Washington, where he was employed on the 
construction of the Northern Pacific Railroad, taking contract work in connection 
with the building of the road through the Yakima valley. In February, 1886, he 
established his home in EUensburg, where he embarked in the livery business, in 
which he has since been engaged. In April, 1890, he built a fine big barn, which 



174 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

he is still conducting. This is the joint property of himself and his brother, Arthur 
V. They have been continuously associated in business since the spring of 1880 
and is all of their travels, the closest connection existing between them in all of 
their interests. 

On the 20th of March. 1888, Mr. Palmer was married to Miss Lulu H. Simon, 
who was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin, a daughter of Andrew Simon, who removed 
with his family to Seattle in 1884. Mrs. Palmer became a resident of Yakima City 
in that year and became a teacher in the public schools in 1883, being employed as 
one of the first teachers of the city. In 1886 she taught school in Kittitas county, 
making the journey hither by stage. She became the wife of Mr. Palmer in Seattle 
and to them have been born three children. George S., a draftsman living in Seattle, 
is married and has one child. Emeline is the wife of H. R. Bartlett, who is a lieuten- 
and in the United States navy, doing geodetic survey work. Mrs. Bartlett resides in 
New York. Clarice L., also a resident of New York, married Fred Zeusler, who 
is a senior lieutenant in the United States navy, and they have a baby girl. 

Mr. Palmer is a democrat in his political views, and fraternally is connected with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Elks lodge No. 1102 of Ellensburg. 
He attends the Unitarian church and is interested in all those forces which make 
for the material, intellectual, social, political and moral welfare of his community. 
.\s the years have passed on and he has prospered in his undertakings he has ac- 
cumulated considerable property, which places him now in comfortable financial 
circumstances. He is a well known pioneer settler, thirty-three years having been 
added to the cycle of the centuries since he took up his abode in Ellensburg, while 
tor a much longer period he has been connected with the northwest. He has wit- 
nessed much of its growth and progress as the years have passed and at all times 
has co-operated heartily in plans and measures to promote the public good. 



GEORGE I. CLITHERO. 

George I. Clithero acquired a public school education and subsequently attended 
was born in Cloud county, Kansas, May 8, 1873, a son of James and Xancy (Mc- 
Eckron) ■ Clithero, the former a native of England, while the latter was born in 
Xew York. The year 1869 witnessed their arrival in Kansas, where the father took 
up the occupation of farming. Later in life, however, he turned his attention to 
merchandising, but both he and his wife have now passed away. 

George I. Clithero. a well known representative of hotel interests in Yakima, 
Campbell University at Holton, Kansas. In e:(rly manhood he took up the pro- 
fession of teaching, whicli he followed in the Sunflower state with marked success 
for seven years, but believing that broader opportunities were furnished in other 
lines of business, he then left the schoolroom to enter the mercantile field and carried 
on commercial pursuits in Kansas until March, 1908, when he removed to Yakima. 
Here he purchased the Cadwell Hotel, now known as the Merit Hotel, and con- 
ducted it for seven years. In 1911 he opened the Warfield Hotel of twenty-four 
rooms and also the Butler Hotel, containing twenty-eight rooms, but in 1917 he sold 
the Warfield. In January, 1914, he purchased the Rinkcr Hotel of twenty-six rooms, 
and of this is still proprietor. In January, 1917, he purchased the Lessard Hotel, 
of twenty-six rooms, in July, 1917, the Empire Hotel of eighty-five rooms, and on 
October 1, 1918, the Pacific Hotel of sixty rooms, which latter is now connected with the 
Empire Hotel by a ten-foot bridge. They are all outside rooms and the two hotels 
are thoroughly modern in construction, equipment and appointments. Formerly Mr. 
Clithero was proprietor of six hotels and is now conducting five, which, together, 
contain two hundred and twenty rooms. He is well known as a progressive hotel 
man, actuated by a spirit of enterprise in all that he undertakes. 

On the 26th of May. 1898. Mr. Clithero was united in marriage to Miss Myrtle 
Linville. a native of Missouri and a daughter of Augustus J. Linville, who was in turn 
a descendant of Beniamin Linville, one of the pioneers of Pennsylvania. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Clithero have been born eleven children. Russell L. Clithero, eighteen years of 




GEORGE I. CLITHERO 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 177 

age, was first with Company B of the Thirtieth Engineers of the United States army, 
and is now in France. At the time of signing the armistice he had been a member 
lor two months of Company B, F'irst Regiment, Gas Infantry, and he was at the 
front lor a period of ten months. He is a graduate of the high school, and, although 
so young, is actuated by a spirit of loyalty so sincere that it prompted him to join 
the colors. Raymond is now a high school student. Margaret, Laura, Dorothy, 
Kuth, Irving, i-ois, i-lorence, James and Albert are all at home. Irving and Lois are 
twins. 

Mr. Clithero and his wife are members of the First Pre-sbyterian church and he 
Holds membership also with the Knights and Ladies of Security and with the Com- 
mercial Llub. In politics he is a republican and he is a very active temperance man. 
No bars have been conducted in connection with his hotels and he holds to the high- 
est standards as to the patronage which he accepts and the service which he renders 
in connection with hotel management. His home is a fine modern residence of eleven 
rooms on North Third street and its hospitality is enjoyed by many friends of the 
family, for the Clitheros are well known and highly respected in Yakima. 

Mrs. Clithero's father was one of the pioneers of the northwest, having crossed 
the plains in 1852, at which time he took up a homestead where Olympia, Washington, 
novv stands. He was a personal friend of Isaac I. Stevens, the first territorial governor 
of Washington. Mr. Linville returned to Ohio in 1857 and there resided for some 
years but again made his way to Washington and settled in Yakima, where he passed 
away in 1911. His widow is still living in Yakima at the age of eighty years. 

Mr. Clithero came to Yakima without capital, hi fact he borrowed the money 
with which he embarked in the hotel business and since that time he has won success. 
He has reason to be proud of the fact that he has ever conducted clean, moral hotels 
and Yakima is to be congratulated that such a man has cast in his lot with hers and 
is seeking thus to elevate the interests of the city. His prosperity has been honorably 
won and his record proves that enterprise and progressiveness are yet dominant 
elements in the attainment of success. 



SAMUEL D. LIXSE. 



Many have been the contributions which Samuel D. Linse has made toward 
agricultural development in the Tieton district of Yakima county through the de- 
velopment of an agricultural property comprising forty-four acres, which is largely 
devoted to fruit raising. He has introduced efficient horticultural methods and 
thereby has not only attained prosperity for himself but has given to many an 
example that may be profitably followed. A native of Minnesota, he was born in 
McLeod county on the 2Sth of July, 1870, and is a son of Fred and Anna (Berg) 
Linse, Minnesota pioneers. In that state the father engaged in agricultural pursuits 
until the family removed to Day county. South Dakota, in 1881 and there he con- 
tinued along the same line until 1899. After spending three years in North Dakota 
he brought his family to Yakima county, where he now owns ten acres on Nob 
Hill, making this place his home. His wife has passed away. 

Samuel D. Linse was but eleven years of age when the family made their way 
to South Dakota and received his education in the schools of Minnesota and the 
Dakotas. He early became thoroughly acquainted with agricultural methods under 
the able guidance of his father and accompanied the family on their removal to 
Yakima county, where he bought twenty acres of land on Nob Hill, ten of which 
he devoted to orchard. When he acquired the property five acres were already 
planted to orchard. He paid one hundred and fifty dollars per acre for this property 
and sold the same for one thousand dollars per acre. In 1908 Mr. Linse bought 
a third interest in six hundred and twelve acres on the Tieton but he has now sold 
all of his land except forty-four acres. He bestowed great care upon his land, built 
suitable barns and erected a fine residence, thus in every way enhancing its value. 
Twenty-four acres of his tract is devoted to apples and he derives a most gratify- 
ing annual income from this. His is considered one of the finest ranches on the 



178 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Tieton. The remainder of the land, comprising t\vent\- acres, is under the plow or 
in hay. 

In 1896 Mr. Linse was united in marriage to Miss Emma Altman, a native of 
Wisconsin and a daughter of J. and Louise Altman. Her father is now a success- 
ful agriculturist of North Dakota, but her mother has passed away. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Linse were born six children: Edward, residing in Seattle; George and Esther, 
at home; and Gertrude, Charles and Clarence, all of whom are deceased. 

The parents take an active and helpful part in the growth and development of 
their section of the county along material as well as moral lines and both are 
devoted members of the Evangelical Association, the services of which they regularly 
attend. In politics Mr. Linse is a republican, steadfastly supporting the principles 
of that party. There is great credit due him for what he has achieved and he is 
honored for the qualities which have made that achievement possible, for 
he is an industrious, progressive, reliable agriculturist and business man who 
has been especially successful as an orchardist. He is very fond of hunting and 
when the season draws near goes deer shooting, deriving from this healthful and 
noble sport recreation and diversion which permit him to take up with renewed 
vigor his duties and labors along his chosen occupation. He is a true sportsman, 
being a sincere lover of nature and all things that live in the open. All movements 
undertaken on behalf of the general public find in him a warm champion and he has 
made many friends in Yakima county, being ever ready to extend a helping hand 
to those whom he may aid by advice, encouragement or through more substantial 
succor. 



WILLIAM S. CLARK. 

Many are tlie successful ranchers and cattle raisers of the Pacific west who 
have come to this prosperous section from the state of Missouri, where William S. 
Clark was born in Livingston county, June 16, 1858, a son of John H. and Mary 
Jane (Moore) Clark. The father, a native of Ohio, removed to Missouri in 1844, 
when the seeds of civilization had hardly been planted in that then new "western" 
state. A loyal son of his country, he served in the Mexican war, turning his attention 
to agricultural pursuits after the conflict was ended. Mrs. Clark was born in Ten- 
nessee and it was in Missouri that she was married to John H. Clark. In 1859 the 
family removed to Kansas and for seventeen years that state remained their home. 
In 1876 the spirit of western enterprise prompted them to seek the far-oflf lands 
of the state of Washington and they made the overland trip to Walla Walla. Four 
years later, or in 1880, Yakima county became their residence and here John H. 
Clark bought a. relinquishment on eighty acres of land on the upper Naches, to the 
cultivation of which he devoted his remaining days, passing away in 1894. His 
widow survived him but a year, her demise occurring in 1895. Both were numbered 
among the honored pioneers of this state. 

William S. Clark was but a year old when the family removed to Kansas and in 
that state he received a public school education. Upon removing with the family 
to Walla Walla he there continued to assist his father and in 1880 came with the 
family to Yakima county. He took up a homestead adjoining his father's property 
and has since added eighty acres to his holdings, so that he now owns two hundred 
and forty acres of valuable land, giving considerable attention to cattle raising, 
having an excellent herd of two hundred head of shorthorns and Herefords upon 
his place. He also raises hay and produce and as the years have passed has be- 
come one of the leading agriculturists of his district. He has erected a modern 
and most comfortable home upon his place and there Mr. and Mrs. Clark often 
entertain their many friends. 

On November 7, 1882, Mr. Clark was united in marriage to Elizabeth Kincaid, 
a native of Oregon and a daughter of J. M. and Martha Ann Kincaid, who came 
to Washington in 1878, taking up their abode in Yakima county, where the father 
was successful as an agriculturist but has now passed away. To Mr. and Mrs. Clark 
were born seven children. Charles, who is successfully engaged in the sheep busi- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 179 

ness in Yakima county, is married and has five children. Clarence is married and 
assists his father in the management of his large stock interests. Winfield also 
resides upon the home place and assists in looking after his father's cattle busi- 
ness. Jessie married Charles Rennie, a sheep raiser of Yakima county, and they 
have two children. Clara is the wife of Jackson Rader, who served with the Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces in France, was severely wounded, supposedly at Chateau 
Thierry, and she and her three children are now residing with her father. John 
has also joined the United States army, and Marion, the youngest member of the 
family, is at home w'ith her parents. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark are among the honored pioneer couples of their district 
and on many occasions the respect and esteem in which they are held is expressed. 
They have richly earned the high regard in which they are held, as both are 
possessed of fine qualities of character. Deeply interested in his business affairs, 
Mr. Clark has not only become individually one of the most prosperous stock 
raisers of his neighborhood but has contributed toward the growth and upbuild- 
ing of the cattle industry in the Yakima valley. Along political lines he is not 
active although he is well informed on the issues of the day and votes independently, 
taking into consideration only the qualifications of a candidate for the oflice to 
which he aspires. Fraternally he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
having many friends in the organization. 



MRS. LOWA M. CRAWFORD. 

The educational afifairs of Benton county and its school system are in the able 
hands of Mrs. Lowa M. Crawford, county school superintendent. She was born in 
Missouri and is a daughter of Dr. L. W. and Mary R. (Gill) Miller. The father, 
who had quite a reputation as a physician in his neighborhood, has now passed 
away but is survived by his widow, who makes her home in Creston, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Crawford spent the first half of their married life in Missouri, 
but in 1905 decided to move westward and came to Prosser, Washington, where 
he is now engaged in the music business, having built up a profitable establish- 
ment, from which he derives a gratifying income. He is a musician whose knowledge 
of things musical makes him an authority in that line, so that he is not only well 
fitted to sell and handle musical instruments but is able to advise his customers and 
to select for them and guide them in their purchases. Mrs. Crawford was a school 
teacher in the Prosser schools for about six years and for two years taught in the 
county schools. She was elected to the office of superintendent in September, 1917, 
and has served ever since. She possesses talent for organizing and has brought 
about a co-operation among the teachers that has resulted greatly to the benefit of 
the pupils. Moreover, she has introduced a number of new systems in regard to the 
improvement of the schools and their equipment and has in many other ways pro- 
moted the cause of education in Benton county. Mr. and Mrs. Crawford have a 
daughter, Lucille, who is now six years of age. Both are highly esteemed members 
of the social set of their city, in the intellectual gatherings of which they play 
an important part. 



ALEXANDER MILLER. 

Alexander Miller, who has contributed much to the development of industrial 
activity and in later years to the development of real estate interests in Yakima and 
occupies a prominent position in commercial and financial circles, vv-as born in Sweden 
in 1856 and his life illustrates the possibilities for the attainment of success when 
one must start out empty-handed. He pursued his education in his native land and 
was a young man of twenty-five years when he crossed the Atlantic and became a 
resident of Minnesota. He was a practical miller, having learned the trade in Sweden, 
and after reaching his destination he entered the milling business. He continued 



180 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

his residence in Minnesota until 1882, when he made his way to the northwest with 
Oregon as his destination. There he took up work in the line of his trade and re- 
built flour mills for W. L. Ladd, of Portland, and also operated along the same 
line in Washington. Watchful of opportunities that would enable him to take a 
forward step in his business career, he came to Yakima and in 1887 purchased an 
interest in the Xorth Yakima Milling Company, of which he is now a director and 
the president. During his connection therewith they were three times obliged to 
enlarge their capacity to meet the growing demands of trade. The increased facili- 
ties made it possible for the company to manufacture four hundred barrels of flour 
daily. That mill, however, was destroyed by fire in 1914. It was the first roller 
mill in the Yakima valley. Since the destruction of the mill the company continues 
to conduct a very extensive grain business and their interests constitute a splendid 
market for the grain raisers of this section. Mr. Miller also invested largely in 
land and is now engaged in the development of several tracts in the valley. His 
operations include the erection of the Miller building in 1907 and an addition in 
1911. This is a six-story office building, one hundred by one hundred and ten 
feet. It was the first large, modern office building in the city and in its construc- 
tion Mr. Miller displayed the spirit of enterprise and progress which has actuated 
him at every step in his career. In addition to his other activities he has become 
the vice president and one of the directors of the First National Bank of Yakima. 
Mr. Miller was one of seven who organized and constructed the first three miles of 
the present Yakima Valley Transportation Company electric city and suburban 
system, and of which he was a member of the board of directors. In fact his labors 
have been a most important element in advancing the material, social and moral 
progress of the community. 

In 1883 Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Esther Andrews, of Pennsyl- 
vania, who died in the year 1903. In 1907 he was married again, his second union 
being with Mrs. Anna (Philips) Adams, a daughter of M. W. Philips, of Yakima. 
She passed away in 1913. 

Fraternally Mr. Miller is connected with the Masons, taking the degrees of lodge 
and chapter, and is also a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He 
is likewise identified with the Commercial Club and with the Country Club, with the 
Young Men's Christian Association, with the Episcopal church and with the republi- 
can party — associations that indicate much of the nature of his interests and the 
rules that govern his conduct. He has served for two years as a meinber of the 
city council of Yakima and also as a private citizen has contributed in marked 
measure to public improvement and to the upbuilding and further development of 
city and district. His plans have always been well defined and promptly executed and 
his energy has carried him into most important relations. 



SERGEANT FRANK ALVIN WOODIN. 

On the roll of those who have been engaged in active military duty in France in 
the great world war is Sergeant Frank Alvin Woodin, who on the 5th of July, 1918, 
enlisted as a member of Company K, Battery 4, Twenty-second Engineers. As the 
year 1918 closes he is still in France, although the world is once more enjoying 
peace. Washington may proudly claim him as a native son. He was born in Seattle, 
January 14, 1878, a son of Ira R. and Susan (CampbelH Woodin. The father was 
born in New York and was a son of Daniel Woodin, also a native of the Empire 
state, who came to Washington in 1854, crossing the plains with team and wagon. 
He had the first tannery on the coast and he homesteaded where the city of Seattle 
now stands, there residing to the time of his demise. His son, Ira R. Woodin. was 
but a boy when the family home was established in Seattle. He served in the Indian 
wars of 1855 and 1856 and in young manhood he, too, engaged in the tanning busi- 
ness. He afterward took up a homestead on what is now a part of Seattle and 
subsequently he removed to Woodinville. ten miles from Seattle, a place that was 
named in honor of the family. There he engaged in farming to the time ot his 
death, which occurred November 27, 1908. In politics he was an active republican 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 181 

and fraternally he was connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His 
wife was born in Marion county, Oregon, a daughter of James Canipliell, who 
crossed the plains in 1846. On that trip the wife of James Campbell and a daughter 
died while the family were en route and were buried on the plains. On reaching 
his destination Mr. Campbell located in the Waldo Hills near Salem. He after- 
ward married again in Oregon and following the death of his second wife he re- 
turned to the east and wedded Nancy Taylor. He then again crossed the plains 
in 1852 and in 1859 removed from Oregon to Washington, where he remained until 
1864. He then returned to Salem, Oregon, where he passed away. 

Frank Alvin Woodin acquired a public school education in Woodinville and 
afterward went with his father to Alaska, where he remained for eighteen months. 
He then engaged in the logging business on the Sound until 1915, when he removed 
to Yakima county and purchased eighty acres on the Cowiche. He also has an 
interest in a stock ranch in Pleasant Valley, whereon they engage in the raising 
of hay and wheat. He also devoted considerable time to stock raising, having a 
fine full-blooded herd of Holstein cattle until 1918, when he sold his stock. 

On the 13th of February, 1901, Mr. Woodin was married to Miss Anna J. Peter- 
son, a daughter of M. I. and Anna Mary (Bartleson) Peterson, both of whom are 
natives of Denmark. They came to the United States as children, however, and 
were married in San Francisco. The father afterward took up a homestead at 
Bothell, Washington, and is now engaged in the lumber business on the Sound, with 
office at Seattle. Mr. and Mrs. Woodin have become the parents of four children: 
Clara. Lillie, Helen and Ira. 

Mr. Woodin belongs to the Masonic fraternity, to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and to the Knights of Pythias. In politics he is a republican but not 
an aspirant for office. He has become a leading rancher of the district in which 
he resides, but feeling that his duty was to his country, he enlisted on the Sth of 
July, 1918, as a member of Company K of the Fourth Battery of the Twenty-second 
Regiment of Engineers and is now in France with the American Expeditionary 
Force, serving as sergeant. It is characteristic of Mr. Woodin that he never slights 
any duty that devolves upon him, however arduous, and his enlistment was the 
logical expression of this characteristic. It is. moreover, a matter of satisfaction 
that such a man has been spared to return to his home and resume the duties of 
civic life, for his aid and influence will be given here on the side of right and prog- 
ress, just as they have been given to further the interests of democracy when 
fighting on the soil of France. 



WARREX L. FLAGG. 

Warren L. Flagg is a well known and successful orchardist of Yakima county, 
owning fifteen acres of land planted to various kinds of fruit, and has thus been 
identified with horticultural interests here for the past decade. His birth occurred 
in Plainfield, Illinois, on the 10th of October, 1875, his parents being William H. 
and Margaret (Van Horn) Flagg, who resided on a farm in the Prairie state until 
their removal to Yakima county, Washington, where both passed away. 

Warren L. Flagg supplemented his early educational training by a high school 
course and after putting aside his textbooks followed farming in association with 
his father until 19<)2. In that year he removed to Calhoun county, Iowa, where 
he carried on general agricultural pursuits until 1908, when he disposed of his 
interests there and came to the northwest, settling in Yakima county. He purchased 
fifteen acres of orchard land near Yakima and planted the entire tract to apples, 
pears, peaches and cherries. His undertakings in this connection have since been 
attended with a measure of success which places him among the substantial and 
representative orchardists of the community. 

On the ilth of June, 1902, Mr. Flagg was united in marriage to Miss Lulu 
Stewart, a native of Illinois and a daughter of John Stewart of that state. They 
have two adopted children, Clarence and Veda, who are seven and eight years 
of age respectively. In his political views Mr. Flagg is an independent democrat, 



182 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

supporting the party where national questions and issues are involved but at local 
elections casting his ballot according to the dictates of his judgment. His re- 
ligious faith is indicated by his membership in the Congregational church. His 
life has ever been guided by high and honorable principles and his genuine personal 
worth has commended him to the confidence and goodwill of all who know him. 



JOSEPH ROBEL. 



Joseph Robel is a successful representative of horticultural interests in the Selah 
valley, where he has made his home for the past ten years and where he owns thirty- 
five acres of valuable land. He is a native of Germany, where his birth occurred on 
the 15th of July, 1849, his parents being Gottfried and Elizabeth (Busch) Robel. In 
1854 the family emigrated to the L^nited States, first taking up their abode near St. 
Louis, Missouri, and two years later in Minnesota, where the father secured a tract 
of government land which he cultivated successfully to the time of his demise. Both 
he and his wife passed away in Minnesota. 

Joseph Rohcl, who was but five years of age when brought by his parents to the 
new world, obtained his education in the public schools and after putting aside his 
textbooks was for manj' years engaged in farming near Mankato, Minnesota, on until 
the time of his removal to Washington in 1909. Making his way to Yakima county, 
he purchased thirty-five acres of land in the Selah valley and has since followed 
horticultural pursuits here, devoting thirty acres of this place to the growing of 
apples, peaches, pears, grapes, etc. His undertakings in this connection have been 
attended with a gratifying measure of prosperity and he has made splendid improve- 
ments on his property, remodeling the residence and also erecting a fine barn and 
warehouse. 

On the 17th of November, 1874, Mr. Robel was united in marriage to Miss Mag- 
dalena Oberle. who was born in Germany but came to the United States in her girl- 
hood days. They became the parents of ten children, namely: Anna, who is the wife 
of George Scheurer, of Eagle Lake Minnesota; Rosa, the wife of Adam Scheurer, 
who resides on the old home farm in Minnesota; Francisco, deceased; Josephine, a 
resident of California; Theressa, who married Edward Xuebel and lives in St. Paul, 
Minnesota; Joseph, who is engaged in merchandising in that state; John, a rancher 
residing in the Selah valley; Gregor, who is in the L'nited States army; Lydia, the 
wife of Captain Hubert Jennings, who is in the LInited States navy as captain of a 
war vessel; and Bernard, at home. 

In politics Mr. Robel is independent, supporting men and measures rather than 
party. His religious faith is indicated by his mcmbeiship in St. Joseph's Catholic 
church, of which his wife is also a devout communicant. His interests have become 
thoroughly identified with those of the northwest and he has won an extensive circle 
of warm friends during the period of his residence in Yakima county. 



JAMES \V. BLACKBUR.V. 

It was but a few years ago that the fruit raising possibilities of the Yakima 
valley became recognized and one of those who has made good use of the oppor- 
tunities presented here along that line is James W. Blackburn, a native of the 
Blue Grass state, who now owns twenty acres of valuable land one mile east of 
Zillah. Of this tract fourteen acres are dvoted to apples, while the rest is in 
alfalfa and under the plow. Mr. Blackburn was born in Caldwell county. Ken- 
tuck}-, March 5, 1868, his parents being William and Elizabeth (Stevenson) Black- 
burn, natives of Virginia and Kentucky respectively. Throughout his life the father 
followed agricultural pursuits and was quite successful in his undertakings. Both 
he and his wife have now passed away, their demise occurring in Kentucky. 

James W. Blackburn was reared amid farm surroundings and in the acquire- 
ment of an education attended the public schools. His father died when he was 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 185 

but fifteen years old and he then laid aside his textbooks and assisted in looking 
after the farm. At the age of twenty he was married and then began farming 
independently, renting land. Having heard many favorable reports in regard to 
the opportunities presented in the northwest, he left Kentucky, April 26, 1904, and on 
th first of May of that year arrived in Yakima county, Washington, where for the 
first two years he worked for wages. Ever keeping his eyes open for an oppor- 
tunity to make himself independent and carefully husbanding his resources, he was 
then enabled to rent land for one year. He operated this to such good purpose that 
on March 10, 1907. he was able to acquire title to twenty acres one mile east of 
Zillah which was partly improved. This tract is now in a high state of cultivation, 
fourteen acres being planted to apples, while the remainder is in alfalfa and under 
the plow. Mr. Blackburn has now resided here for eleven years and today receives 
a most gratifying income from his land. He has ever followed progressive methods 
and has made many improvements and instituted modern equipment, so that his 
place is considered a model one. 

On October 13, 1887, Mr. Blackburn was united in marriage to Miss Ida Brown, 
a native of Kentucky, and a daughter of P. H. C. and Nancy J. (Guess) Brown. 
To this union were born seven children: Nora, who married Reed White, a rancher 
on the .Ahtanum, and has had three children, one of whom is deceased; Shelley J., 
who is now serving his country in the United States army in France; Chester. .'Klvin 
and Leah, all at home; and Raymond and William Henry, both deceased. 

The family are devoted adherents of the Christian church and are ever help- 
fully interested in measures which have for their purpose the moral or intellectual 
upbuilding of the people. Politically Mr. Blackburn is a republican but has never 
desired office, preferring to give his whole attention to his business afifairs and 
his family. Here he has found the opportunities which he sought and is today one 
of the most enthusiastic fruit raisers of the Yakima valley who has not only made 
good use of the chances here presented but has improved upon his opportunities and 
through energy and industry has attained a position which places him among the 
substantial residents of Zillah and vicinity. 



HON. JULIUS CAESAR HUBBELL. 

Hon. Julius Caesar Hubbell, capitalist and statesman, has been identified with 
the interests of Ellensburg and of Washington ^ince 1893. In his business career 
he has been active in the development of water power and of irrigation projects 
and has also figured prominently in financial circles as a banker. Honored and re- 
spected by all, there is no man who occupies a more enviable position in public 
regard, not alone by reason of the success which he has achieved, but also owing 
to the straightforward business policy which he has ever followed. His personal 
qualities, his reliability in all business transactions and his progressiveness in mat- 
ters of citizenship have led to his selection for high political honors and he is now 
representing his district in the state legislature. Mr. Hubbell is a native of Chazy, 
New York. He was born on the 4th of June, 1863, and is a son of John Wolcott and 
Margaret ( Beckwith) Hubbell, who are also natives of the Empire state, where they 
still reside. 

Julius C. Hubbell was provided with liberal educational advantages. He was 
graduated from Williams College in 1885. He specialized in the study of chemistry 
and after leaving college became identified with leading steel companies of the 
east. For a time he was connected with the Crown Point Iron Company and later 
with the Chateaugay Ore & Iron Company. He assisted in developing the first 
malleable iron and also aided in developing Bessemer steel. His broad experience 
made him thoroughly familiar with the utilization of the iron interests of the east, 
but the opportunities of the west attracted him and he made his way to this great 
and growing section of the country, arriving in Tacoma. Washington, in the fall 
of 1893. 

In the following year Mr. Hubbell removed to Ellensburg, whither he came to 
develop a large water power. He then took charge of the interests of the Ellens- 



186 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

burg Water & Supply Company and remained as manager until 1911. He is now 
the president of the Cascade Irrigation District and was one of the builders of the 
irrigation system. He has made a close study of problems of this character and his 
engineering skill, his scientific and practical experience have enabled him to do 
valuable work in this connection. He has also become the owner of and has de- 
veloped several fine ranches in western Washington and he has likewise been 
prominent in banking circles. He has never been afraid to venture where favor- 
ing opportunity has led the way and his even-paced energy has carried him into im- 
portant relations. 

On the 11th of June, 1889. Mr. Hubbell was united in marriage to Miss Carrie 
Looniis, who was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, a daughter of Calvin Loomis. 
She passed away December 21, 1909, and in 1912 Mr. Hubbell was again married, 
his second union being with Josephine Holgate, of Tacoma, who was the assistant 
state librarian. She is a daughter of John Holgate. By his first marriage Mr. 
Hubbell had several children, namely: Wolcott, who is now a sergeant of Company 
A of the One Hundred and Sixteenth Engineers, and is now in France: Frances, 
the wife of Dr. Taylor, of Ellensburg; Beckwith, who is married and has one child 
and who is a member of the National Guard; and Ruth, the wife of George Heron, 
now serving with the United States army. 

Mr. Hubbell is widely known through various connections. He belongs to the 
Elks Lodge No. 1102 of Ellensburg and also to the Grange, to the Congregational 
church, and to the Y. M. C. A. .iMl of these indicate the nature of his interests and 
the rules which govern his conduct. His political endorsement is given to the 
republican party and he has been a close student of the vital questions and problems 
of the day. In 1909 he was elected to represent his district in the state legislature 
and has been reelected at every ensuing election since that time with the exception 
of the year 1913. He was chairman of the committee on roads and bridges in 1917 
and 1919 and is a very active working member of *he house, his opinions carrying 
wei,ght in the councils of his party, while at all times his devotion to the public good 
is widely recognized. His public service has included duty as receiver of the Ellens- 
burg National Bank, as a member of the State Fair Board for ten years and also 
active work in behalf of many other projects which tend to promote public im- 
provement and stimulate action of worth to the community. He likewise has a 
military record, for he served as a first lieutenant of the First Battalion of Washing- 
ton in 1897 and he is now corporal of the Machine Gun Company of the Third 
Washington Infantry, being the oldest man in his regiment. His spirit of patriotism 
has ever been one of the dominant factors in his career. While holding to high 
ideals he has ever utilized the most practical methods in their achievement. His 
service in the state legislature covers an extended period and the record of none 
other' has been more fearless in conduct and stainless in reputation than his. 



ARCHIE G. FLEMING. 

As vice president of the Sunnyside Land & Investment Company Archie G. 
Fleming represents important real estate interests of the Y'akima valley. He is 
an energetic young business man, gifted with ability and discretion and always 
following the highest commercial standards. He has been connected with the in- 
stitution of which he is vice president for about ten years, having been largely 
instrumental in making it what it is today. The company deals in city and farm lands 
and also maintains a loan department, all of its branches securing a gratifying in- 
come to its owners. 

Mr. Fleming was born in Mound City, Missouri, in 1878 and is a son of G. W. 
and Emma (Bobletts) Fleming, who in 1883, when our subject was five years of 
age, removed to Tacoma, Washington, where the father was for many years suc- 
cessfully engaged as a contractor but is now retired. His wife has passed away. 

Archie G. Fleming was reared under the parental roof and received a thorough 
public school education, upon the completion of which he entered mercantile lines, 
with which he was connected until 1908. In 1899 he had removed to Sunnyside, at 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 187 

first holding clerical positions in some of the local stores but later engaging in the 
drug business on his own account until 1908, when he and William H. Harrison 
acquired the Sunnyside Land & Investment Company, of which he has been vice 
president ever since. There are, however, numerous other business organizations 
with which Mr. Fleming has been identified, among them the Fidelity Abstract 
Company, which he founded and of which he remained a director until he sold out 
his interest. For several years he was also president of the North Coast Lumber 
Company. Moreover, he has large farming interests throughout the county and de- 
rives a gratifying addition to his income from this source. 

In 1904, at the age of twenty-six years, Mr. Fleming was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Alice Williams, a daughter of T. C. and M. C. Williams, of Sunnyside, 
and to this union has been born a son, Harold W. In his political views Mr. Flem- 
ing is a republican but has never cared for office. Fraternally he is a member of 
the Elks Lodge, No. 318, of Yakima and is very prominent in the Masonic order, 
not only belonging to the blue lodge but also to the Royal Arch chapter. He is 
connected with the Commercial Club of Sunnyside and is thoroughly in accord 
with its purposes and activities. He is very patriotic and has done valuable field 
work in promoting war activities, serving as local chairman of the Red Cross. Since 
the 26th of October, 1918, he has been assistant regional athletic director of the 
Y. M. C. A. stationed at Bordeaux, France. 



CHARLES C. McCOWN, M. D. 

Dr. Charles C. McCown, engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at 
Grandview, has devoted his attention to the profession for more than a third of a 
century and constant reading, investigation and experience have continually broad- 
ened his knowledge and promoted his efficiency. That he is an able representative 
of the profession is indicated in the liberal patronage accorded him. 

Dr. McCown is a native of Harrison county, Indiana. He was born on the 23d 
of August, 1856, of the marriage of John Nelson and Ruth (Miller') McCown, -who 
were also natives of that state. The father was a son of Edward McCown, whose 
birth occurred in Virginia, whence he removed to Kentucky and afterward became 
a pioneer settler of Indiana, where he followed the occupation of farming. His son, 
John Nelson McCown, also devoted his life to farming and both he and his wife 
have now passed away. 

Dr. McCown supplemented a public school education by study in the Paoli 
(Ind.) Preparatory School and subsequently he took up the profession of teach- 
ing, which he followed for four years, but regarded this merely as an initial step to 
other professional labor, as it was his desire to become a medical practitioner. In 
1882 he completed a course in the Louisville Medical College and following his 
graduation practiced at Ireland, Indiana. He was afterward located at Washington, 
Indiana, for fifteen years and in 1902 he made his way to the northwest, settling 
at Prosser, Washington, where he practiced until 1908. He then went to Vancouver, 
Washington, where he remained until 1916, when he removed to Grandview, where 
he has since followed his profession and during the intervening period he has been 
accorded a liberal patronage by his fellow townsmen, who recognize his worth and 
efficiency. 

In March, 1883, Dr. McCown was married to Miss Elizabeth Harris, a daughter 
of John A. and Mary (McMahan) Harris, of Indiana. Her father was born, how- 
ever, in Kentucky but her mother's birth occurred in Indiana, and both have now 
passed away. The children of Dr. and Mrs. McCown are five in number. Ruth is 
the wife of William Kinnally, residing in Boise, Idaho. Lieutenant Arthur C. is 
a physician and surgeon with base hospital 46 in France. He has a wife and child. 
Sergeant Ernest K. is connected with the Red Cross service in France. Helen 
is at home, and Robert in school. 

Dr. McCown is an exemplary representative of the Masonic fraternity and a 
past master of Euclid Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Prosser, Washington, while his mem- 
bership is now with the lodge at Grandview. He belongs to the Methodist church 

(9) 



188 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

and his political faith is that of the republican party. He served for six years as 
coroner in Washington, Daviess county, Indiana, but otherwise has not been active 
as an office seeker. He is a well known physician, highly esteemed for his pro- 
fessional and for his personal worth, and Grandview numbers him among her rep- 
resentative citizens. 



DAVID ADAMS RAY. 

The beautiful home of David Adams Ray, situated on Nob Hill, just outside 
of Yakima, is one of the most attractive in the valley and the most progressive 
and scientific methods are utilized by him in the conduct of his horticultural inter- 
ests. Mr. Ray comes to the northwest from Scotland. He was born in the land 
of hills and heather on the 22d of September, 1855, a son of Robert and Deborah 
(Barnes) Ray, who spent their entire lives in Scotland, where the father was a 
landowner and farmer. 

David A. Ray, bidding adieu to friends and native country when fifteen years 
of age, crossed the Atlantic to the new world and made his way into the interior 
of the country, settling near Monmouth, Illinois. Later he removed to North 
Dakota, where he lived with a brother for a time and then located near Crookston, 
Minnesota. He became a prominent merchant and banker there and won a position 
among the capitalists of that section of the country. Throughout his business career 
he has ever been watchful of opportunities pointing to success and has never 
hesitated to take a forward step. Moreover, he has readily discriminated between 
the essential and non-essential in all business transactions and his investments have 
been wisely placed and his interests most carefully and judiciously managed. In 
1910 he came to Yakima county but has not disposed of his valuable property 
holdings in Minnesota, where he still has fifteen hundred acres of fine land. On 
reaching the northwest he purchased a beautiful mansion on Nob Hill, for which 
he paid thirty thousand dollars. It stands in the midst of five acres of land set 
out in orchards and his is one of the finest homes in the valley. He raises apples, 
pears and cherries and he is greatly interested in all that pertains to the further 
development and progress of the section in which he lives. 

In early manhood Mr. Ray was united in marriage to Miss Elsie Weslie, of 
Minnesota, by whom he had eight children, as follows: Esther, at home; Elizabeth, 
who is also at home and is a teacher by profession; Emily, who passed away at the 
age of twenty-five years; Henry, who died in infancy; Robert, who resides in Yakima 
and who is married and has one child; Crawford, who owns a fruit ranch and who 
is also married and has one child; Francis, who is in the United States army; and 
Dora, a student in the LTniversity of Washington. 

Mr. Ray and his family attend the Presbyterian church and are loyal adherents 
of its teachings. In politics Mr. Ray maintains an independent course, voting accord- 
ing to the dictates of his judgment without regard to party ties. He has ever been 
actuated by a spirit of progress and improvement and his life has at all times 
measured up to high standards. His course has been such as would bear the closest 
investigation and scrutiny and his sterling traits of character are such as commend 
him to the confidence and high regard of all. 



THOMAS S. COOPER. 

Thomas S. Cooper has since 1892 resided upon his present farm not far from 
Outlook and is the oldest settler of that portion of the county. He was born in 
California, January 8, 1848, a son of James and Sarah (Bigelow) Cooper, who were 
natives of Scotland and of Nova Scotia respectively. They were married, however, 
in California, to which state they had gone in 1845. The father was a ship carpen- 
ter and both he and his wife remained residents of California to the time of their 
death. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 189 

Thomas S. Cooper obtained a public school education in California and there 
followed farming until 1884, when he came to Yakima county and took up a desert 
claim and timber culture of six hundred and forty acres, the place being located four 
and a half miles northwest of what is now Sunnyside. He left that district but re- 
turned in 1892 and homesteaded a part of the land which he had secured, chang- 
ing one hundred and sixty acres of the tract from a desert claim to a homestead. 
He settled upon this property and has since occupied it. He has one hundred and 
twenty-five acres under cultivation, producing large crops of corn, potatoes and 
alfalfa, and conducts his farming interests along progressive lines. 

Mr. Cooper has two children: Raymond, twenty-eight years of age, now in 
the United States hospital service in Scotland; and Edna, a teacher in California. 
Mr. Cooper is a member of the Native Sons of California. His political endorse- 
ment is given to the republican party but he has never been a politician in the 
sense of office seeking, always preferring to concentrate his efforts upon his busi- 
ness affairs. As the years have passed, covering more than a quarter of a century 
in which he has lived upon his present ranch, he has wrought a marked transfor- 
mation in the appearance of the place and it is today one of the valuable farm 
properties of tlie district. 



JOHN MILES NEWMAN. 

John Miles Newman has taken many progressive steps leading to the develop- 
ment of the section of Kittitas county in which he makes his home. He was one 
of the founders and promoters of the town of Thorp, has been actively identified 
with ranching interests and also with industrial activity as a blacksmith. He has 
prospered in his undertakings and his progressiveness has placed him with the 
leading business men of his section. He was born in Sullivan county, Missouri, 
August 10, 1851, a son of Michael P. and Olive (Thurlow) Newman, who in 1859 
removed from Missouri to Texas, where the death of the mother occurred. The 
fa'ther, who was a blacksmith by trade, afterward took the family back to Missouri 
and in 1864 he crossed the plains with ox teams and established his home in LInion 
county, Oregon. In 1865 he removed to Silverton, Oregon, where he resided until 
1870 and then became a resident of Benton county, that state, remaining within its 
borders to the time of his demise. 

In the public schools John Miles Newman acquired Kis education and in 1878 
he came to the Kittitas valley and purchased a ranch two miles south of Thorp. 
In 1882 he bought ranch property adjoining Thorp, comprising one hundred and 
sixty acres of land, and in 1896 he took up his abode in the suburbs of Thorp, where 
he has since resided. He was one of those who laid out the town of Thorp, the 
town site covering a part of land owned by Mr. Newman and by Frank Martin 
and Milford Thorp. All of the land was deeded to Mr. Newman, who then dcecied 
it to the purchasers. Tlie town was named in honor of Mortimer F. Thorp, who 
was one of the first settlers of the locality. A postoffice had previously been estab- 
lished that was called Thorp, and when the town was laid out, Mr. Newman called 
it Thorp in honor of this early pioneer. Mr. Newman was also the first man to 
advocate the raising of grain without water in this part of the country and inter- 
ested other people in trying the experiment, which was profitably followed. He 
was also for a long period identified with blacksmithing, conducting a shop at Thorp 
until 1905. 

In January, 1873. Mr. Newman was united in marriage to Miss Isabel Forgey, a 
daughter of John and Matilda Forgey, who crossed the plains in 1852 and settled in 
Oregon. Mrs. Newman passed away in June, 1896, and in 1903 Mr. Newman was 
again married, his second union being with Mrs. Edna (Hay) Hulbert. of Iowa, 
who was born in Wisconsin. The children of the first marriage were ten in num- 
ber: Olive, the wife of J. A. Wilcox, a rancher of Kittitas county; Lillie, the wife 
of John Marshall, an electrician now at Camp Lewis in government employ; Otis, 
who makes his home at Alderton, Washington; Minnie, the wife of Charles Shull, 
living at Ellensburg; Fred P.. a rancher of Kittitas county; Jacob, at home; John 



190 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

A., who also follows ranching in Kittitas county; Jesse R., who is with a machine 
gun company in the United States army; and two children who died in infancy. 
By the second marriage there has also been one child, Esther, now fifteen years 
of age, at home. 

Mr. Newman is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging 
to Tanum Lodge, No. 155, at Thorp. His political allegiance is given to the demo- 
cratic party and he served for four years as county comissioner and also as justice 
of the peace. He has likewise been a member of the school board and he is inter- 
ested in everything that has to do with the progress and welfare of the community 
in which he makes his home. He is a well known pioneer who from early days has 
resided in this section of Kittitas county, where he has a wide acquaintance. He 
enjoys the high regard of all with whom he has been associated, for his qualities 
measure up to high standards of manhood and citizenship. In business, too, his 
course has been most conimendable and his energy has brought to him a very 
desirable measure of success. 



ELLIS RAGAN. 



With one hundred and twenty-two thousand acres of land under lease and run- 
ning eighteen thousand head of sheep, Ellis Ragan ranks with the most prominent 
and prosperous sheepmen of the northwest. The story of his life is the record of 
earnest endeavor crowned with successful achievement. He was born in Kentucky, 
October 5, 1872, a son of Shelby and Lucetta (Shearer) Ragan. The father is a 
farmer and stock raiser and both parents were early settlers of Wayne county. Ken- 
tucky, where they still make their home. 

Ellis Ragan acquired a public school education in his native state and was a 
young man of twenty years when in 1892 he came to the northwest, settling at 
Pendleton, Oregon. He was there employed in connection with the sheep industry 
and in the fall of 1897 he removed to Prosser, Washington, where he continued in 
active business as a sheepman. In 1900 he came to Yakima and worked with sheep 
until 1904. He next entered the employ of C. H. Frye & Company of Seattle, whom 
he represented as a sheep buyer all over the west. He thus continued until the fall 
of 1914. In 1913. however, he purchased an interest in a band of sheep and in the 
spring of the following year, in connection with .Alexander Dunnett, bought a band 
of sheep and has since been actively and successfully engaged in sheep raising. He 
now runs eighteen thousand head of sheep and has sixty-six hundred ewes. He 
ranges part of these on the reservation and a part at Cle Elum and employs about 
twenty-three men. He has one hundred and twenty-two thousand acres of land 
r.r.der lease and is today regarded as one of the representative, pi-ogressive and suc- 
cessful sheepmen of this section of the country. 

On the 18th of June, 1908, Mr. Ragan was married to Miss Lillian Palmer, of 
Yakima, and they have two children, Gladys and Lois. His political endorsement is 
given to the republican party and he stands for progressiveness in public affairs as 
he does in business life. 



JOHN H. LYNCH. 



While John H. Lynch is known as an able member of the Yakima bar, his 
connection with the city covers a still broader scope, for he has contributed to its 
material and moral development in many ways during the long period of his resi- 
dence here and is today an honored member of the Pioneers Association. He is 
a native son of Washington, his birth having occurred at Chehalis on the 6th of 
October, 1876, his parents being Timothy J. and Julia (McCarthy) Lynch, who were 
natives of Ireland and came to the United States in early life. They were married 
in 1862 and lived for some time in New York and in Boston. The father was en- 
gaged in shipbuilding for the government during the period of the Civil war and 




ELLIS KAGAN 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 193 

was stationed at San Francisco and at Xew Orleans. He removed his family to 
San Francisco after the cessation of hostilities between the north and the south 
and continued to follow the shipbuilding trade there until 1870, when he made his 
way northward to Washington, taking up his abode on the Newaukum river, near 
what is now Chehalis. There he entered government land and began the develop- 
ment of his claim, upon which not a furrow had been turned nor an improvement 
made. He resided upon that property for eight years and then became a resident 
of Yakima county, where he took up government land in the Ahtanum valley, where 
he continued to reside until 1896. At that date he established his home in the city 
of Yakima, where his remaining days were passed, his death occurring in 1910. He is 
survived by his widow, who now makes her home in Yakima. 

John H. Lynch has spent the greater part of his life in the city which is still 
his place of residence and he supplemented his early education, acquired in the 
public schools, by study in the Washington State Normal School at Ellensburg. 
Still later he became a student in the School of Expression in Boston, Massachusetts, 
and in preparation for the bar pursued a course in law in the University of Michi- 
gan at Ann Arbor, where he was graduated with the class of 1903. Returning to 
Yakima, he opened an office and has since engaged in practice. His increasing 
ability has brought to him a liberal clientage that has connected him with much 
important litigation heard in the courts of the district. His success in a profes- 
sional way afTords the best evidence of his capabilities in this line. He is a strong 
advocate with the jury and concise in his appeals before the court, and his present 
prominence has come to him as the reward of earnest endeavor and fidelity to 
trust, for his devotion to his clients' interests has become proverbial. 

In 190B Mr. Lynch was united in marrage to Miss Rosalia McNamara, who 
died July 6, 1910. In 1914 he was again married, his second union being with 
Grace McCafiferty, a native of Yakiina and a daughter of J. P. McCafferty. His 
children are two in number, John Robert and Eleanor, the former two years of 
age. The parents are members of St. Paul's Catholic church and Mr. Lynch is much 
interested in the Catholic history of the valley. He belongs to the Knights of 
Columbus, in which he has filled all of the offices, and he is also connected with the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His political allegiance is given to the re- 
publican party. He belongs to the County and State Bar Associations and to the 
Pioneers Association and the Yakima Columbian Association, serving as secretary 
of the last two. Forty-two years' connection with the state has made him largely 
familiar with its history and his mind bears the impress of many of its most im- 
portant historical events. 



FRANK G. PARK. 



Frank G. Park, who is engaged in ranching on the Cowiche, was born at St. 
Paul, Minnesota, September 1, 1885, a son of Frank L. and Amanda (Ayers) Park, 
who were natives of the Empire state and became pioneer residents of Minnesota. 
The father was a son of Charles Park, who was also born in New York and who re- 
moved with his fami!}' to Minnesota in 1851. After losing his first wife, who 
passed away in 1889, Frank L. Park married again, his second union being with 
Elizabeth Hill. He followed farming and stock raising as a life work, residing for 
many years in Minnesota, but in 1906 he removed to the northwest and purchased a 
ranch on Nob Hill in Yakima county, .^fter cultivating that place for several years 
he sold the property and removed to Fruitvale in 1914. 

In the public schools of his native state Frank G. Park pursued his education 
and in 1900 went to Montana, where he engaged in ranching. He was engaged in 
cattle raising with his brother, C. J. Park, and in 1907 he removed to Yakima county 
and made purchase of one hundred and sixty acres of land on the Cowiche. He 
has since engaged in raising sheep and hogs and he also annually produces large 
crops of wheat, corn and hay. He has sold part of his original holdings, retaining 
only seventy acres. Upon this place he has built a nice residence and has put up all 
the barns and sheds necessary for the shelter of grain and stock. The place was 



194 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

covered with sagebrush when it came into his possession and his labors have con- 
verted it into rich and productive fields, from which he annually gathers excellent 
crops. The attractive appearance of the place is due entirely to his efforts and 
labors and his work has brought splendid results. 

On Christmas day of 19()8 Mr. Park was united in marriage to Miss Grace 
Simmons, who was born in Custer county, Montana, a daughter of John and Mar- 
garet Simmons, who were early settlers of Montana, removing to that state from 
Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Park have become parents of four children: Gertrude, 
Hazel, Alvin and Doris. Fraternally Mr. Park is connected with the Modern Wood- 
men of America and his political belief is that of the republican party. His wife is a 
member of the Baptist church and they are highly esteemed people of the commu- 
nity. Mr. Park has served as a member of the school board and is interested in all 
plans and projects for the general good. The comfortable competence which he has 
acquired is the direct result of his industry. He has worked his way steadily up- 
ward and his property interests now return to him a gratifying annual income. 



DANIEL McKIE. 



Daniel McKie, living in Yakima, has long been numbered among the prominent 
s'-.cepmcn of the valley and his flocks today number over fifty-five hundred head. 
He is leaving the active management of his interests to others but still gives general 
supervision to his important business affairs. He was born in Scotland, July 9, 1873, 
a son of John and Jane (Bell) McKie, both of whom have passed away. He ac- 
quired a public school education and the year 1899 witnessed his arrival in Yakima, 
at which time he entered the employ of John Clemmens, a sheepman, with whom he 
remained for eight years, gaining valuable knowledge and experience concerning the 
business. During that period he carefully saved his earnings until his economy and 
industry had brought him sufficient capital to purchase property. He then bought a 
farm and continued its cultivation for four years, giving his time to the general de- 
velopment of crops. In 1912, however, he turned his attention to the sheep business, 
purchasing a considerable number of sheep, and has since continued along this line. 
He has over fifty-five hundred head of sheep and his ranges are near White Bluffs 
and Selah Springs. He has closely studied all questions bearing upon sheep-raising 
and the care of the sheep and his progressive methods and advanced ideas are prov- 
ing an important element in the attainment of his success. 

On the 29th of April. 1906, Mr, McKie was married to Miss Sarah Rennie, a 
native of Scotland and a schoolmate of his boyhood days. They have become parents 
of four children; Robert, Mary, John and Rachel. 

Mr. McKie belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and his religious 
faith is indicated in his membership in the Presbyterian church. His political sup- 
port is given to the republican party and he keeps well informed on the questions 
and issues of the day. He is a loyal adopted son of America, true to high principles 
of citizenship and high standards of business, and through his enterprise and close 
application he has won the creditable position which he now occupies as one of the 
leading sheepmen of the northwest. 



EMUEL B. HIMMELSBACH. 

Emuel B. Himmelsbach, who is extensively and successfully engaged in fruit 
raising and general farming not far from Yakima, was born in Wabasha county, Min- 
nesota. December 15, 1859. a son of Bernard and Mary Himmelsbach, both of whom 
have departed this life. They were pioneer settlers of Minnesota and the father there 
followed the occupation of farming for many years. 

Emuel B. Himmelsbach was reared to agricultural life, early becoming familiar 
with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. He continued to 
assist his father until 1878, when he and his father removed to Polk county, Minne- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 195 

sota, where for many years he was actively engaged in the cultivation of a section 
and a half of land. Subsequently he became owner of four hundred and eighty 
acres of land, which he developed and improved, residing thereon until he sold that 
property in order to become a resident of the northwest in 1906. In that year he 
made his way to Yakima county, having purchased fifteen acres of land in 1902. He 
planted this to orchards and afterward sold ten acres of it. More recently he pur- 
chased other property and now has twenty-five acres planted to fruit and ten acres 
of hay land. He is e.xtensively engaged in raising apples, pears, peaches and cherries 
as well as other fruits and his orchards are in splendid bearing condition. Every- 
thing about the place is neat and thrifty in appearance and indicates his careful super- 
vision and unfaltering energy. 

In 1891 Mr. Himmelsbach was united in marriage to Miss Eva M. BuUan, a native 
of Wisconsin and a daughter of Jesse P. and Maria A. (Tubbs) BuUan, of whom 
more extended mention is made on another page of this work in connection with the 
sketch of Roy P. Bullan. a brother of Mrs. Himmelsbach. To Mr. and Mrs. Him- 
melsbach have been born two children, namely: Jesse, who is a graduate of the 
University of Washington and a member of the Aviation Corps of the United States 
army; and Dora, a high school graduate, now attending the Washington State Col- 
lege at Pullman. 

Mr. Himmelsbach built his home upon his ranch and has found his greatest de- 
light in providing the comforts of life for his family. In politics he maintains an in- 
dependent course nor has he ever been ambitious to hold office, preferring to con- 
centrate his efforts and attention upon his business aflfairs, which, wisely directed, 
have brought to him gratifying prosperity. 



GEORGE E. TWEEDT. 

Among the younger business men of Kcnnewick who have been quite success- 
ful is George E. Tweedt, who is engaged in the insurance business. He was born in 
Ge_nessee. Idaho, in 1887 and is a son of H. C. and S. E. (Nelson) Tweedt, who in 
1877 settled in Idaho, whence in 1904 they removed to Kennewick, where the father 
followed agricultural pursuits until he removed to Honolulu in 1912, where he is now 
residing. 

George E. Tweedt attended the common schools in the pursuit of his primary 
education, subsequently rounding out his learning by attending a business college 
at Spokane. He then became connected with banking and was assistant cashier in 
the Bank of Kennewick until 1914, when he entered the insurance and real estate 
business under the firm name of Trenbath & Tweedt, which has ever since had a con- 
tinuous and prosperous existence. In his transactions he has strictly adhered to the 
highest principles and it is therefore but natural that a large clientage has been 
gained by the firm and their business is now an extensive one. 

On June 11, 1913, Mr. Tweedt was united in marriage to Miss May E. Holloway, 
of Kennewick, and they have a daughter. Eleanor. The young couple are popular 
in the social circles of their city, where they have many friends. They are members 
of the Congregational church and politically Mr. Tweedt is , a republican, faithfully 
supporting the principles of the party. In 1918 he was elected mayor of Kennewick 
and is now acceptably filling that oflice. His fraternal associations are with the 
Knights of Pythias, in which organization he has many friends. 



JAMES L. SEARLES. 



For sixteen years James L. Searles has been a resident of Mabton, where he is 
now successfully engaged in the real estate business. He was born in Greenwich, Con- 
necticut. October 25, 1860, a son of Merritt and Mary Elizabeth Searles. the former 
of whom followed agricultural pursuits. Both died in Connecticut. 

James L. Searles received his education in the public schools of that state and 



196 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

after having completed his education in 1878 removed to Miles City, Montana, where 
he was connected with a railroad crew as a cook and also took part in the roundups 
for several years. He came to Washington in 1883 and located in Ellensburg, where 
he remained until 1890, when he removed to Centralia. This city remained his home 
until 1902, which year witnessed his arrival in Mabton. There his brother-in-law, 
Tilton Phillips, was the owner of the first store and Mr. Phillips and our subject 
conducted the store together until 1906, when Mr. Searles sold his interest to his 
brother-in-law and engaged in the real estate business. He has since been interested 
along this line and is considered a good judge of local properties, his advice being 
often sought in regard to real estate values. He has earned a reputation for the 
strictest principles of honesty and his clients are sure to receive fair dealing at his 
hands. It is therefore but natural that he has built up a very substantial business. 
He owns a fine farm of one hundred and forty acres, from which he derives a grati- 
fying income. This property is in a high state of cultivation and its improvements 
are modern and in every way up-to-date. 

On the 3d of August, 1889. Mr. Searles was married to Miss Ella F. Begg, of 
Ellensburg. this state, and to this union two daughters have been born: Dora, who 
married Fred Story, an agriculturist living near Mabton; and Laura, at home. 

Mr. Searles is independent in his political views, giving his support to those 
candidates whom he regards as most worthy of office. He is a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and for the last seven years has been secretary of 
Lodge No. 238. He also has membership witn the Knights of Pythias. As a busi- 
ness man as well as a citizen, Mr. Searles is a valuable component part of the com- 
munity of Mabton, where he has many friends, all of whom admire him because of 
his straightforward dealing, his kindness of heart and his genial, cordial manner. 



WALTER ARNOLD. 



Among the leading orchardists of Washington is Walter Arnold, who is not 
only widely known as an able business man in this state but has extensive interests 
in South America. A far-seeing, energetic man, he has used his qualities toward 
building up a career which lifts him out of the ordinary and places him among those 
who are not only considered as substantial citizens but who have contributed toward 
development wherever their activities have led them. A native of London, England, 
Mr. Arnold was born August 9. 1855. and is a son of John and Esther (Jones) Arnold, 
both deceased. The father throughout his life followed contracting and was quite 
successful along that line. 

Walter Arnold was reared amid the refining influences of an English home 
and received his education in the public schools, but when thirteen years of age 
joined the British navy, serving for one year. He made his advent into the L^nited 
States in 1870 and his first place of residence was North Adams, Massachusetts, 
where he spent a year, after which a short stay was made in New York. In 1873 
we find him in Chicago, where he entered the stone-cutting trade. Three years later, 
in 1876, Mr. Arnold removed to Toronto, Canada, and for five years he made that 
city his home, going from there again to New York and later to Chicago and thence 
to Minneapolis, Minnesota. During this time he was a stone contractor and as such 
located at St. Cloud, Minnesota, doing contracting and railroad work all over the 
northwest, with that city as his headquarters. Among the prominent enterprises of 
that period with which he was connected was the building of the Milwaukee Rail- 
road. In 1909 Mr. Arnold organized the Yakima Orchard Development Company, 
of which for three years he was president, having over six hundred acres of orchard. 
The extent of their operations may be inferred from the fact that during one spring 
ninety-seven thousand trees were planted. This property is located at Parker 
Heights but in 1911 he sold his interest in the company. In 1909 he also bought 
eighty acres on the upper Naches, which he has since retained, and of this forty- 
seven acres are in apples, pears and peaches. He has built a shelte_ring building and 
barns in order to house his orchard interests and also has erected a fine residence, 
his property now being one of the most valuable in the valley. Recently Mr. Arnold 




WALTER ARNOLD 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 199 

has organized a syndicate which purchased a tract of a half million acres, all in one 
body, in Brazil, the organization being known as The American Brazilian Company, 
our subject being the secretary. 

On the 14th of May, 1878, Mr. Arnold was united in marriage to Miss Eliza J. 
Jones, a native of Canada and a daughter of Lewis and Maria (Richmond) Jones. 
To this union the following children have been born: Walter, a ranches of Yakima 
county; Lillian, the wife of A. L. Knouse, of Seattle, by whom she has two children; 
Edward, who has mercantile interests at Xaches, where he resides with his wife and 
three children; Zella, the wife of Grover Hines, of Baker City, Oregon; Alma, who 
married E. G. Johnson, foreman of Mr. Arnold's ranch; Ruth, attending the State 
LTnivcrsity; Esther, who married C. Philip Shank, of Seattle, now a lieutenant with 
the United States army in France; and Mildred, who is also attending the State Uni- 
versity. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold are welcome additions to the social life of their neighbor- 
hood and have made many friends since coming here. Both have agreeable qualities 
v>"hich make them very popular and they often entertain at their home. As a busi- 
ness man and orchardist the reputation of Mr. Arnold is of the highest. He has 
not only acquired an individual fortune but has introduced valuable methods in fruit 
raising thus contributing to local development. His religious faith is that of the 
Baptist church, while fraternally he belongs to the blue lodge of Masons, the prin- 
ciples of that organization guiding him in his relations with his fellowmen. His po- 
litical affiliation is that of the republican party but although well informed upon all 
questions of the day in regard to local, state and national politics he has never de- 
sired public honors for himself, preferring to concentrate his efforts upon his busi- 
ness affairs. 



JOHN WELLARD STEVENSON. 

John Wellard Stevenson has the distinction of being the first native son living 
on the Cowiche and is a representative of one of the eldest pioneer families of that 
section. He was born in the Cowiche valley of Yakima county on the 16th of June, 
1873, a son of John Wellard and Hannah (Lewis) Stevenson. The father was born 
in 1835. in Edwards county, Illinois, and was a son of John W'ellard Stevenson, a 
native of England, who came to the United States about 1830. He cast in his lot 
with the pioneer settlers of Illinois, taking up his abode in that state prior to the 
time of the Black Hawk war, whereby the question of Indian supremacy was for- 
ever settled in that state. After residing there for almost a quarter of a century 
he made the overland trip to Oregon in 1853 and in 1854 established the family 
home near Vancouver, Washington. He took up a government donation claim and 
resided thereon to the time of his death. His son, John Wellard Stevenson, the 
"lather of John Wellard Stevenson of this review, took up government land at Cape 
Horn, Washington, in 1857 and is now residing thereon, although his residence there 
has not been continuous. In the year 1870 he came to Yakima county and bought 
the improvements on a squatter's claim on the Cowiche. being the first white settler 
along that stream. He was married in this locality and resided here until 1890, since 
which time he has made his home at Cape Horn, Washington. His wife, who was 
a native of Indiana, passed away in 1913. 

Their son, John Wellard Stevenson, acquired a public school education and 
through vacation periods and after his school days were over engaged in ranch- 
ing with his father, who afterward gave him a part of the ranch on the Cowiche. He 
now has sixty acres in all and devotes his place to the raising of hay and to the 
conduct of a dairy business. 

On the 3d of October, 1912. Mr. Stevenson was married to Miss Cora L. Wixom, 
a native of Arkansas, and to them have been born two children, John Wellard and 
Ethel Eliazbeth. 

In politics Mr. Stevenson maintains an independent course nor does he seek for 
nor desire public office. He prefers to concentrate his energies and attention upon 
his ranching interests and is meeting with good success in his undertakings. He is 



200 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

one of the oldest settlers of Yakima county and the first native son on the Cowiche 
and throughout all the intervening period he has been closely identified with the 
development and progress of the region in which he lives. He has indeed witnessed 
many notable changes as the work of improvement has been carried forward and 
at all times he has borne his part in the general advancement which has brought 
about modern-day prosperity. 



W. S. DORAN. 



The name of W. S. Doran is closely associated with financial interests in Top- 
penish and on the Yakima reservation. He was born in Sidney, Cheyenne county, 
Nebraska, on the 28th of October, 1879, his parents being Edmund and Catherine 
(Behan) Doran. who were pioneer settlers of Nebraska, having removed to that state 
from northern New York. The father afterward returned to the Empire state, where 
his death occurred but the mother is still living. Mr. Doran had given his time and 
attention to ranching while in the west. 

W. S. Doran, after acquiring a high school education, made his initial start in 
the business world. He was employed in various ways, including railroad work, 
and also served as deputy county treasurer of Cheyenne county, Nebraska. In 
April, 1906. he arrived in Toppenish and accepted a clerkship in the First National 
Bank. He bent every energy to the mastery of the business and afterward was made 
cashier of the Traders Bank upon its organization. The Traders Bank was opened 
on the 15th of September, 1908. with J. D. Cornett as president, William M. McGowan 
as vice president, and W. S. Doran, cashier. The bank was capitalized for twenty-five 
thousand dollars and its deposits have exceeded four hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars. There is now a surplus of ten thousand dollars. The bank owns a site 
upon which it expects to erect a new building when the World war is over. The 
business of the bank has grown steadily under the guidance of efficient officers and 
not a little of the success of the institution may be attributed to Mr. Doran, the 
efficient, courteous and obliging cashier. 

In 1914 Mr. Doran was married to Miss Etha M. Hills, a native of Michigan, 
and they reside upon a fine ranch of eighty acres four miles from Toppenish which 
is owned by them. It is a valuable property, highly improved, and every comfort 
and convenience is there found. Mr. Doran gives his political endorsement to the 
republican party and is a recognized leader in its ranks. In 1913 he was elected on 
that ticket to the office of mayor, after having just served for three years in the posi- 
tion of city treasurer. He belongs to the Elks Lodge No. 318. of Yakima, and also 
to the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen of North Platte, Nebraska. In Toppenish 
he has membership in the Commercial Club and he is interested in everything that 
has to do with the welfare and progress of the city and in office and out of it has 
labored effectively and earnestly to advance the best interests of the community. 



L. A. DASH. 

L. A. Dash, a well known figure in real estate circles in Yakima, conducting im- 
portant business interests of that character as a partner of E. G. Tennant, was born 
in Merrimack, Wisconsin, in 1877, and acquired a public school education in Baraboo, 
Wisconsin. He afterward took up the study of telegraphy and became an operator 
on the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, in which connection he continued for sev- 
eral years. 

It was the year 1906 that witnessed the arrival of Mr. Dash in the northwest. 
He made Yakima his destination and became manager of an abstract office, while 
later he turned his attention to the insurance and collection business. At a subse- 
quent date he became secretary of the Business Men's .\ssociation of Yakrma and 
occupied that position for three years. He then turned his attention to the real 
•estate business, in which he also engaged for about three years, and in June, 1915, 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 201 

he entered into partnership with E. G. Tennant, an association that still maintains. 
Prior to that date he had put several subdivisions upon the market, including Grand- 
view and the Victoria additions. The firm of Tennant & Dash is now largely en- 
gaged in the development and sale of acre tracts and is doing a very extensive busi- 
ness. 

On the 22d of June, 1898, Mr. Dash was united in marriage to Miss Ruby A. 
Peck, of Baraboo, Wisconsin, a daughter of F. N. Peck, who became one of the 
pioneer settlers of that state. Mr. and Mrs. Dash now have two children, Mary 
Jeanette and Lawrence Peck. 

Mr. Dash is connected with the Knights of Pythias and is a past chancellor in the 
order. He also has membership with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and 
in the Commercial Club, and is in hearty sympathy with the plans and purposes of 
tliat organization to upbuild the city, to extend its trade relations and uphold those 
interests which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. He votes with the 
republican party .but has never been an aspirant for office, preferring to concentrate 
his efforts and attention upon his private interests, and today he is a well known 
and successful business man of Yakima, having made for himself a most creditable 
position in real estate circles. 



MRS. ANNA R. NICHOLS. 

Mrs. Anna R. Nichols, who is filling the position of county superintendent of 
schools of Yakima county, is a native of Michigan and was educated in the Michigan 
State Normal College of Ypsilanti, after which she took up the profession of teach- 
ing, which she followed in her native state for five years. 

In young womanhood she became the wife of John D. Nichols, of Michigan, and 
in 1902 they sought the opportunities of the west, removing to Yakima county, Wash- 
ington. Following their arrival they purchased an orchard in the Parker Bottom and 
afterward sold that property but later again invested in land in the same locality. 
Mr. Nichols concentrates his efforts and atention upon the development of the farm, 
which has been brought under a high state of cultivation. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Nichols have been born three children, a son and two daughters: 
Jack, Catherine and Margaret. After removing to the west, Mrs. Nichols resumed 
teaching, which she followed for five years in the country schools, and in 1917 her 
capability won recognition in election to the office of county superintendent of 
schools for a two years' term. She has done excellent work in this connection and 
has again been made the candidate of the republican party for the position. Her 
work has largely received public endorsement and the schools have been greatly ben- 
efitted by her service. 



JOSEPH E. McGRATH. 

Joseph E. McGrath, the efficient cashier of the Moxee State Bank, which was 
opened on the 13th of June, 1914, was born in Tama, Iowa, August 5, 1886, a son 
of Hugh J. and Martha (Bingham) McGrath, the former a native of New York, 
while the latter was born in Vermont. They removed westward to Iowa in the 
'SOs, settling in Clinton county, while subsequently they established their home in 
Tama county. There they resided until 1908, when they made their way to the 
Pacific northwest, settling at Waterville, Washington, where the father died and 
where the mother still makes her home. 

Joseph E. McGrath supplemented his public school training by a course in a 
business college and was thus well qualified for active work along the line in which 
he is now engaged. He started out in the business world as a clerk in a store in 
Waterville, Washington, and afterward accepted a position in the Farmers Bank 
at Krupp, where he remained for five years. He was later connected with the Ruflf 
State Bank at Ruff, Washington, in the position of cashier for three years and on 



202 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

the expiration of that period became one of the organizers of the Moxee State Bank, 
of which he has continuously served as cashier. His associates in this undertaking 
are L. H. Desmarais, who is the president, and G. E. McGrath, the vice president. 
The bank is capitalized for ten thousand dollars and the company owns a bank build- 
ing of brick with oak fixtures, which was built in 1914. The deposits amounted to 
more than ninety thousand dollars in November, 1917, with a surplus of fifteen hun- 
dred dollars and eight hundred dollars in undivided profits. The bank paid ten per 
cent on its stock in 1917 and is doing an excellent business under the careful guid- 
ance and management of Mr. McGrath. 

On the 20th of January, 1915, Mr. McGrath was married to Miss Grace E. Kelly, 
of Addy, Washington, a daughter of James Kelly. They are now parents of two 
children, Evaline and Maxine. Mrs. McGrath is a member of the Congregational 
church and a lady of many attractive social qualities. In politics Mr. McGrath is a 
republican, and fraternally he is identified with Yakima Lodge No. 318, B. P. O. E. 
Wideawake and alert, he loses no opportunity to take a forward step in the busi- 
ness world and has made for himself a creditable position in the financial circles of 
Moxee. 



STEPHEN J. HARRISON. 

Stephen J. Harrison has pursued so many different lines of activity that he may 
be considered one of the best known men within the state. He is not only one of 
the foremost citizens of the Yakima valley, to which he was instrumental in bring- 
ing many people, but has been one of the prime factors in the development of Sun- 
nyside and still owns a part of the townsite. Moreover, he has been noted as a 
preacher, founding the largest congregation of Brethren in the state, and has also 
been one of the bankers of his section. 

A native of Pennsylvania, Mr. Harrison was born near Johnstown, September 
24, 1855, a son of Thomas and Sarah (Waters) Harrison, who located in Sunnyside 
in March, 190O, the father taking up a homestead claim, to which he devoted his 
time and labors until his death in 1905, his widow surviving until 1917. The family 
removed from their Pennsylvania home to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in 1868, when Stephen 
J. Harrison was thirteen years of age, so that his public school education was largely 
received in his native state. He attended school in Iowa after the removal of the 
family there and later was a student in Cornell College of that state. He rounded 
out his education by attending the National Normal School at Lebanon, Ohio, and 
then taught in the Coe Collegiate Institute at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, for one year. 
In 1876 Mr. Harrison and W. E. Lockhard founded the Cedar Rapids Business Col- 
lege, an institution which has been of untold value to that city, but our subject sold 
his interest in that institution shortly after its organization. He then became con- 
nected with a publishing company of the Brethren church at Lanark, Illinois, being 
joint owner and also acting as editor. In January, 1881, he entered the employ of 
the Exchange Bank at that place, remaining in that connection for two years, and 
then devoted his attention to the development of a farm property which his wife had 
inherited, continuing in agricultural pursuits from 1882 until 1892. The farm was 
largely devoted to dairy purposes and he there had a large creamery and conducted 
a wholesale butter and egg business. Mr. Harrison had been an active member of 
the old Dunkard church but later became connected with the Brethren and was 
pastor of the church of that denomination at Waterloo, Iowa, for two years. In 
1895 he became editor of the Brethren Evangelist, the church organ, which he re- 
moved to Ashland, Ohio. 

About this time his son Homer was afflicted with a tumor of the abdomen and 
the anxious father took him to Chicago, where, despite the best care and attention, 
the son died. While in that city Mr. Harrison became interested in .Alexander Dovvie, 
whose acquaintance he soon made, and, each finding an interest in the other, he 
became connected with the great prophet and healer. It was he and Mr. Dowie who 
founded the paper. Leaves of Healing, of which Mr. Harrison became the manager. 
During this period he converted Mr. Dowie to the Dunkard mode of baptism and 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 203 

Mr. Harrison himself baptized Mr. Dowie according to this mode in Lake Michigan. 
Later Mr. Harrison went to California in search of a location for a colony, but in- 
stead of realizing his purpose acted as pastor of several Brethren churches in that 
state, remaining about one year, after which he returned to Lanark, Illinois. He 
there engaged in the stock, grain and implement business for two years but in 1898 
made his eventful entry into the state of Washington to look for a location for a 
colony. At that time he secured the sale of the land along the Sunnyside canal, a 
tract comprising sixty-four thousand acres, under W. H. Phipps, land commissioner 
of the Northern Pacific Railroad. From March, 1898, to March, 1899, Mr. Harrison 
was pastor of the church at Falls City, Nebraska, but in the latter year he and 
Harvey M. Lichty, of Carleton, Nebraska, removed to Sunnyside, Mr. Harrison 
taking charge of the land development. In 1902 he organized the Sunnyside Bank 
and served as president of the institution for seven years, or until 1909. In 1900 he 
bought the unsold portion of the townsite. Through his efforts many people have 
taken up their homes in the Yakima valley. 

Mr. Harrison never lost sight of church work and during 1901 he combined six 
Protestant churches in Sunn3side into the Federated church, which had an existence 
of six years. At one time it had a Sunday school enrollment of six hundred and 
twenty-five. To this Federated church belonged the following organizations: Baptist, 
Brethren, Christian, Congregational, Methodist and Presbyterion, all holding their 
services under one roof and being known as the Federated church. Later, however, 
each denomination withdrew and holds its own exclusive service. His paramount 
interest in the valley has ever been evident, for Mr. Harrison was one of four to 
assume the responsibility of getting the right of way for the Northern Pacific Rail- 
road through Sunnyside. He has also served as the first president of the Sunny- 
side Water Users Association, which took over the Sunnyside canal. In 1905 he 
organized the Mabton Bank and for seven years served as president of that institu- 
tion. 

In 1880 Mr. Harrison was united in marriage to Miss Loretta Rowland, of 
Lanark, Illinois, a daughter of Isaac and Mary (Stitzel) Rowland, both of whom 
have passed away. To this union were born two children: Homer, deceased; and 
Frank, whose sketch follows this. 

Mr. Harrison is liberal in his views regarding religious denominations and is a 
member of the Brethren church. In his fraternal affiliations he is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and belongs to the Elks Lodge No. 92 of 
Seattle. He is also a member of the Royal Arcanum and the Arctic Club of Seattle. 
In his political views he is a republican and in 1917 was a candidate for the nomina- 
tion to congress but failed of success. He now gives his time to the management 
of his properties. His achievements in Sunnyside stand as monuments to his vision 
and high purpose in life. 



FRANK HARRISON. 



Frank Harrison, who on the 24th of March, 1919, was assigned for duty as 
assistant personnel adjutant for Camp Zachariah Taylor, Kentucky, and whose con- 
nection with the army covers the entire period since America's entrance into the 
great World's war, was born at Lanark. Carroll county, Illinois, January 27, 1S9S, 
a son of Stephen J. and Loretta (Rowland) Harrison. In March, 1899, his parents 
removed to Sunnyside, Washington, which place was his home until 1910, when he 
removed to Seattle, Washington. He had previously been a pupil in the public 
schools of Sunnyside and afterward continued his education at Seattle until gradu- 
ated from the Lincoln high school of that city with the class of 1911. In the mean- 
time he had been a member of two interscholastic debating teams and one of six 
to contest for high school oratorical championship of the city. In the summer of 
1907 he attended the Acme Business College of Seattle, studying stenography and 
typewriting. In 1911 he entered the University of Washington and pursued the lib- 
eral arts course, being graduated cum laude in 1915, winning the Bachelor of Arts' 
degree. While in the university he was a member of the intercollegiate debating 



204 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

team, the winner of the Philo Sherman Bennett Essay contest and was president of 
the Badger Debating Club. He was also made a member of the Delta L'psilon fra- 
ternity and of the Phi Beta Kappa, the Phi Delta Kappa, the Phi Alpha Delta and 
the Tau Kappa Alpha honor societies. His early military training was also there 
received, for in 1915 he became major of cadets. He was a member of the Young 
Men's Christian Association cabinet in 1913 and 1914. 

Frank Harrison studied law at the University of Washington and was graduate 
assistant instructor in political science in 1916 and 1917. In June, 1916, he became 
associated with his father and L. L. Todd in the development of a farm at Benton 
City, giving considerable attention to that project until August, 1917. During the 
legislative session of 1917 he acted as clerk of the roads and bridges committee in 
the house of representatives at Washington. He was an enlisted man of the Wash- 
ington National Guard. Coast Artillery Corps, from May, 1916. until April, 1917. On 
the 13th of August. 1917, he enlisted in the Washington Field Artillery, National 
Guard, and in September was commissioned lieutenant with rank from August 5th. 
He served with the One Hundred and Forty-sixth Field Artillery, of which the Wash- 
ington National Guard was a part, from October 9, 1917, until July 29, 1918. being 
executive officer of Battery E during the advance at Chateau-Thierry. He was 
detached from the One Hundred and Forty-sixth Field Artillery from May 21 to 
June 30, 1918, as instructor in artillery for the Fifty-sixth Artillery, C. A. C. On the 
29th of July he was ordered to the United States to be artillery instructor; was pro- 
moted to first lieutenant August 11, 1918; w-as assigned to the Fifty-first Field Ar- 
tillery at Camp Bowie, Texas, as instructor and in addition from October 23, 1918, 
to February 8, 1919, commanded Headquarters Company and from December 13, 

1918, to February 8, 1919, was acting regimental adjutant. On the 8th of February, 

1919, he was assigned as student to the Field Artillery Officers School. Camp Zach- 
ariah Taylor, Kentucky, and on the 24th of March, 1919, was assigned as assistant 
personnel adjutant Jor Camp Zachariah Taylor. 

Mr. Harrison had a short experience during various summer vacation periods 
of high school and college years as bank clerk with the Mabton Bank at Mabton, 
Washington; as mechanics' helper with the Ford Motor Company of Seattle; as office 
clerk with the Essenkay Sales Company of Seattle; as district circulation manager 
of the Seattle Sun; and was in charge of hearings of the United States commissions 
and industrial relations at Seattle, Washington, in Auguft, 1914. His record as a stu- 
dent, in business circles and in military circles has been marked by steady progress. 
It must ever be a matter of gratification to him and a source of pride to his parents 
that he participated in the battle of Chateau-Thierry, which proved the turning point 
in the great World's war, the entrance of the Americans at that time checking the 
advance of the Germans, lending courage and hope to the French and, moreover, 
proving the worth of the American arms and the American spirit. 



MARTIN V. JACKSON. 

In the lamentable and tragic death of Martin V. Jackson, Yakima county lost 
not only a foremost agriculturist and the community a loyal and public-spirited citi- 
zen, but there were also many who mourned him as a steadfast friend, while to his 
imr^ediate family he was ever deeply devoted. While he attained individual pros- 
perity and occupied a substantial position among the people of his neighborhood, he 
also made valuable contributions to the general good and the sum total of his whole 
career must be counted of the greatest value to the state. Whatever he undertook 
he prosecuted with steadfast purpose and his energy and industry won for him the 
day. He had the intelligence of original thought and the audacity of new action and 
thus he became a leader in his particular vocation, setting a good example for present 
and future generations. 

Mr. Jackson came of most distinguished ancestry. He was born in Hinchin- 
brooke, Ontaria, Canada, May 12, 1864, a son of John Cogswell Jackson, who was 
born in New York and was a son of Jethro Jackson, the latter a nephew of Presi- 
dent Andrew Jackson. Mrs. Jackson, the mother of our subject, before her marriage 




MARTIN Y. JACKSON 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 207 

was Elizabeth Jane Cronk, a native of New York and a daughter of John Cronk, Jr., 
of New York, and a niece of John Cronk, Sr., who voluntarily served in the War 
of mil. He was the last survivor of that conflict and in 1905 died at Albany, New 
York, at the age of one hundred and five years. On account of his distinguished con- 
nection with the War of 1812 and being the last survivor he was given a public 
funeral. John C. Jackson, father of our subject, was a farmer by occupation, and as 
a pioneer made his way overland to Clear Lake, Iowa. Later he was located at 
Tarkio, Missouri, where he passed away. The family had returned from Canada 
when our subject was but a child. 

Martin V. Jackson, having removed with the family to Iowa, received his public 
school education in that state and after laying aside his textbooks at the age of 
seventeen left home and became connected with a surveying gang of the Great 
Northern Railroad. He was among the early residents of Washington, arriving in 
Kittitas county in the early '80s, and shortly thereafter he came to Yakima county, 
where he took up a timber claim on the Wenas. Later, in 1891, he took up a home- 
stead of one hundred and sixty acres, upon which he proved up in 1896, and the 
certificate from the government with the signature of Grover Cleveland is still in the 
possession of his widow. The ranch is located five and a half miles southwest of 
Sunnyside. In October, 1904, Mr. Jackson brought his wife here. Their first home 
was a two-room cabin but the family residence is now one of the finest in the neigh- 
borhood. Mr. Jackson began work by clearing away the sagebrush and as the years 
passed gradually brought his acres under cultivation. In 1903 he sold eighty acres of 
the homestead, retaining the remaining eighty acres, and this he cultivated until 
death claimed him. In 1911 he erected a handsome residence and in the course of 
time also built substantial barns. Modern machinery, in which he was ever inter- 
ested, facilitated the work of the fields, and thus he became a leader in the develop- 
ment and upbuilding of his region. 

On the 17th of February, 1904, Mr, Jackson was united in marriage to Miss Cora 
May Brussman, a native of Covington, Kentucky, and a daughter of Augustus F. 
and Eliza Ann (Linville) Brussman, who were born in Kentucky and Ohio respec- 
tively. The father was a son of Augustus F. and Margaret (Seidel) Brussman, both 
of whom were members of the Austrian aristocracy. They were given permission by 
the government to leave the country on account of the political troubles of 1849 
and after arriving in this country Augustus F. Brussman, Sr., located in Cincinnati. 
Ohio. Later removal was made to Covington, Kentucky, where he passed away. 
His son. the father of Mrs. Jackson now resides near Leasburg, Missouri, being a 
retired cigar manufacturer. Mrs. Brussman was a daughter of Kingston and Zer- 
elda (Steers) Linville. the former born in Linville, Virginia, of an old southern 
family. Colonel Lewis, of Revolutionary War fame, was a great uncle of Mrs. 
Zerelda Linville, while Mrs. Jackson is also descended from General Van Wyck, 
aid-de-camp of General George Washington. To Mr. and Mrs. Jackson were born 
five children: Nettie Rosalind, Elizabeth Jane, Martin Henry, Stella May and John 
Cogswell. 

Mr. Jackson died August 19, 1911, being killed by falling from the roof of his 
house while he was engaged in shingling. The news of his death spread far and wide 
throughout the neighborhood and was received everywhere with the most sincere 
expressions of grief and sorrow. Many were the friends who mourned in him an 
honorable and upright man, while to his family his loss appeared irreparable. He 
was ever devoted to their care and welfare, being a most loving husband and father. 
In his home centered his greatest interest and all of his thoughts were given to 
making that home more pleasant for his loved ones. In fact, he was an ideal family 
man and yet he found time to make friends outside the home circle. These friends he 
retained because of his high character, being ever ready to extend a cheering word 
of sound advice or a helpful action to those whose pathways were beset by difficul- 
ties and obstacles. 

Mrs. Jackson has taken over the business affairs since the death of her husband 
and has proven eminently successful in the management of the property. She is 
giving great care to the rearing of her family in order to make them useful members 



208 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

of society and yet she finds time to do a man's work in looking after the interests of 
the place. She raises largely alfalfa and potatoes and has continued to improve the 
property, which is now one of the most valuable in the neighborhood and is widely 
known as the Fairview Ranch. The prominence of the family is indicated in the 
fact that she is mentioned in the famous Who's Who in America, a place in that 
volume being conceded to her on account of the many distinguished members of her 
family. She is an ex-president of the Riverside Woman's Club and has ever been 
socially active. She gives her allegiance to the Christian church, of which she is a 
faithful member. 

Mr. Jackson was also a devoted and helpful member of the Christian church, 
which he regularly attended and in which faith he passed away. He belonged to the 
Knights of Pythias and also to the Grange, of which he was a charter member, and 
was always concerned in all public improvements, many of which he brought about 
through his active help and cooperation. His political support was given to the 
democratic party but he was never an office seeker although he was thoroughly in- 
formed on the questions and issues of the day not only regarding local affairs but 
also in regard to state and national problems. In fact he was one of the best in- 
formed men in his district, whose advice was often sought and whose opinions 
carried weight. His memory lives as a benediction to all who knevi' aught of him and 
his name will ever stand in the history of the district as one of the sturdy pioneers 
who here assisted in laying deep the seeds of civilization. 



FRED PARKER. 



Fred Parker is an attorney-at-law devoting the major part of his attention to his 
profession, and yet there have been few important business projects of the Yakima 
valley with which he has not been more or less closely associated and his efforts 
and activities have therefore contributed in substantial measure to the growth and 
upbuilding of the district. He has played so important a part in the history of this 
section of the state that his life record can not fail to prove of interest to many of 
the readers of this volume. 

Mr. Parker is a native of Kentucky, his birth having occurred in London, that 
state, on the 8th of December, 1861, his parents being Felix and Eliza ("Lincks) 
Parker. The father was a farmer by occupation and spent his entire life in Ken- 
tucky, which was also the native state of the mother. His ancestry was traced back 
to the old Parker family >that was founded in America by one of the passengers on 
the Mayflower. 

Fred Parker, whose name introduces this review, acquired a public school educa- 
tion in Kentucky, where he spent the period of his minority, and in 1883, when about 
twenty-two years of age. he sought the opportunities of the northwest, making 
Yakima his destination. In fact he aided in laying out the town and from that time 
to the present has been closely associated wth ts growth and improvement. In ISS.^i 
he began reading law with Judge Edward Whitson, now deceased, and after thorough 
preliminary training was admitted to the bar in 1888. That he had proven his worth 
during his student days is indicated by the fact that Judge Whitson then admitted 
him to partnership and the association was maintaned for a quarter of a century 
or until the judge was elevated to the federal bench, and the closest friendship was 
theirs until Judge Whitson was called from this life on the 15th of October, 1915. 
The zeal with which Mr. Parker has devoted his energies to the profession, the care- 
ful regard evinced for the interests of his clients and an assiduous and unrelaxing at- 
tention to all the details of his cases, have brought him a large business and made 
him very successful in its conduct. His arguments have elicited warm commendation 
not only from his associates at the bar but also from the bench. He is a very able 
writer: his briefs always show wide research, careful thought and the best and 
strongest reasons which can be urged for his contention, presented in cogent and 
logical form and illustrated by a style unusually lucid and clear. His clientage has 
long been a very extensive one and his devotion thereto has become proverbial. 
Moreover, Mr. Parker is a farsighted, sagacious and enterprising business man who 
has been identified with most of the important projects of the valley. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 209 

On the 10th of March, 1891, Mr. Parker was married to Miss Louise Irene 
Learning, of Kansas, who came to Washington in her girlhood days with her father, 
Edmond R. Learning, a pioneer settler of Yakima, who established the first nursery 
in the Yakima valley. Mr. and Mrs. Parker have become the parents of two sons and 
a daughter: William Edward, who was graduated from the Washington State Uni- 
versity and entered upon the practice of law in connection with his father, but is now 
a member of the L^nited States army; and Clarence L. and Harriett P., both at home. 

Mr. Parker is an exemplary representative of the Masonic fraternity, having 
taken the degrees of lodge and chapter, and is a life member of the Benevolent Pro- 
tctive Order of Elks. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party but 
has never become an active party worker, preferring to concentrate his undivided 
attention upon his profession and his business interests, and today he is a director in 
several corporations, ranking him with the most valued citizens of this section of 
the state. 



SAMUEL R. McCAW. 

Samuel R. McCaw, a well known representative of the banking fraternity in 
the Yakima valley, was the organizer and is now cashier of the American Commer- 
cial Bank of Wapato. He was born in Steilacoom, Washington, August 2, 1868, a 
son of Samuel and Mary McCaw. The father was of Scotch-Irish descent and in 
1849 crossed the continent to California and later made his way up the Eraser river, 
while subsequently he established his home at Steilacoom, where he engaged in busi- 
ness as a stock trader. He died in May, 1882. while his wife, surviving him for about 
sixteen years, passed away in 1898. 

Samuel R. McCaw attended the Indian school at Forest Grove, Oregon, now 
known as the Chemawa Indian School and was a member of the first class to gradu- 
ate from that institution. For three years he was a student in the Earlham College 
of Indiana and started out in the business world as an employe of the Crane Com- 
pany of Chicago, for whom he served as discount clerk. In 1894 he accepted a posi- 
tion in the L^nited States government service at Fort Simcoe and was afterward at 
Colville. Washington, as chief clerk of the Indian agency there. In the meantime, 
however, he had gone to Yakima in 1893 and was for a year connected with the 
Yakima National Bank. It was in 1894 that he entered the government service. In 
1895 he returned to the Yakima National Bank, where he was employed for twenty- 
two years, becoming general teller of that institution. He then decided to engage in 
the banking business on his own account and became the organizer of the American 
Commercial Bahk, which was established on the 2d of January, 1918. This was the 
first bank in the LTnited States to be owned entirely by Indians. It is a state bank, 
capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars, and now has a surplus of twenty-five 
hundred dollars, while its deposits already amount to one hundred thousand dollars. 
The bank has entered upon a very prosperous career under capable and efficient man- 
agement, for progressive business men stand at its head. The first officers were: 
P. A. Olney. a stock raiser, who became the president; S. R. McCaw, vice-president 
and cashier; and Nealy N. Olney, assistant cashier, while the other directors were 
C. C. Olney, a sheep and cattle raiser and farmer, and George W. Olney, also prom- 
inent as a stock raiser and farmer. Mr. McCaw has been the active head of the bank 
from the beginning. The company purchased and remodeled the building which 
they occupy, a modern fireproof and burglar proof structure, equipped with a splendid 
vault, safe and other devices found in every modern banking institution. Mr. McCaw 
was well qualified by previous training and experience for the duties which he 
assumed and which he is now most capably discharging. The success of the bank 
seems assured and his business career, judged by what he has accomplished in the 
past, will be well worth watching. 

On the 6th of June, 1903, Mr. McCaw was married to Miss Alice K. Wallace, of 
Lucasville. Ohio, and they have one son, Samuel Robert, Jr., while by a former mar- 
riage Mr. McCaw- had two children, Winona and Myrtle Ramona. 

Mr. McCaw owns some fine farm land on the reservation and is meeting with 

(10) 



210 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

substantial success in his undertakings. He is the president of the Yakima Indian 
Commercial Club, of which he became a charter member, and his efforts are 
proving an important element in promoting business conditions among the Indian 
residents of this section of the state. His political allegiance is given to the repub- 
lican party and he stands for progress and improvement along all lines. 



MISS MAUD GILMOUR. 

Miss Maud Gilmour, who is filling the office of county treasurer of Kittitas 
county, is a native of Lebanon, Oregon, and a daughter of John L. and Virginia 
(Linbarger) Gilmour. Her father was born in Illinois and in early life crossed the 
plains to Oregon, making the hard trip across the sands and over the mountain 
passes at a day when there were no railroads to shorten time and distance. It was 
after his arrivalin that state that he was married to Miss Virginia Linbarger, who 
was born in Oregon, her parents having been pioneer settlers of that state. Mr. 
Gilmour was a blacksmith by trade and followed that pursuit in Oregon until 1881, 
when he romoved to Ellensburg, where he took up his abode on the 13th of October. 
He had one of the first blacksmith shops of this section of the state. He was one 
of the early settlers of Ellensburg, taking up his abode there when the town con- 
tained only a very sparse population. With its industrial interests he was closely 
identified to the time of his death, which occurred in January, 1904. His widow sur- 
vived him for more than a decade, passing away in 1914. In the meantime the father, 
as he prospered in his undertakings, made judicious investments in property and 
became the owner of several ranches. To him and his wife were born eleven chil- 
dren, six of whom are still living. 

Miss Gilmour, whose name introduces this review, pursued a public school edu- 
cation in Ellensburg and afterward continued her studies in the State Normal School 
of this place. Later she engaged in office work and in 1911 was appointed to the po- 
sition of deputy county treasurer, in which capacity she served for four years, or 
until 1915. She was then elected county treasurer and her previous experience was 
of great value to her in assuming the duties of the office. She served her second term 
in that position and is now chief deputy under W. G. Damerow, the present county 
treasurer. Her record is one which has gained for her high credit and admiration, 
for she is most systematic, thorough and accurate in all that she does. She was 
elected to the office on the democratic ticket and she has been a stalwart supporter 
of the party. Her religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. She represents 
two of the old pioneer families of the northwest. Both her grandfathers on the 
paternal and maternal sides were pioneer Indian fighters and from that early day her 
people have taken an active part in the development and progress of the northwest 
and in tlie utiliation of its resources for the purposes of civilization. Miss Gilmour 
is widely known in Washington, where she has many friends, her attractive social 
qualities making for her popularity wherever she is known. 



GEORGE F. HEYDUCK. 

George F. Heyduck ranks with the leading fruit growers in the vicinity of 
Yakima and his life is. illustrative of the fact that opportunity is open to all in the new 
world. Starting out in life empty-handed, he has steadily advanced and each forward 
step has brought him a broader outlook and wider opportunities. He is today con- 
ducting important fruit raising interests upon an excellent property of thirty-nine 
acres in the vicinity of Yakima. He was born in Centralia, Illinois, March 23, 1866, 
a son of John G. and Caroline (Cretzmeyer) Heyduck. The mother passed away 
in 1887, but the father long survived and died in Illinois, July 24, 1918, at the age of 
seventy-seven years. He was a farmer by occupation, following that pursuit through- 
out the greater part of his active life, but in his later years he enjoyed a well-earned 
rest. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 211 

When his school daj'S were over, George F. Heyduck started out in the business 
world. In 1892 he became a railroad employe and working his way steadily upward 
in that connection, became an engineer on the lUnois Central Railroad in 1897. He 
occupied that position until October, 1913, when he came to the Yakima valley. He 
had previously visited this section of the state, in 1908. and had invested in twenty 
acres of land, one-half of which was planted to fruit. He now has thirty-nine acres, 
of which twenty-seven acres is in fruit, while twelve acres is plow land and pasture 
land. He directs his interests wisely and systematically and has won a place amon.y 
the foremost fruit growers of this section of the state. His orchards when in blossom 
are a scene of rare beauty that is only equalled when the fruit turns to gold and red 
upon the trees. He is thoroughly familiar with the most modern scientific methods of 
caring for and spraying the trees and study has made him also familiar with the 
kinds of fruit that can best be raised in this locality. In addition to his horticul- 
tural interests he keeps a number of fine cows and is also successfully engaged in 
raising corn, having eight acres planted to that crop. 

On the 24th of February, 1892, Mr. Heyduck was married to Miss Cordelia 
Crawford, of Centralia, Illinois. They had been schoolmates in the district school 
in childhood days and the acquaintance then formed ripened into love, which was 
consummated in marriage. They are now rearing an adopted daughter, Pearl. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Heyduck is connected with the Masons as a member of the lodge and 
chapter. He took an active part in the work of railway orders while engaged in that 
line of business. In politics he maintains an independent course, voting for men 
and measures rather than party. His religious faith is that of the Methodist church 
and to its principles he loyally adheres, while high principles guide him in every rela- 
tion of life. He is a member of the Yakima County Horticultural Union and his 
all times commends him to the confidence and goodwill of his associates 

acquaintances throughout the valley. 



JOHN L. WILLETT. 



John L. Willett has the reputation of being a successful educator and an equally 
successful hortoculturist. The qualities which make for advancement in both lines 
are his and, actuated by a laudable ambition, he has steadily progressed. A native 
of Appanoose county, Iowa, he was born near Centerville on the 7th of September, 
1877, a son of James M. and Mary A. (Roundy) Willett. The father, a native of Vir- 
ginia, was a son of William Willett, who became a pioneer settler of Iowa. The 
mother of John L. Willett was born in Illinois, being a daughter of John Roiindy, 
who took up his abode in that state when it was upon the western frontier and after- 
ward removed to Iowa when it was still a pioneer district. The parents of John L. 
Willett were married in Iowa and the mother is living at Moulton, that state, but the 
father has passed away. 

In the year 1902 John L. Willett came to Washington. He had previously taught 
school for two years in Iowa and after reaching this state he attended a normal 
school and subsequently taught for five years. He was at one time principal of the 
Summit View school of Yakima and did splendid work in the educational field. For 
a few years thereafter he gave his attention to ranching and subsequently was called 
to the position of deputy sheriff, in which capacity he served for two years. He 
then returned to the ranch and is today the owner of twenty acres located three 
miles west of Yakima. Of this five acres is in orchard, producing as fine apples as 
can be raised in this section of the country. He has fifteen acres of his land in 
corn and alfalfa. He took the first prize in corn sweepstakes at the county fair in 
1917, also the third prize and won honorable mention. His eflforts along horticul- 
tural lines have been further extended in that he rents ten acres of orchard land 
devoted to pears and apples. Thoroughly familiar with all that has to do with the 
propagation of fruit in this locality, his labors have produced excellent results and 
he is now conducting a profitable business. 

On the 21st of June, 1905, Mr. Willett was married to Miss Carrie E. Morgan, 
a daughter of Robert S. Morgan, and they have one child, James Hamilton, who 



212 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

was born July 27, 1915. In his political views Mr. Willett is a democrat. He and 
• his wife are members of the Methodist church and take an active interest in its 
work and in all that pertains to. the upbuilding and progress of the community in 
which they make their home. They have gained many warm friends during the 
period of their residence in the northwest and Mr. Willett has won a most creditable 
position in the regard of his fellow townsmen by reason of the ability he has dis- 
played in educational lines and as an agriculturist and horticulturist. 



JOHN B. FREDRICKSON. 

John B. Fredrickson, proprietor of a well appointed drug store in Toppenish, was 
born in Madison, Wisconsin, March 9, 1886, a son of O. C. and Anna Frederickson, 
who in the year 1889 came to Washington, settling first at Tacoma, where the father 
engaged in shipbuilding. He is now residing in Seattle, where he continues in the 
same line of business. 

John B. Fredrickson pursued a public school education at Auburn, Washington, 
and after his textbooks were put aside entered upon an apprenticeship to the drug 
business at Puyallup, Washington, being employed by the Truedson Drug Company. 
He remained with that house for three and a half years and then went to Tacoma, 
where he resided until 1908. He then removed to Roslyn, Washington, where he 
lived for two years, and for one year was located at Sunnyside. All through these 
periods he continued in the drug trade and in the fall of 1911 he came to Toppenish, 
where he entered the Peterson drug store as an employe, there remaining for two 
and a half years. Mr. Fredrickson then joined R. R. Dasher in the purchase of the 
Clark Pharmacy, which has since been conducted under the firm style of Fredrick- 
son & Dasher. They occupy a building twenty-five by one hundred and ten feet, hav- 
ing one of the best drug stores of the town. 

In June, 1908, Mr. Fredrickson was married to Miss Hettie Glascock, a native ot 
Texas but at the time of her marriage a resident of Puyallup, Washington. The 
children of this marriage are: Verna Estelle, six years of age: and Audrey Lucille, 
who is in her first year. 

Mr. Fredrickson belongs to the Woodmen of the World and also to the Im- 
proved Order of Foresters and he has membership in the Toppenish Commercial 
Club. He is interested in all that has to do with the welfare and progress of his 
adopted city and his cooperation can always be counted upon to further plans and 
measures for the general good. In business he has never dissipated his efforts over 
a wide field but has concentrated his attention upon a single line, in which he has 
developed ability of a high order. 



DANIEL W. BRUNSON. 

Daniel W. Brunson. who has been actively and successfully identified with 
ranching interests in the Kittitas valley during the past twenty-two years, now owns 
and cultivates an excellent farm of one hundred and eighty-three acres situated three 
and a half miles northwest of Ellensburg. As an auctioneer he has also had charge 
of about all the pul^lic sales in Kittitas county in the past fourteen years. His birth 
occurred in Ralls county, Missouri, on the 1st of May, !872, his parents lieint; Carden 
Porter and Drucilla (Hunt) Brunson, who were natives of Ohio and Illinois respec- 
tively and became early settlers of Missouri. The father devoted his attention to 
general agricultural pursuits throughout his active business career, but both he and 
his wife have now passed away. 

Daniel W. Brunson attended the public schools in the acquirement of an educa- 
tion and on attaining his majority undertook the cultivation of rented land in Mis- 
souri. He was thus engaged in tliat state for three years or until 1896. when he made 
his way westward to the Kittitas valley and here took up a homestead claim. He 
also worked as a farm hand by the month for three years and he continued the opera- 




MR. AND MRS. DAXIKL W. BRUNSON 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 215 

tion of his place until disposing of the property in 1910. In that year he purchased a 
tract of eighty acres near Thorp and thereon carried on his agricultural interests until 
1915, when he sold the place and bought his present farm of one hundred and eighty- 
three acres three and a half miles northwest of EUensburg. He has erected thereon 
a substantial barn and other buildings and has brought his fields under a high state 
of cultivation, annually raising excellent crops of hay and grain. He likewise devotes 
considerable attention to sheep raising, which branch of his business adds materially 
to his income. 

On the 23d of December, 1903, Mr. Brunson was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary 
B. Hawthorn, a native of Tennessee and a daughter of J. S. and Josephine (Min- 
nick) Hawthorn. The father still resides in Tennessee, but the mother has passed 
away. Mr. and Mrs. Brunson have become the parents of three children: Roy Car- 
den, Annie Irene and Daniel Hawthorn. Mr. Brunson gives his political allegiance 
to the republican party, exercising his right of franchise in support of its men and 
measures. The prosperity which he now enjoys is all the more creditable by reason 
of the fact that it has been entirely self-acquired and through his own efforts and 
industry he has won a place among the substantial and representative farmers of 
Kittitas county. 



GEORGE W. ROCKETT. 

George W. Rockett, who is engaged in ranching on the Cowiche in Yakima 
county, is a representative of one of the old pioneer families of Washington. His 
birth occurred in Clarke county, this state, on the 28th of November, 1868, his parents 
being R. P. and Hannah M. (Lewis) Rockett, the former a native of Glasgow, Scot- 
land, while the latter was born in Indiana. The father left the land of hills and 
heather when a boy and became a sailor. He made the trip by way of Cape Horn 
to the western coast in the 'SOs and settled at Vancouver, Washington. He was 
drowned about 1871 and his widow afterward became the wife of John W. Stevenson. 
She was a daughter of Henry Lewis, who died in Indiana, and she came to Wash- 
ington with her brothers. Jack and Ben Lewis. It was at Vancouver that Mr. and 
Mrs. R. P. Rockett were married and it was after the death of her first husband 
that Mrs. Rockett removed to Yakima county in 1872 and was here married again. 

George W. Rockett acquired a public school education and has devoted his en- 
tire life to ranching in this part of the state. He obtaned forty acres of the old 
homestead and has bought forty acres additional, so that he has a good ranch of 
eighty acres, which he is careful!}', systematically and successfully cultivating, de- 
voting his land to tlie raising of grain and hay. 

Mr. Rockett is a republican in his political views but does not seek nor desire 
office. He keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day and is never 
remiss in the duties of citizenship but cooperates heartily in all plans and measures 
for the general good. He has always lived in the northwest and has been a most 
interested witness of the remarkable changes that have been wrought in a compara- 
tively short time, reclaiming this great region, which only about a half century ago 
was wild and undeveloped, for the purposes of civilization. 



WILLIAM P. MURPHY. 

William P. Murphy, serving as sheriff of Yakima county, was born in Washing- 
ton county, Illinois, on the 28th of March, 1877, a son of John F. and Martha 
CGilbert) Murphy, who after residing for many years in the middle west came to 
Washington about 1908 and are now living on the home farm near Fairview. 

William P. Murphy obtained his education in the public schools of his native 
state and through the period of his boyhood and youth assisted in the work of the 
home farm, early becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and 
caring for the crops. He made his way to the Puget Sound country in 1901 and the 



216 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

following year arrived in Yakima, since which time he has made his home in this 
section of the state. For a considerable period he engaged in the life insurance 
business after having spent four years as an organizer all over southeastern Wash- 
ington for the Modern Woodmen of America. He established during that period many 
of the lodges in the state. He then concentrated his energies upon life insurance, in 
which he continued until 1911, after which he occupied the position of chief deputy 
sheriff for two years. He next became superintendent of the jute warehouse mill 
at the state penitentiary and he was also steward at the state reformatory in the 
years 1913 and 1914. In the latter year he was again called to public service in his 
election to the ol¥ice of sheriff of Yakima county, at which time he received the 
largest majority ever given to a candidate for that position. He made a most ex- 
cellent record in the office and was then reelected in 1917 with three times the ma- 
jority tliat had been given liim before, and moreover he has the distinction of being 
the first sheriff to be re-elected in more than ten years. This fact is indicative of his 
personal popularity and the confidence and trust reposed in him. All recognize in 
him a most faithful custodian of public interests. He stands for law and order and 
his name brings a sense of safety to all law-abiding people and carries with it a 
menace to those who do not hold themselves amenable to law. He is prompt in the 
execution of his duties and he has served as president of the State Sheriffs' Associa- 
tion. 

On the ISth of July, 1896 Mr. Murphy was united in marriage to Miss Martha 
Rhine, of Washington county, Illinois, and to them have been born five children; 
I-avata, eighteen years of age: Lawson, aged fifteen; Zenas, a youth of fourteen; 
Norma, six years of age; and Wilbur, aged three. 

Mr. Murphy is a well known member of the Masonic fraternity and exemplifies 
in his life the beneficent spirit of tlie craft. He belongs to Yakima Lodge Xo. 24, 
F. & A. M. He is also a member of the Odd Fellows Lodge No. 22 and of the Mod- 
ern Woodmen Camp of Yakima and in the latter has filled all of the offices. In 
politics he is a republican, stalwart in his support of the principles of the party and 
doing everything in his power to secure their adoption and to win success for the 
party candidates. He was deeply and helpfully interested in war work and served 
as chairman of the local exemption board. He stands for those things which are 
of vital worth to the city, the commonwealth and the country and his >aid and influ- 
ence are always given on the side of right, progress and improvement. Washington 
gained a subsantial and worthy citizen when he left his native sate and cast in his 
fortunes with those of the northwest. 



BENJAMIN F. LINSE. 

The younger agricultural fraternity of Yakima county is represented by Benja- 
min F. Linse, the owner of twenty acres of land on the Tieton, part of which is in 
apple orchard, the remainder being devoted to hay and grain. A native of South 
Dakota, he was born in Marshall county, February 12, 1886, and is a son of Fred and 
Anna (Berg) Linse, pioneers of Minnesota, who in 1881, five years before the birth 
of our ^subject, removed to South Dakota, where the father continued to follow 
farming, the family home being established in Day county. Tliere they continued 
until 1902, Benjamin F. Linse receiving his educational training in the rural schools 
near his father's farm, and on the removal of the family to Yakima county he accom- 
panied them, at which time he was sixteen years of age. He continued upon the 
home farm until 1906, when, at the age of twenty, he bought twenty acres of land 
on the Tieton, which was then covered with sagebrush. He has since improved this 
place and now has four acres in apples, while the remainder is devoted to grain and 
hay. 

On the 6th of October, 1910, Mr. Linse was united in marriage to Miss Ella 
Speich. a native of Renwick, Iowa, and a daughter of Mathias and Barbara Speich, 
who were born in Switzerland and in early life crossed the ocean to the United States. 
They at first located in Wisconsin, later removing to Iowa and in 1906 coming to 
Yakima county. The father was an agriculturist, following that occupation in the 



HISTORV OF YAKIMA VALLEY 217 

various states in which the family resided and continuing ranching at Nob Hill until 
his death. His widow survives. To Mr. and Mrs. Linse has been born a son, 
Edmond Burton, whose birth occurred December 19, 1913. 

Mr. and Mrs. Linse attend the Evangelical church. In his political views Mr. 
Linse is independent, giving his support to measures and candidates as his judge- 
ment dictates. From 1902 until 191S he was a member of the National Guard of 
the state of Washington and reached the rank of first lieutenant in the organiza- 
tion. 



OSCAR R. STRAND. 



For twelve years Osc^r R. Strand has been a resident of the Yakima valley, 
having come here in 1907, and he now is the owner of a twenty-four-acre ranch, 
twelve of which are in orchard. His labors here have been attended with success 
and he is today a prosperous horticulturist of his neighborhood. .-^ native of Chi- 
cago, Illinois, he was born March 2, 1880, and is a son of Ole and Madeline (Thomp- 
son) Strand, natives of Norway, who came to the United States many years ago. For 
a number of years the father worked for wages but later was engaged in the ex- 
press business in Chicago. 

Oscar R. Strand was reared under the parental roof and received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of the metropolis on the lakes, but at the early age of 
fourteen started out for himself. He not only worked on farms but also taught 
school, from which fact it is evident that he improved his education to a considerable 
extent, although the opportunities offered him were meager. In 1902 he came to 
Yakima county, Washington, where he worked for a year, at the end of which period 
he went to Iowa. In 1907, however, he again took up his residence in the Yakima 
valley, working at first for wages. He then operated rented land until 1918, when he 
bought sixteen acres of land, having previously, in 1915, purchased eight acres. Thus 
he today owns twenty-four acres, twelve of which is in orchard, while the remainder 
is devoted to alfalfa and under the plow. There is great credit due Mr. Strand for 
what he has achieved, as he has worked up from the bottom and therefore is en- 
titled to the proud American title of a self-made man. 

Mr. Strand married Miss Nellie Forrest, a daughter of Eben U. and Clara 
(Selfies) Forrest, who are mentioned at greater length on other pages of this work. 
To this union has been born a son, Forrest Le Roy, whose birth occurred March 
29, 1909. 

Mr. Strand is prominent in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, having 
filled all the chairs in the subordinate lodge, while he also is a member of the Grand 
Lodge and has served as a delegate to the same. He belongs to the Christian church, 
in the work of which he is helpfully interested, and politically is a republican. Fully 
realizing the importance of irrigation and drainage, he has closely studied that sub- 
ject and at this writing is ably serving as supervisor of drainage district No. 15. 



AARON F. JAEGER. 



For twelve years horticultural interests have claimed the attention of Aaron F. 
Jaeger, who has a fine ranch of twenty acres within the city limits of Zillah, twelve 
of which are in orchard. Moreover, Mr. Jaeger is conducting a sinall dairy, from 
which he receives a gratifying addition to his income. A native of Winnebago county, 
Wisconsin, he was born December 10, 1857, of the marriage of John Philip and Mary 
(Durr) Jaeger, natives of Germany. Both were brought to this country during their 
childhood, in 1837. They spent their youth in New York city, where they were 
married, and subsequently went to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, when that city was but a 
village, traveling the last ninety-five miles with o.x teams. Subsequently the father 
bought land in Winnebago county, Wisconsin, which was still in a wild state, but 
undismayed he set himself to the task of bringing it under cultivation and in the 



218 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

course of years became a successful agriculturist. Both parents passed away in 
Wisconsin. 

Aaron F. Jaeger was reared under the parental roof amid farm conditions and 
thus early became acquainted with agricultural methods. In the acquirement of his 
education he attended the public schools and remained on the home farm until he 
was twenty-one years of age. Desiring to take up a trade, he learned coopering and 
subsequently became manager for the Symes Cooperage Company at Glenwood, 
Wisconsin, having been first with that firm at Appleton, that state. He was asso- 
ciated with that company for twenty years. He then attended to the setlement of 
his father's estate and was so engaged for five years, at the end of which time he 
removed to Yakima county, Washington, where he arrived March 6, 1906. He ac- 
quired twenty acres of land within the city limits of Zillah and immediately set 
himself to the task of transforming this into a valuable orchard. He now has 
twelve acres thus planted, while the remainder is plow land, being devoted to hay 
and corn. He also conducts a small dairy, out of which enterprise he makes a hand- 
some profit yearly. 

On October 18, 1882, Mr. Jaeger was married to Miss Mary McLelland, of Mill- 
town, Maine, the ceremony, however, being performed at Neenah, Wisconsin. She 
is a daughter of John and Sarah (Ingersoll) McLelland, the former a native of New 
Brunswick and the latter of Maine, but in an early day they became residents of 
Neenah, Wisconsin. For many years Mr. McLelland was connected with mining, 
but both he and his wife have now passed away, the father dying in 1914, at the 
age of eighty-six years, while the mother passed away in October, 1899. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jaeger have become the parents of two children: Lester R., who was born at 
Neenah, Wisconsin, June 10, 1884, is now engaged in ranching in the neighborhood 
of Zillah. He married Miss Clara Nelson of Zillah, and they have two children. 
Kesten Phillip, born April 17, 1898, is at home. 

Mr. Jaeger has always maintained his independence in regard to political mat- 
ters, preferring to follow his own judgment in supporting candidates. While he has 
not been politically active he became more or less interested in public afifairs while 
a resident of Wisconsin. Both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
church, and fraternally Mr. Jaeger is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, on the roster of which organization his name has appeared since 1890. He 
has held all of the chairs in the subordinate lodge and also is a member of the en- 
campment and the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin. He is one of the substantial residents 
of Zillah, in the growth and development of which he is ever ready to cooperate, and 
since becoming a resident of this city he has made many friends, all of whom are 
agreed as to his high qualities of character, which make him a public-spirited citizen, 
a reliable and trustworthy business man and a loyal and true friend. 



ARCHIE M. PRIOR. 



Archie M. Prior has for a number of years been numbered among the most 
prominent stockmen of the northwest. He is now largely living retired, his invest- 
ments in property and stock being heavy. He makes his home in Yakima and the 
fruits of his former toil are providing him with all of the comforts and many of the 
luxuries of life. 

Mr. Prior is a native of Kingston, Missouri. He was born on the 7th of August, 
1882, a son of George Prior, mentioned elsewhere in this work. The family home was 
established in Washington in 1895, at which time settlement was made in Klicki- 
tat county, where they remained for a year and then came to Yakima county. 

Archie M. Prior attended the public schools of Missouri until thirteen years of 
age and afterward became a student in a business college at Yakima which he at- 
tended for two terms. His father became identified with the sheep industry in Wash- 
ington and Mr. Prior of this review was his active assistant until 1915, thus gaining 
broad experience concerning the best methods of caring for sheep in the north- 
west. He afterward became associated with Robert Herron in the care of eighteen 
hundred head of sheep and they are now the owners of thirty-six hundred ewes and 




ARCHIE M. PRIOR 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 221 

twenty-one hundred wethers. They run sheep on the Colville reservation. Mr. Prior 
has leased a range in Horse Heaven and has been very successful in sheep raising. 
There is no one more able to speak with authority upon the industry in any of its 
phases or branches, for long experience has given him most practical knowledge 
and at all times he has followed the most progressive methods in the care and 
marketing of his sheep. Throughout the entire period of his close connection with 
the industry he has made his home in Yakima and now owns and occupies a beautiful 
residence on West Yakima avenue. 

In October, 1905, Mr. Prior was united in marriage to Miss Martha Beck, a 
daughter of Ross and Martha (Frederick) Beck, who were pioneer residents of the 
Yakima valley and have now passed away. Her grandmother, Mrs. Martha Beck, 
taught the first school in Yakima county, and Edna Beck, a cousin of Mrs. Prior, was 
the first female child born in Yakima. Mr. and Mrs. Prior have become the parents 
of four children: George. Dorothy, Donald and Catherine, The religious faith of 
the family is that of the Presbyterian church, to the teachings of which Mr. and 
Mrs. Prior loyally adhere. His political allegiance is given to the republican party 
but he has no thought of nor desire for public office. He belongs to the Com- 
mercial Club and is in hearty sympathy with its purposes to upbuild the city and 
country, extend its trade relations and advance its civic interests. Practically his 
entire life has been passed in Washington and he is a most enthusiastic champion 
of the state and its opportunities, while at all times he has borne his full share in 
the work of general progress and improvement. 



HERBERT C. WALKER. 

Herbert C. Walker, who is devoting his time to the raising of apples and pears 
upon a good ranch near Yakima, was born in Pansville, New York, July 31, 1878, 
a son of F. C. and Charlotte .(Pickstock) Walker, who in 1895 left the east and 
removed with their family to Tacoma, Washington, where the father is now vice 
president and manager of the department store owned by the Stone & Fisher 
Company. 

Herbert C. Walker acquired a public school education in the Empire state, 
supplemented by study in the Whitworth College and the Tacoma Business Col- 
lege. His practical business training was received under the direction of his father 
in the store at Tacoma and after preliminary experience he was made manager of 
the linen department, so continuing until 1908, when he removed to the Yakima 
valley, for he had determined to withdraw from commercial connections and enter 
upon a business career that would keep him out of doors. Attracted by the possi- 
bilties for horticultural development in the Yakima valley, he purchased ten acres 
of land four and a quarter miles west of the Yakima depot. A part of the tract w-as 
already planted to fruit and he has set out the balance to fruit, making a specialty of 
apples and pears. The old house upon the place was destroyed by fire and Mr. 
Walker built a modern and attractive residence. Everything about the place is neat 
and thrifty in appearance and his unfaltering care and unwearied industry have 
converted his ranch into one of the profit bearing properties of the district. He 
also rents ten acres _more of fruit orchard and he has a twenty acre tract, which he 
has planted to hay and corn. He is prompted by a laudable ambition in all that he 
undertakes and wisely utilizes every opportunity that comes to him. 

On the 24th of August, 1904, Mr. Walker was married to Miss Alberta Race, 
of Tacoma. a daughter of Frank E. and .^nna Race, who were pioneer settlers 
of Beloit, Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Walker have five children, Charlotte, Kathryn, 
Franklin, Robert and Charles. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walker are highly esteemed people of the community in which they 
reside. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, while his wife has membership 
in the Episcopal church. His political allegiance is given to the republican party 
and while he has never sought public ofifice, he has served as school director for the 
past six years and is a most earnest advocate of progressive education, the schools 
finding in him a stalwart friend. He is likewise a member of the Yakima County 



222 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Horticultural Union and is interested in all that pertains to the dissemination of 
knowledge concerning the most advanced horticultural methods. In fact he stands 
for progress along all lines that have to do with the material, intellectual, social 
and moral advancement of the community. 



FRANK S. WEED. 



A quarter of a century has passed since Frank S. Weed became a permanent 
resident of Kittitas county, where he now follows farming in the neighborhood of 
Thorp. He was born in New Hampshire, November 7, 1862, a son of W. O. and 
Sarah (Bennett) Weed, both of whom passed away before the year 1865, so that 
Frank S. Weed was early left an orphan. He was reared in the home of his uncle, 
W. P. Ames, who removed to Iowa in 1870 and in 1878 became a resident of Wash- 
ington, establishng his home in Klickitat county. There he resided for five years, 
at the end of which time he removed to Kittitas county, where he still makes his 
home. 

Frank S. Weed was a youth of sixteen years at the time he came with his 
uncle to Washington. He remained in Klickitat county until 1888 and then went to 
Tacoma, while in 1894 he removed to Kittitas county and purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres of land two miles south of Thorp. He then began the development 
and improvement of his place, upon which he has erected a comfortable and com- 
modious residence, together with large barns and sheds. In 1915 he suffered the 
loss of his barn by fire but immediately rebuilt. He has added modern improve- 
ments and equipments to his place, which is now an attractive one of the neigh- 
borhood. 

On the 6th of November, 1887, Mr. Weed was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
E. Lusby, a daughter of Meredith Lusby, who was one of the first settlers of Klicki- 
tat county. He was born in Kentucky and was a son of John Lusby, a native of 
England. In 1870 he went to California, making the trip over the hot, sandy plains 
and through the mountain passes, and in 1876 he arrived in Klickitat county, casting 
in his lot with the earliest settlers who were reclaiming this region for the purposes 
of civilization. To Mr. and Mrs. Weed have been born three children: William, 
who is now engaged in ranching in Kittitas county; Mildred, the wife of Arthur 
Ribard, who is also a ranchman of the Kittitas valley; and Elton M., at home. 

Mr. Weed is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and politically 
is a republican where national questions and issues are involved but at local elec- 
tions casts an independent ballot. He is separated by the width of the continent 
from his birthplace. The sterling traits inherited from New England ancestry, 
however, he has brought to the west with its countless opportunities and the years 
have chronicled his success as he has systematically carried on his farm work. 



NELGIS T. ROULEAU. 

Nelgis T. Rouleau is not only numbered among the representative farmers in 
the vicinity of Moxee City but also deserves special notice as one whose efTorts 
have been most effective in promoting the good roads movements in his part of the 
state. He was born in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, February 7, 1868, a son of Peter 
and Emily (Valencourt) Rouleau, both of whom were natives of Canada and of 
French descent. They crossed the border into the Lfnited States when young peo- 
ple, settling in Wisconsin, where they were married, and there the father engaged 
in farming. He afterward removed to St. Paul, Minnesota, and subsequently lived 
at Minneapolis and later at Hancock, Minnesota. He was in various parts of that 
state and was the owner of six hundred and forty acres of valuable land near Brecken- 
ridge, Minnesota, which he owned until 1900, when he sold that property and made 
his way to Yakima county, Washington. Arriving in the Moxee valley, he pur- 
chased twenty acres of land and thereon resided for a number of years. He after- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 223 

ward bought other farm property and devoted his time and energies to its cultiva- 
tion and improvement until his death, which occurred in 1911. His wife survived 
him for four years, passing away in 1915. 

Nelgis T. Rouleau obtained a public school education in Wisconsin and through 
the period of his boyhood and youth worked with his father -upon the home farm, 
assisting in the task of plowing, planting and harvesting when not in school. He 
also followed logging in Wisconsin and likewise worked on farms there. He after- 
ward became interested in horse racing in connection with E. H. Everette and was 
engaged in raising and training race horses. He also engaged in clerking in stores 
and did collecting. He bought and sold horses and thus in various lines of busi- 
ness developed his powers and cultivated that alertness which made him wide-awake 
to every business opportunity. In 1899 he went to Helena, Montana, and after- 
ward to Missoula, that state. He subsequently spent a few months in Idaho and 
then made his way to Seattle and afterward to Everett, Washington, where he 
worked in logging camps. He traveled at different periods over various parts of 
British Columbia. Oregon, Washington and other sections of the northwest and 
again had varied experiences along business lines. In 1911, upon the death of his 
father, he came to the Yakima valley and purchased the old homestead property, 
having now twenty acres of land which is highly cultivated and well improved. He 
engaged in raising hops until 1916 and he has been identified with many progressive 
elements in farming in this neighborhood. He spent one year in northern Alaska, 
where he went in the spring of 1906, making his way north of Cape Prince of Wales. 
Mr. Rouleau is now quite extensively engaged in raising high grade Percheron horses 
and was the first man to bring full blooded Percherons to the Moxee valley. He 
has two standard bred trotting horses, Norlock and Darklork, whose pedigree dates 
back over a hundred years. He has every reason to be proud of his fine horses and 
his efforts have done much to promote an interest in the raising of high grade 
horses in this section of the country. 

Mr. Rouleau belongs to the Yakima lodge of Elks, No. 318, and his political 
allegiance is given to the democratic party. He is a most public spirited and ener- 
getic citizen, who stands loyally for any cause wdiich he espouses, and he has been 
particularly helpful in promoting the good roads movement and improving the public 
highways in this section of the state. There is no plan or measure for the general 
god that does not receive his endorsement and support, and he attacks everything 
with a contagious enthusiasm that never fails to bring desired results. 



WILLIAM M. MUXSELL, M. D. 

Dr. William M. Munsell, physician and surgeon of Grandview who has prac- 
ticed there since 1913 and who has ever kept in touch with the trend of modern pro- 
fessional thought and methods, was born in Schuyler county, Missouri, November 
17, 1871, a son of Ward L. and Margaret J. (Logan) Munsell, who were natives of 
Ohio and of Kentucky respectively. They became early settlers of Missouri, where 
the father followed the occupation of farming, and he also bcamc a prominent figure 
in political circles there. He frequently was called upon to fill positions of public 
honor and trust and died while serving as circuit clerk in 1878. His wife passed 
away the same year. 

Dr. Munsell was reared by his maternal grandfather, Addison Logan, for he 
was but a young lad of seven years when left an orphan. His grandfather was a 
native of Kentucky and for many years followed farming in Missouri. Dr. Mun- 
sell acquired a public school education and, having determined to make the prac- 
tice of medicine his life work, he then entered the Missouri Medical College of St. 
Louis, from which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1895. He after- 
ward pursued post-graduate work in Chicago in 1910, making a specialty of diseases 
of the eye, ear, nose and throat. He entered upon the active practice of his pro- 
fession at Downing, Missouri, where he remained through 1896 and 1897 and then 
went to Granger, Missouri, where he continued to reside until 1910. Following his 
post-graduate work in Chicago he came to Yakima county, Washington, and pur- 



224 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

chased a ranch near Grandview. He was out of practice for three years but in 
1913 resumed his professional duties and has since practiced at Grandview, having 
sold his ranch. He is accorded a large general practice and does considerable surg- 
ical work, for which he is splendidly qualified. He is cool and collected in emer- 
gencies, possesses steady nerve and hand and, moreover, has intimate knowledge 
of anatomy and the component parts of the human body together with the on- 
slaughts made upon it by disease. He is acting as local surgeon for the Northern 
Pacific Railway and for the Oregon-Washington Railway, in addition to which he 
does a large amount of private surgical work. 

On the 26th of March, 1895, Dr. Munsell was married to Miss Artie B. Job, a 
native of Missouri and a daiigthter of Taylor Job, a farmer of that state. They now 
have one child, Helen Louise, at home. Dr. Munsell is a stalwart champion of the 
Masonic fraternity and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in the latter 
lodge he has held all of the chairs. He has likewise filled all of the offices in the 
Modern Woodmen camp to which he belongs and he has membership with the 
Royal Neighbors and with the Elks lodge at Yakima and the Foresters of America. 
He attends the Presbyterian church and his political endorsement is given to the 
democratic party but he does not seek nor desire office, preferring to concentrate 
his time, energies and efforts upon his professional duties, which have constantly 
developed in volume and importance. In September, 1918, the Doctor offered his 
services to his country and after passing the required examination at Camp Lewis 
was appointed captain in the Medical Corps, but before being called into active 
service the armistice was signed. His commission, however, runs for five years. 



OSCAR W. MIDDLETON. 

Oscar W. Middleton a garage proprietor at Grandview, having the agency for 
the Chalmers, Reo, Maxwell and Dodge cars, was born in Beatrice, Nebraska, April 
18, 1876, a son of Jesse and Margaret (Murgatroyd') Middleton. The father was 
born in Columbus, Ohio, while the mother's birth occurred near Racine, Wisconsin. 
They became pioneer residents of Nebraska and were married in that state. The 
father there engaged in farming for a number of years but eventually came with 
his family to the northwest, settling at Grandview, Washington, where he purchased 
a ranch. This he further improved and developed, residing thereon until he retired 
and rented his ranch, while he now makes hs home at Grandview. Both he and 
his wife are consistent and -faithful members of the United Brethren church and 
their genuine worth has gained for them the friendly regard of all with whom they 
have been brought in contact. 

Oscar W. Middleton acquired a public school education attending the high 
school, while later he became a student in the Fremont (Neb.) Business College. 
During his residence in his native state he served for three years as a member of the 
National Guard. He also taught school for a year and afterward engaged in farm- 
ing in Nebraska for five years. In 1903 he arrived in Grandview and purchased 
twenty acres of land, to which he has since added until he now has forty-two and 
a half acres of rich, productive and valuable land upon which he raises hay, grain 
and potatoes. He also taught school in this locality in 1904 and 1905 but the greater 
part of his time and attention has been devoted to his ranching interests. His land 
was all covered with sagebrush when it came into his possession and there were no 
roads through the district. He assisted in laying out the first roads and in establish- 
ing the schools and as a pioneer settler has contributed much to the development, 
progress and upbuilding of the section in which he lives. He has also greatly improved 
his ranch and for four years he was engaged in the dairy business. He now spends 
the winter months in Grandview and in April, 1918, he opened a garage which he is 
now successfully conducting, having in connection therewith the agency for the 
Chalmers, Red, Maxwell and Dodge cars. His sales have reached a gratifying 
figure and the business is steadily growing. 

On the 17th of August, 1907, Mr. Middleton was married to Miss Nellie Lewis. 
a native of Illinois and a daughter of John W. and Florence (Malone) Lewis, whe- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 225 

in 1909 removed to Sunnyside where tlie father is engaged in ranching. Mr. and 
Mrs. Middleton have become the parents of three children: Claude ]^., Edith J. 
and Ruby Joyce. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church and fra- 
ternally Mr. Middleton is connected with the Foresters. In politics he is a republi- 
can, giving stalwart support to the party and its prmciples. For three years he 
acceptably filled the office of drainage supervisor and for six years he served as 
deputy assessor for the Grandview district. He is a public-spirited citizen, ever 
loyal to any trust reposed in him, and his interest in the welfare and development 
of the district in which he lives is manifest in many tangible and helpful ways. 



J. CLIFFORD KAYNOR. 

J. Clifford Kaynor is well known in journalistic circles in eastern Washington 
as editor of the Evening Record, published at Ellensburg. He was born in Ames, 
Iowa, February 20, 1887, a son of H. G. and Sarah (Stamp) Kaynor, both of whom 
were natives of New York, whence they removed to the middle west, becoming 
early settlers of Iowa. The father was associated with the American and Great 
Northern Express Companies until 1912, when he joined his son J. Clifford, in 
Ellensburg. 

The latter, spending his youthful days under the parental roof, completed a 
high school course at Fort Dodge, Iowa, by graduation and then, with the lure of the 
west upon him, made his way to Seattle, where he arrived in March, 1907. He 
worked for a few months on the Morning Times and also for a few months on the 
Yakima Republic. He later spent two years on the Post-Intelligencer of Seattle 
and his newspaper work in the northwest followed four years' experience in news- 
paper circles in Iowa. 'He also spent a short time in the University of Washington, 
pi-.rsuing a journalistic course. 

It was in July, 1909, that Mr. Kaynor arrived in Ellensburg and purchased 
the paper of which he is now editor and owner. The Evening Record was estab- 
lished on the 1st of July, 1909 as successor to the Ellensburg Localizer, which 
had been founded in 1883 by D. J. Schnebly. In 1905 the daily edition of the Local- 
izer was established and on the 1st of July, 1909, the Evening Record issued its 
first copy, absorbing the Daily Localizer. In 1915 a new building, sixty by one 
hundred and twenty feet, was erected. This is the finest country newspaper building 
in the northwest. It was erected especially for the purpose used and the plant in- 
cludes the most modern equipment, including two linotype machines and every- 
thing necessary to produce first class work. The company prints on an average of 
six pages to the paper, all home print, and the circulation is about nineteen hun- 
dred copies per day. They use Associated Press service and Mr. Kaynor displays 
a most progressive spirit in editing and publishing the Evening Record, which ranks 
with the leading daily papers of the northwest. 

On the 14th of October, 1908, Mr. Kaynor was married to Miss Bessie B. How- 
ard, a daughter of A. E. and Grace (.^shfield) Howard of Yakima. Mr. and Mrs. 
Kaynor have become the parents of two children: Margaret Elizabeth, who was 
born in March, 1910: and Howard Henry, born August 30, 1913. 

Fraternally Mr. Kaynor is connected with the Elks Lodge, No. 1102, of Ellens- 
burg and is also a Mason, belongng to Lodge No. 39. He is an honorary member 
of Sigma Delta Chi, being identified with the Zeta Chapter of Washington. In 
professional circles he is widely known and honored, as indicated in the fact that 
he has served as president of the Washington State Press Association in the years 
1917-18. He is now chairman of its executive committee and he has been very active 
in the organization, filling all of its offices. His political allegiance has ever been 
given to the progressive branch of the republican party since he reached his major- 
ity and while not an office seeker he has been a most stalwart champion of the policy 
of the party, doing everything in his power to promote its growth and insure its 
success. He has served a? chairman of the school board and has been identified 
with many activities for public benefit and progress. He has been president of the 



226 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Young Men's Christian Association, has been vice chairman of the county commit- 
tee of the National Council of Defense has been a director of the Ellensburg 
Chamber of Commerce and active in Red Cross work. His religious faith is indicated 
by his membership in the Episcopal church. He is a first lieutenant of Machine Gun 
Company of the Third Washington Infantry, in which he is very active. His edi- 
torials, his personal labor and his influence have all been directed strongly in favor 
of the war activities and the national policy, and there is no plan or measure for 
the public good that does not receive his endorsement and cooperation. His edi- 
torials are concise and trenchant his arguments logical and convincing. He pre- 
sents any cause which he espouses with clearness and his writing has the "touch" 
which carries it across. He is justly accounted one of the leading newspaper men of 
the state and, moreover, he is one who recognizes the fact that the press is both 
the mirror and the molder of public opinion and that as such it can do much to 
regulate public standards and shape public thought and action. 



GEORGE F. STEAX. 



George F. Stean's early experience in the hotel business in the east well quali- 
fied him for the conduct of similar interests in the northwest and he is now manager 
of the Hotel Commercial of Yakima. He was born in Cleveland, Ohio, January 16, 
1872, his parents being George and Elizabeth (Brown) Stean. The father was a hotel 
man of Cleveland and there passed away but the mother is still living. 

George F. Stean obtained a public school education and v hen his school days 
were over entered the hotel business in connection with his .ather, thus receiving 
thorough practical training, and gaining knowledge and experience which have been 
of great worth to him in later years. He left Cleveland in 1891 and went to Pitts- 
burgh, where he accepted the position of manager of the Duquesne Hotel, while sub- 
sequently he was manager of the Engineers Club of Chicago. I ater he went to Xcw 
York, where he was manager of Archibald's Restaurant. He became identified with 
hotel interests upon the Pacific coast on his removal to Seattle, where he assumed 
the management of the Chelsea Hotel. He then took over the management of the 
Sol Due Hot Springs Company's Hotel, in the Olympic mountains, thirty-eight miles 
from Port Angeles, and at a later period became manager and proprietor of the 
Wixon Hotel at Sedro Woolley, Washington. In 1915 he moved to Yakima to 
become manager of the Hotel Commercial, of which he has since had charge. He 
thoroughly understands every demand of hotel service and provides for his patrons 
all of the conveniences of the modern hotel of the twentieth century. 

In 1901 Mr. Stean was united in marriage to Miss Katherine Starck, a native of 
Chicago, and they have become the parents of two children, Ardath and Adrianne. 
The family resides on Thirteenth avenue, south, and they have a fine summer home 
on the Naches river. 

Fraternally Mr. Stean is connected with the Elks and he belongs to the Com- 
mercial Club and also to the Country Club. He is a gentleman of genial manner, 
social disposition, keen business sagacity and indefatigable enterprise, and all these 
qualities combine to make for him success in his chosen held of labor. 



WALTER G. DAMEROW. 

Walter G. Damerow, who for four years filled the oi¥icc of county auditor of 
Kittitas county and is recognized as one of the republican leaders of Ellensburg 
and that part of the state, was born in Lockport, Xew York, April 3, 1882, a son of 
W. G. and M. E. (Plaster) Damerow, both of whom passed away in New York, 
where the father had engaged in business as a manufacturer. 

Walter G. Damerow, after completing his public school education in his native 
state, devoted four years to business along mechanical lines and then, attracted by 
the west, made his way to the Pacific coast. He settled first in Portland. Oregon, in 




^ 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 229 

1899 and the following year became a resident of Washington, establishing his home 
in Tacoma, where he lived for two years. He came to Ellensburg in 1902 and for 
several years was employed at office work for the Northern Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany. In 1908 he was appointed to the position of deputy treasurer, in which capac- 
ity he served for two years, and afterward was made deputy auditor, serving in that 
office for four years. He was next elected to the position of county auditor for a 
four years' term and after eight years' association with the office retired. In the 
fall of 1918 he was nominated on the republican ticket for the office of county treas- 
urer. His previous record as auditor commended him for the positon and his 
public service has been at all times marked by devotion to the general good. He 
has also been a member of the local draft board for Kittitas county since June 1, 
1917. 

In 1905 Mr. Damerow was married to Miss Willie -L. Hardwick, who was born 
in Texas, a daughter of F. P. and Maude (Hoskins) Hardwick, who became pioneer 
settlers of Ellensburg, where they arrived about 1888. Mr. and Mrs. Damerow have 
one son, Charles. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Damerow is an Elk, belonging to Lodge No. 1102 
at Ellensburg. also to the Knights of Pythias lodge and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. His political endorsement has always been given to the republican party 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He has ever felt the keenest 
interest in politics and has loyally supported the party in every possible way. He 
is widely and favorably known as a representative young man and citizen of Ellens- 
burg and enjoys the high esteem of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



EDWARD A. BANNISTER. 

The name of Edward A. Bannister is synonymous with progressiveness along 
agricultural and horticultural lines in the Yakima valley. He has never hesitated 
to take a forward step when the way was open and by reason of his intelligently 
directed efforts he has risen to a position in the foremost ranks of the successful 
horticulturists of his section of the state. He is a western man by birth and train- 
ing and the spirit of western enterprise finds exemplification in his career. 

Mr. Bannister was born in Alameda, California, February 19, 1882, a son of Alfred 
and Emma T. (Barber) Bannister. His paternal grandfather. Rev. Edward Ban- 
nister, was one of the pioneer settlers of California of 1850. He was a leading 
minister of the Methodist church who did much to promote moral progress in that 
section of the country in an early day and he also contributed to the educational 
development of the state as president of the L^niversity of the Pacific, in which 
position he continued for several years. He remained a resident of California until 
called to his final rest and left the impress of his individuality for good upon the 
history of that state. His son, Alfred Bannister, became a civil engineer at Berkeley, 
California. He wedded Emma T. Barber a daughter of A. S. Barber, who removed 
to California in 1848, the year in which gold was discovered on the Pacific coast. 
He served as postmaster at Almeda. where he also engaged in general merchandis- 
ing being one of the pioneer business men and representative citzens of that locality. 

Liberal educational advantages were accorded Edward A. Bannister, who was 
graduated from the University of California in the class of 1905 with the degree of 
mining engineer. He then practiced his profession until the winter of 1910. being 
thus engaged in various sections of California, Montana, Nevada and Minnesota. 
He represented the Chester Congdon interests on the Mesabe iron range at Coler- 
aine, Minnesota, for a year, after which he came to Yakima county and rebuilt the 
Congdon ditch, the work covering the years 1911, 1912 and 1913. In this undertaking 
he replaced the wooden flume built by his father in 1892 by a cement flume. While 
engaged in building the Congdon flume he also took up fruit raising and now 
concentrates his entire time and attention upon that business. He is engaged in 
the cultivation of eighty acres of orchard and twenty acres devoted to diversified 
farming. He raises all the standard varieties of fruit produced in the northwest, 
including the Jonathan and Winesap apples, the Bartlett, D'Anjou and Winter Nelis 



230 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

pears, Bing cherries and English walnuts. His place is splendidly equipped. He 
has his own packing plant and warehouses and his ranch is supplied with every 
facility for the propagation care, packing and shipping of the fruit. He owns fifty- 
five acres of his land and rents forty-five acres. 

On the 15th of February, 1909 Mr. Bannister was inarried to Miss Emily A. 
Thorning, of Almeda, California, a daughter of Edwin T. and Christina J. (Thomas) 
Thorning, who came to California in 1880. Her father is engaged in the tent and 
awning business. Mr. and Mrs. Bannister have become the parents of a daughter, 
EHzabeth T. 



MARVIN H. THOMAS. 

Among the successful agriculturists of Yakima county who have attained their 
prosperity entirely through their own efiforts and are therefore entitled to honor 
and distinction is Marvin H. Thomas, who now has a fine ranch of sixty acres on 
the Tieton. He located here in 1907 and has made profitable use of the past years 
to develop his land, so that the ranch is a very valuable one today. Mr. Thomas 
was born in Marshall county, Indana, August 25, 1854. a son of Samuel S. and 
Mary Magdalene (Linard) Thomas, natives of Pennsylvania and Maryland respec- 
tively. They were married in the Keystone state and subsequently took up their 
residence in Ohio, where the father as a railway contractor assisted in building the 
Pennsylvania Railroad. Later they removed to Indiana where he helped to lay 
out the town of Bourbon and also built the first sawmill in that section. In subse- 
quent years he turned his attention to agriculture and became quite successful along 
that line. He also bought and sold farm properties acquiring run-down land, which 
through his labors he put in fine shape and then disposed of at a good profit. He 
and his wife died in Indiana. Both were members of the Brethren church, to 
which they were very devoted. 

Marvin H. Thomas was reared under the parental roof, attending the public 
schools of Indiana in order to acquire an education. Laying aside his textbooks, 
he turned his attention to carpentering and became very proficient along that line. 
As a millwright he engaged in the manufacture of sash and doors and also en- 
gaged in building barns, in his native state until 1898, when he decided to seek his 
fortune in the far west and made his way to Tacoma, Washington, where he worked 
for others for some years. Later he assisted in organizing a factory for the manu- 
facture of washing machines, churns and similar products. In the spring of 1899 
he made his way to Alaska and for four years he remained in the far north, being 
occupied with railroad construction work during that period. The fall of 1903 found 
him in Seattle and there he continued in sash and door manufacturing until 1905, 
in which year he came to Yakima county, buying one hundred acres of rich land 
on the north fork of the Cowiche. Later Mr. Thomas spent two years in Seattle 
and when the Tieton irrigation project came into existence and brought the neces- 
sary water to his ranch he moved upon the property, which he had acquired in 1907. 
Since that time he has given his undivided attention to its cultivaton although he 
has now sold fofty acres of the tract, retaining sixty acres. The land is largely 
devoted to hay and grain but he also has three acres in orchard. In 1910 Mr. Thomas 
met with a rather serious accident when upon taking a rifle out of his wagon, the 
weapon was discharged the bullet lodging near his heart, where it has remained 
ever since. 

Mr. Thomas was married August 2, 1910, to Martha A. Linsc, a sister of Samuel 
D. Linse. of whom more extended mention is made on other pages of this work, 
and a daughter of Fred and Anna (Berg) Linse, pioneers of Minnesota, who there 
farmed until the family removed to South Dakota in 1881, the father taking up land 
in Day county. In 1902 he brought his family to Yakima county, where he now 
makes his home on a seven acre farm near Nob Hill. Mrs. Thomas was largely 
reared in South Dakota and Yakima county. Mr. Thomas had been married before 
and by his first union had a son and two daughters who are still living. Burt 
Ellsworth, the eldest, is successfully engaged in engineering in Seattle. Winifred 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 231 

Pearl married Frank E. Brown and they reside at White Horse, Alaska, wliere she 
holds the position of librarian. Sarah May married Edward A. Kennedy, their home 
being in San Francisco California, but Mr. Kennedy is now in the service of his 
country wearing L'ncle Sam's uniform. There were two other children of Mr. 
Thomas' first marriage but both have passed away. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas are highly respected members of their community and 
have many friends. They are welcomed in the best homes of their neighborhood 
and at their own fireside chtcrfully and generously extend hospitality. He is a 
member of the Church of God, to which denomination he is devotedly attached, 
and in politics he is a republican, being more or less allied with the progressive 
wing of that party. Prosperity has come to him as the result of untiring industry, 
close application, foresight and his inherent honesty, which has guided him in all 
of his business transactions. 



CLARENXE E. DUFFY. 

Clarence E. Duflfy, who is now serving his second term as sheriff of Benton 
county, was born in Mahaska county, Iowa, December 3. 1878, his parents being 
William John and Ruth (Van Sickle) Duflfy, natives of Virginia and Missouri re- 
spectively. In tlie '70s they removed to Pottawattamie county. Iowa, later to Sioux 
county and still later to Lyon county that state, the father always following agri- 
cultural pursuits. At a subsequent period they took up their residence in Fergus 
Falls. Minnesota, and in 1898 they came to Washington, settling at Sunnyside, where 
the father acquired wild land which he improved to a considerable extent and then 
sold. He is now cultivating another farm, being still actively engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits. His wife has passed away, her death occurring in 1885. 

Clarence E. Duffy was edticated in the public schools of Iowa and throughout 
his life has followed agricultural pursuits with the exception of the period from 
1906 to 1914, when he was engaged in road and ditch construction work in the 
Yakima valley. Having become well known throughout Benton county, his name 
was tendered the public for the office of Sheriff and in 1913 he was elected to that 
office. So faithfully and fearlessly did he discharge his duties and with such good 
results that in 1915 he was reelected and is now serving. He has succeeded in 
ridding the county to a large extent of the bad element and has in return earned 
the admiration of all law-abiding citizens. 

In 1904 Mr. Dufify was- united in marriage to Miss Leah Anderson and their 
children are five in number, namely: • Alpha, William E., Paul, Dorothy and Don. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Duflfy are well known in Prosser and have many friends in the 
city. 

Mr. DufTy is a member of the Brotherhood of American Yeomen and in politics 
is a republican, always upholding the standards of that party. He has ever stood 
for the development and upbuilding of his district and is always ready to aid worthy 
public movements. He has wild land in Idaho and the Yakima valley and some 
day expects to give more attention to its cultivation. As a sheriff he ranks with 
the best Benton county has ever had and it is therefore but natural that his untiring 
labors have earned the appreciation of his constituents. 



F. B. SINSEL. 



F. B. Sinsel, treasurer of the firm of A. B. Fosseen & Company of Yakima, 
was born in Nebraska in 1889, his parents being Albert and Lucia (Boise) Sinsel 
who remained residents of Nebraska until 1890 and then took up their abode in Iowa. 
The mother is now residing in Yakima. 

F. B. Sinsel obtained a high school education in Iowa, completing his course 
by graduation with the class of 1907, after which he spent two years in study in the 
Bellevue (Neb.) College. His liberal training thus well qualified him for an active 

(11) 



232 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

business career. He came to the Yakima valley in 1911 and spent two years on a 
ranch. In 1914 he entered the employ of A. B. Fosseen & Company and his faith- 
fulness to the interests of the house combined with his efficient service led to his 
being taken into the firm in January, 1917. In 1918 he was elected to the office of 
treasurer and is now serving in that capacity. He is a progressive young business 
man, putting forth every effort to legitimately develop the trade of the house, which 
covers a line of builders' supplies, irrigation and drainage supplies, coal, paints, 
spray-oils and hollow clay interlocking blocks. The business has grown steadily, 
Mr. Sinsel contributing to the desirable results that have been attained. 

In 1914 Mr. Sinsel was united in marriage to Miss Violet Saunders, a native of 
Illinois, and they are widely and favorably know in Yakima, the hospitality of many 
of the best homes of the city being freely accorded them. Mr. Sinsel votes with 
the republican party and fraternally is connected with the Masons, being ever 
loyal to the teachings of the craft, which is based upon a recognition of the brother- 
hood of mankind and the obligations thereby imposed. 



NEALY X. OLXEY. 



Xealy N. Olncy, who became assistant cashier of the American Commercial 
Bank of Wapato upon its organization, was born on the Yakima Indian reservation 
near Fort Simcoe on the 9th of August, 1884, a son of William and Lizzie T. Olney. 
The father and mother are now deceased. 

The son attended the schools of Fort Simcoe and later continued his education 
at Toppenish. He was graduated in 1909 from the Haskell Institute at Lawrence, 
Kansas, where he completed a course in the commercial department, after which he 
returned to Toppenish, where he spent six years as a clerk in the law office of D. H. 
Bonsted. He then became connected with the lumber trade at Toppenish and at 
White Swan and was made manager of the yard at the latter place. He entered 
the banking business in the early part of 1918, when he was made assistant cashier 
of the .American Commercial Bank, which is the only bank in the L'nited States that 
was organized and is conducted solely by Indians. They have entered upon a nota- 
lilj- successful career. Already the deposits of the bank have reached the sum of 
one hundred thousand dollars and their business is steadily growing owing to the 
efficiency and enterprise of the men at its head. 

Mr. Olney was married on the 28th of June, 1913, to Miss Hazel Foster, a 
Yakima Indian. He is one of the charter members and is the secretary and treasurer 
of the Yakima Indian Commercial Club. He has a wide acquaintance in this section 
of the state and sterling traits of character as well as marked business ability have 
gained him the high regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



W. E. COLEMAX. 



W. E. Colman is the vice president of the firm of A. B. Fosseen & Company 
of Yakima, dealers in building supplies. He was born in Wahoo, Xebraska. January 
9, 1885, and is a son of J. E. and Ruth E. (Terry) Coleman, who in 1912 removed 
with their family to Oregon. They now make their home at Morrow, that state, 
and Mr. Coleman is engaged in the machinery and hardware business there. 

W. E. Coleman acquired a public school education and afterward entered the 
University of Nebraska, in which he pursued a classical course, winning the Bachelor 
of Arts degree as an alumnus of 1910. Attracted by the opportunities of the grow- 
ing northwest, he came to Yakima and entered the employ of the Irrigation Pipe 
Manufacturing Company, witli which business he was connected until 1913, when he 
joined -A. B. Fosseen of the firm of .\. B. Fosseen & Company and was elected vice 
president on the 1st of January, 1915. It has always been the policy of Mr. Fosseen 
to recognize capability, worth and faithfulness on the part of those in his employ 
and to make them feel that they have a real interest and share in the business. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 233 

Carrying out his polic}-, he has taken several of his employes into the firm, includ- 
ing Mr. Coleman. The company has earned a most enviable reputation for honesty 
and fair dealing and the business is now an e.xtensive one. covering the territory 
from Ellensburg to Pasco. They handle all kinds of building supplies and specialize 
also in irrigation and drainage supplies, in fencing, in fireplace materials, oils, paints 
and hollow clay interlocking blocks. 

On July 14. 1918, W. E. Coleman married Miss Harriett Parker, of Yakima, a 
daughter of Fred Parker, a well known Yakima attorney. Mr. Coleman is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Yakima Lodge, Xo. 24, F. & A. M., and 
passing up through the Scottish Rite, he has attained, the thirty-second degree in 
the consistory and also belongs to the Shrine. He is connected with the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks and his interest in the welfare and progress of his 
city is indicated by his membership in the Commercial Club. He is in hearty sym- 
pathy with all of its well defined plans and purposes for the general good and co- 
operates earnestly in every measure that tends to advance Yakima's best interests. 
On May 20. 1918, Mr. Coleman enlisted in the utility section of the Quartermaster's 
department at Camp Lewis. Washington, and was sent east to- Camp Meigs, near 
Washington, D. C, for training. He was discharged November 27, I9I8. 



EMORY J. HAASZE. 



It is a well recognized fact that real estate activities arc a potent factor in the 
development of a city and Emory J. Haasze has therefore taken a prominent part 
in the upbuilding of Grandview and vicinity, where he is established in the real 
estate business, having a large clientage. He has carefully studied local conditions 
and is thoroughly informed in regard to values and opportunities, and having al- 
ways followed reliable methods, enjoys the highest reputation. He was born in 
Madison, Wisconsin, January 26, 1861. and is a son of James and Harriet (Kinney) 
Haasze, both natives of Xew York. They became pioneers of Wisconsin during 
the early history of that state and thence removed to Goodhue county. Minnesota, 
in 1864, the father there following agricultural pursuits throughout his remaining 
days. His wife is also deceased. 

Emory J. Haasze was reared in Minnesota, spending his youthful days upon 
the farm and attending the country schools in the acquirement of an education. 
When he was but twelve years of age his father died and he was thrown upon his 
own resources, having to work for wages. At the age of eighteen he decided upon 
a change of scene and went to Aberdeen, South Dakota, where he worked on farms 
and also sold farm machinery. In 1882 he entered the hardware business in Freder- 
ick. South Dakota, and in that town successfully continued until 1892, displaying 
that rare business ability which he has shown throughout his later career. So 
favorably was he known, that he was elected to the position of sherifif of Brown 
county. South Dakota, in which office he served for four years, or two terms, dis- 
charging his duties so faithfully and fearlessly that he was reelected to the posi- 
tion. At the end of that period he did not return to the hardware trade but en- 
gaged in the cattle business and also in the sale of farm machinery and real estate 
at .\berdeen. South Dakota. Subsequently he became general agent for the J. I. 
Case Coinpany, acting in that capacity from 1900 until 1905, and in the latter year 
he came to Yakima. Washington. Here he bought land on Nob Hill, which he 
developed into a valuable fruit ranch. He later bought more land, which he later 
sold, and developed in all over one hundred acres of fruit land on Nob Hill and 
in the Parker Bottoms, thus greatly assisting in the development of the fruit industry 
in the Yakima valley. In 1909 he removed to Seattle and in that city remained until 
1918, when he came to Grandview, where he is now engaged in the real estate and 
insurance business. .Although he has been here only a short time he has ever been 
closely connected with realty values in this district and is therefore thoroughly 
competent along this line. He already has a large clientage and a prosperous future 
may be predicted for the business of which he is now at the head. Moreover Mr. 
Haasze has forty acres of valuable orchard at Zillah, Washington, which he bought 



234 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

in 1916, and also has one hundred and fifty acres of valuable land on the Ahtanum, 
near Wiley City. He also owns a large warehouse in Grandview, from which he 
derives a gratifying income. 

On October 26, 1887, at the age of twenty-six years, Mr. Haasze was united 
in marriage to Myrtie A. Milne, a native of Iowa and a daughter of Andrew C. and 
Ella Milne, both now deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Haasze were born five children: 
Ray J., who is married and resides at Grandview; Gussie, deceased; Myrta I., the 
wife of Russell I. Parker, of Grandview, by whom she has one child; Cecil E., who 
is a sergeant in the United States army, being with Company A, Fifty-eighth Engi- 
neers; and Harriet E., who is twelve years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Haasze are well 
known and poular in Grandview. having ever taken a prominent part in public aflfairs 
in the communities in which they have resided. She is a valued and devoted mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church. 

Fraternally Mr. Haasze is very prominent in the Masonic order, being a mem- 
ber of Yakima Lodge, No. 24, F. & A. M.; Yakima Chapter, R. A. M.; Yakima 
Commandery, K. T., and also belonging to the Shrine and to the Scottish Rite bodies 
at Aberdeen, South Dakota. In the Independent Order of Odd Fellows he has also 
been very active, having held all of the chairs in the local lodge. He likewise 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias. In his political affiliations Mr. Haasze is a re- 
publican but since becoming a resident of this state has not been active in public 
life, concentrating his energies upon his private afifairs, which are large and im- 
portant. He has ever given his support to worthy movements undertaken on be- 
half of public welfare and readily gives of his time and eflfort in order to bring about 
material or intellectual improvement. He is a valuable acquisition of Grandview and 
all who know him honor him as a self-made man who has attained success entirely 
through his own efforts. 



E. V. T.AYLOR. 



E. V. Taylor is one of the self-made men of Yakima county who for twenty-two 
years has resided in this section of the state and is now the owner of an excellent 
ranch property of forty acres. He was born in Lucas county, low-a, June 12, 1864, 
a son of Jacob and Mary (McKnight) Taylor, the former a native of Indiana, while 
the latter was born in Virginia. They became pioneer settlers of Iowa and both 
passed away in that state before 1872. 

E. V. Taylor was a lad of but eight years when left an orphan and lived with 
his mother's eldest sister till he had reached the age of eighteen. He acquired a 
public school education and after starting out in life on his own account rented land 
until he was able to purchase property. At length his industry and economy brought 
to him sufficient capital to purchase eighty acres in Lucas county and there he carried 
on general agricultural pursuits until 1896, when he came to Yakima county, Wash- 
ington and for five years rented land in the Selah valley. In 1901 he purchased fifty 
acres in the valley, three miles northwest of the town of Selah, but afterward sold 
ten acres of the tract. He has twenty acres of his land planted to apple orchards. 
It was all wild when it came into his possession, producing nothing but sagebrush 
and giving no indication that it might be converted into a productive tract. His 
labors, however, have wrought a marked transformation and he is today the owner 
of an excellent ranch property on which he has erected a fine residence, also a large 
and substantial barn and other buildings. Moreover, he has upon his place the oldest 
frame house in the Yakima valley. It was built in the early days by L. L. Thorp 
and is still in use as a tenant house. In addition to his horticultural pursuits Mr. 
Taylor conducts a fine dairy, keeping high-grade cows for this purpose, and both 
branches of his business are proving profitable. He is likewise a director in the 
Naches-Selah Irrigation District. Flis business affairs are wisely and carefully con- 
ducted. He displays sound judgment in everything that he undertakes and his 
energy and perseverance have brought to him a measure of success that is most 
gratifying. 

On the 26th of September, 1885, Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss 




E. V. TAYLOR 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 237 

Jennie Miller, a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of W. L. and Eliza Miller, 
who came to the Yakima valley in 1898. They were here several times and returned 
to the east but are now living in the Selah valley. They were also pioneer settlers 
of Iowa, removing to that state from Pennsylvania. To Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have 
been born eight children: Pearl M., at home; Perry, who is cultivating a part of his 
father's land and is married and has two children; Folyd, of Yakima, who is married 
and has two children; Guy, a member of the United States navy; Fay, the wife of 
Harry Harrison, a rancher living on the Yakima Indian reservation, by whom she 
has three children; Ethel, at home: Thomas, a member of the United States navy; 
and Teddy, at home. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Taylor are members of the .\merican Yeomen, which he 
joined on its organization. His political endorsement is given to the republican party 
,ind he keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day. 



GUS LINDEMAN. 



Prominent among the energetic, farsighted and successful business men of Ellens- 
burg is Gus Lindeman, who is engaged in the conduct of a lumberyard. Alert and 
energetic, he meets the modern demands of trade and his enterprise is bringing to 
him gratifying prosperity. He was born in Atlantic, Cass county, Iowa, March 31, 
1877, a son of William and Catherine Lindeman, both of whom passed away in 
.Atlantic, Iowa. The father was well known there as a farmer and as a real estate 
Ijroker. 

Gus Lindeman acquired a public school education while spending his youthful 
days under the parental roof and in young manhood became identified with the 
lumber trade, embarking in the business in Cumberland, Iowa. He afterward re- 
moved to Platte, South Dakota, where he was again known as a lumber merchant, 
carrying on business at that place from 1900 until 1910. In the latter year he re- 
moved to the northwest, coming to Ellensburg as manager of a branch yard for 
the Crab Creek Lumber Company. In 1913 he purchased this business, which he 
reorganized under the name of the Lindeman Lumber Company, but in 1914 sold 
out to the Rovig Lumber Company and became vice president, one of the trustees 
and the local manager. This company has five lumberyards and two sash and door 
factories, the factories being located in Seattle, while the lumberyards are in Yakima 
and Kittitas counties. The company also owns a big gravel pit at Ellensburg and 
handles coal, wood, paints, building hardware, brick and cement, in addition to all 
kinds of lumber. Their business has reached extensive proportions and as local 
manager at Ellensburg Mr. Lindeman is contributing in substantial measure to the 
continued success of the undertaking. 

In December. 1899. Mr. Lindeman was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Kelly, of Walnut. Iowa, a daughter of .Anthony and Mary Kelly. They had one 
child, Mildred, who died in 1905 at the age of eighteen months. 

In politics Mr. Lindeman is a democrat, giving stalwart support to the party. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Elks lodge of Ellensburg. His success in a 
business way is attributable in large measure to the fact that he has always con- 
tinued in the line in which he embarked in early manhood, never attempting to dis- 
sipate his energies over a broad field. His concentration of purpose, his close ap- 
plication and his determination have been elements in his continued advancement 
and he is today numbered among the representative business men of his adopted city. 



ALEXANDER C. MARSHALL. 

Alexander C. Marshall who is successfully engaged in horticultural pursuits 
in the Naches valley, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, October 5. 1863, his par- 
ents being Charles and Elizabeth (Xash) Marshall. The father, a native of New 
York, was a sea captain and many an interesting tale he could tell of his experi- 



238 HISTORY OF YAKIMA YALLEY 

ences on his voyages. His wife was horn in Massachusetts and both have now passed 
■away. 

'Alexander C. Marshal attended the public schools of Brooklyn, New York, and 
after laying aside his textbooks entered upon life's active duties by accepting a posi- 
tion in a broker's office on Wall street, New York, remaining in that connection for 
two years. In 1883 he took Horace Greeley's advice and came west, his trip, however, 
ending in Minnesota, where for a year he was connected with a bank. In 1884 an- 
other removal took him to Colorado, where he engaged in the cattle business on his 
own account. He remained in that state until 1892, when he removed to Seattle, 
Washington, which city he made his residence for a year. During the following 
five years he was engaged in mining in British Columbia and in 1898 went to Alaska. 
For nine years he braved the dangers and endured the hardships of that trying 
northern climate, in the vicinity of Dawson, but in 1907 he returned to the centers 
of civilization, having done well during his sojourn in the far north. The year 
1908 was spent in Seattle but at the end of that time he returned to Alaska, remain- 
ing for a year. Once more he made his way back to Seattle and became connected 
with the steamboat business but in 1909 came to the Yakima valley, having after 
thorough investigation decided to try his fortune in this district. He acquired ten 
acres on the upper Naches, to which he subsequently added a tract of similar size, 
and he now has one of the finest orchards in the district, comprising twenty acres, 
devoted to apples and pears. All modern improvements can be found upon his 
farm, his buildings are suitably appointed, with storing and packing facilities, and 
he has erected a modern home. After a most varied and interesting career he has 
here found an occupation which is most congenial and at the same time profitable. 

On the 17th of June, 1913, Mr. Marshall was united in marriage to Laura D. 
Simonds. a native of Milwaukee and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Sim- 
onds. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall have many friends in Naches and vicinity, all of 
whom speak of them in terms of high regard. 

Fraternally Mr. Marshall is a member of Elks Lodge, No. 318, of Yakima, 
while politically he is a republican, stanchly supporting the candidates of that 
party. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall attend the Presbyterian church, in the work of which 
they take a helpful interest, and are ever ready to support measures which are 
undertaken on behalf of growth and development in the Naches valley, both keeping 
well informed upon all questions of the day in regard to local, county, state or 
national affairs. 



ALBERT E. WING. 



.Albert E. Wing has been a resident of Yakima county for only a brief period, 
having arrived in March, 1914, but in the intervening years has gained for himself 
a creditable position in connection with the fruit growing interests of this section of 
the state. He is a native of Whitehall, Wisconsin, his birth having there occurred 
July 23. 1865. His parents, Benjamin Franklin and Christine (Knudtson) Wing, 
were early settlers of Wisconsin, the father establishing the town of Whitehall. 
The mother was a daughter of Ole Knudtson, also a pioneer settler of Whitehall. 
Benjamin F. Wing established a mercantile enterprise at that place and through his 
enterprise and business ability contributed much to the development of that sec- 
tion. After a time he retired from commercial pursuits and concentrated his energies 
upon farming, but both he and his wife have now passed away. 

Albert E. Wing acquired a public school education in Wisconsin and when his 
textbooks were put aside concentrated his efforts and attention upon farming, which 
he followed in connection with his father. Later he began farming on his own ac- 
count and subsequently he spent twelve years in the butter, egg and poultry busi- 
ness in that state. He afterward removed to South Dakota, where he resided for a 
few years, and was also in Colorado when a young man. 

In March, 1914, Mr. Wing arrived in Yakima county and purchased twenty 
acres of land five and a half miles west of the city. This is now all planted to fruit 
and he has splendid orchards of both pears and apples. He erected the residence 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 239 

upon his place and in every possilile way has promoted the work of improvement 
and development, converting his property into a very attractive ranch. He has 
seeded it all to alfalfa between the trees, thus following methods of intensive farm- 
ing, and excellent results are crowning his labors. He is a member of the Yakima 
County Horticulutral L'nion. 

Mr. Wing was married November 1, 1899, to Miss Nina Stanley, of Wisconsin, 
and they have become parents of three children. Esther C, Lucille and Bernice. 
Fraternally Mr. Wing is a Mason and an Odd Fellow. In the latter he has held all 
of the chairs of the local lodge and. is a past noble grand. His political endorse- 
ment is given to the democratic party, but he has never been ambitious to hold 
office. His business affairs have claimed his entire time and attention and he has 
put forth every effort to legitimately develop his interests and by individual labor 
and perseverance has gained a creditable position as a successful horticulturist of 
Yakima county. 



OSCAR L. BOOSE. 



Oscar L. Boose, engaged in the practice of law at Sunnyside. was born at 
Somerset, Pennsylvania, March 10, 1884, a son of John R. and Annie E. Boose and a 
brother of H. A. Boose, the cashier of the First National Bank of Sunnyside, men- 
tioned elsewhere in this work. Mastering the branches of learning taught in the 
public schools. Oscar L. Boose passed through consecutive grades to his graduation 
from the high school and for three years thereafter he engaged in teaching, but 
he regarded this merely as an initial step to other professional labor, as it was his 
earnest desire to become a member of the bar. With that end in view he matriculated 
in the law department of the Michigan State University at Ann Arbor and was 
graduated with the class of 1908. He then located at Sunnyside on the 1st of Janu- 
ary, 1909, and opened a law office. Here he has since continued in practice and has 
been accorded a large and distinctively representative clientage. The thoroughness 
with which he prepares his case, his clear understanding of legal principles and his 
correct application of these principles to the points in litigation have been salient 
features in his growing success, .\side from his practice he has an interest in a 
large alfalfa ranch. 

On the 18th of September, 1912, Mr. Boose was married to Miss Elizabeth Corn- 
well, of Yakima, and they now have a little daughter, Barbara, two and a half years 
of age. Mr. Boose is a well known Mason, belonging to Sunnyside Lodge, F. & 
A. M., and Sunnyside Chapter, R. A. M. He also has membership with the Elks 
lodge. No. 318, of Yakima and with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and his interest in The develop- 
ment and welfare of his community is indicated by his connection with the Sunny- 
side Commercial Club. Along strictly professional lines he is identified with the 
County and State Bar Associations and he enjoys the respect and confidence of 
colleagues and contemporaries by reason of his close conformity to the highest ethical 
standards of the profession. 



GUY H. HEBERLING. 

Among the county offices in the west that of engineer is one of the most im- 
portant and Guy H. Heberling who today is surveyor of Benton county, ably dis- 
charges his duties in this connection. He was born in Cottonwood, Idaho, Novem- 
ber 21, 1882, a son of George H. and Clara N. (Bryant) Heberling. The father is 
a native of Ohio and in the '50s accompanied his father. Hiram Heberling, on his re- 
moval to Kansas, where the latter passed away. In that state George H. Heberling 
grew to manhood. His wife was a native of Kansas, where they remained until 
1882. when they proceeded to Idaho and ten years later to Spokane, Washington, 
whence another removal brought them to Amber, Washington, where George H. 



240 HISTORY OF YAKIMA \ALLEY 

Heberling is now successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits. In fact, this has 
been his occupation practically throughout his entire life with the exception of some 
years which he devoted to mining. 

Guy H. Heberling of this review attended the public schools of Idaho in the ac- 
quirement of his early education and subsequently entered Washington State Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated in 1907 with the degree of Civil Engineer. He 
was then engaged in railroad and mining engineering work in Idaho until 1908, 
when he came to Washington, locating in Kiona. He it was who laid out Benton 
City and he followed surveying in various other parts of the state until 1912, when 
he located m Prosser. where he has been entrusted with civil engineering work of 
various kinds. In 1913 he was elected city engineer and in 1917 wa> called by ballot 
to the position of county engineer, both of which offices he now holds. His wide 
exi-triencc and thorough study well fit him for these positions and under his direction 
a number of important works have been undertaken in the county. He is conscien- 
tious in the discharge of his duties and stands high in the estimation of his pro- 
fessional colleagues. Benton county is indeed to be congratulated upon having so 
efficient a surveyor and engineer as Mr. Heberling. 

On the 10th of January, 1911. Mr. Heberling was united in marriage to Miss 
Carrie B. Strain, of Prosser, and they have two children, a son and a daughter, Ruth 
Hazel and Guy Myron. Mr. Heberling is a republican but not active in party work. 
His religious faith is that of the United Presbyterian church, and fraternally he 
is a member of the Modern Woodmen of .America. He is ever interested in prog- 
ress and development along moral, intellectual and material lines and is a valuable 
citizen of Benton county. 



CASTO E. JOHNSON. 

Among the substantial agriculturists that have come to this state from the 
middle west is Casto E. Johnson, who now has important ranching interests near 
Sunnyside. He was born in Hardin county, Iowa, July 31, 1861, of the marriage of 
Hugh and .\nn (Macy) Johnson, the former a native of New Jersey and the latter 
of Indiana. They were among Iowa's early pioneers, having gone to that state in 
1856, and there the father successfully followed farming throughout his active career. 
Both parents have now passed away but the old homestead is still in possession of 
the family, the two brothers of our subject owning the same, the farm having been 
in the family for seventy-two years, or since 1856. 

Casto E. Johnson was reared amid pioneer conditions and in the acquirement of 
his education attended the schools of his neighborhood. He subsequently thoroughly 
learned agricultural methods under the guidance of his father and later rented land 
in his native state for one year. For three years he engaged in farming in Fall River 
county, South Dakota, but at the end of that period returned to Iowa, where he was 
for three years engaged in carpenter work. In August, 1893, he came to Yakima 
county, Washington, and acquired a relinquishment on a homestead five miles south- 
west of Sunnyside. He was among the first pioneers here and his land when it came 
into his possession was all sagebrush. Undiscouraged, he set himself to the task of 
placing it under cultivation and how well he has succeeded is evident from the im- 
proved appearance of the place, which is now one of the most valuable properties of 
the neighborhood. He has one hundred and ten acres in all and raises hay, corn 
and wheat, also giving close attention to, hogs and deriving a gratifying addition to 
his income from this source. He has erected a substantial home and upon his place 
are found many other evidences of prosperity. 

On November 19, 1884, Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Edith E. Hubbard, a 
native of Clinton county. New York, and a daughter of Jeremiah and Johanna 
(Brown) Hubbard. The parents removed to Wisconsin as pioneers and in 1870 took 
up their abode in Iowa, where both spent the remainder of their lives. The father 
was not only a successful agriculturist but also followed the blacksmith's trade, in 
which he was well trained. Both he and his wife were held in the highest esteem 
in the communities in which they resided. To Mr. and Mrs. Johnson three children 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 243 

have been born: Harry, who married Winnie Smith, rents his father's farm in part- 
nership with his brother. Harold Leighton married Gladys Woolliscroft, by whom 
he has one child, Jeannette. He is renting his father's farm in partnership with his 
brother Harry. Lenora Edith married Oscar Longnecker. who is engaged in ranch- 
ing nearby, and they have a daughter, Ruth. 

Mr. Johnson and his wife are devoted members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in the work of which they are helpfully interested. In his political affilia- 
tions he is independent, voting for the candidates whom he considers best fitted for 
the offices to which they aspire. He served for six years as school director and in 
many other ways has given evidence of his interest in aflfairs of local importance, 
readily giving his support to all movements for the growth and upbuilding of his 
district. Fraternally he is prominent in the Odd Fellows, having held all the chairs 
in the local lodge and having also acted as representative to the Grand Lodge in 
190O and 1902. His wife belongs to tlie Daughters of Rebekah and was a delegate 
to the state lodge at Bellingham in 19()2 and at Walla Walla in 1903. Mr. Johnson 
is also connected with the Sunnyside Camp of the Modern Woodmen of America. 
There is much that is commendable in his career, for he has attained to a substantial 
position in life entirely through his own efforts and, moreover, has set an example 
to a 3'ounger generation, showing what may be accomplished where there is the will 
to dare and to do. He has ever performed his tasks to the best of his ability and in 
the faithful performance of each day's work is to be found the solution for his suc- 
cessful career. 



EBEX U. FORREST. 



For over eighteen years Eben U. Forrest has been connected with horticultural 
pursuits in the Yakima valley, where he now owns a valuable property a half mile 
north of Zillah. Twelve acres of his tract is devoted to the raising of pears, apples 
and peaches and he has been very successful along this line, having closely studied 
orcharding methods and always followed the latest leads in trying to obtain the 
best results. Mr. Forrest was born at Green Lake, Wisconsin, August 24, 1852, a 
son of John and Hannah P. (Utley) Forrest, the former a native of Scotland and the 
latter of New York. Both were numbered among the early pioneers of Wisconsin. 
The father was a veteran of the Civil war and died at its close, in the south, of 
yellow fever. His widow survived him for some time, her death occurring in Tacoma, 
Washington. 

Eben U. Forrest in the acquirement of his education attended the public schools 
of his native state and at the age of twenty-two, in 1874, went to Colorado, where 
he engaged in freighting, and subsequently he made his way to Montana, where he 
followed the same occupation. He then retraced his steps eastward as far as Kansas 
and he bought a farm in Lyon county. The lure of the west was upon him, how- 
ever, and in 1899 he again set his face toward the setting sun, arriving in Tacoma, 
Washington, in 1899. Two years later he came to the Yakima valley and here he 
bought twenty acres of land a half mile north of Zillah, which tract was partly im- 
proved. He has since added two acres to his holdings and today has twelve acres 
in apples, pears and peaches, while the remainder of the land is devoted to the 
raising of alfalfa. He has rebuilt the house and has erected good barns and out- 
buildings, thus improving his property so that it now is very valuable. .'\s he never 
does anything by halves Mr. Forrest has become one of the thoroughgoing horti- 
culturists of his district and as a result is today in receipt of a most gratifying in- 
come. 

On December 31, 1885, Mr. Forrest was united in marriage to Miss Clara Selfies. 
a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of Frank and Mary Selfies. who became 
pioneers of Kansas. To this union five children were born. Nellie is the wife of 
Oscar Strand, who is ranching near Zillah, and they have a son, Forrest Le Roy. 
.■Mbert is now serving in the New York Coast Guard of the L^nited States navy 
and is married to Laura Duckham, who during his absence resides with Mr. and 
Mrs. Forrest of this review. George is also in the United States navy and is now 



244 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

a chief petty officer. He was on the U. S. S. San Diego when that ship was sunk. 
His twin brother, William H.. and Ada are at home. 

In his political affiliation Mr. Forrest is a republican as far as national issues 
are concerned but often votes independently, particularly in regard to local politics, 
taking into consideration the qualifications of the candidate instead of his party 
connections. Frat'^rnally he is an esteemed member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and his religious faith is that of the Christian church. While a resident 
of Kansas he served for twelve years as treasurer of his school district and the 
cause of education still finds in him a warm champion. He also served for two years 
as township trcasurt-r and since becoming a resident of Yakima he has served as 
supervisor of drainage district No. 15, for two and a half years, thus giving evi- 
dence of his interest in irrigation, the importance of which he fully realizes. He is 
a member of the Yakima Valley Fruit Growers Association and through this con- 
nection is able to dispose of his crops to the best advantage. There is much credit 
due Mr. Forrest for what he has achieved in life, as he now is the owner of valu- 
able fruit property in the valley, through the development of which he has not only 
achieved individual fortune but has contributed toward general prosperity. He is a 
loyal and public-spirited American citizen, a reliable and trustworthy business man 
and a true friend, as all who have the honor of his closer acquaintance are ready 
to testify. 



WALTON D. McNAIR. 

Walton D. McXair, active in directing municipal affairs in Yakima as one of 
the city commissioners, was born at Versailles, Morgan county, Missouri, March 
7, 1871, his parents being James and Virginia L. (Thruston) McNair, both of whom 
have now passed away. The father served as circuit clerk and recorder of Morgan 
county. Missouri, and later became a member of the bar there, continuing in the 
practice of law successfully for many years, 

Walton D. McNair received his college training, supplementing his public school 
course, in Central College at Fayette. Missouri, and afterward entered upon rail- 
way work in connection with the office of the master mechanic of a railroad com- 
pany in Kansas. He devoted three years to the position and in 1895 went to .Alaska, 
spending trn years in the far northwest. He was there largely engaged in public 
work, filling a position in the office of the L^nited States district clerk and also acting 
as chief deputy collector of customs at Sitka. 

The }-ear 1907 witnessed the arrival of Mr. McNair in Yakima, where he has 
since made his home. In this city he accepted the position of bookkeeper at the 
Horticultural L^nion and there continued for three years. He next prepared an ab- 
stract index for the Consolidated Abstract Company, after which he was called to 
public office, becoming chief deputy county assessor, in which position he capably 
served for three years. His efficiency and fidelity were indicated in the fact that 
in 1914 he was elected by popular sufifrage to the office of county assessor and 
served for three years. He then resigned in order to accept the office of city com- 
missioner, being made superintendent of finance and accounting. He entered upon 
the duties of this position on the 17th of December, 1917, for a three years, term, 
and is now serving. His previous training and experience well qualified him for 
the work that now devolves upon him and his record in office is characterized by 
marked efficiency and fidelity. 

On the 1st of November, 1899, Mr. McNair was married to Miss Stella D. Butler, 
of Portland, Oregon, and they have become parents of a daughter, Virginia. Mr. 
McNair votes with the republican party and seeks the welfare of the city also 
through his co-operation with the plans of the Commercial Club, of which he is 
a member. He belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks but is chiefly 
active outside of office in the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Yakima Lodge, No. 
24, F. & A. M.; Yakima Chapter, No. 21, R. A. M.. of which he was high priest in 
1916; Yakima Commandery, No. 13, K. T., of which he was eminent commander 
in 1916; and Afifi Temple. A. A. O. N. M. S. He is most loyal to the teachings and 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 245 

purposes of the craft. In fact loyalty to duty is one of the marked characteristics of 
Mr. McXnir and. moreover, he is actuated by a progressive spirit in all that he 
undertakes. He is a typical western man, holding to high ideals on behalf of the 
public and putting forth every effort to advance civic standards. 



NORRIS H. KANDLE. 

Among the native sons of Yakima county and the Xaches valley who have at- 
tained considerable success along agricultural lines is Norris H. Kandle, now a 
rancher of the Naches district, who was born March 22, 1888. He is a son of Frank 
and Ida R. (Green) Kandle, the former born near Tumwater, Washington, and the 
latter a native of Iowa. More extended mention of the family is made in connection 
with the sketch of R. H. kandle on other pages of this work. 

Norris H. Kandle attended the public schools in the acquirement of an educa- 
tion and after laying aside his textbooks assisted his father with the work of the 
ranch, thus laying a good foundation for his later endeavors along that line. Becom- 
ing thoroughly acquainted with modern and up-to-date methods, he later took over 
the management of the home place, which he is now cultivating, his holdings com- 
prising one hundred and ninety-eight acres. He devotes a great deal of time and 
attention to horticultural lines, having seventeen acres in apples and peaches, while 
the rest of the farm is devoted to the raising of hay and grain. Moreover, Mr. Kandle 
has important stock interests, deriving a gratifying addition to his income from this 
line. He is thoroughly up-to-date in all that he undertakes and in all branches of his 
work is meeting with success. His parents, who have now retired, live upon the 
home farm with him. 

On the 21st of October, 1916, Mr. Kandle was united in marriage to Miss Kath- 
erin Dilley, a native of Roseburg, Oregon, and to this union has been born a son. 
Lance J. Mr. Kandle is a worthy representative of an honored family which has 
long been connected with agricultural and horticultural interests in this state and he 
well upholds the high reputation which the name has so long enjoyed. By develop- 
ing a valuable property he has greatly enhanced values in his district and thus is 
contributing toward more prosperous conditions. Public advancement has been near 
his heart and he has ever given his aid to movements which have had this purpose. 
In politics he is a republican, stanchly upholding the candidates of that party, but 
he has never sought office for himself, preferring to devote his whole attention to his 
private affairs. He is a leading agriculturist of the Naches district who has many 
friends and is admired by all who know him for his strength of character, his energy 
and industry, his pleasant ways and all those other qualities which make up the suc- 
cessful man. Both he and his wife are popular among the younger people of the 
neighborhood and their own fireside is often the scene of cheerful and pleasant gath- 
erings. 



CHARLES W. GRANT. 

Charles W. Grant, a wholesale fruit shipper of Toppenish and one whose busi- 
ness interests are being constantly developed, was born in Wichita, Kansas, June 6, 
1877, a son of J. W. and Ida (Gordon) Grant, both of whom were natives of Iowa. 
In the year 1868 the father went to Kansas. He was there engaged in business as a 
government contractor and also dealt in cattle. He afterward resided in Coldwater, 
Kansas, and in 1880 cTme with his family to Washington, settling in Tacoma, where 
he was engaged in the paint business and also in shipwrecking, but both he and his 
wife have now passed away. 

Charles W. Grant after leaving high school pursued a business course in a night 
school and thus qualified for life's practical and responsible duties. He early accepted 
the position as clerk in the county treasurer's office at Tacoma, where he was eih- 
ployed for two years, and subsequently he spent five years as secretary of the state 



246 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

board of control, during which time Governor Lister was chairman. In 1904 he 
came to Toppenish and here entered the employ of the Richey & Gilbert Com- 
pany and has been manager with them since 1910. In this connection he has been 
active in the development of important interests and is one of the prominent repre- 
sentatives of the wholesale fruit trade of the Yakima valley. The Richey & Gilbert 
Company have a very large warehouse at Toppenish and own nine others in differ- 
ent parts of the Yakima valley, Mr. Grant acting as general manager over all and 
shipping a thousand carloads of produce annually. Theirs is one of the most exten- 
sive interests of the kind in the Y'akima valley. They handle produce as packers 
and shippers and employ from thirty to two hundred people. Mr. Grant is well 
qualified for the important duties that devolve upon him in this connection and is 
thoroughly familiar with the Yakima valley and the products produced within its 
borders. He is also the owner of one hundred and thirty acres of excellent farm 
land on the Yakima Indian reservation. He built the first dwelling house in West 
Toppenish, also assisted in platting the town and sold the Gilbert addition. From 
the first he has been largely instrumental in promoting the growth and development 
of this district. He aided in getting the first patents issued from the government to 
the Indians so they could sell the land and the town could be built. He was a factor 
in establishing the first newspaper called the Toppenish Review, and he served as 
postmaster for two years under President Wilson's first administration. He has 
ever been an enthusiastic champion of the city, promoting its progress in many 
ways, his efforts being far-reaching and beneficial. 

In 1898 Mr. Grant was married to Miss Luella M. Campbell, of Steilacoom, 
Washington, who passed away in 1909. In 1910 he wedded Martha .Anna Barclay, 
of Toppenish. He has one daughter, Florence, born of the first marriage. 

Fraternally Mr. Grant is connected with the Elks lodge No. 318, of Yakima 
and also with the Woodmen and the Foresters. His political allegiance is given to 
the democratic party and he is a recognized leader in its local ranks. He was not 
only one of the incorporators of Toppenish but also served as a member of its first 
council and at different times has again represented his ward in that connection. He 
was also the second mayor of Toppenish and gave to the new city a progressive ad- 
ministration which largely promoted its interests. He is a member of the Commer- 
cial Club and there is no project put forth by that organization or in other connec- 
tions for the benefit of Toppenish that does not receive the hearty endorsement and 
earnest support of Mr. Grant, who is actuated in all that he does by a public-spirited 
devotion to the general good. 



ALBERT J. LOW, D. D. S. 

Dr. .Albert J. Low is a successful representative of the dental profession in 
Roslyn, where he has practiced continuously during the past fourteen years. His 
birth occurred in Al!)ion, Illinois, on the 27th of September, 1877, his parents being 
Alvin C. and Alice (C'ome) Low, the latter now deceased. The father, an able 
physician and surgeon, made his way to Roslyn, Washington, in 1914 and there 
practiced his profession for three years. In 1917 he removed to Spokane, where he 
irtill makes his home and is now living retired. 

•■Mbert J. Low acquired his early education in the public schools and subse- 
quently spent two years as a student in the Southern Collegiate Institute of Albion, 
Illinois. Having determined upon the practice of dentistry as a life work, he then 
entered the Indiana Dental College of Indianapolis, from which he was graduated 
with the class of 1902. He first followed his profession in Illinois for six months 
but on the expiration of that period made his way westward to Washington and 
for a half year practiced at Colfax, this state. He next opened an office at Pullman, 
Washington, there remaining for a year, while since 1904 he has practiced continu- 
oiTsly at Roslyn. His patronage is now extensive and gratifying, having continually 
grown as he has demonstrated his skill and ability in the line of his chosen profes- 
sion. He belongs to iioth the state and national dental associations. 

On the 5th of September, 1917, Doctor Low was united in marriage to Miss 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 247 

Elizabeth Creed Searle. a native of Omaha, Nebraska, and a daughter of F. P. 
Scarle, who was formerly a banker of Seattle and is now acting as auditor for the 
government at the Sanderson & Porter plant at Raymond, Washington. Dr. and 
l\lrs. Low have a son, Albert James, Jr., who was born on the 9th of August, 1918. 

In his political views Doctor Low is a republican, exercising his right of fran- 
chise in support of the men and measures of that parly, while his religious faith is 
that of the Episcopal church. He is also a worthy exemplar of the Masonic frater- 
nity, belonging to St. Thomas Lodge No. 54, A. F. & A. M., of which he is a past 
master, and he is likewise a member of the Delta Sigma Delta. His many sterling 
traits of character have commended him to the confidence, esteem and goodwill of 
all and the circle of his friends is a wide one. 



WILLIAM F. ELSER. 

William F. Elser is now prominently connected with the hotel business in Grand- 
view, Washington, where he and his wife own one of the finest hostclries in the 
state, the success of the enterprise being largely due to their joint management. 
However, much credit must be given to Mrs. Elser for the establishment and suc- 
cessful management of the business, as it was largely through her enterprise that 
Mr. Elser turned to this occupation, as he had been largely interested in orcharding. 
Both arc Grandview pioneers, the townsite being covered with sagebrush at the time 
of their arrival and theirs being the only house in the neighborhood. They have 
therefore been closely connected with developmnt and progress here and it is largely 
through their enterprise that this town has been developed. Beginning in a small 
way, they have nov.' attained to great prosperity and are numbered among the most 
substantial citizens in their neighborhood. 

Ml. Elser was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, June 22, 1862, a son of John 
and Hannah (Cassell) Elser, natives of Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. The father 
followed agricultural pursuits but also gave considerable attention to shipbuilding, 
beins^- a shipbuilder by trade. Both he and his wife have now passed away. 

Mr. Elser o' this review was reared in Harrisburg and in the acquirement of an 
education attended the public schools there, learning the carpenter's trade after lay- 
mg aside his textbooks. He later was for three years connected with the car shops 
in Harrisburg, removing at the end of that time, about 1883, to Fulton county, Illi- 
nois, where he worked on farms. There and in Knox county he remained for four 
years, being employed by others. Having acquired the means to start out inde- 
pendently he farmed in Knox county, Illinois, on his own account for one year. 
About 1887 he removed to Barton county, Kansas, where for two and a half years 
he followed the same occupation, returning at the end of that period to Illinois, 
where several years were spent. For ten years he was connected with the Glenwood 
Ice Company at Galesburg, Illinois, but in 1902 he decided upon a removal to Wash- 
ington, having heard glowing accounts of the opportunities presented here. That 
year he arrived in Sunnyside and at first worked for the Sunnyside Land Company 
but in 1904 located on a forty-acre tract, on which the townsite of Grandview was laid 
out in 1906 He cultivated this land for about two years, at the end of which time 
he assisted in laying out the town. It was then covered with sagebrush and the 
wonderful changes that have transformed it into the present prosperous village are 
truly remarkable Mr. Elser later bought forty acres near Grandview but two years 
later sold th'S tract and acquired title to eight acres southeast of Grandview, while 
his wife has six acres there, their combined holdings being fourteen acres. The land 
is devoted to orcharding and to the raising of hay and from it Mr. and Mrs. Elser 
derive a gratifying income. 

In their lives the 5th of May, 1906, is a historic day, as it was on that date that 
Mrs. Elser began serving three meals a week at her home, and from that small 
beginning the Grandview Hotel has developed to serve fifty-two guests three times 
daily. The present building was erected in 1909 and the hostelry is one of the most 
popular in the Yakima valley, famous for its home cooking, its good cheer and hospi- 
tality. Mr. and Mrs. Elser are genial hosts and have instituted many modern improve- 



248 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

merits, making their place up-to-date in every respect. Tlie rooms are modern and 
handsomely furnished and everything about the hotel indicates progressive manage- 
ment. 

On December .11. 1885. Mr. Elser was united in marriage to Minnie Myrt'e Dean, 
a native of Knox county, Illinois, and a daughter of John and Lucinda (Pitman) 
Dean. Her father passed away in Illinois in 190O. and her mother subsequently 
made her home with Mr. and Mrs. Elser. She died in 1913. The father had been 
quite successful in the hotel business in Illinois and it may be said that the daughter 
has inherited her talent along that line from him. To Mr. and Mrs. Elser were born 
four children, of whom Will Ellis, the first born, died at the age of three months. 
The others are as follows; Lulu Pearl, Theo Fern and Metta Ruth. Lulu Pearl 
has the distinction of being the first girl married in Grandview. She married Charles 
Reese, of Sunnyside, Washington, and they have four daughters: Evelin, Helen, 
Irene and Ines. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elser have truly been builders of the section in which they re- 
side. They assisted in establishing the first schools here. At the time of their arrival 
here the land was covered with sagebrush and there was only one wagon road pene- 
trating the wilderness. Mrs. Elser began the hotel business by serving about three 
lunches per week and the genuine appreciation of her cooking is evident from the 
fact that before the present hotel was built she was serving over fifty meals three 
times per day. As the business grew the Grandview Hotel came into being and to- 
day she and her husband own one of the finest hostelries in the state as well as a 
richly bearing orchard, from which they also derive a gratifying income. While in 
Illinois Mrs. Elser was so ill that her life was despaired of by the doctors, who 
assured the family that she had but three months to live. She was seriously affected 
by tuberculosis and for that reason the family removed here. Theirs was the only 
house in the neighborhood and Mrs. Elser took up the business of supplying travel- 
ers and government surveyors with meals if they so desired, much against the wishes 
of her husband, who wanted her to principally devote herself to getting well. Later 
she took up the proposition as a business and subsequently decided to build a hotel, 
although her husband .strongly objected to the project. .A twenty-room hostelry was 
erected and the place has become very popular and as soon as conditions become 
normal again an addition will be erected. Mrs. Elser weighed but one hundred and 
twenty pounds when she came to Washington but now she is the picture of health. 
She and her husband had no money to begin with, but undiscouraged, they took up 
their burden. Mrs. Elser largely financing and managing affairs, and that she has 
been successful is evident from the present prosperous condition of their enterprise. 
Her husband has given much of his time to orcharding, while she has presided 
over the hotel interests. 



FREDERICK MERCY. 

I'rederick Mercy, engaged in the theatrical business in Yakima, was born in 
Xewark. Xew Jersey, May 7, 1877, a son of Frederick and Sarah F. < Randolph) 
Meicy. The father was a hat manufacturer. Both he and his wife are now deceased. 

Frederick Mercy after acquiring a public school education started in the hat 
factory of his father and learned the trade, thoroughly acquainting himself with 
evei-y feature of the business. As the years passed he developed extensive interests 
of that character, opening a chain of eight hat stores in Xew York city, where he 
profitably conducted his interests until 1908, when he sold out and crossed the con- 
tmcnt to San Francisco. He there opened a moving picture house and later estab- 
lished a vaudeville theatre. He continued in that city for three years and then came 
to Yakima in June. 1912. Here he purchased the Majestic Theater, which then had 
a seating capacity of two hundred and fifty, but now seats eight hundred. He re- 
niocic'ed and enlarged the theater, making it the second best moving picture house 
in Washington, and he still successfully conducts it, presenting the finest productions 
of filmland there. In 1915 he leased the Empire Theater, with a seating capacity 
of eleven hundred, and now conducts it as a moving picture and vaudeville house. 
In March, 1918, he built the Liberty Theater, with a seating capacity of nine hun- 




FRKDERICK MERCY 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 251 

dred. and completed it at a cost of fifty thousand dollars. Hie has a lot adjoining 
and expects to enlarge his theater before the end of the present year so that it 
will have a seating capacity of sixteen hundred, constituting it one of the largest 
theaters in Washington. It will present vaudeville attractions and also legitimate 
drama. Mr. Mercy conducts a large bill posting business in addition to his theatri- 
cal business and is meeting with substantial success in his undertakings. His theaters 
are well ventilated and sanitary in every regard and every attention has been paid to 
the romfort of patrons as well as to the production of first-class attractions. 

On the 12th of June, 1901, Mr. Mercy was married to Miss Theresa Stein, of 
Newark. Xew Jersey, and they have three children; Frederick, Jr., sixteen years of 
age; Edgar, two and a half years; and Paul, who is but a year old. 

Mr. Mercy belongs to the Masonic fraternity, having membership in Munn 
Lodge Xo. 190, F. & A. M., of Xew York city, where he also attained the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite. He is a member of Afifi Temple of the Mystic 
Siirine at Tacoma. He is also a life member of Elks Lodge No. 318, of Yakima and 
has membeship relations with the Knights of Pythias at Yakima and with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He belongs as well to the Commercial Club, the 
Business Men's Association, the Country Club and the Washington Theater .Associ- 
ation and is widely known and popular in these various organizations. His political 
endorsement is usually given to the democratic party, yet he does not consider him- 
self bount' by party ties and votes independently if his judgment so dictates. He 
owns a fine ranch near Yakima devoted to diversified farming and his residence is 
one of the beautiful homes of the city. His success is the merited and legitimate re- 
ward of earnest, persistent efifort, carefully directed. He has made a close study ol 
the puldic demand in regard to entertainment of a theatrical character and he has 
('one not a little to educate and improve the public taste through the presentation of 
the finest films and the liest vaudeville attactions to be obtained on the coast. 



GEORGE W. TAYLOR. 

George W. Taylor owns and occupies a ranch of one hundred and ninety-seven 
acres in the Selah valley and the care an development of this property claim his 
full time and attention, while his enterprising labors are bringing to him well 
merited success. Mr. Taylor is a native son of Yakima county, having been born 
at Fort Sinicoe, August 17, 1867. His parents, George S. and Nancy Rebecca (Mc- 
Glothlen) Taylor, were natives of Indiana and were married in Lucas county, Iowa. 
The father served throughout the Civil war as a supporter of the LTnion cause, hav- 
ing enlisted as one of the boys in blue of Company G, Thirty-fourth Iowa Infantry. 
When the war was won and victory perched on the Union banners he came across 
the country from Iowa to the Pacific coast in 1865, inaking his way first to Oregon, 
thence to the Sound and finally to the Selah valley, where he arrived in August, 1866. 
He took up a homestead and purchased other land until he was the owner of a 
thousand acres and with the agricultural development of the district he was closely 
associated. He became extensively engaged in raising live stock and continued 
his residence in the Yakima valley until his death, which occurred April 21. 1900. 
He built probably the first irrigation ditch in the valley and used to say that some 
day the hills would be irrigated. Few, however, agreed with him, thinking such 
an undertaking impossible. Mr. Taylor, however, had the prescience to discern much 
of what the future held in store for this great and growing country and to the limit 
of his power he aided in the development and improvement of the district and as- 
sisted in laying broad and deep the foundation upon which has been built the present 
progress and prosperity of this section of the state. He was always keenly interest- 
ed in the west. Born in Indiana on the 8th of March, 1832. he was a young man 
of twenty years when he went to Lucas county, Iowa, and was thirty-four years 
of age when he arrived in Yakima. From that time until his demise he was deeply 
concerned in the welfare and progress of his district and aided largely in the work 
of general development. He served as a member of the state legislature and also 
as a member of the state senate but refused the nomination for sheriflf. He was 



252 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

killed by an accident while driving cattle in the mountains and his wife, long sur- 
viving him, passed away December 2. 1916. To them were born four children: H. J., 
who was born in Iowa in 1857 and is now living with his brother George; E. W. R., 
who is a miller at Prosser, Washington; George W., of this review; and Rosie, the 
wife of Fred Brooker, living in Vancouver, Washington. 

George W. Taylor acquired a otiblic school education and after his course was 
completed entered actively into the live stock business as the associate of his father 
and is today the owner of the ranch which his father homesteaded more than a 
half century ago. He today has one hundred and ninety-seven acres of land in the 
Selah valley, which is largely devoted to the raising of alfalfa and to the pasturing 
of cattle. 

In 1903 George W. Taylor was married to Belle M. Parker, of Yakima, who 
was born in Kansas, and they now have three children, Dorothy, Robert and Fred- 
erick Gale. Fraternally Mr. Taylor is connected with the Yakima lodge of Elks, No. 
318, and his political allegiance is given to the democratic party. He is one of the 
oldest, if not the oldest, of the native sons of the Yakima valley and was probably 
the third white child born in the valley. He has witnessed the entire growth and 
development of this section and has borne his full share in the work of general 
improvement. 



WILLIS P. HUBBARD. 

Willis P. Hubbard, deceased, was born in East Troy, Walworth county, Wiscon- 
sin, January 25, 1859, a son of Edward A. and Elizabeth (Kenney) Hubbard, both 
of whom were natives of New York, their birthplace being in the vincinity of Mount 
Vernon. They came to Wisconsin as young people and cast in their lot among the 
pioneers of Walworth county. 

Willis P. Hubbard was accorded liberal educational opportunities, supplement- 
ing his public school training by two years' study in Beloit College, in his native 
state. In 1890 he arrived in the northwest, making his way to Cheney. Washington, 
and their he built the first creamery in the state, He also engaged in merchandis- 
ing and in the conduct of a livery stable and he retained his position as one of the 
leading creamery men of the northwest, at one time owning three different plants. 
In 1903 he removed to Yakima and purchased forty acres of wild land six miles west 
of the city, upon which he built a home, there residing to the time of his demise, 
which occurred on the 12th of December, 1910. Throughout the intervening years 
he concentrated his efforts and attention with excellent results upon the develop- 
ment and improvement of the property. Nineteen acres have been planted to fruit 
and the remainder of the farm is devoted to diversified farming. In its midst stands 
a beautiful home and there are large barns and sheds for the care of crops and fruit 
and in fact every facility of the model farm property of the twentieth century is 
found upon the place. 

On the 3rd of June, 1891, Mr. Hubbard was united in marriage to Miss Nina M. 
Harris, a daughter of Stephen M. and Mary E. (Stoughton) Harris, the former a 
native of Missouri, while the latter was born in Salem, Oregon. Her father was a 
son of Phillip Harris, a native of New Jersey, who in young manhood removed 
westward to Missouri and in 1845 became one of the pioneer residents of Oregon, 
establishing his home in the vincinty of Portland. He built the ferry there and 
afterward lived near Granite Lake, where he spent his remaining days, passing away 
at the venerable age of eighty-one years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Sally Taylor, died at the notable old age of ninety-four years. The maternal grand- 
parents of Mrs. Hubbard were J. A. and Frances (Townsend) Stoughton. Mr. 
stoughton was born in Westfield. Massachusetts. September 23, 1830. and was a son 
of .\lexander Stoughton, whose birth occurred in Westfield in 1807. The latter went 
to Oregon in 1843 with the Whitman expedition taking his family with him. Mrs. 
Pringle. the adopted daughter of Mr. Whitman, acted as bridesmaid at the marriage 
of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Stoughton. The latter, who in her maidenhood was Frances 
Townsend, was born near Atlanta, Georgia, and was a daughter of James M. Town- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 253 

send, who went to Oregon about 1844 with an expedition that was lost and nearly 
all starved while en route. Mrs. Hubbard has in her possession a feather l)cd which 
was made by her great-grandmother. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hubbard were born two sons. Wallace Clair, who attended the 
Yakima high school, was for a time with the United States Indian service but is 
now a mill foremen at Reedsport, Oregon. He is a graduate of a business college 
North Yakima and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He married Ruth Sar- 
gent, of Chicago, and thev have one son, Robert Phelps. Raymond Tracy, the 
younger son, operates the home farm. He is a graduate of the Yakima high schoo 
and married Ruth Couch, of Yakima. Mrs. Hubbard and her sons are members o: 
the Congregational church and all are supporters of the republican party. Mrs 
Hubbard is a woman of excellent business ability, wisely directing the affairs which 
were left to her at the death of her husband. She is a woman of many highly com 
mendable traits of character and admirable social qualities and has a circle o 
friends almost coextensive with the circle of her acquaintance. 



A. H. HUEBNER. 



Efficiency may well be termed the dominant note in the character of A. H. 
Huebner. He has ever done w-ith thoroughness whatever he undertakes and as 
general manager of the Cascade Lumber Company he occupies a very prominent 
position in industrial and commercial circles in the Yakiina valley. He early realized 
that if one would win success, he must be willing to pay the price of it — the price 
of earnest, self-denying effort, of close application and persistency, and these quali- 
ties he assiduously cultivated as the years have passed on. 

Mr. Huebner was born near Burlington, Iowa, on the 1st of October, 1873, and 
is a son, of .'Xugust and Emelie Huebner. He obtained a common school education 
and then became connected with the lumber business in Burlington, Iowa, as an 
employe of the Rand Lumber Company, with which he retnained until 1906, when he 
came to Yakima, where he entered business circles as sales manager for the Cascade 
Lumber Company. In this connection he has steadily worked upward and was made 
general manager the same year. Through all the intervening period he has there- 
fore been active in control of the operation of the plant, contributing in marked 
measure to the success of the enterprise. 

The Cascade Lumber Company was incorporated in 1902 with H. P. Svendsen of 
Hudson, Wisconsin, as president and organizer, A. E. Macartney, an attorney of 
St. Paul, Minnesota, as secretary and Robert E. Slaughter as treasurer. With the 
death of Mr. Svendsen in 1910, Mr. Slaughter was elected to the presidency. George 
S. Rankin, of Yakima, was also one of the organizers of the company and in fact was 
the man who interested the others in the project. The officers at the present writing, 
in 1918, are: Robert E. Slaughter, president and treasurer; William Carson, of Bur- 
lington, Iowa, vice president: C. W. Lockwood, of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, secretary; 
and A. H. Huebner as general and resident manager. The first sawing was done in 
1903 and with the growth of the business the plant was enlarged in 1906. The com- 
pany owns four hundred acres of land and the two mill ponds cover seventy acres, 
while the mill plant and yards cover thirty acres. They employ about three hundred 
men at the Yakima plant, which does not include a large force of woodmen employed 
in operation in the lumber woods. The plant cuts from thirty to forty million feet 
of lumber annually, handling mostly western pine. Their product is sold over the 
middle wesi save such as is cut into fruit boxes and sold in this section, one- 
fourth of the product being used in fruit boxes for the local trade. They 
also manufacture some l:r lumber for building purposes. The plant is operated 
with steam power, the rngin< s havng about thirteen hundred and fifty horse 
power. They manufacture their own electricity for lighting purposes and the 
business has been most carefully systematized, so that practically all waste is elimi- 
nated. Tliey sell all of the waste wood and burn all of the sawdust and in the 
methods thus adopted they have found the secret of success, which is always the 
accomplishment of a maximum result with a minimum expenditure of time, labor and 

(12) 



254 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

material. Mr. Huebner is familiar with every branch of the trade and his well 
directed efforts and energy are productive of splendid results. One of the effective 
forces for success with the Cascade Lumber Company is the splendid organization 
that has been built up. John Rhodes is sales manager and general superintendent 
and has been with the company for fourteen years, while W. T. Hines has charge 
of local sales and has been with the company for twelve years. Mr. Huebner has 
the entire loyalty of his large force of workmen, being fair and just in his treatment 
and ever conducting his interests on terms that are beneficial alike to employe, cred- 
itor and debtor. 

On the 31st of January. 1900. Mr. Huebner was married to Miss Myrtle Shontz, 
of Burlington, Iowa, and to them have been born two daughters, Dorothy and Ruth, 
aged respectively fifteen and ten years. Mr. Huebner is a republican in his political 
views but not an office seeker, although interested in the success of the party and 
at no time remiss in the duties of citizenship. He belongs to Yakima Lodge No. 24 
F. & A. M., and Yakima Chapter No. 22, R. A. M., and he also has membership in 
Modern Woodmen Camp No. 550. He is an active member of the Commercial 
Club, serving on its board of directors and also as its vice president, and is putting 
forth earnest and effective effort to advance through this organization the welfare 
and upbuilding of the city. 



ROBERT L. MAINS. 



In the death of Robert L. Mains, Yakima county lost one of its honored pio- 
neers and a substantial orchardist who also took a great interest in the intellectual 
and moral development of humanity, having given much time and effort to Sunday 
school and similar work. He was ever a champion of the cause of education and 
very active in church work and in fact any movement undertaken for the betterment 
of the public. He had the greatest confidence in the future of this locality and by 
assisting, irrigation projects and developing his land greatly stimulated prosperity 
here. 

.^ native of Michigan. Mr. Mains was born near Olivet in Eaton county, Feb- 
ruary '22. 1865, a son of John and Lois (Walker) Mains, who were natives of Maine 
and became early agriculturists of Michigan, settling in that state during its pioneer 
epoch. Robert L. Mains was carefully reared by his parents, who instilled into him 
the best principles in regard to life's conduct, and in the acijuirement of his educa- 
tion he attended public school in his native state. He then turned to farming as 
suited to his tastes and ambition and continued along that line in Michigan until 
1884, becoming thoroughly acquainted with progressive and efficient agricultural 
methods. In 1884, having heard glowing reports in regard to the opportunities pre- 
sented in the far west, he decided to remove to this district and came to Washington, 
locating in Roslyn, where later he conducted the Northern Pacific Hotel. In 1891 
he took up a homestead claim about live miles south of what is now Sunnyside, 
which district was then but sparsely settled, the nearest store being at Prosser and 
from there water had to be hauled. That this commodity was precious at that time 
is evident from the fact that he had to pay one dollar per barrel. He was one of the 
first settlers, his nearest neighbor being two miles away, while the nearest school 
was at Prosser, fifteen miles distant. Mr. Mains assisted in organizing a school about 
1)^95. the building being located near his ranch. He also organized the first Sunday 
school and later assisted in founding the Bethany school in 1901. The Presbyterian 
church and Sunday school were established and Mr. Mains gave valuable assistance 
in starting them, .^t first mail had to be brought from Prosser but now delivery is 
much facilitated and in a comparatively few years a wild country has been developed 
into a garden spot and orchard. Much of this development was due to the ceaseless 
actiivty, energy and progressive spirit of Mr. Mains. He never lost sight of the 
inteUectur.l and moral phases of life but on the contrary took a deep interest in the 
sam.-, being ever activ° in church work and serving for several years as Sunday 
school superintendent. .\ stanch champion of education, he served for years on the 
school board and his activities resulted in many improvements and facilities that 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 255 

were introduced in order to supply the children with a better and more efficient 
means of education. He also was a director of the Water Users Association, being 
thoroughly convinced of the value of irrigation. His great confidence and faith in 
the country were rewarded by ready returns. In his political affiliations he was a 
republican, stalwart and faithful in his support of the candidates and measures of 
that party. 

On the 12th of February. 1888, Mr. Mains was united in marriage to Annie 
Bryant, a native of Wales and a daughter of David and Annie (Edwards) Bryant, 
who in 186S came to the United States, taking up their abode in Pennsylvania, where 
they remained until the early 70s, when removal was made to Boone county, Iowa. 
The father was a taxidermist by profession and made his home in Newton, Iowa, 
whence later he removed to Roslyn, Washington, where in 1886 he engaged in mining 
until 1890, when he look up a homestead on the site where Grandview now stands. 
LTpon this place he died in 1915. His widow afterward made her home with a daugh- 
ter in Ellcnsburg, where she passed away. They were among the honored pioneers 
of this state. To Mr. and Mrs. Mains four children were born: Ethel married Oliver 
Beckes, a resident of Tacoma, and they became the parents of two children, Richard 
and Ralph, but the latter was drowned. Edward, who resides upon the home farm, 
married Bessie Martin, of Yakima. Anna is the wife of Rudolph Syverson, who is 
manager of the White River Lumber Company. They reside at Grandview and have 
a daughter, Eveljn. Mac, the youngest member of the family, is at home with her 
mother. 

In the death of Robert L. Mains on the 4th of December, 1910, Yakima county 
lost one of its true and honored pioneers. L^pon coming here he used all his energy, 
intelligence and vigor in order to plant civilization in a western wilderness and how 
well he succeeded is evident from the fact of his later prosperity. Moreover, the 
welfare of his neighbors and friends as well as humanity at large was ever near 
his heart and he coopeiated throughout life in movements which were of great value 
to tht community. Here he had many friends, all of whom spoke of him in terms 
of great respect and esteem and who acknowledged his unselfishness and kindness. 
To Irs family his loss was a great blow but to them his memory has remained as a 
beiicdictinn. Open and above board in all of his dealings, he left behind him an un- 
tarnished name — a possession which is truly to be more highly prized than great 
riche'. \\ hile Mr. Mains largely lived up to high ideals, he was a man of practical 
mind who in his business affairs did not pursue rainbow schemes but ever followed 
conservative methods, utilizing modern discoveries which he found of value. He 
builded carefully and therefore builded wisely and well He was a substantial man 
whose word was as good as his bond and he will long be remembered by all who 
had the honor of his acquaintance. 



JOHN W. PETERSON. 

John W. Peterson is well known as proprietor of the oldest drug store in Top- 
penish. where he has carried on business continuously for the past decade. He is a 
native of Sweden, where his liirth occurred on the 9th of December, 1875, his parents 
being C. O. and Caroline (.Anderson) Peterson. In 1882 the family emigrated to the 
United States and eftablished their home in Stillwater, Minnesota, where the father 
'.Yorked at the trade of cabinetmaking to the time of his demise. • In 1913 the mother 
removed to Seattle. Washington, where she still makes her home. 

John W. Peterson, a lad of seven years when brought by his parents to this 
country acquired his education in the public schools of Minnesota and in prepara- 
tion for his chosen life work entered the Minnesota Institute of Pharmacy at Minne- 
apolis, from which institution he was graduated in 1895. Making his way to Minto, 
North Dakota, he was there employed as a clerk for a few years and in 1898 em- 
barked ii. business on his own account at Leeds, North Dakota, where he success- 
fully conducted a drug store for a period of ten years. In 1908 he removed to Yakima 
but at the end of six months came to Toppenish, here opening a drug store which he 
has conducted continuously since and which is now the oldest establishment of the 



256 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

kind in the town. He carries an extensive stock of drugs and druggists' sundries and 
has built up a large patronage by reason of his enterprising and reliable business 
n^etlicds and earnest desire to please his customers. 

In 1900 Mr. Peterson was united in marriage to Miss Anna Hughes, of Minto, 
Xo-th Dakota, by whom he has a son, Albert Charles, who is now si.xteen years of 
ago an(' is attending high school. 

Politically Mr. Peterson is a stanch republican and he has done valuable service 
as a member of the city council, exercising his official prerogatives in support of all 
movements and measures for the development and upbuilding of the community in 
which he lives. He has also served on the governing board of the Commercial Club. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, being a charter member of Toppenish 
Lodge No. 178, F. & A. M. He is fond of shooting and is a charter member of the 
Toppenish Gun Club. His business career has been one of steadj- progress, result- 
ing from vjeW directed eflfort, and he is widely and favorably known as a representa- 
tive and substantial citizen of the Yakima valley. 



DANIEL BARBEE. 



A life of intense and well directed activity brought Daniel Barbee, now deceased, 
to a position among the successful ranchers of the northwest. In 1906 he took up 
his abode a mile from Zillah. where he purchased thirty-four and a half acres of 
partly improved land, and his remaining days were devoted to the further develop- 
ment and cultivation of that place. He was born in Iroquois county, Illinois. June 
7, 1841, a son of Solomon and Sarah (McFall) Barbee. the former born May 25, 1812, 
and the latter born in Indiana, December 19, 1833. The mother was a daughter of 
Joseph McFall. Mr. and Mrs. Barbee became pioneer settlers of Illinois and subse- 
quently removed to Missouri while in 1855 they went to Iowa, establishing their 
home in Mills county, where they settled upon a farm and resided throughout their 
remaining days. 

Daniel Barbee acquired a public school education and took up the occupation of 
farming as a life work. He was identified with agricultural interests in Iowa for 
thirty-five years, or until 1905. when he removed to Yakima county and for a year 
thereafter was a resident of Toppenish. In 1906 he brought his family to their pres- 
ent home, which is situated a mile northwest of Zillah. and with characteristic energy 
"lie began the further development and improvement of the farm of thirty-four and a 
half acres which he purchased. He planted ten acres of his land to Winesap apples, 
four acres to pears and also set out two hundred prune trees. Since his demise 
his wife has built a packing house upon the place and also good barns and thus the 
work of further development and improvement is being steadily carried forward. 

It was on the 14th of June, 1868, that Mr. Barbee v.-as married to Miss Mary E. 
Fall, who was born in Monroe county. Iowa. March 12, 1850, a daughter of M. W. and 
Elizabeth (Forshear) Fall, the former a native of Ohio while the latter was born in 
Putnam county. Indiana. They removed to Monroe county. Iowa, in the sprmg of 
1848, and Mrs. Barbee still has in her possession an old gourd that was raised liy her 
mother in that year. She also has old candlesticks which were used by the family, 
and an old dresser that was made in Indiana, taken to Iowa and then brought across 
the country to the northwest. These are cherished heirlooms in the family. Her 
parents purchased land in Iowa and there her father carried on farming throughout 
his active business career. He reached the notable old age of ninety-one years, while 
his wife was eighty-three years of age at the time of her demise. They had a family 
of twelve children. To Mr. and Mrs. Barbee were born eleven children: Wiley, the 
eldest, now farming the home ranch, married .'\nnie Hill and they had fourteen 
children, six of whom have passed away; Stella is the wife of T. C. Mintle, who is 
engaged in farming in Nebaska, and they have three sons; .Arthur a rancher of 
Hay Springs, Nebraska, wedded Nellie Alderson and has one daughter; Lester, who 
follows farming near Buena, Washington, married Ellen Peterson and has one son; 
Lillie is at home with her mother; Charles, who devotes his attention to farniing in 
Iowa, married Laura Stanford and has two daughters; Dollie is the wife of Calvin 




DANIEL BAEBEE 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 259 

Calhoun, a ranchman of Arizona; Mary is the wife of Sylvester Shelley, who follows 
ranching near Zillah, and they have one son; Ernest, who is engaged in ranching near 
Buena, married Rose Olson; Maude is the wife of Fred Hickenbotton, who is fol- 
lowing ranching near Zillah: William who was the second of the family, died March 
8, 1873, at the age of six weeks. 

In 1917 Mrs. Barbee purchased a beautiful cement home at the edge of Zillah 
and her place is called Cherry Hill Ranch. The death of Mr. Barbee occurred No- 
vember 10, 1908, and was the occasion of deep and widespread regret. He was a de- 
voted member of the Methodist Episcopal church and was a prohibitionist in poli- 
tics, associations that indicate the high principles that governed his life and shaped 
his conduct in ajl of his relations with his fellowmen. He had many admirable traits 
of character, was kindly in spirit and generous in disposition and had a very exten- 
sive circle of friends. 



RALPH ORCOTT SMITH. 

Ralph Orcott Smith, who is engaged in the cultivation of a forty-acre ranch 
five miles west of Yakima, was born in Geneseo, Illinois, October 14, 1876, a son of 
John and Kate COrcott ) Smith, who in the year 1884 made the journey to the north- 
west, establishinp- their home in Union county, Oregon. Ralph O. Smith acquired a 
public school education and when sixteen years of age left home in order to start out 
in the business world independently. Coming to the Yakima valley, he worked on a 
farm in the employ of others for fourteen months and later he made a prospecting 
trip in British Columbia. In 1900 he purchased the Pete Taylor ranch on the Cowiche 
fo.- ten dollars per acre and in 1904 sold that property at thirty dollars per acre. He 
afteiward spent two years in San Diego, California, after which he returned to the 
Yakima valley, where he remained, however, but a short time. He next went to La 
Grande. Oregon, and bought a stock ranch of fifteen hundred acres, upon which he 
ren-ained for two years. Later he again spent a year in San Diego and on the expira- 
tion of that period removed to Highland, California, where he purchased an orange 
grove, but lost three successive crops. He next established his home at Paso Robles, 
California, and devoted five years there to the wheat and stock business. He still owns a 
six hundred and forty acre ranch in that district. In 1917, however, he sold his 
stock there and returned to the Yakima valley, where he invested in forty acres of 
land five miles west of the city of Yakima, of which ten acres is planted to fruit, 
while the remainder is given to the cultivation of alfalfa and corn. 

On the 18th of November, 190O, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Viola May 
Livengood, a daughter of R. A. and Letitia Livengood, who were pioneers ot the 
Yakima valley. To Mr. and Mrs. Smith have been born seven children: Ervin, 
Chester, Ira, Ivan, Harvey, Glenn and Katie May. While in California Mr. Smith 
served as a member of the school board and has always been interested in the cause 
of education. In politics he may be called an independent republican, for while he 
usually supports the" principles of the party, he does not consider himself bound by 
party ties and at local elections when no party issue is involved, usually casts an in- 
dependent ballot. While he has made many changes, he has steadily progressed in 
his business career and is today successfully conducting fruit raising as well as farm- 
ing interests in Yakima county. 



JOHN K. LUTHER. 



John K. Luther, extensively identified with farming and fruit raising interests in 
the valley, was born in Marion county, Kansas, on the 23d of March, 1880, a son of 
John and Anna (Klott) Luther, who in 1887 removed to Whitman county, Washing- 
ton, where the father has since engaged in farming. The mother passed away Oc- 
tober 18, 1905. 

John K. Luther was but seven years of age at the time the family home was 



260 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

established in this state, so that almost his entire life has been passed in the north- 
west. He supplemented his public school education by a course in Walla Walla Col- 
lege and then entered upon the work of the ministry as a representative of the Sev- 
enth Day Adventists church. For ten years he engaged in preaching the gospel 
throughout Washington, Idaho and Oregon, but on the 8th of September, 1916, 
turned his attention to fruit raising and farming in Yakima county, where he pur- 
chased thirty acres of land, of which seventeen acres is planted to fruit, while the 
remainder is devoted to the raising of hay, corn and other crops. His place is pleas- 
antly and conveniently situated about five and a half miles west of Yakima. He has 
also leased a ranch of one hundred and sixty acres on the Yakima Indian reserva- 
tion and is there extensively and successfully engaged in raising grain and alfalfa. 
In young manhood he had carried on farming interests on a large scale in Whitman 
county, so that he brought broad practical experience to his work and in the conduct 
of his aflfairs he is meeting with well deserved success. 

On the 13th of April, 1902, Mr. Luther was married to Miss Elsie E. GetzlafT, of 
Whitman county, a daughter of Gustave and Otilie Getzlaff, who removed from Min- 
nesota to Whitman county, Washington, in 1890. Their children are Raymond, Ruby. 
Edwin, Erma and Emerald. 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther are loyal and active members of the Seventh Day Adventist 
church and his political allegiance is given to the democratic party. His has been 
an active and useful life fraught with good results for the material and moral pro- 
gress of the communities in which he has lived and labored. 



CHARLES H. FLUMMERFELT. 



Charles H. Flummerfelt, a prominent figure in insurance and real estate circles 
in EUensburg, having now an extensive clientage, was born in Delaware, Warren 
county. New Jersey, on the 31st of July, 1863, a son of Daniel A. and Macrina H. 
(Hoagland) I-'lummerfelt, both of whom were representatives of old colonial fami- 
lies. The father was engaged in the mercantile and milling business and spent his 
eptire life in the east, passing away in 1884. The mother still survives and is now liv- 
ing with her son, Charles H., at the advanced age of eighty-two years. She is still 
well preserved and takes the keenest interest in raising flowers. 

Charles H. Flummerfelt obtained a public school education and started out in 
the business world as a telegraph operator. Later he took up office work and subse- 
quently began traveling for a southern hardwood lumber company of St. Louis, 
Missouri, his territory covering the central states. He afterward removed to Haw- 
ley, Minnesota, where he was appointed agent for the Northern Pacific Railway 
Company, and his identification with Washington dates from 1885, in which year 
he made his way to Pasco, becoming the third station agent at that place. He con- 
tinued to occupy that position until 1888 and it was during his agency that the first 
passenger train passed over the Cascade division. This was an excursion, held on the 
4th of July, 1887. and carried many prominent people, who came from Walla Walla. 
In 1888 Mr. Flummerfelt entered the live stock business near what was then Lake 
Station but what is now Mesa, Washington. He became a prominent and influential 
citi?en of that region and in the fall of 1889 was elected the first representative from 
Franklin county to the state legislature, where he so capably and faithfully served 
his constituents that he was reelected for a second term. He gave earnest and 
thoughtful consideration to all the vital questions that came up for settlement and 
left the impress of his individuality upon legislation enacted during the period of his 
service in the general assembly. 

In 1891 Mr. Flummerfelt removed to EUensburg and again entered the employ 
of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, being in a responsible position in the 
superintendent's office. In the spring of 1892 he was made traffic manager of the 
EUensburg & Okanogan Transportation Company and served in that capacity until 
the following fall, when he resigned and embarked in business on his own account, 
establishing a mercantile store at Oroville, Washington, where he continued for a 
few months. He then returned to EUensburg and again entered the employ of the 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 261 

Xorllicrn Pacific in 1893, acting as relief agent in the superintendent's office. In 
18S'4 he was made assistant postmaster of Ellensburg and occupied that position 
until the fall of 1896. He was then elected county treasurer, serving for two terms 
and proving a most faithful custodian of the public funds. In 1901 he went to 
VVenatchec, Washington, where for a year he was associated with the Rose & Wright 
I'ruit Company. In 1902 he returned to Ellensburg and purchased the grocery stock 
of R. B. Wilson, after which he was continuously and successfully engaged in the 
grocery business until February, 1909, when he sold out. .'\t that date he entered 
th'; real estate and insurance business, in which he has now continued for a decade, 
and within this period has built up an extensive clientage. 

In 1883 Mr. Flummerfelt was married to Miss Ella Mary Sebring, who was born 
in Monroe county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Andrew and Theresa B. (Moyer) 
Seliring. The children of this marriage are two in number. Ray is married and is 
with the Northwestern Improvement Company of Roslyn, Washington. The daugh- 
ter, Nellie, is the wife of John J, Brown, a lieutenant in the railway division that 
ivent to Russia, in the L^nited States-Russian Rail Service. 

Fraternally Mr. Flummerfelt is an Odd Fellow and has held all the chairs in the 
local lodge. He also has membership in the Elks Lodge No. 1102, of Ellensburg and 
in the woodmen of the World. He is a prominent member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, in which he has served as president, and his religious faith is manifest in his 
membership in the Presbyterian church. In politics he has always been a democrat 
since reaching his majority. He has served on the city council of Ellensburg, filling 
that office at the time the electric light system was extended and at the time plans 
were l;.i(l for the water service. He had the distinction of being the youngest member 
of the first state legislature in 1889 and in 1913 he was elected to represent his dis- 
trict in the state senate, where he served for a term. He has served as president of 
the building committee of the Young Men's Christian Association and was the first 
president of the association in Ellensburg. He has continuously served as its board 
of directors and is now its treasurer. His activities have been a factor in material, 
intellectual, social, political and moral progress in his section of the state. 



I. H. DILLS. 



I. H. Dills needs no introduction to the readers of this volume, for he is at the 
head of the oldest and largest clothing business of the Yakima valley, having long 
ranked with the most progressive merchants of the city of Yakima, where he took up 
his abode in 1888 and in the fall of that year established his present business, which 
is conducted under the name of the Star Clothing Company. 

Mr. Dills was born in Adams county, Illinois, in 1862 and is a son of Henry and 
Elizabeth Dills, the former a farmer and a mechanician. The son acquired a public 
school education in his native state and was reared to agricultural life, early becom- 
ing an active assistant in the work of the fields through vacation periods. He con- 
tinued to aid in the labors of the farm until he reached the age of twenty years, 
when he opened a butcher shop at Corning, Missouri, there continuing for a year. 
He afterward supplemented his earlier education by a term's study in Shelbina. Mis- 
souri, and later he again spent a summer in Illinois. He subsequently devoted a year 
to farming in Missouri, residing there during 1884, and in 1885 he removed to Kansas, 
taking up a homestead claim in Clark county, upon which he lived until 1886. In that 
year he again became a resident of Missouri, where he carried on general agricultural 
pursuits for tvt-o years, but the opportunities of the far west attracted him and he 
made his way to the Pacific coast country. 

It was in the spring of 1888 that Mr. Dills arrived in Yakima and established the 
business of which he is now the head. In this undertaking he was associated with 
Harry Hampton and the store was opened in the old postoffice building, where they 
continued for a year. A removal was then made to First street, adjacent to the 
postoffice, where the business was conducted until 1891, when they removed to 
Yakima avenue, occupying a building with the firm of Fechter & Ross. With the 
growth of their trade, however, they took over the whole building and later, or in 



262 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

1898, purchased a building on Yakima avenue, between First and Second streets. He 
there remained until the spring of 1909. when he established his store at the corner of 
Second street and Yakima avenue in a building with a fifty-foot frontage. This is 
the oldest and largest clothing house of the Yakima valley. The company was in- 
corporated in 190O with I. H. Dills as president and treasurer and W. L. Lemmon 
as vice-president and secretary. They employ nine people and the two officers are 
also active in the conduct of the business. During the busy season a still larger 
force of employes is secured. They carry a very extensive and attractive line of 
goods, showing all the styles that the market affords, and their reasonable prices, 
their straightforward dealing and their progressive methods have brought to them 
a constantly growing patronage. 

It was in 1900 that Mr. Dills was united in marriage to Miss Gertrude Blanker, 
a native of Tennessee, and they have become parents of five children: Leslie H., 
William H., Herbert, Elizabeth and Richard, all of whom are yet under the parental 
roof, the family circle being still unbroken by the hand of death. 

In his political views Mr. Dills is an earnest republican, having supported the 
party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. In his fraternal relations 
he is an Elk. loyal to the teachings of the order, and he is also a charter member of 
the Commercial Club and a valued member of the Country Club. 

While Mr. Dills is perhaps best known as a leading clothing merchant, he has 
not confined his efforts alone to this line and has become an important factor in the 
valley's progress and development in any fields of activity. He is now the presi- 
dent of the Yakima Fruit Products Company, which indicates one of the points of his 
interest. He is likewise the vice-president of the Hub Mercantile Company of 
Wapato, which he aided in organizing. He has long been interested in farming 
and is part owner of the U. S. Development Company, cultivating four hundred and 
eighty acres of wheat land in 1918. Mr. Dills is president of this corporation. Dur- 
ing the season of 1896 Mr. Dills was in .Alaska, sledding in from Diah and crossing 
the Diah Pass on the 14th of April, 1896. He reached Fort Selkirk and there met 
George Carmack and his wife, who made the Dawson discovery. Mr. Dills went up 
the Pelly river and Mr. Carmack went to Dawson, where he found gold. Upon 
coming out of Alaska in the fall Mr. Dills heard of Mr. Carmack's discovery and was 
within two days' drive of the place but decided to return home instead of going to the 
gold camp. In 1915 he went into the Behring Sea country on a mining venture and 
made five hundred miles with rowboats, going as far as Alamma lake and up the 
river, then crossing to Cook's inlet, where he had to remain for two weeks, waiting 
for a steamship. He had planned to cross the inlet .with a Frenchman, having given 
up the steamship, but was picked up by a gas launch and proceeded to Kodiac Island, 
where he found the boat. On this trip his son, Leslie H., accompanied him. His 
travels in the northwest have been extensive and his experiences varied. For thirty 
years he has been identified with the development of this section of the country and 
his efforts and energies have constituted a potent force in the work of general prog- 
ress and improvement, especially in the Yakima valley, where he has become identi- 
fied with a number of lines of business, all of which have profited by his cooperation 
and support, his energy, enterprise and business sagacity constituting a stimulating 
force toward the attainment of success. 



LEONARD L. THORP. 

Leonard L. Thorp, now living retired in Yakima, is numbered among those who 
have contributed in large measure to the development of the agricultural and stock 
raising interests of the Yakima valley, where for many years he owned and operated 
a large ranch which he brought under a high state of cultivation and to which he 
added many attractive modern improvements. Mr. Thorp is a western man by birth, 
training and preference and has always been imbued with the spirit of enterprise 
which has been a dominant factor in the rapid and substantial upbuilding of this 
section of the country. He was born in Polk county, Oregon, October 16, 1845, a 
son o: F. M. and Margaret (Bounds") Thorp, the former a native of Kentucky and 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 265 

the latter of Tennessee. They were married in Missouri and in 1844 crossed tlie 
Plains, making the long and arduous trip over the stretches of hot sand and through 
the mountain passes until they reached the Pacific coast. Locating in Oregon, tiie 
father took up a donation claim of six hundred and forty acres of government land in 
Folk county, becoming one of the first settlers there. He followed diversified farm- 
ing and stock raising and in the early days he experienced all of the hardships which 
form features of pioneer life. There were no white settlers near at the time of his 
arrival. He had a number of relatives who participated in the Cayuse Indian wars 
of 18SS and 1856. Mr. Thorp was one of the first permanent white settlers in Polk 
county and his place was near that of Captain Birch. He afterward removed to 
what is now Klickitat county in 1858 and assisted in its organization. With the 
work of development and improvement he was closely connected and at one time 
served as probate judge of the county. On the l5th of February, 1861, he removed to 
the Yakima valley, settling on the Moxee, where he secured a stock ranch, becoming 
one of the first to locate in that district. In 1867 he removed to a farm twelve miles 
west of Ellensburg and there resided to the time of his death, which occurred in 
1898. His wife had previously passed away. 

Leonard L. Thorp was educated under private instruction, his father hiring a 
teacher for his children. He says that he was raised upon a horse, for from his 
earliest childhood he was almost continuously in the saddle. Reared amidst frontier 
conditions and environment, he learned to speak the Indian tongue and had In- 
dian playmates in his youth. He continued at home with his father until he had 
attained his majority, but went into Idaho and Montana with cattle when twenty 
years of age, there selling a drove of cattle for his father at a profit of ten thou- 
sand dollars. On the return trip he brought with him his grandfather, who had 
been in Montana. They came in the winter, found the stage stations burnecf and 
the horses stolen by the Indians, but they managed to escape the red men. On the 
trip, however, Mr. Thorp of this review had his feet so badly frozen that the ends of 
both feet had to come off. leaving him a cripple for life. He crossed the Columbia 
river when it was full of ice, making the trip over with Indians. After recovering 
from the injuries which he had sustained on the trip he took a ranch on the Moxee 
and later secured a second ranch. Afterward he sold that property and secured a 
ranch on the Selah whereon he resided for fourteen years and during that period 
he turned his attention to the live stock business. He took a trip to California but 
did not like the state and returned to the Yakima valley, settling on the Xaches, 
where he developed a fine ranch. He was the first man to bring full-blooded Hol- 
stein cattle to this state, introducing that stock in 1884. He added many splendid 
improvements to his place, erecting buildings for the shelter of grain and stock 
.nnd keeping the fences in good condition so that the place was thus divided into 
fields of convenient size. He devoted much of his land to the production of alfalfa 
and he also raised cattle on a large scale. Eventually, however, he sold the Xaches 
ranch and afterward took up his abode near Yakima, where he established a fruit 
ranch, one of the first of the district, and which he well improved with buildings, 
fences, etc. Thereon he resided until 1899, when he removed to Yakima, where he 
has since lived retired. For many years he has been a director of the Yakima 
National Bank and is now vice president. In business afifairs he has ever been 
recognized as a man of sound judgment and progressive spirit and his success has 
been the direct outcome of persistent labor, intelligently guided. 

On the 28th of May, 1867, Mr. Thorp was married to Miss Philena Henson, a 
daughter of Alfred Henson, who removed to Oregon in 1852 and to Klickitat, Wash- 
ington, in 1858, while in 1861 he settled in Yakima, being one of the early pioneers 
and upbuilders of the west. The children of this marriage were: Martha, now 
deceased, who became the wife of W. B. Young, by whom she had two sons; Eva, 
the wife of Thurston Brown, living in Seattle; Dale, w^ho died on a trip to Alaska; 
Herbert, who died at the age of seven and one-half years; and Margaret, the wife 
of W. M. Hawkins, of Yakima. 

Mr. Thorp belongs to the Pioneer Society. He has resided in the Yakima 
valley for a longer period than any other white settler and is a most honored 
pioneer resident. There is no phase of the northwest with which he is not famil- 



266 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

iar. His memory goes back to the days when its great forests were uncut, when its 
broad plains were unclaimed, its streams unbridged, and when the work of civiliza- 
tion and development seemed scarcely begun. He has lived to witness a remarkable 
change as the years have passed and he has borne his full share in the work of 
progress and improvement. Under his direction and through his aid w-ild land has 
been transformed into productive fields and he has done much to develop the great 
herds of cattle found grazing upon the pasture lands of the Yakima valley. He 
also made a valuable contribution to the prosperity of the district by introducing 
the Holsteins and thus aiding in the improvement of the grade of stock raised. His 
stories of the early days are most interesting and his reminiscences claim the 
attention of all who hear them. Mr. Thorp well deserves the rest which he is now 
en-joying, for he has passed the seventy-third milestone on life's journey and ease 
should ever crown a life of intense and well directed activity. 



SrMEON E. HOOVER. 

Simeon E. Hoover has been a resident of Yakima county only since 1913 but in 
this brief period lias made for himself a place among the representative ranchmen 
of the district. He comes to the west from Elkhart county. Indiana, where he was 
born on the 18th of February, 1852, a son of David and Susanna (Shank") Hoover, 
who were natives of Canada and of Ohio respectively. The father devoted his life to 
the occupation of farming, which he followed for many years in Saint Joseph county, 
Indiana, where both he and his vyife passed away. 

Simeon E. Hoover acquired a public school education and in 1877, when a young 
man of twenty-five years, went to Kansas, where he remained for two years, devot- 
ing his attention to agricultural pursuits during that period. In 1888 he arrived in 
the northwest. Making his way to Tacoma, he afterward engaged in shingle weaving 
on the Pacific coast for twenty years and at length determined to take up the busi- 
ness of fruit raising in the Yakima valley. Accordingly in the fall of 1913 he came 
to Yakima county and purchased forty acres of land on Naches Heights, of which 
twelve acres is in orchards and the remainder is plow land. He has a fine ranch, on 
which he has built a good barn, a large silo and made many other modern improve- 
ments which indicate the progressive spirit that is back of all of his work and which 
is producing splendid results. 

On the 31st of December, 1874, Mr. Hoover was married to Miss Ellen Reed, 
who was born in Saint Joseph county. Indiana, a daughter of William and Susanna 
Reed. The children of this marriage are: Dora, the wife of M. C. McDougal, a 
rancher, by whom she has two daughters; and Arthur, a resident of Seattle, but 
now a member of the United States army. He is married but has no children. 

Mr. Hoover gives his political endorsement to the republican party, which he has 
supported since reaching manhood. He is a member of the Baptist church and high 
and honorable principles guide him in all the relations of life. He never seeks to 
figure prominently in public affairs, preferring to give his attention to his business 
interests, and his close application and unfaltering energy have been the salient 
features in the attainmeat of the success which he now enjoys. 



EDWIN W. TRENBATH. 

It is a well recognized fact that real estate activities largely contribute toward 
the growth and development of any community, and in that line of business Edwin 
W. Trenbath has aided in the upbuilding of Kennewick, where he has maintained a 
real estate office for several years in partnership wnth George E. Tweedt. He was 
born in Soverville, New Jersey, February 2, 1889, his parents being Robert C. and 
Alice Alva (Wight) Trenbath, both of whom have passed away. The father, a native 
of England, crossed the Atlantic to the United States at the age of twenty-one and 
for many years was a buyer for the famous firm of A. T. Stewart & Company. Later, 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 267 

however, he turned his attention to farming, following that pursuit until his demise. 
The mother came of an old American family, the first ancestor having emigrated to 
this country in 1634 from the Isle of Wight. 

Amid the refining influences of a Christian home Edwin W. Trenbath received 
the first lessons of life from his parents. In the acquirement of his education he 
attended the common school in Somerville, subsequently entering the high school, 
from which he was graduated. Well prepared to take up life's active duties, he then 
entered the employ of the Amei-ican Steel & Wire Company of Trenton, New Jersey, 
with which he remained for three and a half years, coming in 1910 to Kennewick, 
Washington, where he secured a position with the Hover Investment Company. He 
remained with that concern until 1914 and in that connection acquired much valuable 
experience which has stood him in good stead in his present business enterprise. In 
1914 he joined George E. Tweedt in establishing a real estate and insurance busi- 
ness which has since grown to extensive proportions. They handle not only tarm 
but also city property and write various lines of insurance, representing some of the 
best known companies of the country. Mr. Trenbath has given much time to the 
study of local real estate conditions and is considered an expert in his line, so that 
his judgment is regarded as practically infallible and his advice often sought. He 
is equally well versed in insurance matters and this knowledge, in combination with 
his natural ability, has made him one of the foremost business men in his line within 
the Yakima valley. The most honorable business standards have guided all the trans- 
actions of the firm and their reputation is of the highest, so that they enjoy the full 
trust and confidence of the public. 

On the 18th of September, 1913, Mr. Trenbath married Alice Armstrong Ashmun, 
of Waupaca. Wisconsin, and both are popular members of the social set of Kenne- 
wick, their hospitable home often being the meeting place of their many friends. 
They have an adopted daughter, Margaret Middleton, upon whom they bestow all 
the love and care of an own child. 

Mr. Trenbath has always taken a laudable and active interest in the growth and 
development of his city and county and has particularly concerned himself in indus- 
trial and commercial expansion, serving at present as vice-president of the Commer- 
cial Club and having in his official position advocated many measures which have 
proven of great benefit to the community. He has also been a strong advocate of 
the good roads movement, realizing the value of improved roads in order to bring 
tourists, motorists and other travelers to the district and also to facilitate transpor- 
tation generally, and serves at present as the secretary of the Benton County Good 
Roads Association. The family ide.ntify themselves with the Episcopal church and 
take a laudable and helpful part in its work. Fraternally Mr. Trenbath is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he is a past noble grand. In his 
political affiliations he is a democrat and has always faithfully supported the party, 
although he has never desired office for himself, preferring to devote his time and 
efforts to his other interests. As a business man and as a private citizen he is a valu- 
able addition to Kennewick, which city has now been his home for over eight years, 
and all who have the honor of his closer acquaintance are agreed as to his high 
qualities of heart and character. On the 10th of September, 1918, Mr. Trenbath 
enlisted in the L^nited States military service and was sent to the Infantry Central 
Officers' Training School at Camp Pike. Arkansas, where he remained until after the 
armistice was signed. He was then honorably discharged December 7, 1918, and 
returned home to resume business affairs. 



ANGUS C. DAVIS. 



Holding to the most advanced educational standards, Angus C. Davis has greatly 
benefited the educational system of Yakima as superintendent of the city schools, 
and Yakima has every reason to be proud of the educational opportunities which she 
offers to her youth. Since taking up the profession of teaching, Mr. Davis has been 
a close and discriminating student of all that bears upon his chosen life work and is 
continually reaching toward higher ideals. He was born in Polo, Illinois, February 



268 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

1, 18S0. a son of Charles H. and Hattie A. (Allen) Davis, the former a native of 
Ohio, while the latter was born in Massachusetts. In the late 70s, however, she re- 
moved westward to Illinois. Charles H. Davis was a minister of the Baptist church 
and for many years devoted his life to preaching the gospel but is now living retired 
in Yakima. His labors proved a potent element in the upbuilding of the churches 
with which he was connected and the influence of his teachings was widely felt. He 
is a Civil war veteran, having served throughout the period of hostilities between the 
north and the south, and was an active member of the freedmen's bureau after the 
war. 

Angus C. Davis is indebted to the public school system of Ohio for the early edu- 
cational opportunities which he enjoyed. He also attended the Denison L^niversity 
of Ohio and subsequently became a student in Chicago University. Taking up the 
profession of teaching, he was for three years identified with the public schools of 
Marshall Texas, and for a year and a half was a teacher in McMinnville College of 
McMinnville. Oregon. Later he was in charge of the department of physics in the 
Spokane public schools and for two years occupied the position of principle of the 
high school at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. In 1909 he came to Yakima as principal of the 
high school and so continued for four years, when he was advanced to the position 
of city superintendent of schools and has remained in that connection for five years. 
In 1909 the daily attendance at the high school was three hundred and today this 
number has increased to seven hundred. Mr. Davis has put forth every possible 
effort to develop his ability and is regarded today as one of the foremost public 
school educators in the state — a state which holds to the highest possible standards. 
He has attended a summer school for several years and at all times keeps abreast 
with the trend of modern thought and progress along educational lines, being now 
active in the building up of a wonderful school system in Yakima. 

Mr. Davis was married in 1908 to Miss Jessie Hopkirk, of Fort Madison, Iowa, 
and their children are: Norman, now deceased; and Marietta. Mr. Davis belongs to 
Yakima Lodge No. 24, F. & A. M., and the Knights of Pythias fraternity. His mem- 
bership relations also extend to the Presbyterian church and to the Commercial 
Club. In politics he is an independent republican but places the general welfare 
before partisanship and the good of the community before personal aggrandizement. 
In fact he has never been an aspirant for office. He has preferred to do his public 
service in other ways and his contribution to progress and improvement in his 
community has indeed been marked. He is now president of the board of trustees 
of the public library, also a member of the board of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation and of the board of trustees of the First Presbyterian church. His work and 
influence have been a most potent element in advancing social, intellectual and moral 
progress in Yakima. 



WILBUR HUGHES. 



.\ native of Washington county, Oregon, Wilbur Hughes is an enterprising 
western agriculturist who cultivates a valuable property near Wiley Citj', having 
been a resident of Yakima county since his third birthday, at which time he was 
brought by his parents to this part of the state. Coming of an Oregon pioneer fam- 
ily, Mr. Hughes was born July 9, 1868, a son of Samuel Vinton and Louisa (Ketch- 
ings) Hughes, the former born in Pennsylvania and the latter in Missouri. Mrs. 
Hughes was a daughter of Benjamin Retchings, who in 1853 or 1854 brought his 
family to Oregon, in which state he remained during the balance of his life, there 
following agricultural pursuits. Samuel V. Hughes removed to Oregon in 1865 and 
there was married. He crossed the plains twice, going on his first trip to California 
during the gold rush in 1855, and remaining five years. He continued along farming 
lines in Oregon until 1871, in which year he came to Yakima county, and in the 
spring of 1872 he bought one hundred and sixty acres on the Ahtanum, Wiley City 
now being located on part of the old home farm. For many years Mr. Hughes de- 
voted his entire attention to the further cultivation of his property but later in life 
removed to Centralia, Washington, where he died August 4, 1912, in his ninetieth 



HISTORV OF YAKIMA VALLEY 269 

year. His wife had preceded him in death, passing away on the home farm on the 
Ahtanum. Mr. Hughes. Sr., also conducted a livery stable in old Yakima City long 
before the railroad came here, his being the second establishment of the kind to be 
opened in the city. 

Wilbur Hughes was reared amid western pioneer conditions and was but three 
years of age when the family was transplanted to the Yakima valley, where he at- 
tended the public schools. Having received a fair education, he laid aside his text- 
books and continued to assist his father with the farm work, thus becoming thor- 
oghly acquainted with valuable methods in regard to local farming conditions. He 
subsequently worked for wages but in 1910, in which year his mother died on the 
8th of February, Wilbur Hughes received as his share of the old home farm twenty- 
five acres and here he has made his home ever since. He raises hay, grain and pota- 
toes but his live stock interests are also important and he has cattle and hogs, also 
conducting a dairy. He is enterprising in all that he does and has instituted modern 
improvements and facilities, thus increasing the value of his property from year 
to year. 

On December 14, 1904, Mr. Hughes married Ada Jackson, a native of Illinois 
and a daughter of Charles Jackson, who was one of the pioneers of Kansas. Mrs. 
Hughes came to Yakima county in \903 and in the following year her marriage 
occurred. She bore her husband three children, Dolly, Robert and Fay, but the 
firstborn, Dolly, is deceased. The family are highly esteemed in their community, 
where they have many friends, all of whom speak of them in terms of warm regard. 

Mr. Hughes is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and in his 
political affiliations is a republican. He is ever ready to cooperate in worthy 
measures and movements for the promotion of the public welfare and through the 
development of his agricultural property has contributed toward the prosperity 
that is now prevalent in this part of the state. 



WILL G. LAUDERDALE. 

Will G. Lauderdale, who is at the head of an attractive and leading dry goods 
establishment of Ellensburg, ranks with the representative merchants and business 
men of Kittitas county and in all that he does is actuated by a spirit of progress 
and advancement. He was born in Elkhorn, Wisconsin, January 17, 1875, a son 
of J. H. and Zelia M. (Gibson) Lauderdale. The father died in Wisconsin in the 
year 1895, but the mother survives and is now making her home with her son in 
Ellensburg. J. H. Lauderdale also devoted his life to merchandising. He became 
one of the pioneer settlers of Wisconsin, as did his wife, and in that state they were 
married. 

Will G. Lauderdale, passing through consecutive grades in the public schools, 
pursued a high school course and then entered upon his business career as a clerk, 
in which capacity he was employed until 1910. He had come to the northwest in 
1903, at which date he took up his abode in Everett, Washington, there residing 
until 1905, when he removed to Ellensburg. Step by step he advanced in his com- 
mercial career, gaining valuable knowledge and experience as the years passed, 
and in 1910 he purchased the dry goods store of A. C. Spalding. He has since 
greatly improved the establishment and now carries a very high grade stock, his 
being one of the leading dry goods stores of Ellensburg and this part of the state. 
He occupies a corner building with a fifty foot frontage and employs seven people. 
He carries an extensive and well selected line of dry goods and ladies' ready-to- 
wear clothing, and his patronage has grown year by year. He is most careful and 
maintains the highest standards in the personnel of the house, in the treatment 
accorded patrons and in the business methods pursued, and his earnest desire to 
please his customers, combined with his integrity and enterprise, have been the 
dominant characteristics in the attainment of his present day success. 

On the I2th of February, 1908, Mr. Lauderdale was married to Miss Pauline 
Burcham, of Indiana, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Burcham, who came to 



270 IIIS'JORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

the northwest in pioneer times, settHng in Salem, Oregon. Mr. and Mrs. Lauderdale 
have two children, James Burcham and William Arlet. 

Fraternally Mr. Lauderdale is a Mason of high rank, belonging to lodge, chap- 
ter, commandery and Mystic Shrine. He is also identified with the Elks Lodge, 
Xo. 1102, of Ellensburg and he attends the Presbyterian church. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party and he keeps well informed concerning 
the questions and issues of the day but does not seek nor desire office, his attention 
and energies being fully occupied by his business afifairs. His strict attention to his 
commercial interests and his progressive spirit have made him one of the success- 
ful merchants of Ellensburg, and all with whom he has come in contact speak of 
him in terms of high regard. 



CHARLES SMITH. 



Charles Smith, who is successfully engaged in the cultivation of twelve acres 
of land on the Cowiche, was born in Will county, Illinois, April 19, 1875. a son of 
Joseph and Elizabeth (Sampson) Smith, both of whom were natives of England. 
They became residents of Illinois in the '50's and were married in that state. The 
mother was a daughter of Samuel Sampson, who brought his family to Illinois at 
an early day. Joseph Smith devoted his life to the occupation of farming and thus 
provided a comfortable living for his family but passed away on the 19th of April, 
187.S. His widow afterward became the wife of Joseph Brereton. who passed away 
in Illinois. In later life she came to Yakima county and here her death occurred 
in May, 1909. 

Charles Smith is indebted to the public school system of his native state for 
the educational opportunities which prepared him for life's practical and responsible 
duties. He came to Yakima county in 1898 and worked for wages for a few years. 
He afterward took up a homestead on the Cowiche but sold it and purchased twelve 
acres of land, also on the Cowiche. In addition to cultivating this tract he rents 
forty acres from Mrs. A. J. Splawn and is now busily engaged in the further devel- 
opment and improvement of this land, which he devotes largely to the raising of 
grain, hay and potatoes. He annually gathers large crops, for he employs most 
practical and progressive methods in the cultivation of the fields. He has made a 
close study of the soil and its condition and his work bears the sanction of science 
and modern judgment. Moreover, his efficiency is attested in the excellent financial 
results which accrue. 

On the 27th day of July, 1905, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Sarah E. Steven- 
son, a daugjiter of John W. Stevenson. To Mr. and Mrs. Smith have been born 
two children: Harold E., nine years of age; and Shirley M., aged six. Mr. Smith 
votes with the republican party, which he has supported since reaching adult age. 
His entire time and attention, however, have been concentrated upon his agricul- 
tural interests and he is numbered among the successful farmers of his district. 



ALFRED H. SINCLAIR. 



Live stock interests, particularly in regard to the cattle industry, are ably rep- 
resented t)y Alfred H. Sinclair, a wideawake and successful agriculturist of the 
Xaches district. He is a worthy representative of one of its honored pioneer fami- 
lies, the Sinclairs living in the first log cabin built in the Xaches valley. A native of 
Xova Scotia, he was born August 27, 1867, and is a son of Hugh K. and Frances 
(Bishop) Sinclair, also natives of Xova Scotia. His cousin, Dan Sinclair, retnoved 
from Xova Scotia to Puget Sound when a young man and for some time worked m 
a logging camp but afterward returned to Xova Scotia. On again coming to Wash- 
ington in 1879 he was accompanied by Hugh K. Sinclair and his two brothers. Hugh 
K. Sinclair, who was a blacksmith by trade and very proficient in his line, had 
removed to Iowa in 1867 but later returned to Nova Scotia, whence he came to the 




ALFRED H. SINCLAIR 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 273 

Xaches valley in 1879. as mentioned above. Here, hcvi'ever, he did not work at his 
trade but gave his entire attention to live stock interests, being successfully engaged 
in that business until his death on the 22d of July, 1908. His widow survives and now 
makes her home in Yakima at the age of seventy-five years. 

Alfred H. Sinclair was but twelve years of age when the family removed to this 
section and he therefore received his education partly in the British Dominion and 
partly here. After laying aside his schoolbooks he assisted his father with the work 
on the ranch, thus becoming thoroughly acquainted with farming conditions in this 
locality. At a later date he acquired the property and now has one hundred and 
seventy-five acres, eighty of which are in a high state of cultivation. He largely 
raises hay and gives considerable attention to the live stock business, particularly to 
Shorthorn cattle. He has thoroughly studied all the details in regard to this busi- 
ness and has been very successful along this line. 

On the 31st of December, 1896, Mr. Sinclair was married to Miss Grace McMil- 
lan, a native of Sumner, Washington, and a daughter of James and Mary (Stone) 
McMillan, pioneers of this state, who made their way to the Pacific slope in pioneer 
style, coming by wagon. To this union have been born three children: Kenneth, who 
is twenty years of age; Minnie Frances, who died in 1917 at the age of seventeen; 
and Edith Grace, at home. 

Mr. Sinclair is numbered among the Yakima pioneers and stands high in the 
confidence of his fellow citizens not only for what he has achieved but because of 
those qualities which made his success possible. He is industrious, reliable, de- 
pendable and true in friendship and is therefore a valuable member of the community. 
Fraternally he is a member of Yakima Lodge, No. 318, B. P. O. E., and also belongs 
to the Knights of Pythias, being a charter member of the local lodge. His political 
affiliations are with the republican party. Besides his agricultural interests he is a 
director of the Yakima National Bank, as was also his father. The family stands high 
among those connected with the planting of civilization and culture in this state 
when Washington was practically still undeveloped. 



JOH.N DITTER. 



The name of John Ditter is closely interwoven with the history of commercial 
development in the Yakima valley, for he is today at the head of the oldest and 
largest grocery store in this section of the state. Moreover, he has ever been actuated 
by a notable spirit of enterprise that has never stopped short of the successful ful- 
fillment of his purpose and at all times his methods have been such as would bear 
t-ie closest investigation and scrutiny. He indeed deserves mention among the 
leading and highly respected business men of the Yakima valley. 

Mr. Ditter was born in Hennepin county, Minnesota, in 1869, a son of Frank 
and Regina (Butz) Ditter, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father 
was a son of .\rmor Ditter, who in pioneer times in the development of Wisconsin 
became a resident of Fond du Lac county, that state, and there spent his remaining 
da>s. Frank Ditter removed to Minnesota and cast in his lot with the pioneers of 
that section of the country. He devoted his life to farming and was also a country 
merchant and tlie postmaster of his town. He continued a resident of Hennepin 
county until he passed away and his wife also died in that locality. 

Their son, John Ditter, acquired a public school education yet his opportunities 
'vere somewhat limited, for he started out in life at an early age. When a youth 
of eleven years he left home and went to Wisconsin. Later he became a resident 
of Minnesota and the year 1888 witnessed his arrival in North Yakima, where he 
followed the carpenter's trade for a year. He later spent two years in the employ 
of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company in connection with the bridge department 
and for one year was on the coast at Port Townsend, Washington, his sojourn there 
covering the year 1890. In 1893 Mr. Ditter secured a clerkship in the grocery store of 
t'. W. Luther and from that time on has been almost continuously connected with 
the grocery trade. He remained with Mr. Luther in his Front street store for a 
year and then, in connection with John Mechtel, purchased the business of his em- 



274 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

ployer and formed the firm of Ditter & Mechtel. They removed to Yakima avenue 
and their partnership continued most harmoniously and profitably for seven and a 
ha'.f years. On the expiration of that period Mr. Ditter established a bakery busi- 
ntss and in 1899 his store was destroyed by fire. He then again followed carpen- 
tering for a year, after which he became identified with the Mulholland Grocery 
Company, with which he continued for two years. He afterward established busi- 
ness on Yakima avenue and Third street and admitted a partner under the firm style 
of Ditter & Bothwick. an association that was maintained for five years, when he 
bought out his partner and continued the business alone on Third street and Yakima 
avenue for four years. -At the end of that time a removal was made to Nos. 19 and 
21 Xorth Second street, where he has been located since July, 1917, occupying a 
splendid business block with a frontage of fifty feet and a depth of one hundred 
and forty feet. This is the largest grocery store in the valley. Mr. Ditter has ever 
conducted this business alone and in connection with it he owns and operates a 
large bakery. The store is splendidly equipped. In fact it is one of the finest 
grocery houses in the entire west and it furnishes employment to twelve people. 
One of the attractive features of the establishment is a ladies' rest room. Mr. 
Ditter caters exclusively to family trade and meets the wants of his customers 
with auto delivery. He carries a most extensive line of staple and fancy groceries, 
everything that the markets of the world afford, and his trade has assumed most 
gratifying proportions. 

On November 21, 1895, Mr. Ditter was married to Miss Gertrude Mechtel, a 
native of Shakopee, Minnesota, and their children are: Genevieve, now the wife 
of Dr. A. J. Lemioux, of Yakima; Gertrude, deceased; Francis and Margaret, at 
home: and Benitia, who has passed away. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church and they are 
Communicants in St. Joseph's parish. Mr. Ditter belongs to the Knights of Columbus 
and to the Catholic Order of Foresters and he also holds membership with the 
Benevolent Protective Order o.f Elks. He is president of the building association 
of .the Knights of Columbus. He is likewise a member of the Commercial Club 
and in pol'tics he maintains an independent course, preferring to cast his ballot in 
support of the candidates whom he regards as best qualified for office without con- 
sidering party ties. There have been no spectacular phases in his career, but his 
record is that of a most substantial citizen, loyal to the best interests of his com- 
munity ar-d holding to high standards in commercial activity and in private life. 
Ask any old-time resident of Yakima concerning John Ditter and he will be spoken 
of in terms of warm regard and of genuine respect. 



RAY W. SMITH. 



Ray W. Smith was born in the old town of Yakima, July 28, 1886, and through- 
out his entire life has resided in this locality, his life expressing the spirit of western 
enterprise and progress, which have been the dominant factors in the upbuilding 
of the great empire of the northwest. His parents were Robert W. and Addie 
Gertrude (Adkins) Smith, the former a native of England, while the latter was 
born in Michigan. Coming to Washington in 1886. they located at Yakima, where 
the father engaged in business. He also secured a homestead in Yakima county 
and in 1893 he purchased ten acres of land six miles west of the city of Yakima, 
planting one-half of this to orchard, while the balance was devoted to the raising 
of hay and corn. He afterward divided his homestead between the children, but 
the property has since been sold. The father is now living retired, enjoying a 
rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves. He served as a soldier of the 
Civil war, enlisting in the Union army from Wisconsin and giving active aid to 
the cause of liberty. Since coming to Yakima he has filled the office of justice of 
the peace and he is recognized at all times as a citizen of worth. In the family 
were three children, two sons and a daughter, but the daughter is now deceased. 
There was also one child .of the father's second marriage. 

Ray W. Smith acquired a public school education and in early life took up 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 275 

ranching. He now manages the old home place and is accounted one of the suc- 
cessful and representative business men of the locality. 

On the Sth of April, 1907, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Margaret Gearhcart, 
of Oregon, and they have become parents of two children, Raymond and Welford. 
Mrs. Smith is a member of the Seventh Day Adventist church. In politics Mr. 
Smith is an independent republican, voting according to the dictates of his judg- 
ment, which often, however, endorses republican principles. He stands for progress 
in all that relates to the community and district in which his entire life has been 
passed. For a third of a century he has lived here, witnessing the growth and 
development of the community, and he is a most enthusiastic champion of the west. 



JULIUS SCHXASE. 



Julius Schnase, an orchardist of the Yakima valley, residing in Yakima county 
since October. 1912, was born in Germany, August 30, 1859, a son of Adam and 
Edmunda Schnase, who came to the LInited. States in 1874, settling in Minnesota, 
where the father followed farming until he passed away. His wife also died in 
that state. 

Julius Schnase was a youth of about fifteen years when the family emigrated 
to the new world. He attained his majority in Minnesota and started out in life 
as a farm hand, working in the neighborhood of his home at a wage of ten dollars 
per month. He afterward took up government land in Minnesota but later sold 
his property there for eight hundred dollars and removed to South Dakota in 1881. 
Again he entered a claim from the government, locating in Brown county, where 
he developed and improved a farm but eventually sold that property and established 
his home near Aberdeen. There he remained imtil October, 1912, when he came 
to Yakima county, Washington, having in 1911 purchased a ten-acre orchard six 
miles west of Yakima. Here he has devoted his attention to the cultivation of 
apples and pears and has been very successful in his fruit raising ventures. In 
the midst of his farm he has built a fine home and is most pleasantly and comfortably 
situated in life. 

In 1882 Mr. Schnase was married to Miss Amelia Knie, a native of Wisconsin 
and a daughter of Martin and Adolphina (Reivert) Knie, who were pioneer settlers 
of South Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Schnase became the parents of a son. Elmer Martin, 
who was born in South Dakota, Septem'ber 12, 1888, and after acquiring a public 
school education continued his studies in the Norwestern College at Naperville, 
Illinois, since which time he has engaged in farming with his father. On the 26th 
of December, 1911. Elmer M. Schnase married Maude Hey, of Naperville, Illinois, 
who passed away in February, 1912, leaving a little daughter, Maude. In 1913 he 
married Olga H. Mitzel, a native of North Dakota, but at that time a resident of 
Yakima, and they have become parents of one child, Eunice. The religious faith 
of the family is that of the Evangelical Association. In politics Julius Schnase main- 
tains an independent course, voting according to the dictates of his judgment. He 
concentrates his eiTorts and attention upon his business af¥airs and his success is 
the ilirect and legitimate result of his industry and perseverance. 



CLINTON C. MOFFAT, M. D. 

Dr. Clinton C. Moffat, who died October 29, 1918, was not only one of the able,t 
physicians and surgeons of Benton county but also maintained a drug store at 
Prosser. A large amount of his time was given to surgery and he successfully per- 
formed some difficult operations. He was born in Ontario county. New York, 
September 27, 1883, a son of John and Kathryn (Strayline) Moffat,' who in 1885, 
when the subject of this review was but two years of age, removed from New York 
to Nobles county, Minnesota, and thence to Davenport, Washington, in 1898. Since 
1909 the parents of Dr. Moffat have made their home in Eugene, Oregon, where 
(13) 



276 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

they now live retired, the father having followed agricultural pursuits throughout 
his active life. 

Clinton C. Moffat was reared under the parental roof and received his primar}' 
education in the rural schools. Having prepared for college, he entered the Wash- 
ington State College, from which he received the pharmaceutical degree in 1905, 
while in 1914 the M. D. degree was conferred upon him by the University of Oregon. 
In 1905, having become a full Hedged pharmacist, he came to Prosser and here 
opened a drug store. In August. 1907, he bought out Todd's Pharmacy and com- 
bined the two stores. He carried a complete line of the best drugs on the market 
and also all standard patent medicines in addition to sundries generally found in 
a store of this kind. Desirous of taking up the profession eri- rwedicine. he in the 
meantime graduated from the University of Oregon, as above stated, and then en- 
gaged in general practice, giving, however, a great deal of his time to surgery, along 
which line he was quite successful. He was careful in diagnosis but after reaching 
a conclusion followed the course decided upon unfalteringly and had a remarkable 
number of cures to his credit. His reputation extended as he became better known 
and he enjoyed a large practice in the valley. 

In 1908 Dr. Mofifat was united in marriage to Miss Verda Hardesty, of Rosalia, 
Washington, a daughter of John and Ella (Roberts") Hardesty, who are numbered 
among the honored pioneers of Washington. To Dr. and Mrs. Mofifat was born a 
son, John, who is nine years of age. 

Along professional lines Dr. Moffat was connected with the Benton county 
and Washington State Medical Societies and the American Medical Association. 
In his political views he was independent and fraternally he was a member of the 
f)lue lodge of Masons, the Scottish Rite bodies and the Eastern Star. He also held 
membership with the Knights of Pythias, of which he was a past chancellor, with 
the Foresters and the Brotherhood of American Yeomen. He readily cooperated 
with all movements undertaken for the betterment of the people of the district in 
ri moral and intellectual way and was ever ready to give his aid to progressive meas- 
ures for the material development of Prosser and Benton county. Among his 
colleagues his standing was high and from a business point of view he achieved 
considerable success for one of his years. He had many friends in Prosser whom 
he had made in private, business and professional life. 



F. A. WIGGINS. 



F. A. Wiggins is the president of the Washington Xurscry Company, conduct- 
ing the largest nursery business in this state. Twelve years of determination and 
energy have brought Mr. Wiggins to his present enviable position in his company, 
for step by step he has worked his way upward, utilizing the opportunities which 
have come to him and making the best possible use also of his time and talents. He 
was born near Toronto, Canada, in 1869, a son of Robert and Eliza Wiggins, who in 
1871 crossed the border into the LTnited States, establishing their home in Kansas. 
In 1903 they came to the northwest, settling in Oregon. The father devoted his 
life to farming until 1918, when he was called to the home beyond. His widow sur- 
vives and is living in Portland, Oregon. 

F. A. Wiggins acquired a public school education in Kansas and became con- 
nected with mercantile interests. In 1888 he removed to Salem, Oregon, where he 
was identified with commercial pursuits as a dealer in dry goods and farm imple- 
ments. In 1906 he came to Toppenish and purchased an interest in the Washington 
Nursery Company, of which he was made vice-president and sales manager. He has 
since been identified with this enterprise and in 1916 was elected to the presidency. 
The Washington Nursery Company was organized in 1903 by A. W. McDonald, who 
retained the presidency until his retirement in 1916, when Mr. Wiggins succeeded 
him in that position, also continuing as manager. The other officers are: W. L. 
Shearer, vice-president, and C. J. .Atwood, secretary and treasurer. This company 
grows fruit, shade and ornamental trees and also farms two hundred and seventy- 
five acres of land in all, having one hundred and fiftv acres in nurserv stock, while 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 277 

the remainder is devoted to hay and grain. The main cfftice is at Toppenish, where 
employment is given to from twenty to fifty people. The product is sold all over the 
west, from British Columbia to Arizona, and theirs is the largest nursery in the 
state. At one time they had four hundred and twenty-five acres in nursery stock and 
in one year prepared and planted four and a quarter million apple trees, which they 
sold in a period of two or three years. They now conduct a big but conservative 
business and they are represented by a sales force of from one hundred to one hun- 
dred and twenty-five men over the west. They handle all kinds of fruit trees such as 
grow profitably in the west and they arc now giving much attention to the develop- 
ment of the ornamental and landscape branch of their business. They have always 
maintained the highest standards in the character of the nursery stock which they 
have handled and propagated, and anything that comes from the Washington Nur- 
sery Company is known to be of worth. Their name is accepted as a synonym for 
high grade goods and for straightforward dealing. 

In 1894 Mr. Wiggins was married to Miss Myra .Albert, of Salem. Oregon, and 
they have a daughter, Mildred, who is now a student in the State University. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Wiggins is connected with the Masons as a member of Toppenish Lodge 
No. 178, A. F. & A. M. He likewise belongs to the Commercial Club, of which he 
has been president for two years. His political endorsement is given to the repub- 
lican party and for six years he served on the city council, exercising his official pre- 
rogatives in support of all plans and projects which had to do with the upbuilding of 
the city and the advancement of its civic standards. 

Mr. Wiggins, with others, has been active in getting legislation through con- 
gress for the development of the Yakima reservation, the promotion of its irrigation 
system aud other practical means of assisting the Indians to get their rights. He has 
worked for their allotments of land, whereby more than four thousand allotments 
have been made, giving to each man, woman and child a separate tract, usually 
eighty acres, but in some instances one himdred and sixty acres, depending upon 
the location and the availability of water for irrigation. The Yakima reservation 
comprises one of the richest agricultural districts of the northwest, splendidly adapted 
for crop production because of the absence from frost and the possibility for early 
planting. Mr. Wiggins has been untiring in his efforts to promote development in 
this section and has done most effective work for Toppenish, the main trading point 
of the reservation, as a member of the Commercial Club. 



H. H. ANDREWS. 



H, H. Andrews, well known in the business circles of Yakima as the head of the 
Andrews Overland Company, was born in Pontiac, Michigan, May 5, 1880, and is a 
son of Charles N. and Sarah Jane .Andrews. The father is a son of Samuel Andrews, 
a native of Connecticut and a representative of one of the old families of the Massa- 
chusetts Bay colony. His wife was a niece of General Joseph Warren, who led the 
forces at the battle of Bunker Hill. In the year 1832 the grandfather of Mr. Andrews 
of this review left New England and made his way westward to Michigan, travelin.g 
across the country with ox team and wagon. On reaching his destination he took 
up government land, for at that time much of the state of Michigan was still owned 
by the government and the work of progress and improvement had scarcely been 
begun in many .sections of the state. The family has since been represented there 
and Charles N. Andrews, father of H. H. Andrews, yet occupies the old homestead. 

Spending his boyhood and youth in his native state, H. H. Andrews supple- 
mented his public school training by a course in the University of Michigan at .Ann 
Arbor and there won the Bachelor of .Arts degree upon graduation with the class of 
1905. He afterward took up newspaper work, which he continued to follow in the 
Mississippi valley until 1907, when attracted by the opportunities of the growing 
\-est, he made his way to the Pacific coast, continuing in newspaper work until 1911. 
He was editor of the Yakima Morning Herald for four years and became well known 
in journalistic circles of this section of the state. He had also proved up on a home- 
stead, which he afterward sold, and in 1912 he entered the automobile business, 



278 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

making his initial step in that direction as an employe of the Washington Automobile 
Company, with which he remained for a year. He afterward began working for 
Fred Chandler, with whom he continued from 1913 until 1917, when he embarked in 
business on his own account. It was on the 21st of December of that year that he 
organized the Yakima Motor Sales Company, in which undertaking he was asso- 
ciated with C. S. Mead. They leased a building opposite the postofifice and having 
a frontage of fifty feet. On the 1st of January, 1919, the name of this company was 
changed to the Andrews Overland Company. They have the agency for the Over- 
land and also for the Willys-Knight cars and for the Nash passenger cars and trucks. 
The Overland business in this locality was much increased in the year 1918, owing 
to the progressive methods and unfaltering spirit of enterprise displayed by the new 
firm. They have a service station for their own patrons and they carry a full line 
of accessories and auto parts. They have the general agency and are the distribut- 
ing center for Kittitas, Yakima and Benton counties and the firm has adequate rep- 
resentation all over the valley. They employ several men in Yakima and their busi- 
ness is constantly growing. Mr. Andrews has built up a business of very gratifying 
proportions and his present interests are indicative of the spirit of enterprise and 
progress that actuates him at all points in his career. 

On the 20th of September, 1916, Mr. Andrews was married to Miss Emma Flor- 
ence Mead, of Yakima, and they have many friends in the city where they reside. 
Mr. Andrews belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and also to the 
Country Club. He likewise has membership in the Yakima Valley Business Men's 
Association and was made secretary of the Yakima Valley Auto Dealers' Association 
for 1918. Of the latter he was one of the organizers and is doing much to further the 
interests of the association, which was formed to promote the business of dealers 
through cooperation resulting from a discussion of problems and opportunities for 
the trade. In politics Mr. Andrews is a republican, having been a stalwart cham- 
pion of the party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He is well 
known as an alert, energetic young man to whom opportunity has ever been the call 
to action. 



ELLSWORTH S. GIBSOX. 

Ellsworth S. Gibson, secretary of the Yakima Meat Company, was born in 
Waterloo, Oregon, on the 24th of August, 1872. His father, James D. Gibson, was 
a native of Pennsylvania, and in the year of 1859, crossed the plains to California, 
and after residing for a number of months in the Golden state, made his way to 
Walla Walla, Washington, in 1860. where he made his headquarters for about ten 
years, mining and packing supplies to the mines of the northwest. He later estab- 
lished his home at Portland, Oregon, and still later removed to Waterloo, that state, 
where he married Miss Mary Agnes Keys, a native of Linn county, Oregon, and a 
daughter of Elmer Keys, who crossed the plains to Oregon in 184S, and subsequently 
went to California during the gold rush in 1849. later returning to Oregon where he 
made his home until his death, about 1855. About the time of his marriage Mr. 
Gibson entered the grist mill and lumber business and later turned his attention to 
the raising of live stock. He afterward went to Wasco county with his stock, arriv- 
ing there in the fall of 1877 and remaining in that district for many years. Even- 
tually, however, he removed to Idaho and is now living retired at Pleasant Valley, 
California. The wife and mother passed away in the year 1891, and he subsequently 
married Miss Ange McGowan, and they have one child, John. 

Ellsworth S. Gibson acquired a public school education and then pursued a 
business course in the Holmes Business College at Portland. Oregon. He afterward 
engaged in the stock business and has since been associated with his brother, O. D. 
Gibson. He was also for a short time at Auburn, Washington, in the butchering busi- 
ness, but through the greater part of his active career has been identified with the 
important interests controlled by the Gibson brothers, and is now the secretary of 
the company. These brothers are proprietors of the Yakima Meat Company, in 
which connection they are conducting an extensive packing business, having made 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 281 

theirs one of the important industries of the city. They also own and lease large 
land holdings under the name of Gibson Brothers, Inc., on which they are exten- 
sively engaged in raising cattle, hogs and sheep. 

On the 2d of June, 1909, Ellsworth S. Gibson was married to Miss Inez Harer, a 
daughter of John H. Harer, of Walla Walla. Their family now numbers three chil- 
dren. Miles Ellsworth, Stanley and Evelyn Jane. 

Mr. Gibson is a representative of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, his 
membership being in Yakima Lodge No. 318. He also belongs to the Commercial 
Club and to the Business Men's Association and is an esteemed member of the 
Country Club. In politics he is a republican. He stands for all that is progressive 
in civic affairs and gives hearty endorsement and support to many plans and meas- 
ures for the general good. The cooperation of the Gibson brothers in the conduct 
and management of their growing and important business has placed them with the 
men of leadership in trade circles of the northwest. The sterling worth of Ellsworth 
S. Gibson is recognized by all with whom he has been associated. He is alert and 
energetic but always courteous in demeanor and obliging and never allows business 
interests to so monopolize his time that he has no opportunity to bear his part in 
activities that have to do with the welfare and upbuildmg of the community in which 
he makes his home. 



OMER D. GIBSON. 

Omer D. Gibson, president of the Gibson Brothers Corporation and the Yakima 
Meat Company, was born in Waterloo, Oregon, January 18, 1877, but has spent much 
of his life in Washington. He is a son of James D. and Mary Gibson, who settled in 
Oregon in pioneer times. The father was a farmer and also engaged in the live 
stock business. In 1879 he removed from Waterloo to Wasco county, Oregon, 
where he engaged in the stock business for many years, and he is now living retired 
at Pleasant Valley, California. 

Omer D. Gibson, of this review, acquired a public school education in Oregon 
and Walla Walla, Washington, and afterward had the benefit of instruction in a 
business college at Portland, Oregon. He next entered the live stock business in 
connection with his father and brother and. later devoted his attention to horse raising 
at Snake River in Washington. In 1896 he took up the business of cattle buying for 
the Walla Walla Meat Company and afterward spent three years with the firm of 
Bruhn & Henry, whose headquarters were at Snohomish. On leaving that firm he 
and his brother, E. S., organized the Walla Walla Meat & Cold Storage Company 
with a capital stock of twenty thousand dollars, and built a fine plant which they 
conducted for three years, increasing the capital stock to one hundred and fifty thou- 
sand dollars. Afterward Mr. Gibson went to Seattle, where he built a large packing 
liouse in connection with the Yakima Sheep Company, but eventually sold his interest 
in that corporation. He subsequently came to Yakima and entered into active rela- 
tions with the Yakima Meat Company, which was incorporated in 1909. It had been 
established by the firm of Rand & Sigle about 1906 and in 1911 the business was pur- 
chased by the Gibson brothers and Charles Bruhn. The plant then consisted of a 
small slaughter house. They began to do packing in 1911 and in 1912 commenced 
packing on an extensive scale. The plant has been increased until today it covers 
forty acres, with a yard capacity for several hundred head of stock. They feed and 
fatten five hundred or more head of cattle each winter and they buy extensively 
throughout the valley. They also have an interest in thirteen thousand acres of 
grazing land, and the Gibson Corporation owns eighteen thousand acres. They kill 
sheep, hogs and cattle and their product is sold from Pasco to the Cascade moun- 
tains. They employ about sixty people, having the largest packing house in the 
Yakima valley. The Gibson brothers incorporated their interests under the name of 
Gibson Brothers in 1914 in order to attend to the general live stock business 
and their landed interests. As the years have passed their business has steadily 
grown until it has reached the position of leadership in their line. From early boy- 
hood Omer D. Gibson has been closely associated with live stock interests, each year 



282 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

bringing- him broader experiences and wider opportunities which he has eagerly 
utilized for the bcnetit of his own fortunes and for the advancement of community 
welfare. He is now the president and manager of the Yakima Meat Company and of 
Gibson Brothers, Incorporated, and ranks with the foremost business men of his 
section of the state. 

On the 10th of September, 1901, Mr. Gibson was married to Miss Lillian Gholson, 
of Walla Walla, Washington. Mrs. Gibson, who had many friends in Yakima, passed 
away on December 27, 1918, her death causing deep sorrow to all who knew her. 
Mr. Gibson is well known in lodge circles, beonging to Trinity Lodge No. 121, 
r. O. O. F., and to the Elks Lodge No. 318, of Yakima. He also belongs to the 
Yakima Commercial Club and to the Yakima Valley Business Men's Association and 
that he is appreciative of the social amenities of life is indicated in his connection 
with the Yakima Country Club. In politics he is a democrat but without desire or 
ambition for office. During 1905 Mr. Gibson was engaged in breaking wild horses for 
the firm of Stofifer & Switzler and in the intervening period of thirteen years he has 
steadily advanced until he stands in the foremost rank among the packers and the 
live stock men of the northwest. He has utilized every opportunity which has come 
his way and difficulties and obstacles have been regarded as an impetus for renewed 
effort on his part. He has studied every phase of the business in which he has en- 
gaged, has given due attention to every detail and at the same time has most wisely 
directed the principal features of his business, his life record showing what can be 
accomplished through determined energy intelligently directed. 



LYMAN J. GIBSON. 



Lyman J. Gibson is the vice-president of the Yakima Meat Company and thus 
active in the control of the foremost business enterprise of the character in the valley. 
A native of Oregon, he was born at Wasco on the 2d of June, 1883, his parents being 
James D. and Mary Gibson, who are mentioned in connection with the sketch of 
E. S. Gibson on another page of this work. The educational opportunities accorded 
him were those of the public schools, supplemented by a course in the Holmes Busi- 
ness College at Portland, Oregon. When his textbooks were put aside he entered 
the business of stock buying, becoming a representative in this connection ot the 
Walla Walla Meat Company. Later he entered the employ of James Henry of 
Seattle and afterward was identified with the Union Meat Company of Portland, which 
company was taken over by the Swift interests. He continued one year with them 
after the Swifts had taken over the company, and bought stock for their Los .-Xngcles 
and San Francisco plants. At a subsequent date he returned to the employ of James 
Henry of Seattle and bought stock over Montana, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. 
He next became a member of the firm of Gibson Brothers of Seattle, whom he rep- 
resented as buyer and he is now a member thereof. He is vice-president of the 
Squaw Creek Land Company, in which the Gibson Brothers own a one-third interest, 
besides being lessors of much land. He is also identified with the Yakima Meat Com- 
pany as its vice-president, the two organizations working hand in hand in the rais- 
ing of stock and its preparation for the market as well as the sale of the finished 
product. 

On the 30th of July, 1913, Mr. Gibson was united in marriage to Mrs. Paiiline Cos- 
tamagno Ronketto, who was born in southern France of Italian descent. She came to 
the L'nitcd States with her mother when eleven years of age. the family home being 
first established in Wakefield, Michigan. Subsequently, Mrs. Gibson lived in Seattle 
for a time and on two different occasions lived in Fairbanks, Alaska. By her first 
marriage she became the mother of three children, Helen, Laura and John. One 
child. Lyman James, Jr., has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Gibson. 

Fraternally Mr. Gibson is connected w'ith the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. He also belongs to the Yakima Commercial Club and to the Yakima Valley 
Business Men's .Association and is deeply interested in all fhose questions and projects 
which have to do with the development of the resources of the country and the pro- 
motion of its business connections. His political endorsement is given to the repub- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 283 

lican party but without desire for office. He is preeminently a business man and one 
who concentrates unfaltering effort and attention upon his activities. He has util- 
ized his opportunities wisely and well and each forward step in his career has brought 
him a broader outlook. The course of his orderly progression is easily discernible 
and his record should serve to inspire and encourage others, for he belongs to that 
class of representative American business men who are known as self-made. 



CHARLES A. GIBSON. 

The name of Gibson is closely associated with the meat industry and with 
ranching interests in the Yakima valley, and Charles A. Gibson of this review is the 
treasurer of the Yakima Meat Company, controlling one of the most important 
packing interests of this section of the state. He was born in Wasco, Oregon, on 
the ISth of October, 1889, and is therefore a western man by birth and training as 
well as by preference. His life has exemplified the spirit of western enterprise and 
progress which has led to the rapid upbuilding of this section of the country. He 
is a son of James D. Gibson, mentioned elsewhere in this volume in connection w'ith 
the sketch of E. S. Gibson, brother of Charles A. Gibson. 

The latter pursued his education in the public schools of Walla Walla and also 
spent one year as a student in Whitman College and another in Pullman College. 
Thus liberally trained for life's practical and responsible duties, he entered into busi- 
ness relations as a member of the firm of Gibson Brothers and was manager of their 
butchering business at Auburn, Washington, for five years. In 1914 he removed to 
Yakima and became treasurer of the Yakima Meat Company and also secretary of 
the firm of Gibson Brothers. The former conducts an extensive packing business, 
having a large plant splendidly equipped according to most modern, scientific and 
sanitary, methods. Their trade in this direction has reached large proportions and 
the enterprise has become one of the important industries of the district. The 
brothers also own a one-third interest in the Squaw Creek Land Company, which 
comprises twenty sections in Yakima and Kittitas counties, and their ranching prop- 
erty is conducted under the style of Gibson Brothers, Incorporated. Of the latter 
Charles A. Gibson is also the secretary. Each brother who is a member of the 
firm is well qualified for the duties which devolve upon him in his particular con- 
nection, making this a strong business organization. 

In 1910 Charles A. Gibson was united in marriage to Miss Kittie Horn, of Walla 
Walla, a daughter of Robert A. and Ferdinanda Horn, the former a jeweler of Walla 
Walla. Mr. and Mrs. Gibson have one child, Roberta. In the Elks lodge No. 318, 
of Yakima. Charles A. Gibson is a popular and well-known member and he also has 
a very wide and favorable acquaintance in the Yakima Country Club. He likewise 
belongs to the Yakima Commercial Club and to the Yakima Valley Business Men's 
Association and cooperates heartily in their plans and projects for the improvement 
of business and trade relations throughout this section of the state. In politics he 
maintains an independent course nor has he ever been ambitious to hold office, yet 
he does not neglect the duties of citizenship and his cooperation can be counted 
upon to further plans and measures which are looking to the upbuilding of the city's 
welfare and the advancement of those interests which are a matter of civic virtue 
and of civic pride. 



F. G. MILLIRON. 



F. G. Milliron, the progressive owner and proprietor of one of the best general 
merchandise stores in Tieton and one of the town's foremost citizens, is a native 
of Wisconsin, born in Knapp, August 6, 1874, and is a son of George and Angeline 
(Geroy) Milliron, pioneers of that state, who in 1890 removed to Minnesota, where 
the father was successfully engaged in ranching until death claimed him. He is 
survived by his widow, who now makes her home in Washington, D. C. 



284 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

F. G. Milliron was reared under the parental roof, receiving such lessons as 
would instill into him the priciples of industry, honesty and perserverance. These 
qualities have never left him and have given vent to activities that have ever beeir 
honorable. His education was received in the public schools of Wisconsin and after 
laying aside his textbooks he assisted his father with the farm work, until 1905, 
when, at the age of thirty-one, he made his way to Mount Vernon, Washington, 
where he found a position as a farm hand, thus continuing for several years. In 
1911 he came to Yakima county and turned his attention to merchandising, being 
employed for a year and a half as a clerk in Naches. On January 11, 1912, Mr. 
Milliron, With F. E. Crumb, became interested in the first store at Tieton and from 
a modest beginning the present splendid enterprise- has resulted. Later Mr. Crumb 
sold out to G. W. Mortimer, who is now the partner of Mr. Milliron, the latter 
being manager of the store. A well assorted line of general merchandise is carried 
and everything about the establishment indicates the progressive methods followed 
by Mr. Milliron. The goods carried is of the highest standard and in all of his 
dealings he has been found dependable. As the years have passed his list of cus- 
tomers has increased and he now has a very profitable trade. In 1918 a modern 
building was especially erected for the business, which gives added convenience to 
the many patrons. 

On the 7th of June. 1899, Mr. Milliron was united in marriage to Miss .Amy 
Eckenroad and they have become the parents of six children: Russell, who is now 
in the L'nited States army; and Howard, Angeline, Frederick, Ella and Mabel. The 
family are highly respected by all who know them. Mr. and Mrs. Milliron occupy- 
ing an enviable position in the best social circles of the town. He is a member 
of the Modern Woodmen of America and politically is a republican as far as na- 
tional issues are concerned, but in local affairs prefers to follow his own judgment, 
irrespective of party issues. As one of the leading men and progressive merchants 
of his community he has ever been interested in progress and development and is^ 
ready to give his support to worthy movements. He has many friends in Tieton 
and all who know him are thoroughly agreed in regard to his high qualities as a- 
private citizen and as a successful business man. 



CHARLES BULL. 



Charles Bull is one of the leading live stock raisers of the Yakima valley, being 
extensively engaged in the raising of full blooded cattle, hogs and sheep. He is now 
the owner of two hundred and twenty acres of highly cultivated land near Mabton, 
upon which he took up his abode in the spring of 1914. His entire life has been 
passed in Washington, however. He was born in the Kittitas valley of Yakima 
county on the 8th of October, 1878, a son of Walter A. and Jennie (Olmstead) Bull. 
The father was one of the most .prominent, influential and valued citizens of this 
part of the state. He was born in Albany, New York, June 20, 1839, and was a rep- 
resentative of one of the distinguished old families of that state. He died March- 
4. 1898. at the comparatively early age of fifty-nine years. He was a veteran of the 
Civil war, having served in the Quartermaster's Department, and after the war he 
became a contractor on the Union Pacific Railroad. It was about 1868 that he came- 
into the Kittitas valley. It was in Kittitas county that he was united in marriage to 
lennie Olmstead, a native of Illinois and a daughter of J. D. Olmstead, who arrived' 
in the Kittitas valley in 1871. The death of Mrs. Bull occurred January 27, 1885, and 
she left besides her husband, five children to mourn her loss: John, who is now a 
retired rancher living in Ellensburg, Washington; Lewis, who was a prominent 
rancher of Kittitas county and passed away in 1907. at the age of thirty-three x-'-ars; 
Cora, the wife of Charles S. Wright, who is principal of a school on Long Island, 
Xcw York; Charles, of this review; and Grant, who resides in Ellensburg and is the 
owner of a ranch near the city which he rents. Having lost his first wife, the father 
married Mrs. Rebecca Frisbie. and they had two sons: Alvadore, who is ranching in 
Kittitas county; and Leland, who is a physician now serving with the United States- 
army. 




CHARLES BULL 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 287 

Walter A. Bull was one of the first of the pioneer settlers in the Kittitas vallej' 
and acquired over two thousand acres of land in one tract. This he devoted to gen- 
eral farming, to the raising of hay and to stock raising. He was most progressive in 
all that he undertook and he was one of the first to begin irrigating land in the 
valley. In 1893, however, he met with financial reverses. Later he had mining 
interests on the Okanogan, where he passed away. He served as local probate judge 
at an early day and he exerted much influence over public thought and action, being 
a most loyal and devoted citizen and one well qualified by nature for a position of 
leadership. In politics he was ever a stalwart republican and fraternally he was an 
Odd Fellow, becoming a charter member of the lodge at Ellensburg. His worth 
was attested by his brethren of the fraternity, by those with whom he had business 
relations and by those whom he met socially. All spoke of him in terms of the high- 
est regard and his name is written high on the roll of honored pioneer settlers who 
contributed much to the upbuilding and development of the county. 

Charles Bull acquired a public school education and attended Pullman College, 
where he pursued a three years' agricultural course. He was thus qualified by liberal 
training as well as practical experience for the business which he took up as a life 
work. When his college days were over he became identified with live stock raising 
in the Kittitas valley where he had a fine ranch of one thousand acres, all under 
cultivation. In the spring of 1914 he sold this property and removed to Yakima 
county, taking up his abode on two hundred and twenty acres of land between Sun- 
nyside and Mabton. He purchased this property, which was then a wild tract cov- 
ered with sagebrush, and today he has nearly the entire amount under cultivation. 
Upon the place he built a very attractive home, also splendid barns and has all of 
the modern equipments of the model farm of the twentieth century. He raises full 
blooded Hereford cattle, also full blooded hogs and sheep and he has received va- 
rious prizes upon his cattle at the state fair. He ranked with the most extensive cattle 
raisers of Kittitas county and he occupies an enviable position as a prominent ranch- 
man of Yakima county. 

On the 24th of October, 1906, Mr. Bull was united in marriage to Miss Kate 
Cooke, a daughter of George B. Cooke, who was a son of C. P. Cooke, one of the 
pioneers of the Yakima valley and of the Kittitas valley. He was a very prominent 
cattle man in the latter district and the Cooke family has long occupied a leading 
position in business and social circles in this part of the state. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Bull have been born three children: J. Lewis, George Walter and Elma Kathcrine. 

Mr. Bull is a democrat in his political views but has never been an office seeker. 
Business aflfairs have made full demand upon his time and energies and the spirit of 
enterprise which has actuated him in all that he has undertaken has brought him to 
a creditable position among the successful ranchers of the state. 



HARRY E. SCHROEDER. 

Harry E. Schroeder, cashier of the Outlook State Bank, was born in Freeport, 
Illinois, January 26, 1870, a son of Henry W. and Belinda L. (Hane) Schroeder, the 
former a native of Germany, while the latter was born in Ohio. They became early 
settlers of Illinois, where they took up their abode in the latter part of the 'SOs. 
The mother was reared near Canton, Ohio, and was a schoolmate of Mrs. William 
McKinley. The father had come to the United States on a sailing vessel with his 
parents during his boyhood days and with the outbreak of the Civil war the grand- 
father proved his loyalty to his adopted country by active service in defense of the 
Union. Throughout his entire life Henry W. Schroeder engaged in merchandising 
but is now deceased. His widow survives and makes her home in New York city. 

Harry E. Schroeder of this review acquired a public school education and was 
afterward graduated from the Benton (rolkge of Law at St. Louis as a member of 
the class of 1907. His brother William was also a student in that institution and was 
graduated at the same time. For a year thereafter Harry E. Schroeder practiced law 
in St. Louis and then removed to Outlook, Washington, where he became one of the 
organizers of the Outlook State Bank, which was established in 1909 with Wallace 

(13a) 



288 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Goodsell as the president. W. H. Norman as vice president and H. E. Schroeder as 
cashier. The bank is capitalized for ten thousand dollars and the deposits in 1919 
have reached over one hundred and ten thousand dollars, there being now more 
than three hundred active accounts. In 1910 Mr. Goodsell retired from the presi- 
dency and was succeeded by W. H. Norman. The institution has built up an excel- 
lent business and serves a fine farming country. The bank has the confidence and 
support of the public and has been an important factor in the development of the 
surrounding district, placing advantageous loans that have been of great assistance 
in carrying on the development of this region. While the bank was established on a 
small scale, its growth has been continuous and the institution is regarded as one 
of the strong moneyed concerns of this section of the state. 

On the 18th of January, 1909, Mr. Schroeder was married to May Meyers Doug- 
las, who was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. His political allegiance is given to the 
republican party but he has neither time nor inclination to take public office, his 
entire energies being devoted to the successful conduct of the bank. 



CHARLES S. BILGER. 



Charles S. Bilger, conducting a growing and substantial business at Wapato 
under the name of the Hub Mercantile Company, was born at Jacksonville, Oregon, 
on the 13th of November, 1866, a son of John A. and Amanda (Schick) Bilger, both 
of whom were of German lineage. The mother came to the L^nited States when 
thirteen years of age and the father crossed the Atlantic in young manhood. The 
former, with a twin sister and a brother, came to the new world in childhood and 
crossed the plains from Burlington, Iowa, with ox teams, making the long journey 
to the Pacific coast, after which they settled at Jacksonville, Oregon. Mrs. Bilger 
and her twin sister are both living at the age of sexenty-eight years. John A. Bilger 
also made the trip across the plains and they were married in Jacksonville. There 
he conducted business for many years as a hardware merchant and his life's labors 
were ended in death on the 3d of April, 1877. Following the demise of her husband, 
Mrs. Bilger and her son, W. L., continued the business for some time, after which 
they sold out and rsmoved to Portland, Oregon, in 1885. 

Charles S. Bilger acquired a public school education and then, too, turned to 
merchandising, securing a clerkship in a general store when a lad of fifteen years. 
Finding the business congenial, he resolved to engage in trade on his own account 
and established a general store at Roslyn, Washington, in 1888 as junior partner in 
the firm of Miller & Bilger. There he continued until 1892, when he removed to 
EUensburg, Washington, where he spent six years in clerical work. In 1898 he went 
to Portland, Oregon, where for two years he conducted a grocery store, and in 
1901 he removed to Mabton. Washington, where he purchased a store and also be- 
came identified with the business interests of Sunnyside, Washington, conducting 
his business under the name of the Hub Mercantile Company. In 1906, however, 
he removed to Wapato, where his company. The Hub Mercantile Company, bought 
the business of the A. E. McCredy Trading Post. They built their present building, 
which is fifty-five by one hundred and twenty-five feet. It is built in the form of 
an L and opens on two streets. Since that time he has erected a one story and base- 
ment concrete warehouse fifty by one hundred and twenty-five feet and is thus well 
equipped for carrying on the business. His is a department store containing all 
lines of goods, including farm machinery and heavy hardware, as well as dry goods, 
groceries and other lines usually found in the modern department store. The stock 
carried is extensive and the trade is steadily growing. The Hub Mercantile Company 
now has as its officers: George S. Rankin, of Yakima, president; J. F. Douglas, vice- 
president; I. H. Dills, of Yakima, treasurer; and C. S. Bilger as secretary and man- 
ager, with W. L. Bilger as one of the directors. The company was organized by 
these men on the Sth of February, 1901, and they have since been associated in the 
ownership and conduct of the business. 

On the 23d of September, 1891, Charles S. Bilger was married to Miss Lillie B. 
Hall, of EUensburg, a daughter of Newberry and Margaret A. Hall, the former now 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 289 

deceased, while the latter, at the age of eighty-seven years, is living in Ellensburg. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Bilger have been born t\vo children: Raymond, born August 2, 1892, 
is manager of the hardware department of the Hub Mercantile Company; Lavilla, 
born June 7, 1894, is the wife of A. W. Nussbaumer, a resident of Wapato. 

Mr. Bilger is a member of Wapato Lodge No. 171, A. F. & A. M., of which he 
is a past master, and he has taken all of the Scottish Rite degrees up to and including 
the thirty-second. He is also a life member of the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks, being identified with the lodge at Yakima, and for twenty-eiglit years he has 
been a member of the Knights of Pj'thias. of which' he is a past chancellor. His 
political endorsement is given to the republican party and for one term he served as 
mayor of Wapato but has never been a politician in the sense of office seeking, pre- 
ferring to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his business affairs, and step 
by step he has worked his way steadily upward, each forward step bringing him a 
broader outlook and wider opportunities. These he has been quick to utilize and his 
laudable ambition and even-paced energy have carried him forward into important 
al relations. 



ALEXANDER SIMPSON. 

Ranching interests near Mabton, Washington, have a typical representative in 
Alexander Simpson, a progressive agriculturist of that district. There is much 
credit due him for what he has achieved as he is a self-made man who started out in 
life empty-handed. A native of Scotland, he was born January 15, 1866, his parents 
Ijciiig .-Mexander and Elsie (Hepburn) Simpson, the former deceased, but the latter 
is still living, yet making her home in "Scotland. The father followed agricultural 
pui-suils throughout his life. 

Alexander Simpson of this review was reared in Scotland under the strict guid- 
ance ol loving parents, who instilled into him the first lessons in regard to life's 
conduct. He acquired his education in his native land, but upon looking around for 
Inifiness opportunities decided he would find better chances to succeed in life on the 
other side of the Atlantic, and crossing the ocean, reached Argyle, Minnesota, on 
the 1st of March, 1888. He there worked for wages for fifteen years, and carefully 
saving his earnings, he was enabled at tlie end of that period to take up a homestead 
claim in Polk county, Minnesota, which he subsequently sold. In 1902 he went to 
California and for five years raised oranges near Pomona but in 1907 sold out. rfe 
then came to the Yakima valley, and, buying twenty acres of land on the Moxee, 
gave his whole attention to the cultivation of this tract for about four years. In 
1911 he acquired title to eighty acres near Mabton. of which he later sold twenty. 
He cleared all of his land, which he has made very valuable, and now raises corn, 
potatoes and alfalfa, also conducting a dairy and deriving a gratifying income from 
these various sources. He has made many improvements and instituted modern 
facilities and machinery and his farm is now one of the most valuable in his neigh- 
borhood. He has a fine home and suitable barns and other outbuildings and every- 
thin.g about the place bespeaks the progressive methods of the owner. 

Or^ March 9, 1898, Mr. Simpson was married to Miss Katie Johnson, a native of 
Red Wing. Minnesota, and a daughter of Martin Johnson, who is a successful rancher 
at Ada. Minnesota. To this union were born six children, of whom Roy, the eldest, 
died at the age of eighteen years. The others are Alexander, Elsie, Edna, George 
and Norrnan. Mrs. Simpson died in February, 1916, after eighteen years of happy 
married life. Her death was a great blow to the family and caused deep sorrow to 
her many friends, as she was a woman of high qualities of character, who was ever 
ready to extend a helping hand to those in need. 

Mr. Simpson is numbered among the pioneers of his district, having now for a 
number of years been connected with its development not only to his own benefit 
but to the advantage of the community at large. He was the first to get water in 
his neighborhood and the first to realize the importance of irrigation. Fraternally 
he is a member of the Knights of the Maccabees and their religious faith is that of 
the Presbyterian church, in the work of which he is actively and helpfully interested. 



290 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

111 politics he is a republican, believing thoroughly in the principles of that organi- 
zation. He has never regretted the step which he took in crossing the ocean, for 
here he has found the opportunities which he sought and through their utilization has 
attained a substantial and honored position in life. He has made manj- friends in 
Yakima county, all of whom appreciate his sterling qualities, and his word is as 
good as his bond. 



JAMES O. CULL. 



James O. Cull, attorney-at-law, successfully practicing at the Yakima bar. was, 
born in Missouri. April 6, 1869, a son of John B. and Permelia P. (King) Cull, both 
of whom were also natives of Missouri. The father was a son of Thomas Cull, of 
Kentucky, who removed to Missouri about 1840 and there followed the occupation of 
farming. John B. Cull likewise devoted his energies to general agricultural pur- 
suits, becoming a well known farmer of Johnson county, Missouri. He and his wife 
are still living and reside in that county. 

James O. Cull acquired a public school aducation and afterward attended a nor- 
mal school. Determining upon the practice of law as a life work, he began reading 
Kent, Blackstonc and other commentaries at Warrensburg, Missouri, under the direc- 
tion of O. L. Houts, an able member of the bar of that place. After thorough pre- 
liminary study he was admitted to practice in February, 1896, and for a short time 
followed his profession in his native state, but thinking to have better opportunities 
in the northwest, he made his way to Washington in 1897, first establishing his home 
in Spokane, where he continued until 1902. In that year he came to Yakima, opened 
an office and has since successfully practiced in this city. He is careful and con- 
scientious in his legal work and enjoys a good clientage. 

On the 6th of December, 1899, Mr. Cull was married to Miss Emma L. M. Buente, 
of Warrensburg, Missouri, and they have become parents of two children: Ruth 
Louise and James B. 

Mr. Cull is well known as an exemplary member of Yakima Lodge No. 24, F. & 
A. M., and he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in Oriental 
Consistory No. 2, S. P. R. S. He is likewise a member of Afifi Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine and in the York Rite he has taken the degrees of Yakima Chapter R. A. M. 
and Yakima Commandery No. 13, K. T. He is a very active member of the Masonic 
fraternity and is a most valued representative of the order. He also belongs to 
Yakima Lodge of the Knights of Pythias and to the Modern Woodmen of America. 
In politics he is a republican and he served as city attorney of Yakima in 1904. He 
was also one of the organizers of the Yakima Trust Company and is well known 
as a progressive business man but gives the major part of his time and attention to 
his professional interests. He holds to high standards in law practice and has ever 
proven an able and faithful minister in the temple of justice. 



AUSTIN E. GLENN. 

The broad acres of the Yakima valley have been taken up by enterprising men, 
and where once was arid land covered with sagebrush are now found fine orchards 
and highly cultivated fields. The result has been achieved through earnest, persistent 
labor intelligently directed — until the once sterile tract has been made to bloom 
and blossom as the rose. Austin E. Glenn is among the number who have been 
active in the development and improvement of the district. He was born at Shell- 
rock, Iowa, October 19, 1854, a son of Thomas and Mary Jane (Bussey) Glenn, both 
of whom were natives of Ohio. Removing westward in 1851, they settled in Iowa, 
where the father devoted his life to genral agricultural pursuits, but both he and his 
wife have now passed away. 

Au.'.tin E. Glenn is indebted to the public school system of his native state for such 
educational opportunities as he enjoyed. Through vacation periods he worked upon 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 291 

his father's farm and for some time after leaving school continued farming in Iowa, 
while subsequently he carried on business along that line at Pipestone, Minnesota. 
He nexf went to Virginia and there engaged in farming until 1906. In the latter 
year he came to Yakima county and purchased ten acres of land two and a half miles 
west of the city of Yakima. He has since planted four acres to fruit, six acres having 
already been so planted. After improving the property he sold about seven acres in 
one-half acre tracts and twelve homes are built thereon. He has been actuated in all 
that he has done by a spirit of progressivcness productive of excellent results. 

On November 10, 1875. Mr. Glenn was married to Miss Lucia E. Rew, of Illi- 
nois, a daughter of Noel and Emily Rew, who in 1865 removed to Iowa. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Glenn have been born six children: Merton R., who follows farming in Iowa 
and is married and has three children: Vernon T., a resident of Pipestone, Minnesota, 
who has been married twice and has four children; Karl R., a ranchman of the 
Yakima valley, who is married and has four children: Harold A., a member of the 
United States army and in January, 1919, on active duty in Siberia: F. Thearle, who 
was a first lieutenant of Company C of the One Hundred and Sixty-first Regiment, 
was on active duty in France and was honorably discharged in December, 1918, 
having brought home as a souvenir a beautiful revolver, which he personally took 
from a German officer; and Mary E., at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn have been members of the Baptist church since 1874 and 
are loyal adherents of its teachings. His political endorsement is given to the re- 
publican party. He belongs to the Yakima County Horticultural LTnion and he has 
been a student of all that bears upon fruit raising in the northwest. His labors here 
have been wisely directed and his enterprise and recognition of opportunity have 
been salient features in the attainment of his present success. 



FREDERICK W. McKNIGHT, M. D. 

Dr. Frederick W. McKnight, well qualified by thorough preliminary training for 
the active duties of his profession, is now successfully engaged in practice at Cle 
Elum. He was born in fronton, Ohio. December 16, 1877, a son of John T. and Mary 
Katherine (Hall) McKnight. The father was a merchant who for a long period 
conducted business at fronton, Ohio, where he also filled the office of county treas- 
urer. He was prominent in the public life of his community, exerting considerable 
influence over public thought and action. 

Frederick W. McKnight obtained a high school education and afterward spent 
two years as a student in Cornell University. Later he entered the George Wash- 
ington University, from which he was graduated in 1909. He won the general prize 
of fifty dollars in gold for the highest scholarship average — ninety and three-tenths 
per cent, for the four years. He also won the Henry C. Yarrow prize in dermatology 
and the William K. Butler prize in ophthalmology. Following his graduation he 
became interne in the University Hospital and also served in a similar capacity at 
the Children's Hospital in Washington, D. C. For a few months he practiced in 
West Virginia, but the opportunities of the growing northwest attracted him and he 
came to Kittitas county in 1912. He located at Clc Elum in 1913 and has since prac- 
ticed there. He has served as deputy county health officer, also as city health officer 
and is at present a member of Cle Elum school board and in addition has enjoyed 
an extensive private practice. He also practiced for a year at Roslyn but during 
the greater period of his residence in the northwest has given his attention to general 
practice in Cle Elum. He is physician and surgeon for the Northern Pacific Railway 
and the Milwaukee Railway Company and also for a number of large lumber com- 
panies and coal companies. He specializes also in examinations for insurance and 
government work. He does a great amount of surgery and is particularly skilled in 
that field. He keeps in touch with the trend of modern professional thought and 
scientific investigation and his practice has placed him prominently in the front rank 
among able physicians and surgeons of this part of the state. 

In 1901 Doctor McKnight was married to Miss Corinne Evans, of Los .^ngcles, 
California, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George McClure of that city and they now 



292 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

have two sons: John T. and Robert Abbott McKnight. Doctor McKnight belongs to 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and also to the Fraternal Order of Eagles. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party but he has no aspiration for 
public honors or office, feeling that his time is fully occupied by his professional du- 
ties, which he discharges with a sense of conscientious obligation that has been pro- 
ductive of excellent results. 



SAMUEL G. BLACKBURNE. 

The experiences of Samuel G. Blackburne have been most varied and his rem- 
iniscences are thoroughly interesting. He is a native son of the Emerald Isle, his 
birth having occurred at Fenagh in County Carlow, Ireland, January 30, 1865, his 
parents being Thomas and Elizabeth Sarah (Murphy) Blackburne, both of whom 
passed away in Ireland, where the father had followed the profession of school 
teaching. 

At the age of eighteen years Samuel G. Blackburne left his native country and 
went to Australia, remaining there for sixteen years in all, during which time he 
followed gold mining and also traveled extensively over that countrj'. As he passed 
to and fro over the dry deserts he was many times near death, for intense heat pre- 
vailed in those arid districts, where there was no water. However, he found much 
of intciest in the country and as the years passed on he continued his prospecting 
for placer gold. He also spent two years in New Zealand, where he engaged in 
timber cutting un.ier contract. He was likewise for six months in Tasmania, where 
he was engaged in the artillery service. He also served for two years as a member 
of an artillery company in Australia. He was through that period a young man 
enjoying adventure and excitement and he gained much of both. In February, 1898, 
he left Australia, and in April of that year landed at Skagway, Alaska, where he en- 
gaged in prospecting during the summer. In the fall of the year he returned to 
Dawson and through the winter worked for wages. In the fall of 1899 he bought a 
claim on Last Chance, which he operated for eight months and then engaged in pros- 
pecting during the summer of 1900 in connection with three others. The)' went 
down the Yukon river and then up the Hosianna river to a point one hundred and 
fifty miles north of the .Arctic circle and found some gold but not in paying quan- 
tities. In the fall of that year Mr. Blackburne made his way to Rampart, where he 
worked a claim through the winter. In March, 1901, he took four dogs and made a 
trip of four hundred miles up the Yukon river with one companion. They were 
caught in a blizzard and w-ere almost frozen to death but at length Mr. Blackburne 
succeeded in reaching Fort Hamlin. The other man, however, could not stand up to 
the severe hardships and quit, but Mr. Blackburne proceeded on his way to the fort 
and then sent others back from the fort to bring in his companion, which they suc- 
cessfully accomplished. Nine days later they went on to Circle City and pur- 
chased two claims sixty miles out. There they remained for two years. In 1903 
Mr. Blackburne went to Fairbanks and purchased several claims in that vicinity, there 
residing until the fall of 1907. when he came to the United States. He visited New 
Y'ork and Chicago, IMinneapolis and other cities, after which he returned to Ireland, 
where he spent three months and also one month in London. He then again came 
to the United States, making his way to Washington, D. C, to Philadelphia and other 
points in the east. He had prospered in his Alaskan venture and with the money 
thus earned he made a most pleasurable and enjoyable trip in various parts of this 
countiy as well as in Great Britain. In March, 1908, he arrived in Seattle with the 
intention of returning to Alaska but came to the Yakima valley to look over the 
district, having met a number of other Alskan men who had purchased land in this 
section. Mi. Blackburne became interested in the valley and its prospects and 
invested m eighty acres of land on Selah Hieights, which at that time was all covered 
with sagebrush. He was one of the first to locate in that locality, taking up pioneer 
work in the development and improvement of the district. His labors have since 
brought about wonderful results. He has planted sixty-five acres to apples, pears, 
peaches and grapes and his orchards and vineyards are in excellent bearing condi- 




RAMT'EL (!. BLACKBrRNE 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 295 

tion. In fact he has one of the finest ranches to be found in the valley, supplied and 
equipped with every modern improvement and commanding a beautiful view of the 
surrounding country. 

In 1909 Mr. Blackburne was united in marriage to Miss Kathe Werley, a native 
of AUentown, Pennsylvania. Mr. Blackburne belongs to Yakima Lodge No. 318, 
B. P. O. E., also to the Grange and to the Sour Doughs, a society made up of former 
residents of Alaska. In politics he maintains an independent course, voting for men 
and measures rather than party yet giving deep and earnest consideration to all vital 
and significant problems affecting the welfare of community, commonwealth or 
country. He is a big man physically and mentally, has seen much of life and from 
each experience has learned the lessons therein contained. He is a strong man, 
Strom; .n his honor and his good name, strong in his ability to plan and perform 
and, moreover, his marked characteristics are such as make for personal popularity 
among all who know him. 



SIMEON DELOS VAX DUSEX. 

The early settlers who penetrated into the Yakima valley could scarcely have 
dreamed that within a few short years its once uncultivated and arid lands would be 
traii.'-formed into fine orchards or farm property. The change has occurred so 
rapialy as to seem almost magical and today fruit from the valley is regarded through- 
out the entire country as of standard excellence. Devoting his attention to the 
rais-ing ot apples, pears and cherries, Simeon Delos Van Dusen is meeting with 
well merited success. He was born at Pine Island, Minnesota, November 29, 1876, a 
son of Oliver and Electa (Mentor) Van Dusen, who were for many years residents 
of Minnesota, where the father followed the occupation of farming. He was born i.i 
Ohio and removed to Minnesota in 1854, there spending his remaining days. 

The youthful experiences of Simeon D. Van Dusen were those of the farmbred 
boj- who divides his time between the duties of the schoolroom, the pleasures of the 
plavLTound and the work of the fields. After his textbooks were put aside he con- 
tinued to engage in farming in Minnesota until 1904 and then came to Yakima county, 
taking up his abode on a five-acre tract of land given him by his father-in-law and 
situated four miles west of the city of Yakima. He rebuilt the house upon the place 
and replanted the orchard and now has fine hearing apple, pear and cherry trees. 
He also is the owner of fourteen acres six miles west of Yakima. He is a member 
of the Yakima County Horticultural L^nion, also of the Yakima County Fruit Grow- 
ers' .Association and is interested in everything that tends to promote the welfare 
of the horticulturists of this section and to safeguard their interests. 

Or the ir)th of September, 1902, Mr. Van Dusen was united in marriage to Miss 
Lattie Lodema Irish, a daughter of Harrison Arthur and Lattie E. (Smith) Irish. 
They now have three children: Arthur Simeon. Ella Lodema and Helen Melissa. 

Mr. Van Duven is a republican in his political views but at local elections casts 
his ballot rather for the candidate whom he regards as best qualified for ofiice tKan for a 
part^ choice, as at local elections there is no political issue involved. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with the Modern 
Wo' (hiien of America and is loyal to the teachings and purposes of these organiza- 
tions. 



GEORGE L. HASKINS. 

.\mong the successful business men of Grandview is numbered George L. Has- 
kins. who has already built up a very gratifying trade in the automobile business. 
He has perceived an opportunity and made good use of the same and is therefore 
no-v on the highioad to prosperity. Being a young man of modern and progres- 
sive ideas, he has made his an up-to-date establishment where practically all kinds 
of repair work is done, besides having a good storage capacity for machines. Mr. 



296 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Haskius was born in Hudson, Michigan, January 30, 1883, a son of Henrj' B. and 
Mary M. Haskins. The father was a farmer by occupation. In 1901, when our sub- 
ject was eighteen years old, the family removed to Paynesville, Minnesota, and 
seven years later to Minneapolis, where the father died in 1910. The mother after- 
ward came tc Grandview, Washington, and here passed away in 1914. 

Gee rge L. Haskins was reared under the parental roof, amid farm surroundings, 
and largely acquired his education in Michigan. Removing with the family to Min- 
nesota in 1901, he subsequently entered the furniture and undertaking business in 
partnership with his brother, R. W. Haskins, at Paynesville, that state, where they 
conlinued for seven years. Later he was engaged in the real estate business in 
Minneapolis. Having heard favorable reports in regard to conditions in the far west, 
he decided to come to Washington and in 1910 arrived in Yakima. For four years 
he was engaged in farming on the Naches and at the end of that time, removed to 
Grandview. Here his brother had located in 1910 and together with L. D. Geaney 
they entered the automobile business in April, 1915. The business grew so rapidly 
that in 1916 they built a fine garage and so quickly was the capacity of this' building 
utilized that in 1917 an addition had to be erected, so that they now have storage 
for twenty cars. In their dealings as well as in their work the firm is reliable and 
has therefore built up a good business. They also maintain a thoroughly equipped 
repair shop which is well fitted up in order to do any kind of automobile work. In 
1917 a garage was also opened at Mabton and in connection therewith a Ford 
agency was established which covers the southern part of Yakima county and a 
portion of Benton county. In 1917 over one hundred cars were sold, in fact the 
manufacturers were unable to deliver all of the machines. In Tune, 1918, the firm 
embarked in the wholesale tire business under the name of the Yakima Tire Service 
Ccmpany at Yakima, the management of that place being now in the hands of 
R. W. Haskins and in March, 1919. they opened another place at Toppenish. From 
there a wholesale tire business is conducted. 

In 1906 George L. Haskins was married to Fanny B. Bump, a native of Hudson, 
Michigan, who passed away in 1911. On May 22, 1913, he wedded Blanch Leisenring, 
also of Hudson, and they have a daughter, Mary. By the first marriage were born 
two daughters, Elizabeth Vaughn and Ruth. Both Mr. and Mrs. Haskins are very 
popular among the younger people of Grandview and vicinity and often entertain 
their many friends at their hospitable fireside. 

Fraternally Mr. Haskins is a member of Grandview Lodge No. 196, F. & A. M., 
having joined the Masonic order in Paynesville Lodge No. 71, in Minnesota. In this 
political views he is a republican but in regard to local aflfairs is largely independent 
and his religious faith is that of the Methodist church. He has ever been interested 
in movements which have for their purpose the development and upbuilding of 
Grandview and Yakima county and although not a public man or politician has done 
much to further prosperity here in a private way. 



J. ALVA BULL. 



J. Alva Bull, one of the leading young farmers living in the vicinity of Ellens- 
burg, was born in Kittitas county, Washington, September 10, 1891, a son of Walter 
A. and Rebecca (Nelson) Bull. The father was born in New York, while the mother's 
birth occurred in Norway, whence she came to the new world, arriving in the Kitti- 
tas valley in 1878. Mr. Bull had previously become a resident of this section of the 
state in 1869 and as the years passed on he engaged extensively in farming and stock 
raising, having seventeen hundred acres of fine land, which he brought under a high 
state of cultivation and improvement, converting the place into productive fields and 
rich meadow land. He died in the year 1898 and his widow survives, making her 
home with her son, J. Alva. Walter A. Bull had been twice married and had four 
children by his first wife and two by his second wife. 

J. .^Iva Bull received liberal educational advantages. He attended the University 
of Washington, where he pursued a law course, and in 1913 he took up farming on 
his own account by renting the old homestead, which he has since managed. He now 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 297 

has one hundred and sixty acres planted to hay and grain and he also manages an 
additional tract of three hundred and twenty acres not far from the old home. He is 
persistent and energetic in carrying on his work, follows the most progressive meth- 
ods and by reason of his capability in business and his undaunted enterprise has won 
a place among the representative agriculturists of his section of the state. 

On the 24th of December, 1915, 'Mr. Bull was united in marriage to Miss Mar- 
garet Porter, of Columbus, Montana, and to them has been born a son, John A. 
Fraternally Mr. Bull is connected with the Elks Lodge No. ' 1102, of Ellensburg. 
In politics he casts an independent ballot, voting for men and measures rather than 
party. He is fond of hunting and indulges in that sport when leisure permits but 
the greater part of his time and attention is occupied by his business affairs and he 
has won a place among the leading young farmers of Kittitas county. 



JOSEPH M. FLEMING. 

Joseph M. Fleming, an orchardist with large interests and marked business 
ability, as manifest in the success which has come to him, was born in Traer, Iowa, 
June 2, 1874, a son of John W. and Jane E. (Fleming) Fleming, both of whom were 
natives of Belleville, Pennsylvania, and became pioneer settlers of Iowa. The father 
was a cabinet maker by trade and also followed farming, and both he and his wife 
passed away in the Hawkcye state. 

Joseph M. Fleming acquired a public school education, which was supplemented 
by study in the Iowa State College at Ames, Iowa, but upon the death of his father 
he relinquished his textbooks and returned home to take charge of the farm. He had 
attended college together with four sons of Hon. James Wilson, ex-secretary of agri- 
culture. For eight years Joseph M. Fleming continued to cultivate and further de- 
velop the home farm and at one time had over a thousand head of hogs upon the 
place, his attention being largely devoted to the feeding and fattening of hogs and 
cattle. In 1903 he went to Pueblo, Colorado, where he worked for the Colorado Fuel 
& Iron Company, having charge of the woodworking department of the Steel Wheel 
& Wagon Works. He has always been actuated by a progressive spirit and while 
upon the farm in Iowa he installed the first gas engine to be used upon a farm in 
that part of the state. In 1904 he removed to California, where he worked at the 
carpenter's trade for a year and then returned to the old home in Iowa, where he 
continued for another year. Later he traveled upon the road through Nevada and 
. Utah and in September. 1906, he came to Grandview, Washington, opening the first 
store of the town and erecting the second building. He was engaged in merchandis- 
ing there for seven years, at the end of which time he disposed of his commercial 
interests and bought ten acres in orchards near Grandvievv and later added seven 
more. He has also built and sold two residences in Grandview and has platted and 
sold the first addition to the town, doing this in September, 1908. He and his 
brother developed and sold twenty acres of orchard land which had been planted to 
cherries and other fruit. His business activities have ever been of a character that 
have contributed largely to the development and progress of the region in which he 
makes his home. He has upon his ranch a packing house thoroughly equipped to 
take care of the fruit and also a fine residence. He brought lumber by team from 
Sunnyside for the first store built in Grandview and hauled merchandise by team 
from Mabton. .Ml freight was brought by wagon from Sunnyside and from Mabton 
for a year. A birdseye view of Grandview taken in 1906 shows Mr. Fleming's store, 
the bank of A. H. Hawn and the postoffice building, and from the founding of the 
town, Mr. Fleming has been closely associated with its progress and development. 

On the Sth of June, 1906, Mr. Fleming was married to Miss Ethel E. Morse, a 
native of Iowa and a daughter of C. O. and Nancy (Eggleston) Morse. The chil- 
dren of this marriage are: Ralph, w^ho was the first child born at Grandview, his natal 
day being in March, 1907; Isabel; and Lester. 

Mr. Fleming is a Mason and assisted in organizing Grandview Lodge No. 191, 
A. F. & A. M. He likewise belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being 
a member of the first class that was initiated here. He became a charter member 



298 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

of the Eastern Star and he was one of the organizers of the first Commercial Club of 
Grandview. His political endorsement is given to the republican party and his re- 
ligious faith is indicated in his membership in the Presbyterian church. He has 
been very active in establishing and promoting the church and school interests of 
the district and stands for all that is worth while along educational and moral lines. 
In fact his entire career has been one of benefit to the community in which he lives 
and he is justly accounted one of the foremost citizens of his section. 



J. G. TERRY. 



J. G. Terry, manager of the Yakiam Orchards Securities Company, engaged in 
developing and improving orchard properties in the Yakima valley, and a well known 
resident of the city of Yakima, was born in Xorthfield, Minnesota, July 4, 1873, and 
is a son of George R. and Caroline Thayer (Miller) Terry. The father was a farmer 
by occupation, but both he and his wife have now passed away. 

J. G. Terry acquired a high school education, supplemented by commercial train- 
ing under special tutelage and started out in the business world as a traveling sales- 
man. Later he became active in editorial and publishing work with the Vir Publish- 
ing Company of Philadelphia, with which he was associated for several years. He 
had charge of distribution work all over the world, handling various publications, 
including^ Self and Sex series. The house which he represented were pioneers in 
this and various other lines of publication. Mr. Terry remained with the firm for a 
number of years and afterward spent two years with the Knox School of Salesman- . 
ship. He assisted in establishing the San Francisco office of that school and was 
its assistant manager. They instituted the first classes of salesmanship ever held and 
Mr. Terry was active therewith from 1906 until 1908. In the latter year he returned 
to the Vir Publishing Company as manager and in 1912 they began operating under 
the name of the Terry-Swain Company of Des Moines, Iowa. From 1912 until 
1914 Mr. Terry lived retired from business but in the latter year invested in Yakima 
interests and property and in 1916 removed to the northwest, taking up his abode 
in the city of Yakima, where he became manager of the Yakima Orchards Securities 
Company, which is developing and operating orchard properties. The company has 
four liundred acres in orchards and one hundred and sixty acres devoted to general 
a.ariculture. These orchards will soon be producing at least three hundred car loads 
of fruit annually. The}- are among the finest of the west. The land is plentifully 
supplied with water, which comes from artesian wells, and there is also a full water 
right under canal supply. Mr. Terry is very enthusiastic about the Yakima valley 
and its opportunities and his labors are another proof for the exceptional possibili- 
ties for fruit culture in this section of the state. 

In January, 1916, Mr. Terry was married to Miss Florence C. Cowles, of Minne- 
apolis, and they have a daughter, Elizabeth. Mr. Terry belongs to Yakima Lodge 
No. 24, F. & A. M., also to the Knights of Pythias and to the Country Club and the 
Commercial Club. His is the record of a successful business man who has made 
steady progress through intense eflfort intelligently directed. He is now closely 
identified with the interests of the northwest and the spirit of progress which is the 
dominant factor in the upbuilding of this section of the country characterizes him 
in his orchard undertakings. 



VICTOR O. NICHOSON. 

-Among the valued residents of Sunnyside whom Michigan has furnished to this 
section is Victor O. Nichoson, a very successful young attorney of Yakima county. 
He was born in Baldwin, October 18, 1885, his parents being John W. and Mary 
(Walker) Nichoson. both natives of New Y''ork, who, moved by the pioneer spirit 
of the times, transferred their residence to Michigan. There the father died on the 
13th of December, 1915, being survived by his widow. John W. Nichoson was a sur- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 299 

veyor of considerable reputation in Michigan and was also very prominent in po- 
litical circles. 

Victor O. Xichoson received his more advanced primary education in the Luther 
high school in Michigan and subsequently attended the Ferris Institute at Big Rapids, 
that state, from which he was also graduated. In 1908 he received his law degree 
from the University of Michigan and on the 4th of November of the same year 
he came to Sunnyside. where he has ever since been engaged in successful practice. 
Not only is he well versed in the law but is a man of keen perception and ably con- 
ducts his cases before the court, .^s the years have passed he has been connected 
•\\'ith much important litigation of his section and his services are now in frequent 
demand, his practice having attained very gratifying proportions. 

On June 6, 1917, Mr. Nichoson was united in marriage to Miss Eva Scott, of 
Yakima, and both are very popular in the social circles of the valley. They are 
likable people and have many friends and the best homes of the community are 
always open to them. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Nichoson is a republican and for the past six years 
has served as city attorney, representing the interests of the community greatly to 
the satisfaction of the public. He is a member of the State and County Bar Asso- 
ciations and fraternally is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
Sunnyside Encampment No. 80, and also belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks, holding membership in Lodge No. 318 of Yakima. The further development 
and improvement of the valley along many lines are dear to his heart and he is 
ever ready to give his endorsement and cooperation to any worthy enterprise under- 
taken along those lines. He is a member of the Sunnyside Commercial Club and in 
thorough accord with its purposes. When Mr. Nichoson came to Sunnyside in 1908 
he was only a young attorney who took his fate in his hands, trying to find a foot- 
hold in a new community, and today he is accounted among the best legal repre- 
sentatives oT his district and, moreover, has made countless friends in Sunnyside, 
all of whom regard him highly not only for his professional attainments but because 
of his manly qualities of heart and character. 



LINCOLN D. LUCE. 



Lincoln D. Luce has for thirteen years resided in the Yakima valley but his en- 
tire life has been passed on the Pacific coast and he possesses the spirit of enterprise 
and progress which has been the dominant factor in the rapid upbuilding of the 
northwest. His attention is now given to horticultural pursuits, his holdings em- 
bracing nineteen acres of valuable land devoted to the raising of apples and pears. 
Mr. I^uce was born in Grant county, Oregon. August 19, 1869, a son of John C. and 
Anna C. (Hodson) Luce. The paternal grandfather, Jacob Luce, was a native of 
Louisville, Kentucky, and on leaving that city went to Iowa in 1843. A decade later 
he crossed the plains to Oregon, making the trip with ox teams and wagons, and 
after traveling for six months over the long, hot stretches of sand and through the 
mountain passes he reached Eugene, Oregon, which he made the terminus of his trip. 
Soon afterward he took up government land and witli characteristic energy he began 
its development and improvement, continuing thereon to the time of his death. His 
son, John C. Luce, also became a ranchman of tliat state, residing in Oregon until 
called to his final rest in 1904, when sixty-one years of age. He was very active in 
political circles, although not an office seeker. He gave his support to the republi- 
can party and was an earnest and convincing speaker, ever able to hold the close 
attention of his auditors. His wife was a daughter of James Hodson. of Ohio, who 
in 1843 removed westward to Des Moines, Iowa, and in 1854 cast in his lot with the 
pioneer settlers of Josephine county, Oregon, having made the overland trip to the 
far west by ox team. In 1863 he removed with his family to Canyon City, Oregon, 
John C. Luce having in 1861 become a resident of that place. It was there that the 
latter met and married Anna C. Hodson. the wedding being celebrated in 1868. Mrs. 
Luce departed this life in 1890. She had become the mother of eight children, of 
whom Lincoln D. is the eldest. 



300 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

In the public schools of his native state Lincoln D. Luce pursued his education 
and was also at one time a student in the Portland Business College. After his 
textbooks were put aside he became actively engaged in the live stock business and 
remained a resident of Oregon until 1905, when he removed to the Yakima valley, 
settling on a ranch. The previous year he had purchased forty acres of land three 
and one-half miles southwest of the city of Yakima and has since resided upon this 
place but has sold twenty-one acres. He has. remodeled the home, transforming it 
into a most attractive and comfortable residence, and he has planted all of his land 
to fruit, specializing in the propagation of apples and pears. He belongs to the 
Yakima County Horticultural Union and is interested in everything that has to do 
with the development and progress of the fruit raising interests of this section. He 
is quick to adopt nny improved methods in the case of his trees or in the methods 
of shipping his product and he is numbered among the representative business men 
of the district. 

On September 3, 1891. Mr. Luce was united in marriage to Miss Eva M. Officer, 
who was born in Dayville, Oregon, a daughter of Casey and Martha Officer, who 
were pioneer settlers of that state, the father making his way to the coast from Mis- 
souri in 1849. To Mr. and Mrs. Luce have been born three children: Alta V., the 
wife of E. H. Cornell, a resident of Yakima county, who is now with the United 
States army, doing motor work; Floyd E., a member of the United States marines, 
now in a hospital in Rimancourt, France; and Alma V., at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Luce are members of the First Christian church and are highly 
esteemed throughout the community in which they make their home. In politics Mr. 
Luce is a republican and in November, 1917, was appointed to the office of county 
assessor to fill out the unexpired term of W. D. McNair. He is now a candidate for the 
position and the record which he has made indicates that he will prove a most cap- 
able and faithful officer if chosen by popular suffrage. He is most widely known, 
being highly esteemed both as a business man and as a citizen, his sterling quali- 
ties being such as make for personal popularity among all with whom he has been 
associated. 



HARRY G. BROWN. 



Harry G. Brown is well known as a representative of the automobile trade in 
the Yakima valley, being a member of the Hesse & Brown Motor Car Company. He 
Vk'as born in Louisiana on the ISth of July, 1876, and is a son of M. F. and Mary E. 
Brown. The father passed away in the year 1905, but the mother is living, making 
her home with her daughter, Mrs. E. M. Turner, of Shreveport, Louisiana. 

Harry G. Brown acquired his education in the State Normal School of Louisi- 
ana. He left home as a boy and traveled in thirty-seven different states of the Union, 
learning the machinist's trade and ultimately becoming a steam engineer. He de- 
veloped his native talents and powers in this connection, for he is of a mechanical 
trend and easily masters problems of that character. He became connected with the 
automobile trade in 1905 in Nevada, working for others for some time. In October 
1912, he came to Yakima, Washington, and organized the Hesse & Brown Motor 
Car Company on the 15th of September. 1915, in association with Walter Hesse. 
They established their business at No. 15 North Third street, where they did repair- 
ing and overhauling. In August. 1916, they removed to the corner of Front and A 
streets and extended the scope of their business to include a line of accessories in 
connection with their garage and repair shop. In March, 1917, they accepted the 
agency for the Dort automobile and for the National car and later added the Moline 
truck and the Stephens Salient Six, also the Moline one-man tractor. Their business 
has grown rapidly and they have enlarged their quarters, now having three floors 
of a building one hundred by seventy feet. Something of the extent of their patron- ^ 
age is indicated in the fact that they now employ fifteen people. Mr. Hesse has 
become a member of Company C of the Second Battalion of the One Hundred and 
Sixty-sixth Depot Brigade with the National army, while Mr. Brown remains as 
manager of the business. In fact he has occupied that position since its establish- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 303 

ment and the growing success of the firm has been largely due to his efforts and 
enterprise as well as his mechanical skill. An indication as to the rapid development 
of their business is given in the fact that in 1918 their trade amounted to over two 
hundred thousand dollars. 

Mr. Brown's gift as an inventor has been mentioned before and referring to it, 
it should be stated here that in 1918 he brought out and patented a rotary gas engine 
which is the first of its kind and which undoubtedly will compel the attention of 
aeroplane, marine engine and stationery engine manufacturers. Its principal points 
are that there is no crank, no fly wheel, no timing or other gear, no magneto and no 
dead center,, it being so constructed that it is off of dead at all times. Mr. Brown 
closely applied himself for some years to bringing out this engine and has succeeded 
despite many setbacks. 

On the ISth of May. 1913. Mr. Brown was married to Miss Frances Wattle, of 
Yakima, and they had four children, of whom three are living: Florence Lucile. Reta 
and Joseph Harry. Theresa died at the age of three months. Mr. Brown is a 
member of the Yakima Valley Business Men's .\ssociation and also of the Auto Deal- 
ers' Association, organizations that further the interests of trade and commerce and 
have to do with the material upbuilding of the city. His political allegiance is given 
to the Democratic party, and while he gives to it stalwart support because of his 
belief in its principles, he does not seek nor desire office his attention being concen- 
trated upon his business aflfairs. 



GEORGE W. MASON. 

George W. Mason, who for many years was a respected and valued resident 
of Yakima county, was born in Pennsylvania, December 25, 1837, a son of Jacob 
and -Amanda (Harroun) Mason. The father was also a native of the Keystone 
stale, while the mother was born in Vermont in 1806. They became pioneer resi- 
dents of Minnesota and it was in that state that George W. Mason acquired a public 
school education. He was reared to farm life and continued to assist his father in 
the further cultivation and development of the home property until he reached the 
age of about twenty-six years. He then enlisted for service in the Civil war, 
becoming a member of Company B, Tenth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, with 
which command he was connected from the 14th of August, 1862, until the 22d 
of May, 1865, being on active service throughout that entire period. Prior to 1862 
he was in active service against the Sioux Indians in Minnesota and Dakota. After 
the war he engaged in farming in Minnesota for ten years and in 1875 removed to 
Linn county, Oregon, devoting his attention to farming near Harrisburg for three 
years. In 1879 he took up his abode in Goldendale, Washington, where he devoted 
ten years to farming and carpenter work, and in 1890 he came to Yakima, where he 
opened a hotel and also continued carpentering. In 1892 he bought forty acres 
south of Zillah, all covered with sagebrush, and at once began the arduous task of 
developing the property, which is today a well improved place. At the end of two 
years he sold twenty acres of this tract. He built a good house and substantial 
barns, planted a fine orchard and otherwise increased the value of his property, 
which is today one of the fine ranches of the district. It was Mr. Mason who 
erected the first building in Prosser, Washington, hauling the lumber a distance of 
fifty miles. 

In 1869 Mr. Mason was married to Miss Malinda Twitchell, who was born in 
Maine, August 18, 1844, a daughter of Hiram and Maria (Dodge) Twitchell, who 
were also natives of the Pine Tree state and have now passed away. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Mason were born six children: Mrs. Lettie Faulkner, a resident of Bickleton, 
Washington; Mrs. Clara B. Spraguc, of Bickleton, Washington; Artemus, who is 
engaged in ranching near Bickleton; Ralph, a sketch of whom appears on another 
page of this work; Albert, who is operating the home farm; and Ethel, who became 
the wife of Napoleon Dooley, a resident of Yakima, and died June S, 1911, leaving 
three children. Edwin, a son of Mrs. Mason's sister, Mrs. Effie Hackley, was three 



304 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

months old when he became a member of their household and has now reached 
the age of fifteen. 

The death of the husband and father occurred March 17, 1916. He was most 
widely and favorably known, having been for many years a representative and 
honored resident of the district. While in Minnesota he served on the board of 
county supervisors and as township treasurer but after coming to Washington did 
not take an active part in public aflairs as an office seeker. He possessed many 
sterling traits of character that made him greatly beloved by all who knew him and 
most of all by the members of his own household. 



FRED W. MAY. 



Modern sciehtific attainment has contributed much to the development of the 
natural resources of the Yakima valley. Advanced knowledge concerning fruit rais- 
ing and the development of nursery stock constitutes an important element in the 
success of the Yakima & Columbia River Nursery Company, of which Fred W. May 
is one of the officers, and in this connection he is contributing in substantial meas- 
ure to the improvement of his and other sections of the northwest through the 
production of nursery stock specially adapted to soil and climatic conditions in 
this section of the country. 

Mr. May is a native of Ontario, Canada. He was born November 29, 1877, and 
is a son of Silas and Emma (Thomas) May. In young manhood he went to St. 
Paul, Minnesota, with an uncle and there remained for sixteen years, during which 
time he was active in the nursery business in connection with his uncle, L. L. May. 
The year 1909 witnessed his arrival in Yakima, where he established business under 
the name of the Yakima & Columbia River Nursery Company, in which undertaking 
he was associated with I. H. Dills. The company grows a general line of nursery 
stock, including fruit and ornamental trees, and their place is located near Parker, 
Washington. It is a tract of forty acres and includes ten acres of orchard. This 
is today one of the oldest as well as one of the most flourishing nurseries in the 
valley. The company enjoys a large local trade, their sales extending over the 
northwest and into California. They also ship to Montana and British Columbia. 
The business has steadily grown in volume and importance and they employ from 
eight to twenty-five people according to the season — a fact indicative of the liberal 
patronage which is now theirs. 

In 1912 Mr. May was united in niarirage to Miss Inez Clay, of Tacoma. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Yakima Lodge, No. 24, F. 
& A. M., and he is likewise a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. May gives his political allegiance to the democratic party. He belongs to 
the Commercial Club and is well known as a representative citizen who heartily 
cooperates with every movement of that organization to upbuild the interests of 
the city, extend its business connections and stimulate those agencies which pro- 
mote civic virtue, civic improvement and civic pride. 



JOSEPH F. LAFRAMBOISE. 

Canada's contribution to the Moxee region of Washington includes Joseph F. 
Laframboise, who is now identified with farming intersets in this state. He was 
born near Montreal, Canada, December 9, 1872, a son of Joseph Laframboise, who 
is mentioned in connection with the sketch of Antoine Laframboise, on another 
page of this work. 

Joseph F. Laframboise was largely educated in the public schools of Crookston, 
Minnesota, for his parents removed to that state during his youthful days and the 
period of his minority was there passed. He was thirty-two years of age when in 
1904 he came to Yakima county and for seven years he was employed by others, 
acting as manager of hop ranches. In 1907 he invested his savings in thirty acres 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 305 

of land on the Moxee and took up his abode upon that property in 1911. He has 
built a pleasant residence and good barns and outbuildings and now has a well 
improved farm, upon which he raises hay and potatoes. He is also engaged in rais- 
ing graded Percheron horses for sale, and both branches of his business are bring- 
ing to him substantial iinancial returns. 

In 1898 Mr. Laframboise was married to Miss Rose Alva Delorme, a native of 
Canada, who in her early girlhood went with her parents to Minnesota, where she 
formed the acquaintance of Mr. Laframboise, who sought her hand in marriage. 
Their children are: Aram, who was a member of the United States army and was 
honorably discharged at the close of the World's war; Armand. who is working 
in the shipyards as a representative of the United States army; one who died in 
infancy; and Eliane. 

The parents and children are members of the Holy Rosary Catholic church of 
Moxee. and in politics Mr. Laframboise is a republican where national questions 
and issues are involved but at local elections casts an independent ballot, consider- 
ing the capability of a candidate rather than his party ties. He has ever been ready 
and willing to aid in any movement for the public good and cooperates in many- 
well defined plans for the progress and upbuilding of the section in which he has 
now lived for fourteen years. He has brought his farm under a high state of culti- 
vation and the many improvements which he has added thereto constitute it one 
of the valable properties of the district. 



LEWIS J. HILLBERY. 

The fruit industry of the Yakima valley finds a foremost representative in Lewis 
J. Hillbery, who now owns forty acres of valuable land one mile north of Zillah, 
fifteen of which are devoted to orchard. From this source he now derives a gratify- 
ing income which is greatly augmented because he not only raises the fruit but also 
packs the same, having upon his place a frost proof packing house with storage for 
two thousand boxes. 

Mr. Hillbery was born in Sweden, Ma-rch 16, 1856, a son of Peter and Emeline 
Hillbery. He began his education in his native country but in 1870 the family took 
up their abode in Polk county, Wisconsin, where the father secured a homestead. 
They remained in that state for ten years, when removal was made to Pope county, 
Minnesota, and there Lewis J. Hillbery bought a farm, his parents living with him. 
In that state his mother passed away. 

Having heard many favorable reports in regard to the opportunities presented 
in Yakima county, Mr. Hillbery came to this district in the fall of 1901 and bought 
seventy-five acres of land one mile north of Zillah which was partly improved, but 
of this tract he has sold thirty-five acres, so that he now owjis forty acres. About 
fifteen acres are in orchard, devoted to the raising of apples, pears, peaches and 
cherries, the remainder of the tract being under the plow or in alfalfa. Mr. Hill- 
bery has remodeled the house, which is now a modern and substantial residence, 
and has built suitable barns and made other improvements which have enhanced 
the value of his property. He built a frost proof packing house with a storage 
capacity of two thousand boxes and thus has in every way anticipated the needs 
of the modern fruit raiser. 

On the 20th of December, 1899, Mr. Hillbery was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Bryce. a native of Minnesota and a daughter of John and Esther (Smith) Bryce, 
the former a native of Canada and the latter of Wisconsin. The parents are suc- 
cessful agriculturists and reside in Minnesota. By a former marriage Mr. Hillbery 
had the following children: Wilber, who is employed in the postoffice at Yakima 
and is married and has five children; Otto, who has a wife and one child and is 
residing at home: and Clarence, who is serving his country in the LTnited States 
navy on a cruiser and has crossed the ocean seven times. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hillbery are prominent socially, and have many friends in the 
neighborhood of Zillah. In his political affiliation he is independent to a large ex- 
tent although he gives ,his allegiance to the republican party as far as national issues- 



306 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

are concerned. He has ever given the subject of education careful attention and 
while a resident of Minnesota he served for two terms as a member of the school 
board and was also road overseer in that state. Mr. Hillbery is now numbered 
among the substantial and prosperous residents of his district and there is great 
credit due him for what he has achieved, as his success is entirely attributable to 
his own efforts. 



RALPH O. WALTON. 

Ralph O. Walton is one of the more recent arrivals in Kittitas county, having 
resided within its borders only since 1915. He makes his home near Thorp, where 
he has nine hundred and twenty acres of land which he is rapidly bringing under 
cultivation. He was born in Sturgis, South Dakota, July 5, 1887, a son of Andrew 
and Lillian (McLean) Walton. The father was born in Utah but in his boyhood 
days became a resident of Iowa, where he resided until he reached young manhood, 
when he took up his abode in South Dakota, remaining in the latter state to the 
time of his death in 1901. His widow afterward came to Washington with her 
son, Ralph O. Walton, their home being established in Tacoma in 1907. Later 
the mother removed to California and is now residing in Los Angeles. 

Reared in South Dakota, Ralph O. Walton accompanied his mother to Tacoma 
in 1907, when a young man of twenty years, and there resided until 1912, when he 
removed to Auburn, Washington. He thence came to Kittitas county in June, 1915, 
and purchased nine hundred and twenty acres of land two miles southwest of 
Thorp, of which fifty-five acres is irrigated land, while about one hundred and foi;ty- 
five acres is devoted to dry farming. The remainder is in pasture and his attention 
is given to the raising of hay and grain and live stock. The farm is splendidly im- 
proved with an attractive residence, good barns and sheds, and a spirit of neat- 
ness, thrift and enterprise pervades the place, indicating the progressive plans that 
are at all times followed by the owner in the cultivation of his farm. 

On the 26th of February. 1913, Mr. Walton was united in marriage to Miss 
Estella H. Waggoner, a native of Kittitas county and a daughter of John C. and 
Ella I. (Pease) Waggoner. The father is a native of Ellington, New York, while 
the mother was born at Sauk Center, Minnesota. The latter was a daughter of 
Benjamin Pease, who became one of thd pioneer settlers of Kittitas county. John 
C. Waggoner also arrived in the Kittitas valley before the railroad was built through 
this section and he purchased the ranch property upon which Mr. and Mrs. Walton 
now reside, .'^t the present writing Mr. Waggoner makes his home in Des Moines, 
Washington, having retired from active business life. To Mr. and Mrs. Walton 
have been born two children, Garna Louise and Calvin Andrew. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walton attend the Christian church and are among the highly 
esteemed residents of the community, occupying a prominent position in social 
circles. Politically he maintains an independent course. He holds the rank of 
corporal in a federalized machine gun company of the Third Regiment of Infantry, 
Washington National Guard. 



C. H. RICHEY. 



C. H. Richey is the owner of a beautiful home, Sunnycrest, situated on Nob Hill, 
am! is accounted one of the representative and leading business men of Yakima. 
He was born in Tonica, Lasalle county, Illinois, on the 3d of September, 1870, a son 
of James and Anna (Hamilton) Richey, both of whom were natives of the same state. 
The father was a farmer and stock raiser in Illinois and in 1900 came to the north- 
west, settling in Yakima county. Here he entered into business relations as a mem- 
ber ox the firm of Richey & Gilbert, prominent fruit growers, packers and shippers, 
in which he became senior partner. He made his home at No. 206 North Naches 
avenue in the city of Yakima, where he passed away on the 13th of December, 1903. 




JAMES RIt'HEY 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 309 

His widow survived him for about five and a half years, her death occurring April 
30, 1909. In his political views Mr. Richey was a republican and while residing in 
Tomca, Illinois, served as mayor of that city. He was a loyal adherent of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity and an equally faithful member of the Congregational church, these 
associations indicating the nature of his interests and the rules which governed his con- 
duct. To him and his wife were born three children: Marion, the wife of H. M. Gil- 
bert; Luella, the deceased wife of Fred A. Hall; and C. H., of this review. 

The last named supplemented his public school training by a course in a business 
college at Di-xon, Illinois, and was thus well qualified for life's practical and respon- 
sible duties. He came to Yakima with his father and they were associated in busi- 
ness until the father's death. He is now the vice-president of the firm of the Richey 
& Gilbert Company, which was organized in 1900 for the conduct of fruit farming 
inlcrctts and which was incorporated in 1904. They are now extensively engaged in 
the wholesale fruit trade as dealers, packers and shippers. Something of the extent 
and importance of their business is indicated by the fact that while their main office 
is in Toppenish. they also have warehouses at Zillah, Buena, Wapato, Donald, 
Yakima and Selah. They ship over one thousand carloads of fruit annually, their 
interest.^ in this lire placing them among the prominent fruit growers and dealers 
of the northwest. 

On the 24th of May, 1908, Mr. Richey was united in marriage to Miss Effie A. 
Stewart, a daughter of John and Annie C. (Johnson) Stewart, both of whom were 
natives of Scotland and in childhood days came to America, crossing the Atlantic in 
the '30s, They first settled in Canada and afterward removed to Illinois, where the 
father of Mrs. Richey followed agricultural pursuits. In 1908 he removed with his 
family to Yakima and passed away in February, 1917, at the age of eighty-eight 
years. The mother is still living at the age of eighty-five. Their family numbered 
eleven children. Mrs. Richey was the eighth in order of birth and is one of six of the 
family now residing in Yakima county. By her marriage she became the mother of 
two children, but the little daughter, Ruth, died in infancy. The son, James A., is 
now eight years of age. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richey hold membership in the Congregational church and his 
attitude upon the temperance question is indicated l)y the stanch support which 
he gives to the prohibition party. His life has ever been actuated by high and hon- 
orable principles and his entire business career has licen characterized by unfaltering 
integrity as well as enterprise. 



FRANK R. HENRY. 



Fine orchards, large packing houses and every facility for the raising and ship- 
ment of fruit are the visible evidences of the life of well directed energy and thrift 
which Frank R. Henry has led. His ranch properties are indeed attractive, his or- 
chards presenting a scene of rare beauty in blossom time and bespeaking prosperity 
when the fruit hangs heavy on the trees. 

Mr. Henry was born in Nova Scotia. June 16, 1863, a son of Charles and Eliza- 
beth (Kitchen) Henry. The father passed away in Nova Scotia but the mother is 
still living there. Mr. Henry had engaged in school teaching and farming and thus 
provided for the support of his family. 

His son, Frank R. Henry, acquired his education in the public schools. In 
November, 1889, he crossed the continent to Tacoma, Washington, where for seven 
years he served as a conductor on the electric car lines. In March, 1896, he arrived 
in the Yakima valley, where in 1893 he had purchased ten acres of land in the Selah. 
He was the eleventh farmer to buy land under the project and in 1895 he invested in 
twelve and a half acres additional, so that he then had twenty-two and a half acres. 
When he came the entire district was covered with sagebrush. He sold his ten acre 
tract and improved the remaining twelve and a half acres and in 1900 he bought six 
acres more. In 1907 he invested in one hundred and twelve acres in the extension 
district of the Selah but has sold all save fifteen acres of that tract. He now has 
about thirty-two acres in orchard, largely devoted to the raising of apples, and all 

n3b) 



310 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

of the trees are of his own planting. He has fine packing houses on both ranches 
and all modern equipment. He built a splendid hollow tile packing house on the 
upper ranch, where he also has a most attractive residence, and his is one of the 
best orchards in the Selah valley. His entire place is seeded to alfalfa and he is thus 
following intensive farming methods, making his land bring forth two crops — fruit 
and hay. 

In October, 1889, Mr. Henry was married to Miss Mary E. Mitchell, of Nova 
Scotia, a daughter of Thomas and Martha Mitchell. Their children are: Myrtle, the 
wife of Earl Cebelle, of Auburn, Washington, by whom she has a son five years of 
age; and Dell M., who conducts the upper ranch. 

Mr. Henry is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and in politics is a 
republican where national issues and questions are involved but casts an independent 
local ballot. Xot only does his memory compass the period of the entire develop- 
ment of the Selah valley but in the work he has been an active and helpful factor 
and his labors have been marked by the attainment of most substantial success. 



JOHN B. WEEBER 



John B. Weeber, who after long identification with meat packing and mining 
interests in other sections of the country came to the Yakima valley in 1910, has 
since been engaged in orcharding and farming on Naches Heights, where he owns 
seventy acres of rich and productive land. The life story of John B. Weeber is 
one that indicates triumph over adversity and steady progress, actuated by a laud- 
able ambition and stimulated by unfaltering industry. 

Mr. Weeber was born in Albany, New York, July 4, 1864, a son of Christian 
and Dora (.\mond) Weeber, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father, 
however, had to leave that country on account of being a revolutionist opposed to 
the military power and autocracy of that land. He was a butcher by trade and 
followed the business in Albany, New York, for many years. Both he and his wife 
have now passed away. 

John B. Weeber obtained a public scool education in his native city and became 
an active associate of his father in the development of a farm which his father owned 
in the vicinity of Albany. He continued to assist in its cultivation until 1881, when 
at the age of seventeen years he made his way westward to Denver, Colorado. 
In that state he devoted his attention to the butchering business and to mining, be- 
coming owner of several mines. He was interested with a number of the most 
prominent mining men of Denver and took out sixty-four thousand dollars in six 
weeks from one mine but afterward lost it all. He was a large operator of several 
mines and later developed copper mines at various points in Wyoming, Montana 
and Utah, but the price of copper slumped as silver had done in 1893. 

In 1907 Mr. Weeber arrived on the Pacific coast. He made his way to Port- 
land, Oregon, and traveled largely over the state. He also spent some time in 
Kittitas county. Washington, at Roslyn and at Cle Elum. in the meat packing busi- 
ness, and in the fall of 1910 he purchased thirty acres of land on Naches Heights. 
He was induced to take this step by an old associate from Denver, a Mr. Johnson, 
who interested him in buying the place. He has added to his original purchase from 
time to time until he now has seventy acres, constituting a very fine ranch property, 
of which twenty-two acres is planted to orchards. Everything about the place 
is indicative of his progressive methods and the systematic care with which he con- 
ducts his interests. • 

On the 16th of October, 1887, Mr. Weeber was married to Miss Kate Firsich, 
a native of Indiana. Their children were three in number; Arthur J., who is now 
with the United States Army in France; Pearl, the wife of Frank Wiethofl, of Den- 
ver, who is also a member of the United States Army; and Emil, who died at the 
age of three years. 

Mr. Weeber was very active in the Masonic and Elks lodges while in Denver. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he is one of the earnest 
workers in its ranks, while his opinions carry weight in its local councils. He has 



HISTORY OF YAKIMx\ VALLEY 311 

ever stood for progress and improvement in all things relating to the public welfare 
and has been largely instrumental in the development of good roads, in the es- 
tablishment of the telephone system and in securing the rural free delivery for new 
neighlorhoodf in Yakima county. His efforts have been far-reaching, resultant 
and beneficial and his fellow citizens recognize the value of his efforts along the 
line ol general development and progress. 



SEAMEN VAN VLIET. 

Seamen Van Vliet, proprietor of the Yakiina Business College and holding to 
the highest standards in the purpose and in the conduct of the institution, was born 
in the tow nof Aurora, Erie county, New York, January-- 20, 1858, and is a son of 
Richaid S. and Ann (Chapman) Van Vliet. He acquired a district school educa- 
tion, supplemented by study in an academy, while later he became a student in the 
State Normal School at Buffalo, New York, and afterward was graduated from 
the Bryant & Stratton College of that city. He then began teaching in the insti- 
tution where he remained as a teacher from June, 1881, until his connection with 
the school had covered twenty-one years, becoming its superintendent after a few 
years had passed. In 1902 he v/ent to Cleveland, Ohio, and in connection with two 
others purchased the Spencerian Commercial School, of which he became the presi- 
dent and so served for three years. He then returned to BufTalo and had charge 
of the Caton Business College for a year, after which he removed to Yakima and 
in 1906 purchased the Noith Yakima Business College, which had been established 
in the fall of 1903 by Miss Van Slyke and Mr. Churchill, who conducted the school 
for three years, first in the Ditter block and later in the Union block. In 1906 Mr. 
Van Vliet purchased the school, which he conducted in the Union block until April, 
1912, wher. he removed it to the Clogg building. The school has enjoyed splendid 
growth under his direction. There were only a few pupils twelve years ago, when 
he took charge, but today the enrollment during the year approximates two hun- 
dred and this is acknowledged to be one of the leading business schools of the west. 
Its growth has been continuous and its success is largely due to the excellent record 
of the pupils, vihich is the most satisfactory proof of the value of the course of 
instruction. Tlie school has never issued a catalogue but has been conducted upon 
the maxim that "to gel, one must give." In other words the school has been built 
up from the inside. Carefully formulated plans of instruction, thorough methods, 
competent teaching and pronounced ability have led to the gradual development of 
tho school and the increase of the patronage. The first year Mr. Van Vliet found 
it rather uphill work, but the next year the good words spoken by former pupils 
led to doubling the attendance and the growth of the school has continued rapidly 
since that time. All branches of commercial study arc taught and Mr. Van Vliet 
has every reason to be proud of the loyalty of his former pupils. He has made it 
possible for many of them to work their way through school and is actuated in 
large degree by a spirit of humanitarianism in conducting the institution, for he 
never turns a pupil away for lack of money, feeling that when he has placed them 
in a self-supporting position they will repay him, and such has proved to be the 
case on invariable occasions. Many of his pupils are now occupying important 
and responsible positions. 

On the 19th of March, 1882, Mr. Van Vliet was married to Miss Rinda M. 
Churchill, of .\urora. New York, and their children are: Mrs. E. V. Lockhart, Mrs. 
Fran't Sharkey, Mrs. Wheeler Warren, Mrs. Ted Holland and Mrs. Kenneth Arrow- 
smith, all of Yakima; Richard Churchill, who is a sergeant in the LJnited States 
army in France; and Carolyn, at home. 

Fraternally Mr. Van \'liet is a Mason, .belonging to Yakima Lodge, No 24, A. 
F. & A. M.; Yakima Chapter, R. A, M.; Yakima Council, R. & S. M.; Yakima Com- 
mandery, K. T., of which he is a past eminent commander; and in the Scottish Rite 
he has attanied the thirty-second degree. He is a past reigning sovereign of St. 
-Mban Chapter of the Red Cro.ss nf Constantine, and he is also a Noble of the Mystic 
Shrine. !i. politics he is a republican and he is well known as a member of the 



312 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Country Club and of the Commercial Club. His acquaintance in Yakima is wide and 
he is held in favorable regard by all who know him. His entire life has been de- 
voted to the profession which he follows and his labors have constituted a contri- 
bution of worth to the world's work. 



ORVAL ROY FLECK. 

Modern agriculture in all of its up-to-date ramifications as regards conditions 
in the west is ably represented by Orval Roy Fleck, who is a prosperous rancher 
near Wiley City. He was born in Klickitat county, Washington, May 19, 1882, and^ 
is a son of Peter and Allie (.White) Fleck, the former born in Ohio and the latter 
in Iowa. His maternal grandfather, George White, brought his family to Washing- 
ton in 1871 and settled at Vancouver but later came to Klickitat county. Peter 
Fleck, who for many years was successfully connected with the sheep business, 
was also numbered among the early settlers of this district but later he removed to 
The Dalles, Oregon, and there passed away. In 1918 his wife came to Wiley City, 
where she now makes her home. 

Orval R. Fleck was reared under the parental roof and in the acquirement of 
his educution attended the public schools. After laying aside his textbooks he de- 
cided upon the cattle business as most suited to his tastes and ability and was suc- 
cessfully engaged along that line at The Dalles, Oregon. In June, 1917, he acquired 
title to forty acres of land on the .\htanum, in Yakima county, and there he raises 
hay but also gives considerable attention to live stock interests, having cattle and 
conductins^ a dairy. In all that he does he is progressive and enterprising and as 
he works early and late the income from his property is yearly increasing so that 
he is already numbered among the successful agriculturists of his section. Mr. 
Fleck worked upon the ranch which he now owns in 1901. 

On November 28, 1907, Mr. Fleck was united in marriage to Gertrude Kinney, 
who was born in Yamhill county, Oregon, in 1880, a daughter of Peter and Mavina 
Kinney, Oregon pioneers. Mr. and Mrs. Fleck have an adopted daughter, Marg- 
aret. They are valued members of the younger social set of Wiley City and vicinity, 
where they ha.ve many friends. They have reliable qualities of character and are 
respected by all who know them. 

Fraternally Mr. Fleck belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, a 
member of Columbia Lodge, No. 5, at The Dalles, and also belongs to the Modern 
W^oodmen of America. His wife is devotedly attached to the Adventist church, of 
which she is a member. In his political affiliations Mr. Fleck is a republican, being 
thoroughly in accord with the principles of that party and a stanch supporter of 
its candidates. He is a self-made man and a successful agriculturist of his district. 
to the development of which along agricultural lines he has greatly contributed 
through his labors. A bright future may be predicted for him, as his underlying 
qualities give a sure promise of his further advancement. 



DANIEL WEBSTER. 



Daniel Webster, who for a number of years was a highly respected resident of 
Yakima county, where he engaged in fruit raising, passed away on the 18th of 
February, 1917, and left behind him many friends who had held him in high regard 
and who counted him as one of the substantial citizens of the community. Mr. 
Webster was born in Weld, Maine, March 4, 1854, a son of Samuel and Hannah 
(Masterman) Webster, who were also natives of the Pine Tree state and were rep- 
resentatives of old families founded in America during colonial days. Removing 
to the west, they settled near Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1856 and were there identi- 
fied with farming interests throughout their remaining days. 

In young manhood Daniel Webster of this review went to North Dakota, es- 
tablishing his home in what was first called Wcljster township and afterward Gunkle 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 313 

township, in Cass county, in 1878. He took up government land upon which not a 
furrow had been turned nor an improvement made, securing a tract of three hun- 
dred and twenty acres which he at once began to convert into productive fields. 
He lived thereon until March, 1906, when he brought his family to Yakima county, 
Washington, where in 1905 he had purchased eight acres of land on Grandview avenue, 
west of Yakima. Here he concentrated his efforts and attention upon the business 
of fruit raising, making a specialty of apples, cherries and pears. He wisely and 
carefully directed his activities and the years brought to him substantial success 
as a reward for his intelligently guided labor. 

On the 19th of February, IS'84. Mr. \\'ebster was united in marriage to Miss 
Lura Masterman, a daughter of Levi and Celestia (Doble) Mastcrman, who were also 
natives of Maine and were of English descent. The father died in Maine and the 
mother afterward became the wife of Holland Newman, who in 1876 removed to 
Minnesota, where the death of both occurred. To Mr. and Mrs. Webster were born 
seven children: Clifton, who died March 2, 1915; Gertrude, who died at the age 
of two years; Margie, the wife of C. R. Barber, residmg at Schoolcraft, Michigan; 
Guy, who died at the age of four years; Agnes, at home; and Vera and Lois, who 
are also with their mother. 

Mr. Webster was a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the Brotherhood of American Yeomen. His 
religious faith was that of the Congregational church, to the teachings of which 
he was ever loyal. His political allegiance was given to the republican party and 
he was an active worker in its ranks while residing in North Dakota. He served 
as township assessor for fifteen years and was also a member of the school board, 
but office seeking was not his aim. He gave his support to the party because of his 
firm belief in its principles and his desire that his country should have the best 
possible government. He was descended from the same family as the distinguished 
American statesman of the same name, Daniel Webster, and he ever displayed the 
same qualities of patriotic loyalty to the country that has characterized the family. 
He had the respect and good will of all who knew him, was faithful in friendship 
and devoted to the welfare of his family and his many sterling traits won for him 
the confidence and high regard of all with whom he came in contact. 



ALLAN GRANT LEWIS. 

-Allan Grant Lewis is numbered among the pioneer settlers on the Cowiche and is 
today the owner of one hundred and twenty acres of land, of which he has placed 
twenty acres under a high state of cultivation. Almost his entire life has been 
passed in this section of the state, for he was a lad of but eight years when brought 
to Yakima county. His birth occurred in Illinois, September 27, 1863, his parents 
I)eing Andrew J. and Isabel L. (Parker) Lewis, the former a native of Indianapolis, 
while the latter was also born in Indiana. In 1864 the parents crossed the plains 
to Clarke county. Wasliington, and took up a homestead upon which they resided 
until 1871, when they removed to Yakima county, where the father purchased rail- 
way land on the Cowiche, after living on the Ahtanum for three years. They were 
among the first settlers there and Mr. Lewis and B. F. Parker built the Cowiche 
ditch, also known as the Dolly. Varden ditch. This was the first on the north side 
of the Cowiche. Mr. Lewis owned three-quarters of a section of land and for a 
considerable period was actively identified with the agricultural interests of the 
district but passed away on the 11th of January, 1914. His widow survives and now 
makes her home with her son. Allan G.. at the age of eighty-one years. 

-■\llan Grant Lewis acquired a public school education. He has lived continu- 
ously in the northwest from the age of one year and the spirit of western enterprise 
and progress finds exemplification in his career. He carried on ranching in con- 
nection with his father and at the age of twenty-one years took up a homestead on 
the Cowiche. Later he bought thirty-nine acres and sold part of the old place. 
He is today the owner of one hundred and twenty acres in all, of which he has 
cultivated twenty acres, transforming it into a highly productive tract. In fact he 



314 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

has made the barren region, which in early days produced nothing but sagebrush, 
bloom and blossom as the rose. His labors have indeed wrought splendid results 
and as one of the early pioneer settlers here he has contributed in marked measure 
to the development and upbuilding of the district in which he lives. 

On the 9th of November, 1905, Mr. Lewis was married to Miss Bertha V. Hay, 
who was born in Kansas, a daughter of Jacob Hay, one of the early settlers of 
Washington, who arrived in the Yakima valley at an early day. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Lewis have been born seven children: Paul B.; Naomi and Nora, twins; Velma; 
Abraham Grant; Emma; and Jacob Jackson. 

In his political views Mr. Lewis is a republican and keeps well informed on 
the questions and the issues of the day. He has always been a deep student of 
the bible, being wonderfully well posted upon this holy volume. He and his wife 
are active and earnest members of the Church of God. Through his close study 
he has found that the bible is divided into 40's, 12's, 7's and 3's, these numbers running 
all through. These numbers are there to show that God is the author of the bible, 
for no human could have interluded these numbers through the bible in their har- 
mony, sequence and frequency. Mr. Lewis is one of the pioneer settlers of the 
Cowiche, a well known, genial oldtimer \vhose friends are legion and who is every- 
where spoken of in terms of the highest regard. 



D. D. REYNOLDS. 



D. D. Reynolds, a representative of ranching interests in the vicinity of Wiley 
City, was born in Greene county, Missouri, August 16, 1873, a son of J. W. and 
Susan E. (Garoutte) Reynolds, the former a native of Missouri, while the latter was 
born in Ohio. The paternal grandfather, D. D. Reynolds, was one of the pioneer 
settlers of Missouri, where he spent the remainder of his days. His son. J. W. Rey- 
nolds, came to the Pacific northwest in 1877, at which time he settled in Oregon, and 
after residing there for seven years removed by wagon to Yakima county in 1884. 
He purchased a ranch on the Ahtanum, where he lived for some time, and later made 
his home on the Cowiche. subsequently returning to the Ahtanum where he spent 
the last twenty years of his life, passing away in 1913. His wife died in this locality, 
one year later, in 1914. 

D. D. Reynolds of this review obtained a public school education and engaged 
in ranching with his father, early becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling 
the soil and caring for the crops. He was thus employed until 1896, when he pur- 
chased twenty acres of land at Fairview, owning that property until February, 1901, 
when he sold it. He then removed to the Ahtanum and bought forty acres of land 
adjoining Wiley City. Upon this he erected a fine residence and model barns. The 
place is called Carnation Illahee and is one of the attractive ranch properties of this 
section of the state. Mr. Reynolds is engaged in the raising of alfalfa hay and also 
in stock raising, dairying and poultry raising. Each branch of his business is care- 
fully conducted and he makes a close study of the best methods of carrying on the 
work of each particular line. 

On the 6th of April, 1896, Mr. Reynolds was united in marriage to Mrs. Mary 
(Benton) Libbey, who was born on the Ahtanum in Yakima county, in fact she was 
the first white child born on the Ahtanum the date of her birth being February 6. 
1867. Her present home is within one mile of the place of her birth. She is a daughter 
of H. M. and Mary (Allen) Benton. Her father was born at Hartford. Connecticut, 
while her mother's birth occurred in the Cascades of Oregon. H. M. Benton was a 
sea captain who made the trip around Cape Horn and up the Pacific coast, becom- 
ing one of the pioneers of Oregon. He had previously visited all parts of the world 
and had gained many interesting experiences. In the fall of 1866 his wife and her 
father, J. W. Allen, arrived in Yakima county and they located on the Ahtanum, 
where Mrs. Reynolds was born in the following February. Her father traded a pipe 
and twenty dollars in money for one hundred and sixty acres of farm land that is 
today worth two hundred dollars per acre. He resided thereon until his later life, 
when he accepted a job on the steamship Clara Nevada, running to Alaska. This 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 317 

boat was wrecked by an explosion in 1897 and all were drowned. His widow survives 
and is now living on the lower Ahtanum. 

Mrs. Reynolds had one child by her former marriage, Mabel, who is now residing 
in Yakima. When Mrs. Reynolds came to this section the nearest postoffice to her 
home was at The Dalles. Oregon, and all supplies were freighted in by wagon, a 
distance of one hundred miles. Mr. and, Mrs. Reynolds attend the Congregational 
church, and he is a charter member of the Modern Woodmen of America and also 
belongs to the Royal Neighbors. In politics he is a strong republican unfaltering 
in his allegiance to the party. Both he and his wife are representatives of honored 
old pioneer families of the northwest and from early days they have been much in- 
terested in the growth and development of the section in which they live and have 
borne their full part in the work of general progress and improvement. They have 
indeed witnessed great changes as the years have passed and the wild regions have 
been taken over for the purposes of civilization. Mr. Reynolds is today numbered 
among the leading ranchers of his section, having a valuable and attractive home, 
while his land has been brought under a high state of cultivation. 



CHARLES A. ABBE. 



• The beautiful home of Charles A. Abbe is situated in the midst of a valuable 
ranch property on which he is extensively and profitably engaged in fruit raising, 
while a portion of his land is seeded to alfalfa. The steps in his orderly progression 
are easily discernible. He has worked persistently and energetically, wisely utiliz- 
ing the opportunities that have come to him and never afraid to take a forward step 
when the way seemed open. He was born in Berrien county, Michigan. December 
12, 1855, a son of Albert Goodell and Margaret (Kromer) .\bbe, the former a native 
of Massachusetts, while the latter was born in New York. Removing to the west 
in 1814, when a youth of but sixteen years, Albert G. Abbe became one of the earliest 
of the pioneer residents of Michigan, making the journey to the Mississippi valley 
with ox teams. He was afterward a boatman on the St. Joseph river and he took 
active part in the early development of the section of the country in which he lived. 
The work of planting the seeds of civilization on the western frontier had scarcely 
been begun, Indians still hunted in the forests and wild game of all kinds was to 
be had in abundance. He bravely faced the privations, hardships and dangers of 
life on the frontier and he lived to see a remarkable transformation in the country 
ere death called him. His remaining days were passed in St. Joseph, Michigan, 
and he was regarded as one of the substantial citizens of that community. 

Charles A. Abbe acquired a public school education in his native country and 
was reared to the occupation of farming, early becoming familiar with the best 
methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. He afterward became identi- 
fied with the milk business in St. Joseph. Prior to this time he had spent a period in 
a hardware store, so that his training and experiences were broad and varied. 

It was in M'arch, 1898, that Charles A. Abbe arrived in Yakima and with the 
northwest he has since been closely associated, covering a period of more than 
two decades. He first invested in forty acres of land three miles southwest of the 
city and to his original tract afterward added ten acres. This was devoted to the 
raising of wheat. He at once began the task of further developing and improving the 
property. Five acres had been planted to orchards of apples, pears, peaches and 
other fruits. That he has constantly carried forward the work of development is 
shown in the fact that he now has thirty-two acres in bearing orchards, from which 
he annually gathers good crops. He also has considerable of his land seeded to 
alfalfa. He knows what kinds of fruit are best adapted to soil and climatic condi- 
tions here and he employs the most scientific methods in the care of his trees and 
in the preparation of his fruit for the market. He has built a beautiful home on 
his place and added to it all modern equipment and improvement and it now con- 
stitutes one of the attractive features of the landscape. 

In 1883 Mr. Abbe was married to Miss Florence Miners, a native of Michigan 
and a daughter of John Minerf. To Mr. and Mrs. Abbe were born two children: 



318 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Aletha Geneva, now the wife of Wilbur R. Williams, a resident of Yakima, by whom 
she has two children; and Frederick, who is living in Traverse and has a wife and one 
son. Mrs. Abbe passed away in October, 1898, and on the 11th of April, 1903, Mr. 
Abbe was again married, his second union being with Mary H. Murphy, who was 
born in California and is a daughter of Edward and Mary (Holmes) Murphy, who, 
leaving Illinois in 1860, crossed the plains to California. At a subsequent period, 
however, they returned to Rock Island, Illinois, and their last days were there passed. 
Her father, a native of Washington, D. C, was a lawyer and had been admitted to 
practice in six different states. Her mother was born in Vermont. Her grand- 
father, Edward Murphy, was a stone mason and helped to build the Capitol at 
Washington, D. C. 

In his fraternal relations Charles A. Abbe is a Mason, belonging to Yakima 
Lodge, No. 24, F. & A. M., also to Yakima Chapter, No. 21, R. A. M., and hkewise 
to the Order of the Eastern Star, with which his wife is also affiliated. They are 
consistent members of the Methodist church and are people of genuine worth, hav- 
ing the warm regard and good will of all with whom they have been brought in 
contact. In politics Mr. .^bbe is an independent republican, usually supporting 
the principles of the party yet not considering himself bound by party ties. He is 
a member of the Grange and of the Yakima County Horticultural Union and he is 
interested in everything that has to do with the development of the state along 
agricultural and horticultural lines. He has been quick to adopt new ideas of value 
in the further development of his land and he readily discriminates between the 
essential and the non-essential in all that has to do with the raising of fruit and 
grain. 



WILLIAM J. POTTER. 

William J. Potter has attained a position in life which entitles him to be num- 
bered among the prosperous horticulturists of Yakima county. Not only has he 
very valuable property near Tieton but he is also in charge of the large packing 
house which is maintained by the Yakima County Horticultural L^nion, of which he 
is local manager. He is in every way a leading and progressive business man and 
through his efforts has done much toward bringing about prosperity in his district. 
Moreover, he has rare social qualities and has many friends in his neighborhood. 
His farm is considered one of the most valuable on the Tieton and in its present 
prosperous condition stands as a monument of his industry and advanced thought 
in regard to horticultural and agricultural work. 

A native of Wisconsin, Mr. Potter was born in Eau Claire, July 11, 1881, and is 
a son of Herbert R. and Emma May (Hamilton) Potter. The father was born in 
Maine and the mother in Prescott, Wisconsin, the latter being a daughter of Rev. 
William Hamilton, a well known pioneer of that state and a Methodist minister 
known throughout northern Wisconsin, whither he had traveled by wagon from 
Indiana. Herbert R. Potter took up his abode in Wisconsin in 1871 and in that 
state he was married. For many years he was in the shoe business but in 1908 came 
with his family to Yakima county, where he bought twenty acres of land on the 
Tieton which was then covered with sagebrush. His was the second new family to 
come into this district after the Tieton project was completed and the Potters are 
therefor to be numbered among the pioneers here. This tract was all planted 
to apples, pears and peaches. As the years have passed this has been developed 
into a very valuable property and the income which the family receives therefrom 
is most gratifying. 

William J. Potter of this review owns the ranch with his father and they are 
numbered among the leading horticulturists of the section. He has made a deep 
study of horticulture and is not only thoroughly informed in regard to local condi- 
tions as pertaining to climate and soil but he is equally well informed regarding 
the marketing and sale of his fruit. He traveled for a number of years for a shoe 
house and carefully studied business conditions in various states, thus acquiring 
the business insight which now well qualifies him for his important position as 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 319 

local manager for the Yakima County Horticultural Union, being in charge of their 
large packing house. The Tieton branch of this union handled eighty-five carloads 
of fruit in 1918 and during the busy season thirty people are employed to pack and 
ship this fruit. The importance of Mr. Potter's position is therefore easily rec- 
ognized. Moreover, it stands to reason that he has the full confidence of his neigh- 
bors, who entrust him with their valuable shipments and have great faith in his 
ability. Another item which has probably had part in his business success is the 
excellent education which he received in his youth, for he is a graduate of the high 
school at Eau Claire, Wisconsin. After coming to the west he assisted his father 
greatly in picking out the desired land and it was partly due to his judgment that 
the land now under the Tieton project was chosen. 

On the 10th of June, 1903, Mr. Potter was united in marriage to Miss Susan May 
Strang, who was born in McGregor. Iowa, a daughter of I. L. and Margaret (Wheeler) 
Strang, who moved to Eau Claire. \\'iscon?in, when Mrs. Potter was a little maiden. 
She received an excellent education ami i'^ a thoroughly trained musician. She has 
a fine studio at Naches, Washington, and at one time served as president of the 
Ladies Musical Club of Yakima. Not only is she a fine teacher, but also an ex- 
cellent performer and high encomiums have been paid to her art. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Potter are welcome guests in the best social circles of their neighborhood and 
at their own fireside often dispense hospitality with a free hand. Mrs. Potter is 
an active member of the Episcopal church. 

In his political views Mr. Potter is a stanch republican, being thoroughly versed 
in regard to the issues of the day. He is not only interested in national and state 
politics as well as county affairs but gives active help to all worthy projects in order 
to promote the general welfare. He is popular and is generally conceded to be a 
hale fellow well met. having many friends who appreciate in him a man of high 
qualities of character and sound business ability. 



JOHN C. WILSON. 



John C. Wilson, owner of one of the fine ranch properties of Kittitas county, 
comprising one hundred and sixty acres, of rich and valuable land, annually gathers 
abundant golden harvests by reason of the care and attention which he bestows upon 
his place. He comes to the northwest from Iowa, his birth having occurred in Lee 
county, that state, on the 8th of August, 1858. He is a son of Robert and Mary E. 
(Mills) Wilson. The father was born in England, while the mother's birth occurred 
in Ohio and they became pioneer residents of Iowa, where they settled in the early 
'50s. They removed to Scotland county Missouri in 1872 and there both the father 
and mother remained until called to their final rest. 

John C. Wilson acquired a public school education, supplemented by study in 
the State Normal School at Kirksville, Missouri, from 1876 until 1878. He afterward 
engaged in farming in Missouri for a period of six years and in the spring of 1885 
made his way to the Pacific coast, settling in California. In August of the same year, 
however, he proceeded northward to the Kittitas valley, where he purchased land 
and also took up a desert claim of three hundred and twenty acres. He has since 
sold all of this property, however, save one hundred and sixty acres, which he has 
converted into rich and productive fields upon which he annually raises good crops 
of grain and of hay. He has improved his farm in many ways and is" todav the 
owner of an excellent ranch upon which are found good buildings and all modern 
accessories and conveniences. 

Mr. Wilson has been married twice. In 1887 he wedded Artilda A. Tribble- 
cock, a native of Iowa, who passed away in December, 1891. In 1901 Mr. Wilson 
was again married, his second union being with Isabelle Murray, of Ellensburg. The 
children of the first marriage are: Clyde W., who died in 1912; and Grace A., the 
wife of William Evans, residing at Sunnyside. Washington. Two children have also 
been born of the second marriage: Mildred M., twelve years of age: and Helen E., 
aged eight. The family attend the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Wilson is a republican in politics but has never been an office seeker. He 



320 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

has, however, served as a member of the school board and the cause of education 
has ever found in him a stalwart champion. He has not sought, however, to figure 
in public affairs, content to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his business, 
with which he was actively identified until a recent date, when he rented his land and 
is now practically living retired, enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly 
merits. 



LOUIS POULSEN. 



A well improved ranch property pays tribute to the care and labor bestowed 
upon it by its owner, Louis Poulsen, now one of the representative agriculturists of 
Kittitas county. He was born in Denmark, August 19, 1869, a son of Paul and Mary 
Poulsen. both of whom are now deceased. He came to the United States in 1893, 
when a young man of about twenty-four years, spending two years in Chicago, 
after which he came to the northwest, settling in Kittitas county, Washington, in 
1894. For four years he engaged in mining at the Swack mines in this county and 
in 1898 he went to Alaska, where he engaged in mining for four years, prospering 
during the period of his residence in that section and making enough to buy his farm. 

In 1902 Mr. Poulsen returned to Washington and purchased one hundred and 
twenty acres of land in Kittitas county, near Ellensburg. Later he sold forty acres 
of this but still retains eighty acres and upon his ranch he has built a fine home, 
also large and substantial barns and all modern improvements. He raises hay and 
grain and carefully studies the needs of the soil and the crops best adapted to 
climatic conditions here. His work is at all times practical and his enterprise and 
diligence are the basis of his success. He has the latest improved machinery upon 
his place and in fact his is one of the model ranches of this section, his business 
being most carefully and wisely managed. 

In 1904 Mr. Poulsen was united in marriage to Miss Nettie Deilig, who was 
born in Springfield, Illinois. Fraternally he is connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and his political faith is that of the republican party. He 
has traveled quite extensively, seeing much of the world and thus constantly broaden- 
ing his knowledge by experience. He has a wide acquaintance in Kittitas county 
and all attest his worth as a man and citizen. 



EDMUND L. DORAN. 

Edmund L. Doran was born in Waddington. New York, March 14. 1883, son 
of Samuel B. and lane (Behan) Doran. The father was customs collector at Wad- 
dington and in his younger days owned and operated a carding mill at that point. 
He departed this life in 1907 but the mother still makes her home in the Empire state. 

Mr. Doran supplemented his high school course by attending business college 
at Brockville. Ontario, and started in life as a stenographer. He was employed as 
such in Detroit, Michigan, from which city he later moved to Chicago, Illinois, and 
was subsequently employed in various western towns and cities from Chicago to the 
Pacific coast, but finally returned to Chicago, whence he came to Toppenish in the 
fall of 1909. 

During part of 1909 and 1910 Mr. Doran was employed as bookkeeper by the 
Traders Bank. In the latter part of 1910 he entered the employ of the Toppenish 
Commercial Company. Inc., as manager, and a year later bought the controlling 
interest in that corporation, since which time he has retained such interest and as 
president and manager has had active control of the business. The company deals 
largely with city and reservation lands; also has a large fire and life insurance busi- 
ness. 

In 1917 Mr. Doran brought into his office and took the management of a branch 
of the Fidelity Abstract & Title Company, with head office at Sunnyside, Washing- 
ton. 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA X'ALLEY 321 

In 1910 Mr. Doran was united in marriage to Mary E. Stone, of IToppcnish, the 
only daughter of Mrs. Susan Swasey, formerly Mrs. Susan Stone. 

In 1911 Mr. Doran put a thirty acre addition to Toppenish on the market and 
has been very successful in disposing of same, and having placed a building restric- 
tion on the property has succeeded in getting but the better class of residences. 

In 1918 Mr. Doran bought the "Bond" property, a one story brick building on 
Toppenish avenue and moved his offices into same. 

Mr. Doran belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, having mem- 
bership in Y'akima Lodge, No. 318. He is also identified with the Knights of Colum- 
bus, Toppenish Council, No. 1699, which indicates his religious faith to be that of the 
Catholic church. Mr. Doran's political belief is that of the republican party, though 
he is not active in politics, only insofar as the local situation is concerned, hav- 
ing acted as councilman on the city council, and at present acting as city treasurer. 



JOHN MECHTEL. 



One of the important business enterprises of Yakima is the bakery owned and 
conducted by John Mechtel, whose long experience in this line of business well 
qualifies him for the successful conduct of the enterprise of which he is now the 
head. He. was born in Minnesota, October 18, 1867, and is a son of Mathew and 
Katherine Mechtel. The father is still living but the mother has passed away. Mr. 
Mechtel is a farmer and a dairyman who still makes his home in Minnesota. 

John Mechtel acquired his education in the public schools of Shakopee, Minne- 
sota, and was reared upon the home farm to the age of eighteen years, working 
in the fields with his father during the periods of vacation, while in the winter months 
he pursued his studies. He afterward learned the baker's trade under the direction 
of his uncle at Shakopee, working at twelve dollars per month from four o'clock in 
the morning until eight o'clock at night. After spending five years in that employ, 
during which he gained a comprehensive knowledge of the bakery business, he went 
to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he continued to follow his trade for two years. In 
1893 he arrived in Yakima and spent one year in the employ of Joe Metzger. He 
afterward became connected with John Ditter and eventually they purchased the 
Luther grocery store on Front street. At a subsequent date they removed to Yakima 
avenue and in 1896 they purchased the bakery business of Joe Metzger. Mr. Mechtel 
ihen took over the bakery, while Mr. Ditter continued in charge of the grocery store. 
In 1897 the grocery store was destroyed by fire and for two years Mr. Ditter was 
with Mr. Mechtel in the conduct of the bakery, but in 1899 Mr. Mechtel purchased 
the interest of his partner and has since conducted the bakery alone. He has ever 
maintained a lunchroom in connection with the bakery and both branches of his 
business are liberally patronized. He has an excellent restaurant capable of seat- 
ing ninety people, and his pastry shop is in the rear. The bread shop is on West 
Yakima and Eleventh avenues, and the bakery equipment consists of two ovens 
capable of baking eight thousand loaves of bread daily. He ships bread to all the 
surrounding towns, making the Butternut and the Holsum bread, for both of which 
he finds a large sale. He also conducts an extensive wholesale ice cream business 
and he manuafctures. his own candies. His trade has steadily grown to extensive 
proportions and he now employs twenty-seven people. He is one of the few busi- 
ness men of Y^akima who have been connected with its commercial interests for a 
quarter of a century. He has the oldest and largest bakery in the valley and his 
business overtops that of any other concern of the kind in this section of the state. 
During tTie war he set an example by making such changes in his bakery goods as 
to strictly conform to the existing food regulations and, in fact, was food adminis- 
trator for the city hotel and other dining rooms for the Yakima district. 

On the 14th of April, 1895, Mr. Mechtel was married to Miss Anna K. Hartmann, 
of Shakopee, Minnesota, and to them have been born two daughters, Lucile Margaret 
and Gertrude Georgia, both at home. 

Fraternally Mr. Mechtel is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Loyal Order of Moose, the Modern 



322 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

Woodmen of America, the Woodmen of the World, the Catholic Order of Foresters 
and the Knights of Columbus and his religious faith is indicated by his membership 
in St. Paul's Catholic church. He also belongs to the Commercial Club and he is 
interested in all that pertains to the development and welfare of the city in which 
he has so long made his home and in which he has been so very active as a busi- 
ness man. There have been no spectacular phases in his career but his enterprise 
and progress have accomplished splendid results not only in the development of his 
individual interests but in ttie promotion of trade relations of the city. 



CHARLES L. COCHRAN. 

Charles L. Cochran, who was a valued citizen of that section of Yakima county 
which is near Outlook, in which region he has many' warm friends, was born in 
Boone county, Missouri, September 13, 1868, a son of John G. and Elizabeth (Eagen) 
Cochran, who were also natives of Missouri. The father, who was born in Septem- 
ber. 1839, passed away in 1912. In 1871 he came with his family to Washington, 
settling at Walla Walla, and in the succeeding years became a prominent farmer 
of that district. Afterward he retired from active business and spent his remaining 
days in the enjoyment of well earned rest at Dixie, Washington. 

Charles L. Cochran acquired a public school education, supplemented by study 
in the Empire Business College at Walla Walla. He was but a young lad of three 
summers when brought by his parents to the northwest, so that practically his entire 
life was spent in this state. He was reared to the occupation of farming and con- 
tinued to follow that pursuit until 1892, when he opened a general merchandise 
establishment at Dixie, Washington. He was made postmaster in 1893 and served 
for several years, having charge of the duties of the office while conducting his 
mercantile business. At length he sold his store in 1912 and removed to Sunny- 
side, where he engaged in farming until 1915. He then traded his farm for a general 
store at Outlook and conducted it until his life's labors were ended in death, being 
recognized as one of the representative business men of his community. 

On the 8th of May, 1901, Mr. Cochran was united in marriage to Miss Pearl 
M. Lewis, who was born in Garfield county, Washington, a daughter of William 
T. and Ellen (Logston) Lewis, who were pioneers of Washington and now live 
in Walla Walla county, where the father follows farming. To Mr. and Mrs. Coch- 
ran were born four children: Esther, Reese, Ruth and Veora. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Cochran held membership in the Christian church and were 
most loyal to its teachings. Mr. Cochran was a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Felows, in which he filled all of the chairs, and his wife is identified with the 
Rebekah lodge. He also belonged to the Modern Woodmen of America and in 
ploitics was an independent democrat. He was widely known and loved by all 
because of his many excellent traits of character, his geniality and his kindly dis- 
position. He passed away on the 17th of August, 1917, and nowhere was his death 
more deeply regretted than at his own fireside, for he was a most devoted husband 
and father, finding his greatest happiness in promoting the welfare of his wife and 
children. 



WILLIAM C. HAMILTON. 

That Illinois enterprise has taken advantage of the opportunities of the north- 
west is indicated in the fact that many of the now substantial and progressive citi- 
zens of the Yakima valley have come to this district from the Prairie state and are 
nov/ most loyal aiid enthusiastic residents of this section, .'\mong the number is 
William C. Hamilton, who is now successfully engaged in fruit raising upon an ex- 
cellent property two. and a half miles west of Yakima. He was born in Eureka, 
Illinois. .April 13. 1857, a son of William and Mary (Hunter) Hamilton, both of whom 
were natives of Ireland, but were married in New York. At an early period in the 




EDGAR HAMILTON 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 325 

development of Illinois they established their home within the borders of that state 
and spent their rem;iining" days there. The father was a stonemason and thus pro- 
vided for the support of his family. 

William C. Hamilton, when his textbooks were put aside, started out in the busi- 
ness v/orld as a clerk in a grocer}- store and carefully saved his earnings until his 
industry and economy had brought him sufticient capital to enable him to engage in 
the grocery business on his own account at Eureka, Illinois. He afterward conducted 
a store of that l-cind at Colfax, Illinois, but in 1905 disposed of his interests in the 
middle west and came to 'S'akima county. Here he purchased land two and a half 
miles west of Yakima and has planted it all to fruit. He has ten acres in pears and 
his is one of the finest orchards in the valley. Everything about his place is neat 
and well cared for and a spirit of enterprise and progressivcness has actuated him 
in all that he has undertaken. He is also owner of a fine nursery and sells all varie- 
ties of fruit trees, selected from the best stock. He has specialized in fine Anjou 
pears and these have proven very successful in this section of the country. He be- 
longs to the Yakima Fruit Growers Association, of which he is a director, and he 
is also a member of the Yakima County Horticultural L^nion. 

On October 27, 1880, Mr. Hamilton was united in marriage to Miss Mary Emma 
Chambers, of Illinois, and their children are: Walter, a farmer of Idaho, who is mar- 
ried ?nd has six children, a son and five daughters; Charles, who is married and is 
now field manager for the Yakima Fruit Growers Association; Percy Hale, at home; 
Helen, deceased; Grace, the wife of G. E. Eyler, living at Selah, Washington; Edgar, 
vvho sacrificed his life in the service of his country, having joined the LTnited States 
navy before he was of age, and who died of pneumonia on October 9, 1918, at Brem- 
erton where he was in training; Richard, who has also departed this life; and one 
child wdio died in infancy. 

Mr. Hamilton and his family are identified with the Presbyterian church and take 
an active and helpful interest in its work and upbuilding. Mr. Hamilton votes with 
the republican party and was one of its active workers in Illinois, where he served 
as a member of the board of aldermen and also as a member of the school board. 
In Washington he has preferred to concentrate his undivided efiforts and attention 
upon his business afifairs, which are gradually developing and have already placed 
him in an enviable position among the horticulturists .of the northwest. 



AUGUST B, HAUETER. 

August B. Haueter occupies a fruit ranch of five acres adjoining the west city 
limits of Yakima and is devoting his attention to the raising of apples, pears, peaches 
and cherries. Actuated by a spirit of enterprise, he has won well deserv'ed success 
in his business career. He was born in Carver county, Minnesota, June 23, 1863, a 
son of Christian and Wilhelmina Haueter, who were pioneer settlers of Carver 
county, where they took up their abode in 1858, the father there securing govern- 
ment land. They lived upon that place throughout their remaining days, both having 
now passed away. 

August B. Haueter acquired a public school education and early became familiar 
with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops as he assisted in 
the work upon his father's farm. He continued to devote his attention to farming 
in Minnesota until 1905, when he removed to Saskatchewan, Canada settling near 
Prince Albert, where he purchased land and again gave his attention to general 
agricultural pursuits. He there remained until 1911, when he sold that property and 
came to Yakima county, Washington, at which time he purchased a ranch of forty 
acres on Cowiche creek. Thereon he engaged in raising fruit, alfalfa and wheat, 
producing large crops of each. He made his home upon that place for three years 
and afterward resided in Yakima for a year, at the end of which time he purchased 
a five-acre tract of land adjoining the west city limits, on which he now resides. 
This is planted to apples, pears, peaches and cherries and his orchards are in ex- 
cellent condition. He has thoroughly studied the question of spraying and the 
care of his trees in general and he annually handles a large amount of fruit raised 



326 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

upon his place. He still owns the Cowiche ranch, which contributes much to his 
yearly revenue. 

On the 30th of October, 1895, Mr. Haucter was married to Miss Louisa Block, 
who was born in Carver county, Minnesota, a daughter of Carl and Hulda Block, 
who were pioneer settlers of that state. The children of this marriage are: Esther 
Louise, a stenographer; Lillian Hulda, a student in the Deaconess Hospital of Chi- 
cago which she is attending in order to become a professional nurse; and Milton 
August, Herbert Frederick and Mildred Edna. Mr. Haueter and his family are 
members of the First Evangelical church and are people of sterling worth, enjoying 
the high regard and good will of all with whom they come in contact. They have 
gained many friends during the years of their residence in this section of the state 
and the hospitality of their home is greatly enjoyed by all who know them. 



IRA J. GANO. 



Ira J. Gano, devoting his attention to general farming in Yakima county, was 
born in Patterson, Hardin county, Ohio, February 6, 1877, a son of James H. and 
Rhoda M. (Gardner) Gano. The father was a native of Champaign county, Ohio, 
born December 3, 1837, and was a son of Isaac and Nancy Jane (Hogg) Gano, the 
former a native of Berkeley county. West Virginia, and the latter of Clark county, 
Ohio. The Gano family is of French lineage and was established on American soil 
during early colonial days. The ancestral line is traced back through Isaac Gano 
to Daniel Gano, who served in the Revolutionary war, enlisting from Virginia. He 
was a valiant adherent of the cause of the colonies and rendered active aid in the 
cause of independence. He passed away in Virginia at the age of sixty years. His 
son Isaac afterward removed to Ohio in young manhood and there spent his re- 
maining days. He was a miller by trade and followed that pursuit in early man- 
hood, while later he took up the occupation of farming. 

His son, James H. Gano, father of Ira J. Gano, acquired a public school educa- 
tion in Ohio and was reared to farm life, with which he was identified in that sec- 
tion of the country until 1892. He then left the Buckeye state in order to try his 
fortune in the northwest, making his way to Yakima county, where he took up a 
homestead on the Moxee. With characteristic energy he began the improvement of 
the place and within a short time his labors had wrought a marked transformation 
in its appearance. For a number of years he was actively identified with farming 
in this section but now lives with his son. He is a valued and highly respected 
citizen of the county by reason of an upright life and sterling worth of character. 
Since 1856 he has been a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
was one of the organizers of the first Methodist church at Moxee. In politics he 
gave his support to the republican party for many years, but because of his deep 
interest in the temperance question he became allied with the prohibition party, which 
now has the endorsement of his ballot. His aid and influence have ever been given 
on the side of right, progress and improvement and of all those moral forces which 
tend to uplift mankind. His wife passed away January 5, 1918, at the age of seventy- 
six years, and thus this worthy couple, who had so long traveled life's journey 
together were separated by death. They were the parents of eleven children, of 
whom two died in infancy. The others are: William, a resident of Ohio; Ida, the 
wife of W. F. Benson, living in Yakima; Emma, the wife of Horner Purdy, of Yakima; 
George, who was a twin of Emma and died in February, 1917; Elva, the wife of 
Samuel HefTclfinger, of Yakima; Estelle, the wife of F. H. McElrce, living in Los 
Angeles, California; Avelnell, the wife of J. B. Patterson, whose home is at Reedley, 
California; Omar, who died in infancy; Ira J., of this review; Wesley E., who is 
engaged in ranching on the Ahtanum; and one who died in infancy. 

Ira J. Gano acquired his education in the public schools of his native state and 
was actively associated with his father in farming operations in the east as well 
as in the west until 1900. In that year he purchased a part of his father's farm and 
later bought eighty acres more on the Moxee. He was also engaged in the livery 
business at Yakima for three years but disposed of his interests there and in 1913 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 327 

he bought eighty acres a half mile south of Ahtanum, whereon he is now success- 
fully engaged in diversified farming. Broad experiences well qualified him for the 
work in which he is now engaged and his efforts are productive of excellent results. 
His farm is under a high state of cultivation and he annually harvests large crops of 
golden grain as a reward for the care and labor he has bestowed upon his fields. 
On the 12th of December, 1900, Mr. Gano was married to Miss Margaret Keys, 
of Yakima, a daughter of George and Isabel Keys. They now have four children, 
Elva, Gladys, Ruth and Walter. Fraternally Mr. Gano is connected with the Knights 
of Pythias and his religious faith is that of the Congregational church. In politics 
he maintains an independent course. He is serving for the second term as a mem- 
ber of the school board and also acted in that capacity for one term while living 
on the Moxee. He is interested in education and in everything that tends to pro- 
mote the material, intellectual, social and moral progress of the community and his aid 
can be counted upon to further any plan or project for the public good. 



JACOB F. OTTMULLER. 

The ranch property of Jacob F. Ottmuller comprises eighty acres of land near 
Mabton and in its development and improvement he displays an enterprising spirit 
that is producing" excellent results. Mr. Ottmuller was born in Livingston county, 
Illinois, December 11, 1868. a son of Jacob F. and Jardina (Johnson) Ottmuller, who 
were farming people, but both have now passed away. 

Jacob F. Ottmuller pursued his education in the public schools of Illinois and 
was reared to the occupation of farming, early becoming familiar with the best 
methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. He devoted his attention to 
general agricultural pursuits in Illinois until 1898, when he left his native state to be- 
come a resident of Barnes county, North Dakota. There he resided until 1910, when 
he again started westward with Yakima as his destination. After reaching this 
valley he bought ten acres of apple orchards on Nob Hill, which he sold at the end 
of a year and made investment in forty acres near Mabton. ' He is devoting his 
land to the raising of hay, grain and corn, of which he produces large crops be- 
cause he employs practical and progressive methods. He puts forth every eflfort 
to enhance the fertility of the soil and his work is being attended with most gratify- 
ing results. 

In 1911 Mr. Ottmuller was united in marriage to Miss Lydia Hicks, a native 
of Winona, Minnesota, and a daughter of Thomas Hicks, now a retired farmer liv- 
ing in that state. Mr. and Mrs. Ottmuller have one child, Christie. In his fra- 
ternal relations Mr. Ottmuller is a Yeoman and in political belief a socialist. His 
wife is a member of the Baptist church and they arc well known in the community 
in which they make their home. Mr. Ottmuller has persevered in the conduct of 
his business affairs, having no such word as failure in his vocabulary, and his de- 
termined and intelligently directed effort has made him the owner of an excellent 
ranch property. 



EDWARD SHEPPARD. 

For fifteen years Edward Sheppard has conducted a drug store in Kennewick, 
which from small beginnings he has developed into a finely appointed modern 
establishment where can be found a complete assortment of the best drugs and 
sundry articles such as are generally carried by a store of this kind. He is now 
numbered among the well-to-do and respected merchants of his city, and as he has 
always followed the most honorable standards in business, he has built up a large 
and profitable trade. He was born in Fillmore, Minnesota, September 15, 1861, a 
son of George and Hannah (Yost) Sheppard, the former a native of Germany and 
the latter of Pennsylvania-, in which state they were married. Subsequently they 
removed to Wisconsin and in 1857 to Minnesota. The father was a mechanic by 



328 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

trade but when in Minnesota turned liis attention to agricultural pursuits, which he 
followed throughout his active life, passing away at the age of eighty-six years, 
while his wife attained the age of eighty-four. 

Edward Sheppard attended school in his native state and after having com- 
pleted his education turned his attention to the drug business by serving an ap- 
prenticeship in a store at Spring Valley, Minnesota, after which he continued as 
drug clerk for some time. He then decided to embark in business independently 
and opened a drug store in Spring Valley, which he conducted until 1902 with 
good success. Perceiving the opportunities of the west, he determined to take ad- 
vantage of the business chances here and for one year traveled through the states 
■of Idaho, Oregon and Washington, looking for a suitable location. On the 3d of 
November, 1903, he located at Kennewick, where he acquired a small drug, store 
which was owned by a Mr. Hays and had been the first store established here. 
In 1904 Mr. Sheppard erected a new building and therein he has since conducted 
business. It is a two-story structure, twenty-five by sixty-five feet, and the store 
appointments are thoroughly modern and splendidly fitted for the business. Only 
the best qualities of drugs are carried and all allied articles, such as are generally 
carried in drug stores, are to be found in this establishment. The prescription 
department is handled with the greatest of care and all customers are treated with 
that politeness which assures of their return. It is therefore but natural that Mr. 
Sheppard enjoys a large custom. His thorough experience and natural business 
ability have made his business one of the largest within the county and he now 
derives a gratifying income therefrom. His is the only store in Kennewick that has 
never changed its name or location or policy, the same upright principles which 
haA e guided it from its inception still prevatling today. 

In 1908 Mr. Sheppard was united in marriage to Miss Viola Kampf, of Minne- 
apolis, who prior to her marriage was one of the able teachers of the Kennewick 
nigh school. Mrs. Sheppard completed her education at the L-niversities of Minnesota 
and Illinois, receiving the degree of Bachelor of .'^rts from the latter. She also 
holds certificates from the College of Pedagogy in both universities, and completed 
the three year course in the Northwest Bilile Training School. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Sheppard has been born a daughter, Ardice Mae, who is nine years of age. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Sheppard is a republican and he has the distinc- 
tion of h.iving served as the first mayor of Kennewick for a term of two years, giving 
the city a businesslike administration productive of excellent results. He also served 
for one term as councilman. Fraternally he is connected with the Elks lodge of 
Austin, Minnesota, and with the Knights of Pythias and Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. Outside of his drug store and building he is the owner of a valuable 
irrigated alfalfa ranch, from which he derives an addition to his income. His resi- 
dence is one of the finest in Benton county and there Mr. and Mrs. Sheppard often 
entertain their many friends, all of whom are agreed as to their splendid qualities 
of character and heart. Mr. Sheppard has well earned the reputation of a successful, 
high principled business man and public-spirited citizen, ever being ready to give 
of his service or means in order to promote the developemnt and growth of his 
section and city. 



ORDL-V R. LEAMING. 

Ordia K. Learning, engaged in the weldmg business in Yakima, is numbered 
among the native sons of the northwest, for his birth occurred in Adams county, 
Oregon, on the 21st of June, 1881. His parents, Ezra and Frances (Gerkin) Learn- 
ing, were pioneers of Oregon, where the father devoted his life to the occupation of 
farming. He passed away and in 1888 the mother removed to North Yakima, where 
her death occurred. 

Ordia R. Leaming acquired a public school education in Yakima, for he was a lad 
of but seven years at the time the family home was established in this city. After 
reaching young manhood he turned his attention to the hay trade, having in the 
meantime followed farming to the age of sixteen years. For some time he con- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 331 

tinned to engage in the sale of haj- and later entered npon gas engine repair work. 
He was employed at the gas plant for several j'ears in the nianufactnre and repairing 
of gas engines and later he went to Seattle where he learned acetylene welding. 
Subsequently he returned to Yakima and purchased a bicycle shop and a little later 
he added an acetylene welding plant. He now does more of this welding than any 
of the other plants of the kind in Yakima, his business having reached extensive pro- 
portions because he has developed expert skill in this particular. He has thoroughly 
mastered a work that never ceases to excite the wonder of all — a work whereby metal 
raised to an almost incredible degree of heat fuses at an instant touch, the process 
enabling the individual to etTect repairs that could not have been accomplished before 
this method was invented and perfected. 

In 1910 Mr. Learning was married to Miss Albertine Poirire, of Yakima, and 
they have three children: Frances, Ordia Rollins, Jr.. and Mabel. Mr. Leaming 
has never been active in lodge or club circles but has always concentrated his efforts 
and attention upon his business affairs and his home, and finds his greatest happiness 
in promoting the welfare of his wife and children. 



JOSEPH L. CLIFT. 



Joseph L. Clift, cashier of the Yakima Trust Company, was born in Elkader, 
Iowa, on the 3d of July, 1885, a son of Walter and Margaret Clift. The father was a 
merchant of Iowa, who on the 2d of May, 1895, arrived in Yakima. He purchased 
land in the Selah valley and has there engaged in farming to the present time. 

Joseph L. Clift was a lad of about ten years when the family came to the Pacific 
coast and in this section of the country he acquired a district school education and 
afterward attended the North Yakima Business College. He did not desire to follow 
the occupation of farming, to which he had been reared, his commercial training 
qualifying him for other work. He secured a position in the Mabton Bank at 
Mabton, Washington, and was advanced to assistant cashier. On the 10th of De- 
cember, 1906, he became connected with the Yakima Trust Company as bookkeeper 
and later was made its secretary, while subsequently he was elected cashier and is 
now occupying that position. 

, On the 22d of January, 1907, Mr. Clift was united in marriage to Miss Sada 
Goldsberry, of Yakima, and they now have one son, Walter Forman. Fraternally 
Mr. Clift is connected with the Knights of Pythias and he is a member of the local 
chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution, of which he is serving as treasurer. 
He also belongs to the Commercial Club and is deeply interested in every enter- 
prise of that organization for the benefit and upbuilding of the community in which 
he lives. His political allegiance is given to the republican party. 



U. KIRBY LAIL. 



Among the popular officials of Sunnyside and the Yakima valley is U. Kirby 
r,ail, the efficient postmaster of his city. He was born in Cynthiana, Kentucky, Sep- 
tember 9, 1860, of the marriage of George and Sarah (Gray) Lail, both natives of 
the Blue Grass state and descendants of old southern families. Throughout his 
active life the father followed agricultural pursuits with good success, so continu- 
ing until his death. He is survived by his widow, who was born in 1828, and has now 
reached the age of ninety years. 

Under the careful guidance of his worthy parents U. Kirby Lail received his 
first Icsons preparing him for life's serious duties. In the acquirement of his educa- 
tion he attended public schools, rounding out his learning at a business college in 
Lexington, Kentucky. He subsequently took up agricultural pursuits in that state, 
follovvmg in the footsteps of his father, but in 1893 reinoved to Macedonia, Iowa, 
where he conducted a general store for about nine years, or until 1902, when he came 
to Washington, locating in Wenatchce, where for nine vears. or until 1911, he suc- 

13c) 



332 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

cessfully conducted a furniture business. In that year he came to Sunnyside and 
gave his attention to ranching for about four years, at the end of which period he 
became connected with the mercantile business of J. B. George. On the 19th of 
February, 1916, Mr. Lail was appointed postmaster of Sunnyside, entering upon his 
duties in July of that year. He has since ably administered the office, giving great 
satisfaction to the public. He has introduced simplified systems in order to facili- 
tate mail matters and does everything possible to render the best service obtainable. 
On February 22, 1888, Mr. Lail was united in marriage to Miss Iva Roberts, a 
native of Kentucky, and to them have been born three children: George, who is 
married and is an electrical engineer, making his home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; 
Louise, who is acting as assistant postmaster; and Lillian, a resident of Pullman, 
Washington. 

In his political views Mr. Lail is a democrat and has always taken an active 
part in promoting the interests of this organiation, being quite prominent in local 
politics. He is a member of the Sunnyside Commercial Club, ever ready to assist 
in its projects, and fraternally he belongs to the Masons, being a member of the 
blue lodge and chapter. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. Mr. 
Lail has a fine apple ranch in the Wenatche valley and is well known as a successful 
agriculturist. All who know him speak of him in the highest terms and his genial, 
pleasant ways have won him many friends who are as one in regard to their es- 
timation of his high qualities of character. 



EARL V. WYAXT. 



Earl V. Wyant is the owner of a good farm property of forty-four acres near 
Grandview, which he purchased in 1917. although he had previously owned land and 
been identified with the agricultural interests of Yakima county. He was born in 
Greenwood county, Kansas, February 26, 1873, a son of M. B. and Sarah W. Wyant, 
who were pioneer settlers of the Sunflower state and were natives of Ohio. The 
fa'her has devoted his entire life to farming but has now retired from business cares, 
he and his wife still making their home in Kansas. 

Earl V. Wyant supplemented his public school education by a course in a 
business college and afterward took up the profession of teaching, which he followed 
for several years, dividing his time between the work of the schoolroom and farm- 
ing. He was the owner of several farms in Kansas but in 1900 sought the oppor- 
tunities of the northwest. He visited Yakima county to look over the country but 
did not at that time purchase land. In 1907 he returned to this state and bought a 
farm near Seattle. In 1915 he became owner of a ranch west of Yakima, which 
he sold in 1917, when he made investment in forty-four acres of land near Grand- 
view, whereon he is now engaged in raising hay, corn and other products. He is 
successfully managing his farming interests and annually harvests good crops. 

On the 6th of May, 1896, Mr. Wyant was united in marriage to Miss L. Delle 
Wood, a native of Kansas and a daughter of James and Mary Wood. They have 
one child, Jesse W. In his political views Mr. Wyant has always been a republican 
and while in Snohomish county served as deputy county assessor. His religious faith 
and that of his wife is indicated by their membership in the Presbyterian church. 
They are highly esteemed people of the community, winning the warm regard of 
all with whom they have come in contact by reason of their many sterling traits 
of character. 



JOSEPH A. SNYDER. 

Joseph A. Snyder, actively engaged in farming on a ranch of one hundred and 
fifty-eight acres nine miles southwest of Yakima, was born in Harrison county, Ohio, 
June 21, 1861, a son of John and Nancy Jane (Hutchinson) Snyder, who in 1864 
removed from Ohio to St. Clair county, Missouri, where the father continued to re- 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 333 

side until his death. The mother is now living in Pittsburg, Kansas, at the age 
of eighty-one years. 

Joseph A. Snyder acquired a public school education in Missouri while spend- 
ing his youthful days upon his father's farm and through vacation periods he early 
became familiar with the work of the fields. He was actively identified with agri- 
cultural interests in his native state until 1909, when he removed to the northwest 
with Seattle as his destination. In young manhood he had learned the carpenter's 
trade, which he followed in connection with construction work for the Seattle Ex- 
position. He also built a Joy Wheel, which he operated during the exposition, and 
made considerable money on that venture. In 1910 he located in Yakima and became 
a carpenter foreman in connection with the erection of the buildings for the State 
Fair. Pleased with the northwest, its opportunities and prospects, he then rented 
an eight hundred acre wheat ranch near Ellensburg and continued its cultivation 
for eighteen months. He afterward rented the Mountain View ranch, near Naches 
City, living thereon for three years, and in January, 1916, he purchased one hundred 
and fifty-eight acres nine miles southwest of Yakima and has since devoted his 
energies and attention to the cultivation and development of the place. He is now 
engaged in raising wheat, alfalfa, corn and other diversified crops and he also con- 
ducts a profitable dairy business, keeping graded cattle for this purpose. 

On the 31st of December. 1885, Mr. Snyder was united in marriage to Miss 
Virginia C. Bushong, of Virginia, a daughter of Samuel and Mary Bushong, who 
removed from the Old Dominion to Grundy county, Missouri, during her girlhood 
days. Mr. and Mrs. Snyder have never had any children of their own, but their 
kindness and generosity have prompted them to rear six children: Walter and Min- 
nie Redford, now of Spokane; William and Lettie Merritt, the latter the wife of 
Andrew Dahl, a rancher; and two others, who are deceased. 

Mr. Snyder is a member of the Woodmen of the World, also of the Loyal Order 
of Moose and of the Grange. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party and while in Missouri he served for eight years as deputy sheriff but has never 
sought or desired office in the northwest. He concentrates his energies, efforts and 
attention upon his business affairs and has become the owner of an excellent farm 
property, from which he is now deriving a substantial annual income. 



JOHN SEVERYNS. 



-Although one of the latest additions to Sunnyside's merchants, John Sevcryns 
is already recognized as one of its most enterprising business men, being connected 
with the hay and grain trade. He was born in Custer county, Nebraska, July 12 
1885, and is a son of Joseph H. and Mary F. (Francois) Severyns, the former of 
whom has passed away. Coming to Washington in 1900, Mrs. Severyns located in 
Rattlesnake, where she acquired three sections of railroad land, to the cultivation 
of which she has since devoted her attention. 

The first fifteen years of his life John Sevcryns spent in his native state, there 
receiving his primary education. In 1900 he removed with the family to Rattlesnake 
and for five years assisted his mother in the cultivation of the large tract which she 
had acquired from the railroad. He then removed to Prosser, and subsequently, 
realizing the value of a better education, attended college at Pullman. There he also 
lieid a position with a Mr. Fry, who was engaged in the feed business. He was then 
elected county assessor of Benton county and served for four years, or two terms, 
proving highly efiicient in the discliarge of his duties. The two subsequent years 
he spent in the employ of the Union Pacific Railroad, at the end of which time he 
again entered the employ of Mr. Fry. In April, 1918, he came to Sunnyside and 
bought out the business of Rowland & Son and is now engaged in the hay, grain, 
feed and fuel business. .Although he has been located in Sunnyside only a short time 
he has already instituted a number of improvements in his business and in every way 
tries to please tlie pulilic by carrying the highest class of goods and by selling at a 
reasonable profit. He fully recognizes and practices the principles of good service 
and honest prices. 



334 HISTORY OF YAKIAIA X'ALLEY 

On June 4, 1914. Mr. Scveryns was united in marriage to Miss Jessie M.- Shelby, 
of Prosser, and both are prominent among the young people of the valley. In his 
political views Mr. Scveryns is a republican and fraternally is quite prominent, be- 
longing to the blue lodge of Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the Foresters. 
Aside from his mercantile interests he owns valuable farm lands, from which he de- 
rives a gratifying addition lo his income. He is an energetic, farsightcd young busi- 
ness man of honoralilo principles and a splendid future may be predicted for his en- 
terprise in Sunnysidc. 



JL'DGE EDWARD B. PREBLE. 

Jiuige Edward B. Preble, who for ten years was a judge of the superior court and 
is now president of the Yakima County Bar Association, has long figured promi- 
nently in connection with law practice in the northwest. The width of the con- 
tinent separates him from his birthplace, for he was born in Portland, Maine, in 
I8S8. a son of J. T. and Almira Preble. In the early '60s the family removed west- 
ward to Minnesota, where the father followed the occupation of farming and also 
served as county superintendent of schools in Hennepin county, where both he and 
liis v.ifc continued to reside until called to their final rest. 

Judge Preble acquired his education in Minnesota and was graduated from the 
State University there. He also read law in that state under private instruction and 
was admitted to the bar in 1883. In 1886 he removed to the west, making his way to 
Roseburg. Oregon, where he continued in the active practice of law until 1895, when 
he removed to Washington. In the following year he took up his aliode in Yakima 
and has since engaged in active practice, and his ability has brought him promi- 
nently to the front as an able representative of the legal fraternity here. His high 
standing among his colleagues and contemporaries is indicated in the fact that he is 
now serving as president of the Yakima County Bar Association. He was called 
upon for iuilicial service and was judge of the superior court for about ten years, 
retiriii- frnni tlic- bench in January, 1917. He has always been accorded a liberal 
and ili^tiiu i!\ t.l.\ leprescntative clientage and has long ranked as one of the dis- 
tinguished menihers of the bar of this section. He is the owner of fine farm lands, 
which he has held throughout the period of his residence in the northwest. He now 
owns a valuable fruit farm and he spends his summers upon his ranches. 

In 1880 Judge Preble was united in marriage to Miss Mattie Lewis, of Monti- 
cello, Minnesota, who was born in Arkansas. Of the children of this inarriage the 
only one surviving is Nora, the wife of George Guilland. of New York city. The 
wife and mother passed away and in 190.^ Judge Preble was again married, his second 
union being with Xettic Haynes, of Spokane, Washington, and to them one child 
was born, Bessie. 

Fraternally Judge Preble is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. He is esteemed as a man of personal worth as well as of marked professional 
aliilitv. 



JOHN B. RAMERMAN. 

John B. Ramerman, who now owns thirty-six acres of valuable land two miles 
southeast of Zillah, of which twenty-five acres are in orchard, is one of those valu- 
able citizens whom Holland has furnished to the United States. He was born in that 
country. February 4. 1852, a son of William and Johanna (Meyerenberg) Ramerman, 
both of whom passed away in their native land. Throughout his life tlic father was 
successfully engaged as a merchant. 

John B. Ramerman passed his boyhood and youth under the parental roof in 
liis native country and there aco.uircd his education. He began his ind?pendent 
career there but at the age of twenty-nine crossed the Atlantic in order to profit by 
the chances presented here for a quicker rise. In 1881 he arrived in the United States 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 335 

and at first located in CleAeland, Ohio, where he worked for others, but later estab- 
lished himself in the coal business. He was thus engaged for about nineteen years 
but in 1900 sold 'out and, having heard favorable reports in regard to the oppor- 
tunities for horticulture in the Yakima valley, he made his way to Yakima county 
and at first rented eighty acres three miles northwest of Granger. Two years later 
he acquired title to thirty-six acres two miles southeast of Zillah and this he now 
has in a high state of cultivation. He has made many improvements and instituted 
modern equipment and, moreover, has erected a handsome farm residence. Twenty- 
live acres are devoted lo orchard, principally apples, but he also raises a few pears, 
while the remainder of the tract is under the plow. Since taking up horticulture Mr. 
Ramerman h.TS closely studied the latest mbethods along that line, and profiting by 
his own experience and that of others, he has succeeded in developing a property 
from which lie now deri\es a \ ery gratifying income. He has raised corn sixteen 
feet high and his picture takoi in his corn field was exhibited at many local fairs 
and also at the World's I'air. 

In Xovember. 1879. Mr. Ramerman was united in marriage to Miss Albertine 
Bos, also a native of Holland, and tn this union have been born the following named: 
William, who is a rancher near his fatlier's place and is married and has two chil- 
dren; Harry, who is also engaged in ranching in the vicinity and is married and has 
six children: John, who fills the position of principal of schools in Iowa; George, 
who fills a similar position at Lyndcn, Washington, and has a wife and one cliild: 
and Jerry, who is also married and is farming his father's place. 

Mr. Ramerman and his family are highly respected by all wlio know them. He 
has ever been deeply interested in religious matters and assisted in building the 
Christian Reformed church, of which he is a devoted member. In politics he is a 
republican but outside of performing his duties at the ballot box has had no connec- 
tion with public life altliough he is helpfully interested in all movements undertaken 
for the development of the district in which he resides. He is a loyal American citi- 
zen who has made .\merican ideals his own and has become a valuable resident of 
this countrv. 



WESLEY E. GAXO. 



Wesley E. Gano, who is engaged in general farming, was born in Hardin county, 
Ohio, August 25, 1881, a son of James H. Gano, mentioned elsewhere in this work in 
connection with the sketch of Ira J. Gano. Wesley E. Gano obtained a public school 
education in Yakima county, having removed with liis father to the northwest in 
1892. His youthful days were spent in the usual manner <it the farmbred boy, his 
time being divided between the acquirement of a public school education, the pleas- 
ures of the playground and such duties as were assigned him by parental authority, 
.^fter his textbooks were put aside he and his brother, Ira J. Gano. engaged in farm- 
ing together until 1904. when Wesley E. Gano established a livery liarn at Yakima. 
He was joined by his brother and father in the next year and they conducted the 
business in that way until 1908, when it was sold. They then purchased eighty acres 
of land on the Moxee and there resided for two years, after which they disposed of 
that property. Wesley E. Gano bought twenty acres of land independently and con- 
tinued its cultivation for a year, when he disposed of it. His next purchase made 
him owner of sixty-two acres nine miles southwest of Yakima, of which he sold 
twenty-four acres in 1917. He now has thirty-eight acres of land, devoted to diver- 
sified farming, and he also rents forty acres on the Yakima Indian reservation. He 
is likewise one of the directors and stockholders of the .Ahtanum Cooperative Store, 
is a director of the Ahtanum Irrigation District, which he helped to organize, and 
otherwise is prominently connected with the commercial and business development 
of this section of the state. 

On the 15th of November, 1905, Mr. Gano was united in marriage to Miss Minnie 
R. Patterson, of Fresno, California, a daughter of W. S. and Sarah (Hope) Patter- 
son. Mr. and ,Mrs. Gano now have two children: Leroy William and Jay Harrison. 

Fraternally Mr. Gano is connected wnth the Knights of Pythias. His political 



336 HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 

allegiance is given to the republican party and he has served as special deputy 
sheriff for several years past and has been in charge of the policing of the fair 
grounds for the past three years, having twenty or more men, who report to him 
during the State Fair. He belongs to the Ahtanum Grange and also to the Knights 
of Pythias. He has been road foreman for the past three years and is interested in 
everything that pertains to the welfare and progress of the community in which 
he makes his home, and his cooperation can always be counted upon to further any 
plan or measure for the general good. 



GEORGE E. DESMARAIS. 

George E. Desmarais is the owner of an excellent farm property of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres not far from Moxee City. This he has brought under a 
high state of cultivation, transforming it into very productive fields. His business 
interests are thereby successfully conducted and he is meeting with well deserved 
prosperity in what he undertakes. He was born in Quebec, Canada, September 14, 
1880, a son of Israel and Sophia Desmarais, who in 1882 removed from Canada to 
Crookston, Minnesota. They are mentioned at length on another page of this work 
in connection with the sketch of Louis Desmarais, a brother of the subject of this 
review. 

George E. Desmarais attended school in Minnesota and in 1900. when twenty 
years of age, made his way to the northwest. Arriving in Yakima county, he pur- 
chased thirteen acres of wild land on the Moxee that was covered with sagebrush. 
No plow had ever turned a furrow upon this tract and it required much arduous 
labor to transform the hitherto undeveloped district into the rich fields seen today. 
Mr. Desmarais worked on energetically and persistently, however, and as his finan- 
cial resources increased he kept adding to his original holdings until he now has one 
hundred and twenty acres of valuable and productive farm land, all of which is under 
cultivation. He is engaged extensively in raising hay, corn, grain, beets, potatoes 
and hops. He built a home upon his place and has added many modern improve- 
ments which make this one of the attractive farm properties of the district. 

On the 29th of February, 1905, Mr. Desmarais was married to Miss Amabiles 
Crevier, who was born in Canada, where they were married. Their children were: 
Cecelia; Euclid, deceased; Alice; Florence; Robert; Leon; Corina; one who died in 
infancy; George; and another child who passed away in infancy. 

The family are all members of the Holy Rosary Catholic church. In politics 
Mr. Desmarais maintains an independent course, voting for men and measures rather 
than for party. He belongs to the Knights of Columbus and also to the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He is interested in public progress along all lines leading to 
the benefit of the community at large and he has served as a director of the drainage 
district. His business affairs have been most carefully and successfully conducted 
and he is today one of the most prosperous farmers of his part of the state. A fine 
orchard upon his home place proves the value of the region for fruit raising and he 
now has extensive crops of grain and vegetables where was found wild sagebrush 
land at the time of his arrival in the state. 



JOH'X ALDERSOX. 



The fine home formerly occupied by John Alderson, now deceased, stands in the 
midst of the oldest ranch in that part of the Yakima valley. In the development and 
improvement of the property he displayed keen sagacity and persistency of purpose 
that brought rich results. Mr. Alderson was born in England, December 27, 1836, 
a son of Mr. and Mrs. John Alderson, the latter's maiden name being Walker. He 
had a public school education and after his textbooks were put aside began learning 
the butchering business, which he followed in his native country until 1864. The 
stories that reached him concerning the opportunities of the new world led him to 




JOHN ALDERSON 




MES. ELIZABETH ALDERSON 



HISTORY OF YAKIMA VALLEY 341 

the determination to try his fortune on the west side of the Atlantic and he made 
his way to the United States, settling at Clinton, Pennsylvania, where he resided for 
several years. He aferward removed to Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, establishing 
his home in Wilkes-Barre. where he