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Full text of "The History of the Parish of Bitton, in the County of Gloucester"

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/2)Av sic,^. iia- ( y 



HARVARD COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 




BOUGHT WITH INCOME 
FROM THE BEQUEST OF 

HENRY LILLIE PIERCE 

OF BOSTON 

Under a vote of the Ptenieat and Fellows 
October 34, 1898 



r 



THE HISTORY 



OF 



9H §nhk of iittun, 



IN THE COUNTY OF GLOUCESTER 



BY THE 



,\ t> ' . '^^^ 



HEY. H. T. ^KL^LACOMBE, MA., F.S.A., 



OF ORIEL COLLEGE, OXFORD, 

RECTOR OF CLYST S. GEORGE, DEVON, 

FORMERLY VICAR OF BITTON. 



VoLj. 



"Maxima de nihilo nascitur Historia." — Propertius. 



EXETER : 
PRIVATELY PRINTED BY WILLIAM POLLARD, NORTH STREET, 

1881. 







\ 



a^XJL Xk^:1 



HISTORICAL ANTIQUITIES. 

"There be some who slight and despise tins sort of learning, and represent it 
to be a dry, barren, monkish study : but I dare assure any wise and sober man 
that Historical Antiquities do deserve and will reward the 'paflins of any English 
student. ... I wish the excellent parts of many other writers were not spent 
upon, more frivolous arguments, where by subtleties, and cavils, and controverting 
quibbles, they serve only to weaken Christianity, and (what otherwise were 
pardonable) to expose one another." Bishop Kennett'a History oj KidUngtorty 1696. 






PREFACE. 

Tlie first chapter of this volume, relating to the Mother Church of Bitton, 
was read as a Paper before the Exeter Diocesan Architectural Society, 
September 23rd, 1875, and now forms a part of the fourth volume, second 
series, of the Society's Transactions. The Plates at the end were reduced 
from drawings kindly supplied by Mr. H. R. Perry of Bath, to whom 
I return my most sincere thanks. 

The second chapter relates to the history of the several Manors, with 
Records of great interest. 

The third chapter relates to the celebrated Common Meads of Bitton. 

The fourth chapter does not embrace a full history of the whole Forest 
or Chase of Kingswood, but chiefly of that portion which lies in the 
Parish of Bitton. 

Collecting materials for this history has been a labour of love, beginning 
from the beginning of my residence in the parish, and following it up 
ever since as opportunities might occur (sometimes not without long 
intervals of doing nothing) : examining, I may say, all the available 
records in London, with the courteous assistance of the gentlemen in 
charge of the several departments: though the searches were attended 
with much pleasure, they were not effected without considerable expense. 

The parish has long been notorious for lawsuits, between the chiefs, 
about manorial or other rights, especially about Kingswood, between the 
Crown and pretended lords, nearly the whole proceedings of which by 
purchase or. the kind presents of many friends (to all and each of whom 
I take this oppoHfcunity of returning thanks), have come into my possession ; 
the result being the most important portion of what is now issued. 

Other chapters are to follow, relating to the Manufactures, the Geology, 
and Flora of the parish, the Via Julia and some other antiquities, with 



iv. PREFACE. 

an Appendix of Ancient Records in extenso; but at my advanced age I 
have thought . it advisable to leave these for a second volume : presuming 
by so doing, I am acting in accordance with the wishes of kind friends 
who desire to possess the work : still not without hope that it may 
please our Heavenly Father, with length of days, to continue to me vigour 
of mind and clearness of intellect, to finish the work I have been spared 
to see so far completed. 

Whatever defects or printers' errors may be found, I would request the 
courteous reader to favour me with his discovery, that they may be 
amended in the future volume.' 

I will conclude with a translation of my Greek colophon motto : 
"Ye who from your natural disposition, as well as from your education, are in 
all things good and kindly affectionate, and moderate .... be favourable to 
this work." 

H.T.E. 



Clyst S. Georgk, 

Kpiphamj, 1881. 



^ The if^HUo is liniitod to 125 copies. All the plates appear in this volume. 



LIST OF WOOD BLOCKS. 



Chapter L 

North-west view of St. ilaiy 's Church 

Fig. 1. Feet of Colossal Figure, treading on the Dragon ... 

2. Similar Figure at Rouisey 

3. Head of the Colossal Rood 

4. Arm of ditto 

* ' [■ Capitals of the Norman South Door-case 

7. Plan of tlie Foundation of the South Transept 

8. Fragment of a Bishops Effigy 

'[capitals of Norman North Door-case 

11. Corbel Head of Edward III at the West Doorway 

12. Ditto of Queen Philippa at the West Doorway... 

13. Head of the Saviour in the Roof of the Chancel 

14. Head of the Virgin, ditto 

15. Grotesque in the same Roof 

16. Two Dogs in ditto ... 

■^^" I Small monumental Effigies in the North Chantry 

12. j 

13. Monumental Tomb of Robert de Bitton or Button 
14^ ,, of Emmote de Hastinges 

15. ^ 

16. I Fragments of Ancient Monmneuts... 

17. i 

18. Initial Cross on a Bell at Hanham 



PAGE. 

4 
. 6 
. 6 
. 6 
. C 



8 
9 



10 

12 
12 
13 
13 
13 
13 

34 

33 
33 

30 




"Part of the worke remaines, one part is paat • 
And here my Ship rides, having Anchor cast." 

—'^eniok'B SiiprndM, 1648. 



Tl. 



WOOD BLOCKS. 



Chapter II. 



Seal of Bishop Thomas do Button 
Incised Tomb of Bishop William de Button 
Arms of Newton 

Tomb of Newton at Earl Harptreo 
Tomb of Newton in Bristol Cathedral 
Tomb of Chaucer in Westminster Abbey- 
Tomb of Newton in Bristol Cathedral 
Seal of the Abbess of Lacock 



FAGB. 
. 97 

. 99 
. 102 
. 103 
. 104 
. 104 
. 105 
. 113 



Chapter IV. 



Arms of Matthew de Button 
Net used in a Cockwood 



174 
212 



LIST Of THE PLATES. 



V 



Plate I. Map of the Parish of Bitton. 

„ Geology of the Parish. 

„ of the Manor of Gee Moor. 

„ Micklemead. 

„ Hohn Mead. 

„ Sydenham Mead. 

„ Edensfield. 

„ Kings wood Chase, IGIO. 

„ . „ » 1672. 

„ Manor of West Hanham. 

„ Liberties of Player and 2sewton. 

View of John Wesley's School in Kingswood. 
,, Holy Trinity Church, Kingswood Hill. 
„ Christ Church, Jefferies' Hill. 
„ of Hanham Hall. 
„ of Upton House. 
Map of the Via Julia. 



V 


„ n. 


v^ 


„ III. 


Y 


„ IV. 


V 


, V. 


^ 


„ VI. 


V 


, VII. 


y 


, VIII. 


V J 


, IX. 


v^ 


, X. 


y 


, XL 


• 


, XII. 


\/- 


, XIII. 


v^ 


, XIV. 


^ 


. XV. 


V 


, XVI. 


^ i 


, XVII 



Chapter I. 

Frontispiece — North-east View of S. Mary's Church Church, Bitton. 
Plan of S. Marys Church. 
North Elevation of the Tower and Church. 

Details of the Chantry Chapel. 

„ North Door of the Nave. 

„ Chantry Chapel. 

View of the Sedilia in the Chantry. 
Details of ditto. 

Groined Stone Ceiling of the Chancel. 
View of the South Door-case. 
View of Hanham Abbots. 
View of S. Anne's, Oldland. 



v^ 


Plate 


1. 


V 


j> 


2. 


r 




» 


3.) 


V 




» 


4. J 


r 




}> 


5. 


\r 




fy 


6. 


\/' 




J 


7. 


V 




)f 


8. 


V 




ti 


9. 


r 




>i 


10. 


v^ 




}i 


11. 


v^ 


f 


» 


11. 



/AQTpiot, Kai (l>i\avOpw'!roi, .... 
TSTOvg Xoyoig iirivivaan. 

Ad. fill. Op. - -^Justin :\l;irtyr, Ed. Paris, 1636, p. 39. 



THE PREBENOAL CHURCH OF S. MARY BITTON, 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE, 

BY THE REV. H. T. ELLACOMBE, M.A., F.S.A., 

(Sometime Vicar of Bitton^) 
RECTOR OF CJ.YST S. GEORGE, DEVON. 

READ AT THE COLLEGE HALL, EXETER, 23 SEPTEMBER, 1875. 

INTRODUCTION, 

Bitten is a parish of large extent, containing in its entirety 7,165 acres,' 
in the Hundred of Langley and Swineshead. The Prebendal Church 
of S. Mary is about six miles east of the City of Bristol, six 
west from Path, and thirty-eight south-west from Gloucester. It is 
boimded on the east by a corner of Somersetshire, from which it is 
separated by a brook at Swinford, on the west by S. George's, on the 
north by Abson and Siston, and on the south by the river Avon, which 
parts it from Keynsham, in Somersetshire. 

The river Boyd runs through, and probably gives name to the parish, 
which has been variously written in different ages ; it is Betarne in Doomsday 
Book, Button in other ancient records, which will be found in the Appendices 
in the History of the Manor ; and latterly Bitton ; all which are supposed 
to be contractions of, or corrupt modes of writing Boyd Town, that is, 
the town on the river Boyd, which is thus commemorated in an ancient 
poem, called "The Secrets of Angling," by John Dennys, Esq., published 1632. 

« Bitton ... ... ... ... ... 3355 acres 

Oldland ... ... ... ... ... 26L5 „ 

Hanham ... ... ... ... ... U9o „ 



7,165 „ 
VOL. IV, N.S., B 



2 THE PEEBENDAL CHURCH OF 

"And thou, sweet Boyd, l£iat with thy wat'ry sway 
Dost wash the cliffes off Deington and of Week, 
And through their rocks, with crooked winding sway, 
Thy mother Avon runnest soft to seek : 
In whose fair streams the speckled trout doth play, 
The roch, the dace, the gudgin, and the bleike." 

A large portion of the parish lies in that tract of ground formerly 
called the Forest of Kingswood, which was disafforested in the reign of 
Henry the Third, a portion being reserved as a royal chase; about which 
reference may be made to the Appendix. Rudder, in his County History^ 
of 1779, truly says of this parish that "It is beautifully varied with easy 
elevations, and some bolder rising grounds, which form a very agreeable 
landscape, as seen from several points of view. The soil is rich and 
fertile, consisting chiefly of loam, intermixed with different proportions 
of sand, and in some parts a little clay. The greater pait is meadow and 
pasture, both in common fields and inclosure." 

Als for the common fields, they were inclosed by a local Act 
passed 59th George III., 1819, excepting certain meadows known by 
the names of Holm-mead,' Micklemead," Sydenham,^ and Edensfield* — in 
which certain householders within the entire parish had unstinted right 
of common of pasture from Lammas-tide^ till old Candlemas-day, or 14th 
of February — ail which rights were extinguished by the Commissioners 
acting under the provisions of the Act 8 and 9 Vict., c. 118, and being 
thus disfranchised the lands were afterwards sold. 

There was an ancient custom connected with the opening or breaking 

' Helm-mead measures ... 

2 Micklemead ,, 

3 Sydenham „ 
4Edcnsfield ,, 

216 2 12 
3 It was in Sydenham meadow that the Duke of Monmouth and his rebel army, 
amounting to about 1,000 horse and foot, besides field pieces, &c., were encamped on tlie 
25th of June 1G85, about ten days before they were defeated at Sedgemoor. 

5 The day was the first Saturday after the 21st of August, at twelve o'clock noon, 
or 10th of August {O.S.) 



A. 


11. p. 


99 


2 19 


63 


1 14 


40 


1 37 


13 


22 



S. MAEY, BITTON, GLODCESTERSHIEE. 3 

of these meadows, which was done in this manner : by the proprietors 
of three estates — a white bull was turned into one ; a black boar into 
another ; and a black stallion into another ; after which, those who had 
rights turned in their cattle. The origin of this singular custom has not 
been made out. 

Great quantities of coal are dug in this parish, particularly in the 
Chace ; there are quarries of Pennant and blue and white lias ; bastard 
oolite occurs towards Landsdown, from which it is supposed the stone was 
taken for the buUding of the Parish Church. In the licts, fossils of 
nautili, saurians, &c. are abundant. 

There are two principal Tythings in this parish, now called Hamlets, 
viz. — Oldland and Hanham. Within the former was an early English 
Chapel, which was pulled down and rebuilt in the year 1830 ; adjoining 
which is a parsonage house, and by an Order in Council dated June 26th 
1861, an Ecclesiastical District of S. Ann's, Oldland, was formed out of 
Bitton. There is also the large Church of the Holy Trinity on Kingswood 
Hill, which was the first Church built by the "Million Fund Commissioners," 
and consecrated September 11th 1821, by the late Bishop Ryder. To it 
is annexed an Ecclesiastical District taken out of the Hamlet of Oldland. 

Within the other, viz. — Hanham, or more properly West Hanham, there 

is an ancient Late Norman Chapel, in which there remains a font and a 

piscina of that date. The building was restored (as it is called) in 1852. 

There is also Christ Church, with a parsonage house and school, built on 

Jefferies' Hill, and consecrated October 18th 1842, by Bishop Monk : 

This by Queen Ann's Bounty was made a separate parish, and by an 

Order in Council dated March 4th 1844, the new Church was made the 

Parish Church, and the ancient Chapel of Hanham Abbots a Chapel of 

Ease to it. This West Hanham and Grange annexed, with Norman barn 

adjoining, formerly belonged to Keynsham Abbey, to which it was given 

A.D. 1330 (See Appendix). So that now there are five Churches within 

the parish. There is also a Parsonage house with schools annexed to 

that on Kingswood-hill ; and also a Parsonage house annexed to that at 

Oldland, built in 1849, with school buildings, also the district of 

Warmley, the history of all which will be found in the Appendices. 

So much by way of introduction to the mother Church of Bitton. 
4 B» 



THE PREBENDAL CHURCH OF 




{Domus Mansionalis Omnipotentis Dei.) 



Bitton, or Button, is a Prebend founded at an early unknown date in 
the Cathedral Church of S. Marys at Salisbury. It is the most 
southern parish in the Diocese and County of Gloucester ; but before 
1552 it was in the diocese of Worcester. The exact date of the 
foundation of the building is buried in obscurity. The Church held half 
the parish in the time of Edward the Confessor,' but no record of its 
ancient history has been found. We can therefore judge of its age only 
by what we see. It is not improbable that, like the Abbey at Bath and 
many other sacred buildings, it stands on the site of a heathen temple, 
remains of Roman bricks having been found in the Norman masonry of 
the western wall of the nave when penetrating (in 1850) through it for 

» Domesday, 6, 170G, Ixvij. 



S. MAEY, BITTON, OLOUCESTEESHIEE. 5 

making the present entrance to the staircase of the tower from the 
outside. Tesserae of Roman pavements have also been found in the 
Church-yard, with an abundance of cinerary ware and burnt earth/ 
Roman coins also have been found in abundance in the neighbourhood ; 
there are remains of Roman villas. The Via Julia from Bath to Bristol 
runs through the village. 

We will first call attention to the existing remains of Early work, 
beginning at the Chancel arch. On the east side, in the Chancel, the 
abacusses of the original semicircular arch may be seen in situ. There 
used to be a plain hood mould. The arch itself was constructed with 
perfectly plain voussures resting on plain jambs of long and short work. 
In 1760-1 that arch work and jambs were covered with plaster of Paris 
ornamentation. Mr. John Wood, the celebrated architect of many of the 
fine buildings in Bath, who resided for a time at the Prebendal house 
adjoining, was one of the churchwardens at that time. Over this arch — 
the exact size of the present — on the west side was a plain hood mould. 



In one deposit were found the following 

ValftUittinn L A,D. 361. 

1. D.N. VALENTINIANVS. P.P. AVG. 

Head of the Emperor. 
R. VIRTVS. EXEUCITVS. Valentinian Btand- 
ing erect, holding the Labarum and a Globe. 
Ex. LVG. 

VaUntinian 11. A.D, 883. 

2. D.N. VALENTINIANVS. IVN. P.F. AVG. 

Head of the Emperor. 
Qt. VRBS. HOMA. Rome seated, holding a Victory 
and a Hasta. Ex. AQ. PS. 

3. DITTO. 

a. VIRTVS. EXERCITVS. The Emperor holding 
a Standard and a Globe. 

Grnti%H. A.D. 367. 

4. D.N. GRATIANVS. P.F. AVG, 

Head of tho Emperor. 
H. VIRTVS. ROMANORVM. Rome seatedholding 
a Globe, and tho Hasta rovorscd. 

Ex. AQ. PS. 

5. Dirro. 

ft. DITTO. Ex. TR. PS. 

6. DITTO. 

ft. VOT. X. MVLT. XX. in a Laurel, Crown. 



in a small earthen vessel : 

7. DITTO. 

ft. VIRTVS. R0M.\N0RVM. as No. 4. 

8. DITTO. 

ft. VIRTVS. ROMANORVAI, as No. 4. 

Eiigenmn. A,D. 392. 

9. D.N. EVGENIVS. P.F. AVG. 

Head of the Emperor to the right, 
ft. VIRTVS. ROMANORVM. Rome seated, hold- 
ing a Globe surmounted by a Victory* 
All copper or Billon. 

Areadius. A.D 395. 
Silver. 

10. D.N. ARCADIVS. P.F. AVG. 

ft. VIRTVS ROMANORVM. Rome seated. 
Ex. MDPS. 

11. CONSTANTIVS. A.D. 306. 

12. TETRICVS. 

13. Small coin, found A.D. 1822, in Mrs. Mantell*s 

Garden. 

At Oldlatid near Bitton was found Feb. 1836 a fine 
silver medallion of Valentinian, with several denarii, 
some of Arcadius. 



6 THE PBEBENDAL CHURCH OF 

and the plain string course still in situ ; above which are the rudely 
carved remains of what is supposed to be a colossal eflSgy of the Saviour 
treading on some dragon — (see Fig. 1) — so that the original roof 
must have been very high pitched to admit such a figure being visible 
inside the Church. A very similar figure exists at Romsey, not now 
inside the Church, but placed against the outside of the wall of the 
south transept. (Fig. 2'). The date of this plain work — viewed with 




other plain work still existing — may be as early as 1100, coeval with 
the plain Norman corbel t^ble on the north and south side. 

At the distance of 100 feet from the west side of this Chancel arch 
was the west end. This fact was ascertained by taking up the pavement 
of the present tower, and there was found the original entrance step, 
six inches below the present floor; and on the outside of the tower, in 

» I am indebted to the courtesy of Mr. Parker of Oxford for the loan of this Cut from 
his ''English Saints.'' 



S. MARY, BITTON, GLOUOESTERSHIEE. 



a line with the outside south wall of the Church, we found the foundations 
of two flat Norman buttresses ; so that, when the present tower was built, 
the nave was reduced to its present length, and the south wall west of 
the dooi-way, now blocked up, will be seen to be of a different style of 
masonry, and somewhat roughly sloped off to be tied into the angular 
tower buttress. This south doorway (now blocked up) has an elegantly 
plain Norman arch, with hood moulding springing from capitals of much 
later date. The capitals (Figs. 5, 6) and bases of these columns are 



.'^^ 





original, but the columns were set up in 1822, at which time the 
inside jambs of this doorway, with a bold tones running all round a 
depressed arch, were unfortunately destroyed. (Plate). 

On the north side, immediately opposite, was a corresponding doorway, 
which was destroyed in 12.99, when the two arches were built by 
Bp. Bitton opening the Chantry Chapel to the nave ; the foundations of 
this doorway were discovered in 1849. 

Over the then north entrance there was a square-headed single-light 
window, with deep inside splays and fan-like arch over. It had been 
blocked up when the north-east buttress of the tower was built and 
carried into it. Upon removing the masonry in 1822 for the purpose of 
converting tliis window (accidently discovered by the removal of some 
plaster) into an entrance to the then existing gallery, it was found that 
the window had been closed first of all at the time the west wall of the 
chantry was built ; for the end of that wall was carried close up and 
against the bars of this window, which appeared in situ, and whitewashed 
as well as the wall was ; and so, in the Church, this blocked-up window 



THE PEEBENDAT. CHUECH OF 



was like a circular-headed niche, in which state it must have remained 
until closed by the tower buttress. 

There was another window — of which the outline of the same arch 
may still be seen — exactly like it in the north wall, close to the east end 
of the chantry ; there was also a square-headed window over the rood-loft 
staircase : so that the probability is that all the windows of the Chiu-ch 
were originally of the same Norman type as those on the south side, and 
would be destroyed in the reign of Henry the Sixth, when the two 
three-light windows were constructed ; that, close by the chantry was 
destroyed in 1823, when the present two-light window was inserted. 

Massive blocks of Norman ashlar masonry may still be seen in the 
north and south walls. This work was disturbed very little when the 
two arches were inserted in 1299 between the nave and the chantry. 
On the north and south there were transepts, as may be seen by the 
remains of the arches and chamfers of the openings. That on the south 
side was a Mortuary Cliapel, in which the tombs of the Button family 



1. Tomb of Robert de Button. 

2. Tomb of Emmote de Hastinges. 

3. Fragment. 

4. Stone Coffin found in 1843. 

5. Space originally open between nave 

and transept. 
6 and 7. Old Foundations. 

8. Part of Churchyard. 

9. Parsonage Garden. 
10. Nave. 



were discovered in 182G just below the level of the floor. (See Engravings 
in Appendix). The foundations of this transept extended under the wall 
and into the Rectory or Parsonage garden twelve feet. 

The archway on the north side may have been an opening into a tower 
before the present western tower was built. Many such side towers still 
exist, e.g.y Fremington. When this opening was walled up in the fifteenth 




S. MARY, BITTON, GL0UCESTER8HTEE. 9 

century a low doorway was made, leading, as I imagine, to the basement 
of such a tower. Upon examining the ground in 1842 outside, foundations 
were discovered extending four feet beyond the present wall. The ashlar 
was face worked, and bore marks of having been fired or burnt. Many 
fragments of Nonnan tiles were found — one with the arms of De Vivon, 
another of Berkley, early lords of the manor ; also a piece of Roman flue tile. 
On the south side of the Chancel arch there was a plain oblong squint 
or hagioscope, that persons in the south transept might see the elevations 
at the altar. Among the fillings up was found a fi-agment of a bishop's 
effigy (Fig. 8), with the colossal head and arm of the rood : fragments, no 
doubt, of the feet above. 




tJTTfnC SC ■ 



8 

In January 1823 the staircase leading to the ancient rood-loft was 
discovered in the north wall, plainly accounting for the excrescence on 
the outside of that wall. 

It may be safely inferred from an examination of the masonry in close 
approximation to the elegant Norman doorway in the north wall, that 
that doorway was not inserted there at the time of the building of the 
chantry chapel adjoining, and that it is not the door case destroyed on 
account of the building of the two arches. There are traces of disturbance 
in the masonry of the wall — the removal of a flat Norman buttress —the 
masonry of the arch is imperfect. At the point commonly called the 
key-stone, one arch stone is missing (see Plate) : the space appropriated for 
the insertion of this door-case was not wide enough, so that some of the 
hood mould is buried in the adjoining wall, and that the elegant capital 
(Fig. 9) might not share the same fate it is made to project two inches from 
its proper place, the abacusses also are left out. The great torus of the door- 
case itself has been chopped down ; the quirks may be traced on one side. 

VOL. IV, N.S., c 



\ 



10 



THE PEEBENDAL CHUEOH OF 





9 lo 

It has long been my opinion that when the tower was built at the 
west end which was taken down, there would be, as we find in other 
Norman Churches, a western entrance, one of more elaborate work than 
those in the side walls, and that this distorted door case which we now see 
might have been that very one ; and, in order to preserve it from total 
destruction, it was, as it were, squeezed in (the placing it there 
being an after-thought) as best they could; a smaller doorway through the 
angle buttress having been before most ingeniously constructed, as 
may be seen, three feet wide and of the tower date. The plinths of the 
Norman doorcase were buried, the floor of the Church having been 
raised six inches when the tower was built. 

This completes the account of the Norman work in tlie Church, and 
it is not diflficult to determine the character of the old Norman Church. 
It was a long single aisle Church, of considerable height, with a row of 
small windows placed high up, and a north and south, and probably a 
rich western doorway ; it had either north and south transepts, or a south 
transept and a northern tower. Of the Norman Chancel there are no 
remains, and it is impossible to conjecture either its size or shape ; it 
may have been a short apse, as suggested by Mr. E. H. Freeman, when 
he visited the Church with the Somerset Archaeological Society in 1876, 
and this only accounts for the unusual shortness of the Chancsl as compared 
with the long nave. There may have been reasons why the Chancel of 
the fifteenth century should not occupy more ground tlian the older 
Chancel of the tenth century. 



8. MARY, BITTON, GL0UCE8TEBSHIEE. 11 

Following in the order of construction, we come to the chantry of 
S. Catherine, on the north side of the Church, founded by Thomas de 
Button, Bishop of Exeter, over the bodies of his parents, who were 
buried there. The ordinance for this chantry is dated May 1299. (See 
Appendix). In 1822 a stone coflSn was found at the foot of the altar 
step ; it had been previously disturbed. The elegant sedilia, with a 
piscina imder four canopies, are worthy of study — (see Plate) — ^as are 
the six side windows with their escons6n arches. The western entrance 
to this chapel is a rich bit of work. The roof at present is flat ; but we 
cannot suppose it was so originally. The east window is composed of 
three lights of equal height, with pointed cusps in each. On the front 
of the Chancel step is inscribed in modern enciiustic tiles. — 

maiBiDeiD a.D. 1299, «g ti!:i^(&^^^ dc «<a(i;c<i^j0, 

In the portico or vestibule of this chantry chapel there were rough 
stone seats all round, probably coeval with the chantry, before the same 
space was used as a church entrance, which it would not have been 
before the building of the tower and doorway through the buttress : the 
entrance to the Church must have been by the west and south doors. 

Following the order of construction, lis I have made it out, we must 
now briefly notice the two-light decorated window in the north wall, 
probably constructed of old window tracery, as the lines are not very 
correctly formed. Neither must we omit the two small square headed 
windows on the south side, constructed, no doubt, when the south transept 
was standing. 

We now come to the very beautiful tower which was begun, in my humble 
opinion, as early as 1377, at least within the reign of Edward III, judging 
from the doorway corbels, which represent that King with his divided 
flowing beard and jewelled crown, with strawberry leaves (Fig. 11). and 



12 



THE PEEBENDAL CHURCH OF 



Eleanor his Queen.* (Fig. 12). If the doorway had been of a later date, it 
would have had, probably, a squai-e panelled head moulding with spandrels. 





II 12 

The four-light west window is like those in the ante-chapel of New 
College, Oxon, built before 1380; judging from the very unworkmanlike way 
in which the string course is finished off at the sides, this window may have 
been an after thought, an insertion, not much later, but after the basement 
had been carried above it. Be that as it may, looking at the upper work, 
it surely very plainly tells its own history; viz. — that all that was done 
by other hands than those which began and built the basement ; yet, as 
a whole, it is a beautiful design, and has been considered a masterly piece 
of masonry, especially the way in which the panelling of the turret 
staircase is executed, and the north window of the bell chamber brought 
to the centre of the north wall, which did not appear to have occurred 
to them when they were building the window below. (See Plate). 

All the details of the three-quarter piimacles which spring from the 
slopes of the angle buttresses are the work of a master s hand ; and even 
now show a sharpness of arrisses, having been fortimately wrought in the 
hjtrd bed of bastard oolite, supposed to have been du^ out of the western 
escarpment of Landsdown, in the parish. 

The spiret was reconstructed in 1842. The tradition is, that the original 
one was destroyed by lightning about 1680. A corner of the lower string 

* Eot. Pat., 17th Edward III, p. 31, m. 3. *Eex concessit Adro do TIioi-p barbi tonsori 
suo^ in froodo unum messuag^um viginti et quir.quo acras terrro, ot trc« acras prati 
Eyo juxta Westmonastorium nuper Edwardi Barber do Eye.' The monument of EdNrard lU 
in Westminster Abbey, and this corbel, are proofs of the attention of tlie King to his beard. 



S. MAEY, BITTON, GLOU0E8TEE8HIEE. 



la 



course of the tower appears to have been broken off by its fall, and it 
is known, from entries in the parish books, that, in 1687, the Chapelries 
paid the sum of £16 10s. ll^d. towards repairing the Ohm-ch porch. 
The ceiling of the t<iwer was constructed in 1822 ; it is plastered between 
arched ribs of wood, with a trap door in the centre. 

We must now return to the elegant and unique Chancel. I call it 
unique, for I know no other instance where the principles of lateral 
groining are shown and produced on a flat surface as we see in the 
vaulting of the roof. {Sue Plate). The date of this may be put at about 
1450-60. The fine five-light east window corresponds in the tracery with the 
windows at S. Mary's, Redcliffe, built about 1440. There are bosses in the 
roof worthy of notice ; that immediately over the altar being the head of the 
Saviour (Fig. 13), the next is the head of the Virgin (Fig. 14), then a grotesque 
(Fig 15) ; and two dogs (Fig. 16) at the principal intereection. There are 




J3 





15 16 

other grotesques and Tudor roses at other intersections. Tlie roses have 



14 THE PREBENDAL CHURCH OF 

six petals instead of five the usual number, perhaps an accidental blunder 
of the carver's. 

The triple sedilia and piscina, with credence table all on the same 
level, though perfectly plain, are evidence that there was a permanent 
number of priests and deacons once employed within these sacred walls. 

At the same time that this Chancel was buUt, the sacrarium on the 
north side was annexed; not with the easterji doorway which now exists, 
for that was made in 1822 by cutting down the window. 

The roofs of the Chancel and sacrarium were originally, and are still, 
covered with tabulated stone work ; but as it was not found sufficiently 
effectual for keeping out the wet, the whole was covered with slate. 

It may be noticed that the Chancel is not set evenly as to the arch. 
At this distance of time it is difficult to account for such anomalies. There 
was a bell cot on the apex outside for the Sancte Bell; the hole for the 
rope may still be seen. It may also be worthy of notice that the sill of 
the window on the north side is considerably lower than those on the 
south side; probably the latter were raised to give more room for the 
sedilia. 

I attribute this elegant Chancel to John Gunthorpe, elected Dean of 
Wells 1472, who has the character of being a good architect, and has 
left proof of his ability in the Deanery of Wells, which he built 1472. 
He was also Prebendary of Bitton from 1492 to 1496, and in his will, 
dated June 25, 1498, he left the sum of £20 to the altar at Bitton, 
with which money, equal to about £80 of the present day, this work 
might have been carried on to completion.' 

During what may be called the dark ages in modem ecclesiology, the 
east window was walled up to the springing, and a Tuscan altar piece 
with entablature was set up against it, the work of Mr. Wood, before 
mentioned. It fell to my lot to remove it, and to restore some of the 
mullions in 1826, and to see it filled with some decent glazier's quarry 
work picked out with colour ; since which it has been richly adorned 
with the very beautiful glass with which it is now filled by Mr. John 

' Will proved Aug. 2C 1498. "Item logo ecd: Prebend: de Bitton, Wigorn: Dioc: 
jLxl pro ornamentis ccmparandis ad usum sacri altaris." 



S. MAEY, BITTON, GLODCESTEESHIRE. 16 

Hughes of London, being the munificent gift of Mrs. Hollins in memory 
of kinsfolk who died in different places in India, chiefly during the 
Indian mutiny : vide infra. 

The single-light window at the end of the chantry was inserted in 1825. 

We now return to the reign of Henry the Sixth (1450), at which 
time, from some cause or other, it was found advisable to rebuild the 
portion of the south wall, between the Norman doorway and the south 
transept, without at all disturbing the Norman corbel table; and when 
also two of the Perpendicular windows were inserted, in the head of 
one of which may still be seen pieces of painted glass of that date. 
The four-light window is considered to be of a little later date, say 1480. 
It was no doubt inserted when the south transept was wholly demolished. 

There is little more to be said about the work of the fabrick, excepting 
the rebuilding of the spiret in 1843, and constructing the Chancel arch 
in its present form. In this work the elegant fret work moulding of 
the north doorway was copied, the ornaments being multiplied, not 
magnified, to suit a wide opening, and the capitals were reproduced firom 
those of the two Nonnan doorways. As more patersa were required, 
copies were taken of some at S. Joseph's Chapel, Glastonbury. It may 
here be mentioned that the fret of this arch has its counterpart at 
Jedburgh Abbey, south entrance, founded 1147 — (see Engraving, Edin. 
Ency., vol. vi, pi. 167, p. 559) ; also a doorway at York and S. Mary's, 
Shrewsbury ; also the Chancel arch of Broadwater, Sussex. 

The present substantial and goodly adorned hammer-beam roof of Stettin 
oak, boarded with cedar, was set up 1860-5. The wall plates, forming 
a cornice of stone, are well moulded, in the hollow of which, on the 
south side, is boldly cut in raised letter? — 

D^jiy, »^Jiy, wiDiiV, iiiDK» (??)» U)jr mm^sf. »b;ivb« ;*«» 
9> ji^»» mr^$ts wKjJit. naxhx.T.T.^ixTin + xmz-fi' 

On the north side — 



16 THE PREBENDAIi CHURCH OP 

The roof which preceded it was ably constructed between 1710 and 1720. 
It was originally covered with lead, which overlapped in the usual way 
the stone wall plate which rests on the corbel table, upon which the 
present parapet was built, when the lead was removed about 1770. The 
weather table on the east wall of the tower shows that the high pitch 
of the roof was reduced to its present angle before the tower was built. 

A few words about the roof of the demolished south transept. That 
I believe was higher than the corbel table, and died into the roof of the 
nave. There is an instance of this of the same date at Branscombe, 
Devon. The proof that it was so, lies in the corbels which now occupy 
the width of that transept ; for it will be found upon examination that 
they were worked by a different hand than the others. 

In 1785 the internal fittings of open oak seats with a screen 
(fragments of the doorway of this screen are preserved) under the 
Chancel arch, were removed, and high pews, with double seats facing each 
other, weie set up. In 1822 these were altered by being cut down 
about twelve inches, and each pew was divided so that the whole 
congregation might face the east. At the same time the pulpit was 
removed to the north-east corner of the nave, from a position lower down 
in the Church. A gallery, erected 1721, at the west end was enlarged, 
and the sittings continued the whole length of the nave. At that time, this 
arrangement was looked upon as a most outrageous proceeding, being one of 
the very first churches in the neighbourhood where the pews were so treated. 

The present pulpit was the gift of Robert Lucas Pearsall, Esq. The 
design is copied from one at West Kington, in which Latimer occasionally 
preached. On a stone near is inscribed — 

THIS puLPrr 
ERECTED A.D. MDCCCXXXVIII. 

WAS GIVEN BY 

ROBERT LUCAS PEARSALL, ESQ. 

LATE OF WILI^BBIDGE, 
IN THIS PARISH. 

Since that time most happily a marvellous progress has rapidly advanced 
throughout the length and breadth of England — and in Scotland too 



FT. 


IN. 


24 


.3 


2 


9 


93 


6 


17 


2 




137 


80 





100 






S. MAKY, BITTON, GLOUCESTEESHIEE. 17 

and the seats of 1822, with the singers' gallery of 1721, all been 
swept away; and we have the pleasure to see the sjnxces filled with 
elaborately carved bench ends, with substantial sittings of enduring 
Stetting oak. 

The measurements of the Church are these : — 

Length of the Chancel 
Thickness of Chancel arch wall 
Length of the Nave ... 
Leng^ of the Tower 

The height of the Tower to top of the battlement 
,, ,, to top of the finial 

There are six bells, bearing the following inscriptions : — 

1.— I WAS ADED TO THIS RING BY SEV^ GIFTS 1694. 

PROCURD BY I BVSH AND ROG HARDING. L.O. 
2.— W ^ H ^ A ^ B. ANNO DOMINI 1633. 
3._^ W ^ H ^ A ^ B ANNO DOMINI 1633. 

4.-gj ROBERT ^ BRIANT ^ ANTHONY Jg WOODWARD .:. CW .;• 1669 AWAPAB/JP. jg 
6.— M' JOHN PALMER AND RICHARD FRANCIS CHURCH WARDENS. 1740. 
6.-C0M ^ WHEN v) I J CALL .;> TO ^ SERVE ^ GOD <^ ALL 1633 .:. W ^^ H ^ A ^ B .j. 

Before 1816 there was a ting-tang bell hung in the tower window, 
probably the same which had been the sancte bell of the Church. In 
the same year (January 8) the vestry ordered it to be sold towards the 
reparation of the bells. 

The font on the south side of the western entrance was made in 1846, 
by John White of Bristol. It is copied from one at Kidlington, Oxon, 
and is of Caen stone. The bowl of the former font was carefully 
reduced, and laid within the new one. It stands on an octagonal space 
paved with encaustic tiles, forming a plain cross, round which there is an 
elegant border, with this inscription : — 

In the basement of the tower is a manual, within a case, for chiming 
the belLs for service by means of a hammer striking the inside of the 
bells above. This was set up in 1822. The method was suggested to 

VOL TV, N.S., D 



ih THE PEEBENDAL CHURCH OF 

me by Sam. Watts, a clever v^orkman, and is supposed to be the first 
thing of the sort. Since that time the same contrivance has been set up in 
about two hundred towei-s. It is so arranged above as not to interfere 
with the gear for ringing. The lines being brought down to the floor, 
a child may easily call the people to the Services of the day. Before 
this the tenor bell only was tolled, which has a melancholy sound, instead 
of the sweet, mellow, and subdued tones which the bells cheerily throw 
out when they are chimed. The difficulty of getting a sufficient number 
of hands to do this daily, or it may be only on Sundays and Saints' days, 
with unbroken regularity for both services, is often found to be im- 
practicable, especially in country places ; and therefore, this simple 
contrivance is very valuable to all who consider chiming one of the 
most legitimate uses of bells. It is available for any number of bells, 
and lately it has been fixed at Worcester Cathedral for chiming the 
twelve l)ells for the daily Services. The chiming gear being distinct from 
the clappers, it does away with the lazy practice which is so common, 
but so destructive, of "clocking" the bells, or tying ropes to the clappers, 
by which so many fine bells have been cracked. The place for the 
manual should be the ground floor of the tower, which is also the 
proper place for the ropes to be brought down for the ringing. 

The altar cloth deserves notice ; it is of blue cloth. All round it, as a border, 
worked in letters of gold, now faded, with the Seymour crest at each comer : — 

THE GIFT OF COLONELL JOHX SEYMOUR TO THE CHURCH OF BITTON IN THE 

COUNTY OF GLOUCESTER FOR THE COMMUNION TABLE IN REMEMBRANCE OF 

HIS DEAR GRANDFATHER S^' JOHN SEYMOUR WHO DYED AND WAS INTERRED 

IN Y« MIDDLE OF THIS HOLY SQUARE NOV' 17"' 1663. 

There are some very beautiful modem windows of interest by Ward 
and Hughes of London, and Bell of Bristol, which may thus be described. 
In the three central lights of the east window The Ascension is represented, 
and in the lights on either side is the Nativity and Kesurrection on one; 
in the other the Baptism and Cmcifixion of our Saviour. Under the whole 
is the following inscription : — " Sophia, wife of Cap" H. A. Boscawen, and 
dau' of W™ HoUings, Esq. died at Calcutta 15 Feb. 1842. Henry Hollings 
died at Lucknow 22 Feb" 1847. W*" Charles Hollings was massacred 
at Cawnpore 20 June 1857. George Edward Hollings died at Lawdour 



S. MABY, BITTON, GLOUCESTERSHIEE. 19 

9 May 1857. George Boscawen died at Ballygunge 23 Sep. 1852. Erected 
in honor of God and in affectionate memory of the ahove by Harriet- 
Mary and Charlotte Hollings, 1863." 

In the south-east three-light window of the Chancel ; The crucified 
Redeemer in the centre light, with S. John in the one side light, and the 
Blessed Virgin in the other ; inscribed below on a brass plate : — " In affection- 
ate remembrance of John Whittuck Palmer, who deceased September 13, 1871." 

In a three-light south window of the nave : The Reproval of S. Thomas, 
inscribed in tiles : — "In memory of Thomas White of Hanham Court, 
and Bedford Row, London. Bom 29 Nov. 1793. Died 23 August 1869. 
And of William Bowman White, B.A., his second son. Bom 23 Feb. 
1823. Died 17 November 1849. 

In another three-light window in the nave : Dorcas clothing the poor ; 
Mary at the feet of Jesus ; Timothy instructed by his mother : Inscribed : 
"As a humble offering for the adorning of God's House, this window was 
placed by the nephews and nieces of Jane Ellenob Frere. While 
mourning the loss of her loving presence and bright example on earth, 
they rejoice in the remembrance of the fervent piety of one, who after 
the manner of holy women of old, 'Sat at Jesus' feet' (Luke x, 39), 
* Ministered to the poor' (Acts ix, 36), 'Taught the saints of His flock' 
(2 Tim. iii, 15). She fell asleep in sure and certain hope of the 
resurrection to eternal life, through our Lord Jesus Christ, April 6th 1872, 
in the 69th year of her age." 

Two-light window, by Bell of Bristol, on the north side of the nave : S. 
Luke and S. John. Inscribed : " Lieut. Will^* Glennie, R.N, Died 
June 20 1856. Erected to his memory by a few friends." 

The west window of four-lights; in two, The Angel appearing to the 
Maries ; in the other two, Christ appearing to Mary Magdalene. Inscribed : 
" WiLLMOTT Henry Wemyss Ellacombe, son of the Keverend H. N. 
Ellacombe, M.A., Vicar of the parish. Died Feb. 7 1864, aged 10 years. 
Erected to his memory and in deep sympathy with his parents by 
parishioners and friends." 

In the chantry chapel, all refer to the family of Whittuck, who was 
owner of Barrs Court, the ancient residence of the Buttons, to which 
this chapel is claimed as an appurtenance. 



20 THE PEEBENDAL CHUECH OP 

There are several mural tablets bearing the following inscriptions 

In the Ch.vncel. 
Oil th<j north wall :-- 
Arms: Gules, two vviDgs coujoiucd in lure, or. 

MEMOia^ SACRUM 

JOHN SEYMOR, laLITTS, 

COMIT. GLOUCEST. 

QUI NUN MINUS ILLUSTRIS ANIMI DOTIBUS EXCELLUIT, QUAM 

PR-E ILLUSTRl ET NOBILI ORTU CIAUUIT, MORTEM OBIIT 

NOVEMBRIS 17, ANNO EPOCHS. CHRISTIANiE, 1663.» 



HENRY THOMAS ELLACOMBE, M.A. 

SOMETIME VICAR OF TfllS PARISH 

ANI) 

RECTOR OF CLYST S. GEORGE, DEVON. 

DIED .... AGED .... 



ANNE, THE WIFE OF THE ABOVE, 

DIED AT THE VICARAGE HOUSE 

ON THE TENTH OF MARCH 

M.D.C.CCXXV. 

AGED XXXI. 



ANN, HIS SECOND WIFE, 

DIED AT THE VICARAGE HOUSE 

ON THE EIGHTEENTH OP MARCH 

MD. CCC XXX I 

AGED XXVIII. 



CHARLOTTE, HIS THIRD WIFE, 

DIED AT CLYST S. GEORGE 

ON THE NINETEENTH OF NOVEMBER 

MD.CCCLXXII 

ACiED LXXIIL 

"THESE ALL DIED IN FAITH.'' 



On the South Wall:— 

HEERE • LYETH • BENEATH • THIS • PLACE • THE • BODY 
OF • lOHN • BVRNLIE • VICAR • OF • BITTVN, • AND 
PRECHER • OF • THE • WORD • OF • GOD • WHO 
DECEASED • THE • 22 • DAY • OF • MAY. 
ANNO. DOML 1G27. 

1 Pedigree of Scyir.our in the Appendix. 



S. MART, BITTON, GLOUCESTEESHIEE. 21 

In the Nave. • 
On the east wall: 

In the North Aisle of this Church 

are deposited the remains of Martha King, 

the infant daughter of Samuel & Ann Whittuck 

of Hanham Hall in this parish, 

who died January 15th 1818, aged 6 months. 

Also of Anne Barnes, eldest daughter 

of the said Samuel & Ann Whittuck, 

who died February 22nd 1829, aged 21 years. 

Also of the above named Ann Whittuck, 

who died December 1st 1829, aged 52 years, 

leaving an afflicted husband and 11 children to 

lament the loss of an excellent & most affectionate 

wife and mother. 

Also of Edward Decimus, youngest son 

of the said SAMUEL it Ann Whittuck. 

who died August 17th 1858, aged 22 years. 

Also of Alice Rebecca, third daughter 

of the said Samuel & Ann Whittuck, 

who died June 23rd 1841, aged 29 years. 

Also of Samuel Hooper Wnirrucic, Clerk, m.a., 

eldest son of the said Samuel & Ann Whittuck, 

who died August 13th 1842. Aged 37 years. 

Also of Martha Jane, sixth daughter 

of the same Samuel & Ann Whittuck, 

who died March loth 1844, aged 25 years. 

Also very deeply lamented, Mary, ^second wife of the above 

Samuel WnmuCK, who died June 13th 1845, aged 51 years. 

Also of the above Samuel Whittuck, 

of Hanham Hall, Esquire. 

who died August 25th 1849, aged 68 years. 



On the south wall: — 

Arms: quarterly — 1, a lion rampant, for Jones; 2, azure, a stag's head caboshed or; 
3, argent, three acorns azure ; 4, sable a cross coupe engrailed or, between four 



22 THE PREBENDAL CHURCH OP 

maxtlets argent ; 5, on a fess wavy, between three water bougets, three cross crosslets 
6, as the first. 

Near this place 

lyeth the body of Alice, the wife 

of KiCHARD Jones, of Hanham, Esq. 

Also 

the body of Catherine Bethell, 

Widow, one of the daughters of 

Sir Francis Norreyes, Knight, who 

died June 3, 1C92, aged 44 years. 

Likewise the body of 

Richard Jones, of Hanham, Esq., 

who died January 27, 1697, 

aged 87 years. 

In his Vault at Oldland's Chapel 

lies the body of Thomas Trye, 

of Hanham, Esq., grandson of the above 

named Richard Jones, Esq., who 

departed this life November 23, 1728, 

aged 59 years. 

In the 

Church Yard 

on the north side of this Church 

are deposited the mortal Remains of 

The Revd. John Adey Curtis, m.a., 

formerly Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, 

and for the last 13 years. Vicar of this Parish. 

His unaffected Modesty and Benevolence, 

and the peculiar Sweetness of his Disposition, 

endeared him to his Family & his Friends: 

Zeal, ever tempered by fond Judgment, 

ardent Piety and unfeigned Humility 

were the leading Features of his INfinisterial Character; 

and by his unwearied Activity in the discharge of 

the Sacred Duties of his Pastoral Office, 

He obtained the Respect and Love of all his Parishioners. 

To the Sick and afflicted he was a kind & constant Benefactor, 



S. MARY, BITTON, GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 2» 

and while he imparted to them the coDsolations of Religion, 

his Hand was ever open to relieve their temporal necessities. 

He was bom 1761, was married 1799 to Albinia Frances, 

Daughter of William Hay ward Winstone, Esqr., 

and died 23rd January 1812, 

looking forward in Faith to a blessed immortality; 

leaving an afflicted Widow and Eight Children to lament 

his irreparable loss. 

The numerous Inhabitants of this extsnsive Parish 

being desirous of bearing testimony to the private & public 

Virtues of the Vigilant and faithful Pastor of whom they have 

been deprived, have by the permission of his Widow 

erected this monument to perpetuate his memory. 



Arms: party per pale or and gu. a double-headed eagle displayed az* 
Anotlier, Ermine, two bars gu. 

Neare to this place lieth 

buried the body of Francis 

Stone, who departed this life 

December 9, in the 

year of our Lord 1641. 

Also by him 

lieth buried his 3 sons, John, 

Francis, and Edmund, John 

was buried July 7 1647, 

Francis was buried May 2 

1658, Edmund was buried 

September 4 1656. 

Neare to this place lieth buried 

the body of Bridget the wife 

of Frances Stone, the elder, 

she died May 5 1635. 

Above their soules crowned with eternal blisse 
Triumph in Saints and Angells hnppines 
Below their bodies rest waiteinge to bee 
Calld forth in time to immortallitie. 



24 THE PEEBENDAL CHTJECH OP 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Egbert Straton, Esqre., 

late of Willsbridge in this Parish, 

Who died June 5th, 1851, aged 47. 

Of 2\Iary Letitia, his wife, 

Who died at Laiigen Schwalben, Germany, 

Sept. 15th 1856, aged 62. 

And of Frances Eliza, their daughter. 

Who died June 22nd 1851, aged 20. 

Also of Emily Charlotte 

their 2nd daughter 

WTio died in London, Dec. llth 1866. 

Aged 31. 

" I am the resurrection and the Life : 

He that believeth in me, though he were dead, 

yet shall he live. I. John xi. verse 25. 



On the north wall : — 
Arms: parti per pale gu. and az. a lion rampant, ar. 

In memoriam Stepheni Eosewell Gent, 
qui vitam obiit 28 die Feb. 1650. 



On a brass plate:— 

Near this place lieth the body 

of Jane Hollister, daughter 

of Edward Hollistb:r, of Upton Cheyney, 

Gent., by Mary his wife, and niece 

to William Scede, of CuUey Hall, Gent., 

and Katharine his wife, who 

departed this life the 23rd day of Oct. 1716, 

aged 11 years 8 months 1 week 

5 days. 

Sacred 

To the memory of 

Joseph Parker of Upton Cheyney Esquire, 

A deputy Lieutenant for the Counties of 



S. MAR^, BITTON, GLOUCESTERSHIRE, 25^ 

Gloucester & Bristol, 

And a Magistrate for Gloucestershire, 

Who died at St. Leonards, Exeter, 

29th December 1860, 

Aged 90 years. 

Also of Martha, his wife, 

\Mio r'ied at the same place 

22nd June 1843, 

Aged 74 years. 



Beneath lies inter'd 

Jannett wife of Richd. Williams, Esqr., 

of Culley Hall in this Parish. 

Who died 12th July 1794. 

Aged 29 years. 

Also the above 

Richard Williams, Esq., 

Died 28th April 1795, 

Aged 37 years. 



Beneath is interred the Body of 

Samuel Peaksall of this Parish (Gent.) 

Who died 16 Janry. in 1800. Aged 30 years. 

Also Susannah Creswicke his 

daughter, by Sarah Creswicke his 

wife, died 17 Janry. in 1779, aged 20 weeks. 

late Sarah Creswicke Clarke, Spinster, 

only daughter of David and Susannah 

Clarke, heretofore of the Parish of 

Westerleigh in this County. She died 

the 13th September 1803. 

Aged 32 years. 

Likewise Samuel their son died 

26 August 1799. Aged 12 hours. 



On flat stones in the Chancel there were several obliterated inscriptions for the 
family of Whittington : they lived at Upton Cheyney— see Pedigree in Appendix — 
and had intermarried with Seymour, the Lords Farmer, of the Prebendal Manor. 
VOL. IV, N.S., E 



26 THE PREBENDAL CHURCH OP 

On a flat stone under the pulpit : — 

Heare lyeth the body of George Wood 

of Saltford, who deceased the 19th of December 

1622. Mors optimo quies. 



In the Nave:- 



Edward the son of Edward and Elizabeth 

Pabk£R, died May 27 1741, aged 29 years. 

Sarah, wife of Joseph Pabkeb, 

died Sep. 5 1745, aged 25 years. 

Also the said Joseph Parker 

died Jan. 16 1778, aged 70. 

Mary, wife of Richard Parker, Gent, 

died Aug. 18 1764, aged 53 years. 

Also seven children of 

the said Richard and Mary are 

interred near this place. 

Also the said Richard Parker 

died Nov. 7, 1770, aged 56 years. 



Here lieth the body of William the 

son of Henrt Weare and Mart his 

wife who departed this life 30th 

day of July, Anno Domine 1700. 

Here lieth the body of Phillip Weare, 

the son of Henry Weare and Mary his wife, 

who departed this life the 2l8t of February, 

Anno Domino 1707, setatis suae 24. 

Here resteth the body of Mary Weare, 

the daughter of Henry and Mary Weare, 

who departed this life the 2l8t day of 

May 1712, aged 37 years. 

Here lyeth the l)ody of Henry Weare, 

of this parish, Gent., who departed this life 

the 2l8t of March 1720, ag3d 77 years. 

Also the body of Mary, wife of 

the said Henry Weare, ob. Sept. 11 1737, 

aged 88 years. 



S. MAEY, BITTON, GLOUCE8TER8HIEE- 2% 

In spe Besurrectioms, 

Hie jacet Corpus Francisci Creswickb, 

Armig, qui obiit 18 Jan, 1732, setatis bu8b 89» 

Ac etiam Corpus Marise Uxoris suae ^tat 58* 

Ac etiam Corpora Johannis, GtALFRIDE, Francisci 

et Mari^. 

Nee non Corpus Henrici Creswicke, Armigeri, 

qui obiit 

Vicesimo sexto Die mensis Julii, Ann. Dom. 1744. 

Etenim infra jaeet Corpus Hellenje, uxoris 

HEifKiCi Creswicke, Armigeri, obiit vicesimo 

Seeundo die Janiri 1757, setatis suaa 46. 



On the verge of an old stone : — 

Here lyeth the body of 

John Burgis, of this parish, Gent., who departed 

this life the 10th day 

of October, Anno Dom. 1697, aged 84 years. 



Beneath this stone 

Secure from storm or tempest, rests in peace, 

the body of Captain Samuel Alden, native 

of New England. He was bred to the sea 

service frpm his youth, in which dangerous 

employment, by the Providence of God, he 

was so successful as never to meet with an accident. 

After a passage in life of 45 years, 

he launched into eternity, Oct. 10, 1757. 

To whose memory this stone is erected by 

his truly afflicted widow 

Edith Alden. 

Also underneath lieth the body of Edith, 

wife of the above Captain Samuel Alden, and 

late wife of Mr. George Williams of the parish 

of St. James in the City of Bristol. She left this 

life, on Nov. 29 1775, aged 55 years. 

E^ 



58 THE PEEBENDAL CHURCH OF 

Here lyetli the body of WiLLUM, the son of 

William Mabtin, of the parish of Long Asluon, Gent,, 

in the County of Somerset, who departed this life 

in the 83rd year of his age, Anno Domini 1716. 

Here also lieth the body of Edith his wife, 

who departed this life April 12 1724, 

in the 80th year of her age. 



Here lyeth the body of Mrs. Sarah Dunn, 

wife of Mr. Tobias Dunn, of Hanham in the 

parish of Bitton and County of Gloucester, who 

departed this life October the 29th, Anno Dom. 

1719, aged 65 years, 2 months and 2 weeks. 

Also, here lyeth the body of Ann Dunn, daughter 

of Mr. Francis Dunn, Wine Cooper in the 

City of Bristol, and granddaughter to the said 

Sabah Dunn, who departed this life March 15 

Anno Dom. 1719, aged 16 months. 

Also here lyeth the body of Mr. Tobias Dunn, 

of this parish^ who departed this life 

March 29, Anno Dom. 1721, aged ?2 years. 

In memory of Mr. Edmund Wabd, 

late [of Nevis, one of the Leeward Islands, in the 

West Indies, who was killed by a fall from his 

horse, as he was passing through this parish, 

on the 20th of June 1784, aged 33. 

Here lyeth the body of Mrs. Maby Wobnell, 

of Hanham in this parish, who departed this life 

May 17, 1721, aged 60 yeare. 

Also here lyeth the body of Elizabeth Batt, 

sister to the above named Maby Wobnell, 

who departed this life March 17, 1733, 

ag?d 81 years. 

Here also lyeth the body of Nicholas Wobnell, 

Yeoman, who died June 19, 1711, 

aged 67 years. 



S. MARY, BITTON, GL0U0E8TEESHIRE. 2f 

In the Chantry Chapel, tommonly called Barr^s Court, or Nbwton Aisle. 

On the west walls: — 

Arms : Quarterly, Ist and 4th argent, on a chevron azure, three garbs or ; 2nd and 
3rd argent, two thigh bones in saltire sable, for Newton. 

Here lyeth the body of 

Sir John Newton, Bart., 

Thrice burgess of Parliament. 

A most loving husband, 

caretul father, and faithful friend : 

pious, just, prudent, 

charitable, valiant, and beloved of all. 

He was born June 9, A.D. 1626, 

being the son of Thomas Newton, 

of Gunwarby in the County 

of Lincoln, Esq. 

and died May 31, A.D. 1699. 

He married Mary, the daughter of 

Sir Jervase Eyre, 

of Bampton, in the County of 

Nottingham, Knight. 

They lived happily all their time 

together, which was 55 years; 

by whom he had issue 

Four sons and thirteen daughters. 

This monument was erected 

at the charge of his youngest son 

Gervis Newton, Esq. 



Arms : on a lozenge, per chevron sable and or, three eagles displayed, countercharged, 
for Stringer; impaling Nkwton. 

Piae Memoriae 

Dom. 

ELizABErHiE Stringer 

obiit vicesimo 

primo die Julii, 

Anno Dom. 1694. 

Sequimur quamvis non passibus sequis 



90 THE PEEBENDAL CHURCH OF 

Chantby. 

In tbe south wall on a stone pannel, taken from Bars Court: — 

HONOUR THY FATHER 

AND THY MOTHER THAT THY 

DAYES MAY BE PROLONGED IN 

THE LAND THE WHICH THE 

LORD THY GOD GIVETH THEE. 

On flat stones:— 
Abms: on a lozenge, as before. 

Here lyeth the body of Dame 

Mart Newton, widow and relict of 

Sir John Newton, late of Barrs Court, Bart., 

by whom she had four sons and thirteen daoghters. 

She died Nov. 23, 1722, in the 85th year of her age» 



Here lyeth the body of 

Mrs. Elizabeth Stringer, 

daughter to Sir John Newton, 

Baronet, and Dame Mary 

hie wife^ and wife to Francis 

Stringer, of Sutton upon Lown 

in the County of Northumberland, 

who died 



Here lyeth the Body of Elizabeth 
the wife of John "WTiittington 



Here lyeth the body of Dorothy, the wife of 

Francih Woodward, of this parish, Gent. 

and youngest daughter of the Honourable 

Sir John Newton, Bart., who departed this life 

the 16 day of October 1712, who had 

issue 8 sons and 3 daughters. 



8. MARY, BITTON, GLOUCESTERSHIEE. ^I 

Here lyeth the body of the said Francxs Woodward, 
of this parish, Gent., who departed this life 
Dec. 12, 1730, in the 60th year of his age. 

And also here lyeth the body of John, son of John 

and Elizabeth Woodward, and grandson of 

Francis and Dorothy Woodward, who departed 

this life May 29, 1741, aged ]1 years. 



Beneath this stone lies the body of 

John, son of John Woodward, Gent, who died 

May 29, 1741, aged 8 years. 

Also in memory of Anne, wife of Newton 

Woodward, of this parish, Gent., who died 

June 18, 1743, aged 50 years. 

Also five children of the above Newton Woodward 

by Anne his second wife. 

Died. Aged. 

Francis Berkley, May 25^ 1750, 21 months. 

Ann, May 20, 1750, 6 years. 

Mart, May 31, 1754, 3 months. 

ThOMAS, Mar. 21, 1758, 18 months. 

Francis July 16, 1764, 12 years. 

In memory of Dorothy their daughter, who died 

July 15, 1775, aged 15 years. 

Also the body of Newton Woodward, Gent. 

who died Dec. 9, 1778, aged 79. 



On the verge of a flat stone : — 

Here lyeth the body of Francis, son of 

Francis and Dorothy Woodward, Gent, 

of this parish, grandson of Sir John Newton, 

Bart., who was buried ^Sep. 7 1701. 



Here lyeth the body of Gerves, the son of 

Francis Woodward, Gent., by Dorothy his wife, 

daughter of Sir John Newton, deceased, 

who depai-ted September 6 1702. 



32 THE PREBENDAL CHURCH OF 

Here also lyeth the body of Richard, the son of 
Francis Woodward, Gent., by Dorothy his wife, 

who departed November 11 1703. 

Here also lyeth the body of Frances, daughter of 

Francis Woodward, Gent., by Dorothy his wife, 

who departed the 18th day of August, 1705. 



In 1850, all these flat stones in the Chantry were removed, and the 
floor paved with Minton's encaustic tiles. Squares of white stone were 
arranged in the design — inscribed with the names and dates taken from 
the above, to which the following were added : — 

Martha Jane Whittuck, 

Deceased Jan. 15, 1818, 

Aged 6 months. 



Martha Jane Wluttuck, 

deceased March 15, 1844, 

Aged 25. 



Edward Decimus Whittuck, 

deceased Aug. 17, 1838, 

Aged 22. 



Samuel Hooper Whittuck, M.A., Clerk, 
died August 15, 1842, aged 37. 



This is on a brass: — 

Eliz. Hall, grandaughter 

of Francis and Dorothy Woodward, 

deceased Oct. 1828, 

Aged 88. 

At' the same time all the windows of this Chantry Cliapel were fitted 
with painted glass as memorials of Samuel Whittuck, Esq., of Hanham 
Hall, and Barr's Court, his first wife Anne, who died in 1829, and his 
second wife Mary who died 1845, and his children.^ 

* See Monument in tho Nave. 



S. MA.IIY, BITTON, GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 33 

Ix THE Tower. 

This Tablet is erected 

to the memoiy of 

John BIixgo, 

by the Eev. H. T. EUacombe, 

with whom he lived 

a Servant fourteen years 

at the Vicarage in this parish, 

Di&.charging his duty 

with 

exactness, honesty, and aflFection. 

He left Bitton on the xxiij"* day of Feb'- 

MDCCCXXXV, 

and died on the viij^ of March following 

at Powderham. Devon, 

in the Lxvr^ year 

of his age. 



Anciext Monuments. 

There are two small recumbent statues supposed to be Chantry Priests, 
or Prebendaries of the Church. In 1822 the groimd immediately imder 
these effigies, then lying on the floor of the chantry, was thoroughly exn mined, 
but no trace whatever was found of bodies there deposited, thereftjre the 
supposition is that they were not in their original position ; but, as they 
represent Canons, their original depository might have been in the Chancel. 

Each being little more than three feet in length, they may not, perhaps, 
be improperly chissed with the effigy of the Boy Bishop at Sarum. 

In March 1846 Mr. Bloxam, of Rugby, communicated to the Midland 
Counties Herald an article on some similar effigies in other places, in which 
he alludes to these as rare specimens of sculptured ecclesiastics of the 
canonical orders, clad in the surplice and aumasse, which latter is worn as 
a hood on the head. To quote his words which appeared with a letter 
of mine in the Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of London, 
vol. ii, p. 90, 1849. 



34 



THE PEEBENDAL CHUBCH OF 



'* In general, sculptured effigies of ecclesiastics are represented as vested 
for the Eucharistic sacrifice of the mass ; but these are in ancient canonical 
or choral habits, in the aumasse (almucium) or furred hood a very different 
article from the amice (amictus), the extremities of which hang down in 
front; imder this is worn the ancient surplice with loose sleeves, and over 
it the cope; under the surplice was worn the ancient cassock (tunica talaris), 
in these figures barely visible at the wrists. The canonical dress is thus 
described in an extract I have from some Council of the fifteenth century, 
but I am unable to give a reference : — ' Horas dicturi, cum tunica talari ac 
superpelliceis raundis, ultra medias tibias longis, vel capis juxta temporum 
ac regionum diversitatum ecclesias (canonice) ingrediantur, non caputia sed 
almutias vel beryl^a tenentes in capite.' 

'* In the 5th Provincial Council of Milan, as quoted 
by Mr. Bloxam, held A.D. 1579, the aumasse is 
declared to be peculiar to those of canonical rank, 
'Almutia pellicea insigne canonicorum est/ On 
monumental brasses of canons in this country we 
frequently find the cassock, surplice, and aumasse, 
with the addition of the coj^e ; and sometimes, 
when the cope is worn over the surplice, the aumasse 
or fun-ed tippet is omitted. This is explained by 
the statutes of one of the foreign conventual churches 
' Statuta Ecclesia Vinensis,' respecting the canons, as 
follows : — * A festo S. Martini usque ad Pascham 12 

portabunt capas nigras super euperpelliceum, et a Pascha usque ad festum 
Omnium SS. portabunt superpeUiceum sine capa, et in capite capellam 
de griso, quem vulgariter almucium vocant.' 

"I would add another quotation from Mr. Bloxam, that 'the ancient 
aumasse or tippet of sable or fur continued to be worn by Bishops and 
other [dignitaries of the Church of England in the reign of Elizabeth, 
during which it was in a great measure superseded by a similar habit of 
silk, the precursor of the present scarf, which continued to be called a tippet 
down to the last century.' And in Bailey's Etymological Dictionary, 
published 1731, the woi-d 'tippet' is defined as a 'long scarf which 
doctors of divinity wear over their gowns.' 








S. MARY. BITTON, GLOUCESTERSrilEE. 



35 



" With the exception' of the faces, what is held in the priests* hands, 
and the head and part of the tail of the dog at the feet of one, these 
figures are well preserved. No traces of colour are visible. They have 
very lately been laid in a suitable part of the church, and on stones about 
a foot thick, raising them so much off the floor for effect a^d protection." 




^^^ifi^f^—.^. 



r 



13 




36 



THE TREBENDAL CnORCH OF 



Two very interesting and early sepulchral slabs which were found a few 
inches below the surface of the ground, on the south side of the 
Church (figs. 13 and 14), are now set up in the vestibule of the Chantry 
Chapel : (fragments of another similar slab were found). The shield 
of the knight is charged with the arms of De Button (ermine, a fess 
gu :). This slab is supposed to represent Robert de Button, who was 
living in the time of Henry III, the father of Thomas de Button, 
Bishop of Exeter, whose arms are in the east window of that Cathedral. 
See Pedigree in Appendix, and in the History of the Manor in Supplement. 

The otlier slab, which lay along side the knight, is inscribed 
Emmote de Hastinges. No record respecting her has been found. She 
was probably an heiress and a wife, and so, marrying secondly, she re- 
tained the name of her first husband. 

The site where these were found was no doubt a transept, and used 
as a mortuary Chapel, before Bishop Button built the chantry of St. 
Catherine over the bodies of his father and mother, May, 1299. The 
foundations are represented in a cut, p. 8, ante. On the same spot was 
found a very inide stone coffin. 




S. MARY, BITTON, GLODCESTERSniEE. 



37 



The stone coffin of the Bishop's father, which lay in front of the 
sacrariuin steps of the chantry, is preserved by the side of these slabs. 

The fragments of an Early English tomb (fig. 15), inscribed, "gist ici, 
De Salme merci," were found built into the western wall, with fragments 
(tig. 16) of a knight's effigies. 

The head (fig. 17) may be a fragment of the tomb of Petronilla de 
Vivon, who died at the Vicarage 128G. The costume is of that date. See 
in the Supplement an account of the manor of Bitton. 

It has been briefly stated in the Introduction (p. 3) that two ancient 
chapels were appurtenant to the Vicarage, viz., Oldland and Ilanham 
Abbots. The former was ruthlessly pulled down in 1830. It will be 
seen by the Engraving that all lovers of Church architecture must 
lament its destruction, especially the saddle-backed tower, so rarely 
found in England, in which were three ancient bells. One was recast, 
and is inscribed "Reader, thou also must know a Resurrection." The 
other two inscribed, iji faucta aiUia, had been previously removed to 
the Church of the Holy Trinity, on Kingswood Hill, a district severed 
from Oldland in 1822. Figs. 18 and 20 are the initial cross and intervening 
stop. 






i8 19 20 

After much search and inquiry, no records have been found relative to 

the date or origin of the foundation of this Chapel. It is not mentioned 
either in the Taxation of Pope Nicholas, nor in that of Henry the Eighth. 
Before the Reformation the parish of Bitton was in the diocese of Worcester ; 
and there I have found a reference to " Bytton cum CapellS, de Oldelond," 
in Bp. Giffard's time, about 1280. Though in the index, it is not to be 
found in the register. 

The south doorway, porch and tower were in the Early English style, also 



38 



THE PREBENDAL CHUECH OF 



the pillars and arches in the inside ; and from fragments of mouldings, 
capitals, and bases, found in pulling down the walls, it is fair to conclude 
that the chapel was in existence in the thirteenth centuiy. The venerable 
yew tree, indeed, speaks almost i\s much. 

The interior was divided into two sides, and a Chancel, separated from the 
nave by a coarsely wrought screen. There was a plain stoup on the east side 
of the south doorway, and the remains of a piscina on the south of the altar. 
The font was very plain, but apparently coeval with the foundation of the 
Chapel. It was built into the walls of the new Church. Most of the sittings 
were of oak, carved and wrought in the old style, and open at either end. 

The register of baptisms and marriages in the chapelry are from 1586. 
In 1719 a Faculty was gmnted for burials in the chapel-yard. 

The clergyman of Bitton used to serve this Chapel, and the other at 
Hanham, every alternate Sunday, having served tlie mother Church at 
Bitton in the moniing ; but in 1817 a curate was licensed to these 
two chapels only. 

As for the Chapel at Hanham (see view at the end) that is of earlier date, 
judging from a square Nonnan font with tongues at the angles of the base (fig. 
21) and a Norman piscina (fig. 22), also being annexed to the ancient Manerium 
(see History of the Manor in the Supplement) and a Late Norman barn 
adjoining. In the tower, of fifteenth century work, 

were two ancient bells, one 
was disposed of by the 
Churchwardens, the other 
is inscribed, ^{4 ffllUtt ^ 

gorgi § ora § pro, with the 

initial cross (18) as on the 
old bells at Oldland, and 
the crown (19) as an 
intervening stop. There 
is a nave and Chancel and 
south aisle, divided by low, 
plain, early arches. Bap- 
tisms and marriages are 
celebrated here, but not 
biu'ials. 





21 



22 






S. MAEY, BITTON, GLOUGESTEESHIRE. 



39 



Vicarii Prebendcdia Eccleaioi de Bucton^ alias Button, 
as they are entered in the Registers of the Bishops of Worcester, from 1268. 



Eesigned 

Eesigned 
Resigned 



Died 



Galfridiis de Compton, Capellanus 

Eustachius de Button 

Hugo de Cycestre, Diaconus 

Boger Hermer 

Tliomas de Bruyton 

Reginaldus de Pjryton, Presbiter 

Johes. de Strengeston, Capellanus 

Kichardus Franceys , 

Johannes de Alia Bipa, Presbiter 



Tairott. Date. Jtegi'ufcr. 

Adenulph l^ector. 1270. GiflFord. 

EicdeSotwell ... 1295. Ditto 

JohndeWynchelsy 1319. Cobliam 



Arleston 
Rome? bury, Preb. 
Romesbury 

Walter Waleys ... 



FoL 
46 

393 
18 

18 



Exchanged Johannes Hauterine ( Exchanged for ) . . . 

Richardus Acard I Shrivenham ) ... 
Died Philip 

Johannes Cok, Presbiter ... Walter Waleys 

Johannes de Burgo, Capellanus ., 



1328. Horlton . 
1335. Monte Acuto 15 
1338. Hemenale 17 

Ditto 
1348. Braunsford 

Thoresby 

Ditto 

Bryan 
1360. Ditto ... 



Thomas de Barton Segrave ) ^ , 

5 Exchange 
Thomas r ranceys ) 

Nicholas Danyel ) ^ , ( 

5 Exchange? ^ , 
John Bradenynggt ) ( Godewyke 

Exchanged William Shawe, Capellanus 

Resigned Nicholas Peverell . . . 

Resigned John Gowk, Priest 

Thomas Erme 

Exchanged William Ingylby, Priest 

Exchanged] Walter Eymer, Vicar of Burford Line Hallum 

Died Walter Haclyng alias Wyot, 

Rector of St- Michael, Bath ... Ditto 

Exchanged Thomas Staunton, Priest ••• Ditto 



Henry leDespencer 1362. Bamet 
Prebendi de Button. 

1 Lynne 



10 
18 
16 
16 
30 
30 
3 



Ditto 
Ditto 
Ditto 
Ditto 
Ditto 



1371. Ditto ., 
1 . Wakefield 

1377. Ditto .. 

1382. Ditto .. 
1385. Ditto .. 

1383. Ditto .. 
1387. Ditto .. 
1392. Ditto .. 
UOO. CliflFord .. 

1404. Ditto .. 

1404. Ditto .. 



IG 
16 
19 
19 
30 
81 
42 
48 
107 
64 

79 
83 



Gtilfudus Roger 



Crucadam Herchell Morgan vol. 1 & 2. 



Exchanged Johannes Taylor, Rector of Notgrove Harewell 
Resigned Philippus Kyng, Rector of Tarent Bubwyth 
Died Humfridus Clerk, Capellanus ... Vance 

Johannes Taylor, Capellanus ... Doget 
Resigned Edwardus Owey ... 

Jacobus Powey, Capellan ... Halls 



1421. Morgan ... 7 

1444. Carpenter 44 

1453. Ditto ... 109 

1481. Alcock ... 91 

Jeremimi... 16 

1524. Jeremimi... 17 



40 



THE TEEBENDAL CHUECH OF 



Eychardiis Bond, Vicar ... from 1529 to 1537. 

The foregoing from Worcester: Diocese of Gloster was founded 1541. 
Note. — Ejch. Bond does not appear in the "Worcester Eegister, but I find his name 
as a Tritnoss in three wills at Worcester, viz.: — John Underbill, 1529; John Tayte, 1538; 
Thomas Clarke, 1537. 



Eesigned 

Died 

Died 

Died 

Died 

Died 

Died 

Resigned 

Died 

Eesigned 

Died 

Eesigned 

Died 

Died 

Eesigned 

Died 

Died 

Eesigned 

Eesigned 

Ceded 



The follmvhig are from Institutions at Glocester. 

William Beckwythe, Clerk ... 

William Moseleye 

Thomas ilynthorne, Buried at Bitton 1582... 

William Sprinte, Clerk 

Lewis Evans, B. A. 

John Burnley, B.A., Buried at Bitton 1627 

John Carpenter, A.M., Buried at Bitton 1662 

Henry Hoskins, A.M. 

Eichard Towgood, A.M. 

Edward Parker, B.A., Buried at Bitton lo Seymour the Elder 1691, Nov. 11 



Ptitrou. 


J>ale. 


K Kyvfc 


1554, 


Oct. 12 


Ditto 


1555, 


April 8 


Hugh Powell 


1564, 


June 11 


John Sprinte 


1573, 


Nov. 9 


M. Morgan 


1582, 


Sep. 6 


And. Atwood 


1617, 


March 23 


F. T^ech 


1627, 


June 23 


Anth. Ilawles 


16G2, 


Nov. 8 


B. Johnson ... 


1684, 


Feb. 23 



Joseph Stockwell, A.]\I., Coll. Trin. Oxon.... 

John Eade, B.A. 

Eobert Eyre, A,]M. 

Eichard Barry, Jun., A.M., Buried at Bitton 

Charles El wes, A.M. 

William Coxe, A.M. 

John Adey Curtis?, A3L, Buried at Bitton 

William Batchellor, A.M., ... 

William Macdonald, A.M. ... 

Maurice Hiller Goodman, A.INI. 

Henry Thomas Ellacombe, A.M. 

Henry Nicholson Ellacombe, A.M. 



Eich. Eyrc.Pub. 1714, Aug, 3 

Ditto ... 1715, Dec. 25 

Ditto . . 17193 March 7 

Ditto ... 1724, June 29 

Ealph Freeman 1766, Marcli 20 

Himself. ... 1796, April 20 

Wm. Coxe ... 1798, July 15 

Wm. Macdonald 1812, July U 

Himself ... 1817, March 4 

Wm. Macdonald 1823, July 10 

Ditto ... 1835, Nov. 5 

Ditto ... 1850, Aprils 



Prebendaries of the Prebend of Button or Bitton^ Gloxvcestershirej foumled in tlte 
Cathedral Church of 8. Mai'y the Virgin of Scci^m. 

Eector Ecclesiaj de Button, in Pope Nicholas' Valuation ... 1291 
1. William de Sardene ... died 1303 

2« Eichard de Wynton ... died ... 3 Dec. ... 1303 ... Gandavo ... 140 

3. John de Winchelsey ... resigned 11 Dec. ... 1304 ... ... 150 

4. Eobert Ayleston ... 15 Feb. ... 1321 ... Mortwall ... 90 



S. MAEY, BITTON, GL0UCE8TERSHIEE. 



41 









Xmlh. 


A.I>. 


oarwm 
Begitter. 


Rl. 


5. John de Wynkelie 


... 


resigned 


2Aufi:. . 


.. 1347 


... Wyvil 


... 162 


6. John Godewyke 


... 


resigned 


26 Jan. . 


.. 1394 


... Waliham 


... 93 


7. Eobert Hallum.^ 














8. Galfrid, Crucadan Uteris Apostol. 




22 Nov. . 


.. 1407 


... Dunham . 


.. 326 


9. Roger Harewell 


... 


resigned 


20 Sept. ., 


. 1420 


.. Chandler . 


.. 37 


10. Thomas Bubwith 


••• 


resigned 


12 July . 


. 1428 . 


.. Nevyl 


.. 9 


11. WilUam Vance 


... 




24 Oct . 


.. 1447 


. . Burgh 


.. 6 


12. John Doget 


... 


resigned 










13. Ralph Heathcot 


... 




8 Feb. , 


,. 1485 


... Langton 


.. 7 


14. David Hopton 


• •• 


died 










15. Ralph Langton 


... 


died 


23 Jan. . 


.. 1491 


... 


... 39 


16. John Gunthorp,' died June 28, 1498 


4 Oct. ... 1492 


... 


... 42 


17. Thomas Holes 


... 


died 


26 July . 


.. 1498 


.. Blyth 


... 30 


18. George Woolfitt 


... 


died 


11 July . 


.. 1531 


... Camper 


... 27 


19. Robert Ryve 


... 


died 


6 July . 


.. 1554 


... Capon 


31,59 


20. John Sprinte, M.A. 


.f . 


resigned 


10 Sept. , 


. 1573 


... Gheast 


... 4 


21. Meredith Morgan, M.A. 


... 


died 


10 Feb. . 


.. 1577 


... Piers 


. 1 


22. Henry Cotton 


... 


resigned 


4 Dec. . 


.. 1612 


... Cotton 


... 29 


23. Thomas Leach 


..« 


died 


23 March 


1614 


... 


... 34 


24. Anthony Hawles, D.D. 


... 


died 


26 July . 


.. 1616 


... Duppa 


... 4 


25. Thomas Hill 


... 


died 


23 Jan. . 


.. 1663 


.. Earles 


... 2 


26. Richard Watson 




died 


15 Dec. .. 


. 1671 


.. Ward 


... 13 


27. Benjamin Johnson 


... 


died 


19 Jan. . 


.. 1684 






28. Edmund Jeffery 


... 


resigned 










29. Richard Eyre, A.M. 


... 




19 Feb. . 


.. 169i 


... Bumel 




30. Ralph Freeman, D.D., 


... 




11 Feb. . 


.. 1745 






31. Matthew Spry, M.A. 


• . • 


died 


9 Nov. . 


.. 1772 






32. William Coxe,» M.A. 


... 


resigned 


26 July . 


.. 1792 






33. Thomas Henry Hume, M.A 


.... 


resigned 


2 May . 


,. 1799 






34. William Lewis Rham, M.A. 


resigned 


3 Dec. . 


.. 1806 






35. William Macdonald,M.A., 


died June 24, 1862 29 Sept. . 


.. 1807 







» This Prehendary became Bishop of Sarum 1407, therefore the Crown presented his stall 
to William Pilton, as affirmed by Patent Roll, 9th Henry IV, p. 1, m. 29, but liis name does 
not appear in any oi the Episcopal Registers wliich I have searched. Bishop Hallum died at 
Constance, the circumstances of his death, and his memorial brass will be found in the 

Appendix. 

' He was Dean of Wells. 
G 



• The Historian. 



42 THE PBEBENDAL CHUECH OF 

By Act of Parliament 3 and 4 Vict., c. 113, August 11th 1840, all Prebends were 
suspended. On the death of the last Prebendary, the disendowed Stall was 
conferred by the Bishop of Salisbury on 
36. Edward Arthur Dayman, B.D., Bector of Shillingstone ... 1862 

The foregoing account (to Richard Eyre inclusive) is copied from a 
folio volume of Seth Ward's, in the Bishop's Registry at Sarum, con- 
taining a list of the Bishops, Deans, and Prebendaries, and the value of 
each Prebend, and a Visitation of the Dean and Chapter in 1682. 



The Paksonage, Manor, and Pkebend of Bitton. 

Very little is known of the early history of the Prebend, neither have 
I succeeded, with the help of the most kind courtes;)^, to find much about 
it at Salisbury. In Domesday it is stated that one hide belonged to the 
church, and it may fairly be supposed that this is the Prebendal Manor, 
the extent of which I shall presently shew. It appears by the Hundred 
Rolls, in the time of Richard II, that the Decenna of the Rectory was 
one of the seven tything men who appeared at the Courts of the Manor 
Lord. 

In the Valuation of Pope Nicholas, or Nona Roll, 1291, the Prebend 
is not mentioned with the others in Salisbury. Under the taxation of 
Wapley in Gloucestershire is this entry : " Pretium hujus (£7) porcioms, 
Rectori ecclesise de Button 18s. 4d.," reference to which is made in one 
of the following charters. In the Muniment room at Sarum there are 
two small deeds relating to Bitton, copies of which I am able to annex. 
One is — " Quieta Clam. Ecclia. de Button |?. A, B. et conventus Sci. 
Augusti de Bristol, A. C. 1380," which has reference to Wapley. The 
other is — " Carta H. R. confirmans Deo et Ecclie. B. Marie Sarum Ecclias. 
seq. de" ^ ^ * * ^ 

* * * Jppendicns suu '' Buttona'^ 

The first is an agreement between the Abbot and Convent of S. Augustine, 
Bristol, and John de Kenovill, Canon of Salisbuiy, about a parcel of land 
at Wapley in the County of Gloucester, which he claims as belonging to 



S. UAB.Y, BITTON, GLOUCESTEESHIEE. 4S 

his prebend of Bitton. The following copy in extenso was kindly made by 
my late friend Mr. Joseph Burtt of the PubUc Kecord Office : — 

" Omnibus Ohristi fidelibus ad quos presens scriptum pervenerit : Johannes 
dei gratia Abbas Sancti Augustini de Bristoll' et ejusdem loci conventus 
salutem in domino. Ad universitatis vestre noticiam volumus pervenire 
quod controversia que vertebatur inter nos et Johannem de KenoviU' 
canonicum Saresberie super ecclesia de Wippel' (?) et una hyda terre in 
Sudwik' quas prefatus Johannes ad prebendam suam de Betton' vendicabat 
pertinere; hoc fine sopita conquievit. Videlicet quod nos pro bono pacis 
unam marcam argenti annuatim ecclesie de Betton' imperpetuum persolvemur. 
Scilicet dimidiam marcam ad festum Sancti Michaelis et dimidiam marcam 
ad Pascha. Ita quidem quod ecclesia de Betton' vel aliquis rector ilhus 
nichil ampUus in ecclesia de Wapel' et prefata hyda de Sudwik imperpetuum 
possit exigere. Set hac imperpetuum contenti erunt precatione. Hanc 
autem composicionem inter ecdesiam de Wappel' et ecclesiam de Bettona 
firmiter imperpetuum observandam tam nos quam sepedictus Johannes fidei 
religione confirmavimus. Quoniam igitur eaque amicabili comp<^icione 
terminantur in recidivam dubitacionem devenire non debent, nos prenominatem 
composicionam ratam et grataan habentes ut perpetue firmitatis robur inter 
ecclesiam de Wappel' et ecclesiam de Betton' optineat ; eam presenti pagina 

^ Hiis testibus Willielmo Abbate de Cainesham. 

Bob^rk) ' Archidiacono de Ultra Parret. GalMdo Marmiun. Koberto de 
Jordana de Bonevill'. Et multis aliis." 

The other charter is a quit-claim dated 1380' between Eobert deHanam 
and John de Kenovill of certam parcels of land to the parson of Bitton, 
which is also extended as follows :— 

" Sciant tam presentes quam futori quod ego Bobertus de Hanam remisi 
et quiete clamavi imperpetuum Deo et Sancte Marie de Salesberi et ecclesie 
Sancte Trinitatis de Betton' et Johanni de Canervill' parsone ejusdem ecclesie 
et omnibus successoribus ejus pro salute anime mee et successorum et 
antecessorum meorum totum jus quod vendicabam in tribus mesuagus 
juxta cimiterium ecclesie de Bettone scilicet in mesuagio Thome Fardevel 
et mesuagio Robert! et mesuagio Roberti Parmentarii et mesuagio Tiardi 
'. lu Oas^eU'B two volumes of Indexes is this entry :-Bitton E. 5. has two parcels. 
I. Liters, Johannis Abbas de Bristol. 2. Ditto A. D. 1380. 



O* 



44 THE PREBENDAL CHURCH OF 

piscatoris Unde placitum erat inter me et Johannem predictum de Canervilla 
in curia Domini Regis per breve de nova diseisina Et volo et concedo ut 
ecclesia de Betton et ejus parsona predicta mesuagia cum omnibus pertihentiis 
suis imperpetuum quiete et pacifice possideant. Ita quidem quod ego vel 
aliquis heredum meorum in predictis mesuagiis aliquid nunquam poterimus 
exigere. Pro hac autem quietaclamacione dedit mihi prefatus Johannes 
X. soKdos sterlingorum Et ut hoc scriptum sit firmum sigilli mei 
apposicione confirmavi. Hiis testibus Waltero Capellano Williehno Capellano 

Roberto Damevill' W. Marmium Petro Radulpho Joie Roberto 

de Betton et multis aliis. In quorum omnium testimonium sigillum nostrum 
commune presentibus est appensvun. Datum Sarum xxj die Julli anno 
Domini nullesimo tresentesimo octogesimo." 

The Prebend was richly endowed with what is called the Parsojuage Manor. 
In old terriers it is described as a mansion house, outhouse, gaixien, &c., 
with closes of pasture, in all about 22 acres, the tythe of corne, grayne, 
hay and hoppes within the parish and hamlets thereto belonging. Also 
the presentation and advowson of the vicarage ; also seversil copyhold estates 
measuring about 300 acres, leased for one, two or three lives and four lives, 
and a capital messuage called the Beach Farm, and a wood called Tibbot's 
Grove. In the Appendix may be seen a survey of the copyholds taken 
in 1824. 

It is probable that before the Reformation, say 1538, the Prebendary 
was resident at the Parsonage. Be that as it may, no record has been 
found among the archives at Salisbury of any lease of these lands before 
that date, at which time begins the first volume of the Chapter Leases. 
These leases were regulated by the 32nd Henry VIII, c. 28, called the 
Enabung Statute, 1540, and by the 1st of Elizabeth, c. 19, called the 
Restraining Statute, 1558-9. 

In Holte and Blacker's Register (88, 175, 143), is a copy of a lease in 
English, dated 25th March 28th Henry VIII, viz. 

1538 By which George Wolfet, Doctor of Law, and Prebendary of Bytton, 
leased to Wm. Popley, Gent., of Somerset, the Prebend of 
Bytton, with the mansion of the same called the Parsonage of 
Bitton, and all the lands, &c., the presentation of the Viairage 
being excepted for sixty years. 



S. MAET, BITTON, GLOUCESTERSHIEE. 45 

1547 The next lease in the 1st volume of Chapter leases, page 345, is 
dated October 10 1547, by which Bishop John granted to John 
Bamabe, Gent., Roger Ryve and Wilkins, Yeoman, and John 
PoweU, Notary, the next presentation of the advowson of the 
Prebend of Bytton. 

1558 The next lease is in the same volume, p. 426, by which Bishop John 
granted the advowson of the Prebend after the next avoidance 
to Wm. Wylkins, his tenant. 
After this date, including the above three, they occur in the following 
succession : — 

1. 1538 26 March George Wolfet to Wm. Popley 

2. 1547 Oct. 16 Bp. John to John Bamabe and others. 

3. 1555 Aug. 9 Bp. John to Wm. Wylkins and others. 

4. 1578 Nov. 12 Meredith Mo]^;an to Thomas Seymour and others. 

5. Meredith Morgan to Sir John Seymour and others.^ 

6. 1611 Dec. 11 Henry Cotton to Sir John Seymour and others. 

7. 1636 Feb. 13 Tho. Leach to Sir John Seymour and others. 

8. 1663 Sep. 23 An. Hawles to Sir John Seymour and others. 

9. 1677 June 1 Bichd. Wataon to John Seymour and others. 

10. 1688 Nov. 24 Ed. JeflFery to John Seymour and others. 

11. 1689 Feb. 10 Ed. Jeffery to John Seymour and others. 

12. 170§ March 20 Bich. Eyre to Sir John Seymour and others. 

13. 1711 June 25 Bich. Eyre to Berkley Seymour and others. 

14. 1744 Mar. 2 Bich. Eyre to Jane Seymour and others. 

15. 1759 Ap. 4 Balph Freeman to Thos. Edwards, Freeman & others 

16. 1770 Jan. 18 Balph Freeman to Thos. Edwards, Freeman & others 

17. 1788 June 18 Math. Spry to Thos. Edwards, Freeman & others 

18. 1799 March 27 Wm. Cox to Thos. Edwards, Freeman & others 

19. 1809 Sep. 20 Wm. Macdonald to John Adey Curtis and other Trustees 

20. 1812 June 10 Wm. Macdonald to Chas. Walker and other Trustees 

21. 1834 Jan. — Wm. Macdonald to Sir Thos. Fremantle and others 



Vol. i, 


345. 


» 


• 

1. 


426. 


5> 


ii) 


323. 


J5 


iii. 


70. 


Lambeth. 


Vol 


•vii, 


78. 


M 


vii. 


29. 


99 


viii, 


57. 


5> 


ix. 


139. 


>J 


X. 


41, 


55 


xii. 


123. 


99 


xiii, 


149. 


99 


xiv, 


76- 


n 


xvi. 


65. 



In the conditions on which the Prebendal Manor and Parsonage were 
leaised, the lessee covenanted to pay the yearly rent of £26 Os. 6d,, by 
two equal payments at Lady-day and Michaelmas; also to repair the 
Chancel of the Parish Church, and a certain portion of the fencing of 
the Churchyard; also to provide to the Prebendary and three of his 
1 Not found but quoted in another Lease. 



46 THE PEEBENDAL CHUEOH OF 

men-servants, " good and suflScient house room, diet, lodgings, and pro- 
vender, fodder, litter, and stable room, or grass, for four horses or 
geldings yearly, if he shall happen to repair thether." 

In a Siurey of the manor made in 1649, which may be found in the 
Parliamentai^ Surveys ^ vol. xv, 130, at Lambeth Palace, these conditions are 
noted, and they have been continued ever since till the year 1853. 

Beach or Le Beche, with Tibbots Grove, was leased to other parties 
as a separate holding. In the second volume of Chapter Leases at Sarum, 
p. 369, it was leased in 1586 by Meredith Morgan, Prebendary, to 
William Atwood, then in his occupation. He was to do suit and 
service at the manor court of Bitton, twice a year, held by the Prebendary. 
In 1678 the premises were leased to Henry Weare the younger, in 
whose family they remained, by renewal of lease from time to time, until 
December 1836, when William Weare, the then lessee, of Bristol, died 
in possession of it, and by his will this estate was devised to his cousin, 
John Braikenridge, Esq., of Chew Magna, The annual quit-ient payable 
to the Prebendary was £7. 

In 1873 under certain Acts of Parliament the whole endowment of 
the Prebend (excepting any right in ecclesiastical patronage) became 
absolutely vested in the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for England, after 
the first avoidance of the Prebend. By powers in the same Acts, the 
Commissioners agreed with the last Prebendary (William Macdonald) 
for the payment to him of £1380, to surrender to them his interest in 
the Prebend, provided no lease be renewed since May 1852. Tliis agreement 
was confiimed by an Order in Council, June 13th 1853, and published in 
the Gazette. 

By another Order in Council, November 25th, 1853 (Gazette, December 
2nd, 1853), authority was granted to the said Commissioners for the 
sale of the prebendal property. After this the parsonage house and 
buildings annexed, and some closes of land were sold to the lessee, Sir 
Thomas Freemantle, who resold the same to William Frere, Esq., who 
was put into possession September 29th, 1857. 

About the same time, and under the same powers, Beach Farm wa-s 
sold by the Commissioners to John Braikenridge Esq., the lessee. 

Long before the Reformation, a tything man of the Rectory was 



S. MART, BITTON, GL0UCE8TEESHIEE. 47 

appointed by his Court, who attended the Court Baron of the Chief 
Lord of Bitton, and made presentment of matters within his jurisdic- 
tion. (See Supplement.) Afterwards the Lord Farmer of the Prebendal 
Manor continued the same, and the copyholders were summoned to do 
suit and service, and to pay the quit-rents due from the several 
holdings. The total was £9 12s. 5d., particulars of which may be seen 
in the valuation of the whole estate in the Appendix. 

On the suspension of the Prebend the ecclesiastical patronage was transferred 
to the Bishop of the Diocese (viz., Gloucester and Bristol) by 3rd and 4th 
Vict. c. 113, sec. 41. By the same Act, the title of Prebendary was 
changed to Honorary Canon. The Vicar's patronage is not disturbed, 
being patron of the perpetual curacy of S. Ann's, Oldland, also of 
Hanham, with the Church of Hanham Abbots, and Christ Church, a 
Chapel-of-ease thereto. 

In 1840 the tithes were commuted for the following rent- charges : — 

Bitton ••• 
Oldland ... 
Hanham ... 

£693 6 £565 10 

Before 1812 certain modusses were paid in lieu of vicarial tithes, but 

they were all set aside at that time. 

In 1869 the income of the Ministers of the three Chapels-of-ease was 

augmented by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners to £300 each, and Grazetted 

February 5th, 1869. 

Vicarage Houses, etc 

The Vicarage House, at Bitton, was certainly founded before 1280, and old 
parts still remain. The Parsonage House, annexed to Holy Trinity in 
Kingswood, was built in 1824, at a cost of £1200 ; the Parsonage House, on 
Jefferies' Hill, Hanham, in 1842, at a cost of £1228 lis. 4d. ; and the 
Parsonage House, adjoining Oldland Church, was built in 1850, and 
cost £800. 

All these latter works, amounting to over £IC,000, were done, before 1850 by Voluntary 
Contributions from Parishioners, Landowner-^, and other persons in no way connected with the 
Parish, added to grants from the Public Societies and Government Boards. 



Beotorial. 
£353 





VicariaL 
:g266 8 


235 





209 


105 





90 2 



48 THE PBEBENDAL OHTIBOH OP 



S0H00U3. 

National Schools were built at Bitton .•. in 1830 for 120 Children. 

Oldland, with Master's BeBidenoe,&c. 1838 „ 200 „ 
Hanham „ „ 1841 ,, 200 „ 

Trinity in KingBWOod ,, 1822 „ 216 ^ 



99 


»» 


>» 


99 


99 


99 



736 



All these schools have since been enlarged. 



Population. 

In a Register of All Livings (Lansdown MSS. pt. 2, No. 459) in 1654 there 
were in Bitton 120 families, in Hanham and Oldland 146, making a total of 
260 families ; and estimating five in each family, would give 1300 as the total 
population. Sir R. Atkins in his County History gives the families 
in 1712 as 820, which multiphed by five would give 1600. 

According to a census taken by John Wright, the then Parish Clerk, 

and recorded in the Register, in 1767 it was 4634, and 4997 in 1787. 

By the oensus in 1801 - 4992 By the census in 1841 - 9338 

„ 1811 - 6061 „ 1851 - 9452 

„ 1821 - 7171 „ 1861 - 9534 

„ 1831 - 8703 „ 1871 - 10327 

By a special Act, dated March 23rd, 1819, many of the common lands in 
the parish were inclosed and sold, the award is deposited in the parish chest 
at Bitton. Under the General Inclosure Act other large lands called 
Holm Mead, Micklemead, Sydenham, and Edensfield were inclosed, and sold in 
1865. Plans of these may be seen in the Supplement. 

A large portion of Kingswood Chace lies in the Oldland District, some 
account of which will appear in the Supplement, 

As for the acreage, the Hamlet of Bitton contains 
„ Hamlet of Hanham 

„ Hamlet of Oldland ... 

Total ... 



3355 acres. 


1195 „ 


2615 „ 


7165 Acres 



8. M^Y, BITTON, OLOUCESTERSHIEE. 49 



APPENDIX A, 



Account of the Monumental Brass of Bishop Ilallum in the Cathedral 
Church of Constance. By R. L. Pearsall, Enq., of Carlsruhe. 

From the ARCH.*;OLOGIA, vol. xxx, pp. 430-437. 

Bishop Hallum was, in his day, a Prebendary of tins parish. He was collated to 
the stall in Salisbury Cathedral on the 26th of January, 1394, on the resignation of 
John Godewyke, and he continued prebendary of Bitton or Button till 1406, in which 
year he was succeeded by G-eofFry Crukadam, *' Uteris apostoiicis." Robert Hallum was 
educated at Oxford, and became Archdeacon of Canterbury; and in 1403 was 
nominated Chancellor of the University. "He was first designated for the see of 
York by a papal bull; but soon afterwards was nominated Bishop of Sarum, and 
received the temporalities August 13, 1407. He is said to have been made a cai-dinal 
June 6, 1411.'* His death and burial at Constance are fully detailed in Mr. Pearsall's 
letter. Massingberd, in his English Keformation, pp. 197, 198, gives a very interest- 
ing account of the conduct of this prelate in the Council of Constance, which tells 
so much to his credit that I must beg to quote it. "When Jerome of Prague was 
brought up for his first examination, and had given offence by one of his answers, 
so that several of the doctors called out, * To the fire with liim,' the accused answered 
with some emotion, * If my death is what you wish, God's will be done.' Hallum 
took up his words; *No, Jerome,' he said, *it is not God's will that any sinner 
should die, but that he should be converted and live.' It would seem by this 
speech, that he doubted of the propriety of convincing a man by fire and faggot, or, 
at least, that he had more mercy in his soul than the majority of them. He dis* 
tinguished himself by the boldness and r3solution with which he enforced the council 
to prosecute the pope (John XXIII ) saying to a prelate that defended him, that he 
knew, if he would speak the truth, that the man deserved a hundred deaths. And 
he brought with him to Pisa and Constance a good plan for reformation, drawn up 
by his friend Richard UUerston, an Oxford man, an opponent of the Lollards, but 
very desirous to recover the church from its abuses in discipline." 



50 THE PBEBENDAL CHUECH OF 



A Description of the Tombstone of Bislwp Halluniy one of the English Mission 
to the Council of Constance, who died there A.D. 1416. 

At the foot of the steps leading up to the high altar in the cathedral of Constance 
there is a monument particularly interesting to the English, on account of its con- 
nexion with the history of their country. 

It consists of engraved brass plates let into an oblong square stone slab, about 
nine feet by five in dimension, and represents the effigy of a bishop in the costume 
of the fifteenth century, standing in an arched niche, which terminates upwards in a 
crocketed canopy, having on each side of it an escutcheon. That on the dexter side 
contains the royal arms of the Plantagenet, — quarterly, France and England, surrounded 
with the garter of the order of St. George, and its device, *' Honi salt qui mal y 
penseJ* The other, on the sinister side, probably contained (for the metal within the 
border of it has been removed) the private arms of the bishop, impaled with those 
of his see; and is surrounded by a scroll, in which appears in gothic characters the 
words, ^' Miser cot^ioLS Domini in eternum cantaho.^ At the sides of the niche are 
two pillars ornamented with gothic pannels, in each of which is the figure of an 
angel, and the whole is surrounded by a square border (separated from the other 
part of the monument by an intervening space of stone), wliich exhibits, at each 
comer, an ornament, in the centre of which is a figure, much defaced, but which 
seems to have been the representation of a dove, with a halo round its head, bear- 
ing a scroll, and intended, I suppose, to signify the Gospel proceeding from the 
Holy Ghost. Such a figure can be clearly made out on the ornament at the bottom 
left-hand comer of the border; and it seems as if the other figures were merely 
varieties of that which I have particularized, and are the usual emblems of the four 
evangelists. 

The rubbed oflf fcuyaimile, which accompanies the present paper, (Plate inserted) 
will verify the foregoing description, as well as the underwritten epitaph, which ap- 
pears on the. border in letters of a diflferent character to those around the escutcheons. 
It sets forth the qualities of the deceased, and the year of his death, in the follow- 
ing quaint manner: — 



S. MABY, BITTON, GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 



51 



V jrf&umtt l if mm t uhtf Wan '^wSmt 



S 



I 



i 



I 



1 

ft 




j^ m \ f-T Mh total tS-^ 



62 THE PREBENDAL CHDECII OF 

t^ Subiacet hie stratus Robert Hallum 
vocitatus : ^ Quondam platus SJr 
sub honore creatus Hie decretoTr 
doctor pacis q5 ereator : Nobilis 
aDglor Regis fuit ambaeiator : ^ 
festii cuthberti septembris mense vigebat : 
^ In quo Robti mortem Constantia flebat : 
Anno Milleno trieent oetuageno : Sex 
cii ter deno cu xpo viuat ameno. ^ 
This inscription is more than commonly remarkable, for it forms itself into hexameter 
verses, not only rhymed at the end, but often in the middle, thus: — 

4« Subjacet hie stratus Robert Hallum vocitatus : 

Quondam prelatus Sarum sub honore creatus : 

Hie decretorum doctor pacisque creator : 

Nobilis Anglorum Regis fuit ambasciator : 

Festum Cuthberti Septembris mense vigebat : 

In quo Roberti mortem Constantia flebat : 

Anno Milleno trieent [ et ] oetuageno : 

Sex cum ter deno, cum Christo vivat amoeno. 

The day of the bishop's death then, appears to be the feast of St. Cuthbert, that 
is, the 4th of September, 1416: for '^ Anno milleno trieent et octucigeno^ brings 
us to 1380, to which add six and thrice ten, '^ Sex cum ter deno^* and the pro- 
duct will be 1416. 

It may be here remarked that the word " Christo " in the original inscription is 
contracted and expressed by an equivalent for the Greek characters XPO, that is to 
say, a Gothic i for the Greek chi UA^ a p for the rho (yo), and an o for the omici^on 

Note also! that over the head of the effigy, in the quatrefoil of the canopy, is a 
rose in the centre, around which are the letters R. O. B. S., which I presume were 
intended to denote the four principal letters in the bishop's baptismal name — Robertus. 

On the upper part of his dress, on the collar of the chesible, there are two gothic 
letters which look like A. V. 

I have sought, but without success, in such records of the fifteenth eentiury as have 
come within my reach, for some information as to what part Bishop Hallum took in 
the proceedings of the Council. All that I have been able to find is a notice of his 
death, contained in an old printed book, now somewhat rare, dated 1483, and written 
in German by Ulrieh von ReiehenthaL, under the title of Consilium von Coatniiz. 
I have subjoined a literal extract from it (vide fo. xxxix.) with an English transla- 
tion of the same. 



S. MABY, BITTON, GLOXJCESTERSHIEE. 5 3 

EXTRACT, 

An dem vierten tag dea ersten Herb- On the fourth day of the first Harvest 

stomonaths wz da ein Zinstag in der VIII month, happened a Tuesday during which, 

stiind nach mittetag, gegen d' nacht, VIII hours after mid-day, towards the night, 

da starb der-hochwiirdig Furst Bischoff there died the highly worthy Prince Bishop 

Rupertus Scdv^wienaus aus Engelland, in Robert of Salisbury from England, in tlie 

d' festin Gothliebc ; un ^morgems um fortress Gotlieben ; and on the morrow about 

vesperziet do leytet man jm zu Kostanz, vesper time there they conducted him to 

iin trug man in mit zweie glildiene tuchem Cocstance, and they bore him with two 

ill dz Munster, iiii giengen da mit all Kar- golden cloths into the Jlinster, and thither 

dinal, Patriarchen, Erzbischofif, Bischoff, went all Cardinals, Patriarchs, Archbishops, 

unser herr d' Kiinig, alle geijstlicli iiii Bishops, — oiu* Lord the King, — all spiritual 

weltlich Furste prelate iiii pfaffe (in s'dnst and temporal Princes, prelates and priests, 

ein grosse welt, bey LXXX groster briiiender and with them a great crowd, by [the light 

kertzen, die triigent alt arm maii un siinget of] LXXX of the largest-sized burning 

jm ein Vigilie, iiii ward vergrabe in de tapers, — ^which poor old men bore, — and 

Chor zu and'n Bischoflfen, iind hat man they sung him a Vigil, and he was buried 

jm da kein opflFer, in the choir with the other Bishops ; — and 

they had for him there no offering. 

It need hardly be said that the German of the above-written extract is very old, 
and therefore not always consistent with modem idiom. I have translated it as 
closely as I could ; but still there are some parts of it which may require the 
following explanation : — 

The word " Costnitz^'* which appears in the title of the book from which the 
extract is taken, is an ancient German designation of the city of Constance. It was 
also called Kostantz, and this orthography is to be found in the 8th line of the text. 

^^ Zinstag^ (at line 2) is a corruption of '^ Dienstcig^ which is yet called ^^Ziatag^^ 
and ^'Zistig^' in the dialect of the Black Forest. See the Glossary at the end of 
J. P. Hebel's AUemannische Gedichte, 

'' Hochwitrdig ^^ (translated "highly worthy") is equivalent to our "Very reverend." 
In the fifteenth century it was exclusively given to dignitaries of the church; but it 
has since, like many other high-sounding German titles, become common property ;i 
so that at the present day it is given even to clergymen of the lowest rank. 

Bishop Hallum is called (see line 4) ^^ F'drat Biscliqfj i.e. Prince Bishop; probably 

^ For instance, Btier Onadden, {Anglice Your Grace) which, in the middle ages, was 
reserved for the highest nobility, is now commonly given to persons of the lowest grade in 
the German aristocracy : i,e. to those who are two degrees below the rank of a knight, and 
may therefore be assimilated to our gentleman. Wohlgehoren (i.e. well-bom) has sunk still 
lower. On a tombstone dated 1574, in Gernbach church, near Baden-Baden, this honorary 



54 THE PREBENDAL CHUBCH OF 

because he was a cardinal at Home (he was made so A.D. 1411), and therefore was 
classed at the Council with the other ecclesiastical princes. 

The word ^' SalubuTiensia "^ is an evident corruption of Salisbunenaia. 

^^Gotlieben^^ (vide line 6) was a little fortress, or strong-house, belonging to the see 
of Constance. 

" Unaer Hen* dCKunig,^^ alludes I presume to the Emperor Sigismond, in his 
character of king of the Eomans, or king of Bohemia; but I do not know why 
he is not designate by his imperial title, for he was elected on the 20th September 
1410, and crowned at Aix la Chapelle on the 8th of November, 1414, that is to 
say, nearly two years before the death of the bishop. See Ahregi de Vhietoire 
cPAUemagne par M. de Pfeffel, p. 318. 

At the conclusion of the extract is this singular phrase, "und hat man jm da 
kein opfer.'^ In the Boman Catholic Church it was, and still is, at funerals, 
an established custom for the friends of the deceased to make an offering in 
money or money's worth for the good of his soul. This is called in German 
an " opfer " or sacrifice ; and it is certainly strange that such a custom should 
have been discontinued in the present instance. But it must be remembered that 
the monarchs who sent ambassadors to the Council of Constance were in full dispute 
with the Pope; and that there was a strong desire on their parts to oppose and 
set limits to the pretensions which had been advocated in his behalf. Now I do 
not know whether the offering made at funerals was ever claimed by the church 
as a right; but, if so, one can easily understand that the colleagues of the Bishop 
might have been disinclined to admit such a claim, and might have omitted the 
customary donation in order to show that they were determined to regard it in the 
light of a benevolence. 

I ought not to take leave of the present subject without stating that, according 
to the report of the sacristan at the Cathedral of Constance, grounded on generally 
believed tradition, the brass part of Bishop Hallum's monument was manufactured 
in England, and sent from thence to cover his remains. If this indeed be true, 
it is an interesting fact, for it affords a presumption that in the early part of 
the fifteenth century our brass-engravers were reputed to be superior to those of the 
Rhenish cities, where the thing might have been executed without incurring the 
charge of transport and the risque of damage which must have attended any ship- 
ment from England. Certainly, the art of inscribing on brass does not appear to 

epithet is applied to Bemhard of Eberstein, a count of the empire with seat and voice 
in the Diet, and consequently a member of the high nobility. Now, however it haa 
become the property of the superior order of plebeians. To give it to the meanest member 
of the aristocracy, even to a captain in the army, with no other zank than that derived 
from his commission, would be a flagrant breach of good manners. 



S. :MARY, BITTON, GIX)U0ESTERSHIRE. 55 

have been cultivated, for this purpose, so much in Western Germany as with us. 
There are effigies cast in brass and plated with it to be found; and I am informed 
that most of these are believed to have been executed at Nuremburg, where brass- 
founding is said to have been cultivated with success, and at an early period. 
But in the many churches which I have visited on and about the shores of the 
Bhine I scarcely remember such a thing as an engraved plate monument of the 
early part of the fifteenth century. Perhaps the form of the escutcheons over the 
head of the Bishop's effigy may be adduced as very slight evidence of English 
workmanship; for that form was prevalent in England in the year 1416, at which 
period the Germans had begun to adopt another, somewhat different, in depicting 
heraldic achievements. The garter and garter-like scroll too which surround the 
escutcheons are peculiar to England. These little traits, although they do not 
amount to conclusive proof, give nevertheless an air of probability to the tradition. 
Indeed no reason for disbelieving it can be founded on the general apperrance of 
the monument. I think, nevertheless, that the inscription on its border was executed 
in Germany; for the letters of which it consists are very different to those round 
the escutcheons, on the collar, and over the head of the effigy; and they resemble 
at the same time those which one often sees in Germany on gravestones of a 
-contemporary date. 

I do not understand why the royal arms should appear on the monument in 
-question, imless it were to show that the bishop, when he died, was the King's 
representative. 

E. L. PEARSALL. 

Karlsruhe, (Germxi^ny)^ 2Sth October j 1842. 



56 



THE TREBENDAL CHURCH OF 



APPENDIX B. 



Survey of the Copyholds belonging to the Manor of the Prebend of Button, 
alias Bitton, founded in the Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary 
in Sarum, taken in the year 1824, by John Bro^ai and William Hickg 
Townsend, Siu^^eyors. 



John Popham, Lessee or Copyholder, 



Kumbcrs ia 

Parish Map. Promwos. 


Tenant. 


state in 1824 


. Quantity. 


921 


In Micklemejid 


Self 


Pasture 


A. '* ■" 


2 


6 


1168 


In Upper Nonnead 




Ditto 


1 





26 


1200 


Orchai-d 


Sam. Hicks 


Ditto 




3 


15 


1199 


House, Garden, and Buildings 


Ditto 








35 


1224 


Paddock, Long 


Ditto 


Ditto 


1 





8 


1233 


Field, Stoke Brook 


Ditto 


Ditto 


7 


1 


8 


la34 


Part of Field 


Ditto 


Ditto 


2 


2 


13 


1247 


Cottage and Yard and Bam 










15 


1249 


House and Garden 


James Lewis 








15 


1242 


Field, Steep Cleeves 


Sam. Hicks 


Pastiu-e 


1 


3 


1 


1240 


Garden 


Ditto 


Garden 






35 


1267 


Paddock, Atkins' Roborow Ty nings 


1 Ditto 


Arable 


1 


1 


5 


1275 


Field, Little Stoke Brook 


Ditto 


Pasture 


4 


3 


37 


1282 


Field, Long Pipley 


S. Hicks 


Ditto 


7 





12 


1287 


Wood 


Ditto 


Wood 




3 


3 


1449 


Field, Beech Leaze 


Self 


Pasture 


8 





23 


1305 


Paddock, Atkins' Tynings 


S. Hicks 


Ditto 


2 


2 


25 


1328 


Paddock (woody) 


Ditto 


Ditto 


2 


3 


3 


1099 


Field, Harding's 


Self 




4 


2 


38 


10U3 


Pt. of Paddock 

• 


Ditto 


■I 




1 


12 




48 


2 


25 



S. MARY, BITTON, GLOUCESTERSHIEE. 



57 



Rachel Humberstox, Copyholder. Late "Moss's" Living. 



964 


In Micklemead 


John Capel 
Wm. Builder 


Pasture 




2 


3 


1020 


In Normead 


• Ditto 




3 





1248 


Yard and Buildings 


John Capel 


• • • 






20 


1250 


House and Garden 


Ditto 


• • • 






33 


1273 


Paddock 


Ditto 


Arable 




2 


25 


1374 


Paddock 


Ditto 


Pasture 


3 


2 


2 


1308 


Ditto 


Ditto 


Ditto 




1 


,0 


1352 


Ditto 


Ditto 


Ditto 


3 


2 


14 


1052 


Field 


Thos. Bevan 


Ditto 


2 


2 


3 


1055 


Ditto 


Ditto 


Ditto 


1 


2 


31 


1056 


Ditto 


Ditto 


Ditto 


1 


1 


25 


408 


Aldermoor 


Ditto 


Ditto 




2 


22 


409 


Island 


Ditto 


Ditto 






12 


1062 


Paddock 


Ditto 


Ditto 


• 


1 


3 


1101 


Field 


Ditto 


Ditto 


7 


3 


29 


1120 


Ditto 






3 





4 


1060 


Field 


Ditto 


Ditto 


4 


1 


32 



32 2 18 



Mary Bush, Widow, Copi/Jiohlei'. ImU "Bryant's" Living. 



968 In Micklemead 

945 Ditto 

Part of Paddock 

1026 Field 

1165 In Upper Noimead 

1167 Ditto 

1291 Field 

1307 Ditto 

1034 Paddock 

1133 Ditto 

239 Kimmercombe 

222 Jay's Hill 

781 Three Comer Paddock 

1016 Part of Paddock 

1047 In Boyd Field 

1316 Garden 

9 The Close 

10 Garden 

1 1 House ) -.r ( and Garden 

12 House} Manor ^ __j ^,_.^„ 

13 Ditto 
In Waddown Moor 



VOL. IV, N.S., I 



Self 

Ditto 

Ditto 

Ditto 

DanL Lewis 

Ditto 

Isaac Lewis 

Self 

Ditto 

Ditto 



Pasture 

Ditto 

Ditto 

Ditto 

Ditto 

Ditto 

Arable 

Pasture 

Ditto 

Ditto 



Daniel Bumell Arable 
Ditto Pasture 



4 
1 
1 
4 
4 

3 
1 



1 



( and Garden 



Pasture 1 
Arable 
Garden 
Ditto 
Ditto 
Geo. Lewton Pasture 



2 
35 

2 24 

2 27 

25 

12 

33 

26 

2 18 





1 
2 
3 



2 
1 



3 



33 

23 

11 



14 
30 



28 
16 
16 
14 
34 
4 



27 1 26 



58 



THE PREBENDAL CHUECH OF 



John Bush (Brewer), Copylwlder. Late ''Flowers'' Living. 



1438 


Paddock 


Self 


Pasture 


1 


3 


28 


1436 


Field 


Ditto 


Ditto 


3 


2 


19 


1437 


Wood, &c. 


Ditto 


Wood 




2 


31 


1378 


Long Tyning 
Paddock 


John Caple 


Arable 


2 


1 


4 


1309 


Ditto 


Ditto 




1 


27 


1350 


Field 


Self 


Pasture 


4 





34 


1368 


Paddock 


Ditto 


Ditto 


3 


3 


36 


1356 


House and Garden 


SundiyPei-sons 


1 


2 


20 


1349 


Field 


Self 


Pasture 


5 


2 


32 


1404 


Paddock 


Ditto 


Ditto 


1 


2 


4 


1424 


Ditto 


Ditto 


Ditto 


1 


2 


35 


1409 


In Quarry Ground 


Ditto 


Amble 


2 





15 


1415 


Paddock 


Ditto 


Ditto 


2 





19 




Ditto 


Ditto 


Ditto 




3 


13 




Field 


Ditto 


Pasture 


3 





38 


1096 


In Wilton's Field 


John Gibbs 


Arable 




1 


20 


1429 


Wigley Comer 


— Flower 


Ditto 




2 


8 


1426 


Wigley Comer 


Self 


Ditto 




2 


36 


1298 


Part of Field 


John Caple 


Pasture 


1 


1 


7 



38 26 



William Jason Parker, Copyholder. 
1343 Field John Bush (Brewer) Pasture 10 14 



John Bush (Bristol), Copyholder. Late " (joodman's " Living. 



1188 Field, The Rookery 

1162 Part of Paddock 

1201 House, Garden, &c. 

1202 Field, Old House Ground 
1205 Ditto 

1207 Garden 

1209 House, Garden, and Land 

1268 Paddock 

1276 Ditto 



Daniel Lewis 


Pasture 


1 


3 


32 


Ditto 


Ditto 




1 


1 


T. Gibbs, 






3 


3 


J. Bath, Ac. 










D. Lewis 


Pasture 


1 


3 


39 


Ditto 


Ditto 


3 


3 


7 


M. Shipp 








13 


Ditto 








21 


T. Lintem 


Arable 


1 


2 


31 


T. Gibbs 


Ditto 




3 


20 



S. MAEY, BITTON, GL0TJCESTER8HIEE. 



59 



1272 


Coninger, Part of 


John Caple 


1283 


Part of Blackland 


Saml. Hicks 


1439 


Field, StubVs Leaze 


John Gibbs 


1445 


Part of a Field in Beach Leaze 


Ditto 


1442 


Field, Bound Close 


Ditto 


1324 


Paddock 


Bich. Dennis 


1333 


Ditto 


Dan. Lewis 


1373 


Ditto 


Jos. Wilton 


1394 


Field, Leaze 


John Gibbs 


1410 


Withy Bed 


Ditto 


1428 


In Wigley Comer 


Ditto 


1431 


Ditto 


Ditto 


1122 


Field 





Ditto 


15 


2 


33 


Pasture 






20 


Ditto 


4 


2 


8 


Ditto 




1 


37 


Ditto 


1 


2 


35 


Ditto 


1 


1 


11 


Ditto 


2 


2 


26 


Ditto 


1 


3 


39 


Ditto 


5 


3 


11 


Withy 






32 


Arable 




1 


21 


Arable 






33 


Ditto 


3 





11 



49 3 



Martha Pboctor, Widow, Copyholder. Late " Bladder' a" Living. 



975 In Micklemead 




Self 


Pasture 




2 


3 


1210 Orchard 




Ditto 


Orchard 




1 


28 


1137 Paddock 




Ditto 


Pasture 


1 








1 067 In Dry Leaze k Palmei 


•'s Ground 


Ditto 


Ditto 




2 


7 


1211 House, Garden, and 


Orchard, 


Ditto 






2 


10 


Blackler's 














1218 Field 




Ditto 


Pasture 


3 


3 


38 


1271 Field 




Ditto 


Ditto 


5 


1 


9 


•"^{S 




Ditto 


Arable 




2 


35 




Ditto 


Ditto 




2 


22 


1274 Part of a Field 




Ditto 


Pasture 


1 





20 


1279 Pipley 




John Glass 


Ditto 


2 





39 


1094 In Wilton's Field 




John Gibbs 


Arable 




1 


20 


984 In Micklemead 




Self 


Pasture 




3 


16 



18 1 10 



William Shipp, Copyholder. " lAtte Harding's " Living. 



1153 House and Garden 

11.54 Ditto 

115i Ditto 

1156 Garden 

1167 Orchard 



Geoi^ Hawkins 
Hannah Bright 
Stephen Jones 
Self 
Ditto 



3 




18 

20 

31 

4 

5 

38 



60 



THE PREBENDAL CIIUKCH OF 



Joseph Fabker, Copyholder. Late 


" Danijerjteld's, 




In Normead 


Wni. Builder 


1021 


Ditto 


Ditto 


1365 


Paddock 


Peter GeiTish 


Pt. of 1226 In Long Close and Famndel 


Daniel Lewis 


1262 


Garden 


John Meere 


1261 


Ditto 


John Meere 


1398 


Field, Patches 


John Gibbs 


T342 


Paddock 


Rtvchel WUton 


1423 


Paddock 


John Gibbs 


1408 


In Quarry Ground 


Ditto 




In Coflfin Tyning 


llich. Dennis 


1106 


HiU Bush and Paddock 


Ditto 




In Lower Nailors 


JoH.Pai-ker,jun. 




In Long Furlong 


R. Dennis 




Ditto 


Ditto 




Ditto 


Ditto 


1212 


Seed's House, Garden, &c. 


Wm. Ship 


1213 


Seed's Orchard 


Ditto 


1222 


Seed's Three Acres 


Mai-thaProctor 




In Butterwell 


Wm. Ship 


1219 


Butterwell Paddock 


Martha Proctor 




In Roborough 


R. Mayne 




In Upper Roborough 


Ditto 




Ditto 


Ditto 


1296 


The Harp 


John Glass 




In Great Pipley (Brake) 


Self 




Stony Leaze 


John Glass 




Upper Pipley 
Late Blackers 


Ditto 




Ditto 




Pipley Paddock 


Ditto 


1443 


Field 


John Gibbs 




In Upper Wall Tyning 


John Pophani 
Roger Mayne 




Ditto 




In Wall Tyning 


Ditto 




Ditto 


Ditto 




Ditto 


Ditto 




Blacker's Acre 


John Glass 



Pasture 






30 


Ditto 




1 


20 


Ditto 




2 


12 


Ditto 




1 





Garden 




1 


23 
33 


Ditto 


2 





37 


Ditto 




2 


31 


Ditto 


1 


3 


25 


Ditto 










1 








Pasture 


5 


3 


25 


Ditto 


1 


1 


20 


Arable 


8 


2 


19 


Ditto 




2 


27 


Ditto 


3 


3 


12 






1 


22 


Pasture 


1 





9 


Ditto 


2 


3 


34 


Ditto 




1 


31 


Ditto 




3 


33 


Arable 


1 








Ditto 




2 


11 


Ditto 




2 


5 


Pasture 




3 


14 


Brake 




2 





Pasture 




3 


37 


Ditto 




3 


14 


Ditto 


1 


1 


39 


Ditto 


2 





13 


Ditto 


4 





26 


Arable 




2 


8 


Ditto 


2 





34 


Ditto 


1 








Ditto 


1 








Ditto 




2 


17 


Pasture 


1 





11 


« 


54 


3 


J 3 



S. MAEY, BITTON, OLOUCESTERSHIEE. 



61 



Joseph Parker, \; Martha Proctor, ^; John Popham, ^; Peter 
.^ . Gerrish, ^ ; John Bush, ^, are Joint Copyholders in the folloiviny 
lands in MicHemead, called " Lots." 



966 The Dwelling Acre 

985 The Long Acre 

986 The Short Acre 

987 The Mill Acre 



Roger Mayne Pastm-e 2 2 32 

Ditto Ditto 1 2 5 

Ditto Ditto 3 10 

Ditto Ditto 1 3 25 



6 3 32 



Peter Gerrish, Copyholder. Late " Foord^s " lAving. 



960 


In Micklemead 


Self 


Pasture 




3 


2 


1385 


Paddock 


Isaac Lewis 


Arable 


2 


3 


22 


1875 


Field 


Self 


Pastiu'e 


5 





33 


1335 


Paddock 


Ditto 


Ditto 


1 


2 


26 


1364 


Ditto 


Ditto 


Ditto 


3 





33 


1359 


House and Garden 


Joseph Williams 






36 


1338 


Field 


Self • 


Pastvu'e 


3 


1 


39 


1417 


Part of Paddock 


Rachel Wilton Ditto 




1 


16 


1411 


Paddock 


Jos. Williams 


Arable 




2 


13 




18 


1 


20 



Mary Lewis, Widow, Copyholder. Late " Hanney's." 



1198 House, Grarden, &c. 
1197 Ditto 
1314 Paddock 



Self 

Mary Tliompson 

James Lewis Pastiu-e 



1 3 
1 4 

1 27 



3 34 



William Truebody, Copyholder. Late " Mulling' s." 
1189 House and Garden Self 1 14 



62 



THE PEEBENDAL CHUECH OP 



William Weare, Lessee of Beach Farm, part of the Prehendal 

Manor of Bitton. 



952 


In Micklemead 


John Popham 


Pasture 


9 


1 


7 


1450 


Upper East Field 


Ditto 


Ditto 


12 


1 


4 


1451 


Lower ditto 


Ditto 


Ditto 


10 


2 


5 


1452 


Nine Acres 


Ditto 


Ditto 


10 


2 


5 


1453 


Eight Acres 


Ditto 


Ditto 


8 


3 


17 


1454 


Great Thickat 


Ditto 


Ditto 


24 


1 


24 


1455 


Cow Leaze 


Ditto 


Ditto 


19 


2 


32 


1456 


Lower Leaze, or Leigh 


Ditto 


Ditto 


9 


2 


12 


1457 


Vernshard 


Ditto 


Ditto 


10 





34 


1458 


Upper Leaze 


Ditto 


Ditto 


12 


1 


29 


1459 


Wood 


Ditto 






3 


11 


1460 


Orchard Mead 


Ditto 


Pasture 


6 


1 


34 


1461 


Orchard , 


Ditto 


Orchard 


2 





8 


1462 


Beach Farm, House, &c, 


Ditto 




1 


1 


34 


1463 


Six Acres 


Ditto' 


Arable 


5 





5 


1464 


Four Acres 


Ditto 


Ditto 


3 


2 


8 


1465 


Road to Great Down 


Ditto 


Pastiu« 






30 


1466 


Garden 


Ditto 


Arable 






31 


1467-8 Beach Wood and Quany 


Ditto 


Wood 


27 





5 


1469 


Great Down 


Ditto 


Pasture 


61 


2 


20 


1470 


Little Down 


Ditto 


Ditto 


14 


2 


28 


1447 


Six Acres 


Ditto 


Arable 


5 


2 


30 


1380 


Lower Tyning 


Ditto 




12 


3 


28 


1383 


Tyning 


Ditto 




6 


2 


16 


1383 


In Upper Wall Tynmg 


Ditto 




1 


3 


14 


1388 


Tyning 


Ditto 


< 


6 





28 




284 





19 



The Parsonage Hoicse and Glebe, Leased with the Manor of the Prebend to 
Sir Thomas F. Fremantle, Bart., on Tliree TAves. 

2 Mansion House and Garden 

3 Cottage, Barn, Yard, &c. 
4 

5 Nine Acres 
5a Plantation 

6 Croft 



Garden 


1 


3 


25 






3 


24 


Pasture 


5 


3 


6 


Ditto 


9 


2 


6 


Ditto 




1 





Ditto 


4 


3 


27 




23 


1 


8 



S. MAKY, BITTON, GLOUCESTEESHIER 



63 



The Vicarage House and Glebe, part of the Patronage of the 

Prebendary of Bitton. 



7 & 8 House, Garden, &c. 
8 Part of Close 
791 Little Breaches 
Hanham In Sydenham Mead 

779 In Cherry Garden 
1419 Oldland In Waddown Moor 
1124 In Lower Nailors 
1 The Church Yard 



H. T. Ellacombe Garden 
Ditto Pastiu*e 

Job Lapham Ditto 
Dan. SheUand Ditto 
Wm. Stibbs Ditto 
Geo. Lewton Ditto 
Robert Strong Arable 
Mortuorum Pasture 





2 


9 


1 


3 


10 


3 





21 




2 


29 




1 


37 




2 


4 




2 


5 


1 


3 


15 


9 


2 


5 



Summary of the Totals held by each Copyholder, also of the Beach Farm and 

the Glebe Lands of the Parsonage and Vicarage, shewing the extent of the 

Prebendal Manor and the Acreage with which the Church was endowed. 



Quit Bent8. 


Copyliolders. 


1 14 


5 


Popham, John 


1 7 





Humberston, Rachel 


11 


11 


Bush, Mary 


10 


10 


Bush, John 


18 


2 


Bush, Jolin 


7 


6 


Proctor, Martha 


1 





Parker, Wm. Jason 


15 


2 


Parker, Joseph 
Parker and others 


13 


2 


Gerrish, Peter 




8 


Lewis, Manr 


4 





Trubody, William 



8 Shipp, William 



Tenements. 

Gunning's, &c. 
Rosse's 


Quantify. 

48 2 25 
32 2 18 


Bryant's 
Flower's 


27 
38 


1 26 
26 


Goodman's 


49 


3 4 


Blacker's 


18 


1 10 




1 


14 


Seeds, &c. 


54 


3 13 


Mead 


6 


3 32 


Foord's 


18 


1 20 


Hanney's 
MuUing's 




3 34 
1 14 


Harding's 


1 


38 



296 1 27 



36 Weare, WiUiam Lessee of Beach Farm 284 19 

26 6 Fremantle, Thomas Lord Farmer of the Parsonage 23 1 8 
Goodman, Maurice 

HiUer Vicar of the Vicarage 9 3 5 



615 3 26 



64 



THE PREBENDAL CHURCH OP 



APPENDIX C. 



Exchequer. Lay Subsidies. Gloucester. No. *^ 1 Edward III, 
Membrane 25. — Hundred de Swynesheved. 



Button. 



De Edinudo. le Blount 
Alio, la Blount 
Johe. atteBregge- 
Johe. Vauncoup - 
Johe. Gibbos 
Henr. Colquines - 
Johe. Chiualer 
Eobto. Perkyne's - 
Rico. Dameanneys 
Johe. Inchehum - 
Johe. de Maluarn - 
Johe. deKyngton- 
Johe. Marmyoun - 
WiUo. Blount 
Potr. Bercar 
8m» 



iij«iiije? 
xiij« }d oh 
xxd 
xijrf 
ixd oh 
ij«9 
Y}d oh 
xij d 
xixd oh 
xijrf 
xijrf 

ij.* .... , 
ij« mjtf 

xviij^ 



- xs 

xlij« xjrf oh q*. 



Uptofi et Bech. in Button. 



Da Johe. le Hope 
Thorn, de Staunton 
Robto. de Launcesdon - 
Johe. de Cottenham 
Rogo. atte Elme - 
Alicia, atte Grene - 
Robto. atte Bech. - 
Rogo. ate Fortheie 
Rico. Hamond 
Thorn. Lekhamond 
Rico. Heort - - - 
Willo. Vikeries - 
Stepho. Cranel 
Johne. Plie - - - 
Robto. Poyncel - 
Thorn. Barouns 
Thorn. Morwe 
Johne. Marmyoun - 
Sm» 



xiiijrf 

. ij« viiji 

- xijrf 

- xyiiid 

- xviijrf oh 

- xv<^ 

- ij« oh 

- iij« oh 

- xviiji 

- xij<i 

- iij« Yjd 

- xij<^ 

- ijs ijrf 

- xviijri 

- xijrf 

- ii.* 

- xyrf 

- xiiij<^ 
XXX8 oh 



Hanam et Oldelonds in Button. 



De dno Johe. de Button 
Stepho. de la More 
Johe. Santemareys 
Nicho. de Bakhous' 
Rogoro. Sygge 
Robto. Burnel 
Johe. Trabes 
Rico. Oaliar - - - 
WiUo. Poddyng' - 
Hugon Payn 
Roeo. de Donerleve 
Gilb atte Hulle '- 
Johe. le Bercar 
Willo. atte More - 
Alicia. Duraunt - 
Robto. le Beek' - 
Willo. Marshale - 
Willo. de KyngeshuU - 
Thorn. Holoweye - 
Johe. Donerleye - 
Rico. Wildegos 
Robto. Stork' 
Rogo. Berde- 
Rogo. Fabro- 
Rico. atte Wode - 
Robto. atte Wode - 
Waltero. atte Soler 
Johe. Fox - - - 
Johe. le Man- 
Rico, atte Gorste - 
Johe. le Frensshe - 
Adm. Ghrymesbur - 
Johe. Joye - - - 
Waltero. de Pauele 
Johe. Wade . - - 
Marg'ia. atte More 

Sm' - iiij/» 



- \^# viijrf 

- iij« iiij<l 

- yj# \h}d 

- vj* iiiji^ 

- xviiji 

- xiji 

- iiij« 

- rs 

- xij<l 

- vj# viijif 

- iiij« Hid 

- xiji 

- xiiijrf 

- xiji 

- xviiji 

- xiiijrf 

- 1)8 ixd 

' 'K 

- xija 

- viiji 

- viijrf 

- xyprf 

- 3Lijrf 

- xijrf 

- ij« iiijrf 

- »y^ 

- xiiijrf 

- xijrf^ 

- xviijJ 

- z^d 

- iij« oh 

- ^i^d 

- iuxJ 
xxij J oh 



Hericus Weston 
Thomas Tybbett 
Johanna Rygevale 



S. MARY. BITTON, GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 

Subsidy Ex^ll, 37th Henry VIIL 
Htmdredm de Gromoldeayshe. 



Bytton. 



in bon. bubs. 

xlmrh. xij« viij/? 

xLlt xx« 

XX/* X8 



Ricus. Trewbody 
Willms. Waren 



65 



in bon. Bubs. 
xxli X9 

xxU X8 



, Hundr, de Gromholdasshe. 
Decenx. de Bytton and Hanham. 



Subs. 

Johes. Staunton, in terris iij// vj* 
Thomas Tybotts, in bonis xxxiij// xliiij* 

Edward Tybotts - vij// iiij* \\i}d 

Johes. Grome - vij// iijj« viijr/ 

Johes. Holbeine - v// iij« i\\}d 

Tliomas Towney - v// iij« iiije^ 

Johes. Bumell - v// iij« iiijrf 

Thomas BrytajTie - rj// iiij« 

Johes. Crew, sen. - v// iij« \\\yl 

Thomas Crede, sen. • vj// iiij* 

Wyllam Vnderhyll - vij// iiij« Y\i]d 

Thomas Awsborne - v/i iij« iijrf 

Ricus. Trewbody - xvj// xvj« 

Harry Weston - xxli xxvj^viijrf 

Edmond Weston, in terris x// xx« 

Johes. Taylor sen., in bon. xij// xij« 

Wyllm. Wamo - xviij// xy'iiyi 



Thomas Smythe, in bonis 
Johes. Smythe 
Ricus. Smythe 
John Byrde, sen. 
Wilhns. Jonys 
Ricus. Gonyng 
Elizabeth SkoTton, vid. - 
Nichus. Smythe 
Thomas Wyllyams 



Thomas Bryantt 

Ricus. Fermoa 

Roger Appresser, in terr. 

Wills. Stone, in bonis • - 

Johes. Jonys 

Walt' us Smythe .... 

Summa xv// 



xvj// 

ix// 

xix// 

y// 

ix/i 

xv// 

viij// 

xij// 

xij// 

v// 

v// 

v// 

xl« 

v// 

vj// 

v// 

viijrf. 



Subs. 

xvj* 

vj« 

xix* 

iij« iiij^ 

vj« 

X\H 

\s iiij^ 
xij,9 
xij» 

iij« iiijrf 
iij« iii}d 
iij« iiijf/ 
iiij« 

iij« iiiji/ 
iiij« 
iij« iiijf/ 



Second Payment of Subsidy granted 1st Elizabeth. 

Hundredtim de Grombouldesashe. 
Bytton and Hanham. 







Subs. 






Subs. 


Johes. Nuton., miles in 






Willms. Vnderhill, in 


bon. x// 


X* 


terris 


- xl// 


liij« 


iiijr/ 


Rogerus Tibbett 


- vij// 


w 


Edmond. Weston, 


in terr x// 


xiij» 


iiijrf 


Johnes. Holbyn 


- vij// 


V1J« 


Ricus. Davers, in 


bonis - xx// 


xxs 




Johnes. Hardmffe 


- v// 


X8 


Johnes. Roede, in 


terris - x// 


xii>iiijf/ 


Willms. Burnell, senior - v// 


\t< 


Willms. Wame, in bonis- x// 


x^ 




Lewis Briaunt 


- vij// 


vij« 


Nichus. Lmirhe 


- ix// 


i\* 


1 


1 Thomas Forde 


- v// 


v» 


Johnes Curties 


• - v// 


VA- 


1 


Thomas Britayne 


. v// 


V* 


Johnes. Smithc 


- v// 


v/* , 




Elbriglit Brownige 


. v// 


v« 


Poyntus Smythe 


- v// 


YA- 




Ricus. Fox 


- v// 


Yft 


Johnes. Warne 


- v// 


T* 


1 


Walter Smithe 


- v// 


V* 


Johnes. Jones 


- vj// 


vjx 




Johnes. Bisshoppe 


- vij// 


vij* 


Thomas Credo 


. v7/ 


\)< 




Johnes. Crewe 


. v// 


v« 


Willms. Stone 


. v// 


v« 




Wilhnus Burnell 


■ ^('' 


v« 


Johnes. Taylor 


- v// 


V* 


Summa 


Ileniyc. Smithe 
xij// ix^. 


• vj// 


^j* 



VOL. IV, N.S., K 



6a 



THE PKEBENDAL CHITECH OF 



The Last Payment of Subsidy cm anted 13th Elizabeth. 

The Iloundvede of Grouihakktshe. 

Bytton and Hannam. 



l.>72. 




Subs. 


IlaiTy Newton, in landea 


xiij/* 


xvij« iiiyl 


Edmund Weston „ 


xij// 


xy]« 


John Lacie „ 


xj// 


xiiij^viijrf 


Stanton Batman ,, 


iiiiV* 


vs iii^d 


WiUm. Vnderhill „ 


1/ 


\iU iu]d 


Nichas. Sinithe, in goods 


xfU 


X]« 


Eichard Ooxe „ 


T^ll 


vj« 


ElbrighteBrowninge „ 


yili 


vj« 


Walter Smythe „ 


iij/(t 


HI* 


Eichard Smythe ,, 


iiij^j 


iiijjf 


Joane Bisshop ,j 


\U 


V9 


Eoger Cottell „ 
Eobei-te Stowte „ 


iiij/« 


iiij# 


iiijV/ 


iiij« 


John Warno ,, 


yj/* 


vj« 


John Jonnes „ 


yj// 


vij« 


Walter Bryttaino „ 


vj« 



Willm. Stane, in 
Thomas Eeade 
John Osboiirne 
Lewes Bryante 
Thomas Bryttayne 
John ( -rewe 
Harry Vnderhill 
Edward Bussett 
John Hawkyns 
John Davyes 
John Harding 
Wilhn. Burnell 
Eoger Tibbatt 
Thomas Fourd 
Eobert Hawkins 
Sum. 







Subs. 


goods 


y\li 


^"? 




m. 


UIJ« 




iiija 


iiij« 




^!y.. 


viij« 




Vllj// 


viij« 




r,7,- 


vj« 




v/» 


V* 




iij7« 


iij« 




iiij^t 


iiijjf 




"W. 


vj« 




vj" 


yy 




'j';" 


yi« 




Vllj/* 


viiij* 




vij//' 


vj« 




iiij/« 


iiij« 


xU iij« 


viijt/. 





The ITundrede of Grouihaldashe. 
Bytton and Hannam. 



Harry Newton, in landes (Sums omitted) 


Willm. Stane, in goods (Sums omitted) 


Edmund Weston, ,, 


Thomas Eeade 




John Lacie „ 


|| John Osboume 




Stanton Batman ,, 


1 Lewes Bryante 




WiUm. A^nderhill 


i Thomas Bryttayne 




Nichas. Smith, in goods 


i; John Oewe 




Eichai*d Coxe ,, 


Harry Yuderhill 




Elbrighte Browuinge „ 


Fi<lward Bassett 




Walter Smythe „ 


' John Hawkyns 




Eichard Smythe ,, 


j John Davyes 




Joane Bishop „ 
Eoger Cottell „ 
Eoberte Stowte „ 


1 John Harding 




: Will. Burnell 




l' Eoger Tibbatt 




John Wame ,, 


Thoms. Fourd 




John Jounes „ 


Eobert Hawkins 


M 


Walter Bryttaine „ 







S. MARY, BITTON, GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 



07 



First Subsidy of 39th Elizabeth. 

Hand, cle Langley et Swinshed. 

Bytton and Hannam. 



Willnis. Bassett, ar. in ter. 
Johes. Weston, gen. „ 
Johes. Danvers, gen. ,, 
Willms. Lacy, gen. ,, 
Hered .Willi. Price, gen. ,, 
Stanton Bateman -^ „ 
Willus. Vnderhill 
Willus. Atwood, in bon. 
Johes. Britten 
Johes. Osborne 
Johes. Crewe 
Thorns. Flower 
Willus. Tibbett 
Johes. Burnell de Vpton 
Editha Ford de Vpton 
Johes. Rede 
Willus. Browning 
Henriee Hardinge 



xj// xliiij« 
yli xx« 

\Ji XX8 

iiijV/ xvj« 

■ ii}U xij« 
xis viij« 

• xl« viij« 

■ vij// xviijs viijf? 
iiij// x« viij^ 

• iiij/* x« yiiyl 
iij// viij* 
iiii7* X8 YU}d 
u^li viij* 
iiij^* X9 viijrf 
u^li viij« 

• iij^i* viij« 
iij/* viij« 

' iijii viij« 



Edrus. Henton, in bonis 

Thorns. Bishopp 

Jo. Rede de Highe Kinge 

Hill 
Willus. West de Westham 
Thome. Creed 
Johes. Burnell de Hanam • 
Barth^* Rymer 
Johes. Hardinge de Bitton • 
Johes. Bryant de Lipyate 

in ter 
Ric. Taylor deHanam,in bon 
Johes. Sherborne 
Heuricus Stowt 
Joanna Gates, vid. 
Johes. Wame 
Robt. Jones 
Nicus. Carter 



- iijU viij< 

- ii]Ii viij* 

- iijZi viij« 

- ii}li viij« 

- iij/t vuj« 

- yli xiij.5 iiijc^ 

- li^li viij« . 

- iiij7* xs yii^d 

» xl# viij« 

iij/t viij« 

iij^/ viija 

iij/e viij« 

iij// viij« 

iij// x« viij^ 

iij/* viijs 

iij/» Yiij« 



Sum* xviij/e xij«. 



Subsidy, 40th Elizabeth. 

Hund, de Langley et Sicinshed. 

Bytton and Hanam. 



Willus. Bassett, ar. in ter. (Sums omitted) 

Johes. Weston, gen. in ter. 

Johes. Danvers, gen. in ter. 

Willus. Lacy, g©n. in ter. 

Hered. Willi. Price, gen. in terr. 

Stanton Bateman in ter. 

Willus. Vnderhill, in ter. 

Willus. Atwood, in bon. 

Johes. Britten 

Johes. Osborne 

Johes. Crewe 

Thomas Flower 

Willus. Tibbett 

Johes. Burnell de Vpton 

Editha Ford df V^ton 

Johes. Rede 

Willus. Browning 



Henric. Hardinge, in bon. (Sums omitted) 

Edrus. Henton 

Thomas Bishopp 

Jo. Rede de Highe Kingehill 

Willns. West de Westhanan 

Thomas Creed 

Johes. Burnell de Hanam 

Barthw. Rymer. 

Johes. Hardinge de BHton 

Johes, Biyant de Lipyate, in ter. 

Ricus. Taylor de Hanam, in bon. 

Johes, Sherborne 

Henricus Stowt 

Joanna Gates, vid. 

Johes. Wame 

Robt. Jones. 

Nicus. Carter 



fig 



THE PREBENDAL CHURCH OF 



Subsidy 20th Jameh L 
Hundred, de Lanley et Sivinshead. 

BlTTOX ET HaNAM. 



Theodoras Nevrton, miles 

in ter. - xsJi 

Johnes. Seed, in ter. - iiij// 
Henricus Weston, in ter. iiij// 
Andreas Atwood, in bon. \Ii 
Jobes. Britten - iiij// 

Jobes. Lowe et Tho. 

Underbill - ij// 

Bogerus Hardingo - iiij// 

Jobes. Britten, sen. in ter. ij// 
Tobias Bead, in bon. - iijr/ 
Jobes. Harding, senn. - iij// 
Nicholas Flower, in ter. - j/« 
Jobes. Flower „ - ij// 

Stanton Batman „ - ij// 
Tbo. Dain^erfild „ - j// 
Jobes. Bead, in bon. - iij// 
Bicbus. Powe - iij// 



j// vjw yii}d 
Oil V* iiij«^ 
O/i iiij« ^ 

O/f V8 

0// iiij* 

O/i ]j« 
0/^ iiij« 
0//ij«viij^ 
0// iij« 
O/i iij« 
0// 18 iiiyi 
OH ij* Yii^d 
0// ij* viijf? 
0// j* iiijfll 
0// iij* , 
0// iij* 
Soma, total. 



ij// 
iij// 

ij/i 

viij// 

ij// 



Bartbol. Bynier, in ter. - 
Jobes. Foord, in bon. 
Jobes. Britten de Ypton 

in ter. 
3 obes Bumell, in bon. - 
Willms. Lacie, in ter. 
Bobertu9Bi*owninge,inbon iij// 
Joanna Bisbope, vid. - iij// 
Humpbridus Kead in ter. ij// 
Jacobus Stibbs „ - j// 

Bogeros Joanes ,, - j// 
Jobes. Cotle ,, - j/i 

Bicbus. Stowt et Edwardus 

Seel, in ter. „ - j// 

Willims. Tybbat, in ter. - ij// 

Alicia Wad, vid. ,, - j/i 

Willims. Bobings „ - ij// 

Walterus Joanes „ - j/i 

v// xiiij* viij</. 



0// if* Yiijd 
0// iij* 

Oil ij* Yujd 
Oil viij* 
0// ij* viiii 
0// iij* 
0// iij* 
0// ij* viiji/ 
0// j* iiijrf 
0// j*iiijrf 
0// j* iiijrf 

0//j* iiijd 
Oli ij* liijd 
0//j* iiijrf 
0// ij* viij* 
0// j* iiijrf 



Subsidy 22nd James I. 
Lamjletj et Swineshead Htmd. 

BiTTON ET HaNAM. 



Theodore Newton, Knight, in ter. 

Henry Weston, gen. ,, 

Andrew Atwood, in bon. 

John Brytten, fir. 

John Lowe, et Thomas Vnderhill, in ter. 

Boger Hardinge, in bon. 

John Brytten, senior, in terr. 

Toby Beade, in bon. 

John Hardinge, senior 

Nicholas Flower, in ter. 

Stanton Batman „ 

John Ford, junior & John Bede, in ter. 

Bartholomew Bymer „ 

John Ford, senior, in bonis 



John Davis and John Britten de Vi)ton, in ter. 

John Bumell de Hanna, in bon. 

Bobert Brownings de Hanna. 

Joane Bisbopp, vid. 

Hum fry Beade, in ter. 

James Stibbs 

Boger Jones 

John Cottell 

Bichard Stowt 

Willia. Tybbatt 

Alee. Wade, vid. 

Willia. Bobbins 

Walter Joanes 

John Hellier 



S. MARY, BITTON, GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 



69 



The foregoing extracts of Lay Subsidies are interesting, as they are a 
recoixi of the chief parishioners Kving at the respective dates. They 
ai'e extracted from the originals in the Public Record Office, London. 
I have been enabled to add the following : — 

Subsidy, 2kd Edward VI. 

Hiirui^ de Gromholdsashe. 

Bytton and Hanham. 



Edward Tybott, in bonis - xiij//p EeKo xiij« 
John Crew - - x/« p Relio x« 

Wyllm. Wame- - xli p Betio x« 

Henry Weston - - xx/e p Ret. xx« 

John. Cromo - - xU p Ret. x« 

W^rrf . Vnd'hyll - xili p Ret. xi^ 



Thomas Osborne, in bonis 
Ryehard Gonyng 
John. Taylor jun. 
Ryehard S my the 
Wyllm. Jonys 



Sum. y\U X*. 



x//p Ret. x« 
xiiji^/pRet. xiii« 
xli p Ret. X8 
xiij^/pRet. xiij« 
xli p Ret. xs 



Exchequer. Lay Subsidies. Gloucester. No. 
14th and 15th Henry VIII. 



113 



Decenn. de Olmide, 


Bytton, 




Tlioms. Smythe 


yli 


ii« \\d 


Tliome. Breten, in 


bou. 


xij7*subsicl 


. vj« 


Willmo. Grene 


xl« 


Xljrf 


Johes. Tebott 




• iiij7* 


ij« 


Johes. Wodehows 


xx« 


iiijr^ 


Johes. Crew - 




- vj7* 


iij«' 


Johes. Gregory 


xx« 


iiij<? 


Johes. Redo - 




- iiij^* 


ij« 


Willmo. Jonys 


xx« 


iiijrf 


Johes. Bryantt 




-'iij/* 


xy\\]d 


Thorns. Tybbes 


XX* 


iiijrf 


Thorns. Hiirne 




- XX9 


n\}d 


Johes. Bryantt, sen. 


XX8 


mid 


Johes. Underhyll 




- ^^l^ 


vj« 


Johes. Jonys al. Brydys 


XX8 


iiijd 


Johes. Breten 




- vj/* 


iij« 


Johes. Teytt 


XX8 


iiij^^ 


Johes. Rondcll 




- vU 


ij# vjrf 


Johes. Warkeman 


y'lili 


iij« vj^ 


Johes. Tebott, sen. 




- x\s 


xij^ 


Willmo. Byrde 


xh 


xijrf 


Ricus. Davys 




- xh 


x\yl 


Johes. Smythe 


xh 


xijd 


Walteru. Twyneborow 


- xli 


v« 


Johes. Sheram 


iiij7* 


ij« 


Robtus. Haidyng 




- xli 


\8 


Willmo. Waren, in bon. 


iiif li subs. 


in« vi4 


Thorns. Hogge 




- xx« 


iiij^ 


Johes. Robyns 


\bli 


David Jonys - 




. XX8 


iii^ 


Johes. Strowt 


:d8 


••J 

Xljrf 


Robtus. Waturford 


. xx« 


iiije^ 


Johes. Strowt, sen. 


xh 


xi^d 


Heniicus Weston, 


gent 


. xVi 


xi* ! 


Johes. Swayne 


XX8 


m}d 


Tlioms. Curnell, famul 






Johes. Byrde - 


XX8 


iiij^ 


ej. p. stipend. 




- xx« 


iiijrf 


Ricus. Gonwyn 


iij7» 


xviijrf 


Thorns. Bryantt 




- vj// 


iij« 


Johss. Jonys - 


xxli 


XX8 


Johes. Smythe 




- yU 


ij« y^d 


Jacobus Coekeson famul 






Nichus. Grafftpn 




- iij/e 


xviijrf 


ej. 


XX8 


m^d 


Thorns. Darke 




- xx# 


iiij^ 


Johes. Taylor 


Xli 


ys 


Thorns. Crede 




. xl« 


x\}d 


Thoms. Burnett 


xli 


\8 


Johes. Bryantt 




- iij/e 


xyi\}d 


Nichus. Smythe 


Xl8 


xi^d 



VOL. IV, N.S., L 



70 



THE PREBENDAL CHURCH OF 



Decenn. do Hanh^m. 

Bobtus. Waren, in bon. v/» ij« yji 

Johes. Nojrs - xz« iiij^ 

Jokes. Stewyn - xx« iiij^ 

Henric. Smytke • xb xiji 

Bicus. Smithe - xx« \i\}d 

Jokes. Mors - - xx« iiiji 

Tboms. Jonys - xx# iiijrf 

Tboms. Jonys deWylgoce xx« iiijrf 
Jokes. Bondye - xxvjt Tiij^ vji 

Tkoms. Gyfford - xx« iiijrf 

Jokes. Orene - iij// xviii'e? 

Jokes.JonysdeCastellyndxU xija - 



Willmo. Tybbott 
Willmo. Smytke 
Jokes. Fyeker, sen. 
Jokes. Pycker, jun. 
Jokes. Jonys 
Willmo. Gylle 
Willmo. Lewys 
Jokes. Byggervale 
Nickus. Yonge 



- xx« iiijj 

- iij// xviiji 

- xLs xijid 

- xx4r iiiji 

- iiij/> \}s 

- xxyj« viij/? vjrf 

- xx# iiij<^ 
X7J/ixiij«iiiji viij« iiij<^ 

- x/t xl# 



Jokes. Waron famul. ej. xxvj* viiji rjrf 
Willmo. Sawnders - xx« m^d 

Bogeru. Trewbody - xxvj# viijrf yjrf 



Exchequer Lay Subsidies, Gloucester, No. ~, Mem. 2, 
4th and 5th Philip and Mary (1557-8). 

Hundred of Gnuijboldsash. 



Bytton and Hanham. 



Eduo. Weston, gent, in 

terr. - - x/» subs, xk 

Juliana Weston, vidua - vj/t 
Jokes. Bede, gent. - xx/t 
Jokes. Stawnton - iij// 

Jokes. Seymere, gent, in 



I) 



XXlUJf 

iiij// 
xij# 



bonis - - xx/» 

Lewse Biytton - vj/* 

Bicus. Sn^ke - ix/» 

Willms. Wame - x/* 

Jokes. Bysskoppe - y\}U 

Willms. Underkyll - xv/» 

Bicus. Gunnyng - tj7/ 

Mbrigkt Brownjmg - Tj7t 

Bicus. Foxe - v// 



liij« m}d 
xvj« 
xxiiij« 
xxT]# yiij<^ 
xviij# viij<? 
xk 

xiij« iiiji^ 
xvj# 
xiij« m^d 



Nickus. Smytke, in bon. ixli subs, xxiiiji^ 



Henricus Smytke - yj/i 

Jokes BumeU - v/i 
Jokes. Jonys de Gargas yj/i 

Willms. Jonyp. - vij/» 

Tkoms. Credo . v/» 

Jokes. Holbyne - vj/t 

Boger. Tybpett - viij7t 

Tkoms. Brycton - xv/» 

Willms. Burnett - v/t 

Jokes. Hardyng - yU 

Macute Grome - v/» 
Willmo. BumeU sen. - v/i 

Jokes. Curtos - v/i 



99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 



XVJ« 

xiij« iilj(/ 
xyj« 

xviij« viili 
xiij« iiijrf 
xyj# 

xxj« iiij^ 
xU 

xiijf iiiyd 
xiij# iiijrf 
xiijf iiijV 
xiiJA iiiji/ 
xiiJ4 iiij(/ 



Sm» xxxj/i ij# viijrf. 

Tkese payments may be traced as far back as tko statute of Magna Ckarta, on tke 
conclusion of wkick tke Parliament granted tke King, for tke concessions tkerein made, 
a "fifteentk" of all tkeir moveable goods. Tkis taxation was originally set upon tke 
several individuals. Afterwards in tke year 1334 a certain sum was rated upon every 
town by commissioners appointed in tke Ckancery for tkat purpose, wko rated every 
town at tke fifteentk part of tke value tkereof at tkat time, and tke inkabitants rated 
ikemselves proportionably for tkeir several parts, "Fifteentks" continued down to 1624, 
in wkick year tkree "fifteentks" were granted to James I.* Tkey continued to 1670 
wkick was tke last grant of tke kind. After tkis, in 1693, tke Land Tax was imposed. 
Tke following is an early specimen : — 



> See Blackfitone, book i, ck. 8. 



S. MABT, BITTON, GLOUCESTEESHIBE. 



71 



GiiOUCEs: — An Assessment made in the yeur of our Lord 1707 for the Tything of 
Bitton in pursuance of an Act of Parliament granting an aid to her Majestie 
of foure shillings out of the pound by a Land Tax by us whose names are 
heare subscribed. 



Impis. 





£ 


s. 


d. 


Col. Seymour or his tenant 


13 


10 


8 


Mr. Parker for the Vicaridg 


3 


4 





Esq'Hart - 


8 


18 





John Bush - - - 


8 








John Holbin- 


1 


11 


4 


Abram Bayly 


1 


6 


8 


Richard Rifing, or the occupiei's 








of y* George & D. - 




12 





Joshua Burnel or John Bush 




8 





John Boush 


1 


6 


8 


Roger Harding 
Thomas Bumell 


5 


1 


4 




14 


8 


Hannah and Mary Bumell 




3 


4 


Mr. Edwards or his tenent 


5 


16 


8 


John Powell or his tenent 




1 


8 


William lidyei-d 




12 





Elizabeth Bush 




18 


8 


Robert Bryant ^ - 


1 


16 





John Lasbury or his tent. 




8 





William Nuttor the occupier thereof 


8 


8 


Edward Wai-d or his tenent 


1 


16 





Mr. Weston or his tenent 


3 


2 





The occupiers of Hainses 




8 





Mrs. Perry or her tenent 


2 








John Flower 




18 





Arthur Wickam 


1 


16 





The Widdow Grinaway for Arthurs 


1 








The occupiers of Mayoes 


1 


6 


8 


The Widdow Williams 











Mr. Winston or his tenent 


2 


8 





Cornelius Voules for Waterses - 


1 








Samuell Jones 


2 


10 





John Smith 




12 


8 


John Thomas for Terviles 


1 


12 


6 


John Thomas 


2 


2 


8 


Thomas Jones 


1 


12 





Mr. Edwards for part of Robinses 




4 





Sir Thom.-xs Cann or his tenent - 


2 


14 


8 


The Widdow Gi-enaway for Jones 


1 








John Woodman for part of Criswik 


3 


2 





Mrs. PeiTy - 


1 


2 





The Widdow 











Robart Painter 




1 


8 


Josiph Weeb 




3 





Thomas Jones for Lemans 




2 


8 


Edward Fox 




2 





Mr. Fry for Sanderses - 




4 





Christopher Smith for pt. of Rymen 


i 


2 





William Brookes for pt. of Rymers 




1 





Richard Emerson 


1 


17 


4 


Joshua Brown 


2 


10 


8 



1 

. 4 

- 1 

- 3 

- 4 
. 2 



Esquir Hart for pari; of Jo. Flowers 

Mr. Seed for pt. of Rimers 

Bartly or the occupiers thereof 

John Fox - - - 

Josias Bobbins 

Isack Stout - - - 

Esquire Hart forpart of Isa. Stouts 

Walter Jay for Hales - 

John Flower for part of Rymars - 

Christopher Smith for Baglands - 

John Collett 

The Widdow Greneway for part of 

Robinses . - - 

John Smith for part of Criswiks - 
Cornelius Youles for Hisoookses 
Cornelius Voules for part of Rymers 
Cornelius Voules for Long Craft - 
Mr. Parrot - - - 

Mr. Day 

Christopher Morgen - 
William Kight 
Robart Sharp 
Mrs. Roseweil 
Mr. Parker 
Mr. Parker Jun' 
Mr. William Seede 
Mr. Holester for Facknams 
Mr. Lacy 
Mr. Goodman 

Mr. Goodman for Arbors Ly 
The Widdow Batman - 
George Willis 
^fr. Samuell Balsam and Samu. 

Brittin 

Mr Hordge - 

Edward Harding 

Lambrock Flower 

John Harding 

Mr. Holister 

llobbert Evings for Rudducks 

Robart Evings 

John Smith for Bumels Acre 

William Dagg 

Richard Ki^t 

John Nut or the Occupies of Butt erwell 4 

John Gromet for Laishlies - .3 

Mr. Henry Ware - - 12 

Jo. Britting - - - 2 4 

Mr. Thomas Whitington - 5 16 



16 

8 

5 

1 

15 

6 

6 

8 

4 

16 

18 

16 

16 

6 



4 

13 



14 

18 

6 

2 

8 
4 
4 

10 
2 

18 

4 

13 
2 

12 

16 



d. 







8 
8 



4 
4 
4 








8 


4 

8 


8 



8 





4 




4 






72 



THE PEEBENDAL OHTJEOH OF 



Thomas Ford and Bobart Evings 

For CoUinn and Daggs 
William Bosh 
Gorge Attwood 
Ann Attwood 
Ann Sodbom 
Thomas Bodbome 
Thomas Fox 
John Flower 
Thomas Hasldngs for Bartlys 



£ B. i. 



18 

1 14 

11 

5 

5 

1 18 

1 4 

2 12 

7 4 



4 

4 

4 
4 
4 




William Kight for Coulyeat 

Samuel Boss for Butchers 

Anthony Kipping 

Bichard Karnes or his tenent 

Abraham Latham 

John Goome 

John Naish for part of Bodboms 



£ s. 


d. 


- 1 12 


8 


6 





2 


8 


1 


4 


2 


8 


5 


4 


18 2 


4 



£202 1 8 



CHKISTOPHEB SMITH > 
JOHN FLOWER ; 



Otertteri, 



Nominated 
MR. EDWARD PARKER Jxjmioe) 



JOHN BOSH 

THOS. CANN8 x 

RICH. HAYES x 

EDW. HILL X 



; 



Collectors. 



S. MAEY, BITTON, GLOUCE8TEE8HIEE. 78 



APPENDIX D. 



PROCEEDINGS IN CHANCERY, temp. ELIZ. SS. 25, No. 42. 

John Seymor, Pit. ; Sir Nic. Poyntz, Knt., Ac, Def. 

Extrdct from Billy dated 21 October^ 1584. 

John Seymob, of Frampton Cotterell, Esq.,— 

Recites lease granted by G-eo. WoUfett, Clerk, Dr. of Laws, Preb. of Bytton, dated 25th 
March, 28 Hen. VIII, to Wm. Popley, Gent., of the Prebend of Bytton, with th^ Mansion 
House called the Parsonage House of Bytton, and all lands, tenements, &c., &c., to the said 
Prebend belonging, for 60 years. The Bishop, Dean, and Chapter of Sariun confirmed and 
ratified the lease. 

John Seymor, the plaintiff, got possession of the estate (when and by what 
means not stated), and being in danger of his life by reason of enemies seeking his 
destruction, did convey the estate to Thomas Seymor, his son and heir apparent, in trust, 
but kept possession of the premises, and also of the deed of conveyance, till Jane his wife, 
Thomas Seymor's mother, did, by the allurement of said Thomas, embezzle the deed. After 
her death John Seymor missed the deed and applied to his son Thomas and to Sir Nic. 
Poyntz, Knt. (brother to his late wife Jane) for it, but they with oaths denied having it, but 
Thomas Seymour offered to convey the premises to John Seymour for the unexpired term 
of the original lease, and caused two conveyances to be made of the said premises, one to 
Sir Nic. Poyntz, and the other to John Seymor, who, not knowing of the conveyance to 
Sir Nic. Poyntz, was satisfied ; and about 8 July, 23 Eliz., granted the premises to Tho^mas 
Seymour for three years, and at the end of that term endeavoured to enter on them in his 
own right, but Thomas Seymor kept possession by force and arms, and affirmed that Sir 
Nic. Poyntz was by virtue of the said conveyance possessed of the premises, and had con- 
veyed them to John Webb for and to tlie use of him, Thomas Seymor. 



74 THE PEEBENDAL CHURCH OF 



POSTSCRIPT. 



The Archseological Association of Somerset met at Batli in July, 1876. In theii 
excursions to places of interest in the neighbourhood they visited Bitton. Mr. E. A. 
Freeman, d.CL., was one of the party. He was greatly pleased with the church, 
which he had never seen before ; and as a parish church, judging from the great 
length of the nave, it might be compared to St. Alban's among cathedrals. He 
further remarked that the neiglibourhood of the Via Julia and the fragments of Boman 
ware which have been dug up from time to time in the Vicarage grounds and in the 
churchyard prove that the Romans occupied this spot ; and there still remain 
untouched stones which were placed in their present position by builders in the period 
next after the Latin, probably on the site of a Boman basilica. 

The existing nave of the church is essentially Norman in character, and it presents 

the usual features of a nave of that period — great length and height in proportion to its 

width. The Norman corbel table is preserved on both the nortli and south aides, and 

there is good reason for believing that the north wall lias never been disturbed, except 

for the insertion of the present two-light windows. There are tnices in the wall on 

the interior — and the manner in which these traces have been preserved and are left 

uncovered is beyond all praise — of two or three plain round-headed Norman windows 

which have been walled up. But there are two fragments of greater interest than 

these. Near the east end of the north wall are distinctly to be seen the large stones 

of an archway of much earlier date than the Norman Conquest, and near the ground 

is a block of masonry which the least tutored observer would see is of the same 

character as that in the little church of St. Lawrence at Bradford-on-Avon. It is 

undeniably primitive Komane8<|ue work, done by those English ancestors of ours, whom 

people will call Anglo-Saxons and believe such an amount of fiction about. This 

archway was the entrance either to a north tower or north transept in the first church 

on this site. On the south side the foundations of a corresponding transept have 

been found, though the archway has been replaced by a very late Perpendicular 

window, pointing to the conclusion that it was destroyed in the abolition of chantries. 

On the north side however interments have been allowed in times gone by so close to 

the church that any similar evidence has been swept away. Again, the present chancel 



S. MARY, BITTON, GLOUCESTEESHIRE. 



75 



arch, which stone for stone replaces a late Norman one removed in 1843, is built 
within a still older arch, the rough capitals of which can still be seen on the chancel 
side. On the nave side there is an old string course of the same date as the first 
arch, and above it a portion of a carving, of which no one can positively say what 
it is; but it might be, and is generally believed to be, the feet of the holy rood. 
On the south side of the Norman entrance a plain but good doorway still remains, 
and apparently this section was not disturbed by the Perpendicular builders, 
though finding a rough piece of stone at the end of one of the mouldings they 
carved it and finished it in their own style. Tliere is a finer doorway on the 
north side, from which the chancel arch is copied. This must have been either 
the western entrance or a north entrance ; I am inclined to think the latter as 
more in character with the plan of the church. It is now within the church at 
right angles to the west wall of the chantry chapel, and there are some who think 
it has been shifted. I do not fancy myself that it is far from its original position, 
though its eastern side has been cut down to make room for other work. 

I append as a tail piece an engraving of a double Bulla or leaden Seal, found 
about 1825 in a garden at Upton in Bitton, on the site now occupied by a Non- 
conformist meeting house. 

On one side are represented the heads of SS. Paul and Peter ; on the other the 
name of Alexander IV. He succeeded Innocent IV in 1254, and died in 1261. He 
vexed England with his exactions, intending a war against the Turks. I have not 
succeeded in tracing the object of the Bull to which this seal was appended. This 
Bulla is in the possession of Mr. Parker of Upton. Staveley in his Histoty of 
Churches, 1773, p. 90, has printed one of the Bulls of this prelate. 




76 



8. MARY, BITTOX, (JLOrCKSTKKSHIKK 



APPENDIX P:. 



TKKRrERS: HYTTON, 1603, JUNIJ. 



A true Terrier of all the «^lel)es, luiids, meadows, 
ganleiis, orchanls, houses and tithiii^s y* doth l)e- 
longe to the Vicarage theras folio we tli : — 

In primis ij akera and — of erndile laud in h 
field 

It" halfe an aker of ine<h)W lieing hy Kaiiis- 
ham hrid«(e ende ther well knt»wn. 

If" one Iwiukside contiiynin«jf<» ])y estiniao'ou 
one fai'ndle of <(round. 

It" one litle ^inlen. 

It"' the churehyartle. 

It" all tlie privie tythes excejit the hoppis. 
/// hnirfitiitjp. 

In prhni> a hall, a parlor, a buttrie. 

Itm. iij ehanihers above and ov' the jwirlor. 



Itni. f»ne barne, a stable, u yatehouse and one 
otlier howse called the myllhouse, 
And as for the pai-sona^e it is an 

hnprop'nae'on, and have all the Tithingc 
('(»nie, hei, and ho}>pes. 

Lkwys Evans Vi(% ther. 
John Waunk and 
XiCHoi^\s Flowre, 

C'hnrchwai'dens. 
[The alx^ve is the earliest Terrier in the 
Registry at (iloucesU*r. Tliere an^ none earlier 
at Worcester. Then^ are other Terriers at 
(iloucester dated 1619, 1678, 1680, 1764, 
1807, 1835.] 



A TERRIER OF THE PARSONAGE MAXNO AND 
PREHENL) OF BITTON, 1677. 



Imiu'imis the Parsduage howse, outhouses and 
ganh'.n w*'' thai)j>urtt's. 

It™ 2 Closes of pasture thert!to near adjoyning 
contayning by estiniat'on five acres and halfe Ix' 
it more or lesse. 

It" 2 grounds one called the Cnift and the 
other called the Hopyard, both no we used for 
hopp grounds and both contayning by estiuiac'ou 
eleven actiws 1k» the same nioiv or less. 

It'" the Tythes of Corne, grayne, hay and 
liojips within the p'ish of l^itton and sev'rall 
Yilllag(^s or handets thereto belonginge. 

Ciijujhtthl Esfftff'tt in hoi III f fnr 2 fi/tif \\ Urci* 
prt'll of fho x'/. Mfiinior. 

John (foodnian of one Messuage in Ui)ton 
with the land thereto Ix'longinge. 

John Smith of one tenement att Heach w"* 
the lands thereto belonginge. 



Robert Bryant for one tenement calle<l Mour- 
tons with the lands thereto beh)nging.e 

John Ihittain of the Moytie of a teuement in 
Uj)ton with the lands thereto Ijelonginge. 

The same for th'other nmyety of the same 
t<Mienient. 

Joane Croome for a RofHess tenement. 

Th(»s. Rodbourne for (me Cottage. 

Robt. Hawkins for a tenem* att Ueach. 

Thos. 1 )angi'rfeild fnr a tenem^ att Ditton. 

»John Ffonl for a teuem* att l>ittnn. 

Japhet liuucell for a t(»neni* att ]>itlon. 

[Indorsement : " A Terrier of the Prebend of 
r»itton given into the Chajjter at the renewing of 
Bittern Lease ]»y Dr. AVatsnn June 1, 1677." 
Similar ones are attaclied to all the Leases. 
These leases have all been tninsfernMl with the 
pro]»erty to the Ecclesiastical Cominissionoi-s.] 



IIISTOHY OF BITTON 



CHAPTER II. 



Notices of the Manors. 

In the foregoing chapter, lately issued by the Exeter Diocesan Architectunil 
Society, I have given the fullest extent of the parsonage or pl^ebendal 
manor, which I have been able to collect, with an account of the mother 
Chiu-ch of the parish, and a short notice of each of the daughter 
Churches. But there are several other manors in the jiarish, a memoir of 
which was printed in the Herald aiid Genealoijical Journal, vol. iv, 18G7, 
p. 193 c^ scq., and p. 311 et scq,, from which the following is reproduced, 
with some alterations and iidditions. 

Of the Manor of Button or Bitton, co. Gloucester. 

At the time of the Conquest the manor of Bitton was held of the King 
by one Dons, a Saxon, who held it in the time of King Edward the 
Confessor.^ There were two liides in Bitton, one of which belonged to the 
church.'* In 1151,' Robert Fitzharding, as a rewaid for his services to Maud 
the Empress and her son Duke Henry, obtahied, with other estates, the 
manor of Bitton. This appears by a charter in the Muniment Room 

r 

» All the R(M;«>nls referrcMl U) in those notes will be foiiml in a separate chai>ter. 
- Domesday, f. 170b., Ixvii. 

^ Tliis date is proved by ^tr. Fleming in his ai^^ument on the J>erkeley l>arony before the Lords, 
July 1860. 



78 HISTORY OF IMTTON. 

at Berkeley Ciistle, with seal appendant. Smith, ii; his Lives of the 
Berkeley's, in the Library of the Herald's College, London, says, ''and 
for an handsell (as it were) of that lump which followed, one hundred 
pound land of that of Berkeley, with the Manor of Bitton, was given in 
theis words*, '' Henricus Dux Normandorum et (/omes Andegavorum omnibus 
Archiepiscopis Episcopis Abbatibus Consulibus, Baronibus et amicis fidelibus 
Francis et Anglicis salutera : Sciatis me dedisse Koberto filio Hardingi et 
heredibus suis Manerium Betthone cum omnibus appendicis suis. Et insuper 
centum libratas terre in* manerio de Berkelei,"^ ita libere et quiete in bosco 
et piano, in pascuis et pratis, in aquis et viris, et terris arrabilibus, cum 
omnibus libertatibus, et consuetudinibus, cum Tol et Them, et Sorch et 
Saeke et Belle et Bucklyet, et Infiinkenethef, et onmibus quietantiis que 
ibi fuerunt in tempore Henrici Regis avi mei in feodo et hereditate, illi 
et heredibus suis ad tenendum de me et heredibus meis per servicium 
duonmi mutatarum accipitrum'* singulis annis mihi et meis heredibus 
reddendorum. Et pepigi ei firmare ibi castellum secundum volimtatem issius 
Rodberti. Et propter haec superscripta dicta dona, Rodbertus filius Hardingi 
devenit mens Homo, et ego pei* fidem meam affidavi ei, partiones supradictus 
tenere illi atque here iibus suis ; et hoc idem affidavit Reginaldus comes 
cornubie et Rodbertus de Dunstanvilla et Ricardus de Humer constabularius, 
et Maneferbiseth dapifer et Guavinus filius Heroldi, Camerarius, et Willielmus 
filius Hamonis, et Philippus de Columbers qui hujus pactionis testes existunt ; 
et preter istos testes sunt inde Abbas sancti xlugustini de Briston et frater 
Adam ^Janonicus ejus, et Henricus filius Rodberti, -et Willielmus Cumin, 
et Jordanus frater Rodberti, et Jordanus et David nepotes ejus et Ricardus 
de Hanam, apud Briston." 

When Duke Henry became king he granted another charter, in which 
Bitton is •omitted, for it appears in the Planta de Juratis et Assisis (15 

' T have cxtciulod this for the convenience of the general reader. 
" In the Barony of Berkt^ley : 

A Knight's fee was = 640 acres, or 4 hides. 

A Hide = 160 acres, or 4 yard hinds. 

A Yard Land = 40 acri's, or 4 farundels. 

A Farundel = 16 acres. iSnfil/i'a Lirei<, p. 222. 

3 :\Iewed "Hawks." 



HISTORY OF BITTON . 79 

Edward I, 1287) (V in Appendix), thnt Robert Harding had aliened Bitton 
to Robert de Hanham, whose son, Robert de Berkeley, had enfeoffed 
Robert de Amnevil to the seignory of the manor, to whom it was confirmed 
by Henry HI, the service being one knight's fee. 

Appurtenant to this manor was the manor of Hannum or Hannam.^ 
This included the whole parish, excepting what was within the bounds 
of Kingswood, or the Forest of Furches,* and the one liide belonging to 
the church. Early tiles with the arms Berkeley have beon found in the 
churchyard of Bitton. 

Adam d'Amneville, the fnther of Robert de Hanham, had another son, 
also named Robert, who usually occurs in records as Robert de Bitton or 
Button, and was the ancestor of the family of that name. In this family 
were three bishops, one a Bishop of Exeter, who in 1299 built the chantry 
chapel on the north side o^ Bitton church over the bodias of his father 
and mother, there buried.^ (See pp. 8, 11, and 35 ante). 

This family of Bitton also accjuired lands in Bitton and Ha.nham, and 
ended in an heiress, Jane Rouge, Rugge, or Rigge, who married first Robert 
Greyndour of Newland, co. Ghnic, secondly Sir John Barre of Rotherwas, 
CO. Hereford. On her death without issue in 1485 the Hanham estates 
(also called Barres Court Demesne)"* reverted to the descendants of the 

^ After tlu* \vi»st«.'rn ]Mirtion was alienod to Kt»,viis«liuiu Ablnn', that portii)!! was willed West 
Hanliani, the other jMirtion, in wliicli tlie l)ittf)n estates lay, Wiis called Hannam, or Ilast Hannaiu, 
an<l now Oldland. 

^ Fnirhix. r)th Henry III, Close Roll, ni. 12, Kobert (rAmenoville is allowed to enjoy in peac(! 
the wood of Fureis, ])roj)e IJristol. Patent Roll, 8tli Henry III, ni. 2, the cnstody of Hristol Castle, 
with the wo(h1 of Fnrrhr^, is committed to R. de Willi nj^^ton. Charter, 13th Henry III, i)art i, m. 
18,* in the charter of deafforestatit)n, " Boscus de Fureis" is cit<Ml. After that, what remained 
was called " Chju'.ia de Kinj^'eswode. " Hy Oi-^linatio Forestu*, 3;kd Edward I, it is to be continued 
a chase, (See Plans at the entl) 

•* His name occurs in a charter of c(mfirmation of the manor, 11th Hen. Ill, No. 143, ]>* servicium 
unius militis ita libere, t<;c., sicut uncjuam Adam pater suns illud tenuit de Rege Henrico avo nostro: 
sicut Cartii Ricardi Rej^is avunculi nostri testatur." This grant is also recited in Phtcita tie Qtm 
Wnrrnnto, 1287, page 263. This record sinmis to show that the Aumevilles held the manc^r directly 
of the Crown. Yet in 1287 it was considered to be parcel of the barony of Herkeley. See Pladia 
tie Jurat iti and Atwlaiti^ Oloitr, xv. Rot. 15th Edward I, m. 29. 

* See the licence for the Cluintry at Ih'tton. 

* An fjxtmi of these estates, taken in the time of Robert Greyndour, 1431, is among the Ad<l 
M8S. in the Brit Museum, No. 7361. 



80 



HISTORY OF BITTON, 



TABLE SHEWING IN BRIEF THE DESCENTS OF BLOUNT AND BITTON, 
ALSO OF DE LA MORE, DRAWN FROM RECORDS. 



Adam D'Amneville, haA manor of Bitt<)n=7=Petronilla, " mater 
from Henry II, service a knight 'd fee. | Roberti." 



llobert D'Amneville, manor coiitirmeil to hi rup Isabella. 
1227, Oii (luietly as Adam his father held it. | 



William de Put<»t, Sheriff-pPet ro- 
of Glouc. 1222-8,} half a nilhi. 
knight's fee. | 



NichoUw <U* Oxen-= Petro- 
haye, half a knight's nilla. 
fee ; ol). H.p. 



liobertus de Button ,=t= 

" Filius Ada?." (Harl. MS. 1548, 1866). 

I ' 

" liobertus, filiua Roberti de Button ;" bought land=f .. 
of Nic. de Oxenhaye and wife. (Ped. Fin. 1237). | 



Hugh de Vivou,^=T=Patronilla, dau. and heir <)f=pl)avid le 
.Hlain in Wales, l'i^57. William de Putot; die<l at I Blund, Vnd 
I the Vicarage Bitton, 1286. | husband. 

r -> r -' 

John de Vivon, David le Blund, ob. 17th rAm^billa 



William de Button, 
avunculus Thome de 
Button. (Plac. 12th 
Ed. I.) 



Adam de But-^" Qusedam 



ton, miles, 
filius Roberti: 
died 1299.1 



Mulier.' 



bom 1252, ob. 
s.p. 

I — 



Edward II, seized of half 
the manor of Bitton. 



Archer. 



John de Button, miles, sum-=p 
moned against the Scots 1300 { 



Thomas de Button, Dean of Wtdla, 
Bishop of Exon; died 1307. 



Richard le Blunt, 
ob. 8.p. 1327. 

r- 



Edmund le Blunt,= pAlici:i, 
2nd son, ob. 1362. | 
I 



Hugh de Blunt, ob. 1361, v.p.=f=... 

Edmund le Blount, ob. 1381.=pMargaret. 

1 ^ 



Johannes de Button, " fil. Johannis=i=Havisia de Thomas 

nepos et hjcres Thomse, Episcopi, I Purneaux. frater 

avunculi sui ; died vivente Thoma Johannia, 

fruirer [ diedB.p. 

r- 



William Blount,-j Jone. 
died 1399. I 



John Blount, heir onn=Willelma, 



Matthew de Button, 
died 1374 ; fiL et h. 
Joh. et Hawisie. 



»-r' 



'Constantina 

de Kingston. , — 



1 



Three daughters. 



the death of his niece, 
died 1444. 



die<l 1454. 



Hamptouy Strode=T= 



Bassetn 



Isabella, dau. and Edmund Blount,=7-M»u^ret, dau. of 
heir ; died 1403, 8.p. died 1468. I Sir John St. Maur. 

Sir Simon Blount, died 1477.=T=Elyner, dau. of Lord Daubeny. 

/ John Lord Hussey,=^=MargiU'et Blount, 
Sold Bitton to \ beheaded 153"<. | dau. and heir. 
Sir Maurice Berke- i 



1st wife, Margery=j=Sir John de=2nd wife,=2nd husband, Sir 
Button, Johanna John Deverose, 

died 1382. Hurst. died 1419. 



>K 



de la More.' 



Thomas Rugge,=j=Katherine Button. 



ley, 1515. 



Sir WilUam Hussey. 



RobertGreyn-=Jane Rouge, Rugge, or Rigge, died s.p.=Sir John 
dour, died 1485. Her heirs were the descendants Barre, 

1447. of Bassett, Strode, and Hampton, the 2ud 

three daughters of Sir John de Button hunband. 

by Havisia Fumeaux. (ob.l483) 



First wife.=nFBartholomew de la More,=7=2nd wife 

r — ~~. _ .r I ' 



Nicholas de la' 
More. 



1. Bartholomew, 
de la More. 



John de la More, aged 30 in 
20th Edward I. 



Stephen de la=f=Constantia, 



More, (Ued 1328, 
sei/.cd of Old- 
laud. 



dau. of Wm. 
de Heweya. 



Al icia. =T=1 iotil ler. 



William. 

(-See A 
oppt)8ite) 



2. Richard, died 1292, seized 
of the manor of Oldland.' 



William de la More=T=Maud de Bitton,=^2nd husband, 



alMS Attemore, die<l 
1341, seized of Old- 
land. 



dau. of John and Sir Simon 
Havisia (above). Bassett, died 
1365. 



Walter Jo vett.= Alicia. John Boteler of Shentingfield. 



Cecily, mar. Sir 
Nicholas Berke- 
ley, who died 
1382, s.p. 



Margaret, mar. 
Sir John de 
Button 
(above). 



John Atte- 
more, died 
1849, 8.p. 



1 See Pedigree of De Vivonia,m Coll. Top. vii, 137, and House of Yvery, vol. ii • See Robert's Calendarium Qeneal. vol. i, p. xxv. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. »l 

coheiresses of Sir John de Button, who had married Basset, Stode, and 
Hampton ; and so^ Cradock alias Newton of Harptree, having married a 
Hampton, became the possessor of Barre's Court. (See Pedigree opposite). 

There were two Roberts de Button and a Robert d'Amneville. The effigy 
of the first Robert de Button was discovered in the churchyard of St. Mary's, 
Bitton, in 182fi, on the south side, close to the church, the site no doubt 
of what was a mortuary chapel of the founder (see Arcluv dogia, vol. xxii, 
p. 437, and vol. xxxi, p. 268). It is carved on the lid of his coffin, partly 
in relief and partly incised, as shown in the engraving. The armour shows 
that he must have been tlie first of the name. (See Pedigree). His shield 
is charged with a fess. See also pp. 8 and 35 ante, with engravings. 

To return to Robert d'Amneville, who held the manor of Bitton. He 
had two daughters each called Petronilla,* {Uid, between these two, the manor 
was divided into Bitton and Oldland, and the service of half a knight's fee 
annexed to each.'- One of these dinghters married Nicholas de Oxenhaye,*"* 
who had no issue, and that moiety of the manor was aUened to the family 
of De la More ;^ being left a widow, she gave (according to the custom of 
the times) some of her lands to the nuns of Lacock Abbey.* These lands 
abutted on Barre's Court estate, and at the Dissolution were sold ; and, 
after passing through many hands, not without many a suit, they became 
the property of Mr. Edwards, solicitor, of Bristol, and afterwards of Colonel 
John Freemantle of the Guards, who sold them to Mr. Samuel Whittuck 
about 1830. 

The other daughter Petronilla marned William de Putot, a person of 
some consequence, for he was a sherift* of Gloucestershire from 1222 to 1228. 
He filled several high offices, amongst others that of Warden of the Stannaries 
in Cornwall, and of the coast of the sea of Bristol. He had estates at 

* In a Quo Warranto, 15th Edward I, it is .<itat(Hl that Robert (VAmneville had two daughters, 
Petronilla d(^ Vivon, and Petronilla d'Anmevillo. Rot. Claus., 18th Ileiiry III, p. 34; 19th 
Henry III, m. 2. Plac. de Quo Warmnto, 15th P:<lward I. (See also p. 28.) 

* Testa de Nevill, W. Putot paitl half a kni.!:(ht*s Uh\ which was RolMjrt (rAnme'ville's ; ^Nicholas 
de Oxenhaye paid the. other half. 

» Fine Roll, 13th Henry III: and in 1229 paid a fine " nt ne ait miles."' 

* Inq. p.m. Petronilhe d'Amneville, 45th Henry III, No. 38. 

* Bowie's History of Lacock, p. xliii, from the Lacock Cartulary. 



82 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

Mangotsfield (a parish adjoining Bitton), and founded a chantry there. He 
and his brother-in-law, Nicholas de Oxenhaye, each did service for half the 
manor of Bitton, thus completing the fiill knight's fee. 

One only daughter wiis the issue of this marriage, who w»as called Petronilla. 
She took for her first husband a baron of some celebrity, Hugh de Vivon, by 
whom there was one son, John de Vivon, wlio was born at Sellinges in Kent 
1252. This boy was left a minor, and slie a widow by the death of her 
husband, who was slain in Wales in 12.") 7.^ 

Petronilla de Vivon (having married for her tivnt husband a person of 
some conso(juence), retained the name of her first husband, though she 
married secondly one Uavid le Blund, by whom she h^id one son called 
David. He married one Amabilla : to this son by her second marriage, 
and to his wife Amabilla, Petronilla de Vivon conveyed her Bitton estites, 
viz., the half umnor of Bitton. It does not appear why she preferred these 
to her son by her first husband. The probability is that, as the heir of 
Iiis father, he inherited large estates elsewhere ; but that she did so is 
most certain, for in 1287 there Wiis a trial at Gloucester between the two 
half-brothers, John de Vivon and David le Blund, by which the former 
endeavoured to possess himself of the Bitton estate, but the jury gave a 
verdict in favour of David le Blund. At this triaP it came out in the 
evidence that, after the mother had conveyed the estates to her son David 
and his wife Amabilla, she left the phice, but afterwards returned to visit 
her son and his wife, not Jis a mistress, but as an ordinary friend. While 
there she was taken dangerously ill ; and, that it might not be said that 
she died there, and so in possession of the place, she requested to be carried 
to the Vicarage house : this was done on a Monday, and there she died 
the following Saturday, anno 1281). Fragments of tiles with the arms of 
De Vivon (a label of five points in chief, see The House of Yvei^j, ii, 498), 
have been found in Bitton churchyard. 

David le Blund died July 1323 (probably at Bitton, as the inquisition 
on his death was held there), seised of half the manor and hundred of 
Bitton (for Bitton was then a hundred), the gift of his mother Petronilla 

1 1st Edwjinl I, No. 6.'), In([. p.m. Soe RuIktIs's C'siliMulariiim Geiunil., vol. i, p. 205. 

* S('i' this roinarkablc rt'(<»i*(l appondcil hereafttu' : 1*1 art fa '/^ Jnrnflt;^ (Hoiir,^ xv, in«m. 16, 



HLSTORY OF BITTOX. 83 

de Vivon, a aipitul messuage, garden, dovecote, &c.^ He was succeeded 
by his eldest son, Richard le Blount, who died 1327 without issue, when 
Edmund his brother and heir succeeded to the estates at the age of thirty.'- 
Edmund died in 1362 seised of the same manor ; and it is also stated in 
the inquisition that he held a meadow called Holmeade, and another called 
Overmeade, which means the Upper Meade/ These are two well-known 
extensive common meadows by the side of the Avon ; they have lately 
been inclosed and sold, and all the rights of common extinguished. They 
were Lammas lands, and doled out in severalty for the crops ; but more 
of these in a separate chapter, with plans. 

The next heir of Edmund would have been his son Hugh, who resided 
at Filton, where the family held estates ;^ but, he having died in his father s 
lifetime, Edmund Blount, his son, only nine years old, became the heir, and 
the custody of the estates was committed by the Crown to Thomas Stiward 
during the minority. This Edmund died in 1381,* leaving a son and heir 
William, only seven yeans old. In 1399^ he died, leaving an only daughter 
Isabella, upon whose death iti 1403^ her uncle, John Blount (her father's 
brother), succeeded to the estates at the age of twenty-six.* At his death 
in 1444 he held other estates in Bitton, besides the manor, capital messuage, 
dovecote, &c., as before recited.^ The dovecote (coluinhanum) is still there. 

The next owner of the estates was Edmund Blount, his son, who married 
Margaret, a daughter of Sir John Seymour (their arms impaled were on 
the old church porch at Mangotsfield). Mangotsfield also belonged to the 
Blounts as descendants from Putot. He died 1468.'® Smythe, in his Fjives 
of the Berkeley s No. 692 (there is an original MS." copy in the Herald's 
College), says, " Bitton and Mangotsfield had for centuries one manor-house 
in common, till the Blounts built one at Mangotsfield." That is an Eliza- 
bethan building on Rodway Hill ; but the manerium at Bitton lias remains 

1 Imi. p.m. 17tli Edwiml II, No. 53. - Ibid. 20th Edward II, Xo. 41. 

3 Ibid. 36th Edward III, No. 35. < Ibitl 48th Edwai-d III, X(». 97. 

' Ibid 4th Ricliard II, No. 4. « Ibid. 4th Henry IV, Xo. II. 
' Ibid •22ud Richard II, Xu. 7. 

- Iiui. p.in., 22ud lU'.nry VI, X... 20 b. « Ibid 8th VAwurd IV, Xo. 50. 

^" 8ec Nut^jis ami Qnnw, I, v. 610. '' Inq. p.m., 16th Edwanl IV, Xo. 79. 



84 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

of Early English domestic architecture about it, especially a two-light window, 
similar to the one at Coggs, Oxfordshire, engraved in Turner's Domestic 
Architecture, i, 161. 

The son of Edmund Blount by Margaret Seymour, afterwnrds styled Sir 
Simon Blount, wtis born at Mangotsfield, Octoljer, 1472. He married Elyner, 
daughter of Giles Lord Daubeney, by which marriage there was one daughter, 
only two yeai-s old in 1477, when her father died.^ This daughter Margtuet 
became the first wife of Lord John Hussey of Sleaford, who w^as beheaded 
at Lincoln in 1538. By this marriage there wtis a son, Sir William Hussey. 
In 1515 Lady Margaret Hussey (the last heiress of this branch of the Blount 
family) was not living. In that year, John Lord Hussey and his son Sir 
William aliened the manors of Bitton and Mangotsfield to Robert Dormer; 
who in the same year re-sold the same to Sir Maurice Berkeley, and so 
that family again became possessed of the manor of Bitton, and it continued 
with them till about 1G33, when the manor wius dismembered and the 
estate sold to several persons. 

The manor had passed before 1652 into the hands of John Mallet, Esq. 
(the father of Lady Rochester), who in the survey of Kingwood Chase 
made in that year is called the " Chief Lord." But Sir John Newton 
appears to have had or claimed seignorial rights in the same manor. He 
had by inheritance become possessed of Barrels Court and its extensive 
demesnes, consisting of the manor of East Hanham (held of the lords of 
Bitton and Oldland), a distinct manor from that of Hanham or West 
Hanham hereafter mentioned, which belonged to the family of Saltmarsh, 
and afterwai'ds to Keynsham Abbey.' Sir John Newton also acquu-ed the 
other half- manor of Bitton called Oldland; thus he became possessed of 
all the manorial rights in the parish, excepting the prebendal manor (the 
old one hide of Domesday), and the view of frank-pledge in Oldland, then 
belonging to Lord Staftbrd, and now to Henry Howard, Esq., of Greystoke 
and Thornbury ; and the manor of West Hanham (formerly belonging to 
the Abbot of Keynsham) ; where there are lemains of an Early-English 
barn (see Plate xi), a chapel and hall, the ancient mansion of De Salso 
Marisco, who held Hanum before it was subinfeuded into East and West 
Hanham, under the early Berkeleys.*'^ As for the manor house and farjn, 
» See luige fulhnving. See the Keconls at the end. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



85 



a capital messuage, &c., at Bitton, those premises were sold about the 
same time to one John Brittayne, who sold them to John Dennis, Esq., of 
Pucklechurch, who was the owner in 1660. This once very influential 
Gloucestershire family terminated in two co-heiresses. Mary Dennis, the 
eldest, married in 1721 Colonel James Butler of Kilveleghan, Ireland, who 
about 1722-3 first by mortgage sold this estate to Thomas Edwards, Esq., 
an eminent solicitor in Bristol, to whose use, after a protracted Chancery 
suit, it Wiis at last decreed. From the Edwards family it passed by will 
to Thomas Edward Freeman, Esq. of Batsford, whence it descended to 
Sir Thomas Edwards Freemantle, Bart, (now Lord Cottesloe), who in 
1847 sold it to the family of, the present writer. 



TABLE SHEWING IN BKIKF THE LAST EIGHT DESCENTS FROM SIR WALTER 

DENNYS, OF CO. (JLOUC. 

Sir Walter Dennys, of Dysham ;^ Agnes, dau. nnd heir of 
fought for Richard III at Bosworth, | Sir llobert Davers, or 
died 1505. Inq. p.m., 2l8t Henry VH. | Danvere. ^ (2nd wife.) 



Sir Wm. Dennys, of Dyr-=f=Lady Anne, 
ham, CO. Gloiic. where he | dau. of Wm. 
founded a guild lft2() ; Berkeley, 
in 1^12 he incloned the | 
Park ; 2nd wife, Edith. ^ 



Richard John r)ennyH,=|=Fortune. wid. of Wil- 



<;f Puckle- 
church. 



Ham Kemys, of New- 
port, CO. Monmouth, 
and dau. of Thoimis 
I Noi-tt>n, of Bristol. 



Anne. 

Jane. 

Cathe- 



Hugh Denny s,=j=K at heiine, dau. of Edward Trye, of Hardwick, 
died lo9» | co. (Jlouc. ; died 1583, at Pucklechurch. 



James Butler, 
9th Earl of 
Ormonde ; 
died 1546. 



Pierce Butler, of 
Grant's Town, 
CO. Tipperary. 



Alisia, wife of 
Gilbert Berry, 
of Eston, CO. 
Lincoln. 



Hunry 
died 
8. p. 



John Denny-s, died Ifi^'i ;• 
bur. at I'ui'klerhiuch ; 
author of '* !Se(•r^»tf* r»f 
Angling," prinUni after 
his death in Hil-i. 



=Elianor, or 
Helena, dau. 
of Thomas 
Millet, CO. 
Warwick. 



Walter, 
2d son. 
William, 

died 

B.p. 



Henry Denny8,=TpMargar«t, <lau. of Sir George 
won and heir, j Sj^jkc, of White Lackington, 
Died 1638. I Somerset Died 1622, buried 
I at Pucklechurch. 



James 

I 

James 

I 

Pierce,= 
of 

Kilve- 
leghan 



John Dennis, e8q.,=f=Marj', dau. and coheir of Na- 
owner of Bitton | thaniel Still, of Hutton ; died 
Farm ; died May, i 1698, " annis plena" ; bur. at 
1660 ; a5t. 44. | Pucklechurch. 



T 



n 1. 

Henry, William, Cecily, wife of William 
dietl. Guise, of Elmore, co. 

8. p. Glouc. 



P- 

Henry, 

died 

1676. 

1721. 



r— 

John, 

died 

1682. 



William Dennis, Esq.j^^Dorothy, dau, of of John Cotton, of 



of Bitton and Puckle- 
church ; died 1701, a;t. 
56. 



Connington, co. Hunts, "vidua, nurus, 
et mater " ; bur. at Pucklechurch. 



James Butler (Colonel), of=pMary Dennis, 
Kilveleghan, Page of Honour eldest dau.and 
to Charles II. ; died Jan. c«)heir ; tli('<l 
1738, a5t. 94, Int mar. Mar- 1739, R.p.; will 
garet, dau. of Viscount Moly- proved July, 
neux. '710. Bur. at 

Pucklechurch. 



Amy=fSir Alexander Cum-=T=Kli«iljeth 



Wliite 
head, l«t 
wife, died 
1793. 



John, 



ming, N.S. Hai-t. of Dennis, 2 wife bom 

Coulter: bur. at Coul- lM)rn 1688 ; 1 686 ; 

ter. in AlH'rdeenahire. bur. at dietl 

1725. Coulter, 1738 1687. 



Arms : Gu. a bend engrailed 
az. between two leopard' hciidi* 
jessant de lis or. 

N 



Sir Alexander Cuniming, King of the Chcrokees, 1775=t» 

I ' 

Sir Alex.Cumming, last Baronet died s.p. 



«6 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

It is probable that D'Amnevilles and De Vivons occasionally resided in 
the "capital messuage" of Bitton still called the Court. David le Blund' 
certainly ddi, because it is stated in the trial at Gloucester in 1286 that 
Petronilla de Vivon visited her son and his wife there as a friend. 
Edmimd de Blunt also resided there, because his name appears on a 
subsidy roll in 1327 (p. 64 ante), when he is assessed for goods in Bitton. 
After this date the Blounts resided at Filton or Mangotsfield, for the name 
does not appear in later subsidies, and therefore Bitton Coui-t (then called 
Dennisses) was probably let to a farmer. John Brittayne lived there as 
such/ having bouglit it of Berkeley, and sold it to Dennis of Pucklechurch, 
ut supra. 

The manorial rights were probably severed from the residence when 
Newton, who resided at Barres Court, got possession of the manors of 
Bitton, Oldland, and East Hanham. 

As for the prebendal or. rectorial manor, I have already treated it as 
distinct property. Bitton constituted a Imndred (afterwards called the 
hundred of Swineheved), the rolls of which, temp. Richard II, were sold 
at Puttick and Simpsons, in London, 1851, and some of them are now 
in my possession. Therein the several divisions of the parish are called 
tythings, and so there appeared at the hundred court seven tytliingmen, 
namely, decennarius de Buttone, Upton, Rectoria, Oldlond prima, Oldlond 
secunda, Hanam prima, Hanam secunda. Four milites were elected at 
each court and sworn as a jury by the steward. The perquisites of the 
court were divided into two moieties. The Lord of Button took one half, 
and it is presumed that the Lord of Oldland took the other half.' 

*' The arms of Blount of Bitton were : Azure, two bars argent, over all 
an escarbuncle of eight rays or, pomett^e and florett^e gules. Other 
branches of the family omitted the escarbuncle.'* 

** I cannot help thinking that in some way or other Robert d'Ameneville, the 

' Who by the bye, having a view of frankpledge, had " f ureas, et tumbrellum," that is, 
a gallows for the punishment of felons, and a cucking stool for ducking scolds and unquiet 
-women. Quo Warrante Becordj Gloiic, Ed. m. xv, Rot. 2. 

* Parish rates. 

^ At the end there will be given a fragment of early Court Rolls of these manors. 

* The Editor of the Herald says : — " Our renders will not have forgotten the article in our 
thiid volume (pp. 2\S et seq.), in which it was shown that the escarbuncle was not really the 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 87 

father of Petronilla, to whom the manor of Bitton was confirmed by 
Henry III, was related to GeofFry de Mandeville, whose shield *on his 
effigy in the Temple Church bears an escarbuncle of eight rays, and that 
therefore David le Blund placed that charge on liis own coat upon his 
marriage with the widow of De Vivon, the heiress of the descendants 
of D'Amneville or Mandeville. There is one fact in favour of this view, 
viz., that the honour of Gloucester was for a time held by GeofFry de 
Mandeville, when he became Earl of Gloucester, *jure uxoris Isabel, the 
divorced wife of John Plantagenet' (Nicolas), and Bitton was a part of 
that honoiu', and some part of the parish is still under its jurisdiction." — 
(From my Paper in Bristol Volume of Archcroloyical Institute, 1851, p. 252)- 

The accompanying Table of descent (p. 8.")) illustrates this brief history 
of the Dennis family. 

It has been shown that De Vivons, D'Ameneville's, Blunts, and Dennisses, 
resided at the Court or Manerium. The other most influential family 
would be the Rector or Prebendary at the Parsonage. But soon after 
the Reformation in 1568, Sir John Seymour of Frampton Cotterel, be- 
came the possessor of the Parsonage and Estate (see p. 73) and resided 
there. He was a ''base" son of Edward Seymour Duke of Somerset,' 
and consequently nephew to Lady Jane Seymour. He bore for his 
arms : gu. two wings enjoined in lure or, within a bordure gobony ar. 
and az. In the pedigree of the family in the Heralds' College he is 
entered Xothus.^ He died 1597, and was succeeded by his son Sir Thomas 
Seymour, who was Sheriff of Gloucester 1605. Next we find his son (at 
Bitton) Sir John Seymour, who died 1G63 (see his monument in Bitton 
Chancel page 20). Thomas Seymour his son was succeeded by John 
Seymour, who was born at Bitton, 1649. He was a Lieut. -Colonel in the 
Queen's Guards, served with his regiment in Flanders ; in 1702 he was ap- 
pointed Governor of Maryland, where he died in 1709. It appears by the 
Parish Rate that his widow occupied the parsonage till about 1730, and was 
succeeded by her son Berkeley Seymour, born in 1686 : educated at Eton, 

armorial charge of any ancient English coat, but that the constructional boss of tho shield, which 
wa.s in«lependont of the actual armorial do vice, has been misinterpreted and confused with it. This 
remark applies to the case of Blount, as to Mandeville and all others." 

^ Smith s Li.v^^. "^ Vincent's Baron/uje, Xo. 20. 



88 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

whence he became Fellow of King's College, Cambridge. He resided for a time 
at Bitten, but being of unsound mind he was removed to Westminster, where 
he died 1744. He devised his Bitton property to his sister Jane, who 
was rated for the Parsonage till 1770 ; she resided at Woodford, Essex, 
where she died and was buried. In Coles MSS. in the British Museum, 
vol. i, p. 94, and vol. xvi, page 168, is a very particular account of 
Berkeley Seymour's funeral in the Chapel of King's College. He had a 
nephew of the same name, who in 1750, the Dukedom of Somerset being 
in abeyance, petitioned the Lords for the title ; his claim was submitted to 
the Attorney-General Dudley Ryder, who in December 1750 reported that 
the title belonged to Sir Edward Seymour. This Berkeley, though 
described in his petition as of Bitton, was a Lieutenant in the lioyal 
Navy, and lived at Plymouth, where he died and was buried at S. Andrew s, 
August, 1777. He was born at Oxford, the son of John Seymour, m.d., by 
Elizabeth, daughter of John Sellwood, of that city. His father graduated 
from Trinity College, Oxon., m.a. Feb. 21, 1701 ; b.m. Oct. 23, 1704 ; d.m. 
Dec. 1708, and became Physician to the Royal Hospital at Plymouth, where 
he died 1741, and was buried at St. Andrews. After 1770 the Parsonage 
mansion was let from time to time to divers tenants, — Thomas Edwards 
Freeman of Batsford, Esq., having become the owner in that year. 

It appears by Parish Riites that during Mr. Berkeley Seymour s residence 
in Westminster, the Parsonage was occupied by two brothers and a 
sister, viz., William, Berkeley, and Ann. I have failed to discover their 
direct relationship, but that they were cousins. 

In January 1740-41, Berkeley liad sold seven oxen in Bristol, and re- 
turning to sleep at the Parsonage, in the night his brother William 
robbed him and ** murdered him by a gun-shot wound," after which he 
escaped on horseback. The morning being a hard frost, he called at 
a blacksmith's shop to have the shoes of his hoi-se roughed, and in payment 
offered a guinea with ' a hole in it. The murderer was soon taken and 
conunitted to the gaol at Gloucester. The purchaser of the oxen swore 
that the guinea given with the hole in it was one of the coins he paid 
to the murdered brother. He was finally executed at Gloucester, March 
3l8t, 1742: his body was conveyed to Bitton, and buried on the 1st of 
April in the Seymour vault in the Chancel by the side of his brother. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



89 



TABLE SHOWING THE DESCENT OF THE SEYMOURS OF BITTON. 

Arms op Qlouobstbr Seymours. 
Gu. two Tsings enjoiiietl in lure, or., within a bordure gobony, ar. and az. 



Sir John Seymour, of Wolf- 
Hall, Wilts, Knt. Died 21 
Dec. 1636 ; ajt. (50. Bur. at 
Great Bedwyn. 



^Margery, 2nd dau. of Sir 
Henry Wentworth, Knt., of 
Nettle«ted, Suflblk, Died 
1550. 



Ann, 2nd=T= Edward Seymour. ureat«d=f=' 



diiu. of 
Kilwanl 
Stanhope 
Esq. 



Earl of Hertford liJTJ? 
Duke of Somerset 1547, | 
and Protector of Kiigland. j 
Beheaded and attainted I 
Jan., 22, loM-O. ^ 



Catherine, 
dau. of Wil- 
liam Foliot, 
of W(kk1- 
land, Dor- 
set, Knt. 
— I 



Henry = 
Seymour, 
of Framp- 
tou. Knt. 
Died 1578. 



=Barbaia, 
dau. of 
Morgan 
Wolfe. 



Jane, mar. 
to King 
Hen. VIII. 
Hehejvled 
Oct. 1537. 



Thomas Sey- 
mour, created 
liord Sudley 
1017 ; Hi'h 
Admiral. Exe- 
cuted 1549. 



1 

Sir John 
Seymour, 
ob. ca)lel>H 
155rt. Bur. 
at Grejit 
Bedwyn. 



Rt Worshipful John Seymour, Kmi, of BitU>n, lo()8,"= 
Lessee of the Prebend of Bitton, 1550. In Vincent's 
Baronage, No. 2«», Coll. of Arms, entered " Nothus." 
Smith in his Live.s calls him Base Son of Edward 
Seymour, Duke of Somerset. Buried at Frampton 
Cottrel, 1598. Vv'ill proved 1599. 



• JiUie, dau. of Sir Nichohw Poyntz, 
of Yate, by Jane, youngest, diiu. of 
Thomas Lord Berkeley. 

2nd wife,Goodithe — in Will proved 
1599. 



Johannes Pension- 
arius, Eliz. liegina;, 
in Vincent's Baron- 
age, No. 20, in ColL 
Arms. 



Sir Thomas Seymour,=T=Elizabeth, 



Sheriff of Glouc, 1605. 
.'Et 40 in 1697. Bur. 
at Frampton Cottrel 
April 26. 1627 



Elizabeth 



dau. of John 
Webb, Esq, 



Joan Sey- =pJohn Seed, 
mour, bur. bur. at Bit- 
at Bitton, ton, 1623. 
1626. 



EHzabeth, 2nd wife,=pSir John Seymour, =pDame Ann, dau. 



dau. of George White of Frampton, Knt. 

of Bristol, Merchant. Bitton. Died 1663. 

Bur. at S. Werburgh, Bur. at Bitton. 
1650. 



I 

Harry Syme8,=|=Anne Seymour, 
of Pondes- I died '2o May, 
ford. I lrt86. 



of William Poulett, 
of Cottles, WUta, 
Esq. 



Gabriel Seymour, 
of Bitton, bur. 
there 1655. 



Thomas Seymour, 8on=T=Eliwibeth, dau. of 



and heir apparent, died 
about 1675. 



Six Sons. 



Lyte, of Lytes 
Gary, Somerset, 
Esq. 



Catherine 
Seymour, 
died 1633. 



Hester, 2nd=f=John Seymour, of London, bom at=f=Margaret, dau. of 



dau, of Sir Bitton, 1019. Patron of Bitton. Lieut. 
John Newttm, Col. in the Guards, wounded at Cadiz, 
of Barres 1702. Appointed Governor of Mary- 
Court land, where he died July 30, 1709. 



Charles liowles, 
of Chatham, 
Kent 



Eight Daughters. 



John Seymour, m.d., Physi-^^pElizabeth, 



cian to the Royal Hospital, 
at Plymouth, where he dietl, 
17^1. Bom at St. Andrew. . 
Graduated at Trinity, Oxon, 



dau.of John 

Selwood, 

Oxf<»rd, 



Berkeley Seymour, m.a., born in London, Oct 
25, l(i85. At Eton 1698, Fellow of Kings 
College, Cambridge, till hia deatli in Westmin- 
ster Oct. 1744. Bur. in his College Chapel. 
Lived at Bitton as Impropriator many years. 
Devised his estate to his sister Jane. 



_ 1 

Jane Seymour, of Stratton 
street, Loudon till 1744, after 
which she is rated at Bitton 
till 1770. She was living at 
Woodford, I^ex, in 1766, 
where she died and was buried 
tliere April 7th 1770. Will 
proved July following. 



Berkeley Seymour, born at Oxford, 1709. 
Lieut in Royal Navy. Died at Plymouth, 
1777. Bur. at St Andrews. Petitioner 
for the Dukedom. Ccolebs. 



T 1 1 

Jane Maria Margaret=TpReginald Hester. 

Osborne a lunatic 

Bradshaw. in 1776. 



After this the sister left Bitton. He left one illegitimate child by Sarah 
Bright, a daughter of the parish clerk 

Horace Walpole (in his Anecdotes of Painters, 4to, 1798, p. 390) 
speaks of "a Colonel Seymour, a noted painter in the reign of Queen Anna" 
I have not succeeded in identifying this man, but that he was one of the 



90 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

family may be assumed from several old portraits at the Rectory House, 
and small portraits of King William and Queen Mary, and a clever panoramic 
view of Bitton Church and its surroundings, and a large picture of Bitton 
Church now in my possession. 

In 1833, Edward Frere of Roydon, Suffolk, Esq., became the tenant, 
and after his death, 1844, his son William Edward purchased it of the 
lessee, Sir Thomas F. Freemantle (in 1857), who had purchased the whole 
prebendal estate of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners (see p. 48). 

There are six Alms Houses near the Church, as a memorial of their 
parents, inscribed — 

IN MEMORY OF 

EDWARD AND MARY ANN FRERE, 

SOMETIME OF THIS PARISH, 

THESE ALMSHOUSBS WERE ERECTED 

BY THEIR GRATEFUL AND AFFECTIONATE CHILDREN, 

ANNO DOMINI 1859. 

A National School was built near the Church in 1830 for 120 children; 
it cost £360 ; and in 1838. another school house for 200 children, with 
master's residence, was built near Oldland Church, within the bounaryd 
of Bitton Hamlet, at a Qost of £650. In both cases the sites were given. 

There was a goodly residence for a gentleman's family at Cully or Coly 
Hall in this hamlet, formerly belonging to the possessions of Hanham 
Abbots. It is now in the possession of the Whittuck family, having been 
bought in 1815 by the late. Samuel Whittuck, Esq., of Hanham Hall. 
In the eighteenth century Seedes were the possessors, who built the present 
mansion. Seedes acquired it of John Reed, who possessed it with Upton 
Cheyney by purchase from Lacy, the possessor of Hanham Abbots after 
the dissolution. I may be able to say more of the Seede family under 
the manor of Upton Cheney. 

Weston's Court, formerly i)ossessed by an influential family, is now a 
farm house. It lies between Oldland Common, and North Common belongs 
to the representatives of Richard Woodward, Esq., late of Bath, a grandson 
of Dr. Richard Woodward, Bishop of Cloyne, son of Francis Woodward of 
Grimsbury, on the borders of Kingswood Chase, about which place and 
family mention will be made hereafter. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 91 

Mr. Woodward purchased the property 1794 of the representatives of 
Eichai'd Jones, Esq., of Hanham Hall, who had purchased the manor of 
Oldland in 1G52 of Westons, a family established in Bitton and Bristol 
from very early date. The name appears in the early Subsidy Rolls. 
Weston Court was in possession of Henry Weston, 2nd Henry YIH, 
as parcel of the manor of Oldland and Gee Moor : as early as 1238, 
a Weston was Mayor of Bristol. Arms of Weston on several early deeds 
in my possession, are, as given by Edmonston : on a plate 3 fleur-de-Us, a 
mullet for difference. 

Of Fieldgrove, now so called, or Filgrove, from Philomela, though once 
a grove, still abounds with nightingales, only a few ancient oaks remain; 
it was the residence of Hart of Bristol, afterwards Sir Richard Hart, w^ho 
died 1701 : it is a good residence, and occupied by Thos. Sealey, Esq., 
the owner. 

Hitherto, chiefly about Bitton proper. I now return to Hannum or 
Hanham, the principal dependency of Bitton. At the time of Domesday 
(f. 169, Ix) it was the land of "Ernulf de Hesding." It is next found 
to be held by a family De Hanham, and then by Salso Marisco or 
Saltmarsh, holding under the superior lord, but whether of Bitton or 
Oldland was a question raised in 1272, and decided by a jury in favour 
of the Lord of Oldland (see Records at the end, ii, iii, iv, v,), for, 
before that date, Bitton had been divided between the two co-heiresses 
of Amneville into two moieties, Bitton and Oldland (of which latter 
hereafter). According to the pleadings in an assize, 15th Edward I 
(1287), in which John de Salso Marisco was plaintiff, the title of his 
family to this property was derived from a charter of Richard Foliot ; 
but this appears doubtful, as his opponent, who obtained the verdict in 
the suit, asserted that the manor was granted by Robert Harding, the 
ancestor of the Berkeley family, to Robert de Hanum, the ancestor of that 
of Salso Marisco.' In a previous action, 56th Henry III, 1st Edward I 
(1272-3), the question had been, whether the wardship of the said John 
de Salso Marisco belonged to David Blount as owner of one moiety, or 
to Richard de la More, owner of the other moiety, called Oldland ; an I 

^ Sc»' Kf'conls in Fine. 



92 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

the jury had decided in favour of De la More.^ The original grant of 
the maiior to Harding was in these words, " manerium Bethone cum 
omnibus appendiciis suis ;" and when the manor was divided between 
the two Petrunillas the moieties were called " medietiis manerii de Button 
Vocata Button," and " medietas manerii de Button vocata Oldland." 

In 1329, under the name of the manor of West Hanham (so called 1325 
in a Fine relating to John and Hawise de Button), it was sold by Salso 
Marisco to William de la Grene and John Bagworth (Fine, 2rd Edw. Ill, 
No. 20), who the following year gave the premises to the Abbot and 
convent of Keynsham (In(^. ad qd. d., 4th Edward III, Nos. 80 and 102), 
"a capital messuage,*' &c., &c., which at this time is called ''Hanham 
Court." The walls of the house, especially the cellars, are very massive 
and ancient. Tliere is also a little early church or chapel, as before stated, 
adjoining this mansion, with a late Norman font, and a more curious 
Norman piscinn.* 

At the Dissolution, the manor of West Hanham, also called Hanham 
Abbots, was surrendered to the Crown by Abbot John, 30tli Hen. VIII, 
(see Eighth Report of Dep. Keeper, p. 25). 2nd and 3rd Philip and Mary, 
1553, the Crown sold the reversion to Rowland Hay ward, subject to a 
lease for twenty-one years to Ursula Gresly ; Hayward, 2nd and 3rd 
Philip and Mary, 1555, sold to John Reed, who dismembered the manor 
by sale of divers lands for a thousand years; and 8th Ehzabeth, 1566, 
sold the manor house and 1,470 acres to John Lacy of London and 
Bristol. He was a clothworker, and luid' a house at Fulham, where Queen 
Elizabeth used to visit him. It remained in this family till 1633, when 
it was sold to T. Colston of Bristol, who in 1638 sold it to Francis and 
Henry Creswicke, in whose family it remained till 1842, when it came 
into the possession of John White of Bedford Row, London, Esq., after 
whose death in 1869, it was sold for £15050 to Mr. G. W. Hancock of Bat,h. 
Of the Creswicke family I will speak more fully hereafter. 

The boundaries of this manor of Hanham Abbots or West Hanham, art 
well defined, being bounded on tlie south by the river Avon, on the norhe 
by the high road leading from Bristol to Bath, on the west by Strood 

' See Records in Fine. » Figs. 21, 22, p. 40 ante. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 93 

Brook, and on the east by Clack Mill brook, this is still the boundary 
of the hamlet of Hanham, which for all civil purposes is like a distinct 
parish. 

The Grange in this hamlet, which lies on the south side of the high 
road boundary, with about thirty-five acres of land, was occupied by Mr. 
Edmond Stone, in the reign of Elizabeth. In 1683 it became the 
possession of Sir Richard Hart, Knight, in whose family it remained till 
1753, when it was sold for £1450 to Mr. Tonguo, on whose death, in 
1764, it was bought .by Messrs. Smith, Harford, Chapman, and Loscomb, 
the Bristol Brass Battery and Copper Company. lu 1794, James Emerson 
of Hanham, Brass and Spelter Maker, bought tie premises, and in 1832, 
Samuel Whittuck, the lord of the other manors, bought the estate, and 
in 1840, the old Elizabethan Grange House was pulled down and a new 
house built. 

There is another good mansion in this hamlet called Hanham Hall, 
which was built in 1655, by Richard Jones, Esq.* On his diath in 1697, 
it became the property of Thomas Trye, Esq. of Hardwick, who had 
married one of his co-heiresses. In 1726, April 26th, a bill received the 
royal assent for the sale of Mr. Trye's lands in Gloucestershire. Kedgwin 
Webley of London, Esq., became the purchaser : his only daughter 
Frances, widow of David l^arry of Noyadd, co. (Cardigan, succeeded to 
the estate. In 1791 the estate was sold to Mr Emerson; and again in 
1803; and it was afterwards purchased by Samuel Whittuck, Esq., in 
whose family it now remains. 

The other manor of Hanham was called Est or Fast Hanham, which 
was held of the Lord of Bitton, and it was here that the possessions of 
De Buttons lay from an early period, as before shewn. The first record 
in which the possession of De Button is called Est Hanham is in a Fine 
1348 (21st Edward III), by which the widow Hawise de Button passed 
the premises to John and Alice Delarobe for her life. I have shewn (p. 79) 
that this was the locale of the mansion afterwards called Barre's Court. 

When Leland made his Itinerary,'^ about the year 1540, Barre's Court 
at Hanham was the residence of Sir John Newton : and he describes it 
as "a fayre old maniiar place of stone."- *' At this Hannam dwellyth 
See his Moniiment, p. 22. • Itinerary, toI. vii, pf. 37. 



94 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

one Sir John Newton." — " The forest of Kyngeswodd cummyth just onto 
Barres Court, mastur Newton's house." Tlie site is still marked by a 
moat :' and over tlie door of the present fiirni-house remain the Newton 
arms, beautifully wrought in stone, though much nmtihited. In 1878 
the property wjxs sold to George Hare Leonard of Clifton, E^q. 

From aged pei*sons living close by, I have gjithered the following : That it 
was enclosed with a high wall ([)arts of which remain) all round the park. 
There were niches all round the outside of the house, tilled with colossal 
leaden statues, a large and lofty entrance hall, richly carved and gilt, 
particularly the fireplace, the shelf of which was suppoi'ted by two large 
figures of wood : it was paved with l)lack and w^hite marble squares ; 
there was a music gallery at the end, and a chapel. The house was 
square, with square stone muUioned windows, with gothic heads and 
labels ; there wiis a drawl)ridge. The porter s lodge had a large gateway 
and a small one, and images about it ; and text of scripture, one of which 
T recovered, and set up in the chantry aisle at Bitton (see p. 30). 
The vane wtis a figiu'e representing the Newton crest, which is still 
preserved, viz., a Moorish king on his knee, dehvering up his sword.^ The 
place took its comparatively modern name from Sir John Barre of 
Rotherwas, co. Hereford, who became its possessor by marriage. Perhaps 
Newton gave it that name when he inherited the property on Lady 
Barres death, or when he set up the arms with all the glory of blazon, 
which were granted to him in 1557, with which date the description of 
the house accords. But it did not entirely lose its earlier name of Hannam. 

His wife was Jane, the sole daughter and heir of Thomas Rigge, of 
Charlcombe, co. Somerset, by Katharine, daughter and sole heiress of 
Sir John de Button, who died hi 1382 (as shewn in the pedigree 
at p. 80) She had been previously married to Robert Greyndour, esquire, 
who died in 1447 ; and on her death in 1485 she desired to be buried 
with her first husband at Newland, in the forest of Dean, co. Glouc, where 
a chantry had been founded called the chantry of Robert Greyndour.^ Her 

* Those rocr)lloctii)iis of the ohl inaiisioii are <riveii in the PrnrfptHngs of the ArcJueologmd 
Insfihdr fit Bristol^ liiol, p. 244^. It Wiis Uikcn down about the year 1770. 

' See grant of Anup in Appendix 

* See the h'ttevs patent printed in Appendix vi. 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 95 

will (see Appendix), which is on record in the Prerogative Court of Canter- 
bury is a very long and curious document. The vicar of Newland was en- 
joined to pray for her soul and those of her two husbands, for her 
daughter Elizabeth sometime Countess of Worcester/ for her father 
Thomas Rigge, and Katherino his wife. Subsequently she mentions her 
sister dame Joane Lychefelde and William Walwyne among her immediate 
kinsfolk. She bequeathed to the altar of Saint Katharine in tlie parish 
church at Bytton a goodly pair of vestments of black chamlet, with a 
cope of the same cloth to serve there, '' for myne auncesters be buried in 
that chapell, and the priest to pray tenderly for the soules of them." 
" Item, I bequethe to the parishe chirche of Charlecombe, where I was 
cristenyd, a crosse of copir and gilt, to be borne in the procession, the 
which is now in my chapel at Clowrewall" There are other legacies to 
her cousin Alice Beyman [Baynham ?] and her heirs ; for the chapel of 
Clowrewall ; and to her niece Elizabeth de la Bere. 

And with regard to her '•ancestors," I would refer to a very long and 
interesting assize roll of novel disseisin, in the Public Record Office, 
19th and 20th Richard II., M. 2, 19, 2, — a most valuable document in 
a genealogical point of view, jis several descents are laid down in pedigree. 
In this trial, the father and mother of Lady Barre, viz., Thomas Rigge 
and Catharine his wife, were plaintiffs, against Sir John Devereux and 
Joan his wife (relict of John de Bitton), touching certain lands in Bittoii 
Hanham, &c., wherein it is laid down that the said Catherine was the 
heir of John de Bitton, by Margaret sister of Cecily, the wife of Sir 
Nicholas Berkley. Aske, in his Collection, before quoted, says that this 
Sir John Bitton died in Portugal ; that he married Joanna Hurst, and in 
the Assize Roll it is stated that she afterwards married Sir John Devereux ; 
which Sir John Bitton was son and heir of Matthew de Bitton, whose 
deed, dated at Hannam, 23rd Edward III, will be found in Appendix. 
There is a curious circumstance in the life of this Matthew, which I wish 
to mention. 

Upon an inquisition, in 48th Edward III, to inquire who were the 
1 Elizabeth, daughter of Robert (Jreyndour was the first wife of John Tibetot, or Tiptoft, 
Earl of Worcester, the Lord Treasurer, and he had by her a son John, who died young. 
Dugdale, Baronage, ii, 41. 
0* 



96 HISTORY OF lUTTON 

destroyers of game in the Chace of Kingswood, he is found to be, with 
others, '* communis malefactor de venacione Dom. Regis." Upon his 
being taken; he acknowledges his transgressions, and throws himself on 
the kings mercy — **et committitur prisone Dom. Regis in custodia vice- 
comitis quousque justiciarii de ipso habeant locutionem cum consilio Dom. 
R." This record is among certain forest proceedings in the Public 
Record Office, London. 

What became of him afterwards, I cannot discover, — whether he was 
tried, or died in prison, or was executed. Though his name appears in 
the court-roll of Bitton in that reign, in tlie next year John de Bitton, 
his son, appears at the court. It was on Friday in the third' week of 
Lent that he was counnitted, which iu that year (1374) would be the 
3rd of March ; and on the Fine Roll of the same year there appears the 
writ of his *' Diem Clausit Extremum," which is dated April 10th. In 
the ordinance of the chantry at Newland, founded by Joan Greyndour, on 
the death of her husband (Pat. 24th Henry VI, p. 2, M 17), in which 
prayers were to be offered for the good estate of her relations, she al- 
together omits the name of this Matthew, who was her grandfather, 
though she mentions the generations above and below him. 

It has been supposed that for his transgressions, the killing of thirty- 
seven head of deer, he might have been excommunicated, and that if he 
died under that sentence he would not be entitlf^d to the prayers to be 
offered in the said chantry. 

It will be recollected that Leland said that Kingswood Forest was 
close U) Barre's Coin-t. 

In the deed quoted above he calls himself the son and heir of John de 
Button, and in the Assize Roll he is styled the son and heir of John (the 
son of John) and Hawise. Also in a Fine (Hil. 18th Edward HI), John 
(son of John) and Hawise, occur ; which John was the heir of an elder 
brother. Thoracis, who died without issue. 

This is that John, the son of John, who (see Rot. Orig. 1st Edward II, 
Rot. 9) did homage '*' ut nepos et haeres Thoma? de Bitton Episcopi 
Exon : avunculi sui," and whose wife Hawise was the second daughter and 
co-heir of Matthew Fumeaux, by whom, besides his son Matthew, he had 
three daughters, viz., Maud, who first married William de la More, and 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



97 



secondly, Simon Bassett ; Elizabeth, married to Phil. Hampton; Beatrix, 
married to George Strode, whose descendants were co-heirs on the death 
of Lady Barre. In 18th Edward II., by fine he acquired lands i^ 
Bitton, Hanham, &c. 

It is to be regretted that no inquisitions post mortem have been found 
of any of the family, excepting this Thomas de Bitton just mentioned, 
who was Bishop of Expter* from 1293 to 1307, having before been Dean 
of Wells from 1284 to 1293, during which time, viz. in 1287, it appears, 
by a Plea Roll, 15 Edw. I. m. 3, that his cow and two bullocks were 

» I am indebted to the late Rev. Dr. Oliver of 
Exeter, for the following biographical sketch of 
this Thomas de Button, or ]5itton, Bishop of 
Exeter : " Of a worshipful family, was pro- 
moted from tlie Deanery of Wells to the See of 
Exeter, in November 1292 (Prynne's Records, vol. 
iii, 474) ; and the temj)or.vlities Avore restored to him 
on 2nd December ensuing. Unfortunately, his register 
has long since perislied, but in that of his successor 
Walter Stapleton, foL 28, is pn^served the interesting 
report of his visitation of Bosham Collegiate Churcli, 
Sussex, on 28th July, 1294: and again in foh 175, 
his appropriation to the Dean and Chapter of Exeter, 
of the Church of St Uvelus, or Evall, in Cornwall, 
for the maintenance of his Obit. The original instru- 
ment, dated Exeter, 15th October, 1297, with his 
beautiful seal attached, is cai*efully preserved in the 
Exchequer Room of the Cathedral, with King Edward the First's license, dated 10th of April 
following. 

"The Bishoj), in 1292, appropriated to St John Baptist's Hospital in Wells, the Church 
of West Down, in Devonshire. Two years later he obtained a market for Paignton, as also 
for Newport, near Barnstaple. 

"A curious document is extant in the Episcopal Archives at Exeter, \'\z., a grant of forty days' 
indulgence, by three archbishops and fivQ bishops, dated Rome, A.D. 1300, in favour of all 
true penitents, who thould avail themselves of the bishop's spiritual ministry, or oflfer up 
prayers for his prosperity whilst living, or for the repose of his soul after his death, and for 
the departed souls of his parents, brothers, and sisters. Three only of the eight seals originally 
attached to the instrument are in fair preservation, viz., of Basil, Archbishop of Jerusalem; 
of Ademelphus, Archbishop of Cosenza; and of Manfrid, Bishop of St Mark's, Venice. 

"In nearly the beginning of the earliest Register, at Exeter, Bishop Bronscombe's, Is found 




98 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

seized by De la More, a lord of one of the manors in Bitton ; and by 
another Plea EloU, 12 Edw. I. Mic. (52), he recovered a right of estover 
in Bitton on the death " cujusdam mulieris,*" — his mother, vv^ho had a life 
interest in it, as it had always been enijoyed by William de Bitton, his 
wicle, whose heir he was ; so that there c<in be no doubt that he also had 
his residence at Hannam. William de Bitton just mentioned, was pro- 

r>isliop Ritton's pui-cIuvso-hUmmI, bi«iriii^ date Sunday before St. La^\Tence, 1302, of KpIUj^ in 
St. Ahui's jiavish, Cornwall, from William de Rostourek, fur ten pounds of silver. In the 
MonaHticon of thcr Exeter diocese wym jirinted, p. 445, his Lonlship's excellent regulations for 
tlie Colh^giatf Church of Crediton. To the Ahhey of Tavistock he appropriated, on 26th 
Auj^ust, 1304, the Chunh of T>arrin«,don. On 31st Di^ceniber, 1305, he assi^riunl Walkhaniptou 
Chui*ch t(> the Al)h(»t and Convent of Ihickland. The Fabric Rolls of his Cnth*uJrnJ 
abundantly ti'stify to the encoin-aj<t*ment \\v. gave to the jH-osecution of its Imilding. 

*'The r>ish«»p was unablf to att^'ud the Parliament summoned t«> nuu't at Carlisle, within 
the Octave «»f St. Hilary (Jaiuiary) 1307, to treat * sui)er onlinatione et stjibilitiit** teme 
►Scotia'.' According to tlie Ghrnitirnn of Exeter (^hurch, he die<l 17th September, that year 
(TT(H>ker siiys 21st of St'ptember) ; Vnit we prefer the Cathedral Calendar or Martyrologium 
the 25th of Septemlk^r 1307. He Wius buried just before the lowest stej) of the high altar, 
Acconling to T^dand (Itin. voL iii, p. 57) his grave-stone wjus inscribed : 

"THO. BYTTEN, EPUS. EXON. 

"From a deed of 17th Jidy, 1310, I learn that his executors were enabled from his 
means, to erect the new Chapel of St. (Jabriel, in tlie Priest*s Hospital, at Clist. (n) 

"That he was a general favourite amongst his episcopal brethren, of the Province of 
Canterbury, is manift^st from the encouragement they g*ave to the faithful of their n^spective 
dioceses, 'ad orandum ])ro anima bcma^ memoria- Thonia*, cpiondam Exoniensis episcopi." 

"(hxlwin commemorates the tiustefully deconited Imuss on his grave; but that has long since 
disiipi)eared. In taking ui> the lloor of the choir, in August, 1763, the large slab was nmioved, 
covering his very shallow walled tomb, in which lay a leaden coffin six feet long ; the skeleton 
was nearly entiiv. ( )n the right side stood a small chalice, covered with a paten ; a piece of 
silk or linen WiU* wound rounil the stem; amongst the dust was discovered a fair gold ring 
with a large sap])hire set in it, and some fragment's of a wootlen crosier. The remains were 
respectfully covered ; but the ring and chalice are pre8erve<l within a cjise in the Chaj)ter 
House. In the inventory of the Cathedral Plate, a.I). 1327, Dishop Bitton is recorded as 
the donor of two silver candlesticks, weight Zs. and 8^?., and of a silver holy water vase, with 
two sprinklei-s, weighing \Q\s. 

» "When a man has a bastard son and afterwaiils marries the mother, and by her has a 
legitimate son, the woman before marriage is cidled Concubina and afterwards Mulibb." — 
Blackstone's Commeuiarhis, vol ii, Book 2, p. 248, Edit 1787. 

(a) See account of his Executors published by Camden Society, 1874. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



99 



bably the Bishop of Bath and Wells, who 
died 1264, having beea elected in 1248. 
The second Bishop of See who died in 
1274, whose monumental slab in Wells 
Cathedral is here represented, taken from 
the Bristol volume of the Archaeological 
Institute. 

At the inquisition taken on the death 
of Lady Barre her heirs* were found 
to be — 

Robert Basset, aged oO ; 

William Strode, aj^ed 40 ; 

Lucy Chokke, aged 15 and more ; 

Johanna Chokke, aged 14 and more ; 

Elizabeth Chokke, aged 16 and more. 

The three Ifust were sisters ; but, though 

so young, are mentioned above by their 

husbands' names. Lucy was the wife of 

1 " The 1st dougliter of Sir Joliii of T»ytt<in, Mavvik*, 
maryed one Symou Basset, kiii<^'hl, of whouie coinytli 
Robert l>4i8set now alyve, that clayniyth as heyre to 
my Lady lUrre. 

"The 2nd d(m«^hter Elisahetli, sistc^r and ]nm' of 
Mathew of Rytt^^n, niaryed Hampton, and had is.siie 
Philp<»t [/.<'., I'hilip] Hampton, which Philpot had 
Ricliard, which Richanl had John Hampton, which 
John had 3 daughters, Luce, Jane, and Elisiibeth, 
now being alyve, that claymeth us heyres to my 
Lady Barre. 

" The 3rd sister Beatrice maryed Heugh Strowde 
knight, and had iss(»u by liir Henry which had 
Richard Strowde, which Richard had William 
Strowde now aliA^e, yt chaymytli as heyre t^) my 
Lady ]>arre." From a l>aper entitletl Dfanmihaita ttf 
Mntthf'ir Fftrnrftujr, contjiined in Robert Aske's Col- 
lections, in the possession of Sir Thomas Phillipps, 
and ])rint<id in the CnllrctKuru Ttfp. et (rrf,., 
voL i., J). 243. 




IXCISKD SKPUr.CHRAL SLAB IN WELLS CaTHKDRAL 

Supimscl to be ilie Memorial of Bisuop William 

DE Bttton, scooinl of the name, who died 

A.D. 1274. 



100 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



TAHLE SHEWING THE DESCENTS OF THE HEIRK OF LADY BARRE, 
PARTICULARLY THE NEWTONS OF BARRE'S COURT, BITTON. 



Sir John Bitton=rHawwe, clau. of Matthew Funieaiix. 



Simon BaMetf^mi 
2iid huflband I Bi 

Edmund =T=Margery. 
Batwet I 

Sir Hichard 



Maud de^= William de la Mare, 8on of 
Bitton. Stephen and Confltintia. 



r 
John 
Baflset. 



Philpott=f Elizabeth 
Hamjiton. | de Bitton. 

1 ' 

Alice, dan. and heir of Walteri^Jalde-^ Philip Hampton, 
cott and Jjuvn de Goumay. | living 6th H. IV. 

I , 

Egelina, dau. 



alia8 Newton, Jutttice 
in Banco ; bur. at Yat- 
tou, Dec. 1449. 



Cra<lock,=pEnima Harvey of 



London, " Domina 
de VVyke," U7'i. 



I- 
Rubert Basnet 
Uley, CO. Olouc, 
died 4th Hen. VII. 
One of Laily Barre'H 
heirs. 



of-^Mai^ret 
dau. of 
Harewill. 



Sir John=7 
Newton ; 
buried at | 
Yatt*)n,d. ■ 
U87. 



I 



[B.'il)el de 
Chwldar, 
dau. and 
co-heir of 
;d,14»8 



John (0 

Hauip- 

tiin. 



1 1 

Oeorge=f=Beatrix Sir John, died 
Strode j deBitton. at Calais, 8.p. 

Henry =j^Elizabeth, dau. and heir 
StiiKie I of John Brent. 

Richard=pMai y 
of Sir Thotf. Strode of | dau of 

Neville. Parham, I ... 

CO. Dorset. | 



1 

Richard = 
Hampton of 
Ea«t Harp- 
tree. 



'.lulian, nister of 
Dr. Richard StU- 
lington, Biehop 
of Bath&WellM, 
UGti-l 91. 



William Strode = 
of Somerton and 
Parkham. One 
of Lady Barre's 
heirs. 



= Alice. 



Issue resided 
long at High- 
field, Bitton. 



Ricliard New-=f= Eliza- 
ton ;die<l MO 1, beth St. 
eldest son. | John. 
1 



Sir Thomiw Newton,"i--Joan (0<lau. and coheir, mar-^^Thomas Chokkc, 
aliaH Cradcx'k, end I riod a thinl husband, Sir Ed- sen., 1st hus- 
husband ; 2nd sou. I mund Goi*geH, died 1304. band. 



Two Joan, a Hec<nid=Sir John Newton " dwelljrtli at Hannam." Le-=pMargaret 
daugh- wife, survived land's If in. Died 1568. bur. at Harj)tree. He < dau. of 
ters, him. was heir of Iiih brother Sir Thomas Newton, I Sir H. 

on the death of his nephew s.p. | Poyntz. 

r 



Sir Thomas =f=Margaret 



Sir Henry Newton, d. lo99, bur.inxCitherine, dau. of Sir 13 daughters. 
Brist4)l Cathedral ; b<»rn 1531. | Thomas PaHt*)n. 



Newton, eldest 
sou, died 1518- 
19. 

H 



Gorges. 



6 other sona. 



Thomas Neiiv'ton, 
d. 1522, 8, p. 



Arms of Nticton of / 
Hador : Sa. two f 
shin bones in sal- 
tier or 



Sir John Newtcjn of 
Lincoln, succeeded 



Hador, co.^i^Mary, daughter 
as second of Sir (Jer\*a»«e 



Bai-t. and to the (Jloucestershire 
estates 1661 ; die<i 1699, bur. at 
Bitton. 



Evre ; 
Bitton. 



biu". at 



Sir Theo-=T-l*enelope { ArvM of Cradock^ 
dc»re dau. of | or Newton^ of BU- 

Newton, | Sir John ^ Urn: Ar. on a char, 
liotiney. | az. three garb*, or. 
L 



died 1 63 i I 



Abigail, dau.=SirJohnNewton,=f=2nd Susanna, dau. of Sir John Newton, created a Baronet 1660 =Qrace, dau. of .. 

of William died 1733, bur. I Sir Mich. Warton, with remainder to Sir John Newton of Stone; in 1 675 she is 

Heringham. at Hador, let. 83. i relictof Sir Richard Hador. Die<l 1661, s.p., bur. at Bristol styled "DameNew- 

I Bright Die<ll737. Cathedral. ton of Hannam." 

■ ' 1 

Susanna 



Sir Michael Newton, K.B., pulled= 
down Barrs Court, died s.p., Ap. 
1743, 



I — 
John 

of Cooperaale, 
Essex. Died 
1800, bur. at 
Welford, 
Berks. 



"Lady Margaret Susanna Newton, sisterY=William Eyre Archer, 
Coningsby. and coheir. Died 1761. died June 17J9, bur. 

Devised estate to her I at Theydon Oarnon, 
youngest son Michael. | Rs«e3L 



Archer=f=Lady Mary, 
dau. of Earl 
Fitzwilliam. 
Died 1776. 



Michael Archer, took the name 
of Newton, by n)yal assent 25 
March, 175f, <lied 18o5, s.p. 
estates sold by executor to the 
present i^ssessors, WTiittuckn. 
Died s.p. 



T 



Edward=Su8anna. 
Harley Earl 
of Oxford. 



Philip Blun-= 
dell, Esq., of 
Tivertou, died 
8. p. 



^Catherine. 



Jact>b Houblon of Halling-=j=Susanna. 
bury, Essex, f>ij. Diedl783. j Died 1837.^ 
. I 



Giller>' Pigott of Kew,=Charlotte. 
Esq. Died 1814 s.p. Died J 8 19 s.p. 



John Archer Houblon, Esij-'^^pMary Anne Brampton. Died 1865. 



Charles 2nd son toko the name of Eyre only f Mary Anne, dau. of QenL Popham «if Littlecot, Wilts, by Elizabeth, 
on succee<ling to the Welford estite in 183L | 5th dau. of John Andrew, Rector of Powderham& Archdn. of Barum 



George Brampston, Iwmi 1843.^1873, La<ly Alice Frances eldest dau. of Earl of Crawford, 



^ Mrs. Houblon took the name and arms of Newton in addition to Houblon, as sole heiress, on her sister's deatli in 
1819, to the Newttm estates. 

' Took the name of .cVrcher «)u death of his grandfather 1800, succeeding to the Welford estate. 



HISTORY OF MTTON. 101 

Thomas Chokke junior, Johanna of Thomas Chokke senior, and Elizabeth 
of John Chokke jmiior. They were the daughters of John Hampton. 

Robert Basset, one of the heirs of Lady Barre, inherited the Manor of 
Upton Chaun (of which hereafter), Strode inherited her estates in Dorset 
and Somerset. The descent of all these coheirs may be traced in the 
annexed pedigree. 

Lucy Hampton, first the wife of Thomas Chokke, was married secondly 
to Sir Thomas Newton,* second son of Sir John Newton, of Wyke, in 
the parish of Yatton, co. Somerset, and was mother of the Sir John 
Newton who entertained Leland, and gave him much information, which 
the itinerant antiquary has recorded under the head of — 

Thynga lemed of Sir John Neivtonr- 

"Newton's very proper name (he begins) is Caradoc. The name of Newton came 
by this error and use, bycawse the graundfather of Sir John Newton dwellyd, or was 
borne, at Trenewith in Poise-land" — Tre-newydd being Welsh for New-town. 

"One Newton, a man of fayre lands, inhabytyng at Wyke toward Banwell, had 
a yonger brothar that maryed one of the dowghtars and lieyres of Hampton, and wife 
afore to one of the Chokkes, that dyed without ysswe by hyr. This was the yonggest 
dowghtar of the three that Hampton lefte; and yet she being maried unto Newton, 
fathar to 8er John Newton, fortuned to have all the thre partes." 

Sir John Newton inherited from Hampton an old castle called Richmount, 
erected on a rock "in the rote of Mendip," three miles from Wells, and 
in the parish of East Harptree. " There standith yet (writes Leland) a 
pece of the dungeon of it.' Syr John Newton dygged up many olde 
foundations of it, toward buyldinge of a new house hard thereby, cauUyd 
Estewood." He probably died at that new house, for he was buried at 
East Harptree, as shown by his monument hereafter noticed. 

Sir Thomas Newton, of Barrels Court, was the father of Sir John, who 
is styled *'of Richmond CastiU, in the countie of Somersett, knyght," in a 
confirmation of his arms* granted by the three kings of arms in 1567, whereby 
it was declared that he might bear "twelve several coates" or quarterings, 

* In the Bai"oiic'tiiges the heiress that Sir Thomas Xewt<iii married is erroneously ilescribed as 
*Moau da\ij;hter and heir of Sir John Ikrr." The same error occurs in Atkyn's Ilintori/ oj 
GlouceMershire^ and elsewhere 

* JftHfrttn/, vol. vii. p. 88. 

* A view is given in the Rpcord of the ILmjef rf Gournay^ \\ 69G. 

* Printed in the Bristol volume of the Archteological Institute, p. 239. 

P 



102 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



viz. Cradock alias Newton, Sherborne, Angle, Pirot, Harvie, Chedder, 
Hampton, Bitton, Furneaux, Caudecot, Comey alias Gourney, and Harterie 
or Harptree. The same document conferred a crest, viz. "a King of the 
Moors armed in mail, crowned gold, kneeling upon his left knee, rendering 
up his sword," — the same being (fabulously) asserted to have been the crest 
of Sir Auncell Corney, or Gourney, his ancestor,* said to have been present 
"at the winning of Aeon with King Richard the First, where he took 
prisoner a King of the Mooi^s." 

These are the same quarterings' which appear on the stone carving still 
preserved at Bane's Court, viz. : — 

1. Caradoc or Newton^ Argent on a chevron azure three garbs or, 

2. Sherboime^ Ermine, three lozenges fesswise sable. 

3. Avgle^ Or, four fusils fesswise azure, over all a bend gules. 

4. Pyrott^ Gules, three pears or. 

5. Harvey^ Sable, billet^, a lion ram- 

pant or. 
G. Chedder^ Sable,^ a chevron erinine 
between three escallops argent. 

7. Hampton^ Azure, a bend between six 

fleurs de lis or. 

8. BittoTiy Ermine, a fess gules. 

9. FurneaiiXy Gules, a bend between six 

crosses (sometimes crosscrosslets) or. 

10. Cavdecot, Sable, on a chevron be- 
tween three trees uprooted or, an 
eagle displayed of the first. 

11. Gwraey^ Paly of six or and azure. 

12. Hai^trCy Or, a saltire flory azure. 

Several costly monuments of the Newtons remain at Yatton, at East 
Harptree, and in Bristol Cathedral. 

* No such person, however, as Sir Anselm Goumay has Ijeen traced by the historian of the 
family until a generation considerably later. This matter has been noticed at p. 357 of the 
Hercdd and Genealogist y voL iv. 

' The engraving represents the same quarterings, somewhat varied, as they appear on the 
monument of Sir Thomas XeAvton in Bristol cathedral. The seventh quartering is for Harmyngey 
Ermine, on a chief gules three bucks' heads caboshed. The coat of Gumey of Harptro is paly 
of eight, and distinguished by a fleur-de-lis placed on the second pale. Tlie last coat of the other 
atchievcment, that of Harptre, is omitted. 




HISTORY OF BITTOX. 



103 



At Yatton in the Wyke aisle, is a remarkable effigy of Sir Richard 
Newton alias Cradock, a judge of the common pleas in Henry VFs reign, 
whose death is believed to have occurred in 1449, when Sir John Prisot was 
appointed his successor.^ He is attired in his official robes and coif; a 
girdle round his waist and a purse at his right side, both shown by the 
opening of his robe, as is a small portion of his collar of esses on his right 
shoulder. His hands, on which he wears massive rings, are raised together 
in the attitude of prayer. His head rests on a garb, his crest ; and at 
his feet are two dogs. By his side is his wife, attuned in a close surcoat 
and a mantle; a head-dress somewhat resembling that of the women of 
Normandy ; and wearing a solid necklace and a heavy chain of gold. 

In the same church is another pair of effigies, presumed to represent 
Sir John Newton (who died in 1488), the son of the judge, and liis lady; 
and her head-dress so closely coincides with that of the judge's wife, that 
we may well attribute all these effigies to nearly the same period,^ if not 
to the same sculptor. The knight is in plate armour, with a large collar 
of esses, his head resting on 
a helmet with a garb for 
crest, and his feet on a lion. 












-K'-'-l 




At East Harptree the 
monument of Sir John New- 
ton, who entertained Leland 
on his itinerary, formerly 
exhibited the appearance 
shown in this engraving.^ 
At one end are the arms of 
Newton with twenty quarter- 
ings.* 

It was erected against the f^ 

* Fu8s, Lives of fJie Jndjes^ vi. 347, His will is at Lanibeth. In Register Stafford, fol. 169, 
<lated Xoveuiber 28th, 1448. 

2 Sir John and his wife are both of very juvenile aspect. We may imagine that the 
•effigies were made by his own order, during his lifetime, and not long after his father's death. 

'Extracted from The Record of the House of Gournay^ by kind permission of Daniel 
Oumey, Eb^., f.s.a., to whom I am also indebted for these blocln. 

* Described in ColUiison's Somerset^ vol. iii, p. 589. 



104 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 



eastern wall of the chancel, and the communion table consequently stood 
partly in front of it. The ecclesiastical taste of the present generation 
has suggested the removal of this monument. The canopy with its Ionic 
columns has been destroyed, and the tomb alone remains. It sustains on 
its summit a very indifferent figure of the knight in armour, bareheaded, and 
his hands raised in prayer. In front, in bas-relief, are kneeling figures of 
ten sons and fifteen daughters. Sir John Newton died in 1568. 

The Newtons of Barre's Court had their sepulture in the cathedral church 
of Bristol, in the south transept, named after them the Newton Chapel. 
The oldest of their monuments there is one that in style resembles the 








Monument of the Poet Chaucer, hi Westminftter Abbey. 



Monument of a Newton, in Hristol Cathedral. 

monument of poet Chaucer in Westminster abbey; and it was formerly 
attributed,^ but erroneously, to Sir Richard Newton alias Cradock, the 

^ The following inscription was placed u|K>n it in the last century : " In memory of Sir 
Richard Newton Cradock, of Barrs Court, in the county of Oloucester, one of his Majesties 
Justices of the Common Pleas, who died December the 13th, 1444, and with his Lady lies 
intend beneath this monument, which was defaced by the Civil Wars, and repaired by Mrs. 
Archer, sister tr) the late Sir Michael Xewton of Barrs Court, 1748." The judge^s death did 
not occur in 1444, for he was livini;; in Nov. 1448 (Foss's Live^ of the Jutlfjes^iv, 347), and 
hia successor was not appointe<l until June 1449. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



105 



judge' of the Common Pleas already mentioned as buried at Yatton. 
It was probably erected to commemorate one of the family who died about 
a century later.^ I would venture to assign it to Kichard Newton, a 
grandson of the judge, the time of whose death, 1501, would accord 
well with the design of the monument, and it is not known where 
he was buried: the circumstance of his being called Kichard, after his 
grandfather, might have led to the mis- 
take. 

A lofty monument, which is here 
represented, is that of Sir Henry 
Newton. It bears the following in- 
scription : — 

Here lyeth Sir Henry Newton of Barris- 
court, CO. Gloucester, knight, who married 
Catherine, daughter of Sir Thomas Paston, 
knight, by whom he had two sons and four 
daughters He died 1599, aetatis 70. 
Gurney, Hampton, Cradock, Newton last, 
Held on the measure of that ancient line 
Of Barons' blood; full seventy years he past, 
And did in peace his sacred soul resign. 
His Christ he loved ; he loved to feed the poor. 

Such love assured a life that dies no more. sir Henry Ncwtons Monument. 

, The arms upon this monument have been blazoned in the article on 
the "Heraldry of Bristol Cathedral," in the Herald and Genealogist, 
vol. iv, pp. 299-301. 

* The recess at the side of these table tombs seems to show that it was intended for the 
accommodation of a chantrj'-priest, and was therefore of a date shortly precedent to the 
Reformation. There is reason to believe that the monument erected to the memory of Chaucer 
by Nicholas Brigham in the year 155^5 was one purchased at second hand during the changes 
of this period. The monument of Sir William FitzwiUiam in St. George's Chapel at Windsor 
(engraved in Lysons' Miufna Britannia, vol. i, p. 704) is still more nearly of the pattern of 
Chaucer's. A fourth, resembling the other in many of its features, is at Ringwood, in Hampshire, 
and is figured in the Ghntlenuin'tf Magazine^ 1807, p. 1001. The last has a step for the 
chantry-priest to kneel on in front, instead of in the recess; it has been inaccurately attributed 
to Richard Line, the founder of a free-school at Ringwood so late as 1577. 




106 HISTORY OF BITTON 

Immediately adjoining to the last, and also below the south window 
of the chapel, was erected another still grander monument for Sir John 
Newton the first JBaronet. On the tomb is his effigies in full armour, 
but bare-headed, the right hand raised holding a truncheon, the left 
extended by his side and resting on his sword. The head is placed on 
a large cushion. In the rear the monument was raised to a great height, 
two twisted columns of black marble, with Corinthian capitals, supporting 
an architrave, above which is a shield of arms : Argent on a chevron azure 
three garbs or ; impaling Party per pale or and gules, an eagle displayed azure, 
for Stone. On either side of the shield are two female figures, in the place of 
supporters ; and, crowning the whole, is the crest of the kneeling Moorish 
king, as on the other monument. The epitaph was inscribed on two tablets, 
but they were entirely obliterated, from the dampness of the wall, before 
Browne WUlis made his survey of Bristol Cathedral. Dingley, in his History 
from Marble, gives the inscription as follows : — 

HERB LYBTH INTERRED THE BODY 
OF SIR JOHN NEWTON OF BARSCOURT 
IN THE COVNTY OF GLOVCESTER BARO- 
NETT WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE XIV 
OF FEBRVARY 

:mdclxi. 

But this was evidently not all that occupied the two tablets, and Barrett^ 
supplies these imperfect copies : — 

(}8t Tablet). Here lyeth the body of Sir John Newton, Bart, son of Sir Theodore 

Newton, Kt. and his Lady Grace, daughter of Stone, esq. who dy'd without 

issue 1661. 

{2nd 1 ablet). He was a man of great courage, and the greatest loyalty to his Prince, 
an honour to his country, a credit and noble ornament to his name and family. 

Party per pale or and gules, an eagle with two heads displayed counterchanged azure 
and or, for Stone. 

^'History of Bristol^ 1789, 4to, p. 307. In his account of St. Peter's Church, Bristol (p. 519), 
Barrett writes, " In the south aile is a very lar^'e tomb within a Gothic arch, adorned with a great 
deal of curious workmanship, and various arms without any inscription ; there is the figure of a 
lady carved, lying upon the tomb who was of the family of Barrs Court, Gloucestershire, as appears 
by the arms." 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 107 

Sir John Newton, when he was created a Baronet, adopted for his heir a 
namesake of a different family, and bearing a wholly different coat of arms. 
The title was therefore conferred upon him for the term of- his natural life, 
with remainder to John Newton esquire of Hador in Lincolnshire. The 
following are the terms of the letters patent: — 

(Patent EoU 12 Oar. II, par, 7). 
Sciatis modo quod nos de gratia nostra speciali ac ex cert& scientia et mero motu nostris 
ereximus prsefecimus et creavimus ac per praesentes pro nobis heredibus et sviccessoribus 
nostris erigimus prasficimus et creamus dilectum nostrum Johannem Newton de Barscourt 
in comitatu nostro Olouc. armigerum, virum familia patrimonio censu et morum probitate 
spectatum, qui nobis auxilium et subsidium satis amplum generoso et liberali animo dedit 
et praestitit ad manutenendum et supportandum triginta viros in cohortibus nostris 
pedestribus in dicto regno Hibemise per tres annos integros pro defensione dicti regni 
nostri ac praBcipu^ pro socuritate plantacionis dicta) provincise Ultonise, ad et in digni- 
tatem statum et gradum Baronetti Anglic^ of a Baronett, pro termino vitae suas naturalis ; 
ipsumque Johannem Newton Baronettum pro nobis heredibus et successoribus nostris 
praefecimus constituimus et creamus per praesentes. Et quod post decessum prsedicti 
Johannis, praedicta dignitas status et gradus perveniat ad fidelem subditum nostrum 
Johannem Newton de Hador armigerum, et heredes masculos sues de corpore suo legitime 
procreates. Habendum dicto Johanni Newton de Barscourt pro termino vitae suae 
naturalis et post decessum dicti Johannis Newton, praodicto Johanni Newton de Hador 
in comitatu Lincoln armigero et heredibus masculis de corpore suo legitime procreatis in 
perpetuum. Apud Westmon. decimo sexto die Augusti. 

Sylvanus Morgan, in his Sphere of Gentry^ 1661, gives for "The atchieve- 
ment of a Baronett," facing the second chapter of his fourth book, the conjoint 
arms (side by side) of the existing and future Sir John Newtons : — 

Insignia utritusq. Johannis NewUmi^ Armig. & Baronet tarn 
jprcBsentis, hiace titvXia insigniti, ciimfuturi aeu atbcceaaivi. 

The first shield is quarterly : 1 . Newton ; 2. Hampton ; 3. Bitton ; 4. 
Caudecot ; the second is Sable, two shin-bones in saltire argent. 

Motto : HUIC HABEO NGN TlBl. 

(Upon this enigmatical motto, also used by the family of Ellis of Kiddall, 
see remarks in Herald and Genealogist^ 18G9, p. 357/ 

There is a full pedigree of Newton, showing the two families, in Nichols's 
History of Leicestei^shire, vol. iv, p. 807. It appears, however, to require 
material corrections. 



108 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

V 

The first Baronet having died in 16G1, shortly after his creation, the 
Lincolnshire esquire succeeded to the dignity ; but Dame Grace Newton, the 
widow, was living at Hannam in 1672. 

The second Baronet was the son of Mr. Thomas Newton, a chief constable 
at Hatherthorp in Lincolnshire, and had derived a large fortune from one 
Hixon a usurer who lived with his father.* He was M.P. for Grantham 
during the the whole of the reign of Charles II, and died in 1699. His 
history and character are delineated in the epitaph at Bitton, ante page 29. 

Sir John Newton, his son and successor, married, 1. Abigail, daughter of 
William Heveningham, or Heningham, esquire, of Heveningham in Norfolk, 
by Lady Mary Gary his wife, daughter of John Earl of Dover, and had issue a 
daughter, Gary the wife of Edward Goke, esq., of Holkham, and mother of 
Thomas created Earl of Leicester in 17G4; 2. Susanna, widow of Sir John 
Bright, Bart., of Badsworth in Yorkshire, and sister to Sir Michael Warton of 
Beverley, by whom he had issue Sir Michael Newton the fourth Baronet ; who 
became possessed of a great estate on the death of his uncle Sir Michael 
Warton, and was made a Knight of the Bath in 1725. He married in 1730 
Margaret (in her own right) Gountess of Goningsby, the eldest daughter and 
coheir of John Earl of Goningsby, of Hampton Gourt, co. Hereford ; but their 
only offspring, John Viscount Goningsby, died in its infancy, the victim of an 
accidental fall, occasioned, it is said, by an ape that frightened its nurse. Sir 
Michael Newton pulled down Barre's Court, and the baronetcy became extinct 
on his death in 1743. The Gountess survived until 1761. (See Pedigree 
extended p. 100.) 

An extent of the demesne lands of Barrels Gourt under the title of 
^' Hannam," made 10th Henry VI for Robert Greyndour, is in the British 
Museum, No. 7,361 : it is a roll of parchment twenty-five feet long, and 
was bought at the Hon. Miss Harley's sale, July 9th, 1850, with two 
volumes of surveys, made in 1740, for Michael Newton, Esq., numbeied 
in Addit. MSS. 18,266, 18,267.* 

J See in the Herald and Genealogist, voL ii, p. 124, the curious contemporary notice of Sir John 
Newton in Sir Joseph Williamson's " Notes upon Lincolnshire Families temp. Charles IL" 

• Emulf de Hesding who held this manor of Hannam at the time of Domesday, came 
into England with the Conqueror, and became the holder of large possessions in Tarious 
counties. See his descendants in the Herald and Genealogiaf, voL vi, p. 241, &c. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 109 

This Survey gives the names of all the tenants, and the terms on which 
they held. In the margin are the names of succeeding tenants in a later 
hand. Several of the tenants were to mow and make the hay, and reap 
and carry the corn for the manor lord, for a certain number of days. Some 
held " Monday-lands," involving working for the lord every Monday. 
Each customary reaper was to be paid twopence a day, and every mower 
one mark. The names of all the common fields occur. 

The Abbot of Keynsham was one of the tenants in fee, holding by other 
services than by rent, as by sxiits, aids, homages, and other things ; as 
appears by a certain charter and donation, made to tlie heir of Hanam by 
Thomas, the knight of Oldland. I have failed to discover who this 
worthy was — probably one of the early D'Amenevilles. 

Within the year 1878, the estate has been sold l)}^ John Whittuck 
(with the exception of the minerals) to G. H. Leonard, Esq,, of Clifton. 

I have thus endeavoured to give a coiTect account of liow the Newtons 
became poskessed of this extensive property. One historian, copying fi'om 
another, without reference to other authorities, often perpetuates error upon 
error : such is particularly the case with this family, all originating with 
Atkyns in his Cfloucestersliire. 

It had been laid down, without any proof, that Margaret, a daughter of 
Blount, who W£is lord of the manor of Bitton, married Sir John Barre, who left 
a daughter Joan, who married a Newton. Even Sir Alexander Croke, in his 
Genealogy, p. 343, has depended upon Atkyns' statement. All this has now 
been corrected, by reference to records, some of which ma}' have been dis- 
covered since Atkyns' time. 

It can be shown, that no such marriage ever took place — that Sir John 
Barre left no daughter by his wife, through whom he acquired that property. 
Upon the death of Lady Barre, without issue, in 1485, it was found by the 
inquest at her death, that her next heii-s were Basset,^ Hampton, and Strode, 
descendants of the co-heiresses of Sir John de Bitton by Harvise de Furneaux. 
It was so far true that Newton (Sir Thomas) married cm heir of Lady Barre, 
but not a daughter, viz : Lucy Hampton ; and in that way Cmdock or Newton 
of Richmount Castle acquired Barre's Court estates. 

^ S<H* P(M.li^r(M», p. 79. 



110 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

Oldland Moiety. 

This moiety of Bitton called Oldland, which apparently passed by 
purchase from Nicholas and Petronilla de Oxenhaye to Richard de la More, 
who died s.p. 1292 (Inq. p.m.) seised of Oldland, and a capital messuage, 
&c., leaving Stephen de la More his nephew and heir, which Stephen (who 
died 1328, seised of the same premises) by his wife Constantia de Heweya 
left a daughter, Alicia de la More, who married Walter Jovet, and a son, 
William de la More, who married Maud or Matilda de Button, the same who 
Avas remarried to Simon Basset (see Pedigree, p. 79 and 100). William de 
Iti More (also called Attemore) died 1341 seised of the manor of Oldland. 
By Maud de Bitton he Imd one son and two daughters, viz., John Attemore, 
Margery and Cecily. John was only tliree years old at his father s death, 
and he died 1349, whereupon Cecily, only fourteen, succeeded as heir, and 
married Sir Nicholas Berkeley of Dursley. She died without issue 1393. 
The inquisition, on her death found her possessed of half the manor of 
Bitton, called *' Holdlonde," held for her life, having aliened it by fine to 
Sir John Deverose and his wife Joanna, who was the relict of Sir John 
Button the father of Katharine by his first wife Margery de la More or 
Attemore, the sister of Cecily de Berkeley. 

The next heir of Cecily was John Boteler of Shentinfeld, Berks, the 
son of Alicia de la More. 

In 7th Henry V, 1419, Sir John Deverose died seised of this manor, 
from whom it passed to his daughter and heir Joanna the wife of John 
Chesebrook. From these persons it passed by Fine, 10th Henry V (1422), 
to Thomas Wykis, who died 13th Edward IV, 1473, and it continued in 
that family till 4th and 5th Philip and Mary, 1557-8 ; when Nicholas 
Wykis died seised of it, leaving a son Robert,^ who 20th Elizabeth (1578) 
passed it by Fine to Edward and Henry Coulthurst. In the records, 
authorizing the sale of this manor, its extent is thus described: 15 
messuages, 10 gardens and orchards, 300 acres of land, 100 acres meadow, 
200 acres of pasture and of wood, 300 acres of heath, with common of 

* Smith in his Liras of the Berkeley 8, under Dursley, gives a melancholy account of the 
state of beggary to which this Robert Wykis was reduced, becoming a beggar in the streets 
of London. 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. Ill 

pasture for all sorts of cattle in Hannam, Downe Hanam, West Hannam, 
Oldland, Bitton, and Upton. From Coulthurst it passed to the 
family of Weston, with whom it remained till 1652, when it was sold to 
Mr. Kichaid Jones of Bristol, merchant, for £1,854 10s. ; on whose death, 
1697, it passed by his will to his grandson, Thomas Trye, after having 
been greatly dismembered and encmnbered. By some means the Newtons 
got hold of portions of it, but it was not till 1791 that the "reputed 
manor" and manor-house were sold by public auction in Bristol. 

This reputed manor house was Hanham Hall, which Mr. Richard Jones 
built in 1655, and so called it (see p. 93). "Aged persons have told me 
that the ancient manor house of Oldland stood near Willsbridge, on the 
site where Mr. John Pearsall built a fair house j)f residence about 1730, 
and mills for rolling and slitting hoop-iron ; in whose family it remained 
till about 1816. 

The old house stood by the side of the mill-clack brook, with gable and 
dormer windows. It was remarkable for rich carving, elaborate ceilings 
and wainscoting. Pearsall made a dam across the brook to form a pond 
and mill-head for his iron works, flooding a meadow and orchard, called 
Swan's Flat. A single stone of the chimney of the ancient house was left 
in situ, which earned right of conunon in all the Bitton meads. 

Another member of the Pearsall family built a house of residence on the other 
side of the road, opposite a noted public well called Goldwell. Tlie mills 
were discontinued about 1816, and the various membei-s of the family, 
left the parish excepting Mr. Robert Lucas Pearsall, who after residing a 
few years at the upper house, retired to Germany, having sold the estate to 
Robert Straton, Esq.; after whose death in 1851 it passed into other hancK 

There was another gentleman's house in this division of the parish, now 
a farm house, called Londonderry, a comparatively modern name coiTupted fronx 
Londoner's, by which it was once known. It is in the manor of West Hanhanu 

In 1666, the premises were sold by Mr. Lacye, of Hartrow, (who had 
bought Hanham Abbots), to Mr. Richard Jones, as a *' roveless tenement 
called Burnt house," afterwards called Brand house. Mr. Jones built a 
gentleman's residence, which he sold to Thomas Costar, Esq., M.P. fi^r 
Bristol. His only daughter married John Quicke, of Newton St. Cyres, 



112 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

Devon, Esq. About 1770 Mr. Quicke sold the property, and it is now 
in possession of the Kennett and Avon Canal Company. 

There is an entry in Domesday which implies that before the entu'e 
manor of Button was divided into two moieties, Oldland was a separate 
manor at that date. It was the land of Osbern Bishop of Exeter, and was 
called Aldelande, fol. 165, v,* Alwin held it. Earl Harold's man. and he 
could go where he pleased. When Leland visited Sir John Newton, 
in his " fayre maUvsion or place of stone caullyd Barescourt," at Hanham, he 
adds, " there be divers villages, together caullyd Hanhams." And so we 
find Downe-Hannam and Hanham Prior, of which I would now give some 
account.^ 

Here there is a small estate, about thirty acres, called the Grange, 
which was given to Farleigh Priory, Wilts, by Humfry de Bohun and 
his wife, in the reign of Henry III, in perpetuam elemosinam or free alms.^ 
The grant runs thus in the charter, as given by Dugdale, (Edit. 1825, 
vol. 5, p. 26) : 

" Proeterea concedimus eis et confirmanus terram de Hanum, ([uam Hugo de Chalde- 
felde et Leolselina mater sua, cum haeredibus suis, ipsis vendiderunt, solutam et 
quietam, de omnibus rebns, excepta quarta parte foedi unius militis." 

In another charter by Henry III, given in Dugdale, confirming these 
gifts, this gift Ls styled "unam virgatam terrse in Buthond quae vocatur 
Puriland, cum omnibus pertinentiis suis." 

At the dissolution, Queen Elizabeth, August 1st, 1565, granted to Roger 
Langesford and Christopher Martin the lordship and manor of Hanam, &c., 
belonging lately to the dissolved monastery of Farleigh, and the mansion 
house called Le' Grange, in Downe Hanam. 

Langesford and Martin soon after sold the property to William Neale, 
from whom it passed into the Weston family, and afterwards to divers 
persons ; by mortgages ,and suits, it has long been subjected to litigation. 

^ A view of th<i aucioiit (*.liapel of Oldland, Plate xii. Copied from a Plate in the Gnit, Mag. 
Xov. 1830, from a tlrawiug by the late Henry Aston Piarker of panoiumic celebrity. 

2 See p. 81, ante. 

' In perpetuam elemosinain, or free alms. This mode of tenure, usually called frank almoign, 
Avas the freest and least fettered of any of the feu<lal tenures. The grantees held the donatnm 
for ever, under the light ami easy service of praying (not, however, at any specific time) for the 
soul of the donor, if dead, or for his welfare, if living. It was a tenure by which almost all the 
religious houses anciently held their possessions. — 1>ijick8Tone. 



HI8T0KY OF BITTOX 



U^ 



It never coiild have been much of a mansion, and is now a plain farm house* 
It appears by the Ministers accounts, 27th and 28th Henry VIII, 1536, 
that it was then in the tenure of John and Elizabeth Parsons and assigns^ 
by deed, dated August 20th, 1533, for a term of sixty years. 

The other monastic estate in Down-hanham (see the site in Plate iii) 
was about thirty acres, abutting on Barre's Court ; it belonged to the nuns 
of Lacock, Wilts, to whom it was given by Petronilla D'Anteneville, the 
widow of Nicholas Oxenhaye* in perpetuam elemosynam.^ 

The grant, as extracted from the Lacock Cliartulary, runs thus: — 
" Petronilla filia Roberti de D'Amenevilla concessit eisdem monalibus viginti 
duas acras terrae arabilis de dominiea teml sua in manerio de Button, 
videlicet in Northfelde, &c."' Next we find the following : — '* Robertus 
Marmiun remisit eisdem totum jus quod habuit in terns et tenementis quae 
Robertus Perpunt apud Hanum, quo qu& remissione moniales dederunt 
ei 40s/ *' Petronilla de D'Ameneville dedit eisdem totam teiTam quam 
habuit in manerio de Button, faciendo inde regi debitum servitium." 

At the dissolution, this tenement was 
hi the tenure of John Taylour and Julia 
his wife, and William, a son, by deed 
(February llth, 1517, 7th Henry VII), 
for their lives, at 13s. 4d. per annum. 
The seal of the abbess, attached to the 
deed in my possession, is here produced, 
by the kind courtesy of the publisher ot 
Bowie's Lacock, The abbess and convent 
reserving all the timber, imderwood, and 
coal-pits. Very early in the next reign, 
disputes and suits arose in ,the family 
about this property ; and they continued 
for many years. After a time, the estates 
passed into the hands of Mr. Edwards, 
of Bristol, SoHcitor, who sold to the late 
Col. Fremantle, who sold to- Mr. Whit- 
tuck, as stated p. 81. 




1 See pedigree, i>. 79, and Bowlegs Lacock^ p. xliilz See note, aula ^ Fol. 119.'^ * Fol. 120 



lU HISTORY OF BITTON. 

The continued and expensive suits in which these two estates, formerly 
monastic lands, were involved, are a striking instance of the fate of 
what Sir Henry Spelman calls the "Infelicity of Sacrilege;" as also is the 
estate of Hanham Abbots, which will be more clearly pointed out when we 
fipeak of the Creswick family, under the Bitton meads. 

The Newtons deduced their title to the manor of Bitton, Oldland, and 
Hanham from 1662. 

Besides the manor of Oldland there is a distinct view of frankpledge in 
Oldland, Upton, &c. (see p. 84), an oflfset of the Honour of Gloucester, which 
was once held by Henry II, by whom it was sold to Geoffry de Mandeville, 
Earl of Essex,* on whose death it devolved to Gilbert, son of Richard de Clare. 

It appeal's by the Hundred KoU, p. 175, that this court or view was 
held by Gilbert de Clare, 1275/ in these words : " the Jury say that Gilbert de 
Clare, Earl of Gloucester, now living, has taken away the suit and service of 
persons of Hanam, and many others of the manor of Button, who were 
a^jcustomed to come to a view of frankpledge twice a year at the Court 
of Button for six years past. In the Quo Warranto Roll it is proved 
that David le Blund and Stephen de la More held the like view in their 
manor of Bitton. From the Clares it passed to the Earls of Stafford. 

4Gth Edward III (1372), Inq. p.m., 62, Ralph Earl of Stafford held 
in right of Margaret his wife the Manor of Thombury and a view of 
frankpledge at Oldlonde, parcel of the Honour of Gloucester. 

In the iOth Richard II (1386) Inq. p.m., No. 38, Hugh Earl of Stafford 
held the same, and one-third of a knight's fee in Oldland, Upton, and 
Breche, which John de Button once held. 

1 Fo8bi*ooke Gloue,, vol. i, p, 126. 

* View of Frankpledge, or court leat, held once a year before the steward of a manor, 
according to the institution of Alfred; originally intended to view the frankpledges or sureties 
for the gooil behaviour of each other, and the punishment of various minute oifences against the 
public good. — Blackstonb. 

Honour op Glouobster. — First possessed by Aylward Sneaw, a Mercian nobleman, in the reign 
of Athelstan, who succeeded 926, See Sayer's Brititoly vol. i, p. 243. 

Cowell defines it thus : " Honour is used for the more noble sort of stngnories, whereof other 
inferior lonlships or manors do dejjend. And I have reason to think that none are Honours 
originally, but such as are belonging to the king, howbeit they may after, be bestowed upon other 
nobles." 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 115 

16th Richard II, Inq. p.m., No. 27, Thomas Earl of Stafford was seised 
of a view of frankpledge at Oldland, value 13s. 4d. 

22nd Richard II (1308), Inq. p.m. 46 Thomas Earl of Stafford held the same. 

4th Henry IV (1403), Inq. p.m. 41, Edmund Earl of Stafford held 
the same. He was Idlled at the battle of Shrewsbury, July 21st 1403. 

38th Henry VI (1460), Inq. p.m., No. 59, Humphrey Duke of 
Buckingham held the same. This Duke was slain at the battle of Nor- 
thampton, July 10th, 1460. His successor was Henry Stafford Duke of 
Buckingham, who was beheaded at Salisbury by Richard III, without judge 
or jury 1483. 

Edward Stafford was the next Duke. He was beheaded 1521 for 
high treason, and being attainted, all his estates forfeited to the King; 
but in 1547 Heniy Stafford, his son and heir, was restored in blood, and 
so the Honour continued in the family till 1776, when the Honour of 
Gloucester was sold to Edward Duke of Norfolk by tlie Earl of Stafford 
for £24,000, but there was excepted " all that reputed manor, liberty, or 
fee of Ouldland in co. Glouc. lying in Oldland, Hanham, Upton Cheyney, or 
any of them," which by a deed of the same date is conveyed for the use 
of Henry Thomas Howard and his son in tail male. 

Within the jurisdiction of this Honour are Beach, Upton Cheyney, Barren ' 
Court, Oldland, and Hanham. The ancient Court Rolls of these holdings 
are among the Stafford MSS. in the possession of Lord Bagot, at Blithfield. 

In 1766 a map of this property was made for Thomas Howard, Earl 
of Effingham. The boundaries are Stump Brook, Hough Lane, including 
North Common, Lower Cadbury Heath in front of Mr. Bragg's House 
(the Grange), and outside Dr. Woodward's (Grimsbury). The boundary 
then passes along Hanham Road (since called Wraxall Lane), passing the 
mouth of Cockroad to Upper Cadbury Heath, the whole of which is 
included; then Barrs Court estate is the boundary passing along the Park 
Wall to the Bristol Road, including part of Langdon's Green. Dod's 
Lane is the boundary to Oldland Chapel, including lands known by 
the name of Staffords ; Nuns Lane to Leapyate, and then along the old 
southern boundary of Oldland Common to the old eastern boundary of 
North Common, including both the Commons, Cann Wood, and Highfield : 
but not including the land between the two Commons, measuring about 
forty acres. 



116 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

Upton Chaun or Upton Cheyney. 

This is another lordship or subinfeudation to be noticed. In Domesday it 
is one of the hides belonging to the King and it is called Optune, p. 162 b, 
and is accounted for to Earl Alwin, the same who is mentioned under 
Aldelande. 

3rd Edward II. In a Fine, John de Button bought land in Upton of 
Henry le Chaun, by service of a rose at Christmas during Henry's life. 

7th Edward II. Charter of free waiTen was granted to John de Bitton 
in Upton, Button, and Hanham. 

In a Fine, 18th Edward II it is recited that Upton Chaun, with land 
in Button, Hanain, Oldland, West Ilanam, passed to John son of John 
de Button and Hawise his wife ; and it is stated to be held by Henry 
Fitz Johan Chaun for his life. 

31st Henry VI, by a Fine the manor of Est Hannam and Upton, with 
divers lands in Oldland, Upton Chaun, and West Hannam were settled 
in trustees for the use of Sir John Barre for life, and after his death to 
revert to his wife's heirs. In the In(]. p.m. of Sir John Barre it is recited 
that 22nd Edward IV the manor of Est Hannam was held of Margaret 
Blunt, lady of Bitton, and Jane Wykis, lady of Oldland ; the lands in 
Upton Chaun were held of Stafford by a bunch of gillyflower (ganofili). 

Lady Barre died 1483 (2nd Richard III) seised of the manor of Est 
Hanham held of John Blount, Lord of Bitton, and the manor of Upton 
Chaun held of the Earl of Stafford, Robert Baiiset one of her heirs. He 
died October 13th, 1488 ; but in the inquisition on his death taken June 
following, no mention is made of any lands in Bitton, a strong proof that 
a distribution of the estates of Lady Barre had not then taken place. 
His son and heir was Giles Basset, who died Februarv 1543 seised of the 
manor of Upton Chaun and Highfield where he afterwards resided, not 
perhaps at that date, as it appears by an entry in the following par- 
ticulars, that John Burnel was the tenant at that time. His next 
heir was his son Robert, who held the same premises of Lord Stafford 
as of his Honour of Gloucester. The property continued in this family 
till about 1650, much dismembered; but the manorial rights passed 
about that time to Brice Seed, in whose family it continued tiU by the 



HISTORY OF BITTOK 



iir 



marriage of Alice Seed, his daughter, it passed to the Rev. Edward 
Parker, b.a., the Vicar of Bitton. This gentlemaD, in 1701, uader 
a private act, bought the mansion and estate of Arthur Lacy, Esq., 
whose family had acquired the property by purchase in 1566 as part of 
the estate of Hanham Abbots, see p. 92. Edward Parker his son 
succeeded, and by his wife Elizabeth (died 1778), daughter of Joseph 
Rosewell, of Bitton, Esq,, left a son Joseph his next heir. He, by his wife 
Sarah, (died 1745 set. 25), left a son William his next heir, who married 
CoeUa daughter of John Stanford Perrot of Highfield, by whom he left 
Joseph, who married Martha the youngest daughter of George Bush, of 
Cliff House, Bristol, Merchant. On his death (Dec. 1860, aged 90) he 
was succeeded by the present possessor Joseph Parker, Esq., who has a 
family by Louisa Jane, daughter of B. Milwai-d, of Keynsham, Esq. 

The following are the particulars of the Manor of Upton Cheynew,, 
as laid down in an Inquisition taken on the first of September 35tli 
Henry VIII (1543) after the death of Giles Basset, Esq. 



Premises. 
Mediettis Firme 
Ditto ditto 

Two Messuages 

Courte Orclmrd 
One Messuage 



Occupisrs. 
John Sawden 
William Burnell 
John Sawden 
F. W. Burnell 
Will. Burnell 
Thomas Clarke 



Three Messuages (one) Thomas Shepard 
Upton Cheynew — 

One Com mill (one) John Danyell 
One of the Three 



Messuages 
Upton Cheynew- 
One Pasture 
Highfeld 
Redcroft 
Brodmede 



John Burnell 



.-John Burnell 



Premises. Occupiers. 

One Messuage - Will, Hardjmg 

One Fastuie 30 a. - John Rudgebale 
Land 16 a. - John Snalham 

One Messuage - Rowland Tynborough 
One Messuage - John Smyth 

Pasture - Robert Cokeston 

Vasture, Fifteen Acres Thos. Tybott 
A Close (Caules) - John Bryan 
Pocke (Laid) - Wm. Maynard 

Ardble 1 a. - John Willis 

Upton Cheynew — 

Highfield (Pasture) . 

Canwood (a Grove) i Giles Bassett 

Moremede (Mead) ; 



Note. The said Manor of Upton Cheynew and Premises in Upton Cheynew and 

Bytton are held of the King as or the Honor of Gloster, by service of one-thind of 

a Knight's Fee. 
K 



118 HISTORY OF lUTTOX. 

It appears by the above particulars, that Hiijhtield and other pieces 
were then let to John Burnell, therefore it may be concluded that the 
mansion house was built afterwaixls. Some of the Bassets lived there ; 
but in 1619, Sir Thomas Escourt, by fine, &c., conveyed the estate to 
John Barker of Bristol, merchant, who in 1G27, sold the mansion, &c., 
to Sir Vincent Gookin, Knt. He lived at Highfield till his death, and 
lK)th he and Lady Judith were buried ni Bitton Churchyard, the one 
in 1637 the other in 1642. In 1646 Vincent Gookin, his son, sold the 
same lands to Samuel Bave, M.D., who resided there till 1706, when 
it became the property of Benjamin Perrot of Bristol, glass-maker ; he 
died November, 1754, and was succeeded by his son John Stanford 
Perrot, who resided at Highfield. His issue were Benjamin, Jason, 
John, and Robert, and three daughters, one of which (Coelia) became 
the wife of William Parker of Upton, Esq., in 1768. Highfield was 
deeply mortgaged, when by a private act (12th Geo. Ill 1773-4), for vesting 
the property in trustees, and for sale, Archibald Drummond, Esq., M.D., 
became the purchaser, and in his heir it was vested, till lately devised to 
J. A. Werg, Esq. In the a<jt the house is said to be too large for the 
estate. Standing on high ground the view from it is very extensive. The 
mansion was pulled down by Dr. Drummond, and ever since it has been 
a farm house. 

The pedigree of Perrot as given by Kimber in his Baronetage, vol iii, 
p. 43, is headed by thirty-two British kings, and continued to Sir 
Richard Perrot, Bart., living in 1771. Perrots of Highfield are supposed 
to be an offshoot. 

Vincent Gookin, Esq., the son of the knight, was Surveyor-General 
of Ireland. See a further account of the family in Notes and Queries^ 
vol. i, pp. 385 and 492. 

By will, dated 1682, Brice Seed gave to Brice Seed, son of his son Tobias, 
*'all his rights to the manor of Upton Cheynew — also Upton Cheynew;" 
to his son John, he gave his tenement called Tuckers, now a substantially 
built farm-house, lately occupied by Mr. Roger Mayne ; it is the site of 
the manor house of Upton Cheynew. 

In a field on the north side is an ancient dove cot or columbarium, the 
usual appendage of a manor. But the principal residence was that now 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 119 

occupied by Mr. Parker, called Upton House ; this is where the Lacy family 
resided. It was acquired with the purchase of Hannani Abbots by John 
Reade in 1565, but he had previously dismembered the manor by the 
sale of lands in Bitton to William Underbill, then a copy holder, for 2000 
years, now called Underhills. 

Lacy lived at Upton till 1701, at which time Art,hur Lacy, as before 
stated, obtained a private Act, 12 Will. Ill, for the sale of his manor and 
estates to discharge mortgages, and lay out the surplus for the benefit of 
three coheiresses, Ann, Elizabeth, and Uoiothy, his sisters (see Lacy 
Pedigree). Rev. E. Parker, the vicar of Bitton, became the purchaser. 



TAHLK SHEWING IN BRIEF THE FAMILY OF BASSET, OF YEWLEY; 

AND OF HIGHFIELD, BITTON. 

Arms: — Krmine on a chief gu, three muUetd or, 

Sir Anseliu Baaaet, Kiit.=7=Margaret Lemaheu. 

' ' . 

Pyuchard aiicut Basket. =j= Isabella Basset, heir on the death of her bi-others, 8.p. 

Elizabeth 1st \vife.=Sir Symon BoBset, Knt., SherifiFof Qlou-=y=Maude de Button, 2nd wife, widow of WilUam 
cester, 1387 to 1346 ob. 13H5. | Delamore. 

I ;; ' 1 

Maurice ob. vita patris, s.^). Edmond. ^Margery. 



John Ba.s»iet.=T=. 



Robert Biusset of Vewly, first poBseiwor of HighfieM, Upton, and=f=Margai'et Harewell. 
Beach on death of Lady Ban-e, ob. Oct. 13, 1488, Inq. p.m., { 
buried at Yewley. j 



Giles Ba8set, of Upton and Highfield,=j= Joanna, dau. of I 'avid Davis, 
ob. Feb. IS), 1543, Inq. p.m I 



Isabella dau. of Maudlyu.=Robert Basket of Uley, ob. 1572, held Upton Manor=jf=Ann, 'ind wife, dau. of ... Spicer. 
of the Honour of Gloucester. | 

1 : ' 

William Basset, of Uley and Highfield,-T=.roan dau of John Ashe of Tickenham, jun. 
ob. 1594. ' I 

Edward Ba-sset of^Mary dau. of Richard Calthorpe. Cicely Bas»et.^=Sir Bamaby Samboume, 

Yewley, l'iO'2. : Knt.,- of Timsbury. 

I ' 1 

William Bfwset, of Clavei-ton, which he bought of Sir Thos.=f=Dau. of Davy. 
Ertcourt, 1609, built there a man.sion, ob. 1(513. | 

I ^ 

Miiry d;ui. of Moses Ti-yon.=pWilliam Ba-iset of Claverton, ob. l<>o6 -=in.l. Elizabeth, dau. of Sir Jos. Killigrew. 



Elizabeth dau. of John Frauncie.^=Sir Wm Ba.sset <if Claverton, Knighte<l July 7, 1660, ob.=7=2nd wife, Rachael. 

1693, willed Claverton to be sold to jwiy debts. I 

I — 1 ' 

William B*«.set ob. before his father. ==Theoi)hila Cami>bell. James Basset, ob. 1701, s.j*. 

N<iTK — *^(e Collectanea Toi)ogr. and Geneal., v*fl. i, p. 245, also Gloucester Visitation, 1623. 
R- 



120 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



Arms, by Burke: — Qules, two bare wavy ermine, Oxon. and Somerset. 



WQliam Lacy of oo. Northumberland=T=Jane, da. and heir of 
. Lacy=T= Alice, da. of ... Pipard. 



William ] 



William Lacy, John Lacye, Gen. of Hanham. In=f=Margery, 



2nd son. 



8th Eliz. 1565 a merchant in Brits- 
tol. Hot. the manor of Hanham 
Abbots of John Reade, except what 
Read had previously sold to Wm. 
Underhill and Wm. Bettenfield. 
Died at Hanham 10 Aug. 1577. 
Held Hanham in fee, Upton and 
CulUhaU. 



Wi] 



ill^aT" 



of 



survived 

her 

husband. 



London, Esq. ,=f Eleanor, da. 
~ and heir of 



John Lacye 

clothworker. Held lands at Put* 
ney and at Shipton, co. Oxon. 
&c., and the manor of Brisling- 
ton. Inquisition p.m. dated 1607 
Held Hanham as free tenant. 



Barnard 
Langton. 



Lacye, son, aged 16 at liie=f= Alice, da Sir Rowland Lacye of Ship-=FConstance, da. 



father's death, of Hartrow. Died at 
Hartrow, pish, of Stogumber,2H May 
1607. Held the manor of Hartrow 
and several othera. In 1599 he mort- 
gaged Hanham to Sir Rowland Lacye. 



ofMartha ton under Whichwood, Oxon, 
in Pat son and heir, aged 40 at hia 

27thEliz. father's death. Sheriff of Ox. 
11)23. Held Brislington. 



of Sir Thos. 
Lucas of 
Colchester. 



William Lacye, son and heir,=i= 
aged 40 at his father's death, 
-of Hartrow. Died 1641. 



il^ 



Sir John Lacy, son and heir, of Shipton, Sheriff=j=Mary, da. and heir of Edmund 



of Oxon 1631. Held Brislington. In 1633 he sold 
Hanham to Thos. Colston, Esq., 9th Car. I. 



Wythefoll of co. Suffolk, Knt. 



Sir William Lacy, Knt. of the=T=Sarah (Blunt, 
Royal Oak, of Hartrow, Sheriff of 
Som. 1692. 1669, he leased to his 
son Qeorge the Upton estates for 
60 years. 



Rowland Lacy's, only=r=" Arabella 



In 1653 Brisling- 
ton passed to Langston. 
In 1634 he was 15 yrs. 
old. 



tomb 
in Shipton 
Chancel. 



John, 
ob. 



-George Lacy,= 
<lied B.p. 



=Mary ,=George Doble, 
da. of 2nd husband. 



William Lacy, 
died s.p. 

Nicholas, died 
s.p. 



Arthur Lacy, Esq. In 1700-1, 
12th W*m. Ill, he obtained an 
act for the sale of his manors 
and estates, to discharge a mort- 
gage and lay out the surplus 
for the benefit of three co- 
heiresses. 8th of May, 1701, the 
Upton estates were assigned to 
Rev. Edwd Parker, who was 
the purchaser for £760. 



P—p-, 

Ann Lacy. 

Elizabeth Lacy. 

Dorothy Lacy. 



Arabella, 
only da. 
buried at 
Shipton 
1691, 



three coheiresses 7 years. 



Besides the Upton property and Cully Hall, the Seeds held a goodly tene- 
ment and land lying between Upton and Beach, called Bartons, part of the 
manor of Upton ceded to Mr. Parker. 

Nearly all the copyhold lands of the parsonage manor lie in Upton. 
There are other houses in the village, once occupied by gentlefolk, but now 
they are farm houses. 

Early in the seventeenth century Whittington of Ivythorne, co. Somerset, 
Tvas one. I have not been able to make out where it was : many of the 
family lie buried in the Chancel, being lessees of the prebendal tithes for a 
few years. They bore Az. three fishes hauriant. The family is distinct from 



4 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 121 

Sir Rich. Whittington's, the Lord Mayor's family, who resided at Hamswell, 
in the adjoining parish of Cold Ashton; their arms being Gu., a fess cheeky 
or and az. But some members of this family resided at Fifteen AcreSy 
a tenement bought of Seed, a part of the Upton Manor. Dr. Drummond 
bought it of Mr. Whittington, and it is now vested in his representatives. 

Swinfordy within memory called Swineshead, and giving name to the 
hundred, is a village ai^oining Upton on the Avon : enjoying a stream 
from Lansdown, water mills of some sort or other have always existed. 
Of old a molendinum is met with. Besides this, Logwood mills estab- 
lished here early in the last century, by Messrs. TyndaJl of Bristol, and 
mills for rolling copper by the Bristol Copper Co., and now lead mills. 

At Be*ach, or la Beche, the chief residence in 1586 was described as a capital 
mansion, held as copyhold under the prebendal manor ; it was then, and long 
after, occupied by the family of Atwood, and by marriage and renewed leases 
it passed to Weare of Bristol. The family lived at Beach. Many of them 
are buried in Bitton Church ; and the descendants are the present possessors 
(see p. 46). 

An extensive wood annexed on the west side is called Tibbot's Grove, 
from an earlier copyholder. All the customary tenants of the prebendal 
manor had a right to take wood for wattle and spike (see Proceedings in Star 
Chamber, 1590, A. 32, No. 27) from a certain part of this wood. It extends 
to the top of Lansdown, on the outskirts of which, within and without the 
boundaries of the parish, the celebrated battle of Lansdown was fought on the 
5th of July, 1648, between the king's forces and those of the parliament, the 
latter under the command of Sir William Waller ; the result was a doubtful 
victory on either side. 

Sir Beville Granville, marching from Marshfield over Toghill, charging from 
Frizen or Furzen hill (see Map, Plate i), crossing the intervening valley up 
the Lansdown steep; having gained the summit, took possession of the 
enemy's battery. On the plain there was a bloody hand to hand fight. At the 
third charge Sir Beville was moi-tally wounded by a blow from a pole-axe. 
The enemy returned to Bath for the night, leaving the king's troops in pos- 
^session of the hill. 

On the spot where Sir Beville fell, a few yards outside the boundary of la 
Beche, stands a monument recording the event. In the wood adjoining. 



122 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

bullets and cannon balls are often found. For particulars, see Clarendon, Rush- 
worth, and other historians of the day. 

So long was the fight that this quotation from Herodotus (vii, 167) is most 
applicable : — 

ifjLa\ovT6 is, tiovq dpyi^uvoi ^i\pi SecXiyc oi//»nc- 
«irl ToaovTO yap Xiytrai cAfcvaac rriv awrratriv. 



The Manor of Gee or Joy Moor. 

This manor, as will be seen by the Map (Plate iii), is not of large 
extent. It was part of Weston Court estate, and in the map of Kings - 
wood, 1610 (Plate vii), is called Weston's Woods. 

It lies in the heart of Kingswood Chase, and is bounded on the south 
by CooKROAD, a place notorious for thieves and lawless characters Even 
within the last century, the state of the district may be imiigined by a 
circular issued in 1812, which will be found in a following chapter about 
Kingswood. 

A few years ago Gee Moor became the property of Samuel Batchellor, 
Esq., of Bath, whose son, the Rev. Ed. Batchellor, sold it in divers lots 
in June, 1862, and now the manor is dismembered. 

With so many entangled and conflicthig subinfeudations (qu. before the 
statute " Quia emptores'') it can be no matter of surprise that there have 
been endless lawsuits respecting the exact rights and boundaries of each : 
and respecting the rights of common spread over many acres of open 
fields and meadows, including the right of pasture and cutting of wood 
in the royal chase of Kingswood, which abutted on the Hannam manors, 
and the digging of coal. With the exception of West Hanham and Mr. 
Howard's view of frankpledge in Oldland, the others are nearly lost sight 
of, and the entire parish has long been divided for civil purposes into 
three hamlets, with separate officers, viz., Bitton, Oldland, and Hanham. 
Ever since the Act 43 Eliz., c. 2, each hamlet has maintained its own 
poor, although appeals had been made, early in the seventeenth century, 
by the inhabitants of Oldland and Hanham, to the Sessions at Gloucester 
to throw the whole parish into one. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



123 



What are now called hamlets used to be called tythings (see p. 86 ante). 
Besides these civil divisions, there are various Liberties as to mining, 
and modem districts for ecclesiastical purposes. For the administration 
of the poor, the whole parish is in the Keynsham Union, where it is 
represented by seven guardians. 



ANCIENT NAMES OF THE MANOES. 



Betthone in grant of ma- 
nor by Duke Henry 
to Bobt. Fitzharding. 

3eton. 

Betone, 1086. 

Betune, 1086. 

Bettione, 7 John. 

Betton, 7 Hen. III. 

Bittone, 11 Hen. III. 

Button, 15 Hen. III. 

Buthon, 46 Hen. III. 

Byttone, 1230. 

Buttone. 1342. 

Bitten, 10 Ric. II. 

Butbam, 10 Eic. II. 

Bytton, 1540. 

Bycton, 15B1. 

Bytten, 1572. 

Bitton. 

Bucton. 

Buthon. 

Buton, 1625. 



Aldelunde, 1086. 
Holdlonde, 2 Ed. ni. 
Oldelonde, 1327. 
Holdelond, 2 Eich. II. 
Oldelond, 9 Hen. IV. 
Wholdland, 1564. 
Oldland, 20 EHz. 
Eland, 39 Eliz. 
Wooland, 42 Eliz. 
Wolland, in maps 1611. 
Eldland, 1 Gar. I. 
Ouldland, 1661. 



Swynford, 1482. 

Swineherd. 

Swincheard. 



Hanun, 1086. 
Hanum, 15and20Ed.I. 
West Hanam, 1324. 
Hanam, 1327. 
Esthanam, 1348. 
Haneham, 22 Hen. VI. 
Hangham, 4 Ed. VI. 
Hanham. 
Hannam. 
Hannan Abbots. 
Henham Abbots, 1565. 
Hannam Pryor, 1572. 
Henham, 1587. 
Hannam Abbots, 43Eliz. 
West Hannam. 



Optune, 1086. 
Uptone Chaun, 1324. 
Upton Obey eny, 12 Eliz. 
Upton Cheney, 1573. 
Upton Chaune. 
Upton Chenew. 
Upton Cheyney, 3 C. I. 
Upton Cheynew. 



La Beche, 10 Eic. 11. 
Beach, 1655. 
Beache, 6 Anne. 
Beech. 



Dounehanam, 1422. 
Donnhannani, 1561. 



124 



HISTORY 0¥ BITTOX. 



TABLE SHEWING THE SUBINFEUDATIONS OF BITTON MANOR. 



HoNOUB OF Oloucestkr, an ancient 
Barony before the Conquest, held by 
William the Conqueror. 

Temp. Domesday. 
The King held . . . Bitton. 

Osbert Epus. Exeter held...01dlande. 
Emulf de Hesding held . . . Hannum. 
Earl of Olocester held . . . Upton. 
Adam D'Amneville held grant of the 
manor from Henry II. 
Of Button. 



Bmiomy or Bbrklkt, 16th Ed. I. 

I 
Honour or Botton, bo named in Testa de Nerille 
1272. 

Nicholas Oxenhay and Wm. de Putot of Puco*. held 
one fee, which was Robt. D'Amneville's. 

Totum Manerium, et Hundredum de Button, con- 
firmed 11 Hen. III. to Rob. D'Ammenerille, heir 
of Adam. Service one knight's fee. 



Prebenda! Manor, one 
hide belonged to the 
Church at Domesday. 



La Beche and other 
copyholders. 



Oldelohdb, one-half knight's fee Richd. De la 

More, held 45th Hen. III.. 

17th Ric. II,. it passed from the last heiress of 

De la More to Sir J. Deverose. 

10th Hen. Y, it passed to different parties by 

Chesebroke; it afterwards was possessed by 

Wykes and Weston ; the last in 1652 sold it to 

Ric. Jonib, Gent., who in 1655 built Hanham 

Hall, and called it the manor house. 

I I 



BiTTOif, one-half knight's fee held by D. Le Bland. 
16th Hen. Ill, Wm. de Putot had a market. 
David le Blund, ob. 17th Ed. II, seized of half of 
the manor of Button, which was held by that 
family till an heiress by marriage carried it to 
Uussey, who 7th Hen. VIII. sold it to Sir Mau- 
rice Berkley. Held by Berkley tUl 1633, and 
then dismembered (see p. 84 ante). 
J. Blount had Furcas et Tumbrellum. 



Upton, Oldelond Upton Manor of West Hanham, 8rd 

AND Beche, one- Chauni Edw. Ill, washeldbyWm. De 

Uiird of a knight's Manor, la Mure, and 10s. per an. Some 

fee, and view of held by Sir was held by Cecily de Berkley 

frank pledge atOld- John Barre in pura etperpetua eleemosyna 

land twice a year, and his of her manor of Oldland, and 

Held by all the Lady, 22nd of John de Button, who held of 

Earls of Gloster as Edw. lY. & the Honor of Oloster. 

part of the Honour, 2nd Hen. In Barton Hundred: 

after, of them, by VII. Service 3r<l Ed. Ill John de Santer- 

John de Button. a nosegay of marys sold this manor to Wm. 

24th Ed. I. The giUyflowers de la Orene and John De 

heir of Will Mar- to Earl of Baggeworth, who in the next 

mion held one quar- Gloucester, year gave it to the Abbot and 

ierof aknight's fee Convent of Keynesham ; all 

in Upton. was held of John de Button, 

who held it of the Earl of 
GloBter. I 

' See History of each in foregoing pages. 



I I i 

Weston's Manor or Est^ Hanham, Downe- 

Court, 22nd or Hanum, one-sixth of a hanam als. 

Hen. YII. The knight's fee, 1 5th Ed. I, and Hanham- 

name of the is part of the Honor of But- Prior. 22nd 

messuage or ton. The jury thought the Hen. VII. 

property of Manor of Hanum was part of held by 

H. Weston, the Barony of Berkeley. H. Weston 

who held the 2nd Ed. IV. and 2nd Hen. of the Prior 

manor of Old- VII, held by Sir John and of Monkton 

land, and Gee Lady Barre of Maiigaret Farleigh, 

Moor, which Blund, Dom. de Button, paying one- 

he called a This was sold to Lord fourth of a 

Berkeley with Bitton, 7th knight's fee. 
Hen. VIIL 

22nd Hen. VI, it was held 
by Joan Greyndon of John 
Blunt and Thos. Wykes at 
8d. pjr an. I j 

Sir John Newton accjuired these and so became Lord 
Paramount of Bitton, Oldland and Hanham (see p 84 
ante) ; purchased by G. Whittuck, Esq.. early in this- 
century, and since dismembered. 



*' Tempora irutantur, et nos mutamur in illis." 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



CHAPTER III. 



THE COMMON MEADOWS. 



*' Praia recentia rivis 
iEterno vestiti gramine Campi." 



"Sunt privata nulla natura; sed aut vetere occupatione, ut qui 
quondam in vacua venerunt; aut victoria, ut qui bello potiti sunt; 
aut lege, paction e, conditione, sorte, ex quo fit, ut ager Arpinas 
Arpinatium dicatur : Tusculanum Tuscalanonim : Bimilisque est 
privatarum possession um descriptio." — Cic. de Ojf., lib. 1, c. vii. 



HISTORY OF BITTOX 

CHAPTER III. 

The Common Meadows. 

" Pratii rocentia rivis 
^tonio vestiti gramime Cam pi." 
" Meadows trim wnth cowslips pied, 
Shallow brooks and rivers wide." — Milton's Allcfjro, 75. 

The year 1819 wtis an eventful period in the annals of the parish of Bitton. 
A new turnpike road, leading from Bitton over Oldland and North Common 
to the Passages on the Severn was begun ; the foundation stone of a new 
Church, called Holy Trinity, was laid on Kings wood Hill; and a local Act, 
59 Geo. Ill, obtained for inclosing certain commons, fields, and other 
waste places and for stopping up several public highway roads and foot- 
ways was put in operation. 

The common lands were West Field, Red Field, Longwell Green, Cadbury 
Heath, Oldland and North Common ; the particulars of which, with plans, 
are all set forth by the Commissioner in the Act, Mr. Young Sturge, and 
signed by him 3 1st March, 1827, and enrolled by the Clerk of the Peace 
for the county of Gloucester ; a copy of which is deposited in the parish 
chest at Bitton. 

The Act specially excepted the four meadows (see p. 2, ante) which form 
the subject of this chapter; but since that time, namely in June, 1853, 
application wiis made to the Inclosiue Commissioners for England and 
Wales, under the Act 8 and 9 Vict., c. 118, for their inclosure ; which was 
finally settled, and all the ancient rights and privileges connected with them 
were extinguished April 1 8th, 1864 ; therefore, nearly all that follows relates 



128 HISTORY OF lilTTON. 

to the former history of these meadows, which will be the subject of this 
chapter, viz., Hohn-Mead, Micklemead, Sydenham Mead, and Edensfield- 
Mead, measuring, as before stated (p. 2), 216 acres. The Plates iv, v, vi, vii, 
represent the pieces owned by various persons in severalty (their names will 
be found at the end), in the year 1844, when these plans were made. 

Holm-Mead, pronounced Hoiome, is probably derived from the Saxon 
Holme, a river island, the river Avon, the Boyd, and the Grip or Dyke, 
(on the north side), make it an island. In Promptorium Parvulorum it is 
defined, " a place be-sydone a water," with a long note.^ 

Micklemead, from the Saxon Micely means the great meadow. In the 
Inquisition on the death of Edward le Blunt, 31 Edward HI. In Court 
Boll of Bichard II, 1380, Micklemead is rated. 

Sydenham may be derived from its approximation to the Hams or low 
meadows adjoining.*^ It was partly bounded on the west by West Field, 
which lay fallow one year and was sown with corn another, and so on alter- 
nately. 

Edensfield is called EdenshuUe in the Extent of the Demean of Barre s 
Court, A.D. 1431 in Additional MSS. No. 7621. The Map (Plate vi), 
shows it is bounded by the Avon on one side and by Cleeve's Wood on 
the other. I have not found any clue to the meaning of the word. 

In the Inquisition taken in 1362 (36 Edward III),* on the death of 
Edmund le Blunt, the lord of Bitton, among other lands he held Holmede 
and Overmede, meaning the upper mead; he also held a portion of wood 
in Kingswood Chase ; and so in a fragment of a Court Boll, which will 
be found at the end, held in the reign of Elizabeth, persons were fined 
for pulling up certain weeds growing in either of these meadows, as well 
as for beating down acorns in the Chase of Kingswood. 

In the Nona Boll, 1342, mention is made of the hay of the Demean 
Meadows in this parish, which is supposed to be these. There is a record 
in the Exchequer in 1370^ the end of the reign of Edward III, proving 
that the Abbot of Keynsham recovered these meadows by king's writ to 
the Sheriff of Gloucester ; this could only apply to some portion, which 

^ See Notes and Qupries, Feb. 1st, 1877, p. 93. 
* See NotcH and Querle^^ 5, xi, p. 93. 
^ Note, p. 1, No. 35. 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 129 

might have belonged to the manor of West Hanham. Be that as it may, 
certain it is that at the dissolution as a whole, they formed no pirt of the 
abbot's possessionii. In Holm-Mead he had seven acres, and in Edensfield 
two acres, and small pieces intermixed. 

All the meadows are of a deep alluvial soil, lying mostly on a substratum 
of gravel, in which many fossils have been foimd — ^teeth of elephants and 
bones of other animals — they were much admired in their unenclosed state 
as a little prairie ; they were all part of the demean of the manor lords — 
common one part of the year for pasture, and private property as to the 
hay. Similar lands were to be found in many parts of the kingdom, 
especially in the neighbourhood of rivers, or lands liable to be flooded ; 
they are generally called Lammas lands, from being thrown open at that time 
of the year ; and Dole Meads, from having been at some time or other doled 
out by the lord of the manor in allotments for private math, the private 
holdings being marked by dowle stones or meers, the divisions for marking 
the lands/ 

How many persons there were originally in the enjoyment of this right 
of common of pasture does not appear, many having lost the right from 
not having been able to prove the exercise of it for twenty years, as required 
by the general Inclosure Act ; but at the time of the Bitton Inclosure 
Act, 1819, 168 persons established their right. As a record of history, their 
names will be found at the end. Those who had this right of depasturage 
were the occupiers of ancient houses and sites which formerly had four 
acres of land attached to them. The right was for cattle of all sorts, 
excepting pigs, provided the said cattle were the sole property of the 
claimants, and had been in their possession and in the parish forty days 
immediately preceding the time when they were turned into the meads, 
and a fire had been kindled in the chimney of the tenement to which the 
right was appended, implying occupancy, hence called Auster right,'^ the 
word meaning the hearth of the chimney. All these commodable beasts 
might enjoy themselves in the said meadows, and feed to their full, from 
Lammas-tide till old Candlemas Day, the 14th February, provided they 
bore on their backs the initials of the christian and surname of their owner, 
marked with pitch. After the above dates, the meadows were shut; the 
* See Cowell and Blount * See Spdman. 



130 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

gates being locked, and kept in repair by the owner of certain estates 
adjoining ; viz. — the impropriator of the rectorial tithes — Fieldgrove, Barre s 
Court, and Londonderr}-. They were then laid up for mowing, which the 
particular tenants might do when they pleased ; but no peraon might carry 
away his crop over another man s land before the 24th of June. 

There was a curious custom connected with the use of these meadows 
for common of pasture called shooting the meads. It took place at noon, on 
the first Saturday next after the 21st of August. Before the new style, it 
was the first Sunday after the 10th August, S. Lammas-day. It used to 
be done by the manor lords leiiding a white bull, a black stallion, and a black 
boar, through the several meadows ; or, instead of the bull, a horse with a 
white sheet over him. This custom was abandoned many yeara before the 
inclosure. 

In olden times, an unseemly revelling took place at the gate leading into 
Holm-Mead, which in later years was removed to the east end of Mickle- 
mead, at Swinford. It used to be quite a festive, and anything but a 
solemn, day in the parish. People used to crowd from the neighbourhood 
to witness the sight ; tents were erected, and music and drinking on the 
whole day ; but owing to the riotous and drunken proceedings which 
took place it was all stopped by the magistrates about 1814. The Sunday 
following was called the Meadow Sunday, when many persons were naturally 
attracted, from traditional associations, to enjoy each other's company, 
and to look at each others beasts. The first milking used to take place, 
very early on Sunday morning, even at midnight ; and whoever was the 
first to milk was considered by the farmers to be the king or the queen 
of the meadows 2^^o tempore. 

An Act was obtained 10th of Queen Anne, cap. 8 (1711), for making the 
river Avon navigable for barges from Bath to Hanham, and a towing path 
to be made by the side of these meadows. At the south end of Sydenham 
locks were built. But we are told by Barrett, in his Ilistoiy of Bristoly 
that thirteen years elapsed before anything was done. At last it was 
completed by subscription; and on 27th December, 1727, the first barge 
was brought to Bath from Bristol, laden with deals, lead and meal. An 
annual payment is made by the Canal Company to the owners of the 
meadow lands for the towing path. 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. )31 

Sydenham Meadow. It was in this meadow that the unfortunate and 
imprudent Duke of Monmouth and Lord Grey, with a rebel army of 1,000 
horse and 10,000 foot, with field-pieces, &c., encamped, on the 25th June, 
1685. On the same day they had a skirmish there with a party of the 
King's Dragoons, commanded by Col. Oglethorpe, and got the worst of it — 
a foretaste of their total defeat at Sedgemoor, about ten days afterwards. 

The following papers will give some particulars of interest, which will 
show how Mr. Francis Creswick, of Hanham Court, got entangled in this 
rebellion, which was the beginning of a series of troubles and ended in 
the ultimate ruin of the family, not perhaps immediately, but in a few 
generations. 

F. CKESWICKE'S CASE. 

Francis Creswicke of Hannam's Court in the parish of Bitton in y*" County of Glouc, 
Esq% being informed that ilonmouth and the Rebel Is were come on the 25*** June last 
into y* s* Parish where hee then lived (viz) in a Meed there culled Sidnam INIeed 
adjoyninge to Keynsham, beinge within a mile of the said abode, immediately after dinner 
went towards the s.*^ Meed havinge there a Mow of Hay worth £'30 which he feared y* 
Eebells would seize, it which afterwards they did take without givinge any compensation ; 
but as soon as hee came into y' s* Meed there rodd forth of y'' Eebell campe a trooper 
directly to him who was y" about 2 bow shots of y*" s^ Campe, & unlightin^e off his 
horse he came up & saluted liim whom he y** discovered to be Tylye of BristoU y* outlaw. 
The s* Tylye then asked him what Newes, I answered him thut I knew none. Then 
Tylye told that hee was come once more to England, I asked him what number was 
with him, Tylye said that they mustered 10,000 on Mendip. I asked him w* they did 
doe here. Whereupon Tylye tooke out of his Coat pockett a paper or two & opened 
one being a sheet close wrott on one side & oflFered it mee, w^** when I had scene the 
Title vv<* was Keasons for y^- takinge up Armes or to y* purpose, I returned it him, 
& which he pressed mee to keep, but I refused it tellinge him in the presence of many 
of my neighbours that I would have none of his papers, & soe tooke leave of him, & 
returned imediately backe y* I might y*" better shun him & there discoursed severall of 
my neighbours awhile, one whereof asked mee whether y* man 1 discoursed was not 
Monmouth, whom I then told y* 'twas Tylye of Bristol!, who y° replyed y* hee formerly 
knew Tylye. I asked one of y* Countrymen whether hee had any Hay in y^ Meed, it 
beinge a common Meed, & some Hay then in Cocke, who y" told mee hee had not, I told 
him y* I doubted if I should lease my Mow of Hay there being close by it. I also 
advized him to retuvne home, & secure his Horses and Cattle, sayinge y* if the Rebells 



132 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

should come forward, wee should bee all undone, who (as I advized) with a neighbour 
went homewards. I then went nearer y* Campe, seeinge y* Countrye flockinge there 
without any disturbance, & at a considerable distance I observed Monmouth a Horse 
backe, but not Grey, but did not goe neare him. A Country neighbour standinge by 
mee, asked mee if I knew Monmouth or Grey, I told him Monmouth was yonder 
pointinge towards him. He asked if I knew Grey, I told him noe, who y" replyed y* 
hee would shew him mee, I asked him how hee knew him, who said y* just now one 
had shewne him, & by & by hee directed my sight towards one hee called Grey but 
beinge amonge many other horsemen I could not distinguish him, & after y^ I saw not 
Grey, nor ever did speake to INIonmouth or Grey in my whole life. And y' I passed by 
the Rebell Army to S' Tho. Bridges's Summer House in Keynsham, where I mett S*" Tho. 
Bridges's daughter & waitinge raaide, & stayinge there a little while in comp* only of 
those 2 lookinge on y' Rebells passing to & fro, wee all three went thence to S' Thomas 
Bridges's dwellinge House, & att y* Doore wee mett S** T. Bridges Lady & maide, wee 
all stood awhile att y* Doore, where came one of y* Rebells to shelter himself from y* 
Raine, y* waitinge maide there discoursinge y^ Rebell, stiled Monmouth in her discourse, 
his Maj"' wch I immediately cheeked her but softly y* y* Rebell might not heree, sayinge 
to her y* shee had a mind to be hanged. And y' I was desired to walk in S' Tlio. 
Bridges's House, y* daughter soon after cominge & telling mee y* her flfather was glad 
y* I was come, for y* hee was about leaving his House, & soe brought me to S' Tho. 
Bridges, who told mee y* hee would not stay in his house, for y* y* Quarter Master 
Bouvet, his Cozen Speeke & fferguson had been with him just before, & had taken 
Lodgings there for Monmouth & others & bespoke a supper. S*" Tho. Bridges y* 
alleadginge y* if hee should stay there, y' King's party as soon as y* Rebells were gone 
would plunder & burne his house. Thereupon I offered him my House to lye there y' 
night, who readily accepted it, & immediately wee both walked thence towards Hannams- 
Court, but in y* middle way wee mett w"* an old man of Keynsham whom as I remember 
called himself Webb, S' Thomas Bridges asked him if hee would goe into Sidman & see 
w* y* Rebells did there & learn w* hee could, & bringe it him, & hee would stay till 
hee returned at his Lodge w^** was close by & in his way to Hannam. Y* s** S' Tho. 
Bridges y" alleadging that he must leame somew* to send y" Duke of Beaufort who was 
y» at Bristoll, I y* replyed that I thought y* that old fellow would bee but little serviceable 
to him in gettinge any Intelligence, & therefore if hee pleased to walk alone to his 
Lodge, I would goe myself & learne w* I could, & bringe it him, who desired mee soe to 
doe, & alsoe call on his Lady to see if shee would have anything w*^ him. Accordingly 
I returned to Keynsham & thence to Siddenham observinge & inquiringe w* I could of 
& amonge y° Rebells for about 2 houres, makinge it my chiefe businesse to know W* 
fSTce y** Rebells had, & where they intended y' march, & after y' long inquiry & not 
being able to learne to what place they designed to goe, some sayinge Bristoll, some 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 133 

Gloucester, some Batb, and fcome Warminster. At last I mett w*** Tylye againe 
whom I asked where they intended goeing, who y" told me y' they never knew where they 
should goe till w^Mn a quarter of an houre before they marched, beinge satisfyed 
w**^ y* answer, 1 forthwith went to S' Thos. Bridges' House to see his Lady and w* 
shee had to say, and findinge she had nothinge of news to send, I presently went 
Homeward, & just w**^out ye Towne y" Centinell stayd mee & callinge 2 troopers 
they seized mee & my boy sayinge y* they believed I was a spy for y* I went hastily, 
& out of all road, I told y™ y* it was my nearest way home. They said y' they were 
not satisfyed with y* answer but tol'd mee I must goe w^ them before my Lord, & 
soe they brought mee thro y** Towne to Sidnam Meed & as I was just entred ye 
Meed I mett Tylye againe to whom I called & desired to bee released & who accor- 
dingly did release mee. Soe againe I returned homeward & Tyly by & by overtakinge 
mee offered mee a paper againe, w''^ I refused, not knowinge w* it was, but believinge 
it y** like hee offered mee before, hee y" pressed mee urgently to receive it, soe beinge 
loath to hazard displeasinge him, I tooke it putt it up in my coat pockett, & imme- 
diately went to S' Tho. Bridges who tarryed for mee at his Lodge, but by y* way 
I opened y® Paper, & found it to be a print stiled Monmouth's declaration. Where- 
upon as soon as I came to S' Tho. Bridges, beinge a Justice of y® Peace for y* 
County, I tendred it him, who bidd mee putt it up till I came home, & soe imme- 
diately wee went for Hannam, & y' I tendred him againe y° s* declaration, who tooke 
it of me & opened it, but y" Print being I suppose too small for his sight, he desired 
me to read it, vr^ accordingly I did, & y" offered it him againe, who still refused it, 
sayinge hee had one given him before he came forth y* day. I told him I would y" 
bume it, & soe immediately I went out of y* parlour where we were then into y'* 
Kitchinge, & threw it in y* fire, & y" returned & told S' Tho. Bridges, who y** said 
y* hee would doe y* like w* hee came home & y" S' Tho* Bridges began a discourse 
on y* declaration to w^^ I referred myself in my affid* annexed. Soe y* night S'^ Tho. 
Bridges lay at my house who said in y* morninge he would write y* Duke of Beaufort, 
soe earely about 2 or 3 o clocke in y° morninge I arose & went forth on y'' top of a hill 
by my house, & y" I pceived y® Rebells were marched away out of Sidnam & presently 
I saw one cominge fr5 Keynsham, who gave mee an ace** y* y^ Rebells were just gone 
out of Keynsham towards Bath or Warminster, whereupon I returned & called on S' 
Tho. Bridges in his chamber & desireii him to rise and write y- Duke, who desired 
mee to lett him alone till his man came from Keynsham, whom he had ordered y* 
night before to come to him for y'' letter, I y"* told S' Thomas y* my man should carry 
the letter who replyed y* hee would stay till his owne man came. And about 3 or 4 
houres after his man came whom I againe awakened, & brought him pen, Ink, & 
Paper, who y° rose & wrott a letter to y*^ Duke & sent it away by his servant from 
my house w%ut impartinge y*' contents to mee. And afterwards in y** same morninge 



134 HISTORY OF lUTTOX. 

S' Tho. told mee y* Fferguson did y*" day before intimate to him of y' goinge to 
Warminster, for y* they expected 2000 foot & 500 Horse to joyne them there. And 
about a day after I mett w*^ y*" Lady Bridges whom I told (amongst other discourse) 
y* Thursday last I received a declaration from one of y' Rebells, & had burnt it. 
Shee y" made answer, y^ she had one given her too, but she had hid it in a cimninge 
place. And on Satturday y*^ 27** of June last, I went againe into Sidenham Meed, 
to see if any of my mow of hay (w*^'* y*" Kebells thursday before had taken) might be 
gathered up, where I found S*^ Jn'' Newtons servants rakinge y' hay together. I asked 
y"* what they meant, they told mee S' Jn° Newton had ordered y™ to take to it, it 
beinge traytors goods, meaning Monmouths, sayinge y* I had sold it him for 20 
guenneyes, w^^ provoked mee to tell those servants y* I never did nor never would 
assist traytors, nor never did assent to exclude my lawfull prince, & bid y™ goe & tell 
y' master soe & leave my goods alone. Whereupon S' Jn° Newton very earely y* next 
day beinge Sunday morninge sent forth 3 of his Servants amongst y" poore Cottagers 
in Kingswood Chacc, and elcewhere w^ this inquiry in y' mouths. Did ye heare Mr. 
Creswicke say y'' Duke of Beaufort & all his Officers were papists. And some of ye 
most infamous of ye Cottagers inhabitinge in y*" Chace of Kingswood (whose Colts & 
inclosures are lyable to be pulled downe by vertue of y*" decree lately gotten by mee & 
my partners) were alsoe brought (thro' subornation) to sweare that they did see Mr. 
Creswicke discourse Monmouth & Grey & delivered y™ papers. Upon w^^ I was comitted 
to y* Castle of Glouc for Hygh treason on y" 1'* July last. And on y* V Aug* last y* 
Assizes for y" County beinge held there, I petitioned on y' 3** day of y* Assizes to be 
brought to my tryall, findiuge my prosecutors had delayed it, w** ye Judge there was 
willinge to admitte, but y* 2 prosecutors S' J. Newton & M' Player designinge only to 
deprive mee longer of my liberty, sent forth one of y* Kings evidences, a poore profligate 
servant of y* s** S' J. Newton out of towne, & y" caused another servant of y^ s* 
Newtons to sweare y* one of y* Kings evidences was not ready. Whereupon I could 
not be admitted to a tryall, nor baile. Then after y'' Assizes by menaces y* s* S' Jno 
Newton getteth a new evidence, another cottager in Kingswood Chace, purposely to 
baffle Baron Gregory's' report y*' Judge of y* Assize & S' Ro. Atkyns y* Justice of 
peace y* made my mittimus, allcadginge that they two are strangers to y* new evidence. 



Annexed will be found notes of papers connected with Monmouth's 
Rebellion, as printed in the 5th Eepoi't of the Hist. MSS. Commissioners, 
1876, p. 327. At the end of this chapter they are given in extenso, from the 
originals in my possession. 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 135 

Francis Creswicke stands indicted for talking with the rebels at Keynsham. — 
At two following assizes he petitioned to be tried, but his prosecutors, Sir John 
Newton, &c., pretended not ready. The tSrd assizes Mr. Attorney-General gave him 
a certiorari and at the same assizes it was allowed and he then indicted a tenant 
of Sir John Newton for suborning 2 witnesses against him, which bill the grand 
jury then found. At the hearing before the King and Council the Duke of Beau- 
fort declared to his Majesty that he did believe that Creswicke did not talk with 
the rebels with any ill intent, for that he gave his grace the best intelligence that 
he had in the west of England. To pray a Noll invseqiil to free him from the 
malice of his prosecutors. 

1. Petition to the King, of Francis Creswicke of Hannaras Court in the co. of 
Gloucester now a prisoner in the castle of Gloucester. — In this he charges Sir John 
Newton with malice on account of a suit at law about Kingswood Chace, and prays 
that he may ba heard before the King and Council, and that Sir John Newton 
may be ordered to attend. 

2. Petition by Francis Creswicke to Sir William Gregory, one of the barons of 
the exchequer and judge of the assize for the county of Worcester. — After men- 
tioning the device by which his tryal had been delayed and noticing the malice of 
Sir John Newton and Mr. Player, two of the most violent opposers of his Majesty's 
right of chace in Kingswood, — he asks that the Judge will take bail for his appear- 
ance at the next assizes held for the county. 

3. Another petition (at the back of the last) asks the Judge to allow him to 
remain in Gloucester jail till he can have his habeas corpus to appear at the 
King's Bench. 

4. Petition t:) the King by Dame Elizabeth Davies, relict of Sir Thomas Davies, 
deceased, Lord Mayor of London in 107G and 1G77 — asking that her brother-in-law 
Francis Creswicke may be bailed, and that his wife and relations may have access 
to him. — And another by her asking that Creswicke may ba heard before .the King 
and Council, and that Sir John Newton might be ordered to attend ; or that he 
might be discharged or bailed. 

5. Another petition by Creswicke to the King. Creswicke being then removed 
by habeas corpas to the Kings Bench Bar. — Alludes to the malice of his neighbours 
by reason of his having got a decree in the matter of Kingswood Chace: and that 
they charged him with having had discourse with the rebels at Keynsham. Says 
that his house being half a mile from Keynsham, he went there to get intelligence 
for the Duke of Beaufort, but did not go near Lord Grey. — Asks that the attorney 
may be allowed to consent to his (Creswicke) being bailed, and that he and Lord 
Grey may be confronted. 

6. 1 James II., Aug. 31. Original deposition by James Phipps of Bitton, cole- 



136 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

miner, sworn before J. Lowforde. — Says that on Thursday 25 June last about 2 p.m. 
he was at a mead called Sydenham in the parish of Bitton near Keynsham, looking 
on the rebels there, viz., the late Duke of Monmouth and his army: he saw a trooper 
ride out of the said army towards Francis Creswicke, who was then walking in the 
path in the said mead, and alight, go up to Creswicke, and soon afterwards return. 
He saw William Hawkins, of Bitton, and the said Oraswicke immediately come and 
stand by the wall there for the space of one hour about (>0 yards from the place 
where the Duke of Monmouth was. When the rebels cried Horse and away, Cres- 
wicke and Hawkins were standing with the deponent. Says that Creswicke did not 
deliver any papers or speak to the Duko of Monmouth or Lord Grey. Says that 
there were near a hundred people looking at the rebels, and that Hawkins is a 
person of ill fame. 

7. Draft affidavit by F. Cr. (Creswicke) that Sir Ric. Hart, of Hannam, is the son 
of a decimator, who decimaterl the deponent's father in the late usurpers times, and 
lately married a sister of Sir Wm. Jones, formerly Attorney-General to his late 
Majesty, and that Lady Hart declared, as the deponent is credibly informed, when 
the Duke of Monmouth and rebels were at Keynsham, that if the Duke had come 
a little further into Gloucester she would have given him some hundreds of cheeses, she 
keeping then a dairy on a farm called Filgrove, near that place. That soon after the 
last sessions of Parliament held at Oxford, Sir Richard Hart, a member thereof, declared 
that he was for the Bill of Exclusion, and after that made his brags (*tis reported) 
that he had opposed the delivering in the charter of Bristol to his late Majesty. 

8. Copy of Sir T. Bridgess affidavit. — That on the 25th of June last when the 
rebels were at Keynsham, Creswicke came and (deponent's hoase being taken up 
for Monmouth's quarters) asked him to go and stay at Hannam. As they were 
going they met an old man whom the deponent sent to a place called Syddenham 
mead, to get intelligence that the deponent might send to the Duke of Beaufort. 
Creswicke thought the old man not capable, and offered to go himself, if deponent 
would go to Hannam alone. In about two hours Creswicke returned and gave 
deponent some account of what he had seen and learned there in the camp as he 
pretended. They both then went on to Hannam and lodged there that night. 
Next morning Creswicke came early to deponent and asked him to write to the 
Duke of Beaufort that the rebels were gone from Keynsham towards Bath or 
Warminster, as he, Creswicke, was informed, and the deponent did so, and sent the 
letter the same morning by his own servant from Creswicke's house. 

A few short memoranda of what Thomas Harrison, Thomas Rose, and Anne 
Siswek had deposed (or could depose) about Sir R. Hart's sayings. 

9. (Indorsed.) William Hawkins and John Isles, their testimony as T. Rosse gave 
me.— 28 June 1685. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 137 

"William Hakens made othe be fore the gostes apase (Justice of Peace).^--He 
"says that he saw the squire (Creswieke) in Sydenham give 2 papers to Lord Grey, 
" one about a foot long, and the other about a foot and a half long, and that Lord 
" Grey gave them to a man that was by him with a star on the left breast," &c. 

10. .1685, July 8. Thornbury. Copy (by Creswieke) of letter to the Duke of 
Beaufort. — He says what Bridges says in the deposition above: — "The contents of 
" Sir Thomas's advice I know not : what I observed was that Monmouth's army con- 
"sisted of above 1,000 horse and about 8,000 foot, 8 field pieces with some Drakes^ 
" and 30 ploughs, whereof 4 was teenies of good horses and the rest oxen : his men 
"some well armed, others indifferent, and some not at all, only having an old sword 
"or a sticke in their hand; however, I observed many musketis and other ammu- 
"nition in their carriages. Gray, Ferguson, Wade, Tyler, and Specke were there at 
"Keyasham." — Defends himself against Sir John Newton's accusations. 

11. (Indorsed.) Copy of the Kalendar, my affidavit, D. of Beaufort's Mittimus, 
and Sir W. Atkyns Mittimus. 

John Stone to be hang'd, drawn, and quartered. 

Elizabeth Lumbart to be hang'd, but after reprieved. 

John Asplin to be transported. 

Christopher Tilly remain as before. 

George Martin, burnt in the hand and acquitted. 

William Randle, the like. 

Robert Peere, \ 

Thomas Stephens, >To find bail for appearance the next, and acquitted. 

Hanna Gale, j 

Peter Rivers to find bail for liLs appearance the next sessions of the peace 

for the county, and acquitted. 

Philip Cambridge, to be sent into Somersetshire to be tried for high treason. 

GS^^S,imdera^^^^'}^^^^^^ *^^ ^^°^ treason, to remain in Goale. 
Tho. Skyn, to find bail before one of the justices of this county, to appear 
the next. 

12. Copy of an affidavit by Creswick, regarding Sir Jno. Newton purposely keeping 
away a witness so as to delay Creswick's trial. 

13. 1G85, July 1. Duke of Beaufort to Col. John Jefferyes. — Order to send two 
troopers to assist the constable in taking Francis Creswieke and Geo. Saunders to 
Gloucester Gaol. (Copy.) 

14?. 1685, July 1. Rob. Atkyns to the keeper of ye castle of Gloucester. — Order 
to receive the bodies of Creswieke and Saunders. (Copy.) 

15. 1685, Nov. 30. Affidavit by Thomas Attwood of the Inner Temple, Gent., 
sworn before F. Wythens, that on 28th instant Creswieke attended on Lord Grey 



138 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

and asked him whether he had any conference with, or received any paper from 
Creswicke on the 25th of June, at or near Keynsham, and the Lord Grey declared 
the negative, nor did he ever sej Creswicke before to his knowledge. 

IG. 168G, Jan. 13. Whitehall. Sunderland to the Attorney-General. — Directs him 
to enter a Xoli Prosequi on the record of the indictment agaiast Creswicke. (Copy.) 

17. 1680, Jan. 17. R. Sawyer to Sir Samuel Astey, Kt., His Majesty's coroner 
and attorney in the court of K. B. — Says that an indictment was preferred at the 
assizes at Gloucester on March 3, 2 Janu;s II., against Cnvswicke for holding corre- 
spondence with the late rebels in the west; and that by virtue of the Kings sign 
manual, dated 13 January 108", he authorises Astey to enter a Noll Prosequi. (Copy.) 

The notoriety of this family of Creswicke deserves more than a passing 
mention of the nams. Francis Creswicke, who bouc/ht the manor of Han- 
ham Abbots, 1638-49, was a Bristol merchant, and died in 1G49. His son 
Henry, by his wife Anne NiclioUs, succeeded as heir. He was mayor of 
Bristol in 1G60 ; and in 1663 was knighted, at Bristol, by Charles II. 
He had frequent law-suits with Sir John Newton, about manorial rights 
as to coaling. His son Francis, by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of 
Humphrey Hooke, merchant, succeeded him ; he also had continued law- 
suits w^ith Sir John Newton about the manor. In 1685 he got into 
trouble about Monmouth's Rebellion, as shovrn by the above papers. After 
that, he was imprisoned at Dublin, from 1704 to 1713, for stabbing with 
a skean* on Sunday, May 21st, in the church of S. Andrew, Dublin, 
after service, Robert Rochford, Esq., Her Majesty's Attorney General. 
Francis died in 1732, at the advanced age of eighty-nine, and was buried 
in Bitton Church. He was succeeded by Henry, his eldest son, who went 
to law with Sir Michael Newton, about manorial rights. Dying in 1741, 
his son Henry succeeded, wlio was many years a prisoner in London for 
debt. Henry married Mary Dickenson, of Queen Charlton, leaving two 
sons, Henry and Humphrey. The last bought Hanham Abbots of his elder 
brother, Henry, by whom he was imprisoned fourteen years in London 
for non-payment. 

The annexed table of descent will show the end of this remarkable 
family, verifying the truth of Sir Henry Spelman's words, the "Infelicity 
of Sacrilege," quoted before (p. 114), and a sad instance of the fate of 
those who possess monastic lands. 

1 An Irish short sword. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



139 



TABLE SHEWING THE DESCENT OF CRESWICKE OF HANHAM COURT. 



Roger Creswicke. 



r 



Arms. — Or, a lion rampt. 
gardant purp. armed aad 
laDgued Gu. 



Francis Creswicke of Bri8tol,=j=Ann, dau. of Antony 
mercliant, bought part of Han- I Nicholls of Mort< 
ham 1638 of T. Colston. Ob. | Henmarsh, Glo. 
Sep. 1649, bur. at St. Wer- | 
burgh, Bristol. Will proved " 
15 Oct. 1649. (150, Fairfax) 



John, died 
1698. 



— T 

Joseph. 



Godfrey, Hardwareman, 
1618. 



Samuel. Sir Henry Creswicke, Mayor of Bristol, 1660,=T=Elizabeth, dau. of 



and of Hanham Abbots. Knighted by Chas. 
II. at Bristol 6 Sep. 1663. Ob. 28 Sep. 1668. 
Bur. at St. Werbui^h. Went to law with Sir 
John Newton the elder, and got a verdict 
against him. About 1653 bought the residue 
of Hanham (the manor of Hanham). Will 
proved 8 Feb. 1668. 



HumphiyHooke of 
Bristol, merchant, 
and Cecily his 
wife. 



Francis Creswicke, B.A., Gent. Comr. of Magdalen Coll., Oxon.=7=Mary, daur. of John 



Matriculated 21 May, 1661. Went to law with Sir John 
Newton the younger 1683. Got into trouble about Monmouth's 
rebellion 1685. King James visited him at Hanham Court, 
25 Aug. 1686 (Sever) ; entertained him under a tree there. 
In 1704 he stabbed Kobt. Roclifonl, Esq. Attomey-Genl. for 
Ireland, in St. Andrew's Church, Dublin, and was imprisoned 
for it till 1713. Ob. 18 Jan. 1732, aged 89, buried at Bitton. 
ImprLioned 20 years for debt. 



Ridge, Citizen and Al- 
derman of London, bur. 
at Bitton, set. 58, Jan. 6, 
1720. 



_ r—r-r- 
Elizabeth. 

Sarah. 

Mary. 



Humphry. 
Francis. 



Thorn as=... Boucher. 



Henry Crej»wicke of Hanham Court, Esq.=T=Helen, dau. of John 
Died 20 July, 1744. Buried at Bitton. | Hart of Westbury on 
Went to law witli Sir Michael Newton Trim. Ob. 22 June, 



about manorial rights. Will dated 14 
Sept. 1741, 



Samuel. 



— rn 

Susan. 

Helen. 



1757, ait. 46. Buried 
at Bitton. 



Sarah=Rev. C Elwes, Henry Creswicke of Han-=rMary, dau. of Vickris Dickinson, of Queen's 
Vic. of Bitton. ham, in the King's Bench Charlton, co. Somerset, Esq. Died July, 1799. 
m 1785. Ob. 4 June 1806. Bur. at Bitton. M" June 1775. 



Henry Crcswick,n=Sarah, da. of 
ajt. 19. Md. at I ... Weymouth, 
the Chapel in | ob. 1853, 
Queen's S<iuaie, 
Bath, died 1852. 



Mary. 



=John Bartlet 
Hill, died. 
1833, 8. p. 



Humphry Creswick. Died= 
Jan. 1856. Buried in Bitton 
Churchyard. Imprisoned in 
London 14 years for debt. 



Henry, bapt. 
3 Feb. 1805. 



-Sarah Ann, da. of George 
Burgess of the White Hart 
Inn, KeyHhum Bridge. 



Benjamin HU, 
ob. infans. 



Francis Ethelbald, 
ob. s.p., xt\ 14. 



Matilda, da. of 
... Hill. Ma. at 
St. Giles, Lon. 
ob. July, 1809. 

( 
( 

A daughter. 



In Canada. 



In 1692 Francis Creswicke bon-owed money of James Marmion, of London, Goldsmith, and mortgaged Hanham 
to him. In 1693 Marmion took jKissession, ejecting the wife and family. Afterwards Creswicke took forcible 
iwssessiou ; and from that time there were no end of suits. 

27 September, 1845, Thomas White, of London, Esti., executed release of the equity of redemption ; and 
resided at Hanham from 1846 till his death, 1869 (see p. 92). It wjuj sold to Mr. G. W. Hancock of Bath, 
who resold to Mr. G. Gerrard, the present jKissessor. 



140 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 



PAPERS CONNECTED WITH MONMOUTH'S REBELLION (from the originah). 

No. 1. 

To his Sacred Majestic. 

The Humble Petition of ffrancis Creswicke of Hannams Court in ye County of 

Glour Es(ie. now a Prisontn- in ye Castle of Gloucester. 

Humbly Sheweth yt yr Petitioner havinj^ had severall contests at law wth one Sr 
John Newton & others about yr Majties Chace of Kingswood in ye sd Countj'', & 
for wch hee hath now latt^ly «^ot a decree. Upon the Malitious contrivance of ye 
sd Sr Jno. Newton & those wth whom hee hath had ye sd Contest was committed 
prisoner to Gloucester Goale ye 1st of July last as a lj\son suspected to have had 
discourse wth Monmouth «&: (Jrey ye late Rt^bells in ye West. And in Augt last ye 
Assizes was held at Glour. wn yr Petitioner desired to bee brought to his tryall, 
but ye sd Sr Jno. Newton desi<rninge further Malice procured yn* one of his servants 
to make Oath yt one of yr Majties Evidences ic another Servant of ye sd Sr Jno. 
Newton was not in towne, \: whom hee had jiLst before purposely sent out of 
towne. Wliereupon Baron Gregory ye Judge of yt Assize thought it not proper yn 
to trye yr Petitioner. 

That yr Petitioner it Ins Ancestors liave been always Loyall & Dutyfull Subjects 
to yr Majtie k> Royall Predecessors. 

Yor Petitioner Humbly prays yr Majtie will be gratioasly pleased to Order yt hee 
may bee admitted to l)ee heard before yr Majtie Ac Councell &: yt ye sd Sr Jno. 
Newton be ordere<l to Attend. Or that yr Petitioner bee discharged or Bailed. 

Ffra>xis Creswicke. 

No. 2. 

For ye Right Honoiurable Ye Sr Wm. Cfregory one of The Barons of the Exchequer 
fr Judge of ye Assize for ye County of Worcester. 

The Humble Petition of Ff. Creswicke Esq. a Prisoner in ye Castle of Gloiu-. 
Humbly Sheweth 

That yor petitioner Ijeinge a prisoner at yor Ldpps sittinge last at Gloucester in 
ye Castle there Ac unac(iuainted wth ye Ha))eas Corpus Act did forbeare movinge 
yor lidpp far his tryall y(^ 1st day of ye Assizes in respect yor Ldpp had come a 
great Journey yt day k ye 2d day of ye Assizes ye prosecutors of yor petitioner 
gave out in sudden & sent him word that they had preferred ye bill of Indictmt 
agt him, but afterwards findinge they had deceived him, Yor petitioner ye 3d day 
of ye Assizes moved yor Ldpp to be tryed, wch yor Ldpp was willinge to have 
done had ye Kings Wittnesses beenc ready, but there beinge Oath made yt One 



HLSTORY OF IJITTOX. 141 

Cornelius Merry one of ye Evidences (& a servant of Sr John Newtons one of ye 
prosecutors) was absent, yor Ldpp did not think iitt then to tryc yor petitioner, k 
Mr. Player }>einge there demanded whether yor petitioner was ye Occasion of ye sd 
Cornelius Merrys absence, answered yt he could not say he was, it beinge really ye 
pure Artifice of ye sd Sr Jno Newton k Mr, Player ye other Prosecutor to keepe 
backe ye sd Cornelius Merry, thereby knowing they should deprive yor petitioner 
further of his liberty wch is ye rather to be believed for yt presently after ye Lords 
Assizes ye sd Cornelius Merry returned again to Sr J. N. Sei'\4ce & still is there con- 
tinued. And ye better to accomplish this yr designe, they then gave yor Ldpp a 
sight of ye Informations yn agt yor petitioner, wch l)einge Singly Considered were 
of sufficient Moment to restrayne yor petitioner as to his liberty.s. But had yor 
petitioner been yn brought to his tryall he had manyfested to yor Ldpps ye Infaraoas 
lines of those wittnesses k the Incredibility of yr Testimonies, a of most des- 
picable wretches of ye worst reputation in ye (^ountrey aa Deer-steelers, Sheep- 
steelers k ye like, k that they were suborned to give such yr Evidences. All wch yor 
petitioner was ready to have proved by ye mast Substantiall k best livers in ye 
Countrey who would have confronted all yr Evidences. And yt this prosecution 
was only ye implacable Malice of Sr John Xewton »!c Mr. Player who have 
beene for many yeares last past violent opposers of his Majties right of Chace in 
Kingswood in ye sd County, wch yor petitioner at his great cost maintained k at 
last gotte a Decree in ye Court of Exchecquer for his Majties sd Right, wch truly 
is ye Cause .^ ye only Cause of this prosecution. 

Yor petitioner therefore Humbly prays yor Lordpp will be pleased to take 
bayle or Order ye same to be taken for his appearance at ye next Assizes 
held for ye sd County, when k where he doubts not but to make his 
Innocency appear. 

And yor petitioner shall ever pray kc. Ff. C. 

No. 3. 
Moreover yor petitioner 1>eing informed yt Mr. Ben. Hyett ye Chiefe malitious 
Agent in this prosecution by reason of some private differences did at ye sd Assizes 
at Glour informe yor Ldpp yt there was enough to hang yor petitioner at (Jlour 
but much more in Sommerseishire. Yor petitioner thereup(m ma<le his application 
to his Grace ye Duke of Beaufort to know if any Chargii was agt him in Som- 
merseishire, who knew of none, k yn readily «S: freely forgaue yor petitioner for 
ye scandalous reports of his Grace charged agt him, wlu^fore yor petitioner have 
reason to believe yt his Grace was satisfied wth ye Malitioas prosecution, ye rather 
for ji; ye next day after yor petitioner had been in ye RelniU campe wch was yn 

neere his Hoase he ga\'e his Grace a true Intelligence of all yt he had there 
U 



142 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

observed, to learne wch wa« ye only reason of yor petitioner goinge there. And 
yor petitioner Iwing alsm* infonned yt ye sd Mr. Hyett likewise gave yor Ldppe 
an account of a letter ho. recieued fro ye Attorney (jlenerall requiring to defere 
yor petitioner's tryall at Olour for yt there was more aceusatioas agt yor Petitioner. 
Wch letter (if any) might Iw pcured l)y ye psecution of yor petitioner upon an 
Information given Mr. Attorney of more Evidence, wch to Compasse ye sd Sr 
J. N. & Mr. Player ^ little before ye sd GloucestcT Assizes did examine 2 or 3 

piligate wretches agt yor petitioner namely Wm. Hawkins k Monke 2 Cottagers 

in Kingswood Chace whom yor petitioner can prone were tempted wth 10/ apiece 
in an Ale house in the sai<l Chace liy on(^ Nicholas Wornell a tenant of Sr J. N. 
to swear any thinge agt yor petitioner to hange him, wluireupon those 2 wretches 

found dayes afterwards ye Information agt yor petitioner brfore ye sd Sr J. N 

& Mr. PI. Moreover wn ye sd Hyett had declared t) hand a letter to Mr Attorney, 
Sr Robt. Atkyas then twicj desired a sight thereof but could not haue it, where- 
upon Sr R. A. declared to yor petitioner yt he did not belieue yt Mr Hyett had 
any such letter, 6: yt he never knew or heard of any Charge agt yor petitioner 
in Sommersetshire, but if my psecut'Ji-s should bring any (wch must be only to 
trouV)le, charge, & disrepute me) yt yn he would possibly ride there himself to Justifye 
yt yor petitioner did giue ye aforesaid Intelligence to his Grace of Beaufort, to 
learne wch was ye Occasion of yor petitionee being there. 

Yor Petitioner therefore Humbly prays yor Ldpp will bc3 pleased t) lett yor Peti- 
tioner remained in Olour Goale til he can haue his Hal)eas Corpus to appeare at 
ye Kings Ijcnch where he will be rea<ly to answer all Accusations agt him both 
in Gloucestei-shire .^ Sommei-setshire (if any) soe yt there l)einge then an accumu- 
lation of all yor petitioners Offences as pretended his Majties service thereby will 
be ye better pformed «J)C ye Malice ic wicked designes of yor petitioners Enemies 
detected. 

No. 4. 
To his Sacrid Magesty 
the Humble Peticion of Dame Elizabeth Davi(».s ril(»ck of Sir Thomas Davies decesed 
Lord Mayor of the city of Lcmdon in the y<»ar 1070 and 1677. 
humbly shoeth that ffrances Criswick of Hannams Court in Oloster Esq your 
peticionra Brother in law haveing had sav^arall (Contests at law alx)ut your Masts 
Chase of Kingswood and for which he hath now a Decree as your peticionr is 
informed by the malicioas contrivance and upon the Informacons of the parsons 
with whom he hath had the sade Contest is Comitted prisoner to Gloster Goale as 
a parson saspectted to have had discorse with sum of the late .Rebelk in the weest 
that your peticionrs sade Brother and his Anchesters have bin all ways loyall 
and dutiful subjects to your Majsty and your Royall predecessors 



HISTOBY OF BITTOX. U3 

your peticionr humbly prays your Majsty well be graciosly plesed to order that 
he may be Bayled and that his wife and relacions may have access to him 

Eliz Davies 

No. 5. 
To his Sacred Majesty 

The Humble Petition of ffrancis Creswicke of Hannaias Court in ye County of 
Glour Escje A Prisoner in yc Castle of Glour & now removed by Heas Cor to ye 
Kings bench barre 

Humbly sheweth 

That yr petitioner having had severall contests at law wth some of his Neigh- 
bours about yr Majties Chase of Kings wood in ye sd County & for wch hee hath 
now lately got a Decree. Upon ye Malitious Contrivance of those wth whom hee 
hath had ye sd Contest was comitted Prisoner to Glour CJoale ye first of July last 
as a "ifkson charged to have had discourse wth ye Lord Grey at Keynsham in ye 
time of ye late rebellion. Yor petitioner indeed beinge then at Keynsham wch is 
wthin half a mile of hia abode purposely to gett Intelligence for his Grace ye Duke 
of Beaufort then at Bristoll, but did not come neare ye said Ld Grey. & in Augt 
last ye Assizes was held at Glour when yr petitioner desired to be brought to his 
tryall, but his prosecutors sent one of yr Majties Evidences out of towne & yn made 
Oath yt one of ye Kings Evidences was absent (all ye evidences agst yor petitioner 

being only cottagers Ac trespassei-s in yr Majties sd Chace whom yor had 

long before fined for yr trespasses) wh... arts yn deferred yr petitioners tryall. 

That JT Petitioner cV: his Ancestors have been always Loyall and Dutifull Subjects 
to yr Majtie & Royall predecessors 

Yor Petitioner Humbly prayes yr Majtie will be gratiously pleased to order yr 
Majties Attorney Genii to consent in Court to ye Baylinge of ye Petitioner & further 
to order yt yr Petitioner may be admitted to ye sight of ye said Gray before 
whom yr Majtie shall thinke fitt to see whether ye sd Ld Grey knows yor peti- 
tioner or have any accusation agt him. 

No. G. 
James Phipps of the parisli of Bitton in the County of Gloucr Coleminer maketh 
Oath that on thursday the twenty-fifth daye of June last past about two of 
the clock in the afternoone of the same day he was att a meade called Sydenham 
in the said parish of Bitton & county of Gloucr neere keinsham in the county of 
Somcrsett lookeing on the Rebells there (vizt) th(» late Duke of Monmouth and his 
army, and saith that he saw a Trooper ride out of the said army of the Rebells 
towards firancis Creswicke Esqr who w^as then walking in the Path in the said 
meade and that the said trooper alighted from his horse ifc came up to the said 



114 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

Mr Creswick and soon aiU^r returned, and saith that he saw William Hawkins of 
the said Parish of Bitton and tlie said Mr Creswick immediately come and stand 
by the wall there for th(^ spac(» of aboute one lioure which was aboute sixty yards 
from the i)lace when* the said lat(^ Ihike of Mon Month was and saith that when 
the Rebells crie<l horse and away the said Mr Creswicke and the said Hawkins 

were standin*^^ with the by the said wall and this Dept. further saith 

that <hn-eing that time the said Mr (-reswick did neither deliver any papers or 
speak to the said late Duke of Mon Mouth or the Lord Gray, and further saith 
that he beleeveth that tliere were there neere one hundred perscms of the neigh- 
1)ourhood looking on the Rebells And saith that the said William HawkiiLs is a 
pei>ion of very ill fame and reputacon and a poore indigent fellow and one of a very 
loose life and eonversason haveing been ^[Uestioned for stealing sheep and seldome 
or never frecpientng his parish ('hurch but frequently Cutts and steales young Oakes 
and other trees in the Chase of Kingswood to make cart bowes deeds and posts. 

James Phipps. 
Jurat apud Civit Bristol! tricesimo priino 
die Auixusti Amio reono Jacobi soei nunc 
Regis Angli gr primo coram un\ 
Aon. Lowforde. 

No. 7. 
ff. Cr. of H. com Glour ar maketh (lath yt Sr Ric. Hart of Hannam aforesd is 
ye son of a Decimator who decimated this Deponts father in ye late Usurpers 
times k; yt ye sd Sr Ric. Hart lately marryed one Sr Wm. Jones's Sister yt was 
fonuly Attomy Generall to his late Majtie cV: ytye sd Lady Hart did <leclare as 
this Depont is (credibly informed at ye time wn yc* late Duke of Monmouth k the 
Rebells were at Keynsham yt if ye sd Monmouth had then come a little further 
into (Jlour that her Ladyshipp would have given him some lunidreds of Cheeses, 
shee keepinge then a dayry on a ffarm called ffilgrove nean* yt place. «ic further 
deposeth yt soon after ye last Sessions of parliamt held at Oxford the said Sr Ric. 
Hart a Member tliereof boastingly declared that hee was for the Bill of Exclusion, 
and sometime after yt ye sd Sr Ric. Hart made his brags likewise yt he had 
opposed ye delivering up ye (.'barter of Bristol! wn liis late Majtie reiiuired it, 
saying yt if hee had not opposed it, it had beene delivered up then. 

No. 8. 

Sr T. B(ridges) maketh Oath yt tirancLs Creswicke on ye 25 June last when ye 

Rebells were at Keynsham aforesd came to this Deponents House there, & desired 

him to goe to Hannam about one mile distant where ye sd Creswicke lived k> lye 

there yt night by reason ye Deponents house was taken up for Momnouths Quarters. 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 145 

And as this Deponent wth ye sd Creswicke was goinge towards Hannam, they mett 
wth an Old man who said hee lived at Keynsham, k> whom ye depont desired to 
goe to a place called Syddenham meed adjoyninge to Keynsham where yn Monmouth 
&; ye Bebells were encamped to gett wt Intelligence hee could & briuge it him, yt 
this Depont miglit send it to his Grace ye Duke of Beaufort. Whereupon ye sd 
ffirancis Creswicke reply ed yt he believed yt that Old fellow was not capable of 
Servinge him in yt messuage fc therefore if this Depont. would goe by himself to 
Hannam aforesaid ye sd ffrancis Creswicke would goe there himself & learne what 
hee could k, bringe it him. The Depont yn alsoe desired ye sd Creswicke to call 
on his Lady too at Keynsham to know if shee had any thinge to say to ye Depont. 
Whereupon ye sd Creswicke retiurned to Kejmsham & Syddenham as this Depont 
believes & sometime after about 2 houres returned to this Depont who in ye mean 
time stayd at a Lodge hoase of his lying by the way, & gave him some acct. of wt 
hee had scene & learnt in ye Campe there as hee pretended & then this Depont & 
ye sd Creswicke both went forwards to Hannam aforesaid to ye House of ye sd 
ffira. Creswicke <5c lodged there that night. The Depont. resolvinge ye next mominge 
to give his Grace of Beaufort an Acct. of wt hee had received from ye sd Creswicke. 
& very early in ye sd next morninge presently after it was day, ye sd Creswicke 
called upon this Depont. in his Chamber ^ desired him to viae &; write his Grace 
of Beaufort, sayinge yt ye Rebells were gone from Keynsham towards Bath or War- 
minster as hee the sd Creswicke was informed since hee was up. &; sometime after 
yt ye sd Depont. did rise & write his Grace of Beaufort ye sd Intelligence & yt 
morning sent it his Grace by his owne Servant from the dwellinge house of ye sd 
firancis Creswicke. 

No. 9. 
Wm. Hawkins & Jno. Isles, yr Testimony as T. Rasse gave me. 

July the 28th day An. Donno, 1G85 William Hakons made othe beffore the Gestes 
apase That he saw tfrances Creswik give in Sedname with my Lord Graye And 
the Duke of nmnmuthe And that Se tha Squire delevar to papars to me Lorde 
Graye Againe he Said tha he Saw The Squire take to me Lord Graye 2 papers 
and one of Them wase about affut Long And tlia other affut and ahalfe Longe. 

And he So my Lord delefer one of them to aman that wase by hem with a Star 
on hes Left Breast. 

The Jesteses asked hime agane how fur he ware from them when he Saw them. 

John Uese Sayde that he wase Thare at the Same tyme and Sqire Criswik and 
they ware decoasing. 

Tho. Rudes confeshon tha he hade at Tha Same tiuie ahoss the powne and he 
went to Sednam and to Kaine Same to Se whare he colde Spake with tha Squire. 

But he culde not tinde hhn. 



UQ HISTORY OF 15ITT0X. 

No. 10. 
Co^vj of a Letter, not slfjnei, but written in Francis Cresvjicke's haml. 
May it plea8t> your Grace, 

Should I be wholly silent it would argue some guilt, & should I be importunately 
troublesome it would argue more rudeness, I will there fore endeavour to keepe a incdiu, & 
by avoidiugo the former I shall discharge my duty to myself & family, & by observing the 
latter I shall pay all due revorenco to Your Grace. My case is this. Being formerly under 
your Grace's displeasure for a pretended disaffection suggested by some when these late troubles 
broke forth, to avoid the like chance I wholly retired from company and kept my own home 
that my neighlx)uriDg adversaries might have noe advantage against me, but when the 
Rebell army came within a mile of my owne house I then went over to Keynsham to S' 
Tho' Bridges who I found was leaving his house to avoid offence, & whom I persuaded to 
accept of my house; upon going thereto I was persuaded by him to return alone and learn 
what I could amonge the soldiers y*^ he might the better advize your Grace, w^*** I the more 
readily undertooke being sometime before told by Capt Stubbs y^ y*" Grace said you 
would give oO gueuuys to be truly iuformetl of Monmouth's forces & condition. This 
service of mine I thought would have been gratcfull to your Grace which I was contented 
to perform & lett S"" Tho** have the creditt of y'* Intelligence wo*^ he wrotte in my 
house to y"* Grace myself satlsfyed only with my labour of 3 hours walkinge in y*^ 
raine to make y'' discovery knowing S*^ Thomas to be a more fitt person to converse 
with y' Grace than myself The Contents of S"" Thomas's advice, I know not, but what 
I observed in short was y* Monmouth's army consisted of above 1000 Horse, & ab* 8000 
Foot, 8 field pieces with some Drakes, & 30 ploughs whereof 4 was teemes of good horses, 
the rest oxen. His men some well armed, others indifferent, and some not at all, 
only havinge an old sword or a sticke in y*" hands, however I observed many musketts 
& other ammunition in y' carriages. Gray, Ferguson, Wade, Tyler, & Speke were 
there at Keynsham, this was my discovery, & how my friend S' Jno Newton & M' 
Player have construed this action of mine, I am too sensible. I lost by the fiebells a 
mow of hay, & y next day S' Jno Newton was seizinge y*= remnants as traytors goods, 
w*'** provoked me to tell his servants, that I never did nor never would assist rebells, 
nor never did assent to exclude my lawfuU Prince, w*^* I suppose made him the next 
day to send out 3 of his servants to enquire after my actions in the army, who 
did almost t'ireaten many to have spoken what they knew not, & himself particularly 
one Henry Jones his tenant & constant workman to his house, who was soe honest as 
not to be prevailed with. But besides all this I was informed just before I was sent 
from Bristoll that another charge ag** me was for traducinge y*" Grace in speech w^ 
is a most untrue & malitious sugg(».stion. I can safely depose that I have been 
fioo carefull at all times & in all companyes to pay all just respect unto y' Grace, y* 
I wonder what, malice will not invent. Againe y* I swore ag®* S' Jno Newton to 



HISTORY OF BTTTOX. 147 

Monmouth, a thinge soe farre from truth that I never spoke to Monmouth in my whole 
life, nor to any other pai-son in the army about y* worthy Gentleman, & yet he, his 
Lady, and servants run up and down exclaiminge y* I directed Troopers to seize his 

horses an invention of theyr owne. I dare my conscience that Monmouth 

would never have Sc'ized any Horse of his knowingly. My Lord, this is my condition. 
I have adversaryes that T thinke will not scruple at any ill thinge. I have seen 
and felt th' corruptions, as briberies, subornation, perjuries, and murder itself. Witnesse y'^ 
information formerly ag^ Capt Stubbs & y*" dayly murtheringe of my reputation. I 
must now againe feele y® effects thereof, bcinge w^^ my servant by some of them or y' meanes 
disgracefully sent from my home full of little ones & a wife newly lyinge in, in y* middle 
of my harvest havinge none within or w^'^out doors filt to take care of my concernes, 
they well know this mist tend to my ruin, unless prevented by y' Graces* favour. 
These things considered I beseech your Grace to permitte my return to my owne home 
upon good bayle given in Bristoll for a fortnight, y* I may settle my family in some 
better order than I left them, & I will engage to returne without trouble or charge at 
y« expiration thereof, & I shall be ever bound to pray for your Grace's Happinesse 
subscribinge myself 

Yo' Graces 

Most faith full humble Servant, 
Thornbury: 2^ July. 85. 



No. 11. 
John Stone to be hang'd draw'd and quartered. 
Elizabeth Lumbart to be hangd but after reprieved. 
Sanill Asplin to be transported. 
Christophr Tilly remaine as before. 
George Martin burnt in ye hand & acquitted. 
Wm Handle ye like. 
Robt Peere n 

Tho Stephens J- to find baile for yr appearance ye next and acquitted. 
Hanna Gale ^ 
Peter Rivers to find baile for his appearance ye next Sessions of ye Peace 

for this Coimty and acquitted. 
Phillip Cambridge to bee sent into Somnisettshire to be trycd for Hygh treason. 

^ _, ' {.accused for Hygh treason to remaine in Goale. 

Geo Sanders j 

Tho Skyn to find baile before one of ye Justices of this County to appeare 

ye next. 



148 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

No. 12. 
tfraricis Creswicke of Hannams-court in ye County of Glour Esqr. maketh Oath 
yt at ye last Assizes lield for ye County before ye Ri<^ht Honble Sr Wm Gregory 
one of ye Barons of ye Excliecciur and Judge of ye Assize Hee ye sd ffrancis Creij- 
wickc yn a prisoner in ye Castle of Gloucester did on ye 3d day of ye Assize 
petition ye sd Judge to l)e brought to his tryall, who was willinge to have tryed 
him, but Oath beinge made (a^ this <leponent was informed) yt one Cornelius Merry 
(a Servant of Sr Jno Newtons one of ye prosecutors) who was an Evidence for ye 
Kinge was not in towne, his Lordshii)p therciupon thought it not iitt to trye him, 
but yn told this Deponent yt hee might have his Habeas Corpus ye next tenne. 
And yn it was reported yt this Deponent had bribe<l ye sd Cornelius Meny to be 
out of ye way yt Assizes ^ yet presently after ye Assizes ye sd Cornelius Merry 
returned againe to ye Service of ye, sd Sr John Newton, \: still is there con- 
tinued, as this Deponent is Credibly informed. And this Deponent further saith 
yt he never did directly or indirectly occasion such ye sd Cornelius Merry es absence 
nor was privy thereto but doth verily belieue yt ye sd Sr Jno. Newton did him- 
self designedly keep backe ye sd Cornelius Merry i)urp()sely to <letaine this deponent 

longer in Goale. 

Ffrancis Creswicke. 

No. 13. 
Bristoll 

you are hereby Ordered to send two of yr Troopei's for ye Assistance of ye 

Coastable in Conveyinge of his Prisoners Ffrancis Creswicke fr George Saunders to 

ye Goale of Gloucester. But in Case (on ye way) they should meet with ye Militia 

of Herefordshire that yn they deliver them Over unto ye Superiour Officer com- 

mandinge ye sd Militia & soe returne, who is hereby required to call for ye 

next Constable, k> putt ym into his hands Orderinge two of his Troopei^s to be 

aidinge to ye sd Constable untill hee shall safely deliver them unto ye Keeper of 

ye Goale of Gloucester wlio is hereby likewise commanded to keepe ye sd Ffrancis 

Creswicke & George Saunders in safe Custody til he shall recieue further Order. 

Given under my hand & scale this first day of July, 1085. 

Beaufort. 
To Collonell John Jefferyes. 

No. 14. 
Glour 

To ye Keeper of ye Castle of Glour & to his under Keepers & under Keeper there. 
For as much as Ffrancis Creswicke & George Saunders stand Charged before mee 
for seuerall Treasonable matters in adhearinge to James Scott late Duke of Mon- 
mouth a knowne Rebell now in actual! Armes agt his Majtie These are therefore in 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 149 

his Majties name to require you to recieue ye bodyes of ye sd Ffrancis Creswicke 
& George Saunders & ym safely to keepe untill they shall be thence legally dis- 
charged thereof faile not at yor perilL Given under my hand k seale, ye 1st day 
of July Anno Rni Ks Jacobi secimdi nunc Angli & primo. 1685. 

Eo Atkyns jun. 

No. 15. 

Thomas Atwood of ye Inner Temple Gent maketh Oath yt on ye 28th day of this 

instant November, hee this Depont wth Ffrancis Creswicke of Hannams-Court in ye 

parish of Bitton in ye county of Gloucester Esqr. attended on ye Lord Grey of 

Warke, & ye sd Ffrancis Creswicke then askinge his Lordshippe, whether hee had 

any conference wth or received any papers from him ye sd Ffrancis Creswicke on 

ye 25th of June' last past at or neare Keynsham in ye County of Sommersett, his 

Lordshipp was pleased then to declare, yt hee had noe conference wth, nor recieved 

any paper from ye sd Ffrancis Creswicke att or neare Keynsham aforesd on ye sd 

25th of June nor att any other place or time, nor ever saw the face of ye sd 

Ffrancis Creswicke before ye sd 28th day of November to his knowledge. All wch 

his Lordshippe did say hee would publikely attest, when tliereunto required. 

Tho. Atwood. 
Jurat 30^ die Obris 1685. 

Coram me 

S. W. J. Akens. 

No. 16. 
A Copie of Mr. Creswicks orde for a Noli prosequi. 
(Locus Sigilli.) 

James R. 
Whereas Francis Creswick Esq. hath by his humble Petition informed Us, that 
he stands Indicted for having held correspondency with the late Rebells in the West, 
and that though he hath attended with his Witnesses at severall Assizes, in order 
to a Tryall, the same hath not yet been brought on; Wee having seen yor Report 
in this matter, have thought fit hereby to signifie Our Will and pleasure to you, 
that you forthwith cause a Noli prosequi to be entred on Record of the said Indict- 
ment, & Discharge all Proceedings thereupon. And for so doing this shall be your 
Warrant. Given at Our Court at Whitehall the 13th day of January 1686 in the 
Second year of Our Reigne. 

By his Mats. Command 

Sunderland P. 
To Our Trusty & WcUbeloved 
Our Attorney Generall. 



150 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

No. 17. 

Wherea« an In<lictnient was prferril at tho Assizes held at Gloucester on Wednes^lay 
the third flay of >Iareh Anno Scdo Jacob! Secundi Rs against Francis Creswick late 
of Bittrm in the County of Gloucester Esrjr. for holding correspondence with the 
late Rebells in tho West. These are by Vertue of his Mats. Signet k Signe 
Manual liearing ^late the thirteenth day of January 108^- unto ine directed to require 
and Authorize me to enter or caase to Ije entree I a Noli prosequi uix>n Record of 
tiie said Indictment, And Discharge all Proceedings thereupon. I rloe hereby require 
and authorize you in my name to enter or cause to be entred a Noli prosequi 
upon Record of the said In<lictment and Discharge all proceedings thereupon against 
the said Francis Creswick according to his Maties Royall pleasure & intention And 
for HO doing this shall be yor Warrant. Given luider my hand the 17th day of 
January IGSt 

R Sawyer. 

To Sr. Samuel Astry Knt. 
his Mats. Coroner; k, Attorney 
in the Court of Kin^s-Bench. 



FRAGMENT OF A COURT ROLL RELATING TO THE MEADOWS AND 
KINGSWOOD CIIA8E, DATE ABOUT THE 16th CENTURY. 

♦ m ♦ * * * * 

way thereunto adjoining bee not annoyed by such default, under the paine of 3/4 
a peice for everie such default. 

14/ Item it is further ordred that no person or persons shall put in any sheepe 
into the stubble feild before the Sonday next after the feast of S^ Michael 
tharchangell yearelie, & longer if the corne bee not clearelie rid and carryed out 
of the* same under the paine of 20/ for everie such default. 

15/ Item it is further ordred that all & everie person & persons that have 
anie *g;round in Michaell-meade Holmeade & Siddenham shall make their hedges 
and ' mojinds sufficientlie about the same meads from time to time & at all times 
when neede shall require yearely imder the paine of 10/ for everie such default. 

16/ Item it is further ordred that the grippe that runs from Croft gate over 
thwart Michaell meade to the brooke called Boyde shall be scoured and kept 
cleane by everie person or persons to whom it doth belong unto continuallie from 
time to time, & so often as neede shall require, & that the said grippe shall 
be made two foote broade & two foote deepe under the paine of 10/ a peice for 
every one soe neglecting the same, and this paine to continue. 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 151 

17/ Item it i8 further ordred that no person or persons at the time of harvest 
shall let loose any cattle in the common meades of Bitton aforesaid, whereby the 
said cattle shall trespasse anie Inhabitant in their ground grasse or hay in the 
said common meades under the paine of 10/ apeice for everie such default, & 
this paine to continue. 

18/ Item, it is further ordred that no person or persons shall at anie time 
hereafter pull cut or gather anie Globweedes or Swinesmeate in the common 
meades of Bitton aforesaid whereby anie Inhabitant that hath anie groimd there 
male be trespassed in their grasse growing in the same, under the paine of 3/4 
a peice for everie such default, and this paine to continue. 

19/ Item it is further ordred that no person or persons shall suffer their swine 
or piggs to goe into anie of the said common meades, or into anie of the com- 
feilds within the said parish, under the paine of 3/4 a peice for everie pigge that 
shall soe trespasse therein for everie such default, and this paine to continue. 

20/ Item it is further ordred that all & everie person or persons that have 
anie land or ground betweene the hedge nearest unto Filgrove & that of the lane 
against Barrow hill feild, & Andrew Buraell's Leaze, or adjoyning or abutting to 
either side of the said lane shall at all tymes when neede shall require secure 
and make cleane their ditches, that the said lane maie bee made more drier 
and fitter for ploughs and carriages to passe without damage through the same 
under the peine of 10/ a peice for everie one soe neglecting the same, and this 
paine to continue. 

21/ Item it is further ordred that all and every person and persons to whom it 
doth appertaine shall at all times when and so often as neede shall require rid 
make cleane and cut up all such stowles and rootes of trees and all other wood 
that may be a stopping to the water in the said brooke called Boyde, that the 
said water maie the more better and clearlie run into the river of Avon that the 
Kings Majest's highway in Bitton Streete and beyond the bridge there maie be 
kept more drier and passable for Travailers to goe and passe there without damage 
of water under the paine of 3/4 a peice for everie one so neglecting the 
performance hereof contrarie to this present order. 

22/ Item it is further ordred that no person nor persons shall at anie time 
hereafter force & beate downe anie mast and acorns from anie trees within the 
forrest of Kingswood, whereby to gather and carye the same away under the paine 
of 6/8 a peice for everie such default. 

23/ Item it is further ordred that no person or persons professing & using the 
trade of bakinge and selling of bread, shall cut, gather or carry away anie gosse 
or other fuell out of the said forrest of Kingswood or out of the commons or wast 



152 HISTORY OF JUTTOX. 

ground within the Libertie aforesaid, under the paine of 6/4 a peice for every 
such default. 

24/ Item wee doe further order that Jolin Britten' sen. farmer shall ihake a. 

sufficient goute out of his out house, near the Church path, and it with 

stone that the said goute be not offensive to the said Church path thore unto 
adjoyning, and that the stenche thereof bee not noysome to the persons tliat shall 
pass that waie, at or before the last daie of November next, under the paine of 10/. 

25/ Item wee doe fuither order that Eichard Peryn & Robert Cross or one of 
them shall scoure his or their ditches, & make his or their mounds about his or 
their grounds belonging to the tenement of tlie said Robert Cross sufficientlie that 
the Kings Majesties highwayes and Church paths thereunto adjoyning bee not 
annoyed by such default at or before the 25^ daye of November next under the 
paine of 20/. 

' 320/ Item wee doe further order that Thomas Underbill shall not anie tyme 
hereafter throw out the & earth or muck out of . 



In the following Tables will be seen the names of the Proprietors and 
Occupiers of the Meadow Lands in 1844, with the measurements 
against each number. 

IN 

No. Proprietor. 

1. Henry Sealey 

2. John Popham Sainsbury 

3. Avon and Gloster Sailway Co. 

4. Henry Sealey 

5. John Popham Sainsbury 

6. Henry Sealey 

7. Samuel Whittuck 

8. Edward Parker 
c Thomas Thompson Bush 

* ( John Nash Bush 
10. Edward Parker 



11 



{James Bush Flower, for the late 
George Aaron Brain 



MICKLE MEAD. 






Plate 4. 

Occupier. 

... Daniel Harris 


Quantity. 
A. B. p. 

... 1 15 


... Henry and John Tanner 
... Daniel Shellard ... 


... 2 


1 21 
3 30 


... Daniel Harris 




3 21 


... H. and J. Tanner ... 




1 36 


... Daniel Harris 


... 1 


20 


... Samuel Gerrish 


... 2 


3 37 


... Jonas Cryer 




3 37 


}- Hannah Herringshaw 




35 


... Jonas Cryer 




3 


" ' > James Bush Flower 


... 4 


3 20 



»Thi8 John Britten died 1611. 

• This clause is scored through in the original. 



HISTORY OF BTTTOX. 



153 



No. 

12. 
13. 

14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
15). 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 

29. 

30. 

31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 



Proprietor. 

Joseph Parker 

John Popham Sainsbury 

Samuel Whittuck 

Joh n Popham Sainsbury 

John Braikenridge .. 

Jolin Popliam Sainsbury 

Joseph' Po rker 

Ditto ... 

Sir Thomas Freemantle 

, Francis Waters 

JSir Thomas Freemantle 

Joseph Parker 

Anne Rush 

Joseph Parker 

Sir Thomas Freemantle 

John Hughes Morgan 

William Clarke 

f James Bush Flower for the late 
I George Aaron Brain 

Joseph Parker, Martha Proctor, John 
Popham Sainsbury, Samuel Ger- 
rish, John Hugh Morgan Brown 

Joseph Parker 

T. T. Bush and J. N. Bush 

Joseph Parker, junr. 

Edward Frere 

Joseph Parker 

Ditto ... 

Sir Thomas Freemantle 

Joseph Parker, j unr. ... 

Martha Proctor 

William Ward 

John Popham Sainsbury 

Anne Bush 

Henry Sealey 

Joseph Parker, junr. ... 

Ditto ... 

John Popham Sainsbury 



{ 



Occupier. 


Quantity. 
A.. B. p. 


Edward Burnell •.. 




3 1 


H. and J. Tanner . . 






3 13 


Samuel Gerrish \ . . 






3 3 


H. and J. Tanner .. 




.. 2 


30 


William ^Eatthews 




.. 9 


1 7 


H. and J. Tanner .., 






1 28 


Edward Burnell .. 






1 13 


Ditto 




.. 1 


32 


Sarah Dore 






1 8 


Abraham Oliver .. 




2 


5 


Sarah Dore 




.. 1 


3 39 


Edward Burnell ... 




2 


4 


Daniel Burnell 






3 2 


Edward Burnell .. 




.. 1 


1 12 


Sarah Dore 






1 2 


Edward Burnell . 






2 31 


Himself 






2 3 


> James Bush Flower 




2 3 


s Aaron Brain 


2 


2 32 


Aaron Brain 


2 


2 4 


Hannah Herringshaw 




2 


Aaron Brain 




3 13 


Himself 




1 4 


Aaron Brain 


. 3 


1 


Ditto 




2 8 


Sarah Dore 




2 G 


Aaron Brain 




2 6 


Herself 




2 5 


Richard Mayne 


. 1 


20 


H. and J. Tanner ... 




1 13 


Daniel Burnell 




1 9 


Daniel Harris 




I 19 


Aaron Brain 




1 19 


Ditto 




1 6 


H. and J. Tanner ... 


. 




1 6 



154 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 



Na 



Proprietor. 



Occupier. 



47. Martha Proctor 

48. 'f Joseph Parker and others, 

49.* as before 

50. Ditto ... 



... Herself 

{Aaron Brain 
Ditto 
... Ditto 



Total 



Q 

A. 


lant 

B. 


tity. 
r. 




3 16 


1 


2 


5 




3 


16 


1 


3 


25 


63 


I 


16 









IN 


HOLM MEAD. 
Plate 5. 


1 


John Stout Stibbs 


... 




... Martha Bush 


2 


Avon and Gloucester* Eailway Co. 


... Daniel Shellard ... 


3 


Samuel Whittuck 






... Daniel Harris 


4 


Ditto ... 






... Ditto 


5 


Ditto ... 






... Ditto 


6 


Martha Proctor 






... Herself 


7 


Samuel '^^Tiittuck 






... Daniel Harris 


8 


Ditto ... 






... Ditto 


9 


Henry Creswicke 






... Daniel Shellard ... 


10 


Samuel Whittuck 






... Daniel Harris 


11 


Henry Sealey 






... Ditto 


12 


Samuel Whittuck 






... William Stibbs ... 


13 


Ditto ... 






... Daniel Harris 


14 


Henry Sealey 






... Ditto 


15 


Ditto ... 






... Ditto 


16 


Anne Cryer 






. , Herself 


17 


Sir Thomas Freemantle 




. . Sarah Dore 


18 


Henry Sealey 


... 




... Daniel Harris 


19 


Samuel Whittuck 


... 




... Ditto 


20 


Henry Sealey 


... 




... Ditto 


21 


Sir Thomas Freemantle 




... Sarah Dore 


22 


Henry Sealey 


... 




... Daniel Harris 


23 


William Herapath 


..! 




, . . Bobert Hemmings 


24 


William Boult 


• •• 




... Thomas Gully 


25 


Anne Cryer 


... 




... Herself 


26 


Henry Sealey 


... 




... Daniel Harris 


27 


Ditto ... 


... 




... Ditto 



.. 


2 20 


••• 


18 




32 




24 


... 2 


3 8 




2 37 




1 




33 




3 


... 2 


30 




3 6 




1 20 




2 21 




1 6 




1 33 




1 28 




31 




1 3 




1 30 




1 18 




1 31 




2 7 




3 27 




3 9 




1 25 




3 8 


... 6 


1 7 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 



155 



No. 


Propriet 


or. 


c 


►ccupier. 


Quantity. 
A. B. p. 


28 


Martha Proctor 


... 


... Herself 


... 


. . * 


2 33 


29 


Samuel Whittuck 


• .• 


... James Parsons 


... 




1 22 


30 


William Bevan 


. . . 


... Himself 


... 


... 4 


8 


31 


Samuel Wliittuck 




... Jame:^ Parsons 


• . • 


... 2 


3 30 


32 


Ditto ... 




... Ditto 


... 


... 6 


38 


33 


Charles Joseph Whittuck 


... George Hook 


... 


.. 


2 7 


34 


Henry Sealey 




... Daniel Harris 


... 


.. 5 


1 10 


35 


John Pring 




... John Fry 


... 


.. 


1 19 


36 


Joseph Parker, junr. 




... John Godfrey 


... 


.. 


2 38 


37 


Anne Cryer 




... Herself 


... 


.. 


1 32 


38 


Samuel Whittuck 




... William Stibbs 


. .. 


.. 


1 20 


39 


Henry Sealey 




... Daniel Harris 


... • 


,, 


3 24 


40 


Henry Creswicke 




... Daniel Shellard 


... « 


.. 1 


1 28 


41 


Henry Sealey 




... Daniel Harris 


.. 


.. 


1 26 


42 


Avon and Grloucester 


Railway Co. 


... Daniel Shellard 


... . 




1 33 


43 


John Popham Sainsbury 


... Henry and John Tanner 




1 8 


44 


Ditto ... 




... Ditto 




,, 


I 8 


45 


Ditto ... 




... Ditto 




.. 1 


2 4 


46 


Henry Sealey 




... Daniel Harris 




.. 


3 12 


47 


Samuel Whittuck 




... James Parsons 




.. 


1 29 


48 


William Bcult 




... Thomas Gully 




.. 1 


6 


49 


Henry Sealey 




... Daniel Harris 




... 


1 27 


50 


Henry Creswicke 




... Daniel Shellard 




.. 2 


1 33 


51 


Henry Sealey 




... Daniel Harris 




.. 1 


2 25 


52 


Joseph Parker, junr. 




... John Godfrey 




• • 


3 14 


53 


Samuel Whittuck 




... Samuel Gerrish 




.. 2 


iJ 2 


54 


Ditto ... 




... Thomas Gully 




• • 


1 38 


55 


Anne Cryer 




... Herself 




.. 


2 


36 


Avon and Gloster Railway Co. 


... Daniel Shellard 




.. 1 


4 


57 


Henry Sealey 




... Daniel Harris 




• • 


2 20 


58 


Ditto ... 




... Ditto 




... 1 


15 


59 


Anne Cryer 




... Herself 




• • 


38 


60 


Henry Sealey 




... Daniel Harris 




.. 


1 38 


61 


Samuel Whittuck 




... Samuel Gerrish 




. . 


3 2.5 


62 


Henry Creswicke 




... Daniel Shellard 




.. 


3 2(> 


63 


Joseph Parker, junr. 




... John Godfrey 




.. 


I 34 


64 


Samuel Whittuck 




... Lewis Bright 




• • 


3 18 


65 


Ditto ... 




... James Parsons 




.. 


3 30 



156 



HISTORY OF IJITTOX. 



No. Proprietor. 

66 Charles Joseph Whittuck 

67 Samuel Whittuck 

68 Henry Sealey 

69 Ditto ... 

70 Sir Thomas Freemantle 

71 Anne Cryer 

72 John P. Sainsbury 

73 Samuel Whittuck 

74 John P. Sansbury 

75 Sir Thomas Freemantle 

76 John P. Sainsbury 

77 Ditto ... 

78 Ditto ... 

79 Ditto ... 

80 Francis Waters 

81 Joseph Parker, junr. 

82 Henry Sealey 

83 Francis Waters 

84 Sir Thomas Freemantle 

85 Samuel Whittuck 

86 Henry Sealey 

87 Ditto ... 



Occupier. 


Quantity 

A. R. P. 


... William StiLbs 




3 


... Samuel Gerriish ... 


.. 2 


1 2G 


... Daniel Harris 




1 ."4 


... Ditto 




1 29 


... Sarah Dore 




1 21 


... Herself 




1 31 


... Henry and John Tanner 




1 22 


... Lewis Bright 




2 6 


... Henry andJohn Tanner 




3 33 


... Sarah Dore 




28 


... Henry and John Tanner 




16 


... Ditto 




8 


... Ditto 




2 29 


... Ditto 




3 21 


... Abraham Oliver ... 




1 27 


... John Godfrey 




14 


... Daniel Harris 




14 


... Abraham Oliver ... 




35 


... Sarah Dore 




3 


... Samuel Gerrish ... 




1 22 


... DanielHarris 




2 17 


... Ditto 




2 11 


Total . 


.. 99 


2 19 



IN SYDENHAM. 
Plate 6. 



1. Avon and Grlostershire Railway Co. 

2. Samuel Whittuck 

3. Avon and Glostershire Railway Co. 

4. John Fry 

5. Avon and Grlostershire Railway Co. 

6. Ditto ... 

7. Samuel Whittuck 

8. Ditto ... 

9. Ditto ... 



Daniel Sliellard 

Thomas Gully 

Daniel Shellaid 

Himself 

Daniel Shellard 

Ditto 

John Wrench 

Ditto 

Ditto 



. . 9. 


1 28 




2 24 




31 




33 




2 12 


... 1 


2 5 


... 2 


1 8 




1 21 


.. I 


3 5 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 



157 



N«. Proprietor. 

10. Avon and Glostershire Kail way Co. 

11. Samuel Whittuck 

12. Henry Creswicke 

13. William Boult 

14. Samuel Whittuck 

15. William Boult 

16. John Fry 

17. Avon and Glostershire Railway Co. 

18. Samuel Whittuck 

19. Ditto ... 

20. Avon and Glostershire Railway Co. 

21. Samuel Whittuck 

22. Avon and Glostershire Railway Co. 

23. William Boult 

24. Avon and Glostershire liailway Co. 

25. Ditto .. 

26. Samuel Whittuck 

27. Ditto ... 

28. Avon and Glostershire Railway Co. 

29. John Fry 

30. Avon and Glostershire Railway Co. 

31. William Boult 

32. Avon and Glostershire Railway Co. 

33. Samuel Whittuck 

34. Charles Whittuck 

35. Avon and Glostershire Railway Co. 

36. Charles Whittuck 

37. Samuel Whittuck 

38. Ditto 

39. Sir Thomas Freemantle 

40. William Boult 

41. Samuel Whittuck 

42. John Cox 

43. Avon and Glostershire Railway Co. 

44. Samuel Whittuck 

45. Henry Creswicke 

46. Ditto ... 

X 



Occupier. 



Daniel Shellard 
John Wrench 
Daniel Shellard 
Thomas Gully 
John Wrench 
Thomas Gully 
Himself 
Daniel Shellard 
Himself 
John Wrench 
Daniel Shellard 
Himself 
Daniel Shellard 
Thomas Gully 
Daniel Shellard 
Ditto 

John Wrench 
Himself 
Daniel Shellard 
Himself 
Daniel Shellard 
Thomas Gully 
Daniel Shellard 
John Wrench 
George Worlock 
Daniel Shellard 
George Worlock 
John Wrench 
Ditto 

Sarah Dore 
Thomas Gully 
John Wrench 
Himself 
Daniel Shellard 
John Wrench 
Thomas Shellard 
Ditto 



Quantity 

A. R. 1". 


1 


1 27 


1 


1 4 




3 




2 19 




1 11 




2 7 




1 13 




1 21 




1 9 




1 




1 29 




1 36 




1 33 


1 


2 16 




1 3» 


4 


9 




3 11 




3 36 




1 38 




2 2 




3 25 




1 26 




2 S4 




32 


1 


4 




1 kO 




I 16 




1 15 




3 24 




2 




1 37 




20 




37 




2 24 




3 33 




3 29 




2 35 



158 




No. 


Propr 


47. 


John Fry 


48. 


Samuel Whittuck 


49. 


Edward Harris 


50. 


Samuel Whittuck 


51. 


Henry Creswicke 


52. 


Glebe ... 



HISTORY OF lUTTOX. 



Occu] 


pier. 


Quantity. 

A. R. 'p. 


Himself 




1 15 


John Wrench 




... 1 1 6 


Timothy Gully .. 




... 1 1 22 


John Wrench 




11 


Daniel Sheliard .. 




2 4 


Ditto 


Total 


2 




... 40 1 .37 



IX EDENSFIELD. 
Plate 7. 



1 Henry Creswicke 

2 Edward Burnell 

3 Samuel Whittuck 

4 Henry Creswicke 

5 Robert Willis 

6 Henry Creswicke 

7 Thomas Jones 

8 Henry Creswicke 

9 Samuel Wliittuck 

10 Henry Creswicke 

11 Bol>ert Willis 



John Fry 






2 20 


Himself 






2 20 


John Fry 






2 20 


Ditto 




.. 5 


26 


Ditto 






2 


Ditto 




.. 1 





Ditto 






1 10 


Ditto 




. 3 


1 25 


Ditto 






I 1 


Ditto 






1 10 


Ditto 


Total . 




1 10 




. 13 


22 



HISTORY OF EITTON. 



159 



The following Table will shew the Names of those who claimed Right of Common of Pasture 
in these meadows, and wliat amount of acreage was awarded to them by the Inclosure Com- 
mission in consideration of such claim in 18o9. 





KaniPH of Tenement* of 












' 


Fcrsons to Tfhom awarded 


which Kigbts were claimed 
ttud allowed. 


Acreb 111! II V 
or le*w. 

A. R. P. 


Present Proprietors. 


Present Occupiers. 


Where Situate. 


John Stouts Stibbs 


Stouts Hill house 


52 








North Pritchard 


North Pritchard 


Stout's Hill 


John Stouts StibUs 


Oldland Mill 


8 








Kev. W. Morrice 


William Broad 


Oldland Bottom 


George Burgees 


The Queen's Head 


5 


2 





Daniel Harris 


WiUiam Caple 


WUlsbridge 


George Burgess 


Flowers or Dvmocks 


2 





2 


G. Burgess 






William Fry 


Brente 


28 








Mrs. Fry 


Mannings 


Hanham 


William Waten 


Pinkers or Stibbs 


40 








In Chancery 

Free Methodist Chapel 




North Common 


Samuel Lloyd Harpford and 


New Inn 


3 





9 


The Public 


NearWarmley Tow 


Bristol Brass Battery Com- 










Committee 






pany 
Samuel Lloyd Harpford And 


Blakes 


14 








Alfred Davidson 


Albinas Humphries - 


Oldland 


Bristol IJi-aas Battery Com- 
















pany 
Thomas Bevan 


Fitton Mill 


26 








William Sommerville 


William Sommerville 


Bitton 


Robert Nurse 


Strattons 




2 





. 


Himself 




Isaac Hicks 


Kobbins's 




2 





Isaac Hicks 


Isaac Hicks 


Oldland Common 


Thomas Bevan 


Long Croft 


8 








William Bevan 


John Caple 


Golden Valley 


Sarah Bishop, widow- 


George Inn 




3 





James Freeman 


James Freeman 


Bitton 


John Bush 


liush'H 


S2 








Geox^e Bush 


George Bush 
Sarah Rose 


Beach 


John Bush 


The Swan 


1 





u 


George Bush 


Swinford 


John Bush 


Fl*)wer« or Hardings 
















Copyhold 


39 








Henry Bush 


Henry Bush 


Beach 


James Mantell and others 


Greens 


17 








Francis Riners 


J. R Mantell 


Bitton 


Trustees of Francis Rinera, 










Mantell 






deceased 
















Thomas Palmer 


Mercer*8 or Coole's 


25 








1 John'w. Palmer - 


James Olds 




Thomas Palnjpr 


Evans's 


1 


2 





J Ditto 




Thomas Palmer 


Dimerys 


3 










Joseph Whittuck 


Way House 


30 


2 





C. J. Whittuck 


Edw. Williams, late 
Bailey 


Hanham 


Joseph \\*hittuck 


Park Estate 


59 


2 





C. J. Whittuck 


Edward Williams 


Oldlimd Common 


Joseph Whittuck 


' Fry's 


8 


2 





Trustees of British 
School 


William Stibbs 


Near Hole Lane 
Colliery 


George Alcock 


' White Hart Inn 


1 


2 





Richard Bryant 

* 


William Parsons 


Bitt<jn 


James Bumell 


Malt House 


3 














Elizabeth Thirkill 
Elizabeth Thirkill 


' Fox's 
Hicks'8 Stile 


16 
6 










J John B. Stanley 


Williiun Marsden 


Longwell's Green 


Elizabeth Francis 


I^te Hulbins 


20 








Ann Cryer 


Ann Cryer 


Bitton 


Elizabeth Francis 
Elizabeth Francis 


Stouts 

Late Martha Holbins .- 


1 










Elizabeth Fi-ancis - 






Thomas Webb 


Kerby's 


16 


2 





Whittuck Brothers - 




Stone Hill 


Rev. John Pring and wife - 


Brownings 


76 








^ John W Palmer - 






Rev. John Pring and wife - 


Gowings 


4 








1 v \^AAJA V* • JL •wa***^/* 






Robert Williams 


Hobbles 


1 








R. Williams 


Himself 




Thomas Stephens 


Tapsters 


14 








Richard J. Parker - 


R. J. Parker 


Cadbuiy Heath 


William Bush and wife 


Martins 




2 





William Bush 


R. Williams 




William Bush and wife 


Hugh Smyths 


20 










W. Williams 




William Bush and wife 


Cherry Orchard 


2 


2 





Ditto 


C. Leonard 




William Bush and wife 


Parrys 


1 


2 







John French 




WilUam Boult 


HLVs 


15 








W. Boult 


Himself 




William Boult 


Cooles, held by lease for 








j Whittuck Brothers 

1 








lives under Samuel 














Whittuck 


23 













160 



HISTORY OF lUTTON. 



-J- _ 


NamoB of TenementB of 


Aamm- — ' 










Peraons to whom awarded. 


which HigrhtH were claimed 
and allowed. 


Acrrr 
or 


ICHfl. 


Present Propricton. 


Preucnt Occupiers. 


Where Situate. 




A. R. 


p. 








William Stephens 


Parrys 


I« 








Exi-s. of W. Stephens 


Mrs. Bence and S. 


Longwell's Ormn 


Francis Earl (now Robert 




1 








Gerrish 




Willis) 


Mould House 


4 








Robert WilUs 


1 Himself 




Francis Earl 


Womells, lield by lease 
for lives under Samuel 








- 


Ditto 






Whittuck 




2 





Whittuck Brothers 


Robert Jones 




Francis Earl 


Trubodys, held by lease 
for lives under Samuel 






i 

1 








Whittuck 




1 





Whittuck Brothers 






Francis Monk 


Pettegi'ove 


1 














Joseph Parker 


Parkers 


162 








Joseph Parker 


Himself 


1 


Joseph Parker 


Laceys alias Dobles 


70 








Joseph l*arker 


Roger Mayue 


j 


Joseph Parker 


Chedwins 


16 





1 Joseph Parker 


Himself 


. > Upton 


Joseph Parker 


Hipslcys 


135 








Joseph Parker 


John Gla,sH 


Joseph Parker 


Hollister 


4i 








Joseph Parker 


William Builder 


Joseph Parker 


Seed.s, coj^ylKjld 


40 








Joseph Parker 


W. Shipp 


- 


Martha Quaniian 


Cainert's 




2 





Mr. Holbin 


Silas Jenkins 




George Whittington 


Howards 


25 








Daniel Dore 


George Lee 


North Common 


Samuel Whittuck 


Colletts 


a6 








Whittuck Brotliers - 


.rameit Parsons 




Samuel Whittuck 


Haringtons 


20 








Whittuck Brothers - 


Stephen Jones 


Upton 


Samuel Whittuck 


Sanders's 


30 








AMiittuck Bit)thers - 


Samuel Ivong 




Samuel "\\'hittuck 


Lower Cully HaU 


60 








Whittuck Brotherrt - 


Thoniiw Hatliway 


Cully Hall 


Samuel ^^•hittuck 


Hanham Hall 


44 








Whittuck Brothers - 


John J. Wittuck 


Hanham 


Samuel \\'hittuck 


Parry's 


50 








Whittuck Brothers - 


Himself 




Samuel Whittuck 


Parry's 


44 








Whittuck Brothers - 


Robert Hemmings - 




Samuel Whittuck 


Pan\8 


ao 


2 





Whittuck Brothers - 


Himself 




Samuel Whittuck 


Parryrt 




2 


Whittuck Bi-others - 


Joseph Gorsen 




Samuel Whittuck 


Parrys 


1 


3 


ol 


Whittuck Brothenj - 


John Couch 


Hanham 


Samuel W^hittuck 


Willisi's 


43 


2 





Whittuck Brothers - 


John Knowles 




Samuel Whittuck 


Lydiardrt 


47 








Whittuck Brothers - 


Himself 




Samuel Whittuck 


Arthes 




2 





Whittuck Brothei-s - 


W. Chidgers 




Samuel Whittuck 


Ross's 


17 





Whittuck Hi-others - 


Lewis Mo.s3 




Samuel Whittuck 


Reeds 


t> 








Whittuck Brothers - 


Ditto 




Samuel Whittuck 


Dunns 


19 


2 





Whittuck Bi-others - 


James Rogers 




Samuel Whittuck 


Abrahams 


•28 


2 





Whittuck Brothers - 


John Wrench 




Samuel W^liittuck 


Barrs Court 


90 





(1 


Whittuck Brothers - 


Jac. Fowier 




Samuel Whittuck 


Barrs Court 


210 








Whittuck l^rothers - 


Hinwelf 




Samuel Whittuck 


Mount Pleasant 




2 





Whittuck Brothers - 


Aau-on Webb 




Samuel Whittuck 


Cooles 





2 


1 Whittuck Brothers - 


Ditto 




Samuel Whittuck 


l)avie.-*'ri 


16 





(» Whittuck Brothers - 


Robert Leonard 




Samuel Whittuck 


Laphaui's 




3 


, Whittuck Bn>thei-rt - 


Samuel Cary 




Samuel Whittuck 


Ree<rs or Lew ton in 
Lea.'ie to James Stone - 








Whittuck Brotliers - 


Jame.H Stone 




Samuel Whittuck 






3 





Whittuck Brothers - 






Sarah Batman 


Late Wm. Batman's 


12 








Sarah Batenian 




Upton 


Martha Proctor 


Pnictor's 


8 








PiTcter Family 


Job Thomas 


Upton 


Martha Proctor 


BUcker'd Copyhold 


20 








I 


Herself 


Upton 


Thomas Baynton 


Griuisburj' 


96 








Benjm. Waters 


Benjamin Waters 


Oldlaud 


Thomas Baynton 


The (irange 


32 








Henry Stone 


Ditto 


Oldland 


Marv Hojjed 


Jjiiie Evanri's 


2 








William Clark 


W. FrauciH & others - 


Upton 


William .Ship 


L.ate Harding's Copyhold 


2 








Mr. Kitchin 


ChiM. King & others- 


Upton 


George Hook 


Cheipiers Inn 


1 


2 





Elirtha Ho«)k 


Elieha Hook 


Oldland Common 


Edward 1 niton 


Late Whittuck's 


3 








Joseph Hawkins 


Widow Huss 


Upton 


Samuel Webb 


Robin s's 




2 


. . 


John Knap}> 




Sir Thos. Francis Fremantle 


The Pa.4onage Prebendal 


20 





V\'illiam Frere 


Mary Ann Frere 


Bitton 


Sir Thos. Francis Fremantle 


Late Bryants now Bash's 
Cojjyhold 


30 








-1 


IClizabeth Matthew - 


Bitton 


Sir Thos. Fi-ancis Fremantle 


Late Dennis's 


100 








H. T. Ellaconilje 


Alfred Spenin 


Bitton 


Sir Thos. Francis Fremantle 


Late L'nderhills 


yo 





Daniel Hairis 


William (lodwin 


Bitton 


Sir Thos. Francis Fremantle 


Late Lashleys 


2 





1- 


H. Pedlid^dmnl 




Sir Thos Franciri Fremantle 


Late Xutts 


H 








. 


Thomas Bush 


Bitton 


Sir Thos. Francis Fremantle 


Sheppards 


G 








- 


John Meere 




llo>>ert Jefferis 


Gee Sloor 


100 








Batcliekr 


Various 


Kingswood 


Rachel Hnmberstone 


Rot^s'.-j Copyhold 


21) 








William Clark 


- 


U^iton 


Charles Warren 


Bmnd House 


84 








J. Whittuck 
Whittuck 


Edwin Grove 


Londonderry 


William Sutton (now Stibbs) 


Stouts Hill 




1 





North PritcLard 


Robert Furber 


Willsbridge 



HISTORY OF DITTON. 



161 



Persons to whom awarded. 



Namca of Tenement^ of 

which Rights were claimed 

and allowed. 



Acrps more 
or less. 

A. R. P. ' 



I rrcsent Propxietors. 



Present Oocupiers. 



Where Situate. 



Samuel Malpass 
John Lewton 



Thomns Peckatone Peterson 1 

John Holbin -i 

John Fiemantle -! 

Arthur Lysaght -I 

Peter Gerrish -, 

Peter (Jerri.sh -'■ 

Peter Gerrish -1 

Samuel Whittuck -| 

Hill Collicott -j 
John Couch 
Bethia Lapham 



Andrew Drummond 
Andrew Drummond 

Andrew Drummond 
Andrew Drummond 
Andrew Dnimmond 
Andrew Drummond 
Richard Brain 
William Weare 
William Jason Parker 
Richai-d Emerson Gerrish 
• Richard Emerson Gerrish 



Rev. AVilliam Macdonald 
Geoi^e Willmot 
John Popham 
John Popham 
James GuUey 
Rachel Wilton 
Henry Creswicke 
Henry Crertwicke 
Henry Creswicke 
Henry Creawicke 
Henry Creswicke 
Henry Creswicke 
Henry Creswicke 
Fniucis Walters 
Thomas Walters 
Thomas Willis 
Samuel Whittuck 
Thomas Peter 
Thomas Martin 
William Winwood 
William Trubody 
Henrj' Roberts 



John Bush 

John Lee 

John Lee 

Soloman Leonard 

Thomas Tyndall 

Thomas Ward 

Rev. Richard Woodward 

Rev. Rich an 1 Woodward 

Samuel Whittuck 

Rev. Richnnl Woo<lward 
Rev. Richanl Woodward 
Sarah His 



Formerly Foxes -' 

Lediards or Phipps'sLease- 1 

hold for lives under Sam- 1 

uel Whittuck 
Rogers's 
Robins's 
Gibbs's 

Fieldgi'ove -j 

Fords Copyhold -I 

Flowers -[ 

Partridges 

Hardings -| 

Bettertons -' 

Harris's 
1 y mock's Leasehold for 

lives under Samuel 

Whittuck 
Brittrms 
The Old House or late 

Wm. Bush's 
Fifteen Acres 
Highiield 
Cann Farm 
Kings Field 
Jays 

Beach Farm Prebendal 
Bolsoms 
W^hi tings 
Williams's 

The Vicarage House 

Brownings 

Fishers 

Kites 

Tile House 

Fords 

Hauham Court 

Stones 

Grigsons or Tongues 

The Engine House 

Reids 

In Hanham Street 

Late Newman's 

Hudds 

Bumells 

Poyntz Smiths 

Castle Inn 

Croft 

Hancock's 

Pearsalls 

Trubody's Copyhold 

Sweets, held by lease for 

lives under Samuel 

Whittuck 
Goodmans Copyhold 
Upper Cully Hall 
Innocks 
Cling Close 
Brimblos 
Late Seeds 
Grange 
Cowhill 
Woodwards or Words 

and Blackers 
Late Jones's 
Late Creswicke's 
Mays Farm 



1 
25 

28 
130 

18 

50 
4 

30 
4 
2 

10 



/ 

10 

7 

49 

14 
6 

44 
3 
9 

10 



64 

60 

6 

9 

24 
38 
1*) 

47 
>0 

17 

1 



Whittuck Brothers 
' In Chancery 

Whittuck Brothers 
Henry Sealy 
Robert Parker 



Daniel Harris 
Whittuck Brothers 



2 - 



39 Miss Drummond 



! Miss Drummond 
Miss Dnimmond 
Miss Drummond 
Miss Drummond 
Miss Drummond 
R. Brain 

Jno. braikenridge 
Eleanor B. Peterson • 
William Saunders ■ 
Jacob Long and Wm 

Joy 
H. N. EUacombe 
Elizabeth Hicks 
Mr. P. Sainsbury 
I. P. S. 

Moses S. Wilton 
Thomas Wliite 
Thomas White 
Thomas White 
Thomas White 
'I'homas White 
Thomas White 
Thomas Wliite 
(?) R. Willis 
(:-) R. Willis 
Whittuck Brothers - 



51 








94 








160 








50 








20 








1 








270 








3« 








10 








2 








4 








1 








80 








14 








4 








4o 








150 








180 








40 











! 

I 

I 

I 

9 I 

: 

I 



2 j 

I 

2 . 



Robert Mountain 



\Miittuck Brothers 



Edwd. Wm.Plo^^Tight 
Edwd. Wm.Flowright 
Whittuck Brothers - 
Thomas Tydell 
I T. Ward 
' Robt. L. Jefferies 
Robt. L. Jefferies 



Whittuck brothers 

j Robt. L. Jetleries 

I Robt. L. Jefferies 

1 ' George Hicks 



Joseph Lindsey 
Himself 



Himself 
Willuim Fry 

Daniel Harris 
William Mannings 
Himself 
John Brioe 
Louis Bright 
James Long 
Himself 
Herself 



George Gibb 

Thom<is Qibbs 

Geoi-ge Sparrow 
I Moses Gibbs 
j James Savory 

James Lacey 

A. Webb 

William Matthews 

E. B. Peterson 

John Saunders 

T. Worlock 

Jacob Long & others- 

liev. H. N. EUacombe 

Mary Pillinger 

George Davis 

Mary Trubody 

Eliyabeth Green 

William Gibbs 

Thomas White 

John Knowles 

G. Bailey 

R. Britton 

S. Waters 

C. Bull 

D. Shellard 
R. Willis 
T. Willw 
William Lear 
S. A\'illis 
W. Lewton 
Himself 
Ditto 
Ditto 



Thomas Gibbs 

William Siibbs 
William Stibbs 
Robert Hemmings 
W. Brimble 
G. Harding 
Richiuxl Jefiferies 
Ditto 



Rithard Gerrish 
A. Brain 
R. Gei-rish 
George Hicks 



Fieldgrove 
Beach 



Bitton 

Hanham 
Park W«dl 



Beach 

Beach 

Fifteen Acres 
Highfield 
Cann Farm 

KiDgoWOOll 

Beach 

Beach 

Hole Lane 

Court Lane, Oldland 

Conmicn 
Bitton 

Oldland Common 
Swinford 
Upton 

Beach 



> Hanham 



Beach 



Ditto 

Swinford 

Upton 

North Common 

Oldland 



Ditto 

Ditto 
- Ditto 
•' Court Lane 



162 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 



FenonB to whom awarded. 



NameN of Tenements of 
whidi Bights were claimed I 
and allowed. i 



Acres more 
or lens. 

A. R. P 



Thomas Willig 

Thomas Hooper Riddle -i 

Samuel Whifctuck as Trustee | 

of John Stibbs -' 

Simon Newman 
Rev. Jjawrence Short 
Rev. Ijawreuce Short 
Josepli Parker as Trustee of: 

William Atkins 
Rev. John Ryland 
George Flower 
Samuel Brain 
Samuel Brain -I 



Crews 
Martins 

Cha])cl House 

Harts 

Wa««broughs 

Emersons 

Atkins 

Evann'H 
Knglands 
\Vinfitone8 
"Winstones 



4 
15 

1 
8 

18 

13 
2 

32 



Present Pi-oprictons. 



0' Himself 

o! Whittuck Brothers 

o; 

R. J. Parker 

AVhittuck Brothers 

o; 

I Whittuck Brothers 

0, William Cains 

(» Wm. Bevan 
Oi Wm. Bevan 



Present Occupien. 



Whci-e Situate. 



Himself 
R. Willis 



W. P. A. CampbeU 
I R. J. Parker 
I J()na.s Cryer 

1 W. Jarratt 

William Shipp 



Isaac Godfrey 
Isaac Godfrey 



> Hanham 

r 

Oldland 
' Park Wall 
■ Upton 



- Upton 

I 

I Bull Halls 
•I Bull HalU 



*' Claudite 



PUERI 



SAT prata biberunt." — Virgil. 



SHORT ANNALS 



OP THE 



FOREST AND CHASE OF KINGSWOOD. 



" Forests have ever been in use, in all parts and ages of the 
world. When Nehemiah was in captivity, in the court of Artaxerxes, 
and had obtained leave of that Prince to rebuild Jerusalem, it is 
recorded (Nehemiah ii, 8) tliat Artaxerxes granted him, among other 
favours, a letter to Asaph, Keeper of the King's Forest, to supply 
him with timber!" — PoriERS " Chaeinwood." 

"The royal appropriation of most of our English forests, seems to 
have been at the least as early as the times of the Heptarchy. 
Every petty Prince had his royal demesnes. Afterwards, when one 
Sovereign obtained possession of the whole Island, he found himself 
proprietor of a number of these forests scattered over the different 
parts of it!"— GiLPlx. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 

CHAPTER IV. 
SHORT ANNALS OF THE FOREST AND CHASE OF KINGSWOOD. 

" Itur in antiquam sylvam, stabiUa alta feranim."-^-^/?. vi, 179. 

As the hunter in the pursuit of the object of his chace is often carried 
beyond the bounds of his own circuit, so having ventured into the forest of 
Kingswood, I find myself of necessity taken off into other parishes, skirting 
on Bitton, without which, the history of a large portion of the Chase which 
lies in Bitton would be most incomplete ; but after making a circuit of 
the outer bounds and purlieus of the forest we shall find ourselves at home, 

whence we set out. 

" LongiB 

Ambages : sed aumma sequar fastigia rerum." — jEh, i, 345. 

It is generally supposed that this forest was a portion of the imcultivated 
woody tract of country belonging to the Anglo-Saxon kings resident at 
Pucklechurch, (where the outlaw Leolf, a notorious robber, who duriag the 
solemnization of the Festival of S. Augustin at that place, a.d. 948, stabbed 
Edmrmd, the successor of Athelstan, to death, the king himself having 
attempted to arrest him, at the banquet where he had audaciously intruded 
himself); and extended to the Severn beyond Bristol. 

No mention is made of Kingswood in the Doomsday Survey of 1066; 
probably because forests were extra-parochial, or it was included in "Terra 
Regis" thus translated. 

In Bertone King Edward held nine hides. Of these seven were in demesne, 
and there are four ploughs and fourteen villeins and ten bordars with nine 
ploughs. There are seven serfs. Of this manor two freemen hold two hides 



166 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

and have there nine ploughs. The^ can neither sever themselves nor their land 
from the manor. There is one mill at 4s. The reeve of King William accrued 
eight bordars and two millstones and one plough. In the time of King Edward 
it rendered £9 28., and three thousand loaves for the dogs, 16s. 

From the last clause in this record it may be fairly assumed that Edward 
the Confessor was a sportsman, and that all his compeers before and after 
him enjoyed themselves in this forest : for, for what other piu^pose was the 
barton required to supply 3,000 loaves for dogs annually ? 

Bristol Castle was appendant to it, and it is laid down by Lord Coke in his 
Institutes, that ** where this is the case the constable of the castle is by forest 
law the chief warden of the forest." 

That part of the forest which abutted on Bristol was called the wood of 
Furcis, or Furchis, the meaning of which name I have failed to discover. Mr. 
Smith, in his Lives of the Berkeleys^ translates it " the wood of * Fuzzes :' " 
certainly not Furze nor Firs as some have supposed. For the present I 
would leave it as a questio vexata. 

This forest extended itself into Somersetshire under the name of Filwood, 
the liberties and jurisdiction of which were under the Constable of Bristol 
Castle; but it is my intention to avoid as much as possible this southern 
portion, though as a matter of history it may be interesting to mention that it 
appears by a petition in the Bolls of Parliament (i, p. 439, 10 Edward II., 
1325), that *'John le Warre prays to be allowed to cut down 30 acres of wood, 
Ac, in his demesne land of Brislington, lying within the Kling's Chase, and 
that a mandate might be issued to the Constable of Bristol Castle." This 
petition was granted on certain conditions. In the second of the next reign, 
(1328) the same petitioner alleges, that beyond the memory of man, this 
manor of Brislington belonged of right to his ancestors, that it was not within 
the bounds of the chase, but that it had been filched away. Be that as it may, 
certain it is that the Lord Le Warres built a chapel, dedicated to S. Anne, 
in the wood still bearing that name, skirted by the Avon, where the ruins of 
it may now be seen. 

It appears in a Close Roll (2 Henry III, m. 6, 1218) that the forest was 
perambulated by Hugh de Neville in the reign of King John, but that record 

^ " Forests and chases anciently belonged to no county or diocese, they were governed by a law of 
their own, neither municipal nor civil, and acknowledged no sovereign but the king, then acting with 
arbitrary power." — Fosbroke, vol. i, p. 80. 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 167 

cannot be found. The earliest record I have found is a Close Roll (17 John, 
m. 21, 12G5) addressed to the Constable of Bristol Castle to allow Geofl&y 
de Marisco, an Irish judge, to take three stags and some poles from the wood 
of Furchis for cleting (ad cleiendas) his ship ; and in the next year a mandate 
was issued to Hugh de Vivon the Constable (see about him, chap, ii, p. 82 ante) 
to allow Roger Alard to take ten oaks from the same wood for the building of 
his ship. 

About this time several mandates were issued from the king to deliver 
up to Gilbert de Clare, the Earl of Gloucester, the Berton of Bristol with the 
wood of Furchis and the Chase of Keynsham as belonging to his Honour of 
Gloucester by heirship. This was notified to him, 2 Hen. Ill (1218), and it 
was repeated the next year, 29th June, 1219, with the wood of Furchis and 
the Chase (Brullia) of Keynsham. The same mandate was repeated 7th March 
following, with a threat that unless done within forty days from that date all 
the lands which he possessed would be seized and held until the mandate is 
complied with. 

Among the royal letters preserved in the Public Record Office there is one 
(No. 71) from Hugh de Vivon to the king on this business, dated about March, 
1219 (see it in extenso in Appendix). The letter is worded most cour- 
teously : that though a king's officer, he refused to comply with the mandate, 
" until I am provided with the means for maintaining the Castle of Bristol, 
having been promised by his council 100 pounds rent and 100 marcs in silver 
for that purpose, of which I have not received anything. As for what you 
threaten to do, that you will seize and keep all my lands until I comply, I 
scarcely think I deserve such treatment, considering the services I have 
rendered to you and to your father. King John, having given up much richer 
and more profitable hinds than I have obtained in England. I have always 
served you and your father most faithfully, and am still ready to continue my 
service as long as I live, if it be your pleasure." 

The order was repeated over and over again, 1219-1220, but without effect ; 
the Earls of Gloucester never recovered Bristol Castle. 

It was repeated 9th August, 1220 (m. 6), and again 12th September, and 
again 27th January, 1221. After that date it is probable that De Vivon 
gave up the castle, for it appears by Patent Roll (8 Henry HI, m. 2, 
1224, October 8th) that the king appointed Ralph de Willington to the 



168 HISTORY OF lUTTON. 

Castle and Berton of Bristol with everything thereto belonging, and on the 
9th of October following the king ordered the keeper of his wine to deliver six 
casks of wine at the castle for his use (Close EoU, 8 Hen. HI, m. 3) ; and on 
the 15th October (Close, m. 2) he is ordered to supply timber from the wood 
of Furches for the repair of the king s mills at Bristol, to be selected by 
the verderers and foresters. In the following year (9th Henry III, m. 4) 
the keeper is ordered to supply Richard de Vain two planks and other timber 
from the same wood. 

We now come to the disaftbrestation of the forest. Smith, in his Lives of tl^e 
Berkelei/8 (quoted by Fosbroke, vol. i, p. 122, and Kington, in his Nihley Green, 
p. 261) says : '* At the general petition of the inhabitants of all those parts, 
especially of the men of the forest of Horwood, and for £150 in money. King 
Henry III (I am quoting from Kington, p. 2G1) in the twelfth and thirteenth 
yeare of his reigne, did disafforest all the towns, lands, and woods betweene 
Huntingfbrd (where Berkeley Hundred and this Lord's [de Goumeys] landes 
parted), and the wood of Furzes now called Kingswood, within fewer miles of 
Bristol, and soe from Seveme side to the browes of the hilles by Sodbury, 
excepting only AUeston Parke, and for more assurance, the Bishop of Bath and 
Wells, and some other lords, tooke particular patents of disafforestation of their 
proper manors."* 

The following is a free translation of the Record : — *' The king for himself and 
his heirs has granted that all the woods, towns and lands which* lie within the 
wood of Furcis,' near Bristol and Huntenford, and between the river Severn 
and the Rudgeway on the brow of the hill of Sodbury as the hiU stretches 
itself towards Langdown to the river of Ardeleigh, be for ever disafforested, not 
only as to hunting, but to everything else relating to a forest, excepting the 
park of Alweston lately inclosed, and that all persons who have hitherto had 
any woods within the forest may now use them as they please, make parks, 

* It appears by Fine Koll, 7 Hen. Ill (1213), that all the lands of Hugh de Goumey were 
seized for hunting in tliat part of the forest called Huntingford Chase, without the king's licence. 
(Fosbroke, i, 122). Sayer says (Britftol Ilid.^ p. 356) : — " Hugh de Gournay had his lands seized by 
a precej)t to the Constable of Bristol Castle from y* King for hunting in the King's Chace (King's 
wood) by Bristol for thrive days without licence, 7 Hen. III., ni. 9." 

" The charter of disafforestation will be found at the end in ejrtniHo, 13 Hen. Ill, pt. 1, m. 18. 

' In a private memoran<luni book, June, 1670, I find this entry :— " Furchis is a wood near Mrs. 
Nyio's house, and Huntingford is by it" (Old MS. book of F. Creswick, dated about 1679, penes 
the author.) 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 169 

fell and sell timber, and grub up as they please, without hindrance from the 
verderer, without cheminage or tolls for passing through the forest. All 
persons on the east side of Severn who used to attend the pleas of the forest 
of Harewood be for ever acquitted thereof. Dated 6 May at Westminster, 
anno xii." 

After this a mandate (Close Roll, 12 Henry III, m. G) dated June 20th 
following, was issued to the Sheriff of Gloucester to make proclamation 
throughout his district, that the lands had been disafforested. On the back of 
this Record are the names of the knights who had been summoned as a jury 
to perambulate the forest, and give the bounds, as may be seen in Appendix. 

In 1251, 35 Henry III, an order was issued to the Constable of Bristol 
Castle to supply old wood and brush wood to the workmen for firing. 

The portion of the forest left as a Chase, comprising about 3432 acres, lying 
in the parishes of S. Philip and Jacob, Stapleton, Mangotsfield, and Bitton, 
enables me to confine the chief points of history to Bitton, occasionally noting 
any matter of interest in the adjoining parishes ; and as the constable of the 
castle was still the chief ranger he will occasionally be mentioned. 

1st Edward I (1273) the king commands the Constable of the Castle of 
Bristol, that he allow to Hugh Malverne, keeper of the forest of Kingswood, 
the wages of 7:^d. per day for himself and three footservants. 

In the great Pipe Roll (1223), 8 Henry III, and in the years 5, 6, 8, 
10, 12, 16, 17, 19, 22, 28, and 33 of Edward I, the profits of the forest 
are accounted for yearly under the title of the Castle of Bristol. One 
person being divers times constable of the castle and keeper of the forest ; 
and he accounted for a certain custom called Wood Silver, both in the forest 
on both sides of the Avon, and for sea-coal dug within the limits of the 
forest; and for earth dug for making pottery within the forest, and for 
quarrying stone. The wages of the constable of the castle and keeper of 
the forest are allowed out of the profits belonging to the Castle of Bristol. 

9th Edward I (1281), '^ Thomas Lord Berkeley, in consideration of his 
services in the wars, had liberty to hunt in the King's forests of Mendip and 
Kingswood. He was in most of Edward's battles as general." Banatt's 
Bristol, p. 253-54. 

It may be supposed that great destruction of deer took place, and therefore 
we need not be surprised to find that on 17th August 1292, (20 Edw. I, 



170 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

Pat. Rot., m. 6) authority was given to Walter Bello-Campo, to 
inquire who are the malefactors in the Chase of Kingswood who lately, vi 
et a7^s, drove and seized the game. I have not succeeded in finding an 
account of the proceedings arising out of the above patent ; no doubt there 
were very many such malefactors.^ 

Michael de Dune was the keeper in 1325 ; he was accused of cutting dowTi 
100 oaks and acres of goi-se without leave and selling it to his own use; having 
also taken six bucks and six does, and that the forest was not well looked 
after ; whereupon the sheriff was ordered to take it into the king's hands ; and 
on the 15th December, 1325 (Patent Roll, 19th Edward II, p. 1, m. 9), the 
king granted the custody of the Chase to Thomas de Bradeston^ for life during 
the king's pleasure, according to the accustomed wages, and by mandate (in the 
same Patent) Dune, the late keeper, is to deliver up to Bradeston; and the 
Constable of the Castle of Bristol is to pay the said Thomas the accustomed wages. 

It must not be omitted (for the following record connects the Chase 
with the Manor of Bitton), that on the 5th of May, 1221, as appears by a 
Close Roll 5 Hen. III., m. 12, the king commanded the Constable of Bristol 
Castle to allow Robert de Ameneville to have quiet possession of his wood of 
Furchis, as beheld it in the time of King John; and in 1223 (Close 7 Hen. III., 
m. 12) an inquest was held whether Robert de Ameneville — when he allowed 
strange pigs to have agistment in his own wood of Bitton — was accustomed 
to be allowed to let his own pigs run in the wood of Furchis also, at the 
time when the Bishop of Norwich was the Constable of the Castle? And they 
give their verdict that such was the case. Also they say that the pigs of the 
people of the Berton of Bristol were allowed agistment in the wood of Bitton, 
without pannage (that is payment), therefore the Constable was commanded 
not to interfere with this custom, and at once to return to Robert D' Amene- 
ville the five pence which had been exacted. 

Robert D'AmeneviUe was Lord of the Manor of Bitton, which was confirmed 

» Gilbert White, in 7//;^^. of Sclhorne, cd, 1802, 8vo., vol. i, p. 32, says: «Tlio' largo kinds of 
deer do much harm to the neighbourhood, yet the injury to the morals of the people is of more 
moment than the loss of their crops. Tlie temptation is irresistible, for most men are sportsmen by 
constitution, and there is such an inherent spirit for hunting in human nature, as scarce any 
inhibition can restrain." Bishop Hadley, when urged to restock Waltham Chace, refused, replying 
that "it had done mischief enough already." 

* See about Bradeston (an Extinct Peer), in Fosbroke's GIoncf^iM' under " Winterbome." 



HISTORY OY BITTON. 171 

to him by Henry III. in 1227, (Charter Roll, 11th Henry III, p. 1, No. 143), 
by virtue of this lordship he and his successors had a right to a certain 
quantity of wood. 

3rd Edward II, (1309-10, Originalia, Rot. 5), the king granted to Bar- 
tholomew de Badlesmere the Castle and the Barton of Bristol, at the yearly 
rent of £210, and to pay to the Abbot and Monks of Tewkesbury 60s. from 
the mill, and 60s to the same for the maintenance of a certain Chantry 
within the castle; and 14s. 3d. a year to the keeper of the Forest of Kings- 
wood. 

14th Edward II (1320-21, Inq. ad quod damp. 36), Johes Salso Marisco 
was allowed to cut down and sell twenty acres of wood in the Chase of Kings- 
wood. He was a member of the family of that name, who resided at what was 
afterwards, and is still called, West Hanham. Hanham in its entirety was the 
principal dependency of Bitton. In 1325, West Hanham became the property 
of the Abbot and Convent of Keynsham. See p. 91, ante, and Records ii, 
iii, iv, V, at the end. 

15th Edward II (1321, Fin. Rot., m. 5), the king appointed Hugh le 
De Spencer the keeper of the Castle and Barton of Bristol at £210 a year, and 
to pay the forester of Kingswood 7^d. a day. 

In 38th Edward III. (1364, Pat. Rot., m. 5), a Commission was issued to 
Sir John Tracy, Robert Foulhurst, and William de Wrotham, to inquire who 
were the disturbers of the peace, and had broken down the coverts and trees to 
the value of £1,000 in the Chase. An order was issued to the Sheriff at the 
same time to assist in the inquiry. I have not succeeded in finding the 
Record of the proceedings which arose out of this Commission. 

In the 45th Edward III., 1371, the king commanded the keeper of his 
Chase to allow the then Lord of Bitton, Hugh Blunt, to take, cut, and carry 
away his wood and gorse, growing within the bounds of his moiety of the 
Manor, without payment of toll or other accustomed payments. This right 
was continued and acted upon, as will be seen in the after part of this 
history, when the Chase was divided into Liberties by the parties whose 
names wUl then appear. 

Queen Philippa had the Barton and Chase granted to her. After her death, 
1369, the king granted to Sir Robert Knowles' what was seized into the 

» Sir Robert Knowles. Hume, vol. ii, p. 482 (edit 1807), quotinj^ from "Froissart," liv. i, c. 311, 



172 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

king's hands, and in the next year, the bailiff accounted in the Pipe for £10 
8s. 4d., for timber and gorse sold in the Chase of Kingswood, and so he did in 
the 46th Edward III (1372). 

47th Edward III (1373, Pat. Rot., p. 2, m. 32), the king reciting that ' Hugh 
de Segrave had surrendered his grant of the constableship of Bristol and 
keepership of the fforest of Kingswood and ffillwood, granted the said con- 
stableship and keepership of the said fforest to John de Thorpe, Knt., to hold for 
his life with the like wages fees and profits as the said Hugh might have taken.' 

In 48th Edward III (1374-5, Pat. Rot. p. 1, m. 37), the king having been in- 
formed that very many, as well foresters as others, had entered into his chase 
and freewarren of Kingswood and ffillwood without licence, and taken and 
carried away fish, hares, conies, pheasants, &c., and wild beasts of the chase, 
and that divers oppressions had been committed, granted a commission to John 
de Foxle and other justiciaries to enquire, and the sheriff is to assist in the 
inquiry, &c. This Commission found many trespassers in the Chase, hunting 
and killing the deer without licence, for which they were fined. They 
found also that three oaks had been ordered by Privy Seal for making a 
new lodge in the Chase, and that one Thomas Morton took them to 
his own use, on the 23rd April, 1372, 46 Edwd. III. They also found that the 
said Thomas kept two horses carrying wood for sale in Knowles' time, and 
they went on daily. Another transgressor was Hugh Wemell, who killed four 
conies that year, and that Robert Godwyn had cut gorse worth forty pence, 
and that the beasts of the Chase suffered much by the destruction of the gorse. 
Also that Moreton, lately a forester, had unwarrantably cut bushes and an oak 
and trees to the value of 100s., and had carried them away and sold them. But 
the most heinous trangressor was Matthew de Button. 

The first inquest on this case was held at Bristol Castle before a jury of 
twelve on Monday the third week in Lent, 1374, and they found that Matthew 
de Button killed two does on Monday after the feast of S. Lawrence, 1365; 
and in the same year, Sunday next after the feast of the Nativity Beatae 
Marioe, one sorrel and a doe ; and that on Thursday next after the feast of the 
Nativity in the same year, in company with John Crook, he killed two does ; 
also that the same Matthew and John killed two does and one fawn on Friday 

says that this man in 1370, at the head of 30,000 men, marched out of Calais and ravaged the 
country to the gates of Paris. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 173 

next before the Purification of the Blessed Virgin in 1366. And that the same 
two, in the same year, killed two does on Thursday before the feast of S. Peter 
ad Vincula ; and that the same Matthew and John and their servants killed 
six does, four sorrels and three sorelles on Monday between aforesaid feast and 
the feast of S. Michael. Also that they killed two does on Thursday next 
before the feast of the Exaltation of the Cross in the same year, viz., 1366. 
Also they found that the said Matthew and the servants in his company, 
whose names they do not know, killed three does, three precketts (two year 
old bucks), and two fawns, on Sunday before the Nativity of our Lord, 1367. 
And that he killed one doe on Tuesday before the feast of S. Margaret, 1368. 
Also that the said Matthew and John killed two does on the Vigil of the 
Purification of the Blessed Mary m the 43rd year of the king's reign, 1369. 
And that he killed one sorrel on Monday next after the feast of S. James in 
the 44th year, 1370. And they say that the said Matthew and John are 
common malefactors of game in the King's Chase. 

The jury met again on the next day at the same place, and a warrant was 
issued to the sheriff to arrest the culprits the next day, when it was reported 
that Matthew had been taken by Richard Scott and — Stout, but as they did 
not appear they were amerced, and the sheriff was ordered to arrest on the 
following Friday. The justiciars met at Bitton, when the sheriff returned that 
the said Matthew was taken by Roger Mare and John West, who bring him 
into court. He threw himself on the mercy of the king for the charges laid 
against him, and is committed to prison until the justiciars consult the council 
of the king. 

The record from which the above is abridged is in the Public Record Office, 
London. There is also a copy among the Hale's MSS. (No. 81) in the Library 
of Lincoln's Inn. Nothing more can be found, neither is any record of trial or 
gaol delivery, therefore I would repeat here, what I have already stated in the 
History of the Manor, ante p. 96. 

"What became of him afterwards, I cannot discover, — whether he was tried, 
or died in prison, or was executed. Though his name appears in the court-roll 
of Bitton in that reign, in the next year John de Bitton, his son, appears 
at the court. It was on Friday in the third week of Lent that he was 
committed, which in that year (1374) would be the 3rd of March ; and on the 
Fine Roll of the same year there appears the writ of his "Diem clausit 



174 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 



extremum," which is dated April 10th. In the ordinance of the chantry at 
Newland, founded by Joan Greyndon, on the death of her husband (Pat. 24th 
Henry VI, p. 2, m. 17), in which prayers were to be offered for the good 
estate of her relations, she altogether omits the name of this Matthew, who 
was her grandfather, though she mentions the generations above and below 
him. It has been supposed tliat for his trangressions, the killing of thirty - 
seven head of deer, he might have been excommuniciited, and that if he died 
under that sentence he would not be entitled to the prayers to be offered in 
the said chantry." 

The execution of such a person must 
have caused a great sensation in the 
neighbourhood. His residence was at 
Hannam, afterwards called Barres Court, 
which Leland in his Itinerary says is 
close to Kingswood Forest. 

I would refer the reader to the pedigree 
of De Button (p. 80, ante), where it will 
be seen that he was son and heir to Lord 
John de Button, Knight, nephew of Thomas 
de Button, Bishop of Exeter. There will 
be found in the appendix a copy of a short 
deed with this seal attached, dated Hannam 
23rd Edward HI (1369), it is a lease of a tenement at Goldwell, in the 
Hundred of Bitton, a place lying on the south of Stout s Hill, near the site 
there was a gate entering the chase. In this deed he calls himself the son 
and heir of John de Button, and in the Assize Roll he is styled the son and 
heir of John (the son of John) and Hawise. Also in a Fine (Hil. 18th 
Edward III), John (son of John) and Hawise, occur ; which John was the 
heir of an elder brother, Thomas, who died without issue. 

On the 26th of February, a.d. 1371, 45th Edward III, the king'jssued a 
mandate to the keeper of the Chase of Kingswood to allow Edward, the son of 
Hugh Blunt, the Lord of the Manor of Bitton within the chase, as had been 
the custom within the memory of man, to take, sell and carry away without 
payment of any chiminage or other fees, wood and gorse and sea coal within 
his demesne. A similar mandate was issued by Henry IV, 1407, in favour 




HISTORY OF BITTON. 175 

of John Blount; again in 1454 by Henry VI, in favour of Edmund 
Blount ; and so the Lord of the Manor of Bitton on the division of the 
chase into liberties acquired their portion. 

15th Richard II (1392). Among the memoranda, Easter, Rot. 8, great 
destruction of vert and game having taken place in the Chase of Kingswood, 
a commission was issued to Thomas Broke, Maurice de Berkeley and others to 
make inquiry by inquest, and to report. Among the same Records, 20th 
Richard II, Rot. 4, the commission is repeated to the same parties. What 
the result was, I have failed to find. 

In the following years the records do not reveal any thing of local interest, 
excepting the appointment of the Constable of the Castle and Barton of 
Bristol and the Keeper of the King s Forest. I mention these because 
reference is frequently made to them in the endless suits which occurred in the 
seventeenth and eighteenth century. 

By Patent 4th Henry IV (1402-3), the king granted to Edward, Duke of 
York, the Manor and Barton of Bristol, with all proper franchises, UbBrties, 
Ac, to hold to him and heirs male in lieu of 400 marks. 

By Patent 14th Henry IV. m. 22, (1412-13), Hugh Lutterel was appointed 
Constable and Keeper of the Forest for life. He was a man of great worth 
and was honourably employed by three successive kings of England. 

3rd Henry V. (1415-lG), the king granted the same pension, with the same 
beneficial clauses, to Humphry, Duke of Glo'ster, in tayle (p. 129, Old MSS. 
Book of F. Creswick, penes the author.) 

15th Henry VI., July 15th (1436-7), the king granted to Richard, Earl 
of Warwick, the Constableship of the Castle of Bristol and Keeper of the 
Forest of Kingswood for life. 

Patent 21st Henry VI. (January 16th, 1443), re-citing a former grant of the 
Constableship of the Castle and town of Bristol, and the custody of the forest 
of Bristol to John Saint Loc, and Nicholas his son, to hold them from the 
death of Richard, Earl of Warwick, now grants it in fee, with several fees, out 
of which several officers were to be paid out of the revenues of Bristol, as fully 
as Sir Hugh Lutterel, deceased, and by the same' patent he granted primagium 
et herbagium within the forest and all woodfalls and dead wood now and 
always for his own use, and a customary called corny n woodin in King's wood, 
also the fishery at Stapleton. 



176 HISTORY OF BITTOX 

By inquisition taken after the death of John Saint Loc, the jury of the 
neighbourhood found that he died seized of the above, and also that the 
appointment of all officers of the forest belonged to the Constable of the 
Castle of Bristol, and that all who break the soil of Kingswood for coal, clay, 
or sand, or other profit, must have the licence from him at a rent to be 
agreed upon. 

24th Henry VI. (1445-6), the king granted to Henry, Duke of Warwick, 
the Manor of the Barton of Bristol, with the appurtenances in Gloucestershire, 
to him and his heirs for ever. 

By Patent 39th Henry VI. the king granted the Constableship of the 
Castle and Vil of Bristol, and the Keeper of the Forest of Kingswood to 
Edward, eldest son of Richard, Duke of Gloucester, Earl of March, for his life ; 
the next year he became Edward IV. 

36th Henry VI. (1457-8), the Constable of the Castle was ordered to 
deliver 30 oaks to the Priory of Bristol. 

Edward IV, the last Patentee, having obtained the crown on the 2nd 
of January, 1462, the first of his reign, he granted the Constableship of the 
Castle and the custody of Kingswood to Sir Humphry Stafford, of Hooke, 
for life. 

By an Inquisition taken 1478 it was found that George Duke of Clarence 
and Isabella his wife were seized in the demean as of fee in right of 
the said Isabella at her death, December, 1474, of the Manor and Hundred 
of Barton, next issue — leaving issue Edward Plantagenet and others — that he 
survived her and held the premises and the rents of £60 a year — the duke 
died 18th of February last — and that Edward Plantagenet was his son and 
next heir to the said Isabella, three years old. 

A.D. 1485, the King granted to Sir Giles Daubeny, Knt., for life the 
Constableship of the Castle and Town of Bristol. Pat. Roll, 1st Henry VII, 
p. 2, m. 2, No. 562. 

1st Henry VII, Pat. Roll, p. 1, m. 8, No. 551, (1485), Thomas Fulbrok, 
one of the king's yeomen of the guard, was appointed forester and ranger of 
the Forest of Kingeswode and Fulwood during life, with the usual fees and 
allowance. 

13th December, 3rd Henry VII, (1487). Anne Countess of Warwick 
granted the Manor of Barton Regis next Bristol and Barton Hundred, to 



. HISTORY OF BITTOX. 177 

King Henry VII and the heirs of his body. In Hilary Term of the same year 
a fine was levied of the said premises by the said countess. 

24th Henry VII (1508-9), the King granted to the Lord Maurice Berkeley 
for his life the rangership (so says Fosbroke) and custody of the forests 
On the surrender of the patent letters, which were not found sufficient, he 
had a new grant 3rd Henry VIII (1511, July 11) and was appomted keeper 
of the Forest, and 7^ a day out of the fee farm of Bristol, and 10s. a year 
from the 25th October, 24th Henry VII (1508). He died 1506.' 

15th Henry VIII (1523, Nov. 26th). Sir Francis Poyntz was appointed 
keeper of the forests of Kingswood and Fyllwood, with herbage and pannage 
at 2d. a day, in the place of Maurice Berkeley deceased. Pat. Rot. p. 1, 
m. 12. 

17th Henry VIII (1525), another grant to the same, the former being in- 
valid. Pat. Rot., p. 1, m. 33. 

17th Henry VIII, (1525), granted the custody of Kingswood, after the 
death of Francis Poyntz, occupator, to Sir Anthony Poyntz for life as fully 
as Sir Maurice Berkeley and the said Francis held ; and reciting a sur- 
render of the patent made to Sir Anthony Poyntz the same custody of 
Kingswood is granted to Sir Anthony and Nicholas his son for their lives. 
Pat. Rot., p. 2, m. 26. The last sold to Henry Lord Berkeley. 

The king (35th Henry VIII, 1543), by the authority of Parliament, granted 
to Queen Catherine in lieu of dower, the Manor, Hundred, &c., of Barton, part 
of the possessions of the Earl of Warwick, and all forests, chases, woods, and 
property thereto belonging, and all money for wood sales from Lady-day, 1542. 

36th Henry VIII (1544-5) in a Survey in the Augmentation OflSce, the 
Surveyor accounted £8 2s. 8d., for the sale of shnibs in the Forest of Kings- 
wood, 5s. for bark sold to divers persons, and the sellers had a fee for the sales. 

Queen Catherine demised her possession to Henry Braine by Indenture 
dated March 2nd, 1st Edward VI (1547), for 21 years, and this, by the 
auditor's particulars, is certified to be all the lands the king had in Barton in 
the right of the said queen. 

King Edward the VI, April 27th, 1564, in consideration of £8,440 7s. 2^d, 
granted to the Earl of Pembroke and William Clarke, and the heirs of the 
Earl, the Lordship and Manor of Barton Regis, near Bristol, and everything 
* This Lord Berkeley built his house at Yate with timber from tlie forest. 



178 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

thereto belonging, and by virtue of this grant the Earl and Clarke were seized 
of the Manor and Hundred ; also they were to hold courts, as their pre- 
decessors had done. 

Edward the VI having thus granted away the Manor of Barton Regis, with- 
out any mention of forest or chase amongst all franchises thereby granted, 
the Eari of Pembroke never claimed the chase. From this earl the Manor of 
Barton Regis came to Sir Maurice Dennys, who died seized 7th Elizabeth, 
1565, but he had nothing in the Chase, as appears by his Inquisition p. m. ; 
from Dennys the premises passed to Thomas Chester, Esq., who died 28th of 
Elizabeth, 1585-6, seized of the said Manor and Hundred. Although no 
mention is made in the post mortem inquest, Kinqswood^ it is said, was 
afterwards foisted in, and the family claimed a moiety of the soil of the Chase. 
In the 41st of Elizabeth (1598-9), an information was brought against Chester 
for intrusion on the kings soil in the chase and felling 1000 oaks, and a trial 
at bar ensued in the 4th of James, (1606-7), when it was found by evidence on 
both sides for the king s title ; but further proceedings were twice delayed, as 
appears by several orders in Hilary Term, 4th James. But in the 15th of 
James (1617-18), a new information was brought against Chester, and on the 
17th January it was tried at bar, but after evidence and a privy verdict given 
against the King, the Attorney-General moved a Nolle prosequi because one 
Fitzgerald became a lessee of the coal mines only, receiving money of Chester 
and others ; and the cause of nonsuit was because the claimants could not 
prove the place to be within the chase where the woods were supposed to 
have been cut. 

It may here be observed with regard to the soil, that Henry Lord Berkeley 
having been made keeper of the chase, 1st Elizabeth, 1558-9, and so 
continuing till 11th of James, so long a time was the cause of the intrusion on 
the soil of the common ; for setting up his claim for 1000 acres in the 
chase, as belonging to his Manor of Bitton, he set up bounds there, and 
allowed Mr. Chester, who had got his grant of the Manor of Barton, to intrude 
also and set up bounds. 

With regard to Mr. Fitzgerald, I find that on the 11th of March, 1608-9, 
King James, by indenture of this date, grants to one Capt. Edward Fitzgerald, 
of Rathshillarth, co. Kildare, Ireland, in consideration of long and faithful 
services, for the term of sixty-one years from the 26th of January before this 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 179 

date, all coal works, coal pits, and mines of sea- coal, stone coke, and slate to 
be found within the forest of Kingswood, in co. Gloucester and Somerset, for 
the yearly rent of £40, with a covenant not to hurt the timber, wood, or 
underwood. It appears by a letter dated May 2, 1610, among State Papers, 
that the captain was hindered in his proceedings in the forest by certain parties, 
(alluding no doubt to Chester and others), who deny the soil to belong to 
His Majesty ; and this, notwithstanding a verdict and judgment appears 
given in His Majesty's favor, the suit having been carried on twelve years or 
more before the verdict by Mr. Tavenner, the late Surveyor of Woods. ^ 

The following proceedings in this suit explain all this; they are among 
the Exchequer Queen Remembrancer Records, B & A, James I, No. 360, 
Gloucester : — 

Sir Thomas Coventry, Attorney-General, plaintiff, i\ Richard Berkeley, Esq., 
Sir Theodore Newton, knight, and William Player, defendants. The bill sets 
out that the forest of Kingswood has been seized by the sovereign time out of 
mind, as their demesne as of fee, in the right of the Crown of England, and of 
all gi'ounds, woods, and soil, and hath from time to time appointed oflScers for 
preservation of the game of the said forest, with certain fees for executing the 
same. Accounts were rendered of the profits coming and arising therefrom, 
that is, of the woods and mines therein, as by divers and several records of the 
Court of Exchequer most fully and plainly appear. The bill also mentions that 
information was heretofore exhibited in the Exchequer by Sir Edward Coke, 
Attorney-General, versus Sir Richard Berkeley and William Chester for 
committing spoils of the woods and timber trees in certain parts of the forest 
grounds, to which the defendants pleaded not guilty, whereupon issue was 
joined and judgment given for the king. Notwithstanding the said judgment, 

» The long and vexatious suits between Fitzgerald and Player anii others, may be found in 
Exchequer Decreed and Orders, the King v, Chester, 1605, 3 Jac. I, vol. xxix, fol. 253 ; 3 Jac. I, 
vol. xxix, fols. 268, 301 ; vol. iii, fol. 47 ; 4 Jac I, vol. iii, fols. 224, 242 ; 5 Jac. I, vol. iii, fols. 
344, 350; vol. ii, fol. 239; voL iii, fols. 305, 317, 347; voL iv, foL 112; vol. v, fol. 102; 
5 Jac. I, vol. vi, foL 13, a.d. 1607 ; 7 Jac. I, voL viii, foL 58, a.d. 1609, and fol. 72 ; vol x, foh 
154; 9 Jac. I, vol. xii, fol. 298 ; 10 Jac. I, voL xiv, fol. 150; vol. xv, foL 185, a.d. 1612, and 
242 ; 11 Jac. I, vol. xvi, fol. 165, 193 ; 12 Jac. I, vol xix, fol. 151, 257, and 306 ; vol. xx, fol. 
147 ; 14, vol. xxiii, foL 170 and 278 ; a.d. 1616, in this last a Sun'ey is ordered; 16 Jac. I, vol. 
xxvi, fol. 43 ; vol. xxvii, fol. 15 ; 17 Jac I, vol. xxviii, fol. 26 and 160, this last trial contains the 
Nolfe prosequi. 



180 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

the Lord Stafford, Lord Berkeley, Sir Henry Billingsley, Sir Rowland Lacy 
and Sir Theodore Martin, knight, Richard Barkeley, Thomas Chester, William 
Player, Langley, and Weston, Esqs., being seized of divers manors and lands 
adjoining to the said forest, by colour thereof, and by reason that ''Meres, 
battaJls, and boundaries between the proper soil and freehold, of them the said 
defendants, and the said forest are much defaced and obscured," do unjustly 
challenge, claim, and share amongst themselves all the king's soil, ground 
woods, and other profits within the said forest, intending to make total 
" disesisn " of the king, and did about fifty years since enter into the said 
forest, upon the possession of the king, and hath ever since, and yet doth take 
the profits, by felling and cutting of the several woods grovdng and being 
within the said forest, and by digging of divers coal mines, coal pits, stone pits, 
and slate pits, and converting the same to their own use, the said profits 
amounting yearly to the value of £4,000. They also sent their beasts, sheep, 
and all manner of cattle into the said forest as freely as if it were their own 
proper inheritances, without yielding any accompt or pa^^ing any rent for the 
same. The Attorney-General therefore desired that a subpoena might be 
directed to the said defendants to appear in the Court of Exchequer, and to 
declare what parts of the forest they claimed and by what title they take 
the same. 

Sayer, in his History of Bristoly vol. ii, p. 262, says, that 10th April, 1609, 
the Duke of Lennox, the king's uncle, visited Bristol from Bath, when the 
sheriff with 200 horse, met him in Kingswood. 

12th James I (1614) Sir Greorge Chaworth was appointed the keeper of 
the forests of Kingswood and Filwood, vacant by the death of Lord Berkeley; 

The Records supply no further information about Fitzgerald : it is to be 
feared he was a ruined man. Player seems to have monopolized the coal trade, 
by which he made himself most unpopular to the Bristolians and others ; this 
is evident from the way in which he is mentioned in the following Survey, and 
by a petition, preserved in the Harleian M.S., 363, though not dated, belongs 
to this period. 

" The humble i>etition of the ^riiyor and Commonaltye of the Citye of Bristol, to the Right 

Honorable the Lordes of Her Mnjestye^s Most Honorable Privie Council, — 
" That, whereas th(>, poorer sort of the inhabitants of Bristol doe use only to bume stone coals al's 
sea coals in their houses, which coals they have had from Kingeswoode and other places adjojninge 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 181 

to the said citie, paying for the same not above threepence halfpenny for a bushel, being brought 
home to their houses, which hath been a very greate benefit unto theym, not being able to buy 
woodde, which is very deere and scarce to be hade. So it is that one Arthur Player, now inliabitant 
in the city of Bristol, of a gredy desyer of gayne to hymselfe, hath to the greate grievance of all the 
])OOTe people of the said citye and places adjoyninge engrossed and taken into handes all the coale 
pyttes in Kingswood aforesaid and other places in the county of Gloucester, and neere adjoyninge to- 

the said citie, and giveth yearly rentes to have and will shutte up savinge only 

some fewel at his pleasure, whereby the price of the said cr»le is much enhanced, and hath cutU*. 
and diminished the sackes of such as are to bring coal to the sayd cities, and bringeth e ver}'c sacko- 
to contayno but one bushel and three }>ackes for some special gayne to himcelfe. 
Upon supplication, i^jc. 

Fosbroke, in his History of GlottcestershirCy vol. i, p. 119, says that a violent 
commotion arose from the conduct of Player. 

The following copy of the execution of a Commission issued for the survey of 
Kingswood^ by John Norden, surveyor, discloses to us the state of afiairs at 
that time.' 

" As touchinge Kingswood, I have taken the plot thereof, and of everie 
division clayme within the same, all approved by the depositions of divers 
antient borderers uppon the said forest in everie parte, which claymes doe 
swallowe up the whole forest, not allowinge his Majestie the breadth of a foote. 
The timber, wood bushes, soyle, coale mines, and all other profittes altogether 
carryed from his Majestie by unknown rights. 

His Majestie is only allowed herbage for his deere. But everie pretended 
owner, in his division, cuts downe, consumes, and takes the profittes of all 
kinds of verte, at their pleasures. * * * * 

These pretended owners not beinge restrained of their wastinge the verte, 
there will not be browse within these few yeares to releeve the deere. 

There are within the forest four several waTkes, and as many keepers, all 
havinge under charge by their owne depositions not above 100 or 120 deere at 
the most. 

As for lodges there is not one now in use ; one there was of antiquitie. 



' Domestic Papers, James I, vol. Ixxxiv, Na 46. 

* There -was an earlier sur^'ey of the chase by John Ilencage, Kscj., 35th Henry VIII (1543-4), 
in which it is letumed ten miles in compass, besides the pnrlieus belonging to certain gentlemen. I 
have not succeeded in finding tin's. 
2 A 



182 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

knowne by the name of the old lodge, now utterly decayed. A second was 
built by and m the time of King Henry VIII, as is proved by others, the use 
whereof is altered and converted to an ale house, standing in the principall 
parte of the forest, upon a hill fittest for a lodge to keepe the deere, now fitt 
to harbor thieves and enimies to the game, standinge verie privately within the 
claime of one Mr. Richard Barkeley, who disposes of the same to his owne use. 

Everie keeper has 40s. per annum of his Majestic, besides other knowne and 
casual profittes incident to their places. 

Sir George Choworthe is master of the game, who hath under him a ranger, 
whose fee per annum is £111 8s. Ijd. These wages and fees are paid by the 
Sheriffe of Bristole yearly, who are allowed the same againe upon their accompt 
in the Exchequer. 

Sheepe and goates, most pemitious cattle, intolerable in a forest, make a far 
greater shew than His Majesties game. As for the goates, they have confounded 
by their barking and pelling off the barke infinite manie faire holleyes, the 
chiefest browse now in use. 

The coale mines also devoure the principall hollies in all partes of the forest, 
for the supportation of these pittes. His Majestic having no share of the 
profittes thereby in the browse fit for deere consumed, and the herbage dayely 
impaired by castinge of their coal mines over manie places of the forest. 

It is proved by others also that in former tymes, the keepers have used to 
cutt downe the boughs of oke in all partes of the forest, as big as a Scare 
or Soarell could turn over with his head, and to sell the wood thereof to their 
own use, which cutting has been lately discontynued, by reasons that everie 
pretended owner presumes at his owne wiU to cut downe his wood, and by that, 
their lybertie prevents the deere of that kind of browse, and force the 
keepers to either to take bushe browse or to famish the game in winter ; and 
the small browse that the keepers are enforced to take, the offall thereof the 
woodwards of everie division doe usurpe and take from the keepers, which 
makes them so much the more remisse in guardinge and relieving His 
Majesties game, insomuch that the game is allmost consumed. 

There are verie many cottages raysed upon the forest maintained under the 
toleration of the statute for erecting of houses neere unto mineralle places. 
But in this forest are far more erected than the necessitie of the coal mynes 
requireth, which cottages are a great spoyle of the browse, and much hiu^full 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



18^ 



to the game. Everie particular pretended owner of the divisions wherein they 
are erected receiving the rents for the same.* 

The coales yearly taken within the whole of the forest are deposed to be 
yearley worth clearley about £200, but by relation they * arie esteemed to be 
worth about £500 per annum at the leaste. 

There is one division claymed by Mr. Thoma.s Chester (against which it is 
said there is a judgment for the kinge), wherein is a place called Megg 
Thatchers Greene, upon and neere which, it is proved by others, that Mr. 
Chester hath caused to be felled and sould neere 40 timber trees since 
(February, 1613), and one that carried parte of them deposeth, that he carried 
about 30 tuns of timber ; and there is more lately sould to a tanner of Brights- 
toll, about 40 timber trees to be felled this season without present restraint. 
Also within the same division are dayly coales digged by one Player, the 
generalle farmer of the coales within the whole forest, but the judgment 
considered it were fit he were inhibited from digging. Quousque, &c.* 

There are within the forest ten severall clayms, viz : — 

Acres. 



Thomas Cliester, Esq. .. 


... 1300^1 


Richard Barkeley, Esq. 


540 


Sir Henry Billingsley .. 


810 


The Lord Barkeley 
The Lady Newton 


•••|l350 

' ■ 1 


The Lady Staflford 


22 


Mr. Weston 


83 


Sir Rowland Lacie 


28 


Mr. Evans of Bitton 


36 


Sh- Raulfe Sadler 


• •• ^^ > 



L uij cccuij xvm acres 
by estimation. 



If any graunts have paste firom his Majesties progenitors of their claimes it 

were fit to consider with what words, by what name, and in what lymits it is 

paste, and assigned to lye. 

(Signed) JOHN NORDEN. 

In Dorso.— The Surveyes of the Forest of Kingswood and the Chace 
of Fulwood, 1G15. 
1 In a suit in 1675, between Attoniey-General, Cheater and others, one of the witneH»e«, 
William Rodbum of Week, aged 84, yeoman, " remembers when there was only one cottage between 
Siston Brook and Dongeon's Crc^ss, near the Causeway." 
« I omit about FulwoocL 
2A» 



184 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

In 1629 (5th Cliarles I.) another trial was held between the Attorney 
General v. Berkeley, Chester, Newton and Player defendants. 

Among the special depositions of the witnesses there is much relating 
to the history of the cliase, therefore I will extract a few. 

Thomas Walter says it was sometines called a forest, sometimes a chase, and 
sometimes a heath ; that deer have been there for forty years past, and that 
James Dyer is the ranger ; also four deer-keepers, viz. : William Tucker, William 
Oregory, Nicholas Reed, and Richard Prosser, each has forty shillings a 
piece per annum, besides "Vails," that the wages are paid by the sheriff 
of Bristol. An old house in the middle of Kingswood is called a Lodge, 
but he never knew or heard of any keeper dwelling there; that thirty 
years ago (that would be 1599) several " Meerstones " were set up to 
mark the liberties claimed by the Lords of the Manors adjoining. 

Thomas Fido of Oldland, clidrk, aged sixty-eight, has known the forest about 
forty-eight years, that the king has now and ever had deer there, and 
that the Earl of Arundel has now the custody of the forest and the deer; 
he knows the Lodge, but never knew of any ranger being there; that 
the liberties which are claimed meet at a place called Oldwyfe's Cross alias 
Old Down Cross, about the middle of the forest. The claimants maintain 
that the soil belongs to them, and that only the feeding and browse belong 
to the king's deer; cannot say when the boundaries of the liberties were 
set up, as it was done before he can remember. About twenty cottages 
have been set up in Geemore, towards Jefferies Hill, and ten more towards 
Oldland and Hanham side, to which garden plots have been enclosed 
within the last ten years. Richard Prosser s walk in Oldland and Hanham 
extended from Conham to Siston Brook, William Gregory's is from Siston 
Brook to Mangotsfield Mill, William Tucker's extends from Mangotsfield 
Mill to Stapleton Sides, and Nicholas Reed from Stapleton Sides to 
Conham; these keepers have walked their said several walks without any 
<;ontradiction. They have also cut browse for the king's deer from time 
to time and have taken rnoneys at Laffor<Vs (sic) Gate, and sometimes at 
Breach Gate, at S. James's-tide and Paul's-tide, and at the end of Keynsham 
Bridge in Gloucestershire at S. Lawrence-tide of some strangers coming 
by with pack-saddles marking the same, but whether for chimenage or not 
he cannot say. He knows August Causway in the foi-est near Dimgeons 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 185 

Cross, Gossnell near the lodge. Golden Kaye and Broad Arrowhead Oak 
within the forest, also Gillard's Inn near the lodge. 

Giles Musley of Barton Regis, yeoman, aged fifty, knows the heath of 
Kingswood and " New Pools," near Stapleton.^ Deer belonging to king and 
queen have always been in Kingswood. Mr. James Dyer is the ranger, and lias 
supervision over four keepers. There is a lodge, but never a ranger or 
keeper dwelling there ; his evidence is on other points the same. 

Richard Prosser of Hannam, aged sixty, yeoman, gave similar evidence ; 
his grandfather was a keeper, and has heard that the deer first came out 
of Filwood, and in consequence of the wood being very thick in Kingswood 
the deer could not be destroyed. The keeper s wages are sometimes paid 
by the sheriff of Bristol, and lately by Lord Chaworth, then Sir George 
Chaworth, who had the custody of the deer; he has heard the lodge was 
built by Lord Berkeley, who was lieutenant. of the forest, for the keepers 
to meet in. The keepers have walked in these liberties without hindrance, 
and have lopped holly trees for the deer, and taken money as chimenage 
at certain times, as the other witnesses have stated. All passengers passing 
Roegate and Dungeon's Cross with wains, carts, and pack-saddles, viz., a 
penny for every pack-saddle and fourpence for every wain and cart, marking 
them with an iron mark." 

William Tucker of Stapleton, a baker, aged fifty-five ; he was a keeper 
of the deer twenty years; he speaks of the boundaries of the chase; his 
grandfather was a keeper, and his father and mother told him that when 
he died there were 1600 deer in Kingswood. 

James Dyer is the ranger under the Earl of Arundell, he is paid 
^3 8s. l^d., and the keepers 40s. each per anniun in wages; he knew the 
Lodge, and also another lodge near the pound at Downinge. Has heard 
that the keepers have formerly cut oak and ash for browse. He speaks of 
the tolls collected, and that it is called " conducting " money or cheminage 
or wheelage. Conceives the money is paid for aiding travellers and strangers 

* These were old Pennant quarries, now called FIshpondH. 

' In the reign of Eliaibetli one Tliomas Pytley was one of the kocpew of the forest : this 
appears on the verge of a flat monumental ledger stone in the Church of S. Philip, Bristol, in- 
scribed, " Here . lieth . the . Bo<ly . of . Thomas . I^ytley . Symtims . kcpiT . of . the . Qvcen's 
. Forest." In the centre of the stone is a representation of a cross 1k)w and a dog. 



186 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

through and over Kingswood, if they happen to be out of the way or crave 
assistance; he knows Conham, Stanshall Oak in Kingswood, Derridge 
adjoining Kingswood, the Rudges near Hanham, the " Hounge Splotts " near 
to Broad Faulte, Pigg's Green, &c. 

Edward Woolie speaks of the Lords of the Manors holding certain parts 
ever since it was bought of one Dennys who purchased the same from the 
King. When the said Manors were entire in the king's hands or his farmers, 
the same parts in Kingswood were undivided and open, and that the marks 
and meers which now divide the same one from another were set up since 
the same were bought from the King, and by direction of the persons who 
bought them from Dennys. 

WiUiam Gregory, one of the keepers, aged sixty, in stating the boundaries 
speaks of Deveridge and Dungeon's Cross ; he knows Kingswood Lolge ; 
never knew a ranger or keeper dwell there ; the keepers generally use it 
as an ale house and to shelter or warm themselves. 

Richard Haynes says that the Lords of Barton, Bitton, Hannam and 
others have been reputed owners of these liberties in Kingsvrood ; has never 
known any division of the liberties. There were very ancient marks and 
meers when he first knew Kingswood, but about twenty years ago new 
marks and stones were set up in some of the ancient bounds by direction 
of Mr. Richard Barkley and Mr. Chester. 

All the above witnesses and some others whose depositions were the same 
were given in favour of the plaintiff, the Attorney General. 

The following are from witnesses in behalf of the defendants from special 
depositions. Glouc. 5th Charles I. (1G29) 1 Mic. No. 191. 

John Harding of Bitton, yeoman, aged seventy-eight. He knows that 
those who have been Lords of the Manor of Bitton dig coals and stone 
and cut down trees within their manors; that Mr. Rob: Weekes (see p. 
110 ante) who preceded Sir Theodore Newton about fifty years ago cut 
down about one hundred loads of wood on that part of Kingswood for 
his own use, and not long after Mr. Coulthurst, who bought that part of 
Mr. Weekes', cut down a great quantity at a place called Golden Caye, 
and made charcoal of it, and then enclosed the ground ; but two or three 
years after the poor people pulled it all down, and it has been open ever 
since. The Westons, who have lands in Bitton^ have done the same, and so 



.HISTORY OF BITTON 187 

has Lord Stafford in Oldland. All the lords and owners of the waste of 
Kingswood have, as long as he can remember, done the same in their 
several liberties, and leased coal works, which have been quietly enjoyed. 

John Marne, of Barton Regis, yeoman, aged seventy, deposed that the 
lands of Newton, Berkeley, and Chester called their "Liberties," and the 
land held by Wm. Player, and called the liberty of Henry Billingsley, Esq., 
all lie upon. It is well known how far each liberty extends by ancient 
meers, &c. 

John Ball, yeoman, of Mangotsfield, aged eighty, stated that about 
twenty years ago new stones were set up where' ancient trees before stood 
to divide the lands. By strangers, Kingswood is called a forest, but the 
usual name among neighbours is Kingswood Heath, but his father used to 
call it Kingswood Heath Chase to the forest of Filwood. 

John Noble of Bitton, Collier, aged 70, deposed that he knew the 
manor of Bitton belonging to Lord Berkeley and Sir Theodore Newton, 
and the groimds which divide it from the Manors of Barton Regis, which 
begin at Conham, by Stradbrook, Elder's Cross, Garratts Mead, and so to 
Bnmbles, the Lords of the Manor usually made their drift beginning at 
those places, and so drove to Bitton and Oldland to his knowledge for 
sixty years. 

Thomas Greorge of Barton Regis, aged eighty-three, deposed that the 
Manor of Bitton extends unto and through and beyond the waste or 
Common of Kingswood northwards, and is well known by ancient marks 
on each side. Other depositions are recorded, but they do not contain 
anything of particular interest. What the issue of this suit was, can- 
not be found. 

It may be worth while to observe that in the Survey by Norden 1616 
he says a good deal about the liberties, though in the old map of 
Kingswood, dated 1610, they are not laid down nor marked in any way. 

That map is copied from the original in the possession of S. W. Chester 
Master, Esq., of Knole Park and Cirencester Abbey ; on its margin is noted, 
"This mapp of Kingeswoodd as it is now fynished (excepteng the trewe 
placinge of the lodge and the addinge of the Borderinge to same), was 
received the twentithe of September 1610, by U. Cox, Esq., ye persons 
whose names are subscribed to vppon and examined 

Fitzherbert Warre, Anno Dom'i, 1610." 



188 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

Many of the spots mentioned in the foregoing depositions will be found 
in it; the map was discovered among the archives of the late Mr. Chester 
of Knole and Cirencester Abbey, in whose family the Barton Begis property 
has been held from the time Mr. Thomas Chester purchased it in the reign 
of Elizabeth. 

During the last fifty years the whole of the manor has been sold, principally 
to the lease-holders with the exception of the manorial rights, which in June, 
1875, were sold and conveyed to Messrs. Handel Cossham and Joseph 
Wethered, colliery proprietors. 

Before proceeding with the fixture history of Kingswood, it may be well 
to give a short account of Bristol Castle, as its connection with the forest 
will soon come to an end. In early records it is called the " Great Dungeon 
Tower ;" its outworks were very large and extended to Lawford's frate, 
which is worthy of note, because the forest came close to it ; in the reign 
of Stephen, as is found in Barratt's History, p. 191, it was the strong- 
hold of free-booters and robbers, and exempt from the jurisdiction of the 
citizens. In a petition to the privy council from the mayor and citizens, 
they complain that Sir John Strafford, knt. (who was appointed by Queen 
EHzabeth the constable of the castle) never resided, seldom visited, and left 
a mean deputy who allowed all sorts of bad characters, as many as forty- 
nine families, to reside there : that the castle not being within the 
jurisdiction of the city was a refuge of malefactors of all sorts. In 1630, 
5 Car. I., the King granted to the mayor and citizens the Castle of Bristol, 
separating it from the county of Gloucester, and annexing it to the city. 
When the civil war began the fortifications of the castle were repaired; 
in 1642-3 the castle was garrisoned by parliamentary forces, and Colonel 
Essex took upon himself the governorship of the castle; in 1643, July 24th, 
Prince Rupert attacked the city, and on the 27th the garrison marched 
out, and Rupert became the governor of the city and castle. In 1645 the 
parliamentary rebels determined to recover the Castle and City of Bristol, and 
on August 21st, 1645, General Fairfax and Lieut. -General Cromwell were 
quartered at Kainsham — on Friday the 22nd — Fairfiix and Cromwell removed 
to Hanham their head quartera, and the next day to Stapleton.^ In Sep- 
tember following, Cromwell was ready to storm ; but on the 11th of that month 

1 Rritish Museum Pamphlet, fol. Slicct, Xo. I). 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 18^ 

the castle ^ surrendered : Philip Skippon was made the governor ; 
and after him Adrian Scroop, who was the last governor of the castle. 
After Cromwell was proclaimed Protector (in 1653), orders were given in 
1655 for demolishing the castle, which were carried out in the following 
year. It is noticeable, that the castle is called the Dungeon, and in the 
foregoing depositions, all the witnesses speak of the "Dongeon's Cross,'' it 
being within a short distance of the city gate, and the nearest to the 
castle, it might be very fitly called the " Dongeon's Cross ;" if so, the tradition 
that its present name, " Don John's Cross," is in commemoration of the 
resting of the corpse of some Spanish nobleman on its way to Spain falls 
to the ground. 

Before the expiration of the grant of the chase to Chaworth and during 
the ci\il wars and the troublous times of Charles I. it was utterly destroyed ; 
for those that pretended to the soil there caused all the deer to be killed, 
and cut down great quantities of wood there, and built, or permitted to 
be built almost 300 cottages, with great inclosures, granting leases and 
taking fines for the same as if it were their own lands. Before the civil 
wars there were no cottages in the chase, and very few coal mines.* 

We now come to the time of the Commonwealth and by order of a 
Parhament in 1653, the following survey was made : 

"A survey of Kings wood comonly call'd Kingswood Chase, al's Kingswood 
Forest, al's Kingswood with ye rights members and appurtenances thereof, 
scituate lying and being in the parishes of Phillip and Jacob in Bristol, of 
Bitton of Mangarsfild and of Stapleton in the County of Gloster, late p'cel of 
the possessions of Charles Stuart late King of England or of Henrietta Maria 
the relict of said late King, as p'cell of her joynture as a Queen of England, made 
and taken by us whose names are hereunto subscribed by vertue of a comm'on 
granted to us by the Hon""*- the trustees appyted by act of y* commons 
assembled in parliament for the sale of y® Honor* Mann" and Lords'pp* 
heretofore belonging to y® late King, Queen, and Prince under their hands 
and seales. 

"All that peece and parcell of pasture and woody ground comonly 
called Kingswood Chase scituate in the parishes of Bitton Mangotsfield 
and Stapleton in y* County of Glouc. as it is now abutted and bounded, 

* Old MSS. penes H.T.E. 
2 B 



190 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

beginning at a smith's shop called Sims shopp, at y® road which passeth 
y"* said chase from Bristole towards London and neere vinto a stone 
standinge in y' side of y* said road called Dungons Crosse and over 
against a smith's shop called Sym's shop passing northwards along by 
certaine enclosed lands called Deane and Chapters land behind a cottage 
and garden, in y* tenure of one John Wood alias Burges, imto an old 
oake standinge neare John Rod's gate and thence alonge behinde and on 
y® west side of a cottage and garden in y® tenure of Henry Smith and 
from thence passeth through y* middle of William Coxe's garden imto y* 
south east corner of Wni. Coxe's cottage and along by his house and y*" 
hedge adjoyning to his house inclosinge his garden on y* west and soe 
alonge behinde y® cottage and ground in y* tenure of Jno. Coxe into 
Scorsbyry bottom and being thus farr abutted on y® west by y* said Dean 
and Chapters land and soe passing over Scorsburrough bottom and up 
Croft end lull passing by y® dwelling house of Thomas Eoach standinge 
within certaine inclosures in y® tenure of Mr. Chester and so along behind 
two cottages and ground in y*' tenure of Wm. Stone and of one Thomas 
Maynard unto y'* north east end of certaine inclosures called y® Croft s end 
aforesaid being abutted on y** west by y* said Roach's house and Croft's 
end grounds aforesaid and thence passinge westward along Row Green unto a 
way or land's end from y® said chace being abutted on y* south by y* aforesaid 
Croft's end land and thence turninge northwards againe over y* said way 
or land unto another inclosure in y* tenure of y* aforesaid Mr. Chester called 
Croft's End and soe passing behinde a new cottage in y* tenure of one Mr. 
Williams unto y* north-east comer of y** said Croft's end being abutted 
on y® west by y* said Croft's end grounds, and from thence turning westwards 
along by y' said inclosures unto another lane end of y* said chace called 
Newlands Lane and thence passinge northwards over y* said lane and along 
y Gosse's Hill imto Rowgate lane and soe on unto a brook or rivulet, 
Gossie Hill's Gully beinge abutted hitherto on y* west by certaine inclosures 
in y* tenure of y* said Mr. Chester and soe on from Gosshills Gullye up 
alonge by Constable leas unto Rowgate and y* said road from BristoU towards 
Mangotsfield includinge y° grounds called y® Constables leas aforementioned 
beinge abutted on y* west by Mrs. Smith's grounds and from Rowgate 
passinge eastward neerunto y"" said road way along by y® manner house and 



HISTORY OF BITTOK 191 

ground called y* Bidgeway unto a gate called Longlands Gate being abutted 
on y* north by y* said Bidgeway house and ground and from thence along 
unto BuUybrooke being abutted on y* north by a certaine house 
and ground called y* Inn's house and ground, and by Henry Silcox house 
and grounds, and by a close called Coles Parke, and by Mr. Barkley's 
lands, and by Chamell's Hill grounds adjoyninge unto BuUybrooke 
aforesaid and thence passing still eastward along by Wm. Long's house 
and behind y® new cottage and garden of William Goldinge, and soe along 
unto Nicholas Milson's house end being abutted on y* north from BuUy- 
brooke by y** house and grounds in y tenure of y*' said Wm. Long and 
John Hondes and thence passing northward by y® said house in the tenure 
of Milson aforesaid unto BuUybrooke at y® foot of y® new pooles and thence 
unto Bubley's Gate Lane being abutted in y* west of y® house and lands 
in the tenure of y* said Milson and by John Nation's house and the close 
caUed the Heath Close and thence along by Mr. Wyatt's quarry close and 
grove unto a gate and lane leading to WUliam WoUeys miU being abutted 
on y* west and north by Mr. Wyatts quarr-close and y* grove and thence 
passing eastward unto a house in y® tenure of Wm. HUl being abutted 
on y® north by a certaine close called y* Comcroft Close and by Jno 
Ponges house and grounds and y® house and grounds in y^ tenure of Walter 
Houbn and by y* house and grounds in y* tenure of Wm. HUl aforesd., 
and thence returning southward unto y* south-west comer of LongwaUs 
ground being abutted on y® east by y* LongwaUs grounds and thence passing 
north-eastward unto an *'ash" called y* Bound Ash at Hoyslades where 
begins Mangerfield parish, being abutted thither on y* north by y* LongwaUs 
house grounds before mentioned and thence passing along by Erford's Lane, 
passing by Heyslades grounds and soe along winding towards y* east 
behind Thos. Goldings little cottage and thence passing along northward by 
Lantham's Poole and soe downe Bromleys Heath unto Brimble Gate and 
thence returning towards y® south surrounding y* said heath passing along 
by Mr. Players mansion house and grounds caUed Cleaven HiU and soe 
along by y® east side of Lantham Pool before mentioned and thence south- 
eastward passing behind Wm. WoUey's cottage and garden and soe unto 
Downinge Greene being abutted on y* north by divers lands in y® tenure 

of Mr. Player and soe passinge northward along Downings Green behind 
2 B» 



192 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

y* cottage and garden of Thomas Eshar and soe on to Sodbury Gate and 
Koad and thence eastward surrounding y* said green unto y* gate called 
Westerlye Gate — and thence returning southward along by Wm. NoUeys 
gate soe unto y* south-west corner of y* said Downing's Green against 
Jno. Bamptons house and yard and thence passing westward behind Henry 
Sandys cottage and garden and unto Roger Phipps h(^ase and thence toward 
y* south up a road toward Kainsham unto a house in y* tenure of Thomas 
Wickwicks and thence passing eastward behind two cottages in y* tenure 
of Thomas Lovell and Ellen Smyth and soe along to Pathwayes Comer — 
and thence returneth southward unto y® highways inclosing and surrounding 
y cottage and garden in y* tenure of Richard Clement and thence returning 
along by y*' north-west comer of a close Wm. Midfords Stable Leas passing 
southward and y'' eastward «alonge by y* outward bound of y* said Stable 
Leas and thence passinge southward and eastward along by certaine groimds 
caUed y* Chamalls and soe along by Chamalls Stile and by a dwelling 
house in the tenure of one — Fox into Mangerfield bottom along Siston s 
brook e unto y^ highway or road called London Road from Dungell's 
Cross before mentioned — being abutted on y* east by a certaine ground 
called Sistons common — and thence returninge south-westward behind 
Wm. Hardings cottages and garden unto Grimsbury lane above Mr. 
Woodward 8 house, being abutted on y* south by divers grounds and y* 
mansion of y'' said Mr. Woodward and thence winding westward and then 
southward alonge Grimsbury 's hill soe alonge Cock rode hill towards the 
windmill in y® tenure of Mr. Newton — passing behind divers cottages and 
gardens said to be in Mr, Weston's liberty and hereafter mentioned — ^and 
thence returning eastward downe Workmans green and thence southward 
unto y* highway towards Mr. Newton s mannor house passing behind certaine 
cottages and gardens in y* tenure of John Harris and of widdow Marks 
and of Widow Fford and of one Weekes and thence passing alonge y^ 
said lane unto Herring lane end and soe on westward and southward over 
y® hill called Martins Horse hUl along by certaine grounds in y° tenure of 
Captaine Sherriffe and soe alonge by a house and grounds in y* tenure 
of one Thomas Lewise and behind a new encroached garden in his occupation — 
and so on into Cadbury's bottom and thence south-eastward up Jeffery's hill 
into the roadway from Bristol to Bath and soe passing northward up y* said 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



193 



road unto y* door of Henry Stone whose tree crosses y* said road and thence 
passes southwards behind two cottages and gardens in y® tenure of — Bussie 
and Barrett and thence retuminge westward along by Pressor gate and soe 
on behind John Lester's cott and garden unto Cadimore brook and soe 
windinge alonge by y* enclosed lands unto Hannam land and thence over 
Jeffery's hill passinge behind a garden in y® tenure of John Wilson and soe 
along downe Conham's hill unto y* lower end thereof against William 
Williams's tenement and Mr. Hayes at y"" lower end of Stroadbrooke and 
thence returning up y* said brooke unto y"" south-east comer of certaine 
lands called Deanridge lands and soe alonge by Deanridge house unto y® 
north-east comer of y* said lands and thence returninge westward by 
Deanridge gate and soe along southward rounding y® said grounds called 
Deanridge lands unto y® river Avon and thence retuminge short towards 
y* north-west - passing along by Deanridge meed unto y* north-west comer 
of y* said meed and thence passing northward rounding y® outward bound 
of certaine grounds called y* Harris hill unto y® north-east corner of y® 
said grounds near unto Bath rode aforesaid and thence retuminge westward 
along by y* said Deanridge lands and house in y* tenure of one — ffox 
and soe along westward passing behind a cottage and plott of ground in 
y* tenure of Wm. Curroll and y® cott and ground of John Jarveis and y" 
cott and ground of Richard Williams and soe along by Dean and Chapter's 
lands till wee come over against Syms y® smith's shopp retuminge north- 
ward unto y* place where wee first began— and conteyninge in all by 
admeasurement three thousand four hundred thirty-two acres and halfe, 



VIZ : — 



Chesters Division contains 
Barkley 
Players 

Newton 1st Division 
2nd 
3rd 
Rochester 1st 
2nd 
3rd 



..• 880f 
.-. 720i 
... 571 

213i) 

193 U04 

198 ; 

201 \ 

275 Ul4i 
38|) 



194 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

Stafford •.. ... .. ..* 17^ 

Westons ... .•. ... .,. 63^ 

Creswicks and Wickhams ... •.. 60^ 

3,432^ 

"Which said chace is claymed by 
1. "Mr. Chester, All his in St. Philips. A list of the cottages is given 
Libertie or and their value then follows (fol. 19), " Mr. Chester's 

Division." Clayme '' in these words : — 

Memorandum that Thomas Chester Esq*"®* vpon Sum'ons given did 
appeare and p'duce a declarac on of a Clayme to divers Manny's 
and Lands made before the Barrens of y* Exchequer & exemplified 
wherein was reeyted as followeth, viz** 
That Henry y* Eight by Letters Pattents dated the 28*^ of ffebruary in y* 
35th of his Raigne did grant vnto Queene Katherine during his Life {inter 
alia) y Lo^P" and Mann' of Barton Regis neare Bristoll and Hundred of 
Barton Regis, and his Parke of Barton w^^ all and singular fforrests Chases, 
walkes, Circuitts, inclosures, Compassings, Asserts, Purprestures, Parkes, 
Warrens, woods and vnd' woods w'^ th'apprtenances in y* said Coimty of 
Glocester p'cell of y® possessions of y® late Earle of Warwicke, &c. And 
alsoe that Edward y** Sixt did by Lett" Pattents dated 27"* Aprill : 7** grant 
vnto Wm. Earle of Pembrooke and Wm. Clarke, Gent, all y* said Mann' of 
Barton Regis and Hundred of Barton Reeris in y* Countv of Glocester w*** y* 
Rights members and app'tenances thereof, late p cell of y* Lands and 
possessions of y* Joynture of Queene Katherine, Ann all and singular Lands 
and tenem*" woods and und' woods growing and being in the Towne feilds 
Parish or Hamlett of Barton Regis or elsewhere w*^ in y* said Countye to y* 
said Mann' by any meanes belonging or in any waies app'tsineing Habendum 
to y"" said Earle, and to W"" Clarke and to y® heires of y* said Earle ffor eu''* 
Together w*^ all Courts Leete veiw of ffranke pledge And all that did or 
hereafter might or ought to app'taine to y® said Courtes, w**' all ffree Warrens, 
and whatsoeuer to them did belong. 

AVliich said W""- Earle of Pembrooke and W"* Clarke, Gent, did convay 
the same 18*" Junii 10^ Eliz. vnto Maurice Dennis, Kt., and his heires 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 



195 



for ever, ffrom whom y® same descended to Thomas Chester, Esq., y® 
present possessor of y® said Mann'" and Hundred : All w"* was sett 
fForth more flPuUye and largely in y® Claime before menc'oned. 

But fforasmuch as noe Pattent was p'duced whereby y® said Chace of 
Kingswood was past away ffrom y® Crowne : Neyther in y^ 
RecytaUs of y"* Pattent menconed in y® Declaracon of the said 
Clayme was there any menc'on made of any grant of y* said 
Chace vnto W"" Earle Pembroke and W°*- Clarke, Gent., neyther 
in the Recytall of their grant vnto Maurice Dennis, Kt., therefore 
wee return y® same in possession valued as aboue said. 



2. " Stableton 
Division." 

3. Mangerfield 
Division. 

** Hanham, 
First Division. 



Hanham, Second 

Division 
Hanham, Third 

Division 



Described as particularly as the former one, with list and 

value of Cottages ; " claymed by Sir Maurice Berkley." 
Described in the same way as the others, and claymed 

by PhiUp Langley, Esq. 

(Folio or Page 33.) 
"Als Mr. Newton's first part." 
It is then described as being in the north 

part of the chace, and in the parish of 

Bitton, and measures 
In the parishes of Bitton and Hanham, and 

measures 
In the parish of Bitton and Hanham, is on 

the south side of the chace, and measures 198 



213 2 



193 



Jones New House, lately erected situated near Hanham Wind- 
mill, described as "a fayre dwelling house 
erected by Mr. Newton." 

Wind Mill on Wind mill hill, near the last named house. 

Besides these two items all the cottages in 
the three divisions are described, also : 
"the Trees and Cole Mynes." 



Mr. Newton's 
Clayme. 



(Folio 41), is the charter of Henry IV, 
m. 35, viz., the grant to John Blunt to 
cut wood, &c., in Kingswood; and an 
Inquisition post mortem, John Blunt, 17 



196 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

Edward II, No. 53, wherein it is laid 

down that he died seized of 200 acres in 

Kingswood Chace. 

Mallett's First K t... ^ tt i 

^. .. f In Jiitton and Hanham, measures ... 201 

Division ) 

Mallett's Second) ^. 

^. . . > Ditto ... ... .. ... 275 

Division ) 

Mallett's Third 1 ^. 

„ . . f Ditto ... •.. ... ... 30 2 

Division ) 

Mallett's Clay me (Folio 46) said to clayme 

as part of the Manor of Bitton, but no 

person appeared for him. 

Stafford s Libertie In Bitton and Ilanham ... ... 17 2 

Stafford (Sir John) none appeared. 

Weston's Division In Bitton and Hanham ... ... 63 3 

Weston's Clayme, is an Indenture of one 

Henry Weston, by ancient deeds as reported, 

but he did not attend. 

Mr. Dyer claimes to hold his house by a grant from 

Mr. H. Weston, but no evidence was 

produced. 

Jefferays Hill and They claime under an Indenture dated 28th 

Conham Hill December, 9th Car. I, from Sir John Lacy 

being Wickham and Anthony Sands to Giles and Andrew 

and Creswickes Mursley, of the Common of Jeffereys Hill, 

Liberties. measures ... ... ... 6000 

Creswickes claime to cottages and inclosures about 

Jefferys Hill. Mr. John Creswicke claims 
by a Poll Deed 21, 8th Elizabeth, from 
John Reede and John his son to John 
Lacy of Bristol and John Lacy of London, 
all the Manor of Hanham Abbotts; but 
they produced, no evidence and therefore 
we value them. 

Deere about thirty. 



HISTOBY OF BITTOK 197 



"MEMORANDUMS." 

"There used to be 1500 — 1800, and sometimes 2000 Deere. Some Free- 
holders in Bitton & Hanham claim Right of Common in the Chace for all 
their cattle. W"- Day of Bitton, who holds of Mallet as chief Lord, & 
M'- Bryce Seed of Upton as holding of y* Honor of Gloster, & Sir John 
Seymour claims as belonging to an Impropriation. All claim by Custom 
& usage & none by Grant. 

" Also M""* rile. Jones of Kensington claims a right of Common of pasture 
as belonging to an ancient Site of a Manor in Bitton, & to other Lands 
& Tenements, & also part of s^ Chace called Jay More, by ancient grant, 
but no proof. 

"The division of the Chace among the several Lords, was made by a 
mutual consent as tis said, or Combinacion & not by Grant from the 
Crown." 

At FoUo 65 is : 

" An abstract of y* Improved value of y® said Chace p' an'u, and of y* 
Acres, and of y* grosse value for woodes and vnd"" woodes therin. 

li. s. d. 

( Totall imp ued value p' ann' 278 01 06 

Chesters ^ r^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ gg^ 3 ^^ 

( Totall imp'ued value p' ann' 155 15 00 

Stableton^ Totall of acres 720 2 00 

Libertie (^^^^^11 ^f Q^^gg^ ^^^^ 342 10 OO 

Manger- ^ Totall imp'ued value p' ann' 210 04 00 

field < Totall of acres 571 00 

Libertie (Totall of Grosse value 115 00 00 

Hanhams T Totall imp'ued value p' ann' 267 19 06 

3 De- < Totall of acres 604 2 00 

visions (TotaU of Grosse value 145 00 00 

Malletts r Totall imp'ued value p'ann' 218 11 [8] 

3 De- < Totall of acres 514 2 00 

visions ' Totall of Grosse value cccl7i. 

2 c 



198 HISTORY OF BITTON, 

Staffords ( Totall imp'ued value p' ann' 007 00 00 

Libertie i Totall of acres 017 2 00 

Westons ( TotaU imp'ued value p' ann' 055 07 04 

Libertie I TotaU of acres 063 02 00 

Wiek- ^ 

hams and j^^^^^ imp'ued value p' ann' 048 01 04 

f" ' TotaU of acres OGO 1 00 

■wicks 

Libertie , 

Totall imp'ued value of y* whole Chace p' ann' mccxliZi. iiijd. 

Totall of acres 3432 2 00 

TotaU of Grosse value mmhili. xs. 

And of Deere xxxli. Jeremie Baines. 

"This Survey was pTected this 26 day of May, 1652, by ns 

John Fiske, 

John Haddocke, 

Samuel Cottman. 

Exd. by Wm. Webby 1651." 

After this survey and a report of the commission, the records do not 
supply any information as to what action was taken thereupon ; it was 
a time of great national trouble, everything being disorganized; therefore 
the probability is that nothing was done : the lawless became more law- 
less, more inclosures were filched, and every deer was kiUed. After the 
Eestoration of Charles II (Cromwell having died September 3rd, 1658), 
aU their transgressions were pardoned by the Act of Indemnity. 

The year after the Restoration Sir Humphry Hooke was by patent dated 
March 5th, 1661, appointed ranger for life, with £40 a year for the maintenance 
of keepers, but he did not put in any deer nor pay any keepers. 

Under date of October 14th 1661, a warrant was issued to certain gentlemen 
to inquire about the Chase. The following is a copy of their return to the 
Rt. Honble. the Lord High Treasurer of England.* 

May it please y' Lordshipp, 
In obedience to your Lordship'g warrant of y*" 14th Oct"^ 1661, to us & others directed, 

' From Old MS. poiios H.T.E. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 19^ 

wee have called before us y® severall Lords of y« soyle of ye said Chace & also y® inhabitants 
& Commoners of ye severall Parishes of Bitton, Mangottsfield, Stapleton & S* Phillip's 
near BristoU who clayme a Right of Com'on there, tfe upon strict enquiry & Examination 
of deeds &; evidences, wee cannot find the King hath any right of soyle in y® s* Chace, & 
that by reason of y® many Quarries & Cole-pitts, & y totall destruction of his Maj**** Game 
& Woods there it is altogether unfittinge to be replenished with Deere. 

We have therefore treated with y® severall Lords of the soyle, viz., S' Jno. Newton, wlio 
hath subscribed for to sett out one third part of y* lands for his Majesties share, & y® 10th 
part of y" Cole, as it is landed within his Maj"®" share or lott to y® use of his Maj*^ within 
his Lordshipp or Royalty, & alsoe one third part of ye lands & y* 10th part of y« Colinge 
in like manner, to y« use of y Commoners & y** poor as in our Rules prescribed is hereunto 
annexed. 

The Widdow Player &; Phillip Langley Esq. have subscribed to sett outt y* like shares, 
as is before & by y* Rules annexed sett downe, out of their Royalty. 

John Tooke Esq. who holdeth y* Royalty belonginge to y« Lady Berkeley duringe her 
life, hath in like manner subscribed. But in regard Sir Maurice Berkeley deceased hath 
soe entailed y® Estate that noe good title in Law, without Act of Parliament, can be made 
to his Majesty, for his Majesties share, upon reasonable Time & Rent for Terme of 31 
yeares or more. 

The Lord Hawley & Sir John Warre, who are guardians to y* Heyrese of John Mallett 
Esq., deceased, in regard of her minority are willing to condescend to sett out y® like 
shares & become Tenants to his Majestic, in like manner, for y* Terme aforesaid in her 
royalty. 

Thomas Chester Esq. hath subscribed to sett out a 3rd part of y* Lands to his Majestic, 
& a like 3rd part to y® Commoners. But refuseth to part with y* 10th part of y* Colinge 
to his Majestic or y« poore, for trespassers in theyr shares. And would reserve the Colinge 
wholy to himself, & become his Majesties Tenant for his Majesties share, upon Reasonable 
Rent & ffine, soe that all Cottages enclosed by him & his Preddecessors Authority, w«^ are 
very many, &; all assarted lands thereto annexed, may be allotted to his owne share, with y» 
Rents thereupon reserved. 

Wee have also taken y® subscriptions of most of y* Inhabitants, that have Right of 
Common within the Libertys of Bitton, Mangottsfield, & Stapleton, who for the greatest 
part have subscribed for enclosure, according to our Rules annexed, iflf y' Lordshippe shall 
approve thereof. 

Wee have taken but few subscriptions from y« Commoners that claime in Mr. Chester's 

Liberty of S* Phillip's beinge unwillinge to proceed any further w*^ them, in Regard of 

Mr. Chester's nonconformity to y* p** of y' Colinge & other things aforementioned, untill 

wee knew y' Lordshipp's future pleasure therein. 

My Lord. Havinge considered of our whole proceedings, wee conceive it best for those 
2& 



200 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

Lords of y** Soyle that have fully consented &; subscribed, should become His Majesties 
Tenants, upon reasonable Fines & Rents, They beinge best able to manage y® Commoners 
& Cottagers to conformity. We alsoe conceive that if Commission of Oyer & Terminer 
were but awarded by y^ Lordshipp &; taken out (tho* it were never putt in Execution) it 
would be a speedy means to bring all persons to conformity, to Augment his Majesties 
fines & rents to l)e reserved, And to make y** Encroachers and Cottagers sensible of his 
Majesties gratious Act of Oblivion, who for y* most part, thro' those longe distracted late 
times, have forgotten His Majesties Interests, & doe believe it to be y*" owne inheritance ; 
W* wee humbly oflfer to yo' L'^shipp's more serious consideration, & shall be ready to obey 
yo' L"*pps further Commands herein. 

My Lord, 
Y' Lordshipp's most Humble Servants. 



In 1666 another Commission was issued to survey the Chase as appears by 
the following record. 

Gloucr. To tfie petty Conatahles & tythingmen of the Pysh. of Bitton dk Tything- 

men of Oldland & Hannam in ye ad. County of Gloater^ & to every 
dk any of them. 

Warrant of Whereas the Kings most excellent Maty, by his Letters Patent or 

the Com. to Commission under y* scale of his Majesties Court of Excheq*^ to us & 
examine into others directed as well for inquiring examining of all & all y* manner 
the Chace, of nusances, offenses, encroachments, destnictions, wasts & spoyles what, 

right of Com- soever committed & done within his Maj^ forest or Chace of Kingswood 
mons, 20 Sep. in the s* County of Glouc' as also for y* disafforesting, dischasing- 
1666. enfranchising & improving y* same, hath authorised & empowered us 

(amongst divers other things) to summon & call before us all & every 
the Lords or pretended Lords, Freeholders and other pretended owners of any part of y* 
soyle of y* s* forests or Chace, or that claime or pretend to have any right of Conmion or 
other benefit or advantage out of y* same, to the end their respective rights & interests 
may be ascertained and made forth, and that they may have such benefit & advantage of y* si* 
deafforestation & enfranchisement as by y* s** Commission is directed. These are therefore 
in his Maj*'*" name to will & require you or some of you or one of you to give public notice 
(by publishing this precept in your parish Church & Chappells, upon Sunday next after 
divine service & sermon ended, to all y® s** Lords, freeholders, & other persons before 
mentioned within y* parish & tythings to appear before us at the house of Samuel 
Sandford in Westbury upon Trym upon Friday the fifth day of October next by ten of the 
Clock in the forenoon for the purposes before mentioned, and that you bee then & there 



HISTOBY OF BITTOX. 201 

present to make a return of the precept, together with a note or list in writing of the 
names of all such Lords, Freeholders, & other persons within your said parish & tythings 
that claime or pretend to have any right or interest to any part of y" soyle or common of 
y® 8* Forest or Chace, as aforesaid, & hereof you are not to fail: given under our hands & 
scales this twentieth day of Sep' in the eighteenth yeare of his now Maj. reigne, Annoqu* 
Domini, 1 666. 

(Signed) 



Tho. Tracy 


e 


Geo. Probert 


e 


Tho. Carpender 


e 


W" Jones 


© 


Tho Pritchard 


e 



The following extracts taken from a petition laid before the King in 
council, January 12th, 1668, shew the state of affairs afterwards. It first sets 
forth that Sir Charles Harbord, Surveyor-General, made a report in 1661, 
to the Lord Treasurer, that the soil, the wood, and the coaling belonged 
to the lords, the King having nothing but the pasturage for deer, and 
free-warren for hunting; that in consideration of their services and suffer- 
ings for Charles I, and on their petition granted per Privy Seal, dated 
17th March, 1662, to Sir Gilbert Gerrard and Sir Nicholas Throckmorton, 
£1500 to the first and £1000 to the latter, to be raised out of the chase 
by composition w^th the lords and others ; but before anything was done 
(though commission of inquiry was issued). Sir Nicholas died in 1664, 
leaving Lady Alice a widow and six small children sadly destitute. 

In 1665, Sir Gibert Gerrard and the widow prevailed on Sir Baynham 
Throckmorton, of Clewerwall, Bart., nephew of Sir Nicholas, to prosecute the 
business : articles of agreement were signed and sealed between the 
Lord Treasurer and Sir Baynham on the 10th May 1666. After this two 
commissions were issued out of the Exchequer to persons of quality in the 
neighbourhood, who reported that the Chase had become wholly unfit to 
be replenished vnth deer, and that the lords were obstinately opposed to such 
a measure. Thereupon Sir Baynham, November 1667, petitioned the King to 
grant him all his interest in the Chase, with his franchise, for sixty years, 
having already spent £1000 among some of the pretenders to the soil, and 
had paid (lOth March 1666), £100 to Sir Humphry Hooke for the surrender 
of his patent of rangership, <fec., the Chase had become a public nuisance, as was 



202 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

lately represented to the judge by the grand jury at Gloster, being inhabited 
by a numerous company of idle, dissolute characters, resorting thither from all 
quarters, living as they please; the roads tlirough from London and other 
places to Bristol were very dangerous to passengers, especially in the night, the 
highway not being fenced or bounded ; the goods and houses of the adjacent 
inhabitants were insecure and daily getting worse and worse. The second 
petition (his first having been refeiTed to the Council by the Lords of the 
Treasury) was laid before the King in Council on the 10th of June 1668, 
and ordered to be heard on the 12th, on which day it was ordered that the 
Chase should be re-stocked with deer and Sir Baynham was appointed Ranger. 
In January following a patent was granted to him, which was followed by a 
lease,* dated 20th January 1670, for sixty years, on condition to restore 
the Chase within seven years, and within three years to repair the lodges, 
the King to hunt when he might please, and to have five brace of bucks 
and five of does yearly, to maintain keepers and preserve the vert and 
suppress purprestures (inclosures) and nuisances, without charge to the King. 
Sir Baynham had before appointed one Robert Dover his deputy. 

After the execution of this lease Sir Baynham went to work, by prosecuting 
many indictments against intruders. Upon which the sheriff issued his 
warrants, and some were arrested. The sheriff's men were greatly opposed, 
especially by Sir John Newton, who most unwarrantably committed one of 
them to gaol tiU the assises., for which Sir John was reprimanded by the judge 
and the prisoner was discharged. In the following September the sheriff 
apprehended about twenty more cottagers accepting bail ; but as the sheriffs 
ofl&cers were returning home they were attacked by a riotous mob of four 
himdred persons, who destroyed the keeper s gardens, cut down trees, and 
threatened to murder them and the keepers. About thirty of the rioters were 
found guilty at the Epiphany Sessions 1670. 

Sir Baynham re-stocked the Chase with 5000 deer, and exhibited a Bill in 
the Exchequer against the intruders, the pretended lords of the soil of the 
Chase, viz.. Sir John Newton, Thos. Chester, Jno. Berkely and Whl Player, 
Esquires, for their intrusions and encroachments as well on the soil as the 
franchise. 

* See copy in extenso in Appendix. 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 203 

Interrogator at another Commission issued Sep. 1671. 
Articles of Instruction to be observed by y« Commission named in the Commipsion 
hereunto annexed, in order to y* punishment and correction of all offences com- 
mitted in his Majesties Chace of Kingswood called Kingswood Forest in y** County 
of Gloster, & for the ascertaining his Majesties right there & for the better 
regulating and settling of the said Chace & otherwise as is hereafter directed. 

The said Comm" according to the power contained in y® said Commission shall inquire 
by jury & examination of witnesses & by all & every & any other lawful ways & meanes as 

they shall think fit of all & the particulars hereafter specified in manner as they are 

herein expressed. And shall summon all person & persons as can give any evidence for his 

Majestic in any of the said particulars, & review tions & certifye y* names of such 

persons as shall neglect or refuse to give their information & therein, & shall also 

certifye unto his Maj^^ Court of Exchequer all matters & things which the said shall 

find by any such enquiry, together with the examinations of such witnesses as shall be 
examined therein, as in y* s^ Com" is directed. 

1. To inquire They shall perambulate y* s^ Chace if they think fitt, or cause the same 
the Bound. to be perambulated by a jury of able men, inhabiting without the wasts & 

boundarys thereof, & having noe lands or tenements within the same, & 
shall take into their consideration the survey thereof made under or in the time of the 

parliament, & shall inquire & certify the true meetes, limitts & boundes of the 

said forest or Chace by particular names & descriptions, within which his Majesties 
franchise or liberty of Chace aforesaid is conteyned, hath been or ought to be of right used 

& enjoyed, as also the limits and bounds of each I'dship or lying intirely or in part 

within y* meetes & perambulation of y" s** Chace, to y* end the same may be distinctly & 
certainly knowne. 

2. To inquire of They shall likewise inquire & certifye how many lodges his Maj. or any 

lodges or w*do of his have or ought to have had & used within the s** Chace for y* 

belong thereto, habitation of his or their Hanger keepers or other oflScers of the s^ Chace, 

& in what places by particular boundaries they stood & how long since & 
how the same came to be demolished, & when & by whom & what gardens inclosures 

grounds or belonged or do belong thereunto, & who is or are in possession of the said 

lodges gardens grounds or easements or any of them, & for how long time such person or 
persons have or hath been in possession thereof. 

3. To enquire They shall inquire & certify what person & persons by name & whether 
who have had living within y* s** or without y* s*^ Chace & where living do claime & use 
or ought to by any pretense of right common of pasture, estoores or turbaiy within 
have any right y' s** Chace for themselves or tenants whether in grose or appurtenant to 



204 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 



of common any & to what manors messuages lands & tenem** and where y* same are 
according to lying or situate, & to what number of acres particularly & for what & 

to custome. how many in what proportions or other certainty, and how long they 

or any of them have claimed & used the same, and by what title, 
whether it be by prescription or how & in what other manner. 

4. To inquire They shall enquire & certify what person or persons by name & where 

who have put dwelling have at any time since y' day of June 1660 put any cattle 

cattle in have & what number & of what sort unto all or any of y* wasts or other lands 

not any right lying within y' said cliace to depasture there, not having right of common 

of common. in the said wasts or having right who have overcharged the said common. 

And further who have taken or ciitt any timber & or turbary there^ 

& what quantities thereof, & when & whether having or not having any right of estovers 
there or other interest in the said timber woods or turbary to the prejudice & disadvantage 
of y* B* Chace or the herbege or coverts thereof & the value of such prejudice & damage. 

5. To inquire They shall enquire & certifye how many trees, loads or other quantities 
whattreeshave of timber, oaks, elms, ash, hollies, hazels or other underwoods for coverts^ 
been cut down have been felled cut downe or carried away within y" s"* Chace at any time 
since 24 June or times, since y* 24 June 1660 within or without pretence of right soe to 
1660. do, whereby the said Chace or the correct franchise or liberty thereof 

hath been in any wise prejudiced & damnefied & to what value, & what 
person or persons by name & where dwelling have cutt & felled & carried away the same. 

6. To inquire They shall inquire & certifye how many pitts of coal & quarries of stone 

about pitts or & in what or places of y* s** Chace have been sunk opened or digged 

quarries wh. within y*' ** Chace att any time or times since y* s'* 24th of June 1660 & 

have been dig- when & by whom & by what right or title were the said pits or quarries 

ged & not filled so sunk opened or digged & the coles or stones thereof carried away, & 

up. what prejudice there hath been to the s"* place or the franchise thereof or 

liberty, & whether any of the pits or quarries within y* s* Chace after 
they have been fully wrought have been filled up againe & made even as the same ought 
to bee by those that sunk opened digged & wrought the same, & how many do now lye 
open & who ought to fill up & make the same plaine. 

7. Q. What in- They shall inquire & certify what assarts purprestures or incroachments 
croachments or have been made & what number of acres, perches or other quantities have 

inclosures have been taken or inclosed by incroachments or otherwise the wast 

been made since grounds of or within the said Chace, & annexed to old or any other 
24 June 1660? inclosures, or severally within y* s** Chace, since y* s* 24 June 1660 



HISTORY OF BITTON. 205 

or before & when & by whom & where dwelling to the prejudice of y* b* Chace or any of 
the woods or coverts thereof & what damage his Majestic hath susteyned in y* s"* Chace 
by such assarts purprestures, incroachments or inclosures or any of them. 
S, Q. What They shall inquire & ceytifye what Cottages or Hutts have been erected 

Cottages have upon new foundations in the said Chase at any time during the terme of 
been erected. 40 years last past to the terror hurt or destruction of the Deer there or to 
the prejudice of the said Chase, & by what person or persons & upon whose 
Boyle, & whether the owners of the soyle whereon the s* Cottages or huts were built did 
authorize or give leave for the erecting thereof & the names of such owners respectively. 
And what person or persons of what profession or imployment have continued & inhabited 
in the s^ Cottages or huts, or any of them since the s'* 24**^ day of June above named, or 
whether the owners or pretended owners of the soyle thereof, & who by name have demised 
or lett the s* Cottages or hutts or any of them to the inhabitants thereof or any of them, & 
for & under what fine or fines Rent or Rents or have recev* for y® same any & what Rent 
or Rents. 

9. They shall enquire & certify which & how many of the s** Cottages or hutts are 

of such prejudice to the state of the said Chace that they may not be permitted to remaine 
& continue & which & how many of the said Cottages & hutts & where standing may be 
permitted to stand, and be arrented to the occupiers thereof at a certain fyne & under a 
certaine yeares rent without any considerable prejudice to y* s"* Chace, & what fines are 
reasonable & fitt to be taken & what yearly rents to be reserved upon the arrentation 
thereof upon his Majties lease to continue the said Cottages which shall be thought fit to 
be continued. 

10. They shall inquire & certifye what libertyes profits fees authorities *'': priveliges his 
Maj*-** Ranger Keepers & other officers of the said Chace have been used to take receive 
& exercise within y* s*^ Chace, either to his Maj*^^' use or their owne benefits. And 
whether they have used to make any drift or drifts of or in the said Chace or to take or 
impound such beasts & cattle as have been found there trespassing or have seized all wayfes 
& strayes there found to his Maj**" use or other or otherwise & in what other manner, 
& how long the said priveledges libertyes profits fees & authorities have been there 
exercised taken or used. 

11. They shall inquire & certifye what new parkes or warrens have been of late years 
erected, made, or used as parkes or warrens either within or adjoining the said Chace 
& who have erected inclosed or used any such parkes or warrens, of what extent or quantity 

the same are & in what places and how long they or any of them have been so erected 

enclosed or used, & upon what right or of right & whether such new parkes or any 

other parks within or adjoining to the said Chace have any deer leap leaft open in them, 

or any of them, & whether any person or persons of warren within or adjoininge to 

the said Chace have enlarged his or their warren or & how long they have been 

enlarged &; how much & to what prejudice of the said Chace. 
2 D 



206 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

1 2. They shall inquire & certifye all & all manner of other assarts purprestures wasts 
nasanoes over burdenings of commons incroachments erections destructions of vert & 

vension & offences whatsoever committed acted omitted or suffered within or in 

relation to the same to the prejudice of y" s** Chace or the vert or venison thereof since the 
said 24th of tfune 1660, & all other matters things & circumstances for the better finding 
out & discovering the truth & certainty of the said premisses in order to the punishment 
& correction of all offences committed in y^ s^ Chace, & the ascertaininge his Maj^^ rights 
there & therein, & the regulating & settling of the said Chace which by the said Com*" or 
any three or more of them according to the purport of the Commission hereunto annexed 
shall be thought most conducing to his Maj***"* said service therein. 

13. And lastly in case any question or doubt shall bee moved in this service which the 
Said Commissioners or any of three of them cannot reconcile amongst themselves, then they 
or any three of them are to certifye the Lords Com" of the Treasury or Lord Treasurer & 
Chancellor of the Exchequer of such question & doubt that such timely order may be taken 
therein, that his Majestie's service be not delayed or hindered. 

Signed, FANSHAWE. 

Once it was proposed (in 1661, vide p. 1 99 ante) by the Lords of tlio Treasury 
to disfranchise the Chase and inclose it, and to accept a third part for the King, 
a third to go to the freeholders, and a third to the pretended lords. The 
commission issued in 1666 also endeavoured to tr6at with the owners and 
commoners, and it would have been eftected had it not been opposed by Sir 
John Newton (he had lately by purchase become an owner) who receded from 
his promise of agreement. 

In 1675, Mr. Robert Dover, deputy ranger, one of the witnesses in the 
suit then pending, says that he perambulated the Chase with "a jury of 
several of the antientist of the inhabitants aboute the said Chase, by virtue of 
the Commission issued from the Exchequer in 1666 for that purpose." He 
describes the boundaries of the Chajse, in all essentials the same as before, 
but worded rather dijSerently. lludder in his History of Gloucestershire, 
p. 458, has printed them. He speaks of Don Johns, alias Dungins Cross, 
&c., also that one Grimes, a Pursuivant from Charles I, was sent down, and 
imprisoned some for killing deer, that some compounded on payment of 20s., 
that the same had been done before. Mr. Dyer built a lodge and enclosed 
three acres of coal ground, which he held twenty years and then sold to 
Captain Burges. 

The suit lasted Sir Eaynham's life ; for he, having consented to a special 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 207 

jury, could never get all the judges to ai'gue it, so great interest was made 
against him, especially by Sir John Emley, the Chancellor of the Exchequer 
and brother-in-law to Chester, one of the defendants. Whereupon Sir Bayn- 
ham was induced to defer the matter, as the nation was in such a state. 
About the same time (1680) he died. After which the intruding or pretended 
lords forcibly entered the Chase, killed the deer, denying the King's right. 

On 3rd of January 1681-2 the three daughters, Elizabeth, Caroline, 
and Mary (devisees under Sir Baynham's will dated 16th July 1680 and 
proved 1 3th February 1681) assigned to Francis Creswick, Esq.,* Thomas 
Stubbs and Stephen Chapman, Gents., the Chase with all the deer, &c. for the 
residue of the term of sixty years unexpired ; the consideration money was 
£850. 

The assignees, beinfj thus possessed, and become the farmers or lessees of the 
Chase, immediately exhibited a bill in the Exchequer in Trinity term 1682, 
after which they had a long and tedious controversy with the lords for the 
King's franchise, the Attorney General acting for the plaintiffs. In these suits 
every record from the Conquest to the present time was produced in Court, 
copies of which I have been allowed to see and to possess. At last, in Michael- 
mas term (October 27th 1684), the King's right to free chase was decreed to 
him and all claiming under him against the opposers. 

Notwithstanding this Decree (copies of which were served to each) the 
intruders stiU continued to spoil the Chase destroying the deer, building 
cottages and adding inclosures, cutting down timber, &c., though served with 
many injunctions from the Exchequer. It was proved by many witnesses that 
they and others bordering on the Chase kept deer harness for catching the 
deer, and cross-bows for killing them. 

The lords, against whom the decree was made, during the troublesome time 
of Charles had divided the Chase among themselves, and called them 
Liberties, after their own names, and allowed the cottages to be built, 
taking rent for the same. After the decree the lessees made the best terms 
they could with the cottagers, granting leases. 

It may here be noted, that in August, 1687, when the Queen of James II 
was at Bath, a letter from the Board of Green Cloth, with a warrant, was 



1 The sanie who was afterwards mixed up with ^lonmouth's Rebellion, see p. 140 ante. 
2 D* 



208 HISTORY OF BITTOX. 

addressed to the Ranger of the Chase to deliver to the King's larders five brace 
of bucks on certain days, and others when required. 

In 1718 a negociation was opened with Creswick by one Joseph Durden, of 
London, for the eleven years to run of the unexpired lease ; in reply he writes, 
" much good may it do the Peer who wants it. I should not advise my son to 
have any thing to do with it. At a great expence we got a Decree for the King's 
right, and not one farthing the better for it — nor will any body — for it is now 
utterly destroyed — woods all cut down. Mr. Chapman and Stubbs have been 
long since dead — myself surviving- -nobody now claims, or concern themselves 
with the Chase, but the Lords. Stubbs sold his right to them, and they will 
never part with it till the eleven years to run are expired."* 

The lease expired in January, 1729, when it was stated that the lands were 
held by several personages who had no title thereto, the lessee or his repre- 
sentative having neglected to maintain the king's rights, or to make any 
advantage of the lands for many years previous to the expiration of the lease, 
so that it was apprehended that the boundaries would be very hard to 
ascertain and the possession very difl&cult and expensive to recover. 

On 27th September, 1734, a lease was granted to Onisiphorus Tyndall, jun., 
for thirty-one years, on condition of the payment of 40s. yearly, and that he 
should try the title of the crown to the premises, with the aid of the 
exchequer if need be ; and not compound with any pretended owner or 
occupier of the premises, to the prejudice of his Majesty his heirs and 
successors. In addition to the said lease, in 1736 he obtained a demise of the 
quarries of stone, pits of coal, and mines of lead, copper and other minerals 
within the Forest and Chase of Kingswood for thirty-one years, rendering the 
yearly rent of 6s. 8d. and a tenth part of the clear yearly profits.* 

It does not appear what was done in consequence of this lease, whether 
Mr. Tyndall ever took any measure towards the fulfilment of the condition of 
it. 

The next record is by the Committee of the Land Revenue, in their first 
report to Parliament, dated the 25th of January 1787, in which it is merely 
stated that "this was a disputed matter, and the lessee was to try the Crown's 
title." Whether he succeeded or not does not appear to the Surveyor-General. 

^ Creswick died aged 89 in 1732. 

* Exchequer' Book of Ahxiroai^ of Croicn LcftHCi^y vol. x, p. 343). 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 209 

From the foregoing history it will be seen how from generation to generation 
a set of lawless persons had not only encroached upon the King's right, but 
had converted it into an instrument of spreaduig immorality and desolation 
throughout the neighbourhood. 

In April, 1786, Joseph Fry and Samuel Ward were executed. They made 
the number of ten persons from Bitton who had died at the gallows within three 
years. The gang to which they belonged kept the neighbourhood in so much 
dread that people used to pay them an annual stipend not to rob them ; some 
paid 10s. 6d., some 5s., which was regularly collected at Lansdown Fair.* 

In 1795 riotous persons from Kingswood attempted to prevent the supply 
of coals and other provisions to the city of Bristol, committing robberies 
on the highways; when a reward of fifty guineas was offered by the 
city chamberlain for the apprehension, and on conviction, of any of the 
offenders. Edward Peacock {alicis Peake), Richard Hobbs, Henry Lewis, Jacob 
Porter, Moses Isles, WiUiam Fry and George Thomson were the principals.* 

Things of this sort were come to such a climax that at the beginning of 
the present century an association was formed for the prosecution of thieves, 
housebreakers, &c. Also a troop of yeomanry called the Bitton troop was 
raised, which proved a great assistance to* the constabulary, most of the 
cottages in the Chase being surrounded by a hedge and a road all round; many 
of these roads were closed by the Bitton Inclosure Act 1819. 

The following prospectus issued in 1811 gives a woeful account of affairs at 
that time, — 

"Kingswood Association 
for the Prosecution of Thieves^ Housebreakers, &c. 
" Whereas the alarming Depredations continually committed, by a very 
daring and daily increasing Combination of Villains, extending their ravages 
for many miles round the Country, and well known to reside chiefly in this 

1 Bristol Gazette, April 23nl, 1786. 

* In October, 1261, Roger de Button witli otliers broke into the Abbey of (llastonlmry and 
robbed the coffers, carrying away two hundred pounds worth of treasures and the Abbot's seal and 
the seal of the abbey, which they kept four years. (Abb. placit., Coram Rege Roll, 44th Henry 
III, Rot 12.) Though I have failed to graft the above Roger into the pedigree of the Bishop's 
family, no doubt they were a gang from the same parish. 



210 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

neighbourhood, have induced a few Persons, desirous of promoting the welfare 
of the Community, to unite their eflforts, in attempting to form a Society, for 
the suppression of such enormous evils ; and they did, by Advertisement, 
convene a considerable number of respectable Inhabitants, at the Flower-Pot 
Inn, at Kingswood, on Monday the 9th of September last; when certain 
Resolutions were agreed to, and a committee chosen, for the purpose of taking 
into mature consideration the peculiar circumstances of the Case, — in order 
to adopt and vigorously prosecute, with unwearied diligence, such measures as 
may tend to produce the desired eflfect, by striking a decisive blow at the root 
of such a System of Iniquitous Practices, as it is supposed, never was equalled 
in any other part of the Kingdom ; 

*' The Committee, in pursuance of such appointment, have since met at a 
room, engaged for the purpose, at Kingswood Hill, and resolved (in an 
entirely gratuitous manner, and with unremitted attention) to use every 
exertion in their power to promote the designs of this Institution ; and having 
acquired a comprehensive view of tTiis singular System, as to the different 
modes in which their diabolical purposes are accomplished, conceive it not 
irrelevant to detail a few particulars. 

" This Scheme of unparalleled enormity, demanding such earnest attention, 
has been progressively and uninterruptedly maturing for a long series of years ; 
and such is the nature of theu- establishment, that whole families are depen- 
dant on this combination for mauitenance, and many hundreds of the younger 
branches are well known to be now in actual training for the like purposes. 
It is also ascertained, that they are in the habit of decoying labourers from 
their accustomed employments, and formally admitting them into their 
society. 

" Great numbers of hucksters, in this and the surrounding neighbourhood, 
are in alliance with them ; the vendors of the goods are seen passing with 
cart-loads, to and from different places, by night, none presuming to interrupt 
them ; and although it seldom occurs, that any of these plunderers succeed in 
securing their booty, without being recognized by colliers passing to and from 
the mines, before they arive at their several places of residence, yet they 
consider themselves as inviolably secure : for any one daring to impeach them, 
would endanger both property and life : consequently, ordinary means adopted 
by Societies in general, in offering Rewards, &c. would be altogether abortive. 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 211 

Should the statement of these circumstances create surprise, or be deemed an 
exaggeration, suffice it to observe, that the committee (several of whom have 
been long resident in Kingswood, close observers of the transactions alluded to, 
and for those peculiar reasons, selected as most suitably qualified to meet the 
exigencies of the society) stand pledged to give the most positive proof of 
their existence, which is sufficiently notorious to the majority of the inhabitants 
of these parts. 

"The great number of Persons resident in the Neighbourhood of Kingswood 
might reasonably have encouraged us to expect extensive assistance. Such, 
however, is the astonishing terror prevalent in the minds of very many, arising 
from an apprehension that the incensed miscreants would reward their inter- 
ference with still greater destruction, and so many are prevented from aiding 
this Associatio:i on account of Relationship to them, that when it is considered, 
in addition hereto, that thousands are connected, by receiving and vending 
the goods, it will not appear surprising that very few, comparatively, remain 
sufficiently virtuous or courageous to unite with us ; and it must be needless 
to hint at the unparalleled enormities we have to expect, unless such prompt 
and energetic measures be adopted as the nature of the case requires. Under 
the impression therefore of their very urgent necessity, the Committe have 
determiaed on such cautious and vigorous steps as are very likely to accomplish 
their designs, and hope, through the united exertions of many of the respectable 
Inhabitants of Bristol, Bath, Kingswood, and their vicinity, to be soon enabled 
to proceed to successful operation. 

" Subscriptions are received at all the Banking Houses, at the Commercial 
Rooms, by Mr. Thomas Roberts, Stokes-Croft ; Mr. James Ewer, Dighton 
Street ; Mr. Thomas Stock, Lewin's Mead ; and Mr. William Stockham, Castle 
Street, in Bristol ; Mr. T. Parker, and Mr. Hobbs, Stapleton ; Messrs. Emett 
and Gunter, Downend ; Messrs. Piper and Jefferys, Siston ; Mr. R. Jarret, at 
the Tower, Warmley ; and the Treasurer ; for which purpose suitable books of 
entry will be left with them. And in order to give the utmost satisfaction 
relative to the manner in which the business of this Society shall be conducted 
and the money applied, Mr. Robert Lewis, Merchant of Bristol, has obligingly 
consented to become Treasurer and Inspector, to whom progress will be 
regularly reported. " Robert Lewis. 

"December 28th, 1811. ** Thomas Stock. 

"Thomas Sanders." 



212 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 




In 1815 there were in Gloucester 
gaol twenty-five prisoners committed 
for divers offences. They were spoken 
of as the "Cockroad Gang." A part 
of a Chase known as Cockroad 
[see Plate III] is foimd in many 
forests ; it means a passage or opening 
cut in a wood for the more convenient 
catching of woodcocks by a net placed, 
as here represented, across the open- 
ing :* there is another place on the 
Chase called Cockshot allied to it. 
The most notorious characters of 
the gang were the family of Benjamin Cains.* 

It was my lot to' go to the parish in July 1817, as Curate in sole charge 
of the mother Church, with an Assistant at the two Chapels of Ease ; and 
one of the earliest funeral services I had to perform was that of Benjamin 
Cains (aged 23), executed at Gloster for burglary. I preached after the 
Lesson to a numerous and attentive congregation. At that time all the 
inhabitants in that part of the Chase were buried at Bitton. 

Strangei-s to the neighbourhood will very naturally ask, how it came to pajss 
that such a population, so close to the city of Bristol, was apparently neglected 
and allowed to make such lawless head ? It must be borne in mind, that at 
that time the Church was almost powerless. Bitton Church and the two 
Chapels of Ease, Oldland and Hanham, and SS. Pliilip and Jacob in Bristol 
were the nearest to tlie Chase ; miserably endowed, and, it may be, the 
ministerial duties were carelessly attended to. 

There were no schools for poor children. The Baptists appear to have been 
the first who came to the rescue ; for they set up a meeting house in Hanham, 
dated on the outside 1714. Mr. Andrew Gifford and his son Mr. Emanuel 

* Arcluaological Journal^ voL v, p. 119. 

* The eldest son George was transported for life for housebreaking ; Thomas and Benjamin were 
executed for burglary ; Thomas, Joseph and Samuel transported for burglary ; James, a grandson 
of old Benjamin, executed for murder ; Francis and Thonuis, grandsons, transported ; other 
descendants transported or executeil ; three daughters had their respective husbands executetl or 
transported Richard Bryant (the noted " Dickboy ") was of this gang, as were Ben. Kay ford and 
Geo. Ward {(dlas Dagger) and some others, all hanged at Gloucester, Bristol, Salisbury and Ilchester. 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 213 

were the first who ministered there; afterwards for many years it was supplied 

from the Pithy meeting house in Bristol. In 1737 Mr. John Cennick of 

Beading, then an associate of the Eev. G. Whitfield, preached his first sermon 

in the house of Mr. Tippet on Kingswood Hill, on the site of which he 

afterwards bnilt a chapel in association with the Revs. John and Charles 

Wesley, from whom he separated in 1744 and joined the Moravian Brethren, 

who still hold their own on the Hill. 

In 1739 the neglected state of Kingswood attracted the notice of Whitfield, 

who was then at Bristol. " At length," says Southey in his Life of Wesley, 

vol. i, p. 230, " he considered it a matter of duty and of sound policy (which is 

always a duty) that these people should not be left in a state of bestial 

ignorance ; heathens, or worse than heathens, in the midst of a Christian 

country, and brutal as savages in the close vicinity of a city, which was then 

in extent, wealth, population, and commercial importance the second city in 

England." In the afternoon, therefore, of Saturday, February 17, 1739, he 

stood upon a mount in a place called Rose Green, his " first field pulpit," and 

preached to as many as came to hear, attracted by the novelty of such an 

address. Not above two hundred persons gathered round him, for there had 

been no previous notice of his intention, and these, perhaps, were more 

astonished than impressed by what they heard ; but the first step was taken, 

and Whitfield was fully aware of its importance. When he went again to 

Kingswood, his second audience consisted of about two thousand persons, his 

third from four to five thousand, and they went on increasing to ten, fourteen, 

and twenty thousand. " The sun shone very bright," he says in his Journal, 

"and the people standing in such an aweful manner round the moimt, in 

the profoundest silence, filled me with a holy admiration." After this, by 

frequent and urgent request, Wesley came to Bristol in 1739, and was 

introduced by his friend Whitfield, who then left. "His journey," Southey goes 

on to say, p. 243, "lay through Kingswood, and there the colliers, without his 

knowledge, had prepared an entertainment for him. Having been informed 

that they were wUling to subscribe towards building a charity school for their 

children, he had preached to them on the subject, and he says it was surprising 

to see with what cheerfulness they parted with their money on this occasion, all 

willing to assist, either by their money or their labour, and now at this 

farewell visit they earnestly entreated that he would lay the first stone. The 
2 E 



214 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

request was somewhat premature, for it was not yet certain whether the site 
which they desired would be granted them. A person, however, was present 
who declared he would give a piece of ground in case the lord of the manor 
should refuse, and Whitfield then laid a stone; after which he knelt and prayed 
to God that the gates of hell might not prevail against their design, the 
colliers saying a hearty Amen." The place is still standing, and is called the 
" Old Tabernacle," but a more enlarged building has since been erected. 

The next place of worship is called " The- Old School," built by John 
Wesley in 1748. Annexed to it was a large building called Kingswood 
School (see plate xii). It was afterwards much enlarged. On two stones 
are recorded — 

HaSC ScHOLAM CONDITA^I, DEDICAVIT ReV. 

Johannes Wt:sLEY, A.M., Junii 28, 1748. 
In gloriam Dom. opissimi maxim] 

IN USUM ECCLESLE & KEIUPKLTC'-«. 

Tlie buildings were enlarged in 1832, as appears by tliis inscription on another 
stone tablet— 

Wesleiadarum filils 
doctrina liberali 

COMMODIUS InSTITUENDIS 

Ps. 68, 11. 
A.D. 1832. 

The school, as a place of education for the sons of Wesleyan minister, was 
carried on many years most successfully; but in 1851 the premises were sold 
and the scholastic establishment was removed to Lansdown, near Bath. The 
buildings are now used as a reformatory school, founded in 1852 by Miss 
Carpenter and Mr. Scott Russell, as an Asylum for young persons who 
had been amenable to the law. It is still Gamed on with the happiest 
results, for the western counties, assisted by grants from the Treasury. 

At last the Church made a move. In the year 1751, Dr. Butler, Bishop of 
Bristol, obtained an Act of Parliament for dividing the parish of SS. Phihp and 
Jacob, severing from the mother Church a large portion of the parish lying in the 
Barton. Mr. Thomas Chester, as lord of the manor, gave a site a little to the 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 215 

south-east of Dungeon's Cross for a church and churchyard and a parsonage. 
On the 3rd of March, 1752, the first stone was laid by David Paloquin the 
mayor of Bristol, but the building was not consecrated before September 6th, 
1756, when it was dedicated to S. George. 

The building was not very ecclesiastical, and therefore it was pulled down 
in 1845 and enlarged and reopened in 1846; that church was burnt down 
December 22nd 1878 : since which a most handsome building, with a spire and 
six bells, has been erected and opened May 8th, 1880. At the opening of 
the second church I read the First Lesson, and at the opening of the third 
church my son officiated in the same way. 

After this date nothing more appears to have been done to civilize and 
educate the inhabitants, who had become more and more notorious for wicked- 
ness, before Sunday the 26th of July, 1812, on which day a school was opened 
on Mount Pleasant, in the very heart of Cockwood, under the direction of the 
Bristol Methodist School Society ; seventy-four children were first admitted, 
many of them children of the worst characters in the district. It was soon 
found that the building was not large enough for a day school, which it was 
most desirable to establish, therefore a piece of land was purchased on the same 
site, large enough for a building capable of containing three hundred children, 
and a master's residence ; through the energies of Mr. Henry Hill Budget (who 
for a time, and from the first, managed the school), and other members of 
the Wesleyan body, and many members of the Society of Friends, and some 
Moravians, the present buildings were erected. 

In 1818, immediately after the liberality of Parliament had voted one 
million for Church building purposes,^ and a Society was formed in London 
to iissist in particular cases the building of churches, the Honble. and Right 
Rev. Henry Ryder, the Bishop of Gloucester, turned his attention to the 
state of Kingswood; a subscription was set on foot to meet what might 
be granted either by the Building Commission or the Society ; the Patron 
and Incumbent offered to appropriate a portion of tithes towards an endow- 
ment ; the Commission immediately voted £2143, and the Society £700. 
" Furnished with these means preparations were immediately made to begin 
the work, a site on Kingswood Hill was given, — within sight and not far 



* 58tli George III, cap. 45. 
2 E^ 



216 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

from the Wesleyan and Whitfield buildings and the Moravian's, and on the 
9th of June, 1819, the first stone of the Church of the Holy Trinity was laid 
by the Bishop of Gloucester. When all expected that the superstructure 
(wholly of Bath stone from Beech, within the parish and on the prebendal 
manor) would shortly follow, a gloom, for some months, hung over the 
undertaking, arising from difficulties with regard to the title of the site,' 
nor was it till the following May, in 1820, that the work proceeded; 
notwithstanding this unexpected delay, the building was completed at the 
time appointed and was the First of the Million Fund Churches consecrated, 
viz., on Tuesday, the 11th September, 1821. On the same day his Lordship 
perambulated and pointed out a line of demarcation, for that part of the 
parish to be attached as an Ecclesiastical district to the new church, 
according to the provisions of the Act. By the census 1821, that district 
contained 3,G92 souls, the total of the whole parish being 7,171. The New 
Church was dedicated to the Holy Trinity.^ It was a day that would 
not be easily forgotten by the old and young of Kingswood Forest. It 
was well said in a provincial paper that "the service had everything con- 
nected with it to render it as solemn and interesting as any we have ever 
witnessed." A very great concourse of people was assembled on the 
occasion, and though the Church is calculated to contain one thousand 
persons (nine hundred sittings being free) it is supposed that twice that 
number was present, beside many who could not gain admittance. No 
persons were admitted into the Church before the Bishop except the 
Clergy (wlio were in waiting to receive his Lordship) and the children of 
the Cock-road and other schools in the neighbourhood, who had been 
previously trained to be the leading singers of the day. The Bishop, soon 
after eleven, was received at the gates of the yard by the Churchwardens, 
who conducted his Lordship to the west door of the Church, where the 
Clergy and other principal inhabitants were waiting. Mr. Whittuck as 
lord of the Manor, in his own name, and that of the other parishioner, 
presented a petition to his Lordship, setting forth the necessity of an 
additional place of worship, owing to the great population of the neigh- 
boiu'hood, the distance from the motlier Cliurch at Bitton, and other local 
circumstances. The petition was received by the Bishop, and given to 
1 ChriMian Bewrhthrtnicer, January, 182*2. « Sco jilate xiii. 



HISTORY OF BITTOK 217 

his Registi-ar to read. After which the doors were opened, and his Lord- 
ship preceded by his mace-bearer and the Churchwardens, and followed 
by the Clergy, repaired to the vestry. When the congregation was 
accommodated, and every thing quiet and orderly, the Bishop, accompanied 
as before, went to the west door, where he began the appointed service 
of the day, viz. the 24th Psalm; "The earth is the Lord's," &c., which 
was alternated by the Clergy and people. The Bishop having gone to the 
north side of the altar, and the Rev. Mr. MacdonaJd, the Vicar of Bitton, 
with the Rev. Mr. Kempthorne (his Lordship's Chaplain), to the south ; 
the deed of endowment was presented to him by the Rev. Vicar. His 
Lordship then proceeded to read, in a most impressive manner, the Ex- 
hortation and Prayers of Consecration ; the sentence of Consecration was read 
by the Chaplain, and signed by the Bishop. After which, the Rev. Mr. 
EUicombe, the Curate of Bitton, began the Morning Service. The Psalms^ 
and Lessons^ appointed for the occasion, are particularly striking, so well 
are they adapted to such an interesting solemnity. The 100th Psalm, 
and part of the 2Gth Old Version, were admirably sung by the children 
and congregation. The sermon followed, in which his Lordship expatiated 
at some length in an elegant and animated manner, on the privileges and 
advantages of the public service of our church, and beautifully introduced 
the long neglected inhabitants of Kingswood hailing with joy and gladness 
the temple lately raised for their accommodation. The sermon being ended 
his Lordship, accompanied as before, proceeded to consecrate the burying 
ground adjoining, and returned to administer the Sacrament to those who 
remained. Thus was completed the first church built with the assistance 
of Government : and it is devoutly hoped, that the blessing of the Almighty 
ever lighting upon this church it may be instrumental in reforming the 
lives and manners of those for whose benefit it has been erected. 

At the Fishponds, in the parish of Stapleton, adjoining Bitton, about two 
miles from Holy Trinity, on 31 August in the same year, an additional 
church, capable of accommodating eight hundred people, was consecrated 
by Bishop Kaye of Bristol."* This church was built by a grant from the 

^ Psalins Ixxxiv, cxxii, cxxxii. 

* First Lesson, part of viiitli chap. 1st of Kings. Second from Hebrews x, 19 to 27. 

^ The consecration of chiirclies was tlien a solemnity " few anil far between;" there was no 
authorized fonn, therefore the IJisliop atlojitid tliat drawn up by Convocation 1712, wliicli is 
set forth in Lurn's En'h'ftUifil h-al Imt. 



220 HISTORY OF BITTON. 

What though gay youth no more his soDg renews, 
Life's summer-light dies, like the rainbow hues ; 
The Christian hails the ray that cheers the gloom, 
And throws its heavenly halo round the tomb. 

Who bade the grave its mouldering vault unclose ? 
' Christ — Christ who died ; yea, rather Christ who rose : ' 
Hope lifts from Earth her tear-illumined eye, 
^he sees dispersed the world's last tempest fly ; 
Sees death arrested 'midst his havoc vast, — 
- Lord, at Thy feet, his broken weapons cast ! 

In circles, far retiring from the sight, 
Till, undistinguished, they are lost in Light, 
Admiring Seraphim suspend their wings, \ 

Whilst, hark ! th' eternal Empyrean rings, /- 

* Hosannah, Lord of lords, and King of kings ! ' ) 

Tliese thoughts arose, when from the crowded fane 
I saw retire the mute assembled train ; 
These images beguil'd my homeward way. 
That high o'er Lansdown's lonely summit lay. 

There seem'd a music in the evening gale. 
And looking back on the long-spreading vale, 
A blessing seem'd to wait upon the hour 
When the last light from Heav'n shone on the distant tower 

W. L. B. 

Having given an account of the consecration of these two churches of 
the Holy Trinity and S. Mary's at the Fishponds, as published in the 
Christian Bemembrancer, January, 1822, it will not be out of place to record 
here the other churches which have since been -built and consecrated 
within the purlieus of the Old Chase, not to mention several others 
beyond the old boundaries. 

1831, Oct. 28, Christ Church at Downend. 

1832, Feb. 17, Holy Trinity at Lawfords Gate. 
1834, Aug. 21, S. John's at Frenchay. 

1842, Oct. 18, Christ Church, on Jefferies' Hill. 

1843, Sep. 19, S. Luke's, on Barton Hill. 
1845, Oct. 10, S. Saviour's, on Coal Pit Heath. 



HISTOKY OF BITTON. 221 

1848. May 18. S. Michaers at Lower Easton. 
Aug. 23. S. Michaers on Two Mile HQl. 

1860. Nov. 1. All Saints on Winterbourn Down. 

Besides Meeting Houses of various denominations, one called Appii Forum, 
near three public houses, built by Mr. George Pocock of Bristol. 

But to return to Kingswood Hill. The Rev. Joseph Ditcher, M.A., was the 
first minister appointed to Holy Trinity. He lost no time in building a 
parsonage house and a large national school. Other good works, set on foot 
before the building of the Church, were in full operation ; chiefly through the 
energy of Mr. Henry Hill Budgett, assisted by many benevolent friends in 
Bristol.* The first of all was the Kingswood Benevolent Society, begun in 
1804, from which date to 1814, four thousand persons had been reUeved. In 
1817 there were six hundred applicants, who suffered from hunger, nakedness, 
and disease, in a circuit only of two miles, supported chiefly by friends in 
Bristol, and has ever since continued its works of benevolence. The whole 
district teems with poverty. 

It deserves to be mentioned that in 1831 'very serious riots took place in 
various parts of the kingdom, ricks of com and machineiy being destroyed. 
In October of that year riots took place in Bristol, when the Bishop's palace 
and other buildings were destroyed. During all that time nothing of the sort 
occurred in Kingswood or the neighbourhood. It was stated in London and 
other newspapers that colliers from Kingswood were principals in the riots, 
which was a slanderous libel. I visited the Bristol Infirmary the day after the 
outrages, but I could not find among the wounded sufferers any person from 
Kingswood, or other parts of the parish of Bitton. Mr. Budgett, who had 
resided in Kingswood over thirty years, issued a circular as an act of justice to 
the colliers, denying the statement. He said "very few of them were 
concerned in the outrage, and that the few who were are such as the colliers 
as a body would altogether disapprove of and disclaim." One to whom I 
mentioned the report replied to me, '* I think we know'd better than that." 
Surely this quietness may be attributed to the religious tone which then 
pervaded the district. 

* Ho was tho eldest brotlier of Samuel Budgett, made known to all the world as " the sticcessftd 
merchant ;** they had a large mercantile establishment on the Hill, from which tho country for 
many miles round was supplied. 

2 r 



222 HISTORY OF BITTOX 

Again, when the Beer House Act passed, the colliers petitioned both Houses 
of ParUament on the propriety of repeaUng or modifying the same. Whatever 
the colliers may have been in formei- times, it is a pleasure to me to say, that 
during my long residence amongst them, from 1817 to 1850, they were, with 
very few exceptions, the cleanest and most industrious parishioners: the 
majority (for some worked in the night) going down the Pits at five a.m., and 
returning at one p.m., they washed in hot water, on reaching their neat 
cottages, and then worked as gardeners, tailors, shoemakers, or some other 
handicraft during the remainder of the day. 

The building of a new Church, with parsonage house and school, on that 
naturally and spiritually wUd and uncultivated spot Jefferies* hill, in the 
southern extremity of the Chase, was too important a transaction to be passed 
over without some particulars of interest. 

The first stone was laid on the 28th of February, 1840, with a solemn service 
of prayer and sacred song, by Jane Isabella Ellacombe, the eldest daughter of 
the Vicar of Bitton, on which day she completed twenty-one years from her 
birth in the parish. As it pleased our Heavenly Father to take her to himself, 
on the 27th December, 1854, after ministering many years among the poor in 
the north of Londoii, this Church may be considered as her monument, no 
other having been raised at Clyst S. George, where she died, nor at Bitton 
where she rests in hope. 

It was consecrated by the Right Rev. Dr. Monk, Bishop of Gloucester 
and Bristol, on the 18th of October, 1843, on which occasion a large 
congregation was assembled, with many clergy from Bristol and the neigh- 
bourhood. Concurrently with the Church a school and parsonage house were 
built. The site was given by Samuel Whittuck, Esq., the lord of the manor 
(See Plate xiii). The Diocesan Church Building Society and the late Rev. 
Dr. Warneford were munificent contributors to this good work. 

West Hanham, in which the Church stands, was made a separate parish by 
Queen Anne's Bounty; and by an Order in Council, dated March 4th, 1844, 
the new Church was made the parish Church, and the ancient Chapel of 
Hanham Abbots, a Chapel of Ease to it (see p. 3 ante). 

The following historical and interesting verses were written by the late Mr.. 
George Pocock, of Bristol, who for nearly thirty years was in the habit of 
visiting the spot, and preaching, sometimes under a tent, sometimes in a 



HISTORY OF BITTOX. 



223 



cottage, and sometimes in the open air. He became a subscriber to the new 
Church, and afterwards ceased his visits. 

The information embodied in these verses was given by a very old man, who 
had lived on the spot from his infancy. 



ON THE ERECTION 

JEFFERY'S H 
Lo! on the self same pleasing site, 

Where smiles that sacred pile, 
There met of yore, for brutal fight, 

The lawless, rude and vile. 

Aroimd, unseen, unknown, untaught. 
Here the rough quarrier dwelt, 

His soul uncared for, and untaught. 
His end no pastor felt. 

The collier, too, distinct of race, 

From his lone hovel came. 
He sought no God or means of grace. 

But gloried in his shame. 

These different clans their champions 
brought. 

This hill their Sunday stage. 
Where, urged by blasphemies, they fought 

In fierce and fiend-like rage. 

Unchecked, alas, on God's own day. 
Thus 'midst the King's free Wood, 

By combat and by savage play 
This hill was stained with blood. 



OF CHKIST-CHURCH, 

ILL, H A X H A M. 

With mingled gore of man and brute, 

For here the game cock bled ; 
And the brave bull to persecute 
W^ere maddened mastiffs led. 

It is a remnant of those tribes 
Who leave their lairs, and toil 

When Bristors parties tempt with bribes 
And blood is mixed with broil. 

From such still spring the burglar bold, 

Horse-stealer, petty thief. 
Too oft found here in sin s strong hold, 

And dragg'd to sentence brief. 

And though much zeal has wrought 
around. 

Uncultivated still 
Has lain this sad unhallowed ground. 

This long neglected hill. 

But now we hope Established Tnith, 

Extending here her ray. 
Shall guide to Heaven both age and youth 

And make Christ's Church the way. 



Since the above date, various societies bave sprung up for the social and 
moral improvement of the inhabitants ; the happy result is that Kingswood 
(Cock -road especially, once a city of refuge for deserters from the army, 
and outlaws of every kind) is now, by God's blessing, as quiet, orderly and 
peaceable as any place in the County of Gloucester. 

In the Appendix will be found many Records of the historical parts given 
in these short Annals. In the next chapter will appear a short account 
ot the various manufactures carried on in the parish or on its border. 

**3fam. satis rsc 



224 



HISTORY OF I5ITT0X. 



COKRIGENDA. 



S^ 


4. 


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6, 


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107, 


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„ 113, 

„ 114, 

„ lie, 

» 117, 

„ 118, 

„ 121, 



129, 
1G4, 
100, 
10!), 
177, 
181), 
210, 
212, 
210, 



Chapter I. 

9, for Lanclsdon read Lansdown. 

8 from bottom, for 1100 read 1000. 
11, for tones read torus. 

8, for North read South. 

7 from bottom, for Landsdon read Lansdown. 

2, for Hollins read Holling s. 
last, for Lawd(K)m read Landom. 
10 from lK)ttom, for 1872 read 1871. 

9 from bottom, for scede read seede. 



Chapter II. 

0, for theis read these. 
11, for veris read viis. 
I. 17, fljr issius read ipsius. 
1. 19, for supradictus read supradictas. 
4, for d(li read did. 

11 from bottom, for ho)^ read buried, boin at London, 1679. 
1 9, for bounaryd read boundaries. 
7 up, for John read Thomas. 
4 up, for art read are. 

4 down, insert the before nee ; delete v:ho ; for whose, read and hLs. 

In the coat of Newton insert 7, Harmj'nge erm. on a chief 

gu., three bucks* heads cabashed ; for 7 read 8, for 8 read 

9, for 9 read 10, for 10 read 11, for 11 read 12; delete 

Harptre line 9 up. 

8, for nostri read nostro. 

3, after Company insert — Mr. Warren of Midhurst became the 
* i)osse.ss()r, who sold to the Kennett and Avon Canal Co., 
who sold to the Great Western Railway Co. ; it was then 
sold to Joseph Whittuck, Esq., who sold to the present 
proprietor, Mr. E. Groves. 
1. 10 up, for rescuing read rescued. 
1. 12 up, for Breche read Beeche. 
1. 12 up, insert rcv/s before ove. 
1. 10, after daughter insert heiress. 
1. 19, for Werg read Worge. 
last line, et nos read nos et. 



1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 



Chapter IV. 

3, insert a comma (,) after dissolution. 

0, for Charrwood read Charnwood. 

2 up, soveregn read sovereign. 

21, delete forrat of the, 

9, for 1500 read lo.^J / 

14, for of read it. 

4 up, for arive read arrive. 

in the cut of a net, delete the reference letters. 

20, delete " and put them on p. 210 after erected" 






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