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Full text of "History of Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo and Ventura counties, California"

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HISTORY OF 

SANTA BARBARA, 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 

AND VENTURA COUNTIES 

. CALIFORNIA 

BY 

C. M. GIDNEY, of Santa Barbara County 

BENJAlkllN BROOKS, of San Luis Obispo County 

EDWIN M. SHERIDAN, of Ventura County 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

CHICAGO, IliL. 
1917 



■; •• oigftif-^J by vJOO^lC 



ASTOR. LENOX AND 
l^ioEN FOUNDATIONS 



1931 



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THE tVH TOWt 

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SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 
AND VENTURA COUNTIES 



John F. More. Distinguished not only as one of the early promoters 
of Santa Barbara County, and a prominent figure in its material develop- 
ment, but for the remarkable sagacity and discernment he has displayed in 
all of his business transactions, John F. More holds an important position 
among the more extensive and progressive agriculturists of Southern 
California, his highly improved and finely equipped ranch, containing 
between 2,000 and 3,000 acres, being advantageously located on the sea 
coast, about five miles from Santa Barbara. A native of Ohio, he was 
bom in Medina County, August 19, 1839, and was there brought up 
and educated. 

Mr. More was one of a family of twelve children, six boys and six 
girls, all of whom eventually settled in California. His eldest brother. 
A. B. More, who served for a time in the Mexican war, came to this 
state in 1846, and three years later two other brothers, T. Wallace More 
and A. P. More, also located here, and in 1850 they were joined by 
another brother, Henry H. More. These enterprising brothers invested 
largely in land, at one time owning a strip extending from within a mile of 
the sea up the Santa Clara Valley for more than thirty-two miles, a 
valuable property, from which they subsequently sold 15,000 acres to G. G. 
Briggs. On March 24, 1877, T. Wallace More was brutally assassinated 
by masked men who first set fire to his barn in order to get him out of his 
house, and when he appeared at his door shot him, even continuing to 
pierce his body with bullets while he was dying. A. P. More, whose 
death occurred in 1893, was at that time sole owner of Santa Rosa Island. 
Three of the brothers, A. P. More, Henry H. More and A. B. More, are 
buried in Oakland, California, while the bodies of two other brothers, 
T. W. More and F. W. More, were laid to rest in the Santa Barbara 
Cemetery. 

The More brothers were eminently capable, industrious and far- 
sighted men, and full of enterprise. T. W. and A. P. More began life in 
California as miners, receiving $16 per day wages until they got a stake, 
when they took up diggings on Mokelumne Hill, Placer County, after 
which their stake enabled them to start in the cattle business, driving beef 
cattle from Santa Barbara to the mines. Prosperous in their undertak- 
ings, they wisely invested in land, buying the La Pusisimo and Mission 
Viego ranch of 44,000 acres at Lompoc ; the Sespe, or San Cuietlano, in 
1854; the Santa Paula and Saticoy ranch of 16,000 acres a little later; and 
in 1859 purchased Santa Rosa Island. 

487 



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488 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

A native of Ohio, John F. More, the youngest son of the parental 
household, was bom in Medina County, August 19, 1839. He received 
his early education in his native state, attending first the public schools 
and at Oberlin College. Soon after coming to Southern California he, in 
common with his brothers, bought large tracts of land, and is now owner 
of a very large and valuable ranch in Goleta bordering on the sea, where 
its ocean bank, one hundred feet in height, is composed of a solid rich 
clay, in which are found large pockets of asphaltum. This mineral is 
here easy to mine, as when it is blasted the tide on the beach carries away 
the loose clay, leaving the mineral free. 

Mr. More carries on general agriculture on an extensive scale, raising 
walnuts, produce of all kinds, and this year, in 1916, having between 500 
and 600 acres devoted entirely to the culture of lima and white beans, 
principally the former. His shipments, amount to large sums each season. 
In addition to his walnut orchard of upwards of 200 acres, he has a 
valuable and highly productive oliye orchard, from which he gets good 
returns. His ranch is one of the best improved and equipped in the Santa 
Barbara Valley, and is well furnished with all of the more modem 
improvements. He and his wife are now living in Santa Barbara, the 
ranch being under the supervision of his son, John F. More, Jr. 

The speed ground for the Government's gunboats lies just off the coasc 
of Goleta, the little village adjacent to the More ranch, it having been 
selected for that purpose on account of the enormous quantities of oil 
floating on the water, producing a calm sea. One of the three towers 
built by the United States for the starting gauge stands on the More ranch, 
while the other two are located on the Santa Barbara mountains.. 

Mr. More married, while yet a resident of Ohio, Miss Miriam Hickox, 
a daughter of Royal N. Hickox, of that state. Six children have been 
bom of the union of Mr. and Mrs. More, three of whom have passed 
to the higher life, namely: Olive, who died in infancy; Mary, who was 
graduated with honors from Mills Seminary, died in early womanhood ; 
and Alexander H., whose death occurred at the early age of seventeen 
years. The three children still living are as follows: Belle; Miriam; 
and John F., Jr., who has charge of the home farm at Goleta. 

In his political relations Mr. More is a stanch republican, but he has 
persistently refused to be a nominee for any public office. He has always 
generously supported any movement in behalf of public improvement, 
and takes a personal pride in caring for and keeping in excellent repair 
a mile of the private highway extending through his property. He is one 
of the most prominent and best known figures in Santa Barbara County, 
and has ever been of the foremost contributing factors in its development. 

John F. More, Jr. The development and management of the agri- 
cultural and horticultural resources of Southern California are more and 
more attracting the best brains and best enterprise of ambitious young 
men. John F. More, Jr., who is successfully managing the large ranch 
of his father, John F. More, Sr., in or near Goleta, is a man of university 
training, has a great variety of interests and is finding a congenial as well 
as useful and profitable occupation in the ranching industry. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 489 

He was bom in 1879 in Santa Barbara, where he received his pre- 
liminary education. He subsequently continued his studies at the Bel- 
mont School for Boys, and in 1903 was graduated from the University 
of California at Berkeley, receiving the degree master of arts. He was 
prominent while in the university, being a member of the Chi Phi fra- 
ternity and the Skull and the Keys and the Golden Bear honor societies. 
He also played quarterback on the varsity football team, 1900 to 1903 
inclusive. 

Returning after his university career Mr. More at once began work 
with his father, and now has entire care of the large ranch lying in a 
rich and highly productive region about seven miles from Santa Barbara. 
He possesses a thorough knowledge of the various branches of agricul- 
ture, and is making a big success in the growing of fruits and general 
produce. 

March 19, 1904, in Oakland, California, he married and has one 
child, John F. More III. In politics he is a republican and takes an intel- 
ligent interest in all matters pertaining to the public welfare, more es- 
pecially in those connected with local improvements. Socially he is a 
member of the Santa Barbara Club and the La Cumbre Golf Club. 

Robert Oxnard. It is a tribute to the individualistic spirit of 
America that the enterprise of a single family becomes so closely identi- 
fied with a great creative industry and source of wealth that the name 
is practically synonymous with a business and product vitally associated 
with the daily welfare of the entire people. Several obvious examples 
of this will at once occur, but in California in particular there is no more 
striking illustration of the fact than the close association of the name 
Oxnard with the beet sugar industry. Only a few years ago the press of 
the country contained almost daily references to the Oxnards as "beet sugar 
kings." While the Oxnards still contribute the dominating influence to 
the beet sugar industry of America, the business has for a number of 
years in the West been carried on under the title of the American Beet 
Sugar Company, while the city which is the chief headquarters of the 
industry carries the family name. 

The father of the Oxnard brothers who brought so much wealth to 
Southern California in the development of the beet sugar industry was 
Thomas Oxnard, member of a distinguished American family in the early 
part of our national era. Thomas Oxnard was bom at Marseilles, France, 
July 4, 181 1. At that time his father was American consul. Thomas 
Oxnard was educated in France, but at an early age returned to the 
United States and settled in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, where he was 
owner of a sugar plantation. He sold his interests in Louisiana in 1859 
and then lived with his family in Europe until 1862. 

Returning to the United States, he engaged in the sugar refining busi- 
ness at Boston, and later transferred his operations to Brooklyn, New 
York. Thomas Oxnard married Adeline Brown. When he retired from 
business in 1882 Thomas Oxnard was succeeded by his four sons, Henry 
T., Robert, Benjamin A. and James G. 

In 1887 these sons consolidated their interests with other sugar 



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490 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

refineries under the corporation now known as the American Sugar 
Refining Co. 

Henry T. Oxnard, former president of the American Beet Sugar 
Company, was born at Marseilles, France, June 23, 1861, during the resi- 
dence of his parents abroad, already noted. In 1889 Henry T. Oxnard 
and his associates established a sugar refinery at Grand Island, Nebraska. 
This was conducted under the name of the Oxnard Beet Sugar Company, 
of which he was president. The following year he and his associates 
erected the factory at Chino, California. In 1897 they established the 
plant in Ventura County known at first as the Pacific Beet Sugar Com- 
pany and on th^ present site of the City of Oxnard. At that time the site 
was an open bean field, with only two or three farm houses, and the 
entire development of that magic city of the West has taken place within 
less than twenty years and almost entirely as the result of the operations 
of the American Beet Sugar Company. Henry T. Oxnard became the 
first president of the American Beet Sugar Company which is the result 
of a consolidation of the various Oxnard and allied interests in beet sugar 
companies. The company now has six refineries. 

In 1906 Henry T. Oxnard retired from the arduous duties of the 
office of president in favor of his brother Robert, who himself resigned 
that position in 1910. The president of the company now is Col. H. R. 
Duval of New York City ; Henry T. and Robert Oxnard, vice presidents, 
the former now a resident of New York City and the latter of San 
Francisco; J. E. Tucker of New York, secretary and treasurer; E. C. 
Howe of Denver, general manager; and Maj. J. A. Drifiill of Oxnard, 
local manager. In the development of the industry other men who were 
actively associated were W. Bayard Cutting of New York, R. Fulton 
Cutting of New York, James G. Hamilton of New York, C. Kennedy 
Hamilton of New York, and James G. Oxnard of New York. 

Robert Oxnard, vice president of the American Beet Sugar Company, 
was born in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, in October, 1853. He was 
educated in Boston and in young manhood went to Cuba to learn the 
sugar business in all its details. He remained on that island until 1876, 
and then joined his father at Brooklyn in the sugar refining industry. As 
already stated he and his four brothers succeeded their father in 1882 
and continued the business as Oxnard Brothers until 1887. In that year 
Robert Oxnard came out to San Francisco and became identified with 
sugar refining. 

Some items concerning the great plant of this company at Oxnard 
should be mentioned in connection with this article. The plant repre- 
sents an investment of over $4,000,000. Many improvements have been 
introduced since the plant was started in 1898 and it now has a capacity 
of over 3,000 tons of beets per day. The busy season runs from July 
until the end of November, and during that season the payroll amounts to 
over $75,000 a month, while the rest of the year the average salaries 
paid are $20,000 a month. In 1916 the factory paid over $2,000,000 to 
the growers of sugar beets, sliced a total of 320,000 tons, and produced 
nearly 58,000 tons of refined sugar. In a single year about 10,000 carloads 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 491 

of freight are handled at Oxnard, the larger part of course representing 
the tonnage of raw beets. The oil consumed in running the factory is 
pumped from the seaport at Hueneme. The company owns the Ventura 
County Railroad lines and over 2,000 cars are handled on these lines alone. 
Within the last two years a by-product plant has been installed for the 
drying of the beet pulp, making a very valuable form of cattle feed now 
widely used and marketed all over the West. Until the process of drying 
was introduced the wet beet pulp was largely wasted, except such as 
could be consumed in the near vicinity of the plant. 

Throughout the history of the American Beet Sugar Company at 
Oxnard there has existed the closest co-operation between the management 
and the growers of beets. The company has always maintained a staff of 
expert advisers, who keep close supervision over every acre of beet plant- 
ing designed for ultimate consumption in the factory at Oxnard. There 
are now about 200 growers of sugar beets in Ventura County and about 
18,000 acres planted in that crop. There is also a larger number of grow- 
ers situated outside of Ventura County, but within a radius of 100 miles 
around Oxnard. 

Caswell Carl Elkins, Sr. As the chief pioneer in the founding and 
development of Fillmore in Ventura County Caswell Carl Elkins, Sr., 
deserves a special tribute in this history. Apart from his achievements 
in a material sense, he is undoubtedly one of the most interesting men in 
the county. He has had a long life, has lived it not for himself alone but 
for the benefit of his fellow citizens and has been in close touch with the 
frontiers of several states. He knows the world as few men now living 
know it. 

As a matter of historical record it should be stated that Mr. Elkins 
built the first store building in Fillmore, put in the first stock of general 
merchandise, set out the first orange orchard, built the first packing house, 
in which was packed the first carload of oranges ever shipped from that 
vicinity ; he set out the first olive orchard and made the first and only olive 
oil ever manufactured there, and in a public way was the first insurance 
agent, the first notary public, the first justice of the peace and the second 
postmaster. These are distinctions and services that will give him a last- 
ing place in the history of Fillmore as long as the annals of that locality 
are recorded. 

As such a pioneer, the story of his life should be given as fully as pos- 
sible. He was bom near Newberry, in the State of Indiana, November 2, 
1847. He was quite young when he lost his parents, Winfield Scott 
and Mary (Bryant) Elkins, who married in Daviess County, Indiana, 
about 1846. Mr. Elkins' people were quite prominent in the early days 
of Indiana. His grandfather, Capt. Smith Elkins, was captain of 
a company in Col. Winfield Scott's regiment during the War of 181 2. 
Captain Elkins afterward became a lawyer and was practicing law at 
Bloomington, Indiana, as early as 1822. Somewhat later he served as a 
member of the Indiana Legislature. 

The first real public schools were not established in Indiana until 
several years after Mr. Elkins' birth, and schools of any kind were not so 



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492 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

numerous nor did they offer such extended courses of instruction as 
is the case at the present time. Such schools as were to be foimd 
he attended and also had a term or two in a select school. He made 
the best of his limited advantages, and some years later he was himself a 
teacher, an occupation he followed in Missouri and also in Kansas. 

Like most boys of the time his imagination took him out to the Far 
West, where adventure, personal danger and excitement were unlimited. 
His first experience in the West came when he was extremely young. In 
1859, at the age of eleven, he went to Pike's Peak, a name that then was 
used to designate not so much the lone mountain as an entire district in 
Colorado where gold had been found. He made this journey with a party 
driving three yoke of oxen and a yoke of cows, all hitched to a prairie 
schooner. At that time no line of railway extended west of the Missouri 
River, and it was the best and chief means of crossing the plains, but was 
an exceedingly slow and toilsome journey and exposed to constant danger. 
The limit of white settlements on the western frontier at that time was 
about Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Kansas City had hardly become a name, 
but Leavenworth was then and had been for some years a great outfitting 
post from which caravans departed almost daily for the Far West. In 
coming to Leavenworth young Elkins and his companions traveled by 
prairie schooner to St. Louis, and there shipped oxen, wagon and other 
supplies on a steamboat, which carried them up the Missouri to Leaven- 
worth. In crossing the plains to Central Colorado they were three months 
or more on the road. They saw members of several tribes of wild Indians, 
armed with bows and arrows, and passed through herds containing 
thousands of buflfalo and also saw much other wild game. Mr. Elkins is 
one of the men who knew the Indians in their wild and barbarous con- 
dition. He saw them kill buffaloes with bow and arrow. He states that 
the Indian did not stand off and shoot at a buffalo as would be done with 
a rifle, but would guide his horfee alongside the chosen animal and then 
leaning over with utmost precision would drive the arrow with all the 
force of the bow between the bones into the vital spot. 

Arriving at Denver the party found a settlement containing about 
four log houses. Some timber grew on the banks of the Platte River, 
near Denver, but as yet there was no lumber. Young Elkins witnessed the 
sawing of the first liunber at Denver. It was accomplished with a whip- 
saw operated, as he says, "by arm-strong power." The party of which he 
was a member bought some of this first lumber and made with it a skiff. 
After a short stay the prospects of the gold mines did not seem favorable, 
and disgusted with the country they started home. It was their intention 
to make the journey down the Platte River and back to St. Louis. As is 
well known, the Platte River is a very shallow and uncertain stream, and 
the voyagers encountered numerous difficulties. For a day or two below 
Denver it was frequently necessary to portage around beaver dams and 
from that point the skiff again and again ran into sand bars. With much 
toil and trouble they traveled about 600 miles on the river. They then 
camped one night with a Government train of six mule teams going 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 493 

back empty. They paid the wagonmaster to haul them to Leavenworth, 
and thence made the rest of the journey home by boat and train. 

After the war Mr. Elkins taught school in Benton and Hickory coun- 
ties, Missouri, and in Anderson County, Kansas. After three years of 
teaching in Missouri from 1871 to 1874, his health was broken and buy- 
ing some cattle he drove them across the plains to Colorado, which was 
still a territory. Colorado is the "Centennial state" and was admitted to 
the Union while Mr. Elkins was living in the country near Canyon City, 
which was his postoffice. In 1876 he traded his cattle for 200 acres 
of land in Anderson County, Kansas. In going from Colorado back 
to Kansas he made his last trip across the plains in a wagon. This time 
his prairie schooner was drawn by horses, and while they made better 
progress than the old time oxen still the journey was by no means so rapid 
or so comfortable as the slowest of railroad trains. They set out from 
Canyon City in the summer of 1876. The party included Mr. Elkins, his 
wife and two small children, Elizabeth and William. They traveled 
without special incidents as far as Las Animas, Colorado. He had not 
seen a newspaper for some time, and arriving at that town he bought 
some papers. The first head line he saw was relative to the Custer mas- 
sacre, which had occurred in July, 1876. The Las Animas paper warned 
travelers particularly about the danger of Indians at the time, stating 
that the Southern Sioux had gone north to help Sitting Bull in the 
fight and were then returning to Texas in scattered bands, and would kill 
any one they might intercept. With such intelligence and the warning 
given by the paper, Mr. Elkins hired a car and shipped all his goods and 
family to Ellsworth, Kansas. His wife and children went on a passenger 
train, while he rode in the caboose and looked after his stock in the car. 

In Anderson County, Kansas, he looked after his farm during the 
summer and taught in the winter until about 1880. In 1877 he was 
elected justice of the peace of Rich Township, served two or three terms, 
and while justice was also elected township trustee. Kansas counties had 
the township organization, and each township had its own pfficers. The 
township trustee was ex-officio assessor, road overseer, overseer of 
the poor, etc. Rich Township was 9 by 10 miles on each side, 
and while he was trustee he redivided it into road districts, and made and 
filed in the county seat at Garnett a new map of the township. Mr. Elkins 
now anticipates returning to his old home in Kansas some day and intends 
to make a special point to see what local changes have been made since he 
lived there forty years ago. 

About 1880 he moved to the Town of Westphalia in Anderson County 
and engaged in the lumber business. After a couple of years he started a 
branch yard at Aliceville in CoflFey County, Kansas. This was his chief 
business connection until 1886, when on account of failing health he left 
the Middle West and came out to the Golden State of California. Locat- 
ing at Compton he bought a twenty-acre ranch. He also speculated to 
some extent in Los Angeles lots, and though, as he states, that specula- 
tion was not fatal, it proved a costly experiment, since the wane of the 
boom soon followed. 



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494 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS -OBISPO 

In 1887, having sold his place at Compton, Mr. Elkins removed to 
Fillmore, Ventura County, arriving at that location in December. The 
Town of Fillmore then contained three small houses — 3, boarding house, 
a saloon and a residence. Where now there are three school districts, 
one was sufficient at that time. The schoolhouse was on the banks of the 
Sespe, between Mose Fine's place and the railroad bridge. The voting 
place was Cienega schoolhouse, about three miles east of Fillmore. Fill- 
more had no postoffice then and the mail was delivered at Bardsdale. 

Soon after his arrival Mr. Elkins erected a store building on the comer 
where the new Fillmore State Bank Building is now being constructed 
(1917). Into this store he introduced a stock of general merchandise. 
The first postmaster of the village was E. B. Turner, who had no diffi- 
culty in keeping all the mail in a goods box. The first election in which 
Fillmore took part was the campaign of 1888, when Benjamin Harrison 
was elected president. The local voting place was in a back room of Mr. 
Elkins' store building. It has been Mr. Elkins* humorous contention that 
Harrison was elected at his store. Soon afterwards Mr. Elkins himself 
was appointed postmaster, and of course kept the postoffice in his store. 

While his store building was in process of construction he took means 
to get it insured. There being no local insurance agent he went to Santa 
Paula and applied to Toland & Baker for a policy. They informed him 
they could not insure the building since a personal inspection and survey 
was necessary, and as Fillmore was so far from their office they could not 
aflford to do it. Mr. Elkins then shrewdly devised a way by which he 
might get insurance. He secured an appointment as insurance agent at 
Fillmore, and as agent sold himself a policy on his building. He was 
also made a notary public, and that was followed by election as justice of 
the peace, and thus largely through him Fillmore became a place for the 
transaction of public business as well as a center of trade in groceries and 
other supplies. 

When Mr. Elkins came to Fillmore there was not an orange or lemon 
orchard between Camulos and Santa Paula. In 1888 he bought a farm 
lot of the Sespe Land & Water Company, and the following spring set 
out eight acres in oranges. It was the first orchard on the Fillmore 
Mesa. The present status of the citrus fruit business at Fillmore is 
sufficient proof that this experiment of Mr. Elkins with oranges was not 
a mistake. In 1890 he set out six acres more of oranges, ten acres of 
lemons in 1892, eleven acres of oranges in 1894, and one hundred acres 
of lemons in 1913. His main business at the present time (1917) is pro- 
ducing citrus fruits. 

In the telling of all these incidents it is possible that not enough 
emphasis is placed upon the trials and tribulations of early settlers like 
Mr. Elkins. There were discouragements and many difficulties to over- 
come. But out of it all the town he did so much to found has become 
well established and, as he says, "Many good roads lead to Fillmore." 

Mr. Elkins' individual prosperity has been worthy of the energy he 
put into his business in the early days. He retired from active business 
in 1 9 14, but is still a director of the Fillmore State Bank, is president 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 495 

of the Cienega Water Company, is a stockholder in the Fillmore Irriga- 
tion Company, the Fillmore Citrus Fruit Association, is a member of 
the Ventura County Co-operative Association, the Grimes Canyon Water 
Company, the Fillmore Fumigation Company, and the Fillmore Improve- 
ment Company. He is president of the Fillmore Club. 

ilr. Elkins was reared a democrat, but even before he reached his 
twenty-first birthday, as a result of observing the actions of the copper- 
heads in yelling for Jeff Davis, he has been a republican. He voted for 
General Grant the first time he was elected in 1868, and cast his vote 
the day after he became twenty-one. While living in Kansas he was a 
member of the Knights of Pythias, but did not resume his connection in 
California. He is a member of the Independent Order of Foresters at 
Santa Paula. In Kansas he was a member of the Universalist Church, 
but has no church connections now. 

On April 9, Easter Sunday, 1871, at Fairfield, Missouri, Mr. Elkins 
married Annie Phillips, daughter of Sanford and Elizabeth Phillips. 
Mrs. Elkins was born and reared at Woodburn in Macoupin County, 
Illinois. Her father's people were Virginians. Her mother, Elizabeth 
Long, came from England when a small girl, and her father. Deacon 
Long, lived in Philadelphia a time and then moved out to Macoupin 
County, Illinois. Sanford Phillips and family removed to Missouri just 
after the Civil war. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elkins had seven children, all of them still living and 
all in Ventura County except a daughter, Mrs. Davis, who lives at Bur- 
lingame, California. Elizabeth, the oldest, is the wife of George L. T. 
Rivard; William W. is a business man at Fillmore; Hess H., in the bee 
business, married Lena Cary; Christie L. is Mrs. David Davis; C. C, Jr., 
married Amy F. Anderson ; James G. Blaine and Thomas B. Reed, both 
named for great republican statesmen of whom Mr. Elkins was a great 
admirer, are both unmarried. 

William Watts Elkins, one of the leaders in business affairs at 
Fillmore, is a son of Caswell Carl Elkins, Sr., whose career is elsewhere 
sketched. 

Born in Rice County, Kansas, March 7, 1875, William W. Elkins had 
his first schooling in Anderson County, Kansas, and after 1886 attended 
school at Compton, California, one year and at Fillmore until 1889. Since 
then he has been an active business man. He assisted his father in the 
store at Fillmore a part of the time until 1897, and since then has looked 
after his father's extensive ranch and other properties. In 1900 he took 
up 160 acres of Government land near Fillmore, and twenty-five acres 
are now planted in beans and the rest in pasture. In 1904 he turned this 
land over to his father. His father's estate now includes fully 1,600 acres, 
partly tillable and partly hill land. A hundred and thirty acres are planted 
in oranges and lemons, twenty acres in olives and the rest is in lima beans, 
hay and pasture land. 

W. W. Elkins is a republican voter and a member of the Order of 
Elks. He was married in Ventura county in March, 1899, to Miss Mary 



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496 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

M. Ward. Mrs. Elkins is a native of Nebraska. Her father, Alfred A. 
Ward, has been a resident of Ventura County for the past twenty-five 
years and is identified with the oil interest of this section. Mr. and Mrs. 
Elkins have three children: Freda Ann, aged fifteen; Carl Ward, aged 
twelve ; and Eunice Belle, aged ten. All the children are attending public 
school. 

DoMiNiCK McGrath. One of the pioneers of the older industrial 
regime in this section of California was the late Dominick McGrath. He 
lived in California nearly half a century. Coming within less than ten 
years after the original discovery of gold, he identified himself with 
the ranching and stock raising interests of the southern counties, and 
through his long and successful connections with the business proved an 
important factor in the development of Ventura County. 

Bom in Ireland February i6, 1835, he was at the time of his death 
on December 21, 1908, several years past the age of three score and ten. 
From an early age he became dependent upon his own resources and was 
the architect of his own destiny. 

Reared and educated in his native country until the age of eighteen, 
he then came to New York City and for three years worked in a foundry 
in that city and Brooklyn. Moving along with that eager tide of emigra- 
tion which was flowing so steadily to the Pacific Coast, he found himself 
in 1858 in Alameda County, California. 

There for two years he worked as a ranchman at Livermore. Indus- 
trious, thrifty and energetic, he accumulated sufficient money while in that 
employment to buy 1,000 head of sheep. It was as a sheep man that he 
made the basis of his fortune. For four years he continued as a breeder 
and raiser of sheep in Alameda County, and then located in the Santa 
Clara Valley. He was one of the pioneer ranchers in the vicinity of the 
present thriving industrial city of Oxnard. Through the proceeds of his 
operations he invested in more and more land, and at the time of his 
death had a large estate to be divided among his children. For many 
years he used his land for livestock, but gradually developed it for agri- 
culture, and much of it is now devoted to the prolific crops of beets and 
beans. 

In 1856 Dominick McGrath married Miss Bridget Donlan, also a native 
of Ireland. She died in 1888. There were ten children of the union: 
Mary M., wife of Bernard Hanley of Oakland, California; Margaret; 
Nellie, wife of James Leonard; Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Cormick; 
Josephine, wife of James Dowd; Ann, wife of E. G. Laubacher; James 
H. ; Joseph D. ; Frank ; and Robert. In political matters the late Dominick 
McGrath always maintained an independent view and in religion was a 
Catholic. I 

Joseph D. McGrath. A son of the late Dominick McGrath, one of 
the pioneer ranchmen and land owners of Ventura County, Joseph D. 
McGrath possesses many of the vigorous qualities that distinguished his 
honored father, but industrially is thoroughly in sympathy with the mod- 
em age of progress and improvement, and is an active figure in those 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 497 

branches of agriculture which are now distinctive in the region around 
Oxnard. 

He was bom in Ventura County July i8, 1878, attended district schools 
until fourteen, and was then a student in St. Vincent's College of Los 
Angeles up to the age of seventeen. 

Returning home, he found work on his father's ranch and was made 
proficient in every detail of ranch management during succeeding years. 
After his father's death in 1908 an estate of several thousand acres were 
left to him and his brothers and sisters. The family have since kept this 
estate intact and have incorporated it under the name D. McGrath Estate 
Company. Joseph D. McGrath is secretary-treasurer and one of the 
managers of this company, and is actively directing the cultivation of a 
large acreage to beans, beets, citrus fruits and general farming. He owns 
a beautiful home on a part of the McGrath estate. 

Joseph McGrath is a member of the Catholic Church and of the 
Knights of Columbus and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of 
Santa Barbara. 

Adolfo Camarillo. One of the greatest landed estates in Ventura 
County is the Calleguas Rancho owned by Adolfo and Juan Camarillo. It 
is not only one of the largest estates but also one of the oldest under 
continuous management and cultivation since the Mexican era in Cali- 
fornia. The two brothers who are present proprietors of this magnificent 
property are sons of the original owner of the rancho, who in turn 
acquired it more than forty years ago from the Spanish grantee. 

Juan Camarillo, father of the two brothers above mentioned, was a 
distinguished figure in the history of Ventura County and as such his 
career deserves some special mention. He was bom in the City of 
Mexico May 27, 1812, a son of Luis and Marie (Rodriguez) Camarillo. 
Both parents were natives of Mexico. The late Juan Camarillo was 
liberally educated in his native country, and at the age of twenty-two, 
in 1834, came with a colony whose destination was Monterey. Various 
members of this colony landed at San Diego, and continued their journey 
overland. At Santa Barbara Juan Camarillo left the company and soon 
found quarters among the Mission Fathers in that locality. He set up 
as a traveler and trader with the Califomians between San Francisco and 
San Diego, and the fortunes of trade giving him a capital of several thou- 
sand dollars he finally opened a store at Santa Barbara and as a merchant 
laid the basis of his properous career. 

He was engaged in mercantile pursuits in Santa Barbara until 1859, 
and in that year went to what is now Ventura County. From that date 
until his death in December, 1880, he lived in Ventura County, and it 
was his widely considered investment that accumulated the splendid tract 
of land now known as the Calleguas Rancho, situated east of La Colonia 
and twenty miles east of San Buenaventura. 

On April 12, 1840, Juan Camarillo married Martina Hemandes, a 
native of California. Fourteen children blessed their union, and four 
daughters and two sons survived their honored father. The large property 



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498 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

interests which Juan Camarillo had acquired in the City of Ventura were 
left to his daughters, while his two sons Adolfo and Juan were given the 
ranch jointly with their mother. 

Adolfo Camarillo was bom at San Buenaventura October 29, 1864, 
was educated in the public schools of Ventura, graduated from the Inter- 
national Business College at Los Angeles, and since his father's death, 
which occurred when he was sixteen years of age, has been actively 
identified with the Calleguas Rancho as manager. 

Concerning the Calleguas Rancho historically and as a business propo- 
sition an interesting article appeared in a local California publication 
recently which should be quoted both for the history it contains and as a 
commentary on Mr. Camarillo 's business life. The article is as follows: 

*Tt is interesting to note that this year, 191 5, marks the fortieth 
anniversary of the acquisition by the Camarillo family of the final parcels 
of land which make up the great ranch of about ten thousand acres, for 
it was in 1875, just forty years ago, that the late Juan Camarillo, father 
of the present owners Adolfo and Juan E., made the purchase of the land 
which extended the boundaries of the ranch to their present proportions. 
The Calleguas ranch was one of the old Spanish grants, being granted by 
the Mexican government to Jose Pedro Ruiz in 1847. This grant was 
confirmed by the United States Government and patents issued on 
September 17, 1862, to Gabriel Ruiz, son of the original grantee, and was 
sold to the late Juan Camarillo by him in several different parcels, the 
final purchase being made in 1875 ^ above stated. Probably there is no 
other ranch in Ventura County, certainly none of similar size, that has 
had so few changes in its ownership from the early days of California's 
history down to the present time. More noteworthy, however, than the 
mere fact of long continued ownership by the Camarillo family is the 
fact that the ranch has been developed into a high state of productivity 
under their ownership and management. 

"From being a cattle and sheep ranch the Calleguas Rancho had begun 
to assume the aspects of a farm at the time of the death of the father of 
the present owners in 1880, he having placed about fifteen hundred acres 
of it in cultivation, principally in corn, barley and other grain crops. 

"It was about this time that Mr. A. Camarillo, then a mere boy, 
assumed the active management of the ranch, which he has retained ever 
since, and under his progressive policies it has been developed to its 
present productivity. 

"One finds at Calleguas Rancho in addition to three thousand acres of 
beans, a couple of thousand acres devoted to corn, barley, alfalfa and other 
forage and grain crops. Here too is found the model dairy of Ventura 
county, equipped in the most modem manner, operated throughout by 
electricity and milking a hundred and fifty high grade cows. Then too, 
Calleguas Rancho is one of Ventura county's largest producers of hogs, 
a large herd being carried, while on the grazing lands and the hills, which 
are not susceptible of cultivation, a herd of stock and beef cattle is found. 

"All the feed consumed by the live stock is raised on the ranch, thus 
the products of the ranch leave it in what might be termed a manufactured 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 499 

form, rather than as raw products. And thus we find every one of the 
ten thousand acres in Calleguas Rancho being utiHzed, being made to 
produce something. 

"From the insistent demands which the operation and management 
of this great ranch and his other financial interests make upon his atten- 
tion Mr. Camarillo found the time to serve the public's interests in 
numerous ways. He was for eight years a member of the Ventura County 
Board of Supervisors, a position which he filled with honor to himself 
and the utmost satisfaction to his constituents, voluntarily retiring from 
the office last year after having made a record for progressive achievements 
of which he might well be proud — and not the least of his activities in that 
office was in the promotion and building of good roads." 

In 1888 Mr. Adolfo Camarillo married Miss Isabella Mancheca, 
daughter of Francisco Mancheca, a native of Spain. Mr. Camarillo and 
family are members of the Catholic Church and in politics he is a democrat. 
The children are: Mrs. Rosa Petit of Oxnard; Ave, Isabel, Frank and 
Carmen, all at home. 

Adolfo Camarillo is a member of the Knights of Columbus, No. 
750 of Oxnard, and was Grand Knight of Oxnard Council for two terms. 
He is also a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 
613 of Santa Barbara and of the Native Sons of the Golden West. He 
is vice president of the First National Bank of Ventura, vice president of 
the Ojai State Bank of Nordhoflf, a director in A. Levy Bank, Incorporated, 
of Oxnard, and is a stockholder of the First National Bank of Oxnard and 
in the Fillmore State Bank, Ventura County. 

John Edward Borchard. The first family of Americans to locate 
on the Colonia grant in Ventura County were the Borchards. That was 
nearly half a century ago. The worthy people of this name have accord- 
ingly witnessed and had their part in every phase of development by 
which a once exclusive grazing country has been converted into a land- 
scape of some of the richest and finest farms and fruit ranches in Southern 
California. 

The founder of the family in Ventura County was the late J. Christian 
Borchard. Born in Werkshausen, Germany, July 6, 1816^ J. Christian 
Borchard received his education in German schools until he was fourteen. 
Then followed some experience on his father's farm and three years 
in the German army. Setting out for America in 1841, he was employed 
as a laborer at Cincinnati, Ohio, for a year, and then went back to Ger- 
many to claim his bride. He and his wife Elizabeth after their marriage 
in 1843 came to the New World and located in Dubuque County, Iowa. 
There he was engaged in farming until 1849. 

J. Christian Borchard's name deserved a place among the California 
'49ers. He drove an ox team across the plains, and in the vicinity of 
Red BluflF spent two summers in mining, and then for two years operated 
a hotel at Colusa. Leaving Colusa he went up the Sacramento Valley 
nine miles and for five years did the heavy work required in farming and 
hog raising. He afterwards farmed and also did teaming to the mines 



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500 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

from Marysville for three years. Similar pursuits were followed when 
he removed to Stockton, and from there he went to Antioch and began 
farming on the high lands. He was drawn into the speculations and 
investments in the Tule swamp lands, but in 1866 a flood practically 
destroyed all his crop and much of his property, and he was well satisfied 
to return to the high lands. Thereafter for three years he followed sheep 
raising and general farming and this was his experience preliminary to 
his removal to Ventura County, which was then a part of Santa Barbara 
County. 

On coming to Ventura County J. Christian Borchard bought 1,000 
acres of the undivided interest of the old Colonia grant. As a pioneer 
there he had a considerable struggle to make both ends meet, and it is 
said that several years he threshed out the wild mustard that grew so 
abundantly and the sale of mustard seed was an important item in his 
revenues. He gradually developed his land for general farming and stock 
raising, and was a resident of that community until his death, January 
22, 1903. J. Christian Borchard was a Catholic, and a democrat in politics. 
He and his wife had three children: J. Edward; Catherine, now 
deceased ; and Mrs. F. Ayalla of Ventura County. 

The life of John Edward Borchard has been jSractically contemporane- 
ous with his father's experience as a Calif ornian. He was bom in 
Dubuque County, Iowa, December 26, 1847, ^i"^ ^^^Y ^ f^w months 
after his birth his parents set out for California. He did not have the 
advantages of schools and teachers when a boy. That is easily under- 
stood when it is recalled that California had no public school system 
worthy of the name for a number of years and that his father was living 
first in one place and then in another, struggling to get a foothold in this 
new country. Mr. Borchard worked on his father's farm until he was 
twenty-four, and his father then gave him 100 acres in Ventura County. 
Taking that land he rented 100 acres more from Timothy Cramer, and 
spent about four years farming this property. He then bought 148 acres 
and in 1872 returned to his father's ranch and acquired thirty-eight acres 
more from his father. These holdings of land have constituted the scene 
of his ranch operations ever since. However, his success has been on a 
rising scale, and can be measured by the increase in his holdings which 
now amqunt to 807 acres. 

He is an active member of the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic 
Church, and in politics is a republican. In Ventura County May 12, 
1872, Mr. Borchard married Miss Mary Kauffman. They are the parents 
of nine children, all of whom were bom in Ventura County, knd are 
briefly referred to as follows: William E., bom May 5, 1873, educated 
in the public schools and in the Los Angeles St. Vincents College, and now 
a young rancher in Ventura County; Frank A., born November 7, 1876, 
also educated in the common schools and the high schools at Los Angeles, 
finishing his education in the Throop Polytechnic School at Pasadena, 
and now a Ventura County rancher ; Mrs. A. C. Martin of Los Angeles ; 
Henry M., bom October 28, 1878, now ranching in Ventura County, and 
educated in the Ventura High School ; Eamest J., born August 6, 1885. 



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wL^^'Ply'Pl.^yCAy l7 • -^AyCH^^yty/" 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 501 

educated at home and in St. Vincents College and Business College at 
Los Angeles, and now ranching in Ventura County; Mrs. John Lagor- 
marsino of Ventura; Andrew J., bom September 15, 1892, educated in 
the local schools, the Oxnard High School and the Los Angeles Business 
College, and now a rancher living near his father ; Raymond, bom Novem- 
ber ii, 1894, completing his education in the Los Angeles Business College 
and also a rancher in Ventura County; Marion B., bom November 21, 
1897, was educated in the public schools and the Santa Clara College, 
and is now assisting his father on the home place. 

I<[enneth Peter Grant is one of the oldest settlers of Ventura 
County, and is now vice president of the Pioneer Society of the county 
and one of the three men still living of the original officers of that organi- 
zation. It is nearly forty years since he came to. Ventura County and 
few men have had a greater range of activities connected with the 
development of this section than Mr. Grant. 

He was bom in Glengary, Canada, July 13, 1842, a son of Alexander 
and Mary (Creits) Grant. Leaving school at the age of fourteen, he 
became self supporting, and has compressed a remarkable range of 
experience Into his career. For two months after leaving school he 
worked as a teamster on constmction for the Grand Tmnk Railway 
Company. Until the age of nineteen he was then employed on farm of 
his stepfather at Comwall, Canada. Crossing the boundary and locat- 
ing in St. Lawrence County, New York, he worked on a farm there two 
months, and then took up the blacksmith's trade, serving his apprentice- 
ship at Massena Center, New York, to the age of twenty-one. 

He had in the meantime heard much of the glories of Califomia and 
a spirit of adventure led him to the western coast. He made the joumey 
by way of the Nicaragua route, and it was said that his was one of the 
first parties of Americans to come to California in that way. His first 
location was at Yountville in the Napa Valley, where he was employed 
as a blacksmith for two months, then engaged in the blacksmithing 
business for himself in Walnut Creek, Contra Costa County, and in 
1867 he left there and came to Ventura County (then Santa Barbara 
County), Califomia. The first month was spent in the employ of 
Harrington Robinson, a local blacksmith, and he then became a partner 
of Tom Williams, blacksmith, they opening a shop together and con- • 
tinning until 1869. Buying out Mr. Williams' stock and also the building 
and business of D. D. McCoy, he set up a blacksmithing business of his 
own, and not long afterward he embariced in the undertaking business. 
The first shipment of coffins ever made into Ventura County was billed 
to Mr. Grant, and he gradually developed undertaking as an important 
feature of his enterprise. He ran the first hearse and embalmed the first 
body in Ventura County. A number of years ago he also held the office 
of county coroner and public administrator. 

Selling out his blacksmithing and undertaking business in 1890, Mr. 
Grant took up the real estate business, and in 1893 ^^ ^"d a partner 
bought 500 acres of land. Not long afterward he obtained his individual 

Vol. n— 2 



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502 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

s?hare of this purchase, consisting of 350 acres, and most of his active 
work has been in connection with the development of that place. Thirty 
acres are now planted in apricots, while the rest in devoted to general 
farming purposes. Originally he had over 100 acres of orchard, but 
he reduced this as circumstances suggested the wisdom of so doing. 
Besides this handsome property Mr. Grant owns ninety acres in Ventura, 
and rents that. 

In 1867,^ on coming to Ventura County, he filed on 160 acres of 
Government land in the Santa Clara Valley, but this afterwards proved 
to be a part of the famous Tom More ranch. 

In 1893 the governor appointed him to fill an unexpired term as 
supervisor of Ventura County, and at the next general election he was 
chosen for the regular term. Mr. Grant is a past master of Ventura 
Lodge No. 214, Free and Accepted Masons, is past high priest of Ventura 
Chapter No. 50, Royal Arch Masons, is past eminent commander of 
Ventura Commandery No. 18, Knights Templar, and is a member of 
Al Malikah Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Los Angeles. He is a past 
grand master of the Knights of Pythias and was district deputy grand 
master for seven years. Mr. and Mrs. Grant in the past were both 
members of the Order of Eastern Star. Politically he is a republican. 

In Ventura December 31, 1870, he married Miss Hattie Perry, who 
died May 25, 1880. For his second wife he was married in Ventura 
January 11, 1884, to Miss Tonie Shafer, a native of Germany. Mr. 
Grant has no children. 

MiLo M. Potter. Through no one medium have the manifold attrac- 
tions of California been brought so distinctly to the favorable attention 
of the world as through the magnificent hotel accommodations the state 
has afforded to the tourists and to those who pass a portion of the year 
in this ideal section of the Union. Among those who have contributed 
much to the unrivalled hotel attractions and accommodations of Southern 
California a place of relative precedence must consistently be accorded to 
Milo Milton Potter, the able and popular proprietor of the fine Santa 
Barbara hotel that bears his name and the management of which has 
given him place as one of the representative hotel men of America. 

Mr. Potter was bom at Dundee, Monroe County, Michigan, on the 
19th of May, 1854, and is a scion of one of the honored pioneer families 
of that historic county of the southern part of the Wolverine State. He 
is a son of Alfred and Betsy Ann (Hecock) Potter, both natives of Ver- 
mont and representatives of staunch old colonial families of New Eng- 
land, both families having given gallant soldiers to the Continental Line 
in the War of the Revolution. Alfred Potter, who was bom at Rutland, 
Vermont, became one of the early settlers of Monroe County, Michigan, 
where he developed one of the largest and finest farms in the state and 
where he continued to reside until his death, in 1864, his devoted wife 
having passed to etemal rest in the late '50s, when their son, Milo M., of 
this review, was little more than an infant. 

Milo M. Potter was doubly orphaned when he was a lad of about ten 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 503 

years, but the family estate was such that he was not denied the best of 
educational advantages. After availing himself of the privileges aflforded 
in the public schools he was matriculated in the great University of 
Michigan, at Ann Arbor, in which he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1877 and from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
In initiating his independent business career he went to the State of 
Florida, and after there devoting one year to fruit-growing he engaged 
in the buying and ginning of cotton, with which line of enterprise he 
there continued his association four years. He then served his novitiate 
in the hotel business, his first two years of experience having been gained 
in Florida, after which he was for a time connected with one of the 
leading hotels at Atlantic City, New Jersey. Four years thereafter 
found him identified with the hotel business in the City of Philadelphia, 
and in 1888 he came to California and became connected with the West- 
minster Hotel in the City of Los Angeles. With this hotel he continued 
as an able and popular executive for a period of seven and one-half 
years, and that at a period when Southern California was just beginning 
to come into its own in the matter of popular recognition of its splendid 
attractions for tourists and as a place of winter residence. While still 
connected with the Westminster Mr. Potter effected the erection of the 
Hotel Van Nuys, at the comer of Fourth and Main streets, Los Angeles, 
and this he successfully conducted as one of the leading hotels of the 
metropolis of Southern California for a period of fifteen years. He 
then sold the property and business to Edward L. Potter, who was not 
a kinsman, though of the same family name. 

While still a resident of Los Angeles Mr. Potter conceived the idea 
of building a modern hotel of the best grade in Santa Barbara, and 
results have proved most fully the excellence of his judgment in bringing 
this enterprise into being. Believing that such a hotel would meet a 
distinct popular demand, he effected the organization of a stock com- 
pany that was incorporated with a capital of $1,000,000, and in 1901 
was initiated the work of building the splendid hotel, the same having 
been completed in eleven months and ten days and this making a record 
in the building of a hotel of such large proportions in so brief a period of 
time. Not only was the building completed within the time noted but it 
was also fully furnished and opened to the public with the best of 
appointments, facilities and service. A large business deal recently con- 
summated regarding this hotel was fully given in a local publication 
and is here inserted: 

"While the hotel property comes under his jurisdiction as sole owner, 
the deal having been quietly completed the latter part of September, 
Milo M. Potter, president of the Potter Hotel company, will retain his 
present business associates as members of a board of directors. The 
buildings and grounds represents an investment of $1,200,000, it was said. 

"Though representing the interests formerly owing large blocks of 
the stock in the company. Col. D. T. Perkins, vice president and chairman 
of the board, Richard Bard, Tod Ford, Jr., of Pasadena, Otto Gerberd- 



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504 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

ing, Mrs. Nellie M. Potter and A. A. Rossetti, Jr., secretary and auditor, 
will continue to serve on the board. 

" 'While the deal makes me the sole owner of the property I have 
asked my former associates to continue in their same respective posi- 
tions for counsel and advice, because of their loyalty to me during the 
first fourteen years of the hotel's existence,' said Mr. Potter today. 

" 'There will be no re-organization of the company or a change in the 
hotel staff, things will remain just as they have been. There will also 
be no change in the policy by which the Potter hotel has built up an 
enviable reputation as being one of the foremost exclusive hotels in the 
United States.' 

*'The conference which resulted in the sale of the property was 
attended by Col. Perkins, Richard Bard and Otto Gerberding, represent- 
ing the Bard estate, and Tod Ford, Jr., representing the Ford estate. 
The deal was made on a cash consideration, according to Mr. Potter. 

"The Potter hotel was built fourteen years ago by the above named 
interests, Ex-Senator Thomas R. Bard and Tod Ford, Sr., having been 
on the original board of directors with Messrs. Potter and Perkins, who 
were the real founders and builders of the hostelry. 

"The property comprises 30 acres of grounds, containing gardens on 
which have been expended $150,000, and the building. 

"Mr. Potter, who has been general maneger and president since the 
organization of the company, is one of the pioneer hotel men of the west, 
having built and operated the Hotel Van Nuys in Los Angeles for 15 
years." 

The Potter Hotel is a building of six stories, is 600 feet in length, 
the main building, with the power plant and laundry and the quarters for 
the hotel employes, covering a tract of about seven acres. The hotel is 
situated on a small hill, about 800 feet back from the ocean, with a com- 
manding view, and it has accommodations for the entertaining of 1,000 
guests. The dining room has a seating capacity for 750 persons, greater 
than that of any other hotel west of New York City, and with the ideal 
arrangement of small and more intimate tables it is doubtful if any hotel 
in the world can equal the Potter in this important domain of service. 
About the hotel is a beautiful park of thirty acres, and in every depart- 
ment the house is a model in luxurious appointments and perfect service, 
so that the Potter well merits its reputation and is to be consistently desig- 
nated as one of the finest hotels not only on the Pacific Coast but also 
in the entire Union. The park of the hotel has been developed into one 
of the most idyllic in the world, with a wealth of semi-tropical foliage, 
including palms, shrubs and other ornamental vegetation, and with the 
landscape effect heightened by its houses of glass and other consistent con- 
struction. The entire place is one of America's ideal beauty-spots, and 
attests most fully the initiative and executive ability of Mr. Potter and his 
capacity for the achievement of large things, besides which his capacity 
for the handling of manifold details with exactitude and dispatch is almost 
marvelous. He gave his personal supervision to the construction of the 
hotel building and to all matters pertaining to the development and im- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 505 

provement of the grounds, even as he has had the general management 
of the fine hotel from the time of its completion and has been president 
of the company controlling the property since the time of incorporation. 

Mr. Potter is a member of the directorate of the Farmers & Mer- 
chants National Bank of Los Angeles, a position which he has held 
continuously since 1898, and he is one of the largest stockholders in the 
W'estem Lnion Oil Company, one of the most successful corporations 
engaged in the development work and general operations in the Cali- 
fornia oil fields. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, 
he is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, and he is a popular member 
of numerous representative social organizations in Southern California, 
including the Jonathan, the California, the Athletic, the University, the 
Driving and the Country clubs of Los Angeles, and the Santa Barbara 
Country Club and La Cumbre Club, of Santa Barbara. He is specially 
well known as a fancier of fine horses, and he maintains a stable of 
splendid driving and riding horses, besides having others eligible for the 
making of excellent turf records. Mr. Potter has never manifested any 
semblance of the sporting proclivities so common to the American type 
of successful business men, and thus he has never associated him- 
self with fishing, hunting, cards, billiards or with gambling or specu- 
lative matters. He confesses to a love of the farm and the untrammeled 
life out of doors, but he is sane, direct and normal in all of his personal 
characteristics, genial and buoyant of temperament, and well worthy of 
the unequivocal popularity that is his. Mr. Potter is the owner of a 
splendidly improved farm of 320 acres, eight miles distant from Santa 
Barbara and near the Village of Goleta. Here he has developed a fine 
dairy enterprise, besides raising the best grades of cattle and swine. 

Mr. Potter has been one of the world's constructive workers and has 
achieved a large measure of success through his well ordered endeavors. 
His greatest success has been gained in a field of enterprise that has 
recorded innumerable failures — the hotel business. It is somewhat 
remarkable that while living in the great West, where are centered the 
most attractive of mining investments, he has never deviated from his 
course to the extent of investing a single dollar in mining projects or 
enterprises. When recently asked to explain what he attributed as the 
specific medium of his success in the hotel business, Mr. Potter stated 
that he felt assured that his advancement had been compassed through 
the agencies of energy, hard work and natural generalship in directing 
the work of others, it having been his good fortune to gain the respect 
and esteem of his employes and thus to receive on their part the most 
loyal co-operations and service. 

Mr. Potter is a man who is by no means given to subtleties or super- 
stition, but he clings insistently and loyally to the nineteenth day of the 
month as one of special significance in his career. He was bom on the 
19th of May, and every event of special importance in his life has touched 
the number nineteen. He left for Florida on the 19th of the month, 
engaged in his first business enterprise on the 19th, signed his first con- 
tract on the 19th ; the construction of the Potter Hotel was instituted on 



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506 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

the 19th and the building was completed and opened on the 19th, even 
as had previously been his Los Angeles hotel, the Van Nuys ; and, more 
than all, his engagement and his marriage were recorded on the 19th. 

Practical politics and public office have had no lure for Mr. Potter, 
but in his civic attitude he is emphatically liberal, progressive and public- 
spirited. He has done much to foster the advancement of Santa Barbara 
and is one of the most popular and valued citizens of this fine little city. 

On the 19th of November, 1901, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Potter to Mrs. Nellie M. Jones. No children have been bom of this 
union but by her former marriage Mrs. Potter has one daughter, Miss 
Nina Maude Jones. 

Charles Fernald. Through his character and his distinguished 
services the late Judge Charles Fernald added new honors to a family 
name that has been prominently and worthily linked with the annals of 
American history since the early colonial era. He was one of the honored 
and influential pioneers of Santa Barbara and few have done more to 
foster the development and progress of this favored section of the State 
of California, where he long lived and labored to goodly ends and where 
his achievement was such as to make his name worthy of enduring honor 
on the pages of California history. 

Judge Fernald was bom at North Berwick, Maine, on the 27th of 
May, 1830, and his death occurred at Santa Barbara, California, on the 
7th of July, 1892. He was a scion of a long line of Puritan ancestors, 
and the original American progenitor of the Fernald family was Dr. Reg- 
inald Femald, who was bom in Bristol, England, and who, as a physician 
and surgeon of marked ability, accompanied Sir Ferdinand Garges' expe- 
dition to America and settled in New Hampshire, in 163 1. He was a 
member of the colonial company of Captain John Mason and in 1640 
there was conveyed to him a grant of fifty acres of land, on the northeast 
shore of the Piscataqua River. The property here owned by Doctor 
Femald and his brother Thomas continued in the possession of the 
family for 150 years, the final conveyance of the estate to others having 
been made by John Femald, Jr., and it is specially worthy of record that 
at this time John Femald, Jr., gave up possession of Femald's Island, 
which, on the 15th of June, 1806, became the property of the United 
States, the property being now the site of the Portsmouth Navy Yard 
maintained by the Govemment. 

Hercules Fernald, grandfather of the subject of this memoir, was bom 
at Kittery, Maine, on the 4th of December, 1749, and during the War of 
the Revolution* he was a gallant soldier in the Massachusetts Line, with 
which he took part in the historic engagements at Dorchester Heights, 
Fort Constitution, Bennington, Bemis Heights, Stillwater, Saratoga, and 
other important conflicts with the British forces. 

The early education of Judge Charles Femald was gained largely 
under the eflFective preceptorship of Prof. Harrison Carroll Hobart, 
and the adventurous spirit of the New England youth was manifested 
in action that was taken by him when he was not yet nineteen years of 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 507 

age. At this time he became a member of a party of argonauts that set 
forth for the newly discovered gold fields in California. He arrived in 
San Francisco on the 14th of June, 1849, and after passing a few months 
in the mining camps he returned to San Francisco, where he engaged in 
editorial work for such prominent pioneer newspapers as the Post and 
the Alta Califomian. Prior to coming to the West he had given closfe 
attention to the study of law, and in San Francisco he continued his 
technical studies with characteristic zeal. Disastrous fires that visited 
San Francisco in 1851 and 1852 somewhat reduced his ardor for life in 
the Far West, and he decided to return to New England. He made plans 
to visit friends in Southern California prior to his departure for the East, 
and on the 30th of June, 1852, he joined his friends, Edward Sherman 
Hoar and Augustus F. Hinchman, at Santa Barbara. Apropos of this 
stage in his career the following interesting record has been written, and 
it is worthy of perpetuation in this connection : 

"So complete has been the transformation in the appearance of Santa 
Barbara that one can scarcely imagine the contrast afforded by present- 
day activity in comparison with the dreamy drowsiness marking the 
Mexican settlement of more than sixty years ago. Just at the time of 
Mr. Femald's arrival, however, the peaceful lives of the citizens had 
been interrupted by the depredations of an organized company of bandits 
who terrorized the entire community and who compelled the county 
officers to resign their posts. The best men of the community were making 
a determined effort to evolve order out of anarchy. At this opportune 
time Mr. Femald was tendered the office of county judge, and in a single 
day his entire plans were changed. He decided to remain in California, 
and March 14, 1853, he received the appointment as county judge. On 
the 15th of the following September he was duly elected to this office, 
and two years later he was re-elected. One of his first official acts was 
the appointment of Russell Heath as district attorney. His splendid 
personal courage enabled him to cope with the desperadoes who had no 
regard for life or property. His life was in constant danger in the then 
unsettled condition of the country and he had many stirring experiences 
in the administration of the law and the holding in check the many rough 
characters who menaced the public, peace. That he succeeded in admin- 
istering justice and in securing the respect of the community is proved 
by the fact that he held office four successive terms by election. Under 
the first state constitution the duties of a county judge were not limited 
to the trial of civil cases. As judge of the court of sessions he presided 
at the trial of many criminal offenders, and he was also judge of the 
probate and county courts. 

"During his incumbency of his position on the bench, Judge Femald 
continued his close study of the law and also devoted much attention to 
the study of the Spanish language. As a result he was thoroughly equipped 
to handle the peculiar litigation arising principally from the construction 
of Mexican grants, their authenticity, their limitations and boundaries; 
and consequently, after retiring from the bench, he was retained as coun- 
sel by the principal owners of property in Santa Barbara County, which 



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508 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

at that time included the present county of Ventura. He was admitted 
to the state supreme court September 2, 1854; to the United States cir- 
cuit court in 1857 ; and to the United States supreme court in 1874." 

The superior legal attainmsents of Judge Femald were supplemented 
by remarkable resourcefulness in his management of the complicated 
fnatters affecting the titles to land and arising in the peculiar disputes 
characteristic of this country after its conquest, and this eminent forti- 
fication resulted in the retention of the services of Judge Femald not 
only by the land-owners of his locality but also brought to him a clientage 
beyond the borders of California. In this connection it may be noted 
that he was retained as attorney for Thomas A. Scott, of Philadelphia, 
who was the owner of large landed holdings in Southern California. 

Judge Femald was unsparing in his services in behalf of his home 
city and county, which shall ever owe to him a debt of gratitude and honor. 
Especially valuable were his services in fixing the titles and boundaries 
of the municipal lands of Santa Barbara, as successor to the ancient 
pueblo of the same name, and he was primarily instrumental in obtain- 
ing from the United States Government a patent for these lands, embrac- 
ing four square leagues, this having been the first patent issued to any 
pueblo in Califomia. 

In May, 1882, by an almost unanimous vote, the people of Santa 
Barbara voiced their high estimate of Judge Femald by electing him 
mayor of the city, and he served two years as the characteristically loyal 
and progressive incumbent of this municipal office, in the meanwhile 
refusing to accept the salary attaching thereto. As mayor he had the 
distinction of extending welcome and entertainment to the Marquis of 
Lome and Princess Louise, who honored Santa Barbara with a visit of 
three weeks, incidental to their American tour. Judge Femald later 
served as United States commissioner for the Southern District of Cali- 
fomia, and in this position likewise he acquitted himself with charac- 
teristic ability and distinction. 

Judge Femald was a man of fine intellectuality and was specially 
talented as a linguist, as he familiarized himself with the French and Italian 
as well as the Spanish languages. He was a life member of the American 
Forestry Association, and took the deepest interest in its work as pertain- 
ing to Califomia. He was the first to make experimentation in the culti- 
vation of olive trees in Southern Califomia, save for the minor essays 
that had been made in connection with the old-time Spanish missions, and 
his initial experiments were made in 1865-66, when he purchased the Bel- 
mont property near Santa Barbara and planted on the tract a large num- 
ber of olive trees, with the purpose of establishing the fact that here 
could be produced olives for preserving and for the making of oil of the 
best grade. In all of the relations of life Judge Femald effectually 
demonstrated the truth of the statement to the effect that a man does not 
represent a fraction but a whole number; he is complete in himself. His 
influence was benignant at all times and he accounted well for himself 
and to the world as a resolute, noble and productive element in the social 
fabric. 



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REGIXALD G. FERXALD 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 509 

On the 7th of August, 1862, at North Berwick, Maine, was solem- 
nized the marriage of Judge Fernald to Miss Hannah Hobbs, daughter 
of Wilson and Sarah Eliot (Goodwin) Hobbs and a descendant of Judge 
John Hill, Samuel Goodwin, Robert Eliot and the Pepperell family. 
Mrs. Fernald still survives her honored husband and is one of the revered 
pioneer women of California. She is a member of the Daughters of 
the American Revolution and also of the Colonial Dames, several of her 
ancestors having participated in the colonial wars and the War of the 
Revolution. Her maternal uncle, Hon. Ichabod Goodwin, served as 
Governor of New Hampshire, and another uncle, Dr. Daniel Goodwin, 
was president of the University of Pennsylvania. Judge Fernald is 
survived by two sons and two daughters, and concerning one of the sons, 
Reginald G., individual mention is made on other pages of this work. 

Judge Fernald was a life member of the Pioneer Society of California, 
was affiliated with the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
was a member of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 
in Philadelphia, and was an honored and influential member of the 
California State Bar Association, of which he served at one time as 
vice president. He was an appreciative student of the history and teach- 
ings of the time-honored Masonic fraternity, with which he was long 
and prominently affiliated, and incidental to this and other associations 
maintained by him the following pertinent statements have been written : 

"As the bearing and deeds of Judge Fernald in life had been worthy 
a knight of old, it was fitting that his associates, the Knights Templar, 
should perform the cross of steel over his grave. His comrades in the 
California Society of the Sons of the American Revolution issued a 
pamphlet calling attention to his worthy life and dwelling upon his 
merits. The Superior Court of Santa Barbara County passed a resolu- 
tion embodying a high tribute to the memory of the departed jurist, as did 
also the San Francisco Bulletin in publishing the account of his death." 

Reginald G. Fernald. The high standing of Reginald Goodwin 
Fernald in the civic, business and social circles of his native city is such 
as to demonstrate that he does not stand in the shadow of paternal 
greatness but has made for himself a place of prominence and influence, 
with secure vantage-ground in popular confidence and good will. He 
is president of the Morning Press Publishing Company of Santa Bar- 
bara, is a member of the California bar and is a progressive and public- 
spirited citizen who is a stalwart supporter of those civic and material 
enterprises and measures that tend to advance the communal welfare. 
On other pages of this work is entered a memorial tribute to his honored 
father, the late Judge Charles Fernald, so that further review of the 
family history is not demanded in this connection. 

Reginald Goodwin Fernald was born in Santa Barbara on the 6th 
of July, 1880, and as a youth he here attended the collegiate school 
conducted by Professor T. H. McCune. In 1903 he was graduated in 
Stanford University, from which he received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, and on the 26th of June, 1907, he was graduated in the law 



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510 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

school of historic old Harvard University, from which he received the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws. In 1908 Mr. Femald was admitted to the 
California bar, in the City of San Francisco, and in that city he became 
associated with the representative law firm of Morris, Cope & Brabeck. 
He continued in the practice of his profession in San Francisco for 
several years, and his withdrawal from practice was enforced by a 
severe illness from which he recuperated very slowly. He thus returned 
to Santa Barbara, and in his native city he has since effectively staged 
his activities. After the death of Cameron Rogers he succeeded that 
honored citizen in the office of president of the Morning Press Publish- 
ing Company, through the medium of which he has continued the 
splendid services of his predecessor in making the Press an effective 
exponent of community interests and in supporting those measures 
which conserve the best interests of the City and County of Santa 
Barbara. 

Mr. Femald was one of the candidates on the republican electoral 
ticket of California in 191 2, but cast in his lot with that contingent of 
the party that made Theodore Roosevelt the standard-bearer and effected 
the organization of the progressive party. He was chosen a delegate to 
the republican national convention of 1916, but he declined the honor, 
as he had previously planned for a trip to Alaska. He is now, 1916-18, 
member of the Executive Committee of the Republican State Central 
Committee. While a student at Harvard he passed one of his vaca- 
tions in travel through Europe. 

Loyal in his allegiance to and appreciation of the glorious state 
of his birth, Mr. Femald is actively affiliated with the Native Sons of 
the Golden West, besides which he is identified with the Sons of the 
American Revolution, the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Santa Barbara Club, the Palo Club, 
the Santa Barbara Country Club and the Bohemian Club of San Fran- 
cisco. His religious faith is that of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 
of which he is a communicant. 

In addition to his active association with the Morning Press Publish- 
ing Company Mr. Femald conducts a successful and representative 
real-estate and insurance business, under the title of the Santa Bar- 
bara Realty Company, and he has large and valuable real-estate interests 
in and about his native city. 

Julius Doty and Sons. Three generations of the Doty family have 
given their constructive efforts to the upbuilding and progress of Cali- 
fomia. Representing the second generation, the late Julius Doty had a 
part in the pioneer activities of several communities included within the 
scope of this historical survey, and the qualities which distinguished him 
as a successful rancher and public spirited citizen have been continued 
through his stalwart son. 

A native of Illinois, the late Julius Doty was a small boy when he 
accompanied his father, Martin Doty, across the plains to California in 
1852. He remained in California until 1858, then went back East, but in 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 511 

1861 recrossed the plains and from that time forward for forty years was 
a busy and useful citizen. The family located in Calavares Valley in 
Santa Clara County. In 1869 Julius Doty moved to Hollister, then in 
Monterey County, and was one of the builders of that now flourishing 
town. His father, Martin Doty, was one of the organizers of the San 
Justo Company, which laid out and built the Town of Hollister and devel- 
oped the surrounding country. 

Following his early efforts at Hollister Julius Doty returned in 1879 
to San Jose in Santa Clara County, and in 1883 moved to Naples and 
bought the 200-acre ranch which he and his four sons, Julius Edward, 
Francis G., Lawrence A. and Russell E., developed as one of the finest 
of the older ranching properties of Santa Barbara County. Julius Doty 
continued his active superintendence of his varied interests and lived on 
his ranch until his death in 1901. He was a quiet, unassuming citizen, 
and though repeatedly tendered political office the only public position he 
ever would consent to hold was that of forest ranger. 

Sur\aving him were his widow, his four sons already mentioned, and 
five daughters, whose names are : Minnie E. and Mary E., both at home ; 
Bertha Edith, wife of G. S. Chamberlain, a farmer at Goleta ; Lucy Edna, 
wife of Alex Main, a rancher at Lompoc; and Hattie Alice, wife of Her- 
bert Beattie, a Lompoc rancher. 

Lucy (Roberts) Doty, widow of the late Julius Doty, is now living 
on the old homestead in Naples. She likewise represents a prominent 
pioneer California family. She was bom at San Jose, a daughter of G. M. 
Roberts. Her father was a contractor and carpenter of San Benito 
County, and through that vocation and other material ways he did much 
for the upbuilding of the new Town of Hollister, already mentioned. G. M. 
Roberts came to California in 1852 and acquired a number of distinc- 
tions during his long residence in the state. He was a member of the 
Legislature for two terms in the early '70s. His death occurred in 
December, 1915, at the age of eighty-five, and he was laid to rest on 
Christmas day. 

Since the death of Mr. Julius Doty his four sons have taken the active 
management of the 200 acres, and with increasing experience and ability 
they have also leased 500 acres, which for the past two or three years they 
have cropped in lima beans. Prior to that their main crops were hay 
and grain. 

Julius Edward Doty, the oldest son of the late Julius Doty, was bom 
December 2^, 1872, in Hollister, then in Monterey County, was educated 
in the public schools of Hollister, and in early youth began assisting his 
father on the farm. He has proved one of the valuable members of that 
combination of four brothers who now carry on the operations of 700 
acres of the rich, fertile farming land of Santa Barbara County. He is 
a member of thfe Knights of Pythias and the Uniform Rank of that order. 

Lawrence A. Doty, the second son, was born in Hollister December 
30, 1876, was educated in the public schools there and at Naples, and his 
career since the completion of his schooling has been worked out with 
his father and his brothers. 



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512 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Francis G. Doty, who was bom at Hollister May 22, 1879, has the 
practical qualities which have distinguished all these brothers as fanners. 
His education was acquired in the Den school district of Naples. He is 
school trustee of that district, for the term of three years beginning with 
April, 191 5. Fraternally he is a Uniform Rank Knights of Pythias, 
belongs to the Pythian Sisters, is an active republican in politics, and 
belongs to the Native Sons of the Golden West. On October 19, 1910, he 
married Orabelle Jamison, a native of Santa Barbara County and a 
daughter of S. I. Jamison, of Goleta. They have one daughter and one 
son, Frances Belle and Martin Thomas. 

Russell E. Doty, the youngest son, was bom at Santa Barbara January 
3, 1892, had the advantage of g^mmar schools and for one year attended 
high school at Santa Barbara, and as soon as old enough took his place 
among his brothers in the work of the farm. He is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias. 

John Troup. If there is cwie expert authority on livestock in South- 
em Calif omia, the weight of opinion would probably incline to the name 
John Troup for that distinction. For more than a quarter of a century 
he has been identified with the cattle and horse business in Southern Cal- 
ifomia, has been manager for some of the owners of the largest stock 
ranches, has dealt independently, and has been influential in introducing 
some of the finest breeds and strains from both the Old and the New 
World into Califomia. Thus his dealings and activities have been by 
no means confined to one or several counties. In fact his name is nation- 
ally if not intemationally known among stock men, and wherever the 
California live stock industry is under consideration it is almost inevit- 
able that the name of John Troup or some reference to the work he has 
accomplished should be mentioned. 

Mr. Troup is a Scotchman by birth and training, and has the patience, 
determined, steadfast, reliable and prosperous characteristics of his race. 
He was bom in Aberdeenshire July 22, 1864. He is the fifth in as many 
successive generations of the family to receive the name John. His 
father, John, now deceased, was a Scotch farmer and stock raiser, a man 
of considerable prominence politically, and for a number of years was 
'^Factor" of the large Scotstown estate on the River Don, the owner of 
which was an officer in the English army, stationed in India. John 
Troup, Sr., married Mary Smith, who was bom at Aboyne, a few miles 
from Balmoral, Scotland, and she also is deceased. 

With an education received at Drumoak public schools, John Troup 
grew up on his father's farm and }>erfected his talents for farming and 
stock husbandry in the early period of his life. For three years after 
he reached his majority he served with the Aberdeenshire Constabulary, 
and as a young man he also had four years training with the Vohmteer 
Gordon Highlanders. 

His introduction to America came in 1888, when he went to Canada. 
At that time the Bank of England, the Canadian banks and the Canadian 
Pacific Railway opened up eleven farms situated from Balgonie to 



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JOHX TROUP 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 513 

Calgary on the western prairies of Canada. The purpose in opening 
these farms was to demonstrate to prospective settlers that wheat and 
stock could be grown with profit in that region, which hitherto had been 
shunned hy any considerable number of permanent settlers. Mr. Troup's 
father was at that time associated with Ben Reed & Co., the Aberdeen 
firm which sold the seeds and the implements for this Canadian project. 
Because of his early training and the ability shown by him in various 
directions, Mr. John Troup was recommended by Reed as the proper 
man to set up and take charge of the machinery on the Canadian farms. 
It was an interesting experiment, and was financed and managed upon a 
large scale. The combination sent out a hundred Black Angus bulls, 
eleven Clydesdale stallions, two thoroughbred stallions from England 
and some fancy sheep and hogs. 

After one year of connection with this project Mr. John Troup left 
Canada and sought a new field in California. Some relatives were living 
in Santa Barbara, where they were employed by El wood Cooper, and 
they wrote to Mr. Troup while in San Francisco suggesting that he visit 
Santa Barbara and vicinity. In 1889 he and his brother James, who is 
now living at Santa Ynez, followed the advice of his correspondents, and 
in 1890 Mr. John Troup entered the service of George Edwards on the 
latter's Goleta property. He also looked after some property of Mr. 
Edwards at Naples. 

For twenty-one years Mr. Troup was in the employ of Mr. Edwards. 
For the first five years his management extended to fruit raising, and 
he was then employed in importing cattle and horses from the East. 
He put in a stud of registered Clydesdale horses from Indiana, Wiscon- 
sin and Iowa, and sold a great many young stallions in California, 
Nevada, Utah and Arizona. Some of this stock was secured from Scot- 
land. The first registered herd of Galloway cattle ever introduced into 
this vicinity was secured by Mr. Troup from Indiana. He also made 
.several importations of Shorthorns from Wisconsin. 

The great value of this work to the advancement of animal husbandry 
in California can be understood better when it is stated that Mr. Troup 
sold stallions to all the big ranches, including the Bishop, Elwood, Stow, 
Dibbles, Calef and McGilray, Torrence, Sutton estate ranches; Cooper 
Ranch of Santa Rosa ; Kelly Ranch of Santa Maria ; Strotham Ranch of 
Simi; Randolph Ranch at Lompoc and many others. The stock sold to 
these ranches had been imported under the personal supervision of Mr. 
Troup. At one time the ranch of which he was superintendent furnished 
breeding registered stock in Southern California. When Mr. Edwards 
sold his ranch to Mr. Ripley, of the Santa Fe Railway, Mr. Troup was 
engaged independently for several years as an importer. For two years 
he was superintendent of the Fred H. Bixby Ranch of 8,500 acres 
between FuUerton and Corona. His principal work on this ranch was 
the setting out of walnut, orange, lemon and Bartlett pear groves, and 
the installation of an extensive irrigation system. 

A few years ago Mr. Troup went East and bought a car load of 
registered bulls, and most of these were recently sold to the John F. 



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514 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

More and to the Bibblee estate. Quite recently Mr. Troup has sold a 
hundred head of bulls to Mexico and a hundred to Arizona. At this 
writing he is engaged on a very large undertaking to sell a dairy order 
and expects to put a thousand cows in the dairy of the America Farm 
Land Company at Merced. 

These various activities have naturally brought Mr. Troup a well 
earned fame as an authority on live stock in California. In 1910 he 
was selected as judge at the state fair in Sacramento to pass upon the 
stock exhibit. A number of prominent men have selected him to per- 
form various commissions in the buying and handling of live stock, and 
ranch owners and trade journals in general regard his experience and his 
advice as authority. He has contributed many articles to the Wheel and 
Saddle, the well known stock paper of San Francisco, to the Livestock 
and Dairy Journal of Sacramento and to the Short-Horn World of 
Chicago. A number of the livestock and agricultural papers of the nation 
have from time to time written up his work and referred to him in fit- 
tingly complimentary terms. The limits of this sketch permit only one 
brief quotation. It is from the Chicago Live Stock News, in a recent 
issue: "He is the typical, blest, big, broad representative of the Scotch 
race— one of the kind that Robert Louis Stevenson had in mind when he 
wrote: *No matter what queer comer of the world you butt into you 
will find Sandy sitting cross-legged on top of the pile — the best there is.' " 

Outside of the stock industry Mr. Troup has found time to do his 
part as an American citizen, and he has a fine home and family. In 
politics he is a republican, and has acted on the county central committee 
and as delegate to state conventions held at Sacramento and Santa Cruz. 
Fraternally he is a Knight of Pythias. 

In Scotland, in March, 1888, he married Elizabeth Logan Milne, of 
an old Scotch family. Six children were bom to them, four now living : 
Margaret Watson Troup; John, who is employed by President Ripley 
of the Santa Fe; Mary Elizabeth Troup; George Edward Troup; Walter,, 
who died in infancy; and William, who at the age of six years lost his 
life by the explosion of a coal oil heater, an explosion which also 
destroyed the home. 

John Troup, Jr. Possessing many of the qualities which have made 
his father so distinguished in the livestock industry of California, John 
Troup, Jr., is likewise to be named among the professional farm and 
ranch managers of Santa Barbara County. 

Bom at Goleta, on the place where he is now employed by Mr. E. P. 
Ripley, president of the Santa Fe Railway Company, he was educated 
in the Goleta public schools and his natural talents for agriculture and 
livestock handling had a splendid environment and opportunity to develop 
under the supervision of his father. 

His first employment was with George Edwards, and he was one of 
the right hand men on the Edwards Ranch until 191 1. In that year 
Edwards sold his property to Mr. Ripley of the Santa Fe, and since 
then Mr. Troup has continued as foreman for Mr. Ripley. He has 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 515 

under his superintendence an extensive plantation, and most of the land 
is devoted to beans, lemons and walnuts. 

Mr. Troup is a republican, belongs to the Presbyterian Church, and 
is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and the Fraternal Brotherhood. 
On November 21, 1912, he married Miss Jeannie Ann Main. She was 
bom in Goleta, and her father, Robert Main, was one of the old settlers 
of the valley. They are the parents of one son, William Gordon Troup, 
born December 20, 1914. 

Harry H. Harris. A prominent and prosperous resident of Santa 
Barbara, Harry H. Harris conducts the largest jewelry establishment 
in the city, and is also doing his full share towards promoting the mercan- 
tile and civic interests of that section. 

A native of California, he was bom April 10, 1881, in San Francisco. 
His father, Daniel Harris, was a wealthy capitalist of San Francisco, 
had extensive interests in mining and landed properties, and was sole 
owner of the famous Harris ranch in the Los Alamos Valley, not far 
from Santa Barbara. The original ranch contained 17,000 acres. Much 
of the land belonging to the original tract was found to be rich in oil, 
and the oil lands are now under lease to the Pinal Dome Refining Com- 
pany. 

Harry H. Harris was educated at Belmont Military School at Bel- 
mont, San Mateo County, California. He came to Santa Barbara in 
search of a favorable location and for the first ten years here served 
as deputy county clerk. He then bought an interest in the jewelry 
store of L. Eaves & Company, and now has entire management of that 
entire establishment, which in its wares and its service is hardjy excelled 
by any of the metropolitan jewelry stores of the state. The business 
was founded by Mrs. L. Eaves in 1883, and has had a continuous and 
prosperous existence for thirty-three years. 

Mr. Harris married in January, 191 1, Miss Leonora Eaves, daughter 
of Mrs. L. Eaves of Santa Barbara. He is a member of Santa Barbara 
Lodge No. 613, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and of La 
Cumbrae Golf and Country clubs, 

Fernand Lungren. a painter of recognized ability and originality, 
well known on both sides of the Atlantic, Femand Lungren, of Santa 
Barbara, through his own energy and perseverance, has achieved marked 
success as an artist, his creative work being intelligently and conscien- 
tiously done, and in a most delightful and individual style that will not 
suffer by being compared with the work of other artists. He was bom 
November 13, 1859, in Maryland, a son of Dr. Samuel Sanford Lungren, 
coming from a family of title in Sweden, from whence the immigrant 
ancestor came to this country in 1620. One of his forefathers, his great- 
grandfather, established the first pai>er mills on the Brandywine. 

Dr. Samuel S. Lungren, a Pennsylvanian by birth and breeding, was 
a noted physician and surgeon of his day, practicing his profession first 
in Maryland, and later in Toledo, Ohio, where his death occurred in 1893. 



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516 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

He was a man of influence, and served as president of a number of 
different medical organizations. He married Mary Catherine Marshall, 
who was bom in Maryland, and was a relative of Chief Justice Marshall. 

Receiving his preliminary education in private schools, Femand Lun- 
gren entered the University of Michigan, where he took the scientific 
course, specializing as a mining engineer. He subsequently engaged in 
journalistic work in Baltimore, from there going to New York, where 
he did his first work as an artist by illustrating for the old Scribner 
Magazine. He afterwards became well known in Boston; also, in fact, 
throughout the length and breadth of the United States, as an illustrator 
for Wide Awake, Saint Nicholas, Harper's Magazine, Century Maga- 
zine, and for all the leading publications. About ten years ago Mr. Lun- 
gren relinquished his work as an illustrator, and has since devoted his 
talents to painting, a branch of art in which he acquired fame while 
illustrating by being the first person to paint a picture^ of the city streets 
by night. 

Mr. Lungren subsequently pursued his art studies abroad, remaining 
in Paris three years. Returning then to this country, he spent a short time 
in Cincinnati, from there going to New Mexico and Arizona, where he 
lived and labored for five years, painting landscapes, and becoming inter- 
ested in the Pueblo Indian^. Later he became a priest of the Hopi 
Indians in Arizona, which gave him an excellent opportunity for his 
studies. Leaving the Southwest, Mr. Lungren again crossed the ocean, 
and, after spending two years in England, pursuing his art studies, he 
went to Africa, where he stayed a year, making studies of scenes along 
the Nile, and in the desert regions of the Sudan. 

In 1902 Mr. Lungren returned from his wanderings abroad and 
lived for two years in New York City, and two years in Los Angeles. 
He was then, in 1906, induced by his intimate friend, Stewart Edward 
White, to locate in Santa Barbara, which he intends to make his per- 
manent home. He is a painter of international prominence, his pictures 
having attracted attention both at home and in European art circles, 
and are to bfe found in the Staats-Forbes, Warren, Roberts, Corcoran, 
Wallace and other noted collectors. While he has disposed of a number 
of his paintings in the East, he now finds ready sale for all of his work 
in California. 

Mr. Lungren has worked steadily and faithfully along the line of 
his intention, his aim being to make an authoritative and comprehensive 
collection of desert pictures that will forever settle the general miscon- 
ception of the desert. In his labors, which have carried him to distant 
and odd comers of the earth, he has encountered many dangers and 
endured much privation. While he was in London the public at first 
was slow in responding to the subjects of his artistic efforts and took but 
little interest in his work until he painted his noted pictures of "London 
at Night." After that, as he says, he and his wife were "tremendously" 
well received, and he was made a member of the Pastel Society. His 
pictures were grouped, and he was honored as the man who had dis- 
covered London at night. He and Mrs. Lungren were the recipients of 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 517 

many flattering courtesies and mingled freely with men and women of 
prominence. 

Mr. Lungren has original views on art, as every true artist has, one 
of the strongest being his conviction of the great mission of the West, 
especially the Pacific coast, into the immediate future in commercial 
and artistic development, and his desire is to be identified with that 
development rather than with what has been done in the East. In Europe 
American artists are appreciated, but very little is known of American 
art, and with a desire to add his artistic mite to its better comprehension, 
he committed "professional suicide," in the opinion of many of his 
eastern friends, in leaving his secure position to make another in the 
field of his adoption. 

Soon after the Japanese-Russian war he began to talk and write upon 
the now much discussed subject of preparedness and urged i the people 
to cease "wallowing in the mire of complacency, and wake up to the 
gravity of the defenceless condition of the coimtry." Three years ago 
he was practically alone in his views, but now has many friends. He is 
strong in his pleadings for universal service from a military point of 
view, and is a stanch advocate of Americanism, pure and unadulterated. 
He argues that it is impossible for us to demand a place among the 
world powers unless we are capable of satisfactorily filling a position so 
full of responsibility and trust. 

Mr. Lungren married, in New York City, Miss Henrietta Whipple, 
a native of the Empire state. Mr. Lungren is. a member of the Salaman- 
gundie Club, the old Tile Club, the Southern California Art Club, the 
Santa Barbara Country Club, and the La Cumbre Qub. 

Joseph Sexton is properly credited with the pioneer enterprise in 
several industries by which Southern California has contributed to the 
wealth and well being of the world. 

He was bom in Ohio March 14, 1842. His grandfather Joseph 
Sexton, Sr., was a farmer on the old homestead nine miles from Cincin- 
nati, and a man of no small prominence in affairs, known as a leader 
in the whig party in the early days. His only son was Richard Sexton, 
who cultivated the old Ohio farm for some years, and afterwards with 
a partner operated a store at Dent in the same vicinity. He and his 
partner were attracted by the many stories concerning the discovery of 
gold on the Pacific coast. Accompanied by their wives they started for 
California in the summer of 1852, going over the Nicaragua route and 
landing in San Francisco January 4, 1853. In San Francisco Richard 
Sexton was in the wood and coal business for a year, and then estab- 
lished a fruit farm and a small nursery in the lone Valley, forty miles 
east of Sacramento. After the dry season of 1864 he sold out and 
moved near to Petaluma in Sonoma County, where he bought the 
Stewart Nursery. 

In February, 1868, Richard Sexton came to Santa Barbara. Heri 
he supervised his real estate investments, and bought 100 acres of the 
Hill Ranch, paying $22 an acre and afterwards selling sixty acres flj>r 
YoL n— « 



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518 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

what he had paid for the entire property. He died in Santa Barbara at 
the age of sixty-six. Richard Sexton married Ann Claypool, who was 
born in New Jersey and died in California. 

One of the four sons of his father, Joseph Sexton came to California 
at the age of eleven years, and grew up on a fruit ranch. Coming to 
Santa Barbara in November, 1867, he started the Santa Barbara Nursery. 
On account of the wet season he made his start at the comer of Monte- 
cito and Castilleo streets. Santa Barbara was then a small town with a 
meager American population. In the absence of better material he 
built a small cabin 12 by 16 feet, with only two windows and with a rooi* 
of boards. After the first season he transferred his nursery to his ranch 
at Goleta in Santa Barbara County. 

With regard to the pioneer work by which he helped to establish 
the reputation of Southern California for its wonderful products, the 
following paragraphs written several years ago give a succinct account: 

"Too much praise cannot be given Mr. Sexton for importing and 
introducing a great many of the finest specimen plants that decorate 
the City of Santa Barbara today. At the home place at Goleta he owns 
sixty-five acres of land devoted to the nursery business and to the 
raising of pampas plumes. Of the latter industry he is the pioneer in 
California, having made the first shipment to San Francisco and to Peter 
Henderson of New York City. Since then the business has grown until 
it has reached splendid proportions and has become not only profitable 
to himself but of inestimable benefit to the County of Santa Barbara, 
for he buys up most of the crops raised by others in his neighborhood. 
His principal markets are London, Hamburg and Berlin, and he has 
shipped as high as 500,000 in a single year. 

**In another industry besides the raising of pampas plumes, Mr. Sex- 
ton has been a pioneer and has made a noteworthy contribution to the 
development of California's resources. To him belongs the distinction 
of having introduced soft shell walnuts in Southern California. In 1867 
he shipped 120 pounds of nuts from San Francisco to Santa Barbara 
County. These were mixed nuts that had been imported from Chile in 
South America. He planted them in his nursery and sold about 750 
trees. The balance about 250 trees he planted in an orchard of his own. 
Of these, sixty came in as soft or paper shell nuts, and he cultivated 
them with the greatest care, finally crossing between the hard and soft 
shell walnuts and securing what is now known as the soft shell walnut of 
commerce. As the raising of these nuts has grown to be one of the 
most important industries in Southern California, too great praise can- 
not be given to Mr. Sexton for his pioneer work in the developing of 
the nuts." 

At Goleta Joseph Sexton developed a splendid estate and home, and 
he also owned a ranch of 4,000 acres in Ventura County, devoted to 
stock, grain and beans. In 1894 he retired from the nursery and left 
it in charge of his oldest son Charles, who subsequently losit his life 
in a dynamite explosion. On giving up the nursery business Joseph Sex- 
ton undertook to develop water for his stock ranch in Ventura County. 



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HARRY E. SEXTOX 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 519 

For a number of years the residents of the section between Ventura 
and Saticoy had been hauling water in tanks for domestic use and stock 
purposes. Joseph Sexton was the principal promoter in establishing the 
Saticoy Water Company, and through that corporation the water prob- 
lem has been solved for a large and rich district. Joseph Sexton is a 
republican, and in many ways besides those already noted has been a 
factor in the development and improvement of his home locality. At 
Goleta November i8, 1869, he married Lucy A. Foster, daughter of I. 
G. Foster. They became the parents of twelve children, seven sons 
and five daughters, namely: Charles E., deceased; Harry E., mentioned 
elsewhere in these volumes; Lottie, the wife of D. W. MacDonald, of 
Orange, California; Marietta, at home; Howard, deceased; Rose, the 
wife of F. J. Dearborn of Oreland, California ; Edna, the wife of C. H. 
Beattie, of Eugene, Oregon; Joseph, of Santa Barbara; Horace A., of 
Santa' Barbara; Walter R., of Ventura, California; Ernst, of Santa 
Barbara; and Lucy, the wife of Arthur Griffin, of Salt Lake City. 

Harry E. Sexton, who was born at Goleta in February, 1872, a 
son of the pioneer Joseph Sexton of Santa Barbara County, has made 
a career in keeping with the high standards set by his father and is one 
of the most prominent ranchers and contractors in this section of the 
state. 

After completing his education in the Goleta public schools and the 
Santa Barbara Business College, he entered with all the energy of his 
nature the ranching business at Ventura. Beginning in 1891, when he 
was nineteen years of age, he rented land for five years, and made lima 
beans his principal crop. For two years he was employed in the La 
Patera asphalt mines. The following 6^ years were spent with the 
Southern Pacific Railway on construction work in California and Nevada 
and in the reconstruction of the Central Pacific and the extension of the 
railroad up the coast. 

Then returning to Goleta, Mr. Sexton again rented land and was a 
farmer, bean grower, dairyman and stock raiser for five years. He then 
acquired a quarter interest in the 4,000 acre ranch originally owned by 
his father and situated four miles out of Ventura on the Santa Paula 
road, and has been actively identified with its cultivation ever since. In 
1916 he had 400 acres in lima beans. For four years he was also man- 
ager of the Saticoy Water Company. 

In 191 1, returning to Goleta, Mr. Sexton engaged in the business of 
making concrete tile and irrigation pipe. Since that time he has become 
one of the leading contractors in this section of the state. He contracts 
for anything in the concrete line and is the pioneer of irrigation in the 
Goleta district. He maintains an extensive yard in Carpinteria, and 
has done much irrigation contracting in that section. 

Mr. Sexton is vice president of the Sexton Ranch Company of Ven- 
tura, is an active republican, a lodge and chapter Mason and a member 
of the Eastern Star and also belongs to the Knights of Pythias. 

In 1908 he married Miss Mary Chamberlain of Goleta. Mrs. Sexton 



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520 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

was bom in Nebraska, coming to Goleta when a girl, and is a daughter 
of Judge J. C. Chamberlain, one of the early settlers of the valley and 
now serving as justice of the peace at Goleta. Mrs. Sexton is also a 
member of the Order of the Eastern Star. They have two sons, Charles 
and Eugene, and one daughter, Elwene. 

Eldret M. Williams. One of the American families longest identi- 
fied with this section of California is represented by Mr. Eldert M. 
Williams, who lives near Santa Paula and enjoys the fruits of his lemon 
grove and ranch in that part of Ventura County. 

His father was the late Edward Benton Williams, who was bom in 
New York City March 7, 1828, a son of Clark Williams, who was bom 
in Rensselaer County, New York, in 1801. The Williams family is of 
Welsh origin. Qark Williams, who married Lucinda Brewer, was for 
many years a merchant in New York City, a lumber dealer and also 
carried on an extensive traffic over the canals and river routes of his 
day, owning some canal boats of his own. 

After his education in the common schools of New York State, 
Edward Benton Williams found work as an employe on the Erie Canal, 
and during that time lived in Oneida County. He had an intimate 
experience with all that vast traffic which poured back and forth from 
east to west and west to east through the Erie Canal and the Hudson 
River in the days before railroads. At one time he personally owned 
quite a fleet of boats on the Erie Canal. 

Coming out to California in 1858, by way of the Isthmus of Panama, 
he located in San Francisco, where he became associated with his 
brother, Charles Williams, in the mustard and spice business and for a 
time had charge of the spice factory of the Hudson Company. He 
was head workman of that company's affairs in California for over nine 
years. Selling out in 1866, he soon afterwards came to Ventura County 
and started the first grist mill in that county at Saticoy. Horse power 
furnished the motive force, but the machinery was afterwards taken 
to Santa Paula, where Mr. Williams used water power. He also rented 
land and was engaged in agricultural operations up to 1885. His sons 
then bought the Sewell ranch near Santa Paula, comprising 640 acres, 
and they conducted it until the land was sold in 1906. After that 
Edward Benton Williams lived retired until his death in 1908. In 1868 
E. B. Williams became one of the charter members of the Congregational 
Church organized at Ventura. 

He was married in 1850 to Elizabeth Rogers, daughter of Peter and 
Hester Rogers of Oneida County, New York. They became the parents 
of six children : Edward D., Eldret M., Fanny, B. H., Llewellyn A. and 
Charles A. 

Eldret M. Williams was bom in Oneida County, New York, Febmary 
3, 1855, and was only an infant when his parents came out to California. 
He had his early education in San Francisco, but soon after his father 
located in Ventura County, began working on the farm and around 
the mill. In 1885 he became associated with his father and brother 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 521 

Edward in the purchase of a valuable ranch of 640 acres near Santa 
Paula. This ranch they made into a stock farm for the raising of 
high-grade horses, Durham cattle and Poland China hogs. Mr. Williams 
had the personal management of the livestock department, and was 
actively identified with the business until the land was sold in 1906. 
Mr. Williams then bought twenty acres in the same valley and has since 
developed half of this to a lemon grove while the rest is hill land. 

He is a member of the Fraternal Brotherhood, is a republican and a 
Presbyterian. In San Francisco in August, 1895, he married Miss Ida 
Elizabeth Hudson, a native of San Francisco and a daughter of J. M. 
Hudson, a descendant of the Hudsons that C. H. and E. B. Williams were 
associated with in the early days in California. They have three children : 
Everett, now sixteen years of age and attending high school at Santa 
Paula; Catherine, also in high school, and Maynard Edward, aged ten 
years, and in the grade school. 

Jefferson L. Crane. To bring Southern California to its present 
condition as one of the richest areas on the globe in the production of 
a varied fruitage of horticulture and agriculture has required the ener- 
gies, the plans and the efforts of nearly two generations of people, 
Those who began the experiment and laid the foundations of the 
industry have largely passed away. All the more honor therefore 
belongs to one who was identified with the first stages of that work and 
has been a witness and factor in every step of progress up to the present 
time. 

Such a place of distinction is enjoyed by JeflFerson L. Crane of Santa 
Paula. In the annals of Southern California horticulture his name and 
service should always be remembered. 

He was bom near the present City of Akron in Sharon Township, 
Medina County, Ohio, June 17, 1839. His is an old and -worthy Ameri- 
can ancestry. His father was a pioneer Ohioan, having taken up land 
from the Government and having cleared it of timber in order to render 
it available for agriculture. He made his home there the rest of his 
life and reared a family of seven sons and one daughter. He was a 
native of Massachusetts and died in Ohio in 1885. Mr. Crane's great- 
grandfather, Bemice Crane, served for three years in the Revolutionary 
Army and in the Indian wars in Narraganset Swamp. In the latter he 
was badly wounded. Mr. Crane's grandfather was Barnabas Crane, 
who led an interesting life between the ocean and the land. During 
the summer months he commanded a seagoing vessel, while the winter 
season was spent in school rooms as a teacher. He was a man of great 
physical vitality and rugged in nature as in character, and lived to be 
four-score and six years of age. The first American ancestors of Mr. 
Crane came early in the seventeenth century from England to Massa- 
chusetts, and later the family furnished soldiers who fought for inde- 
pendence in the Revolutionary war. On the maternal side his ancestors 
came over in the good ship Fortune in 1621. 

It was in October, 1861, that Jefferson L. Crane arrived in Cali- 



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522 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

fomia. He was at that time twenty-two years of age. He had attended 
country schools back in Ohio, and was possessed of the knowledge and 
experience that were part of a farmer boy's training. In California 
he became associated with his uncle G. G. Briggs, who was the pioneer 
of pioneers in the development of fruit as a part of California's 
wealth. Mr. Crane was first employed by his uncle in the Santa Clara 
Valley, and managed the Briggs ranch there for seven years. Mr. 
Briggs had bought this property from the More brothers in 1862, paying 
$45,000 for 18,000 acres. A year after the purchase of the land Mr. 
Crane assisted Mr. Briggs in setting out an orchard of 200 acres. 
Particular attention should be paid to this orchard, since it was the first 
planted in the entire valley. All the surrounding country was wild and 
uninviting, and the occupation of its scattered inhabitants, chiefly 
Indians in the neighborhood of Saticoy, was entirely nomadic and pas- 
toral. The nearest white neighbors at that time were eight or ten 
miles away. Some of the riches of the land consisted of game, which 
abounded everywhere, and the early settlers like Mr. Crane often saw 
deer and bear in their dooryards. His uncle Mr. Briggs set out with 
the intention of colonizing this valley, but a visitation of drought ruined 
one season's crops and discouraged all the settlers who had arrived or 
who were intending to make it a home. 

During 1868 Jefferson Crane returned to Ohio, but remained there 
only ten months until he was lured back to the Golden West, where 
his real destiny has been worked out. On returning he settled in Santa 
Paula, where previously he had bought twenty acres. He erected the 
first house in that settlement, but after six months of farming expe- 
rience sold his land and moved to Carpinteria, where he bought 160 
acres. He utilized that land as one of the pioneers in the planting of 
lima beans. 

Mr. Crane was more personally related to the lima bean development 
in 1874 than any one else in the matter of its introduction to eastern 
markets. Before the panic he corresponded with eastern people and 
found the price of beans to be from $5.50 to $7.50 a bushel with a good 
market and he invested $5,000 in lima beans and shipped them to an old 
acquaintance named P. D. Hall in New York City and when they arrived 
there the panic was on and market was obstructed for all luxuries. 
The beans would not sell for sufficient to pay the freight and Mr. Crane 
held on and had his father go to New York to look over the situation. 
It was concluded to peddle them and Mr. Cran'es father visited forty- 
eight cities and disposed of a part of them, and that was the first intro- 
duction of the lima bean in that part of the country. It took two years 
to dispose of that output and when they were gone, so was Mr. Crane's 
home, but the distribution of these beans did as much to develop the 
trade and the market as anything that ever happened. 

Seven years later, having sold out, Mr. Crane returned to Ventura 
County and rented 170 acres of the Nicholl tract, and this he cultivated 
as a bean plantation for two years. His next work was on 500 acres of 
Las Posas grant, which he rented, and where he raised flax for three 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 523 

years. Mr. Crane then rented 320 acres from the Luther tract, including 
what is now the City of Saticoy, and devoted his land to beans and 
barley for a couple of years. Renting 600 acres of the Edwards tract, 
he planted that in beans and wheat for five years, and then came to his 
present home location, buying fifty acres from the old Mission grant, 
and there he has since lived and now has his land chiefly in a walnut 
orchard. 

From the first Mr. Crane has been active in the Saticoy Walnut 
Growers' Association, and for a time was its president. In political 
matters he supports the democratic ticket. 

In Medina County, Ohio, October 4, 1861, he married Janette 
Briggs, a native of Massachusetts and a foster daughter of Daniel Briggs. 
They are the parents of five children: Emmet C. of Santa Paula; 
Lincoln P., of Monticello, California; Cora, Mrs. A. C. Hardison of 
Santa Paula; Charles and Chauncey I., both of whom are engaged in 
the operation of their father's walnut orchard. 

Rev. Benjamin A. Goodridge has been the minister of the 
Unitarian Church in Santa Barbara since April, 1901. He was 
bom at Lyndeborough, New Hampshire, on the 5th of October, 
1857, and in both lines of descent he comes of sterling English colonial 
stock in New England. The first representative of the Goodridge family 
in this country came from Bury Saint Edmunds, England, in 1640, and 
settled in Massachusetts. 

The subject of this sketch is a son of Benjamin and Irene (Wardwell) 
Goodridge. His mother was a native of Penobscot, Maine, and it was 
in that state that he spent his boyhood, for his father died when the 
son was but six weeks old, and within a few years his mother took her 
children and made a home in Bucksport, Maine. It was there that she 
died in 1870. 

Mr. Goodridge attended the public schools in his Maine home, but 
on the death of his mother went to live in Tilton, New Hampshire, 
where he fitted for college. With intervals of teaching in order to 
supply himself with funds, he succeeded in graduating from Boston 
University in 1881, as Bachelor of Arts. For two years following his 
graduation he taught Greek and Latin at Lasell Seminary, Auburn- 
dale, Massachusetts. The next two years he was principal of Powers 
Institute in Bemardston, Massachusetts. He then went to North Caro- 
lina, where for a time he was engaged in teaching, but mainly in news- 
paper work until 1889. 

It was in that year that Mr. Goodridge entered the Harvard Divinity 
School, Cambridge, Massachusetts. There he completed about two-thirds 
of the work necessary for graduation, and then, having a chance to 
spend a year in Europe, in travel and study, he took steamer from 
New York to Genoa, Italy. 

In the early summer of 1891 he was again in Massachusetts, doing . 
literary work, and spent some months in one of the editorial rooms of a 
Boston newspaper before he began preaching. In the winter of 1892 



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524 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

he made application to the New England Fellowship Committee of the 
Unitarian Church, was accepted at once, and for a time supplied the 
pulpit of the church at West Upton, Massachusetts, and later at Framing- 
ham, in the same state. 

He was then called to the church in Harvard, Massachusetts, and 
was formally ordained to the Unitarian ministry in that parish in October, 
1892. There he remained two years and a half and was called from 
that church to Christ Church, in the Dorchester District of Boston. 
Six years was the length of his pastorate in Boston. In April, 1901, 
he was settled over the Unitarian Church in Santa Barbara, California, 
where he has ever since remained. 

Mr. Goodridge has always taken a deep interest in civic affairs wher- 
ever he has been located and has sought to be of service. For twelve 
years he was a member of the board of trustees of the Santa Barbara 
Free Public Library, for four years its secretary, and for eight its presi- 
dent. He is a member of the local Harvard Club. 

On the 30th of November, 1882, at Windham, Maine, Mr. Goodridge 
was married to Miss Julia E. Wiggin, who was bom and reared in 
that state, and comes of a family with many generations of New England 
descent. They have one daughter, Elaine, who married Henry W. 
Howard of Santa Barbara. She and her husband live in Oregon. 

Emmet C. Gam mill. The builder of one of Santa Barbara's most 
successful business concerns is Emmet C. Gammill. His personal skill 
in a trade was at the foundation of his success, and the remarkable 
prosperity of the Santa Barbara Packing Company can be credited 
almost entirely to his energy, business judgment and enterprise. He is 
vice president of that well-known company. 

A son of Miles and Delila (Anderson) Gammill, he was bom in 
Guthi;ie County, Iowa, June 17, 1869, and when he was still a boy his 
parents removed to Califomia. His early education was received in 
the public schools of Santa Barbara and he thus grew up in the com- 
munity where his business career has been worked out. After leaving 
school he spent three years on a farm, and then learned the butcher's 
trade. Mr. Gammill opened the first market in Montecito, later owned 
for twelve years a market at Elrio, and was in the retail meat business 
at Oxnard until 1905. 

Having demonstrated his ability to conduct an individual market, his 
mind planned out the details of a larger organization. He established 
the California Packing Company, which took over the interests of the 
Ealand Packing Company, and in 191 1 the business was incorporated 
and the name changed to the Santa Barbara Packing Company. The 
president of this is A. L. Hobson of Ventura, and Mr. Gammill is 
vice president. This company conducts three well-known markets in 
Santa Barbara — the Califomia Market, the State Street and the Bon Ton 
Market. 

In matters of politics Mr. Gammill is a democrat. At Oxnard July 
i5» 1902, he married Miss Ruth Dobbin, a daughter of Andrew and 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 525 

Margaret Dobbin. To their union have been bom five children: Roy, 
Leland, Margaret, Katherine and Howard. 

Cav. Leopoldo Schiappa Pietra. At the ancestral home of the 
Schiappa Pietra family, in Albissola Marina, province of Genoa, Italy, 
Cav. Leopoldo Schiappa Pietra was bom February 3, 1842, and his edu- 
cation was acquired in the City of Savona. From 1859 to 1866 he was 
in the employ of the Italian Government, in the department of the min- 
ister of public works of Italy, but during the year 1866 secured a two- 
year leave of absence in order to visit his brothers, Federico and Antonio, 
in Califomia. These brothers had purchased the Juan Sanchez rancho, 
named the Santa Clara del Norte, but probably better known as Punto de 
la Loma, or Point near the River, and comprised 14,000 acres, being used 
as a range for their sheep. 

When Leopoldo Schiappa Pietra joined his brothers in 1866, he had 
intended to remain only for a short visit, but his plans were changed by 
the death of Federico in 1867, and he remained for a time, hoping to be 
able to induce Antonio to return permanently to Italy. Previous to this 
the two brothers, Antonio and Federico, had bought stores at Santa Bar- 
bara and Ventura, but in 1868 the former was closed and until 1877 
Antonio and Leopoldo gave their attention to the management of the 
Ventura business. Subsequently they turned their attention to the im- 
provement of the ranch, Punta de la Loma, where at first they raised 
sheep in large numbers and a few cattle. In 1890 they began to change 
from the stock business to general farming, raising principally barley 
and com, but finally centered all their activities in the lima bean industry, 
in which product they planted some 7,000 acres, mostly all watered by 
an irrigation ditch. Ehiring the dry season of 1891 they gave the squat- 
ters permission to work in the opening of this canal, and in this Leopoldo 
owned a controlling interest, being vice president of the Santa Clara 
Water and Irrigation Company. 

In 1894 the brothers returned to Italy, and during the trip Antonio 
died at San Remo, that country, Febmary 2, 1895, at the age of sixty-two 
years. His death left Leopoldo sole heir to their large and valuable 
interests in California, whence he returned, and during his latter years 
made his home at Los Angeles, where he erected a handsome residence 
at the comer of Alvarado and Ninth streets, of the Moorish style of 
architecture. During a later visit to Italy, he was made a Cavalier of 
the Crown of Italy by King Umberto. 

The lady whom Mr. Schiappa Pietra married was Miss Amparo 
Arenas, a member of one of the old and distinguished families of Cali- 
fornia. Her grandfather, Cristobal Polomares, came as an officer from 
Alamos, Mexico, to the presidio of Monterey in the beginning of the 
nineteenth century and there married Benedicta Sainz, by whom he had 
twelve children. A native of Spain, he was a member of a patrician 
family of that country and went with his father from the City of Madrid 
to Mexico. His son, Don Ygnacio Polomares, was one of the owners 
of San Jose ranch, where now stands Pomona, Lordsburg, Azusa and 



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526 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

other towns of the San Gabriel Valley. This vast area of 22,380 acres 
was a Mexican grant conferred on Ygnacio Polomares, Ricardo Vejar 
and Luis Arenas in 1840. Some years ago, when a transfer of property 
in Pomona made an abstract of this land necessary, it required the work 
of six men for ninety days to make the translations of old Spanish deeds 
into English, and the abstract when completed filled thirty-eight volimies. 

The mother of Mrs. Schiappa Pietra was the late Donna Josepha 
Polomares de Arenas. When she was bom, the pueblo of Los Angeles 
was only thirty- four years old. There were no schools, but, ambitious 
to learn, she eagerly seized every scrap of paper that came wrapped 
around merchandise in vessels from Spain, and, when Governor Alvarado 
established his residence at Los Angeles, she obtained a primary reader 
from his family. She was compelled to discontinue her studies at that 
time, as there were no more books obtainable. At the age of fourteen 
years she married Don Jose Maria Abila, whose ancestor, Comelio Abila, 
came from Mexico in 1769, with Padre Junipero Serra, to establish the 
missions. He acted as custodian of the sacred vessels, had charge of the 
olive and grape cuttings for the orchards, and was subsequently major- 
domo at San Gabriel. The members of the Abila family were among 
the largest landowners of their time, owning Sansal Redondo, Salina, 
Laguma Seca, Los Cuervos and Piletas, all situated in what is now the 
County of Los Angeles. 

In 1830 Manuel Victoria was appointed governor of California, but 
soon made himself obnoxious to the people by his attempt to overturn 
civil authority and substitute military rule. In compliance with his orders, 
Jose Maria Abila was imprisoned in the cuartel and Don Abel Steamy 
and Jose Antonio Carrillo were exiled. The arrest of Abila was an 
outrage not to be borne by a man of his proud nature and he vowed 
vengeance upon Victoria. An opportunity was soon offered him in the 
leading of a small force from San Diego against the governor under 
Pablo de Portilla, comandante of the presidio. Don Jose Maria Abila 
joined the insurgents, of whom he was chosen a captain, and when they 
arrived at the Buena Vista hills they met Victoria with an armed force. 
Reckless of danger, Abila rushed forward to meet the enemy and Cap- 
tain Pacheco was instantly killed by a shot from his gun. He then 
attacked and wounded Victoria, but received a fatal bullet in his own 
body from one of the governor's soldiers. Victoria was taken to Mission 
San Gabriel, and to the relief of the people he soon fled from the coun- 
try. The bodies of the two dead soldiers were taken to the Abila residence, 
which stood on the ground north of the Church of Our Lady of Angels 
of the Plaza. 

The news of the death of his son-in-law proved a fatal shock to 
Christobal Polomares, who had been a district judge. A demand for 
valuable papers was made upon him, which he delivered, getting up 
from a sick bed to do so, but dropping dead as he re-entered his home. 
This left the girl of fifteen years a widow and fatherless on the same 
day. Six months later she became the mother of Mercedes, who, grown 
to womanhood, became the wife of Don Jose de Amaz, proprietor of 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 527 

the Ventura Mission. Four years after the death of Abila, his widow 
was married to Luis Arenas, who was associated with her brother in 
the ownership of San Jose ranch and also owner of the San Mateo ranch 
in Sonoma County. With him she removed to the northern part of the 
state, where the three oldest children of that union were born. From 
there the family moved to Ventura, near the mouth of the Ventura 
River, where the two youngest children were bom. She was spared to 
a great age and died at her home on South' Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, 
in 1901. Of her second marriage were born a son, Frank, who was 
governor of Lower California in 1868; and four daughters, Mrs. J. M. 
Miller, Mrs. Louisa Stanchfield of Spadra, Mrs. Schiappa Pietra, who 
died in Rome, Italy, in 1907, and Mrs. Aurelia Ross, who died in Los 
Angeles in 1900. 

The two sons and two daughters of Mrs. Ross were reared and edu- 
cated by Mr. and Mrs. Schiappa Pietra, whose own children, Luis and 
Beatrice Josephine, both died in infancy. The Ross children inherited 
the large estate of Mr. Schiappa Pietra, whose death occurred at Milan, 
Italy, in 1908. The Ross children are as follows: Mrs. John Lloyd But- 
ler, who lives in Ventura County ; William L., of Los Angeles, California, 
who is operating 550 acres of land in Ventura County as a bean ranch ; 
Miss Josephine Ross, a resident of Santa Barbara; and Leopold C, who 
has 700 acres planted in beans in Ventura County. 

Homer N. Duffey. A business is successful or unsuccessful accord- 
ing to the service it renders. There are certain lines of business which 
are constantly under the inspection of the public and their patronage 
rises and falls in proportion to the quality of work performed. That 
is particularly true of a business which makes a specialty of handling 
transportation and traffic within the bounds of a single city, where every 
piece of work is in the nature of an individual transaction and the quality 
of the entire service is often judged by such single performance. 

The general excellence and efficiency of the Santa Barbara Transfer 
Company have been commended by many thousands of people who in 
the course of a year spent all or part of their time in this noted Southern 
California resort. The business as it is now conducted represents largely 
an evolution from the mind and management of Homer N. Duffey, 
president and general manager of the company. 

Bom in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, August 13, 1870, educated in the 
public schools of his native town, Mr. Duffey arrived in California in 
1887 at the age of seventeen. His parents located in Santa Barbara, and 
here he had his first experience in business affairs. For ten years he 
was connected with a retail grocery house in different capacities. In 
1903 he established the Montecito Transfer Company, making a specialty 
of handling the business of this highly exclusive suburb of Santa 
Barbara. From the first he studied the needs of the service, perfected 
it at every point, and it was his success in the management of that 
company for seven years that brought him to the larger responsibilities 
he now enjoys. 



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528 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

In 1 910 the Montecito Transfer Company was consolidated with the 
Santa Barbara Transfer Company, the latter having been in existence 
for many years. Mr. Duffey was at once elected president and general 
manager of the corporation, and has since controlled and directed its 
destinies. This is now one of the largest companies of its kind in the 
entire state. 

The Santa Barbara Transfer Company does a large and varied busi- 
ness, employing a vast amount of capital and equipment and the services 
of many individual persons. Santa Barbara, being the mecca for tourists 
from every quarter of the Globe and the winter home for people from 
many climes, a very important feature of the business and one to which 
the company devotes special attention, is the packing for shipment of 
goods of every character in such a manner as to insure safe delivery 
to the most remote points. The company recently added a new feature 
in a modem, thoroughly fire-proof warehouse, constructed entirely of 
concrete. This warehouse has 25,000 square feet of floor space and is 
situated on the railroad tracks in such a manner as to permit the unload- 
ing of five cars at one time. It also has equipment of apparatus permitting 
of the handling of the heaviest kind of freight. 

In a brief description of this plant the burglar-proof vault should 
not be overlooked. This vault has floor dimensions of 20 by 20 feet and is 
two stories high. It is built throughout of steel and concrete, and furnishes 
quarters equal to those of safety deposit boxes in the banks for the 
storing of valuables, including paintings, silverware, etc. Safety is pro- 
vided for throughout, and the entire warehouse has a modern burglar- 
proof alarm system. 

Mr. DufFey built and personally owns this warehouse, which repre- 
sents an investment of considerable capital. The transfer company 
leases it from him. 

Fraternally he is affiliated with the Masonic Lodge, the Mystic Shrine 
and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. In 1894 he married 
Miss Addie S. Blood, who was bom in Santa Barbara. They have seven 
children, five sons and two daughters. 

Caesareo E. Lataillade. Now living retired at his home 1705 
Bath Street in Santa Barbara, Caesareo E. Lataillade is one of the inter- 
esting residents of this wonderful Southem Califomia city, and his own 
career and that of his family reflect many points of interest in the history 
of Southem California, leading back to the days of Spanish and Mexican 
domination. 

He was bom December 2, 1849, ^" Santa Barbara, and thus his life 
has been contemporaneous with American immigration and activity on 
the Pacific Coast. 

His father Caesareo A. Lataillade, Sr., was a very conspicuous citizen 
of Califomia in the early days. The mother's name was Maria Antonia 
de la Guerra and is still living and enjoying good health at the 
age of ninety. His father came to Santa Barbara in 1841. He was a 
merchant and importer, and made several voyages between California 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 529 

and Peru and other points in South America. He became very wealthy 
and one of the most extensive land owners in Southern California. He 
bought the Cuyama rancho of 22,000 acres, the Zaca and Corral de Quate 
ranchos, containing 17,000 acres. The Mexican Government also gave 
him a grant of 48,000 acres, but this was declared invalid by the United 
States Government in 1852. Then followed a number of years of liti- 
gation, and finally in 1871 Congress made tardy recognition of the val- 
idity of the claim and by special act confirmed the title as valid. Another 
interesting transaction was the buying in 1852 of 4,000 acres of land from 
an Indian resident of California. The Government also annulled this 
title. The affair was neglected for some years, but subsequently the 
title was declared valid since the Indian was not under tribal jurisdiction 
and was therefore competent to sell the land. 

Since the senior Lataillade was a man of such wealth and varied inter- 
ests it can easily be seen that Mr. Lataillade the son had a large career 
marked out for him even as a youth. He was well educated in the public 
schools of Santa Barbara and the Santa Ynez College. In 1871 he en- 
gaged in the hardware business on State Street in Santa Barlmra, but 
after a month his establishment was burned out. He rebuilt, and in 
1876 sold to Roeder & Ott. 

He then took a trip to Europe, partly for the purpose of visiting his 
father's home, and he also toured Spain, France, Belgium, England 
and other continental countries. After his return from Europe Mr. 
Lataillade resumed the management of some of the large properties of 
the family estate, and he is still owner of large and valuable tracts of 
land around Santa Barbara, and spends his time supervising its manage- 
ment. 

He has served for many years on the city council of Santa Barbara. 
He was on the council when the city purchased the property next to the 
city hall. This brought about a long litigation which the Supreme Court 
finally decided in favor of the city. Mr. Lataillade was also instrumental 
in securing the passage of many ordinances for the aid of the tax payers 
and in every way has conducted himself as a public spirited and liberal 
minded citizen. Mr. Lataillade married Acacia Ruiz. They have one 
child, Catherine, now four years of age. 

Jesse P. Osborne. The very elements of character that fortified 
Mr. Osborne in his determined efforts to overcome obstacles and through 
his own energy and resources prepare himself for the legal profession 
have been the dominant forces leading to his definite success and prestige 
as a representative of this exacting vocation. Prior to coming to Cali- 
fornia he had achieved prominence as a member of the bar of the State 
of Utah, and he has been a resident of Santa Barbara, California, since 
1904, though he has here been engaged in the practice of his profession 
only since 1908, as he first turned his attention to contracting and 
building, in order to establish his sons in this field of industrial enter- 
prise, besides gaining for himself a knowledge of approved structural 
and architectural work most in favor in this state. In this connection 



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530 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

it should be noted that he erected a number of the handsome residences 
of Santa Barbara and had the distinction of building the forms for the 
first entire concrete building in the city. He continued his activities 
as a contractor for 33^2 years, and since that time he has given his close 
and effective attention to the practice of his profession. 

Jesse P. Osborne was bom in New York City, on the 28th of February, 
1857, and his parents, Peter J. and Anna (Asboe) Osborne, were bom 
and reared in Denmark, where their marriage was solemnized, the father, 
however, having been of English ancestry. The parents of Mr. Osborne 
were residents of Denmark at the time of their death. 

Jesse P. Osborne acquired his early education in the public schools 
and his initial activities as a youth were in connection with farm enter- 
prise in Missouri and Kansas. He was a determined and industrious 
worker and in addition to his association with agricultural pursuits he 
was for some time employed as a carpenter and also identified with 
mining operations in Colorado and Utah. He bent his energies to the 
achieving of his ambitious purpose, and he realized the purpose when, 
on the 9th of October, 1899, he was admitted to the bar of the State 
of Utah by the Supreme Court of that commonwealth. While other- 
wise employed he had given close and constructive attention to the study 
of law, and thus he came to the bar with excellent fortification. He 
engaged in the practice of his profession in Piute County, Utah, and 
there he served two years as states attorney. At the expiration of his 
official term he became the local attorney for the Sevier Consolidated 
Mining & Prospecting Company, and of this position he continued the 
incumbent until his removal to Santa Barbara, in 1904. After concluding 
3y2 years of activity as a contractor and builder in Santa Barbara, as 
previously mentioned, he prepared to restmie the practice of his pro- 
fession, and on the 23d of November, 1908, he was admitted to the 
California bar. Mr. Osborne has built up a substantial and lucrative 
law practice of general order, and is consistently to be designated as 
one of the honored and representative members of the bar of Santa 
Barbara County. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party and he has represented the same in local conventions, though 
he has had no desire to figure as a "practical politician." 

In 1885 Mr. Osborne wedded Miss Hattie B. Penland, and her death 
occurred at their home in Utah in 1900. She is survived by four children ; 
Jesse L. and Andrew M., who are successful contractors and builders 
in Santa Barbara County, the first named being a resident of Montecito, 
and Andrew being in business in the City of Santa Barbara ; William G., 
the third son, is taking special studies for a professional career ; Roy B., 
the youngest son, is a student in the Junior College of Santa Barbara at 
the time of this writing, in 1916. In May, 1903, was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Osborne to Miss Minnie L. Gay, a daughter of Rev. 
Philip Gay, who was at the time pastor of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church at Ohlman, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Osborne have three daughters : 
Amy, Flora and Minnie. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 531 

Roland F. Sauter. Noteworthy among the rising and successful 
young architects of Santa Barbara is Roland F. Sauter, who is making 
rapid strides in his profession and building up an extensive and profitable 
business in the city and its suburbs. He was bom October 31, 1888, 
in Baltimore County, Maryland, where his parents, C. C. and Ella (Stem) 
Sauter, are still living, owning and occupying a good farm. 

Roland F. Sauter received his elementary education in the public 
schools of his native state, after which he prepared himself for an 
architect at the Maryland Institute, from which he was graduated with 
the class of June 7, 1910. Embarking upon his professional career 
immediately after receiving his diploma, Mr. Sauter worked as a draughts- 
man for three years, spending the last eight months of the time in San 
Francisco. About four years ago, in 1912, he came down to Santa 
Barbara in search of desirable work in his line of industry, and a year 
later started in business on his own account, opening an office in the 
San Marcos Building. As an architect Mr. Sauter has met with most 
encouraging success, much important work in the city having been 
entmsted to his supervision. He was the architect for the First Presby- 
terian Church, for the Santa Barbara Detention Home, for the improve- 
ments around the old Santa Barbara Mission, for the improvement 
work at the State Normal School, and for a large number of beautiful 
residences that have recently been erected in Santa Barbara. 

Politically Mr. Sauter is identified with the republican party, but 
takes no active part in public affairs. He belongs to the Santa Barbara 
Chamber of Commerce, and is a member of the Ancient Free and 
Accepted Order of Masons. 

Charles Archibald Smith, Sr. The ranching and farming activ- 
ities of few residents of Santa Barbara County have been attended with 
more consistent success than those of Charles Archibald Smith, Sr., of 
Naples. Mr. Smith came to California more than thirty years ago, and 
since then has been identified with practically every phase of the agricul- 
tural and stock growing interests of this section of the state. 

A native of Scotland, he has the Scotch virtues of thrift, honesty 
and unceasing diligence, and those have taken him far on the road to 
success. He was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, March 12, 1858, a son of 
George and Ann (Archibald) Smith. For nine years he attended the 
national schools of Scotland, and then was. employed as a farm laborer 
up to 1883. After one year as member of the police force in the City 
of Aberdeen, he came to California in 1884. 

Locating near Santa Barbara, he bought eight acres in Goleta, and 
soon afterwards leased 160 acres of the Hope Ranch. His operations 
as a farmer have taken on a gradually expanded scope, and for a num- 
ber of years he leased and farmed about 1,000 acres. Fifteen years after 
his coming to Santa Barbara County he engaged in ranching near Santa 
Ynez, and he then moved to Naples, where he leases 850 acres, 300 acres 
of which are planted in beans and hay. 

Mr. Smith is a democrat, a member of the Presbyterian Church at 



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532 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Santa Barbara, and is well known over the county. In Santa Barbara 
July II, 1888, he married Miss Barbara Dawson, who was bom in Scot- 
land, a daughter of George and Annie (England) Dawson. Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith are the parents of eight children: James, George, Charles, 
Frank, Jennie, Sydney, Barbara and Stanley. 

Charles E. Phoenix, besides being one of the leading merchants of 
Santa Barbara, has had an active part in civic and social affairs in that 
city and is now a member of the Republican County Central Committee. 

The Phoenix family has been identified with California since the 
early years of American settlement, and with ranching, commercial and 
other phases of the life of this section of the state for more than half a 
century. The late Charles Phoenix, father of the Santa Barbara busi- 
ness man, was bom in England, came to San Francisco as early as 1850, 
and almost from the first took up the livestock industry as his business. 
Coming to San Luis Obispo County in 1861, he was a factor in the 
ranching and stock-raising affairs of that section until the close of his 
active career. His death occurred in 1914. The Phoenix family orig- 
inated in England, and the ancestry goes far back into the history 
of that country. Charles Phoenix married Emma Kinney, who was 
bom in Illinois, and when a young girl came with her father across the 
plains in the early days and located in San Luis Obispo County. She is 
still living, making her home at Arroyo Grande in San Luis Obispo 
County. 

It was in the City of San Luis Obispo that Charles E. Phoenix was 
bom April 13, 1881. Educated in the grammar and high schools of his 
native city, he was graduated in 1903 with the degree of pharmacist 
from the University of Califomia. In the same year he located in Santa 
Barbara and entered the drug business as manager of the pharmacy 
department of Mr. Guitterez. Mr. Guitterez had established a dmg 
business at Santa Barbara in 1851, and was not only the pioneer in that 
line but his store has been a landmark in the commercial activities of 
the town perhaps for a longer time than any other commercial institu- 
tion. After the death of Mr. Guitterez Mr. Phoenix and J. B. Cunnane 
bought the old establishment in 1905 and have since conducted it with 
such changes and adaptations as would make it a modem and perfectly 
appointed store. 

Mr. Phoenix is a member of various Masonic bodies in Santa Barbara 
and of the Mystic Shrine at Los Angeles, is affiliated with the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, belongs to the Chamber of Commerce, 
and, as already noted, is an active republican. In 1908, in San Luis 
Obispo, he married Miss Cliffie A. Carpenter. Mrs. Phoenix was bom 
in Kansas, her father, C. E. Carpenter, having been one of the early 
farmers and fruit raisers in San Luis Obispo and later of Arroyo Grande, 
and is now a resident of the State of Oregon. One daughter, Geraldine 
Elizabeth, has been bom to the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Phoenix. 

Frank J. Maguire. The real estate and insurance business finds a 
prominent and successful exponent in the City of Santa Barbara in 



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MR. AND MRS. JAMES ANDERSON 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 533 

the person of Mr. Maguire, and special interest attaches to his career 
by reason of his being a native of the fair city in which he has found 
a stage for his successful endeavors in the mature years of his life. 
He was here bom on the 5th of November, i860, and his father, the 
late Judge Francis J. Maguire, established his home at Santa Barbara 
about the year 1851. Judge Maguire, a man of fine character and high 
professional attainments, became one of the leading members of the 
bar of this part of the state and served seventeen consecutive years 
on the bench of the Coimty Court of Santa Barbara County, his incum- 
bency of this judicial office having continued until his death, which 
occurred in 1879. He was one of the well-known and highly honored 
pioneers and influential citizens of the county, and his name merits 
high place in the history of the county. 

Frank J. Maguire acquired his early education in the public schools 
and supplemented this by a course of study in Franciscan College. As 
a young man he engaged in the dry goods business at Santa Barbara, 
and with this line of enterprise he continued his association sixteen 
years. In 1892, under the administration of President Roosevelt, he 
was appointed postmaster of his native city, and he retained this office 
four years, his administration having been signally efficient and popular. 
Since his retirement from this office he has given his attention to the 
real estate and insurance business, of which he has become one of the 
influential representatives in Santa Barbara County, his clientage being 
of important order and his real estate operations having contributed much 
to the civic and ipaterial advancement of his home city and county. 

Mr. Maguire is emphatically liberal and progressive as a citizen, is 
always ready to lend his influence and co-operation in the support of 
measures projected for the general good of the community, and his 
unqualified personal popularity indicates the estimate placed upon him 
in the city that has ever been his home. He is now serving as trustee 
of the Santa Barbara Public Library, his political allegiance is given 
to the republican party, and he served one term as city treasurer of 
Santa Barbara, an office of which he became the incumbent in 1890. 
In his youth he was an active member of the Santa Barbara Militia, a 
volunteer organization formed for the protection of the people of the 
community and not attached to the California National Guard. In this 
splendid military organization he held the office of first lieutenant. He 
was at one time president of the local body of the Native Sons of the 
Golden West, and has filled various other official posts in the same. 

May 2, 1893, recorded the marriage of Mr. Maguire to Miss Winifred 
B. Hardacre of Cincinnati, Ohio, and their only child, Francis C, is 
now associated with the moving picture business in Santa Barbara. 

James Anderson. In every nook and corner of the wide world is 
found a Scotchman. Everywhere he is master of circumstances, deter- 
mined and industrious, and usually one of the worthy workers in a 
world of affairs. One of the representatives of this rugged land in 
Santa Barbara County is Mr. James Anderson, whose long and success- 



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534 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

ful experience as a farmer and rancher deserves some special mention. 

A son of Charles and Elizabeth (Patterson) Anderson, both natives 
of Scotland and substantial farming people there, James Anderson was 
bom in his native country August i8, 1866. He received an education 
in the Scotch schools. 

At the age of eighteen coming to the United States, he arrived in 
Goleta, California, and in 1885 began employment with John F. More. 
After two years with More he entered the services of S. P. Stow, also 
another big rancher in Santa Barbara County, was with him eight months, 
and then for three years was with George S. Edwards. After that Mr. 
Anderson acquired some land of his own, and ten years ago, selling his 
other interests, he bought 240 acres near the head of Glen Anne Canyon, 
not far from Goleta. That has since been the stage of his successful 
part as a farmer in Santa Barbara County. Unlike many of the ranchers 
in this vicinity Mr. Anderson follows the mixed form of farming, and 
does not concentrate all his efforts upon one crop. His iand produces 
beans, walnuts, hay, and also maintains some fine livestock, cattle, horses 
and hogs. 

' Now rated as one of the most substantial and well-to-do citizens of 
the Goleta District, it is interesting to recall that Mr. Anderson landed 
in Santa Barbara with only sixty-two dollars as his cash assets. Hard 
work has been the key by which he has unlocked the door to success, 
and no man better deserves his present fortune. 

In Santa Barbara July 11, 1888, he married Elizabeth Rae, who was 
also bom in Scotland and she comes from a long line of thrifty ancestors 
in that country. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have six Uving children: 
Elizabeth, wife of Earl Bell, of Santa Bafbara; Emma, living at home; 
Annetta, wife of T. B. Jamison, a farmer at Carpinteria; William, Wal- 
ter and James, Jr., all of whom are now taking an active part in the 
responsibilities of their father's ranch; and a son, Albert, who died at 
the age of nineteen. 

Public spirit has gone along hand in hand with Mr. Anderson's 
material prosperity. He is a democrat, though not a hide-bound par- 
tisan, and is an active and influential figure in his district. He repre- 
sented his party in several of its earlier county conventions. 

Sherman Patterson Stow spent thirty-six of the best years of his 
life in the development of the magnificent property in Goleta known as 
La Patera Ranch. Coming to Goleta in the spring of 1871 on a visit to his 
friend. Colonel Hollister, Mr. Stow was attracted by the place and before 
he left purchased a tract of a thousand acres adjoining the Hollister 
Ranch. He built an attractive home upon it and there settled down to 
the pleasures of ranch life. He brought the property up to a splendid 
state of productiveness during his control of it, developing its every 
resource and making it one of the finest properties in the state. When he 
passed on, the management of the estate fell into the hands of his son and 
the same care is being exercised in its management that marked the life 
of its original owner. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 535 

The early life of Sherman P. Stow was an interesting one, but may 
only be briefly touched upon here through lack of details. He was 
bom in Binghamton, New York, on November 24, 1851, and was the 
son of William Whitney and Ann (Patterson) Stow, both natives of 
the State of New York. The family came to California in the year 
1852 and the father engaged in the practice of law in San Francisco, 
where he spent the remainder of his life. 

The son, Sherman P. Stow, carried on his studies under careful 
supervision until he was sixteen years of age, then was sent to France 
and Germany, where he continued his studies until 1870. He was in 
Paris at the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian war and he left the city 
on the last train to leave before the siege of Paris. 

Not yet twenty years of age, he came to Goleta to pay a visit to a 
friend, and it was then he became attracted by the possibilities of ranch 
life in Santa Barbara County. His father presented him with a tract 
of 1,000 acres that seemed especially desirable in the opinion of the 
young man, and he settled down to the task of making a valuable estate 
out of what was then an undeveloped tract of land. The land was 
unfenced and not a building of any sort stood upon it, but the task 
proved not too great for his abounding energy and ambition. 

Building the ranch house was a task that presented many difficulties, 
chief among them being the lack of facilities for getting lumber. That 
obstacle was overcome by floating the lumber from the steamer to the 
shore and hauling it about two miJes to the building site. 

During the first two years of his possession, Mr. Stow planted 11,000 
walnut trees and 22,000 almond trees, as well as about 1,500 lemons. 
The- almonds, however, proved unsuited to the soil, and after a time 
they were dug up and gave place to trees that were more grateful for the 
attentions bestowed upon them. For many years the place has yielded 
abundantly, making a splendid return upon the investment made by its 
owners in money and labors. 

Perhaps the most interesting feature connected with the develop- 
ment of this splendid property is its water system, which is generally 
acknowledged to be one of the most complete and satisfactory to be 
found anywhere. It represents a cash outlay of about $35,000, and the 
water used in irrigating the ranch is piped down the mountains a distance 
of about three miles. This plant insures the ranch abundant water at 
all seasons of the year, the ranch being its own water company and 
not dependent upon the caprices of any organization of men. The 
system is in itself very similar to the plants used by the cities for distri- 
bution purposes and is a feature that has gone far to make the ranch 
the big financial success it has been. 

After Mr. Stow's death in August, 1907, his son, Sherman H., took 
over the management of the property. He followed largely the intensive 
methods and the production was increased very materially in the brief 
time he was in charge. When he died in 191 5 another son, Edgar W., 
took charge and is now in command at the ranch. 

Mr. Sherman P. Stow., in addition to his many duties as operator of 



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536 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

one of the largest properties in the county, found time to take an 
interest in outside matters, and for years he was president and secretary 
of the Johnson Fruit Company. He was a member of the Elks and his 
religious affiliations were with the Episcopal Church. He was married 
on September lo, 1873, in San Francisco, to Ida G. Hollister, the daughter 
of John Hubbard and Ellen (Mossman) Hollister. Her father crossed 
the plains twice in the early days and was a pioneer of San Luis Obispo 
County, in which he settled and lived until his death. 

The children of Sherman P. and Ida Stow were six in number and 
are liere named briefly as follows : Sherman H., deceased ; Anne ; Kath- 
erine; Samuel M., living in Manila; Edgar Whitney, who manages the 
ranch, and Margaret, who married E. B. Bruce of New York City and 
Manila. 

Charles W. Rasey. A well known and popular citizen of Santa 
Barbara, C. W. Rasey, president and manager of The Wright Abstract 
Company, has filled various positions of responsibility, — ^as a railroad 
man, as a county official, and for the past fourteen years as the managing 
head of the above named land title company. He has always been held 
in high esteem as a public spirited man of ability and integrity. He was 
born in 1856 in Washington County, New York, of Scotch and Holland 
Dutch descent, and comes from patriotic stock, some of his forefathers 
who came to America before the Revolutionary war, having served in 
that war under Washington ; while several uncles and his father, Edward 
B. Rasey, served through the War of the Rebellion, his father having 
been a three years' member of the One Hundred and Twenty-third New 
York State Volunteers (infantry), participating in the battles of Chan- 
cellorsville, Gettysburg and other important engagements, and having 
been under General Sherman in his historic campaign and march to 
•'Atlanta and the Sea." 

In his boyhood days, C. W. Rasey became an expert telegrapher and 
as such was for several years in the employ of the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company and the Rutland & Washington and Renselaer & Sara- 
toga Railroad companies in commercial and railway departments at 
Saratoga Springs, Albany and other points in Eastern New York. Going 
to Colorado in 1879, he was for the following two years in the employ of 
the Western Union Telegraph Company as its manager at Trinidad and 
with the Denver & Rio Grande Railway Company at Denver in its freight 
traffic department. 

Coming from Colorado to California in 1881, he accepted a position 
with the Southern Pacific Railroad Company (then the Central Pacific) 
in its general passenger and ticket office at San Francisco, having been 
in charge of the apportionment, rates and divisions department in that 
office for six years. Leaving San Francisco in 1887, he came to Santa 
Barbara, and, when, in the same year, the Santa Fe Railroad Company 
opened an office in Santa Barbara, he became its passenger and ticket 
agent, which position he held for seven years, giving the highest satisfac- 



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SAMUEL MYERS AND HIS SISTER, MRS. SARAH R. DAUB 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 537 

tion to the railway management, and maintaining a high degree of popu- 
larity with the traveling public. 

In January, 1895, Mr. Rasey resigned his position with the railroad 
company to take up the duties of county recorder of Santa Barbara 
County, to which office he was elected in the autumn of 1894 in a trian- 
gular contest, his standing with the people being such that he won out 
in a spectacular fight against the republican candidate on one comer, and 
the democratic-populist candidate on the other. Again in another three 
cornered fight and as an independent candidate, he was re-elected, in 1898, 
to the same office. After having served the county in this important office 
for eight years to the highest satisfaction of the public, and upon the 
expiration of his second term, in January, 1903, he went into the office 
of The Wright Abstract Company as its manager, soon thereafter be- 
coming the president, which position he still holds, and wherein his 
accuracy, promptitude and efficient knowledge of his work are fully 
recognized throughout the county by patrons of the office. 

Mr. Rasey has served upon the board of directors of the Young 
Men's Christian Association of Santa Barbara, and for a time was its 
treasurer. He has also served several terms as a director of the Santa 
Barbara Chamber of Commerce. He is a member of several fraternal 
orders, including the Masonic orders, the Woodmen of the World, Knights 
of Pythias and Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

In 1882, at Glens Falls, New York, Mr. Rasey married Miss Alice E. 
Whedon, who was a daughter of a prominent family of Rutland County, 
Vermont, and who was an accomplished musician, having studied at the 
New England Conservatory of Music at Boston. Into their home two 
daughters made their advent, namely, Mabel A., born in San Francisco, 
and Dorothy W., bom in Santa Barbara. The former, a graduate of the 
Santa Barbara High School, was married in 1910 to Howard Mitchell, 
who is now and for several years past has been at the head of the depart- 
ment of modem languages in the high schools of the City of Holyoke, 
Massachusetts. Dorothy W. attended the Santa Barbara High School 
for one year, studied two years in Europe and subsequently graduated 
from the high school in the City of Holyoke, Massachusetts. She is now 
a student at Columbia University, New York City. 

Mrs. Rasey passed away in April, 1908. In December, 1912. Mr. 
Rasey married Miss Harriet Esther Peck of Santa Barbara, who was a 
graduate of the Ventura High School and who was later a student at 
the State Normal School at Los Angeles. 

Samuel Myers. Noteworthy among the enterprising and thriving 
farmers of Naples especial mention should be made of Samuel Myers, 
a pioneer ranchman, who took up a tract of land still in its virgin wildness 
thirty or more years ago, and through his energetic labor and good man- 
agement has cleared and improved a valuable ranch. He was bom June 
15, 1844, ^^ Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, the birthplace of his 
parents, John and Katherine (Ellenberger) Myers, both of whom were 
of old Pennsylvania Dutch stock. In 185 1 they removed with their 



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538 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

family to Sandusky County, Ohio, where the death of the father occurred 
in 1858. The mother survived him many long years, passing away in 
1881. 

Samuel Myers was educated in the district schools of Sandusky 
County, and there obtained his first knowledge of agriculture while 
working as a farm hand. During the progress of the Civil war he enlisted 
as a soldier in Company H, One Hundred and Sixty-ninth Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry, in which he served bravely for four months. Leaving 
Ohio in 1872, Mr. Myers spent eight years in Illinois, continuing life 
as a farmer, and then came to California, locating in Santa Barbara 
County in 1880. The ensuing four years he was engaged in general 
farming in Montecito, familiarizing himself with the agricultural meth- 
ods used in farming in Southern California. Settling in Naples in 1884, 
Mr. Myers took up 136 acres of land in the foot hills of Doty Canyon, 
originally known by its Spanish name **Los Barros Canyon." 

Mr. Myers at once began the pioneer labor of clearing and improv- 
ing his property, and has met with unquestioned success in his efforts, 
raising general produce of all kinds, but making a specialty to some extent 
of raising beans and vegetables, both of which find a ready market. Of 
more recent years Mr. Myers has had a partner, Mr. John Sullivan, 
who thoroughly understands the agricultural work in which he is engaged. 

Mr. Myers is a democrat, but not an active politician. He is living 
a life of single blessedness, having never taken upon himself the responsi- 
bilities of married life. 

William Ignatius Kocij. Among the many men who have been 
prominent in affairs pertaining to Old Mexico and California, the late 
William Ignatius Koch deserves especial mention. A man of lai^e 
affairs, of wide and varied influence, Mr. Koch was known as a man 
whose first consideration was for the welfare and happiness of his family, 
and no greater tribute can be paid his memory than that he was a kind 
and loving husband and father, and considerate of the interests of every 
one. 

Born of distinguished parents, he proved himself worthy of the task 
to carry with honor and dignity, the influential name fallen to him. 

Mr. Koch was a native of Mazatlan, Mexico, and he first saw the 
light of day on June i, 1861. He was the son of William and Maria 
(Echeagaray) Koch. 

The paternal side of the Koch family was a line of eminent Lutheran 
ministers who intermarried with the Elderhorst family, large land owners, 
who were quite influential at the court of the Dukes of Mecklenberg. 
The histories of these two families are well known and easily traced as 
far back as 1700. His patemal grandmother was descended from the 
Prussian General \'on Maltzan, afterwards called Schlichteisen. 

On his mother's side, M'r. Koch was descended from the Echeagaray 
family, originating in Spain. His mother's father, Juan Echeagaray, was 
general treasurer of the Province of Rosario, Mexico, and given the 
honorary title of general of brigade. Brigadier General Echeagaray mar- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 539 

ried a daughter of the Nunezand Fletes family, equally prominent, and 
who left several memorials in Rc^ario, Mexico. 

Mr. Koch made a short visit to Germany when very young, but on 
his return entered Jesuit College, in San Francisco, where he acquired his 
earlier education. He finished his education and broadened his under- 
standing by extensive travels. 

On his return to San Francisco, he entered the business world, dividing 
his time between San Francisco, Mexico and Central America, in the 
interest of his large coffee and timber business. These he managed with 
splendid success, until his retirement from active business participation, 
which occurred in 1906. He then located with his family in Santa 
Barbara, where he purchased a beautiful home at No. 5 Crocker Row, 
and where he enjoyed the delightful climate and associations of that 
charming city until the date of his death, which came on April 23. 1916. 

On June 12, 1894, in the chapel of St. Mary's Cathedral at San 
Francisco, Mr. Koch was united in the holy bonds of matrimony to Miss 
Serena Orena, a native of California and a daughter of Caspar Orefia 
and Marie Antonia de la Guerra de Orena, a descendant of one of the 
oldest and most prominent families of this state. The union was blessed 
by six children: Serenita, William, Carlota, Edward, Cristina and 
Lorenzo. The family still maintain their home at Santa Barbara. 

In closing, it is to be said that Mr. Koch was of pronounced religious 
convictions, a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and a man who 
commanded the respect and admiration of all who came in contact with 
him. He was a firm believer in thorough education, and a man who 
recognized the happy obligations imposed by his family. He found more 
pleasure and happiness among his family than could be found in social 
and fraternal associations. 

In a quiet and unassuming way, none held more secure vantage ground 
in popular confidence and esteem, and he was a man that any community 
could well be proud to number among its citizens. 

John Powell Hinckley, M. D. In point of continuous service 
Doctor Hinckley is one of the oldest physicians of Ventura County. He 
has lived and practiced here for more than a quarter of a century, and 
his experience in the profession covers more than forty years. 

He is of stanch New England ancestry and of the rugged mold of 
the Puritans. He is directly descended from the second governor of 
Plymouth Colony. His grandfather served as a soldier in the War of 
1812. Doctor Hinckley was born at St. Albans in Franklin County, Ver- 
mont. October 4. 1853, ^ son of John W. and Lucina (Wait) Hinckley. 
His father was a man of prominence in Vermont, was educated in the 
Georgia Academy, became a blacksmith, and followed that trade at St. 
Albans for a number of years. He also filled the office of justice of the 
peace in the early days. In 1863 he returned to Georgia, Vermont, and 
lived there until his death on October 4, 191 1. 

Doctor Hinckley until he was ten years of age attended a select school. 
He was a student in the old Georgia Academy until 1870, and then entered 



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540 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

the ranks of school teachers. He taught one winter in Swanton, and one 
year in Georgia, Vennont, and largely with means earned by his work 
he entered the University of Vermont at Burlington, where he was grad- 
uated in the medical department in 1875. 

Doctor Hinckley did his first practice at Salisbury, Vermont, where 
he remained until 1884, and then went to Tulare in Spink County, South 
Dakota, and was engaged in a profitable practice in that territory, attend- 
ing patients scattered over a wide area and enduring all the hardships of 
the pioneer doctor. 

In 1890 Doctor Hinckley came to Fillmore, California, and practiced 
in that village until 1902, and after the following two years were spent in 
Ventura he returned to Fillmore in 1904 and has since made that the 
headquarters of his large practice. 

Doctor Hinckley is a member of the Ventura County, and California 
State Medical Societies and the American Medical Association. Fra- 
ternally he is a past master of the Masonic Lodge at Fillmore, has taken 
the York Rite degrees, is a member of the Mystic Shrine, the Woodmen 
of the World, the Foresters of America, the Fraternal Brotherhood and 
the Fraternal Aid. Politically he is a republican, and his church is the 
Presbyterian. 

At Georgia, Vermont, on October 23, 1872, he married Miss Cora A. 
Loomis. Mrs. Hinckley died in June, 1906, being survived by four chil- 
dren : Ira L., who is a dentist at Los Angeles ; May Lucina, at home 
with her father; Eugenia, who died in 1915 ; and Vinnia I., at home. On 
August 6, 1908, at Sespe, California, Doctor Hinckley married Fannie 
Barnes. She was bom at Binghampton, Broome County, New York, 
and her parents removed to Ventura County in the early days. 

George M. Williams. One of the many enterprising and pro- 
gressive men who are extensively engaged in agricultural pursuits in 
the rich and fertile country of Southern California, George M. Williams 
brought to his calling excellent judgment and good business methods, 
and his labors have surely been crowned with success. Coming to Santa 
Barbara in 1866, when the country roundabout was still in its virgin 
wildness, he has witnessed wonderful changes during the years that have 
since passed, and in the growth and development of town and country 
has taken an active and prominent part, having highly improved and 
placed under culture many acres of land, his large and well appointed 
ranch showing the care and supervision of a good manager and a thor- 
ough-going farmer. He was bom in Baltimore, Maryland, September 
20, 1850, a son of Joseph and Mary (Sharpe) Williams, natives of Mary- 
land, and life-long residents of that state, his father for many years 
having been a merchant in Baltimore. 

Left fatherless when an infant, George M. Williams obtained his 
early education in the Baltimore schools, and at the age of sixteen years 
came to California, stopping first in San Francisco. A few months later 
he made his way to Santa Barbara, where he was variously employed 
for four years. Starting in life for himself about 1870, Mr. Williams 



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TAMES {;. WILLIAMS 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 541 

purchased eleven acres of land, and in its improvement was very suc- 
cessful, fortune smiling upon his every effort. Through wise invest- 
ments he has since added more land by purchase to his original tract, 
and has now title to 3,000 acres of fine land. In 1873 Mr. Williams 
bought his home ranch of 150 acres, pleasantly located between Santa 
Barbara and Goleta, and in its improvement has taken great pleasure. 
He is a general farmer and stock-raiser, and makes a specialty of raising 
beans, walnuts and fruits, having planted his own walnut grove and set 
out his fruit trees himself, his orchard being one of the most productive 
in the vicinity. 

In February, 1873, ^^- Williams married, in Santa Barbara, Miss 
Eliza Jane Towne, who was bom in Petaluma, California, a daughter 
of the late Edward Towne, a pioneer farmer of Sonoma County. Eight 
children have been bom of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Williams, namely: 
Charles H., farming with his father; James G.; Georgiana, living with 
her parents; Mary, wife of William Bueneman, of San Francisco; 
Birdie, wife of Charles Sproule, of San Francisco; Edith, wife of Louis 
Lefivre, of San Francisco; Dorothy, a student in the University of Cal- 
ifornia ; and Fannie, wife of Walter Cooley, also of San Francisco. 

Mr. Williams is now affiliated with the republican party, but is not 
active in party ranks. He was formerly a democrat, and represented that 
party in county and state conventions. At the present time he is render- 
ing appreciated service as chairman of the board of county road com- 
missioners, and is one of the directors of the Central Bank of Santa 
Barbara. Fraternally Mr. Williams is a member of Magnolia Lodge 
No. 242, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at Los Angeles; of Al 
Malikah Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 
Los Angeles; of Santa Barbara Lodge No. 613, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, Santa Barbara; of Channel City Lodge, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, Santa Barbara; of La Cumbre Club; of 
the Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce; and of the Union League 
Club of San Francisco. He is also president of the Santa Barbara 
County Walnut Growers' Association, and of the California Walnut 
Growers' Association. 

James G. Williams, the second son of the parental household, was 
bom at Santa Barbara July 16, 1881, and was there educated in the 
graded and high schools. Since his graduation he has been busily 
employed on his father's ranch, and in his agricultural labors is meeting 
with most satisfactory results. 

James G. Williams married, at Goleta, October 5, 1905, Miss Flor- 
ence Kemp Pollard, who was bom in New Jersey, and came to California 
with her parents, Thomas and Harriet Pollard when a girl. Four chil- 
dren have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Williams, namely : James, 
George, Thomas, and Ealinor Elizabeth. Fraternally Mr. Williams be- 
longs to Santa Barbara Lodge No. 192, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, and to Al Malikah Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at Los Angeles; and to the Santa Bar- 
bara Lodge of Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. A republican 



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542 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

in politics, he represented his party as county commissioner under the 
old system, and is now serving as a member of the County Central 
Committee. 

William Scott Day. During the thirteen years he was a resident of 
Santa Barbara, William Scott Day attained some of the best distinctions 
in his profession of the law and in public affairs. Appointed to the bench, 
he brought to that dignity a long experience and the best of professional 
and personal qualifications. He was a man of commanding presence, of 
fine address, of perfect integrity, and was universally admired. 

Sixty-four years of age at the time of his death, Judge Day was bom 
in Smith, now Trousdale County, Tennessee, March 14, 1848, a son of 
Henry and Martha (Kearley) Day. He was of Scotch ancestry. Part of 
his childhood was spent in Tennessee, where he attended school, but in 
1859 h's parents removed to Arkansas and in 1861 to Illinois. In Southern 
Illinois he attended the Carbondale Seminary, and some of his early years 
were spent in teaching school. In 1872 he took up the study of law 
under Judge M. C. Crawford of Jonesboro, Illinois, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1874. From that year imtil 1888 he practiced law at Jonesboro. 
Elected in 1876 he served four years as state's attorney of his county, and 
in 1886 was elected to represent his home district in the State Legislature 
during the session of 1887. In 1882 he was admitted to the bar of the 
Supreme Court of the United States. 

With this varied and successful experience behind him Judge Day 
removed to California and engaged in the active practice of law at Santa 
Barbara. In 1897 Governor Budd appointed him judge of the Superior 
Court to succeed Judge W. B. Cope, who had resigned. At the general 
election of 1898 he was elected on the democratic ticket to that office by a 
majority of 350 votes. This was a striking testimonial of his ability and 
qualifications, since normally Santa Barbara County was republican. After 
leaving the bench Judge Day served one term as city attorney. From 
that time until his death on February 16, 191 2, he resumed the private 
practice of law. 

He was a Knight Templar Mason, a charter member of St. Omar 
Commandery No. 30, was affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was a Unitarian 
in religious belief and a member of the Santa Barbara Chamber of Com- 
merce. He married Miss Helen A. Frick of Jonesboro, Illinois. There 
are two children who survive him: William Clarence, a young attorney 
at Los Angeles; and Alice M. 

John M. Arneili. represents some of that high class technical ability 
which in recent years has been drawn into service in the management of 
California's agricultural resources and for a number of years he has 
demonstrated his ability to perform big work by the successful manage- 
ment of a large bean plantation in Ventura County. 

He is a son of the late John Arneill, who established the family of 
this name in Ventura County about thirty years ago. John Arneill, who 



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U A^{r7^;nx^ Crf C/'i 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 543 

was bom in Kelso, Scotland, January 9, 1843, ^^^ came to this country 
when nine years of age, and served an apprenticeship in a grocery store 
up to the age of twenty-three. He educated himself, went to night school, 
became a great student and took up French and German, in which he 
became very proficient, and he was also very fond of history. He was 
first employed in a large grocery house in Detroit, Michigan, then at the 
age of twenty-four went to DePere. Wisconsin, had a thorough training 
there for five years in a retail general store, and next opened a general 
stock of merchandise of his own at Wrightstown, Wisconsin. He was in 
business at Wrightstown for fifteen years, then sold out and moved to 
Appleton, Wisconsin, where he lived retired until 1888, when he brought 
his family to Ventura, California. He was retired until October, 1894, 
and at that date bought a ranch near Camarillo, on which his death 
occurred in the following December. He was a prosperous business man, 
a very active member of the Congregational Church, and he illustrated 
those fine qualities of business sense, sound judgment and upright citizen- 
ship for which the sturdy Scotch are everywhere noted. • 

In Milwaukee, Wisconsin, September 29, 1869, John Arneill married 
Elizabeth Rae. Nine children were bom to their union : William, who 
died September 29, 1914; Dr. James, practicing medicine at Denver, 
Colorado ; Mrs. Staire, wife of Dr. H. M. Staire of Oxnard ; Mrs. Roy V. 
Rippey of Hollywood; Mrs. Charles W. Pettit of Ventura; John; and 
Edmund, John and Stuart, who died in infancy. 

John Ameill was bom at Appleton, Wisconsin, June 18, 1887. The 
following year he was brought to California, and he grew up in Ventura 
County, attending ihe grammar and high schools until he was sixteen. 
From there he entered St. Mathews Seminary at San Mateo, and two 
years later went to the University of Califomia, from which he was 
graduated in the technical course in agriculture in 191 1. Trained to the 
theory and practice of farming and with the consideration of the large 
problems involved in the industiy, Mr. Ameill since leaving the univer- 
sity has managed his mother's farm, and in 191 5, after the death of his 
brother William, took the management of that part of the mother's estate 
also, and has now under his supervision 400 of the fertile and productive 
acres of Ventura County. He has forty acres in apricots, twenty acres in 
walnuts, and all the rest of the tract is devoted to the staple crop of lima 
beans. 

He is a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon college fraternity, is a 
republican and a member of the Episcopal Church. In Ventura, June 11, 
1912, he married Miss Anna Mary Baker, a native of Ventura and a 
daughter of F. W. Baker, a hardware merchant of Ventura, who has 
been there in business since 1875. They are the parents of one child, 
Anna Sheridan. 

Thomas Foxen. Having accomplished a satisfactory work in the 
free and independent calling to which he was reared, Thomas Foxen, 
of the Town of Los Alamos, Santa Barbara County, has accumulated 
a handsome competency, and is now enjoying to the utmost the well- 



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544 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

merited reward of his earlier years of toil. A son of Benjamin Foxen, 
he was born in Santa Barbara, March 9, 1852, His father was a pioneer 
settler of this section of Southern California, coming to the Pacific Coast 
from England, his native land, and here obtaining title to about 8,000 
acres of land in Foxen, or the Sisquoc Canyon; at his death this land 
was divided among his eleven children, 800 acres of the estate going to 
his son Thomas, the special subject of this brief sketch. 

Although one of a large family of children, Thomas Foxen had 
excellent educational advantages, attending first the public schools, 
later continuing his studies in the college at Santa Ynez, and at Saint 
Mary's College. Settling in life as an agriculturist after his marriage, 
he began farming on his own large tract of land, also having in charge 
a lOO-acre ranch which belonged to his bride. Mr. Foxen diligently 
improved his property, each season adding to its value. Subsequently, 
wishing to be relieved of the heavy responsibilities devolving upon him 
as such an extensive landholder, he disposed of his interests in the 
Foxen Canyoq and purchased his present home place of three acres in 
Los Alamos, where for the past twenty-five years he has lived a quiet 
and pleasant life with his wife and children. 

On September 8, 1878, Mr. Foxen married Miss Adelaide Bottiller, 
who was bom in Santa Barbara, and was there brought up and educated. 
Her father, Thomas Bottiller, a native of Los Angeles, was a pioneer 
jeweler of Santa Barbara, where his death occurred when his daughter 
Adelaide was a little girl. Mr. Bottiller married Marie Olivas, who was 
bom in Santa Barbara, and her mother was one of Governor Pico's 
family, who was for many years the administrator of what is now Santa 
Barbara County. 

Mr. and Mrs. Foxen have seven children, namely: Gerald, a paper 
hanger by trade; Helen, wife of Joseph Sepulveda, a deputy sheriff in 
Los Angeles, where he won a gold star for making the greatest num- 
ber of arrests; Annie, wife of Joseph McCartney, engaged in farming on 
the Buell Ranch; Leonard, of Los Angeles; Clara, wife of Leonard 
Simons, of Pismo, San Luis Obispo County; Margaret, living with her 
parents; and Edmund, working in the oil fields at Dome, Califomia. 
By a previous marriage Mrs. Foxen has one son, Alexander, a carpenter 
in Los Angeles. Mr. Foxen invariably casts his vote in favor of the 
republican party, but is never active in politics. He is a member of the 
Catholic Church. 

Charles J. Cleveland is one of the successful men of Ventura County. 
His home has been in this state thirty-five years and a large amount of 
practical enterprise has flowed out of his character and energies into the 
substantial activities of his home county. 

Bom in Fluvanna County, Virginia, January 15, 1862, a son of Jerry 
and Sallie Ann Cleveland, he grew up in his native state, attended the 
public schools there until he was sixteen, and then worked on his mother's 
plantation for a couple of years. 

With this limited experience and still a young man of only eighteen. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 545 

he came West and identified himself with the great State of California. 
For a year he worked on ranches at Grangeville, Kings (formerly Ttdare) 
County. He was then made manager of a ranch and continued in that 
way four years. Coming to Santa Paula in Ventura County he was a 
wage worker for five years but during that time he and his brother, the 
late E. M. Cleveland, erected the Cleveland Hall in Santa Barbara. That 
building, which was used as a church for nearly all denominations and 
for lodge meetings, theatricals and other entertainments, was the first 
substantial structure of the kind erected in the village. In 1891 he traded 
his interest in the hall for thirty-five acres of land near Santa Paula. 
That land now comprises the chief part of Mr. Charles J. Qeveland's 
home ranch, and it has been profitably developed to walnuts and lemons. 

In the meantime he has acquired other important business interests, 
being a director in the Santa Paula Land Company, a director in the 
First National Bank of Santa Paula and is trustee to his brother's estate. 
Fraternally he is a Mason, a democrat, and a member of the Universalist 
Church. In Ventura County in November, 1890, he married Miss Lizzie 
Henderson, who died in May, 1896. In 1904 he made a trip to his native 
state, and on August 24th of that year was married in Fulvanna County, 
Virginia, to Irene Gentry. Mrs. Cleveland is a native of Virginia, the 
daughter of James Gentry, whose home in Virginia was near that of 
Mr. Cleveland. 

Mr. Cleveland has been a lover of good horses and owned a fine 
mare that he named after his native state Virginia. At that time he joined 
the Gentlemen's Driving Qub of Los Angeles and with this mare won 
the cup presented by William Garland to the winner of the 2 :20 (pace) 
class. In this contest the winners were : G. A. Pounder, one race ; E. R. 
Guirado, one race; William A. Clark, Jr., two races, and Charles Cleve- 
land, three races. Time, 2:10. 

Frederic E. Snowden ranks as one of the foremost experts in Cali- 
fornia on all the processes of oil refining and manufacturing, and is now 
in active charge of the Ventura Refining Company's plant, the model oil 
refinery of the state, located at Fillmore in Ventura County. 

A native son of California, he was bom at San Jose on May 21, 1888. 
His schooling was finished at the age of fourteen. He began work for 
self support, and followed various lines of employment until in 1907 he 
was made superintendent of the Capital Refining Company near San 
Francisco, remained there 3^/^ years, and then for two years was man- 
ager of the American Oil and Paint Company of San Francisco. 

Mr. Snowden took an entire year for the purpose of traveling through- 
out the East and Middle West and studying various details and processes 
employed in the diflferent oil refineries. This was in the nature of a 
post-graduate course to his previous practical training, which had given 
him a more than ordinary familiarity with many branches of the oil 
industry. On returning to California he took up work as an expert on all 
phases of oil refining, and has also done a g^eat deal of remodeling of 
refinery plants, installing diflferent oil processes for various independent 



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546 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

companies. His services have been employed by the Southern Refining 
Company, the S. A. Thompson Oil Company, the Puritan Oil Company, 
and the Densmore-Stabler Refining Company. In 191 5 Mt. Snowden 
became superintendent of the Puente Oil Company at Chino, but since 
December 25, 191 5, has been superintendent of the Ventura Refining 
Company at Fillmore. 

This company as already mentioned owns and operates the most 
modem and fully equipped refinery in California. In capacity it is the 
fourth largest in the state and while not so large as some others, it is in 
point of efficiency of operation properly regarded as the model plant of 
its kind in the West. The company is absolutely independent, employs 
over 200 people and gets its supply of crude oil from the Montebello 
Oil Company, located nearby. The oil is brought from the field to refin- 
ery by pipe lines. This company also manufactures all the various by- 
products of petroleum. 

John James Holloway. Reminiscent of much that has been writ- 
ten into California annals is the career of John James Holloway one of 
the pioneer ranchers of Santa Barbara County, a resident of Los Alamos. 
Mr. Holloway is almost a Califomian '49er, having come to this state 
when a boy in 1850. Within his personal recollection and experience 
have developed nearly all those phases of California life which are so 
well known to the people of this state and elsewhere. He was one of 
the early Americans to locate in Santa Barbara County, and there for 
nearly half a century has prospered and lived an upright and public 
spirited life. 

Born in Benton County, Missouri, January 26, 1839, he is a son of 
John and Nancy K. (Foster) Holloway, Jiis father a native of Kentucky 
and his mother of North Carolina. As a boy he attended the Missouri 
public schools. Then at the age of eleven years, in 1850, he came across 
the plains with his parents to California. There were twenty-five 
wagons in the caravan that slowly trekked over the wilderness of the 
West, and there were incidents, hardships and difficulties almost without 
number in the several months spent on the way. 

Mr. Holloway attended school after coming to California, but most 
of his training was acquired in looking out for himself and in drinking 
in the spirit of adventure which then filled all the Golden State. At the 
age of twenty he began farming for himself in Sutter County. In 1861 
he moved to Butte County and was a stock raiser there until 1864. 

For two years he was a stockman in Modoc County, and while all 
the incidents of his career cannot be dwelt upon at length, there was one 
in connection with his life in Modoc County that requires some special 
mention. He was looked upon as one of the leading citizens of that 
county, and while there he wrote the first agreement of law and order 
for white settlers published as the basic law or constitution of the county, 
and that agreement when written out by him was signed by 104 men, 
constituting practically the entire law abiding population of the county 
at that time. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 547 

From Modoc County Mr. Holloway continued the cattle business in 
the State of Nevada for a time, but in 1868 came to Southern California 
and since then has been identified with the Santa Maria Valley. He has 
been a successful farmer and he still owns a fine place of thirty-two 
acres, highly developed and a property that gives him an ample com- 
petence for his declining years. 

He has always been interested in public affairs, and serv^ed as deputy 
county assessor four years, as squirrel inspector three years and as 
school trustee for eleven years. He is a member of the Christian Church. 

On December 22, 1870, at Santa Maria Mr. Holloway married Miss 
Rebecca T. Miller. Mrs. Holloway, who died in 1882, was the mother 
of six children: Lucy E., Dora, Nancy, Albert, Everett and James. 
In 1884 at Santa Maria Mr. Holloway married Sarah Linebaugh, who 
passed away January 31, 1899. Four children were bom to this union: 
Charlotte, Carl, Cornell, deceased, and Frank. 

A. Jack Baker during his long residence in Southern California has 
prosecuted his business affairs with such wisdom and discretion as to be 
able to enjoy the comforts of retirement at Santa Paula, where he is one 
of the best known and most public spirited citizens. 

His father, the late William Baker, was one of the pioneers of Cal- 
ifornia. Bom in Tennessee, he afterwards removed to Dallas, Texas, 
and from that city brought his family in 1866 across the plains to the 
State of Califomia. He was engaged in ranching near Downie City 
until his death in 1869. He was married in Dallas, Texas, to Miss Annie 
Cole, and they became the parents of six children. 

A. Jack Baker was bom in Dallas, Texas, April 17, 1863, and was 
three years of age when brought across the plains to Califomia. He 
attended public schools in Downie City until 1871, in which year his 
widowed mother removed to Ventura County and settled on a ranch in 
Wheeler's Canyon. The public schools of that locality fumished him the 
rest of his education. In 1877 Mr. Baker left home and went to Clickitat 
County in what was then Washington Territory and spent six months as 
a cowboy. Boarding a steamer, he came to San Diego County, California, 
and was there employed on a stock ranch for about a year. After that 
Santa Anna, Califomia, was his headquarters for four years, and among 
other things that engaged his attention he put in much of the time as a 
professional foot racer. He ran races all over Southem Califomia, and 
for a number of years held the championship of this section of the state. 
He has always been fond of athletics and outdoor sports and in his later 
and more mature years has lost none of the keen interest which he once 
had, though he is no longer a participant. 

On coming to Santa Paula Mr. Baker spent three years on Jack 
Rehart's ranch, after that was with the Union Oil Company in the drilling 
of wells near Santa Paula for two years, then became manager of the 
Hardison Horse and Cattle Ranch near that town for another two years, 
and on resigning his position rented 200 acres of the Del Norte Ranch. 
That land he conducted as a general farm for ten years, and made a 



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548 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

success of it. For the following six years he was in the real estate 
business at Santa Paula, and since then has been mainly retired from 
business affairs, his chief responsibility at present being as constable of 
Santa Paula. 

Mr. Baker is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
is a member of the Citizen's Club, is independent in politics, and is a 
director in the Santa Paula Building and Loan Association. In Santa 
Paula September 12, 1884, he married Miss Sina Snuffin, a native of Cal- 
ifornia and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Snuffin, and they are the 
parents of three children. Starling, now thirty years of age, is employed 
as an oil pumper in Santa Paula; Mrs. Stella Harwood lives in Ventura 
County; and Marion, aged nineteen, is a miner in Plumas County, 
California. 

Samuel Jenkins was one of the veteran employes of the Southern 
Pacific Railway Company for a g^eat many years, and on leaving the 
railroad service located at Santa Paula, where he was active in business 
and civic affairs until his death. 

Born at Lowell, Massachusetts, November 20, 1847, Samuel Jenkins 
was educated in his native city, and soon took up railroading, becoming 
a locomotive engineer. In 1865 he came west to California and Nevada. 
In 1875 he established his home at Truckee, Nevada, and entered the 
service of the Southern Pacific Company as engineer. In 1885 ^^ trans- 
ferred his home to Oakland, California, and in 1886 removed to Los 
Angeles. All the time he was a locomotive engineer, and after coming 
to Los Angeles he piloted as engineer the first train between that city and 
Santa Barbara. 

Retiring from the railroad service in 1888 and locating in Santa Paula, 
he operated a planing mill for one year, and then erected a one-story 
building on Main Street and was proprietor of a billiard hall. In 1910 
he retired from business, and lived in Santa Paula until his death on 
June 17, 1916. He owned considerable valuable real estate in the down- 
town section of Santa Paula, and for a number of years served as city 
trustee. Fraternally he was a Mason and politically a republican. He 
is survived by his widow, Mrs. Sarah (Deyo) Jenkins, whom he married 
at Albany, New York, in 1872, and also two children, Mrs. Belle Spang- 
ler of Ventura County, and Fred E. Jenkins. 

Mr. Fred E. Jenkins, who has long been numbered among the active 
business men of Santa Paula, was born at Watsonville, California, May 
29, 1875, attended public school in Alameda County and Los Angeles 
until 1887, and completed his education at Santa Paula, leaving high 
school at the age of nineteen. For some years he was associated with 
his father in the billiard hall and in 1910 he bought another business and 
conducted it actively until he sold out in 1916. 

Mr. Jenkins is a member of the Native Sons of the Golden West, 
is a republican, and holds to the Christian Science faith. In Santa Paula 
in 1 901 he married Robie Keene. Their two children, Robie, aged nine, 
and Fred, aged fifteen, are both now in the public schools. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 549 

Walter Franklin Torrence. Widely known as one of the more 
able and prosperous farmers of Santa Barbara Coimty, Walter Frank 
Torrence is numbered among the citizens of good repute and high stand- 
ing in the enterprising little town of Santa Ynez, where the larger part 
of his life has been spent. A native of California, he was bom in 
Stanislaus County, May i, 1876, being a son of the late James Writchey 
Torrence, an early settler of that section of the state. 

James W. Torrence was bom, reared and educated in Illinois, and 
lived in that state until some time in the late '60s when he followed the 
march of civilization westward to the Pacific Coast. Coming to Cali- 
fomia, he located in Stanislaus County, where for a number of seasons 
he was engaged in general farming. In 1876 he came with his family 
to Southem Califomia, and continued his chosen occupation in the Los 
Alamos Valley until 1883. In that year he purchased, 480 acres of land 
in the Santa Ynez Valley, and immediately began its improvement, 
residing on his valuable ranch until his death, which occurred February 
19, 191 1. He was identified with the democratic party, and served as 
supervisor in the Fourth District for one term. He took an active 
interest in local affairs, and was a prominent factor in promoting the 
educational and social interests of the valley. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Nancy Scaiefe, was born and brought up in Illinois, and is 
now living on the home ranch, with her son, Walter Frank Torrence, 
who has had the management of the farm since his father's death. 

After his graduation from the Santa Ynez High School, Walter F. 
Torrence began working with his father on the home farm, and finding 
that occupation both congenial and profitable he has continued the pur- 
suit of agriculture, at the death of his father, as previously mentioned, 
assuming the management of the home farm. He has invested much 
money in land, and is now the owner of 800 acres, all of which is under 
a good state of cultivation. He raises excellent crops of wheat and 
barley, and until recently raised considerable stock,' principally horses. 
Just at the present time Mr. Torrence is making experiments in the 
growing of beans, a branch of agriculture that promises good results. 

Mr. Torrence married, April 11, 1909, Mary A. Mahoney, who was 
bom in Ireland, a daughter of Daniel Mahoney, and a niece of John 
Mahoney, supervisor of San Luis Obispo County, the marriage taking 
place in San Francisco. Mr. and Mrs. Torrence have four children: 
Daniel Richard, who passed away at the age of twenty months ; Hester ; 
Audrey; and Alice. Politically a democrat, Mr. Torrence has repre- 
sented his party in county conventions, and is much interested in public 
aifairs. In 1898 he was one of the organizers of Santa Ynez Lodge No. 
212, Knights of Pythias, at Santa Ynez, and is one of its active members. 

Adoniram J. Marshall is .one of the men who after a long and 
active career have gained ample material prosperity and financial inde- 
pendence by their operations as farmers and business men in Ventura 
County, and is now living retired and enjoying the fruits of his well spent 

years at Santa Paula. 
Vol. n— 5 



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550 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

He was bom in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, August 30, 185 1, a 
son of Joseph and Jane Marshall, and grew up in his native state and 
attended the public schools there until he was eighteen years of age. After 
that he submitted himself to the rugged discipline of the old farm until 
he was twenty-three. On leaving home he went to Mansfield, Ohio, and 
continued working as a farm laborer in that vicinity several years. 

In April, 1876, Mr. Marshall arrived in Ventura County. Though 
conditions were very different here from what they had been in the states 
where he had previously lived he found his industry and previous experi- 
ence available to him as a worker on various farms, and he continued in 
that way in the Pleasant Valley until 1889. In that year he went to 
Ventura, rented some land near that city, and engaged in bean raising. 
In 189J came his removal to the Santa Clara Valley where he rented land 
in Adams Canyon, and farmed it four years. His next location was in 
Saugas in Los Angeles County, where he combined farming and mining 
for fifteen months. On returning to Ventura County Mr. Marshall 
rented fifty acres three miles east of Santa Paula. Four years later he 
bought 160 acres in the same locality and devoted it to the raising of 
stock and barley. Subsequently he bought the fifty acres he occupied as 
a renter, and continued his activities until 191 1, when he sold his farm 
and used a portion of the proceeds in the purchase of 2j/^ acres and a 
comfortable home at Santa Paula, where he now lives retired. 

Mr. Marshall is a republican and attends the Presbyterian Church. 
In Ventura September 9, 1891, he married Miss Ada McDonald, a native 
of Pennsylvania and a daughter of W. B. H. McDonald, who came to 
Ventura County in 1886. He was a farmer by occupation and was well 
known in Ventura County. Mr. Marshall was a member of the Dayton 
militia, Pennsylvania National Guard, from 1871 to 1873. 

Ernest Milton Franklin is one of the young and progressive 
ranchers of the Saticoy locality of Ventura County. His affairs are in 
a prosperous condition, and he is possessed of all that intense energy and 
enterprise which are characteristic of the leaders in California horticul- 
ture and agriculture. 

He was born in Carpinteria, Santa Barbara County, December 11, 
1876, a son of Meshack and Ninnie B. Franklin. When he was four years 
of age in 1880 his parents removed to Ventura County, locating near Sati- 
coy. In that locality his early youth was spent and his education came 
from the grammar and high schools of Ventura. At the age of twenty, 
following his father's death, he took the active management of his mother's 
fifty-acre walnut ranch. He is now owner of that splendid plantation, 
situated near Saticoy, and has thirty-five acres in a mature walnut orchard 
and fifteen acres in lemons. 

Mr. Franklin is republican in politics and is always ready to do his 
part in community advancement. For six months he was a member of 
Company E, National Guard Company, at Santa Paula, during the Span- 
ish-American war, but his company was not called upon. Mt. Franklin 
has devoted considerable attention to the sport of baseball and for five 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 551 

years was one of the pitchers in the Northwestern League, three years 
in Tacoma, one year in Spokane and one year in Vancouver, his club hav- 
ing won the pennant that year. 

In Ventura County February 17, 1908, Mr. Franklin married Edna 
Peterson. They have one child, Jesse Howard, now four years of age. 
Mrs. Franklin is a native of Carpinteria and a daughter of David Peter- 
son, a rancher of that place. 

Thaddeus Welch. Endowed by nature with artistic tastes and 
talent, and possessing the courage and persistency of purpose necessary 
to successfully push hhnself onward to the goal of his ambitions, Thad- 
deus Welch, one of California's most distinguished artists, has labored 
with tremendous industry, and through careful and patient work 
has evidently mastered the secrets of those who for centuries have 
delighted the world with their thoughts expressed on canvas. A son 
of Russell Welch, he was born in Laporte, Indiana, July 14, 1844, coming 
from Revolutionary stock. 

A native of New York State, Russell Welch migrated to Indiana in 
early manhood, locating near Laporte. Following the tide of emigration 
westward in 1847, he crossed the plains via the old Lewis and Clark 
Trail to Oregon, and having taken up 640 acres of land in the vicinity 
of McMinnville, about forty miles from Portland, he there began the 
improvement of a homestead. During the excitement caused by the 
finding of gold in California in 1849, he spent a few months there hunt- 
ing for the precious metal, but not feeling rewarded for his efforts at 
miping he returned to his farm in Oregon, and there both he and his 
wife, whose maiden name was Sarah Smith, spent their remaining years. 

Acquiring his early education in the district schools, Thaddeus Welch 
remained beneath the parental roof until eighteen years of age. The 
following four years he worked in a printing office in Portland, and then, 
in 1866, came to California. Entering a newspaper office in San 
Francisco, Mr. Welch followed his trade, at the same time devoting all 
of his leisure time to the painting of pictures. In 1874, having saved 
quite a sum of money, he went to Germany for the purpose of studying 
art, and for six years resided in Munich, where he studied the antique 
under Stroehuber; life under Rabb; and painting under the careful 
instruction of Alex Wagner. 

Going from there to Paris, Mr. Welch studied for two and one-half 
years, painting from nature, and had the distinction of having some of 
his pictures exhibited in the Paris Salon. During his career as a student 
he met with many troubles and trials, having a hard struggle to get 
through, but whenever his funds got too low he went back to the print- 
ing case and worked at his trade for awhile. As soon as he found he 
could paint both acceptably and profitably Mr. Welch built a boat, and 
having assumed the offices of captain, engineer and pilot launched it, 
with the assistance of the entire force of the printing office, on the Seine 
River. Living on his boat, he followed the picturesque stream down- 
ward, painting as he went, and thus secured some fine pictures and 
many valuable studies. 

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552 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Returning to this country, Mr. Welch spent a brief time in New 
York City, after which he went to Boston, where he worked for a month 
at the printer's trade. He then drifted around in different New Eng- 
land places, painting pictures, and on rare occasions selling one. Going 
westward to the Hudson, he found some admirable studies for pictures, 
and also met with a most charming young girl, who subsequently became 
his wife. From the Hudson he went back to Boston, and for two years 
was there in the employ of Louis Prang, the art publisher. 

From Boston Mr. Welch proceeded to Chicago, where he subsequently 
worked on three cycloramas, the "Battle of Gettysburg," the "Siege of 
Paris" and "Jerusalem on the Day of the Crucifixion." Going 
then to Australia, he there set up the cyclorama "Battle of Gettysburg," 
and later painted a large picture of the "Ballarat Riots" as a compan- 
ion piece to the "Battle of Waterloo," which was then in possession of 
the company by which he was employed. 

On his return to the United. States, Mr. Welch came to California 
and here painted several large pictures, ten feet by forty feet, for the 
California Building erected in Chicago for the World's Columbian 
Exposition in 1893, the subjects being as follows: Leland Stanford, 
Jr., University; the Stanford ranch in Vina; Hotel del Monte; the 
Haggin and Tavis ranch at Bakersfield; a view of Pasadena and the 
Raymond Hotel; and one of San Francisco taken from Goat Island. 
Mr. Welch remained in San Francisco and vicinity for a number of 
years after which he was for seven years a resident of Marin County. 
In the meantime he made many trips for the purpose of securing desir- 
able studies, going to Puget Sound, the Yosemite Valley, and other 
points of especial interest to the artist. While in Marin County he built 
a beautiful little home in a picturesque canyon, near Bolinas. 

Since 1905 Mr. Welch has lived in Santa Barbara, where he is kept 
busily employed, his fame as an artist being not merely local, but extend- 
ing from coast to coast. His paintings may be found in all parts of the 
country, a large part of them being found in the homes of the wealthy and 
cultured people of New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, and the 
larger cities of California. Very recently he received an extensive 
order from a large dealer, and as these pictures are nearly ready to be 
turned over to the one who gave the order he has a magnificent display at 
the present time in his studio. 

Mr. Welch married, July 14, 1883, while painting views on the 
Hudson, as mentioned above. Miss Ludmilla Pilat, a daughter of Carl 
Pilat, an Austrian refugee, who came to this country in 1848. Her 
father belonged to an excellent family, one of his uncles having served 
as private secretary to Prince Mettemich of Austria. Mr. Welch is 
independent in politics, but not at all active in party ranks. While living 
in San Francisco he was a member of the Bohemian Club. 

JosiAH I. Keene. One of the men who contributed to the improve- 
and extensive development of the beautiful Santa Qara Valley in Ventura 
County was the late Josiah I. Keene, a stanch New Englander, a pioneer 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 553 

of the great Northwest in the early days, a soldier of the Civil war, and 
one of the arrivals in Ventura County of the early '70s. 

He was bom at Canaan, Maine, December 19, 1828. Reared and edu- 
cated in his native state he learned the machinist's trade and in early 
manhood moved out to what was then the extreme northwestern frontier, 
the territory of Minnesota, locating in Mankato, where he was employed 
at his trade until the outbreak of the war. In 1861 he enlisted in the 
Second Minnesota Volunteers, and remained with his command until he 
was wounded in 1864. Being incapacitated for active field service he 
was assigned to work in the Department of the Interior at Washington, 
District of Columbia, and remained a resident of the national capital 
until 1872. 

In that year he came to Ventura, California, and bought eighteen acres 
of land near the city of that name. This land he planted to walnuts and 
orange trees. In 1874 he took up a soldier's claim of 160 acres on Sespe 
Rancho in Santa Clara Valley near Santa Paula, but retained his residence 
on the original eighteen acres. Not long afterward he filed upon a 132- 
acre timber culture claim adjoining the homestead. One feature of his 
early industry there was bee culture. In 1888 he sold his Ventura prop- 
erty and moved to the homestead, where in 1889 began the development 
which has transformed every portion of it into a varied fruit orchard. 
In that year he planted forty acres of vineyard and twenty-five acres of 
olives. In 1895 water was introduced for irrigation purposes. He con- 
tinued the active management of his fine estate until death came to him 
on September 12, 1900, when he was past seventy years of age. 

The late Mr. Keene was an active member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic, was a republican voter and a member of the Universalist Church. 
In Washington, District of Columbia, December 31, 1873, he married 
Lucy Monroe, who was born at Conway, Massachusetts. There were 
five children: Kendall, a rancher at Suisun, California; Allen in the oil 
business at Fullerton, California; Herman; Mrs. Robie Jenkins of Santa 
Paula; and Mrs. Helen Foster of Santa Paula. 

Herman Keene, who has succeeded to the large ranching responsibil- 
ities established by his father, was bom at Ventura December 26, 1879. 
He attended public school in his native town until 1889, and thereafter 
was in the schools of Sespe completing the common school course in 1894. 
For two years he was in the high school at Santa Paula and had a busi- 
ness college course in Ventura for six months. With this preparation 
he began working his father's ranch and continued to find ample employ- 
ment for his energies there until the death of his father in 1900. Since 
then he has been active manager of the 292 acres comprised in the old 
homestead and timber claim, and in 1903 he personally bought no acres 
adjoining the Keene estate. At the present time the management of this 
property is divided about as follows : Forty acres in vineyard, ten acres 
in walnuts, sixteen acres in apricots, sixteen acres now being planted to 
lemons, and the rest in pasture land. 

Mr. Herman Keene is a member of the Native Sons of California, the 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Eagles, the Fraternal Brotherhood, 



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554 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

and politically is a republican as was his father. In Santa Paula July ii, 
1907, he married Vesta Fansler, a native of Iowa and a daughter of John 
Pansier, who came to the Santa Clara Valley, Ventura County, in 1887. 

Chauncey I. Crane represents the second generation of a family of 
successful horticulturists and ranchers in Ventura County. He is a son 
of Mr. J. L. Crane, whose business connections and whose experience 
during his active career are detailed on other pages. 

In Saticoy, Ventura County, November 4, 1877, Chauncey I. Crane 
was bom, and he grew up on his father's place and was a student in the 
public schools until he reached the age of sixteen. After that he found 
regular employment on his father's ranch and in the varied business 
aflfairs controlled by his father up to 1896. Leaving home, he then became 
a farmer for himself in Orange County, but in 1909 returned to Ventura 
County and took charge of his father's fifty acre ranch in the vicinity 
of Santa Paula. He has forty acres of this planted in walnut and the 
rest is a lima bean plantation. 

Chauncey I. Crane is a member of the native sons of California, of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, is a democratic voter and affiliated 
with the Universalist Church. On March 15, 1900, he married in Los 
Angeles Miss Edna M. McLean, a native of Missouri. They are the par- 
ents of two children : Elmer Jefferson, fourteen years of age, is attend- 
ing the public school, and Nellie May is also a school girl. 

Willis A. Lowe. Enterprising and up-to-date methods of mer- 
chandising are a necessary prerequisite to success in that line in the 
progressive city of Santa Barbara. One of the men who have achieved 
special success in that line is Mr. Willis A. Lowe, the well known con- 
fectioner and grocer. 

Still a young man, not yet forty years of age, Mr. Willis A. Lowe 
has already won a substantial and independent place in the world of 
affairs. He was bom in LaBelle, Missouri, May 10, 1877, a son of 
Martin and Elizabeth (Wilson) Lowe. His early life was spent in 
Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma, attending the public schools in the 
latter two states, and he had a varied experience in different lines of 
work in the southwest until 1905, when he came to the Pacific coast 
locating at Paso Robles when he went into the confectionery business, 
he remained there until 1908, when he came to Santa Barbara where 
in November of that year he bought the confectionery store of Whit- 
tingham's and was its active proprietor Gyi years. When the 
San Marcos Building, the largest business structure in the city, was 
completed, Mr. Lowe opened a store there and has made it one of the 
finest confectionery establishments in Southern California. In 1916 with 
his brother he branched out still further in merchandising, opening the 
Lowe Brothers Grocery store. 

Mr. Lowe is independent in politics and is fraternally affiliated with 
the Knights of Pythias. In Cloudchief, Oklahoma, in November, 1899, 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 555 

he married Miss Lx)la Barney. Their two children are Lola Lois and 
Willis A., Jr. 

Denoon Howard Johnson. An able representative of the agricul- 
tural and horticultural interests of Santa Barbara County, Denoon How- 
ard Johnson is a valued resident of Naples, where he owns and operates 
a large, well appointed and well managed ranch devoted to the raising 
of lima beans and walnuts. He was bom October 28, 1838, in Pennsyl- 
vania, where his parents lived several years. His father, John Johnson, 
born in Tennessee, of German ancestry, married Abigail Howard, who 
was bom in Pennsylvania, and was of English descent. 

Completing his early studies in the public schools, D. H. Johnson 
moved with his parents to Iowa while yet a boy, and there gained his 
first knowledge of the various branches of farming. After living in that 
state twenty-one years, he decided to make a change, and woo fortune 
under more favorable conditions. In 1863 he, therefore, crossed the 
plains, and much more difficult proposition than it would be at the present 
time, and for three years followed his chosen industry in Sonoma County, 
California. Coming to Southern California in 1866, he spent one year 
in Santa Barbara County; about seven years on a ranch in Los Angeles 
County ; one year in Ventura County, and then retumed to Santa Barbara 
County. In the spring of 1883 Mr. Johnson located near Naples, at Dos 
Pueblos Canyon, where he began farming on an extensive scale by begin- 
ning the improvement of a ranch containing 208 acres. He not only raised 
strawberries and small fruit at first, but built up quite a business as a stock 
raiser and dealer. Mr. Johnson has since varied his crops, at the present 
time making a specialty of raising lima beans and walnuts, from both of 
which he gathers large and profitable harvests. 

On October 15, 1870, Mr. Johnson married, at Healdsburg, Sonoma 
County, Miss Alice Allen, who was bom in Ohio, where her father, Wil- 
liam Allen, was for many years engaged in work as an expert carpenter. 
The union of Mr. and Mrs. Johnson has been blessed by the birth of five 
children, namely : Abbie L., who became the wife of William J. Ruther- 
ford, a stock raiser and dealer in Santa Miaria, has three children, Mary, 
Wilfred and Helen; Vesta L., wife of S. F. Smith, who is engaged in 
farming on a part of Mr. Johnson's estate, has one child, Alice; William, 
who has charge of a portion of the parental ranch, is married, and has two 
children, Ellen and Lester; Gertrude, who married J. Lane, of Goleta, 
has one child, Doris, and May, the wife of Roy F. HoflFman, of Oxnard, 
and they have two children, Gladys and Mildred. Politically Mr. John- 
son invariably votes the democratic ticket, and religiously he is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

John Pico. In that fine community of which Goleta is the natural 
center, and of the weighty citizens, prosperous business men, and an 
individual whose name is never mentioned except in terms of respect and 
honor, is Mr. JohA Pico, whose relationship with this part of Califomia 
extends beyond his own years, since his family had been identified with 
the country from the time it was part of old Mexico. 



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556 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Mr. John Pico has spent his life largely in and around Goleta, and was 
bom there August ii, 1871. His father is Miguel Pico, who is now living 
practically retired at the age of seventy-eight. He was bom in Santa 
Barbara County, and his early youth was spent there before the California 
gold excitement and before the American conquest. Santa Barbara was 
a very primitive village within his early recollections, and he has been a 
witness to the remarkable changes that have come over industrial, social 
and civic life. The principal industry in his youth was the grazing of 
cattle, and he himself was a vacquero. He represents the same family 
which produced Governor Pico, whose name is one of the most honored 
in the early annals of the State of California. John Pico's maternal 
ancestors were also prominent, being the Romero family of Montecito. 
His mother, Guadaloupe (Romero) Pico, was bom at Montecito, and 
died in 1873. 

An education in the common schools gave John Pico the literary foun- 
dation for a career which has been one of hard work and continued 
advancement. Some of his early experiences were upon a farm, but in 
1892 he apprenticed himself to learn the trade of blacksmith. Not long 
afterward he set up a blacksmith shop and added to it facilities for iron 
working, and this has been his chief business at Goleta ever since. It is 
the leading industry of its kind in Goleta, and he has all the modem 
equipment for performing such iron work as is required in this commun- 
ity, and the business of horseshoeing for the ranchers in the country 
around is also a service for which his shop is noted. Mr. Pico has been 
industrious and a good manager, and enjoys all the material comforts of 
life. His home at Goleta is conceded to be one of the finest on Kellogg 
Avenue. 

In his home town on December 14, 1902, he married Avery (Shearll) 
Kellogg. Mrs. Pico was bom in Texas, a daughter of Thomas Shearll, 
of that state. Mr. and Mrs. Pico have four children, all of them the 
children of her first marriage: Eugene Kellogg, who is a graduate of the 
State University at Berkeley, and is now employed near Sacramento; 
May Kellogg, a teacher at Santa Maria; Irma Kellogg, at home; and 
Frank Kellogg, who is leaming the trades of blacksmith and iron worker 
under his step- father. 

The esteem accorded Mr. Pico in his community has been manifested 
in various ways. Under the old election laws of the state he represented 
the republican party at various county conventions. For the past two 
years he has served as constable for his district, and his term in that office 
mns on indefinitely. The only order to which he ever belonged was the 
Native Sons of the Golden West, but he gave up his membership some 
years ago. 

Alex F. Harmer. That Southern California, *'wherc every prospect 
pleases," was by very nature of its being destined to challenge the 
brush of the artist was a foregone conclusion incident upon the march of 
development and progress, but that this idyllic section of a great state 
should have gained so able and loyal an art exploiter of its manifold 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 557 

charms as Alex F. Harmer, the revered pioneer and distinguished 
exponent of California art production, was a matter that rested upon 
the favor of the gods. What he has done for California through the 
medium of his masterly canvases is a matter for enduring gratitude on 
the part of the state and also of all lovers of true art. He has not been 
of the dillitante but has shown definite mastery of his art, for the sake 
of which he has endured much and wrought gallantly. He is today one 
of the revered and influential members of the California art colony, 
maintains his home in the beautiful city of Santa Barbara and it is 
specially gratifying to be able to accord him recognition in this publica- 
tion. From an appreciative estimate of the life and labors of Mr. 
Harmer are taken the following extracts, which are well worthy of 
perpetuation in this connection: 

'^Whether by shrewd deliberation or by natural gravitation, Alex F. 
Harmer has made a field peculiarly his own. No other painter has given 
so much attention to California of the old times, and for that matter, no 
other painter knows the subject one-half so well. The plausible sug- 
gestion that a great master might have done more with the marvelous 
art material of our southwestern border is, after all, impertinent; for 
the great masters have not cared to risk their skins where Mr. Harmer 
learned his material. Nor is the invidious to Mr. Harmer. The fact 
that he led an uncommon life and has taken his higher education in art 
where few other artists would dare to go, does not by any means indicate 
that his work needs such apology. The simple fact is that it greatly 
enhances the value of his art. To his technical skill, which is, within 
certain limitations, far from ordinary, is added the rare distinction of 
accuracy beyond that of anyone else who has presented like subjects. 
He is particularly and indisputably the artist of the Apaches and the old- 
time Califomians, — with many handsome successes in other lines. His 
sympathy with these specific motifs is unmistakable and his experience 
with them has been long and romantic. I know of no one else, with half 
his talent as an artist, who has had a tenth of his touch with this frontier 
life, — one of the most picturesque the world has ever seen. A sensitive 
boy wTio would enlist as a common soldier that he might get to what was 
then, indeed, the Far West and paint it, had something in him.'* 

Breaking the narrative from which the above quotations have been 
made, there may be entered a brief review of the earlier stages in the life 
history of Mr. Harmer, but later, without distinctive evidence of 
quotation, further recourse will be taken to the splendid tribute from 
which excerpt already has been made. 

Mr. Harmer was bom at Newark, New Jersey, on the 21st of 
August, 1855, and is a son of S. B. and Matilda (Ward) Harmer, both 
natives of Pennsylvania. The Harmer family was founded in America 
in the colonial era and representatives of the same served as patriot 
soldiers in the Revolution. Josiah Harmer was the first adjutant gen- 
eral of Pennsylvania, in the time of General Washington, and closely 
allied to the family was the fine old Quaker family named Sharpless. 



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558 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

The mother of Mr. Harmer was a decendant of one of the early Holland 
Dutch families of colonial Pennsylvania. 

Alex F. Harmer attended the public schools until he was twelve 
years of age and his later educational discipline has been that gained in 
the college of his own work and experience. As a mere boy he gave 
evidence of his artistic talent, and at the age of eleven years he sold his 
first oil painting, for which he received the munificent sum of two dollars. 
By working as a telegraph messenger boy he saved a few dollars, and 
when but thirteen years of age he set forth for the West, a land of 
veritable enchantment to him. By degrees he finally made his way to 
Lincoln, Nebraska, and it is needless to say that his experiences were 
varied during this adolescent adventure. When fifteen years of age he 
determined to study art, and with this purpose in view he began working 
his way back to the East. At Cincinnati, after a vain search for work, 
he enlisted in the United States Army, for a term of five years. After 
some time had elapsed he was assigned to Troop B, First United States 
Cavalry, then stationed at Benecia, California, but he was held on 
detached service at headquarters. Thus he had occasion to serve as 
hospital steward at Benecia and later at Halleck, Nevada, and after two 
years* service he was granted an honorable discharge, this having been 
requested by him in order that he might pursue his art studies, from which 
adverse circumstances had deflected him. At the age of nineteen years 
he made the return journey to the East, by way of the Isthmus of 
Panama, and in the City of Philadelphia he obtained employment in a 
photograph studio. In the meanwhile he gave every possible moment 
to drawing, and finally his work attracted the attention of William T. 
Richards, the later famous Joseph Pennel and also Sartain, the great 
engraver. Through the good offices of these representative men and 
through recognition of his ability, he was admitted to the Pennsylvania 
Academy of Fine Arts, and after two years of earnest application in this 
institution he decided to go to the Southwest and "paint something." 
Not having financial resources adequate to compass this object, he again 
enlisted in the army, with the understanding that he should be assigned 
to active service in Arizona, where the Indians were then habitually upon 
the war path. There he passed two very active years. As a member of 
Troop L, Sixth Cavalry, for one year, he did not lack adventure and 
opportunity to study the Indians and the frontier at first hand, and he 
was then assigned to duty at the headquarters of the great Indian fighter, 
Gen. George Crook, the "Grey Fox," who had as high right-hand 
man Capt. John B. Bourke, famous as a scientist as well as a soldier. 
In the great campaign of 1883, when General Crook penetrated the 
Sierra Madre of Mexico and brought out the wily Geronimo, Mr. Harmer 
was the only enlisted man from headquarters to be selected as a member 
of this expeditionary party. On the return from this historic incursion 
he was, by his personal request, transferred to the command of Captain 
Crawford, at the San Carlos Indian Reservation, where he continued his 
study of the Apaches. A few months later, through the efforts of Gen- 
eral Crook, he procured his discharge from the army, and he then 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 559 

returned to Philadelphia for another course at the academy. Defraying 
his expenses by his work as an illustrator, he continued his studies at 
the academy a little more than one year, and then his old friend Captain 
Bourke, prevailed upon him to go again to Arizona — this time not as a 
soldier but as a friend and companion. At this time Mr. Harmer was 
enabled to make interesting trips through the territory with General 
Crook, and later he enjoyed similar privileges in company with J. Arm- 
strong Chanler, of New York. 

Finally Mr. Harmer established his residencs in Los Angeles and 
began his intimate and appreciative study of the old Spanish missions 
and the incidents and conditions of early California life. Later he 
passed a year in the interior of Mexico, and finally, in 1893, ^f^^r 
another term in the academy at Philadelphia, where he studied under the 
famous artist Thomas Elkins, he established his permanent home in 
Santa Barbara, California, where the passing years have recorded his 
production of many fine canvases depicting California scenery and 
frontier, Indian and army life. Many of his paintings have found 
place in the homes of wealthy and distinguished families in the different 
sections of the United States, and his fame as an artist rests secure in 
results accomplished and in the originality not only born of genius but 
of broad and uncommon experience. Within the years of his life in the 
West Mr. Harmer made a most comprehensive and valuable collection 
of Indian relics of various order, and this fine collection was displayed 
in the Hopkins School of Art, in the City of San Francisco, which was 
later destroyed by fire. The people of California delight to do honor to 
this sterling and talented artist, and here his circle of friends is limited 
only by that of his acquaintances. 

Mr. Harmer gives his allegiance to the republican party, but the arena 
of practical politics has never had any lure for him, though he takes a 
loyal interest in all things pertaining to the community welfare and Ihat 
of his native land. In the metropolis of the old Keystone State he holds 
membership in the Philadelphia Sketch Club, and in a fraternal way he 
is affiliated with the Woodmen of the World. 

. In 1893 w^s solemnized the marriage of Mr. Harmer to Miss 
Felicidad E. Adabie, who was bom and reared in Santa Barbara County, 
a representative of one of the early French and Spanish families of Cali- 
fornia, and a daughter of Domingo Adabie, who was the owner of one 
of the large ranches of Santa Barbara County and who was murdered in 
the early '60s. Mrs. Harmer is a woman of culture and gracious pres- 
ence and is a popular factor in the representative social life of her native 
city and county. Mr. and Mrs. Harmer have seven children, Ynez, Alex- 
ander B., Ernest, Helen, Ethel, Olga and Alfred S. 

Mark BradLey. Santa Barbara County in 1916 claims as one of its 
efficient and popular public officials the native son of the county whose name 
introduces this paragraph, Mr. Bradley being the incumbent of the office 
of county recorder, in which his administration is fully justifying his 
selection for the important post. 



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560 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Mark Bradley was bom at Montecito, Santa Barbara County, Cali- 
ifomia, on the 14th of August, 1873, and is a scion of one of the sterling 
pioneer families of this favored commonwealth. He is a son of John and 
Velona (Van Buren) Bradley, the former of whom was bom in the State 
of Michigan and the latter in New York State, she having been of close 
kinship with Martin Van Buren, President of the United States. John 
Bradley was one of the honored pioneer citizens of Santa Barbara at the 
time of his death, in 1902, and his devoted wife survived him by only 
six months. Of their two sons the subject of this review is the younger, 
the elder having been Frederick C, who was elected county clerk of Santa 
Barbara County in 1895 and whose death occurred in the autumn of the 
following year. 

John Bradley was a member of a pioneer family of Michigan, in 
which state he was reared and educated. In 1851 he was one of the adven- 
turous young men who made the trip across the plains to the newly dis- 
covered gold fields of Califomia, and he continued to be actively iden- 
tified with gold-mining operations in Placer County until 1858, when he 
returned to the East and organized a company to work the mining claims 
held by him in Placer County. He set forth on his retum trip to Cali- 
fomia on the day that President Lincoln issued the declaration of war 
against the Confederate states and he was accompanied by several of 
those who thereafter continued to be associated with him in the working 
of the mining claims until 1871. He then removed to Montecito and 
became one of the progressive and influential citizens of Santa Barbara 
County, though he never consented to become a candidate for public 
office of any kind. He constmcted and exploited the first race track in 
this county, was notable for his civic loyalty and enterprise and was a 
leader in movements that tended to conserve the social and material 
advancement of the community. Generous, buoyant and whole-souled, 
he won and retained the loyal esteem of a host of friends, and his home 
was always known as a center of generous hospitality, with his gracious 
wife as its popular chatelaine. He operated his race track in connection 
with his farm of seventy-two acres, near Montecito, until 1877. Mr. 
Bradley was a republican in his political proclivities and was long and 
actively affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mark Bradley continued to attend the public schools of Santa Barbara 
County until 1888, when, at the age of fifteen years, he met with an injury 
that virtually incapacitated him for the ensuing three years. Upon recov- 
ering his physical well-being he found employment and also showed his 
ambition by attending the Lincoln night school, in the City of San Fran- 
cisco, where he became proficient in stenography and typewriting. He 
remained in San Francisco four years and then retumed to Santa Bar- 
bara, where he assumed a clerical and confidential position in the office 
of Senator John J. Boyce. When the senator went to Alaska Mr. Bradley 
accepted a position in the office of Richard & Carrier, with whom he 
remained four years. In addition to his stenographic work in this law 
office he also did court reporting and made record of preHminary exam- 
inations and other work in connection with the courts. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 561 

In November, 1902, Mr. Bradley was elected county recorder, as can- 
didate on the democratic ticket, and no better voucher for the efficiency 
of his administration and for his personal popularity can be offered than 
by the statement that he has continued the incumbent of this office to the 
present time — by successive re-elections in 1906, 1910 and 1914. He has 
been an influential figure in the councils and compaign activities of the 
democratic party in his native county, has been almost constant in his 
service as a delegate to the county conventions of his party and for fifteen 
years he served as secretary of the Democratic County Central Committee, 
his incumbency of the position having continued until legislative enact- 
ment prcdiibited county officials of California from serving on central 
committees of political parties. 

Mr. Bradley was a charter member of Santa Barbara Lodge, No. 613, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of which he is past exalted 
ruler; he is past president of the local organization of the Native Sons 
of the Golden West; and he is affiliated with the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, the Improved Order of Red Men and the Independent Order of 
Foresters. He and his wife are communicants of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church and in former years he gave effective service as a member 
of church choirs. 

On the loth of June, 1901, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Brad- 
ley to Miss Frances Holden, of Danville, Illinois, in which city she was 
bom and reared. Her father served several years as a member of the 
Illinois Legislature and was a prominent and influential citizen and busi- 
ness man, the extensive lumber business which he developed being now 
conducted by one of his sons. Mr. and Mrs. Bradley have two sons, 
Philip H. and Mark, Jr., both of whom are attending the public schools 
of Santa Barbara. 

Lauren E. Mills. Coming to California in 1903, with the average 
young American's and college graduate's ambition to make something of 
himself in the world, Lauren E. Mills took up ranching near Santa Paula. 
In the past fifteen years his interests have steadily grown and widened, 
and besides the business under his explicit control he is closely associated 
with several of the large companies and organizations which are bring- 
ing system and mutual profit into the leading industries of Southern 
California. 

After some years of ranching experience as a tenant, Mr. Mills in 
191 1 bought 210 acres near Santa Paula. Of that tract he now has 
twelve acres in apricots, forty acres in lemons and the balance in beans 
and hay. He also owns a quarter interest in the Mountain View Citrus 
Company. Mr. Mills is now a director in the following organizations. 
Santa Paul Citrus Association, Santa Paula Lima Beans Growers Asso- 
ciation, Santa Paula Walnut Growers Association, Mountain View Citrus 
Company, Foothill Water Company, Ventura County Fair Association, 
Farm Bureau of Ventura County. 

He was bom in Ann Arbor, Michigan, September i, 1880, a son of 
F. E. and 1. M. Mills. He grew up in that university town 



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562 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

which was his birthplace, attended the grammar and high schools, gradu- 
ating from the latter in 1897 and then took the full literary course in the 
University of Michigan, where he was graduated A. B. in 1902. During 
the first year out of college Mr. Mills was a traveling representative of 
the Olds Motor Company, being employed in the establishment of 
branches all over the United States. 

He is a member of the Masonic Order at Santa Paula and of the 
Royal Arch Chapter at Oxnard. He is a republican. In Santa Paula 
in August, 1906, he married Miss Georgia 0*Hara, a native of Santa 
Paula and a daughter of William and Mary Ellen O'Hara, pioneers of 
Ventura County, both now deceased. Their three children are William 
Elmer, Rutli Elizabeth and Laura Allen, aged respectively seven, five 
and four years, WiUiam E. being now a student in the public schools. 

William O'Hara is a native son of California and of Ventura 
County, where he was bom January 21, 1880. By the success 
with which he has managed his private business affairs he is well fitted to 
stand as a representative of one of the earliest pioneer families of the 
Santa Paula Valley. 

His father was the late William O'Hara, who died March 12, 1913. 
William O'Hara was born in Bangor, Maine, May 4, 1841, a son of 
Henry and Nancy (Galaher) O'Hara, who were born in Ireland in 1804 
and 1806 respectively. Henry, Sr. and wife were married in 1824, and 
soon afterward emigrated to America, settling on a farm in the State of 
Maine. In 1849 Henry O'Hara came out to California, spending two 
years in the mining regions of Tuolumne County. Going back to Maine, 
he took his family to the State of Illinois and lived there for a few years, 
but in 1867 came out to Contra Costa County, California. 

The late William O'Hara spent two years as a miner in Virginia 
City, Nevada, and subsequently took part in a fruitless expedition in 
search of gold into the Territory of Arizona. The expedition comprised 
a hundred men, and suffered greatly from Indian attacks and endured 
many hardships. 

It was in 1865 when William O'Hara came to Santa Paula and bought 
150 acres of the Briggs tract. As a pioneer he was associated with such 
other early settlers as John Montgomery, E. B. Higgins, Peter Boyle 
and William McCormack. After selling his first purchase he bought 
160 acres 2^ miles west of Santa Paula, but it required nine 
years of litigation before he could perfect his title. Building a small 
house, cooking his own meals, he spent twelve years there as a stock 
raiser. For many years he was one of the leading stock men in the 
valley. Gradually he devoted his land to such crops as barley, com and 
other grains, but he continued stock raising and often had as high as 
3,000 head of cattle on the range. Though one of the earliest settlers he 
was to the last unusually progressive, and was willing to try out almost 
every crop introduced into Southern California during his active career. 
More than twenty-five years ago he engaged in the raising of lima beans, 
and at one time he planted practically an entire forest of gum trees. He 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 563 

was interested with several relatives in a tract of oil lands and was one 
of the pioneers in the development of these resources of California. In 
1887 William O'Hara replaced his early humble home with one of the 
finest mansions in Ventura County. The house was one of almost luxu- 
riant appointments and was surrounded with beautiful grounds, trees 
and shrubs. 

The late William O'Hara was a republican who cast his first vote for 
Lincoln, was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
is well remembered by hundreds of his old friends and associates for the 
sterling integrity of his character. In 1877 he married Miss Mary E. 
Kelley, who was bom in Napa, California, February 17, 1858, a daugh- 
ter of Michael Kelley of Ireland. William O'Hara had two children: 
Henry and Georgia, the latter bom December 12, 1886. 

Mr. Henry O'Hara received his education in the grammar and high 
schools of Santa Paula, and also attended for two years St. Vincent's 
College in Los Angeles. Returning home he found employment on his 
father's ranch for a couple of years, and then turned his attention to the 
oil industry. He worked in almost every capacity in the oil fields in the 
state up to 191 1. His father then gave him thirty-five acres in Ventura 
County, and he has since developed this largely to the growing of lemons, 
having a grove of twenty-five acres. On the death of his father he in- 
herited sixty-five acres in the O'Hara Canyon, and has made this a bean 
plantation. He is also one of the large stockholders in the Mount View 
Citms Company of Ventura County. 

Mr. O'Hara is a member of the Native Sons of CaHfomia and a 
republican. On June 13, 1906, he married Myrtie Provin at San Diego. 

Walter R. Nichols. As a result of the development of the past 
thirty or forty years one of the most interesting and attractive and valu- 
able sections of Santa Barbara County is the Dos Pueblos Canyon. The 
pioneer American settler there was the late Walter R. Nichols, who more 
than thirty-five years ago went there with his wife, and she is now the 
pioneer woman of that locality. The part played by the late Walter R. 
Nichols was one of consistent effort and progressive advancement not 
only as a developer of his own land but also as a good citizen. 

He was bom in Springfield, Illinois, in 1851, a son of William and 
Mary Nichols. After gaining an education in the public schools of his 
native state he set out for the land of his dreams, California. 

It was in 1880 that he came into the Dos Pueblos Canyon, where he 
homesteaded 160 acres. Thenceforward to the end of his life he was 
engaged in clearing, improving and cultivating this fine tract, and left it 
in a splendid condition at the time of his death on August 13, 1896. He 
was the type of citizen whom the people of Santa Barbara County can 
consistently honor. 

Since his death the work of the ranch has been conducted by his chil- 
dren, and it is one of the very fine estates in that part of Santa Barbara 
County. Mrs. Nichols still resides there. In 1883 ^^- Nichols married 
Matilda Hanshew, a daughter of Joseph and Maria (Bird) Hanshew. 



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564 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Mrs. Nichols was bom in Brooklyn, New York, but was brought to Cal- 
ifornia as a girl, and as already stated was the first woman resident in the 
Dos Pueblos Canyon. With the assistance of her children she has suc- 
cessfully carried on the old ranch, and is one of the highly esteemed 
citizens of that community. Her children are : Walter R., now deceased ; 
Eliabeth, Emily, William and Faith. 

The late Mr. Nichols was a republican and was a member of the 
Masonic order. 

William H. Martin, of Santa Barbara, is not only a veteran Cali- 
fomian, but a man whose long life has been spent in a practical and con- 
structive service to the state. He is one of that small coterie of men who 
knew California as the land of gold in the exciting years of the decade 
of the '50s. He early became identified with the colonization work, and 
that has been the current of his large and varied achievements. 

As his e;cperiences and activities since he first came to California in 
1849 ^^^ 3- P^rt ^f the intimate history of the entire state, only a few of 
the more important points can be considered, since a full history of his 
life would be a subject for a volume at least, and if written would doubt- 
less be as illustrative of California's changing history as that of any 
individual career. 

He was bom in Baltimore, Maryland, March 2, 1831, and comes of 
old American stock. His people were Quakers. His father, Dr. Samuel 
B. Martin, was also a native of Baltimore, and had finished his medical 
education early enough so that he served as a surgeon in the American 
Army during the latter part of the Revolutionary war. For twenty years 
he held the office of port surgeon at Baltimore. He had a Icmg and hon- 
orable career, and died at the age of ninety-three. It seems probable 
that his son William H. will live as long, since the latter has already 
passed his eighty-fifth birthday and is still hale and vigorous and looking 
after his business responsibilities every day. 

When William H. Martin was a boy he entered the original Adams 
Express Company, in the years when the express service was just being 
developed and when all its equipment and facilities were extremely crude. 
It was in the capacity of company messenger that William H. Martin 
first came to California via Panama, in December, 1849. It illustrates 
the small volume of the company's business at that time, when it is stated 
that Mr. Martin had under his supervision only twenty trunks of express 
matter and letters. He represented this company as messenger imtil 
1855. In that year he was elected clerk of Placer County, and filled that 
office until 1857. 

He was next employed as messenger by the Wells, Fargo & Co., and 
all told made about twenty-five trips from New York via Panama to San 
Francisco, and two trips via Cape Horn. 

It was his thorough knowledge of California conditions, his experi- 
ence gained in the transportation service, and his influential connections 
both East and West, that led Mr. Martin, in 1868, to engage in the colon- 
izing business, a work which has employed his best talents and energies 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 565 

now for nearly half a century. Mr. Martin is now land commissiQner 
of the Pan-American Colonizing Company, which was formerly the 
California Emigrant Union. This is undoubtedly one of the largest organ- 
izations of its kind in America, and has a capital stock of $1,000,000. 
Its representative and branch offices are found in all the leading cities 
of California and also in New York. 

Years ago in a circular sent out to correspondents in the eastern states 
Mr. Martin alluded to his individual connection with the colonizing com- 
pany, and gave some facts of history which are deserving of permanent 
record. The circular mentioned reads in part as follows : 

"We have been engaged in the work of giving reliable information 
about the Pacific coast and colonizing lai^e tracts of land since 1868, and 
have always been successful in obtaining desirable settlers. In 1868, at 
the suggestion of Hon. Leland Stanford, President of the Central Pacific 
Railroad at that time ; Hon. Oliver Ames, first President of the Union 
Pacific Railroad; Major Richard P. Hammond, Irving M. Scott, builder 
of the U. S. S. Oregon; H. J. Booth, William T. Coleman, Alexander 
Weill, of Lazard Freres; Jesse and Abraham Seligman, Governor 
Henry H. Haight, W. W. Montague, Henry L. Davis, Professor George 
Davidson, Henry M. Newhall, Horace Davis, Captain N. T. Smith 
and others, all members of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce; 
we established the International Emigrant Union in the City of Bal- 
timore, Maryland, for the purpose of encouraging a good class of for- 
eigners from Europe, Canada and the eastern United States to California. 
We selected the City of Baltimore as our eastern headquarters, as the 
North German Lloyd had just made its steamship landing there, and 
that in connection with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad offered superior 
advantages to those who desired the Pacific coast. The Baltimore office 
was managed by Hon. Oden Bowie, Governor of Maryland, president; 
Captain George A. Coleman, vice president; Richard Colvin, secretary 
and treasurer; W. E. Banks, mayor of Baltimore, W. H. Small, J. P. 
Amidon, Bernard Gilpin, W. H. Baltzell, M. D., Lewis M. Cole, G. W. P. 
Coates and others. This organization, after five years of good work, 
was made a state institution by the legislature of Maryland. 

"Early in 1869 the California Emigrant Union was incorporated in 
San Francisco by members of the Chamber of Commerce, headed by 
William T. Coleman, W. C. Ralston, C. T. Hopkins, Major Richard P. 
Hammond, Abraham Seligman, Henry M. Newhall, A. N. Towne, Milton 
S. Latham, ML S. Severence, H. P. Bowie, John J. Valentine, Hon. John 
Bidwell, Hon. George C. Perkins, A. D. Sharon, Jotham Bixby, Hon. 
George Stoneman and others. 

'This corporation was without capital stock but had a list of sub- 
scribers, members of the Chamber of Commerce, bankers, merchants, 
railroad companies, steamship companies and others, creating a fund of 
$36,000 a year to and including 1899, when its charter expired. It was 
then succeeded by the International Colonizing Company, a California 
corporation with a capital of $500,000 — 50,000 shares at ten dollars each. 

"The principal object of this company is to take charge of large 
Vol. n— 6 



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566 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

estates, subdivide them into small farms, and dispose of them to settlers 
at reasonable prices and upon easy terms. In locating settlers upon our 
lands we follow a long existing rule not to encourage any intending set- 
tlers to locate on any tract of land in our state unless he can have at his 
disposal one thousand dollars. We do this because so many have come 
to California with only a few hundred dollars, made failures and returned 
to their old homes denouncing the country, climate, etc." 

The last paragraph quoted deserves special emphasis. Undoubtedly 
the principle of confining the feelings of this company with prospective 
settlers who had the generally accepted minimum of capital necessary 
for success, is largely responsible for the uniform prosperity of the many 
colonies that have been established under these offices and the high 
standard which the name of the company has maintained in this state 
and elsewhere. 

To recount all of Mr. Martin's experiences as a colonizer would be 
to give the history of a large number of California's best known cities 
and communities. In a series of interesting reminiscences which were 
published several years ago by Harry Ellington Brook in the Los Angeles 
Review, the author refers to several of the notable enterprises under- 
taken by the California Emigrant Union as now the International Colon- 
izing Company. Mr. Brook had come to California in 1876, and he 
became financially*interested in one of two important colonies then being 
promoted by the California Emigrant Union. One of these was the 
Fresno Colony and the other was the Indiana Colony, as it was then 
known. The Indiana Colony is now the City of Pasadena. He states that 
the land in the Indiana Colony was then listed at $50 an acre, and after 
forty years it could hardly be bought for $1,000 a front foot. 

As special interest to this publication is the following paragraphs 
from Mr. Brook's reminiscences: *Tn March, 1874, the California Emi- 
grant Union, assisted by General J. H. Shields, of Illinois, Frederic 
Adams, of Santa Cruz, California, O. L. Abbott, Jacob Parsons, of Santa 
Barbara, W. H. Martin, of San Francisco, formed a company known as 
the Lompoc Valley Land Company, and purchased the Lompoc Rancho in 
the northern part of Santa Barbara county (46,000 acres) from Colonel 
W. W. Hollister, of Santa Barbara, at $10 per acre. It was immediately 
surveyed, and on November 9 an auction sale took place in charge of 
Henry M. Newhall & Company, auctioneers of San Francisco. This 
continued for one week, the 20, 40 and 80 acre tracts selling from fifteen 
to twenty dollars per acre. During the evening the town lots of Lompoc 
City, about 1,200 acres, sold from fifty to one hundred and fifty dollars per 
lot and upwards — 50x150 in size. During 1874 and 1876 sufficient land 
was sold to pay off the entire amount due Colonel Hollister. To-day 
(1916) land at Lompoc ranges from one to one hundred and fifty dollars 
per acre. Lompoc from the beginning was a strict Prohibition settle- 
ment." 

At the present time Mr. Martin is engaged in colonizing Santa Mar- 
garita in San Luis Obispo County. This is a tract of 20,000 acres, 
twenty miles south of Paso Robles, Hot Springs, and was originally a 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 567 

large and well improved ranch which has been subdivided so as to con- 
stitute a number of small tracts for individual home owners. It is in both 
the fruit and grain region of Southern California, and is one of the few 
sections where irrigation is not practiced and is not required for the 
production of fruit and grain. The same restriction as to the capital 
required for initial investment has been pursued in this colony, and since 
it was put on the market Santa Margarita has been the home of many 
prosperous and progressive citizens, constituting an important contribu- 
tion to San Luis Obispo County. 

About a year ago the honorable president of Peru, knowing of this 
company's work in California, requested its land commissioner to under- 
take colonizing the lands of Peru. Mr. W. H. Martin, the company's 
land commissioner, having visited Peru often, visited Peru again and in 
making subsequent arrangements for said work, induced the directors 
to change the company title to the "Pan American Colonizing Company*' 
in order to properly handle land in any foreign country. 

In Peru the new company has a concession of 1,600,000 acres, an old 
Spanish grant, which is offered at 30 cents per acre, and payable only as 
sold to settlers. It also has offered several other Spanish grants of 
150,000, 80,000 and 50,000 acres, in good locations on the coast of Peru. 

During last August the Hon. Frederico A. Pezet, minister from the 
Republic of Peru to the United States, visited the Potter Hotel in Santa 
Barbara for several days and consulted daily with officers of the company 
and it has been determined that in all the colonizing work to be done in 
the Republic of Peru in the future his experience and advice will be 
gladly accepted. 

Our colonizing work in Peru will commence in 191 7. 

In accepting the proposition to assist the Republic of Peru, South 
America, the company will not relax its work in California, as shown by 
the fact that' it is at present contemplating colonizing a 20,000-acre tract 
in the Cuyama Valley, Santa Barbara County, belonging to Hon. George 
C. Perkins, of Oakland, California, who has been United States senator 
for more than thirty years, and was one of the directors of the *'Califor- 
nia Emigrant Union" when it was incorporated. 

Mr. Martin is a republican in politics, and was able to vote in the 
first campaign of that party in 1856. In 1854 he became a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is now one of the oldest 
members of that order in California. He was married in 1854, and is 
the father of four children, three daughters and one son. His only son 
was in the United States Navy and was on his way to Manila with Admiral 
Dewey at the outbreak of the Spanish-American war, when he died at 
Yokohama of fever. 

Mrs. Marie Bruno. Those who know her story intimately say that 
there is hardly a more remarkable woman in Santa Barbara County 
than Mrs. Marie Bruno. She has lived here for thirty-one years, and by 
her own resourcefulness and energy has acquired a competency and 
enjoys one of the handsome homes of Santa Barbara. 



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568 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

She was bom at Cava, Italy, May i6, 1850. She married Joseph 
Bruno, a tailor, whom she left behind in Italy. 

On June 18, 1885, she sailed from Havre, France, to America. While 
she herself was not ill during the voyage many of the passengers were, 
and on account of her devotion and skillful attendance to the sick on 
board she earned the title of "Little Captain." The vessel on which she 
crossed the Atlantic was the Normandie, then making its first trip, and 
setting the record for transatlantic sailing, arriving in New York City 
seven days after leaving France. 

Mrs. Bruno arrived in Santa Barbara on the nth of July, 1885. 
Here she was employed on the ranch at Carpinteria as a cook, the Del de 
Mar Ranch, now owned by Mr. J. R. Fithian. She supervised the kitchen 
and the cuisine of that ranch for twenty-four years. Out of her earn- 
ings she made the money which started her on her successful business 
career. She bought from her savings her present property at 923 Bath 
Street in Santa Barbara. She was one of the first sixteen stockholders 
in the Santa Barbara Transfer Company, but later sold her interests 
to Homer N. Duffey, now president and general manager of that com- 
pany. Some years ago Mrs. Bruno paid $1,500 for a ranch at Lompoc, 
and afterwards sold it for $5,000 with the stipulation that should asbestos 
or oil be found on the ranch, which had already shown traces of those 
deposits, she is to get a half from the proceeds of the sales during 
her lifetime. 

The mountains and sea near Santa Barbara remind Mrs. Bruno of 
her childhood days in sunny Italy, and as she gazes at the mountains in 
the distance tears of longing for her old home sometimes fill her eyes. 

AsHBY C. ViCKERS. Perhaps no really successful man believes much 
in luck. He is apt to remember well the steps which have gradually led 
him to prosperity and knows full well that it was hard work, energy and 
endurance that advanced hfm. Among the substantial men of Ventura 
County, California, who has built up his own fortunes from a modest 
beginning and has earned the prominent place he now occupies in the 
business world, is Ashby C. Vickers, grain, nut and bean grower and 
owner of many acres of valuable land. 

Ashby C. Vickers was bom at Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau 
County, Missouri, December 25, 1861, and is a son of William and Martha 
Vickers. He grew to the age of sixteen years in the City of Springfield, 
Illinois, attending the excellent public schools, and then went to work 
on a stock farm near that city and learned the business of breeding and 
handling horses. In 1883 he came to Ventura County, California, and 
for three years followed the same work with Chrisman & Whiliby. From 
that firm he went to Santa Paula City to embark in business for himself 
and conducted a livery stable there for three years and then disposed of 
it and moved to Los Angeles and there continued in the same business 
tor two more years. 

Mr. Vickers then turned his attention first to farming, locating at 
Round Mountain, in Ventura County and renting 350 acres of land from 



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ALFRED TEN'SEX 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 569 

the Rancho Santa Clara Del Norte grant, in 1903 purchasing forty-three 
acres of this land. In 1907 he bought sixty acres more and this entire 
purchase he now has planted in walnuts. In 1910 he bought a one-half 
interest in a tract of 820 acres, situated near Simi, in Ventura County and 
this land he devotes to grain and beans. Two years later, in 1912, he 
purchased 140 acres more of the Santa Clara Del Norte tract and this he 
is devoting exclusively to beans. Mr. Vickers has proven himself a man 
of business foresight, practical in the extreme and imusually successful 
in the undertakings he plans. 

On June 14, 1888, at Santa Paula, California, Mr. Vickers was married 
to Miss Addie Holden, a native of Oregon and a daughter of Thomas 
Holden a pioneer who crossed the plains in 1849 with an ox team. Mr. 
and Mrs. Vickers have six children: Mrs. Fred Snodgrass,.of Ventura 
County; Mrs. Harold Tuttle, of Los Angeles; Mattie, a student in the 
University of California ; Vesta, a student in the high school at Oxnard ; 
and Ashby C, Jr., and Dorothy, aged respectively eight and five years. 

While not active in politics, Mr. Vickers takes an intelligent citizen's 
interest in public affairs and particularly those that affect his own state 
and community, lending a helping hand as his judgment dictates. He has 
an interest as a stockholder, in tiie bank of A. Levy, at Oxnard. Many 
years he has been a Freemason and is a member of the Royal Arch in 
Oxnard. 

Alfred Jensen. As one of the prominent contractors Mr. Jensen 
holds secure vantage-place as one of the representative business men 
and progressive citizens of Santa Barbara, and he is well entitled to 
Specific recognition in this publication. He was born in the State of 
New Hampshire, in the year 1882, and there received his rudimentary 
education in the public schools. He was fourteen years of age at the 
time when he accompanied his parents on their removal to California, 
and here he continued his studies in the public schools until he was 
fortified for assuming the practical duties and responsibilities of life. 
In 1903 Mr. Jensen became a resident of Santa Barbara. His marked 
mechanical ability and ambitious purpose led him into the field of con- 
tracting and building, and he has constructed many of the fine resi- 
dences, public buildings and business blocks in a city that is widely 
known for its beautiful homes. As a contractor he gives employment 
to forty or more skilled workmen and also conducts a shop that is 
equipped with the most approved of modern machinery and other 
mechanical devices pertinent to architectural construction work. He 
was one of the organizers of the Unit Brick & Tile Company, of which 
he is president, and this company has developed a substantial and con- 
stantly expanding business in the manufacturing of the best type of 
architectural brick, as well as ornamental tiles for building and roofing 
purposes, drain pipes, etc. The specially designed product of tile are 
manufactured from cement, and by a delicate modern process the com- 
pany is able to impart different colors to the tile and thus to supplement 
most effectively various modem schemes of effective architecture. The 



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570 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

enterprise has become one of the important industries of Santa Bar- 
bara, and Mr. Jensen is honored as one of the vigorous, resourceful 
and steadfast young business men who has won success and advance- 
ment through his own ability and well ordered endeavors. He takes 
lively interest in all things touching the civic and material welfare of 
his home city and is essentially progressive and public-spirited in his 
attitude. 

In November, 19 13, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Jensen to 
Miss Oleta Kellogg, who was born in the State of Michigan, and they 
have one son, Alfred Kellogg Jensen. 

James T. O'Connor. When a man starts life as a hard worker and 
struggling against adverse circumstances at an age when most boys are at 
school, and finally masters the problems of life so as to gain the object 
of his ambition for material success it is with genuine admiration that 
people regard the results of his enterprise and diligence. 

One of the old time residents of Ventura County has had such a career. 
He is Mr. James T. O'Connor, of Camarillo. Bom in County Sligo, 
Ireland, February 2, 1862, a son of Thomas and Mary (Connel) O'Connor, 
he was brought to New York City by his parents at the age of ten years. 
In that metropolis he had the advantages of the public schools and the St. 
James parochial school until he was fourteen. He then started out to 
make his own way in the world. The first six months were spent as a 
laborer in a greenhouse at Springfield, New Jersey, a similar period was 
spent in a greenhouse at Flatbush, Long Island, and he then went to 
Newark, New Jersey, and was employed in a glue factory for two years. 

Such was his early experience and environment. Coming west to 
Ventura County, he here laid the real foundation of his business success. 
For three years he worked on Mark McLaughlin's ranch, and at the end 
of that time felt such confidence in his ability that he bought 320 acres 
from the Patterson Ranch Company and started out as an independent 
farmer. He was successfully identified with the management of that land 
until 1900, when he sold out and bought 200 acres comprising the north- 
west corner of the noted Calleguas rancho near Camarillo. This property 
he has developed into one of the very valuable estates of the county. 
About thirty acres are planted in walnuts, and aside from that his chief 
crop is lima beans. 

Mr. O'Connor, who is unmarried, is a member of the Catholic Church 
and in politics is a democrat. 

George W. Glenn is the son of a California pioneer, Joseph Glenn, 
who came to this state in 1852. He made the trip overland with an ox 
team, the approved mode of family travel in those days, and from then 
until his death in 191 1 he was devoted to the great State of California and 
was proud to call it his home. 

The first stop of Joseph Glenn after reaching the state was in Los 
Angeles, then a mere hamlet, and here he established himself in the cattle 
business, continuing for one year, when he moved on to San Jose and 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 571 

took up farming. Two years later he made another move, this time 
settling in Visalia. where he became active in the cattle business again, 
in 1871 he made his last move, locating in that year in Ventura County 
and settling on a farm in Hueneme. For two years he worked the farm, 
then retired and lived quietly in Hueneme until his death in 1891. 

Joseph Glenn married Mary Ann Growns, and ten children were bom 
to them, one of them being George W. Glenn of this review. He was 
bom on January 5, 1857, in Visalia, California, and he had his education 
in the public schools of the state. He was fourteen years old when his 
parents located in Hueneme, and for five years he was identified with the 
farm his father owned and operated. He then went to Los Angeles 
County and worked on a farm for four years, after which he returned to 
Ventura County and with his savings purchased nine acres in the Town of 
Camarillo. He later bought a seventy acre tract in that vicinity, and now 
owns and cultivates 150 acres all of which is planted to beans, that being 
the only crop he favors. On the whole he has enjoyed a very pleasing 
success, and is regarded as one of the prosperous men of the community. 

In the year 1880, February i6th, Mr. Glenn was married to Miss 
Kathryn Cawelti, and four children have been born to them. Ethel is 
the wife of Guy Mahan of Ventura County. The other daughter is Mrs. 
Lena Kimberly of Camarillo. The two sons, Clifford and Edward Percy, 
are both engaged in ranching with their father. Mr. Glenn is a democrat 
in his political affiliations. 

James Wilson Smith. For a few months after he graduated LL. 
B. May 19, 1896, from Hastings Law College James Wilson Smith 
remained in San Francisco, but in August of the same year returned 
to Santa Barbara, where his family is an old and prominent one, and 
engaged in the practice of law. 

With a large professional following as a lawyer, Mr. Smith has 
used his talents and ability in behalf of the public welfare. For ten 
years he was city councilman of Santa Barbara and filled the office of 
United States commissioner from 1898 to 1902. He is now one of the 
state inheritance tax appraisers of Santa Barbara County. 

Though his home has been in this section of California sinte early 
childhood, James W. Smith was born at Spring Valley in Fillmore 
County, Minnesota, October 17, 1871. His father is Rufus Dana Smith, 
one of the best known citizens of Santa Barbara County. Bom in 
Vermont, he came to Santa Barbara in February, 1876, was for a time 
in merchandising, filled the office of justice of the peace two terms, and 
in i§8o became connected with the sheriff's office and has quietly and 
efficiently performed duties in that capacity ever since, being under 
sheriff of Santa Barbara County. Rufus Dana Smith married Lucy M. 
Lebourveau, who was of French-English descent and a native of Canada. 
She is also living in Santa Barbara. 

James W. Smith came with his mother to Santa Barbara in Novem- 
ber, 1876. He attended the public schools of Santa Barbara, graduating 
from the high school in 1891, and, as already mentioned, finished his 



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572 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

education in Hastings Law College. For the past twenty years he has 
been in active practice at Santa Barbara, and has had a long, pleasant 
and profitable association with Judge E. A. Rizor, a prominent mem- 
ber of the Santa Barbara bar elsewhere mentioned. Mr. Smith has a 
general practice, including some corporation work, and for some years 
his chief time has been devoted to probate aflfairs. As an active repub- 
lican he has represented his party in county conventions and was for- 
merly secretary of the republican central county committee. His law 
offices are in the Howard-Canfield Building. 

Mr. Smith is a past master of Magnolia Lodge No. 242 Free and 
Accepted Masons, is past president of the Fraternal Brotherhood, is a 
member and former director of the Chamber of Commerce, and for 
four years was with the Santa Barbara Naval Reserves as quarter- 
master. 

March 14, 1900, in Santa Barbara County he married Miss Kath- 
erine M. Holland, who was bom in California, a daughter of Richard 
and Catherine Holland. Both parents are now deceased, and her father, 
who was one of the early settlers of San Jose and a native of England, 
was a ranchman. Mr. and Mrs. Smith's only child, James Holland 
Smith, is a sophomore in the high school of Santa Barbara. 

Thomas F. McFarland. Of the men who have lent dignity of 
character, excellence of labor and largeness of co-operation to affairs 
in Ventura County for a considerable period, few have attained more 
general or satisfying success than has Thomas F. McFarland, whose 
broad acres lie in the Los Posas Grant. It has been the privilege of this 
still active ranchman to have lived close to the heart of nature, to partake 
generously of her rewards and to respond with clear judgment and 
enthusiasm to her opportunities for advancement. 

Mr. McFarland was bom at Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, April 8, 1859, 
a son of Robert Parker and Ellen (Robinson) McFarland, and comes of 
sturdy and honorable lineage and one which has furthered the universal 
gospel of industry. His education was secured in the public schools, and 
when still a pupil he began working on his father's farm, receiving eight 
dollars a month for his labor during the summer months. When he was 
eighteen years of age he began giving all of his time to the farm, his wages 
being increased to ten dollars per month, and by the time he was twenty- 
five years old rented the homestead place, consisting of 290 acres, which he 
farmed until coming to Ventura County, California, in 1900. On his 
arrival he accepted employment with the late Sen. Thomas M. Bard, on 
the latter's ranch in the Hueneme District, and continued as an employe 
for i>4 years, in which time he became familiar with the conditions and 
methods of this part of the country. He then rented 150 acres from 
Senator Bard, it being a part of the Senator's home place, and, after a time, 
560 acres in the Los Posas Grant, which he eventually purchased in IQ07. 
In 191 2 he built a home in Oxnard, at 102 F. Street, and then began 
giving his entire attention to the cultivation of his own ranch of 560 acres, 
which is located twelve miles from Oxnard near Somis. Of this he has 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA . 573 

1 80 acres in beans, 160 acres in grain and hay and the balance in pasture 
land. He makes his home at Oxnard and employes a superintendent for 
the active management of the farm, although he himself supervises the 
operations thereon. Mr. McFarland markets his own beans in the East, 
finding it more to his advantage to do this than to deal with the local 
marketing association. He is a skilled agriculturist, with a comprehensive 
knowledge of every department of his calling, and who through honorable 
and straightforward dealing has attained and maintained an excellent 
standing in business circles. He is a public-spirited and enterprising 
townsman, the recipient of the good will and esteem of a community in 
which more than sixteen years of his life have been passed. His political 
support is given to the nominees of the republican party, but beyond this 
he takes little part in public matters. 

Mr. McFarland was married at P^rkersburg, West Virginia, in 
January, 1894, to Miss Adelaide Brown, a native of Parkersburg, West 
Virginia, and the daughter of John M. Brown, of that city. Mr. and Mrs. 
McFarland have two children: Louise, bom in 1896, a graduate of the 
graded and high schools, who attended Mary Baldwin Seminary, Staunton, 
Virginia, from 191 3 to 191 5, and Marlborough School for Girls, Los 
Angeles, California, from 191 5 to 1916, and now residing with her parents 
at Oxnard ; and Thomas Bard, sixteen years of age, who is a student in 
the Oxnard High School. Mr. McFarland's children were the fifth gen- 
eration of McFarlands born in the old home near Mercersburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. The old farm has been in the name of McFarland for 175 years 
and his sisters still own it. They have the deed that was made out on 
parchment paper by the heirs of William Penn. Mr. McFarland is a 
nephew of the late Judge Thomas Bard McFarland who was one of the 
supreme judges of California for many years. Judge McFarland came to 
California in 1849 in an ox cart, across the plains. 

Clio L. Lloyd. The present efficient and popular county assessor of 
Santa Barbara County has been a resident of Santa Barbara County 
since he was a lad of nine years and it has been within his ability and 
loyal ambition to become a prominent and influential figure in connection 
with civic development and progress in this county, where his circle of 
friends is limited only by that of his acquaintances and where he has been 
called upon to serve in numerous positions of public trust, including that 
of mayor of Santa Barbara. To him is due special honor for the splen- 
did influence which he put forth in securing to Santa Barbara the Cali- 
fornia State Normal School of Manual Arts and Home Economics, of 
which admirable institution he has been consistently termed the father. 

Mr. Lloyd was bom at Keithsburg, Mercer County, Illinois, on the 
24th of April, 1864, and he was nine years of age at the time of the 
family removal from that state to Santa Barbara, in 1873. He is still 
a bachelor and it is pleasing to record that he remains with his venerable 
parents, Marion and Jennie (Patterson) Lloyd, as a member of the 
gracious home circle of one of the pleasant residences of Santa Bar- 
bara. After having profited fully by the advantages of the public schools 



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574 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

of Santa Barbara Clio L. Lloyd took a course of higher study in a private 
academy in this city, and that he made good use of these advantages is 
demonstrated by the success and popularity which were his during sev- 
eral years of effective service as a teacher in the schools of Santa Bar- 
bara County. From the pedagogic profession he passed into the domain 
of journalism, and for fifteen years he was actively identified with prac- 
tical newspaper work, as manager in turn of the Santa Barbara Daily 
Independent and the Morning Press. Thereafter he became a prominent 
representative of the real-estate business in his home city and while he 
was thus engaged he was elected mayor of Santa Barbara, in which 
municipal office he served one term, 1 909-11, and gave a most progres- 
sive and popular administration. In 1912 Mr. Lloyd was appointed 
county assessor, to fill an unexpired term, and in 1914 he was continued 
in this office by regular election for the full term of four years, his elec- 
tion having been compassed by the largest majority ever given a county 
official in this county save with one exception. 

Mr. Lloyd is a veritable stalwart in the California camp of the re- 
publican party and he has been influential in its local councils and cam- 
paign activities. He served from 1901 to 191 1 as chief clerk of the 
Lower House of the California Legislature and has held various other 
positions of trust and responsibility. He was president of the board 
of trustees of the Santa Barbara State Normal School for a period of 
five years, and a member of the City Board of Education for four 
years. 

The chairman of a democratic convention had occasion to refer to 
Mr. Lloyd as the "Father of the State Normal School at Santa Barbara/' 
and this title clung to him many years, besides which some of his friends 
even apply the same to him at the present remote date. It was largely 
through his well ordered and indefatigable efforts that the bill creating 
this school at Santa Barbara was passed by the Legislature, and in friendly 
and appreciative way the institution was often referred to as ^'Lloyd's 
School." The passage of the bill represented an interesting bit of finesse, 
as shown by the legislative records. The finance committee had turned 
down three normal-school bills, but Mr. Lloyd prevailed upon the com- 
mittee to withhold report on the Santa Barbara School until one week 
prior to the adjournment of the Legislature, the while he made a stipula- 
tion for cutting out of the state appropriation and made pledge that the 
people of Santa Barbara would supply the required building and equip- 
ment. The committee agreed to this dispensation and at the proper 
moment made favorable report on the bill, minus the appropriation. 
The bill passed without comment and occasioned much astonishment 
when the members of the Legislature, particularly those backing the 
other two normal-school bills, woke up to what had "been put over on 
them." The new institution was established in one of the public-school 
buildings of Santa Barbara, and these quarters sufficed until the regular 
building was erected and ready for occupancy. Two years after the pas- 
sage of the original act creating the school there was secured for the 
institution an appropriation of about $200,000, and today Santa Barbara 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 575 

has the finest building and finest site of all of the state normal schools of 
California. The results achieved stand to the enduring credit of the 
citizens of Santa Barbara and especially to those who, like Mr. Lloyd, 
labored so earnestly and gallantly to compass the desired ends. When 
the governor of California appointed the trustees of the new school Mr. 
Lloyd was the first one named, and during the first five years he was 
retained by the board as its president, his regime having continued dur- 
ing the construction and equipment of the present fine building and the 
establishing of the school therein. The establishing of this institution 
in Santa Barbara has had a far-reaching and benignant influence. It 
led to the reconstruction of the only traction railroad line entering the city 
and the standardizing of the street-railway track guage in the city, besides 
which the progressive policy in connection with public utilities resulted 
in giving a forty-five-year franchise to the traction company. By the 
improvements thus instituted the territory adjacent to the city was made 
available for the building of attractive suburban homes and resulted in 
the normal and substantial expansion and growth of the entire community. 
In a fraternal way Mr. Lloyd is affiliated with the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose and the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles. He is actively identified with the Santa Barbara 
Chamber of Commerce being on the board of directors and also with the 
Neighborhood House, a local organization whose functions are for com- 
munity betterment along both civic and material lines. Mr. Lloyd pays 
to his venerable parents the deepest filial solicitude and devotion and 
rejoices in the fact that he still has the privilege of remaining with them, 
this sterling pioneer couple having celebrated their golden- wedding anni- 
versary in the year 191 3. 

Hiram B. Payne has been a resident of Santa Barbara County more 
than twenty-three years. His early experience was with the farming 
activities of the Middle West, and he has neVer regretted his choice of 
the Pacific coast as a location both for reasons of climate and residence, 
and also for the industrial opportunities it has afforded. He is one of the 
leading ranchers at La Patera near Goleta. 

Bom in Oakland County, Michigan, November 10, 1865, a son of 
George and Abbey P. (Long) Payne, he spent his youth partly in Michi- 
gan and partly in Nebraska. In both states he attended the public schools 
and when he left school at the age of nineteen he took up the vocation to 
which he had been trained, that of agriculture. He was engaged in 
contending with the difficulties of practical farming in Nebraska until 
1889. In that year he started west, and in and about Spokane, Washing- 
ton, he found employment for several years. In 1893 M'*- Payne came 
to La Patera in Santa Barbara County, and in this locality has been one 
of the active and enterprising farmers since that date. His farm com- 
prises fifty-seven acres, and the crops from which he has derived the 
greatest revenue are walnuts and beans. 

In matters of politics he is a republican, and is affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and belongs to the Methodist Episcopal 
Church at Goleta. In 1903 at Ventura he married Maria Isenhour. 



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576 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

George Hendry. A rancher of thirty years experience at Goleta, 
George Hendry has witnessed many of the important transformations in 
the economic stages of this section of California, and has himself borne 
an honorable and successful part in the changes and adaptations to modem 
conditions. 

Like many of the most successful men in Santa Barbara County, Mr. 
Hendry is a native of Scotland. Besides his inheritance of the thrifty 
Scotch traits, the impelling force behind his successful career has been 
hard work and a constant exercise of good judgment. He was bom in 
Aberdeen, Scotland, in October, 1861, a son of John and Mary (Sim) 
Hendry, and spent his early life in his native land, attending school for 
some years and being employed on different farms in the land of hills and 
heather until 1887. 

In that year Mr. Hendry came to California and began adapting him- 
self to the conditions of agricultural practice made necessary by the soil 
and climate of this sunny clime. At Goleta he bought thirty-two acres, 
and has gradually improved and farmed that ever since. His is one 
of the fine estates in that locality, and for many years has raised abundant 
crops of walnuts and beans. 

One of the influential citizens of his locality, he is now serving his third 
term as a school trustee. He is a democrat and Presbyterian. In Santa 
Barbara he married Miss Susan Overall, a native of England. Their 
three children are named George, William and James. 

Robert S. Ramsaur^ of Santa Paula, has lived a long and eventful 
life. As a youth he served in the Confederate army in the war between 
the states until wounded and incapacitated for further duty. The greater 
part of his years since the war have been spent in the Far West in Cali- 
fornia. Here he has been variously engaged in the ranching and fruit 
growing activities which have contributed so much to the resources of 
the state, and long since he was in a position that would justify retire- 
ment, though he still finds plenty to do looking after his various interests, 
though the heaviest labors are now performed by his sons. 

He was born in Catawba County, North Carolina, August 13, 1843, 
a son of Jonas and Eve C. Ramsaur. In 1848 when he was five years 
of age his parents removed to Marshall County, Mississippi, where he 
attended school until fourteen, and they then went to Ashley County, 
Arkansas. For several years Mr. Ramsaur worked with his father on 
an Arkansas farm and also attended schools during a portion of the year. 

In 1861, soon after the outbreak of the war he joined Company K 
of the Ninth Arkansas Regiment, and participated in several of the 
important campaigns in his section of the country. In 1862 he was 
wounded in battle, and spent the following year in an army hospital. 
Returning to his old home in Ashley County, he was employed as a teacher 
for a year, and then followed the business of cotton raising, at first in 
his home county of Ashley and after 1867 in Woodruff County, Arkansas. 

In 1869 Mr. Ramsaur came out to California and first located in Ven- 
tura then Santa Barbara County. He and his brother W. P. Ramsaur 



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SANTA BARB.V; 

ICE Hendry. A rancli^^ . 
Hendry has witnessed ^i-^-^^ 
lomic stages oi this sei^t^ _^ 
rable and successful pat^t ^ 

^ many of the most succ:::^^ ^^ 
is a native of Scotlan ^.^ _ 
traits, the impeUmg f o -m^ 
ork ant! a coiistant exL^-^^ 
ren, Scotland, in OctoV^c^ 
\\ and si>ent his early W ^ 
ears and being t?mv>loy^ cJV 
r nntil 1887, 

that year Mr. Hendry ,^ ^^ 
» the conditions of agiri^---, 
iimate of thi^ sunny crW-in 
las gratlnally improve €±<_^ 
fine estates in that loc::i: 
of walnuts and bean a _ 
r^e of the influcnttal ir\^\ ^^ 
as a school trustee. ^^^ 

^ra he married Mis^ 
children are named 



'ns years sfno^ tiV^ 

Were he hass To.^, 

r activities vv^lr^f^^^ 

^j and Jong ss^i.-rT^ 

lough be still 4=^ 

the heaviest X 

A^as born in -*-.___ ^^^^ 

f Jonas and 

his parent?- ^^^^ 

I school uti^^X 

IS. For sew- ,^^ .^ ^^^ ^ 

1861, soon 

Nmtb 
am 




SAN LUIS OBISPO 

* thirty years experience at Goleta, 
-y C3f the important transformations in 
^^ ^ Calif ornia^ and has himself borne 
*^ »^o changes and adaptations to uioder: 

^ ^*--^l men in Santa Barbara Count \ , >. ' 
-tii^^ sides his inheritance of the Mn 
__ *-^^ViiTid his success fnl career h;*- ' 
^^^ c>f good judgment. He wa>« hr- 
^ ^^^>i, a son of John and Mar^*^ i 
^,,^ ^^-'xv^ Viis native land, attending^ srlifi- 
*^i fife rent farms in the land of liil 

- ^^^ lio California and began juL.-, 

^^*"^*^^1 practice made necess:irv 

-^t Goleta he bought thir;.' . 
. ^^^^ ^^ farmed that ever since. 
^^ » ^iiTd for many years has rai^*, 

^^ *^^ € Ills locality, he is now ^t: ^ 
^ democrat and Prcsbyl*;r*i. 
'^^^^^^■^ Overall a native of Ki*,^ 
^^^C^ » William and James* 

, "^^^^TTita Paula, has lived a Ii>i> 
^ ^\^ t:Wt^ Confederate army h\ 
^'^^^Bipaciiated for further , , 
^^ 'S" laave been spent in Ihc 1 
^^^^ 'Piously engaged in tl^c 
^^"N^^^ contributed so miRli 
^^^ ^"N-'a.s in a position thru 
^t^^^^-ity to do looking aftui ,, 
^*-'"*^^ now pcrformefl by biis 
Oounty, Xcjrth Carrjhi« 
-^ - T^amsaur, In iS^ \^i' 
^^ to Marshall County, 
'^^^^is^-n. ami Eliey then \ 
*^^i.T-s Mt. Ramsaur wn- 
il schoola fhirtn; 
k of the t\Tir 
and parlivif 
n nf the ctjQ 



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'■;. rt'!4l ])articipatefl !'■ ^t ' . • 
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Hso t^^ilowing year in ; m it- . '.•- ■ : 
■' \'h! V •County, he \va^ i.!i.j'i' . •.;.;■. 
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.- \(\ after 1867 in Woodrntl ( •! '\. XiK.-n^.* 
"V out tC) <. ahfornia ai •! 1;'-: !- .ittd in \ .n 
' 'CmMv. He au'^ ]i\> l»rf:}i' , ^\ P. Ramsaur 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 577 

rented 300 acres from the late Senator Bard in Pleasant Valley. Farm- 
ing was practiced only to a limited extent in this section of California at 
the time, and the brothers were among the first to grow field crops in their 
section. In 1871 Mr. Robt. S. Ramsaur and his brother were members 
of the company which built the first big ditch in Santa Clara Valley east 
of the Santa Clara River. This ditch irrigated thirty acres of land per 
day. In 1876 Robert Ramsaur removed to Los Angeles County, buying 
ninety-five acres where the Town of Watts now stands. Later he bought 
another hundred sixty acres adjoining his first tract, and as the demands 
for land became more insistent he duly subdivided and sold off the prop- 
erty. In 1896 he removed to Azusa, California, and bought a ten acre 
orange grove, which he sold in 1909. 

In the latter year he returned to Ventura County and bought fifty 
acres in the Santa Clara Valley near Santa Paula. This has been planted 
to walnuts and lemons, with lima beans between the rows. His two sons 
now have the active management of this splendid property. 

Mr. Ramsaur is a charter member of the Masonic Lodge at Ventura. 
He and his family worship in the Presbyterian faith and in politics he is 
a democrat. In Los Angeles County he married Miss Clara Walker. 
They are the parents of three children. Ben Walker, bom in Los 
Angeles County in August, 1881, was graduated from high school in. 
1901 and was a student in the University of California until 1905 ; he is 
now giving all his time to ranching with his father. Sue, the only daugh- 
ter is a graduate of the State Normal at Los Angeles and is now teaching 
in Taft; James C, bom in Los Angeles County in March, 1894, has 
had a high school education and is assisting his father in the manage- 
ment of the ranch. 

Santa Barbara Unit Brick and Tile Company. Founded in 1912, 
the Santa Barbara Unit Brick and Tile Company is the only business of 
its kind in Santa Barbara County devoted exclusively to the manufacture 
of artificial granite, limestone, sandstone, roof tile, plain and ornamental 
brick, and interior and lawn decorations. It is a company that has supplied 
an insistent local demand for the highest class of building material, and 
these materials have been constantly utilized since the opening of the 
plant in the construction of many of the notable private, business and 
public structures in and around Santa Barbara. Its output includes 
various types of re-enforced concrete constmction, notably sewer pipe 
and other materials employed so extensively in municipal enterprises. 
The company does an extensive business in the manufacture of tile, a 
process that has been patented. All roofing tile is water-proof and made 
from natural colored sand that gives the tile its permanent color. The 
different patterns of tile are: American S., Spanish Mission, Old Mission 
and Italian, they will also make any special shapes to suit the purchaser. 
The successful operation of this plant goes far toward increasing the 
permanency and fireproof qualities of building construction in this section 
of California. 

Mr. A. F. Lewis, a well known resident of Santa Barbara, is at present 



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578 SANTA BARBARA, SAN I,UIS OBISPO 

superintendent of the plant, which is located at No. lo State Street. It is 
a company of local capital, its backers being some of the principal business 
men of the city. Under such auspices it is not strange that the success 
of the company has been of almost amazing proportions. 

J. R. Brabo. One of the places deservedly famous in Santa Barbara 
and known to the epicures of California and of travelers from all over 
the world, is the Casa de Brabo at 229 State Street. The proprietor is 
Mr. J. R. Brabo, who on all sides is acclaimed as the best Spanish cook in 
California, and that probably means the best in the world. Mr. Brabo at 
his fine place in Santa Barbara has entertained some of the country's most 
noted people. The cuisine of his cafe is unsurpassed, and for years 
travelers in Santa Barbara have made this one of the primary features of 
their local entertainments and the tables and banquet rooms are often 
engaged far ahead for the purpose of some special occasion. 

J. R. Brabo represents one of the old families of Southern California. 
His father Juan Brabo was born at Santiago, Chile, but at the age of 
eighteen came to California, spending about a year m Monterey, then 
going to Santa Barbara, afterwards spending some time in Mexico, and 
finally locating in Ventura County, where he engaged in business as a 
general merchant. He was married in Santa Barbara to Barbara Ruiz. 
He died at Ventura at the age of fifty-two. He held a number of places 
of public trust in Ventura. 

Ventura is the native city of Mr. J. R. Brabo. He was born there in 
1850 and was educated in the public schools. For sixteen years Mr. Brabo 
was steward of the Santa Barbara Club. After that he had the manage- 
ment of a noted place at Casa Verduga La Ramada, and on leaving that 
opened the Casa de Brabo on State Street. 

In 1877 Mr. Brabo married Francisca Gonzales. They have a fine 
family of children and grandchildren. There are four girls and three 
boys: Mrs. Barbara Sanchez, Mrs. Lucile Lopez, Miss Margaret Brabo, 
Mrs. M. J. Joyce, J. R. Brabo, Jr., Roque Brabo, Henry Brabo. All the 
sons are in business in Santa Barbara. The grandchildren of this noted 
California chef are: Marnita Fox and Gladys Fox, the children of Mrs. 
Joyce. J. R. Brabo, Jr., a son of J. R. Brabo, Jr. Henry and Frances, 
children of Henry. Panchita and Manuel, children of Mrs. Lopez. 
Mary Margaret, daughter of Roque Brabo. Charles Sanchez, son of 
Barbara Sanchez. 

John F. Cummings was born in Richland County, Ohio, September 
19, 1835, and is the son of Hon. James and Christine (McMillan) Cum- 
mings. The father was bom in Pennsylvania in 1795 and his ancestors 
came to America in the seventeenth century. James Cummings, though 
of brilliant mentality arrd splendid ability, was a man of practically no 
schooling. In fact, his actual attendance at school would not exceed four 
months. But he gained an education through his own efforts and outside 
of school walls, so that he lacked nothing in the way of mental training 
and finish. He possessed a hoard of information that few men acquire. 



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■ . . ' • . ^ ^ X i.I'i-^ < >HISPO 

•s 11 ,.'.', t * . * * * ; • , '. " vv ■ . h . I . ■' {\ ^- 1 • . f ( » "^ 1 ■ ♦ t S ' lev* . 1 : ■ 
a «■(.'■ I.,'.:- - . ' ■ .'* ;■ , ! .1. M '•. > \' ".' .. .' •! ' ' ;•".''':;/;.' !;iiM'iv - 

11 it'll f1 [\ , .;i:.' ' ".i ;'■"'».."-.' '- ■' I ' . ■/' '! tliC >\KCC- 

•■jf ti-u ,'<'i*^; 'r\ li . '■• 'M- ,; ..';: , ' . ■ . 

^ 1 • I t< 1 ';.'.-,'-. ' ' . . ■ ■ ' . .' . '-Pa '" 1'. f'ok ITl 

(. ^*)i . I, .il •'''.■■ ■■: '- . • • . . • . ■ i ' • t ' . Ml I'ra'K) at 

tM< :i' •).'•. r .!, • . ! ■ ■ .,'.:,- 1 ,'•' • ' . ■ -.■!-■ v-MiiTitrv'^ mo.-t 

: tr " j < ' I • i • '■ . '1- • ■■ • ' :- •• ; 4 * ';•<"!, .iitd fijr years 
ri.t\i:( 5- Ml - . r . I'l-i < ; h. • u '■' ' i .■•. « ' '!•• |iiiniary features of 
un ,: 'c ( .1' ..-i-i* I'.ii.r.r. .. ,J < ,*/ 1, ' I'^ ar.«l It'Muiuct rooms are often 
V'iL-.»i4**«i J-r '. « . ' f •! 'U- ^M 11 !>*,-« uf ^oriie s{K.viaI CK^casion. 

!. k l.t.i.M i.j rc-ciii.s <»i»c of the old taniilics of Sotithern California. 
i!i> f .:^;rr Jn.m I'.rabu was born at Santiago, Chile, but at the age of 
(i^iitecn came to California, sf)ending about a year in Monterey, then 
troji.'j t(. S^.nta Darbara, afterwards sjicnduit: some time in Mexico, and 
bn.-illv l(»v'aiH'^' in W'nlura Couiit\. v';ri« 'u t . f^.iL^ed in business as a 
L''"."!* T.i! Uienhaut. He \\a^ nviir^t/i m -<,,.'., [Barbara to Barbara Ruiz. 
1 U' d'" 1 a\ \ eiunra ai ll.i .»; ' ' * :■ . • 1 U held a number of places 
"f p'l'hiK- r u-t •: \ ' ' PI* ! 

■' ^'"t :- ■ .^ ■' , - ■ • - l.rabo. He was born there in 

i^-'> P".; u . ( •' -. . ; . I ur sixtte.i rears Mr. Brabo 

••..'*.;■■' . " ■ \fi* r »i.;'t lie liad the manage- 

;• • I ' ':. . I I '^ IP.!'!', and on leaving that 

• • -K '• •: ' ■ < ' ■■/pzales. They have a fine 

1 * . il . ■.. ' ure are four girls and three 

■ :lt Lopez, Miss Margaret [>rabo, 

-. \: ■ ,-.-.. I ^ ■:.ui,ie BralK), Henry Brabo. All the 

^ ' .: ■ ' tra. The grandchildren of this noted 

.'•■..: ■ '. * ' '. ox and Ciladys bDx, the children of Mrs. 

• i . of J. K. Brabo, Jr. Henry and Frances, 

...: I and Manuel, children of Mr<^. T.O|>ez. 

' ^ d KcKiue lirabo. Charles wSanthez, son of 



\,;'^ b. -in in Fxichland County, Ohio, .September 
• t ti'>!P lanus and Christine (McMillan) Cum- 
!."!': in ! \ pii^vlvania in 1793 and his ancestors 
-I \' ''ttnnili century. James Cummings, thouj^^h 
1 I'vi. lid ability, was a man of practically t>'» 
fii 1] aliriiilance at school would not exceed forr 
M ,(] p^ation through his own efforts and outside 
>' l-A-kcd nothing in the way of mental trainp ;.' 
. a iTiard of information that few men acquir- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 579 

and was widely known as a skilled debater and an orator of no little 
ability. 

For years Hon. James Cummings carried on farming operations near 
Mansfield, in Richland County, Ohio. He was a successful and prosper- 
ous farmer, and found prominence among his fellow men, for twice he 
was elected to represent his district in the State Legislature, and during 
twenty-eight years he served continuously as justice of the peace. He 
lived a full and worthy life, never idle and always deeply interested in 
the affairs of his community and state. He died at the age of eighty- 
five and was widely mourned in his state. 

To him and his wife, Christine, five daughters and two sons were 
born. Two of the number are now living. John F., whose name heads 
this brief family review, and the fourth in age, was born in Mansfield, 
Ohio, September 19, 1835. Another of the sons, Wilson S., was one of 
the most prominent men in Fredericktown, Ohio, and controlled practi- 
cally every big business enterprise in the city, as well as owning most 
of the business buildings. 

John F. Cummings was twenty-five years old when he first came to 
California. He was without resources of his own and he worked by the 
month in the northern part of the state to get a start in Hfe. He was 
ambitious and saved his money carefully, with the result that in a short 
while he was able to make some investments in land. When he had been 
nine years in the state he purchased 150 acres of land in Ventura County, 
and three years later built his home upon it. For the first few years Mr. 
Cummings devoted himself to hog raising, and raised barley in quantities 
for that purpose. He has raised as high as 600 head annually, and his 
efforts along those lines brought him a considerable prosperity. It was 
in about 1876 that he began his experiments with the lima bean, and he 
was the first man in the valley to make a success of what is now one of 
the big agricultural features of the county. He began by giving over 
ten acres to beans, and' gradually increased the acreage until he had 100 
acres in beans, the average yield being about a ton pet acre. Today he 
has a part of his land in walnut grove. In 1893 M^- Cummings made 
another purchase of 108 acres near his original purchase, and this he 
planted to walnuts. In 191 3 he secured 508 acres more located in Wheel- 
er's Canon, which he has planted to hay in part, and part of it being 
mainly range land. The land is now being farmed by his son Wallace 
who in 191 5 raised 100 tons of hay on it. 

Mr. Cummings was married in September, 1880, to Miss Georgia 
Sweeney, of Nordhoff, California, a daughter of Charles B. Sweeney, 
an engineer who was permanently employed by the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company. Nine children were born to them. Ada is conducting 
a millinery store at Filmore, California, at the present time (1916). 
Madge is now living at home. Walter W. is now assisting with the 
management of his father's ranching properties. Esther finished with 
the local high school, then attended a prominent School of Expression 
in Los Angeles, after which she spent a year in the State Normal of Los 
Angeles, and is now teaching at Bardsdale, California. Jeannette, a high 



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580 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

school graduate, is living at home. Victor Edwin is a high school gradu- 
ate. After two years work as teller in the bank at Saticoy was com- 
pelled to abandon that work on account of his eyes. He is now with the 
California Lima Bean Growers Association at Oxnard. Olga, the next in 
order of birth, died at the age of nineteen. John F., Jr., is engaged in 
work on the ranch. Wilson Shannon, the youngest child, is now a student 
in the University of California. 

P. Alvin Rice is a son of Thomas A. Rice, who came to Ventura 
County in 1883 and is one of the oldest and best known citizens of that 
section. His important relationships with the farming and business com- 
munity are sketched on other pages. 

His son has shown similar qualities of enterprise. Bom in Ventura 
County July 3, 1884, he attended the school established and maintained by 
his father under private tuition until fourteen. Later he was educated for 
several years in St. Mathew Military School at San Mateo, at the age of 
seventeen entered Boone's University School at Berkeley, California, 
where he was graduated in 1903, and for one year was in the University 
of California. 

With the close of his college career he returned to Ventura County, 
and for six months was in the employ of the American Beet Sugar Com- 
pany. After that he spent six months as a lineman for the Sugar Belt 
Street Car line, and this varied experience prefaced his real work in life, 
which has been farming. For several years he has rented 700 acres from 
his father's estate, and has it planted in various crops of lima beans, beets 
and barley. 

Mr. Rice is a York Rite Mason, a Shriner, a member of the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, the Sigma Nu fraternity, the Phi 
Epsilon fraternity, and is a republican and a member of the Episcopal 
Church. In July, 1906, at Oxnard he married Miss Kate L. Walker. 
Their one child, Lillian Floumoy is now in the public schools. 

Berton L. Munger, Sr. Various members of the Munger family 
have been actively identified with Ventura County for over forty years. 
As a family they have helped forward the development work and especially 
diversified horticulture of this region. 

Dexter X. Munger, father of Burton L., was bom in Genesee County, 
New York, in 1836, was reared and educated there, being a college man, 
and in 1857 removed with his parents to Shiawassee County, Michigan. 
The father of Dexter was one of the pioneer lumbermen of that region, 
and buying a large tract of timber land he erected a planing mill and on 
his land established the Town of Mungerville. In order to attract perma- 
nent residents he gave each settler an acre of ground. 

Dexter Munger found employment in his father's mill at Mungerville, 
but in 1861 subordinated all personal interests to the welfare of his 
country, and enlisted in the Ninth Michigan Cavalry. A portion of this 
regiment afterwards had the distinction of capturing Jefferson Davis. 
Later he became captain of a company and served until the close of the 
war in 1865. He then re-enlisted in the Veteran Reserve Corps and was 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 581 

second in command at Fort Snelling, Minnesota, during the Indian 
troubles on the northwestern frontier. In 1867 he returned to Munger- 
ville, Michigan, to take charge of his father's estate. In 1869 he removed 
to TuUahoma, Tennessee, and was a merchant there until he came out to 
California in 1876. Locating at Nordhoff in Ventura County, he bought 
sixty-five acres of land and set out the olive grove which now distinguishes 
that tract under the name Los Olivas. He sold this olive grove in 1880 
to his son, and removed to Boston, Massachusetts, where he was actively 
identified with the mercantile business for a number of years. In October, 
1889, having sold his eastern interests he returned to California and while 
visiting his sons in Santa Paula died in January, 1890. Dexter Munger 
was a republican and a member of the Methodist Church. He was mar* 
ried in Orleans County, New York, to Miss Jennie Warren. They were 
the parents of two sons : Seymour of NordhoflF, California, and Berton 
Lorenzo. 

Berton Lorenzo Munger was born in Mungerville, Michigan, June 15, 
1858. He had the advantages of the public schools there until 1869, and 
afterward attended school at TuUahoma, Tennessee, until he was seven- 
teen. On coming to California with his father he took up farming at 
Nordhoff in Ventura County, and in 1880, as already stated, he and his 
brother Seymour bought their father's olive grove. In 1887 Berton 
Munger sold his interests in that property, and removed to San Bernardino 
County and had charge of some lime works for six months. On returning 
to Santa Paula he put in three years with the Hardison-Stewart Oil Com- 
pany, and then became manager of the Hardison Horse and Cattle 
Company, a business which engaged all his time and attention for twelve 
years. Some years ago Mr. Munger bought fifty acres west of Santa 
Paula, and now has it developed, eight acres in lemons, twenty-five acres 
in beans, and the rest in pasture. 

Mr. Munger is affiliated with the Woodmen of the World, is a repub- 
lican in politics, and a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

In the Ojai Valley of Ventura County in August, 1888, he married 
Miss Elizabeth Gamble. They have four sturdy sons. Elwood is con- 
nected with the Union Oil Company at Fullerton, California. The other 
three, Heathcot, Berton L., Jr., and John, are all engaged in ranching in 
Ventura County. Mrs. Munger is a native of Ireland and a daughter of 
John Gamble. She is the niece of John Pinkefton, deceased, who was one 
of the first to buy land from Senator T. R. Bard in the upper Ojai. 

Veronica Medicinal Springs Water Company. One of the institu- 
tions that go far toward making Santa Barbara one of the most attrac- 
tive health resorts in Southern California is the Veronica Springs. 
More and more every year people come to these springs for recupera- 
tion and restoration of health, at the same time enjoying the wonderful 
advantages of life in and around Santa Barbara. The water from these 
springs attained a fame through its extensive use, and for a number of 
years more than half a million bottles of the water have been shipped to 

all parts of the country. 
Vol. n— T 



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582 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Concerning the springs and their surroundings the following bit of 
history and description is given: **A little history of Veronica Springs 
will be quite interesting, since the spring was known many years before 
the white man came. Known first to the Indians who inhabited the beau- 
tiful Santa Barbara V^alley, and when the Padres arrived, who founded 
the Old Mission, they found this valley densely populated by a tribe 
which were far in advance of the natives of California. The men were 
of extraordinary physique, and the women, especrally Tsuigui, the daugh- 
ter of the powerful chief Saliaputa, was of unusual beauty. The Padres 
learned that the reason for this vast superiority in health and beauty of 
the local tribe was due to their knowledge of nature, and that when sick 
they drank from a certain spring which was well known to all the 
Indians. Chief Saliaputa's beautiful daughter gave to the white man his 
first drink of Veronica water. She gave him plentifully of the water 
without divulging the secret from whence it came and within a few days 
he was well and strong. Later the location of the springs was revealed 
to the Padres, who used the water with good eflfect and who in turn 
revealed the secret to the white man. 

**About the year 1870 a gentleman who had married the daughter of 
of one of the early Califomians and through her had learned the value 
of Veronica Springs water, sought to interest the white man in commer- 
cializing the same but without success, until about the year 1880, when 
a couple of prominent Santa Barbarans agreed to finance the proposi- 
tion in a small way, as they had but little faith in its merits. They 
opened offices in San Francisco, from which began the sale of Veronica 
water. 

**A young man who had enjoyed a remarkable cure as a result of the 
use of this water decided to spend the remainder of his life furthering 
the interests of Veronica water. In 1895 he went East with the first car- 
load of it and opened offices in Philadelphia, and from this small beginning 
Veronica water has found its way around the entire world. The distri- 
bution has grown in leaps and bounds and each user becomes an earnest 
and permanent booster for it. 

**The analysis of this water shows that it contains 2,295.45 grains of 
mineral matter to the gallon, consisting chiefly of potassium sulphate, 
sodium sulphate, sodium carbonate, magnesium nitrate, calcium phos- 
phate, sodium chloride, magnesium sulphate, magnesium carbonate and 
calcium sulphate. Its composition therefore indicates to the thoughtful 
physician its wide range of therapeutic application. It has no equal of 
its class in the world and needs only to be used to be appreciated. 

"Located in the beautiful Veronica Valley adjoining Santa Barbara 
City the springs* natural facilities are unsurpassed anywhere in the 
world. The sea coast at Point Concepcion, in the northern part of this 
county, follows a direct easterly direction, the Santa Ynez mountains 
following the same course. This gives Veronica Valley a southerly 
exposure with the mountains at its back and on the south the Santa Bar- 
bara channel which is protected from all storms excepting from the south- 
east by the Santa Barbara Channel islands. The trade winds, which blow 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 583 

constantly during the summer months over the entire state, are diverted 
to the north of the coast range. When the temperature rises during the 
summer and fall months, a cool air soon equalizes the temperature pre- 
venting extreme heat as is experienced in the interior valleys." 

Willis Burson, one of the leading citrus fruit growers of Ventura 
County in the vicinity of Fillmore, is president of the South Side Improve- 
ment Company, is a stockholder in the Farmers and Merchants Bank of 
Fillmore and also belongs to the Fillmore Citrus Fruit Association. 

He and his family have been identified with this section of California 
for nearly thirty years. A son of Edward Burson, an Illinois farmer, he 
was born in Marshall County, Illinois, November 5, 1866, and was reared 
on his father's farm and attended the public schools of his native county 
until the age of twenty. In 1886 Edward Burson, and three sons came 
to California, and bought 187 acres of land in Ventura County near 
Fillmore. Two years later he rented his Illinois farm and permanently 
located in California. Edward Burson was one of the pioneers of orange 
culture, having set out the third orange grove at Bardsdale. On that land 
Willis Burson found plenty of employment, and in 1893 his father 
removed to Santa Barbara and retired, dividing the land among his four 
sons. 

The share which fell to Willis Burson, who was next to the youngest 
boy, was twenty-eight acres, and since then he has developed that to a 
high degree of intensive cultivation and has it in oranges, lemons and 
apricots. In 191 3 he bought 160 acres near Bakersfield and in 191 4 another 
160 acre tract near Fresno. These lands he operates through renters. 
Mr. Burson and his brother, E. W. Burson, own seven pumping oil wells 
within the City of Los Angeles. Mr. Burson owns residence property on 
Figueroa Street in Los Angeles. 

He is a York Rite Mason and Shriner. Five of his brothers are also 
Shriners, all belonging to the Al Malaikah Temple of Los Angeles. This 
record of six brothers belonging to the same shrine is a remarkable one. 
Willis Burson is second past master of Fillmore Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons. He is a republican voter and a member of the Meth- 
odist Church. At Bardsdale, California, January 15, 1896, he married 
Miss Katie Baldeschweiler. They have been married now more than 
twenty years, and have a happy family of six children: Howard the 
oldest, twenty years old, is a graduate of the Fillmore High School and is 
now attending the agricultural department of the University of California 
at Davis; Sarah and Leslie are both students in the high school, while 
the younger children, all attending the grammar schools, are Walter aged 
fourteen, Edward aged twelve, and John aged nine. Mrs. Burson is a 
native of Illinois and a daughter of Gutlip Baldeschweiler, a native of 
Germany. 

Harvey T. Nielson. Actively associated with the higher and better 
interests of Santa Barbara as a business man and as a public official, 
Harvey T. Nielson is widely and favorably known not only as a real estate 
dealer and insurance agent, but as president of the city council. He was 



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584 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

bom, January 23, 1887, in Jackson, Michigan, a son of MacFarlane and 
Emma Jane (Cleveland) Nielson, coming on the paternal side of the 
house from pure Scotch ancestry, and on his mother's side of English- 
Dutch stock. 

Receiving his elementary education in the public schools of Detroit, 
Michigan, Harvey T. Nielson was graduated from the Santa Barbara 
High School with the class of 1904. Immediately securing a position 
with the County National Bank, he was there assistant cashier for ten 
years. Subsequently Mr. Nielson embarked in the real estate and insur- 
ance business in partnership with Edgar D. Park, whom he afterwards 
bought out, and has since conducted both branches of the business alone. 
In addition to managing his own private affairs, he is a director of the 
Santa Barbara Building and Loan Association. 

On June 4, 191 2, Mr. Nielson married Miss Hazel Venable, a daughter 
of P. S. and Susan Venable, of Redondo Beach, Los Angeles County, and 
they have one child, Nancy Nielson. Mr. Nielson is a steadfast republican 
in politics, and in 191 6 was elected to the city council for a term of two 
years, and is now serving as its president. Religiously Mr. Nielson is a 
member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Maj. Joel Adams Fithian. Santa Barbara came to know Major 
Fithian during the later years of his life. He was already distinguished 
by his gallant record in the Union army during the Civil war, by a suc- 
cessful career as a banker and by the possesson of many qualifications 
that made him esteemed in the most cultured social circles. Though his 
home was in Santa Barbara hardly ten years, Major Fithian made his 
citizenship count for a great deal to the advantage of that community. 

He was bom near Bridgeton, Cumberland County, New Jersey, April 
3, 1839. His birth occurred on the old Fithian homestead which has been 
in the family for generations. His parents were Joel and Hannah (Lud- 
1am) Fithian. Nature endowed him liberally, and education and culture 
were inbred from the earliest years of his life. 

His business experience began before he reached his majority. At 
Easton, Maryland, he owned an extensive plantation. That was in the 
border district between the North and South, and in the late '50s parti- 
san feeling ran very high. He was himself a pronounced unionist. It 
is said that a committee of citizens waited upon him one day and gave 
him twenty-four hours to leave the state. Other Union men had been 
severely dealt with on account of refusal to comply with such demand, 
and Major Fithian, feeling that nothing could be attained by a vain resist- 
ance, returned to his birthplace in New Jersey. It was only a short time 
before the war broke out. He then opened a recruiting office and formed 
the Kearney Guards, which subsequently became Company F of Ihe 
Twenty-fourth New Jersey Infantry. He was elected captain of this 
company, and was mustered into service September 16, 1862. The 
Twenty-fourth Regiment of which he was made major was attached to 
General Abercrombie's Brigade, and afterwards transferred to the 
Third Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, under the 



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>\''- I .';=i\.\. S'lT'.i I' ' '■ ■ •■ : • Kiu'nv Major 
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• AUP.^ive j)linta!i'>n, That vva^ in iho 

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• ■/ was himself a nrf)notniv'ed unioni>l. It 

. . ' itizens waiird ni»**n Inm one <lay and i^a\e 

•I ua\e the st.tli'. ( >:hti I'niuu mi n had been 

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' .': 'hat not!iinq o)tild be attained b\ a vain re'> 

J -:r'' ; ■ ;.\ ni \<-\\ Jersey. It was oidv a shtT' 

nt !iv »liw; opened a r'-crtiitin^ otTice a'l 
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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 585 

command of Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball. Gen. William H. French, rec- 
ognising the ability of the young major, appointed him inspector general 
of the Third Division. In that capacity he took part in the battle of 
Fredericksburg in December, 1862, and later at Chancellors ville in May, 
1863. His first term of enlistment expired and he was mustered out June 
29, 1863. He soon returned to the army, and on February 28, 1864, was 
appointed major and additional paymaster United States Army, in 
which capacity he was with the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah 
and in various campaigns under General Sheridan. After the surrender 
of the Confederate army at Appomattox, he was ordered to Richmond to 
assist in the final payment of the soldiers. He was continued on duty 
until October 12, 1865, when he resigned his commission. 

For about thirty years after the war Major Fithian was a prominent 
banker in the East. He was vice president of one of the largest banks 
of Richmond, Virginia, and subsequently became intimately connected 
with financial aflfairs in New York City and in Paris, France. He had 
some very large investments in France, and in the meantime he began 
buying lands in Southern California, especially property in and around 
Santa Barbara. At different times he had visited California and finally 
established his home in Santa Barbara. Though he came to this city with 
well matured success, he was not content to let his investments lie idle 
or allow his individual service to rust from disuse. He was warmly inter- 
ested in Santa Barbara's growth and development, and in many ways 
used his ample means for the enrichment of the city. His name has long 
been associated with the Fithian Building, which at its completion in 
1896 was the finest structure in the city. He had formulated various 
other plans for additional improvement of the real estate he controlled 
in the city, but in 1898 while returning from Paris, France, he was sud- 
denly taken ill on the journey across the continent, and he died at. Los 
Angeles, before reaching his beloved home at Santa Barbara on March 
26, 1898. 

Those who recall Major Fithian will attest the truth of what has been 
said of him in the following words: **Possessing the qualities of mind 
and heart that win and retain friends, he soon became one of the leading 
citizens of his adopted city. In any gathering of people his soldierly 
bearing, courtly dignity of manner and genial courtesy made him a con- 
spicuous figure. His face bore the stamp of a striking personality and 
even those who met him but once could readily discern his possession of 
powers than raise a man from competency to wealth and prestige and 
prominence.*' 

In New York City Major Fithian married Fannie B. Connolly, daugh- 
ter of Richard B. Connolly. Mrs. Fithian after the death of her husband 
spent a portion of each year in Europe and the rest of her time in Santa 
Barbara. She died while visiting in Paris December 29, 1901. There 
were four children: Myra married Chester Allan Arthur, son of ex- 
President Arthur, and lives at Colorado Springs, Colorado. Fannie 
married Comte Arthur de Gabriac of Paris. R. Barett has been an active 
factor in Santa Barbara's business aflfairs and he succeeded to the owner- 



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586 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

ship of the Country Club in Montecito which Major Fithian built and 
founded. Joel R. Fithian, the younger son, is one of Santa Barbara 
County's leading" horticulturists, reference to whom is made on other 
pages. 

Joel Remington Fithian. A man of scholarly attainments and 
broad culture, energetic and enterprising, Joel R. Fithian, of Carpinteria, 
holds high rank among the leading agriculturists of Santa Barbara 
County, and is well worthy of the respect and confidence in which he is 
everywhere held. He was born February 28, 1874, in Marseilles, France, 
a son of Maj. Joel Adams and Fannie (Connolly) Fithian. Major 
Fithian was for many years a distinguished officer of the United States 
army, and having made wise investments in Southern California obtained 
title to large tracts of land in Santa Barbara County. 

Joel Remington Fithian had superior educational advantages, attend- 
ing Mount Pleasant Military Academy at Ossining on the Hudson, and 
later going abroad and continuing his studies at Sillig College, in Vevay, 
Switzerland, and studied German at Heidelberg College, Germany. 
After leaving college, Mr. Fithian spent two years in traveling, visiting 
all of the more important points of interest in a trip around the globe, 
finding much pleasure in his jomeyings, and gaining much knowledge. 
In 1892 he located in Santa Barbara, and began his career as a farmer 
by assisting in the management of his father's large ranch in Carpinteria. 
At the death of his father, March 26, 1898, Mr. Fithian fell heir to that 
portion of the parental estate lying in Carpinteria, and has since been 
actively and successfully engaged in fruit growing and general farming, 
branches of agriculture in which he is genuinely interested, finding both 
pleasure and profit in his work. 

Mr. Fithian is officially connected with two of the substantial finan- 
cial institutions of Santa Barbara County, being vice president of the 
Central Bank of Santa Barbara, and of the Bank of Carpinteria. He is 
president of the Johnson Fruit Company, and is also president of the 
board of trustees of the museum of comparative ornithology, a position 
for which his intelligent study of birds has eminently qualified him. Soci- 
ally Mr. Fithian is a member of the Santa Barbara Country Club, which 
he and his brother, R. B. Fithian, founded, and for which they and their 
father erected the first club house of the Hot Springs Club; La Cumbre 
Club, the Quaker Club, the Santa Barbara Polo Club, and the Aero Club 
of America. Religiously he belongs to the Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Fithian married, May 28, 1903, Miss Mary Rathbone Baker. 

Phillip Hollowell Rice. A man of marked ability and honest 
integrity, Phillip Hollowell Rice holds a noteworthy position among the 
foremost citizens of Santa Barbara, being prominent not only as a large 
dealer in real estate and an extensive landholder, but as a leader in the 
business and social life of the city. He was bom in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, September 2^, 1861, a son of Thomas H. and EHzabeth (Bancroft) 
Rice. He comes of honored ancestry, being descended from an old and 



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ii;iii(*ni> and 

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•uc in whicli he is 

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' '• edu*'ational a<l\anta<^es. atten<l- 

:i\ at ( )>-inin<; o'l the lludson, and 

-^t :iiies v >il;ii^ i^'Iu\i;e, in \*e\a\. 

II ,'•'!'! ( « Mk . '-, ( icrnianv 

'■ ^ m tia\ einiL'. \ isitin:^ 

a irij) aroiin«i the ^lobe, 

. d / lUiing much kn^wled^e. 

'.I I.' Ml his career as a fiynier 

. ' 'i. f > lar*^e ra;irh in i arpinteria. 

• ..' .N. ?wlr. rirhian fell heir to that 

.; ' arjtKUvP', a"d has since been 

'•- i')n:t i^rnwii": ..'.d 'jt't<:'i! tarnri": 

I' I"- i^ •^(•"in,n 'y r.;. ' - '. ,1 ;.• .''ir.i^ 1 • 

- . ;' _\ ii.ntK-ctLd w ' ' •' "• .substantial u . ' 

* .^aiua luiiinra i «^>'. ;*. ' . i -e president mI •; ; 

••' .-.inta llajbaia. a; <i •, ■ .'. -x '.»i C'arpinteri: lie i- 

'\''{ oi the J«)hn^tjn iMMti i <>,':-> .' ' . .i^-o prcsid^-ni la the 

( ' «.t trn-!r«>,()f <!.»' n;" tun) '.t i . ■ :.'.r '!i\ {' «,ni:l'inlnj^y^ i p.-iiion 
^ .- 11 his ini< H'u- : I :r i- ff •' i - ha- eniineini\ 'lualifuMl li..ii. .^4)ci- 
. "^ ' '-. r-ri'an i- a 'n- > > i <-" ^-h* '^anta liarbara ( ountry < !■]. ^\hich 
;■• 1 •■''.''. I' . ' ! >!(. tniiude<h and for which th-'-. aj.-l their 

f-.M-' «)f th*' Hot Sjirings (dub; ' a i umbrv 
.•■•'a ''.nbar-i {'o--. *.hi1). and tin- \'T.> Cli.; 
* h' !f '';;.' s to tiie I'pisc(tpal ( t im''» 
: .'^. i';'>3, Mis^ Mary K iil.'< )i.r- T.aker. 

!':*• A man of ni,.f-- d ai--' ty and l-- ■ 
•' ' Uat' holds a n''l' \\ori ;v po-M o-i 
.. ■• I I'.ir'hara. beinj.; p^«>inin(-nt not on.-. 
"'.| ,: 1 t'Ktcn i\e la'^lholiler. InU as a 1'' 
'. '»tthe«'*\. ill was born in l'hita;!ci -''.i ' 
' '' f.a -on of 'I'bwmas 11. and l'.li/a*a:!' 
■ ..(•*' ai!'.' -tr\'. bein*r descended froir. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 587 

distinguished Welsh family, his genealogical record dating back to two 
centuries before the time of William the Conqueror. His pleasant home 
in Goleta bears the name of the old Welsh estate on which his forefathers 
lived in ancient times, long before any bearing that name had thought of 
crossing the broad Atlantic. 

Having laid a substantial foundation for his future education in the 
city of his birth Phillip H. Rice completed his early studies at Swarthmore 
College. Turning his face westward, he subsequently spent a few years 
engaged in agricultural pursuits, being employed in raising cattle, first in 
Kansas and later in Colorado. Not satisfied with the financial returns of 
his labors, Mr. Rice returned to Philadelphia, and soon after embarked in 
the business that had long been carried on by his ancestors, that of a woolen 
manufacturer. In 1884, again feeling the lure of the West, Mr. Rice came 
to California, and has since been prosperously engaged in the real estate 
business at Santa Barbara, his transactions in that line having been exten- 
sive and highly remunerative. In 1912 he formed a partnership with Mr. 
J. R. Whittemore, and the business, which is constantly increasing, has 
since been conducted under the firm name of Rice & Whittemore. Mr. 
Rice is likewise interested in the agricultural development of this part of 
the state, having a lemon ranch of sixty acres at Goleta, where he and his 
family reside, and in Monterey County having 1,000 acres of land, which 
he devotes to general farming. 

Mr. Rice has been twice married. He married first, in Santa Barbara, 
Miss Isabelle Perkins, a daughter of Joseph J. Perkins. Mrs. Rice passed 
away leaving three children, namely: Phillip H., Jr.; Isabelle P.; and 
Joseph P. Mr. Rice married for his second wife, July, 1906, Miss 
Suzanne More, a daughter of Thomas R. and Mary (Deu) More, of 
Santa Barbara, and they have one child, Thomas Bancroft Rice. 

Mr. Rice is prominently identified with various Santa Barbara organ- 
izations, being vice president of the Johnson Fruit Company ; one of the 
directors of the Chamber of Commerce, of which he was president for one 
year; a member of the Santa Barbara Club; and is now serving as 
president of La Cumbre Golf and Country Oub. 

William R. Hayward. As one of the prominent citizens of Santa 
Barbara William R. Hayward has a number of interesting distinctions. 
He is one of the prominent painting and decorating contractors of the 
city and his business connections extend over practically all Southern 
California. To an even wider circle he is known as an authority on 
geology and numismatics, and has a most rare knowledge of the various 
arts and sciences connected with these two fields of research. As a 
collector Mr. Hayward has spent time, money and labor, and his eflForts 
have been splendidly rewarded. 

In his geological cabinet he has specimens covering the lower and upper 
Silurian ages; the Devonian age; the carboniferous, the reptilian age; 
and the mammalian age right up to and including prehistoric man. All 
the articles found in this collection have been obtained by himself in 



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588 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

various parts of the country. He has petrified specimens of the first 
animate things that could articulate, so far as known to science. 

In his coin cabinet Mr. Hay ward has specimens of all the big copper 
cents from 1793 until 1857 in American coinage, including those very rare 
ones bearing date 1799 and 1804. He also has a silver half dollar of 1804, 
the year in which none of that coin were issued, but which were sent out in 
1805 with the figure five restamped over the four. In the mintage of the 
early coinage of the United States mint a number of instances of this 
character have been noted, especially among the half cents. He likewise 
has two half dollars dated 1807. On one the profile faces to the left, while 
on the other the profile faces to the right. He has copper coins dating 
back 4000 years B. C. In his collection are many very fine specimens 
belonging to the stone age of the prehistoric man. Mr. Hay ward has had 
the honor of donating in 1887 to the Smithsonian Institute at Washington, 
D. C, some coins which were not in the possession of that institution. 
In reply to a question of recent date regarding them he was assured by the 
secretary of the National Museum that the coins were still on exhibition 
and were very much valued and appreciated. Mr. Hayward has often 
been called upon as a special authority on United States coins. His 
knowledge is almost encyclopedic. 

Apart from his specimens of minerals and coins, Mr. Hayward has a 
collection of many other interesting articles. Noteworthy among them are 
some acorns gathered from a tree supposed to have been planted by Gen- 
eral Washington at Mount Vernon; a piece of glass from one of the 
windows in Independence Hall at Philadelphia where the Declaration of 
Independence was signed ; a Government grant deed given to John Symmes 
for 160 acres of land in Ohio where a considerable part of the City of 
Cincinnati now stands, the deed having upon it the original seal as it was 
given in the year 1788; an iron cross of Germany, also a decoration with 
two medal awards, on which are the original ribbons, given by Germany 
in 1813-15 to John Spohr, whose original signature still remains on a 
piece of paper sewed to the ribbons ; and other relics and curios of value. 

A native of England, Mr. Hayward was bom February 24, 1869, in 
Farnham, County Surrey, and comes of excellent ancestry on both sides. 
His father William Hayward, a life-long resident of England, was a noted 
watchmaker and jeweler. During the reign of Queen Victoria he did 
much work at Windsor Castle for the royal family. He was a lineal 
descendant, it is said, of Tom Hayward, one of the early English authors, 
while his wife, whose maiden name was Jane Stuart, was, according to 
genealogical records, connected with the old and honored family of Stuart. 

Mr. Hayward is the oldest of a family of fifteen children, eight boys and 
seven girls. His brothers are serving in the English army and he knows 
not whether they are living or dead. His oldest married sister contributed 
all of her five sons to the cause, one being killed by a fall from the Rock 
of Gibraltar, and the other four still in the army. The husband of that 
sister is a retired sergeant major of the English army, and at the present 
time is serving as customs officer of Southampton, England. 

Having completed his early studies in the public schools of his native 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 589 

land, William R. Hayward entered the Government service of Great 
Britain, where he obtained his first insight into the business he is following 
today. Becoming familiar with the details of the painter's trade he 
emigrated to the United States, first locating in Washington, D. C, where 
he remained a year. After that he accepted contracts for painting in 
various parts of the country. Somewhat of a coincidence of his career 
is the fact that he had the privilege of working on Rear Admiral Bob 
Evans' residence at Old Point Comfort on the Atlantic coast and later 
on the Pacific coast was employed on the residence of Rear Admiral 
McCalla, both of whom were noted admirals in Uncle Sam's navy. 

Since coming to Santa Barbara in 1902 Mr. Hayward has continued 
his successful business, and has performed important contracts for paint- 
ing both in the city and in the surrounding territory. A business distinc- 
tion is that he is the only painter between Hollywood and San Luis 
Obispo who can get his accounts insured. While living in the East Mr. 
Hayward spent seven years in Cincinnati. While there he was naturalized 
for the special purpose of casting his first presidential vote for William 
McKinley. While in Cincinnati he became active in politics, and served 
as first vice president for four years of the old Garry Owen Republican 
Club, which at that time was dominated by George B. Cox. He continued 
the meetings all through the McKinley administration, and when he left 
Cincinnati was given a life membership in the club for his valued services 
rendered. 

Mr. Hayward married Miss Frances J. LeCount, a daughter of William 
H. LeCount. Her father was born in Wales and came with his father, 
who was a retired officer of the English army, to the United States in the 
early part of the nineteenth century. William LeCount enlisted as a 
soldier in an Ohio regiment during the Civil war, and having been 
captured by the enemy was confined for a long time in the notorious 
Andersonville prison. While thus confined, he suflfered as most of his 
comrades from hunger, and he exchanged a Masonic charm for the 
shinbone of a mule. He obtained a meal from that bone and from a part 
of the bone he carved with a penknife a Masonic charm, which at his 
request was given on his death to Mr. Hayward, who is a member of the 
Masonic order and who prizes it highly among his collection. 

Mr. Hayward is a member of various societies and fraternities. He 
is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science ; 
of the International Masters Painting Society of the United States and 
Canada ; of the Order of Masons ; the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks; Knights of Pythias; Modern Woodmen of America; and 
numerous other institutions. He is intensely American in every respect, 
taking a special pride in the city of his adoption and in Southern 
California. 

Richard Stuart is a Scotchman who came to Southern California 
thirty years ago, first locating in Santa Barbara. After working on the 
S. P. Stow Ranch for a year, then for a year on Mr. Stock's Las Posas 
Rancho in Ventura County a year, and for three years on Harvey Wall- 



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590 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

bridge's Ranch, he rented some land near Camarillo, and was a farmer 
there three years. Removing to Bardsdale in the Santa Clara Valley he 
and his brother Archibald bought sixteen acres, and soon afterwards 
divided it. From the nucleus of eight acres which he thus owned Richard 
Stuart developed one of the finest farms and fruit ranches in that section 
and now owns fifty-seven acres in Bardsdale. Forty-six acres are planted 
in lemons, oranges, walnuts and apricots and the rest in beans. He is 
also owner of 120 acres near Milford, Utah. 

Mr. Stuart is an active member of the Fillmore Citrus Fruit Associa- 
tion, of the Santa Paula Walnut Growers Association, and the Ventura 
County Cured Fruit Association. Politically he is a republican and is a 
member of the Methodist Church. 

He was born in Berwickshire, Scotland, December 17, 1869, a son 
of Dr. Charles and Georgina Stuart. In his native district of Scotland 
he attended public schools until thirteen and continued his education in 
George Watson's College for Boys at Edinburg until he was sixteen. 
After that he worked on several farms in Berwickshire untij he came to 
America in 1887 and located in Santa Barbara. 

At Santa Cruz, California, in February, 1892, he married Mary 
Evans. Mrs. Stuart is a native of Santa Cruz, California, and a daugh- 
ter of William Evans, one of the early settlers of Santa Cruz County. 
During his life, William Evans was prominent in the Methodist Church. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stuart are the parents of three children. Charles William, 
aged twenty-one, is associated with his father on the ranch. Arthur 
and Evelyn, twins, are now seventeen years of age, and the former is 
one of the workers on his father's ranch, while Evelyn is attending high 
school. 

John B. Cunnane. A prominent druggist of Santa Barbara, and 
one of the city's most substantial business men, John B. Cunnane has 
been an active factor in promoting the advancement and prosperity of 
this section of California for upwards of a quarter of a century, during 
which time he has fully established himself in the esteem and confidence 
of his associates and neighbors, and has built up a large and lucrative 
trade. A son of the late Bartholomew Cunnane, he was bom in White 
County, Indiana, August 17, 1863. His father, who for many years was 
an employe of the Wabash Railroad Company, came to California in 
1889, and subsequently lived retired until his death, in 1900. He was 
a native of Ireland, belonging to a family of note, while his wife, whose 
maiden name was Margaret Mullaney, was likewise born and bred in the 
Emerald Isle. She survived him many years, passing away in 191 4. 

Removing with his parents to Missouri when young, John B. Cunnane 
received his elementary education in the public schools of Moberly, 
Randolph County. Coming to California in 1884, he studied pharmacy 
in San Francisco, and four years later established himself in the drug 
business at Santa Ynez, Santa Barbara County, where he continued the 
business for twenty years. In 1905 Mr. Cunnane purchased the Guitterez 
Drug Store, located at 635 State Street, Santa Barbara, and immediately 



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JACOB PEXSINGER 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 591 

placed it in charge of his partner, C. E. Phoenix, who managed it until 
1908, when Mr. Cunnane himself moved to the city and assumed the man- 
agement of his store, which is the oldest drug establishment in the city, 
having been established in 1855, and run by the Guitterez family until 
it came into the possession of its present owner, who is still running it 
under its original name. Mr. Cunnane retaii\ed his business in Santa Ynez 
until 1914, when he sold at an advantage, although he still owns the store 
building in that place, and has other property interests in that vicinity. 

Mr. Cunnane married, at Santa Ynez, December 9, 1891, Miss Alice 
N. Torrence, who was born in Illinois, a daughter of J. W. and Nancy 
Torrence, who came to the golden state in pioneer days. Mr. Torrence 
died in 1912, but Mrs. Torrence is still living in Santa Ynez. She comes 
from patriotic ancestry, being a direct descendant of Col. William Wash- 
ington, a cousin of Gen. George Washington. Mr. and Mrs. Cunnane 
have three children, namely: Philip J., who was graduated from the 
medical department of the University of Southern California with the 
class of 1914, and is now a practicing physician in Santa Barbara ; Thomas 
B., who is studying medicine in the same university, being a member 
of the class of 1917; and Margaret N., who was graduated from the 
Santa Barbara High School in 1916. 

A democrat in politics, Mr. Cunnane was for many years active in pub- 
lic affairs, representing his party at nearly all of the county conventions, 
and serving as a member of the Democratic County Central Committee 
for twenty years. In 191 5 Mr. Cunnane was one of the committee of 
fifteen freeholders that framed the charter for the City of Santa Barbara. 
While living at Santa Ynez he served as postmaster during both of 
Cleveland's terms as president. He belongs to various fraternal and 
social organizations, being a member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks; the Modem Woodmen of America; the Knights of 
Columbus ; the Santa Barbara Chamber of Commence ; and the Commer- 
cial Club. He is also a stockholder in the Central Bank of Santa Barbara. 
Religiously he is a member of the Roman Catholic Church. 

Jacob Pensinger. A man of much ability and intelligence, industri- 
ous and thrifty, Jacob Pensinger, of Goleta, holds a pftsition of note 
among the successful agriculturists of his community, as a grower of 
fruits and vegetables reaping abundant crops. A son of the late George 
Pensinger, he was bom, December 31, 1844, in the Keystone State, 
where his early life was spent. 

George Pensinger enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Twenty- 
sixth Pennsylvania Infantry during the Civil war, and served until the 
end of the struggle. He married Christine Raughtraff, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, and three of their sons fought throughout the Civil war, Jacob, 
William and John having been members of Company K, Twenty-first 
Pennsylvania Cavalry. With the exception of John, who received a 
slight flesh wound, neither the father or either of the sons were injured. 

Jacob Pensinger was educated in his native town, and after leaving 
^'"hool worked with his father, who was a miller, until after the breaking 



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592 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

out of the Civil war. Enlisting, as previously mentioned, in a company 
of cavalry, he actively participated in the engagements at the Wilderness, 
Antietam, Fredericksburg, Petersburg, and others of importance, as a 
soldier doing his duty most faithfully. Soon after his discharge from 
the army, Mr. Pensinger followed the tide of emigration westward, 
working for awhile in different places between the Alleghanies and the 
Pacific coast until 1873, when he settled in Santa Barbara. Immediately 
securing a position with Judge Ord, he remained in his employ for eleveri 
months, after which he worked on the Sisters building and ranch for 
four consecutive years, gaining a valuable experience in ranching as car- 
ried on in Southern California. 

Mr. Pensinger then took a trip to Oregon, where he remained nine 
months. Not content with his prospects in that state, he returned to 
Santa Barbara County and here invested his money in his present ranch 
of forty acres, lying near Goleta. With characteristic enterprise and 
forethought, he set out fruit and walnut trees on a part of his estate, 
while on the hill land he has been very successful in raising large crops 
of beans. His ranch, which is well improved and judiciously cultivated, 
constitutes one of the model farms of the community. 

In 1877 ^I^- Pensinger was united in marriage with Miss Ilattic 
Glass, who was born in Goleta, where her father, the late John Glass, 
was for many years engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pensinger have three children, namely : George, residing in Santa Bar- 
bara, is bookkeeper in Eland's butcher shop; Jennie, wife of Robert 
S. Rowe, of Goleta; and Christina, wife of Ed McCaffrey, assistant post- 
master at Santa Barbara. Mr. Pensinger is a stanch republican in politics, 
and an active member of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Charles T. Wason. Few men have had a more varied career than 
Charles T. Wason. His activities have carried him through various 
stages of ranch life, beginning as a workman on his father's ranch, to 
operating a 1,000 acre ranch on his own responsibility. He has tasted 
the less strenuous, though perhaps equally trying life of a retail furni- 
ture dealer, and followed that experience with a four-year term as under- 
sheriff of his Vounty. Later he came into possession of a ranch in the 
Santa Clara Valley, through inheritance, and he has since then devoted 
himself to life on the land. 

Charles T. Wason was bom in Solano County, California, and is 
thus entitled to the somewhat enviable appellation in his state of "Native 
Son." His natal day was May 6, 1859, and his parents were Milton and 
Maria A. (Borgnis) Wason. 

Hon. Milton Wason was born in Nashua, New Hampshire, on Janu- 
ary 17, 1817. Three generations of the family were bom and reared 
in that state. The father of Hon. Milton Wason was Judge Wason, 
bom on November 2, 1785, and he was one of the foremost men of his 
time in New Hampshire. He was prominent in public life, serving sev- 
eral terms in the state legislature, and he served as a judge for many 
years. The first of the name to settle in New Hampshire was James 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 593 

Wason, great-grandfather of Hon. Milton Wason and great-great-grand- 
father of the subject. 

James Wason was the emigrant ancestor of this branch of the family, 
and he was born in County Antrim, Ireland, from which place he emi- 
grated in 1740 with his wife, Hannah ( ) Wason. They located 

on a tract of land in New Hampshire which became the ancestral home 
of the family, and has sheltered as many as five generations of the name. 
The son of this family of Irish emigrants was Judge Wason, who mar- 
ried one Mary Colbum, an English girl who was bom within a mile of 
the Wason home, an^ their son was Milton Wason, father pf the subject 
of this family review. 

When Milton Wason finished his training at Dartmouth College, he 
took a law course at the Harvard Law School, and followed that very 
excellent training with a course of reading in the offices of Philips & 
Robbins, a prominent law firm of Boston, Massachusetts, and still later 
was associated in a similar capacity with Bradford Sumner. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1847, practiced law on his own responsibility in Bos- 
ton for two years and in 1849 came to California on a sailing vessel via 
the Horn route, and thereby won the title of "forty-niner." 

In common with the prevailing custom of the time, he turned his atten- 
tion to gold-mining in Eldorado and Calaveras counties, without regard 
for his professional training, and for four years he gave his best energies 
to the pursuit of the yellow-metal, enjoying a very reasonable success. 
He did not become rich, but he met with occasional successes sufficient to 
hold him to the task for four years. He then moved to Solano County 
and settled on a Government tract, engaging in ranching. He prospered 
and was a leader in his community for years, serving some time as county 
superintendent of schools. In 1868 he left the county and came to Ven- 
tura County, purchasing 275 acres in the Santa Clara Valley, one of the 
garden spots of a wonderfully fertile and productive region. In 1874 he 
sold 150 acres and continued to operate the remaining acreage. This move 
was prompted partly because of his having been appointed county judge 
of Ventura County in 1873, he being the first to hold that office. In the 
same year he was elected to the post for a four year term. As incumbent 
of that office he made a name for himself and proved himself a man of 
great public talent, so that his election to the State Legislature in 1879 
came as a matter of course. He gave an honorable and efficient service 
in that office and was returned to the Legislature by his constituency in 
1881. In 1883 he was appointed to the post of deputy-revenue collector. 

Mr. Wason retired from public life with the close of his term in that 
post, and retired to enjoy the comfort and beauty of his home in the Santa 
Clara Valley. This place, a 100 acre ranch which he had brought to a 
splendid state of development, was then one of the most delightful spots 
in the valley. He gave his closing years to its care and development, and 
died there on September 20, 1893. His passing was mourned throughout 
the county and in many parts of the state where he had become known 
in the years of his active career. 

Mr. Wason was married on October 26, 1852, to Maria A. Borgnia, 



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594 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

bom in the City of London, England, on February i, 1820. Two sons 
and two daughters were bom to them. The eldest, Maria A., married 
Riall A. Sparks and is now a resident of Los Angeles. Mary Elizabeth is 
the wife of Chas. A. Deleree, of Santa Barbara. Charles T. is the subject 
of this review, and George M., who married Agnes Jones, of Elizabeth, 
Pennsylvania, and lived on the home place during the life of the father. 
All four were bom in Solano County. 

Charles T. Wason attended the public schools in his native county up 
to the age of nine, after which the family settled in Ventura County, and 
he continued his studies there in the public schools to the age of seven- 
teen. Then he applied himself to work on his father's ranch until he was 
of legal age, and in 1880 branched out for himself. He began by renting 
a ranch of about 1,000 acres. It was a part of the well known Las Pasas 
Rancho, owned by the late Senator Bard, and he continued to operate the 
ranch until 1887, when he gave it up, settled in Ventura and opened a 
furniture store. He gave one year to that business, and was then 
appointed to the post of undersheriff, serving in that capacity four years. 

With the death of his father Mr. Wason inherited a part of the home 
place, thirty-five acres comprising his share. This acreage he has planted 
to walnuts, one of the most profitable groves in the valley being in his 
possession today. 

Mr. Wason was married on June 13, 1889, to Miss Ella B. Wason, 
of San Francisco, a daughter of James P. Wason, she being a distant 
cousin of the family. Three children were bom to them. Grace lives at 
home. Maude is the wife of James H. Shields, Jr., of Buhl, Idaho. The 
youngest child, Thomas, seventeen years old at this waiting, is a student 
in the Ventura High School. 

Mr. Wason has been a republican all his maturer years, but has not 
been active in politics after the manner of his father. Mr. Wason was a 
member of the Ventura Company of the Seventh Regiment, National 
Guard of Califomia. He was one of the original members of that com- 
pany, the first organized in Ventura Cotinty, and served for 3^ years. 
With his family he has a high place in the esteem of the community at 
large. 

Joseph Paul Morette. Stone cutting and carving is one of the 
oldest arts of civilized men, and in modern times it is more valuable than 
ever as an adjunct to the business and work of the world. 

A finished carver in stone, and one who has followed his trade in all 
parts of the United States, Joseph Paul Morette is now established per- 
manently at Santa Barbara, where on January i, 191 5, he organized the 
California Granite and Marble Works. He is sole proprietor and has 
already put this on a plane of permanence and success. He furnishes 
both monumental and building work and specializes in fancy fountains, 
fireplace and other stone carving, and his plant at Santa Barbara is 
becoming recognized as one of the most important sources of high class 
and artistic work in this line in Southem Califomia. 

Mr. Morette was born in Boston, Massachusetts, December 18, 1882, 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 593 

a son of Martin and Madaline (Gibilo) Morette. He grew up in Boston, 
attended the public schools there and in 1896 graduated from the South 
Framingham High School. It was in his native city that he learned the 
granite trade, and had a thorough apprenticeship lasting for three years. 
After that he went on the road and was a stone cutter in all parts of the 
United States and Canada until he came to Santa Barbara and set up in a 
profitable business of his own. In Santa Barbara in December, 191 5, 
Mr. Morette married May Cheadel. 

Jam£S G. Black. One of the oldest and best known merchants and 
business men of Santa Maria is James G. Black, one of the proprietors of 
Black's Bazaar. He has spent most of his life in California, and was 
thoroughly grounded in the details of merchandising before he undertook 
an independent business career. 

He was born in Victoria, British Columbia, December 18, 1863, but in 
1870 when he was seven years of age his parents Patrick J. and Mary E. 
(Morris) Black came to Santa Maria, California. His father was a 
rancher. 

With a public school education in the Santa Maria Valley James G. 
Black began looking after himself at an early age and in 1888 he removed 
to San Francisco, where he was employed by different firms until 1903. 
With a mature business experience behind him he returned to Santa 
Maria and entered the employ of his brother George, and later with his 
brother William bought the mercantile establishment of George Black 
and these brothers have since conducted one of the best equipped stocks of 
general merchandise in Santa Maria, known as Black's Bazaar. 

For three years Mr. Black served as private in Company F of the Fifth 
Regiment of the National Guard of California. He is a republican, is 
affiliated with Lodge No. 322 of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks and the ICnights of Pythias. 

On December 25, 1894, in Oakland, California, he married Miss Alice 
McDonald. Mrs. Black was bom in Nevada City, California. They 
are the parents of one daughter, Maude. 

William W. Pope. During a visit to Southern California in Febru- 
ary, 1911, William W. Pope, who had in the meantime established him- 
self as a successful business man and manufacturer in Ohio, was so 
favorably impressed with the country around Santa Paula that he deter- 
mined to make it his future home. As soon as he could dispose of his 
interests in Ohio, he returned and has lived at Santa Paula since Novem- 
ber, 191 1. 

His first investment was the purchase of forty acres near Santa 
Paula from James Buchanan. He at once set out thirty-five acres in 
lemons, and retains the balance for home and garden. He has one of 
the very attractive places in that valley. Besides this place which is 
being developed as a lemon orchard he leases seventy acres adjoining, 
and employs it for raising hay. 

Mr. Pope is agent for the JeflFery Automobile in Ventura County, 
and was one of the organizers and has been a director of the San 



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596 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Cayletano Mutual Water Company. This company has invested $70,000 
in a plant, has a well flowing from thirty-five to forty inches of water, 
and supplies water for irrigation purposes to 800 acres between Santa 
Paula and Fillmore. 

William W. Pope was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in February, 1880, 
a son of W. W. and Kate M. Pope. He attended grammar schools of 
several states and was also a student in the high school at Galveston, 
Texas, in which southern city he lived for a number of years. On leav- 
ing high school there he entered the offices of the Santa Fe Railroad as 
a clerk and was connected with the auditing department for five years. 
From Galveston he went to Akron, Ohio, spent a year and a half in 
railroad construction work, and then entered the service of the Robinson 
Clay Products Company of Akron, manufacturers of stoneware, sewer 
pipe, fire brick, etc. He was clerk with this firm until 1905. In that year 
the company bought out the J. A. Bauer Pottery Company at Paducah, 
Kentucky, and established the Paducah Pottery Company, with Mr. 
Pope as secretary and manager. Ke lived at Paducah until 1907, when he 
resigned his position and returned to Akron and bought an interest in 
the Hall-Harter Insurance Agency, and was in the insurance business 
and a dealer in real estate as salesman for the company until he came 
out to California. 

Mr. Pope is a Scottish and York Rite Mason and a member of the 
Mystic Shrine. As a republican he is one of the County Central Com- 
mittee of Ventura County. He is a member of the Sierra Madre Club of 
Los Angeles, the Union League Club of Los Angeles, the Chamber of 
Commerce and the Citizens Club of Santa Paula, and is secretary of 
the Citizens Club. In Akron, Ohio, June, 1905, he married Katharine E. 
Merrill, a native of Ohio and a daughter of Henry E. Merrill, one of the 
pioneer stoneware and pottery men of that state. 

William L. Ross. Among the large landholders of Ventura County, 
few have more important interests than those held by the Ross family, 
whose members are largely identified with agricultural affairs here. 
A worthy representative of this family is William L. Ross, who, while a 
resident of Los Angeles, is superintending the operations on a 550-acre 
ranch in Ventura County, which is producing large crops under his good 
management. 

Mr. Ross was bom in the City of Los Angeles, California, May 6, 
1889, and is a son of Charles and Auriella (Arenas) Ross. His education 
was secured in the public schools, at Saint V^incent's College, where he 
graduated from the high school department in 1908, at Santa Clara Col- 
lege, at Santa Clara, California, which he attended for one year, and at 
Troop Polytechnic School, Pasadena, California, where he was a student 
for a like period. Upon the completion of his education he entered at 
once upon the business of looking after his 550-acre bean ranch in Ven- 
tura County, which he had inherited from his uncle, Cav. Leopoldo 
Schiappa Pietra, and which is now one of the productive and well- 
improved properties of this part of the state. Mr. Ross is a young man 



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CHRISTIAN' LARSOX 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 597 

of progressive and industrious spirit, who has given much thought and 
study to modem methods of agriculture and has installed numerous im- 
provements which have lessened labor and decreased the cost of pro- 
duction. His standing in business circles is an excellent one, and he has 
numerous friends also in civic and social circles. He maintains his 
residence at Los Angeles, where he is a popular member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Columbus and the Los 
Angeles Athletic Club. His political support is given to the candidates 
oi the republican party. 

Mr. Ross was married January 29, 1913, at Los Angeles, California, 
to Miss Alice Spillane, and they have one son : William L., Jr., who was 
bom in 1915. 

Louis C. Larson. Any list of the prosperous ranchers in the vicinity 
of Goleta in Santa Barbara County would include the name of I^uis C. 
Larson. Mr. Larson is a native son of this section of California and 
for more than thirty-nine years he and his people have borne a worthy 
part in the planting and general agricultural affairs of Santa Barbara 
County. 

The birthplace of Mr. Louis C. Larson was the old La Patera Ranch. 
He was born there November 26, 1877, a son of Christian and Minnie 
Larson, both natives of Denmark. Christian Larson came to La Patera, 
California, in 1871, and entered the service of the well known ranch 
owner S. P. Stow. He assisted in the planting of the great fruit orchard 
on the La Patera Ranch, and altogether was in Mr. Stow's service for 
sixteen years. This long experience and the thrifty utilization of his 
means gave him the foundation for an independent career. He bought 
forty acres from the old La Patera Ranch, and was successfully identified 
with its operations until his death on May 29, 1916. 

Louis C. Larson grew up at Goleta, and was well educated, partly 
in the public schools of Goleta and also by private teachers. His educa- 
tion being finished, he took his place with his father on the farm, and 
since his father's death has been its active manager. Mr. Larson employs 
his land successfully in the growing of walnuts and beans as the chief 
crop. He is unmarried and his sister Inga is the wife of A. W. Conover 
who is supervisor and a rancher of Goleta. 

Louis C. Larson is identified with the republican party in politics 
and is a member of Santa Barbara Lodge No. 613 Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. 

Henry Meyer is a business man whose associations have made him 
a Californian in every sense of the word for fully thirty years. For 
more than ten years his home and interests have been centered at Oxnard, 
and he is well known in that community and over Ventura County in 
general. 

He is a native of the Kingdom of Hanover, Germany, where he was 
born April 29, 1859, a son of Johan Meyer. His early training was 
after the substantial German fashion. The public schools were his 



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598 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

source of literary information until he was about fourteen. Going 
to the great free City of Hamburg, he found a place in a wholesale 
liquor establishment. To become a merchant in Germany means pass- 
ing through as rigid apprenticeship as any of the mechanical trades or 
professions. Mr. Meyer spent eleven years in that concern at Hamburg, 
and then had considerable other experience in his native land, being for 
six months located in the same line of business at Rendsburg, for one 
year at Altoena, and two years at St. Paulie, Germany. 

With all this experience as the groundwork for his permanent career, 
Mr. Meyer set out for the land of opportunities and arrived in Santa 
Barbara, California, July i, 1885. Here he was connected with a liquor 
concern for two years and then established a business of his own which 
he continued successfully until 1905. Selling out his establishment at 
Santa Barbara, he moved to Oxnard, and here established and has since 
conducted a wholesale and retail liquor business. 

Mr. Meyer is affiliated with the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the 
Improved Order of Red Men, the Sons of Hermann and in politics is 
identified with the republican party. In Santa Barbara, California, in 
August, 1887, about two years after his arrival in California, he married 
Carolina Ulsen. They are the parents of eight children: Mrs. Clara 
Greene; Conrad; Mrs. Elsie Jordan; and Dolly, Waldemar, Walter, Otto 
and Elmer, all at home. 

Charles J. Daily. When he came to Ventura County about thirty 
years ago, Charles J. Daily spent several years in mastering the intri- 
cacies of California agriculture as a farm and ranch hand. He developed 
into manager of one of the largest and most valuable ranch holdings in 
Ventura County, and a number of years ago retiring from that work 
turned all his attention to the management of his own land. He now has 
a splendid estate and one of the very beautiful homes of Southern Cali- 
fornia. His location is near Camarillo. 

He is a son of Charles Wesley Daily, who is an honored old soldier 
well known in this section of California. Charles Wesley Daily was bom 
in Monroe County, New York, August 22, 1835, was educated in the dis- 
trict schools until he was sixteen and thereafter the Genesee Wesleyan 
Seminary until eighteen. From that time forward he had a varied and 
interesting experience in many lines of work, and altogether has been a 
very successful man. For two years he was employed in a general mer- 
chandise store, then worked on his father's farm until he was twenty- 
five, went west to Topeka where he took up a full section of Government 
land, and for three years was engaged in farming it. 

Selling his Kansas land and returning home to New York, he enlisted 
in Company L of the Fiftieth New York Engineers, and served with that 
organization until the close of the Civil war in 1865. After that he spent 
two years on his parents' farm in Monroe County, New York, then farmed 
for ten years in Van Buren County in Northwestern Michigan, and sell- 
ing out his interests there returned to Monroe County, New York, and 
again spent two years on the homestead. His next location was at Hone- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 599 

oye Falls in Monroe County, where for a year he was employed in the 
general merchandise store of Downey & Lay, then for a year was on the 
farm of William Markham near Honeoye Falls. 

Mr. Charles W. Daily on leaving New York came to Ventura County, 
California, and has since been closely associated with his sons in the 
ranching industry. He is an honored member of the Grand Army Post, 
is a Mason, and has a wide circle of friends both in the East and the 
West. On January 27, 1858, he married at Lima, New York, Ruth F. 
Green. Their three sons are : Charles J., E. Wright and Wendell Philips. 

Charles J. Daily, a son of this honored old soldier, was born in Monroe 
County, New York, February 7, 1859, ^^^ ^ district school education, 
and at the age of twelve left his father's farm to win his own way in the 
world. For a number of years he worked out for various farmers in 
Monroe County, but in 1886 sought new scenes and better opportunities 
in the Far West. Arriving in Ventura County, he engaged as a farm 
hand with the Patterson Ranch Company, and after two years of that 
work was promoted to the position of manager. He was manager of the 
old Patterson Ranch for eighteen years and did much to develop its 
splendid resources not only as a stock ranch but as a producing center 
for some of the staple agricultural products of Ventura County. 

In the meantime in 1891 Mr. Daily bought the sixty-three acres of 
land surrounding his present home. This home is in Pleasant Valley. 
After leaving the Patterson Ranch he undertook the active superintendence 
of his home farm, and has since added to his holdings until he is now the 
owner of 400 acres. His primary crop on this land is lima beans. He 
has not only won a substantial place as a farmer, but has surrounded 
himself with all the many attractions of Southern California life and with 
his family enjoys a beautiful home with all the modem comforts and 
conveniences. In politics Mr. Daily is a republican. 

He was married in Ventura County February 14, 1891, to Theresa 
Gisler. They are the parents of seven children. Thomas C, the oldest, 
now twenty- four years of age, is in business with his father. The younger 
children are Lillian, Edna, Milton Frank, aged eighteen, Mary and Martha, 
twins, and Marguerite. 

Ezra Catlett. Actively engaged in the prosecution of a calling upon 
which the wealth of a nation largely depends, Ezra Catlett occupies a 
position of importance among the thriving agriculturists of the Goleta 
Valley, where he has a large and well appointed ranch, which, with its 
excellent improvements constitutes one of the most desirable pieces of 
property in the neighborhood. A son of Lewis H. and Eliza Ann (Ker- 
fote) Catlett, he was born January i, 1842, in Texas, on the banks of 
the Trinity River in Fort Houston. 

His parents having moved to Louisiana when he was a child, Ezra 
Catlett received the rudiments of his education in the public schools 
of Shreveport, and later continued his studies in the district schools of 
Northeastern Missouri. Soon after the breaking out of the Civil war, in 
1861, Mr. Catlett joined Company C, Tenth Missouri Volunteer Infan- 



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600 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

try, which was assigned to Gen. Stirling Price's army, and served until 
the close of the conflict. The ensuing few years he spent in the Middle 
West, being principally employed while there in agricultural pursuits. 
Ambitious to improve every offered opportunity lor advancing his 
fortunes, Mr. Catlett followed the march of civilization to the Pacific 
coast, and on the tenth day of March, 1869, located in Goleta Valley. 
Securing title to 160 acres of land, he immediately began its improve- 
ment. He met with excellent results in general farming, and has since 
bought other land, now owning and managing between 700 and 800 acres, 
on which he is successfully pursuing his pleasant and independent 
occupation. 

Mr. Catlett married, November 24, 1873, in Goleta, Miss Annette 
Smith, who came from Kendall County, Illinois, the place of her birth, 
to California in 1872, and subsequently taught school until her marriage. 
Six children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Catlett, namely: 
Ida, who married M. B. Neff, and is now living in Portland, Oregon; 
Otis Ezra, of \'ancouver, British Columbia; Jessie, wife of Elmer Kel- 
logg, of Goleta; Leonora, wife of Jerome Roberts, of Fresno, California; 
Karl, unmarried; and Nina, who married a cousin, E. M. Catlett, and is 
living in Chino, California. Mr. Catlett is independent in poHtics, voting 
for what he considers the men best qualified for the office, and for those 
measures most conducive to the public welfare. 

Ulpiano T. Ruiz. The Ruiz family of the present generation are 
descended from the forefathers of that name who were among the promi- 
nent Spanish grantees in this section of Southern California. Mr. Ulpiano 
T. Ruiz of Oxnard, has acquitted himself creditably as an agricultural 
producer in Ventura County and directs the management of one of the 
most prolific bean plantations in that locality. 

His earlier ancestors were active in the military and social life of old 
^lexico during the Spanish regime, and his grandfather, Jose Ruiz, a 
native of Spain, came to California during the Spanish control, with 
Father Junipero Serra when twelve years of age and was given a grant 
of 10,000 acres in and around Ventura for services rendered the Mexican 
government in California. Gabriel Ruiz, father of Ulpiano T. Ruiz, 
was born in California in 1817. At one time he owned a large part of 
the Calleguas Grant, now known as the Calleguas Rancho, but finally 
disposed of the last of that tract about 1876. Throughout his active career 
he continued as a farmer and stock raiser, owned land in both Ventura 
and Santa Barbara and lived on the Santa Anna Rancho in Ventura 
County. In 1859 Gabriel Ruiz married Miss Rafaela Cota, whose father 
Balentin Cota was bom in Mexico. Gabriel Ruiz and wife became the 
parents of fourteen children, all of w^hom were educated in the English 
schools and they constituted a family of unusual abilities and talents. 

Of this family, Ulpiano T. Ruiz was bom in Santa Barbara County 
April 16, 1865. Part of his early childhood was spent on the Calleguas 
Rancho in Ventura County, but after 1879 he lived in Santa Barbara City. 
He was educated in the Lincoln School in Santa Barbara up to the age 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 601 

of twelve, and found employment on his father's ranch until he was 
twenty-one. 

Starting out for himself, Mr. Ruiz followed the work of teamster for 
several years, was employed by some of the prominent ranch owners of 
this section until 1892, and in that year rented 190 acres from the Santa 
Clara Del Norte Grant on Central Avenue in Ventura County. Later he 
rented 142 acres in the same district, and he now has the entire tract 
planted in beans and is prospering as his abilities and labor deserve. 

He is a member of the Native Sons of California, of the Latin- Ameri- 
can Union, is a democrat and a member of the Catholic Church. In Ven- 
tura County he married, December 10, 1892, Miss Minnie Nevius. Mrs. 
Ruiz is a native of Kansas and a daughter of Dr. J. B. Nevius (deceased), 
who was a doctor of dental surgery at Paola, Kansas. He moved to 
Ventura County in 1888. Doctor Nevius served for three years in an 
Illinois company during the war and was in many important engagements. 
This is an old American family of Revolutionary stock and German 
descent. Mr. and Mrs. Ruiz are the parents of three children. Ruth, 
aged twenty-one is still at home; Lucy, aged nineteen is Mrs. I. II. Her- 
nandes of Camarillo; Gabriel, aged fourteen, is attending St. Joseph's 
Institute at Oxnard. 

William H. Flint, M. D. The mark of distinctive success attained 
in the exacting profession of medicine and surgery offers the most sig- 
nificant voucher for the ability and sterling character of the one who has 
made such achievement, and by this gauge Doctor Flint has secure vantage- 
ground as one of the leading exponents of his profession in the City of 
Santa Barbara, his high professional attainments being on a parity with 
his unequivocal personal popularity in the community that has been the 
stage of his activities for somewhat more than twenty years. 

Doctor Flint was born at East Baldwin, Maine, on the 20th of May, 
1852, and his rudimentary education was gained in the public schools of 
Saco, that state, and those of Lynn, Massachusetts. He was but a boy 
when he accompanied his parents on their removal to the State of Wis- 
consin, and he was thence sent to Lake Forest Academy, an excellent 
preparatory school at Lake Forest, Illinois, a suburb of the City of Chi- 
cago. After completing the prescribed curriculum of this institution he 
passed three years in Europe, where he continued his studies under most 
auspicious conditions, and upon his return to his native land he was 
matriculated in Cornell University, at Ithaca, New York, in which insti- 
tution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1874 and from which 
he received the degree of bachelor of arts. Thus thoroughly fortified in 
academic scholarship, Doctor Flint followed the line of his ambitious 
purpose by entering the celebrated Bellevue Hospital Medical College, in 
New York City, this being now the medical department of the University 
of New York. In this representative medical school he was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1877, and from the time of receiving his 
degree of doctor of medicine he served as interne in Bellevue Hospital 
until 1879. He then went abroad again, and he did most effective post- 



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602 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

graduate work along professional lines, it having been his privilege to 
continue his studies under the direction of leading specialists in the cities 
of Vienna, Bonn, and Berlin, Germany, and the City of Laussane, Swit- 
zerland. In 1881 the doctor engaged in the practice of his profession 
in the City of New York, and in the national metropolis his ability and 
close application gained to him definite prestige and success in the work 
of his profession. He there continued in active practice for a period of 
fourteen years, and in the meanwhile he served as clinical assistant to 
Dr. Austin Flint, a kinsman, and to Doctors Janeneway and Lusk, now 
men of international reputation in their profession. While engaged in 
practice in New York City Doctor Flint served several years as visiting 
surgeon to workhouse and almshouse and for ten years as visiting physi- 
cian to the Presbyterian Hospital. 

In 1895 Doctor FHnt canue to California and established his residence 
at Santa Barbara, where he has since continued in the active general prac- 
tice of his profession, with a large and representative clientele, and with 
acknowledged precedence as one of the. leading physicians and surgeons 
of the state of his adoption. He has never abated his zeal in study and 
research and through his influence has done much to advance both medical 
and surgical science. He was president of the Santa Barbara County 
Medical Society and maintains active membership in the American Medi- 
cal Association. The doctor is affiliated with the Phi Beta Kappa and 
the Kappa Alpha college fraternities and holds membership in the Santa 
Barbara Club. He is one of the loyal and public-spirited citizens of the 
beautiful city of his adoption and takes lively interest in all things tending 
to advance the civic and material welfare of Santa Barbara. 

In 1883 was solemnized the marriage of Doctor Flint to Miss Mary 
Adelaide Hay, of Portland, Maine, and they have one son and three 
daughters, Adelaide, Richard, Olive and Margaret. 

Philip C. Marble. Every community has for the basis of its pros- 
perity and progress a number of men who live quietly and without 
making themselves heard in their districts, but who keep up a constant 
effort to better their respective positions and develop to the uttermost 
those resources they find at their command. One of these men is Philip 
C. Marble, a successful rancher of Goleta, who has made this community 
his home since 1892. 

Philip C. Marble was born in Northern Michigan on October 22, 
1872, and is the son of Miner S. and Melvina (Huickman) Marble. 
Until he was about eighteen years old he was a student in Nebraska, and 
then he began to devote himself to farm life. After two years of work 
there he came to California and located almost immediately in the 
Goleta Valley of Santa Barbara County, where he has since occupied 
himself with his ranch. He has been manager of Santa Barbara County 
Walnut Growers Association for the past nine years and on the board 
of directors for the past eight years. 

Mr. Marble was married on December 15, 1897, to Mrs. Mary Hails, 
a widow with three small sons. She is the daughter of James P. and 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 603 

Isabella (Middlemans) Hamilton, and was born in Iowa. She came to 
Goleta with her parents in 1873. By her second marriage there has been 
one child, Elizabeth. The children of her first marriage are Charles 
H., Raymond and Alan W. 

James R. Thompson. In according recognition to the representative 
members of the bar of Santa Barbara County there is distinct consistency 
in giving special consideration to James Roderick Thompson, whose 
ability and character have gained to him secure vantage-place as one of 
the resourceful and successful attorneys and counselors at law in the 
City of Santa Barbara and who, as a native son of the West, fully exem- 
plifies in his civic attitude the progressiveness that has so significantly 
denoted this portion of our great national domain. 

Mr. Thompson was bom at Goldendale, the judicial center of Klicki- 
tat County, Washington, and the date of his nativity was September 18, 
1 88 1. He is a son of Rev. James and Frances (Mackenzie) Thompson, 
the former of whom was bom in Denmark and the latter of whom was 
born in the Province of Ontario, Canada, of Scotch and English lineage. 
Rev. James Thompson was a youth when he came to America, in 1863, 
and he first settled in Califomia, whence he later removed to the State 
of Washington, where he continued his residence for many years. He 
has labored long and faithfully as an earnest and able member of the 
clergy of the Presbyterian Church, and he and his wife now maintain 
their home in Santa Barbara. 

James R. Thompson acquired his preliminary educational discipline 
in the public schools, supplemented this by an effective preparatory course 
in the collegiate institute in Salt Lake City, Utah, and then was matricu- 
lated in historic Princeton University, in which institution he was gradu- 
ated as a member of the class of 1905 and from which he received the 
degree of bachelor of arts. For two years thereafter he was a successful 
teacher in the "Asheville School'* of Asheville, North Carolina, and he 
then followed the course of his ambition by pursuing the study of law 
with characteristic vigor and earnestness. He continued his technical 
studies under effective private preceptorship until he had gained a com- 
prehensive knowledge of the involved science of jurisprudence, and in 
1909 he was admitted to the Califomia bar, his examination having 
shown him to be splendidly fortified for the work of his chosen profes- 
sion. He forthwith opened a law office in Los Angeles, where he was 
engaged in practice two years, with Oscar Mueller as his professional 
associate. He then removed to Santa Barbara, where he formed a law 
partnership with Alfred W. Robertson, with whom he has since been 
associated in the conducting of a substantial and representative general 
law business, under the firm name of Thompson & Robertson. Recogni- 
tion of his ability has been shown in his retention as counsel for a num- 
ber of important corporations, and he has made an excellent record as one 
of the versatile trial lawyers of the younger generation at the bar of 
Santa Barbara County. 

Mr. Thompson is a stalwart in the camp of the democratic party and 



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604 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

has been active and influential in its councils and campaign activities in 
Santa Barbara County. In 1914 he was the unsuccessful candidate of 
his party for the office of district attorney, and in 19 16 he was elected 
on the democratic ticket as state senator for the twenty-fifth senatorial 
district. He served as a member of the democratic central committee 
until he became a candidate for district attorney, when, in compliance 
with the laws of California, he resigned this post. Mr. Thompson is a 
director of the Santa Barbara Associated Charities and Humane Society, 
is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, and is a popular member, as well 
as a director of La Cumbre Golf and Country Club of Santa Barbara, 
besides which he holds nrembership in the Princeton Club of Southern 
California and the Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce. Both he and 
his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. 

At Santa Barbara, on the 25th of October, 1913, was recorded the 
marriage of Mr. Thompson to Miss Mary Merriman, who was bom in 
the City of Chicago, where her father, the late Dr. Henry P. Merriman, 
was a prominent physician and surgeon, the Merriman family having 
been founded in America in the colonial era and having given patriot 
soldiers to the Continental forces in the War of the Revolution, besides 
which a member of this family served at one time as president of Prince- 
ton University. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have two children — James 
Roderick, Jr., and Mary Elizabeth. 

Judge Eldert A. Rizor. Devoting his time and energies to his pro- 
fessional and official duties, Judge Eldert A. Rizor, of Santa Barbara, who 
has a broad and comprehensive knowledge of law, and an inherent love 
of justice, has achieved success as an attorney, and as a police judge is 
performing the duties devolving upon him in a most worthy and satisfac- 
tory manner. A son of Jacob S. Rizor, he was bom August 11, 1869, in 
Columbus, Ohio, of honored German ancestry. His great-grandfather on 
the paternal side was bom and reared in Germany, and as a young man 
was there engaged in the manufacture of fire arms. Subsequently becom- 
ing involved in the Franco- Prussian troubles, he was forced to leave the 
fatherland, and immigrated to this country. The LTnited States Govern- 
ment becoming aware of his knowledge of arms, took advantage of it and 
placed him in charge of armory located at Harpers Ferr>% Virginia, during 
the Revolutionary war. 

Jacob S. Rizor, a retired promotor and business man of Santa Barbara, 
which has been his home since 1891, enlisted as a soldier during the Civil 
war, doing brave service for y/2 years as a member of the Fifteenth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry. The ensuing 2^ years he continued in the employ of 
the Government, in the meantime assisting in the building of the ''Granny 
White Pike'* at Nashville, Tennessee. During the reconstruction period 
he was employed in the quartermaster's department. The maiden name 
of his wife, who died in 1908, was Matilda Trindle. She was bom in 
Newark, Ohio, in 1839, coming from Irish ancestry. 

Brought up in Kansas, Eldert A. Rizor acquired his preliminary edu- 
cation at Fort Scott, there attending the public and high schools, and later 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 605 

a business college. Coming to Santa Barbara in the fall of 1 891, he read 
law with ex-Senator John J. Boyce until the spring of 1893, when, with 
fifteen other students, including among others Oscar Lawler, United 
States district attorney, and Joe Scott, he formed the law classes that 
subsequently became the nucleus of the University of Southern California. 
These sixteen ambitious and studious young men conducted the classes in 
the Los Angeles Law Library, and fourteen of the number were admitted 
to the bar, Judge Rizor being admitted on April 3, 1904. Beginning his 
professional career as a clerk in the office of Judge D. P. Hatch, where he 
attended to the corporation practice, Mr. Rizor met with encouraging 
success, and was afterward associated for a time with Horace H. Appell, 
of Los Angeles. When Summerland was opened he and a friend, H. L. 
Williams, established a law office in that place. 

In the spring of 1896 Mr. Rizor assumed charge of the office of Mr. 
Boyce, who was serving as state senator, but during Mr. Boyce's second 
term as senator he went to Sacramento, where he served as a journal 
clerk in the Senate until Mr. Boyce closed his Sacramento office, having 
accepted an appointment as district attorney for the Southern District of 
Alaska. Going from there to San Francisco, Mr. Rizor was connected 
with the law department of the Mutual Life Insurance Company for a 
time. 

Returning to Santa Barbara in 1900, Mr. Rizor was special census 
agent for the Government for population and products, and later compiled 
the asphalt and oil statistics for the Government. During the same year 
he and J. W. Smith, who had also been a census worker, became associates 
in the same office, but not as partners, and have maintained the same 
relation until the present timje. 

In 1908 Mr. Rizor was appointed judge of the police court to fill out 
the term of the late Judge Price, who died while in office, receiving his 
appointment in November from Mayor Boeseke, and the following year 
he was elected to the same position, being the only member of that admin- 
istration to be so honored. The judge has been continuously re-elected 
every term since that time, his efficiency and popularity as a public official 
being recognized and appreciated. 

Judge Rizor married, October 3, 1899, in San Francisco, a Santa 
Barbara girl, Miss Mabel E. Kiler, who was born in San Rafael, Cali- 
fornia, a daughter of the late Edmond F. Kiler, who was for many years 
a successful rancher in Santa Barbara County. Five children have blessed 
the union of Judge and Mrs. Rizor, namely: Cliflford F., Francis, Paul E., 
Ruth Elizabeth, and Quinten. 

A stanch republican in politics, the judge has represented his party in 
county and state conventions, and has served as a member of the executive 
committee of the Republican County Central Committee. Fraternally he 
is an active member of the Knights of Pythias, being keeper of the records 
and seals, and is likewise a member of the Uniform Rank which carried 
oflF the drill prize at the San Francisco Exposition, and secured the second 
prize at the San Diego Exposition. The judge ser\'ed as first sergeant 
for two years in the National Guard of Kansas. He is a member of the 



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606 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce, and takes an active interest in all 
things pertaining to the welfare of the community. Broad in his religious 
views, Judge Rizor is affiliated with the Unitarian Church. 

Thomas William Middleton. A native son of California, Thomas 
William Middleton has spent his career with notable success as a farmer, 
stock raiser and business man, largely in Ventura County, where he 
is now proprietor of one of the fine ranches near Camarillo. 

He is a son of Thomas and Sarah (Cooper) Middleton. His father, 
who was bom in Lumley, England, in 1820, was reared and educated 
there, served an apprenticeship at the butcher's trade, and in 1855 came 
to California by way of the Panama Canal. Locating in Amador 
County, he followed his trade there until his death December 6, 1865. 

It was in Amador County that Thomas William Middleton was born 
May 21, i860. At the age of thirteen he left school and took up the 
real work of life as a sheep herder. That was his occupation until 1879 
when he came to Ventura County with his mother, who in the meantime 
had married the late Samuel Hill. Here he rented a hundred acres from 
his step-father, farmed that and after a year rented 400 acres more. In 
1887 he gave up this lease and rented 400 acres from Mr. Russell, who 
was a rancher in the same vicinity. Associated with him in the manage- 
ment of this Russell farm was his brother Anthony C' Middleton. The 
brothers operated it successfully until 1900, when Thomas Middleton 
moved to Riverside County and he and his brother were grazing stock 
in that locality a year and then followed the same business and teaming 
at Redlands until 1906. In that year Thomas W. Middleton returned 
to Ventura County and rented 280 acres from his mother. This land 
he inherited in 191 1, and he has since developed it as a splendid farm 
and ranch. Eighty acres are planted in beans, fifty acres in grain, while 
the rest is used as pasture land. 

Mr. Middleton is a republican and a member of the Episcopal Church. 
At Hueneme, Ventura County, April 7, 1912, he married Margaret Ann 
Eccles. Mrs. Middleton was bom in Stanley, Durham County, Eng- 
land, a daughter of Edmond Eccles, who was a wood turner by trade, but 
for a number of years was a coke manufacturer. Mrs. Middleton 
traces the Eccles family back to a residence of more than 300 years in 
Durham County. Mr. and Mrs. Middleton reside on what is known as 
the Rosa Lea Farm. They are the parents of two children : Sarah, aged 
three and Margaret aged two years. 

Samuel Hill. A redoubtable pioneer of California and of Ven- 
tura County was the late Samuel Hill. He had all the qualities which 
make the true pioneer. He was resourceful, determined, aggressive, 
ready to adventure but not discouraged by ill success, and consistently 
followed the leading of a worthy ambition until he ranked among the 
foremost men of Southern California in material means and in influence 
as a citizen. 

He was of old England's contributions to early California society. 



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real u«. k i-i 1 :■• -^ ^ i,- :• herder. That was his c>ccupaL!i>:i unlil 1870 
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had ni.. Tw.o M,^ ; tt; SamiU'I Hill. Here he rented ;t ' '■ 1 . :♦.-,.- from 
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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 607 

Bom in Lancashire, England, March 21, 1815, a son of Samuel and 
Sarah Hill, who spent all their lives in England and died there at the 
ages of sixty and forty years respectively, grew up in their English 
home, attended the local schools and served an apprenticeship which 
made him proficient in the trade of miller. That apprenticeship con- 
tinued for four years before he was pronounced a master workman. 

Then in 1835 at the age of nineteen he came to the United States. 
Landing at Quebec, Canada, he lived there a year and a half, and then 
moved to Dubuque, Iowa, where he followed his trade as miller for 
seven years. After this long American residence he went back to England 
for a brief sojourn. 

On his return to this country the news of California gold discov- 
eries was fresh in everyone's mouth and was the incentive that pulled 
almost every young man away from the stores and workshops of the 
East to the Pacific slope. Gathering sixteen men as a party Samuel 
Hill agreed to pilot them to the gold fields and pay the expenses of 
transportation and also support them for the first year in California pro- 
vided these men would give him the benefit of their labor during that 
year. On the whole Samuel Hill was well versed in human nature 
and seldom made mistakes on that score, but he did not properly esti- 
mate the spell cast over men by the atmosphere of early California. The 
party crossed the plains with wagons and teams of horses and the jour- 
ney was made without particular incident. Hardly had they arrived on 
the western slope of the Sierra Nevadas when Mr. Hill saw his com- 
panions disappear singly and in groups with no accounting for their 
previous contract and without rendering any service of value to Mr. 
Hill in the new country. 

His first year in California Mr. Hill spent in taking an inventory 
of prospects for the future and in mining and prospecting. At Spring 
Hill, a noted quartz mine, named for him and the spring gushing out 
of the premises, he and Mr. P. Y. Coal operated a mine and also had a 
small store for the sale of miner's supplies. This was chronicled as 
another item in Mr. Hill's early misfortunes. After the loss 5f all his 
investment he determined to foreswear mining altogether. Locating 
in Amador County, for sixteen years he was engaged in ranching, and 
that he followed with* considerable success. 

Then coming into Ventura County in 1876 he bought 6,500 acres 
in the Conejo Valley in partnership with Mr. Edwards. The partners 
embarked in the sheep business. That was a hazardous venture. In the 
dry years that followed barely 800 were left out of the original flock 
of 9,000 sheep. On account of these heavy losses Mr. Hill surrendered 
1,600 acres of his land, leaving him with 5,600 acres, which at that time 
represented only a fraction of the value at which this estate is now 
held. The water supply on this land is one of the finest in Ventura 
County. It was with the operation and management of this handsome 
estate that Mr. Hill employed his later years. 

On February 28, 1870, he married Mrs. Sarah Middleton, widow 
of Thomas Middleton, who died in 1864. Mrs. Hill was bom in County 



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608 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Durham, England, a daughter of George and Margaret (Grant) Cooper, 
her parents being also natives of England. By her former marriage Mrs. 
Hill had five children: Thomas, who lives on land inherited from the 
Samuel Hill estate; Anthony, living on another part of the Hill prop- 
erty; Margaret, wife of George Worts; Sarah L., wife of Wilham Rats- 
ler of Ventura County; Elizabeth, wife of Joseph Howard of V^entura 
County. 

The late Samuel Hill was a democrat in politics and he and his wife 
were members of the Episcopal Church. The career of this worthy old 
California pioneer came to a close in November, 1904. His widow fol- 
lowed him in 1912. 

Robert B. Ord. The late Judge Robert Brent Ord was not only one 
of the honored pioneers of California, of which state he became a resi- 
dent in the historic year 1849, but his fine character and splendid talents, 
his resourcefulness and insistent civic loyalty, made him a figure of prom- 
inence and influence in connection with the progressive history of this 
favored commonwealth. He was a member of a family whose name has 
been long and worthily identified with the history of America and repre- 
sentatives of the name have attained to distinction in the learned profes- 
sions, in military affairs and in the directing and 'conserving of public 
interests, as one generation has followed another on to the stage of life's 
activities. 

Judge Robert Brent Ord was born in the City of Washington, D. C. 
on the 4th of March, 1827, and was a son of James and Rebecca Ruth 
(Cresap) Ord, the former a native of England and the latter of Maryland, 
she having been a member of an old and distinguished Maryland family 
that gave gallant soldiers to the patriot forces in the War of the Revolu- 
tion and also the War of 1812. James Ord acquired his early education 
in his native land and was a young man when he came to America. His 
higher academic education was gained at Georgetown College, in the 
District of Columbia, and in his youth his intention was to prepare him- 
self for the priesthood of the Protestant Episcopal Church. Circum- 
stances and various exigencies, however, led him to abandon this purpose 
and to enter the Government service. He became first a midshipman and 
later a member of the regular United States navy. For many years he 
was located as Government Indian agent at Sault de Sainte Marie, in the 
midst of the isolated wilds of what is now the Upper Peninsula of the 
State of Michigan, and after his retirement from active association with 
official and business affairs he established his home at Santa Cruz, Cali- 
fornia. After the death of his devoted wife he resided for a time in the 
City of San Francisco, and the closing years of his life were passed in 
the home of one of his sons. Gen. Edward O. C. Ord, who was long an 
honored and influential citizen of California. Concerning the children 
of James and Rebecca Ruth (Cresap) Ord, the following brief data are 
consistently incorporated at this juncture: Placidus served as a valiant 
soldier of the Union in the Civil war and was a resident of the City of 
Omaha, Nebraska, at the time of his death ; Gen. Edward O. C. rose to 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 609 

the rank and command of major general in the Civil war and passed the 
closing years of his life in California ; Judge Pacificus Ord came to Cali- 
fornia in 1849 ^^^ became one of the most distinguished lawyers and 
jurists of this state, as well as a citizen of substantial wealth ; he served 
as a justice of the Supreme Court of California and his death occurred 
in 1900, in the City of Washington, D. C. ; Dr. James L. Ord served as 
surgeon in the United States army, was f6r^ forty years engaged in the 
practice of his profession at Santa Barbara, California, and was a resident 
of Maryland at the time of his death ; Marcy Ord, the next younger son, 
became a successful business man of California, where he established his 
home in 1849, and he was one of the revered and influential citizens of 
Santa Cruz, this state, at the time of his death ; John Ord came to Cali- 
fornia in 1855 ^^^ still resides at the old homestead at Santa Cruz; and 
Georgiana C. is the wife of Judge Holliday, of San Francisco. 

Judge Robert B. Ord, the only member of the family not mentioned 
in the above list, by reason of his being the immediate subject of this 
memoir, gained his early education at Sault de Sainte Marie, Michigan, 
and supplemented this by an effective course in one of the leading col- 
leges in the State of Maryland. In 1849, shortly after attaining to his 
legal majority, he came to California, making the trip by way of the 
Isthmus of Panama and coming from the isthmus to San Francisco on 
the old-time steamship designated as the Oregon. Concerning the 
earlier stages of his career in California the following pertinent record 
has been given and the same is well worthy of perpetuation in this con- 
nection : 

*'The following years were notable for his remarkable undertakings 
in the stock-raising business, operations being conducted upon the old 
Green Ranch, near Chico, a property which he purchased and which con- 
tained more than 3,000 acres. For a long time he was a general stock- 
man, but he finally made a specialty of the raising of sheep and hogs. 
During the drouth of 1864 he suffered the fate of all others similarly 
engaged, and though he met with severe financial losses he continued his 
association with the stock-growing industry until 1866, when impaired 
health compelled him to make a change of vocation. He then removed 
with his family to Santa Barbara, where he purchased the fine property 
still held in the possession of the family — two blocks of land in almost 
the heart of the city and lying between De la Vina and Castillo; and 
Canon Perdido and De la Guerra streets. At times he owned other town 
and ranch property, and through his activities in real-estate transactions 
he did much to further the civic and material progress and development 
of Santa Barbara and the surrounding country." 

Judge Ord was a man of specially strong and broad mental grasp, and 
he was eminently qualified for leadership in popular sentiment and action. 
He was liberal and public-spirited and his unqualified personal popularity 
led to his being called upon to serve in various important offices of local 
trust, his title of judge having been given him by reason of his having 
held a position on the bench of the police court of Santa Barbara and also 
that of justice of the peace. He was a stalwart and effective advocate 



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610 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

of the principles of the democratic party, was affiliated with the Masonic 
fraternity and the Knights of Pythias, and was one of the most influential 
and honored pioneer citizens of Santa Barbara at the time of his death, 
which occurred on the 20th of October, 1889. 

On the 24th of August, 1859, was solemnized the marriage of Judge 
Ord to Miss Eliza Good, who was bom and reared in England, where she 
was graduated in Hanover College, at Peckham. Her father, John Good, 
was born near Peckham and became a successful designer and manufac- 
turer of wall paper. In 1849 he brought his family to the United States 
and became a pioneer business man in Chicago, the western metropolis 
having been then little more than a village. In 1853 Mr. Good made the 
journey across the plains to California, in company with his family, and 
here he was engaged in mercantile business until his death, his activities 
being principally in supplying merchandise to the various mining camps 
and the family home having been maintained at McCallamy Hill, where 
his death occurred in 1856, his wife, whose maiden name was Jane Rad- 
son, having been bom in Ireland, and having passed the closing years of 
her life in San Francisco. Mrs. Ord survived her husband by many 
years and left the old home in Santa Barbara to live in Mexico City where 
her death occurred on the 17th of October, 1915, and her memory being 
revered by all who came within the compass of her gentle and gracious 
influence. By special military permit, Mrs. Ord was buried in the United 
States Government Cemetery of Mexico City. Of the eight children 
of Judge and Mrs. Ord the eldest is James A., who has for a number of 
years been prominently engaged in mining enterprise in Mexico ; Robert 
Captivilla likewise is identified with mining enterprise in Mexico ; Emmett 
G. is specifically mentioned in the article immediately following this 
memoir; Mrs. Eliza Georgiana Mears died in Santa Barbara May ,27, 
191 5 ; Mrs. Althea Watson of Monterey, Mexico, but in Los Angeles now 
on account of Mexican trouble; Edward survived his honored father 
by one month and was seventeen years of age at the time of his death; 
Mabel married H. W. Shoemaker of New York City where she now 
resides ; and Walter is now a resident of Bisbee, Arizona. 

Emmett- G. Ord. The career of this well known business man and 
popular citizen of Santa Barbara seems to indicate that he has not failed 
to imbibe a due quota of the progressive spirit of the West or to be ani- 
mated with that self-reliance and resourcefulness that has been character- 
istic of the people of his native state from the early pioneer epoch to the 
present time. He is a representative of one of the old and honored 
families of California, where his father was a "Forty-niner,*' and due 
record concerning the distinguished family history is given in the preced- 
ing memoir dedicated to his father, the late Judge Robert B. Ord. Mr. 
Ord is at the present time a prominent and enterprising exponent of the 
automobile business at Santa Barbara, where he has a well appointed sales 
establishment in which he maintains the local agency for the celebrated 
Cole and Chevrolet automobiles. 

Emmett G. Ord was bom in Colusa County, this state, on the ist of 



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Hfn: of \]\c taniily r*'m*->\a! to 

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April. i^^5, aivl v - -"K-. ; "\m n 

Santa Iiari)ara. ^^Iv u I:r \\ i^ i* .. 

his early t'(hicati('P in llie pu'»!i^ - -'thI- • - '■'*• i.(,m«-1 

here served a practical a4)prentice^h!j' :" i'a ; •■mi' ':.: 

ne>N, an<l with the same he conlinued lo '^ .; : ^ • .*■ .Im 

(luriiij^ a peri(j(l of fifteen years, lie then c?i;;at." ' "^ ■• 

ne.^^'. t>f which he was a representati\e at Santa I'.. . • \ 

Pallia Cruz for two years: at Randbburg^ f«*r i' ^ ye.^- 

Arizona, for four years. In i8</) his hardware t--t'd ii 

burg was destroyf d by fire, and ^oon afterward h'* w* 

assumed ehar^<* of ,1 iar;:e 

( )ne year later 1,'/ \'. • ; 

months, and he li;- 

engaged in the Ijav:. 

merchants of tin.* 'j.^ ■ 

eouneil of Hivbt c ... d ■ 

first village 1(k ..*'<■ . * ..' ' 

the waterworks -^ ' • . ' ' - '^ 

the same two v-aiv.. ';. ' . . . •' 

since been enj^a^^ d rr r.-e / • ' . . 

constantly increa-^iit^ ]\'iirona^e <-,'>• 

Mr. ( )rd is aligned as a loyal snpp ^* 

party but he has never consented to beo'.. !.- 

save in the case of his election to the council (;t i •> ' • . 

ously noted. At Risbee he still maintains athliati<'T: > 

671) of the Benevolent and Protective Order ot E 

Barbara he holds membership in the lodge of Kniglits of * \ -.t^ lie is 

one of tiic dert and progressive business men and public-.-; ir-ttd citizens 

of the beaut. I'd litv with wliiili the familv n..me has Utn '.av^ and 

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prominently idi i;>; , 
representative soci.' 
prominent and influ*- .* . •- •.'< 
served one term as a ni'-' - • :1 
serving in 1916 as sec ret a r;. • • 
In the l-'iiv of Los Angeles 
the marriage of Mr. Ord to Aii 
in the City of Portland. Maine, a- 
colonial family of Ncvv I ,.L'\;id 
Continental Line in tljt \\ ,ir » 
one son, Robert I'mckcct * 'r i 
grandparents, and wh(^ \\ t- .,'' 

1915. lie is II ry M , ' r^ 

conducts mo^t -a • 



and he mul hi- wit"- arc popular fru tor- 



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^' ?ii<itive «'f a '-Iftbiie 

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T and Mrs. < tiI have 

' :nal and maternal 

' . -ra High School, 

111 ■ ' ity, where he 



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tions with X'entura Coun'- . .. 
of California. Thi- prt ^ u\ i i* 
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ii.o^ -ii'Mv nUerestnig .^ocla- 
. -dur .-fv lions of the State 
: ■ .•■' *or a nimiber of yeai 
■' nt of large ranching 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 611 

April, 1865, and was one year old at the time of the family removal to 
Santa Barbara, where he was reared to adult age and where he acquired 
his early education in the public schools of the period. As a youth he 
here served a practical apprenticeship at the plumbing and tinning busi- 
ness, and with the same he continued to be actively identified at intervals 
during a period of fifteen years. He then engaged in the hardware busi- 
ness, of which he was a representative at Santa Paula for three years ; at 
Santa Cruz for two years; at Randsburg for ij4 years; and at Bisbee, 
Arizona, for four years. In 1896 his hardware establishment at Rands- 
burg was destroyed by fire, and soon afterward he went to Mexico and 
assumed charge of a large stamp mill in Monterey, State of Nuevo Leon. 
One year later he went to the City of Mexico, where he remained six 
months, and he then established his residence at Bisbee, Arizona, where he 
engaged in the hardware business and became one of the leading pioneer 
merchants of the thriving little city. He was a member of the first city 
council of Bisbee and served in this office two terms. He purchased the 
first village lot and erected the first hotel at Douglas, Arizona, and built 
the waterworks system at Naco, that state, where he continued to operate 
the same two years. He then returned to Santa Barbara, where he has 
since been engaged in the automobile business, with a substantial and 
constantly increasing patronage of appreciative order. 

Mr. Ord is aligned as a loyal supporter of the cause of the democratic 
party but he has never consented to become a candidate for public office 
save in the case of his election to the council of Bisbee, Arizona, as previ- 
ously noted. At Bisbee he still maintains affiliation with the lodge (No. 
671) of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and in Santa 
Barbara he holds membership in the lodge of Knights of Pythias. He is 
one of the alert and progressive business men and public-spirited citizens 
of the beautiful city with which the family name has been long and 
prominently identified, and he and his wife are popular factors in the 
representative social life of the community. Mrs. Ord has been specially 
prominent and influential in civic affairs in Santa Barbara, where she 
served one term as a member of the board of education and where she is 
serving in 1916 as secretary of the Juvenile Court committee. 

In the City of Los Angeles, on the 9th of June, 1895, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Ord to Miss Estelle Brackett Cobb, who was born 
in the City of Portland, Maine, and who is a representative of a sterling 
colonial family of New England — one that gave valiant soldiers to the 
Continental Line in the War of the Revolution. Mr. and Mrs. Ord have 
one son, Robert Brackett Ord, uniting the names of paternal and maternal 
grandparents, and who was graduated in the Santa Barbara High School, 
1 91 5. He is now engaged in independent business in this city, where he 
conducts most successfully an automobile service station. 

James Leonard. The name Leonard has many interesting associa- 
tions with Ventura County, and also with other sections of the State 
of California. The present James Leonard, who for a number of years 
has been successfully identified with the management of large ranching 



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612 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

properties in the vicinity of Oxnard, is a son of James Leonard, Sr., 
whose experiences and enterprise made him one of the builders of 
California. 

James Leonard, Sr., was born in Ireland, was educated there, and 
coming to the United States when quite young reached San Francisco 
during the early '50s. His part in the founding of the University City 
of Berkeley has recently been recounted for the benefit of a modem 
generation, and from an article recently published at Berkeley the fol- 
lowing facts are taken. The article recounts how George M. Blake and 
a fellow miner by the name of James Leonard, who also was from the 
East, returned to San Francisco to catch a steamer that would carry 
them back to New York. Francis K. Shattuck in the meantime started 
over the trail headed for Marysville and on his way fell in with a man 
who afterwards proved to be William Hillegass. Destiny brought all 
four of these men together. Hillegass and Shattuck decided to link 
their fortunes and together they proceeded to Marysville. Iti the mean- 
time Blake and Leonard, who were waiting in San Francisco for the 
vessel to sail, found an acquaintance in the master of the vessel they 
expected to take passage on. The captain suggested that inasmuch as 
the boat was not yet ready to sail that the three make a trip across the 
bay to Contra Costa, which all of the east side of the bay was then called. 
After landing at the foot of Broadway, the only available place on this 
side at that time, they secured horses and rode through a vast field of 
wild oats several miles to the northeast to the cabin of a squatter who was 
a typical Irishman and a good congenial spirit. It was he who persuaded 
Blake and Leonard to ride with him overland to where Berkeley is now 
located. Such an enthusiast over the future of the oat field was the 
Irishman that he succeeded in convincing Blake and Leonard that it 
would be wise if they would locate at once. They immediately wrote 
to Shattuck who with Hillegass came down from the Marysville coun- 
try and joined them. Blake, Shattuck, Hillegass and Leonard staked 
off a parcel of land one mile square, the northern boundary of which is 
now Addison Street and the southern Russell Street, the eastern College 
Avenue and the westerly line Grove Street. This land the four men 
divided into four equal parts or strips, each contaming 160 acres, being 
one mile in length, running north and south and one quarter mile in 
width running east and west. They drew straws for first choice, which 
fell to Hillegass, who settled on the eastern strip. Leonard drew the 
next strip, Blake the next and Shattuck the westerly strip. Each of these 
strips of land became known after the names of their owners. That 
portion of the land which the University of California now occupies was 
donated to that institution by Hillegass, Leonard and Blake. 

So much for his very active part and share in the founding of one 
of California's most beautiful and noted cities. James Leonard in i8n8 
came to Ventura County, being one of the first white settlers in that 
section. He bought i.ooo acres of the Colonial grant, and was prosper- 
ously engaged in its management as a farm until his death on September 
3, 1893. Since his death the estate has been in the ownership of the 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 613 

family. It was James Leonard, Sr., who built the first wooden house 
south of the Santa Clara River in Ventura County. While in Oakland 
he married Margaret Connelly, and they became the parents of eight 
children. 

James Leonard, Jr., was bom at Oakland, California, February 3, 
1858, but has lived in Ventura County for almost half a century. He 
attended the public schools of Oakland until 1868, then the Franciscan 
Collie at Santa Barbara until 1870, and was then sent to the Quebec 
Seminary in Quebec, Canada, where he had some of the best literary 
advantages and influences until 1873. In that year he returned to his 
father's ranch in Ventura County, but in 1875 again entered the Francis- 
can College at Santa Barbara, where he remained engaged in his studies 
for six months. 

Since that date Mr. Leonard has been identified with the management 
of his father's ranch and since his father's death has managed and owned 
a large section of this old property, which with the changing of years 
has adapted its cropping to modern demands and is now one of the chief 
centers of the lim?, bean culture in Ventura County. Mr. Leonard is a 
member of the republican party, of the Catholic Church and of the 
Elks Lodge. On July 25, 1899, he married in El Rio, Ventura County, 
Miss Ella McGrath, daughter of one of the fine old pioneers of Ventura 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Leonard have seven children: James 
Dominick, aged sixteen, and attending the convent in Oxnard; Eleanor 
Cecelia, aged fourteen, Thomas, aged twelve, Margaret, aged ten, Mary 
Letitia, aged eight, Virginia, aged seven, and Elizabeth, aged four. All 
the older children are students in the Oxnard Convent. The home of 
James *Leonard and family is one of the most palatial residences in 
Ventura County or anywhere in Southern California for that matter. 

Frank E. Good is a veteran of the oil industry, both in the State of 
Pennsylvania, and in California. In recent years he has retired from that 
business and is now happily and profitably employed in the management 
of a fine farm in the Santa Paula district. 

He was bom in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, October 26, 1864, a 
son of David and Catherine Good. His early life was spent on his 
father's farm up to the age of eighteen, and up to sixteen he attended the 
public schools. For four years he was employed in a flour mill at Edin- 
boro, Pennsylvania. 

On coming to California his first location was near Santa Paula, 
where he was employed as an oil well driller for twelve years by the Har- 
dison & Stewart Oil Company. He continued work in the same line of 
business for two years in Los Angeles County, for a year and a half at 
Fullerton, and for one year at Colingo. Returning to Ventura County, 
Mr. Good was connected with the Union Oil Company in the Tapo Can- 
yon, and for five years was drilling wells for himself on the lands con- 
trolled by this company. He was successful and eight of the wells became 
producers. These he afterwards sold to the Union Oil Company. 

Seeking a place where he might settle down and enjoy the fruits of 
Vol. n— » 



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614 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

life somewhat more at leisure, Mr. Good bought forty acres in the Santa 
Clara Valley near Santa Paula, and has given his time and active energies 
to the improvement and cultivation of this tract. He now has thirteen 
acres in lemons, ten acres in walnuts, and the rest constitutes an apricot 
orchard. As a temporary crop, while his trees are reaching maturity, he 
grows large quantities of lima beans. 

Mr. Good is a Mason, a member of the A. O. F. and a republican. 
In November, 1890, in Ventura County, he married Miss Olive Line- 
burger, a native of Ventura County and daughter of William Lineburger, 
one of the pioneers of the valley. They have one son, Harry Glenn, who 
has finished his education in the high school and is now assisting his 
father on the ranch. . 

W. Walter Coultas and his family have been residents of Ventura 
and adjoining counties of Southern California for the past thirty years. 
They came here from Illinois where W. Walter Coultas was a practical 
farmer and with several years of experience in the same line in South- 
western Kansas just before setting out for the Pacific Coast. Mr. Coultas 
is well known in this section of the state as a successful farmer and 
rancher, and has some very large and important interests in the country 
around Oxnard. Several of his sons are likewise identified with the staple 
agricultural business of Ventura County, including Alexander E., one 
of the leading bean growers of the county. 

Born in Scott County, Illinois, February 3, 1846, W. W^alter Coultas 
is a son of Benjamin Coultas. The latter emigrated from England, locat- 
ing in Scott County, Illinois, in pioneer times. He was a farmer and 
stock raiser there until his death at the age of fifty-five. After becoming 
a naturalized American citizen he voted with the whig party, but became 
a member of the republican party when that organization came into exist- 
ence. In Illinois in 1836 Benjamin Coultas married Sarah Qark, who was 
also a native of England. She died in Ventura County, California, at 
the age of seventy-seven. Both were active members of the Church of 
England. 

The only survivor of their five children is Mr. W. Walter Coultas of 
Ventura County. He was reared in Scott County, Illinois, had the prac- 
tical training of an Illinois farm boy, and at the age of eighteen started 
out for himself. In a few years he was owner of a fine farm of 200 
acres in Scott County and besides the work of general farmer was a stock 
raiser and dealer. Selling his Illinois farm in 1884, he moved to Sedgwick 
County, Kansas, being one of the early settlers in the vicinity of Wichita, 
where he bought 150 acres. He farmed that and experienced the hazards 
and vicissitudes of a Kansas farmer of that day, and spent two and a 
half years there. 

In 1887 Mr. Coultas came on west to Ventura County, California, and 
during the following sixteen years had the management of the 1,000-acre 
ranch belonging to his uncle, the late Thomas Clark. With the death of 
Mr. Clark this estate was divided and since then Mr. Coultas has bought 
313 acres from the heirs. This in itself constitutes one of the valuable 



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.W:^ M.AiURA lOUXTIES, C \I.I1'« )K\I A GIT) 

t I?..-"- (,\ -.1 >.! M. >.-i'Mti.n ( rilift^rnia, niul }i.. ^.:.,, na- n^r.n* j'l-fj.crTv 
5 \ ■'• ii '-..1,' :t ranJ. (,f M^> acre- iif'ar ( K5, .' 1 ,.i..I s '. ;m«t^'s .,f vai- 
.' :' '. " i .•• v.t .1 !'lt I cf i; v' fruit hcU at Tolu' a .1 : ".' ' . : ••ir^ t "..^' -u . 
.r. : . : •. ,\',t-, li 1 _» I •; ; , \'.' Waltt-r C"on!ta< iik.*:i»:1 ' '.' i ■:!'. V. 
\\ . "s -. A- h..'M n: i*'"!i)is jti !^;t> .'mkI (I't'.I in \\:t.:r';-< •> •'•. 
S. ;•.-" . •: '''.•^». 'l\.'\ "h .1^' rii' I'.'^'-ou^ (if Ihirtu V '-Ktl i'"ri i • ■ ■ 
^' V . ' -.'..11'! ' .,.;'• -11. ,1 if I I /' I 1. ( ./li f(>n!ia ; IM'tlf. "viH ^■ 
\\ ' . • .:• \ ■ *t • . t ■ ' t . I . * t . ^' . ' -it'. \\ lu» «Kf»l M» iiii.i. ^-) ; 
■ .-< M W. »t • . i *., • .' ■ '.,'.. , ' < . . i.aiji'-":'l:i':'i , * ii.a *; \, 
. 'i • Ml. (i M ll- . . ■ - ; x;, , r, '. • i .. i.up. 

:uiiA ' i * •. ' . • ■ ' ' • * 'P .. ' :r<':'' K'h ; 

Ruth ' ' . . . . ,t .j^, , .. ],,, . 

rt"^i<!^ i:- • t " • ' » • : *i e 

hi<:'. • ■ * • : 1 . 

atui Acv '"; ' . .' ' . .V 

and with \v> '..:. * .- , • 

Alex.iiKli T 1- \\ . . t • * . 

(le.^t'f \< - "'• -:'....•:■•'■■' - • ■ • 

Illinc.i^. .-..',. .:; . , 

to Kan- ■ . - . • ,• v\ ■' '. ■ . 

I'hi*^ coupr . «... . • * t .!< ''•■..-.;, .. : • 1 

atteixUul r> .* I' . < ■ I ' li.'.lll:l^ m a ijii-i:^. - . 

W'Titura jind acvu'it* > " * ;i :•«•.-• .-■.■Iw-ntiirt' and (-'.1 .• -i 
during the folloninj^ m\ n- - ' ... »'■ ., -k- it ("annanea in ^onora, * 
Mexico. On his return i*^ \ enni-.i • -^m' ;-., rrptrrl yx) acres from his 
father, and with that lanci empi(jyi.'i " - . . . :it - .i^ a j>ractical farmer 
until U)i5. In the hitter \ear Mr. (.• ii: i* ...-■i; . ,'^!\'<ix acre^ from 
his father, this land hein^; ](K\ated on the ' , w. ,, ■ ("r . ^, .,\ i.^^d's he 
rents a 150 acres (rom lh^ t.alier and si^t* : \t t . - ■. .^ t ^.' '..1 ":• 
heans, and that is the <.:*|i In*'^ 1m> i^iven l;..^ t! < ,, • • ■ • vt * ;. ir Ur 
aj^ricultural ex{KTienre< in \(ii:iMa t (nVi's 

Mr. Coultas i^ arhliatcd .'I;) it>.„. •: t.-.I-c, !". t/m v-.-Mid 
Masons, is past ma'^tt r (»f tl-* I ;: ^i '\ . 'i ' t < '^ m I i .. ,»: 1 I '- * d \; ;. 
Masons, heloni^s to th.- XfM.tn'.^ ( ■« . .'t r, .,1" \ .;,•. it i • r'u 
Mystic Shrme at T.os At'^I ^. "..i ',• • . ' .,i .]. ' .. '•-♦ ^ • .1 a: 
Oxnard. I le is aKo a n.i '^^er ..1 .'• . V .- \. '• •:u.*t- .' Vii '. 1 \t 

the pres*Mit time Mr. \. I . v nu\;; . 1- - . "• k cf \\-k- ho.. id ^f 

school tmstees. 

At ( )\nard Fel^rr.iM j >, i.;m>, l;r mniiud !.'"v.< "^,c'\i Mdli^an. 
Their three children art ,. '•. Unry, a^ed six; Ktmr^ '< 1. .aiuler, aged 
four: and Idizabeth Kn: \ j^^ ;'-,', years old. 

John Si x*^ ■ ; ^'. ;.■. :.; >' « *" hi^ death, in 1002, the late lohn 

Scarlett wa^ -- :• •• ■- ! • ..ii *. nv and successful ranchmen and 
agriculturists • • v .'■... \ ;» '-^t^^ed good judgment, com- 

mon sense a. ' • ':.-• ■' d«'>'Jo]it<l, and he was aN*^ 

a citizen widil. m • • i-...u : ' :."n hi^ rise from sm U 

hoginnings on- ]r.i\ • - • ■; ". Iv. .<!•!- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 615 

parcels of land in Southern California, and he also has other property 
in Ventura County, a ranch of 146 acres near Oxnard and ten acres of val- 
uable land in the center of the fruit belt at Toluca in Los Angeles County. 

In Illinois, March 12, 1867, W. Walter Coultas married Miss Ruth A. 
Wells. She was bom in Illinois in 1840 and died in Ventura County 
September 6, 1896. They became the parents of thirteen children : Luella 
M., wife of Samuel Chamberlain of Toluca, California; Edith, wife of 
William Wheeler of Sawtelle, California; Jessie, who died in infancy; 
Albert W. of Ventura County, who married Susie Cha'mberlain ; Grace A., 
who died at the age of nineteen ; Theresa ; Thomas ; Alexander E., men- 
tioned below ; Percy, who died in infancy ; Bertha ; Ventura ; Frederick ; 
Ruth A. Politically W. W. Coultas is a republican, and during his 
residence in Kansas served as township treasurer and as member of the 
high school board. He is affiliated with Oxnard Lodge No. 341, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and Oxnard Chapter No. 86, Royal Arch Masons, 
and with his family worships in the Christian Church. 

Alexander Everett Coultas, whose career as a Ventura County farmer 
deserves some special mention, was bom in Winchester, Scott County, 
Illinois, August 18, 1882. He was still an infant when the family removed 
to Kansas and was five years of age when they came to Ventura County. 
This county was the scene of his early rearing and education. He 
attended the public schools, spent six months in a business college at 
Ventura and accumulated some experience, adventure and hard work 
during the following six months in the mines at Cannanea in Sonora, 
Mexico. On his return to Ventura County he rented 300 acres from his 
father, and with that land employed his energies as a practical farmer 
until 191 5. In the latter year Mr. Coultas bought eighty-six acres from 
his father, this land being located on the Colonia Grant, and besides he 
rents a 150 acres from his father and sister. All this land is planted in 
beans, and that is the crop that has given him the greatest profit in his 
agricultural experiences in Ventura County. 

Mr. Coultas is affiliated with Oxnard Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons, is past master of the First Veil of Oxnard Chapter Royal Arch 
Masons, belongs to the Ventura Commandery of Knights Templar, the 
Mystic Shrine at Los Angeles, and the Chapter of the Eastern Star at 
Oxnard. He is also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. At 
the present time Mr. A. E. Coultas is serving as clerk of the board of 
school trustees. 

At Oxnard February 22, 1910, he married Blanche Stella Milligan. 
Their three children are John Henry, aged six ; James Alexander, aged 
four ; and Elizabeth Ruth, now two years old. 

John Scarlett. Up to the time of his death, in 1902, the late John 
Scarlett was one of the most industrious and successful ranchmen and 
agriculturists of Ventura County. He possessed good judgment, com- 
mon sense and the commercial sense well developed, and he was also 
a citizen widely respected and esteemed. From his rise from small 
beginnings one may glean many helpful lessons. 



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616 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

John Scarlett was but an infant when his father was taken from 
the family by death. The boy grew up sound of body and active of mind. 
From early youth he had felt that in America he could find the oppor- 
tunities for advancement which he craved, and with a definite goal in 
view he eagerly grasped every chance to earn extra money so that the 
time might be hastened when he could put foot on United States soil. 
Finally, from his earnings, he was able to save enough to pay his passage 
to this country, and upon his arrival made his way to the City of Phila- 
delphia. Knowing nothing of the customs or methods of the new land, 
he was forced to accept an humble position at the start, but his energy 
and industry soon gained him promotion and he rose to the position 
of dyer in a woolen manufacturing plant. As soon as he could save 
enough from his wages he sent for his mother, who joined him at Phila- 
delphia, and who resided with him until her death, in January, 1865. In 
the meantime, in 1857, Mr. Scarlett, with the rare foresight which char- 
acterized his actions throughout Hfe, had become a pioneer in California, 
settling at San Francisco, where he secured work as engineer in a sugar 
refinery, the first cane sugar refinery in the state. Three years later he 
resigned his position and went to Dougherty Station, Alameda County, 
California, where, in 1861, he erected a hotel building and conducted a 
hostelry for six years under his own name. Next, noting the fortunes 
which were being made in the sheep industry, he went to Fresno County, 
where he established himself in the sheep business on the west side, 
upon a large scale, and continued to carry on successful operations there 
until 1874. 

In that year Mr. Scarlett came to Venttya County upon a tour of 
inspection, having heard glowing reports of this part of the state, and, 
being pleased with the prospects, purchased a ranch on the Colonia, 
from W. I. Rice, to which 600-acre tract he brought his family in the 
following year. Once again his good judgment was vindicated, for 
both as a general farmer and stockraiser and as a specializer in lima 
beans and sugar beets, he won almost phenomenal success. The estate 
lies four miles from the City of Oxnard and ranks as one of the most 
valuable in the entire Ventura Valley, the land having been rented for 
bean growing since Mr. Scarlett's death, which occurred on his farm, 
February 14, 1902. Mr. Scarlett was one of the most forceful, keen- 
sighted, progressive and successful of the many notable men who have 
left their impress upon the material development of Ventura County. 
When his death came he left, aside from his bereaved family, many 
former associates who sorely missed him from the scene of his long- 
continued activities. He was a republican. 

On September 22, 1864, Mr. Scarlett was married to Miss Anna 
Lyster, a native of Sydney, Australia, and a daughter of Lawrence 
Lyster, who, in early life, emigrated from Roscommon, Ireland, to 
Sydney, Australia, where he followed the building business. In 1852 - 
he brought his family to California and settled at San Francisco, where 
he was employed in the construction of the old customs house. Not 
long thereafter he removed to a farm near Dougherty Station, and there 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 617 

his death occurred in 1861. His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Sarah Moran, was bom in Roscommon, Ireland, and died at Pleasan- 
ton, California, in March, 1896. Of their family of ten children, all 
but three are living. Mrs. Scarlett was educated in the sisters* school 
which stood on the present site of the Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 
After the death of her husband, whose faithful companion in life she 
had been for nearly forty years, she left the ranch and moved to Oxnard, 
where she now resides, surrounded by every comfort, tenderly cared for 
by her affectionate family and conscious of the warm regard of many 
friends. She is a stockholder in the Bank of Oxnard. Mr. and Mrs. 
Scarlett had three children: John, bom in Ventura County, December 
5, 1877, attended the public schools and a business college at Ventura, 
succeeded his father in the management of the ranch, and died September 
21, 1907; Mrs. Elizabeth Williams, of Oxnard, whose husband is a 
prominent attomey of San Francisco; and Mrs. Anna Rundle, who lives 
with her mother at Oxnard. Another daughter. Miss Sarah M., died at 
the age of twenty years and one day, at San Francisco in 1899. 

Mr. Scarlett loved fine horses and greyhounds, of which he was a 
fine judge. . That he was one of the kindest and gentlest of men is 
demonstrated by the fact that horses loved to get close around him and 
would fight with one another to gain that privilege. He was the first 
man to start the sport of coursing in San Joaquin, Sacramento and 
Stanislaus counties in the early '60s ^nd would send to Ireland for a good 
hound when he thought he could get one. Many San Francisco pioneers 
delighted to go with him on these coursing trips, particularly to Sacra- 
mento and vicinity. 

Joseph F. Friedrich. Members of the Friedrich family have 
played an active and honorable part in the ranching and business and 
civic life of Ventura County for nearly thirty-five years. Mr. Joseph 
F. Friedrich, whose farms and bean plantations are in the neighborhood 
of Oxnard, came to this country with his parents at the age of ten, and is 
partly a product of the Ventura County schools, and since reaching man- 
hood has been very prominently concerned with the management of his 
father's or his own property. 

He was bom in Hanover, Germany, October 29, 1871, a son of the 
late Franz Joseph and Magdalena Friedrich. Franz Joseph Friedrich 
was also bom in Hanover on January 31, 1851, was educated in the 
German schools until fourteen, and up to the age of twenty worked on 
his mother's farm. At that date he married Magdalena Huch, and then 
started farming for himself. In 1882 he led his family across the ocean 
and coming to Ventura County, California, bought 1,200 acres. From 
that time forward he was one of the leading ranchers of the county, 
and gradually bought other land and had a magnificent estate when he 
died in 1907. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, all 
of whom have given excellent accounts f gr themselves. The first is Joseph. 
Ignaz and Adolph are both ranchers in Ventura County. Sister Raphael 
(Mary) is mother superior of St. Catherine College, San Bemardina and 



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618 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Sister Clara is a nun in Hollywood; Frank has a ranch in Ventura 
County; Emma married Louis Brucker, a farmer of Ventura County; 
William is a rancher in this county ; and John is now pursuing his studies 
in preparation for the Catholic priesthood. 

Until he left Germany Joseph F. Friedrich had the advantages of the 
schools there. After coming to Ventura County he soon found plenty 
to occupy him on his father's farmland later, as the oldest son, he took 
the active management of the extensive lands owned by his father and 
directed their cultivation until he was thirty-seven years of age. On the 
death of his father Mr. Friedrich inherited 127 acres, and that is still 
part of his extensive holdings. In 1913 he moved to the i3C^-acre farm 
of his father-in-law, John Borchard, and he now has that planted in beans. 
Another tract owned by him is 160 acres in the Mound EHstrict of Ven- 
tura County. 

Mr. Friedrich is also a director in the First National Bank of Oxnard. 
Politically he is a republican, and is an active member of the Catholic 
Church and a member of the Knights of Columbus of Oxnard. At Ox- 
nard August 24, 1910, he married Miss Annie Borchard. They have a 
household of four small children : Cecelia, Elizabeth, Joseph and Caroline. 

Alfonso Erburu. Prominent among the men of Ventura County 
who, coming from foreign lands, have found success awaiting them in 
the fertile fields of California, is Atfonso Erburu, of Montalvo. While 
this country offers many opportunities to men of ambition, it has no place 
for shirkers, and Mr. Erburu's success has not come to him without a 
full measure of hard and persistent labor. When he first came here he was 
compelled to begin at the bottom, and it has been only the possession of 
superior attainments that has won him position and independence. 

Alfonso Erburu was born in the Province of Navarre, Spain, April 
17, 1865, ^"d is a son of Peter and Makoler Erburu. He was given ordi- 
nary educational advantages in his youth, attending the public schools 
until he reached the age of thirteen years, at which time he began to 
devote his entire time to assisting his father in the cultivation of the 
home farm. He proved an industrious and energetic youth, but his 
ambitions were greater than the opportunities of his surroundings, and 
his dreams constantly brought to his mind the winning of a worth-while 
success in America. With this goal in view he carefully saved his earn- 
ings, and in 1882, when seventeen years of age, he took passage for the 
United States and eventually arrived in Ventura County, California. 
Here he had little trouble in securing employment as a sheep herder, a 
vocation which he followed for five years in Ventura County, but in 1887 
went to the northern part of the state and began a system of working that 
eventually led him to prosperity. In the summer months he herded his 
sheep in the mountains, but with the coming of winter he would guide 
his flocks into the lowlands, and thus, little by little, he built up a fair 
business in breeding, buying and selling sheep. For about seventeen years 
Mr. Erburu continued to be engaged in this manner, and in 1904 he 
returned to Ventura County with 3,600 sheep. A part of this flock he 



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• AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA frl9 

sold, but with the balance went into partnership with Hobson Brothers, 
a Ventura firm, and continued with them for four years. He then con- 
tinued in the same line in association with his brother, Mariano Erburu, 
for four years thereafter, and finally disposed of his interests in the sheep 
business to turn his attention to farming. For some time he had watched 
with interest the progress being made in the bean industry, and in 1912 
purchased a tract of fifty-five acres of good land in Ventura County, near 
Montalvo, which he is now cultivating. Mr. Erburu is recognized as a 
practical agriculturist, who uses modem methods in his work and has 
made a study of his subject. He devotes his entire property to the raising 
of beans, and has gained success by honorable dealing and fidelity to 
engagements. 

Mr. Erburu is a member of the Union Latin American and of the 
French Hospital of San Francisco. He is a republican in politics, and 
adheres to the faith of the Catholic Church. Mr. Erburu is unmarried. 

Joseph F. Lewis. How much the enterprise and example of a single 
family or individual do to stimulate the progress and advancement of a 
community is well illustrated by the case of the Lewis family. For more 
than half a century the people of this name have had their home in 
Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, and in an important degree the 
commercial enterprise of the little City of Camarillo might be said to 
center around the name of Joseph F. Lewis. 

The founder of the family in California was the late Henry Lewis. 
Henry Lewis a Virginian, bom in Richmond that state April i, 1837, 
was reared and educated there and was of old southem stock. In 1852 
he came to Califomia via the Isthmus of Panama, and was engaged in 
mining in Sonora until i860, and in that year moved to Santa Barbara 
County and settled on 109 acres near Carpinteria. Thereafter his life 
was quietly and prosperously spent as a farmer until his death in 1906. 

A historical distinction of no mean degree belongs to Henry Lewis. 
In 1868 he planted the first lima beans ever put into the soil of the 
United States. At that time a vessel happened to be anchored at Santa 
Barbara after a recent voyage from Lima, Pern. An intimate friend of 
Henry Lewis became acquainted with one of its sailors. This sailor 
had procured some of the beans which were being used on the table of 
the boat and which are indigenous to the country around Lima, and that 
geographical source has given this bean its special name. A handful 
of these beans were given to Henry Lewis and from them he raised the 
first crop of the species ever grown in the United States. He preserved 
and improved his seed from year to year, and for many years his crop 
of limas was regarded as the finest on the market and were in great 
demand for seeding purposes by all the ranchers in that section. It is 
interesting to record that the highest grade of lima beans is still known 
as the "Lewis Bean." 

Henry Lewis was married in Fairfax County, Virginia, to Eliza- 
beth Jane Chatten, and they became the parents of eight children. 

Mr. Joseph F. Lewis was bom on his father's plantation at Carpin- 



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620 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

teria August 20, 1863. He was well educated, attending the public 
schools of his native village until sixteen, then the State Normal School 
at San Jose for a year, the high school until he was nineteen, and enter- 
ing Heald's Business College in San Francisco he completed the regular 
six months' course in three months. 

Since then he has had a long and active business experience. Em- 
ployed at first as errand boy with the Wittman Brothers Commission 
House in San Francisco, he was promoted to buyer, and remained with 
that firm two years. The following year he spent working on his father's 
ranch near Carpinteria, and he then started farming for himself. His 
home was near Carpinteria in 1889, when he came to Ventura County 
and rented 260 acres of the Camarillo Ranch. Here he himself became 
a pioneer in the planting of lima beans. He was the first to plant lima 
beans in that section of Ventura County. In doing so he went against 
the judgment if not the prejudice of people who claimed that this bean 
would not flourish in that particular locality. His experiment was suc- 
cessful, and due to his initiative it has since been proved that some, 
of the finest bean land in Ventura County is in the section around Cama- 
rillo. After a year" Mr. Lewis moved to Montalvo in Ventura County, 
where he rented 300 acres and was successfully identified with farming 
until 1901. In that year returning to Camarillo he formed a partnership 
with Adolpho Camarillo, and together they carried on farming opera- 
tions on 10,000 acres, most of which was a magnificent bean plantation. 
When the partnership was dissolved in 1906, Mr. Lewis bought 8,200 
acres of the Guadalasca grant located in Pleasant Valley of Camarillo 
Township. This special domain of agricultural land has been employed 
for mixed farming, 2,000 acres being planted in beans, 2,000 acres in 
beets, hay and g^in, and the rest used as grazing land. Mr. Lewis keeps 
about 120 head of stock, and from twenty-five to seventy-five men are 
employed on his plantation in the various departments. 

His commercial operations centering at Camarillo deserve some spe- 
cial consideration. In June, 1916, he has completed at Camarillo a build- 
ing of re-enforced concrete, one story high, and 122 by 140 feet in ground 
dimensions. This is modern in every point of equipment. It is divided 
into four distinct store rooms. One 70 by 135 feet is used for a depart- 
ment store. An 18 by 70 foot store room is used for a confectionery 
store, another of similar size for barber shop, a 16 by 70 foot room for 
the Farmers Bank of Camarillo, and another large section 50 by 70 
feet has been recently completed as a garage building, known as the 
Knob Hill Garage. All of these various enterprises are now operated 
and owned by the J. F. Lewis & Sons Company, of which Mr. Lewis is 
president. In June, 1916, he organized the Farmers Bank of Camarillo, 
of which he is vice president and director. Only recently a branch of 
this bank was established at Moor Park. 

In matters of politics Mr. Lewis is an independent and is a member 
of the Christian Science Church. At Carpinteria October 5, 1884, he 
married Miss Sarah M. Richardson. They are the parents of five 
children. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 621 

Guy E., the oldest, bom at Carpinteria in April, 1886, was educated 
in the Ventura County public schools, in the Troop Polytechnic School 
at Pasadena, the Pasadena High School and Heald's Business College at 
San Francisco, and since leaving school has been active manager of his 
father's large ranch. 

Alma, now Mrs. Frederick Stein of Los Angeles, is a graduate of 
the Collegiate School of Los Angeles. 

Lulu, also a graduate of the Collegiate School of Los Angeles, is 
still at home with her parents. 

Joseph F., Jr., bom in Montalvo August 22, 1893, had the course of 
both the grammar and high schools of Ventura County, and at the age 
of eighteen was graduated from Woodberry Business College of Los 
Angeles. He is now manager of the J. F. Lewis & Sons Company. 

Searles B., bom at Montalvo July 30, 1897, after attending the gram- 
mar and high schools entered Harvard Military School at Los Angeles, 
where he remained until June, 191 5. The following summer he spent 
on his father's ranch and since October, 191 5, has been manager of the 
Knob Hill Garage in Camarillo. 

Joseph Rosa Silva is one of the men whose names deserve longest 
memory in connection with the fruit and general agricultural husbandry 
of Ventura County in Southern Calif omia. In his time he looked after 
some very extensive interests and he was a man of original thought and 
methods, and helped to stimulate and increase the productiveness of 
Southern California. 

He was born on the Island of St. George in Portugal October i, i860. 
With a public school education, he lived in his native land and worked on 
his father's farm up to 1876. Then sixteen years of age, he emigrated 
to the United States, and spent the first two years working in the mines 
of Virginia City in Nevada. From there he removed to Nevada City in 
Califomia, and continued employment in the mines for three years. 

It was after this experience that his successful venture as a farmer 
and rancher in Southem Califomia began. Coming to Ventura County 
he rented 200 acres of the old Taylor Ranch near Ventura, and he farmed 
that successfully for four years. His next place was the Mayhew Ranch 
of 250 acres near Montalvo, which he rented and on which he raised beans 
for fourteen years. In that time he became recognized as one of the 
most successful bean growers in the southem part of the state. From 
that he moved to his own place which he bought, comprising forty acres, 
not far from Montalvo. This he planted and cultivated as a walnut 
grove. 

In 1900 Mr. Silva was employed to go to Santa Monica and with 
F. D. Barnard he rented 1,200 acres of the Wolfshill Ranch. On that 
property Mr. Silva had the distinction of becoming the pioneer bean 
grower in Los Angeles County. The crop of lima beans is rapidly in- 
creasing in Los Angeles County, and the original stimulus no doubt came 
from Mr. Silva's successful efforts. While he was there the Santa 
Monica Land & Water Company presented him with a silver loving cup 



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622 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

as a token of esteem and appreciation of his efforts in growing the finest 
beans in the county. 

Joseph Rosa Silva died February 7, 1906. He was still a compara- 
tively young man, but few men in an even longer career accomplish more 
and better deserve the respect of future generations. He was a member 
of the U. P. E. C, was a republican and a member of the Catholic Church. 
In Ventura in September, 1880, he married Anna Peters. There are eight 
children: Joseph Rosa, Jr., and William (twins), now thirty-two years 
of age, the latter managing the Bastin & Cherry Ranch and warehouse 
of Fullerton, California ; Frank, who is twenty-seven years of age and is 
a rancher at Sawtelle, California; Margaret, Mrs. Charles Curtis of Ven- 
tura ; Clara, Mrs. D. J. Case of Los Angeles ; Marie, Anna and Jeanette, 
all at home. 

Joseph R. Silva, one of the eldest sons, was bom in Ventura County 
May 29, 1884. Up to the age of eighteen he attended regularly the pub- 
lic schools, and finished his education in the Southern California Business 
College at Los Angeles. After leaving school he took his place on his 
father's ranch at Santa Monica, and was closely identified with the elder 
Silva in the varied enterprise already described in that section. In 1906 
after his father's death he returned to Ventura County and has since 
looked after the home estate of forty acres. This is an extensive walnut 
grove and is one of the best managed walnut orchards in Ventura County. 
Mr. Silva is a republican. He is unmarried. 

J. L. Knox. If there is any phrase of practical farming or general 
experience in Ventura County unknown to Mr. Knox, it is something 
that belongs to a period of more than forty years ago. 

When he came out to California he was twenty years of age. He had 
been bom at Sigoumey, Keokuk County, Iowa, March 25, 1852, a son of 
John and Cordelia (Jacobs) Knox. His early education was acquired 
in public schools. On coming to Califomia he located at Woodland in 
Yolo County, and was employed at wages on different farms for a couple, 
of years. Coming then to Ventura County and locating near Saticoy, he 
and E. B. Higgins rented 1,000 acres of the old Orchard Ranch. The 
partners were engaged in raising hogs and grain for their principal output. 

From Califomia Mr. Knox went north in 1879 and near Walla Walla, 
Washington, took up 160 acres of Govemment land. He was employed 
in farming that for ten years. Retuming to Ventura County he rented 
within 200 and 300 acres of the Rancho del Norte until 1893. I" ^^at 
year he bought sixty-five acres on Telegraph Road in the Mound District, 
and has since concerned himself with its development and improvement. 
Forty acres are now planted in walnuts and the remainder in beans. 

Politically Mr. Knox is a republican and he is a member of the Meth- 
odist Church. In Saticoy, Califomia, July 4, 1877, he married Miss 
Adelaide Leavitt. Her people came to Saticoy in Ventura County during 
the early '70s. Mrs. Knox taught school at Brocton, Massachusetts, 
which was her home before coming to California. She is a very active 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 623 

worker in the Eastern Star and is now worthy matron of the chapter at 
Ventura. 

Mr. and Mrs. Knox have seven children. Mrs. E. Florence Dudley 
lives in Ventura County. The sons, Chester Baker, Bernard Leavitt, 
Paul Stanley and Theodore White, are all associated in partnership and 
manage a large tract of farming land in Ventura County. Mrs. Marian 
Cordelia Dudley lives in Ventura County, Doris Davis is at home. 

PoRFiRio R. Palomares. The Palomares family is descended from 
Don Francisco de Palomares, governor of the castle of Saint Gregory, 
at Oran, Spain. In his family there were six children: Esteban, who 
was lieutenant-colonel of, the Knights of the Order of Santiago ; Don 
Juan, who became governor of the castle after his father's death; Don 
Antonio, who was a judge; Don Jose; Eugenio, who lost his life as a 
result of his attempts to overthrow the Catholic religion ; and Donna 
Francisca, who married Don Diego Francisco, Knight of the Order of 
Santiago and governor of the plaza of Oran. 

Capt. Juan Palomares, the second of the sons, is remembered in his- 
tory as the officer who led his troops in a determined but hopeless resist- 
ance against the Turkish troops at Boreha. After the majority of his 
troops had been killed, not being able to defend himself and the castle, 
he set fire to the powder house or depository and blew up the castle and 
beneath the ruins the dead bodies of himself and his devoted followers 
were later found. 

Tracing the history of this noble family, it is found that Don Fran- 
cisco de Palomares was a well known citizen of Toledo, Spain. A letter 
written to his sister and dated Mexico, 1777, states that he was born 
about 1701 and died in Madrid in 1771. His children were: Don Fran- 
cisco, who was clerk of the City of Madrid and died in 1795 ; and Donicio, 
Maria Josefa and Juan Leocadio. The last named crossed the ocean 
from Spain to Mexico and established a home at Sonora, and there 
marrieti Donna Maria Antonia Gonzales de Zayas, sister of Father Elias, 
an influential priest. Their only son, Juan Francisco, was bom at 
Sonora. He became the father of the following children: Herman, 
Antonio, Juana, Francisca, Procopio, Almara, Tranquilina, Fibrucio, 
Manuel, Ygnacio and Jesus. 

Among the children of Manuel Palomares was Juan Leocadio, by 
whose marriage to Maria Antonia Gonzales was born one child, 
Christopher. He came to Los Angeles as a sergeant in the Mexican 
army and later in Hfe served as a judge in Los Angeles. By his mar- 
riage to Beneditia Luisa he had the following children: Concepcion, 
Barta, Rosario, Francisco, Ygnacio, Louis, Dolores, Marie Jesus, and 
Josefa. Of this family Ygnacio married Concepcion Lopez and their 
children were: Louise, Teressa, Tomas, Francisco, Manuel, Josefa, 
Concepcion, Caroline and Marie. 

The second son of the above family, Francisco, at the age of eighteen 
years was engaged as assistant on a ranch and later he became a large 
land owner and a wealthy cattleman and it is said that for years he was 



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624 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

the largest land owner in the Pomona Valley and over his fields roamed 
thousands of cattle and horses. On the ground where the residence of 
Mr. Nichols now stands, he built a large adobe house and here the hap- 
piest days of his life were passed. In those days an abundance of rain 
kept the pastures in excellent condition and stockraising was very profit- 
able. The increase in the value of land induced him to dispose of much 
of his property and his last days were spent in retirement from business 
cares. He was influential in the democratic party in his section and for 
some years serv^ed in the office of supervisor. He died comparatively 
young, aged but forty-two years, in 1882, leaving a wife and four chil- 
dren. He had married Lugardia Alvarado, a native of Los Angeles, who 
died June 14, 1896. Thier children were: Coi]cepcion, Christina, Fran- 
cisco and Porfirio R. 

Porfirio R. Palomares was bom June 4, 1872, at Pomona, California, 
where he was educated. During his father's life he assisted him on his 
cattle and sheep ranch. At his father's death he inherited seventy-six 
acres and to this he has gradually added until he now owns 182 acres 
which he devotes to grain and alfalfa, and has a i6-acre orange grove 
near Pomona. Since 1910 he has had his own property under rental, his 
entire time being taken up with his duties of superintendent of the 
I, coo-acre Ross Ranch in Ventura County, which is mainly planted in 
beans. 

Mr. Palomares was married December 18, 1901, to Hortense Yorba, 
of Yorba, California, and they have two children: AHssandro, a bright 
youth of thirteen years already a student in the high school at Oxnard; 
and Vincent, aged six years. The family belongs to the Roman Catholic 
Church. In politics Mr. Palomares votes with the democratic party. He 
belongs to the Knights of Columbus, to the Elks and to the Latin-Ameri- 
can Union. 

John Irwin. When John Irwin came to California in 1883 from his 
native state, Pennsylvania, it was with the plan and purpose of irfterest- 
ing himself in the ranching and stock-raising business. The possibilities 
presented by the state in the oil producing industry proved more attract- 
ive to him, in the light of experiences in similar fields in Pennsylvania 
than did the ranching prospect, and he accordingly turned his attention to 
the exploration of new oil fields. His success in that line has been a 
highly creditable one, and he has developed unsuspected fields into pro- 
ducing wells in various locations where he has seen fit to begin operations. 
The Sespe Oil Company was established and organized by him, and it 
has long been one of the most successful companies in this section of the 
state. Up to the year 1900 Mr. Irwin was head of the company, but in 
that year he retired from active participation in the work of the concern, 
his son, Ralph Irwin, succeeding to that position. 

A brief review of his early life and something pertaining to his 
ancestry must prove a valuable addition to the biographical matter included 
in this work. 

John Irwin was bom in Cherry Tree, Venango County, Pennsylvania, 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 625 

on May 4, 1841, and he is the son of William and Eliza (Stewart) Irwin. 
William Irwin was a native of Cherry Tree and his father before him 
early settled in Venango County and there passed his life. Richard 
Irwin, the great-grandfather of the subject, was of Irish birth and ances- 
try, and was bom in County Armagh, Ireland, in 1740. He was the 
emigrant ancestor of John Irwin, and he came to Pennsylvania from his 
native land when he was twenty-one years old. His son, Richard Irwin, 
in 1809 built the first grist mill that operated in Cherry Tree, and the 
first saw-mill in the township was built in 1823 by Richard Irwin, a cousin 
of the other Richarjl. Both these men were leaders in their communi- 
ties, and held various offices in the public life of the town and county. 

The mother of the subject was the daughter of Elijah Stewart, a 
native of Pennsylvania. To her and her husband were born seven chil- 
dren, John being the first bom, and when he was nineteen years old 
the husband and father died. They were farming people, and the care 
of the farm and his younger brothers and sisters naturally fell upon the 
eldest son. He was a slender youth, none too prepossessing in appear- 
ance at that time, and it is noteworthy that at the age of twenty-one he 
only weighed 100 pounds. But what he lacked in weight he seems to 
have made up in wit, for he managed the farm successfully and kept a 
comfortable home for the family until his younger brothers were able 
to step into his place. 

The family home was located just about four miles from the site of 
the Drake Oil Well, the first producing well in the oil regions of the 
state. It was opened on August 2y, 1859, ^^d young Irwin used occa- 
sionally to hire out at the well and earn a little spending money, when his 
duties at the farm would spare him for a time. He acquired a good deal 
of miscellaneous knowledge of the well-drilling business and after a 
while decided to go into the work on his own responsibility. He accord- 
ingly purchased an outfit and began taking contracts to sink wells. He 
spent twelve years in this work, enjoying a degree of success that per- 
mitted him to step into wider and more lucrative branches of the werk, 
becoming an owner and operator on his own responsibility. 

In the years that he spent in the oil business in Pennsylvania Mr. 
Irwin says the "Old Sherman" was the most productive well he ever 
brought in. That well flowed 1,200 barrels daily for many months, and 
it is estimated that it produced in that time 1,900,000 barrels. After it 
began to run down they resorted to pumps and it yielded in paying quan- 
tities for twenty years longer. The well was sunk to a depth of 600 
feet before they ceased drilling. 

Mr. Irwin felt himself interested in the stock-raising business as a 
result of his early connection with that work, and in 1883 he gave up 
his oil operations and came to California with a view to engaging in the 
stock business here. On the trip he was accompanied by Mr. Lyman 
Stewart, and before they made any move to investigate the ranching 
prospects of the country they turned their attention to the oil fields. The 
prospects were excellent, and they abandoned all thought of the other 
enterprise and decided to devote their time to the oil industry. 



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626 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Mr. Irwin and Mr. Stewart were joined soon after by Mr. W. L. 
Hardison, an eastern man, and the three went to work in earnest. In 
May of 1883 Mr. Hardison returned to the East to secure machinery and 
men for the work, while Mr. Irwin made the preliminary arrangements 
for the wells at Newhall, after which he came on to Santa Paula Canyon 
and made preparations to drill and develop. They continued there for 
three years, when they moved on to the Sespe Canyon in 1887, that place 
being located about eighteen miles east of Santa Paula. The work was 
pushed rapidly at Sespe Canyon and they brought in a number of pro- 
ducing wells, later building a pipe line to the refinery. For years Mr. 
Irwin was acting superintendent of the work there, his activities covering 
the sinking of the wells, the handling of their product and the building 
of roads to them. This company was organized under the name of the 
Sespe Oil Company, which is still operating. Mr. Irwin, however, is 
no longer connected with the concern, having sold all his oil interests 
in 1900, since which time he has lived quietly in Santa Paula, a town that 
owes something to him for his labors in its upbuilding and advancement. 

In 1868 Mr. Irwin married Miss Caroline B. Canfield, of Niagara 
County, New York. Their only child is Ralph, who was bom in Cherry 
Tree, Venango County, Pennsylvania, in 1874. He has succeeded to cer- 
tain of his father's business interests and gives his time to operations in 
oil well drilling. 

Mr. Irwin became of age in time to cast his first vote for Abraham 
Lincoln, and he has stuck to republican politics down to the present time. 
Never a politician in any sense of the word, he has yet given some 
attention to the political activities of his county and has always done his 
full duty as a citizen. His property interests are varied and include a 
pleasant home in an attractive spot in Santa Paula, where the family 
has long enjoyed the friendship and regard of a wide circle. 

John B. Clifford, M. D. The character and achievement of Doctor 
Clifford give him secure vantage-place as one of the representative 
physicians and surgeons of the state that has been his home since his youth, 
and he has been actively engaged in the practice of his profession for 
nearly a quarter of a century. Since 1904 he has been engaged in practice 
in the City of Santa Barbara, where he controls a substantial and repre- 
sentative professional business, in which his able coadjutor is his wife, 
who was his classmate in graduation in the medical college. The doctor 
has been a close and ambitious student along scientific lines, especially 
those pertaining to his profession. 

Of staunch English lineage, Doctor Clifford was bom in far distant 
New Zealand, the date of his nativity having been May 14, 1865. He is 
a son of Dr. Jesse and Mary M. (Bruce) Clifford, who preceded him to 
California, his father having been a successful practitioner of medicine 
in New Zealand and having become one of the successful and honored 
physicians and surgeons in the City of San Francisco after he had estab- 
lished his home in California. He whose name introduces this review 
acquired his early education in the excellent schools of his native land 



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S-^ i-^L-^-Mi^U-wsJ-.^rr A'y 




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n 



AND VKXTUKA COUNTIl-S, CAl.IF' »kM \ t::'7 

and as a youth he there became idctititicil wiil. ih-- ''ni-j '.p-n- -, . v'l 
which he continued his association until iS>^. \\\u\\ l*^ i .• ■. 1 . j.i! it ■ 
in Cahfomia. At San Francisco ho c(*ntiiiii<'*i Ir-. i -t • r.>:-. 
the drug business until he had fnnnulatcd \u^ pi -'• h'» : •:' ; > 
for the profession that had been sij^iuilly h(>ii"r;*, '•* :;. - mm ^ . : : 

father. He entered the California >>U'<hcal < '•;!, t--. ... ' n ' •- ■• ' •:- 
tion he was graduated as a menibvr of the chi<> ..i i. •- .. a ' *' - 
maiden name was Agnes McCraith, haviiii^ br^-r. .1 m- *. 
class and both having receive*} th^ ir d";^'M;i - cf 1 j... • , ! 

After his graduation in the Tii">]i/ 1 ci rt- . '• • , • • 
gaged in active general practice at '^;«" i lar.. • .-> '• , . 

then, in 1904, removed to S;i:ita '>iri,iT v, << tr '. ' 
his successful prof*'.>-i.MKi] cnd«'iv,i: in-* v> ». \\ . • ' 
have gained him a 1 .- ;,. .iP! it : p -i /. j^ • - ' 

of the State Eck\'!. Mtr:;- .t -. - *- ^.t « . ' 

Francisco County S" h • .*''.-.■■• -: 

Dr. John V>\ hh .-' .^ '- . 
Pythias, in wImi ii i;r 1 , . » ■,.....;...■ . . ■ < ■ 

chief surgeon oi >-' - ■ . .•: ' ^ - *. . I . '. •- . ,. 

adjunct organizatioii. li • !''.:.>..'■- » ' \ ^ - 1 • .. i".. .•}'., 

Doctor Clifford ua- r-. •• • ! v .n ^ •. ' r ■ .. • i . 

Schoen, who passed away bi:u; i" « i-;!,-; I h«'> i:.; 1 > h !. ...: r 
Lavinia A. Doctor Clifford subx ';'.u .ii:\ jji.i'iit'd Dr. Aj^ul- M.^ ■ - •:; 
He is a repul;lican in j)olitics. 

LEOPOLD C. K' ^-. \"^ compared to the great majority of men whose 
biographies aj)pear 'u .!- - 'v.)rl< and who have at! i:..r'l to high po.sition 
as ranchers and in i'»t • . i { business, Leopold ( . Ross, of Oxnard, 
is but a beginner in t'.- ' "» « t of none of the yonuL'^'T generation 

can it Ix* more tnuhfuli) - i '■ foundation for what (jf success, 

of popularity and of hcMv.r :r ' » ' ■ *,n store, has been njoi( t'lrnily 

or with greater good judgiiicin i • • -s r.i^c. 

]\Ir. Ross is a native sou ot • * •'. n mi tbo City •»! I .)s 

Angeles, February 13, 1893, a >":> •: Manilla lAri-nisi 

Ross. He was given excellent t •:: .< • tlu- )^- -I of 

California's institutions, be^innin'/ .,t ^^ -.* • ■!: ^.'. wi:kb 

he attended until 190S, an<l ri>"iiniratg .it ^ .w .. ' • ." trc, Santa 

Clara, California, where be i''.ia"tt'.l si\ in<,i/!, . .".mly he 

enrolled as a student at Troop i '(•!;. u-rhnic School, at 1 :.*■.■, Cali- 
fornia, and studied two vcar^, and tJHii erected the high s()i. .d -i, oart- 
ment of tfie University of '^ >n;]i«Ta California, where he rcmauu'-} two 
years. Following this >'» ■• -- liad his intro.luction to business ai -iMs 
in the capacity of booL;.- v . r f..- the Merchauts National Bank, but 
after seven months ri-.'^'">' ''' :" ''"1'- position and made a trip over 
F^uro[)e, which lasted f-a >- ■ a ?./.; ii*s <' )n his return he was unoc- 
cupied for a year, sa- t N' '!." ^^ . 11 < .'.-..i,'-! with the arranging of 
affairs associated wi*!- li-. ,1" ' •• - < + \''u'\:)\\ ^ >! nty land which he 
had inherited from bis nr* li-. C.. 1 * ;'Miri >'li'app<i Fietra, and of 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 627 

and as a youth he there became identified with the drug business, with 
which he continued his association until 1882, when he joined his parents 
in California. At San Francisco he continued his active connection with 
the drug business until he had formulated his plans for preparing himself 
for the profession that had been signally honored by the services of his 
father. He entered the California Medical College, and in this institu- 
tion he was graduated as a member of the class of 1894, his wife, whose 
maiden name was Agnes McCraith, having been a member of the same 
class and both having received their degrees of Doctor of Medicine. 

After his graduation in the medical college Doctor Clifford was en- 
gaged in active general practice at San Francisco for ten years, and he 
then, in 1904, removed to Santa Barbara, where he has since continued 
his successful professional endeavor and where his ability and popularity 
have gained him a large and representative clientage. He is a member 
of the State Eclectic Medical Society of California, and also of the San 
Francisco County Society of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Dr. John B. Clifford is influentially affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias, in which he is past chancellor and in which he is now serving as 
chief surgeon of the Uniform Rank body, besides being a member of the 
adjimct organization, the Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khorassan. 

Doctor Clifford was married in 1888, at San Francisco, to Dora A. 
Schoen, who passed away January i, 1913. They had one daughter, 
Lavinia A. Doctor Clifford subsequently married Dr. Agnes McCraith, 
He is a republican in politics. 

Leopold C. Ross. As compared to the great majority of men whose 
biographies appear in this work and who have attained to high position 
as ranchers and in the field of business, Leopold C. Ross, of Oxnard, 
is but a beginner in the field. Yet of none of the younger generation 
can it be more truthfully said that the foundation for what of success, 
of popularity and of honor the future has in store, has been more firmly 
or with greater good judgment laid than in his case. 

Mr. Ross is a native son of California, born in the City of Los 
Angeles, February 13, 1893, a son of Charles and Auriella (Arenas) 
Ross. He was given excellent educational advantages in the best of 
California's institutions, beginning at Saint Vincent's College, which 
he attended until 1908, and continuing at Santa Clara College, Santa 
Clara, California, where he remained six months. Subsequently he 
enrolled as a student at Troop Polytechnic School, at Pasadena, Cali- 
fornia, and studied two years, and then erected the high school depart- 
ment of the University of Southern California, where he remained two 
years. Following this Mr. Ross had his introduction to business affairs 
in the capacity of bookkeeper for the Merchants National Bank, but 
after seven months resigned from this position and made a trip over 
Europe, which lasted for seven months. On his return he was unoc- 
cupied for a year, save for the work connected with the arranging of 
affairs associated with the 940 acres of Ventura County land which he 
had inherited from his uncle, Cav. Leopoldo Schiappa Pietra, and of 



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628 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

which he has since sold 240 acres. He now has the balance planted in 
beans, and is getting excellent results from his property, being possessed 
of the executive ability and knowledge of his vocation necessary in the 
handling of a large tract. He lives on his ranch, in order to keep in 
close touch with its affairs, and has a beautiful home, in addition to which 
there are a full set of substantial modern buildings for the housing of 
his livestock, grain and modem machinery. Mr. Ross has been inter- 
ested in a number of business ventures aside from his ranch, and at this 
time is a stockholder and director in the Santa Clara Water and Irrigat- 
ing Company and a stockholder in the North American Dredging Com- 
pany of San Francisco, and the Angelus Hospital, at Los Angeles. He 
belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Frater- 
nal Order of Eagles, and has many friends in each lodge. 

Mr. Ross was married at Los Angeles, in February, 1915, to Miss 
Vera Stiles, who was well kno\yn in social circles of that city. 

Rexwald Brown, M. D. In according recognition to those who 
stand forth as able and influential representatives of the medical profes- 
sion in Santa Barbara County, it is but a matter of consistency to give 
special consideration to Doctor Brown, who is known for his advanced 
scientific and professional attainments and for 'his earnest and effective 
devotion to the exacting vocation that he is making his life work. That 
he has gained high place in the esteem of his professional confreres in 
California needs no further voucher than the statement that in 1916 he 
is the popular incumbent of the office of vice-president of the California 
State Medical Society. 

Doctor Brown was bom in the City of Joliet, Illinois, on the 6th of 
May, 1878, and after profiting by the advantages of the public schools of 
his native city he entered the Michigan Military Academy, at Orchard 
Lake, Michigan, in which excellent institution, now unfortunately passed 
from existence, he gained both scholastic and military discipline of the 
best order. Doctor Brown was a youth of twenty years at the outbreak 
of the Spanish-American war, and he promptly entered the service of his 
country, by becoming a second lieutenant of the marine corps of the 
United States Navy, in which position he continued his services until 
the close of the war. In this connection it is specially interesting to 
record that at the present time he is serving as assistant surgeon in the 
medical reserve corps of the United States Navy and that he maintains 
affiliation with the United Spanish-American War Veterans' Association. 

After formulating his plans for his future career. Doctor Brown 
entered the medical schools of Northwestem University, in the City of 
Chicago, and in this admirable institution of the western metropolis he 
was graduated as a member of the class of 1903. After thus receiving 
his degree of Doctor of Medicine he further fortified himself by serving 
eighteen months as interne in the celebrated Mercy Hospital of Chicago, 
in which he gained most valuable and diversified clinical experience. He 
also became chief surgeon for the great concern of Armour & Company 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 629 

and attending pathologist to the Providence Hospital, another of the 
leading hospitals of Chicago. 

In 1906 Doctor Brown came from Chicago to California and estab- 
lished himself in the general practice of his profession in the City of 
Santa Barbara, where he has since continued his successful services as 
a skilled physician and surgeon and where he ccmtrols a large and repre- 
sentative practice. He is surgeon to the Cottage Hospital of this city and 
is retained as district surgeon for the Southern Pacific Railway. He is 
affiliated actively with the American Medical Association and the Amer- 
ican College of Surgeons, besides being a popular and influential member 
of the California State Medical Society, of which he is vice-president, as 
previously noted. The doctor has made many valuable contributions to 
the standard and periodical literature of his profession and is the author 
of several papers pertaining to modem surgical science, the same having 
been published. Doctor Brown holds membership in the Santa Barbara 
Club, the Santa Barbara Country Club and the Phi Rho Sigma College 
Fraternity. Though he is indefatigable in his devotion to his profession 
the doctor finds time for due recreation and the enjoyment of the social 
amenities, both he and his wife being popular in the representative 
social activities of Santa Barbara and their attractive home, on Eucalyptus 
Hill Road, being known for its gracious hospitality. 

In 1905 was solemnized the marriage of Doctor Brown to Miss Eliza- 
beth Murphy, of Appleton, Wisconsin. 

Francis Price. The loyalty to and appreciation of his native city on 
the part of this representative young attorney and counselor at law needs 
no further voucher than the statement that he is making Santa Barbara 
the stage of his professional endeavors, in which he is well upholding the 
prestige of the family name, his father, the lat^ Judge Samuel S. Price, 
whose death here occurred on the 21st of March, 1901, having been a 
prominent and honored member of the bar of Santa Barbara County for 
a period of about thirty years and having given long and effective service 
in the offices of justice of the peace and police magistrate in Santa Barbara. 

Judge Samuel S. Price, a man of distinguished intellectual attainments 
and noble character, was bom in the State of New Jersey, and one of his 
paternal ancestors served as a general of the patriot forces in the war of 
the Revolution. In 1840 the parents of Judge Price became members of 
the colony that founded and developed what is now known as Jersey 
County, Illinois, the greater number of these pioneers having been from 
New Jersey and this fact led to the application of the name Jersey 
to the county in the wilds of Illinois. Samuel S. Price was reared to man- 
hood in Illinois, where he duly availed himself of the advantages of the 
common schools, and he was a young man at the outbreak pf the Civil 
war. He promptly gave evidence of his patriotism by tendering his aid 
in defense of the Union. He enlisted as a private in Company F, Four- 
teenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with which he went to the front and 
with which he soon felt the full tension of sanguinary conflict. In the 

spring of 1862 he received severe wounds while taking part in the memor- 
vot n— 10 



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630 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

able battle of Shiloh, and his injuries were such as to incapacitate him for 
further service in the field and also leave him permanently crippled. After 
his honorable discharge was given him he proved that his courage and 
ambition were not abated by his physical infirmities, for by his own 
eflforts and resources he defrayed the expenses incidental to the comple- 
tion of a course of study in the law department of the celebrated Univer- 
sity of Michigan, in which institution he was graduated in 1865 ^"^ from 
which he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Soon after his grad- 
uation he engaged in the practice of his profession in the State of 
Nebraska, and he had as his able and valued professional associate a 
veteran of the Confederate service in the Civil war. The two young men 
who had defended opposing causes in the great conflict between the North 
and the South proved most effective coadjutors in their professional en- 
deavors, ancj they built up a law business that was not exceeded in scope 
and importance by that of more than a very few law firms in the Middle 
West. Judge Price continued his residence in Nebraska until the '70s, 
when his impaired health, resulting from the injuries he had received in 
the Civil war, caused him to seek recuperation in California. He estab- 
lished his permanent home at Santa Barbara and here he continued in 
the practice of his profession with distinctive success. He was recog- 
nized as a man of remarkably fine scholastic and professional attainments 
and was a virtual encyclopedia of learning in the science of jurispru- 
dence, the while he took great pride and interest in the collection of one 
of the largest and most select classical libraries in California. In the '80s 
he served as district attorney of Santa Barbara County, and his service 
in minor judicial offices continued up to the time of his death. His 
widow, who still maintains her home in Santa Barbara was bom in Ohio, 
of Dutch, English and Scotch strains of ancestry, and her maiden name 
was Mary Peckinspaugh. 

Francis Price was bom at Santa Barbara on the 4th of October, 
1890, and he has been virtually dependent upon his own resources since 
he was a lad of nine years. By his own efforts he worked his way through 
the public schools and college, and it is a matter of record that he 
has thus been self-supporting from the time when he completed the 
work of the fourth grade in the schools of his native city. While 
attending college he found employment as a forest ranger or guard, and 
upon passing the civil-service examination for forest ranger he received 
the highest percentage of all who appeared for examination in the 
district which he served. After completing a course in the Santa Barbara 
High School Mr. Price entered Stanford University, and in this great 
Califomia institution he was graduated in 1913, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. Thus thoroughly fortified along academic lines, the 
ambitious youth promptly applied himself to characteristically diligent 
and appreciative study in the law department of the same institution, in 
which he was graduated as a member of the class of 191 5 and with the 
well eamed degree of Doctor of Jurispmdence. He was admitted to the 
bar of his native state on the 19th of May of the same year, and he then 
engaged in active general practice in his native city. Though he may 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 631 

still be said to be in but the novitiate period of his professional career 
Mr. Price has already developed a substantial law business, including his 
representation of a number of important corporations. The statements 
already made in this context offer assurance that in his makeup are the 
distinct elements that insure success, and that his ability along profes- 
sional lines has not failed of objective appreciation is indicated by the fact 
that in 191 6 he is serving as special prosecutor for the attorney general 
of California, in which connection it devolved upon him to prosecute in 
Santa Barbara the first case brought to trial under the anti-alien act. 

The department of Romance languages of his alma mater, Stanford 
University, has recently accorded to Mr. Price special recognition for his 
effective efforts for his translation and restoration of an old pastoral 
drama in the Spanish language, and he has prepared this interesting work 
for publication. In 1908 he served as a member of the parade committee 
during the observance of the "Fleet Festival" at Santa Barbara. While 
a student in the law department of Stanford University he was given 
preferment as an assistant to member of the faculty of the law school. 

In politics Mr. Price is admirably fortified in his convictions and is 
an effective advocate of the cause of the republican party. He takes an 
active interest and part in public affairs of a local order and is a progres- 
sive and valued member of the city council of Santa Barbara, to which 
he was elected December 5, 191 5, for a term of two years, and in which 
he is able to express more fully his loyalty to his native city. On August 
29, 1 91 6, he was elected a member of Republican County Central Com- 
mittee and became its secretary, and was also appointed a member of the 
State Central Committe of the republican party. He is recording secretary 
of the local organization of the Native Sons of the Golden West, and in his 
home community he holds membership in the University Club and La Cum- 
bre Golf Club, besides which he is affiliated with the Phi Alpha Delta col- 
lege fraternity. Joseph J. Price, one of the two brothers of the subject of 
this review, succeeded their honored father in the office of police judge in 
Santa Barbara and was the incumbent of this position at the time of his 
death. The surviving brother, Samuel S., is a lawyer by profession and is 
now title officer for the Title Guarantee & Trust Company of Los Angeles, 
in which city he is also specially active and appreciative in his affiliation 
with the Masonic fraternity. 

In the City of San Francisco, on the 19th of June, 1915, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Price to Miss Carrie Isabel Sanford, who was bom 
and reared in that city, where her father, William L. Sanford, conducts an 
extensive commission house. Mrs. Price was graduated in Stanford Uni- 
versity in 191 5, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and her husband was 
graduated in the law school of the university in the same year, their recep- 
tion of their degrees having been almost immediately followed by their 
marriage. Mrs. Price is affiliated with the Phi Beta Kappa and the Delta 
Delta Delta college sororities. Mr. and Mrs. Price pay due homage to the 
fine little son, Francis, Jr., who made his advent in their home on the 13th 
of June, 1916. 



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632 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Carl Schmitz. A quarter o£ a century ago there were more oppor- 
tunities to pick up parcels of land at a reasonable figure than one is apt to 
find today in Southern California. In fact, at this writing, all land that 
is within the possible range of irrigation of any sort is held at a prohibi- 
tive figure and the mere speculator has little chance in the land* game. 
When Carl Schmitz came to California in 1882 he found conditions vastly 
different than they were when he passed on in 191 1, and he did more to 
develop and bring about the changes in land and its values in Ventura than 
the average man may be credited with. 

Carl Schmitz was bom in the City of Berlin, Germany, on August 28, 
1849, and was there educated to the age of fourteen years. He came to 
America with his father, his mother having died in Germany, and they 
settled on a farm in Kentucky. In 1867 they moved to Bell wood, 
Nebraska, where he engaged in farming, and he was active in the agricul- 
tural business there until 1882, when he gave up his interests there and 
came to California. He settled first in Santa Ana, there bought twenty 
acres and planted it to apricots. Eight years later he sold the ranch, 
returning to Bellwood, Nebraska, where he farmed for three years. 
California called him, however, as it usually does in the case of one who 
has had a taste of her Southern climate, and he found himself back in 
the Golden West in 1893, prepared to make it his permanent home. 

Settling in Ventura County, Mr. Schmitz bought 120 acres in the 
locality that is now a part of the townsite of Oxnard. He sold a part of 
his land for a railway station site and the balance he platted into city 
lots. Then he bought another tract of 140 acres near Camarillo, which he 
planted to beans. This proved a good buy and he was induced to reach 
out a little further. His next purchase was a ninety acre tract near the 
present site of Hueneme and planted beets and beans. Here also he 
profited, and he soon purchased 270 acres in Ventura County, which he 
gave over to grain and hay, and fifty acres at El Rio. A little later he 
bought a choice tract of 200 acres near Santa Susana which he planted 
to grain with the exception of twenty acres which he gave up to an 
Apricot orchard. Another large tract of 400 acres came into his pos- 
session through purchase in Paso Robles, San Luis Obispo County, and 
this he planted to hay and grain, though a part of the land was timbered. 

The instincts of the Nebraska farmer will readily be discerned in the 
activities of this land operator, for he never, except in rare cases, gave 
up his land to the choice fruits that the small ranchman in California 
invariably goes in for. Hay and grain, beets and beans and similar prod- 
ucts were the winners with him, and his lands bore bumper crops of 
these varieties yearly, or semi-yearly, as the delightfully accommodating 
climate of Southern California permits in many instances. 

Mr. Schmitz was active in his land operations up to the time of his 
death, which occurred on May 3, 191 1. He was a republican, but was 
never addicted to politics at any time. He performed his duties as a 
citizen and a voter and left politics to those who cared for the life. On 
October 15, 1876, Mr. Schmitz was married to Miss Anna Steiner at 
Bellwood, Nebraska. She became the mother of nine children, and 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 633 

died on May 19, 1901, ten years prior to the passing of her husband. 
Their children are here named briefly as follows: Frank, who passed 
away at the age of twenty-four. Mary is the wife of Edmund Gill of 
Ventura County. Katherine married A. Clyde Stewart, also of Ventura 
County. Leonard is engaged in ranching, and operates the Conego 
ranch, left him by his father. Lena, Maggie, Luna and Edward are living 
at Oxnard in the family home. Bennie, now twenty-one years old, oper- 
ates the Camarillo Ranch, one of the properties left by the father, and 
Edward, eighteen years of age, is a student in the Oxnard High School. 

All the members of this family are taking their places in the world's 
work, and have already shown themselves to be true sons and daughters 
of the sturdy German parent who accomplished so much in the upbuild- 
ing of the agricultural interests of Ventura County. 

Bennie Schmitz, son of the late Carl Schmitz, whose biographical 
sketch immediately precedes this, was bom in Oxnard, California, on 
January 22, 1895, and had his primary schooling in Camarillo, later 
attending the Oxnard High School, from which he was graduated in 
June 191 5. His first work after leaving school was on various ranches 
in his home community, after which he entered the employ of his 
brother-in-law, A. Clyde Stewart, a prosperous rancher in the county, 
spending about one and one-half years in that work. 

It is the intention of the young man to begin operations on his own 
responsibility on a forty-three acre ranch left him by his father and 
also on 104 acres, belonging to his sister and brother, in the vicinity 
of Camarillo, at the close of the present season. His experience in the 
employ of his brother-in-law and other well known ranchers will un- 
doubtedly prove very valuable to him, as he is one who is quick to absorb 
knowledge of any variety. He is a member of the Fraternal Brother- 
hood of Camarillo. 

Mr. Schmitz was married in Oxnard on July 28, 1916, to Miss 
Pauline Train, a daughter of F. W. Train, proprietor of the Oxnard 
News, formerly the Review. Mr. Train is an old timer in this com- 
munity, coming from the East. 

Walter W. Varner. Something more than the average ability and 
energy have characterized the career of Walter W. Varner. In 1897 ^^ 
entered the service of the Limonera Company. He was assigned to duty 
as a lemon packer. He showed a capacity for responsibility, was efficient 
and intelligent in the handling of every task committed to him, and has 
been one of the vital factors in the success of that great organization 
which controls the largest lemon orchard in California. In 1910 he was 
promoted to foreman of the 412-acre lemon grove, and that position means 
one of the most important executive responsibilities in connection with the 
citrus fruit industry of Southern California. Mr. Varner is unmarried, 
has his home at the Limonera Ranch, and in politics is a republican. 

He was bom in Clearwater, Minnesota, May 5, 1865, but has lived in 
California over forty years. He attended school until he was seventeen, 



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634 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

and then entered the service of the Santa Paula Flour Mill Company 
where he was employed under his father for two years. After that he 
worked on various farms in Ventura County until in 1897 he entered the 
service of the Limonera Company. 

His father is Mr. Clark L. Vamer, who was bom in Harveysburg, 
Ohio, March 29, 1839. Educated in his native locality, he went out in 
1854 to Jordan, Minnesota, where he was a pioneer in that northwestern 
territory. Learning the milling business, he followed it in various places 
in Minnesota, and coming out to California in 1874 accepted the position 
of miller with the Golden Gate Flour Mill Company at San Francisco. 
After two years he came into Southern California and for nine years was 
miller with the Santa Paula Flour Mill Company at Santa Paula. For a 
number of years he has lived retired on a ranch near Santa Paula. In 1863 
at Farmington, Minnesota, Clark L. Vamer married Miss Mattie Nis- 
kem, a native of New York State and a daughter of Martin Niskem. 
Walter W. Vamer is their only child. 

Donald W. Herzog. Possessing both artistic and executive ability, 
Donald W. Herzog has won a noteworthy position among the prosperous 
business men of Santa Barbara, and is widely known not only as an 
extensive dealer in paints and painters* supplies, but for his prompt and 
satisfactory execution of contracts for painting and decorating. He was 
born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June 7, 1872, and he is descended from 
one of the earlier German families of that state. 

Donald W. Herzog was educated in his native state, completing his 
early studies at a normal school. Beginning life for himself as a painter, 
he worked as a joumeyman several years, becoming familiar with all 
branches of the trade. Subsequently making his way to California, he 
located in Santa Barbara, and for four years carried on business as a 
painter and contractor. Going then to Tucson, Arizona, Mr. Herzog 
there continued in the same line of business for five years. Although he 
met with excellent success while in that city, and made many warm friends 
in business and social circles, he was not content, and decided to return to 
Santa Barbara, which had always seemed like home to him. Immediately 
resuming his work as a painter and decorator, Mr. Herzog has since built 
up a large and extremely remunerative business as a contractor in that 
line, each season securing a large part of the contract work for interior 
decorating in both Santa Barbara and Montecito. He has also a large 
mercantile trade in the city, dealing extensively in paints and painters' 
supplies, and is much interested in the automobile industry, his business 
including auto painting and body building. Mr. Herzog is independent 
in politics, and has no aspirations for political honors. 

Capt. Spencer Roane Thorpe. As an officer in the Confederate 
Army during the Civil war, as a capable lawyer, as a man of distinguished 
character and widespread influence, and is one of its early residents, Capt. 
Spencer Roane Thorpe deserves a special place in the annals of Ventura 
Countv. 



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' • ' l ucson, Arizona, Mr. Ilerzog 
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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 635 

The late Captain Thorpe was born in Louisville, Kentucky, January 20, 
1842, and he was a great-great-grandson of Governor Patrick Henry of 
Virginia. His early education was acquired in Saint Joseph's College at 
Bardstown, Kentucky, where he remained a student until a short time 
before the outbreak of the Civil war. At a very early age he joined the 
Confederate Army, enlisting in the Sixteenth Mississippi Regiment of 
Infantry, and was later transferred to the First Kentucky Infantry. He 
was in the battle of Drainsville, Virginia, December 20, 1861, in which 
battle he was wounded. Upon that regiment's being disbanded he re- 
turned from Kentucky and served under Morgan's forces in the raid 
through Indiana, holding at that time the rank of first lieutenant and 
being in command of a battalion of four companies, serving as an advance 
guard. 

At Corydon on July 9, 1863, he was again so seriously wounded that 
he was left for dead on the field. He was taken prisoner and his recovery 
was very slow. When partially recovered he was sent to the military 
prison at Johnson's Island, where he was retained until exchanged in 
Octobfer, 1864, when he re-joined his regiment, then commanded by Gen. 
Basil W. Duke, who thus writes of his record : 

"Captain Thorpe is worthy to be credited with a record of active and 
almost continuous service for the entire duration of the war, and his good 
conduct during that entire period was recognized by every officer under 
whom he served." 

His final service in the Confederate Army was with the rank of cap- 
tain, when his command was surrendered at Woodstock, Georgia, on May 
10, 1865. 

After the war he located at Marksville, in Louisiana, where, in 1867, 
he was admitted to the practice of the law, and almost from the beginning 
of his practice he was noted as a man of unusual attainments and ability, 
and was soon one of the leading lawyers of that state. 

In 1877, while on a visit to California, Captain Thorpe spent some time 
in Ventura, and foreseeing the possibilities and the future of Ventura 
County, he returned to Louisiana for the purpose of closing his aflfairs 
there, and in 1883 he returned to California, and at that time made large 
investments in farming property near the Town of Ventura. Upon his 
permanent coming to California Captain Thorpe first resided in San 
Francisco, but in 1886 he took up his residence on one of his properties 
near Ventura, where he remained with his family until 1889, when he re- 
moved to Los Angeles, in which city he continued to reside until his death, 
which occurred at Moorpark, in Ventura County, September i, 1905. 
During all of his. residence at Los Angeles Captain Thorpe spent a great 
portion of his time in Ventura County in the active management of his 
agricultural interests. His unbounded faith in the inherent values of the 
farm lands of Ventura led him from time to time to make great sacrifices 
to acquire holdings of lands, which have amply fulfilled all of his 
prophesies and expectations, and which remain to his family to evidence 
an exceptionally keen and clear foresight and judgment. 

He was always a stalwart democrat, and was active in behalf of his 



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636 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

party, though he never aspired to any public office in California. In this 
state he served as brigadier general of the Pacific Division of the United 
Confederate Veterans for three terms, and was a member of the Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution and of tlie Society of Colonial 
Wars. 

At Marksville, Louisiana, January 20, 1868, Captain Thorpe married 
Helena Barbin. Mrs. Helena Barbin Thorpe, who survives her husband 
and who resides in Los Angeles, was always active in assisting Captain 
Thorpe and upon his death took over the active management of his prop- 
erties in Ventura County. Captain Thorpe and his wife were the parents 
of five children, all of whom are living. Helena Barbin Thorpe, who is 
now Mrs. E. J. Riche of Los Angeles ; Andrew Roane Thorpe of Detroit, 
Michigan ; Virginia Roane Thorpe, who is now Mrs. Harry L. Dunnigan 
of Los Angeles ; Spencer Thorpe, who is an attorney engaged in the prac- 
tice of law at Los Angeles ; and Carlyle Thorpe, who also resides in Los 
Angeles. 

Samuel Curtis Pinkham.. To do a little bit better than anyone else in 
the same line of business is a sure means of attaining success. That has 
been the principle and policy of Samuel Curtis Pinkham as a druggist ever 
since he came to Southern California. In 1914, after withdrawing from a 
partnership in which he had been engaged for a number of years, he estab- 
lished his store under the name Sterling Drug Company at 1137 State 
Street in Santa Barbara. This store occupies the comer of the fine San 
Marcos Building. It is generally conceded that the Sterling Drug Com- 
pany has one of the most if not the most attractive drug store north of 
Los Angeles, and many establishments in that city cannot compare with 
this in point of completeness of stock, perfection of system and the thor- 
oughness and reliability of service to the patrons. 

Mr, Pinkham was bom in Santa Barbara, Calif omia, April i, 1870, 
though most of his early youth and manhood was spent in the State of 
Maine, where his family has lived for a number of generations. Both his 
father and mother were named Pinkham and their respective families go 
back in American history to Colonial days. The Pinkhams originated 
in England, but in the colonies were true patriots and both branches fur- 
nished soldiers to the Revolutionary war. 

The late Rufus D. Pinkham, who died in 1901, was a prominent factor 
in the breeding and raising of horses and in ranching in California. He 
introduced into Santa Barbara the first pedigreed horses from the East. 
He first came out to California in 1851, making the voyage around Cape 
Hom. Later he made a trip by way of the Isthmus. After some expe- 
rience in the northem part of Califomia as a miner, he drifted south, 
first locating in Santa Ynez, and later in the Goleta Valley, where he 
bought land and engaged in farming and stock raising up to the time 
of his death. His old Goleta ranch is still owned by his family. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Maria L. Pinkham, was also bom in 
Maine and she died in 1908. 

When Samuel C. Pinkham was a child he was taken to Maine and he 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 637 

attended the grammar and high schools of that state, also a normal school 
and the academy at Fryeburg. 

He gained his first experience in the drug business at Augusta, Maine, 
where the family lived for several years, and was employed as a clerk 
there a period of four years. In 1899 Mr. Pinkham brought his family 
to Santa Barbara and resumed his connection with the drug business. 
In 1902 he organized the Sterling Drug Company, which located at 609 
State Street. In 1914 he opened a store of his own in the San Marcos 
Building. Mr. Pinkham is a registered pharmacist in the two states of 
Maine and California. 

December 8, 1896, at Winterport, Maine, he married Qara Powers 
Haley, a native of Maine and a daughter of Walter and Julia Haley. Mrs. 
Pinkham is also of an old American family of English descent and of 
Revolutionary stock. They are the parents of four children : Raymond 
D., Walter H., Leroy S. and Chesley M. The son Raymond was born 
in Maine but the others are native sons of California. 

Mr. Pinkham is a member of the Masonic bodies of Santa Barbara 
and of the Royal Arch Chapter in Maine. He also belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Native Sons of the Golden West, is a republican, though not active in 
politics, and is a member of the Chamber of Comnrerce and the Com- 
mercial Club at Santa Barbara. 

William Stratton Porter, J^, There is hardly any position in the 
business world today to which youth and energy, coupled with sound 
ability and integrity of character may not aspire. Possessing these 
fundamentals, William Stratton Porter, Jr., not yet thirty years of age, 
has a position in the business affairs of Santa Barbara which many older 
men might well envy. 

In 1910, soon after completing his university career, he became a clerk 
in the Santa Barbara Abstract & Guaranty Company. This is a business 
made up of infinite detail. Mr. Porter had the systematic mind which 
enabled him to comprehend readily and adjust himself quickly to every 
problem as it arose, and it was soon recognized that he was turning out 
his work with a finished precision difficult to match. From a plerkship 
he reached the larger responsibilities of the business, and in 191 3 was 
elected secretary and manager of the company, and is now entrusted 
with the direction of this large and complicated business. 

Mr. Porter was born at Santos in Brazil, South America, October 
24, 1887, a son of W^illiam S. and Martha (Newman) Porter. His father 
for many years has been in the business of coffee buyer and it was that 
business which called him to reside in Brazil. 

William S. Porter, Jr., has spent most of his life in California, attended 
the public schools at Hanford and the high school at Santa Barbara, where 
he was graduated in 1907. He then entered Leland Stanford University, 
where he was graduated in 1910. 

Mr. Porter is a director in the Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce 



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638 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

and is a member of the Presbyterian Church, July 24, 1913, he married 
Ellen Bird. 

Franklin E. KELLOcg. There is much interest attaching to the 
vigorous and prolific career of this sterling citizen, who is a native of 
California and a scion of one of the early pioneer families of the state, 
where his father established residence prior to the ever memorable 
discovery of gold. Both father and son made records of splendid achieve- 
ment in connection with the civic and material development and progress 
of California, and he whose name introduces this review is known as 
one of the most liberal, loyal and public-spirited citizens of Santa 
Barbara. 

Franklin Erwin Kellogg was bom in Napa Valley, Napa County, 
California, on the 22d of September, 185 1, and is a son of Florentine 
Erwin Kellogg and Rebecca Jane (Williams) Kellogg. His father 
was bom at Batavia, New York, and was a child at the time of the 
family immigration to the wilds of Morgan County, Illinois, in 18 18. 
Florentine E. Kellogg was reared to manhood under the conditions and 
influences of pioneer life in Illinois, and in 1846, as a well fortified 
frontiersman, he made the weary and dangerous trip across the plains 
to Califomia. He settled at a point about midway between St. Helena 
and Calistoga, where he engaged in farming and also found demand for 
his services as a skilled mechanic. After the discovery of gold in 
Califomia he shared to a certain extent in the excitement and became 
concerned with mining operations in the gold fields, but his larger and 
greater success was that which he gained through his activities as a 
farmer and fruit grower. In 1848 he planted the first English walnuts 
in the northem part of the state, and in the same year he planted the 
first vineyard of commercial importance. To him was due also the plant- 
ing of the first peach and apple orchards of any importance, and he was 
the first man to ship grapes, apples and peaches to San Francisco. He 
was a man of indomitable energy and public spirit, and his name and that 
of his noble wife merit high place on the roll of the honored pioneers 
of California. 

Franklin E. Kellogg acquired his early education in the schools of 
Califomia and his broader academic training was gained in Illinois Col- 
lege, at Jacksonville, Illinois, in which he was graduated on the 6th of 
June, 1872. On the 15th of the following August was solemnized his 
marriage to Miss Sarah Frances Foster, and for a year thereafter Mr. 
Kellogg was engaged in the study of law, at Hannibal, Missouri. In 
June, 1873, he returned to the old home in Napa Valley, and for the 
ensuing fourteen years his attention was given principally to teaching in 
the schools of his native state, his record in the j>edagogic profession 
having been one that was most successful. In February, 1877, Mr. Kel- 
logg and his wife established their home at Goleta, Santa Barbara 
County, where for the ensuing ten years he continued as the successful 
and popular principal of the Goleta grammar school. His removal to 
that place had been prompted mainly by his desire to assume the active 



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FRANKLIN E. KELLOGG FLORENTINE E. KELLOGG 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 639 

management of the sixty-acre farm which had been presented to him by 
his father, the same having been purchased at a cost of $150 an acre. 
Mr. Kellogg planted the tract principally to English walnuts, and with 
the exception of four acres, he retained this farm in his possession and 
made it his place of residence for more than thirty years. He made it 
one of the model places of Santa Barbara County and when he finally 
disposed of the property, on the 24th of April, 1897, he received $1,000 
an acre for the same. During the last eleven years of his residence on 
this fine homestead Mr. Kellogg was a director and the secretary and 
manager of the Santa Barbara County Walnut Growers' Association, 
his retention of his official positions with which was compassed by the 
unanimous vote of the members of the organization. After selling his 
farm Mr. Kellogg resigned his position as secretary and was succeeded 
by his son Erwin A. Two years later the son resigned the office and 
the father was again elected secretary of the association, which he con- 
tinued to serve in this capacity for the ensuing seven years. Within 
the eighteen years of his incumbency of the position of secretary the 
association's sale of nuts brought several millions of dollars in return, 
and under the effective regime of Mr. Kellogg every dollar was collected. 

On the 1st of March, 1907, Mr. Kellogg was elected secretary of the 
Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce, and in his six years' incumbency 
of this important position he made a characteristically vigorous and 
effective administration. During his administration of the office the 
Chamber of Commerce exerted powerful influence in effecting the erec- 
tion of the new postoffice building in Santa Barbara, in the founding 
in this city of the California Normal School of Manual Arts and 
Home Economics, and in the construction of the viaducts along the 
Rincon beach between Santa Barbara and Ventura. For the support 
of the last mentioned enterprise the Chamber of Commerce collected 
by popular subscription nearly $50,000. 

Mr. Kellogg has been a valued leader in both civic and industrial 
advancement in his native commonwealth, and while residing on his 
farm he was for many years retained as one of the corps of lecturers 
for the State Farmers' Institute, his addresses, always vigorous and 
practical, having been mainly on the subjects of the English walnut, 
dairying, transportation facilities and needed legislation. He was spe- 
cially insistent in his advocacy, through the public addresses of the ini- 
tiative and referendum policy in popular elections and also the policy 
of recall of incompetent or otherwise undesirable public official. In 1882 
he established the Goleta Dairy and in 1889 he amplified this enter- 
prise by founding the Goleta Creamery, both of which were continued 
in operation under his effective direction until July 31, 1907. 

Mr. Kellogg assumed a position of leadership in connection with 
the movement for the construction of the tunnel aqueduct to supply Santa 
Barbara with water, and the project reached its culmination during the 
time he was serving as secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, which 
body has fostered the important undertaking from the time of its 
inception. On the recommendation of the Chamber of Commerce Mr. 



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640 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Kellogg was appointed a member of the board of water comrtiissioners 
of Santa Barbara, of which position he has been the incumbent for sev- 
eral years. He has been an ardent advocate of the building of storage 
reservoirs for irrigation purposes, and in behalf of this cause he has 
delivered many effective public addresses. By the Chamber of Com- 
merce he was appointed to report on the best system of water ser\'ice 
for Santa Barbara, and after careful investigation he reported that in 
his judgment the most effective method was to impound the water of 
the Santa Ynez River and to bring the water by tunnel to the city. He 
was not the first to make this recommendation but he ably emphasized 
that which had been made previously by George F. Wright, the city 
engineer. This system was eventually adopted, and in the various bond 
elections for procuring funds for constructing the tunnel Mr. Kellogg 
was untiring in his efforts, which were represented in personal activi- 
ties, in vigorous newspaper articles and public addresses. Nine years 
were required to complete this great public-utility improvement, and the 
tunnel is 19,560 feet in length. The incidental project was the largest 
ever attempted by so small a city as Santa Barbara. To accomplish 
the purpose the city issued bonds to a total of $600,000, and up to the 
time of this writing, in the autumn of 1916, the revenue from the sale 
of water has brought more money into the city treasury than the amount 
of the bond payments and interest. 

Mr. Kellogg maintains an independent position in political affairs 
and supports the men and measures meeting the approval of his judg- 
ment, irrespective of strict partisan lines. He is one of the popular 
and appreciative members of Santa Barbara Parior of the Native Sons 
of the Golden West. 

In conclusion is entered brief record concerning the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Kellogg: Elmer P. is proprietor of the Pottery Dairy Farm, 
in Santa Barbara County. Minnie L. is the wife of Fred L. Hogue, a 
representative farmer of Santa Barbara County and a member of the 
firm of Hogue Kellogg Company engaged in the seed and bean business 
at Ventura. Mary R. is the wife of R. C. Watson, head bookkeeper 
for the above mentioned firm of Hogue Kellogg Company. Erwin A. 
is the mayor of the City of Ventura and partner of the firm of Hogue 
Kellogg Company. Clarence F. is Federal veterinary inspector at the 
plant of the Cudahy Packing Company in the City of Los Angeles. 
Leonard F. is a prosperous young farmer near Lompoc, Santa Barbara 
County. 

Charles A. Hoffman. Endowed by Nature with artistic tastes and 
talent of a high order, Charles A. Hoffman early gave evidence of his 
preference for a professional life, and having taken up the study of pho- 
tography when young he has risen to much prominence in the art, and 
secured a leading position among the photographers of Santa Barbara, 
where he has a finely equipped studio, and is carrying on a successful 
business. A son of Michael and Appolonia (Shonen) Hoffman, he was 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 641 

bom November 14, 1872, in Keokuk, Iowa, but was brought up and 
educated in Parsons, Kansas. 

Mr. Hoffman has also achieved an enviable reputation as an artist 
in an entirely different line from that of a photographer, being a genius 
in plastic art, designing and carving. With a master's cunning, he has 
beautifully ornamented much of the furniture in his attractive home, the 
designs being original, and the work, done mostly in oak or walnut, being 
exquisitely done, the delicate carvings showing the artist's skill and 
ability. Since opening his studio in Santa Barbara, Mr. Hoffman has 
built up a large patronage in the city and surrounding country, and although 
he has been established but two years in that locality, having arrived there 
in 1914, he is numbered among the more successful photographers of 
the county. 

Mr. Hoffman married, September 6, 1889, at Saint Joseph, Missouri, 
Miss Rosie Schwend. Politically he is an independent, voting with the 
courage of his convictions, regardless of party prejudice. Religiously 
he is a Christian Scientist. 

Judge Henry N. Evans. A practical, skilful and well-to-do agricul- 
turist of Los Alamos, owning and occupying a well-managed and highly 
productive ranch. Judge Henry N. Evans is a man of influence in his 
community, and has there filled various official positions with ability and 
fidelity. He was bom December 8, 1869, in Alabama, which was like- 
wise the birthplace of his father and mother, Henry and Ann (Higgin- 
botham) Evans. His parents came to California in 1870, and his father, 
who was a Methodist preacher, died in 1875, and his wife in 1872. 

Educated in the public schools, Henry N. Evans began life for him- 
self as a teacher on the Buell ranch, and for fourteen consecutive years 
taught in Santa Barbara County, being well liked and quite popular as 
an educator. About seven years ago, in 1909, Mr. Evans purchased his 
home farm of twenty-seven acres, and has it now all under cultivation, 
raising beans, barley and cattle, and is meeting with unquestioned suc- 
cess in his operations. In fact, the Judge has been so fortunate in his 
work on his own ranch that he now rents a large tract of near-by land, 
1,500 acres, which he also devotes to the growing of barley, beans and 
cattle. 

Judge Evans married, June 10, 1891, in Lompoc, Miss Annie A. Callis, 
who was born in Carpinteria, California, a daughter of the late Thomas 
C. Callis, a California pioneer, and one of the very earliest merchants of 
Montecito. Five children have blessed the union of Judge and Mrs. 
Evans, as follows: Reginald S., a clerk in the Lompoc Valley Bank; 
Gerald, foreman on the home ranch; Wallace, range boss of the ranch; 
Howard P., assisting his father on the farm ; and Dorothy I., who assists 
her father as bookkeeper for the ranch. 

Although Judge Evans is a stanch advocate of the principles of the 
democratic party, he has ever been too busy to take an active part in 
political affairs, but for the last ten years he has rendered efficient service 
as justice of the peace, an office that was forced upon him by his con- 



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642 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

stituents. He has also served for twelve years as a member, and the 
clerk of the board of school trustees, and has been deputy assessor several 
terms. He belongs to the Methodist Church and for many years was a 
leader in church work. 

William Rife Coffey. For upwards of a quarter of a century 
actively identified with the advancement of the agricultural prosperity 
of Santa Barbara County, William Rife Coffey, late of Goleta, was 
widely known as an enterprising and successful farmer, and as a man 
of worth and integrity his death, which occurred October 26, 1903. was 
a cause of general regret. He was bom near Louisville, Kentucky, 
January 3, 1831, a son of Osborn and Jane (Bell) Coffey. 

His parents moving to Silex, Lincoln County, Missouri, when he 
was but two years old, William R. Coffey was there educated, attend- 
ing the grammar schools and college. Joining a band of gold seekers in 
1849, he crossed the plains to California, and was engaged in mining in 
Grass Valley, Nevada County, for a number of years. Coming south- 
ward to a more congenial climate in 1872, Mr. Coffey visited friends in 
Santa Barbara County, in the meantime looking about for a favorable 
place in which to locate. Coming to Goleta in 1875, he purchased twenty- 
five acres of land, which was then in its primitive condition, and by 
judicious management and wise labor improved the fine ranch on which 
his widow is still living. He was very successful in his work, and added 
by purchase to his original ranch twenty-seven acres of land, all of which 
he placed under culture, making his estate one of the best in its im- 
provements and appointments of any in the neighborhood. Mr. Coffey 
was a democrat in politics, and a member of Magnolia Lodge No. 242, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons, at Santa Barbara. 

Mr. Coffey married, August 31, 1884, ^^ Goleta, Miss Orilla Hill, 
who was bom in Iowa, and as a young girl came with her parents to 
Goleta, settling in this section of the country in pioneer days. Four 
children were bom of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Coffey, namely : Minnie 
Belle, living on the home ranch with her mother ; George William ; Lelia, 
wife of Jesse R. Hill; and Osbom D. Mrs. Coffey is a member of the 
Presbyterian Church, to which her husband also belonged, and ha? 
reared her family in the same religious faith. 

George W. Russell. There are many interesting data pertaining to 
the personal career and family history of this well known citizen and 
representative business man of Santa Barbara, where he conducts a sub- 
stantial and successful real estate and insurance business. Though Mr. 
Russell was bom in Macomb County, Michigan, on the 24th of July, 1851, 
he has been a resident of Califomia since he was a child of about three 
years, his father having been one of the sterling pioneers of this state and 
he himself having been reared under the conditions and influences of the 
pioneer days. His memory constitutes an indissoluble link between the 
primitive period of civic and industrial development and the latter days 
of opulent prosperity in Califomia, and his reminiscences of the past are 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 643 

most graphic and interesting, as his life has been one of full and varied 
experience. 

Alpheus W. Russell, father of him whose name initiates this review, 
was bom at Brattleboro, Vermont, on the 22d of February, 1826, and on 
the 14th of February, 1878, he met a tragic death, as he was killed by a 
runaway team of horses attached to a loaded truck. He was one of the 
gallant band of historic "Forty-niners" in California and was successful 
in his early operations in the gold fields. In 1850 he returned to the 
East, and while there he married Miss Rachael Maria Adams Williams. 
Mr. Russell returned to California after remaining a comparatively brief 
period in the East, and each of his trips to and from the Pacific coast 
was made by way of the Isthmus of Panama. When, in 1854, his young 
wife set forth to join him in California, she too crossed the Isthmus of 
Panama, and she endured much hardship on the long and weary jour- 
ney, as conveniences of travel were notable specially for their absence, 
besides which she had the care of her infant son, George W., of this 
sketch. On her way from the Isthmus to her destination it became nec- 
essary for her to sleep in an open boat, and as the result of the exposure 
this brave and noble young woman died shortly after her arrival in Cal- 
ifornia. In crossing the Isthmus she was compelled to pay $200 for the 
dejected donkey which gave her transportation over the trail and which 
she abandoned upon reaching the Pacific coast side of the Isthmus. 

Alpheus W. Russell went to a mining claim on Bear Creek, between 
Grass Valley and Nevada City, and there he was successful in his gold 
mining. Besides developing his claim he also conducted a pioneer hotel 
at the mining camp. After the death of his wife he placed their son 
George W. in a boarding school conducted by one of his friends. He 
then prepared to return to the East, but he lost the tickets which he had 
purchased and which provided for his transportation on the ill fated 
steamer Golden Gate. He was thus unable, fortunately as it turned out, 
to take passage on this vessel, which was wrecked at sea and all trace 
of which was lost after it left port. After selling his mines Mr. Russell 
founded the Sonoma Democrat, and after presiding as editor and pub- 
lisher of this pioneer newspaper for one year he sold the plant and busi- 
ness to James Budd. He then engaged in the general merchandise 
business at Santa Rosa, where he continued operations from 1858 to 1861. 
He joined in the latter year the memorable rush of gold seekers who 
were making their way into the new fields in Nevada. There he acquired 
considerable stock of distinct value, the development of these mining 
interests making him a wealthy man. Later he became foreman of an 
extensive ore mill at Mineral Rapids, and shortly afterward, in the spring 
of 1862, a continued and torrential rain so swelled the river as to cause 
the turbulent stream to sweep away the mill, the surrounding grounds 
and all the houses of the village except the one in which Mr. Russell, his 
son and a few other men were marooned. Under these perilous conditions 
John Black, a notorious gambler, swam the rapids and held in his mouth 
one end of a piece of twine, the other end being retained by his com- 
panions and by means of this slender and fragile cord a rope being 



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644 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

extended over the rapids and made possible the rescuing of the stranded 
persons by means of a raft, the house in which they had found refuge 
having been swept away shortly after their departure. After this disaster 
the miners, by a virtually unanimous vote, elected Mr. Russell recorder 
of Lyon County, Nevada, and of this office he continued the inctunbent 
seven years. On the 7th of October, 1867, with goodly financial resources, 
Mr. Russell came to Santa Barbara County and turned his attention to 
farming. Lack of experience in this field of industrial enterprise brought 
to him financial disaster, and under these depressing conditions he engaged 
in the trucking business. In this connection he brought to Santa Barbara 
the first short-turn truck, and he continued his operations in this enter- 
prise until he met his death by the runaway of his team, as previously 
noted. He served three or more terms as a member of the city council of 
Santa Barbara and his civic loyalty was such that he never consented to 
accept a cent of salary for this service. He was long affiliated with the 
Masonic fraternity, and his wife had been a member of its adjunct organ- 
ization, the Order of the Eastern Star. Alpheus W. Russell was a man of 
sterling character, of strong individuality and resolute purpose. He lived 
up to the full tension of the early days in California and his name merits 
high place on the roll of the honored pioneers of this great commonwealth. 

George W. Russell, the immediate subject of this review, gained his 
early education in the pioneer schools of California, and in his youth he 
had the distinction of presiding over the operation of the first mowing 
machine and the first horse hay-rake brought into Santa Barbara County. 
Thereafter he was employed in the printing office of J. A. Johnson, who 
published the Santa Barbara Press, which was later sold to General Otis, 
a prominent figure in California journalism. In the office of the Press, 
Mr. Russell held the position of pressman for sixteen years, — 1872-87, — 
and in the long intervening i>eriod he has continued his active association 
with civic and business affairs in Santa Barbara, where he now is the 
head of a prosperous and representative real estate and insurance agency. 

Mr. Russell gives stanch allegiance to the republican party, though 
he has manifested no special ambition for political activity, and as . a 
government weather observer he is special correspondent for the United 
States weather bureau at Los Angeles. 

By the hour <:an Mr. Russell draw upon his fund of interesting 
reminiscences concerning conditions, scenes and events of the pioneer 
days in California, and he has related with relish, as indicating the devo- 
tion of early church-goers in Santa Barbara County that some of the 
number had to swim a stream in order to reach the church. Horses 
were scarce and in ferrying the stream one horse usually carried two per- 
sons, the animal being utilized for numerous trips across the stream. The 
church to which reference is made had as its pastor Rev. E. M. Betts, a 
Congregational clergyman, and practically all commjunity news and infor- 
mation was disseminated from the unpretentious little church. After the 
close of the religious services the minister would make such announce- 
ments as these : "Brother Ben will grind wheat on Tuesday ;" 

"Brother Jones is out of store tea, and if any brother has a surplus 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 645 

Brother Jones would like to trade for the same." Swapping wheat for 
beef and other supplies was the common custom, mail was supposed to be 
received every ten days, but the interval was often one of thirty days; 
the pioneers raised their own meat, ground their own flour, made out of 
beans and peas a substitute for tea and coffee, and used honey for sweet- 
ening. The first coal-oil lamp brought into Santa Barbara was introduced 
by the father of the subject of this sketch and proved an article command- 
ing much curiosity and wonderment, while the consensus of opinion was 
that the bright light would injure the eyes. 

As a young man Mr. Russell wedded Miss Ella Pierce, and they have 
no children. Mrs. Russell is a daughter of the late Isaac B. Pierce, who 
came from Indiana to California in the early days and who became a prom- 
inent and influential citizen of Santa Barbara, where he served for a num- 
ber of terms as a member of the city council. 

John Baptiste Deu. A prosperous and thriving merchant of Goleta, 
John Baptiste Deu has risen to his present position by his own exertions, 
having begun life for himself on the lower rung of the ladder of success. 
A son of Simon and Marguerite Deu, he was born April 25, 1849, i" 
Haute-Garonne, France, where the earlier years of his life were passed. 

Immigrating to the United States in 1864, when but fifteen years of 
age, Mr. Deu came directly to Santa Barbara County and during the 
next twenty or more years worked for an uncle, Mr. P. Baron. In 1885 
he established himself in business on his own account, opening a store 
of general merchandise in Goleta. In 1892 Mr. Deu feeling the need 
of more commodious quarters, erected a larger and more substantial 
building for store use. Putting in a large and varied stock of general 
merchandise he has since carried on a very satisfactory mercantile 
trade, his patronage being extended and remunerative. 

On November 24, 1892, Thanksgiving day, in Goleta, Mr. Deu mar- 
ried Miss Mary Taylor, a woman of sterling worth and much force of 
character. She is a daughter of the late Alexander S. and Josepha 
(Hill) Taylor, Mr. Taylor a native of Charleston, South Carolina and 
Mrs. Taylor a daughter of Daniel A. Hill, an old pioneer of Santa Bar- 
bara County. Mrs. Deu passed to the life beyond October 4, 191 5, leav- 
ing two children, Marguerite and Alexandrine. 

Samuel Lyons. An esteemed and highly respected citizen of Bal- 
lard, Samuel Lyons, who has materially assisted in establishing the 
reputation of Santa Barbara County as a superior agricultural region, 
is actively following his chosen occupation on his home ranch of twenty 
acres, devoting his labors to the raising of the grains and fruits that 
grow so well, and yield such abundant harvests in this part of the state. 
A native of Pennsylvania, he was bom January 27, 1847, of Irish par- 
entage. His father, James Lyons, a native of the North of Ireland, im- 
migrated to the United States when young, settling in the Keystone State, 
where he carried on general farming until his death, in 1867. He married, 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Eliza Wray, who was born in County Derry, 

Ireland, and died on the home farm in 1858. 
YoL n— 11 

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646 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Leaving school in his youthful days, Samuel Lyons assisted his father 
on the home farm during the stunmer seasons, while in the winter time 
he was engaged in mining coal. In 1882, having decided upon an agri- 
cultural career, he sought the more congenial climate and richer soil of 
California, and on December 8th of that year arrived in Santa Barbara 
County. During the ensuing twelve months Mr. Lyons carried the mail 
from Ballard, by way of Jonita Post Office, to Los Alamos. Finding 
then a good opportunity to invest his money, he bought 130 acres of 
land, and embarked in general farming. Three years later he disposed 
of that property, and purchased his present home ranch, which he has 
since managed with characteristic enterprise and energy, as a grower of 
hay, alfalfa, com, garden truck .and fruit is quite successful. Mr. Lyons 
has met with some reverses in his work, his house having been burned 
to the ground twenty or more years ago, entailing considerable loss, and 
in October, 191 5, he was again unfortunate enough to have the house he 
then occupied burned. 

Mr. Lyons has had other interests of an industrial nature aside from 
farming, having done a good deal of carpenter work in and near Ballard, 
and likewise having worked in the asphalt mines in Sisquoc, where he 
met with a bad accident, his hip being seriously injured. In 1887 he pre- 
empted 160 acres of land in San Luis Obispo County, near Shandon, and 
about thirty-five miles from the Town of San Luis Obispo. This land is 
now under cultivation, and is leased to a man who raises grain, his main 
crop being wheat. 

Mr. Lyons married, in 1871, in Pennsylvania, Miss Myra W. Wilson, 
who was bom in that state, and was there educated, having been gradu- 
ated from the State Normal School in the Town of California, Washing- 
ton County. She was of English descent, the daughter of John Wilson, a 
prosperous weaver, and a great-granddaughter of Surgeon McDonald, 
who came to this country from Scotland, and served in the Revolution, 
he having belonged to the Oan MacDonald of Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lyons are the parents of six children, as follows : William M., a general 
merchant in Cambria, San Luis Obispo County ; Grace W., who married 
Edgar B. Davison, postmaster at Ballard, and has four children, all boys ; 
Alice, wife of E. F. Potter, formerly principal of the Santa Ynez \'alley 
Union High School, but now engaged in farming, has two daughters and 
one son ; George W., who was graduated from the University of California 
as an agricultural chemist, and after teaching in that institution for a 
year took a course in forestry at the University of Michigan, and is now 
assistant forester at Hot Springs, California, married Donnie Thompson, 
and has two children, a boy and a girl ; Jeannette, a teacher in the Ballard 
Grammar School, has a life certificate as a teacher; and Samuel H., an 
attorney in Solvang. 

In politics Mr. Lyons has always been identified with the republican 
party, and has served as delegate to state and county conventions, and as 
a member of the County Central Committee. For nearly thirty years he 
served continuously as justice of the peace, was deputy assessor of Santa 
Barbara County for seven years, and for the last six years has been notary 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 647 

public Ever interested in public and educational matters, Mr. Lyons was 
for ten years president of the high school board at Santa Ynez, during 
which time he was influential in advancing its material interests, and 
raising its standard. While a resident of his native state, Mr. Lyons was 
for several years a member of the Pennsylvania National Guard. He now 
belongs to the Farmers Mutual Insurance Company, an organization of 
much benefit to the agriculturists of this locality. Fraternally he is a 
member, and past chancellor, of Santa Ynez Lodge No. 212, Knights of 
Pythias. Religiously he is a member and an elder of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

Jarrett T. Richards. At this juncture it is permitted to accord 
recognition to one of the able and honored members of the bar of Santa 
Barbara County, Mr. Richards having established his residence in the 
City of Santa Barbara in 1868 and having long held prestige as one of 
the representative lawyers of this section of the state. He has assisted 
materially in the developn^ent and upbuilding of Santa Barbara and in 
providing the city with its effective system of municipal government — 
his status, in short, being that of a loyal, broad-gauged and public-spirited 
citizen. 

Mr. Richards was bom at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, in the year 
1842, and is a son of John Curtis Richards, who was bom in Baltimore, 
Maryland, on the ist of June, 1812, a scion of stanch Welsh ancestry. 
John C. Richards was a grandson of Rev. Lewis Richards, who was sent 
from Glamorganshire, Wales, as a missionary in America. He came to 
this country at the instance and under the gracious patronage of Lady 
Huntington, in the latter part of the eighteenth century, and here was 
solemnized his marriage to a young Virginia woman, a member of the 
distinguished Custis family of that historic old commonwealth. In the 
schools of his native place Jarrett T. Richards acquired his early educa- 
tion, and at the age of seventeen years he went to Europe, where he 
devoted abbut three years to study in well ordered educational institu- 
tions in Switzerland and Germany. In 1864, at Chambersburg, Penn- 
sylvania, Mr. Richards began the study of law under the direction of an 
able preceptor, but in the summer of that year the town was virtually 
destroyed by Confederate forces that were operating in the old Keystone 
State at a climacteric period in the Civil war. In the autumn of the same 
year Mr. Richards went to the City of New York, where he entered the 
law school of Columbia University. In this institution he was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1866, and in addition to gaining his degree 
of bachelor of laws he had the distinction of being awarded the second 
prize in municipal law. After his graduation he remained one year in 
the national metropolis, and during this period he gained valuable experi- 
ence through his association with the representative law firm of Brown, 
Hall & Vanderpool. Upon leaving New York City Mr. Richards engaged 
in the practice of his profession at Erie, Pennsylvania, where also he was 
political editor of the Erie Daily Republican at the time of the impeach- 
ment proceedings against President Johnson. After having remained 



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648 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

one year at Erie he was urged by certain of his friends to remove to 
California, his health having in the meanwhile become considerably im- 
paired. Accordingly, in the autumn of 1868, he came to the Golden State 
and established his residence at Santa Barbara, where he has been actively 
and successfully engaged in the practice of his profession during the 
long intervening years and where his work has been principally in con- 
nection with the civil department of practice. 

In 1872 there was made on the part of the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad 
Company an attempt to obtain from San Francisco and the southern 
counties of California a subsidy, efforts being specially made to obtain a 
donation from the County and Town of Santa Barbara. Mr. Richards 
maintained that it would be disastrous thus to saddle a burden of debt 
upon the community under conditions that gave no positive assurance 
that the proposed railroad line would be constructed, and his opposition 
to the cause was later fully justified by results. To oppose the project the 
more effectively he became an interested principal in the Santa Barbara 
Times, through the columns of which he vigorously opposed the move- 
ment in behalf of the railroad, with the result that the proposition was 
defeated insofar as applying to Santa Barbara County. The county 
board of supervisors, composed of Thomas R. Bard, of Ventura, and 
Thomas W. Moore and John Edwards, of Santa Barbara, refused to 
place the question before the people, and for a time the popular feeling 
was very pronounced — in fact, to such an extent as greatly to color poli- 
tical affairs in the county. 

In 1875 Mr. Richards was elected mayor of Santa Barbara, and while 
the vigorous and loyal incumbent of this office he conceived and brought 
into operation the system of having municipal warrants bear a reasonable 
rate of interest, pending the existence of a large floating indebtedness, 
and this action put the city scrip at par, with the result that the municipal 
credit was properly maintained until the final extinguishment of the city's 
indebtedness. 

In 1879, 2tt the first republican state convention held after the adop- 
tion of the new state constitution, Mr. Richards was made one of the 
republican nominees for the office of associate justice of the Supreme 
Court of California. In the ensuing campaign three parties were repre- 
sented, and the democratic and workmen's parties combined upon their 
judicial nominations, with the result that the republican nominees for 
the Supreme Court were defeated with the one exception of Judge Myrick. 

Mr. Richards has been a close student of economic and governmental 
matters and is implacably opposed to monopolies, the combination of 
capital and the centralization of governmental power, but he is no longer 
active in the arena of practical politics, his entire time and attention being 
given to the large and representative law business which he has long 
controlled. Mr. Richards was married, in 1898, in Santa Barbara to Mary 
Lewis, a native of Maryland. 

John Thomas Torrence. One of the old timers of Santa Barbara 
County, where he has lived for more than thirty-five years, John Thornas 



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JOHN T. TORREKXE 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 649 

Torrence has made a success of life both as a rancher and as a business 
man. His interests are now of considerable importance and of wide 
scope in the vicinity of Santa Ynez, and everyone in that section knows 
and respects Mr. Torrance for what he has achieved and also for what 
he is. 

Bom in Springfield, Illinois, March 7, 1855, a son of James W. and 
Elizabeth (Skeefe) Torrence, he attended the public schools of Illinois 
as a boy and then came to California with his parents. The family first 
located in Stanislaus County, where John T. Torrence was employed on 
his fathers' farm. In 1880 he came to Santa Ynez and with his brother 
assumed the active management of his father's farm for two years. 

In the meantime having been thrifty and having confidence in the 
future, John T. Torrence bought 160 acres of his own, and that was the 
basis of his independent career as a rancher. Besides farming his quarter 
section he also was associated with his father in the ownership of 800 
acres of mountain land, but this was subsequently sold. For more than 
thirty years Mr. Torrence has looked after the improvement and cul- 
tivation of his 160 acre ranch, and in the meantime his interests have 
extended to several financial enterprises. He is a director of the Solvang 
Bank and of the Santa Ynez Valley Bank. In the election of November 
7, 1916, by a vote of almost 2 to i, he was elected to the office of super- 
visor of Santa Barbara County. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, a Presbyterian in church faith, and politically a 
democrat. 

In Santa Barbara October 3, 1883, he married Miss Mary Agnes 
Hails, a daughter of James R. and Abbey (Jones) Hails. Mr. and 
Mrs. Torrence are the parents of four children: Mary; James R., who 
married Gertrude Connell; Samuel P.; and Margaret I. 

Fred S. Tucker. Like many other of the representative citizens of 
Southern California, Mr. Tucker was led to establish his home in this 
idyllic commonwealth primarily in order to recuperate his physical ener- 
gies after they had become much impaired through close application to 
business and through living under adverse climatic conditions. He has 
been notable for his initiative and constructive ability as a business man, 
has had broad and varied experience, and after establishing bis home in 
the beautiful City of Santa Barbara he brought his admirable powers 
to bear in the developing and upbuilding of one of the leading retail 
mercantile houses of the city. Thus he has gained precedence as one 
of the most progressive, liberal and public-spirited business men and 
loyal citizens of Santa Barbara, on which score he is specially eligible for 
recognition in this history. 

The original progenitors of the Tucker family in America settled in 
Massachusetts in 1662, and representatives of the name were patriot 
soldiers in the War of the Revolution. Fred S. Tucker claims the fine 
old City of Dorchester, Massachusetts, as the place of his nativity and 
is a son of Charles and Vesta (Gates) Tucker, both likewise natives of 
the old Bay State and both now deceased, the father having been for 



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650 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

many years successfully engaged in business as a general contractor. 
The lineage of both the Tucker and Gates families traces back to sterling 
English origin, and one of the maternal great-grandfathers of the subject 
of this review gallantly served the colonies as a soldier in the War of the 
Revolution. 

He whose name initiates this review gained his early education in the 
public schools of the City of Boston, where his studies were continued 
until he had completed a course in the high school. At the age of twenty 
years he became associated with the retail furniture business in the City 
of Peoria, Illinois, where he eventually became a partner in a firm that 
conducted a large and prosperous business in this line. Later he engaged 
in the same business in an independent way and after developing a pros- 
perous enterprise he continued at its head for seven years at Peoria. 
He then sold the business to a stock company and his next step was to 
go to the City of London, England, where he opened a business as a 
representative of American furniture manufacturers. After five years 
of successful business in London he returned to the United States and 
purchased an established house-furnishing business at Colorado Springs, 
Colorado. He consolidated the business with that of two other local 
stores and for twelve years he conducted the largest mercantile estab- 
lishment in that city. A nervous breakdown, resulting from his inces- 
sant application to business, caused him to seek "the most climatically 
perfect place in the world," and thus it was that in 191 3 he established 
his home at Santa Barbara. Here he assumed the ownership of an old- 
established business at the end of his first year of residence in the city, 
and he removed the stock to the Garland Building, which he had exten- 
sively remodeled for the purpose, and under his able and progressive 
management the enterprise has expanded most satisfactorily, the while 
his establishment, devoted principally to art goods and to furniture of 
superior and exclusive order, is one of the show places of the city — one 
that lends great attraction to the leading retail district. 

In all stages of his remarkably active and successful business career 
Mr. Tucker has exemplified in a characteristically unassuming way the 
best spirit of civic loyalty and progressiveness, his political allegiance 
being given to the republican party. While a resident of Colorado he 
served several years as a member of the city council of Colorado Springs, 
but he has been in no degree a seeker of public office or of political influ- 
ence. He is a director of the Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce and 
was formerly president of the Commercial Club of this city. While 
residing at Peoria, Illinois, Mr. Tucker served three years as a member 
of the local organization of the Illinois National Guard. 

At Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Tucker to Miss Mary Stehley, who was bom and reared in that state, a 
representative of one of its sterling pioneer families. Mr. and Mrs. 
Tucker have five children: Donald is a man of fine intellectual attain- 
ments and is now a member of the faculty of Columbia University, New 
York City; Mary is the wife of Professor M. R. Kirkwood, a member 
of the faculty of Stanford University, Palo Alto, California; Vesta is 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIEORXLA C51 

*h(' wife of Charles M. Anj^ell. who is an electrical engineer by j^rofes- 
^itM^ and they reside in the City of Denver, i oU.rado; Fred S., Jr., is a 
i.icniher of the class of 1917 in Stanford Uni\cisit\ ; and KoUrt i.^ a 
n If rubor of the class of 19 17 in the Santa iuirl-ara I]it:h Scb.MMl. 

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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 651 

the wife of Charles M. Angell, who is an electrical engineer by profes- 
sion, and they reside in the City of Denver, Colorado; Fred S., Jr., is a 
member of the class of 1917 in Stanford University; and Robert is a 
mem&er of the class of 1917 in the Santa Barbara High School. 

Capt. George M. McGuire has had a very versatile and unusual 
business experience since coming to Santa Barbara in 1902. His early 
life was spent in the Middle West. He was bom in Sandusky, Ohio, 
March 14, 1853, and he brought with him to California a wide experience 
and a knack of getting things done in an original way. 

Locating in Santa Barbara he spent several years in boating around 
the channel islands up and down the coast. During that time he was a 
wholesale dealer in sea shells, sea grass and also made a business of 
securing sea lions alive, furnishing them to the markets of the world, 
including zoological gardens, animal trainers, and other sources of demand. 
He was also interested in retailing shells, curios and various kinds of 
jewelry. He was a manufacturer along with M. F. Berkey for several 
years. 

In 1910 Captain McGuire engaged in the theater business at Santa 
Barbara. He acquired the LaPetite at 622 State Street in the old Lacy 
Block. This has the distinction of having been the first successful mov- 
ing picture theater in Santa Barbara. Since then Captain McGuire has 
continued steadily in the theatrical business and in 191 1 he bought the 
New Tally Theater on Canyon Perdido and State streets. He changed 
the name to the Palace and is now proprietor of that well known place 
of amusement. Captain McGuire is a member of the Elks Club and he 
still resides in Santa Barbara. 

Charles H. Willard. This is the name of a Ventura County 
pioneer, one who was worthily and successfully identified with the 
ranching and civic interests in and around Santa Paula for nearly half 
a century. 

Bom in Illinois March 7, 1842, he had his first training in the public 
schools of his native state, and at the age of nineteen years in 1851 came 
across the plains with his parents, who settled as farmers in Napa 
County, California. There he grew to manhood, and in 1866 he came 
to Southern California and located on a 160 acres of Government land 
in Ventura County. While bringing this land into a state of cultivation 
he engaged in freighting business between Los Angeles and Ventura 
County. This old homestead is situated four miles east of the present 
City of Santa Paula and in the Santa Clara Valley. He did his part in 
reclaiming a part of that beautiful and fertile valley to the uses of 
civilization and modern agriculture, and was a general farmer there 
for a great many years. In 1901 he bought 150 acres adjoining his 
homestead, and in 1902 acquired twelve acres of timber land also adjoin- 
ing. Of the old homestead thirty acres was planted in fruit trees, and 
the rest was devoted to the culture of beans, grain, hay and pasture. 
This land has suffered considerable damage by floods. 



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652 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

In 191 2 Charles H. Willard having then attained the age of seventy 
retired from active farming and lived in Santa Paula until his death 
on March 24, 1916. He was a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, a republican, and belonged to the Universalist faith. 

In Ventura on August 3, 1863, he married Harriet Atwood. Mr. 
Willard, a native of Carroll County, Missouri, is the daughter of another 
California pioneer, William Turner. He was bom in Carroll County, 
Missouri, January i, 18 19, two years before Missouri became a state, 
and his parents were thus in the vanguard of pioneers who pushed for- 
ward across the Mississippi Valley during the early part of the nine- 
teenth century. Reared and educated in Missouri, William Turner 
was a farmer there until 1850, when he joined in the great exodus to the 
gold fields of California, crossed the plains, locating in Placer County 
was an active farmer in that district until 1866. In that year he removed 
to Mendocino County, where he continued farming, and subsequently 
came to Santa Barbara County. He lived there until the early '80s and 
then removed to Santa Paula, where he was connected with various 
business concerns until his death in 1901, when past eighty years of age. 

John Thille. For a quarter of a century the late John Thille, who 
died September 24, 191 5, was a successful horticulturist and rancher in 
Ventura County. On settling in that county in 1890, he bought twenty- 
five acres near Santa Paula in the Santa Clara Valley. Eight years later, 
in 1898, he bought fifteen acres adjoining, and though limited to forty 
acres the homestead ranch is one of the choicest bits of property in that 
valley. Mr. Thille planted it in apricots as the chief crop, but a few 
years before his death began developing it to lemon culture. In 1908 he 
took out nine acres of his apricot trees and replaced them with lemons, 
and in 1910 planted six acres more in lemons, in 1914 two acres, and 
in 191 5 another planting of six acres was made to lemons. 

He was a man who made his own way in the world by industry and 
thrifty management. Born in Alsace Lorraine, Germany, April 9, 1857, 
he attended the public schools of his native land until he was fourteen, 
and thfen spent a year learning the wagon maker's trade. Immigrating 
to America, he settled at Burlington, Iowa, where he was employed as a 
carpenter until 1882. The following year he spent on a farm in Texas, 
and from there came out to Los Angeles and after one year's work as a 
carpenter rented a ranch near Santa Monica, where he successfully con- 
ducted an apiary. He employed his time in this work until 1890 when 
he came into Ventura County. The late John Thille was a democrat and 
a member of the Catholic Church. 

In Burlington, Iowa, May 16, 1883, he married Mary Elizabeth Rump. 
They were the parents of four children: John, of Montalvo; J. Nicholas, 
at the home place; Albert, of Moorepark, California; and Mary, still 
living at home. 

J. Nicholas Thille was bom in Los Angeles County, April 15, 1886, and 
received a substantial education in the grammar and high schools until he 
was eighteen years of age. After one year working on his father's farm. 



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AND VENTURA COUN'TIES, CALIFORNIA 653 

he went into a machine shop at Los Angeles, and afterwards for a year 
farmed at Hanford. Returning to Ventura County he took up farming 
and fruit growing with his father, and since the latter's death has been ' 
active manager of the home ranch. He is a member of the Native Sons 
of California, of the Fraternal Brotherhood, the Knights of Columbus, 
is a democrat, and a Catholic. He is unmarried. 

John T. Glines. An extensive landholder, and a prominent farmer 
and stockgrower of Santa Barbara County, John T. Glines is an active 
and valued citizen of Los Alamos, where he has erected a commodious 
residence, his home being one of the most beautiful in the town. A son 
of C. H. Glines, he was born in Lake County, California, March 27, 1875, 
of pioneer stock. 

C. H. Glines was born in Utah and educated in Sacramento. In 
early manhood he migrated to California, and after living for a few years 
in Lake County came to the southern part of the state to settle perma- 
nently. Buying land near Santa Maria, he resumed farming, and has now 
a well improved ranch which he is conducting satisfactorily, raising excel- 
lent crops. His wife, whose maiden name was Sarah Belle Martin, was 
bom in Missouri, and died at Santa Maria in 191 3. 

Having completed the course of study in the Santa Maria schools, 
John T. Glines worked on his father's ranch until attaining his majority, 
in the meantime becoming skilled in the various branches of agriculture. 
Starting then in life on his own account, he embarked in the stock busi- 
ness in San Luis Obispo County, and at the end of eight years bought, 
from his profits as a stock raiser and dealer, 1,180 acres of land in the 
Alamo, San Luis Obispo County, a tract which is still in his possession. 
Moving then to Los Alamos, Mr. Glines was for two years engaged in 
the livery business, and operated a meat market for an equal length of 
time after disposing of his livery bam. In 1911 he again engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, and in the raising of beans and stock is meeting 
with characteristic success. In addition to caring for his own land, Mr. 
Glines has leased other large tracts in Los Alamos, having placed 700 
acres under culture in 1913 ; 300 acres in 1914 ; and 150 acres more in 1916. 

At Los Alamos, September 10, 1895, Mr. Glines was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Dora B. Holloway, who was bom in Santa Maria, a 
daughter of J. J. Holloway. A talented and well educated woman, Mrs. 
Glines taught school prior to her marriage, being very successful in her 
profession, and this year, 1916, resumed teaching, becoming one of the 
instructors in the grammar grades of the Los Alamos schools. Mr. and 
Mrs. Glines have five children, namely : Vera Lucille, a student at Pomona 
College ; Melba Violette, a pupil in the Santa Maria High School ; Rebecca 
Belle and Denzil Cassius, attending school in Los Alamos; and John 
Holloway. 

A strong advocate of the principles of the democratic party, Mr. Glines 
has taken an active part in political matters, having represented his party 
in county conventions, and in addition has served as a member of the 
County Central Committee, and for four years was deputy constable and 



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654 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

road master. Fraternally he is a member of Santa Maria Lodge No. 90, 
Knights of P)rthias, and of the Fraternal Brotherhood. 

John Calvix Harbard is a Calif omian of varied and interesting 
ex|>eriences. His home has been in Ventura County for a great many 
years, and some of the fertile acres in the vicinity of Santa Paula have 
been developed to farming and fruit culture by his personal labor and 
under his direction. 

Few residences of Ventura County have a better knowledge of the 
old W^est and its conditions from personal experience than Mr. Har- 
bard. He was born in Davies County, Missouri, November 14, 1845, 
and his early life was spent almost on the frontier. His parents removed 
to Des Moines, Iowa, where he gained his education in the local 
schools. In 1864 he was attracted to the recently opened mining dis- 
tricts of the far Northwest, and became a miner at Helena, Montana. 
Later he drifted south and for some time drove a team for the grading 
of the Southern Pacific railroad and was present and witnessed the 
driving of the golden spike which marked the completion of that 
transcontinental railroad. 

It was in 1869 that he came into California. He arrived at San 
Bernardino in a lumber wagon, and from there rode a pony into Santa 
Barbara County. His first settlement was in the Santa Clara Valley, 
in what is now Ventura County, and for almost half a century he has 
witnessed all the changing conditions and transformations in this section 
of the state. He was employed on different ranches there until 1871, 
and then went into the sheep business on the Ex Mission grant near 
what is now Santa Paula. Two years later selling out his sheep he 
established the first meat market in the Village of Santa Paula and con- 
tinued its oi^eration until 1876. Mr. Harbard then bought fifty acres 
east of Santa Paula, and owned it for two years and employed it for 
general farming. On selling out he bought forty acres in the same 
locality and that he has continued to own to the present time and has 
gradually purchased other land until his ownership now extends to 100 
acres. Thirty acres are in apricots, five acres in walnuts, and the rest 
is a bean plantation. He has been well prospered in California and is 
deeply loyal to the Golden State and all its institutions. 

He is an active member of the Pioneer Society of Ventura County. 
Fraternally he is a Knight of Pythias and politically a democrat. At 
Ventura November 18, 1875, he married Miss Sarah Scott. At her 
death she left two children: Mrs. Alice Double, of Los Angeles; and 
Mrs. Nora Harding of Ventura County. On December 12, 1883, in 
Ventura Mr. Harbard married Josephine Granger, a native of Missouri, 
and a daughter of Thomas Granger, who enlisted in a Missouri Cavalry 
Company in 1861 and died December 12, 1862, in Springfield, Missouri. 
Mrs. Harbard's mother, Mrs. Mary Granger, is still living in San Luis 
Obispo County, and was ninety-two years of age on January 14, 1917. 

Samuel H. Lyons. Well versed in legal lore, and a man of good 
business intelligence and capacity, Samuel H. Lyons, of Solvang, is build- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 655 

ing up a large and lucrative law practice, and as junior member of the firm 
of Frese & Lyons is becoming well known in real estate circles. He was 
bom in Ballard, Santa Barbara County, February 9, 1889, a son of Samuel 
Lyons, who came from Pennsylvania to the Santa Ynez Valley in 1882, 
and is now a successful farmer of Ballard, and a citizen of prominence, 
having for thirty years served as justice of the peace in the fourth judicial 
township. The maiden name of the wife of Samuel Lyons was Myra 
Wilson. She, too, was born and reared in Pennsylvania, and is now 
enjoying life on the home farm in Ballard. 

Acquiring his first knowledge of books in the public schools of Bal- 
lard, Samuel H. Lyons was subsequently graduated from the Santa Ynez 
High School, after which he spent a year at the University of California, 
in Berkeley. Deciding to enter the legal profession, he continued his 
studies for three years in the College of Law at the University of Southern 
California, and in 1914 was there graduated with the degree LL. B. On 
June 1 2th, of that year, Mr. Lyons was admitted to practice in the Dis- 
trict Court of Appeal, and two days later was admitted to practice in the 
Federal Court. He is a young man of push and energy, and has the dis- 
tinction and satisfaction of having worked his own way through college, 
being employed in different lines of industry. On September i, 1915, he 
opened his law office in Solvang, where he has already met with flattering 
success. Mr. Lyons is likewise interested in the real estate and commis- 
sion business in partnership with Mads J. Frese under the firm name of 
Frese & Lyons, Mr. Frese having been the promotor and executive for 
the Danish-American Colony. Mr. Lyons is the only male attorney in the 
Santa Ynez Valley, and as an able and skillful lawyer has won an excellent 
patronage. 

Mr. Lyons married one of his college classmates. Miss Ruth Roberta 
Black, who was graduated at the head of her class, and began the prac- 
tice, of her chosen profession in Los Angeles. She relinquished her prac- 
tice, however, on November 6, 191 5, to become the wife of Mr. Lyons, 
and now acts in an advisory and consulting capacity, only. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lyons have one child, Roberta Wood Lyons. 

While in college Mr. Lyons was class president, and he is now a 
member of the University of Southern California Scull and Scales. He 
is a republican in politics, and served under Qio L. Lloyd as deputy 
assessor for his district. He takes great interest in the educational and 
moral advancement of the community, and is a valued member of the 
Presbyterian Church. 

American Film Company. Santa Barbara and vicinity furnish the 
incidental scenery and background for one of America's largest industries 
— the manufacture of motion picture films. 

In July, 19 1 2, the American Film Company established its studio at 
Santa Barbara, and beginning with only one company of players has 
developed a plant now employing from eleven to thirteen companies, and 
has a payroll amounting to thousands of dollars weekly. 

The continued presence of the American Film Company at Santa 



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656 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

• 

Barbara is due to the fact that that city and surrounding country offers 
practically every scenic location necessary for making pictures adaptable 
to almost every situation and subject. There are mountains and canyons, 
deserts, the Pacific ocean with its rocky cliffs, caves and sandy beaches, 
noted hotels and homes that range from the old adobes of Mission days 
to the beautiful estates of millionaires. 

In recent months President Samuel S. Hutchinson of the American 
Film Company has inaugurated construction work at the local studio 
which will make the plant, long noted for its efficiency, one of the most 
complete in the world. The local manager of the industry at Santa Ba;-- 
bara is Mr. P. G. Lynch. At the present time the American Film Com- 
pany is the second largest consumer of film in the world. 

Nathan W. Blanchard. The year 1854 marked the coming of 
Nathan Weston Blanchard to the State of California. He was then in 
his early twenties and the spirit of the then practically unknown West 
called to him as it has done since with countless young men who have 
had dreams of ambition. In his case, as in many of theirs, his dreams 
were realized, and in the years that have passed Mr. Blanchard has built 
up a position and standing in Ventura County and the state that any 
man might envy. His activities have ranged through mining and lumber- 
ing to ranching and milling, and later he realized a tremendous success 
in the fruit growing enterprise. All his ventures have been creditable to 
him in their respective successes, and he has earned undeniably the quiet 
life he is enjoying in these later years. 

Nathan W. Blanchard was bom in Madison, Maine, on July 24, 1831, 
and he is the son of Merrill and Eunice (Weston) Blanchard. The 
father was a native of Massachusetts, bom in the Town of Abington, on 
July 18, 1806, and was the son of Dean Blanchard and the grandson of 
Capt. Thomas Blanchard. Both these gentlemen, as well as the two 
preceding ancestors, were natives of Massachusetts, so that the Blanchard 
family may properly be considered as a product of the Bay State. 

Tracing the family history back to its origin one finds the Blanchards 
in France, and the ancestor of the subject was a Huguenot, who, driven 
from his native land, took refuge in London. Thomas Blanchard came 
from London to Massachusetts in 1639 and it will be found that the 
greater number of New England Blanchards found throughout the 
country name that worthy gentleman as their common ancestor. Thomas 
Blanchard in 165 1 purchased a farm of 200 acres at Mystic-Side, Charles- 
town, Massachusetts and died in 1664. One of his sons, John, bom 
March 2^, 1660, was an ancestor of Nathan W. Blanchard. 

The Blanchards entered early into the manufacturing activities of 
Massachusetts, and down to the present time they have occupied places 
in that industry. They have been machinists, inventors and operators 
and to them is due a great deal of credit for the introduction of many 
labor saving inventions in the manufacturing field. 

Eunice (Weston) Blanchard was bom in Madison, Maine, on the 
Kennebec River, in the year 1804, and was the daughter of Deacon 



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;y ■ ' • ' ■ ' ^ • • !. ,.r:^in one finds the P.laiu :. . 

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. ■■ a deal of rredn for the intro! , 
'^ ni the nianufucturing field. 

'ii) Blanchard was born \n Nfad' '! 

in the vtar 1S04. and was the d,uic« 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 657 

Benjamin Weston, who was bom in Concord, Massachusetts, in 1772. 
She married Merrill Blanchard and became the mother of eight children, 
of whom three sons and three daughters lived to adult years. Nathan W. 
Blanchard was the first child in order of birth. His father, for the most 
of his life was a tavern keeper, as well as a farmer, and from his earliest 
life Nathan was kept busily employed in the work attendant upon the 
farm and the various duties pertaining to keeping a tavern in New 
England. His schooling was limited to the usual three-month schools, 
winter and summer, supplemented by some schooling in private schools, 
which taught a little more than the three R's. 

When he was seventeen years of age an academy was built in 
Houlton, the county seat of Aroostook County, Maine. This he says was 
one of the greatest joys of his life, as it offered him the opportunity of 
fitting for college, which he did in three years' time, teaching in the mean- 
time two winter schools, and working one summer on the farm. 

He entered Waterville College, now called Colby College, in 185 1. 
Having no assistance and teaching three schools during the freshman and 
sophomore years, he was forced to come to California in 1854 where he 
thought he could earn enough money in a couple of years to renew his 
studies. 

He failed badly in this purpose for after two years of hard labor, 
misfortune and the treachery of partners, he was heavily in debt and it 
had the effect of changing the whole course of his life. The first ten 
years in California he was engaged in the meat or butchering business, 
first for three or four years on the Iowa Hill Divide where he was in 
charge of various markets for his employers, Kneeland & Wilcoxson, 
who were cattle men. In 1858 he went to Dutch Flat to take charge of 
the market there, after which he became a partner and continued in this 
relation until 1864. 

He went east but soon returned and engaged in the lumber business 
with Towle Brothers in Dutch Flat continuing for seven years. The 
state offered excellent opportunities to enterprising men at that time in 
that especial field, and up to 1872 he carried on extensive lumbering 
operations, with a success that marked every branch of business activity 
to which he gave his attention. 

While on his wedding trip Mr. Blanchard visited Santa Barbara, in 
the spring of 1865, after the two great dry years, and rode with three 
gentlemen from the North from Santa Barbara, down to Ventura and 
up the Santa Clara Valley of the South, as far as* the Sespe. Not one 
head of stock was to be seen and the grass was nearly as high as the 
wagon wheels. The view greatly impressed him so that afterwards when 
he became acquainted with Mr. E. B; Higgins, on the steamer from San 
Francisco to Santa Barbara and learned that he wished to sell part of his 
interest in his land and sheep, Mr. Blanchard purchased a half interest 
in both the Santa Paula tract and in the sheep. 

After six months' association with Mr. Higgins, he bought the latter's 
remaining half interest in land and sheep and sold the same to Mr. E. L. 
Bradley of San Jose. The latter was a rich man in that day and was one 



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658 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

of Mr. Blanchard's neighbors in Dutch Flat. He only visited the Santa 
Paula ranch three or four times in his life. He died in 1884. 

In the fall of 1873 Mr. Blanchard commenced building a flouring mill, 
cleaning up and improving the tract of land and for twelve years follow- 
ing furnished most of the flour consumed in the county. He took the 
premium in Los Angeles on flour over the Los Angeles Flour Mill. 

The location of the flouring mill in Santa Paula, connected with the 
water privileges of Santa Paula Creek suggested and called for a town or 
village, which he located and adopted for it, the name Santa Paula. 

Messrs. Hardison and Stewart came to Santa Paula in the interest of 
oil development, and other oil men followed them. These men were the 
originators of the Union Oil Company. Mr. Hardison, Mr. McKevitt 
and Mr. Blanchard were the three men responsible for the building of the 
Santa Paula Academy which was afterwards given to the district as a 
high school. Mr. Blanchard did the work of soliciting the money and 
superintending the construction of the building. 

The history of the orchard is interesting because it is anomalous. 
Mr. Clark, a nursery man of Santa Barbara, in 1874 arranged with 
Mr. Blanchard to plant about 100 acres in oranges. The trees were 
raised from the seed of Havana oranges and brought from Santa Bar- 
bara. They were planted in the spring of 1874 and it took fourteen years 
of continuous cultivation and irrigation to bring the orchard into a 
sufficient bearing condition to pay the running expense. The year 1889 
was the first remunerative year, an experience which surprised the 
scientists and has no equal in the state — in the fact that it took so many 
years to bring the seedling orange tree to a profitable bearing condition. 
When the trees did bear they produced oranges of exceptional quality. 
The trees were very productive for many years until they were cut back 
and budded into Valencia late oranges. A portion of the orchard was 
budded into lemons at an early date so that Mr. Blanchard was a pioneer 
in both the orange and lemon business in the county. 

In recent years Mr. Blanchard has lived a quiet life, practically retired 
from all active business, but keeping up a wholesome interest in the 
aflPairs of his town, county and state. His home is delightfully situated 
in the community he founded many years ago, and with which he has 
been largely identified in its improvement and general development. 

Always Mr. Blanchard has manifested a genuine enthusiasm for the 
educational interests of the community, and he served for some years as a 
trustee of the local schools. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard gave to the City of Santa Paula as a 
memorial for their first born, Dean Hobbs Blanchard, a magnificent public 
library comprehending a gift of $13,294.38. Ground for the building was 
broken in December, 1908; the building was completed July 31, 1909, and 
the interior finished in September, 1909. The style is Greek Ionic and the 
structure is one of the most attractive in the city. Mrs. Blanchard is at 
present president of the library trustees. The name of the library is 
"Dean Hobbs Blanchard Memorial Library." 

The citizens of the city through its first library board presented Mr. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 659 

and Mrs. Blanchard with a most magnificent printed and illustrated 
appreciation of their generosity and public spirit, and it is something 
that Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard regard as amongst their greatest treasures. 

Mr. Blanchard is, one might say, a life-long republican. He has 
always been a sturdy supporter of the party, and he has never failed to 
assume political responsibilities when to him it seemed best. While in 
Placer County he served two years as district collector, and was later 
elected to the State Legislature, serving during the session of 1862-3 when 
the building of the Central Pacific Railroad was inaugurated and while 
Stanford was both governor of the state and president of the railroad. 
Mr. Blanchard was one of the charter members of the Central Pacific 
Railroad and is probably now, 1916, the only living charter member. At 
a still later period he declined a nomination to the Legislature, though 
nomination at that time insured election. While servfng in the Legislature 
he was a member of the Committee on Education, when a new school 
law was enacted and he was the author of a bill that became a law, wiping 
out an evil that had made the state notorious for years — that is, the 
practice of permitting bands of dancing girls of questionable order to 
periodically visit the mining towns, where they made the saloons their 
headquarters and helped generally to make the mining towns undesirable 
places in many respects. 

A member of the Masonic fraternity, Mr. Blanchard has taken prac- 
tically all degrees, is past commander of the Knights Templar of Ventura 
and has been presented with the past master's jewel, by his brother past 
masters of his lodge. Was a charter member both at Dutch Flat and in 
Santa Paula of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and owns a badge 
for fifty years continuous membership. His religious affiliations have 
long been with the Congregational Church. He was one of the com- 
mittee selected by the association of Southern California churches to 
select a place for a college, which is located at Qairmont and is known 
as Pomona College. He has been a trustee from the beginning up to date. 

Mr. Blanchard returned to his eastern home in the autumn of 1864 
on a visit and there he married Miss Ann EHzabeth Hobbs on the 21st 
day of E>ecember of that year. She was bom in North Berwick, Maine, 
and is the daughter of Wilson Hobbs, a life-long resident of Maine. 
Two daughters and three sons were bom of their union : Dean Hobbs, 
Sarah Eliot, Eunice Weston, Nathan Weston, Jr., and Thomas Goodwin. 

Charles I. Dolan. One of the important factors in the growth and 
prosperity of Los Alamos is the comfortable Los Alamos Hotel, whose 
genial proprietor is Charles I. Dolan. Mr. Dolan has had a wide acquaint- 
ance and experience in business affairs in this section oi California, and 
having made his own way in the world he is thoroughly deserving of 
that esteem paid him by his fellow citizens. 

He was bom in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October i, 1874, a son 
of William P. and Hortense (Bernard) Dolan. Both parents are now 
deceased and the father having also been a hotel man. 

Up to the age of twelve years Charles I. Dolan attended the public 



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660 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

schools of Philadelphia. He came to California then, first living in Saiv 
Francisco and later in San Luis Obispo where he was employed in the 
hotel conducted by Mr. Frederick for six or seven years. That was the 
foundation of his experience as a hotel man. Removing to Santa Maria 
Mr. Dolan established and conducted for ten years the original grill, 
and the people of that section have a grateful memory of this enterprise 
as conducted by Mr. Dolan. 

He next became associated with three other gentlemen in opening the 
Sisquoc merchandise store and was its manager for three and a half years. 
In June, 191 5, Mr. Dolan came to Los Alamos and opened his present 
hotel. 

He is affiliated with Santa Maria Lodge No. 10 of the Knights of 
Pythias, with the Santa Barbara Lodge No. 613 of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and is popular in these fraternities and in 
every community where he has lived in California. In San Luis Obispo 
January 7, 1900, he married Miss Mary Arillanes, a daughter of J. B. 
and Francisca Arillanes. Mrs. Dolan was born in Santa Maria and 
received her education there. They are the parents of two children: 
Nellie, aged ten, and Lama, aged eight. 

David VV. Mott, M. D. While Doctor Mott has for thirty years 
been one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Ventura County, 
located at Santa Paula, his activities and services could not be classified 
altogether under one head or profession. He has been foremost in 
business affairs, has been public spirited and generous in his support of 
public movements and in every way has borne more than his individual 
share of the responsibilities connected with the progress and history of 
this county. 

Doctor Mott was bom at Bangor; New York, May 8, 1855. He is a 
son of George and Sarah (Marvin) Mott. He has one brother, George 
T. Mott residing in Camas, Washington, who is by profession a chemist in 
the manufacture of paper. His father was a prominent man in the East. 
Bom in Alburgh, Grand Isle County, Vermont, January 24, 1806, he 
received his education and spent his early youth in his native state. 

He was sheriflF of his county, and for a time was United States Col- 
lector of Customs in the Lake Champlain District. He was also promi- 
nent in military (preparedness) affairs and was an officer in the Vermont 
State Militia. 

In the early '40s removing to Bangor, New York, he engaged in 
farming and the lumber business. In 1857 ^e was elected Member of 
Assembly in the New York Legislature. In 1870 he ran for Congress 
against William A. Wheeler, of Malone, New York, who was the suc- 
cessful candidate and who later became vice president of the United 
States on the ticket with Rutherford B. Hayes. 

As a young man Doctor Mott lacked neither the encouragement at 
home nor the advantages of the best schools to equip himself for a place 
of adequate service in the world. His mother had been one of Vermont's 
popular school teachers, and she frequently wrote articles of accepted 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 661 

merit for the publications of those days. From both parents example 
and inspiration were abundant. He attended public school, the Frank- 
lin Academy at Malone, New York, where he graduated in 1872, then 
spent two years in Cornell University in a scientific course, and from 
there entered the University of Michigan, from which he was graduated 
in the medical course in 1881. He engaged in private practice at North 
Lawrence, New York, until 1886, in which year he came to Santa 
Paiila, California. 

Doctor Mott has always been a keen student of his profession and 
the summer of 1893 he spent in the post-graduate medical schools and 
hospitals af New York. He frequently visits centers of medical learn- 
ing to keep in touch with the progress of his profession. 

The local profession has always held him in high honor and at three 
different times he has served as president of the Ventura County Med- 
ical Society. He is a member of the California State Medical Society 
and of the American Medical Association. 

After getting well established in his profession at Santa Paula, 
Doctor Mott took an active interest so far as his professional duties 
would permit in both business and civic affairs. 

Since 1885 he has been a stockholder and director in the First 
National Bank of Santa Paula. He is also a director and vice president 
of the Santa Paula Savings Bank. In 1890 with others he was active in 
Starting the Santa Paula Building and Loan Association and was its 
vice president during the first twelve years of its existence, and for the 
past fifteen years has been president of this very prosperous institution 
which has contributed to the building of hundreds of homes in Ventura 
County and now has assets of over $500,000. 

In 1910 he was elected on the republican ticket for a term of two 
years to the State Assembly, and in 191 2 he was elected state senator for 
a term of four years, representing Santa Barbara and Ventura counties 
at the capital in Sacramento. 

During his services as a legislator Senator Mott was a member of 
many important committees including Finance, Banking, Building and 
Loan Associations, Agriculture and Horticulture, Irrigation, Roads and 
Highways, Oil Industries, Hospitals and Asylums, Health and Quaran- 
tine, Taxation, Universities, etc. He was chairman of the Committees 
on Building and Loan Associations, Irrigation, and Oil Industries. He 
was author of much of the most needed horticultural, irrigation, general 
business and humanitarian legislation that was written into the state's 
statutes during his terms. 

Senator Mott is a fluent speaker and because of his ready expression 
of original thought is often called upon to address audiences on popular 
subjects in various parts of the state. 

At the close of the last session of the Legislature, Senator Mott 

received a letter from the San Francisco Merchants and Manufacturers 

Association of which any man may be pardonably proud, and which 

must give satisfaction to those who placed him in office. We here copy 

the closing paragraph of this commendable tribute: 
Vol. 11—12 



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662 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

"There are no words at our command to express to you our grate- 
fulness for your general conduct and energy in the Legislative Session 
just closed. We believe you have been a true representative and con- 
structive in your acts for your District and for the State as a whole. 
We wish to compliment you most heartily on your truly human American 
attitude. We are yours to command. 

**Yours truly, 
''Merchants and Manufacturers Association, 
"By Seneca C. Beach, President." 

Doctor Mott was for eighteen years a trustee of the grammar and 
high schools of Santa Paula. He is a Knight Templar Mason and 
Shriner, has served three times as master of the Masonic lodge at 
Santa Paula, is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and the Knights of Pythias. 

In St. Albans, Vermont, April lo, 1883, Doctor Mott married Miss 
Emma Drown of Bellmont, New York. They have one child, Arley C. 
Mott, who has gained distinction as a musician. Miss Mott is a graduate 
of the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music, spent two years in Post- 
graduate work in the Washington College of Music at Washington, D. C, 
and then for two years was a member of the faculty of that institution. 
She has accompanied some of the country's best musicians in concert 
tours of the Eastern States. Mrs. Mott has been prominent in club 
affairs and is greatly interested in philanthropic work. She is president 
of the Santa Paula Ebell Club which is the largest woman's club in the 
county. She is interested in the general club work of Southern Cali- 
fornia. She is a past matron of the Order of the Eastern Star and has 
been district deputy of that organization. 

Mrs. Mott is a native of Bellmont, New York, a daughter of Alexander 
and Phoebe Drown, an old American family of Revolutionary stock and 
of English descent. 

Felix Mattel One of the pioneer residents of this section of Cali- 
fornia, widely and favorably known for his participation in various lines 
of business, Felix Mattei for nearly thirty years has been proprietor of 
a hotel which has entertained and attracted hundreds of visitors and 
travelers, and is one of the landmarks of Los Olivos in Santa Barbara 
County. 

It is known as the Mattei Tavern, and as such is synonymous with a 
splendid cuisine and a wonderfully attractive location. The hotel is 
situated in the center of the Santa Ynez Valley, has spacious grounds 
around it, and is in the midst of one of the scenic parks of Santa Barbara 
County. Besides the main hotel building there are three guest cottages, 
and with all the facilities for entertainment the chief feature of this 
hostelry is its splendid table, the setting of which Mr. Mattei has empha- 
sized from the start and that has undoubtedly been the chief factor in 
his success as a landlord. 

Mr. Mattei was bom in Ticino, Switzerland, September 7, 1854, and 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 663 

since coming to California has found here much of the beauty and romance 
which attaches to his own native mountains. His parents, both now 
deceased, were Peter and Adolorata (Soldate) Mattei, both natives of 
Switzerland. His father was a physician by profession. 

With an education in the Swiss common and high schools, Felix 
Mattei left his native land at the age of fifteen and some months later 
arrived at San Francisco. He was employed in that city one month, lived 
at Marine about a year, and then came to San Luis Obispo County. At 
Cayucos he operated a dairy until 1874, was in similar business at Guada- 
lupe another year, and in 1879 established himself in the dairy business 
independently at Huasna. He continued dairying in that locality of San 
Luis Obispo County until 1884. Returning to Cayucos he took up the 
hotel business for a year, and for the following two years was dealing in 
horses out of San Luis Obispo. 

Since 1887 Mr. Mattei has been a prominent resident of Los Olivos. 
Here he started the Central Hotel, but in 1908 changed its namie to the 
Mattei Tavern. Thus for nearly thirty years he has been the genial and 
popular host to the traveling public in this section. 

He is also a prominent citizen, and has served as school trustee, two 
terms as justice of the peace, and for one term was deputy county asses- 
sor of San Luis Obispo County. In politics he is a republican, is a thirty- 
second degree Mason, being affiliated with Al Malakak Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine, and also belongs to Lodge No. 613 of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. 

In San Luis Obispo, October 26, 1879, he married Lucy Fisher, who 
was bom at Troy, New York, a daughter of Joseph F. and Anna Maria 
(Volz) Fisher. Her parents brought her to California when she was a 
baby and she grew up and received her education in San Luis Obispo. 
Mr. and Mrs. Mattei are the parents of the following children : Francis 
P. of Los Olivos ; Frederick Louis, who married Elaine Spaulding ; Clar- 
ence R., an artist living at Santa Barbara ; Charles C, still at home ; and 
Albert C, who is a student in Stanford University. 

J. N. HiLLER. Santa Barbara was fortunate in being the home for 
more than thirty years of the late J. N. Hiller. Any community would 
be the better for such a citizen. He brought with him to Santa Barbara 
the mature experience and the substantial means of his pioneer activities 
as a lumberman, business man and public official in Northern Michigan. 

After coming to Santa Barbara, Mr. Hiller was engaged for some 
years in the real estate business, also as an undertaker, but he will be 
longest remembered for the broad and liberal policies he put into effect as 
a public spirited citizen. In January, 1900, he became a member of the 
first board of water commissioners in Santa Barbara, and in 1905 was 
elected its president. He remained in close touch with this public 
utility, serving gratuitously until on account of ill health he retired from 
membership on the board in 1913. In 1904 he turned the first shovelful 
of earth in the construction of the Mission tunnel. Then in 1912 he 



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664 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

was accorded the signal honor of firing the final blast to complete this 
monumental municipal enterprise. 

Mr. Hiller was bom at Pike in Allegany County, New York, Decem- 
ber 23, 1837, and his long and useful career came to a close with his 
death at Santa Barbara on April 24, 1914, in his seventy-seventh year. 
Up to the age of eighteen he attended public schools and then spent two 
years in the Genesee Conference Seminary of the Methodist Church. 
Following his education he spent two years in teaching in the winter 
terms and followed the carpenter trade in the summer seasons. From 
New York he went west to Chicago, and in that then small city put in a 
year working in a printing office. 

He was one of the noble pioneers of the extreme Northern Michigan, 
known as the Northern Peninsula. In March, 1861, he entered the 
employ of N. Ludington & Company's lumber mills on the Escanaba 
River. He was foreman for that company and a prominent factor in the 
lumber industry of the northern woods .until 1864. He became one of 
the organizers of Delta County in Northern Michigan, and of the 
Village of Escanaba, the county seat. In 1864 he was elected county 
treasurer, and removed to Escanaba to take charge of the office. He filled 
that office until 1868, and from 1862 until 1870 was justice of the peace. 
In 1866 another public honor was given him as United States commis- 
sioner, and he performed the important functions of that position for a 
number of years. In the fall of i863 he engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness with a partner, but the following spring bought out his partner and 
conducted the business successfully for some years. He was also agent 
for the American Express Company. He was elected to a place on the 
school board of Escanaba when the school system was started in 1865, 
and was a member of the board continuously for twenty-two years. In 
1866 he became a loyal member of the Masonic order. In politics he was 
a democrat. 

Mr. Hiller for over twenty-five years was actively identified with the 
Royal Arch Chapter and the Knights Templar Commandery of the 
Masons in Santa Barbara, and at the time of his death was ser\'ing as 
recorder of the Commandery and was also past master, past high priest 
and past commander in these various branches of Masonry and also past 
patron in the Eastern Star. 

On July 31, t86i, he was married at Green Bay, Wisconsin, to Julia 
Langley. Mrs. Hiller, who still resides in Santa Barbara, was bom in 
Stetson, Maine. She is the mother of four children. Her daughter 
Myrtie was born April 26, 1862, and died in 1901. Fred, bom in 1864, 
is a business man of Seattle, Washington. Roy, bom August 26, 1873, 
is a resident of San Francisco. Earl, born November 24, 1875, is also of 
San Francisco. 

Frank Henry Smith. Frequent references in these pages are made 
to the industries and activities of the attractive little City of Santa Ynez 
in Santa Barbara County, and it is pleasing to be able to give some brief 
record of the career of one of the pioneer citizens of that locality. Frank 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 665 

Henry Smith has been a resident there for more than thirty years, and his 
was one of the first homes built on the townsite. 

A resident of California forty years, Frank Henry Smith has pro- 
gressed from comparative poverty to one of the substantial men of Santa 
Barbara County. He was born in Perry County, Illinois, August 26, 
1854, a Son of Horace Porter and Jane (Chandler) Smith, the former a 
native of Missouri and the latter of Ohio. His father was a carpenter 
by trade. 

After an education in the schools of Illinois, Frank H. Smith, at the 
age of nineteen, came to Salinas, Monterey County, California. He 
worked for a time on a stock ranch, farmed in the Arroyo Grandie one 
year, and for two years was employed in Santa Maria. 

The year of his advent to the Santa Ynez community was 1882. Mr. 
Smith is one of the exemplars of dry farming methods in this commu- 
nity, and on his fine ranch of 200 acres he has succeeded for many years 
in producing bounteous crops of barley, wheat and other grains, and 
besides his own farm he leases 300 additional acres. His success in busi- 
ness has not interfered with a public spirited share in public affairs. He 
is now serving his third term as a school trustee and is a member of the 
republican county central committee. Fraternally he is identified with 
the Knights of Pythias. 

• In passing some tribute should be paid to the late Mrs. Smith, who 
was one of the pioneer women of Santa Ynez and a thoroughly beloved 
character, not only on account of her gracious personahty but because of 
her constant spirit of helpfulness in the neighborhood. She was almost 
constantly engaged in some practical charity which she performed in the 
most unostentatious manner, but those who were helped remember with 
gratitude the beneficence of her life as she went in and out in the com- 
munity. Mrs. Smith's maiden name was Rosie C. Preston. She was bom 
in Casterville, a daughter of E. J. and Nancy A. (Slack) Preston. Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith were married in Santa Maria October 23, 1882, and at 
the tinxe of their marriage started housekeeping in the new Village of 
Santa Ynez. Mrs. Smith passed away September 22, 191 5. She and 
Mr. Smith a few days before her death started on a camping trip to 
the mountains. She was thrown from her horse and received injuries 
from which she died in the camp a few days later. 

Mr. Smith has the following children: Nellie C, who married Samuel 
McMurray, and is the mother of two children, Mildred and Howard; 
Irene, who married William Quinn ; and Glenna, wife of William Burhans. 
• 

Peter G. Barnes has been an active factor in the Village of Ballard 
in Santa Barbara County for a number of years, and his business and his 
influence count for much in that community. 

Bom in Georgetown, Clay County, Illinois, September 8, 1861, a son 
of Pheland G. and Margaret J. (Green) Barnes, he grew up on his 
father's farm in Clay County, and attended the common schools. On 
leaving home he went to Texas, spending two years in that vast common- 
wealth working in different sections, and from there came west to Santa 



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666 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Maria, California. He was at Santa Maria one year, and then began 
learning the blacksmith's trade at Los. Alamos, in Santa Barbara County. 
Since his apprenticeship he has made blacksmithing his regular vocation, 
but for several years he traveled as a journeyman blacksmith, covering 
most of the southwestern and middle states and was engaged in black- 
smithing, railroading and other lines of work. 

In 1907 Mr. Barnes returned to California and located in Ballard, 
where he has since conducted the chief blacksmithing and iron working 
establishment, and with a growing patronage and prosperity. He is an 
active member of the Knights of Pythias. 

In June, 1895, Mr. Barnes married Edith Storey at Fruitland, Mis- 
souri. He is the father of two children : Charles E. and Gladys M., wife 
of William Snyder. 

Richard D. Jones. Beginning life under adverse circumstances, 
upon the lower rung of the ladder of attainments, Richard D. Jones, pro- 
prietor of the leading eating house in Santa Barbara, has made diligent 
use of his faculties and opportunities, and by untiring energy and close 
application to the work in which he might be engaged, has met with good 
success in his ventures. He was bom in Van Wert, Ohio, July 29, 1878, 
a son of Thomas and Ann Jones. 

Brought up on a farm in Ohio, Richard D. Jones had very limited 
educational advantages as a lad. Arriving in Los Angeles, February 12, 
1898, at the age of twenty without a cent he started at $20 per month 
at Van Nuy's Hotel, filling every position to steward, serving there in 
the latter capacity for seven consecutive years. Coming from there to 
Santa Barbara, Mr. Jones was here steward at the Potter Hotel for 
seven years, gaining much knowledge and a wide experience that has 
since proved most useful to him. Starting in business for himself, he 
opened a cafeteria at 916 State Street, May, 1913, and is conducting it 
with most satisfactory pecuniary results, having won a generous patron- 
age among the traveling public and the city dwellers, more especially 
among those people who recognize and appreciate prompt service, and 
cleanly, hygienic conditions. Mr. Jones is energetic and enterprising, and 
on July 20, 191 5, enlarged his operations by opening a dairy lunch room 
in connection with a first class bakery, since made famous for its pies, 
cakes, bread, etc., which he is managing with characteristic success, 
his many customers being highly pleased with the good food served, and 
with the prompt and careful attention each one receives. 

Mr. Jones married in June, 1907, in Santa Barbara, Miss Pauline 
Keiser, and they have one son, Richard M. Jones; 

Justus C. Fast. Apparently every business enterprise and activity 
of Mr. Justus C. Fast has been pr9spered, and he is one of the large 
property owners of Santa Barbara and a very prominent rancher in that 
county. His position in the community is not due alone to his material 
interests, since he is a citizen of the finest public spirit and is noted for his 
generosity and helpfulness in every movement for the public welfare. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 667 

Though a resident of this section of California nearly all his life, 
Mr. Fast was bom near Pelia, Iowa, March 4, 1872, a son of Salathiel 
and Margaret (Hill) Fast. His father was bom in Ohio and his mother 
in West Virginia. When Justus was two years of age the parents moved 
to Goleta, Califomia, were on a ranch there for many years, and are now 
both living retired in Santa Barbara. 

The public schools of Goleta gave Justus C. Fast his early education 
until he was about seventeen years of age. After a brief experience in 
the La Patera mines he was in the cigar business at Stockton from 1894 
to 1896, and in the latter year returned to Santa Barbara County and 
bought nineteen acres which he has developed as a fine fruit and agricul- 
tural farm. He also conducts a cigar business and pool room at State 
and Haley streets in Santa Barbara, his place of business being in the 
Central Hotel Building, which he owns, and the greater part of which he 
leases for business purposes. His home is on his ranch at Goleta. 

Mr. Fast is a republican and a member of the Knights of Pythias. 
On July 17, 1901, in Goleta he married Miss Angeline J. Kellogg, a daugh- 
ter of P. E. and Sarah (Montgomery) Kellogg. They are the parents of 
two children : Norval C. and Marian Angeline. 

Joseph Guidotti. The business activities of Joseph Guidotti would 
classify him as one of the pioneers in the dairy industry of Santa Bar- 
bara County. He has had a long and successful experience as a dairyman, 
and conducts one of the largest institutions of that kind at Los Alamos. 

Born in Switzerland December i, 1865, a son of Peter and Mary 
Guidotti, he had a thorough training in the dairy methods which have been 
developed to so high a degree of perfection by the Swiss people. He 
attended the public schools of his native land until he was fourteen, and 
thereafter was employed on dairy farms until he came to America at the 
age of eighteen. Locating at Lompoc, Califomia, he worked as a farm 
hand two years, and in 1889 with his cousin Peter Guidotti' established a 
dairy farm at Lompoc. In 1893 Joseph bought out his partner, continued 
alone in the business at Lompoc for four years, and then removed to 
Casmalia, where he conducted a fine dairy farm for twelve years. 

In 1909 he transferred his location to Los Alamos, and the extent of 
his business can be understood by the fact that he employs about 3,000 
acres of rented land as grazing land and for the purpose of growing feed 
for his herd. He and his cousin Peter Guidotti also own a 200-acre dairy 
ranch and farm at San Diego. 

In 1894, at Lompoc, Mr. Guidotti married Miss Mary Guidotti. Mrs. 
Guidotti died in 1905 leaving the following children: Elvezio, Romalda, 
Albert, Cora and Lillian. For his second wife Mr. Guidotti returned to 
Switzerland and in 1906 married Theresa Guidotti. 

Peter Guidotti. With the skill, experience and energy of such men 
as Peter Guidotti the dairy industry has made great progress in Santa 
Barbara County and Mr. Guidotti is one of the most prominent men in 
that business in this section of Califomia. 



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668 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

He spent his early life in a country famed for its milk products, hav- 
ing been born in Switzerland August 20, 1864. His parents were Louis 
and Theresa Guidotti. He attended the public schools of Switzerland 
until he was fourteen, and thereafter was employed on dairy farms and 
vineyards of his native land until the age of twenty. 

Coming to the New World to seek his fortune, Mr. Guidotti located 
in California at Lompoc, and remained there until 1898. His next loca- 
tion was at Gaviota, where renting some land from the Hollist^r estate he 
established a dairy farm. He introduced some first class stock, and with 
the success of that enterprise was encouraged to move to Los Alamos in 
1907. Here he established one of the largest dairies of Santa Barbara 
County and has been conducting it in a highly prosperous manner ever 
since. He rents 3,000 acres. In partnership with his cousin J. Guidotti 
he also owns a 200-acre dairy farm near San Diego, but that is under 
the management of a tenant. 

In Lompoc in January, 1890, he married Miss Louisa Guidotti. Their 
children are named Alfred, Lewis, Alfonse, Claudina, Josie and Neta. 

Charles C. Teague. "From Maine to California'* is a familiar 
rhetorical flourish often employed to signify the extent of the United 
States or of an individual man's interests and travels therein. It also 
serves in this particular case to describe the progress of Mr. Charles C. 
Teague from birth to the present time. He was born at Caribou, Maine, 
June II, 1873, but since early manhood has found his home and interests 
m California. 

To those familiar with the citrus and nut growing industries of 
California, the name of Charles C. Teague needs no introduction. He 
has been one of the most aggressive leaders in the co-operative movement 
which has been developed to its highest point of efficiency in California 
for the purpose of marketing fruit crops. Mr. Teague is an old and 
experienced fruit grower, and as a business man ranks among the fore- 
most in the state. 

His parents were Milton D. and Clara (Collins) Teague. His father, 
who was bom in Caribou, Maine, in 1849, was educated and became a 
merchant there, but in 1880 brought his family to the Middle West and 
at Salina, Kansas, organized the First National Bank, of which he was 
cashier and manager until about two years before coming to California. 
In 1893 he completed the journey which he had begun on the Atlantic side 
of our country and arrived in Ventura County. His death occurred in 
this state in August of that year. 

Charles C. Teague received his early education chiefly in the schools 
of Kansas and in St. John's Military Academy at Salina. In 1893 he 
came with his father and mother to Santa Paula, California, and spent 
one year working in the orchards of N. W. Blanchard. While Mr. 
Teague is not "to the manner born" in California, he is today as prom- 
inently identified with some of its horticultural operations, more par- 
ticularly as a lemon grower, as any other man in the West. 

His first independent venture on leaving the Blanchard orchards was 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 669 

with his father in the purchase of twenty acres near Santa Paula, which 
he planted in a lemon grove and which is still in the possession of the 
family. His intimate knowledge of fruit growing and his executive 
ability have brought him many large interests. In 1896 he was made 
manager of the Santa Paula Horse and Cattle Company. He also took 
the management of W. L. Hardison's extensive interests in Ventura 
County, and managed them until Mr. Hardison gradually sold his holdings 
there. 

In 1898 Mr. Teague was made vice president and general manager of 
the Limonera Company, which at that time owned 412 acres planted in 
lemons. In 1907, when 100 acres of this lemon grove were nipped by the 
frost, the acreage was replanted in walnuts. In 1906 the company 
bought the Oliveland Ranch, comprising 2,300 acres. Of this 600 acres 
are planted in lemons, 500 acres in hay, 240 acres in English walnuts, 
and the rest is grazing lands. The company employs an average of 300 
men continuously, and during the last season shipped 400 carloads of 
lemons. Mr. Teague has the active management of one of the largest 
lemon groves in the world, and the high degree of success which has come 
to the company can safely be credited to Mr. Teague more than to any 
other individual. 

The Limonera Company is of such importance in Southern California 
that it deserves more than incidental description. From an article which 
appeared in the California Citrograph in December, 191 5, are taken some 
facts which are of general interest to all the people of Ventura County. 
The Limonera Company was organized by Nathan W. Blanchard and 
N. L. Hardison in 1892 and the first plantings to lemons were made in 
1893, the original grove consisting of 260 acres of lemons, which at the 
time came near being the world's record for one orchard. This was 
the nucleus of the great Limonera orchards, which have since been 
developed under Mr. Teague's management until there are now 900 
acres in lemons, of various ages. The Limonera properties lie along the 
foothills four miles west of Santa Paula. The company has private wells 
available for irrigation, and also has 200 inches of water from the 
farmers' ditch. There is every facility for the handling and care of the 
trees, including fumigation and spraying outfits. The Limonera brands 
are justly famous, and are shipped and marketed through the California 
Fruit Growers Exchange. The principal brands are "Selected," "Loma," 
"Bridal Veil" and "White Cross." A special characteristic of these lemons 
is their fine keeping quality, and this and other reasons account for the 
premium of from 50 to 75 cents per box which the Limonera brands 
command in the markets. 

The company has about $90,000 invested in "frost insurance." About 
65,000 oil heaters are used in the groves, averaging about 112 pots to the 
acre in the full grown orchards. The system was so complete that in 
1913* when the frost destroyed many of the California groves, the 
company shipped a large crop. To furnish oil for the heaters the com- 
pany has two great cement reservoirs with a capacity of 100,000 gallons 
each and also two 5,000-barrel tanks, located on the higher ground, from 



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670 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

which oil flows by gravity to the orchards. Not only is the equipment 
as nearly perfect as any, but there is a complete discipline of the forces 
of men in the employ of the company, and when frost threatens a small 
army are available to keep the pots burning and regular reports are made 
from all sections of the grove by telephone to the central offices. 

The land now used by the Limonera Company was formerly bean 
growing land, and only two or three men were required to handle the crop 
of beans, whereas now several hundred are continuously employed in the 
lemon groves, and the value of the crop taken from the orchards is pro- 
portionately as many times more valuable as the old crop of lima beans. 

The officers of the Limonera Company are: N. W. Blanchard, 
president ; C. C. Teague, vice president and general manager ; N. W. 
Blanchard," Jr., secretary ; R. L. Churchill, treasurer and sales manager. 
The directors are N. W. Blanchard, Sr., N. W. Blanchard, Jr., A. C. 
Hardison, Guy Hardison and C. C. Teague. 

When Mr. Teague took the management of the Limonera Company 
eighteen years ago the methods were crude and he developed the method 
of curing lemons which is largely used throughout the state. It is known 
as "The Tent System." The Limonera ranch has been an experimental 
farm for many years, and has tried out and developed the best methods of 
growing, curing and packing lemons. Under Mr. Teague's management 
the ranch has become a sort of mecca for fruit growers all over Cali- 
fornia, and these growers come every year or so for the purpose of 
studying the improvements in production and packing. 

Mr. Teague is now president of the First National Bank of Santa 
Paula, president and manager of the Teague McKevett Company, which 
owns 200 acres of lemon orchards; is general manager of the Santa 
Paula Waterworks; general manager of the Thermal Belt Water Com- 
pany. He is a Mason, a member of the Los Angeles Athletic Club and a 
republican voter. 

In November, 1897, Mr. Teague married Miss Harriet McKevett of 
Santa Paula, daughter of C. H. McKevett, whose sketch appears else- 
where in this volume. They have three children: Alice, attending the 
Santa Paula High School ; Milton M., now fourteen years of age and a 
student in the public schools; and Charles M., aged seven. 

It is one thing to grow fine products and yet another to realize a 
profitable return on them. Getting the value is strictly the results of 
co-operation on the part of growers. For many years Mr. Teague has 
given much of his time to developing and perfecting the co-operative 
organization, particularly the California Walnut Growers Association. 
He was largely instrumental in bringing about this organization, of 
which he has been and is now president. This association markets about 
70 per cent of all the walnuts produced in California. It is the parent 
organization With twenty-two local associations which individually gather 
the nuts direct from the growers, process them and prepare them for 
market, leaving to the parent organization the greater task of distributing 
and marketing the nuts. 

The association not only properly distributes the nuts so as to provide 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 671 

a good market condition for the crop, but also markets the product at 
cost. Last year it saved to the growers nearly $100,000 market charges 
alone, besides making stable market conditions. 

Walnuts are standardized and shipped under one brand, and the 
twenty-two unit associations pack and ship under the supervision of the 
parent company. The nuts are standardized under a uniform grade and 
packed under the brand of the parent association. They are sold direct 
to grocers in the East, who deal direct with the trade. As a result of 
this arrangement the brokerage has been reduced from 6 to 3 per cent. 
They have also been able to establish a "crack" so that brokers can de- 
pend upon 90 per cent good nuts. As a result the association's products 
have a good standing with the trade, and it has been possible to maintain 
reasonable prices. 

Mr. Teague is also a member and director of the California Fruit 
Growers Exchange, which markets the citrus crop of California. The 
exchange l^st year marketed 30,000 carloads of oranges and lemons, and 
returned $28,000,000 to the growers. Without these two strictly co- 
operative growers' organizations the citrus and walnut business in Cali- 
fornia would not be worth the enterprise of the individual growers, since 
both crops for a number of years past have been nearing the point of 
over-production. It was necessary to have a large organization which 
would be in a position to advertise nationally and keep consumption apace 
with the production and to distribute these products properly at all times. 
To do this intelligently and successfully requires about as high an order 
of business ability as can be found in any big business. 

These two organizations are of greatest importance to the well being 
of the State of California, since the walnut and citrus crops are two of the 
most important grown in the state. Mr. Teague has long recognized that 
only through the development of these co-operatiVe agencies could the 
horticultural and agricultural interests be on a permanently prosperous 
basis. He has given freely of his time to perfect both of the associations. 

Fred Tunnell. A popular and well- patronized garage man, Fred 
Tunnell is intimately associated with the development and advancement 
of the industrial and business interests of his home town, Los Alamos, and 
is kept busily employed by the many autoists living in this vicinity, or 
passing through the town on pleasure or business bent. He is a native 
son of California, his birth having occurred October 14, 1876, at Ukiah, 
Mendocino County, while his father, Frank Tunnell, who was also of 
California birth, was born in Santa Maria, Santa Barbara County. 

Frank Tunnell was the son of Martin Luther Tunnell, one of the 
earlier settlers of the Golden State, and a pioneer of the Santa Maria 
Valley. Becoming well versed in agriculture when young, he became 
a farmer from choice, and in course of time became owner of consider- 
able land, and is now successfully operating his home ranch at Los Olivos, 
and a large stock ranch in the mountains. His good wife, whose maiden 
name was Emma Hopper, was bom and bred in Santa Rosa, and was 
likewise of pioneer descent. 



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672 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Acquiring his preliminary education in Santa Maria, Fred Tunnell 
completed his early studies in Santa Barbara, attending the public schools 
and Hoover's Business College. An agricultural career having no charms 
for him, he sought other work when young, and for eleven years was in 
the employ of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, beginning as fire- 
man, and later running both freight and passenger trains between San 
Francisco and Santa Barbara. Severing his connection with that com- 
pany, Mr. Tunnell was for four years associated with the oil industry, 
working in the Santa Maria fields. 

Locating then in Los Alamos, he opened an up-to-date garage, putting 
in all the most approved equipments and appliances, and is building up 
an extensive and highly remunerative business. 

Mr. Tunnell married, September 5, 1900, in Los Alamos, Miss Cora 
Hartley, who was born in Kansas, a daughter of L. P. Hartley. Three 
children have been bom of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Tunnell, namely: 
La Verne, James, and Muriel. Fraternally Mr. Tunnell is^a member 
of Hesperian Lodge No. 694, Ancient Free and Accepted Order of 
Masons, of Santa Barbara ; and belongs also to the Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Engineers. 

Edgar D. Goodenough. The numerous land transactions in which 
the name of Edgar D. Goodenough has appeared in Ventura County, his 
present extensive holdings, his important operations as a citrus fruit 
grower and farmer, have made him one of the prominent men of this 
section, where he has spent the greater part of his life. 

His father O. J. Goodenough was also a well known Ventura County 
citizen. Born in Watertown, New York, February 9, 1836, he lived in 
the East until young manhood. In 1856, going to Galesburg, Illinois, he 
remained there two years and then entered the nursery business. His 
next removal was to Magnolia, Iowa, where he was employed as a 
teacher until 1861. In that year he enlisted for service in the Union 
army at the call for three months' volunteers. From 1862 to 1863 he was 
employed as wagon master for the Government, carrying supplies to 
various western posts, and having about sixty Government wagons in 
the train. That gave him a practical experience in the freighting business, 
as then conducted over those vast western territories where as yet no 
railroad had appeared. On leaving the Government service in 1863 he 
began hauling freight independently between Salt Lake City and Virginia 
City, Montana. He spent two years in that hazardous occupation and 
then returned to Magnolia, Iowa, where once more he taught school for a 
year. Moving to Logan. Iowa, he was a contractor and builder for three 
years, and then located on a farm near Pigeon, Iowa, where he lived 
until 1875. 

In that year O. J. Goodenough came west to Ventura, spent six months 
as a carpenter, and then removing to Saticoy bought forty-two acres 
which he farmed until 1883. Selling out he moved to the Sespe Grant, 
bought 320 acres, and occupied it ais a farm and stock ranch until his 
death, June 11, 1895. He also contracted and built some of the first build- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 673 

ings of Fillmore, including the first school building and the first church. 
He was a member of the Masonic order and the Order of Foresters and 
at one time served as justice of the peace at Saticoy. Politically he was 
a republican. He was one of the organizers and one of the first elders of 
the Fillmore Presbyterian Church. 

In Magnolia, Iowa, September 6, 1866, O. J. Goodenough married 
Miss Zedora Helen Tietsort, a native of Michigan and now residing in 
Fillmore. There were five children : Mrs. R. A. Holley and Mrs. Harry 
W. Hiller, both of Sespe, Ventura County; Glen C, deceased; Earle O. 
of Fillmore and Edgar D. of Santa Paula. 

Edgar D. Goodenough, who was bom at Logan, Iowa, August 5, 1868, 
and was seven years of age when his parents came to California, gained 
most of his early education in Ventura County, where he attended the 
public schools until 1883. Following that he was an employe on his 
father's ranch and at the age of eighteen became chain man for the 
civil engineer engaged in subdividing the Sespe Rancho. After one year 
in that work he put in two years at teaming in the stone quarry in the 
Sespe canyon, and was then on his father's ranch until 1890. Mr. Goode- 
nough afterwards worked as an employe on the Kellogg ranch a year, 
rented ninety acres on the Sespe for two years, and in 1893 bought seven 
acres in the Sespe canyon. This land he set out in lemons, and while 
developing it he also for thirteen years had the supervision of the citrus 
groves owned by J. D. McNab of Riverside. In 1896 he bought twenty- 
two acres on the Sespe, and this land is devoted to bean culture. Seven- 
teen acres bought by Mr. Goodenough in 1900 in the Sespe canyon has 
since been developed by him, ten acres of the tract being in oranges. 
Associated with Mr. Stowe he bought in 1906 eleven acres at Fillmore, 
and that has been subdivided and sold under the name of the Stowe- 
Goodenough subdivision, which was the first subdivision put on the 
market at Fillmore. In 1907 he acquired eighteen acres more on Sespe 
Avenue, ten acres of which are now in oranges. A thirty-acre purchase 
made in 1908 in the Sespe canyon has been developed by the planting of 
twenty acres in lemons, and he has since sold five acres of the lemon 
grove. In the same year he changed his residence from Sespe to Santa 
Paula, purchasing the home where he now resides at 302 Santa Barbara 
Street. In 1909 he and Mr. Leavens of Santa Paula bought 560 acres 
near Piru, and this valuable tract is now divided seventy acres in apricots, 
seventy acres in lemons, 200 acres in hay, five acres in alfalfa and the rest 
in pasture. His most recent purchases were six acres in the Sespe canyon 
in 1914 and twenty-two acres on the east side of the Sespe Creek adjoining 
other holdings of his, and an apiary located in Castaic Canyon in Los 
Angeles County. 

Mr. Goodenough served as a member of the board of city trustees of 
Santa Paula from 1910 to 1916, two years of the time as chairman of 
the board. He was supervisor of roads at Fillmore from 1903 to 1906. 
He is a director of the Fillmore Irrigation Company and with the excep- 
tion of two years has been on the board since 1896. He was also one of 
the first stockholders of the first newspaper published at Fillmore. Mr. 



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674 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Goodenough is a republican, and as a Presbyterian, he was an elder in the 
First Presbyterian Church at Fillmore until his removal to Santa Paula. 
The Fillmore Church recommended him as its delegate to the Santa Bar- 
bara Presbytery, which body elected him to act as delegate in behalf of 
the Fillmore Church to the General Assembly held in Des Moines, Iowa, 
in 1906. Fraternally Mr. Goodenough is a member of the Woodmen of 
the World. 

In Ventura County February 13, 1890, he married Miss Mattie Akers. 
Mrs. Goodenough is a native of Utah, where she was bom while her 
parents were on their way to California over the ox team route. Her 
mother Mrs. Sarah Akers is still living in Santa Paula, enjoying a 
vigorous old age. John Akers, her father, came to Ventura in 1868 and 
took up government land where the Sespe Avenue now runs. This land 
was later surveyed into the More Grant, and Mr. Akers with many other 
settlers was dispossessed of his holdings. He then moved down to the 
Orchard Ranch, where he lived two years, and then bought land in the 
Sespe, which he conducted as a farm and stock ranch until his death on 
May 6, 1885. He was one of the first white settlers in Ventura County. 

Mr. and Mrs. Goodenough have one son, Paul, aged twenty-two, who 
is a successful young rancher in Ventura County. In 1913 at Bardsdale 
he married Rosabel Mayhew, a daughter of M. R. Mayhew of Bardsdale. 
They are the parents of an infant son, Dwight, the only grandchild of 
Mr. and Mrs. Goodenough. 

Charles W. Dabney. Identifying himself with Santa Barbara 
County in 1912, as a rancher, Mr. Charles W. Dabney is one of the men 
most socially prominent in the City of Santa Barbara, and all his associa- 
tions and tastes are such as to give him an influential position in any 
community. 

He was born at Fayal, in the Azore Islands, June 5, 1867, a son of 
Samuel W. and Harriet (Webster) Dabney. From the year 1807 a 
member of the Dabney family served almost continuously as an Ameri- 
can consul in the Azore Islands, and that was the position occupied by 
Mr. Dabney 's father and grandfather. 

He was sent to the United States for his education and attended 
St. Mark's School in Massachusetts until about eighteen. He also had 
instruction from a private tutor for four years. After leaving school 
Mr. Dabney came out to California, spent several years ranching in San 
Diego County and then returned to Boston, Massachusetts, actively con- 
nected with the real estate business until 191 2. In that year he returned 
to California and has since been ranching in Santa Barbara County. 

During his residence in Massachusetts Mf. Dabney served five years 
in the state militia. He is a member of the governing board and secre- 
tary of the Santa Barbara Polo Club, a member of the Santa Barbara 
Country Club and the Santa Barbara Qub. In Middletown, Connecticut, 
October 16, 1899, he married Lucy Hubbard Russell. Their two children 
are Charles W., Jr., and Samuel Russell. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 675 

Harvey Roy Steele. To the eastern mind a ranch of forty-three 
acres is not large, but even the eastern mind changes its view when it 
takes into consideration that land in the fertile valleys of Southern 
California will bring from $i,ooo to $2,000 per acre in the open market. 
J. Harvey Steele, when he died in 1895, left to his wife and son a tract of 
forty-three acres in the Santa Clara Valley in Ventura County, all planted 
to apricots and all in bearing condition. It was one of the finest ranges of 
its kind in the valley, and still is, having been well kept up to the standard 
set for it by its owner when it came into the care of Harvey Roy Steele 
in recent years. 

Bom in Ventura County, on October 23, 1882, Harvey Roy Steele is 
the son of J. Harvey and Katherine (Olmsted) Steele. The father was a 
Missourian, bom in Polk County in 1840, and he was reared on his 
father's stock farm and educated in the public schools of his home com- 
munity. While still in his teens he crossed the plains in the '50s and 
found his way to Calif omia. He settled in Sonoma County, occupied 
himself with ranching and was identified with ranch life there until the 
early '70s. It was then he came to Ventura County, and he first settled 
on a tract in the Mission Grant,.where he farmed until 1876. Then, with 
his brother, Allan T. Steele, he purchased a tract of no acres in the 
Santa Clara Valley, six miles west of Santa Paula. He planted his share 
of the land to apricots and worked up his acreage to a splendid state of 
productiveness. When he died in 1895 he left to his wife and son forty- 
three acres of the finest land in the valley. 

Two children were bom to J. Harvey and Katherine Steele. One of 
them survives. He is Harvey Roy of this review. He was thirteen years 
old when his father died, and his schooling after that time was limited, for 
he early took charge of the work of the place, and has proved himself 
equal to the task he set himself. In recent years Mrs. Steele has divided 
the ranch, and his share he has planted to walnut trees, a crop that seldom 
fails in Ventura County. 

Mr. Steele is one of the progressive young men of his community. 
He is a democrat in politics, attends the Congregational Church and is 
unmarried. 

Robert Vogel. The ability to manage successfully a farm and ranch 
is one of the sure means to influential position in aflfairs in this section 
of Califomia. By a long experience in the Middle West and also in 
Califomia Robert Vogel is a master of the various branches of agricul- 
ture and animal husbandry and is also a capable business executive and 
skilled in the handling of men and resources. 

By hard work and these other qualifications he is now foreman of the 
Oak Glenn Ranch of La Patera in Goleta. He was bom at St. Joseph, 
Missouri, August 16, 1884, a son of John G. and Alice (Launenberger) 
Vogel. When he was a small child his parents removed to the State of 
Kansas and he lived there and attended the public schools until he was 
sixteen. Leaving school he began working on farms, and was employed 
in the agricultural district in several sections of the Middle West until 



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676 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

1910. Then following a year of employment with the city fire department 
of Milwaukee, he came in 191 1 to Santa Barbara. 

Mr. Vogel was employed as a hand on the Bishop Ranch until 19 14, 
and was then made foreman of Mr. Bishop's Oak Glenn Ranch, which 
comprises 100 acres and is being cultivated intensively to some of the 
staple crops of this section. 

Mr. Vogel is himself the owner of five acres on Central Avenue, but 
this is under lease to a tenant. Politically he is independent. At San 
Diego, March 14, 191 5, he married Miss Minnie Erdmann. They have 
one child, Margaret Marian. 

James Smith. One of the finest bean and hog ranches in the vicinity 
of Naples is now being conducted by the Smith brothers, James and 
Charles A., Jr. Mr. James Smith as well as his brother is a native of 
Santa Barbara County and the family has been long and prominently 
identified with this part of the state. 

Bom at Goleta December 8, 1889, a son of Charles A. and Barbara 
(Dawson) Smith, Mr. James Smith grew up in the La Patera district 
and attended district schools there until he was fourteen years of age. 
A natural genius for mechanics and for farming operations, together 
with a thorough training and experience, have afforded good reasons for 
Mr. Smith's success. 

After leaving school he worked on the ranch with his father for three 
years, and then learned the blacksmith trade, which he followed in 
Goleta and Santa Ynez up to 1914. Then associating himself with his 
brother Charles he leased 450 acres near Naples, and the brothers have 
carried on their operations on an extensive scale, their chief crop being 
beans, and their specialty in livestock being hogs. 

James Smith is a member of the Fraternal Brotherhood and Modem 
Woodmen of America and worships in the Presbyterian faith. In Goleta 
June 8, 1912, he married Miss Constance Saundy. Mrs. Smith was bom 
in London, England, a daughter of William G. and Emily (Overall) 
Smith. To their marriage was born one child, Charles William. 

Charles A. Smith, Jr., who is associated with James Smith in the 
management of the ranch above referred to was bom in Goleta November 
II, 1893. His schooling at La Patera was concluded when he was about 
twelve years of age, and he then found employment for his energies on 
his father's ranch and for about five months attended Hoover Business 
College in Santa Barbara.^ He has been associated with his brother James 
in farming the 4SO-acre ranch since 19 14. He is still a bachelor and is a 
member of the Fraternal Brotherhood. 

Edward S. Thacher. If anyone can properly be considered an 
authority on the history of the citrus fruit industry in the Ojai valley of 
Ventura County, it is Edward S. Thacher, who first became interested in 
what was then an experimental industry as early as 1887, and has been 
one of the chief individual producers of the crop now marketed through 
the Ojai Orange Association for twenty-nine years. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 677 

In an interesting article contributed to the California Citrograph in 
December, 1915, Mr. Thacher reviewed some of the experiences of the 
pioneer orange growers in the valley. He recalls the fact that the original 
orange grower was a Mr. Buckman, a school teacher of Ventura, who bad 
the hardihood and courage, despite the cynicism of his neighbors, to 
plant about six acres in orange trees during the '70s. Mr. Buckman in 
spite of many difficulties and lack of financial means demonstrated the 
fact that the valley could produce oranges of marked excellence for 
flavor and general quality. After Mr. Buckman began sending his fruit 
to the market and getting returns, others naturally followed his example, 
until at the time Mr. Thacher wrote about 600 acres were planted in 
oranges in the entire valley. The Ojai valley not only produces an 
orange of splendid quality, but has the advantage of situation in the 
matter of frosts, which seldom if ever have made it necessary to use 
protective means to safeguard the fruit from injury. The early crop of 
oranges had to be transported over rough roads many miles to the nearest 
transportation center at Ventura, until the modern era of railroads and 
improved highways. The growers also packed and sold their fruit 
individually, but for the past five or six years have adopted the advantages 
of co-operative handling, and in 191 5 the crop from 400 acres, amounting 
to over 200 cars, was marketed through the Ojai Orange Association. It 
should be noted that Mr. Thacher was one of the organizers of the asso- 
ciation, and is now its president. 

Edward S. Thacher comes of a prominent Connecticut family, closely 
identified with the history of Yale University, and he himself has the in- 
clinations to scholarship, though, largely on account of ill health in his 
early years, he has lived mostly in the rugged outdoors. 

He was born in New Haven, Connecticut, April 18, 1852, a son of 
Thomas A. and Elizabeth (Day) Thacher. His father was a distinguished 
scholar, was bom at Hartford, Connecticut, attended local schools there, 
and graduated from Yale University in 1835. For two years he taught in 
the State of Georgia, after which he went abroad and spent a number of 
years in German universities. On returning to America he became 
professor of Latin at Yale University in 1846 and held a chair in that 
university nearly forty years until his death on April 7, 1886. At New 
Haven he married for his first wife Elizabeth Day, daughter of Jeremiah 
Day, a former president of Yale. After her death he married, August i, 
i860, Elizabeth Sherman. Her father Roger Sherman was prominent 
in the shipping business and his father, also Roger Sherman, was one of 
the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 

Edward S. Thacher attended the public schools of his native city 

until ten years of age, and in 1868 graduated from the Hopkins Grammar 

School. Entering Yale University, he was graduated in 1872, and his 

first experience after leaving college was as chainman with a railroad 

surveying crew along the borders between New York and Pennsylvania. 

After a summer spent in that occupation he was a teacher in the high 

school at Montclair, New Jersey, for a year, and after that went abroad. 

His plans and intentions at the time were to become an architect. At 
Vol, n-is 



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678 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Paris, France, he spent two years in th^ famous ficole des Beaux Arts 
and on returning to New York City he was employed in an architect's 
office for eight months. The confining nature of the business and the 
necessity of living outdoors, caused him to abandon the profession. 

The following six months he spent on a farm at Concord, Massa- 
chusetts, and the following winter he was in the Catskill Mountains, 
New York, with James Beecher, a preacher, and a half brother to the 
famous Henry Ward Beecher. The next summer he also spent on a 
farm at Concord, Massachusetts, and realizing that continued health 
depended upon outdoor occupation, he decided to take up ranching. 
He first investigated Minnesota without finding a desirable place to 
locate, and then developed a cattle ranch on a large tract of prairie owned 
by Robbins Battell at Victoria in Ellis County, Kansas, until 1880. Mr. 
Battell, who lived at Norfolk, Connecticut, then employed him to look 
after his property holdings at Mishawaka, Indiana, where he remained 
a year. Returning to Kansas, Mr. Thacher bought a ranch near Emporia, 
intending to engage in the cattle business and was also land and title 
examiner for the Central Loan and Land Company of Emporia. 

In 1887 he came to Southern California to look out some land for 
himself, and in April of that year he and T. S. Krutz and Mr. Leighton 
bought in partnership ninety acres in the Ojai valley. About seven acres 
of this land had already been planted in apricots, and Mr. Tracher pro- 
ceeded to set out forty acres in olives. 

In July, 1887, they bought what was known as the Buckman Ranch, 
where Mr. Thacher still lives and which contains the greater part of his 
orchard acreage. In 1904 his brother, Thomas Thacher, of New York, 
joined him in the purchase of what is known a§ the Greene place, lying 
west of the Thacher orchard, and also in the purchase of the interests of 
Mr. Krutz and Mr. Leighton, in the orchards and lands of the former 
Buckman Ranch and other lands adjoining which they had more recently 
purchased. 

Mr. Thacher has since given most of his time to the management 
of the orchards and outlying lands. The orchard planting was increased 
to about 160 acres planted chiefly to oranges and grapefruit, and he is 
the largest individual grower of oranges in the valley. The Greene place, 
mentioned above, of 100 acres, already had a small orchard, but Mr. 
Thacher has increased it to forty acres in oranges, but has since sold 
2SJ/2 acres of the orchard, retaining the balance. In 1905 he and his 
brother incorporated the business as Topa Topa Company, with Thomas 
Thacher, who lives in New York City as president, and Edward Thacher 
as manager. At the present time 134J4 acres of this ranch are planted 
in oranges, grapefruit and avocados, of which latter fruit Mr. Thacher is 
one of the first producers who have reached the market. 

In 1902 Mr. Thacher organized the Ojai Olive Association, and has 
been its president ever since. He is a director of the California Avocado 
Association. He is a member of the University Club of Los Angeles, 
Yale Club of Southern California, Jack Boyd Club of NordhofF, and 
politically is a democrat. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 679 

In Nordhoff in August, 1890, he married Miss Lucy W. Smith, daugh- 
ter of Gen. T. C. H. Smith. Mrs. Thacher died in January, 1915, leaving 
three children : Olive Day, who is a graduate of the University of Cali- 
fornia and now lives at home with her father ; Edward, aged twenty-two, 
a student in the University of California; and Thomas Church, aged 
twenty-one, attending the University Farm School, at Davis. 

Leonidas D. Hill. The parents of Leonidas D. Hill were pioneers 
to the community of Goleta, locating there in 1874 when the town was 
in the struggling stages through which most communities must pass. 
They have been identified with the agricultural life of this part of the 
state since first locating in Goleta and their son is going on with the 
good work that has made Santa Barbara the agricultural center it has 
come to be. 

Bom in Knoxville, Iowa, February 10, 1865, Leonidas D. Hill is the 
son of George W. and Rhoda Barbara (Wood) Hill. When nine years 
of age the family left their Iowa home and traveled to California, locat- 
ing on a farm in Goleta, and Leonidas Hill was reared to manhood there. 
When he had finished his schooling he purchased a tract of thirty-five 
acres and settled down to farming on his own responsibility. Beans and 
walnuts are the products of his labors and he has enjoyed a good success 
with his farm thus far. 

In addition to his work at home, Mr. Hill is manager of the bean 
warehouse at Goleta. 

Mr. Hill was married in Point Pleasant, West Virginia, on July 6, 
1892, to Miss Ida J. Hill, daughter of R. M. and Emily (Page) Hill. 
Three children have come to them — ^Rhoda E., George D. and M. Earl 
Hill. 

Mr. Hill is a democrat, but not active in local politics. 

J. CoRBLEY Pool. When Mr. Pool was a boy his fondest ambitions 
were for a career as architect. At the age of thirteen his father died, 
leaving him the head of a family consisting of his mother and three 
younger children, a sister and two brothers. Under such conditions and 
heavy responsibilities the task of securing an education became a very 
difficult problem. While setting himself earnestly to the duties which 
lay nearest at hand, he also took a long look ahead and never lost sight 
of the star to which he had hitched his wagon. As a boy he determined 
that his goal should be a high rank in the architectural profession. No 
obstacle seemed too great for him to overcome. The success he has 
attained has been due to certain principles and rules of conduct. One 
of these was a definite purpose. He also was strongly determined to 
succeed, and refused to consider defeat, feeling that whatever was worth 
doing was worth doing well. Another factor in his advancement was 
systematic study, carried on every day, as a youth as well as in mature 
manhood. He has neglected none of the stepping stones that lead to 
success in his exacting calling. He worked through the different trades 
connected with architecture, and after a hard day's work he continued 



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680 SANTA BARBARA,. SAN LUIS OBISPO 

his studies into the night. He has also followed the rule of purchasing 
the best books and magazines and from them has derived many new 
lights on the various problems which . come up in the course of his 
practice. 

During the few years of his independent practice Mr. Pool has at- 
tained a rank among the leaders of the profession in Southern California. 
He practices in Santa Barbara, but has done work in various states of 
the Union. Besides architecture he is also an authority on acoustical 
engineering, having worked out his own formulae for determining acoustic 
qualities. 

Bom in Waco, Texas, December i8, 1876, he educated himself largely 
by self application and by constant study. In 1896 at the age of twenty 
he took up the earnest study of architecture. For some years he also 
continued in the contracting business in order to increase and broaden 
his experience. 

His office as architect and acoustical engineer is now at Santa Bar- 
bara. A large part of his practice is in acoustical engineering. Some 
splendid achievements are to his credit in that line. He was responsible 
for the arrangement with respect to acoustic properties in the Christian 
Science Church on West Adams Boulevard in Los Angeles, in St. Mary's 
Catholic Church at Phoenix, Arizona, in the Presbyterian Church at 
Chattanooga, Tennessee, and he has also been called in as a consulting 
expert on acoustics and other phases of architecture in many other audi- 
toriums on the continent and some of the palatial residences of Southern 
California. Mr. Pool drew the plans for the San Marcos Building, the 
largest business structure in Santa Barbara. 

For the past eight years he has served in Santa Barbara as a park 
commissioner and is a loyal and public spirited citizen of that community. 
Politically he is a republican. In Santa Barbara he married Miss Mabel 
Young. They are the parents of two children, Phena and Harry, both 
of whom are enthusiastic followers of their father's profession and are 
studying architecture in hfs office and lend him a great deal of assistance 
in various ways. 

William Stronach. Worthy of especial note in a work of this 
character is William Stronach, of Goleta, a fine representative of the 
enterprising and thriving farmers who have come to this region from a 
land across the sea, and by means of industry and thrift has accumulated 
a good property. A Scotchman by birth and breeding, he was bom near 
Aberdeen, Scotland, November 16, 1869, a son of John and Ann (Skin- 
ner) Stronach. 

Leaving school when but twelve years of age, William Stronach sub- 
sequently served an apprenticeship at the plasterer's trade, which he 
followed for about a year. Determining then to seek his fortune in 
America, the land of glorious opportunities, he came to Santa Barbara, 
Calif omia, in 1887, and remained in that city a short time. Subsequently 
finding work as a farm laborer in Goleta, he settled in the valley, and 
when he had accumulated a sufficient sum of money wisely invested it in 



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BENJAMIN F. WARRING 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 681- 

land, buying ten acres of raw land, from which he has improved his well 
cultivated and finely improved home ranch. In addition to working his 
own property, Mr. Stronach, with characteristic enterprise and energy, 
leased 2cx> acres of near-by land, which he is carrying on successfully, in 
connection with general farming making a specialty of raising beans. 
Although not active in politics, he is identified with the democratic party. 
In November, 1893, in Santa Barbara, Mr. Stronach was united in 
marriage with Miss Helen Keith, and into their attractive home eight 
children have been bom, one of whom, Mary Jane, died when young; 
those now living are as follows : Helen, William, Frank, Grace, Raymond, 
Alice, and Louis. 

John Francis Sullivan. Perhaps the most gratifying success is 
that which comes at the end of many years of well directed effort and a 
constant striving for a betterment of one's material condition. This is 
the kind of success which John Francis Sullivan enjoys. Mr. Sullivan 
was for many years an employe and by hard and conscientious work 
finally arrived at the position of independence which he now enjoys as 
one of the leading ranchers in the vicinity of Naples in Santa Barbara 
County. 

He was bom at Montville, Connecticut, Febmary 28, 1859, a son of 
John F. and Mary (Carey) Sullivan, was educated in the public schools 
of his native state and in Hinman's Business College at Worcester, Massa- 
chusetts. For a number of years he was employed at different vocations 
throughout the New England States. 

In 1892 Mr. Sullivan came to Califomia and since that date has been 
identified with the community at Naples. For about twenty years he was 
one of the efficient employes on a ranch, and by experience and by a care- 
ful husbanding of his resources was enabled to engage in ranching for 
himself. He bought a half interest in Mr. Samuel Myers* ranch of 136 
acres near Naples, and they have developed this as one of the fine f mit 
farms in that section of Santa Barbara County and both are reaping the 
benefits of their long experience and industry. 

Mr. Sullivan, who is unmarried, is a Catholic, is a democrat, and a 
member of Council No. 1684 of the Knights of Columbus. 

Hugh Warring. One of the families that has been identified con- 
tinuously with Ventura County since the decade of the '60s is the War- 
rings, represented by Mr. Hugh Warring of Piru, one of the leading 
horticulturists, farmers and business men in that vicinity. 

His father, Benjamin F. Warring, was a pioneer in this section of 
Califomia. Benjamin was bom in Tioga County, New York, December 
12, 1829, and was reared and educated there. He had just about reached 
his majority when the great gold discoveries were made on the Pacific 
Coast, and in 1850 he came out to California by way of the Isthmus of 
Panama. His first experience was in running a restaurant in San Fran- 
cisco for three months. From there he removed to Santa Clara County, 
and was employed in the great redwood timber district until i860. He 



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682 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

bought a farm near San Jose, operated it until 1869, and then sold out 
and drove overland into Ventura County. Soon after his arrival he 
settled in the Santa Clara Valley in that section now known as Buckhom. 
A government claim of 160 acres gave him the land which he devoted to 
farming for so many years, and it was his home until his death on July i, 
1903. He was a very prosperous citizen, stood high in the community, 
and was much respected for his many excellent qualities of character. As 
to politics he was a republican. He was a member of the San Jose 
Cavalry Company in the early days of its formation. In 1853 Benjamin 
Warring was married at San Jose to Missouri D. Easley. Six children 
were bom to them and the two now living are Walter S. of Ventura 
County and Hugh. 

Mr. Hugh Warring was bom in San Jose, California, September 23, 
1857, and was about twelve years of age when the family removed to 
Ventura County. His education in the public schools was concluded a 
year later and from that time forward he made a hand on his father's 
farm. Arriving at the age of twenty-one he bought fifty acres adjoining 
the old homestead, and was successfully identified with its cultivation and 
management until 1913, when he sold that fifty acres. In 1912 he had 
bought thirty acres near Pirn with twenty acres in lemons and the rest in 
pasture land. On the death of his father he inherited 120 acres, and of 
that property he has sixty acres in oranges and walnuts and the rest in 
pasture. His ownership extends to fourteen acres of bean land in 
Ventura, but he rents this. Thus his possessions indicate that he is one of 
the most prosperous citizens of Ventura County and he is a man who 
wisely uses his prosperity. He is a stockholder in the Fillmore State 
Bank, is a member of the Fillmore Union High School Board, is a director 
in the Ventura Co-operative Association, and is a republican and a member 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Masonic Order. 

On September 4, 1881, Mr. Warring married Alice Conaway, a native 
of Stockton, California. They had a happy married life of fifteen years 
until her death on June 18, 1896. Four children were bom to them: 
Edwin Cecil who is thirty-four years of age and is now postmaster at 
Piru ; Floyd S., aged thirty, a rancher near Pirn ; Alfred A., aged twenty- 
nine, also engaged in ranching near Pirn ; and Lester J., who is twenty-five 
years of age and is connected with the Union Oil Company. On January 
15, 1903, at Piru, Mr, Warring married Orie J. Eaton. Mrs. Warring is 
a native of Kansas, and a daughter of H. B. Comfort, a retired rancher 
and now living in Sawtelle. Two children have been bom to this mar- 
riage, Benjamin F., aged seven, and Chester Amold, two years old. 

Frederick H. Rhead. Success in any line of endeavor, be it indus- 
trial, professional or financial, is gained through the utilizing of the 
means at hand, the improvement of every opportunity for advancement, 
and the exercise of good judgment and wise discrimination. That Freder- 
ick H. Rhead, well known throughout Southem Califomia as an expert 
manufacturer of art pottery, has met with recognized success as an 
artist in clay is positive proof of his patient courage, intelligence and 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 683 

ability, and mark him as a faithful follower of those world-famed potters 
of old Staffordshire, Wedgwood, Whieldon and Woods. 

A native of England, he was bom August 29, 1880, at Staffordshire 
Potteries, where his parents, Frederick Alfred and Adolphine (Hurten) 
Rhead, still reside. His father, an artist in pottery, was born in Eng- 
land, but his mother claims France as the country of her birth. 

Mr. Rhead was educated in England, attending first a parochial school 
at Stoke-on-Trent, and later the English Government Art School, the 
Wedgwood Institute. At the early age of nineteen years he became a 
teacher in the Longton Government Art School, being one of the young- 
est teachers ever appointed to such a position, and retained it for three 
years, after which he was for three years a director of the Wardle Art 
Pottery Company at Hanley, Staffordshire, England. 

Coming to America well equipped for his chosen line of work, Mr. 
Rhead was for six years a director of the Rozane Potteries at Zanesville, 
Ohio, and for two years occupied a similar position in the pottery depart- 
ment of the People's University at St. Louis, Missouri. 

With a view of broadening his field of endeavor, Mr. Rhead came to 
California, and as an associate of Dr. Philip King Brown organized the 
Arequipa Pottery Company at Fairfax, Marin County. Coming from 
there to Santa Barbara in 1913, Mr. Rhead organized the Rhead Pottery 
Company, Inc., of which he has since been the manager. In his factory, 
which is advantageously located at the north edge of the town, on the 
Mission Road, may be seen some of the most perfect specimens of art 
pottery ever manufactured, the touch of the individual craftsman being 
everywhere in evidence, moreover, it is the one and only spot on earth 
where the actual reproduction of the Chinese mirror, black glaze, can be 
seen. After fifteen years of experimenting Mr. Rhead successfully 
reproduced this glaze, which was originally made by the Chinese in the 
seventeenth century. In his efforts to master the secret of its manufac- 
ture, Mr. Rhead made over 11,000 formulas before developing the cor- 
rect one, and as a result these wares are very expensive. He makes a 
specialty of manufacturing beautiful architectural and artistic pottery, 
often of unique and highly artistic design and decoration, much of which 
is purchased by the wealthy eastern tourists, although some of his most 
exclusive productions are to be found in the homes of the cultured people 
of Montecito and vicinity. 

The wonderful productions of Mr. Rhead's factory are entirely hand 
made, as are those of the cunning Italian craftsmen, including not only 
expensive cabinet and museum pieces, but garden ornaments, the larger 
part of which are of cement construction. In carrying on his work he 
uses almost exclusively California clays, obtaining about twenty kinds 
in Santa Barbara, and the others from National City and Elsinore. 
Eventually he expects to use local clays only. A visit to his workshop is 
both instructive and interesting, and well worth the time to the near-by 
resident or the visitor, being far more satisfactory than a view of the fine 
exhibit of his creations and reproductions which attracted so much atten- 



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684 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

tion at the San Diego Exposition, where Rhead Pottery was awarded a 
Gold Medal. 

Politically Mr. Rhead is independent, voting with the courage of his 
convictions, and has never sought office. He is a member of the National 
Society of Craftsmen; of the New York Ceramic Society; and of the 
American Ceramic Society. 

Robert S. Rowe is a business-like farmer and rancher in the rich 
and attractive country around Goleta in Santa Barbara County. To farm 
and make a success of it in California requires those same qualifications 
of energy, enterprise and intelligent direction which are at the foundation 
of a business suctess in any line of endeavor. Mr. Rowe is abundantly 
equipped in that respect, and although already independently situated is 
quite a young man in years. 

A resident of California since he was five years of age, he was bom 
in Plymouth, England, January 15, 1878, a son of Herbert William and 
Eliza (Popplestone) Rowe. Both parents were bom in England and are 
now deceased, and both represented some old families of Southwestern 
Britain. His father came to America and settled at Goleta in 1883, and 
there afterward engaged in farming and stock-raising. 

While growing up Robert S. Rowe attended the public schools at 
Goleta, and at the same time secured a practical training in the vocation 
which has been the object of his best endeavors for a number of years. 
No time was lost after he left school before he and his brother Russell 
engaged in farming. Subsequently they bought ninety-three acres near 
Goleta, and that land they have since developed as a valuable olive, lemon 
and walnut plantation. The brothers conducted this ranch in a highly 
profitable manner, and in 1910 they were able to extend their enterprise 
on a larger scale. They then bought an additional 138 acres, known as 
the Buck Place and a quarter of a mile from the original ranch. Russell 
Rowe is now the active manager of the second ranch, and that is devoted 
to walnuts and beans. Mr. Robert Rowe still gives his active super- 
vision to the ninety-three-acre place. 

Not yet forty years of age, and extremely busy with his successful 
farming, Mr. Rowe has found little time for outside interests. He is a 
democrat, is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
and the Fraternal Brotherhood of Santa Barbara, and with his family 
worships in the Catholic Church. 

On May 24, 1903, he married Miss Genevieve Pensinger. Her father, 
Jacob Pensinger, was one of the old settlers and ranchers at Goleta. Two 
children have been bom of their union : Barbara and Robert. 

E. E. Huntley. The death of E. E. Huntley, in September, 1914, 
left the son Leon Huntley in charge of the home place in Santa Paula, 
and he is at present looking after the interests of his mother as manager 
of the ranch his father had developed. Mr. Huntley was bora in Granger 
County, Ohio, on January 2, 1883, and he is the eldest of the four children 
bom to his parents, E. E. and Amy Louisa (Crane) Huntley. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 685 

E. E. Huntley was born in Granger, Medina County, Ohio, on June 19, 
1855, and he is the son of Ezra and Katherine (Wolcott) Huntley. He 
had a public school training, followed by a normal school course, and he 
was for many years engaged in the teaching profession in Ohio. In fact, 
he continued there in that estimable work until 1883, when he took his 
family to California and settled in Ventura County, on an eighty acre 
tract he was able to purchase. 

There Mr. Huntley devoted himself to the development of this place, 
planting it to apricots and apples, both of which yielded abundantly, mak- 
ing his ranch most valuable. Later he sold thirty acres of the original 
tract, later buying back ten acres of it, to which he added an additional 
eighteen acres of foothill land near his place. All this he gave over to 
the cultivation of apricots and apples and replanted the entire tract to 
walnuts. Under his direction the ranch came to be a most attractive and 
productive spot, and has yielded a comfortable income to the family from 
the beginning. 

Mr. Huntley, as a resident of Ventura County, found a field for his 
interests in the local schools, and for twenty-one years he served as a 
trustee of the Saticoy School Board. His services in that line were 
highly valuable to the city, and much credit is due to him for the excel- 
lency of the schools of the community. He resigned the office, saying 
that it was better for a younger man and one who had children in the 
school to take up the work. His politics were those of a democrat and 
he was long a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Ohio and 
after coming to California joined the Congregational Church at Saticoy. 
Mr. Huntley was married in Wadsworth, Medina County, Ohio, in 
March, 1882, and their four living children are Leon; Beatrice, who 
married E. H. Cavanagh of Santa Barbara, and Louis and Lois, twins, 
who are still in the parental home. 

All four received their educations in the public schools of Ventura 
County, and Leon, after finishing his studies, gave his attention to work 
on the ranch under his father's supervision* When the father died in 
1914 the son was well prepared to go ahead with the care of the ranch, 
and is making an excellent success of his work. 

Henry W. Gordon. A prominent and successful representative of 
the lumber trade of Santa Barbara County, Henry W. Gordon has won his 
responsible position as manager of the Santa Barbara Lumber Company 
through industry, perseverance, and the exercise of good judgment 
and wise management. A son of Aexander J. and Alice G. (JelliflF) Gor- 
don, he was bom, January 28, 1876, in Brodhead, Wisconsin, where he 
was educated, being there graduated from the high school at the age of 
sixteen years. 

Soon after leaving school Mr. Gordon learned telegraphy, and for 
five years thereafter worked as telegraph operator and ticket agent, being 
employed in different places in Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota. Desir- 
ous of obtaining more congenial and lucrative employment, Mr. Gordon 
then became associated with a lumber company in Missouri, and while 



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686 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

there was so observant, and paid such attention to his duties that he 
thoroughly mastered the details of that part of the business with which 
he was concerned. On, coming to Santa Barbara in 191 1, Mr. Gordon 
assumed his present responsible position as manager of the Santa Barbara 
Company, and through his energy and enterprise has built up an extensive 
trade and secured an excellent reputation for business ability and judg- 
ment. 

On December 19, 1900, at Redlands, California, Mr. Gordon was 
united in marriage with Miss Laura M. Knapp, and to them four children 
have been bom, namely: Doris, Marjorie, Alice, and Malcolm. 

Henry Rich. Though he is now ninety-one years of age, Henry 
Rich does not think himself too old to carry on the management of his 
thirty-acre ranch in Goleta, where he has lived since about 1874. He 
keeps sufficient hired help to do the actual labor, but is himself active 
and hearty, mentally keen and alert and possessing a splendid memory 
for one of his years. 

Mr. Rich was bom in Saxony, Germany, on December 10, 1825, and 
is the son of Godfrey and Christina Rich. As a young man in his native 
country he learned the trade of a millwright and when he came to Amer- 
ica in 1849 he found ample demand for his services in that lifte of work. 
He traveled rather extensively throughout the country in carrying on 
his work, but spent several years in the State of New York, so that he 
probably looked upon that as his home state. In 1875 he decided to locate 
in Califomia and coming to Goleta settled down on a small piece of land 
where he has since made his home. 

Mr. Rich is republican in his politics and a Lutheran in his religious 
convictions. He was married in New York State on May 5, 1885, to 
Priscilla Derhler, and their children are here briefly named. John died 
at the age of six years. Emma married William Porter of Spring- 
field, Missouri. Anna Isabel, deceased, was the wife of Charles 
Maltby. Cora married Theodore Neeley of Los Angeles. Henry is 
living at home. Hudson is living: in Los Angeles. 

George Friedrich Maiers. As proprietor of an implement store 
and a walnut huller manufactory in Goleta, where he has a well-estab- 
lished and highly lucrative business, George F. Maiers is one of the leading 
business men of his community, and a citizen of prominence. A son of 
John Friedrich and Marguerithe (Setzer) Maiers, he was born, December 
24, 1 87 1, in Stuttgart, Germany, and was there educated in the public 
schools. He subsequently learned the trade of wagon and carriage 
building and started in business for himself before being of age. 

In 1887, Mr. Maiers, seeking newer fields of endeavor, immigrated to 
Califomia, and for five years worked with the well known firm of 
Hunt, Son & Schuster. Starting in business on his own account in the 
fall of 1892, he erected a small wagon shop in connection with Mr. 
Joseph Lane in Goleta, and in its management met with great success. 
In 1896, feeling the need of larger and better accommodations, Mr. Maiers 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 687 

purchased land on the opposite comer of the street upon which he was 
located, and in the commodious building, of 10,000 square feet of floor 
space, which he erected, has since been prosperously engaged in the general 
implement and wagon business, being successful both as a merchant and as 
a manufacturer. Mr. Maiers is also an inventive genius, and is now 
receiving a good income from the sale of walnut hullers, which he 
designed, had patented, and is now manufacturing. 

Mr. Maiers married, June 19, 1912, Miss Katharine Pyster, of Carpin- 
teria. They have one child, Helen Virginia, born December 19, 1916. 
Politically Mr. Maiers is a republican. Fraternally he is a Royal Arch 
Mason, and a past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. 

David M. Culver. Having been a tiller of the soil during his active 
career, David M. Culver, of Goleta, is numbered among those sturdy, 
energetic, and successful farmers who thoroughly understand the voca- 
tion which they follow, and are carrying it on with profit and pleasure. 
A native of Canada, he was bom, April 10, 1851, in Norfolk County, 
Ontario, where his parents, Gabriel M. and Martha (Cullver) Culver, 
were then living. 

Beginning his school life in his native town, David M. Culver com- 
pleted his studies in the public schools of Kalamazoo, Michigan, after 
which he spent five years in the lumber camps of Northern Michigan. 
In 1875, realizing that the far West had greater opportunities for young 
men of industry and ambition, he made his way to Santa Barbara County, 
and not many months later was fortunate enough to obtain a position 
on the noted More ranch in Goleta. His services being appreciated, 
Mr. Culver was subsequently given charge of the ranch, and continued its 
supervision for twenty consecutive years, a record that bears witness 
to his efficiency and fidelity in that capacity. In 1898 Mr. Culver pur- 
chased, in Goleta, his present ranch of nineteen acres, all of which he 
devotes to the raising of walnuts, an industry that keeps him fully occu- 
pied, and proves exceedingly lucrative. 

Mr. Culver has been twice married. He married first in 1884, in 
Goleta, Miss Jennie Kellogg, who lived but five short years after her 
marriage, dying in 1889, and leaving one child, Edgar Culver. In 1894 
Mr. Culver married for his second wife Miss Martha Tucker, and of 
their union two children have been bom, Ruth and Mildred. Politically 
Mr. Culver is a stanch supporter of the principles of the republican party. 
Fratemally he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and of the Knights of Pythias. Religiously he belongs to the Federated 
Church of Goleta. 

Francis Marian Glass is a Missourian, born there on April 3, 1850, 
and he is a son of John W. and Mary (Roberts) Glass, natives of Ohio 
and Kentucky, respectively. The family came to Califomia in 1852, 
experiencing all the hardships incident to pioneer life in such a trip as 
they undertook, and settled in Stockton and later went to Mendino County. 
Francis Glass had his early education there and in Sonoma County, and 



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688 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

when he had finished his schooling he farmed in Solano County for twelve 
years. It was during that time that his father, together with a Mr. 
Pensinger, his brother-in-law, purchased the places that Francis Glass 
and Mr. Pensinger now own and operate. This was afterwards divided. 
Mr. Glass has i6o acres of fine land, and he gives his time chiefly to 
stock-raising and general farming. He came into possession of the place 
in 1885 and has operated it since that time. 

Mr. Glass is a member of the Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He is 
a democrat in politics, and was supervisor of his township for the years 
1894-8 inclusive. 

In 1885 Mr. Glass was married to Miss Sallie Parker, in San Fran- 
cisco. She is the daughter of Richard D. Parker. Two children have 
been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Glass. Albert W. and Harold, who live on 
the home place. 

Russell Rowe. Associated as a partner in the business of ranching 
at Goleta in Santa Barbara County, Russell Rowe is one of the lead- 
ing producers of the olive, the lemon and the walnut crops of that dis- 
trict. 

A son of Herbert William and Eliza (Poppleston) Rowe, he was 
born in Plymouth, England, June 13, 1875, and was eight years of age 
when his father came to America and settled in Santa Barbara County, 
California. Russell Rowe attended the public schools of Goleta, and at 
the conclusion of his studies engaged in farming and since then he and 
his brother Robert S. Rowe have had their business interests in com- 
mon, and are now proprietors of a ranch of ninety-three acres near 
Goleta and of a still larger plantation near by. Mr. Russell Rowe now 
has the active management of the second ranch of 138 acres, and is 
specializing in the production of walnuts and beans. 

Russell Rowe married Miss Nellie Chamberlain, a daughter of J. C 
Chamberlain of Santa Barbara. Her father was one of the old settlers 
of the valley and has lived there for about thirty-five years. He came 
west from Ohio, from which state he had served through the Civil war 
with an Ohio regiment. Mr. and Mrs. Russell Rowe have one son, 
Norman Chamberlain Rowe. In politics he is a democrat, though with- 
out aspirations for public honors. His fraternal associations are with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, with the Knights of Pythias 
and the Uniform Rank of that order, and with the Fraternal Brotherhood. 

Harry W. Beatty. California has gained national fame for the 
superior hotel facilities which it aflFords, and the best of provisions in 
this important field of enterprise are not lacking in the City of Santa 
Barbara, where the attractive and popular Hotel Mascarel contributes 
materially to the prestige of the city along this line. Of this ably con- 
ducted hotel Harry W. Beatty is fhe proprietor, and his long and varied 
experience in the hotel business makes him the ideal host of the excellent 
house which he now conducts and which he maintains at the most approved 
standard, the hotel being operated on the American plan and being eligibly 



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HARRY W. HKATTY 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 689 

situated in the heart of the city, adjacent to the principal retail shopping 
district and near the railway station. The house is one of the well 
established and carefully managed hotels of Santa Barbara, has seventy- 
five guest rooms and caters to a representative and appreciative patronage, 
the while its proprietor is one of the progressive and popular hotel men of 
Southern California. 

Mr. Beatty was bom in the State of Minnesota, on the 20th of January, 
1870, and after making effective use of the advantages of the public schools 
of his native state he entered the University of Minnesota, in the City 
of Minneapolis, in which institution he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1888. In the same year he came to California and became 
associated with the hotel business in the City of Los Angeles, his alliance 
with this line of semi-public enterprise having continued without interrup- 
tion to the present time and his experience, genial personality and marked 
business ability giving him prestige as one of the able and popular hotel 
men of the state of his adoption. Mr. Beatty established Jiis residence in 
Santa Barbara in the year 1898, and for the ensuing ten years he held a 
responsible executive position with the Arlington Hotel. Upon severing 
his alliance, in 1908, he assumed the proprietorship of the Hotel Mascarel, 
which he has since conducted with distinctive success. 

Mr. Beatty is popular in both business and social circles in his home 
city, is loyal and public-spirited in his civic attitude and is an active 
member of the Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce. He is affiliated 
with the Masonic fraternity, is a member of the local commandery of 
Knights Templars, and is identified with the adjunct organization, the 
Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

Henry Doty. A man of excellent business ability and judgment, well 
versed in all matters pertaining to the improvement of California's rich 
soil, Henry Doty, proprietor of a finely-bearing walnut orchard near 
Goleta, has contributed largely towards the development of the agri- 
cultural resources of Santa Barbara County, and occupies a place of 
prominence among the active and prosperous ranchmen of this section 
of the country. A son of Edward Doty, he was bom December 12, 
1855, in Santa Clara County, California, of honored pioneer stock. 

A native of New York State, Edward Doty migrated to Knox County, 
Illinois, in the days of his youth, and while living there was variously 
employed. Full of enterprise and ambition, and a leader among his com- 
panions, he joined the gold seekers of 1849, ^"^ as captain of a band 
of venturesome jayhawkers crossed the plains, his little company being 
the first white men to pass through Death Valley. The company mad^ 
its first stop at Newhall, Los Angeles County, from there coming to 
Santa Barbara County, where it disbanded. Edward Doty proceeded 
to San Jose, and thence to the mines on Feather River. Having accumu- 
lated some money, he returned to San Jose and there embarked in farming, 
first putting in a large crop of grain, in its cultivation being very suc- 
cessful. Coming southward to Santa Barbara County in 1876, he pur- 
chased 500 acres of land in Doty Canyon, near Naples, and was there 



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690 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

an honored and highly respected resident until his death, in 1892. A 
free-hearted, generous, hospitable man, he was ever ready to lend his 
aid to the poor and needy, and to give his hearty support to all move- 
ments calculated to advance the public welfare. 

Edward Doty married, March 5, 1854, in San Jose, Santa Clara 
Valley, Mary Ann Robinson, who crossed the plains in the same year that 
he did, although he was not aware of the fact at that time. Her father, 
Henry Robinson, was a pioneer settler of Santa Qara Valley, where for 
many years he carried on an extensive and profitable business in gen- 
eral farming, dairying and stock raising. Like other farmers, Edward 
Doty met with reverses, the second crop which he raised after coming 
to California being burned, entailing a loss of $30,000, on which he had 
no insurance. He was an up-to-date farmer for his times, and had the 
distinction of having brought the first threshing machine ever landed 
in San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Doty reared four children, namely: Henr}', 
the special subject of this brief sketch; Frank, now living in Doty 
Canyon ; Edward, Jr., who at the age of twenty-one years was shot and 
killed, he having been mistaken for a deer; and Margaret, widow of 
Daniel Carter, now residing at Brawley, Imperial County. 

Henry Doty received a practical education in the public schools of 
San Jose, and under his father's wise instructions acquired a thorough 
knowledge of agricultural arts and methods. Accompanying his parents 
to their new home in Santa Barbara County, he and his two brothers 
assumed charge of the ranch at Naples, and continued its management 
until after the death of the father, probably about ten years after. Mr. 
Doty then disposed of this ranch, and he and his brother Frank pur- 
chased his sister's property, situated farther up the canyon. When he 
sold his ranch in Doty Canyon, Mr. Doty lived for eight years in Santa 
Barbara, and then bought fifteen acres of rich land near Goleta, and in 
its cultivation finds both pleasure and profit, his principal crop being 
walnuts. On September i, 1916, Mr. Doty bought the historic Ranch 
Alamada Pintado a Ballard. Mr. Doty expects to improve and beautify 
the grounds and buildings and sow fields of alfalfa and in every way 
make it a beautiful and up-to-date country home. Mr. Doty's son Ches- 
ter will assume the management of the property and make his home there. 

On May 30, 1885, in Santa Barbara, Mr. Doty was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Lillie M. Williams, a daughter of George Washington 
and Charlotte (Cadogan) Williams, who came to California via Panama 
and Aspinwall in i860, locating on a ranch in Contra Costa County, 
where the death of Mr. Williams occurred in 1892. Mr. Doty is a direct 
descendant of a Mayflower passenger, while Mrs. Doty, through her 
mother traces her genealogical record back to the Cadogans of England, 
of whom Lady Ethel Cadogan was lady in waiting to Queen Victoria. 
Mr. and Mrs. Doty have two children, Chester Henry, bom Novem- 
ber 26, 1886. and Charlotte, bom October 20, 1895. Chester, a promi- 
nent electrician of Santa Barbara, married Miss Fay Johnson, and they 
have one child, Dorothy Fay Doty. He was educated in the public 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 691 

schools of Santa Barbara, in a business college and at Vandernailen 
Electrical School at Oakland, California. He now holds a responsible 
position with the Reynolds Electrical Company of Santa Barbara. Miss 
Charlotte Doty was educated in Santa Barbara, and now holds a re- 
sponsible position as district clerk and paymaster for the Sunset Telephone 
Company. She is a most estimable young woman, popular in social circles, 
and a valued member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Doty is 
actively identified with the republican party, and for fifteen years rendered 
good service as school director of the Den District, at Naples. Fraternally 
he has been a member of the Knights of Pythias for twenty-eight years. 

Joseph J. Whipple. Coming from Germany to the United States as 
an ambitious and aspiring youth of splendid character and marked talent, 
the late Joseph J. Whipple made a splendid record of achievement in the 
domain of expert landscape gardening, and he became one of the promi- 
nent and popular representatives of this profession at Santa Barbara. In 
this city he continued to maintain his home until his death, which was of 
tragic order, as he was killed in an automobile accident, on the 26th of 
July, 191 5, when in the very height of his strong and useful manhood, his 
death having occurred when he was thirty-nine years of age. 

Mr. Whipple was bom at Osterhofen, Bavaria, Germany, on the 19th 
of January, 1876, and was reared and educated in his native land, though he 
was but fourteen years of age when he severed the home ties and came 
to the United States, where he felt assured of better opportunities for the 
achieving of success through individual eflFort. None could have been 
more appreciative of the advantages and institutions of the United States, 
and he became one of the most loyal of American citizens. Mr. Whipple 
was endowed with distinctive genius along mechanical lines, and in the 
land of his adoption he was able to command the wages of an expert 
machinist. In 1893, at the age of seventeen years, he returned to his 
old home in Bavaria, where he inherited an appreciable sum of money 
from the estate of his paternal grandfather, who had been a man of influ- 
ence and substantial financial resources. After receiving this patrimony 
Mr. Whipple returned to the United States and resumed his association 
with agricultural pursuits, though he later developed his distinctive talent 
for horticulture and floriculture. As an exponent of the latter branches 
of enterprise he entered the employ of D. E. Richardson, at Riverside, 
Illinois, a suburb of the City of Chicago, and by his employer he was sent 
to California to supervise the improvement of the fine new estate, "Piran- 
hurst," which Mr. Richardson had purchased at Montecito, Santa Barbara 
County, a property now owned by Mr. Bothin. Mr. Whipple assumed 
charge of the landscape gardening and other incidental improvements of 
this estate in E>ecember, 1901, and he there continued his eflfective service 
until Mr. Richardson's death. Thereafter he passed a few months at 
Goldfields, Nevada, and upon his return to Santa Barbara he engaged in 
independent business as a contractor in landscape gardening. There came 
instant and appreciative demand for his services in the laying out and 
beautifying of many of the beautiful private grounds of finer private 



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692 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

residences in this section, including those of Miss Waring and Mr. 
Bartlett, and in 1908 he opened at Santa Barbara the finely appointed 
store, on State Street, that has been successfully conducted by his widow 
since his death. He continued his successful activities as a contractor in 
landscape gardening until the close of his life, and his tragic death was 
deeply deplored in the commimity in which his circle of friends was 
limited only by that of his acquaintances. 

Though he had no ambition to enter the arena of practical politics or to 
become a candidate for public office of any kind, Mr. Whipple was essen- 
tially loyal and progressive in his civic attitude and gave staunch support 
to the cause of the republican party. He was actively affiliated with the 
Masonic fraternity and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

At Kenosha, Wisconsin, on the 19th of November, 1895, was solem- 
nized the marriage of Mr. Whipple to Miss Annie S. Baker, who was bom 
in the City of Copenhagen, Denmark, a daughter of Henric Eric Alfred 
Baker and Amelia Sophia Baker, her parents having passed away there 
when she was a child. Mrs. Whipple has proved a very successful and 
popular business woman and has continued to conduct the store that had 
been established by her husband, their two children, George Edward and 
Theresa Matilda, being students in the public schools of Santa Barbara. 

Martin C. Hemenway. When the subject of consideration is those 
men who have through a number of years consistently promoted the 
development of Southern California and have made that portion of the 
state the main contributing force of the world's fine fruit supply, there 
should be at least some mention made of the part played by Martin C. 
Hemenway. In Santa Barbara County Mr. Hemenway is one of the 
leading horticulturists and farmers, and has one of the beautiful and 
valuable ranch properties in the vicinity of Goleta. 

A man of eastern birth, he has spent practically all his life in Cali- 
fornia. He was bom at Clinton, Wisconsin, September 16, 1869. His 
father, Levi A. Hemenway, now deceased, was a Pennsylvaniari, a 
farmer by occupation, and of an old American family of English descent, 
some of his ancestors having taken part in the Revolutionary war. Levi 
A. Hemenway himself was a soldier in the Civil war, having been first 
sergeant in Company D of the Thirteenth United States Regiment, and 
going through many of the hardest fought campaigns of the war, includ- 
in the sieges of Vicksburg and of Arkansas Post. In 1877 he came out 
to California, and after farming for many years died in 1902. His 
wife, Melvina (Wilbur) HemenWay, was born in New York State, of 
Welsh and English descent, and likewise of Revolutionary stock, is 
still living, making her home with her son Martin. 

For the foundation of his career as a successful horticulturist Martin 
C. Hemenway had a liberal literary education. He attended the grammar 
and high schools of Santa Barbara, and his education was completed 
in the University of the Pacific at San Jose. On completing his school- 
ing he felt that his duty lay on the home place, since his father was 
then suflFering from ill health. Returning home, he took charge of 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 693 

affairs at the ranch at the foot of San Marcos Pass. This ranch is 
in what was known as Indian Orchard Canyon. There he lived and 
carried on his work for a number of years, finally selling out in Novem- 
ber, 191 1, and buying twenty-six acres near Goleta, where he has since 
been a successful grower of walnuts, beans and alfalfa. While con- 
ducting the ranch at San Marcos Pass he cultivated the largest acreage 
of strawberries probably in all Southern California. His plantation to 
this crop contained five acres. For twenty years he was one of the 
heaviest growers of this fruit, and as it is a crop requiring a great deal 
of care during the producing season he kept at times as many as ten 
hands busy. His aim was to produce berries not only in large quanti- 
ties but of the highest quality, and naturally there was a ready market 
for his entire crop. The hundreds of crates sent from his place those 
years were sold through Mr. John Diehl at Santa Barbara, and this 
was a relationship mutually profitable and agreeable. 

In every locality in which he has lived in California Mr. Hemen- 
way has proved a booster for good roads and all public improvements. 
He has been too busy to make politics a diversion or a vocation, and is a 
man if independence in his views and voting. For three terms of two 
years each he served as school trustee. 

On June 8, 1892, in the house where he is now living in Goleta, on 
the old George W. Hill estate, Mr. Hemenway married Miss Minnie 
Hill. Her father, George W. Hill, -settled at Goleta in the early '70s and 
was one of the pioneers in this section of Santa Barbara County. The 
Hills are an old American family of English descent. 

Frank R. Simpson. An instinct and talent for mechanical lines 
caused Frank R. Simpson some years ago to leave a farm and establish 
a machine works in Goleta. He was limited by lack of capital and equip- 
ment at first, but as the output of his little shop was found by an increasing 
patronage to be more and more satisfactory, his business enlarged, and he 
now has a large anwunt of capital and is proprietor of one of the best 
machine works in Santa Barbara Coimty. Practically all the business in 
that line around Goleta comes to him. 

Though he spent only the months of infancy in Scotland where he was 
born October 6, 1872, Frank R. Simpson no doubt inherits from his Scotch 
forefathers the characteristics of thrift and enterprise which have brought 
him so far along the road of business success. His father Francis R. 
Simpson, who was bom in Scotland and died in California in 1896, was a 
farmer and on establishing his home at Goleta in 1873 ^^ls employed by 
Elwood Cooper for a number of years and afterwards by S. P. Stow, both 
of these being among the most prominent ranchers of this section of Cali- 
fornia. Later Francis Simpson bought forty acres in Goleta and conducted 
a dairy farm there until his death. His wife, Jessie (Milne) Simpson 
was also bom in Scotland and is now living in Goleta. 

Frank R. Simpson grew up and received his early education in Goleta, 
and was employed in farm work there and in that locality for six years. 
He then established the machine business at Goleta. His brother Thomas 

Vol n— 14 



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694 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

is associated with him in this business, another brother Henry is a machin- 
ist in Santa Barbara, and two brothers Reginald and William are employed 
by the Southern Pacific Railway. 

Mr. Simpson is unmarried. He is a republican, belongs to the Feder- 
ated Church, and is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and the Fraternal 
Brotherhood. 

Peter A. Swanson. A specially popular and successful exponent 
of the merchant-tailoring business in the City of Santa Barbara is Peter A. 
Swanson, whose ability and sterling character have here enabled him to 
build up a most prosperous enterprise, in connection with which he caters 
to a large, appreciative and representative supporting patronage. 

Mr. Swanson is a native of Sweden, where he was bom on the 7th of 
January, 1868, and he is a son of Sven and Metta (Matson) Jonson, 
his own surname being taken from the personal name of his father, in 
accordance with the ancient Scandinavian custom. His parents passed 
their entire lives in Sweden, where his father was a substantial farmer, 
and the youthful experience of Peter A. Swanson was that gained in 
connection with the basic industry of agriculture. He gained his early 
education in the ex:cellent schools of his native land, and was apprenticed 
to a tailor in Valleberga, Sweden. In 1890, shortly after attaining to his 
legal majority, he severed the home ties and set forth to win for himself 
a position of independence in the United States. He established his resi- 
dence in Wisconsin, where he connected himself with the tailor's trade, in 
which eventually he became a specially skilled workman, as fully attested 
by the substantial business which he now controls as a merchant tailor. 
From Wisconsin he went to the City of Chicago, where he remained about 
eighteen months, and for twenty years of his application to the work of 
his trade he traveled extensively throughout the United States and also 
in Mexico. 

In 1907 Mr. Swanson established his home at Santa Barbara, and 
six months later he here opened a ladies' and men's tailoring establish- 
ment. The finely appointed headquarters are in the Swanson Block, a 
building that is owned by Mr. Swanson and that is eligibly situated at 
the comer of East Ostego and Anacapa streets. This is recognized as 
one of the most artistic establishments of its kind on the Pacific coast and 
it has attracted much favorable attention on the part of tourists from the 
East as well as on the part of appreciative citizens of the city in which it 
IS located. In the carrying on of his extensive business Mr. Swanson gives 
employment to a corps of from ten to fifteen assistants, and while he 
controls a large local trade the major part of his business is gained from 
the tourists who visit Santa Barbara and who are impressed with the 
superiority of his products in both men's and women's fashionable apparel. 

In his native land Mr. Swanson served the allotted term as a soldier 
in the Swedish army, and he has served one term as vice president of 
the State Federation of Labor within the period of his residence in 
California, his political attitude being that of an independent repub- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 695 

lican. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, the 
Select Knights of America and other social organizations. 

Mr. Swanson was married February 20, 1907, to Mrs. Eliza C. C. 
Marsh, whose maiden name was Miss Eliza C. Cadwallader, daughter of 
Charles and Catherine Cadwallader of Springfield, Ohio. Mr. Charles 
Cadwallader was prominent in both educational and political circles, and 
was chosen by the people to occupy many positions of trust. He was a 
descendant of General Cadwallader of military fame. Mrs. Swanson has 
resided in Santa Barbara since 1883 and is an extensive property owner, 
both in Santa Barbara and other parts of California, and she has contrib- 
uted in a financial way to the many improvements of Santa Barbara. She 
has been a special help to her husband in building up his present flourishing 
ladies' tailoring establishment. Mrs. Swanson is a popular factor in the 
social activities of her home city. 

Joseph Archambault. Many stories are told of successful Cali- 
fornia men who starting on the bottom round of the ladder have climbed 
steadily to a degree of prosperity such as might make anyone envious. A 
more than typical case is that of Joseph Archambault, now living retired in 
Santa Barbara. 

When Mr. Archambault arrived in Santa Barbara forty years ago, the 
story is told on good authority that his entire capital amounted to twenty- 
five cents. He was eighteen years old at the time, and though he had been 
rolling about the world for some time he had accumulated very little moss. 
He was born in Montreal, Canada, April 12, 1858, a son of Joseph and 
Marie Archambault. Up to the age of twelve he attended public school. 
Going to Ross Point, New York, he worked there a year, in Montpelier, 
Vermont, a year, and was in Crown Point, now Burlington, Vermont, 
until 1876. 

After this uncertain and not altogether successful experience Mr. 
Archambault tried his hand in California. Almost immediately after his 
arrival in Santa Barbara, perhaps out of sheer necessity, he secured em- 
ployment on a ranch near that city. He was certainly a hard worker, and 
given a reasonable opportunity he soon made good. He remained on the 
ranch four years and then used part of his earnings in paying for some 
instructions in school at Santa Barbara, thus making up for some of his 
earlier deficiencies. 

After that for five years he was employed in the lumber mills at 
Eureka, California, but since then has lived in Santa Barbara County. For 
six months he was employed by R. K. Fisher, and then following a trip back 
East to home and relatives, lasting six months, he began farming on leased 
ground. That was his plan of procedure for several years, and with 
the capital thus realized he bought 100 acres. From that time forward his 
success was cumulative. One year after his first purchase he bought 200 
acres, and a year later 200 more. All of that he conducted as a magnificent 
farm and ranch under his personal supervision until 1912. In that year 
he began getting ready to retire, and sold 200 acres, and in 191 3 the rest 
of his place. 



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696 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Since coming to Santa Barbara Mr. Archambault has built a fine home 
in that city and is now living retired and enjoying the fruits of his earlier 
toil. He is unmarried. Since 1876 he has been a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Felows, and so far as politics is concerned is en- 
tirely independent in his judgment and voting. 

James Sweeney is one of Santa Barbara County's prosperous and pro- 
gressive ranchers. His place is located near Lompoc. 

He has lived in California only a few years, and his early life was 
spent in Ireland, where he was reared and educated and acquired the 
general experience which he brought with him to California. 

He was bom in County Donegal, Ireland, January 4, 1878, a son of 
James and Mary (Sweeney) Sweeney. His father was an Irish patriot. Mr. 
James Sweeney Jr. lived in Ireland until 1910. In that year he married 
Ellen McNulty. The journey to America was in the nature of a wedding 
trip. They arrived in this county July 16, 1910, and came on direct to 
Lompoc in Santa Barbara County, California. Here Mr. Sweeney spent 
several years as a ranch employe, and after mastering the various phases 
of California agricultural conditions he bought his present ranch of 360 
acres, and is making a very prosperous and substantial showing. 

Since becoming an American citizen he has allied himself with the 
democratic party. He and his wife are members of the Catholic Church 
and they are the parents pf four children, one son and three daughters. 

Nicholas Olivas represents one of the old Spanish families that 
have been identified with this section of California since pioneer times. 
He is a very successful rancher and horticulturist in Ventura County, and 
is one of the men who has done much to develop this county as a center 
of production for some of the California crops most in demand by the 
world. 

He is a son of Nicholas and Joesefa (Figueroa) Olivas. Nicholas 
Olivas, Sr., was bom in Los Angeles February 18, 1822. In 1832 his 
parents removed to Santa Barbara. There his father had charge of the 
Mission Indians for a time. In 1833 he came to what is now Ventura 
County, where the grandfather was given a grant of 2,000 acres, now 
known as the San Miguel Grant. He used this land for grazing large 
herds of stock, and followed the pastoral pursuits which largely pre- 
vailed in this section of California until comparatively recent years. 

On that ranch Nicholas Olivas, Sr., worked with his father up to the 
age of twenty-five. He was then given sixty-two acres by his father from 
the grant, and was successfully identified with its management as a farm 
and ranch until his death on December 31, 191 5. In Ventura County 
Nicholas, Sr., married in 1845 Joesefa Figueroa. They became the parents 
of fourteen children. 

One of these children, Nicholas Olivas, Jr., \f^s bom in Ventura July 
18, 1880. Up to the age of eighteen he attended the public schools and 
his early experiences having acquainted him with the management of a 
farm, he took most of the responsibilities connected with his father's 



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NICHOT,AS OLIVAS 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 697 

ranch and carried them until the death of the senior Nicholas Olivas. On 
the division of the estate he inherited his share of the sixty-two acres, 
and since then has bought the interests of the other heirs with the 
exception of those of his mother who still owns twenty acres. However, 
Mr. Olivas farms the entire place of sixty-two acres, and his main crop 
is beans. 

He is a republican and a Catholic. May i8, 1914, he married at Santa 
Barbara Miss Minnie Smith. They have one child, Nicholas Charles. 

Alfred James Avery. Possessing great mechanical ability and ex- 
cellent business judgment and tact, Alfred James Avery is numbered 
among the leading contractors and builders of Santa Barbara, and has 
acquired far more than a local reputation for skilful and durable work, 
having been employed in his chosen vocation in various parts of the 
Union, embracing many cities and large towns lying between the Atlantic 
and Pacific Oceans. He was bom at Southampton, England, February 3, 
1851, a son of Joseph and Sarah (Saunders) Avery. 

Educated in his native land, Alfred James Avery remained beneath the 
parental roof-tree until seventeen years of age when he immigrated to this 
country, crossing the ocean in a sailing vessel. Landing in New York 
City, he served an apprenticeship of three or more years at the carpenter's 
trade. Becoming proficient at his work, Mr. Avery sought newer fields of 
action in the West, and for four years followed his trade at Atchison, 
Kansas, after which he spent two years in San Francisco as a builder 
and contractor. Returning then to the Missouri River country, he filled 
several contracts, living there until 1889, when he went to Seattle, Wash- 
ington Territory, where a large part of the city had been destroyed by fire. 
During the four years that he remained there Mr. Avery did an extensive 
business as a contractor and builder. Going back to Missouri once more, 
Mr. Avery accepted the contract for erecting the Tootle Theatre in St. 
Joseph, and for eight years had charge of the Tootle estate building 
affairs. Completing his work in that locality, he located in Santa Barbara, 
California, which has since been his home. Mr. Avery has filled many 
important contracts in the county, having built the Country Play House at 
Montecito ; Doctor Poor's fine residence ; and many others of note, all of 
them bearing evidence of his mechanical skill and genius. He has special- 
ized in theatre building, having erected many of the finest in Southern 
California, as well as in other places. 

Mr. Avery is a republican in politics, but is too busy with his business 
affairs to take an active part in public matters. He married, November 
21, 191 1, Nellie Ruth Belt, a daughter of John and Nelly Belt, of 
Monrovia, Kansas. 

Francis T. Underhill. One of the foremost citizens of Santa Bar- 
bara, and a man of prominence in business, industrial and social circles, 
Francis T. Underhill is a fine representative of the energetic, far-sighted 
and progressive men that have been influential in developing and promoting 
the higher and more important interests of town and county. He was 



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698 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

born February 25, 1863, i» New York City, being a son of James W. 
Underbill, and a lineal descendant in the ninth generation from Capt. John 
Underbill, who liberally assisted in financing the Mayflower project. 

A native of New York, James W. Underbill came from substantial 
colonial stock. A man of integrity and ability, he became prominent in 
financial circles, carrying on for many years an extensive banking busi- 
ness in New York City, and at the time of his death, in 1867, being chair- 
man of the building committee of the old Stock Exchange in that city. The 
maiden name of his wife was Margaret A. Vamum. She was born in 
New York, and was a granddaughter of Gen. Joseph Bradley Vamum, of 
Massachusetts, who served as speaker of the house of representatives, in 
Washington, Pistrict of Columbia, from 1807 until 181 7. One of her 
ancestors founded the town of Draycott, Massachusetts. 

Francis T. Underbill was educated principally by tutors, the last four 
years of his education being spent in travel with his preceptors. In 1879 
he came with one of his tutors to California, and remained six months in 
Santa Barbara ; he was so pleased with the place that he passed the two 
following winters in the same city. Marrying in the autumn of 1883, 
Mr. Underbill came at once with his bride to Southern California and in 
the spring of 1884, invested in land, buying the Ontare ranch of 1,100 
acres, lying four miles west of Santa Barbara. Selling that property in 
1886 to the Pacific Improvement Company, Mr. Underbill purchased, in 
the same year, the El Roblar ranch, at Los Alamos, containing between 
5,000 and 6,000 acres, which twenty years later he sold at a good profit, 
he having in the meantime developed the property in the highest sense of 
the term, having devoted it to the raising of grain, cattle and horses. 
Neither that ranch or the one previously alluded to were fenced when 
they came into his possession, but he cleared and improved both of them, 
bringing the virgin land up to a high state of cultivation and produc- 
tiveness. 

Santa Barbara has proved so attractive to Mr. Underbill that he later 
purchased considerable property in Montecito, including his home in 
Montecito, he having practically deserted the city of his birth as well as 
the home which he has owned for a number of years at Oyster Bay, 
Long Island. 

During the last few years that Mr. Underbill has been a resident of 
Santa Barbara he has devoted his time to the designing and building of 
houses and gardens of the finer type, his work as a landscape and house 
architect having been largely in Montecito, notable among the number be- 
ing the following named : the Peabody home ; the Knapp Roman Baths 
and water garden ; the Joseph G. Coleman home ; the Wetmore home ; the 
Runyon and Douglas cottages ; several cottages of his own ; the Polo Club 
house, and others. Five large and handsome homes are now in process of 
construction for Messrs. Gavit, Boldt, Chatfield, Jordan, and Patterson. 

Mr. Underbill has been twice married, by his first marriage having 
three daughters, Margaret V., Katharine and Dorothy. He married for 
his second wife Miss Carmelita Dibblee, a daughter of Thomas B. 
Dibblee, a prominent New York lawyer who came here in the early '50s. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 699 

Her mother was one of the de la Guerras, a family identified with the 
earlier history of California. 

During his residence in New York, Mr. Underhill enlisted in the 
National Guard of New York, and as captain of a company of United 
State Volunteers took an active part in the Spanish-American war, serv- 
ing as a soldier for nine months. Mr. Underhill is a lover of horses, and 
spent twenty-five years of his life as a judge of horseflesh. In 1895 ^^ 
wrote a book entitled **Driving for Pleasure/' which was accepted as an 
authority on the subject. He was one of the organizers of the National 
Horse Show Association, in which he was an exhibitor for many years, 
and was a judge in fourteen New York Horse Shows. 

Mr. Underhill has always taken much pleasure in yachting, and once 
owned the old cup defenders "Mayflower" and "Mischief," and a number 
of other smaller boats. He belongs to various social and fraternal 
organizations, including the Santa Barbara Club; the Santa Barbara 
Country Club; the La Cumbre Club; the Santa Barbara Chamber 
of Commerce; the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons; and 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is also a member of the 
Union Club of New York, and of the Seawauhaka Yacht Club. In politics 
he is an adherent of the republican party. 

Edmund Waite Gerry. Various members of the Gerry family have 
been pioneer agriculturists in Ventura County, their residence here cov- 
ering a period of over forty years. School teaching, fruit and general 
crop raising, business affairs, have all occupied the time and attention 
of Mr. Edmund Waite Gerry, one the very well known and highly 
esteemed citizens of that county. 

His parents were Waite and Esther Gerry. Waite Gerry came out to 
Ventura in 1872. He had a varied experience before settling down in 
his real vocation. For a time he was employed by the Western Union 
Telegraph Company in erecting the line from Ventura to Newhall. After 
three months in that work he went up the Sacramento River and for four 
months was engaged in the salmon fisheries. He then joined a party 
that prospected for borax in the eastern part of the state. In 1873 he 
returned to Ventura County and thereafter made it his permanent home. 
The first year he rented the five hundred acre Collins ranch at Montalvo. 
He then acquired a claim of 160 acres at the mouth of the Eliseo Canyon, 
and farmed that for a year. The following year he rented ten acres near 
Santa Paula, and then for several years was renter of 100 acres of the 
Olivas ranch in the Mound district. Out of the proceeds of many years 
of successful work as a renter he bought seventy-five acres in the Mound 
district and was employed in its operation until his death on July 4, 1907. 

Mr. Edmund W. Gerry was bom April 2, 1868, while his parents had 
their home in Pleasant Hill in Cass County, Missouri. He was four years 
of age when the family located in Ventura County, and he has thus spent 
practically all his life in the West. Up to the age of nineteen he attended 
the public schools and then entered the Normal School at Los Angeles 
where he was graduated in 1889. Mr. Gerry is well remembered by a 



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700 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

large number of people who were at one time his pupils. He was a very 
successful and popular teacher. For three years after leaving Normal 
School he taught in the Mound District of Ventura County, and after that 
was employed on his father's farm up to 1897. Then for a year he taught 
at Piru in Ventura County, and for another year at Filbnore in the same 
county. 

Leaving the school room he then took charge of his father's seventy- 
five acre ranch and actively managed it until his father's death. He then 
inherited part of this and has since acquired it all by purchase of the 
remaining heirs with the exception of i2)4 acres owned by his sister. 
All of this fine ranch is now developed as a walnut and bean plantation, 
and it furnishes a very profitable business for Mr. Gerry. 

Besides his interests on his home farm he is secretary of the Mound 
Threshing Machine Company. He is a member of the Masonic order, a 
republican, and of the Congregational Church. In Los Angeles Decem- 
ber 25, 1892, he married Miss Jennie M. Sheldon. They have two children. 
E. Sheldon, aged twenty-two, is a graduate of the high school of Ventura, 
with the class of 1913, and is now attending Pomona College at Pomona, 
California. Claresta, the younger child, is in the Ventura High School. 

Walter S. Warring is one of the native sons of Ventura County, 
has been identified with the farming and fruit growing industry in this 
section since he reached manhood, and is now very influentially and suc- 
cessfully connected with the community around Piru. 

Bom on the old home place in Ventura County September 14, 1875, 
he is a son of that pioneer Calif omian and Ventura County citizen 
Benjamin F. Warring, whose career is sketched on other pages. Walter 
S. Warring grew up on the old farm, was educated in the district 
schools up to the age of eighteen and then found ample employment for 
his energies on his father's ranch. With the death of his father in 1903 
he inherited fifty acres. The management of that has engrossed all his 
time and attention. He has twenty-five acres planted in an orange grove, 
twelve acres in walnuts, five acres in lemons and the rest in pasture land. 

Mr. Warring is a member of the Piru Citrus Association, of the Santa 
Paula Walnut Growers Association, and is a very active member of the 
horticultural interests. He is a republican, and a Methodist. At Hayward, 
Alameda County, California, November 24, 1908, he married Miss Eloise 
Beem, a native of Illinois and a daughter of Mrs. Cara F. Beem, one of 
the pioneer school teachers of Ventura County. They have one child, 
Stephen Dudley, aged six years. 

Seth a. Keeney. California has drawn within its borders many 
valued citizens of worth and influence, men whose character and ability 
have been shown forth in splendid achievement in varied fields of human 
thought and action. The city of Santa Barbara claims as one of its 
substantial capitalists, influential business men and loyal and progressive 
citizens Seth A. Keeney, who is vice-president and a director of the First 
National Bank and who has other large and important capitalistic 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 701 

interests in this favored section of the state, his idyllic home, "Ivydene," 
being in the attractive little suburban village of Montecito, about four and 
a half miles distant from Santa Barbara. 

Mr. Keeney was bom at Jamaica, Queens County, New York, on the 
30th of March, 1864, and is the eldest son of Col. Abner C. and Susan 
(Ashby) Keeney. He whose name introduces this article was afforded the 
advantages of the Collegiate and Pol)rtechnic Institute at Brooklyn, New 
York, and later prosecuted a course of study in Bellevue Medical College, 
New York City, though circumstances and opportunities have led him to 
devote the greater part of his active life to business affairs rather than to 
the practice of medicine. 

In 1888 Mr. Keeney removed with his family to Denver, Colorado, 
where he became the executive representative of the Prudential Insurance 
Company, one of the foremost life-insurance companies of America. As 
general agent for this great company he continued his residence in Col- 
orado until 1897, when he came to California and centralized his interests 
in the city of Santa Barbara. He was a member of the directorate of 
the Prudential Insurance Company for twenty-one years, and his capital- 
istic and executive associations at the present time are briefly noted in 
part in the following schedule : Vice-president and a director of the First 
National Bank of Santa Barbara; vice-president and a director of the 
Press Publishing & Printing Company of Santa Barbara; vice-president 
and a director of the Bankers' Realty Company of this city ; a director of 
the Arlington Hotel Company, Santa Barbara; vice-president and a di- 
rector of the Occidental Life Insurance Company, of Los Angeles. At 
Brooklyn, New York, he is one of the owners of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 
one of the leading newspapers of the United States. Mr. Keeney is 
serving in 1916 as president of the Santa Barbara Club, besides 
which he holds membership in the Santa Barbara Country Club and in 
the California Club of Los Angeles. In the time-honored Masonic fra- 
ternity he has received the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite. His well fortified political convictions are indicated by the 
staunch allegiance which he accords to the republican party, and in his 
civic attitude he is distinctively progressive and public-spirited. 

In the year 1886 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Keeney to Miss 
Cornelia Huntington, daughter of the late Benjamin H. Huntington, of 
Brooklyn, New York, and they have two children, Miss Gladys Keeney 
and Ashby H. Keeney. 

Henry Pinney Flint is a pioneer of pioneers in Ventura County, 
With the exception of members of native families, few have lived con- 
tinuously in this part of Southern California for a greater number of 
years. Mr. Flint was here while the Civil war was raging, and for many 
years was identified with the sheep raising industry. He knew Ventura 
County when it was almost entirely grazing lands, and he had almost 
reached that point in life when he was content to retire when the new 
movement for growing fruit was introduced. 

The eighty-three years of his life he has spent amid varied scenes, 



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702 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

from the Atlantic coast to the Pacific. He was bom at Quincy, Illinois, 
July 29, 1833, a son of Ariel and Persis (Pinney) Flint. He gained his 
first schooling in his native locality, but when he was eleven years, of age 
his parents removed to Shelby County, Ohio, where he continued to 
attend such schools as were maintained at that time until he was sixteen. 
At that age he went to Ellington in Tolland County, Connecticut, and 
put in five years as a worker on a farm. His next experience was 
fifteen months as an employee in a woolen factory at Rockview, Con- 
necticut. From Hartford he crossed almost half the distance of the 
Continent to Iowa City, Iowa, working on a farm near there for a year, 
put in the following year at farm work and repairing a flour mill in Holt 
County, Missouri, and then going to Leavenworth, Kansas, which at the 
time was the great outfitting post for many of the Government and 
private trains which were crossing the plains to the Far West. 

At Leavenworth Mr. Flint hired out to the United States Government 
and was employed to dfive a six mule team hauling a supply wagon to 
Salt Lake City with soldiers. He and his party got only as far as Fort 
Laramie, Wyoming, where the summer was spent, and he then drove back 
to Fort Leavenworth. In the fall of that year he resigned his place with 
the Government, and again resumed work on i farm in Holt County, 
Missouri. 

It was in the spring of 1859 ^^^^ ^^- Flint came to California, making 
the entire journey overland across the plains with an ox train. Settling 
in San Benito County, he worked on Colonel Hollister's ranch, where 
the Town of Hollister now stands. He was employed in herding sheep for 
three years, following which he drove a band of sheep to Los Angeles, 
and remained in that vicinity until May, 1863. He then conducted his 
. sheep to Ventura County, renting 1,300 acres of El Rancho Santa Oara del 
Norte near \'entura. At that time his brother Benjamin T. was associated 
with him in the business. They kept their sheep on this ranch for a year, 
and Mr. W. R. Tomkins then joined them as a partner. The three rented 
the old Colonia Rancho, but after two years the partnership was dissolved 
and Mr. Flint moved his flocks to the Briggs ranch near Saticoy, renting 
that place for two years. Mr. Flint then took up a 160 acre claim at the 
mouth of Sycamore Canyon. This claim was taken away from him 
four years later by the Ex-Mission Grant. Mr. Flint next moved his 
sheep to the Paterson ranch near Hueneme for a year, and then bought 
400 acres of the Snodgrass ranch. After six years there he sold his 
lands and sheep. 

Such very briefly is an account of Mr. Flint's business activities as a 
sheep rancher in California. On the whole he made a decided success of 
the business, and when he gave it up he was in a position to take life some- 
what more easily. He then bought fifty acres on Ventura Avenue near 
Ventura and has since lived there quietly, devoting his land to bean crops 
and other general farming purposes. 

He is a republican and a member of the Masonic order. At Oakland, 
California, he was married June 26, 1872, to Miss Catherine Collins. 
Four children were born to this union, two of whom are deceased, Lena 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 703 

Belle, who passed away in infancy, and Harry P., who died at the age of 
twenty-one, while a member of the Seventh California Regiment at San 
Francisco, he having volunteered his services to his country at the 
outbreak of the Spanish-American war. Those living are Grace and 
Wm. Collins, both of whom are at home, the son having the active manage- 
ment of the ranch. 

Edward Romo. A highly respected resident of Santa Barbara County, 
and one of its most industrious and prosperous farmers, Edward Romo 
is carrying on general farming, including stock raising and walnut 
growing on a modest scale not far from Goleta. He has the distinction 
of being a native bom citizen, his birth having occurred in Goleta on 
February ii, 1864. 

Francisco Romo, Mr. Romo's father, was bom and reared in New 
Mexico, and there resided until attaining his majority. He came to 
Southern Calif omia in 185 1, and from that time until his death, at the 
age of eighty-two years, in 191 1, was engaged in ranching. He married 
Maria J. Eguerre, who was the first person of Spanish descent to settle in 
the vicinity of Goleta. She now lives on the ranch with her son Edward, 
at the advanced age of eighty-three years, being the oldest Spaniard in 
the vicinity. She has eight sons and one daughter, all residents of Santa 
Barbara County, her daughter, Mary, being the wife of C. L. Badger, of 
Santa Barbara. 

Having acquired a practical education in the public schools of Goleta, 
Edward Romo started in life for himself as a farmer, and as the owner 
and manager of a fine ranch of 146 acres, which he is devoting to the 
culture of corn, beans and hay, and to some extent in the raising of 
walnuts and cattle. In his political views Mr. Romo is a democrat, al- 
though not a worker in party ranks, and in religion he is a member of 
the Catholic Church. He has never married. 

Randal Gordon Baber. A skilful and prosperous agriculturist of 
Santa Barbara County, Randal Gordon Baber is busily and profitably 
engaged in the growing of walnuts on his well improved ranch, which 
is pleasantly located not far from the village of Goleta. A son of the 
late Randal Baber, he was bom May 19, 1858, in Missouri. 

Randal Baber was born in Kentucky and spent his early life in the 
Middle West. About 1859 ^^ came with his family to California in 
search of a favorable opportunity of increasing his financial resources, and 
having purchased a tract of land in the Santa Rosa Valley was there 
engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, in 1882. He was of 
Revolutionary stock, and while in Calif omia was quite active in public 
affairs, serving for several years as justice of the peace. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Louise E. Hampton, died when her son Randal was a 
small child. She was bom in South Carolina, and belonged to a family 
of considerable importance, having been a niece of Wade Hampton 
who served as an officer in both the Revolutionary war and the War of 
1812. 



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704 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Randal Gordon Baber was educated in the public schools of Sonoma 
County, living there until eighteen years of age. Migrating then to Ne- 
vada, he settled in Humboldt County, where for fifteen years he was 
successfully engaged in the cattle business. In 1891 Mr. Baber came back 
to California, and having secured his present ranch of ten and a half 
acres near Goleta has since devoted his time and labor to the raising 
of walnuts, as above mentioned. 

Mr. Baber married Miss Ella M. Kellogg, a daughter of Philander 
Kellogg, and a niece of Frank E. Kellogg, who for many years served as 
secretary of the Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce, and was an active 
member of the Walnut Growers' Association. Mrs. Baber died at the 
birth of their only child, a daughter who was named Ella May in memory 
of her mother. Mr. Baber is a democrat in politics, and as a man and a 
citizen stands high in the esteem of the community. 

Carlo Hahn. The career of Carlo Hahn, now a prominent business 
man of Ventura, is an expression of practical and diversified activity, and 
in its range has invaded a number of fields of endeavor, all of which have 
profited by the breadth and ability which are distinctive features of his 
work and character. Also his activities have carried him to various 
countries, both on this continent and in Europe, and have served to make 
him a man of broad and comprehensive information. While a resident of 
California for but five years, he occupies a well established place among 
its men of business, as well as among its public-spirited citizens. 

Mr. Hahn was born at Stuttgart, Wurttemberg, Germany, September 
21, 1876, and is a son of William and Margaret Hahn. His education was 
secured in the public schools of Zurich, Switzerland, from which he was 
graduated at the age of fourteen years, following which he entered upon 
his career as an employe of a large machine factory, in which he mastered 
every detail of the business from the bottom up. When he was seventeen 
years of age he resigned his position with the machine company and went 
to Genoa, Italy, where he became manager of a company engaged in the 
importing of oil cloth, silks and cotton goods. This position he held for 
three years, when the young man resigned and returned to Zurich, there 
being made manager of a shirt and clothing factory, a capacity in which 
he acted during a period of two years. Following this, Mr. Hahn returned 
to Germany and served his time, two years, in the German army, and when 
he received his honorable discharge again went to Italy, this time locating 
at Spezia, and being made assistant manager for the L. Merello Flour 
Mills. For six years he continued to be connected with this enterprise, 
and then was transferred to Alexandria, Italy, as assistant general 
manager of the "Societa Commerciale," a tuna fish company with many 
subsidiary companies, being identified therewith until 1905. The "Societa 
Commerciale*' then established a hat factory at Alexandria, and Mr. 
Hahn's fine business and executive abilities were recognized by his appoint- 
ment to the office of superintendent of foreign trade. In discharging the 
duties of this position, Mr. Hahn traveled all over the world in opening 
agencies, and it was in this way that he first came to the United States, in 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 705 

1907. In that year he opened his headquarters in this country at No. 220 
Fifth Avenue, New York City, the business being known as the G. B. 
Borsalino Fu ^^azzaro & Company, hat manufacturers. Mr. Hahn 
remained.in New York City for four years, but in 191 1 came to Ventura, 
where he formed a partnership with G. Ferro. While their interests 
are combined here, Mr. Hahn still maintains his hat business in the 
East and Mr. Ferro his real estate business at Ventura. Mr. Hahn is 
one of those who have taken a keen and helpful interest in the business 
affairs of Ventura ever since his arrival, and at this time is second vice 
president of the Ventura Chamber of Commerce. He is president of the 
Ventura County Rifle Qub and belongs to the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, and in politics votes the republican ticket. He 
received his final naturalization papers in April, 1914. In all respects 
he is an honorable and creditable representative of the men to whose 
enterprise and ability and character is due the present prosperity of the 
community. 

Mr. Hahn was married at Spezia, Italy, July 15, 1901, to Miss Teresa 
Ferro, and they are the parents of three children: Marguerite, aged 
thirteen years ; Mary, who is nine years old ; and August, who is eleven, 
all attending the public schools of Ventura. 

Edward R. S. McGrath. A resident of California for more than fifty 
years, Mr. McGrath has here been engaged in the practice of law since 
1888, and he has been one of the representative members of the bar of 
Santa Barbara County since 1890. With offices in the city of Santa 
Barbara, he has long controlled a substantial and important law business, 
and his prestige as a trial lawyer and well fortified counselor rests upon 
the firm basis of results achieved, the while his ability and sterling 
attributes of character have pven him secure place in popular confidence 
and good will. 

Mr. ^McGrath was bom in New York City, on the 7th of November, 
1853, and is a son of James A. and Priscilla (Taylor) McGrath, both of 
whom were bom in the city of Baltimore, Maryland — the former of 
Scotch-Irish and the latter of English ancestry. James A. McGrath was 
the incumbent of a responsible executive office in the ordnance department 
of the govemment navy yard at Philadelphia at the time of his death, in 
1864, and his widow long survived him, she having been summoned to 
the life eternal in 1891, her father having been captain of a packet ship 
and having been identified with navigation enterprise for many years. 

Edward R. S. McGrath was a lad of about ten years at the time of his 
father's death and was carefully reared by his devoted mother, who gave to 
him the best possible educational advantages. As a youth he was a student 
in tum in Erasmus Hall Academy, at Flatbush, New York, Brainard 
Institute, New Jersey, Fergusonville Academy, New York, Hudson River 
Institute and Qaverack College, at Claverack, that state, and in 1875, 
shortly after attaining to his legal majority, he came to Califomia. In 
April of that year he established his residence in the City of San Francisco, 
where he remained about three years. He then removed across the bay 



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706 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

to Oakland, later resided at Napa and finally he established his home at 
San Jose, where he served his novitiate in the work of his profession. He 
had given close attention to the study of law, under the direction of private 
preceptors, and he was admitted to the bar in San Francisco, by the 
Supreme Court of the State of California, on the 4th of September, 
1888. He continued thereafter in the practice of his profession at San 
Jose until 1890, when he removed to Santa Barbara, which city has 
since been his place of residence and the center of his effective pro- 
fessional endeavors. He has at all times conducted an individual prac- 
tice and has appeared in connection with numerous cases of importance, 
in both the civil and criminal departments of law, his law business at 
the present time being one of general order. Mr. McGrath has preferred 
to subordinate political activity and office-holding to the demands of his 
profession, though he has always been found as a staunch and effective 
advocate of the basic principles of the republican party and is significantly 
broad-minded and progressive in his civic attitude. He is a zealous com- 
municant of the Protestant Episcopal Church and served as Junior Warden 
of the vestry of Trinity Parish, Santa Barbara, at the time when Rev. Wil- 
liam H. Ramsey was rector of the parish. 

Rudolph E. Pfeiler. Of the many phases or departments of the 
agricultural industry in Ventura County, hardly any one surpasses in im- 
portance that of the bean growing industry. One of the most successful 
men connected with that specialty of Ventura County agriculture is Mr. 
Rudolph E. Pfeiler. 

A native son of Ventura County, where he was born October 10, 1884, 
a son of Louis and Caroline Pfeiler, Rudolph is a product of the local 
schools and has made a success in life by application of his energies to 
some of the staple activities of this section. 

He attended both the grammar and high schools up to the age of six- 
teen, and then went on his father's farm, where he remained until the 
age of twenty-one. Having thus laid a substantial groundwork for his 
independent career, he rented 100 acres from his father. That 100 
acres he developed as a beet and bean plantation, and in 191 1 he bought 
an additional 100 acres and since then fifty-eight acres more. All of this 
land now including 120 acres he holds by lease, is devoted to the growing 
of beans and sugar beets on an extensive scale. For a man only thirty- 
two years of age he has been prospered out of the ordinary, and still more 
can be expected of him in the future. 

Mr. Pfeiler is a Catholic and a member of the Knights of Columbus and 
in politics a republican. November 29, 191 1, he married in Ventura Coun- 
ty Miss Mary Seckinger. Their three children are Margaret, Viola and 
Ethel. 

Judge Daniel S. Brant. A public spirited and highly esteemed 
citizen of Santa Ynez, and a fine representative of the self-made men 
of our country, Judge Daniel S. Brant, is successfully engaged in mercan- 



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DANIEL S. BRANT, MRS. BLANCHE G. WHEELER, DAUGHTER, AND 
JUNE WHEELER, GRANDDAUGHTER 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 707 

tile pursuits, having through his own efforts built up a large and pros- 
perous business. He was bom in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, April 20, 
1843, a son of James W. Brant, whose father was a rich planter in Vir- 
ginia, owning at one time hundreds of slaves. James W. Brant was 
bom and bred in Virginia, but later settled as a merchant in Pennsyl- 
vania, where, at the age of sixty-six years, he enlisted for service during 
the Civil war, and served in the Northem army for a period of nine 
months. His wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Gaff, was a life- 
long resident of Pennsylvania. 

Obtaining a limited education in the common schools of his native state, 
Daniel S. Brant worked* as a farm hand during the days of his boyhood 
and youth. In i860 he came to Illinois and located in Canton, Fulton 
County. Soon after the breaking out of the Civil war he enlisted in 
Company I, Eleventh Illinois Cavalry, in which he served bravely for 
four years, taking part in the Battle of Shiloh, and in many other engage- 
ments of minor importance. At the close of the conflict he was mustered 
out of service, his discharge, dated September 30, 1865, being signed 
by A. W. Campbell, captain of the Eighth Iowa Infantry, who was then 
mustering officer of West Tennessee, and countersigned by Capt. J. A. 
Davis, who had command of Company I, Eleventh Illinois Cavalry. Re- 
tuming home, Mr. Brant worked out for a while, and was afterward 
engaged in mining in Colorado for a few months, but without sufficient 
pecuniary reward to warrant him in continuing in that industry. Going 
back to his old home, he leamed the trade of plastering and brick laying, 
which he followed from 1868 until 1896, being located in the East for 
several years. Migrating to Califomia, he located in Los Angeles, on 
July 15, 1883, ^"d ^^ter went to Santa Ana, and from there to Riverside, 
where he met with good success as a brick manufacturer and a contractor. 
Coming to Santa Ynez in 1888, Mr. Brant followed his trade until 1897 
when he embarked in his present business, which he is now conducting 
in a highly satisfactory manner, having built a large and constantly in- 
creasing patronage. 

An active supporter of the principles of the republican party. Judge 
Brant has represented his party at the county conventions, and has served 
as a member of the County Court Committee. For seven years the judge 
was justice of the peace in Santa Ynez, and had charge of the Santa Ynez 
post office as postmaster for eleven years and nine months, from 1904 until 
191 5. He is a valued member of the Grand Army of the Republic and 
formerly belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

At Atchison, Kansas, in 1867, Judge Brant married Miss. Martha L. 
Gay, who was bom in Ohio, and died at her home in Santa Ynez in 1908. 
Five children were bom of the union of Judge and Mrs. Brant, the eldest 
of whom lived but two short years. The four now living are as follows ' 
Charles W., engaged in the painting business; H. E., proprietor of a 
garage in Santa Ynez ; Carrie E., who has reniained with her father, and 
is ably assisting him in his business ; and Blanche G., wife of Ray Wheeler, 
bookkeeper for the Santa Barbara Lumber Company. 



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708 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Charles August Borgstrom has experienced about every phase of 
life in Ventura County from the early days to the present. He has known 
hardship, has lived in the extreme simplicity necessitated by the program 
of ambitious endeavor which he had formulated, and has also enjoyed the 
comforts and prosperity that go with the average conditions of pros- 
perity in this beautiful valley. 

A native of Sweden, born at Skonay March 6, 1849, ^ son of John 
Pearson and Chastie Borgstrom, he lived the plain and simple annals of 
the poor boy. In winter time he attended the public schools, and in the 
summer was employed at hard physical toil in the fields. At the age of 
fifteen he began a four years apprenticeship to* the shoemaker's trade. 
That apprenticeship was served in Helsingburg. 

This completed, and with a certificate as a master shoemaker, he 
emigrated to the New World to find better opportunities for a fortune. 
The first year he spent working at his trade in Brooklyn, New York. He 
then came via the Isthmus of Panama to San Francisco and after three 
years there came to Ventura. 

Mr. Borgstrom was for thirty-eight years a shoemaker in this county 
and by steady application to his work provided for his family and also 
accumulated those small savings of thrift which eventually brought him 
higher up the scale of prosperity. 

In 1885 Mr. Borgstrom made his first investment in land, purchasing 
twenty-five acres. While working at his trade in Ventura, he developed 
that land for farming purposes. However, up to 1902, prosperity seldom 
smiled upon him. He built a bam on his farm, but was unable to erect 
a residence, and he and his family lived in a portion of the barn for 
seventeen years. There was no water and many times he had to haul 
water in a barrel a distance of four miles. The beginning of comfort 
and all the good things that go with prosperity came in 1902, when a little 
later Mr. Borgstrom was able to erect his beautiful home on his country 
place, and he now has the entire twenty-five acres planted with walnuts 
intersected with lima beans, and is reaping abundant crops as a result 
of his years of toil and thrift. 

Mr. Borgstrom is a republican and a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. On December 15, 1877, he was married in Ven- 
tura to Addie Webster, a daughter of Aaron and Lucy (Ozborn) Webster, 
the father a native of New York State. Mr. Webster passed away on 
Put-in-Bay Island in 1872. In 1875 Mrs. Webster with her twin daugh- 
ters, Ada and Addie, came to Santa Barbara, California. Mrs. Webster 
passed away in Santa Barbara in 1881. The twin sister of Mrs. Borg- 
strom is the widow of Lawrence Holmberg and residing in Santa Barbara. 
Mr. and Mrs. Borgstrom are the parents of three children: Ole, thirty- 
two years of age, is a Ventura County rancher; Nina is the widow of 
F. M. Myers and living in Ventura; and Charles, aged twenty-two, is 
employed in Ventura. 

George A. Jones. The only capital George A. Jones had when he 
arrived in Ventura County on the 27th of May, 1879, was his experience 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 709 

as a farm worker, but as that experience had been gained on farms in 
the Middle West, he was unable to capitalize it effectively. 

For the first two years he was employed on Mr. A. Everett's ranch near 
Montalvo. By that time he was ready to start out as an independent 
farmer and rancher, and did this by purchasing forty-one acres in the 
Mound District. Since then he has bought and traded land and has 
become one of the very successful men in this district. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jones now own a fine ranch of loo acres in Ventura County, and it is one 
of the very profitable bean plantations. 

He is a man who has won a commendable station in life by hard work 
and much energy intelligently employed. He had to depend upon his 
own resources from an early age. He was born in Richland, Wisconsin, 
March 4, 1856, a son of Louis W. and Jane (Johnson) Jones, and lived 
at home with his parents until he was ten years of age. During that time 
he gained all the education he was to receive from public schools, and 
had some training as a farm worker. After that he worked out by the 
month on various farms until he came out to California in 1879. 

Mr. Jones is a republican and a Protestant in religion. In Ventura 
County, November 27, 1881, he married Miss Caroline M. Beckwith. 
They have lived and worked together for nearly thirty-five years and 
besides their home they have a fine family of three children. Frank, now 
twenty-seven years of age, is the active manager of his father's ranch. 
The others are daughters: Mrs. L. L. Dorveau of Ventura County and 
Mrs. A. G. Walter of Ventura County. 

M. L. Steckel. During his twenty-five years in California M. L, 
Steckel has had a great variety of experience, and altogether is one of the 
most successful men in the Santa Paula community. He has been actively 
identified with the oil industry in this state, is connected with several 
of the large corporations in Ventura County, is a successful rancher and 
water expert, and is thoroughly familiar with this section of Ventura 
County and is known throughout this territory as a successful business 
man. 

Born in Clinton County, Indiana, September 15, i860, a son of 
Joseph and Maria Steckel, he grew up in his native county, attended 
the public schools up to sixteen, and after that worked on his father's 
farm until he reached his majority. On leaving home he went into the 
wooded districts of Southern Missouri and conducted a sawmill and a 
corn mill in Camden County for some six or seven years. 

In 1892 Mr. Steckel came to California and located in Santa Paula, 
where he has since been identified with a number of representative inter- 
ests. About twelve years ago he purchased a ranch home about one 
mile west of the city, consisting of nine acres of good land set to 
walnuts and apricots, from which he derives a substantial annual revenue. 
On this place he has erected a beautiful home, which is one of the show 
places in that city. 

This energetic rancher has been connected with the Santa Paula 
Water Company for the past several years; acting as superintendent, and 
y<^ n— If 



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710 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

is one of the best posted watermen in this section, paying particular 
attention to the interests of the company and aiding much in the up-to- 
date operations of the big plant and service of the company. He is also 
actively interested in a number of important local enterprises that are 
doing much to aid in keeping the city before the world as a shipping and 
industrial center. He is president of the Growers Warehouse Company 
and a factor in local developments. Mr. Steckel is interested in the 
Faulkner Plantation Company, with large interests in Mexico, and has 
other **irons in the fire" which keep him busy while this section of the 
Santa Clara continues to spread and become more important. 

As a booster and man of affairs who is continually doing things that 
help this section Mr. Steckel is always to be found doing his share. He 
was interested in the distributing of the Ford automobile in this territory, 
having been a member of the firm of Steckel & Page, an agency that 
handled many Ford cars in the Santa Paula country. It remained for 
this firm to be the first to ship in a full car load of eight cars in one 
shipment in 191 2, and they went like "hot cakes." He is now engaged 
in selling the Allen car. 

Mr. Steckel is a firm believed in the future of this part of the country 
and never overlooks an opportunity to demonstrate that faith. He is a 
worker for results, and his achievements during the past twenty-five 
years stamp him as a man with a bright and interesting future. He is 
numbered among the substantial people of Santa Paula and Southern 
California because they have much'to do with the growth and expansion 
of the rich home territory. Mr. Steckel also has the distinction of having 
a huge mountain slide named for him, owing to his discovery of it. 
The muddy condition of the city's drinking water in April, 1909, caused 
him to make an investigation. Twelve miles from the city he found 
that a part of a mountain had sunk away, the pressure against an oppos- 
ing mountain of almost solid rock south of Santa Paula Creek pushing 
the loose formation in front of it and under the creek bed, raising the 
latter 200 feet into the air and forming a dam half a mile wide and 
impounding a lake 50 feet wide, 1,000 feet long and 50 feet deep. 

Mr. Steckel is an active worker in religious affairs, being a prominent 
member of the Methodist Church and a firm believer in the good to be 
found in the right kind of associations. He is district deputy of the 
Indei>endent Order of Odd Fellows for the term 1916-17, and politically 
is a republican. In Mulberry, Indiana, in October, 1882, he married Miss 
Carrie Webb. She shared in his work and in the making of their home 
for many years, and at her death left two children: Earle, who is 
twenty-four years of age and engaged as an oil well driller at Maricopa, 
California, and Elma, at home with her father. 

Oliver L. Reardon. One of the sound and substantial business 
houses of Ventura is the undertaking establishment conducted under the 
name of The Reardon Undertaking Company. Mr. Reardon has had 
extensive experience in his line of business, and prior to entering upon 
his career pursued a long and comprehensive course of training which 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 711 

fitted him in every way for the definite demands and responsibilities 
connected with the vocation of Sanitary Science, undertaking and 
embalming. There is no calling which calls for greater tact than that of 
the funeral director, and that Mr. Reardon occupies such a high place in 
the esteem and confidence of the people of his community evidences that 
he is possessed of just those qualities which his business demands. 

Mr. Reardon was born at Chicago, Illinois, February 15, 1874, and 
is a son of Patrick and Johanna (Dwyer) Reardon. Having parents 
who fully believed in the benefits accruing from a good educational train- 
ing, he was sent first to a select school in the Illiiiois metropolis, and 
then to Saint Ignatius College, one of the foremost of the city's collegiate 
institutions. After his graduation therefrom, in the class of 1895, Mr. 
Reardon secured a position with the firm of L. Gould & Company, 
wholesale dealers in woodenware and willowware, as collector, and con- 
tinued to be thus engaged for three years. His next employment was 
with the big musical house of Lyon & Healy, being retained as a sales- 
man in the wholesale sheet music and book department, and after seven 
years with that concern went to Kansas City, Missouri, where he entered 
the employ of the J. W. Jenkins & Sons Music Company, again as a 
salesman in the wholesale sheet music and book department. Mr. Rear- 
don remained with the latter firm for eight years, at the end of which 
time he returned to his native city and entered the Barnes School of 
Anatomy, having decided upon entertaking the undertaking business. 
At that institution he took the courses of Anatomy, Sanitary Science and 
Embalming, and was duly graduated with the class of 1910, almost imme- 
diately following which he went to Tucson, Arizona. There he entered 
the employ of his brother-in-law, John Reilly, who was engaged in the 
undertaking business, as embalmer, and had six months experience, and 
next came to California, where, at Santa Barbara, he engaged with 
another brother-in-law, Charles McI>ermott, also an undertaker and 
funeral director. Mr. Reardon acted as embalmer for four months, and 
at the end of that time felt himself qualified to enter the business on his 
own account. Having found an opportunity at Ventura, he came to this 
city in 191 1 and bought the business of J. A. Coates, which he has since 
conducted. Mr. Reardon has installed every modem appliance for the 
proper, dignified and reverent care of the dead, and his establishment is 
well appointed and tastefully furnished. 

Mr. Reardon belongs to a number of fraternal societies, including 
the Knights of Columbus, the Fraternal Brotherhood and the Improved 
Order of Red Men, of the last-named of which he is sachem. Mr. 
Reardon is a democrat and a member of the Catholic Church. He was 
married at Chicago, May 25, 1902, to Miss Mary O'Leary, and they have 
six children, aged as follows: Oliver L., Jr., thirteen; Mary, eight; 
Joseph, six; James, three; John, one year; Francis, born December 23, 
1916. The first three named are attending the Ventura public schools. 

Edmund O. Tucker. The various steps by which an enterprising 
farmer of Southern California progresses toward success is w^ll exem- 
plified in the career of Mr. Edmund O. Tucker of Ventura County. 



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712 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Bom at Middlesea, Somersetshire, England, June 14, 1870, brought to 
America by his parents at the age of seven, reared on a New York State 
farm and educated in the public schools up to eighteen, he spent another 
six years as a worker on various farms in the East. 

Coming out to Ventura County, he worked on a ranch near Saticoy one 
year, then invested his savings in twenty acres near Simi. With farming 
that land he was employed for some years. He then sold and returned to 
Saticoy, where he rented 100 acres from M. Cohn for three years. Since 
then he has been gradually purchasing and developing more land into one 
of the finest walnut plantations of the state. His first purchase was 
ten acres near Saticoy, shortly afterwards I2j/^ acres more, and all this he 
planted in walnuts and it is a part of his magnificent walnut grove. About 
that time he rented forty-five acres from W. D. Richards, land adjoining 
his own, and that he has also planted in walnuts. In 1903 he bought five 
acres across the road from his original place, buying from Mr. King. In 
1908 he purchased twenty-five acres adjoining the five acres last men- 
tioned from F. M. Smith, and in 191 1 his property was added to by the 
purchase of forty-four acres in the same Vicinity from W. H. Lane. 
These various purchases totals ninety-seven acres, and it is now all 
developed to walnuts. 

Mr. Tucker as one of the leading walnut growers of Ventura County 
is a director of the Saticoy Walnut Growers Association. He is also a 
director in the Saticoy Water Company. As a good American citizen 
he takes an active interest in local affairs, is a republican voter and a 
member of the Congregational Church. 

His parents were W. J. and Eliza Tucker. His father, who was born 
at Middlesea, Somersetshire, England, was reared and educated there 
and was a practical English farmer until 1877. Selling out he then emi- 
grated with his family to America, and bought 125 acres in Onondaga 
County, New York. He afterwards sold parts of that farm until he 
had eighty acres left, and he was employed in its management until his 
death in 19 14. 

At Santa Paula October 23, 1893, Mr. Edmund O. Tucker married 
Minnie M. Helmes. They are the parents of six children: Edith May, 
who is still at home, a graduate of the high school ; Herbert Leslie, aged 
seventeen, and attending the high school at Santa Paula ; Elizabeth Alice, 
a student in the Santa Paula High School ; Dorothy Grace, Mildred May 
and Helen Dorothy, all of whom are in the public schools of Saticoy. 

• 

Mariano Erburu. In Mariano Erburu, of Ventura, there is found 
a sample of that material which has brought Ventura County into the 
limelight as a prosperous agricultural and stockraising center. Endowed 
with average ability and backed by shrewd business judgment and deter- 
mination, he has worked his way to the possession of a handsome and 
valuable property, although when he first came to America he was 
possessed of practically no capital except that represented by his inherent 
talents and amibtions. 

Mr. Erburu is a native of Spain, having been born in the Province 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 713 

of Navarra, September 20, 1856, a son of Peter and Micaela Erburu. 
His father was a small farmer and the youth was brought up to agricul- 
tural pursuits, his education being confined to attendance at the country 
schools of his vicinity. When he was fourteen years of age his schooling 
ceased, and at that time he began to give his entire attention to helping 
his father and brother on the home place, where he was taught the methods 
of farming and learned to be skilled in barter and trade. Like many 
other young men of his country, however, he could see nothing of 
promise in the future for him, and therefore decided to try his fortune 
elsewhere. Naturally, America attracted him, and when he was seventeen 
years of age, in 1874, he set sail for the shores of California, and 
eventually reached his destination in Ventura County. He was energetic 
and intelligent, and soon found work as a herder of sheep, a position 
which he held for twelve years. In the meantime, as soon as he had 
found it possible, he got together a few animals of his own, and gradually 
added to his little flock, so that eventually he was able to give up his 
position and to buy a partnership in a mercantile establishment, with J. 
Feraud, under the firm style of Feraud & Erburu. After some years 
passed in general merchandising, Mr. Erburu sold out to his partner, 
in 1900, and rented 3,750 acres of land from L. M. Lloyd, and once 
more resumed operations in the sheep business, this time upon somewhat 
of a diflferent scale than before. In 1903 he bought this land from Mr. 
Lloyd, and from that time forward gradually gave up sheep feeding, 
going more and more into the general livestock business. In 1914 he 
Withdrew from the sheep business entirely, and now devotes his energies 
unreservedly to cattle feeding, at this time owning a herd of 300 head. 
His agricultural operations, as to the growing of produce, are confined 
to teans, of which he has sixty acres. Mr. Erburu is a practical and 
far-seeing stockman, who recognizes the drift of the times and who is 
quick to see opportunities. He has succeeded because he has persevered, 
and that whatever he has had to do he has done to the extent of his 
resources, never resting until his labors have brought him a full measure 
of success. As a citizen he has displayed his helpful spirit on a number 
of occasions. 

Mr. Erburu married at Santa Barbara, Miss Juana Orella, and to this 
union there have been born two children: Michael, twenty-five years 
of age, who attended the public and high schools, graduated from the 
State Polytechnic School at San Luis Obispo, California, and is now 
engaged in ranching with his father; and Miss Mercedes, a graduate of 
the high school, who resides at home. Mr. Erburu is a member of the 
LTnion Latin American. He is a republican in politics and a faithful 
member and generous supporter of the Catholic Church. 

Walter H. Duval. The raising of hay, beans and citrus fruits is the 
industry by which Walter H. Duval made himself a factor in the life and 
activities of Ventura County, and through which he has best expressed 
his own ability and has contributed his chief work to the productive re- 
sources of Southern California. 



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714 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

He was born near Saticoy in Ventura County December 28, 1875. 
His father E. A. Duval was an early settler in that part of Ventura 
County. Born September 14, 1834, in one of the Windward Islands of 
France, he is of French parentage and ancestry. When sixteen he came 
to America, spent a number of years in the State of Maine, and in 1861 
came out to California as a pioneer. He had some experience in the 
mines of Nevada, also in the grocery business, and in 1868 moved to 
Saticoy. He was thus in this country at the very beginning of that trans- 
formation which changed this section from a grazing district into fruit 
orchards. E. A. Duval, buying seventy-five acres, began setting out trees, 
and in time had his entire ranch devoted to such fruits as apricots, peaches, 
plums, pears, walnuts and other nuts, and citrus fruits. He bought when 
land was very cheap, from $12 to $20 an acre, and partly by his own 
improvements and partly by the gradual rise in prices his land was worth 
upwards of $500 an acre. April 15, 1855, E. A. Duval married Miss 
Artemisa G. Hopkins, who was born at Frankfort, Maine, daughter of 
Captain Smith and Susanna Hopkins. To their marriage were born ten 
children, the first three in the State of Maine and the others at Saticoy. 

Up to the age of fifteen Walter H. Duval attended the local public 
schools and then had the benefit of one year of instruction in Woodbury 
Business College at Los Angeles. 

At the outset of his independent career he rented 250 acres near Sati- 
coy, and was engaged in the raising of grain and beans there until 191 2. 
In that year he bought 227 acres from Hobson Brothers, and on that 
land he grows his crops of beans and hay. 

In 191 1 Mr. Duval and four business associates bought the Blackburn 
ranch near Saticoy. With this property as their chief capital they 
formed the Saticoy Citrus Company, of which Mr. Duval is president and 
manager. The 300 acres at the time of purchase were all farmed in beans 
and walnuts, but the entire tract is now developed to oranges and lemons. 

In 1912 Mr. Duval and his brother, Edward S., bought the Deacon 
Mose place of thirty acres, and this constitutes one of the fine walnut 
groves of Ventura County. 

Mr. Duval is a charter n>ember of the Independent Order of Foresters 
at Saticoy and politically he votes the republican ticket. At Saticoy De- 
cember 8, 1897, ^^ married Miss Jeanne Bell. They have one child, 
Laura, now seventeen years of age and attending the high school at 
Hollywood. 

G. Ferro. In that splendidly cosmopolitan population which is one 
of the factors of strength in the commercial greatness of California, can 
be found many men who by training and station occupied positions of 
distinction in their native countries, and are naturally prominent in the 
affairs which they have touched and influenced in California. 

One of these is G. Ferro of Ventura, a polished and scholarly Italian 
gentleman and lawyer, and now successful as a rancher, fruit grower, 
banker and capitalist. He was born in Genoa, Italy, May i, 1873, a son 
of August and Maria (Mombello) Ferro. He had the liberal training 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 715 

given to a youth of the best Italian families. From the elementary 
schools of Genoa he entered at the age of eleven a gymnasium, in which 
he was a student until sixteen, was then in the Lyceum Academy until 
nineteen, and continued his higher education in the Commercial Univer- 
sity until twenty-two. Locating at Spezia, Italy, he was engaged in the 
practice of commercial law there for ten years, and continued in the 
same profession for two years at Alexandria. For another two years 
Mr. Ferro was engaged in practice at the City of Rome. 

His coming to California was to represent in this state the Italian 
affairs in the great Schiappa Pietra Estate, consisting of 9,000 acres in 
Ventura County. In 1909, having settled the estate he bought 700 acres 
of this land from the heirs, and has since developed this as one of the 
notable plantations of the country, forty acres being devoted to lemons, 
forty acres to grapes, and the rest to beans. He also has a half interest 
in the Conception ranch of 4,000 acres at Conception, California. This 
large acreage is planted to beans and grain. 

Mr. Ferro is a director in the Bank of Italy at San Francisco, and is 
vice president of the Italian Vineyard Company at Cucamonga in San 
Bernardino County. At that place the Italian Vineyard Company has 
one of the largest vineyards in the world. Mr. Ferro is a republican 
in politics and is of course a naturalized American citizen. He belongs 
to the Catholic Church and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
At Alexandria, Italy, May 22, 191 1, he married Anna Cavezzale. They 
have one child, August, now one year of age. 

Theodore A. Kei.sev. For fifty-seven years a resident of California, 
Theodore A. Kelsey, of Ventura, was one of the pioneers in the field of 
bean-growing in this part of the state, although he now devotes himself to 
walnut-growing on his finely improved ranch of sixty-five acres, located 
near Saticoy. Mr. Kelsey commenced his career as a hamessmaker, but 
subsequent joumeyings gave him the opportunity to see the advantages 
of ranch and farm life, and the greater part of his career has been devoted 
to activities connected with the cultivation of the soil. 

Mr. Kelsey was bom at Rockaway, Morris County, New Jersey, in 
April, 1845, a"d is a son of J. B. and Delia Kelsey. His father came to 
California in 1859, by way of Panama, but after living four years at 
San Francisco returned to his home in New Jersey, where he passed the 
remainder of his life. Theodore A. Kelsey commenced his education in 
the public schools of Rockaway, which he attended until he was fourteen 
years of age, at which time he accompanied his father on the long trip to 
California. After locating here he became a student at the grammar 
school at Oakland, which is now the University of California, and at the 
end of one year gave up his studies to enter the employ of the firm of 
W. H. Baxter & Company, harness manufacturers, as an apprentice to 
the trade. He rose rapidly in the confidence of his employers, and in 1864 
was sent to Owens River, California, to look over some mining interests 
for the company. After nine months he returned to San Francisco and 
resumed the following of his trade, but in 1866 was again sent out by 



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716 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

the company to look after its interests, which this time consisted of its 
sugar plantations in Nicarauga. This business consumed ij^ years, when 
he returned to the United States, and, having decided to go into business 
for himself, opened a harness shop at Oakland, of which he was the pro- 
prietor for four years. Mr. Kelsey then disposed of his holdings and 
came to Ventura County, where he secured employment on a ranch while 
looking over the country with a view to settling. This property was near 
Saticoy, and Mr. Kelsey, becoming favorably impressed with conditions 
here, formed a partnership with his brother, J. B. Kelsey, and rented the 
Montalvo tract, consisting of 500 acres, which they conducted until 1876. 
They then gave up that land and bought the Jack Hill place, near Mon- 
talvo, consisting of 300 acres. Merely as an experiment, they planted 
twenty acres in lima beans, the rest being set out to general produce. The 
first experiment proved successful, and in the following year they devoted 
the entire 300 acres to beans and an additional 100 acres that they rented, 
but there was but little profit at that time in the bean industry, as hand 
hooks were the only method of cutting, while the beans had to be tramped 
by horses. A part of their crop they disposed of at 3 cents per pound, but 
the best they could get for the balance was 2 cents per pound, and eventu- 
ally the brothers decided that this was not a paying crop. In 1881 they dis- 
posed of their land and rented the Blackburn place, consisting of 316 
acres, which they farmed for nine years. In the meantime Theodore A. 
Kelsey had bought 65 acres near Saticoy, which he now has planted in 
walnuts, a crop which he has made a decided success. His ranch has 
modem improvements of every kind, and a beautiful home, situated 
in the center of the walnut grove, makes the place doubly attractive. 
Mr. Kelsey is known as a good business man, honorable in his dealings 
and faithful to his engagements, and as a citizen who assists all move- 
ments making for the betterment of his community. He is a republican 
in his political views. 

In August, 1876, Mr. Kelsey was married at San Francisco, to Miss 
Sophia Earle, and to this union there have been born six children: 
C. Earle, who is manager of his father's ranch; Mrs. Mabel Rugg, a 
widow, who is now teaching music and resides with her parents ; Addie, 
who is the wife of Ernest Duval, of Kingsburg, California ; Rita, who is 
the wife of W. J. Carman, of Saticoy ; Inez, now Mrs. Ernest Beam, of 
Saticoy; and Theodore H., aged nineteen years, who is assisting his 
father and brother in the work of the home ranch. 

Joseph Hobart was one of the California forty-niners, a pioneer 
merchant of San Francisco, but the last forty years of his life he spent 
in Ventura County. He was the first man to successfully grow apricots 
and almonds in the Upper Ojai Valley. 

The interval of almost an entire continent separated his birthplace 
from the scenes where he died. He was born in Abbington, Massa- 
chusetts, December 3, 1831, a son of Benjamin and Deborah (Lazell) 
Hobart. He grew up in a cultured home, was given the advantages of 
the public schools and the Preparatory School of Phillips-Exeter 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 717 

Academy at Andover, New Hampshire. He did not complete his edu- 
cation on account of ill health. Seeking a change and also being 
desirous of the excitement and adventure loved by every energetic boy, 
he eagerly accepted an opportunity to become a member of a crew on a 
sailing vessel which was bound for California and made the journey 
around the Horn. He arrived in San Francisco when that was still a 
city of tents, and in association with his brother engaged in the whole- 
sale boot and shoe business. He prospered in his business affairs and 
was one of the substantial business men who assisted to bring order 
•out of chaos in that city, serving as a member of the famous Vigilance 
Committee. He was also one of the founders and a trustee of the 
Mercantile Library of San Francisco. 

In 1862 Mr. Hobart returned to the East for the purpose of being 
married. He and three others chartered a mail coach from San Fran- 
cisco to St. Louis and they made the entire journey across the plains 
and over the mountains in twenty-one days and nights. The journey from 
St. Louis to Philadelphia was made by railroad. After his marriage he 
returned to San Francisco, but in 1864 sold out his interest in the wholesale 
shoe business, and went to Boston, Massachusetts. This journey he made 
by way of the Isthmus of Panama. During his business years in San 
Francisco he crossed the Isthmus of Panama no less than fourteen 
times. From Boston he removed to New York City, lived there 
until 1 87 1, and in that year returned to California, making Santa Bar- 
bara his home. His health being somewhat impaired, he sought a more 
congenial location, and in the spring of 1872 bought 450 acres in the Upper 
Ojai Valley tiien a part of Santa Barbara County. Part of that land he set 
out in apricots and almonds, and as already stated he was the first to plant 
those crops with success in that region. At the time of his death on 
September 4, 1912, he had a grove of fifteen acres in almonds and fifteen 
acres in apricots. Since his death his two energetic daughters have 
continued this branch of culture, and now have eighteen acres in apricots 
and twenty- four acres in almonds, and the remainder of their estate, forty- 
two acres, is devoted to general farming. 

During his absence from San Francisco and prior to locating in 
Santa Barbara he made two trips to Europe, one for pleasure, and the 
other one of both business and pleasure. Mr. Hobart in his younger 
days took an active interest in politics and during his residence in 
the Ojai Valley was a member of the Library Board, the school trustees 
and in fact took an active part in all matters delating to the community. 
He always was an optimist and his presence was welcome in all gather- 
ings. He was one of the most popular men in the valley and his death 
came as a shock to the community. He was not a self-seeker and was 
ever seeking to do some kindly act for his neighbors. 

The late Mr. Hobart was a member of the Masonic order, was a 
republican in politics and in religion the views as expressed in the writings 
of Emanuel Swedenborg he found most acceptable. In Philadelphia, 
January 16, 1862, he married Miss Elizabeth Hutchinson, daughter of 
Joseph and Rachel (Burr) Hutchinson, who were members of old Quaker 
families. Mrs. Hobart died August 6, 191 5, in her eighty-first year. There 

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718. SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

were four children, the two older dying in infancy and the two younger 
Gertrude L. and Margaret H. remain on the old homestead near 
Nordhoff, and have proved exceedingly capable in managing the 
estate. Miss Gertrude L. and Miss Margaret H. Hobart are 
both members of the Ojai Woman's Qub, which developed from the 
order of the Ojai King's Daughters Association, both incorporated so- 
cieties. Miss Gertrude L. Hobart was one of the organizers of the 
King's Daughters and she and her sister were charter members of the 
Woman's Club, which has a very attractive club house in Nordhoff. She 
was president of the King's Daughters Association for twelve con- 
secutive years, an organization which grew from twenty charter mem- 
bers to over eighty. In the Woman's Club she is a member of the execu- 
tive board and is chairman of the manual training committee. She was 
elected as a member of the several boards of trustees, to the positions 
made vacant by her father's death, and has faithfully endeavored to 
carry on the work in conformity with the views expressed by her father. 

J. H. Bays. In 1910 J. H. Bays received an honorable discharge from 
the United States army at the Presidio in San Francisco. His experiences 
up to that time had been in his native State of Virginia, in Tennessee on 
his father's farm, and in the Philippines during his military service. 

Becoming a Californian after leaving the army he was for a short 
time employed on Mr. Fowler's ranch in Ventura County. On April 27, 
191 1, he married Mrs. Minnie Edgar in San Francisco. Mrs. Bays owned 
two tracts in the Mound District of Ventura County, one of twenty-one 
acres and another tract of nineteen acres and this land Mr. Bays at once 
began farming and developing on a new and successful plan. In 1912 he 
and his wife bought fifty-five acres in the same district. This constitutes 
a fine ranch of ninetv-five acres, which Mr. Bays farms. Thirty-six 
acres are planted in walnuts intersected with beans, and the balance is a 
large bean plantation. He also specializes in growing the freesia bulbs, 
and has a grove of alligator pear trees. 

Mr. J. H. Bays was bom in Russell County, Virginia, March 23, 1884, 
a son of S. J. and Armelda (Fullen) Bays. In 1892, when he was eight 
years of age, his parents removed to Knoxville, Tennessee, where he 
attended public school, and in 1894 to Smithwood, Tennessee, where his 
education was completed in the public school. Later his parents removed 
to Blount County, Tennessee, where Mr. J. H. Bays lived until he was 
fifteen and attended the local schools. After that he was employed on 
his father's farm until he reached the age of twenty. 

At that time seeking a career of adventure and experience beyond the 
horizon of a farm, he enlisted in the United States army. He served three 
years in Company K of the Twenty-sixth Infantry, and by re-enlistment 
continued in service with Company E of the Thirtieth Infantry. Much of 
his time was spent in the Philippine Islands. As already stated he was 
finally discharged at San Francisco in 19 10. Mrs. Bays by her former 
marriage has a child, Ivan, who is still at home and is attending the 
public schools. Ivan was legally adopted by Mr. Bays December 30, 1916. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 719 

George N. King. In the citrus fruit industry of Ventura and 
adjacent counties there is hardly a more prominent factor than George 
N. King, who is president of the Fillmore Citrus Fruit Association 
and a large owner of property devoted to citrus fruit and one of the 
extensive producers in Ventura County. 

Mr. King has been in California since reaching his majority. He 
was born at Keosauqua in Van Buren County, Iowa, October 12, 1865, 
a son of Rev. O. J. and Caroline (Bell) King. His father was a pioneer 
minister of the Presbyterian Church and preached in many localities of the 
Middle West. George N. King attended public school in Iowa until 1875, 
and then removed with his parents to Marion, Kansas, where he con- 
tinued his education and also had some practical experience as a farm 
worker. 

Coming to California at the age of twenty-one, he spent the first 
six months in the mines of Shasta County, and then found employment 
on various farms both in California and Oregon. It was in 1894 that he 
came to Ventura County and settled at Piru, where he lived for six 
years and where he was part of the time employed in farm work and part 
of the time as clerk in a general merchandise store of C. J. French. 
In the meantime he had bought five acres at Bardsdale, and after de- 
veloping it as a citrus grove he made it his permanent home in 1900. 
Since then he has both bought and sold a number of orange and lemon 
groves and under his individual ownership at the present time he has 
considerable acreage of citrus fruit, being proprietor of the El Portal 
ranch near Bardsdale, comprising 160 acres and owning smaller tracts 
in the neighborhood. 

Both in the development of the citrus industry and also in other 
affairs he has figured prominently for a number of years. In 1907 he 
succeeded J. R. McKee as manager of the late Senator Bard's interests 
at Bardsdale, and continued until all the property was sold in 19 10. 
For a number of years he was secretary of the South Side Improvement 
Company, an organization which installed a complete water pipe system 
at Bardsdale. Later, associated with Judge Elkins, Senator Bard and 
others, he installed the Cieniga water system, which made it possible 
to cultivate to citrus fruits 500 acres of South Bardsdale. 

Mr. King was the leading spirit in securing the establishment of the 
Fillmore Union High School District, and is now president of the 
Union High School Board. He is a republican in politics and is a 
trustee of the Methodist Church at Bardsdale. 

At Piru, California, he was married October 11, 1896, to Miss Hattie 
Virginia Busick. Mrs. King is a native of Gold Hill, Eldorado, California, 
and a daughter of J. M. and Harriett Busick. She came to Ventura 
when twelve years of age, and after the death of her mother made her 
home with her aunt, Mrs. S. A. Guiberson, on the place where Willis 
Burson now lives. She was educated in the schools of Ventura County 
and the Santa Paula High School. At the age of twenty she learned 
the trade of dressmaking and followed it for five years in Piru. 

She became actively engaged in temperance and missionary work 
and was county president of the Epworth League Association for one 



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720 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

term. She is one of the charter members of the Pacific Branch 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of Southern California. She first 
took up the temperance work at the age of seventeen and belonged to 
the first young woman's temperance society organized in Ventura County. 
In 1902 she was elected as president of the county organization of the 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union and served four years. A lapse 
of three years then ensued, when she was elected to the iX)sition again, 
and at the present writing is the incumbent of that office. She has always 
been interested in the suffrage movement and probably has a wider ac- 
quaintance throughout the county than any other woman there. She is a 
capable business woman and independent of Wer husband's eflForts has 
acquired considerable property in her own name. This is all in orange 
groves (123^ acres) and in full bearing. 

She is president of the Spanish Mission Board and takes a great 
interest in civic work as well as religious. 

Mr. and Mrs. King are the parents of two children, Oona Caroline 
and Agnes Blanche, the older of whom is a graduate of the Fillmore 
High School and Miss Agnes Blanche is a student in the high school. 

Henry E. Peck. Ventura County as a business corporation has for 
a number of years entrusted its fiscal affairs to Mr. Harry E. Peck as 
county treasurer. No abler or more faithful public official has ever filled 
a place in the county's annals, and during a residence of thirty years in 
this state Mr. Peck has become widely and favorably known not only in 
his home county but in other sections. 

He was born and reared in a very interesting section of rugged West- 
ern Pennsylvania. His birth occurred at Mercer on January 21, 1857. 
His parents were George F. and Harriet (Stewart) Peck. 

In his native village Henry E. Peck attended the public schools until 
he was sixteen. Then seeking an occupation which would give him one 
key at least to the fortunes of the world he learned the trade of carriage 
trimmer and served his apprenticeship and worked at it until 1876. From 
that time until 1881 he was employed as clerk in a dry goods store. 

With this variety of business experience Mr. Peck made his first trip 
to the west, spending one year as a carriage trimmer at Humboldt, Kan- 
sas. After that he returned to his native town in Pennsylvania and once 
more resumed his trade, which he followed three years. After that he 
worked in the same line for six months at Carthage, Missouri, and then 
at Kansas City, Missouri, until 1887. 

The year 1887 marked Mr. Peck's establishment in the State of Cali- 
fornia. At Riverside he followed his trade for six months, was in the 
same business for another six months at Stockton, and then for four years 
was at Merced. 

About twenty-three or twenty-four years ago Mr. Peck came to 
Ventura, and accepted a place as editor and business manager with 
Ben A. Sykes, owner of the Ventura Free Press. Later for six months 
he was bookkeeper for the Southern Pacific Milling Company at Mon- 
talvo and then for two years was bookkeeper with the Patterson Ranch 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 721 

Company near Oxnard. On his return to Ventura he entered the offices 
of the Ventura Wharf Company for a year. 

In the meantime he was becoming more widely and favorably known 
as a citizen every year in Ventura County, had hosts of friends and 
acquaintances, and when he was nominated for the office of treasurer of 
the county his election followed almost as a matter of course. Since his 
first election in 1902 he has served continuously in the office, and all 
people who have any business relationships with the business headquar- 
ters of Ventura County know and are unqualified in their appreciation of 
Mr. Peck's services. 

He is a member of the Masonic Order, a republican in politics, and 
belongs to the Congregational Church. In his home city of Mercer, 
Pennsylvania, he married Miss Sarah Howell, who was bom in Newark, 
New Jersey. They were married May 20, 1880, and Mrs. Peck died in 
September, 1899. Five children were bom to their union: Mrs. Esther 
Rasey of Santa Barbara; Mrs. Nellie Middlecoff of Ventura; Mrs. Bessie 
Morris of Oceanside ; Harry, who is now twenty-five years of age and is 
following the plumbing trade in Ventura ; and Mrs. Mary Sexton of 
Ventura. 

Daniel Smith is an honored veteran of the Civil war in which he 
fought with gallantry and distinction for four years. He is also a 
pioneer of Ventura County, having bought land and begun farming 
operations in the Ojai Valley more than thirty years ago. His success 
in business aflFairs has been made in California, and he is a man of many 
interests, owning farms and stock in various business enterprises. 

A pative of Pennsylvania, he was born in Bedford County September 
15, 1845, and in 1851 his parents Morgan and Elizabeth Smith removed 
to Ohio. He grew up on a farm and attended the country schools 
until 1861. 

On the 23d of September, 1861, when a little past his sixteenth 
birthday, Mr. Smith was enrolled as a private in Company E of the 
Eighteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry at Camp Wool, Ohio, by 
Captain Taylor, and was mustered into the United States service as such 
for a period of three years. He was with that regiment in all its cam- 
paigns, marches and battles, being a part of the Fourteenth Corps in the 
Army of the Cumberland under General Thomas. A few of the gpreat 
battles he participated in shows the arduous nature of his service. He was 
in the battle of Stone River, the decisive engagements at Chattanooga, 
Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, and after 
the fall of Atlanta was in the campaigns through Tennessee culminating in 
the bloody battles of Franklin and at Nashville, where Hood's army was 
destroyed. On January 30,1864, Mr. Smith was granted an honorable 
discharge at Chattanooga, but on Febmary 16, 1864, he re-enlisted in 
Company C of the First Regiment of Veteran Volunteer Engineers. He 
re-enlisted at Chattanooga, and remained in service until discharged at 
Nashville September 26, 1865, just four years two days after his first 
enrollment. 



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722 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Having acquitted himself so gallantly as a defender of the Union. 
Mr. Smith returned to Ohio, and with his mother bought a farm and 
operated it until 1873. In the meantime, on December 24, 1866, in Athens 
County, Ohio, he married Angelena Eddy. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have had 
half a century of happy married life. 

In March, 1873, Mr. Smith left Ohio and moved to what was then 
the western frontier in Clay County, Nebraska, taking up a homestead 
claim of 160 acres. He had all the experiences which fell to the lot of 
the Nebraska farmer of forty years ago, and remained on his homestead 
ten years. 

Coming to California in 1883, he located in the Ojai Valley of 
Ventura County, and bought forty acres of the old Ed Ayers ranch. He 
still owns that property. He was actively engaged in ranching until 
1893 when he was appointed road commissioner of Ojai Road District 
of Ventura County, filling a vacancy created by Frank Maddox. He 
served two terms, a period of eight years. He was afterwards elected 
supervisor in 1902 of the third district of Ventura County and served 
two terms of four years each. 

Mr. Smith resumed ranching in 1910. In 1896 he bought ten acres 
on the foothills, and in 1901 removed to that land as his place of residence. 
His ranch is a mile and a half northwest of NordhoflF. Three acres of 
this are planted in oranges, and it produces some of the choicest citrus 
fruit in the state. Only recently Mr. Smith erected one of the beautiful 
homes to be found in the vicinity of Nordhoff . 

His other interests are well diversified. He is and has been for a 
number of years a director of the People's Lumber Company of Ventura 
County, is a director of the Ojai Light and Power Company, a stock- 
holder in the Ojai State Bank, and is president and manager and third 
owner of the Cozy Dell Eucalyptus Company, which owns 173 acres 
near NordhoflF now devoted to stock raising purposes. Mr. Smith also 
has a half interest in the Smith & Phillips Company, owning a twelve acre 
block of hill lands near NordhoflF. 

Mr. Smith is aflSliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
in Lodge No. 53 in Clay County, Nebraska. He is a member of the 
Jack Boyd Club of NordhoflF and is a republican. To his marriage were 
bom five children. The four now living are : Clara H., an instructor in 
the State Normal School at San Jose; Mrs. Frank Ayres of NordhoflF; 
Ira B., proprietor of a meat market in NordhoflF; and Eldred Elroy, a 
carpenter at NordhoflF. 

C. S. Duval. One of the oldest American families in Ventura 
County is the Duvals. Three successive generations have been working 
for the material and moral improvement and advancement of this section, 
and while reference elsewhere is made to Mr. Lawrence G. Duval, some 
mention should also be made of his father and grandfather. 

His grandfather was E. A. Duval. Bom in one of the Windward 
Islands of France September 14, 1834, and of French parentage and 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 723 

ancestry, he came to America at the age of sixteen, and spent several 
years in the State of Maine. 

Coming to California in i86i, he followed mining and the grocery 
business for several years, and in 1868 came to Saticoy in Ventura 
County. All that district was then a vast field of wild mustard. He 
began life here on seventy-five acres, and was soon developing an orchard. 
In time he had the land completely devoted to fruit, and though it was 
worth only from $12 to $20 an acre when he purchased it some of it 
afterwards sold as high as $500 per acre. 

On April 15, 1855, E. A. Duval married Miss Artemisa G. Hopkins. 
She was bom in Frankfort, Maine, a daughter of Captain Smith and 
Susanna Hopkins. There were ten children, and the nine who grew up 
were named Charles S., Carrie, Winton, Gertfude, Anna, William^ 
Walter, Ernest and Edwin. 

Charles S. Duval, father of Lawrence G., was bom in the State of 
Maine, August 4, 1858, was about three years of age when the family 
came to California and has lived in Ventura County since he was ten 
years of age. After leaving school he spent two years in the general mer- 
chandise business under the firm name of Crane & Duval. He then 
bought some lots from the Pacific Improvement Company with the under 
standing that he would build a hotel. That resulted in the establishment 
of the Charles Hotel at Saticoy, which was opened to the public June 2, 
1889, and was the first house for the accommodation of the traveling 
public in this part of the valley. It was destroyed by fire eight months 
later and in March, 1890, the construction of a new hotel was begun. 
Mr. Duval continued as the proprietor of this well known hostelry for a 
number of years. 

In 1879 he married Miss Mary E. Knox, who was born in Iowa, a 
daughter of John Knox. The four children of their union were: Elmer 
H., I^wrence, Melvin and May. 

Lawrence G. Duval. The successful management of an orchard 
of 215 acres in a community where competition is rife and high standards 
prevail presupposes the possession of a thorough knowledge of the science 
of fruit growing, as well as shrewd business ability. When these requi- 
sites are combined with the enthusiasm of youth and a helpful spirit of 
ambition, a harmony should result as gratifying generally as it is success- 
ful financially. Such a combination of characteristics have led to the 
success of Lawrence G. Duval, manager of a lemon orchard of 215 
acres located near Ventura, and one of the progressive and well- 
informed young fruit growers of Ventura County. 

Mr. Duval was bom at Saticoy, Ventura County, California, Decem- 
ber ID, 1884, and is a son of Charles S. and Mary Duval. The public 
schools of Saticoy fumished him with his educational training, and when 
he was thirteen years of age he gave up his studies and entered the 
employ of E. C. Crane, in whose grocery establishment he worked as a 
clerk for two years. The business was then sold to R. L. Owens, with 
whom Mr. Duval remained for a like period, and when Mr. Owens sold 



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724 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

out to Stewart and Sabastin, he remained in the same capacity with the 
new concern. Two months later, however, he resigned his position to 
accept another with the Saticoy Co-operative Store, as a clerk, and was 
identified with that concern for two years. During all this time Mr. 
Duval had carefully saved his wages with the idea in view of becoming 
the proprietor of a store of his own, and finally, with his brother, Elmer 
Duval, purchased the stock and good will of the Stewart & Sabastin 
interests and operated the business for four years. When they sold out, 
Lawrence G. Duval went to Spokane, Washington, where he secured 
employment on the stock ranch belonging to Dorman Brothers, with 
whom he remained two years, and where he received his introduction to 
farm and ranch life. At the end of that time he returned to commercial 
pursuits for a short period, going to Randsburg, California, and taking 
charge of the grocery department for the Rand Mercantile Company, but 
resigned his position after two months of connection with that concern. 
Returning to Saticoy, he became associated with his uncle Walter Duval 
in the management of a bean ranch, and after nine months thus spent was 
oflFered and accepted a position as manager of the 215-acre lemon orchard 
owned by G. C. Power and located in the vicinity of Ventura. The 
monotony which often ensues from the continuous following of a single 
line of work has never been a feature of the career of Mr. Duval. 
Gifted with abilities of a versatile character, his activities in the various 
lines of endeavor in which he has engaged have given him a broad outlook 
and knowledge of more than ordinary scope. He is one of the progres- 
sive young men of his community who is making good and developing his. 
community, and has always been helpful in public enterprises. 

Mr. Duval is unmarried. He is popular in fraternal circles, and 
belongs to the Camp and Encampment of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and to the Rebekahs. 

Sherman Day Thacher. The Thacher School for Boys, in exist- 
ence almost thirty years, has long since gained and still holds a place as 
one of the leading preparatory schools of the Pacific Coast. Many men 
prominent in business and the professions, not only in California but 
throughout the world, acknowledge their debt to the Thacher school for 
a wholesome education that has been not only a source of discipline 
but also an opening of the resources of broad and fundamental life. 

The Thacher School for Boys is located in the western part of the 
Ojai Valley in Ventura County, being situated on the foothills five miles 
from NordhoflF. It was in 1888 that Sherman Day Thacher, now head 
of the school, took up a homestead claim of 160 acres. Five acres of 
this land was set in oranges, lemons and grapefruit and these trees have 
long borne abundantly. The idea of a school was gradually developed. 
The first pupil came to the Casa de Piedra ranch in 1889, and while 
being fitted for college by Mr. Thacher, who is a Yale College graduate 
and a lawyer by profession, he also had the unexcelled opportunities 
for wholesome outdoor life. These two features have been developed 
side by side, thorough mental discipline with active training in the in- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 725 

vigorating sports and recreations of the out-of-doors. Other pupils came, 
the ranch developed into a school, suitable buildings and equipment were 
added, and year after year have seen improvements and additions. The 
old school and ranch headquarters were destroyed by fire in June, 1895, 
and the site was then changed and the new buildings begun with a more 
definite plan as to future growth. The general plan of buildings is a 
group of cottages surrounding a main school building. The school has 
not emphasized any one department, is not an institution for special 
training, and therefore the equipment has been maintained at a propor- 
tionate balance. There are facilities for the instruction of boys in some 
of the accomplishments of manual training, there is a library, physical 
and chemical laboratories, opportunities for musical instruction and appre- 
ciation, there are stables for the care of the horses kept by the individual 
students, and athletics has been encouraged, though the outside com- 
petitive feature has been carefully restricted. Besides the general oppor- 
tunities for camping, horseback riding, and other outdoor recreations 
afforded by the situation, the students participate in tennis, basket ball, 
baseball, football and golf. 

To comment at length upon the courses of instruction and the other 
opportunities afforded would be to belittle the essential purpose and the 
reaj work of the school. The school gives young boys, between the ages 
of thirteen and eighteen, a place to live, a place to grow and develop 
with appropriate supervision as to their habits and regularity of occupa- 
tion, though not with the rigid requirements of military discipline, and 
a place to profit by their association and competition with other boys of 
similar age. Its curriculum is life itself. 

The object and purpose of the school, as stated in the school calendar, 
is as follows : "It is the idea of this school to combine thorough educa- 
tion for boys to the point of preparation for college, with outdoor life 
in the peculiarly healthful climate of Southern California. It is further 
characteristic of the school that strenuous and sincere efforts are made 
to exclude boys whose habits or records are doubtful ; and if any boys 
of bad influence reach the school in spite of these efforts, they are dis- 
missed when their disqualifications become apparent. Much attention, 
too, is paid to the development of character and to the cultivation of 
good morals and good manners, and of a sane and well balanced view 
of life, that may enable a boy to attain to an effective appreciation of 
Vhat peace he brings to himself and what joy to others, merely by 
managing himself right.' The aims of the place are thus in three direc- 
tions: toward health and happiness, toward unselfish, manly character, 
and toward accurate, thorough, and self-reliant habits of thought and 
study. An object constantly in view is to help a boy toward the simplest 
way of living a happy, useful life — with other people." 

Mr. Sherman Day Thacher, head of the school, has had the asso- 
ciations of the scholarly and cultured life from early childhood. He was 
bom in New Haven, Connecticut, November 6, 1861, a son of Thomas A. 
and Elizabeth (Sherman) Thacher. His father was a distinguished 

scholar, was born at Hartford, Connect i^cut, attended local schools there, 
Vol. n— 18 



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726 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

and graduated from Yale University in 1835. For two years he taught 
in the State of Georgia, after which he went abroad for a number of 
years in German universities. On returning to America he became pro- 
fessor of Latin at Yale University in 1846 and held a chair in that 
university nearly forty years until his death on April 7, 1886. At New 
Haven he married for his first wife Elizabeth Day, daughter of Jeremiah 
Day, a former president of Yale. After her death he married August i, 
i860, Elizabeth Sherman. Her father Roger Sherman was prominent 
in the shipping business and his father, also Roger Sherman, was one of 
the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 

Sherman Day Thacher attended the Hopkins Grammar School in 
New Haven until 1879, and then entered Yale University, graduating 
in 1883. The following year he spent in the employ of W. J. Sloane & 
Company, carpet manufacturers, in New York City, and in 1884 entered 
the law department of Yale University, graduating in 1886. He prac- 
ticed law in Kansas City, Missouri, for a year, and in 1887 came to 
Nordhoflf in Ventura County. In the spring of 1888 he filed on the 
Government claim near NordhoflF in the Ojai Valley, and began develop- 
ing a fruit and general ranch until the school idea originated and gave 
him his real life work. 

Mr. Thacher is a member of the Faculty Club of the University of 
California, of the University Club at San Francisco, is president of the 
Boyd Club of NordhoflF, a member of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Political and 
Social Science. Politically he is independent. 

In Berkeley, California, June 24, 1896, he married Eliza Seely Blake, 
a native of San Francisco, and daughter of Charles T. Blake, a native of 
New Haven and a Yale graduate, and his wife Harriet W. Stiles, a 
native of Massachusetts. Mrs. Thacher is a graduate of the University 
of California. They are the parents of six children: Elizabeth, now 
attending the University of California ; George Blake, attending Thacher 
School; Anson Stiles, attending Deane School at Montecito, California; 
Helen Sherman, a student in Miss Spicer's School near NordhoflF ; Harriet 
Janet, a student in the same school; and Sherman Day, Jr., now two 
years of age. 

Harry S. Valentine. A representative of that broad-minded, intel- 
ligent and ever progressive element which is to mold the agricultural 
policy of Ventura County in the future as it has in the past is found in 
Harry S. Valentine, who is carrying on extensive operations near Mon- 
talvo, but whose home is at Ventura. Mr. Valentine's career is typical of 
those of many of the county's successful men. When he first came here 
he was not possessed of capital, but had boundless ambition, faith in his 
own ability and a determination to make a place for himself among the 
farmers of this fertile region. He passed through the stages of employe 
and renter, finally acquired a small property, and thenceforth added to his 
holdings, until he is now possessed of 173 acres, in addition to which he 



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has oTJur 'It' rt i- ih.ir make him t»i" ' .• ' = - 

comniui-My 

Mr \ alfiiM'ic \va< lM»rn al I'ilhnore, KunIi: . . . v ■• 

fuiy 8, jSf.4, aMil i> a ^^-u uf R. li ami .\f urc'irLt . ■ ' • • ■ 

liis Tiativo comiminity hv rtxcivtil hi^ tHUK^^ri'-n. *!'"•-'-♦.•. • ..• u 

,.M'l i!u-ii the hiirh .sciiool. ah<l ai llie age of t-ij^'p'^ -m ^ • -. > ?'.■ 

hjigtiin, Iowa, and ihere for one year i)ursui •-' a * •.!}..» :o ■' • i •; .. 

hiisiru'ss (olltj^e. With thib preparation, in i.--, !.< * .. .^ t . x . « .. 
I ount\, C alifornia, and for the following year wnrkci .in '\" ' "'i ^ .- '•(.•', 
farms, acquiring experience and gaining kno\vlt<1^t* a- t. * ir:- ^.r ■:. n-' 
tiuns and agricultural methods in thii> region. Next hv k •*' • i " ij-:! 
thai was ])art]y owned hy his father, vyho at that tinu uj^ :ir .; .- I '"« 
Angeles, Mr, \'alentine continued his operatiotis on this tract u' ti; ''- 
with some measure of success, thus acquiring >ufhcient capital to {■'•:* !^'i>«' 
.» one-half interest in fifty-three acres of land lying near MoiUaKo. At*i r 
a leu tnore years Mr. \'alentine'> affairs had adxantcd to such an extent 
that lie \\a-> ahle to huy not onl\ the other half interest in his original 
purchase, hut 120 acres more a^ well, thus m<tking Inms' If ir'lrj/^MideTU. 
lie now plants the entire 173 acres to b*-ans, a ci i]> \\ iU» whul. In- : i*^ 
na<l nuich success. Mr. \alentine has spent nciH^li time "m r. , » • ':^ i.i.iu 
'ind study, and this, coupled with his \ear.s of ex{>crience, nuk^.-- hini '.m*. 
iJ the practical agriculturists of jhs locality, and one who \> ai>le t" gi t 
i. rr.ll measure of results from lah'>r and capital expended. While he per- 
^01,. II\ ^nj)erinten(is tlie work d.>ne irr 1*'^ farm, he makes his home at 
\ r'.tnra. wlur*- he i,\\']^ a (»"ar.;.!'n! n-a.U;a» at Xo. 1339 Santa Clara 
stu t't N' I . \ /'• !ri'K- 1 . a !« '.•h .' an, hiu hi^ dkA l^rcii a seeker after per- 
sonal I u '^''intent n*i \\\t v\ i\ • i ;'nl»iic office, hnviiiv'^ i««-» n < onteiit to devote 
li'!j;-v-it to his auHiiduird opt rat tons. In partner.Onp wuii i ^mI':' 1 <'Mk. 
ht has been engaged v) \hr tlireshing business for tweti'y []\l - t:uN. and 
^.\vns a complete, motU rn onuv 

Mr. \ alentine was main«'vl at Montalvo, Ma\ ^o. i-^u. to >.''-s .\>i t- 
Wa'd, :nal thry have two ih-.dre!.' M'-ia, se\*'ntct!i \va * • •>! aj^e. .J.d 
h' -.il' six^ri-i], ho-h atteu'i!.-/ l^'gh ^.honl 

\*'' ' ii\M >iM!;i.>. Fiaiv-i'-nn \'M'> c-- * i>^y : . .<*.*: ke 'r ^i -mt-. 

:■• < .!"-rT)i' \^ 'Vwiv Sl.i«'l. 'a.''- 't tarn! ..-..! \.nw\\ h.md. iic ha.-. b<'eri 

t' ''-ii-' : 1 Iv ifi,"iiifnd wnh the fa'M;".'</, fjnt tjrowii.g .aiid iin^mrs^ .lo- 

'*'-•;' •' . t ni X'entura i onnt\ fur more than thiriv v 'T-. ind he now 

• ■»- ' 'H' (•* ti;f in«»^i \aln.Ju es»;iles h\ X^ntiua i *',].-' ^ .''d is being 

'' ■ .. ^' >'*':•: :'i. '.>'■"• U) i ia(kkniM' !i 1 Ml. .^^ . i'.i'mI. .\:. \ 4. 1852, 
a » •• •* t 'i:^< - •*: '' !'''» 1 ^''icIK. Ih w r«..T..' <:•..' r<kt' tted in 
>••.♦'.■■' '•:>, '. '■ ! u, drt H^c of f" >•• t.;- ;.' ' 'I :c' !r..'i earning 

-I ■ - ;• ..\ !•'••■>• -! , . t '^ k' 'I .au f'.r :-..• 1 1 ,t^! •:- .< ,.t T-'c age of 

I ' !<■".. :^ •<► :- ,j'.. :: ^,t,, < .■•Mi^y in '>i;*_- h(- .i,, t t.' 1 ."..-litr James 
wt-if ' •','» i '• t « ii I •, : i\] T.-ar < oi'ii.t'-iui »i':"! iS7';. when Wdliam 
came to \t:i*u 1 v-imi^ i* •' 'r..t«-<! ia:'.iM:g ^i r' tn twIm ilv in the Santa 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 727 

has other interests that make him one of the substantial men of his 
community. 

Mr. Valentine was bom at Fillmore, Rushford County, Minnesota, 
July 8, 1864, and is a son of R. H. and Margaret (Petre) Valentine. In 
his native community he received his education, first attending the graded 
and then the high school, and at the age of eighteen years went to Bur- 
lington, Iowa, and there for one year pursued a commercial course in a 
business college. With this preparation, in 1887 he came to Ventura 
County, California, and for the following year worked around on various 
farms, acquiring experience and gaining knowledge as to farming condi- 
tions and agricultural methods in this region. Next he rented some land 
that was partly owned by his father, who at that time was living at Los 
Angeles. Mr. Valentine continued his operations on this tract until 1896, 
with some measure of success, thus acquiring sufficient capital to purchase 
a one-half interest in fifty-three acres of land lying near Montalvo. After 
a few more years Mr. Valentine's affairs had advanced to such an extent 
that he was able to buy not only the other half-interest in his original 
purchase, but 120 acres more as well, thus making himself independent. 
He now plants the entire 173 acres to beans, a crop with which he has 
had much success. Mr. Valentine has spent much- time in investigation 
and study, and this, coupled with his years of experience, makes him one 
of the practical agriculturists of his locality, and one who is able to get 
a full measure of results from labor and capital expended. While he per- 
sonally superintends the work done on his farm, he makes his home at 
Ventura, where he owns a beautiful residence at No. 1339 Santa Qara 
Street. Mr. Valentine is a republican, but has not been a seeker after per- 
sonal preferment in the way of public office, having been content to devote 
himself to his agricultural operations. In partnership with George Cook, 
he has been engaged in the threshing business for twenty-five years, and 
owns a complete, modern outfit. 

Mr. Valentine was married at Montalvo, May 30, 1894, to Miss Alice 
Ward, and they have two children: Alma, seventeen years of age, and 
Frank, sixteen, both attending high school. 

William Shiells. Forty-four years ago (1872) after he first came 
to California William Shiells was a farm and ranch hand. He has been 
continuously identified with the farming, fruit growing and business de- 
velopment of Ventura County for more than thirty years, and he now 
owns one of the most valuable estates in Ventura County and is being 
rapidly made wealthy by the oil produced on his farm. 

He is a Scotchman, born in Haddingtonshire, Scotland, May 4, 1852, 
a son of Francis and Helen Shiells. He was reared and educated in 
Scotland, attending school to the age of fourteen, and after that earning 
a living by farm work until he set out for the United States at the age of 
twenty. 

Coming to Santa Barbara County in 1872 he and his brother James 
were together on a farm near Carpinteria until 1879, when William 
came to Ventura County and started farming independently in the Santa 



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728 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Clara Valley. In 1884 his brother James again joined him, and the two 
acquired and purchased 1,200 acres near Fillmore. That large property 
they devoted to stock raising purposes for a number of years, but they 
now have twenty acres of this planted in oranges, forty acres in lemons, 
and ten acres in walnut3. The brothers have made the ranch pay large 
dividends both in stock and fruit, and in 1910 James and William Shiells 
leased 880 acres to the Montebello Oil Company. The royalties from 
the oil produced on this land now constitute a magnificent income. The 
oil produced from this land is among the highest gravity oils in the state 
and over eighty wells in the group are now producing. The oil is 
manufactured into the famous Ventura gasoline known all over the 
United States. 

William Shiells is a director in the Fillmore State Bank of Fillmore, 
president of the Fillmore Improvement Company, and in 1914 was 
elected supervisor of Ventura County. He is a republican in politics, and 
has taken an active part in local improvement, particularly as relating to 
the good roads of the county. Mr. Shiells is a Mason and a Knight 
Templar. 

On November 9, 1893, at Ventura he married Miss Sarah Thompson, 
a native of County of Cumberland, England, a daughter of Jeremiah and 
Ann Thompson, and came to California in 1892. They are the parents 
of four children: Helen is now attending Mills College at Oakland, 
California. James F., bom September 20, 1898, is a graduate of the 
Fillmore High School and is a student in the University of California. 
The two younger sons are Lester T., born December 20, 1901, and Wil- 
liam N., Jr., born July 21, 1903, both of whom are in the public schools 
at Fillmore. 

Richard Stephens. While many large individual fortunes have 
been brought out to California for investment and development of the 
varied resources of the state, it is noteworthy that many of the most sub- 
stantial men of Ventura County have made their start in this state just 
about even with the world, and by hard work and taking advantage of 
opportunities have gained prominence and prosperity. 

An instance is the case of Richard Stephens. A young man of about 
twenty or twenty-one, when he came to Hollywood, California, he spent 
a year on a ranch, and then became clerk in the general merchandise store 
of J. Duncan at Fillmore, California. A year later he acquired an inter- 
est in the business, and the firm name was changed to Duncan and 
Stephens. About a year and a half later Mr. Duncan died, and the entire 
business was acquired by Mr. Stephens. At that time the store was 
located on the southeast corner of Central and Main streets. After 
changing the name to ''Richard Stephens, General Merchandise," he 
bought a block of land 100 by 125 feet on the southwest comer of Central 
and Main streets, and there erected a commodious building, in which he 
installed his stock of merchandise, and for about fifteen years continued 
meeting the demands of the large and increasing trade. He finally sold 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 729 

his store to the firm of Cornelius & Hawthorne, the latter of whom still 
conducts it. 

From 1897 until March, 1915, Mr. Stephens served as postmaster of 
Fillmore, and although a republican received his appointment by Cleve- 
land, and retired during the administration of Wilson. In recent years he 
has been one of the leading business factors in the town. In 1900 he 
established the Fillmore Warehouse Company, for the storing of the 
products of the community, and sold that out in 191 1. He was one of the 
organizers and was a director of the Fillmore State Bank until 191 3, and 
after selling his interests in that institution he and others organized the 
Farmers and Merchants Bank of Santa Paula and Fillmore. He is still 
a director in that bank. Mr. Stephens has one of the most attractive 
country homes in the vicinity of Fillmore. In 1904 he bought eleven and 
a half acres near Fillmore which he has developed into one of the finest 
lemon and orange groves in the county. In 191 3 he bought twenty-two 
acres additional, planting it to lemons and oranges, and it promises to 
become one of the show orchards in the district. 

Richard Stephens was born in Glasgow, Scotland, August 31, 1870, 
a son of John G. and Mary C. Stephens. He attended the public schools 
of his native city up to the age of fourteen, and then learned business as 
clerk in the offices of the Anchor Line Steamship Company at Dundee, 
Scotland, where he remained four and a half years. The company then 
transferred him to Leghorn, Italy, and he remained there a year and a 
half as assistant manager. It was on resigning this position that he came 
to America and began his career in California. 

Mr. Stephens is a Scottish Rite Mason, also a member in the York 
Rite bodies, and of the Mystic Shrine. At San Diego, California, Decem- 
ber 25, 1903, he married Miss Stella F. Warburton, a native of Nevada 
and a daughter of Thomas Warburton, one of the pioneers of California 
and Nevada, coming around Cape Horn in 1850. Mr. Warburton early 
turned his attention to affairs in Nevada, first engaging in mining and 
later in the mercantile business. He was an influential man in the early 
days of Nevada and occupied several positions of political trust and 
importance. In about 1898 he retired and made his home in San Diego, 
where he now resides. 

Idell Guiberson, of Santa Paula, is one of the veteran oil well men 
of California, having done his part as a constructive worker in the 
development of the great oil resources of this state. His experience in 
the industry, however, is by no means confined to California, since he 
has followed prospecting and various other lines of business in prac- 
tically every state of the west. 

A native son of California himself, he represents one of the earliest 
families, dating back to the gold days, and also very early settled in 
Ventura County. His grandfather, Rev. John W. Guiberson, crossed 
the plains in 1850. He was a Methodist minister, and one of the few 
ministers of any religion who ventured into the wild and reckless life 
of early California. He preached the Gospel in Grass Valley, Ukiah, 



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730 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

and other parts of the state, and during the early *70s came to Ventura 
County and continued the active work of the ministry all over that sec- 
tion of country until his death. 

The late Dr. Simon Peter Guiberson, father of IdeU, was also a 
noted Califomian. He was quite young when he came, in 1850, with 
his parents across the plains to California. That journey was made 
in a 500 wagon train, one of the largest individual parties that ever 
came to the state in the early days. The Guibersons settled in Grass 
Valley and there Simon Peter practiced medicine for a few years, later 
moved to Lake County, where in addition to his practice he conducted 
a drug store, and in i86g he came to \^entura and established one of the 
first, if not the first, drug stores in that town. He also practiced medi- 
cine until 1874, in which year he removed to Santa Paula and conducted 
a drug business, attended his patients as a medical practitioner and also 
did government surveying. In 1886, turning over his medical prac- 
tice to Dr. D. W. Mott, he turned his versatile talents to still another 
profession, and was engaged in the practice of law until his death. He 
was a man of tremendous activity, was stirred by impulses of deep 
generosity and sympathy, and his life was one of the most useful ever 
passed in this section of the state. Due to his influence a great many 
people came to Santa Paula, and he took an active part in the develop- 
ment of the surrounding country. Doctor Guiberson was married in 
Napa County, to Miss Lou Eddington, and of their five children two 
are living, Mrs. Maude Youngken of Santa Paula, and IdeU Guiberson. 

Mr. IdeU Guiberson was born in Lake County, California, April 24, 
1866, received his first training in the public schools of Ventura, and 
from 1874 to 1883 attended public school at Santa Paula. 

On leaving school he became connected with one of the pioneer oil 
development enterprises of the state. He was employed by the Hardi- 
son-Stewart Oil Company in their oil fields until 1886. He then took 
up a 3,000 acre claim of Government pasture land near Santa Paula, 
and was engaged in the stock business there untU 1888, when he sold 
his land and again returned to the oil fields. He worked as a driller 
for various companies having headquarters in Los Angeles, and in 
1889 became a drilleit for the Ventura Oil Company near Santa Paula. 
In 1898 he returned to Los Angeles and worked in and around that 
city in the service of various oil companies for ten years. Leaving Cali- 
fornia Mr. Guiberson bought up some timber lands near Medford, Ore- 
gon, and was actively identified with the lumber industry for one year. 
Selling out, he began traveling as a prospector for oU and gold and since 
then has covered every state west of the Mississippi River. In Septem- 
ber, 1916, he returned to Santa Paula, and since then has been driUing 
oil wells for himself. He is also developing some oU properties which 
he holds under lease. 

Mr. Guiberson is a member of the Knights of Pythias, is a demo- 
crat, and on December 23, 1888, at Los Angeles he married Miss Carrie 
A. Smith, a native of New Jersey and daughter of J. W. Smith, a mer- 
chant of Medford Oregon. They are the parents of two children. Madge 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 731 

is court reporter in Medford, Oregon. Wallace is connected with the 
Home Oil Company, adjoining the Montebello, near Fillmore, California. 

George W. Faulkner. Southern California has always been a para- 
dise in climate, but that wealth of fruit and general agricultural crops by 
which this portion of the state is now best known to the world is the 
result of a long period of experimentation and of shrewd enterprise 
directed by a large number of progressive Americans. 

It is of one of the pioneers in several branches of Southern CaHfomia 
agriculture and horticulture that this article is to speak. 

A little more than forty years ago, January i, 1876, George W. Faulk- 
ner came to Ventura County and bought seventy-five acres in the Santa 
Qara Valley, a portion of the old Santa Clara del Norte ranch, situated 
on the south side of the river where El Rio now stands. At that time 
George W. Faulkner was comparatively unacquainted with California 
resources and conditions, and his early experience had been gained as a 
farmer in the Middle West. For three years he used his land in the 
Santa Clara Valley for general farming purposes. He also set out a small 
orchard there. In the spring of 1879 he bought one hundred fifty acres 
near Santa Paula. This land had been used for grazing, but had scarcely 
any improvements and was largely undeveloped. In 1894 George W. 
Faulkner built there one of the largest and finest rural homes in Ventura 
County. Up to 1883 the land continued to serve the purposes of general 
farming. At that date Mr. Faulkner started to set out fruit trees, and 
since then has led the way in horticultural development in that section of 
Ventura County. 

He was among the first to raise apricots in that community. To 
him belongs the distinction of raising the first soft shelled walnuts in the 
valley. He has also devoted part of his land to the crops of sugar beets 
and beans. 

So much for his work as an individual farmer and fruit grower. In 
later years his name has been closely associated with a number of the 
larger organizations by which the resources of his section have been 
developed. He was one of the original board of directors of the People's 
Lumber Company and is still identified with that business. In 1897 he 
assisted in organizing the Santa Paula Co-Operative Company's store 
and for several years was its president. He was a director in the Santa 
Paula Fruit Packing Company, and helped to organize the Saticoy Wal- 
nut Growers' Association, of which he was president, and for many years 
was on the board of directors and secretary of the Farmers' Canal and 
Irrigating Company. He was one of the organizers of the Ventura 
County Mutual Fire Insurance Company, which was one of the earliest of 
its kind in California and has saved the farmers of this county over 
$100,000. He has been on the board since the organization and is now its 
vice president. He is also a stockholder in the Riverstreet Irrigating 
Company, and in partnership with his brother owns eighteen hundred 
acres of land at Fillmore, where he has a twenty-acre orange grove. 

Mr. George W. Faulkner was bom in Richland County, Ohio, August 



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732 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

i6, 1846, a son of George Faulkner, who was bom in England in 1806 
and came to America in 1835, settling on a farm in Richland County, 
Ohio. In that locality he spent the rest of his years. George Faulkner 
married Julia A. Green, who was bom in Franklin County, Ohio, a daugh- 
ter of William and Martha (Stanton) Green. Her mother was a relative 
of Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton, a member of President Lincoln's 
cabinet. William Green had served his country in the War of 1812 and 
was a prominent pioneer in Crawford County, Ohio, where he built the 
third house in the township. 

The environment of an Ohio farm and the advantages of such schools 
as were maintained there fifty or sixty years ago formed the training and 
early experience of George W. Faulkner until he came to California. He 
is the fourth in a family of six children and all his education was acquired 
in the common schools. He came out to California in 1875 and lived a few 
months in San Francisco before coming to Ventura County. 

In Richland County, Ohio, August 16, 1874, he married Rhoda S. 
Seymour, who had graduated from Baldwin University at Berea, Ohio, 
with the class of 1872. She was a native of Ohio, and her father Rev. 
S. D. Seymour, now deceased, was at one time a member of the North 
Ohio Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, but at the time of 
his death was living in Texas. Mr. and Mrs. Faulkner have three children : 
Stella, now Mrs. E. G. Outland of Ventura County; Alpha, Mrs. F. H. 
Ayres of Ventura County; and George Seymour, who was born in Ven- 
tura County June 9, 1886, was graduated from the high school in 1906, 
attended the University of Southern California one year, and is now 
managing his father's old homestead. All the children are graduates of 
the high school and both daughters attended the University of Southern 
California. In 19 12 George W. Faulkner divided his homestead of 150 
acres among his three children, and has since enjoyed a retired life there 
with his son George S. superintending the management of the farm. 

Mr. Faulkner is an active prohibitionist, a member of the Anti-Saloon 
League, and at different times has proved a valuable factor in promoting 
education and other institutions and movements for the welfare of his 
home county. He served two terms on the high school board. He is a 
Methodist, assisting in organizing the church of that denomination at 
Santa Paula, and at different times served as a lay delegate of his church. 

Marco Zim. Califomia is proud to claim as one of its distinguished 
and popular citizens the talented young artist whose name introduces 
this review and whose reputation in the domain of art interpretation 
marks him as one of the essentially representative artists of the United 
States, his natural talent having been thorough reinforced by the high- 
est grade of technical training. He maintains his home in the City of 
Santa Barbara, a popular figure in business and social circles and a 
leader in the art world of Califomia. 

Marco Zim was bom in the City of Moscow, Russia, on the 9th of 
January, 1880, and is a son of Rev. Jacob Zim and Bella (Ratner) Zim, 
who immigrated to America from their native land when their son 
Marco was five years of age, the family home being established in Cali- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 733 

fornia, where the parents still reside. Rev. Jacob Zim, a man of high 
scholarship after coming to America became a teacher of ancient 
languages. It was his desire that his son Marco likewise should enter 
the ministry, but the latter was not to be denied expression of his nat- 
ural ability as an artist and it i5 to be considered most fortunate that 
he was not deflected from the course of his ambition and maximum 
potential. 

After having profited duly by the advantages of the American art 
schools Marco Zim was given the best of opportunities in prosecuting his 
art education abroad. Thus it may be noted that he was a pupil of such 
celebrated artists as Leon Bonnat, A. Rodin and George Gray Barnard, be- 
sides which he zealously studied and worked at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, 
in Paris, France; and the National Academy of Design, New York. His 
studies covered a wide field and led to his becoming a master interpreter 
of art, as demonstrated to a certain extent by the distinguished recogni- 
tion he has received. In 1903 he was awarded the Suydam silver medal 
at the National Academy; in the same year he received first prize from 
the Hallgarten Prize Fund; in 1904 he was awarded first prize for 
sculpture and medal designing, the first prize from the A. H. Baldwin 
Fund for Etching; and the first prize for painting from the Hallgarten 
Prize Fund. In 19 15 he received a silver medal from the Panama-Cali- 
fornia Exposition at San Diego. In bringing the art standard of this 
beautiful exposition to favorable attention his contribution was large, 
and he was the only artist in Southern California to whom the exposi- 
tion authorities gave an exclusive gallery for the exhibition of his work. 
The medal that was received by him from the exposition was awarded 
for a portrait bust. He is an appreciative and valued member of the 
California Art Club, at Los Angeles, and of the California Etchers' 
Club, San Francisco. 

After his return from his studies abroad Mr. Zim continued his 
work as a sculptor and painter in New York City until 1910, and for 
2>4 years thereafter he maintained his home and professional head- 
quarters in the City of Los Angeles. He then assumed a contract 
for the execution of special art work in the home of W. H. Cowles, 
at Montecito, Santa Barbara County, and he was so favorably impressed 
with the attractions and advantages of Santa Barbara County that he 
established his home and studio in the City of Santa Barbara, where 
he has since continued his earnest and splendid art work. In addi- 
tion to his creative work as an artist he has also been specially suc- 
cessful as a teacher, and the fine art colony of California numbers him 
as one of its most able and valued members. 

On the 20th of November, 1905, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Zim to Miss Minnie R. Cohe of New York City, and they have two 
fine little sons, Herbert Spencer, who was born in the national metropo- 
lis ; and Milton, who was bom at San Diego, California. 

David Darling has been a resident of Ventura County upwards of 
half a century. Practically every phase of the farming industry and 



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734 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

general business affairs in this section has been impressed by his ability 
and experience. 

His early life was spent in Scotland, and he was nineteen years of age 
when he came to the United States and located in Ventura County, Cal- 
ifornia. He was born at Ayton, Berwickshire, Scotland, April i6, 1849, ^ 
son of David and Charlotte (Renton) I>arling. His school advantages 
terminated at the age of fifteen, and after that he had a part in the man- 
agement of his father's farm in Scotland until he came to the United 
States. 

In Ventura County Mr. Darling rented 200 acres of the Sudden Ranch 
near Saticoy. He used that land chiefly for the production of hogs, and 
that was the stage on which his activities were set until 1891. 

In 1 891 he bought forty-seven acres near Saticoy on the T/elegraph 
Road, and later purchased the adjoining eighty acres. At this ranch ninety 
acres have been planted in walnuts, intersected with lima beans, and the 
balance of the acreage is devoted entirely to beans. Besides his part in 
producing some of the staple crops of this section of California, Mr. 
Darling is president of the Saticoy Development Company, is vice presi- 
dent of the Farmers and Merchants Realty Association of Saticoy and is 
a director in the Farmers and Merchants Bank of Santa Paula. Thus he 
is one of the men who wield an important and substantial influence in 
everything that affects the industries and welfare of this community. 

In politics he is a republican and is a member of the Independent Order 
of Foresters. In Berwickshire, Scotland, Mr. Darling was married in 
March, 1888, to Eliza Eddington Simpson, a native of Glasgow, Scotland. 
They are the parents of two children. Eliza is a graduate of Stanford 
University and is now at home. David, aged twenty-one, attended the 
public schools and is a graduate of the Santa Paula High School. 

Francis Jefferson Beckwith. In the Santa Paula district of Ven- 
tura County is a large and beautiful estate which was the home and scene 
of activities during his later years of the late Francis Jefferson Beckwith, 
who died there December 30, 1901. He was a California resident- for 
many years, and the improvements which made his estate so valuable as 
as a business property and so attractive as a home can be traced largely to 
his energies and his thorough methods of management. 

This late honored citizen of Ventura County was born in Ontario 
County, New York, August 14, 1834, and was not yet seventy years of age 
when he died. He was of Scotch ancestry. His grandfather Nathan 
Beckwith, Sr. was one of the early settlers of Oswego County, New York. 
Three of the Beckwith family had previously shouldered arms and taken 
an active part on the American side in the War of 1812. Nathan Beck- 
with, Jr., was bom in 1798 and for many years made his home in New 
York State. In the early years of the century he went out to Indiana, 
which was then on the western frontier, and acquired considerable land 
there. He did not remain to cultivate and develop it, but spent his last 
years in Ontario County, New York, where his death occurred at the age 
of sixty-five. He married Phoebe Granger, who was bom in Ontario 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 735 

County in 1808, her father Elihu Granger having moved to Western New 
York from New Jersey. 

The youngest in a family of seven children, Francis Jefferson Beck- 
with when still a boy went out with his parents to Indiana and helped to 
clear up a tract of raw land. After the death of his father he remained 
at home and looked after the property for his mother, the older children 
having in the meantime found homes of their own. 

When he started for himself it was in the State of Michigan, where he 
bought land near Vermontville, in Eaton County. Eaton County was then 
a wilderness. Not a single improvement had been attempted on his land, 
and like other pioneers his first task was the building of a log cabin. He 
then undertook to clear and cultivate his place but after two years he sold 
out and took employment in a mill, where he remained three years. 

On September 21, 1874, he arrived in California. For two years he 
was employed by his brother Appleton on the latter's ranch in Ventura 
County. The next two years he spent in his old home in Indiana, and on 
returning to California he was again in the employ of his brother. Apple- 
ton Beckwith died February 3, 1881, and bequeathed his fine ranch of 700 
acres to his brothers Francis and Addison. Some years later Addison 
sold his interest in the property to Francis J., making the latter the sole 
owner of a valuable estate. Three hundred acres of this ranch are now 
rich farming lands, highly develof>ed, while the rest is adapted to pasturage 
with the exception of a small area of waste land. In location the ranch 
has many advantages. It is in the midst of a fine farming country and 
is in the line of that development which is rapidly transforming vast dis- 
trict of Ventura County into some of the most eagerly sought for lands 
of Southern California. In earlier days the chief products of the ranch 
were hogs and cattle, but the most profitable crop today is lima beans. 
The late Mr. Beckwith was constantly seeking methods to improve his land, 
and among other things he set out numerous trees which now adorn the 
homestead and erected some large barns and granaries. 

On August 27, 1859, Francis J. Beckwith married Sarah L. Green- 
mayer. She was born July 5, 1841, a daughter of Jesse and Mary (Paul) 
Greenmayer, the former bom in Pennsylvania in i8r8 and the latter bom 
in the same state in the same year of Dutch descent. Mr. and Mrs. Francis 
Beckwith were the parents of four children : Caroline, born in Indiana, 
September 20, i860, now Mrs. George A. Jones of Ventura County; 
Charles F., born in Indiana, January .12, 1862; Delbert T., bom in Mich- 
igan, January 31, 1869; and Emma G., bom October 22, 1878, the wife 
of M. M. Baker of Ventura County. 

The late Francis J. Beckwith was a republican in politics. His widow 
survived him some years and passed away Febmary 23, 1909. 

Charles F. Beckwith, their son, was bom in Steuben County, Indiana, 
January 12, 1862, obtained part of his public school training there until 
he was ten years of age, when his parents removed to Berrien County, 
Michigan. He went to school there and also in Ventura County from 1875 
to 1877. His early experiences in a business way were on his father's 
farm, and he assisted in its management until he was twenty-one years of 



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736 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

age. He inherited i8o acres of the old ranch from his mother in 1909 and 
most of it is now devoted to the growing of beans. In 1884 he made his 
first purchase on his own account, a part of a seventy-two acre ranch 
adjoining his present home, and in 1905 he completed the purchase of the 
entire tract. This is now a bean plantation. He also owns a half interest 
in 250 acres near Santa Paula, partly developed to apricots, lemons, and 
hay and some of it in pasture. 

Mr. Beckwith is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
is a republican and belongs to the Christian Church. In Ventura, January 
21, 1883, he married Luella Orr. Their three children are: Mrs. Ada 
Knight of Santa Paula ; Ralph, who is thirty years of age and was educated 
in the Ventura public schools and is now farming one of his father's 
ranches ; and Mrs. Myrtle Brown of Ventura County. 

Ulpiano F. del Valle. Of the del Valle family in Ventura County, 
and the many interests and associations connected with it, a comprehen- 
sive sketch has been written and appears on other pages. 

The magnificent family estate known as the Camulos Rancho has 
for many years been under the active management of Ulpiano F. del 
Valle, son of the distinguished Califomian sketched elsewhere. It was 
on this ranch that he was bom March 2, 1865. Other members of the 
del Valle family, brothers and sisters of Ulpiano are: Jifventino, who 
lives on his father's estate in Ventura County; Reginald F., of Los 
Angeles, former state senator of California; Mrs. J. F. Foster, Mrs. 
C. H. Cram, and Ygnacio R., all of Los Angeles. 

Ulpiano F. del Valle was educated in St. Vincent's College at Los 
Angeles and in Santa Clara College until the age of twenty. For two 
years he was a clerk in the Dillon and Kenealy Mercantile Company of 
Los Angeles. 

Mr. del Valle is the fortunate owner of the rancho immortalized as 
the home of Ramona in the famous novel by that name written by Helen 
Hunt Jackson. It has also been seen on the screen just as it is today by 
many thousands of the admirers of *'Ramona." The weeping willow 
tree under which Ramona and Allessandro whispered their vows of 
love still stands at the end of the grape arbor under which the ill-fated 
lovers wandered hand in hand. The fountain still stands in its leafy 
enclosure near the chapel where Ramona made her devotions. While 
the years have taken toll in nearly everything the chapel Ss unchanged, 
its many objects of interest yellowed or dimmed by time. The walnut 
tree on the side of the ranchhouse has grown into the largest tree of 
record and the poinsettias and roses are a flame of color against the 
window of Ramona's bedroom. But the ranch, the oldest in Ventura 
County, has remained as it was when Ramona made it her home, and 
it is now and will continue to be an object of interest to all visitors to 
and inhabitants of California. 

The Cumulos ranch comprises 1,600 acres of some of the picturesque 
landscape of Southern California. Two hundred fifty acres have been 
developed to walnuts, apricots and oranges, while the rest is a great 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 737 

plantation devoted to beans, grain and grazing land. Mr. del Valle 
is a democrat in politics and has represented his party in both state and 
county conventions, but has never sought public office. 

In Los Angeles, October 22, 1906, he married Miss Clara Dowling, 
a native of California. She died October 22, 191 1, on their fifth wed- 
ding anniversary, and is survived by three children: Stella, James and 
Ulpiano, Jr., the two older now in public schools. 

In the conclusion of this article we quote from the Los Angeles Herald, 
whose portrayal of the life and achievements of Don Ygnacio del Valle 
are so fittingly set forth in the following paragraphs : 

"Death struck down a good man, one in whose character there was 
much to love, admire and revere, without awakening any regret for 
error or apology for frailty. His life can be set up as a fit example for 
youthful emulation — elevated, solid, pure. Passing his days along the 
sequestered paths of life with a noiseless tenor, full of candor and mod- 
eration, mild and dispassionate, of irreproachable conduct, dispensing 
benefaction with generous prodigality, he has left a chosen spot of affec- 
tion for everything that was disinterested in kindness and noble in good 
feeling. 

"Don Ygnacio del Valle was bom in Compostela, State of Jalisco, 
Mexico, on the first of July, 1808. He received a liberal education, his 
parents having been persons of wealth and position. In the year 1818 
depredations were committed on the coast towns of California by pirates 
under the command of a desperado named Buchard. To protect the 
country two military companies, one from San Bias, were sent by the 
Mexican Government in 1819. Don Antonio del Valle, father of the 
deceased, was Lieutenant of the San Bias company. Six years after 
the arrival of Don Antonio in California he sent for his son, Don 
Ygnacio, who landed in Monterey on the 27th of July, 1825. In March, 
1828, Don Ygnacio entered the service as second lieutenant, being at- 
tached to the staff of General Echeandia, Governor of California, with 
headquarters at San Diego, remaining there until 1833, and discharging 
various functions at that place, as captain in command of the place and 
chief customhouse officer. On the arrival of Governor Figueroa, in 
1833, Lieutenant del Valle was transferred to Monterey, where he con- 
tinued to discharge his duties on the staflF of Governor Figueroa until 
the latter's death in 1836, when, on account of the insurrectionary move- 
ment led by Castro and Alvarado against the Government, represented 
by Gutierrez, Lieutenant del Valle, unwilling to take part in the move- 
ment, remained separated from the service until 1840, when he obtained 
his discharge. In 1834 Don Ygnacio was appointed Commissioner by 
Governor Figueroa in secularization of the Missions. He fully carried 
out his orders with respect to the Missions of Santa Cruz and Dolores. 
In 1845 ^^ ^vas a member of the Junta Departmental, or Departmental 
Assembly from Los Angeles County. Since 1861 Don Ygnacio resided 
with his family on his rancho at Camulos, devoting his time to the rear- 
ing and proper education of his children, developing the resources of 
his beautiful domain, and lavishing the utmost hospitality to all. 



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738 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

"In the seeming vigor of apparent health, disease insidiously ap- 
proached and set its fatal seal on him. No man could have resisted it with 
a more gentle spirit. All the medical skill that could be brought to his aid 
was faithfully administered. Through every change of the painful malady 
he showed uncomplaining moderation, fortitude and unrepining calm- 
ness, anxious only to avoid giving trouble and inconvenience to others. 
Although those who were around him knew that he could not live many 
months, yet his death was a calamity so startling that it shocked his 
friends. 

"There was much in his life to engage our affections and respect. Few 
men have impressed upon the memory of their friends a lovelier sense 
of excellence and unsullied virtue. In the private and domestic circle 
he was greatly beloved. He was confiding and affectionate. He pos- 
sessed an enlightened benevolence and a warm sensibility, always eager 
to advance those who were within the sphere of his influence. He was 
a man of the most inflexible honor and integrity, a devout lover of truth, 
conscientiously scrupulous in the discharge of his duties. The voice of 
censure rarely escaped from his lips. He had a deep sense of religion. 
His faith was such that it imparted serenity and confidence. He was 
modest and reserved, of thoughtful aspect, but not cold. With those 
with whom he was intimate he indulged in playful and delicate humor. 
No man had a sounder judgment. The tears that fall upon his grave are 
unstained by any mixture of bitterness for frailty or for voice. He 
Jived as a true man wished to live ; he died as good men would wish to 
die. *How beautiful is death when earned by virtne!'" — ^Los Angeles 
Herald. 

David Brown. A number of men have made substantial fortunes out 
of the lima bean and walnut industry in Southern California, and that is 
the chief business of Mr. David Brown in the Saticoy community of Ven- 
tura County. Mr. Brown has the benefit of long years of active experience 
and he knows as few other men do the possibilities of the soil and climate 
and the best methods of utilizing the splendid resources of this section. 

He is a son of W. H. and Anianda A. Brown, his father having been 
a well known resident of Ventura County in his day. W. H. Brown was 
born in Lawrence County, Indiana, October 17, 1837. Educated there and 
reared to the age of twenty on his father's farm, he then started out as an 
independent agriculturist in the same county. From the care of his fields 
he was called to serve his country in 1861, enlisting in Company A of the 
Sixty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was in the army until the 
close of the war in 1865. After the war he was engaged in farming in 
Madison County, Iowa, up to 1886, and then spent three years more in 
Edwards County, Kansas. From Kansas he came to Ventura County, 
California, and renting land lived near Saticoy until his death on March 
25, 1906. He was married in Lawrence County, Indiana, October 11, 
1856, to Amanda A. Ramsey. 

David Brown, the only son of his parents, was born in Lawrence 
County, Indiana, July 20, 1858, and received his early education in the 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 739 

public schools of Madison County, Iowa. After he was twenty-two he was 
employed on his father's farm for several years, and at the age of 
twenty-five came West and has ever since made his home and the scene of 
his activities in Ventura County. 

For the first year he rented seventy-five acres from W. D. Richards 
near Saticoy, and then bought ten acres in the same locality. While his 
operations at first were on a modest scale, he has gradually expanded 
them and has acquired other land until his holdings now constitute ninety 
acres. He has a well developed walnut orchard of fifteen acres and 
another of equal extent planted in young walnut trees, with lima beans 
between the rows. The rest of his farm, sixty acres, is all planted to 
beans. 

Mr. Brown attends the Methodist Church and in politics is affiliated 
with the republican party. In Madison County, Iowa, June 27, 1883, he 
married Miss Susie M. Peters, a native of Iowa, bom in Clayton County. 
They now have a fine family of six children. Charles La Vert, aged thirty- 
one, is following his trade as a carpenter at Ventura. Anson, aged twenty- 
eight, is engaged in ranching with his father. Mrs. Kate lone Reams is 
living with her parents, while Mrs. Carl Burson lives at Fillmore, Cal- 
ifornia. The daughter Emma is a graduate of the Ventura High School, 
and Herbert, aged seventeen, has attended the grade and high schools and 
is assisting his father on the ranch. 

Henry D. Udall spent the last years of his active, energetic and 
purposeful life in Ventura County, and the fine ranch home on which 
he settled near Sespe is still occupied by Mrs. Udall and her son. 

Born in Hartford, Vermont, February 24, 1833, Henry D. Udall was 
more than fourscore years of age when he died. Like most New England 
boys, he had a good education. Besides the advantages of the public 
schools he attended the Meriden Military School at Meriden, New 
Hampshire, and after that was a practical Vermont farmer near his old 
home town of Hartford until 1872. In that year he moved out to Boone, 
Iowa; was in the grocery business there until he sold out in 1884 ^"d 
moved to Lane County, Kansas, resumed farming in the Sunflower state, 
and in 1895 made his last progress toward the West when he arrived in 
Ventura County. Here he bought nineteen acres in the Sespe Canyon 
near Fillmore. This land he developed under his direct supervision to 
lemons chiefly, and was thus able to pass a pleasant, profitable and con- 
genial concluding period of his years and died there in July, 1914. Jle 
was a member of the Masonic Order and a republican in politics. 

In Hartford, Windsor County, Vermont, February 25, 1865, Henry D. 
Udall married Miss Laura Keyes, daughter of O. A. Keyes. Her father, 
who was a native of Chelsea, Vermont, was for many years a merchant 
in Windsor County. Mr. and Mrs. Udall became the parents of two 
children, James H. and Caroline U. White, of Los Angeles, Calif. 

James H. Udall, who was bom in Hartford, Windsor County, Ver- 
mont, September 3, 1871, gained his first education in the public schools 
of Boone County, Iowa, and also had some further advantages after his 



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740 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

parents removed to Lane County, Kansas. There he gained a knowl- 
edge of ranching and in 1895 came with his parents to Ventura County, 
where he has since assumed the chief duties in connection with his father's 
place in the Sespe community. 

The Udall family is of revolutionary stock and English descent. 

Mrs. Udall has in her possession a deed from King William and 
Queen Mary under date of 1694, to Lionel Udall of the City of Exon. 
The consideration named is "20 quinas (guineas) and two broad pieces 
of gold — in the current coyne of England.'* 

James Shiells, of Fillmore, is a Scotchman, and that fact accounts 
somewhat for the phenomenal energy and ability with which he has 
handled his business affairs. He is also one of the pioneer residents of 
Ventura County and the family is well known over a large part of South- 
em California on account of the extensive lands and other properties 
which are under the Shiells ownership. 

Bom in Haddingtonshire, Scotland, June 10, 1850, a son of Francis 
and Helen Shiells, he worked on a farm in Scotland until 1869, and 
in that year came to California, making the trip by way of the Isthmus 
of Panama and settling in the Carpinteria Valley of Santa Barbara 
County. After three years of work on a farm he went to Goleta in the 
same dounty, worked on a farm there a year, and on returning to Carpin- 
teria rented some land with his brother William. James and William 
Shiells for a great many years have been associated in practically all 
their business transactions. 

After farming until 1884 James Shiells went to Ventura County and 
bought 160 acres in the Santa Clara ^Valley near Fillmore. Not long 
afterwards his mother and brother William arrived and joined him, and 
each of the three then filed on a homestead claim of i6o.acres, that giving 
them 640 acres in one body. In 1886 the brothers bought 160 acres more 
and in 191 1 a tract of 112 acres, later purchasing other lands until their 
holdings were 1,200 acres. 

At first the Shiells brothers used their land for stock raising and 
general farming purposes, but in recent years they have developed it 
more and more for horticulture, having planted fifty acres in lemons, 
twenty acres in oranges and ten acres in walnuts. One of their most 
recent purchases was 526 acres near Newman, California. The brothers 
own an immense amount of valuable property in different sections of 
SojLithem and Central California. 

In 1910 they leased 880 acres of land in Ventura County to the 
Montabello Oil Company. That company started operations in Decem- 
ber, 1910, and this has since proved one of the richest oil fields in the 
state. Naturally an immense revenue goes to the Shiells. brothers in 
the form of royalties. 

Mr. James Shiells is a stockholder in the Fillmore State Bank. He 
is a Mason, a Shriner, Knight of Pythias and republican. Having long 
since attained financial independence, he has used his means to enjoy his 
principal diversion, travel. He has made one trip entirely around the 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 741 

world, and has been abroad many times. During the last three years he 
has traveled more than 65,000 miles. Mr. Shiells has never married. 

Thomas M. Storke. Of the native sons of Santa Barbara who have 
continued to make this city their home there is none who is more loyal 
and appreciative than Thomas More Storke, who is editor and publisher 
of the Santa Barbara Daily News, which he has brought to the front as 
one of the representative daily papers of Southern California, and his 
prominence and popularity in his home community are further shown 
by his incumbency of the office of postmaster, to which position he was 
appointed in 1914, by President Wilson. 

Thomas More Storke was bom at Santa Barbara on the 23d of 
November, 1876, and after profiting fully by the advantages afforded in 
the public schools he was matriculated in Stanford University, in which 
admirable California institution he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1898 and from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
In 1900 Mr. Storke purchased the plant and business of the Santa Barbara 
Daily Independent, of which he assumed control on the ist of January, 
1901. He continued as editor and publisher of the Independent until 
19 ID, and the resourcefulness which he brought to bear in bringing success 
to the newspaper enterprise is forcibly indicated by the fact that though he 
purchased the business for the stun of $2,000, at the end of a decade he 
sold the property and business for $38,500. 

After disposing of his newspaper business Mr. Storke had no active 
business association for three years, but in the spring of 1913 he purchased 
the business of the Santa Barbara Daily News, with which, was con- 
solidated the business of the Santa Barbara Independent, which had 
suspended publication about two months after Mr. Storke had again 
entered the journalistic field. He places at the present time a conservative 
valuation of $100,000 upon his newspaper property, but he has no intention 
of permitting the same to be sold, as he has enthusiastic confidence in the 
future of his native city and believes that there is all scope for success 
and worthy influence through the medium of his well established paper. 
The News is an independent paper with progressive democratic proclivities, 
and its business has greatly expanded in scope and importance under the 
eflFective direction of Mr. Storke. The plant is of thoroughly modem 
order, and in the summer of 1916 was installed in the same a twenty-page 
rotary press, with a color deck, the first issue of The News on this press 
having been sent forth on the i6th of June of that year. 

In 1904 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Storke to Miss EKse 
Smith, daughter of Edwin F. Smith, of Santa Barbara and Sacramento. 
Mr. and Mrs. Storke have three children: Jean, Margaret and Charles 
Albert. 

Rev. J. S. Laubacher. It frequently happens that what at the time 

had seemed a calamity, in the end proved to be a blessing. Individuals 

whose entire plans have been overthrown by some accident have lived 

to realize that this was the turning point in their career, and that without 
Vol. n— IT 



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742 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

pain and suffering attendant upon bodily affliction they never would have 
developed into what they later became. Such has been the case with 
Rev. J. S. Laubacher, pastor of the Santa Clara Catholic Church of 
Oxnard, for had he not been forced to seek a change of climate because 
of ill health in his youth it is doubtful that he would ever have come 
to the West, where he has since accomplished so much for the church 
and the people. 

Father Laubacher was bom at Malvern, Ohio, September 12, 1869, 
and is a son of George and Anna Laubacher. His father was bom in 
Alsace Lorraine, Germany, January 17, 1831, and came to the United 
States with his parents in 1832, the family settling in Brown Township, 
Carroll County, Ohio, where George Laubacher received his education. 
As a youth he Jeamed the trade of carpenter, gradually developed into 
a contractor, and passed his entire life near Malvern, in Carroll County, 
where he died March 17, 1908. He was married in Malvem, Ohio, Janu- 
ary 30, 1868, to Anna Gang, and they became the parents of nine children : 
John Silvester, Francis Albert, a rancher in Ventura County; Joseph 
Henry, engaged in the real estate business at Oxnard ; Daniel Benjamin, 
of this city; Edward George, a rancher of Ventura County; Mrs. R. H. 
McGrath, of Ventura County; Bemardine, now known as Sister Saint 
John, a nun at Prescott, Arizona; Stella R., living with her mother at 
Oxnard, and William Louis, who died in infancy. 

Rev. J. S. Laubacher attended the public schools in Malvem, Carroll 
County, Ohio, until he was fifteen years of age. During the next five 
years he worked on his father's farm, helping to acquire the means 
for his college and seminary courses. In September, 1889, at the age 
of twenty, he entered Saint Jerome's College, Berlin, Ontario, Canada, 
and graduated therefrom in philosophy in 1894. Subsequently, in Sep- 
tember, 1894, he entered Mount Saint Mary's Seminary of the West, 
at Cincinnati, to take up the study of theology, but too hard study and 
the confinement of the schoolroom caused the failure of his health, and 
upon the recommendation of his physician he went to Colorado Springs, 
Colorado, in October, 1895, where he entered a sanitarium. However, 
he did not give up his studies, but with that indomitable spirit and per- 
tinacious perseverance which are among his strongest characteristics, 
despite ill health, he not only continued his theological studies under the 
direction of the learned Jesuit, the Rev. Father Gubitosi, S. J., who was 
the chaplain of the Glockner Sanitarium, during the two years spent in 
Colorado Springs, and at the same time earned his expenses by working 
part of each day as clerk for the firm of Gillis Brothers, contractors and 
builders. It was here that Father Laubacher acquired experience which 
has proved invaluable to him in the building up of the splendid parish 
plant in Oxnard, and which, we dare say, is responsible for his great 
success in this life. 

In July, 1897, he came to Los Angeles and applied for adoption into 
the diocese of Monterey and Los Angeles, but the Bishop, the Most 
Jlev. George Montgomery, D. D., of blessed memory, hesitated to accept 
the young aspirant to the priesthood, owing to his delicate health. Dis- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 743 

couraged somewhat by this disappointment, he was on the point of giving 
up his cherished hope of reaching the priesthood and returning to his 
home in Ohio when he had the good fortune to meet the Very Rev. A. J. 
Meyer, president of St Vincent's College of Los Angeles, who greatly 
encouraged him and induced him to enter that college as professor of 
German. This generous offer was gladly accepted, and in September, 
1897, he took up his duties as teacher and assistant prefect in the college, 
at the same time continuing his study of theology, which he completed 
in June, 1898. On the 29th of that month he received Holy Orders in 
Saint Vibiana's Cathedral, Los Angeles, at the hands of the late lamented 
Most Rev. George Montgomery, D. D. 

After a two months* visit to his old home in Malvern, Ohio, where 
he celebrated his first mass at the same altar where he had served as an 
altar boy for many years, Rev. Fr. Laubacher returned to Los Angeles, and 
remained there for about two months as assistant at the Cathedral. He 
was then sent as pastor pro tem at Saint John's Church, a Fresno, Cali- 
fornia. On the 26th of October, 1898, Father Laubacher arrived in 
El Rio, where he became assistant priest to his venerable and much 
loved predecessor, the Rev. John Pujol, and on April 27, 1910, upon the 
resignation of Rev. John Pujol, who became pastor emeritus, was 
appointed pastor of Santa Clara Church at Oxnard, where he has since 
remained. 

Father Laubacher is an ecclesiastic, honored and respected by all 
the sections of the community, liberal natured, broad-minded, generous ; 
kindly and free, full of understanding of special circumstances and con- 
ditions, and with a heart open in sympathy to every necessity. As a 
legislator he has been prudent and conservative, enjoying the confidence 
of both bishops under whom he has served, — the Most Reverend George 
Montgomery, D. D., and the late beloved Thomas James Conaty, D. D., 
the latter of whom expressed his appreciation of Father Laubacher's 
work and ability by promoting him to one of the most responsible posi- 
tions in the Diocese of Monterey and Los Angeles, making him a member 
of the Bishop's Council, a position which he continues to hold at the 
present time, and, furthermore, appointing him to several other offices 
in the Diocese: A member of the board of school examiners. Diocesan 
Director of the Priests' Eucharistic League and secretary of the Clerical 
Beneficiary Association. 

Father Laubacher is a member of the Knights of Columbus and is 
the Chaplain of Oxnard Council. In 1903 he began the erection of the 
Santa Clara Church, which was dedicated August 4, 1904, and is one 
of the most beautiful church edifices of this section. Prior to this time» 
in 19QI, he had built a parochial school at Oxnard, known as Saint 
Joseph Institute. His fine talents as an organizer were displayed in his 
work in connection with the building of Saint John's Hospital at Oxnard, 
a $100,000 structure, and in 191 5 he was also instrumental in the estab- 
lishment^of the chapel for Mexicans at Oxnard, located next to the school 
of Our Lady of Guadalupe for Mexican children, which he had erected 
previously, in 1907, at the comer of Meta and Seventh streets. 



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744 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Father Laubacher possesses a rich fund of information upon all timely 
topics and a fund of humor which is a delight to the thousands of his 
friends throughout this part of the state, who in him recognize the best 
type of the ecclesiastic, the loving, kindly friend who can sorrow with 
them as well as rejoice, and who faithfully and earnestly is endeavoring 
to carry out God's work in the world, armed with that happy cheeriness 
which is the strongest power in dissipating the miseries and evils which 
are so universal. 

W. D. HoBSON. The subject of this sketch has been termed "The 
Father of Ventura County," for the reason that he was a resident 
so long and took such an active interest in its welfare from its very 
founding. W. D. Hobson was bom in Green County, Illinois, January 
20, 1829. His father, Peter John Hobson, was a native of England and 
the son of a minister of the Church of England. His mother was 
Eloisa Dewey, daughter of Hon. Stephen Dewey of Bennington, Vir- 
ginia, and a cousin of the grandfather of Admiral Dewey. 

W. D. Hobson came to California in 1849, crossing the plains with 
an ox team, which started from St. Joseph, Missouri. He first went into 
mining at Weaverville, now Coon Hollow, Placer County. He built large 
sluiceways and built the Western House, a famous hotel at Sacramento, 
conducting it for a number of years. From mining Mr. Hobson drifted 
into other vocations and finally into the business of buying of cattle, so 
it will be seen that the present successful firm of Hobson Brothers 
evidently came naturally into the great cattle business it now transacts. 

In his work of buying cattle Mr. Hobson traveled about the country 
a great deal and in 1857 he found himself in San Buenaventura. He 
traveled everywhere over what is now Ventura County, but which was 
then a part of Santa Barbara County. Of an observing turn and with 
good memory even to his last day, he discoursed interestingly on what 
he saw in those old days. There was but one house between the Mission 
Church and the Camulos Rancho, this being an adobe where is now the 
City of Santa Paula. The mustard was of such thick growth and so 
high all over the valley that one could not see over it on horseback and 
a rabbit could scarcely get through it. Found only one cultivated spot 
in the whole Santa Clara Valley, this being a little vineyard, which was 
later known as the Dominguez vineyard. There was a cluster of three 
or four adobes at the vineyard, these being the only ones besides the 
one at Santa Paula and the adobes at the Mission. 

Two years after this visit Mr. Hobson moved to the county and 
settled in San Buenaventura. His first work in the county was in the 
line of construction. He settled on the Sespe, where he built several 
abodes. Also built adobe houses at what is now Saticoy. Later he 
farmed for five years in Ventura Avenue on what is known as the old 
Gilbert place. 

Mr. Hobson was always an active man and branched into the work 
of building extensi\^ely. He built the first brick house in the county. 
It still stands on West Main Street and is known as the Cohn Building. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 745 

a man named Cohn having a store there for years which was later 
conducted by his widow. The Cohns are well remembered by the 
old-time residents. 

He also built the courthouse, the schoolhouse on the hill, the Chaffee 
stote building and what was known as the Henry Spear Building, which 
occupied the comer of Palm and Main streets. The Spear Building in 
the old days was built and occupied as a saloon by Henry Spear, while 
the rear portion was used as the first courthouse in the county. The 
upper floor contained the first Masonic Hall and a portion was the chief 
hall of the town for public gatherings and dances for many years. 

Mr. Hobson was married in 185 1 in Sacramento to Miss Isabel Jane 
Winemiller. To the couple was bom ten children, seven of whom were 
reared to man and womanhood. These were Mrs. Frances Marian Rice 
(deceased), Mrs. Clara Janes William, Cyrus H., Abram Lincoln, Peter 
John, William Arthur (deceased), and Mrs. May Belle McMillan. 

Mr. Hobson always took a lively interest in all matters of the day. 
He had always been a great reader and has written considerably on 
current events. In the earlier days in this county he took an especially 
lively interest in matters political and was always considered a power in 
framing the policies of his party. He did much hard and responsible 
work in the founding of the county and was its chief sponsor when it 
was launched upon the world of its own account. He is clearly entitled 
to be termed "The Father of the County." 

Mr. Hobson passed away on August 28, 191 5. 

Abram Lincoln Hobson, son of the late W. D. Hobson, "The 
Father of Ventura County," has for years been one of the most influ- 
ential and successful business men of Ventura County and his work 
and activities have given additional prestige to the honored name he 
bears. 

Mr. Hobson was bom on March 22, 1861, in Ventura, California. 
He was educated partly in the public schools of Ventura and partly 
under the instmction of his father. At the age of fifteen he became 
associated with his father in the packing and retail meat business. Four 
years later he purchased his father's interest and admitted his brother, 
William A. Hobson, into a partnership which has existed for over 
thirty-five years. Together they accumulated large real estate holdings 
and became the leading live-stock men in Ventura County, organizing the 
Hobson Brothers Packing Company in Ventura and the Santa Barbara 
Packing Company in Santa Barbara. 

Much of their business has been of a semi-public character. For a 
number of years they were among the leading street-paving contractors 
in the West and handled various large contracts in several cities, including 
the contract for building the gravity outlet sewer in Salt Lake City. 

In 1905 they organized the Palo Verde Land & Water Company, 
which put on the market 40,000 acres included in the old Bl3rthe estate 
and founded the Town of Blythe. Mr. Hobson, as president of the 
company, put the valley under irrigation, converting a desert waste into 



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746 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

one of the most productive and prosperous communities in the state. 
Through his influence the railroad has recently been extended into the 
valley. 

Mr. Hobson takes a very active interest in republican politics and in 
all the public affairs of his county, being at present a member of the 
State Central Committee 'and having served during the past year as 
president of the Chamber of Commerce. 

Colonel Charles C. Hunt. A resident of Santa Barbara many 
years, Colonel Hunt is known largely over this section of Southern 
California as a genial old soldier, a successful business man, and a most 
companionable and intrepid gentleman. 

The first place in his record should be assigned to the brave and loyal 
service he rendered as a soldier in the Civil war. On October i8, 1861, 
he enlisted from Mower County, Minnesota, to serve three years. He 
was mustered in at Fort Snelling, Minnesota, October 18, 1861, as a 
private in Captain Robert P. Mooers' Company K of the Fourth R^ment 
Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. The commander of that regiment was a 
prominent Minnesotan, Colonel John B. Sanborn. 

The Fourth Minnesota Infantry was organized at Fort Snelling 
between October 2 and December 23, 1861. Company K was recruited by 
Captain Robert P. Mooers at Otranto in Mower County near the Iowa 
state line. During the winter of 1862 five companies remained at Fort 
Snelling, while the others were sent to the various frontier posts on the 
northwest line. April 20, 1862, the regiment embarked for St. Louis to 
report to Major General Halleck, and it remained at Benton Barracks 
until May 2. It then proceeded to join the army before Corinth, and on 
May 14 it arrived at Hamburg Landing in Tennessee, encamping near 
Childer's Hill. On joining the army under General Halleck it was 
assigned to the First Brigade (Buford's) Third Division Army of the 
Mississippi. It participated in the siege of Corinth, in the pursuit of the 
enemy to Boonville, and in June it marched through Holly Springs, Rienzi 
and Ripley. It then encamped near Jacinto, and took a prominent part in 
the battle of luka September 19, in which it inflicted heavier losses on the 
enemy than the regiment itself sustained. It was in the battle of Corinth 
October 3-4, then in pursuit of the enemy to Crum Mill on the Hatchie 
River. After various marches and skirmishes it started in November, 
1862, on the campaign down the Mississippi Central Railway to reach 
Vicksburg. It was on duty at White Station and near Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, until February, 1863. It took part in the operations against Forts 
Pemberton and Greenwood, known as the Yazoo Pass, from March 13 to 
April 5th, and then moved to Milliken Bend and participated in the Battle 
of Port Gibson May ist. It then successively participated at Jones Cross 
Roads, Willow Springs, Raymond, Jackson, Champion's Hills, and the 
siege of Vicksburg from May i8th to July 4th. After the surrender of 
Vicksburg the regiment moved to Helena, Arkansas, then to Memphis and 
to Corinth, Mississippi, and then took part in the Chattanooga-Ringgold 
Campaign, November 23-27. It was in the battles at Tunnell Hill, Mis- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 747 

sionary Ridge, and at Bridgeport and Huntsville, Alabama. That brings 
the record down to June, 1864, The regiment then moved from Hunts- 
ville to Stevenson, and to Altoona, and was on garrison duj:y there until 
November 15th. It was in the Battle of Altoona, and was in the march to 
the sea from November 15th to December 6th, following up with the siege 
of Savannah, the campaign through the Carolinas from January to April, 
1865, during which time it participated in *the Battle of Salkahatchie 
Swamp, Cheraw, Bentonville, and the occupation of Goldsboro and 
Raleigh. Then followed the surrender of Johnston and his army, and the 
march to Washington by way of Richmond. The regiment was in the 
Grand Review at Washington, following which it was sent west to Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, and was given an honorable discharge from service 
August 7, 1865. Its total loss was 239 killed and wounded. 

Charles C. Hunt was in all the engagements of this regiment except 
during the time when he was on detached service. He was always at his 
post of duty, and made a gallant record for meritorious service and 
soldierly conduct. He was promoted to second sergeant December 23, 
1861 ; was appointed regimental color bearer about February i, 1862; was 
promoted to orderly sergeant; commissioned second lieutenant May 24, 
1863; commissioned first lieutenant July 29, 1863; commissioned captain 
of Company G January 22, 1864. After the battle of Missionary Ridge 
he was detached from duty and sent to Minnesota to recruit and drill men 
for the regiment by order from War Department. From these recruits 
he organized a company known as Company A, and it became part of the 
permanent garrison at Fort Snelling, Minnesota. He was assigned to 
command of that company as captain. Colonel Hunt received a certificate 
of final honorable discharge at Fort Snelling, Minnesota, December 22, 
1864, t>y reason of expiration of term of service. 

After being mustered out of the United States service at St. Paul, 
Minnesota, Mr. Hunt returned to his home at Austin, Minnesota, and 
engaged in a successful hardware business until 1870. He then moved to 
Santa Barbara, California, and engaged in the "Grocery, Crockery and 
General Supply" trade, doing a large and leading business under the 
several firm names of C. C. Hunt, Hunt & Austin and Hunt & Metcalf. 
About 1888 he retired from this business and engaged in quite exten- 
sive real estate transactions dealing mostly in his own properties, and is 
still engaged in the real estate business to the present time. It is a great 
satisfaction for him now to know that he has always paid par on his 
indebtedness and has accumulated sufficient means to make himself and his 
family comfortable for life. He has always held the esteem and good 
will of the business public wherever he has engaged in business. 

In spending his last years in the sunny and congenial climate of 
California, Colonel Hunt is far from his birthplace. He was bom in the 
extreme northeastern state of the Union, in Somerset County, Maine, 
June 30, 1839. He early went to the West, was on the frontier in Min- 
nesota in the early days, and wherever he has been he has found useful and 
honorable service to occupy his unusual talents and capacity. He is now 
serving as notary public of Santa Barbara, an office he has filled for a 



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748 . SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

number of years. His father Leprilete Hunt served as a soldier in the 
War of 1 812. The mother's name was Mary Ann Sheldon. Colonel 
Hunt's brother Richard O. was also a soldier in Company C of the Second 
Regiment of Minnesota Cavalry. 

On January 23, 1865, Colonel Hunt married Phalinda Demmond at 
Chicago, Illinois. Four children were bom to them: Charles A. and 
Jennie F., both still living ; and twin daughters Maud and Edith, who died 
in infancy. 

Colonel Hunt is a charter member of Star King Post No. 52, Depart- 
ment of California and Nevada, Grand Army of the Republic, and was the 
second commander of this Post, elected in 1886. He also served as 
department aide de camp. He is a member of California Commandery of 
the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, is a Mason, and Royal Arch 
Mason. He was colonel and aide de camp on the staff of Governor Miller 
of Minnesota after the war, having been appointed to that office March 18, 
1865. His wife is a member of Star-King Corps No. 10, Woman's 
Relief Corps, and was president two terms. She was formerly identified 
with the Eastern Star. 

Colonel Hunt is no less loved as a business man and citizen than he 
was active as a soldier, and his dealings have always characterized him as 
a man of sterling worth who enjoys the respect and esteem of his comrades 
in the Grand Army circles and of the entire community where he is now 
spending his declining years. 

A. W. Blumberg was one of the first pioneer settlers at the Village 
of Nordhoff, in Ventura County, and had a very important part in its 
early development and business enterprise. He arrived at Ojai Valley 
January 12, 1874. The townsite had only recently been laid out and 
subdivided, and he took advantage of an offer made by the townsite 
promoters, who gave him twenty acres of land in return for building 
the first hotel in the village, and which also was the first building to be 
built in the town. The owners of that land had paid only $4.25 an acre, 
and on that basis Mr. Blumberg did not receive a fabulous sum as a 
bonus for his enterprise in establishing the pioneer hotel. However, 
his faith in the village was well justified. It is said that in 1890 Mr.. 
Blumberg sold one-fourth of an acre of his original holdings for the 
sum of $5,000. The hotel established by him was at first called the 
Nordhoff, but afterwards became the Ojai House. He conducted it 
under his personal supervision for three years. 

Aside from what he did in the early development of the Village of 
Nordhoff, his name should also be associated with the bringing to public 
attention the resources of the marvelous canyon and montainous district 
north of Nordhoff. On January 20, 1887, having 'acquired the sur- 
rounding land, he opened what was known as the Ojai Hot Springs 
Resort in the Matailija Canyon — five miles north of Nordhoff. Later he 
changed the name to Matailija Springs. He had eighty acres of land there, 
including several hot springs, whose waters have for many years enjoyed 
a high reputation for their healing qualities. Around these springs Mr. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 749 

Blumberg built the Matailija House, also cottages, bath house, store 
and postoffice, and started the resort which has been there ever since. 
He was the first postmaster — and continued as postmaster until his 
death — and it was his enterprising qualities as a business man that brought 
success to an enterprise which, in the hands of a less able person, would 
have failed. Mr. Blumberg continued to look after his business at 
Matilija and his various interests at Nordhoff and elsewhere until his 
death on September 28, 1899. 

The late Mr. Blumberg was a man of exceptional ability and had 
been educated as a lawyer, though he did not practice after coming to 
California. He was bom in Roxbury, Delaware County, New York, 
July 9, 1836. He was of Scotch and German ancestry. His grandfather, 
George Blumberg, came from Germany about the time of the Revo- 
lutionary war, was employed for a time in the British army, and after- 
wards settled in Delaware County, New York. The father of the late 
Mr. Blumberg was Christopher Blumberg, who married Jane Mackey, 
also a native of New York, and a daughter of Thomas Mackey, who 
was of Scotch ancestry. 

A. W. Bltunberg was educated in New York and, going West to Iowa, 
was admitted to the bar of that state, where he practiced. He came 
to California in 1872, spending a year or two in Los Angeles before 
coming to Ventura County. 

In 1859 he married Miss Catherine E. Van Curren, a daughter of 
Calvin Van Curren, both of whom were natives of New York State. 
Mr. and Mrs. Blumberg had five children, three of whom are still living. 
One of the sons was the late Wheeler C. Blumberg, mentioned else- 
where as the originator of the famous Wheeler's Hot Springs in Ven- 
tura County. The three living children are: Inez, who was bom in 
Erie, Whiteside County, Illinois, January 6, 1862, is now Mrs. J. B. 
Berry and is the oldest living citizen of Nordhoff today, who was there 
when the town was founded ; Ward Blumberg was bom in Ogden, Iowa, 
May 12, 1872, and is now a resident of Los Angeles; Irene May was 
the first child bom in the Village of Nordhoff, her birth occurring 
September 29, 1874, and she is now Mrs. William Rickell, living in 
Crescent Mills, California. 

The Town of Nordhoff was named by Mrs. A. W. Blumberg, after 
the late eminent joumalist and author, "Charles Nordhoff.*' It was 
through his writings that she and her husband came to California. She 
said he gave such glowing descriptions of the beautiful valleys of Cali- 
fomia she thought this must be the one he described and thought he 
should have the honor of the name of the town. Mr. Nordhoff and 
family in later years visited several times with Mr. Blumberg and family 
and they became close friends. A strange coincidence is the fact that 
the Memorial Fountain given to the Town of Nordhoff in 1904, in 
memory of Miss Evelyn Hunter Nordhoff, Mr. Nordhoff's daughter, was 
placed in the identical spot where Mrs. Blumberg sat on a log when 
she named the town after her father. 



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750 ^ANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

J. B. Berry, who has been identified with California for forty years 
and has been active in business affairs at Nordhoff for the greater part 
of that time, was bom in Bath, Maine, August 19, 1857, and comes of 
old New England stock. His parents, Daniel H. and Sarah (Purington) 
Berry, were both natives of Maine. The former was a locomotive 
engineer and met an accidental death in his vocation. The mother sub- 
sequently removed to California and lived at Santa Paula. 

The only one now living of three children, J. B. Berry, acquired his 
early education in Brunswick, Maine, and in the Franklin Home School 
at Topsham in that state. His first occupation was seafaring, but he 
left the sea after four years, and soon started across the plains for 
California. He arrived at San Francisco September 10, 1876, and the 
first year was spent in the dairy business at Oakland. He also worked 
in the mines of Mono County for a time, and for three years was driver 
of a six-horse stage over the mountainous roads. 

After these varied experiences he came to Ventura County and engaged 
in ranching near Santa Paula. He also began investing in property in 
and around Nordhoff, acquiring a block of land in that town, and for 
a number of years he was also proprietor of the hotel known as Berry 
Villa, located among the beautiful live oaks which are found in so much 
magnificanoe in the Ojai Valley. Mr. Berry was also proprietor of the 
Nordhoff City Water Company until he sold the plant in 191 3 to the 
Nordhoff Power Company. He is a republican in politics, has taken 
a lively interest in all matters connected with the material and civic 
progress of his home town, and is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

In 1882 he married Miss Inez Blumberg, a- natural born artist of some 
renown, daughter of the late A. W. Blumberg, whose many conspicuous 
activities in connection with the early history of the Ojai Valley have 
been described elsewhere. ♦ 

Alfred Howard Avery. A fine representative of the self-made men 
of our country, Alfred Howard Avery, a well-known and respected citizen 
of Santa Barbara, has been, in truth, the architect of his own fortune, 
through his industry, perseverance and ability having achieved an honored 
position among the active and successful contractors and builders of Santa 
Barbara County. A son of Alfred J. and Nellie (Wade) Avery, he was 
born, April 22, 1872, in New York City, of English ancestry. 

Accompanying his parents to Kansas when a child, Alfred H. Avery 
was educated in the public schools of Atchison. He subsequently learned 
the carpenter's trade while assisting his father, who was a contractor and 
builder, with him working at his trade in Horton, Kansas, Denver, and 
Seattle. In 1893 ^^^- Avery opened a carpenter's shop in Saint Joseph, 
Missouri, where he built up a good business, remaining in that city until 
1904. Coming to Santa Barbara in that year, he worked first as superin- 
tendent for William Butler and J. C. F. Miller, and on giving up that 
position started in business on his own account. As a contractor and 
builder Mr. Avery has met with unquestioned success, among the important 
contracts which he has satisfactorily filled having been the erection of the 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 751 

Higginson Building, the Kennedey Building, the F. Bain Building, the 
Wetmore Building, and the Doctor Conrad Building, all of which stand as 
memorials to his architectural tastes and his mechanical skill. He was also 
associated with M. Johnson in the construction of the American Film 
Company's plant. He subsequently erected for Owen Knapp a beautiful 
and attractive home in the mountains, "Mountain Lodge," which is located 
at the very top of the range, just out of the city. 

Mr. Avery married, at Saint Joseph, Missouri, May i8, 1893, Miss 
Bessie Purdy, and into their pleasant home six children have made their 
advent^ as follows : Gladys, who married Everett Burquin, has one son ; 
Alfred James ; Hazel ; Dorothy ; Benjamin ; and Carl, deceased. Politically 
Mr. Avery is a republican, but not an active worker in party ranks. Fra- 
ternally he belongs to Lodge No. 613, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks ; and to the Independent Order of Foresters. Religiously he is iden- 
tified with the Methodist Church. 

Delbert T. Beckwith. In all the varied fortunes of the famous and 
fertile Santa Clara Valley the members of the Beckwith family have had 
a part for over forty years. 

The work by which he has made himself a factor in this valley Mr. 
Delbert T. Beckwith has performed as a rancher and fruit grower. He 
was bom in Eaton County, Michigan, January 31, 1869, and is a son of 
Francis Jefferson Beckwith, whose career as a pioneer in Southern Cali- 
fornia has been sketched on other pages. Delbert T. Beckwith came out 
to California with his parents in 1874 when he was five years of age. 
He grew up in Ventura County, attended the public schools there till the 
age of seventeen, and for several years had a good deal of practical expe- 
rience in working on his father's ranch. 

He made his independent start by renting forty acres from his father. 
He farmed that until 1892, when his father gave him a deed of title to the 
land, and with the death of his father on December 30, 1901, he inherited 
seventy acres additional. He made all that tract a splendid bean planta- 
tion, and for years has been one of the leading bean growers in the valley. 
In 1905 Mr. Beckwith bought an eighteen acre walnut orchard, and now 
lives on that place, which is not far from his other land in Santa Clara 
Valley. 

Mr. Beckwith is a republican. In Santa Paula in July, 1889, he married 
Miss Abbie Smith, a native of Michigan. They are the parents of three 
children : Mrs. Pearl Armstrong of Ventura County ; Fred, who is twenty- 
four years of age and is working on the ranch with his father; and Mrs. 
Ruth Lederle of Los Angeles. 

Jonathan F. Fulkerson. For about twenty-five years Jonathan F. 
Fulkerson has borne a very influential and active part in the industrial 
and civic affairs of that community known as Somis, Ventura County. 
It is noteworthy that he was the first postmaster of that village and is 
now known as head of one of the largest mercantile concerns of the town. 

Bom in Pope County, Illinois, February 17, 1867, his early life was 



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752 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

spent largely in Kansas until he came to California. His parents were 
William B. and Mary (Whiteside) Fulkerson. William B. Fulkerson, a 
native of Illinois, learned the shoemaker trade in early youth, but his 
main business in life was farming. In 1872 he left Illinois and removed 
to Rooks County, Kansas, later to Graham County in the same state, and 
for a time conducted a hotel at Bogue. His wife, Mary Whiteside, was 
also bom in Illinois and died in Kansas in 1879 ^^ ^^e age of thirty-five. 

Reared in Kansas, Jonathan F. Fulkerson obtained a public school edu- 
cation, and at Webster, Kansas, served an apprenticeship at the trade of 
blacksmiths It was with considerable experience and proficiency jn this 
line that he arrived on March 23, 1891, at Somis, in Ventura County, 
with which region his activities have since been identified. He followed 
his trade for several years, and in January, 1900, bought an independent 
shop. People came to rely upon him for his expert workmanship and 
the reliable nature of the service rendered, and he was the recipient of 
many favors as well as a large patronage. In December, 191 3, he sold 
out his blacksmithing shop and established his present business as a 
farming implement and general hardware dealer. Eighteen months after 
starting his hardware business the entire concern burned down, entailing 
about a $10,000 loss, but Mr. Fulkerson rebuilt his store property and 
started anew with a fine stock of goods. 

As already mentioned, he was the first postmaster appointed at Somis, 
being appointed to that office May 12, 1893, and resigning in 1895. ^^ 
1902 he served as school trustee. He is a democrat, is master of Oxnard 
Lodge No. 341, Free and Accepted Masons, is affiliated with Oxnard 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, Ventura Commandery of the Knights Tem- 
plar, the Shrine at Los Angeles, the Chapter of the Eastern Star, and is 
past consul of the Somis Camp of the Modern Woodmen of America. 

In Fairview, California, December 25, 1892, Mr. Fulkerson married 
Miss Frances Gertrude Hughes. They are the parents of three children : 
Mrs. Birdie Culbert of Ventura County ; Inez, who is attending the public 
schools ; and Jonathan Floyd, now two years of age. 

Charles Basolo, of Fillmore, Ventura County, is a native of Italy, 
and his experiences have made him familiar with many parts of the 
civilized world. 

His home has been in Ventura County since 1895, when he started out 
as a rancher, rented one hundred eighty acres in the Santa Qara X^'alley 
near Fillmore. He had the energy, the studious attention to details, and 
the thrift characteristic of his race, and from the first he has steadily pros- 
pered. In 1898 he gave up his first place and rented two hundred nineteen 
acres across the road. He continued his work as a farmer there and in 
1908 was able to purchase the land and it now comprises one of the best 
estates in the valley. Twenty acres are planted in lemons and oranges, 
while the rest he uses for the growing of beans and alfalfa. 

Charles Basolo was bom in Turin, Italy, November 25, 1862. His 
father was Dominick Basolo. His early life was spent on his father's 
farm, where he remained to the age of seventeen, in the meantime gain- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 753 

ing the advantages of the schools. On leaving Italy he first went to 
France and afterwards for a time worked in the silver mines of Africa. 
Later he took up farming near his birthplace in Italy, and in 1888 emi- 
grated to America, locating at Decatur, Illinois, where he was an employe 
in the coal mines until he came out to California. 

Mr. Basolo was married in Genoa, Italy, to Celestina Paratica on 
June 23, 1888, and almost immediately after their marriage they set out 
for America and together they have gained a substantial fortune in the 
New World. They are the parents of ten children: Dominick, who is 
in the hay and grain business at Fillmore; Joseph, associated with his 
father in farming; Mary, Mrs. Earle Middleworth of Fillmore; Rose, 
Mrs. Harry Hastings of Fillmore; Joanna at home; Jolena, who is a 
student in the high school; Bismark and Charles, both on their father's 
farm ; Nellie and George who are still students in the public schools. 

Miles M. Balcom has a record of more than forty years of successful 
participation in the hay, stock raising, and bean growing activities of 
Southern California. 

The family was introduced into Ventura County in 1873, when he was 
about seven years of age. He is a son of the late William Elder Balcom, 
who was bom at Paradise Valley in Nova Scotia, September 26, 1819. 
Though the family lived for many years in the Dominion of Canada, they 
are originally of colonial stock, and of Scotch and English lineage. The 
Balcoms came to America more than 200 years ago, settling in Rhode 
Island and were members of the community established by the venerated 
koger Williams. After they had lived in New England for a century the 
American colonies revolted and set up an independent government. The 
Balcoms were what afterwards became known as United Empire Loyalists, 
were true to the king, and in the colonies endured the obloquy of being 
called Tories. Their loyalty was unshaken even though all their property 
was confiscated and they had to leave and seek a refuge on the shores of 
Nova Scotia. There they gathered to establish a new home in Acadie, the 
land immortalized by Longfellow in his poem Evangeline. 

William Elder Balcom was married in Nova Scotia, February 15, 1858, 
to Miss Margaret Gannon of St. Johns, Nova Scotia. In 1863, leaving 
Nova Scotia, he came out to California. Several years were spent in and 
around Oakland, where his principal occupation was hotel keeping. In 
1873 he brought his family to what is now Ventura County, but was then 
a part of Santa Barbara County. Here he was engaged in ranching, and 
in other successful business activities until his death on December i, 1901, 
when he was past eighty-two years of age. Mr. W. E. Balcom was 'the 
first purchaser on the Tom More tract after it was opened up for settle- 
ment, buying 265 acres. The price at that time was $25 per acre. In 
1914, some of Mr. Balcom's heirs were offered $750 per acre for some of 
the same land. Mr. Balcom was an active member of the Universalist 
Church. He and his wife had eight children: James Balcom of Santa 
Paula; Mrs. Phebe Lee of Santa Paula; Miles of Santa Paula; William 
E. of Arizona; Mrs. Lena Morgan of Redlands, California; Henry, of 



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7M .vVXlA iiXklJAKA .^ \V JA IS nlilSI'D 

Sal". I I t.-l.i. Ml- ( iforgia IS^i-r::-!.' •»! > «»^ A'a;»^^it's ; au'l Mi 

'■' ! ■ \i ''..'■•.! '*.t^ •-•IP. will'' i.. '-'.«r'- ri'^^w-n 111 S.iti r • • 

cjl iL' ^'\': .1; ' ' \ I'lilur.i ( 11: I. :• •' '• t t.Jhi' i.iowd 'iri\ I' ^ . 

raiic!:. In iSX«) he rented that i.iiKf. i. I .•,.- .• 'v.i\ . .•^ li^ed in faiic •■ 
it UMtil Hmv tu that year he rri:."-c ■ ;< ! ■•- \r. v ■ • •inily an<l -ci '■ • 
thr ! l.iiTiinr! ov 1 Jiiiker raii'di ot 5* <-> *( :r I i;.it :..!•. 1. .- .i-;\v the lU- o '» 
tnwT^;*. r Mi". r.a]if;:ni '^ :i • iIi-:"h 1 .t;:, 1 •.,.'■ i;i" "<•.-(• of lire *ii - 
:< : i •( htna U-aii^ I'l '»uit ■f<'i]..'i ■ t Ma ^' ■" ''i "■^' '« "m;' '_i» to W-k 
inia (. < n'liv, he at^iMlI^«i twt i^v lu-u .nTf.- r, . 1 >':!!. fM h's fiithtr'^ 
Cytale ] ht^ (.-mkI i> ice'ttul u. iUe >.'\i;i I i -m \ ' ^y . *•■! r ■"" *ii' ti h** 
ha^ huu. ht «j\U a i)orti()n of the ii:'' re^T- uf tIh .•"»<■'- ^ ,t .. -.-i u )\^ ...\i's 
im;- ai r» >. c»»fi^n*tulin^' a ^i'l'_-:i hd t. 'i.tr .4-' i)! -r •! ir ^- j' - a':-' 'mi-.n :; 
a^ d.». ii ilc'>Tr. I ►cnun lan' }i. 

Itprn,.in\ year> he ha^ heen one of thi ....,•■•.-•'' t-. '"i^ •*• ;!^- I.im u 1 
i»r(.vjur'!V nf this ^eelioIl of the stal<^ ( M. ! -:■... ■:• : . i-^.-'r. he ''m '■ •, •• 
a ' ' ' » ai It 1 i<>\ ernnirm i laim near llni ! <'.<'n'. , J i.- pi-' j)! -.le ! v\ 
i'.':ii\ am* hi im- ,ii,d devotes it also to ^toek r . ..- " ',.1 v- . .^I 
I '.in t \.n- ti' -'it . p'm) aeres In Fresno Ci>iiT.tv 

< *:. i". ',.!. :\ o», i>"^\ in Santa Tania lie nuMt-: ^'■'^ -^irih i- r-, ' 
I'm't'. . r a ' .'• e '-:* -^ »"^ 'i,i and a d.^np^hter of ! \ I.. .- t r a un.^i . '•! 
>a;.M 1 .. s . .!* '' ' • •'. ''i •>•! ''tie t)f the ]^u i .-t . <• '- of \ m.v / 

1 ouniy 'J W ,1, ' .'. •* .1 harj;e fiinii* . .'>i :..;d-(Mi. \[i , ' 

l^arle L\<tn> '>♦ I m^'">. v.* . ••'■ ; !^ V. l-'-.d. ..t j. v^'-,- i. innv twtn:^ 
three year^ uf a^,'- aiid i^ n.:. !!•,•• '■ le^ f itht r"-* t,,v. : '•. I re-no ( on:.'\ 
r:ir!, i\vent\ two yrars ol .t.;*- M.fl ( :!.ol''.\. <1 on ^'.- ^ I'ui's l>»nu- pl'.i* 
i I'^lrr. ,\i:ci\ ninetcrij aiid in the >anta l-'anl.^ 1 ! -r^ '^.i^mI; ( ojs. ]>r\\.> 
l.U'. I*, and I'iioehe. ail of whom are in tlie iiulli ^t h«! . 

Ml. [),dtoni aKo owns a half int<M-e<t ni ;,2t> avri^ ii--^ north *d ir- 
h^.nn-^tr.; '. and that is devoted to .-^tock rai.^Iiii;. 

( »>( \K I). Stku art. In every f(dk)winj:^ tre!^•rat!<':' Mu people «»f \ ^ . 
tnra C ounty wdl liaxc a ^rowM*n^ interest in th'- | i'»;u'r ^MtU-rs. (h« ^c wi ■- 
haul the ^nh'-.tann:J foundation and framework for tin* [iro.-pt t it\ ulr. ', 
later eon)*--^ Iii\e tiM^Mtl. Anionj^ tlie names wli^h inn^t he (mu.'*'\ * 
1:. tl e h-t uf I ■ 'iut*: of \ cntiira ('oitntv is Mr. (\--ear I ». St< wtrt. 1 i." 
lixuii^ pT i ;ii ,*.'■ I. ..,r.| |,..t ijn- .,rt. of three sc-oie aiid ten at '"..-tr.^'n. 
r^or neafl\ ! .ilt .t -i'mmux !,e h'^ h,;d his >hare in the aeti\ Ities thi»t ii.ik* 
the'modeMi \en:uia toutUy a!:d ha^ heen a witness to all the tr.m^l' nt 
develoj>ment .^inec th's wa< :\u e\(hisive t^razinq" rei^ion. 

nf a i'<nnf-tr familv in Southern Mi^hicran. he was l)oni at I'atile 

( TcrK, m C dl.onn Coinitv. of tliat state, August 20, 1845. His j-artMits 

wr'.- I iioch anrl Xaney A. Srewart. llis fath<T was reared on a farm 

'" 'iM (,f the eastern states, and when Sonthern Michig'an was still an 

' : i.'hroken wilderness he pioneered into that country and c«^tah- 

. ' ' .1 '• Mne in Calluniii C'onnty, living there the greater part of his life 



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754 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Santa Paula ; Mrs. Georgia Pickering of Los Angeles ; and Miss May of 
Santa Paula. 

Miles M. Balcom was bom while his parents resided in San Francisco, 
on May 29, 1866. He had some education in the public schools in that part 
of the state and in Ventura County after the family moved here in 1873. 
In 1875, leaving school he found employment on his father's 260 acre 
ranch. In 1889 he rented that ranch and was actively engaged in farming 
it until 1903. In that year he removed to Los Angeles County and rented 
the Hammel & Dinker ranch of 500 acres. That ranch is now the Beverly 
townsite. Mr. Balcom has the distinction of having been one of the first 
to raise lima beans in that section of the state. In 1905, returning to Ven- 
tura County, he acquired twenty-nine acres as his share of his father's 
estate. This land is located in the Santa Clara Valley and since then he 
has bought out a portion of the interests of the other heirs, and now owns 
167 acres, constituting a splendid estate, all planted in beans and known 
as the Balcom Benito ranch. 

For many years he has been one of the aggressive factors in the landed 
prosperity of this section of the state. On February 11, 1889, he took up 
a 160-acre Government claim near Bardsdale, and has that planted in 
barley and beans and devotes it also to stock raising purposes. Mr. Bal- 
com owns another 160 acres in Fresno County. 

On February 10, 1889, in Santa Paula he married Miss Sarah Isabel 
Barker, a native of Nevada and a daughter of J. A. Barker, a rancher of 
Santa Paula until his death and one of the pioneer settlers of Ventura 
County. They are the parents of a large family of children: Mrs. J. 
Earle Evans of Fresno, California; E. E. Balcom, who is now twenty- 
three years of age and is managing his father's ranch in Fresno County ; 
Earl, twenty-two years of age and employed on his father's home place ; 
Lester, aged nineteen and in the Santa Paula High Schpol; Lois, Delia. 
Lucile and Phoebe, all of whom are in the public schools. 

Mr. Balcom also owns a half interest in 320 acres just north of his 
homestead, and that is devoted to stock raising. 

Oscar D. Stewart. In every following generation the people of Ven- 
tura County will have a growing interest in the pioneer settlers, those who 
laid the substantial foundation and framework for the prosperity which 
later comers have enjoyed. Among the names which must be enrolled 
in the list of pioneers of Ventura County is Mr. Oscar D. Stewart, now 
living practically retired past the age of three score and ten at Gardena. 
For nearly half a century he has had his share in the activities that make 
the' modem Ventura County and has been a witness to all the transient 
development since this was an exclusive grazing region. 

Of a pioneer family in Southern Michigan, he was bom at Battle 
Creek, in Calhoun County, of that state, August 20, 1845. His parents 
were Enoch and Nancy A. Stewart. His father was reared on a farm 
in one of the eastern states, and when Southern Michigan was still an 
almost unbroken wilderness he pioneered into that country and estab- 
lished a home in Calhoun County, living there the greater part of his life. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 755 

He finally came out to California, and died February i, 1896, at the age of 
seventy-nine. He was the father of three children. 

Oscar D. Stewart's early life was spent in his native county in Mich- 
igan, and as a boy he came to know what frontier life meant. He attended 
some of the old subscription schools, but was best fortified for an inde- 
pendent career by the training he received on the home farm. 

When about twenty years of age, in 1864, he started for the West. 
He came to California by the overland route before the days of trans- 
continental expresses and was in this state for one year. It is probable 
that he became homesick, in spite of a deep-seated satisfaction with this 
sunny clime, and at any rate he returned to Michigan to visit home and 
family. One year there was sufficient to convince him that his real destiny 
was on the Pacific slope, and since then California has been his home 
state. For the first two years he lived in the vicinity of Sacramento, but 
in 1868 came to Ventura County. Since, then, with the exception of 
two years spent in Oregon, his home has been in this county continuously. 

After locating here he spent some months as a farm hand on the 
various large ranches of this vicinity, but in the fall of 1868 he located on 
the ranch now farmed and managed by his son, A. Clyde. Mr. Stewart 
retired from the active responsibilities of farming some years ago and is 
now living in Gardena, California. 

On the 1st of August, 1869, he married Fredericka Louise Sip, who 
was bom in Ohio. They became the parents of five children: George, 
born June 11, 1870, a resident of Camarillo, and married Lillas Shields; 
Edward J., bom September 24, 1871, living in the same part of Ventura 
County, and married Lucy Russell; Walter O., bom July 16, 1873, living 
near Oxnard, and married Anna Sebastian ; Clara A., bom February 19, 
1875, the wife of George Hughes, and Arthur Clyde. The father of these 
children has always been an active supporter of the democratic party. 

Arthur Clyde Stewart, the youngest child pf Oscar D. Stewart, was 
bom in Ventura County, October 30, 1883. His enterprising and active 
years have been spent in this district where he was bom. He attended 
the Pleasant Valley district school until the age of sixteen, and was then 
given an opportunity to show what he was worth on his father's farm. 
He was one of the workers on the Stewart ranch until 1905, and since 
then has been renting the old homestead, which consists of ninety-eight 
acres, and also 145 acres of the Schmitz tract. All this land is planted 
in beans, and he is one of the successful cultivators of that crop in Ven- 
tura County. Under his supervision he employs from three to twenty men 
during the busy season. 

Mr. Stewart is a member of the Fratemal Brotherhood, the Modem 
Woodmen of America, and like his father is a democrat. In Camarillo, 
June 4, 1905, he married Katherine Schmitz. They have one child, 
Myrtle, now seven years of age and attending the public schools. 

Fred H. Sheldon belongs almost to the pioneer class of residents in 
Ventura County. This has been his principal home for more than forty 
years and his interests and business identify him with the rich and fertile 



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756 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Ojai Valley around Nordhoflf, where he owns one of the highly improved 
and valuable orange groves and ranches. 

He is a son of Charles H. Sheldon, whose name also belongs among 
the early settlers of Ventura County. Charles H. Sheldon was bom at 
Comstock, Michigan, June 9, 1839, and represented a family that was 
among the earliest settlers in that district of Southwestern Michigan. At 
Kalamazoo, Michigan, he learned the trade of blacksmith, and followed 
it as a journeyman until 1875. In that year coming to California, he 
worked at his trade in Santa Barbara for a year, and then moved to Ven- 
tura, where he formed a partnership with N. Vickers. They conducted 
one of the chief blacksmithing concerns of the city until Mr. Sheldon 
retired in 1900. At Decatur, Michigan, he married Miss Elizabeth Young. 
Their four children are: C. L. Sheldon of Santa Paula; Mrs. Tyson of 
Pasadena ; Mrs. McPhail of Oakland, California ; and Fred H. 

Fred H. Sheldon was bom in Decatur, Michigan, April 26, 1862, was 
educated in the public schools there, but in 1876 at the age of twelve joined 
his father in Ventura. He continued to attend the Ventura public schools 
until 1880, and then with a view to a better preparation for business life 
he spent two years in the Pacific Business College at San Francisco. On 
returning to Ventura County, he accepted employment as bookeeper with 
the Blanchard & Bradley flour mill at Santa Paula, remaining two years 
in their service. After that he engaged in ranching in different locations 
in Ventura County, and in 1887 he went to the Matilija Canyon, north of 
Nordhoff and bought the eighty acres upon which he still concentrates his 
efforts as a farmer and fmit grower. Ten acres have been planted in 
oranges and the balance is hill land used chiefly for grazing purposes. 

Mr. Sheldon is a member of the Jack Boyd Club of Nordhoff. He is 
secretary of the board of education of Nordhoff, and has been a member 
of that board since its organization. He has also been a trustee of the 
Matilija Grammar School for thirty years. He is a republican. In Berry 
County, Michigan, October 20, 1901, he married Miss Lillian Pope, a 
native of Michigan and a daughter of A. C. Pope. They have two chil- 
dren: Fred H. Jr., aged sixteen, is a student in the University of Cal- 
ifornia, and Kenneth P., aged twelve, is attending the public school at 
Nordhoflf. 

Guv T. Stetson, who is one of the orange growers of. the Ojai 
Valley, a director in the Ojai Orange Association, and formerly secretary 
and director of the Farm Bureau of Ventura County, was born in Sioux 
City, Iowa, February 25, 1884, a son of Henry Elmer and Harriet M. 
Stetson. 

Henry Elmer Stetson, his father, now living retired at Santa Barbara, 
has also had an important share in the development of Ventura County's 
resources. He was bom at Farmington, Illinois, April 21, 1861, was 
educated in the public schools, the Academy at Lake Forest, Illinois, and 
Andover Academy at Andover, Massachusetts, and after the completion 
of his education he removed to Sioux City, Iowa, where he engaged in 
the wholesale commission business. Though very successful and building 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 757 

up a splendid enterprise, ill health made it advisable for him to sell out 
in 1893, ^^d after several years of residence abroad he came in 1896 to 
the Ojai Valley of Ventura County, buying seventy-five acres of land. 
Under his personal supervision five acres of this were set out and devel- 
oped as an orange grove. The ranch was largely in the nature of an 
investment and a means of recreation, and in 1912 he sold a part of his 
holdings to his son Guy and has since lived in Santa Barbara. 

Guy T. Stetson had an exceedingly liberal education preparatory to 
his entrance into commercial life. He attended public schools until his 
parents came to California in 1896, and here he entered the noted Thacher 
School for Boys at NordhofF and remained a student in that model pre- 
paratory school five years. He then went East to his father's old school, 
the Andover Academy at Andover, Massachusetts, where he was gradu- 
ated in 1902, following which, perhaps as a result of the early influences 
of the Thacher School, whose head is a prominent Yale graduate, he 
entered Yale University and was graduated in 1906. 

Mr. Stetson for the next three years was receiving teller in the Com* 
mercial German National Bank at Peoria, Illinois, and then returned to 
California. For a year he worked on his father's ranch in the Ojai 
Valley, and left that employment to become receiving teller for the First 
National Bank of Fresno, California. He remained with the bank only 
six months, returning to his father's ranch, and in 191 2 purchasing fifty- 
four acres of that, which he at once proceeded to develop as a fruit raising 
proposition. He now has seventeen acres in oranges and six acres of 
olives. He is also a stockholder in the Santa Barbara Olive Company. 

He is active socially, a member of the Jack Boyd Club of Nordhoff, 
the Ojai Men's League and the Yale Qub of Southern California, and is 
a Delta Kappa Epsilon college fraternity man. Politically he is a repub- 
lican. In Ventura on August 14, 1912, he married Inez Came. Mrs. 
Stetson is a native of Illinois and a daughter of John Came, a capitalist 
and rancher of Ventura County and founder of the First National Bank 
of Ventura. He is now deceased. His oldest son, Edgar, is now cashier 
of that bank. Mr. Came was prominent in the development and progress 
of the county and was one of the large land holders. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stetson have one child, Thomas Carne Stetson, three years old. 

J. C. Bainbridge, M. D. Since 1899 Doctor Bainbridge has had his 
home and his professional practice at Santa Barbara. His attainments 
and long experience give him unquestioned rank among the foremost 
physicians and surgeons in California. For a number of years he was a 
specialist in diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat before coming to 
Santa Barbara, but the bulk of his practice is now as a general physician 
and surgeon. 

Doctor Bainbridge is now and has been for the last ten years serving 
as county physician of Santa Barbara County. He is also surgeon for 
the Native Sons and the Native Daughters of the Golden West, and 
examining physician for the Woodmen of the World and the Knights of 
Pythias. He is also medical surgeon for the following insurance com- 

VoL n— 18 



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758 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

panics: Mutual Ufe, New York Mutual, Pacific Mutual, State Life of 
Indiana and Occidental Life of California and was a member of the 
state board of medical examiners from 1904 to 1907. 

Doctor Bainbridge is well known to the profession as a contributor 
to medical and surgical literature. Some of his articles that have appeared 
in American medical journals have been extensively copied and editorially 
commented upon by the journals of Vienna and Berlin. He is a keen 
student, has an original mind and has advanced a number of theories and 
adaptations and modifications of accepted practice which have attracted 
much attention. For years Doctor Bainbridge was secretary of the 
Eclectic Medical Society of California and is a member of the San Fran- 
cisco Society of Physicians and Surgeons, and also of the local medical 
organizations at Santa Barbara. He was the first physician in Santa 
Barbara to introduce an X-Ray machine into his office, and he has also 
acquired an extensive equipment required for his special lines of work. 
From 1894 until 1899 Doctor Bainbridge has had charge of the eye 
and ear clinics in the California Medical College. He gave up that posi- 
tion and also his private practice in San Francisco and came to Santa 
Barbara to find a climate more suitable to his wife. 

Doctor Bainbridge was bom near St. Louis, Missouri, November 23, 
1862, but has spent the greater part of his life in California. His family 
came to this state when he was about twelve years of age. In the mean- 
time he had attended public school in Lincoln County, Missouri, and in 
1878 he graduated from the high school at Stockton, California. After 
completing a course in the Stockton Business College and Normal School 
he remained with that institution as professor of mathematics, and he 
also began his medical studies during that time under his father. 

Doctor Bainbridge's father was a very prominent early physician of 
California, and he comes of very prominent ancestry. From England, 
the original seat of the family, members of the name settled in Virginia. 
The great-grandfather of Doctor Bainbridge was bom in Virginia, and 
he served as a private soldier in the Revolution and as a major in the 
War of 1812. This Revolutionary soldier was a brother of Commodore 
William Bainbridge, whose exploits as one of the daring naval com- 
manders in the early years of our national history have become a theme 
for nearly every historical text book on the history of the United States. 
Doctor Bainbridge's grandfather, E. B. Bainbridge, was bora near Lex- 
ington, Kentucky, in 1804, afterward removed to Wisconsin, from there 
to St. Louis, Missouri, and spent his last years near Lexington, Kentucky. 

Dr. J. A. Bainbridge, father of the Santa Barbara physician, was bom 
in Wisconsin, graduated in i860 from the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical 
College, practiced at Troy, Missouri, and then at St. Louis, and in 1874 
came to Stockton, California. He finally combined his practice as a 
physician and the management of a large grain ranch at Lathrop, Cal- 
ifornia. Dr. J. A. Bainbridge married Mary E. Herold, who was bom 
in Missouri and died in Califomia in 1885. Her father, Thomas Herold, 
a native of Wuertemberg, Germany, was graduated in medicine from 
the University of Wuertemberg, and after coming to this country prac- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 759 

ticed at New Orleans, but finally gave up his profession to become a 
business man. For many years he was a prominent tobacco manufac- 
turer, and in partnership with his sons started the tobacco factory later 
owned by Drummond & Co. John Drummond, whose name figtired 
so prominently in the American tobacco industry, was at one time 
employed by W. G. Herold & Co. Mr. Herold owned large amounts 
of land in the Mississippi Valley and at one time operated a line of 
boats on the Mississippi River. He died on one of his farms in Lincoln 
County, Missouri. 

Doctor Bainbridge was third in a family of five sons and five daugh- 
ters, eight of whom reached mature years. Three of the daughters mar- 
ried and the other sons are : E. D. Bainbridge, a California rancher ; B. 
M. Bainbridge, a California school man, and C. E., who graduated from 
the California Medical College and the New York Polyclinic and prac- 
ticed at Sacramento, but is now deceased. 

In 1883 Dr. J. C. Bainbridge entered the California Medical College 
at San Francisco, where he was graduated M. D. in 1886. In his earlier 
years he suffered a great deal from ill health, and he spent much time 
in extensive and world-wide travel as a means of recuperation. After 
leaving medical college, instead of beginning active practice he was the 
principal of a school in Sacramento three years. From 1889 to 1891 he 
traveled, visiting England, Scotland and other European countries ; also 
some of the cities of South America, and following that trip he went to 
Australia and returned to the United States by way of Yokohama, and 
for six months lived in British Columbia. 

From 1891 until January, 1894, Doctor Bainbridge was superintendent 
of instruction at Heald's Business College in San Francisco. He resigned 
that position to take his place as an instructor and also as a student in 
the California Medical College, and later for almost a year pursued 
special courses in eye, ear, nose and throat at the New York Polyclinic. 

In San Francisco Doctor Bainbridge married Miss Dora A. Waters. 
She was bom in California, and her father, Abraham Waters, was a 
native of England and came with his parents to the United States, settling 
at Richmond, Illinois. From there in early manhood he came west to 
California, and for a number of years was employed as a mineral expert. 
His death came as the result of drowning at the age of forty-seven. 
Abraham Waters was married in California to Susan Pedler, a native of 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. After the death of her husband she made her 
home in San Francisco. Three children were born to Doctor and Mrs. 
Bainbridge, two sons who are deceased and a daughter, Gertrude Alethe, 
who was bom in Santa Barbara thirteen years ago. Mrs. Bainbridge is 
a member of the Native Daughters of the Golden West, and both she 
and her husband are prominent members of the Santa Barbara Episcopal 
Church. Doctor Bainbridge is a prominent democrat and takes an active 
part in the affairs of his party, being chairman of the county central 
committee, and he has served in that position for the past fifteen years. 

James C. Leslie. As a contractor and builder James C. Leslie has 
contributed many of the important material improvements to the Ojai 



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760 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Valley, where he has lived for nearly thirty years. Mr. Leslie is also one 
of the prominent bee growers in this valley, and is a citizen whose 
influence and associations have always been on the side of progress. 

He early learned to rely upon himself, and his success has been a 
matter of hard work and of long continued concentration of energies 
toward the one end of making his service count for something in the 
world. He was bom in Famham, Province of Quebec, Canada, January 
19, 1862, a son of John and Betsy Ann (Tilson) Leslie. His education 
in the public schools was finished at the age of sixteen. The next four 
years he spent in a butter and cheese factory. Wisely looking ahead and 
seeking a new field in which to try his energies, he came west to California. 

His first location in this state was at Pomona, where he leased and 
operated the Brown's Hotel until 1888. In that year he came to Nordhoff 
and for two years was employed on Mr. S. D. Thacher's ranch. He had 
also perfected himself in the mechanical trade of carpenter and g^dually 
all his time was given to that work, being employed as carpenter for the 
Thacher School and for a number of other individuals in and around 
Nordhoff. He finally capitalized his skill and experience as a carpenter, 
and in 1908 engaged in the building and contracting business. Mr. Leslie 
is credited with having constructed nearly all the buildings in the Ojai 
Valley east of Nordhoflf, and he has also been employed as the contractor 
and builder of over twenty of the handsome structures which adorned 
the campus of the Thacher School for Boys, but eight of these were later 
destroyed by fire. 

Other interests have also claimed his attention. In 1889, the year 
after he came to Nordhoff, he took up a homestead of eighty-five acres 
northeast of the town, and his development work has made that a very 
valuable property. Twelve acres had been planted in eucalyptus trees. 
He early saw the advantages of bee culture in the valley, and beginning 
with a few hives he now has 200 producing colonies and has a considerable 
income from this source alone. 

Mr. Leslie is a member of the Boyd Qub of Nordhoff, of the Modem 
Woodmen of America, is a republican, and a tmstee in the Presb)rterian 
Church of Nordhoff. Near Montreal, Canada, in April, 1885, he married 
Miss Eliza Ann Hawthorne, a native of Canada and daughter of James 
Hawthorne. There are two children. Albert, now twenty-six years of 
age, is associated with his father in the contracting business. Edna has 
been liberally educated and is a teacher at Nordhoff. 

Pierre Lapeyre. The ranching interests of Ventura County have a 
worthy representative in the person of Pierre Lapeyre, whose farm of 
666 acres is located in Santa Rosa and Moorpark townships, four miles 
from Moorpark. Mr. Lapeyre is a native of France, but has lived in the 
United States for thirty-six years, and here has attained the success which 
has rewarded his efforts. He is a sample of the stable and energetic 
material which has combined to develop this section of the state in the 
past and which must be depended upon to conserve its interests in the 
future. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 761 

Pierre Lapeyre was bom in the province of Basses-Pyrenees, 
France, March 19, 1861, and is a son of Alexis and Marie Ann 
Lapeyre. His public school education ended when he was fourteen years 
old, but he has always been a close student, a keen observer and a great 
reader, and in this way has supplanted his school training with a vast 
store of valuable information on important subjects. When he left school 
Mr. Lapeyre commenced working on his father's farm and so continued 
until he was twenty years of age, at which time America called him to 
her hospitable shores, and from sunny France he made his way to 
golden California. On his arrival he began herding sheep in Los Angeles 
County, a vocation which he followed for /J^ years there. He next came 
to Ventura County and engaged in the same line of business, but in 1895 
disposed of his interests therein to become a farmer and rancher. In 
the meantime, in 1891, he had purchased 666 acres of valuable land in 
Santa Rosa and Moorpark townships, and this he has since operated. He 
has forty acres planted in apricots and peas, devotes 200 acres to hay, 
and the balance is pasture for his great herd of cattle, as well as other 
live stock of a high grade. Mr. Lapeyre has always been a progressive 
farmer and has been quick to recognize the value of new methods and 
improved machinery. The value of his farm has been greatly enhanced 
by the erection of large and modem building^, anJ the property is well 
fenced and drained, making it one of the ideal country places of the 
county. 

Mr. Lapeyre is a republican, but has not been a seeker after prefer- 
ment at the hands of his party, being content to confine his activities to 
the cultivation of his broad acres. He has assisted his community to 
grow and develop, both as a citizen and as a farmer, and has made a 
place for himself in the confidence of the people of his conununity. Mr. 
Lapeyre is unmarried. 

J. J. Burke. Some of the important improvements and enterprises 
that have opened up and developed the resources of the Ojai Valley are 
directly traceable to the energies of John J. Burke, one of the most 
prominent business men and financiers of Nordhoff. 

Mr. Burke came to Nordhoff when twenty-five years of age. His 
experiences up to that time may be briefly stated. He was bom in Picton, 
Ontario, Canada, March 8, 1862, a son of Richard Burke, and was 
educated in the public schools, left school at the age of eighteen, and 
worked three years as clerk in a dry goods store, and then went to Kansas, 
being similarly employed in a dry goods store at Emporia two years, and 
after that in a store at Sedalia, Missouri, for a similar period. 

On coming to Nordhoff he spent three months as clerk with F. P. 
Barrows, general merchant. At that time he was neither a capitalist nor 
a man who could command the resources of capital. His rise to prom- 
inence has been entirely the result of his individual energies and the 
success with which he has handled various undertakings. On leaving 
the store at Nordhoff he rented 275 acres of the Soule Ranch near Nord- 
hoff, and farmed it for one year. He then resumed clerking with the 



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762 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Van Curren Grocery Store until 1889, and then took up a 160-acre Gov- 
ernment claim in Lion Canyon, and again had a ranching experience for 
a year. Leasing the old Ojai Inn at Nordhoff, he conducted it a year, 
and was then employed to close out a merchandise store at San Luis 
Obispo. It required three months to get the business cleared up, and 
since returning to Nordhoff he has been permanently engaged in the real 
estate and loan business. 

His interests have been growing both in importance and variety for 
many years. On March 19, 1900, he and others incorporated the Ojai 
Improvement Company, and has since been its secretary and a director. 
This company owns 210 acres in Nordhoff, and the property has been 
sub-divided for sale as resident sites. The same company also owns the 
Foothills Hotel, which is one of the finest winter resorts in Southern 
California, and is widely patronized. In 1901 Mr. Burke and others 
organized the Ojai Olive Company, and he has been secretary of that 
company ever since. In 1906 with Mr. Ewing, of Ventura, Messrs. Juan 
and Adolph Camarillo, and Edgar W. Caime, Mr. Burke started the Ojai 
State Bank. He was with that institution as cashier until 1909, and still 
retains his place as a director. Mr. Burke, E. L. Wiest, M. W. Phillips, 
J. F. Dennison and D^ A. Smith, as incorporators and directors, with the 
backing of Mr. C. M. Pratt, E. D. Libbey and others, started what is 
known as the Ojai Power Company, which furnishes light and power to 
the town and valley and also water to the Town of Nordhoff. This was 
established in 191 3, and is the only company in California that has no 
bonds nor outstanding indebtedness, and it has been successful from its 
inception. 

One of the most important undertakings to which he has given his 
active support was in promoting the organization and securing the funds 
for the construction of a railroad from Ventura to Nordhoff. This is 
the Ventura & Ojai Railway, and the property has since been purchased 
by the Southern Pacific Company. Mr. Burke also took an active part 
in the installation of the telephone system in the Ojai Valley. He is 
unmarried. Fraternally he belongs to the Order of Elks and in politics 
is a republican. 

George G. Crane. Among the pioneers in the development of the 
great fruit industry of California one of the first names and most prom- 
inent to be encountered is that of George G. Briggs. 

A brief account of his activities in this line would not be out of place 
here. 

George G. Briggs, who crossed the plains in the fall of 1849 ^"^ 
settled upon a piece of land upon the Yuba River, three miles above 
Marysville. Instead of going to the mines as the majority of emigrants 
did, he attempted to raise vegetables and farm products for those that 
went into the mines. But owing to the climatic difference between the 
Eastern states and the Pacific Coast his venture would not have been 
very profitable had it not been for the lucky circumstance of meeting up 
with an emigrant who was coming to the mines after a passage around 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 763 

the Horn. This emigrant had a goodly supply of watermelon seed which 
he had secured in one of the ports of Chile on his voyage up the coast 
This supply of seeds Mr. Briggs purchased of him at the rate of $io 
a pound. He had sufficient amount to plant ten acres, which yielded 
one large crop which readily sold at about $5 a piece. For the next 
few years he was known as the "Melon King*' of California. 

In 1852 he concluded to try and see if fruit would do well and ordered 
from eastern nurserymen some 500 or .more fruit trees of different 
varieties, but owing to improper packing and the long ocean voyage 
he succeeded in getting to grow but about 150 trees out of the ship- 
ment; these were largely peach. In a couple of years the peaches bore 
a few, which decided him to go largely into the fruit business. He then 
went East and purchased a large consignment of fruit trees, superin- 
tended their packing, brought them over successfully and set out an 
orchard of 200 acres, and when the orchard came into bearing he dom- 
inated the California market for some years. 

In 1862 he sold his fruit interests to his brothers and purchased a 
tract of land in the then suburbs of Oakland and retired from business ; 
but his active nature would not permit him to be idle long, and in as much 
as he had sold his fruit interests to his brothers, he concluded one could 
raise raisins in California as well as in foreign lands. So he purchased 
a large tract of land at Davisville and planted some 400 acres of raisin 
grape vine ; and also a large tract of land at Winters, putting out there a 
large vineyard of the same grape. He had gathered all the information 
possible from books read regarding the industry, and when his vine- 
yards came into bearing dried his grapes upon trays and prepared and 
packed them for market, shipping a carload in 1869 to Chicago. But 
they were turned down as improperly cured and unfit for market. This 
was a severe blow, but he tried another year, making such changes as he 
thought necessary, and shipped another carload, which was again turned 
down, thus entailing a heavy loss ; as he could see no climatic reason nor 
fault in quality of fruit, he called one of the brothers to take charge of 
his affairs and he went over to raisin-producing districts of Europe to see 
if he could find the reason of his failure. His judgment convinced him 
that in quality of fruit and adaptability of soil and climate Califor- 
nia was in many respects more favorable for the industry than the Euro- 
pean sections. But the proprietors of the industry were loath to show 
him or to explain to him the process of curing and preparing for market ; 
so selecting one of the largest and best vineyards, he disguised himself 
and hired out to work as a common laborer in the fields and packing 
house, thus getting a perfect knowledge of the process. He then returned 
and had no further trouble in curing and marketing his product. He 
could rightly be named the "Father" of the raisin industry of California. 
He died on January i, 1885, possessed of over a thousand acres of bearing 
vineyard in various parts of the state and two or three thousand acres of 
vineyard land in the vicinity of Fresno, which he pronounced to be the 
raisin center of the Pacific Coast. 

In the winter of 1861 and 1862 he became owner of Rancho Santa 



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764 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Paula y Saticoy in Ventura County, and it was his enterprise which sub- 
divided and put that land on the market for individual settlement and led 
the way in making it an important fruit section. 

The name of George G. Briggs is mentioned at the beginning of 
this article because it serves to introduce another pioneer fruit grower 
and rancher whose career has been of notable importance in this section 
of California. This is Mr. George G. Crane, a nephew of the George G. 
Briggs above mentioned. George G. Crane has had a career of versatile 
experience not only in California, but elsewhere. 

Bom in Sharon Township of Medina County, Ohio, July 7, 1835, 
he is of very old American ancestry. His first paternal ancestor settled 
in Massachusetts from England in 1654. His maternal ancestor, also 
from England, settled in the same vicinity in 1621, and many of his 
descendants were bom and reared in or near Dighton, Massachusetts. 
Mr. Crane's mother was Louisa (Briggs) Crane. She was born in 
Ontario County, New York, in 181 5, a daughter of Thomas Briggs, a 
native of Massachusetts, and she was a sister of the pioneer fmit man, 
George G. Briggs. 

In 1855, George G. Crane came out to California to assist his uncle, 
Mr. Briggs, in putting out a 200-acre orchard,. which supplanted a small 
orchard, which had just begun bearing, near Marysville. Mr. Crane 
assisted his uncle in setting out an orchard of 100 acres near Oroville 
and another of 2cx> acres on the Sacramento River, near Knight Landing. 

This work in connection with some of the pioneer orchards of Cal- 
ifornia kept Mr. Crane busy for three years. He then returned to his 
native county in Ohio, and in 1859 married Adeline Huntley. Mrs. Crane, 
who is now deceased, was bom in Granger Township of Medina County 
in 1836. Mr. and Mrs. Crane had two children: Amy, the widow of 
E. E. Huntley of Saticoy, and Abbie, wife of L. W. Andrews, an attorney 
of Los Angeles. 

After his marriage Mr. Crane bought a farm in Ohio and lived there 
for ten years. Selling it, he moved to Cass County, Missouri, and six 
years later went to Denver, Colorado, where he became identified with 
the wholesale fruit business, shipping from California from forty to 
fifty carloads of fruit every year from Marysville and Sacramento, Cal- 
ifornia, to eastem markets. While this was a very profitable business, 
he suffered much loss during the drought in California in 1877, and that 
decided him to abandon the fmit business. 

His next ventures were in the mining region of the Black Hills in 
Dakota. There, in company with others, he succeeded in locating and 
developing what are known as the Trojan group of mines near Dead- 
wood, and in 1883 he and his associates sold these mines. 

In the same year Mr. Crane moved with his family to Saticoy, Ven- 
tura County, with his son-in-law, E. E. Huntley, he bought Subdivision 
II of the Rancho Santa Paula y Saticoy, containing 135 acres, upon which 
he and his daughter, the window of E. E. Huntley, still reside. He 
utilized this land for the raising of lima beans, while the orchard of wal- 
nut trees which he set out, were growing to maturity. Mr. Crane has 



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W. A. HUGHES 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 765 

a fine orchard of Santa Barbara soft shell walnuts. He has been one 
of the leading figures in this industry of Ventura County, and assisted 
in the organization of the Saticoy Walnut Growers* Association. He 
was also one of the early stockholders of the People's Lumber Company, 
and for years has been vitally interested in the subject of water supply 
and has used both time and means to perfect a reliable source of water 
for his community. Besides his home ranch Mr. Crane owned eighty 
acres west of Pasadena, and that land has very promising possibilities 
for grape culture. In politics Mr. Crane is a democrat. 

LoRiNG Farnam is one of the former pupils of the Thacher School 
for Boys at Nordhoflf, has had business connections both in the East and 
in the West, and is now prosperously and contentedly settled down as a 
farmer, fruit grower and stock raiser not far from the Thacher School 
which he attended as a boy. 

He was born of good family in New Haven, Connecticut, January i, 
1882, a son of Dr. George B. Farnam. Most of his early education was 
acquired in a boarding school in the East, but in 1898 he came out to 
California and attended the Thacher School for Boys until 1900. 

Returning East he became an employe in the General Electric Com- 
pany at Schenectady, New York, and by service in diflferent departments 
beginning at the bottom, he learned many phases of the business in all 
their details, and eventually was promoted to considerable responsibilities. 

In 1908 he resigned his position at Schenectady, and coming to Nord- 
hoflf bought ninety-seven acres near that town in 1912, and has since been 
active in its development. He has now eighteen acres planted in prunes, 
two acres in olives and two acres as a family orchard. His chief ambition 
now is to make a business of stock raising, and as a nucleus he owns one 
of the finest Guernsey bulls in the state and has some standard bred 
horses. Mr. Farnam, who is unmarried, is well known throughout the 
Ojai Valley and is an active member of the Jack Boyd Club of NordhoflF. 
He is a democrat and a member of the Episcopal Church. 

George A. Hughes, who has had a long and varied experience in 
mining, ranching, bean growing and public aflFairs in California, is one 
of the oldest native sons of Ventura County, and his was one of the first 
white American families to locate in that section of the state. 

W. A. Hughes, his father, is a Ventura County pioneer whose activ- 
ities and experiences deserve more than passing comment. W. A. Hughes 
was born in Washington County, in Southwestern Pennsylvania, October 
I, 1837, and from that section which was settled before the American 
Revolution the family has by diflFerent stages crossed the entire continent, 
and for many years William A. Hughes has lived almost within sight 
of the Pacific Ocean. His parents were George and Nancy (McCul- 
lough) Hughes, both natives of Pennsylvania, and about 1846 they settled 
with their family on a farm in Adams County, Illinois, not far from 
Quincy. Subsequently they removed to Hancock County in the same 
state. On their farm in the latter county both George and Nancy died, 



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766 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

the former in 1855 at the age of fifty-six, and the latter eight years later 
in her sixty-sixth year. 

Nine years of age when the family went to Western Illinois, W. A. 
Hughes grew up on farms in Adams and Hancock counties, attended the 
common schools, and in early life acquired some land and settled down 
to the business of farming. In 1864, having sold his Illinois farm, he 
became a member of a party that crossed the plains to California with 
wagons and teams. That was several years before the completion of 
the first transcontinental railway, and the journey from the Mississippi 
Valley to California consumed seven months. The lady who subsequently 
became Mrs. W. A. Hughes was also a member of the same party. 

Reaching California they were married in 1865 in Sutter County. 
W. A. Hughes from Sutter County moved to Marysville, in Yuba County, 
still later to Red Bluff, in Tehama County, and a few years after the 
close of the Civil war, and nearly half a century ago, he arrived in Ven- 
tura County. Ventura County was then a district of cattle raising 
industry almost entirely, and was divided up into large grants. The 
pastoral character of the locality continued for many years. W. A. 
Hughes bought some land and took up 121 acres from the Government 
in 1868. Later he bought fifty acres adjoining that and was one of the 
pioneers in this section of California to engage in bean growing. 

W. A. Hughes married Mary B. Bamett, who was bom in Illinois, 
a daughter of Adrian Barnett, who was a native of Kentucky and came 
out to California in 1873, dying in this state in 1881 when sixty-two 
years of age. Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Hughes had nine children. Mr. 
Hughes is now living practically retired and enjoying the fruits of a long 
and well-spent career. In politics he has always supported the dem- 
ocratic ticket. 

George A. Hughes, his son, was bom in Pleasant Valley of Ventura 
County, December 28, 1869. Up to the age of fifteen he attended district 
schools. He then lived on his father's ranch and took his share in its 
work until he was twenty-one. With his brother, John E., he then rented 
1,000 acres at Moorpark, California, and the two were associated in farm- 
ing this large tract until 1894. After that his employment was on the 
ranch of A. B. Smith & Co., in Ventura County, until 1898. 

Mr. Hughes is one of the enterprising men who went to Alaska in 
the latter '90s and engaged in the mining interests of the Klondike. He 
spent two years as a prosi>ector there. Having had a taste of mining in 
the far north, on his retum to Calif omia he continued mining at Rands- 
burg a year. 

Since then his home and activities have been in Ventura County. He 
was employed on different ranches until 1908, and in that year rented a 
small piece of land near Somis, and has extended his lease right until he 
now controls 500 acres. He specializes in two crops, having 350 acres 
in beans and 150 acres in hay. 

In 1908 Mr. Hughes was appointed superintendent of county roads 
for District No. 8, and he took a good deal of time from his private 
affairs to look after that office until 1913. A believer in fraternities, he 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 767 

is past noble grand of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and past 
venerable counsel of the Modem Woodmen of America. Politically he 
is a democrat like his father. 

In Camarillo, California, August 20, 1892, he married Clara Stewart. 
There are two children, Frank E., now twenty-three, bookkeeper and 
assistant manager in a department store at Palms, California; Ray A., 
aged twenty-one, is sharing the responsibilities of the home ranch with 
his father. 

Rudolph E. Haase. When Mr. Haase came to Ventura County in 
1889 his previous experience had been as a laborer on his father's farm 
in Eastern Prussia, Germany. He had no special capital, no influential 
friends, and it was necessary for him to start in at the bottom. He made 
it a policy to do everything well which he undertook, gained the confi- 
dence of those who employed him in the early years, and now for more 
than twenty years has been advancing step by step to a position where 
he is one of the leading fruit growers and farmers of the Bardsdale 
District around Fillmore. 

Mr. Haase was bom in the Province of Posen, Germany, November 7, 
1861, a son of William and Wilhelmina Haase. The public schools of his 
native land gave him regular training until he was fourteen, after which 
he took his place on his father's farm. In 1889 he came to America and 
located at Bardsdale in Ventura County, and spent three years as a farm 
laborer. With his thrifty savings he bought five acres at Bardsdale, and 
at once began planting the tract to lemons and oranges. In 1896 he was 
able to buy eight acres more, and on that he erected the fine two story 
residence where he and his family now have their home. The land he 
also developed as a lemon and orange grove. A three-acre tract adjoin- 
ing these which he acquired in 1909 has also been planted in oranges, 
and in 1910 he extended this with the purchase of lyi acres, and that 
small tract is now regarded as one of the finest and best producing lemon 
groves in Southern California. Twenty acres which he bought in 1909 
have also been developed to oranges and walnuts, and in 191 3 he pur- 
chased fifty-one acres at Buckhorn near Piru and has that land in lemons 
and oranges. His most recent acquisition was ten acres in Bardsdale, 
which he bought in 19 15, and is planted in lemons. 

Mr. Haase is a stockholder in the Farmers and Merchants Bank of 
Fillmore, in the Fillmore Citrus Fruit Association, and the Ventura 
County Co-operative Association, and is a member of the Santa Paula 
Walnut Growers Association. His politics is republican and in church 
aflFairs he is a member of the Evangelical Association. 

For his wife he returned to his native Province of Posen and was 
married there in November, 1892, to Emily Wiegert. They are the 
parents of six children, namely: Herman J., twenty-three years of age, 
and now assisting his father in the management of the ranch; Otto 
William, aged twenty-one, a graduate of the Fillmore High School and 
also on his father's farm ; Elsie and Albert, the latter aged seventeen, both 
in the Fillmore High School ; and Hilda and Alma, students in the public 
schools. 



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768 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Alexander M. Ritchie. When Alexander M. Ritchie came to 
Ventura Cotinty in 1890, he already possessed a wide and thorough busi- 
ness and commercial experience gained in his native Scotland. He is 
now one of the substantial and Well fixed citizens of Fillmore and has 
much property to show for his efforts carried on through a long period 
of years. 

He was bom in Fifeshire, Scotland, August 13, 1866, a son of Robert 
and Catherine Ritchie. His public school education ended when he was 
123^ years of age. He learned trade as an apprentice in a grocery store 
five years, was then employed for 134 years as a journeyman in a grocery 
store at Fisher Row, East Lothian, and after that was foreman of a 
grocery and hardware establishment for four years at Tranent, Scotland, 
and subsequently was manager of John Alexander's grocery and hard- 
ware store in West Linton, Pebbleshire. 

In May, i860, he left Scotland and came to Ventura County. After 
two years as an employe on the Piru Ranch at Piru and five years with 
Mr. R. P. Stratheame near Simi, he engaged in the bee business on his 
own account. His location was near Moor Park. Selling out his interests 
there in 1903 he moved to Bardsdale, bought forty acres, and farmed it 
for three years. Selling to advantage, he bought another twenty acres 
in the same locality, and planted three acres in oranges and the rest in 
walnuts. That is his home estate and he also owns a six-acre orange and 
lemon grove nearby. 

Mr. Ritchie has always concerned himself with the best interests of 
the community since coming to Ventura County. He is affiliated with 
the Woodmen of the World, the Knights of Pythias, is a republican and 
a member of the Presbyterian Church. In Ventura County in January, 
1896, he married Miss Agnes Lamb, a native of Scotland and daughter 
of James Lamb. Mrs. Ritchie's father was one of the pioneers of Ventura 
County, but had only been here four weeks when death overtook him. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ritchie are the parents of three children. Catherine is a 
graduate of high school and still at home. Ronald, aged seventeen, and 
James, aged sixteen, are both students in the high school. 

Joseph R. Howard. While his principal interests as a stockman and 
rancher are located in the neighboring State of Arizona, Joseph R. 
Howard is well known in Ventura County, and he and his wife reside on 
one of the finest country estates in the vicinity of Moorpark. 

Bom in Orange County, New Jersey, January 25, 1866, Joseph R. 
Howard is a son of Joseph Howard and a grandson of Joseph and Jane 
(Wells) Howard. Grandfather Joseph Howard was bom in Providence, 
Rhode Island, and his wife was a native of Hartford, Connecticut. Joseph 
Howard Sr. was bom in Hartford, Connecticut, spending his early years 
in that state and in Rhode Island. He finally removed to Orange, New 
Jersey, and from there came to Santa Barbara, where he became inter- 
ested in the management of a part of the Canajo ranch. He is now living 
retired in Santa Barbara. He was formerly a member of the Board of 
Trade and Chamber of Commerce and in politics is a republican. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 769 

Joseph R. Howard received his early education in Orange County, 
New Jersey, but in 1880, when a boy of fourteen, came to Santa Barbara 
with his parents. Here for two years he attended the Franciscan Brothers' 
College. After some experience on his father's ranch he removed in 
1888 to Flagstaff, Arizona, and spent three years there as a successful 
stock raiser. Then followed four years as a miner in Southern Arizona, 
and after that he bought 160 acres at Date Creek, Arizona, and that 
has since been the stage of his activities as a stock farmer. 

In Los Angeles, November 27, 1886, Mr. Howard married Elizabeth 
Middleton. Mrs. Howard represents one of the prominent old families 
of Ventura County. She is a daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Cooper) 
Middleton, and her father, who was an early settler in this state, died 
in 1865. Her mother subsequently married Samuel HiU, one of Cal- 
ifornia's "forty-niners" and for years one of the most prominent ranchers 
in Ventura County. Mrs. Howard inherited from her stepfather, Samuel 
Hill, a large ranch of 2,500 acres in Ventura County, and that is her 
home. This ranch is under the active management of her son Samuel. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard are'the parents of nine children : Samuel, now 
twenty-nine years of age; Joseph and Robert, both deceased; William, 
twenty-three years of age and on his father's ranch in Arizona ; Fletcher, 
aged twenty, also living on his father's Arizona ranch; Mary, aged 
eighteen, now attending St. Joseph's Institute in Oxnard; Elizabeth, 
who is fifteen years of age and attending Santa Barbara High School; 
Richard, aged twelve, and in the grammar school ; and Sarah, the young- 
est, who is nine years old. 

DiEDRicH F. H. B ARTELS is One of the men who came to Southern 
CaUfomia twenty years or more ago and have found congenial as well as 
profitable employment in the great horticultural industry. Mr. Bartels 
has some of the best fruit lands in the vicinity of Fillmore and has not 
only been a producer for a nimiber of years but has had that experience 
which lends his example as a practical authority in the business of fruit 
growing. 

A native of Germany, where he was bom September 18, 1862, a son 
of Henry and Marguerita Bartels, he was educated according to^ the 
German fashion in the public schools until fourteen, and after that was 
employed on his father's farm until he reached his majority. 

In 1883 Mr. Bartels emigrated to the United States. He came as a 
poor man and being without capital he found employment on various 
farms in Randolph County, Illinois, where he remained for ten years. 
He then went to the far Northwest, and at Oregon City, Oregon, did rail- 
road work and also took his place as a ranch hand. 

It was in 1894 that he arrived in Ventura County. He bought ten 
acres in the Bardsdale District, developed it to apricots, but in 1906 
replanted in walnuts and in 1914 replanted five acres in oranges. In 1898 
he also bought twelve acres near his first purchase, and that also was in 
apricots. In 191 1 he replanted seven acres in lemons. His third purchase 
of land in this vicinity was ten acres in 1901 which he planted in apricots. 



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770 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

In 1909 he lx)ught ten acres planted in walnuts, and in 191 4 replanted it 
with Valencia oranges. 

Mr. Bartels is a prominent member of the Fillmore Citrus Fruit 
Association, of the Santa Paula Walnut Growers Association, and is a 
stockholder in the Farmers and Merchants Bank and the Ventura County 
Co-operative Association. Politically he is a republican and is a member 
of the Evangelical Association. 

In Oregon City, Oregon, he married Miss Freda Zimmerman. They 
have a housdiold of twelve children: Louise, the oldest, lives in Los 
Angeles; Mrs. Ted Opsahl resides at Fillmore; Mary has finished her 
education and lives at home ; Martha, Ida and Freda are all students in 
the Fillmore High School ; Ella, Lena, Elizabeth, Albert and Bertha are 
in the grade schools, while the youngest of the family is Marguerita. 

Jacob Stoll. In Southern California as elsewhere the careers which 
show the most substantial prosperity are those which have depended upon 
such staple qualities as persistent industry and a thrifty management 
covering a period of many years. It is the long and steady pull which 
gets results here as in every other part of the world. 

In 1892 there arrived in Ventura County a youthful representative 
of the Swiss Republic. He was unacquainted with the country and with 
conditions, had no special capital except his energy and willingness to 
work, and he put in a number of years working for others before he got 
started on his independent career. 

This young Swiss was Jacob Stoll, who was bom in Schaffhausen, 
Switzerland, September 21, 1873, a son of Andrew and Barbara 
(Schweitzer) Stoll. He had a thorough education in the schools of his 
native land up to the age of nineteen, and had also worked on farms so 
that he had at least a passing knowledge of the general principles of 
agriculture. On coming to Ventura County he spent four years on the 
Storke ranch in the Santa Clara Valley, two years on Mr. Todd's ranch 
near Santa Paula, and two years more on Mr. Beckwith's ranch. With 
this experience he was well qualified for the position he assumed as man- 
ager of the Storke ranch, and he also received a shart of the profits from 
his management. To that position he gave fifteen years and during that 
time he recovered a large part of this land from its brush state, planted 
200 acres in walnuts and brought them into successful bearing. 

In the meantime in 1909 he bought seventy-four acres in Bardsdale, 
and that acreage is now planted in walnuts and oranges. In 191 3 he 
bought eighteen acres in the same locality, and he lives on that tract and 
has it planted in lemons and oranges. Mr. Stoll also owns 160 acres in 
Kern County, California, and operates that through tenants. He is one 
of the most progressive farmers in Ventura County, and for years has 
been foremost in the work of development in the Bardsdale country. 

He is a stockholder in the Farmers and Merchants Bank of Santa 
Paula and Fillmore, is a stockholder in the Growers Warehouse Company 
of Santa Paula, and a director in the Southside Improvement Company 
of Bardsdale. Since gaining his American citizenship he has been a 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 771 

supporter of the republican party. Fraternally he is affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. At Los Angeles, December 13, 
1907, Mr. Stoll married Miss Martha Waller. They are the parents of 
two children: Jacob George, aged six, and Vema, aged three. Mrs. Stoll 
is a native of Chicago, Illinois, and a daughter of Albert Waller of that 
city. 

John Montgomery. One of the successful men of Ventura County, 
engaged in the management of a fine walnut ranch in the vicinity of 
Somis, John Montgomery has had a career of varied experience, and 
has always been willing to accept the chance and hazard of fortune in 
order to advance himself in the world. 

He was bom in Decatur County, Kansas, May 19, 1879, a son of 
John and Mary Montgomery. His education in public schools was con- 
cluded when he was fourteen years of age. After that he worked on his 
father's farm for several years and at the age of seventeen left home 
and found hard work and plenty of incident in Oklahoma Territory. 
He was employed in herding cattle in the old Cherokee Nation of that 
territory for eleven years, and then for three years was a farmer in Semi- 
nole County. 

Leaving Oklahoma Mr. Montgomery came to Moorpark, Ventura 
County, California, was employed for nine months on the ranch of 
W. R. Sealy, and then for four months was employed by the American 
Beet Sugar Company at Oxnard. Following that he had an experience 
of seven months in an apricot orchard of A. Everett near Moorpark. 

Mr. Montgomery subsequently became associated with Mr. James 
Evans in the Los Posas district of Ventura County, and remained with 
him until the death of Mr. Evans in 1908. 

In November, 1908, Mr. Montgomery married Mrs. Meda Evans, 
the widow of the late James Evans, and they now are living comfortably 
on their ranch and superintend the productive resources of a 128-acre 
walnut orchard. 

The late James Evans, former husband of Mrs. Montgomery, was 
one of the prominent pioneer ranchmen of Ventura County. He was 
bom in Clark County, Indiana, July 5, 1839, the third in a family of five 
children of Thomas JeflFerson and Catherine (King) Evans. His paternal 
ancestors were Virginia people of Scotch and English origin, while his 
mother was a native of Pennsylvania and of Pennsylvania Dutch stock. 

James Evans attended school in Missouri, later in Oregon, to which 
state his parents removed, and in 1859 the family came to California, 
settling in Sonoma County. 

On starting out for himself James Evans followed farming for two 
years in Sonoma County, was in the mining district of Idaho about four 
years, but all the money he made there was lost, and after another experi- 
ence of two years as a farmer in the Salinas Valley of Monterey County 
he came with his father and other members of the family in 1869 to 
Ventura County. Here Mr. Evans bought eighty acres and during his 
remaining active years was engaged in its development as a fine walnut 



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772 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

plantation and also for general agricultural crops. He raised all the 
crops which are staples of this locality and his part in those activities 
was so successful that no history of Ventura County should omit some 
mention of his name. He was a republican in politics. 

In October, 1884, he married Miss Meda Osmossen, who was bom 
in Germany. Mrs. Montgomery by her former marriage has two children : 
Pleasant, a rancher in Ventura County ; and Mrs. Wilbur H. Stiles, of 
Ventura County. 

William C. Hendrickson. Though bom and reared in New York 
City, and with wealthy and influential connections there, Mr. Hendrick- 
son has found his most congenial occupation in Southem California and 
has long been identified with orange growing and ranch management in 
the Ojai Valley near Nordhoff in Ventura County. His grandfather, 
Thomas R. McNeil, is a well known New York City capitalist, for many 
years has spent his winters at Nordhoff, and has made extensive invest- 
ments in that locality. 

In 1892 William C. Hendrickson came to NordhoflF to take the manage- 
ment of his grandfather's 160 acre ranch. Sixty acres of this tract 
have been developed in navel and Valencia oranges, and it is one of the 
largest individual orange groves in the county. In 1894 Mr. Hendrick- 
son returned to New York City and in 1896 came again to California, and 
managed a forty acre vineyard at Fresno owned by his grandfather, but 
in 1898 returned to Nordhoff and has since been in full control as 
manager of the McNeil ranch of 160 acres. 

Mr. Hendrickson is a stockholder in the Ventura County Game 
Preserve, is secretary of the Jack Boyd Club, is vice president of the 
Ojai Orange Association, and is secretary of the San Antonio Water 
Company. He is one of the most influential men in that part of Ventura 
County. 

Politically he is a republican and is a member of the Episcopal . 
Church. In 1908 he married Marion L. Carne of Ventura County. 

Thomas S. Clark has been a business man in Ventura County for 
more than thirty-seven years. He is still active in looking after his 
affairs and is one of the most popular residents in the Ojai Valley^ with 
home at Nordhoff. 

He was bom in Lafayette County, Wisconsin, October' 18, 1865, son 
of Michael H. and Margaret Clark. His father, who was bom in Ireland 
in 1845, was educated there, at the age of nineteen came to the United 
States, and locating in Lafayette County, Wisconsin, was a school teacher 
in the districts of that county for two years. He then became a farmer, 
cultivated a place in Lafayette County five years, and from that occupa- 
tion became interested in the lead mines in Southem Wisconsin. In 
1878, selling his interests in Wisconsin, he came out to Nordhoff, Ventura 
County, and was actively engaged in ranching in that vicinity until his 
death in 1910. 

He came to \''entura County in 1881, and here he found a congenial 



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ANTHONY C. MIDDLETON 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 773 

vocation in driving the stage between Nordhoff and Santa Barbara. 
In 1895 Mr. Clark rented a ranch in the Upper Ojai Valley, and gave it 
his personal supervision for six years. Because of his experience and 
inclinations perhaps there was no one better fitted to conduct a successful 
livery business than Mr. Clark, and he kept a high class establishment at 
Nordhoff from the time he left the ranch until 1916. He then sur- 
rendered to the inevitable changes which are being brought about by the 
introduction of the automobile, and at the present writing is erecting a 
fine modern garage, and will conduct as his chief business. 

In 1904 he was elected supervisor of Ventura County from the Third 
District, and his personal popularity and his ability to managa the 
county affairs have given him repeated re-elections to the same post. 
He is a democrat and a member of the Order of Elks. In Los Angeles 
on April 10, 1894, Mr. Dark married Miss Ella Bakman. They have a 
very comfortable home in Nordhoff and they are the proud parents of 
nine children: Dorothy, who is teaching in Ventura; Jack, nineteen 
years of age, assisting his father; Richard, aged seventeen, and attending 
high school at Nordhoff; Margaret and Elizabeth, also students in the 
Nordhoff High School ; Thomas, aged eleven, and in the grammar school ; 
Louise and Hortense, also in school ; and Edward, five years old. 

Anthony Cooper Middleton. Situated in the beautiful and fertile 
Santa Rosa Valley, in Ventura County, is the 325-acre farm belonging 
to Anthony Cooper Middleton, a property that has been brought to a 
high state of cultivation through the continued and well-directed efforts 
of its owner. Mr. Middleton has passed his entire life in California, 
being a native son, and throughout his career has been connected in one 
or another way with farming, ranching and live stock. His business 
success is well merited, for he has been an industrious and consistent 
workman, whose labors have been directed along a well-defined channel. 

Mr. Middleton Was born at King City, San Joaquin County, California, 
August 6, 1863, and is a son of Thomas and Sarah Middleton, a sketch 
of whose lives will be found elsewhere in this work. His schooling 
was secured in Amador County, where he resided until he was thirteen 
years of age, and he worked on his father's ranch during his spare time, 
and in 1876 he came to Ventura County, where he began working for 
his stepfather. Mr. Middleton continued on the latter's ranch until 
1891, in which year he rented 200 acres of land from Adolpho Camarillo, 
which he farmed for three years. Subsequently, with his brother, Thomas 
Middleton, he rented 400 acres from Mr. Russell for three years, and 
then became a renter on the Johnson tract, a magnificent property, 4,000 
acres in extent. At the end of three years he gave up his interests there 
and went to Riverside, with his brother, and they were engaged in the 
pasturage business for one year. Later they went to Redlands, where 
they carried on a like business and engaged in teaming for five years, 
and Anthony C. Middleton then went to Los Angeles and carried on 
teaming for one year. Later he went to Gardena, where he was inter- 
ested in the same line for six years, and on his return to Vertura County 

Vol. n— 1» 

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774 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

settled on his present farm, which he had inherited from his stepfather, 
Samuel Hill, a sketch of whose career will be found combined with that 
of Thomas Middleton elsewhere in this volume. Anthony Middleton has 
225 acres planted in beans, twenty acres in grain, and the balance is pasture 
land. In the management of his property he uses modem methods, and 
the success which has attended his operations would seem to indicate that 
his judgment is good and his spirit progressive. He is a democrat in 
politics, but not a politician. With his family he belongs to the Episcopal 
Church. 

Mr. Middleton was married at Los Angeles, California, June 17, 
1891,'to Miss Sarah Lowes, and they became the parents of ten children: 
Robert Lee, twenty-two years of age, received a public school education, 
and is now assisting his father in the operation of the ranch ; Richard, 
twenty-one years old, had a like education and is also helping his fatHer ; 
Ellen, living at home, a public school graduate; John George, eighteen 
years of age, who graduated from the public schools and is assisting 
his father and brothers ; Anthony, sixteen years old, a high school gradu- 
ate and now on the home ranch ; Mary Ann, fourteen years of age, who 
is attending the Ventura High School; Hazel, eleven, Dolly, nine, and 
Ethel, eight years old, all of whom are attending the graded schools; 
and Violet, aged sixteen months. 

Philip Pierpont. One of the active contributors to the resources of 
Ventura County as one of the favorite winter resorts of Southern Cali- 
fornia was the late Dr. Ernest Pierpont. He was the founder of the 
widely known 'Tierpont Cottages'* at Nordhoff. This property is now 
under the active management of his son Philip Pierpont. 

Doctor Pierpont was bom at Fairmont, West Virginia, in October, 
1854, began his education there, and in 1864 his family removed to Young 
America, Illinois. After finishing his public school education he entered 
the Northwestern University of Chicago, where he was graduated in the 
medical department. He acquired a very large practice as a physician 
in the City of Chicago and it was reasons of ill health that compelled him 
to abandon it and come out to California in 1889. He located in Los 
Angeles, but in 1890 invested some of his means in the Ojai Valley of 
Ventura County. There he bought forty acres, and planted thirteen 
acres of it in oranges. It was in 1892 that he erected the eight cottages 
with hotel accommodations which for a number of years were known as 
'The Overlook." In 1900 Doctor Pierpont changed the name to the 
Pierpont Cottages, and these have for years been a fashionable winter 
resort for a number of families that spend a portion of the year in Southern 
California. 

Doctor Pierpont died August 26, 1905. His widow then took charge 
of the property and in 1910 she erected a high class family hotel at 
Ventura, overlooking the ocean and known as "The Pierpont Inn." She 
sold this hotel in 1915, and has since resided in San Francisco. Her 
maiden name was Josephine Carpenter, and she and Doctor Pierpont 
were married in Chicago in 1884. Their two children are Austin, now a 
resident of San Francisco, and Philip. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 775 

Philip Pierpont was born in the City of Chicago April 23, 1887, ^"d 
was still a small child when his parents came to Ventura County. In 1906 
he graduated from the Thacher School, and subsequently attended Stan- 
ford University until 1910. In that year he took the active management 
of the Pierpont Cottages, including the thirteen acre orange grove, and 
now gives all his business attention to this valuable enterprise. He is a 
republican in politics. 

On August 31, 1909, he married Miss Violet Paterson of San Francisco. 
They have one child, Phillip, now two years old. 

Charles W. Leach. One of the extensive properties in the Ojai 
Valley, with especial interest attaching to it because its ownership since 
pioneer times has been associated with a number of well known and promi- 
nent people in Ventura County, is the Leach and Rynerson Estate near 
Nordhoif. 

It was originally a part of the great Rancho Ojai. It was subdivided 
in September, 187 1, by a grant to H. N. Riggen. On April 15, 1873, Mr. 
Riggen conveyed the 660 acres to Charles W. Leach and C. C. Rynerson. 
C. C. Rynerson was the father-in-law of Charles W. Leach. Both resided 
in Santa Barbara at the time the ranch was bought, having moved to that 
city from Stockton, San Jaoquin County, in 1869. Mr. Rynerson was 
principally engaged in the flour milling business at Stockton and at 
Linden in the same county, and after removing to Santa Barbara built a 
flour mill there. He lived in Santa Barbara from the time of his setthng 
in the town until his death in July, 1887. His share of the Ojai property 
passed to his wife Mary A. Rynerson, who held it until her death May 28, 
1913, when the title \Vas united in the present owner Evelyn J. Leach, 
widow of Charles W. Leach. 

With the purchase of the property in 1873 M*"- C. W. Leach took 
possession, but resided on it only a few months. He was in failing 
health at the time, and died in May, 1874. Thereafter until 1895 ^^^ 
owners resided in Santa Barbara, but since then have lived in the Ojai. 
All of the owners mentioned above were California pioneers. Mr. and 
Mrs. Rynerson and their young daughter Evelyn crossed the plains in the 
gold excitement of 1849, starting from Mineral Point, Wisconsin. 

Charles W. Leach was a California forty-niner and a pioneer in 
Ventura County. He came to California making the entire trip around 
the Horn on a sailing vessel in 1849. ^^^ ^^^ bom in Portland, Maine, 
in 1829, was reared and educated there, and was trained to the trade of a 
ship carpenter. After coming to California he engaged in mining for a 
time, but finally settled at Linden in San Jaoquin County, and was there 
married to Evelyn J. Rynerson in 1865. He was associated with Mr. 
Rynerson in the milling business at Linden, and afterwards in the same 
line at Santa Barbara. It was ill health which interfered with his plans 
for developing the Ojai ranch. During the last thirty or forty years con- 
siderable portions of the original ranch have been sold at various times. 
There remains about 400 acres, with 150 acres in cultivation. Mr. A. C. 
Rynerson planted the first fruit trees on the place in 1887. ^^ present 



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776 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

about thirty acres is in orchard, principally apricots and almonds, while 
the rest of the land is devoted to raising hay and grain. Two children of 
Charles W. Leach and Evelyn Rynerson survive and live on the ranch in 
the Ojai — Clarence W. and Ethelda V. 

Clarence W. Leach was bom at Linden, California, October 13, 1868. 
He attended the grammar schools of Santa Barbara, the high school at 
Oakland, and was graduated from the state university in the class of 
1893. He was connected with the university as a student and teacher until 
1897. He has always been very studious, has an inclination for scholarly 
pursuits, but for the past twenty years has been practically and successfully 
identified with ranching in Ventura County. However, there was an 
interval of some years spent as a searcher of records at San Francisco. 
Mr. Clarence W. Leach is a progressive in politics. In Santa Cruz, 
California, September 17, 1909, he married Kate A. Halsey. She died 
May 15, 1912. 

Ethelda V. Leach attended the schools of Santa Barbara and has lived 
there and in the Ojai. She is a trustee of the Thacher Memorial Library, 
is secretary of the Ojai Valley Tennis Qub and is active in all social 
interests of the community. 

John P. Trotter. In the earlier years of his life John P. Trotter 
made several moves and changes in his occupations and saw a good deal 
of the country, but since 1891 has been steadily identified with Ventura 
County and has made a notable success as a homesteader, business man 
and fruit grower. 

He was bom at Carrollton in Carroll County, Missouri, November 
30, 1859, a son of Hamilton and Mary Jane (Hill) Trotter. His father 
was also bom in Carrollton, Missouri, and was a merchant there until 
he entered the army during the Civil war, and died soon after beginning 
service. 

The early life of John P. Trotter was spent in his native town, where 
he had the advantages of the public schools until he was twenty years 
of age. He then went out to the far Northwest as it was forty years ago, 
and spent two years working on a dairy farm at Bozeman, in Gallatin 
County, Montana. Though very young at the time, he showed a capacity 
for responsibility, and was promoted to foreman of a big stock ranch, 
a place he retained for five years. 

Following that Mr. Trotter returned to Missouri, the old home of 
his childhood, and was there married to Miss Emma Jane Paris, October 
25, 1888. To this union one child was bom, a son, who died in infancy. 
For three years he remained in Missouri engaged in farming and stock 
raising. 

Seeking to better his condition in the Far West, Mr. Trotter came to 
Ventura County and was a homesteader on a 160-acre tract in the 
Pole Canyon. After farming that place five years, he sold it and moved 
to Fillmore, where he engaged in the livery business, in which he con- 
tinued eleven years. 

During this period Mr. Trotter was bereft of his faithful wife, who 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 777 

died July 31, 1898. while on a visit to her father's home in Carrollton, 
Missouri. Six years later, September i, 1904, in San Diego, California, 
Mr. Trotter was united in marriage to Miss Mabel Edith Anderson. To 
this union two daughters were bom, Emma and Doris. Mrs. Trotter 
is a native of Illinois but was reared in Nebraska, having the advantages 
of the public schools there as well as being a student in the State Agri- 
cultural College in Manhattan, Kansas, after which she taught in the 
public schools of Nebraska two years. She moved to California in 
July, 1900, with her parents, W. N. and Hettie L. Anderson. 

In the year 1909 Mr. Trotter bought forty acres of land near Fill- 
more, now in the limits of Fillmore. This he has successfully developed 
as a fruit and walnut proposition. The forty acres when he bought it 
was wild land. In its virgin state it was a willow patch. His resojurces 
and energies have converted it into a high state of cultivation. He 
built the house where he now resides with his family. Around the 
home he has a family orchard of twp acres, containing all the different 
kinds of fruit grown in California, and affording an abundant supply 
for family use. On the commercial side of his enterprise he has thirty 
acres planted in walnuts, two acres in avocodas and five acres in lemons. 

Mr. Trotter was one of the organizers and since organization has 
been a director of the Fillmore State Bank. He is also one of the 
organizers and a director of the Fillmore Improvement Company, which 
is now putting up a two-story brick block, part of which is designed as 
quarters for the Fillmore State Bank. Fraternally Mr. Trotter is a 
member of the Masonic order. 

Hartley F. Sprague. The Spragues were among the early settlers 
in the Santa Clara Valley of Ventura County. Hartley F. Sprague has 
lived in that community for forty-five years, and for the greater part of 
that time was engaged in general ranching and stock raising, though he 
now devotes his attention to the care and management of an orange grove 
at Sespe. 

His father Frederick A. Sprague, who was bom in Ohio in 1833 and 
was educated there, came out to California in 1854 by way of the Isthmus 
of Panama. At Sacramento, where he first settled, he was for a time 
engaged in the dairy business, and later removed to Lincoln City, where 
he worked as a carpenter until 1867. After that he resumed farming in 
the vicinity of Sacramento, and in 1871 drove a wagon across the country 
to Ventura County. He settled with his family on a tract of 160 acres 
in the Santa Qara Valley and was successfully identified with farming 
that land until 1884. He is now living at the venerable age of eighty- 
three and for the past thirty years has made his hom<e in Sonora, Mexico. 
In Sacramento in 1856 he married Elizabeth Smith, and they became the 
parents of three children: Mrs. E. J. Beekman of Ventura County; 
Mrs. Gara Sheldon of Lamar, California ; and Hartley F. 

Hartley F. Sprague, who was bom in Amador County, California, 
September 23, 1857, and attended the public schools there, was fourteen 
years of age when his parents in 1871 came to Ventura County. Follow- 



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778 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

ing that for six years he worked on his father's ranch and also for other 
farmers in that vicinity, but in 1877 bought 600 acres of hill land and 
started in the cattle business, which despite the ups and downs and 
occasional severe losses proved on the whole profitable, and was continued 
by him until 191 1. Since that year Mr. Sprague has found pleasure and 
profit in looking after his twelve acre orange grove near Fillmore. He 
bought that grove in 1902. 

November 6, 1902, in Los Angeles he married Miss Nettie Snyder, 
a native of Dakota and a daughter of H. W. Synder. Mr. Sprague is a 
member of the Citrus Association of Fillmore. 

J. R. Black is one of the highly prosperous men of Ventura County. 
Good judgment and foresight opened to him the door of success and his 
friends and neighbors say he has never neglected an opportunity in a 
business way and has been equally public spirited in behalf of every 
movement to promote the best interests of his community. 

He was born in Rockbridge County, Virginia, August 3, 1872, a son 
of James Lucian and Eliza Black, and all his education was acquired in 
Virginia schools. At the age of fourteen his parents removed to Pettis 
County, Missouri, and he remained there working on his father's farm 
for six years. Coming out to Ventura County, he familiarized himself 
with local conditions during the next 33^ years as an employe on the 
Robert Dunn ranch in the Santa Clara Valley. 

He then took up a government claim of hill land consisting of 320 
acres. It was in the midst of the oil district, and sixty days after he had 
filed his claim he sold the tract for $16,000 to oil promoters. He used 
part of the proceeds in purchasing 400 acres adjoining his claim, also in 
the Santa Clara Valley, and of that large estate he now has forty acres in 
apricots, ten acres in lemons, while the rest is devoted to beans, alfalfa and 
barley. 

Mr. Black is a stockholder in the Farmers and Merchants Bank of 
Santa Paula and Fillmore. He is a member of the Woodmen of the 
World, is a republican in politics, and belongs to the Christian Science 
Church. Near Fillmore on the ranch he now owns March 15, 1896, he 
married Lelia V. Conoway, daughter of one of the pioneers of Ventura 
County. They are the parents of two children: Mrs. Lucile Smith of 
Los Angeles ; and Nadine, who is a student in the high school. 

Jean B. Lapeyre. Among the men of Ventura County who within 
the past two decades have risen to prominence in agriculture, Jean B. 
Lapeyre occupies an established and recognized place. When he came 
to this county, in 1891, he was possessed of little save determination 
and ambition, and his early efforts to gain a foothold were filled with 
discouragements and hardships. However, he persevered and his indom- 
itable energy and constant spirit finally won him success. He is now 
niunbered among the substantial farmers of the vicinity of Moorpark, 
where his home is located. 

Mr. Lapeyre is a native of France, bom in the province of Basses- 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 779 

Pyrenees, August 28, 1871, a son of Alexis and Marie Ann Lapeyre. 
He attended the public schools of his native locality until he was fifteen 
years of age, when he began assisting his father on the home farm, so 
continuing for five years. Mr. Lapeyre felt that he was making but little 
progress in his own country and that he could better his condition by 
coming to the United States, where opportunities for success were 
greater. Accordingly, in 1891, he came to California and first located 
in Los Angeles County, where he secured employment as a sheep herder, 
a vocation which he followed for two years in that county and four 
months in Ventura County. When he gave up herding he became a 
farm hand and worked on various farms in the county until 1899. He 
carefully saved his earnings and in 1899 became a proprietor by renting 
600 acres of farming land in Ventura County, and this he has cultivated 
ever since. In 1915 he rented 400 additional acres from A. Camarillo 
and A. Levy, of Oxnard, and Camarillo Coly, whose land adjoins his 
600. Mr. Lapeyre devotes 225 acres to beans and has 750 in grain and 
hay. In addition, he is engaged in the threshing business and is the 
owner of a large and modem outfit. Mr. Lapeyre uses modem methods 
in all of his work, and is known as a practical farmer who is always 
ready to experiment with innovations which promise benefits. In com- 
munity aflfairs he takes a lively and helpful interest, and has cheerfully 
accepted his full share of the burdens and responsibilities of citizenship. 
He votes the republican ticket and is a member of the Catholic Church. 
Mr. Lapeyre was married at Los Angeles to Miss Celine Durmortier, 
in October, 1909. They are the parents of two children: Alexis and 
Irene. 

Edward J. Beekman is a native son of California, and since his 
school days were over has been almost continuously for a period of forty 
years identified with ranching and fruit growing in Ventura County. 

He was bom in Sierra County, California, October 3, i860, a son of 
William and Mary Alice Beekman. In 1866 his parents removed to San 
Jose, where he received his first instruction in the public schools. In 
1870, his father having in the meantime died, his stepfather Alfred Joy 
and the mother moved to Ventura County and settled at Saticoy. In the 
public schools of that town Edward J. Beekman continued his education 
for three years, and the family then removed to the Eliso Canyon, where 
his stepfather was a sheep rancher for seven years. On returning to 
Saticoy, Edward J. Beekman again resumed his work in the public schools 
and continued for three years. 

When his parents moved to the Sespe grant near what is now Fillmore 
and engaged in the cattle business, Edward J. found work at home, but at 
the age of eighteen went to the Jack Hill ranch on the location now 
occupied by the City of Oxnard. He remained there five years, then 
spent one year on the Zellar ranch, and returning to the Sespe grant bought 
eighty-eight acres which he planted in oranges. He now has a finely 
developed orange grove and is one of the prosperous and well satisfied 
citizens of Ventura County. 



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780 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

Fraternally he is a member of the Woodmen of the World and is a 
republican voter. At Los Angeles in 1886 Mr. Beekman married Miss 
Iva Sprague, a native of Sacramento, California, and daughter of F. A. 
Sprague. They have three children: Ernest, aged twenty-two, is con- 
nected with the Montebello Oil Company near Fillmore. Orland, aged 
nineteen, and Edwin, aged eighteen, are both on the ranch with their father. 

James A. Gibson. Many of the prosperous farms and fruit ranches 
of Ventura County are owned by men who came to this state with prac- 
tically no capital and have gained success by intelligently combining their 
individual enterprise and hard work with the splendid resources of soil 
and climate. 

A case in point is furnished by Mr. James A. Gibson of Nordhoff. 
Bom in Mercer County, Pennsylvania, September 10, 1861, he grew up 
and received his early education in the public schools of Lee County, 
Iowa, and at the age of seventeen took his place as an apprentice in a flour 
mill. He learned that business in all its details and eventually was pro- 
moted to head miller. 

Then in 1888 he came to California. Locating in the Ojai Valley of 
Ventura County he bought twenty acres. His first work of development 
was the planting of five acres to naval oranges. He has obtained a great 
many fine crops of fruit from that planting, and in 1897 he extended his 
orange groves by the planting of ten acres in navel and Valencia oranges, 
and in the spring of 1906 put out three more acres in oranges. He is one 
of the leading orange growers in that valley. In 1891 Mr. Gibson bought 
five acres in the foothills and seven acres near his home place, but as yet 
he has not developed that land. 

He is a son of Essington and Julia Gibson. His father was bom in 
Pennsylvania, was a carpenter and millwright, and in 1869 removed from 
Mercer County, Pennsylvania, to Lee County, Iowa, where he followed 
his trade for many years. In 1889 he followed his son to the Ojai Val- 
ley of Ventura County and has since lived there in comfortable retire- 
ment. 

Mr. James Gibson is a republican. He married in Los Angeles June 
30, 19 1 6, Sarah Shearing, a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of 
one of the coal producers and operators of that state. Mr. Gibson is a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, No. 360, of Los 
Angeles. 

Mathew Atmore. Very few of the Calif omia pioneers of the early 
'SOs still survive. The men who went through that rugged experience 
and faced the trials and difficulties of life on the Pacific Coast in the 
years immediately following the discovery of gold, deserve the grateful- 
ness of recognition in every history of the state, though recognition must 
in the majority of cases be paid to those who have long since departed 
these scenes. 

One of the survivors of that time is Mr. Mathew Atmore, now living 
at the venerable age of fourscore in Sespe, Ventura County. Mr. Atmore 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 781 

was born in Norfolk County, England, in 1836, a son of Mathew, Sr. 
Until he was nine years of age he lived in England and attended public 
school, and then came to the United States with his parents, who settled 
at Penfield, in Calhoun County, Michigan, where they were among the 
pioneers of that region which is now one of the most populous and 
progressive in Southern Michigan. His schooling was continued in 
Calhoun County until he was fifteen. 

At that youthful age, filled with the spirit of adventure and enter- 
prise, he set out with others and crossed the plains to California, settling 
in Eldorado County, where he put in four years in the mmes. After 
that he went into the freighting business between Sacramento, California, 
and Virginia City, Nevada, until the outbreak of the war in 1861. 

Among other distinctions to his credit Mr. Atmore is an honored 
veteran of the Civil war, and fought with a California regiment that 
made an imusual record of gallantry and hard fighting qualities. He 
enlisted in Company K of the Second California Cavalry, and his indi- 
vidual record is part of the story of splendid performance by that com- 
pany. The regiment was organized at Camp Alert, San Francisco, and 
was ordered to Fort Churchill, Nevada. At Fort Churchill eight com- 
panies of the Third Infantry under Col. P. Edward Connor, five com- 
panies from the Second Cavalry, and a battery of two 12-pounders 
formed the expedition to Salt Lake City. They moved as a column of 
1,200 men from Fort Churchill, Nevada, over the route of the stage 
to Ruby Valley, where they established a camp and remained one month. 
Thence the column moved to Salt Lake, one company of infantry being 
left at Fort Ruby. In September they arrived at the west bank of 
Jordan River. There they were met by a courier from Brigham Young 
forbidding Colonel Connor and his command from crossing the Jordan. 
His answer was : "We cross Jordan at eight o'clock tomorrow morning 
if hell is gaping open at the bottom." (This point is known as Camp 
Floyd and was the same place occupied by Colonel Johnson two years 
before by order of Brigham Young.) 

The next morning the column crossed the Jordan at 8 o'clock and 
started for Salt Lake City, forty miles distant. Not a friendly sign 
was given the advancing troopers all the way. They arrived on the out- 
skirts of Salt Lake at 3 P. M. the second day. A battle front was formed 
with Company K in advance and 1,200 men following. They were 
ordered to deploy and keep the streets open and marched into Emigra- 
tion Square. From a wagon seat Judge Curry's wife offered them 
greetings, the only welcome extended them, and Mrs. Curry's action 
was strongly opposed by the men of the city. While the command was 
at Fort Ruby Colonel Connor had proceeded to Salt Lake and located 
the ground for the fort without the knowledge of Brigham Young. 
The soldiers dug holes in the ground, put the tents over them, and 
were in camp before dark and remained in that location all winter. 

Next summer they were out on the overland route skirmishing with 
the Indians, their base of supplies being at the City of Rocks, 100 miles 
west of Ogden. They had four fights that summer but lost no men. 



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782 SANTA BARBA^IA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

In the fall of 1863 they organized against Bear Hunter, the Indian 
chief of the Renegade Snakes, and went into camp on the north side 
of Bear River. Ten wagons with a company of infantry and 240 cavalry 
as an escort were sent out for grain. It took two days and three nights 
to cover the distance to the Town of Franklin, where they arrived on 
the third night. Bear Hunter was camped fourteen miles away on Bear 
River. At sunrise the little company of 4CX) men brought up on the 
bluff of Bear River. Eighteen inches of snow covered the ground. 
Private Atmore and three others were ordered out as skirmishers. 
Bear Hunter and his warriors, their squaws and children were camped 
in a draw running back from the opposite side of the river. The 
soldiers forded the stream and Lieutenant Chase was ordered to take a 
platoon of twelve men and charge. Instructions were not to shoot, 
but Bear Hunter, in all the glory of a chief's paraphernalia, swept 
around a point on a big roan horse, yelling his defiance. Mr. Atmore 
and a soldier named Joe Hill fired at the same time and the great Indian 
renegade was shot to death. Later inj^restigation showed that both shots 
were fatal. The fight lasted from sunrise until 2 P. M., and out of 510 
bucks only sixty-five or seventy made their escape. The balance were 
killed, as the order was to allow no wounded bucks to live and no prison- 
ers were taken. Company K went into this action with forty-two men, 
of whom seven were killed and twenty-two wounded. The entire com- 
mand lost twenty-two men and fifty-two wounded. The result of the 
day's work was that this band of hostile warriors was completely 
broken up. 

Mathew Atmore had left an income of $200 a month in order to 
enlist in the army. Fifty-two men were raised for service in the Town 
of Mud Springs, El E>orado County, where he enlisted. The brag of 
Captain Smith of Company K was that he never lost a fight or a scalp. 
Whenever the company struck the trail of mounted Indians they fol- 
lowed until they came up and secured their quarry. It is noteworthy 
that every state in the Union except four was represented by member- 
ship in this Company K of the Second California Regiment. During its 
campaign the company had twenty-one fights and the one pitched battle 
above described. 

When mustered out of service in 1864 Mr. Atmore returned to his 
old home in Southern Michigan, near Battle Creek, and remained there 
for twelve years, engaged in farming. California in the meantime lost 
none of its fascination and attractions for him, and returning to this 
state he settled in the Santa Clara Valley of Ventura County. After 
two years working on various ranches he bought sixty-two acres of 
Government land in the same valley. That land he has since sold off 
piece by piece, and the water rights he traded for a twenty-five-acre 
tract on the Sespe. Five acres of that he has also sold, and the rest 
is now planted, nine acres in walnuts, five acres in lemons and five acres 
in oranges. Eighty acres which he owns adjoining his home place are 
used for grazing lands, and another 160 acres owned by him in Los 
Angeles County is devoted to stock raising and to bee culture. 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 783 

Mr. Atmore and some of his neighbors organized the first school 
district in the Sespe, in what was known as the Guiberson and Conway 
neighborhood. For many years he served as a trustee of this district. 
Mr. Atmore is still an active and honored member of the Fillmore Citrus 
Fruit Association and the Santa Paula Walnut Growers Association, 
and as an old soldier enjoys his meetings with comrades in the Grand 
Army Post. 

In Penfield, Michigan, January i, 1866, not long after he left the 
army, Mr. Atmore married Mary M. Gorham. Three children were 
bom to their union. The oldest is Mrs. Harry Peyton of Ventura 
County, the second is Miss Grace D., still at home, while the son Frank 
is now associated in the ranching business with his father. 

Frederick Udall, who has been developing some of the choice prop- 
erty of Ventura County as a citrus fruit grower during the past twenty 
odd years, came to California from England. 

He was bom on the Isle of Man off the English coast on August 4, 
1870, a son of Charles and Sarah Udall. When old enough he was put in 
a boarding school at Derbyshire, England, where he studied until the 
age of twelve, and in 1886 he graduated from Victoria College on the 
Isle of Man and the following year was a student in King Williams Col- 
lege at Castletown, Isle of Man; where he completed his education in 
1887. 

For the following five or six years he was associated with his father, 
and during that time was agent with headquarters at Douglas, England, 
for some of the largest manufacturing firms of England. In 1893 Fred- 
erick Udall came to Ventura County, and during the first year he rented 
a home on the thirteen acre orange grove belonging to the Wychoff estate 
in the Ojai Valley. Purchasing ten acres of land in the same vicinity, 
Mr. Udall began his systematic development, planting it in grapes, peaches, 
plums and apricots. In 191 5 he purchased another ten acres adjoining 
his first place, and now has three acres of that planted in oranges, and 
plans to lay out the rest of it for resident property. 

Mr. Udall is a member of the Masonic Order, of the Episcopal Church 
and as an American citizen votes to support the republican party. In 
Ventura he married in May, 1907, Miss Adeline Murphy, who is also a 
native of England and a daughter of Jeremiah Murphy, a prominent man- 
ufacturer, hotel proprietor and business man of the Isle of Man. They 
have two children : Frederick Villiers, seven years of age and attending 
public school; and William Douglas, aged four. 

Walter H. Fleet has found the work and life by which he acquits 
himself most creditably as a farmer and rancher, and is one of the men 
who carry the heaviest responsibilities of fruit production in Southern 
California. 

In 1910 Mr. Fleet was made manager of the Rancho Sespe, six miles 
east of Santa Paula in the famous Santa Clara Valley. This magnificent 
ranch, owned by Mrs. Keith Spalding of Chicago, contains a little over 



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784 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

1, 600 acres of tillable land. It has been producing crops for many years, 
and part of it is still undergoing development. It is one of the oldest 
ranches in the county. So far 300 acres have been planted to lemons, 
with trees ranging from one to eight years of age. Thirty-five acres are 
in Valencia oranges, the trees being from four to eight years old. An- 
other part of the ranch includes sixty acres in walnuts, while the rest of 
the cultivated land is in lima beans. Under Mr. Fleet's individual man- 
agement from 75 to 125 men are employed continually. 

Mr. Fleet is a native of Virginia, bom in King and Queen County, 
March 29, i860, a son of William C. and Lucy (Roane) Fleet. He grew 
up in his native state, attended the public schools until seventeen and for 
two years was a student in the Blackburg Military School at Blackburg, 
Virginia. As a young man he distinguished himself by practical enter- 
prise and an ability to look after important trusts, and for two years after 
leaving school had charge of his grandfather's flour mill. 

Leaving Virginia he went to Lafayette County, Missouri, and until 
1888 was manager of a stock ranch owned by H. C. Sydnor. Mr. Fleet 
has been in California since 1888. For twenty-two years he worked on 
the Piru ranch of 14,000 acres, of which 2,400 acres were put into fruit 
of various kinds during his stay there. This property was owned for 
twelve years until 1900 by David C. Cook, who sold to the Piru Oil and 
Land Company, a corporation of Los Angeles. Mr. Fleet continued to 
handle the property for the last named company more than eight years. 
From an employe he was promoted first to superintendent and later to 
manager. He left the responsibilities of the last named position in 1910 
to identify himself with the Rancho Sespe. 

Mr. Fleet is a director and president of the Santa Paula Walnut 
Growers' Association, president and director of the Santa Paula Lima 
Bean Browers* Association; a director in the California Lima Bean 
Growers' Association ; and a director of the California Walnut Growers' 
Association with headquarters in Los Angeles. 

He is a Mason, Elk, and a republican voter. January 21, 1897, he 
married Miss Lorina C. Scott, a native of Kentucky and daughter of one 
of the old settlers of that state. 

Charles H. McKevett. The ancestral home of the late Charles H. 
McKevett is in Scotland. He, however, was of American birth and 
parentage, the first of the name to immigrate to our shores being Alex- 
ander McKevett, grandfather of the subject, who came to America as a 
boy and settled in New York City. There he married and reared his 
family, and one of his sons became the father of the subject of this all 
too brief review. 

Charles H. McKevett was born in Cortland County, New York, on 
October 3, 1848. Details regarding his early life and education are lack- 
ing, but it is known that he was still very young when he first identified 
himself with the oil business in Pennsylvania. His early connection with 
that great enterprise was as an employee, but he was not made of the 
stuff that would permit him long to remain in th^t position, and he soon 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 785 

found it possible to launch out as a contractor in well drilling. Still later 
he became an independent operator. His knowledge of the business was 
most comprehensive, and for a period of fifteen years he continued to 
operate in Clarion, Butler, Warren and McKean counties, Pennsylvania. 
As a result of his labors in those years he amassed a considerable fortune 
and in 1886 he decided to withdraw completely from the oil business and 
locate in different surroundings. A complete change of climate and 
activity was what he wanted, and in casting about for a suitable location 
he chose California. 

Mr. McKevett first came to this state in January, 1886, and after a 
little looking about he chose Santa Paula for his permanent place of resi- 
dence. At that time the town was in a most undeveloped condition, lack- 
ing everything in the way of transportation advantages and boasting a 
population of not more than 200 people. Mr. McKevett looked ahead 
a few years and was able to see that land purchases made in the com- 
munity then would be profitable ventures, and accordingly bought a 
tract of 424 acres from the Bradley and Blanchard ranches in the town. 
His land extended from about the center of the town out into the outly- 
ing country, and a few years later a good part of it was platted into city 
lots and sold. A few years after the time of purchase, however, he 
planted a portion of it to oranges, lemons and apricots, as well as devoting 
some of it to general farming. 

In 1887 Mr. McKevett organized the Santa Paula Lumber Company 
and was president of the concern until its consolidation with the Ventura 
County Lumber Company, when he became general manager of the com- 
bine. In 1888 he organized the Santa Paula State Bank, George H. 
Bonebrake becoming president and himself vice president, with J. R. 
Haugh, cashier. On September 23, 1889, the bank was converted into 
the First National Bank of Santa Paula, Mr. McKevett being elected to 
the presidency of the new concern. He also served as secretary and 
treasurer of the Graham Loftus Oil Company, and was a director and 
treasurer of the Limoneira Company, then owners of about 350 acres, 
which was afterward increased to the present holdings of 800 acres. 
Lemons constituted the main crop of this ranch, but some oranges and 
walnuts were also produced. Another office Mr. McKevett long held was 
that of vice president of the Santa Paula Water Company, being the in- 
cumbent of the office at the time of his death in 1907. 

His life on the whole was one of tremendous activity. He was inter- 
ested in every upward movement inaugurated in the county as long as 
he was resident in it, and his interest was always a helpful one. When 
he died the community and the county lost a man who had contributed 
largely and in numerous ways to the betterment and upbuilding of that 
section of the state. He was a republican in politics and a Mason of 
high degree. He was a member of Santa Paula Lodge No. 291, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, of Ventura Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, 
of the Commandery and the Shrine. He was also a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. 

In 1873 Mr. McKevett was married in Pennsylvania to Alice Stowell, 



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786 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

of Pennsylvania birth and parentage. Three children are now living: 
Mrs. Harriett M. Teague of Santa Paula, Mrs. Helen Best of Los Ange- 
les, and Allan C." McKevett. Allan C. v^as born in Bradford, Pennsyl- 
vania, on January 31, 1884, and he attended the schools of Santa Paula 
to the age of fourteen. Owing to impaired eyesight he was compelled 
to leave school. He had an admirable business training at his father's 
hands in the bank and in the offices of the lumber concern of which his 
father was head, and proved himself the possessor of the splendid busi- 
ness instincts that had made his father so successful in life. Since the 
death of his father he has had the management of the McKevett estate 
in his charge and is one of the directors of the First National Bank of 
Santa Paula. He also represents his mother on the directorate of a num- 
ber of corporations in which she is heavily interested. Mr. Allan C. 
McKevett is a republican in politics, but has never taken an active part 
in political matters, as the business of the estate demands his entire atten- 
tion. He was married in Santa Paula to Miss Ruth Lowry on June 6, 
1907, and they have one child, Virginia, now seven years of age and 
attending the public schools. Mrs. Allan C. McKevett is a native of 
Los Angeles County, California, and a daughter of Dr. J. H. Lowry, 
deceased, who was practicing medicine in Santa Paula at the time of the 
marriage of his daughter. 

Mrs. Charles H. McKevett has given to the City of Santa Paula the 
grounds upon which the North Grammar School has been built, and she 
is now preparing to build a Women's Club House, which is to be given 
to the women of Santa Paula. This club house will be situated on 
grounds laid out and beautified as a park, and will be given to the women 
of Santa Paula in the name of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Collins Teague, the 
daughter and son-in-law of Mrs. Charles H. McKevett. 

Mark McLoughlin. One of the earliest pioneers of the County of 
Ventura was Mark McLoughlin (now deceased). He was a man of high 
character, honest and just in his dealings. He was of Irish birth, the 
county of his nativity being Sligo where he was born April 20, 1843. His 
parents, Patrick and Ellen (Wynne) McLoughlin, were life long resi- 
dents of Ireland, the mother dying at the age of eighty- two years and 
the father at the advanced age of eighty-eight. They were the parents of 
eleven children, two coming to America, Mark and another brother who 
located in Detroit, Michigan. 

At the age of fourteen years, Mark McLoughlin set out in life for 
himself becoming dependent upon his own resources. He had the advan- 
tages of a common school education. At the age of seventeen he sailed 
for America, landing first in New York City, and for the following eigh- 
teen months found employment as clerk in a large department store. 
Stories of the wonderful opportunities of acquiring wealth in the land of 
Golden California fired the imagination and ambitions of Mr. McLough- 
lin. In the spring of 1863 he started for this state, reaching San Francisco 
and remaining there six months, after which he engaged in farming in 
Alameda County for a short period. His connection with Ventura 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 787 

County began in 1870 when he leased land from the late Senator Thomas 
R. Bard. His first investment was in 318 acres on the Colonia. Mr. Mc- 
Loughlin started in an unpretentious way as a grain raiser, increasing his 
facilities and acreage as his means would permit, until eventually he 
became one of the wealthiest men of his county and remained a leading 
citizen of that place until the time of his death, December 3, 191 4. His 
widow still makes her home on this, their first acquired property. 

Ever since becoming a voter Mr. McLoughlin was a believer in and 
supporter of the democratic principles. He was jovial and companion- 
able, approachable when his financial support was desired for charitable 
or worthy cause, and throughout the county could count his friends by 
the score. 

In the winter of 1871 Mark McLoughlin married Margaret Clyne, also 
of Irish birth, a daughter of James and Mary (Green) Clyne. To this 
union were born nine children, three being deceased, while six are living, 
namely : Thomas F., who married Anna Liedel ; Mary Kathryn, wife of 
Henry M. Borchard; Ellen, wife of Francis A. Borchard; James P., 
Caroline, and Sara E., the latter three making their home with their 
mother. James P. has power of attorney, thus rendering substantial aid 
in the management of his mother's holdings, which consist principally of 
bean and beet lands, 318 acres being on the Colonia, 243 acres in Camarillo, 
a half interest in 640 acres in Santa Susana, 120 acres near Hueneme, 220 
acres on the Patterson Ranch, two residence lots in the City of Oxnard, 
and stock in the First National Bank of Oxnard of which institution 
Mr. McLoughlin was a director for a number of years, a position he held 
until the time of his death. Religiously Mark McLoughlin was a Catholic 
and fraternally a Knight of Columbus. 

Thomas F. McLoughlin. The vitality and enterprise of some 
of the old pioneers of Ventura County are now continued through their 
worthy successors, sons and daughters, and no small part of the great 
landed estates in this section are now being actively operated by some 
men who, had circumstances been otherwise, would have been able to 
carve their destiny by their own courage and ability, and as a matter 
of fact are carrying the heaviest responsibilities of citizenship and industry 
in modem years. 

One of these younger men is Thomas F. McLoughlin, who is a son 
of the late Mark McLoughlin, one of the fine old pioneers of Ventura 
County and whose career is sketched on other pages. Thomas F. 
McLoughlin was bom in Ventura County December 9, 1873. He attended 
public schools until the age of eighteen, and then found work on his 
father's farm up to 1898. Since that year he has been an active and 
independent farmer, and now owns a half interest in a 640-acre ranch 
and recently has bought 150 acres from the Patterson Ranch Company. 
He devotes his exclusive attention to the raising of two crops, beans 
and beets. 

Mr. McLoughlin is a democrat, a Catholic, a Knight of Columbus 
and an Elk, and is a widely known and popular citizen of the Oxnard 



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788 SANTA BARBARA, SAN LUIS OBISPO 

community. On November 8, 1898, he married at Elrio Miss Anna 
Leidle. They are the parents of a vigorous household of ten children: 
Mark, Margaret, Francis, Anna, William, Raymond, James, Thomas F. 
Jr., Kathryn and Ellen, the last two being twins. The oldest child, Mark, 
is sixteen years of age and attending high school, while the younger 
children of school age are in St. Joseph's Institute. 

George H. Holsten of Xordhoff has under way some developments 
which will add largely to the productiveness of the Ojai Valley as one of 
the leading fruit centers of Southern California. In 1913 he bought 
seventy acres near Nordhoff, and has since planted 1,521 apricot trees, 
561 almond trees, and 2,396 orange trees. Mr. Holsten is an expert in 
the citrus fruit industry, having gained his knowledge by broad experience 
in connection with some of the best producing groves in this part of 
the state. 

He was born in Morgan County, Missouri, October 26, 1869, a son 
of John P. and Annie (Orrinberg) Holsten. His public school education 
was finished at the age of fourteen. After that he worked on his father's 
farm two years, then did work as clerk in a shoe store at Sedalia, Mis- 
souri, for five years, and was from that promoted to a position as travel- 
ing salesman for a St. Louis wholesale shoe house. He continued on the 
road for three years, and at the end of that time came to California. 

Locating at Los Angeles, he soon afterwards took charge of some 
orange and lemon groves at Hollywood. In 1904 the Barr Realty Com- 
pany of Los Angeles sent him to the Ojai Valley as foreman for three of 
their ranches, including a seventy acre orange and apricot orchard, a 
forty acre olive orchard and a sixty acre orange grove. In 1905 he left 
the employ of this company and after that engaged in various business 
pursuits until 191 3, when he bought his present property near Nordhoff. 
Mr. Holsten also owns a third interest in a 149 acre ranch west of Nord- 
hoflf. He is a member of the Woodmen of the World, is a republican, 
and a Protestant in religion. In Pike County, Missouri, February 28, 
1893, he married Annie Price Murphy. Their only child is Marie, who is 
a graduate of the Los Angeles High School and is now living in Los 
Angeles. 

O. A. Wadleigh. For over forty years members of the Wadleigh 
family have been identified with the fortunes of this section of Cali- 
fornia and two of the most prosi>erous ranchers and planters in this 
locality are Mr. O. A. Wadleigh and his son, Mr. Frank Wadleigh. 
The latter has an extensive bean plantation in the vicinity of Somis, in 
Ventura County. 

O. A. Wadleigh was bom in Canada January 6, 1852, a son of 
Henry L. and Annis (Austin) Wadleigh. His father died in East Bolton, 
Canada, in 1882, aged sixty-six, and the mother lived to attain her 
eightieth year, dying in California. Both parents were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church at Bolton. 

Next to the oldest in a family of four children, O. A. Wadleigh 



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AND VENTURA COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA 789 

received a substantial education, graduating from high school at the age 
of twenty. In the meantime his interests had been turned in the direction 
of the Far West, and he soon afterward arrived in California. For some 
years he was engaged in ranching in Santa Barbara County, but has 
lived in Ventura County since 1889. He is one of the men who began 
on limited capital and have come to a place where they command and 
direct some of the important resources of the county. His plan of 
farming for some years was renting, but eventually he made enough to 
purchase, and he is now owner of an estate of 14,000 acres not far from 
Newbury Park. 

November 26, 1882, O. A. Wadleigh married Gertrude Kleckner, 
who is a native of Pennsylvania. Their three children are Frank O., 
Fred H. and Dacy G. O. A. Wadleigh is a republican and fraternally 
is affiliated with Oxnard Lodge No. 341, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons. 

Mr. Frank O. Wadleigh was bom in Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, 
September 24, 1884. He was reared in Ventura County, attended the 
public schools there until sixteen, following which he had a six months' 
course in a business college at Los Angeles. His first practical business 
experience was one year spent in the Llewellyn Iron Works at Los 
Angeles, but he gave up industry or commerce in favor of ranching and 
agriculture. Returning to Ventura County, he found employment on 
his father's ranch on the Del Norte Mesa grant, consisting of 200 acres, 
for a period of nine years, and has since been farming that f