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HISTORY 



OF 



SOUTH CAROLINA 




EDITED BY 

YATES SNOWDEN, LL. D. 

In colUboratioa with 

H. G. CUTLER, 

General Hiitomn 

and an Editorial Advisory Board including 
Special Contributors 



Issued in Five Volumes 
VOLUME V 



ILLUSTRATED 



PUBLISHERS 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK 

1 9 JO 






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History of South Carolina 



Chief Justice Gary and the South Carouna 
Judiciary. Carlyle tells us that history is the es- 
sence of innumerable biographies. With equal truth 
it may be said that the life-story of one man, well 
and truly and fully told, is a chapter in the history of 
his coimtry. Especially so is this the case when the 
man has spent his life in a high public office, in the 
service of his country and his state. I purpose to 
write a brief chapter in the history of our state by 
giving a sketch of the life of Eugene Blackburn 
Gary, chief justice of South Carolina. A complete 
biography it cannot be, for he is still living and in 
active service; and long may he so continue. This 
fact also forbids the use of panegyrics and terms of 
exaggerated praise, nor does it permit the search 
and exposure of failings, if any there be. It also 
bids me refrain from invading the privacy and sanc- 
tity of his home, no matter how beautiful and attrac- 
tive the description might be. I can only hope to 
draw, as it were, an outline sketch, observing the 
limits that good taste lays down. 

There is no higher office, nor one of greater honor 
and responsibility, than that of judge, whether of the 
Supreme or the Circuit Court. And there is no state 
in the Union where judges are held in so high honor- 
as in South Carolina. Yet here, as elsewhere, it is 
sad to reflect that after death the memory of them 
is shortened. Read the history of our own or of any 
state and you will see that while governors, states- 
men, generals, are remembered with honor, hardly a 
reference is made to the judges. It is very true that 
when they rest from their labors their works do 
follow them. But those works, in the shape of 
opinions, decisions and decrees, are pigeon-holed as 
court records, or bound in calf as law reports, vol- 
umes unknown to the historians, and consulted only 
by succeeding judges and lawyers in search of au- 
thorities and precedents. Thus it is that chief jus- 
tices, chancellors and judges, distinguished in their 
lifetime for their learning, and honored for their 
splendid service, are not long remembered after 
death. They share the common fate to be forgotten 
ere long, like a dead man out of mind, unless they 
have done something worthy of note outside of the 
work of the court. Chancellor Kent is remembered 
because of his "Commentaries," not because of his 
chancellorship. Who would ever hear of Judge 
Longstreet if he had not written the "Georgia 
Scenes"? A similar fate awaits lawyers; McCrady 
will be remembered for his **History of South Caro- 
lina," when Petigru shall have been forgotten. 



It is therefore, to me, a grateful task to contribute 
to this book on South Carolina a sketch of Chief 
Justice Gary which may be read by future genera- 
tions and may show them what manner of man he 
was. 

It has been said that no one is qualified to write 
the biography of another unless he has known him 
from his boyhood and all throu^ his life. I may 
claim to that extent to be qualified; for the boy, 
Eugene Gary, had me for his schoolmaster for three 
years; he and I were for nearly twenty years prac- 
ticing at the same bar, and the same day saw him 
made associate justice and me a Circuit judge. He 
was born in Cokesbury, in the old County of Abbe- 
ville, on August 22, 1854. Looking back through ^e 
three score and six years of his life so far — this is 
written in 1920 — we were bound to say that he has 
lived through a most eventful period in the history 
of his state, his country, and the world. He was 
old enough to remember the terrible times of the 
Civil war. He saw the sad end of it when President 
Davis spent the night in his grandfather's house in 
Cokesbury just the day before he held in Abbeville 
the last meeting of the Cabinet of the Confederacy. 

Then followed, until 1876, the horrible reconstruc- 
tion period, worse in many respects than the war 
time, when South Carolina was known throughout 
the world as the "Prostrate State," ground to the 
dust under the heels of her emancipated negroes, 
who were led and controlled by Yankee carpet-bag- 
gers and backed by garrisons of soldiers, white and 
black. The bloodless revolution led by Hampton in 
'76 put an end to the rule of Yankee and negro. In 
that revolution no one played a better part than did 
Gen. Mart Gary, uncle of Eugene. 

The year 1886 saw the beginning of the farmers* 
movement, led by Benjamin R. Tillman, which re- 
sulted in 1890 in the election of Tillman as governor, 
and of Eugene Gary as lieutenant governor. Mean- 
while Eugene B. Gary had served one term in the 
Legislature and had taken an active part in the 
political strife which waged for several years. For 
six years he was chairman of the democratic party 
in Abbeville County. After serving four years as 
lieutenant governor and president of the Senate, he 
was electd to the Supreme Court as associate justice 
in 1893. In 1912 he was elected chief justice, and 
still occupies that high office. 

His has been a successful life. We often hear and 
read of the secret of success. This is a misleading 
and inappropriate phrase. There is nothing hidden 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



nor mysterious about it. The cause is plain to any- 
one who will look for it. Success is a plant of slow 
growth which requires constant and most careful 
nursing. The price of success is the proper phrase. 
A man makes up his mind to reach a certain goal; 
it may be far off, the road may be a rough and 
thorny one, and progress may be by painful steps 
and slow; but he trains himself by education, he 
devotes all his powers to the attainment of his aim, 
and in the end succeeds. That was the case with 
Eugene Gary; he paid the price, he succeeded; and 
like all truly successful men he deserved success. Let 
us now look back and trace his course from boy- 
hood and see what was the price he paid. 

It was in February, 1869, that I first saw young 
Eugene Gary. I had opened a classical school in 
his native town, Cokesbury. He and his two younger 
brothers came on the opening day. He was in his 
fifteenth year. I remember well how he looked — a 
tall lad, slight in build, his pale complexion made to 
look more pale by the intense blackness of his hair. 
For three years he was one of my schoolboys. Of 
the thirty or forty lads who were his schoolfellows, 
it is pleasant to remember that they all did good 
work, that they all behaved uncommonly well, that 
several of them could not be surpassed for dili- 
gence and progress in their studies, and none sur- 
passed Eugene Gary. Regular in attendance, he 
showed each morning that the lessons appointed for 
study at home had been thoroughly learned. If he 
had a fault, it was that he was more. of a student 
than a schoolboy; he seemed to have no great lik- 
ing for the active sports and games of his school 
fellows. 

It is to me a most gratifying reflection that so 
many of those schoolboys turned out so well in after 
life. Eugene Gary is not the only one who has 
attained to high and honorable position. From that 
group of lads there came a United States senator, 
a governor of the state, a lieutenant governor, a chief 
justice, two Circuit judges, a member of Congress, 
a speaker of the House, a president of the Senate, 
several members of the Senate and the. House, be- 
sides lawyers, physicians and business men success- 
ful in their various callings. This is a record to be 
proud of, not unworthy to be placed beside the rec- 
ord of Doctor Waddell's school at Willington, so 
famous in the history of Abbeville County. 

Eugene Gary went straight from the school to- 
the University of South Carolina, from which in due 
time he was graduated. With his course there I am 
not familiar, but I am sure he was a most diligent 
student, that he "lived laborious days" and burned 
the midnight oil. 

After his graduation he read law in the office of 
his uncle, Gen. Mart Gary, at Edgefield, and was 
admitted to the bar in his twenty-second year. He 
immediately opened an office and **hung out his 
shingle" as an attorney at law at Abbeville Court 
House, and began the practice of his chosen pro- 
fession. His determination to join the Abbeville 
bar showed that the young lawyer had a brave heart 
That bar at that time had no superiors in the state, 
and only one, or perhaps two, that could match it. 
Armstead Burt, Thomas C. Perrin, General Mc- 
Gowan (afterward judge of the Supreme Court); 



Edward Noble, William H. Parker, W. A. Lee, 
James S. Cothran (afterward Circuit judge) — these 
are the names of the men who then composed the 
Abbeville bar — all of them lawyers of manv years' 
experience and of large practice. It was a bar that 
not only controlled the business of Abbeville County, 
but had a large share in the litigation of all the 
upper and surrounding counties. 

At that time Abbeville County was one of the 
largest, most populous, and most influential counties 
in the state. It was a model county in size and shape, 
and its people were proud of its history. The forma- 
tion of new counties reduced old Abbeville in influ- 
ence as well as in size. 

But Abbeville was old Abbeville still during the 
eighteen years in which Eugene Gary practiced law 
at its bar. The same qualities that had distinguished 
him as a schoolboy, made him successful as a lawyer ; 
he was diligent in business, faithful to the interests 
of his clients, always well-prepared and ready for 
trial of his cases in court. It is not strange, there- 
fore, that he built up an excellent practice. 

At this point I may state that Eugene Gary mar- 
ried young, in 1877. Good taste forbid that I should 
say more than this — ^that he was most fortunate in 
his marriage. In the expressive language of Holy 
Writ, he "obtained favor of the Lord." 

We have already seen that in 1893 he was honored 
with a seat on the Supreme Bench as associate 
Justice; and that in 1912 he was chosen to be chief 
justice — 2L well merited promotion and the goal he 
had aimed at when he began to read law with his 
uncle. He still holds that high office, the highest 
and most responsible office in the commonwealth, 
second only to the chief justiceship of the United 
States, held in honor not onlv in South Carolina, 
but in all her sister states. The Supreme Court of 
South Carolina has long attracted the attention and 
gained the respect andf confidence of judges and 
&wyers and text writers in America and in the old 
country. Its decisions on the principles of the com- 
mon law, and of commercial law, and upon the 
ethics of equity jurisprudence, are cited with ap- 
proval, and many of them as leading cases, in all 
the courts of the United States and in the high 
court of Westminster Hall. I well remember how 
high was the estimation in which our Supreme 
Court Reports were held by Judge Dillon and Judge 
Cooley, those learned judges and standard text 
writers. In conversation with me they both showed 
they were familiar with our law reports and re- 
ferred to some of our leading cases in terms of 
highest praise, naming even the chancellors or the 
justices who had written the opinions they spoke 

of. 

It is excellent to reflect that our Supreme Court 
has a traditional reputation for its great learning, 
judicial ability and the wisdom and soundness of 
its opinion — a reputation of which the bench and bar 
and the state at large have good reason to be 
proud. It would not be proper, nor is it necessary, 
for me to pass upon the merits of the incumbent 
chief justice and associate justices. It is enough 
to say that, judging from the frequency with which 
their opinions are cited as authority in all the 
American courts and included with commendation 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



in the volumes of leading cases, they are doing their 
important work in a manner worthy of the best 
traditions of our Supreme Court 

And yet it would not be an offense against the 
canons of good taste to say that Chief Justice Gary 
is a learned judge. His whole life, since boyhood, 
has been spent in laying up stores of legal knowl- 
edge, of which his numerous opinions afford ample 
proof. They also show that he is endowed with the 
judicial cast of mind, and possesses the analytical 
faculty to discern the real points at issue. They 
manifest his intimate acquaintance with precedents 
and aptness in applying them. Whether passing 
upon statute law or the common law, lex scripta or 
the lex non scripta, or upon the fundamental prin- 
ciples of law and equity, his decisions are marked 
by clearness, conciseness and freedom from tech- 
nicality ; and, greatly to the satisfaction of the mem- 
bers of the bar, those decisions, excepting in rare in- 
stances, are brief. 

This quality of brevity is much to be commended ; 
all the more so because it is more rarely found in the 
decisions of courts than formerly. There has been 
a perceptible lengthening during the last forty or 
fif^ years. Compare a volume of the United States 
Supreme Court Reports of the year 1800 with a 
volume of the year 1900, and you will find a great 
difference in the length of the decisions. In the 
former they are, with very few exceptions, brief 
and to the point; in the latter they are nearly all 
too long and elaborate. This regrettable change may 
be due to the modem habit of dictating to a stenog- 
rapher. There is no doubt that when justices wrote 
their opinions with their own hand, the patience and 
pen lal>or encouraged concentration of thought, con- 
ciseness and condensation. As little doubt is there 
that the habit of dictating to a stepographer tends 
to diffuseness and elaboration and long drawn out 
argumentation. 

As to Chief Justice Gary — I see in the man of 
15520 the boy that I knew in 1869— -the boy who was 
without doubt the father of that man. The same 
qualities are manifest in the chief justice which 
I remarked in the schoolboy; he is, just as the boy 
was, a hard worker, painstaking, diligent in busi- 
ness, impatient of delay, eager to finish his task and 
have "a clean slate." This accounts for the celerity 
with which he dispatches the business of the court 
during term time, and the promptness with which 
he hands down the opinions in the cases assigned 
to him. No suitor can complain of "the law's de- 
lay" when the opinion in his case is to be written by 
Chief Justice Gary. 

Onerous though his labors are as chief justice, 
he still finds time for respite from those labors in 
other studies than the strictly legal. Studious by nature 
and habit, he takes his recreation in much reading 
of g^eral litcrtiture, history seeming to be his 
favorite branch, if we are to judge by several of 
his published addresses on historical subjects. In 
more than one of these addresses he has presented 
most admirably the case of the Southern Confed- 
eracy — a subject which even at this late day receives 
scant justice at the hands of Northern writers. He 
has delivered a number of excellent addresses to law 
students, and even those addresses have a historical 
tendency, as also have those he has made at the dedi- 



cation of new court houses. A notable address on 
legal ethics, which he delivered before the South 
Caroline Bar Association, was deservedly compli- 
mented by Judge Alton B. Parker, of New York, 
who was in the audience. He rose and congratulated 
South Carolina oa having at the head of her 
judiciary one who could produce so admirable a 
paper. 

The chief justice has also been a frequent con- 
tributor of articles to law journals. He is said to 
have written at least 1,800 opinions, before writing 
which he had to listen with close attention to nearly 
4,000 arguments of opposing counsel. Add to this 
the labor in preparing numerous public addresses and 
contributions to various journals — is it surprising 
that his predecessor, the late Chief Justice Mclver, 
himself a hard worker, said that Chief Justice Gary 
was the hardest working man he ever knew? In 
19 1 5 the degree was conferred upon him by the 
University of South Carolina. 

Having given this outline sketch of Eugene Black- 
bum Gary, let me now look up his pedigree. It is 
a pedigree to be proud of. He comes of good stock 
on both the paternal and maternal side of his family. 
Both the Garys and the Blackbums have a clear 
claim of descent from early pre-Revolutionary 
settlers. The Garys are first heard of in Virginia. 
The first identified Gary ancestor of our chief jus- 
tice is Charles Gary, who had come with others of 
the same family name from Virginia and settled 
in Carolina in what is now called Newberry County. 
There we find him in 1767. 

The Blackburns, his mother's family, are descend- 
ants of William Blackburn, who was killed in the 
battle of King's Mountain, fighting against the 
British. 

But it is through the Porters, the family of his 
grandmother, Mrs. Thomas Gary, that the chief jus- 
tice can go farthest back in tracing his descent 
That venerable lady — I knew her welf— was the lin- 
eal descendant of John Witherspoon, a Presbyterian 
minister, born in Scotland in 1670, who, after hay- 
ing lived in Ulster, the North of Ireland, came to 
Carolina in 1734 and made his home in the Williams- 
burg settlement. He was a descendant of John 
Knox, the great Scottish reformer. He was a 
brother-in-law of another Witherspoon. the illustrious 
divine, the president of Princeton College, one of 
the signers of the Declaration of Independence. He 
did more than merely sign. There was in the Con- 
gress a manifest and natural hesitation to "put their 
necks in a halter" by signing it, when John Wither- 
spoon came to the front and carried the day. **For 
myself," said he, "though these gray hairs must 
soon descend into the sepulchre, I would infinitely 
rather they should descend thither by the hand of 
the public executioner than desert at this crisis the 
sacred cause of my country." On the appeal of 
that Scotman the declaration was signed. 

It thus appears that Chief Justice Gary has reason 
to be proud of his ancestry. They were all of that 
excellent stock, usually called Anglo-Saxon, which 
furnished the Southern colonies with a notable pop- 
ulation, from whom have descended the bulk of our 
present day Southerners, who, being the descend- 
ants of those that made America, are the living em- 
bodiments of pure and true Americanism. Our 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Northern and Western friends have long boasted 
the marvelous power of the "melting-pot" to as- 
similate and transform into good Americans all the 
people of the earth. That was before the Great 
war. The melting-pot is not so highly thought of 
now. They would be glad to empty it and get rid 
of some millions of "undesirables," who decline to 
be Americanized. Fortunately for the South' there 
has been no such flood of foreign immigration hither 
as to require the use of that pot. In South Carolina, 
for example, among the early settlers were three 
colonies of Huguenots and one of Germans from 
the Rhenish Palatinate — all of them most desirable 
as fellow citizens. They have long ago been entirely 
absorbed and assimilated in our Anglo-Saxon pop- 
ulation. Long may the South continue to be the 
home of true Americanism, the guardian and pre- 
server of liberty and independence; of personal 
liberty and state independence and self-government. 

Proud of his ancestry, Chief Justice Gary has no 
reason to be ashamed of his immediate kith and kin, 
but quite to the contrary. His father, Dr. Frank 
Gary, was a physician eminent in his profession. 
So was his grandfather, Dr. Thomas R. Gary. His 
uncle, Thomas P. Gary, was brigade surgeon in the 
Confederate army, as, indeed, his father, Dr. Frank 
Gary, had also been. The South Carolina Garys 
seem to have had a family predilection and aptitude 
for the medical profession, manifested first by two 
sons of the ancestor, Charles Gary, already men- 
tioned, and showing in each succeeding generation. 
In the last and present generation, however, they 
seem to have taken to law rather than to medicine. 
Martin Wither spoon Gary — mark his historical name 
— the uncle already referred to, was a leading lawyer 
in Edgefield, although he is better known as Maj. 
Gen. "Mart" Gary, one of the most famous and gal- 
lant of the cavalry commanders in the Confederate 
army. Another uncle, William T. Gary, who had 
served as major in that army, was afterward a law- 
yer and a Circuit judge in Augusta, Georgia. An- 
other uncle, S. M. G. Gary, was a lawyer in Ocala, 
Florida. Then come the two brothers and three 
first cousins of the chief justice, all lawyers in South 
Carolina. 

The two brothers, Ernest Gary (deceased), and 
Frank B. Gary, were both Circuit judges at the same 
time Eugene B. Gary was chief justice. It was the 
extraordinary, the unparalleled fortune of their 
mother to see her three sons all honored with seats 
on the judicial bench. No wonder she was proud 
of her boys. She lived to a great age, dying in Abbe- 
ville in 1918. Before his election to the bench 
Judge Frank Gary had served an "unexpired term" 
as United States Senator. 

Of the three cousins, the oldest, John Gary Evans, 
was governor of the state; was a major in the army 
during the war with Spain, and was placed in charge 
of the City of Havana after peace was declared. 
His father, N. G. Evans, who was an officer in the 
United States Army before the Civil war, became 
the gallant Gen. "Shanks" Evans of the Confederate 
Army. South Carolina awarded him a sword and 
a medal in token of his bravery and success in battle. 

The foregoing paragraphs concerning the Gary 
family abundantly testify that the chief justice 
comes of a good breed. This is a cause of pleasant 



reflection not only for himself, but for the people 
of South Carolina who have honored him so highly, 
and whom he has served and still serves so well 
and faithfully. The man who has reason to be 
proud of his ancestry is also the man who desires 
to leave an honored name to posterity. 

I wish I could finish this without adding a note 
of sadness. But a sketch of . Chief Justice Gary 
could not be complete without a reference to the 
great loss and bereavement he suffered during the 
Great war, in the death of his only son, who bore 
his own name, Eugene Blackburn Gary. 

True to the traditions of his family, when war 
was declared, young Gary, twenty-seven years of 
age, at once answered his country's call. Some 
slight trouble with his eyes twice caused him to be 
unsuccessful in his eager efforts to join an officers' 
training corps; but his persistence brought success 
on his third effort. After the proper training he 
sailed for France as a lieutenant in a motor-truck 
company. On the ocean passage he contracted pneu- 
monia and died in the American Hospital at Brest 
on the very day after landing in France. Djring thus, 
young Eugene Gary gave his life to his country as 
fully and patriotically as if he had fallen on the 
field of battle. 

We thus see that Chief Justice Gary has repaid 
his state and his country for the honors they have 
abundantly bestowed on him — ^he has given his son, 
his only son. — By his old teacher, Former Judge 
W. C. Benet. 

Col. Henry Harrison Halx was a dignified, suc- 
cessful and influential business man and citizen of 
Aiken for over thirty years, and his record is one 
that commends him to a place among South Caro- 
lina's most honored citizens. 

He was bom in Darien, Georgia, November 22, 
1847, a son of Henry Tucker Hall, who was bom 
an English subject on the Isle of Bermuda. The 
mother of Colonel Hall was Susan Harrison, a na- 
tive of Georgia and of the distinguished Harrison 
family of Virginia. She was a granddaughter of 
President William Henry Harrison and a first cousin 
of President Benjamin Harrison. The late Colonel 
Hall was therefore a great-grandson of one of 
America's most distinguished soldiers and presidents. 
Colonel Hall has three sisters and two brothers, all 
now deceased: Mrs. D. O. C. Heery; Phyllis and 
Marian Hall, of Atlanta. Georgia; T. T Hall, of 
Highland, North Carolina, and Horace S. Hall, of 
Charleston. 

At the begrinning of the Civil war Henry Harrison 
Hall was fourteen years of age. His youthful am- 
bition to become a soldier was denied until 1863, 
when he enlisted as a private, and was in servkre 
until the end of the struggle. As a member of 
Matthews Heavy Artillery he sp^t most of his 
time at Battery Wagener and about Charleston, and 
was with the forces of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston 
when they surrendered in North Carolina in 1865. 
At that time he was an acting quartermaster ser- 
geant. He was an ardent defender of his beloved 
southland, as a soldier was fearless and brave, and 
while his generous nature prompted him to acknowl- 
edge the bravery of his enemies, he regarded the 
Confederate soldier as his ideal of manly courage 



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FOUR GENERATIONS 
Samuel T. Jenerette, Mrs. Lucinda Cooper, John P. Cooper and Wife, 

John P. Cooper, Jr. 



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HISTORY OF SpUTH CAROLINA 



and chivalry. He gave to the South the full meas- 
ure of his devotion, yet after the war he proved his 
love for a reunited country. He was for many 
years deeply interested in military affairs, serving 
for some time as an officer of the local militia, and 
his title of colonel was bestowed upon him as an 
officer of the First South Carolina Regiment. His 
comrades among the Confederate veterans acknowl- 
edged his many sterling qualities by making him 
commander of the local camp, and later he was 
made colonel on the staff of Gen. B. H. Teague. 

At the close of the war he took up the study of 
pharmacy, completing his studies in Charleston in 
1872. At that date his health became impaired and 
going to Louisville, Kentucky, he engaged in the 
retail shoe business under the ^rm name of the Rebel 
Shoe Company. In 1875 he came to Aiken from 
Charleston, at the request of some of the physicians 
of the former town, and formed a partnership 
with Alfred Holmes to open a drug store. The 
partnership soon dissolved, and after that Colonel 
Hall was engaged in business for himself until his 
death and developed an extensive establishment and 
a professional reputation well known in Aiken and 
surrounding territory. He was a real leader in busi- 
ness affairs, and at the time of his death probably 
the oldest business man in consecutive service at 
Aiken. His advice was frequently sought, and he 
never relaxed his efforts in behalf of the general 
welfare of his community, serving several years as 
a member of the City Council. He was also at one 
time a director in the Aiken County Loan and Sav- 
ings Bank. 

He served as a vestryman of the St. Thaddeus 
Episcopal Church and was closely identified with 
the affairs of that institution. A devoted husband 
and father, he did all he could to contribute to the 
happiness and welfare of his family and showed an 
interest and sympathy with the lives of others that 
made his death deeply mourned by the people of the 
town. The young people were especially fond of 
him. In November, 1870, he married Miss Emma 
J. Dawson, of Charleston, who survived him some 
years. Their children were: Mrs. W. W. Edger- 
ton and Mrs. R. G. Tarrant, both of Aiken; Dr. 
Huger T. Hall, a prominent physician of Aiken; 
Charles D. Hall, a pharmacist, who is in business 
m Washington, D. C, and Henry Harrison Hall, 
who died at the age of ten years. 

John Thomas Long, who had three stalwart sons 
in the World war, has spent a busy life chiefly as an 
agriculturist in Anderson County, where he owns 
one of the finest farms in the northern part of that 
county. 

He was born in the county June 25, i860, a son of 
Rev. Ezekiel and Anna Matilda (McMurray) Long. 
His great-grandfather Ezekiel Long was of Irish 
ancestry, and an earhr settler in Brushy Creek Town- 
ship of Anderson County. Ezekiel Long, Sr., the 
grandfather, was a native of Anderson County and 
married Bettie Hewey. Rev. Ezekiel Long, father 
of John'T. Long, was born in Anderson County, 
made a faithful record as a Confederate soldier, 
and two of his brothers gained special distinction in 
the Confederate army, James rising to the rank 
of colonel, while John was a major. Rev. Ezekiel 



Long died at the age of fifty-two, spent his life 
chiefly as a farmer and Baptist minister. He married 
Anna Matilda McMurray, whose father was William 
McMurray and her mother a Wilson. The McMur- 
rays were also of Irish ancestry. She survived her 
husband many years, dying at the age of eighty- 
three. Rev. £zekiel Long and wife had three sons: 
James M., John T., both Anderson County farmers, 
and William M., who is a successful physician at 
Liberty, South Carolina. The daughters in the 
family were: Elizabeth, who married N. B. Moore, 
of Pickens County; Sallie J., who became the wife 
of W. A. Simpson, of Greenville; and Ella, wife of 
T. S. Stegall, of Anderson County. 

John T. Long grew up on a farm, had a common 
school education, and from boyhood to the present 
time has been a practical worker and interested in 
agriculture. For a few years he was a merchant 
at Piedmont and in that enterprise and in the oil 
mill business he was associated with his brother-in- 
law, W. A. Simpson. When their store burned, en- 
tailing a heavy loss, they discontinued business and 
soon afterward Mr. Long bought and removed to 
his present farm "Hickory Flat," formerly the Col. 
D. K, Norris homestead, in the northern part of 
Anderson County. The handsome brick residence 
on this plantation was erected by Colonel Norris in 
1884. The farm comprises over 700 acres, and under 
the management of Mr. Long it is one of the chief 
producers of cotton and livestock in the county. Be- 
sides his home place Mr. Long owns 140 acres 
nearby. He is a member of the Baptist Church. 

In 1 881 he married Miss Jennie Orr, a daughter 
of William Orr, of Anderson County. She died 
leaving seven children: Mamie Jane, ueorge Reese, 
Weston Homer, John Hovy, Terrell Orr, Cynthia 
Caroline and Bessie Gertrude. The three sons who 
wore uniforms of soldiers in* the recent war were 
Weston Homer, John Hovy and Terrell Orr. The 
only one fortunate enough to be called overseas was 
John Hovy, who was with a hospital corps in France. 
Mr. Long married for his present wife Miss Donna 
S. McCarley. They have children named Anna A., 
James Thomas, Lewie, Genevieve and Gladys. 

John Purley Cooper, of MuUins, probably had a 
distinct genius for commercial affairs, in view of 
his record. He had hardly attained manhood when 
he was organizing and taking an active part in the 
executive direction of several business concerns. 

He was born at'Mullins, June 30. 1881, son of 
Noah Bryant and Lucinda (Jenerette) Cooper. His 
father was also a merchant and farmer educated in 
the Mullins High School. He began his career as 
clerk in a general store, and at the age of twenty 
organized the Palmetto Grocery Company. This 
business, commanding a capital of $50,000, has felt 
the impetus and energy of Mr. Cooper from the 
beginning:. He is secretary and treasurer of the 
corporation. Mr. Cooper is also president and was 
one of the organizers of the Merchants' and Planters' 
Bank at Mullins, and is president of the Loris 
Grocery Company of Loris, South Carolina, and 
president of the Cooper Smith Company of Con- 
way. 

He was only twenty- four years of age when he 
was elected mayor of Mullins. During the war he 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



was active in behalf of various patriotic causes, be- 
ing county chairman in the Third Liberty Loan 
Drive. He is a trustee of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church and has some active interests in local agri- 
culture, owning and operating a 200-acre farm. 

January 21, 1908, he married Miss Ethel Mae 
Bethea, of Dillon, daughter of Dr. J. Frank Bethea, 
of Dillon. They have four children: John Purley, 
Jr., Franklin Bethea, Noah Bryant and Hannah 
Bethea. 

John Orkin Lea, for many years city treasurer 
of Charleston, was born in that city July 25, 1845. 
His father, John Conyers Lea, was born in Smith- 
ville. North Carolina, now Southport, March 25, 
1815, a son of William Pell Lea, born in Hanover 
Square, London, England, who came to America in 
boyhood, going direct to North Carolina and later 
to Charleston. The mother of John Orrin Lea, Mrs. 
Caroline Theresa (Stanley) Lea, was also born at 
Smithville, North Carolina, November 22, 1822. The 
grandparents on the maternal side were Isaac Davis, 
who settled in Carteret County, North Carolina, was 
in the American Revolution, and he was paid for 
his service on vouchers No. 26 and again on No. 190, 
and was granted first 300 acres of land, and later 
1,735 acres of land, and Stephen Bernard was an 
officer in the United States Navy during the War of 
1812, attached to the naval station at Charleston, 
South Carolina. 

On the paternal side, John Congers was also in 
the American Revolution, and was paid on voucher 
No. 2683. John Orrin Lea's father and mother were 
married at Charleston, July 25, 1844, and became the 
parents of nine children. 

The boyhood days of John Orrin Lea were spent 
in Charleston, and he attended a private school and 
the Charleston Academy, and was in the public 
schools at the time of the outbreak of the war of 
the sixties. At that time he was a member of the 
Pickens' Rifles, state troops, which in i860 did duty 
at General Ripley's headquarters. Southern Wharf, 
Charleston, this being regarded as one of the finest 
companies in the state troops. With the call for 
troops for the Confederate service this company 
disbanded, its members volunteering in other com- 
panies. During the latter part of the war his mother 
sought greater safety in Georgia, and in order to be 
near her he joined the Georgia troops, serving as 
sergeant major, or acting adjutant of Col. James H. 
Blount's Battalion of Cavalry, although then only 
nineteen years of age. The last service performed 
was while in the Wilderness, winding through Geor- 
gia. The battalion was ordered by Gen. F. H. Robin- 
son to bum the bridges between the Chattahooche 
and Ockmulgee rivers, but when within six or seven 
miles of Macon, Georgia, they were met by a flag 
of truce and given the information that General Lee 
had surrendered and that the war was over. The 
members of the battalion took the best care they 
could of themselves and made their way home in 
different directions. Mr. Lea's father was taken 
prisoner and confined at Fort Delaware, where he 
contracted disease and was released, but died on his 
way home at the South Carolina Hospital, May 10, 
1863, at Petersburg, Virginia. His remains now lie 
in the old Episcopal graveyard at Petersburg. 



After the war Mr. Lea returned to Charleston in 
1866 and in a few years entered the city treasurer's 
office. As he had left school at such an early age, 
he felt the need of further instruction, so attended 
a night school while working for his uncle, Mr. 
Stephen Thomas, then city treasurer, as clerk, and 
when Mr. W. L. Campbell succeeded his uncle he 
continued in the office as chief clerk. Upon the 
death of Mr. Campbell in 1893, Mr. Lea was elected 
city treasurer, continuing as such until the time of 
his death, June 22, 1919, having been for fifty-two 
continuous years in service in this department, al- 
though five administrations had come and gone since 
his first election. 

Under his administration as city treasurer Charles- 
ton was the first city to adopt a uniform system of 
classification of accounts, of receipts and expendi- 
tures of cities over 30,000 population, and he made 
many other improvements in his department. 

Mr. Lea was first married to Susan Bee, bom at 
Charleston, and their children were as follows: 
Dr. Norman S. Lea, who is a dentist; Campbell 
Adams, who is deceased, and Mary K. His second 
marriage was with Harriet Parker, and they had 
two children, namely: Harriet S. and J. O. Lea, Jr., 
who served during the great war and is the 
fourth generation of his family to enter the service 
of his country. Mr. Lea was a member of Camp 
Sumter No. 250, Confederate Veterans ; of the South 
Carolina Society of the Sons of the Revolution, and 
was assistant adjutant general on the staff of the 
late General Davis and Gen. B. H. Teagrue, com- 
manding the South Carolina Division of Confederate 
Veterans. Mr. Lea found in the First Presbyterian 
Church of Charleston the medium for the expression 
of his religious faith. 

William A. .G. Jameson has some unusual dis- 
tinctions as a successful farmer in the northern 
part of Anderson County. Reared on a farm, with 
only a common school education, in iSSo at the 
time of his marriage he moved to the land he now 
occupies and with the aid of one small mule put 
in and gathered his first crop. It was a humble 
beginning, but he and his wife had the energy, 
the thrift and the ambition which are the keynotes 
of success. Into their modest home came by birth 
seventeen children, fifteen of whom are still living, 
eleven sons an\i four daughters. This family of 
itself constitutes real wealth, and it is a matter of 
lasting satisfaction to Mr. and Mrs. Jameson that 
the children have been well reared and given good 
school advantages. 

Mr. Jameson was bom in Pickens County Jan- 
uary 5, 1862, a son of McElroy and Margaret (Fer- 
guson) Jameson. His ancestry is a derivation of 
Scotch-Irish. Irish and English stock. His parents 
were both bom in Pickens County. His ^and- 
father William Jameson was a native of Virginia 
and of Scotch-Irish descent. The matemal grand- 
father James Ferguson was of Irish lineage and 
his wife a Miss Dean was English. McElroy Jame- 
son se'ryed as a Confederate soldier, and his life 
occupation was farming. 

William A, G. Jameson married in 1880 Miss 
Lillie Griffin who was bom in Pickens County. 
Mr. Jameson is a deacon in the Baptist Church. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



9 



William David Barnes. *Throu|;h struggle to 
triumph" seems to be the maxim which holds sway 
for the majority of our successful citizens, and, 
though it is undoubtedly true that many fall ex- 
hausted in the conflict, a few by their inherent force 
of character and strong mentality rise above their 
environment and all which seems to hinder them, 
until they reach the plane of affluence towards 
which their face was set through the long years of 
struggle that must necessarily precede any ac- 
complishment of ^eat magnitude. Such has been 
the history of William D. Barnes, who through a 
long, busy and useful life has held the confidence of 
the people among whom he has labored and with 
whom he has mingled. In the history of his com- 
munity his name occupies a conspicuous place, for 
he has been one of its representative men of af- 
fairs, progressive, enterprising and persevering. 

William David Barnes was born in Beaufort (now 
Hampton) County, South Carolina, on August i8, 
1859, and . is the son of William G. and Eusula 
(Rivers) Barnes. William G. Barnes, who was a 
life long resident of Beaufort County, was a soldier 
in the Confederate army during the Civil war and 
followed the vocation of farming. His father, Wil- 
liam Ransom Barnes, who was descended from old 
English stock, wa^ also a native of Beaufort, where 
' he became prominent as one of the leading early 
farmers and planters of that locality. The subject's 
mother was a daughter of David Rivers, of Hamp- 
ton County, this state. By her union with William 
G. Barnes she became the mother of nine children, 
six sons and three daughters, the subject of this 
review being the eldest of the children. 

William D. Barnes was reared on his father's 
farm and received a common school education. He 
remained with his father until he had saved about 
three hundred dollars, with which he built a small 
store building, about ten miles north of Brunson and 
near his birthplace. There he conducted a general 
store for a few years and met with success in the 
enterprise. His business experience thus far so en- 
couraged him that he bought a lot at Brunson and 
built a store, which he operated for about ten years, 
when the store and entire stock was burned, and. 
there being no insurance, he lost ever3rthing. 
Nothing daunted, however, he immediately put up a 
frame building, which still stands and is now used 
for a warehouse. He again engaged in mercantile 
operations and again found himself on the road to 
success. He was keenly alive to his opportunities 
and, with keen foresight as to the future of this 
locality, he organized the Moore-Barnes Company 
in 1012 and erected the present substantial and com- 
modious store building, of brick, 70 by 145 feet in 
dimensions, two stories high, in which they are now 
conducting their operations as general merchants. 
They carry a stock valued at $50,000 and in 1918 
did a business of about a quarter million dollars, it 
being the largest and most successful business enter- 
prise of the kind in this, section of the country. In 
addition to his mercantile interests Mr. Barnes is 
the owner of several fine tracts of farm land con- 
tiguous to Brunson, amounting in all to about t,8oo 
acres, practically all of which are devoted to general 
farming. Mr. Barnes also gives considerable atten- 
tion to the raising and breeding of thoroughbred 
stock, in which he has been very successful. He is 



connected with the Brunson Warehouse Company 
and is identified with a number of enterprises which 
have had an important bearing on the commercial, 
activity of Brunson. He is a member of the board 
of trustees of the Brunson High School and was 
himself mainly instrumental in securing the erection 
of the new high school building. He has also been 
actively interested in promoting the development of 
the artesian wells in this community. 

Mr. Barnes has been twice married, first, in 1891, 
to Angie Brunson, the daughter of F. Brunson, of 
the town of that name. Mrs. Barnes died ^nd 
some time afterward Mr. Barnes married Bertha 
Brunson, a sister of his first wife. This second 
union has resulted in the birth of two children, 
William Forrest,* who has just returned from 
France, where he was in the military service of the 
United States, and Fay Breland, who is now a stu- 
dent at Greenwood, South Carolina. 

Fraternally Mr. Barnes is a member of the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and the Knights 
of Pythias. His religious affiliation is with the 
Baptist Church, to which he is a liberal contributor. 
In the best sense of the term, he is one of the rep- 
resentative men of his community, being public spir- 
ited and enterprising to an unwonted degree, while 
as a friend and neighbor he combines the qualities 
of head and heart that have won confidence and 
commanded respect. 

Leo Wetherhorn. The gentleman whose life his- 
tory is herewith outlined is a man who has lived to 
good purpose and achieved a large degree of suc- 
cess, solely by his individual efforts. By a straight- 
forward and commendable course Mr. Wetherhorn 
has made his way to a respectable position in the 
industrial world, winning the hearty admiration of 
the people of his community and earning a reputa- 
tion as an enterprising, progressive man of affairs 
which the public has not been slow to recognize and 
appreciate. Those wlio know him best will readily 
acquiesce in the statement that he is eminently de- 
serving of the material success which has crowned 
his efforts and of the high esteem in which he is 
held. 

Leo Wetherhorn was bom in Charleston on the 
25th day of May, 1872. His father. Levy Wether- 
horn, who also was a native of Charleston, was a 
soldier in the Confederate army from 1861 to 1865. 
He was the son of Marcus Wetherhorn, a native of 
Poland, who emigrated to the United States and 
located at Charleston, where he lived the remainder 
of his life and died. The subject's mother, whose 
maiden name was Pena Pincus, was a native of 
Germany, who was brought to Charleston by an 
uncle, who died here at the age of about seventy- 
two years. The subject is the third in order of 
birth of the nine children born to his parents. He 
was reared here and received his education in the 
Charleston public schools. At the age of thirteen 
years he went to werk in a planing mill and thus 
early in life began laying the foundation for the 
successful and prosperous career which he later was 
to enjoy. He thoroughly learned every detail of 
the business, applied himself closely to his work 
and was wisely economical of his resources, so that 
in 1894 he was enabled to buy an interest in the 
business, the -firm name becoming Wetherhorn & 



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Fisher. Subsequently, on the death of Mr. Fisher, 
the subject became the sole owner of the business. 
The firm is now known as Wetherhorn & Son and 
is numbered among the prosperous and enterprising 
firms of the city. The main business is the manu- 
facture of sash, doors and blinds and the products 
of this mill are sold at many points outside of 
Charleston, besides a large and constantly growing 
trade in the city. About seventy-five persons are 
constantly employed. Mr. Wetherhorn is also finan- 
cially interested in other enterprises in Charleston, 
contributing to the growth and prosperity of the city, 
particularly in the line of real estate companies. 
Thus, he is president of the Crown Realty Company, 
president of the Exchange Realty Company, a di- 
rector of the Unity Realty Company, and is other- 
wise giving of his time and finances to enterprises 
of a laudable order. 

In 1896 Mr. Wetherhorn was married to Rosa 
Kahn and to them have been born eight children, 
namely: Sophia, Ernest, Raymond, Corrine, Rosalie, 
Mildred, Leo, Jr., and Lester. 

Fraternally, Mr. Wetherhorn is a member of the 
Masonic order, in which he has taken the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite; he is also a 
member of the Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine and of the Benevolent and Pro-^ 
tective Order of Elks. He has taken a keen interest 
in these fraternal orders and is a past master of his 
Masonic lodge, a distinct honor in that time-honored 
order. Religiously he is a member of the Synagogrue 
R. K. B. E., being vice president of that congrega- 
tion. A lifelong residence in this city has but 
strengthened his hold on the hearts of the people 
with whom he has been associated^ and today no one 
enjo}rs a larger circle of warm friends and acquain- 
tances, who esteem him because of his sterling qual- 
ities of character and his business ability. 

CoL. William Handsford Duncan. Barnwell 
County has had the good fortune and distinction of 
claiming the citizenship of a William Handsford 
Duncan in each of three successive generations. The 
first of them was the late Col. William Handsford 
Duncan, an able soldier, successful business man and 
public spirited citizen, whose life was a constant 
influence affecting the advancement and welfare of 
his community and his state. His death in i88g re- 
moved from South Caroli;ia a substantial and highly 
esteemed citizen and the many tributes at that time 
to his high standing in the world of affairs and as 
a man and citizen attested to the abiding place he had 
in the hearts and affections of those who knew him 
and of his work and accomplishment. His career 
was not a path of roses, but he fought against and 
conquered adverse conditions that would have utter- 
ly discouraged one of less sterling mettle. His mili- 
tary' record was marked by courage and ability of a 
high order, his business record showed that he pos- 
sessed industry, energy and inte^ity to a pronounced 
degree, while his interest in public affairs was of that 
practical kind that is of real permanent value to the 
community and state. 

He was bom in Barnwell County. South Carolina. 
August 22, 183s, and died December 14, 1889. He 
was of old Scotch stock and disolaved those solid 
elements of character typical of that race. His 
father Willis Jennings Duncan was born and reared 



in Fauquier County, Virginia, and came to South 
Carolina with his father Joseph Dtmcan who was 
a soldier of the War of the Revolution. 

William H. Duncan was a resident of Barnwell 
practically all his life, secured his education in its 
public schools and began his business career in that 
community, though his interests later embraced other 
sections of the state. He applied himself with energy 
and sound judgment to his varied enterprises, and 
his progressive attitude made him a factor in various 
projects for the public good. He constructed and 
owned the railroad line from Barnwell to Black- 
ville, this being the second railroad chartered in 
South Carolina. The completion of the road was 
stopped by the war between the states, much of the 
material being confiscated and taken to Morris 
Island where it was used in the construction of 
breastworks. 

At the outbreak of the war Colonel Duncan 
promptly enlisted as a private but was soon com- 
missioned as captain of Company E of the First 
South Carolina Regiment, subsequently becoming 
colonel of that regiment. He proved a valiant and 
able soldier and served tmder Gen. Joseph E. 
Johnston with distinguished gallantry. After the 
war Colonel Duncan retired to his home farm, 
called "Duncannon," where he spent most of his 
time, though he did not by any means shut himself 
away from the activities about him, maintaining a 
deep interest in all public affairs and giving his 
active support to public movements and measures 
promising permanent value to the welfare of the 
people and state. He was especially active in the 
Baptist Sunday School work, to which he gave 
hearty support with his time and means. In his 
career no word of suspicion was ever breathed 
against him. His activities were the result of care- 
ful and conscientious thought and when once con- 
vinced that he was right no suggestion of policy 
or personal profit swerved him from the course he 
had decided upon. His career was complete and 
rounded in its beautiful simplicity, he did his full 
duty in all the relations of life, and he died be- 
loved by those near to him and respected and es- 
teemed by his fellow citizens. 

Colonel Duncan married Harriet M. Harley, who 
was born and reared in Barnwell, daughter of Jacob 
R. Harley, a prominent planter and slave owner of 
that place. She survived her husband a number of 
years, her death occurring June 22, 1896. The four 
children of that union were: Willis J. Duncan, 
now in business at Edgefield, South Carolina; Wil- 
liam Handsford II; Daisv, wife of P. M. Bucking- 
ham, whose career is elsewhere sketched in this 
publication: and Maude, a resident of Barnwell and 
widow of W. F. Holmes. 

In every respect the late William Handsford Dun- 
can, second, was well qualified to adorn the name 
he bore. He was born at Duncannon, South Caro- 
lina. July 14, i860. For many years he pursued his 
business as a farmer and planter, and at the same 
time took an active part in county politics. In 1904 
he was elected countv auditor of Bamweir Countv. , 
filling that office until 1910. In 1012 he was elected 
clerk of the Court of Common Pleas and General 
Sessions, and gave an earnest and dignified per- 
formance of the duties of that office until his death 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



11 



on January 7, 1920. He lived not quite sixty years, 
but years alone would hardly offer a proper measure 
for his influence and achievement. During the 
World war he was chairman of the local exemption 
board. From early youth until the end of his career 
he conducted a farm of several hundred acres, with 
crops of cotton, corn and garden truck, and also 
owned landed and other interests at Barnwell. Fra- 
ternally he was affiliated wiUi the Knights of 
Pythias. 

June 4, 1888, at Barnwell he married Miss Cor-' 
nelia Aldrich, a native of Barnwell and daughter of 
Judge A. P. Aldrich, one of South Carolina's notable 
figures. Mrs. Duncan died January 4, 1920, just 
three days before her husband. Her death occurred 
at Conway, South Carolina, where she was visiting 
at the home of her daughter Nell, wife of W. A. 
Freeman. W. H. Duncan II and his wife had six 
children, two of whom died in infancy, Langdon 
Chevis and Mary Allen Duncan. The four sur- 
viving are: 'Nell Aldrich, wife of W. A. Freeman; 
William Handsford Duncan III ; Martha Ayer, wife 
of James C. Patterson, a mechanical engineer now 
living at Kansas City, Missouri; and Miss Louise 
Chevis Duncan of Barnwell. 

The third William Handsford Duncan has to his 
credit an interesting military and patriotic record 
and a place of prommence in the affairs of Barnwell 
County. He was bom October 24, 1890, near Barn- 
well, was educated in the common and high schools 
of his native town and began his career in railroad 
construction work, a line he followed until America 
entered the war with Germany. He volunteered in 
Troop A of the South Carolina Cavalry, and was 
in service altogether twenty-seven months, eighteen 
months overseas. He went overseas with the Thir- 
tieth Division, and was with that famous organiza- 
tion comprising many South Carolina troops when 
it broke the Hindenburg line on the Somme River. 
He was with the* Thirtieth in all its terrific en- 
gagements, but came through without injury. He 
went in as a private and wore the stripes of ser- 
geant, first class, when discharged in November, 
1919. 

Upon the death of his .honored father he was ap- 
pointed by Governor R. A. Cooper to fill the unex- 
pired term as Qerk of Court of Common Pleas and 
General Sessions of Barnwell County, and has given 
a splendid administration of the office. At the same 
time he is the active manager of the extensive 
planting and farming interests left by his father. 

George G. Palmer. The achievements and leader- 
ship of South Carolina in the agricultural affairs of 
the South are readily demonstrated. Those achieve- 
ments are due not so much to the unrivaled natural 
resources of the state, as to the initiative and enter- 
prise of its citizens. In this modem phase of de- 
velopment no individual accomplished more along 
broader lines than the late George G. Palmer, whose 
early death was a blow to the business, agricultural 
and civic interests of his native state. Death al- 
ways sitting by the highway of life chose a sin- 
gularly conspicuous victim when it took him away 
in February, 1920, at the age of thirty-five. Never- 



theless he left a record of mature and enduring 
achievements in the line he had chosen for his life 
work. 

Mr. Palmer possessed a keen intellect, active brain 
and had the intuition and the breath enabling him 
to comprehend a great vision, and also the force of 
character, the grasp of detail to shape and translate 
a vision into terms of effective reality. For some 
years he had enjoyed the reputation of a leader as 
a stock raiser, planter and merchant While his 
home and interests were concentrated at his Duroc 
hog farm at Cartersville, his influence was felt 
throughout South Carolina. Progressive, broad- 
minded, he was singularly modest and retiring in 
disposition, and had a personal charm that caused 
every acquaintance to become a personal fric 
His happy, jovial disposition brought him not only 
the respect and esteem but the admiration and love 
of all with whom he came in contact. 

George G. Palmer was the son of Dr. G. G. 
Palmer, a well-known physician of Cartersville 
who died in 1906. The son at once took charge of 
everything for his mother, including the responsibil- 
ity of educating his sister and brothers, and forth- 
with entered upon plans of enlargement and in- 
crease in the planting and business interests of the 
family. He was devoted heart and soul to the 
raising of the standards of livestock industry in 
the state, and in bringing in pure bred stock he 
spared neither money nor effort, and made a won- 
derful success in that as in everjrthing he undertook. 
His specialty was pure bred Duroc hogs, and with 
the establishment of his hog plant known as the 
Duroc Hog Farms at Cartersville, he gave that 
town an enviable reputation as the home of some 
of the best bred hogs in America. He paid what 
many regarded as fabulous sums for his breeding 
stock, but for one animal he refused an offer of 
$10,000, and during the last year of his life his 
sales of pure bred hogs aggregated over $50,000. 
Fortunately the business is insured continuance and 
increased vitality under the efficient management 
of his wife Mary Keith Palmer. 

Mr. Palmer attended school at Thompsons Mili- 
tary Academy in Siler City, North Carolina, spent 
two years at Guilford College at Greensboro, and 
one year in Davidson College. He was a concien- 
tious and able student, and showed brilliance as an 
orator and was awarded three medals for his work 
in that field. He was a member of the college 
fraternities. On leaving college, while his abilities 
would have promised him credit and advancement 
in professions, he immediately began his life work 
as a planter and stock man. In a comparatively 
few years he became one of the largest land owners 
in Florence County, and also a merchant on a large 
scale. The Duroc hog farms turned out many 
champions and its products carried off ribbons and 
prizes wherever exhibited. Mr. Palmer was organ- 
izer of the first Duroc Hog Association of the state, 
and was its secretary until the fall of 191 9. He 
had the satisfaction of knowing that his was the 
largest hog farm east of the Mississippi. He was 
in great demand as a speaker on stock raising and 
agricultural subjects in general, and magazines and 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



newspapers assigned special members of their staff 
to write up his live stock, his farm, his personal 
management and ideals. 

He was a valued member of the Presbyterian 
Church, was active in the Masonic Order and 
Shrine, and was an Elk and Woodman of the 
World. 

In 1907 he married Miss Mary Izler Keith, a 
daughter of Charles B. and Carrie Keith of Tim- 
monsville and a sister of Maj. James B. Keith of 
that city. She received her early training in the 
graded schools of Columbia and Savannah and grad- 
uated from the Ursuline Convent at Columbia. 
Mrs. Palmer as noted above continues the manage- 
ment of the Duroc hog farms and is also carefully 
superintending the home education and training of 
her five sons, named: George G. Palmer, Jr.,^ 
Charles Keith Palmer, Richard AUston Palmer, Joe 
Bean Palmer and James Bascom Palmer. 

The late Mr. Palmer was also survived by his 
mother, Mrs. Mary Palmer, a sister, Mrs. N. E. 
Moore of Timmonsville, and his brothers Dr. J. S. 
Palmer, a prominent physician of Allendale, Capt. 
O. A. Palmer of the Fourth Cavalry, U. S A, B. 
M. Palmer of the College of Charleston, B. W. 
Palmer and Lockwood Palmer of McAllen, Texas. 

E. T. H. Shaffer. Deeds are thoughts crystal- 
ized, and according to their brilliancy do we judge 
the worth of a man to the country which produced 
him, and in his works we expect to find the true in- 
dex to his character. The study of the life of the 
representative American never fails to offer much 
of pleasing interest and valuable instruction, de- 
veloping a mastering of expedients which has 
brought about definite results. The subject of this 
review is a worthy representative of that type of 
American character and of that progressive spirit 
which promotes public good in advancing individual 
prosperity and conserving popular interests. Mem- 
bers of the Shaffer family have long been identified 
with affairs in Colleton County, and while their en- 
deavors along material lines have brought them 
success they have also contributed their share to the 
general welfare of the whole community. 

E. T. H. Shaffer was born at Walterboro, South 
Carolina, on June 20, 1880, and is the son of A. C. 
and Amelia (Terry) Shaffer, A. C. Shaffer was a 
native of Sussex County, New Jersey, whence he 
came to Walterboro in 1865 and engaged in the 
mercantile business, to which he devoted himself up 
to the time of his death. His ancestors originally 
were from the Rhine Palatinate, Germany. The 
subject's mother was bom in Elmira, New York, the 
daughter of John K. Terry, a native of Long Island. 
She died in Walterboro. The subject of this sketch 
is her only child by her union with A. C. Shaffer. 

E. T. H. Shaffer received his elementary educa- 
tion in the public schools of Walterboro. after which 
he became a student in the Charleston College, where 
he was graduated in 1902, with the degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts. He at once engaged in the mercantile 
business and in farming, in which lines he succeeded 
his father and his maternal grandfather. The gen- 



eral store operated by him was known as one of the 
leading mercantile establishments of the kind in this 
locality. 

Mr. Shaffer sold all his mercantile interests in 
1919. In the fall of 1919 the citizens of Colleton 
County held a mass meeting to consider what steps 
should be taken to meet Sie agricultural changes 
which would be caused by the boll weevil. Mr. 
Shaffer, with Mr. Paul Ss^nders, of Ritter, was sent 
as a committee of investigation into Southern Geor- 
gia and the kesmote of their report was that the 
farmer could continue to prosper only through 
diversification and that successful diversified farm- 
ing can only be accomplished by a greater degree 
of co-operation than ever existed under a one-crop 
system; that by co-operation alone can the proper 
handling and the proper marketing of the varied 
farm products be accomplished. 

The Colleton Products' Association, of which Mr. 
Shaffer is now the president, is a concrete evidence 
of his idea. It is a $100,000 corporatibn with head 
offices at Walterboro and with hundreds of stock- 
holders among the farmers and business men of Col- 
leton County. This company has built a modern 
grain elevator at Walterboro to handle the increased 
grain crops, the first in the state and with a capacity 
of 15,000 bushels. It has also built a chain of 
sweet potato curing houses over the county to turn 
the prolific southern sweet potato into the "sugar- 
spud" for the northern market. 

Trained demonstrators are kept at work in the 
field to instruct the farmer in the new method. 
Especial attention is also given to seed distribution. 
As a result of the work of this company Colleton 
County in 1920 increased its grain acreage sixty 
per cent and increased Spanish peanuts from zero 
to 5,000 acres, all with a corresponding loss to "King 
Cotton." 

The people of Colleton Counfy determined that 
as the county had proven the most effective political 
unit for reaching the individual in the political sphere, 
that a county organized as a commercial unit will 
be found the most effective method of effecting the 
vast economic change which the boll weevil causes 
in all parts of the cotton growing South. 

Mr. Shaffer owns a business block in the Town 
of Walterboro and is the owner of about 2,000 
acres of excellent farming land in Colleton County, 
and to which he gives careful attention. He is also 
a stockholder and a director of the Farmers and 
Merchants Banl^ of Walterboro. His entire life 
has been spent in this locality, and no one enjoys 
to a greater degree the universal confidence and 
esteem of the people. 

In 191 1 Mr. Shaffer was married to Clara Barr, 
of Greenville, South Carolina, the daughter of 
George T. Barr, and they are the parents of two 
children, Jane Terry and E. T. H., Jr. 

Fraternally Mr. Shaffer is a member of the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and the Knig^hts 
of Pythias. He is also a member of the South 
Carolina Historical Society, the Carolina Yacht Club, 
of Charleston, and the Alpha Tau Omega Greek- 
letter fraternity. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



13 



Judge James Aldrich. Son of a distinguished 
South Carolina lawyer, patriot and. jurist, the late 
Judge James Aldrich exemplified many of the splen- 
did qualities of his father and also the beautiful 
side of his mother's nature, and was one of the 
state's real noblemen. His abilities and character 
were highly appreciated, and so papular was he 
that whenever a candidate for public office he never 
had any opposition. 

He represented the eighth generation of an Eng- 
lish family that was planted on New England soil 
at the very beginning of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony. His first ancestor was George Aldrich, who 
married Catherine Seald in 1629, and in November, 
1631, they set out from Derbyshire, England, and 
came to America. George Aldrich became a large 
land owner in Worcester County, Massachusetts. 
His son, Jacob Aldrich, born February 2^ 1656, 
lived the life of a Massachusetts farmer. The third 
deration was represented by Moses Aldrich, born 
in 1691 and died September 9, 1781. He was an 
elder of the Friends Society and gave much of his 
time to the preaching of the Gospel. He married 
Hannah White in 171 1, and their ninth child was 
Luke Aldrich, bom February 22, 1727. 

Esek Aldrich, son of Luke and Anna (French) 
AWrich, was bom September 9, 1753, and married 
Amy Whipple. 

The sixth generation was represented by Robert 
Aldrich, who was born at Mendon, Massachusetts, 
February i, 1780. After completing his education 
he came to Charleston, South Carolma, about 1800, 
and went to work in a bookstore, the branch of a 
Boston establishment About two years later he and 
a partner opened a book store of their own, but 
largely through mismanagement on the partner's 
score the firm failed. Robert Aldrich then called 
his creditors together and promised paynient in full 
of all indebtedness, and though it required nearly 
half of his life to accomplish the task he kept his 
word and thereby established a character for in- 
tegrity and intelligence that neither misfortune nor 
disaster could impair. His work the rest of his life 
was as manager of the Commercial Wharves of 
Charleston, and after his death the proprietors of the 
wharves inscribed upon his monument the follow- 
ing: "Sacred to the memory of Robert Aldrich, 
who died in this city on the 9th of April, 1851, 
aged seventy-one years, two months and nine days. 
He was bom at Mendon, Massachusetts, but spent 
the last fifty years of his life in South Carolina. 
Forty-two years of which he held the most confiden- 
tial station on the Commercial Wharves, the duties 
of which he performed with the most exemplary 
fidelity. He has left a large family and circle of 
friends to mourn his death and has gone to his final 
rest much respected and lamented." 

Robert Aldrich married Ann Hawkins Lebby, 
granddaughter' of Nathaniel Lebby, a distinguished 
South Carolina patriot in the Colonial and Revolu- 
tionary period. She died April 22, 1830. 

The fourth son of Robert and Ann Hawkins Aid- 
rich was James Thomas Aldrich, whose career as 
an eminent South Carolinian deserves space in this 
publication. He was born at Charleston, November 
16, 1819, While on account of his father's circum- 
stances he could not acquire a college education, he 
was a constant reader, devoted to the classics and 
the best modern literature, and for many years held 



rank among the state's most cultured gentlemen. 
He finished his law studies in the office of his 
brother. Judge A. P. Aldrich, at Bamwell, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1842. For a time he prac- 
ticed with his brother and later alone, and through 
his abilities, his wide learning and his character 
justly attained distinction and eminence in his' pro- 
fession. After his marriage he enjoyed fourteen 
years of happiness and success at home, in his friend- 
ships and in his profession at Barnwell. Then came 
the war, and he served as a commissioned officer 
of the Confederacy, being a captain the last three 
years of the war. Most of the time he was sta- 
tioned in Columbia, assigned to department work. 
In the meantime his home was in the path of the 
destroying army of Sherman, but was faithfully de- 
fended by Mrs. Aldrich, though most of the prop- 
erty and many of the most prized possessions were 
burnt or despoiled. He resumed the practice- of law 
and though beset by ill health and blindness caused 
as and by result of his services in the war, and the 
general misfortunes of the state, he battled bravely 
until the end, though he did not live to see the final 
restoration of white rule. He died September 26, 

1875. 

June 30, 1847, James T. Aldrich married Isabel 
Coroneus Patterson, who was born at Barnwell May 
24, 1829. Her grandparents were Alexander and 
Elizabeth Patterson, of Scotch ancestry. Her father, 
Angus Patterson, was born in North Carolina De- 
cember 5, 1790, and in 1808 came to South Carolina, 
where he taught school, studied law, and after his 
admission to the bar located at Barnwell in 1813. 
He lived at ISarnwell until his death in 1854, leav- 
ing a distinguished record as a lawyer, citizen and 
public leader. He represented his county in the 
General Assembly of the state for thirty-two con- 
secutive years, from 181 8 to 1850, the first four 
years in the House and the remaining twenty-eight 
years as senator, the last twelve of which he was 
president of the Senate. Mrs. James T. Aldrich 
had every educational advantage that cultured par- 
ents and wealth could give. She completed her 
training in Limestone College, graduating with the 
first honor of her class in her eighteenth year, and 
was married soon afterward. James T. Aldrich and 
wife enjoyed a marriage companionship that repre- 
sented the ideals of a perfect union. Through all 
the vicissitudes of the darkest and most eventful 
period of the country's history she did her duty 
well, proving the faithful helpmate, prudent coun- 
selor, frugal housewife and devoted and watchful 
mother. After the war both she and her husband 
looked after the education of their children, and both 
were eminently qualified for those responsibilities. 
She educated her daughters and prepared, in great 
part her son for college. She shared with her hus- 
band an ardent love of literature, and both had 
exceptional gifts as writers. She survived her hus- 
band more than a quarter of a century. 

Judge James Aldrich, who was the only son of 
James T. and Isabel Aldrich, was bom in the vil- 
lage of Barnwell July 25, 1850, and was old enough 
to appreciate many of the horrors of war and the 
reconstruction period. He enjoyed a sound 
physique, and, as noted above, his early education 
was largely directed by his father and mother. He 
attended a preparatory school conducted by Rev. 
B. F. B. Perry until about 1862. During the re- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



mainder of the war he lived with his mother on a 
plantation at Edisto River, and continued his studies 
under his mother's guidance. In the winter of 1864- 
65 a company was recruited in Barnwell by Doctor 
Roper, founder of the Roper Hospital in Charleston. 
It was known as the "Cradle and Grave" Company, 
composed of boys and old men. Though only four- 
teen years of age, when the war ended James Aldrich 
entered the service, after having twice been rejected 
before. He took with him for the use of the com- 
pany his father's carriage, horses and wagon. After 
the passing of the destroying army he used this 
equipment to collect some supplies for his destitute 
family in a region that had not been visited by 
Sherman's troopers. While on this expedition he 
used his horses and wagons to haul goods for the 
merchants from Branchville to Barnwell, a distance 
of forty miles, and continued that work until the 
railroad was rebuilt. Then for two years he farmed, 
performing the common labor of the fields. 

In 1869 he entered Washington and Lee Univer- 
sity at Lexington, Virginia, and practically com- 
pleted the course, though he had to leave college 
in 1872 on account of his means being exhausted. 
While in college he was a member of the Graham- 
Lee Literary Society and represented it on several 
occasions. One of his most prized recollections was 
that he enjoyed the personal friendship of Gen. 
Robert £. Lee, and was often a visitor in his home. 
General Lee was president of Washington and Lee 
University at the time and died while James Aldrich 
was in college. He was chosen one of the Guard of 
Honor to attend the body of the "Matchless Lee" 
as it lay in state before interment 

Returning to Barnwell in 1872 he took up the dili- 
gent study of law under his father and was admitted 
to the bar January 20, 1873. After his admission he 
located at Aiken, and early achieved distinction as a 
lawyer of brilliant powers and enjoyed a large pri- 
vate practice there until 1889. While at Aiken he ren- 
dered all the service he could in behalf of peace 
and order and the restoration of white government. 
He aided in the organization of the Palmetto Rifles, 
became first lieutenant and later captain, and com- 
manded the company during its service at the Ellen- 
ton and other riots. The company was disbanded 
by the republk:an or carpet bag governor, but the men 
maintained the organization under the guise of a 
social club, and privately bought Winchester rifles 
to use in safeguarding society and private property. 
Later on James Aldrich was one of the attorneys 
that successfully defended the EUenton Rioters be- 
fore the United States Court in Charleston, South 
Carolina. 

Judge Aldrich also became identified with the 
reconstruction politics of the state. He was an 
opponent of fusion tickets and advocated a straight- 
out democratic nomination. On this platform of 
action he distinguished himself at the democratic 
convention in May, 1876, but the convention hesitated 
to adopt his program, though later in the same 
year Governor Hampton was nominated by the 
"unterrified democracy," and his election finally 
redeemed the state from misrule. Judge Aldrich 
took a prominent part in that memorable cam- 
paign. Later he was elected to the House of Rep- 
resentatives from Aiken County, serving from De- 
cember, 1878, until December, 1884, when he de- 
clined re-election. However, he was again elected 



in December, 1886, and continued in the House 
until December, 1889. 

In December, 1889, he began the service with 
which his name will be always associated, when he 
went on the bench as judge of the Second Judicial 
District, at first including the counties of Aiken, 
Barnwell, Hampton, Beaufort and Colleton, and later 
Bamberg. In the first fifteen of the eighteen years 
he was on the bench he never missed a term ot 
court, and frequently heard cases at night. Many of 
the trials at which he presided involved important 
and exciting issues, and he rendered many decisions 
whose opinions are still quoted as authority. 

It was given to Judge James Aldrich to find 
his calling. He truly loved his work, alwavs find- 
ing it a joy. Coming from a long line of lawyers, 
of which he once counted eighteen judges of the 
name, the calling was congenial, and as he was 
possessed of a very impartial mind, and was a stu- 
dent and a scholar, he was eminently fitted for the 
judgeship. As one paper expressed it when ill 
health compelled him to resign the work he loved. 
"His ability was as unquestioned as his private 
life was spotless." A few words but they picture 
a life of integrity and achievement. 

Though his life was distinguished by many 
achievements and honors, his death at fifty-nine 
years of age, came when in the fullness of his 
powers, and was therefore regarded as nothing less 
than a calamity to his native state. He was always 
deeply interested in educational affairs, assisting 
in organizing the Aiken Institute and became its first 
president. He was a member of the South Carolina 
Historical Society, was an active Mason, and a 
prominent layman of the Episcopal Church. He was 
for years a director of the Bank of Aiken, now the 
Bank of Western Carolina. 

December 15, 1874, Judge Aldrich married Miss 
Frances Lebby, of Charleston, South Carolina. Of 
the three children born to their union the only 
survivor is Anna Lebby, wife of Dr. Huger T. Hall» 
of Aiken, South Carolina. 

Francis Winfield Towles. It is a compliment 
worthily bestowed to say that South Carolina is hon- 
ored by the citizenship of Francis Winfield Towles, 
of Martins Point, for he has achieved definite suc- 
cess through his own efforts and is thoroughly de- 
serving of the proud American title of self-made 
man, the term being one that, in its better sense, 
cannot but appeal to the loyal admiration of all who 
are appreciative of our national institutions and the 
privileges afforded for individual accomplishment. 
Another reason for singling out Mr. Towles for 
specific mention in this work is the fact that to him 
is in a large measure due the development of the 
truck growing industry of the South, for he made 
the first outside shipments and showed the way to 
success along new lines, which thousands of others 
have successfully followed during the subsequent 
years. 

F. W. Towles was bom in Savannah, Georgia, on 
February 29, 1848, and is the son of Daniel Freeman 
and Ann (English) Towles. His paternal grand- 
parents were James and Mary (Watts) Towles, the 
former of whom was born at Edgefield, South 
Carolina, and the latter in the same state. Daniel 
F. Towles was born in Bryan County, Georgia, as 
was his wife, who was the daughter of Reubeit 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



15 



English. They were reared and married in Bryan 
County, Georgia, and reared three sons, Henry A., 
Francis W. and Daniel H., of whom the eldest and 
youngest are deceased, the subject being the only 
member of the family living. 

F. W. Towles spent his boyhood days on the 
parental farmstead in Georgia and received such 
education as was afforded in the log cabin schools 
of that period. At the early age of fourteen years 
he began life's battle on his own account. His hrst 
employment was as a fireman on the Atlantic & Gulf 
Railroad, now known as the Coast Line. He per- 
formed this work about a year and then went to 
Alabama and secured a similar job on the Mont- 
gomery & West Point Railroad. He was soon pro- 
moted to the other side of the cab and ran as pas- 
senger engineer on that road until the close of the 
war between the states. He then returned to Savan- 
nah and was employed in a sawmill and at any kind 
of work which he could find to do. He then came 
to Martins Point, South Carolina, and worked for 
his father and William Geraty for a while. Deter- 
mined to be independent, he then started farming 
operations on his own account, renting a place on 
Goose Creek, where he raised a crop of potatoes, 
but here he lost practically all his money. He then 
returned to railroad ^work, serving as engineer on 
the Savannah & Charleston Railroad for about two 
years. In 1871 Mr. Towles returned to Martins 
Point and engaged in farming and merchandising. 
He also operated a cotton gin and engaged in buy- 
ing and selling cotton. From the beginning of these 
last operations he was successful and increased his 
operations as time went on until he became one of 
the large land owners of this section, his holdings 
amounting to about nine hundred acres. He em- 
ploys on an average about fifty hands and raises a 
wide variety of products, including besides cotton 
and corn, vegetables of all kinds. Mr. Towles has 
been rightfully called the father of the truck grow- 
ing industry in the South, for it was he who first 
demonstrated the feasibility and profit in growing 
and shipping vegetables to outside markets. He 
proved a successful manager in everything to which 
he applied himself, and now, in the evening of his 
life, he is. able to rest from his labors and enjoy the 
fruits of his former efforts. 

F. W. Towles has been married three times, first, 
in 1869, to Annie Allsbrooks, who bore him two 
daughters, Josephine and Ella. His second marriage 
was to Mary Geraty, to which union were born three 
children, Beatrice, deceased; Francis E. and Daniel 
Q. The third marriage of the subject was to Anna 
Schaffer, and they have four children living, Frank 
W., Janice, John O. and Archer Baker. 

Fraternally Mr. Towles is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias. He is a genial and approach- 
able man, who has won and retained a host of loyal 
friends, for he has shown himself to be the possessor 
of those qualities which make a true man. 

Stonewall Jackson Rumph, one of the leading 
plauiters and merchants of Yonges Island, is one of 
th€ prominent men of his neighborhood, and one who 
is held in high esteem because of his uprightness and 
ability. He was born near Saint George, South 
Carolina, August 26, 1864, a son of Samuel D. 
Rumph and grandson of Jacob Rumph. Prior to the 
American Revolution three brothers by the name of 



Rumph came to the colonies from Germany, and one 
settled in Georgia, one in Florida and the third in 
South Carolina. Samuel D. Rumph was born in 
what is now Dorchester County, South Carolina, and 
his wife, who bore the maiden name of Martha F. 
Bowman, was also born in South Carolina, and was 
reared near Saint George, her parents being early 
settlers of the state. The children born to Samuel 
D. Rumph and his wife were six in number, and 
of them Stonewall Jackson Rumph was the fourth. 
Three of these children are still living. 

Stonewall Jackson Rumph was reared near Saint 
George, South Carolina, and attended the Porter 
Military College at Charleston, following which he 
learned telegraphy and was operator and agent at 
different railroad stations, his last position being ac 
Yonges Island. He eng^ed in general trucking, 
especially potatoes and cabbage growing and was 
one of the biggest potato growers until some six 
years ago. He had invested in rural property, and 
in 1900 located on his present plantation. He owns 
three farms and conducts in addition to them two 
others, so that he has under his active supervision 
about 1,000 acres of land and has at times employed 
as many as 300 people. In addition to these re- 
sponsibilities Mr. Rumph conducts a mercantile es- 
tablishment and does a business of about $60,000 an- 
nually, and has opened another store near Meggett, 
which will increase the business $35,ooo or $40,000 
per year. In the past he was extensively engaged in 
the cotton business, putting out from 1,200 to 2,000 
bales annually. In every undertaking Mr. Rumph 
displays signal business ability and each year's re- 
turns proves that he is increasing his production and 
keeping up his quality. 

On January 18, 1893, Mr. Rumph was married to 
Kate W. Boynton. They have no children. Mrs. 
Rumph is a very pleasant lady, interested in the de- 
velopment of the state, and a lover of flowers. She 
delights in caring for the lawn, hedges and direct- 
ing their care and beautification. During the great 
World war she was very active in the work of the 
Red Cross and was chairman of the Red Cross divi- 
sion in her part of the county. She is still an earnest 
worker in after war needs. Mr.. Rumph is a 
Mason and also belongs to the Knights of Pythias. 
He is a school trustee and has charge of the roads 
in his section, to which he gives considerable atten- 
tion and keeps them good. He has never taken a 
very active part in politics. He is a director in the 
South Carolina Produce Association, vice president 
and director in the Hollywood Manufacturing Co., 
which manufactures barrels and packages and is do- 
ing an extensive business, and is vice president of 
the South Carolina Cotton Growers' Association. 
During the great war Mr. Rumph was a member of 
the County Exemption Board and gave to its duties 
a faithful and conscientious service. In ever^ rela- 
tion of life he measures up to the highest standards 
of American citizenship, and his associates, whether 
in business or social circles, hold him in high esteem, 
for they recognize and appreciate his many excellent 
characteristics. 

In 1920 Mr. Rumph has sought to replace the 
cotton which boll weevil has destroyed, and he has 
turned his attention and investment to tobacco grow- 
ing and curing. He has erected two barns and has 
fourteen acres in tobacco. 

He was led to make this experiment in 1920 in 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



tobacco growing because the boll weevil had de- 
stroyed the cotton growing in his vicinity. He feels 
that success in the venture will result in extensive 
planting by the farmers while on the other hand a 
failure will show at his expense just what can be 
expected. Thus he is serving his community, hoping 
to succeed, but willing to bear the expense of a 
demonstration. 

His home is one of the handsomest of the com- 
munity in 191 7, and the foundation of which is over 
one hundred years old, but it is now one of the most 
modern in the county; beautiful hedges and flowers 
surround it and are supervised by and imder the care 
of Mrs. Rumph. 

Jones Henky Columbus All, a pioneer of Allen- 
dale, found his life work in that community as a 
planter, extensive land owner and business man, and 
has dispensed his means and influence for many years 
in a spirit of constructive enterprise that has had 
much to do with the development of this flourishing 
little city in the southern part of the state. 

Mr. All was born in what was then Barnwell 
County near the great Saltcahachie Church Septem- 
ber 29, 1853. His grandfather All was a. native of 
Holland and settled in South Carolina at the begin- 
ning of the nineteenth century. Adam All, the 
father was also bom in' the same locality of Barn- 
well County on August 24, 1812. While most of his 
years were spent in the operation of his plantation, 
he was extremely loyal to nis home state, and though 
nearly fifty years of age when the war broke out 
between the North and South he was not satisfied 
to fight through the proxy of his four sons, but 

i'oined the Home Guards and did what he could to 
:eep the Yankees out of the land when Sherman's 
invaders came through. After the war he was a 
member of the "Red Shirt Brigade" and helped re- 
construct the state for orderly white government. 
He died at the age of seventy-two. His wife was 
Elsie (Williams) All, a native of Barnwell County, 
of English descent and of an old family of the 
state. Four of their sons went all through the 
struggle during the war between the states. George 
All was in Fort Sumter four years, a sergeant of his 
company. W. A. All was superintendent of the gov- 
ernment repair shop at Charleston. Jack and Jim 
All were in Captain Smart's Company of Cavalry on 
the coast. 

Jones Henry Columbus All was about eight years 
old when the war broke out. Consequently the 
period normally devoted to education was one of 
confusion and poverty of resources, and he had only 
the benefit of the interrupted schedule of country 
schools. At the age of twenty-one in 1874 be began 
his active career as a merchant at Allendale, and built 
up and continued a successful business for fifteen 
years. For the past thirty years his big interest has 
been farming, now conducted on about 6,000 acres 
of land he owns in Allendale and Barnwell coun- 
ties. He has a well organized tenant system, with 
a large investment in buildings and other equipment, 
and for years has been one of the leading producers 
of cotton, corn and peanuts. 

Mr. All resides in Allendale, where he owns con- 
siderable improved property, and was one of the 
organizers of the old Allendale Bank. For three or 
four years he served as a warden of the town and 
afterwards was intendant or mayor for four years. 



but whether in office or as a private citizen he has 
neglected no opportunity to build up and promote the 
best interests of the town and county. Mr. All is a 
Mason and a member of the Baptist Church. 

July 2, 1873, he married in Barnwell County Theo- 
dore Gertrude Bowers, a native of that county. Her 
father Capt. G. C. Bowers was a prominent planter 
and of an old South Carolina family of Revolution- 
ary stock and English descent. Eleven children were 
bom to the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. All. One 
daughter, Edith, died at the age of three, and a son, 
Mclver, at the age of fourteen. There are nine 
living children, all well established and equipped for 
life with liberal educations: John E., a preacher in 
the Seven Day Adventist Church in Columbia; Percy 
H., whose career is sketched elsewhere; Gertrude, 
wife of John W. Douglas, of Allendale; Harry W., 
a cotton buyer and farmer at Allendale; Blanche, 
wife of H. G. Marsh, a warehouse keeper at Jack- 
sonville, Florida: Bessie, twin sister of Blanche, 
wife of M. M. Hogan, a real estate dealer at Jack- 
sonville, Florida ; Mrs. Gladys Prelliman of Spartan- 
burg; Fred H., a member of the class of 1021 at 
Harvard University Law School ; and Sarah All, who 

Saduated in 1920 from the Boston Conservatory of 
usic. Mr. Adam All was a large slave owner and 
after the close of the Civil wv kept about seventy- 
five and took great care of them in every way. 

Percy H. All. To the commercial and indus- 
trial progress of Allendale, now county seat of the 
rich and prosperous Allendale Coimty, Percy H. 
All for a number of years has been one of the 
chief contributors. He is an electrical engineer by 
training and early profession, and has done much 
to promote the cotton and other industries of Allen- 
dale. 

He was bom in 1880, near Allendale, in what 
was then Barnwell County. His parents, J. H. C. 
and Theodore Gertrude (Bowers) All, were also 
natives of the same locality. Percy H. All attended 
the Allendale schools and graduated as electrical 
engineer from Clemson College in 1901. The first 
two years after leaving college he engaged in stock 
farming on the Savannah River. Then after some 
associations with a cotton exporting corporation at 
Savannah he returned to Allendale and engaged 
in the cotton business for himself. Mr. All in 1914 
established the All's Ginnery, one of the largest 
gins in Allendale County. It has been in success- 
ful operation and is one of the leading industries 
of Allendale. More recently Mr. All extended his 
initiative and enterprise to a new field. In January, 
1920, he established a horse collar and pad fac- 
tory, one of the few institutions of its kind in the 
state, and ohe that will bring increased recognition 
to Allendale as an industrial center. 

Mr. All is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. On January i, 1917* he married Miss 
Josephine Anthony, daughter of Rev. Bascom 
Anthony, a prominent minister and member of the 
South Georgia Conference of the . Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South. Mr. All had the misfortune 
to lose his wife by death. She was a graduate of 
Wesleyan College of Macon, Georgia. She was the 
mother of four children: Percy H., Jr., Rasrmond 
Anthony, James Bascom and Frank Ewbank. 

Mr. All was an active member of the Georsria 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



17 



Hussars, of Savannah, Georgia, and an associate 
member of the Savannah Volunteer Guards. 

Col. jyARCY Paul Duncan. A youthful soldier 
during the last year of the war between the states, 
for many years a successful planter, public official 
of Union County, a former member of the State 
Railroad Commission, president of the South Caro- 
lina State Fair, these and other positions and 
services have made Col. D'Arcy P. Duncan of 
G>lmnbia one of the best known citizens of the 
state. 

He comes of a family in which high and scholarly 
achievement is a tradition. He is a brother of the 
late Bishoo William W. Duncan of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. Another brother was James Arm- 
strong Duncan, also a Methodist minister but best 
known sis president of Randolph-Macon Colle^ in 
Virginia. Another brother was the late Maj. D. 
R. Duncan of Spartanburg, an ex-Confederate of- 
ficer, prominent as a lawyer and railway president 

These sons were children of David and Alice 
Amanda (Piedmont) Duncan. David Duncan was 
bom in County Donegal, Ireland, in 1790, of Scotch 
parents. He was a graduate of the University of 
Edinburgh. He served four years in the British 
Navy, and while on a British boat was with the 
fleet at St. Petersburg when Napoleon and his army 
read their fate in the flames of Moscow. David 
Duncan came to America in 1817, and for nearly 
twenty years was principal of the Norfolk Academy 
in Virginia, and from 1835 to 1854 was professor 
of Ancient Languages in Randolph-Macon College. 
From 1854 to 1881, the 3rear of his death, he was 
professor of Ancient Languages in Wofford College 
at Spartanburg, going to that institution the year 
it was founded. He died at the age of ninety-one. 
His son William Wallace Duncan had attended 
the first class of Wofford in 1854, after his grad- 
uation filled many pulpits in the Methodist Church 
and in 1875 was elected to the Chair of Philosophy 
at Wofford and made financial agent for the college. 
In 1886, at the General Conference at Richmond, he 
was elected bishop, a high office he filled with dis- 
tinction until his death on March 2, 1908. Bishoo 
Duncan is remembered as one of the most gifted, 
brilliant and scholarly men of the South. 

Col. D'Arcjr P. Duncan was bom in Mecklenburg 
G)unty, Virginia, in 1846, and was eight years old 
when his parents moved to Spartanburg. In 1864 
he was enrolled in The Citadel, the South Carolina 
Military Academy at Charleston, and with the 
Charleston Cadets of State Troops he entered the 
Confederate Army of defense, serving on James 
Island and vicinity. 

In 181^ Colonel Duncan married Miss Carrie C. 
Gist, daughter of former Governor W. H. Gist. After 
his marriage he moved to a olantation in Union 
County ten miles from the Town of Union on 
Tyger River, near the Laurens County line. He 
developed his plantation of 2,100 acres until it be- 
came widely known for its successful management 
and its great productiveness. Colonel Duncan was 
always a pioneer in the introduction of progressive 
agricultural methods. It was his prominence as a 
planter that brought him election in 1881 as presi- 
dent of the State Agricultural and Mechanical So- 
ciety of South Carolina, the incorporation which has 
had the management of the State Fair. During his 
Vol. V— 1 



term of office the annual fair at Columbia enjoyed 
every degree of success and prosperity. Since leav- 
ing the office of president he has remained as an 
ex-o^cio member of the executive committee of the 
society. 

His first important service in public affairs was 
rendered when he was elected in 1876 as a member 
of the Board of County Commissioners of Union 
County. That was just at the period of restored 
white rule, and as a result of the carpet bag regime 
the county was heavily burdened with debt. When 
he left office in 1880 provision had been made for 
the payment of every dollar of debt, and Colonel 
Duncan was complimented by his fellow citizens in 
bringing about such a desirable result In i^ he 
was appointed by Governor Thomson to fill the un- 
expired term of Governor Jeter as a member of the 
Board of Railroad Commissiopers, and was con- 
nected with that board continuously for twenty- 
three years. He was a member until 1894, and then 
for eleven years served as secretary of the board. 

Colonel Duncan has been a resident of Columbia 
since 1904. After severing his connections with the 
Railroad Commission he represented some of the 
local railwav companies until 1918, and is now en- 
joying a well earned retirement, though his interests 
and enthusiasm in all matters touching the welfare 
of his state and community are as fresh as ever. 

Colonel Duncan's first wife died in 1876, and her 
three living children are Mrs. R. P. Harry, of Union, 
Mrs. James R. Cogswell, of Darlington, and William 
Gist Duncan, of Leesville. In 1881 Colonel Duncan 
married Miss Kate Richardson, daughter of the late 
Congressman John S. Richardson of Sumter. To this 
marriage were born four children, Mrs. Harry Nel- 
son Eden, Mrs. Leroy Reeves, Mrs. Ed Brennon, 
Jr., and James A. Duncan. The son is a graduate 
with the class of 1917 from the University of Soutii 
Carolina and is now assistant tutor of physics in 
Harvard University. 

George Benedict Cromer. An unusually busy and 
fruitful career has been that of George Benedict 
Cromer, who qualified for practice as a lawyer more 
than thirty-five years ago, served more than eight 
years as president of Newberry College, his alma 
mater, was four times mayor of Newberry, and has 
long been one of the prominent laymen of the 
Lutheran Church. 

Mr. Cromer was born in Newberry County, Oc- 
tober 3, 1857, son of Thomas H. Cromer, a farm- 
er and merchant. Mr. Cromer spent his boyhood 
days in the country, was farm reared, and had the 
simple advantages of the country schools, supple- 
mented by the- private school of Thomas H. Duckett. 
He was thus qualified for entrance to Newberry 
College, where he graduated A. B. in 1877 and 
A. M. in 1879. From 1877 to 1881 he was an in- 
structor in Newberry College, and while teach- 
ing was studying law and was admitted to prac- 
tice in December, 1881. From that date until Janu- 
ary, 1896, he practiced with growing prestige and 
ability, and three times served as mayor of New- 
berry, being first elected in 1886 and serving until 
1890. Mr. Cromer became president of Newberry 
College in 1896, and held that office for 8j4 years, 
until 1904. That was a period of great prosperity 
for his alma mater. Retiring from this office he 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



was elected in 1905 as mayor of Newberry. He is 
still active in his law practice. 

Mr. Cromer was honored in 1901 with the degree 
LL. D. by Wittenberg College in Ohio and Muhlen- 
berg College in Pennsylvania. He is a member of 
the American Academy of Political and Social 
Science and the National Economic League. He is 
also president of the trustees of Newberry College. 

October 11, 1883, he married Miss Carolyn J. 
Motte, who died in 1888, On November 27, 1890, 
he married Harriet S. Bittle. He has two children, 
Carolyn and Beale H. 

Joel Smith Bailey, of Greenwood, is a son of 
Joel S. and Clara (Tarrant) Bailey. His father's 
rank is well known as a nnancier and merchant, 
having been head of one of the largest mercan- 
tile firms in Northern South Carolina during the 
last two decades of the last century. 

Joel Smith Bailey for fifteen years has prose- 
cuted many and varied and important interests at 
Greenwood. He was born in that city August 12, 
1883, was educated in public schools, and gradu- 
ated from Davidson College in North Carolina in 
1903. As a newspaper man he is secretary, treas- 
urer and business manager of the Index-Journal. 
He is a director of the National Loan and Ex- 
change Bank of Greenwood, and is president and 
treasurer of the Oregon Hotel Company, which 
built and owns the splendid fireproof five-story hotel 
at Greenwood. He is also president of the Citi- 
zens Trust Company and is one of the three mem- 
bers of the Water and Light Commission of Green- 
wood. 

Mr. Bailey from college days has been deeply 
interested in athletic sports of all kinds. On May 
7, 1914, he married Sarah Caldwell Jamison, of 
Greenwood. They have one daughter, Margaret 
Wallace. 

Claudius C. Featherstone is one of the ablest 
members of the South Carolina bar, having prac- 
ticed more than thirty years, and in that time has 
been called on fifteen different occasions to serve 
as special Judge of the Circuit Court. 

Judge Featherstone, whose home is at Green- 
wood, was born in Laurens County, December i, 
1864, a son of J. C. Calhoun and Addie (Sullivan) 
Featherstone. His father wa$ likewise a success- 
ful lawyer before him. Qaudius C. Featherstone 
was educated in the common schools, attending the 
high school at Anderson, and had one year of ex- 
perience in a printing office and also clerked in a 
store. At the age of twenty he began studying 
law in the office of his father, and was admitted 
to the bar in December, 1885. For one year he 
practiced at Anderson and for twenty years in 
Laurens, and since 191 1 has been a resident of 
Greenwood, where he became a member of the firm 
McGhee & Featherstone. 

Judge Featherstone has been a prominent leader 
in the prohibition party in South Carolina for 
many years. In 1898 he was a candidate on the 
ticket of that party for governor, and was beaten 
by only a small majority. In 1910 he was again 
prohibition candidate for governor against Cole 
Blease. Judge Featherstone is chairman of the 



Board of Stewards of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, is a Mason and Shriner, and past chan- 
cellor of the Knights of Pythias. On October i, 
1893, he married Lura Lucretia Pitts, a daughter 
of Rev. John D. Pitts, a prominent Baptist minis- 
ter. To their marriage was born three children: 
John Douglass, who graduated from the University 
of Soutfi Carolina and was admitted to the bar in 
1916, entered the army in 1917 and was a lieutenant 
and afterwards a captain in the field artillery. 
Lucia Sullivan, the second child, is a graduate of 
Winthrop College and a teacher at Greenville. 
Phoebe Laurens is still a student in Winthrop Col- 
lege. 

Capt. Francis Murray Mack is a member of 
the former Mack family of Fort Mill, distinguished 
by the scholarship and professional activities of sev- 
eral of its members. Capt. F. M. Mack is a brother 
of Dr. Edward Mack, long distinguished as a Pres- 
byterian clergyman and theologian, and is also a 
brother of the brilliant New York lawyer William 
Mack. 

The parents of these sons were Rev. Dr. Joseph 
Bingham and Harriet Hudson (Banks) Mack. The 
father was born in New York City of Irish ancestry 
and came south when a youth. He espoused the 
cause of the South in the war between the states, 
and rose to the rank of captain in the Fifty-third 
Tennessee Infantry. After the war he studied for 
the Presbyterian ministry, and spent many years in 
the upbuilding of that church in various states in 
the South. For several years he served as financial 
agent for the Presbyterian Theological Seminary at 
Columbia, South Carolina, and in recognition of 
that service and his high scholarship the institution 
awarded him the Doctor of Divinity degjree. For 
twenty years he was engaged in Evangelistic work 
in Georgia and Alabama. He held a niunber of 
prominent pastorates, including Charleston and Fort 
Mill. He established his permanent home at Fort 
Mill and died there. 

His wife, still living, is a member of the promi- 
nent Banks family of this state. Her brother was 
Prof. Alexander Banks, one of South Carolina's 
leading educators. He died in March, 1920. 

William Mack, mentioned above, was bom in 
Sumter County, South Carolina, October 24, 1865, is 
a graduate of Davidson College, North Carolina, 
received his law degree in the University of Mis- 
souri, and was admitted to the bar in 1887. Since 
1900 he has been secretary of the American Law 
Book Publishing Company of New York, also editor 
in chief of its publications, and from 1900 to 1912 
was editor in chief of the Encyclopedia of Law 
and Procedure and since 1914 of "Corpus Juris.'* 

Dr. Edward Mack, D. D., was born at Charleston, 
July 16, 1868, is a graduate of Columbia Theological 
Seminary and of Princeton Theological Seminary 
and has been a minister of the Presbjrterian Church 
since 1889. He held pastorates at St. Louis, Norfolk, 
Virginia, and other places until 1904. For eleven 
years he was a professor in the Lane Theological 
Seminary at Cincinnati, and has held a chair in 
the Union Theological Seminary at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, since 1915. He is author of a number of 
theological and other books and articles. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



19 



Capt Francis Murray Mack is a junior by twenty 
years to these distinguished brothers. He was born 
at Fort Mill in York County in 1887, and was 
reared in the beautiful Mack home at Fort Mill, 
where he still lives. He attended public school at 
Atlanta, spent two years in Davidson College, North 
Carolina, and two years in Cornell University. 
Before the World war and since leaving the army 
he has been engaged in the management of the 
Mack farm owned by his mother. This is a beauti- 
ful and valuable plantation of 800 acres, and adjoins 
the Town of Fort Mill on the South. 

dptain Mack became a private in the Fort Mill 
Light Infantry and had attained the rank of second 
lieutenant when he was called to duty with that com- 
pany on the Mexican border from July to December, 
1916. The Fort Mill Company was Company G of 
the First South Carolina Infantry. This organiza- 
tion was mustered into the National Army April 
12, 191 7. The first South Carolina with subsequent 
additions became the One Hundred and Eighteenth 
Regiment of the Thirtieth, Old Hickory, Division. 
Concerning the brilliant record of this regiment 
nothing need be said at this point. Captain Mack 
joined the colors at Columbia, was at Camp Jackson, 
and in September, 1917, went to Camp Sevier at 
Greenville. He went overseas with the One Hundred 
and Eighteenth in May, 191 8. In the meantime he 
had spent two months of intensive drill in a ma- 
chine gun course at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and was 
made machine gun instructor in his regiment The 
One Hundred and Eighteenth Regiment was one of 
the units called upon for the heaviest service and 
sustained some of the heaviest losses of any regi- 
ment in France beginning with the events of July, 
1918, and continuing to the signing of the armis- 
tice. While in France Captain Mack was trans- 
ferred from G Company to the Regimental Intelli- 
gence Office of the One Hundred and Eighteenth, 
and when Captain Pyles was killed he was pro- 
moted to regimental operations ofiicer with the rank 
of captain. After the armistice he was kept on duty 
in France until the spring of 1919 and was then 
sent home and received his honorable discharge in 
July, 1919. 

Captain Mack married Miss Elizabeth Nims, of 
York County. Their two children are Francis Mur- 
ray, Jr., and Frederick Nims Mack. 

James Travis Medlock, deceased, for many years 
was one of the leading bankers of Greenwood. He 
was a veteran in banking experience, and filled prac- 
tically every executive position in a bank. Mr. 
Medlock was also widely known as one of the most 
prominent Methodist laymen in the state. 

He was bom in Laurens County, South Caro- 
lina, August 18, 1856, son of James Travis and 
Cornelia (Jones) Medlock. His father was both 
a farmer and merchant. The son had a business 
college education in addition to the advantages of 
the common schools and for three years was a 
teacher. With that exception his career has been 
completely a commercial one. For ten years he 
was in the mercantile business, four years in Laurens 
County and six years in Greenwood. He began 
lanking with the Bank of Greenwood, first as as- 
sistant cashier for six years and then six years 



as cashier. Besides his knowledge of banking he 
had been gaining steadily the confidence of his 
associates and his reputation for financial manage- 
ment. On leaving the Bank of Greenwood he or- 
ganized the Loan and Exchange Bank, and served 
as its cashier and later as its president. This in- 
stitution was consolidated with the First National 
"Bank, becoming the National Loan and Exchange 
Bank, and Mr. Medlock was afterward president 
of the consolidated institution. He was also presi- 
dent of the Citizens Trust Company. He owned 
the handsome bank and office building, 40x120 feet, 
a six-story concrete and brick face fire-proof struc- 
ture that is a substantial evidence of Greenwood's 
importance as a growing business center. Mr. Med- 
lock was also active vice president of the Durst- 
Andrews Company, wholesale ^ocers. 

December 15, 1892, he married Miss Kate Bul- 
lock, of Greenwood County. They had a family 
of seven children : Lucile, a teacher ; Robert Travis, 
who during the World war was a sergeant in the 
Fifty-third Regiment and saw active service with 
the Expeditionary Forces in France; Bertha Nell, 
a teacher; James Rogers, a student in Woflford 
College; Joseph Preston, Melvin Kelly and Mary, 
all at home. 

While Mr. Medlock was daily busy with his af- 
fairs in Greenwood he resided on a farm and 
country estate two miles out of town. He was 
trustee and secretary and treasurer of the Green- 
wood City School Board. Mr. Medlock was a 
steward and treasurer of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Church of Greenwood, secretary and treasurer 
of the Sunday school, and for four years was a 
member of the General Board of Missions of the 
church and was very prominent in the laymen's 
missionary movement. 

James Benette Hunter is junior member of the 
law firm of Hunt, Hunt & Hunter, which for years 
has enjoyed exceptional' standing and has repre- 
sented some of the best abilities in the legal pro- 
fession in the state. Mr. Hunter has also been 
active while building up his professional interests 
in local affairs at Newberry. 

He was bom in Newberry County, July 18, 1872, 
son of Robert T. C. and Rebecca J. (Boozer) Hun- 
ter. His father was a very progressive factor in 
the agricultural community of Newberry County. 
A man of natural mechanical ability, he for many 
years operated a threshing outfit and a cotton gin 
and introduced the first steam threshing machine 
into Newberry County. 

James Benette Hunter grew up on his father's 
farm, had good school advantages, and in 1896 
p-aduated from Newberry College. After read- 
ing law privately he was admitted to the bar in 
1897. In 1896-97 he taught school. He practiced 
law for three years at Saluda, and then came to 
Newberry and has since been a member of the firm 
Hunt, Hunt & Hunter. While at Saluda he served 
as intendant of the town for nearly two years, hav- 
ing resigned on moving to Newberrv. 

He is a prominent lasrman of the Lutheran 
Church, is a deacon in his home church and treas- 
urer of its benevolent fund. He is also one of the 
trustees of Newberry College, and treasurer of one 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



of the endowment funds of the college. Mr. Hun- 
ter is a Mason. During the war he served as chief 
clerk for the local exemption board, and gave 
practically all his time to those duties to the neg- 
lect of his professional duties. 

August 27, 1902, he married Minnie McLarnon, 
of Chester, South Carolina. 

Thomas Kennerly Johnstone was graduated 
from Newberry College, in 1904, and for the past 
fifteen years has been actively identified with the 
commercial affairs of Newberry. 

He was born June 13, 1884, a son of Alan and 
Lilla K. (Kennerly) Johnstone. While his father 
wzs a farmer, he was also active in politics and 
served at one time as a member of the State Senate. 
Thomas K. Johnstone grew up at his father's home 
and prepared for Newberry College in the public 
sdiools. After leaving college he entered the serv- 
ice of the National Bank of Newberry as collec- 
tion clerk, and since 1916 has been cashier of that 
institution. He has served as clerk of the Sink- 
ing Fund Commission of South Carolina, and dur- 
ing 1918-19 was an alderman of Newberry. Mr. 
Johnstone is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

November 24, 1909, he married Miss Jeanne Pel- 
ham of Newberry. Their five children are Alan 
McCrary, Brantly Leavel, Thomas K., Jr., Lilla K. 
and Ellerbe Pelham. 

CoL. Thomas B. Spratt, of the historic Spratt 
family of Fort Mill, was lieutenant colonel of the 
One Hundred and Eighteenth Infantry in the Thir- 
tieth Division and was in active command of his 
regiment during its glorious participation in the 
campaign which broke the Hindenburg line during 
October, 1918. He is one of the distinguished 
military figures in his native state, and his individual 
career adds luster to the military annals of the 
family. 

This is one of the oldest families in the northern 
section of South Carolina, and one inseparably as- 
sociated with the state's history. The Spratt family 
have owned and lived continuously upon the Spratt 
estate at Fort Mill in York County, since 1760, a 
period of 160 years, this land having been given 
to Kanawha (Thomas Spratt) by the Catawba In- 
dians when he settled amon^ them. 

The founder of the name m South Carolina was 
Thomas Spratt, great-grandfather of Colonel Spratt. 
He was born in County Down, Ireland, of Scotch 
parentage, and when a child he came with his 
parents to America in 1730. His father and two 
brothers settled at Cliester, Pennsylvania. Thomas 
Spratt about 1758 came southward with his wife 
and small children and in the southern part of 
North Carolina crossed the Yadkin River and lo- 
cated on the site of the present City of Charlotte 
in Mecklenburg County. A son born there is cred- 
ited with having been the first white child bom west 
of the Yadkin. Historians have also recorded the 
fact that this was the first white family to cross 
the Yadkin. The first court of Mecklenburg County 
was held in the cabin that was erected by Thomas 
Spratt He did not long remain there, however, and 
in 1876 removed to the site of the present Town 
of Fort Mill in York County, South Carolina, about 



seventeen miles south of Charlotte. The land was 
then owned by the Catawba tribe of Indians, and 
that region was inhabited solely by them. Thomas 
Spratt was the first permanent white settler among 
them. The Indians found in him a leader and 
adviser in their domestic and tribal affairs and also 
a valuable counselor in their wars. Thomas Spratt 
led the Catawbas to victory against another tribe 
on the Kanawha River in what is now West Vir- 
ginia. After this campaign the Catawbas bestowed 
upon him the name "Kanawha," by which he is 
known in history. Largely through the wise and 
kind leadership of Kanawha Spratt the Catawbas 
remained faithful and loyal to him and to his de- 
scendants, aiding the white people in all their wars 
beginning with the Revolution and down to the 
period of the war between the states. Some of the 
Catawbas were heroes in these wars, a fact perma- 
nently testified to by a monument erected to their 
memory at Fort Mill by John McKee Spratt and 
Samuel Elliott White. Kanawha Spratt died in 
1807. The land ^ven to him by the (Catawba 
Indians at Fort Mill was later granted to him by 
King George and has never passed out of the family 
name. Thomas Spratt served as a lieutenant in the 
Revolutionary war. 

Col. Thomas B. Spratt, who was bom at Fort 
Mill in 1878, is a son of John McKee and Susan 
(Massey) Spratt, the latter still living. John Mc- 
Kee Spratt, who died in 1909, was a son of Thomas 
D. Spratt and a grandson of James Spratt, who 
was one of the sons of Kanawa Spratt During his 
life of sixty years he was actively and successfully 
engaged in farming, banking and manufacturing, at 
Fort Mill, spending his entire life on the old 
family homestead. Thomas D. Spratt was a man 
of thorough education. Though he spent three 
years in the South Carolina College at Columbia and 
studied medicine in the Medical College of South 
Carolina at Charleston, he never practiced that pro- 
fession. He studied law at Yorkville and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 183 1. His career as a lawyer 
was also brief. In 1834 he retumed to the Spratt 
place at Fort Mill and busied his years with planting. 
He died in 1875. His wife was Margaret McKee. 

Thomas B. Spratt acquired his education in the 
South Carolina military school. The Citadel, at 
Charleston, which has turned out hundreds of men 
who have achieved fame in war and in civil af- 
fairs. After returning home he joined the National 
Guard of South Carolina. He commanded the Sec- 
ond Battalion, First South Carolina Infantry, dur- 
ing the troubles on the Mexican border. He was on 
the border during 1916, and when he returned to 
civil life in 1919 he had been on active duty as a 
military man for nearly three years. Soon after 
his return from the South he volunteered in tfie 
National Army. He went to France as lieutenant 
colonel of the One Hundred and Eighteenth In- 
fantry in the Thirtieth Division. The division was 
largely made up of South (Carolina troops and its 
history is merely a part of the state's military record. 
He was lieutenant colonel in command of the One 
Hundred and Eighteenth Infantry, during the great 
offensive from October 5th to October 20th, and in 
the absence of the colonel of the regiment he made 
the plans and gave the command which preceded 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



21 



the advance and capture of Brancourt, one of the 
most important objectives attained by the American 
army in the offensive of the month of October when 
the Hxndenburg line was broken. 

G>lonel Spratt returned home in December, 1918, 
having been recommended for promotion, for the 
purpose of taking command of one of the new 
regiments being formed. After the armistice he 
resumed his business duties as president of the First 
National Bank of Fort Mill, and farming the old 
homestead. 

The vice president and cashier of thb bank is 
his brother, Dr. J. Lee Spratt, who is a graduate 
in dentistry of the University of Maryland at Balti- 
more. For several years he has not practiced his 
profession, having given much of his time to the 
opratt Bank and to his farming operations. Doctor 
Spratt as a civilian rendered valuable service to 
the Government during the war, serving on Local 
Exemption Board No. i for York County and be- 
ing chairman of all the Liberty '^ Loan drives for 
Fort Mill and vicini^. He married Miss Emma 
Ardrey, daughter of Capt W. E. Ardrey of Meck- 
lenburg County, North Carolina. 

Col. T. B. Spratt married Miss Eleanor Mason 
Harris. They have three children, named John 
McKee, Thomas and Eleanor Spratt. 

CALHOUN Allen Mays, a lawyer whose talents 
have brought him wide recognition in South Caro- 
lina, has faNcen in practice at Greenwood a number 
of years, and resumed his work there after his dis- 
charge from the army in the winter of 1918-19. 

Mr. Mays was born in Edgefield, South Carolina, 
November 14, 1884, a son of Sampson Butler and 
Ella (Calhoun) Mays. His father is a farmer 
and the son made acquaintance with country life 
and its responsibilities when a youth. He attended 
the public schools, also the South Carolina Co- 
educational Institute at Edgefield, where he com- 
pleted his work in 1902, and then for one year was 
a teacher. In 1906 he completed a course in Charles- 
ton College, and then taught in Georgia, spending 
some time at Elberton and at Waycross. In 1909 
he entered the University of Michigan Law Depart- 
ment, and was admitted to the bar in December, 
1910. Mr. Mays has made his home and has had 
his professional headquarters at Greenwood since 
September, 191 1. He is associated with Henry C. 
Tillman in the firm of Tillman & Mays. In 1915 
he was appointed assistant United States attorney 
for the Western District of South Carolina. He 
resigned this office in 1918 to go into the army at 
the Field Artillery Officers Training School at 
C^p Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky. He received 
his honorable discharge November 27, 1918, and 
then returned to Greenwood to resum^the threads 
of private life and his profession. He is a Mason 
and is affiliated with the Alpha Tau Omega college 
fraternity at Charleston. 

Chables Edward Summer is president of the 
Summer Brothers Company, Incorporated, of New- 
berry, a large and important concern operating on 
a capital of $100,000. It is an incorporation for 
general business purposes, doin^ a large mercantile 
btisiness, and in addition to this they operate 2,700 



acres of plantation. This is one of the notable 
agricultursd undertakings in South Carolina. In 
the busy seasons sixty-five plows are at work in 
the fields, and the average annual product from the 
cotton plantings is 700 bails. 

Charles Edward Summer also has during the past 
thirty years been identified with many other impor- 
tant commercial affairs at Newberry. He was born 
in Lexington Cotmty, November 18, 1858, son of 
George W. and Martha D. Summers. The Sum- 
mers family settled in the Dutch Fork of Lexing- 
ton County neiarly a century and a half ago. 
George W. Summer was a farmer, and while a 
Confederate soldier died in a Virginia hospital, 
July 13, 1862. Charles Edward Summer grew up 
on the home farm and was indebted to his mother 
for much of his education and the influences which 
shaped his life. He was trained to farm work and 
has always had some interests in agriculture. Owing 
to the limited circumstances of the family he never 
acquired a college education. He began farming 
for himself in Lexington County, in 1877^ and in 
1888 transferred his field of operation to Newberry, 
where he began merchandising on a' small scale. 
Since then besides the large enterprise noted above 
he has been identified with the Mollohon Manu- 
facturing Company, the Newberry Warehouse 
Company, the Standard Warehouse Company, and 
the Newberry Land and Security Company, serv- 
ing as an executive officer in these and other local 
enterprises. He also owns large stocks and leases 
in oil lands in Kansas, Texas and Oklahoma, is also 
identified with and owns large stocks in fertilizer 
plants, of which he is an officer. Mr. Summer is 
a democrat and is affiliated with the Lutheran 
Church. 

January i, 1877, he married Leonora Sease, who 
died in 1884, the mother of three children. On 
January 2, 1886, he married Mary Jane Sease, sis- 
ter of his first wife. To this marriage were born 
six children. Mr. Summer served two terms as 
an alderman at Newberry and in 1901 began a long 
service as commissioner of public works, which 
position he still holds. 

William Kimbrough Charles established the 
first law office in what is now McCormick County, 
and was associated with Hon. B. E. Nicholson ot 
the Edgefield bar, who was representing the legal 
interests of many individuals and firms in the Town 
of McCormick and surrounding country at the 
thne the new county was organized in 1916. Mr. 
Charles' progress in his profession has been steadily 
upward since that date. 

Mr. Charles was bom at Timmonsville in Flor- 
ence County, April 2, 1892, a son of Kimbrough 
DuBose and Elizabeth (Keith) Charles. The 
Charles family was originally from Darlington 
County. 

William K. Charles was educated in the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina, ^aduating from the law 
department in 1915 and being admitted to the bar 
the same year. While in Columbia he served as 
secretary of the committee on agriculture and sec- 
retary of the committee on banking and insurance 
of the State Legislature. For nearly a vear after 
completing his course in the tmiversity he was in 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Washington, an employe of the Department of 
Justice and also a student of law at Georgetown 
University. He then returned home and in 1916 
located at McCormick. McCormick, the town as 
well as the county, has enjoyed a rapid growth 
and has splendid prospects as the center of a won- 
derfully rich agricultural and industrial district. 

Mr. Charles married Miss Carrie Lou Able, of 
Leesville, South Carolina. They have a daughter 
Doris Virginia. 

Thomas B. Madden. A happy instance of the rule 
of special fitness governing political appointments 
was afforded when Thomas B. Madden received his 
official commission as postmaster of Columbia on 
January 21, 1920. If it were not for his compara- 
tive youth it might appropriately be said that Mr. 
Madden has grown old in the service of the postal 
department of the Government. He is at least a 
veteran, and his present office is an appropriate 
reward of a continuously efficient service of more 
than twenty years. 

Mr. Madden was born at Winnsboro, son of Dr. 
Thomas B. and Margaret S. (Brice) Madden. The 
Maddens came to South Carolina from t^ north 
of Ireland. The grandfather, Dr. Campbell Madden, 
of Winnsboro, was not only a physician but also 
a minister of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian 
Church. Dr. Thomas B. Madden spent his active 
life as a practicing physician in Fairfield County. 

The son was educated in the Mount Zion Academy 
at Winnsboro, and from there in 1897 he entered 
the railway mail department of the Government. 
He also worked in the mail transfer offices in 
Columbia and Florence and on the Charleston and 
Augusta division, and in 1904 was assigned to the 
Augusta postoffice, where during the next six or seven 
years he had experience in practically every depart- 
ment. Mr. Madden came to Columbia in 191 1, was 
in the general delivery department, was promoted 
to assistant superintendent of mails in 191 3 and in 
1915 was appointed assistant postmaster by Post- 
master Huggins. He had charge of a large part 
of the work of the local postoffice during the admin- 
istration of the late W. H. Coleman, who died in 
February, 1919. Following the death of his pre- 
decessor he served as acting postmaster, and on 
January 21, 1920, was appointed by President Wil- 
son postmaster of the Columbia office. 

Mr. Madden is a member of the Associate Re- 
formed Presbjrterian Church and a Mason. He 
married Miss Willie Brunson, of Dillon, and their 
three children are Martha, Thomas B. and Addie. 

John Thomas Fooshe is proprietor of the lead- 
ing furniture and house furnishing business of the 
Town of McCormick, county seat of McCormick 
County. Mr. Fooshe has been in business at Mc- 
Cormick for a number of years, and the esteem 
accorded him as an enterprising and successful 
merchant is heightened by the influence he is known 
to have exercised in behalf of the establishment of 
the County of McCormick, 

Agitation was started to carve a new county from 
old Abbeville, Edgefield and Greenwood as long 
ago as 189s, but support of the movement waned, 
and it was not revived until Mr. Fooshe with oth- 



ers became the active leaders in 1913 and 1914. 
During the next two years the agitation was car- 
ried on with spirit and vigor both in the communi- 
ties effected and before 3ie State Legislature, re- 
sulting in the passage of the act and the establish- 
ment of the new county April 12, 19 16, with the 
Town of McCormick as county seat. 

John Thomas Fooshe was bom at Ninety-Six in 
Abbeville County, now Greenwood County, South 
Carolina, October 21, 1873, a son of T. K. and Sal- 
lie (Clem) Fooshe. The family is of French origin 
and the nrst of the name in South Carolina came 
from France and located near Ninety- Six about 
1700. Mr. Fooshe's grandfather was C. W. Fooshe, 
bom about 1820, and some of his descendants now ^ 
live in the old home which was built fully 100 
years ago by his father. His youngest son, R. L. 
Fooshe, lives on this place at this writing. 

John Thomas Fooshe grew up on the plantation 
in Abbeville, now Greenwood County. On January 
7, 1907, he removed to the Town of McCormick 
and established a furniture business under the name 
Fooshe & Strom. After ten months he became sole 
proprietor and continued the business until the spring 
of 1910, when the store and most of the business 
part of the town was destroyed by fire. For about 
six months he was in business at Lancaster, still 
retaining his business at McCormicl^ and aside from 
that interval has been contmuously identified with 
McCormick for over fourteen years. He is proprie- 
tor of the oldest and the first exclusive fumiture 
and house fumishing store in McCormick and in 
recent years has kept his establishment growing with 
adequate service to fulfill the new needs and de- 
mands of the rapidly developing country around 
McCormick. 

Mr. Fooshe married Miss Hetie Dora Ouzts, of 
Edgefield County, the daughter of J. Ouzts of 
Greenwood, South Carolina. They have one 
adopted daughter, Nellie Norris Fooshe, the daugh- 
ter of the late J. B. Norris, who died February 29, 
1914- Her mother, Emma (Wilson) Norris, died 
March 3, 1914. 

Robert S. Galloway was endowed with good 
business talents and has used those talents during 
a long and active career largely to promote and han- 
dle the several business organizations of the Asso- 
ciate Reformed Presbyterian Church centered at 
Due West. Mr. Galloway is well known as a pub- 
lisher and editor of church publications, and was 
the man chiefly responsible among the local citizens 
of Due West in giving that historic college com- 
munity direct connection with the outside world by 
means of a railroad. 

Mr. Galloway was bom at Newberry, South Caro- 
lina, in 1854 a son of Rev. Jonathan and Martha 
(Spear) Galloway. His patemal grandparents 
were natives of Scotland. Rev. Jonathan Galloway 
was born in York County, South Carolina, and is 
well remembered as a prominent minister and edu- 
cator of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian 
Church. For many years he lived at Newberry but 
in 1859 moved to Due West, the seat of Erskine 
College. He was one of the three men who origi- 
nally conceived the plan of the Due West Female 
College, and when it was opened in i860 as an in- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



23 



sthution for the higher education of women he be- 
came Professor of Latin and Greek. He had been 
an active minister at Newberry for twenty years. 
The mother of Robert S. Galloway was born at 
Lowndesville in Abbeville Cotmty. 

Robert S. Galloway ^aduated from Erskine Col- 
lege in 1874. For a time he was a merchant and 
later organized a company and bought the Asso- 
ciate Reformed Presb3rterian, the official organ of 
the Synod of the church and published at Due West. 
Mr. Galloway for many years has been business 
manager of this publication and is assistant edi- 
tor. Published weekly, the paper circulates to the 
majority of the homes of the Associate Reformed 
Presbyterian people in this S)rnod, and through Mr. 
Galloway's able management its business adminis- 
tration has been conducted on a most substantial 
basis. He is also publisher of the Senior Quarterly 
and Junior Quarterly, the Sunday school publica- 
tions of the Synod. 

Mr. Galloway and his associates among Due West 
citizens financed and built the Due West Railroad 
from Donalds to Due West, connecting with the 
Southern Railway at the former point. The first 
train was run over the line December 24, 1907. Mr. 
Galloway is president and treasurer of the railroad 
and its active manager. He is also a member of 
the board of trustees of both Erskine College and 
the Woman's College at Due West. 

Mr. Galloway married Mary Eleanor Stone of 
Louisville, JeflFerson County, Georgia, daughter of 
James Madison and Mary (Lawson) Stone. Mrs. 
Galloway is active assistant in the management of 
the "Associate Reformed Presbyterian." Their chil- 
dren, seven in number, were all liberally educated 
in the Due West colleges and were well trained 
for lives of usefulness. They are: Jennie, wife of 
H. D. Kirkpatrick; Mary, wife of J. B. McCutcheon; 
Helen, wife of E. W. Neal ; Lena, who married J. B. 
Mosely; Robert, Virginia and Kathryn. 

N. W. Hardin is the present mayor, a leading 
lawyer and for thirty years a source of much- of 
the enterprise which has stimulated the interesting 
and historic community of Blacksburg. 

Blacksburg is the home of the Hardins, one of 
the notable families of 5outh Carolina. Blacksburg 
was originally in York County, and upon the crea- 
tion of Cherokee County in 1897 it was part of the 
territory used in the creation of that new county 
division. In and around Blacksburg many promi- 
nent families and notable men have lived, not least 
among them the Hardins. Mr. Hardin's grandfa- 
ther was Abraham Hardin, who represented Scotch- 
Irish ancestry. He was a large land and slave 
owner before the war, for nearly twenty years sat 
in the General Assembly, was a surveyor, magistrate, 
deacon in the Baptist Church, and in his generation 
exercised a great and splendid influence in his com- 
munity. 

N. W. Hardin was bom near Blacksburg in 1857, 
a son of Ira and Elizabeth (Hamilton) Hardin. 
His father, the late Ira Hardin, was one of the 
founders of the town of Blacksburg, whose his- 
tory dates from 1871. The A. & C. Air Line Rail- 
road, now a part of the Southern system, was then 
being built. Ira Hardin was the means of provid- 
ing a depot for the company. One of the chief ob- 



jects of his interest and enthusiasm was education. 
He caused to be erected the Blacksburg High School 
Building, the first graded school in that part of the 
state. He bore over half the expense of establish- 
ing the high school. He was also instrumental in 
founding the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
the first church in Blacksburg. After a life of great 
usefulness Ira Hardin died in 1917. 

While N. W. Hardin has always lived at Blacks- 
burg and has played a role of influence and use- 
fulness in that community, his brothers have elected 
larger cities in which to make their careers. He 
has three brothers at Atlanta, Georgia, all men of 
prominence in the professions. One of them, Dr. 
S. L. Hardin, is one of the leading surgeons of the 
South. 

Perhaps the most notable of the Hardin brothers 
is Abraham Tracy Hardin, who is many years 
younger than the Blacksburg mayor. His career is 
the record of a remarkable rise of a South Caro- 
lina boy to be one of America's foremost railroad 
officials. Born at Blacksburg in 1880, at the age 
of fifteen he had learned telegraphy and shorthand, 
and was an expert railroad telegrapher, his talents 
attracting the attention of Mr. E. Berkley, superin- 
tendent of the Charlotte & Atlanta Air Line, now 
a part of the Southern Railroad. Mr. Berkley took 
young Hardin into his office as private clerk. While 
thus employed he earned money to guarantee his 
tuition in the University of South Carolina, where 
he graduated with the first honors of his class in 
1903. In university he specialized in higher mathe- 
matics and engineering. His record since leaving 
university has justified all the confidence enter- 
tained of his budding abilities. He became private 
secretary to Mr. R. A. Dodson, general roadmaster 
of the Southern Railway at Washington. He ac- 
cepted the many opportunities in that work to 
acquire the knowledge of an expert in scientific 
railroading. After two and a half years he went 
to the New York Central as assistant roadmaster, 
was promoted to division roadmaster, then division 
engineer, and from there going into the office of 
the chief engineer of the system was soon made 
engineer of maintenance of way. Later he was 
made assistant to the general manager, became 
general manager and finally senior vice president 
of the New York Central System. When the rail- 
roads were put under Federal jurisdiction he was 
appointed Federal manager for all the lines of | 
the New York Central or Vanderbilt system. 

N. W. Hardin attended high school at Blacks- 
burg, studied law under the late William C. Black 
and was admitted to the bar in 1889. For thirty 
years he has practiced his profession in Blacks- 
burg, and in addition has also looked after a grow- 
ing and extensive interest as a farmer. By suc- 
cessive elections he has served as mayor of Blacks- 
burg since 1912 and is probably the most popular 
official that community has ever had. He was 
elected and served in the Lower House of the Gen- 
eral Assembly in 1888 and was again elected in 
1 914, serving in two regular and two extra sessions 
of that body. 

Mr. Hardin married Miss Mattie A. Black, a 
daughter of William G. Black. Their six children 
are Mrs. Willie Davies, S. L. Hardin, James A. 
Hardin, Kathleen, Louis and Roland Hardin. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Maj. Lindsay C. McFadden was one of the 
"seniors" among South Carolina officers in the great 
war in France. He was about fortv years of age, 
but in addition to his years he had the advantage 
of mature business and army experience behind 
him, all constituting a great advantage as a leader 
among the men of the One Hundred and Eighteenth 
Infantry, with which he served as acting commander 
of the Second Battalion. 

Major McFadden has been a prominent merchant 
at Rock Hill for a number of years. He was born 
near Rodman in Chester Cotmty, son of James C. 
and Mary R. (Neely) McFadden. His parents 
still live on their plantation near Rodman. Major 
McFadden had a good high school education and has 
been a resident of Rock Hill since 1904. His busi- 
ness career and his residence at Rock Hill have 
been contemporaneous, though for nearly three 
years he had to neglect and absent himself from 
business duties on account of his military service. 
Major McFadden is vice president of the Diehl- 
Moore Shoe Company of Kock Hill. 

A number of years ago he entered the State Na- 
tional Guard or Militia, and lor about twenty years 
was captain of the Catawba Rifles of Rock Hill. He 
held that office when the National Guard was 
called upon for duty on the Mexican border in the 
summer of 1916. He was called out as captain 
of the Catawba Rifles in Company H of the First 
■ South Carolina Rifles on Jtme la 1916, and was on 
duty during the Mexican imbroglio until December 
6th of the same year. April 12, 1917, a few days 
after the declaration of war against Germany, his 
company was called into the army and became a 
part of the One Hundred and Eighteenth Infantry, 
Thirtieth Division. He retained his rank of cap- 
tain under the new organization, and was taken into 
Federal service without further preliminary train- 
ing. The One Hundred and Eighteenth Infantry 
trained at Camp Sevier, Greenville, and Company 
H embarked at New York May 11, 1918, reaching 
Liverpool May 23d, and soon afterward was on the 
soil of France. Captain McFadden was practically 
in command of the Second Battalion throughout the 
summer and fall of 191 8. The regiment and bat- 
talion saw its first duty as part of the British 
sector around Ypres, but had the climax of its duty 
in the period between September 25d and October 
20, 1918, when the battalion took its place in the 
* Hindenburg line just north of Bellicourt. The 
battalion took its place at this point on September 
29th, and during the next day or so the battalion 
suffered 11 1 casualties. On the 5th of October 
the battalion took up its position at Mont Brehain, 
and in following days it was an important unit in 
the forward movements of the Thirtieth Division, 
including the historic points of Brancourt and Bre- 
hain. It was in repeated advances until the 14th 
of October, by which time the battalion had sus- 
tained total casualties of over 400, including ei^ht 
officers. Captain McFadden at that time commandmg 
the battalion. The battalion resumed its place in 
front line operations the 15th of October, and from 
October 5th, when the battalion went into position 
in front of Mont Brehain until relieved on the 20th, 
the Second Battalion participated in an advance of 
over twenty kilometers and with the exception of 



three days was constantly in action. Captain Mc- 
Fadden was one of the hve officers of the Second 
Battalion who continued through the entire action. 
In the meantime, on October 17th, he had received 
his commission as major. 

The One Hundred and Eighteenth Regiment was 
cited and commended for unusual performance of 
duty by Gen. L. D. Tyson, the brigade commander, 
who in an address said, in addition, referring par- 
ticularly to the Second Battalion, 'that this bat- 
talion did more effective fighting than any other 
battalion in the 30th Division and more actual 
front line work than any other battalion." 

After the signing of the armistice and when the 
Thirtieth Division was preparing for return to 
the United States, Major McFadden was trans- 
ferred to the Third Division and was on duty keep- 
ing watch over the bridgeheads of the Rhine. He 
sailed from Brest August 12, 1919, reaching New 
York Auffust 20th, and was mustered out and dis- 
charged September 12, 1919. 

Major McFadden married Miss Maude Grantham, 
of Florida. 

William Walker Edwards as merchant, banker 
and citizen has proved himself a most active spirit 
in the affairs of the flourishing and rapidly grow- 
ing Town of Due West, long the seat of Erskine 
College and in later years developing as a com- 
mercial center for a splendid agricultural district. 

Mr. Edwards was born near Rock Hill in York 
County in 187 1, but has spent all his life since 
early mfancy in Due West His parents. Dr. E. H. 
and Harriett Elizabeth (Roddy) Edwards, natives 
of York County, moved to Due West in 1873. Wil- 
liam Walker Edwards attended Erskine College and 
as a youth entered a business career. For a number 
of years he has been the leading merchant of the 
old college town, and is proprietor of two stores, 
one is a general dry goods and wpman's store, 
while the other, in a separate building across the 
street, erected in 1919, handles a complete stock of 
men's clothing and furnishing goods. 

Mr. Edwards was cashier of the Farmers and 
Merchants Bank of Due West until 1920, when he 
resigned. He is one of the liberal members of the 
Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. He 
married Miss Isabel Hamilton Miller, daughter of 
the late Col. McDuffie Miller of Abbeville, now 
Greenwood, County. Their four children are Mar- 
garet Virginia, William Walker, Jr., Harriet Eliza- 
beth and Belle Miller. 

Thomas Moore Ross was one of the first attor- 
neys to locate in the new county seat of McCormick 
County. Highly educated, a young man of influ- 
ential social connections, he has made rapid prog- 
ress in achieving secure places in his profession and 
aH around good citizenship. 

He was born in Chester County, South Carolina, 
in 1891, son of Maj. H. M. and Lydia (Moore) 
Ross. This is an old Scotch family early estab- 
lished in Chester County. His father served with 
the rank of major in the Confederate army. His 
mother was a daughter of Dr. Thomas W. Moore 
of Chester County. Thomas Moore Ross attended 
school at Bascomville in Chester County and gradu- 



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25 



atcd from the University of South Carolina in 
loii. He spent two years in the study of law at 
Harvard University, and for one year was in the 
office of Judge Woods of the United States Court. 
After some months at Columbia he located at Mc- 
Cormick in 1916. McCormick County was organ- 
ized in that jrear, and the beginning of his profes- 
sional career was coincident with the hostory of the 
new county. ^^ 

Mr. Ross IS a member of the Methodist Church 
and a Mason. He married Miss Anne McCown, of 
Florence, South Carolina. 

J. Jennings Dorn. Representative of a family 
whose enterprise has done much to contribute to 
the economic resources of the state, J. Jennings 
Dorn is a business man of the Town of McCormick, 
is a lumber manufacturer, cotton ginner, planter, 
banker, and has widespread interests all over that 
section of the state. 

He was bom in 1885, at Dornsville, then in Edge- 
field County. Dornsville, the ancestral home of the 
Doms, is four miles east of the present City of 
McCormick and in the new County of McCormick, 
situated on Hardlabor Creek. J. Jennings Dorn is 
a son of T. M. and Visie (Self) Dorn, both natives 
of Edgeneld County. Both his parents died in 
1906. 

One of the early members of the family and the 
one to originate an interesting chapter of economic 
history was Billy Dorn, who about 1835 discovered 
gold on his property near Dornsville and th6 present 
Town of McCormick. He opened and operated a 
mine, and the records of the United States Treas- 
ury show that the Government pSiid him $900,000 
for gold from his mine up to 1858. The mine was 
again worked after the war, contributing another 
substantial fortune to the Dorn family. Later a 
party of New York men leased the property and 
sunk the New York shaft, and finally the Dorn min- 
ing property and many thousands of acres in that 
section were bought by Cyrus H. McCormick, in- 
ventor and manufacturer of harvesting machin- 
ery. It was his name that is now commemorated 
by the present Town and County of McCormick. 
The county seat stands on land formerly owned by 
him. 

The late J. M. Dorn was one of the leading men 
of affairs of Dornsville for many years, owning a 
store, operating a saw and grist mill and cotton 
gins, all these industries being run by water power. 

J. Jennings Dorn has many of the outstanding 
traits of his family, especially business sagacity 
and ability. He and his brother M. Gary Dorn 
comprise the firm of M. G. and J. J. Dorn. They 
nave a large lumber manufacturing plant on the 
hnc of the Charleston & Western Carolina Rail- 
road at McCormick, and supply great quantities 
of lumber, not only for the local demand but for 
distant shipment Besides the plant at McCormick 
they operate from twelve to fifteen additional saw 
mills at different points in South Carolina. They 
also own twelve cotton gins at McCormick and four 
cotton gins at Dornsville, and their aggregate oper- 
ations make them the largest individual ginners 
m the state. 

Both brothers are also extensively interested in 



farming. J. J. Dorn has a fine farm at Dornsville, 
a special feature of which is a fine herd of Here- 
ford cattle. J. J. Dorn is chairman of the Mc- 
Cormick County Commission for Permanent High- 
ways, and through this commission is exerting the 
full force of his influence for the building of good 
roads. He is a Knight Templar Mason and Shriner 
and was one of the organizers and is vice president 
of the Peoples Bank. He married Miss Nora Cuddy 
and has one daughter, Mabel Dorn. 

William C. Cobb. While for nearly fifteen years 
William C. Cobb has been the manager and super- 
intendent of the Ware Shoals Cotton Mills, he 
achieved that important responsibility and a place 
among the prominent cotton mill men of the state 
pnly as a result of many years of faithful and effi- 
cient toil, beginning in the very lowest ranks and 
coming up ste^ by step on the basis of merit and 
growing qualities of executive leadership. 

Mr. Cobb is a native of South Carolina and was 
born four miles south of Belton in Anderson County. 
November 4, 1862, son of G. W. and Laura (West) 
Cobb. When he was seven years of a^e the family 
removed to Banks Coimty, Georgia, where he lived 
on a farm, did work in the fields and attended coun- 
try schools in limited sessions. At the age of 
seventeen he' went to work as a track hand on the 
Northeast Railroad between Athens and Lula, Geor- 
gia. In a short time he was made foreman of the 
section and work train, and continued as such until 
he met an accidental injury and broke his leg. 
After being able to walk he attended a school near 
Pendleton under Mrs. Rebecca Douthit, and he 
credits her with most of the real education he has 
acquired, especially in mathematics and spelling. 

Since October, 1882, when he engaged as a weaver 
in the Piedmont mills, Mr. Cobb has been wholly 
absorbed in the cotton mill industry. On July 4, 
1883, he changed his job, goin^, as he says, "with 
the generous, big-hearted Captain Smyth as a com- 
mon weaver." October 14, 1884, he was promoted 
from weaver to the duties described as "striker," 
and October 14, 1886, two years later, was pro- 
moted to section hand, and after another two years 
was made second hand in the weave room. Jfune j), 
1890, he was promoted to overseer of weaving in 
Mills Nos. I, 2 and 3, comprising over 1,500 
looms. This responsibility he held for nearly 
six years. January 16, 1896, he was transferred to 
Mill No. 4 to start the operation of the first sheet- 
ing looms the Draper Company ever put on the 
market. March i, 1900, he became superintendent 
at Belton and conducted the mill there until Sep- 
tember 10, 1905, when he resigned, and on the i8th 
of September entered upon his duties as manager 
and superintendent of the Ware Shoals Mills. This 
is one of the model plants in upper South Carolina, 
and the mills, the mill village and the entire com- 
munity comprise one of the "high lights" in the 
industrial situation of the South. In the upbuild- 
ing of the mills and in the creation of the com- 
munity Mr. Cobb shared with Mr. J. F. MacEnroe % 
and others the credit for this really distinctive 
achievement. 

Mr. Cobb is widely known among cotton mill 
managers and is an exceedingly popular citizen in 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



his home community. He is a Knight Templar 
Mason and Shriner. On September i6, 1883, after 
he had been working in the cotton mills less than 
a year, he married Miss Hattie Davis. On June 11, 
1890, Mr. Cobb married for his present wife Miss 
Ella P. Walker, of Greenville County. Mr. Cobb 
is the father of nine children, the oldest, A. C. 
Cobb, being the son of his first wife, while the 
others are C. A., Lillian, Lila, Lora, Hazel, W. L., 
Mary and Frances. 

James C. Dozier. While by no means common, 
the name Dozier has been conspicuous in a number 
of communities, especially in the southern states, 
for many generations. There have been soldiers 
of the name in various American wars, including 
the war between the states. Of French origin, there 
was an interesting appropriateness in the service 
which James C. Dozier rendered his own country 
and the country of his remote ancestors during the 
World war. Both of Lieutenant Dozier's grand- 
fathers were Confederate soldiers and several of 
his uncles were killed in that war. James C. Dozier 
was born at Marion, South Carolina,, in 1886, son of 
John H. and Julia (Best) Dozier. His parents 
have lived for several years at Rock Hill. His 
mother is a daughter of Capt James Best of Marion. 

James C. Dozier entered Wofford College in the 
fall of 1915. At that time he was a member of the 
South Carolina National Guard. In 1916 he went 
with his company to the Mexican border. He was 
one of the many gallant sons of Wofford College 
whose names as soldiers in the World war make a 
long roll of honor to that institution. 

With the declaration of war against Germany 
young Dozier accompanied his comrades in Company 
H of the One Hundred and Eighteenth Infantry 
to training camp at Camp Jackson and later at 
Camp Sevier, and in the spring of 1918 went overseas 
to France, where he was transferred to Company 
G. By service and not through training school he 
rose from private through the grade of sergeant to 
second lieutenant and then to first lieutenant, and 
was ranking first lieutenant of his company when 
he reached the scene of action in France. The 
brilliant record of the One Hundred and Eighteenth 
Infantry, part of the Thirtieth Division, is a matter 
of common knowledge to South Carolinians. To 
no one man in that regiment did greater honors 
fall than to Lieutenant Dozier. The culmination of 
his brilliant performance of duty came early in 
October, 1918. At the request of newspaper corre- 
spondents Lieutenant Dozier has given some modest 
account of the action in which his name became 
memorable, but the service is best told in the formal 
language of official citation given him by order of 
General Pershing, as follows: 

"Dozier, James C, ist Lieutenant, Co. G, Ii8th 
Infantry. 

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above 
and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy 
near Montbrehain, France, 8 October, 1918. 

'Tn command of two platoons, Lieutenant Dozier 
was painfully wounded in the shoulder early in 
the attack, but he continued to lead his men, dis- 
playing the highest bravery and skill. When his 
command was held up by heavy machine-gun fire, 



he disposed his men in the best cover available and 
with a soldier continued forward to attack a ma- 
chine-gun nest Creeping up to the position in the 
face of intense fire, he killed the entire crew with 
hand grenades and his pistol and a little later cap- 
tured a number of Germans who had taken refuge 
in a dugout nearby." 

Besides this official citation Lieutenant Dozier has 
been the recipient of the highest military honors. 
One of these, coveted by every American soldier, 
is the Congressional medal of honor, which for 
years has been a badge of distinction. This Con- 
gressional medal of honor was bestowed by Gen- 
eral Pershing at a review of the Jhirtieth Division 
at Souligne January 21, 1919. Later Lieutenant 
Dozier was presented with the British military cross 
in Belgitun by Gen. Sir David Henderson of the 
British Expeditionary Forces. Lieutenant Dozier 
with his regiment arrived in America March 27, 1919. 
and he received his honorable discharge on the 20th 
of April. In the summer of 1919 he was awarded 
the French Croix de Guerre by Ambassador Jus- 
serand, making a trip to Washington for that pur- 
pose. Still later in the same year he received from 
the President of France the medal of the French 
Legion of Honor, the highest distinction conferred 
by the French Government for military valor, and 
has also been made a Chevalier of the Legion of 
Honor, an order founded by Napoleon the First 
The certificate for this honor reads as follows: 
"The Grand Chancellor of the National Legion of 
Honor hereby certifies that on May 5, 1919, the 
President of the Republic of France conferred upon 
James C. Dozier, Lieutenant, Company G, Ii8th In- 
fantry of the American Army, a decoration of the 
Chevalier of the Order of National Legion of 
Honor." 

Lieutenant Dozier took an active part in the 
campaign and drive for the Victory Loan in the 
spring of 1919. The motion picture made under 
the auspices of the Government and for use in pro- 
moting that loan was known as **The Price of 
Peace" and contained a film illustrating Lieutenant 
Dozier in the act of charging a nest of machine 
guns. 

Since returning to his home at Rock Hill Lieu- 
tenant Dozier has resumed business as an official of 
the City Wholesale Grocery Company. 

While his is one of the most brilliant and out- 
standing records among South Carolinians in the 
World war, he had three brothers who yielded noth- 
ing to him in patriotic devotion. His brother Sidney 
W. was sergeant in Company H of the One Hun- 
dred and Eighteenth Infantry, having volunteered 
a few da3rs after war was declared. Leroy Dozier 
joined the navy and crossed the ocean on duty 
several times. 

The youngest brother, John A. Dozier, was only 
sixteen years of age when the European war broke 
out in 1914. Soon afterward in his zeal to become 
a soldier he went to Canada and joined, the famous 
Princess Patricia Regiment. He was in that regi- 
ment at the battle of Vimjr Ridge, in which only 
eighty-three out of something over 900 men com- 
prising the regiment came out unhurt or not killed. 
He was wounded in that battle, and after leaving 
the hospital at London received an honorable dis- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



27 



charge from the Canadian army. Soon * afterward 
he returned to America and immediately enlisted in 
the United States Navy and was in service until the 
summer of 1919. 

Thomas J. Price. The lifetime interests of 
Thomas J. Price have been identified with that sec- 
tion of old Abbeville County now McCormick Coun- 
ty and particularly the town and business center 
and county seat of McCormick. While Mr. Price 
is best known as a merchant, he has always kept 
in close touch with agriculture both as a land 
owner and planter. He was one of the men chiefly 
responsible for the organization of the present 
County of McCormick. 

He was bom in 1867 at the Price homestead four 
miles from the present Town of McCormick, son of 
Abraham and Permelia (Beatty) Price. His par- 
ents represented two of the older families of Abbe» 
Yillc County. Thomas J. Price grew up on a farm, 
had a common school education, and on reaching 
his majority he bought a farm on the edge of the 
Town of McCormidc. Gradually his business af- 
fairs became more extensive than his individual 
farm. He was interested in the oil mill and live- 
stock industry, and about ten years ago engaged 
in the general merchandise business. His home has 
been in the Town of McCormick since 1901. He 
is now head of the T. J. Price Company, a com- 
plete organization for an adequate mercantile serv- 
ice, supplying all things required in the home and on 
the farm, dealing in grain, hay, cotton, farm imple- 
ments, dry goods, notions and shoes. 

The business is a credit to the county seat of one 
of the richest and most promising counties in the 
state. Mr. Price for several years labored unselfish- 
ly to create sentiment and influence the State Legis- 
lature to create the new County of McCormick. 
After it was established in 19 16 he consented at con- 
siderable sacrifice of his own interests to accept 
the office of county superintendent of schools, to 
which he was elected. His administration has been 
notable, though he makes little profession of being 
a practical school man or educator. He has taken 
sound business judgment and common sense to the 
administration of the local schools. He started 
with no school fund for the county, and yet dur- 
ing the past three years the county has paid its 
teachers, has built new schools, has carried on the 
system of education without borrowing a dollar, 
and now has over $7,000 in the treasury. The state 
superintendent of education calls this the best rec- 
ord made by any county in the state. 

Mr. Price married Sallie E. Ednfiund, of Abbe- 
ville County. They have a family of four daugh- 
ters and two sons: Mrs. Ruth Duncan, Mrs. Ethel 
Davis, Mrs. Linnie Hurd and Miss Kate Price, 
Thomas Ansel and Metz Price. 

J. Capers Gambrell. Probably the most com- 
plete, thoroughly organized business community in 
South Carolina is the Village of Ware Shoals, the 
central features of which are the great cotton mills 
of the Ware Shoals Manufacturing Company. 
While operated incidentally and subsidiary to this 
primary industry, the other departments of the com- 
pany's enterprise make an imposing aggregate of 
business in themselves. This group of mercantile. 



public utility and other industries has as its active 
manager J. Capers Gambrell, who has occupied his 
present post of duty and responsibility for the past 
thirteen years. 

Mr. Gambrell was born at Princeton, Laurens 
Coimty, in 1874, a son of E. B. and Nancy Caroline 
(Riley) Gambrell. He was educated in the public 
schools of Princeton, Wofford College at Spartan- 
burg, and had an early business training and ex- 
perience at Greenwood. June 4, 1906, he came to 
the Ware Shoals Manufacturing Company. He is 
the executive manager in charge of the Ware Shoals 
Bank, various mercantile interests including the ice 
factory, cotton gin, grist mill, laundry, the dairy 
farm, and, in general, all the business and indus- 
trial interests with the exception of the cotton mills 
themselves. It is conceded that Ware Shoals is 
the finest mill town in the United States, where 
more things are done for the comfort, happiness 
anjd prosperity of the citizens than in any similar 
community an3rwhere. 

Mr. Gambrell takes a particular interest and en- 
thusiasm in the magnificent herd of pure-bred 
Guernsey dairy cattle, one of the company enter- 
prises and as a result of which the village popu- 
lation has a source of milk supply of unexcelled 
quality and purity. With good milk, public water 
supply, ice, free public schools and the many other 
institutions and improvements that have been in- 
stituted and carried out by the companv it is easy 
to understand how the people of Ware Shoals might 
well be envied for their comfort and prosperity by 
many larger communities of the country. 

Mr. Gambrell is a Knight Templar Mason and 
Shriner. He married Miss Mary K. McCullough, 
of Greenville County. She is a niece of the late 
Col. J. H. McCullough, who was one of the big 
men of his time in Greenville County, a planter, stock 
man, merchant and owner of many noted race horses. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gambrell have five children, James 
B., Mary, Elizabeth, William and J. Capers Mc- 
Cullough. James B. Gambrell is a graduate of The 
Citadel at Charleston, and during the war with 
Germany volunteered in the Marine Corps, served 
eight months, and rose to the rank of first lieutenant. 

John Randolph Cheatham. Since early man- 
hood John Randolph Cheatham has given his un- 
divided time and abilities to banking. He helped or- 
ganized the People's Bank of McCormick, one of 
the younger and rapidly growing financial insti- 
tutions in that section of the state. 

Mr. Cheatham was born in Edgefield County, 
member of the South Carolina family of Cheat- 
hams which furnish more than one name of promi- 
nence and distinction in the South. His grand- 
father, John T. Cheatham, served in the Confederate 
army and was especially influential during the car- 
pet bag regime. His wife was an Adams, mem- 
ber of the prominent family of that name in Edge- 
field. John Randolph Cheatham is a son of John 
Randolph and Mary (Harvley) Cheatham. 

Mr. Cheatham grew up on his father's farm at 
the Cheatham home place ten miles east of Mc- 
Cormick. He acquired a good common school 
education and from school went to work to learn 
the banking business. For seven years he was 
connected with the Bank of Troy, and in Septem- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



ber, 1917, while the People's Bank of McCormick 
was in process of organization, he assisted through 
his experience and technical knowledge of bank- 
ing, and was elected cashier of the new bank. He 
has been instrumental in building up this strong 
and successful bank. The People's Bank started 
with a capital of $25,000 and its present capital is 
$50,t)oo. The bank owns its own building, a fine 
fiiree-story modern brick block, with facilities for 
offices as well as a modern home for the bank. The 
president of the bank is J. P. Abney of Greenwood. 
Mr. Cheatham married Miss Hermine Young- 
blood, daughter of Dr. D. W. »Youngblood 
and granddaughter of Captain Youngblood 
of Edgefield. Through her paternal grand- 
mother she is related to the Wigfall family of 
Edgefield. Mrs. Cheatham's mother was a dau^- 
ter of Reverend Herman, who was at one time 
pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Edge- 
neld. South Carolina, arid afterward went to North 
Carolina, where he died. Mr. and Mrs. Cheatham 
have two children: Herman R. and Mary Wigfall. 

Stewart Wylie Pryor, M. D. When death 
stopped his generous heart and stayed his skillful 
hand on December 27, 1918, at the age of fifty-four. 
Doctor Pryor had achieved an enviable place among 
America's most gifted surgeons. While members of 
his profession in many states marked with a sense 
of loss his passing, his character appealed to the 
affection and memory of all classes in his home 
community of Chester, where he had done his best 
work and given the best of himself to the highest 
ideals of service through a period of thirty years. 
He was one of the most notable South Carolmians 
who fell victims to the dread plague of influenza 
in the winter of 1918. 

He was bom in Spartanburg Cotmty. January 29, 
1864, a son of Stewart Love and Catherine (Haynes) 
Pryor. His people were pioneers in the states of 
Virginia and North Carolina, and through his 
mother he was of Revolutionary stock. His father 
was a skillful machinist and millwright. 

Doctor Pryor spent part of his early life on a 
homestead in what is now Cherokee County. He 
had the discipline of regular work, but had only 
such educational opportunities as were afforded by 
the home schools. In 1881 he be^an clerking in a 
store at Gaffney, left that position to attend a 
business college at Baltimore, and during 1883-85 
was employed as a bookkeeper at Gaffney. At the 
same time he was trying to realize his boyhood 
ambition to become a physician, and after saving 
some money he resigned to enter the Atlanta 
Medical College, where he was graduated with 
high honor in 1887. He then practiced for a brief 
time at Cherokee Spring, then for a few months at 
Lowrjrville, and from there came to Chester. Doctor 
Pryor was a constant student in his profession, 
specializing in surgery, and took fifteen courses in 
the New York Polyclinic and also attended the 
famous clinics of the Mayo Brothers in Minnesota. 
The skill which he early manifested as a surgeon 
attracted attention and a large practice from many 
remote localities, and in response to this patronage 
and to fill a long felt want he established his' first 
hospital, a part of his own residence at Chester. 



This was enlarged from time to time, and in 1904 
he built a structure specially designed for hospital 
purposes and named it, in honor of his wife, the 
Magdalene Hospital. The facilities of this institu- 
tion had to be increased from time to time, and it is 
said that for several years it handled more than 
1,000 cases in medicine and surgery during a year. 
The Magdalene Hospital was destroyed by fire 
March 20, 1916. After using temporary buildings 
for a time the splendid Pryor Hospital was com- 
pleted at a cost of about $100,000. Competent 
authorities pronounced it one of the best equipped 
hospitals in the South. Both these hospitals had 
their charity ward, and while Doctor Pryor seldom 
mentioned his charity work, it is known that this 
service alone was maintained at a cost of thousands 
of dollars. 

The work he did through so many years at Chester 
brought him a well deserved fame and appreciation 
throughout the state. He had served as president of 
the County Medical Society, as vice president of the 
South Carolina Medical Association, as member of 
the Tri-State Medical Association, the Southern 
Medical Association, the Southern Gynecological As- 
sociation, American Medical Association, American 
Association of Railway Surgeons, and was one of 
the first surgeons from South Carolina elected to 
membership and fellowship in the American Collie 
of Surgeons. Many papers were prepared by him 
for medical meetings and medical journals. 

Those familiar with the heavy demands upon his 
time often marveled how he could arrange to ^ve 
attention to many community, business and civic 
movements. He served as chairman of the Chester 
Board of Health, was a trustee of the public 
schools, iind was a director of the Chester Building 
& Loan Association, National Exchange Bank, Bald-, 
win Cotton Mills, steward of the Bethel Methodist 
Episcopal Church, chief surgeon of the Carolina 
and Northwestern Railway, chief surgeon of the 
Lancaster and Chester Railway, consulting surgeon 
of the Seaboard Air Line Railway, was a Knight 
Templar Mason and Shriner, and also owned and 
supervised the operation of about 2,500 acres of 
plantation. 

Naturally many sincere tributes were paid his life 
and character after his death. One of the best of 
them, adopted as the editorial opinion of the South 
Carolina Medical Journal, was an editorial that ap- 
peared in the Columbia State and read as follows: 
"Not many men in South Carolina have made for 
themselves in the last quarter a century so high a 
-place in public . regard as Dr. Stewart W. Pryor 
achieved in Chester, where as a physician and sur- 
geon he spent his manhood doing good on an ever 
enlarging scale. He was one of the pioneers of the 
extension of modern surgical practice in Upper 
South Carolina. It was not so long ago that most 
of the skilled surgeons in this state lived in Charles- 
ton — when there was not a hospital even in Colum- 
bia. In those days it was necessary for patients 
requiring hospital acconmiodation to be taken to 
Charleston or out of the state. Doctor Pryor built 
a hospital in Chester at a time when the estab- 
lishment of an institution of that kind in a small 
town called for a business courage not far removed 
from audacity. He saw the need of the people and 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



29 



resolved to fill it, disrep^arding the hazard of his 
means, and he devoted hunself to the great work of 
relieving pain and disease with his whole heart and 
mind. The people scarcely are aware af the great 
benefits that have been conferred upon them by the 
physicians and surgeons whose enterprising spirit has 
been not less than their fine skill and unselnsh zeal. 
Without hospitals modern surgery would not exist 
Now, nearly every town of 4,000 or 5,000 inhabitants 
has its hospital, smd that they have been multiplied 
so rapidly in recent years is due in a great measure 
to the vision and toil of men like the late Doctor 
Pryor, whose death is now mourned by the people 
of Chester and by thousands of others throughout 
the state and especially in the Piedmont district." 

Almost at the beginning of his profession as a 
physician and surgeon, on February 14, iSBS, Doctor 
Pryor married Carrie Magdalene Tinsley, daughter 
of Rufus W. and Sallie (Rogers) Tinsley of Union, 
South Carolina. It was a happy marriage, and the 
faithful companionship that followed proved one 
of the most important sources of the strength and 
enthusiasm which Doctor Pryor could take to his 
chosen work. He is survived by Mrs. Pryor and 
by a family of seven children. The only son is S. 
W. Pryor, Jr. The daughters are Mrs. Malcolm L. 
Marion. Mrs. R. H. McFaddcn, Mrs. E. O. Stein- 
bach, Mrs. Alex L. Oliphant, Miss Ruth and Miss 
Qara Dale Pryor. 

The doctor planned in his will that "Pryor Hos- 
pital" should operate under his name by the trustees 
in charge. It is to go to his son, S. W. Pryor, 
when he qualifies as a physician. 

Joseph Murray, who began practice at St. George, 
and is representative of an old and honored family 
in Dorchester and Berkeley counties, identified 
himself with the bar of the new county of Mc- 
Cormick in 1917 and is one of the leading lawyers 
of that section. 

He was bom at St. George in Dorchester County 
in 1887, a son of W. T. and Sallie (Judy) Murray 
and a ^p-andson of Dr. Joseph Murray, who be- 
sides being a ph)rsician of prominence at one time 
represented Berkeley County in the House and in 
the Senate. 

Joseph Murray was reared and educated in St 
Gcoree and graduated in 191 1 from the University 
of South Carolina. He represented Dorchester 
County m the State Legislature in 191 3- 14, and be- 
gan practice at St George in 191 1. He built up a 
substantial general practice there, and his reputa- 
tion followed him to McCormick when he came 
here in 1917. 

Mr. Murray married Miss Mary Griffin, of Co- 
Ittmbia, member of an old and prominent family 
of that city, daughter of James and Wilhelmina 
(Snyder) (Sriffin. Her grandfather, Ben Griffin, at 
one tmie owned much of the land on which the 
City of Columbia is now built. Her father, James 
(iriffin. was for many years a prominent merchant 
at Columbia. Mr. and Mrs. Murray have two chil- 
dren, Joseph and James. Mr. Murray is a Metho- 
dist and is affiliated with the Masonic Order. 

Joseph B. Workman. M. D. Graduated with the 
class of 1907 from the Medical College of the State 
of South Carolina at Charleston, Doctor Workman 



located in the environment of Ware Shoals, Green- 
wood County, and for the past twelve years has 
practiced medicine and surgery there and rendered 
valuable professional services in one of the most 
ideal industrial communities of the state. Ware 
Shoals when he became a young physician there, 
was just at the outset of its development as a 
cotton mill town. Many industries and e;iterprises 
have been added as part of the complicated sys- 
tem now comprised under the Ware Shoals Manu- 
facturing Company. Doctor Workman has been 
adviser and a whole-souled worker in behalf of 
every movement affecting the welfare and progress 
of his community and is regarded with peculiar 
esteem by the residents of the town. 

He was born at Woodruff in Spartanburg Countv 
in 1882, son of Samuel J. and Hepsy (Bamett) 
Workman. The Workmans originally came from 
Dublin, Ireland, to Virginia, thence to South Caro- 
lina and the family have been identified with 
Laurens and Spartanburg counties for more than a 
century. Doctor Workman attended school at 
Woodruff, and was graduated A. B. from Furman 
University at Greenville in 1902. The following 
year he entered the South Carolina Medical Col- 
lege and remained until graduating. He is a mem- 
ber in good standing of the County, State and 
American Medical associations, and during the pe- 
riod of the war was chairman for Walnut Grove 
Township of the Greenwood County Council of 
Defense. 

Doctor Workman married "Miss Laura Vivian 
Murphy, of Charleston. They have a son, Joseph 
B.. Jr. 

William Hughes Nicholson is a talented lawyer, 
member of one of the firms doing an immense busi- 
ness in general practice and corporation law, and 
has been a live factor in the professional and pub- 
lic affairs of Greenwood for a number of years. 

He was born in old Edgefield County, Decem- 
ber II, 1879, a son of Benjamin E. and Elizabeth 
(Hughes) Nicholson. ' His father spent his active 
life as a farmer and at the time of his death was 
clerk of the court for Ed^field County. William 
H. Nicholson attended private schools, graduated 
from the University of South Carolina in 1902, and 
while teaching for two years also read law and 
was admitted to the bar m May, 1904. In the fall 
of the same year he moved to Greenwood, and the 
following winter while building up a practice he 
also taught school. He was in individual general 
practice until 191 1, when he became junior partner 
m the firm of Grier, Park & Nicholson, a firm 
handling an immense corporation practice. Mr. 
Nicholson was elected to the General Assembly in 
1908 and was re-elected in 1910 and 1912. Since 
191 2 he has been county chairman of the democratic 
party. His affairs have prospered under his ener- 
getic management. Besides his interests as a lawyer 
he has a farm of 1,000 acres of land. He is a lay 
leader in the Methodist Episcopal Church and super- 
intendent of the Sunday school. 

November 18, 1914, he married Elise Bates of 
Batesburg, South Carolina. They have had three 
children, Ellen Bates, deceased, William Hughes, 
Jr., and Benjamin Edwin Nicholson. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



WiNTHROP College, whose corporate title is the 
Winthrop Normal and Industrial College of South 
Carolina, has been a state institution for over a 
quarter of a century, having previously been main- 
tained largely as an adjunct of the city schools of 
Columbia for the purpose of training teachers. A 
brief history of the institution during its earlier 
years deserves a place here and the record for which 
can be drawn from the Memorial Address on the 
origin and early history of Winthrop College written 
by Dr. Edward S. Jojmes on the occurrence of the 
twenty-fifth anniversary of the opening of the Win- 
throp Training School. Doctor Joynes, one of the 
founders of the college, and its able friend and 
counsellor through all the years, had assisted in or- 
ganizing the Columbia city schools in 1883, and 
because of his early acquaintance and observation of 
David B. Johnson, whom he had known in his 
school work in Tennessee, recommended that Mr. 
Johnson be elected the first superintendent of the 
Columbia schools and, in the words of Doctor 
Joynes, "among the services it has been my privilege 
to render to South Carolina, the most valuable of all 
I consider the fact that I was directly instrumental 
in bringing David Bancroft Johnson into this state 
and tlius making possible all for which his name 
now stands." 

One of the greatest obstacles Superintendent John- 
son had in the Columbia schools was the lack of 
trained teachers. To supply this deficiency recourse 
was made to the Peabody Educational Fund, and 
mainly through the influence of Robert C. Win- 
throp a promise was secured of $1,500 a year, later 
increased to $2,000, this sum becoming the sole finan- 
cial foundation of the Winthrop Training School, 
and as a recognition of Mr. Winthrop's agency the 
school has since borne his ftame. The Columbia 
School Board accepted this fund from Mr. Winthrop 
in October, 1886, and proceeded to organize the 
Winthrop Training School, D. B. Johnson being the 
first superintendent. The school was first opened in 
an unused room of the Columbia Theological Semi- 
nary and the following year was moved to the 
"Park Building." The number of pupils continued 
to increase, the reputation of the school to grow, 
and in time its original function of supplying 
teachers for the city schools of Columbia acquired 
a wider scope. The first attempt to make it a nor- 
mal school for the state at large was contained in 
a recommendation by Governor Richardson in 1887. 
In that year the Legislature granted to the school 
one scholarship of $150 for each county in the state. 

In the meantime the late Benjamin R. Tillman had 
become an active advocate of a state school for 
agricultural and industrial education. The principal 
result of the "Tillman Movement" was of course the 
establishment of Qemson College, but in his first 
inaugural address after his election as governor, Mr. 
Tillman further recommended an industrial school 
for girls and gave cordial recognition of the work 
done in that field by the Winthrop Training School. 
In the meantime the Training School had outgrown 
its accommodations, and efforts were made to induce 
the state to take over the institution and insure its 
continued life and growth as a state normal institu- 
tion. Doctor Joynes had proposed the matter to 
Governor Tillman, and subsequently a commission 



was appointed, with D. B. Johnson as chairman, and 
in November, 1891, the Columbia School Board ten- 
dered the Winthrop Training School to the state 
with a request that the state provide for its govern- 
ment and maintenance. In his message of 1891 Gov- 
ernor Tillman recommended that an act be passed 
providing for a State Industrial and Normal College 
for Women, with the Winthrop Training School as 
its normal college. This recommendation was car- 
ried out in the legislative act of December 23, 1891, 
and two years later the present title of the Win- 
throp Normal and Industrial College of South Caro- 
lina was adopted. The college was continued at 
Columbia until September, 1895. In the meantime 
the board of trustees had secured a location at Rock 
Hill, and the cornerstone of the new college was 
laid May 12, 1894. 

David Bancroft Johnson, who on February 19, 
1895, was unanimously elected president of the new 
state college, is one of the most distinguished and 
influential educators in the South. He was born at 
LaGrange, Tennessee, January 10, 1856, a son of 
David Bancroft and Margaret E. Johnson. His 
father was president of a college at LaGrange, and 
the son grew up in a college atmosphere. He re- 
ceived his A. B. degree from the University of Ten- 
nessee in 1877 and his Master of Arts degree from 
the same university in 1880. South Carolina College 
bestowed upon him the degree LL. D. in 1^5. He 
was assistant professor of mathematics in the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee in 1879-80; principal of the 
graded schools of Abbeville, South Carolina, in 
1880-82. In the words of Doctor Joynes from the 
Memorial Address above noted, "during my resi- 
dence at Knoxville I had become acquainted with 
a youn^ man who had recently been graduated in 
the University of Tennessee, and had been serving 
as a teacher in the Knoxville city schools. Later he 
had been assistant professor in the University in 
which I was a professor; then he had served in 
Abbeville as organizer and principal of the schools 
in that town, and was now superintendent of schools 
in New Bern, North Carolina. I had watched his 
career with, interest, and was satisfied that he pos- 
sessed the experience and qualification which we 
needed in Columbia. So, upon ttiy nomination, he 
was elected first superintendent of the Columbia 
Schools." Thus for thirty-five years his name and 
his work have been written largely in the history of 
the Columbia City Schools and Winthrop College. 

However, Doctor Johnson's great vigor and en- 
thusiasm in behaH of educational ideals have made 
him a leader hi many movements not directly in the 
routine of his duties at Rock Hill. He established 
and served as president from 1885 to 1894 of the 
Columbia Y. M. C A., and during 1886-95 was chair- 
man of the State Executive Committee of that body. 
He also organized the South Carolina Association 
of School Superintendents and the Rural School 
Improvement Association in 1902. During 1910-11 
he was a member of the South Carolina State Com- 
mission to revise the school laws. He served as 
president of the State Teachejs' Association from 
T884 to 1888 and was vice president of the National 
Teachers' Association in 1894 and again in 1896-97- 
In 1909 he was president of the Department of Rural 
and Agricultural Education of the National Elduca- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



31 



tion Association, was president of the Normal School 
Departinent in 191 1 and a member of the National 
Commission on Normal School Statistics in 191 1 of 
the National Education Association. He was presi- 
dent of tlie Normal Department in 1908 and the De- 
partment of Elementary Education in 1909 and of 
the Southern Education Association, and was presi- 
dent of the latter association in 1910. One of the 
highest honors that can be conferred upon a school 
man is the presidency of the American Education 
Association, an honor which Doctor Johnson enjoyed 
in 191 5-16. 

During the period of the World war Doctor John- 
son was unceasing in behalf of many patriotic duties. 
He was district diairman of the United War Work 
Campaign in South Carolina, was district chairman 
of the Jewish Relief Campaign, and helped organize 
and direct practically all the various patriotic drives 
in Rock Hill and York County. He is now state 
chairman for the Young Men's Christian Association 
in South Carolina and besides founding the Young 
Men's Christian Association at Columbia founded 
a similar institution at Rock Hill. Doctor Jfohnson 
is a member of the National Civic Association, the 
National Peace League and the South Carolina 
Historical Society. 

August 6, 1902, he married Mai R. Smith, of 
Charleston. They have two sons, David Bancroft 
and Burgh Smith Johnson. 

WnxiAM PiNCKNEY Greene, a prominent lawyer 
and citizen of Abbeville, has been a member of the 
South Carolina bar for nearly a quarter of a cent- 
tnry, and has enjoyed the high honors of his pro- 
fession and also of business and citizenship. 

He was bom in Abbeville County, November 24, 
i^3» a son of James H. and Elvira T. (Bowie) 
Greene. His father was an Abbeville farmer. The 
son attended the common schools, also the Prepara- 
tory School at Due West, and in 1889 entered Er- 
sldne College, where he graduated in 1893, at the 
head of his class. While teaching for several years 
he read law in the office of Ernest Moore at Lan- 
caster, and was admitted to practice in December, 
18^ The following year he practiced at Green- 
wood as a partner of the late W. C. McGowan, 
after whose death in 1897 he removed to Abbeville, 
where he formed a partnership with William 
Henry Parker. For over twenty years Mr. Greene has 
shared in the most important business of the local 
conrts and has tried many important cases in the 
state courts. He served several times as special 
judge. He is vice president of the Abbeville Cot- 
ton Mills, and owns the Abbeville Press and Ban- 
ner. He is a member of the Abbeville School 
Board and a trustee of Erskine College and of the 
Woman's College at Due West. 

March 27, 1907, he married Miss Mary Hemphill. 
They have two children, Mary Hemphill and Wil- 
liam Pinckney, Jr. Mr. Greene is a deacon in the 
Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church and is a 
member of the South Carolina Bar Association.. 

John McKee Nickles,. the well known Abbeville 
lawyer and former state senator, has had a promi- 
nent part in the public life of his home city and 
state, and has reason to be especially well satis- 



fied with the part he has played in the modern edu- 
cational program of South Carolina. 

He was born at Due West, South Carolina, Au- 
gust 20, 1876, son of George Newton and Jane 
(McKee) Nickles. His father was a well to do 
and successful farmer of Abbeville County and 
served twelve years as county supervisor of 
Abbeville County. The son was educated in the 
public schools and received his A. B. degree from 
Erskine College. His later interest in education 
is no doubt derived in part from his own experience 
as a teacher, an occupation he followed four years. 
In the meantime he was reading law under James 
P. Carey, and was admitted to the bar in Decem- 
ber, 1904. Since then he has been engaged in a 
busy general practice at Abbeville, and for seven 
years served as referee in bankruptcy. 

Mr. Nickles was a member of the State Senate 
during 1915-16-17-18, and then declined to become 
a candidate for re-election. While in the Senate 
he devoted much of his time and effort to educa- 
tional measures. He was one of the authors of 
the present high school law of South Carolina, and 
was largely instrumental in the passage and is the 
author of the Dr. John De La Howe Industrial 
School Bill. After flie passage of that bill he was 
appointed chairman of the Board of Trustees of 
the Dr. John De La Howe Industrial School and 
has interested himself in alt its work and develop- 
ment 

About the time the war closed Mr. Nickles, though 
forty-two years of age, entered the officers training 
school at Camp Gordon, Atlanta. He is a member 
of the Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of the World 
and Jtmior Order of United American Mechanics 
and is a deacon in the Presbyterian Church at Abbe- 
ville. Besides his law practice he has some farm- 
ing interests. j 

John Moore Mars, whose abilities have com- 
mended him favorably to the people of the state 
at large through his able services in the Legisla- 
ture, both in the House and Senate, is a success- 
ful lawyer at Abbeville, where he has been in prac- 
tice for the last twelve years. 

Mr. Mars was born at Cokesbury, South Caro- 
lina, August 17, 1884, a son of Walter and Lucy 
J. (Moore) Mars. His father was a farmer and 
merchant. The son was liberally educated, attend- 
ing the public schools and the conference schools, 
was a student in Clemson College and afterward 
attended Erskine College in Abbeville County. In 
December, 1907, he was admitted to the bar and 
has since carried the burdens of an increasing gen- 
eral practice at Abbeville. Mr. Mars served as 
a member of the Lower House of the Legislature 
in 1909-10 and sat in the Senate during 1911-12-13- 
14. His most recent public honor came when he 
was elected mayor of Abbeville in March, 1918. 
He is a strenuous advocate of every measure that 
will bring the greatest degree of benefit to the 
community, county and state. 

Mr. Mars is affiliated with the Masonic Order, the 
Knights of P)rthias, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Junior Order of United American Me- 
chanics and the Woodmen of the World. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 



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32 



HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



October 19, igi6» he married Imogen Wilkes, of 
Laurens. South Carolina. 

Charles E. Coicmandes, banker and business man 
of Florence, is possessed and actuated by an essen- 
tially constructive spirit and has found the means of 
influencing and promoting a number of important 
activities in his home city and district He pre- 
pared for the law and practiced several years, but 
was not satisfied with the circumscribed ranp^e of 
a professional man and has devoted most of his life 
to working out problems of practical business. 

Mr. Commander was bom in Darlington County, 
South Carolina, in 1882, and was brought as a child 
by his parents to Florence Coimty. He is a son of 
R. C. and Sarah (McCurry) Commander. His 
mother is now deceased. The grandfather, Joseph 
Commander, was an extensive land owner and 
planter in Darlington County in ante-bellum days. 
He gave generously of his means and influence to 
the promotion of various projects in his home dis- 
trict, providing out of his own funds iFor the building 
of the old Mount Hope Church on the Black River. 
R. C. Commander for a number of years has been 
a planter in Florence County. 

Charles E. Commander grew up at Florence, at- 
tended the public schools, and spent five years in the 
University of South Carolina, three years in the aca- 
demic course and two years in the law school, 
where he graduated in 1904. For about a year fol- 
lowing his graduation he was field and financial 
agent for the Alumni Association of the University. 
For another year he practiced law in Columbia 
associated with the law firm of Bellinger & Town- 
send. Returning to Florence in 1906, Mr. Com- 
mander entered the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness. Within a few years his business was tlie 
largest of its kind in this part of the state. Since 
1916 Mr. Commander has been owner of the Flor- 
ence Motor Sales Company, which he established 
in Florence and which maintains two departments 
in that city, one an accessory store and the other a 
general salesroom and repair plant. The business is 
both wholesale and retail in automobiles and acces- 
sories. Mr. Commander has a great enthusiasm for 
the present and future of the automobile industry, 
and is the first vice president of the South Carolina 
Automotive Trades Association. 

Banking circles know him as active president of 
the City Savings Bank of Florence, which he or- 
ganized in 1913, and which has a capital and surplus 
profits of over $35,000 and deposits closely aggregat- 
ing $500,000, reflecting the wonderful prosperity of 
the city and adjacent district. Through the owner- 
ship and operation of a large body of land Mr. Com- 
mander also belongs among the farmer element of 
Florence County. 

He is a charter member of the Florence Rotary 
Gub, which was organized in February, 1920, and 
is its first vice president. He is afliliated with the 
Presb)rterian Church. He married Miss Adelaide 
Boyd, of Spartanburg, and their three children are 
Charles E., Jr., Liela Spands and Adelaide. 

John Pope Abney is one of the prominent Green- 
wood bankers, cotton mill ofiicials and to a re- 
markable degree has been able to utilize and com- 



bine the opportunities of a comparatively brief ca- 
reer to achieve prominence in business affairs. 

He was bom in Saluda County, January 5, 1885, 
a son of J. R. and Nannie (Clark) Abney. He 
spent his bc^hood days on his father's farm, but 
acquired a liberal education, supplementing his ad- 
vantages in the local schools with attendance at 
Wofford College, where he spent three years, leav- 
ing in 1903. His banking experience has been 
practically continuous since he left college. 

For two years he was a messenger boy for the 
Bank of Greenwood. In 1905 he joined the Farm- 
ers and Merchants Bank, and served it successively 
as bookkeeper, assistant cashier, cashier and presi- 
dent He resigned the presidency in 1916 to become 
cashier of the Bank of Greenwood. 

Mr. Abney is president of the Grendel and Ninety- 
Six cotton millsj is president of the People's Bank 
at McCormick, is vice president of the Greenwood 
Cotton Mills, and a director in the Farmers and 
Merchants Bank of Greenwood and the Cambridge 
Bank at Ninety-Six. His financial interests also 
extend to various wholesale companies and busi- 
ness organizations of this section of the state. 

Mr. Abney married Miss Susie Mathews, of 
Greenwood County, on June 24, 1913. They have 
one daughter, Salfie Marian. 

James Braddock Park has practiced law success- 
fully at Greenwood since 1897. He is second mem- 
ber in the well known firm of corporation lawjrers, 
Grier, Park & Nicholson. 

. He was born in Laurence, South Carolina, No- 
vember 28, 1873, a son of James F. and Jane (Brad- 
dock) Park. His father was a farmer. The son 
grew up in the country and acquired most of his 
primarv education in a subscription school. He 
studied law in the University of Virginia and was * 
admitted to the bar in 1894. He practiced one 
year in his native town of Laurence, but in 1896 
came to Greenwood, and soon afterward became 
associated in practice with Mr. Grier. He served 
four years as mayor of Greenwood, and was m 
member of the commission for paving the city 
streets. He is a deacon of the Presbyterian Church, 
is a Knight Templar Mason and Shriner, and also 
a Knight of Pythias and Woodman of the World. 

In February, 1906, Mr. Park married Lillias 
Klugh, of Greenwood County. They have four chfl- 
dren: Joe Fowler, Martha Braddock, Julia Glass 
and Lillias Klugh. 

Harry Legare Watson was trained for the law 
but inclination, success and other circumstances 
have combined to keep him steadily in the profes- 
sion of newspaper man. He is editor of one of 
the best daily newspapers in South Carolina, The 
Index-Journal at Greenwood. In the course of time 
many other interests, both business and civic, have 
been allotted to him and form the associations by 
which he is so well known in his section of the 
state. 

Mr. Watson, the only child of Johnson Sale and 
Charlotte Louise Watsbn, was born July 11, 1876. 
at Phoenix. Greenwood County. He attended school 
in h'*s native locality, and was prepared for col- 
lege by W. H. Stallworth, Sr., a well known teach- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



33 



er of that community. For two years he attended 
Furman University m Greenville and was gradu- 
ated with the A. B. degree from the University of 
North Carolina in 1899. 

Mr. Watson was admitted to the bar m 1908. 
He practiced law one year with Maj. H. C. Till- 
man, and then retired to give his full time to news- 
paper work He is president of The Index- Journal 
Company and editor of The Index-Journal. He is 
president of the National Loan and Exchange ^Bauk, 
a director of the Southeastern Life Insurance Com- 
pany, a director of the Oregon Hotel Company, 
director of the Chee-Ha Land Company^ a direc- 
tor of the Citizens Trust Company, director of 
Greenwood Chamber of Commerce and a mem- 
ber of Greenwood County Highway Commission. 
During 19 12- 13 he was president of the South Caro- 
lina Press Association. 

Mr. Watson is chairman of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the Greenwood city public schools^ and 
a trustee of the Greenwood Carnegie Public Library 
and a trustee of Furman University and in 1916 
was president of the Furman Alumni Association. 
In 1912 he was a delegate to the Baltimore Na- 
tional Democratic Convention which nominated 
Woodrow Wilson for President. Mr. Watson is a 
member and deacon of the South Main Street Bap- 
tist Church at Greenwood, is a Knight Templar 
Mason and member of Omar Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine, a member of the Greenwood Rotary Club 
and also belongs to the Kappa Alpha college fra- 
ternity. 

June 27, 1900, he married Miss Ella Darean, of 
Phoenix, daughter of the late Rev. John H. and 
Elizabeth (Townes) Dargan. To their marriage 
were bom five children: Louise Montague, John 
Dargan, Elizabeth Sloan, Margaret Josephine and 
Ella Virginia Watson. 

Frank J^arron Grier has been a lawyer and an 
aaive member of the Greenwood bar since 1897. 
He is also president and general counsel for the 
Charleston & Western Carolina Railroad. 

Mr. Grier was bom at York, South Carolina, 
December 10, i860, a son of William Lowndes and 
Mary (Barron) Grier. His father was a Confed- 
erate soldier and captain of his company from 
Mccklenberg County, North Carolina, ahd after the 
war followed the profession of teaching. The son 
had a public school education and in 1890 gradu- 
ated from The Citadel at Charleston. For three 
years he taught in the graded schools at Chester 
and in the meantime studied law and was admitted 
to die bar in May, 1893. For three years Mr. Grier 
practiced at Kingstree, and since 1897 has enjoyed 
a large general practice with home and offices 
at Greenwood. 

He is a Mason and Shrin^r. In October, 1898, 
he married Miss Retta McWillic Withers, of Cam- 
den, South Carolina. They have four children, 
named Mary Barron, Nancy Shannon, Randolph 
Widiers and Frank Barron. 

Eugene Satterwhite Blease, a former member 

of the state senate, has been a prominent lawyer 

at Newberry for the past twenty years, and by 

coQtintious and steadfast devotion to the best ideals 

Td. v— 8 



of his profession has won a high place in the South 
Carolina bar. 

He was bom at Newberry, January 20, 1877, a 
son of Henry H. and Elizabeth (Satterwhite) 
Blease. His father was both a farmer and mer- 
chant. The son was educated in public schools, 
the Newberry Academy, and graduated from New- 
berry College in 1895. On leaving college he had 
made up his mind to become a lawyer. For two 
years, 1896-97, he taught school, studying law, and 
in 1899 was admitted to the bat*. He has since had 
a large general practice with offices both at Saluda 
and Newberry. He was elected and served as a 
member of the Lower House of the Legislature in 
1901-02, and his service in the State Senate was ren- 
dered during 1905-06, but he resigned before the 
close of his term. He also served as city attorney 
of Newberry four years, resigning that office. He 
was elected mayor of Newberry in December, 1919, 
which office he now holds. Mr. Blease married 
Urbana Neel, of Newberry County. 

Zaccheus Franklin Wright has been a promi- 
nent factor in banking, industry and commercial 
aflFairs of Newberry for thirty years. 

He was born at Newberry, March 21, 1869, son 
of Robert H. and Mary Frances (Bowers) Wright 
His mother was a daughter of Jacob Bowers of 
Newberry. His father was a merchant. Zaccheus 
Wright grew up in the home of well-to-do par- 
ents, was given good educational opportunities, and 
also owes much to the training and influence of his 
mother. He graduated from Newberry College at 
the age of nineteen with the class of 1888. The 
fall of the same year found him established in 
business as a book and stationery merchant in his 
native town, and successive years found him bur- 
dened with many additional cares and responsibili- 
ties in commercial affairs. In i8p7 he became cash- 
ier of the Commercial Bank of Newberry, an office 
he filled for many years. He has been a factor in 
developing the cotton industry in and around New- 
berry and in 1905 became president of the Newberry 
Cotton Mill. He was elected president of the New- 
berry Chamber of Commerce in 1906. 

Mr. Wright is a democrat and was reared and for 
many years has been an active member of the Metho- 
dist Church. 

Thomas Hubert Tatum. Steadily through a pe- 
riod of fifteen years Thomas Hubert Tatum has 
been rising to distinction as a well grounded, able 
and hard working lawyer, and in that time has ren- 
dered many services to link his name closely with 
the welfare and progress of his home city of Bishbp- 
ville. 

Mr. Tatum was bom in Orangeburg. South Caro- 
lina, August I, 1878, a son of John Samuel* Capers 
and Martha Washington*. (Smith) Tatum. His 
father was a planter. The son had the advantages 
of local schools as a boy, also attended Clemson 
College, and studied law in private offices and in 
Georgetown University at Washington. He was 

?:raduated with the LL. B. degree in 1902, and the 
ollowing year began geners^ practice at Bishop- 
ville. He was elected and served as a member of 
the Legislature in 1907-08. He has been county 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



attorney for Lee County, has served Bishopville as 
city attorney, and is a former trustee of the local 
schools. Mr. Tatum is a director of the Home 
Building and Loan Association, is attorney for the 
People's Bank of Bishopville and the Bank of 
Bethune, and is local counsel for the Atlantic Coast 
Line Railway. 

He is a steward of the Methodist Church, has been 
for four years a lay leader for the South Carolina 
Conference, and is a member of the executive com- 
mittee of the Layman's Movement for that church. 
November 22, 1905, he married Bessie McClair 
Mann, daughter of Rev. Coke D. Mann, for many 
years a minister of the Methodist Church. They 
have one daughter, Eliza Milford. 

William August Hantske, who is manager of 
the Life Department for the Carolina Life Insur- 
ance Company at Columbia, is regarded by his asso- 
ciates as one of the most competent insurance men 
in the South today. Mr. Hantske knows the insur- 
ance business as the result of practically continuous 
experience and participation from the time he was 
twenty years of age to the present The volume 
of business he wrote in early years as an individual 
agent has brought him successive promotions, and 
for over ten years he has been an executive in the 
life insurance field. 

Mr. Hantske was born at Mount Washington, 
Baltimore County, Maryland, April 28, 1871, son of 
Morris A. and Emma Augusta Hantske, both now 
deceased. On both sides he comes ot an interesting 
ancestry. His father was a native of Austria and 
descended from a family that for generations were 
noted for their attainments in the science of botany 
and included some of the most noted botanists of 
that country. Mr. Hantske's mother was bom at 
Oldenburg, Germany, her father, Hugo Walther, 
being a noted nurseryman. Through her mother she 
was descended from the Bosse family, a name long 
prominent in the annals of the Lutheran Church, 
many of whose clergymen were of the Bosfee family. 
Mr. Hantske is a grand-nephew of the late Louis 
Bosse of Spartanburg, South Carolina, who was a 
Confederate soldier and afterward prominent in the 
reconstruction period. Morris A. Hantske and wife 
were married in Germany in 1865 and at once came 
to America, locating in Maryland, where for many 
years he was prominent as a florist, nurseryman and 
botanist at Baltimore. 

William A. Hantske acquired his education in the 
public schools and business colleges of Baltimore, and 
in 1891, at the age of twenty, made his first effort 
in the field of lite insurance. Later for about one 
year he was a stock salesman, but with that ex- 
ception has acknowledged no other dominant interest 
in business. His work in life insurance has been 
done in Maryland, Pennsylvania and South Carolina. 
From 1898 to 1902 he represented the Baltimore Life 
Insurance Company as manager in Pennsylvania. 
In 1903 he became an agent with the Metropolitan 
Life of New York, and in 1906 was promoted to 
assistant manager of that company and in 191 1 to 
manager. He remained with the Metropolitan until 
the early part of 1916, when he was called to his 
present duties by the Carolina Life Insurance Com- 
pany at Columbia as manager of the Life Depart- 



ment. He is also a member of the South Carolina 
Life Underwriters* Association. 

Like most successful insurance men, his influence 
has been earnestly directed to the promotion of the 
best ideals in civic, moral and educational affairs. 
He has never sought public office though as a demo- 
crat he has done what he could to promote clean, 
progressive politics. He is one of the prominent 
and well known Lutherans of South Carolina, and 
during the late war was state chairman for the 
Lutheran National Commission for the Welfare of 
Soldiers and Sailors. He is a member of St Paul's 
Lutheran Church at Columbia. Mr. Hantske is also 
affiliated with Richland Lodge No. 39, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, and is a past grand of the 
Odd Fellows and chairman of the Finance Committee 
of the Grand Lodge of South Carolina. He is a 
member of the Rid^ewood Country Qub. 

In 1894, at Baltmiore, he married Mary Cyline 
George, daughter of John and Catherine E. George. 
Her father for many years was a farmer in the 
Dulaney Valley section of Baltimore County. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hantske have one son, William George, 
who graduated from Newberry College with the 
class of 1917. 

CouN Bradley Ruffin, of Bishopville, a talented 
lawyer, is member of the prominent Ruffin family 
of North Carolina. 

He was born in Edgecombe County of that state, 
November 7, 1884, a son of Joseph Henry and Zil- 
phi Ann (Lane) Rirfftn. His father for many years 
was identified with the agricultural interests of 
North Carolina. The son attended local schools, 
high school, graduated from the literary department 
. of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
in 1909 and completed the law course in the same 
institution. For one year he taught in the high 
school at Wilmington, North Carolina. Mr. Ruffin 
was admitted to the bar of his native state in Au- 
gust, 191 1, and to that of South Carolina in De- 
cember, 1912. He came to Bishopville in the latter 
year and has enjoyed a rapidly growing general 
practice. He is present county attorney of Lee 
County, is a director and attorney for the Farmers 
Loan & Trust Company, during the war was food 
administrator for Lee County, is a member of the 
County Board of Education and an alderman of 
Bishopville. He is also secretary of the Lee County 
Democratic Club. 

November 26, 1913, he married Miss Mabel Foun- 
tain, of Tarboro, North Carolina, Their three chil- 
dren are Marion, Mabel and Zilphi A. Lane. 

Carroll Johnson Ram age, a lawyer who can look 
back upon the achievements of more than twenty 
years, has been a prominent factor in the business 
and civic as well as professional interests of Saluda. 

He was born in Edgefield County in what is now 
the eastern portion of Saluda County, in May, 1874. 
He attended the local schools and afterward New- 
berry College, where he distinguished himself as a 
student Dr. G. W. Holland was then president of 
the college and took much interest in him. He 
graduated and afterward received the Master of 
Arts degree from Newberry. At his graduation he 
won medals for English Essay and History. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



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Mr. Ramage was admitted to the bar in 1897, 
and since then has' practiced at Saluda and has 
been especially well known as a civil lawyer. He is 
author of two volumes of Digests of South Carolina 
Reports, vols. 61 to 100, and served two years 
as a special judge. He was also a member of the 
State Board of Education two years and was for- 
merly president and is now vice president of the 
Planters National Bank of Saluda. In Mav, 1904, 
he was happily married to Annie Bell Crouch. 

Rev. John McSween, who to distinguish him 
from his honored father, John McSween, the vet- 
eran banker and business man of Timmonsville, 
writes his name John McSween III, was born at 
Timmonsville, November 15, 1888. Concerning his 
father's career a special article is written on other 
paces. 

John McSween had a public school education, 
graduated Bachelor of Science from Davidson Col- 
lege in i9o8» and spent two years in his father's 
store at Timmonsville. In 1913 he was graduated 
Bachelor of Divinity from the Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Seminary at Columbia. For one year he 
did missionary work for his church in the moun- 
tains of North Carolina, and then took a pastorate 
I in the Presbyterian Church at Dillon. 

He was commissioned a chaplain with the Second 
South Carolina Infantry and went to the Mexicart 
border with that organization in 1916. He was 
mustered out in March, 19 17, and on the twenty- 
fifth of July of the same year again entered the serv- 
ice of the Government as chaplain at Camp Sevier. 
In May, 1918, he went overseas, and served as chap- 
lain of the One Hundred and Fifth Ammunition 
Train of the Fifty-fifth Artillery Brigade. He was 
discharged March 2:^^ 1919. 

Mr. McSween married Lina Washington Crews, 
of Durham, North Carolina, June 11, 1913. To their 
marriage were bom three children: Allen Crews, 
William Crews, and John IV, who died in 1918. 

Samuel J. Roy all. While his able work as a law- 
yer has made him well known in professional cir- 
cles at Florence during the past five years, Samuel 
J. Royall has also achieved fame as one of the 
officers in the .One Hundred and Eighteenth In- 
fantry Regiment, made up of South Carolinians, a 
unit in the American forces which won lasting 
fame on the western battlefront of France. 

Mr. Royall, who was selected as historian of the 
regiment by his regimental commander, and whose 
account of the One Hundred and Eighteenth has 
been published in book form, was bom at Florence 
in 1880, son of W. N. and Mella (Norris) Royall. 
The Royalls for many generations have been a 
prominent family in Virgmia and North Carolina. 
W. N. Royall became a prominent railway official 
for many years manager of the Atlantic Coast Line 
Railway with headquarters at Wilmington, North 
Carolina. 

Samuel J. Royall, a native of Florence, was reared 
and received his early education at Wilmington. 
He studied law at the University of South Carolina 
at Columbia, graduating in 1914. He began prac- 
tice at Florence, but nearly three years of the sub- 
sequent time has been taken up in military service 
for his country. He went to the Mexican border 



with the old Second South Carolina Regiment of 
the National Guard in July, 1916. He was on duty 
there until March, 1917. He then resumed his law 
practice, but after five months volunteered for the 
war with Germany and was commissioned lieu- 
tenant of Headquarters Company of the One Hun- 
dred and Eighteenth Infantry, which as is well 
known was a part of the Thirtieth Division. He 
was with this regiment in all its splendid fighting 
record in France, and returning to America re- 
ceived his honorable discharge April 27, 1919. 

Mr. Ro3rall is a member of the Kappa Sigma fra- 
ternity, is also a Mason and belongs to the Epis- 
copal Church. He married Miss Elizabeth Willcox, 
daughter of Dr. James Willcox of Darlington. 

Hon. James Emmit Beamguard. Present state 
senator from York County, James Emmit Beam- 
guard has for many years been one of the solid and 
substantial citizens of the wealthy and rapidly grow- 
ing Town of Clover, the leading business center 
in the upper part of York County. 

The Beamguards in South Carolina have always 
been farmers and planters, though their other quali- 
ties have frequently led them into public affairs. 
Senator Beamguard was bom April 9, 1869, in York 
County, at the family home 254 miles south of Clov- 
er. This old homestead was settled by his grand- 
father, who was born of Scotch parents and came 
from the north of Ireland, where the Beamguards 
had lived for some generations. They are, there- 
fore, of the Scotch-Irish stock. Senator Beam- 
guard is at son of Capt. J. W. and Mona (Steven- 
son) Beamguard. His father was born in the same 
locality of York County and served four years as a 
Confederate soldier, being captain of a company 
in the Eighteenth South Carolina Regiment. 

James E. Beamguard had a common school edu- 
cation, and since early manhood his business affairs 
have been centered at the ancestral Beamguard 
place south of Clover. Since 1916 he has also 
played an important role in the business affairs of 
Clover, being secretary, treasurer and manager of 
the Clover Cotton Oil Mill and Ginning Company, 
manufacturers of cotton seed products and ginners 
of cotton. 

His political experience and participation in pub- 
lic affairs is a record of many years. From 1894 
to 1900 he was clerk of the Senate Finance Com- 
mittee of the General Assembly, then represented 
his county in the House from 1900 to 1908, and since 
1912 has served continuously as senator from York 
County. He was re-elected in 1916 and was chair-^ 
man of the committee on privileges and elections 
and a member of the committee on rules, agriculture 
and finance. His name has been associated with 
much of the important legislation enacted in South 
Carolina during the last twenty years. 

Senator Beamguard is a deacon in the Presby- 
terian Church and teacher of the men's class of the 
Sunday school, while fraternally he is affiliated with 
the Masons, Woodmen of the World and Junior 
Order of United American Mechanics. He married 
Miss Mittie Dorsett, of York County, on April 2, 
1895. Their daughter, Miss Bleeker Beamguard^ 
graduated with the class of 1919 from Chicora 
College at Columbia. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Frederick William James Germany. In the 
wholesale district of Columbia stands a large three- 
story plant, office and cold storage plant, operated 
under the business title of Germany-Roy-Brown 
Company. The president of this company is Fred 
Germany, whose full Christian name has just been 
given. In a peculiar degree this institution repre- 
sents the life work and enterprise of Mr. Germany. 
As it is one of the organizations doing most to 
establish Columbia as one of the great wholesale 
centers of the South, there is also the highest degree 
of personal credit due the president of the company 
for building' up the business and making his indi- 
viduality and energy count as a powerful commer- 
cial stimulus to his native city. 

Mr. Germany was born at Columbia February 13, 
1872. His parents, William Jackson and Elizabeth 
E. (Taylor) Germany, are now deceased. Mr. Ger- 
many is their only surviving son, and he has three 
sisters. 

To the age of sixteen his life was spent at home 
and in attending the local schools. At that age 
he made himself a regular assistant to his father 
in the grocery business, and after four jrears of 
working experience he went north and entered the 
Eastman Business College at Poughkeepsie, New 
York, and completed his training for his chosen life- 
work. 

On returning to Columbia Mr. Germany engaged 
in office work, and for three years was bookkeeper 
with the wholesale firm of R. B. and D. McKay, 
one of the well k.iown and old established firms of 
the South. 

The letter-heads of the Germany-Roy-Brown Com- 
pany bear the words "Established 1894." That date 
commemorates the independent but exceedingly 
modest start of Mr. Germany as a retail grocer 
in Columbia. At that time he had the experience, 
the training, a sound knowledge of merchandising 
and business principles, had earned some credit, but 
had a very limited capital to embark. Moreover he 
entered business at a time of widespread financial 
depression. Against those disadvantages were ar- 
rayed his energy, ambition, skillful and studious 
management, and the result was that he was soon 
handling a capacity trade, and his business grew 
in volume every year. It is a matter of special in- 
terest to note that Mr. Germany still continues the 
retail grocery business in which he gained his first 
success and at its original location. 

His wholesale business was a direct outgrowth of 
his retail establishment. In 1914 he entered into 
partnership with Mr. J. E. Young, making the firm 
Young & Germany. Mr. Young died in December, 
1918. and in January, 1920, the old firm of Young 
& Germany gave way to the new corporation of 
Germany-Roy-Brown Company, with Mr. Germany 
as president, A. F. Brown, vice president, and Mr. 
T. L Roy, secretary and treasurer. Their business 
is groceries, fruit and produce, and in those lines 
the company has become securely established in the 
confidence and patronage of a large southern terri- 
tory. In order to expedite the handling of the grow- 
ing volume of business the company maintains branch 
houses at Florence and Spartanburg. They also 
have a thoroughly equipped and modern cold storage 
plant at Columbia. 



Twenty-five years after his first humble venture 
as a merchant in Columbia Mr. Germany found him- 
self financially independent, and esteemed as he 
really is one of the leading business men of the 
capital city. 

He has also found time to cultivate other interests. 
He is a director in the Carolina National Bank 
of Columbia and is the owner of two fine farms, 
one in Richland and the other in Lexington County, 
both convenient of access to Columbia. Through his 
ownership of these properties Mr. Germany is deeply 
interested in agricultural development, and gives his 
liberal support and encouragement to any movement 
tending toward improved farming, greater produc- 
tion, good roads, and improved rural conditions. 
Though taking an interest in clean politics and 
public questions, he has never been a contender 
for public office, and has believed that he could 
render the greatest service to the world by concen- 
trating his attention on his business. He is affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is 
a member of the Board of Deacons of the First 
Baptist Church at Columbia. 

In the spring of 1899 he married Miss Blanche 
Smith, of Greenville. She died in 1915. In the 
spring of 1917 he married Miss Effie Berry, of 
Wilmington, Delaware. Mrs. Germany is prominent 
in church, charities and other causes in which the 
leading women of Columbia participate. 

Capt. C. Albert Johnson, of Rock Hill, is a 
prominent business man of that city, member of 
the wholesale grocery house of Blankenship & John- 
son, and was a South Carolina officer in the late 
war, serving with the rank of captain in the Sixth 
Division. 

He was born at Rock Hill in 1888, a son of J. B. 
and Ida (Boyd) Johnson. His father for many 
years was a prominent merchant and capitalist of 
Rock Hill, and among present connections is presi- 
dent of the York County Cotton Association. 

Captain Johnson was liberally educated, attending 
the Citadel at Charleston two years and graduat- 
ing from Wofford College at Spartanburg in 1906. 
On leaving college he entered upon a business ca- 
reer at Rock Hill, and his personal part in the 
firm of Blankenship & Johnson has been a strong 
factor in making that one of the leading whole- 
sale grocery houses of the state. In August, 1919, 
the firm notably expanded its facilities by estab- 
lishing a branch house at Gastonia, North Carolina. 

In August, 191 7, Captain Johnson entered the 
Second Officers Training Camp at Fort Oglethorpe, 
received a commission as captain, and was assigned 
to duty with the Sixth Division. He was in camp 
at Anniston, Alabama, Chickamauga, Tennessee, 
and Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, until July, 
1918, when he went overseas His division saw its 
first active duty at the Vosges, and later partici- 
pated in some of the phases of the great Argonne- 
Meuse drive. He spent the winter of 19 18- 19 in 
France and on the German frontier and returned 
home and received his honorable discharge May 2, 
1919. 

Captain Johnson is a member of the Methodist 
Church, and is affiliated with the Masonic f rater- 



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37 



nity. He married Miss Carrie Anderson, and they 
have one daughter, Caroline. 

Frank Oscar Black during the ten years since 
he left college has been devoted to educational 
work, and his present position in his profession is as 
county superintendent of schools of Saluda. 

He was born in Saluda County, May lo, 1886, a 
son of John David and Marina (Satcher) Black. 
He grew up on his father's farm, had some of its 
duties while attending local schools, and acquired his 
higher education in the Ridge Spring High School 
and at Newl)erry College, where he graduated in 

iuric, 1909. He taught school at Prosperity and 
ittle Mountain, also at Bainbridge, Georgia, and 
was a high school principal four years. In Janu- 
ary, 1917, he was elected county superintendent of 
schools of Saluda County. Mr. Black is a member 
of the Lutheran Church, is a Royal Arch Mason and 
a Knight Templar and Shriner, and affiliated with 
the Woodmen of the World. 

June 28, 191 1» he married Miss Lillian Hill, of 
Newberry. They have three children, Francis, Lucy 
and Susan. 

William Henry Keith. While he inherits the 
traditions of a family long identified with the busi- 
ness affairs of Timmonsville, William Henrjr Keith 
has made his own career a means of increasing the 
prestige of that city as a commercial center, and 
has labored faithfully and successfully for a quar- 
ter of a century in building up one of the largest 
concerns of its kind in Florence County. 

He was born at Timmonsville, February 7, 1873, 
a son of Jesse E. and Kate (Sykes) Keith. His 
father was a merchant at Timmonsville for many 
years. The son had a public school education, and 
also attended The Citadel at Charleston. When a 
young man he went to work in the store of John 
McSwcen, his step-father, general merchant at Tim- 
monsville. That business was incorporated in 1899, 
at which time he became vice president. When 
Mr. McSween retired he was succeeded by Mr. 
Keith as president. Mr. Keith is also president of 
the McSween Mercantile Company at Lamar and 
is a director of the Bank of Timmonsville and the 
Merchants and Planters Bank at Lamar. He is 
also a director of the Timmonsville Oil Mill. 

While his time has been well taken up by his va- 
ried business interests, he has served acceptably in 
public responsibilities, being a former alderman and 
former mayor of Timmonsville. During the war 
he was chairman of the local exemption board of 
Florence County. Mr. Keith has been a deacon 
in the Presbyterian Church since it was organized 
in Timmonsville. April 14, 1897, he married Miss 
Cora Byrd, of Timmonsville. They have two chil- 
dren, Dorothy Sykes and Margaret Louise. 

Mason Davis Nesmith, who is a dental surgeon 
by profession, has in addition to his professional 
work performed many interesting public services 
and been active in business affairs in Lake City, 
where he has had his home since 1905. 

He was born in the old community of South Caro- 
lina named for his family, Nesmith, April 15, 1874, 
son of William Edward and Lydia J. (Joseph) 



Nesmith, substantial farming people of that vicinity. 
He was first educated in public schools, atttended 
Clemson College, and in 1905 graduated from the 
Atlanta Dental College at Atlanta, Georgia, and 
finished the pharmacy course in the same year. 
Since then he has been a resident of Lake City and 
active in his profession and in business. He is 
vice president of the Lake City Insurance Com- 
pany and a director of the Bank of Lake City. Soon 
after he identified himself with this community he 
was made chairman of the Committee of Public 
Works, and helped give Lake City its present splen- 
did water system. He also served as an alder- 
man three years, as trustee of the graded schools, 
and is now a member of the Board of Assessors 
for his district. Doctor Nesmith is a deacon of the 
Baptist Church. 

June 14, 1905, he married Virgie Elizabeth Brooks, 
of Georgia. Their five children are Catherine 
Lydia. Julia Brooks, Ethel Elizabeth, Daisy Florence 
and Mason Davis, Jr. 

Woodruff Holston Low man has been the first 
and only cashier of the Citizens Bank of Timmons- 
ville. He was identified with the organization of 
the bank in 1901. At that time its capital was 
$30,000 but in 1919 this was increased to $75,000. 
The bank also has surplus of $37,500, while its de- 
posits aggregate $300,000. 

Mr. Lowman was bom in Edgefield County, South 
Carolina, June 22, 1861. He acquired his early edu- 
cation in the public schools and his early business 
experience as clerk and bookkeeper at Batesburg. 
In 1885 he went to Arkansas and for a time was a 
bookkeeper at Lonoke. Later he engaged in the 
general merchandise business at Orangeburg in his 
native state, and was a general merchant at Tinri- 
monsville until he entered the Citizens Bank in 
1901. He is also a trustee of the graded schools 
and has all the best interests of the community at 
heart. He is a deacon of the Baptist Church. 

In March, 1885, he married Miss Sallie Meyer 
of Batesburg. To their marriage were born four 
children: Eugene Meyer; Ruby, wife of C. L. 
Smith; Woodruff H., Jr., who served as a first 
lieutenant in Company A of the Three Hundred and 
Tenth Infantry with the Seventy-Eight Division 
in the Expeditionary Forces; and Norwood, who is 
still a student. 

Joseph F. Haselden, M. D. For fifteen years 
Doctor Haselden has practiced his profession at 
Greeleyville, is the leading physician and surgeon 
of that community, and both through his profession 
and through his influence as a citizen has done 
much to promote the continued growth and improve- 
ment of what is one of the most prosperous com- 
mercial and home towns in Williamsburg County. 

Doctor Haselden was born near the present Town 
of Johnsonville in Williamsburg County in 1871, 
son of S. B. and Adele (Johnson) Haselden. The 
Haseldens are of English ancestry, and the John- 
son, family has long been prominent in Williams- 
burg County, the Town of Johnsonville being named 
in their honor. 

Doctor Haselden prepared for his profession by 
two years spent in the Medical College of South 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Carolina at Charleston, and in 1904 he graduated 
from the Baltimore Medical College at Baltimore. 
Immediately after graduation he chose the promis- 
ing community of Greeley ville as his home, and 
has found there all the opportunities that an ambi- 
tious medical man desires. 

Doctor Haselden married Miss Mamie Boyle. She 
is a niece of Mr. T. W. Boyle, whose noteworthy 
part in building up the Town of Grceleyville has 
been described elsewhere. Doctor and Mrs. Hasel- 
den have three children : Elizabeth, Boyle and Fleet- 
wood. 

Hon. John Hardin Marion. While the family 
represented by John Hardin Marion, a prominent 
lawyer and state senator of Chester, has been identi- 
fied with South Carolina only about a century, it is 
possible to assert on authentic genealogical evidence 
that several generations earlier the ancestors of this 
branch coincided with those of the celebrated Revo- 
lutionary leader and South Carolina general, Francis 
Marion. Francis Marion, the general, was a grand- 
son of Benjamin and Louise (d' Aubrey) Marion. 
They were French Huguenots, came from the north 
of Ireland and settled in South Carolina early in 
the eighteenth century, living near Georgetown. 

These French Huguenots had left France after the 
revocation of the Edict of Nantes and settled in the 
north of Ireland. Some of them remained there 
nearly a century after the emigration of the grand- 
parents of General Marion. Between 1815-20 Patrick 
Marion, who was born at Craigbilly, County Antrim, 
in 1772, came to America and located in the upper 
part of Fairfield District. He married Jane Mc- 
Neely. Their son John Alexander Marion became a 
planter in Chester County, and through a long life 
was prominently identified with affairs in that sec- 
tion. He married Margaret Jane Sterling. 

Their son James Taylor Marion, long a con- 
spicuous figure in the business life of Chester 
County, was father of John Hardin Marion. 

The late James Taylor Marion was born near 
Richburg in 1845, and at the age of sixteen enlisted 
in Company D of the Seventeenth South Carol iim 
Infantry. Later he was transferred to Company B 
of the Fourth Cavalry, Army of Northern Virgmia. 
At Cold Harbor May 30, 1864, he was captured and 
spent thirteen months in Elmira prison. Following 
the war he engaged in merchandising at Lewisville. 
He is remembered as a man of great energy and 
public spirit, and became widely known in business, 
social and church circles. He died in 191 1. He, as 
did also his father before him, served as a ruling 
elder in the Associate Reformed Presbyterian 
Church. 

James Taylor Marion married Jane A. Hardin, of 
a prominent Chester County family of English an- 
cestry. The Hardins have lived in Chester County 
since the Revolution, and among the prominent char- 
acters of the name one was the late Peter Lawrence 
Hardin, who died in 1914 and who for twenty years 
represented his county in the Lower House and in 
the State Senate. He was a brother of Jane A. 
Hardin. She was a daughter of Peter and Rebecca 
(King) Hardin and was born August 24, 1853, and 
died June 20, 1916. 

John Hardin Marion, who was born in Chester 



County October 23, 1874, has earned distinctions of 
his own in addition to those of his ancestry. He 
acquired his literary and legal education in the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina, graduating with the de- 
grees A. B. and LL. B. in 1893. At that time he was 
only nineteen years old, and it required a special 
act of the Legislature to admit him to the bar. Re- 
turning to Chester, he formed a partnership to prac- 
tice with Hon. William A. Barber, then attorney 
general of South Carolina. In later years he has 
been senior member of the firm Marion & Marion. 
Since 1902 Mr. Marion has been general counsel for 
the Carolina and Northwestern Railway. His prac- 
tice, always large and important, is about evenly 
divided between corporation and general cases. 

One of the eminent members of the Supreme 
Bench of South Carolina has paid Mr. Marion the 
following tribute: "He has been a student of the 
law all of his mature years. He has an ample 
library of law books. His preparation is tireless 
and thorough. He is much of an a4vocate before 
judge ajid jury. He has a good voice, pleasing 
countenance, is apt in anecdote and repartee. He is 
perhaps at his best before the jury; but before the 
court he is strong and helpful. His private library 
of select volumes is full and he diligently studies 
them. He adds to the accomplishments of a lawyer 
the attainments of the scholar. He is a m'an of 
quiet but determined courage. His word is as good 
as his bond, and he may be fully trusted in all of 
the relations of life." 

His active career has not been altogether law 
work. When the Spanish-American war broke out 
he >Yent in as second lieutenant of Company D, First 
Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, and afterward 
served in the National Guard, retiring with the rank 
of lieutenant colonel in 1907. During the World 
war he gave a generous part of his time to patriotic 
causes, having charge of the Speakers' Bureau for 
the second Red Cross campaign, was county chair- 
man of the United War Work campaign and made 
many speeches in behalf of all war measures and 
movements. 

Colonel Marion served as a member of the Lower 
House of the General Assembly from 185^ to 1900, 
and in 1918 was elected state senator from Chester 
County, serving in the session of 1919. He has 
always been greatly interested in education and for 
several years has been a member of the Board of 
School Trustees of Chester. He is a member of 
the Associate Reformed Presb)rterian Church, a 
teacher of its Bible Class at Chester, and is affiliated 
with the Masonic Order and the Knights of Pythias. 

By his marriage he is allied with several historic 
families. December 31, 1902, Miss Mary Pagan 
Davidson became his wife. She was bom at Chester, 
daughter of Col. William Lee and Annie Irvine 
(Pagan) Davidson. Col. William Lee Davidson was 
a son of Benjamin Wilson and Betsie (Latta) 
Davidson, of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. 
William Lee Davidson served with the rank of 
colonel in the Seventh North Carolina Infantry in 
the Confederate army, and gined distinction in 
that war. His grandfather, Maj. John Davidson, 
was one of the signers of the Meckl'enburg Declara- 
tion of Independence, and was a gallant soldier and 
officer in the Revolutionary war. Annie Irvine 



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39 



Pagan, mother of Mrs. Marion, was a daughter of 
Maj. James Pagan of Chester County, who held the 
rank of major in the Confederate army and for 
many years was a successful merchant at Chester. 
James Pagan married Anne Fayssoux, daughter of 
Peter Fayssoux, who was a son of Dr. Peter Fays- 
soux of Charleston, the Continental surgeon re- 
ferred to and quoted by McCready in "South Caro- 
lina in the Revolution." Peter Fayssoux, father of 
Anne, married Rebecca Irvine, whose father, Gen. 
William Irvine, was a member of Washington's staff 
and after the Revolution was distinguished by his 
work in military campaigns and in the civil affairs 
of Pennsylvania. 

WiiXLiAM Tillman McGowan. His associates 
and clients look upon Mr. McGowan as one of the 
accomplished younger lawyers, able, hard working, 
diligent and faithful to all the interests committed 
to his care. He enjovs a fine position in his pro- 
fession at Timmonsville. 

He was born in Hyde County, North Carolina, 
October 8, 1882, son of Henry Lawrence and Dell 
(Stotesbury) McGowaii. He spent his boyhood 
on his father's farm, attended private schools, took 
his A. B. degree from the University of North 
Carolina in 1907 and was awarded the degree Mas- 
ter of Science by the same institution in 1908. For 
four years he was a teacher and superintendent of 
schools at Lynchburg, South Carolina. Mr. Mc- 
Gowan graduated from the law department of the 
University of North Carolina in 191 1. He was ad- 
mitted to the South Carolina bar in 1913, and built 
up his early practice at Bishopville, where he re- 
mained until 19 1 5, having now a general practice 
at Timmonsville. 

February 20, 1917, he married Susie Hill, of Abbe- 
ville. They have one son, William Tillman, Jr., 
bom November 20, 1917. Mr. McGowan is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a 
thirty-second degree Mason and a member of Omar 
Temple. 

William C. Davis for many years has been promi- 
nent as a lawyer and banker at Manning, and is a 
member of an old family of Clarendon County. 
His father, James E. Davis, was for sixteen years 
clerk of the court at Manning. 

William C. Davis was born on his father's farm 
near Manning February 12, 1870, son of James E. 
and Anna M. Davis. He was liberally educated 
and was given a thorough military discipline while 
a student in The Citadel at Charleston, where he 
was graduated at the age of nineteen. He began 
the study of law with Joseph F. Rhame, after which 
he entered the University of Virginia, and in 1891 
was admitted to the Virginia bar. On returning 
home he formed a partnership with Joseph F. 
Rhame, his former preceptor. As a young lawyer 
he also took an active part in local military affairs, 
and was captain of the Manning Guards, which in 
May, 1898, was mustered into the United States 
volunteer service as Company D of the Second South 
Carolina. He was captain of his company, and 
served as judge advocate of the Seventh Army 
Corps while in Cuba. He spent three months in 
Cuba and was mustered out in April, 1899. Dur- 



ing the World war Captain Davis was chairman 
of the Council of Defense of Clarendon County, 
and took' a permanent part in all war activities. 

From 1894 to 1898 he was a member of the Legis- 
lature and was on the judiciary committee. He 
has been interested in various local business affairs, 
was formerly a director of the Manning Oil Mill, 
is a director of the Carolina Stock Farms Com- 
pany and is president of the First National Bank 
of Manning, which was reorganized in March, 1918, 
under a national charter. 

May 17, 1894, Captain Davis married Clara J. 
Huggins, daughter of Doctor Huggins of Manning. 

Raymond Clyde Rollins during the greater part 
of his active business career since leaving college 
has been identified with the Bank of Timmons- 
ville. This is one of the strong financial institu- 
tions of Florence County and has lent its resources 
effectively to the upbuilding of that community for 
many years. The bank is capitalized at $100,000, 
surplus of $15,000 and its deposits in 1919 aggregated 
$500,000. • 

Raymond Clyde Rollins was born at Timmons- 
ville, October 6, 1877, son of William DeLeslie and 
Addie Eugenia (Morris) Rollins. His father for 
many years was a railway telegraph operator. The 
son was educated in public schools and was a mem- 
ber of one of the early classes of Clemson Col- 
lege. On leaving college he entered the Bank of 
Timmonsville, acquired considerable knowledge of 
banking at that time, but afterward spent six years 
as bookkeeper with the John McSween Mercan- 
tile Company. In 1901 he returned to the bank as 
cashier, and has been steadily at his post promot- 
ing the interest of the bank and the welfare of its 
customers for nearly twenty years. In Januarv, 
1020, he was made active vice president of the bank. 
He is also secretary and treasurer and has held 
those offices since the organization of the Timmons- 
ville Building and Loan Association. Mr. Rollins 
is a former alderman, is a steward of the Metho- 
dist Ep'scopal Church, superintendent of its Sunday 
school, is past chancellor of the Knights of P3rthias, 
and past worshipful master of the Masonic Lodge. 

July 20, 1899, he married Addie Elizabeth Cokes, 
of Timmonsville. Their six children are Raymond 
Clyde, Jr., now a student in Wofford CollegCj^ Fran- 
ces Eugenia, ' who is attending Columbia College, 
George DeLeslie, Edwin Morris, Ellen Elizabeth and 
Herbert Cokes. 

Frederick Lesesne. The name Lesesne is of 
Huguenot origin, and the family of that name has 
been numerously represented in South Carolina for 
many generations. The Lesesnes were among the 
early settlers on the Santee River in St. Mark's 
Parish. 

Frederick Lesesne, a lawyer of Manning, was 
born in Clarendon County, April 18, 1875, son of 
Henry H. and Letitia (Wells) Lesesne. His father 
was a farmer, and at the beginning of the war 
between the states entered the Confederate army as 
first lieutenant of Company I, Twenty-Third South 
Carolina Regiment. He was later promoted to n\a- 
jor of the same regiment and was with Lee at 
Appomattox. Major Lesesne spent many years as 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



a farmer in Clarendon County and was elected 
county sheriff in 1878 and had held that. office for 
fourteen years, until his death in 1891. A Camp 
of Sons of Confederate Veterans was named in his 
honor. 

Frederick Lesesne was educated in the Manning 
Academy, also took a business college course, and 
from 1897 to 1915 was employed as a bookkeeper. 
In the latter year he began the study of law in 
the University of South Carolina and was admitted 
to the bar in 1917, since which date he has had a 

feneral practice at Manning. Mr. Lesesne is a 
Loyal Arch Mason and Shriner and is a trustee of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

JuuAN F. NoHRDEN. The late Julian F. Nohr- 
den, of Charleston, principal of the Mitchell 
School, was taken from life when in the period 
of his greatest usefulness, and yet it cannot be 
truthfully said that his work is ended, for the 
influence he exerted, the weight of the example 
of his upright and patriotic actions and the results 
of his conscientious and intellectual instructions, 
remain and bear witness to the value of the man 
and citizen. He was born at Charleston, August 
20, 1888, and died in his natal city of typhoid fever 
August 6, 1918. His parents were F. E. and Flor- 
ence (Harris) Nohrden. 

Julian F. Nohrden was a product of Charleston 
in every respect, and his death was a distinct loss 
to his community. Educated at The Citadel, he 
was orator of his class, and was graduated with 
honoifs in 1908, although he had won a scholarship 
in the Charleston College at the age of sixteen 
years, resigning it to accept appointment to The • 
Citadel. While he won distinction in educational 
matters, he was also prominent in athletics, and 
was a well known fi^re in both base ball and 
foot ball. After leavmg The Citadel Mr. Nohr- 
den associated himself with the News and Courier 
as a reporter, with the idea of following news- 
paper work while he studied law, but changed his 
mind and accepted the position of assistant prin- 
cipal of one of the public schools of Charleston, 
and in it found his life work. Later his talents 
were recognized by his promotion to be principal 
of the Mitchell School. Subsequently he was fur- 
ther honored by being appointed assistant super- 
intendent of the public schools of Charleston, dis- 
charging the onerous duties of both positions at 
the time of his death. Not only was Mr. Nohrden 
intellectually fitted to hold the positions to which 
he was appointed, he had in his heart that inherent 
love and understanding of children without which 
no educator can render the best service to his 
pupils. Inspiring them with a love and winning 
their confidence and respect, he was able to gain 
from them a willing and joyous compliance with 
his regulations which resulted in his school show- 
ing remarkable advances in scholarship. 

While he left newspaper work for the school- 
room. Mr. Nohrden never entirely lost his liking 
for literary work, and for several years edited the 
sporting page of the Charleston American. In 
addition to all of the multitudinous demands on 
his time and strength, when this country entered 



the World war, Mr. Nohrden found opportunity 
to render efficient service, and led by him the 
children of all the schools, especially those of 
the Mitchell School, participated in all of the 
various war activities taking particular interest 
in the Red Cross work. As a slight memorial to 
his memory and in recognition of his efforts in 
behalf of their children, the members of the 
Parent-Teachers Association of the Mitchell 
School awarded a scholarship to the Charleston 
College. 

On June 29, 191 1, Mr. Nohrden was married at 
Charleston to Oriole Walsh, a daughter of James 
and Mary Walsh, all of Charleston. Mrs. Nohrden 
was educated at Lucas Academy, from which she 
was graduated. They had two children, Maynard, 
who was born June i, 1912; and Francis Walsh, 
who was born December 14, 1917. 

The funeral services of Mr. Nohrden was held 
at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Rev. Harold 
Thomas officiating. The following acted as pall- 
bearers: Honorary: Messrs. Hames Simons, 
Julius E. Cogswell, T. W. Passailaigue, Sr., Mon- 
tague Triest, Andrew J. Riley, Edgar Lieberman 
and A. Burnet Rhett; active: Messrs. H. F. Bar- 
kerdling, H. J. O'Brien, Herbert Schachte, John 
D. Rooney, P. K. Bremer and Louis Denaro. His 
remains were laid to rest in St. Laurence Ceme- 
tery, Charleston. ♦ 

Quoting from the tribute paid to Mr. Nohrden 
by the mayor of Charleston: "Having known him 
very intimately from earliest childhood, I feel 
qualified to testify to his very strong personality 
and high character. He inspired 2B>solute con- 
fidence in those with whom he associated, and 
this quality made him most useful and helpful 
in our school life. His genuine interest in the 
individual scholar, and advice cheerfully given 
to the parents made him the friend of all the 
homes he touched. He devoted himself most 
unselfishly to the work as principal. He was most 
efficient and resourceful in his plans and very 
faithful in their execution. Our city has lost a 
devoted, cultured educator and a splendid citi- 
zen of the highest type, one who gave his best 
for the good of our youth and no man can ever 
render a nobler service." 

Mr. Nohrden was a person of poetic instinct 
and wrote much poetry and short stories under 
the nom de plume of Martin Ma3mard. After 
his decease Mrs. Nohrden collected a number 
of poems and short stories and published them 
in a neat little volume. One of the poems — "An 
Ode" — which he had composed for the memorial 
exercises at Magrnolia Cemetery, May 10, 191 5> 
and which he read there is given herewith : 

AN ODE 

Winds of the South, blow soft today; 

Whisper, ye branches over head, 
A mindful people comes to pay 

Sweet tribute to its. hero dead. 

O'er their last camp, a sentry stands 
Eternal guard. What spirits rise 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



41 



To vitalize the nerveless hands? 
What visions luminate the eyes? 

Northward the guns flash out anew ; 

Once more the gray forms rush ahead; 
Kershaw, he sees, and Pettigrew; 

Hampton with knightly Armistead. 

Out where the East blends sea with sand 

Sumter's dull mutterings begin; 
Flouting a navy's wrath, ho! stand 

Mitchell — and Elliott — Huguenin. 

Far to the West a hill-crest flames; 

Up the long slope a thin line crawls; 
Hark, how the "rebel yell" proclaims 

Marrigault's charge! See, brave Gist falls. 

South, as the gun flecked islands lie, 
Wagner's frail walls defy the blast. 

See, where a barred flag flutters high 
Hagood and Ripley standing fast. 

North, East they struggled, West and South; 

Their strength alone, not their spirit, failed; 
Fire and sword, cold, famine, drouth 

Threatened. Thru all their faith prevailed. 

Here Carolina calls them home; 

Here heads are bowed and quick tears start; 
While un forgetting daughters come 

With blooms to soothe her stricken heart. 

Here grateful sons return to give 

Thanks for their sacred heritage; 
Proud in these glories that ever live. 

Humble in this — their pilgrimage. 

Winds of the South, blow far today 

To the distant realm of Eternity; 
Seek out the waiting clans in gray. 

Bear them a sign how their children say 

That we cherish this shrine as we will alway, 
With reverence and love and loyalty. 

Benjamin Franklin McKellar has for many 
years been a fixture in the commercial affairs of 
Greenwood, both as a merchant and banker. His 
friends claim for him a genius as a financier, and 
every undertaking with which his name has been 
associated has had in it some of the elements of 
real success. 

Mr. McKellar was born at Greenwood, June 25, 
1872, a son of Benjamin F. and Susan Eliza 
(Giatham) McKellar. His grandfather was Major 
Peter McKellar. The grandfather was a man of 
wealth and great influence in his day, but the grand- 
son, as a result of vicissitudes which frequently 
overtook southern families in the past century, had 
to start his own life poor. He received most of 



his education by night school study. As a boy he 
worked in a brick yard, also in a furniture store 
for several years. About that time he was dele- 
gated as trustee for an estate, and in its manage- 
ment his business resourcefulness had its first real 
opportunity. He pulled the estate out of debt, and 
thereby also earned the confidence of the commer- 
cial world. For twenty-two years Mr. McKellar 
was a successful furniture merchant. 

In 1910 he organized the People's Bank of Green- 
wood, and has been president since the institution 
was organized. At the beginning $69,900 was sub- 
scribed to the capital stock of the bank and the 
capital is now authorized at $500,000, with from 
$200,000 to $300,000 paid in and doinp: over $1,500,000 
worth of business. Mr. McKellar is also president 
of the People's Bank of Hodges, South Carolina, 
and president of the People's Trust Company. 

He married Nora Victoria Summer, of Newberry, 
South Carolina. Their only son, Benjamin F., Jr., 
is now deceased. He married Katie Edmonds, of 
York, and at his death left four children, named 
Katherine Victoria, Imogene, Alice Frances and 
Susie Elies. 

James Warren Widbman, a prominent lawyer 
and present state senator from Clarendon County, 
bears the same name as his honored father, who was 
a ijrominent physician for many years at Due West, 
South Carolina. 

Dr. James Warren Wideman was born in Abbe- 
ville County, September 16, 1846, was educated in 
country schools, in Erskine College, and at the age 
of seventeen became a member of Company A of 
the First South Carolina Cavalry. After the war 
he studied medicine, and was twice honored with 
the office of president of the Abbeville County Medi- 
cal Society. On January 23, 1868^ he married Emma 
Lucretia Jordan. Their son, James Warren Wide- 
man, was born at Due West, September 30, 1887, 
and supplemented his advantages in the local schools 
with the opportunities of Erskine College, from 
which he graduated in 1908. He then taught one 
year in Hickory Grove before entering the Law 
School of the University of South Carolina. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1911 and has since had a 
growing general practice and reputation as a sound 
and able lawyer at Manning. He was elected a 
member of the State Senate in 1918 and elected a 
member of the Democratic State Executive Com- 
mittee in 1919. Mr. Wideman is a Mason and 
Woodman of the World. 

June II, 1914, he married Mary Louise Brockin- 
ton, of Manning. They have a daughter, Ida 
Louise, born in May, 1915. 

John Jacob Seibels was born in Columbia, South 
Carolina, August 3, 1871. After completing his 
education ^at the University o^ South Cfarolina, he 
entered hfs father's office, then and now known as 
the insurance agency of E. W. Seibels & Son, one 
of the oldest agencies in the South. At the age of 
twenty, Mr. Seibels was appointed Special Agent 
and Adjuster for the Southern States, for the Man- 
chester Fire Assurance Company. In 1898 the 
Southern Department was organized with his broth- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



er, Edwin G. Seibels, as Manager and John J. Seibels 
as General Agent, the Glens Falls Insurance Com- 
pany and the Pacific Fire Insurance Company of 
New York then comprising the Department. Lat'er 
the "Rochester-German/* "New Hampshire," "Amer- 
ican of Newark," "Royal Exchange" of England, 
"Colonial Fire Underwriters" of Hartford, the Cot- 
ton Fire & Marine Underwriters, and others, also 
entered the office under the same management. To- 
day the office is one of the largest agencies in the 
South, maintains offices in New York and London, 
with an annual premium income,, both fire and ma- 
rine, of $2,500,000. The general offices are on the 
fourteenth and fifteenth floors of the Palmetto 
Building, and a force of about seventy-five people is 
maintained. The Palmetto Construction Company, 
which owned and built the fifteen story Palmetto 
Building, was organized by Mr. John J. Seibels, 
president of the company, who especially planned 
the two upper floors for the Southern Department 
offices. In 1910 the South Carolina Insurance Com- 
pany was organized, Mr. Seibels being its secretary. 

Among other companies in which Mr. Seibels is 
a dominant factor may be mentioned the Greenfield 
Construction Company, the Consolidated Holding 
Company, the City Investing Company, the Palmetto 
Trust Company, and he is first vice president of 
the Palmetto National Bank and Palmetto Trust 
Company, and a director in numerous other com- 
panies, including the Southern Railway, Carolina 
Division, from 1902 to 1919. 

Mr. Seibels is a son of Edwin Whipple and Marie 
J. Seibels. His great-great-grandfather emigrated 
from Elberfeldt, Germany, to Charleston, South 
Carolina in 1760. His great-great-grandmother was 
Sarah Temple, daughter of William Temple, brother 
of Sir John Temple of England. Mr. Seibels is a 
democrat in politics, a Master Mason, member of 
the Chi Phi Fraternity, Columbia Club, Ridgewood 
Club and a member of Trinity Church, Columbia. 
Mr. Seibels was married April 25, 1900, to Miss 
Bertha Willingham, oldest daughter of Calder Bay- 
nard and Lila Ross Willingham, of Macon, Georgia. 
Her great-great-grandfather, Thomas Henry Wil- 
Hngham, came to Charleston in 1790 from Willing- 
ham Hall, Market Rasen, present seat of the Wil- 
lingham family in England. His son, Thomas, 
married Phoebe Sarah Lawton. Her great-uncle. 
Ephraim M. Baynard, is referred to as the chief 
founder and benefactor of the College of Charles- 
ton. The Ross family came from Scotland to Vir- 
ginia and Mrs. Seibels great-grandfather, Luke Ross, 
moved to Macon, Georgia, from Williamston, North 
Carolina, in 1821. Mr. and Mrs. Seibels have two 
children. Calder Willingham and Mary Ross Sei- 
bels, these children being the fotirth generation to 
live in the old Seibels home, which is still occu- 
pied by the Seibels family, and which was built in 
1790. 

James Monroe Walker. The talents of a good 
lawyer turned to the business of life insurance nave 
brought James Monroe Walker through successive 
responsibilities, beginning as solicitor, until he is 
now assistant general manager and associate counsel 
of the Carolina Life Insurance Company of Co- 
lumbia. 



Mr. Walker, who was born in Colleton County, 
June 5. 1879, combines the blood of several old and 
prominent families of the state. His great-grand- 
father, George Walker, came from England over a 
century ago, and was a pioneer of Colleton County. 
His son George became a Baptist minister, widely 
known over several southern states. Rev. George 
Walker was the father of I sham David Walker, who 
for many years operated and lived on a fine planta- 
tion in Colleton County. Isham David Walker mar- 
ried Emma V. Hiers, a daughter of Jacob and Re- 
becca Hiers. Jacob Hiers was of an old time plant- 
ing family in Colleton County, and as a compara- 
tively young man entered the Confederate army 
and was killed in battle, giving his life for the 
cause of the South. 

James Monroe Walker grew up on the plantation 
of his father, Isham David Walker, and acquired 
his early education in the public schools of Colleton 
County. He has to his credit three years of efficient 
work as a teacher in the public schools of his home 
county. At the age of twenty he began the study 
of law in the office of Howell & Gruber. His pre- 
ceptors were men of distinction and great learning, 
leaders of the southern bar, the individuals of the 
firm being Major M. P. Howell and Colonel W. B. 
Gruber. Mr. Walker was admitted to the South 
Carolina bar December 9, 1902, and for about ten 
years was busily engaged in a growing practice, 
both at Walterboro and St. Matthews. 

He acquired his first practical knowledge of the 
life insurance business as a solicitor and field agent 
of the Carolina Life Insurance Company. He en- 
tered the service of that company on September i, 
1913. In volume and quality of business he quickly 
showed his class even among older and more ex- 
perienced men in the business. He was promoted 
to assistant superintendent of the local agency at 
Columbia and engaged in that work three years. 
Then, in 1918, he was made superintendent of the 
Charleston district and in February, 1919, was re- 
turned to the home office at Columbia as assistant 
general manager and associate cotmsel. 

Aside from his record in helping to build up one 
of South Carolina's most important business and 
financial institutions, Mr. Walker had some part in 
public affairs white he was a lawyer, representing 
Colleton County in the State Legislature during the 
sessions of 1905-06. A democrat he is primarily 
interested in the promotion of clean politics in com- 
munity and state. Mr. Walker is affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Knights of 
Pythias and is a member of the Baptist Church. 

At Walterboro April 3, 1903, he married Susan 
Annie Caldwell. She was also born in Collet on 
County, daughter of Thomas H. and Susan A. 
(Marsh) Caldwell, the Caldwells and Marshs having 
been people of honorable distinction in Colleton and 
other sections of South Carolina through several 
generations. Mr. and Mrs. Walker have four chil- 
dren: James Monroe, Jr., Leon Waldo, Thelma 
Gertrude and David Thomas. 

David William Galloway. Both by intellectual 
talent and personal character David William Gallo- 



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HISTORY OF. SOUTH CAROLINA 



43 



way is peculiarly fitted for success as a lawyer, 
and the early years of his practice have justiriea 
every promise entertained of a brilliant future. Mr. 
Galloway's ambition is in the line with the best 
traditions of the law. He from the first has re- 
garded the law not as a trade but as a profession, 
and it has signified for him, in the words of an 
eminent jurist, **a mental and moral setting apart 
from the multitude — s. priesthood of justice." 

He was born in Dillon County, at that time Mar- 
ion County, South Carolina, in 1889, son of James 
S. and Mary Lou (Bethea) Galloway. The Gallo- 
way ancestors came to this country from the north 
of Ireland, and represented a hne sturdy stock 
of people, especially identified with Marlboro County 
and its improvement into one of the richest sec- 
tions of the South. James S. Galloway was a Con- 
federate soldier, servmg throughout the war in the 
Twenty-Third South Carolina Infantry. This regi- 
ment was a part of Lee's Army of Northern Vir- 
ginia, and was almost constantly on duty in Vir- 
ginia except for a period when engaged in the 
V'icksburg campaign in Mississippi. James S. Gal- 
loway enlisted as a private, became a commissioned 
orticer of the Twenty-Third and no braver soldier 
or more efficient officer served in the Confederate 
armies, according to the tributes of his old army 
comrades in arms. A bullet wound received in the 
head in one battle was the ultimate cause of his 
death, although he lived many years after the war 
and was a successful planter in that part of Dillon 
County originally a part of Marion, and he died 
at his home there in 19 10. 

Mary Lou Bethea, also deceased, was a member 
of the prominent Bethea family of Marion, Marl- 
boro and Dillon counties. This ancestry originated 
in France and was established in Virginia in early 
colonial times. The first Bethea to come to South 
Carolina located in what is now Dillon County about 
1746. The Betheas were extensive planters, many 
of them have been soldiers, and many have appeared 
as prominent figures in public and political affairs. 

David William Galloway has always expressed a 
great debt to the influence of his mother, who was 
a woman of great nobility of heart and mind, and 
exceedingly charitable. Mr. Galloway was educated 
in Wofford College at Spartanburg and in the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina. He finished his law 
course in the latter school in 1913, and in the same 
year was admitted to the bar. He began practice 
at HartsviUe in Darlington County,, and in 1914 was 
elected magistrate of HartsviUe, filling that office 
for two years in addition to his general practice: 
His talents as a lawyer plainly called for a larger 
field, and he finally abandoned his growing busi- 
ness at HartsviUe and established himself at Co- 
lumbia in November, 1919. Mr. Galloway is a 
thorough student, and much of his success is due 
to the conscientious and thorough manner with 
which he undertakes every important commission 
assigned to him. 

He is a member of the Methodist Church, and 
fraternally is affiliated with the Masons, Knights 
of Pythias, Odd Fellows and Woodmen of the 
World. He married Miss Lois Shores, of Spartan- 



burg. Their three children are David William, Jr., 
Mary Shores and Roslyn. 

Jerome P. Chase, Sr., was one of the leading 
business men of Florence. He was bom in Ten- 
nessee, July 28, 1838. He received most of his edu- 
cation at Washington, D. C, and at the age of 
twenty-one became a telegraph operator in South 
Carolina. During the war he was part of the time 
a soldier and afterwards a military telegraph op- 
erator for the Confederate Government and finally 
served for ij^ years in the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment. After the war he became a Florence mer- 
chant but later engaged in the real estate and in- 
surance business and becaime officially interested in 
nearly all local business enterprises. He was elected 
to the Legislature in 1878 and also served as mayor 
of Florence. He married in 1866 Miss Hattie Mc- 
Leod. 

Jerome P. Chase, Jr., was born in Florence, May 
13, 1872. He was educated in the public schools 
and Wofford College and for several years was 
associated with the electric light plant at Florence, 
built by his father. He managed the company 
through the period of its difficulties and sold out 
the business m 1904. Since that date he has been 
engaged in the real estate and insurance business. 
He is manager and treasurer of the Chase Land & 
Improvement Company owned by the Chase family, 
and is a director of the Bank of Florence. 

Edwin Eugene Brunson has spent most of his 
life in and around Florence, was reared on a farm, 
and for the past ten years has been one of the 
leading real estate men of the city. 

He was born October 4, 1884, a son of Robert 
C. and Anna (Phinney) Brunson. His father was 
a farmer. He received the advantages of private 
and country schools, attended the University of 
South Carolina three years, and in 1910 entered the 
real estate business. He is member of the well 
known firm Lucas & Brunson of Florence. Mr. 
Brunson is president of the Pinewood Club and is 
present city tax assessor of Florence. He is un- 
married. 

James Calvin Hemphill. The Hemphill family 
of old Abbeville district has furnished many dis- 
tinguished names to South Carolina. One of the 
present generation is James Calvin Hemphill, of 
Greenwood, formerly a part of old Abbeville County, 
and he is earning high reputation for himself in 
the profession of architecture. 

He was born at Abbeville in 1889, a son of Robert 
Reid and Eugenia Cornelia (Taylor) Hemphill. His 
grandfather was Rev. William Reid Hemphill, for 
many years pastor of the Associate Reformed Pres- 
b^erian Church at Cedar Springs in Abbeville 
CTounty. An uncle of James C. Hemphill is Major 
J. C. Hemphill, who was formerly editor of the 
Charleston News and Courier, the Charlotte Ob- 
server and the Richmond Times Dispatch. He is 
now editor of the Spartanburg Journal. 

Robert Reid Hemphill, father of the Greenwood 
architect, was a Confederate soldier in Orr's Ri^s. 
He played a creditable part in the war and at W^ 
end of the reconstruction period was a member of 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



the noted Wallace House of 1876. For some years 
he was editor of the Abbeville Medium, was mem- 
ber of the State Senate from Abbeville County, and 
for fourteen years clerk of the South Carolina 
Senate. He is now deceased. 

James Calvin Hemphill acquired a liberal educa- 
tion, attending the College of Charleston two years. 
He studied architecture in Boston, taking a short 
course in Harvard University and another course 
with the Boston Architectural Club. He established 
himself in practice at Greenwood in 19 13, and the 
past five years have been exceedingly bilsy and have 
presented many opportunities for him to prove his 
skill and develop it. H^ was fortunate in selecting 
Greenwood as his home, since it is one of thi 
wealthiest and fastest growing cities in South Caro- 
lina. Mr, Hemphill has designed and superintended 
the construction of several public and private build- 
ings, the most recent being the Abbeville County 
Memorial Hospital at Abbeville and the addition to 
the Greenwood Hospital. He is also architect of 
the fine modern residences of C. C. Wharton, Dr. 
W. A. Barnett, W. H. Mays, and J. B Walton, in 
Greenwood 

Mr. Hemphill is a member of the South Carolina 
Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. 

In August, 1919, he married Miss Milwec Davis, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Davis of Greenwood. 
Mrs. Hemphill became well known over the state 
through her work as an organizer for the State 
Sunday School Association. 

William James Brown for over a quarter of a 
century has been one of the strong and resourceful 
men in the financial and business affairs of Florence, 
and has lent his influence and help readily to every 
movement for the community's advancement and 
welfare. 

He was born in Florence County October 30, 1858, 
and has lived in the City of Florence since 1869. 
He had to be satisfied with the meager advantages 
offered by the private schools of the impoverished 
period following the war. As a boy he began earn- 
ing his. living as clerk in stores, and from 1887 to 
1892 was one of the independent merchants of 
Florence. 

In 1892 Mr. Brown was one of the organizers of 
the Bank of Florence, served it many years as 
cashier and is now president. He has also been 
secretary and treasurer since organization of the 
Florence Gas Company, and was similarly officially 
identified with several building and loan associations. 

Mr. Brown served as alderman of Florence from 
1889 to 1893, and for three years was mayor of the 
city. He has long been prominent in the Baptist 
Church, and for twenty-eight years has been treas- 
urer of the church at Florence. October 11, 1881, 
he married Miss Anna E. Mouzon, of Charleston. 
Six childrea were born to their marriage. The two 
now living are: Gedney M., cashier of the Bank 
of Florence, and Leroy King, assistant cashier in 
the bank. Charles Seignious, who was accidentally 
killed on the railroad in his automobile December 
25, 1919, was second assistant cashier of the bank, 
yhis youngest son during the war was in the Sani- 
tary Department of the Eighty-First Division with 
the Expeditionary Forces in France. The three 



oldest children of Mr. and Mrs. Brown are also 
deceased. They were : William James, Jr., who died 
at the age of twenty; Mattie Seignious, who 
died when five years old; and Furman Evans, who 
died at the age of fifteen months. 

Allard Henry Gasque, who represents old French 
Huguenot stock in South Carolina, has devoted his 
active life to educational affairs and for fifteen years 
has been busily directing the public school system 
of Lawrence County in the capacity *of county su- 
perintendent. 

He was born in Florence County March 8, 1873, 
son of Wesley and Martha (Kirton) Gasque. His 
father was a merchant and planter. The son was 
educated in the public schools and as a young man 
before going to college taught school three years in 
some of the country districts of Florence County. 
He was graduated from the University of South 
Carolina in 1901, and the following year was prin- 
cipal of the Waverly School. He then took a year 
of post-graduate work and in 1902 was chosen 
county superintendent of education, beginning his 
first term in January, 1903. He was elected five 
times in succession for two year terms, without op- 
position, and in 1916 was elected for a four year 
term, receiving a large majority over two rival can- 
didates. 

Mr. Gasque is well known among South Carolina 
educatprs and is a former president of the South 
Carolina Teachers' Association. He has been a 
member of the State Executive Committee of the 
democratic party for eight years and chairman of 
the city democratic organization at Florence six 
years. He is a Mason, Knight of Pythias, and a 
past state counsellor and national representative of 
the Junior Order United American Mechanics. His 
religious connection is with the Baptist Church. He 
married, March 5, 1908, Bessie Hawley, of Rich- 
land County. They have three children, Martha 
Elizabeth, Doris and John Allard. 

John deSaussure Gilland, a prominent and well 
known attorney of Florence, has been in practice 
in that city for the past five years and is at this 
time acting city recorder. 

He was born in Kingstree, South Carolina, No- 
vember 3, 1883, a son of Thomas McDowell and 
Louise (Brockington) Gilland. His father was also 
an attorney, was educated in public schools, and 
took both his academic and law courses in the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina. Mr. Gilland while in 
school and university became well known in ath- 
letic circles, and after leaving university was for 
three years a professional baseball player. He be- 
gan the practice of law at Kingstree in 1909 and 
from that city moved to Florence in 1914. He has 
been admitted to practice in both the State and 
Federal courts. 

April 22, 1913, he married Jane Allen. Their 
three children are J. D., Jr., Ruth Allen and Louise. 

John Wilbur Hicks, member of the prominent 
Florence law firm of Arrowsmith, Muldrow, Bridges 
& Hicks, is a native of South Carolina hut finished 
his legal education in Chicago. 

He was born in Florence County, March 24, 1885, 



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a son of Elijah Myers and Elizabeth C. (Welch) 
Hicks. His father was a minister of the Baptist 
Church. Mr. Hicks was educated in public schools, 
attended the Orangeburg Collegiate Institute until 
1899, and from 1900 to 1904 was a student of the 
Welsh Neck High School. He graduated A. B. 
from Furman University in 1909, and then entered 
the law department of the University of Chicago. 
From this institution he received the degree J. D., 
Juris Doctor, in December, 191 1. On returning to 
South Carolina Mr. Hicks was employed in the real 
cstete department of the Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
way, on business connected with the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission, until the following May, when 
he was admitted to the bar and has smce been en- 
gaged in general practice as a member of the firm 
above noted. 

Mr. Hicks is a member of the Phi Psi college fra- 
ternity. He is also affiliated with the Junior Order 
United American Mechanics and is a thirty-second 
degree Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner. He be- 
longs to the Baptist Church. 

Philip H. Arrowsmith is senior member of one 
of the prominent law firms in eastern South Caro- 
lina, that of Arrowsmith, Muldrow, Bridges & Hicks 
at Florence. 

Mr. Arrowsmith, who was formerly a lawyer at 
Lake City, was born at Winnsboro, South Carolina, 
August 8, 1888, a son of Frances H. and Louise 
(Heller) Arrowsmith. His father was a hotel man. 
The son attended the public schools of Atlanta, 
Georgia, took his literary course in Trinity College 
at Durham, North Carolina, and in 191 1 graduated 
from the law department of the University of South 
Carolina. Soon after being admitted to the bar he 
opened his office at Lake City and handled his 
clientele and business at that point from 191 1 to 
1919, when he removed to Florence. 

July 30, 1912, he married Helen Thames, of Man- 
ning, South Carolina. They have two sons, Mitchell 
Heller and Philip Heller, Jr. 

William H. Malloy has been an active business 
man of Florence for many years, though during the 
past twenty years his business abilities have been 
required almost altogether by the city. He has held 
the office of mayor or city treasurer for an aggregate 
of seventeen years. 

Mr. Malloy was bom at Cheraw, South Carolina, 
July 30, 1859, a son of Dr. A. and Henrietta (Coit) 
Malloy, of Scotch-Irish ancestry. He received his 
early education in common schools and the Cheraw 
Academy, gained his early business experience in 
Cheraw, and in 189 1 removed to Florence. He was 
bookkeeper for one of the local firms several years, 
traveled in Texas one year, and then engaged in 
business as a merchandise broker at Florence. He 
was elected mayor of the city in 1896 and held that 
office for six years, until he felt obliged to resign to 
look after his private affairs. In 1908 he was first 
elected city treasurer and by repeated re-election 
annually he has filled that office to the present time. 
Nearly all the improvements which make a modern 
city of Florence have been instituted and carried 
out during his official connection as mayor or 
treasurer. 



Mr. Malloy was for a number of years deacon of 
the Presbyterian Church at Cheraw. He first mar- 
ried Kate Wilson in 1885. January 28, .1892, he 
married Hannah Pawley Waring. 

Henry Edwards Davis was admitted to the bar 
in 1904, is member of the law firm Willcox & Will- 
cox at Florence, and is division counsel for the 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. 

Mr. Davis, who has earned his high place in the 
South Carolina bar by unremitting industry and hard 
study, was born at Gourdin, South Carolina, October 
4, 1879, a son of James Edwards and Emma W. 
(Chandler) Davis. He grew up on his father's farm 
in Williamsburg County, attended local schools, and 
graduated in June, 1902, from the Presbyterian Col- 
lege of South Carolina. The next fall he entered the 
law department of the University of South Carolina 
and continued his studies there until January, 1904. 
He was then in the office of Associate Justice C. 
A. Woods at Marion until March, 1906, and since 
then has been an associate of the law firm of Will- 
cox & Willcox at Florence. Mr. Davis served four 
years as city attorney of Florence finally resigning 
that office. He is now and has been for two years 
a member of the school board, and is a trustee of 
the Presbyterian Colle^^e of South Carolina and an 
elder of the Presbyterian Church. 

September 26, 1906, he married Miss Lillian Er- 
skine, of Anderson County. Mrs. Davis was a suc- 
cessful teacher for five years until her marriage. 
They have two daughters, Maud Elizabeth and Vir- 
ginia Erskine. 

Davis C. Durham, one of the prominent mer- 
chants and citizens of Greenville, where he has had 
a business career of forty years, is president and 
treasurer and principal owner of Gilreath-Durham, 
Inc., jewelers and silversmiths. This is now one of 
the oldest business firms of that city with a con- 
tinuous record, and is a landmark of the commercial 
district. The principal lines carried are jewelry, 
fine china and fancy goods. 

Mr. Durham, who was born at Shelby, Cleveland 
County, North Carolina, in 1867, is a member of 
a very historic and prominent family. His parents 
are David Noah and Esther Ruth (Coleman) Dur- 
ham, the former now deceased. The original seat 
of the Durham family was in England. The first 
to come to America located in Virginia early in the 
eighteenth century, and some of them later moved 
to North Carolina. The City of Durham, North 
Carolina, was named in honor of the family. The 
name stands for the best there is in American 
character and some of the Durhams have achieved 
very high distinction. On the whole, they have been 
lawyers, merchants, ministers and educators. David 
Noah Durham and his son Davis C. as merchants 
are rather exceptions to the general rule. David N. 
Durham at the age of sixteen was fighting in the 
uniform of a Confederate soldier, and in 1879, he 
removed from Shelby, North Carolina, to Greenville, 
South Carolina, and was a business man in that 
city for many years. 

A brother of Davis C. Durham is Dr. Charles L. 
Durham of Cornell University. He was bom at 
Shelby in 1872, received his Master of Arts degree 



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• HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



from Furman University at Greenville in 1891, was 
an instructor in that school until 1896, and in 1897 
became instructor of Latin at Cornell University 
and since 1909 has held the chair of Latin in that 
great institution and is also secretary of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. He is a man who is held in 
the highest and most affectionate esteem by every 
Cornell man (all of whom know **Bull Durham") 
and for many years has been one of the most popular 
members of the university's staff. His public spirit 
is as notable as his classic scholarship. During the 
war with Germany he devoted much of his time to 
speaking for the Liberty Loan and other war meas- 
ures throughout the East and Middle West. Doctor 
Durham is well known at Greenville, where he spent 
most of his boyhood and early manhood. 

Davis C. Durham, who was born » at Shelby in 
Cleveland County, North Carolina, in 1867, acquired 
his early education there. Shelby is a town notable 
for many prominent characters who were born and 
reared there and attended the same school. Among 
them are Thomas Dixon, the author and lecturer, 
and his brothers, Rev. A. C. and Rev. Frank Dixon, 
and also the Webbs, two prominent jurists of North 
Carolina. Davis C. Durham is a contemporary of 
some of these famous people who once lived in 
Shelby. After coming to Greenville Mr. Durham 
attended Captain Patrick's Military School. 

His father as noted above put on a Confederate 
uniform at the age of sixteen. At a similar age 
Davis C. Durham, the country being then at peace 
and no incentive to fire a boy's military ambition, 
enlisted in the army of commercial travelers, and 
was one of the first to travel out of Greenville for 
a Greenville concern. He became known as the 
"boy drummer" and for a number of years repre- 
sented his firm on the road in South Carolina and 
also portions of North Carolina and Georgia. Mr. 
Durham was always closely connected with all activi- 
ties of the traveling men and is a member of the 
Travelers Protective Association, served as presi- 
dent of his local post and later as state president 

Counting his youthful experience as a clerk and 
traveling salesman he has been constantly in business 
at Greenville for forty years, and in the same section 
of Main Street where his present business is located. 
This business has been built up on character and 
through it Mr. Durham has come to realize the 
ideals of a man's responsibilities and service to the 
world at large. 

Mr. Durham is a member of the First Baptist 
Church and for fifteen or twenty years was super- 
intendent of the Sunday School of this fine old 
church. Now and for a number of years he has 
been giving much attention to work and enlargement 
of the Greenville Woman's College, being vice presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees and chairman of the 
Executive Committee of this institution. He is also 
a member of the Board of Education of the Baptist 
State Convention of South Carolina. 

For a long number of years he was president of 
the Merchants Association of Greenville and was 
one of the founders of the Chamber of Commerce. 
He was chairman of the Traffic Bureau of the 
Chamber of Commerce and represented that body in 
behalf of equitable freight rates for Greenville at 
various sessions of the State Railroad Commission 



and the Interstate Commerce Commission, attending 
many meetings held with the railroad ofiicials of the 
South. Mr. Durham is credited with having brought 
about adjustment of freight rates that have played 
a most important part in making Greenville the 
commercial center that it is today. Mr. Durham 
served as a member of the Greenville Coimty Coun- 
cil of Defense during the war and was one of the 
three or four members of that body who took upon 
themselves the great bulk of its work and achieve- 
ment He was also one of the prime movers in 
the matter of building the Masonic Temple at 
Greenville, and is president and treasurer of the 
Masonic Temple Company and manager of their 
handsome ofiice building on South Main Street 

Mr. Durham was happily married early in his 
business career. His wife was formerly Miss Stella 
Louise Ferris of Spencer, Tioga County, New York. 
A graduate of the New England Conservatory of 
Music and a finished musician, she came to Green- 
ville as head of the voice department of the Green- 
ville Woman's College. 

Richard Durham, son of Mr. and Mrs. Davis C. 
Durham, earned distinction as a soldier in France. 
He is a graduate of Furman University and was 
a student at Cornell University when in June, 191 7, 
he volunteered in the American Field Service. This 
was a volunteer organization of American young 
college men for service under the French govern- 
ment He paid all his own expenses while with the 
field service. He was in the first section of the 
volunteers to be transferred to the American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. The unit to which he belonged 
was decorated three times by the general of the 
division and once by General Gouraud of the Fourth 
French Army. Richard Durham participated in 
some of the most terrific warfare, practically 
throughout the campaign of 1918. He was in the 
Aisne retreat from May 27 to June 4» »" the third 
battle of the Somme August 10 to 23, in the second 
battle of the Marne from September 26 to November 
6, and through special gallantry during the Aisne 
attack at Soissons in June, IQ18, he was cited and 
decorated with the French Croix de Guerre. He 
was still in France in the spring of 1919- 

B. F. Bedingfield who died December 8, 1919* had 
been a resident of Spartanburg thirty years, and 
while he began his career without special resources 
he achieved a place of dignity, influence and real 
success. 

Mr. Bedingfield was born on a plantation in Hen- 
derson County, North Carolina, October 3. 1854* 
oldest of the ten children of George and Nancy 
(Bayne) Bedingfield of the same county. Five of 
those children are still living, one daughter being a 
resident of Greenville, South Carolina. 

B. F. Bedingfield left home at the age of fourteen, 
and during a sojourn in Texas found emplojrment 
as a farm hand. He largely educated himself and 
early learned the lessons of self reliance. For sev- 
eral years he was a farmer in Arkansas, and then 
returned east and locating at Greenville, South Caro- 
lina, engaged in the grocery business. From there 
he removed to Spartanburg, and long before his 
death had acquired a competency by his good busi- 
ness judgment. He was highly thought of in the 



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47 



community, was esteemed for his upright Christian 
life and character. For many years he was active 
in the Methodist Church, and distinguished him- 
self lo^ his public spirit in local affairs, and was 
affiliated with the Woodmen of the World, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Bedingfield married for his first wife Miss 
D<^ly Huff of Spartanburg. By that marriage he 
had one son, Frank, now a resident of Columbia, 
who married Miss Jeffords of Florence, a gradu- 
ate of Winthrop College. B. F. Bedingfield married 
for his second wife Sally Neal of Lawrence. 

Mr. Bedingfield is survived by his widow who 
before her marriage to him was Mrs. Eunice Gil- 
more Robbs, widow of Dr. James R. Robbs. The 
only child of this union died in infancy. Mrs. Bed- 
ingfield was the youngest of four children and was 
bom in Chester County, April 27, 1864, daughter 
of Charles and Vermilla (Osborn) Gilmore. Her 
father's family came originally from Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts, and for many years he was a planter 
and died in 1887. Her mother died in 1900. Mrs. 
Bcdingfield's oldest brother, J. E. Gilmore, died in 
1918. Her sister, Alvinia, is married and living on 
the old homestead. Mrs. Bedingfield is a well read 
and cultured woman, enjoys a comfortable and com- 
modious home in Spartanburg, and is an active mem- 
ber of the Duncan Methodist Church. 

Richard Ashe Meares, of the family of that name 
in Wilmington, North Carolina, has bieen a resident 
of South Carolina more than tnirty-five years. His 
permanent home and chief interests have been in 
Fairfield County. 

Mr. Meares, who is a member of the Legislature 
from Fairfield County and maintains a city home 
for his family at Columbia, was born in New York 
Cidr, July 4, 1858. He graduated from St. Stephen's 
CoUege at Annandale, New York, in 1878, and in 
the same year came South and studied law in the 
famous law school of Judges Dick and Dillard at 
Greensboro, North Carolina. He completed his 
course in 1879, and for three years practiced at 
Winston-Salem. In January, 1884, he established 
his home at Ridgeway in Fairfield County, where 
after a few years he retired from the practice of 
his profession in favor of his farming and manu- 
facturing interests. 

Mr. Meares first came into public note when he 
served as a member of the Constitutional Conven- 
tion in 1895. In 1896 he was elected a member of 
the House of Representatives, serving during the 
sessions of 1897-98, and was again chosen to that 
body in 1910 for the sessions of 191 1- 12, and in 
1918, for the third time, was elected to serve his 
constituency of Fairfield County. He has been 
one of the leaders in the legislative program adopted 
by the sessions of 1919-20. In the last Legislature 
he was a member of the committee on banking and 
insurance and other important committees. 

Mr. Meares is a prominent layman of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church. He was a member of the 
delegation of deputies from the Diocese of South 
Carolina to the General Convention at Detroit, in 
October, 1919. 

Mr. Meares married Miss Louise Woodward Pal- 



mer, of Ridgeway, in 1883. Their son. Gaston 
Meares, was a corporal in Company M of the Three 
Hundred and Twenty-first Infantry in the Eighty- 
First or Wildcat Division, and saw several months 
of active service in France. 

Mancil James Owings. The standing and suc- 
cess achieved by Mr. Owings in business affairs in 
his native County of Laurens rates him as one of 
the men of exceptional enterprise, thorough integrity 
and all around ability. Mr. Owings had little to 
start with as a young man, and his extensive ac- 
cumulations of business interests stand as a jus- 
tified reward of his services and abilities. 

He was born on a farm May 5, 1865, ^a son of 
Benjamin Lewis and Jane (Smith) Owmgs, also 
natives of Laurens County, and a grandson of Man- 
cil James and Susan Owings, the former also a 
native of Laurens County. His maternal grand- 
parents were Franklin and Frances Smith, of the 
same county. Benjamin L. Owings spent his active 
life as a farmer and was also a Confederate sol- 
dier. He lived to the age of seventy-four, while 
his wife died at sixty-four. She was a Methodist 
and he a Baptist. 

Their family of five daughters and two sons all 
grew up on the old farm, and as a farm boy Mancil 
James Owings attended the district schools. At the 
age of eighteen he went to the home of his uncle, 
John R. Owings, and at the age of twenty-two opened 
a country store on his uncle's farm. He conducted 
it for four years, until the death of his uncle. He 
then came to Laurens and became a competitor with 
old established merchants. He pushed his business 
with commendable energy and his affairs have been 
growing rapidly since then. In 1913 he organized the 
Farmers National Bank and became its president, 
and has made that institution one of the solidest in 
Laurens County. He has also bought stock in other 
banks and corporations and has been inclined to put 
most of his profits in farm lands. He is now one 
of the largest farm land owners, in the county, and 
has done much to promote the agricultural welfare 
of his section. 

Mr. Owings, who has never married, is an active 
and public spirited citizen, though he has never 
sought a public ofllice. He is a trustee of the Baptist 
Church, a trustee of Greenville Female College, and 
is affiliated with the Masonic Order and Knights of 
Pythias. 

Samuel Craig Byrd, D. D., president of the Chi- 
cora College for Women at Columbia, has for a quar- 
ter of a century been distinguished by his work and 
leadership in church and educational affairs. With 
the exception of a few years while he was pastor of 
Presbyterian churches his career has been spent in 
his native state of South Carolina. 

He was born at Laurens October 24, 1868, a son of 
Capt. Jonathan Downs and Evelyn (Craig) Byrd. He 
acquired a liberal education, graduating with the 
A. B. degree from the Presb)rterian College of 
South Carolina at Clinton in 1889 and receiving 
his Master of Arts degree from the same institution 
in 1892. In the latter year he also graduated from 
the Columbia Theological Seminary. He received 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



his Doctor of Divinity degree from the Presb3rterian 
College in 1906. 

During 1892-93 he was tutor of Hebrew in the 
Columbia Theological Seminary and left that work 
to become assistant pastor of the First Presbyterian 
Church of New Orleans. In 1894 he was ordained to 
the Presbyterian ministry and until 1897 was pas- 
tor of Lafayette Church in New Orleans. 

He then returned to Columbia and from 1898 to 
1902 was adjunct professor in the chair of English 
Bible, and again tutor of Hebrew in the Theologfical 
Seminary. In the meantime he was managing edi- 
tor of the Presbyterian Quarterly and the Religious 
Outlook in Columbia in 1898-99 and then gave all his 
time to his duties as a member of the faculty of the 
Theological Seminary until 1902. From 1903 to 1906 
he was pastor of the Scion Church of Winnsboro, 
South Carolina, and in 1906 was called to his duties 
as president of Chicora College at Greenville, South 
' Carolina. July i, 1915, this institution was consoli- 
dated with the College for Women at Columbia, and 
the educational work of the combined colleges has 
since been continued at Columbia under the name of 
Chicora College for Women, with Doctor Byrd as 
president. 

Doctor Byrd was also a trustee of the Presbyte- 
rian College of South Carolina, serving for many 
years as president of the board, during the establish- 
ment of the college, and the growth and success at- 
tained reflects in no small degree the result of his 
personal efforts and labor. He is a Royal Arch 
Mason, a Knight of P3rthias, and a member of the 
Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. 

October 3, 1893, he married Wilhelmina Law Coz- 
by, of Newberry and their only son, James Cozby 
Byrd, is now a junior student in the University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Isaiah Davis Durham, M. D., is son of Ed- 
mund Durham and Mary Lee of the distinguished 
family of Robert E. Lee and a grandson of 
Richard Durham, who married Jane Davis, a near 
relative of President Jefferson Davis. The Durhams 
are of English ancestry and many prominent mem- 
bers of the family have their home in North Caro- 
lina, where the City of Durham commemorates 
them. The Durhams in the different generations 
have been distinguished as forceful business men 
and equally prominent in public and professional 
affairs. 

Dr. I. D. Durham was a physician, dentist, minis- 
ter and journalist and was publishing the Confed- 
erate Baptist, a weekly newspaper in Columbia 
when that city was occupied and burned bv« Gen- 
eral Sherman's army. A brother of I. D. Durham 
was the late Dr. A. K. Durham, a life-long minister 
of the Baptist Church, and one of the distinguished 
men of that denomination in South Carolina. He 
was one of the founders of the present Baptist 
Courier, and was also actively identified with edu- 
cational work for many years. 

Dr. I. D. Durham was born in 1832, in Cleveland 
County, North Carolina. He did not have many . 
advantages of an education in early life but he be- 
gan preaching at the early age of seventeen and by 
help from the churches and his own exertions he 
attended Furman University for several 7ears. He 



graduated from the Medical College of Pennsyl- 
vania at Philadelphia in 1859 ^^*^ honors. 

Returning home he practiced his profession very 
successfully for years. He was a Baptist minister 
of note and a very forceful and magnetic orator 
and many churches and associations were organized 
by him. He was quite an original and independent 
character and was possessed of his mountaineer and 
liberty loving traits. 

He was very determined and conscientious, so 
much so that he left North Carolina before he 
reached his majority, because he opposed the prin- 
ciple of paying poll tax. When it became law in 
South Carolina he still opposed the principle and 
claimed that it was unconstitutional and a badg^e 
of slavery. He would not pay the tax himself nor 
would he allow his friends to do so, cons^uently 
he had several trials in court and in one case served 
one day in Aiken County Jail. 

He was married in 1855 to Miss Mary Anne Smith, 
of Laurens County. South Carolina, who died in 
1866. Of this marriage only one son survived, Wil- 
liam Davis Durham. In 1869 he was married to 
Miss Elizabeth M. Knotts of Lexington County, 
South Carolina. 

Doctor Durham took a live, independent and con- 
scientious interest in everything that pertained to 
the welfare of his country, and in 1SB2 was green- 
back candidate for superintendent of education. He 
was a most devoted man to his family and friends. 
He died in 1890. 

Dr. William Davis Durham, only child of Dr. 
Isaiah Davis Durham, was born in 1859, at Winns- 
boro, South Carolina. A physician and dentist, he 
graduated in medicine at the Augusta Medical Col- 
lege, Augusta, Georgia, in 1881. The same year 
he married Miss Ida Norris of Batesburg, South 
Carolina, who lived only a year. In 1885 he was 
married to Miss Lula McLane of Fairfield County, 
South Carolina, a daughter of John Hendrix Mc- 
Lane of Columbia, South Carolina. John Hendrix 
McLane a generation ago was one of the leading: 
public characters of the state. He filled various 
public offices and was a leader of the reform move- 
ment in national politics beginning about 1879. At 
one time he was greenback candidate for governor. 

Dr. W. D. Durham was a very affable man with 
high and noble ideals and quite a success in his pro- 
fessions. He practiced medicine and dentistry 
chieflv in Aiken County. He died in 1913, leaving 
six children, four boys and two girls: Davis Mc- 
Lane Durham, Isaiah Davis Durham, Robert Blak- 
ley Durham^ Virgil Cla3rton Durham, Ruby Eliza- 
beth Durham and Mary Lee Durham. 

Davis McLane Durham was born in 1886, in Aiken 
Counhr, South Carolina. A very energetic and ap- 
plicable business man of good moral stamina. 

Dr. Isaiah Davis Durham, who was named for His 
grandfather, was born in Orangeburg County, Sotitli 
Carolina in 1889. While his professional career Yisls 
been comparatively brief Dr. Durham has done jus- 
tice to the noble record of his family and ancestors 
in the history and affairs of South Carolina. Re- 
ceiving a good common school education he gradu- 
ated in medicine in 1913 from the University of 
Georgia, at Augusta, Geor^a. Before movingr to 
his present home in Columbia, South Carolina, sev- 



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49 



cral months ago, he practiced his profession in New 
Brookland and surrounding territoiy. He has built 
a large general practice in medicine and surgery 
and a reputation for skill and efficiency that piakes 
him a valuable asset to his community. He was 
married to Miss Pauline M. Whitehead of Augusta, 
Georgia. Their two children are William Vernon 
and Isaiah Davis, Jr. 

Dr. Robert Blakley Durham was born in Orange- 
burg County, South Carolina, in 1892. Receiving a 
good common school education he graduated in 
medicine from the University of Georgia, at Au- 
gusta, Georgia, in 1913. He practiced his profes- 
sion at Perry, South Carolina, until moving to Co- 
lumbia, in 1917. He volunteered in the medical 
corps, June 5, 1917, and wasi given a commission 
of first lieutenant. He was called to report for 
duty August 20, 1917. On September 6, 1917, he 
sailed for France. Doctor Durham served twent)r- 
Oiree months in France with the Twenty-Sixth Di- 
vision, that saw about ten months in the trenches, 
being one of the .first American divisions to Europe. 
He took part in all major engagements, namely, St. 
Mihiel, Meuse- Argonne, Chateau Thierry, etc. Dur- 
ing service with the Twenty-Sixth Division he was 
battalion surgeon of the One Hundred and First In- 
fantry and later was given command of the One 
Hundred and Second Ambulance Company. Dr. 
R. B. Durham was promoted to captain in February, 
1919. While in France he attended the University 
of Bordeaux for four months, taking special courses 
in surgery. He was discharged August 4, 1919. 
Doctor Durham is now practicing his profession in 
G)lumbia, South Carolina. 

Virgil Clayton Durban^ was born in Orangeburg 
County in 1894. He received a common school edu- 
cation. On July 30, 1917, he volunteered as a pri- 
\'atc in Major Johnson's Battalion of Engineers of 
South Carolina, in Company B, which was later a 
part of the One Hundred and Seventeenth Engineers 
of the Forty-Second Division. He sailed for Prance, 
October, 191 7, served about nineteen months over- 
seas. He was in action nine months and was en- 
gaged in all important battles which the Americans 
fought, namely, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Chateau 
Thierry. Virgil Clayton Durham received his dis- 
charge April 19, 1919. 

These two young men were gallant soldiers and 
faithfully upheld the traditions of their ancestors. 

Joseph Brown Felton had been continuously a 
teacher and school administrator in Anderson 
County for nineteen years, and was serving in his 
third consecutive term as county superintendent 
when he was appointed State Agent for Colored 
Schools in South Carolina, October i, 1919, with 
headquarters at Columbia. 

Mr. Felton was bom in Anderson County, May 
14. 1882, son of Joseph Bryant and Cinderella 
(Brown) Felton. He acquired a good education, 
graduating June 15, 1900, from the Patrick Military 
Institute at Anderson. In addition to the literary 
training he received there he had four years of 
military instruction and has a practical knowledge 
of military science and technique. 

Mr. Felton began teaching in Anderson County 
in the fall of 1900, and for eleven years was con- 
Vol. v— 4 



nected with local schools. In 1912 he was elected 
county superintendent of education, and was re- 
elected without opposition in 1914, and in 1916 re- 
ceived a third term of four years with four opposing 
candidates. Incidental to his primary work as 
an educator Mr. Felton has maintained some farm- 
ing interests for a number of years. 

He has always been a stanch democrat and is 
a member of the Baptist Church. Fraternally he 
is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias at Town- 
ville, being keeper of records and seal in I912, is 
a member of the Improved Order of Red Men at 
Anderson, serving as sachem for 1918, and is a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

At Townville December 29, 1901, Mr. Felton mar- 
ried Miss Maggie Elizabeth Speares, daughter of 
Joseph C. and Janie (Bruce) Speares. Her grand- 
father, the Rev. Kit Speares, was a noted educator 
of his day in northwestern South Carolina. He 
spent practically his entire life in the schoolroom, 
and many of the best business men of that section 
received their training either in whole or in part 
from him. One of his former pupils is Ex-Governor 
Ansel. Mr. and Mrs. Fehon have five children : 
Herbert Newton, Joseph Bruce, Andy Theodora, 
Emmie Louese and Margaret Elizabeth. 

Marvin Lamar Parler, M. D. While the scene 
of his professional and other commendable activities 
during the past twenty years has been Wedgefield 
in Sumter County, Doctor Parler belongs to that 
sturdy and successful family of Parlers who since 
Revolutionary times have lived in the old Orange- 
burg District. There were three French brothers 
who came to America either with Rochambeau or 
LaFayette to assist in the struggle for American 
freedom. After the war they chose the Colonies 
as their permanent home, and located in the old 
Orangeburg District in the vicinity of the present 
Town of Parler, which was named for the family. 
The Parlers have lived continuously in that section 
of Orangeburg County since 1790. 

Doctor Parler was born there in 1879 and is a 
son of Eugene M. Parler, a prominent merchant, 
planter and land owner and a native of the same 
vicinity. 

Doctor Parler was educated in the public schools 
of his neighborhood, also at Elloree, and attended 
Furman University at Greenville. He studied medi- 
cine in the Medical College of South Carolina at 
Charleston, graduating with the class of 1900. In 
the same year he located at Wedgefield, and has 
achieved enviable rank as the leading physician and 
surgeon of that rich and growing section of Sumter 
County. He has been president of the Sumter 
County Medical Society and is a member of the 
State and American Medical Association. 

Doctor Parler has been a leader in all local affairs, 
and is a planter and owner of • substantial landed 
interests at Wedgefield. He is a director of the 
Commercial Bank & Trust Company of Sumter and 
during the war was chairman of all the Liberty Loan 
campaigns for Wedgefield and vicinity and also had 
charge of the food conservation and was connected 
with other measures incident to the war. He is a 
Knight Templar, Mason and member of Omar 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Charleston, and he 
and his wife are Baptists. 

Doctor Parler married Miss Josie Piatt, daughter 
of Rev. John B. and Celestia (Mims) Piatt. Her 
father was a prominent minister of the South Caro- 
lina Conference. Her mother was a daughter of 
Thomas Mims of Charleston. .Doctor and Mrs. 
Parler have two children: Mary Celestia and Mar- 
vin Lamar, Jr. 

Davib Duncan Wallace seems to have been 
predestined for a teacher and writer. His parents 
both made enviable reputations as teachers. His 
father left his professorship in the Columbia Female 
College after a few years for the freer life of 
journalism. As founder and for many years the 
editor of the Newberry Observer, he was one of 
the most influential members of the South Carolina 
press. 

Dr. Wallace's mother, nee Miss Alice Amanda 
Lomax, spent many years of her life before her 
marriage on Wofford College campus in the home 
of her maternal grandfather. Professor David Dun- 
can. Her education at Barhamville was followed 
by the regular work of the Wofford curriculum 
under the guidance of her grandfather, and though 
the rules of the college did not permit her to appear 
in the classroom, they did not prevent the old 
Professor of Greek from intimating to his boys that 
he had a young lady privately studying the same 
course with whose work their own did not always 
compare favorably. To this day she can read her 
Latin and Greek far better than any of her grand- 
children after the most earnest preparation of the 
day's lesson. She is a student whom it is never 
safe to contradict on a matter of historical fact. 

Professor Wallace's father was born in Laurens 
County, near Mudlick Creek, just across the line 
from Newberry, near the large brick country house 
known as Belfast, which was purchased while he 
was a boy by his father and still remains in the 
family. His family was Baptist. He joined the 
Methodist church on account of attending Woflford 
College, from which he graduated in 187 1. The 
Methodist remains the church connection of all his 
branch of the family. 

David Duncan Wallace was born in Columbia, 
South Carolina, May 23, 1874. in the old Columbia 
Female College, now the Colonia Hotel. The only 
other child was a girl, who died in childhood. When 
the boy was two years old his parents moved to 
Newberry, where he lived until he left home for 
college. He attended the Newberry Male Academy 
and the preparatory department of Newberry Col- 
lege. Entering the Freshman class of that institu- 
tion, young Wallace, along with several other overly 
youthful "town boys", threw away a year by devoting 
himself more industriously to ringing the college 
bell at hours not prescribed by the schedule, heaving 
brickbats against classroom doors, and in other ways 
plaguing the college authorities, from the white 
haired old negro janitor to the President. His 
father effectually corrected these flippant tendencies 
by putting him at steady work in his printing office 
for a year. The youth really valued an education, 
and when the next October rolled round was quaking 
with dread at the possibility of being denied the 



privilege of re-entering college. From that moment 
to the present he has never spent an idle week and 
rarelv an idle day. 

Taking up his work again at Newberry College, 
he came under the influence of that noble Christian 
gentleman Dr. George W. Holland, and that master 
of class room instruction, Asbury Sumter Laird, 
who as Professor of Latin gave an example of 
thoroughness and inspiration in exact scholarly 
work that constituted a valuable part of his pupils* 
equipment for life. It was largely the inspiration of 
Professor Laird's teaching that stirred him to the 
efforts that won him the prize for the highest aver- 
age on all work during the Freshman year. 

Wofford College was a family tradition in the 
Wallace home. At real sacrifice the parents sent 
their son in 1891 to enter the Sophomore class of 
the old college, where he graduated in 1894. Among 
the honors conferred upon him by his college mates* 
were the positions of intercollegiate debater, Foun- 
der's Day orator, and editor-in-chief of the Wofford 
College Joprnal. 

Though the associations with his friends, particu- 
larly of the Kappa Alpha fraternity, and the whole 
life at Wofford were rich in inspiration, the influence 
of the President, Dr. James H. Carlisle, stands out 
as one of the most beneficent and potent forces in 
his life. So profound was the conviction of morai 
values received from that great teacher, supple- 
menting the same influences from his parents, that 
he has all his life perhaps underestimated material 
values. From the influences at Wofford that helped 
to make the man cannot be omitted the wonder fut 
charm and intellectual stimulus of Dr. Henry Nelson 
Snyder's teaching of English literature and the 
stirring spiritual appeal of the preaching of Pro- 
fessor, afterwards Bishop, John C. Kilgo. 

After dabbling in law reading for a few weeks 
the voung graduate decided on teaching as his life- 
work. He studied English, Economics, and History 
at Vanderbilt University for three years, 1894-6 and 
1898-99. Turning more and more to History, he was 
awarded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy with 
that as his major in 1899. His published doctoral 
thesis was on "The Constitutional History of South 
Carolina from 1725 to I775-*' 

Dr. Wallace had already taught English and His- 
tory for the two years, 1896-8, in the Carlisle Fitting 
School at Bamberg, South Carolina. Immediately 
after taking his degree he entered upon his duties 
as adjunct professor of History and Economics in 
Wofford College, where he has worked ever since, 
except for the half of the college year of 191 7- 18, 
during which he gave advanced courses in American 
History in the University of Michigan. Though 
having a strong taste for practical affairs. Dr. 
Wallace has never felt invitations or opportunities 
to enter business or administrative positions as seri- 
ous temptations, as his love for investigation and 
teaching are so much greater as to prevent his 
feeling that other things are in comparison really 
worth while in terms of ultimate values. 

Dr. Wallace has contributed largely to the daily, 
weekly and magazine press on topics connected with 
history and economics. In 191 5 he issued a volumin- 
ous Life of Henry Laurens, with the fullest sketch 
yet published of his distinguished son Lieutenant 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



51 



G)lonel John Laurens.* Henry Laurens was the 
largest national figure that South Carolina con- 
tributed to the American Revolution. He touched 
the life of the country in so many ways, social, 
economic and political, during the last half of the 
eighteenth century as to make his biography a large 
part of the history of his times. The editor of the 
.American Historical Review so valued the book, as 
one "of such quite exceptional qualit/* that he sought 
to secure a review of it by Sir George Otto Tre- 
velyan, the foremost authority on that period; but 
the aged scholar had ceased all composition except 
his correspondence. Perhaps the last book notice 
ever written by Earl Cromer was a long review of 
the Laurens in the London Spectator, evincing the 
great empire builder's profound interest in the story 
of how British politicians of a former generation 
had practiced the art of empire destruction. 

The following is from a review in the Boston 
Transcript of September i8, 1915: 

"For this biography students of the Revolutionary 
epoch have waited long. Nor is their expectation 
disappointed now that, at last, the story of Henry 

Laurens is adequately told An unusually 

vivid portrait — a remarkable one, considering how 
little anecdote, biography's "high light", is used. 
.... The background of the picture is also clear. 
We see the life of the southern American colonies; 
its curious and picturesque mingling of primitive and 
luxurious conditk)ns, its conflicting ideals — political 
and industrial — ^before and after the Revolution. . . . 

"Mr. Wallace throws much light upon several 
mooted historical subjects, among them: The Con- 
way Cabal, the French Alliance, the Wilkes Fund 
dispute, the Deane-Lee affair." 

Dr. Wallace's two- fold task in the Life of Laurens 
was the difficult one of writing in one narrative both 
the scholar's and the general reader's account of the 
great South Carolina business man, planter, states- 
man, and diplomat. How well he succeeded is testi- 
fied by the fact that the most exacting historical 
critics gave the work cordial approval, while a 
journal of the popular appeal of the New York 
World devoted an entire page to review and quota- 
tions. 

Dr. Wallace's interest in political science is only 
second to his interest in history. In 1906 he pre- 
pared a small volume. The Civil Government of 
South Carolina and the United States, which has 
been ever since the State adopted school text.* 
Scholars in several other States have requested 
permission to combine the national part of the book 
with State treatments of their own commonwealth 
governments. 

A larger work published in 1916 is The Govern- 
ment of England, Central, Local and Imperial.** 
This as a straightforward, untechnical account of 
the British ministerial system free from the his- 
torical and legalistic lumber that so commonly repels 
the general reader from a subject so important to 
the citizens of any free country, or any country that 
would be free. The Presbyterian Advance described 



♦G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York and London. 
♦Southern Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas. 
**G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York and London. 



it as "a fascinating book on government," while the 
New York Tribune spoke of it as follows: 

"Just as some of the best works on the govern- 
ment of America have been written toy Britons and 
Frenchmen, so some of the best on the British gov- 
ernment have proceeded from American pens. ... 
As a clear, concise, illuminating and convincing 
analysis of the British system of government, and 
an instructive and suggestive comparison of it with 
the American, it has no superior and leaves little, 
indeed, to be desired." 

Dr. Wallace is at present planning work in some 
important phases of Reconstruction history in South 
Carolina. While Dr. Wallace is a Methodist who 
values highly the special mission of his own church, 
he entertains a broad tolerance towards all, not ex- 
cepting those detestables of so many Evangelicals — 
Catholics and Unitarians. A democrat by principle 
as well as training, he takes a constant interest inr 
state and national politics, so far as even to derive 
a certain pleasure in acting as manager at a primary 
election, attending a ward club meeting, or serving 
as delegate to a Democratic County Convention. He 
was an active worker for establishing the South 
Carolina Industrial School for Boys, for which the 
chief credit belongs to Mrs. Martha Orr Patterson. 
He was for the first six years of the existence of 
that institution a member of its Board of Trustees, 
acting as Treasurer and later as Vice-president. He 
was one of the first members of the State Board of 
Charities and Corrections, and was elected President 
of the Board upon the resignation of its first Presi- 
dent. Dr. George B. Cromer. 

Dr. Wallace's family life is blessed with a most 
charming wife, who was Miss Sophie Willis Adam, 
to whom he was married January 10, 1900, and four 
interesting and promising children. Though his 
chief form of recreation comes from contact with 
Mother Earth in the vegetable garden, the diversions 
that he likes best are mountain tramping and 
swimming. 

Dr. Wallace is above all else a teacher, but a 
teacher who is in constant touch with the great 
living world. He has been rewarded by the esteem 
and affection of his students. 

Charles A. Jefferies, M. D. For a number of 
years Doctor Jefferies had a large and busy prac- 
tice in his home community of Gaffney, and since 
surrendering his professional interests for the sake 
of his health he has had an almost equally strenu- 
ous career looking after some extensive business 
affairs, particularly as a land owner, farmer and 
druggist. 

Doctor Jefferies, who is one of the potent factors 
in the growth and upbuilding of Gaffney and of the 
surrounding territory, belongs to one of the oldest 
families in that section of the state. He was born 
seven miles southeast of the present city of Gaffney, 
in what was then Union, now Cherokee, County in 
1868, a son of William and Ramath (Hames) Jef- 
feries. The Jefferies family came originally from 
England. In England one of the most famous of 
the family, spelling his name somewhat differently, 
was the great jurist and statesman Jeffreys. The 
American branch of the family settled in Virginia, 
and prior to the Revolutionary war established 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



homes in what is now Cherokee County, South 
Carolina. 

Doctor JeflFeries is also a descendant of the Curry 
family, his father's mother having been a Curry. 
Through this line his great-great-grandfather was 
Nicholas Curry, a soldier in the battle of King's 
Mountain. The Currys are of Scotch origin, and, 
coming from Virginia to South Carolina, settled in 
the upper part of Union County before the Revo- 
lutionary war. 

William JefiFeries, father of Doctor JeflFeries, was 
a prominent South Carolinian. He was born in the 
same vicinity as his son, spent his life there, and 
died in 1906. He owned large parcels of land, was 
a planter, and had many business interests in GaflF- 
ney and other places. He was chosen to represent 
Union County In the State Legislature as early as 
1858, when only twenty-one years of age. He was 
a Confederate soldier throughout the war, and had 
an active part in reconstruction. He was a mem- 
ber of the famous Wallace House of 1876. He was 
the first state senator from the new county of 
Cherokee after its organization in 1897. Many 
years prior to that he was one of the first to advo- 
cate the creation of a new county. Active in the 
Methodist Church, he was prominent in Sunday 
school work. He was one of the builders of the 
first cotton mill at GaflFney. 

Charles A. JeflFeries graduated from WoflFord Col- 
lege at Spartanburg in 1887 and took his medical 
work in Tulane University at New Orleans, where 
he graduated in 1892. He first oracticed in his 
home community and in 1896 located at GaflFney. 
Several years ago his arduous duties resulted in a 
threatened breakdown of his health, and he gave 
up medical practice and has since been entirely 
devoted to his business and farming interests. 
These interests alone constitute him one of the most 
useful men of Cherokee County. He is principal 
owner of the Cherokee Drug Company in GaflFney, 
a director of the First National Bank, and is chair- 
man of the Board of Directors of the American 
State Bank at GaflFney, which was org^anized in 
1919. He is also one of the most extensive cotton 
planters in the state and the owner of a number 
of farms in Cherokee County. One of them, the 
largest and the one in which he .takes most pride, 
lies in the upper part of Union County, and he owns 
and controls about 3,000 acres. 

He has never held or aspired to any public oflfice, 
being a quiet, easy, plain citizen. 

J. Roy Fant. The late John A. Fant established 
the Monarch Mills at Union in 1900, and was presi- 
dent and treasurer of that important industry for 
the manufacture of wide print cloths and sheetings 
until 1907. Thus the name Fant has been associated 
with the textile industry of Union County through 
two decades, and the initiative and enterprise of the 
elder Fant are projected into the present by his 
capable son J. Roy, who is now managing the Lock- 
hart plant of the Monarch Mills. 

John A. Fant was born in Union County and for 
many years was a prominent merchant at Union, in 
partnership with his brother under the firm name 
of Fant Brothers until 1900, after which date he 
gave all his time and energy to the development 



of the business of the Monarch Mills and made it 
one of the largest and most successful textile mills 
in the * South. He was frequently honored with 
public responsibilities, being mayor of Union, three 
terms, resigning that office voluntarily. For several 
years he was chairman of the Board of Trustees 
of Union, and was a trustee of Furman University 
at Greenville. He made an endowment to Furman 
University of $1,000 for the benefit of one student 
from Union County. Mr. Fant was in every sense 
a highly useful and gifted citizen. His death in 
1907 jcame when he was in the prime of his activity. 
The mother was a Mcjunkin, of a historic family 
of Union County. John A. Fant married Ora 
Wilkes, who was born at Wilkesburg in Chester 
County, daughter of the late Major John W. Wilkes, 
and she is still living. 

J. Roy Fant was born at Union in 1885, and 
secured a liberal education, at Furman University 
one year, graduated from the University of South 
Carolina in 1906, and also attended the Eastman 
Business College at Poughkeepsie, New York. In 
January, 1907, he became an associate with his father 
in the cotton mill business in the Monarch Mill at 
Union. Later he became an active associate of Mr. 
Emslie Nicholson, who succeeded his father as presi- 
dent of the Monarch Mills. In 1913 Mr. Fant was 
made vice president of the Nicholson Bank & Trust 
Company at Union and held that office two years. 
In August, 1914, he came to the Lockhart Mills at 
Lockhart as assistant treasurer, and in the latter 
part of 1917 this mill was merged with the Monarch 
Mills at Union, being now known as the Lockhart 
plant of the Monarch Mills. Mr. Fant has active 
charge of the Lockhart plant,^ which has 57,184 
spindles and manufactures sheetings and prints. 
The development of Lockhart as a manufacturing 
village has taken place largely under the eye and 
direction of Mr. Fant. His sound judgment and 
ability had contributed not only to the success of 
the plant but he has been equally enthusiastic in the 
making of Lockhart a beautiful and modern village 
where contentment and prosperity are in evidence 
on every hand. Mr. Fant is president of the Lock- 
hart Bank and vice president and a director of the 
Nicholson Bank & Trust Company at Union. 

Mr. Fant married Miss Nathalie Hunter, who is 
a native of Union County but was reared at Colum- 
bia in the home of her grand mother, Mrs. Robert 
W. Gibbes, and is therefore a member of the historic 
Gibbes family of South Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Fant 
have two sons, J. Roy, Jr., and Murray Gibbes. 

James Fitz-James Caldwell. Though one of the 
most retiring and modest of men, James Fitz-James 
Caldwell has rendered many conspicuous services to 
his state, as a soldier, author, lawyer and man of 
aflFairs. 

He was born September 19, 1837, at Newberry, 
where he is also passing his declining years. He is 
a son of James John and Nancy Morgan (McMor- 
ries) Caldwell. His great-grandfather, John Cald- 
well, came from County Antrim, Ireland, in 177a 
The grandfather, Dan Caldwell, was born in 1769 
and spent his life as a farmer. James J. Caldwell, 
who was born in Newberry County January 13, 
1799, acquired his early education in the Mount 



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53 



Bethel Academy, and in December, 1815, entered 
South Carolina College, graduating three years 
later. He was admitted to the bar in 1820 and 
practiced at Newberry until 1843, when he removed 
to Columbia. He was a man of high principles, 
and it is said that he was once defeated as a candi- 
date for the State Legislature because he refused 
to subscribe to the usual practice of furnishing free 
liquor to voters. Later he was elected and served 
in the Legislature from 1830 to 1835, and was then 
chosen solicitor for the Southwestern District, and 
in 1846 was elected to the Chancery Bench, an office 
he filled with great ability until his death in 1850. 
Chancellor Caldwell has been called one of the 
ablest orators the state ever produced. 

James Fitz-James Caldwell, who was one of a 
family of nine children, attended school at Columbia, 
Anderson and Pendleton, and the South Carolina 
College. He received no degree because he refused 
a position offered at graduation, and thus forfeited 
his diploma. Afterwards he pursued the study of 
law for several months in the University of Berlin. 
He was admitted to the bar in January, 185a having 
studied in the office of General James Simons of 
Charleston. 

Mr. Caldwell was in the Confederate army 
throughout the war, serving in the First Regiment 
of South Carolina Infantry, Gregg's Regiment. He 
was promoted from the ranks for "skill and valor 
on the field of battle," and finally served as aide de 
camp to Gen. Samuel McGowan in McGowan's 
South Carolina Brigade. While there he collected 
in memory and notes the data from which he pre- 
pared a "History of a Brigade of South Carolinans," 
which has been pronounced one of the best con- 
tributions from either side to the literature of the 
Civil war. This book was published in 1866. Three- 
fourths or more of it was written in camp. 

From 1870 to 1890 Mr. Caldwell practiced law in 
partnership with Major Suber. He is now prac- 
tically retired from professional work. He has 
served as director and attorney of the National 
Bank of Newberry, the Newberry Savings Bank 
and National Bank of Greenwood, and has repre- 
sented other important interests. He became chair- 
man of the County Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee at its organization in 1868, and in that year 
Newberry was one of the few counties in the state 
in which democracy was successful. He was again 
chosen county chairman in 1877. He has been in 
politics for the sake of good government, and has 
never been interested in political honors for him- 
self. In fact the only public office he ever held was 
as trustee of the University of South Carolina. He 
is a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

At Cokesbury, South Carolina, September 29, 1875, 
he married Rebecca Capers Connor, daughter of 
Francis A. Connor of Cokesbury. 

Robert W. Gibbes, M. D. While for a number of 
years he was a physician of large general practice 
at Columbia, Doctor Gibbes* work is now limited to 
the X-Ray, and as a specialist in that field he ranks 
as the foremost in South Carolina. 

While Doctor Gibbes was bom at Quincy, Florida, 
August 20, 1872, he is a member of the South Caro- 
lina Gibbes, a family of real renown and widely 



known prominence of achievement and personal 
character. His parents were Colonel James Guig- 
nard and Rhoda (Waller) Gibbes. Doctor Gibbes' 
great-great-grandfather was a planter on the Island 
of Barbadoes, and afterwards rempved to Charles- 
ton, founding the family in this state. Many of the 
name have been prominent in the professions, in 
politics, as soldiers, engineers, and in various fields 
of practical achievement. Dr. Gibbes is the third 
Robert W. Gibbes to pursue the profession of medi- 
cine and surgery. One of them was his grand- 
father, and the other an uncle. One very notable 
member of the family was Major Wade Tampton VA 
Gibbes, who served with the rank of Major oJ Artil- 
lery in the Confederate army, and subsequently was 
9 prominent official, merchant and banker at Colum- 
bia. 

Colonel James Guignard Gibbes was born in Co- ' 
lumbia January 6, 1829, was a graduate of South 
Carolina College in 1847, and pursued special stud- 
ies in mathematics and engineering in the South 
Carolina Military Academy at Charleston. In 1852 
he became chief engineer of the New Orleans, Opel- 
ousas and Great Western Railway, the first railroad 
built west of the Mississippi, now a part of the 
Southern Pacific System. In 1854 he began the con- 
struction of the Columbia and Augusta Railroad, 
which was not completed until after the war. Fol- 
lowing the war he built several of the Plant lines 
in Florida and Georgia. Because of his interests as 
a railroad builder he moved to Florida in 1870, but 
returned to Columbia in 1890. About 1887 he was 
made chief engineer of the Pensacola and Mobile 
Railroad, later a part of the Louisville and Nash- 
ville System. 

Colonel Gibbes had a prominent part ip the for- 
tunes of his State during the Confederacy. He con- 
tributed millions to help the Confederacv, and was 
much impoverished in consequence. Wnile he en- 
listed as a soldier he was detailed by the Govern- 
ment to take charge of his Saluda factory to make 
cloth for the Confederacy. He was also successful 
in negotiating a Confederate cotton loan in Europe, 
and while abroad attended the marriage of the 
Prince of Wales. He was chosen mayor of the 
city of Columbia the day after it was burned by 
Sherman, holding the office two years. He served as 
collector of internal revenue during 1865-66. From 
1890 he was state land agent, and is credited with 
having put on the tax books a million acres of land. 
He was twice married, his marriage to Miss Rhoda 
Waller, then Mrs. Gilchrist, being celebrated August 
8, 1870. 

Dr. Robert W. Gibbes was graduated from the 
South Carolina University in 1892 and finished his 
work in South Carolina Medical College in 1895. 
He was an honor graduate of his medical school and 
during 1895-96 was resident physician of the 
Charleston City Hospital, locating in Columbia in 
1896. In 1905, and again in 1909, he made extensive 
tours through Europe, visiting the various hospitals 
and medical colleges, where he pursued intensive 
clinical research, particularly at the University of 
Vienna where he enjoyed special opportunities and 
privileges, under the personal guidance of Professor 
Holtzneck, head of the Roentgen Department of the 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



University, and a noted pioneer in Gastro-Intestinal 
work. 

Some years ago Dr. Gibbes became the pioneer 
X-Ray specialist in Columbia. In fact he began his 
studies of this marvelous discovery soon after it 
was announced from. Europe, and acquired his first 
X-Ray equipment soon after the value of the X-Ray 
was demonstrated as an essential in modern medical 
and surgical practice. In passing years he has de- 
voted himself exclusively to this line of work. His 
laboratory is at 1508 Sumter Street, and is one of 
.the most complete in the South. He is the X-Ray 
scientist for the medical profession in Columbia and 
his part of the South, and is a member of a number 
of scientific societies relating to the X-Ray. He is 
also a member of the Columbia Medical Society and 
the State and American Medical Associations. No- 
vember 29, 1900, Dr. Gibbes married Miss Ethel Dole 
Andrews of Woodworth, Wisconsin. 

A cousin of Dr. Gibbes is the eminent Dr. J.Hcy- 
ward Gibbes of Columbia, who as a specialist in 
internal diseases is one of the ablest men in the 
South. He was educated also at the University of 
South Carolina, receiving his A. B. and B. S. degrees 
from that institution, while his degree in medicine 
was awarded by Johns Hopkins University. He was 
resident physician in the hospital of Johns Hopkins 
University for two years before beginning practice 
in Columbia. He has also spent much time abroad 
in Europe in post-graduate study and investigation. 

Samuel B. George, a former clerk of the court 
of Lexington County, is president of the Home 
National Bank of Lexington, and has been an active 
and influential factor in that part of the state for 
many years. He organized the Home National Bank 
in 1908 with a capital of $25,000, this capital being 
increased in 1919 to $50,000. The bank has a surplus 
of $10,000 and deposits averaging $300,000. 

Mr. George also organized and is secretary and 
treasurer of the Citizens Telephone Company, 
operating 550 telephones in and around Lexington. 
Among other interests he owns and operates a 200- 
acre farm. 

Mr. George was born at Laurel Falls Homestead, 
near Lexington, July 27, 1871, a son of E. J. and 
Bedia (Taylor) George. He is descended from 
Ludwig George, who came from Switzerland and 
joined the American army at Charleston toward the 
close of the Revolutionary struggle. He afterwards 
settled in Lexington County, where he died in 1807. 
E. J. George was a planter and miller, a very 
capable and industrious man, and gave his son plenty 
of work to do to develop habits of industry and 
judgment. Samuel B. attended the local schools, 
also the publk schools of Lexington, and acquired 
a good education by study at night and by constant 
use of the opportunities presented by papers and 
good magazines and other literature. From the age 
of nineteen he for several years had charge of his 
father's flour mills, cotton gins and corn mills. On 
his twenty-first birthday he was commissioned a 
notary public and on December 19, 1892, was made 
official court deputy of the clerk of court. He was 
elected to that office in 1900, and held it for eight 
)rcars. He was also commissioner of elections for 



delegates to the constitutional convention in 1895, 
and has served as member of the County Board of 
Education. He has been a prominent official of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, at Lexington^ 
and is a Knight Templar Mason, a Shriner, member 
of the Knights of Pythias, Junior Order of United 
American Mechanics and Sons of Confederate Vet- 
erans. 

December 29, 1896, he married Miss Olga O. 
Hendrix, a daughter of J. S. and Martha Hendrix. 
To their marriage were bom five children. Celeste 
O., now Mrs. Henry Wienges, Samuel A., Juanita 
O., Francis C. and Sol Irby. 

Robert Thomas Jennings, M. D. An important 
use of the opportunities and privileges of the medi- 
cal profession has been made by Dr. Robert Thomas 
Jennings, formerly of McCormick and for the past 
ten years of Columbia. Doctor Jennings in addition 
to a large private practice in medicine and surgery 
is resident physician for the South Carolina State 
Penitentiary and for the Reform Institute for 
Colored Youth near Columbia. 

He was born at Edgefield, South Carolina, in 1876, 
and comes of a family of physicians. The Jennings 
family is of English origin and was established 
several generations ago in Edgefield District of 
South Carolina. His parents are Dr. W. D. and 
Mattie Elizabeth (Turner) Jennings, who now re- 
side at Augusta, Georgia, where his father has 
carried on a large practice for many years. Dr. 
W. D. Jennings was also born and educated in 
Edgefield County. He enlisted at the age of sixteen 
in the Confederate army and performed the duties 
of a private soldier, while his uncle. Dr. J. H. 
Jennings, was a surgeon in the Confederacy. 

Robert Thomas Jennings received his early educa- 
tion in a private school at Edgefield, and took his 
medical course in the Medical Department of the 
University of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee, 
graduating with the class of 1897. For a time he 
practiced at Augusta, Georgia, then for twelve years 
was at McCormick, South Carolina, and since 1909 
has found a larger scope for his experience and 
abilities in the capital city of the state. Doctor 
Jennings is a member of the Executive ' Board of 
the Columbia Hospital, and is affiliated with the 
Columbia Medical Society and the State and Ameri- 
can Medical associations. He is a member of the 
Masonic Order and belongs to the Main Street 
Methodist Church, South, in Columbia. 

He married Miss Lillie May Talbert of McCor- 
mick County, daughter of Dr. R. J. Talbert. They 
have two children, Permelia and William Robert 
Jennings. 

Charles C. Stanley. For over twenty years 
Doctor Stanley has enjoyed a substantial profession- 
al reputation as a dental surgeon at Columbia. In 
this time he has also served in the U. S. army in a 
professional capacity in two wars. 

In the fall of 1919 he resumed his private practice 
after having been continuously on duty sixteen 
months in the dental department of the United 
States Army. He offered his services to the Gov- 
ernment through Secretary Baker soon after the 
beginning of the war in April, 1917. He passed the 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



55 



examination required for military dental service 
and was commissioned a first lieutenant in Novem- 
ber, 1917. He was called to active duty May 26, 

1918, with the First Battalion of the Fiftieth In- 
fantry, stationed at Curtis Bay Ordnance Depot, 
South Baltimore. Later he was transferred to the 
Third Battalion of the same regiment at Potomac 
Park, Washington. His most important work, and 
the experience which counted for the greatest good 
to him in a professional way and through which he 
rendered his greatest service in the war, was his 
work in the dental infirmary of St. Elizabeth's Hos- 
pital in Washington. Here he had charge of the 
dental infirmary and in this institution many thou- 
sands of soldiers and sailors were treated. Under 
Doctor Stanley was a staff of ambitious and capable 
young dentists. The duties of this staff were both 
examination and treatment, and many of the soldiers 
were for the first time in their lives impressed with 
the importance of the care of the teeth. Beside the 
practical benefit of this work to the young men in 
fitting them for military efficiency it will have an 
untold value in all future years as a means of proper 
education and understanding of measures necessary 
for good health. Doctor Stanley received his dis- 
charge from the army dental service September 4, 

1919, and shortly afterward received his commission 
as Captain U. §. Reserves, this commission having 
been held up on account of the signing of the armis- 
tice. 

Doctor Stanley was born and has spent most of 
his life in Columbia, where he represents one of the 
oldest and most substantial families. His great- 
grandfather was a large property holder in the city. 
He owned the entire block within which stands the 
First Presbyterian Church. He donated part of this 
land to the church and is buried in the church 3rard. 

Doctor Stanley's grandfather was K. ti. Stanley, 
a civil engineer and one of the pioneer settlers of 
Butler County, Alabama. A brother of R. H. Stan- 
ley, Capt. W. B. Stanley, a veteran of the famous 
Palmetto Regiment, was president of the old Central 
National Bank of Columbia, president of the Colum- 
bia Gas Company, President of the Board of Re- 
gents of the State Hospital and one of the wealthiest 
and most influential citizens of Columbia in his day. 
He was one of the city's aldermen when Sherman 
entered Columbia and was the first to occupy the 
office of intendant or mayor after the redemption 
of the state from "carpet bag rule." 

John Calhoun Stanley, Doctor Stanley's father, 
entered the Confederate Army at the age of seven- 
teen and was badly wounded at the battle of Mal- 
vern Hill. Though crippled in body and fortune 
by the war, yet with undaunted courage, he came 
to Columbia at the close of the war and soon be- 
came one of the cit/s most successful business men. 
He was a member of the Board of School Com- 
missioners which established the present system of 
graded schools, and as a member of the City Coun- 
cil from Ward three he did much to further the 
interests of the schools. 

Doctor Stanley's mother was Miss Mary Isabel 
Carringtoti, whose paternal ancestors were among 
the early settlers of Concord, Massachusetts. 

Charles Carrington Stanley was educated in the 
public schools of Columbia, in Professor Clarkson's 



private school, and in Patrick's Military Institute 
at Anderson. He studied dentistry at the University 
of Maryland, graduating in 1894, did his post-gradu- 
ate work in 1895 and for a year was demonstrator 
in extraction in the Dental School of the University. 
Then followed several busy years building up a prac- 
tice in his home city. During the Spanish-American 
war Doctor Stanley was given the Government con- 
tract for the dental work of the First and Second 
South Carolina regiments. He is a member of 
the State, National and Army Dental associations. 
Doctor Stanley represented Ward Three in the City 
Council. 

He married Miss Annie Wilson, of Monongahela, 
Pennsylvania. Their only son, John Carrington 
Stanley, was the youngest graduate of the University 
6i South Carolina in the class of '17. He was in- 
structor of chemistry and junior law student at the 
university at the outbreak of the war, when he 
volunteered for the Aviation Corps and was sta- 
tioned at Kelly Field, Texas. Since the close of the 
war he has been employed as chemist in the Du- 
quesne Steel Works near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Olher p. Loyal. While he is recogiiized as one 
of the younger business men of Columbia, Mr. Lo3ral 
has made his initiative and enterprise count as influ- 
ential factors in several important lines, each con- 
tributing towards the advancement of the Capital 
City as a business and commercial center. He is an 
official of the Palmetto National Bank, one of the 
leading financial institutions of the South; secretary 
of the Carolina Wholesale Hardware Company; 
treasurer of the Southern Motor Company, and 
president of the Loyal-Covin Contracting Company. 

Mr. Loyal is of Scotch and French ancestry and 
was born at Garnett in Hampton County, December 
7, 1891. His parents were Louis Charles, Jr., and 
Fannie (Bostick) Loyal, the former a native of 
Hampton County. The Bosticks are a Scotch fam- 
ily of lower Carolina. The grandfather. Rev. Louis 
Charles Loyal, was born in France, and on coming 
to South Carolina in the early forties settled in 
Hampton County, where for a number of years he 
was widely known as a Methodist minister. 

Oliver P. Loyal attended the Garnett graded 
schools and also Wofford College at Spartanburg, 
and has been a resident of Columbia since 1907. 
After two years of employment with the passenger 
department of the Southern Railway, he entered the 
Palmetto National Bank, and on the merit of good 
service has been promoted to the assistant cashier- 
ship, an office he has held since 1917. 

Mr. Loyal is one of the organizers and is joint 
owner with Mr. L. S. Covin of the Southern Motor 
Company. This well known Columbia concern are 
distributors for the Marmon, American Six, Scripps- 
Booth Six automobiles, and the White truck. Since 
taking up his work as a building contractor Mr. 
Loyal has done an extensive business in Columbia. 
He is one of that city's hardest working young busi- 
ness men, and is closely identified with its every 
movement for advancement and progress. 

Mr. Loyal married Miss Lidie Richbourg of Dil- 
lon, South Carolina. They have one son, Henry 
Richbourg Loyal. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Sewall Kemble Oliver is a graduate engineer 
and has given his professional services largely to 
the cotton mill industry of the South and has 
achieved especial prominence. With headquarters at 
Columbia, he represents one of the leading cotton 
mills of the state as their agent. 

Mr. Oliver was born at Baltimore, Maryland, June 
25, 1884, a son of Charles K. and Catherine C. 
(Reed) Oliver. He had a private school education, 
and afterward prepared at Worcester Academy, 
Worcester, Massachusetts, and finished with a chem- 
ical and general engineering course at Yale Uni- 
versity in the Sheffield Scientific School. The cot- 
ton industry and cotton milling have been familiar 
to him practically since early youth, since his father 
was connected with and interested in several miljs 
and organized the Columbia Mills of this city and 
helped develop the water power at Columbia. 
Mr. Oliver during 1908-09 was superintendent of 
the Druid Mills and in 1909 came to Columbia as 
superintendent of the Columbia Mills Company. He 
is also a bank director and is one of the busy and 
successful men of the capital city. 

October 23, 1909, he married Miss Lucy Hardy, 
of Norfolk, Virginia. Her father, Caldwell Hardy, 
is a former president of the Norfolk National Bank 
and the Norfolk Savings & Trust Company and 
agent of the Richmond district, of the Federal Re- 
serve Bank. Mr. and Mrs. Oliver have three chil- 
dren: Sewall Kemble, Jr., Hardy and Lucy. Mr. 
Oliver is a member and vice president of the Rotary 
Club and also a member of the Ridgewood and 
Columbia Clubs. 

Columbia Mills. The first cotton mills in South 
Carolina and, in fact, in the United States, to be 
completely electrically driven were the Columbia 
Mills, which also enjoy another well earned distinc- 
tion as among the largest heavy duck mills in the 
world. 

These mills were organized by Mr. Charles K. 
Oliver and building started early in 1892. Opera- 
tion of the mills was begun in 1893. The motive 
power weTe the first induction motors ever manu- 
factured larger than 15 H. P. All the electrical 
equipment was supplied by the General Electric 
Company. The powerhouse was located between the 
canal and river, and electric power was developed 
from water taken from the Columbia Canal. There 
was a distinct advantage in this, since through trans- 
mission of electric current the necessity was elimi- 
nated of locating the mills in the low ground along 
the canal or river, thus securing a more elevated 
position than had been therefore possible for any 
of the cotton mills operated direct by water power. 

Up to 1900 the mills were continued under the 
original management, with Aretas Blood as presi- 
dent and Charles K. Oliver treasurer, secretary and 
general manager. During those early years the well 
known Aretas brand achieved its reputation. In 
woo the Mount Vernon-Woodberry Cotton Duck 
Cfompany of Baltimore acquired a large part of the 
stock. 

The product has probably exceeded that of the 
combined output of all the other mills in Columbia. 
In 1916 nearly $700,000 were paid out for labor, 
figures that graphically indicate the tremendous im- 



portance of the mill as a source of prosperity to 
Columbia. At that time about 1,700 names were 
on the payroll. 

The mill village is situated on high ground on the 
Lexington side of the river and for years the 
people of Columbia and the managers of the mill 
have taken pride in the model character of this 
village. All the facilities for welfare, recreation, 
education, and other means of enlightenment have 
been introduced, and probably no mills in the state 
are surrounded by a more permaent and contented 
and prosperous class of working people. 

For the past eleven years the agent of the Co- 
lumbia Mills Company has been Sewall K. Oliver, 
a son of the founder of the industry, Charles K. 
Oliver. 

Frederick Hargrove Hyatt entered the life in- 
surance business thirty-five years ago, and on the 
basis of accomplished results he has become one of 
the most widely known insurance men in the South. 
For many years he was general manager for South 
Carolina with the Mutual Life Insurance Company 
of New York. 

He was born in Anson County, North Carolina, 
June 14, 1849, son of Davis and Louisa (Pumble- 
ton) Hyatt. He is of remote German ancestry on 
his father's side and of English through his mother. 
His mother was a relative of Bishop R. K. Har- 

?rove of the Methodist Church. His father was a 
armer and manufacturer, and Frederick H. grew 
up on his father's farm and early learned the value 
of hard labor as a means to success. He acquired 
his early education in the Field schools, also at- 
tended Anson Academy and Rutherford College, 
each in North Carolina, paying the greater part of 
his expenses while in school, by clerking at night 
and Saturdays in one of the local stores. His favor- 
ite subjects in school and since have been mathe- 
matics and commercial law. 

In 1884 Mr. Hyatt became superintendent of the 
agents of the Valley Mutual Life Insurance Asso- 
ciation of Virginia. He soon determined to ally 
himself with the "old line" branch of insurance, for 
about two years was a sub-agent with the New York 
Life Insurance Company, and subsequently became 
district agent for the Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany. In 1892 he was appointed general manager of 
the Mutual Life for the states of North and South 
Carolina. 

A number of important enterprises have been 
promoted and have been benefited by his participa- 
tion and influence. From 1894 to 1896 he served as 
president of the Columbia and Eau Claire Railroad 
Company. He has been a director of the National 
Loan and Exchange Bank, of the Columbia Loan 
and Trust Company, vice president of the Public 
Service Company, treasurer of the Southern Cotton 
Association of South Carolina, secretary of the 
Hyatt Brick Company, and president of the South 
Carolina Marble Works. He has been interested in 
dairy farming for a number of years and is owner 
of much valuable real estate, having laid out and 
developed "Hyatt Park," a suburb of Columbia. 

In 1896 Mr. Hyatt became president of the Young 
Men's Christian Association of Columbia, and has 
served as a member of the board of trustees and 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



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on the executive committee of Columbia College. 
He may justly be called the founder of this institu- 
tion, since in addition to a very liberal cash dona- 
tion he gave the land upon which the college build- 
ings were erected, besides devoting his time and 
effort in raising the additional funds necessary for 
the building and establishment of the college. He 
is a democrat, and one of the* leading laymen 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He 
became superintendent of the Washington Street 
Methodist Sunday School in 1900 and served as 
president of the State Sunday School Association 
during 1894-95. He has also been identified with 
the good roads movement, and his influence and 
example both in private and business life have been 
a source of constant value to his home city and state. 
August 12, 1874, Mr. Hyatt married Miss Lena 
S. Kendall. She was the mother of eleven children. 
April 13, 1908, Mr. Hyatt married Miss Daisy Bart- 
lett Kistler, of Columbus, Ohio, and to them have 
been born three daughters. 

Claudius M. Lide is a prominent building con- 
tractor of Columbia and has been one of that city's 
progressive young business men for nearly twenty 
years. 

Bishop Gregg's well known "History of the 
Cheraws" contains numerous references to the 
Lides and their kinsmen the Colters, as amon? the 
historic families of the Pee Dee section of South 
Carolina. The Lide family according to this author- 
ity came from Wales, where they had lived for gen- 
erations, to America about 1740, settling in the old 
Cheraw district. There were three brothers, John, 
Thomas and Robert. The name was originally 
spelled Lloyd. Colonel Thomas Lide, second of the 
three brothers, settled on the Pee Dee River at 
Cheraw Hill. He had an active part in the organiza- 
tion of St. David's parish, giving the land for the 
church buildings and afterwards' continuing gen- 
erous contributions to the maintenance of the church. 
One of his daughters was the mother of the late 
Governor John Lide Wilson. The youngest of the 
three brothers was Major Robert Lide, who served 
as an officer in the Revolutionary war under General 
Francis Marion. Hannah, one of his daughters, mar- 
ried Thomas Hart, for whom the town of Hartsville 
was named. One of Thomas Lide's sons -was Charles 
Motte Lide, to whom history has assigned a high 
place as a lawyer of genius and a famous orator. 

Qaudius M. Lide was born at Darlington, South 
Carolina, in 1878, son of John Miller and Eliza 
(Edwards) Lide, the latter a native of Georgia. 
John M. Lide was also a native of Darlington, son 
of Evans James Lide. He was educated in Fur- 
man University and from that school entered the 
Confederate army, serving four years. 

Claudius M. Lide attended the famous St. John's 
graded school in Darlington, and began his business 
career as an architectural draftsman in the office of 
C. C. Wilson and W. A. Edwards, architects, at Co- 
lumbia. His home has been in Columbia since he 
was eighteen years of age* Mr. Lide for several 
years has had an established and independent busi- 
ness as a building contractor. He has specialized 
somewhat in the building of fine residences in Co- 
hmbia and over the State, and has also built a num- 



ber of public buildings and business structures. A 
complete list of his achievements would be hardly 
practicable, but some of the more representative in- 
clude the Darlington High School building, the Girls' 
Industrial School near Columbia, the Kirkland 
Apartments in Columbia, the Taylor store building 
in Columbia, the residence of Dr. Robert W. Gibbes 
on Calhoun Street in Columbia. 

Mr. Lide is a member of the Rotary Club, and is a 
thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and a 
member of Omar Temple of the Mystic Shrine at 
Charleston. 

Dr. Laurence P. Geer came to South Carolina as 
a member of the Public Health Service of the 
Government during the war, and after resigning 
from that work determined to remain in this state 
and is founder and active head of the pathological 
laboratory of the Baptist Hospital at Columbia. 

Doctor Geer, though he was bom and' reared and 
educated in the heart of New England, feels a 
kinship with South Carolina, sings one branch of his 
English ancestors, who settled in New England in 
the seventeenth century, came south and founded 
the widely known Geer family in this state. 

Doctor Geer was born at Lynn, Massachusetts, in 
1891, a son of Charles W. and Izzette (Patten) 
Geer. His mother was a native of Lynn, while his 
father was born at Norwich, Connecticut. Charles 
W. Geer died at Lynn in 1913. 

Laurence P. Geer was graduated with the degree 
Bachelor of Science from the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology in 1915. He specialized in 
biology and public health work, and that training 
has been the basis of his vocation and profession. 
At the beginning of the war with Germany he 
volunteered in the United States Public Health 
Service, and his previous training made him a valu- 
able adjunct to that service. He was assigned to 
duty at Camp Jackson, Columbia, and continued 
there until the close of the war, when he resigned 
and in the summer of 1919 established the pathol- 
ogical laboratory of the Baptist Hospital. He has 
a fully equipped laboratory for all kinds of tests 
and scientific research as an adjunct to the hospital 
and to the medical profession in general. Doctor 
Geer is a man of thorough scientific training and 
tastes and his presence at Columbia is an important 
contribution to that city. 

Jesse Benjamin Ballentine after finishing his 
college education entered upon a career as a teacher, 
and was identified with the schools of Batesburg 

Erior to his leaving educational work and entering 
anking, which is the field in which his energies and 
talents are employed with conspicuous success. 

Mr. Ballentine was born in Lexington County 
August 19, 1888, a son of William Jonas and Helen 
(Riser) Ballentine. He grew up on his father's 
farm, attended country schools, the high school at 
Lexington, received his Master of Arts degree from 
Newberry College and was also a student in South 
Carolina College. In 1913 he became principal of 
the Prosperity High School, remained there two 
years, was principal of the Brightsville High School 
one year, and for two years was superintendent of 
the Batesburg schools. In August, 1918, he was 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



made manager of the Batesburg branch of the Bank 
of Western Carolina. In addition to the responsibili- 
ties of that position he is vice president of the local 
Board of Trade, and chairman of the local Red 
Cross. He is a prominent member of the Lutheran 
Church. 

March 19, 1917, he married Mary Sue Griffin of 
Greenwood. They have a son James Bruce, born 
June 21, 1918. 

Lark IN LeRoy Clippard. While one of the 
younger ligures among the cotton manufacturers of 
South Carolina, Larkin LeRoy Clippard of Enoree 
has an interesting record as a builder and reviver 
of industry. He learned cotton milling when a boy, 
and is still a comparatively young man. In 191 5 Mr. 
Clippard in association with Mr. Allan J. Graham 
of Greenville bought the Enoree Mills at Enoree 
in Spartanburg County. They faced a prospect that 
might have discouraged men of less enterprise and 
confidence in their own judgment and abilities. Not 
a wheel had turned in the plant for nearly a year. 
The mills prescnte'd a picture not only of idleness 
but of settling ruin. The new owners bought the 
industry from a receiver and started at once to 
completely make over the facilities at hand. While 
they have been in charge less than five years, the 
result is now one of the finest cotton manufacturing 
plants in the state. The Enoree Mill has 36,000 
spindles, 842 looms, and manufactures enormous 
quantities of sheeting and drills. The mill is cap- 
italized at $600,000. The president and treasurer of 
the company is Mr. Graham, while Mr. Clippard is 
vice president and general manager. 

The Enoree mill is located on the Enoree River. 
A dam and water power are the source of electricity 
for operating the plant and other local industries. 
The prosperity of the business itself has been re- 
flected in the model mill village which has been 
developed and is in process of development. Those 
at the head of the business are guided by high ideals 
and purposes in line with the most advanced and 
progressive thought of the new industrial aids. In 
less than five years the village and its homes have 
been practically rebuilt, most of the old houses being 
replaced by new ones. Important public utilities ar*; 
electric lights, water works, ice plant and laundry. 
The ground about the individual homes, will be 
beautified and public playgrounds and recreation 
•spots will be laid out and constructed. The com- 
pany at its own expense has erected a handsome 
new school building at a cost of $30,000. Six teach- 
ers are employed in this building and practically all 
the salaries are paid by the company. Many other 
features of modem community and welfare work 
have been instituted, such as girls* clubs, mothers' 
clubs, a canning club which in 1918 put up 2,000 
cans of fruit and vegetables furnished by the com- 
pany. During the summer of 1919 plans were under 
way for a Young Men's Christian Association and 
Young Women's Christian Association Building and 
hardly a phase of community progn*ess has been 
neglected. 

Mr. Clippard in July, 1919, married Miss 
Katharine Murchison of Camden, South Carolina. 
She is a member of an old and prominent Scotch 
family of lower South Carolina. 



Benjamin Frankun Perry Leaphart began his 
career over thirty years ago as a bank clerk at Co- 
lumbia, has been a figure of increasing importance 
and influence in the financial life of the capital city, 
and among other things to his credit was the found- 
ing of the Columbia Clearing House Association. 

He was born at Columbia December 27, 18^, a 
son of John Samuel and Martha Virginia (Janney) 
Leaphart. His father is remembered for his long 
service of a quarter of a century as assistant post- 
master of Columbia, holding that position under va- 
rious postmasters. The son was educated in pri- 
vate schools, in the South Carolina College, and his 
first bank clerkship was with the Commercial Bank 
of Columbia. Later he became one of the organizers 
of the Bank of Columbia and was its bookkeeper 
and assistant cashier fifteen years. He was then 
elected president of the Columbia Savings Bank and 
Trust Company and in 1907 established the Colum- 
bia Clearing House Association of which he has 
since been secretary, treasurer and manager. The 
Clearing House Association has a membership of ten 
banks, and these institutions clear $16,000,000 
through the association every month. 

Mr. Leaphart is a member and former deacon of 
the First Baptist church and is affiliated with the 
Knights of Pythias. On April 17, 1900, he married 
Miss Annie Louise Bruce of Columbia, daughter of 
Horace E. Bruce. Her father was a native of Eng- 
land' and for many years a merchant at Columbia. 
Mr. and Mrs. leaphart have two children: Benja- ' 
min Franklin Perry, Jr., a student in the University 
of South Carolina; and Edwin Bruce, attending high 
school. 

Thomas Walter Boyle. Every man has a proper 
pride in the growth and success of his individual 
business and affairs. When that pride is enlarged 
and seasoned with a sincere public spirit, derived 
from the growth and prosperity of an entire com- 
munity, it is deserving of special praise and com- 
mendation. It is the enthusiasm which he has always 
shown in the upbuilding of the Greeleyville com- 
munity in Williamsburg County that distinguished 
Thomas Walter Boyle beyond the average success- 
ful business man. He went to that locality in 1886, 
nearly thirty-five years ago, when it was known as 
Greeleyville. and a flag stop on the Atlantic Coast 
Line Railroad. Though at that time he was only a 
saw mill laborer, Mr. Boyle has furnished much of 
the enterprise for several of the institutions that give 
Greelejrville its business significance, and all the 
various lines of development, benefiting every per- 
son living in that section, have been matters of the 
deepest satisfaction to Mr. Boyle. 

He was born near Ridge way in Fairfield County 
in 1856, son of William C. and Virginia (Hogan) 
Boyle. His father was bom about thirteen miles 
north of Columbia in Richland County on the , 
Winnsboro Road, but subsequently lived on a plan- ' 
tation near Ridgeway in Fairfield County some 
twenty miles north of Columbia. He left his plan- 
tation at the beginning of the war between the 
States, and while serving as a Confederate soldier 
was killed in the battle of Lookout Mountain in 
1863. 

Besides the loss of his father Thomas Walter 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



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Boyle had the other handicaps imposed upon every 
South Carolina youth by the extreme poverty of the 
state in the reconstruction period. He lived on a 
plantotion, worked in the fields, and was well satis- 
fied with the wage of twenty-five cents a day. 

Mr. Boyle was taken into the firm of Boyle & 
Hogan, and five years later E. G. Mallard acquired 
an interest. By mutual agreement the name of the 
company has emphasized the oldest member of the 
firm. Therefore this business is known as the 
Mallard Lumber Company, with Mr. Boyle as vice 
president. While the manufacture of lumber con- 
stitutes his oldest interest in the community, Mr. 
Boyle is also president of the Bank of Greeleyville, 
is president of the Greeleyville Land & Improvement 
Company, and through these companies exercises a 
controlling influence in local lumber manufacture, 
merchandising, planting and other interests. 

When Mr. Boyle came to Greeleyville it had only 
a saw mill, a store and two dwelling houses, the 
nearest school was five miles away, and the nearest 
telegraph office and passenger train station was at 
Foreston, six miles away. Considering the present 
resources of Greeleyville it is easy to understand 
Mr. Boyle's pride and satisfaction in what has been 
accomplished during the past thirty years. He is an 
active member of Ae Methodist Church, is affiliated 
with the Masons, Knights of Pythias and Wood- 
men of the World. He married Mrs. Ella Boyle 
Hogan. 

Thomas Ketchin Eluott, for over forty years a 
prominent banker, manufacturer and citizen of 
Winnsboro, was born in the years before the war 
and grew up in the straitened atmosphere of the 
State during the war and reconstruction. 

His birth occurred in Fairfield County October 
^. 1855, son of a merchant and banker and farmer, 
Henry Laurens Elliott. Though his mature career 
has been spent in business affairs, Thomas K. Elliott 
had some active acquaintance with manual toil as a 
boy in the fields and on the farm. H^ attended 
country schools, and in 1875 graduated from the 
\'irginia Military Institute ranking third in a class 
of forty-five. He left school to take the nosition of 
teller in the Winnsboro National Bank. He has been 
with that institution for over forty years, and for a 
number of years has been its president and active 
executive head. Mr. Elliott was also president of the 
Fairfield Cotton Mills at Winnsboro and president 
of the Wylie Mills at Chester for many years. As 
a successful business man he has had a sense of 
responsibility to his community and to all the in- 
tcrest^i entrusted to his char^re, and he has given a 
splendid account of his stewardship. 

Mr^ Elliott is a democrat, and for many years 
has been a member and elder in the Associate Re- 
formed Presb)rterian Church. November 26, 1879, 
he married Miss Carrie Aiken. To their union were 
bom seven children. 

David B. Feontis, M. D. For fully thirty years 
Doctor Frontis has practiced medicine and surgery 
at Ridge Spring in Saluda County. The enviable 
standing he has achieved in his profession is sup- 
plemented by an active and influential leadership in 



every movement affecting that rich and prosperous 
and enlightened section. 

While so long a resident of South Carolina Doc- 
tor Frontis is a native of North Carolina and mem- 
ber of an old and prominent family of that State. 
He was born in Iredell County in 1856, son of Rev. 
Stephen and Rachel (Beaty) Frontis. In the pater- 
nal line he is of French ancestry, though men of 
that name frequently intermarried .with Scotch- 
Irish people in a section of North Carolina prevail- 
ingly Scotch-Irish, Mecklenburg, Iredell and Rowan 
counties. The Beaty family also has prominent con- 
nections in the same counties, one of the earliest 
settlers having established his home at Beaty's Ford 
in Mecklenburg County. The ancestors of Doctor 
Frontis were the founders of Presbyter ianism in 
that section, beginning about 1750. Doctor Frontis* 
father was one of the founders of Davidson College 
in North Carolina, an institution which has grad- 
uated many well known men including Woodrow 
Wilson. Rev. Stephen Fronfis was financial agent 
and raised much of the money among Presbyterians 
for the founding of Davidson College during the 
forties. For some time he was also a professor of 
the college, though his life work was that of a min- 
ister. 

David B. Frontis also was a student for two and 
a half years in Davidson College, during 1875-76. 
He studied medicine in the University of Maryland, 
graduating in 1880. He practiced at' Lexington, then 
for four years at Wadesboro, North Carolina, and 
in 1889 removed to Ridge Springs. For several 
years until loio Doctor Frontis was a member of 
the State Board of Health of South Carolina and 
one of its executive committee. He was member 
and examining physician for the local draft board of 
Saluda County and gave much of his time to that 
patriotic duty for eighteen months. He is a mem- 
ber of the County, State and American Medical 
associations and of the Presb3rterian Church. 

He married Miss Annie McKay of Baltimore. 
They have four children: Grace, Mrs. Ruby Wat- 
son, J. B. Frontis and Mrs. Mary Watson. 

Neil Alexander McMillan is a name that should 
go down in any authentic history of Marion County 
as one of the founders of what is frequently re- 
ferred to as the New School of Agriculture in South 
Carolina. 

Mr. McMillan was born in Marion County April 
18, 1855, a son of Malcolm S. and Elizabeth (Wil- 
liamson) McMillan. His father was a planter, and 
at the time of the war between the states was em- 
ployed by the Confederate Government in the steam- 
boat service, and died during the war. In helping 
his mother conduct the farm after the death of his 
father, he learned early in life to use all his facul- 
ties of observation, and, reasoning from effect to 
cause, he became by the time he began business for 
himself, convinced that the old, slipshod way of 
conducting farm operations which had been in vogue 
since slavery days, must give place to a more effi- 
cient system. From then on, he became an apostle 
of intensified and diversified agriculture. He has 
alwa3rs stood for a greater and more intelligent use 
of commercial fertilizers; for home mixing of in- 
gredients, based on his observation of their effects 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



on his soil and crops ; for the best and purest breeds 
of farm animals; for the growing on his own farm 
of all the farm supplies that his soil and climate 
could produce; for the planting of the best seed 
obtainable and the maintaining of the purity of the 
seed used, and as he believes that perfection in 
development is never reached, for the still further 
development of all seeds, and breeds of animals as 
well. 

N. A. McMillan has always been a public spirited 
man. Forty-five years ago, when it was difficult to 
obtain fertilizers except through local agents and 
the prices asked therefor were almost prohibitive 
to the farmer, based on a credit system, he advo- 
cated the idea of the farmer mixing the ingredients 
himself, and by combining the needs of the farmers 
in his communitv and getting the materials in car- 
load lots for cash, they have been able to fully sup- 
ply their demands at a minimum cost to the indi- 
vidual farmer. He has given his time, his thought 
and his best services unsparingly in thus helpmg 
and bringing together the farmers of his commu- 
nity, and the great progress which has been made in 
recent years in the upbuilding of the community 
in which he lives, and the community spirit which 
exists there may be said to be more largely due to 
his efforts than to any other influence. In order 
to better carry out his ideas of co-operation and 
combined energies as the most necessary and the 
strongest forces in the development of the country, 
he built and fitted up the "McMillan Hall," free 
of charge, as a meeting place in the town of Mul- 
lins for the farmers or for any other gathering 
looking to the upbuilding of the town or surround- 
irfg country. 

As a result partly at least of his efforts, among 
other things might be mentioned the formation of a 
company during the fall of 1919 to buy distress cot- 
ton, which in ninety days declared a dividend of 
forty per cent, to stockholders; also, of a recent or- 
ganization with a capital stock of $100,000 to buy, 
store and sell all kinds of farm produce. 

Mr. McMillan has been twice married. On Decem- 
ber 30, 1879, he married Eunice Irene Davis of 
Florence County. From this marriage, there are 
the following named children now living: Jeter 
Davis McMillan, Malcolm Yullee McMillan and 
Blanche McMillan Austin, all of Winter Garden, 
Florida, and Neilie McMillan, Sallie McMillan and 
George Reaves McMillan, all now residing in South 
Carolina. On June 12, 1907, he married Janet Wil- 
son Northcross of Virginia, and they have one 
daughter, Lucy Lee McMillan. 

James R. Westmoreland. Westmoreland is an 
old English name, and the family has been one of 
equal distinction and of residence for almost two 
centuries in America. Three of the Westmorelands 
left England about 1732 and settled, one in Penn- 
sylvania, one in Virginia and one on the Enoree 
River in what is now the southwest section of Spar- 
tanburg county and in the upper part of Laurens 
county. Those ancestors had a grant from the King 
of England to a large tract of land in that section. 
Some of that land has been owned and lived upon 
continuously by Westmorelands nearly two centuries. 
Through the many generations the family has per- 



formed a great deal of effective service, has ren- 
dered duty in army, in business, industry and other 
affairs, though few of them have aspired to the 
conspicuous honors of politics. Probably a majority 
of the men of the name have been planters, lawyers 
or doctors. 

James R. Westmoreland, who has an interesting 
place in South Carolina's industrial affairs, is local 
manager of the Pacolet Manufacturing Company at 
Pacolet in Spartanburg County. He is a grandson 
of James R. Westmoreland and a son of John A. 
and Margaret (Rush) Westmoreland. He was bom 
on the Westmoreland ancestral estate on the Enoree 
River in the upper part of Laurens County, adjoin- 
ing the Spartanburg County line, in 1876. He is a 
graduate of The Citadel with the class of 1900, and 
is now a member of the Committee of the Alumni 
Association which has in charge the raising of the 
"Greater Citadel Fund," to promote the interests of 
South Carolina's famous military college and is also 
a member of its Executive Committee. After leav- 
ing The Citadel Mr. Westmoreland was connected 
for a time with the Central National Bank of Spar- 
tanburg County, and subsequently organized and for 
five years was connected with a bank at Woodruff. 
Since then he *has held his present office as local 
manager for the great cotton mills of the Pacolet 
Manufacturing Company. The president of the 
company is Mr. Victor M. Montgomery, and in an 
article which follows his name is contained some- 
thing of the history of this splendid industrial insti- 
tution. 

Mr. Westmoreland married Miss Eugenia Childs 
of Columbia. Her father was the late Colonel W. 
G. Childs of that city, builder of the Columbia, New- 
berry & Laurens Railroad, founder of the Bank of 
Columbia, and otherwise prominently identified with 
the leading business interests of the state. Mr. and 
Mrs. Westmoreland have two children, William 
Childs and Margaret Rush Westmoreland. 



Elbert Newton Whitmire is a well known 

banker in Greenville County, has been a resident of 

• Greenville since 1912, and is president and cashier 

of the Textile Bank of Greenville, South Carolina, 

having been one of the incorporators of that bank. 

Mr. Whitmire was bom in Macon County, North 
Carolina, in 1880, and has six brothers and three 
sisters. His great-grandfather, John Whitmire, was 
born in old Pickens District, South Carolina, and 
lived on the Keowee River not far from old Pickens 
courthouse. The grandfather, William Whitmire, 
was born and lived in the same locality for some 
years, but finally moved to Rabun County, Georgia. 
John Columbus Whitmire, a farmer, father of the 
Greenville banker, was bom in Rabun County, Geor- 
gia, and is still living in that state. He lived for 
several years in Macon County, North Carolina, 
where he married Miss Jane Elizabeth Williams. 
When Elbert Newton Whitmire was four years old, 
in 1884, the family returned to Georgia and- located 
at Clayton, where Mr. Whitmire was reared on the 
farm and received a common school education. 

He began his business career in earlv life. For 
five years, until 1905 he was identified with the man- 
agement of the Norris Cotton Mills Company Store 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



61 



at Cateechee, in Pickens County, South Carolina. 
While there he married Miss Hattie Wilson a school 
teacher, of Belton, South Carolina. Mrs. Whitmire 
is a daughter of John A. and Lucy (Horton) Wil- 
son, both representatives of old line families in 
South Carolina. She is also a granddaughter of 
John A. Horton, who was a citizen of Anderson 
County near Pendleton and well and favorably 
known about "Old Pendleton." 

In 1905 Mr. Whitmire moved to Spring Place, 
Murray County, Georgia, and established the'Co- 



inkmg < 
s. He 



two years. He then returned to Cateechee as man- 
ager of the Norris Cotton Mill Company's store 
and was again identified with that institution for 
five years until 19 12, when he established his perma- 
nent home at Greenville. 

Mr. Whitmire has had an increasing part in the 
commercial and financial enterprises of Greenville 
and vicinity. For some time he was senior member 
of Whitmire-Cozby Company, wholesale produce 
merchants. In 1918 he took the office of cashier of 
the Citizens Bank of Taylor. This bank is located 
in the prosperous and growing community of Tay- 
lor ten miles cast of Greenville. In September, 
1919, he was one of the incorporators and largest 
stockholders in The Textile Bank, which has been 
established at West GwNenville in the midst of the 
many cotton mills of that section, and as stated is 
president and cashier. 

Mr. Whitmire is a member of the Baptist Church 
and a Mason. He and his wife have two children, 
Lucy and Elbert Newton, Jr. 

WiLUAM L. KiRKPATRiCK, M. D. A gradus^te in 
medicine twenty-five years ago Doctor Kirpatrick 
has had a busy and useful career, and for a num- 
ber of vears has been the company physician and 
surgeon at Trough in Spartanburg County. 

'fliis town is distingfuished as the home of the 
great cotton mills of the Pacolet Manufacturing 
Company, one of the largest textile plants and fin- 
est cotton mill villages in the South. As physician 
and surgeon for the community and its environs 
Doctor Kirkpatrick is a very active and busy prac- 
titioner, and enjoys a high place in the affection of 
the people he serves. 

He was born in Haywood County, North Carolina, 
in 1870. The Kirkpatricks were originally Scotch- 
Irish Presbyterians among the pioneer settlers of 
Mecklenburg County in North Carolina. Many of 
them are still found there and through all the gen- 
erations they have furnished prominent and pa- 
triotic citizens and leading figures in the annals of 
that historic section. Doctor Kirkpatrick is a son 
of M. A. and Annie Laurie (Byers) Kirkpatrick, 
and is a grandson of Silas F. Kirkpatrick, a native 
of Mecklenburg County. M. A. Kirkpatrick was 
a Confederate soldier and was severely wounded 
at the battle of Seven Pines. 

^ As a boy Doctor Kirkpatrick attended local 
schools, acquired his academic training in Weaver 
College at Asheville, and is a graduate with the class 
of 1894 from Vanderbilt University Medical Depart- 
ment in Nashville, Tennessee. For several years 
he practiced in Haywood County, his native locality. 



and then after a year spent in Texas came to Trough 
in Spartanburg County. His magnificent home 
built for him by the company is one of the finest 
in Upper South Carolina. Doctor Kirkpatrick is 
a member of the County, State and American Med- 
ical associations, belongs to the Methodist Episcopal 
Church South and is affiliated with the Masons, 
Knights of Pythias and Loyal Order of Moose. 

He married Miss Mary J. McCracken of Hay- 
wood County, North Carolina. They have three 
children, Orville Y., John W. and Mary S. Orville 
has been in the United States Navy since 1914 and 
is now in the Hospital Corps of the Navy, sta- 
tioned at Atlanta. 

James Edwin McDonald, Sr. Professional, busi- 
ness and public distinctions in large number have 
marked the career of James Edwin McDonald, Sr., 
as a lawyer and resident of Winnsboro. The esteem 
in which he is held as a lawyer was indicated by 
his election as president of the South Carolina Bar 
Association. 

Mr. McDonald was born near Richburg, Chester 
County, December 15, 1856, son of Rev. Laughlin 
and Malissa Lucinda (Stinson) McDonald, being 
of Irish stock on his mother's side and of Scotch 
through the McDonalds, a family that ' has been 
identified with the Southern states since about 1760. 
His father was for years a minister of the Associate 
Reformed Presbyterian Church. 

James Edwin McDonald was* not gifted with 
physical strength but developed a robust physique 
by active outdoor work and also developed a fond- 
ness for the sports of hunting and fishing that still 
prevails upon him occasionally. His education in 
the country schools was supplemented by a full 
course in Erskine College in Abbeville County, 
where he graduated A. B. July 4, 1877. At that 
time there was no law school in South Carolina 
and having definitely determined to enter the legal 
profession he studied in the offices of McCants and 
Douglass from January, 1878, to January, 1880, when 
he was admitted. 

Mr. McDonald has been a resident of Winnsboro 
nearly forty wears. He soon had a profitable client- 
age, including his work as attorney for the Winns- 
boro Granite Company. Later for some years he 
was attorney for the Southern Power Company, 
assistant counsel for the Southern Railway, and has 
represented a number of corporate and business 
firms. 

So far as he could consistently without sacrificing 
family interests he has responded to calls for pub- 
lic service. From 1884 to November, 1892, he was 
circuit solicitor. He has frequently been appointed 
special judge, and in 1894 was elected mayor of 
Winnsboro. He has served as county chairman of 
the democratic party in Fairfield County, is a mem- 
ber of the Winnsboro Commercial Club, is a Knight 
Templar Mason and Shriner and a Knight of 
Pythias. He has been true to the faith in which 
he was reared and for many years has been an elder 
in the Associate Reformed Church. 

October 12, 1882, he married Miss Lillie M. Elliott. 
Six children were born to their marriage. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



James Edwin McDonald, Jr., has for the past ten 
years been the partner of his father in practice at 
Winnsboro. 

He was born at Winnsboro, January 8, 1886, son 
of J. E. and Lillie (Elliott) McDonald. The career 
of his honored father, a former president of the 
South Carolina Bar Association, is told in preceding 
sketch. The son was educated in Mount Zion Acad- 
emy, graduated in 1906 from The Citadel at Charles- 
ton, and took his law course in the University of 
South Carolina, graduating LL. 6. in 1908. Since 
then he has been in active practice with his father 
and with increasing experience has added much to 
the prestige of the firm. 

July 6, 1908, he married Miss Lucy Pride Hcy- 
ward of Columbia. Their three children are Lucy 
Pride, J. E. Ill and Elizabeth ileyward. 

LowRY S. Covin is one of the very active young 
men in the business affairs of Columbia. Many of 
the customers of the Palmetto National Bank came 
to know him and appreciate hfs good service and 
courtesy in the office of receiving teller in that insti- 
tution. Mr. Covin, due to the increase of his pri- 
vate business affairs, left the bank recently and now 
is active manager of the Southern Motor Company, 
one of the leading automobile concerns of the cap- 
ital city. 

He was born in 1887 at Mount Carmel in Abbe- 
ville county, son of Phillip Augustus and Martha 
Virginia (Sanders) Covin. His mother was a 
daughter of Doctor Sanders, at one time a promi- 
nent physician of Abbeville county. The Covin 
family is of French Huguenot ancestry and mem- 
bers of it were among the first settlers at Mount 
Carmel in Abbeville county. Phillip A. Covin was 
a Confederate soldier and was still in the Military 
Hospital at Columbia, when Sherman's army occu- 
pied the city. 

Lowry S. Covin acquired a good common school 
education at Mount Carmel and McCormick and was 
sixteen years of age when in 1903 he acquired his 
first banking experience, with the First National 
Bank at Batesburg. H^ remained with that insti- 
tution three years apd. in igoS came to Columbia 
and entered the Palmetto National Bank. He was 
receiving teller for seven years, finally resigning 
in March, 1919, to give his entire time to the auto- 
mobile business. About two years previously he 
and a fellow associate in the Palmetto National 
Bank, O. P. Loyal, had organized the Southern 
Motor Company, and they are still owners of the 
business. It has grown and prospered until it was 
necessary for Mr. Covin to resign his connection 
with the bank and devote his time and attention to 
the affairs of the Southern Motor Company, of 
which he is general manager. This company occu- 
pies a first class plant on Sumter street and arc 
distributors for the Scripps-Booth Six, the Ameri- 
can Six and the Marmon cars and also the White 
Truck. 

Several years ago Mr. Covin also established the 
Covin Candy Company, but later sold his interest 
in that business. He was also a factor in the organ- 
ization of the Carolina Wholesale Hardware Com- 
pany, and is now vice president of the same. Mr. 
Covin is also secretary of the Loyal-Covin Contract- 



ing Company, doing a general building and construc- 
tion business. 

He is a member of the Automotive Trades Club 
of Columbia, is a Mason and a Presbjrterian. He 
married Miss Mary Beckman of Columbia and their 
o!>e son is Lowry S., Jr. 

Frederick Douglas Marshall was born at Fort 
Mill, South Carolina, on August 14, 1875. He is the 
son of John Wilson Marshall and Mary Clawson 
Mar^all; his father. Captain Marshall was born 
of Scotch and English ancestry, and descended from 
the Charleston family of that name. He served in 
the Confederate army with distinction throughout 
the entire war and was a member of the famous 
Hampton Legion, participating in all battles of his 
command in Virginia. In 1865 he moved to York 
County, where for many years he held a prominent 
place and had the esteem of that community. His 
wife, Mary Clawson Marshall, was the daughter 
of Thomas I. Clawson and Martha Williams Qaw- 
son. Her grandfather, Col. Thomas Williams, was a 
member of the Legislature of South Carolina from 
1820 to 1824, and lieutenant-governor during 1828 to 
1831 ; his wife was Martha White Crawford. Colonel 
Williams moved to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1835, 
from which state he was sent to Congress in 1841. 
This family was closely connected with the Wither- 
spoons, Crawfords, Whites, and other prominent 
families of York County, and it is but natural that 
Fred Marshall should feel a special pride in his 
people. 

In 1905, December 14th, Mr. Marshall married 
Miss Mallie Gladden Friday; their children are 
Mary. Elizabeth and Mallie Margaret. Mrs. Mar- 
shall is a descendant of some of Qie earliest settlers 
of this state, whose names are synonymous with the 
best traditions of South Carolina. , She is a mem- 
ber of the Daughters of the American Revolution 
and United Daughters of the Confederacy. 

Fred Marshall was educated in the local schools 
of Rock Hill, and also attended Clemson College. 
At the beginning of the Spanish- American war he 
volunteered and was First Sergeant, Company G, 
Catawba Rifles, Rock Hill, First Regiment National 
Guard. On leaving the army in 1898 he was con- 
nected for some months with the Columbia Railway 
Gas & Electric Company, afterwards with the South- 
ern *Bell Telephone Company, Atlanta, Georgia. He 
had several years experience when he was promoted 
to district manager for South Carolina, which posi- 
tion he resigned early in 1919 and organized the 
Marshall-Summers Seed & Grain Company. During 
his long residence in Columbia he has gained esteem, 
both in business and social circles and has interested 
himself in good government. He has been elected to 
the city council. He is a member of the Columbia 
Club and of the Rotary Club and is a member of St. 
John's Episcopal Church. In fraternal circles he is 
a Mason, Odd Fellow, Elk, Knight of Pythias, 
Woodman of the World and a Moose. 

ToLLivER Cleveland Callison is a lawyer and in 
ten years has gained a dignified and successful posi- 
tion as a member of the bar of Lexington. 

He was born at the town of Callison in Edgefield 
County July 17. 1884, a son of Preston Brooks and 
Mattie Ella (White) Callison. His father was a 



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63 



farmer and merchant and served two terms as a 
member of the Legislature, and the Callison fam- 
ily has for generations been prominent in Edgefield 
County. Tolliver C. Callison was educated in the 
public schools and Bailey Military Institute at 
Greenwood and studied law at the University of 
South Carolina. He was admitted to the bar in 
the spring of 1909 and at once began practice at 
Lexington. He is now a member ot the prominent 
firm of Timmerman, Graham & Callison. Mr. Cal- 
lison did some valuable work in his community dur- 
ing the World war, serving as chief clerk to the 
local board of the county and as a member of the 
County Food Administration and did much to carry 
the county over the top in various war campaigns. 
He was lieutenant-colonel on the staff of Governor 
Cooper. Politically he is a democrat. 

He is affiliated with the Masons, Knights of 
P>thias and Woodmen of the World. For three 
years he was superintendent of the Baptist Sunday 
School at Lexington. December 17, 191 3, he mar- 
ried Miss Margaret Elizabeth Reel of Edgefield. 
They have three children. Ruby, Tolliver Cleveland, 
Jr., and Helen. 

Daniel Franklin Efird. As a young man Daniel 
Franklin Efird made a definite choice of agriculture 
as the work and business of his life. A successful 
farmer he has been for over thirty years, has been 
a real leader in the agricultural activities of Lexing- 
ton County, and from his farm his influence has 
extended to many unrelated affairs, church, the 
legislature, and practically all the interests of his 
I community. 

He was born in Lexington County January 25, 
1861, a son of Rev. Daniel and Henrietta (Dreher) 
Efird. Hispeople have long been prominent in the 
Lutheran Church. The maternal grandfather was 
Rev. Godfrey Dreher, a leader and organizer among 
the Lutheran chuches of Lexington County. His 
father, Rev. Daniel Efird, was not only a minister 
of the Gospel but a farmer and merchant and at 
one time treasurer of Lexington County. 

Daniel Franklin Efird had experience during his 
youth both as a farmer and in mercantile affairs. 
He was educated in local schools, in Pine Ridge 
.Academy and completed his junior year at New- 
berry College. Since the age of twenty-one he has 
given his business attention primarily to farming. 
Has served in one oflicial capacity and another in 
the management of the South Carolina State Fair 
Association ; Urst as a member of the executive com- 
mittee, then general superintendent for nine years 
and since May 13, 1913, he has served as secretary. 

He has always been interested in politics and 
church. He was first elected a member of the South 
Carolina Legislature in 1896 and was re-elected, 
serving continuously until 1904, when he was chosen 
a member of the State Senate. Some of his work 
while in the Legislature was devoted to putting his 
home county up6n a sound financial basis. Retiring 
voluntarily from the Senate, he was chosen chairman 
of the democratic party of his county, which posi- 
tion he held for six years. As a young man Mr. 
Efird served as lieutenant of a militia company. 
During the World war he was chairman of the local 
draft board from the time it was organized. Fra- 



ternally he is affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Efird is one of the prominent Lutheran lay- 
men of the South. In 1914 he became a charter 
member of the United Lutheran Synod of the South, 
one of the three general bodies governing the 
Lutheran Church in America. He was chosen a 
member of a committee which had charge of the 
printing and other matters continuously until this 
synod was merged into the one general body. In 
January, 1919, an even greater distinction came to 
him when he was one of the three men of the South 
selected on the general committee of the United 
Lutheran Church of America to look after the 
printing for the united body. 

Albert Clifton Hinds has had a very busy and 
profitable law practice at Kingstree for the past ten 
or twelve years, and has also come to be regarded 
as one of the leading citizens of Williamsburg 
county, a willing worker in every movement for 
the welfare of his section and state. 

Mr. Hinds was bom in Williamsburg county April 
4, 1884, a son of Charles Magnus and Ellen (Jau- 
don) Hinds, substantial farmers of that community. 
He grew up on his father's farm, attended public 
schools, and acquired a liberal education in the 
University of South Carolina, graduating with the 
A. B. degree in 1905 and receiving his law degree 
in 1906. He Tias- sinde practiced at Kingstree, in 
partnership with John A. Kelley under the name 
of Kelley & Hinds.-- .Mr. Hinds is president of the 
Kingstree Building andlLoan Association, president 
of the Kingstree Board of Trade, and is also 
chairman of the County Democratic tTommittee. 
He was a delegate from South Carolina to the St. 
Louis National Convention of 1916. 

December 14, 191 1, Mr. Hinds married Miss 
Nancy Meadors of Kingstree. Her father was 
Rev. W. P. Meadors, a well known minister of the 
Methodist Church. 

Washington Price Timmerman, M. D. While 
his own career has been that of a hard working and 
successful physician and surgeon, since 1902 identi- 
fied with the Batesburg community. Doctor Timmer- 
man comes of a family whose interests show a nat- 
ural inclination to politics and public affairs. He 
is a brother of Hon. George Bell Timmerman of 
Lexington, present solicitor of the Eleventh Judi- 
cial Circuit and who in the campaign of 1919 made 
a very close race for the democratic nomination for 
Conarress. 

Doctor Timmerman was born at the Timmerman 
community, named in honor of the familv in Edge- 
field County near Phillipi Church in 1869, son of 
W. H. and Pauline (Asbill) Timmerman. ^ 

The late Doctor Washington Hodges Timmerman, 
his father, who died in 1908. earned a place among 
South Carolina's most distinguished citizens. He 
was born in historic Edgefield County, his home and 
plantation being at Timmerman. His birth occurred 
in 1832. His father was Ransom Timmerman, who 
married a member of the prominent Bledsoe fam- 
ily of English ancestry. His grandfather was Jacob 
Timmerman, who came from Germany and settled 
in Edgefield County about 1770. Washington H. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Timmerman graduated in medicine at the Charles- 
ton Medical College in 1854. In December, 1861, 
he left his profession to become second lieutenant of 
Company K, Seventeenth South Carolina Regiment 
and was soon promoted to first lieutenant, and in 
April, 1862, was elected Captain of his company. 
He served until the following July when compelled 
to resign on account of physical disability. In the 
meantime he was under General Bragg and had 
command of a regiment during the retreat from 
Corinth. In November, 1864, he resumed duty as 
captain of Company B, Second Regiment, State 
troops. When Sherman's army entered the state 
he was detailed by the governor for duty as phy- 
sician in Edgefield County. Following the war he 
practiced medicine in Edgefield County until 1892. 
For several years he lived in Columbia where he 
had prominent connections with business and finan- 
cial affairs, and was also a resident of Batesburg, 
and during that time was president of two of the 
local banks. For some time he was president of 
the Farmers Bank at Edgefield and a vice-president 
of the Farmers and Mechanics Bank of Columbia. 

With all the duties and burdens of a large medical 
practice he became conspicuous in the public life 
of his county and state. He was elected to the 
Legislature in 1882, and again in 1890, resigning to 
enter the State Senate for an unexpired term, be- 
ing re-elected in 1892. He served as president pro 
tem. of the Senate and became acting lieutenant- 

fovernor when Judge Gary was promoted to the 
upreme Bench. He was elected without opposi- 
tion to the office of lieutenant-governor in 1894 and 
served until January, 1897, following which he be- 
came state treasurer and was twice elected to that 
office without opposition. He served as a member 
of the Constitutional Convention of 1895. Captain 
Timmerman married in 1856 Pauline Asbill, who 
died in 1873, the mother of six children. Captain 
Timmerman in 1879 married Henrietta M. Bell. 

Dr. W. Price Timmerman attended local and pri- 
vate schools, and graduated in 189 1 from the Med- 
ical College of the State of South Carolina at 
Charleston. For the first two years he practiced 
at Kirksly in what is now Greenwood County. Then 
for nine years he practiced at Timmerman and in 
1902 moved to Batesburg. He is one of the leading 
physicians and surgeons of Lexington County, en- 
joys a large general practice and is also local sur- 
geon for the Southern Railway. He is a member 
of the County, State, Tri-State and American Med- 
ical associations and has been district councilor in 
the State society. He is also a member of the 
Association of Southern Railway Surgeons. He is 
a member of the Democratic County Executive Com- 
mittee, and for a busy doctor exercises considerable 
influence in local and state politics. 

In 189^ Doctor Timmerman married Miss Saidee 
Moore of Abbeville County, who died leaving no 
children. For his present wife he married Miss 
Mary Swygert in 1905. They have four children: 
W. Price, Jr., William Bledsoe, Mary Elizabeth and 
John Swygert. Also an adopted daughter, Mrs. 
Pauline Timmerman Asbell. 

Ira Cromley Carson has for a number of years 
been a prominent figure in financial, business and 



civic affairs at Batesburg, where he is active vice 
president of the First National Bank. 

He was born in Edgefield (now Saluda) County 
October 9, 1871, a son of Charles and Carrie (Crom- 
ley) Carson. His father was a farmer and the 
son grew up in the country, attending local schools. 
He continued his education in the nigh school at 
Johnston and in Clemson College. 

Mr. Carson has been a factor in the life of Bates- 
burg since 1906, when he was made cashier of the 
First National Bank. He has been the active vice 
president of that institution since 1917. 

December 6, 191 1, Mr. Carson married Grace 
Ridgell, of Batesburg, daughter of Dr. Edgar C. 
and Ella (McFall) Ridgell. They have two chil- 
dren, Edgar Charles, born in 1912, and Ella Carrie. 

Alexander Scott Douglas. Since the close of 
the war for a period of over half a century the 
name Douglas has been associated with some of the 
best achievements of the legal profession and many 
influential connections with business, civic and soci^ 
life of Winnsboro. 

Alexander Scott Douglas who died January 5, 
1914, went to Winnsboro soon after coming out of 
the Confederate army. He was bom in Fairfield 
County, South Carolina, December 25, 1833, son of 
Alexander and Jennet (Simonton) Douglas. His 
grandparents, Alexander and Grace (Brown) Doug- 
las came from County Antrim, Ireland, 1790, and 
settled in Fairfield, South Carolina. Alexander 
Douglas was a farmer and planter, and a man who 
took a very prominent part in local affairs in the 
Fairfield District. 

Alexander Scott Douglas prew up in a rural at- 
mosphere, and was greatly indebted to his mother 
for his moral and spiritual development He at- 
tended New Hope Academy and in 1853 at the age 
of twenty graduated A. B. from Erskine College. 
He studied law from that year until August 17, 
1854, under Ex-Governor B. F. Perry at Greenville, 
and then took the full law course at the University 
of Virginia. He began practice at Spartanburg in 
1856. He wielded a special influence in the affairs 
of Upper South Carolina from January, 1857, to 
August, 1861, as editor of the Spartanburg Express. 
Much of the oublic opinion in that section of the 
state was molded by the Express during those crit- 
ical years. He served as a delegate to the State 
Democratic Convention at Charleston in i860. 

In August, 1861, Mr. Douglas left his chair as 
editor and entered the Confederate army as second 
lieutenant of Company C of the Thirteenth South 
Carolina Volunteers, McGowan's Brigade, Jackson's 
Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. For almost four 
years he was steadily devoted to the fortunes of 
the South as a soldier and was at the surrender of 
Appomattox on April 9, 1865. At that time he .was 
a lieutenant in Company C of the Thirteenth In- 
fantry. 

It was not many months after the war that Mr. 
Douglas located at Winnsboro in January, 1^56, and 
began the practice of law. In course of time he 
had many influential connections and a large general 
practice. For ten years he was attorney of the 
Winnsboro National Bank, also attorney for the 
Winnsboro Bank and for cotton mills and other 
corporations. He has expressed his political faith 



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65 



always throu^^h the democratic party, and became 
an elder in the Presbyterian Church at Winnsboro 
in 1866 and served in that post continuously aftd 
also as superintendent of the Presbyterian Sunday 
School for over forty years. 

November 6, i860, he married Miss Mary E. 
B>*ers. On December 17, 187&. he married Miss 
Sallie McCants, who died September 20, 1901. By 
his first wife he had three children and by his second 
marriage four. One son is W. D. Douglas of 
Winnsboro. 

George James Graham* is one of the prominent 
and historic characters in the life and affairs of 
Williamsburg county. He was a Confederate sol- 
dier during his youth, and while his business inter- 
ests have always been closely allied with the farm, 
he has played an interesting part in public affairs. 

He was bom in Florence county February 23, 
1842, son of Miles N. and Hester B. (Myers) Gra- 
ham. His parents were also natives of this state, 
and the family .were leading planters in ante- 
bellum times. George James Graham grew up on 
his father's farm, attended country schools, and at 
the age of nineteen in 1861 entered the Confederate 
army. He became a private in Company K of the 
Sixth South Carolina Infantry, later being promoted 
to corporal, and was with that regiment in all its 
brilliant campaigns and marches and battles in Vir- 
ginia and elsewhere. The war over he returned to 
his farm, and so far as his public engagements per- 
mitted has remained by preference a tiller of the 
soil ever since. 

Mr. Graham had a prominent part in the redemp- 
tion of Williamsburg county from the reconstruc- 
tion regime. He served as a lieutenant but fre- 
quently in actual command of a local company of 
"Red Shirts" and more than once he led these men 
to scenes of trouble, due to riots caused by negroes 
and carpet baggers, and was always prompt and 
resourceful in taking the measures necessary for 
peace and good order. Mr. Graham was elected 
a member of the Legislature in 1878, serving one 
term, and afterwards was a member Of the Consti- 
tutional Convention. In 1891 he was elected sheriff 
of Williamsburg county and in only one campaign 
had opposition for that office! He was sheriff of 
the county continuously for twenty years, being 
at this time the oldest sheriff in the State of South 
Carolina. 

Gleni^ Walker Ragsdale is a lawyer of over 
thirty-five years experience, and a man of the high- 
est standing in his profession and in the commun- 
ity of Winnsboro, where he h'as had his home for 
many years. 

He was bom in Fairfield County June 3, 1857. 
a son of Elijah and Nancy (Stanton) Ragsdale. He 
grew up on his father's farm, had a public school 
education, and after that paid his own way while 
training for a professional career. He spent two 
years in Furman Vniversity at Greenville, and then 
taught two years. He read law and was admitted 
to the bar in 1882, and since that date has been en- 
gaged in a general practice at Winnsboro. He has 
been the recipient of numerous public honors, serv- 
Vd. V— 5 



ing in the Legislature two terms and sat as a dele- 
gate in the Constitutional Convention of 1895. 

April 16, 1887, Mr. Ragsdale married Miss 
McMeekin, daughter of John W. McMeekttt: Five 
children were born to their marriage: Ethel, Mrs. 
John McLaurin, a farmer and druggist of Dillon, 
South Carolina; Inez, Mrs. G. G. McLaurin, at- 
torney at Dillon ; William Glenn, attorney in Winns- 
boro, who served in the ambulance corps of the 
American army in France; Robert Walker, a law 
student in his father's office; and Edith McMeekin, 
a student in Winthrop College. 

Cyprian Melanchthon Efird. This is one of the 
most widely known lawyers of South Carolina. 
That reputation is based in part upon the author- 
ship of Efird's "Digest of South Carolina Reports," 
comprising volumes from 43 to 60. This monu- 
mental work was published in 1904 while he was 
serving as state reporter. He is a lawyer of high 
standing and of successful practice for over thirty- 
five years and has been prominent in the bar and 
public affairs of Lexin^on County. 

He was born in Lexington County December 18^ 
1856, son of Rev. Daniel and Henrietta M. (Dreher- 
Efird. His mother was a granddaughter of Godfrey 
Dreher, a pioneer Lutheran minister in Lexington 
County. His father also gave his life to the min- 
istry of the Lutheran Church. 

Mr. Efird grew up in a countty district, wofked 
on a farm, prepared for college m the Pine Ridge 
Academy in Lexington County, and graduate4 
A. B. from Newberry College in 1877. In the mean- 
time he taught school and studied law and was 
admitted to the bar in June, 1882. Since then his 
home and professional interests have been at Lex- 
ington. After getting a secure status as a lawyfer, 
he interested himself in politics. SvaS 'elected state 
senator in 1892, serving four years, >Vas a m^hiber 
of the Constitutional Convention of ;i89§i and Mrks 
appointed state reporter in 1896, an office he' held 
for over twelve years. He has sei'ved a^ a meirtbef 
of the board of trustees of Newberry College; and 
as a member of the board of directors Of th^ 
Theological Seminary of the United Synod of the 
South. December 28, 1882, he married MisS Carrie 
Boozer, a daughter of Dr. Jacob and Eva C. Boozer 
of Lexington County. 

Ezekiel Barmore Rasor. of Cross Hill, Laurens 
County, was born in Abbeville County January 27, 
1868, son of Ezekiel Barmore and Eliza (Latimer) 
Rasor. 

His parents were also natives of Abbeville 
County, his maternal grandfather being Dr. Harri- 
son Latimer. His paternal grandparents were Eze- 
kiel and Pamelia (Barmore) Rasor, the former a 
native of Abbeville and a son of Christian Rasor, 
a native of Virginia and who was of Duti^h ances- 
try. Ezekiel Rasor, Sr., was a farmer and died at 
the age of seventy-five, while his wife died at the 
age of forty-nine. Five of their eleven children are 

Ezekiel Barmore Rasor grew up on a farm and 
was educated in public schools, including the high 
school at Honea Path. At the age of tWettty-oHe 
he began merchandising at Cross Hill, and in 1906 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



became cashier of the bank of that town. He was 
in that post of responsibility for ten years and since 
then has been engaged in the general life and fire 
insurance and also operates a small farm. He is 
a member of the Baptist Church. 

Edwin Chustopser Epps. While banking has 
been his chief business for a number of years 
the people of Williamsburg County regard Mr. Epps 
as broadly representative of the county's leading 
interests whether of a business, civic or patriotic 
nature. 

He was bom near his present home town of 
Kingstree, April 7, 1873, son of a farmer and 
merchant William Epps and wife, Mary R.- (Watts) 
Epps. He was educated in public sdiools, spend- 
ing about one year in school at Charleston, when 
he was about fourteen. He also attended the 
Patrick Militaiy Institute at Anderson, and his first 
business experience was when as a boy he clerked 
in his uncle's store at Kingstree— later serving in 
like position at Manning. From 1896 to 1900 was 
engaged in merchandising on his own account 
Since 1901 he has been a banker, beinp^ selected in 
that year cashier of the Bank of Kmgstree. He 
remained with that institution five years, resigning 
in 1906, to become cashier of the Bank of Wil- 
liamsburg, the largest financial institution of the 
county. 

He was also one of the organizers and served 
as the first president of the Kmgstree Insurance, 
Real Estate and Loan Company and is an ex-presi- 
dent of the Williamsburg County Fair Association. 
He served as trustee of the graded schools of Kings- 
tree continuously from 1906 to I9i6> and spared no 
effort on his part to make those schools adequate to 
the fulfillment of every aim of education. Mr. 
Epps is largely interested in the establishment of 
the tobacco market at Kingstree and serves as 
director in several other of the town's enterprises. 

Like many South Carolina bankers he d^oted 
much of his time during the war to the success 
ojf the various patriotic campaigns. He was chair- 
man for Williamsburg County in the first, third, 
fourth and fifth Liberty Loans. He represented 
the county in State Senate for two terms from 
1910 to 1918. In which body he served on the 
important committees on Education and Finance 
and was chairman of the Committee on Banking 
and Insurance. Mr. Epps is a trustee of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church South. 

May I, 1906, he married Nannie L. Snider of 
Orangeburg County. They have two children, Mary 
Catherine and Carlyle. 

Joseph Benjamin Johns is supermtendent of the 
South Carolina Industrial School and Farm at Flor- 
ence. He is an educator of ripe experience, and 
his personal qualifications make him admirably 
adapted for the task of superintending the educa- 
tion and training of the boys who are members of 
this state institution. 

Mr. Johns was bom in Newberry County May 
16, 1875, a son of William Wesley and Elliott 
(Busby) Johns. He grew up on his father's farm, 
attended high school at Cherokee Springs, and grad- 
uated in 1897 from Furman University. Mr. Johns 



for sixteen years was engaged in school work in 
Greenville and Spartanburg counties, and for ei^t 
years of that time had charge of the State High 
School. June i, 1913, he took up his present duties 
at the Industrial School at Florence. He has 190 
boys under his care and supervision, and operates 
the farm of 580 acres as an adjunct to the school. 

Mr. Johns is affiliated with the Masonic Order 
and Woodmen of the World, and is a member of 
the Baptist Church. September 4, i8g8, he married 
Mary EUie Stroud, of Greenville County. They 
have two children, William Clayton and Bonnie 
Kate. 

LuECO GuNTER^ who for six srears served as super- 
visor of rural schools for South Carolina, has re- 
cently accepted the newly established Chair of Edu- 
cation at Furman University. Hie is one of the best 
known educators in South Carolina, recognized as 
a leader in the educational thought of the state. 

He was bom in Aiken County, South Carolina, 
near what is now the Town of Wsigener, March 26, 
1879, son of James A. and Theoria E. Gunter. His 
early schooling was supplied by the public schools 
near and at Wagener until the fall of 1895. Dur- 
ing the school year 1895-96 he attended the Black- 
vifle High School, preparatory for college. He then 
entered South Carolina College, now the Univer- 
sity of South Carolina^ in the fall of 1896, and re- 
ceived his A. B. degree in 1900. During 1900-03, 
while teaching at Columbia, he took a post-graduate 
course at the university and received his Master 
of Arts degree in 1903. 

Professor Gunter was principal of Waverley 
Graded School, a suburban school of Columbia, in 
1900-01, and during 1901-03 was a teacher in the 
Presbyterian High School of Columbia. He became 
superintendent of the Beaufort public schools in 
the fall of 1903. and remained as superintendent 
until the summer of 1910. At that date he was 
appointed assistant state superintendent of educa- 
tion, but resigned the offices in the summer of 191 1 
to become superintendent of the public schools at 
Rock Hill. He was there three years, and in July, 
1914, accepted the post of state supervisor of rural 
schools, resigning that position after six years of 
efficient work to take the Chair of Education at 
Furman University. 

Professor Gunter married, August 10, 1904, Miss 
Laura K. Perry, of Columbia. 

LeRoy Lee, who has been a lawyer and public 
official of Williamsburg County for many years, 
had just graduated in law when the Spanish-Ameri- 
can war broke out, and in July, 1898, he volunteered 
as a private in Anderson's Heavy Artillery, serving 
with that organization until honorably discharged on 
October 16, 1898. 

Mr. Lee was born in Florence County, South 
Carolina, May 21, 1875, son of Henry B. Lee, a 
prominent planter of that section of the state, and 
Margaret J. (Lynch) Lee. LeRoy Lee supple- 
mented his public school education by three years 
in the University of South Carolina in the literary 
course, and graduated LL. B. from the law depart- 
ment in June, 1898. He began prafctice at Kings- 
tree, and has always enjoyed a good business, and 



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since 1900 has filled the official responsibilities of 
connty attorney. 

July 12, 1900, he married Eva C. Riser, of New- 
berry. They have one child, Serena Margaret. 

Geqige Walter Summer. Largely with an equip- 
ment that was due to a determined purpose and 
utilization of meager opportunities during youth, 
George Walter Summer began an active business 
career as a merchant at Newberry thirty-five years 
ago, and since then has become one of the real 
leaders and executives in the broader commercial 
affairs of that city. 

He was bom at Lexington, South Carolina, July 
15, 1861. His ancestors came to America from Ger- 
many about 1775. He is a son of George W. and 
Martha D. Sununer. His father was a Confederate 
soldier, and died in a hospital in Virginia on July 
13, i8o2. George Walter Summer therefore never 
knew his father, and the mfluences upon his 
formative character were derived largely from his 
mother, a woman of beautiful character. He grew 
op on a farm, participated in its labors as soon as 
his strength permitted, and had only a country 
school education. In November, 1884, he took upon 
himself the role of merchant in Newberry, and has 
been a busy factor in that city ever since. Some 
of the larger institutions with which he has been 
identified are the Mollohon Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of which he was president; Newberry Ware- 
house Company, which he served as president; the 
Commercial Bank of Newberry; Security Loan & 
Investment Company of Newberry, in all of which 
he has been a director. Mr. Summer was the orig- 
inator of the Summer Brothers opened m Novem- 
ber, 1884. For five years he was a trustee of the 
Newberry graded schools, and is now trustee of 
Newberry College. 

Mr. Summer is a Shriner, Mason, and a Knight 
of Pythias, is a Lutheran in religion and a demo- 
crat m politics. 

Outside of business he has found his greatest 
pleasure in his home circle. On October 13, 1881, he 
married Miss Polly L. Long. They became the 
parents of ten children, seven of whom are living. 

FRANas FiSK Johnson found his real vocation 
when a young man, and though he allowed his ener- 
gies to be diverted by a professional career for a 
few years, he then returned permanently to the 
business of planting and agriculture, in which he 
is one of the leading exponents in Bamberg County. 

Mr. Johnson was born in Orangeburg County, 
not far from the scene of his present activities, on 
December 28, i860. He is a member of a family 
that has been in South Carolina from Revolution- 
ary times. Both his father, Alexander Hamilton 
Johnson, and his grandfather, Dr. W. S. Johnson, 
were successful physicians and surgeons and prac- 
ticed for many years in the old Barnwell District. 
Dr. Alexander Hamilton Johnson married Addie 
Powers Hays, who was born in the present Bam- 
berg County section of Barnwell County, her father 
being a native of Ireland. 

Francis Fisk Johnson was the third in a family 
of seven children, and was educated in the private 
and public schools of Bamberg. He began farming 



when a boy, but later studied dentistry and prac- 
ticed that profession about eight years. Since then 
he has given his entire attention to farming. He 
has about 1,000 acres, most of it under cultiva- 
tion. He is one of the largest cotton growers in 
Bamberg County. Mr. Johnson is affiliated with 
the Masonic fraternity and the Knights of Pythias. 

Levi M. Ceol is proprietor of Cecil's Business 
College at Anderson. This is an institution which 
in the ten years since it was established has per- 
formed an indispensable service in the training of 
young men and women for business careers, and 
the value of its work has been greatly enhanced by 
the fact that Mr. Cecil is himself a business man 
of wide ahd generous experience and training. 

He was born at Thomasville, North Carolina, 
March 22, 1880, a son of Jesse W. and Elizabeth 
(Moffitt) Cecil, both deceased. Thev were also 
natives of North Carolina, and his father was a 
minister of the Reformed Church of the United 
States. 

As a boy in his native state Mr. Cecil attended 
the Catawba College, and completed the course of 
the Smithfield Business College in North Carolina 
and the Philadelphia Business College. For several 
years he was employed in general office work in 
Pennsylvania, Virginia and North Carolina, and 
acquired a practical training which has been inval- 
uable to him since directing the affairs of the busi- 
ness college which he established at Richmond in 
1909. Many students from Anderson and adjoining 
counties have been enrolled and have gone from 
the college well qualified for business work, and 
some of them are among the prominent young busi- 
ness leaders of the state today. 

Besides the • management of the business college 
Mr. Cecil is secretary and assistant treasurer of the 
Anderson Mattress and Sprinj^ Bed Company and 
of the Anderson Underwear Company, two of the 
cit/s best industrial organizations. He is a deacon 
in the First Presbyterian Church, and both he and 
his wife are prominent socially. In 1910 Mr. Cecil 
married Inez F. Felder, of Summerton, South 
Carolina. 

Sidney Jacob Derrick, who in June, 1918, was 
called to the responsibilities of Newberry College, 
was awarded his well earned degree Bachelor of 
Arts from that institution about a quarter of a cen- 
tury previously, and had long been identified with 
the preparatory and collegiate departments. Mr. 
Derrick was one of the broad-minded educators and 
social and religious leaders in the state. 

He was bom in Lexington County, South Carolina, 
November 10, 1867, and as a farm boy had the 
opportunity to attend only a few brief school terms 
in his neighborhood. Later he attended Mount 
Tabor High School in Newberry County, and in the 
fall of 1888 entered the sophomore class of New- 
berry College. He was not prepared to carry all 
the studies in this class, but made up his ''condi- 
tions," and though he had to discontinue his resi- 
dence at college for several terms, teaching to pay 
his way, he kept up his work and remained with 
his class and when he graduated in 1892 was awarded 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



second honors, and also the medal for the best 
senior essay. 

Then followed a period of teaching, and in 1896 
he resigned the principalship of the Lexington High 
School to accept the principalship of the Prepara- 
tory Department of Newberry College. His use- 
fulness in that institution has been a matter of 
steady growth. In 1903 he was appointed assistant 
in the Department of History and in 1906 elected 
professor of history and economics. From the con- 
genial duties of that chair he was called on June 4, 
1018, to the presidency, to succeed John Henry 
Harms, when Doctor Harms teft Newberry to oc- 
cupy a pastorate in Philadelphia. 

While busied with many interests outside the 
strict routine of teaching Mr. Derrick hais been con- 
stantly a student. He was carrying on studies while 
teaching which qualified him for the degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts awarded by Newberry College in 1897. 
He also attended summer schools at Cornell Univer- 
sity in 1 90 1 and Columbia- University in 1907. 

At the time of his eleclion to the presidency a 
college bulletin contained an article written by E. 
B. Setzler which may be properly quoted concerning 
some other interesting facts in the career of Mr. 
Derrick. 

"Professor Derrick has always manifested a broad 
interest in educational matters. He served two years 
on the Board of Education of Lexington county, and 
twelve years on the Newberry County Board; and 
he is at present a member of the State Board of 
Education, having been appointed by Governor Man- 
ning in April, 1916. The Governor also appointed 
him chairman of the Newberry County Exemption 
Board in April, 191 7. 

"Professor Derrick has likewise shown an active 
interest in the work of the church. He was confirmed 
as a member of Holy Trinity Lutheran church. Lit- 
tle Mountain, in May, 1893, during the pastorship 
of Rev. S. L. Nease. He has been a member of the 
Board of Deacons of the Church of the Redeemer, 
Newberry, since 1899, and chairman of that board 
since 1912; and for the last five years he has been 
a member of the Lutheran Board of Publication. 

"In 1898 Professor Derrick was married to Miss 
Mary V. Hiller, of Lexington, and to her he at- 
tributes — and rightly, we imagine — much of the suc- 
cess which he has achieved. 

"President Derrick is — as the above sketch plainly 
shows — preeminently a self-made man. The church, 
through the Board of Trustees of the College, has 
now called him to the biggest task to which he could 
possibly have inspired. His friends are confident 
that he will meet its demands with the same un- 
yielding determination which has characterized his 
efforts in the past. The measure of his success, 
however, will depend largely upon the way in which 
the friends of the college rally to his support." 

Thad Jerome Cottingham. While his home and 
principal interests for a number of years have been 
at Lake City, Mr. Cottingham is widely known 
all over that section of South Carolina on account 
of his banking interests. He has made banking a 
profession, and has exhibited striking ability ii\ 
financial matters, and was active in the organiza-; 



tion and in the subsequent management of several 
« well known banks in his part of the state/ 

Mr. Cottingham was born in Marion County, 
September 20, 1883, a son of Daniel Sinclair and 
Ida (Legette) Cottingham. His father was a sub- 
stantial farmer and grew up in the country, at- 
tending first the public schools of New Holly, and 
was a student in Wofford College from 1906 to 
1903. The following two years he was a teacher, 
and for another two years kept a set of books for 
a merchandise company. Since then all his work 
has been in the banking business. For two years 
he was cashier of the Bank of Olanta and since 
1909 has been identified with the Farmers and 
Merchants National Bank of Lake City. He was 
•cashier qntil 191 5, then becoming vice president 
and became president in September, iQio. Mr. Cot- 
tingham is also vice president and executive officer 
of the Farmers and Merchants Bank at Cowards, 
helping to organize that institution. He reorganized 
the Farmers & Merchants Bank of Florence, of 
which he is president. He organized the Farmers 
and Merchants Bank of PamplicQ since September, 
1919, also the Farmers and Merchants Bank of 
Johnsonville, and reorganized the Bank of Cades, 
South Carolina. He is also president of the Peo- 
ples Bank at Moncks Corner, South Carolina. 

Mr. Cottingham is a York Rite Mason and 
Shriner, a member of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and for the past eleven years 
has been a steward of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church South. While a very busy man he has 
found time for recreation in the out of doors, and 
when business permits he delights in hunting, fish- 
ing and tennis. 

April 25, 1905, he married Margaret Cox of iiow- 
land, North Carolina. 'Her father was Chalmers 
B. Cox, a farmer in that state. The four children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Cottingham are William Arrow- 
wood, Harriet Cox, Chalmers Daniel and Thad 
Jerome, Jr. 

Oliver Preston Richardson, who served as a 
captain in the Eighty-first Division in France, was 
one of the prominent young business men of GaflFney 
and had resumed his civil pursuits and occupations 
only a brief time after his honorable discharge when 
death stayed his hand on August 31, 1919. 

He was born near Spartanburg May 25, 1884, a 
son of W. and Anna (Wingo) Richardson. His 
parents were natives of South Carolina and were a 
well known family of the upper part of the state. 
Captain Richardson attended school at Charlottes- 
ville, Virginia, and was a graduate of Wake Forest 
University, North Carolina. He was in business for 
several years as a cotton broker at Milledgeville, 
Georgia, and returning to his home state was with 
the well known firm of Jennings & Bryant at Spar- 
tanburg and Greenville. 

Early in the war he joined an Officers Training 
Camp and was made captain of the Three Hundred 
and Sixteenth Field Artillery in the Eighty-first 
. Division. He was sent overseas, and spent, nine 
months in France. After his return he engaged in 
his former business, until his death. He was well 
known and enjoyed the highest esteem of his busi- 
ness and civic associates at Gaffney. 



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69 



Captain Richardson married Miss Irene Bayne 
Wheat, a daughter of H. D. and Anna (Cannon) 
Wheat, of Gaffney, and member of a well known 
family of that section. Captain Richardson is sur- 
vived by one daughter, Anna Wheat Richardson. 
He was an active member of the First Presbjrterian 
Church of GaflFney. 

James Strong Moffatt, D. D. President of 
Erskine College since 1907, Doctor Moffatt has spent 
over thirty years in the ministry of the Associate 
Reformed Presbyterian Church. While he is not 
a native of South Carolina and while much of his 
work has been in other states, he represents one of 
the old and distinguished families of earlier genera- 
tions of South Carolina. In his present office he has 
the satisfaction of presiding over one of the oldest 
institutions of Christian education in the South. 

Erskine College has recently celebrated the 
eightieth anniversary of its founding in 1839. At 
the time of its organization there was not a single 
institution in South Carolina that afforded the ad- 
vantages of a college training under Christian in- 
fluences. It opened its doors under the presidency 
of Rev. E. E. Pressly. Robert C. Grier was the 
president from 1847 to 1858 and again from 1865 to 
1871. For twenty-eight years its president was 
Dr. William Moffatt Grier, whose daughter is the 
wife of Dr. James Strong Moffatt. 

Many of the ablest men whose careers are de- 
scribed in these pages acknowledge their debt to 
Erskine College for some of the most stimulating 
influences of their early lives. Erskine College, 
while not aspiring to the rank of a university, has 
for years done thorough work as a co-educational 
institution. Under the presidency of Doctor Moffatt* 
it is better equipped than ever. The campus has 
six modem buildings, and the facilities for a thor- 
ough college education are supplied in the midst of 
a quiet and classic atmosphere and with every safe- 
guard to the spiritual and moral welfare of the 
students. 

Dr. James Strong Moffatt was born in Fulton 
County, Arkansas, July 17, i860, a son of Rev. 
William Samuel and Martha Jane (Wilson) Mof- 
fatt. The Moffatts are a Scotch family that came 
from Scotland and settled in Chester County, South 
Carolina, in 1772. Doctor Moffatt's great-great- 
grandfather Moffatt was an American soldier in 
the Revolution. His grrandfather was a merchant 
in Greenville Cotmty, South Carolina, where was 
bom Rev. W. S. Moffatt, who spent the greater 
part' of his life as a minister of the Associate Re- 
formed Presbyterian Church. Martha Jane Wilson 
was born in Tennessee. 

When James Strong Moffatt was a child his par- 
ents moved to Uniontown, Belmont County, Ohio, 
where his father was pastor of a church and where 
James Strong Moffatt lived until he was nearly 

Sown. For a time he attended school at St. 
airsville in that county, also attended school 
at Xenia in Western Ohio, spent two years as a 
student in Erskine college and two years in Mus- 
kingum College at New Concord, Ohio, where he 
graduated A. B. in 1883. He graduated in 1S86 
from the United Presbyterian Theological Sem- 
inary at Allegheny* Pennsylvania. He also did post- 



gradiiate work in philosophy in Western University, 
now the University of Pittsburg, and in recent years 
Cooper College in Kansas awarded him the degree 
Doctor of Divinity. 

He was ordained to the Associate Reformed Pres- 
byterian ministry in 1886, and his present work was 
as pastor of the First Church at Charlotte, North 
Carolina, in 1886-87. He was pastor at Chester, 
South Carolina, from 1887 to 1907, for a period of 
twenty years. On January i, 1907, he was called 
to the presidency of Erskine College at Due West. 
He is also a trustee and treasurer of 'the Associate 
Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary at 
Due West. 

Doctor Moffatt is president of the Farmers and 
Merchants Bank of Due West. November 22, 1886, 
he married Jennie Moflfatt Grier, daughter of the 
late Dr. William Moffatt Grier and his wife Nan- 
nie (McMorris) Grier of Newberry County. Doctor 
and Mrs. Moffatt have nine children. 

WnxiAM Blackburn Wilson. This is the name 
of a prominent lawyer of Rock Hill. Distinction 
and eminence as a lawyer and public leader at- 
taches to the name in a previous generation as a 
result of the services and abilities of William Black- 
burn Wilson, Sr. Today there are two William 
Blackburn Wilsons, he of the third generation being 
also a lawyer. . . 

This branch of the Wilson family is of English 
origin. They came fi"om England about the close 
of the Revolutionary war and settled in the lower 
section of South Carolina, in Colleton County. The 
grandfather of William Blackburn Wilson of Rock 
Hill was Rev. William Stanyarne Wilson, a son of 
John Wilson (who had married Miss Stanyarne of 
Johns Island). Rev. William S. Wilson was a man 
of education and the highest scholarly attainments. 
He married a Miss Blackburn, daughter of Pro- 
fessor George Blackburn. Professor Blackburn, a 
graduate of the University of Dublin, became a 
professor of mathematics and astronomy after com- 
ing to America, and was connected with the facul- 
ties of Asbury College, Baltimore, William and Mary 
College and the South Carolina College. He was 
also a technical 'expert on the boundary commission 
which fixed the boundary between North and South 
Carolina. 

The late William Blackburn Wilson, father of 
the present holder of that honored name, was a law- 
yer whose leadership and abilities gave him a just 
fame all over the State of South Carolina. For 
many years he practiced at Yorkville, and his posi- 
tion in the profession made that city a distinctive 
point in the annals of the South Carolina Bench 
and Bar. He married Arrah Minerva Lowry, of 
Yorkville, South Carolina. 

Their son William Blackburn Wilson was born 
at Yorkville, January 12, 1850, and was educated in 
private schools. He attended schools taught by Dr. 
Robert Lathan and by Professor William Currell, 
two teachers of note in YorkvillcL and was also a 
pupil in the Kings Mountain llfifetary School un-. 
der Col. Asbury Coward, In 1867 he entered the 
University of South Carolina, where he graduated 
with the class of 1869. He at opce took up the 
study of law under his father, was admitted to the 



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bar January 9, 1871, just two days before reaching 
his majority, and beginning his practice at Yorkville 
moved to Rock Hill in February, 1876, and that cit>' 
has been his home for over forty years. A man 
forceful in every way— fine physique, strong mental 
caliber, remarkable insight, and splendid advocate- 
always standing squarely in his client's shoes, he 
has enjoyed a large general practice, and at different 
times has represented some of the chief business 
and industrial leaders of York County and else- 
where in the state, and his name has appeared in 
connection with many important trials. Shortly after 
his admission to the bar — on account of his alleged 
connection with the Ku Klux Klan— he concluded 
that it would be convenient to go to Texas ; and he 
remained there several years — until the excitement 
was over. He was always proud of the occasion 
of his going, and often spoke entertainingly of his 
varied western experiences, as cowboy, etc. 

Commencing in 1884, he was elected and served 
two terms in the Lower House and then one term 
in the State Senate from York County (without 
offering a seccyid tiipe), and was one of that coun- 
ty's representatives in the Sute Constitutional Con- 
vention of 1895. He is a communicant of the Epis- 
copal Church, and a Mason, and a friend indeed to 
all his friends. 

Mr. Wilson is owner of valuable farming inter- 
ests, and on many occasions has shown his public 
spirit in behalf of the community. He was es- 
pecially active in procuring for Rock Hill Winthrop 
College, now one of the state's finest educational 
institutions. He was also the founder of Rock Hill 
Land and Town Site Company, which built Oakland, 
the residential section of Rock Hill. 

Mr. Wilson owns and with his family occupies 
one of the beautiful homes in Soutfi Carolina, sit- 
uated in the Oakland section, where he and his wife 
are always at home to their many friends. 

In 187s Mr. Wilson was most happily married to 
Miss Isabella Hinton Miller, daughter of Dr. W. R. 
Miller of Raleigh, North Carolma, and they have 
ten children, viz. Arrah Isabella, wife of Rev. J. 
W. C. Johnson of Gastonia, North Carolina; Wil- 
liam Blackburn, Jr., whose early career as a lawyer 
gives promise that he will add to the distinctions 
of his honored name; Miss Fannie Britton Wilson, 
a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and 
also a member of her father's law firm; William 
Miller, lawyer; Margaret, wife of C. J. Walker, of 
Rock Hill; Minerva Stanyarne, widow of J. M. 
Wylie; Dr. Oscar Wilson, of Spartanburg; Miss 
Loulie Meriwether, a professor of Latin in St. 
Mary's College at Raleigh, North Carolina; York 
Lowrjr Wilson; and Mary Blackburn Wilson; and 
also eighteen grandchildren. 

On April 30, 1920, after the above sketch had been 
prepared, Mr. Wilson patiently yielded to the last 
call, from a sickness that had come upon him nearly 
four months previously. The issue of life— so far as 
he was permitted to take part in it— was most 
bravely and heroically fought; for time and time 
again it seemed that the end was at hand, as hu- 
manlv speaking it would in all reason have been 
but for his sturdy constitution and his wonderful 
will power. His taking and the manner of it has 
left a deep sorrow upon the hearts of his family 



and his friends, while at the same time there was a 
s^pathetic response throughout and beyond the 
limits of his native coun^. He was indeed an all- 
round mah: of commanding stature, virile in body, 
alert in mind, gentle in spirit, tender in heart; 
and so he had to be — as he was in very truth;— a 
loving husband and father, a warm friend, a faith- 
ful lawyer, an upright citizen, a diligent seeker after 
truth. "By their fruits ye shall know them." 
Requiescat in pace. 

Franklin William Fairey is distinguished 
among the business men of Williamsburg County 
by his evident capacity for successfully handling 
varied interests. He is a lawyer by profession and 
training, is also a banker, an extensive farmer, and 
his advice and assistance hav^ been considered in- 
valuable in a number of important civic move- 
ments and public improvements in his home com- 
munity. 

Mf. Fairey was born at B ranch ville, South Caro- 
lina, February 26, 1880, son of Franklin Ernest and 
Laura E. (Berry) Fairey. As he grew up, spend- 
ing most of his early years on his father's planta- 
tion, he attended public schools, the Carlisle Fitting 
School and Wofford College. He finished his edu- 
cation in the Smith Business College at Lexington, 
KentucW, and for two years was a general mer- 
chant. In the meantime he studied law and in 
1904 was admitted to the bar, and for three years 
was the industrious partner in practice with John 
A. Kelley of Kingstree. He gave up his active 
professional work to become cashier of the Bank 
of Kingstree, an office he has held to the present 
time. Re is also a director of the Williamsburg 
.Milling Company, is president of the Williams- 
burg Motor Company, a firm handling automobiles, 
and is individual owner of about 4,000 acres of 
the rich and productive soil around Kingstree. His 
farming operations are carried on with the aid of 
many workers and much equipment. He oper- 
ates twenty-five plows. Mr. Fairey helped give 
Kingstree its modem improvements of water supply 
and electric light, and has laid out several addi- 
tions to the town. He has served as alderman and 
mayor pro tem, and is deeply interested in every 
movement affecting his community. He is chair- 
man of the Building Committee of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and he has served as a member 
of the board of stewards of the same church for 
ten years. 

June 27, 1907, Mr. Fairey married Miss Alma 
Boyd Kelley, daughter of a former law partner, 
John A. Kelley. To their marriage were bom five 
children: Elizabeth, Franklin William, Jr., Vir- 
ginia, Rachel and John Kelley. 

Waddy Thompson is known all over the South 
as an author, historian and journalist, and bears 
a name which would readily be associated even by 
school children with the most brilliant epochs and 
personalities of South Carolina. 

His great-grandfather also bore the name Waddy 
Thompson, and as a judge and chancellor was one 
of South Carolina's most distinguished jurists. One 
of the most eminent South Carolinians and Ameri- 
cans of the first half of the nineteenth century was 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



71 



Hon. Waddy Thompson II, a son of Judge Waddy 
Thompson. He represented South Carolina in Con- 
gress, but is best known through bein^ minister to 
Mexico at the time Texas secured its mdependence 
from that country and for the assistance he gave 
to the Americans whose lives were imperiled in 
Mexico at the time. His work "Reminiscences of 
Mexico/' published in 1846, contains many thrilling 
accounts, and is particularly valuable as an author- 
itative explanation of the history of the relations 
of the United States with the neighboring republic. 

Mr. Waddy Thompson is a son of the late Gov- 
ernor Hugh S. Thompsonj who was the fifty-second 
governor of South Carohna. Governor Thompson 
was bom at Charleston in 1836, son of Henry Taze- 
well and Agnes (Smith) Thompson. He graduated 
from The Citadel, the military college of South 
Carolina at Charleston, in 1856. In 1858 he was 
made lieutenant professor of French in the Arsenal 
Military Academy at Columbia, and later was cap- 
tain and professor of Belles Lettres in The Citadel 
at Charleston. During the war he served bravely 
as captain of the Battalion of State Cadets in Char- 
leston and other parts of the state. His command 
made a glorious record in the war. It fired the 
first gun, January 9, 1861, upon the Federal war- 
ship Star of the West in Charleston Harbor, and 
subsequently participated in the defense of Charles- 
ton, Fort Stmiter and the South Carolina coast. 
This organization was not disbanded until after the 
stirrendcr of Johnston's army. 

After the war he took, charge of the Columbia 
Male Academy, but in 1876 was called to larger and 
more important duties when he was elected state 
superintendent of education. He was re-elected in 
1878 and i8to. He had in the meantime taken an 
active part in the redemption of South Carolina 
from carpet bag rule. The educational system of 
South Carolina owes a distinctive debt to Hugh 
Smith Thompson.^ While the carpet bag regime 
brou^t min to every department of state life, the 
effect was particularly disastrous upon schools, and 
it is almost literally true that the state had no sys- 
tem of education when Mr. Thompson entered upon 
his duties as state superintendent. His name is 
intimately associated with reforms which cleared 
the educational system from debt and restored it 
to life and vitality. Against strong opposition he 
established the plan of supporting the schools by 
local taxes. He instituted summer normal schools 
for the training of teachers, and generally popular- 
ized education when the attitude of most people 
was one of apathy. 

In 1882 Hugh Smith Thompson was elected gov- 
ernor of South Carolina and re-elected in 1884. Be- 
fore the close of his second term, in July, 1886, he 
resigned to become assistant Secretary of the United 
States Treasury under President Cleveland. In the 
absence of his chief he acted as Secretary of the 
Treasury. As chief magistrate of South Carolina. 
Governor Thompson discharged his duties with thor- 
ough abflity and was elected for a second term with- 
out opposition. As acting head of the treasury he 
bandied Tarious responsibilities masterfully. This 
was particularly true when in the financial panic of 
188^ the power of the Government was invoked to 
prevent a money depreciation from running into 



disaster. In that Federal post he added greatly to 
the fame associated with his name in his home 
state. 

In February, 1889, he was made demdcratic mem- 
ber of the Civil Service Commission by President 
Cleveland. His appointment was not confirmed by 
the Senate during the closing days of Cleveland's 
term, but he was reappointed by President Harrison 
in May, 1889. His colleague on the commission was 
Theodore Roosevelt. He continued a member of 
the commission until May, 1892. At that date he 
resigned to become comptroller of the New York 
Life Insurance Company of New York City, and 
served there with credit for several years. When 
President Cleveland was making up his cabinet 
for his second administration, he offered Governor 
Thompson the choice of the Secretaryship of the 
Interior or the Postmaster Generalship, showing the 
esteem and confidence which President Cleveland re- 
posed in him. Governor Thompson died November 
15. 1904. In every position, state, national and in 
private life, Governor Thompson showed the high- 
est qualities. He was conscientious, energetic and 
capable, a man of marked tact and cotfrtesy, and 
possessed the rare quality of adminisftrative states- 
manship. 

In 1856 he married Elizabeth Anderson Clark- 
son, daughter of Thomas B. Clarkson of Columbia. 
Their son, Waddy Thompson, was bom in Colum- 
bia August 13, 1867. He acquired a liberal educa- 
tion in the University of South Carolina, graduat- 
ing A. B. in 1887, and for the following eight years 
engaged in newspaper work, and since then has 
been in the life insurance and publishing business. 

Mr. Waddy Thompson has hail aL busy career as 
a historian. He is known as author of "A History 
of the United States," published in 1904; ''A Pri- 
mary History of the United States," published in 
1910; and more recently of "History of the People 
of the United States," and ''History of the United 
States for Beginners." 

Mr. Thompson is a member of the Columbia 
Club, and of the Round Table Gub of New Or- 
leans, is a Phi Beta Kappa, and also a member of 
the Alpha Tau Omega. He is a member of the 
Louisiana Historical Society, and the United Sons 
of Confederate Veterans. While Mr. Thompson 
is a Columbian, his business office is at Atlanta, in 
the Candler Annex. He married Pauline Spain, 
of Darlington, South Carolina, October 30, 1895. 

John M. Sifly. In the City of Orangeburg, where 
he was bom and reared, John M. Sifly has been a 
business man for the past fifteen years, and while 
he had the struggles and anxieties of. a man start- 
ing with little capital, his position is now one of 
substantial credit and his establishment is regarded 
as an important commercial asset of the city. 

Mr. Sifly was bom at Orangeburg February 5. 
1879, and acquired a liberal education at Woftord 
College in Spartanburg. In 1905 he engaged in 
business as local representative and distributor of 
some standard lines of buggies and waj^ns. With 
the growing popularity of the automobile he began 
the distribution of that vehicle, and has since con- 
ducted both lines, handling also the accessories of 
the trade. Mr. Sifly is the authorized Ford agent 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



at Orangeburg, and conducts a finely equipped serv- 
ice station, and his establishment throughout is one 
of the most complete and modern in the state. 

Mr. Sifly has never established a home of his 
own through marriage. His father was the late 
John L. Sifly, a native of Charleston, whose remote 
ancestors were English and German. The Sifly 
family has been in South Carolina for many genera- 
tions, and some members of the earlier generations 
were Revolutionary soldiers. John L. Sifly earned 
the love and respect of his fellow men through the 
many arduous years he devoted to the Methodist 
ministry. He became a traveling or itinerant min- 
ister in 1867, and gave forty years to the duties 
assigned him by the Methodist Conference. After 
he was superannuatea he lived for seven or eight 
years in Orangeburg, until his death in 1907. Rev. 
John L. Sifly married Sue (Townsend) Sifly, who 
was born at Cokesbury, near Greenwood, South 
Carolina, and her people were also old South Caro- 
linians of English descent. Her father, Rev. Joel 
Townsend, was also one of the pioneer Methodist 
ministers. John M. Sifly has one brother, M. T. 
Sifly, an Orangeburg merchant, and his sister Lillie 
is die wife of Dr. J. L. JeflFries of Spartanburg. 
Mr. Sifly is a Methodist and is afliliated with the 
Lodge of Elks at Orangeburg. 

John Frampton Maybank. Representing one of 
the old and historic families ,of Charleston, John 
Frampton Maybank has for many years been identi- 
fied with its business affairs as a cotton merchant. 

He was born in Hampton Coimty January 31, 
1870. His original ancestor, David Maybank, came 
from England and settled in Christ Church Parish 
of Charleston about 1680. One of the descendants 
was Joseph Maybank, who served as a lieutenant- 
colonel of the Berkeley County Militia. David May- 
bank, father of John F., was born at Mount Pleas- 
ant, South Carolina, December 10, 1841. He was 
educated in Charleston and in King's Motmtain 
Military Academy, and early in the War between 
the States enlisted in the Rutledge Mounted Rifles. 
Going to Virginia, he joined the Boykin Rangers, 
and afterward was temporarily placed with the Jeff 
Davis Division under Col. W. T. Martin. As 
a member of that Legion he took part in Stuart's 
raid around McClellan's army in front of Rich- 
mond. Upon the organization of the Second South 
Carolina Cavalry under Col. M. C. Butler he 
became a private in Company A. He was in active 
service all through the war, and at the time of 
Lee's surrender was in a hospital at Augusta. After 
recovering he engaged in planting in Beaufort 
County, South Carolina. He married in Hampton 
County March 18, 1866, Mary Pope Frampton. Her 
father was John Frampton, one of the signers 
of the Ordinance of Secession in i860. The Framp- 
tons were an English family and John Frampton 
married a Miss Hay of Scotch origin. In 1878 
David Maybanlc returned to Charleston, and was 
bookkeeper for Thomas P. Smith & Company, and 
remained with the corporation of Thomas P. Smith 
Mclvor Company until about 1916, when he retired. 
David Maybank and wife had three sons and three 
daughters: Dr. Joseph Maybank, John F., Mrs. J. 
H. Wym^n, Mrs. Ed. M. Royall, Theodore^, who 



died January 14, 19 19, and Mary, at home with 
her parents. 

John F. Maybank was reared and educated in 
Charleston, and for many years has been in the 
cotton business. After leaving school he spent sev- 
eral years in Georgia. He returned here in 190a 
and founded the business of Maybank & Company, 
cotton merchants, also The Maybank Fertilizer 
Company, and has conducted these with increasing 
success to the present time. 

Mr. Maybank married Eleanor S. Johnson, of 
Charleston. Their six children are Mary, Davids 
Eleanor, Ann, Theodore and John F., Jr. Mr. May- 
bank is a member of clubs and social organizations 
at Charleston, is a Mason and a member of Grace 
Episcopal Church. 

Judge R. Burton Hicks. With the largest popu- 
lation of any county in the state, also one of rhe 
wealthiest as the center of the great textile in- 
dustry, Spartanburg County naturally contributes 
an immense volume of business and many delicate 
and important problems of adjustment for the Pro- 
bate Court. No office in the county touches more 
vitally the well being and financial interests of a 
larger number of people than that of the Chancery 
administration. 

The county is fortunate in its present probate 
judge, R. Burton Hicks. He is a native of the 
county, is known to most of its cituens as a capa- 
ble lawyer, has had service in the Legislature, and 
is giving a most careful and painstaking admin- 
istration of his present office. 

He was bom at New Prospect, Campobello Town- 
ship of Spartanburg Cotmty, in 188I3, a son of R. L. 
and Sarah (Burton) Hicks, but moved to Spartan- 
burg with his parents in 1895. He is a graduate 
of Wofford College with the Qass of 1909, and 
also took post-graduate studies in Columbia Uni- 
versity of New York. Before entering the law 
he was a successful teacher, being at one time 
superintendent of the schools at Woodruff and later 
in the same position at Honea Path. He used all 
his spare time while teaching to give to the study 
of law, and was admitted to the bar in 1913. He 
began practice in the same year, with home at 
Woodruff, and he was elected and served as a mem- 
ber* of the Spartanburg County delegation to the 
Legislature in the session of 1916. 

In the campaign of 1918 he received the demo- 
cratic nomination for judge of the Probate Court, 
was elected in November, and began his official 
term January i, 1919. He was also for some time 
editor of the Woodruff News, and is a director 
of the Bank of Commerce, Spartanburg. 

Judge Hicks is a member of the Masonic order, 
of the Elks, of the Knights of Pythias and the 
Woodmen of Jhe World, and is one of the leading 
lay members of the Baptist Church in Spartanburg. 
He married Miss Myrtle Lanford, of Woodruff. 
They have two children, Burton, Jr., and Myrtle. 

Hon. Arthur R. Young has earned a high place 
in the South Carolina bar and his own merits and 
achievements have conferred additional credit upon 
a family name that is one of the oldest and most 
honorable in the South. 



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Mr. Young, who is now representing the County 
of Charleston in the State Senate, was born in 
Sewanee, Tennessee, July 3, 1876, a son of Henry 
£. Young, a grandson of Rev. Thomas John Young, 
and a great-grandson of William Price Young, who 
was of English ancestry and came to South Caro- 
lina from Pennsylvania. Grandfather Rev. Thomas 
John Young was at the time of his death assistant 
rector of St Michael's Episcopal Church at Char- 
leston. Henry E. Young, who was bom in Charles- 
ton, was when he retired from practice in 1916 the 
oldest member of the Charleston bar, in continuous 
service for sixty years. He had begun practice in 
1856, and his legal career was only interrupted by 
his duties to the Confederate Government at the 
time of the war. He served as a judge advocate 
on General Lee's staff. He died April 9, 1918. 

Senator Young's mother was Elizabeth Under- 
wood Rutledge, who died February 16, 19 18, only 
a few days before her husband. She was bom at 
Bowling Green, Kentucky, daughter of Arthur 
Middleton Rutledge, a native of Tennessee, and 
granddaughter of Henry Rutledge, who went west 
from South Carolina. The father of Henry Rut- 
ledge was a signer of the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, and a brother of John Rutledge, the first 
Governor of South Carolina after the British rule. 
Henry E. Young and wife had a family of six 
children, three of whom reached mature years. 
Arthur R. was the second child and oldest son, and 
has one brother still living, Joseph Rutledge Young, 
a Oiarleston cotton merchant. 

Senator Young was educated in private schools in 
Giarleston and graduated A. B. in 1896 from the 
University of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee. He 
read law in his father's office, was admitted to the 
bar in December, 1898, and was associated with the 
elder Young in practice until 191 5. Since then he 
has beei^ a member of the firm Hagood, Rivers & 
Young, handling a general law clientage. 

Mr. Yotmg served as assistant United States at- 
torney frdm 191 1 to 1914. He was a member of the 
General Assembly in 1917-18, and in the latter year 
was elected to the State Senate. He is a member 
of the Carolina Yacht Club and of Charleston 
Lodge No. 242 of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. 

December 19, 1907, he married Nannie C. Con- 
ner, a daughter of General James Conner of Char- 
leston. They have three sons, named Arthur Middle- 
ton, James Conner and Joseph Rutledge. 

Frank Ravenel Frost. In the thirty years since 
he wad admitted to the "bar Frank Ravenel Frost 
has always commanded a large clientage and has 
done a valuable practice as a lawyer.^ He is one 
of Charleston's most public spirited citizens, and 
has found time to attend to the interests of many 
organizations outside of his immediate profession. 

i^r. Frost was bom at Society Hill, South Caro- 
lina, October 17, 1863, a son of Elias Horry and 
Frances Ravenel Frost. While the Frosts are an 
English family the Ravenels were French Huguenots. 
His father was a native of Charleston, was educated 
in Yale College, and became a prominent merchant 
and banker. He lived to be seventy years of age. 
He was at one time president of the Chamber of 



Commerce. While a business man, he was also 
distinguished by his love and knowledge of books 
and literature. His wife, Frances Ravenel Frost, 
was born at Charleston and lived to be seventy- 
three years of age. Frank Ravenel Frost is the 
second of five children, and the only son still living. 
His two sisters are Mrs. Ella R. Porcher and Mrs. 
Harriet H. Parker, both of Charleston. 

Mr. Frost attended private school at Charleston, 
spent one year at Sewanee, Tennessee, and in 1886 
received his A. B. degree from Harvard University. 
He then returned to Charleston and read law in 
the office of Smythe Lee and was admitted to the 
bar in 1888. After that he practiced as a member 
of the firm Sjnyth, Lee & Frost until 1911, since 
which date he has been alone in his profession. 

During the Spanish-American war in 1898 he 
served as captain in the Third Regiment of the 
United States Volunteer Infantry under Colonel 
P. H. Ray, and saw some service in Cuba. He is 
a trustee of the Porter Military Academy at Char- 
leston, and gives much of his time to that institu- 
tion. He is also a chancellor of the Episcopal 
Church for the diocese of South Carolina. He 
has served as a member of the Charleston - School 
Board and in 1914 was chairman of the Democratic 
City Convention and in 1919 chairman of the City 
Democratic Executive Committee. At different 
times he has given his services to various political, 
charitable and other boards, is a member of the 
Charleston Gub, Country Qub, the Carolina Yacht 
Club, and other social or^^anizations. 

In 1900 he married Miss Celestine H. Preston, 
daughter of John and Celestine E. Preston. They 
have two sons, E. Horry and John Preston. 

George Walton Williams, former president of 
the Carolina Savings Bank of Charleston, was born 
at Charleston in i860 and attended the well known 
schools of Dr. Bmns and Professor Sachtleben in 
his native city. He prepared for Harvard College 
at Adams Academy in Quincy, Massachusetts, and 
spent a year and a half abroad in travel .and study. 
During that time he was a student in the University 
of Bonn on the Rhine. 

Returning from abroad to Charleston he engaged 
actively in business. For a time he was connected 
with the management of the Charleston Iron Works, 
and left that firm to become a partner in the cotton 
and fertilizer firm of Robertson, Taylor and Wil- 
liams.* After a few years he retired from mercan- 
tile pursuits to become identified with the Carolina 
Savings Bank, and was successively its cashier, vice 
president and president. 

After an active business life of thirty-seven years 
Mr. Williams resigned the presidency of this bank 
and has since devoted his time and energies to work 
among the orphans of South Carolina and else- 
where. This has been a really significant service 
and the facts speak eloquently. He is chairman 
of the Board of Commissioners of the Charleston 
Orphan House, an institution founded in 1790 and 
with a continuous record of beneficence covering 
120 years. 

Mr. Williams is also chairman of the Board of 
Trustees of the Epworth Orphanage at Columbia 
and has had much to do in shaping the life of that 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



home for dependent children. In the cause of the 
orphans he has devoted his best thought and service 
for a number of years, and has visited the best in- 
stitutions of the kind both in Europe and America. 
He is directly interested in the welfare of many 
thousands of children at this time. 

For many years Mr. Williams has served as 
trustee of the William Enston Home, an institu- 
tion "to make old age comfortable," and was for 
twelve years an alderman of the City of Charles- 
ton. He is a member of the Charleston Club, the 
Carolina Yacht Club and the Charleston Country 
Qub. 

Mr. Williams married Margaret Adger, of Char- 
leston, .and their children are: Margaret, wife of 
Andrew M. Law, of Spartanburg; George W., Jr., 
Nashville, Tennessee; Ellison A., of Charleston. 
South Carolina; Susan S., of Charleston; and 
Martha, wife of Henry J. Blackford, of Engle- 
wood, N. J. 

Hon. Andrew Jackson Bbthea, who recently re- 
tired from the omce of lieutenant governor, is not 
only one of the attractive personalities in South 
Carolina public life, but a man of undoubted ability 
and true leadership with a proven record in pro- 
fessional and business affairs. 

He was born August 17, 1870, at Free State, now 
in Dillon County, but formerly in the upper por- 
tion of Marion County. His early years were spent 
on a farm and in the invigorating environment of 
the country. His father, Dr. Andrew J. Bethea, 
a native of Marion County and a graduate of the 
South Carolina Medical College of Charleston, was 
both a physician and planter. During the war be- 
tween the states he experienced hard and distin- 
guished service as a Confederate soldier and after- 
wards was equally useful and influential as a citizen 
and phjTsician. He died in the prime of manhood 
at the age of forty-three in 1801. His wife was 
Annie M. Allen, who was bom in Marlboro thb 
state October 22, 1843, and died June 19, 1919. 
Her father. Rev. Joel Allen was a Well known Bap- 
tbt minister. A woman of great refinement and 
culture, she demonstrated her force of character 
when as a widow with five children, three sons and 
two daughters, she reared and educated them and 
proved a model mother and is remembered for her 
exceptional gifts and attainments. 

Andrew Jackson Bethea attended Centerville 
Academy and Dalcho School in Dillon County and 
took his college work in Wake Forest College, North 
Carolina, where he graduated B. A. in 1902 and 
Master of Arts in 1904. During 1905 he was a 
student of the University of Tennessee, and he 
received the Master of Arts degree from the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina in 1910. 

Mr. Bethea, who has been a resident of Columbia 
since 1907, has made for himself a name in several 
sections of the state. For one term he was prin- 
cipal of the Downer Institute of Beech Island, in 
Aiken County, for one term was principal of the 
Hopkins Graded School in Richland County, and 
for a like time was principal of the Camden graded 
school. For a brief time he also edited and published 
the Darlington Press, now The News and Press 
at Darlington. 



Mr. Bethea was appointed private secretary to 
Governor Martin F. Ansel and served as such from 
1907 to 191 1. He was admitted to the bar by the 
Supreme Court of South Carolina in December, 
1910, and is also licensed to practice in the Federal 
Courts. During his legal career he has success- 
fully handled many important cases, and enjoys 
an unusually select practice. Mr. Bethea was elected 
code commissioner of South Carolina on the first 
ballot by the Joint Assembly, and served from 191 1 
to 191 5, during which time he codified the laws of 
the State of South Carolina which is known as the 
Code of 191 2. 

His service as lieutenant governor was from 19 15 
to 1919. He was twice . elected, each time over 
strong competitors. During his second campaign he 
received the largest vote ever given ' a candidate 
with opposition for a state office in South Caro- 
lina. In 1918 Mr. Bethea was a candidate for gov- 
ernor, makii^ the question of loyalty paramount 
in hfis campaign. He received a splendid vote and 
is regarded as a strong and aggressive politkal 
leader in his state. 

Mr. Bethea is a democrat not only in a partisan 
sense, but in the literal interpretation of the word, 
and has always made his influence count in the 
battle for the rights and rule of the people. In 
many ways he has been active in movements for 
the advancement of his partv. He attended the 
democratic convention at Baltimore when Wood- 
row Wilson was first nominated, and latter cam- 
paigned for him in doubtful states and also made 
many speeches to aid in the re-election of President 
Wilson in 1916. 

Mr. Bethea has taken an active part in military 
?»ffair« havini? been a member of' the South Caro- 
lina State Reserve Militia since its organization. 
In 1917 he volunteered for service in the European 
war and later at his own request was inducted as a 
private into the. United States Army. In 1918 he 
entered the Officer! Training Camp at Camp Hum- 
phreys, Virginia, and was transferred to Camp 
Kendrick. New Jersey, and completed training in 
the Training Battalion and U. S. Gas School, tak- 
ing the full course in gas defensive and offensive 
warfare. He received a certificate of graduation 
and was recommended for a commission as. major, 
and later was commissioned with that rank in the 
army and now holds that rank in the reserves. 

In the midst of a busy life, however, Mr. Bethea 
has found time to serve on several business boards 
and is interested in a number of financial enter- 
prises. He has made a decided success in business, 
although he be^n life without means, educatin^r 
himself and relying upon his own resources to be- 
come established. In this respect he is typical of 
what is best in modern commercial life and is 
renrcsentative of the highest type of American 
citizen. 

Mr. Bethea is a prominent member of the Baptist 
denomination and has served in many impoi^ant 
positions in his church. He is president of thnc 
board of trustees of the South Carolina Baptist 
Hospital; is a member of the Board of Deacons of 
the historic First Baptist Church of Columbia, 
in which the Secession Convention was -.held, has 
served as the chairman of the board, and for 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



75 



several years was superintendent of a flourishing 
Sunday school in this church. Mr. Bethea is also 
a member of the Board of Trustees of the Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky, 
and acted as chairman of the committee that or- 
g^anized and established the Young Women's Chris- 
tion Association, of Columbia. 

Mr. Bethea is a Mason, an Elk, a Knight of 
Pythias, and a Woodman of the World, and is 
affiliated with many other organizations, institutions 
and movements to advance the material, industrial, 
social, political and moral life of the state and 
nation. 

Robert Wilson, D. D. Trained for the profes- 
sion of medicine and serving as assistant surgeon 
in the Confederate army during the war between 
the states, Dr. Robert Wilson after the war pre- 
pared for the ministry of the Episcopal Church and 
for half a century has been one of the dignified 
leaders and scholars in that church, not only in 
South Carolina but in other states. 

Reverend Doctor Wilson was bom at Charleston 
October 28, 1838, son of James M. and Ann Isabel 
(Gibbes) Wilson. He represents several well 
known colonial families and is of Scotch, English 
and French ancestiy. His father at one time was a 
leading merchant in Charleston. He is descended 
from a Dr. Robert Wilson who came from Scot- 
land in 17^0 and became one of Charleston's most 
noted physicjans of colonial times. In the maternal 
line he is also descended from Governor Robert 
Gibbes, who came from England in 1670 via Bar- 
bados and became one of the Proprietary Governors 
of the Province of Carolina. 

Robert Wilson received his early education in 
private schools, attended the College of Charleston, 
and afterward the Medical College of the State of 
South Carolina, where he graduated in 1859. For 
two years he practiced medicine at Pineville, later 
at Camden, and at the beginning of the war enlisted 
his services in behalf of the Confederate Govern- 
ment and was appointed assistant surgeon in the 
army. He performed ajl the varied duties re- 
quired of him until 1864. On leaving the army he 
entered the Theological Seminary at Camden, grad- 
uated, and in 1883 Washington College at Chester- 
town, Maryland, conferred upon him the degree 
D. D. He was rector of Claremont Parish at 
Statesburg, South Carolina, afterward at St. 
Paul's, Kent, Maryland, and for thirteen years was 
in charge of St. Peter's Parish at Easton, Mary- 
land. He then Teturned to his native city and be- 
came rector of St. Luke's Parish, which he served 
for seventeen years, and then had four parishes as 
missionary until August, 191 7. He has also been 
vice president of the Church Home, president of 
the Charleston Library Society, president of the 
Huguenot Society of South Carolina, and of the 
Elliott Society, has acted as commander of Camp 
Sumter of the United Confederate Veterans, and 
twice as colonel of the Charleston Regiment, U. C. 
Veterans, as chaplain of St. Andrew s Society, is 
affiliated with the Phi Kappa Psi College Fraternity, 
the Huguenot Society of America and of London, 
England. In 1870 he published "Confirmation Lec- 
tures" and in 1883 "The Sower," and is author of 



many briefer articles and papers found in the pe- 
riodical press, both religious and secular. 

November 22, 1859, Doctor Wilson married Mary 
Susan Gibbes. On April 22, 1862, he married Ann 
Jane Shand. And now, 1920, they have been mar- 
ried almost fifty-nine years. Of the eight children 
born to them but two are living. Dr. Robert Wil- 
son, Jr., of Charleston, and Mary, widow of Elias 
Ball, also of Charleston. Doctor Wilson, Sr., has 
nine grandchildren. The eldest granddaughter. 
Miss Mary W. Ball, an artist, is in the service of 
the United States Government Engineer Depart- 
ment in the map-making drafting department. 

. Edward W. Durant, Jr. A northern lumberman, 
coming to Charleston about fifteen years ago to 
look after the mills and other interests of his asso- 
ciates in this state, Mr. Durant has found here op- 
portunities for his ambition as a developer and has 
become absorbed in a growing list of enterprises that 
not only aroused his complete enthusiasm but are 
of direct benefit to the changing agricultural and 
industrial program of South Carolina. 

Mr. Durant was born xt Stillwater, Minnesota, 
in 1864, and was graduated from Yale University 
with the class of 1887. He is therefore a product 
of the rugged pioneer circumstances of the great 
Northwest, and also of one of the finest institu- 
tions of learning in America. He returned to 
Minnesota from university to enter the Itunber in- 
dustry. He worked in Itmiber camps, and acquired 
a technical knowledge of every branch of the busi- 
ness. Eventually he became an individual timber 
owner and lumber manufacturer and was associated 
with a group of men prominent in that business 
in the hforthwest. Like many other such organiza- 
tions, with the decrease of the timber supply in the 
North they began acquiring holdings in the South. 
It was for the purpose of taking charge of these 
interests and mills in South Carolma that Mr. Dur- 
ant located at Charleston in 1904. 

It was not long before he was awake to the won- 
derful natural wealth and the inducements to cap- 
ital in developing agricultural and other enterprises, 
and he decided to make Charleston his permanent 
home. There is no native son more enthusiastic 
concerning the great future of Charleston and its 
surrounding rich territory than Mr. Durant His 
capital and personal energy have been responsible 
for a number of enterprises, but two of them, per- 
haps of greatest significance, Sire his stock farms, 
one being the T Farm at Rantowles, fourteen miles 
south of Charleston in Charleston County, and the 
other the Pine Grove Farm in Berkeley County, 
adjoming the Town of Mount Holly. The T Farm 
comprises over 5,000 acres of very rich land orig- 
inally a rice plantation, but for several years before 
it was acquired by Mr. Durant the land had been 
neglected and impoverished. Mr. Durant spent 
$50,000 or more developing this land into a modern 
stock farm. It is a large and profitable enterprise 
in itself, and has also been frequently pointed out 
as a practical demonstration of the results that fol- 
low judicious combination of livestock husbandry 
with diversified crop growing. It is the home of 
a very fine herd of pure bred Hereford cattle headed 
by registered bulls, and of registered Duroc^Jersey 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



hogs. Mr. Durant has made similar and about 
equally extensive improvements on the Pine Grove 
Farm, which is also the breeding ground for Duroc- 
Jcrsey and other high grade registered livestock. 
Part of this farm comprises the Pine Grove Club. 
By his practical efforts on these farms Mr. Durant 
anticipated by several years the now general propa- 
gsmda for diversifying South Carolina agriculture 
with the raising of livestock as a means of com- 
bating the threatened menace of the boll-weevil. 

Mr. Durant is president of the Pine Grove Live- 
stock Company, president of the Pine Grove Club, 
president of the Southern Stock and Farming Com- 
pany owning the T Farm, is vice president of the 
E. P. Burton Lumber Company, secretary-treas- 
urer of the Cooper River Corporation, and president 
of the Filbin Corporation. 

He has always enjoyed some of the honors of 
public life. He is a republican and during the 
four years of the administration of William H. 
Taft served as collector of customs for the Port 
of Charleston. He is a member of the Charleston 
Chamber of Commerce, the Country Club and a 
number of other social and business organizations. 

Mr. - Durant married soon after coming to 
Charleston a daughter of William Porcher Miles, 
of one of the old and distinguished families of 
Charleston. 

Julian Mitchell is a prominent Charleston law- 
yer, and counting his services three generations of 
the family have been identified with the Charles- 
ton community as able professional men and con- 
scientious and public spirited citizens. 

Mr. Mitchell was born at the summer home of 
his parents at Flat Rock, November 21, 1867. His 
grandfather. Dr. Edward Mitchell, of English an- 
cestry, was for many years a prominent physician 
and was a native of Edisto Island. Julian Mitchell, 
Sr., was also born on Edisto Island, and for many 
years was a prominent leader in educational affairs 
in his home city and state. He was chairman of 
the school board of Charleston a number of years 
and was chairman of the educational committee in 
the State Constitutional Convention of 1895. One 
of the school buildings of Charleston is named in 
his honor. His wife was Caroline Pinckney, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Charles Cotes worth Pinckney, for sev- 
eral years rector of Grace Episcopal Church of 
Charleston and of the Revolutionary family of 
Pinckneys. 

Julian Mitchell, Jr., was the only child of his 
parents. He was educated in the Charleston High 
School, spent one year in Charleston College, one 
year in the University School at Petersburg, Vir- 
ginia, for three years attended Harvard University 
and finished his law course in the University of 
Virginia. He was admitted to the bar in 1890, and 
smce that date has enjoyed a large general prac- 
tice &s attorney and counsellor. He is senior part- 
ner of Mitchell & Smith. He is also a director of 
the Bank of Charleston, the Charleston Savings 
Institiite and the Exchange Banking & Trust Com- 
pany, and for many years has been interested in 
politics. He was a member of the Legislature from 
1896 to 1900. 

In 1895 he married Belle W. Witte, a daughter 



of C. O. Witte. They have two sons, Julian and 
Cotesworth Pinckney. 

Robert Albertus Dobson, a young lawyer of 
genuine distinction and a prominent member of 
the Gaffney bar, has twice been a member of the 
Legislature from Cherokee County, first elected in 
1910 and again in 1916. The outstanding feature 
of his second term was his influence in procuring 
the bond issue of $225,000 for good roads for 
Cherokee County. It was this bond issue that put 
Cherokee County ahead of most of the other 
counties in South Carolina in matters of good 
roads, and as attorney for the Cherokee Highway- 
Commission Mr. Dobson has handled most of the 
legal work in connection with this great 
improvement. 

He was born near Yorkville, South Carolina, 
September 3, 1877, a son of William and Elizabeth 
(McCarter) Dobson. The Dobsons are an old time 
family in York County, while the McCarters are 
kin of the prominent Wallace family in the old 
Bethel section. Mr. Dobson's great-grandfather was 
John Dobson of York County, conspicuous in his 
time as a teacher and surveyor. 

Mr. Dobson grew up on his father's farm, at- 
tended the public schools at Yorkville, and in 1900 
graduated A. B. from Furman University at Green- 
ville. Like many successful professional men he 
did his turn at school teaching, and was principal 
of the schools at York, Kershaw and Laurens. He 
also studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1904, 
and in 1908 after resigning his position in the 
Laurens School he located at Gaffney. There he 
became associated with Solicitor J. C. Otts under 
th^ name Otts & Dobson. In 1913 Mr. Dobson 
formed his partnership with T. K. Vassy, under 
the name Dobson & Vassy. They have a large gen- 
eral practice, and also served as attorneys for the 
City of Gaffney and County of Cherokee. Mr. Dobson 
is secretary-treasurer of the Farmers & Mechanics 
Building and Loan Association, and during the war 
was a member of the local conscription board. 
During his service in the Legislature . he was a 
member of th^ judiciary and other important com- 
mittees. He has served as moderator of the Broad 
River Baptist Association, and fraternally is affili- 
ated with the Knights of Pythias, Masons, Junior 
Order United American Mechanics and the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men. 

Mr. Dobson married Miss Alice E. Williams of 
Lancaster, daughter of Judge D. A. Williams. They 
are the parents of four children named Rajrmond, 
Nannie Williams, Robert A., Jr., and Sarah 
Elizabeth. 



James Barre Guess. As to a proper policy of 
agricultural management in America many strong 
and convincing claims have been put forth in favor 
of extensive rather than intensive cultivation and 
management. The working of extensive tracts of 
land under one administrative unit has been a pre- 
vailing practice in the old as well as the new South, 
and possesses all the advantages of efficiency and 
economy and satisfies the co-oi\erative principle 
without the obvious faults and weakness of co- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



77 



operation as geQerally applied to industrial under- 
takings. 

Perhaps one of the most successful of these 
large sode plantations in South Carolina is that 
owned by the Guess family of Denmark. James 
Barre Guess, who for over thirty years has sus- 
tained the. active responsibilities of this business, 
was bom in Leesville, South Carolina, November 

7, 1859. 

His father, pr, S. D. M. Guess, was a man of 
real distinction and achievement. A country den- 
tist as well as a planter, he spent four years in the 
Confederate army and returned home to find his 
property destroyed by the invaders and his wife 
and only child almost starving. With that courage 
which enabled many southern gentlemen to begin 
life anew, and with the assistance of his house- 
hold and some hired help, he reorganized his affairs, 
and his associates and friends claimed that few men 
accomplished more, in a shorter time by economy, 
good judgment and hard work. He had a noble- 
woman for his wife, Sarah Eloise Barre. In war 
times in the absence of her husband she managed 
the business, paid the war taxes, and supervised 
both the household and the fields. She saw the 
Union soldiers burn her property and carry off the 
food she needed for daily subsistence. She con- 
tinued with the same loyal co-operation and shared 
in the success enjoyed by the family after the war, 
and liyed to the age of eighty-two. 

James Barre Guess graduated from the Carolina 
Military Institute, now The Citadel, June 13, 1879, 
with the rank of Cadet Captain of Company A. 
There was no thought of a professional career 
and he immediately returned home and became a 
helpful factor in the management of the plantation. 
Here he found his educational training in engineer- 
ing mechanics and agricultural science of great ad- 
vantage to him. In 1885 he was made a full part- 
ner in his father's business, under the firm name of 
S. D. M. Guess & Son. A few years later he be- 
came general manager, the business at that time 
compri$jng extensive plantations, a store or com- 
missary supplying all the needs of the farm and its 
workers in a commercial way and a great deal of 
other expensive equipment required for the operation 
of a large southern cotton plantation and the pro- 
duction of the food supplies to sustain the home 
and plantation workers. In 1889 the firm organized 
the first bank in the Town of Denmark, Doctor 
Guess assuming its presidency, at which time the 
full responsibilities of the plantation devolved upon 
the son. For thirty years that business has con- 
tinued to grow and prosper and even today is one 
of the larger agricultural units in the state. 

Until the demands of his private business absorbed 
all his time Mr. Guess was able to take part in 
various public duties. In 1880, the year after he 
graduated from the military college, he was made 
a captain in the South Carolina State Militia, and 
held a commission until the. fall of 1886, when he 
resigned. In that year he was elected a member 
of the House of Representatives, and served with 
a creditable record from 1886 imtil 1890. He then 
withdrew altogether from politics in order to give 
his undivided time to his business. Mr. Guess was 
a directqr in the Bai^k of Denmark until .its recent 



reorganization, when he retired from the manage- 
ment. 

The conditions that have prescribed "a solid 
South" inevitably have brought southern gentlemen 
into the ranks of the democratic party. Mr. Guess 
is a democrat without rancor or bitter partisanship. 
He is a Mason and Knight of Pythias, a|id his 
chief interest for many years outside of business 
and home has been the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, which he has served as trustee, steward 
and for thirty years as superintendent of its Sun- 
day school. 

Mr. Guess has had an ideal and happy family 
relationship. He was three times married. Octo- 
ber 27, 1880, at Denmark, he married Hattie Ramell 
Wroton, a daughter of W. H. Wroton. August 
12, 1884, at Batesburg, Sallie Sophia Mitchell, daugh- 
ter of J. A. Mitchell, became his wife. She was 
the mother of all his children. He married for his 
present wife at Ridge Spring, South Carolina, 
September 30, 1914, Sudie Catherine Mitchell, 
daughter of McKendree Mitchell. Mr. Guess has 
six children: James Barre, Jr., who married Mary 
Wiggins Connor; Hattie Lee, wife of Hubert W. 
Matthews ; W. Samuel, who married Annie Lou Col- 
lins; Sarsih Ellen, wife of George Milton Crum; 
Emmie Ruth, who married Renold Connor Wiggins; 
and Mary Frances. 

Mrs. Gwrgiana Austin Sauls. The life history 
of the estimable and popular lady whose name heads 
these paragraphs happily illustrates what may be 
attained by faithful and continued effort along a 
definite line. Her career has been dignified and 
womanly, her manner unaffected and her actions 
have been a blessing to all who have come within 
range of her influence. She is a representative of 
one of the sterling old families of this section and 
enjoys to a notable degree the confidence and re- 
gard of the people with whom she has associated 
for so many years. 

Mrs. Georgiana Austin Sauls was born in Lex- 
ington, South Carolina, in 1840, and is the daugh- 
ter of Davis and Mary (Williamson) Austin, both 
of whom also were natives of Lexington. Davis 
Austin was the son of Davis and Inabniette Austin 
and Mary Williamson was a daughter of Thomas 
Williamson. Davis Austin, Jr., was for many years 
a prominent merchant in Atlanta, Georgia, but in 
1864, during Sherman's historic march to the sea, 
he lost everything and fled to Savannah. Subse- 
quently he located at Orangeburg, where he fol- 
lowed farming pursuits during the remainder of his 
active life, his death occurring in 1897, at the age 
of eighty-six years. His wife had died at the early 
age of diirty-one years. They were the parents of 
the following children: Lavinia married a Mr. 
Livingston, of Orangeburg, and is now eighty-one 
years old; Morgan was a member of the Thirty- 
fourth Regiment during the war between the states 
and was killed in battle; Charles Wesley married 
a Miss Johnston, of Colleton; Davis Kirkland was 
married to Jane Croutch, of Edgefield; Jane Kath- 
leen was married to a Mr. Ziegler, of Bamberg. 

Mrs. Georgiana Sauls received her educational 
training in private schools of her home town. In 
1859 she became the wife of Caleb Sauls, who was 



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born on a plantation near Walterboro, the son of 
Isaac and Olive (Savage) Sauls. He received his 
education in the public schools of Walterboro and 
then devoted himself to the operation of his plan- 
tation. He was also a mail and express carrier, 
in which positions he rendered efficient and faith- 
ful service. During the war between the states 
Mr. Sauls was a soldier in the Confederate army 
and was stationed at Sullivan's Island. His death 
occurred in 1887. 

After her husband's death Mrs. Sauls was al- 
most continuously in the hotel business until re- 
cently, when she retired, her experience in this 
line of effort covering a period of practically forty 
years. She has been a resident of Walterboro for 
more than fifty years aftd during these years she 
faithfully served the public in a manner which 
was duly appreciated, as her continued patronage 
b^ the same persons year after year testified. 
Though now seventy-nine years old, she still re- 
tains to a remarkable degree her ph3rsical powers, 
while mentally she is as keen and alert as ever. 
In addition to the hotel building which she occu- 
pies, Mrs. Sauls is also the owner of a fine busi- 
ness block in Walterboro. 

By her union with Caleb Sauls, Mrs. Sauls be- 
came the mother of children who are briefly men- 
tioned as follows: Julia became the wife of James 
DeLetreville, of Charleston ; Davis is mentioned else- 
where in this work; Hattie became the wife of a 
Mr. Peoples, of Mog^etts; Morgan is deceased; 
Minnie became the wife of J. J. Jones, of Au- 
gusta; Sallie became the wife of J. Hagood, of 
Columbia ; Charlie, Edward and Norman are de- 
ceased. The last named was married to Ida Acker- 
mann, of Cottageville. and they are the parents 
of seven children; Edgar Pierce; Norma Evelyn; 
Henry Caleb; Ruth and Naomi, twins, who are de- 
ceased; Davis Austin and Elizabeth Ida. 

Mrs. Sauls has through the years that have come 
and gone since she first engaged in the hotel busi- 
ness seen many changes take place and she re- 
tains a splendid recollection of the happeings which 
if put in shape for reading would make ap absorb- 
ing story. She possesses a charming personality 
and her circle of friends is as large as her circle 
of acquaintances. 

Edward Barnabas Williams is one of the best 
known business men of the southern part of South 
Carolina, and particularly in Dorchester County, 
where for many years he has stood for progress and 
fair dealing, and while he has consistently labored 
for the advancement of his own interests he has 
never been neglectful of his duties as a citizen 
of one of the choicest sections of this great state. 
Therefore he is held in the highest esteem by all 
classes in the locality honored by his citizenship, 
enjo3ring the confidence and good will of all as 
a result of his public spirit, fair and straightfor- 
ward business methods and his exemplary charac- 
ter. 

Edward Barnabas Williams was bom in Orange- 
burg, South Carolina, on July 6, 1864, and is the 
third in order of birth of the ten children bom 
to James Allen and Jane E. (Dukes) Williams. 
James A. Williams, who also was a native of 



Orangebuiv, was a coadipainter by vocation. He 
was a soldier in the Confederate army and served 
throughout the struggle. His father, who was a 
native of the same place, was of English descent. 
The subject's mother was a native of Orange- 
burg County, this state, and the daughter of Wil- 
liam A Dukes, who was a descendant of one of 
three brothers who came from England and settled 
in South Carolina. She had one brother, J. W. H. 
Dukes, who served as a Confederate soldier. 

Edward B. Williams was educated in the public 
schools of his native town, and as soon as old and 
large enough he began to take up life's battle on 
his own account His first work was as an appren- 
tice at the business of carriage manufacturing, but 
on the conclusion of his apprenticeship period he 
engaged in the mercantile business at Orangeburg, 
whidi occupied his attention for eight years, at ^e 
end of which time he sold out, thou^ remaining 
at Orangeburg. He then returned to his trade of 
wagonmaker, at which he worked about two years. 
Then for about one ytar he was engaged in the 
cotton business there, but in 1903 he came to St. 
George, with which locality he has since remained 
identified. His first enterprise at St. George was 
as a dealer in wagons and buggies, in which he 
met with satisfactory success so that the follow- 
ing year he added the cotton business and also 
acquired some farming: interests. He has also 
bought and sold many horses and mules, in whidi 
he has been successful, and in 1918 he opened a 
brick manufacturing plant at the ed^ of town*, 
where he is making an excellent qualitv of brick, 
which find a ready market The plant has a daily 
capacity of TOfioo brick. Because ot his indefatigable 
industry, sound business judgment and accommo- 
dating ways, he has met with a well deserved suc- 
cess and is today numbered among the most popu- 
lar members of the business cirdes of his com- 
munity. In 1908 Mr. Williams was elected mayor 
of St George, and so satisfactory has been his dis- 
charge of his official duties that he has been re- 
tained in the office continuously to the present time, 
his present term expiring in May, 1920. 

In 1904 Mr. Williams was married to Minnie 
Hutto, the daughter of J. S. Hutto of St George. 
To this union have been bom four children, namely : 
Mariam, Jane Ellafair, Sue and Edward B., Jr. 

Fraternally Mr. Williams is an active member of 
the Knights of P}rthias. Distinctively a man of 
affairs, he has long filled a conspicuous place in local 
affairs, and as leader in important enterprises he 
has attained to an enviable place in the esteem of 
all who know him. 

Edward Rufus Cash has played a role of no 
secondary importance in the upbuilding of Ga£Fney 
as a cotton milling center. While to some degree 
financially, he has been chiefly identified with local 
cotton mills as a master of mechanical technique. 
Probably when a boy he showed a genius for me- 
chanics, and he developed that genius by hard and 
close application through many years and is regarded 
as one of the ablest cotton mul superintendents in 
the state. 

Mr. Cash was bora in Spartanburg Coun^ in 
1863, a son of Henry and Lucy (Dcvine) Cash. 



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79 



He was not born to wealth, and the circumstances 
of bis early home life handicapped his taking ad- 
vantage of even the normal opportunities of the 
local schools, which were by no means of the high- 
* est class. It is said that when he was twelve years 
of age he was doing all the milking, cooking and 
hoeing of a **one-horse farm." His mother was 
thenrn ill health, and the son and father had to 
remain on the farm and do all the work both in 
the fields and in the house. A year or so later 
he drove an ox wagon, hauling the wood to bum 
the brick that built the first mill at Clifton, South 
Carolina. When the job was completed he re- 
mained an employe and learned the machinist's 
trade. At the end of three years he was made 
master mechanic, and was elevated to a position 
superior to that of the man who taught him his 
trade. In itoi, leaving the Clifton mills, he joined 
the D. A. Tompkins Company at Charlotte, the 
pioneer mill machinery of the two Carolinas. He 
was with this firm until 1893, and then identified 
hunself with GaflFney, which at that time con- 
tained only two or three stores, two bar rooms 
and a restaurant He was therefore a participant 
in the first movement for the making of Gaffney 
an industrial center, and during the past quarter 
of a century his interests and energies have never 
flagged in behalf of everything that concerns the 
welfare of this town. He came to Gaffney as mas- 
ter mechanic and superintendent of the Gaffney 
Manufacturing Company, which in i8g[3 built the 
first cotton mill of the town. He remained in that 
position until i^, and then took an active part 
in the organization and building of the Limestone 
Cotton Mills, having personal supervision of the 
buildmg, and when it was completed remaining 
as superintendent. Out of the Limestone grew the 
Hamrick mill. Dr. W. C. Hamrick being an active 
official in both organizations, while the venerable 
merchant. J. A. Carroll, was president of the Lime- 
stone milL Mr. Cash has been superintendent of 
these mills since they were started. In July, 1919, 
he organized the Cash Mills of which he is presi- 
dent and treasurer and also the East Side Manu- 
facturing Company at Shelby, North Carolina, of 
which he is also president and treasurer. He has 
had a number of other business and investment 
interests, and for many years has been prominent 
in the Cherokee Avenue Baptist Church of Gaffney. 
He is chairman of its Board of Deacons. This 
church, now housed in a handsome building, grew 
out of what was first known as the Cherokee Ave- 
nue Sunday School, organized in Mr. Cash's home. 
In 1885 Mr. Cash married Miss Meda L. Byrd, 
daughter of David M. Byrd of Darlington. They 
became the parents of ten children, and the seven 
living are: Mrs. Marie Estelle Byers, George F., 
F. Grady, Crowley B., Mrs. Inez Fulmer, Joe Dean 
Price and Meda Catherme Cash. During the war 
two of the sons joined the local coast artillery 
company. 

John FkANas Prettyman is a veteran lumber 
manufacturer and merchant. While he has been 
active head of a large business at Summerville some 
years, he formerly operated at Marion in this state. 



also in North Carolina, and acquired his early 

business experience in the North. 

He was bom at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 
13* 1857. His father bore the same name and was 
also a native of Philadelphia. The grandfather, Da- 
vid Pret^rman, was a native of Lewis, Delaware. 
Practically all the Prettymans now living in the 
United States are descended from two brothers, 
John and William Prettyman, who came from Lon- 
don, England, in 1682 and settled in Virginia. The 
mother of John F. Prettyman of Summerville was 
Elizabeth McClure, a native of Philadelphia and 
of Irish ancestry. He was one of a family of four 
children, being the oldest. 

Mr. Prettyman as a boy in Philadelphia attended 
the public schools. He engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness in 1877, and has been a manufacturer and pro- 
ducer for over forty years. About 1893 he moved his 
headquarters to Newbern, North Carolina, and after 
about seven years there came to Marion, South Caro- 
lina, and since 1909 has had his home at Summer- 
ville. At this time he formed the firm of J. F. 
Prettyman and Sons and built the present milling 
plant, about one mile west of Summerville, under 
the firm name of J. F. Prettyman & Sons. This 
lumber plant is of strictly modem construction, and 
turns out a high grade of material. The timber 
is supplied by about twenty miles of standard gauge 
railroad, all of which is owned and operated by 
the firm, as a, means of bringing in their logs and 
timber, of which they have a sufficient supply to 
operate the manufacttnring plant indefinitely. Mr. 
F. P. Prettyman, secretary-treasurer of the com- 
pany, manages the manufacture, sale and shipment 
of the mills' product, while Mr. C. F. Prettyman 
manages the land, timber and railroad and logging 
operations of the company. At the present writ- 
ing Mr. T. M. Prettyman is not actively connected 
with the mill operation, he being in Texas engaged 
in geological survey work in connection with the 
University of Texas. 

January 8, 1885, Mr. Prettyman married Miss 
Virginia Fleming, a daughter of Dr. T. M. and 
Virginia (Pembcrton) Fleming. Mrs. Prettsrman 
was reared and educated near Richmond, Virginia. 
They have four children: Frank P., Cannon F., 
Thomas M.. arid Virginia Selden. Frank married 
Isabel Cross, of Marion and has two children, Vir- 

^ ginia Fleming and Howard Cross. Cannon married 
Louise Selden, of Richmond, Virginia. Virginia 
is the wife of Dr. R. B. Rhett, of Charleston. 
Thomas M. is unmarried. Mr. and Mrs. Pretty- 
man and their children are members of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

Lawrence Allen Walker is a, banker of long 
and active experience for a man of his years, and 
is president of the Bank of Summerville. He was 
born and received his early banking training in 
Charleston. His birth occurred Febmary 17, 1879. 
He is a brother of Mr. Legare Walker of Sum- 
merville. He was reared and educated in Charles- 
ton and Summerville, attending the Misses Brown- 
field's school at Summerville, The Citadel, the 
Charleston High School and Porter Military 
Academy. As a young man he went to work in the 
Miners and Merchants Bank of Charleston and re- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



mained with that institution for thirteen years, most 
of the time as teller. On removing from Charles- 
ton to Summerville he engaged in the real estate 
and insurance business, and in September, 1916, 
when the Bank of Summerville was organized and 
incorporated he was made its president. Mr. 
Walker is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias 
Lodge at Summerville. He was the Red Cross 
county treasurer and chairman of both War Fund 
drives for Dorchester County during the World 
war. He is president of the Summerville Busi- 
ness Men's League, president of the Summerville 
Tobacco Warehouse Corporation and has given up 
time to promote agriculture and business of com- 
munity. He served two • complete terms as alder- 
man of the Town of Summerville, and resigned in 
his third term to serve on the board of public 
works of the Town of Summerville. 

In 191 5 he married Margaret W. Buswell, of 
Hackensack, New Jersey, daughter of Fred C. Bus- 
well, who was vice president of the Home Insurance 
Company of New York. They have three chil- 
dren, Lawrence A. Jr., Margaret Buswell and Elea- 
nor Buswell. 

Thomas Middleton R.wsor is one of the oldest 
lawyers of Orangeburg, and by his work in his 
profession, in civil and educational affairs, is a man 
of recognized prominence all over the state. 

He was born at Orangeburg, a son of Capt. Peter 
A. and Anna M. Raysor. His father was a planter 
and served throughout the war as a captain in the 
Confederate army. Thomas M. Raysor was edu- 
cated in the public schools, took his A. B. degree 
from Wofford College in 1878 and read law under 
Hon. Samuel Dibble. He was admitted to the' bar 
in December, 1880, and has since commanded a 
large general practice, much of his work having 
been in connection with litigation for railroad, tele- 
graph companies and other large corporations. He 
is also a noted criminal lawyer. He was one of 
the organizers and the first vice president of the 
Bank of Orangeburg, and is now its president. 

Mr. Raysor served as a member of the Legisla- 
ture from Orangeburg from 1884 to 1890 and 'was 
a member of the State Senate from 1901 to 1910. 
He is a trustee of Converse College, was trustee 
of the University of South Carolina, chairman 
of the board of trustees of the graded schools of 
Orangeburg and was one of the organizers of the 
public school system. He and his family have been 
factors in the educational uplift of South Carolina 
for several generations. He has served as a mem- 
ber of the State Board of Education, and while 
in the Legislature he supported the bill to rebuild 
The Citadel, the» state military college at Charles- 
ton. His father was a graduate of The Citadel and 
his grandfather was much interested in that school 
in his early days. Mr. Raysor was one of the 
pioneers in promoting a compulsory system of 
education for the state. In recognition of his many 
varied services to education Wofford College bestowed 
upon him the degree LL. D. During the war Mr. 
Raysor was chairman of the local board of exemp- 
tion and supported the Government in all its poli- 
cies and phms". He is a member of the Episcopal 
Church and in politics has been a delegate to a 



ntunber of state and national conventions Of the 
democratic party. Mr. Raysor married Mattie Man- 
deville Rogers, of Darlington, South Carolina. 

Wyue C. Hamrick. Though a graduate of the 
Baltimore College of Physicians and Surgeons, and 
having earned a deservedly high place in his pro- 
fession, Mr. Hamrick has made his career count 
for most through the promotion and management 
of cotton industries and has built up at least four 
great factories that furnish a large proportion of 
the industrial assets of Cherokee County. 

Mr. Hamrick was born in Cleveland County, 
North Carolina, in i860, and though a resident of 
Gaffney since 189S, his home and work are not 
far distant from die scenes of his birth and early 
childhood. His parents were Cameron Street and' 
Almera (Bridges) Hamrick. The Hamricks are 
an old family of Cleveland County, a county notable 
for its many distinguished characters. The Ham- 
ricks have lived there since before the Revolution. 
Mr. Hamrick's grandparents were Moses and Sarah 
(Robinson) Hamrick. His great-grandfather Rob- 
inson was a Revolutionary soldier and through him 
Mr. Hamrick has membership in the Sons of the 
American Revolution. 

He grew up and received his literary training 
in Cleveland County, and in 1882 took his degree 
from the Baltimore (College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons. He practiced his profession at Grover and 
Shelby, North Carolina, and for one term of two 
(1888-90) years represented Cleveland County in 
the North Carolina Legislature. Upon locating at 
Gaffney in 1895, Mr. Hamrick continued his pro- 
fessional work for several years. In 1900, asso- 
ciated with J. A. Carroll, A. N. Wood and others 
he organized the Limestone Mill at Gaffney, and 
for a number of years has been its secretary and 
treasurer. This mill was started with 10,000 spindles 
and. 300 looms and in 1904 its facilities were in- 
creased by 15,000 spindles and 240 looms, without 
increasing the capita] stock. The business has paid 
many large dividends, even in. adverse years, and 
the industry is now one valued at $1,000,000, and 
furnishing employment to 250 or more operatives. 

The success of this institution encouraged Mr. 
Hamrick to further efforts in mill buildmg. In 
1907 he organized the Hamrick Mill at (jaffney and 
since then its capital stock has been increased from 
% $150,000 to $250,000, and its facilities from 10,000 
spindles and 300 looms to over 25,000 spindles and 
over 500 looms. The mill employs approximately 
225 people. Mr. Hamrick is president and treasurer 
of the company. These two industries at Gaffney 
produce about 4,000,000 pounds of print cloth an- 
nually. The third milling enterprise established by 
Mr. Hamrick was Broad River Mill at Blacksburg. 
organized January i, IQ13. The company purchased 
the old Whittaker Mill, a yarn mill, and in 1916 
enlarged it until it has about 14,000 spindles and 
324 looms. On February 26, 1920, he organized the 
Musgrove Mills, a million dollar corporation of 
Gaffney, South Carolina. 

The community is indeed fortunate when its in- 
dustrial affairs are entrusted to a man of such 
character and ideals as Mr. Hamrick. His abflities 
measure up fo those of the keenest and most .suc- 
cessful practical business men, and yet through all 



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81 



the hand of the administrator is guided by set- 
tled convictions and purposes that keep the technical 
machinery of business always subservient to the 
welfare of the humanity involved. The Limestone, 
Hamrick and Broad River mills are the workshops 
for communities of prospering and enlightened peo- 
ple and nowhere do churches, schools and every 
factor of a modem social community receive more 
encouragement. 

In civic and public life Mr. Hamrick's most im- 
portant work at the present time is as chairman 
of the Cherokee County Highway Commission, an 
office he accepted in 1917, when the commission was 
entrusted with the expenditure of the proceeds of 
a bond issue of $4.so,ooo. Under his wise and able 
administration these and other large sums of money 
have been expended for good roads, and Chero- 
kee County stands among the first in the state in 
the matter of improved highways. Mr. Hamrick 
was elected as a member of the State Senate in 
19 ID. He was prominent in the movement for the 
formation of the new county of Cherokee in 1897. 

Mr. Hamrick married Miss Turner of Grover, 
North Carolina. They have five children: Volina; 
Waite C, who is now actively associated with his 
father in cotton manufacture; Ethel, Alma and 
Lyman A. 

WnxjAM Whetstone Wannamaker, a lawyer 
by profession, is head of one of the oldest and 
most prosperous cotton milling industries in the 
state at Orangeburg. 

He was born at Allendale, South Carolina, Au- 
gust 17, 1872, a son of Rev. Thomas Elliott and 
Sarah Ann (Boyd) Wannamaker. His father was 
a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, dis- 
tinguished by long and devoted service. The son 
was educated in public and private schools, gradu- 
ated in 1893 from the academic department of the 
University of South Carolina, and in 1894 com- 
pleted the law course in the same institution. He 
was in active practice at Orangeburg until Janu- 
ary, 1905. In 1898 he had volunteered for service 
in the Spanish-American war, becoming captain 
of Company E of the Second South Carolina In- 
fantry. He saw some active service in Cuba and 
was on duty until mustered out in April, 1899. 

Mr. Wannamaker is sole owner of the Orange 
Cotton Mills, which is the successor of the Orange 
Mills established by George H. Cornelson, one of 
the southern pioneers in cotton manufacture. Since 
1909 W. W. Wannamaker has been sole owner. 
Mr. Wannamaker served two years as an alder- 
man^ of Orangeburg City. For two years, 1918-19, 
he was grand master of Masons in South Caro- 
lina. He has served as trustee of the city schools 
for six years and is a director of the People's Bank 
of Orangeburg. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church. 

June I, 1899, he married Harriet Lyall Matheson, 
of Bennettsville, South Carolina. They have four 
children : William W., Jr., who graduated f roni The 
Citadel at Charleston in 1919; Alexander James 
Matheson, a high school student; Lyall Matheson; 
and Thomas Elliott, Jr. 

Yd. V— « 



Thomas White Cothran. On the basis of his 
experience and proved achievements Thomas White 
Cothran of Greenwood is one of the leading civil 
and construction engineers of his native state. He 
comes of a prominent family of old Abbeville and 
Greenwood counties, and was born in a portion of 
Abbeville that is now Greenwood County in 1874. 

His parents were Wade E. and Sarah Elizabeth 
(Chiles) Cothran. Both the Cothrans and the 
Chiles families have been long and prominently 
identified with South Carolina. The Chiles family 
came to this state from Virginia, and is numerously 
represented in all the South Atlantic States. Mr. 
Cothran's great-grandfather was Samuel Cothran, 
a son of Alexander Cothran, who came to South 
Carolina about 181 5. Originally the Cothrans were 
north of Ireland people, and on coming to America 
first settled in Connecticut, and arrived in South 
Carolina about 1793. Samuel Cothran, the great- 
grandfather, married Mary Richardson. 

John Cothran (1799- 1860), grandfather of Thomas 
White, was the second son of his parents. He 
was a prominent planter and business man in ante- 
bellum days, owning large tracts of land and many 
slaves. His homestead was at Millway in Abbeville 
County, now a part of Greenwood County. Wade 
Elephare Cothran (1837-1899), was the third son of 
John Cothran and Elephare Rushton. The other 
sons of the union died without issue. 

In the Millway community W^de E. Cothran 
spent most of his life. He was a graduate of The 
Citadel at Charleston in the class of 1858. He was 
a student of medicine in the South Carolina Medi- 
cal College at Charleston when the Civil war be- 
gan. He left his medical studies and became a 
lieutenant in Company C of the Seventh South 
Carolina Infantry. After a brief service he was 
promoted to captain of his company and later as- 
signed to the Engineer Corps. Shortly after re- 
joming his command he was severely wounded at 
Harper's Ferry and was unable to resume duty 
either as a soldier or in private business until 1867. 
Returning to Millway he spent his life as a planter. 
On the formation of Greenwood County he was 
elected its probate judge, and was in that office 
until his death in 1899. 

Thomas White Cothran was born and reared on 
the old plantation at Millway, and was a member 
of the first class that graduated from Qemson 
College in 1896. In that splendid institution he 
received the fundamentals of his training as an 
engineer. He was retained at Qemson the first 
year after gradaution as instructor in drawing. For 
two years he was connected with the United States 
Geological Survey, being on duty in Texas, Indian 
Territory and Iowa. In 1900 he became an assistant 
engineer and later chief draftsman in the chief engi- 
ner's office of the Seaboard Air Line Railway, and 
was in that position for several years, though for 
a brief time he was with a coal mining corpora- 
tion. Subsequently he was made principal assistant 
engineer to George A. Kent, chief engineer of the 
South and Western Railway (C. C. & O.), and in 
1905 became resident engineer of the A. B. & A. 
Railway at Warm Springs, Georgia. July i, 1906, 
Mr. Cothran assumed new duties as principal as- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



sistant engineer on construction of the Norfolk & 
Southern Railway, between Raleigh and Newbern 
in North Carolina. 

Since September, 1908, Mr. Cothran has been prac- 
ticing his profession on his own account and with 
permanent home at Greenwood. He does a gen- 
eral engineering business and has built up an or- 
ganization adequate for handling large construction 
contracts. This organization has put up a number 
of prominent buildings in Greenwood and adjoining 
towns and cities, among them being the Clemson 
College Young Men's Christian Association building. 

Mr. Cothran married Miss Maud Boswell, of 
Portsmouth, Virginia. Their six children are 
Thomas W., Jr., Virginia, Mary Nelson, William 
Benjamm, Sarah Elizabeth and Perrin Chiles. Mr. 
Cothran is a member of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers, is a member of the American 
Water Works Association, a Scottish Rite Mason, 
also a Knight Templar and Shriner, a member of 
the Rotary Club and served several years as mem- 
ber of the South Carolina Highway Commission. 

Thomas B. Bryant. Another member of the 
Bryant family whose interests and activities for so 
many years have been identified with the old Orange- 
burgr district, Thomas B. Bryant is one of the 
largest land owners and planters of the state, and 
for the past thirty years has made his home and 
busmess headquarters at Orangeburg. 

Mr. Bryant, who is a brother of Uston G. Bryant, 
under which name many of the interesting particu- 
lars in the family's history will be found, was 
bom in Colleton, now Dorchester County, Septem- 
ber 5, 1861. He was educated in the common schools 
of his native county, and at the age of seventeen 
began a business career. For over thirty years he 
and his brother Uston were closely associated in 
their varied business affairs. Their first undertak- 
ing was in the lumber business, and in 1^3 they 
moved to Fort Mott, where they conducted a plan- 
totion. for seven years. In 1889 they removed their 
business headquarters to Orangeburg, and as 
Bryant Brothers operated as a livestock firm, buy- 
ing, selling, raising and breeding stock. In 191 1 
the brothers separated their interests, and since then 
Thomas B. Bryant has continued in the stock busi- 
ness under the name of T. B. Bryant. 

As a planter Mr. Bryant is one of the largest 
producers of corn and cotton in South Carolina. 
One of his plantations has an historic interest apart 
from its productiveness. It lies in the eastern part 
of Orangeburg County, in what was at one time 
known as the Upper St. John's Parish. The old 
battlefield of Utah Springs, the scene of one of the 
decisive battles of the Revolution, especially so far 
as the Carolinas were concerned, is on the planta- 
tion. Mr. Bryant has 1,850 acres of land in that 
tract, and uses between 900 and 1,000 acres for his 
com and cotton crops. Another farm of 417 acres is 
in that portion of Calhoun County formerly Orange- 
burg County, and practically all of this is used for 
crop growing. Another highly improved farm con- 
tains 150 acres and is close to Orangeburg. 

Mr. Bryant for five years was interested in the 
Peoples National Bank as a director and stock- 
holder, and then retired. He owns the brick build- 



ing in Orangeburg on Main Street, where he kas his 
business headquarters, and has one of the attractive 
homes and other property interests in the city. 

Mr. Bryant is an active member of the Baptist 
Church and is affiliated with ihe Masonic fraternity. 
He has been twice married. In February, 1893, 
Miss Lelia Wertz, of Newberry, became his wift, 
but she died on the 20th of October of the same 
year. In June, 1895, he married Tulu Rajr, a na- 
tive of Orangeburg, and a daughter of Thomas 
Ray, who came from Ireland. Her mothen Ange- 
line Jackson, was descended from a South Carolina 
family of Revolutionary stock and of English de- 
scent. Mr. and Mrs. Bryant have a family of one- 
son and eight daughters: Pauline, wife of D. P. 
Courtney, a business associate of Mr. Bryant, has 
one child Bryant Courtney; Ruby, wife of H. C. 
Richards, of Orangeburg; Marie and Maud, stu- 
dents in Coker College; Doris and T. B., Jr., both 
in high school, Helen and Angie Ray in the grade 
schools; and Mamie, the youngest. 

James Alexander Carroll. The history ef sev- 
eral important towns in South Carolina is largely a 
repetition' of one name woven through all t^c ex- 
panding life and enterprise of the community. This 
is notably tme of Gaffney, today one of the hobs of 
industry and commerce in upper South Carolina. 
The name most frequently repeated here during a 
half century of growth and development is that of 
James Alexander Carroll, who has been well de- 
scribed as a composite personality of merchant, 
manufacturer, banker, broker, jobber, fanner, 
builder and booster, and through it all has ran an 
eminent public spirit which might well niake him 
deserving of the appellation philanthropist 

He was bom May 19, 1852, in York County. 
His parents were Thomas and Lucinda (Hullcndcr) 
Carroll. His father was a Confederate soldier and 
lost his life in the siege of Petersburg. The pa- 
ternal ancestry is one branch of the distinguished 
Carroll family of Maryland and Virginia. The 
famous Charles Carroll, of the "Carrolls of Car- 
roUton" signer of the Declaration of Independence, 
has probably had no more worthy descendant than 
the Gaffney business man. 

James A. Carroll spent his youth in a period of 
lamentable ruin and destruction in the South, and 
he came to manhood with his character strengthened 
by the shock of circumstance and many vicissi- 
tudes. He had a farm training, attended local 
schools only until he was sixteen, and spent much 
of his youth with a noted citixen of Whittaker's 
Mountain, the late Ira Hardin. On leaving home 
h,e worked for a while on the building of the 
first railroad, the old Richmond & Danville, now 
the Southern, and during his later teens clerked in 
a number of country stores for Mr. Hardin. 

In 1869 at the age of seventeen he first came to 
Gaffney, then known -fitly as Gaffne/s Old Field, 
and clerked in the town^s first store owned by I. 
Hardin. He had little capital, but had showed 
himself worthy of trust, and not long afterwards 
he established a little store of his own at Gowdeys- 
ville near Gaffney. He conducted that four years, 
and in 1877 returned to Gaffney, and now for over 
forty years has been the city's most prominent 



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83 



business factor. Until 1881 he conducted a busi- 
ness under his individual proprietorship, and then 
took into partnership the employe whom he held 
in highest regard, W. C. Carpenter. The firm of 
Carroll & Carpenter continued for nearly a quar- 
ter of a century. In 1900 George C. Byers bought 
an interest, and the organization was Carroll, Car- 
penter & Byers until February, 1904, when Mr. 
Carpenter withdrew. Since then the business has 
been Carroll & Byers, established in a completely 
fitted and modern building of its own known as 
the Carroll & Moore Block. The firm of Carroll 
& Byers is now a complete merchandise organiza- 
tion, carrying over $100,000 of stock, the main store 
being devoted to general dry goods and men's and 
women's clothing, with also a wholesale and job- 
bing department. The firm has at another location 
a grocery store, established since 1905. The firm 
are extensive dealers in fertilizers and through the 
Carroll Cotton Company buy most of the cotton 
produced in that territory. The members of the 
firm are also interested in farming and real estate. 
Mr. Carroll established the cotton buying firm 
of Carroll & Stacy in 1881, and for many years 
it was the largest plant of its kind in the state 
emplojring about 100 men and in some sea- 
sons buying over $1,000,000 worth of cotton. Mr. 
Carroll was one of the original stock holders of 
the Cherokee Falls Cotton Mill, and served as its 
president twelve years, from 1888 to loop. He made 
the first subscription, $10,000, to the Gaff ney Manu- 
facturing Company in 1892 for the purpose of build- 
ing the first cotton mill in Gaffney. He has been 
president of the Limestone Mill since its organiza- 
tion, and has been a director from the start in the 
Gaffney Manufacturing Company, the Hamrick, 
Globe, Cherokee Falls and Broad River mills, and 
is ^ director of the Victor Cotton Oil Company. 
For twenty ye?irs he conducted the great lime works 
in Gaffney, producing about 100,000 barrels of lime 
annually. 

Mr. Carroll appeared in the role of a banker 
when in 1891 becoming associated with F. G. Stacy 
he established Carroll & Stacy, Bankers. In 1896 
this bank took out a national charter becoming 
the National Bank of Gaffney, and later became 
the First National Bank. ; 

These varied activities of themselves obviously 
constitute a great public service in the community. 
Mr. Carroll has been generous of his time and 
means in helping out many worthy causes. He 
has been particularly interested in supplying educa- 
tional facilities for young men and women, partly 
from a consciousness of a lack of these facilities 
during his own youth. Several years ago h^ made a 
donation of $15,000 to Limestone College, and in 
.April, I9i9» there was announced an additional gift 
from him of $25,000 to this institution- 
Mr. Carroll married in 1871 Miss Mary Hum- 
phries. Their two daughters are Mrs. G. Q. Byers 
and Mrs. Doctor A. C. Cree. 

Thomas Boone Fraser, who has been an asso- 
ciate justice of the Supreme Court of South Caro- 
lina since 1912, has his home at Sumter, where he 
was born June 21, i860, and is a son, of Judge 
Thomas Boone and Sarah Margaret XMcIver) 



Fraser. As a boy he intended to become a lawyer, 
doubtless through the influence of his father, who 
for many years was a leader in the South Carolina 
bar and at one time judge of the Third Circuit Court. 

The son graduated A. B. from Davidson College 
in North Carolina in 1881, and read law under his 
father, being admitted to the bar in 1883. He 
steadily practiced law. at Sumter for thirty years. 
From 1901 to 1912 he served as a member of the 
South Carolina House of Representatives, and was 
chairman of the judiciary committee five years. In 
1912 he was elected to the Supreme Court, and for 
a time filled an unexpired term as chief justice. 
He was re-elected in 1916. 

Judge Fraser is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. December 16, 1886, he married Emma M. 
Edmunds, of Sumter. 

James Lawrence Quinby is one of many suc- 
cessful men who regard it as a privilege to refer 
gratefully to the community of Graniteville as their 
birthplace and early home. With Mr. Quinby this 
pride and interest are increased because Granite- 
ville has been his permanent home and the scene of 
his busy career,, for over half a century. 

He was born at Graniteville in 185 1, son of Law- 
rence and Martha (Powell) Quinby. His father, 
a native of Charleston, moved from that city to 
Graniteville in 1845. He was an associate of the 
distinguished Charleston citizen William Gregg in 
the building of the Graniteville cotton mill. This 
was the first cotton mill in the state, and has re- 
mained in continuous operation for over seventy 
years. 

The mill and its surrounding community stand 
out as a high light in southern industry. As soon 
as the mill and village were completed and the 
force of help assembled Mr. Gregg established a 
free school, and while without power to do so by 
strict law he practically provided for a system of 
compulsory eduption for all children between the 
a^es of seven aqd twelve. Thus in that little mill 
village more than seventy years ago was begun, 
in practice, the required attendance of children at 
school for stated periods of the year, a principle 
which was not given full effect over the state in 
general until 1919. From the first no one under 
twelve years has ever been allowed to work in the 
mill at Graniteville, and as a result of that liberal 
and enlightened provision the mill company has 
paid larger divide^ids on its capital than many others 
that made no effort along educational lines. Further- 
more, wholesome sanitary conditions, comfortable 
housing, beautiful surroundings, features which have 
been widely advertised by other mill communities 
in the South, though only of recent establishment, 
have been the prevailing rule at Graniteville for 
three quarters of a century. 

In November, 1907, the Hickman Memorial Half 
was dedicated .^t Graniteville. As a prominent 
member of the, community who knew most of its 
history James Lawrence Quinby was called upon 
for an address at the exercises. He spoke con- 
servatively and yet brought out facts which may 
be a source of lasting, pride to Graniteville for all 
time to come.. He spoke of the unequalled condi- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



lions socially, industrially, morally and religiously 
that have always existed at Graniteville, and as a 
result of these advantages the large number of 
strong and successful men and women who in their 
youth either worked in the mill or were members 
of mill families. He reviewed the past represen- 
tation of Edgefield and Aiken counties in the Legis- 
lature and fotind men who had at one time been 
mill workers at Graniteville, and also referred to 
by name many county officials not only in Aiken, 
but in Georgia, Alabama and other states, named 
physicians, lawyers, judges, soldiers, statesmen and 
ministers, bank presidents, cotton mill executives, 
merchants and educators, all of whom were indebted 
in some way or other to the influences of the 
Graniteville community. Besides those who began 
as mill workers and sought othei" fields of labor, 
better fitted for their talents, there were many who 
continued work in the mill and acquired comfortable 
and substantial homes and farms. In the words of 
Mr. Quinby, "but the iriost of the girls have become 
wives and mothers, which after all is the most per- 
fect and glorious achievement." 

It is indeed a pardonable pride and satisfaction 
on the part of Mr. Quinby that he has so long been 
associated intimately with the community and its 
people. He received his early schooling at the 
Graniteville Academy. At the age of thirteen and 
a half he began work in the mill, and in that time 
his own expectations and those of his family looked 
toward a career as a cotton manufacturer. In- 
stead, in 1871,' he engaged in the mercantile, busi- 
ness, and has been a merchant at his present loca- 
tion for nearly half a century. His store is one 
of the largest and most attractive in that . section 
of the state. Mr. Quinby is also president of the 
Bank of Graniteville, and has much valuable farm 
land and town property. He has always been a 
leader in Graniteville affairs, working for good 
churches, schools and the improvements that mean 
most in his locality. He has been a member of the 
Legislature from Aiken County and a member of 
the state tax board. During the war he had charge 
of Liberty Loan drives for Aiken County and was 
an unstinted worker and giver in behalf of war 
loans, Red Cross and other auxiliary campaigns. 
Mr. Quinby is a Methodist. 

His first wife was Ellen Turner, of Edgefield 
County. She left him one son, James Lawrence 
Quinby, Jr., now an associate in his father's busi- 
ness. Mr. Quinby married for his present wife 
Caroline Wyers, of Brunswick, Missouri. 

Joseph J. Major. The mature years of his life 
Mr. Major has spent as a successful farmer in 
Anderson County, gained a competence in agri- 
culture before the era of tremendous prosperity 
now enjoyed by the farmer, and is personally well 
known all over the county and a member of an old 
and prominent family of the state. 

He was born on his father's plantation in that 
county October 26, 1855. The family was founded 
in South Carolina by James Major and his two 
brothers, Elijah and Enoch, who came to this state 
from Virginia. James Major first lived in Fair- 
field County, and later settled in Anderson County, 
east of the City of Anderson. He was of English 



descent, and the family on coming to America first 
lived in Pennsylvania and later in Virginia. James 
Major married at Pendleton, Margaret (Peggy) 
Breazeale. They had eleven children, Lavina, 
Pinckney D., Caroline, Hiram B., Hezekiah, James 
A., Margaret, E. Jenkins, Sallie, Joseph W. and 
Kennon. The daughter Margaret was accidentally 
killed at the age of two years, but all the others 
lived to be more than thirty years of age. All the 
sons except the first, who was too old, were Con- 
federate soldiers, and Joseph W. and Kennon sacri- 
ficed their lives to the cause. 

E. Jenkins Major married Elizabeth, the daugh- 
ter of Ezekiel Long, a pioneer in the northern part 
of Anderson County. E. Jenkins Major was a 
farmer, and he and his wife reared their children 
on the farm. These children were Margaret, Eze- 
kiel Aiken, Joseph J., Willie, who died at the age 
of three years, John A. and Allie. 

Joseph J. Major was reared on a farm, acquired 
a good education and training for serious respon- 
sibilities, and after his marriage located on the old 
homestead which he still owns. Along with farm- 
ing he was associated with others in the fertilizer 
and buggy business at Anderson for several years, 
but his chief prosperity has been won from the 
soil. He owns several tracts of farm lands, and 
with his family lives at 1429 South McDufiie Street 
in Anderson, where he built a few years ago a beau- 
tiful and spacious home. He and his family are 
all members of the Baptist Church. 

January 25, 1887, he married Margaret J. Harris, 
Mrs. Major is a sister of Dr. J. C. Harris of An- 
derson. Of their marriage the first child, Joseph 
Harris, died at the age of fourteen. The second is 
Elizabeth, usually known as Bessie. The three 
younger children, sons, are Ezekiel, Roy and Harold. 
All were soldiers in the great war, though much 
to their regret their time was spent in training camps 
on this side of the ocean. Ezekiel became a lieu- 
tenant, while the other two sons were privates. 

Hon. Thomas Bothwell Butler. A distin- 
guished lawyer and one of the ablest and most 
resourceful public men of the state, Thomas Both- 
well Butler has been a member of the Cherokee 
•County bar since the organization of that county, 
which was one of the first public movements in 
which he took an active and effective part. He 
has served as mayor of Gaffney and is now a mem- 
ber of the State Senate. 

He was born near Santuc, Union County, Janu- 
ary II. 1866, son of Dr. Pierce Picken and Arsinoe 
(Jeter) Butler, being a member of some of the 
oldest and most prominent families in the state. 
Doctor Butler was a brother of the eminent Gen. 
M. C. Butler, whose career is an indelible part of 
South Carolina history. Senator Butler is also a 
nephew of the late Governor Thomas B. Jeter. 

When he was twelve years old Thomas B. Butler 
left the farm home of his parents to live with his 
uncle. Governor Jeter, at Union, and acquired most 
of his early training from his scholarly relative 
and also from the public schools of Union. After 
the death of Governor Jeter he continued to live 
with his widow, and from the Jeter home he en- 
tered the University of South Carolina, where he 



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85 



took both the literary and law course. Soon after 
his admission to the bar he located at Gaffney in 
1895 and during the following year was leader in 
the agitation before the Legislature for the forma- 
tion of Cherokee County with Qaffney as county 
scat As a lawyer he has climbed to the heights of 
success and has measured hb abilities with many 
of the best of his contemporaries. For twenty 
years he has been employed on one side or the 
other in nearly every important case tried in the 
courts of his county. In a business way he is a 
director of the People's Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation of the American State Bank and Cash Mills. 

Again and again positions of honor and trust 
have been conferred upon him. In 1900 he was 
almost the unanimous choice of his county for a 
seat in the House of Representatives, and in 1901 
he defeated two strong and popular men for the 
State Senate. After the close of his term he de- 
voted himself assiduously to the practice of law, 
and in 1908 formed a partnership with W. S. Hall. 
He has been county chairman of the democratic 
party several terms, for a number of years state 
executive committeeman, has been mayor of Gaff- 
ney, United States commissioner, national elector 
at large, and in 1918 was again returned to a seat 
in the Senate, where he is a member of the Judiciary 
Committee. Three times he was candidate for Con- 
gress, and made a most creditable race against the 
veteran congressman, D. E. Finley. Some years 
ago he was elected lieutenant-colonel of the Third 
South Carolina Regiment, and served with similar 
rank on Governor Ansel's staff. Colonel Butler is 
chairman of the board of trustees of the Buford 
Street Methodist Church. 

He married Miss Annie Wood, daughter of A. 
N. Wood. They have a son and daughter, Thomas 
B., Jr., and Ann Jeter. 

David Robert Coker, of Hartsville, is one of a 
family long prominent in agricultural leadership, 
as upbuilders of the great cotton industry in the 
South, promoters of education, and distinguished 
both in war and peace. 

The family of Coker has been longest identified 
with the community icnown as Society Hill. At 
Society Hill was born James Lide Coker on Janu- 
^'T 3, 1837, a son of Caleb and Hannah (Lide) 
Coker. James L. Coker was educated in St. JDa- 
vid's Academy at Society Hill, in the South Caro- 
lina Military Academy at Charleston, and made a 
special study of botany and chemistry in the Lau- 
rens Scientific School of Harvard University. He 
is the recipient of the honorary degree LL. D. from 
the University of South Carolina. 

Shortly after beginning his business career he 
was called to the stern duty of war. In the fall 
of i860 he organized the Hartsville Light Infan- 
try, and commanded that company in several great 
battles, including that of Fredericksburg. He was 
severely wounded at Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, 
afterward fell into the hands of the enemy, and 
did not return to service. He was promoted to 
major of the Sixth South Carolina Volunteer In- 
fantry about the time he was wounded. He served 
as a member of the South Carolina House of Repre- 
sentatives in 1864-66. 



From 1866 he became a factor of increasing 
prominence as a merchant and manufacturer at 
Hartsville. From 1874 to 1881 he was also a mem- 
ber of the firm of Norwood & Coker, cotton fac- 
tors, at Charleston. 

In 1881 he organized and for a number of years 
served as president of the Darlington National 
Bank. He was the first president of the Darling- 
ton Manufacturing Company in 1884, and in 1889 
built a short line of railway from Floyd to Harts- 
ville. He and his oldest son established the Caro- 
lina Fiber Company at Hartsville, manufacturing 
pulp and paper from native wood. He also served 
as president of the Southern Novelty Company, 
was a partner in the firm of J. L; Coker & Com- 
pany, a director of the Hartsville Cotton Mill, 
Hartsville Oil Mill, and was director and presi- 
dent until 1910 of the Bank of Hartsville. He has 
served as trustee of Coker College for Women at 
Hartsville, as president of the Pee Dee Historical 
Association, has been prominent in the Baptist 
Church, and was affiliated actively with the South- 
ern Historical Association, the South Carolina His- 
torical Society, the. American Historical Associa- 
tion, the American Red Cross, American Institute 
of Civics and many other societies. 

March 28, i860, James L. Coker married Susan ^ 
Stout, of Alabama, who died in 1904. 

His younger son, William C. Coker, born at 
Hartsville in 1872, is a Doctor of Philosophy from 
Johns Hopkins University, is a distinguished botan- 
ist, and since 1^67 has been Professor of Botany in 
the University of North Carolina. He has done 
a great deal of original work, his travels and in- 
vestigations having taken him to many foreign coun- 
tries, and he is widely known for his work as a 
teacher and original contributor in the botanical 
field. 

David Robert Coker, another son of James L. 
Coker, was born at Hartsville, November 20, 1870, 
being the fifth of ten children, seven of whom 
reached mature years. He was educated in the 
public schools, in St. David's Academy at Society 
Hill and for four years was a student in South 
Carolina College, graduating with the degree of 
A. B. in 1891. In 1892 he entered his father's 
mercantile business at Hartsville, was promoted to 
a partnership in 1894, and for many years has been 
managing partner of a firm that does an imposing 
aggregate of the mercantile business of the county. 
He organized and is president of the Pedigreed 
Seed Company and the Coker Cotton Company. 
He is also interested in the Hartsville Oil Mill, 
the Carolina Fiber Company, the Southern Nov- 
elty Company, the Hartsville Fertilizer Company, 
is a director of the Federal Reserve Bank at Rich- 
mond, is one of the trustees of the Universitv o' 
South Carolina and was chairman of the State 
Council of Defense during the World war. 

Aside from his business he has given much of 
his time to the promotion of agricultural inter- 
ests, and especially to the breeding, introduction and 
marketing of better and larger varieties of cotton. 
His work in these respects bas resulted in chang- 
ing the territory around Hartsville from short 
staple to long, and has added millions of dollars to 
the profit of the farmers of the South. He was 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



one of the twenty -five men who constituted the 
National Agricultural Advisory G)mmission of the 
United States in 1918. He was also a member of 
the Agricultural Committee of ei^ht sent to Europe 
to investigate and report on agricultural conditions 
in September-October, 1918. He is president of the 
Plant Breeders Association of South Carolina. 

In 1804 he married Jessie Richardson, of Tim- 
monsvilfe. She died in May, 1914, the mother of 
Catherine, Hannah^ Eleanor, Robert and Samuel. 
In August, 191S, Mr. Coker married May Roper, a 
daughter of D. C. Roper, Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue. By this union there is one daughter, 
Martha. 

DeWyat Rahn Rises, a prominent South Caro- 
lina educator, is present superintendent of the Abbe- 
ville schools, and has been teaching and engaged in 
school administration since early manhood. 

He was born in Edgefield County, South Carolina, 
December ao, 1875, son of James Howard and 
Matilda (Etheredgc) Riser. He grew up on his 
father's plantation, attended the local schools, was 
also a student of Newberry College, and completed 
his work at Yale University in 1905. The succes- 
sive positions and responsibilities he has held in 
the teaching world were in the Mount Pleasant Col- 
legiate Institute in North Carolina, two years as 
superintendent of the Ridgeway schools, two years 
head of the Science Department of the Columbia 
High School, two years superintendent at Aiken, 
also as superintendent of the Manning public 
schools for five years and in 1917 was promoted to 
his present duties as superintendent of the Abbe- 
ville school system. He has now twenty-eight 
teachers on his staff and the enrollment in the 
local schools is twelve hundred. 

Mr. Riser is a member of the State Teachers As- 
sociation and the Superintendents Association, and 
is affiliated with the Knights of P3rthias. June 27, 
1912, he married Mabel Pearl Johnson, of Ridgeway. 
South Carolina. 

Colin Jasper McCaiX, whose business record in 
Marion County extends back thirtv-five years, still 
has many important interests in and around Mullins. 

Mr. McCaU was born in Marlboro County, South 
Carolina, December 10, 1850, a son of Lauchlin and 
Susan (McDonald) McCall. He grew up on his 
father's farm and received a country school educa- 
tion. In 1873 he came to Marion County, locating 
at Temperance, where he was in the turpentine 
industry and later conducted a store and a farm. 
For a number of years he was a lumber manufac- 
turer, also operating cotton gins and other enter- 
prises. In 1893 Mr. McCall removed to Mullins and 
for thirteen years was agent and chief representative 
of Alexander Sprunt & Son. Since then he has 
engaged in the cotton brokerage and fertilizer busi- 
ness, also owns some valuable farming land and is 
a director of the Bank of Mullins. He has been 
elder of the Presbyterian Church and superintendent 
of the Sunday school for seven years. 

December 10, 1874, Mr. McCall married Annie 
Virginia Page, of Marion County. Nine children 
were bom to their marriage: Ida, wife of J. D. 
Piatt, editor and owner of the Mullins Enterprise, 
Oifford Simpson, a cotton broker in North Carolina ; 



Edna, at home; Walter Vernon, a farmer at Mul- 
lins; Bess, wife of Dr. F. A. Smith; McDonald 
Laughlin, engaged in lumber manufacturing; Irene, 
wife of Duncan McDuffy, of Marion; Elbert Dun- 
can of Savannah, Qeorgia; and Jessie Dunlap, wife 
of M. H. Granger, a farmer in Lee County, South 
Carolina. 

Olin Sawyek, M. D. While he has enjoyed as 
busy -a practice as any physician in Georgetown 
County, Doctor Sawyer has yielded to the pres- 
sure of duty and the urging of friends to perform 
many services outside the immediate limits of his 

{>rofession. He has been a member of the Legis- 
ature, held town offices, has been prominent in 
civic patriotic and business affairs, and is one of 
the best known men in his section of the state. 

He was bom in Edgefield County, January i, 
1875, a son of Ptolemy Searon and Frances De 
Laura (Crouch) Sawyer. His father was a planter 
and merchant. Doctor Sawyer attended the public 
schools of Trenton and Johnston, finished his liter- 
ary education in the University of South Carolina, 
and in April, 1901, graduated from the Medical 
College of the State of South Carolina at Charles- 
ton. He largely paid his own way through medical 
college. As a young man he had worked on a 
farm and clerked in a drug store and also taught 
school two summers. He began the practice of 
medicine at Georgetown and from the first has 
enjoyed substantial connections. He is chief sur- 
geon of the Atlantic Coast Lumber Corporation, 
and also the Georgetown & Westem Railroad Com- 
panv, and when that line was taken over by the 
Seaboard Air Line he remained as local surgeon. 
Doctor Sawyer has served as a member of the 
Board of Aldermen in Georgetown and was a mem- 
ber of the Legislature from that county from 1907 
to 1913. In 191 5 he was elected mayor of George- 
town and served two terms. He was in all the 
democratic state conventions from 1902 to 1912, 
was chairman of the County Democratic Organiza- 
tion from 1906 to 1912, and a presidential elector 
in 1904. During the war Doctor Sawyer was chair- 
man of the county Red Cross campaign, was a Four 
Minute Man of the committee on public information 
during the World war and as sUth spoke and actively 
worked for the putting through of all the Red Cross 
campaigns, also Liberty and Victory bond drives, 
Young Men's Christian Association and United War 
Work Community drives, and for Jewish relief. He 
served four years as chairmen of the local Board of 
Health. He is president of the Georgetown Medi- 
cal Society and a member of the State, Southern 
and American Medical associations and the Asso- 
ciation of Southern Railway Surgeons. In 1903 
Governor Heyward commissioned him regimental 
surgeon with the rank of major, First Regiment 
Volunteer Cavalry, ^nd he served in two encamp- 
ments, until a change was made in the system of 
the militia organization of the state. Doctor Saw- 
yer for four years was a director of the Georgetown 
Chamber of Commerce. He is a Presbyterian and 
is affiliated with the Masonic Order, Knights of 
Pythias, and the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. 

November 27, 1901, he married Lulie Boyd of 
Ridgeway, South Carolina, daughter of Dr. John 



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D. and Lucy (Bryant) Boyd. They have twin 
daughters, 01m and Ray. 

George William Dargan was born at "Sleepy 
Hollow" in Darlington County, South Carolina, on 
May II, 1841. He was educated at the academies 
of his native county and at the South Carolina Mili- 
tary Academy at Charleston. In 1861 he married 
Miss Ida Louise Hunter, also a native of Darling- 
ton County. He was admitted to the bar in 1872; 
was elected as a democrat to the State Legislature 
without opposition in 1877 ; was elected solicitor of 
the Fourth Judicial Circuit of South Carolina with- 
out opposition in 1880, and served with distinction 
as a member of the Forty-eighth, Forty-ninth, 
Fiftieth and Fifty-first Congresses of the United 
States, from the Sixth Congressional District of 
South Carolina. He died at Darlington, South Caro- 
Ima, on the 29th day of June, 1898, and was sur- 
vived by his wife, Ida Louise, and five children, 
namely, Lawrence, George Edwin, Emile Bacot, 
Sarah DuBose and Archie Shaw Dargan. 

Mr. Dargan was the son of Dr. William Edwin 
Dargan and Sarah DuBose, and was the grandson 
of Timothy Dargan, whose father was also named 
Timothy, ^1 of whom were residents of Darlington 
County, which has been the home of the Dargan 
family since a time prior to the Revolutionary war. 
The family has furnished some conspicuous names 
to the history of the state. Among them were 
George Washington Dargan, a distinguished chan- 
cellor of South Carolina; Julius A. Dargan, an emi- 
nent lawyer and one of the signers of the South 
Carolina Ordinance of Secession; and Lieut.-Col. 
Alonza T. Dargan, of the Confederate Army, who 
was killed in action at Petersburg, Virginia, in 
1864, all of whom were uncles of George William 
Dargan. 

He was a modest and retiring gentleman of unim- 
peachable character, an able and successful lawyer, 
a ripe scholar and a faithful and fearless public 
servant 

Wilbur L. Rodrigues. While his name was added 
to the Charleston bar only a few years ago, Wilbur 
L Rodrigues has won a large following and many 
successes in his chosen profession. 

He has been a resident of South Carolina most 
of his life, but was born at Jacksonville, Illinois, 
in 18^ son of L L. and Minnie (Vieiera) Rod- 
ngues, who now reside at Orangeburg. South Caro- 
lina. L L. Rodrigues, of Portuguese ancestry, was 
also bom at Jacksonville, Illinois. The grand- 
father, a native of Portugal, was a missionary and 
on coming to America settled in Illinois. L. L. Rod- 
r^es brought his family to Orangeburg County in 
189& 

Wilbur L Rodrigues attended his first schools 
in Orangeburg and after completing his public 
school work b^an the study of law there. He con- 
tinued tiic reading of law in the office of Mr. B. A. 
Hagood at Charleston and was admitted to the bar 
in 1917. In three years his abilities have been tested 
and his qualifications proven in the handling of an 
increasing general practice. 

Mr. Rodrigues is affiliated with Landmark Lodge 
of Masons. He married Miss Ethel Goddard of 
Charleston and their two children are Wilbur L., Jr.. 
and Mary Ethel. 



Richard Lewis Berry. Forty years ago Richard 
Lewis Berry had earned some considerable success 
as a dniggist and dealer in timber lands. Inciden- 
tal to his main business and to express a youthful 
enthusiasm which he had cherished for the practical 
art of printing, he established a small job printing 
plant at Orangeburg in 1881. Not long afterward 
some destructive fires swept away the greater part 
of his timber holdings, involving his other invested 
capital, and on reorganization his assets he found 
little left except the printing plant. It was a dis- 
couraging situation, but proved in fact a blessing 
in disguise, since by givmg all his energies to print- 
ing he discovered his real genius and ability and 
the work to which his enthusiasm and efforts have 
been wholly devoted duriiig all subsequent years. 

Mr. Berry was born in Orangeburg County, Janu- 
ary 23, 1850. While remotely of Irish stock, the 
Berrys have been in America for many generations 
and are of Revolutionary stock. Richardf E. Berry, 
his father, was born in the lower part of Orange- 
burg County, and owing to his age was not called 
into service by the Confederacy until 1863, and 
thereafter served chiefly on guard duty with the 
state troops until the close of the war. He held 
the rank of lieutenant. Otherwise he devoted his 
years to farming. His wife was Mary Ott Berry, 
also a native of Orangeburg County, and one of 
her brothers was a Confederate soldier. She died 
in 1850. 

Richard Lewis Berry was six months old when his 
mother died, and an aunt reared him until he was 
twenty years of age. He had regular duties on the 
farm in proportion to his years and strength, but 
also attended local schools and spent one term in 
Wofford Preparatory School. On leaving home at 
the age of twenty Mr. Berry moved to Branch- 
ville and engaged in the drug business. The license 
he received at that time from the State Pharma- 
ceutical Board he still preserves. He was a drug- 
gist ten years, and also became interested in the 
timber industry in that vicinity. Then came the 
critical stage and the turning point in his career 
above described. 

He developed his printing plant to profitable pro- 
portions and in time expanded his business by estab- 
lishing the Enterprise, a weekly newspaper. He 
continued it for two years, until the financial de- 
pression of 1893. Later he employed his printing 
plant to publish the "Cotton Planr for Dr. W. J. 
Stokes. This was a weekly agricultural paper, and 
Doctor Stokes had bought it to further his political 
ambition, ahd was elected to Congress largely 
through the influence wielded by the paper. The 
Cotton Plant had a circulation of 8,000, and was 
published by Mr. Berry for two years. 

Later Mr. Berry organized the firm of R. Lewis 
Berry & Company, the personnel of which con- 
sisted of himself, his son W. D. Berry and A. C. 
Dibble.. The company published the Southern Chris- 
tian Advocate in 1900-01. Later, under the same 
name, the father and son* in 1904 established the 
Orangeburg Evening News, issued daily except Sun- 
day. The publication of this splendid daily paper 
was continued until 1917, and proved a great asset 
to the city. However, Mr. Berry's ideas were some- 
what in advance of his time, and the patronage of 
the News was not all it should have been. One 



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of the contributing causes for the discontinuance 
was the rapidly mounting high prices of both print- 
ing paper and labor, and it was only after the pub- 
lication was discontinued that the business man 
and citizen generally of Orangeburg appreciated the 
usefulness of the organ. 

Through all these years the job printing plant has 
been continued. In May, 1919, Mr. Berry organ- 
ized the Orangeburg Sun Company, being associated 
with James I. Sims, Henry R. Sims, Hugo S. Sims, 
W. D. Berry and C C. Berry. This company bought 
the Orangeburg Sun, a semi- weekly, from Mr. Fred 
WannamaJcer, acquiring the publication plant at the 
same time. Soon afterward the Sun became a 
weekly and has so been published. The company 
is incorporated for $10,000, with R. L. Berry as 
president, C CliflFord Berry, secretary and treasurer. 
The Sun enjoys a large circulation among the farm- 
ers of the county and exemplifies some of the best 
standards of country journalism in the state. 

Mr. Berry has always been a Methodist, and is 
affiliated with the Masonic order. At B ranch ville, 
December 24, 1876, he married Miss Frances M. 
Howell, a native of that town and daughter of 
William H. and Mary A. Howell. The two sons 
of Mr. and Mrs. Berry have already been noted 
hi the business record of the father. Their names 
are Walter Douglas and Charles Clifford Berry. 
The former now has charge of the printing depart- 
ment of the Epworth Orphanage at Columbia. In 
191 1 he married Miss Otes Ransdale, a native of 
Orangeburg and a daughter of Lendo Ransdale. 
They have one child, W. D., Jr. Charles C. Berry 
married June 29, 1909, Annie Mackay, a native of 
Orangeburg and a daughter of W. E. Mackay. 
Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. C. C. 
Berry, C. C. Jr., Frances and Richard Bruce. 

CoRDiE Page is a well known lawyer of Horry 
County, was born in that section of South Caro- 
lina, and most of his life has been spent there, 
though for a time he was engaged in law prac- 
tice at Florence. 

He was born at Galivants Ferry, Horry County, 
August 19, 1884, ^ son of William and Mary Jane 
(Lewis) Page. He grew up on his father's farm, 
attended Zion School, graduated from the schools 
of Conway in 1905, and took his Bachelor of Science 
degree from the University of South Carolina in 
1909. For one year he taught school in his native 
county and in 1912 received his LL. B. degree from 
the law department of the state university. In 
January, 1913, he formed a partnership with C. J. 
Casque at Florence, but from 19 15 to September, 
19 1 7, was in practice alone in that city. At the 
latter date he returned to Horry County and en-, 
joys a splendid practice at Conway, He is secre- 
tary of the G. T. Walker Company, a clothing firm 
of Florence, and was one of the original charter 
members and organizers of the Pee Dee Fair Asso- 
ciation. From April, 1918, until the close of the 
war he was a member of the local draft board 
at Conway. Mr. Page is also a leader in the affairs 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

John Martin Kinard. A very busy and useful 
career, based upon self attainment and wisely di- 
rected ambition, has been that of John Martin Kin- 



ard, the well known banker and industrial leader 
at Newberry. 

He was born at Kinards, Newberry County, May 
17, 1862. He acquired his early literary education 
in Newberry College and afterward took a special 
course in South Carolina College and while there 
won the debaters medal given by the Christopher 
Society. He- became interested in public affairs 
and for ten years serVed as clerk of court of New- 
berry County. Mr. Kinard was made president of 
the Commercial Bank of Newberry at the time of 
its organization in 1896, and has wisely directed 
the affairs of that institution for over twenty years. 
He is also a director of the Newberry Cotton Mill, 
and is president of the Newberry Knitting Mill. 
He married Miss Margaret Lee Land, of Augusta, 
Georgia, June s, 1895. 

Robert Milton Shirley. A large part of the 
business rendered at Honea Path has been supplied 
by members of the Shirley family. One of the most 
prominent of them was the late Robert Milton 
Shirley, for a quarter of a century a banker and 
from early boyhood an abundant source of business 
enterprise to that community. 

Mr. Shirley died January 29, 1918, in the house * 
where he was born March 14, 1858. His parents 
were John Jasper and Frances (Mattison) Shirley. 
John J. Shirley was bom on Little River, five miles 
south of Honea Path, July 18, 1825, and during his 
infancy his parents removed to Honea Path, where 
he grew up and was long one of the most con- 
spicuous figures in the town. He built the home 
where his son Robert M. was born and where the 
latter's widow still lives. John J. Shirley died 
March 9, 1907, when m his eighty-third year. Though 
well advanced in years at the time, he served as a 
loyal soldier of the Confederacy in Company E of 
the Twenty-First Regiment, under Colonel Keiths 
and as first lieutenant had command of the company 
part of the time. On account of ill health he was 
sent home In 1863. He served as the first station 
agent and performed the duties of that office for 
twenty-eight years at Honea Path. He was also 
the first postmaster, was a merchant, and built the 
Shirley Hotel, which was operated under his man- 
agement for over fifty years. In 1855 John J. 
Shirley married Miss Frances Mattison. They had 
three sons, William A., a furniture dealer and under- 
taker at Honea Path; Robert Milton; and Dr. John 
Fletcher Shirley, of Honea Path. John J. Shirley 
also had farming interests. He was a deacon in the 
Baptist Church. 

Robert Milton Shirley grew up in his home town, 
attended the public schools, and was not more than 
ten years of age when his special genius for busi- 
ness prompted him to become a clerk in a local store. 
Thus he had a thorough training in business at a 
time when most boys are engaged in their books 
and school routine. In 1883 he started in business 
on a small scale as a general merchant. He gave 
up his mercantile interests in 1893 to organize the 
Bank of Honea Path. He became its president and 
served that institution faithfully and well for nearly 
a quarter of a century. Mr. Shirley had the char- 
acter and the ability which made him implicitly 
trusted by all v^ho knew him. In every sense he was 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



89 



a leader in the community, taking an active part 
in organizing the Honea Path Cotton Mills and 
serving as vice president ; was for a long time inter- 
ested in the Honea Path Lumber Company and part 
of the time president; and owned extensive farming 
interests. He was active in the establishment of 
the Carnegie Library, and was a member of the 
Town Council many years. He was an elder in 
the Presbyterian Church and was a member of the 
Knights of Pythias. 

November 13, 1890, he married Miss Sallie Hill 
Erwin, a daughter of Malcolm Erwin of £r win's 
Mill in Abbeville County, and his wife, Margaret 
(McMurtry) Erwin, who were natives of County 
Antrim, Ireland. The Erwin family came to the 
United States in 1865, locating at Erwin's Mill in 
Abbeville County. Malcolm Erwin was a brother 
of Thomas Erwin, who was the first of the family 
to come to South Carolina and from Abbeville 
County moved to Charleston, where he lived for 
many years. Mrs. Shirley's grandfather, Arthur 
Erwin, brought his family to the United States and 
lived near Abbeville Court House. The Erwins are. 
Scotch-Irish. Mrs. Shirley was born in Abbeville 
County. She is the mother of a son and daughter, 
Malcolm John Shirley and Frances Eileen Shirley, 
the latter now Mrs. Clyde Mann. Both children 
were liberally educated, the son graduating Bachelor 
of Science from Davidson College, in North Caro- 
lina in 1 91 5 and taking his law degree from the 
University of South Carolina in 1917. The daugh- 
ter graduated in 19 19 from Chicora College. Mal- 
colm John Shirley, who was born December 29, 1893, 
enlisted in the National army November 26, 1917, 
and was called to active duty December 15, 1917. 
For seven months he was in the Quartermaster's 
Training School at Camp Johnston, Florida, and 
was sent overseas June 5, 19 18. He remained in 
France nearly a year, until May 18, 19 19. During the 
war he was stationed at an intermediate section in 
supply work: He received his honorable discharge 
June 3, 1919. 

John Elbert Steadman is a young lawyer of Den- 
mark, a community in which he has spent practi- 
cally all his life, and in which he is highly esteemed 
as a citizen. 

He was born there August 9, 1891. The Stead- 
mans came to South Carolina during the Revolu- 
tionary war. His grandfather was a native of Lex- 
ington County, and he took part in the war between 
the states. His father is John E. Steadman, who 
was born in Lexington County and was a merchant 
and died in his seventy-seventh year. He was a 
second lieutenant in the war between the states, 
and was wounded The mother, Sarah Merritt, was 
bom in Lexington County and is still living, a resi- 
dent of Denmark. Her parents were from Alabama. 

John Elbert Steadman was the sixth child and 
third son in a family of eight children, all living. 
He has three brothers in Denmark. Boyce, and 
Elmore were in the World, war, Elmore a finance 
officer at El Paso, Texas, and Boyce was in the 
quartermaster's department at Bordeaux. Gordon 
is with the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. He was 
well educated, spending one year in Clemson Col- 
lege and taking the law course in the University 



of South Carolina, where he graduated in 191 5. 
He was admitted to the bar in June of the same 
year, and at once opened his office at Denmark, 
specializing in commercial law. In addition to his 
growing and substantial law practice he represents 
some of the leading fire insurance companies, and 
is also owner of a farm in Bamberg County. 

In 1919 he married Miss Dessie Hungerpiller, a 
daughter of J. E. Hungerpiller, of Elloree, South 
Carolina. They are planters and South Carolinians. 

Arnold A. Rivers. The name of Arnold A. Riv- 
ers of Brunsson, needs no introduction to the people 
of his community, where he spent practically his 
entire life, and where he was successfully engaged 
in business as the result of rightly applied prin- 
ciples, which never fail in their ultimate effect when 
coupled with integrity, uprightness and a congenial 
disposition, as in his case, judging from the high 
standing he maintained among his fellow citizens, 
whose undivided esteem he justly won and retained, 
for his life was one of untiring industry and hon- 
orable dealings with his fellow men. 

Arnold A. Rivers, who was the popular and effi- 
cient cashier of the Merchants and Planters Bank 
at Brunson, was born in that town on February 
2j, 1886, and was the fifth in order of birth of the 
SIX children born to the union of J. E. and Mil- 
.dred (Smith) Rivers. J. E. Rivers was born in 
Hampton County, South Carolina, and has there 
spent his entire life. He is the son of J. D. Rivers, 
who was born at what is now known as Rivers 
Bridge, Barnwell County, South Carolina, and whose 
father, a native of England, was the first of the 
family to settle in South Carolina. The subject's 
mother, who was born in Hampton County, South 
Carolina, is the daughter of Thomas Smith, who 
also was a native of that county and of English 
origin. 

Arnold A. Rivers attended the schools of Hamp- 
ton, where he was graduated from the high school, 
and he then took a complete course in a business 
college in Columbia, South Carolina. He was en- 
gaged in the fertilizer business for a number of 
years at Brunson, in which he was successful, and 
in 1918 he was chosen as cashier of the Merchants 
and Planters Bank of Brunson, which position he 
filled until the time of his death in February of 
1920. Mr. Rivers was also the owner of a splen- 
did farm, to the operation of which he gave proper 
attention. He was considered a splendid type of 
business man, a leader of men in his community 
and a stanch supporter of every movement calcu- 
lated to advance the interests of the locality in any 
way, giving his hearty support to those objects which 
promised to benefit the public welfare. 

In 1906 Mr. Rivers married Lillie Hughes, the 
daughter of L. F. Hughes, and they were the par- 
ents of one son, Louis. Mr. Rivers was a mem- 
ber of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and 
the Knights of Pythias. In the course of an hon- 
orable career he was successful in his business ef- 
forts and enjoyed the confidence and good will of 
those with whom he had been associated in either 
a business or social way. 

At the death of Mr. Rivers his brother, John C. 
Rivers, was elected to succeed him as cashier of 
the Merchants & Planters Bank. John C. Rivers 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



was bom March 23, 1889, near Brunson. He at- 
tended the public schools and graduated from the 
Hampton High School. He was engaged with his 
brother James T. Rivers in the mercantile business 
in Brunsoh for about four years. He then car- 
ried the United States mail for three years, until 
February, lazo, when he was elected cashier of the 
bank. Mr. Rivers is the owner of and conducts a farm 
of about 255 acres near Brunson. His crop has 
been principally in cotton, but he grows com and 
grain as well. He is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias. 

John C. Rivers married December 21, 1916, at 
Brunson, to Ivy Lee Bmnson, a native of Brtmson 
and daughter of William R. Bmnson. The Brun- 
sons are of an old South Carolina family, the town 
of Brunson being named in their honor. Mrs. Riv- 
ers' grandfather was a soldier in the Confederate 
army. Mr. and Mrs. Rivers have one child, Miss 
Mildred Lavonia. 

Herbert King Gilbert is a veteran in the serv- 
ice of the Atlantic Coast Line Railway, and is now 
division storekeeper at Florence. 

He was born at Charleston, March 21, 1873, a so^ 
of Hezekiah Mix and Eveline (King) Gilbert. His 
father spent his active life as a merchant and in 
1858 opened the first general store at Florence. 
Herbert K. Gilbert was educated in public schools 
and left school to become a messenger boy in the 

feneral offices of the Atlantic Coast Line Railway, 
le has been promoted steadily during his quarter 
of a century of service and now holds one of the 
important posts in the railway service in South 
Carolina. 

He has alsol>een prominent in local affairs. For 
two terms he was an alderman, resigning that 
office, served three years as a meu'ber of the Board 
of Health, and from 1907 to 1913 held the office 
of mayor for three terms. In the fourth campaign 
he was beaten by thirteen votes, but in 19 17 was 
again elected mayor, and in that year received the 
largest number of votes ever given to one can- 
didate in a municipal election at Florence. Mr. 
Gilbert has been a director and treasurer of the 
Young Men's Christian Association at Florence since 
it was organized. He is secretary of his Masonic 
Lodge and a member of the Chapter and Council, 
and is a steward in the Methodist Episcopal Church 
South. April 19, 1898, he married Edith May De 
Berry of Florence County. They have two children, 
Herbert McTyeire and Clyde Lee. 

Hon. Frank Boyd Gary. After his admission 
to the bar in 1881 Frank Boyd Gary began prac- 
tice at Abbeville, and has never changed his resi- 
dence from that old and historic city. In the mean- 
time, however, his abilities have won him state wide 
and national prominence, and it is doubtful if there 
is a better known man in the state, or a lawyer 
or jurist in whom the people in general feel more 
complete confidence as to his integrity, ability and 
adequacy. 

Judge Gary, a former United States Senator from 
South Carolina, and present judge of the Eighth 
Judicial Circuit, was born at Cokesbury in Abbe- 
ville County, March 9, i860, son of Dr. Franklin 
F. and Mary Caroline (Blackburn) Gary. In dif- 



ferent generations members of this family faave 
been people of high position. Judge. Gain's pater- 
nal grandmother was of the Witherspoon family, 
which was identified with the very earliest settle- 
ment of South Carolina. They first located near 
Kingstree in Williamsburg County, whence they 
scattered throughout the state, after having with- 
stood the hostility of Indians and the incursions of 
wild animals in the frontier days, and after hav- 
ing established a church, which today is one of the 
oldest in South Carolina. The Witherspoons came 
to this country to escape persecution, and lineage 
goes directly to the reformer John Knox. 

Judge Gary through his mother b a member of 
the Blackburn family, which numbers among it 
many scholars, and two of the Blackbums were 
killed in the battle of Kings Mountain in the Revo- 
lutionary war. Dr. Franklin F. Gary, father of 
Judge Gary, was a prominent physician, and also 
took an active part m public affairs, serving as a 
member of the General Assembly, as president of 
the State Medical Association, as member of the 
State Board of Health and representing in every 
way the highest character and attainments. Dr. 
Franklin Gary and his wife were honored by three 
distinguished sons, who were simultaneously Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court, Judge of the Fifth 
Circuit and Judge of the Eighth Circuit. The Chief 
Justice is Eugene Blackbum Gary, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this publication. There 
is also a daughter, Mrs. M. G. Eason, of Charles- 
ton. 

Frank Boyd Gary was educated in the Cokes- 
bury Conference School, and then entered Unk>n 
College at Schenectady, New York. On account 
of ill health he withdrew from college in his senior 
year and was admitted to the South Carolina bar 
in 1881, and at once began practice at Abbeville 
and continued a leading figure in his profession 
in that part of the state until 1912. While busied 
with the law he accepted many opportunities to 
serve the public For about nine years he was 
bill clerk of the House of Representatives, serving 
under the late James Simons of Charleston, speaker, 
and during that experience acquired mudi knowl- 
edge of legislative proceedings and especially of 
parliamentary law. In 1890 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the House, and was re-elected for four con- 
secutive terms, serving until 1900. In 1906 he was 
again elected a member of the Legislature. He 
was three times elected speaker of the House, and 
in 1895 was a member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention. On March 6, 1908, Judge Gary was elected 
by the General Assembly of South Carolina to fill 
the vacancy in the United States Senate caused 
by the death of Senator A. C. Latimer. During 
this service he made several speeches, one of which 
— ^his speech on immigration — ^attracted wide atten- 
tion and favorable comment, especially in New Eng- 
land. Upon the expiration of his time in the Senate 
he was elected without opposition judge of the 
Eighth Judicial Circuit, and has been successively 
re-elected, having served ten years and is now at 
the beginning of another four year term. 

One of the important incidents in his career, 
which added to his reputation abroad, was his 
annointment upon the recommendation of the then 
Chief Justice Pope of the Supreme Court by Gov- 



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91 



ernor Hayward to preside at the trial of James H. 
Tillxnan in Lexington County. This was a famous 
trial. Tillman was charged with the murder o.f 
Editor Gonzales. The trial lasted twenty-two days, 
and was followed with intense interest all over 
the United States, all of the metropolitan papers 
giving much space to the proceedings. While the 
result of the trial may have been disappointing to 
many, but little if any criticism was indulged as 
10 the presiding judge, and many expressed them- 
selves as pleased with his fairness and impartiality 
in the conduct of the case. 

Judge Gary served as delegate at large from 
South Carolina to the National Democratic Con- 
vention in 1908. He is a director of the People's 
Savings Bank of Abbeville and is active in Ma- 
sonry, having been Potentate of Oasis Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine in 1907, Oasis at that time be- 
ing the Temple for both Carolinas. He is a mem- 
ber and steward of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
South. 

January 6, 1897, at Florence, South Carolina, 
Judge Gary married Maria Lee Evans, daughter 
of Dr. James and Maria Antoinette (Powell) Evans. 
Their only son is Midshipman Frank Boyd Gary, 
Jr., now a second classman or junior in the United 
States Naval Academy at Annapolis. 

Geobix Warren. In a brief sketch of any living 
citizen it is difficult to do him exact and impartisd 
justice, not so much, however, for lade of space 
or words to set forth the familiar and passing events 
of his personal history, as for want of the perfect 
and rounded conception of his whole life, which 
grows, develops and ripens, like fruit, to disclose 
its true and best flavor only when it is mellowed 
by time. Daily contact with the man so familiarizes 
us with his many virtues that we ordinarily over- 
look them and commonly underestimate their pos- 
sessor. There are, however, a number of elements 
in the life record of George Warren, one of the 
representative citizens of Hampton, South Caro- 
lina, that even now serve as examples well worthy 
of emulation, and his fellow townsmen are not un- 
appreciative of these. He is a splendid example of 
the virile, progressive man who believes in doing 
well whatever is worth doing at all, a man of keen 
discernment and sound judgment and enjoying to 
a marked degree the confidence of his fellow men. 

George Warren, solicitor for Beaufort, Jasper, 
Hampton and Colleton counties, was born in Hamp- 
ton County, South Carolina, on November 25, 1887. 
and is the son of JeflFerson and Clara E. (Riley) 
Warren. The father, who was born and reared 
in Colleton County, was a prominent and success- 
ful lawyer in Hampton, where his death occurred 
in 1897. He vras a soldier in Company C, "Fifth 
South Carolina Cavalry, Butler's Brigade, Confed- 
erate States of America, during the Confederate 
struggle, serving throughout the war, which he en- 
tered at the age of fourteen. His father, George 
Warren, who was a native of Colleton District, 
was sheriff of that district and was comn\anding 
officer of the South Carolina Militia, with the raiS 
of brigadier general. His father, also named 
George, was a native of England, who came to 
America prior to the War of the Revolution. The 
subject's mother, whose maiden name was Qara 



E. Riley, was a native of Barnwell Cotmty, South 
Carolina, and was the daughter of J. W. Riley, 
of Barnwell, but who was a native of Ireland. 
Prior to her marriage to Mr. Warren she had 
been married to E. J. Webb, to which union three 
children were bom. The subject of this sketch 
is the only child born to her union with Mr. Warren. 

George Warren received his elementary educa- 
tion in the public schools and then entered Clem- 
son College, where he was graduated in 1908, with 
the de^ee of Bachelor of Science. Then, having 
determmed to make the practice of law his life work, 
he entered the office of his uncle, E. F. Warren, at 
Hampton, under whose direction he read law for a 
year, being admitted to th^ bar in 1909. Immediately 
thereafter he opened an office in Hampton and has 
since then been devoted to the active practice of 
his profession. His abilities were quickly recog- 
nized and he has been engaged in mudi of the most 
important litigation in the courts of this and neigh- 
boring counties. Mr. Warren was elected a mem- 
ber of the House of Representatives in 1912, and 
was twice re-elected, serving in that body until 
1916. In the latter year he was elected judge of the 
Circuit Court, but he declined this position and was 
then elected solicitor by the people, in which posi- 
tion he is still serving for tiie counties of Beau- 
fort, Jasper, Hampton and Colleton. He has also 
held other local offices. 

In 191 1 occurred the marriage of George Warren 
to Rita L Lightsey, who died on October 13, 1918, 
leaving a son and a daughter, George and Rita 
Couise. Fraternally Mr. Warren is an appreciative 
member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has 
attained to the thirty-second degree of the Scottish 
Rite, and also belongs to the Ancient Arabic Order 
of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Junior Order of United American Me- 
chanics and the Woodmen of the World. He has 
earned a reputation as a progressive, enterprising 
man of affairs and a broad-minded and upright citi- 
zen, which the public has not been slow to recog'- 
nize and appreciate. The honorable distinction 
which he has already achieved in his profession is 
but an earnest of the still wider sphere of useful- 
ness which lies before him, for he is a close ob- 
server of the trend of the times and an intelligent 
student of the great questions and issues Upon 
which the thought of the best minds of the world 
are centered. 

Benjamin S. Williams was a gallant and hard- 
fighting youthful soldier and officer in the Confed- 
erate army, serving with a regiment from the State 
of Georgia. Not long after the war he came to 
South Carolina, and for many years has been a 
lawyer, planter and public official in Hampton 
County. 

Mr. Williams was born in Savannah, June 25, 
1843, son of Gilbert W. M. and Esther Williams. 
Although born ' in Georgia, he passed practically 
his entire life in South Carolina. This branch of 
the Williams family is one of the oldest in America, 
and its authentic records and traditions go far 
back into the middle ages of Great Britain. The 
tradition is that the family descended from Mar- 
chudel, chief of one of the fifteen tribes of North 
Wales, in the ninth century. Marchudel was also 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



the progenitor of the royal houses of Tudor. The 
root meaning of the name is "Guard" or "Sentinel/* 
the word being derived from the old Briton or 
Cambrian word "gwylio" meaning "to watch." The 
coat of arms is a sable, a lion rampant, argent 
armes and languid gules. Crest is a fighting cock, 
symbol of watchfulness. Motto: Y Fyno Dwy Y 
Fydd "What God willeth will be." The side motto 
is: Cognosce Occasionem — "Watch your Opportu- 
nity." A traveler in Wales finds this coat of arms 
at every turn, cut in stone monuments, engraved 
upon mural tablets in churches and upon brass 
plates on pew doors. 

In America all the colonial as well as later wars 
had their representatives in the Williams family. 
Descendants have no trouble in establishing eligi- 
bility to the much coveted membership in the So- 
ciety of Colonial Wars. Colonel Ephraim Williams 
of Massachusetts fell in the battle near Lake George. 
He was the founder of a free school at Williams- 
town, which has since become Williams College. 
Joseph Warren, who fell at Bunker Hill, was the 
fifth in descent from Robert Williams, one of the 
Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock. William Williams, 
also a lineal descendant of Robert, was member 
of Congress in 1776 and one of the signers of the 
Declaration of Independence. 

Mr. Williams' great-grandfather was Hon. John 
Williams, of South Carolina, whose mother was a 
Miss Caldwell, sister of the mother of Hon. John 
Caldwell Calhoun, the South's greatest statesman. 
Mr. Williams' paternal grandmother was Elizabeth 
Legare Martin, whose mother was Elizabeth Legare 
of Charleston. 

In the cemetery at Savannah, Georgia, there is a 
modest monument bearing the epitaph "To the mem- 
ory of Rev. Gilbert W. M. Williams, Colonel of 
the Forty- Seventh Georgia Infantry, who fighting 

fstllantly for the cause of the Confederacy died 
eptember i, 1863, — a soldier, a patriot and a Chris- 
tian." Gilbert W. M, Williams* name is in the ar- 
chives of the State of Georgia as a signer of the 
ordinance of session, carnring Georgia, his adopted 
state, out of the Union, following his native State 
of South Carolina. He then organized and com- 
manded the Forty-seventh Regiment of Georgia 
Volunteer Infantry in the Army of the West until 
his death, which occurred in September, 1863. He 
was a Baptist minister, and was widely known 
for his forcefulness and eloquence in debate. 

Benjamin S. Williams was only eighteen years of 
age when his father took up arms in behalf of the 
cause which he believed right. The son followed 
him, enlisting in 1861 as a private in the Twenty- 
fifth Georgia Infantry and rising through the grades 
of corporal, sergeant and first lieutenant. In 1862 
he was appointed adjutant of the Forty-seventh 
Georgia Infantry, his father's regiment. He served 
throughout the remainder of the war with that 
famous regiment, known as "the Bloody 47th 
' Georgia." 

After the war the young soldier returned to his 
devastated home and engaged in farming and plant- 
ing. He also studied law, located in Hampton 
County, and for many years has been one of the 
leading cotton planters of that section of the state. 
He had an active part in politics, particularly in 



reconstruction times. From 1876 to 1880 he was 
auditor of Hampton County. He also served as 
sheriflF and has represented the county in the Legis- 
lature. He was in the Legislature from 1880 to - 
1890. Politically Mr. Williams is an ardent demo- 
crat, and has always emphasized the "State's Rights'* 
principles in the party. . 

On November 7, 1867, in Beaufort District, South 
Carolina, he married Miss Josephine Richardson, 
daughter of James Cameron Richardson. Mrs. 
Williams was the beautiful and pious daughter of 
a wealthy planter, and in her life distinguished 
herself by faithfulness as a wife, affection as a 
mother, and the full performance of her duty as a 
Christian. Mr. Williams has the following child- 
ren: Gilbert James, Albert Richardson, Kate Cam- 
eron, Josephine Caldwell, Esther Ashley and Eliza- 
beth Legare. Only one son is married, Gilbert 
James. 

Harry Alexander Brunson, a prominent mem- 
ber of the Florence bar, formerly a well known 
educator, is present probate judge of Florence 
County. 

He was born at Florence, November 4, 1868, a 
son of William Alexander and Antoinette Taylor 
(Chandler) Brunson. His father before him was 
a prominent lawyer and for ten years held the office 
of probate judge. The son was educated in private 
schools, attended South Carolina College, now the 
University of South Carolina, being a member of 
the class of 1889. At intervals of other work prin- 
cipally teaching, he read law under his father and 
was admitted to the bar in December, 1894. He 
made little attempt to build up a practke, and gave 
his time to teaching and educatk>nal affairs until 
191 1, when he succeeded his father as probate judge 
and has held that office continuously. During his 
teaching career he taught at Lynchburg, Batesburg, 
was principal of the Florence High School, prin- 
cipal of schools at Georgetown and for three years 
connected with the schools of Spartanburg. 

Judge Brunson is a director of Palmetto Bank 
& Trust Company and also director of the Far- 
mers and Mechanics Bank. He is a member of 
the Masonic Order, Junior Order United American 
Mechanics and Knights of Pythias January i, 
1908, he married Miss Annie Louise Mcintosh of 
Lynchburg, South Carolina. They have two daugh- 
ters, Sarah Antoinette and Edith Woods. Judge 
Brunson is an active member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church South. 

Elias Earle Child was born in Pickens County, 
South Carolina, Mav 24, 1880, a son of Rufus Alex- 
ander and Essie (Holcombe) Child. His father 
was an attorney and for twenty-five years was a 
hard working member of the Methodist Conference. 

He married on December 2, 1903. Miss Nola 
Klugh, daughter of William W. and Ida (Frank- 
lin) Klugh. Her father was a planter. To their 
marriage were born two children named William 
Klugh and Earl Holcombe. 

Mr. Child is president and treasurer of the Glenn- 
Lawry Manufacturing Company, a $2,000,000 cotton 
goods mill, and president of the Bank of Whit- 
mire, Whitmire, South Carolina. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



93 



Jacob George Wannamaker, M. D. Though a 
graduate in medicine of forty-five years standing 
Doctor Wannamaker used his professional talents 
chiefly as a business man, was a druggist, banker 
and was pronlinent in the affairs of his native 
city up to the time of his death. 

He was bom in Orangeburg County, April 14, 
1852, son of Jacob G. and Matilda (Colclasure) 
Wannamaker. His father was a large planter 
and served through the war between the states 
as captain in the Confederate army. Doctor Wanna- 
maker was a descendant of Lieut. Jacob Wanna- 
maker of Revolutionary fame. 

Doctor Wannamaker was educated in private 
schools, attended the University of South Carolina 
and was graduated from the Medical College of 
South Carolina at Charleston in 1874. He began 
practice at Orangeburg and in 1875 entered the 
drug business. From 1887 to 1892 he was in the 
wholesale drug business in Columbia and Charles- 
ton, but returned to Orangeburg and enlarged his 
drug business, the firm being known as the J. G. 
Wannamaker Manufacturing Company. He was 
president of this concern up to the time of his 
death. 

Doctor Wannamaker was president and one -of 
the organizers of the Bank of Orangeburg, was 
chairman of the Board of Commissioners of Pub- 
lic Works of Orangeburg for many years and was 
vke president of the South Carolina Pharmaceutical 
Association. He was always active in the aflFairs 
of his city and state. 

On October 7, 1875, Doctor Wannamaker was 
married to Carrie E. Connor, daughter of Lewis 
E. and Mary (Mellerd) Connor. To this union 
there were born seven children. The oldest boy, 
Walter M., died in 1900, and the second daughter, 
Janie Mae, died in 1910. The following children 
surviving the subject of this sketch are: Goldie C, 
wife of Robert C. Holman, of Barnwell; Jacob 
George, Jr., Carrie B., wife of Howard P. Dew; 
Lewis C, and William J., all of Orangeburg. 

Doctor Wannamaker died on May 17, 1919, at 
the age of sixty-seven years. 

Hon. Henry Johnson, the first state senator 
from Allendale County, has been an able lawyer at 
Allendale since he began practice ten years ago. 

Senator Johnson was born at Bowman in Orange- 
burg County, September 10, 1888, a son of John 
W. and Lorena (Bowman) Johnson. The town 
where he was born has been the home of the 
Bowmans for several generations, and the town was 
named for his maternal ancestors. Senator John- 
son's great-grandfather Johnson came from Massa- 
chusetts to Charleston about 1800. The grand- 
father, Henry L. Johnson, was born at Charleston 
and in early life settled at Williston in Barnwell 
County, where the family has since lived. John 
W. Johnson was born in Barnwell County. 

Senator Johnson grew up in Barnwell County, 
attended school at Williston, and graduated with 
the class of 1906 from The Citadel at Charleston. 
He is a graduate of the law department of the 
University of South Carolina of the class of 1909, 
and in the same year began practice at Allendale. 
He is said by all to be an exceptionally capable 



and skillful lawyer and has more than a local repu- 
tation in his profession. 

He was elected state senator from Barnwell 
County in 1916, serving during the sessions of 1917- 
18. The new county of Allendale, with Allendale 
as county seat, formed from portions of Barnwell 
and Hampton counties, was organized in January, 
1919, and at that time Mr. Johnson resigned as 
senator from Barnwell and was chosen for the new 
county. 

During the war Senator Johnson was chairman 
of the Third Liberty Loan campaign for the Second 
Congressional District, was a member of the Legal 
Advisory Board, and earnestly supported all meas- 
ures for the vigorous prosecution of the war. Sena- 
tor Johnson married in 1909 Miss Alene All, of 
Allendale. They have one daughter, Ida Doris 
Johnson. 

Eugene Gibson Hinson. Qualified for the prac- 
tice of law in 1917, Eugene Gibson Hinson spent 
nearly two years in the army, and in the spring of 
1919 he appropriately chose as his home and place 
of practice jthe Town of Allendale, recently estab- 
lished as the county seat of the new County of 
Allendale. This is a rich and promising section 
of South Carolina, and Mr. Hinson entered prac- 
tice with every qualification for an able and suc- 
cessful career. 

He was born at Marion, South Carolina, in 
1S94, son of L. L. and Lulu (Gibson) Hinson. 
The Hinsons for several generations have been 
planters on James Island. Mr. Hinson grew up at 
Marion and acquired a liberal education, graduat- 
ing in both the literary and law courses from the 
University of South Carolina. He was a member 
of the class of 1917. 

Soon after the outbreak of hostilities with Ger- 
many he entered the First Officers Training Camp 
at Fort Oglethorpe, and was commissioned second 
lieutenant. He was first assigned to duty with the 
Eighty-first Division, later was transferred to the 
Fourteenth Division and stationed at Camp Cus- 
ter, Michigan. While there he was promoted to 
first lieutenant. After twenty-two months in the 
army he received his honorable discharge Febru- 
ary 28, 1919. 

Mr. Hinson then located at Allendale and has 
rapidly adapted himself to his new environment, 
and has a substantial law practice. He is a mem- 
ber of the Presb)rterian Church and a Mason in 
fraternal affiliation. 

Mr. Hinson married Miss Agnes Katharine Gibbs, 
of Atlanta. However, she is a member of the his^ 
toric Gibbs family of Charleston. Her father was 
Charles E. Gibbs of Charleston. 

LeRoy Wilson has been a resident of Allendale 
nearly all his life, and for over twenty years has 
been an effective and public spirited factor in the 
advancement and upbuilding of that city not only 
as a commercial center but as the seat of justice 
of the recently organized Allendale County. Mr. 
Wilson was one of the leaders of the new county 
movement. 

Mr. Wilson, who is president of the Citizens 
Bank of Allendiale, was born -in Bamberg County, 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



South Carolina, in 1876, son of Capt. LcRoy and 
Mary E. (Brabham) Wilson. Both the Wilson 
and Brabham families are of Scotch ancestry, and 
the Brabhams have long held a high place in the 
history and social affairs of Bamberg County. Capt. 
LcRoy Wilson was a native of Barnwell, now 
Allendale County, and lived in Allendale from 1878. 
He was a planter and merchant, conducted a farm 
in the neighborhood of Allendale and was a non- 
commissioned officer in the Confederate army. The 
Wilsons are of an old South Carolina family, ante- 
dating the Revolutionary period and coming from 
England. Mr. Wilson took part in the Red Shirt 
brigade during the reconstruction period. He was 
active in. Masonry during his younger days, and 
died at the age of eighty-four in February, 191 1. 

The family moved to Allendale in 1878, and here 
LeRoy Wilson was reared and educated. As a 
youth he chose commercial pursuits, and the ac- 
crued wisdom and experience of passing years has 
given him a dominating position in the commu- 
nity. The Citizens Bank was organized in igop. 
Under the presidency and active management of 
Mr. Wilson this is a strong financial institution, 
and has furthered in many ways the expansion of 
his home community. The bank has a capital 
stock of $30,000, surplus and undivided profits of 
about $13,000, and deposits aggregating about 
$350,000. 

In November, 1919, Mr. Wilson organized the 
Allendale Grocery Company, with capital of 
$50,000, engaged in the wholesale grocery busi- 
ness. This institution has already served to empha- 
size Allendale's position as the center of an im- 
portant and flourishing trade territory. Mr. Wil- 
son is president of the company. The new County 
of Allendale, in the creation of which Mr. Wil- 
son had a creditable part, comprises territory origi- 
nally in Bamberg and Barnwell counties. Mr. Wil- 
son was also a leader in the various patriotic move- 
ments in his locality during the World war. 

He married Miss Ge Delle Brabham, of Bam- 
berg County, daughter of H. J. Brabham, of Bam- 
berg. They have two children, Mary Adele and 
LeRoy, jr. 

Cham-ton DuRant, former state senator, lawyer, 
business man and banker of Manning, has been a 
prominent factor in the life and alfairs of that 
community for over twenty years. 

Hfe was born at Bluff ton, Georgia, in 1874, son of 
E. C. and Virginia (Tinsley) DuRant His an- 
cestors were French, Scotch and Irish. His early 
advantages were limited to the common schools and 
he has been the architect of his own fortune and 
career. By close study he . was admitted to the 
South Carolina bar in 1807, and began practice 
as member of the firm of Wilson & DuRant at Man- 
ning with whom he continued till 1906. In the 
meantime from 1890 to 1894 he was an express 
messenger and thus earned his living while preparing 
for his professional career. Since 1916 be has been 
a member of the firm of DuRant & Eller Company. 

Mr. DuRant organized in 191 1 and has since been 
president of the Home Bank & Trust Company of 
Manning. This institution has $25,000 capital, sur- 
plus, of $15,000, while its deposits aggregate over 



$500,000. He is also member of the firm of DuRant 
& Floyd, and attorney and manager of the Clar- 
endon Building & Loan Association and president. 
Clarendon Telephone Company. Mr. DuRant was 
a member of the State Senate during 1916-17-18. 

Benjamin Hart Moss has practiced law at 
Orangeburg since 1883, is still a busy lawyer, and 
has handled many interests and responsibilities otit- 
side the direct limits of his profession. 

He was born in Orangeburg County, January 17. 
1862, son of William C. and Rebecca C. (Raysor) 
Moss, and a grandson of Stephen Moss and the 
great-grandson of Stephen Moss, who established the 
family in South Carolina from Virginia prior to the 
Revolutionary war. Benjamin Hart Moss grew up on 
a farm near Orangeburg, attended local schools, in- 
cluding the Orangeburg High School, and after- 
ward entered Wofford College, where he gradu- 
ated in 1883. He has preferred the steady prac- 
tice of law and business to politics, though in 1899 
he was elected a member of the Legislature, serving 
one term and voluntarily retired. He has also been 
a circuit judge. He has been and is president of 
the Edisto National Bank of Orangeburg, has 
served as trustee of Wofford College, and has been 
especially interested jn education, serving repeat- 
edly on the Orangeburg School Board. He is a 
democrat, a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, is affiliated with the Masonic Order 
and the Woodmen of the World. 

November 16, 1892, he married F. Agnes DibMc, 
daughter of Hon. Samuel Dibble, one of the most 
prominent names in the Orangeburg bar. To their 
marriage were born four children, three of whom 
reached mature years, Samuel Dibble Moss, May 
Caroline Moss and Agnes Henley Moss. 

Adam H<m.man Moss has been a- member of the 
Orangeburg bar for many years, and while the 
law has commanded the better part of his time 
he has also .been a factor in public affai:is at dif- 
ferent times. 

He was born at St. Matthews,. South Carolina, 
September 16, 1871, a son of James M. and Mar- 
garet (Holman) Moss. He grtw up on his father's 
farm, attended private schools, and graduated from 
Wofford College in 1892. Mr. Moss studied law 
in private offices and was admitted to the bar in 
1895. For two years he taught school, but for a 
quarter of a century has been engaged in the prac- 
tice of law. He served as a captain in the Spanish- 
American war. He served two terms as a member 
of the Legislature, having been elected from 
Orangeburg in 1900 and 1904. He is chairman of 
the County Democratic Committee and director of 
the Bank of Orangeburg. Mr. Moss is affiliated 
with the Order of Elks. 

He married Anne Norwood, of Greenville, and 
their two children are James Alexander and Loaisa 
Norwood. 

Charles G. Dantzler. A number of distin- 
guished South Carolinians have borne the family 
name of Dantzler. The Dantzlers came oriinnally 
from Germany and established their homes . in the 
Carolinas prior to the Revolution. Charles G. Dimtz- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



95 



ler was born at Orangeburg, March 19, 1854. His 
grandfather, Jacob H, Dantzler, was prominent in 
public life. His father, Olin M. Dantzler, was 
trained as a lawyer, but followed the business of 
planter, and during the war between the states 
commanded the Twenty-second South Carolina Vol- 
unteers and was killed in battle in 1864. His wife, 
Caroline Glover, was a daughter of Dr. Charles 
Glover, who attained eminence as a physician. 

Charles G. Dantzler was educated at Mount Zion 
Institute, Winnsboro, attended King's Mountain 
Military School at Yorkville, and from 1871 to 1875 
was a student of Wofford College, where he gradu- 
ated with honors. He then took up the practice 
of law and for over forty years his name has stood 
in the front rank of the Orangeburg District. He 
was elected in 1884 and served for six years as 
representative of Orangeburg County in the Legis- 
lature. In January, 1902, he was elected Circuit 
Judge of the First Judicial Circuit. Judge Dantz- 
ler is a member of the Masonic Order, is affiliated 
with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and 
has served as a trustee of Wofford College. He 
married in 1876 Laura A. Moss. He has two daugh- 
ters, Carrie M. and Annie W. 

David K. Bricx;s, M. D. After thirty-six years 
devoted to his chosen vocation Doctor Briggs is 
still active as a physician and surgeon, going his 
daily rounds, and keeping in close touch with the 
affairs of his home community at Blackville and 
also with the larger interests of his profession. 

A resident of Blackville most of his life. Doctor 
Briggs was born at Charleston, February $, 1862. 
Hts father was David Briggs, whose life was one 
of more than ordinary interest and achievement. 
Bom at Sidney, Maine, in 1819, he was a New 
En^Ismd farmer, and about 1840 came to South 
Carolina. He lived in Charleston for several years, 
and in 1849 with a party of friends sailed around 
Cape Horn to the California gold fields. After 
some more or less profitable but very interesting 
experiences on the Pacific Coast he returned to 
Charleston and engaged in the paint and oil busi- 
ness. In 1870 he moved to Blackville, and after 
that lived on a plantation and followed farming 
until his death in 1888. While a native of the 
North, he espoused the cause of the South in the 
time of war, though on account of physical disabil- 
ities was not in the Confederate army. However, 
he did some valuable service as a blockade run- 
ner, bringing in supplies to Charleston Harbor. 
Because of some of his exploits the Federal Gov- 
ernment offered a large reward* for him dead or 
alive. Throughout his life he exemplified the char- 
acter of a good, plain citizen, and gave his best 
energies to the .welfai*e of his chosen state. He 
was of English descent while his wife, Sarah A. 
Kcene, was Scotch. She was born at Augusta, 
Maine, and died in 1889. 

Doctor Briggs received his first advantages in 
the schools of Charleston, later attended school at 
Blackville, and in 1884 graduated M. D. from the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore. 
He has never allowed any important interests to 
interfere with a fixed devotion to his profession. 
He is local surgeon for the Southern Railway 



Company, has been president of the county and 
district medical societies, and during the war was 
examining physician for the Selective Draft Board. 
He is also a member of the American Medical 
Association. Doctor Briggs has never found time 
nor inclination for activity in politics. He is a 
York Rite Mason and Shriner, a Knight of Pythias 
and Woodmen of the World. 

Doctor Briggs helped organize the Presbyterian 
Church at Blackville in 1893, was chosen one of 
its first elders, and has discharged the duties of 
that office for a quarter of a century. He married 
in 1887 Ida C. Dodenhoff, a native of Blackville. 
Her father, Capt. Henry Dodenhoff, was born in 
Hanover, Germany, while her mother was of an 
old southern family. 

Philip Alston Willcx)x, senior member of the 
law firm of Willcox & Willcox, Florence, South 
Carolina, was bom in Marion, South Carolina, on 
the 4th of December, 1866., He graduated from the 
University of South Carolina, in 1888, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1880. He is general solici- 
tor for the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, 
and represents several large corporate interests, 
among them being the Standard Oil Company, the 
Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Company, 
and the Western Union Telegraph Company. He 
was president of the South Carolina Bar Associa- 
tion 1919-1920; is a member of the general council 
of the American Bar Association, and a trustee of 
University of South Carolina. He is an officer 
and director of several business institutions, 
banks, etc. 

Miles J. Walker, M. D. For over sixty years 
the Walker family of York County has been dis- 
tinguished by the abilities and attainments of its 
representatives in the profession of medicine and 
surgery. Dr. Miles J. Walker has practiced steadily 
for nearly forty years, while his brother. Dr. 
George Walker, of Baltimore, has earned national 
and international fame as a surgeon and scientist. 
The Walkers were of Revolutionary stock. Six 
of Dr. Miles J. Walker's father's brothers were 
in the Confederate army during the war between 
the states. 

Dr. Miles J. Walker was bofn in York County 
in i8.'>7, son of Dr. William Millard and Mary Ellen 
(Hudson) Walker. This is a very old family in 
York County. Dr. W. M. Walker was born there, 
a son of John Walker, and spent all his active 
life as a practicing dentist. He was also a Confed- 
erate soldier, serving throughout the war. 

Dr. Miles J. Walker acquired his literary train- 
ing in the King's Mountain Military Academy at 
York while it was under the direction of that ven- 
erable educator Colonel Coward. He graduated in 
medicine from the Louisville Medical College in 
1879, and after a brief practice in Union County 
removed to York. He has taken post-graduate 
work in the Johns Hopkins University and is widely 
known for his attainments and services in the medi- 
cal profession. He was district counsellor for the 
Fifth District, State Medical Association, has been 
chairman of the Board of Health of York for 
twenty years, and is a menfbcr of the county, state 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



and American associations. Dr. Miles J. Walker 
was surgeon for the First Regiment of Militia for 
ten years, but had to leave the service on account 
of a broken limb. He retired with the rank of 
major. 

Doctor Walker married Miss Nannie E. Walker, 
of Union County. Their children are Mrs. R. E. 
Sharp, Mrs. J. E. Nesbit, Mrs. John Porter Hollis, 
and Mrs. Henry Grady Hardin. 

Though for many years a resident of Baltimore, 
a brief sketch of Dr. George Walker has an appro- 
priate place in this volume. He was born at.York- 
ville, now York, July 27, 1869, was educated in 
South Carolina College and in the medical depart- 
ment of the University of Maryland. From the time 
of his graduation in 1889 until 1895 he practiced 
at York, South Carolina, and since 1895 has lived 
in Baltimore. He was connected with the Johns 
Hopkins University, and in 1905 was made asso- 
ciate in surgery in that institution. He became 
chairman of the Maryland Statewide Vice Com- 
mission in 1913, and is a director of the Social 
Service Corporation of Baltimore. He is an hon- 
ored member of a number of professional and 
scientific organizations, and is an honorary member 
of the York Medical Society. 

The work which has brought him his greatest 
fame was during the World war. In 1917 he was 
commissioned major of the Medical Reserve Corps, 
and is a member of the Johns Hopkins Unit which 
went to France in June, 191 7. The personnel of 
that unit included several other physicians of world 
renown. After a few months, with the approval 
of General Pershing, Dr. George Walker was put 
in complete charge of venereal diseases for the en- 
tire American Expeditionary Forces and was pro- 
moted to the rank of colonel. It was through the 
original methods adopted at the instance of Colonel 
Walker that the venereal disease rate in the Ameri- 
can army was reduced below that of aay other 
army in Europe. Since returning to America Doc- 
tor Walker has given his entire time and talents 
to a nation-wide campaign against venereal diseases. 
He has worked for the co-operation of governors, 
legislators and other organized bodies of public 
opinion to secure the enactment of suitable legis- 
lation to reduce the ravages of such disease$ and 
safeguard the public against them. All this work 
Doctor Walker has undertaken at his own expense 
and as a continuation of the social and scientific 
service in which he has long been engaged. 

Franklin Jacob Geiger, M. D. While his individ- 
ual record was impressive on account of his service 
as a Confederate surgeon, and the many years he 
gave to a large country practice in what is now 
Calhoun . County, Dr. Franklin Jacob Geiger was 
not the only conspicuous member of his family in 
the state. 

The first of the name was Herman Geiger, who 
immigrated either from Switzerland or Germany, 
and settled in Saxe Gotha Township on the Conga- 
ree River, about eight miles below the City of 
Columbia in 1737. The Salley Documentary Sources 
of State History from 1704 to 1782 make reference 
to the Geiger family, and another reference is 
found on page 302 of Logan's History of South 
Carolina. The fourth son of Herman Geiger was 



John Geiger, the third son of John was William, 
and the first son of William was John Conrad 
Geiger. 

John Conrad Geiger, father of Dr. Franklin Jacob 
Geiger, was born August 24, 1801, and died March 
10, 1870. He owned a large plantation, many slaves, 
was prominent in state politics, was a member of 
the Legislature and was a member of the Seces- 
sion Convention and a signer of the Ordinance of 
Secession. He married Ellen Baker who was bom 
in January, 1809, and died May 28', 1881,. being a 
daughter of William Baker of Lexington County. 

Franklin Jacob Geiger was born at Sandy Run 
in Lexington County, December 20, 1835. He was 
educated in the Sandy Run Academy and the Shir- 
ley Institute at Winnsboro and was graduated from 
the Medical College of the State of South Carolina 
with the class of 1858. Soon afterward he removed 
to Mississippi and practiced in that state until the 
outbreak of the war between the states, when he 
returned to South Carolina and joined the Confed- 
erate army. He was in the service from the begin- 
ning until the end of the war, and as an assistant 
surgeon was stationed with the defenses around 
Charleston, Fort Sumter, Battery Wagner and other 
points. The fortunes of war left him in straight- 
ened financial circumstances, and he then settled in 
the northern section of Orangeburg^ now Calhoun 
County, and for more than forty years diligently 
practiced his profession and also looked after his 
farming interests. His character entitled him to 
the respect and esteem he enjoyed, and a large 
family of children feel themselves honored to count 
him as their father. He died November 30, 1910. 

He served as trustee of the local schools, was a 
democrat, was a believer in State's Rights, and dur- 
ing the reconstruction period had an active part 
in his locality in restoring white rule. He served 
as worshipful master of Oliver Lodge No. 133, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and was a 
member and elder of the Sandy Run Lutheran 
Church. 

At Charleston, March 8, i860, he married Anna 
Elizabeth Geiger, daughter of Godfrey Herman and 
Elizabeth (Lorick) Geiger. Her father was a Lex- 
ington County farmer and her mother was a daufi^- 
ter of Michael Lorick, likewise an extensive planter 
in Lexington County. Mrs. Doctor Geiger died July 
20, 1905. They were the parents of thirteen chil- 
dren, briefly noted as follows: Elizabeth Horlbeck; 
Ellen Baker, who married P. H. E. Derrick; Dr. 
Charles Blum, a prominent physician at Manning, 
a sketch of whom appears elsewhere; William 
Henry, who was turned to death in a fire at Man- 
ning, December 13, 1895; John Franklin, a dentist 
at "Manning; Herbert Lorick, who married Leola 
Wolfe; Godfrey Herman, who married Susan 
Whitefield; Stephen Elliott; Mary Louisa; Anna 
Esther ; Ruf us Baker, who married Gertrude Smith ; 
Percy Lee and Harold Conrad. 

Charles Blum Geiger. M. D. Oldest son of Dr. 
Franklin Jacob Geiger, Dr. Charles Blum Geiger's 
professional career was coincident with that of 
his father for about twenty years. He has been 
a physician and surgeon since 1889, and faithfully 
and well has served the innumerable calls upon his 
time and energies not only in the strict routine of 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



97 



his profession but in many other community inter- 
ests. As his father was a Confederate soldier, so 
Dr. Charles B. Gciger was for over a year a mem- 
ber of the Medical Reserve Corps of the United 
States army during the World war. 

Charles Blum Geiger was born in Lexington 
County, South Carolina, June 19, 1867, and grew 
up in the St. Mathews section of Orangeburg Coun- 
ty, where, owing to the reduced circumstances of 
his father's fortune after the war and during the 
reconstruction period he had only the limited ad- 
vantages of country schools and had many duties 
on the farm. By night study he prepared him- 
self for entrance to the South Carolina Medical 
College in 1889, and was graduated in 1892. For 
one year he served as house physician and surgeon 
in St. Francis Xavier Infirmary at Charleston, and 
since then -has been in active practice at Man- 
ning. For a quarter of a century, with the excep- 
tion of a period spent in the war, he has been on 
almost day and night duty as a physician and sur- 
geon at Manning. For four years he served as 
a member of the Manning Board of Health, is a 
member of the County Pension Board, for two years 
was a member of the Board of County Commis- 
sioners and has been active in the County, State 
and Medical Association and a director of the 
Bank of Clarendon. 

Doctor Geiger served with the rank of first 
lieutenant in the Medical Corps from August 16, 
1917, to November 30, 1918. He is a Royal Arch 
Mason and a Woodman of the World. On June 
I9» 1907, he married Miss Nettie Weinberg of 
Manning. 

His brother, John Franklin Geiger, has been a 
leading dental practitioner at Manning for over 
twenty years. He was born in Orangeburg County, 
August 22, 1871, and is a graduatj of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery with the class of 
1895. He is a member of the State and National 
Dental Societies. John F. Geiger married Decem- 
ber 23, 1896, Belle Gallughat. Their five children 
are Emily, William Erving, Virginia, , Rosa Lee and 
Anna Belle. 

Drayton Margart Crosson, M. D. More than 
thirty-five years ago Doctor Crosson began the prac- 
tice of his profession, and since then many enviable 
distinctions have crowned his work as a physician 
and surgeon, as a business man and a public leader. 

He is one of a family of many distinguished 
members and of long and influential residence in 
Xewberry and Lexington counties. He was bom at 
Prosperitj' in Newberry County, September 29, 1858, 
a son of John Thomas Pressley and Rosa Catherine 
(Cook) Crosson. For more than a century his 
people have been identified with Newberry County. 
His great-great-grandfather, Alexander Crosson, 
came from Ireland. His grandfather was James 
Crosson, a merchant, planter and magistrate of 
Newberry County, who married a member of the 
Halfacre family. John Thomas Prcssly Crosson 
graduated at Erskine College, and taught until mar- 
ried, then was also a planter. Rosa Catherine Cook 
was a daughter of John Cook, a well known and 
wealthy planter who married a sister of Sen. John 
C. Hope. 

Vol. v— 7 



Doctor Crosson grew up at a time *when the 
State of South Carolina and its citizens were suf- 
fering from the blight of war, but he had good 
home advantages, and especially from both his 
mother and father received every encouragement for 
intellectual development. He developed a good 
physique on his father's farm, and when only a 
boy determined to become a physician. He paid 
part of the expenses of his preparatory course in 
the Prosperity Academy, was a student for three 
years at Erskine College and in 1879 entered South 
Carolina Medical College. Two years later he was 
graduated and in 1883 completed his medical course 
in the University of Tennessee at Nashville with 
first honors in his class and has since from time to 
time took courses in Baltimore and New York. 
Since his graduation he has carried the heavy and 
continuous burdens of a physician and surgeon. He 
served a number of years as president of the 
County Medical Society of Lexington County, and 
has also been active in the State Medical Associa- 
tion. 

Doctor Crosson has acquired extensive farm in- 
terests and at one time and probably now is- the 
largest planter in Lexingtcai County. He has served 
on the medical examining board for Lexington 
County and volunteered for service with the medi- 
cal reserve corps. Just before the armistice was 
signed he would have gone to France, if needed. 
He has found time for participation in public af- 
fairs, serving as county chairman of the democratic 
party, and in 1900 was elected to the State Senate 
and was re-elected in 1908 and served until 1912. 
He has recently taken active steps to organize the 
Farmers and Merchants Bank of Leesville. South 
Carolina, his home town, and was without opposi- 
tion unanimously elected its president. He is chair- 
man of the Lexington County Cotton Growers' As- 
sociation and takes an active interest in all agri- 
cultural affairs, both state and national. While in 
the Senate he introduced the first good roads 
(highway) bill and advocated a state highway de- 
partment and engineers, and a license on automo- 
biles for its maintenance. He has lived to see these 
ideas all put into effect. The National (Highway) 
or Good Roads Association has made him a life 
member. He is always an advocate for progressive 
advancements, professionally, educationally, socially, 
financially and religiously, and of everything that 
will upbuild the country. He is a Mason, Knight 
of Pythias, Odd Fellow and Woodmen of the World, 
and a Methodist in religious affiliation. Doctor 
Crosson married Miss S. C. Bodie in 1883, and to 
their union were born seven children. Two of them 
are living. 

George William Boylston. One of the most 
interesting men in the old community of Blackville 
is George William Boylston, who before he was 
eighteen years of age entered the Confederate army, 
served all through the war, never surrendered, and 
for more than half a century has been identified 
with planting and other interests in his home local- 
ity. In Confederate reunions for many years he 
has been one of the most picturesque figures, and 
he has a rare memory for the events in which he 
participated, and the fact that he saw many of the 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



most important phases of warfare in his native 
state gives his reminiscences unusual value. 

Mr. Boylston was born at Blackville, near the 
Edisto River, February 27, 1843. His parents were 
Austin and Mary (Reed) Boylston. His great- 
grandfather was William Boylston, who was bom 
July 24, 1802, of Scotch parentage. His grand- 
father was born in Virginia. His mother's father, 
Samuel Reed, was sent to America with an appoint- 
ment as surveyor by King George III. He received 
a crown grant of 5,000 acres of land, some of which 
is in the possession of his descendants to this day. 
He came to South Carolina from Ireland in 1774. 
His daughter was born in December, 1801. Two 
of Mr. Boylston's great-uncles fought in the Revo- 
lution. His paternal grandmother was Alice Cloud, 
wife of George Boylston. His maternal grand- 
mother was Mary Clark, wife of Samuel Reed. 
His maternal great-grand uncle, Malcolm Clark, 
was reported missing in the Revolutionary war. 
He was a justice in Orangeburg District in 1775, 
and was commissioned by President Rutledge jus- 
tice of the peace in 1776. 

The Boylstons have always been planters. George 
W. Boylston acquired his early education in what 
is now Barnwell County. He really had a double 
enlistment for the war. The first company he 
joined did not attain its full quota and therefpre 
in September, 1861, he enlisted in heavy artillery 
under Capt. afterwards Col. Tom Lamar, who 
appointed him ordnance sergeant of Company B, 
Second Regiment, Heavy Artillery. He received 
his baptism of fire on June 16, 1862, an engage- 
ment in which forty-three of his comrades were 
killed or wounded. Mr. Boylston seems to have 
led a charmed life, since on countless occasions 
he was exposed to danger and had many narrow 
escapes. One time a bullet passed through the 
top of his hat and killed has friend, Captain Reed. 
His company was the first encamped on James Is- 
land in the defenses around Charleston, and for 
days and months they were exposed to constant 
fire. Mr. Boylston was present on the occasion 
when the timely arrival of the Louisiana Tigers 
compelled the enemy to draw oflF from what prom- 
ised to be a successful advance upon the southern 
fortifications. At Fort Johnson Mr. Boylston had 
charge of the magazine. Shells from the enemy's 
ships struck and exploded the magazine, killing 
all the men inside, Mr. Boylston being fortunately 
on the outside, and escaped with serious shock and 
disability from duty for a time. He also recalls 
the enemy gun which the Confederates named "The 
Swamp Angel" located on the upper end of Mor- 
ris Island. Shells from this gun carried six miles 
into Charleston, passing over Mr. Boylston's bat- 
tery. 

It was the duty of Mr. Boylston to fuse all the 
shells. He noted a difference in the carrying power, 
and one day General Beauregard came to him and 
asked why some of the fuses were so much less 
effective than others, and his reply was that some 
were much softer and therefore probably defective. 
The general promised to send better fuses, and did 
so the next day. 

Mr. Boylston is the only member of the original 
battery alive today. He has a personal knowledge 



of the facts in one of the interesting stories told 
by the old veterans, when Confederate guns were 
trained on 600 southern soldiers, and Mr. Boylston 
in recalling the event says that while it was a mat- 
ter of general congratulation that none of the 600 
men was wounded, their escape was not creditable 
to southern marksmanship. These men afterward 
became known as the Immortal Six Hundred, and 
their story has been told and retold at Confederate 
reunions. 

Mr. Boylston also recalls the occasion when a 
number of Federal barges loaded with troops were 
stealing up under cover of darkness for a surprise 
on the southern forts, when they were themselves 
surprised and the majority of the men on the trans- 
port killeck At one time, says Mr. Boylston, the 
enemy were advancing on the works which had 
been thrown up after the magazine explosion, and 
the Federal color bearer planted his flag on the edge. 
He was shot down, and the Confederates made an 
. effort to capture the colors, but it was rescued be- 
" fore they could do so. As the Federals retired they 
reached over the works and seized a Confederate 
and carried him away a prisoner of war. 

Mr. Boylston is also one of the surviving Con- 
federates who can give from personal examination 
an accurate description of the first submarines, which 
as history shows were originally perfected by the 
southern government and first put into use during 
the war. These boats were called "The Davids." 
He can describe them in detail, and it is his con- 
firmed belief that the American who later gained 
fame as the inventor of the modern submarine 
undoubtedly took his ideas from the undersea 
boats used by the Confederacy. A description ot 
these submarmes appeared in the Columbia Record 
of March 27^ 1917, and Mr. Boylston, who has 
examined that account, says that in the main it is 
correct, though it is not true that hand pumping 
was resorted to, since he especially noticed how the 
pumps were geared in with other machinery, and 
it was explained how this mechanism was worked. 

When Sherman took Atlanta and came north 
through the Carolinas Mr. Boylston and his com- 
rades left Charleston May 18, 1865, passing up into 
North Carolina, where they had several fights with 
Sherman's advance guard. After Lee's surrender 
Mr. Boylston had several narrow escapes from cap- 
ture and from death. He was delegated to carry 
messages to the pickets, the last time all alone, and 
he always returned safely. After Lee's surrender 
and in the resulting confusion the commanding 
officer told Mr. Boylston and his comrades that they 
could go, and thirteen of them set out for home 
through a country filled with the enemy. They 
were practically without food, and they kept their 
one colored servant constantly scouting for supplies. 
This negro declared he had asked for food in the 
name of every northern general he could remember. 
After an exposure to innumerable hardships and 
difficulties for eleven days Mr. Boylston reached 
his home community and participated in a joyful 
reunion with his loved ones. It has been a matter 
of lasting satisfaction that he is one of the thirteen 
men who never surrendered and who never took 
the oath of allegiance. 

The years following the war Mr. Boylston has 



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99 



devoted to planting, and though now seventy-seven 
years of age he is still active, goes about his afiFairs 
with the energy and spirit of many younger men, 
and his wife also possesses the spirit of youth. 
They enjoy life to the full in their attractive home 
in Blackville. Among the many mementos of his 
war service Mr. Boylston carefully preserves and 
cherishes the Cross of Honor bestowed upon him 
for bravery and courage. He and his wife are 
earnest members of the Baptist Church. 

Mr. Boylston was the nrst school trustee ap- 
pointed on the Edisto River after, the Civil war, 
holding Aat office for many years, finally resigning 
in favor of a nephew. He is a member of Morrall 
Camp of Confederate Veterans. Mr. Boylston has 
been a worker in the Baptist Church* for sixty-two 
years and served eighteen years on the executive 
committee of the Baptist Association. He and his 
two brothers were reared in the Baptist faith, 
married daughters of Methodist ministers, but all 
became Baptists and reared their children in tjiat 

faith. . Tx. /. 

Mr. Boylston was married three times. His first 
wife was Fanny Crum, daughter of Rev. Lewis 
Crum. His second wife was Carrie Euphrasia, 
daughter of Daniel Riley. The present Mrs. Boyl- 
ston bore the maiden name of Emma Warren, whose 
father, Frederick Warren, was related to the famous 
Warren family of Boston, Massachusetts. Her 
father died on a ship he commanded, a victim of 
yellow fever, and was buried at sea four months 
before Mrs. Boylston's birth. Her mother was 
Jane Mirvin. Mrs. Boylston received a superior 
education at Charleston, and she heard the first 
gun fired in the harbor, marking the beginning of 
the Civil war. She is of Irish-American ancestry 
and is a member of Davis-Lee Chapter, United 
Daughters of the Confederacy. Her first husband 
was Elijah Samuel Reed, by whom she had six 
children, three of whom died after they were mar- 
ried, leaving descendants. Her grandson Gilmore 
Mixon is the father of her first great-grandchild, 
Eva Corrine. Mrs. Boylston was born at Charles- 
ton, February 14, 1854- ,. ^ ., t:. 

Mr. Boylston had a son by his first wife, Eugene 
Boylston, of Blackville. His daughter Leila Estelle 
married Dr. George Hair of Bamberg, and their 
daughter, Mrs. J. J. Cudd, of Spartanburg pre- 
sented Mr. Boylston with his first great-grandchild, 
Aileen. He has four grandchildren. By his second 
marriage there were two sons and two daughters. 
Mr. Boylston has in his home a speaking likeness 
of a beautiful young daughter, Ella, who gave 
promise of achieving great fame in the musical 
world, but who died in early girlhood. 

Major Henry Cumming Tillman, one of the two 
sons of the late Senator B. R. Tillman, has for a 
number of years practiced law at Greenwood, 
though for a year and a half all his time was given 
to the government as an army officer in the great 

"^Major Tillman is a graduate of Clemson College, 
which was founded during his father s administra- 
tion as a governor. He received the Bachelor of 
Science degree in 1903 and took his law course at 
Washington and Lee University, graduating in 1905. 



He began practice at Greenwood in 1906, and 15 
senior of the law firm Tillman, Mays & Harris, with 
offices in Greenwood and Anderson. 

Prior to the war with Germany he was captain 
of the Fifth Company, Coast Artillery, National 
Guard, of South Carolina. As commander of that 
company he was mustered into the National Army 
in July, 1917, and later was transferred to the com- 
mand of Headquarters Company, Sixty-First Artil- 
lery, Coast Artillery Corps. He went overseas to 
France in July, 1918, and before the signing of the 
armistice was promoted to major of the Second 
Battalion and transferred to the Sixty-Second Artil- 
lery. Major Tillman returned home in February, 
19 19, and upon his release from the army resumed 
his law practice. 

Major Tillman has always been a keen student of 
politics and public questions, and has given an ex- 
ample of good citizenship in his home community. 
He is associated with a number of fraternal orders 
and is a member of the Episcopal Church. He 
married Miss Mary Fox, of BatesDurg. Their three 
children are: Mary, Adeline and Sarah Stark. 

Charles Valk Boykin is distinguished among 
the successful business men and executives of 
Charleston by the power of a creative faculty, 
which, supplemented with a high degree of business 
courage and energy, has enabled him in a few short 
years, from original resources consisting largely of 
"vision" of the future, to build up a ^eat industry, 

Mr. Boykin was born in Charleston m 1878, at the 
home of his mother, though his parents, Allen J. and 
Elizabeth C. (Courtney) Boykin, at that time lived 
in Kershaw County. The Boykins are a very prom- 
inent and historic family of Camden and Kershaw 
counties. Many details of the family history are 
contained in the work "Historic Camden" published 
a few years ago. The founder of the famfly came 
from England about 1760, and for his services in 
the Indian wars was given a crown grant of land 
consisting of about 11,000 acres a few miles below 
Camden. The Boykins have owned and occupied 
portions of that land ever since. The ancestral resi- 
dence, now more than a century old, is still stand- 
ing. Mr. Boykin's grandfather, Alexander Hamil- 
ton Boykin, though strongly opposed to secession^ 
when secession became an actuality organized and' 
fitted up at his own expense, including horses and' 
other equipment, the noted Boykin Rangers. He 
commanded this body of men two years, most of his- 
service being in Virginia. 

Charles Valk Boykin came to Charleston when a. 
boy and learned the trade of machinist in the shops 
of the old Valk and Murdoch Company on the- 
waterfront. In a few years his qualifications stood' 
as an expert machinist, particularly on boilers and' 
marine machinery and equipment. 

The Charleston Dry Dock & Medicine Company is^ 
chartered under the laws of the State of Delaware 
with a capital stock of $2,500,000. The pay roll of 
the company averages $15,000 per week, many 
highly paid skilled mechanics being employed. The 
company is noted for its fine work in the manufac- 
ture of marine boilers. The traveling and porta- 
ble cranes, lathes, drill presses, and particularly the 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



electric welding and compressed air machinery, are 
of the most modem type. The dry dock can take 
care of any ships that come into Charleston Harbor. 
Electric power is used exclusively. Adjoining prop- 
erty in addition to the original plat mentioned above 
has been purchased, affording ample room on the 
water front for further expansion. One feature is 
a yacht basin, built to give private dockage facilities 
for yachts. As the leading industrial enterprise of 
Charleston, a large degree of the credit due the 
present status of the company belongs to the inde- 
fatigable energy and enthusiasm of Charles V. 
Boykin. 

Mr. Boykin married Miss Sarah Pearson Allen, of 
Charleston, daughter of Mr. .and Mrs. James P. Al- 
len. Their three children are Mary Allen, Elizabeth 
Courtney and Charles V., Jr. 

Rt. Rev. Mgr. P. L. Duffy, V. G., LL. D., Litt. D. 
It is not alone the people of the diocese of Charles- 
ton who appreciated the scholarly character and 
services of Doctor Duffy. His wisdom and learning 
and the ripe fruits of his experience were assets 
to the culture of the state as a whole. 

Doctor Duffy, who was vicar general of the 
Catholic diocese of Charleston, spent most of his 
life in that city, making his preliminary studies in 
the public and private schools of Charleston. From 
there he entered Mount St. Mary's College at 
Emmitsburg, Maryland, graduating with the first 
honors of his class and the Bachelor of Arts degree 
in 1875. On completing his course in theology he 
was accorded the degree A. M. in 1879, received 
the degree LL. D. in 1894, and the honorary degree 
Litt. D. was bestowed upon him in 1908 upon the 
occasion of the delivery of the Centennial Ode at 
the Centenary of that institution. Cardinal Gib- 
bons, who conferred the degree, pronounced this ode 
a masterpiece. 

In 1908 Doctor Duffy published a volume of 
poems, "A Wreath of Ilex Leaves," which was ac- 
corded generous and deserved praise by the press. 
He lectured before the College of Charleston on 
"The Ideal in Literature and Art," and also before 
the South Carolina Military Academy and else- 
where. He was a contributor to the Catholic En- 
cyclopedia, the Library of Southern Literature, and 
other publications. At the request of the Daughters 
of the Confederacy he composed and read the ode 
on Memorial Day and on several occasions delivered 
memorial addresses. 

Through all the years since his graduation, more 
than forty in number. Doctor Duffy was a very busy 
clergyman, devoting himself to the interests of his 
parish, especially to his schools and general educa- 
tional work. He was appointed vicar general of 
the diocese of Charleston in J911 and was made 
a prelate of the Papal Court with the title of Mon- 
signor by Pope Benedict in 1917. 

The Rt. Rev. Mgr. P. L. Duffy. V. G., was born 
March 25, 185 1, at Water ford, Ireland, and died 
July 22, 1919, at Charleston, South Carolina. 

Samuel Vincent Taylor is owner of the S. V. 
Taylor Department Store at Greeleyville, a busi- 
ness founded by his father, the late Samuel J. 
Taylor, who deserves the historical credit of being 
the founder of Greeleyville, and for many years 



closely associated with every phase of its develop- 
ment and improvement. 

Samuel J. Taylor was bom at Charleston in 1840. 
In 1 861 at the age of twenty-one he entered the 
Confederate army, serving as color bearer of the 
Sixth South Carolina Regiment, Jenkin's Brigade, 
Longstreet's Corps. He was a soldier from the 
beginning to the end of the war and saw much 
of the strenuous fighting in Virginia. In the ten 
years that followed the war he was stanchly allied 
with the good citizens of South Carolina in striv- 
ing to save the state from the ruin of recon- 
struction and took a prominent part in the campaign 
of 1876 which restored white man's government and 
resulted in the election of Governor Wade Hamp- 
ton. He was appointed a member of the staff of 
Governor Hampton. 

In the meantime Samuel J. Taylor had come to 
the present site of Greeleyville in 1872. In part- 
nership with S. J. Hudson he bought several hun- 
dred acres of timber, and began the manufacture 
of turpentine and rosin. Later he bought out his 
partner and took in his brother-in-law, W. iS. 
Varner, and they were associated for a number of 
years. Samuel J. Taylor was an expert in the 
naval stores industry, and his enterprise was the 
source of most of the prosperity of the people 
then living in this vicinity. His timber holdings 
became exhausted after about fifteen years. It 
had been his intention to remove his turpentine 
equipment to new territory. However, he was very 
much attached to Greeleyville, had acquired a large 
body of land there, and had also begun the mer- 
cantile business and for both financial and senti- 
mental reasons he elected to remain at Greeleyville. 

In promoting a town community here he was 
actuated by the most liberal motives and wisdom. 
He practically donated building lots to every indus- 
trious and capable man who applied and who would 
agree to construct and improve a good home. He 
also gave land freely for street, churches and 
schools, and long before his death had the satisfac- 
tion of seeing his dreams realized in a beautiful town 
with good streets, good homes -and business insti- 
tutions, and surrounded, by a fine civic atmosphere. 

Samuel J. Taylor died January 12, 1912, after 
forty years of residence at Greeleyville. He mar- 
ried Julia Marie DuBose, who is also deceased. 
Her father was Dr. James M. DuBose of Sumter. 
Samuel J. Taylor was the father of four children: 
Lula T., wife of M. D. DeLong, of Charleston; 
Samuel V.; Dr. E. O., who died October 23, 1918. 
a practicing physician of Greeleyville, and a grad- 
uate of the University of Maryland ; and Dr. W. L., 
a practicing dentist of Kingstree, South Carolina. 

Samuel Vincent Taylor was born at Greelesrville 
November 24, 1878. He attended the local schools 
and the Furman University at Greenville, and as 
a young man found employment in his father's 
store. He mastered the business, assumed many 
of the responsibilities of its management, and be- 
fore his father's death he bought • the business 
and has since conducted it as the S. V. Department 
Store. This business supplies all the varied demands 
for merchandise in and around Greeleyville, and 
the stock is carried in a large and well equipped 
building, 93 by 100 feet. 

Mr. Taylor is a Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, 



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being a member of Omar Temple of the Shrine 
at Charleston. He married Miss Martha Eliza- 
beth Murchison of Camden. They have one son, 
Samuel Vincent, Jr. 

Hon. Benjamin Ryan Tillman. Probably the 
most impressive tribute to the late Senator Tillman 
consists in the simple fact that at the end of his 
long life his old associates and admirers could speak 
of him not in the exaggerated terms of partisan 
hero-worship, but could depict in him real greatness 
as a man and public leader with many of the frail- 
ties of human nature. Error is part of struggle 
and aspiration, or, as another great American ex- 
pressed it, the successful man decides and executes 
promptly and makes a few mistakes. 

Therefore it was the supreme good fortune of 
Mr. Tillman that his life story could be told with- 
out qualifications or apologies, and doubtless few 
biographies of South Carolina's eminent men will 
better stand the test of time and criticism than 
his. A good, brief outline of his career is that writ- 
ten by his friend and associate Mr. J. Broadus 
Knight, clerk of the United States District Court 
at Greenville. With some abbreviation and modifi- 
cations Mr. Knight's article as it appeared in the 
"News and Courier" July 4, 1918, the day following 
Senator Tillman's death, is quoted as follows: 

"Benjamin Ryan Tillman, of Trenton, Edgefield 
county. South Carolina, was bom August 11, 1847* 
on his father's plantation about twelve miles south- 
west of the present town of Edgefield. He was the 
son of Benjamin Ryan Tillman and Sophia Han- 
cock and was the youngest of eleven children. There 
were seven boys, one of whom, Thomas F. Tillman, 
was killed in the Mexican war. Another, George 
D. Tillman, served as Congressman from that dis- 
trict for nineteen years. 

"Young Tillman s father died when he was two 
and one-half years old, and he was brought up by 
his mother on the plantation. He studied at home 
under private tutors, one of whom was Miss Annie 
Arthur, a sister of Chester A. Arthur, later presi- 
dent of the United States. When he reached the 
age of fourteen his mother sent him to a high school 
at Liberty Hill in Edgefield county, and for three 
years he studied under the famous teacher, George 
Galphin. It was here that he secured the founda- 
tion for an education which was later to be broad- 
ened by extensive reading. He was especially* 
proficient in Latin, and for years spent several 
hours each day acquainting himself with works of 
the old masters. In July of 1864 he quit school and 
volunteered for service in the Confederate army. 
While on his way to the army he was taken ill, 
and as a result. of this attack lost his left eye by 
an abscess and was an invalid for two years. 

"He returned to his home and spent the next 
twenty years, from 1866 to 1886, with the exception 
of a year in Florida, reading and studying and 
looking after his farming interests. Having a 
retentive mind he forgot nothing practically that 
he ever read. 

"In 1876, while a member of a local military 
company, the Sweetwater Saber Club, he took part 
in the Hamburg riot just across the Savannah 
River from . the city of Augusta, Georgia. In this 
riot one white man and a score or more of negroes 



were killed. Some two weeks later as a member 
of the same club he participated in the Ellenton 
riot, where many additional blacks were killed. 
The negroes were in absolute control of the politics 
in South Carolina, and strong measures were neces- 
sary for the whites to maintain supremacy. These 
riots caused a Congressional investigation by Presi- 
dent Grant, but resulted in nothing. 

"In 1885 Tillman began his agitation for higher 
education for the boys and ^irls of the farming class 
in South Carolina. It was m this year, when thirty- 
eight years of age, that he faced his first audience 
in the state. This speech was known as his Ben- 
nettsville speech and created deep interest among 
the farmers all over the country. During the next 
three years he continued writing a series of letters 
to the Charleston papers pleading for the farmers 
to assert their rights against the politicians around 
the court houses in the various counties who were 
then parceling out the political offices. 

"He was urged to run for Governor in 1888, but 
declined. In 1890, as the result of his continued 
agitation, the farmers' movement had gained such 
headway and there was such a demand for him to 
oflFer himself for Governor that he could not refuse. 
He entered the race and after one of the most 
bitter campaigns in history was overwhelmingly 
elected. In 1898 he was reelected Governor. 

"One of the most notable acts of his career as 
Governor was the establishment of what is known 
as . the primary system. Under this system the 
people of South Carolina have a right to go to the 
polls, and a farmer's vote counts for just as much 
as that of a lawyer's or court house politician. In 
this way the state was freed from ring-rule, and 
the people in each county were given a voice in 
naming th^ candidates for election to the various 
offices. Thus was displaced the small coterie of 
politicians who had heretofore met and slated their 
candidates behind closed doors. 

"True to his promise made on the stump, Tillman 
set about to establish higher institutions of learning 
for the boys and girls of the state. His efforts in 
this behalf resulted in the establishment of Clemson 
Agricultural and Mechanical College for boys at" 
Fort Mill, Calhoun's old home in Oconee county, 
and the establishment of Winthrop Normal and 
Industrial College for girls at Rock Hill. Under 
a system of scholarships it was made possible for 
boys and girls of scant means to attend college. 

"His next step was the passage of a law to cur- 
tail whiskey selling. South Carolina had at that 
time local option, or the old bar room system. After 
months of study and thousands of miles spent in 
travel in making investigations Tillman asked the 
Legislature to pass what was later known as the 
dispensary law. Under this act the state undertook 
to manufacture and dispense alcoholic drinks to its 
citizens. Many restrictions were thrown around the 
sale of intoxicants, and in this way considerable 
curtailment of whiskey drinking resulted. When 
first established the dispensary was looked on with 
great disfavor in certain sections of the state and, 
under authority given him by law, Tillman appointed 
detectives to hunt down violators. These came to 
be known as Tillman's Spies.' At Darlington, in 
1894, feeling ran so high that a riot resulted and 
several citizens and constables were killed. The 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Governor promptly called out the State Militia and 
the riot was quelled. Thousands of dollars were 
poured into the treasury of the state in profits 
derived from the dispensary. But in after years 
the management of the dispensary fell into the 
hands of unscrupulous and dishonest men, and the 
institution was brought into disrepute. Then, too, 
there was a widespread sentiment favoring prohibi- 
tion sweeping the country, and the people demanded 
further curtailment, which was not permissible under 
the dispensary law. By many the dispensary was 
regarded as a failure, but as a step toward ultimate 
prohibition it must be deemed to have been a decided 
success. 

"In 1894, after having served the state as Gov- 
ernor for four years, Tillman entered the race for 
the United States Senate against Gen. M. C. Butler. 
He was easily elected and went to Washington in 
1895. He was opposed to the policies of President 
Cleveland, and soon after entering the Senate made 
what has become known as his 'pitchfork speech.' 
This speech was a masterpiece and is, perhaps^ one 
of the bitterest arraignments of a president ever 
made in the history of this country. At the next 
election the republicans came into power, and as a 
member of the minority from that time until 1913 
he had to content himself with watchine the repub- 
licans pass what they considered by them 'necessary 
legislation.' At one time during this period the 
Senate consisted of ninety members, sixty of whom 
were republicans. As a result the minority could 
do little more than 'make them go slow,* as Tillman 
said. 

"Tillman's fame as an orator and stump speaker 
had preceded him, and from 1896 to 1908 his services 
were in great demand by managers of lecture bureaus. 
He traversed the country from ocean to ocean 
and visited practically every state in the Union. He 
had many subjects, but probably the most famous 
speech delivered on such occasions was 'The Race 
Problem,' which did much toward educating the 
people of the North as to the true conditions in the 
South. 

"In 1906, with the republicans still in control, and 
while a member of the committee on interstate and 
foreign commerce, the republican members of that 
committee disagreed among themselves as to who 
should handle an important piece of legislation on 
the floor of the Senate known as the rate bill. 
Rather than see one of the republican members 
get the honor three or four of them joined with 
the democratic members and placed Tillman in 
charge. Perhaps this is the first instance in history 
where a member of the minority party was given 
the task of handling important majority legislation. 
Few people know that Senator Tillman prepared 
and had inserted in this bill what is known as the 
anti-free pass amendment, but it was through his 
individual efforts that this legislation was obtained. 

"Soon after Senator Tillman entered the Senate 
he was placed on the great committee on naval 
affairs, and as a member of that committee he be- 
came greatly interested in everjrthing pertaining to 
the navy and its welfare. One of his greatest 
efforts in the * Senate was to compel the manufac- 
turers of armor plate to sell their product to the 
government at a reasonable price. His exposure 



of the Armor Plate Trust in 1897 saved the govern- 
ment hundreds of thousands of dollars. 

"In 1902, while a member of this committee, the 
Senator conceived the idea of a great navy yard 
on the South Atlantic coast There was a naval 
station at Port Royal, South Carolina, but on ac- 
count of its location, and upon the recommendation 
of a board of engineers of the navy, it was decided 
to place the station at Charleston. This he had 
done, and that was the beginning of the present 
Charleston Navy Yard. This yard is seven miles 
from the ocean and has the advantagje of being out 
of reach of shells from an enemy fleet in the open sea. 

"After his handling of the 'rate bill' and the 
notoriety that came to him as a result, Tillman's 
services as a lecturer were still more in demand and 
for six months, in 1907, he spoke almost daily. 
This, coupled with his arduous duties in the Senate 
in the winter of 1907-1908, brought about a paralytic 
stroke in February of 1908. This disabled him for 
several months, and in the summer of that year, with 
Mrs. Tillman, he took an extended trip through 
Europe. In the fall he returned in much better 
physical condition and resumed his work in the 
Senate. In 1910, while on a visit to his home in 
Trenton, he suffered a second stroke and for sev- 
eral weeks was compelled to remain at home. 

"Senator Tillman possessed all the attributes of 
a great man. He sprang from the common people 
and devoted his life to the upbuilding of his people 
and his state. He was a farmer, and his great life 
work consisted principally in helping the farmers 
of South Carolina and trying to give them greater 
opportunities in life. 

"Those with whom Senator Tillman associated 
soon learned that he had the utmost contempt for 
idleness. He was never idle a moment Himself, and 
to see anyone around him idle seemed to make him 
nervous and irritable, and he soon suggested some- 
thing for the idler to do. He was industrious and 
diligent, and as a result of those great characteristics 
he left monuments to his name as he passed along 
his long political career — monuments which will 
grow greater and bigger as the years pass by. He 
was honest and sincere, and has been known for 
many years throughout the nation as 'Honest Ben.' 
He was frank and blunt in his expressions, and 
never spoke a word he did not sincerely believe to 
be the truth. He was kind* and sympathetic and 
never lost the opportunity to do good to his fellow 
men; and he loved his own people, the farmers of 
South Carolina, with a devotion which is rarely 
equalled. Lastly, Senator Tillman was a brave and 
courageous man, and being once convinced of the 
justice of his cause, he went into the battle unafraid. 
Truth and justice were his only guides." 

Another source of interesting information con- 
cerning Senator Tillman is Col. August Kohn, of 
Columbia, who as a newspaper man began his 
career when Tillman was making his first campaij?n 
for governor, and was an intimate of the Senator 
for nearly thirty years. In describing some of the 
elements of his political strength and his public 
achievement Colonel Kohn writes: 

"No man in South Carolina has gone through 
more heated campaigns than Senator Tillman. 
There never was a more bitter or more intense 
campaign than those of 1890 and 1892. Senator 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



103 



Tillman was a keen observer, an apt coiner, a user 
of trite phrases and expressions, and had a way 
of reaching his Audiences that was peculiar to him. 
There has never been a public man in South Carolina 
who could so effectively reach an average audience 
as Tillman. I remember that in 1892, at one of 
the campaign meetings, before the speaking began, 
it was generally agreed that the audience was hostile 
to him. He appreciated that fact and saw there 
were very many in the audience who were an- 
tagonistic to him, and instead of trying to placate 
the crowd he proceeded to curse them out for their 
indifference to him and his work, and finally, when 
the returns were received he carried the county, 
and the general impression was that he had won to 
himself an audience that, at the beginning, was 
entirely in opposition to him. One of the strong- 
holds that Senator Tillman had on the people of 
South Carolina, particularly in the days when he 
made his county to county canvass, was the abso- 
lute faith in the honesty of Ben Tillman. There 
is no question about the fact that the vast majority 
of people in South Carolina then, as now, believed 
absolutely in the personal honesty of Senator Till- 
man. That was his strength in South Carolina, and 
subsequently in Washington." 

Of his work while governor and United States 
Senator Colonel Kohn writes: 

**Of course the dispensary will always be one oi 
the big facts to be credited or charged to Senator 
Tillman. His real reasons for advocating the dis- 
pensary were, first, to abolish the bar rooms, and, 
second, to save the state from prohibition. At the 
time that the dispensaries were inaugurated tliere 
is no question to the fact that Senator Tillman was 
opposed to prohibition. He sincerely believed that 
the dispensary was a great system and if it had 
been honestly conducted would have been the best 
solution of the problem. Later on he stated that 
the dispensary had brought South Carolina nearer 
to prohibition by showing that the liquor question 
could be handled. 

"But it is going to take a great deal of space to 

fo into all of these matters. Senator Tillman in his 
nal message to the General Assembly recounted his 
achievements in this summary: ist: The erection 
and endowment of Clemson College. 2d: The 
overthrow of the Coosaw monopoly. 3d: The just 
and suitable assessment of taxes on railroads and 
other corporations and the victory of the courts 
compelling them to pay. 4th: The passage of the 
dispensary law and the destruction of the bar rooms. 
5th : Refunding of the state debt, which saves 
seventy-eight thousand a year in interest. 6th: The 
establishment of Winthrop Normal and Industrial 
College for Women. 7th: Election of the railroad 
commissioners by the people, and allowing them to 
fix passenger and freight rates. 8th: The in- 
auguration of the primary system of party nomina- 
tions for all offices in the gift of the people. 

"In his career as United States Senator he laid 
claim to the constitutional convention held in South 
Carolina in 1895; to the Charleston Navy Yard, to 
the enlargement of the navy, to the handling of 
the armor plate by the Government, to Camp Jack- 
son at Columbia, the placing of South Carolina in 
its proper light before the country, and other 
matters." 



In 1868, when twenty years of -age, Mr. Tillman 
married Miss Sallie Starke, of Elbert County, 
Georgia. To this union were bom six children, 
including: Benjamin Ryan Tillman, Jr., Capt. Henry 
C. Tillman, Melona, who married Charles S. Moore, 
a lawyer of Atlantic City, New Jersey ; Miss Sophia, 
who married Henry Hughes ; Sallie May, who mar- 
ried John Shuler. 

Colonel Kohn describes some of his early visits 
to the Tillman home, when Mr. Tillman was gov- 
ernor. "He always showed the greatest affection 
for his family, and there has never been a whisper 
or unkind word about his family life. He and 
Mrs. Tillman were married in 1868, have always 
been the most devoted of companions, and she was 
the one person in the world who had final influence 
over him. Whatever Mrs. Tillman said was final 
with him, and it was really beautiful to see the 
utter devotion of Senator Tillman to his wife and 
children. One of the sorest afflictions of his married 
life was the killing of his eldest daughter, Addle, 
by lightning." 

Colonel Kohn also has this interesting paragraph 
concerning his literary gifts and output: "Some 
day someone will collect, and perhaps publish, some 
of the very excellent things that Senator Tillman 
has left in writing, and they will show what a 
master of language he was. There are a large 
number of pamphlets containing addresses and 
speeches prepared by Tillman, but perhaps the best 
of these are his speeches made at the constitutional 
convention on the suffrage question, and why South 
Carolina, in his opinion, had to restrict the ballot; 
then his speech on 'Massachusetts and South Caro- 
lina in the Revolution,' delivered in the United 
States Senate on Thursday, January 30, 1902; his 
address delivered at the Red Shirt reunion in An- 
derson in August, 1905, describing the struggles of 
the people of Edgefield county in 1876; his speech 
in the United States Senate in 1907, on the race 
problem, brought about by the Brownsville raid; 
his speech in the United States Senate in 1903. on 
Trusts and Monopolies'; his speech on Bimetallism 
and Industrial Slavery, in 1896, and his eulogy on 
Senator Earle. In this connection it is well to 
note that his messages as Governor of South Caro- 
lina are very illuminating as to the conditions that 
existed at that time. He always wrote forcefully, 
and up to the day when he was stricken in his last 
illness, so acute was his mind that he dictated with 
hb well recognized terseness and virility and kept 
several stenographers on the *jump* keeping up with 
his correspondence." 

Benjamin R. Tillman for many years was closely 
associated with his honored father, the late Senator 
Tillman, as his principal aide and office manager 
during the Senator's long political career at Wash- 
ington. For twenty years he was continuously with 
his father as chief secretary and in other capacities. 
His last years in Washington were spent as clerk 
.of the Naval Affairs Committee of the Senate, the 
committee of which his father was chairman. Since 
the death of Senator Tillman the son has resumed 
his residence on the Tillman plantation at Trenton. 

Mr. Tillman was born in 1878, at the old Tillman 
home place, ten miles from the plantation where 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Senator Tillman lived for so many years. This is 
in Edgefield County on the Augusta-Abbeville road. 
Benjamin R. Tillman now has charge of the Tillman 
plantation and estate near Trenton. He is a gradu- 
ate of Clemson College with the class of 1896. He 
studied law at Georgetown College, but never prac- 
ticed that profession. While so much of his time 
was spent with his father in politics and public 
affairs, Mr. Tillman has a comprehensive knowledge 
and keen enthusiasm for scientific agriculture, which 
was one of the hobbies of his honored father. The 
Tillman plantation, while always emphasizing the 
cotton crop, has been particularly famous as the 
first home of the commercial asparagus industry of 
South Carolina. The growing of asparagus on a 
commercial scale is one of the achievements prop- 
erly credited to Senator Tillman, but frequently 
omitted from the long list of his achievements. 
Under the management of the son the Tillman 
plantation supplies a considerable part of the aspara- 
gus sent from Trenton to the northern markets. 

Mr. Tillman' is a Shriner, being a member of 
Hijiz Temple of Greenville. South Carolina, a 
member of the Episcopal Church. 

Hon. David William Gaston, Jr. The name 
Gaston has been one of the most prominent in the 
South since early colonial times. Originally settled 
in Virginia, the Gastons in a later generation estab- 
lished their home in Aiken County, South Carolina. 
The great-grandfather of David William Gaston, 
Jr., had seven brothers, and from them have de- 
scended many branches of the family, including 
prominent citizens not only of South Carolina but 
of states further west, especially of Alabama and 
Texas. 

In his own generation David William Gaston, 

ir., has justified the honorable family traditions in 
is work as a lawyer and business man. He was 
born at Aiken, April 29, 1889, and is a son of David 
W. and Allie (Weathersby) Gaston. His father 
is one of the wealthjr and representative citizens of 
Aiken, is an extensive planter and is president of 
the First National Bank of Aiken. 

The son graduated from the Aiken Institute in 
1906, from The Citadel at Charleston in 1910, and 
received his law degree from the University of 
South Carolina in 1912. Since then he has steadily 
gained increasing reputation as a lawyer at Aiken, 
and has a large and busy practice. Besides his pro- 
fessional work he is a planter and gives his super- 
vision to the conduct of three excellent farms in 
Aiken County. 

He was elected a member of the Lower House 
of the General Assembly in 1918 to represent Aiken 
County. During the following session he was a 
member of the committees on banking and insur- 
ance, accounts, incorporations and privileges and 
elections. 

In 1913 Mr. Gaston married Miss Belle Glover, 
of Graniteville, South Carolina. They have three 
children, two daughters, Katharine and Emma, and 
a son, David William Gaston, third, born May 8, 
1920. 

Capt. Charles Wesley Muldrow. member of the 
law firm of Arrowsmith, Muldrow, Bridges & Hicks 



of Florence, twke gave up his promising position 
as a young lawyer to respond to the call of patri- 
otic duty, at first on the Mexican border and then 
to go overseas and fi^^t in France. He is an 
able lawyer as well as a splendid soldier. 

He was born at Florence, June 17, 1886, son of 
Tames F. and Emma Lee (Hudgins) Muldrow. 
Captain Muldrow has acquired a very liberal edu- 
cation from different sources. He attended the 
graded schools at Florence, the South Carolina 
Citadel at Charleston, and the Law School of the 
University of South Carolina at Columbia and also 
the Council of Legal Education (Inns of Court) 
at London, England. 

Early in his career as a lawyer he was elected 
and served as a member of the House of Repre- 
sentatives of South Carolina in 191 5-16. Having 
been educated in a military school, he organized 
Company K of the Second South Carolina Infan- 
try, and was commissioned its captain June 19, 

1916, was inducted into the Federal servkre July 4th, 
and shortly after that date until about March 20, 

191 7, was on duty along the Mexican border at 
El Paso, Texas. 

Then followed a brief interval when he resumed 
his law practice, but on July 25, 191 7, answered 
the call of the President and was assigned to the 
One Hundred and Twentieth Infantry at Camp 
Sevier. He was transferred to the One Hundred 
and Fifth Ammunition Train as adjutant of a Motor 
Battalion April 19, 1918, and left Camp Sevier for 
overseas duty Ma^ 21st of that year. He was with 
the Fifty-fifth Field Artillery Brigade throughout 
the active service of that organization. March i, 
1919, he was ordered to England on detached serv- 
ice from Le Mans, Frabce, and returned to the 
United States July 18, 191 9, and was discharged at 
Camp Dix, New Jersey, July 26th. 

Since he returned to his home state he was ap- 
pointed August 5, 1910, a lieutenant colonel on tlic 
staff of Governor R. A. Cooper. 

Captain Muldrow, whose home is at Florence, is 
unmarried. He is a Knight Templar and Scottish 
Rite Mason, is affiliated with Omar Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine, and is a member of Charleston Lodge 
No. 242 of the Elks, Gate City Council No. 105, 
Junior Order United American Mechanics and Wal- 
nut Camp No. 52, Woodmen of the World. 

Robert L. Gunter recently rounded out ten years 
of consecutive service as solicitor of the Second 
Judicial Circuit. As a lawyer his name has been 
recognized as representing all the ablest qualities 
of the profession in Aiken County for the past 
twenty years. 

Mr. Gunter also represents an old and prominent 
family in the state. The Gunters came to South 
Carolina from Virginia prior to the Revolution. 
One of the name was killed during the war for 
independence. In subsequent generations the name 
has become known also in the states of Georgia. 
Alabama and Texas, and in those localities is asso- 
ciated with men of wealth and prominence. 

Richard Gunter was grandfather of Robert L. The 
latter was born in 1869, in that part of Lexington 
County now included in Aiken County and is a son 
of M. T. and Tabitha (Sawyer) Gunter. His father 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



105 



was a Confederate soldier and was first lieutenant 
of Company I, Twentieth Regiment South Caro- 
lina Volunteers. He was wounded in the Valley 
of Virginia near the Berorville Turnpike, while 
leading his company. He served in the Legislature 
for two terms. R. L. Gunter's mother's father was 
George Sawyer, a prominent citizen of Edgefield 
District, of the section now known as the "Ridge 
Section." Her mother was a Lovelace of the same 
section and at one time represented Aiken County 
in the Legislature. 

Robert L. Gunter acquired his high school educa- 
tion at Leesville, attended Newberry College, and 
graduated in 1892. He studied law one year in the 
University of Michigan and one year in the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina, graduated from the lat- 
ter institution in 1895. He was admitted to the bar 
in 1895 and began practice the same year. He also 
had the special honor and responsibility of being a 
delegate to the Constitutional Convention in 1895. 
He was one of the youngest members of that body, 
but his youth was no bar to effective counsel and 
much hard work in formulating the new organic 
law of the state. 

Mr. Gunter has had his home at Aiken since 1900, 
and he developed a large general practice. In 1910 
he was elected solicitor of the 'Second Judicial Cir- 
cuit, and his tenure of that office has been made 
continuous by reelection based on the high quality 
of the service which he has rendered. His circuit 
embraces Aiken, Barnwell, Bamberg and Allendale 
counties. Mr. Gunter was also a member of the 
Legislature in 1901-02. He has been more or less 
identified with the politics of his county and state 
since 1895. 

During the war he was especially active in behalf 
of Liberty Loan and Red Cross drives. He is a 
member of the Masonic order and the Lutheran 
Church. He married Miss Lula P. Jackson, of 
Aiken County, in 1898. 

Hon. Joseph Andrew Berry, of Orangeburg, 
lawyer and present speaker pro tempore of the 
House of Representatives, has among other distinc- 
tions the unique one of being the youngest grandson 
of a Revolutionary soldier in America. 

His grandfather and Revolutionary patriot was 
James Beery, who was born in County Cork, Ire- 
land, about 1736. It is probable that the original 
spelling of the name in Ireland was Barry. With 
his young wife and child James Berry came to 
America about ' 1758, locating in the Orangeburg 
district. He was a weaver by trade, and a century 
or more ago he wove dress goods and other clothes 
on hand looms, most of his output being used for 
ladies' apparel. James Berry was about forty years 
of age when the colonies revolted and began their 
strugjBrle for independence. He joined with the 
Carohna patriots in that struggle and fought gal- 
lantly as a soldier. James Berry rounded out almost 
a century of life, dying in the thirties. The wife 
he brought with him from Ireland died, and in the 
Orangeburg district he married a second time. 

By his second wife he was the father of James 
Brewton Berry, who was born near Branchville in 
1806 and died near there in 1888. James Brewton 
Berry was a man of prominence in his community 



and helped in the building of the old Charleston 
and Hamburg Railroad, one of the first railroads 
built in America, and now a part of the Southern 
Railway system. He was also twice married. Sallie 
Street, of St. George, South Carolina, the mother of 
Joseph A. Berry, being his second wife. 

Joseph Andrew Berry was born at Branchville 
in Orangeburg County, June i, 1876, his birth oc- 
curring about a hundred and forty years after the 
birth of his grandfather and just a century after 
the Declaration of Independence, which the soldier 
service of his grandfather helped to make valid. 

The vicinity of Branchville is the ancestral home 
of the Berry family, and there Joseph A. Berry spent 
his early life. His mother died when he was eight 
years of age, and his aged father died four years 
later. He was then without anyone to give him 
parental attention, and the rest of his boyhood days 
were very hard and entirely without any promise. 
However, he had attended local schools pretty regu- 
larly up to the time of his father's death and there- 
after whenever it was possible for him to do so. 
His education was very limited. He did not have 
the opportunity to attend even a high school, but 
in 1897 he entered the law offices of Glaze & Herbert 
at Orangeburg for the purpose of reading law, ai^d 
was admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court m 
May, 1898. This was just at the outbreak of the 
Spanish-American war. He immediately volun- 
teered for service with the Edisto Rifles of Orange- 
burg, under command of Capt. D. O. Herbert. 
With the muster into service of his company as a 
part of the Independent Battalion he was appointed 
a corporal, and when the Second South Carolina 
regiment of infantrjr was organized under the com- 
mand of Col. Wilie Jones he was transferred to 
Company K and appointed first sergeant, with which 
command he was mustered out of the service in 
Augusta, Georgia, on April 19. 1899, after almost a 
year's service, a part of which was spent in Cuba. 
After the Spanish -American war he re-enlisted in 
the Edisto Rifles, served as a lieutenant and for 
several years as captain of this company in the 
South Carolina National Guard. Subsequently he 
was major on the staff of Gen. Wilie Jones. 

Mr. Berry has resided and practiced his profes- 
sion in Orangeburg since 1900, with William C. 
Wolfe, his law partner, under the firm name of 
Wolfe & Berry, with a splendid degree of success. 
He is a member of the State Bar Association and 
has been honored with the position of first vice 
president. He served as secretary and treasurer of 
the Orangeburg County Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee from 1904 to 1918, and has been the member 
of the State Democratic Executive Committee for 
Orangeburg County since 1914. He was elected to 
represent Orangeburg County in the House of Rep- 
resentatives in 1914, and his service has been made 
continuous by subsequent elections. In 1917 he was 
chosen speaker pro tempore and was similarly hon- 
ored by his colleagues in the House in 1919. He is 
also chairman of the judiciary committee and the 
chairman of the committee on rules; a member of 
the state canal commission, and the special com- 
mittee of the Legislature appointed to revise the 
tax laws of the state. In the Legislature he has 
displayed ability of leadership, force as a debater. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



and delivered some of the best speeches heard in 
the House of Representatives since he became a 
member. Conspicuous among his speeches may be 
mentioned those made by him in behalf of the estab- 
lishment of a state highway commission, a state 
budget law, the institution and retention of the state 
tax commission, the building of a larger Citadel and 
a bill to repeal the law prohibiting Greek letter 
fraternities in state institutions. The judiciary 
committee at the close of the 1920 session presented 
him with a magnificent gold watch in appreciation 
of his services. 

Mr. Berry missed an education himself, but he is 
a strong advocate of the subject and has urged it in 
many a schoolhouse in his county. He has also 
supported with enthusiasm the establishment and 
growth of the Dixie Library in Orangeburg and is 
a life member of the organization. During the 
World war he was county chairman of the War 
Savings Stamp campaigns, and was on duty as a 
speaker with nearly every patriotic drive made in 
the county. Mr. Berry is a member of the Metho- 
dist Church, is a past chancellor of the Knights of 
Pythias, past exalted ruler of the Elks and also a 
member of the Masonic order. 

October 10, 1900, he married Miss Fannie Pike, 
of Orangeburg. Their three children arc James 
Brewton, Richard Pike and Joseph Andrew. 

Clarence J. Fickling, the active president and 
manager of the Commercial Bank of Blackville, is 
a member of an old and honored Barnwell County 
family, and was a successful farmer in this locality 
before he became a banker. 

Mr. Fickling was born in Barnwell County, De- 
cember 30, 1881. Four brothers named Fickling 
came out of England and were settlers in the 
southern states prior to the Revolutionary war, 
taking part in that struggle. His great-grandfather 
was Rev. William Fickling, a Baptist minister, who 
was active in the organization of the Blackville 
Baptist Church in 1846, and for many years carried 
on the work of the ministry in the southwestern 
portions of South Carolina. The grandfather of the 
Blackville banker was Henry S. Fickling and the 
father, F. G. Fickling, both natives of Barnwell 
County. The latter is still active as a farmer. He 
married Emma J. Hair, daughter of J. Pinckney and 
Mary E. (Owens) Hair, both of whom were also 
natives of South Carolina. 

Henry S. Fickling, subject's grandfather, served 
as a soldier in the Confederate army, and was in 
active service throughout the entire war. 

Clarence J. Ficklmg was second in a family of 
three sons. He was reared and educated in Barn- 
well County, finishing his education in Clemson 
College. After his college course he returned to 
the farm and was interested in agricultural matters 
for several years. He still owns some valuable 
and extensive planting interests in the county. From 
1909 to 1912 he served as cashier of the Bank of 
Western Carolina, and in February, 19 17, was in- 
strumental in organizing; the Commercial Bank of 
Blackville. Since its organization he has served 
as vice president and manager and is now president 
and manager. 

October 30, 1902, he married Miss Maude G. 



Hair, a daughter of James Marshall Hair, of Willis- 
ton, South Carolina. Mrs. Fielding's sister is a 
member of the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion. Her father served in the Confederate army, 
was wounded and left for dead on the field. He was 
hit in the right temple by a Minnie ball, which cut 
his right optic nerve and took out a molar on the 
left side of his jaw. Life was discovered in him 
the next morning, and he was taken and cared for. 
After the war he married and raised a large family. 
He moved to Williston, South Carolina, where he 
followed the business of planting until his death at 
the age of seventy-one, in 191 1. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fickling have four living children: Sarah, Edina 
Bell, Sophia and Robert Bruce. Mr. Fickling is 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, and is a 
prominent member of the Blackville Baptist Church, 
having served as deacon and treasurer for the past 
ten years. He has been an active factor in the 
practical matters of the town, and served two years, 
1918-19, as mayor. He is a member of the County 
Board of Education, 1919-1920. 

Charles Auseuus Smitb. While he came 
Timmonsville a young college graduate with no 
special recommendation and without capital, the late 
Charles Aurelius Smith long before his death was 
one of the foremost men in business, banking and 
citizenship in that community. He ran for governor 
of South Carolina, in 1914 and served his state as 
lieutenant governor for four years. 

Mr. Smith who died March 3h 19^6, was born 
in North Carolina January 22, i8oij son of Joseph 
Smith, and of an old North Carolma family. He 
lived his early life on his father's farm, attended the 
rural schools, but for his higher education had to 
resort to dose economy of his resources and even 
to borrow money to complete his education in Wake 
Forest College. He prepared for college in the Rey- 
noldson Male Institute in Gates County, North 
Carolina. On borrowed money he entered Wake 
Forest College in 1879 and by good use of his time 
and opportunities earned his A. B. degree in 1882. 
He at once began teaching school in order to pay 
off his debt, and it was school work that brought him 
to Timmonsville, South Carolina. From school 
work he* soon entered on a business career, and the 
energy and good judgment with which he prosecuted 
every enterprise brought him to the head of many 
of the leading companies in Florence County. He 
was president of the Citizens Bank of Timmons- 
ville, president of the Timmonsville Oil Company, 
president of the Charles A. Smith Com^y, general 
merchandise, president of the Smith-Williams Com- 
pany of Lake City, and was also organizer and 
president of the Bank of Lynchburg, South Carolina. 
He was a democrat in politics and held the office of 
mayor of Timmonsville for several years beginning 
in 1903. 

The late Mr. Smith was one of the most prominent 
Baptist laymen in South Carolina. He was chosen 
president of the Baptist State Convention in 1903, 
was made vice president of the Southern Baptist 
Convention in 1905, and for a number of years was 
also moderator of the Welsh Neck Baptist Associa- 
tion. He was president of the Board of Trustees 
of Furman University, trustee of Greenville Female 



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College, and a trustee of Welsh Neck High School. 
As a man he was quiet and unobtrusive in spite 
of the energy with which he directed his affairs, 
and his career throughout was one of high service. 

January 3, 1884, he married Fanny L. Byrd. 
They were the parents of nine children. 

C. Ray Smith, who has succeeded his father 
as head of the Citizens Bank of Timmonsville, was 
born in that town July 29, 1889. He was educated 
in the local public schools and in 1906 took his 
A. B. degree from his father's alma mater, Wake 
Forest College in North Carolina. For two years 
he was assistant cashier of the Citizens Bank, was 
manager of the Charles A. Smith Company, and 
upon the death of his father became president of 
this company, president of the Citizens Bank, vice 
president of the Smith- Williams Company of Lake 
City, and a director of the Timmonsville Oil Mill. 
He is also active in Baptist affairs, is trustee of 
Coker College and superintendent of a Sunday 
school. November 25, 1915, he married Miss Hallie 
Garrison of Camden, South Carolina. They have 
one daughter, Margaret Carrison. 

Another son of Charles A. Smith is Charles Lucien 
Smith. He attended the Hartsville High School 
and for two years was a student in Furman Univer- 
sity. He began his business career as assistant 
manager in the Charles A. Smith Company at Tim- 
monsville and is. now vice president and manager 
and a director of the National Bank of Lamar. He 
married Ruby Lowman of Timmonsville. They have 
two children, Frances Myers and Jane Lowman. 

Thomas Lowndes Wragg, who is manager of the 
Western Carolina Bank at Blackville, has had an 
active business career of more than a quarter of a 
century. Most of his life has been spent in other 
states, but he belongs to one of the old colonial 
families of Charleston, where the Wraggs settled 
about 1700. 

They are of English ancestry, and all accounts 
show that in South Carolina they have been a family 
of substantial means and exceptional social position 
and character. During the earlier generations the 
intermarriages were practically restricted to persons 
of the same section, and the first arrivals inter- 
married at once with members of the French 
Huguenot colony. 

The first immigrants to South Carolina of tlie 
Wragg family were two brothers, Samuel and 
Joseph Wragg. While the exact date of their com- 
ing has been lost, there is an interesting historical 
record concerning Samuel Wragg, who on the 6th 
of March, 1710-11, delivered to the council a letter 
from the Lords Proprietors. In 1712 he was a 
member of the Provincial House of Commons and 
in 1717 was a member of the council. 

In 171 8, while outward bound from Charleston 
to England, his vessel was overtaken by the pirate 
"Blackbeard" just oflf the Charleston bar, and he 
was despoiled of a large amount of specie, threat- 
ened with death, subjected to many hardships and 
humiliations before being released and allowed with 
his young son, William, to return to Charleston. 

When the province was transferred to the Crown, 
Samuel Wragg was a member of the council, as 
was later his brother Joseph. These brothers were 



merchants in Charleston, as they had apparently 
been in London, probably in connection with their 
uncle, William Wragg, who seems to have been a 
wealthy merchant of London. Family tradition 
makes the two brothers sons of a Mr. John Wragg 
of Chesterfield, Derbyshire. On coming to the 
province they were well provided with capital, and 
their means must have been substantially increased, 
since they ranked among the wealthy citizens of the 
Carolinas, and when they died both left large for- 
tunes for that period. The brothers married sisters, 
daughters of Jacques du Bosc, a French Huguenot 
immigrant who became a merchant at Charleston. 

Samuel Wragg purchased and settled the Ashley 
Barony on Ashley River. William Wragg, who was 
the son captured by Blackbeard, achieved rank as 
a man of ability, fortune and the highest character. 
He declined from delicacy and disinterestedness the 
position of chief justice of the colony, though he 
served as a member of the council. In 1777. for 
his loyalty to the Crown, he suffered expulsion from 
his native land and on his voyage to England was 
drowned off the coast of Holland. According to 
the writer, Henry A. M. Smith, he was the only 
native born South Carolinian to whom a memorial 
exists in Westminster Abbey. 

On a chart published in the July, 1918, issue of 
the "South Carolina Historical and Genealogical 
Magazine," the authority for the Wragg descent 
prior to the two brothers who came to South Caro- 
lina is largely traditional from a manuscript made 
by the late William Wragg Smith for Henry A. 
Middleton. The connection between the brothers 
and their uncle, William Wragg, and the latter's 
children is from records in this country and other 
old records and are the data for the later descent. 
The chart is as accurate as possible. 

The oldest example of the Wragg coat of arms 
is an old piece of silver, the hall mark of which is 
about 1731. This came down to the descendants of 
Joseph Wragg, and is described "Or, a fesse azure, 
a canton azure charged with a fleur de lys." In 
books apparently owned by Mrs. Milward Poyson, 
a daughter of Hon. William Wragg, is a book plate 
showing a coat of arms with crest and motto above 
the name "William Wragg," but it is not apparent 
whether it was the Hon. William Wragg who died 
in 1777 or his son William who died in 1802. One 
volume in which the book plate is printed was pub- 
lished in 1801 and the other. in 1803. The son may 
have used the book plate of his father. On this 
plate the canton is argent, likely a mistake, since 
by heraldic laws one metal argent should not be 
charged on another metal, so this canton should 
likely be azure as on the old piece of silver. On 
this book plate the crest is a demi-eagle with open 
wings, the motto "Est Ulubris." 

Incidentally it should be noted that Mary Ashby, 
daughter of Shukhrugh Ashby of Quenby, England, 
married Rev. William Breckwith Wragge, vicar of 
Frisbv. while in this country Samuel Wragg mar- 
ried Mary Ashbv I'On. a descendant of John Ashby 
of Quenby in South Carolina, a collateral branch 
of Ashby of Quenby, England. 

Considering now the immediate ' ancestry of 
Thomas Lowndes Wragg, his great-grandfather, 
Samuel Wragg, and his grandfather. Dr. John Asby 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Wragg, were both natives of Charleston. His 
grandfather practiced medicine for many years at 
Savannah, Georgia. The father of the Blackville 
banker, Thomas Wragg, was born at Savannah, and 
also earned a high position in the medical protes- 
sion. He married Joseph L. Cooper, a native of 
Florida, her parents being natives of Georgia. 

Thomas Lowndes Wragg, who was the second in 
a family of three children, was born at ThomasvtUe. 
Georgia, April 15, 1872, and was reared and edu- 
cated in Florida. At the age of eighteen he began 
his active career as a bookkeeper in St. Louis, 
Missouri. He was in that city nine years, spent 
three years in Charleston, and for five years was 
in the general offices of the Southern Railway at 
Washington. Mr. Wragg came to Blackville, South 
Carolina, in 1906, as cashier of the Bank of Black- 
ville. Upon the merging of this with the Bank of 
Western Carolina he accepted the increased re- 
sponsibilities of manager of the bank. 

Mr. Wragg is a member of the Episcopal Church 
and is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity aiid 
Woodmen of the World. In 1905 he married Miss 
Sevena Andrews, a daughter of John Andrews of 
Orangeburg. They have two children, Dorothy and 
Helen. 

William Elliott Spann. Those who note the 
notable figures in Bamberg County agriculture have 
no hesitation in pronouncing William Elliott Spann 
one of the most enterprising factors and one of the 
ablest cotton growers in the state. It is said that 
Mr. Spann had only seventy-five cents to his name 
when he came to Bamberg County, and he has used 
his opportunities and abilities so wisely as to ac- 
cumulate a large plantation and has been one of the 
premier cotton growers of the county for a number 
of years. 

He was born near Leesville in Lexington County, 
South Carolina, November 29, 1859. His grand- 
father was Henry Spann, a native of South Carolina, , 
and one of the early circuit rider Methodist preach- 
ers of the state. His father was Philip C. Spann, 
who served as a Confederate soldier during the war 
and otherwise spent his time as a farmer. He 
married Jane Steadman, of Lexington County. 

William Elliott Spann is the oldest of a family 
of nine children, all of whom are still living. He 
grew up on a farm and was twenty-two years of 
age when he came to *that portion of old Barnwell 
County now Bamberg County. He soon distin- 
guished himself by his ability to make a farm pro- 
duce maximum crops of cotton and grain, and has 
greatly extended his possessions until he now has 
about 1,200 acres, mostly all of which is devoted 
to cotton, corn and tobacco. In several different 
years he has gathered 350 bales of cotton from 350 
acres of land. Mr. Spann is a leader in agriculture, 
has considerable interests in local banks, and is 
known to have invested a large sum in Liberty 
bonds. 

He married Miss Minnie Hutto, now deceased, 
and she was the mother of three children, Elliott 
Leland, Eva May and Blanche; Mrs. Spann came 
from one of the old South Carolina families. 

The Spanns are an old South Carolina family 
and besides his father, the subject had three uncles 



in the Confederate army, one of whom lost his 
life in one of the engagements. The family is of 
old Revolutionary stock and of English descent At 
an early age William E. Spann had to start in to 
make his own way, as the war had destroyed the 
wealth of the Spann family. He is a member of 
the Knights of Pythias fraternity. 

Albert Perry Manville is an honored veteran of 
the Confederate war, and for nearly half a century, 
from the close of the war until he retired, was one 
of the leading, merchants of Barnwell. 

Mr. Manville is of northern birth and ancestry. 
He was born in Milford, Connecticut, March 13, 
1839. His grandfather, .Uri D. Manville, was of 
French ancestry and was also a native of Milford, 
Connecticut. His father, Pernett Perry Manville, 
a native of Milford, was a carpenter by occupation. 
When Albert Perry was a small child the father 
came south to follow his trade in Florida and later 
located at Thomasville, Georgia. While there he 
was injured during his work and took up mer- 
chandising. In 1849 he went west to California, 
around the Horn, and died in that state. His wife 
was Harriet Buckingham, a native of Connecticut 
and of English ancestry. 

Albert Perry Manville was the oldest of six chil- 
dren. He spent his boyhood days at Thomasville, 
Georgia, and at the age of twelve ^ears came to live 
with his uncle, J. C. Buckingham, in Barnwell, South 
Carolina. His mother returned north to Connecticut 
He worked at the tailor's trade, and was thus em- 
ployed when the war broke out. He was one of the 
first to enlist in Captain Brown's company, and he 
heard the first guns in the war at Fort Sumter and 
the last fighting just before the surrender at Ap- 
pomattox. He was in Company C of Kershaw's 
Second Regiment until after the battle of Fred- 
ericksburg, when he became a member of Company 
E, Colonel Hagood's First Regiment, being made 
orderly sergeant. He was wounded in the left arm 
at Savage Station on the York River Railroad, and 
after a period in hospital was granted a furlough 
of sixty days. He then rejoined his command and 
was transferred to Captain Wood's Company E, 
and continued with that gallant regiment of South 
Carolina troops until the close of the war. During 
the reconstruction days he took his part as a good 
citizen in putting down the radical rule. 

He was treasurer of the democratic party during 
reconstruction days, and it is a known fact that 
Barnwell County was the best organized county in 
the state. 

The war over he returned to Barnwell and en- 
gaged in merchandising, a business he followed until 
he retired. On March 27, 1867, Mr. Manville mar- 
ried Miss Alice Hart, daughter of Rev. Allen Hart, 
a Baptist minister, and granddaughter of John Hart. 
Both her father and grandfather were natives of 
South Carolina. Mrs. Manville was the second in 
a family of five children, and was reared and edu- 
cated at Barnwell. To Mr. and Mrs. Manville were 
born seven children, and the two now living are 
Hattie B. and George W. Mr. Manville also has 
a grandson, Daniel P. Hartley, now fifteen years 
of age. Their son George is cashier of the Western 
Carolina Bank of Barnwell. Mr. and Mrs. Man- 
ville are active members of the Baptist Church. 



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The members of this church helped them celebrate 
their golden or fiftieth wedding anniversary in 1917. 

Thomas Gordon McLeod. In his home county 
of Lee Thomas Gordon McLeod long ago estab- 
l^hed his prestige as an able and learned member 
of the bar. His services have not been within the 
strict limits of his profession, however, and again 
and again he has been called upon to act in posi- 
tions of trust and responsibility involving large and 
important issues. For four years he was lieutenant 
governor of the state, has been a member of both 
houses of the Legislature, and in all his record 
there has been nothing to detract justly from his 
reputation as a lawyer, an upright gentleman and a 
forward-looking citizen. 

He was born at Lynchburg, Sumter County, South 
Carolina, December 17, 1868, and is descended from 
James McLeod, a Scotchman, who came to the 
Carolinas before the Revolutionary war. His father 
William James McLeod was a merchant and farmer, 
and served as captain of Company E of the Sixth 
South Carolina Regiment throughout the war be- 
tween the states. He married Miss Amanda Rogers, 
whose father William Rogers was of New England 
stock and came to the Carolinas from Connecticut 
in 1835. 

Thomas G. McLeod once wrote in regard to his 
parentage, inheritance and early influences the fol- 
lowing words: "My parents were both devoted 
Christians and the home influences were of the 
best. My mother died when I was but ten years 
of age; but her place was taken by my step-mother, 
and to her training and influence I am as much in- 
debted for whatever success I have attained as I am 
to any other influence in my life. My early experi- 
ence in my father's country store brought me in 
contact with all classes of people ; and the knowledge 
there gained of human nature and the friendly 
meeting with people of all kinds and classes, appears 
to have been to me the most useful part of my 
life training and the foundation certainly of what- 
ever success I have attained in public life." 

Besides the incidents and experience thus noted 
Mr. McLeod also came in contact with the practical 
work of the South Carolina farm and is strictly 
speaking country bred, though most of his boy- 
hood was spent in the Village of Ljmchburg. He 
attended private schools and in 1892 finished the 
classical course and was awarded the A. B. degree 
by Wofford College. He also took a summer course 
in law at the University of Virginia. For a year 
he taught at Bethel Academy and another year at 
Line Academy and in 1896 was admitted to the bar. 
He soon returned home to take charge of the family 
business affairs during the last illness of his father 
and was thus engaged until 1903, when he removed 
to Bishopville and began the practice at law about 
the same time that Lee County was created. 

For fully twenty years he has been regarded 
as a leader in the public life of his community. He 
was elected to represent Sumter County in the Legis- 
lature until 1901. In 1902 he was chosen the first 
senator from Lee County, and was a delegate to 
the National Democratic Convention of 1904. He 
was elected lieutenant governor without opposition 
in 1906 and 1908. 



Mr. McLeod is possessed of a magnetic personal- 
ity and has many of the qualifications of the true 
orator. He was one of the most eflPective platform 
speakers in every cause and movement related to 
the prosecution of the World war, speaking in be- 
half of Liberty Loans, Red Cross and other drives. 
He was appointed chairman of the local exemption 
board of Lee County and for nearly two years pa- 
triotic work had priority over all his private interests. 

Mr. McLeod has extensive farm interests. He is 
attorney for and director of the Bishopville National 
Bank, is president of the Bishopville Telephone Com- 
pany and was formerly president of the W. J. Mc- 
Leod Company. Recently he was appointed a mem- 
ber of the State Central Committee for the purpose 
of reducing the cotton acreage. For years he has 
been a working member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church South and as district director he spent much 
time in the movement for raising funds for the 
Methodbt Church. In 1916 he was appointed a 
trustee of Winthrop College and is still on the 
board. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Masons, 
Knights of P)rthias and Woodmen of the World 
and is a member of the Kappa Alpha College 
fraternity. 

December 31, 1902, he married Miss Elizabeth 
Alford, daughter of W. McD. and Sarah E. Al- 
ford of Marion County. Mr. and Mrs. McLeod 
have four children: Alford McD.; Thomas G.; 
Lucy Wood and Yancey Alford. 

George Alexander Jennings, the present county 
treasurer of Bamberg County, is an honored resi- 
dent of that locality and a man who for his ad- 
vancement in the world has depended almost en- 
tirely upon the virtues of hard work and an honest 
and straightforward character. 

Mr. Jennings was born in Orangeburg County 
January 22, 1854. Three months after his birth 
his father, George Jennings, was accidentally killed. 
George Jennings was a farmer and a son of John 
Jennings, a native of Orangeburg County. This 
branch of the Jennings family was established in 
South Carolina, coming from England, about 1737. 
The mother of George Alexander Jennings was 
Harriet L. Moody, who was born in Orangeburg 
County, a daughter of John Moody. She was the 
mother of five children, George Alexander being 
the youngest. 

The latter lived on a farm in Bamberg County 
from the age of thirteen and had a common school 
education, supplemented by advanced training in a 
military academy at Charlotte, North Carolina, and 
at Porter Military Academy at Charleston. After 
completing his education he held positions as book- 
keeper for such prominent men as Col. John F. Folk, 
Rice Coplin, H. C. Folk and General Bamberg. He 
was with General Bamberg at the time of the lat- 
ter's death. After that for some years Mr. Jen- 
nings represented the Simmons Hardware Com- 
pany until he was elected county treasurer of Bam- 
berg County in 1912. He has had no opposition 
for that office and has given a faithful and efficient 
admmistration of its affairs. Mr. Jennings has been 
active politically and for several terms was secre- 
tary of the County Democratic Club. He was a 
member of the city council for two terms. He is 



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a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
and fraternally is affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias. 

November 22, 1876. Mr. Jennings married Miss 
Julia Slater, a native of Bamberg County, and 
daughter of John D. Slater. The Slaters arc an 
old South Carolina family of Revolutionary stock 
and English descent. Mrs. Jennings is a niece of 
Gen. F. M. Bamberg, whose sketch appears else- 
where in this work. Mrs. Bamberg is the elder 
sister of Mr. G. A. Jennings. Mrs. Jennings is an 
aunt of the Slater brothers of Orangeburg. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jennings have two children: AUie 
Aleen, wife of A. M. Denbow, of Bamberg, presi- 
dent of the Peoples Bank; and John S., of St 
George, South Carolina. 

AsBURY Lawton Kirkland. While for the past 
several years he has been the esteemed and efficient 
clerk of courts of Bamberg County, Asbury Law- 
ton Kirkland is primarily a farmer and planter, a 
business to which he has given his best years smce 
leaving college. 

He was born in Bamberg County, August 31, io74. 
He is a great-grandson of William Kirkland, a 
soldier of tiie American Revolution, and who lost 
an arm in that struggle. He was born in Scotland. 
The grandfather was Reuben Kirkland, a native of 
Edgefield County, South Carolina. ' His father is 
Dr. N. F. Kirkland, a native of what is now Bam- 
berg County, and still living in his eighty-ninth 
year. For many years he practiced medicine and 
became a physician of wide repute and success m 
what is now Bamberg County. Doctor Kirkland 
married Jennie M. Lawton, a native of Hampton 
County, daughter of Joseph M. Lawton, of the same 
county. The Lawton family was also established 
in South Carolina prior to the Revolution. 

Asbury Lawton Kirkland, the youngest of a fam- 
ily of five sons and one daughter, was reared and 
educated in his home county, attended common 
schools and spent one year in Wofford College. 
He took up planting, and now operates about 500 
acres in general and diversified farming. Mr. Kirk- 
land was elected clerk of courts in 1916. 

In 1899 he married Miss Carrie Brabham. They 
have six children : N. Fletcher, Elizabeth, William, 
Inez, Asbury, Jr., and Frank. Mr. Kirkland is 
affiliated with the Masonic order, the Knights of 
Pythias, and is a trustee of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. 

Albert Murray Denbow. While he has lived in 
the state only a comparatively few years, Albert 
Murray Denbow is widely known as a financier and 
as an executive officer in half a dozen banks and 
business corporations in the southern part of the 
state. 

Mr. Denbow, whose home is at Bamberg, where 
he is president of the Peoples Bank, was born in 
Canandaigua, New York, April 12, 1884, third among 
the five children of Alfred and Cora (Howard) 
Denbow. The parents are both natives of England 
and immigrated from Devonshire in 1870, first set- 
tling at Canandaigua, New York. Alfred Denbow 
spent his active career as a banker. He was active 



in New York politics, and was prominent in the 
financial world. He died in 1890. 

Albert Murray Denbow was educated in New 
York State, and at the close of his schooling located 
in Richmond, Virginia. He was engaged in the 
banking business in Richmond with John L. Wil- 
liams & Sons, bankers. In 1908 he located at Aiken, 
South Carolina, where he became assistant cashier 
of the First National Bank. His home has been 
at Bamberg since 191 2. He served successively as 
cashier, vice president and since 1916 as president 
of the Peoples Bank at Bamberg. He is also presi- 
dent of the Commercial Bank of Blackville, which 
he organized in 1917; is organizer of the First 
National Bank of Barnwell, which was established 
in 1917, and is organizer and vice president of the 
Citizens Bank of Aiken. He organized and is active 
head of the Denbow Tobacco Warehouse of Bam- 
berg, and was one of the organizers and is a 
director of the Bankers National Life Insurance 
Company of Orangeburg. 

Mr. Denbow is prominent in Masonry, being 
affiliated with Orangeburg Commandery of the 
Knights Templar and a member of the Scottish Rite 
Consistory of Charleston. He is a member of 
Omar Temple, Order of the Mystic Shrine at 
Charleston, South Carolina. He is also an Odd 
Fellow and is district deputy of the Third District, 
Knights of Pythias of South Carolina. In 1916 
Mr. Denbow married Mrs. Allie Jennings O'Hem, 
daughter of George A. and Julia Jennings, of 
Bamberg. Mrs. Denbow is a member of one of the 
oldest South Carolina families, which contributed 
much to the history of the state in the past Sev- 
eral members of her family took part in the Con- 
federate struggle. She is also a niece of the late 
Gen. Francis Marion Bamberg. 

Elbert Herman Aull has been editor of the New- 
berry Herald and News for thirty-five years. While 
he has been devoted to his profession of journalism, 
his career on the whole has been a varied one and of 
many useful services. Several years ago a writer 
describing his career said: "While at college he 
intended to be a lawyer, but circumstances were such 
that he commenced work as an educator instead of 
as a legal practitioner. When he had almost de- 
termined to continue teaching for an indefinite period 
conditions changed and he was gradually drawn 
into newspaper work. Finding that he could not 
carry on both lines at the same time, and believing 
that the newspaper field offered the most immediate 
returns, with, perhaps, better opportunities for ad- 
vancement, he gave up teaching and has since been 
doing efficient work in the editorial profession." 

He was born in Newbury County August 18, 
1857, son of Jacob Luther and Julia (Haiti wanger) 
AuH. His grandfather Rev. Herman Aull was a 
pioneer Lutheran minister. The father was a miller 
and farmer. Elbert H. Aull lived in a country 
district when a boy and though his early opportuni- 
ties were confined to country schools he did much 
to develop a many sided and versatile nature. He 
worked on the farm, as a carpenter, and in flour 
and saw mills. In 1877 he entered the sophomore 
class of Newberry College and graduated with the 
A. M. degree in 1880. For one year he taught at 



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Abbeville and during the following two years was 
an instructor in Newberry College and was studying 
law at the same time. He was admitted to the bar 
in 1883. 

In 1885 he took up his duties as editor of the 
Newberry Herald and News, and in March, 1887, be- 
came financially interested in the paper. In Septem- 
ber, 1907, he also became editor of the South Caro- 
,Iina Pythian, the official organ of the Grand Lodge 
of the • Knights of Pythias of the state. He was 
elected president of the South Carolina Press As- 
sociation in 1894 and held that office for sixteen 
years by re-election. 

Mr. Aull in 1899 was journal clerk of the State 
Senate and in June of the same year became private 
secretary to Governor McSweeney, remaining four 
years, and also served with the rank of lieutenant- 
colonel on his staflF. During 1903-04 he was a mem- 
ber of the State Legislature and among the measures 
credited to him was introducing and securing the 
passage of an act establishing free libraries for pub- 
lic schools in rural communities. During 1905-06 
he was chief clerk of the engrossing department of 
the Legislature and in November, 1906, was again 
elected a member of the Legislature for two years. 
Mr. Aull was superintendent of education for New- 
berry County, and is now superintendent for the 
fourteenth decennial census of the third district. 

He is a member of the Lutheran Church and is 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows and the Improved Order 
of Red Men. On February 14, 1881, he married 
Miss Alice Kinard who died in Julv, 191 1. They 
became the parents of six children, four of whom 
grew up. Mr. Aull married for his present wife 
Miss Mae Amiek, in June, 191 5, and has two sons 
by this marriage. 

Of the three sons of his first marriage who grew 
to manhood John Kinard Aull is the court stenog- 
rapher of the Fourth Judicial Circuit of South Caro- 
lina and James Luther Aull and Humbert Mayer 
Aull are associated with their father in the publica- 
tion of The Herald and News. 

Perry M. Buckingham. Through an active and 
interesting career duty has ever been the motive 
of action of Perry M. Buckingham, manager of 
the Bank of Western Carolina at Barnwell, and 
usefulness to his fellowmen has not been by any 
means a secondary consideration. He has per- 
formed well his part in life, and it is a compliment 
worthily bestowed to say that his locality is hon- 
ored in his citizenship, for he has achieved definite 
success through his own efforts and is thoroughly 
deserving of the proud American title of self-made 
man, the term being one that, in its better sense, 
cannot but appeal to the loyal admiration of all who 
are ^ appreciative of our national institutions and 
the ' privileges afforded for individual accomplish- 
ment. 

Perry M. Buckingham was born in Barnwell, 
South Carolina, on November 6, 1862, and it is an 
unusual fact worthy of note that ^>e was born in 
the same house, in the same room and on the same 
bed now occupied by him. His father. J. C. Buck- 
ingham, was born in Mil ford, Connecticut, but 
came to South Carolina about 1840. During the 



Civil war he served on the side of the Confederacy 
as a member of the Home Guards. For many 
years he was engaged in the mercantile trade in 
Barnwell and lived to the age of eighty-three years. 
He was the son of Samuel Buckingham, also a 
native of Connecticut. The subject's mother, whose 
maiden name was Esther Rebecca Gildersleeve, was 
born in Connecticut, the daughter of Sylvester Gil- 
dersleeve, also a native of Connecticut and 
of a family of ship builders. He lived to the 
advanced age of ninety-six years. Esther Rebecca 
Buckingham bore her husband four children, of 
whom the subject of this review is the only sur- 
vivor, and she lived to the age of seventy-eight 
years. 

Perry M. Buckingham attended the common 
schools, and then became a student in St Paul's 
School at Concord, New Hampshire, a preparatory 
school, where he was graduated in 188 1. Soon 
afterward he entered in a modest way on the career 
which has led him to his present plane of activity, 
usefulness and comfort. His first employment was 
as cashier for a railroad at Richmond, Virginia, 
whence he was later transferred to Jacksonville, 
Florida, as train master. After filling that position 
for three years he returned to Virginia as general 
freight and passenger agent, with headquarters at 
Richmond. He filled that position about three years, 
at the end of which time he came to Barnwell and 
accepted the position of cashier of the Citizens 
Savings Bank, holding that position until 1890, when 
,he became cashier of the Bank of Barnwell, filling 
'that position until 1908, when he became president 
of that institution. In 1909 the Bank of Barnwell 
was merged, along with several other banks of Aiken 
and Barnwell counties, into what is known as the 
Bank of Western Carolina, at which time Mr. 
Buckingham became vice president of the new in- 
stitution and manager of its branch bank at Barn- 
well, which relations he still sustains. Thoroughly 
qualified by natural aptitude and experience for the 
banking business, Mr. Buckingham has proven a 
decided success in this line and much of the splen- 
did success which has attended this bank has been 
directly due to his sound discretion, mature judg- 
ment and personal popularity. He has taken an 
active part in all movements for the upbuilding 
and development of this community, and during the 
recent war activities he was especially prominent, 
serving as chairman of the Liberty Loan drive and 
treasurer of the Barnwell Chapter of the Red Cross 
Society ever since its organization. He has been 
deeply interested in educational matters, and for 
the past eighteen years has rendered effective and 
appreciated service as a member of the board of 
trustees of the Barnwell school board. In 1918 he 
was a member of the County Board of Education, 
and in many other ways has exhibited a commend- 
able attitude towards all movements for the public 
welfare. 

On October 5. 1892, Mr. Buckingham was mar- 
ried to Daisy Duncan, the daughter of the late 
Col. William H. Duncan, a review of whose life 
appears elsewhere in this work. All who come 
within range of his influence are outspoken in their 
praise of his admirable qualities and the high regard 
in which he is held, not only in business life, but so- 



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cially, which indicate the possession of attributes 
and characteristics that fully entitle him to the re- 
spect and good will of his fellow men which is freely 
accorded him throughout the community where he 
lives. He is an Episcopalian. 

WiLUAM Jasper Young, M. D. For over forty- 
five years the name of Dr. William J. Young, of 
Fairfax, has been a household word in his section 
of the state, where he has built up a large and 
lucrative practice, being numbered among the repre- 
sentative citizens of this locality, having ever been 
known to be an able, reliable and progressive physi- 
cian and patriotic in citizenship. He is esteemed for 
these commendable traits, together with his cordial 
disposition and genuine worth, and although he has 
been more or less active in various relations with 
his fellow men, his name stands out more promi- 
nently in connection with the medical profession, 
in which he has so long been a prominent figure. 

William Jasper Young is the eighth child in order 
of birth of the ten children bom to Frederick and 
Annie Miley (Blatts) Young, his birth having oc- 
curred in Barnwell County, South Carolina, on 
February lo, 1851. The subject's mother was born 
at Rivers Bridge, Barnwell County, and remained 
in that county after her marriage to Frederick 
Young, they passing the remainder of their lives 
there. 

William J. Young received his elementary edu- 
cation in the common schools of his native locality, 
and then attended the high school at Charleston. 
Having determined to devote his life to the prac- 
tice of medicine, he then matriculated in the medi- 
cal department of the University of Maryland, 
where he was graduated m 1872. with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. He spent the following 
two years in the Roper Hospital at Baltimore, 
where he gained valuable experience. In 1874 
Doctor Young came to Fairfax and entered upon 
the active practice of his profession, and has re- 
mained here ever since. He is a member of the 
Barnwell County Medical Society, the South Caro- 
lina State Medical Society and the American Medi- 
cal Association. During the years of his profes- 
sional work in this community Doctor Young has 
enjoyed to a notable degree the absolute confidence 
of the people. He has kept closely in touch wi:h 
all the latest advances in his profession and has 
been remarkably successful in his treatment ct 
disease. The best part of his life has been given to 
the service of the people of this community, and 
his long and faithful service has been rewarded 
with a competency that would permit him to retire 
from active labor if he so desired. He has been 
generous in his attitude towards worthy objects, 
and among his contributions may be mentioned a 
gift of $25,000 to the library of the medical de- 
partment of the University of Georgia. 

Doctor Young was married to Virginia Durant, 
who died in igo6, without issue. 

; 

James Preston McNair has been one of the 
prominent business men of Aiken County for over 
thirty years. He has been a manufacturer, farmer, 
merchant and banker. 

Mr. McNair was born in Robeson County, North 



Carolina, July 14, i860, a son of Duncan and Betha 
Jane (Alford) McNair. His father was a farmer. 
Mr. McNair was educated in public schools and the 
Red Springs Academy, and in early life entered the 
industry of manufacturing turpentine. Later he 
located at Kitchings Mills in Aiken County, was a 
merchant there from 1885 to 1905, and also de- 
veloped extensive farming interests. In 1906 he 
organized the Farmers and Merchants Bank of 
Aiken, and has been president of that institution 
from the beginning. He also owns a large amount 
of farm land and other real estate both in Aiken 
County and in Georgia. 

Mr. McNair has neglected none of those calls 
made upon a citizen for public work. He served as 
a member of the Public Works Commission for 
Aiken City. He is an elder in the Presbyterian 
Church. He married for his first wife Cora Kitch- 
ings, of Aiken County, and by that union had six 
children. On September 15, 1909, he married Hattie 
Roland, of Laurens. They have one child. 

Charles Thomas Mason of Sumter though his 
name is probably not so widely known as some 
others who have identified themselves with politics 
and public affairs, has been one of the most useful 
men of South Carolina, and as an inventor and busi- 
ness manager has an almost international fame in 
the industrial arts. 

He was born at Sumter June 6, 1855, son of 
Charles Thomas and Judith G. (Britton) Mason. 
He comes by his talents naturally, his father hav- 
ing been a pioneer in electrical invention. His 
father during the war made telegraph instruments 
for the Southern Confederacy and was inventor of 
a practical electric fan. 

Mr. Mason has spent all his life as a mechanical 
and electrical engineer. When twelve years old he 
made a working model of an engine which was 
awarded a silver medal by the State Fair at Colum- 
bia. For some time he gave much thought and 
study to solve the great problem of mechanical 
picking of cotton, and as early as 1880 invented 
a cotton picking machine that would discriminate 
between fibrous and non-fibrous material. His chief 
business, however, has been the manufacture of 
telephones. He b^an making telephones in Sumter 
in 1893, organizing the Sumter Telephone Manu- 
facturing Company, and was its president and gen- 
eral manager until he sold out hi3 interests a few 
years ago. 

Mr. Mason is the inventor of the ignition system 
used on many types of aeroplanes in the United 
States, England, France and Italy. Between the 
telegraph, which was the first practical application 
of electricity to modern life, and the aeroplane, 
rapidl/ becoming a commonplace marvel of the 
twentieth century, is represented a profound epoch 
in industrial art, and at many points the Masons, 
father and son, have contributed to the advance- 
ment recorded. 

Mr. Mason is a director of the Bank of South 
Carolina, and a former director of the Bank of 
Sumter. He is a member of the Franklin Insti- 
tute of Philadelphia and the Royal Society of Arts 
of London. 

At Baltimore, Maryland, November 16, 1875, he 



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married Emma Stewart, a daughter of John H. 
Stewart. They have four children: Emma S., 
wife of E. K. Friar; Eleanor, wife of W. I. Crow- 
son, Jr.; C. Stewart Mason, who married Miss 
Marie Brown; and Carl T. Mason, who married 
OUie Delgar. 

Peronneau Finley Henderson has been a promi- 
nent member of the South Carolina bar for twenty 
years, and has added much to the prestige in which 
the name Henderson is held in legal circles at 
Aiken and that part of the state. 

He is a son of Daniel Henderson of Aiken and 
was born in that city November 29, 1877. He is a 
graduate of the Aiken Institute and took his col- 
lege work in Davidson College, North Carolina, 
where he was an honor man of his graduating class 
in 1897. He read law with the firm of Henderson 
Brothers, was admitted to the bar in 1898, and has 
steadily practiced law ever since. Mr. Henderson 
is a director of the Real Estate & Fidelity Company, 
of the Carolina Light & Power Company, of the 
Highland Park Hotel Company, the Powells . Hard- 
ware Company and is secretary-treasurer of the 
Aiken Hospital Association. 

He was district chairman of the Second Congrca- 
sional District and had charge of the Liberty Loan 
drives in that district during the war, and is a 
member of the South Carolina Memorial Commis- 
sion under appointment of Governor Cooper. He 
is now grand chancellor of the Knights of Pythias 
of the State of South Carolina. 

On June 29, 1904, at Aiken, he married Miss 
Grace A. Powell, a native of Aiken and daughter 
of James Powell, of Aiken, retired. He was head 
of the Powell Hardware Company. They have two 
children, Adelaide and Eleanor. 

J. Leroy Dukes is an Orangeburg lawyer and 
since March, 1914, has been United States commis- 
sioner of his district. 

He was bom at Orangeburg, October 13, 1889, son 
of John H. and Sophie (Johnson) Dukes. His 
father was a planter and also prominent in public 
a£Fairs in Orangeburg County, serving sixteen years 
in the office of sheriff and for three terms, six years, 
representing the county in the Legislature. J. Leroy 
Dukes after attending public schools entered Wof- 
ford College at Spartanburg and was graduated in 
1908. He then studied law, was admitted to the 
bar in 19 10, and since that date has been busy in 
building up a general practice at Orangeburg. He 
is a York Rite Mason and Shriner and Elk. 

October 16, 1918, he married Margaret Keener 
Summers, of Calhoun County. Mr. Dukes is 
steward and trustee of St. Paul's Methodist Epis- 
copal Church at Orangeburg. . 

Robert Lide. Few men in Orangeburg have 
larger interests both in their home community and 
over the state than Robert Lide, long prominent as 
a lawyer, banker and public official. 

He was born at Greenville November 25, 187 1. a 
son of Rev. Thomas P. and Martha Caroline (Haw- 
kins) Lide. He is of Welsh ancestry, and his 
family history goes back to Robert Lide, who was 
bom in Virgmia in 1734 and came to South Caro- 
lina with a relative and settled in the Darlington 

Vol. V— 8 



district, and was later a major in the Continental 
army under General Marion. The second of his 
five sons was Hugh Lide, of Darlington, remarkable, 
says an old history, "for strength of character and 
solidity of understanding." A son of Hugh was 
Evan James Lide, and the latter was the father 
of the late Thomas P. Lide, who died August 2, 
1906, after a life-long devotion to the Baptfst Church. 
He was one of the most prominent ministers of that 
faith in the Pee Dee Association. 

Robert Lide spent his youth in the various com- 
munities where his father was pastor. His father 
was able to send him to college, and he graduated 
from Wake Forest College in North Carolina in 
June. 1892. From that time forward he was de- 
pendent upon his own energies and exertions, and 
by work in a lawyer's office and agency work for 
an insurance company prepared for a professional 
career. He studied law with B. H. Moss at Orange- 
burg, and was admitted to practice in 1894. The 
firm of Moss and Lide has been a prominent one 
in the South Carolina bar for a quarter of a century. 

Mr. Lide was appointed a united States com- 
missioner in 1895, and held that office for a num- 
ber of years. From 1900 to 1904 he represented 
his county in the House of Representatives, and 
was elected and served as a state senator from 
1908 to 1916. From 1904 to 1914 he was county 
chairman of the democratic party and represented 
Orangeburg County as a member of the State 
Democratic Executive Committee. He has imusual 
gifts as a political organizer and has been one of 
the most influential men in the circles of his party 
in the state. He was a delegate to the Democratic 
National Convention at St. Louis in 1916. From 
1017 to 1919 he served as mayor of Orangeburg. 
For twelve years Mr. Lide was also Orangeburg 
correspondent for the Charleston "News and 
Courier." He has been a member of the Orange- 
burg County Board of Education, and is a deacon 
in the Baptist Church, and long has been prominent 
in the fraternal orders. He is a past chancellor of 
the Knights of Pythias lodge, and past consul 
commander of his camp in the Woodmen of the 
World. He is a past head consul of South Carolina, 
and since 1909 has represented the state head camp 
in the sovereign camp of the United States. 

He helped organize the Bank at Elloree in Orange- 
burg County, where his father was once pastor, 
in 1904, and has ever since been president of the 
bank, which is now the First National Bank of 
Elloree. He is also director and attorney for the 
First National Bank of Holly Hill. 

June 2, 1897. Mr. Lide married Ethel Mildred 
Lowman, daughter of Dr. J. W. Lowman of Orange- 
burg. They have three daughters, Mildred, Evelyn 
and Ethel. 

J. Stokes Salley, a lawyer and business man 
of Orangeburg, has been one of the progressive 
factors of the affairs of his native community since 
earlv manhood. 

He was born at Orangeburg October 27, 1880. a 
son of George Lawrence and Mattie (Stokes) Sal- 
ley. Reference is made to the career of his father 
on other pages. The son was educated in the local 
high school, attended Wofford College, and for five 



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years was deputy county clerk. While in that office 
he was diligently preparing for his profession as a 
lawyer, and was admitted to the bar in 1904. For one 
year he served as circuit solicitor and has since ap- 
plied himself to the private practice of law. He is 
also a director of the Peoples Natronal Bank, the 
Orangeburg Packing Company, is president of a 
bottling company, and is secretary of the A. C. 
Watson Company, a general insurance agency. 

November 15, 1905, he married Lizzie C. Salley, 
of Orangeburg. They have three children: J. 
Stokes, Jr., Elizabeth C, and Jane Bruce. 

Isaac Calhoun Strauss, a lawyer by profession 
and training, has found his activities widely en- 
gaged in numerous business relations. 

He was born at Florence, South Carolina, May 
10, 1873, a son of Alfred A. and Amelia (Wein- 
berg) Strauss. His father was a native of Ger- 
many, spent his boyhood in France, and on coming 
to America settled at Charleston, South Carolina. 
His wife was a native of South Carolina. 

Isaac C. Strauss was educated in public schools, 
also under private tutors, attended hi^h school at 
Atlanta, Georgia, one year at the University of 
South Carolina, and took a course at Eastman's 
Business College at Poughkeepsie, New York. He 
was an office boy with the well known law firm of 
Lee & Moise at Sumter, studied law with them, 
and upon his admission to the bar in 1896, became 
associated with his former preceptors and employers. 
From 1898 to 1918, twenty years, Mr. Strauss 
served as referee in bankruptcy, finally resigning 
that office. In that capacity he did a great deal 
of work, hardly compensated by any of the material 
rewards paid him for his services, and resulting 
in many nice adjustments of business interests, 
and altogether his record was a happy combi- 
nation of the judicial temperament and thorough 
business acumen. 

Mr. Strauss is president of the Palmetto Insur- 
ance Company, president of The Sumter Trust Com- 
pany, vice president of the City National Bank, is 
a director and general counsel for the Sumter Tele- 
phone Company, a director of Harby Company, 
director of the Interstate Clay Company, director of 
the Bank of Haygood and Bank of Pinewood. He 
is president of the "Congregation Sinai" at Sum- 
ter, and throughout his career has extended his 
personal energies and means in behalf of many 
charitable causes. 

September 4, 1900, he married Hattie Ryttenberg 
of Sumter, daughter of Harry and Rose (Nuss- 
baum) Ryttenberu. 

Hon. James Benjamin Black. While he has 
had half a century in which to do the work of 
his life, few men employed their years and talents 
and opportunities with better distinction than Dr. 
James Benjamin Black of Bamberg. Until recent 
years he was engaged in the practice of medicine. 

He is one of the prominent physicians of South 
Carolina. Many business affairs have also pre- 
sented themselves to his attention, and for a quar- 
ter of a century he has been a potent figure in the 
politics of the southern part of the state. The 
state as a whole knows him through his long serv- 



ice in both the House and Senate, where his in- 
fluence has been exerted in helpful ways in behalf 
of an enlightened program of constructive legis- 
lation. 

Doctor Black ^as born in Colleton County July 
ip, 1849. His father, Robert Black, who was of 
English and Irish descent, served as captain in the 
State Troops during the war between the states, 
and while a farmer and planter he also became 
prominent in county politics, serving as sheriff for 
twenty years and also as county treasurer. Robert 
Black married Elizabeth Caldwell, who was born 
in Colleton County, while her father came from 
Ireland. 

James Benjamin Black though reared in the im- 
poverished period of the war and reconstruction 
times, acquired a liberal education, attending the 
common and high schools of his native county, took 
one course of lectures in the South Carolina Medical 
College and finished his medical education in the 
University of Maryland at Baltimore. In 1872 he 
began practice in Colleton County, and after seven 
years moved to Bamberg, where he continued to 
employ his strength in meeting the heavy demands 
made upon his professional talents until about five 
years ago, when he retired except for office and 
consultation work. In the meantime many other 
interests have developed. -For forty years he has 
conducted a drug store on one spot in Bamberg. 
Farming on a modest scale has also been one of his 
interests, and for a quarter of a century he was 
associated with his brother Thomas Black in the 
livestock business. 

On the death of Thomas Black in October, 1918, 
Dr. Black's son C. E. Black took the active man- 
agement of this business. Doctor Black also has 
stock in the Bamberg Banking Company, in the 
Enterprise Bank, recently changed to the First 
National Bank of Bamberg, is a former president 
of the Bamberg Bank and now a director in the 
two institutions. 

Doctor Black has given an almost continuous 
service in the Legislature for a quarter of a cen- 
tury. He was in the House eight years and has 
been in the Senate for sixteen years. Some of the 
causes with which his work in the Legislature has 
been especially identified are prohibition, good 
roads, education and public health. He is chairman 
of the Senate committee on medical affairs, and 
for several years has been one of the trustees and 
vice president of the Medical College of the State 
of South Carolina. His home locality has long 
considered him the chosen leader in the demo- 
cratic party, and he has served as chairman of the 
Central Committee and chairman of the Bamberg 
Democratic Club. He is also a former mayor of 
Bamberg. Fraternally Doctor Black is a past master 
of Lodge No. 38. Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, is a past district deputv grand master of the 
Grand Lodge, ^ York Rite Mason and Shriner. He 
is also a past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias 
and a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and Woodmen of the World. Doctor Black 
is a deacon in his home Baptist Church and for 
over thirtv years has been a teacher in the Sunday 
school. He served as moderator of the Barnwell 
Baptist Association for several years and as presi- 



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115 



dent of the County Sunday School Convention also 
for a number of years. When he was a young 
man and doing his first work as a physician in 
Colleton County he received a commission from 
Governor Wade Hampton as captain of a local 
cavalry company. 

While his purposes and ideals in life have been 
expressed in a large degree of individual service 
and achievement, Doctor Black has every reason 
to be proud of the family of children who have 
grown up in his home. He married in Barnwell, 
now Bamberg County, August i, 1872, Miss Hattie 
Ayer, a daughter of Charles F. Ayer. Her father 
was a grand-nephew of General Ayer, a distin- 
guished character in the military affairs of the 
early state. Ten children were born to Doctor and 
Mrs. Black, seven of whom are still living: Mary 
Elizabeth, now deceased, was the wife of Col. F. N. 
K. Bailey, who conducts the well known military 
school at Greenwood, South Carolina; J. Benjamin, 
who died in infancy; Miles Jackson, a traveling 
salesman; Minnie Quincy, wife of Fred W. Free, 
of Bamberg; Doctor Robert, a practicing physician 
at Bamberg; Doctor Thomas, a dentist at Bamberg; 
Dr. Charles F., who also qualified as a physician 
and practiced until his death at Bamberg; Clarence 
Ervin, an attorney by profession, but, as mentioned 
above, is now in charge of his father's stock busi- 
ness; Miss Ethel, a teacher at Estill, South Caro- 
lina; and Miss Urma, a music teacher at Bamberg. 

Jonathan Ingell Hazard has been a George- 
town business man thirty years, first as a merchant, 
but for the greater part of the time as a banker 
and developer of various projects in and around 
the city many of which have directly contributed 
to Georgetown's growth and prosperity. 

Mr. Hazard was born at Conway in Horry County, 
South Carolina, November 8, 1864, a son of Ben- 
jamin I. and Sarah Freeborn (Ingell) Hazard. 
The Hazard family came to South Carolina from 
Rhode Island in 1849. Jonathan I. Hazard was 
educated in private schools and in business college 
and at the age of seventeen went to work in his 
father's merchandise store as office boy. After a 
time his father made him assistant bookkeeper 
and after laying the foundation of a sound busi- 
ness experience he removed to Decatur, Alabama, 
in April, 1888, and engaged in the house furnish- 
ing business under the name Hazard & Wright. 
Selling out in 1890 he returned to his native state 
in 1891 and took an active part in organizing the 
Bank of Georgetown, serving as its first cashier. 
He is now vice president and cashier. This bank 
has long been a bulwark in the financial affairs of 
Georgetown. It has a capital of $100,000, a surplus 
of $100,000 and undivided profits of $30,000. Mr. 
Hazard as a factor in the real estate business is 
president of the Hazard Addition Company, is 
secretary and treasurer of the Carolina Farm Land 
Development Company, an organization which has 
been instrumental in colonizing many tracts of South 
Carolina with northern people, is secretary-treasurer 
of the Rhem' Dock and Terminal Company, secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Washington Park Real Es- 
tate Company, and secretary-treasurer of the 
Georgetown Land Association. 



Mr. Hazard is also a director of the Chamber 
of Commerce, and was one of the citizens of George- 
town who worked hardest and most faithfully for 
the installation of an adequate water and sewer- 
age system. He served as a member of the City 
Commissioners. He was also a member of the 
Volunteer Fire Department as president of the 
Winyah Hose Reel Company. He served during 
the World war as chairman of the County Council 
•of National Defense, and as chairman of the Four 
Minute Men. He served as treasurer of George- 
town Chapter of the American Red Cross, as well 
as of the successive war fund campaigns. Mr. 
Hazard is junior warden of Prince George Winyah 
Episcopal Church. 

January 4, 1888, he married Miss Fannie Wright 
of Bucksville, Horry County, South Carolina. They 
have three children. The son, J. I., Jr., who grad- 
uated from the University of South Carolina in 
191 1 and is now assistant cashier of the Bank of 
Georgetown, served as ensign in the navy from 
February, 1918, until mustered out in February, 
1919. The two daughters, Ruth Hattie and Sarah 
Ingell, are both graduates of Converse College. 

J. Lamb Perry. The legal profession is one that 
demands much and requires of its devotees im- 
plicit and unswerving devotion to its exactions. 
Long and continued study; natural ability and keen 
judgment with regard to men and their motives, 
are all required in the making of a successful 
lawyer. That so many pass beyond the ordinary 
in this calling and become figures of note, demon- 
strates that :this profession brings out all that is 
best and most capable in a man. For ages the 
most brilliant men of all countries have turned 
their attention to the study of the law, and es- 
pecially is this true in the United States, where the 
form of government gives opportunity to the man 
of brains to climb even into the very highest posi- 
tion within the gift of the people, and it is a notable 
fact that from among the lawyers have more of our 
great men come than from all of the other callings 
combined. One of the men who is notable as a 
lawyer and a public-spirited citizen of Charleston, 
J. Lamb Perry, exemplifies these facts, and was 
born here in the '60s, a son of Archibald Simpson 
Johnston Perry, a native of South Carolina, and 
grandson of Benjamin Perry, at one time Secretary 
of State, and who was also born in South Carolina. 
The mother of J. Lamb Perry bore the maiden 
name of Martha Henrietta Lamb, and was born 
at Charleston, a daughter of James and Mary 
(Somers) Lamb, natives of England and South 
Carolina, respectively. J. Lamb Perry is the only 
son of his parents, but he had two sisters, namely: 
Jane Johnston, who married Duke Litta-Visconti- 
Arese of Italy, died in February. 1920; and Mary 
Lamb, who married Blackburn Hughes, died about 
1911. 

J. Lamb Perry attended a private school of 
Charleston until he matriculated at Union College 
at Schenectady. New York, from which he was 
graduated in 187Q. He then studied law and was 
admitted to the bar at Columbia. South Carolina,, 
in 1881. following which he returned to Charleston, 
where he has since been engaged in an active prac- 



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tice. In addition to his profession Mr. Perrj' has 
business interests and is president of the John- 
ston-Crews Company, wholesale dry goods dealers, 
the oldest established business of its kind at Charles- 
ton, or in fact in the country. 

In 1883 Mr. Perry was united in marriage with 
Miss Caroline Stuart Buist, who died in 1913 leav- 
ing three sons, namely: Archibald Simpson, James 
Lamb, Jr., and Edward Henry Buist, and one daugh- 
ter, Martha Henrietta. For a number of years Mr." 
Perry has been a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, ^hich he is now serving as an elder. His 
career is interesting, for his success is due to his 
own ability. He has reaped only where he has 
sown, and the harvest with its valuable aftermath 
is now his. He has reached his high professional 
standing through no favors of influential friends, 
but because of his knowledge of the law and his 
fearlessness in interpreting it and bringing to bear 
upon the conduct of his cases the force of his keen 
intellect and the benefit of his long and varied 
experience which made him from the first able to 
.judge correctly of men and their motives. Without 
this latter qualification few men are able to prose- 
cute their calling as lawyers, for it is necessary 
to understand the complex workings of a man's 
mind in order to get at the true facts in a case. 

Daniel Hazel Marchant is a veteran busmcss 
man of Orangeburg, where he has been a merchant 
nearly forty years. 

He was born in Graniteville, in what is now 
Aiken, then Edgefield, County, in 1854, a son of 
Wesley and Charlotte (Hook) Marchant. The Mar- 
chant family is of French Huguenot descent. The 
first of the name on coming to America settled at 
Tidewater, Virginia, and later in Lower South Caro- 
lina, in the vicinity of Charleston. In different gen- 
erations this family has always produced strong 
and able men and upright citizens. Wesley Mar- 
chant was a native of South Carolina. His wife was 
a member of the well known Hook family, with 
prominent connections in Lexington County. Great- 
grandfather Martin Hook came from Hesse, Ger- 
many, during the Revolutionaiy war, but was not 
a typical "Hessian," since he joined the American 
patriot forces against Great Britain. This Revolu- 
tionary soldier married Sarah Senn. The maternal 
grandfather of Daniel H. Marchant was Nicholas 
Hook. 

When Daniel H. Marchant was six years of age 
his parents left Graniteville and moved to a farm 
about three miles from Columbia in Lexington 
County. He was there until about fifteen and sub- 
sequently lived for several years at Columbus, 
Georgia. September i, 1881, he identified himself 
with Orangeburg, and that city has since been his 
permanent home. For ten years he had charge of 
the piano department of the general mercantile es- 
tablishment of George H. Cornelson. Thus forti- 
fied with a wide experience and acquaintance he 
became engaged in the merchandise business for 
himself. His store is one of the principal ones of 
the kind in this section of South Carolina. He is 
a dealer in pianos, organs and talking machines, and 
a varied line of musical goods. 



Mr. Marchant is a Knight Templar Mason and 
Shriner and a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. At Columbus, Georgia, he married Miss 
Julia Bond, daughter of Rev. William D. Bond, a 
Methodist minister. They have five children, Atti- 
cus Hagood; Qaniel H., Jr.,; Lela Estellc, wife of 
J. G. Smith, Jr.; Julia Belle, wife of J. W. Culler; 
and William Wesley Marchant. One child, Albert 
Andrew Marchant, died in 1916, at the age of thirty- 
six. D. H. Marchant and all of his family on both 
sides are one hundred per cent American. 

Benjamin Huger Rutledge, member of one of 
the prominent families of Charleston, has been an 
active and diligent member of the bar of that city 
for over thirty-five years. He has given his time 
to his profession with few outside interests, though 
frequently appointed to offices of trust. 

Mr. Rutledge was bom at Charleston September 
4, 1 861, a son of Benjamin Huger and Eleanor 
Maria (Middleton) Rutledge. He acquired his 
early education in Charleston, graduated in 1880 
from the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, 
and received his A. B. degree from Yale College in 
1882. He was admitted to the South Carolina bar 
in 1884, and practiced for many years as a member 
of the law firm Mordecai, Gadsden & Rutledge and 
still later as senior partner of Rutledge, Hyde & 
Mann. 

Mr. Rutledge has served with the rank of major 
in the South Carolina National Guards. He was 
elected a member of the South Carolina General 
Assembly in i8po, and for years was clerk of the 
judiciary committee of the Legislature. In 1884 he 
was chosen electoral messenger from South Caro- 
lina at the time of Cleveland's first election. Mr. 
Rutledge was delegate at large to the Universal 
Congress of Lawyers and Jurists at St. Louis in 
1904. He is a member of the St. Cecilia Society, 
and the Episcopal Church. On October 5, 1882, he 
married Miss Emma Blake, of Fletcher, North 
Carolina. 

George H. Momeier, former member of the Legis- 
lature from Charleston, has been a hard working 
law>-er in that city for over twenty years. 

He was born at Charleston October 8, 1873. He 
was educated in grammar and high schools in his 
native city, and was admitted to the bar in 1895. 
Mr. Momeier's father was a native of Germany, 
came to Charleston when a boy, received his educa- 
tion in that city, and married Miss Louise C. Hase, 
a native of Charleston, daughter of John and Dor- 
othea Hase, Who had come from Germany at an 
early date. 

Mr. Momeier achieved success in the law after a 
few years' practice and is one of the most popular 
and able lawyers of the Charleston bar. He is so- 
licitor for a number of business concerns and served 
as a member of the Legislature in 191 5-16. He is 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen 
of the World and the Fellowship Society. 

April 28, 1898^ he married Ernestine Peters, a 
daughter of C. H. Peters. They have five children: 
Roland H., Erna W., Arthur George, Frederick L 
and Margaret L. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



117 



WiLUAM RisH LowMAN, M. D. For over thirty 
years Doctor Lowman has been engaged in the 
heavy work of his profession at Orangeburg. He 
is a former secretary of the South Carolina Medi- 
cal Board of Examiners, has given much of his 
time to educational affairs in medicine and public 
health, and his services and attainments have made 
him widely known over the state at large. 

He is a son of the late Jacob Waltei; Lowman, 
also a physician and distinguished as the first demo- 
cratic member of the State Legislature after recon- 
struction days. Dr. Jacob Walter Lowman was 
bom in Lexington County, March ii, 1837. He 
was a descendant of David Lohman, who came from 
Germany to Virginia in 1770 and whose son Malachi 
Lohman settled at Dutch Forks, South Carolina, 
in 1814. Jacob W. Lowman was a son of Daniel 
and Nancy (Hiller) Lowman. He began the study 
of medicine under his brother-in-law, Dr. John 
K. Kneece, and in 1858 graduated from the Medi- 
cal Department of the University of Georgia. He 
taught school and practiced medicine near Bates- 
burg, South Carolina, and during 1863-65 was a 
lieutenant in the Confederate army. After the war 
he resumed practice in Lexington County and in 
1872 was elected a member of the Legislature from 
that county. On leaving the Legislature he moved 
to Orangeburg, where for thirty years he was a 
leader in his profession and equally prominent in 
business and civic affairs. He served as vice presi- 
dent of the Edisto Savings Bank, as a director of 
the Orangeburg Manufacturing Company, was sur- 
geon to 3ie Atlantic Coast Line Railway and also 
to the C. N. I. A. and M. College of South Caro- 
lina. He published a book on hygiene and medical 
practice in 1879. He was an active Baptist. His 
death occurred January 14, 1905. He married Lo- 
dusky Rish, daughter of Levi and Mary Rish, in 
1858. 

Dr. William Rish Lowman was born in Lexing- 
ton G)unty, December 3, 1866, and has lived at 
Orangeburg since he was eight years of age. He 
^duated from high school there in 1886 and fin- 
ished his course in the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons at Baltimore in 1888. Afterwards he took 
post-graduate courses in New York. Besides a 
large private practice he has been surgeon of the 
Atlantic Coast Line and was a lecturer in • the 
Orangeburg Collegiate Institute, was secretary of 
the trustees of the C. N. I. A. and M. College of 
South Carolina, has been president of the trustees 
of Orangeburg Institute, and has been medical ex- 
aminer for many insurance companies. He is a 
member of the National Science Association of 
America, the State and Tri-State Medical societies 
and the American Medical Association. He is a 
Knight Templar Mason and Shriner, and is a past 
master and past high priest of his lodge and Royal 
Arch Chapter. 

December 27, 1891, he married Elvira Earle Izlar. 
daughter of Judge B. P. Izlar and niece of General 
James F. Izlar of Orangeburg. 

Caklos Harth Able, M. D. Doctor Able was the 
pioneer citizen, business and professional man of 
the community of Norway in the western part of 
Orangeburg County. Soon after graduating in 



medicine he located in that section, and saw the 
brush burned away to make room for the first 
houses built. No one is better known and esteemed 
and has been more conspicuously useful than Doc- 
tor Able. 

He was born in Lexington County in 1863, a son 
of Carson and Priscilla (Stedman) Able. Both his 
father and grandfather were natives of Lexington 
County, where the Able family settled about the 
time of the Revolutionary war. The ancestry is 
English. Doctor Abie's grandfather helped build 
the first Baptist Church in Lexington County. His 
father, still living at the age of eighty-nine at his 
old home in Lexington County, was a Confederate 
soldier in Captain Kaufman's company. He was in 
active service throughout the struggle, but never re- 
ceived a wound. 

Doctor Able attended common schools and studied 
medicine in the medical department of the Univer- 
sity of Georgia at Augusta. He was graduated with 
the class of 1884, and in the same year settled at 
the present Town of Norway. All the older fam- 
ilies of that community have looked upon him as 
their first resource as a physician and surgeon. He 
also conducts a general drug store in Norway and 
has helped make that town one of the best of its 
size in the state, situated as it is in the midst of 
a rich and progressive section. Doctor Able was 
one of the founders and is president of the First 
Bank of Norway, a splendid institution, very strong 
financially and occupying its own building, a mod- 
ern three-story office structure that would be a 
credit to a much larger city. Doctor Able is also 
owner of some valuable planting interests in 
Orangeburg County, consisting of 195 acres ad- 
joining the town and planted in cotton, corn and 
general produce. 

His first wife was Miss Emma Johnson, of Aiken 
County, daughter of Edward Johnson, of that 
county. She was the mother of five children, Annie, 
Grover, Gerhard, Ruth and Gordon. Doctor Able 
married for his present wife Mrs. Nannette Bren- 
neke. 

Grover is engaged in the merchandise business at 
Norway. Gerhard is in the insurance business at 
the same place, and Gordon is attending college at 
Charleston, now taking the pre-medical course. 

John Hf.nry Burnrv. It is in keeping with the 
ancient and honorable traditions of South Carolina 
that some of the most vital and progressive move- 
ments in recent times should originate in the state. 
A movement affecting a numerous class was the 
recent organization of the Roadmasters and Super- 
visors Association of America, the founder of which 
and the secretary-treasurer of the association is 
John Henry Burney of Orangeburg. 

Mr. Burney, whose home has been at Orangeburg 
since 1909, was for a number of years road super- 
visor of the Southern Railway. Road supervisors 
and roadmasters are highly important and respon- 
sible men in relation to the welfare and physical 
maintenance of American railways. Until recently, 
however, they were not organized or associated with 
a view to furthering their interests. Realizing the 
necessity for such organization, especially in view 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



of the federalization of the railroads, Mr. Burney 
took the preliminary steps toward organization, car- 
rying on the work entirely by correspondence. In 
order to give his entire time to the business he re- 
signed from the Southern Railway in the fall of 
191 8, and in October, 1919, he had the satisfaction 
of seeing the Roadmasters and Supervisors Associa- 
tion of America consummated, embracing officials 
of that class not only in the United States but in 
Canada, and therefore an international organization. 
The offices and official headquarters are at Orange- 
burg, with Mr. Burney as secretary-treasurer and 
managing head. Already through negotiations car- 
ried on with the railroad administration at Wash- 
ington many direct benefits have accrued to thi^ 
class of railroad men, not only in the matter of 
salaries but other advantages in working conditions. 

Mr. Burney was born at Clarkton, Bladen County, 
North Carolina, in 1883, a son of A. F. and Sarah 
Ellen (Benson) Burney. He was reared and educated 
in Clarkton and has been a railroad man since six- 
teen years of age. He went to work for the Georgia 
Central Railroad at Savannah, Georgia, in the road- 
way department. Later he was in the operating 
department of the same road, first as flagman and 
later as train conductor. In the fall of 1908 he 
became section foreman for the Southern Railway 
at Charleston, and in November, 1909, was pro- 
moted to road supervisor, with home and headquar- 
ters at Orangeburg. His supervision extended to 
the lines from Branchville to Columbia and from 
Kingsville to Kershaw, including the Sumter branch. 
Upon him in that office devolved the physical main- 
tenance of way, obviously one of the larger respon- 
sibilities of railroad work. 

Mr. Burney is a Mason and a member of the 
Presb3^erian Church. He married Miss Eugenia 
Griner of Statesboro, Georgia. Their three children 
are Eugenia, Edith and John H., Jr. 

John Henry Caldwell. While his home and 
interests for a number of yeans have been in one 
of the quiet rural communities of Spartant)urg 
County, John Henry Caldwell has performed a serv- 
ice to the entire cause of agriculture not only in 
the South but everywhere, that should justify his 
being better known throughout his home state. 

Mr. Caldwell has the distinction of being the first 
to use djmamite in practical farming. In recent 
years a great propaganda has been launched for 
the use of • blasting materials in many forms of 
farm work, and the process of disturbing and shat- 
tering the original strata, especially where hard, 
compacted or in the shape of hard pan, is now gen- 
erally commended and recommended by agricul- 
tural authorities. But it was Mr. Caldwell who gave 
first practical proof of the method and carried it 
out on a scale admitting of broad tests. 

As a result of what he has done in this direction 
Mr. Caldwell is widely known as *T>ynamite Cald- 
well." Mr. Caldwell was borri in Haywood County, 
North Carolina, April 11, 1854^ but has been a resi- 
dent of Spartanburg County since 1872, when he 
was eighteen years of age. His father was Al- 
ford Caidwell, a native of Spartanbufg County, and 
the grandfather, Hughie Caldwell, was bom in 
the same section of South Carolina. The family 



were pioneer settlers of the Tyger River in Upper 
South Carolina. Mr. Caldwell's great-grandfather 
donated the land where the old Nazareth Church 
now stands, the second oldest church in that section 
of the state. The Cald wells were of Scotch origin 
and came to the Carolinas from Virginia. Alford 
Caldwell married Sarah Hannah, a native of Hay- 
wood County, North Carolina, and a daughter of 
Evins Hannah of English ancestry and a native of 
North Carolina. 

John Henry Caldwell is the only son of his par- 
ents. His one living sister is Mary Ann Caldwell. 
He spent his boyhood days in Haywood County 
and was educated there. His first experience in the 
use of dynamite was as a loader with a firm of 
contractors on the Asheville Division of the South- 
em Railroad. For about fifteen years he was cm- 
ployed as an expert in the use of dynamite, in mines, 
in the blasting of wells, and in general construction 
work. 

In the meantime he bought a farm at Wellford, 
and continued the practice of agriculture there for 
twenty-seven years. In 1903 Mr. Caldwell bought 
his present home at Ardella, four miles west of 
Spartanburg. He now has 118 acres. The land 
cost him at purchase only $3,200. It is now con- 
servativelv valued at $32,000. Mr. Caldwell states 
that the land in 1903 produced only ten bushels of 
com to the acre or one bale of cotton to three acres. 
In 1919 some of the same land showed a produc- 
tion of 100 bushels of corn to the acre, while he 
grew seventy-six bales of cotton on fifty acres. 
These results seem nothing less than remarkable, 
and* Mr. Caldwell attributes the change almost en- 
tirely to the use of d)mamite. He has placed heavy 
charges of that explosive beneath the soil, and the 
subsequent blast has thoroughly stirred both the top 
soil and sub-soil and mixed the different elements, 
and made available latent quantities of plant food 
which could never have been made available by 
any known processes of cultivation, even with the 
deepest plow. The results speak for themselves, 
and Mr. Caldwell is convinced that while the use 
of dynamite entails a heavy initial expense, it is 
cheaper in the long run than commercial fertilizer. 

Mr. Caldwell is also interested in a store at Ar- 
della. In that community he is known as a man 
of public spirit, and one who has the courage to 
back his convictions and vision by actual demon- 
strative proof. He has used his influence in behalf 
of educational and school enterprises, and is also 
credited with some of the work that brought an 
electric lighting system to his locality. He has been 
in politics to some extent, and was a candidate for 
the Legislature, being defeated by only a few votes. 
For sixteen years he was a member of the Knights 
of Honor, for eight years was affiliated with the 
Woodmen of the World, and as a youth from 1872 
to 1875 served as a member of the Ku Klux Klan. 

In 1876 he married Isabel Ann Jane Cooper, 
daughter of W. A. Cooper of Spartanburg County. 
Nine children were born to their marriage. One 
son and one daughter are now deceased. The old- 
est of those living is Martha Elizabeth, wife of 
Eber Johnson; Susie is the wife of F. L. Bradley; 
J. M. married Miss Cora Jackson of North Caro- 
lina; Jesse Valentine married Eva Steadman; 



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119 



Austell, Toy Thomas and Roy Max are all at home. 
The sons Austell and Toy were soldiers in the 
World war with very creditable records. Both of 
them enlisted before the draft was issued. Austell 
served in the First Division and spent twenty-six 
months in France. He was in eleven distinct bat- 
tles before he was wounded and he was again 
wounded, both times by shell fire. He served all 
through as a private. The son, Toy, was in Com- 
pany F of the One Hundred and Eij^hteenth In- 
fantry and saw all the overseas service with the 
Thirtieth Division. 

Charles A. Mobley, M. D. Doctor Mobley is a 
Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, and 
for several years has confined his practice exclu- 
sively to surgery, a field in which he has well mer- 
ited prominence throughout the state. Doctor Mob- 
ley recently founded the Orangeburg Hospital, and 
the direction of tiiat modern institution is now his 
chief care. 

Doctor Mobley was born at Rock Hill, South 
Carolina, in 1888. He comes of a family of phy- 
sicians and surgeons, and represents the historic 
Mobhey ancestry which has been in South C'arolina 
since about 1758, founded by Edward Mobley. His 
grandfather is Dr. James Mobley, a retired phy- 
sician whose home is in Florida. His maternal 
grandfather Hope was also a physician. The par- 
ents of Doctor Mobley were Frel and Anna (Hope) 
Mobley, the latter still living. 

Doctor Mobley acquired his literary education in 
the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, and took 
his medical course in the Medical College of South 
Carolina at Charleston, where he graduated in 1910. 
His first home as a physician was at Van Wyck, in 
Lancaster County, whence he removed to his native 
city, Rock Hill. For several years at Rock Hill he 
was associated with Doctor FenneU, a prominent 
surgeon of that city. In 1919 Doctor Mobley chose 
the rich and rapidly growing City of Orangeburg 
as his permanent home, and in September opened 
the Orangeburg Hospital. This is a modern hos- 
pital with every facility and appliance for surgical 
work and the care of patients. A nurses* training 
school has been established, and there is a separate 
building for negro patients. 

Doctor Mobley every year has interrupted his 
work a few weeks or months for further training 
and association with eminent men of his profession. 
Several times he has been an observer of the meth- 
ods and technique of the famous Mayos in Minne- 
sota, and has also attended clinics in Boston, New 
York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Chicago. Besides 
being a Fellow of the American College of Sur- 
geons, he is a member of the American Medical 
Association. 

Doctor Mobley married Miss Susie Bailey, of 
Edisto Island, a daughter of Edward D. and Louisa 
(Whaley) Bailey, both natives of Edisto Island 
and from old South Carolina families of Revolu- 
tionary ancestry and English descent. Doctor and 
Mrs. Mobley have one son, Charles A., Jr. 

George Nixon Bunch. The community of Spar- 
tanburg gained a very high appreciation of the pro- 
fessional talents and the splendid character of the 



late Doctor Bunch during the eight years he prac- 
ticed dentistry there. 

Doctor Bunch, who was stricken in the early prime 
of his career and when he had most to live for, 
was born at North Augusta, Edgefield County, 
South Carolina, January 24, 1888, and died at his 
home in Spartanburg, February 3, 1920. His par- 
ents were Evan Medling and Ollie (Nixon) Bunch, 
also natives of South Carolina. Doctor Bunch ac- 
quired his early education in country schools, grew 
up on a farm, also attended private school at Au- 
gusta, and a private school at Columbia. He ac- 
quired a liberal education, at Clemson College, 
studying for his profession in the Atlanta Dental 
College. He was graduated May 12, 191 1, and after 
a brief residence and practice at Gray Court, South 
Carolina, and at Greenwood, came to Spartanburg 
in 1912. He was a popular member of the com- 
munity, belonged to a number of social organiza- 
tions, and was a thir^r-second degree Scottish Rite 
Mason and Shrii^^r. He had some valuable business 
interests, including property in Edgefield County in- 
herited from his father's estate. He was a liberal 
contributor to the Bethel Methodist Episcopal 
Church and a member of its Sunday school. 

April 24, 1910, Doctor Bunch married Jessie E. 
Wallace, daughter of Watson W. and Martha 
(Kelly) Wallace. Mrs. Bunch was the youngest of 
four daughters and one son. Her father was born in 
Laurens County, South Carolina, and her mother 
in Spartanburg County. Mrs. Bunch finished her 
education in Lander College. She became the moth- 
er of four children: George Wallace, deceased; 
Martha Wallace; Evden Hunter, deceased; and 
George, Jr. 

F. M. Bryan has been a hard working member 
of the Charleston bar for over twenty years. 

He was born at Charleston June 22, 1875, son of 
Judge George D. and Mary M. Middleton (King) 
Bryan. His parents were also natives of Charles- 
ton, where his father for a number of years was 
judge of the Probate Court. F. M. Brj^n was ed- 
ucated in the Episcopal High School of Virginia, 
and studied law in South Carolina College. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1897, and since then has 
been engaged in a widely diversified general prac- 
tice. He served six years as an influential member 
of the State Legislature at Charleston, and has al- 
ways taken a useful citizen's part in politics. He 
is now probate judge of Charleston County, having 
succeeded his father by election in October, 1919. 
He is a member of several local clubs and societies, 
including the Masons and the Hibernian Society. 

Judge Jerry Miles Hughes. An able lawyer, 
now serving his second term as probate judge of 
Orangeburg County, Judge Hughes has accepted 
many calls and opportunities to devote his talents 
to the larger objects and aims of his home com- 
munity. 

He was bom at Orangeburg in 1884, son of J. M. 
and Margaret S. (Mack) Hughes, the former a na- 
tive of James Island, South Carolina, and the latter 
born near Cordova in Orangeburg County. J. M. 
Hughes died in 1907. 

Jerry Miles Hughes was a studious youth, ac- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



quired his local education in the Orangeburg High 
School, ^nd spent four y«ars in the University of 
South Carolina. Three years of that time he was 
in the general academic department and finished his 
law course in one year, graduating in 1907. The 
following year he began practice at Orangeburg. 
He soon left and went west to Oklahoma, which 
had recently been admitted to the Union, and re- 
mained in that slate two years. He returned to 
Orangeburg in 1910 and for several months taught 
school, resuming his law practice in 191 1. 

One of the best services he has rendered Orange- 
burg Cotmty has been in connection with the 
Orangeburg County Fair. This association was es- 
tablished in 191 1, with Judge Hughes as secretary, 
an office he has filled continuously. Orangeburg is 
justly proud of its fair. The fair has exerted a 
tremendous influence in developing and improving 
the agricultural welfare of the community. The 
management has been such as to make this one of 
the best fairs in the entire state. During Novem- 
ber, 1919, the receipts of the annual fair were 
$20,000. 

Judge Hughes was elected county attorney in 
1914, filling that office two years. In 1916 he was 
chosen judge of probate to fill an unexpired term, 
and in 1918 was re-elected at the regular electipn. 
He is a most competent and faithful official, a very 
popular citizen, and enjoys every evidence of trust 
and popular esteem. He is president of the Home 
Building and Loan Association of Orangeburg. 

Judge Hughes is a Methodist and is amliated with 
the Knights of Pythias and Masons. He married 
Miss Oressa Collier, and they have one son, Jerry» 
Miles, Jr. 

William Henry Coleman. In the death of Wil- 
liam Henry Coleman, which occurred January 27, 
1919, South Carolina lost one of its oldest, bravest 
and most efficient public servants. He had been a 
boy fighter in the Confederate army and from the 
close of the war until his death had given about a 
third of a century to public office. He was a for- 
mer sheriff of Richland County, and at the time of 
his death was serving as postmaster of Columbia. 

He was born in Pickens County, South Carolina, 
March 9, 1850. For a few years of his boyhood 
his parents lived in Tennessee. At the age of fif- 
teen Mr. Coleman enlisted in the Confederate army 
and was with the army during the last six months 
of the war. He then located at Columbia and for 
some years was a farmer in that vicinity. During 
the reconstruction period he was a member of a 
Red Shirt company commanded by Captain Lykes. 

His first important public service was as depiUy 
sheriff under S. W. Rowan. He was deputy sheriff 
in Richland County for eighteen years, during the 
administrations of Sheriffs Rowan and Cathcart. 
He was then elected to that office himself and filled 
it for twelve years, until he voluntarily retired. It 
was his work in the sheriff's office which brought 
him his well deserved reputation throughout Rich- 
land County and over a large part of the state. 
As is often true of really brave men, Mr. Coleman 
had a modesty which would seldom permit him to 
speak of the many exciting experiences of his life. 
But others knew his trustworthiness, his fearless- 



ness in the presence of danger, and his undaunted 
determination to discharge his duty at all hazards. 
Throughout the long service he rendered in the 
sheriff s office no prisoner was ever taken from 
him. 

Mr. Coleman was appointed postmaster of Colum- 
bia in February, 1916, and was the courteous head 
of that office for nearly three years. Fraternally 
he was a member of the Masonic order, the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias 
and Elks, and was a member of Ebenezer Lutheran 
Church. He married Miss Annie Taylor Moore of 
York County and a descendant from an ancestry 
long and prominently identified with the state. On 
the paternal side she is a direct descendant of James 
Moore, the first governor of South Carolina, and on 
her mother's side, a descendant of Col. Thomas Tay- 
lor, the donor of the land upon which the City of 
Columbia now stands. Mrs. Coleman survives her 
husband and is the mother of seven children, four 
daughters and three sons. The daughters are, Mrs. 
F. F. Hough, of Richmond, Virginia, Mrs. J. A, 
Krentzlin, of Washington, District of Columbia, 
Mrs. J. B. Sylvan, of Columbia, and Miss Myrtle 
Coleman, of Columbia. The sons are, William Au- 
gustus toleman, George Trezevant Coleman, 'and 
Samuel Rowan Coleman, all residents of Columbia. 

William Augustus Coleman. The distinctively 
modern trend of business and civic development in 
Columbia has had a tireless and effective ally in 
William A. Coleman, whose time and energies are 
devoted to several commercial organizations, and 
he has shown the same aptitude for public adminis- 
tration as his late father, whose career is included 
in this publication. 

Mr. Coleman was born near Columbia in Rich- 
land County, March 27, 1880, son of William H. 
and Annie Taylor (Moore) Coleman. His early 
education was limited to five years in the public 
schools of Columbia, and for the rest he has 
depended upon his experience and the moulding 
power of his own ambition and character. His 
longest and most consistent business association has 
been as a wholesale druggist, having spent twenty- 
three years with the Murray Drug Company. He 
then established himself in business as president 
of the Covin Candy Company, in association with 
Mr. W. D. Drew as vice president and secretary. 

In April, 1920, the Covin Candy Company was 
succeeded by the Coleman-Drew Company, which 
under the same management and with increased 
capitalization, engaged m the wholesale drug busi- 
ness at Columbia. Mr. Coleman is vice president 
of the Liberty National Bank, and a director of 
several building and loan and trust companies. In 
May, 1918, he was elected commissioner of finance 
and police of Columbia. As his record proves he is 
the right sort of man in public office, progressively 
minded, devoted to the public welfare, and when his 
convictions are made up he is aggressive and fear- 
less in action. 

Mr. Coleman is a member of the Odd Fellows, 
the Ridgewood, Columbia and Rotary clubs, and 
is affiliated with the Episcopal Church. June 19, 
1903, at Columbia, he married Frances Mancr Mix- 
son, daughter of Col. F. M. Mixson. Their family 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



121 



consists of three chUdren, Nell P., William F. and 
Lucy M. Coleman. 

James Allan. Though he has been a member of 
the bar five years, and nearly two years of that 
time sacrificed his practice in order to serve his 
country during the war, James Allan has more than 
justified the anticipations of his admiring friends 
who had followed closely his brilliant career 
through college and university. 

Captain Allan was born at Summerville, South 
Carolina, November 14, 1889. His father, James Allan, 
was a native of Charleston, was educated in the city 
schools, also abroad in Switzerland, and was in the 
wholesale jewelry business. He died when about 
forty-eight years of age. The grandfather was also 
named James Allan and was a native of Scotland, 
coming to South Carolina about 1840. He was also 
in the jewelry business. James Allan II married 
Mary Doar Tupper, a native of Charleston, and 
member of one of the oldest families in the South 
and New England. Her father was George Tupper 
and her grandfather Tristram Tupper. Tristram 
Tupper was president of the South Carolina Rail- 
road when it enjoyed the distinction of being the 
longest railroad in the world. The Tupper s came 
from England about 1637 and settled in Massachu- 
setts. The old home at Sandwich, built in 1637, 
is still owned by the Tupper Family Association. 

Capt. James Allan is the younger of two sons. 
His brother, Samuel, was accidentally killed in 
1907. Captain Allan was educated in the Charleston 
High School and the Porter Military Academy, 
where he was awarded three medals, for scholar- 
ship, classics and declamation. He took his college 
literary course at Davidson College, North Caro- 
lina, and during his career there won three medals 
for debating. He graduated A. B. and in 1912 was 
awarded his master's degree by the University of 
South Carolina. Here again he was awarded two 
medals for debating and oratory, and for the first 
time in twenty-five years won the "All Southern 
Oratorical Contest" for the University of South 
Carolina. In 1913 he was awarded a law degree by 
the university and in 1914 did special work in the 
Harvard Law School. He was admitted to the bar 
in 19 13 and began practice in Charleston the follow- 
ing year. 

Captain Allan joined the Charleston Light Dra- 
goons for service on the Mexican border in 19 16- 17, 
and served as corporal and sergeant. At the out- 
break of the war with Germany he was appointed 
first lieutenant of a squadron of cavalry bemg or- 
ganized by Wsmdham Manning. T-his organization 
wais never perfected. He was then appointed a 
junior grade lieutenant in the National Naval Vol- 
unteers, but the original plans for this organization 
were never carried out, due to the fact that the 
Naval Militia was federalized. He then entered 
the Second Officers Training Camp at Fort Ogle- 
thorpe, Georgia, and was commissioned a captain in 
the field artillery. He was an instructor in the 
Third Training Camp at Camp Jackson. He then 
transferred to the Three Hundred and Eighth Cav- 
alry when Pershing called for fifteen regiments of 
cavalry. He was then stationed at Douglas, Ari- 



zona for six months. In August, 1918, all the Na- 
tional Army Cavalry by order of the War Depart- 
ment was transformed into field artillery. Captain 
Allan was then sent for intensive instruction to the 
School of Fire at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and com- 
pleted his course in reconnoissance and gunnery. 
He was assigned to the Fifty-sixth Field Artillery, 
then in training for immediate overseas service, 
but was kept at Fort Sill until after the armistice 
was signed. He received his honorable discharge 
December 6, 1918, and at once returned to Charles- 
ton and resumed his law practice. 

Captain Allan is a member of St. Andrew^s So- 
ciety and the Carolina Yacht Club. March 31, 1917, 
he married Marian Aley, of Wichita, Kansas. They 
have one son, James Allan, Jr., born October 17, 
1919. 

George Lawrence S alley has been a notable fig- 
ure in the public affairs of Orangeburg County for 
a number of years, and since December, 1892, has 
held the post of county clerk. His official record 
has been as satisfactory and honorable as it has 
been long. It is interesting to note that his grand- 
father, Samuel P. Jones, was clerk in Orangeburg 
District in 1812. A hundred and two years later 
George L. Salley in the course of his official duties 
recorded some papers which had been signed by 
his grandfather. Mr. Salley's maternal ancestors 
were of English origin and came to America in 
colonial days. One of the colonial governors of 
South Carolina, William Bull, appointed by the king 
of England, was a grandfather of Mrs. Sheldonia 
(Bull) Salley, the mother of G. Lawrence Salley. 

George Lawrence Salley was born in Orangeburg 
County, February 28, 1847, a son of Nathaniel Moss 
and Sheldonia (Bull) Salley. He grew up on his 
father's plantation and had a common school edu- 
cation. He was only fourteen when the war broke 
out, and later he went into active service as a mem- 
ber of Company D of the Seventh Battery of Ar- 
tillenr. When the war was over he went back to 
the farm and plantation and was called from that 

2uiet routine to the duties of his present office in 
)ecember, 1892. For ten years he also served as 
registrar and supervisor of elections. He is a di- 
rector of the Peoples National Bank of Orange- 
burg. Mr. Salley is one of the prominent niem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Orange- 
burg, serving as trustee and forty years as record- 
ing steward. 

December 12, 1875, he married Martha Stokes, 
of Barnwell County. They became the parents of 
six children. Nathaniel Moss is a member of the 
faculty of the State College for Women at Talla- 
hasse, Florida. Mary E. is the wife of W. P. 
Pollock, present United States senator from South 
Carolina. J. Stokes Salley is a prominent lawyer 
at Orangeburg. Ada Lockhart is the wife of John 
C. Evans. Tames Raworth is a lawyer and deputy 
clerk under his father, while the youngest, Katherine 
Moss, is the wife of Dr. N. Bruce Edgerton. 

C. Dean Gadsden, one of the younger business 
men of (Charleston, has built up an important busi- 
ness and extensive clientage in real estate, stocks, 
bonds and insurance. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



He was born at Charleston, and is a member of 
an old and prominent family represented in the 
affairs and history of the city for five generations. 
His great-grandfather, John Gadsden, was born at 
Charleston, son of an Englishman and an early set- 
tler in the city. His grandfather was Rev. Chris- 
topher Philip Gadsden, founder of St Luke's Epis- 
copal Church. He was a native of Charleston and 
his chief lifework was in connection with the 
churdi which he founded. His father was John 
Gadsden, a native of Charleston, a ^aduate of 
Washington and Lee University at Lexmgton, Vir- 
ginia, and a civil engineer by profession. He died 
at the age of fifty-one. John Gadsden married 
Mary Joanna Deas, who is still living in Charleston. 
Her father was Lieut. Charles Deas, a lieutenant in 
the United States Navy, who died while in foreign 
service. The Deas familv is of Scotch ancestry. 
John Gadsden and wife had six diildren, five of 
whom are still living: Christopher Philip, a travel- 
ing salesman; Ann Deas, wife of James Adger, of 
Charleston; Charles Deas; Mary Porcher, wife of 
John P. B. Sinkler, of Philadelphia; and Joanna 
Stuart, wife of Joseph E. Jenkins, of Charleston. 

Charles Deas Gadsden was educated in the schools 
of Charleston and in Porter Military Academy. In 
1909 he entered the real estate, stocks, bonds and 
insurance business. Mr. Gadsden enlisted in the 
navy in 1918 for a term of four years and served 
to the time of the armistice, then being transferred 
to the reserve list, where he is at present. 

In 1917 he married Marie N. Bogert, daughter of 
Rev. Harry Howe Bogert of Birdsboro, Pennsylva- 
nia. They have a daughter, Marie Bogert. Mr. Gads- 
den is a member of the Carolina Yacht Club, 
Charleston Country Club, the Masonic order, St. 
Andrews Society, and has taken an active part in 
public affairs. 

CoL. James Henry Claffy. Historically South 
Carolina presents an interesting combination of the 
conservative and the progressive. The bulk of its 
people have steered clear equally from the stand- 
pat and reactionary and also from dangerous radi- 
calism. Nevertheless some of the most wholesome 
movements effecting social and economic life have 
received their earliest recognition in South Caro- 
lina, and this state has given to such movements 
many prominent leaders. 

One of the most important units in the proposed 
great federation of American agriculture is tbe 
Farmers' Union, the president of which for South 
Carolina is Col. James Henry Claffy of Orange- 
burg. Colonel Claffy is a practical farmer him- 
self, but for many years has been a leader in various 
movements affecting the best interests of state agri- 
culture. He was born at Columbia, in 1858, a son 
of James and Eliza (McKenna) Claffy. Both his 
father and mother were natives of Ireland. They 
came to America some time before the Civil war, 
locating at Columbia, and later moving to a farm 
at Fort Motte in Orangeburg County. 

James Henry Claffy was twelve years old when 
his parents moved to the farm at Fort Motte. He 
kept his residence in that vicinity until 1893, and 
since that year Orangeburg has been his home. 

He came by his military title justly. It was dur- 



ing the year 1893 that the Darlington rbt occurred, 
when a number of the units of the National Guard 
of the state refused to obey the orders of the Gov- 
ernor, Tillman. Colonel Claffy, with the aid of 
several others then organized a company of citi- 
zens, numbering seventy-five men, and reported with 
them to the Governor within twenty-four hours 
after the call for volunteers was made. A perma- 
nent or^nization of this company was then per- 
fected, Colonel Claffy being commissioned as cap- 
tain. He held this position for twenty years, 
although his resignation was repeatedly offered. It 
was as many times refused, the men refusing to 
permit him to sever his connections with the com- 
pany. In 19 10 he was elected a major, and after 
serving in this capacity for two years was elected 
lieutenant-colonel of the Second South Carolina In- 
fantry. He served in this capacity until 1916, when 
he retired from the service. 

Shortly after moving to Orangeburg Colonel 
Claffy was elected president of the State Farmers' 
Union, and while serving in this capacity organ- 
ized the Farmers Union Bank and Trust Company 
and served as vice president and cashier for sev- 
eral years. He was also the leader in organizing 
the Orangeburg County Fair Association, which is 
conceded to be the most successful effort ever 
made in this direction. Organized in 1910 and cap- 
italized at $20,000.00, of which $10,000.00 was paid 
in, this association in 1920 has accumulated real 
estate valued at $50,000.00 after paying off all in- 
debtedness. In the year 1916 he organized the 
Orangeburg County Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance 
Association, which has been remarkably successful. 
Beginning business without a dollar's capitel, at the 
end of four years has accumulated a surplus of 
$15,000.00 in cash and business to the amount of 
$1,500,000.00. In 1919, while president of the Farm- 
ers' Union, he was foremost in organizing the 
Orangeburg County Marketing Association, which 
gave to the farmers of the county "for the first time" 
the market price of their products. 

Besides being president of the State Farmers' 
Union, Colonel Claffy is one of the leaders of the 
American Cotton Association. At the organization 
of the association at New Orleans in 1919, he was 
elected one of the directors from South Carolina. 
In December of the same year he was elected vice 
president of the South Carolina Division, and also a 
member of the State Executive Committee. He is 
also president of the Orangeburg County Cotton 
Association. 

Many conspicuous war activities are to the credit 
of Colonel Claffy. He was food administrator in 
charge of speeding up production among the farm- 
ers of the state, and his work in that role brought 
him the especial commendation and a medal from 
the Food Administration at Washington. Colonel 
Claffy is a prominent democrat and has frequently 
been a delegate to state conventions. He is a mem- 
ber of the Catholic Church. 

He married Miss Mana E. Rickenbaker, of 
Orangeburg County. Her mother was a member of 
the Elliott family of that County. They have two 
daughters, Mana, wife of Dr. B. M. Montgomery, 
of Kingstree, and Miss Kathleen Qaffy, 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



123 



Samuel Dibble, LL. D., was an eminent lawyer, 
a constructive statesman, an educator and scholar, 
and none can read the history of South Carolina 
and his personal record without realizing how deep- 
ly his life was impressed upon that of the state at 
large, and his home community of Orangeburg in 
particular. 

He was born in the City of Charleston, Septem- 
ber i6, 1837, and died just seventy-six years later, 
September 16, 1913, in a sanitarium near Baltimore, 
whither he had gone in the vain hope of recovering 
his health. He was a direct descendant in the pa- 
ternal line from Thomas Dibble who came from 
England to Dorchester, Massachusetts, in 1630 and 
in 1635 was one of the founders of Windsor, Con- 
necticut. 

Samuel Dibble was the oldest son of Philander 
Virgil and Frances Ann (Evans) Dibble. Philander 
and his brother Andrew when young men came from 
Bethel, Connecticut, to Charleston and engaged in 
business together as hatters. Ann Evans was de- 
scended from the Gabeau family gf French 
Huguenots and the Henley family of England. 

Samuel Dibble acquired his early education in his 
native city at the schools of Misses Caroline and 
Mary Gray and Mr. John Gray, spent one year in a 
common school near his grandfather's farm in the 
Town of Bethel, Connecticut, and in 1849 entered 
the high school under Henry M. Bruns, the prin- 
cipal, and was admitted to the College of Charles- 
ton in 1853. He completed his junior course and in 
1855 entered Wofford College, where he graduated 
A. B. in July, 1856, being the first graduate of that 
famed institution, which was then under the presi- 
dency of Rev. William M. Wightman, afterward 
Bishop Wightman. While at Wofford he was a 
membSer of the Calhoun Literary Society. After 
forty 3rears of devotion to literary and professional 
labors he received the degree LL. D. from his alma 
mater. He considered this the highest honor he 
ever attained. 

. On leaving -college he -taught in Shiloh Academy 
and Pine Grove Academy in Orangeburg District 
in 1856-57, and was assistant teacher of the Wof- 
ford Preparatory Department in the spring of 1858. 
Then and during the year 1859 he studied law un- 
der Tefferson Choice of Spartanburg, and Lesesne 
and Wilkins of Charleston, and was admitted as an 
attorney to the law course in December, 1859, and 
as a solicitor in equity in 1865, having studied equity 
under Hon.^ Charles H. Simonton. In January, 
i860, he began the practice of law at Orangeburg. 

He was soon called from his office and cases to 
a sterner field of duty. January 3, 1861, he volun- 
teered as a private in the Edisto Rifles in Col. John- 
son Hagood's First Regiment 6f South Carolina 
Volunteers. He was with that company throughout 
the war, attaining the rank of first lieutenant. The 
compaiw later became a part of the Eutaw Regi- 
ment, Twenty-Fifth South Carolina Volunteers, un- 
der Col. Charles H. Simonton, a part of Hagood's 
Brigade, Hokes' Division of the Army of Northern 
Virginia. 

Toward the close of the war he married, with 
the return of peace began the practice of law at 
Orangeburg, and in 1867 formed a partnership with 



Hon. James F. Izlar under the name Izlar & Dibble. 
During his earlier years as a lawyer he also edited 
the Orangeburg News. The firm Izlar & Dibble be- 
came one of the widest known and strongest legal 
firms of the state. The Orangeburg Bar in reso- 
lutions passed after the death of Mr. Dibble spoke 
of his record as a lawyer in the following words: 
**Mr. Dibble studied law as a science and was pro- 
foundly versed in its underlying principles. He 
argued many notable causes, involving new and dif- 
ficult questions and of the gravest importance to 
society. When great principles were to be deter- 
mined his genius was equal to the task, and when 
authorities were to be invoked to sustain that which 
already had been settled, he furnished them inex- 
haustless store and used them with the skill of a 
master. Mr. Dibble was a learned lawyer and 
adorned the Bar with the wealth of learning, but as 
a distinguished public servant he belongs also to the 
state. His conspicuous and valuable services in 
public station and in private walk have become. part 
of the rich heritage of the state. He was a leader 
of men and was ready at all times to do all things 
and to dare all things for the public good." 

Having ventured his life and his fortune for 
the sake of the South in the war, he was equally 
ready with all he had to redeem his state from 
the wretched conditions of reconstruction. He 
was an able lieutenant of Wade Hampton and did 
his part in the restoration of white rule. He served 
as democratic county chairman of Orangeburg 
County in the Seymour and Blair campaign of 
1868. When for the protection of the white people 
a military company was organized in Orangeburg 
County, the Edisto Rifles were reorganized in June, 
1876, and he was made captain. He was elected 
to the State Legislature as a member of the House 
in 1877, and while in that body did good work for 
the improvement of the educational resources of the 
state. He wa§ elected one of the trustees of the 
South Carolina University in 1878, when the vaga- 
bond professors and negro students were driven 
out. He was chairman of the executive commit- 
tee of the South Carolina Agricultural College and 
Mechanics Institute for colored students, a branch 
of the State University. He was appointed one of 
the Board of School Commissioners of Orangeburg 
County and formulated the present subdivision of 
the county into school districts. 

In 1880 Mr. Dibble was a delegate to the National 
Democratic Convention that nominated Hancock 
and English and was chosen a presidential elector 
that year. In 1881, on the death of Hon. Michael 
P. O'Connor, member of Congress, he was elected 
to the vacancy in the Forty-Seventh Congress and 
was subsequently reelected as a democrat for four 
more successive terms, serving until the close of 
the Fifty-First Congress in 1891, when he declined 
reelection and retired to occupy his time with other 
interests. He took high rank among the strong men 
in Congress and was admittedly among the ablest 
men this state sent to the nation's councils. 

To his reputation as a lawyer and public leader 
he added that of a wise and able business man. He 
helped orgaiiize the Edisto Savings Bank, noi;^ the 
Edisto National Bank of Orangeburg, was chosen 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



its first president April 3, 1889, and served until 
April I, 1902. The Bowman Land and Improvement 
Company was organized April 11, 1891, and the 
Branchville and Bowman Railroad Company Sep- 
tember 6, 1890, Mr. Dibble serving as president of 
these institutions. 

At this point should be quoted another paragraph 
from the resolutions above cited: "Mr. Dibble was 
essentially a constructionist. He possessed great 
administrative ability and was both a builder and 
benefactor. He was a man of broad vision, with 
a clear insight into our industrial conditions and 
he had the most optimistic faith in the destiny of 
this section o^ the state. He appreciated its re- 
sources and contributed his capital and talents to 
develop them. He evinced the deepest interest in 
improved agricultural methods, in the drainage of 
our lowlands and in the construction and improve- 
ment of the public highways. He developed and 
brought into a high state of cultivation a large 
area^ of practically abandoned territory in the lower 
portion of this county, stimulating the energy of 
the people and adding largely to its prosperity. He 
established and was chiefly instrumental in build- 
ing the thriving town of Bowman, and with his own 
means he constructed a railroad from that town 
to Branchville in order to give the people of that 
section railroad communications with the outside 
world. The growing town and the surrounding 
country with its prosperous farms and intelligent 
citizenship will ever remain a monument to his 
genius and energy." 

Mr. Dibble joined Shibboleth Lodge No. 28, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at Orangeburg 
May 2, 1867, Eureka Chapter No. 13, August 24, 
1867, and was high priest of the Royal Arch for 
a number of years. He was president of Young 
American Steam Fire Engine Company and chief 
of the fire department of Orangeburg. He was 
township commissioner of Bowman Township during 
the latter part of his life, and as such assisted 
largely in widening and improving the highways of 
the county and state. He was also quite active in 
securing to Orangeburg its present railroad facili- 
ties; was appointed superintendent of the St. Paul 
Methodist Episcopal Sunday School in i860, and 
after the war reorganized it and served until April 
18, 1879. On his resignation the Methodist Con- 
ference passed resolutions thanking him for his long, 
intelligent and earnest work as superintendent. 

Of other attributes of his mind and character 
the Bar Resolutions said: "Mr. Dibble was in no 
sense an ordinary man. He possessed many re- 
markable characteristics. He was naturally en- 
dowed with a strong mind, which he cultivated to 
a very high degree. He was possibly the best edu- 
cated and most broadly informed man in the county. 
Familiar with the classics, a master of several lan- 
guages and especially gifted in the higher mathe- 
matics, he was deeply cultured in the truest sense." 

November 10, 1864, Mr. Dibble was happily mar- 
ried to Miss Mary Christiana Louis, of Orange- 
burg, daughter of Deopold and Ann Agnes Louis. 
Mrs. Dibble, who survived her husband, has been 
universally beloved for her admirable character and 
charming personality. She is die mother of four 



children: Mrs. B. H. Moss, Mrs. W. W. Watson, 
Samuel Dibble and Louis V. Dibble. 

Samuel Dibble. The name Dibble has long fig- 
ured conspicuously in Orangeburg County. The 
late Samuel Dibble was a prominent lawyer long 
associated with Judge Izlar and other prominent 
practitioners -of the Orangeburg bar. He is aJso 
remembered for his services in Congress during the 
eighties. 

A son of Congressman Dibble and his wife, Mary 
C. Louis, is Samuel Dibble, Jr., whose work as a 
civil engineer has brought him in dose touch with 
much of the construction enterprise of the South. 
He was born at Orangeburg November 25, 1868, 
and was educated in public schools and the Univer- 
sity of South Carolina, where he graduated in the 
chemistry course in 1890, with the degree B. S. 
He has employed his technical ability as an engineer 
in connection with the reclamation and development 
of large tracts of waste land in Orangeburg County, 
and through that work has conferred benefits upon 
the present and all future generations. He owns 
a large amount of farm property. 

At one time he lived at Bowman, South Carolina, 
and was one of the city fathers there. In 1898 he 
enlisted for the Spanish- American war in the United 
States Engineers and served as first lieutenant. He 
was in service from May, 1808, until discharged on 
May 20, 1899, and part of that time was on duty 
in Cuba. Mr. Dibble is unmarried. 

Lee a. Klauber. Members of the Klauber fam- 
ily have been prominent in mercantile and banking 
circles in the southern part of the state for over 
forty years. His life and services well entitled Lee 
A. Klauber to the rich esteem and veneration in 
which his name is held and his memory cherished. 

He was the founder of the family in South Caro- 
lina. Bom in Bohemia, he located at St. George in 
Dorchester County in 1877. His initiative and public 
spirit proved a valuable addition to the resources, 
of that community. He was a merchant and banker, 
and found many opportunities to express his gen- 
erous ideals of service to his community and his 
fellow men. He was president of the St. Georgfe 
Cotton Seed Oil Manufacturing Company, and per- 
sonally controlled about 2,000 acres of land at 
St. George, some of it in timber and the rest in 
cotton and corn. For a number of years he op- 
erated a large sawmill a mile and a half from 
St. George and cut great quantities of lumber for 
the South Carolina and Georgia Railroad. 

Lee A. Klauber was a member of the Masonic 
lodge and a member of the Jewish Synagogue at 
Orange, New Jersey, where he had a brother living. 
A sister, Mrs. Louisa Plodkin, is now living at 
Atlanta, Georgia. Lee A. Klauber died September 
I, 1919. His character and his generosity made him 
greatly beloved by all classes of people, both white 
and black. Many times he was known to have be- 
friended, in a way that amounted to a studious and 
customary practice, poor women and their families. 
It is said that on the day of his death probably 500 
negroes, stricken with grief at their loss, came to 
his home. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



125 



Lee A. Klauber married Sarah Alice Harbeson, 
member of an old South Carolina family of English 
and Scotch-Irish ancestry. She was an active mem- 
ber of the Methodist Church. Her father, William 
I. Harbeson, of St. George, served four years as 
a member of the Confederate cavalry during the 
war, part of the time under Gen. Joseph E. John- 
ston. He was also prominent in his section during 
the reconstruction period and served as a member 
of the "red shirt" brigade. 

Two sons of the late Lee A. Klauber are suc- 
cessful South Carolina bankers. One, Robert Lee 
Klauber, was born at St. George October 19, 1884. 
He was educated in the local public schools, at- 
tended The Citadel two years, and also spent two 
years, 1901-02, in South Carolina Military Academy. 
He finished his education in Sullivan, Creighton & 
Smith's Business College, Georgia, in 1903, and at 
once returned to St. George and joined his father 
in the mercantile business. He is now president of 
the L 'A. Klauber Company, a concern whose assets 
are rated at over $125,000, and is also president of 
the Bank of St. George, the oldest bank in the 
community. He is a director in the Farmers Bank 
& Trust Company of St. Matthews, is connected 
with the Liberty Bank of Charleston, and operates 
a thirty horse farm near St. George. 

At St. George Robert L. Klauber married Emily 
A. Howell. Her father, John J. Howell, was for a 
number of years editor of the Dorchester Democrat 
and later served as county superintendent of edu- 
cation. Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Klauber have two chil- 
dren, Katherine and Vivian. Mr. Klauber is a 
Mason, and while never active politically served a 
term as a member of the Town Council. Fishing 
and hunting are his favorite recreations and he is a 
great lover and a judge of dogs and for several 
years has maintained a fine kennel. 

William Adolph Klauber, the other son, who for 
the past eighteen years has been a banker and mer- 
chant at Bamberg, was bom at St. George February 
17, 1882. He was liberally educated, attending the 
common schools and the St. George High School, 
and graduated from South Carolina's famous mil- 
itary school The Citadel with the class of 1902. 
Soon after completing his education he came to 
Bamberg and engaged in merchandising, and is still 
active head of a large business in that line. On 
January 28, 1920, he bought the interests of the 
former president of the Enterprise Bank of Bam- 
berg, and at once reorganized, taking in a number 
of prominent men of Bamberg as his associates and 
securing a new charter under the name of the First 
National Bank of Bamberg. The change in name 
and management became effective May 7, 1920. The 
officers of the bank are: W. A. Klauber, president; 
Dr. Robert Black, vice president; W. D. Coleman, 
cashier; while the directors are Aaron Rice, Dr. 
George F. Hair, C. J. S. Brooker, Dr. Robert Black, 
G. A. Ducker, Dr. F. B. McCracken, W. D. Cole- 
man. D. C. Crum, T. D. Copeland, W. E. Free, 
Dr. J. B. Black and W. A. Klauber— all men of the 
highest standing in that community. 

Mr. Klauber is also a director in the Bank of St. 
George and is vice president of the Citizens Build- 



ing and Loan Association and a director in the 
Bamberg Realty Company. 

In recent years he has also taken much part in 
local and state politics, and was one of the leading 
supporters of Governor Manning's aspirations for 
the gubernatorial office. He served four years on , 
the staff of the governor as lieutenant colonel. Fra- 
ternally he is affiliated with Oman Lodge No. 38, 
Free and Accepted Masons. 

Febmary 22, 1903, Mr. Klauber married at St. 
. George Murchy Judy, a native of that community. 
Her father is Dr. Perry M. Judy, of St. George, of 
an old colonial family of English and Irish de- 
scent. Her grandfather was a surgeon and lieu- 
tenant colonel in the Confederate army. Mr. and 
Mrs. Klauber have three children, Louis A., Perry 
McSwain and William A., Jr. 

S. Oliver O'Bryan. How large a place an able 
and hard working young lawyer may fill in a com- 
munity's activities is well exemplified in the career 
of S, Oliver O'Bryan of Manning. 

A graduate of the law department of the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina in 1905, he began general 
practice in Manning the same year. He has served 
as city councilman, county attomey, is present city 
attorney of Manning, is a Imstec of the Manning 
graded schools, and since 1914 has been chairman 
of the democratic party of Clarendon County. Dur- 
ing the war he was chairman of the County War 
Savings Stamps Committee, a member of the Coun- 
cil of Defense, chairman of the Legal Advisory 
Board, chairman of the Home Section of the Red 
Cross and active in every other war cause. He is 
superintendent of the Sunday school, president for 
several years of the Sunday School Association, and 
an active member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. O'Bryan was born in Clarendon County, July 
28, 1883, a son of William M. and Mary Gertrude 
(Oliver) 0'Br3ran. He was educated in the com- 
mon schools, in the Presbyterian College at Colum- 
bia, in Clemson College preparatory to his law 
course. In 1906 he became associated as a part- 
ner with Judge John S. Wilson under the name 
Wilson & O'Bryan. In 1907 Mr. Wilson was elected 
to the bench and since that date Mr. O'Bryan has 
been associated with Robert O. Purdy, under the 
firm name of Purdy & O'Bryan. Mr. O'Bryan is 
a director of the First National Bank of Manning, 
president of the Bank of Paxville, and president 
of the Manning Ice & Light Company. He is a 
Royal Arch Mason and a Past Chancellor Com- 
mander of the Knights of Pythias, a member of 
the Eastern Star and the Woodmen of the World. 
June 28, 191 1, he married Frances Davis of Man- 
ning, a daughter of J. Elbert and Sarah Rawlinson 
Davis. Her father is a former sheriff of Clar- 
endon County. Mr. and Mrs. O'Bryan have four 
children: William, Leila, Samuel Oliver and 
Eugenia. 

George Felder Hair. The Hairs are an old and 
prominent family of the old Barnwell district. 
While farming has always been a dominant interest 
in the family, the present generation is numerously 
represented in the professions, several of the sons 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



having been physicians or dentists, including 
Dr. George Felder Hair, who for twenty years has 
been a resident of Bamberg and is a former pres- 
ident of the State Dental Society. 

The remote ancestry of the Hairs is German, 
though members of the family have lived in the 
South since colonial times. The late Judson E. Hair 
was born in Barnwell County June 30, 1847, and 
died June 16, 1919. He was a student in the Uni- 
versity of Georgia at Athens when the war between 
the states broke out, and he and the other jnembers 
of his class volunteered and went to Charleston to 
enter the Confederate service. He was with Lee's 
army for eleven months, and was a musician in the 
band. His mature years were spent as a farmer and 
merchant in and around Blackville. He was one of 
the prominent Baptist laymen, being one of the 
founders and leaders of the church at Blackville and 
a deacon. Judson E. Hair married Maggie Capres 
Felder, who was born near Branchville, South Caro- 
lina, in 1850, and is still living at Blackville. When 
she was a small girl her father died as a result of 
hardship and exposure endured while a Confederate 
soldier. The family of Judson E. Hair and wife 
comprised twelve children, seven of whom are liv- 
ing: Lorena Blanch, who was married to Thomas 
J. Martin, of Anderson, in 1886; Dr. George F.; 
Arthur B., a hardware merchant and farmer at 
Blackville; John Pinckney, deceased; Joseph Koger, 
deceased ; Dr. Isaac Murray Hair, a dentist at Spar- 
tanburg; Dr. Harry B., also a dentist practicing at 
Columbia; Mary E., deceased; Mrs. D. D. Walters, 
of Columbia ; Mrs. Maggie E. Still and Mrs. Abigail 
Sanders, of Blackville; and Dr. Judson E., deceased. 
Of the younger generation some mention should be 
made of the two sons of Mrs. Lorena Blanch Mar- 
tin, of Anderson. These sons, Haskell Hair and 
Rhett Felder Martin, are both married, but when 
the war came on and they were called in the draft 
they claimed no exemption. The older went over- 
seas as a lieutenant, and saw much of the front 
line service with the Expeditionary Forces. He 
was at Chateau Thierry and other historic points 
on the French front. He is now practicing as an 
architect at Greenville. The other, Rhett Felder 
Martin, who is in the coal and wood business at 
Anderson, was on a transport bound for France 
when the armistice was signed, and the boat was 
then turned about and landed him in America. Earl 
Walters, a son of Mrs. D. D. Walters, of Columbia, 
was a volunteer at the age of eighteen in the World 
war and was overseas with the first forces sent to 
France and remained throughout the war. He was 
a sergeant and participated in all the important en- 
gagements of the Expeditionary Forces. Like all 
the others he had many narrow escapes from death, 
but he escaped without a mark. 

George Felder Hair, who was born at Blackville 
October 31, 1870, was liberally educated, attending 
the common and high schools of his native town, 
graduated in a business course at Newark, New 
Jersey, in 1888, and during the following year was 
employed by the S. S. White Dental Manufacturing 
Company at Staten Island, New York. This experi- 
ence aroused his interest in the dental profession 
and he entered the oldest dental college in the 



world, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
where he was graduated with the class of 1892. 
Doctor Hair practiced at Anderson for ten years, 
and since 1901 has been busy in his profession at 
Bamberg. He has filled all the important offices in 
the State Dental Society, including the office of 
president, and is now a member of the State Board 
of Dental Examiners. He is also affiliated with 
the National Dental Society. Doctor Hair is a Scot- 
tish Rite Mason and Shriner, also a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Woodmen of the World and Improved Or- 
der of Red Men. He has never been active in pol- 
itics, and is a leader in the Baptist Church at Bam- 
berg, being a deacon and a teacher in its Sunday 
school. On May 5, 1892, he married Miss Leila E. 
Boylston, of Blackville. Her father is a veteran ex- 
Confederate soldier, George W. Boylston, for many 
years a prominent citizen of Blackville. Doctor and 
Mrs. Hair have two children. Blanche, the daugh- 
ter, is the wife of J. J. Cudd, a financier and 
farmer at Spartanburg. The son, P. Belton Hair, 
received his A. B. degree from Furman University 
at Greenville, and while there served as a volunteer 
for three months in the Students Army Corps until 
the signing of the armistice. He is now in his third 
year of the Atlanta Dental College of Georgia, pre- 
paring for the profession in which his father and 
some of his uncles have done such distinguished 
work. 

Arthur Byron Hair. A Blackville business man 
and planter of long standing and successful and 
influential connections, Arthur Byron Hair is a 
member of the old and prominent Hair family in 
that section of South Carolina, being a son of 
Judson E. Hair. 

He was born near Blackville June 22, 1872, and 
acquired a liberal education. After common and 
private school instruction he entered Furman Uni- 
versity at Greenville, and in 1893 graduated from 
Sullivan & Crichton's Business College at Atlanta, 
Georgia. While there he became proficient in 
shorthand, and when soon afterward he entered 
Clemson College, in addition to his regular studies 
he acted as secretary to the president, E. B. Craig- 
head. Mr. Hair left Clemson in 1895, and for a 
year was bookkeeper for a mercantile house at 
Pelzer. 

In 1896, nearly a quarter of a century ago, he 
engaged in the hardware business at Blackville, and 
has been in that line ever since, his time beinj? 
divided between his store and his extensive farming 
interests. Mr. Hair owns and supervises a twenty- 
horse farm near Blackville. He does farming on 
a diversified scale, dividing his fields among cotton, 
peanuts, corn, and small grains, with some aspara- 
gus and garden truck. 

So far as his business duties would permit, 
Mr. Hair has accepted those community responsi- 
bilities thrust upon him by his fellow citizens. For 
ten years he was an alderman of Blackville and 
has been mayor of the town two terms. He has 
served as school trustee for ten years and for the 
past four years has been president of die board. He 
is a deacon in the Baptist church and for twenty 



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years has been secretary and treasurer of its Sun- 
day school. Fraternally he is affiliated with the 
Masonic order. 

In 1898 Mr. Hair married Cornelia Ada Rush, 
daughter of C. C. Rush of Blackville. By this 
union he is the father of six children, Arthur 
Byron, Jr., and David Harold, both students of 
Clemson College, James, John Pinckney, Charles 
and Elizabeth. Mr. Hair married for his second 
wife Dot Hamel, of Kershaw, on June 24, 1915. 
They have one son, George Hamel Hair. 

RiCH.\RD Lee Robinson, D. D., entered upon his 
duties as president of the Woman's College of Due 
West July I, 1910, just after the college had fitly 
celebrated its semi-centennial anniversary. Doctor 
Robinson is now in the tenth year of his presidency, 
and has guided the affairs of the institution with 
wisdom and energy to a record of results and 
achievement that justify the institution in the 
modem life of South Carolina as fully as at any 
time in the previous history of the college. 

This college, one of the oldest for the higher 
education of women in South Carolina, has an 
interesting history. Two ministers of the Associate 
Reformed Presbyterian Church, Rev. John I. Bonner 
and Rev. Jonathan Galloway, conceived the idea 
of a school in which young women should have 
equal educational advantages with young men. In 
a conference between these two ministers and Rev. 
R. C. Grier in 1859 the first plans were proposed, 
and in the same year a board of trustees was elected. 
This board took over a girl's academy, previously, 
directed by Miss Elizabeth McQuerns, and the col- 
lege was opened in the academy building January 
8, i860, with Rev. J. I. Bonner as the first president 
of the school. The cornerstone of the first college 
building was laid August 7, i860, and the first class^ 
five in number, graduated in i8i5i. Doctor Bonner 
was president of the Due West Female College, 
which it was originally called, until his death April 
29, 1881. "He lived and worked for it with all the 
energy of his nature. It was the center of all his 
plans and the unfailing stimulus to his ceaseless 
toil. He was one of that noble group of educators 
who rendered such splendid service to the South 
after the terrible Civil war, a group containing such 
names as Robert Calvin Grier, James H. Carlisle, 
John Maurice Webb, John Bunyan Shearer and 
William Moffatt Grier." Succeeding Doctor Bonner 
in the presidency came John P. Kennedy, who had 
been a professor in the college since 1866 and who 
remained as president until April, 1887, and faith- 
fully carried on the ideals and plans of his prede- 
cessor. For eight years Mrs. L. M. Bonner was 
principal, and in June, 1895, Rev. C. E. Todd was 
elected president, to be succeeded by Rev. James 
Boycc in 1899. Doctor Boyce was president for 
ten years, and during his administration the owner- 
ship and control of die college was transferred from 
a joint stock company to the Associate Reformed 
Presbyterian Church. Doctor Boyce died January 
27, loio, and was then succeeded by Dr. Richard 
Lee Robinson. 

"During the first half century of its history the 
college enrolled over 4,000 students and sent out 
1,030 graduates. They are to be found in every 



Southern state and in some of the Western and 
Northern states. Some have gone to the mission 
fields of Egypt, Mexico, Japan, China and India. 
Wherever they have gone their hands and heads 
and hearts have been freely given for every good 
work." 

Richard Lee Robinson was born at Lancaster, 
South Carolina, October 31, 1872, a son of Nathaniel 
Pressly and Agnes Elizabeth (Lathan) Robinson. 
He is of Scotch ancestry on both sides. His paternal 
grandmother was a Craig. The Craigs, Robinsons 
and Lathans are all well known families of South 
Carolina. Doctor Robinson received his A. B. degree 
from Erkine College at Due West in 1892, and was 
awarded the degree Doctor of Divinity in 191 2. For 
four years after leaving college he was teacher and 
principal of high schools and in 1899 he graduated 
from Princeton Theological Seminary. In the same 
year he was ordained a minister of the Associate 
Reformed Presbyterian Church, and for the next 
ten years served as pastor of the church at Camden, 
Alabama. During 1909-10 he was pastor at his home 
town of Lancaster, and from that post was called 
to the presidency of the Woman's College. 

December 22, 1903, Doctor Robinson married Miss 
Anna Marshall, of Millersburg, Kentucky. She is 
a graduate of the Millersburg College and Dean of 
the Woman's College of Due West. 

John Cart from the age of fifteen has been iden- 
tified with the cotton business and for nearly thirty 
years has been located at Orangeburg. 

Mr. Cart was born at Charleston May 5, 1866, a 
son of Francis G. and Annie M. (Gray) Cart. His 
father was both a cotton planter and factor. The 
son, who was educated in the public schools of 
Charleston and Porter Military Academy, at the 
age of fifteen entered business and since 1891 has 
been a resident of Orangeburg, where he established 
himself in the cotton buying business. He is a mem- 
ber of the Episcopal Church 

In 1891 he married Pauline Gervais Prentiss, 
daughter of Dr. Christopher J. and Pauline Gervais 
(Miller) Prentiss. Her father was a prominent 
Charleston physician, Mr. and Mrs. Cart have 
three children: Pauline Gervais, wife of Charles 
Matthews Lindsay, a graduate of The Citadel, who' 
served as a major during the World war; John, Jr., 
a graduate of The Citadel at Charleston and served 
in France as first lieutenant of the Three Hundred 
and Thirty-fifth Infantry; and Gladys, wife of Wil- 
liam Clifton Wallace, who is also a graduate of The 
Citadel and is a lieutenant in the United States 
Navy. 

Rudolph Siegung. When in 1919 the Siegling 
Music House of Charleston celebrated the centen- 
nial anniversary of its founding, emphasis was very 
properly placed upon the artistic quality as well as 
the commercial feature of the achievement. There 
are a number of strictly commercial establishments 
that have existed longer than the Siegling Music 
House, but this business, established in 1819 at 
Charleston, not only makes good its claim as the 
oldest music house in America but also as the cen- 
ter from which have radiated many of the choicest 
influences affecting the musical and artistic life of 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



the South. It would be a serious omission, indeed, 
not to include the Siegling Music House as one of 
the most patent factors in the history of South Caro- 
lina culture. 

The founder of this business was John Siegling, 
who was born in Erfurt, Germany, in 1789. His 
father was an eminent mathematician, who included 
among his scholars the great scientist Humboldt. 
More remotely the family ancestry goes back to 
John Siegling, a Saxon knight, who was one of the 
six knights chosen to protect Luther in his retire- 
ment in the Wartburg. 

John Siegling decided at the early age of seven- 
teen to leave his home for another land where he 
could support himself and relieve his parents. His 
first experience in the business world was in Paris 
in 1809. With no assistance save his sterling charac- 
ter and abilities he entered the services of Messrs. 
Erard Brothers, manufacturers of musical instru- 
ments, in their large factory where they employed 
several hundred workmen. Possessing great me- 
chanical skill and proficiency and having a passion 
for music, he was soon promoted to a prominent 
position, and equally as soon acquired the trust and 
confidence of the Erards, his employers. In 1780 the 
Erards constructed the first piano, the first instru- 
ment of the kind manufactured in France. Later 
they produced their first double movement harp, 
and in 1823 crowned their work by producing their 
model grand piano forte. 

John Sickling remained with the Erards for ten 
years, first m Paris and then in London and Dublin 
to establish and manage branches of this firm. He 
always felt that he owed much to the Erards for his 
success in business life. 

It was a choice between two alternatives that led 
John Siegling to America. When he was in readi- 
ness to start for foreign lands he found two ves- 
sels sailing, one for St. Petersburg, Russia, and 
the other for Charleston, South Carolina. The lat- 
ter obtained his decision as being more promising 
in its destination. He embarked for Charleston in 
September, 1819. At that time Charleston was one 
of the largest cities in commercial importance in the 
United States. On his arrival he decided to locate 
and quickly took out papers of naturalization and 
became an American citizen. 

In November, 1819, his first place of business was 
located on the south side of Broad Street, nearly 
opposite the Court House — a large brick building 
which was demolished for postotnce grounds and 
park. It was next moved to the southeast corner 
of Broad and King streets, where he established a 
house for the importation of musical instruments. 
In 1828 his establishment was moved from King and 
Broad streets to tlie southwest comer of Meeting 
and Horlbecks Alley. From there it was moved in 
1830 to the southwest corner of King and Beaufain 
streets, where the present Siegling Music House 
stands. At the same time a branch house was 
established in Havana, Cuba. The original store at 
that location was .destroyed by fire April 27, 1838, 
but a new and the present building was completed 
in the fall of 1839. 

For nearly half a century John Siegling was the 
business genius who guided this establishment and 



not only extended its trade but inspired it with the 
ideals which have been so carefully cherished by his 
successors. Hundreds of the grand pianos and other 
musical instruments that contributed to the culture 
and gaiety of many of the best homes in the Caro- 
linas in ante-bellum days were bought directly from 
the Siegling Music House at Charleston. 

John Siegling died in 1867, at the age of seventy- 
eight. He married after coming to Charleston Mary 
Schneli, whose brother was a mayor of Charleston 
in the early part of the last century. 

Many South Carolinians will recall the fame that 
attended the career of a daughter of John Siegling, 
Mary Regina Siegling, who was born in Charleston 
in 1824 and died at London in December, 1919, just 
a few days before her ninety-fifth anniversary. She 
became the wife of Edward Schuman-Leclercq. 
Mrs. Leclercq had a long and distinguished career 
as a musician. She sang as a soloist in Ole Bull's 
concerts when that great musican was a young man, 
and appeared in concert in New York, Havana and 
most of the European capitals. She was intellec- 
tually gifted as well as a wonderful musician and 
enjoyed delightful associations and friendships with 
notable personages over a period of three-quarters 
of a century both in Europe and America, Her 
reminiscences in the volume "Memoirs of a Dow- 
ager," written by her in later years, is a fascinating 
account of an artistic career, and has had a host of 
readers both in America and abroad. The volume 
is naturally greatly prized by members of the Sieg- 
lipg family. 

The successor of John Siegling as head of the 
Siegling Music House was his second son, Henry 
Siegling, who was born February 13, 1829. While 
he never served such a long technical apprentice- 
ship as did his father, he was in every other respect 
as well qualified as his father to conduct the grow- 
ing business. He was a man of excellent taste and 
judgment on artistic matters, and was true to the 
best mercantile ideals, placing all the resources of 
his house behind its merchandise, and making the 
name Siegling sjmonymous with reliability, confi- 
dence, sincerity and honesty. Henry Siegling died 
May 28, 1905, at the age of seventy-six, and it was 
his good fortune that the great business conducted 
by him for nearly forty years be left in the capable 
hands of his sons. When fourteen years later the 
centennial of the business was celebrated the man- 
agement of the Siegling Music House was in the 
hands of the following executives: Rudolph Sieg- 
ling, president and treasurer; Henry Siegling, vice 
president; John A. Siegling, secretary; and J. For- 
rest Greer, who for over forty years had been with 
the firm as manager. 

To describe the wares that have been handled and 
sold by the Siegling House during a century would 
be in the nature of an inventory of musical mer- 
chandise and tastes with the striking contrast pre- 
sented by the historic spinets and harpsichords and 
the modern talking machines. During this period 
the Siegling House has figured not only as import- 
ers but also as manufacturers of musical instru- 
ments and music publishers. John Siegling began 
importing pianofortes from London as early as 
1820, .and he personally brought over the first harp 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



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ever imported to America, and he was also the first 
importer of band instruments to the United States. 
During the war between the states under stress of 
patriotic necessity John Sie^ling diverted his arti- 
sans from their regular duties to the manufacture 
of drums for the Confederate forces. 

A happily worded tribute to this firm is found in 
an editorial in the columns of the News and G>urier 
of November 19, 1919: "The celebration tonight by 
the Siegling Music House of the one hundredth an- 
niversary of its establishment in Charleston is an 
event of general interest. In this new country there 
are not many business establishments which have 
survived the vicissitudes of so long a time. The 
Siegling Music House is the oldest music store in 
America. 

"A history of the Siegling Music House would 
make entertaining reading, we are sure, and would 
go far toward reflecting the musical atmosphere 
and musical development of Charleston and of 
South Carolina throughout the period of its ex- 
istence. Its founder, John Siegling, had had his 
training with Sebastien Erard, the celebrated French 
manufacturer of musical instruments who was dis- 
tinguished especially for the improvements he made 
upon the harp and the pianoforte, and whose repu- 
tation was world-wide. The importations which 
John Siegling made of fine musical instruments of 
all kinds from Europe, as illustrated in the adver- 
tisements which he published in the newspapers of 
that day, are an index to the wealth and culture that 
existed in Charleston in 1819 and the years fol- 
lowing. 

*The Siegling Music House has never been con- 
tent with the selling of musical instrinnents. From 
the time of its establishment it has contributed al- 
ways to the maintenance and development of sound 
musical ideals in Charleston, and it has always been 
one of the citv's musical centers. The business 
methods of its founder won for it the confidence of 
the community and his successors have so conducted 
its affairs as to retain that confidence in a worthy 
manner. The News and Courier joins with music 
lovers and the public generally in extending its con- 
gratulations on the celebration which it holds today 
and in wishing for it a long career of ever widen- 
ing usefulness and prosperity." 

The late Henry Siegling married Miss Kate Pat- 
rick, whose father was Doctor Patrick, a prominent 
dentist of Charleston, and who had several sons 
also eminent in that profession. 

Mr. Rudolph Siegling, now president and treas- 
urer of the Siegling Music House, was born in 
Charleston in 1878 and was educated at Nazareth 
Hall, Nazareth, Pennsylvania. He was only sixteen 
years of age when he became an employe of the 
music house, and at first was assig^ned such duties 
as carrying bundles. His association has now been 
continuous for a quarter of a century and since the 
death of his father in 1905 he has been the active 
executive head. 

Rudolph Siegling married Fannie Odell DeMars, 
of Orangeburg, South Carolina. Their two children 
are Rudolph Siegling, Jr., and Charles Casimir 
Siegling. 

Mr. Siegling is a member of the Charleston 
Vol. V— 9 



Chamber of Commerce, and is also vice president of 
the Retail Merchants Association. He is secretary 
and treasurer of St. John's Lutheran Sunday School 
and, as a member of the Masonic fraternity, has 
served as senior warden of Union Kilwinning 
Lodge No. 4. 

Frank Young Pressly, D. D. Quite recently 
Doctor Pressly, president of the Erskine TheologicaU 
Seminary, rounded out forty-five years of continuous 
and efficient work as a minister, educator and leader 
in the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. 
In educational and religious circles he is one of the 
distinguished men of the state. 

He was born at Due West in Abbeville County 
January 18, 1853, son of James Patterson and Maiy 
(Young) Pressly. His grandfather was David 
Pressly. David Pressly was an uncle of Dr. Ebe- 
nezer E. Pressly, first president of Erskine College. 
James Patterson Pressly was also an educator and 
a clergyman of the Associate Reformed Presby- 
terian Church, and was connected in an official and 
teaching capacity with Ers]cine College and Erskine 
Theological Seminary from 1842 until his death in 
1877. 

Frank Young Pressly grew up from childhood 
in the atmosphere of the old college town of Due 
West, was graduated from Erskine College in 1871, 
following which he took the Seminary course and 
was licensed by the Second Presbytery September 
20, 1873. The following winter he spent in the 
United Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Al- 
legheny, Pennsylvania, following which he did 
preaching in the Ohio A. R. P. Presbytery, and in 
October, 1874, was ordained by the Second Pres- 
bytery. From October, 1874, to September, 1876, 
he was stated supply at Mount Zion Church, Auburn, 
Missouri, for four years did missionary work in 
Louisville, Kentucky, and from 1880 to 1886 was 
pastor of Mount Zion Church. He was pastor at 
Starkville, Mississippi, from 1886 to 1890 and while 
there taught in the Agricultural and Mechanical 
College. Returning to his native state he was stated 
•supply of Abbeville from 1890 to 18J4. In 1893 the 
Synod elected him Professor of Creek and Ger- 
man in Erskine College, and he entered upon the 
duties of that office a year later. In November, 
1899, he accepted the presidency of Erskine Col- 
lege, and filled that office until 1907, since which 
date he has been president of the Erskine Theolog- 
ical Seminary. 

He has held many other offices and performed 
numerous duties for the advancement of his church, 
college and home community and people. He was 
moderator of the Synod in 1893 and at Due West 
has served as member of the Board of Trustees 
of the local school district, as intendant of the town, 
and has handled a heavy burden of administrative 
and civic duties. The Doctor of Divinity degree 
was conferred upon him by Westminster College in 
Pennsylvania in 1896, and the degree of Doctor of 
Laws by the University of South Carolina in 1903. 

Capt. Lionel K. Legge. While Captain Legge 
was qualified for and began practice as a lawyer at 
Charleston six years ago, nearly three years of that 
time were devoted more or less actively to military 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



duties. Captain Legge went overseas with one of 
the units of South Carolina troops in 1918, and did 
not return to this country and resume his practice 
until the middle of 1919. 

Captain Legge was born in Charleston in 1889, son 
of Claude L. and Elizabeth J. (Hutchinson) Legge, 
the former a native of Spartanburg County and the 
latter of Summerville, South Carolina. His father, 
who was an educator, died at Charleston in 191 3. 

A younger brother of Captain Legge is Lieut.-Col. 
Barnwell Rhett Legge, a graduate of The Citadel, 
and received a commission as second lieutenant in 
the regular army before the beginning of the war 
with Germany. He was promoted through suc- 
cessive ranks as first lieutenant, captain, major to 
lieutenant-colonel and with that rank is still in the 
army. He was with the Expeditionary Forces in 
France and for his services overseas won both 
American and French decorations, and was one of 
the first southern men to be given the French Le- 
gion of Honor. 

Lionel K. Legge received his education in Charles- 
ton, graduating from Charleston College with the 
class of 1909. The next three years he taught school 
in Georgetown and Charleston, South Carolina, 
after which he studied law in the office of Smythe & 
Visanka, and was admitted to the bar in 1913. 
He received his preliminary military training as a 
member of the old National Guard in Troop 6, later 
Troop A of the South Carolina Cavalry. Soon 
after America entered the war with Germany he 
went to the First Officers Training Camp at Fort 
Oglethorpe, receiving a commission as captain. Fol- 
lowing that he was on duty at Camp Jackson and 
Camp Sevier, and in the summer of 1918 went over- 
seas with the Eighty-first or Wildcat Division. He 
served as regimental adjutant and operations officer 
on the staff of the Three Hundred and Twenty- 
fourth Regiment, and saw active duty during the 
last phase of the great Meuse-Argonne campaign. 
For g;allantry and bravery under fire he received 
his citation and after the armistice remained 
abroad until the spring of 1919. 

Prior to his war servjce Captain Legge was a* 
member of the successful law firm of Legge & 
Allan at Charleston, and returned home to resume 
his relations* with the same firm and find his pres- 
tige as a lawyer undiminished by his absence. Cap- 
tain Legge is post commander of Charleston Post 
of the American Legion. He is a member of the 
Episcopal Church. 

MiLLEDGE Lorenzo Bonham Sturkey. A great 
deal of interesting local history might be told in- 
cidental to the career of Mr. Sturkey, the pioneer 
merchant and leading citizen of the town of McCor- 
mick. He and his brothers were the first mer- 
chants in that town, and for over thirty-five years 
his influence has been one of the chief factors in 
molding the commercial,. civic and social standards 
of the community. 

Mr. Sturkey, who recently retired from active 
business as a merchant, was born only a mile from 
the present town of McCormick, then in Edgefield 
County, in 1861, son of Jefferson and Lucy (Self) 
Sturkey. His great-grandfather Sturkey was a 



native of Alsace Lorraine, France, and with three 
brothers came to America in 1766. A number of 
the descendants of these brothers are still found 
in Lexington and Orangeburg counties. The fam- 
ily was established in Edgefield County by Jeffer- 
son Sturkey. 

Mr. M. L. B. Sturkey grew up on a farm, and 
he owns the land today on which he was born. 
When he was six years of age the family moved 
to Lincoln County, Georgia, where he attended 
school and where he lived until 1882. 

The town of McCormick was established in 1882. 
In that year Mr. Sturkey returned to his native 
community and the following year established his 
permanent home at McCormick. Associated with 
his brothers he engaged in business. They were the 
pioneer merchants, and now after more than a third 
of a century has passed it is especially interesting 
to note that they were the dominant influence where- 
by McCormick was incorporated as a **dry" town, 
being the first village incorporation to prohibit the 
sale of liquor in South Carolina. It was through 
the influence of the same men that Edgefield County 
was freed from the evils of the old dispensary 
saloons. 

In 1887 M. L. B. Sturkey engaged in business for 
himself, and until 1918 he had a large trade over 
an extensive territory in hardware, groceries, farm 
implements, wagons and buggies and other supplies. 
Though he has not been a merchant since August, 
1918, he is still a planter and cotton buyer. 

Mr. Sturkey, as this record faintly indicates, is a 
man of progressive character, of advanced and mod- 
ern thought, and wherever possible has lent his in- 
fluence to securing practical results in behalf of 
national and local welfare. His prohibition aim and 
attitude is a matter of record, and he has long been 
an advocate of woman's suffrage. He rearwl and 
educated his children for practical and serious pur- 
poses of life. 

Mr. Sturkey is one of the few citizens of the 
present McCormick County who can claim an active 
share in the first agitation for the creation of that 
new county. He was allied with the movement 
nearly a quarter of a century ago. He was one of 
the two delegates that went to the Constitutional 
Convention at Columbia in 1895 to present the wis- 
dom of creating a new county from portions of old 
Edgefield, Abbeville and Greenwood counties. 
Nothing came of the movement at that time, but 
Mr. Sturkey did not neglect opportunities to keep 
the subject alive during the twenty years that fol- 
lowed until the new county was finally created in 
1916. 

Mr. Sturkey has been four times married. There 
were no children by his first two wives, who were 
sistcFs, Fannie and Mary Willingham, of Lincoln 
County, Georgia. His third wife was Miss Annie 
Martin, and she was the mother of four daughters: 
Mary F., Marian E., Bertha C. and Wessie. By 
his present wife. Miss Lucy Anderson, daughter of 
P. H. Anderson, of Waterloo, South Carolina, Mr. 
Sturkey has three children : Lucy Harriet, M. L. B., 
Jr., and Annie Laurie. tAr. Sturkey would never 
consent to accept office, although tendered him many 
times. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



131 



Julian Booth Salley. A lawyer at Aiken and a 
citizen whose career has been attended both with 
material prosperity and dignified service, Julian 
Booth Salley is a member of the old and prominent 
Salley family which has been in South Carolina for 
upwards of two centuries. 

He was born in Orangeburg County March 23, 
1878, near the Town of Salley in Aiken County. 
His ancestor Henry Salley settled in South Carolina 
in 1735. A son of this pioneer was John Salley, 
who commanded a company in the Revolutionary 
war. Other members of the family have been prom- 
inent in the professions, as planters and public 
officials. 

The father of Julian Booth Salley was Capt 
Henry H. Salley, who was born near the Town of 
Salley, and served all through the war between the 
states as captain of Company I of the Twenty-sec- 
ond Regiment of Infantry. He was wounded seven 
times, and for many years suffered from these 
wounds, but lived until 1893. He also took a prom- 
inent part in the campaign for the restoration of 
white rule in the reconstruction era. His life was 
spent as a planter. Captain Salley married Mar- 
garet Elizabeth Corley, who is still living at the old 
homestead at Salley, near which place she was 
bom. Her people were of English descent and of 
! Revolutionary stock. 

Julian Booth Salley was educated in The Citadel 
at Charleston, took his law course in the University 
of South Carolina in 1903, and soon afterward had 
achieved his first successes as a young lawyer at 
I Aiken. He has built up a large general law prac- 
tice, which he still carries on. He is also a director 
of the Bank of Western Carolina and a director of 
the Real Estate Fidelity Company. 

Mr. Salley served as mayor of Aiken from 1904 
to 1910, for three successive terms, and has been a 
delegate to numerous county and state conventions 
of the democratic party. 

His professional and other interests were com- 
pletely subordinated during the period of the World 
war to the various services imposed upon him in his 
community. He was county chairman of the regis- 
trars, registering men under the draft and organ- 
izing the country districts, was also county chair- 
man of the Exemption Board, was county chairman 
I for the Thrift Stamp campaign and a leader in all 
the Liberty Loan and Red Cross drives. The gov- 
ernor also appointed him an examiner of county 
boards of exemption. Just before the armistice Mr. 
Salley registered for the draft, and waived exemp- 
tion on any ground. 

December 20, 1906, Mr. Salley married Eulalie 
Chafee, a native of Aiken and a daughter of the 
late G. K, Chafee. She is of English and French 
ancestry and of colonial and revolutionary stock. 
They have two children, Eulalie and Julian, Jr., 
both attending school at Aiken. 

Daniel Alfred Jackson Bell, M. D. Doctor Bell 
has a record of thirty years of honest, self-denying 

' and skilful professional work, divided between two 
communities, Parksville, where he had his home 

I for nearly a quarter of a century, and for the past 



six years at McCormick, county seat of McCormick 
County. 

Doctor Bell has been a valuable man outside of 
his professioij to his present community. He was 
one of the me^ who worked earnestly to bring about 
the establishment oi the present county of McCor- 
mick. He employed his ability as a writer to pro- 
mote publicity work through various newspapers 
of the state in behalf of the organization of the new 
county. He is author of a number of articles on 
the history of those sections of Edgefield, Abbeville 
and Greenwood counties that are now comprised in 
the new county of McCormick. 

Doctor Bell was born at Pleasant Lane in Edge- 
field County in i860, a son of J. Milton and Martha 
(Faulkner) Bell. His great-grandfather, John Bell, 
a native of Scotland, on coming to America settled 
in Pennsylvania and died there. The doctor's grand- 
father, Isaac Bell, subsequently moved to Edgefield 
County. 

Doctor Bell spent his early life on a farm. His 
youth coincided with the period in which South 
Carolina and the entire South were suffering from 
the eflfects of the war, and the resources of his 
family did not avail him beyond the meager oppor- 
tunities of the common country schools. He spent 
several years teaching in order to earn money for 
his medical education. He was twenty-nine years 
of age and had married when he completed his 
medical course. He graduated from the University 
of Georgia at Augusta in 1889, and the same year 
began practice at Parksville, where he lived for 
twenty-four years. In 1913 he moved to McCor- 
mick, and three years later had the satisfaction of 
seeing that town established as the county seat of 
McCormick County. While at Parksville he served 
as intendant or mayor and was a member of the 
town council for eighteen years. Doctor Bell has 
also been in the drug business at McCormick. Dur- 
ing the war he was county food administrator and 
member of the Volunteer Medical Reserve Corps. 

Doctor Bell is a Baptist, having joined the old 
Mountain Creek Baptist Church when seventeen 
years old. He was soon elected superintendent of, 
its Sunday school, since which time he has been 
continuously in the work either as superintendent or 
teacher. His family were religiously inclined, his 
grandfather, Isaac Bell, having only four grandsons 
by the name of Bell, three of whom were deacons 
in the Baptist Church and the fourth a distinguished 
Baptist preacher. Doctor Bell was made a deacon in 
his twenty-eighth year, and has served in the sev- 
eral communities in which he has lived, always 
moving his membership to the nearest Baptist 
Church. He is now a leader in the McCormick 
Baptist Church, having contributed liberally to the 
new fifty thousand dollar church building in process 
of erection. 

Doctor Bell married Miss Mamie Middleton, of 
Edgefield County. They have an interesting fam- 
ily of six children: John Milton; Nettie, wife of 
T. R. Cartledge ; Addie, wife of Lieut. James Parks p 
Sergt. Dan A. Bell, who was in the Medical Re- 
serve Corps; Eddie Bell, who was also with the- 
Expeditionary Forces for several months; and 
Miss Martha Bell, who graduated from the 
Woman's College at Due West in 1920. Doctor Bell 



, 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



has been a strong prohibitionist all his life, and 
worked for the success of its becoming a law. 

William Marion Steinmeyer. The County of 
Beaufort numbers among its citizens many skill- 
ful physicians, lawyers of state ♦repute, well- 
known manufacturers and business men of more 
than local reputation. While proud of them, she 
is not lacking in others who have achieved 
distinction in callings requiring intellectual abil- 
ities of a high order. Among the latter Wil- 
liam M. Steinmeyer, of Beaufort, the popular 
and efficient superintendent of education, occu- 
pies a deservedly conspicuous place. No one 
IS more entitled to the thoughtful considera- 
tion of a free and enlightened people than he who 
shapes and directs the minds of the young, adds to 
the value of their intellectual treasures and moulds 
their characters. This is pre-eminently the mission 
of the faithful and conscientious teacher, and to 
such noble work is the life of the subject of this 
revtew devoted. 

William Marion Steinmeyer was born in Berke- 
ley (now Dorchester) County, South Carolina, on 
February i6, 1870, and is the fifth in order of birth 
of the eleven children bom to John Henry and 
Matilda (Evans) Steinmeyer. The father was born 
in Charleston and spent his life there, being prom- 
inently identified with large business interests. He 
was president of the Steinmeyer Lumber Company 
of Charleston, and his father, who bore the same 
name, had also been identified with the lumber trade 
in Charleston, his native place. His father, George 
W. Steinmeyer, the great-grandfather of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was a native of Wurtemberg, 
Germany, and who on immigrating to the United 
States made his first location in Pennsylvania, after- 
wards locating in Charleston, South Carolina, with 
which city the family has been identified ever since. 
The subject's mother was a daughter of J. W. 
Evans, who moved from Baltimore, Maryland, to 
Charleston, where the daughter was born, her birth 
occurring in the Marine Hospital, of which her 
father was at that time superintendent. John H. 
Steinmeyer was in the Confederate army during 
the Civil war, being captain of Company A, Twenty- 
fourth Regiment, SouUi Carolina Infantry, and his 
death occurred at the age of sixty-nine years. His 
wife died when fifty-nine years old. Of their eleven 
diildren, seven grew to maturity. 

William H. Steinmeyer secured his education in 
his native city, attending the common schools, the 
high school and The Citadel. He then went to Bal- 
timore, where he took a thorough course in dent- 
istry, after which he located at Beaufort, where he 
has ever since been actively, engaged in the practice 
oiE his profession. He is a most excellent workman, 
careful and honest, and enjoys a high reputation as 
a professional man, nearly twenty years of success- 
ful practice having established him in the esteem of 
the people. Mr. Steinmeyer has always evinced the 
highest interest in educational matters, giving hearty 
support to everything calculated to benefit the 
schools in any way. His interest and ability were 
recognized wwien, in 1914, he was made superin- 
tendent of education, which position he is still filling 



to the entire satisfaction of the people of his county. 

In 1903 Mr. Steinmeyer was married to Alma 
Devereaux Cxantt, the daug^er of Richard P. and 
Ella (Mackay) Grantt, of Barnwell County, and they 
have become the par«nts of six children, namely: 
Ella Rachel, John Henry, Maud Douglas, William 
Marion, Jr., Alma G. and Marie Therese. 

Fraternally Mr. Steinmeyer is a member of the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and has been 
honored by being elected six times as master of the 
lodge in Beaufort. He is also high priest of the 
Chapter of Royal Arch Masons. He also holds 
membership in the Knights of Pythias and the 
Woodmen of the World. His religious affiliation is 
with the Presbyterian Church, of which he is an 
elder. Owing to his probity of character, his gen- 
uine worth and genial disposition, he has gained a 
position in his community as one of the earnest men 
whose depth of character and strict adherence to 
principle has called forth the admiration of his con- 
temporaries. 

Hon. Frank Cook Robinson was the first state 
senator representing the new County of McCor- 
mick, and was a member of the Lower House of 
the Legislature and had charge of the bill providing 
for the organization of that county from old Abbe- 
ville. Mr. Robinson for many years has been a 
prominent business man and banker at the town of 
McCormick. 

He was born October 2, 1870, at the old Robin- 
son homestead three miles from McCormick, in 
what was then Abbeville, now McCormick, County. 
His parents were Captain R. J. and Frances (Cook) 
Robinson. His grandfather was John Robinson, and 
his great-grandfather was of Scotch ancestry and 
came from the north of Ireland and settled on Long 
Cane in Abbeville County about 1800. Capt. R. J. 
Robinson was born and lived practically all his life 
at the plantation three miles from McCormick. He 
went from Abbeville County in the army and rose 
to the rank of captain in the (Ton federate forces. 
His wife, Frances Cook, lived on an adjoining plan- 
tation. 

Frank Cook Robinson grew up on the home farm, 
graduated from Furman University in 1902, and for 
two years was principal of the graded schools at 
McCormick. For ten years he was in the railway 
mail service, toward the end being on the Charles- 
ton & Western Carolina Railway. 

Mr. Robinson organized the Farmers Bank at 
McCormick in 1907. This institution has had a 
remarkable growth and enjoys great prosperity in 
keeping with the fortunate district in which it is 
located. Its progress has been especially rapid since 
the organization of McCormick County in 1916. 
The bank has a capital stock of forty thousand 
dollars, surplus and undivided profits of twenty-five 
thousand dollars, deposits of three hundred fifty 
thousand dollars, and aggregate resources of ap- 
proximately half a million dollars. Its resources 
are adequate to meet the financial demands and 
needs of the community, and its officers and direc- 
tors are men of standing in the business community 
and have carefully safeguarded and promoted all 
legitimate enterprises in McCormick County. The 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



133 



president of the bank is J. B. Harmon, and Mr. 
Kobinson has held the post of cashier for a num- 
ber of years. 

Mr. Robinson was a member of the House of 
Representatives from Abbeville County in 191 3-16, 
and worked in close co-operation with other citi- 
zens from his community in bringing about the 
organization of McCormick County. He was elected 
the first senator from the new county in 1916, serv- 
ing during the sessions of 1917-18. Mr. Robinson 
was a 1920 delegate to the National Democratic Con- 
vention in San Francisco, and in that year was 
re-elected to the State Senate. He was chairman of 
the committee on railroads and internal improve- 
ments and a member of the finance committee. 

During the war Mr. Robinson gave much of his 
time to war work. He was chairman of the local 
draft board, county chairman for the War Savings 
Stamps campaign, and was chairman for the town 
of McCormick m all of the five Liberty Loan Cam- 
paigns. 

Mr. Robinson married Miss Annie P. Talbert, 
member of an old and honored family of Abbeville 
and McCormick counties. They have a daughter, 
Margaret, born in September, 19 18. 

Henry Griggs Burckmyer. That the plenitude of 
satiety is seldom attained in the aflFairs of life is 
to be considered a most beneficial deprivation, for 
where ambition is satisfied and every ultimate end 
realized, if such be possible, apathy must follow. 
Effort would cease, accomplishment be prostrate 
and creative talent waste its energies in inactivity. 
The men who have pushed forward the wheels of 
progress have been those to whom satis factk>n lies 
ever in the future, who have labored continuously, 
always finding in each transition stage an incentive 
for furdier eflFort. Henry G. Burckmyer, merchant 
and farmer of Port Royal and Beaufort, is one 
whose well directed efforts have gained for him a 
position of desired prominence in the various 
cirdes in which he moves, and his energy and enter- 
prise have been crowned with success, and, having 
ever had the interests of his county at heart and 
sought to promote them in every way possible, he 
has well earned a place along with his enterprising 
fellow citizens in a permanent history of his 
locality. 

Henry G. Burckmyer was bom in Blackville, 
SouUi Carolina, on February 9, 1870, and is the 
second in the order of birth of nine children bom 
to John A. and Anna (Hagood) Burckmyer. The 
family is originally German, but has been estab- 
lished in America for several generations. John A. 
Burckmyer was a native of Charleston, South Caro- 
lina, where he was reared and where he engaged 
in mercantile business. During the Civil war he 
was in the custom house and then, after the con- 
clusion of that struggle, he again engaged in busi- 
ness. Eventually he moved to Blackville, this state, 
where he spent the rest of his days. He was twice 
married, first to a Miss Davant, to which union 
seven diildren were born. His second union, which 
was with Anna Hagood, was blessed with nine 
children. 

Henry G. Burckmyer was reared in Blackville 



and secured his education in the common schools. 
He remained in . his native town until 1902, when 
he came to Port Royal and engaged in the mer- 
cantile business, which has occupied his attention 
continuously since that time. He has a well stocked 
store and commands a very satisfactory trade from 
the representative people of his community. In 
addition to his mercantile interests he also gives 
considerable attention to truck farming, being the 
owner of two plantations, with an aggregate acreage 
of about five hundred acres. In all his enterprises 
he has been very successful and enjoys an excellent 
reputation as an enterprising and progressive man. 
He maintains his home in Beaufort, where he has 
a comfortable and attractive residence. 

In 1902 Mr. Burckmyer was married to Virginia 
Grimsley, the daughter of Judge D. A. Grimsley, of 
Culpeper, Virginia. To this union have been born 
three children, namely: Margaret Sloyd, Virginia 
Grimsley and Henry Griggs, the latter dying in 
infancy. 

Fraternally Mr. Burckmyer is a member of the 
Ancient Free Masons. He is a man of splendid 
personal qualities, and is proud of the fact that 
his forefathers fought on the side of the colonies 
in the Revolutionary war, and some of them after- 
ward became early settlers of South Carolina, bear- 
ing their full share of the burden of the new com- 
munity. 

James Edward Britt is the recognized dean and 
veteran in the business life of the town of McCor- 
mick, which gained increased distinction as the 
county seat of the newly or^nized McCormick 
County. Mr. Britt has been an mfluential man there 
for over a quarter of a century and is active vice 
president of the oldest bank in the town and the 
first banking organization in what is now McCor- 
mick County. 

He also belongs to a prominent and old time fam- 
ily of this section of South Carolina. He was bom 
in 1872, six miles from the present town of McCor- 
mick, in what was then Abbeville, but now 
McCormick County. His parents were Charles and 
Mary (Foster) Britt. His great-grandfather was 
Charles Britt, a noted character in the early days 
of Abbeville district. When a child in 1760 he came 
with his mother and other members of the family 
from England and settled in Abbeville district in 
the Buffalo neighborhood on Long Cane Creek. 
Charles Britt at the age of sixteen ran away from 
home and joined the Continental forces in fighting 
the British in South Carolina. After the Revolu- 
tion- he married a Miss Longelle, who represented 
a strain of French Huguenot ancestry, her people 
having settled at Bordeaux in Abbeville County. 

James Edward Britt is a grandson of Jacob Britt. 
His father, Charles Britt, like his ancestor of Revo- 
lutionary fame, was also sixteen years of age when 
he went to war, joining the Confederate army. 
James E. Britt grew up in the country, attending 
local schools and Furman University, and in 1892 
engaged in merchandising at McCormick. In 1901 
he became one of the founders of the Bank of 
McCormick, served for a number of years as its 
cashier and is now its active vice president. The 
oldest bank in the town, it is also one of unsur- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



passed record as to integrity and ability of manage- 
ment and resources. The bank has a capital stock 
of sixty-eight thousand dollars, surplus and un- 
divided profits of fifty-seven thousand dollars, and 
has been the bulwark of nearly every commercial 
and many of the individual careers in and around 
McCormick. 

Mr. Britt was one of the leading members of the 
local committee promoting the movement for the 
organization of the new county of McCormick, and 
was especially influential in securing the location of 
the county seat at the town of McCormick. Mr. 
Britt owns a large amount of land and is busily 
engaged in planting. He married Janie Belle Ken- 
nedy. Their four children are named Ed>yard, 
Frances, Mary Elizabeth and William Lewis. 

James B. Heyward entered upon his career as a 
Charleston lawyer in 1912, and as a member of the 
firm McMillan & Heyward is busied with the inter- 
ests of a large clientage and already has secured 
a position as a skillful and eflfective counselor. 

Mr. Heyward was born in McPhersonville, South 
Carolina, May 29, 1891, a son of Robert B. and 
Florida M. (Hutson) Hejrward. His father was 
a native of South Carolina, for many years was a 
rice planter and died December 16, 1918. The Hey- 
ward family is of English descent and has been 
located in and about Charleston since about 1680. 
In the maternal line Mr. Heyward is a grandson 
of Dr. Thomas W. Hutson, and the Hutson family 
came from England to South Carolina about 1720. 
Robert B. Heyward was twice married. His first 
wife was Laura Porcher, who left him one daugh- 
ter, Caroline H., now the widow of E. E. Douglas 
and living at Greenville, South Carolina. By his 
second marriage there were two children, Aucrusta 
H., wife of Edward B. Sinkler, of Savannah, Geor- 
gia, and James B. Heyward. 

James B. Heyward was educated in Porter's Mil- 
itary School at Charleston, graduating in 1907, and 
received his Bachelor of Science degree from the 
University of South Carolina in 191 1. He read law 
in the office of Joseph B. Barnwell, was admitted 
to the bar in December, 19 12, and for two years 
did law work in the office of William Henry 
Parker. On January i, 191 5, he formed his present 
partnership with Mr. Thomas S. McMillan. 

Mr. Heyward is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, being a past chancellor, is also a Mason, 
belongs to the Kappa Alpha fraternity of the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina, and is a member of the 
St. Cecilia Club. 

Giovanni Sottile came from Italy to Charleston, 
Sout^ Carolina, as a young man of sterling character, 
excellent scholastic attainments and purposeful ambi- 
tion. He encountered a full quota of adverse condi- 
tions and proved himself a master of the situation 
which confronted him in the land of his adoption. He 
achieved eventually the material success and the 
high personal standing which the United States 
ever offers to energy, ability and determination, and 
he became not only a representative business man of 
Charleston but also served with distinction as Italian 
consular agent in this city, a position to which 
he was appointed by the Italian government. May 31, 



1899, and of which he continued the incumbent until 
his death, which occurred June 28, 1913. Of hi^ 
service in this office the following estimate has 
been given: "He did much to strengthen the cor- 
dial relations between the two governments and 
to aid those of his countrymen who, like himself, 
had sought the opportunities afforded in America, 
In just appreciation and recognition of his services 
the Italian government conferred upon him an order 
of knighthood, with the title of chevalier." 

Giovanni Sottile was born at Gangi, Italy, June 29, 
1866, and was a son of Salvatore and Rosina (Al- 
bergamo) Sottile, the family of which he was a scion 
having been one of special distinction in connection 
with educational affairs in Italy for many years. 
Salvatore Sottile was numbered among the patriotic 
sons of Italy who served with Garibaldi in the his- 
toric struggle for liberty in 1870. Giovanni Sottjle 
was a studious youth, and his early educational dis- 
cipline was largely supervised and directed by one of 
his aunts, a talented woman who held the position 
of superintendent of the schools of Gangi. Later 
he continued his studies in the college at Palermo, 
where he became specially proficient in mathematics. 
•After leaving school he served four years in the 
Italian army, in which, by reason of his ability 
and superior education, he was promoted and as- 
signed to responsible service in the accounting de- 
partment. After leaving military service Mr. Sottile, 
moved by worthy ambition, determined to seek the 
superior advantages which he believed were to be 
found in the United States. He arrived in New 
York City in the autumn of 1889, and forthwith 
sought employment. At that time there was an in- 
sistent demand for workmen in the phosphate mines 
in South Carolina, and groups of men were being 
sent almost daily from the national metropolis to 
engage in this work. A stranger in a strange land, 
with only a superficial knowledge of actual condi- 
tions, it is not strange that the young Italian immi- 
grant soon found himself en route to South Caro- 
lina, after having accepted a seemingly attractive 
offer to take the position of accountant in one of 
the phosphate camps, not far distant from Charles- 
ton. Of the deplorable conditions, the brutal treat- 
ment of the laborers, most of whom, like Mr. Sottile, 
had been imposed upon by the crafty "padrones," 
it is not necessary to enlarge, but it may be stated 
that the actual experience and the knowledge 
gained during his period of service in the phosphate 
camp formed the basis of the great service which 
he was later enabled to render his countrjrmen in 
America. 

After a short sojourn, Mr. Sottile left the uncon- 
genial phosphate camp and made his way, on 
foot, to Charleston. His personality gained him 
stanch friends in the city, and among those ,who 
manifested kindly interest in the young stranger 
was the wife of Commander Hitchcock, who was 
in charge of the lighthouse service in this district. 
Mrs. Hitchcock, recognizing his talent and sterling 
character, aided him in securing employment as an 
instructor in the Latin and Italian languages. He 
soon became established in Charleston, and it was 
not long before he was joined by his four brothers, 
of whom more specific mention will be made in a later 
paragraph and who came to America upon his ad- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



135 



vice. It is not necessary in this brief review to enter 
into details concerning the achievement and rise of 
Mr. Sottile as one of the valued citizens and rep- 
resentative business men of Charleston, whfcre the 
Giovanni Sottile & Brothers Company became an 
important factor in connection with commercial 
progress. 

. In 1896 Mr. Sottile returned to Italy, where was 
solemnized his marriage to Miss Carmela Restivo, 
a friend of his childhood days in Gangi, where she 
likewise was born and reared. Mr. and Mrs. Sottile 
became the parents of four children, Salvatore, 
Rosina, Giovanni and Carmelina, all of whom were 
born in Charleston, where they remained with their 
widowed mother. 

Of the four brothers, mentioned above, Nicholas 
Sottile came to Charleston in 1890. He is presi- 
dent of the company conducting a leading china 
and glass emporium on King Street, and is actively 
associated with other business activities, especially 
in the handling of real estate and the incidental 
furtherance of the development of Charleston. 
Santo Sottile, who arrived in Charleston in 1895, 
is president of the Sottile Cadillac Company of 
Charleston, where he also has other important inter- 
ests. Albert Sottile was but fourteen years old when 
he came to this city in 1891, and he is now presi- 
dent and treasurer of the Pastime Amusement 
Company. He is one of the prominent theater own- 
ers and managers of the south, and he built and now 
operates the Victory, the Princess and the Garden 
theaters in Charleston. James Sottile came to Charles- 
ton in 1900, and, like his brothers, has here 
achieved marked success. He is president of the 
Charleston-Isle of Palms Traction Company; is vice- 
president and general manager of the Charleston 
Hotel Company, and is interested in other represen- 
tative enterprises in his home city. 

Paul M. Macmillan had practiced law only four 
years when he was elevated to the bench as judge 
of the Civil and Criminal Court of Charleston, and 
has been doing such eflfective work in that position 
that his services have been retained by the urgent 
voice of opinion, though probably at the sacrifice 
of his personal and financial interests. 

Judge Macmillan, who was born in Charlestoti, 
March 5, 1884, a son of Oswald and Emily Mary 
(Smith) Macmillan. His father was a native of 
Scotland, coming to South Carolina direct from 
his native land. For many years he has been an 
active business man of Charleston. Emily Mary 
Smith was a native of this city and a daughter . 
of Thomas Henry Smith. The parents had four 
children, two sons and two daughters, Judge Mac- 
millan being the youngest. 

He graduated from high school in 1900 and fin- 
ished his literary education in the College of 
Charleston, where he graduated A. B. in 1903 and 
with the Master of Arts degree in 1904. He 
studied law in the University of the South, receiv- 
ing his legal diploma in 1906. He forthwith engaged 
in practice at Charleston, and in 1910 was elected 
to his present office. 

He is a member of the Knights of P3rthias, the 
First Presbyterian Church and in 19 18 was the com- 
modore of the Carolina Yacht Club. In 1917 he. 



married St, Clair Walker, a daughter of B. Wilson 
Walker. 

Hon. Samuel Hodges McGhee. A lawyer and 
banker, Mr. McGhee has been one of the honored 
and useful residents of Greenwood all of his life 
and enjoys a well earned and justified leadership in 
local affairs. 

He was born in Cokesbury, Abbeville County, in 
1873, son of W. Z. and Sophronia R. (Hodges) 
McGhee. His paternal ancestor Michael McGhee 
came from Ireland, and was a North Carolina sol- 
dier in the war for American independence, after 
which he settled in Abbeville County, South Caro- 
lina. The Hodges family has also lived in Abbe- 
ville County for a number of generations. 

Samuel McGhee was the son of a merchant, and 
reverses which overtook his father a short time 
before his death made the matter of securing a 
liberal education one of great difficulty to the son. 
But in intervals of other employment he received 
all those advantages that are an index to a man 
of sound culture. He attended the Cokesbury Con- 
ference School, the Greenwood High School, and 
in 1895 graduated with the A. B. degree from Wof- 
ford College and in 1896 received his Master of 
Arts degree from the same institution. He taught 
school in Marion County from 1895 until 1899. The 
following three years he was editor of the Green- 
wood Index. In the meantime, in 1898, he had been 
admitted to the bar, and has been in active and 
regular practice since 1902, though his professional 
work has been varied with many other business 
duties. He was elected president of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Greenwood in 1903 upon its organi- 
zation. He is also president of ihe Panola Cotton 
Mills and the Bauna Mills. 

His father was a delegate to the National Con- 
vention of the democratic party ui' 1884 when Cleve- 
land was first nominated. The son also served as 
a delegate to the National Conventions of 1900 and 
1904, and Mr. McGhee is a member of the State 
Senate, having been elected to that office in 1917. 
He is a Knight Templar Mason and Shriner, a 
Knight of Pythias, and in former years was affili- 
ated with the gold standard wing of the democratic 
party. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. 

Mr. McGhee married in 1906 Miss Laurie Harrall, 
of Bennettsville, South Carolina. 

Simeon Hyde is a Charleston lawyer whose name 
has been identified prominently with various law 
partnerships and with much of the important liti- 
gatkm in the courts of the city and state for forty 
years. 

He was born at Charleston October 11, 1856. His 
father, Simeon Hyde, was of an old Connecticut 
family, but came to South Carolina when a young 
man. His mother was Ann Eliza Tupper, daughter 
of Tristram Tupper, for many years a prominent 
Charleston business man. 

Simeon Hyde received his preparatory education 
in Charleston, and entered Charleston College in 
1871, graduating in 1875. He studied law in the 
office of Pressley. Lord & Inglesby, a law firm of 
the highest standing, and that early association Mr. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Hyde has always regarded as a chief contributing 
cause to his success. He was admitted to practice 
in November, 1877, and was busy building up an 
individual clientage until 1883, when he became 
junior partner of the firm of Lord & Hyde. After 
several years he again resumed individual practice. 
In 1906 he became a member of the firm Mordecai, 
Gadsden, Rutledge & Hagood, whidi after the 
retirement of Mr. Hagood became Mordecai, Gads- 
den & Rutledge. He was with this firm until 
August I, 1917, when he retired. The firm of Mor- 
decai, Gadsden & Rutledge was dissolved in Octo- 
ber, 19 18, and at that time Mr. Hyde became asso- 
ciated with Mr. Benjamin H. Rutledge in the firm 
of Rutledge & Hyde. In January, 1920, Mr. G. N. 
Mann was admitted to partnership and the firm 
name changed to Rutledge, Hyde & Mann. They 
handle a general law practice and are also Division 
Counsel in Charleston of the Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroad Company, and represent a number of other 
corporations and extensive business interests. 

Mr. Hyde is also known to the profession as one 
of the authors of "Chisolm and Hyde Index — 
Digest of South Carolina Reports," published in 
1882. He was a member of the Charleston Delega- 
tion in the South Carolina House of Representa- 
tives from 1886 to 1888. For many years he was 
prominent in the State Militia, serving as a com- 
missioned officer, and retiring with the rank of 
captain in 1888. In 1917, when United States 
entered the European war, he was commissioned 
captain of Company B, First Regiment, South Car- 
olina Reserve Militia, established by the Legis- 
lature as a military force within the state while the 
National Guard and other state troops were enrolled 
in the National Army. Mr. Hyde was for many 
years in charge of the Mission work of The Citadel 
Square Baptist Church in Charleston and is a dea- 
con of that church. 

Thomas Emmette Thrower was bom at Sum- 
merville, Georgia, in 1880, and was reared and edu- 
cated in Atlanta schools, growing up in the mag- 
netic atmosphere of that great and rich southerQ 
metropolis. This environment did much to improve 
his native talents as a commercial salesman. He 
was on the road selling goods at the age of seven- 
teen. Few young men in the South have a finer rec- 
ord in their profession than Mr. Thrower. 

Mr. Thrower, whose parents were O. A. and 
Fannie (McDaniel) Thrower of Atlanta, enlisted 
his talents, enthusiasm and service in behalf of the 
automobile industry about the time motor cars 
achieved real popularity and recognition in the 
South. He has been one of the most prominent 
factors in extending the industry over the south- 
eastern states. Several years ago he located at 
Columbia, where he owns and manages the Thrower 
Automotive Company. This company distributes 
the Premier car in North and South Carolina, 
Georgia and Florida, with a branch at Atlanta, 
Georgia and Jacksonville, Florida, and also are 
southern distributors for the Allen and Skelton 
cars. 

He has been one of the most prominent and 
active members of the Columbia Automotive Trade 
Association and one of the leaders in the forma- 



tion of the South Carolina Automotive Trades As- 
sociation. As chairman of the Show Committee of 
this associatk>n he has charge of, and was respon- 
sible for those special features of the Automobile 
Show in Columbia in March, 1918, that caused com- 
petent critics to pronounce that the best exposition 
of its kind ever held in the capital city. 

Having been so successful in his venture, he was 
selected in 1920 as general diairman of all com- 
mittees of the Great Spring Exposition which was 
held in Columbia in March, the greatest exposition 
of its kind ever attempted in the United States. 

Mr. Thrower has enlisted his enthusiasm and sup- 
port for many other movements in his home city 
and state, being the originator of the Minute Men 
of Columbia, a unique organization having for its 
members the leaders of all organizations in the 
city. This movement rejuvenated Columbia and 
brought about such a spirit of co-operation and civic 
activity as had never been experienced before re- 
stdting in a greater Columbia. He is an advocate 
of good roads and has exerted a very helpful in- 
fluence in retaining Columbia's prestige as one of 
the leading automobile centers in the South. 

Mr. Thrower married Miss Luta Beard of Troy, 
Alabama. They have three children: Frances, £m- 
mett and Nell. 

J. Waties Waring. A lawyer with a large prac- 
tice, many influential social and civic connections, 
J. Waties Waring has gained his professional suc- 
cess in the same city where he was born. 

A native of Charleston, bom Julv 27, 1880, he 
is a son of Edward P. and Anna (Waties) Waring, 
who were also natives of Charleston. His father 
spent his life at Charleston, and was a railroad 
man. The grandfather, Thomas R. Waring, was 
a native of the same city and for a number of years 
was cashier of the Bank of the State of South 
Carolina. The Warings came to South Carolina 
direct from England. 

J. Waties Waring was the youngest in a family 
of three sons and one daughter. The other sons 
are Thomas R. and E. P., while the daughter is 
Margaret, wife of Wilson G. Harvey. 

Mr. Waring graduated in 1900 from the College 
of Charleston, and prepared for the bar in the 
office of Bryan & Bryan. He was admitted to prac- 
tice in 190 1, and since that time his name has been 
connected with an increasing volume of the legal 
business of the city. For about five years he was 
a member of the firm Von Kolnftz & Waring. The 
firm now is Waring & Brockinton. 

Mr. Waring is the present assistant United States 
district attorney for South Carolina, appointed to 
that office in 1914. He is a member of the Carolina 
Yacht Club, South Carolina Society, was for sev- 
eral years a member and captain of the Charleston 
Light Dragoons, is a member of the Alpha Tau 
Omega college fraternity, is a past master of the 
Masonic Lodge, a member of the Knights of 
Pythias and belongs to various other social organi- 
zations. He has been quite active in democratic 
politics, though never as an aspirant for honors on 
his own account. 
. October 30, 191 3, Mr. Waring married Anne S. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



137 



Gammell, a daughter of William Gammell. They 
have one daughter, Anne Gammell Waring. 

John Hodges David, M. D. In the present day 
of keen competition in all lines of industry, suc- 
cess calls for the possession of superlative ability. 
Whether in the professions, in productive lines, m 
work of a promotive character, or in the great mar- 
kets of the world, keen strife is invariably found; 
and when the fight is made with vigor, nerve and 
discernment, when success is acc^uired, half the com- 
pensation other than financial m dependence is de- 
rived from the satisfaction of having come a victor 
from a conflict worthy of one's steel Of the men 
of Dillon County who have fought a worthy fight 
and who have been led to but further achievements 
by the keenness of the fray, is Dr. John Hodges 
David, formerly a leading and successful medical 
practitioner, but of more recent years largely en- 
gaged in business as a planter in the vicinity of 
Dillon. 

Doctor David was born at Bennettsville; South 
Carolina, July 23, 1856, a son of Dr. William J. and 
Rebecca (Spears) David. The original ancestor 
of the David family in America was one Owen 
David, who emigrated from Wales to this coun- 
try about 1776 and settled in South Carolina, where, 
in Marlboro County, John Hodges David, the grand- 
father of Doctor David, was born and passed his 
entire life as a farmer and planter. In that county 
also was bom Dr. William J. David, who was 
engaged in the practice of medicine at Bennettsville 
at the time of the outbreak of the war between the 
states, in which he served four years as a surgeon 
in the army of the Confederacy. Following the close 
of that struggle, he established himself to prac- 
tice at Bennettsville, Marlboro County, and there 
passed the remaining years of his life. He was a 
man who was highly respected and esteemed both 
in his profession and in social circles, and was a 
man of influence and worth in his community. He 
married Rebecca Spears, daughter of James Spears 
of Marlboro County, South Carolina, and of their 
eight children. Dr. John H. was the first born. 

John Hodges David attended the public school 
at Bennettsville and further prepared himself at 
Ansonville, North Carolina, following which he 
enrolled as a student at the Medical College of 
South Carolina, at Charleston. He was graduated 
from that institution with the class of 1879 and 
his cherished medical degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine, and at once embarked in practice at Little 
Rock, where he remained ten years. Although he 
had built up a large and lucrative practice and was 
a successful physician and surgeon, his various busi- 
ness interests Had become so heavy and important 
as to need his undivided attention, and he accord- 
ingly gave up his practice and came to Dillon, 
where he established himself in the midst of busi- 
ness affairs and began to be at once an influencing 
factor in the enterprises that were rapidly moving 
this community toward prestige. He was the main 
actor in the building of a cotton seed oil mill at 
Dillon and was president of the company which 
operated it, and subsequently became manager for 
the company when it was sold to the Southern 
Cotton Oil Company. After a number of years of 
successful connection with this and other enter- 



prises, in 1916 he moved from Dillon to a farm 
two miles south of the city, where he has over 
1,000 acres under cultivation, this land being de- 
voted to cotton, tobacco and corn. He is known 
as one of the successful and thoroughly informed 
planters of his community, and his business affairs 
are in a decidedly prosperous condition owing to 
his excellent management, while his standing in 
business circles is of the highest, due to the recog- 
nition by his associates of his sterling integrity and 
honesty of purpose. 

Doctor David was married in 1879 to Miss Ar- 
letts^ lone Manning, a sister of Senator J. H. Man- 
ning, a sketch of whose career will be found on 
another page of this work, and to this union there 
have been born five daughters and one son : Anna, 
Edna, Mrs. H. E. Dixon, whose husband is in part- 
nership with her father, Helen and Alice, and Lieut. 
John H., who met a hero's death on a battlefield 
m Flanders, as the first officer from South Caro- 
lina killed in action, and who now lies buried at 
Theaucourt, St. Mihiel, American Cemetery, in 
France. Doctor David is a thirty-second degree 
Scottish Rite Mason and has numerous business, 
social and civic connections. He was elected from 
the Sixth Congressional District of South Carolina 
a delegate to the Democratic National Convention at 
San Francisco which he attended. 

William Capers Miller. It is nearly forty years 
since W. C. Miller was admitted to the bar and 
began practice at Charleston. During that time 
his name has been associated with some of the 
most eminent lawyers of South Carolina and the 
largest law firms, and the firm of which he is 
senior member today has a standing and clientage 
probably not exceeded by any other organization of 
legal talent in th^ state. 

Mr. Miller was born in Georgetown, South Caro- 
lina, February 25, 1858. His great-grandfather, 
John Miller, was of Pennsylvania Dutch origin and 
came from Pennsylvania to South Carolina in 
pioneer days. His grandfather, John C. Miller, was 
a native of Charleston. Mr. Miller's father. Dr. 
William C. Miller, was a native of Charleston but 
practiced medicine in Georgetown, South Carolina, 
for a number of years and died at the early age 
of thirty-seven. His mother was Elizabeth M. Cut- 
tino, of a French Huguenot family that came to 
South Carolina in colonial times. He has one sis- 
ter, Mary C, unmarried and living in Charleston. 

He was reared and educated in Charleston and 
as a boy attended the Sachtleben School, one of the 
most noted preparatory schools of the South forty 
or fifty years ago. After graduating there he 
entered Furman University at Greenville, later the 
University of Virginia, and leaving college in 1879 
applied himself to the study of law at Charleston 
until admitted to the bar in the fall of 1881. He 
was first associated in practice with Mr. Charles 
Inglesby. Later he was associated with George M. 
Trenholm and R. G. Rhett, under the name Tren- 
holm, Rhett & Miller. Subsequently he became 
senior member of the firm Miller & Whaley, which 
by subsequent changes became Miller, Whaley, Bis- 
sell & Miller then Miller & Miller, and the present 
partnership is Miller, Huger, Wilber & Miller. 

Mr. Miller is attorney for many prominent busi- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



ness firms and corporations, including banks, fer- 
tilizer companies and general commercial concerns. 

Mr. Miller is a past master of Orange Lodge No. 
14, Accepted Free Masons, and was at one time 
district grand master of the Grand Lodge. He is 
an ex-president of St. Andrews Society, which was 
organized in 1729, being the oldest St. Andrews or- 
ganization in America, and among the very first 
societies of any kind to become established in South 
Carolina. There is still preserved an unbroken roll 
of the signatures of the members of this society, 
from the date of its organization to the present. He 
is vice president of the Huguenot Society of 
Charleston, treasurer of the Carolina Art Associa- 
tion, and a trustee of the Charleston Library 
Society. He was a member of the first Board of 
Law Examiners of the state, holding office about 
six years. He has been a working member of the 
democratic party, though never a candidate for 
office. He has always attended worship with the 
Baptist faith. 

In 1887 he married Georgia H. Gordon, daughter 
of James Gordon of Abbeville, South Carolina. 
They have two children, Gordon and Margaret. The 
son is junior member of his father's law firm. 

Hon. Edgar Clifton Ridgell whose name is a 
subject of frequent mention in the press of the 
state as one of the leading members of the State 
Senate, has many interests and distinctions to his 
credit in his home community of Batesburg in Lex- 
ington County. He was at one time a practicing 
dentist and president of the South Carolina Dental 
Association. He has not been active in his pro- 
fession for more than twenty years and has given 
his time to planting and fruit growing. He is one 
of the leading laymen of the Baptist Church and 
as a man of large means and great influence has 
worked untiringly in behalf of many forward move- 
ments in his home county and state. 

Mr. Ridgell was born in Lexington County where 
the town of Batesburg is now located, November 
6, 1859, a son of Joel and Susannah (Fox) Ridgell. 
The Ridgell family is of English origin and first 
settled at Charleston. Joel Ridgell spent all his 
life in Lexington County. He owned the land on 
which the Town of Batesburg was built, and was 
a highly honored character there for many years. 
The Fox family is likewise one of long residence 
in the county. 

The birthplace of Edgar C. Ridgell was part of 
the original plantation now in the City of Bates- 
burg. The old home was burned some years ago 
and Senator Ridgell replaced it with his present 
residence. He was educated in the public schools 
at Prosperity in Newberry County and attended the 
sessions of 1880-81, in the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery. He began practice in 1881 at Pros- 
perity, and in 1885 returned to his old home at 
Batesburg, where for twelve years until 1897 he 
gave his chief time to his professional work. Since 
then he has devoted his attention to his property 
interests and agriculture. 

The farm where he does his planting and fruit 
growing is a portion of the old plantation and is 
in Batesburg. Mr. Ridgell is president of the Lex- 
ington County Corn Growers Association and was 
one of the organizers and president and treasurer of 



the cotton mill at Batesburg, which was built in 
1885. 

While his own affairs have demanded so much of 
his time he has apparently made one of the ruling 
principles of his life an ambition for service in be- 
half of his civic community, church and every 
worthy movement. While practicing dentistry he 
was honored with the office of president of the 
State Dental Association. He has served as town 
councilman, was president of the Batesburg Board 
of Trade, and for seven years was honored with 
the position of moderator of the Ridge Baptist 
Association. This is one of the largest and most 
prosperous associations in the state, having a mem- 
bership of nearly four thousand. He was also presi- 
dent of the Ridge Baptist Sunday School Conven- 
tion for many years. Mr. Ridgell at present has 
charge with others of the campaign in this asso- 
ciation's jurisdiction to raise its apportionment of 
the $5,000,000 fund now being acquired by the 
Southern Baptist Church for general educational 
and reKgious purposes. He was president of the 
Interdenominational Sunday School Convention of 
Lexington County for a term. Mr. Ridgell is a 
deacon in the Batesburg Churcb, has been superin- 
tendent of its Sunday school for twenty years, and 
was for several years a member of the board of 
trustees of the Baptist Hospital at Columbia. He 
served as chairman of trustees of public schools in 
Batesburg, also president of Tri-County Fair As- 
sociation. 

He was first sent to the Legislature from Lex- 
ington County in 1909-10. He served in the House 
and in 19 16 was elected to the Senate for a term 
of four years. During the 1919 session he was a 
member of the important Finance Conmiittee and 
chairman of the Police Regulation Committee. He 
was author of the bill in the Legislature, appro- 
priating $500,000 to build an office building for the 
various state departments whk:h passed the Senate 
at the 1920 session but failed in the House. 

For more than twenty years. Doctor Ridgell has 
taken a leading part in the prohibition movement, 
both in his county and the state, serving much of 
the time as county chairman of the party in Lex- 
ington County. He was also active in the various 
drives made in the interest of the Liberty Loans. 
He was appointed chairman for Lexington County, 
in the campaign for funds for the American Red 
Cross, organized the county work and raised more 
than the apportionment asked for. He has had 
prominent part in advancing the cause of educa- 
tion, serving as school trustee for a number of 
years. He is also a director in the First National 
Bank, of Batesburg. 

December 20, 1881, Doctor Ridgell married Miss 
Ella McFall of Prosperity. Their six children are 
Daniel Effingham; Lottie, wife of G. F. Norris of 
Greenville; J. McFall Ridgell; Miss Rosa; Grace, 
wife of Ira C. Carson; and Miss Louise. 

Hon. John Frederick Wiixiams. During a con- 
tinuous service of over ten years as a member of 
the Lower House and the State Senate of Aiken 
County. Mr. Williams has rendered services that 
have brought him wide recognition as one of die 
state's most useful leaders in public affairs. 



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HISTORY OF. SOUTH CAROLINA 



139 



Amongst the bills he advocated were compulsory 
school attendance, medical and dental examination 
of school children and better pay for teachers, all 
of which were enacted. In his home city he has 
been a successful lawyer since 1905. 

Mr. Williams was born near Salley in Aiken 
County, February 26, 1884, son of W. S. and Mary 
(Williamson) Williams, both deceased. His great- 
grandfather Williams was born in England. W. S. 
Williams was born in that section of Aiken, for- 
merly a part of Lexington County. Senator Wil- 
liams' maternal grandfather was Thomas William- 
son, and the Williamsons are one of the oldest 
families of Lexington County. 

John Frederick Williams grew up on his father's 
plantation, attended the Smythe Academy near 
Salley and took his literary and law courses in 
South Carolina College. He pursued special aca- 
demic courses and the law course three years, grad- 
uating in law in 1905. He was prominent in student 
activities at the University and was chiefly respon- 
sible for organizing the Criminal Moot Court of 
the law school. In college he was a leader in ora- 
tory, being once monthly orator of the Claraosophic 
Literary Society, and his talents in that direction 
have improved with his service as a lawyer and 
legislator. He has practiced steadily at Aiken, first 
as a law partner of C. E. Sawyer, under- the name 
Sawyer & Williams, and since then has been in in- 
dividual practice. He has a large interest in both 
State and Federal Courts. 

- Mr. Williams was elected to represent Aiken 
County in the Lower House of the General As- 
sembly in 1908, serving in the sessions beginning 
in 1909 and including 1912. In the latter year he 
was elected to the State Senate and was reelected 
for a second term of four years in 1916. He is one 
of the Senate leaders, being chairman of the com- 
mittee on education, ex-officio trustee of Winthrop 
College and University of South Carolina, and a 
member of the judiciary and other committees. In 
May, 1920, he attended the National Conference on 
Education at Washington, D. C, under appointment 
from the governor. 

Mr. Williams was one of the organizers and is a 
director of the Bank of Windsor in Aiken County. 
He and his wife are members of the Baptist 
Church. He married Miss Etta Turner, of Gran- 
iteville. South Carolina, in 1908. Their two chil- 
dren are Mary and Sargent Pickens Williams. 

Col. Robert Cochran Emanuel. This name 
serves to recall not only a very useful and highly 
dignified figure in the old regime of South Caro- 
lina, but also by the manner of his death, at the 
hands of assassins, the peculiar horrors of the early 
reconstruction period. Some of his family are still 
living in old Marlboro County, including his daugh- 
ter. Mrs. P. L. Breeden, of Bennettsville. 

The family trace descent from Michael and Flora 
Emanuel, a young married couple with children 
who came from London to Charleston, South Caro- 
lina, in the late 1780's. Simeon Emanuel, their young- 
est child and the father of Col. Robert C. Emanuel, 
was born in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1800. 
He came to the Marlboro District, South Carolina, 
when quite a young man, and was successful in 



business. He married Miss Maria Cochran, a grand- 
daughter of Thomas Cochran, who was a brother 
of Dr. John Cochran, Gen. George Washington's 
surgeon-general, also a brother of Maj. Robert 
Cochran, who was in command of Fort Edward 
with 500 men when Burgoyne crossed the St. Law- 
rence River from Canada into the United States, 
and immediately retreated. Thomas Cochran came 
to Marlboro District on the Big Pee Dee River 
in 1736. This was the Welsh settlement on the 
Great Pee Dee. He married Miss Lucrecia Coun- 
cil, the daughter of Capt. Henry Council, who 
served in the Rangers imder Gen. Francis Marion, 
Marion's Brigade. Thomas Cochran's chart from 
George III for 200 acres of land has been preserved 
and is now in the possession of Mrs. Breeden. 
Strange to say, this 200 acres of land lies in a large 
body and was owned by her husband at his death 
on October 10, 1919. 

Maria Cochran Emanuel was a woman of no or- 
dinary mental ability. Simeon Emanuel was a 
chaste, peaceful and refined business man. He and 
his wife were obnsistent members of the Baptist 
Church, and both died in full fellowship with the 
church. Both Simeon Emanuel and his son Robert 
Cochran Emanuel belonged to the Masonic Lodge. 

Col. Rofiert Cochran Emanuel was born m Marl- 
boro County, August 16, 1825, son of Simeon 
Emanuel, who was born, as stated above, in Charles- 
ton in 1800. Simeon Emanuel became a very promi- 
nent and wealthy merchant at Brownsville m Marl- 
boro County, and operated several stores and also 
conducted a line of steamboats on the Pee Dee 
River. In managing his extensive plantation and in 
business affairs he employed the service of a large 
number of slaves. He was one of the progressive 
men of his day. . r* t 1 

Concerning the life and character of Colonel 
Emanuel, who lost his life near his residence m 
Marlboro District, June 16, 1866, the best account 
is a contemporaneous one, written by a friend a 
few weeks after he was murdered, showing the 
esteem in which he was held and some of the emo- 
tions his assassination caused in a community then 
suffering from the waste and devastation of war 
and anticipating the heavier burdens of reconstruc- 
tion rule. The chief portions of this In Memo- 
riam" follows : "In the prime of manhood and m 
the midst of a career of prosperity and useful- 
ness, he was cut short in a manner revolting to all 
feelings of humanity. He began life early, hav- 
ing married in his minority, and to the end battled 
with obstacles with a steadiness and success rarely 
to be seen. Deprived of the benefits of a finished 
education, he labored under the disadvantages con- 
sequent therefrom. By relying on his own re- 
sources and strong native sense, he conquered where 
others more favored have failed, and won for him- 
self a name for intelligence and successful indus- 
try which challenges comparison and is worthy of 
emulation. By prudent management and untiring 
effort he elevated himself from poverty to wealth, 
and made himself admired bv all who have a prooer 
appreciation of the energetic man. Kind in dis- 
position, gentle in deportment, and lavish in hos- 
pitality, he had drawn around him a large number 
of admiring friends, and even those with whom he 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



had unwittingly excited prejudice were glad to have 
the benefit of his prudent counsel and advice in the 
hour of trouble and need. Few men in the dis- 
trict, if any, wielded more influence than the de- 
ceased, certainly none in his own immediate neigh- 
borhood. Though possessed of a large and de- 
pendent family, he did not hesitate to leave all in 
response to his country's call in our recent struggle 
for liberty. He was among the first to raise and 
carry into service a company from Marlboro, and 
with them cheerfully endured the privations of a 
soldier's life; and doubtless to his training may 
be ascribed the effective service and noble conduct 
of these men throughout the war. To the soldier 
in the field he was stern, but ever just and kind, 
to the soldier's family at home he was ever benevo- 
lent. At any time his loss would have been felt 
in this community; but especially is it serious at 
the present juncture, when the Example of just such 
men is needed to teach our oppressed people never 
to despair, as all losses may be repaired and all 
difliculties surmounted bj^ determined resolution. As 
a neighbor he was obliging, as a citizen public spir- 
ited and patriotic, as a friend, steadfast, and as a 
son, husband and parent, gentle, kind and affec- 
tionate. It is seldom we see more devotion and 
attachment to one's family than ruled bis breast; 
it was in the family circle he most closely evinced 
his strikin^^ and lofty traits of character. Here his 
jrood qualities were brightly revealed through the 
intensity of his love and devotion to his own. 

"The deceased was not a professed Christian, but 
admired the beauties of religion, and but a short 
time preceding his death he expressed to his most 
intimate friends his resolution to identify himself 
with the church. 

"Our sympathy and condolence for the bereaved 
wife and family are sincere. To them his loss is 
irreparable; and while the present generation lasts, 
many will be the relets in the community of 
Brownsville at the untimely death of its most use- 
ful member." 

Colonel Emanuel received his title colonel while 
serving with a militia regiment during the '50s. 
This was State Regiment No. 37. 

Colonel Emanuel married Sarah Johnson DuPrje, 
daughter of Thomas Johnson James DuPre and 
granddaughter of James DuPre, who was one of 
the original Huguenot settlers coming to South 
Carolina from France. James DuPre was a noted 
planter and slave owner in colonial times. A list 
of the children of Colonel Emanuel is as follows: 
Margaret Elizabeth; James Simeon and Henry C. 
both deceased; Alice M., wife of J. G. W. Cobb of 
Bennettsville ; Eleanor, who died in young woman- 
hood; Francis M., deceased; Sarah Delia, wife of 
H. P. Johnson, of Bennettsville; Theodosia, de- 
ceased wife of Enos Watson; Bulah, deceased wife 
of Isham Watson; Sarah, wife of John Watson; 
and Thomas Johnson James, married and father of 
a family. 

Margaret Elizabeth Emanuel was born in the 
Brownsville settlement of Marlboro County, August 
18, 1843, and was liberally educated in the South 
Carolina Female College at Columbia. She mar- 
ried Capt. P. L. Breeden and became the mother 
of six children. Alma Estelle, the oldest, is the 



widow of John H. Burkhalter, living at Columbia. 
Julius A. lives in Bennettsville. Alice is the de- 
ceased wife of Frank P. Siegnious. Mary Bristow 
died at the age of four years, and the fifth child 
died in infancy. Margaret Elizabeth is the wife 
of J. E. B. Holladay, lawyer of Suffolk, Virginia. 
Mrs. Breeden is an active member of the Baptist 
Church. 

CoL. James Simons, of Charleston, a South Caro- 
linian of national distinction who died at the age 
of nearly fourscore years, was a link connecting 
the modern present with a period of the state tJiat 
is becoming more and more a matter of historical 
record. 

James Simons, whose death occurred on July 4» 
1919, a day whose associations were always deeply 
significant to him, was born at Charleston, Novem- 
ber 30, 1839, of French Huguenot ancestry with a 
strong admixture of Scotch and English blood. 
Just a century before his death another member of 
the family. Col. Keating Simons, was taken away 
from the community of Charleston, and at that time 
an orator said: "The name of Simons is with the 
people of Charleston clarum et venerabilc nomen, 
great in science, great in medicine, great in the law, 
great in divinity and amiable in all the duties and 
charities of life." The same significance has 
attached to the name during the last century. 
Colonel Simons was the third to bear the name 
James. His grandfather was a distinguished officer 
in the Continental Army, serving under Col. Wil- 
liatn Washington at Cowpens. His father was a 
man of very striking appearance and distinguished 
scholarship and was speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives at Columbia at the time of the b^in- 
ning of the war between the states, holdin£[ that 
post for a longer period than any other man in the 
history of South Carolina. Colonel Simons was a 
son of James and Sarah L. (Wragg) Simons. 

He grew up and had associations from early boy- 
hood with distinguished men in his state. He 
served as a page in the Legislature while his father 
was speaker. He was educated in the South Caro- 
lina College when Judge Longstreet was its presi- 
dent. Later he attended the University of Leipzig, 
Germany, and studied law with his father. Hobart 
College and the University of South Carolina both 
bestowed upon him the honorary degree LL. D. He 
returned from abroad just before the war and was 
admitted to the bar in i860. He went with his 
state when South Carolina voted for secession and 
became first lieutenant in Bachman's Battery and 
later was made its captain. Members of tiiis com- 
pany had all enlisted for five years and the circum- 
stances of the organization were such that Mr. 
Simons refused any other promotion and was with 
the battery throughout the war, participating in 
such battles as Seven Pines. Seven Days* Battle 
around Richmond, Second Manassas, Sharpsburg, 
Fredericksburg and Gettysburg and many of the 
operations between Savannah and Charleston. He 
never surrendered his company, disbanding it when 
the news of the capitulation of Johnston's Army 
reached him. After recovering from the eflFects of 
this service he and his father returned to Qiarles- 
ton, where he began the heavy task of rehabilitat- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



141 



ing his fortunes and establishing himself in his 
profession. He and his father were together in 
practice until the latter 's death in 187a. and later 
he was associated with Gen. Rudolph Siegling and 
John D. Cappelmann under the name Simons, Sieg- 
ling & Cappelmann. Though he announced his in- 
tention to retire from his profession he was never 
able to do so completely and his name remains as 
one of the most distinguished in the annals of the 
bar of South Carolina during the last half century. 
For a quarter of a, century also Colonel Simons 
was prominent in affairs at Charleston as president 
of the News and Courier Company. For many 
years he kept his resolution to abstain from poli- 
tics, but was finally drawn into the struggle for 
the restoration in the state of white rule, and was 
a member of the House of Representatives from 
1878 to 1891 and speaker of the House from 1882 
to 1890. As a member of the rules committee he 
revised the rules of the House after the radical 
regime, and those rules today bear the impress of 
his services. He was a distinguished parliamen- 
tarian, and his services in that position were con- 
sistent with those rendered by his honored father 
many years previously. 

Much has been said and is a matter of current 
knowledge concerning his work as chairman of the 
Board of Public Schqol Commissioners at Charles- 
ton during the last twelve years of his life. It was 
his aim to keep the schools out of debt and at 
the same time to enlarge and advance their stand- 
ards to meet the growing needs of the community. 
The school system of Charleston at the time of his 
death was unburdened with debt or incumbrances, 
and a record of constructive work includes the 
building of the Mitchell School and the Colored 
Industrial School. 

For many years Colonel Simons was devoted to 
the patriotic organization the Sons of Cincinnati, 
and it is said he was present at every meeting of 
that order in Charleston for half a century, attend- 
ing one of the meetings during the war while in 
the uniform of a Confederate soldier. Many of 
his friends felt that his death on the 4th of July 
was particularly significant He was president of 
the State Society of the Order from 1898 and since 
1902 had been vice president general of the Na- 
tional Society. He was also president of the Caro- 
lina Arts Association. 

The following comments on his personal life and 
character found in a Charleston paper will be of 
interest: ''Mr. Simons was one of the most charm- 
ing of men in his personality and a man of much 
scholarship and varied accomplishments. He not 
only kept up his interest in classical learning but 
all his life was a student of music. He slept very 
little, generally working or reading until after 
midnight, and rising by or before six in the morn- 
ing, when he usually played the violin until break- 
fast On the streets of the city his has been one 
of the best known and most familiar figures and 
his passing will be looked upon as removing one 
who was not only a type of all that was best in 
the Old South but an example of that sort of citi- 
zenship which feels that useful public servke comes 
ahead of everything else. 
Colonel Simons married, October 16, 1890, Miss 



Elizabeth Potter Schott, of Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. She survives him. Colonel Simons was a 
brother of Dr. Manning Simons, a physician and 
surgeon of Charleston who died in 191 1. 

Rev. Pleasant Edgar Monroe is the president of 
an increasingly well known institution for the higher 
education and training of youna: women, Summer- 
land College at Summerland, founded and main- 
tained under the auspices of the Joint Conference 
of' the South Carolina Conference of the South 
Carolina Synod of the Lutheran Church. 

The first plans for the founding of this institu- 
tion for the education of young women within 
South Carolina were made in April, 1909, and in 
the winter of 1911-12 the Summerland Inn prop- 
erty was secured and in this building the college 
was opened October i, 1912. The colleg^e has a won- 
derful location in the Piedmont region of South 
Carolina, and its facilities are now availed of by 
an average of 100 students, and there is a corps of 
nine teacher's on the staff, headed by Rev. Mr. Mon- 
roe. 

Mr. Monroe was born in Salsbury, North Caro- 
lina, December 18, 1875, son of Thomas B. and 
Victoria (Cress) Monroe. He grew up on his 
father's farm, attended local schools and Episcopal 
schools and was a student in the North Carolina 
College, where he was graduated in 1898, A. B., and 
in the Chicago Theological Seminary, where he was 
graduated in 1901. Then followed an active ca- 
reer as a pastor, bein^^ in charge of the Lutheran 
Church at Pulaski, Virginia, two years, six years 
at Ehrhard, South Carolina, five years at Johnston 
in this state, and in 1913 was called to his duties 
as president of Summerland College. He is looked 
upon as one of the leaders in the Lutheran Church 
in South Carolina. In 1910 he received the degree 
of D. D. from Newberry College. 

April 2, 1902, he married Julia Houseal Hentz of 
Newberry. They have a daughter Mary Catherine. 

Cooper Family. The Cooper family, represented 
at Denmark and some other localities of South 
Carolina, is one of the first families of the state 
in point of lineage, prominence and patriotism. 
The first Coopers came from England as Quaker 
followers of Sir William Penn and settled in Penn- 
sylvania. About two generations ago the Coopers 
began breaking away from their faith as Quakers, 
and most of them became Baptists. 

Jeremiah Cooper, grandfather of the branch of 
the family in South Carolina, came from Pennsyl- 
vania to upper South Carolina in 1774. An Indian 
trader, he married Miss Charity Clark. They often 
made the journey back to Philadelphia to vbit 
relatives. Members of this generation all figured 
prominently in the Revolutionary war. Letters and 
documents tell of the journey of Jeremiah Clark 
Cooper to Atlanta, Georgia, in 1824, -when Atlanta 
was simply a small trading post for Indians. These 
facts and many others are all substantiated in 
Landrum's History of Upper South Carolina. 

The father of those Coopers still found near 
Graham (now Denmark) was Clark Columbus 
Cooper. In 181 8 he was born in Laurens County, 
South Carolina, and in 1837, before he was twenty- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



one, moved to Denmark. He was the youngest of 
eleven children. From Denmark he soon removed 
to Augusta, Georgia, but soon returned. February 
1 6, iS47t he married Miss Alice Reed, grand- 
daughter of the well known Malcolm Clark, justice 
of the peace in Orangeburg District in 1775-76. 
They were married on the plantation granted by 
King George to Malcolm Clark, who had served as 
a crown surveyor under appointment by that king. 
This plantation remains in the possession of the 
family today. A brother of Clark Columbus 
Cooper, Micajah, served in the Mexican war, and 
another brother, Sam, in the Florida Indian war. 
Clark Columbus Cooper was the father of: Samuel 
Powell, deceased; Marion Reed Cooper, a noted 
figure in South Carolina politics living in Port 
Royal ; Georgie, who married Robert Gibbs ' Center 
and both are deceased; Jerome, deceased; William 
Sumpter, living on the old plantation; Elizabeth, 
who married William Clark; Perry H., deceased; 
James Clark, deceased; Julia D., at home; Alice, 
deceased; and Lillie, still at the old home. Wil- 
liam Sumpter Cooper married Augustus Faust and 
has two sons. Perry and Angus. He lives on 
Cooper Street, on the old plantation opposite his 
sisters, Julia and Lillie, who occupy the old home 
to which their father brought his bride in 1847. and 
where all the children were born and where the 
children died. This property is entailed and some 
of the two hundred acres are within the city 
limits. 

When the war of the states broke out Qark 
Columbus Cooper was too old for actiye service 
and became a member of the Reserves, Barnwell 
District, Eighth Battalion, as a first lieutenant and 
afterward as captain. All the members of this 
organization were either too old or too young for 
regular army service. One of those too youthful 
was James H. Bush, who was in Captain Cooper's 
Company. One precious relic of the war period 
is a book in which the Northern prisoners in 
Captain Cooper's care wrote their names and rank. 
In exquisite pen and ink the first page is em- 
bellished with the inscription "Autographs of Fed- 
eral Officers, Prisoners of War of Charleston, 
South Carolina, presented to First Lieut. C. C. 
Cooper." A letter signed by Capt H. J. McDon- 
ald, Eleventh Connecticut Volunteers, and William 
C. Locke, first lieutenant Connecticut Volunteers, 
describes how Captain Cooper did everything to 
alleviate their sufferings compatible with his duty 
as a Confederate officer, even using his own money. 
It asked all Northerners to treat him as a gentle- 
man and Mason. Among names in the autograph 
book are many known to fame. In the book of 
autographs of southern men are those of G. T. 
Beauregard, general of the Confederate States 
Army; R. S. Ripley, brigadier-general; John H. 
Winder, brigadier-general; M. C. Butler, the fa- 
mous South Carolinian; Gen. J. B. Hood, Wade 
Hampton, Lieut-Gen. W. H. Wallace, Brigadier- 
General Hagood and many others of fame. 

After the war Captain Cooper came back home 
and heroically gathered up the little left by Sher- 
man's army, and after the war, as during it, lived 
a hero and a patriot and died at the homestead 
in 1894. 



Mrs. Clark Columbus Cooper died in March, 
1920, when nearly ninety years of age. She was 
an object of love and reverence, and old and young 
made pilgrimages to her home just to see her even 
at the last when she could not talk to them. 
Teachers and pupils alike came to her for first 
hand information and dates of the Civil war and 
to listen to thrilling accounts of Sherman's march, 
when it required four full days for the army, four 
abreast eacii side of the Cooper home, to pass it 
In her home Wheeler's Scouts ate dinner, a few 
hours later Brigadier-General Williams occupied 
the' opposite end of the house, eating and sleeping 
there while tents filled the spacious yard, and one 
day later General Sherman arrived, riding his fa- 
mous black horse, and ate his dinner in the lovely 
parlor today filled with invaluable mementoes of 
the Cooper family and of the war between the 
states. In front of the house still stands the black 
jack oak to which Sherman's horse was tied. In 
the parlor are the tables and chairs used by the 
northern officers, and also a child's chair of ma- 
hogany and rosewood, looted from some home near 
and which the soldiers placed on the fire and the 
Coopers recovered. Their silver spoons in antici- 
pation of the raid had been buried in soft mud, 
and though the soldiers poked about with their 
bayonets they were not discovered. A large sum 
of money and a quantity of "handsome silver sent 
to Orangeburg for safety were all carried away 
by the enemy. At the beginning of the war Clark 
Columbus Cooper had in a safe (still standing in 
the home) a large sum of money to erect a mag- 
nificent mansion. The bricks had been hauled, but 
he gave the money to his beloved South for uni- 
forms and food for its army, and the brick he sold 
for the same purpose. Thus the wonderful his- 
torical old home still stands, a rambling white cot- 
tage enclosed with a fence made of the pickets 
placed there by an English workman and which 
cost what was then a fabulous sum, twelve dol- 
lars per panel to make. 

Clark Columbus Cooper was also a member of 
the Ku Klux Klan. His sword and uniform of 
gray are cherished possessions of Miss Lillie 
Cooper. He had feared the worst for his family 
when Sherman marched through. However, be- 
yond the incidents above noted, they were safe 
from Sherman and his men, though two stragglers 
lingered when the enemy marched off, and demand- 
ing Mrs. Cooper's gold watch, were just setting 
the house on fire when an orderly galloped up and 
scared them off. 

This house is now an objective for many visitors 
from all over the United States. They are always 
welcomed and Miss Lillie and her sister Julia open 
the house with its priceless treasures for inspection. 
Many articles eventually will be given to the various 
museums, and others distributed among the family. 

Miss Lillie Cooper, youngest child of Clark 
Columbus Cooper and Alice (Reed) Cooper, was 
born in the historic Cooper home, whose location 
many years ago was known as Graham's Turnout, 
then Graham, and now as Old Denmark, the newer 
town of Denmark being about a mile away. Old 
Denmark is a Hag station. Miss Cooper recently 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



143 



delivered a talk on this subject to the United 
Daughters of the Confederacy, telling them that 
Mr. Graham made the deed with the proviso that 
the moment the railroad ceased to use it as a 
station it reverted to his heirs. His son is living 
and a grandson, Winchester Graham, lives at New 
Denmark. The flag station thus must always be 
in use. 

Miss Lillie Cooper is a true daughter of the 
South, a gentlewoman whose influence is felt not 
only in her home and town but throughout her 
beloved state. She lives in the old home with her 
sister Julia. It is a peaceful, beautiful spot, sur- 
rounded by stately trees, with about two hundred 
acres in the estate. The columns of the wide old 
gates were demolished by Sherman's raiders, a 
portion of one still standing. 

Miss Julia and Miss Lillie Cooper intend to 
bequeath many of their heirlooms to state institu- 
tions. Both were educated near their home, which 
both love above the ordinary love for a home. 
Their mother came here as a bride, the children 
were all born here, the father and mother died 
here, and it is a hallowed spot. They have heard 
their parents tell of the thrilling events which took 
place in this home while it was used successively 
as headquarters for Wheeler's Scouts of the. Con- 
federate army and for General Sherman and 
Brigadier-General Williams of the Northern army. 
From memory the sisters have an impressive testi- 
mony as to the destructive effect of Sherman's 
raiding army. No family of South Carolina or the 
entire South gave more or suffered more than the 
Cooper family. 

In their home is a piece of the iron rail used 
in building the first railroad in South Carolina. 
They have counterpanes over a hundred years old, 
grandmothers caps from one to two hundred years 
old, and other articles of clothing of similar age. 
One is a dressing sacque worn by their great- 
grandmother, Alice Cloud, and one of the grand- 
mother caps was worn by Mary Reed, daughter of 
Malcolm Clark. In every room are priceless treas- 
ures — the huge glass shades placed over candles, 
a spinning wheel, a mirror that has hung in one 
place over seventy years, miniatures, silver, china — 
these and others tfiat might be noted in an in- 
ventory are still retained, while many treasures 
were stolen in the war. General Wheeler was 
expected, his rooms were supplied with the best 
of the house, but instead General (Federal) Wil- 
liams occupied it and when he left the soldiers 
despoiled all that could be carried away. Many 
think the Cooper home should be the property of 
the state, but Captain Cooper strictly entailed it. 
Miss Lillie Cooper has a fortune for herself and 
her sister in Confederate bonds which their father 
bought and in Confederate money, if these could 
be redeemed. They also have South Carolina 
money of the issue of 1779. 

Miss Lillie Cooper organized the first Daughters 
of the Confederacy in Denmark, was its first presi- 
dent and has always been its most valued speaker 
and historian. She is now in great demand as a 
speaker and writer. Constant study and research 
have made her an authority on history, but she is 
also widely versed on other subjects of the day. 



She was a member of the Arlington committee and 
a leader in all work for the World war, and is 
recorder of crosses of the South Carolina Division 
and a director of World war records. She has 
now taken the place of her mother, and the pupils 
and teachers of the schools come out to the old 
home for information on historical subjects. She 
and her sister, Miss Julia, are gracious hostesses 
to the visitors from all over the United States and 
even from England and other countries. 

Their's is a wonderful home, presided over by 
two Southern ladies, than which there is no higher 
title in the world. 

Sam L. Sweeney. Farmers and stock men all 
over the State of South Carolina are familiar with 
the name and business of Sam L. Sweeney of Co- 
lumbia. He has handled livestock, especially horses 
and mules, for over thirty years, and he knows do- 
mestic animals and the business of handling them 
as only a man can with the benefit of thirty years 
of practical and intimate experience. His suc- 
cess in business has meant more than mere money 
making, and has stood firmly from the beginning 
on the bedrock of integrity and character. He has 
earned a good name and his associates in Columbia 
and over the state vouch for the fact that his word 
is as good as his bond and that the latter is gilt 
edged. 

Mr. Sweeney is entirely a self-made man, and 
educated himself by contact with the world of busi- 
ness and men. He was born in Columbia, August 
25, 1874, a son of John C. and Mary (Hill) 
Sweeney. He has been in the livestock business 
since he was thirteen years of age, and from that 
time has depended upon his own efforts to advance 
him in the world. For several years he was located 
at the Columbia stock yards, later bought the Rhea 
livestock business, and since January, 1919, has 
been located at 14 13 Assembly Street. He has been 
a hard worker, and the disposition of his means 
indicates a thorough faith in Columbia as a coming 
commercial metropolis. He owns over thirty houses 
and lots in Columbia. For four years he was a 
member of the city council and is now serving on 
the Civil Service Commission. He is also a direc- 
tor in the National State Bank, and the Homestead 
Bank, both of Columbia. 

Doubtless the greatest inspiration to his business 
career has been his happy family life. He married 
Miss Catharine Koneman of Columbia, and his 
greatest misfortune was her death in 19 12. She was 
a young woman of true nobility of character and 
in the few years of her association with her chil- 
dren impressed her characteristics upon them so 
that even in the eight years since she died her in- 
fluence has been a constant one in their growth 
and development. Mr. Sweeney now has two grown 
daughters, both educated in good schools and col- 
lege, and have shown splendid preparation and 
equipment for life's serious work. The daughters 
are Georgia F. and Hilda S. Sweeney. The latter 
made an especially notable record as a student at 
St. Genevieve's School in Asheville, North Carolina. 
The* only son is Sam Louis Sweeney, bom in 1909. 
At the age of ten he is already a willing and cheer- 
ful assistant to his father in business, and shows 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



every promise of a fine young manhood. WhUc 
the children have had every advantage at home and 
at school, they have never shown the slightest in- 
clination to idleness, and voluntarily have chosen 
means and accepted opportunities to do useful work 
and assist their father. 

Oscar E. Johnson, president of the Southern 
Home Insurance Company, is one of the most 
aggressive business men of Charleston, where his 
operations have made him a well known man. He 
was bom at Charleston, December 25, 1853, a son 
of Oscar E. Johnson, also a native of Charleston, 
of English extraction. His mother was prior to 
her marriage Miss Gabriella A. Strobel, one of 
the best known instructors in languages in the city, 
and she came of German ancestry. The Johnson 
family was founded in South Carolina at a very 
early day in its history, the descendants of the orig- 
inal settler taking part in the constructive work of 
developing the country from colonies of England. 
Daniel Strobel, the maternal great-grandfather of 
Oscar E. Johnson, came to South Carolina from 
Germany in 1752, when he was nineteen years of 
age, and located at Charleston, becoming active in 
the life of the city, and lieutenant of a company 
of home guards. His death occurred in 1786 after 
a residence at Charleston of fifty-four years. Oscar 
E. Johnson, . Sr., and his wife were the parents of 
six children, of whom Oscar E. Johnson, Jr., is the 
eldest, and four of the six are still living. 

Oscar £. Johnson attended the grammar and high 
schools of his native city and the College of 
Charleston, of which he is now a trustee. Upon 
leaving school Mr. Johnson engaged in the insur- 
ance business, with offices on Broad Street, and 
has been in it for fifty years, during which time 
he has represented some of the most prominent 
and trustworthy companies in the world, and sell- 
ing a vast amount of insurance. He has served as 
president of the Charleston Board of Underwriters, 
the oldest board of underwritcirs continuously in 
existence in the United States. He was president 
of the State Association of Fire Insurance Agents, 
and is therefore one of the best known insurance 
men in South Carolina. In 191 1 Mr. Johnson 
organized the Southern Home Insurance Company, 
of which he was elected president, and which he 
is conducting upon lines which have made it a suc- 
cess, and firmly established it in the confidence of 
the people. He also represents a number of marine 
insurance companies and the Department of Insur- 
ance for United States shippers, including the fleet 
corps. Always interested in Charleston, he has 
been active in civic matters and for two terms of 
four years each has been a member of the City 
Council, and has served on many of the important 
committees of the Council. His offices, which are 
the finest in the Peoples Building, are occupied by 
his force of fourteen assistants. A member of the 
Presbyterian Church, he has always given that or- 
ganization generous and faithful support. 

In 1879 Mr. Johnson was married first to Lila 
Boozer, who died in 1887, leaving three children, 
namely: Maud, Lila and Lewis. In 1889 Mr. John- 
son was married to Maud Boozer, a sister of his 
first wife, and they have had one child, Louise, 



who married Robert S. Small of Charleston. Lfla 
is the wife of A. P. Steele, of Statesville, North 
Carolina. 

Lewis Johnson, the son, was educated at Qemson 
College, South Carolina, after which he studied the 
insurance business and now occupies a fine position 
in the Alabama insurance field. He married Kath- 
leen Dunn, a daughter of Judge Norvell Dunn, of 
Jasper, Alabama, and they have two children. 

Albert Horace Ninestein. The community of 
Blackvillc in Barnwell County recognizes Mr. Nine- 
stein as one of its ablest lawyers and best citizens. 
Mr. Ninestein has come up to his present position 
after many hard struggles and against adversities. 

He was born at Palmyra, New York, February 
13. 1875, eiphtli among a family of twelve children 
born to Edward and Augusta (Naskow) Ninestein. 
The parents were both born in the old country and 
>vere brought 10 America as children. Albert Hor- 
ace Ninestein was thirteen years of age when his 
father died,, and the next year he left home to earn 
his own way in the world. In succeeding years he 
did a great many things. One time his salary was 
three dollars and a hsilf a week and he paid three 
dollars for board. He not only made a living, but 
also sjipplied the deficiencies in his early education, 
and earned the money to equip himself for better 
and broader things. He studied law in a lawyer's 
office, and on December 5, 1907, was admitted to 
the bar at Columbia, South Carolma. The same 
year he located at Blackville. He reached Black- 
ville with his wife and two children, and his entire 
capital consisted of $142.00. While he did not know 
a person in town he had the training and ability 
to make his talents appreciated, and was soon 
enjoying a living practice. Since then he has 
handled some of the most important cases in Bam- 
well County. He has also been honored with the 
office of mayor of Blackville, and is now president 
of its Chamber of Commerce. He is also city attor- 
ney. For the past two years he has been chancel- 
lor commander of the Knights of Pythias Lodge. 

In October, 1900, he married Miss Florence Jar- 
ret, a native of Archdale, North Carolina. They 
have a family of six children, Dorothy, Florence, 
Edward, Albert, Jr., Theodore and Eleanor. 

Edward Walter Hughes. The steady and faith- 
ful devotion he has given to the profession of law 
for over thirty years has been accompanied with 
many honors that have made Mr. Hughes promi- 
nent in the public life of his home city of Charles- 
ton and in the state. 

He was born at Summerville, South Carolina, 
April 21, 1864, son of Edward T. and Anna Gillard 
(White) Hughes, his ancestors coming from Eng- 
land and France and some of them serving in the 
Revolutionary army. His father was a banker of 
Charleston. 

Mr. Hughes attended preparatory schools at 
Charleston, was graduated Bachelor of Science 
from the University of the South at Sewanee, Ten- 
nessee, and in 1885 completed his law course in 
the University of Virginia. The following year he 
took up the work of his profession at Charleston 
and has risen to real distinction as a law}rer. He 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



145 



was a member of the Legislature from 1888 to 1894. 
From 1894 to 1898 he was assistant United States 
attorney, and in 1898 was appointed referee in 
bankruptcy, which position he still occupies. He 
was a candidate in 1903 for mayor of Charleston, 
and was one of two candidates to run in the second 
primary, 191 3, for Congress. His name was prom- 
inently considered in connection with the federal 
judgeship at the time of the appointment of Judge 
Ham Smith. He is prominent in club life, and 
has been commodore of the Yacht Club, president 
of the Country Club and president of the Charles- 
ton Club. 

February 20, 1890, Mr. Hughes married Miss Vir- 
ginia Randolph Pinckney. 

Perry McQueen Smoak. While he began his 
business career modestly as a clerk in local stores, 
Mr. Smoak for twenty years has been one of the 
most influential figures in the commercial affairs 
of Orangeburg. 

He was bom in Orangeburg County August 21, 
1869, son of Andrew James and Ann A. (Bair) 
Smoak. The Smoak family are of old South Caro- 
lina Revolutionary stock. His father was a Confed- 
erate soldier and a farmer, and he was the son 
of a soldier, the grandfather having spent four years 
in the service and was wounded through tlie thigh 
by a minie ball at the Battle of Gettysburg. Five 
of his sons were also soldiers. At one time he 
held a reunion in Orangeburg County, — at which 
108 members of the family were present. Perry 
McQueen Smoak received a common school edu- 
cation, and in early life, began his business 
career as clerk in a general store. For four 
years he managed the shoe department of the store 
of George H. Cornelson at Orangeburg. He engaged 
in the wholesale grocery business under the firm 
name of Jennings & Smoak in November, 1808. He 
was active in that concern until 1910, when he or- 
ganized the Orangeburjg Fertilizer Works, aftd thus 
gave the city one of its important industries. He 
is still president of the Fertilizer Works. His tal- 
ents and ability as an organizer have resulted in 
several other substantial local enterprises. He or- 
ganized the Orangeburg Coca Cola Bottling Com- 
pany, the Newberry Coca Cola Company, and the 
Orangeburg Packing Company. He is a director 
of the Edisto National Bank, and owns and directs 
the management of 2,000 acres of farm land. 

December 29, 1902, he married Miss Gertrude 
Boliver, of Orangeburg. They have two children, 
Dorothy McQueen and Perry McQueen, Jr. Mr. 
Smoak is a Royal Arch Mason, an Elk« and is a 
senior deacon in the First Baptist Church of 
Orangeburg. 

W. HuGER FiTZ Simons began the practice of law 
in his native state of South Carolina thirty-five 
years ago, and the success and reputation for abil- 
ity now a-ssociated with his name are in proportion 
to the length of years spent in close and con- 
scientious devotion to his profession. 

Mr. Fitz Simons was born in Charleston January 
8, 1861, and most of the years of his lifetime have 
been spent in his native city. He is a son of Chris- 
topher and Susan Milliken (Barker) Fitz Simons, 
Vol. V— 10 



also natives of Charleston, where his father was a 
well known medical practitioner for many years. 
The grandfather, Qiristopher Fitz Simons, was also 
a native of South Carolina, descended from an 
Irish ancestor who came to the Carolinas soon 
after the close of the Revolution. The Charleston 
lawyer's mother was born at Charleston, a daugh- 
ter of Samuel Gaillard Barker, a native of the city 
and for many years a lawyer of prominence. 

W. Huger Fitz Simons is the fifth of seven chil- 
dren, all still living. He graduated from Charles- 
ton College in 1881 and spent about a year in a 
law office on Wall Street, New York City. Return- 
ing to Charleston in 1882, he continued his studies 
and was admitted to the bar in 1883, soon after 
taking up practice for himself and in 1886 forming 
the partnership of Barker, Gilliland & Fitz Simons. 
In 1892 he joined George H. MoflFett in practice, 
their associatbii continuing until about 1900. Dur- 
ing the following fifteen or sixteen years Mr. Fitz 
Simons looked after his law business alone and 
since 1916 has had as an associate his son Sam- 
uel' G. 

In January, 1887, Mr. Fitz Simons married Anne 
Palmer Cain, a daughter of Maj. William Henry 
Cain, of Pinopolis, South Carolina. Their five chil- 
dren are James C, W. H., Jr., Samuel G., Mar- 
garet and R. C. Three of the sons were soldiers 
in the World war. James C. was a first lieutenant 
witH the One Hundred and Seventeenth Engineers 
in the Forty-second or Rainbow Division, and was 
on active duty in France for fourteen months. 
Samuel G., now his father's law partner, also served 
with the rank of first lieutenant, was an aviator, 
and was on duty in France about twenty months. 
W. H., Jr., was a first lieutenant of artillery and 
later transferred to the Aviation Corps and re- 
ceived his "wings" three days after • the signing 
of the armistice. The senior Mr. Fitz Simons is 
a member of the South Carolina Society and of 
the Charleston Ancient Artillery Company. 

Hon. Joseph Walker Barnwell is one of the 
oldest members of the Charleston bar, having re- 
cently rounded out a half century since his admis- 
sion to practice. He has enjoyed many honors 
both in and out of his profession and his life has 
been one of signal usefulness and service. 

He was born at Charleston October 31, 1846, a 
son of Rev. William H. and Catherine Osborn 
Barnwell. He attended private school at Charles- 
ton, Beaufort College in 1861, also private schools 
at Columbia and The Citadel at Charleston in 1864. 
There he was a member of the corps of Cadets 
and as such rendered active service to the Con- 
federacy and was wounded in the leg in a skirmish 
along the Charleston and Savannah Railroad De- 
cember 7, 1864. After the war he entered South 
Carolina University, and during 1869 studied abroad 
at the University of Goettingen, Germany. 

Mr. Barnwell was admitted to the bar in 1869, 
and along with a large law practice has many times 
been called to duty in public offices. He was a 
member of the House of Representatives from 
Charleston County from 1874 to 1876, and took 
an active part in the Hampton campaign. He was 
chief of staff to Governor Hagood in 1880 a^nd 



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1882, was senator from Charleston County from 
1894 to 1896, and again from 1898 to 1902, declin- 
ing further election and was candidate for attorney 
general on the Haskell ticket in 1890. In 1895 he 
was, together with J. C. Hemphill, William G. 
McGowan, John T. Sloan and others, a member 
of the committee which met in conference with 
Governor Tillman, former Governor Evans, Judge 
Ira B. Jones, and Hon. C. M. Efird, representing 
the Tillman faction, the object of the conference 
being to bring about an agreement between the 
opposing factions, whereby the Constitutional Con- 
vention, which was about to meet, might be con- 
ducted upon a non-partisan basis and in the 
broader interests of the public welfare, and while 
such an agreement was easily arrived at, it was not 
carried out by the faction then in power. Mr. Barn- 
well took a prominent part in the restoration of 
Charleston after the earthquake of 1886, serving as 
chairman of the relief committee. He was chair- 
man of the democratic party of his county in 1880, 
and has been an official of the Charleston Library 
Society, the South Carolina Historical Society, and 
the Charleston Club. He has spent many years of 
earnest and successful effort in promoting and sus- 
taining the Charleston Library Society. While not 
the author of any history of the state, he has con- 
tributed many interesting and valuable articles to 
the magazine published, by the South Carolina His- 
torical Society, and has delivered many notable 
addresses before literary, patriotic, and educational 
associations of the state. 

January 17, 1900, occurred the death of his wife, 
whose name was Harriott Kinloch Cheves, daugh- 
ter of Dr. Charles M. Cheves. The surviving chil- 
dren of Colonel and Mrs. Barnwell are: Capt. 
Joseph W. Barnwell, Jr., now with the State High- 
way Department at Columbia; Charles Edmund 
Barnwell, of New Orleans; and a daughter, Har- 
riott Kinloch, wife of Esmond Phelps, Esq., of 
the New Orleans bar. 

Thomas Hiller Dreher, A. M., M. D. To speak 
of him merely in the terms of nearly thirty years 
of steady medical practice, the greater part of the 
time at St. Matthews, would be doing an injustice 
to the broad usefulness and influence of Doctor 
Dreher in that community. A skillful man in his 
profession, he has also turned his versatile talents 
into other avenues presenting means of doing good 
to his community and the people of his home state. 

Many people outside of Calhoun County who 
know nothing of him as a physician have read and 
been influenced by his published views and writ- 
ings. Doctor Dreher has the gift of literary skill 
and a splendid facility in translating his experiences 
and well matured judgment into concise and enter- 
taining language. Recently he contributed to a 
number of the American Lutheran Survey an article 
entitled "Experiences of an Exemption Board Chair- 
man," in which he describes a number of the in- 
cidents that came under his observation and which 
indicate both the weak and the strong qualities of 
a community engaged in war. Doctor Dreher as 
a "rock-bottom democrat" is a man of decided in- 
dependence of opinion and an original thinker, as 
is well indicated in the views he expressed in pages 



of the Manufacturers Record in opposition to the 
ratification of the League of Nations treaty. Intro- 
ductory to the article which he contributed to the 
Record the editor gave a concise description of the 
author in the following words: "Dr. T. H. Dreher 
is a prominent physician of South Carolina. He was 
County Democratic Chairman for many years in 
his county and chairman of the board of trustees 
of St. Matthews School for a long time. He was 
also chairman of the Local Exemption Board dur- 
ing the entire war. Doctor Dreher has always 
taken a prominent part in public affairs." 

He was born near Irmo in Lexington Count}', 
South Carolina, November nth, 1861, a son of 
Jacob W. and Anne A. (Hiller) Dreher. His 
Dreher ancestors came out of Germany and settled 
in Lexington County in the colonial period, lome 
years before the Revolutionary war. Their home 
was in the vicinity of the present town of Irmo. 
Doctor Dreher acquired his early training at 
home, and on January i, 1880, matriculated in New- 
berry College, where he was graduated with first 
honors in 1885. The following four years he re- 
mained as principal of the preparatory departmerr 
of Newberry College. 

He studied medicine in the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, now the medical department of the 
University of Maryland, graduating in 1891. After 
a brief practice at Lexington he established his home 
in St. Matthews Parish, then in Orangeburg, now 
the county seat of Calhoun County. Doctor Dreher 
took a leading part in the campaign for the organi- 
zation of the County of Calhoun, was president of 
the new county association and when the new county 
was organized was made county chairman of the 
Democratic Executive Committee, serving as such 
until 1916. He held for several years the position 
of chairman of the Board of Trustees of St. Mat- 
thews Grade and High schools, and has been vice- 
president of The Home Bank of St. Matthews smce 
its organization. He is a member of the County, 
State and American Medical associations and is an 
ex-president of the District Medical Society. He 
was reared a Lutheran but for many years past has 
been active in the Methodist Church. 

Doctor Dreher married Miss Frances Wanna- 
maker, daughter of the late Captain Francis Wanna- 
maker of St. Matthews. Articles on other pages 
give in detail the career of her father and other 
members of this noted family of Calhoun County. 

Augustine T. Smythe is a lawyer and well 
known business man of Charleston and bears the 
same name as his honored father, with whom he 
was associated in practice for a time. Consider- 
ing their career together the name has been a dis- 
tinctive one in the legal, civic and business life 
of Charleston for over half a century. 

The late Augustine T. Smythe, who died in 1914^ 
was born at Charleston October 5. 1842, son of 
Rev. Thomas and Margaret M. (Adger) Smyth. 
Rev. Thomas Smyth, D. D., came from Belfast, 
Ireland, in 1830 and for over forty years was 
pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church of 
Charleston. He was also a gifted speaker and 
writer. Margaret M. Adger was a daughter of 
James Adger, who came from County Antrim, Ire- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



147 



land, in 1790. The names Sni3rthe and Adger have 
for a century been conspicuous in the business, 
professional and all the varied interests of the 
City of Charleston. 

Augustine Thomas Smythe always acknowledged 
a great debt to his parents and next to them to 
Professor Sachtleben, whose excellent private 
school he attended as a boy. In i860 he entered 
South Carolina College, and remained a student 
until he entered the arnriy. As a member of the 
College Cadets he assisted in the defense of 
Charleston Harbor at the first attack on Fort 
Sumter. In 1862 he was mustered into the regular 
Confederate army as a member of the Washing- 
ton Light Infantry, which became Company A of 
the Twenty-Fifth South Carolina Volunteers. He 
was with that organization until the close of the 
war. doing duty in the Charleston defenses and 
at the end of the war was a member of a Cavalry 
Brigade. After the war he accepted his own pov- 
erty as the common lot of the South and endured 
a time of stress and struggle until he could be- 
come established in his profession. He studied law 
in the office of Siraonton & Barker at Charleston 
and was admitted to the bar in 1867. He at once 
began practice and continued active in the pro- 
fession for nearly half a century. For a number 
of years he was senior partner in the well known 
firm of Smythe, Lee & Frost. 

From 1880 to 1894 he was member of the State 
Senate, and during a large part of that time was 
chairman of the judiciary committee. In earlier 
years he was the president of the Pioneer Fire 
Company, one of the volunteer fire companies of 
his city, and always kept up an interest in the local 
militia, serving for a number of years as major 
of the Washington Light Infantry. He was also 
prominent in Masonry, being grand master of the 
Grand Lodge and grand high priest of the Grand 
Chapter and commander of South Carolina Com- 
mandery No. i. He was also a thirty-second 
degree Scottish Rite Mason. From 1890 to 1896 
he served as a trustee of South Carolina College 
and was a trustee of Clemson Agricultural College 
from 1900 to 1906. He was the first commodore 
and one of the organizers of the Carolina Yacht 
Oub, and at one time was president of the Hiber- 
nian Society. For many years and until his death 
he was an elder in the Presbyterian Church. On 
June 27, 1865, he married Miss Louisa McCord, of 
Columbia. She was a daughter of Col. D. J. 
McCord, prominent as a lawyer, and the grand- 
daughter of Judge Langdon Cheves. 

Augustine T. Smythe, Sr., left surviving him 
three daughters and two sons. The eldest of his 
surviving sons is the Rev. L. Cheves McC. Smythe, 
who has been a missionary of the Presbyterian 
Church for several years in Japan, and who was 
during the World war with the Red Cross in 
Russia. Mr. Smythe is a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, where he received an M. A. de- 
gree, and of Princeton Theological Seminary. In 
1916 he married Miss Mary Fletcher, daughter of 
Judge James H. Fletcher, of Accomac, Virginia. 
The daughters are Louisa C.,'wife of Samuel G. 
Stoney, of Charleston; Hannah McC, wife of 



Anton P. Wright, of Savannah, Georgia; and Susan 
S., wife of John Bennett, of Charleston. 

Augustine T. Smythe, Jr., the younger son, was 
born at Charleston, January 25, 1885, and was 
graduated in 1903 from the University School of 
Charleston. He received his Bachelor of Arts 
degree from the University of Virginia in 1907 and 
in 1909 completed his preparation for law in the 
Harvard Law School. He was admitted to the bar 
the same year and began practice at Charleston 
with his father's firm, Smythe, Lee & Frost. He 
is now a member of the firm Smythe & Visanska. 
Mr. Smythe is a director of the Southern Home 
Insurance Company, Charleston Savings Institu- 
tion, Dime Bank and Trust Company, and has many 
other business connections. He is a member of the 
Carolina Yacht Club and is a Mason and Knight 
of Pythias. 

He married Harriott Ravenel Buist, a daughter 
of the well known Charleston citizen and lawyer, 
Henry Buist. They have two children, Frances R. 
and Augustine, Jr. 

William Elijah Free began the practice of law 
at Bamberg in 1908, and has a substantial general 
practice and also a good business in real estate at 
Bamberg. 

He was born in Bambere County July 3i» 1S76. 
His people have lived in that section of the old 
Barnwell District, now Bamberg County for several 
generations. His grandfather, Jacob E. Free, was 
a native of Barnwell County, served as a Confeder- 
ate soldier, and before the war was a planter and 
slave holder. His wife. Elizabeth (Dowling) Free, 
was a dau^ter of William B. Dowling, who was 
the son of Elijah Dowling, the grandfather of Ellen 
E. (Dowling) Cox so that Mr. W. E. Free's great- 
great-grandfather on both his father's and mother's 
side was both one and the same man. Both the 
Free and the Dowling branches of the family are 
of Revolutionary stock, the former being of Irish 
descent and the latter of Scotch descent. A brother 
of Elijah Dowling settled in the pre-Revolutionary 
period in what is now Darlington County. Elijah 
Dowling was a lieutenant in the Continental army. 

The late Charles Benjamin Free, father of the 
Bamberg lawyer, was owner of extensive planting 
interests, employing many people. He was born 
July 6, 1852, and died December 24, 1914. He was 
the first clerk of court of Bamberg County, begin- 
ning his official duties in 1897 and holding the office 
uninterruptedly until his death. He never had oppo- 
sition in election after the first time. His wife was 
Sallie Dowling, a native of Barnwell County, and 
a daughter of A. J. and Ellen E. (Dowling) Cox. 
She was born in 1856 and died in 1896, the mother 
of four sons and two daughters. Charles B. Free 
was three times married. His second wife was 
Amanda R. Stephens, who became the mother of 
two children, while his third marriage was to Lizzie 
M. Jenkins. To the third union were born two 
daughters. Of these ten children in all nine reached 
mature years and are still living. 

William Elijah Free was educated in the high 
school at Bamberg, attended Furman University at 
Greenville for three years and studied law in the 
office of the late John R. Bellinger. He was ad- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



mitted to the bar in January, 1908, and since then 
has been busily engaged at Bamberg. For seven 
years he was a member of the law firm of Mayfield 
& Free, since which time he has practiced ilone. 
He also operates in real estate and loans and is a 
stockholder, director and counsel for the First Na- 
tional Bank of Bamberg, and a stockholder in the 
Bamberg Banking Company. 

June 17, 1909, he married Miss Birdie Gill, daugh- 
ter of W. T. and Senie (Brown) Gill of Bamberg, 
one of the old and original South Carolina families. 
He has two sons, William E., Jr., born July 17, 191 1. 
and Joseph D., born July 13, 1915. Mr. Free is a 
trustee and treasurer of the Baptist Church, and a 
member of the Executive Board of the Barnwell 
Baptist Association. 

Peter Lowry Lea. The most elaborate history 
is perforce a merciless abridgment, the historian 
being obliged to select his facts and materials from 
manifold details and to marshal them in concise 
and logical order. In every life of honor and 
usefulness there is no dearth of interesting situa- 
tions and incidents, and yet in summing up such 
a career as that of Mr. Lea, the writer must needs 
touch only on the more salient facts, giving the 
keynote of the character and eliminating all that 
is superfluous to the continuity of the narrative. 
The gentleman whose name appears above has led 
an active and useful life, not entirely void of excit- 
ing events, but the more prominent have been so 
identified with the useful and practical that it is 
to them almost entirely that the writer refers in 
the following paragraphs. 

Peter Lowry Lea, a well known and successful 
merchant at Burton, South Carolina, was born in 
Sumter (now Lee) County, South Carolina, on 
April 9, 1863, and is the son of William P. aiid 
Saphronia (Carter) Lea. William P. Lea was a 
native of North Carolina, who later became a resi- 
dent of Charleston, South (Tarolina, but who fol- 
lowed the sea for many years. His father, William 
Lea, was a native of Virginia. The subject's 
mother was a native of Charleston, of which city 
her father was an early settler. He was a con- 
tractor, and among the many early structures 
erected by him there was the historic Bank of 
Charleston. The subject of this sketch is the third 
in order of birth of the five children who were 
born to his parents. 

Peter L. Lea attended the public schools of 
Charleston, and was a student in the old St. Phil- 
lips Street School. At the age of fourteen years 
he began a seafaring career, and after spending 
four years before the mast he, at the age of eight- 
een years, entered an apprenticeship at Port Royal 
as pilot. During the following twenty years he 
followed the sea as pilot, and gained a reputation 
as a man of unusually high qualifications in that 
line. However, in 1899 Mr. Lea decided to spend 
the remainder of his life on solid land and engaged 
in the mercantile business at Burton, Beaufort 
County, where he is still engaged. He has by strict 
attention to business and catering to the wants of 
his patrons built up a large and representative 
patronage, and has been successful even beyond 
his anticipations. He carries a general line of 



goods of well selected grades and his evident de- 
sire to please his customers and his uniformly 
courteous treatment of them has gained for him 
an enviable reputation. In addition to his mer- 
cantile interests Mr. Lea is also the owner of about 
150 acres of excellent truck land, on which he 
raises all the crops of vegetables common to this 
locality. He is also a stockholder in the Southern 
Furniture Company of Charleston, of which he is 
the vice president. * 

Mr. Lea has been married twice, first in 1887, to 
Sarah Hay, to which union was born a daughter, 
Lilla, who is now the wife of R. A. Long, Jr., of 
Beaufort, South Carolina. Mr. Lea's second mar- 
riage was with Eva Fink and they are the parents 
of two children, Peter L., Jr., and Eva Hampton. 
Fraternally Mr. Lea is a member of the Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, in which he has 
attained the degrees of the Royal Arch, and to 
the Knights of Pythias. He has tiken a commend- 
able interest in local public affairs, though with- 
out ambition for public office, but he gives his 
support to every movement having for its object 
the betterment of the community in any way. Be- 
cause of his fine personal qualities and business 
success he enjoys to a marked degree the confi- 
dence and esteem of the entire community. 

Thomas Frederick Brantley has practiced law 
in his native city of Orangeburg since 1896. He 
has also been a member of both branches of the 
Legislature, and as a political leader and speaker has 
been an important aid in several democratic na- 
tional campaigns. 

He was bom at Orangeburg January 28, 1867, 
a son of Ellison W. and Angelina (Ulmer) Brant- 
ley. His mother's ancestry included men who were 
soldiers in the Colonial and Revolutionary wars. 
Ellison W. Brantley was a farmer. The son grew 
up on his father's farm and early learned the toil 
of the fields. He was two years old when his 
mother died, and many of the influences that shaped 
his early life were supplied by his grandmother. As 
a boy he looked beyond the farm to a career, and 
as a preliminary step in his progress he borrowed 
the money that enabled him to attend the famous 
Bingham Preparatory School in North Carolina. 
In 1892 he graduated A. B. from the South 
Carolina University. He was prominent as a de- 
bater in the university, won the debater's medal 
from his society, and was a member of the Pi Kappa 
Alpha Fraternity. He next entered the law depart- 
ment of Georgetown University at Washington, and 
graduated LL. B. in 1905. He was one of the 
Georgetown Debating Team which carried off 
the honors in contest with Columbian Univer- 
sity. While at Washington he was appointed chief 
of division of the Treasury Department, winning 
that appointment after examination. He was dis- 
missed from this office because of his activity in 
behalf of the election of W. J. Bryan in 1896. On 
leaving Washington he returned to Orangeburg and 
has since been busy in a general practice. In 1898 
he was elected a member of the Legislature and 
re-elected the following vear, and in 1902 was chosen 
a member of the State Senate. He resigned that 
office to become a candidate for Congress. He was 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



149 



a delegate to the democratic convention at Denver 
in 1908, where he again warmly supported Bryan 
as a candidate for the presidency, and was a mem- 
ber of the Notification Committee. Mr. Brantley 
is a member of the Baptist Church. 

Mr. Brantley still owns the original home settle- 
ment, which was acquired prior to the Revolution- 
ary war by Mr. Brantley's great-great-grandfather 
and which has been handed down to successive gen- 
erations until the present time. It is still one of 
the old landmarks of this section of the county and 
is located about seven miles cast of the Orange- 
burg courthouse. It is in the famous "Four Holes" 
section referred to frequently in Simm's historical 
novels of South Carolma. Mr. Brantley's father, 
Ellison W. Brantley, was one of the leaders of the 
Ku Klux Clan which did so much toward the res- 
toration of South Carolina to white rule. Going 
back in the geneological tree, Mr. Brantley dates his 
ancestry to Swiss-German origin, this ancestry 
settling in this immediate section about 1740. 

April 26, 1905, Thomas F. Brantley married Miss 
Estelle Fairey, daughter of John W. Fairey of 
Orangeburg. They have four children: Mary Elli- 
son Brantley, Henrietta Estelle Brantley, Thomas 
F. Brantley and John W. Brantley. 

Mr. Brantley is a Mason: a member of Orange- 
burg Lodge of Elks, of which he is a past exalted 
ruler; and a member of the Uniform Rank Knights 
of Pythias, of which he is past chancellor com- 
mander. . 

He is at present engaged in the practice of law 
in Orangeburg County, and is the head member of 
the firm of Brantley and Zeigler, which is one of 
the leading firms in that part of the state. 

Capt. Thomas S. Sinkler. A capacity for 
sticking to a purpose and confining one's efforts 
to a single line of endeavor brings about very 
desirable results in most instances, and especially 
is this true in the case of Capt Thomas S. Sinkler, 
who, beginning his business career in his present 
concern, has risen from office boy to be part owner 
of the wholesale coal company of Johnson, Sinkler 
& Stone, one of the leading firms of its kind at 
Charleston. Captain Sinkler was born in Berkeley 
County, South Carolina, January 7, 1861, a son 
of William Sinkler, and grandson of James Sink- 
ler, who was bom in Scotland, but came to the 
United States and located in Berkeley County, 
South Carolina. William Sinkler was born at St. 
Johns, South Carolina, and he was married to 
Mary Simons, born at Charleston, a daughter of 
Dr. Thomas Y. Simons, one of the skilled phy- 
sicians of a past generation, and a native of Charles- 
ton, his family having been founded in this city in 
the very earliest days of its history. There were 
ten children in the family bom to William Sinkler 
and his wife, all of whom are living. 

When he was a lad Thomas S. Sinkler was 
brought to Charleston by his parents and was edu- 
cated in Porter's Military Academy. Entering upon 
a commercial career, he has been in the employ of 
but one concern, and his persistence and faithful- 
ness have been rewarded by his steady advance- 
ment, and he now owns a half interest in the 
business. This concern does a very large foreign 



business, and also handles coal at retail, and the 
annual sales are enormous. 

In 1887 Mr. Sinkler was united in marriage with 
Caroline Finley, a daughter of W. W. and Carrie 
(Glover) Finley, members of one of the prominent 
families of Charleston. Mr. and Mrs. Sinkler have 
three children, namely: Thomas S., who is a 
graduate of West Point and a captain in the regu- 
lar United States Army; Caroline, who is the widow 
of Watson C. Finger, lives at Charleston; and 
Allen, who lives at home. Hr. Sinkler is a direc- 
tor of the Security Bank, his connection with 
it being of long standing. Fraternally he belongs 
to the Knights of P3rthias. His social connections, 
which are very pleasant, are with the Charleston, 
the Charleston Country, and the Charleston Yacht 
clubs. For many years he has been a consistent 
member of St. Philip's Church of Charleston. 

During the great war Mr. Sinkler rendered signal 
service to his country in the Charleston Reserve 
Corps, Charleston Light Dragoons, of which he is 
still captain. Not only did he assist in organizing 
this company, but through his personal example 
and enthusiasm brought his men into a high state 
of efficiency, and won from them and the community 
generally a respect which -will not be forgotten. In 
days which tried men's souls and brought out their 
real selves, Mr. Sinkler proved his metal, and earned 
the right to be accpunted one of the^ true-blue Amer- 
ican citizens and patriots, whose deeds are as wor- 
thy of perpetuation on the pages of history as arc 
those of the ones who had the privilege of going to 
the front. 

Joseph Blain Cash, M. D. The community in 
and around Chesnee, in both Spartanburg and Cher- 
okee counties, has many reminders of the business 
enterprise and public spirit of the Cash family. 
Dr. Joseph Blain Cash has recently undertaken to 
give Chesnee a model private hospital, affording 
increased facilities for his own extended practice 
as a physician and surgeon and an institution which 
would do credit to a large city. 

Doctor Cash is a son of Columbus Cash, who has 
long been one of the leading business men and 
property owners in the Chesnee community. He 
was born two miles east of Chesn>se, in what is now 
Cherokee County. He came to manhood in very 
humble circumstances. He had no regular school- 
ing, and by plowing for small wages and by many 
severe struggles he finally got started, and the 
struggling years have given place to prosperity until 
he is now one of the largest and wealthiest land 
owners in Spartanburg and Cherokee counties. He 
operates several fine farms. Columbus Cash is 
owner of an historic spot in South Carolina, of in- 
terest not only to this state but to the nation. This 
is the Cowpens battle ground, not far from Chesnee, 
and included in a farm of about four hundred acres 
owned by Columbus Cash. Every American school 
child knows of the battle of Cowpens as one of 
the marks of progress by the American armies in 
their struggle for independence. Recently Colum- 
bus Cash set aside five acres- of his land as a gift 
to the Daughters of the American Revolution, and 
thus the scene of the battle will become a perma- 
nent park, with a suitable monument erected there- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



on. Columbus Cash owned all of the land on which 
the village of Chesnee is located, and still has much 
s>i the valuable property in that village. 

l^r. Jpscph Blain Cash, who it a son of Colum- 
1)US and Susan (King) Cash, was born February 
25, 1891, two miles southeast of Chesnee. He took 
several courses in the Wofford Fitting School at 
Spartanburg, and afterward continued the regular 
study of medicine in the Atlanta Medical College, 
xiow the Medical Department of Emory University. 
He was graduated in 1914. For four and a half 
JTionths he did post-c^raduate work at Tulane Uni- 
versity in New Orleans and also spent five months 
in the New York Polyclinic and three months in 
1^ Grady Hospital at Atlanta. He had b^gun the 
practice of his profession in the meantime at Ches- 
nee in 1914. His abilities and experience have led 
him more and more to the practice of surgery. He 
has been ambitious not only to succeed but to excel 
in his profession. Pending the building and com- 
pleting of his new private hospital, Doctor Cash 
in July, 1919, entered the New York Lying-in Hos- 
pital for a six months* course. 

He began the construction work on his new hos- 
pital at Chesnee about the firsf of July, ipiQ- It 
is a modern new brick -building, two stories and ■ 
basement, the building and equipment costing about 
sixty thousand dollars. It exemplifies all the mod- 
ern ideas of hospital construction and is on an ideal 
site, comprising nearly two acres on a gently slop- 
ing elevation in the east part of the town of Chesnee. 
Jt has the pure atmosphere of the upper Carolina 
region, pure water, and otherwise is an ideal place 
for treatment and convalescence. The hospital will 
be open to all classes of patients except those suffer- 
ing from contagious diseases. Just recently Doctor 
Cash has incorporated the hospital with a capital 
stock of $75,000.00. and it will be known as Moun- 
tain View Hospital. This will be completed and 
ready for patients on the ist of July, 1920. 

Doctor Cash, like his father, owns valuable busi- 
ness property in Chesnee and much farming land, 
and has ample financial resources for carrying out 
any enterprise in which he embarks. 

Charles R. Valk, vice president and treasurer 
of the Charleston Dry Dock and Machine Company, 
is one of the substantial men of Charleston. He 
was born at Compo, Connecticut, on October 6. 
1848, a son of Charles P. L. Valk, a .native of 
Charleston who moved to Connecticut and there 
died. His widow returned to Charleston, bringing 
with her Charles R., then but one year old. He 
grew up at Charleston and attended the Octavius 
Porcher School at Abbeville, South Carolina. At 
the age of fifteen years he entered the Confederate 
army in the Third South Carolina State Troops. 
Colonel Goodwin's regiment, but after six months' 
service peace was declared between the states, and 
he returned to Charleston. 

His military experience made him feel too old for 
school, so he began an apprenticeship in the foun- 
dry of William S. Henerey. and was there from 
1866 to 1870, when he became superintendent for 
the Stono Phosphate Company. In 187 1 he formed 
a partnership with J. Ralph Smith under the style 
of Smith & V^lk, which continued until the name 



of the Valk & Murdoch Iron Works was adopted, 
of which Mr. Valk was made president. The plant 
was moved to the foot of Calhoun Street, and 
later the business was reorganized as the Valk & 
Murdoch Company, and again as the Charleston 
Dry Dock and Machine Company. The company 
does a general marine business and gives employ- 
ment to 400 people, its annual volume of product 
showing a healthy increase. 

In 1889 Mr. Valk was united in marriage with 
Miss E. F. We3rman, of New York City, and they 
have three children, namely: Elizabeth, who is the 
wife of G. Lee Holmes; Martha Lawrence and 
Courtney. 

Mr. Valk is chairman of the Hampton Park As- 
sociation, vice president of the William Austin 
Home, and is identified with other organizations in 
the city. A man of wide outlook and unusual capa- 
bilities, he has risen to be a strong factor for good 
in his community. The same enthusiasm which sent 
him a youth of fifteen years into the army has car- 
ried hiip on in many a conflict with conditions which 
did not meet with his approval, and in most in- 
stances brought him through a victor, for right 
was always on his side. Deprived of a father's 
fostering care so early in life, he has had neces- 
sarily to make his own way in the world, but early 
hardships have but developed his character and 
strengthened his resistance, and he feels that he is 
all the better for having to earn his living by the 
"sweat of his brow." 

Hon. James Willard Ragsdale. A great loss to 
South Carolina and the nation was experienced in 
the death of James Willard Ragsdale, which oc- 
curred at Washington July 23, 1919, while he was 
in the midst of his duties as representative from 
the Sixth South Carolina District in Congress. He 
was in his fourth consecutive term in Congress, and 
his work and influence were greatly appreciated 
both by his fellow members in the House of Repre- 
sentatives and the Senate. 

Mr. Ragsdale for many years had been a promi- 
nent lawyer and banker at Florence, and in that 
city and in Eastern Carolina his friends and sup- 
porters were most numerous. Mr. Ragsdale was 
born at Timmonsville, South Carolina, December 
14, 1872, son of Littleton Russell and Ellen Adelaide 
(Bird) Ragsdale. His mother was a daughter of 
Doctor Byrd of Timmonsville, a greatly beloved 
physician and citizen. J. W. Ragsdale acquired his 
iarly education in the schools of Timmonsville and 
at Darlington. For several years he lived at Wil- 
mington, North Carolina, where he was employed 
in the general offices of the Atlantic Coast Line 
Railway Company. As a student in the University 
of South Carolina he studied law under the late 
Doctor Pope, and began practice at Florence. He 
was a law partner of Judgp Shipp and later of 
R. E. Whiting and D. G. Baker, under the firm name 
Ragsdale, Baker & Whiting. Mr. Ragsdale was re- 
garded as one of the ablest criminal lawyers of the 
state. As a banker he organized the Farmers and 
Mechanics Bank of Florence, and was its president 
at the time of his death, and also was a director 
of the Citizens Bank of Timmonsville, and the 
People's Bank of Darlington. He owned and con- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



151 



ducted several of the finest farms in Florence and 
Darlington counties. 

Mr. Ragsdale early entered politics, and was 
elected to the Legislature from Florence County for 
two terms and afterwards served as a member of 
the State Senate. He resigned from the Senate 
to make the race for attorney general, but was 
efeated in that campaign. His first aspirations for 
a seat in Congress were also defeated by J. E. 
Ellerbe, whom he finally succeeded in 19 13. Among 
other important committees he served on the Com- 
mittee on Foreign Affairs. Mr. Ragsdale was a 
Methodist, was a trustee of the South Carolina In- 
dustrial School, and was a member of the Columbia 
Club of South Carolina and the Army and Navy 
Qub of Washington. 

November 15, 1900, he married Marie Louise 
Joynes, of Columbia, daughter of the late Dr. 
Edward Southey Joynes, the distinguished South 
Carolina educator whose career is briefly sketched 
elsewhere. Mr. Ragsdale was survived by two chil- 
dren: James, aged eighteen, and Marie, aged four- 
teen. 

Besides the many tributes paid the life and work 
of Mr. Ragsdale by members of Congress and of 
his home community, the following interesting com- 
ments are found in an article by the Washington 
correspondent of the Columbia State: 

"It is probable that from the time Mr. Ragsdale 
entered Congress as the successor to the late J. E. 
Ellerbe of Marion until the death of Mrs. Ragsdale's 
father, the late Dr. E. S. Joynes of Columbia, no 
one entertained official and social Washington more 
elegantly and lavishly than he and Mrs. Ragsdale. 
Their first home in the fashionable section of Wash- 
ington, on Connecticut Avenue, was often the scene 
of magnificent functions, and later when they moved 
to the old William J. Bryan residence, Calumet 
Place, this entertainment was continued. About a 
year and a half ago, upon the death of Doctor 
Jo>'nes, this public entertaining naturally ceased for 
a time and Mrs. Ragsdale since then has mostly 
remained at her home at Florence. 

"Mr. Ragsdale's influence in certain departments 
of Washington was frequently commented upon. It 
was often stated that he could get more appoint- 
ments for his constituents from the state depart- 
ment than almost any other member of the House. 
There are now many men from South Carolina in 
the diplomatic service due to his efforts. There 
was also a strong link between Mr. Ragsdale and the 
War Department, and during the momentous days 
of the war he landed many excellent assignments 
for men from South Carolina in various depart- 
ments of the service. He was especially close to 
General Enoch Crowder, judge advocate general of 
the army and provost marshal general. 

"It has frequently been noted in Washington that 
Mr. Ragsdale was always willing to do whatever he 
could for any man from South Carolina if it came 
to his knowledge that his services were needed, and 
during the early days of his official career he took 
the initiative in this matter and stamped himself 
as being always at the command of any South Caro- 
linian with a worthy cause. 

"Mr. Ragsdale was close to the late Senator Till- 
man, and last summer, just before Senator Tillman's 



death, Mr. Ragsdale had under consideration for 
some time the question of entering the race for the 
United States Senate, but always said that he never 
would do so while Senator Tillman was a candidate. 
As events of last year turned out, the situation 
developed so that after Senator Tillman's death 
it was too late for Mr. Ragsdale to enter the race. 
He had many urgent suggestions from friends in 
different parts of the state offering their support 
in the event that he should become a candidate. His 
loyalty to Senator Tillman was unquestioned and 
remained so throughout his life and that of the 
Senator." 

Edward Southey Joynes, M. A., LL. D., who 
died in Columbia, South Carolina, June 18, 191 7, 
was one of America's most distinguished educators. 

He was born in Accomack County, Virginia, 
March 2, 1834. He was a son of Thomas R. and 
Anne Bell (Satchell) Joynes, a grandson of Maj. 
Levin Joynes of the Continental army, and a de- 
scendant of some of the .earliest English settlers on 
the eastern shore of the Old Dominion. After re- 
ceiving his preparatory training at the celebrated 
Concord Academy,. Virginia, and at Delaware Col- 
lege, he entered the University of Virginia in 1850, 
and graduated from that institution with the degree 
of A. B. in 1852 and M. A. the following year. 
On his graduation in 1853, he was appointed 
Assistant Professor of Ancient Languages, 
under the distinguished Dr. Gessner Harrison, 
and remained at the University of Virginia in 
this capacity until 1856. To prepare himself more 
completely for his life-work, he then went to the 
University of Berlin, 1856-1858, where he studied 
under the most famous professors then living. 
While still abroad, he was, in 1858, elected Pro- 
fessor of Greek and German in William and Mary 
College. Here, in Williamsburg, Virginia, long 
famed for its brilliant social life, he met, and mar- 
ried, December 14, 1859, Miss Eliza Waller Vest. 
To this union were born four children: Capt. 
Walker W. Joynes, of the United States Revenue 
Cutter Service; Mrs. Alex. G. Fite. of Nashville, 
Tennessee; Mrs. Robert Macfarlan of Darlingtop, 
South Carolina; and Mrs., J. Willard Ragsdale, of 
Florence, South Carolina. 

In 1861 William and Mary College having closed, 
Professor Joynes was appointed chief clerk in the 
Confederate States War Department ip Richmond, 
where he served until 1864. From 1864 to 1865 
he taught Modern Languages in Hollins Institute, 
Virginia. In 1866 he became Professor of Modern 
Languages and English in Washington College (now 
Washington and Lee University) at Lexington, Vir- 
ginia, and regarded his service under Gen. Robt. 
E. Lee, who was president of the college, as the 
greatest privilege of his life. In 1875 he was elected 
Professor of Modern Languages and English in 
Vandcrbilt University, and in 1878 to the same chair 
in the University of Tennessee. The degree of 
LL. D. was conferred upon him by Delaware 
College in 1875, and by William and Mary 
in 1878. In 1882 he entered upon his duties as 
Professor of Modern Languages and English at the 
South Carolina College, and continued his work 
there until he was retired by the Carnegie Board 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



in 1908, after fifty- four years of educational work, 
for "unusual and distinguished services as Professor 
of Modem Languages/' He was at once made 
Professor Emeritus of the University of South Car- 
olina. 

In addition to his long service as professor, Doc- 
tor Joynes was distinguished as a successful author 
of many well known text-books in German and 
French, which are now regarded as classics in the 
world of letters, and are used all over America. 
Of these, the most important are his well known 

frammars of German and French; his "Maria 
tuart" in German, and his "La Mare au Diable" 
in French. 

Doctor Joynes was always deeply interested in 
public school work in Virginia, Tennessee, and 
South Carolina. He assisted in founding and or- 
ganizing the graded school system in South Caro- 
lina, and was one of the founders and trustees of 
Winthrop College. It was due to his untiring 
efforts that the University charter was secured for 
the South Carolina College. This fact is referred 
to in the dedication of the Year Book for 1907, as 
follows : 

"To Dr. Edward Southey Joynes, Professor of 
Modern Languages, eminent as teacher and scholar, 
a distinguished author, patron of the Literary Socie- 
ties, and 'Father of the University,' this volume is 
affectionately dedicated." 

As a conversationalist Doctor ^oynes was bril- 
liant and fascinating, as a writer he was an 
acknowledged master of English prose; as a teacher 
he was scholarly and inspiring. His varied attain- 
ments and charming personality drew around him 
an admiring circle of devoted friends. A cultured 
gentleman of the Old South, he was imbued with 
the youthful zeal and progressive spirit of the New 
South. His long experience as an educator, the 
text-books which came from his pen, and the ripe 
scholarship which characterized his writings and 
addresses, made him more than a state figure, — ^he 
was known nationally. His is a name mentioned 
with reverence and affection wherever scholars are 
gathered together, a name that is a synonym for 
sound learning, pre-eminent ability, and scholarly 
production. 

The New York Nation says of Doctor Joynes: 
"Probably few, if any American professors, have 
personally taught so many students in foreign 
tongues, and certainly no other American professor 
has so widely influenced the study of Modern Lan- 
guages in America." 

Thomas Calvin Stevenson has been an engineer 
for a quarter of a century, and as president of the 
Charleston Engineering and Contracting Company 
has been identified with many important constructive 
enterprises, both private and public works, in 
Charleston and up and down the coast. 

Mr. Stevenson was born in Chester County, South 
Carolina, September 3, 1873. His father was Daniel 
R. Stevenson. HJs mother, Nancy Beaty, was born 
in Fairfield County, South Carolina, a daughter of 
James Beaty, a native of Ireland, of Scotch-Irish 
parentage. Thomas C. Stevenson was the youngest 
m a family of seven children, five of whom are still 
living. He completed his education at The Citadel 



at Charleston, graduating in 1894. He then took 
up engineering as a Government empk)ye, and spent 
several years in fortification work. He then en- 
tered contract construction, and in 1910 organized 
the Charleston Engineering and Contracting Com- 
pany, of which he has been president Mr. J. A. 
McCormack is secretary-treasurer. 

Mr. Stevenson married in 1904 Miss Nell Wil- 
liams, of Alabama. They have five sons, Thomas 
C, Jr., Jere W., Dan R., Fred W. and Norman W. 
Mr. Stevenson is a Mason and member of the 
Chamber of Commerce, and is an elder in the West- 
minster Presbyterian Church. 

Benjamin Mason Anderson was a son of the 
late Maj. Franklin L. Anderson. His father was 
distinguished as a Confederate soldier and officer, 
and one of the finest representatives of tWe chivalry 
and ideals of the South. Major Anderson during 
the greater part of his life lived at the beautiful 
ancestral estate of the Anderson family. Holly Hill, 
in Spartanburg County. 

At Holly Hill, one of the beautiful landmarks of 
upper South Carolina, Benjamin Mason Anderson 
was bom September 9, 1874. As noted in the sketch 
of Major Anderson, he was a child of his father's 
second marriage, his mother being Ada Eppes. 

Though Benjamin Mason Anderson died Septem- 
ber 13, 1918, at the age of forty- four, in a com- 
paratively brief career he had emulated the high 
character of his honored father and left a record of 
good citizenship and practical achievement that g^ives 
his name a lasting affection in the hearts of Spar- 
tanburg County people. He was liberally educated, 
and became inspired with (lis responsibilities and 
opportunities for service to the agricultural devel- 
opment of his region. It was the part he played as 
a farmer that constitutes his best business achieve- 
ment. He was long regarded as an authority on the 
subject of agriculture, and his extensive farms were 
and are today models of progressive culture and 
management in the Piedmont section. H^ always 
believed that farming was one of the highest voca- 
tions which can command the services of men, and 
he took pride in stud3dng it from a scientific stand- 
point and adopting every progressive device to the 
handling of his own property and encouraging his 
neighbors in similar progressive systems. The coun- 
try home where he lived with his family and where 
he died was in the Reidville section of Spartanburg 
County. 

His work and influence were by no means con- 
fined to his immediate possessions. He regarded 
the interests of his home community as his own, 
and was always willing to perform service for the 
upbuilding of the county and state. He was reared 
in the old home church of the Anderson family, 
the Nazareth Church of the Presbyterian denom- 
ination. At the time of his death he was an elder 
in the Reidville Presbyterian Church, this organiza- 
tion having grown out of Nazareth. His funeral 
services were conducted in the church where he had 
worshiped in earliest childhood. 

Mr. Anderson married Miss Mary Philson of 
Clinton, South Carolina. She and five children sur- 
vive, the children being Kathryn, Sadie, Henrietta, 
Benjamin and Mary Agnes Anderson. Mrs. Ander- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



153 



son <was well educated for the responsibilities she 
has carried since her marriage, and has radiated a 
wonderful influence in her home and has also shown 
the qualities of good business judgment. She has 
been a worker in many women's organizations in the 
county, both church and patriotic. 

Capt. Hakry Ogier Withington, a prominent 
young Charleston business man, was commander of 
the Motor Battalion of the One Hundred and Fifth 
Ammunition Train practically the entire time this 
splendid body of Charleston soldiers were on active 
duty in France, from July, 1918, until after the 
signing of the armistice. 

Captain Withington Was born at Charleston in 
1882, son of William A. and Julia M. (Thrower) 
Withington. The With ingtons* are of English an- 
cestry and on coming to America established their 
home in Massachusetts. William A. Withington 
was also bom at Charleston, son of Perez With- 
ington. 

Captain Withington was reared in Charleston, had 
a public school education, and prior to the World 
war and since returning from abroad has been in 
active business life as secretary of the. Lanneau 
Art Store and secretary and treasurer of Melcher's 
Studio. 

Many years of training and discipline with the 
state troops gave Captain Withington preparation 
for the duties he performed as an officer in the 
American Expeditionary Forces. As a boy he joined 
the Washington Light Infantry. He was a member 
of that organization eighteen years, ten years of the 
time as captain. The Washington Light Infantry, 
whose history as a military unit has been continuous 
since 1807 and whose members have participated in 
all the wars of the nation since that date, was 
Company B of the Second South Carolina Infantry 
prior to the war with Germany. 

Captain Withington gave nearly three years to the 
military service of the nation. He was in com- 
mand of his company on the Mexican border from 
June, 1916, to March, 1917. He and the company 
were called into Federal service in July, 19 17, and 
was on guard duty at Camp Jackson until Septem- 
ber of that year and then in training at Camp Sevier 
until the spring of 1918. While at Sevier the com- 
pany became the nucleus of the One Hundred and 
Fifth Ammunition Train of the Thirtieth Division. 
As such it sailed from Montreal for France May 
26, 1918. In France the One Hundred and Fifth 
Ammunition Train was assigned for active front 
line duty in various divisions, being changed about 
according to the exigencies of the service. Captain 
Withington was on duty during the Somme-St. 
Mihiel drive, at the Argonne, in the defense of the 
Toul sector, and also on the Woevre Plains. There 
was seldom a letup to the service at and near the 
front lines beginning with the great offensives of 
July and ending with the armistice. 

After reaching France Captain Withington was 
made battalion commander of the Motor Battalion 
of the One Hundred and Fifth Ammunition Train. 
From the time his men received their final inspec- 
tion at Le Mans until the embarkation for home 
Captain Withington was in command of the entire 
One Hundred and Fifth Ammunition Train, com- 



prising seven companies and numerous detachments, 
a total of 1,300 men. Captain Withington left 
France March 13, 1919, reaching Charleston toward 
the end of the same month, and was discharged 
April 3, 1919. 

Captain Withmgton is a member of Bethel Meth- 
odist Church and is affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias. He married Miss Jennie Connor, of 
Branchville, South Carolina, daughter of David and 
Annie Connor and granddaughter of General Stokes, 
a distinguished Confederate officer. Mrs. Withing- 
ton is deceased, and is survived by a daughter, Julia 
Elizabeth Withington. 

J. Arthur Wiggins, active vice president and 
manager of the Bank of Denmark, first identified 
himself with that commtmity of Bamberg County 
in the capacity of an educator. For a number of 
years he was head of the Denmark schools, finally 
resigning to take up banking. 

He was born at Holly Hill, South Carolina, July 
26, 1871. He is of English ancestry, the family com- 
ing to America in the i6oo's and taking part in the 
Revolution. His grandfather, James Wiggins, was 
a farmer, while his father, James B. Wiggins, is a 
successful physician and surgeon. Dr. J. B. Wig- 
ghis was a surgeon in the Confederate army, taking 
an active part throughout the struggle, and was 
prominentty identified with the famous "red shirt" 
brigade during the period of reconstruction. He 
was active in the political world, in which he ex- 
ercised a wide influence. He was called upon sev- 
eral times to serve in public office and filled the 
offices of county treasurer and county auditor. In 
addition to his professional and political duties he 
owned and operated ^bout 4,000 acres in what is 
now Orangeburg County, cultivating what is known 
as a twenty-plow farm. He was prominent in the 
Methodist Church at Holly Hill, in which he was 
a steward. He died in 1910. Doctor Wiggins mar- 
ried Mary C. Brownlee, a native of Holly Hill. Both 
the Brownlee and Wiggins families were early set- 
tled in South Carolina. 

J. Arthur Wiggins was reared and educated in his 
home community and received his A. B. degree in 
1895 from Wofford College at Spartanburg. He 
spent ten years as superintendent of the high school 
at Denmark, and in 1906 accepted the post of cashier 
in the Bank of Denmark, and since 191 5 has been 
its active vice president and manager. He exercises 
a wide influence in financial matters of the district. 
The bank is one of the strong ones of Bamberg 
County, and has a capital of $50,000, and belongs 
to the State and National Banking Associations. 
D. N. Cox is president. 

Mr. Wiggins takes an active part in the work of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, being a 
steward and trustee. He is affiliated with the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias and the 
Woodmen of the World. 

In 1896 he married Miss Mattie Connor, a native 
of Holly Hill and a daughter of Fred Connor, a 
farmer of Holly Hill. The Connors are an old 
South Carolina family of Revolutionary stock. Fred 
Connor was a soldier in the Confederate army and 
served until the close of the war. He was a man of 
sterling character and was an ardent supporter of 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



all measures looking toward the general welfare of 
the community. He became one of the wealthiest 
and most prominent men of the Holly Hill section. 
He died in 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Wiggins have four 
sons and four daughters: Reynold, Vera, Martha, 
James, Fred, Grace, Frances and Hugh. 

Reynold C. Wiggins is auditor of the Edisto Na- 
tional Bank at Orangeburg. He married Ruth, a 
daughter of Capt. J. B. Guess of Denmark, one of 
the most prominent farmers in this section of the 
state. The Guess family is of Revolutionary stock. 

Edward H. McIver, who for twenty years has 
had an active business career at Charleston, where 
he is now secretary of the Leland Moore Paint & 
Oil Company, is a grandson of the distinguished 
Hon. Henry McIver and member of the historic 
family of that name in the old Cheraw District of 
South Carolina, frequently referred to in Bishop 
Gregg's notable work, the History of the Cheraws. 

Hon. Henry McIver was bom in Darlington 
County, South Carolina, in 1826, and graduated 
from South Carolina College in 1846. The follow- 
ing year, after studying law with his father, he 
was admitted to the bar, and three years later, 
when his father died, he was solicitor and continued 
to fill that office until the close of the Civil war. 
In 1877 he was elected an associate judge of the 
Supreme Court, and upon the death of Chief Jus- 
tice Simpson was elected chief justice. He was a 
member of the Secession Convention of South 
Carolina and served as an officer in the Fourth 
South Carolina Cavalry under General Hampton, 
being successively promoted from second lieuten- 
ant to first lieutenant and finally to a captaincy. 
Judge McIver married Caroline Powe, daughter of 
Dr. Thomas Powe, of Cheraw. 

Edward H. McIver was born at Cheraw, in Ches- 
terfield County, a son of Thomas P. and Susan 
(Duvall) McIver, the father now deceased. When 
a boy he came to Charleston and finished his educa- 
tion in the Charleston High School and the College 
of Charleston. He then began his business career, 
and for a number of years has been associated with 
the Leland Moore Paint & Oil Company. In Jan- 
uary, 1920. this corporation increased its charter 
from $40,000 to $iSO,ooo, to provide funds for the 
building of a new plant with greatly enlarged manu- 
facturing facilities for the making of paints and 
oils. With this new plant it will become one of the 
larger industrial concerns of Charleston. 

Mr. McIver is a member of the St. Cecelia So- 
ciety, the Charleston Country Club, the Carolina 
Yadit Club, the Young Men's Christian Association, 
the Chamber of Commerce, the Masonic order and 
St. Philip's Church. He married Miss Kate Bull, 
of Orangeburg. 

G. Frank Bamberg. The Bambergs are one of the 
oldest families of South Carolina. They were 
transplanted from Germany to the Carolina colonies 
about 1700. For two centuries they have been 
prominent planters, business men and citizens in the 
southern part of the state. 

G. Frank Bamberg of Bamberg is owner and 
director of some of the largest plantations in the 
southern part of the state and is also a leading 



banker at Bamberg. He was bom in that city 
October 8, 1873. His great-grandfather was' John 
George Bamberg, a native of Lexington County, 
South Carolina, a minister of the Lutheran Church. 
He died in 1800. The grandfather, John Frederick 
Bamberg, was a native of that portion of Barnwell 
County now Bamberg. The father of the Bamberg 
banker was Francis Marion Bamberg, who was bom 
in what is now Bamberg County and was a prom- 
inent banker, stock farmer and planter. He was a 
member of Hart's Battery, Hampton's Legion, dur- 
ing the Confederate struggle, and served throughout 
the war as a lieutenant. During the reconstruction 
period of 1876 he was a prominent figure among 
the "Red Shirts," and although a natural leader 
among men, he never aspired to political honors. 
The Town of Bamberg was named for his uncle, 
W. C. Bamberg, while the county was named in his 
honor. The United Daughters of the Confederacy 
also named their chapter in Bamberg in his honor. 
He was a rugged, fearless American whose un- 
wavering kindness endeared him to all. He helped 
every one he could and would buy any honest man 
a farm to start him right. At the time of his death, 
which occurred in his sixty-seventh year, he left 
$300,000 in mortgages with instructions to his son 
to never foreclose one of them, an order which the 
latter, G. Frank Bamberg, has never violated. Mr. 
F. M. Bamberg was affiliated with the Masons. He 
married Mary Ann Jennings, who was of English 
ancestry. The Jennmgs family was established in 
South Carolina in 1737- She was a daughter of 
George P. and Harriet Ann (Moody) Jennmgs and 
a granddaughter of John Jennings, a native of Or- 
angeburg County. 

G. Frank Bamberg was the third in a family of 
eight children. He was educated at WoflFord Col- 
lege in Spartanburg, and at the age of twenty began 
business for himself as a livestock dealer and 
planter. Today he owns 2,500 acres, with about 
1,500 acres under cultivation, being one of the larg- 
est producers of cotton in the southern counties of 
the state. Mr. Bamberg is president of the Bamberg 
Auto Company, and of the Bamberg Banking Com- 
pany, which operates on a capital of $55,000. He is 
vice president of the B. E. & W. Railroad. Mr. 
Baml^rg is a member of the Masonic order 

In i^ he married Nell Elizabeth McGee, a 
daughter oi J. B. and Mollie (Cobb) McC^ee. They 
have two sons and one daughter: Francis Marion, 
Joseph McGee and Nell Jennings. 

C. M. Benedict has for a number of years been 
a factor in the public utilities business of South 
Carolina. He is vice president of the (Charleston 
Consolidated Railway and Light Company. 

He had a thorough training in the technkal as 
well as the business departments of public utilities. 
He was bom at Gloversville, New York, June 7» 
1872, son of Joseph E. and A. (Morgan) Benedict 
He is of English ancestry. He was the only son of 
his parents and had a high school education and 
also attended the Fort Edward Institute in his 
native state. Some of his younger years were spent 
in the lumber busmess, and at the age of twenty- 
one he gained his first experience in the gas indus- 
try, with the old Gloversville Gas Company. He 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



155 



began as a pipe fitter, and went through various 
grades of promotion until at the end of seven 3rears 
he was made manager of the company. This plant 
was owned by a larger corporation having head- 
quarters at Philadelphia, to which city Mr. Benedict 
was called. In Uie spring of 1910 he came to 
Charleston and was made assistant treasurer of the 
Charleston Consolidated Railway and Light Com- 
pany. In Noven>ber, 191 7, he was promoted to his 
present office as vice president. 

He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, 
the Charleston Club, Country Club, Otranto Club, 
also of the Manufacturers Club of Philadelphia and 
of the Presb3rterian Church. He married Marvie 
Rhodes, of Gloversville, New York. They have two 
sons, Joseph B. and Clarence M., Jr. Joseph B. 
was an ensign in the United States Navy and was 
engaged in transport duty during the war. He re- 
signed from the service, effective June 21, 1920. 

Jesse Francis Carter. After working his way 
through school, paying expenses of his living and 
of his education and with the aid of his versatile 
and brilliant talents, Jesse Francis Carter has won 
an enviable position as a lawyer at Bamberg. 

He was born near the little town, of Lodge in 
Colleton County, September 12, 1873. His father, 
Miles McMillin Carter, was a native of the same 
county and spent his active life as a farmer. He 
is of an old South Carolina family of English 
descent. He married Janie Irene Kinard, a native 
of Barnwell County, and daughter of Jacob Francis 
Kinnard, also an old South Carolina family of 
Scotch-Irish descent. Miles Carter after his mar- 
riage moved to a plantation in Colleton County 
where his six sons were born, all of whom are still 
living, named: Jesse Francis and Bert Dean Carter, 
attorneys at law in Bamberg under the firm name 
of Carter, Carter & Kearse; Joseph Edgar Carter 
of Wilmington, North Carolina; Alonzo B. Carter, 
of Maxton, North Carolina; Wilbur Lee Carter of 
Greensboro, North Carolina; and Miles J, Carter 
of Florence, Alabama, all of whom are engaged in 
some phase of insurance work, Wilbur Lee and 
Miles J. owning controlling interests in the business 
which they conduct. 

Jesse Francis Carter as a small boy had oppor- 
tunities to occasionally attend a log cabin school in 
Colleton County, a term of only a few weeks each 
year. He was thirteen when his father died, at 
which time he took charge of the farm and as- 
sisted his mother in rearing his infant brothers. 
His mother died when he was twenty years of age, 
after which he attended the graded schools at Bam- 
berg, also a classical institute, and as a means of 
support taught a number of summer terms. He 
finally entered Peabody College ifi Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, where he graduated in 1900^ and after teach- 
ing for a while, he graduated with the degree A. B. 
from the University of Nashville in 1903. In 1904 
Mr. Carter entered the Law School of the Univer- 
sity of South Carolina and took two years' work 
in one, receiving his LL. B. degree in 1905. He then 
located at Bamberg, and has rapidly made his way 
to the front as a lawyer. In 1900 he again took spe- 
cial post-grraduate work in Chicago. He is engaged 
in general practice and is a member of the firm 



Carter, Carter & Kearse of Bamberg, South Caro- 
lina. Mr. Carter owns and as a means of recreation 
conducts some small farming interests in the neigh- 
borhood of Bamberg. 

In college and university Mr. Carter gave all the 
time he could to literary and debating societies. 
He won several debates, including the debater's 
medal of his society at the University of South 
Carolina. He was also a winner in the oratorical 
contest, and was president of his literary society in 
the University of Nashville and was made perma- 
nent secretary of his class at graduation. 

He is affiliated with the Masonic ord6r and the 
Knights of Pythias, and has held many of the 
offices in both orders. He is a member of the State 
Bar Association and was attorney for the local 
board of Bamberg County during the war, also gov- 
ernment appeal agent, a member of the State Coun- 
cil of Defense, and a leader in the second Red Cross 
campaign and in many other war activities. He is 
a member and deacon of the Missionary Baptist 
Church and teacher of its Men's Bible Class. Mr. 
Carter has never been a seeker for political honors, 
but is one of the most influential men in his party 
in Bamberg County and is the present chairmari of 
the democratic county committee, serving his sec- 
ond term in that office. Mr. Carter is president of 
the Home Building & Loan Association, which has 
an issued capital of $200,000. This is a recently 
organized company, Mr. Carter being one of the 
organizers. The company starts off with bright 
prospects. 

In 191 1 Mr. Carter married Lydia Jenkins, a 
daughter of B. M. Jenkins of Kline, South Caro- 
lina. They have three daughters: Lydia Frances, 
Janie Elizabeth and Martha Jaudon Carter. 

James Hayes- Roberts, M. D. The veteran phy- 
sician and surgeon of Ehrhardt is Dr. James H. 
Roberts, who began practice there nearly thirty 
years ago. He has had much to do with the pro- 
fessional, business and civic life of this community. 

Doctor Roberts was born at Allendale in old 
Barnwell County March 2, 1863. His grandfather, 
Richard Roberts, according to the best information 
obtainable, was a * native of France. The father. 
Dr. Richard Creech Roberts, was a native of Barn- 
well County, was reared and educated there, and 
for fifty years practiced dentistry. He served as a 
lieutenant of cavalry in the Confederate army and 
was at one time a member of the Legislature and 
in other ways prominent in local affairs. He was 
a major in the State Militia. He died at the age 
of sixty-nine. His wife was Sarah Emily Duiin, of 
Barnwell County. Her father was born in Ireland 
and came to Barnwell County when a young man 
and was a contractor and built many of the early 
houses in that county. 

Dr. James Hayes Roberts was the second in a 
family of six children, five of whom reached ma- 
ture years and two are still living, the other being 
Boyce H. 

Doctor Roberts was liberally educated, attending 
the Porter Military Academy and The Citadel at 
Charleston, and graduating from the South Caro- 
lina Medical College on March 4, 1887. For three 
years he practiced in his native town of Allendale, 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



and in 1890 located at Ehrhardt. During 1906-07 
he was in practice at Great Falls, but then returned 
to Ehrhardt. He is a member of the Bamberg 
County Medical Society, the State Medical Associa- 
tion, is vice president of the Farmers and Mer- 
chants Bank of Ehrhardt, and is affiliated with the 
Masonic order, the Knights of Pjrthias and the 
Woodmen of the World. 

February 25, 1891, Doctor Roberts married Lottie 
O. Barber. She died July 18, 1895, the mother of 
two children: Sarah Elizabeth, wife of B. D. Car- 
* ter, a Bamberg attorney, and Lottie, who died at 
the age of nine months. October 9, 1901, Doctor 
Roberts married Laura Dunbar, widow of James 
Dunbar. They have had seven children: James 
Heyward, Richard C, Furman, Catherine, Lucile, 
deceased, Louise and Carlisle. 

Junius T. Liles, lieutenant governor of South 
Carolina in 1919-20, has given a notably constructive 
service to the legislative and public affairs of South 
Carolina for eight years. He is a business man of 
Orangeburg and was born at Lilesville, Anson 
County, North Carolina, August 25, 1876, son of 
Col. Edward R. and Frances (Fladger) Liles. 

His father, for many years prominent in North 
Carolina politics, died when the future lieutenant 
governor of South Carolina was but six years old. 
Later his mother, a daughter of Rev. Charles B. 
and Jane (Givee) Fladger of Marion County, South 
Carolina, became the wife of Capt. John H. Hamer 
of Little Rock, South Carolina. 

Through industrious efforts and thrifty manage- 
ment of his meager opportunities and financial re- 
sources Junius T Lides came to manhood with a 
good education. After attending private and pub- 
lic schools in Marion County he entered the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at the age of seventeen, 
but could only attend one year. He then became a 
bank clerk and salesman in Marion County, and 
after two and a half years of such work had saved 
enough to enter Wilmore College of Kentucky. His 
studies in that institution were interrupted by the 
outbreak of the Spanish- American war, during 
which he enlisted in the Second Kentucky In- 
fantry. 

In 1901 Mr. Liles engaged in the insurance busi- 
ness, and his success in that line has made him one 
of the most prominent figures in the insurance world 
in South Carolina. In 1908 he became general man- 
ager for this state for the Jefferson Standard Life 
Insurance Company. He is associated with his 
brother in the General Insurance Agency of Liles 
& Liles of Orangeburg. 

All his enthusiasm was given to business until his 
success was assured, and his career in politics did 
not begin until 1912, when he was elected to the 
Legislature from Orangeburg County. He led the 
ticket in the first primary with fourteen in the race, 
and was re-elected in 1914 and 1916, winning out 
by a handsome majority each time in the first 
primary. 

His business experience and other qualifications 
enabled him to take a leading part in legislative 
activities and in 1916 was made chairman of the 
Ways and Means Committee of the House of Rep- 
resentatives. His name was associated with some 



of the most progressive and creditable legislation 
during the past eight years. 

Among the most notable features of his legislative 
record, he was connected either as author or spon- 
sor with some measures of far-reaching importance, 
including the acts creating the tax commission, laws 
of great benefit to the educational system of the 
state, the law that made it a chain-gang offense with- 
out the alternative of a fine to sell whiskey illegally, 
and also the act providing the necessary appropria- 
tion for eradicating from the state the Texas cattle 
fever, the enforcement of which has lifted the most* 
serious obstacle to the development of the cattle 
industry in South Carolina. 

Throughout his entire membership in the House 
of Representatives he was regarded as a leader 
and was selected by the governor as pilot for some 
of the most important measures that have been en- 
acted into law in the state for many years. His 
political career was an open book to the public, and 
he demonstrated the value of honorable methods in 
dealing with the affairs of government, a policy 
which in itself is a permanent contribution to the 
betterment of state politics. 

In 191 8 he was elected lieutenant governor of 
South Carolina, and notwithstanding the fact that 
he had every assurance of re-election to that posi- 
tion in 1920 declined to run again and withdrew from 
politics, stating that while he desired no longer to 
hold office, he would yet hold himself in readiness 
to respond to the call of the people if at any time 
his services should be needed for the advancement 
of the welfare of his state. 

In 1899 Mr. Liles married Miss Gertrude Jones, 
of Meridian, Mississippi. To their marriage have 
been born four children. 

Francis Q. O'Neill. The name O'Neill has been 
a distinctive one in the commercial, financial and 
, civic affairs in Charleston for more than half a 
century. 

The father of Francis Q. O'Neill, long prominent 
as a merchant and banker, was Bernard O'Neill, 
who was bom in Ireland and came to Charleston 
in 1840. He was a merchant and banker, built up 
a large wholesale house and at one time was presi- 
dent of the Hibernia Bank, Loan & Trust Company. 
He was a member of the Legislature of 1876 when 
white government was restored in the state. His 
ability as a banker was an important resource in 
restoring the state's credit. He was at one tknc 
acting mayor of the City of Charleston, and lived to 
be eighty-three years of age. His wife was Eliza- 
beth Quale. They had five sons and three daugh- 
ters, and two sons and two daughters are still liv- 
ing, all at Charleston. 

Francis Q. O'Neill was born in Charleston July 
13* 1857. He grew up in a good and comfortable 
home with every encouragement to develop his 
talents. He was graduated with the first honors of 
his class from the College of Charleston in 1878. 
In the following year he began his business career 
as a clerk and in 1884 became a member of his 
father's fifm. For several years he was president 
of the Combahee Fertilizer Company. He was also 
president of the Hibernia Bank. He is now a di- 
rector of the First National Bank, a director of the 



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Bank of Western Carolina, is vice president of the 
Equitable Insurance Company, president of the Jack- 
sonboro Lumber Company and has long been inter- 
ested in various business and industrial organiza- 
tions. 

In 1894 he was acting mayor of Charleston, and 
beginning in 1898 served as alderman for many 
years. He is a trustee of the College of Charleston, 
the Charleston Library Society and the Charleston 
Orphan House, and has been a member of various 
public boards. He is a member of the Charleston 
Club, the Charleston Yacht Club, Chamber of Com- 
merce and is a prominent member of St. John's 
Cathedral of the Catholic Church. In 1905 he mar- 
ried Emma Fourgeaud McGahan. Their two chil- 
dren are Etnma T. and Francis Q., Jr. 

Robinson P. Searson has practiced law at Allen- 
dale since 1907. His reputation as a lawyer is by 
no means confined to one community of the state. 
For several years he represented Barnwell County 
in the State Legislature. As an Allendale man there 
was committed to him the responsibility of repre- 
senting interests of his constituents in agitating for 
a new county organization. He discharged those 
responsibilities with his characteristic ability and in- 
fluence, and it was largely through him that the 
program was carried to the Legislature for the crea- 
tion of Allendale County. This is one of the small- 
est but one of the richest counties in the state, and 
with Allendale as the county seat the new civil 
unit, which came into existence in January, 1919, is 
justifying all the hopes and expectations of its 
zealous advQcates. 

Mr. Searson was born at Allendale, February 5, 
i89i> and most of his life interests have been in that 
community. His father was R. P. Searson, of South 
Carolina; his mother was Bonita Arnold, a daugh- 
ter of William W3mne Arnold, a prominent equity 
lawyer of Georgia, to whom the Georgia State 
Legislature erected a monument at Zebulon in 1854; 
and his great-great-grandfather, John Robinson 
Searson, who married a niece of Commodore Hull 
of the "Constitution," was of English ancestry and 
was an American soldier in the Revolution under 
General Marion. 

The late R. P. Searson, who died in 1916, was 
one of the first settlers in the town of Allendale 
and for thirty years was its postmaster and a mer- 
chant and druggist of long standing. He was also 
a Confederate soldier serving in Butler's Cavalry. 
He personally assisted General Butler to the rear 
at the battle of Seven Pines, when this gallant Con- 
federate officer had his leg shot oflF. 

Robinson P. Searson was educated in the Johnston 
Institute, in Clemson College, and took both the lit- 
erary and law courses in the University of South 
Carolina. He received his LL. B. degree in 1902. 
Following that he practiced at Hampton two years, 
three or four years at Barnesville, Georgia, then 
locating at Allendale. He enjoys a large general 
practice, and has exercised much* influence both in 
local and state politics. In 1918 he was candidate for 
the democratic nomination for attorney general. He 
represented Barnwell County in the State Legisla- 
ture for six years. 

Mr. Searson was also identified with all the or- 



ganizations in his home county and state for the 
better prosecution of the war. He was a member 
of the Legal Advisory Board for Barnwell County 
and chairman of the Victory Loan for the Second 
Congressional District. Mr. Searson is a Baptist 
and is affiliated with the Elks and Knights of 
Pvthias. He married Miss Mattie Tea Turner, of 
Macon, Georgia, and they have one son, R. P. Sear- 
son III. 

Edmund B. Jackson. A new chapter is being 
written in the history of southern banking and one 
that serves to obliterate the older picture of the 
banker as an obstacle to the progress of the south- 
ern farmer. One of South Carolina's bankers whose 
activities and influence are a constructive example 
in this new era is Edmund B. Jackson, of Wagener, 
Aiken County. 

Mr. Jackson, who is president of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Wagener, and himself an extensive 
planter, was born in Aiken County, ten miles from 
the Town of Wagener, in 1881, son of W. Q. and 
Laura (Jeffords) Jackson. His early life was spent 
on a farm, and from boyhood he has had an ex- 
perience that gives him a practical knowledge of 
cotton oroduction. He was thoroughly educated, 
graduating from The Citadel at Charleston in 1901. 

Several years later Mr. Jackson became one of 
the organizers of the Bank of Wagener, established 
in August, 1907. He was its cashier until 1912 and 
since has been president. However, on February 
14, 1914, the bank took out a national charter as the 
First National Bank. Its capital stock is $30,000 
and the deposits now aggregate nearly half a mil- 
lion. The service of the bank has been much more 
than that of a routine banking institution. It has 
been one of the primary factors in the growth and 
development of the Town of Wagener and the sur- 
rounding rich agricultural territory, which is ad- 
mittedly the best agricultural part of Aiken County. 
Within a few years Wagener has become the chief 
cotton market of the county, and is a town growing 
and prospering, with a number of important mer7 
cantile institutions. 

Ever since he became a banker^ Mr. Jackson has 
devoted his best talents and energies to the welfare 
of cotton farmers, not as a philanthropist, but as a 
far-sighted business man who conceives the welfare 
of his patrons as inextricably bound up with that 
of himself and his bank. Having grown up in the 
community, he knoWs what the problems of the 
farmers are and their needs. His greatest satis- 
faction has been derived from the part his bank 
has had in the prosperity of his cotton growing 
customers. Mr. Jackson was the first banker in 
South Carolina to lend money to cotton farmers at 
six per cent. His was also the first bank to enlist 
the Federal Land Bank system for extending finan- 
cial assistance to farmers. Between ninety and 
ninety-five per cent of the loans made by the First 
National Bank are to farmers. Contrary to a deep 
seated prejudice among some older bankers, the 
records show that this bank has never lost a cent 
of money on such loans. This record is due above 
all to Mr. Jackson's personal judgment. It is said 
that he knows every farmer in his section, also 
knows his land, his stock, and his character and 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA. 



reputation, and stands in the relation of a personal 
adviser to everyone who conies into his bank re- 
questing a loan. Much of his lending is on the 
"moral risk," but his faith has always been justified 
by the results. 

Mr. Jackson owns several fine plantations, and for 
years has been one of the most extensive cotton 
growers in Aiken County. He has also carried on 
a large real estate business, and during the past two 
years had carried out a broad plan for the dividing 
up of large plantations and individual holdings and 
selling at auction to small owners. The result of 
this program has been to bring about an era of in- 
tensive production. Mr. Jackson as a banker and 
farmer has used his best efforts to rid his district 
of the old evils of the credit system, under which 
cotton farmers were usually bound in virtual slavery 
to merchants, being always in debt. He has encour- 
aged farmers to borrow money for their necessities 
at a low rate of interest and then pay cash for all 
their goods. 

Mr. Jackson is a prominent member of the Bap- 
tist Church of Wagener, being chairman of its 
Finance Committee and one of the leaders in the^ 
building of the beautiful new church. He is a 
teacher of the Bible class. In Masonry he is a Scot- 
tish Rite and member of Omar Temple of the Mys- 
tic Shrine at Charleston. 

He married Miss Fannie L. Lybrand, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Lybrand, of Wagener. Their 
two children are Lybrand and Hazel Jackson. 

John F. Ficken, a Confederate veteran, former 
mayor of Charleston and a lawyer of over half a 
century's experience, has lived a life of practically 
uninterrupted service to his own city and state from 
early youth to old age. 

He was born at Charleston June i6, 1843, son of 
John F. Ficken, Sr., who was a merchant and factor. 
He was educated in private schools at Charleston 
and received his A. B. degree from the College of 
Charleston. He was a youthful soldier in the Con- 
federate army, and at the close of the war began 
the study of law with Col. John Philips. Sub- 
sequently he was a student at the University of 
Berlin. He was admitted to the bar in 1868, and 
for several years practiced in partnership wrth 
Col. Isaac Hayne, and later with Edward W. 
Hughes, Esq., and is still practicing in copartner- 
ship with his son, Henry H. Ficken, Esq., and H. 
L. Erckman, Esq. He was elected a member of 
the Lower House of the State Legislature in 1877, 
and served seven consecutive terms, representing 
Charleston County until he resigned in 1891 to be- 
come mayor of Charleston. He filled that office 
four years and declined re-election. In 1876 he was 
elected as a delegate to the National Democratic 
Convention which met at St. Louis, Missouri, which 
body nominated Samuel J. Tilden for President of 
the United States. In 1902 he was made president 
of the South Carolina Loan & Trust Company. 
He is also president of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the College of Charleston, is president of 
Charleston Library, president of the Carolina Art 
Association, and president of the St. John's Luth- 
eran Church. Among other services rendered to 
the public he was a member of the Board of Com- 



missioners of the South Carolina Institution for 
the Education of the Deaf, Dumb and Blind; trus- 
tee of Newberry College, and vice-president of the 
board of trustees of .the Medical College of the 
State of South Carolina. He was one of the direc- 
tors and general counsel of the South Carolina 
Inter State and West Indian Exposition. Mr. 
Ficken is a thirty-third degree Mason. He also 
served as one of the District Deputy Grand Masters 
of the Grand Lodge of Masons of South Carolina. 
He was twice married, first to Miss Margaret 
Buckingham Horlbeck, and some years after her 
death to Miss Emma Julia Blum, both of whom are 
descendants of John Horlbeck, a soldier of the 
American Revolution. 

John F. Riley, proprietor of the John F. Riley 
Foundry and Machine Works of Charleston, is one 
of the sound business men and public-spirited cit- 
izens of this city, and a person whose word is 
regarded as good as another's bond. He was bom 
at Charleston, July 20, 1859, a son of Patrick and 
Ann (Collins) Riley. Patrick Riley was born in 
the north of Ireland and came to the United States 
in young manhood. Locating at Charleston, he 
found it more profitable to manufacture gas than 
to work at his trade of weaving, and was so en- 
gaged when Charleston with other southern cities 
became involved in the war between the states, and 
he, naturally, gave his support to the Confederacy 
and enlisted in its army. The authorities, however, 
decided that he could do the cause more good by 
continuing the production of gas, so was returned 
to civilian life. His widow survived him many 
years, living until she was seventy-nine, but he 
passed away at the age of sixty-two years. They 
had five sons and four daughters, seven of whom 
are living and residents of Charleston. 

Growing up at Charleston, John F. Riley attended 
its schools and then served his apprenticeship at the 
foundry and machine trades, which he learned with 
the Charleston Iron Works. In 1884 he began busi- 
ness for himself upon a very small scale, increasing^ 
his plant as his trade warranted until he has one 
of the largest iron works and machine shops in 
South Carolina, and is now, as he has been from 
the beginning, sole owner of the establishment. He 
was a member of the State Democratic Executive 
Committee from 1902 to 1904. A strong democrat, 
he succeeded his brother, Andrew J. Riley, in the 
City Council, and has represented his ward in that 
body for the past nine years, during that period 
being connected with some very important con- 
structive work in behalf of the municipality. He is 
a director of the City Banking & Trust Company 
and the Hibernia Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
and has other interests in the city. A Catholic Mr. 
Riley is a member and official of St. Patrick's 
Catholic Church of Charleston, and he belongs to 
the Knights of Columbus. A sound, practical and 
efficient man, Mr. Riley has steadily forged ahead 
until he is a leader in his line. Having had to prac- 
tically make his own way in the world, he sympa- 
thizes with those less fortunate than he, and his 
benefactions are many, although the majority of 
them are never made public. The indigent of his 
ward have great reason to give him a grateful re- 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



159 



spect, for he has proven himself their friend upon 
many occasions. For his native city Mr. Riley has 
much affection, and it is a source of pride to him 
that the recent improvements here have been the 
result of the efforts of him and nis associates in 
the Council, backed by the best men of the com- 
munity. 

George L. Buist. There have been five genera- 
tions of the Buist family represented in the citizen- 
ship of Charleston. The first of the family in the 
citj' was a very able Presbyterian clergyman. One 
of his sons, a grandson, great-grandson and great- 
great-grandson have been lawyers. The name given 
at the beginning of this paragraph was his grandson. 
Rev. George Buist, D. D., was born in Fifeshire, 
Scotland,* in 1770, and was educated at Edinburg Uni- 
versity. In 1793 he was called to Charleston as 
minister of the First Presb3^erian church, and served 
that congregation ably for a number of years. He 
died at Charleston in 1808. In that city he married 
Miss Somers, and he left six children. 

His son George Buist was born at Charleston in 
1805 and died there in 1877. He was educated at 
South Carolina College, and during the greater part 
of his active life practiced law. His wife was 
Mary Edwards Jones, and among their thirteen 
children one was the late Major George L. Buist. 
Major George L. Buist, who filled so conspicu- 
ous a place in the affairs of Charleston for up- 
wards of half a century, was born in that city in 
1838 and died there in 1907. He also attended 
Charleston College. The best tribute to his life 
and character is found in an editorial in the News 
and Courier of June i, 1907. It reads as follows: 
**Yesterday the mourners went about the streets 
and would not be comforted. There was not one 
who did not have a good word to say about the 
model citizen who had passed away without a mo- 
ment's notice, after a busy day spent in the service 
of his people. The lawyers who had practiced with 
him at the Bar, the men who had served with him 
in the affairs of State, those who had been inti- 
mate with him in the management of large busi- 
ness concerns, his associates in the educational af- 
fairs of the city, his comrades who had stood with 
him in the shock of battle, his neighbors and 
friends, white and black, the people of the whole 
community, indeed, spoke of him and his good 
deeds, and sorrowed because they should see his 
face no more. 

*'It is rare, even in such a community as this, that 
the emotions of a people are so stirred by the death 
of any citizen as Charleston was touched to the 
heart by the news yesterday that the Honorable 
George Lamb Buist had ceased to exist here. Four 
months ago Major Julian Mitchell, for many years 
identified with the educational interests of Charles- 
ton, passed out of this life while in the very act 
of speaking to. a brilliant assemblage upon the sub- 
ject in which his heart was most deeply concerned; 
Thursday night after returning to his home from 
the Commencement exercises of an Academy in 
whose success he felt a deep interest, Mr. Buist, 
the successor of Mr. Mitchell as chairman of the 
City Board of School Commissioners, answered the 
same dread call which had come to his associate, 



as it must come to all. In the church yard at Mel- 
rose Abbey an old time-worn gravestone arrests 
the attention of every passer-by. On it there is no 
name, but only this inscription : *Be thou also ready ; 
great and small are here.' None can stay the hand 
of the destroyer. The best that can be hoped for 
is that when our summons comes to join the in- 
numerable caravan that is ever moving on, we shall 
be able with unfaltering trust to meet our friends 
who having lived uprightly here, have taught us 
how to live and how to die. 

"Major Buist was nearly seventy years of age. He 
was born in Charleston and had lived here all his 
life. He was a splendid citizen. His conduct was 
never influenced by any but the best and highest 
^notives, and no worthy cause was ever presented 
to him that did not enlist his support and sympathy. 
Possessing the thorough confidence of the public, he 
was trusted by the public in all questions affecting 
the public welfare. For forty-seven years a mem- 
ber of the Charleston Bar, he was never without 
clients, and during this long period in the midst 
of all the changes which have come to the profes- 
sion he lived up to its best traditions. His advice 
to his clients was always sound, his appeals to the 
jury in his more active days were irresistible, and 
to the last he possessed the unbroken confidence of 
those who engaged his services. 

"As representative and senator from Charleston 
County in the Legislature, he worked with untiring 
zeal for the good of his constituents and with 
never a thought of personal promotion and emolu- 
ment. He did not seek any benefit for his people 
which he would not have cheerfully extended to 
the people in other parts of the State. While his 
disposition was entirely pacific he did not seek to 
escape any responsibility when the interests of his 
constituents required the exercise of the sterner 
qualities of statesmanship. He intentionally gave 
offense to none so it came to pass that none gave 
offense to him. 

"Major Buist was the representative for many 
years of a number of the most important business 
and financial institutions in Charleston. He had 
excellent judement, srreat business acumen, and was 
engaged in the settlement of many grave questions 
affecting large interests. His associates placed the 
most implicit confidence in his good faith and lofty 
personal character. 

"With the educational concerns of Charleston 
Major Buist was closely allied for years, as trustee 
of the College of Charleston, as Commissioner of 
the City Public Schools, and for the last four 
months as Chairman of the Board. His heart was 
wholly enlisted in this work and his death is 
especially deplored by his associates. 

"In the church Major Buist had been deeply in- 
terested nearly all his life. He was for years chair- 
man of the Vestry of St. Paul's church, Radcliff- 
boro, and when he withdrew from this important 
post about a year ago his retirement was made the 
occasion of very flattering resolutions by those who 
knew what he had done to keep the light of a pure 
faith burning in this shrine. 

"In his private and personal life Major Buist was 
above reproach. He was never false to any friend, 
or disloyal to any obligation as man or citizen. 



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HISTORY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 



Everybody liked him and everybody trusted him. 
Wise in counsel, strong in conviction, loyal in friend- 
ship, brave in battle and true in every trust, his 
death is a serious blow to the commimity in which 
he dwelt." 

Major Buist married Martha Allston White. He 
was survived by seven children, one of whom is 
Henry Buist. 

Henry Buist was born at Charleston March 3, 
1863, and was graduated from Yale University in 
1884. He has practiced law over thirty years, hav- 
ing read law in the office of Buist & Buist, and at- 
tended lectures under the celebrated John B. Minor 
of the University of Virginia. He was admitted 
to the bar in December, 1885, and is now head of 
the firm of Buist & Buist, attorneys, at Charleston. 

On October 20, 1887, he married Miss Frances 
Gualdo Ravenel. They have four children: George 
L. Buist, who was born in 1888 and is now practic- 
ing law at Charleston, having graduated from Yale 
University in 1910; Mrs. Harriott Ravenel Smythe, 
bom in 1890; Henry Buist, Jr., bom in 1895, a 
graduate of the class of 1919 in Yale University; 
and Frances Gualdo Ravenel Buist, born in 1897. 

Frank Burbidge. Fealty to facts in the analy ra- 
tion of the character of a citizen of the type of 
Frank Burbidge, president of the Etiwan Fertilizer 
Company of Charleston, is all that is required to 
make a biographical sketch interesting to those who 
have at heart the good name of the community, be- 
cause it is the honorable reputation of the man of 
standing and affairs more than any other considera- 
tk)n that gives character and stability to the body 
politic and makes the tme glory of a city or state 
revered at home and respected in other and distant 
localities. Mr. Burbidge i-s regarded as one of the 
leaders in business circles in his city, and thirty 
years of identification with the industrial and com- 
mercial life of this locality have but confirmed the 
high position he holds in the hearts of those who 
know him. 

Frank Burbidge is a native of London, England, 
where he was born on February 4, 18^7, and is the 
son of Enoch and Caroline (Green) Burbidge, also 
natives of that place. Five children were born to 
these parents, of which number the subject is the 
third in order of birth. He was reared in his na- 
tive city and received a good practical education in 
the public schools of that locality. In 1873, when 
seventeen years of age, Mr. Burbidge came to the 
United States. During the subsequent seventeen 
years he was located at various places, but in 1890 
he came to Charleston, being enpraged to build the 
plant of the Chicora Fertilizer Company. He be- 
came thoroughly familiar with the business of man- 
ufacturing and preparing fertilizers for the market, 
and in 1900 he was chiefly instrumental in organ- 
izing the Etiwan Fertilizer Company, of which he 
became president, and which took over the old 
Etiwan fertilizer plant which had first been started 
in 1868 and which is located on Cooper River. This 
concern, under the able manaerement of Mr. Bur- 
bidge, has enioyed a steady and healthy growth and 
is now numbered among the most important en- 
terprises in its line in this section of the South, 
its products being shipped to practically every part 



of the Union. In the promotion of modern methods 
in the manufacture of fertilizer Mr. Burbidge may 
be regarded as a pioneer, for it was he who first 
introduced the burning of pyrites, instead of the 
former method of using sulphur, an ingredient 
mostly imported from Italy. This newer process 
not only resulted in greatly reducing the cost of 
manufacture, but also* increased both the quantity 
and the value of the output, and is now in universsd 
use in all modern fertilizer plants. Mr. Burbidge 
takes a live interest in the general commercial ad- 
vancement of his city and gives his support to every 
movement looking to the general public betterment. 
He is a director of the Atlantic Savings Bank of 
Charleston. 

In October, 1875, Frank Burbidge was married to 
Matilda Mathison, a native of Sweden, the cere- 
mony occurring in New York. To them have been 
born two sons, Frank A. and Theodore A. Mr. Bur- 
bidge is a member of the Masonic order. 

Mr. Burbidge is not only a prc^ressive man of 
affairs, successful in material pursuits, but a man of 
modest and unassuming demeanor, a fine type of the 
reliable, self-made man who has ever stood ready to 
unite with his fellows in any good work. 

Rt. Rev. Wiluam T. Russell, as Bishop of 
Charleston has brought to his d'ocese and the state 
of South Carolina singular abilities and a brilliant 
record of achievement in his church. Bishop Rus- 
sell came to Charleston from one of the greatest 
churches in America, St. Patrick's Church at Wash- 
ington, which he served as rector for nine years. 

He was born at Baltimore October 20, 1863, a 
son of William T. and Rose Russell. As a boy he 
served at the altar of old St. Patrick's Church and 
p*t(*nded prirochial schools. At the age of fourteen 
he began his studies at St. Charles' College at Elli- 
cott City, Maryland, where he remained five years, 
but on account of failing health he went to Loyola 
College, where he spent a year under the care of 
a physician. He then re-entered St. Charles' College 
and spent four years more. From St Charles' Col- 
lege fte went to Rome, Italy, where he finished his 
studies in philosophy, but his health again failing 
he returned to the United States and resumed his 
studies in theology at St. Mary's College in Balti- 
more, Maryland. He was ordained a priest June 
21, 1889. His first appointment was at H)rattsville, 
Maryland, where he served as pastor of St. Jerome's 
Church from 1889 to 1804. It was a small church, 
and he had time to spend several days of each week 
in study at the Catholic University of America at 
Washington. At the end of two years he was given 
the degree of Licentiate of Sacred Theology. He 
has since been honored with the D. D. degree by 
St. Mary's Seminary, and that of LL. D. by Mount 
St. Mary's College. 

It was his work in his first parish of Hyattsville 
which attracted the attention of Cardinal Gibbons, 
and he was assigned to duty in the Cathedral as 
secretary to his Eminence, serving from 1894 to 
1908. 

February 23, 1908. he was installed as nastor of 
St. Patrick's Church at Washington. His prede- 
cessor, the late Rev. D. J. Stafford, had earned a 
great fame for himself and his church through his 



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eloquence, and Bishop Russell therefore was con- 
fronted with a most difficult task when he assumed 
the pastorate. What he lacked in eloquence ne made 
up m initiative and constructive progress, and in 
ten years, it is the opinion of church authorities, 
he made St. Patrick's in many respects the first 
parish in the United States. 

During this time he realized an important aim in 
making it a national parish, in keeping with the 
character of the city and community it serves. One 
of his notable achievements was founding the 
League of the Good Shepherd, which held its meet- 
ings in St. Patrick's, and was established November 
I, 1908. This League has since grown until it is 
now a feature of many parishes throughout the 
country. In the year 1909 Bishop Russell inau- 
gurated the Pan-American Thanksgiving Celebra- 
tion at Washington, a celebration attendedf by Presi- 
dent Taft and the representatives of twenty-one 
American Republics. Since then the Pan-American 
Mass has been an annual feature of St. Patrick's. 
Cardinal Gibbons at the Thanksgiving service of 
1916, in referring to Bishop Russell's work in in- 
augurating the annual festival, said: ''He has im- 
pressed it with a dignity and solemnity which has 
won nation-wide, yes, world-wide fame and which 
commands for him . the highest respect and grati- 
tude of the citizens of Washington and even of 
the nation. This celebration of Thanksgiving day 
has been going on now for some years and I am 
satisfied that it would be impossible to duplicate 
a festival of this kind with all its consequences and 
with all its surrounding circumstances." 

Another achievement of Bishop Russell was "The 
Field Mass," celebrated at an altar erected on the 
Monument Grounds only a short distance from the 
Washington Monument. It was for these services 
and celebrations, in addition to a growing program 
of usefulness, dignity and beauty in St. Patrick's 
regular service that Bishop Russell achieved his 
• great fame among the Catholic clergy of America. 
A leading Catholic publication said: "The imposing 
celebration held in St. Patrick's church made him 
known personally or by reputation to many people 
throughout the country. There were tasks of im- 
portance, however, concerning the general welfare 
of the church and its people, accomplished without 
any display, of which only the few knew and for 
which only the few could offer thanks. He now 
goes to a difficult field of