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HARVARD UNIVERSITY 




LIBRARY OF THE 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 
OF EDUCATION 



& 



HISTORY 



State Normal School. 



FARMINGTON, MAINE; 



SKETCHES OF THE TEACHERS AND GRADUATES. 



BY 






GEORGE C. PURINGTON, A. M. 



FOURTH PRINCIPAL OF THE SCHOOL. 



History is the essence of inniunerahle biographies. — Carlyle. 



FARMINCiTON, MAINE: 

PRESS OE KNOWLTON, McLEAKY & CO. 

1889. 






HACVASP uptvnnr 

\J% aptCXX Of EOUCATIQII 




TO THE 

Graduates of the Farmington State Normal School, 

IN RECOGNITION OF THE 

EMINENT SERVICES THEY HAVE RENDERED THE CAUSE OF EDUCATION, AND ALSO 

OF THEIR HONORABLE RECORD IN OTHER FIELDS OF LABOR, WITH 

THE HOPE THAT THE PERUSAL OF ITS PAGES 

MAY STRENGTHEN THE TIES THAT BIND THEM TO ONE ANOTHER AND 

TO THEIR ALMA MATER, 

THIS HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 

IS MOST SINCERELY DEDICATED. 



INTRODUCTION. 



The publication of this history has been undertaken for a threefold purpose : first, 
to preserve records that it would have been impossible to secure in a few years; 
secondly, to show how important a place the School has filled, and is filling, in the 
educational work of the State ; and, thirdly, to create a new interest among the gradu- 
ates for the School and for one another, by strengthening the ties of those early, 
school-day friendships that have grown weak liy time and distance, and the cares and 
burdens of life. 

The historians of the new school have entered upon a higher plane of historical 
work than their predecessors. They believe that the forces that move the world are 
to be found in the lives of the many, rather than in the lives of a few so-called great 
men; hence they believe in the careful preservation of the history of individuals. 
With them, " history is the essence of innumerable biographies," and they prefer facts 
to generalizations. So, as a matter of historical interest, it has seemed desirable to 
collect and put into permanent form as many facts concerning the School and its 
graduates as possible. 

As to the second consideration, it seems proper at the close of the first quarter- 
century to record in a modest way the achievements of the graduates. It is a duty 
that the School owes to itself and to the State. 

How many of the graduates, as they have realized that time and distance have 
sadly weakened those ties of friendship that they once prized so highly, must have 
felt the sentiment of Prince Henry in the Golden Legend^ — 

'• Come back ! ye friendships long departed ! 
That like o'erflowing streamlets started, 
And now are dwindled, one by one, 
To stony channels in the sun ! '* 

What the yearly visit to the parental roof, and the frequent family letters will do for 
kindred, it is hoped this book, in some measure, will do for those who own a common 
Alma Mater. 

The historian wishes to express his sincere thanks to the graduates for many kind 
words of encouragement in his undertaking, and for the generally prompt and satis- 
factory replies to his inquisitorial communications. He regrets that many, however, 
have not given more information, and that, in a few cases, the record given has been 
very meager. In the case of some, this has doubtless arisen from not comprehending 



IV FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

the scope of the work, in others, from a mistaken feeling of having accomplished 
nothing worthy of record, and, in a very few cases, from indifference. As it is, he has 
heard directly from all but five of the living graduates, and from friends he has ascer- 
tained the address, and some facts in regard to the five delinquents. In the case of 
deceased graduates, he has, in all but a few cases, received quite a full report. 

One thing has been particularly noticeable in the reports, — the extreme modesty 
of the graduates in speaking of what they have accomplished. The historian cannot 
recall a single instance of self-praise. There has been such an utter lack of commend- 
atory adjectives that he has been often tempted to supply them, but believes he has 
resisted the temptation, except in a few cases where he was sure from a personal 
acquaintance with the older graduates that they were deserved. For obvious reasons, 
he has resisted that temptation in respect to those graduating since 1883. 

Beginning with the Second Class of 1884, records have been kept showing what 
schools the pupils had attended before coming to the Normal, and their teaching 
experience, both before and during the course. The historian regrets that he cannot 
give such information in regard to the earlier graduates, as the early advantages of the 
pupil often furnish a key to his work after leaving the Normal. If he were to gather 
material for another work like this, he would ask for such information. And while he 
has but little expectation of getting it, he cannot help saying that it would be a valuable 
part of the history of the School (to be used without doubt in some future history), if 
every graduate would send him a statement of what schools he attended other than 
the district schools, and how many terms, before coming to the Normal, and how many 
weeks he taught before, during, and after his course, and in what places. He sincerely 
hopes that this history will be followed in a few years by one much more complete. 

It has often been charged that the graduates do not fulfil their pledges to the 
State. In looking over this history, it will be found that such cases of dereliction are 
rare. It must be remembered that some have graduated in less than two years, some 
have paid tuition, and very many have taught during the course, which should be 
credited to them. 

It is much to be regretted that we cannot have a history of that large number who 
have spent from one to five terms in the School, but for various reasons have not grad- 
uated. They number more than two-thirds of all who have entered, and probably the 
aggregate of their teaching experience in the State exceeds that of the graduates. A 
few of them, who were so fortunate as to marry graduates, will find their names 
embalmed in these pages. We wish there was some way of doing the same by all. 

One word in regard to the name of the School. It was organized as the Western 
State Normal School. In 1879 another school was established in the western part of 
the State at Gorham. In the revision of the Revised Statutes in 1883, the revisers 
took the liberty to apply " western " to the Gorham School, and " northern " to this. 
This change naturally created some confusion and injustice, which the Trustees cor- 
rected by naming each school from the town in which it is located ; consequently this 
School is now styled the Farmington State Normal School. 

No one can be more painfully aware of the imperfections of this work than the 
historian. He has, however, used great care to avoid errors, and will esteem it a 
favor if anyone finding errors or omissions will immediately inform him. He had 
hoped to include the pictures of some of the assistant teachers, notably those of longest 
experience, but a failure to receive a photograph from one of those longest connected 
with the School seemed to make it necessary to leave out all. 



INTRODUCTION. v 

In conclusion, the historian wishes to express his acknowledgments to many who 
have helped lighten his work, especially to two of his teachers, Miss Hortense M. 
Merrill, '8i, and Miss Ardelle M. Tozier, '87, and to the printers, Messrs. Knowlton, 
McLeary & Co., for the superior manner in which they have done their work. 

He also wishes to gratefully acknowledge the support and encouragement he has 
received from the Alumni since he became connected with the School, and assures 
them that their hearty good will is more than reciprocated. He feels that the School 
has a life and history of its own, which, in a measure, may be given shape by its 
teachers, but yet is independent of them, and should be carefully cherished. Changes 
of name, or teachers, or fortunes, should not be allowed to dwarf that life, or endanger 
the unity of the graduates. 

GEORGE C. PURINGTON. 

FARMIN(iTON, Mk., Aug. I, 1 889. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



History of the School 9 

Sketches of the Teachers, 19 

Sketches of the Graduates, 37 

Graduates from Advanced Course, 175 

Necrology, 177 

Statistics, 

Number of Pupils Attending and Graduating by Terms, 1 79 

Number of Pupils Entering and Graduating by Counties, . 181 

Distribution of Graduates, 181 

Occupations of Graduates, 183 

Occupations of Husbands of Graduates, 184 

Alumni Records, 185 

Index of Graduates, 199 

Additions and Corrections, 205 

ILLUSTRATIONS. 

The Present Buildings, 

''The Original Buildings, 

f'hotographs of the principals, 




/ . '' 



v/ 



(^riucipaU 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL. 



1 



Hon. William G. Crosby of Belfast, the accomplished Secretary of 
the first Board of Education of Maine, was the first person to call 
attention, in an official capacity, to the need of a Normal School in our 
State. This he did in his first report in 1847. For seventeen years he 
and his successors urged upon the Legislature the importance of estab- 
lishing a "training school" for teachers. Many of the reports show a 
careful study of the subject and are eloquent presentations of the claims 
for professional training, and, looking back upon those days, the wonder 
grows that the establishment of the schools was delayed so long. 

In 1857, the Hon. Mark H. Bunnell, State Superintendent, reports 
that, "there have been, at one time, not less than twenty teachers from 
Maine in the different Normal Schools of Massachusetts." 

The teachers of Franklin County at their convention that year 
passed the following resolutions which may be of interest : 

Resolved: That the interests of our common schools, and the teachers having 
them in charge, not only require the fostering care of the State, but most impera- 
tively demand the immediate establishment of that long neglected source of improve- 
ment, a State Normal School; but that in its endowment, no partisan or political 
interest should be observed, and that no locality should be the object of favor, unless 
a disposition be manifested to return ample equivalent for all benefits bestowed; and 
as teachers of Franklin County, we would respectfully, yet earnestly, request the early 
attention of our present Legislature to the endowment and establishment of such an 
institution. 

At last the demand became so imperative that it could no longer be 
ignored by the Legislature, and in i860 a law was passed establishing 
Normal Departments in eighteen academies in the State. The acad- 
emies in Franklin and Piscataquis counties declined to enter into the 
arrangement. The academy at Presque Isle advertised for a Normal 
class, but no pupils presented themselves. So few were enrolled in Lin- 



lO FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

coin Academy that after one term the trustees asked to be released from 
the arrangement. In the fourteen academies that supported Normal 
Departments there were reported as "enjoying the advantages of the 
instruction afforded at these schools," 457 pupils in the spring term, and 
438 in the fall term. These numbers, of course, refer to those who 
were enrolled in the Normal Departments. But exactly two-thirds of 
them were reported as *' pursuing other studies." In his report for 1861, 
the Hon. E. P. Weston says of this experiment : 

While the scheme need not be pronounced a failure, it may be safely charged 
with a fatal incapacity to meet the demands of the age and the State. * * * 
We need, then, institutions of ampler means and more commanding character to 
educate the teachers of our public schools. * * * By recent inquiry I 
find that there have been connected with the four Normal Schools of Massachusetts 
during the past year, thirty Normal pupils from Maine; and that, too, in face of the 
fact that we have had fifteen Normal Schools at home ! 

This plan was tried for another year with no better success, and was 
repealed by the Legislature of 1862, which passed an order "requiring 
the Superintendent of Common Schools to make certain inquiries and 
investigations looking to the estabhshment of a more efficient system." 

This report, together with a memorial from the Trustees of Farming- 
ton Academy prepared at the instance of the Principal, Mr. A. P. Kel- 
sey, was, in the regular order of business, referred to the Committee on 
Education. After careful deliberation and several public hearings, that 
committee made the following unanimous report : 

The Committee on Education, to which was referred the memorial of the Trus- 
tees of Farmington Academy, asking for aid in establishing a Normal School; also, 
the report of the Superintendent of Common Schools on the subject of Normal 
Schools; have had the same under consideration, and report: 

Your Committee are satisfied that one of the most urgent requisites to the success 
of our public schools at the present time, is a larger supply of well-qualified teachers. 
We believe that a very large portion of all the money expended for school purposes 
is lost through the incompetency of many of the teachers employed. 

To prevent this great waste in future we look to no single remedy. School officers 
must keep a more vigilant watch at the school-house door against the entrance of 
unqualified teachers. Candidates for this important work should be impressed with 
the importance of making larger attainments, if they expect to find employment in 
the profession. 

But we believe that the State, as such, has a duty in the premises which it cannot 
longer neglect with justice to this great public interest. 

While the State provides by law that each town shall raise money for the sup- 
port of public schools, according to the population; and while it grants additional 
bounties, from the bank and other funds, to aid in sustaining these schools; — the 
whole expenditure for school purposes amounting to more than $700,000 annually — is 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL. II 

it right or wise for the State to neglect the most important means of rendering this 
expenditure in the highest degree conducive to the great object for which the money 
is expended? 

No one doubts that we need a large additional number of well-educated teachers 
for our primary and higher schools. And some may claim that we have the means, in 
our academies and colleges, of supplying the demand. But while we acknowledge the 
very important service rendered by these institutions, and must look to them for similar 
service in time to come, your Committee are convinced that there is need of institu- 
tions which shall make it their grand aim to train teachers for their special vocation. 
Our academies and higher seminaries have their various educational work to accom- 
plish. They are training young men for college and for the various business of life. 

The teacher, like the student in law, or medicine, or divinity, needs an especial 
training for his professional duties. This training it is the intention of the Normal 
School to impart. It aims to teach men and women the art of teaching. It seeks to 
make them familiar with the best methods of instruction and government; to impart 
a knowledge of the philosophy of dealing with youthful minds, developing and disci- 
plining their mental and moral powers aright. The great work of the teacher, the 
Normal School assumes, cannot be accomplished without much painstaking and 
special appliances. 

Normal, or training schools, are not an experiment. They have existed in Europe 
for more than a hundred years, and in this country for nearly a quarter of a ceritury. 
In Prussia a Normal School was organized in 1735. In this country the first Normal 
School was opened in July, 1839, at Lexington, Mass.; two others were opened in the 
course of the following year. New York followed with her State Normal School in 
1845; Connecticut in 1848; Michigan in 1849; Rhode Island in 1854; New Jersey 
in 1855; Illinois in 1857; Pennsylvania opened two schools in 1860-61 ; Minnesota 
one in. 1 860; and Iowa, in connection with her State University, established a Normal 
School in i860. 

The British Provinces — Canada East and Canada West, and New Brunswick — 
have also their Normal Schools; those in the Canadas being very liberally endowed 
and efficient institutions. 

The general success of these schools has been ample and gratifying. The testi- 
mony of school officers in all parts of Massachusetts, in response to a circular issued 
by Ex-Governor Boutwell, while Secretary of the Massachusetts Board of Education, 
was almost unanimous to the effect that the system of normal instruction is having a 
very powerful influence in elevating the standard of instruction and improving the 
common schools of that State. Similar testimony is given in response to similar 
inquiries made in New Jersey and Connecticut. 

Your Committee are therefore unanimous in the conviction that Maine should 
put herself upon a level with other States, in this respect, by inaugurating at an early 
day, within her own borders, a system of instruction which has proved elsewhere of 
the highest value to the cause of popular instruction. 

With this intent we submit the following bill. 

George B. Barrows, for the Com. 

With the foregoing Report the Committee presented a Bill, which 
with a few amendments made on its passage, was enacted in the follow- 
ing form : 



12 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

An Act for the Establishment of Normal Schools. 

Whereas, the interests of public education are suffering by reason of incompe- 
tent teachers, and 

Whereas, Normal Schools have proved in other States a very efficient means 
of furnishing teachers better qualified for their work. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in Legislature assem- 
bled, as follows : 

Section i. Three persons whom the Governor and Council shall appoint, shall 
constitute a commission to make the necessary investigations, and to locate, subject 
to the approval of the Governor and Council, two Normal Schools, one in the eastern 
and one in the western part of the State, at such places as will best suit the public 
convenience; provided, that the citizens of such places, or the trustees of any institu- 
tions there existing, will furnish without expense to the State, suitable buildings for 
the instruction of two hundred pupils for the term of at least five years, and provided 
that such locations be not within the limits of any incorporated city. 

Sect. 2. Said schools are established for the purposes and shall be conducted 
upon principles herein set forth. 

First — ^They shall be thoroughly devoted to the work of training teachers for 
their professional labors. 

Second — ^The course of study shall include the common English branches in 
thorough reviews, and such of the higher branches as are especially adapted to pre- 
pare teachers to conduct the mental, moral and physical education of their pupils. 

Third — The art of school management, including the best methods of govern- 
ment and instruction, shall have a prominent place in the daily exercises of said 
schools. 

Fourth — Said Normal Schools, while teaching the fundamental truths of Chris- 
tianity, and the great principles of morality, recognized by statute, shall be free from 
all denominational teachings and open to persons of different religious connections, 
on terms of entire equality. 

Sect. 3. The Commissioners shall be guided in locating said schools by the fol- 
lowing considerations : 

First — ^The size and condition of the buildings. 

Second — ^The character of the community and healthfulness of the location. 

Third — ^The means of access by railroad or otherwise. 

Fourth — Facilities for obtaining board, and cost of same. 

Fifth — Extent and character of library, apparatus and cabinets offered for the 
use of said school. 

Sixth — Opportunity for experimental or model schools. 

Sect. 4. The course of study shall occupy two years with suitable vacations; 
and together with the terms of admission shall be arranged by the Superintendent of 
Schools, subject to the approval of the Governor and Council. 

Sect. 5. Any student who shall complete the course of study prescribed, and 
othervike comply with the regulations of the school, shall receive a diploma certifying 
the same. 

Sect. 6. Applicants for admission to said schools shall be sixteen years of age, 
if females, and seventeen, if males; shall signify their intention to become teachers, 
and shall come under obligation to teach in our own State for at least one year, and 
in case they receive the diploma mentioned in section five, two years after they shall 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL. 13 

have graduated; and on these conditions shall be received without charge for tuition. 
Each pupil shall pay one dollar per session for incidental expenses of the school. 

Sect. 7. Said schools shall be put in operation in August, eighteen hundred 
and sixty -three, or as soon thereafter as the necessary arrangements can be made 
therefor, due notice of the time of commencement and the terms of admission being 
given in the public newspapers of that section of the State in which said schools are 
severally located, four weeks at least before the time of commencing. 

SEcr. 8. To sustain said schools during the period of five years, four half town- 
ships of the public lands are hereby appropriated; the same to be sold in whole or in 
part, at such times and in such manner as shall be deemed best by the Governor and 
Council, acting as a board of trust and management in the premises ; and before these 
lands shall be sold they shall be advertised six months in a newspaper in Bangor, 
Augusta and Portland, then sold at public auction to the highest bidder; and the 
avails of such sales shall be deposited in the State Treasury to the credit of the 
Normal School fund thus created. 

SECr. 9. It shall be the duty of the Superintendent of Common Schools to act 
as Superintendent of the Normal Schools; to employ teachers and lecturers for the 
same, and with the consent of the Governor and Council to provide such apparatus 
and other facilities for conducting the operations of the schools as may be deemed 
negessary; the whole arrangements to be approved by the Governor and Council, 
who shall audit all accounts for expenditures in this behalf, and draw their warrant 
for the payment of the same when approved. 

Sect. 10. This act shall take effect when approved by the Governor. 
[Approved March 25, 1863.] 

After an earnest discussion in both houses, in which the friends of 
the measure successfully answered the objections of its opponents, the 
act was passed by a vote of thirteen to seven in the Senate, and sixty- 
three to twenty-nine in the House, and was approved by the Governor, 
Hon. Abner Coburn, March 25, 1863. 

To carry out the provisions of the first section of this act, the Gov- 
ernor appointed the following Commissioners : Philip Eastman of Saco, 
Henry Williamson of Stark, and Ephraim Flint of Dover, who immedi- 
ately entered upon their duties, inviting and receiving proposals, and 
visiting those places from which they had received proposals. Proposi- 
tions to furnish the necessary accommodations were received from the 
Trustees of Paris Academy, Gorham Seminary, Farmington Academy 
and Litchfield Academy for the location of the Western School. After 
carefully considering the advantages of each they made the following 
report : 

Each locality that we have visited possesses its own peculiar advantages above 
the others in some of these particulars; and in comparing them and balancing the 
one against the others, we have had no little solicitude that we might arrive at a judi- 
cious and satisfactory conclusion. After a very careful and deliberate, and we trust, 
impartial investigation, having reference to the considerations prescribed in the Act, 



14 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

for our guidance, and the promotion of the very important objects desired to be 
secured, we have decided to locate one of the said Normal Schools at Hampden, 
and the other at Farmington; subject to the approval of the Governor and Council; 
provided, the Trustees of Hampden Academy, at that place, and the Trustees of 
Farmington Academy, at that place, shall fulfil,- in a manner satisfactory to the Super- 
intendent of Common Schools, the proposals and assurances by them respectively 
made to us, and herein substantially stated. 

The statement in regard to the Farmington offer is as follows ; 

The Trustees of Farmington Academy offer their present Academy building, 
which is fifty by thirty feet, and two stories high, to be divided into recitation rooms, 
with settees, blackboards, etc. 

They propose to erect an additional building about sixty by forty-five feet, and to 
finish upon the first floor a school-room with permanent seats, with desks for two 
hundred persons; upon the second floor a hall for lectures and other uses, to be fur- 
nished with movable settees. Also, other suitable rooms for library, apparatus, dress- 
ing-rooms, etc. They have also an available cash fund of $^qoo all of which they 
will appropriate for erecting, altering and furnishing the buildings, and for such other 
objects as may be deemed necessary. 

We are assured that board for two hundred students may be had in respectable 
private families, within three-quarters of a mile from the Academy, at from $1.75 to 
52.50 per week, according to the accommodations required; and that an arrangement 
will be made with the Androscoggin Railroad to transport students from abroad to 
and from school for one fare. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Philip Eastman. 
Henry Williamson. 
Ephraim Flint. 

Augusta, June 19, 1863. 

That a strong effort was made to have the school located elsewhere is 
evident from the action of the Council. The Committee made their Re- 
port June 19, 1863, but on the twenty-fourth, j;he Council passed an order 
" that the Commissioners should deposit in the office of the Secretary of 
State, the several propositions submitted to them by citizens or trustees, 
with all the facts within their knowledge or possession, relating to the 
establishment of said schools." The facts and papers asked for in the 
above order were submitted to the Council August 7th, and after a long 
debate the Governor and Council on the ninth of October, 1863, con- 
firmed the action of the Commissioners in locating the school at Farm- 
ington, with the following proviso : 

Provided^ The said Trustees of Farmington Academy will furnish, without ex- 
pense to the State, suitable buildings for the instruction of two hundred pupils for 
the term of five years, the same to be completed by the fifteenth day of August 
next. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL. 15 

This delay in locating the school and the fact that no funds had been 
received from the sale of the lands that had been set apart for the sup- 
port of the school, compelled the postponement of the opening of the 
school until the fall of 1864. 

In the Report of 1866, the Rev. Dr. Ballard, State Superintendent 
of Schools, relates the next year's (1864) work : 

Short as the time was, the Trustees with great energy proceeded with prepara- 
tions for erecting a brick building, which, with the repair of the wooden structure, 
would afford the desired accommodation; and it having been impracticable to com- 
plete it in season, the Brst term of the school was held in a commodious hall (Beal's) 
furnished by the Trustees. The Trustees have expended more than eight thousand 
dollars in erecting and furnishing the buildings now occupied, exceeding the available 
funds of the institution by three thousand five hundred dollars, raised by them on a 
mortgage of the property. 

While all the Trustees heartily co-operated in the work, it is due to Mr. A. P. 
Kelsey, the first Principal, to say that he devoted a year's time in laboring for the 
establishment of the school and superintending the building operations without 
compensation. It was at his suggestion that the Trustees took the initiatory measures 
herein before stated. 

After much care and deliberation, the State Superintendent selected 
the following Board of Instruction : 

Principal — Mr. Ambrose Parsons Kelsey, a graduate of Hamilton 
College, formerly a professor in the State Normal School at Albany, 
N. Y., and recently Preceptor of Farmington Academy. 

Assistants — Mr. George M. Gage, a native of Waterford, Me., and a 
graduate of the Bridgewater Normal School. Mr. Gage had taught sev- 
eral years in the Maine and Massachusetts public schools, and was prin- 
cipal of the Adams School, Quincy, Mass., when he was called to this 
school. Moreover, he had been zealous in urging the establishment of 
training schools in his native State ; Miss Annie E. Johnson, a native of 
Maine, for two years preceding one of the principal teachers in the 
Framingham Normal School. 

Lecturer— ^2\X.^x Wells, A. M. 

Thus admirably equipped the school began its work Aug. 24, 1864, 
in BeaPs Hall, for the new building was not yet completed, and it was 
not until the beginning of the winter term that the school moved into 
its new home. 

Thirty-one pupils, from nine different counties, were present the first 
day. This number was increased to fifty-nine before the close of the 
term. Surely this was a much more auspicious opening than that of the 
first State Normal School in our country. Twenty-five years before — 



i6 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

July 3, 1839 — three pupils presented themselves for admission to the 
Normal School at Lexington, Mass. 

During the year one hundred and thirty pupils entered the school, — 
a number larger than has entered any subsequent year. 

After a year of arduous duty, Mr. Kelsey, *' who had anxiously labored 
for the welfare of the school through the perplexities of its first year, 
declined a re-election, having in view the acceptance of a position in an 
educational institution in western New York." 

Miss Johnson also resigned to become Principal of the Framingham 
Normal School. 

Mr. Gage succeeded as Principal, with Miss Sarah R. Smith and her 
sister. Miss Mary B. Smith, both graduates of the Salem (Mass.") Normal 
School, and teachers in that school, and Miss Mary C. Packard, also a 
graduate of Framingham Normal School, and a very successful teacher 
in the Brunswick High School, as assistants. In the spring term of that 
year. Miss Helen B. Coffin, a graduate of the Bridgewater Normal School 
(now Mrs. Daniel Beedy of Farmington), one of the most successful 
and widely known lady teachers ever connected with the Maine Normal 
Schools, and Miss Sophia R. Earle, a graduate of and teacher in the 
Framingham Normal School, were added to the faculty. 

At the close of this year a class of ten ladies graduated. It was an 
occasion of great interest, as shown by the large number of visitors pres- 
ent. The Rev. Dr. Ballard, State Superintendent of Common Schools, 
in his report of the exercises, speaks as follows : 

The whole drew forth warm commendation from the literary gentlemen present, 
and all felt satisfied that the diploma, given to each member of the graduating class, 
was indeed a testimonial to good character, diligence in study, ample attainments, 
and a compliance with the rules of the school. The persons most interested in its 
work and care, saw on that day a rich compensation for the solicitude of the enter- 
prise, which had thus far, at least, been regarded as an experiment; and they might 
well be pardoned, if somewhat of the feeling of triumph over the difficulties of its 
incipiency and early timid progress pervaded their breasts. 

The importance of the occasion and justice to those who were 
instrumental in founding the School, will justify, perhaps, another quota- 
tion from the same report : 

Our Normal School at Farmington is rapidly coming to its promised usefulness; 
and its record for the first two years, though some of its lines may tell of uncer- 
tainties, trials, and anxieties, yet in its present results will speak of success and 
encouragement. The sagacity and skill of my predecessor in perceiving and display- 
ing the benefits of such a school, and his perseverance in securing the requisite 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL. 17 

enactment by the Legislature; the earnestness of the first Principal in gaining its 
pleasant location, and his devoted attention to its wants in the struggles of the first 
experimental year; the equal earnestness and unshrinking fidelity of its present Prin- 
cipal, himself one of the original prompters of the enterprise, and an efficient teacher 
in it from the beginning, aided by assistants competent in the branches assigned to 
their instruction; — have brought the institution to a condition of prosperity hardly 
equalled in any other, in the same short time of its continuance. 

In 1868, Mr. Gage resigned to take charge of the Normal School at 
Mankato, Minn., and Mr. Charles C. Rounds, Principal of the Edward 
Little Institute, Auburn, Me., was chosen as his successor. 

In addition to a mind eminently clear and critical, trained in one of 
the best scientific schools of New England, with great energy and intense 
love for his profession, Mr. Rounds brought to his work here a profound 
knowledge of the needs of our schools gained by eleven years' experi- 
ence as a teacher in this and other States. Here he labored for fifteen 
years, graduating three hundred and seventy-seven pupils, making the 
school respected wherever known for the thoroughness of its professional 
work. 

Perhaps in no other way is the quality of his work better shown than 
in the fact that, whereas it was necessary for many years to obtain most 
of the teachers from other schools, the teachers for the last decade have 
been nearly all his own graduates. 

He was an enthusiastic teacher. He strongly impressed his own 
personality upon his pupils. He created and sustained a healthy moral 
tone in every class as it entered. He could not endure sham. Dishon- 
est work of any kind he would never tolerate. The daily "teaching 
exercises" as a part of the regular work were introduced by him, as well 
as many other new methods, the result of his own professional studies 
and investigations. 

Not only in the school -room and in the work of the graduates has his 
influence been felt, but by his addresses and reports the educational 
spirit of the whole State has been raised. To him belongs the credit 
of the inception of the Maine Pedagogical Society, unique among the 
educational associations of the Union, and destined to be of great value 
to the cause of education in the State. 

Through his efforts in 1869, at a time when many of the other Normal 
Schools in the country either doubted the expediency of establishing 
model schools or were not alive to their importance, the Primary Train- 
ing School was established, and has proved to be the "strong right arm" 
of the institution. 

After fifteen years of earnest labor, Mr. Rounds resigned to become 



1 8 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Principal of the State Normal School at Plymouth, N. H., where, it is 
pleasant to record, he is meeting with equal, or greater, success. 

Of his work here, Supt. Luce, in his report for 1883, speaks as 
follows : 

Dr. Rounds had been at the head of the school by annual re-election, for fifteen 
years, a record speaking volumes in his praise. By his untiring devotion to its inter- 
ests during all those years, by his unwearying labors with tongue and pen for the 
educational well-being of the State, and by wha;t he has been able to accomplish 
through his wide and accurate professional acquirements in giving form and shape to 
our Normal School work, and through his professional zeal in creating among the 
teachers of the State a spirit of earnestness, of devotion, and for untiring labor for 
educational progress, similar to his own whose effects, though already largely felt for 
good, are yet to show themselves more largely in the future — he has won a place in our 
educational history second to that of no other man. Such men deserve better of the 
State than they are wont to receive. 

And as showing the respect and affectionate regard of the graduates, 
the following resolutions are given from the Alumni records : 

Triennial Reunion, July 6, 1883. 

Resolved: That by the resignation of Dr. C. C. Rounds from the position he has 
so long and honorably filled, Maine loses and New Hampshire gains a man who 
stands in the front rank among the educators of the day; that in his new field of 
labor he has our confidence, our esteem, and our affection, no less in the future than 
in the past; that we trust his future outlook may be only "from above the clouds;" 
and we sincerely hope we may often meet him as an honored member of this Associ- 
ation. 

Triennial Reunion, June 11, 1886. 

Resolved: That the Alumni Association of the Farmington State Normal School 
assembled at Farmington June 11, 1886, send friendly greetings and hearty good 
wishes to Dr. C. C. Rounds, and express our continued love and respect as increased 
and strengthened with passing years. 

The vacant principalship was tendered to the Rev. A. W. Burr, Prin- 
cipal of the Hallowell Classical and Scientific Academy, but Mr. Burr 
declined to accept the position. Again the Trustees went to Auburn 
and Mr. George C. Purington, Principal of the Edward Little High 
School, was invited to come to Farmington. Of himself he can only say 
that he has labored with whatever ability and earnestness he may have 
to sustain the former high reputation of the school, and that he feels 
deeply grateful for the help and encouragement he has received from 
the graduates. 



SKETCHES OF THE TEACHERS. 



PRINCIPALS. 



Ambrose Parsons Kelsey, Clinton, N. Y. 

Mr. Kelsey was born in Paris, Oneida Co., N. Y., August 30, 1832. 
Graduated from Hamilton College in 1856. Professor in the State Nor- 
mal School, Albany, N. Y., 1859. Married in Farmington, Me., Dec. 24, 
1863, Ellen v., daughter of Hon. Robert Goodenow. 

Was Principal of Farmington Academy for several terms. Largely 
through his efforts the Normal School was established and located at 
Farmington, and he became its first Principal, remaining but one year. 
Appointed a Visitor to the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, 1865. 
Was elected Principal of the New Hampshire State Normal School in 
1876, and Professor of Natural History, Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y., 
in 1879, a position which he still holds. Received the degree of Ph.D. 
from Bowdoin College in 1881. 

George M. Gage, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mr. Gage was born in Waterford, Oxford County, Maine, August 22, 
1834. His father, a physician, died in 1842, leaving a family of eight 
children, — six girls and two boys, George being the youngest. His mother 
inspired all her children with a desire to get as good an education as 
possible, being herself a well-read lady. A family school and the village 
district school afforded opportunities at first, and the Latin language 
was begun at home almost as early as the English. At fourteen George 
was placed in charge of his guardian, a farmer, to remain until of age. 
He lived on this farm about two years, a very discontented life. In the 
autumn of 1850, being sixteen years old, he started out for himself, deter- 
mined to go to school. The path was not easy, as his father's estate 
was small, and he must work his own way. At North Bridgton Acad- 



20 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

emy, about six miles from his home, good facilities were afforded, and 
with alternate teaching and study, the years passed on. During these 
years, there was, however, a great variety of work done, in service on the 
farm in haying time and nearly a year of work as brakeman on a railroad. 
Schools were taught in Bridgton, Sweden, Lowell, Perry, Robbinston 
and Charlotte. The principal part of the years 185 7 and 1858 was spent 
in the State Normal School at Bridgewater, Mass., and in the summer of 
the latter year, Mr. Gage was graduated from that institution. From 
the Normal School, he went at once to take charge of the High School in 
Manchester, Mass. Remaining there two years, he accepted the position, 
in i860, of Principal of the South Grammar School, Beverly, Mass. 
From this place, he went, in 1863, to take charge of the Adams School, 
Quincy, Mass. Having interested himself for several years in the estab- 
lishment of Normal Schools in Maine, in 1 864, when provision had been 
made for the opening of the school at Farmington, the State Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, Hon. Edward P. Weston, invited him to 
become assistant teacher there ; this position he accepted. In 1865, Mr. 
Gage was made Principal of the school, continuing in that place until 
the year 1868. While he was Principal, the charter of Farmington 
Academy was turned over to the State, and the building and grounds 
became the State's property to be used thereafter for the purposes of a 
teachers' training school. Seventy-seven were graduated during his con- 
nection with the school. 

In 1 868, the second State Normal School of Minnesota was estab- 
lished at Mankato, and by invitation of the Board of Directors, through 
Hon. Mark H. Dunnell, then State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
Mr. Gage became the first Principal of the school. During his principal- 
ship, the building for the school was erected. At the end of four years, 
in the year 1872, he was elected Superintendent of Public Schools for 
the City of St. Paul, where he has since resided, though at the end of 
two years, (in 1874), he resigned the position of Superintendent, and 
since that time, except occasionally in institute work, has not engaged in 
teaching. 

While in the State Normal School at Farmington, Mr. Gage founded, 
in 1866, The Maine Normal^ which he continued to edit and publish 
until he went to Minnesota. This journal advocated the revival of the 
Maine State Teachers' Association, and in 1867, largely on account of 
this advocacy, a new organization of the teachers of the State was 
effected. After Mr. Gage's departure to the West, The Maine Normal 
was continued under the name of The Maine Journal of Education, Mr. 
A. P. Stone, then of Portland, Maine, becoming its editor. 



SKETCHES OF THE TEACHERS. 21 

Soon after going to St. Paul, the Governor of the State, Hon. Horace 
Austin, appointed Mr. Gage a member of the Board of Directors of the 
State Normal and Training Schools, and he was, by the Members of the 
Board, elected their President. He also associated himself with Prof. 
W. W. Payne, of Carleton College, in the publication of The Minnesota 
Teacher, .of which he finally became sole proprietor and publisher, con- 
tinuing in that work until the close of the year 1873. 

In August, 1 86 1, Mr. Gage was married to Elizabeth S. Webber of 
Sweden, Maine, who was herself a graduate of the State Normal School 
at Framingham, Mass., and for several years a successful teacher. They 
have three children : Frances, born in Quincy, Mass., who was graduated 
from the Teachers' Training School, St. Paul, taught two years in the 
public schools of that city, and is now an undergraduate in Carleton 
College, Northfield, Minn. ; Benjamin, who has also taught, born in 
Farmington, Me., now connected with the Oregon Navigation and 
Railway Co., at Portland, Oregon ; and May, born in St. Paul, 
Minnesota. 

Charles Collins Rounds, Plymouth, N. H. 

Mr. Rounds was born in Waterford, Maine, Aug. 15, 1831. From 
1849 to 1853 was a printer in Portland, Me., and Boston and Cambridge, 
Mass. Graduated from the Scientific Department of Dartmouth College 
in 1857, and was Principal of the Academy at South Paris from 1857 to 
1859. From 1859 to 1865, principal of a public school in Cleveland, 
Ohio. Teacher in the Edward Little Institute, Auburn, Me., 1865- 1868, 
the last year as Principal of the school. From 1868 to 1883, Principal 
of the State Normal School, Farmington, Me. Since 1883, Principal of 
the State Normal School, Plymouth, N. H. 

Mr. Rounds married in 1857, Miss Kate N. Stowell of South Paris, 
Me. They have four children : Agnes lola, Arthur C, Ralph S., and 
Katie E., the first three being graduates of the Farmington State Normal 
School. 

Mr. Rounds has received the degrees of B. S. and M. S. from Dart- 
mouth College, A. M. from Bowdoin College and Colby University, and 
Ph. D. from Bates College. He has been once President of the Maine 
State Teachers' Association, twice President of the National Normal 
Association, once President of the New England Normal Association, 
and has received three successive elections by the National Educational 
Association as a member of the National Council of Education, having 
been continuously a member of the National Council since its organiza- 
tion in 1880. 



22 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

He has at this writing (June 22, 1889) just sailed for Europe 
as Commissioner from the State of New Hampshire to the Paris 
Exposition. 

George Colby Purington, Farmington, Maine. 

Mr. Purington was born in Embden, Me., June 27, 1848. Began 
teaching at the age of seventeen and taught district schools, working on 
a farm and in a store in the spring and summer until 187 1, when he 
became an assistant in Yarmouth Academy. After remaining there a 
year, he became Associate Principal of Hebron Academy, where he 
remained two years, fitting for college in the time. Entered Bowdoin 
College in 1874, graduating in 1878. For two years during his college 
course he was Principal of the Topsham High School. Was Principal of 
the Brunswick High School the last term of his Senior year, where he 
remained three years, when he resigned to become Principal of the 
Edward Little High School, Auburn, Me. After teaching there two years 
he was called to his present position. 

Mr. Purington received the degree of A. B. from Bowdoin College at 
his graduation, and three years later the degree of A. M., and in 
December, 1888, was elected President of the Maine Pedagogical Society 
for the current year. 

Mr. Purington married, Dec. 26, 1878, Sarah C, daughter of Rev. 
D. P. Bailey of Hebron, Me. They have three children : Otis Garland, 
born Dec. 23, 1879, died Dec. 26, 1879 ; George Colby, Jr., born Dec. 5, 
1880 ; Dudley Bailey, born Jan. 27, 1884. 

ASSISTANTS, 

George M. Gage, 1864-5, St. Paul, Minn. 
For sketch, see pages 19-21. 

Annie E. Johnson, 1864-5, Bradford, Mass. 

On leaving Farmington, Miss Johnson became Principal of the State 
Normal School at Framingham, Mass., where she remained several years. 
She resigned her place there to become Principal of Bradford (Mass.) 
Ladies' Seminary, which position she still occupies. 

Sarah R. Smith, 1865-6, Beverly, Mass. 

Miss Smith is a graduate of the Salem Normal School, and was one 
of the teachers there before coming here. Since teaching here. Miss 
Smith writes that she has been constandy at work in various private and 



SKETCHES OF THE TEACHERS. 23 

public schools, teaching in all the grades from Kindergarten to the High 
and Normal. Has taught in the Edward Little Institute, Auburn, Me., 
in Robinson Female Seminary, Exeter, N. H., Brooklyn, N. Y., Wash- 
ington, D. C, and in Boston, where she is now teaching. She adds : " I 
am happy to say that I believe now as I have always believed, 
that teaching is the noblest and most satisfactory work that mortal 
can do." 

Mary B. Smith, 1865-6, Beverly, Mass. 

Like her sister, Miss Smith is a graduate of the Salem Normal School 
and was a teacher there before coming to Farmington. After leaving 
here, she went back to the Salem School, taught there several years, then 
in the Miner Normal School, Washington, D. C, and is now teaching a 
private school of her own at Beverly, Mass. 

Mary C. Packard, 1865-6, Brunswick, Me. 

Miss Packard graduated from the Framingham Normal School, and, 
if we are not mistaken, was Principal of the Brunswick High School 
before coming here. 

Married, June 13, 1867, Albert G. Tenney, editor of the Brunswick 
Telegraph, and has resided ever since in Brunswick. 

Mrs. Tenney has been constantly engaged in literary work and study, 
and has devoted considerable time to painting, in which she excels. 
During the illness of Mr. Tenney for several months, the editorial man- 
agement of the Telegraph was mainly in her hands, and was so well 
conducted that she received many encomiums from the press of the 
State. 

Helen B. Coffin, 1866-9, 1880-2, 1883-5, Farmington, Me. 

Miss Coffin is a native of Maine. She taught ten years in our public 
schools before her graduation from the Bridgewater Normal School, and 
has spent nearly thirteen years in the Normal Schools of Maine. In 1869 
she was transferred from this school to a higher position in the Eastern 
Normal School at Castine, where she taught six years, when she married, 
Aug. 5, 1875, Mr. Daniel Beedy of Farmington, and came back here to 
live. During the years 1880-2, she taught at different times several 
months in the Normal, her wide acquaintance with the subjects taught 
enabling her to perform successfully the work of any of the teachers 
whose places became vacant by sickness or resignation. 

From 1883 ^o 1885 she was first lady assistant, thus completing her 
term of long and honorable service to the State. 



24 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

In one of the most beautiful and delightful homes in Farmington 
she is still a teacher in the widest sense. She is an earnest Chautauquan, 
an active member of the W. C. T. U., has served as President of the 
local Union, and is now President for Franklin County. Of her it can be 
truly said that she is among the foremost in all good works ; and in her 
home any Normal will find a hearty welcome. 

SoPHU R. Earle, 1866-8, Paxton, Mass. 

Miss Earle graduated from the Framingham Normal School and was 
a teacher there when she was called to Farrnington. After two years' 
service here she resigned and accepted a place in the Normal School at 
Fredonia, N. Y., and after that became an assistant in the Athenaeum 
Seminary for Young Ladies, Brooklyn, N. Y., where she remained until 
her marriage, June 12, 1872, to Mr. Ledyard Bill of that city. 

They have three children : Frederic Ledyard, born June 13, 1873 ; 
Bertha Earle, born June 5, 1875, ^"^ Lucy Sophie, born Oct. 28, 
1882. 

For several years their home has been at Paxton, Mass., where Mrs. 
Bill has been connected with the schools, either as Superintendent, or as 
a member of the School Committee, serving in the latter capacity at the 
present time. 

Isabel L. Wight, 1866-7, Natick, Mass. 

Miss Wight was graduated from the Framingham Normal School in 
the same class with Miss Ellen Hyde, the present Principal of that insti- 
tution. Before coming to Farmington she taught three years in the 
High School at Natick, and after leaving here taught in a high school 
in Stamford, Ct., then in private schools in Matawan, N. J., and Stamford, 
Ct. Following this she was for five years an assistant in a large high 
school in Lee, Mass., and for the next four years taught Latin, History 
and Geography in the Framingham Normal School. 

In 1879 she had the pleasure of an eighty days' European trip with 
Miss Julia Sears for a companion. 

Miss Wight is now at her home in Natick, Mass., caring for her 
parents and other home friends. 

Julia A. Sears, 1866-8, Nashville, Tenn. 

Miss Sears is a graduate of the Bridgewater Normal School. Since 
leaving Farmington she has taught in the Normal School at Mankato, 
Minn., and has been teaching in the Peabody Normal College, Nashville, 
Tenn., for nearly fourteen years, or since its organization. 



SKETCHES OF THE TEACHERS. 25 

RoLiSTON Woodbury, A. M., 1867-79. 

Principal of the Castine State Normal School. Died Nov. i, 1888. 

The following tribute to the memory of Mr. Woodbury was prepared 
and read by Dr. Rounds at the annual meeting of the Pedagogical Society, 
of which Mr. Woodbury was an honored member, December, i ^%?> : 

Roliston Woodbury, born in Sweden in this State in 1840, died at Castine, 
Nov. I, 1888. 

He began teaching at the age of sixteen or seventeen. Fitting for college at 
Bridgton Academy, he entered Bowdoin in 1861, but soon left to join the 5th Battery 
of the first Regjment of Maine Volunteers. This Battery ranked first of the eighteen 
best drilled batteries of the Army of the Potomac. Its discipline and valor were put 
to the severest tests, as at Cedar Mountain, Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg, Gettys- 
burg, Chancellorsville. 

Of the terrible struggle at Chancellorsville, Mr. Woodbury wrote an account 
which is one of the most vivid ever written of the real spirit of a battle. Here he 
stood until he was the only man left at his gun. The next gun also had only one man 
at it; the other four were silenced. After three years and eight months of honorable, 
arduous service, he was mustered out with his regiment at the close of the war. 

The college course was not resumed. He entered the Normal School at Farm- 
ington, from which he graduated in 1867. Upon his graduation he became one of 
the faculty of the school. He continued in this place for twelve years, until in 1 879 
he took the position of Principal of the Normal School at Castine. This place he 
held until his death, thus rounding out the long period of twenty-one years devoted 
to normal school work in his native State. 

To stand so long in such prominent places argues much for the character of the 
man; but when we consider how he stood, the confidence and affection which were 
his in life and the sorrow attending his death, it follows that Mr. Woodbury possessed 
rare qualities of character, of mind, and heart. 

His character was singularly straightforward. He was not aggressive, nor self- 
assertive, but no one who knew him ever doubted where he would be found. 

His home was of the kind which has moulded the best New England lives — 
frugal, industrious, religious. The town was always singularly free from demoralizing 
or disturbing influences. I knew it well. Before his time I was a student in the 
beautiful, quiet village at the head of the lake where he fitted for college. To the 
influence of the college he owed nothing, for the whirlwind of war bore him away. 
Fortunate again, he passed into the school of Captain Lepien, American by birth, but 
trained in the best military science of Europe, a man of such sovereign devotion and 
elevation of character that his men gave him at once full confidence and implicit 
obedience and mourned in his untimely death their dearest friend. The very best 
results of army dicipline were clearly apparent in Mr. Woodbury's promptness, dili- 
gence, unflinching devotion to duty, his singularly rare ability to mind his own business 
and do it. 

His success as a teacher was due to qualities which were patent to all observers. 
He had never lived on speculation. His early days had brought him into connection 
with the realities of a simple mode of life. There was here no suggestion of specu- 
lations as to fundamental principles of sociology which are at times forced upon those 
who find themselves in a world too strong for them. Holding fast to the promise 



26 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

that seed time and harvest should not fail, every day brought its duties dependent on 
the inflexible course of nature/ During the period of army life which so powerfully 
influenced all his subsequent thought, he was not to speculate, but to obey. He was 
not confronted by a theory, but by a fearful reality — the confederacy in arms against 
the Nation. In his later career as pupil and as teacher he wisely adapted himself to 
his circumstances; his employment was continuous and without special anxieties. By 
constitution and training he was led to reverence real truth, and he must have it 
definite and clear. In taking up any new line of teaching he must first of all get his 
bearings, establish his points of observation, measure his base lines, and from these 
cover his field by a kind of mental triangulation. So long as he taught this subject 
he would add here and there as new knowledge or new light came to him, but his 
bases were seldom moved. In his teaching he made points. He did not repress 
discussion but he guided it. He came to his results by thought, his pupils had to do 
the same. He sometimes forgot that they could not take so long steps as he, but as 
soon as they came to know him, they could go to him with their difficulties again and 
again, for his patience with an earnest pupil was invincible. 

In the class-room he was at home and so were his pupils. He and they were 
never taken by surprise. Visitors would at any time see the regular work, they would 
at no time see more. The mental and moral air of his class room was delightful. 

Beyond and above the intellectual eff'ects of his work there was another effect 
arising from his moral nature, his ready sympathy, his instinctive respect for humanity, 
his modest deference to others, his quiet reserve. Any school would run more 
smoothly from his being in it. He never antagonized people. Assuming nothing, he 
soon came to hold in the school and in the community an influential place, due to his 
straightforwardness, his intelligence, his integrity. Though of pleasant and easy 
address, and social with his friends, he was not fond of society in the usual sense of 
that term. 

But there was a side to his character which more truly than any other reveals the 
man; he was before all else a religious man. His moral and religious nature were 
so closely intertwined that it is not always easy to make a distinction between them. 
In his entire religious thought and life there was the same reality that pervaded all 
else. His faith was, in the language of Bacon, " the perception of spiritual truth;" 
it was indeed the " substance of things hoped for and the evidence of things not 
seen." Loyal in a remarkable degree to the church of his fathers, he had no word 
or thought of detraction for others. He had made his choice, and there, by the very 
constitution of his nature, he must stand. It was for others to do the same, and with 
the same liberty which he claimed and exercised for himself. 

But in our analysis we end as we began with a man ; and in the study of any com- 
plete life, as of any consummate work of art, it is the unity resulting from perfect 
blending of essential qualities that remains as the final impression upon the mind. 
And this character, so simple and yet so strong, was the result of blended influences 
that maybe easily understood, — those early years on the peaceful farm with its 
prospect of field and forest and encircling mountains; a studious youth; the years 
spent in stress of march and battle; then the long years of study, of thought, of 
teaching, and through all, the search for truth and the devotion to duty. 

Our relations were for a long time of a peculiarly intimate nature. He had been 
a teacher in the Normal School for a year before I became connected with it. In the 
reorganization of the school and the development of its plans of work we wrought 
together. To his faithful assistance I owed much, and he came by right to fill to me 



SKETCHES OF THE TEACHERS, 27 

a place which has never since been filled, which will, most likely, henceforth remain 
unfilled. In more than eleven years of daily intercourse there was never a word of 
difference between us, and yet, by nature, from our training, and our diverse experi- 
ences in life, we differed in many ways. Devoted to his work, loyal, true in thought 
and deed, it was very pleasant to work with him in brotherhood; it were ungenerous 
not to pay a personal tribute. It must seem to you extravagant should I say all that 
is in my thought, for simple in his tastes, fond of the quiet ways in which you were 
never privileged to walk with him, you could not know him as I did. 

To him belonged the beatitude, " Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see 
God." His soul was diamond — the sunlight and the rock — not a dazzling but a 
mellow light; not of perfect water — it took a tinge from the earth on which he dwelt; 
there were tints but no streak. He was serious, not sad; never hilarious, for he had 
looked death in the eye and blenched not. One who is a man does not pass through 
such battle tests and come out as he was before. No influence had been so powerful 
as this. He was not one to talk of his past in the great struggle, but when he did 
speak his soul went into his utterance. Those who have heard his lecture on Gettys- 
burg will remember the expression thrown into his reference to " that thin line of 
blue that wavered but would not break." The anniversaries of his army life were in 
his thought and sometimes on his tongue : as, " So many years ago to-day such a 
battle Was won;" or, " We were on such a march;" or, " We received such orders." 

The effects of his army life never left him. The death he had faced so often 
followed on his steps, and in his later years walked by his side, and he knew it. Yet 
it was his choice to stand at his post to the last, as he stood by his gun at Chancellors- 
ville. And so, child of the mountains, he rests at last by the sea. Rests by the sea. 
So we speak, but how false the phrase to Christian faith and hopes of immortality. 
He disappeared from mortal sight. He answers to the roll-call above. If he stand 
not now among the shining ones who watch and wait, it is idle to speak of the 
communion of saints and the life everlasting. 

What shall his monument be? Not painted window which may break. Not 
marble shaft to tell the idle wanderer, who cares not, what man this was. His life 
and work have built for him, in loving souls, a monument more lasting than glass or 
stone, not a dead shape but a living influence to sustain and inspire, and to pass on 
into other souls when these shall mould. But something more is due. Let his pupils 
of both schools join in a testimonial marking their appreciation of his worth, in some 
form to continue the work he loved so well. Thus will the good he has done live 
after him, and the generations following bless his name. 

For a further sketch of Mr. Woodbury's work, see history of the 
Class of 1867. 

Hannah B. Stewart, Spring Term, 1867, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 
Mrs. Noel E. Stevens. 
See Class of 1866. 

Susan D. Melcher, 1868-72, Melrose, Mass. 

Miss Melcher is principal of a grammar school in Melrose, Mass., 
and writes that she has been teaching for sixteen years in that town. 



28 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Mary A. 13 avis, 1868-70. 

From friends we learn that Miss Davis graduated from the Salem 
Normal School in 1861. After leaving Farmington her health did not 
allow her to teach, and she died at Lee, N. H., in 1878. 

Maria N. Billings, 1869-71, Castine, Me. 
Mrs. Roliston Woodbury. 
See Class of 1869. 

Charles E. Williams, M. D., 1870-71, Auburn, Me. 
See Class of 1870. 

Clara A. Hinckley, 18 7 1-2, Farmington, Me. 
Mrs. D. H. Knowlton. 
See Class of 1870. 

Eliza T. Moore, 187 1-2, Spring Term, 1885, West Farmington, Me. 

Married, Feb. 10, 1874, Calvin D. Sewall of Farmington, who died 
Nov. 5, 1883. Mrs. Sewall has two daughters : Susie Isabel, born June 6, 
1875 ; and Helen A., born March 10, 1877. 

From 1885 to 1888 Mrs. Sewall served on the Farmington School 
Committee, and largely through her long experience, good judgment and 
energy the schools of the town were raised to a high standard. A course 
of study was arranged for the rural schools and a deep interest in educa- 
tion was created in them. 

Laura M. Curtis, 1872-3, New York City. 

Miss Curtis has a school, a friend informs us, at 36 East 23d St., 
New York. 

Jennie M. Hayden, 1872-81, New Gloucester, Me. 
Mrs. Dr. J. L Sturgis. 
See Class of 1867. 

Sarah B. Morton, 1872-3, Cannes, France. 

Miss Morton writes from Cannes : " After leaving Farmington I taught 
but a short time, as illness of many years' duration among the members 
of my family absorbed my time and attention so that I am now rather a 
nurse .than teacher. The few later years have been spent in Switzer- 
land and France with an invalid brother, and a sister who were in need 
of the mild climate of the Riviera. I recall with pleasure my stay 



SKETCHES OF THE TEACHERS. 29 

among the kind people of Farmington and never lose my interest in its 
Normal School." 

Miss Morton is a graduate of the Salem Normal School. 

Clara F. Allen, 1873-81, 158 E. 55th St., New York. 

Miss Allen is a native of Maine, and graduated from the Bridgewater 
Normal School. After eight years of very successful work here she mar- 
ried J. Arthur Greene, Second Class of 1876, q. v. 

One of her pupils pays her the following tribute : 

To fine scholarship and a thorough preparation for her work, was added the 
natural gift of the true teacher — the power to inspire in her pupils the enthusiasm 
and interest which she possessed. In the class-room she was a rapid and thorough 
worker, and however difficult the subject, the recitation period was always a pleasant 
one. Quiet in her manner, she aroused in her pupils the desire to do their best, 
and the same influence, reaching outside the schoolroom, led them to try to be 
their best. 

J. Walter Stei-son, 1873-4, Auburn, Me. 
See Class of 187 1. 

Lottie E. Caldwell, 1874-5, Argyle Park, 111. 

Miss Caldwell graduated from the Cincinnati Normal School. Taught 
here one year, was re-elected, but declined and accepted a position in 
the Cincinnati Public Schools. In the fall of 1878 she went to St. 
Margaret's School in Waterbury, Connecticut, as a teacher of mathe- 
matics. Remained there two years, when she was compelled to 
leave on account of sickness. In the fall of 1880, accepted a call to 
the High School in Claremont, N. H., declining a re-election the 
following year to accept a much higher salary and position in the 
Bartholomew English and Classical School in Cincinnati, where she 
remained five years. 

Married Mr. W. F. Wood of Chicago, where she has resided since, 
in Argyle Park, a suburb of the city. 

They have one son. Mrs. Wood writes that " she has a warm spot 
in her heart for all old friends who were in the Farmington Normal 
School during 1874-5, and would be glad to see any of them." 

Edith E. Wiggin, 1875-6, Exeter, N. H. 

Miss Wiggin is a graduate of the Salem Normal School. From 
Farmington she went back to Salem, as Principal of the Training School. 
The next year she taught in the Gannett Institute, Boston. For the next 
five years her health did not allow her to take a permanent position. In 



30 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

1884, she became one of the teachers in Greylock Institute, a preparatory 
school for boys, at South Williamstown, Mass., where she remained until 
the present year. In January, 1889, she began her duties as Principal of 
the Normal Department of Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. 

Martha H. Wiggin, 1875-6. 

Like her sister, Miss Wiggin graduated from the Salem Normal 
School. After leaving Farmington, she taught part of a year in that 
school, taking the place of an absent teacher. In 1880, she went to 
Maiden, Mass., where she was an assistant in a grammar school four 
years. She taught no more after this, and died in Arlington, Mass., 
June 17, 1888. 

Addie F. Hayden, 1876-7, Raymond, Me. 
Mrs. Dr. John C. Winter. 
See First Class of 1876. 

William Harper, 1877-81, Dalton, Ga. 

After graduating from a western college, Mr. Harper studied some 
time in one of the German Universities, and married in Munich, Bertha 
Von Tauber, the daughter of a German artist. 

After leaving the Normal, he was Principal of the Farmington High 
School one year. In 1885-6, he was Superintendent of Schools in South- 
bridge, Mass., and since that time Superintendent of the Public Schools, 
Dalton, Ga., and for the current year is Principal of the white school. 

While in Southbridge he prepared the map questions for the special 
Geography of New England for Maury's Revised Manual, besides revis- 
ing and condensing the text. Since going to Georgia he has prepared 
a special Geography of Georgia, including history (with the exception 
of the cities and towns) for the same work. 

He has the manuscripts of two educational works nearly ready for 
publication. • 

Mr. and Mrs. Harper have a very interesting family of six children, 
five of whom are living, the youngest born since leaving Farmington. 
They are enjoying their sunny Southern home very much. 

Georgia P. Bucknam, 1879-80, Newton Centre, Mass. 
See Second Class of 1874. 

Freelan O. Stanley, i 880-1, Lewiston, Me. 
See Class of 1871. 



SKETCHES OF THE TEACHERS. 3^ 

Eliza J. Perley, 1881--3, Thorndike, Me. 

Miss Perley had studied in Europe and been Preceptress at the Sem- 
inary at Kent's Hill before coming here. After leaving, she was Principal 
of the High School, Ottumwa, Iowa, from 1884 to 1888. She is now 
taking a needed vacation. 

Annie M. Pinkham, 188 1-2, 1883-6, Bluehill, Me. 
Mrs. Rev. E. A. Mason. 
See Second Class of 1878. 

Warren C. Philbrook, 1882-3, Waterville, Me. 

Mr. Philbrook is a graduate of the Normal School at Castine and 
also of Colby University, Class of 1882. Married the same year, Miss 
Ada M. Foster of Waterville. 

After leaving Farmington, he returned to Waterville, finished his legal 
studies and was admitted to the bar in 1884. Became Principal of the 
Waterville High School the same year and taught with fine success until 
the summer of 1887, when he resigned and formed a law partnership 
with the Hon. O. G. Hall of Waterville, since which time he has been in 
the active practice of his profession in that city. 

Lillian M. Monger, 1882-3, 86 Marlborough St., Boston. 
See Second Class of 1878. 

Edwin S. Matthews, 1882-3, Boston, Mass. 

His present occupation is that of a mechanical engineer. Since 
leaving Farmington, he has been employed mainly in steam and hydraulic 
engineering in New England, and at the present is employed in putting 
in elevators. Married, July 10, 1888, Agnes lola Rounds of Plymouth, 
N. H., a graduate of the Second Class of 1880, and is living in Boston. 

Office, 113 Devonshire Street, Boston, Mass. 

Mabel E. Austin, Farmington, Me. 
Mrs. E. E. Richards. 
See First Class of 1879. 

Charles F. Warner, 1883-8, 22 Centre St., Cambridgeport, Mass. 

Mr. Warner graduated from Colby University in 1879 and took a 
course of study in the Bridgewater Normal School the following year. 

After five years of very valuable work, he resigned to accept the 
position of Sub-Master in the English High School, Cambridge, Mass. 



32 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

In Mr. Warner's resignation the School met with a great loss. To a 
generous and special preparation for his profession, joined to natural 
abilities of a high order, he added an earnestness and zeal that have 
placed him in the foremost rank among teachers. 

Mr. Warner married, July 5, 1886, Marion A. Luce, Second Class of 
1883, and for two years, 1885-7, Principal of the Primary Training 
School. They have one child, Margaret, born Feb. 12, 1888. 

Elizabeth G. Bell, 1883-5. 

Miss Bell was a graduate of the Manchester (N. H.) High School and 
the Salem Normal School. After teaching three or four years, the last 
two years as an assistant in the Edward Little High School, Auburn, Me., 
she went abroad, spending two years in Germany and PVance to perfect 
herself in the languages of those countries. Returning, she was again 
called to the Edward Little High School, this time as first lady assistant. 
She remained but a year, when she resigned to accept a position, in the 
fall of 1883, in the Normal. During her second year her health failed, 
and she was obliged to seek a milder climate. In the summer of 
1885, she was elected Professor of French and History in the State 
Agricultural College, at Fort Collins, Colo., where she taught for nearly 
two years, making a brave battle for life. But the nature of her disease 
(consumption) was such that neither climate, nor more than human 
courage, nor the prayers of her friends could avail, and she returned 
to the hills of her early New Hampshire home and found rest April 
23, 1887. 

It would be unjust not to pay a tribute to the memory of one to 
whom her fellow teachers as well as her pupils were deeply indebted. 

She belonged to a family that has given to the Granite State some 
of the brightest minds among its brilliant men. She inherited her full 
share of the mental vigor and acumen of that family. Her teaching 
was always clear, direct, earnest and enthusiastic. Her classes could not 
be dull, and, no matter what she taught, no pupil failed to be interested 
in his w^ork. No braver, gentler, purer spirit ever shed its benediction 
over a schoolroom, and a shrine to her memory has been built in every 
heart that has been blessed by her instruction. 

Nellie Dennett, Spring Term, 1885, Brunswick, Me. 
See Second Class of 1884. 

HoRTENSE M. Merrill, 1885 , Farmington, Me. 

See Class of 1881. 



SKETCHES OF THE TEACHERS. 33 

Lillian I. Lincoln, 1885 , Brunswick, Me. 

See Class of 1885. 

LuTiE F. LuQUES, 1885 , Kennebunkport, Me. 

See Class of 1881. 

Harriet P. Young, 1886 , Matinicus, Me. 

See Class of 1881. 

Holmes H. Bailey, Spring Term, 1886, Allen's Mills, Me. 
See Second Class of 1886. 

Ardelle M. Tozier, 1887 , Farmington, Me. 

See Class of 1887. 

Jefferson R. Potter, A. M., 1888 , Farmington, Me. 

Mr. Potter is a graduate of Brown University, Class of 1877. Taught 
1877-8 in Vermont Academy, Saxton's River, Vt., then seven years in 
the Castine State Normal School, resigning in 1885 ^^ accept a pro- 
fessorship in the State Agricultural College, Lexington, Ky., where he 
remained until coming here. 

He married, Julys, i^79) Miss Jennie Rider of Holyoke, Mass., and 
has two children: Claudia, born May 30, 1887; Paul Merrick, born 
Dec. 18, 1888. 

MODEL SCHOOL, 

Lucilla E. Smith, 1869-71, 231 Lincoln Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
See Class of 1869. 

Mrs. C. C. Rounds, Plymouth, N. H. 

Mrs. Rounds taught a term or more in the Model School, her 
acquaintance with the school, her ability as a teacher and experience in 
primary work enabling her to render valuable service in emergencies that 
often arise from sickness and other causes in a large school. 

Laura M. Curtis, 187 1-2. 
See preceding sketch. 

Carrie G. Sewall, 187 1-3. 
Mrs. C. P. Robbins. 
See Class of 1870. 



34 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

En'A KiLBRETH, 1 8 73-4, Keamcy, Nebraska. 
Mrs. F. M. Hallowell. 
See First Class of 1872. 

Helen C. Smith, 1874-5, Easthampton, Mass. 

Miss Smith is a graduate of the State Normal School, Oswego, N. Y. 
Her health failed soon after coming to Farmington and she remained in 
the School but a few weeks. She writes that her " health has been too 
delicate to admit of her teaching at any time since leaving Farmington 
until within a year or so," and that "she has some expectation of entering 
the field again at the beginning of another school year." 

Anna V. Hunt, 1874-5, Farmington, Me. 
See Second Class of 1873. 

Martha B. Wyman, 1875-6. 
Mrs. Dr. O. O. Wells. 
See First Class of 1875. 

Olive Hamblv, 1878-9, Dansville, N. Y. 

After leaving Farmington, Miss Hambly returned to Washington and 
taught a " Fifth Grade School" one year, when her health gave way 
completely. After spending eight months at the Sanitarium at Dans- 
ville, N. Y., she returned to her work, taught another year and then 
returned to Dansville in poorer health than before. Has lived there with 
her mother ever since, "slowly coming up again." Has done some 
literary work — mainly magazine articles, — and devoted much time to the 
study of Metaphysics. 

E. Burt Holt, 1879-81, 407 S. Eighth St., Lebanon, Pa. 
Mrs. D. B. Berry. 
See Second Class of 1879. 

Alice E. Warren, 188 1-2, Nor\vay, Me. 
Mrs. George A. Brooks. 
See First Class of 1880. 

Agnes I. Rounds, 1882-3, Boston, Mass. 
Mrs. E. S. Matthews. 
See Second Class of 1880. 



SKETCHES OF THE TEACHERS. 35 

Viola A. Johnson, 1883-5, 228 Tenth St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Mrs. Charles E. Weston. 
See Second Class of 1883. 

Marion A. Luce, 1885-7, 22 Centre St., Cambridgeport, Mass. 
Mrs. Charles F. Warner. 
See Second Class of 1883. 

JuLiA' W. Swift, 1887 , Farmington, Me. 

See Class of 1886. 



LECTURERS AND SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Walter Wells, A. M. 

Lecturer on Physics. Resided in Massachusetts and was engaged in 
literary work for several years. Died in Portland, April 21, 1881. 

C. A. Allen, Farmington, Me. 

Teacher of Vocal Music. Is still a dealer in musical merchandise, 
and conductor of choruses. 

N. T. True, M. D. 

Lecturer on Natural History and Geology. Was Professor of Nat- 
ural Sciences in the Normal Training School, Oswego, N. Y., 1872-76 ; 
Principal of the Academies at Milan, N. H., and Litchfield, Me., 1876- 
%2i \ died in Bethel, Me., May 17, 1887. Was the author of History of 
Bethel ; History of Gorham, N. H. 

J. B. Severy, M. D., Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Lecturer on Physiology. Left the practice of medicine for that of 
the law. Was Judge of the Municipal Court and Trustee of the Normal 
Schools. In 1882, went to Colorado, and is now Judge of El Paso Co. 

A. H. Abbott, A. M., Farmington, Me. 

Lecturer on Physics. Is still the Principal and Proprietor of the 
** Little Blue" School. Is taking a trip through Europe at the present 
time. 

Austin Reynolds, M. D., Farmington, Me. 

Lecturer on Physiology and Hygiene. Is still in the practice of 
medicine in Farmington. 



36 FARMIAGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

J. B. Taylor, A. M. 

Teacher of Elocution. Have not ascertained anything in regard to 
Mr. Taylor. 

Lewis F. Worthley, Fiske, Pa. 

Teacher of Vocal Music. (See Second Class of 1872). 

Mrs. E. O. Greenleaf, Farmington, Me. 

Teacher of Elocution. Is still giving private instruction in Vocal 
Culture. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 



[The address given at the beginning of each sketch is that taken from the 
records of the School when the graduate entered. At the close of the sketch, the 
present address is given.] 

CLASS OF 1866. 

First Class. — Graduated May 25, 1866. 

Sarah S. Curtis, Mercer, Me. 

From the report of 1874 we learn that Miss Curtis had taught up to 
that time six terms in her own town. As no reply has been received to 
several circulars and letters, we are unable to speak of her later work, 
other than that she has been for several years a successful canvasser for 
subscription books. 

Mercer, Me. 

M. Augusta Evans, Athens, Me. 

Taught for six years after graduation in the public schools of 
Washington, D. C. Married, Aug. i, 1872, Rev. Osgood W. Rogers 
of Windham, Me., once a pupil in the Normal, attending three terms, 
and leaving to prepare for college. He entered Bowdoin College in 
1868, graduating in course in 1872 and from the Bangor Theological 
Seminary in 1876. He has been pastor of the Congregational churches 
in Farmington and Bridgton, Me., and for the past six years in Mt. 
Pleasant, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rogers were both present at the opening of the School 
in Beal's Hall on the morning of Aug. 24, 1864. 

They have two children : William Osgood, born May 4, 1874 ; Annie 
Evans, born May 6, 1877. 

Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. 



38 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Emma J. Freeman, Manchester, Me. 

Was present at the opening of the School. Has taught six or more 
terms. Occupation for several years before marriage was stitching. 
Married, Nov. 6, 1884, Cyrenus PuUen of Augusta, now a farmer in 
Manchester, Me. Have one child, Hannah E. L., born Aug. 28, 1885. 

Augusta, Me. 

Nellie M. Hayes, Farmington, Me. 

Miss Hayes was also one of the thirty-one present Aug. 24, 1864. 
Has taught in Farmington and Strong, Me., and Leavenworth, Kansas. 
Married, April 22, 1875, M^- Chas. Sparrow of the last named place. 
They have five children : George H., born April 22, 1876, died July 22, 
1876 ; Nellie H., born Sept. 24, 1877, died Dec. 25, 1886 ; Emma H., 
born Jan. 23, 1879, ^^^^ J^"^- 6, 1887 ; Edward C, born May 17, 1882 ; 
and Hayes, born Nov. 11, 1888. 

226 Third Avenue, Leavenworth, Kansas. 

S. Fanny Norton, Farmington, Me. 

Monday morning following her graduation found Miss Norton mis- 
tress of a private school of twenty-seven pupils in Farmington. She 
spent a year at Vassar, and then taught two years and five months in 
Maiden, Mass., where she married, July 20, 1869, the Rev. Albert W. 
Moore, whose pastorate in Farmington is so affectionately remembered 
by the people of the "Old South." They have seven children : Walter 
Goodenow, born Nov. 29, 1870; Hugh Kelsea, born Jan. 3, 1872; 
Alice Woods, born Nov. 7, 1873, died Oct. 2, 1874; Mary W. Lane, 
born Jan. 21, 1875, ^^^^ ^^Y ^3? 1880; Horace Dwight, born Aug. 14, 
1877; Clara Abbott, born Jan. 30, 1879, died Sept. 30, 1879; Mabel 
Cutler, bom Dec. 6, 1880. 

14 Estes Street, Lynn, Mass. 

Martha T. Perkins, Bath, Me. 

Miss Perkins was present at the opening of the School the first day 
of its existence, and at her graduation delivered the valedictory address, 
"which," said Principal Gage in the Superintendent's Report for 1866, 
" gave a very interesting history of the rise and progress of the Normal 
School, and will be a valuable paper to refer to in future years." She 
taught a primary school in Bath one term, then in the South Grammar 
School two years and one term, then was promoted to the High School, 
where she remained until her marriage to Capt. George W. Tucker of 
Bath, April 18, 1870. " For fifteen years," she writes, " I ^sailed the seas 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 39 

over ' with my husband, but now, that our family needs to be * on shore,' 
we have bought a home in Brooklyn." 

For literary work, she has taken lessons in Spanish, French, German, 
Drawing ; also has read Caesar, Sallust and Cicero. 

They have four children: Charles P., i8 years of age; Louise E., 
15 ; Florence M., 11 ; George W., Jr., 4 years. 

483 Putnam Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dora A. Sprague, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 255 weeks, teaching fourteen terms in Maine. Since 
1874 she has taught part of the time in Massachusetts, and devoted her- 
self to the duties of a professional nurse part of the time. At present 
she is teaching in the town of HoUiston, Mass. 

Address during the school year, Braggville, Mass. ; during vacations, 
85 Chester Square, Boston, Mass. 

Hannah B. Stewart, Farmington, Me. 

Was assistant in the Normal the last term of her course. After 
graduation, taught one year in Farmington and six months in Auburn. 
She then went to Leavenworth, Kansas, teaching three years in the 
Grammar Department. Married, Jan. 28, 1873, Mr. Noel Eugene Stev- 
ens, a commercial traveller of that city, and now engaged in railroad 
business. 

They have three children: Mabel Stewart, born Dec. 13, 1875; 
Edith Griswold, born March 20, 1878; John Roland, born Nov. 30, 
1880. 

Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

Susie K. Tobey, East Machias, Me. 

Has taught three years in Farmington, Whitneyville, and Machias, 
Me. Present occupation, cashier for Seavey, Foster & Bowman, 104 
Arch St., Boston, Mass. 

446 Shawmut Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

Mira Q. Vaughan, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 120 weeks, all in Farmington, except one term in Phillips 
Village, and one term in Chesterville. From 187 1 till her marriage, the 
care of home friends prevented her teaching. Married, Aug. 27, 1876, 
Sumner W. Thompson, a farmer, of New Sharon, Me. They have one 
son, Edmund Quincy, born April 10, 1879. 

Farmington, Me. 



40 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

CLASS OF 1867, 

Second Class. — Graduated June 4, 1867. 

Charles M. Bisbee, Canton, Me. 

Taught about 50 weeks after graduation, and then took a course in 
Latin and Greek. Studied medicine, and graduated from the Maine 
Medical School in 187 1, receiving the degree of M. D. Has served on 
the S. S. Committee eight years, and is Secretary of the local Board of 
Health. Married, Aug. 6, 187 1, Ella R. Tucker of West Peru, Me., and 
has two children : Harlan M.,born Jan. i, 1875 ; Chester G., born Sept. 
16, 1881. 

West Sumner, Me. 

Maria H. Bisbee, Canton, Me. 

Has taught more than 700 weeks. Is principal of a large grammar 
school in Evansville, Indiana. 

Evansville, Ind. 

Electa W. Bixby, Anson, Me. 

Has taught twenty years, — eleven years in Maine, in Searsport, 
Thomaston, Lewiston and other places. Married, in 1875, ^^'* 
classmate, Charles A. Boston of Avon, Me. They have one child, 
Ada D., born in 1876. For several years they have lived in Minne- 
sota. 

St. James, Minn. 

Charles A. Boston, Avon, Me. 

Taught in 1868-9 ^^ ^^ State Normal School at Mankato, Minn. 
Pre-empted land near the present village of St. James, Minn., in 1869. 
Appointed County Superintendent of Schools of Watonwan County 
in 1870. Engaged portions of time for the next two years as instructor 
in State Normal Institutes and Training Schools. Taught graded 
schools in Minnesota and Wisconsin for several years. Engaged one 
year in work on the State Atlas of Iowa, and one year in County 
History work in Maine and Kentucky. Settled in the village of St. 
James in 1883, and taught there two years. Is Chief Templar of 
St. James Lodge of I. O. G. T., and President of the County S. S. 
Association. 

Married, in 1875, his classmate, Electa W. Bixby of Anson, Me. 
They have one child, Ada D., born in 1876. 

St. James, Minn. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 41 

Mary R. Bugbee, Perry, Me. 

Taught in Maine until March, 1868, then went to Stockton, Cal., and 
taught until her marriage, December, 1869, to Mr. L. C. Bliss, a 
merchant of that city. Ten years later, Mr. Bliss was killed by the 
explosion of a locomotive-boiler. 

Nov. 8, 1883, Mrs. Bliss married Mr. Samuel Cole of Gilroy, Cal., 
and has resided in that place since. Is now principal of a primary 
school. Has one child, Laura E. Bliss, born Aug. 21, 1873. 

Gilroy, Cal. 

Susie M. Dyer, New Sharon, Me. 

Taught one year in Maiden, Mass., three years in the Normal School, 
Mankato, Minn., and a high school for one term at New Sharon, Me. 
Married, May 15, 1872, Mr. L. G. M. Fletcher, a farmer of Mankato, 
Minn. They have seven children : Lucina E.,born April 7, 1873 ; Ella 
May, born Dec. 11, 1874; Jennie D., born Nov. 24, 1876; Nellie B., 
born March 6, 1879, died Sept. 10, 1884 \ Mildred, born June 4, 1881 ; 
L. G. M., Jr., bom March 24, 1883 ; Edith A., bom Aug. 10, 1886. 
Mankato, Minn. 

George M. Ferguson, Shapleigh, Me. 

Mr. Ferguson was also one of the thirty-one pioneers. Was principal 
of a grammar school at Thomaston, Me., for one year after graduating 
and then taught three years in the State Normal School, Mankato, Minn., 
where he died, Oct. 24, 187 1, of typhoid fever. He was very popular 
as a teacher and much respected as an earnest Christian man. Principal 
Gage said of him : " Those who knew him best will associate with his 
memory only such words and deeds as belong to the nobler types of 
human nature." 

Ada M. Floyd, Winthrop, Me. 

Taught until 1870 in various Maine towns. From 1870 to 1875 taught 
the grammar school in Keene, N. H., and then for a time the same 
grade in Marlboro, Mass. Married, Aug. 9, 1878, Charles Edwin Smith, 
A. B., of Monmouth, a graduate of Bowdoin College, class of 1874, and 
at this time Superintendent of City Schools, Lyons, Iowa. Here they 
resided till 1880, when they removed to Crookston, Minn., where Mr. 
Smith held the Superintendency of the City Schools, and was also largely 
interested in wheat raising. His death occurred in Crookston, in June, 
1883, leaving one child, Charley C. F., born August, 1882. 

Since her husband's decease, Mrs. Smith has resided with her parents 



42 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

in Winthrop. She is much interested in the Natural Sciences. Has 
organized and conducted a Summer School of Science, holding weekly 
meetings from April to October at her home, and has been its President 
since April, 1886. Is also President of Chapter 498 of the Agassiz 
Association. In connection with these organizations she has studied and 
taught, chiefly Geology, Botany and the History of Maine. 
Winthrop Centre, Me. 

Mary L. Goodwin, Dresden, Me. 

Miss Goodwin is also one of the thirty-one whose names adorn the 
first page of the old register. After graduation, attended the Academy 
at Richmond several terms, studying French, the Higher Mathematics, 
etc. Has taught 148 weeks, all in Richmond, Gardiner, Lewiston and 
other Maine towns. Married, Nov. 4, 1873, Augustus S. Bixby of Lewis- 
ton, Maine, and went to Los Angeles Co., Cal., where they have since 
resided. They have four children : Alice M., born Nov. 24, 1874 ; Lulu 
A., born Sept. 25, 1876 ; Willie F., born Sept. i, 1878 ; Florence L., born 
Dec. 22, 1886. 

Sierra Madre, Cal. 

Jennie M. Hayden, Raymond, Me. 

Taught more than 500 weeks. For five years after graduation she 
taught in New Sharon and Lewiston, Me., and Mankato, Minn. In 1872 
she was elected to a position in this School, where she remained a most 
successful teacher until her resignation at the end of the school year 
1 880-1. During her teaching she took a course in Drawing in the 
Boston Normal Art School, in Latin, French and Higher Mathematics 
at Bates College and Gorham Seminary, in Botany at the Harvard 
Summer School, and in Zoology at the Martha's Vineyard Summer 
School. She married, Sept. 5, 1883, John Irving Sturgis, M. D., of New 
Gloucester. 

Her long connection with this School, and the superior character of 
her work, are sufficient excuse, if any be needed, for the insertion of the 
following tribute from the pen of one of her pupils : 

As a teacher, Miss Hayden's work was characterized by clearness and thorough- 
ness. No class was allowed to leave a subject in which the foundation had not been 
thoroughly laid. Perhaps no branch better showed the excellence of her teaching 
than history. Quick to detect superficial preparation, her pupils soon learned the 
value of fliligent and persevering effort. 

Her interest in her work was not confined to the classroom but extended to all 
that pertained to the school life of the pupils. Her time was theirs, and help and 
encouragement, whenever needed, were freely given. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 43 

Edmund Hayes, Farmington, Me. 

Taught but forty weeks after graduation, and then entered the class 
of '73 in Chandler Scientific Department, Dartmouth College, remaining 
there two years. He then entered, in '71, the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and for two years took a special course in Civil Engineering, 
but took no degrees. In May, 1873, he began the practice of Civil Engi- 
neering on the Erie Railway. Since 1874 has made bridge-building a 
specialty, and is now one of the four members of the Union Bridge Co. 
From other sources we learn that this is one of the largest bridge-building 
concerns in the world. They built the famous Cantilever Bridge over 
the Niagara River, the first bridge of the kind ever built, and have now 
on hand a contract to build and equip a railroad in Chili for thirty-five 
million dollars. 

Married, April 27, 1878, Mary H. Warren of Buffalo, N. Y. 

160 North Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Abbie L. Huse, Farmington, Me. 

Taught a short time and then went to Evanston, Illinois, where she 
spent a year studying French, German and Spanish. For several years 
previous to her marriage, she was a clerk in her brother's store. She 
married, April 14, 1875, M^- George Charlton, of Toledo, Ohio. In May, 
1877, they moved to Wichita, Kansas, where she died, Jan. 10, 1882, after 
a brief illness, leaving three children : Vesta Adell, born Dec. 17, 1877 ; 
Lotta Abbie, born March 6, 1879 ; Guy, born June 5, 1880, died June 
21, 1880. 

John Jackson, Alfred, Me. 

Taught several terms after graduation, at Whitneyville and Dennys- 
ville, Me., and, in the winter of 1869, in Haverhill, Mass. He was a 
member of the Freshman Class of the State College at Orono, when he 
was drowned, July 19, 1870, while bathing in Stillwater Stream. 

Jerome B. Knapp, North New Portland, Me. 

Has not taught since graduation. For fifteen years was engaged in 
the canvassing business as a General Agent. Is now a Real Estate Agent. 
Married, July 8, 1867, Lizzie S. Holley of Farmington, Me., who died 
Oct. 16, 1887. 

69 N. East Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Joseph W. Knight, Windham, Me. 

Has taught about 450 weeks, all in the State of Maine, in the towns 



44 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

of Springfield, Gray, Standish, Gorham, and Windham, fifteen terms of 
which were high schools. Has been a member of the S. S. Committee 
of Springfield, Me., four years, and of Standish seven years, and is now 
one of the Selectmen of the latter town. Is engaged in farming during 
the spring and summer, teaches falls and winters. Married, May 17, 
1870, Sibbie A. Lewis of Springfield, Me., and has one child, Charles E., 
born March 23, 1872. 
North Gorham, Me. 

Ella A. Leland, Farmington, Me. 

Was present at the opening of the School. Since graduation has 
taught about 200 weeks, all in Maine. For literary work, she has taken 
the C. L. S. C. course and a course in English and French History. 
Married in December, 1871, Mr. Edward L. Spalding of Worcester, Mass., 
now cashier of the First National Bank, Webster, Mass. They have two 
children : Leland J., born March 11, 1877 ; and Edward E., born Aug. 
9, 1879, ^^^^ Nov. 30, 1879. 

Webster, Mass. 

Emma C. Leland, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 350 weeks, all in Maine, four years of that time in the 
Farmington schools. Married, Jan. 19, 1880, Hiram B. Coolidge, of 
North Jay, Me., a former pupil in the School, for some time in business 
in Washington, D. C, now a merchant in Webster, Mass. Has taken 
half of the Chautauquan Course. They have one child, Florence Spald- 
ing, born Aug. 16, 1882. 
Webster, Mass. 

Mary O. Lord, Springvale, Me. 

Has taught 400 weeks, — two years in a primary school in Lewiston, 
Me., the remaining time in a Boston grammar school. Married, Aug. 7, 
1877, George Whitman Bailey of Portland, Me., now a dry goods mer- 
chant. 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

Julia E. Lowell, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 150 weeks, all in Skowhegan, Lisbon, Richmond, Farm- 
ington and other Maine towns. Married, Feb. 3, 1875, Alfred Augustine 
Atwood, a merchant of West Farmington, Me. They have one child, 
Marion A., born Sept. 2, 1876. 

Farmington, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 45 

M. Emma Morrill, Farming ton Falls, Me. 

Taught successfully three terms in Chesterville. Her health failing, 
she devoted herself to teaching music for a time. Died Sept. 29, 1874. 

Adella C. Parsons, North Chesterville, Me. 

Has taught 215 weeks. After graduation took the College Course at 
Kent's Hill, Me., graduating in 1873 with the degree of A. B., receiving, 
three years later, the degree of A. M. Taught during vacations several 
terms in the towns of Chesterville and Farmington. In 1873-4 was 
Preceptress of a young ladies seminary in Quincy, Illinois. Taught at 
Kent's Hill in 1877-8. Married, Nov. 18, 1875, Joseph Waldo Vinal 
Rich, a graduate of Wesleyan University, for some time one of the 
Professors at Kent's Hill, now Principal of the High School, Woonsocket, 
R. I. They have two children : Edwin Gile, born Sept. 30, 1879 ; Ethel, 
born Aug. 17, 1881. 

55 Blackstone Street, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Anna De W. Pearce, Eastport, Me. 

Has taught most of the time since graduation, fifteen terms in Maine, 
in Pembroke, Eastport (High and Grammar), Harrington, and Water- 
ville (Classical Institute), and the remainder of the time in Massachusetts, 
mainly in Worcester, where she is now teaching a primary school. Has 
studied Greek, Latin and Shorthand, and read a part of the Chautauquan 
Course. 

155 Park Avenue, Worcester, Mass. 

Ruth G. Rich, Canton, Me. 

Taught several terms in Lewiston, Maine. Is now completing her 
seventeeth year in the Dwight School, Boston, Mass. 

Dwight School, Boston, Mass. 

John G. Roberts, Farmington, Me. 

Has not taught. Has for several years been a contractor and builder. 
Married, June 24, 1877, AldanaC. Hatch of Auburn, Me., Second Class 
of 1872. 

37 Seventh Street, Auburn, Me. 

.Addie B. Stevens, Lewiston, Me. 

Has taught fifteen years in the city of Lewiston, where she is now 
teaching in the primary grade. 
9 Sabatis Street, Lewiston, Me. 



46 FAKMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

Olive H. Swan, New Sharon, Me. 

Taught 25 weeks. Married, Jan. 15, 1874, Mr. Townsend I. Sutton of 
Boston, Mass., now a farmer and fruit-grower in Michigan. They have 
five children : Asa F., born May 26, 1875 ; Benjamin T., born May 6, 
1877 ; Webster W., born Jan. 7, 1879 ; Elizabeth M., born Aug. 6, 1880 ; 
Mary C, born Jan. 4, 1888. 
Sutton, Mich. 

John A. Sweet, Farmington, Me. 

Taught one term in Farmington, and then went West. Entered the 
employ of Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., one of the largest dry goods houses 
in America, in January, 1872, as Superintendent of their Law and Col- 
lection Departments, filling this position until May, 1878, when he was 
promoted to the position of business manager, which implies the exclusive 
management of the Financial, Credit and Law Departments, which 
position he still holds. . 

Has studied law, with particular reference to his business, but not for 
general practice, and for two years was President of the Garden City 
Savings and Loan Association, resigning at the end of that time on 
account of other duties. 

Married, June 18, 1878, Mary Stevenson, of Sandusky, Ohio, and has 
two children : Fred Kent, born Sept. 26, 1879, ^^^^ Dec. 2, 1879 ; John 
Allen, Jr., born April 27, 1881. 

The following excerpt fronl the Chicago Morning News has been 
handed us, which, we are sure, Mr. Sweet will pardon us for inserting : 

With hundreds of other enterprising men who flocked to this great business mart 
at the close of the '6o*s came John A. Sweet, a tall, symmetrically proportioned young 
man, with a head well set upon broad shoulders, a pleasing countenance, and the 
impersonation of health and vigor. He sought and obtained the desirable but arduous 
position of Manager of the Collection Department of Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., and 
by dint of sagacity soon established an enviable reputation in the Northwest for the 
successful manner in which he hunted " lame ducks" and the celerity with which he 
settled doubtful accounts for cash or indorsed notes. So satisfactory was the progress 
he made that additional duties were assigned to him, and in 1878 he received the 
well-earned promotion to the responsible position of Credit Manager, and he continues 
to fill that place of trust. The statement has been made by reliable authorities, sup- 
plemented by able exponents of commercial law in this city — men who are unbiased 
in formmg an opinion regarding the qualifications or standing of a credit-maker — 
that Mr. Sweet has no superior in the West as an accurate judge of credits. He 
seems to be endowed with marvelous discernment and is a natural physiognomist, and 
thus almost intuitively is able to form a correct judgment. This opinion, however, must 
be confirmed by the manner of the merchant applying for credit in making his state- 
ment, as well as by the statement itself. Mr. Sweet's success in his important depart- 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 47 

ment may also be attributed to his wonderful memory, which renders him such valuable 
assistance that only in isolated cases does he consult his credit register. For 1887, 
the goods represented by the tickets he signs will approximate a value of $1 i,ooo,cxx) 
— a remarkable showing considering the low value of goods and close competition. 
Mr. Sweet is equally popular with the purchasers and salesmen and highly esteemed 
by the business community. He is a member of the Chicago Commandery, Oriental 
Consistory, and has taken the 32d degree of Masonry. He is a native of the State of 
Maine, and in his 41st year. 

Sarah C. Thayer, Auburn, Me. 

We have not been able to learn anything in regard to her teaching. 
For several years she carried on the millinery and fancy goods business 
at Mechanic Falls, Me., where she died, Sept. 26, 1885. 

Olivia M. Toothaker, East Holden, Me. 

Has taught 574 weeks, — 123 weeks in Maine, the remainder in Cali- 
fornia. Has studied Spanish, and commenced the C. L. S. C. course. 
Married, Feb. 25, 1884, William Thomas Armstrong, a gold miner of 
Grizzly Flat, California, where they now reside. 

Grizzly Flat, El Dorado Co., Cal. 

Alonzo p. Tukey, Windham, Me. 

Taught the High School at Dennysville, Me., for three years. Took 
a year's course in Latin and French at Westbrook Seminary. For six 
years was Superintendent of City Schools, Mankato, Minn., and for ten 
years was western agent for a schoolbook publishing house. Is now 
in real estate business at Omaha, Nebraska. 

Married, Aug. 8, 1871, Elizabeth I. M. Allan of Dennysville, Me., and 
has five children : Lillie S., born Aug. 3, 1873 ; Harry A., born Aug. 7, 
1877 ; Ethel M., born Aug. 11, 1878 ; Louise M., born Nov. 10, 1881 ; 
Beth T., born Nov. 13, 1887, died Dec. 10, 1888. 

15th and Douglas Streets, Omaha, Nebr. 

Priscilla S. Walker, New Sharon, Me. 

Taught about 550 weeks, — nearly three years in the ungraded schools 
of Maine, two years nearly in a grammar school in Rochester, Minn., 
eight years in the First Grammar School, Bath, Me., and then for two 
years ('81-3), was the popular and successful Principal of the Shailer 
School, Portland, Me. 

Married, Sept. 3, 1883, Mr. John Edgar, a real estate broker of 
Rochester, Minn. 

14 Prospect Street, Rochester, Minn. 



48 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

RoLiSTON Woodbury, Sweden, Me. 

Immediately after graduating he was engaged as an assistant in this 
School, where he remained twelve years. The remaining nine years 
of his life he spent at Castine as Principal of the Eastern Normal 
School, engaged in active work till his death, which occurred Nov. i, 
1888. 

The same courage and devotion to duty that had characterized his 
army life was conspicuously shown in the last years of his teaching. For 
months he knew that death was walking in his steps, but he did not 
falter. He was ready to go, or to stay, but while he staid nothing should 
keep him from his daily duties. 

It was the great privilege of the editor to spend two days in the 
Castine School only a week before Mr. Woodbury's death, and he wishes 
to gratefully acknowledge the inspiration he received as he witnessed the 
energy, enthusiasm and clearness of the teaching of a man upon whom 
was already set the seal of the Better Land, and of whom his many 
devoted friends were saying, " For only a day can he be with us." 

Mr. Woodbury married, Aug. 9, 1870, Miss Maria N. Billings of the 
Class of 1869, for nearly two years a teacher in this School. They have 
three children: Ernest R., born July 3, 1871, and just graduated from 
the Castine School; Nelson L., born May 22, 1874; Willie B., born 
April 20, 1877. 

For a Memorial of Mr. Woodbury, see pages 25-7. 



CLASS OF 1868. 
Third Class. — Graduated June 2, 1868. 

Hattie Atkinson, Farmington, Me. 

From a relative in Brunswick who knew her well, we learn that she 
taught constantly and successfully from the time of her graduation, 
in the villages of Phillips, Farmington, Freeport and Brunswick until her 
decease, March 23, 1876, in the last named place. 

Mary D. Bicknell, Madison, Me. 

Of Miss Bicknell's teaching we have not been able to obtain any 
account. Married, May, 8, 1871, George F. H. Paul of Skowhegan. 
Lived in Brighton and then in Lexington, Mass., where she died Jan. 27, 
1888, leaving two children : Arthur H., born Aug. 10, 1873 ; Clarance B., 
born July 9, 1875. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 49 

John W. Bixby, Anson, Me. 

From a relative we learn that Mr. Bixby went to California about the 
year 1871 and engaged in the business of sheep-raising, in which he was 
very successful. At the time of his death, which occurred May 6, 1887, 
he was the owner of a large landed estate, and, besides sheep- raising, 
carried on a considerable dairy business, farming, and the raising of fine 
horses. A library of several hundred volumes in his residence at " The 
Alamitos Ranch" indicated his love of literature and desire for mental 
cultivation. He at one time held the office of trustee of one of the 
public schools and at the time of his death was a member of the Los 
Angeles Board of Trade. 

He married, Oct. 15, 1873, Susie P. Hathaway of Wilmington, Cal., 
and left two children : Fred Hathaway, born April 20, 1875 ; ^"^ Susanna 
Paterson, born April 11, 1880. 

Lizzie M. Bixby, Norridgewock, Me. 

Taught three and one-half years in Lewiston (primary grade), Nor- 
ridgewock, and Madison. Weak eyes and ill health compelled her to 
relinquish teaching, and her life has been spent since in caring for invalid 
relatives. 

Madison, Me. 

Laura N. Brackeit, Phillips, Me. 

Miss Brackett's name has appeared in all the early catalogues as 
" Ella Brackett," a mistake made at the time she entered the School. 
She has taught ten years, — seven in Maine and three at Harper's Ferry, 
West Virginia. Is now engaged in the millinery and fancy goods 
business in her native town. 

Phillips, Me. 

LuRA Brackett, Phillips, Me. 

Has taught about 800 weeks, two years of that time in Maine. Is 
now, as for several years past. Preceptress of the Academic and Normal 
Department of Storer College, Harper's Ferry, West Virginia. Spent 
part of the year 1872 studying Latin and French at Lapham Institute, 
Rhode Island. 

Married, June 7, 1884, Scott W. Lightner of Harper's Ferry, West 
Virginia, a teacher who has been connected with the public schools of 
that State for twelve years, and is at present Principal of the Bolivar 
Graded School, and a member of the Examining Board of Jefferson Co. 

Harper's Ferry, W. Va. 



50 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Emeline M. Brown, Vienna, Me. 

Taught district schools in Vienna and Mt. Vernon until the fall of 
1869, when she went to Anoka, Minn., where she taught two years in the 
graded schools. Returning to Maine in 187 1, she took care of an invalid 
sister until her marriage, Jan. 12, 1874, to Mr. Leverett W. Bruce, a shoe 
manufacturer, then residing in New York. For three years they resided 
in Stoneham, Mass., seven years in Rochester, N. Y., and one year in 
Jamestown near Lake Chautauqua, N. Y. 

Mr. Bruce died. May 8, 1886, leaving three children: Abby Molly, 
born Jan. 19, 1876; Pearl, born Feb. 21, 1881 ; and Percy Leverett, 
born Jan. 31, 1883. 

Mr». Bruce's home is now with her brother, Sewall Brown, in 
Canaan, Me. 

Rice Brown, Vienna, Me. 

Taught one term of high school at North Vienna. Spent nine years 
in the northern part of California at work in the "Red Woods," and 
worked for some time as a ship-carpenter in Bath, Me. Is now a farmer. 
Married, Dec. 27, 1882, Miss Ann O. Sanborn of Vienna, and has one 
child, Georgia May, born Nov. 5, 1886. 

Vienna, Me. 

Fersis K. Burr, Holden, Me. 

Has taught about 250 weeks. Taking a vacation at present. 
Brewer, Me. 

Charles G. Chick, Lebanon, Me. 

Has taught in Farmington, Berwick and East Lebanon ; at the latter 
place a high school, and was Principal of Lebanon Academy, which was 
founded through his efforts. He also taught a grammar school in 
Holliston, Mass., and another at Great Falls, N. H. Studied law in the 
offices of Wm. Emery, Esq., Lebanon, and of Messrs. Wells & Eastman, 
Great Falls, N. H., then at the Harvard Law School, and with the Hon. 
Charles Levi Woodbury of Boston until his admission to the bar in 
November, 1871. 

Married, Dec. 16, 1874, Miss Eliza A. Marshall of Dedham, Mass., 
and has two children : Charles Levi, born June 13, 1885, died Aug. 12, 
1885 ; Francis Marshall, born Feb. 10, 1888. 

Mr. Chick has been a member of the School Committee in Hyde 
Park, Mass., since 1879, two years of the time as Chairman of the Board, 
and four years as Secretary. Has served on the building committee for 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 51 

several of their school-houses, and, in fact, has devoted a large amount 
of time to the school work in that town for the past ten years. 

He has an extensive law practice in Boston, office, 28 State Street ; 
residence, Hyde Park, Mass. 

Florence A. Church, Phillips, Me. 

Taught at Temple Mills, and about two years in a private school in 
Knoxville, Tenn. 

Married, June 28, 1870, Mr. H. W. Clark, of Knoxville, and died 
there, Nov. 2, 1882, leaving five children : H. R., born March, 1872 ; 
Julia E., born July, 1874; Percy, bom December, 1876; Archer F., 
born April, 1879; Ernest, born March, 1881. 

Wm. H. B. Cole, Smithfield, Me. 

Taught several terms in Minnesota, Texas, and California. Married, 
Aug. I, 1887, Miss Nellie Stewart, of Portland, Oregon, where he is in 
business as an importer and jobber of wooden and willow ware. 

18 and 20 Front Street, Portland, Oregon. 

Clara F. Copeland, Holden, Maine. 

For two years after graduation was employed in keeping books in 
Taunton, Mass., then as a teacher in the primary schools of that city for 
five years and a half. 

Married, Aug. i, 1876, Rev. William N. T. Dean, a Congregational 
clergyman of Fall River, Mass., and settled in Norton, Mass. After a 
pastorate of five years in that town, they removed to Orange, remaining 
there also five years, and removing, in January, 1887, to Oxford in the 
same State. 

While living in Orange, Mrs. Dean, in addition to the other work 
that falls to the lot of a pastor's wife, completed a part of the C. L. S. C, 
performing the usual literary work of that course, taking, also, a course 
in English History. She is also the author of several hymns and other 
religious poems, which have been very favorably received. She is an 
earnest and successful Sunday School teacher. 

They have three children : Nathan J., born May 12, 1877, died May 
13, 1877 ; Eveline L., born Sept. 24, 1878 ; Eliza W., born Dec. 20, 1882. 

Oxford, Mass. 

Lizzie M. Copeland, Holden, Me. 

Has taught 147 weeks, all in Maine, from June, 1868, to February, 
1872, in country schools, when she went to Biddeford, where she taught 



52 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

in a grammar school until February, 1874. Since that time her occupa- 
tion has been dressmaking. 

128 Alfred Street, Biddeford, Me. 

George K. Dike, Sebago, Me. 

Taught but two terms, and then, finding that an out-door occupation 
was necessary to his health, took up land surveying. For twelve years 
was U. S. Deputy Surveyor in the West. Is now a Civil Engineer in the 
employ of the St. P. M. & M. R. R. Co. 

Married, Nov. 18, 1876, Hattie B. Shelden, of Excelsior, Minn., who 
died June 9, 1884. Married, Dec. 15, 1886, Nancy P. Douglas of Sebago, 
Me. He has three children : AHce Bell, born Sept. 23, 1879 ; George 
Edward, born June 6, 1883 ; Dana Douglas, born March 7, 1888. 

Grand Forks, Dakota. 

May a. Ferguson, Shapleigh, Me. 

Taught twelve terms in Maine, in Lyman, Alfred, Springvale, Fair- 
field, and in East Lebanon as assistant in the Academy. Also taught in a 
grammar school in Lynn, Mass., and, since her marriage, the same grade 
in Manchaug, Mass., and has served on the S. S. Committee of that town 
until home duties compelled her to decline a re-election. 
. Married, June 27, 1872, Mr. James M. Hodgdon of Lawrence, Mass. 
They have four children: Florence M., born June 26, 1875; Seddie 
Gertrude, born April 9, 1877 ; Grace Louise, born April 7, 1879 ; and 
Myrtle Agnes, born Oct. 6, 1883. 

Manchaug, Mass. 

Clara E. Gilman, Anson, Me. 

Has taught 185 weeks, all in Maine, — in Farmington, Norridgewock, 
Skowhegan, Oakland and other towns. Is taking the third years' work 
of the C. L. S. C, and is Secretary of the Circle in her village. 

Married, July 2, 1876, Frank L. Powers of Bangor, now station agent 
for the Somerset R. R. and a merchant. They have one child, Maud B., 
born Aug. 30, 1879. 

Anson, Me. 

Joseph A. Coding, Bean's Corner, Me. 

Has been engaged in teaching and superintending schools contin- 
uously since graduation. Has taught in Jay and Wilton, and in Illinois. 
Has served four years as Superintendent of Schools for Mercer Co. 
Is now Principal of the High School, Alexis, Illinois. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 53 

Married, May 14, 1872, Sarah E. Noble of New Boston, Illinois, and 
has six children : Lena, born July 3, 1873 ; Clara, born June 6, 1875 ; 
Bertha, born Aug. 6, 1877; Delia, born June 26, 1879; Maurice R., 
born Aug. 22, 1881 ; Arthur J., born June 14, 1888. 

Aledo, 111. 

Joanna W. Harris, New Sharon, Me. 

Taught 92 weeks in Vienna, Mercer and New Sharon. Married, May 
8, 1875, Albion T. Stinson, M. D., of New Sharon, a member of the 
School for one term. They have four children : Mabel E., born March 
13, 1876 ; George A., born July i, 1877 ; Alfred M., born June 11, 1880 ; 
Helen S., bom Nov. 27, 1885. 

New Sharon, Me. 

Mellen Hayes, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught five terms, all but one in Farmington. Is now a success- 
ful farmer on the old homestead. Married, Dec. 25, 1875, ^^^s Alfarata 
Rackliff, of Allen's Mills, and has three children : Ella M., born Nov. 
5, 1876 ; Edmund, born Oct. 14, 1879 ; C. Benjamin, born Oct. 24, 1881. 

Farmington, Maine. 

Fannie W. Huse, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 243 weeks, all in Maine ; among other places, in Farming- 
ton, Livermore and Lewiston. Married, Dec. 12, 1878, Mr. William 
Augustus Niles, a farmer of Bean's Corner. 

Bean's Corner, Me. 

Rose E. Knapp, East Livermore, Me. 

Taught 161 weeks in Rumford, Harpswell, Calais and other Maine 
towns. Married, Feb. 6, 1875, Nahum B. Pinkham, a lawyer in Fargo, 
Dakota, formerly of Anson, Me., and for several terms a member of the 
School. They have since moved on to a farm seven miles from the city 
of Fargo, and have five children : Rosabell, born Nov. 12, 1875 \ Emma 
E., born May 26, 1877 ; Villie E., born April 29, 1879 ; Crace C, born 
April 27, 1 88 1, died Oct. i, 1881 ; Clifford N., born Aug. 9, 1883. 

Fargo, Dakota. 

Milton L. Merrill, St. Albans, Me. 

Has taught five terms, — two of them being a high school. Agent 
for A. S. Barnes & Co., schoolbook publishers of New York, one year. 
Lived four years in Auburn. Has studied Latin and made a special 



54 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

study of Geology. Has served as member of the S. S. Committee, and 
is now serving the sixth year as Chairman of the Board of Selectmen of 
St. Albans. 

Married, Oct. 14, 1873, Lizzie E. Eastman of Sweden, a member of 
the School for one term. They have two children : Erlon E., born April 
30, 1875, died June 4, 1875 ; Bertie Merrill Prince (adopted), born 
March 26, 1877, died Aug. 27, 1877. 

St. Albans, Me. 

Daniel Pease, Bean's Corner, Me. 

Was present at the opening of the School, Aug. 24, 1864. Went to 
work immediately after graduation on the farm where he now lives, 
teaching winters until he taught six terms. For many years has made a 
specialty of dairying. 

Married, March 14, 1872, Helena C. Pendleton of Rockland, and 
has two children : S. Howard, born March 21, 1875 ; Arthur H., born 
June 13, 1878. 

Bean's Corner, Me. 

Nancy M. Pinkham, Anson, Me. 

Has taught 80 weeks in Farmington, Anson, Skowhegan and other 
Maine towns. Married, June 8, 187 1, Alvin Briggs, a farmer of 
Anson, now a carriage manufacturer and Deputy Sheriff in Caledonia, 
Dakota, whither they moved in September, 1882. 

Mrs. Briggs has taken an active interest in the Sabbath School, mis- 
sionary, and temperance work in her State, having been Secretary of the 
County S. S. Institute, and for three years Superintendent of the Cale- 
donia Sabbath School. 

They have two children : Jennie M., born Dec. 24, 1872 ; Alton A., 
born June 4, 1880. 

Caledonia, Traill Co., Dakota. 

Julia F. Reed, Springfield, Me. 

Has taught 39 terms, all in Maine. Is now an assistant in Lee Normal 
Academy. Has served on the S. S. Committee in her native town. 

North Lee, Me. 

Samuel H. Reed, Springfield, Me. 

Mr. Reed reports having taught 150 weeks, three years of that time 
in Walla Walla, Wash., and that he is now a merchant in Lewiston, 
Idaho. Married, Feb. 2, 1889, Miss May McKern of that place. 

Lewiston, Idaho. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 55 

Carrie A. Skinner, Farmington, Me. 

Taught four years in Lewiston. Married, Nov. 24, 1873, John W. 
Nutting of Farmington, and died in the same town Sept. 20, 1875, 
leaving a daughter, Sadie E., born Sept. 10, 1874. 

Lizzie M. Sweet, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught one year since graduation. Married, July 2, 1870, 
M. E. Wadsworth, Ph. D., a graduate of Bowdoin College, Class of 1869, 
since then, an Instructor in Harvard University ; Professor of Mineralogy 
and Geology in Colby University ; and now Director of the Michigan 
Mining School, Houghton, Mich. In 1886, Mrs. Wadsworth spent some 
months in Europe. 

Houghton, Mich. 

Frances E. Taylor, Norridgewock, Me. 

Has taught continuously since graduation, with the exception of two 
years, — fifteen terms in Maine before her marriage, Sept. 17, 1873, to 
Mr. Alfred S. Wright, a teacher of Port Penn, New Castle Co., Del. 
For twelve or thirteen years she taught with her husband at Port Penn, 
and Middleton, Del. 

She is now completing the second year as first assistant in the 
English and Classical Institute at South Norridgewock, of which her 
husband is Principal. 

South Norridgewock, Me. 

Mahala R. Tufts, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 120 weeks, all in Maine except one year in a grammar 
school in Haverhill, Mass., besides systematically teaching her children 
at home. 

Married, June 27, 1871, Mr. WiUiam Henry Pearson, a farmer, 
residing at that time in Fairfield, Me. They have six children : Raymon 
Earnest, born April 5, 1872; Flora Alice, born Aug. 7, 1875 J "Baby 
Parker," born Nov. 5, 1877, died May 20, 1878; Parker Tufts, born 
June 8, 1879; Harland Curtis, born May 25, 1882; Nina Bell, born 
Sept. 15, 1884. 

Flora Alice, though only in her fourteenth year, has taken one term 
of special work in the Normal, the first child of a graduate to enter the 
School ; and, though so young, finds that she can do the work as easily 
as the average pupil several years older, by reason, no doubt, of her 
Normal parentage and training. 

Farmington, Me. 



56 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Louise L. Walker, Rockland, Me. 

Has been Principal of a grammar school in Rockland ever since 
her graduation, except one year, when she taught in Lewiston. Has 
taken the C. T. R. U. course besides constant reading in the Hne of her 
work, and in General History. She has also done editorial work for 
one year on the Teachers' Column of the Co. Institute, and written 
essays for educational meetings. 

2 2 State Street, Rockland, Me. 

Annie V. Whiitier, Madison, Me. 

Has taught 278 weeks, — 68 in Maine, four years primary grade at 
Mankato, Minn., then two years in Pennsylvania, and finally in Oregon. 
Has studied Latin, French, German, Vocal and Instrumental Music. 
In 1876, made arrangements to enter Oberlin College, but ill health 
prevented. Spent twelve weeks at the Ladies' College, Ottawa, Ontario, 
in 1878. Is now taking the C. L. S. C. course, and engaged in the 
millinery and fancy goods business. 

Married, March 18, 1880, Isham Laurance, a farmer of Prairie City, 
Oregon, and has two children : L. Grace, born Jan. 20, 1881 ; I. Ray, 
born Nov. 30, 1884. 

Prairie City, Oregon. 

E. VoDiSA Whither, Farmington Falls, Me. 

Taught five terms in Maine, and then for some time was a compositor 
in the office of the General Advertiser, Providence, R. I. Married, Oct. 
13, 1878, Joel Maddocks of Foxboro, Mass., where she still resides. 

Foxboro, Mass. 

Frederick E. WHinsrEv, Farmington, Me. 

Taught one term each in Mt. Vernon and Vienna, and a high school 
in Waldoboro in 1870-1-2, a grammar school in Dedham, Mass., 
1873-4-5, and same grade in Boston in 1875-6-7. Was Professor of 
English Literature and Rhetoric in the Government University, Tokio, 
Japan, from 1878 to 1881, — teaching in all about 340 weeks. 

Graduated from the Waterville Classical Institute in 1869. Took 
his degree of A. B. at Bowdoin College in 1873, and three years later, 
A. M. from the same college, and LL. B. in the Law School connected 
with Washington University at St. Louis, Mo., in 1882, since which time 
he has been in the practice of his profession in Oakland, Cal. 

Has held since 1883 the office of Court Commissioner of Alameda 
County, Cal. Is Chairman of the Republican City Central Committee 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 57 

and a member of the Republican State Central Committee, and has 
held the rank of Major on the Staff of the Major-General commanding 
the National Guard of California. 

Married, March 22, 1884, Edith A. Adams of Farmington, a member 
of the School for one year, and has two children : Frederick Adams, 
born April 18, 1885 ; Edna, born April 30, 1887. 

Office, 906 Broadway, Oakland, Cal. 



CLASS OF i86g. 

Fourth Class. — Graduated June 2, 1869. 

George F. Billings, Hallowell, Me. 

Has taught 270 weeks, — two terms in Newport, three years in the 
State of Missouri, and one year in Washington, D. C. Is now engaged 
in the real estate and insurance business in Ashland, Oregon. Is a 
member of the School Board, and has been Superintendent of a Sabbath 
School for nine years in the city where he resides. 

Married, Dec. 16, 1879, Frances M. Myer of Ashland, Oregon, and 
has two children : Ralph, born Feb. 7, 1881 ; Homer, born July 5, 
1885. 

Ashland, Oregon. 

Maria N. Billings, Fayette, Me. 

Taught a district school one term, and was an assistant in the Normal 
a year and a half. Married, Aug. 9, 1870, Roliston Woodbury, Class 
of 1867. Mr. Woodbury, as before stated, died Nov. i, 1888, leaving 
three children : Ernest R., born July 3, 1871, and just graduated from 
the Castine School; Nelson L., born May 22, 1874; Willie B., born 
April 20, 1877. 

Castine, Me. 

Henrietta Cobb, Buxton, Me. 

Taught more than 300 weeks in Calais, Biddeford, Buxton, Gorham, 
Kennebunk and Cape Elizabeth (State Reform School). Married, 
May 8, 1880, Capt. George C. Gordon, a sea captain of Biddeford, 
and has three children: George Milton, born March 14, 1881 ; 
Berenice Elizabeth, born Aug. 6, 1883 ; Olive Cobb, born Dec. 2, 
1885. 

Biddeford, Me. 

8 



58 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Thirza S. Cushman, West Leeds, Me. 

For the three years succeeding graduation she taught in Calais in the 
gramniar grade. In 1872 she went West and taught two years in Blair 
and one year in Omaha, Neb., where she married, in 1875, ^^- Ja-^^^s 
W. Love, a teacher of that city. For the next two years she was 
her husband's assistant in Onawa, Iowa, where he was Superintendent of 
Schools, and then five years in Omaha and Plattsmouth, Neb., when she 
gave up teaching, holding a State Certificate of the First Grade. 

They have two children : Para C, born in 1876 ; and Roma Louise, 
born in 1884. 

Fremont, Nebraska. 

Ella F. Downing, North Auburn, Me. 

Had taught up to 1879, when she quit teaching, nine terms in the 
primary grade at North Auburn. Died, July 31, 1884. 

Edgar Leaviit, New Vineyard, Me. 

Has taught 72 weeks, — ungraded schools in Farmington and Pitts- 
field, grammar school in Bath, and high schools in Searsport and Strong. 

Went to Minneapolis, Minn., in 1872, and, after remaining there 
eight months, he went to La Crosse, Wis., where he remained nearly 
a year. June i, 1874, he received a license to preach and settled as 
pastor of the Church of the Messiah at Fort Atkinson, Wis., where 
he remained four years, having been ordained in June, 1875. ^^s also 
been pastor for four years at Columbus, Wis., and for the past three 
and a half years, pastor of St. John's Universalist Church, and State 
Agent of the Wisconsin Universalist Convention at Oshkosh, Wis. 
Is at present visiting in California. Has studied German, Greek, Latin 
and Hebrew since graduation. His literary work has all been in the line 
of his profession. Visited Maine in 1876 and 1888. Married, Aug. 14, 
1878, Miss Ada Winslow of Fort Atkinson, Wis., and has one child, 
Thora Alberta, born Sept. 3, 1881, died Feb. 25, 1884. 

Fort Atkinson, Wis. 

Louise D. Mayhew, Mt. Vernon, Me. 

Has taught with fine success for more than fifteen years in Maine 
schools, in Calais, Lewiston, Kennebunkport (six years), Edgecomb, 
Mt. Vernon and Caribou, more than one-third of that time as principal 
of high schools. At the present time she is Principal of the High School 
at Bristol Mills. Graduated from Advanced Course in June, 1885. 

Mt. Vernon, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 59 

Marie V. Page, Hallowell, Me. 

Taught two or three terms in Maine and as many years in Massachu- 
setts. Has resided for several years in Worcester. 

Worcester, Mass. 

LuciLLA E. Smith, Farmington, Me. 

Was the first Principal of the Model School, where she remained 
one year, resigning to accept a responsible position in the public 
schools of Washington, D. C, where she remained until 1873, when she 
was entrusted with the organization of the Washington Normal School, 
and was its Principal for twelve years. More than two hundred of her 
graduates are to-day doing excellent work in the Washington schools. 

In 1885 she resigned to accept the position of first lady teacher in 
the newly established Training School for teachers in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
and still occupies that position. 

During her connection with the Normal, the school prayer-meeting, 
which has been productive of so much good, was organized in her room. 

Since graduation she has taken with specialists courses in Mineralogy, 
Botany, Zoology, Psychology, Drawing, Physical Training, Meteorology 
and English Literature, and during the present summer is enjoying the 
pleasure of a trip in Europe. 

231 Lincoln Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ashley St. Clair, Rockland, Me. 

Began teaching in Calais immediately after graduation and has taught 
sixty consecutive terms as Principal of the Milltown Grammar School. 
Has taken the Chautauqua Course, and is now studying law. Has been 
a member of the City Council one year. 

Married, Sept. 7, 187 1, his classmate, S. Evelyn Tarbox, who died 
Jan. 20, 1887, leaving three children: Louise E., born June 3, 1872 ; 
Eda Estelle, born Aug. 18, 18174 ; Alice Winnifred, born Sept. 27, 1883, 
died Aug. 12, 1885. 

Clara S. Stevens, Dixfield, Me. 

Taught 56 weeks in Maine in ungraded and high schools, and then 
taught two years in Allston, Mass., where she married, Feb. 28, 1873, 
David B. Morrill, a market gardener of that place. Graduated from the 
C. L. S. C, class of 1887. For seven years has taught in the primary 
department of the Brighton Avenue Baptist Sunday School and is Super- 
intendent of that department at the present time. She is also a mem- 
ber of the W. C. T. U. She has four children : Lester S., born Jan. 27, 



6o FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

1874, died Sept. 2, 1874 ; Lewis, S., born March 16, 1875, ^^^^ J^'^^ 2, 
1880; Charles C, born April 11, 1877 ; Clara N., born Feb. 17, 1881, 
died Nov. 2, 1888. 

Corey Hill, Allston, Mass. 

Hattie F. Stevens, North Fayette, Me. 

Taught 92 weeks in Calais, East Livermore, Fayette and Turner. 
Has completed the C. L. S. C. course, and been for seven years a mem- 
ber of the Auburn Art Club, of which she is now President. Married, 
Nov. II, 1872, Charles E. Wing, Esq., a prominent lawyer of Auburn, 
and has three children : Hattie A., born March i, 1877 ; Nellie C, born 
June 19, 1878; Alice M., born Jan. 22, 1880. 

259 Court Street, Auburn, Me. 

Josephine L. Tarbox, Westport, Me. 

Taught "about 600 weeks,'* one year in the Grammar School, Lew- 
iston. In 18 70-1-2 taught in Leavenworth, Kansas, and in 1883-4 was 
Vice- Principal of the Grammar School in Redding, California, and is now 
Principal of the Grammar School at Pine Grove, Shasta Co., Cal., and 
has received from the State of California an "Educational Diploma" 
and also a "Life Diploma." Married, December, 1872, Mr. James H. 
Bell of San Antonio, Texas. For several years they have resided in 
California, and have three children: Gertrude, born Jan. 16, 1874; 
Edith, born Oct. 9, 1882 ; Ralph A., born Sept. 5, 1884. 

Roberts, Shasta Co., Cal. 

S. Evelyn Tarbox, Phillips, Me. 

Taught in Calais one year and married, Sept. 7, 1871, her classmate, 
Ashley St. Clair, a teacher in that city. Mrs. St. Clair died Jan. 20, 1887, 
leaving three children. (See Ashley St. Clair above.) 



CLASS OF 1870. 
Fifth Class. — Graduated June 2, 1870. 
Lorene Churchill, North New Portland, Me. 

Has taught more than 600 weeks in ten Maine towns, fully one-half 
of that time in the city of Calais. Has taken a part of the C. L. S. C. 
course. Her studies have been largely in the line of her teaching, yet 
she has found time to belong to a reading club for fifteen years. Is 
now taking a vacation on account of ill health. 
North New Portland, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 6 1 

R. Jennie Day, Woolwich, Me. 

Taught in Lewiston a short time, and in Washington, D. C, for thir- 
teen years. Married, July 24, 1884, Mr. Edwards M. Burchard of 
Cedarville, Va., where they now reside. They have one son, Edwin Day, 
born Nov. 7, 1886. 

Cedarville, Warren Co., Va. 

Clara Dillingham, Freeport, Me. 

Has taught 330 weeks in Freeport, Calais and North Berwick. 
Married, July 17, 1883, Mr. James H. Banks of Freeport. 

Freeport, Me. 

Charles A. Hayes, Farmington, Me. 

Became a student of Medicine in the office of Dr. J. L. Wever, 
Leavenworth, Kan., in 1875. Graduated from Rush Medical College, 
Chicago, in 1877, representing the class as salutatorian. Was offered 
and accepted the position of Assistant Superintendent of the Kansas 
Hospital for the Insane, where he remained for five years and then 
resigned to go into general practice at Chippewa Falls, Wis., where he 
is at the present time. He is also surgeon for the Wisconsin Central 
R. R. Dr. Hayes is unmarried. 

Chippewa Falls, Wis. 

Clara A. Hinckley, Livermore Falls, Me. 

Taught one year in ungraded schools and one year as an assistant in 
the Normal. Married, Nov. 17, 1875, David Hunter Knowlton, A. B., 
of Farmington, a graduate of Bowdoin College, Class of 1869, "^^ 
senior member of the firm of D. H. Knowlton & Co., publishers of the 
School World, School-Days, and Our Little People, besides a History of 
Farmington and other books. They have two children : Clarence 
Hinckley, born Sept. 9, 1876 ; Helen, born Oct. 9, 1879. 

Mrs. Knowlton took a course of study in Latin, French and German 
at Westbrook Seminary before her marriage, and still keeps up her 
interest in all literary and educational matters. She has very largely 
conducted the education of her own children, and the School is very 
much indebted to her loyal zeal for its welfare. 

Farmington, Me. 

Nellie M. Kimball, North New Portland, Me. 

Took the Advanced Course in the Bridgewater Normal School, and 
taught in Calais three or four years, also in Lawrence and Boston, Mass. 



62 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Upon the establishment of the Normal School at Gorham, Jan. 19, 1879, 
she became one of the teachers, and remained there until her decease, 
Feb. 7, 1883. In his report for that year, the Principal, Hon. W. J. 
Corthell, speaks of her work and life in the following terms : 

In November, 1882, Miss Helen M. Kimball, who had been a teacher in the school 
from its organization, left on account of sickness. She died in February, 1883. The 
school sustained in her retirement and death a very great loss. Possessing elements 
of character rarely united in so great measure in the same person, viz. : A remarkable 
power of clear logical thought and intense sympathy, she impressed all who came 
under her instruction in a very effective way for their good. She moulded character 
as well as intellect, and her pupils were better men and women, as well as better 
thinkers, on account of her influence. Her impress is felt in the lives of those who 
were under her instruction here, and it may well be said of her, that in the lives of 
these, her pupils, raised to nobler planes of living, by her teaching and example, " She 
being dead yet speaketh." 

Emma L. Merrill, St. Albans, Me. 

Taught about 150 weeks, all in Maine, in Skowhegan, Anson, St. 
Albans, Lewiston and other towns. Was for some years in the millinery 
business in Lewiston. Married, June 17, 1872, Mr. Henry K. Prince of 
Brunswick, Me., for several years since a machinist with the Thorndyke 
Man'f. Co. of Lowell, Mass., now a clerk in that city. They have six 
children : Emma Estelle, born March 27, 1876 ; Bertram Merrill, born 
March 26, 1877, died Aug. 27, 1887 ; Angelia, born June 20, 1878, died 
Aug. 22, 1878; Daisy, born July 22, 1880, died Aug. 20, 1883; Mary 
Kidder, born Aug. 17, 1883 ; Sylvanus Gushing, born Jan. 6, 1885. 

89 Bridge Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Oliver S. Norton, Strong, Me. 

Mr. Norton has taught about 340 weeks, and all grades up to and 
including the high school. He has been in particular demand as a 
teacher of "hard schools," and it is needless to add that he has always 
been successful. 

For several years he was engaged in farming in connection with teach- 
ing winters. He is now Principal of the Saccarappa Grammar School. 
Married, Dec. 20, 1874, Ella J. Gutting of Gampton, N. H., and has two 
children ; Iva L., born June 15, 1879 \ ^^^ Angie E., born Oct. 1 1, 1884. 

1 1 Gasco Street, Portland, Me. 

Alice J. Poiter, Larone, Me. 

Taught two years, 1870-2 in the primary grade in Skowhegan. Mar- 
ried, July 3, 1872, Mr. Alfred H. Lang, a merchant of that town. 

Skowhegan, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 63 

Charles W. Purington, West Bowdoin, Me. 

Taught 48 weeks in Bowdoin, Richmond and Topsham. Studied 
Latin and Greek for one year in the Latin School at Lewiston, and spent 
over two years in the Cobb Divinity School, nearly completing the 
course. Took a voyage around the world, visiting England, France and 
China, and spent a short time on the Pacific Coast. Has held several 
pastorates in Maine and New Hampshire. Is now preaching for the 
North St. Free Baptist Church, Bath, Me. Married, Oct. 4, 1883, Hat- 
tie Newman of Weld, and has two children : Joseph Ray, born Aug. 13, 
1884; Granville Newman, born Jan. 14, 1888. 

West Bowdoin, Me. 

Nellie F. Reed, Farmington, Me. 

Taught two years in Lewiston, two years in Washington, D. C, when 
her health failed, then, after a rest of several years, taught for eight years 
in the primary and grammar grades in Lawrence, Mass. Has made a 
special study of Elocution, and read considerably in public. Married, 
Jan. 25, 1888, Mr. Oran J. Randlett, a merchant of Lawrence, and has 
one child, LilHan A., born Feb. 6, 1889. 

33 Milton Street, Lawrence, Mass. 

Carrie G. Sewall, Farmington, Me. 

Taught one year in a primary school in Calais, and for one year was 
Principal of the Model School. Married, Sept. 19, 1872, Mr. Charles 
P. Robbins, a merchant of Calais, and resided there until her decease, 
April 13, 1886, leaving two children: Mary Parkman, born May 26, 
1875 ; Alice Mayhew, born March 22, 1877. 

N. Maria Stevens, Lewiston, Me. 

Graduated from Westbrook Seminary in 187 1 with the degree of 
L. S.' Has taught about 550 weeks, — twenty terms in Maine, in Liver- 
more, Westbrook Seminary, Auburn, Guilford, Sangerville, Abbot, Dexter 
and Foxcroft. Taught History and Mathematics in Dean Academy, 
Franklin, Mass., for three years, and for ^v^ years was a teacher 
in the Cambridge grammar schools. In 1888 she took a diploma 
from the School of Drawing and Painting at the Museum of Fine Arts 
in Boston. Her studies are not yet completed, and she is now doing 
advanced work in the school in addition to her professional work as a 
crayon artist. 

3 Frost Street, North Cambridge, Mass. 



64 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Charles E. Williams, Durham, Me. 

During the year following graduation he successfully filled the place 
of an absent teacher in the Normal. Taught the next year in the 
Nashua (N. H.) Grammar School, then for four years was Principal of 
the Auburn (Me.) Grammar School, and afterwards taught two terms 
of high school in New Gloucester. Graduated from the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, New York, and is enjoying an extensive and 
increasing practice at Auburn, where he has been located for several 
years. Married, March 31, 1872, Emma J. Harlow of Nashua, N. H., 
formerly of Livermore, Me., and at one time a member of the School. 
They have three children: Ethel E., born April 25, 1873; Charles E., 
born June 12, 1875 ; Annie, born July 18, 1880. 

104 High Street, Auburn, Me. 



CLASS OF 1871. 
Sixth Class. — Graduated June 30, 1871. 

James W. Brown, Milbridge, Me. 

The next day after graduation he entered upon the duties of Assist- 
ant Superintendent and principal teacher in the State Reform School of 
Maine, where he remained nineteen months. For the next six months 
was principal teacher in the Michigan State Reform School. In 1873, 
accepted the position of Assistant Superintendent in the Minnesota Re- 
form School at St. Paul, remaining two years and six months. He then 
served as Assistant Superintendent and principal teacher in the Reform 
School at Meriden, Conn., until the spring of 1879, when ^e returned to 
St. Paul, occupying his former position until the spring of 1 886 when, on 
the retirement of Dr. J. G. Riheldaffer as Superintendent, he received 
the appointment to that position, holding it at the present time. 

Married, June 29, 1878, Miss Angie D. Dresser of Maine, and has 
one child, May D., born Nov. 24, 1879, ^^^^ Feb. 9, 1880. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

M. HoRTENSE Chappell, Carolina, R. I. 

Taught about four years in Rhode Island and then married Mr. 
Edward K. James, a farmer of Richmond in that State. They have six 
children: Richard Eugene, born Aug. 16, 1878; Sarah Lila, born Dec. 
29, 1879; Ruth Hortense, born Sept. 29, 1881 ; Marcia Helen Wood, 
born April 20, 1883; George Edward Babcock, born Jan. 10, 1885; 
Mary Vira, born Aug. 18, 1886. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 65 

Mrs. James writes that she gave up teaching for about ten years and 
then resumed the business that she might instruct her own children, and 
is now teaching a district school near her home. 

Shannock, R. I. 

Anna M. Dakin, Jay, Me. 

Has taught 150 weeks, a large part of that time in Maine. Married, 
Aug. I, 1877, Sanford H. Pendleton of Sacramento, Cal., and has one 
child, Addie H., born June 12, 1878. 

Deming, Grant Co., New Mexico. 

Thomas J. Davis, Newmarket, N. H. 

Has taught 152 weeks, — in Augusta, Me., in 187 1-2, Durham and 
Newmarket, N. H., in 1872-3, in the latter place a high school. In the 
fall of 1873 h^ went to Ann Arbor, Mich., to attend the Law Depart- 
ment of Michigan University, but owing to a temporary weakness of his 
eyes, he taught school at Scio, Mich., a part of the year, subsequently 
making up the lectures lost while teaching. At the close of the Law 
Term in March, 1874, the seductive wiles of a general agent of a sub- 
scription-book publishing concern sent him, for a short time, to make 
the acquaintance of the Michigan farmers, but he resumed his legal 
studies at Pontiac, Mich., with new zest after this little diversion, and was 
admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of Michigan, Aug. 25, 1874. 
He then taught for two years in St. Paul, Minn. From June, 1876, to 
June, 1887, he practiced law at Pontiac, Mich., and then removed to 
Duluth, Minn., where, with his partner, he has an extensive practice, 
making a specialty of the laws relating to railroad, mining, and banking 
corporations. He is a Director in the Duluth Union National Bank, and 
in the First National Bank of Tower, Minn. 

Mr. Davis pays a handsome tribute to his old teacher, saying that 
"the foundation of my success is due to the personal influence and 
enthusiasm of Dr. Rounds." 

The editor wishes to express his appreciation of several very kind 
letters received from Mr. Davis, while prosecuting his inquiries in 
regard to the history of the graduates, one in particular containing 
some very valuable suggestions upon the value of personal work on 
the part of the teacher with every pupil, and also upon the importance 
of encouraging Normal students to take a post-graduate, or college 
course. 

He has married twice : July 8, 1879, ^^^s Juliet Bennett of New- 
market, N. H., who died June 3, 1886; Jan. i, 1889, Mattie Clark 



66 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Mills of Mayville, Mich. He has one child, David, born Nov. 7, 
1881. 

Duluth, Minn. 

Florenxius M. Hallowell, Weeks' Mills, Me. 

Taught fifty-six weeks in Oak Grove Seminary, Vassalboro, and forty- 
two weeks in a grammar school in Bath. Graduated from the Waterville 
Classical Institute in 1873, and from Colby University in 1877, receiving 
the degree of A. B. Went to Kearney, Neb., in October, 1877, studied 
law and was admitted to practice. Has filled the office of Court 
Reporter for eleven years, and still holds that office. 

Married, Dec. 25, 1876, Miss Etta Kilbreth of the First Class of 
1872, and has four children : Florence M., born May 5, 1881 ; Marion 
E., born Nov. 9, 1883 ; Amy B., born April 9, 1887 ; Bertha L., born 
Aug. 17, 1888. 

Kearney, Neb. 

Melinda Haskell, East Limington, Me. 

Has taught about 300 weeks, — in Auburn, Lisbon, Standish, Gorham 
and Cape Elizabeth. Married, April 8, 1881, Mr. John M. Hutchinson, 
then a merchant of Buxton Centre, but on account of failing health 
moved on to a farm where they now live. 

Buxton Centre, Me. 

Juliette Knowlton, East New Portland, Me. 

In September, 1871, she went to Calais to teach, but, on account of 
poor health, was obliged to give up teaching after one term. Spent the 
next year in Reading, Mass., and then was employed in a shoe-shop in 
Stoneham until the spring of 1876, when she came home, where she 
remained, after teaching one term, until her marriage, June 12, 1879, ^^ 
Luther F. Edwards of Madison, Me. Mr. Edwards is the undertaker 
and funeral director of the village and vicinity in which they live. They 
have three children : Bryce K., born May 3, 1880 ; Albion P., born July 
17, 1884; Jennie H., born Aug. 23, 1886. 

Madison, Me. 

Mary P. Lara, Auburn, Me. 

Has taught about 400 weeks, in the following places : Weymouth, 
Mass., one year ; Atlantic City, N. J., five years ; Minneapolis, Minn., 
two years ; Lewiston, Me., one year ; Auburn, three years. She is now 
principal of a primary school in Merrimac, Mass. 

114 Hampshire St., Auburn, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 67 

Maryette Leavitt, New Vineyard, Me. 

Has taught one year in Auburn and Bath. Married, Jan. i, 1873, 
Mr. Alfred G. Trask of Bath. 

Winnegance, Me. 

Lizzie G. Melcher, Freeport, Me. 

Has taught nineteen years, — four years in the intermediate and 
grammar grades, Lewiston; nine and one-half years in the Dwight 
(Grammar) School, Boston, two and one-half years as second assistant 
in the Everett School, Boston, teaching Drawing, History and Geography 
as a specialist ; and for three years, the position which she now holds, as 
Master's Assistant in the Comins School, Boston. 

Miss Melcher has also had private pupils in Illustrative Drawing, and 
has taught that subject at the National Summer School at Saratoga. 
Since graduation she has taken courses in the Natural Sciences, French, 
German, English Literature, Mineralogy, Drawing, Illustrative Drawing 
and Painting. 

104 West Chester Park, Boston, Mass. 

Hattie R. Morison, Livermore Falls, Me. 

Has taught 134 weeks, in Lisbon, Leeds, Auburn, New Gloucester 
and other Maine towns. Has received the diploma for the completion 
of the four years' C. L. S. C. course. 

Livermore Falls, Me. 

Love M. Norton, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught ten years, the larger part of the time in Maine, and 
several terms in Illinois and Massachusetts. Has studied Latin and 
German and taken a part of the Chautauqua work each year since 
1882. Since her marriage she has taught several terms, and, together 
with Mrs. E. T. Sewall, a teacher in the Normal in 1871-2, has 
served one term on the S. S. Committee of Farmington, where 
her long experience as a teacher and her Normal training enabled 
her to render valuable assistance in raising the Farmington schools 
to a higher standard of excellence. As a resident graduate she 
has retained a cordial interest in the success of the Normal, and 
the present Principal is indebted to her for many kind words and 
courtesies. 

Married, in 1879, M^- John C. Ames, a salesman of Farmington, 
and has one child, Edith, born in 1880. 

Farmington, Me. 



68 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Alvin E. Prince, New Sharon, Me. 

Has taught 482 weeks, — twenty-four weeks of high school in his 
native town, where he was also a member of the S. S. Committee for one 
year, and the remaining time in New Jersey, where he is now teaching 
as Principal of the Bridgeton High and Grammar School. He is also 
City Examiner of teachers, a position which he has held for eight 
years. He has taken courses in German, French and Latin with private 
teachers, and ^ one year of Physical Culture under Dr. D. A. Sargent 
at Harvard. 

76 Walnut Street, Bridgeton, N. J. 

Elva M. Reed, Livermore Centre, Me. 

Taught eleven years in the primary, intermediate and grammar grades 
in Lewiston. Married, Dec. 2, 1882, Mr. Edward Pratt, a farmer of 
Strickland's Ferry, and has one child, Charles H., born Oct. 15, 1885. 

Strickland's Ferry, Me. 

Maria M. Shaw, West's Mills, Me. 

Soon after graduating she went to Eau Claire, Wis., where she taught 
forty weeks. In August following, she went to Rochester, Minn., where 
she had secured a fine position, but was attacked with typhoid fever 
a few days before her term was to commence, and died, Sept. 4, 1872. 

Frkelan O. Stanley, Kingfield, Me. 

Has taught about eight years. For the first year after graduation, 
he taught district schools in Andover, Farmington and Lisbon. In the 
summer of 1872 he began to fit for college at Hebron Academy and 
entered Bowdoin in the fall of 1873, where he remained one year. Was 
Principal of the Mechanic Falls High School for several terms, and then 
taught in Columbia, Penn., for some time. In 1880 he accepted a posi- 
tion in the Normal, where he remained over a year, resigning on account 
of failing health to go into some less sedentary occupation. For two or 
three years he was a manufacturer of school supplies and apparatus, 
some of which he had invented, at Mechanic Falls, and Boston, Mass. 
In connection with his twin brother, Frank E., at one time a member of 
the School, he discovered and perfected a superior process of coating 
photographic "dry plates," by which, current rumor says, they have 
made a handsome fortune. They have an immense manufactory and a 
constantly increasing business. He married, April 18, 1876, Miss Flora 
J. R. Tileston of Mechanic Falls. 

Lewiston, Me. 



SKETCHES .OF THE GRADUATES. 69 

J. Walter Stetson, East Sumner, Me. 

Taught about 675 weeks, — district schools in Livermore, Dennys- 
ville, Sumner, Buckfield and Oxford, until the summer of 1874, when he 
entered the " College Preparatory" class at Hebron Academy, but left 
after a few weeks to accept a position as assistant in the Normal. Here 
he remained nearly, or quite, a year, and then resigned to become Prin- 
cipal of the Calais Grammar School, where he remained ten years. 
Having been elected Master of the Ash Street Grammar School, Man- 
chester, N. H., he left Calais to the great regret of a large circle of 
friends. After nearly five years of very successful work in that school, 
he resigned to accept the office of Treasurer of the Mechanics Savings 
Bank, Auburn, Me. 

Mr. Stetson has completed the Chautauqua Course, receiving a 
special seal for high rank. Has taken an earnest and patriotic interest 
in politics, and was Warden of his ward in Calais for several years. Has 
taken an active interest in educational matters, and has been President 
of the Washington Co. (Me.) Teachers' Association, and Treasurer of 
the New Hampshire State Teachers' Association. In June, 1888, he was 
elected a deacon of the First Congregational Church in Manchester, 
and was for some time Assistant Superintendent of the Sunday School 
connected with that church. 

Married, Dec. 23, 1879, ^^^s Agnes Halliday of Calais, and has four 
children: Mary Louise, born Nov. 29, 1880 ; Lilla Augusta, born Nov. 
13, 1882 ; Everett HaUiday, born April 18, 1886 ; Agnes Gertrude, born 
June 21, 1888. 

Auburn, Me. 

Hiram B. Stoyell, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 5 2 weeks, — in Maine, Pennsylvania, Dakota and Mon- 
tana. Fitted for college at Kent's Hill Seminary and spent two years in 
Bowdoin College. Then went West, studied law and vvas admitted to 
the bar in Bismarck, Dak. Held the office of Register of Deeds in 
Morton Co., and was City Clerk in Deadwood. Since 1884, he has 
resided in Farmington, and has been engaged in farming, teaching at 
intervals. 

Farmington, Me. 

Gardner M. Whittier, Madison, Me. 

Taught thirty-four weeks in 187 1-2-3 ^^ North New Portland. Re- 
ceived his medical degree from the Bellevue Hospital Medical College 
in 1875, ^"^ since that time has been actively engaged in the practice of 



70 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

medicine. Received a post-graduate degree from Jefferson Medical 
College in 1884, and a diploma from the C. L. S. C, Class of 1886. He 
is a member of the Town Council, of the School Board, and President 
of Clearfield Co. (Pa.) Medical Society. 

Married, Jan. 17, 1876, Miss Elva House of Turner, Me., for several 
terms a student in the School, and has three children : Ben Keen, born 
July 21, 1878; Edward Torrey, born March 11, 1880, died Nov. 17, 
1885 ; Raymond Wright, born Aug. 16, 1887. 

Houtzdale, Pa. 

FIRST CLASS OF 1872. 
Seventh Class. — Graduated Dec. 29, 1871. 
Susan J. Delano, Canton, Me. 

Taught about eighty weeks, all in Maine. Married, March 26, 1876, 
Mr. Andrew J. Marsh of Dixfield, and lived on a farm in that town about 
five years, then sold and went to Cleveland, Ohio, where Mr. Marsh went 
into the manufacture of chemicals. For the last six months they have 
been visiting the Pacific Coast. They have two children : Florence, 
born Sept. 17, 1881 ; Harold N., born May 2, 1887. 

25 Longwood Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Florence E. Hamlen, New Sharon, Me. 

Has taught 412 weeks, in Calais, Freeport, Winthrop, New Sharon, 
and other Maine towns. Attended the Waterville Classical Institute 
one year, completing all but one year's work of the course. Is teaching 
in New Sharon. 

New Sharon, Me. 

Etta Kilbreth, Livermore Falls, Me. 

Has taught over 200 weeks, — in the primary grade in Calais for 
sixty weeks, in the Normal for one year as Principal of the Model 
School, and 128 weeks in the primary schools of Melrose, Mass. Has 
completed the Chautauqua Course. Married, Dec. 25, 1876, Mr. F. M. 
Hallowell, at that time of Bath, a graduate of the Class of 1871, and 
has four children. (See Class of 1871). 

Kearney, Neb. 

Dora M. Norton, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught more than ten years. After graduating she taught 
primary and grammar schools in Maine for six years, in Waterville, 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 71 

Bridgton, Farmington and Calais, remaining over four years in the latter 
place. She then spent three years in the Massachusetts Normal Art 
School at Boston, receiving certificates A, B and C, also certificates for 
best sets of work in classes A and C. In the fall of 1881, went to 
Columbus, Ohio, to teach in the Columbus Art School, then just estab- 
lished, and remained there four years. Feehng the need of further 
study, she spent a year in New York, working in the Cooper Union life 
class, where she received a first grade certificate, and in the life and 
painting classes at the Art Students' League under Kenyon Cox, Walter 
Shirlaw and William Chase. During the following summer, she taught 
classes in painting and drawing in Middletown, Conn. Returned to 
Columbus in the fall of 1886, and is still teacher of drawing and painting 
in the Art School. 

Art School, Columbus, Ohio. 

Anna E. Paddack, North Fairfield, Me. 

Taught sixty weeks, in Skowhegan, Norridgewock, Fairfield, Corn- 
ville, Wilton and Calais. Has taken the four years' course of reading 
and study prescribed by the C. L. S. C, and also some of the "seal 
courses" of the same. Married, Sept. 6, 1874, Mr. Samuel Covel, a 
merchant of North Fairfield. They have lived some time in Dexter 
since their marriage. 

North Fairfield, Me. 

Uriah Proctor, Eustis, Me. 

Present occupation, shoemaking. Is unmarried. 
90 Howe Street, Lewiston, Me. 

MvRA A. Whitney, Strong, Me. 

Has taught about 400 weeks. After teaching four years in Calais in 
the intermediate and third grammar grades, she resigned in March, 1876. 
In the fall of that year she obtained a position in Westboro, Mass., in 
the third grammar grade, where she remained until the fall of 1878, 
when she was elected to a position in Melrose, and was promoted to 
the first grammar grade, holding that position during the remainder of 
her teaching. While in Melrose she availed herself of the advantages 
of the Massachusetts Normal Art School, receiving the highest grade of 
diploma awarded to evening students. Married, Nov. 30, 1882, Mr. 
F. C. Reed of Astoria, Oregon, whose business has been salmon canning 
until two years ago, when he was appointed President of the Board of 
Fish Commissioners for the State, and has since devoted his time 



72 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

to the artificial propagation of salmon in the waters of the Columbia 
River. 

Present address, 3 Marion Street, Salem, Oregon ; hortie address, 
Astoria, Oregon. 

SECOND CLASS OF 1872, 
Eighth Class. — Graduated June 28, 1872. 
Mariana Bailey, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 277 weeks, all in mixed schools in Maine, "believing," 
as she says, "that trained teachers are more needed in those schools 
than in others." She has had, we are told, the best of success. Besides 
other towns, she has taught in Farmington, Phillips, Lisbon, Pownal, 
Yarmouth, Waterville, Saco and New Gloucester. Although she has not 
taken any course of study, she has been a constant student and reader 
of pedagogical books and papers. Like many others, she adds that 
she owes very much to Dr. Rounds for whatever success she has had, 
and that the influence of his hearty words is with her yet. Jan. i, 1883, 
she married Mr. Albert Caswell, a farmer of New Sharon, where they 
have since resided. They have one child, Frank P., born April 2, 
1884. 

New Sharon, Me. 

Angie L. Boothby, North Limington, Me. 

Has taught forty-four weeks, in Lisbon, Gorham, and Fall River, 
Mass. Completes this year the Chautauqua Course. Married, Aug. 8, 
1872, William R. Smith of Farmington, a carpenter and master builder. 
They have two children : Helen Gertrude, born May 7, 1876 ; Hariph 
Mayhew, born April 18, 1882. 

43 Cambridge Street, Fall River, Mass. 

Carrie A. Cargill, Augusta, Me. 

Has taught about ninety weeks, mostly in the city of Augusta. A 
growing deafness compelled her to give up teaching in 1876, and for 
the last eight years she has been further incapacitated for work by an 
accident. Has done some literary work. 

247 Prospect Street Annex, New Haven, Conn. 

Celia E. Clement, Smithfield, Me. 

From the report of 1874, we find that she had taught four terms in 
Skowhegan, and was then a book-keeper in Augusta. Since then she 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES, 73 

has learned telegraphy, and in 1886 was in charge of the telegraph 
department in Victoria Hotel, New York. Married, Feb. 25, 1889, 
William J. Hayes of Cleveland, Ohio. 
705 Prospect Street, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Clara A. Forbes, Paris, Me. 

The two years following her graduation were spent as a teacher in 
the Normal Department of the Maine Central Institute at Pittsfield. 
Has been a member of the Boston Home Study Society four years and 
belonged to the Chautauqua Society of Fine Arts one year. Married, 
May 28, 1874, Alden E. Bessey, M. D., of Centre Sidney and has one 
daughter, Lenora, born June 11, 1876. A stepson, Merton W., is a 
member of the last (1889) graduating class, and another, Earle E., is 
a member of the School. 

Centre Sidney, Me. 

Eliza S. Getchell, Belgrade Mills, Me. 

Miss Getchell has taught the grammar grade continuously, with 
the exception of one year in the rural schools, since her graduation, — 
two years in Bath, three years in Lewiston, five years in Portland, seven 
years in Cambridge, Mass., where she is now teaching. 

2 River Street, Cambridgeport, Mass. 

William E. Gorham, Windsor, Me. 

Over 200 weeks in mixed, grammar and high schools in Calais, 
Augusta, Windsor, Bristol, Jefferson and other Maine towns has been 
Dr. Gorham's experience, besides doing more or less of a great many 
other things. Pursued medical studies while connected with the Normal 
and graduated from a New York medical college in 1873. ^^ i^75> 
was managing physician of the Green Mountain Home for Invalids, and 
then was Principal of the High School at West Concord, Vt. Returning 
to Maine, he practiced medicine in Windsor, where he was also Super- 
visor of Schools for several years. Was a candidate for member of the 
Legislature, receiving a handsome majority in his own town, but failed 
of election by reason of an adverse vote in the other towns classed with 
his. Not liking his practice, after one or two commercial ventures, he 
studied dentistry in 1884, which, together with surgery, he has practiced 
since. Literary work has also had charms for him, and he has wooed 
and won the Muses. In 1882, he married Miss Aura E. Andrews of 
South Bristol, and has four children : Grace A. ; Winnie E. ; W. Victor ; 
and Alfred E. 

East Jefferson, Me. 



74 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Charles A. Harrington, Parkman, Me. 

Has taught 132 weeks, — high and grammar in Solon, two terms; 
high school two terms, and grammar one term, at South Waterford ; 
and two terms of grammar school at South Yarmouth, Mass. Attended 
Hebron Academy one term in the summer of 1873, ^^^ Maine Central 
Institute at Pittsfield the following year. Read law at Norridgewock in 
the office of Hon. S. D. Lindsey, M. C^ from the Third District. Admitted 
to practice at the September Term of the Supreme Court in Somerset 
County in 1877, and was Mr. Lindsey's partner until his (Mr. Lindsey's) 
death in April, 1884. Was Chairman of the Board of Selectmen from 
1879 to 1885, and member of the House in the Legislature of 1887. 

Married, Nov. 5, 1878, Jeannette A. Merrill of Solon, Me., and has 
one child, Pauline M., born Nov. 12, 1879. 

South Norridgewock, Me. 

Aldana C. Hatch, Minot, Me. 

Has taught 150 weeks, all in Auburn. Married, June 24, 1877, 
John G. Roberts of Auburn, Class of 1867. Finding that manual labor 
was much more remunerative than teaching, she has for several years 
been a stitcher in a shoe manufactory. 

37 Seventh Street, Auburn, Me. 

Augusta A. Holley, Farmington, Me. 

Taught in Lisbon thirty weeks, in the Bridgton Grammar School 
one hundred weeks, and twelve weeks in the Farmington Grammar 
School. Married, June 15, 1875, Mr. George E. Murphy of Bridgton, 
and died Jan. 23, 1883, leaving two children : Charles L., bom March 
9, 1876; Augusta H., bom Jan. 20, 1883. 

Georgia F. Howe, Greene, Me. 

Taught one year in Lewiston. Has received a diploma from the 
C. L. S. C. Is now Librarian of the Young Women's Reading Room. 

Corner Main and High Streets, Lewiston, Me. 

L(WiE A. Leland, North Jay, Me. 

Has taught 300 weeks, in Farmington, Jay, Naples, Bridgton and 
Deering. Married, Aug. 19, 1879, Mr. Caleb Montgomery of Wood- 
fords, and has fi\Q children: Carroll Iceland, born Jan. 14, 1881 ; S. 
Margaret, born Nov. 12, 1883; Andrew Emerson, bom Oct. 4, 1885; 
Frederic Blake, bom March 16, 1887 ; Mary Julia, born Sept. 27, 1888. 

Central Avenue, Woodfords, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 75 

William H. Newell, West Durham, Me. 

After graduation he took the Classical Course at the Maine Wesley an 
Seminary. Has taught 234 weeks, — one term in Freeport, three in 
Durham, and six years as Principal of the Brunswick Grammar School. 
From personal knowledge, having taught three years in the same build- 
ing with him, the editor feels justified in saying he had no superior in 
the State as a grammar school master. He was earnest, sufficiently 
enthusiastic, and an excellent disciplinarian. Studied law with Weston 
Thompson, Esq., of Brunswick, and since his admission to the bar has 
practiced in Lewiston, where he has built up an excellent practice and 
won an honorable place at the bar by his ability and integrity. Was the 
Democratic candidate for Mayor in the spring of 1889. Married, Sept. 
20, 1883, Ida F. Plummer of Lisbon P'alls, Me., and has one child, 
Augusta Plummer, born March 17, 1887. 

49 College Street, Lewiston, Me. 

Lizzie H. Norton, Farmington, Me. 

Few of the graduates can claim a longer or more honorable record 
as teachers. From four years of age until her marriage, she was in 
school, as scholar and teacher, without a term's vacation, and, although 
she lived two miles from the Normal, and walked to and from school, 
she completed the course in two years, without being absent from a 
recitation of her class. 

She taught one year in Lisbon, one in Turner, eight years in Lewis- 
ton (primary and grammar), and four years in one of the Portland 
grammar schools, — 516 weeks in all. The historian well recalls the 
regret expressed by the friends of the schools at her departure from 
Lewiston. Married, July 20, 1886, Mr. George F. French, a bookseller 
of Portland. 

99 High Street, Portland, Me. 

Herbert Patten, West Falmouth, Me. 

Has taught about 540 weeks, — two years in Maine, three years in 
Ohio, and the remaining time in California. Is Principal of the Gram- 
mar School, Redlands, Cal. Married, Jan. 22, 1879, Miss Mary A. 
Hobbs of West Falmouth, Me. 

Redlands, Cal. 

Dicea S. Pierpont, Livermore Falls, Me. 

Has taught forty weeks, in Farmington, Livermore, Lisbon, East . 
Livermore and Lewiston. Married, Nov. 23, 1873, Winfield S. Treat 



76 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

of Livermore Falls, and has two children: George W., born July 21, 
1875 ; Edith Louise, born Dec. 27, 1886. 

Fred E. C. Robbins, Winthrop, Me. 

Has taught nearly 500 weeks. In 1872-3 he taught a high school in 
Newport, and a mixed school in Bath. From 1873 to 1878, he was 
Principal of the Westbrook High School, and from 1878 to 1887, Prin- 
cipal of the Deering High School. Since leaving the profession he has 
been Supervisor of Schools in Deering, and on the editorial staff of the 
Portland Evening Express, Married, Dec. 15, 1875, his classmate, 
Lizzie A. Rogers of Richmond, and has two children : Harry Chandler, 
and Floyd Rogers. 

Woodfords, Me. 

Lizzie A. Rogers, Richmond, Me. 

Has taught over 100 weeks, in Richmond, Lisbon and Yarmouth, in 
the high schools in the first and last named places. Married, Dec. 15, 
1875, ^^^ classmate, Fred E. C. Robbins, Principal of the Westbrook 
High School, and has two children. (See above). 

Woodfords, Me. 

Herbert E. Stetson, East Sumner, Me. 

Has taught 270 weeks. Is now a book-keeper in Earlville, Iowa. 
Married, June 17, 1879, Miss Hattie E. Smith of that place, and has four 
children: Eugene J., born Dec. 25, 1880; Ralph H., born Aug. i, 
1883 ; Ruth A., born Aug. 24, 1886 ; Edna F., born Sept. 11, 1888. 

Earlville, Iowa. 

J. Frank Stevens, West Gardiner, Me. 

Taught twenty weeks in Westport and Manchester, Me. Is now a 
Civil Engineer in Minnesota. 

3217 Lindley Avenue, MinneapoHs, Minn. 

Lewis A. Thomas, East Rumford, Me. 

Went to Illinois in August, 1872, and has been teaching or superin- 
tending schools in that State ever since. Has passed the examination 
and holds the Illinois State Diploma, which licenses him to teach any- 
where in the State and is good for life. Is now Superintendent of Schools 
at La Salle. Married, Aug. 19, 1875, Marianna Reed of Mexico, Me., 
and has one son, Lewis A., Jr., born May 19, 1880. 

La Salle, 111. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES, 77 

Lizzie C. True, Hope, Me. 

Has taught in Camden and Hope. Married, May i, 1878, Mr. 
Lewis Augustine Spear of Rockport, who died April 20, 1887. She has 
three children : Harold A., born May 4, 1879 ; Louise N., born Jan. 24, 
1884 ; La Forest T., born Oct. 6, 1885. 

Rockport, Me. 

Thomas Varney, Windham, Me. 

Has never taught, but has been engaged in the lumber business ever 
since his graduation. Has devoted considerable time to Ancient His- 
tory and Bible study. Has held some of the minor town offices and is 
a Justice of the Peace and Quorum. Married, Oct. 7, 1876, Florence 
M. Goodrich of Farmington, and has three children : Lewis Goodrich, 
born Dec. 8, 1877 ; Leona Berard, born May 27, 1880, died July 14, 
1880; Perley Wood, born Aug. 7, t88i. 

Windham, Me. 

Clinton A. W(X)dbury, Sweden, Me. 

Has taught 1 78 weeks, in Waterford, Bridgton, Springfield and Den- 
nysville, all high schools except in Bridgton. Taught the Dennysville 
High School four and one-half years. After teaching three years, he 
was editor of the Somerset Reporter for three and a half years, then went 
back to teaching for two years. For several years he has been in the 
insurance business, and is now Manager of the United States Life Insur- 
ance Co. for Maine. Is a frequent contributor to the press, and, as he 
writes, "frequently preaches for tired ministers." He is also a member 
of the S. S. Committee of Deering. 

Married, June 2, 1876, Ida Sumner Vose of Dennysville, and has four 
children : Carl Vose, born August, 1877 ; Donald Clinton, born Sept. 30, 
1879 ; Malcolm Sumner, born March 27, 1881 ; Ruth Lincoln, born Feb. 
25, 1889. 

Woodfords, Me. 

Lewis F. Worthley, Farmington, Me. 

As no reply to several circulars and letters has been received, we have 
to depend on friends for whatever information we can give in regard to 
Dr. Worthley. He was teacher of Vocal Music in the Normal one year. 
Studied medicine in Pennsylvania and graduated from the Medical 
Department of Columbia College, N. Y. Practiced in Glasgow, Pa., and 
is now in Fiske, Pa. Is married and has one child, Clyde, about five 
years of age. 

Fiske, Pa. 



78 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

FIRST CLASS OF 1873^ 

Ninth Class. — Graduated Jan. 3, 1873. 
LoRETTE C. Bennett, Canton Point, Me. 

Has taught 388 weeks, in Canton, Dixfield, East Livermore, Jay, 
Carthage, Calais, Lewiston, Georgetown, North Yarmouth, Orr's Island, 
Carroll and Lee. While teaching, she found time to study Latin, Greek, 
French, and took a course in Short-hand and the Natural Sciences. 
Married, Feb. 22, 1886, Mr. C. Eugene Ludden, a farmer of Lee, 
and, surrounded by books and magazines, is living the ideal life of a 
farmer's wife. 

Lee, Me. 

Nettie M. Cartland, Portland, Me. 

Taught school up to the time of her marriage, — about 280 weeks, in 
Farmington one year, Deering two years, Cumberland Mills four terms, 
and Cape Elizabeth five years, also in Calais and Lewiston. Married, 
Aug. 28, 1882, Granville Libby, a carpenter of Cape Elizabeth. She has 
nearly completed the Chautauqua Course. 

Cape Elizabeth Depot, Me. 

Ezra F. Elliot, South Norridgewock, Me. 

Has taught 212 weeks, in Calais and Fort Kent in 1873-4, Bedford, 
N. H., 1874-5, Norridgewock 1875-6, where he held the office of Super- 
visor of Schools, in Gray 1876-7, Marcella St. Home (Reformatory), 
Boston, Mass., 1877-8, again in Gray, Me., 1 880-1, Euclid, Minn., 
1883-4, Angus, Minn., 1884-5, i^ Euclid again the next year. Since 
1886, has been Superintendent of Schools, Polk Co., Minn. Graduated 
from Bryant and Stratton Business College, Manchester, N. H., in 1874, 
from the Waterville Classical Institute in 1878, and Colby University, in 
1882, with degree of A. B. 

Crookston, Minn. 

Sarah A. Farrington, Livermore Falls, Me. 

Taught several terms during her connection with the School, and 
twenty weeks after graduation. Married, June 23, 1873, Rev. Ozro Roys, 
a Free Baptist clergyman of Farmington. They have five children : 
Ozro Z., born July 29, 1874 ; Lincoln L, born Sept. 2, 1877 ; Edville A., 
bom April 28, 1879 ; June A., born April 24, 1885 \ Mayville, born Jan. 
6, 1889. 

Temple, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 79 

Newi'On J. Jones, Bristol, Me. 

Has taught in Stark, Waldoboro, Peru, Princetown, and other Maine 
towns. Was engaged in business for some years at Round Pond, Bris- 
tol. Is now teaching in the West. 

Muck, Pierce Co., Wash. 

Josephine Thompson, Windham, Maine. 

For some time after graduation it was her duty to care for home 
friends. Taught 48 weeks in Standish in one district. Wisely refused 
several good offers to teach in the West, to become a farmer's wife in 
Maine. Married, Feb. 6, 1876, Mr. Edward Payson Nash of Windham, 
and has six children : Howard E., bom Dec. 30, 1876 ; Lovina J., born 
Nov. 27, 1878 ; Clara A., born April 30, 1880; Julia M., born Nov. 25, 
t88i ; Alice S., born July 27, 1883 ; Herbert, born June 12, 1885. 

Windham Centre, Me. 



SECOND CLASS OF 1873. 
Tenth Class. — Graduated June 13, 1873. 
Addie S. Berry, West Sumner, Me. 

Has taught over 400 weeks, in Farmington, Wells, Sumner, Cape 
Elizabeth and Portland, where she taught in a primary school from May, 
1876, to December, 1885. Has studied Latin and French, and nearly 
completed the Chautauqua Course. Married, Dec. 22, 1885, Rev. J. 
Roscoe Remick of Winthrop, and has one child, Anna Lucy, born Jan. 
2, 1887. 

Winthrop, Me. 

Flavilla a. Cushman, West Leeds, Me. 

Taught in the intermediate grade in Calais three years, grammar 
grade in Farmington one year, and in Omaha, Neb., six years, — 400 
weeks in all. Married, Jan. 20, 1886, Mr. Robert O. Fink of Omaha, 
now engaged in the real estate and loan business. They have two 
children : Robert Alton, born Dec. 3, 1886 ; Vera Cushman, born Dec. 

29, 1887. 

Valentine, Cherry Co., Neb. 

Emma L. Day, Anson, Me. 

Taught 64 weeks, in Matinicus, Stark and Madison. Married, June 

30, 1879, Mark L. Hutchins, a farmer of New Portland, a member of 



8o FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

the School the first term, and one of the thirty-one present the first day. 
They have three children: Melvin S., born May 27, 1880; Lucy N., 
born March 7, 1882 ; Laforest J., born Aug. 25, 1884. 
East New Portland, Me. 

ViOLETTE Eaton, Mt. Vernon, Me. 

The historian can testify from personal acquaintance that Miss Eaton 
was a very successful teacher before coming to the Normal. She com- 
pleted the course in one year, and taught the Free High School at 
Oakland for forty weeks after her graduation. Married, March 21, 1875, 
Mr. George W. Stevens of Oakland, a manufacturer and member of the 
Emerson & Stevens M'f 'g Co. 

Mrs. Stevens has taken three years of the C. L. S. C. work, is a 
member of the Oakland Reading Club, which is making a study of 
English History and Literature. She has three children : Arthur Joseph, 
born April 18, 1882; Elizabeth May, bom May 10, 1886; Harold 
Crosby, born Nov. 30, 1887. 

Oakland, Me. 

Clara F. Elliot, South Norridgewock, Me. 

Taught 72 weeks, in Maine, in Skowhegan, North Yarmouth and 
Yarmouth. Married, Aug. 15, 1877, her classmate, Enos F. Floyd, 
Principal of the public schools in Murphy's, Cal., and taught with him 
nearly 200 weeks. She died at that place^ May 21, 1889. 

To Mrs. Ada Floyd Smith of the Class of 1867 we are indebted for 
the following memorial : 

In the summer of 1887, Mrs. Floyd, with her three children, visited her friends in 
Maine. At her home in Murphy's, she was universally loved and respected. A friend 
writing home says: "At the time of her death the house was filled with wreaths, 
anchors, and crosses of flowers until there was literally room for no more, brought by 
those who thus tried to express their sympathy with the relatives and their own sense 
of personal loss. As the long procession of friends and school children filed past the 
open grave the casket was covered with the bouquets thrown in, and many eyes were 
wet at the thought that they should see her no more on earth." 

Mrs. Floyd left three children : Albion E., born Sept. 3, 1878 ; Eva- 
lyn F., born April 2, 1880 ; Winthrop T., born Aug. 6, 1885. 

Daniel L. Fisher, Charlotte, Me. 

Has taught 200 weeks, in Edmunds, Ashland, Pembroke, Machias, 
and Canton, N. Y. Graduated from St. Lawrence University, Canton, 
N. Y., in 1883, and received the degree of A. M. Is now pastor of the 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 81 

Universalist Church in Hinsdale, N. H. Married, Jan. 29, 1885, Clara 
Aspinwall Barnes of Henderson, N. Y., and has one child, John Aden, 
born July 10, 1887. 
Hinsdale, N. H. 

Ends F. Floyd, Winthrop, Me. 

Has taught 496 weeks, all in California, for twelve years in Murphy's, 
where he now resides. Left teaching in July, 1888, and is now a Notary 
Public and conveyancer. Has been Justice of the Peace, for several 
years was editor of the Educational Department of the Calaveras Citi- 
zen, and has done general newspaper work ever since his graduation and 
is now Associated Press agent. Since 1876, has been a member of the 
Board of Education of Calaveras Co., and is now President of the 
Board. 

Married, Aug. 15, 1877, his classmate, Clara F. Elliot of South Nor- 
ridgewock, who died May 21, 1889. Has three children: Albion E., 
born Sept. 3, 1878; Evalyn F., born April 2, 1880; Winthrop T., born 
Aug. 6, 1885. 

Murphy's, Calaveras Co., Cal. 

Lizzie A. Hardy, Wilton, Me. 

Taught in Maine 296 weeks, — in the Orono High School 108 weeks, 
and in Farmington, New Sharon, Gray and other places. Married, Dec. 
24, 1878, Mr. Harlan P. Munson, a merchant of Morrisville, Vt., and 
assists in the fancy goods department in her husband's store. She has 
one child, Levi M., born Oct. 10, 1880. 

Morrisville, Vt. 

Anna V. Hunt, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught about 150 weeks, in Wilton, Dennysville, Farmington one 
year as Principal of the Model School, in Portland, and in Deering, 
where she is now teaching. Has completed a part of the Chautauqua 
Course. 

Farmington, Me. 

Eldora Nichols, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 70 weeks, in the primary grade at Calais, free high school 
at Naples, primary in Farmington, and one year in a grammar school in 
Portland. Married, Dec. 14, 1874, John M. S. Hunter, and lived for 
some years in Portland while Mr. Hunter was on the editorial staff of the 
Portland Press, He is now Editor and Proprietor of the Farmington 



82 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Chronicle, Mrs. Hunter is an assistant in the editorial department of 
the paper, and a member of the C. L. S. C. They have three children : 
John Walter, born March 14, 1880, died May 14, 1880; Mabel Eldora, 
born Jan. 7, 1882 ; Charles Walter Keyes, born Dec. 7, 1886, died July 
21, 1887. 

Farmington, Me. 

Mary A. Quint, Winthrop, Me. 

Has taught six terms, in Farmington, Strong, New Sharon and Win- 
throp. Married, Oct. 26, 1874, Edgar L. Keene of Winthrop. They 
have lived in Massachusetts for several years. 

14 Tremont Street, Lynn, Mass. 

Lewis H. Reed, Mexico, Me. 

Graduated from the Scientific Department of Bowdoin College in 
1877 with the degree of B. S. Has taught about 60 weeks, in Pownal, 
Westport, Mexico and Livermore, in the last named places, a free high 
school. Occupation, farming and lumbering. Holds the office of Town 
Clerk. Married, Oct. 26, 1880, his classmate, Abbie P. Sanders of Liv- 
ermore, and has four children: Mary Luretta, born Nov. 3, 1881 ; 
Martha Sanders, born April 8, 1884; Caroline Stockbridge, born June 
10, 1886; Elma Lucile, born Sept. 11, 1887. 

Mexico, Me. 

Abbie P. Sanders, Livermore, Me. 

Has taught 107 weeks, in Livermore, East Livermore, Durham and 
Topsham. Married, Oct. 26, 1880, her classmate, Lewis H. Reed, B. S., 
of Mexico, and has four children. (See above). 

Mexico, Me. 

LiLLA M. Scales, Temple, Me. 

Has taught 425 weeks, all in Maine, in Calais, Farmington, Auburn, 
Foxcroft, New Gloucester, Paris and other towns. Is now leaching in 
Matinicus. 

Temple, Me. 

Calvin F. Stanley, Kingfield, Me. 

1'auglit one year after graduating, one term of grammar school and 
two terms of high school in Minot. In the fall of 1874 he entered the 
Normal School at Bridgewater, Mass., and graduated from the Advanced 
Course in 1876. Was appointed principal of a grammar school in 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. ^Z 

Washington, D. C, where he remained but one year, being obliged to 
resign on account of poor health. He then went to Galesville, Wis., 
where he remained one year, teaching part of the time. From there 
he went to Waterville, Kan., where he spent his time teaching and as the 
editor of a local paper. He died with consumption March 6, 1883. 

From the Farmington Chronicle we take the following tribute to his 
memory, written by his friend, Fred W. Craig, First Class of 1874 : 

We were intimate for over two years in Farmington, and then were together 
constantly day and night at Bridgewater, Mass., where Mr. Stanley took the Classical 
Course in the Normal School. After that we kept up our intimacy by visits and 
correspondence, and I can truly say that he was as noble, upright, honest, and stead- 
fast a man as ever I knew. The news of his death from consumption in a foster 
State, away from every relative and old-time friend, comes to us with unusual pathos; 
but he had many friends in Kansas, where he had lived since 1878, and had been 
principal of the public schools, then editor of the home paper, and later, also the 
music teacher of the village. He was a true and worthy man in every sense, and 
many a friend will long mourn his early death. 

Eugene C. Stevens, West Gardiner, Me. 

Taught four years in Maine, — two years in grammar and high 
school grades, at Westport and Oakland. Was Principal of the schools 
in LeRoy, Minn., four years. Superintendent of Schools in Alamosa, 
Colo., for six years, and has held for two years past the same position 
in Central City, Colo. Has been Deputy County Superintendent, and 
President of the Board of Trade at Alamosa. 

Married, Dec. 25, 1875, Miss Hattie U. Parlin of East Winthrop. 

Central City, Colo. 



FIRST CLASS OF 1874. 

Eleventh Class. — Graduated Jan. 16, 1874. 

John E. Case, North Livermore, Me. 

Graduated from Classical Institute, Waterville, in 1876, and from 
Colby University, in 1880, with the degree of A. B., and taught in 
Maine every winter during his course. Was two years at the Newton 
Theological Institution, and ordained as a Baptist clergyman May 18, 
1882, at Newton Centre, Mass., and immediately went as a missionary 
of the American Baptist Union to Toungoo, Burma, and is now located 
at Myingyan, Burma, as a teacher and preacher. Married, Nov. 8, 
1886, Lillie B. Clarke of Toungoo, and has one child, Brayton Clarke, 
born August, 1887. 



84 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Fred W. Craig, Farmington, Me. 

Began teaching in Farmington on the Monday following graduation 
and taught ten weeks. In the following autumn entered the State Nor- 
mal School, Bridgewater, Mass., and graduated from the Advanced 
Course, June 29, 1876. Went to Iowa in September following and 
taught one year as principal of the public graded schools of Smithland. 
Has also taught Vocal Music in Des Moines. Began the study of law 
in the summer of 1877, and was admitted to the bar of the State Circuit 
and District Courts in February, 1879. Graduated from the Law 
Department of Simpson College with the degree of LL. B., in June, 
1879. Practiced for a time in Chariton, Iowa, and afterwards in Des 
Moines. In December, 1879, ^^as admitted to the bar of the Supreme 
Court of Iowa, and in October, 1881, was admitted to the bar of the 
United States District Court. In June, 1887, was elected to the office of 
Police Judge of the City of Des Moines. Joined the Masonic fraternity 
in 1883, and was made a Master Mason in 1884, and was made a Royal 
Arch Mason in January, 1886, elected High Priest of his Chapter in 
September, 1887, and re-elected in September, 1888. 

Married, Sept. 29, 1880, Miss A. Diantha Corliss of Woolwich, 
Me., a graduate of the First Class of 1877, and has four children : 
Clyde Firman, born Sept. 4, 1881 ; Earl Howard, born June 3, 
1883 ; Philip Kell, born June 9, 1885 ; Mildred Diantha, born Feb. 27, 
1887. 

1129 Tenth Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Emma G. Gardner, Calais, Me. 

Eleven years is the measure of Miss Gardner's service to the State. 
She taught in Cherryfield one year, Westport and Bridgton two years, 
and from 1877 to 1885 in the primary, grammar, and high school grades 
in Calais. Since 1885 she has been an assistant in the High School, 
Provincetown, Mass., where she is now teaching. 

Calais, Me. 

Sarah Gill, Augusta, Me. 

Her mother writes: "After teaching in Bucksport, my daughter 
went to Chicago and taught a short time, but soon gave up teaching 
and devoted herself to art, in which she excelled. She was married 
Sept. 3, 1879, to M^- ^- P- Dumont, and died with consumption in 
Minneapolis, Minn, (whither she had gone for her health), Nov. 9, 
1884." 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 85 

SECOND CLASS OF 1874. 

Twelfth Class. — Graduated July 2, 1 874. 

Helen N. Bates, Somerset Mills, Me. 

Taught six terms, at Lisbon Falls, Somerset Mills, Skowhegan and 
Dennysville, and five years in one of the Portland grammar schools. 
Gave up teaching on account of ill health, six years ago. Has studied 
Vocal Music and Elocution in Boston for a year and a half, and since 
then with various teachers. Has taught Elocution the past two years. 

Waterville, Me. 

James O. Bradbury, Limington, Me. 

Has taught 90 weeks, in New Sharon, Dennysville and Hartland. 
Admitted to practice law at the December term of the Supreme Judicial 
Court, 1876, in Somerset County, and commenced to practice, March, 
1877, at Hartland, Me., where he has remained. Was appointed Commis- 
sioner of Disclosures for Somerset Co. in 1879, ^^^ ^^ \it\d that position 
to date. Was County Attorney for Somerset Co. from January, 1883, 
to January, 1887, — two terms. Had charge of the Hartland schools 
as Supervisor from 1876 to 1887, and has been one of the municipal 
officers of the town for nine years. Was appointed Trustee of the Normal 
Schools in 1888 by Gov. Marble. Is one of the projectors of the Sebasti- 
cook and Moosehead R. R., and is solicitor of the S. & M. and the H. 
& W. Railroad corporations. For one and and one-half years was the 
Principal of Hartland Academy. 

Married, August 5, 1877, Ella S. Butler of Wells, for several terms a 
member of the School, and has two children : Mary Alma, born Sept. 26, 
1882 ; Eva Elizabeth, born Apr. 12, 1886. 

Hartland, Me. 

Georgia P. Bucknam, Yarmouth, Me. 

Taught two years in the primary grade at Bridgton, and three years 
in grammar grade at Alfred. Was a teacher in the Normal one year, 
1879-80. Has been teaching for three years in the Grammar School 
at Newton Centre, Mass. 

Newton Centre, Mass. 

Lizzie N. Eaton, Farmington, Me. 

Taught 170 weeks, in Farmington, Strong, North Yarmouth, New 
Portland and other Maine towns, and one year in Massachusetts. Has 
studied History, Geology and Geometry. Married, June 30, 1883, J. 



86 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Adelbert Til ton, a farmer of Farmington, and has one child, Florence 
M., born May 6, 1885. 
Farmington, Me. 

Jennie S. Furbush, East Wilton, Me. 

Taught several terms in Wilton, North Yarmouth, Farmington and 
other towns in Maine, and in West Acton, Mass., where she married, 
March 20, 1876, Mr. Willard Blanchard, a farmer of that town, where 
she lived until her husband's decease, May 3, 1881. She then returned 
to her former home in East Wilton, resumed the occupation of teaching, 
and was thus employed until her death, March 21, 1888. Mrs. Blanch- 
ard had three children : Louise A., born Aug. 7, 1877, died Sept. 30, 
1877 ; Sara H., born June 12, 1878 ; Bernice, born May 12, 1879. 

Mary L. Giddinge, Minot, Me. 

Taught 70 weeks, — one year in the ungraded schools of Lewiston, 
and began another year, when the sickness of a sister interrupted her 
work, one term in Minot, and two terms in Auburn in the Pine Street 
Primary School. Married, Dec. 25, 1876, Merrill A. Pulsifer, a farmer 
of Minot, and has three children : Harry Lester, born March 25, 1878 ; 
Amy Giddinge, born Sept. 15, 1881 ; Oscar Nelson, born Dec. 4, 
1886. 

Minot, Me. 

LoviNiA H. Haynes, Smithfield, Me. 

Has taught 213 weeks, all in Maine. In the fall of 1874 began 
teaching in the Normal Department of the Maine Central Institute, 
where she taught over two years, being obliged to relinquish her work 
during her third year there on account of illness. For nearly four years 
was unable to teach. Married, June 18, 1880, Mr. Whitney J. Rideout, 
a teacher of Garland, Me. Has taught two terms of ungraded school in 
Charleston, and for eleven terms was an assistant in Charleston Academy, 
of which her husband is Principal. They have two children : Clare M., 
born April 10, 1881 ; Fred W. C, born Aug. 22, 1884. 

Charleston, Me. 

Henktstjta Howard, Leeds Centre, Me. 

Taught about 300 weeks, — seven years in the city of Lewiston in 
IJR* primary grade. Married, June 13, 1886, Mr. J.Clark Stinchfield of 
Wjiync, Me., and has one child, Paul, born May 8, 1888. 

Waynt\ Me. 




SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 87 

Mary T. Leighton, Calais, Me. 

Taught about fifty weeks in Calais. Married, Oct. 16, 1878, Mr. 
Samuel Dingley of Sebago, and has two children : Andrew Libby, born 
Nov. 21, 1879; Donald Leighton, born March 14, 1884. 

Sebago Lake, Me. 

Elizabeth M. McRoberts, North Baldwin, Me. 

Her name appears on the register and in the catalogues as " Lizzie 
M. Roberts," but she writes that it should always have been written as 
above. Has taught about 500 weeks, — seven years in the intermediate 
and grammar grade in Lewiston, and six years in a grammar school, 
Brookline, Mass. Has studied Latin, and has taken painting lessons of 
Harry Brown. Resigned her position in Brookline in September, 1887, 
and went to Germany, studying German eight months in Hanover. Is 
now caring for her mother. 

North Baldwin, Me. 

Ellen N. Parsons, Eustis, Me. 

Has had a long experience teaching in Maine. Graduated from the 
Advanced Course in 1885. Is now teaching in CaHfornia. 

Burbank, Los Angeles Co., Cal. 

Helen C. Thorne, Deering, Me. 

Has taught about 70 weeks, — primary school in Skowhegan, and 
kindergarten in Auburn. Married, Sept. 5, 1876, Sidney Smith Soule, a 
farmer of Freeport, and has ^v^ children : Theresa H., born July 6, 
1877 ; Louise B., born May 11, 1879 ; Marion, born July 14, 1881 ; Mal- 
colm, born June 3, 1883 ; Marjorie, born April 3, 1885. 

South Freeport, Me. 

Mary A. Townsend, North Jay, Me. 

Taught seven years in the Lewiston Grammar School, and seven 
years in a grammar school in Cambridge, Mass., where she is now teach- 
ing. Has studied the history and literature of England, Germany and 
ancient Greece, and in her reading, has covered a wide range of subjects 
in pedagogics, science and art. 

34 Cottage Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Clinton D. Tufts, New Sharon, Me. 

Taught four years. Has been farming since 1879. He writes (Feb- 
ruary, 1889) that he expects to put fifteen hundred acres into crops this 



SS FAKMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

spring. He is well and pleasantly located, takes an active interest in 
town and county affairs, and has held several offices of trust. Is Town 
Clerk of Gardner township. Married, Dec. 5, 1883, Mary Bell Camp- 
bell of Fargo, Dak., and has three children : Jay Warren, born Nov. 27, 
1884; Eulalia, born June 13, 1886; D. Clinton, Jr., born Jan. 18, 
1888. 

Argusville, Dak. 

Lucia A. Turner, West Sumner, Me. 

Has taught fifteen years, — 570 weeks — in the Lewiston schools 
from kindergarten to first intermediate. 

94 Ash Street, Lewiston, Me. 



FIRST CLASS OF 1875. 
Thirteenth Class. — Graduated Jan. 14, 1875. 
Georgia A. Ellis, Farmington, Me. 

Taught ten weeks. Married, Oct. 29, 1881, Clarion O. Hayford of 
Farmington, now a merchant in Massachusetts. 
4 Mt. Pleasant, Woburn, Mass. 

Juliette C. Haines, East Liver more, Me. 

Has taught no weeks, in Calais, East Livermore, Farmington, Wil- 
ton and Fayette. Married, Oct. 9, 1878, Charles H. Oakes, M. D., of 
Farmington. They lived at West Farmington for several years and 
moved to Massachusetts in 1887. They have one child, Carrol Haines, 
born Nov. 22, 1885. 

Northboro, Mass. 

Nellie A. Prescott, Farmington Falls, Me. 

Taught about 100 weeks, in New Sharon, Farmington, Wilton and 
Lisbon, and also in Minneapolis, Minn. Married, Nov. 28, 1878, Mr. 
George McLaughlin, a farmer of New Sharon, and has two children : 
Horace Prescott, born Nov. 9, 1879 ; Alice May, born Jan. 1, 1883. 

Farmington Falls, Me. 

Emma S. Small, Oakland, Me. 

That she is teaching in Bay City, Mich., is all the information that 
Miss Small vouchsafes. 

Bay City, Mich. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 89 

Martha B. Wyman, New Sharon, Me. 

Taught 445 weeks, — two years in Farmington in primary grade, 
which was a part of that time used as a Normal Practice School, and 
then in the grammar and high school grades ; in Bath one term ; in 
Bridgewater, Mass., in 1878-9-80, where she was very successful. Her 
health failing, she came home for a rest. In t88i she went West and 
taught in a grammar school two years in Beatrice, Neb., with the repu- 
tation of doing a great amount of work, and, as her Superintendent said, 
"not surpassed in methods by any teacher in the city." 

Jan. 10, 1883, she married O. O. Wells, M. D., of Beatrice, and be- 
gan the study of Medicine, which she very much enjoyed, and in which 
she became a proficient student. Her nervous system having become 
somewhat disturbed, her husband prevailed upon her to lay aside her 
studies for awhile, but it was too late. Nervous prostration followed, 
and she died Dec. 24, 1885. 



SECOND CLASS OF 1875, 
Fourteenth Class. — Graduated July i, 1875. 
Lizzie M. Brown, Farmington, Me. 

Taught 216 weeks, — three years in Saccarappa, and three years in 
Farmington, all in the primary grade, and always very successfully. For 
several years she has been studying and teaching vocal music ; and as a 
soprano concert and oratorio vocalist she has no superior in the State. 
97 Oak Street, Portland, Me. 

William J. Drew, Stark, Me. 

One who knew him well, writes : " His life has constantly been 
onward and upward. He had the fullest confidence of his friends and 
townsmen, of which he was fully worthy. He was Supervisor of Schools 
in Stark and also in Mercer, and a member of the Board of Select- 
men. For several years he was a teacher in the Sabbath School, and 
for some time Superintendent. At the time of his death, which occurred 
Nov. 2, 1888, he was Lodge Deputy of Mercer Lodge, L O. G. T., and 
District Secretary of Somerset District Lodge." 

He taught seventy weeks, in Fort Kent, Stark, and Mercer. Mar- 
ried, March, 30, 1878, his classmate, Emma C. McGaffey, and had four 
children : Katie Emma, born June 3, 1880 ; William Winter, born Jan. 
26, 1882 ; Frank Wesley, born Nov. 10, 1884 ; Frederic Carlton, born 
Nov. 12, 1887. 



90 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Georgia R. Holden, Sweden, Me. 

Has taught 187 weeks, in Calais, Naples, Bridgton (assistant in 
the High School), and other towns. Married, June 7, 1881, William 
Thomas Greene, a farmer of North Waterford. They have two chil- 
dren : William A., born April 12, 1884; George Holden, born July 19, 
1886. 

North Waterford, Me. 

Emma C. McGaffey, Mt. Vernon, Me. 

Has taught 81 weeks, in Dennysville, Mt. Vernon, Stark, Farmington 
and Mercer. Married, March 30, 1878, her classmate, William J. Drew, 
a farmer and teacher of Stark, moving later to Mercer, where he died 
Nov. 2, 1888, leaving four children. (See above). 

Mercer Me. 

Sarah L. Potter, Bath, Me. 

Has taught 285 weeks, — a high school in Edgecomb, ungraded 
schools for one year in Arrowsic, and seven years in the Bath Grammar 
School. Married, June 5, 1884, James G. Dunning, Esq., a lawyer of 
Springfield, Mass., and has four children : Harold G., born May 1 7, 
1885 ; Arthur J., born Oct. 11, 1886; Raymond P., and Rebecca F., 
born Dec. 12, 1888. 

47 Grosvenor Street, Springfield, Mass. 

Mary E. Stiles, Gorham, N. H. 

Taught about 460 weeks, — in Farmington one year, the Augusta 
Grammar School six years, and since 1883 in the Forster Grammar 
School, Somerville, Mass., where she is now teaching. 

3 1 Dartmouth Street, Somer\alle, Mass. ; home address, Gorham, 
N. H. 

John C. Winter, Kingfield, Me. 

Taught in New Portland, Kingfield and Dennysville. Took a partial 
course at the Classical Institute, Waterville. Studied medicine with Dr. 
F. H. Russell of Farmington, took one course of lectures at the Maine 
Medical School, and graduated from the Medical Department of the 
University of Vermont. Married, March 5, 1880, Miss Addie F. Hay- 
den of Raymond, Me., for one year a teacher in the Normal, and a grad- 
uate in the First Class of 1876. They settled in Phillips, where Dr. 
Winter soon gained a large practice, and in which he overtaxed his 
strength. He died Feb. 2, 1883. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES, 9^ 

FIRST CLASS OF 1876, 

Fifteenth Class. — Graduated Jan. 13, 1876. 

Florence M. Colcord, Somerset Mills, Me. 

Taught 300 weeks, in Calais Grammar School, North Anson, Durham, 
Lewiston, Fairfield and Canaan. Is now teaching the Somerset Mills 
Grammar School. Married, Feb. 26, 1885, Mr. George W. Smith of 
Canaan, and has one child, Mabel F., born May 9, 1887. 

Somerset Mills, Me. 

John B. Donovan, Lisbon Falls, Me. 

Has taught 5 2 weeks as Principal of a high school. Graduated from 
the Law Department of Boston University in 1880. Member of the 
Legislature from Biddeford in 1883, and also member of the Commis- 
sion to revise the Revised Statutes of Maine the same year. Married, 
October, 1882, Miss Ella H. Emery of Alfred, where he is now prac- 
ticing law. 

Alfred, Me. 

Milton B. Dyer, New Sharon, Me. 

Was assistant in the Farmington High School one term, and then 
taught the Grammar School one year at the same place. In the winter 
of 1878, taught the village school at home. He then went to Boston 
and was a teacher in Marcella Street Home, Boston Highlands, until his 
health failed, when he went to Nebraska hoping to recover, but died 
in that State, Sept. 30, 1880. 

Stephen Haines, Saco, Me. 

Has taught 138 weeks, in Woolwich, Old Orchard, Hollis and Saco. 
Has taught winters, farming summers. Married, June 16, 1886, Ella R. 
Dyer of Sebago. 

Saco, Me. 

Addie F. Hayden, Raymond, Me. 

Has taught three years, — one year (1877-8) as an assistant in the 
Normal, one year in a high school at Kennebunkport, and one year in 
the Auburn Grammar School. Is now taking a course in " vocal and 
pantomimic training" at the School of Expression, Boston, under Prof. 
S. S. Curry. Married, March 5, 1880, John C. Winter, M. D., of the 
Second Class of 1875, who died, Feb. 2, 1883. 

East Raymond, Me. 



92 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Charlotte Lyde, Freeport, Me. 

Has taught about i68 weeks, primary grade mainly, in Farmington, 
Rangeley, Lewiston, and in Lawrence, Mass., where she taught nearly 
three years. Married, Nov. 19, 1 88 1, Mr. Charles L. McCleery of Farm- 
ington, a journalist, later Maine correspondent of the Boston Journal, 
and now editor of the Morning Mail, Lowell, Mass. They have two 
children : Walter Lyde, born May 25, 1883 ; Grace, born Nov. 20, 1888. 

Corner 1 2th and June Streets, Lowell, Mass. 

Louise Lyde, Freeport, Me. 

Graduated from the Advanced Course in 1885. Taught the next 
year in the Portland High School. Spent a year at Wellesley College 
studying Botany, French and Ethics. Is now teaching in California. 

Santa Monica, Cal. 

Martha E. Norcross, Farmington, Me. 

Taught one term in Farmington, and since that time has been steadily 
employed in the publishing house of D. H. Knowlton & Co., as corres- 
ponding and mailing clerk. 

Farmington, Me. 

Hannah E. Osborne, St. Albans, Me. 

Has taught 44 weeks, — one term at Winnegance, and one year at 
Bridgton in the primary school. Married, June 3, 1878, Ralph R. 
Reade, an engineer of Lewiston, and has one child, Benton R., born 
June 27, 1 88 1. 

Livermore, Me. 

Mary E. Parkhurst, Palmyra, Me. 

Has taught 112 weeks, in Madison, Palmyra and Skowhegan. Mar- 
ried, Jan. 3, 1880, Mr. Philander C. Jewett, a carpenter of Solon, and 
has two children : Flossy Leona, born Oct. 3, 1 880 ; Rosa May, born 
Nov. 26, 1886. 

Skowhegan, Me. 

LiLLA M. Sanford, Hallowell, Me. 

Taught 214 weeks, in Farmington, New Gloucester, Saccarappa, 
West Gardiner, Lisbon Falls, Georgetown seven terms, and Farmingdale 
twelve terms. Married Nathan L. Niles of Hallowell, and has two chil- 
dren : William S., born Sept. 14, 1885 ; AUston W., born Aug. 26, 1887. 

Hallowell, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 93 

Charles W. Smith, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught two terms in Maine, and one year in Boston, Mass. 
Graduated from the Medical College of Ohig, at Cincinnati, in March, 
1884, and followed the practice of medicine three years. Is now head 
clerk in the United States Engineer Office at Zanesville, Ohio. Married, 
Aug. 25, 1885, Miss Harriet A. Parker of Boston Highlands, Mass., and 
has one child, Corinne Marden, born July 25, 1887, died April 12, 1888. 

40 Pine Street, Zanesville, Ohio. 

Halie p. Soule, South Freeport, Me. 

Has taught eight years. Married, July 29, 1884, Willis M. Soule of 
South Freeport. 

South Freeport, Me. 

Floriman J. Taylor, Bean's Corner, Me. 

Has taught 128 weeks. The year following graduation he taught in 
the Abbott Family School, P'armington, and the next year at Glenwood, 
III. He then returned to Maine and entered the Nichols Latin School 
at Lewiston and completed the College Preparatory Course, teaching 
several terms during the time. Began the study of Medicine in 1879, 
and graduated from Rush Medical College, Chicago, 111., March 18, 
1881. Settled in Pittsfield, where he has been in active practice for 
eight years. Has been a member of the S. S. Committee of that town, 
and is now a Trustee and member of the Executive Committee of 
Maine Central Institute, and has recently been appointed a member of 
the Board of United States Pension Examining Surgeons for Somerset 
County. Married, June 12, 1881, Miss Nellie M. Vaughan of Chester- 
ville. 

Pittsfield, Me. 

T. Elwood Tuti'le, South Durham, Me. 

Taught 47 weeks after graduation, — a high school and three district 
schools in Durham. In the spring of 1880, thinking a change of busi- 
ness would benefit his health, he went into a store in Portland, but to no 
avail. He came home, and, as his aged mother writes, "after a short 
and distressing illness, passed away, beloved and lamented by all who 
knew him, June 10, 1880." 

Carrie M. Weston, Skowhegan, Me. 

Taught 100 weeks, in Skowhegan, Athens, and Gray, and in Buda 
and Neponset, 111. Died at Skowhegan, Jan. 30, 1883. 



94 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Lizzie F. Weston, Skowhegan, Me. 

Has taught 200 weeks, all in Maine, in Skowhegan and Lexington. 
Is now teaching in the primary grade in Skowhegan. Married, Nov. 20, 
1879, Mr. Edgerly H. Healey of North New Portland, and has two chil- 
dren : Josephine A., born Aug. 9, 1883 ; Don W., born July 13, 1886. 

Skowhegan, Me. 



SECOND CLASS OF 1876. 

Sixteenth Class. — Graduated June 29, 1876. 
Holmes H. Bailey, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 176 weeks, — in Farmington, one term as an assistant in 
Normal, in Wilton, one term as an assistant in the Academy, New Vine- 
yard, Boothbay, Wayne, Industry (free high and ungraded schools), and 
in Rangeley. 

Graduated from the Advanced Course in July, 1881, having previously 
studied Languages at Wilton Academy and the Waterville Classical In- 
stitute. Since then has studied German with a private teacher. Has 
read essays at educational meetings, several of which have been printed. 
Was for four years Supervisor of Schools in Industry. Is now an agent 
for the educational publications of Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

4 Park Street, Boston, or Industry, Me. 

Amos L. Baker, New Sharon, Me. 

Taught 212 weeks, — 140 weeks in Maine, ungraded schools in New 
Sharon and Monroe, grammar school at Oakland, and high schools at 
Farmington, Stockton and Brewer. From 1883 to 1885 taught a gram- 
mar school 72 weeks in Dover, Minn. 

Graduated from the College Preparatory Course of the Maine Cen- 
tral Institute June 16, 1881. Took his medical course and degree of 
M. D., at the Rush Medical College, Chicago, 111., graduating Feb. 1 7, 
1887, and has entered upon the practice of medicine. Married, Feb. 
21, 1887, Miss Lula E. Atwood of Monroe, Me., a graduate of Castine 
State Normal School, Class of 1877. 

Eyota, Minn. 

Stella B. Collins, Farmington, Me. 

Taught four years in Farmington, two years of that time very success- 
fully in the primary school. She taught three years in the ungraded 
schools of Deering with such marked success that at the close of the 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 95 

school year 1885-6, she was elected Principal of one of the grammar 
schools, but died, after a brief illness, July 5, 1886. 

Lizzie R. Ellis, Buckfield, Me. 

Taught about 60 weeks in Farmington in the intermediate grade. Is 
taking the Chautauqua Course. Married, Jan. 28, 1878, Mr. Albert F. 
Gammon, a merchant of Farmington, and has one child, Fitz Roy, born 
Jan. 21, 1880. 

West Farmington, Me. 

Delphina E. Gordon, Chesterville, Me. 

Has taught 122 weeks, all but one term in Maine, in Skowhegan, 
West Gardiner, Farmington, and Eyota, Minn. Married, July 5, 1880, 
Mr. Henry E. Doty of Eyota, Minn., where she writes she is enjoying 
a very busy and pleasant life. 

Eyota, Minn. 

J. Arthur Greene, North Waterford, Me. 

Taught two years in the Abbott Family School, " Little Blue," and 
two years as Principal of the Farmington High School, in both of which 
places he was eminently successful. Studied law and was admitted to 
the bar in Oxford County in 1880. Practiced a short time in Chicago 
and then accepted a position with Messrs. Ivison, Blakeman & Co., 
of New York, in their Boston office, where he remained until 1884, 
when he assumed a responsible position in the home office of that 
firm in New York. He remained there until the spring of 1889, when 
he became a member of the firm of Barrows & Greene, Managers of 
" The Trade Promoting Company," which does designing, engraving, 
printing, editorial work, and advertising. 

Married, April 12, 1881, Miss Clara F. Allen of Rockland, Me., for 
many years a highly popular and successful teacher in the School, and 
has one child, John Arthur, Jr., born May 13, 1883. 

Times Building, New York. House, 158 E. 55th Street, New York. 

Hannah S., Jones, Dennysville, Me. 

Has taught 120 weeks, all in the intermediate grade at Pembroke. 
Has taken a part of the C. L. S. C. course. Married, Nov. 27, 1879, 
Rev. S. L. Vincent, a Congregational clergyman of Peru, Vt., and has 
five children : Merton L., born April 12, 1881 ; Rollo D., born Feb. 13, 
1883 ; Edith May, born Jan. 13, 1885 ; Leslie J., born Sept. 26, 1886 ; 
Fred M., born July 25, 1888. 

Bridgewater, Vt. 



96 FAJRMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

MiRA C. Jones, Dennysville, Me. 

Has taught twelve years, in Perry, Eastport, East Machias, Me., 
Watertown and Somerville, Mass., and since September, 1883, in Min- 
neapolis, Minn., in the grammar grade. 

1126 First Avenue, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Charles S. Jordan, Bowdoinham, Me. 

Taught 29 weeks, in Brunswick and Wiscasset. Since 1887, has been 
engaged in mechanical pursuits. From 1880 to 1884, lived in Haverhill, 
Mass., where he was a contractor and manufacturer of button-holes. In 
the latter year he transferred his business to New York. While in that 
city he invented, patented, and assigned to the Singer MTg. Co., an 
improvement in button-hole sewing-machines for automatically barring 
or staying across the ends of button-holes in ladies' shoes, and also a 
device for automatically stopping button-hole machines. Has a perma- 
nent and lucrative position with the Singer MTg Co., in Lynn, Mass. 
Married, Oct. 30, 1877, Miss Addie A. Durgin, of Bowdoinham, and 
has one child, Elmer H., born July 23, 1882. 

Lynn, Mass. 

John R. Luce, Industr)-, Me. 

Has taught 170 weeks, in Mercer, Industry, Farmington, Carthage, 
New Vineyard, Madison, Oakfield, and a high school at Smyrna Mills. 
Held the office of Assessor in Oakfield in 1885, and of Supervisor of 
Schools in 1885 and 1886. His occupation is farming and teaching. 
Married, Deo. 14, 1884, Miss Annie L. Clarke of Oakfield, who died 
Dec, 8, 1885, leaving one child, Annie ^L C, bom Nov. 21, 1885, and 
dieti Sept. 27, 1888. 

Smyrna Mills, Me, 

Meijjk H, Mt^'oMJsrrER, North Livemiore. Me. 

Has taught 250 weeks, in Lyman, Kennebunkport, Jay, Cumberland, 
Cantv^n, New Gloucester, North Vaniiouth and Portland. Has taken 
one yearns wv^rk in the Chautauqua Course, and for four years has been 
a memlx^r of the S. S. C\>mmittee. For t\\x> and a half years was Post- 
mistress, having ret ontly resignoil on account of |x>or health. Is now 
taking a vacation. 

f."xnutH^rland Centre, Me. 

A\MMK F, NoRU^N, New Vinoyar\i, Me. 

r,iujiht noarl) ivx^ wxvks. in New VineyanL Farmington, Wilton, 
Kinjineld, Rangvloy, CumUTland and F,ilmoi;ih, Me., in Traer, Iowa, 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 97 

and Lyons, Neb. Married, Dec. 3, 1881, Wendell M. Farrington of 
Lyons, a dealer and shipper of live stock. 
Lyons, Neb. 

George W. Norton, Farraington, Me. 

All the information Mr. Norton furnishes, or wishes to appear in the 
History, is his name, occupation, and address. He is a reporter on the 
Portland Evening Express, 

13 Market Square, Portland, Me. 

Julia S. Talbot, South Freeport, Me. 

Taught two years in Freeport. Married, Nov. 3, 1878, Mr. Paul C. 
Pinkham of South Freeport, Agent for the ^tna Life Insurance Co. of 
Hartford, Conn. They have two children: Philip E., born Sept. 6, 
1880, died Sept. 6, 1886; Paul B., bom Jan. 14, 1883, died Aug. 21, 
1886. 

30 Green Street, Portland, Me. 



FIRST CLASS OF 1877, 
Seventeenth Class. — Graduated Jan. 25, 1877. 
Amanda L Bass, Farmington, Me. 

Taught about 135 weeks, in New Vineyard, Farmington and Jay, and 
in New Hampshire. Married, Aug. 30, 1882, Rev. William Vaughan, a 
native of Maine, and a graduate of Rutgers College, New Brunswick, 
N. J., and also of the Theological Seminary at the same place. He is 
now pastor of Knox Memorial Chapel, New York City. They have three 
children: Otto Bass, born July 23, 1884; Claire, born Jan. i, 1886; 
Willie, born Jan. 23, 1888. 

229 West 42d Street, New York. 

Jennie S. Bennett, Canton Point, Me. 

Taught 30 weeks in Canton. Is reading the Chautauqua Course. 
Has held the office of Flora in Canton Cirange for several years. Mar- 
ried, June 15, 1878, Malcolm Reynolds, a farmer of Canton. 

Canton, Me. 

LuETTA Blanchard, East Wilton, Me. 

Has taught 320 weeks, — in Jay two years, and in Chesterville two 
terms in ungraded schools, in Deering two years in the intermediate and 

13 



98 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

grammar grade, in Auburn as Principal of the intermediate grade seven 
terms, and North Anson as Preceptress of the Academy two years. 
Graduated from the Classical Course of the Maine Central Institute with 
the degree of L. A. Has taken the C. L. S. C. course and the C. T. 
R. U. 

West Farmington, Me. 

Carrie Blunt, Bingham, Me. 

Taught during and after her graduation 84 weeks, all in Maine. 
Married, Dec. 10, 1878, her classmate, Manley E. Lowe, at that time a 
teacher in Bingham. They went West in August, 1880, and remained 
at Greeley, Colo., for nearly four years, when they removed to Fort Mor- 
gan, where they now live. Mrs. Lowe has been Treasurer of the School 
Board for three years. They have two children : Alice E., born Oct. 25, 
1879; Raymond M., bom Aug. 11, 1882. 

Fort Morgan, Colo. 

Joseph J. Cobb, Lovell Centre, Me. 

Has taught 58 weeks, in New Gloucester and Dennysville, two terms 
of high school in each place. Attended three successive courses of 
medical lectures at the Medical School of Maine, receiving his degree 
in 1 88 1. Settled in practice in Milan, N. H., where he has served on 
the S. S. Committee two years, 1884-5, ^^^ was Chairman of the Board 
of Education in 1886, and where he has an extensive practice. During 
the past winter (1889) he has been taking a post-graduate course in 
medicine and surgery in New York City. Married, May i, 1884, Miss 
Hattie Bennett of Milan, N. H., and has one child, Herbert Bennett, 
born May 24, 1885. 

Milan, N. H. 

A. DiANTHA Corliss, Woolwich, Me. 

Has taught 124 weeks, — 50 weeks in Woolwich, Winthrop (where 
she taught a high school), and Georgetown; 74 weeks in the Marcella 
Street Home at Boston Highlands, a school for pauper boys, where 
she was the first lady teacher ever employed. Returning home, she 
taught one term, and was married, Sept. 29, 1880, to Fred W. Craig, 
Esq., a graduate of the First Class of 1874, at that time a lawyer in Des 
Moines, Iowa. They have four children : Clyde Firman, born Sept. 4, 
1881 ; Earl Howard, born June 3, 1883; Philip Kell, born June 9, 
1885 ; Mildred Diantha, born Feb. 27, 1887. 

1 1 29 Tenth Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES, 99 

Lewis H. Corliss, Woolwich, Me. 

Has taught 269 weeks. In April after graduating, he went to the 
Marcella St. Home, Boston Highlands, where he taught for nearly three 
years. Had as fellow teachers in that time, Elliot of '73, Smith and 
Dyer of '76, and Miss Corliss of '77. Resigned in 1879, and during 
the next six years he taught eight terms in his native town, one term as 
assistant in Wilton Academy, and served a year as Supervisor of Schools. 
In 1886 he went to Foxcroft, where he was Principal of the Grammar 
School till February, 1888, and since September of that year has been 
Principal of the Bridgton Grammar School. 

Has read extensively in the line of pedagogy, and is a member of four 
educational associations, one of which, the Maine Pedagogical Society, 
he joined at the time of its organization. As showing his interest in 
the School, he has attended every reunion since his graduation except 
the last (1889), and nearly all the graduations. Married, Oct. 6, 1879, 
his classmate. Miss Minnie F. Crabtree, and has two children : John 
Arthur, bom Sept. 14, 1880 \ Dora Helen, born Dec. 9, 1882. 

Bridgton, Me. 

Minnie F. Crabtree, Topsfield, Me. 

Has taught 42 weeks, in Bancroft, Haynesville and Baring. Mar- 
ried, Oct. 6, 1879, her classmate, Lewis H. Corliss, a teacher of Wool- 
wich, and has two children. (See above.) 

Bridgton, Me. 

Abbie L. Drew, East New Sharon, Me. 

Has taught 236 weeks, in New Sharon and Rockland, Me., and in 
several towns in Wisconsin. Has written for the press and has given 
public recitations. Travelled for three months as a general agent for 
the Ruth Publishing House of Chicago. Married, Dec. 31, 1888, Mr. 
Henry Soare, a travelling salesman for a wholesale boot and shoe firm 
of Minneapolis. 

No. 22, Fifth Street, N. E., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Moses A. Fowler, Searsmont, Me. 

Has taught 92 weeks, in Union, Searsmont and Friendship. Present 
occupation, farming and teaching. Has attended Bucksport Seminary 
since graduation. Is a member of I. O. G. T., and has been W. C. T., 
and also Superintendent of the Sunday School in his village. Married, 
Oct. II, 1880, Miss Flavilla Peters of Bluehill, and has one child, Ralph 
Peters, born Aug. 12, 1883. 

Searsmont, Me. 



lOO FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Nellie Giddinge, Minot, Me. 

Taught 78 weeks, in New Gloucester, Georgetown, and Minot. For 
nearly two years was a book-keeper in Harrison. Married, May 31, 
1882, Mr. Thomas D. Emery, a clothing manufacturer of that place. 

Harrison, Me. 

KnTiE L. Hayden, Raymond, Me. 

Taught T32 weeks, — two years in the public schools of Raymond and 
New Gloucester, and two years in the Cooper School for Young Ladies, 
Philadelphia. Married, in October, 1881, Frank C. Dolley, M. D., of 
Falmouth, a former member of the School, and has two children : Frank 
S., bom July 26, 1884 ; Harold H., bom Oct. 5, 1887. 

Falmouth, Me. 

Clara A. Jennings, Leeds Centre, Me. 

Married, Sept. 21, 1878, Mr. Charles H. Richmond of Fayette, pro- 
prietor of a large novelty wood-turning establishment, and has two chil- 
dren : Willie H., bora April 12, 1880, died April 8, 1882 ; Winnie C, 
bom March 2, 1882. 

W^ayne, Me. 

^LARY E. Longley, Oakland, Me. 

Has taught in the towns of Oakland, Lisbon, Farmington, and sev- 
eral terms in Sidney. Gave up teaching ^\^ years ago on account of 
her health. 

23 Dexter Street, South Boston, Mass. 

Manley E. Lowe, Oakland, Me. 

Has taught about 60 weeks, in Sidney and Bingham, and was Super- 
visor of Schools in the former toi^-n one year. Married, Dec. 10, 1878, 
his classmate, Carrie Blunt of Bingham, and lived in that town two years, 
then went to Colorado, and has been in the retail lumber business most 
of the time since. For the last two and a half years has been President 
of the Bank of Fort Morgan, and real estate loan agent for eastern cap- 
italists. He has two children : Alice E., born Oct. 25, 1879 ; Raymond 
M., born .\ug. 11, 18S2. 

Fort Morgan, Colo. 

AiJCK C. Mansi'R, Plymouth, Me. 

Taught 44 \\*eeks, in New Ciloucesier, Manchester and Augusta. 
Marrievl, Dec. 25, 1870, Mr. Roi:endvill H.Jacobs, a carriage-maker and 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. lOl 

farmer of Mt. Vernon, and has two children : Merton R., bom March 
27, 1881 ; Caro E., born Sept. 18, 1883. 
Mt. Vernon, Me. 

Emma M. Parsons, Eustis, Me. 

Has taught thirty weeks in her own town. Married, Dec. 22, 1878, 
Mr. Florian L. Porter, who was for several years a jeweler by trade in 
Indiana, but had come back to Maine, his native State, to regain his 
health by farming. Among other duties, Mrs. Porter has kept the 
Town Clerk's books for nine years. She has two children : Ernest 
A., born Oct. 28, 1879 \ Mabel M., born Aug. 12, 1883. 

Eustis, Me. 

Angie G. Yeaton, Belgrade, Me. 

Taught ten terms, in Woolwich, Wiscasset and Belgrade. Run a 
button-hole machine for several years in shoe-shops in Augusta, Me., 
Lynn and Brockton, Mass. While in the latter place, she took a severe 
cold from which she never recovered, and after two years of patient suf- 
fering, passed away March 2, 1888. 

Cora A. Yeaton, Belgrade, Me. 

Has taught about 130 weeks, — one term in Georgetown, Me., one 
term in Liberty, Ohio, and the remainder in her own town, five terms of 
which were in her own school-district. Spent over a year in the West 
in Ohio and Indiana. Married, Nov. 15, 1884, Mr. Benjamin M. 
Penney of Belgrade, an employe of the M. C. R. R., and has one child, 
Clyde L., born Nov. 25, 1887. 

Belgrade, Me. 



SECOND CLASS OF 1877, 

Eighteenth Class. — Graduated July 5, 1877. 
M. Ella Alden, Waterford, Me. 

After graduation she taught in Waterford, Andover and Bridgton. 
Her health failed in 1879, and she died with consumption, Jan. 25, 1880, 
at Swampscott, Mass., where her mother was living at that time. 

Lucy E. Carter, Woolwich, Me. 

Taught twenty weeks in Woolwich but was obliged to try other work 
on account of ill health. In April, 1885, she passed the examination in 
the Civil Service of Massachusetts, and was appointed a clerk in the 



I02 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Census Division of the Bureau of Statistics of Labor. Remained in that 
office two years, when ill health compelled her to relinquish her work. 
When she was able to return, Civil Service rules barred her out until she 
had again passed the examination and awaited her turn to be appointed. 
Medford, Mass., or Woolwich, Me. 

J. Arthur Chadbourne, Waterford, Me. 

Has taught about 340 weeks, — six terms in ungraded schools in 
Waterford, North Waterford, and North Bridgton, four years and one 
term in the Grammar School, Avon, Mass., and since August, 1886, in his 
present situation. 

Studied one term at Hebron Academy in the spring of 1878, and 
one at Bridgton Academy in the spring of 1879. Entered the State 
Normal School at Bridgewater, Mass., in September, 1879, and gradu- 
ated from the four years* course in July, 1881. In July, 1885, taught 
elementary Physics and Physiology for one month in a State Normal 
Institute for colored teachers in Aiken, S. C. 

At the present time he is at the head of the Academic Department 
in the Santee Normal Training School for Indians. He has six subordi- 
nate teachers and 150 pupils, chiefly Dakotas — all grades from those 
beginning to read to Methods of Teaching and Mental Science. It is 
the aim of the school to prepare native preachers and teachers for the 
Indians. 

Married, April 2, 1883, Miss Ruth K, Greene of North Waterford, 
and has three children : Ruth Anna, bom Oct. 27, 1884 ; James Greene, 
bom Nov. 3, 1 886 ; William Warren, bom Feb. 5, 1888. 

Santee Agency, Nebr. 

Preston W. Charles, Lovell, Me. 

Has taught 280 weeks, in Bristol, Newry and Dennysville, Me., and 
in New Troy, Mich. Attended the Waterville Classical Institute three 
years graduating in 1880, and entered Bowdoin College that year, 
remaining till the close of Sophomore year. Then entered the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, from which he received the degree of LL. B., in 1884. 
Was Super\isor of Schools in Lovell in iSSo, and Superintendent of 
Schools in New Troy, Mich., in 18S5. Is now practicing law in Fort 
Worth, Texas, and unmarried. Is a Mason and an Odd Fellow. 

Fort Worth, Texas. 

EvERKiT C. Oow, Livermore Falls, Me, 

Taught 100 weeks, in the towns of Livermore, Wilton, Chesterville 
(a high schtx>l), and Jay. Attended the Maine Wesleyan Seminary at 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 103 

Kent's Hill in the spring of 1878. Worked in a store during vacations 
several years while teaching, and for several years past has been a buyer 
and shipper of apples. Is now farming and managing a milk route. Is 
Superintendent of the M. E. Sabbath School in his village, and a mem- 
ber of the S. S. Committee of his town (Jay). Married, June 20, 1883, 
C. Maria Hunt of Farmington, a graduate of the School, Second Class 
of 1880, and has three children: Clinton Hunt, born Jan. 10, 1886; 
Pearl, bom Feb. 14, 1887; Francis Sylvester, bom May 26, 1888. 
Livermore Falls, Me. 

Hattie E. Fitch, Sebago, Me. 

Taught 24 weeks in Standish. Married, Oct. 28, 1878, Corydon L. 
Cole of Parkersburg, W. Va., and has two children : Ruth Fitch, born 
Oct. 3, 1879; David Hammond, born May 9, 1885. 

1805 Fifth Aveuue, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Lizzie S. Hewey, Phillips, Me. 

Taught in the towns of Harrison and Waterford 74 weeks. Mar- 
ried, Jan. 27, 1883, Mr. Silas K. Kneeland of Harrison, now a manu- 
facturer of spools in Nova Scotia, where they reside. 

Tangier, Nova Scotia. 

Frank E. Perham, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 172 weeks, in Winthrop in 1877-8, assistant in Abbott 
Family School, Farmington, 1878-9, Principal of Dukes County Acad- 
emy, West Tisbury, Mass., 1880-2-3, Principal of the High School, 
Hartland, Vt., 1883-4, Principal of the Public Schools, Duarte, Cal., 
1884-5, and is now second teacher in the Public School, Monrovia, Cal. 

Entered Bates College in the fall of 1879, the Sophomore class at 
Bowdoin in the winter of 1 880-1, where he remained till the close of the 
first term of Senior year. 

Married, June 26, 1883, Henrietta De Blois Cleaveland of West 
Tisbury, Mass., and has two children : James Cleaveland, born March, 
1884 ; Douglas McDonald, born May, 1885. 

Monrovia, Cal. 

Dora Rogers, Kittery, Me. 

Has taught about 340 weeks, — in Calais two and one-half years, in 
Washington, D. C, six years. Has taken one year in the History of 
Art in the Home Study Society, one summer in Literature at Martha's 
Vineyard, and one year in Greek History in the Chautauqua Course. 



I04 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Married, Feb. 3, 1886, Lyndon A. Smith, Esq., of Montevideo, Minn., 
a graduate of Dartmouth College, and an LL. B. of the University of 
Georgetown, D. C, and has one child, Charlotte Smith, born Aug. 10, 
1888. 

Montevideo, Minn. 

Sarah A. Smith, Farmington, Me. 

Taught a high school in Strong fourteen weeks, and was then occu- 
pied till a short time before her marriage in caring for an invalid mother. 
Married Mr. Charles C. Bartlett, a wholesale grocer of Portland, resid- 
ing at Deering Centre, and has three children : Edee Maria, born Oct. 
2, 1885 ; Mary Ellen, born Oct. 2, 1885, died Oct. 4, 1885 ; Charles 
Lawrence, born Dec. 2, 1888. 

Woodfords, Me. 

Mary L. Thayer, Water\dlle, Me. 

Has taught 378 weeks', — eight months at Presque Isle, Me., sixteen 
and one-half months at Cannon Falls, fifty- six months at Red Wing, 
eleven months at Albert Lea, Minn., where she is now teaching. 

Albert Lea, Minn. 

Clare B. Thomas, Industry, Me. 

Has taught 32 weeks in Industry and St. George. Married, May 
19, 1879, Mr. Dudley L. Stevens of Somerville, Mass., and has two chil- 
dren : Alton Lyford, born March 31, 1881 ; Ernest Parker, born Jan. 
28, 1887, died Aug. 14, 1887. 

Jay Street, West Somerville, Mass. 

Winifred B. Thorndike, Rockport, Me. 

Is completing her first year as an assistant in the Willard Grammar 
School, West Quincy, Mass. Has taught in Maine, thirteen terms at 
Rockport as assistant in the High School, and four terms in the Grammar 
School, in Appleton two terms grammar and one term primary, in Hope 
^\^ terms, Camden four terms and Jefferson one term ungraded schools, 
— in all nearly 400 weeks. 

Rockport, Me., or West Quincy, Mass. 

Nellie Y, Townsend, West Farmington, Me. 

Taught one term in Farmington. Died at Sherman Mills, Aug. 16, 
1878. 



k 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 105 

John A. Tuck, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught over 200 weeks, — free high schools fifteen months in 
Norridgewock, New Gloucester and Bristol ; ungraded schools in Mc- 
Donough, Del., three months, and Arcadia, Iowa, eight months ; in the 
High School, Roslyn, L. I., one year ; Principal, and teacher of the High 
School, Terry ville. Conn., two years. Was elected one of the teachers 
in the Normal in 1883, but declined. Received the degree of B. A. 
from the State University of Iowa in 1883, B. D. (Bachelor of Didac- 
tics) from the same in 1884, Ph. B. from Wesleyan University the same 
year, and M. A. in 1887. 

He is engaged as missionary teacher at Ungo, Alaska, but owing 
to official delays will not start before the middle of the summer of 
1889. Married, Aug. 7, 1883, Mary Penelope Templin of Iowa City, 
Iowa. 

Farmington, Me. 

Emma S. Wyman, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught about 250 weeks, in the Wilton Grammar School one 
year, Standish Village one year, Farmington Grammar School four years. 
Graduated from the Advanced Course in 1884. During 1885-6-7, 
studied and taught Art, and attended the Saratoga Summer School of 
Methods in 1886. Is now Supervisor of Drawing and Teacher of Rhet- 
oric in the High School, Red Bank, N. J. 

Red Bank, N. J. 



FIRST CLASS OF 1878. 
Nineteenth Class. — Graduated Jan. 17, 1878. 
Z. Vaughan Carvill, Kingfield, Me. 

Taught 68 weeks, in New Portland, Wilton, Farmington and Free- 
man, and in Fall River, Mass. For several years practiced dentistry at 
Phillips, where he was for one year Treasurer of Phillips Savings Bank, 
member of the S. S. Committee in 1884, and Supervisor of Schools in 
1886. Moved to Fall River in 1887, where he is practicing his profes- 
sion and employed as principal of one of the evening schools. 

Married, March 2, 1882, Miss Hortense Teague of Phillips, and has 
four children: Celia M., born May 14, 1883; Gertrude H., born July 
7, 1884, died July 30, 1884; Earl A., born Nov. 7, 1885 ; Ernest H., 
born Aug. 16, 1888. 

79 Walnut Street, Fall River, Mass. 

14 



Io6 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Angie B. Dolloff, Mt. Vernon, Me. 

Taught 143 weeks, in Mt. Vernon, Manchester, Belgrade, Vienna 
and Augusta. Married, Aug. 22, 1883, Alpheus D. Guild, a farmer of 
Augusta. 

Augusta, Me. 

Fidelia Drew, Stark, Me. 

Has taught 62 weeks, in New Sharon, Industry and Stark. For the 
first three years after graduation the care of invalid friends largely occu- 
pied her time. Was a book-keeper from the fall of 1882 until the 
summer of 1887, when she was obliged to give up work on account of 
a lung trouble from which she is still suffering. Has studied French and 
completed the four years* Chautauqua Course. 

Stark, Me. 

Flora M. Ham, Monmouth, Me. 

Taught 92 weeks, in Auburn, Lewiston, Monmouth and Wales. Mar- 
ried in May, 1883, Frank L. Frost of Wales, and died in January, 1885, 
leaving one child, Edna E., bom in April, 1884. 

Ella M. Holley, Farmington, Me. 

Taught 129 weeks, in Industry', Bridgton, Farmington and Eustis, 
Me., and in Marengo, 111. (15 weeks). Married, March 24, 1886, Mr. 
George E. Murphy, a contractor, formerly of Bridgton. 

Comer 4th Avenue and East 3d Street, Rome, Ga. 

AucE A. PREsa^TT, Xew Sharon, Me. 

Taught thirty ^-eeks, when on account of failing health she was 
obliged to give up teaching. 

Farmington Falls, Me. 

Lizzie M, PRE^cv^rr, Xew Sharv^n, Me. 

Taught nearly ioo ^-eeks, — 121 weeks in Maine, in New Sharon, 
Farmington and Readfield, and t\\x) years in Haverhill and Middleboro, 
Mass, While in Haverhill she toi^k one-half year in the Training School. 
Tvx^k less^Mis in ixiiming, and while at MHiii'.elx^ro, fitted herself to teach 
that art. Took one war of the Chainauv^iia Course, studied French, 
Short-hand and Insinimental Mv;s:c. She ii-as obliged to resign her 
|x>sition on accvvant of failing health, and died in New Sliaron, July 10, 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 107 

Lucy M. Sewall, Farmington, Me. 

Taught sixty weeks, in Farmington, North Jay, New Gloucester, and 
East Wilton. Married, Jan. 27, 1881, Reuel W. Fogg, a farmer of New 
Gloucester, and has two children : Ethel Woodman, born March 3 1 , 
1882 ; Carrie Sewall, bom April 16, 1886. 

New Gloucester, Me. 

Mary B. Starbird, Pishon's Ferry, Me. 

Miss Starbird has sent no report of her work. Her sister Attie, 
Second Class of '78, writes that she is an assistant in a primary school 
in San Diego, Cal. 

1340 Tenth Street, San Diego, Cal. 

Alde Louise Tuck, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught eight terms, — two terms in the Farmington High School, 
in Brunswick, at Farmington Falls, and in one of the Portland Grammar 
Schools. Married, March 15, 1881, William Frederic Blake, formerly 
of Maine, then of Chicago, 111., where they resided for several years. 
They have two children : Esther Colby, born Dec. 30, 1881, died May 
6, 1884; Ethel Farnsworth, bom Feb. 5^ 1885. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Annie M. Verrill, West Auburn, Me. 

Has taught 210 weeks, in Auburn, Cumberland and Minot. Is com- 
pleting the fourth years' work of the C. L. S. C. course. Left teaching two 
years ago on account of poor health, and has since been needed at home. 

West Aubum, Me. 

Sophia G. Wright, Woolwich, Me. 

Has taught 360 weeks, in Woolwich (190 weeks), Westport, Booth- 
bay, Georgetown and Arrowsic. Has served on the S. S. Committee and 
is now Supervisor of Schools in Woolwich. Is taking a vacation. 

Woolwich, Me. 



SECOND CLASS OF 1878. 

Twentieth Class. — Graduated June 28, 1878. 

Isabel Beal, Southport, Me. 

Has taught 140 weeks, in Limerick, Southport and Boothbay. Is 
still teaching and has commenced the Chautauqua Course this year. 
Has been Supervisor of Schools for two years past. 

Southport, Me. 



io8 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Anna E. Bradford, South Livermore, Me. 

Has taught 227 weeks, — 87 weeks in Livermore, Winthrop and 
Hiram, 140 weeks in Empire and Farmington, Minn. Married, Oct. 19, 
1887, Wallace D. Wadsworth, a farmer and lumberman of Hiram, Me., 
and has one child, Clara Viola, born Aug. 10, 1888. 

Cornish, Me. 

Lizzie H. Carter, Woolwich, Me. 

Taught one term in Woolwich. Died April 3, 1882. 

Minnie F. Churchill, North New Portland, Me. 

Taught one year at North New Portland. Is now in a straw manu- 
factory, and is taking the Chautauqua Course. 

Medfield, Mass. 

Rose B. Collins, Farmington, Me. 

Taught 200 weeks in Farmington, mostly in the graded schools of 
the village, with good success. Present occupation, dress-making. 

P'armington, Me. 

Mary E. Downing, North Auburn, Me. 

Has been ill quite a part of the time since graduating. Married, 
May II, 1887, William L. Hall, a photographer of North Auburn. 

Lewiston, Me. 

Clara M. Ellis, Buckfield, Me. 

Tried teaching in the schools of Cambridge, but did not like it, and 
found more congenial employment with Houghton, Mifflin & Co., of that 
city. Graduated from the Chautauqua Course in 1882. 

22 Lake Street, Cambridgeport, Mass. 

Emma R. Fogg, Limerick, Me. 

Taught 140 weeks, — in Evart, Mich., in 1879-80-81, and one term 
in Limerick in 1883. Married, Feb. 15, 1883, Mr. B. Frank Philpot, a 
farmer of Limerick, and has one child, Cyrus E., born Dec. 29, 1883. 

Limerick, Me. 

Alice B. Hamlin, South Paris, Me. 

Has taught 230 weeks, in Alna and Sumner, Me., in Pittsburgh, Fair 
Oaks, Sewickley and Wilkinsburg, Pa., and in Ogden Academy, Ogden, 
Utah, where she now is. Spent one year, 1883-4, in Europe, visiting 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 109 

Ireland, England, Scotland, France, Belgium, Germany along the Rhine, 
and Switzerland. 

Her present work is that of a mission teacher, sent out by the New 
West Education Commission, under the auspices of the Pilgrim Congre- 
gational Church, St. Louis, Mo. Is taking the Chautauqua Course. 

Ogden, Utah. 

William H. Hatch, Lisbon, Me. 

Has taught about eighty weeks, in Woolwich, Durham and Edge- 
comb, one term of high school in the latter place and two terms of 
grammar school. Is now a carpenter and builder. Married, Feb. 4, 

1886, Miss Isa E. Huff of North Edgecomb, at one time a pupil in the 
Normal, and has one child, W. W., born Nov. 14, 1887. 

717 Third Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

L. Maria Knight, North Waterford, Me. 

Taught 27 terms, mostly in Maine. She was one year an assistant in 
the Training School at Madawaska and three years Principal of the 
Grammar School at Skowhegan, resigning to accept a more lucrative 
position in California. But she did not like the country and returned to 
Maine in less than a year. Came back to the Normal in the fall of 1886 
to take the Advanced Course, and was graduated with her class June 16, 

1887, although unable to be present. 

She secured a fine position in Maiden, Mass., but her strength was 
not equal to the task and very reluctantly she resigned. She taught no 
more except a few weeks in a district school near her home. She made 
an earnest fight against her disease — consumption — but without avail, 
her death occurring Nov. i, 1888. 

Cora C. Lovejoy, Livermore Centre, Me. 

Taught one term of ungraded school in Livermore, but not liking 
the business, and feeling that she did not have the qualities necessary to 
make a successful teacher, she gave up teaching and went to Foxborough, 
Mass., to work in a straw-shop, where she worked winters, spending her 
summers at home until her marriage, Oct. 25, 1883, to Lincoln E. Berry 
of West Sumner, also an employe in the straw-shop in Foxborough. 

Foxborough, Mass. 

Melvin W. Lovejoy, Salem, Me. 

Has taught 140 weeks. In the fall of 1878 substituted for three 
months as Principal of one of the Portland Grammar Schools, and also 



no FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

taught in a school of mixed grades in that city. Has also taught in 
Strong, New Portland, Salem, Farmington and New Sharon, in the last 
named town, a free high school. Was Supervisor of Schools in Salem 
in 1879, and a member of the S. S. Committee of New Sharon every 
year but one from 1883 to 1887, when he was elected Supervisor. 

Studied law in the offices of J. H. Thompson, the present Clerk of 
Courts of Franklin Co., and J. C. Holman, Farmington. Was admitted 
to practice in the spring of 1882. Commenced practice in New Sharon, 
where he remained six years. Removed to Seattle, Wash., in the fall of 
1888, and is in the practice of his profession there. Married, Nov. 19, 
1 884, Miss Lottie A. Sampson, of New Sharon. 

Corner Battery and Depot Streets, Seattle, Wash. 

Nellie E. Merry, Stark, Me. 

Has taught 276 weeks, in Stark, Industry, Norridgewock, New Port- 
land, New Sharon, Farmington, Hurricane Island and Vinal Haven, Me., 
and in Del Mar, San Diego, and El Cajon, Cal., — eleven terms in 
Maine, and twenty-two months in California. Took one term of the Ad- 
vanced Course. Is teaching in the first grade at El Cajon, Cal. 

944 Twelfth Street, San Diego, Cal. 

Mae B. Morrill, Waterville, Me. 

Was assistant in the Madawaska Training School one year, and died 
Oct. 10, 1879. 

Lillian M. Munger, Kent's Hill, Me. 

Taught one year in the Tileston Normal School, Wilmington, N. C, 
three years in the High School, Millbury, Mass., one year in the Farm- 
ington Normal. For the next three years, owing to the illness and 
death of her mother, she was unable to teach. For nearly two years has 
been a teacher in a Boston family. Took a two years' course at Welles- 
ley College, and has been especially interested in the history of Art 
during the Renaissance. Has written and delivered several parlor 
lectures on that subject, supplementing this work by a thorough study of 
the Louvre Gallery during the winter of 1887-8. 

86 Marlborough Street, Boston, Mass. 

Joseph W. Perkins, Stark, Me. 

Has taught 130 weeks, in Bingham, Industry, Stark, Salem, Mercer, 
Madison and Fairfield. Did one year's work in the Nichols Latin 
School, and then began the study of medicine with Dr. J. J. Linscott of 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES, in 

Farmington. Attended the Portland School for Medical Instruction, 
and graduated from the Medical School of Maine June 6, 1884, since 
which time he has been in practice in Wilton. Has married and has 
one child, Harry, bom June 20, 1884. 
Wilton, Me. 

Annie M. Pinkham, East Wilton, Me. 

Has taught 148 weeks, — seventeen weeks in Oakland High School, 
eight weeks in Phipsburg, and nine weeks in Skowhegan in ungraded and 
grammar schools. Graduated from the Advanced Course in 1881 and 
taught the next year in the Normal, when her health failed and she was 
not able to teach for a year. In the fall of 1883 she was called back to 
the Normal, where she remained, an earnest, conscientious and highly 
prized teacher, until her marriage, Jan. 22, i88(5, to Rev. Edward A. 
Mason, pastor of the Baptist Church in Farmington. They moved to 
Bluehill, where they have resided since, and have one child. May, born 
Feb. 15, 1887. 

Bluehill, Me. 

Emily J. Richards, Farmington, Me. 

Taught the two years immediately after graduation in the Normal 
Department of the Maine Central Institute, and the next two years in 
the Training School, Fall River, Mass. Married, Oct., 26, 1882, Mr. 
Charles Coburn of that city. Since that time, has been Assistant Prin- 
cipal two years, and Principal for two years of the Evening High School, 
a position she now holds. 

8 Bamaby Street, Fall River, Mass. 

Rena H. Rogers, Industry, Me. 

Taught 124 weeks. Is now, as for some years past, an employe in 
the Waltham Watch Factory, Waltham, Mass. 

15 Robbins Street, Waltham, Mass. 

Atiie T. Starbird, Pishon's Ferry, Me. 

Has taught eleven years, six years of that time mainly in the graded 
schools of Skowhegan and Fairfield. Went to California in August, 
1884, and has taught in Pasadena and San Juan. Is now completing 
her third year as Principal, with six assistants, of a primary school at 
San Diego. 

1340 Tenth Street, San Diego, Cal. 



112 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

Flora E. Stevens, Industry, Me. 

Taught seventy weeks, in New Sharon, Industry, Vienna and Anson. 
For a short time was a dressmaker, and also a saleswoman in a store in 
West Somerville, Mass. Married, Feb. i6, 1884, Mr. Dean McLaughlin, 
a farmer^ of Industry, and died April 7, 1885. 

Charles S. Walker, Peru, Me. 

Went West in 1879, and was engaged in one school for fifty 
weeks, and afterwards spent one season in teaching Vocal Music in 
LaSalle Co., 111. An accident caused his return to Maine in Febru- 
ary, 1882. Taught a term of school in his own district. In 1884, 
commenced work as a salesman of nursery stock, and drifted into 
his present occupation of nurseryman, florist and market gardener. 
Married, Aug. 21, 1880, Lizzie M. Hazleton of Peru, and has two 
children: lola Agnes, born Dec. 14, 1882; Alma Celeste, bom June 
17, 1886. 

Peru, Me. 

Euzzie R. Webb, Skowhegan, Me. 

Taught two years in the Academic and Normal Department of 
Wayland Seminary, Washington, D. C. Married, Dec. 6, 1880, Mr. 
Howard N. Wagg of Lewiston, now in the wholesale woolen business in 
Chicago. 

24 Wisconsin Street, Chicago, III. 

Delia A. Weston, Skowhegan, Me. 

Has taught 86 weeks in Skowhegan and Gray. Married, June 29, 

1882, George H. Weston, a farmer of Skowhegan, and has one child, 
Ralph C, born May 4, 1884. 

Skowhegan, Me. 

Clara M. Woodward, Lisbon Falls, Me. 

Has taught about 300 weeks, — in Boothbay 100 weeks, in Wash- 
ington, D. C, five years. Has been taking a short vacation during the 
past winter. 

Lisbon Falls, Me. 

Carrie J. Works, Farmington Falls, Me. 

After graduation she devoted one year to the study of Music in Ban- 
gor, after which she taught about 150 weeks until her marriage, Nov. 18, 

1883, to Fred B. Morrill, Esq., a native of Maine, at that time a lawyer 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 113 

in Fargo, Dak., where they have since resided. They have three chil- 
dren : Don Oliver, born Sept. 14, 1884; Fay Beatrice, born July 13, 
1886 ; Lynn Works, born Nov. 9, 1887. 
1 201 Third Avenue, S., Fargo, Dak. 



FIRST CLASS OF 1879. 
Twenty-first Class. — Graduated Jan. 17, 1879. 

Annie M. Dixon, Chesterville, Me. 

Taught seventy weeks in the towns of East Livermore, Chesterville 
and Jay. Is taking the Chautauqua Course. Married, July i, 1882, 
Rev. Lucien C. Graves of Vienna, now pastor of the Free Baptist Church 
at Bowdoinham, and has two children : Walter L., born Nov. 26, 1885 ; 
Merle D., born Oct. 13, 1887. 

Bowdoinham, Me. 

Emma S. Dixon, Chesterville, Me. 

Has taught 1 74 weeks, in East Livermore, Leeds, Farmington, Jay, 
Chesterville, New Sharon, Vienna, Mexico, Fayette, Oakland and Bow- 
doinham. Is now taking a vacation. 

Bean's Corner, Me. 

Frank C. Foster, Belgrade, Me. 

After graduating, he finished out a term of school, teaching three 
weeks. He then learned the trade of machinist which he worked at 
five years, and then came home to take charge of the farm, which he has 
since carried on. Married, Oct. 31, 1888, Susie E. Lord of Belgrade. 

Belgrade, Me. 

Olive A. Frazier, Lisbon Falls, Me. 

Has taught seven years in Lisbon and South Berwick. Is now tak- 
ing a vacation. 

Lisbon Falls, Me. 

Statira E. Gibbs, Peru, Me. 

Has taught forty weeks, in Livermore and Peru, and in Vermillion, 
111. Married, Aug. 21, 1881, Wayland W. Weld, a farmer of Tonica, 
111., and has two children : Carl E., born Aug. 3, 1883 ; Zalia A., born 
Oct. 16, 1885. 

Tonica, 111. 



114 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Lizzie S. Hodgkins, North Chesterville, Me. 

Has taught 138 weeks, — grammar schools at East Wilton and Read- 
field, ungraded schools in Farmington (eleven terms), Belgrade, Ches- 
terville, New Sharon, Mt. Vernon, Fayette, Carthage and Jay. Twenty- 
one of her pupils have entered the Normal. 

North Chesterville, Me. 

Alice M. Jones, Union, Me. 

Has taught about eighty weeks, — in Thomaston Grammar School 
one year, in St. Helena, Cal., one and one-half years. Married, June 7, 
1882, Nathan A. Morford, Principal of St. Helena Public Schools, now 
editor and proprietor of the Phmnix Daily and Weekly Herald, a Repub- 
lican paper in the capital city of Arizona. 

Phoenix, Arizona. 

Fannie B. Jordan, Lisbon, Me. 

Taught 74 weeks, all in Lisbon. Married, June 29, 1886, Crosby G. 
Eaton, M. D., of Oakland, a graduate of the Second Class of 1880, and 
has one child, Mabel, born Sept. 16, 1887. 

Oakland, Me. 

Charles Lord, Kingfield, Me. 

Taught 48 weeks, — twelve weeks in Stratton, and thirty-six in Wor- 
cester, Mass. Is now a foreman and book-keeper. Married in Febru- 
ary, 1 88 1, Miss Stella B. Cooley of Worcester, Mass. 

31 Addison Street, Chelsea, Mass. 

Alice A. Manter, Oakland, Me. 

Taught forty weeks, in Sidney, Me., Grant Township, Iowa, and 
Wheatland, Cal. Is now a general agent for A. B. Stockham & Co., 
publishers of subscription books, Chicago, 111. 

Oakland, Me. 

James Morison, Livermore Falls, Me. 

Taught forty weeks, in Jay, Rangeley, Andover and Tremont. Is 
now a salesman of fruit and produce. Married, Sept. 30, 1882, 
Mary A. Goodwin of East Livermore, and has two children: Grace 
E., born July 3, 1883; Earl J., born Feb. 5, 1885, ^^^^ Y^h, i, 
1889. 

93 South Market Street, Boston, Mass. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 1 15 

Alice M. Norton, Rangeley, Me. 

Has taught 200 weeks, in Farmington, Temple, and Pascoag, R. I., 
since 1884, several terms in Rangeley where she still teaches. Married, 
Nov. 14, 1880, Roland S. York of Temple and has one child, James 
Lewis, born Feb. 8, 1882. 

Rangeley, Me. 

Katie W. Parker, Skowhegan, Me. 

Has not taught. Married, July 11, 1881, Lewis C. Moore, a lumber- 
man of Skowhegan, and has two children : Agnes, born Oct. 15, 1883 ; 
Alice F., bom April 15, 1885. 

159 Hammond Street, Bangor, Me. 

Annie E. Richardson, Jay Bridge, Me. 

Has taught 112 weeks, in Lisbon, Me., and primary grade in Revere, 
Mass. Married, April 14, 1885, Marshall Lee Gray of Jay, a dealer in 
wood and lumber, and has two children : Marion L., born May i, 1886 ; 
Florence M., born July 21, 1887. 

Jay, Me. 

Martha W. Sanders, Livermore, Me. 

Has taught 184 weeks, — in Poland in the spring of 1879, Ham- 
mondton, N. J., in the winter of 1879-80, at Strickland's Ferry in the 
winter of 1882-3, and since September, 1885, at Mine La Motte, Mo., 
in the intermediate grade. 

Mine La Motte, Mo. 

May H. Sawtelle, Oakland, Me. 

Has taught 181 weeks, in Norridgewock, Fayette and Oakland. 
Married, Nov. 26, 1887, Charlie D. Bates, a farmer of Oakland, and has 
one child, George H., born Sept. 10, 1888. 

Oakland, Me. 

Addie M. Swain, Skowhegan, Me. 

Has taught 204 weeks, in Norridgewock, Clinton and Skowhegan, 
teaching in the latter place in the primary grade from 1883 to 1887. 

Skowhegan, Me. 

Jennie F. Swain, Skowhegan, Me. 

Taught twenty-six weeks, in Norridgewock, Cornville and Madison. 
Married, June 4, 1887, Mr. John R. Philbrick of Skowhegan. 

Skowhegan, Me. 



Il6 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Halie p. Vaughan, New Portland, Me. 

Has taught 128 weeks, — eleven terms in her own town, and one 
term as an assistant in Anson Academy. Has studied Latin, French and 
Music, and completed the Chautauqua Course. Married, Aug. 6, 1884, 
Fred H. Pease of North Anson, station agent of the Somerset R. R. 

North Anson, Me. 



SECOND CLASS OF iSyg, 

Twenty-second Class. — Graduated June 29, 1879. 
Mabel E. Austin, Farmington, Me. 

Taught one term in the Normal. Devoted herself to studying and 
teaching Music until her marriage, July 14, 1884, to Elmer E. Richards, 
Esq., a lawyer of Farmington, and a graduate of Bates College, Class of 
1880. Spent the following year in the Royal Conservatory of Music in 
Leipsic. Since returning to America, she has established an enviable 
reputation as a pianist and is at present under the instruction of Prof. 
Carl Baerman, formerly of Munich, now of Boston. 

Farmington, Me. 

IsADORE A. Baker, South Norridgewock, Me. 

Has taught 200 weeks, in Norridgewock, Cornville and Fairfield. 
Has studied Art at the Boston University, and since then has devoted 
herself to portrait painting and designing. Married, June 29, 1889, Mr. 
Edwin W. Wing of Westbrook. 

Georgia A. Brown, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught about 350 weeks, — four years in the primary and inter- 
mediate grades in Farmington, one year in the Grammar School, Salem, 
N. H., and four years in the Orono Grammar School. Married, Jan. 23, 
1888, William F. Chase, a merchant of Orono. 

Orono, Me. 

Isabel A. Coffin, Winthrop, Me. 

Has taught about 350 weeks, — two years in the Winthrop Grammar 
School, two and one-half years in the High School, Rochester, N. H., 
one year in the Grammar School, Amesbury, Mass., one-half year in the 
Grammar School, Newark, N. J., and two years in the Hoboken High 
School, where she is now teaching. Has devoted much time to painting 
and taken lessons of some of the best artists in New York. Has had two 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. H? 

Studios, — one in Haverhill, Mass., and the other in Newark, N. J. Is 
a graduate of the New York Industrial College and is greatly interested 
in industrial training. Has received the highest grade certificate issued 
to teachers in the city of Brooklyn, and a diploma from the Hoboken 
City Normal School. 

194 Hudson Street, Hoboken, N. J. 

Myra M. Eastman, Casco, Me. 

Taught in Bridgton four years in primary grade, and is completing 
her sixth year in Portland in the same grade. Has completed the Chau- 
tauqua Course. 

217 Cumberland Street, Portland, Me. 

Abbie E. Goddard, Canton, Me. 

Taught 99 weeks, in New Gloucester, Phipsburg, Farmingdale, Nor- 
ridgewock and New Sharon. Has studied History and English Litera- 
ture since graduation. Married, March 20, 1881, her classmate, Ora 
K. Packard, a farmer of South Norridgewock, and has three children : 
Ora Mabel, born June 20, 1884; E. Winnifred, born Nov. 22, 1885 \ 
Hilda M., bom Dec. 7, 1887. 

South Norridgewock, Me. 

Lizzie A. Greenwood, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught about 275 weeks, — 75 weeks in P'armington, Phillips 
and Vienna, and 200 weeks in Haverhill, Mass., where she has also taken 
a course of one year in the Training School. 

80 Winter Street, Haverhill, Mass. 

E. Burt Holt, New Sharon, Me. 

Miss Holt had taken one year's work in the Cook Co. Normal School 
at Englewood, III., before coming here. After graduating she taught 
very acceptably in the Model School two years (1879-81). Married, 
July 2, 1 88 1, Mr. Daniel B. Berry of New Sharon and has two children : 
Edmund Holt, born June 3, 1882 ; Alice Burt, born April 13, 1884. 

407 S. Eighth Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

M. Nettie Keene, West Sumner, Me. 

Taught 86 weeks, in the towns of Buckfield and Sumner. Married, 
Sept. 14, 1882, Mr. Ten Broeck W. Stetson, a farmer of Hartford, and 
has three children: Clarence Elbert, born Sept. i, 1883; Fred Ten 
Broeck, born May 13, 1885 ; Samuel Norton, born May 14, 1888. 

Canton, Me. 



Il8 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Ora K. Packard, South Norridgewock, Me. 

Has, taught 83 weeks, in Phipsburg, Mercer and Norridgewock. Is 
now a farmer. Married, March 20, 1881, his classmate, Abbie E. 
Goddard of Canton, and has three children : Ora Mabel, born June 
20, 1884; Esther Winnifred, born Nov. 22, 1885; Hilda M., bom 
Dec. 7, 1887. 

South Norridgewock, Me. 

May E. Paul, New Sharon, Me. 

Has taught over 320 weeks, — in New Sharon, East Auburn, and 
since 1883^ in the Auburn Grammar School, her present situation. At- 
tended school one year since graduation at the Maine Wesleyan Semi- 
nary at Kent's Hill. Is doing the work of the C. T. R. U. course. 

23 Spring Street, Auburn, or New Sharon, Me. 

Mary C. Pollard, Skowhegan, Me. 

Has taught 325 weeks, in Embden, Madison, Greenville, Phillips, and 
Skowhegan, where she has taught for most of the time, and is still teach- 
ing in the primary and intermediate grades. Has graduated from the 
Portland Business College, taken German and Music, and the Chautauqua 
Teachers* Reading Union Course, besides other pedagogical reading. 

122 Water Street, Skowhegan, Me. 

EiTA M. Reed, Upper Bartlett, N. H. 

•Has taught 197 weeks, — in Wells, Burlington, Enfield, Lisbon, and 
one year in the Brewer Grammar School, one year in the Grammar 
School, Maple Rapids, Mich., and one year in the primary grade at 
Bartlett, N. H. Married, July 3, 1886, her classmate, Sidney S. Twom- 
bly, a teacher of Enfield, now a Professor in the State Industrial 
University, Fayetteville, Ark., and has one child, Katharine, bom Oct. 
15, 18SS. 

Fayetteville, Ark. 

John A. Ri'^eu^ Temple, Me. 

Has taught 220 weeks, — ungraded schools in Embden and New 
i^loucesrer eighteen weeks, the Denm^sville High School sixteen weeks, 
Kreetiom Academy sixteen weeks. Brewer High School one year, 
Farminglon High S^hoi^l one and three-fourths years, the Grammar 
Si h«.x^l, Wellesley, Mass,, where he is now teaching his second year. 

Has taken lessi^ns on the pivino and organ at the New England Con- 
sorwuory of Music, French vUid Carman of IVif. Cari Braun of Bangor, 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 119 

French and Spanish of Prof. G. de Coligny of Boston, Mass., and Ger- 
man in the Berlitz School of Languages, Boston. Took a trip to Europe 
in the summer of 1888. 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Edward P. Sanderson, Mt. Vernon. Me. 

Taught sixty weeks, in Osceola, Alden and Farmington, Wis. Is now 
a book-keeper. Married, July 27, 1881, Miss Estelle Ballard of Farm- 
ington, and has three children : Carroll S., born Nov. 7, 1882, died Feb. 
17, 1883; Violette E., born March 17, 1886; Ethel, born March i, 
1888. 

St. Croix Falls, Polk Co., Wis. 

Addie p. Smullen, Orr's Island, Me. 

Taught 72 weeks very successfully, in Harpswell, Brunswick, Auburn, 
in ungraded schools, and in the Barker Mill Grammar School in Auburn. 
Graduates from the Chautauqua Course in the Class of 1889. Married, 
Sept. 5, 1882, Frank O. Purington, Esq., a lawyer of Mechanic Falls, 
and a graduate of Bowdoin College, Class of 1880, and has one child, 
Beulah Frances, born July 5, 1883. 

Mechanic Falls, Me. 

Emma Taylor, Calais, Me. 

Taught 380 weeks, in Collinsville, Conn., in 1880, and in Troy, Ohio, 
1881-7 in primary grades. After a year's rest she is back in Troy 
again in the grammar grade. Has taken the Chautauqua Course, and 
also the course prescribed for the Ohio Teachers' Reading Union. 

Troy, Ohio. 

Hattie F. Thompson, New Sharon, Me. 

Has taught thirty-two weeks in New Sharon. Was unable to teach 
for three years on account of illness. Then took a two years' course in 
the Portland Training School for Nurses, graduating Feb. 2, 1887. In 
1888, substituted six months for the Superintendent of the Training 
School. Is now in the Maine General Hospital as a nurse. 

Maine General Hospital, Portland, Me., or New Sharon, Me. 

Mary J. Thompson, Farmington, Me. 

Taught 52 weeks in Farmington and Eustis. Has taken lessons in 
Music and other studies related to her school work, and holds a first 
grade certificate from the County in which she lives. Married, April 7, 



I20 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

1882, John E. Norton of Farmington, now a contractor in California, 
and has two children: Frank E., born Aug. 23, 1884; Hazel I., born 
Oct. 20, 1888. 
Pomona, Cal. 

Jennie M. Thorne, Wayne, Me. 

Has taught 300 weeks, in Wayne, Rangeley, Winthrop, Deering, and 
for two years past in the primary grade in Wallingford, Conn. Gradu- 
ated from the Advanced Course, June 16, 1887, and has taken a part of 
the C. L. S. C. work. 

Wallingford, Conn., or Wayne, Me. 

Elizabeth W. Titcomb, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 178 weeks, — in the Farmington Grammar School two 
years, in Deering one year, and in Westport twenty weeks, in Tilton, N. 
H., one year, and in Middlefield, Conn., one year. Married, June 25, 
1885, Mr. William D. Gray of Middlefield, Conn., and has one child, 
Raymond Titcomb, born Dec. 15, 1887. 

Middlefield, Conn. 

Sidney S. Twombly, Enfield, Me. 

Has taught 250 weeks, — ungraded schools in Greenbush, Phipsburg 
and Montville ; grammar schools in Edgecomb and New Gloucester ; the 
Free High School in Atkinson two terms ; Freedom Academy one term ; 
the Brewer High School one year, and since the fall of 1888 has been 
Adj. Professor of Chemistry and Agriculture, and Vice-Director of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station in the Industrial University of Arkansas. 

Graduated from the Advanced Course in 1881, from the Maine 
State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in 1886 with the degree 
of B. S., and took a post-graduate course in Cornell University in 1887-8. 

Married, July 3, 1886, his classmate, Etta M. Reed of Eartlett, N. 
H., and has one child, Katharine, born Oct. 15, 1888. 

Fayetteville, Ark. 

Grace E. Whittier Farmington Falls, Me. 

Has taught but one term since graduation, but taught several while 
taking the course. Married, Dec. 3, 1881, Frank H. Rollins, an 
orchardist of Farmington Falls, and has three children : Deane Whit- 
tier, born Sept. 25, 1882 ; Kenneth Albert, born May 16, 1886 ; Ruth, 
born Oct. 14, 1887. 

Farmington Falls, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. I2i 

FIRST CLASS OF 1880. 

Twenty-third Class. — Graduated Jan. 16, 1880. 
Sadie W. Brackett, Cornish, Me. 

Has taught ^^ weeks, in Limington, Cornish and Hiram. Is now a 
clerk in the post-office. 

Cornish, Me. 

Georgia W. Colcord, Cornish, Me. 

Has taught over 200 weeks, in Baldwin, Fryeburg, North Yarmouth, 
Brownfield, Hiram, and fully one-half of that time in the primary grade 
in Cornish, where she is now teaching. 

Cornish, Me. 

A. Augusta Downing, North Auburn, Me. 

Taught twenty weeks, in Norton, Mass., and Upton, Me. The rest 
of the time since graduation, she writes, has been about equally divided 
between work in the shoe manufactory of Ara Cushman & Co. of 
Auburn, and housekeeping. Graduated from the C. L. S. C. course in 
1888. 

67 Pleasant Street, Auburn, Me. 

Alice I. Foster, Bowdoinham, Me. 

Has taught 64 weeks, in Buxton and Rangeley. Taught four terms 
after her graduation, when the death of her mother made it necessary 
for her to give up teaching and remain with her father for a year and a 
half, when she married, June 19, 1883, Mr. Lyman J. Kempton. For 
one year they lived in Mansfield, Mass., and since then in Rangeley, 
Me., where Mr. Kempton is a manufacturer and dealer in lumber. 
Has taught three terms in the Rangeley Grammar School since her 
marriage. 

Rangeley, Me. 

N. Emma Foster, Bowdoinham, Me. 

Taught 82 weeks. Immediately after leaving the Normal she learned 
Telegraphy and filled the position of ticket agent and telegraph operator 
at West Farmington for one year. In 1881, taught two terms of school 
at North Leeds and Rangeley. In the fall of that year, secured the 
position of telegraph operator in the master mechanic's office of the M. 
C. R. R. at Waterville, entering on her work Jan. i, 1882, and remaining 
three years, when she resigned and went to California. Taught in that 

16 



122 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

State, in Turlock and Milton most of the time, until her marriage, Nov. 
3, 1887, to Mr. Albert Simpson, a rancher of Turlock, and has one 
child, a boy, bom Nov. 14, 1888. 
Turlock, Cal. 

Etta B. Gordon, East New Sharon, Me. 

Has taught over 200 weeks, in New Sharon, Mercer, Rome and 
Chesterville. Is still teaching. Spent one year as a student at the Maine 
Wesleyan Seminary. 

East New Sharon, Me. 

Hettie B. Gurney, Cornish, Me. 

Has taught about 140 weeks, in Hiram, North Yarmouth, Yarmouth, 
and Cornish. Is now a stenographer. Married, Sept. 29, 1888, Charles 
O. Barrows, a stenographer of Portland. 

217 Cumberland Street, Portland, Me. 

J. Sherman Manter, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught about 150 weeks, — one term each in Farmington, 
New Vineyard and New Sharon ; one term in the Marshfield (Mass.) 
Grammar School in the fall of 1886 ; since then has been Principal 
of the Grammar School at East Brain tree, Mass. Married, July i, 
1888, Miss Susie W. Snow of Braintree, Mass., a teacher in that 
town. 

76 Middle Street, Braintree, Mass. 

Carrie F. Norton, North New Portland, Me. 

Taught 59 weeks, in New Portland, Farmington and Lexington. 
Married, May 3, 1884, George A. Gilbert, a box manufacturer of her 
native town. 

North New Portland, Me. 

Annie L. Richardson, Cornish, Me. 

Taught 270 weeks, — 78 weeks in Hiram, North Anson, Cornish and 
Deering, and since 1884, 182 weeks as Principal of the Grammar and 
Intermediate School, Meriden, Conn. Since graduation, has attended 
one term at the Maine Wesleyan Seminary, and taken the Commercial 
Course at North Bridgton Academy. Graduates from the Chautauqua 
Course in the Class of 1889. 

65 Lindsley Avenue, Meriden, Conn. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 123 

Marcia E. Ridlon, Kezar Falls, Me. 

Went to Portland immediately after graduating, took the examination 
and began teaching in the North Grammar School, where she now 
is — a successful experience of nine years. Is taking the Chautauqua 
Course. 

211 Cumberland Street, Portland, Me. 

Annie M. Stacy, Kezar Falls, Me. 

Taught after graduating in Kezar Falls, a village in her native town, 
for three years, with the exception of one term, which she taught in 
Parsonsfield. After that, was a compositor in a printing office for two 
years. Has taken no regular course of study, but is a member of " The 
Pequawkets," a society for the study and discussion of the events of 
the day. 

Married, in 1884, Mr. R. Fult : Wormwood, then of Kezar Falls, 
now editor and proprietor of the Oxford County Record, and has 
two children: Bertha May, born March, 1885; Florence Edna, born 
February, 1887. 

Fryeburg, Me. 

Nancy Stilson, New Sharon, Me. 

Has taught 118 weeks, in Industry, Augusta, and New Sharon. Since 
graduation, has taken the Primary Course at the Massachusetts Meta- 
physical College in Boston, and received the degree of Bachelor of 
Christian Science. 

New Sharon, Me. 

Elida V. Wadsworth, Cornish, Me. 

Has taught about 220 weeks, — from 1880 to 1884 in Brownfield, 
Fryeburg and Hiram ; appointed in 1884 Principal of the village schools 
in Farmington, Conn., where she remained two years, and became Prin- 
cipal of the Grammar School in Northborough, Mass., in January, 1889, 
where she is now teaching. Has graduated from the Chautauqua 
Course. 

Northborough, Mass. 

Alice E. Warren, Cornish, Me. 

Taught a primary school in Cornish in 1880, was Principal of the 
Model School in the Normal, 1 880-1, and in the Portland Schools, 
1882-6. Married, Nov. 16, 1886, George A. Brooks of Norway. 

Norway, Me. 



124 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Belle Whipple, Solon, Me. 

Taught 66 weeks, in Solon, Embden, Madison and Oakland. Mar- 
ried, Oct. 14, 1885, George W. Gower, Esq., a lawyer of Kingfield, for 
several terms a member of the School, and a graduate of the Gorham 
Normal School, now practicing in Solon, and has two children : Winni- 
bel, born Sept 29, 1886 ; Grace, born July 8, 1888. 

Solon, Me. 

SECOND CLASS OF 1880. 

Twenty-fourth Class. — Graduated July 8, 1880. 
Allietta a. Anderson, Wells Depot, Me. 

Taught thirty weeks in Lincoln, R. I., and twenty-eight weeks in 
Wells and Kittery, Me. In the winter of 1884, found employment in 
Boston as a dressmaker, and in the summer of the same year became a 
member of the family of a friend in Charleston, where she now resides. 
In the spring of 1885 entered upon her present occupation, which is 
that of Teller in the Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank. Like many 
others she pays a grateful tribute to the faithful labors of Dr. Rounds. 

21 Cordis Street, Charlestown, Mass. 

LiLLL\N E. Bass, East Wilton, Me. 

Taught during and after her Normal Course 54 weeks, in Carthage, 
Wilton, Weld and Lisbon Falls. Is doing the second year's work in the 
Chautauqua Course. Married, Dec. 24, 1880, Wilder B. Neal, a clerk 
in Farmington, now a merchant in New Hampshire, and has three chil- 
dren : Carroll W., bom Dec. 9, 1882; Erlon H., bom Oct. 5, 1884; 
Lucille R., bom July 30, 1887. 

48 Sumner Street, Rochester, N. H. 

Jennie C. B(>yn-ix>n, Cornish, Me. 

Taught one term in Westport, three years in the intermediate grade 
in Cornish, and one year in the same grade in Farmington, Conn. 
Married, July 28, 1SS6, Mr. C. E. Brandt of the last named place, who 
died Oct. 13, 1888. 

St. Paul Minn. 

T. Parker Craig, Island Falls, Me. 

Graduated from the Advanced Course in 1881. Left Farmington in 
the summer of that year and has been in the mining regions of Colorado 
since thai time. Has worked at surxeying, assaying, mining, and school 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 125 

teaching, but for the last few years his work has been principally survey- 
ing. Has held for several years, and now holds, the office of United 
States Deputy Mineral Surveyor, whose duty it is to survey claims for 
a U. S. Patent. 
Aspen, Colo. 

Crosby G. Eaton, Mt. Vernon, Me. ' 

Taught sixty weeks, in Phipsburg and Belgrade. Graduated from 
the Medical School of Maine in 1883. Has taken two post-graduate 
courses at the New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital 
in 1885 and 1888. Married, June 29, 1886, Miss Fannie B. Jordan of 
Lisbon, a graduate in the First Class of 1879, and has one child, Mabel, 
born Sept. 16, 1887. 

Oakland, Me. 

Seretha E. Farrar, North Turner, Me. 

Taught seventy weeks, in Turner and Auburn. Married, in 1884, 
Mr. B. Frank Page, a wholesale boot and shoe dealer of Brooklyn, N. 
Y., and has one child, Mabel E., born Jan. 22, 1885. 

1 7 Marshall Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Florilla L. Hall, Peru, Me. 

Has taught 150 weeks, in Woodstock, Carthage, Franklin and Peru, 
and is still teaching. 

West Peru, Me. 

Clara E. House, North Turner, Me. 

Has taught eight years, — four years in Maine in ungraded schools, 
one year in Houtzdale, Pa., in primary grade, and three years in the 
same grade in Minneapolis, Minn., where she is still teaching. 

1 1 29 Seventh Street, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Julia B. House, North Turner, Me. 

Has taught nine years, — two and one-half years in Turner, two 
years in Houtzdale, Pa., in Primary grade, and four and one-half years 
in Minneapolis, Minn., in the same grade. 

1 1 29 Seventh Street, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

C. Maria Hunt, Farmington, Me. 

Taught forty weeks, in Temple, Avon and Farmington. Married, 
June 20^ 1883, Everett C. Dow of Livermore Falls, a graduate in the 



126 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Second Class of 1877, and has three children : Clinton Hunt, born Jan. 
10, 1886 ; Pearl, born Feb. 14, 1887 ; Francis Sylvester, born May 26, 
1888. 

Livermore Falls, Me. 

Mary V. Jacobs, Farmington, Me. 

Taught 92 weeks, — ungraded schools in New Sharon and Eustis, 
one year in the intermediate grade in Athol, Mass., and one year in the 
Farmington Grammar School, meeting with excellent success. From 
1882 to 1887, her work was principally studying and teaching Painting, 
in which she has been very successful, having become an artist of real 
merit. Married, Sept. 13, 1888, Elmer E. Jennings of Farmington, a 
ticket agent of the M. C. R. R. 

Farmington, Me. 

Herbert J. Keith, Gardiner, Me. 

Has taught 100 weeks, — in Farmington forty weeks ungraded 
schools, in Excelsior and Windham, Minn., sixty weeks in grammar and 
high schools. Is now in the produce business and unmarried. 

Windom, Minn. 

Abbie a. Macomber, East Wilton, Me. 

Has taught 87 weeks, in New Sharon, Vinal Haven, Farmington, 
Phillips and Wilton. Is now at home. 
East Wilton, Me. 

Chari.es S. Murray, Solon, Me. 

Has taught 160 weeks, in Kingfield, North Wales, Pa., Principal of 
Grammar School, Chinoteague Island, Va., Principal of High and 
Grammar School, Bridgeville, Del,, where he is now teaching. 

Bridgeville, Del. 

Mary E. Norixw, Farmington, Me. 

Taught 98 weeks, — in New Sharon and Farmington in 1 880-1, and 
in Troy, Ohio, in 18S 1-2-3. Has completed the Chautauqua Course. 
Married, June 28, 18S3, Lauren M. Lindenberger, M. D., of Troy, Ohio, 
and has one child, I^uiren N., born Sept. 10, 1886. 

Troy» C^hio. 

R. May IVrtfj^, Kingfield, Me. 

.\fter leaching 45 weeks in New Portland, she learned dressmaking. 
Wont to I^uvrence, Mass., and worked at her trade imtil her marriage. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES, 127 

Jan. I, 1884, to Orren W. Simmons, for several years past a merchant 
at West New Portland, now a student of medicine in the Medical 
College, Brooklyn, N. Y. They have one child, Ralph M., born Sept. 
2, 1886. 

New Portland, Me. 

Agnes I. Rounds, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught nearly six years, — one term in the Grammar School, 
Machias ; one year in the grammar grade as Principal of the building, 
and one year in the primary grade and Training School, Washington, D. 
C. ; one year as Principal of the Model School in the Normal ; one year 
as Head Critic and Teacher of Methods in the State Normal School, 
Buffalo, N. Y. Here she broke down from overwork and was out of 
school for more than a year, when she went into the Training School, 
Cambridge, Mass., as Critic and Teacher of Methods, where she remained 
a year and a half until her marriage, July 10, 1888, to Mr. Edwin S. 
Matthews, a mechanical engineer of Boston, for a short time a teacher 
in the Normal. 

Graduated from the Advanced Course in 1883, has taken special 
courses in German and Philosophy, and a course in Wellesley College 
in 1883-4. 

Was Vice-President of the Elementary Department of the National 
Educational Association at San Francisco in 1888. 

Has given the following addresses and papers : Paper read at the 
meeting of the New England Normal Association in Boston, January, 
1883, — "What is the best method of developing in normal students 
practical skill in teaching?" Address at Normal Meeting, New Haven, 
Conn., February, 1883, — "Teaching of Language." Paper read at 
State Teachers' Association, Concord, N. H., October, 1884, — "Train- 
ing of Teachers." Address before the Niagara Co. (N. Y.) Teachers' 
Association, June, 1885, — "Reading as a means of culture." Paper 
read before the Elementary Department, National Educational Associa- 
tion, Topeka, Kans., in 1886, — "Principles of methods and common 
errors in teaching." 

In Institute work has given several lectures at Lancaster and Laconia, 
N. H., in the winter of 1883-4 ; lectures on methods in Primary Arith- 
metic at the Saratoga Summer School, July, 1885. Was engaged for 
fifteen lectures in Indiana in August, 1886, but illness compelled her to 
abandon their delivery. 

Performed editorial work on the " Question Drawer " in the Ameri- 
can Teacher in 1886, and has contributed articles to the daily papers, the 



128 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

American Teacher^ Journal of Education, having just written a series of 
fifteen articles for that paper on "Composition Teaching," Popular 
Educator^ Education, and is now engaged for contributions to College 
and School to be published next fall. 

Huntington Avenue, Boston, or Plymouth, N. H. 

Arthur C. Rounds, Farmington, Me. 

Taught one term of free high school in Turner, one term ungraded 
school at Jay Bridge, and two terms as assistant in the Hallowell Classical 
and Scientific Academy, where he fitted for college. Graduated from 
the Advanced Course in 1883, and from Amherst College with the degree 
of A. B. in 1887, and has taken two years of the three years* course at 
the Harvard Law School. While in college, was one of the editors of the 
Amherst Literary Monthly, and is now one of the editors of the Harvard 
Law Re^new. 

14 Mellen Street, Cambridge, Mass., or Plymouth, N. H. 

Ralph S. Rounds, Farmington, Me. 

After graduation he finished his preparation for college by a two 
years' course in the Hallowell Classical and Scientific Academy, gradu- 
ating in 1882. Then taught a term of high school in Turner and a dis- 
trict school at Welchville. Graduated from the Advanced Course in 
1883. Went to Amherst College, where he took the regular course and 
was graduated with the degree of A. B. in 1887. At once accepted a 
position in the Adelphi Academy, Brooklyn, where he now is, as a 
teacher in the Academic Department, and is also first assistant in 
Mathematics in the Cooper Union Night School of Science and 
Art. Is taking a trip through Europe during the summer vacation 
of 1889. 

While in college, was on the editorial board of the college paper, 
and editor-in-chief of the Literary Mi>nthh\ and also ^Tote a prize 
ess;iy for Lippimott*s Mag:uine on ** Social Life at Amherst." 

5^5 Clinton Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Annik K, SANOFRSi^x, Mt. Vemon, Me. 

Taught two terms when her health failed. Worked one summer in 
a drv^ssmaker's shop, Marrieii, CVt. 13. 18S3, Fred L. Redman, a 
farmer of IVsquc Isle, and has three chiKlren : R,ilph Woodbur}', bom 
Juno 5, 1SS5 ; C»raoo K., Ix^rn Sept. jq. k^So : Charles W.. bom Jan. 4, 

S^Hith IVsquo Isle, NU\ 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES, 129 

Ellen A. Winslow, Saccarappa, Me. 

After graduation she spent two years in the Friends' School, Provi- 
dence, R. I., graduating at the end of the first year, and taking post- 
graduate work the second year. Has taught nearly 200 weeks, — seventy 
weeks in the different grades of public schools of Westbrook and 
Deering. From 1884 to 1887, she was Preceptress, and at the head 
of the Normal Department, in Oak Grove Seminary, Vassalboro, Me. 
Since the fall of 1887, has been a student in Bryn Mawr College, Bryn 
Mawr, Pa., also tutoring in Mathematics and Latin in the college and in 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa., or Saccarappa, Me. 



CLASS OF 1881. 
Twenty-fifth Class. — Graduated June 30, 188 1. 
Emma Baker, Gardiner, Me. 

Spent the winter following graduation, in Haverhill, Mass., with 
friends. Returned to her home in Farmingdale in April, 1882, and be- 
gan teaching. Taught 55 weeks, in Gardiner, West Gardiner and Farm- 
ingdale. Married, Oct. i, 1885, James N. Cannon, for two terms a 
member of the School, at that time a farmer in Farmingdale, but since 
September, 1887, in the grocery business in Gardiner. They have one 
child, Ralph Willis, born Aug. i, 1888. 

97 Brunswick Street, Gardiner, Me. 

Lizzie B. Boynton, Cornish, Me. 

Has taught about 150 weeks, — fifty weeks in Hiram in the grammar 
grade, and the remaining time in Cornish Village in the intermediate 
and grammar grades, and as an assistant in Cornish Institute. Is now 
teaching as Principal of the Grammar School in her own village, and 
taking the Chautauqua Course, Class of 1892. Married, April 4, 1883, 
Fred E. Wadsworth, a merchant of Cornish. 

Cornish, Me. 

Cora L. Call, West Dresden, Me. 

Taught forty weeks, all at Dresden Mills. Married, Dec. 23, 1882, 
Frank H. Whitney, of Richmond, now a clerk in Lowell, Mass., and has 
three children : Agnes V., born June 2, 1885 ; Maude E., born Jan. 5, 
1887 ; Winnifred G., born Nov. 27, 1888. 

59 Tremont Street, Lowell, Mass. 

17 



130 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Mary A. Chadbourne, East Waterford, Me. 

Has taught more than 250 weeks, — in Waterford, Paris and Bethel 
38 weeks, in Avon, Mass., nine months, and in Brockton, Mass., five 
years, where she is now employed. 

Brockton, Mass. 

Norman Clifford, North Edgecomb, Me. 

Has taught over 200 weeks, — in the Bath Grammar School, 1882-3, 
Grammar School, Pawtucket, R. I., 1883-4, Grammar School, Golden, 
Colo., 1884-7, High and Grammar School, Buena Vista, Colo., 1887-8, 
since 1888, has been Principal of the High and Grammar School in 
Como, Colo. Completed the Chautauqua Coutse in 1886. 

Buena Vista, Colo. 

GusTA Davis, Lewiston, Me. 

Has taught about 175 weeks, — two and one-half years in the pri- 
mary grade in Auburn, and since January, 1887, in the intermediate grade 
in Lewiston, where she is now teaching. Has completed the Chautauqua 
Course. 

■90 Franklin Street, Lewiston, Me. 

Otis L Davis, Farmington, Me. 

His health began to fail before graduation, and he died May 5, 
1882, in Meredith, N. H. 

Mary E. Emery, Sangerville, Me. 

Taught ungraded schools in Maine in 188 1-3, a granimar school in 
New Hampshire in 1888, and since that time has been teaching in Mas- 
sachusetts, now in the intermediate grade in East Brookfield. Has also 
taught outside of the public schools. Has taken a course in Latin, 
French and German. 

21 Pleasant Street, Beverly, Mass. 

Emma L Fassett, Auburn, Me. 

Has taught about 230 weeks, — in the primary grade in Portland 
two years, 1881-3, i^ ^^e Auburn Grammar School from 1883 to 1886, 
and in the intermediate grade, Gorham, N. H., since 1887, where she 
is now teaching. 

Gorham, N. H., or Auburn, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES, 131 

Annie L. Goodwin, North Fairfield, Me.^ 

Has taught nearly 250 weeks, — in Fairfield 165 weeks, Manchester 
16 weeks, Ipswich, Mass., 36 weeks, and in the Skowhegan Grammar 
School, where she is now teaching as Principal, nearly a year. 

North Fairfield, Me. 

Liluan a. Haynes, Mt. Vernon, Me. 

Has taught 78 weeks, in Stow and North Waterford, in Attleborough 
and Ashbumham, Mass., and in Rye, N. H. Has taken a partial course 
in a Medical College in Boston, one year's work in a Woman's Surgical 
Hospital as nurse, nearly three years in Boston and a Water-Cure Insti- 
tute in Maine as nurse. Is now a private nurse. 

30 Worcester Square, Boston, Mass. 

LuTiE F. LuQUES, Kennebunkport, Me. 

Has taught over 200 weeks, — in ungraded schools in Monmouth and 
Waterford, in the grammar grade in Kennebunk and at West Auburn, 
and in the primary grade in the city of Auburn. Graduated from the 
Advanced Course in 1885, ^^^ since that time has been an assistant in 
the Normal. Has devoted considerable time to the study of Music, 
and is taking the Chautauqua Course. 

Farmington, or Kennebunkport, Me. 

JiLLiE H. Mayhew, Mt. Vernon, Me. 

Has taught no weeks, — one term in Vinal Haven, four terms in 
Mt. Vernon, and six terms in New Gloucester. The greater part of her 
time since graduation has been spent in the sick room, either as patient, 
or caring for the other members of her father's family. Is now teaching 
in New Gloucester. 

Mt. Vernon, Me. 

Hortense M. Merrill, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught nearly 250 weeks, — twenty weeks in an ungraded school 
in New Gloucester, eleven weeks in the intermediate grade in Booth- 
bay, twenty weeks in a primary school in Deering, and thirteen weeks 
in the Farmington Grammar School. In the winter of 1884-5 became 
a teacher in the Normal, and since the fall of 1885 has been first lady 
assistant. 

Spent the year 1882-3 at the Hallo well Classical and Scientific 
Academy. Graduated from the Advanced Course of the Normal in 
1884. Attended the Sauveur Summer School of Languages at Burling- 



132 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

ton, Vt., in 1885, and Oswego, N. Y., in 1886. Has also taken Latin, 
French and German in private lessons. 
Farmington, Me. 

Lavella a. Norton, Kingfield, Me. 

Has taught about 125 weeks, mostly as Principal of the Grammar 
School in Kingfield. Has also been a member of the S. S. Committee. 
Is a carpenter and builder, teaching winters. Married, Aug. 19, 1883, 
Miss Imogene F. Parker of Kingfield, and has two children : Parker L., 
bom Jan. 11, 1885 ; Stella J., born Sept. 26, 1886. 

Kingfield, Me. 

Ruth A. Norton, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 160 weeks, — ungraded school in Eustis, primary school 
in Bridgton 108 weeks, and in the Farmington Grammar School forty 
weeks. Has taken three years* work in the Chautauqua Course. Mar- 
ried, Sept. 3, 1885, Mr. Arlie B. Toward, a druggist of Boothbay, now in 
Somerville, Mass., and has two children : Natalie, born June 23, 1887 ; 
Gladys, born March 17, 1889. 

46 Cross Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Louis M. Perkins, Mechanic Falls, Me. 

Is a graduate of Bates College, Class of 1879. After graduating 
from the Normal, was Principal of the Kennebunk High School four 
years, then was on the road as a travelling salesman two years, and 
now is in the hardware business. Married, Nov. 25, 1887, Miss Nellie 
Parsons of Kennebunk. 

Kennebunk, Me. 

AucE M. Sewall, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 225 weeks, — one year in New Gloucester, nearly a year 
in Auburn in primary grade, and four and one-half years in Indianapolis, 
Ind., two and one-half years in the public schools and the remaining 
time in a Boys* Classical School. Has belonged to an English Literature 
Club for four years, and has done special work in French and German. 

373 Park Avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Flora E. Small, East Hiram, Me. 

Has taught 52 weeks, in Fryeburg, Hiram, Phipsburg and Baldwin. 
Married, July 12, 1885, William H. Wakefield, an engineer of Brown- 
field, and has one child, Arthur H., bom Jan. 23, 1887. 

Hiram, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 133 

Adelaide E. Smart, Farmington, Me. 

Taught two terms, and after that was a clerk in a store in Farming- 
ton until a short time before her death, which occurred Oct. 4, 1887. 

Maggie E. Smullen, Orr*s Island, Me. 

Has taught 168 weeks, ungraded schools in Harpswell and Bruns- 
wick, in the primary and intermediate grades at Mechanic Falls, and for 
the past year has been teaching the primary grade at Lisbon Falls. 

Lisbon Falls, Me. 

Rose M. Tarbox, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 225 weeks, — ungraded schools in Farmington, Jay and 
Stark, the primary grade in Farmington eleven terms, and has been 
an assistant in the High School five terms. 

Farmington, Me. 

Lucy H. Thorndike, South Thomaston, Me. 

Taught about 97 weeks, — in Livermore and Brunswick 36 weeks, in 
Black Hawk, Colo., 61 weeks, as an assistant in the High School a part 
of that time. Married, Feb. 6, 1884, James E. Lightbourne, a lumber 
dealer of Central City, where they reside. 

Central City, Colo. 

Sarah P. Titcomb, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught twenty-five weeks, in Farmington, Me., and in Greenfield 
(N. H.) Grammar School. 

308 Bowdoin Street, Dorchester, Mass., or Farmington, Me. 

Mary E. Whiitier, South Windham, Me. 

Has taught 255 weeks in Windham and Deering; now teaching 
in the latter place as Principal of an Intermediate and Grammar 
School. 

South Windham, Me. 

Harriet P. Young, Matin icus, Me. 

Has taught about 240 weeks, — ungraded schools in South Thomas- 
ton, Union, Woolwich and Matinicus 92 weeks, primary grade in Vinal 
Haven ten weeks, and since the spring of 1886, has been a teacher in 
the Normal. Has taken two terms' work of the Advanced Course, one 
year's work in the Chautauqua Course. 

P'armington, or Matinicus, Me. 



134 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

CLASS OF 1882, 

Twenty-sixth Class. — Graduated June 29, 1882. 

Agnes E. Allen, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught one term in Farmington. With that exception has 
devoted her time and energies to studying and teaching Music, in which 
she has been very successful. 

Farmington, Me. 

Ella L. Barker, New Vineyard, Me. 

Has taught 240 weeks, in Dennysville, St. George, New Portland, 
Farmington, Chesterville, Readfield, New Vineyard and Phillips. For 
the past year has been teactiing in the primary grade in Phillips. 

Phillips, Me. 

Edgar F. Blanchard, East Wilton, Me. 

Has taught nearly 100 weeks, — in Jay and Baring, Me., Greenfield, 
111., and for the past year Principal of the High School, Sutton, Mass. 
Graduated from Bates College in the Class of 1888 with the degree of 
B. A. 

Sutton, Mass., or West Farmington, Me. 

William R. Bowker, Phipsburg, Me. 

Has taught 153 weeks, in Berdan and CarroUton, 111., Craig, Nebr., 
Brewster, Mass., in the grammar grade, and one term in Phipsburg. Is 
a farmer and teacher, and unmarried. 

Phipsburg, Me. 

Belle D. Curtis, Solon, Me. 

Has taught 240 weeks, — in Solon twenty weeks, and in Hyde Park 
primary grade the remaining time. Has studied Painting and Stenog- 
raphy. 

48 Lincoln Street, Hyde Park, Mass. 

Josephine W. Dunton, Bath, Me. 

Has taught in Phipsburg, Arrowsic, West Bath, and Bath five terms 
in the Grammar School. 

823 Washington Street, Bath, Me. 

Mae E. Fales, Freeman Centre, Me. 

Married, May 30, 1885, Mr. Charles S.Gilbert of Cambridge, Mass., 
where they now reside. 

126 Norfolk Street, Cambridgeport, Mass. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 135 

Ida L. Farrar, Farmington, Me. 

Her health was not such as to permit her to teach. Went to Kansas 
in the fall of 1882, hoping to regain it, but received no help. Came 
home, and died Sept. 7, 1884. 

Andietta L. Ham, West Dresden, Me. 

Has taught 109 weeks, in Norridgewock, Perkins and Dresden. 
West Dresden, Me. 

Minnie H. Hubbard, Hiram, Me. 

Has taught nearly 200 weeks, in Hiram and Brownfield, Me., Passaic, 
N. J., Bristol, Conn., Atlanta, Ga., and in Meridian, Miss., where she 
is now teaching in the primary grade in a colored school under the 
auspices of the American Missionary Association. Has completed half 
of the Chautauqua Course. Has been President of the Y. P. S. C. E., 
and Recording Secretary of the W. C. T. U. in Hiram, and also of the 
colored W. C. T. U. in Meridian, Miss. 

Hiram, Me. 

Eva a.' Lebroke, Foxcroft, Me. 

Taught during her course and since graduation nearly four years, in 
Foxcroft, Guilford, Sangerville, Dover, Lincoln, and Bingham, where she 
taught the Grammar School forty weeks ; was also a teacher in Foxcroft 
Academy. Has been a member of the S. S. Committee in Bingham 
and is now engaged in the millinery and fancy goods business. Married, 
June 14, 1883, Arthur N. Burke, a merchant of Bingham, and has two 
children: Harold Augustus, born Oct. 30, 1884, died Aug. 13, 1885 ; 
Ethel Arlene, born March 9, 1886. 

Bingham, Me. 

Henry H. Mansfield, Camden, Me. 

Has taught sixty weeks, — free high schools in Phipsburg and 
Edgecomb. Went to New York in March, 1883, where he obtained 
a position as stenographer which he retained for three years. Has 
been Principal of one of the Evening Schools for four winters. Is 
now a broker and commission merchant. Married, Sept. 4, 1884, 
Mary I. Woodifield of New York, and has one child, Ethel Myra, born 
Oct, 26, 1885. 

Business address, 36 Pine Street, New York; home, 19 Cottage 
Place, Hackensack, N. J. 



136 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Flora M. Rackliff, West's Mills, Me. 

Has taught fifty weeks, — seven terms in Industry and Anson, and 
two terms at Badger Mills, Wis. Married, Oct. 20, 1883, George F. 
Lovejoy of Eau Claire, Wis., and has three children : Ina May, born 
Nov. 24, 1884; Joseph Edwin, born Sept. 25, 1886; Harrison E., bom 
March 30, 1889. 

West's Mills, Me. 

John E. Richards, Mexico, Me. 

Has taught 78 weeks, in Mexico, Me., in Minnesota and Dakota. 
Has been a member of the S. S. Committee of Mexico. Is now farm- 
ing and lumbering. Married, May 7, 1887, Etta P. Park of Mexico, a 
graduate in the First Class of 1884. 

Mexico, Me. 

Edith A. Willard, Dresden, Me. 

Taught 29 weeks, in Solon, Pittston, Dresden and Perkins. Married, 
Sept. 18, 1888, Mr. J. Ardine Blake, a jeweler of Farmington. 

Farmington, Me. 



FIRST CLASS OF 1883. 

Twenty-seventh Class. — Graduated Jan. 18, 1883. 
LiLLA V. Chase, Bingham, Me. 

Taught ten weeks. Married, Nov. 5, 1883, Milton H. Plummer 
of Farmington, Me., and has one child, Flossie C, born Feb. 24, 
1888. 

Rochester, N. H. 

Annie S. Clifford, Edgecomb, Me. 

Has taught nearly 200 weeks, — a free high school in North Edge- 
comb, in the grammar grade in Wiscasset, Whitneyville and Lubec, one 
term in the Grammar School, East Bridge water, Mass., and since April, 
1887, in the Grammar School, Cochituate, Mass. 

Received a prize on an essay on "The mental and moral effects of 
the use of tobacco on the individual." Graduated from the Chautauqua 
Course in 1887. In January, 1888, she was offered the position of 
teacher of English branches in a Seminary in Rio Janeiro, S. A., but 
declined, fearing the climate. 

Cochituate, Mass., or North Edgecomb, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 137 

May L. Clifford, North Edgecomb, Me. 

Has taught six years, — one year in Portland, three years in the State 
Normal School, Plymouth, N. H., and two years in the State Normal 
School, Emporia, Kans., where she is at present engaged as teacher of Art. 
Has taken a course in Art in the Massachusetts Normal Art School. 

1004 Mechanic Street, Emporia, Kans. 

Wesley N. Clifford, Monmouth, Me. 

Has taught 207 weeks, — a free high school in New Vineyard in 
1883-5, same grade in Jonesport, and private tutor in Cincinnati in the 
summer of 1885, Principal of the High School, Logansport, Ind., 1885-8, 
since 1888, Principal of the Normal Department of Clark University, 
Atlanta, Ga. Married, Aug. 1 8, 1 886, Miss Elizabeth Bazin, of Logans- 
port, Ind. 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Maud C. Conant, Temple, Me. 

Has taught about 122 weeks, in Farmington, Vienna, Temple, Weld, 
Waterford, Wilton, St. George, and East Jefferson. Is now a book- 
keeper. 

Danvers, Mass., or Temple, Me. 

Clara A. Johnson, West*s Mills, Me. 

Has taught more than 150 weeks, — in Bingham, Industry, Wilton, 
Farmington, Mt. Vernon, Oakland for two years as Principal of the 
Grammar School, and is now teaching as Principal of the Grammar 
School, South Acton, Mass. Has attended the Maine Wesleyan Seminary 
since graduation. 

West's Mills, Me. 



SECOND CLASS OF 1883. 

Twenty-eighth Class. — Graduated July 6, 1883. 
William O. Butler, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 88 weeks in Spiritwood and Uxbridge, Dak. Is now 
teaching in the latter place. Is a Justice of the Peace. Married, Oct. 
27, 1888, Catharine A. Walks of Uxbridge. 

Uxbridge, Dak. 

Helen M. Cobb, Yarmouth, Me. 

Has taught over 200 weeks. For three years after graduation she 
had charge of the High School in Plymouth, N. H. In the fall of 1886, 

18 



138 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

she accepted a position as assistant in the Stevens High School, Clare- 
mont, N. H., resigning in the following spring to accept the principal- 
ship of the High School in Hanover, N. H. After two terms, was 
obliged to give up the work on account of ill health. In the fall of 
1888 she went to Wolf borough, N. H., as assistant in the Brewster Free 
Academy. 

Yarmouth, Me. 

Emma A. Cutting, Phipsburg, Me. 

Has taught 159 weeks, — in the primary grade in Auburn one year, 
and since that time in ungraded schools in West Bath and Phipsburg. 

Phipsburg, Me. 

Emma L. Hacker, Saccarappa, Me. 

Has taught 144 weeks, all in the Saccarappa Grammar School. Was 
a post-graduate student in the Friends* School, Providence, R. I., in 
1887-8, and is now a student in Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Saccarappa, Me. 

Viola A. Johnson, West's Mills, Me. 

Has taught four years, — two years as Principal of the Model 
School in the Normal ; one year in Deering Grammar School, and in 
the same grade in Bartlett, N. H. ; one year in Boston, Mass., and 
Bradford, Pa. Has devoted considerable time to the study of Miner- 
alogy, Botany, Zoology, French, English Literature, and the Chautauqua 
Course. Married, Sept. 25, 1887, Charles E. Weston, a retired 
lumberman of Milwaukee, Wis., and has spent much of the time since 
her marriage in travelling in different parts of the United States. 

228 Tenth Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Annie F. Judkins, Lisbon, Me. 

Has taught 149 weeks, — one year in the Lisbon Grammar School, 
three years in a grammar school in Waltham, Mass., and a short time in 
the Grammar School, Plymouth, N. H. Is now a book-keeper. 

45 Lowell Street, Waltham, Mass. 

Marion A. Luce, Freedom, Me. 

Taught 1 24 weeks, — one year in the primary grade in Deering, one 
term in an ungraded school in Vassalboro, and two years very success- 
fully as IVincipal of the Model School in the Normal. Married, July 5, 
i886» Charles F. Warner, A. B., a graduate of Colby University, Class of 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES, 139 

1879, and for five years the first assistant in the Normal. They have 
one child, Margaret, born Feb. 12, 1888. In the summer of 1888, they 
moved to Cambridge, Mass., where Mr. Warner is Sub-Master in the 
English High School. 

22 Centre Street, Cambridgeport, Mass. 

Lizzie J. McLain, New Vineyard, Me. 

For over four years after graduation she was an invaUd. Commenced 
work again in the fall of 1888 by teaching an ungraded school of twelve 
weeks in Temple. 

New Vineyard, Me. 

Isabella B. Norton, Farmington, Me. 

Taught 30 weeks in Farmington. Is now studying Music and taking 
piano lessons. 

Farmington, Me. 

Alvint W. Parker, Phillips, Me. 

As no reply has been received to numerous circulars and letters, we 
cannot give a detailed sketch. Taught one or two terms after graduation 
and then went West. In 1886, was teaching in the vicinity of Omaha, 
Nebr., where he probably is now, as the postmaster of that city writes 
that he gets his mail at that office. 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Effie S. Pierce, Boothbay, Me. 

Has taught 32 weeks. Is now a telegraph operator. 
Boothbay Harbor, Me. 

Almer Warren Pottle, Strong, Me. 

Continued his studies in Pharmacy after graduation. In the winter 
of 1884-5, too^ ^ course of lectures at the Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy. In April, 1885, passed the examination and received the 
diploma from the Commissioners of Pharmacy of Maine. Is taking the 
Chautauqua Course. Married, Nov. 19, 1885, Florence L. Fowler of 
Albion, at one time a member of the School. 

Farmington, Me. 

Annette L. Pratt, Greene Corner, Me. 

Has taught over 200 weeks, — in the grammar grade in North Edge- 
comb, and in the ungraded schools and the grammar grade in Auburn. 
Is now teaching in the West Auburn Grammar School. 

West Auburn, or Greene Corner, Me. 



I40 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Haitie M. Springer, Lisbon, Me. 

Has taught 120 weeks, — two years in the Grammar School, Ply- 
mouth, N. H., the remaining time in the Lisbon Grammar Schools. 
Married, Oct. 27, 1887, Fred W. Jordan, a merchant of Lisbon Falls. 

Lisbon Falls, Me. 



FIRST CLASS OF 1884. 
Twenty- ninth Class. — Graduated Jan. 29, 1884. 
Carrie A. Chase, Lisbon, Me. 

Has taught more than 150 weeks, — three years in the intermediate 
and primary grades in Lisbon, and two years in the primary and gram- 
mar grades in Farmington. 
Farmington, or Lisbon, Me. 

Marietta Eaton, Farmington, Me. 

Taught 55 weeks, --at Livermore Falls, East Wilton, grammar grade, 
and in Farmington. Married, March 26, 1887, George H. Lord of 
East Wilton. 

East Wilton, Me. 

Hattie Hari'well, Strong, Me. 

Has taught more than 125 weeks, in Farmington, Strong, Phillips, 
New Vineyard, Madison, and ten weeks in Upton, Mass., where she is 
now teaching. 

Strong, Me. 

LuRA A. LooMis, Skowhegan, Me. 

Has taught forty weeks in the grammar grade in Eureka, Cal. Has 
taken the Chautauqua Course and is now taking lessons in Music and 
Painting. Married, Sept. 5, 1885, George M. Fay, a lumber manufac- 
turer of Eureka. 

Eureka, Cal. 

Ella J. Mann, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 51 weeks, — the Phillips Grammar School one term, un- 
graded schools in Farmington and Wilton, the Wilton Grammar School 
one term. Began to teach the Farmington Grammar School in the fall 
of 1887, but was obliged to resign after teaching three weeks and has 
been an invalid since. 

Farmington, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 14^ 

Etta P. Park, Mexico, Me. 

Has taught 120 weeks, in Mexico, Rumford, Bryant's Pond, Car- 
thage, Canton Village and Peru. Married, May 7, 1887, John E. Rich- 
ards, a farmer of Mexico, and a graduate in the Class of 1882. 

Mexico, Me. 

HoRTENSE F. Phinney, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 22 weeks, in Farmington and Vienna. Is mailing clerk 
with D. H. Knowlton & Co. 

Farmington, Me. 

H. Pearl Richards, Mexico, Me. 

Has not taught. Very soon after graduation she went to Minne- 
apolis, Minn., where she found employment as a clerk and copyist. Is 
now at home on a visit. 

800 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn. 

J. Albert Tyler, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught 58 weeks, in the "Little Blue" school, and ungraded 
schools in Industry and Avon. In 1884, went West and worked on a 
large wheat farm in Dakota. After two years, returned and took such 
of the Advanced work in the Normal as was necessary to fit him to enter 
the State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, which he did in 
the fall of 1888, taking the Civil Engineering Course in the Class of 
1892. 

Farmington, Me. 



SECOND CLASS OF 1884. 
Thirtieth Class. — Graduated June 12, 1884. 

[Beginning with this class, records have been kept showing the number of weeks 
the pupils have taught before entering the vSchool, and during the course, also what 
schools they had attended before coming to the Normal, though, in this last respect, 
the record is not quite complete, to which fact any omissions must be ascribed.] 

Alice M. Campbell, Atkinson, Me. 

Taught forty weeks before graduating ; since then, 92 weeks, in Atkin- 
son, Foxcroft, Abbot Village, and three terms in Dover, Dak., where she 
married, April 20, 1887, James W. Gurney, a farmer of that town. Is 
taking the Chautauqua Course. 

Dover, Dak. 



142 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

LiNA V. Carter, Hallowell, Me. 

Had attended the Hallowell Classical and Scientific Academy several 
terms before entering the Normal. For a year and a half after gradu- 
ation was a copyist in Augusta, then taught twelve weeks in Gardiner, 
when she returned to Augusta remaining another year. From Novem- 
ber, 1887, to August, 1888, was book-keeper in the Hallowell shoe 
factory. In September, accepted a position in Boston as copyist and 
book-keeper, where she remained but a few months being called home 
by sickness. Has taken the Chautauqua Course one year, and is study- 
ing Music and Stenography. 

Hallowell, Me. 

Nellie Dennett, Brunswick, Me. 

Had graduated from the Brunswick High School before entering the 
Normal. Between that time and her graduation, had taken a year's 
post-graduate course in the B. H. S. fitting for college, and spent nearly 
a year in Bates College. Owing to ill health she was obliged to relin- 
quish her college course. Has taught one term as a substitute in the 
Normal in the spring of 1885. 

Brunswick, Me. 

M. LuELLA Dill, Stroud water. Me. 

Graduated from the Deering High School and taught 150 weeks 
before graduating from the Normal; since then, has taught nearly 150 
weeks, — in the fall of 1884, a free high school in Wayne ; from Decem- 
ber, 1884, to March, 1886, in the intermediate grade in Deering; from 
April, 1886, to July, 1888, was assistant in the Mechanic Falls High 
School. Owing to a serious illness she was not able to return to 
Mechanic Falls and was out of school until the spring of 1889, when 
she went to Barre, Mass., where she is Principal of the school containing 
all the grades below the High School. 

Has taken lessons in Latin, French, English Literature, and in Form 
and Drawing. Has done one year's work in the Chautauqua Course. 

Stroudwater, Me. 

Minnie A. Everett, Dover, Me. 

Had attended Foxcroft Academy and taught thirteen weeks before 
coming to Farmington. Since graduation has taught over 130 weeks, 
in Dover, Me., and Anoka, Minn. Is now teaching in the first primary 
grade in Anoka. 

Anoka, Minn. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 143 

Cora A. Jackson, Lisbon, Me. 

Taught 32 weeks before graduation ; since then has taught about 140 
weeks, in the Lisbon Grammar School, and in the Farmington primary 
grade, where she is now teaching. 

Lisbon, Me. 

Affie E. Luce, New Vineyard, Me. 

Taught 46 weeks before graduation. Married, Dec. 25, 1884, Henry 
J. Bogardus, M. D., of New York City, and has two children : Rollins, 
born Dec. 8, 1885 ; Florence E., born Oct. 8, 1888. 

25 Crescent Avenue, Jersey City Heights, N. J. 

Alexander P. McDonald, Bath, Me. 

Has taught 24 weeks, — one term in Phipsburg, and one term on 
Outer Long Island. Graduated from the Coburn Classical Institute, 
Waterville, in 1887. Is now a student in Bowdoin College, Class of 
1 89 1, and intends to enter the ministry. Has already begun preaching 
where he has taught. 

Bath, Me. 

Addie F. McLain, Farmington Falls, Me. 

Taught thirty weeks before she graduated, and since that time has 
taught 93 weeks, — in the primary grade in Boothbay, Cooper's Mills 
and Vinal Haven, and ungraded schools in Manchester, Chesterville and 
Farmington. Is taking the Chautauqua Course. 

Farmington Falls, Me. 

Mary S. Morrill, Deering, Me. 

Had graduated from the Deering High School and taught one term 
before coming to Farmington. Since graduation has taught 134 weeks, — 
nine weeks in the Pittston Grammar School, ten weeks in an ungraded 
school in Phipsburg, 33 weeks in the intermediate grade in Saccarappa, 
and 82 weeks in the primary grade in Deering. Graduated from the 
Chautauqua Course in 1888. Has reviewed her high school studies, and 
had private pupils in some of them. Has recently sailed as a mission- 
ary to North China under an appointment by the American Board of 
Foreign Missions. Letters sent to her home address will be forwarded 
to her, and the Principal takes the hberty to add, that he hopes she will 
be often remembered. She writes that she is anticipating much happi- 
ness in her chosen work. She is to be gone ten years. 

Deering, Me. 




144 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

James S. Norton, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught io8 weeks, — ungraded schools in Linneus, Oakfield, 
Farmington and Leeds, in the Farmington Grammar School one term, 
free high schools in Leeds, and is now Principal of the High and Gram- 
mar School, Vanceboro. Graduated from the Advanced Course in 
1887. 

Farmington, Me. 

L. Blanche Nutter, Dexter, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Dexter High School and had taught one term 
before she entered the Normal. Since her graduation she has taught 
141 weeks, — in ungraded schools in Readfield 82 weeks, as Principal 
of the Randolph Grammar School 26 weeks, as Principal of the Dover 
High and Grammar School nine weeks, and as Principal of the Mechanic 
Falls Grammar School, where she is now teaching, 36 weeks. Has 
taken two terms in Oil Painting at Kent's Hill. 

Dexter, Me. 

Arthur B. Paiten, Bowdoinham, Me. 

Taught 36 weeks during his Normal course ; since then, has taught 
fifty weeks, — one year, 1884-5, >" Mitchell's Boys' School, Billerica, 
Mass., and twelve weeks in an evening school in Waterville. Graduated 
from the Coburn Classical Institute in 1886. Is a member of Colby 
University, Class of 1890. Attended Moody's Summer School at North- 
field, Mass., in 1888, and is a member of the Executive Committee of 
the Foreign Mission Volunteer Association of Maine. Will enter the 
ministry, and has preached during vacations in Bowdoinham, Olamon 
and Monmouth. 

Waterville, or Bowdoinham, Me. 

Mary C. Perkins, New Sharon, Me. 

Taught one term before graduation ; since then, 67 weeks, in New 
Sharon, Farmington and Industry. Married, Sept. 21, 1887, Mr. B. 
Corydon Bailey, a farmer of New Sharon, and has one child, Charles H., 
born Aug. 3, 1888. 

New Sharon, Me. 

Maggie A. Springstead, Tomkin's Cove, N. Y. 

Has I ;t Light 220 weeks, all in the Grammar School at Tomkin's Cove 
in tht: tuwn of Stony Point, N. Y. Has graduated from the Chautauqua 
Coiiriie. 

Tomkin's Cove, N. Y. 




SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. I45 

Ella F. Titcomb, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught two terms, in New Sharon and Hollis. 
Farmington, Me. 

Eugene L. Torrey, Dixfield, Me. 

Has taught 60 weeks, — two terms of free high school in Weld, one 
year in the " Little Blue " school at Farmington, and one term ungraded 
school in Carthage. While in the " Little Blue," took a part of the work 
in the Advanced Course in the Normal. In the fall and winter of 1886, 
studied Latin, Greek and German in the Phillips Classical Institute, and 
in the following spring had private instruction in the higher Mathematics 
and the Languages. Entered the Senior Class of Hebron Academy in 
the fall of 1887, and was graduated from the College Preparatory Course, 
June 26, 1888. Was Editor-in-Chief of the Semester, the school publi- 
cation, and won the Bonney first prize in the Extemporaneous Prize 
Debate. 

Dixfield, Me. 

Carrie P. White, Boothbay, Me. 

Has not taught. Married, Oct. 3, 1888, Ernest A. Johnson of 
Boothbay. 

9 Linden Street, Bath, Me. 

Mary D. White, Arrowsic, Me. 

Taught one term before graduation ; since then, fifty weeks, in Phips- 
burg, Arrowsic and East Dixfield. Is now teaching in the Grammar 
School, Upton, Mass. 

Arrowsic, Me. 

Frank C. Worthley, Strong, Me. 

Before graduating he had taught 70 weeks ; since then, has taught 
twenty weeks, — as an assistant in Wilton Academy one term, one term 
in Phillips, and the High School, Greenfield, N. H., one term. Took 
part of the work in the Advanced Course one term. Is now at work on 
the farm at home. 

Strong, Me. 

Elwood T. Wyman, West Sidney, Me. 

Taught one term before entering the Normal ; since then, 90 weeks, — 
two years in a mixed school, and eleven weeks in an evening school in 
Waterville, and one term in an ungraded school in Belgrade. Gradu- 

19 



146 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

ated from the Coburn Classical Institute in 1886, and is an under- 
graduate in Colby University, Class of 1890. Is Supervisor of Schools 
in Sidney, and one of the editors of the Colby Oracle. Has done 
considerable work as reporter for the Kennebec Journal. 
Waterville, or West Sidney, Me. 



CLASS OF i88s- 

Thirty.first Class. — Graduated June 11, 1885. 

Martha P. Adams, East Deering, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Deering High School and taught twenty weeks 
before graduation. After that, taught six weeks in the Deering High 
School, when her health failed, and she was obliged to resign. She was 
an excellent scholar and admirably fitted to teach, and, could she have 
lived, would have been very successful. Her death occurred Sept. 22, 
1887. 

Nora M. Beedy, Farmington, Me. 

Taught 23 weeks, — one term ungraded school and one term in the 
primary school in Farmington, and one term in the primary grade in 
Camden. Was a clerk for a short time in the winter of 1886-7, and 
was engaged to teach in the primary grade in Farmington for the year 
1887-8, but resigned on account of her health, and went to Minneapolis, 
where she died April 8, 1888. She was singularly winning, and a great 
favorite with all with whom she came in contact, especially with children. 
Her great ambition was to be a successful primary teacher, for which 
she had many qualifications. 

From the columns of the Farmington Chronicle we take the follow- 
ing tribute : 

It is fitting that more than a passing notice should be given to the death of one 
who had so large a place in the heart of her friends. It is not quite three years since 
Nora graduated from the Normal School and, selected by her class, delivered the val- 
edictory essay. She was always pleasant and cheerful, doing her work faithfully and 
honestly, and always earnest to improve every opportunity. Her sunny and lovable 
nature won the love of all her teachers and schoolmates. In the next triennial cata- 
logue the first three names of the Class of '85 will have the " fatal asterisk," three 
who were warm friends here, for a little while separated, now united. With them, 
indeed, " Death is the crown of life." The subject of Nora's valedictory was, "Gude 
nicht and joy be wi' you a'." It seems prophetic now, and I doubt not the last 
thought she had of her classmates was " good night " — " good night" to them, while 
she heard from angel voices a glad " good morning" — " and joy be with you all." 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 147 

Carrie B. Coffin, Harrington, Me. 

During the last part of her second year in school, her health failed 
rapidly, yet such was her strength of purpose and mental vigor that she 
graduated with her class, in many respects the finest scholar in it. If her 
life had been spared, she could not have failed to be a brilliant teacher. 
But it was not to be. After a short sickness, borne in all sweetness and 
serenity, she exchanged one home for another, Jan. 23, 1886. The 
following tribute from the pen of an appreciative friend and Miss May's 
poem are taken from the columns of the Farmington Chronicle : 

Though many of us felt, when our pupil and friend graduated last June, that, 
though with us, she was not of us, still we hoped that one so well fitted for life in 
every way might be spared to the world and her friends for many years, and the 
news that she had passed to the higher life brought to us all a sense of loss and 
deep sorrow. As a pupil her work was always faithfully, thoroughly, and honestly 
done. To an intellect remarkably clear and acute, she added a character of singular 
purity and sweetness. She seemed never to have had a selfish or an unkind thought. 
In its goodness and purity her life was a lofty ideal, a Christian ideal. For her, we 
may be sure, the coming of the " guest divine " who took her from her home, — " two 
angels coming out where but one went in," — was but an incident of life, a summons 
to a brighter chamber of her King. To her it was but a change in life^ but to us, 
" God's finger touched her and she slept." It was a beautiful conceit of the Greeks to 
speak of the departed as " those who have been weary." How true of our departed 
friend ! And equally true is the Christian sentiment, " He giveth his beloved sleep." 

GOD KNOWS WHY. 

IN MEMORIAM. 

My darling ! On the flash of lightning sped 
The news too quickly, " She you love is dead." 
I hastened homeward as if you were there; 
Only the lovely robe you used to wear, 
Only a pure white form that held no more 
Your blessed spirit, lay inside the door; 
Only an angel face whose close shut eyes 
Moved not but seemed to look beyond the skies. 
Darling ! I cried, oh wherefore must you die? 
A whisper seemed to answer, " God knows why." 

Yes, God knows why, but to my feeble sight 

' Tis deepest darkness with no glimpse of light. 

I miss you so, at morning, noon and eve. 

And cannot think 'tis wrong for me to grieve; 

I miss you, and I want you every hour. 

The song has lost its sweetness and the flower 

Has lost its fragrance, and the evening prayer 

Unanswered falls upon the pulseless air, 

Because you join not, and I vainly try 

To stop my tears, and whisper, " God knows why." 



148 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

He knows, and sometime /shall sorely know 
The reason why; and yet the teardrops flow 
Unbidden, as your tenderness I miss, 
And long, my darling, for your vanished kiss. 
He knows, and sometime / shall plainly hear 
The blessed reason echoing in my ear. 
Perhaps some danger lay along your road. 
Some fearful trouble or some heavy load 
For you to bear, and so, my dear, I'll try 
To murmur, " It is best, for God knows why." 

— Julia H. May. 

Elizabeth N. Coffin, Harrington, Me. 

Has taught about 120 weeks, — in East Livermore, Harrington and 
Beddington 37 weeks, and is teaching her second year in the Shurtleff 
Grammar School, Revere, Mass., and for the present year has been 
Principal. Is taking the Chautauqua Course. 

36 Crest Avenue, Beachraont, Mass. 

Maude L. Cuits, Pittston, Me. 

Has taught 59 weeks, ungraded schools in East Pittston, South Pitts- 
ton and West Gardiner. 

Randolph, Me. 

Frank Linton Davis, Belfast, Me. 

A graduate of the Belfast High School. Has taught 134 weeks, all 
in the city of Belfast as assistant in the intermediate grade. Since grad- 
uation has taken lessons for three years in voice culture, one year in 
theory and harmony, and three months in French. 

Belfast, Me. 

Nettie G. Dolley, Weld, Me. 

Had nearly completed the course at Wilton Academy, and had 
taught III weeks before entering the Normal. Since graduation, has 
taught 58 weeks, — in ungraded schools in East Livermore and Fal- 
mouth, and the East Wilton Grammar School for 33 weeks. Has given 
up teaching for the present, but will resume it again when she is strong- 
er, and for the present is a dressmaker. 

Falmouth, Me. 

Martha J. Dunton, Westport, Me. 

Taught twenty-one weeks before graduation ; since then, 103 weeks, 
in Southbridge, Mass., two terms in primary grade, in the Strong Gram- 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 149 

mar School one term, and ungraded schools in Boothbay and Westport 
the remaining time. Has taken a part of the Advanced Course. 
Westport, Me. 

Mary E. Eaton, Wilton, Me. ^ 

When she entered the Normal she was already a graduate of Wilton 
Academy in the College Preparatory Course, and had taught 38 weeks. 
Since graduating, she has taught 56 weeks, — in North Berwick, New 
Sharon as an assistant in the High School, in the primary grade in Bart- 
lett, N. H., one term, the same grade in Wilton two terms, and has just 
closed a term at Westport. Graduated from the Advanced Course in 
1887, ^^d was a special teacher in the School the spring term of that 
year, and graduates from the Chautauqua Course the present year, 1889. 
Has also studied French with private teachers. 

Wilton, Me. 

Lew. M. Felch, Linneus, Me. 

Had attended Houlton Academy and Lewiston High School several 
terms, and taught 36 weeks, before entering the Normal. During his 
course he taught thirty weeks ; since graduation, 128 weeks. During 
the year 1885-6 was an assistant at the "Little Blue" school, and did 
quite a part of the work in the Advanced Course in the Normal. Has 
also taken Greek and Latin with private teachers. In the fall of 1886, 
was elected assistant in the High School, Riverton, Nebr. At the end of 
the year he was elected Principal of that school, and holds the position 
at the present time. Married, June 20, 1885, his classmate, Augusta B. 
Holley, and has two children : Pansy May, born Oct. 2, 1886 ; Ermina 
Ray, born Sept. 30, 1888. 

Riverton, Nebr. 

Alice H. Hodgkins, North Chesterville, Me. 

Had taught 44 weeks previous to graduation ; 76, since that time. 
She has taught in Carthage, Fayette, Mt. Vernon, Belgrade, New Sharon, 
Farmington, Chesterville, Camden and Solon, all ungraded schools ex- 
cept in the two places last named, which were grammar schools. 

North Chesterville, Me. 

Augusta B. Holley, Farmington, Me. 

Had attended the May School before coming to the Normal, and 
taught eight weeks before graduating, and 71, since, — in East Wilton, 
Farmington, and in Riverton, Nebr., where she was an assistant in the 



150 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

High School for a short time supplying a vacancy, and for one year 
taught the Grammar School. Married, June 20, 1885, her classmate, 
Lew. M. Felch, and has two children. (See above). 
Riverton, Nebr. 

Neva Lane, Auburn, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Edward Little High School, and had taught 
112 weeks, when she entered the Normal. Since graduation has taught 
over three years, — one and a half years in the primary grade in Auburn, 
and nearly two years in a Kindergarten school in Pendleton, Oregon. 
Has studied Elocution, Latin and German, and has taught Elocution 
in Oregon. 

Pendleton, Oreg. 

Stella E. Lane, Lewiston, Me. 

Taught part of a term, but owing to illness was obliged to resign. 
Married, July 6, 1886, Fred A. Sidelinger of Lewiston. 

Pittsfield, Me. 

Lillian L Lincoln, Brunswick, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Brunswick High School from the Classical 
Course, and also had prepared for college by a post-graduate course in 
the same school, before entering the Normal. Had also taught 54 weeks, 
a part of that time as assistant in the Mechanic Falls High School, 
and during her course taught one term as Preceptress of Wilton Acad- 
emy. Immediately upon graduation was elected an assistant in the 
Normal, where she has been teaching continuously since. Has taken 
courses in Drawing and Latin. 

Farmington, or Brunswick, Me. 

Ii>A M. LuFKiN, Lewiston, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Lewiston High School before entering the 
Normal, and taught 60 weeks before entering and during her course. 
Since graduation, has taught 112 weeks in the rural schools of Auburn 
and Lewiston. Is now taking a course in the Lewiston Normal Practice 
School. 

37 Franklin Street, Lewiston, Me. 

Josephine Pearsi^n. Fairfield, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Fairfield High School before coming to Farm- 
ington. Since graduation has taught over 100 weeks in one school — 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 151 

the advanced primary grade in Fairfield. Married, July 6, 1889, Mr. 
Elmer E. Knowles of Fairfield. 
Fairfield, Me. 

H. Arthur Sanders, Livermore, Me. 

Has taught one term in East Livermore. Took part of the Advanced 
Course. Fitted for college at the Cobum Classical Institute, and is now 
an undergraduate in the University of Michigan, Class of 1890. 

Livermore, Me., or Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Edhh J. Stanley, Pittston, Me. 

Taught two and one-half years, in Pittston, Newcastle and Gardiner. 
Is now a book-keeper in the office of J. W. Ingalls & Son, shoe manu- 
facturers of Lynn, Mass. 

76 Johnson Street, Lynn, Mass. 

Annie M. Stevens, Farmington, Me. 

Taught two years in the primary grade in Farmington. Was obliged 
to resign on account of her health. Since 1887, has lived in Exeter, N. 
H. Has taken two years' work in the Chautauqua Course, and is a 
member of the Chautauqua Society of Fine Arts. At the present time, 
has a class in English Literature. 

Exeter, N. H. 

Alice C. Swifi', New Vineyard, Me. 

Had attended the May School several terms before entering the 
Normal, and had taught 58 weeks at the time of graduation. Since 
then has taught 99 weeks, in ungraded schools in New Vineyard and 
Freeman, the Grammar School in Strong, primary grade in Wilton, 
and Bartlett, N. H., where she is now teaching. Is taking the Chautau- 
qua Course. 

New Vineyard, Me. 

Joseph S. Titcomb, Farmington, Me. 

Taught a few weeks in Freeman in the fall of 1885. Was a clerk in 
a store in Bangor for some time after that. For nearly two years was 
an invalid and died July 18, 1889. Of a fine, manly character, and 
energetic disposition, he gave promise of a very useful life. He won 
the respect of people wherever he went, and the fullest confidence of 
his friends. 



152 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Lydia p. Wait, Canton, Me. 

Before graduation, had taught 100 weeks ; since then, has taught 59 
weeks, in Canton, Hartford, Dixfield and Temple. Married, April 10, 
1889, Rev. Franklin Blake of Lx)udon Centre, N. H. 

Loudon Centre, N. H. 

Mary Westall, Lewiston, Me. 

Had taught one term before graduating; since then, 122 weeks, in 
Auburn and Lewiston. Is now one of the teachers in the Lewiston 
Grammar School. Has taken nearly half of the Advanced Course. 

44 Spring Street, Lewiston, Me. 

Carrie A. Whhtier, Farmington Falls, Me. 

Has taught 92 weeks, in Farmington, North Monmouth and New 
Gloucester, and is now teaching the intermediate grade in Farmington. 
Graduated from the Advanced Course in 1887. 

Farmington Falls, Me. 

Susie L. Willeit, Woolwich, Me. 

Had taught 28 weeks before graduation ; since then, has taught 124 
weeks, in Boothbay, Arrowsic, Woolwich and Westport. Has recently 
moved to Massachusetts. 

East Pepperell, Mass. 



CLASS OF 1886, 
Thirty-second Class. — Graduated June 10, 1886. 

Elmie J. Briggs, Dexter, Me. 

Before entering the Normal had graduated from the Dexter High 
School, and taught before and during her course, 150 weeks. Since 
graduation, has taught eighty weeks, in Oakland as Principal of the 
Grammar School, one year in the intermediate grade in Dexter, and 
both primary and high school grades in Sangerville, where she is now 
teaching. 

Dexter, Me. 

Mary E. Briggs, North Auburn, Me. 

Graduated from the F^dward Little High School, Auburn. Has 
taught three terms in her native town since graduating from the Normal. 

North Auburn, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 153 

Ernest L. Couillard, Farmington, Me. 

Soon after graduating obtained a position in the office of the Fitch- 
burg Railroad Co., and, after a short time, entered the drug store of 
F. C. Goodale, 113 Central Street, Lowell, Mass., where he is learning 
the business. Has taken one course of lectures in the National Institute 
of Pharmacy. 

113 Central Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Alice R. Cummings, Dexter, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Dexter High School, and taught 59 weeks 
before she graduated from the Normal. She was a fine scholar, had 
been successful in her work, and gave promise of a very useful life, but, 
after a brief illness, died Feb. 2, 1888. 

Jennie M. Cutts, Farmington, Me. 

Had spent several terms in the Farmington High School before en- 
tering the Normal. Since graduating, has taught three terms, — in 
Kingfield as Principal of the Grammar School, and in Dover in the fall 
of 1888 and spring of 1889, as Principal of the High and Grammar 
School. Graduated from the Advanced Course in 1887, and is taking 
the Chautauqua Course. 

Farmington, Me. 

Carrie M. Douglass, Gardiner, Me. 

Had taught 56 weeks before entering the Normal; has taught 92 
since, in Lisbon, Farmingdale, and in the Farmington intermediate 
grade. Is now teaching in the Industrial School, Lancaster, Mass. 

Gardiner, Me., or Lancaster, Mass. 

Grace L. Douglass, Gardiner, Me. 

Has taught 90 weeks, in Phipsburg, Farmington intermediate grade, 
and Lisbon Falls primary and intermediate grade. 

Gardiner, Me. 

Flora L. Duley, Stark, Me. 

Had attended the Farmington High School, and taught one term 
before entering the Normal, one term during the course, and 100 weeks 
since graduation, in Industry three terms and Boothbay five terms in the 
primary grade. Married, Dec. 25, 1888, Arthur E. Nickerson, a mer- 
chant of Boothbay. 

Boothbay, Me. 



154 FAKMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Nellie C. Duley, Stark, Me. 

Had attended the Farmington High School, and taught 24 weeks 
before entering the Normal, fifteen weeks during her course ; since 
then, has taught 94 weeks, in Vinal Haven one term. Mechanic Falls 
primary grade one term, the Boothbay Grammar School two terms, one 
year at South Framinghara, Mass., in the second intermediate grade, 
and is now teaching in Cambridge, Mass. 

Stark, Me., or Cambridge, Mass. 

Annie M. Fellows, Farmington, Me. 

Taught one term before entering the Normal. Since graduation, has 
taught 100 weeks, — 92 weeks in New Vineyard, Matinicus, Fayette 
and Farmington, eight weeks in the Industrial School, Lancaster, Mass., 
where she is now teaching. 

Farmington, Me., or Lancaster, Mass. 

Sadie A. Ford, East Livermore, Me. 

Has taught 61 weeks in Farmington, East Livermore, North Wayne 
and at West Farmington. 

East Livermore, Me. 

Carrie S. Foss, North Leeds, Me. 

Had attended the Seminary at Kent's Hill several terms before enter- 
ing the Normal, and had taught 52 weeks. Since graduation has taught 
about 75 weeks, — one term of fourteen weeks high school in Wayne, 
twenty-eight weeks in ungraded schools in Leeds, and the remaining 
time in Stockton, Cal., as an assistant in the Grammar School where she 
is now teaching. Has completed the supplementary course of the Cal- 
ifornia State Reading Circle. 

288 Hunter Street, Stockton, Cal. 

Guy G. Furnel, Wilton, Me. 

Was a graduate of Wilton Academy in the English Course, and had 
taught 26 weeks when he came to Farmington. Taught thirteen weeks 
during his course. The year immediately following graduation was 
spent in teaching and studying in South Berwick Academy, the next year 
taking work in the Advanced Course at the Normal and receiving private 
instruction. During the past year, 1888-9, ^^ ^^^ completed prepara- 
tion for college at the Academy, St. Johnsbury, Vt., and will enter col- 
lege the coming autumn. Spent his vacations canvassing. 

Wilton, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES, 155 

Pauline L. Gould, Madrid, Me. 

Has taught 236 weeks, — 192 before entering the Normal, 20 during 
her course and 24 since. Married, March i, 1887, Emery W. Rogers, 
a farmer of Belgrade, and has one child, Owen Leo, born March 10, 
1888. 

Belgrade, Me. 

Blanche M. Harrington, Bath, Me. 

Had spent two years in the Bath High School before coming to 
Farmington. Since graduation, has taught 83 weeks, in New Vineyard, 
HoUis, and the two years just passed in the primary grade in Farmington. 
Has taken lessons in Elocution and is taking the Chautauqua Course. 

Bath, Me. 

Vina F. Hussey, North Vassalboro, Me. 

Had attended the Seminary at Kent's Hill and taught 1 70 weeks 
before entering the Normal. Since graduation, has taught 102 weeks, — 
five terms in the intermediate grade at Mechanic Falls, and since then 
in the Hunnewell Grammar School, Wellesley, Mass., where she is now 
teaching and is Principal of the schools in the building. 

Natick, Mass. 

Ella J. Longfellow, Lambert Lake, Me. 

Taught one term during her course, and since her graduation has 
taught 104 weeks, — in Easton ungraded and free high schools, in Houl- 
ton ungraded school, in Danforth in the primary grade, and is now 
Principal of the Training School in the recently established Normal 
Department of the Ricker Classical Institute at Houlton. Is taking the 
Chautauqua Course and lessons on the. piano. 

Houlton, or Lambert Lake, Me. 

LiLLUN S. Mallett, Topsham, Me. 

Taught 30 weeks before entering the Normal, 20 weeks during her 
course, and 80 since graduation, in Phipsburg, Five Islands, New 
Gloucester and Georgetown. 

Topsham, Me. 

WiLBERT G. Malleti', Topsham, Me. 

Had attended Topsham High School two or three terms before 
entering the Normal. Taught one term during his course, and 22 weeks 
since graduation, in Topsham and Georgetown. Spent the year follow- 



156 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

ing graduation in the Brunswick High School, where he completed his 
preparation for college, graduating in June, 1887. Entered Bowdoin 
College the following September and is a member of the Class of 
1891. 

Topsham, Me. 

Adelaide M. Merchant, Gardiner, Me. 

Graduated from the Gardiner High School before entering the 
Normal. Has taught nearly 100 weeks, ungraded schools three terms 
in Gardiner and West Gardiner, and the remaining time as an assistant 
in the Randolph Grammar School, where she is now teaching. 

Gardiner, Me. 

Elizabeth D. Moore, Monroe, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Belfast High School, and had taught fifteen 
weeks when she entered the Normal. Taught ten weeks during her 
course, and %?> since graduating, — in Winterport primary grade, in 
Brooks and Hampden. Is taking the Chautauqua Course. 

Monroe, Me. 

Alice S. Patten, Topsham, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Topsham High School when she entered 
the Normal. Taught before and during her course, 69 weeks. Since 
graduating she has taught nearly 70 weeks, in Harpswell ungraded 
schools, Cumberland two terms grammar grade, and since the fall 
of 1888 in the Normal Department of Talladega College, Talladega, 
Ala. 

Talladega, Ala., or Topsham, Me. 

Georgia F. Peva, Vanceboro, Me. 

Has taught 72 weeks, at Lambert Lake in ungraded schools, in Dan- 
forth and Vanceboro in the primary grade. Married, June 3, 1889, Mr. 
Harry S. Holbrook, a merchant of Vanceboro. 

Vanceboro, Me. 

Carrie S. Russell, New Sharon, Me. 

Taught one term during her course. Since graduation, has taught 
about 100 weeks in Perham and Phillips, and in Athol, Princeton and 
Wakefield, Mass. Is now Principal of the Grammar School in the latter 
place. 

New Sharon, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 157 

Frank E. Russell, Phillips, Me. 

Taught 2 2 weeks before entering the Normal, twelve during his 
course, and 82 since, in Phillips, Southport, Easton, Wilton, Oakland and 
Calais. At Wilton, he taught in the Academy, where he completed his 
preparation for college, graduating in the summer of 1888, and entered 
Colby University the following autumn, a member of the Class of 1892. 
Taught during the winter vacation a district school in Oakland, and is 
now teaching as Principal of the Calais Grammar School. 

Waterville, or Phillips, Me. 

Nettie M. Sewall, North Chesterville, Me. 

Had graduated from the Farmington High School before entering 
the Normal. Has taught 38 weeks, in Farmington and Chesterville, and 
taken a part of the Advanced Course. 

North Chesterville, Me. 

Philip E. Stanley, Phillips, Me. 

Taught eighteen weeks before and during his course. Since gradu- 
ation, has taught 94 weeks, — ungraded schools in Phillips and Madrid, 
as assistant in Anson Academy in the spring of 1887, Principal of a 
grammar school. Westerly, R. I., and teacher in an evening school in 
1887-8, and an assistant in Fryeburg Academy in 1888-9, where he 
completed his preparation for college. 

Phillips, Me. 

Carrie I. Sullivan, Skowhegan, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Skowhegan High School, and had taught 84 
weeks before coming to Farmington. Since graduation, has taught 64 
weeks, in Skowhegan and Richmond. Married, Dec. 25, 1888, George 
H. Boardman, an insurance agent of Skowhegan. 

Skowhegan, Me. 

Julia W. Swift, New Vineyard, Me. 

Had attended the May School in Farmington several terms before 
entering upon the Normal course, and had taught 58 weeks before its 
completion. During the next year she took the Advanced Course 
and did special primary work. Immediately upon her graduation was 
elected Principal of the Model School in the Normal, where she is now 
teaching. 

Farmington, or New Vineyard, Me. 



158 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Charlene a. Whitney, Presque Isle, Me. 

Taught 150 weeks before entering the Normal, forty during the 
course, and 117 since graduating, in the village of Rock Bottom, Mass., 
one year in grammar grade, and is now completing her third year as 
Principal of the Grammar School, Wallingford, Conn. Has taken a 
course in English Literature. 

Presque Isle, Me., or Wallingford, Conn. 

George H. Winter, Kingfield, Me. 

Has been a merchant since graduation. Was Superintendent of the 
S. S. in 1887-9 ^^^ is serving a second term as Supervisor of Schools. 

Kingfield, Me. 



CLASS OF 1887. 
Thirty-third Class. — Graduated June 16, 1887. 
Emma J. Allen, East Dixfield, Me. 

Had attended Wilton Academy several terms before entering the 
Normal. Taught before and during her course seventeen weeks. Since 
graduating has taught 27 weeks in Monmouth. Is taking the third year 
in the C. T. R. U. course. 
East Dixfield, Me. 

Burt Andrews, Augusta, Me. 

Had spent three years in the Augusta High School before coming to 
Farmington. Has taught thirty weeks as Principal of the Manchester 
High School. Entered the Maine Medical School in February, 1889, 
but owing to a serious difficulty with his eyes, which at one time threat- 
ened total blindness, was obliged to relinquish his course after a few 
weeks. His eyes are much better, and he will resume his studies, teach- 
ing falls and winters. 

26 Oak Street, Augusta, Me. 

Abner a. Badger, Rangeley, Me. 

Taught 31 weeks before entering the Normal, and twelve weeks dur- 
ing the course. Graduated from the Advanced Course in June, 1888. 
Since then, has taught 33 weeks, — a free high school in Swanville, a 
grammar school in Whitneyville, and a free high school in Linneus. Is 
now studying Greek and Latin, intending to enter college. 

Farmington, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 159 

Addie Bartleit, East Dixfield, Me. 

Had nearly completed the course at Wilton Academy and had taught 
37 weeks before coming to Farmington. Taught eleven weeks during 
her course, and 58 weeks since, in Monmouth, Matinicus, the Mechanic 
Falls Grammar School, and Canton. 

East Dixfield, Me. 

RissiA R. Beals, North Turner Bridge, Me. 

Taught before and during her Normal course, 46 weeks. Since 
graduation, has taught the same number of weeks, in Monmouth, Tur- 
ner and Andover. Is taking the Chautauqua Course. 

North Turner Bridge, Me. 

Fanny S. Belcher, Farmington, Me. 

Had attended the Farmington High School before entering the Nor- 
mal. Completed the Regular and Advanced Courses at the same time. 
Spent the following year in the study of French, German and Music, 
taking lessons (piano) in Portland. During the past year, has completed 
her preparation for college, passed her examination and been admitted 
as a member of the Class of 1893, Vassar College, and will begin her 
work there in September. 

Farmington, Me. 

Alice M. Bishop, North Monmouth, Me. 

Had attended the Seminary at Kent's Hill two or more terms, and 
had taught 42 weeks before taking the Normal course. Since gradu- 
ation, has taught the same number of weeks, in the towns of Greene and 
Monmouth. 

North Monmouth, Me. 

Minnie J. Bishop, Strickland's Ferry, Me. 

Taught 24 weeks before entering the Normal, and 26 during the 
course. Since graduating, has taught 22 weeks in East Livermore. 

Strickland's Ferry, Me. 

Mamie V. Brackett, Auburn, Me. 

Had completed half of the course in the Edward Little High School 
before entering the Normal. Since graduating, has taught 72 weeks, — 
one year in the rural schools in Auburn, and one year in the primary 
grade in the city. Is taking the Chautauqua Teachers' Reading Union 
course, and has taken lessons in Painting. 

76 Goff Street, Auburn, Me. 



l6o FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Frank W. Butler, Phillips, Me. 

Taught twenty weeks before entering the Normal and sixteen during 
his course. Since graduating, has taught 32 weeks, — two terms of free 
high school and one term of grammar school in Linneus. For the past 
year has been studying law at Phillips, and taken extra work in Latin 
and Literature. Is a Justice of the Peace. 

Phillips, Me. 

Fannie J. Carr, Bowdoin Centre, Me. 

Taught 41 weeks before entering the Normal and eighteen during 
the course. Since graduating, has taught fifty weeks, in Phipsburg, 
Bowdoinham and Bowdoin. 

Bowdoin Centre, Me. 

LiLLiE A. Carr, Bowdoin Centre, Me. 

Taught 168 weeks before coming to Farmington. Since graduating, 
has taught sixty weeks, all in Bowdoinham, and, with the exception of 
one term, in the primary grade. 

Bowdoin Centre, Me. 

Mabel A. Crowell, Temple, Me. 

Taught eight weeks before entering the Normal and 32 during her 
course. Since her graduation, she has taught fifty weeks, in Chesterville, 
Wilton, New Sharon and Madrid. 

Temple, Me. 

Liluan F. Ellis, Canton Point, Me. 

Had attended Wilton Academy, and taught 1 20 weeks before coming 
to the Normal. Taught fifteen weeks during her course, and has taught 
nearly forty since graduating, in Jay and Canton. Is Supervisor of 
Schools in Canton. 

Canton Point, Me. 

Myrtie P. Foi-sc^M, Chester\ille, Me. 

Taught eighteen weeks l>efore she entered the Normal, the same 
numlx^r during the course, and also the same number since graduating. 
Her health Ivgan to fail in the early part of 1S8S. and she died Sept. 
20. of that year. She was earnest and faithful in her work, a good 
scholar, and successful in her pn^fession. 

F.MUY W, (..oiAviN, Rumtorvl. Me, 

Tauiihl 40 wooks before and 37 weeks during the course. Since 
^raduaiiuii. has tauiihi alxnit eighty weeks, — in Caribou in an ungraded 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. i6i 

school one term and assistant in the High School one term, the Grammar 
School in Presque Isle and also in Fort Fairfield, and ungraded schools 
in Rumford. Is a member of a Reading Circle. 
Rum ford, Me. 

Alice M. Haley, Fort Fairfield, Me. 

Had taken one term at Castine, and taught 76 weeks before coming 
to Farmington. Taught 34 weeks during her course. Since graduation 
has taught nearly or quite 75 weeks, — in Fort Fairfield primary and in- 
termediate grade, and also in ungraded schools, and in the Pittsfield 
Grammar School. Has entered upon the Classical Course at the Maine 
Central Institute. 

Fort Fairfield, Me. 

Henrietta H. Johnston, Winthrop Centre, Me. 

Had taken a year at the Friends' School, Providence, R. I., and one 
or two terms at the Seminary at Kent's Hill before entering the Normal. 
Has taught since graduating, 26 weeks, in Winthrop and Manchester. 
Is now caring for her parents. She writes, " When the duty and privi- 
lege of taking care of father and mother are ended, I have been engaged 
by a church committee on foreign missionary work to go, if nothing 
prevents, as a missionary and teacher of young children, to Ram Allah, 
Palestine." 

Plattekill, N. Y. 

Lillian V. Kennison, Temple, Me. 

Taught fourteen weeks before, and 2 7 during her course. Has taught 
twenty weeks since graduating, all in Temple. 

Temple, Me. 

Etta F. Kimball, Harrison, Me. 

Had attended North Bridgton Academy and taught twelve weeks 
before coming to Farmington. Taught 36 weeks during her course, and 
40 since graduating. Is taking a rest on account of ill health, but 
will resume teaching as soon as she is able. 

20 Wachusett Street, Worcester, Mass., or Harrison, Me. 

Frank W. Lombard, East Wilton, Me. 

Graduated from Wilton Academy and taught one term of school 
before graduating from the Normal. Since then, has taught the I)am- 
ariscotta Grammar School 24 weeks. Is now in an architect's office in 



i62 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Boston, and zealously taking a course of study to fit him for his pro- 
fession. 

East Wilton, Me., or 1 78 Devonshire Street, Boston, Mass. 

Katie M. Lynch, Lewiston, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Lewiston High School before entering the 
Normal, and taught 64 weeks before graduating. Since then, has taught 
76 weeks, all in the intermediate grade in Lewiston. 

1 75 Oak Street, Lewiston, Me. 

Lewis J. Norton, Farmington, Me. 

Had attended the Seminary at Kent's Hill, and taught 22 weeks be- 
fore entering the Normal. Since graduating, he has taught one term, 
and graduated from the College Preparatory Course at Kent's Hill, and 
will enter Wesleyan University the coming autumn. 

Farmington, Me. 

Fred C. Nottage, Farmington, Me. 

Taught one term before graduation, and two since that time. Grad- 
uated from the Advanced Course, June 13, 1889. 

Farmington, Me. 

Henry J. Page, Belgrade, Me. 

Had graduated from the Dirigo Business College in Augusta and 
taught fourteen weeks before he entered the Normal. Taught twelve 
weeks during his course, and 32 weeks since in his own town, where he 
is now Supervisor of Schools. Has studied Latin since graduating. 

Belgrade, Me. 

Mary E. Porter, Strong, Me. 

Graduated from the May School before entering the Normal. Since 
graduating, has taught 34 weeks, all in her native village in the primary 
and grammar grades. Has taken lessons in Music and French. 

Strong, Me. 

M. Etta Reed, Richmond, Me. 

Graduated from the Richmond High School before coming to 
Farmington. Taught one term during the course. Has taught 48 
weeks since graduation, all in Richmond. Is now a book-keeper and 
cashier. 

Richmond, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 163 

Minnie L. Rice, Livermore Centre, Me. 

Taught one term before coming to the Normal, and one term during 
the course. Since graduating, has taught 37 weeks, in Carthage, Matin- 
icus and Livermore. Has taken music lessons in Portland and studied 
French. 

Livermore Centre, Me. 

Myrtie G. Robbins, Fort Fairfield, Me. 

Had attended the Fort Fairfield High School before entering the 
Normal. Since graduating, has attended the same school one term, tak- 
ing up French and Latin. Has taught 58 weeks, in Fort Fairfield two 
terms of ungraded school, the remaining time in Houlton, where she is 
Principal of a primary school with more than 100 scholars. 

Fort Fairfield, Me. 

M. Nellie Russell, New Sharon, Me. 

Taught sixteen weeks before entering the Normal. Since graduating, 
has devoted herself to the study of Art, and has taken lessons in Boston 
in painting and crayon work. 

New Sharon, Me. 

Nellie A. Skinner, Port Clyde, Me. 

Taught 31 weeks before entering the Normal, and 56 since gradu- 
ating, — ten weeks in Port Clyde, and the remainder in Woolwich. Is 
taking the Chautauqua Course. 

Port Clyde, Me. 

Nellie F. Springer, Yarmouth ville, Me. 

Had taken a part of the course in the Yarmouth High School before 
coming to the Normal. Has taught since graduation, 5 2 weeks in Cop- 
lin PL, Oakland and South Gardiner. 

Yarmouthville, Me. 

Flora E. Strout, Auburn, Me. 

Has taught 24 weeks, all at West Harpswell. Has studied Latin 
since graduating. 

Auburn, Me. 

Ardelle M. Tozier, Easton, Me. 

Had attended Hebron Academy, the Edward Little High School, 
Auburn, and studied French and Latin with private teachers, and had 
taught one term, before entering the Normal. During the course, and 



i64 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

since graduation, has kept up her studies in the Languages. Was 
a special teacher during the last year of her course, and elected an 
assistant at graduation. Has published a book on Letter-Writing. 
Farmington, Me. 

Addie a. Turner, St. Albans, Me. 

Taught 5 2 weeks before entering the Normal. Since graduating, has 
taught 49 weeks, all in St. Albans. Is now studying Music. 

St. Albans, Me. 

Myra K. Verrill, Auburn, Me. 

Taught 75 weeks before graduation, and 32 since, in Minot, and in 
the Industrial School in Lancaster, Mass., where she now is. Is taking 
the Chautauqua Course. 

Lancaster, Mass., or Auburn, Me. 

Lillie D. Weymouth, East Sangerville, Me. 

Taught 125 weeks before entering the Normal and 45 during the 
course. Since graduating, has taught 64 weeks, in Dover, Dexter, and 
Sangerville. 

East Sangerville, Me. 

AucE M. Whitney, Augusta, Me. 

Had spent one year in the Augusta High School and taught 41 weeks 
before coming to the Normal. Since graduating, has taught sixty weeks 
in Chelsea and Augusta. Is teaching in the Howard School, Augusta. 

Augusta, Me. 

Lizzie F. Whittredge, Foxcroft, Me. 

Was a graduate of Foxcroft Academy and taught 67 weeks before 
coming to Farmington. Taught fourteen weeks during her course. 
Since graduating has taught 43 weeks, in Monson, Abbot Village, and in 
Foxcroft intermediate grade, where she is now teaching. 

Foxcroft, Me. 

CLASS OF 1888, 

Thirty-fourth Class. — Graduated June 20, 1888. 

Will H. Atkinson, Brunswick, Me. 

Had graduated from the Bryant and Stratton Commercial College in 
Boston, and taught twenty weeks before entering the Normal. Entered 
the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts in the Class of 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 165 

1892, and is taking the Course in Civil Engineering. Taught one term 
of eleven weeks at Trevett. 
Brunswick, or Orono, Me. 

Annie W. Bean, Palermo, Me. 

Taught 181 weeks before graduation. Since graduation has been 
studying Latin, and taught seventeen weeks, in Palermo and Augusta. 

Palermo, Me. 

Mary E. Bickmore, Camden, Me. 

Had graduated from the Camden High School before entering the 
Normal. Taught eight weeks during her course, and thirty weeks since 
in the Camden High School. Is taking the Chautauqua Course. 

Camden, Me. 

Addie F. Chase, Bowdoinham, Me. 

Taught ten weeks during her course. Has taught about 30 weeks, 
in Bowdoin and Jay. 

Bowdoinham, Me. 

Edwin T. Clifford, Leeds Centre, Me. 

Had taught fourteen weeks when he entered the Normal, and taught 
twelve during the course. Entered the State College at Orono in the fall 
of 1888, but, after spending a part of a term there, he decided to become 
a farmer. Taught twelve weeks in Chesterville. Married, March 27, 
1889, Stella M. Farnham of Belgrade, a member of the School for two 
terms. 

Monmouth, Me. 

Grace L. Cowan, West Sidney, Me. 

Taught 28 weeks before entering the Normal, and ten during the 
course. Since graduating, has taught 31 weeks, in Belgrade, Sidney and 
New Gloucester. 

West Sidney, Me. 

Ida S. Cowan, West Sidney, Me. 

Taught 93 weeks before coming to Farmington, and seventeen dur- 
ing her course. Since graduating, has taught 21 weeks, in Falmouth 
and Augusta. 

West Sidney, Me. 



i66 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Sadie L. Doyen, Stark, Me. 

Had taught nineteen weeks when she entered the Normal. Since 
graduating, has taught twenty weeks, in Avon and Stark. Is now fitting 
for college at the Nichols Latin School, Lewiston. 

Stark, Me. 

Fannie M. Frost, South Monmouth, Me. 

Had taught 94 weeks before her graduation. Since then, has taught 
28 weeks in Belgrade and Monmouth. 

South Monmouth, Me. 

Harry A. Greenwood, Wales, Me. 

Taught nine weeks before entering the Normal and eighteen during 
his course. Since graduating, has taught thirty weeks in the town of 
Wales, one term in ungraded schools and two terms of free high school. 
Has been a member of the S. S. Committee for three years and is now 
Chairman of the board. 

Wales, Me. 

Jane U. Haley, Fort Fairfield, Me. 

Taught 46 weeks before coming to Farmington, and eighty weeks 
during the course. Since graduating, has taught 24 weeks in Fort Fair- 
field. 

Fort Fairfield, Me. 

Hannah M. Harris, Belfast, Me. 

Had taught sixteen weeks and received by private instruction nearly 
the equivalent of a high school course before she entered the Normal. 
Since graduating has taught 32 weeks, in grammar schools in Peter- 
borough and Lancaster, N. H., and in Falmouth, Me. 

Belfast, Me. 

EuLA C. Hersom, Belgrade Mills, Me. 

Had attended the Chauncey Hall School, Boston, one year before 
coming to Farmington, and taught twenty weeks during her course. 
Since graduating, has taught 29 weeks in Belgrade and Augusta. 

Belgrade Mills, Me. 

Essie J. Hinkley, South Lewiston, Me. 

Has taught 36 weeks, — twenty weeks in Lisbon, and sixteen weeks 
in the Lewiston Training School. 

South Lewiston, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 167 

Henrieita M. Holmes, Bean's Corner, Me. 

Had attended Wilton Academy several terms and taught seventy 
weeks before entering the Normal. Taught during the course, twelve 
weeks ; since graduating, 38 weeks, in Monmouth and Matinicus. 

Bean's Corner, Me. 

Lily G. Hupper, Martinsville, Me. 

Taught seven weeks during her course, and 26 weeks since gradu- 
ating, all in St. George. Is taking the Chautauqua Course. 

Martinsville, Me. 

Lena B. Hutchins, Yarmouth, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Yarmouth High School and had taught thirty 
weeks when she entered the Normal. Since graduating, has taught the 
same number of weeks, all in Bowdoinham, one term in an ungraded 
school, and the remainder in the Village Grammar School. 

Yarmouth, Me. 

Albert E. Jennings, Farmington, Me. 

Had attended the Seminary at Kent's Hill and taught 24 weeks be- 
fore entering the Normal and seventeen during his course. Since grad- 
uating, has taught twelve weeks in Vienna. 

Farmington, Me. 

Rosa E. Keniston, Lewiston, Me. 

Taught 57 weeks during her course. Since graduating, has taught 
31 weeks, — one term ungraded school in Harpswell, and the South 
Paris Grammar School two terms. Has studied French and taken a 
course of pedagogical reading. 

53 High Street, Lewiston, Me. 

Florence J. Keves, Chesterville, Me. 

Had attended Wilton Academy and taught nine weeks before taking 
the Normal course. Taught during the course, 34 weeks, and ten weeks 
since graduating, at East Monmouth. Is taking the Chautauqua Course, 
and is a member of a Shakespeare Club. 

Chesterville, Me. 

Nina E. Kinney, Farmington, Me. 

Has taught sixteen weeks in Farmington. 
Farmington, Me. 



i68 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Sadie J. Lothrop, Chesterville, Me. 

Has taught one term. Is a member of a Shakespeare Club. 
Chesterville, Me. 

Elgiva B. Luce, New Portland, Me. 

Had attended Anson Academy and taught twenty weeks before 
coming to the Normal. Taught 54 weeks during the course, and since 
graduation, thirty weeks, — in the primary grade in New Vineyard two 
terms, and the Kingfield Grammar School one term. 

New Portland, Me. 

Arthur Pickard, Canterbury, N. H. 

Has taught eighteen weeks at Allen's Mills. 
West Farmington, Me. 

Clara Pickard, Canterbury, N. H. 

Had attended Black River Academy, Ludlow, Vt., two years, and 
taught 24 weeks before coming to Farmington. Since graduating, has 
taught one term in Canterbury. 

Canterbury, N. H. 

Inez C. Pickard, Auburn, Me. 

Has taught one term in Topsham since graduation. 
Auburn, Me. 

Lillian L. Ramsdell, Milo, Me. 

Had attended Foxcroft Academy and taught 77 weeks before com- 
ing to Farmington. Taught since graduating, 36 weeks, — twenty weeks 
in Milo, and one term in Clear Lake, Minn. Is now in Minnesota, 
whilher she went for the benefit of her health. Is engaged to teach 
as Principal of a grammar school at Monticello, Minn., beginning in 
September. 

Monticello, Minn., or Milo, Me. 

Josie T. Reed, North Chesterville, Me. 

Had attended the May School and taught 92 weeks before entering 
the Normal. Since graduating, has taught 34 weeks as Principal of the 
Grammar School, South Gardner, Mass. Is taking the Chautauqua 
Course. 

South Gardner, Mass., or North Chesterville, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 169 

Clara L. Scales, Farmington, Me. 

Is a compositor in the office of the Farmington Chronicle. 
Farmington, Me. 

Hadessa L. Sharp, Lyndon, Me. 

Taught 63 weeks before entering the Normal, and 22 during her 
course. Since graduating, has taught seventeen weeks in Caribou. 

Lyndon, Me. 

Will L Smith, Strong, Me. 

Has gone into business with his father in the manufacture of lumber. 
Strong, Me. 

Herman S. Spear, New Portland, Me. 

Taught sixteen weeks during his course, as an assistant in the " Little 
Blue." Has been taking a part of the Advanced Course and fitting for 
college the past year. 

New Portland, Me. 

Edith C. Stanley, Chesterville, Me. 

Taught sixteen weeks during her course, and eight weeks since grad- 
uation, in New Sharon. 

Chesterville, Me. 

Carrie H. Stevens, Five Islands, Me. 

Taught nine weeks before entering the Normal, 45 weeks during the 
the course, and 29 since graduating, in New Gloucester. 
P'ive Islands, Me. 

Herbert L. Stevens, Temple, Me. 

Had attended Wilton Academy, and had taught 41 weeks before 
coming to the Normal, and 28 during his course. Since graduating, 
has taught seventeen weeks at Sherman Mills. Has studied Latin under 
private instruction. 

Temple, Me. 

Gertrude L. Stone, Farmington, Me. 

Had attended Farmington High School several terms before entering 
the Normal. Before completing the course, her father, the late Rev. Dr. 
Stone, was stationed at Kent^s Hill, where Miss Stone was graduated 
from the Collegiate Course of the Maine Wesleyan Seminary and Female 



170 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

College, in the Class of 1888, with the degree of A. B. She then came 
back to the Normal and completed the course. Since graduating, has 
taught as assistant in the Normal Department of the Seminary at Kent's 
Hill, where she is now teaching. 
Kent's Hill, Me. 

Mertland W. Swett, East Knox, Me. 

Had attended Freedom Academy several terms, and had taught one 
term before coming to Farmington. Taught 48 weeks during his course. 
Since graduation, has taught one term, and is a member of the S. S. 
Committee in his town. 

East Knox, Me. 

Mattie H. Swift, New Vineyard, Me. 

Had attended the May School several terms, and taught fifteen weeks 
before she entered the Normal. Taught thirteen weeks during her 
course, and eleven since graduating, in the Grammar School, Bartlett, N. 
H. Is now taking lessons in Painting. 

New Vineyard, Me. 

Laura M. Sylvester, North Turner Bridge, Me. 

Had taught 44 weeks before entering the Normal. Taught thirty 
weeks during her course, and 26 since graduating, all at Leeds Centre 
and Leeds Junction. 

North Turner Bridge, Me. 

Lucy M. Sylvester, North Turner Bridge, Me. 

Had taught 5 7 weeks before entering the Normal. Taught 2 7 weeks 
during her course, and thirty since graduating, at Leeds Junction and in 
Farmington. 

North Turner Bridge, Me. 

Mabel Sylvester, Farmington, Me. 

Graduated from the Farmington High School before entering the 
Normal. During the past year has taken the Advanced Course, gradu- 
ating June 13, 1889. 

Farmington, Me. 

Fannie A. Voter, New Vineyard, Me. 

Taught 143 weeks previous to graduation. Since then has taught 28 
weeks, — in the Bingham Grammar School two terms, and in New Vine- 
yard one term. 

New Vineyard, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. 171 

Carrie A. Wade, Athens, Me. 

Had attended Somerset Academy several terms, and taught 57 
weeks before coming to the Normal. Taught during her course nine 
weeks, and since graduating 36 weeks, — two terms in district schools, 
and one term as Preceptress of Somerset Academy. 

Athens, Me. 

Rosa Winslow, St. Albans, Me. 

Taught sixteen weeks during her course. Since graduating, has 
taught 22 weeks in St. Albans and Corinna. 

St. Albans, Me. 

Laura H. Williams, Richmond, Me. 

Has taught seventeen weeks since graduation, in Richmond and 
Bowdoinham. 

Richmond, Me. 

Addie F. Woodman, North Leeds, Me. 

Owing to sickness and death of friends has not taught. 
North Leeds, Me. 

Hattie a. Woodward, Dresden Mills, Me. 

Had attended the Seminary at Kent's Hill two terms, and taught 10 1 
weeks before entering the Normal. Taught, during her course, twenty 
weeks ; since graduation, taught part of a term at Solon, when she was 
elected Vacancy Officer in the State Industrial School in Lancaster, 
Mass., where she now is. Is taking the Chautauqua Course. 

Lancaster, Mass., or Dresden Mills, Me. 

Josephine C. Wyman, West Sidney, Me. 

Taught 65 weeks before entering the Normal, nineteen during her 
course, and twenty-one since graduating, — one term in Harpswell, and 
one term as Principal of the Foxcroft Grammar School. 

West Sidney, Me. 

CLASS OF i88g. 

Thirty-fifth Class. — Graduated June 13, 1889. 

Martha O. Andrews, West Gardiner, Me. 

Taught eight weeks before entering the Normal, and 32 during her 
course. 

West Gardiner. Me. 



172 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Forrest H. Badger, Rangeley, Me. 
Taught eight weeks during his course. 
Farmington, Me. 

Merton W. Bessey, West Sidney, Me. 

Had attended the Coburn Classical Institute before coming to the 
Normal. 

West Sidney, Me. 

Lillian N. Brown, Grafton, Me. 

Had attended Gould's Academy at Bethel several terms. Taught 47 
weeks before coming to Farmington, and eight weeks during the course. 

Grafton, Me. 

Herman A. Childs, East Dixfield, Me. 
Taught ten weeks during the course. 
East Dixfield, Me. 

SuNiE C. Cufford, North Edgecomb, Me. 

Had graduated from the Wiscasset High School and spent one year 
in the State Normal School, Plymouth, N. H., before coming here. 

North Edgecomb, Me. 

Edward A. Croswell, Farmington Falls, Me. 

Annie A. Hartford, Richmond, Me. 

Taught forty weeks before entering the Normal, and the same number 
of weeks during the course. 

Richmond, Me. 

E. Etta Holman, East Dixfield, Me. 
Taught ten weeks during the course. 
Dixfield, Me. 

Juno F. Hutchins, Farmington, Me. 

Was a graduate of the Farmington High School, and taught twelve 
weeks before beginning the Normal course. 

Farmington, Me. 

Minnie E. Kent, West Mt. Vernon, Me. 

Had attended the Seminary at Kent's Hill, and taught eight weeks 
before entering the Normal. Has taught eighteen weeks during the 
course. 

West Mt. Vernon, Me. 



SKETCHES OF THE GRADUATES. I73 

Margarei' F. Knowles, Lubec, Me. 

Taught 39 weeks before and eight weeks during the Normal course. 
Lubec, Me. 

Nettie M. Knowles, Chesterville, Me. 

Had taught 130 weeks before entering the Normal. 
Chesterville, Me. 

May L. Macartney, Oakland, Me. 

Graduate of the Oakland High School. Taught twenty weeks 
during her Normal course. 

Oakland, Me. 

Emma R. Merrill, Lisbon, Me. 

Attended the Edward Little High School one year before coming to 
Farmington. Taught forty weeks during her Normal course. 

Lisbon, Me. 

Alice Morrison, West Farmington, Me. 

Taught 35 weeks before her Normal course. 
West Farmington, Me. 

Carrie B. Norton, Farmington, Me. 

Mary D. Pollard, Solon, Me. 

Taught forty weeks before her Normal course, and sixty while pur- 
suing it. 

Skowhegan, Me. 

Della Prescott, Foxcroft, Me. 

Had attended Foxcroft Academy, and taught 5 1 weeks before she 
came to Farmington. Taught 28 weeks during the course. 

Foxcroft, Me. 

Emma J. Robinson, South Danville, Me. 

Taught 89 weeks before entering the School, and 60 weeks during 
the course. 

South Danville, Me. 

Harriet A. Seavey, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Graduated from the Portsmouth High School, and taught 120 weeks 
before coming to Farmington. Taught ten weeks during the course. 

Portsmouth, N. H. 



174 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Fred O. Small, Madrid, Me. 

Taught 46 weeks before he began the Normal course, and 31 weeks 
while taking it. Is now engaged to teach the Milo High School. 

Madrid, Me. 

Rose M. Stanley, Phillips, Me. 

Taught 42 weeks before beginning the Normal course, and 54 weeks 
while taking it. 

Phillips, Me. 

Hattie E. Tozier, Easton, Me. 

Has taught 45 weeks during her course. 
East Washburn, Me. 

Clare A. Varney, Bath, Me. 

Graduated from the Bath High School. 
Bath, Me. 

Alice M. Wait, Vienna, Me. 

Taught six weeks before beginning the Normal course, and sixteen 
while taking it. 

Vienna, Me. 

Sammie C. Wheeler, Chesterville, Me. 

Had attended Wilton Academy and the Phillips Classical Institute 
before entering the Normal. 

Chesterville, Me. 

Edith M. Witherell, Monmouth, Me. 

Taught seventeen weeks before beginning her course and eleven 
while taking it. 

Monmouth, Me. 

Ada B. Young, Matinicus, Me. 

W. Scott Young, Matinicus, Me. 

Taught fourteen weeks while pursuing the Normal course. 
Matinicus, Me. 



I 



GRADUATES FROM THE ADVANCED COURSE. 

I 



Abner A. Badger, 


'87, 


June 20, 1888 


Holmes H. Bailey, 


'76, 


June 30, 1 88 1 


Fanny S. Belcher, 


'87, 


June 16, 1887 


T. Parker Craig, 


'80, 


June 30, 1 88 1 


Jennie M. Cutts, 


'86, 


June 16, 1887. 


Mary E. Eaton, 


'85, 


June 16, 1887 


L. Maria Knight, 


'78, 


June 16, 1887 


Lutie F. Luques, 


^81, 


June II, 1885 


Louise Lyde, 


'76, 


June II, 1885 


Louise D. May hew, 


^69, 


June II, 1885 


Hortense M. Merrill, 


'81, 


June 12, 1884 


James S. Norton, 


'84, 


June 16, 1887 


Fred C. Nottage, 


'87, 


June 13, 1889 


Ellen N. Parsons, 


'74, 


June II, 1885 


Annie M. Pinkham, 


'78, ' 


June 30, 1 881 


Agnes L Rounds, 


'80, 


July 6, 1883. 


Arthur C. Rounds, 


'80, 


July 6, 1883 


Ralph S. Rounds, 


'80, 


July 6, 1883 


John A. Russell, 


'79, 


June 30, 1 88 1 


Julia W. Swift, 


'86, 


June 16, 1887. 


Mabel Sylvester, 


'88, 


June 13, 1889 


Jennie M. Thorne, 


'79, 


June 16, 1887 


Sidney S. Twombly, 


'79, 


June 30, 1 88 1. 


Carrie A. AVhittier, 


'85, 


June 20, 1888. 


Emma S. Wyman, 


'77, 


June 12, 1884. 



NECROLOGY. 





TEA CHERS, 




Date of Decease. 


Name. 


Date of Teachinjf 


Feb., 1879. 


Mary A. Davis. 


1868-70. 


Dec. 24, 1885. 


Martha Wyman Wells. 


1875-6. 


April 13, 1886. 


Carrie Sewall Robbins. 


1871-3. 


April 23, 1887. 


Elizabeth G. Bell. 


1883-S. 


June 17, 1888. 


Martha H. Wiggin. 


1875-6. 


Nov. I, 1888. 


Roliston Woodbury. 


1867-79. 



GRADUATES, 



Date of Decease. 


Name. 


Class. 


July 19, 1870. 


John Jackson. 


1867. 


Oct. 24, 1871. 


Geo. A. Ferguson. 


1867. 


Sept. 4, 1872. 


Maria M. Shaw. 


I87I. 


Sept. 29, 1874. 


M. Emma Morrill. 


1867. 


Sept. 20, 1875. 


Carrie A. Skinner. 


1868. 


March 23, 1876. 


Hattie Atkinson. 


1868. 


Aug. 16, 1878. 


Nellie F. Townsend. 


2—1877. 


Oct. 10, 1879. 


Mae B. Morrill. 


2—1878. 


Jan. 25, 1880. 


M. Ella Alden. 


2-1877. 


Sept. 30, 1880. 


Milton B. Dyer. 


I— 1876. 


June 10, 1880. 


T. Elwood Tuttle. 


I— 1876. 


Jan. 10, 1882. 


Abbie L. Huse. 


1867. 


April 3, 1882. 


Lizzie H. Carter. 


2—1878. 


May 5, 1882. 


Otis I. Davis. 


I88I. 


Nov. 2, 1882. 


Florence A. Church. 


1868. 


Jan. 23, 1883. 


Augusta A. Holley. 


2 1872. 



23 



178 



FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL 


SCHOOL. 


Date of Decease. 


Name. 


Class. 


Jan. 30, 1883. 


Carrie M. Weston. 


I— 1876. 


Feb. 2, 1883. 


John C. Winter. 


2—1875. 


Feb. 7, 1883. 


Nellie M. Kimball. 


1870. 


March 6, 1883. 


Calvin F. Stanley. 


2—1873. 


July 31, 1884. 


Ella F. Downing. 


1869. 


Sept. 7, 1884. 


Ida L. Farrar. 


1882. 


Nov. 9, 1884. 


Sarah Gill. 


I— 1874. 


Jan., 1885. 


Flora M. Ham. 


I— 1878. 


April 7, 1885. 


Flora E. Stevens. 


2—1878. 


Sept. 26, 1885. 


Sarah C. Thayer. 


1867. 


Dec. 24, 1885. 


Martha B. Wyman. 


I— 1875. 


Jan. 23, 1886. 


Carrie B. Coffin. 


1885. 


April 13, 1886. 


Carrie G. Sewall. 


1870. 


July 5, 1886. 


Stella B. Collins. 


2—1876. 


Jan. 20, 1887. 


S. Evelyn Tarbox. 


1869. 


May 6, 1887. 


John W. Bixby. 


1868. 


July 10, 1887. 


Lizzie M. Prescott. 


I— 1878. 


Sept. 22, 1887. 


Martha P. Adams. 


1885. 


Oct. 4, 1887. 


Adelaide E. Smart. 


I88I. 


Jan. 27, 1888. 


Mary D. Bicknell. 


1868. 


Feb. 2, 1888. 


Alice R. Cummings. 


1886. 


March 2, 1888. 


Angie G. Yeaton. 


I— 1877. 


March 21, t888. 


Jennie S. Furbush. 


2 1874^ 


April 8, 1888. 


Nora M. Beedy. 


1885. 


Sept. 20, 1888. 


Myrtie P. Folsom. 


1887. 


Nov. I, 1888. 


Roliston Woodbury. 


1867. 


Nov. I, 1888. 


L. Maria Knight. 


2—1878. 


Nov. 2, 1888. 


Wm. J. Drew. 


2—1875. 


May 21, 1889. 


Clara F. Elliot. 


2—1873. 


July 18, 1889. 


Joseph S. Titcomb. 


1885. 



STATISTICS. 



NUMBER OF PUPILS ENTERING, ATTENDING, AND GRADUATING BY TERMS. 



Terms. 


^1 


1 


"0, 


^1 




j 






S« 





feS 


firtJH 


!»^S 











« 




vy 




■s 






U 


h 


IS 


l£^ 


> c V 


1 


Fall Term, 


1864, 


59 




59 




19— 0.74 




Winter Term, 


1864-5, 


20 




36 




i8— 8.01 




Spring Term, 


1865, 


51 


130 


94 


130 


19— 1.64 




Fall Term, 


1865, 


47 




no 




19— 7.62 




Winter Term, 


1865-6, 


16 




50 




20— 2.01 




Spring Term, 


1866. 


43 


105 


119 


Xt 


18— 9.58 


10 


Fall Term, 


1 866, 


42 




121 




18— 8.39 




Winter Term, 


1866-7, 






75 








Spring Term, 


1867, 


38 


80 


137 


* 


19— 1. 12 


32 


Fall Term, 


1867, 
1867-8, 


42 




"5 




i8— 5.89 




Winter Term, 


7 




58 




18— 8.44 




Spring Term, 


i868. 


34 


83 


122 


164 


18- 5.63 


35 


Fall Term, 


1 868, 


35 




86 




19— 2.54 




Winter Term, 


1868^, 


2 




46 




17 — 1 1. 01 




Spring Term, 


1869, 


50 


87 


123 


151 


18— 2.26 


14 


Fall Term, 


1869, 


54 




119 




19— 569 




Winter Term, 


1869-70, 


II 




56 




22 — 3.67 




Spring Term, 


1870, 


56 


12! 


140 


206 


18- 8.34 


14 


Fall Term, 


1870, 


62 




144 




19 0.87 




Spring Term, 


1871, 


39 


lOI 


136 


202 


19— 501 


19 


Fall Term, 


1871, 


19 




72 




20^ 7.67 




Spring Term, 


1872, 


42 


61 


III 


134 


19— 9.01 


32 


Fall Term, 


1872, 


30 




63 




18 — II.OI 




Spring Term, 


1873, 


36 


66 


86 


112 


18—10.30 


22 


Fall Term, 


1873, 


53 




95 




I8-II.73 





*No record of the names of the pupils in attendance for the Winter Term, 1865-6, Spring 
Term, 1866, and Winter Terra, 1S66--7, is to be found, hence the number of different pupils 
attending for the years 1S65-6 and 1866-7 cannot be given. 



i8o 



FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 







'0, 

I 


CO 


.•3 

"S, 

I 


s| . 




J 


Terms. 




1 

3 


S So 




fit 


3 

1 







3-e 


^ 


i& 


l£l 


> C V 


1 


Spring Term, 


1874, 


62 


"5 


132 


171 


18—11.31 


19 


Fall Term, 


1874, 


43 




lOI 




18— 9.69 




Spring Term, 


1875, 


57 


100 


^33 


177 


19— 6.94 


12 


Fall Term, 


'f75» 


40 




114 




19— 5-33 




Spring Term, 


1876, 


54 


94 


142 


200 


19— 9.67 


31 


Fall Term, 


1876, 


54 




133 




18— 4.65 




Spring Term, 


1877, 


43 


97 


135 


199 


18— 7.81 


35 


Fall Term, 


'877, 


36 




106 




19 — 0.58 




Spring Term, 


1878, 


53 


89 


148 


187 


20— 5:50 


39 


Fall Term, 


1878, 


29 




96 




19— 1.58 




Spring Term, 


1879, 


26 


55 


106 


145 


18 — 10.00 


42 


Fall Term, 


1879, 


30 




It 




18- 8.15 
19—10.78 




Spring Term, 


1880, 


14 


44 


"5 


37 


Fall Term, 


1880, 


20 




60 




18— 7.68 




Spring Term, 


i88i. 


24 


44 


83 


lOI 


19— 9.46 


26 


Fall Term, 


i88i. 


29 




54 




19 — 2.92 




Spring Term, 


1882, 


20 


49 


81 


96 


19— 8.84 


15 


Fall Term, 


1882, 


25 




67 




19— 7.10 




Spring Term, 


1883, 


13 


38 


73 


100 


19— 5-59 


20 


Fall Term, 


1883, 


14 




45 




:i= IS 




Winter Term, 


1883-4, 


15 




65 






Spring Term, 


1884, 


29 


58 


81 


104 


20— 4.59 


30 


Fall Term, 


1884, 


60 




no 




i8 — ii.oi 




Winter Term, 


1884-5, 


20 




102 




19 — ii.6i 




Spring Term, 


1885, 


43 


123 


140, 


188 


19— 0.38 


26 


Fall Term, 


1885, 


60 




151' 




19— 0.00 




Winter Term, 


1885-6, 


16 




112 




19— 7.81 




Spring Term, 


1886, 


35 


III 


143 


221 


20— 2.00 


31 


Fall Term, 


1886, 


62 




165 




19— 1. 13 




Winter Term, 


1886^7, 


19 




138 




19— 2.11 




Spring Term, 


1887, 


32 


"3 


163 


250 


19— 7.44 


39 


Fall Term, 


1887, 


52 




135 




18—10.83 




Winter Term, 


1887-8, 


27 




158 




20 — 2.00 




Spring Term, 


1888, 


28 


107 


134 


230 


19 — 2.50 


48 


Fall Term, 


1888, 


40 




104 




19— 8.65 




Winter Term, 


1888-9, 


18 




125 




20 — 2.67 




Spring Term, 


1889, 


30 


88 


131 


205 


18— 7.10 


30 



SUMMARY. 



Number of pupils who have entered the School, 2159. 
Number who have graduated : Regular Course, 658 — Ladies, 505 ; 
Gentlemen, 153. Advanced Course, 25 — Ladies, 16; Gentlemen, 9. 





STATISTICS. 


NUMBER OF PUPILS 


ENTERING AND GR 


Counties. 


Entering. 


Androscoggin, 


204 


Aroostook, 


55 


Cumberland, 


126 


Franklin, 


730 


Hancock, 


14 


Kennebec, 


^93 


Knox, 


41 


Lincoln, 


53 


Oxford, 


145 


Penobscot, 


43 


Piscataquis, 


31 


Sagadahoc, 


104 


Somerset, 


263 


Waldo, 


17 


Washington, 


42 


York, 


76 


Out of State, 


22 



Graduating. 
76 

9 
36 



68 
13 
15 
45 
II 

9 
32 
67 

7 
16 
24 



2159 



658 



DISTRIBUTION OF GRADUATES. 



[Those 


deceased are enumerated in 


the State where they died.] 




Arizona, 


I 


Maine, 


439- 


Pennsylvania, 


3 


Arkansas, 


2 


Massachusetts, 


64. 


Rhode Island, 


2 


California, 


20 


Michigan, 


3- 


Tennessee, 


I 


Colorado, 


6 


Minnesota, 


22. 


Texas, 


I 


Connecticut, 


3 


Mississippi, 


I. 


Utah, 


1 


Dakota, 


7 


Missouri, 


I. 


Vermont, 


2 


Delaware, 


I 


Nebraska, 


10. 


Virginia, 


I 


Georgia, 


2 


New Hampshire, 13. 


Washington, 


I 


Idaho, 


I 


New Jersey, 


4. 


West Virginia, 


2 


Illinois, 


5 


New Mexico, 


2. 


Wisconsin, 


4 


Indiana, 


3 


New York, 


9 


Nova Scotia, 


I 


Iowa, 


4 


Ohio, 


6. 


Burma, 


I 


Kansas, 


3 


Oregon, 


5- 


China, 


I 



OCCUPATIONS OF GRADUATES. 



GENERAL. 

[The figures represent the number who have been since graduation, or are now 
engaged in the occupation.] 

Agent of publishing house, 4 ; artists, 4 ; book-keepers, 7 ; compos- 
itors, 2 ; civil engineers, 4 ; clerks, 7 ; clergymen. 4 ; caring for friends 
(now), 4 ; dressmakers, 5 ; editors, 3 ; farmers, 10 ; farmers and teach- 
I ers, 8 ; farmers and lumbermen, 2 ; lawyers, 13 ; manufacturers, 3 ; mis- 

i sionaries, 4 ; millinery and fancy goods, 4 ; mechanics, 5 ; members of 

j Legislature, 2 ; nurses, 2 ; pharmacists, 2 ; physicians, 1 1 ; pension ex- 

aminers, 2 ; real estate business, 3 ; straw work, 3 ; shoe-stitchers, 3 ; 
students, 18 ; town officers, 8 ; stenographers, 2 ; taking a vacation, 10, 
telegraph operators, 2 ; invalids, 5 ; and one each in the following occu- 
pations : business, business manager, bank president, broker, book- 
binder, book-keeper and foreman, cashier, bridge-builder, contractor and 
builder, carpenter and builder, contractor and teacher, dentist, dentist 
and surgeon, engineer and contractor, florist, librarian, life insurance 
company manager, market gardener, notary public and conveyancer, 
nurseryman, police judge, reporter, agent for subscription books, sales- 
man, shoemaker, sewing machine adjuster, treasurer of savings bank, 
type-writer, watch factory employe, vocahst. 

PEDAGOGICAL. 

IN THE PAST. 

Teaching. — In High Schools, 66 ; in Normal Schools, 34 ; in Nor- 
mal Departments, 4 ; in Training Schools, 3 ; in Academies and Semi- 
naries, 21 ; in College, i. 

Supervision of Schools. — Superintendents, 5 ; Supervisors, 13 ; Mem- 
bers of S. S. Committee and School Boards, 15. 



1 84 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

AT PRESENT. 

Teaching. — In Ungraded Schools, io8 ; in Primary Schools, 48 ; in 
Grammar Schools, 51 ; in High Schools, 22 ; in Normal Schools, 8 ; in 
Training Schools, i ; in Normal Departments, 7 ; in Academies and Sem- 
inaries, 7 ; in private schools, i ; in College, i . 

Supervision of Schools. — Superintendents, 2 ; Supervisors, 5 ; Mem- 
bers of S. S. Committee and School Boards, 1 1 . 

ADVANCED WORK. 

Chautauqua Course. — Completed, 31 ; taking, 38; partial course, 

13- 

Advanced Normal. — Graduates from Farmington, 16 ladies, 9 gen- 
glemen ; from Bridgewater, Mass., 3 gentlemen, one lady. 

College. — Prepared, 32 men, 12 women; graduated, 11 men, 2 
women ; partial course, 7 men, 5 women ; now in college, 1 1 men, 3 
women ; fitting, 5 men, i woman. 

Work not classified. — 24 men, 70 women. 

MATRIMONIAL. 

Married. — Men 90, women 208; married classmates, 22 ; married 
other graduates, 16 ; married undergraduates, 16. 

Children. — Boys 220, girls 224. 

Deaths. — Graduates, men 11, women 35. Husbands of graduates 
8, wives of graduates 7. Children, boys 23, girls 19. 



OCCUPATIONS OF THE HUSBANDS OF THE GRADUATES. 

Brokers, 2 ; clergymen, 1 1 ; commercial travellers, 2 ; carpenters, 6 ; 
contractors, 4 ; editors, 4 ; engineers, 2 ; farmers, 4 1 ; farmers and lum- 
bermen, 3 ; jewelers, 2 ; lawyers, 10 ; lumbermen, 3 ;' insurance agents, 
2 ; manufacturers, 1 1 ; merchants, 2 7 ; real estate brokers, 2 ; sea cap- 
tains, 2 ; superintendents of schools, 2 ; station agents, 3 ; teachers, 14 ; 
wood and lumber dealers, 2 ; and one each of the following : banker, 
bank cashier, clerk, druggist, dealer in live stock, gold-miner, machinist, 
mechanical engineer, orchardist, overseer, printer and publisher, pho- 
tographer, rancher, railroad employe, salmon-canner, stenographer, un- 
dertaker. 



ALUMNI RECORDS. 



FIRST ALUMNI MEETING. 

June 6, 1867. 
The graduates of the Farmington Normal School, feeling that they were not will- 
ing that the pleasant ties here formed should be entirely severed, met at Normal Hall, 
Wednesday A. M., June 5, 1867, for the purpose of forming an Association. Chose 
a committee of which A. P. Tukey, '67, was chairman, to draft a Constitution and By- 
Laws. In the evening of that day the committee reported the following Constitution 
and By-Laws, which were adopted article by article. 

CONSTITUTION. 

PREAMBLE. 

We, the graduates of the Farmington Normal School, being unwilling that the 
pleasant associations we have formed should be entirely brol^en, each of us being 
isolated from the rest, and wishing further that some plan may be devised so that our 
reunions may be both pleasant and profitable to us and the School, do organize our- 
selves into an Association, through whose channels we may learn of one another's 
welfare, and we do adopt the following as our Constitution : 

Article i. This Association shall be known as the Farmington Normal Associ- 
ation, and its meetings shall be held on the day of the graduation exercises of each 
spring term. 

Art. n. The officers of this Association shall consist of a President, Vice-Pres- 
ident, Treasurer, Assistant Secretary and Executive Committee, who shall be chosen 
by ballot at each annual meeting of the Association. 

Art. III. It shall be the duty of the President to preside over all meetings of 
the Association and to superintend the disbursement of its funds. 

Art. IV. In the absence of the President, his duties shall devolve on the Vice- 
President. 

Art. v. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to collect all the funds of the 
Association and expend the same on the written order of the President. 

Art. VI. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to keep the records of the meet- 
ings of the Association, and answer all letters of inquiry in regard to the situation of 
members, and to notify all members at least one month before the meetings of the 
Association. 

24 



1 86 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Art. VII. During the absence of the Secretary, his duties shall devolve on the 
Assistant Secretary. 

Art. VIII. It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee to prepare an Order 
of Exercises and report at each regular meeting. 

BY-LAWS. 

Article i. Each member of this Association binds himself to report to the 
Secretary, his residence, occupation, compensation for teaching, whether married or 
single, at least two months before the annual meeting of the Association. 

Art. II. Each member also binds himself to report each change in his residence, 
occupation and compensation, if teaching, as soon, and as often as such change shall 
occur. 

Art. III. Five members shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. 

Art. IV. At the request of the Principal of the Normal School, the Secretary 
shall give to him any information in regard to. the situation of members which may 
be in his possession. 

AMENDMENTS. 

I. The officers of this Association shall consist of a President, Vice-President, 
Treasurer, Secretary, and one Assistant Secretary from each graduating class, who 
shall be chosen by ballot. (June 2, 1869). 

II. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to keep a true record of the meetings 
of the Association and of the reports of the Assistant Secretaries, and to inform the 
Assistant Secretaries of the time of the meeting of the Association. (June 2, 1869). 

III. It shall be the duty of the Assistant Secretaries to answer all letters of in- 
quiry in regard to the situation of members of their respective classes, notify them at 
least one month before the meetings of the Association, and to forward their reports 
to the Secretary as soon as possible. (June 2, 1869). 

IV. The name of this Association shall be the Farmington Normal Alumni 
Association. (June 2, 1870). 

The following officers were elected : 

President, R. Woodbury, '67; Vice-President, C. A. Boston, '67; Secretary, J. A. 
Sweet, '67; Assistant Secretary, Miss H. B. Stewart, '66; Treasurer, Edmund 
Hayes, '67. 



SECOND ALUMNI MEETING. 

June I, 1868. 

At a meeting held June i, in the Library Room, E. Hayes was chosen President, 
pro tern., and C. A. Boston, Secretary, /r^? tern. 

Voted, That a committee of five be chosen to ascertain the minds of the several 
classes graduated as to continuing the Association. 

The following committee was raised: A. P. Tukey, '67, S. H. Reed, '68, Mar- 
tha T. Perkins, '66, Electa W. Bixby, '67, and Lizzie M. Bixby, '68. 

Voted, That the committee take the Constitution, revise it, if necessary, and 
report at the next regular meeting. 

Adjourned to June 2. 



ALUMNI RECORDS. 187 

June 2, 1868. 

Meeting called to order by President Woodbury. C. A. Boston chosen Secretary 
pro tern. Report of the committee on the Constitution read and accepted with slight 
amendments, article by article. 

Votedy That the expenses of the Association be defrayed by an equal tax on all 
its members, to be paid at each annual meeting. 

The following officers were chosen for the ensuing year : 

President^ R. Woodbury, '67; Vice-President^ S. H. Reed, '68; Secretary, Ed- 
mund Hayes, ^(i*]; Assistant Secretary, Martha T. Perkins, '66; Treasurer, J. W. 
Knight, '67; Ex. Committee, C. A. Boston, '67, G. K. Dike, '68, Ruth G. Rich, '67, 
Hannah B. Stewart, '68, Lizzie M. Bixby, '66. 

A tax of five cents was assessed on each member. 

Adjourned till close of spring term, 1869. 

THIRD ALUMNI MEETING. 

June 2, 1869. 

President R. Woodbury in the chair. Amendments I, H, and HI, to the Con- 
stitution and By-Laws, were unanimously adopted. Assessed a tax of ten cents on 
each member to defray expenses. Passed a vote of thanks to the Secretary, Edmund 
Hayes, for his earnest efforts in behalf of the Association. The following officers 
were chosen for the ensuing year : 

President, R. Woodbury, '67; Vice-President, J. W. Bixby, '68; Secretary, R. 
Woodbury, '67; Treasurer, J. W. Knight, '67; Assistant Secretaries, Mira Q. 
Vaughan, '66, Ella A. Leland, '67, Mahala R. Tufts, '68, Lucilla E. Smith, '69; Ex. 
Committee, Martha T. Perkins, '66, J. W. Knight, '67, R. Woodbury, '67, Chas. G. 
Chick, '68, G. F. Billings, '69. 

An oration was delivered by J. W. Knight, '67, and a poem by Mahala R. Tufts, 
'68. Mr. C. C. Rounds was introduced to the Association and made brief remarks. 

Adjourned to June i, 1870. 

FOURTH ALUMNI MEETING. 

June I, 1870. 

p. M. 

President R. Woodbury, in the chair. John Jackson, '67, chosen Secretary, 
pro tern,. 

PROGRAMME. 

1. Singing, by a choir from the School, led by C. A. Allen. 

2. Reading of a letter of greeting from George M. Gage, Principal of the State 

Normal School, Mankato, Minn., signed by Susie M. Dyer, '67, Jennie M. 
Hayden, '67, Annie V. Whittier, '68, assistants, and A. P. Tukey, '67, Supt. 
of City Schools. 

3. Essay, by G. F. Billings, '69, on " Oral Instruction." Discussed by Messrs. 

Chick, Billings, Norton, Leavitt, Pease, and Principal Rounds. 

4. Address, by Prof. W. P. Atkinson, — " Present Aspects of Education." 

5. Essay, by Chas. G. Chick, '68, on " School Discipline." Discussed by Principal 

Rounds, W. P. Atkinson and A. H. Abbott. 



1 88 FARMING TON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

June 2. 

Amendment IV unanimously adopted. Voted to choose one Vice-President 
from each class. 

Officers elected for the ensuing year : 

President, Chas. G. Chick, '68; Vice-Presidents, Sarah R. Curtis, '66, J. G. Rob- 
erts, '67, J. W. Bixby, '68, Ashley St. Clair, '69, C. E. Williams, '70; Secretary, R. 
Woodbury, '67; Treasurer, J. G. Roberts, '67; Assistant Secretaries, Mira Q. 
Vaughan, '66, Ella A. Leland, '67, Mahala R. Tufts, '68, Lucilla E. Smith, '69, Nellie 
M. Kimball, '70; Ex. Committee, R. 'Wotjdbury, '67, Dora A. Sprague, '66, Julia F. 
Reed, '68, G. F. Billings, '69, Chas. W. Purington, '70. 

No arrangements were made for meetings in 1871, 1872 and 1873. 

FIFTH ALUMNI MEETING. 

July I, 1874. 

p. M. 

Vice-President Williams, on account of the absence of President Chick, in the 
chair. A committee on Constitution was appointed, of which J. W. Stetson, '71, was 
Chairman. 

Evening Programme at the "Old South." 

1 . Singing, by a choir from the School, led by C. A. Allen. 

2. Prayer, by the Chaplain, C. W. Purington, '70. 

3. Address by Rev. Thomas Hill, D. D., on the " Formative Principles in Education." 

4. Sociable at Normal Hall, — C. A. Woodbury, '72, Toast-Master. Responses by 

Prin. Kelsey, Prin. Rounds, Prin. Fletcher of Castine, Gov. Dingley, R. Wood- 
bury, '67, and F. M. Hallowell, '71. 

July 2, 1874. 

A. M. 

Vice-President C. E. Williams, '70, in the chair. 

Prayer by the Chaplain, Chas. W. Purington, '70. The committee on the Consti- 
tution reported the following Constitution to take the place of the one adopted in 
1867, which was taken up article by article, and adopted. 

CONSTITUTION. 

PREAMBLE. 

We, the graduates of the Western State Normal School, wishing to advance the 
interests of our profession and to strengthen the ties that bind us as fellow-workers, 
agree to adopt the following Constitution : 

Article i. This Association shall be known as the Western State Normal School 
Association, and its meetings shall be held at the close of each third school year. 

Art. II. The officers of the Association shall consist of a President, two Vice- 
Presidents, Treasurer, Secretary, and an Executive Committee of three, who shall be 
chosen by ballot at each triennial meeting of the Alumni. 

Art. III. — Section I. The duties of the President, Vice-Presidents, Treasurer, 
and Secretary, shall be such as usually devolve on such officers. 

Section 2. It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee to arrange the exer- 
cises for the meetings of the Alumni, which shall consist of an Oration, a Poem, a 
Social Reunion, and such other exercises as they may think proper. 



ALUMNI RECORDS, 189 

Art. IV. This Constitution may be amended by a two -thirds vote of the mem- 
bers present at any regular meeting. 

BY-LAWS. 

Art. I. All graduates of the Western State Normal School shall be considered 
members of this Association. 

Art. II. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to notify all members of the Asso- 
ciation of the time of its meetings, and to obtain from them as far as possible such 
information as may be of use. 

Art. III. Thirteen members shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of bus- 
iness. 

Art. IV. At the request of the Principal of the Western State Normal School, 
the Secretary shall give to him such information in regard to members as may be in 
his possession. 

Art. v. The expense of the meetings of this Association shall be defrayed by a 
direct tax assessed by a Finance Committee, at each meeting, on all, or on such a 
portion of the Alumni, as they may think best. Said tax shall be collected by the 
Treasurer. 

Art. VI. These By-Laws may be amended by a two-thirds vote of the members 
present at any regular meeting. 

After the adoption of the above Constitution, Mr. A. P. Kelsey was introduced 
and gave the early history of the School, including its establishment, and the first year 
of its growth when he was Principal. 

Mr. R. Woodbury, '67, followed and spoke of the three years of the School when 
it was under the principalship of Mr. George M. Gage. 

Principal C. C. Rounds then took up the narrative, bringing the history down to 
the tenth year of the School. 

The following officers were elected for the next three years : 

President^ F. E. C. Robbins, '72; Vice-Presidents^ Ashley St. Clair, '69, Lizzie G. 
Melcher, '71; Secretary, R. Woodbury, '67; Treasurer, C. E. Williams, '70; Ex, 
Committee, J. W. Stetson, '71, Jennie M. Hayden, '67, Mira Q. Vaughan, '66. 

F. E. C. Robbins, '72, read a paper on the " Relations of the Free High School 
to the Normal Schools," followed by a discussion of the same by Principal Rounds. 

The usual resolutions were passed. 



SIXTH ALUMNI MEETING. 

July 6, 1877. 

A. M. 

President F. E. C. Robbins, '72, in the chair. 

Officers elected for the next three years : 

President, J. A. Greene, '76; Vice-Presidents, Elva M. Reed, '71, J. Walter Stet- 
son, '71; Secretary, R. Woodbury, '67; Treasurer, L. H. Reed, '73; Ex. Committee, 
Chas. G. Chick, '68, Louie A. Leland, '72; J. A. Tuck, '77. 

Finance Committee reported a tax of 75 cents per capita. 

Voted, That, if practicable, arrangements be made for an informal meeting of 
the graduates years when no reunion is held. 



190 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



PROGRAMME. 

1. Prayer, by the Chaplain, Chas. W. Purington, '70. 

2. Music. 

3. Address of Welcome, by Principal Rounds. 

4. Response, by the President of the Association. 

5. Paper, by J. A. Greene, '76, — " Rights and Responsibilities of Teachers," follow- 

ed by a discussion by Lucilla E. Smith, '69, G. W. Norton, '76, C. W. Puring- 
ton, '70, Chas. G. Chick, '68, Rev. C. Munger, R. Woodbury, '67, Principal 
Rounds, and Rev. L. H. Angier. 

6. Discussion, — " The Educational Needs of Maine," — opened by F. O. Stanley, 

followed by Emma S. Small, '75, O. S. Norton, '70, and Supt. Corthell. 

7. Singing. 

8. Paper, by Fred. E. Whitney, '68, — " Character the result of Habit." Discussed 

by Chas. G. Chick, '68, C. W. Purington, '70, F. O. Stanley, '71, and J. A. 
Greene, '76. 

9. Passage of the usual resolutions. 

EVENING. 

Met at the " Old South." 

1. Music, by the orchestra. 

2. Prayer, by the Chaplain, Rev. O. W. Rogers. 

3. Music, by the orchestra. 

4. Address, — " Enthusiasm," by the Rev. L. H. Angier, D. D., of Everett, Mass. 

5. A general sociable at Normal Hall. 
One hundred sixteen graduates present. 

SEVENTH ALUMNI MEETING. 

July 8, 1 880. 

A. M. 

President J. A. Greene, '76, in the chair. After merely routine business, appoint- 
ment of committees, etc., adjourned till afternoon. 

p. M. 

1. Prayer, by the Chaplain, Rev. C. W. Purington, '70. 

2. Music, piano solo by Mabel E. Austin, '79. 

3. Officers elected for the next three years: President, F. O. Stanley, '71 ; Vice- 

Presidents, Emily J. Richards, '78, Crosby G. Eaton, '80; Secretary, R. Wood- 
bury, '67; Treasurer, G. W. Norton, '76; Ex. Committee, J. O. Bradbury, 
'74, Helen M. Kimball, '70, Jennie M. Hayden, '67. 

4. Inaugural address, by the President, — "Lessons of history of the past three 

years." 

5. Paper, by George W. Norton, '76, — "What can we do?" Discussed by A. E. 

Prince, '71. 

6. Paper, by R. Woodbury, '67, — " Why is school-teaching in our State so poor in 

quality?" Discussion opened by J. O. Bradbury, '74. 

7. Voted, That the thanks of the Association be extended to the Trustees of the 

Normal School, for giving to the School a year's Advanced Course. 



ALUMNI RECORDS. 191 

EVENING. 

Met at the Methodist vestry, where a supper had been prepared for the Alumni, 
visitors, and members of the School, by the ladies of Farmington. Tables were set 
for 300 persons, abundantly provided with substantial as well as delicacies, and the 
room was elegantly decorated. 

Speeches in response to toasts were made by Gov. D. F. Davis, Superintendent 
N. A. Luce, Hon. Fred Robie, F. O. Stanley, '71, J. E. Case, '74, J. O. Bradbury, '74, 
Rev. A. W. Moore, J. A. Greene, '76, G. W. Norton, '76, Principal C. C. Rounds, R. 
Woodbury, '67, and Nellie M. Kimball, '70. 

Adjourned to Normal Hall, to a sociable, Ballard's Orchestra furnishing music. 

About 100 graduates present. 

EIGHTH ALUMNI MEETING. 

July 5, 1883. 
After the graduating exercises, there was a fine collation given to the Alumni 
at Normal Hall, followed by a promenade concert, at which a beautiful gold watch 
was presented to Dr. Rounds by the Alumni. 

July 6, 1883. 

A. M. 

1. In the absence of the President and Vice-Presidents, J. A. Greene, '76, was 

chosen President, pro tern. 

2. Appointment of committees. 

3. Routine business. 

4. Voted, That C. C. Rounds, Ph. D., be elected an honorary member of this Associ- 

ation. 

5. Voted, That Mrs. Ellen M. Mason be elected an honorary member of this Asso- 

ciation. 

p. M. 
J. A. Greene, President, /r<7 tern., in the chair. 

1 . Reports from the different classes. 

2. Music, by Ballard's Orchestra. 

3. Officers elected for the next three years : /*/-rj/V<f«/, J. W. Stetson, '71 ; Vice- 

Presidents, Hortense M. Merrill, '81, Hattie R. Morison, '71; Treasurer, A. 
W. Parker, '83; Secretary, R. Woodbury, '67; Assistant Secretary, Mabel E. 
Austin, '79; Ex. Committee, F. E. C. Robbins, '72, Louise D. Mayhew, '69, 
Ashley St. Clair, '69, 

4. Voted, That Mrs. Helen B. C. Beedy, Mrs. J. A. Greene, and Miss Susan D. 

Melcher be elected honorary members of the Association. 

5. Resolutions of esteem for and confidence in Dr. Rounds. (See page 18). 
Resolved, That this Association tender its hearty thanks to the citizens of Farm- 
ington for their kindness, courtesy and generosity in providing the collation 
for the Alumni and friends, and to those who have so cordially aided in 
decorating and beautifying the familiar halls. 

Resolved, That the thanks of the Association be tendered to the Methodist 
Society, who have freely granted the use of its church for the purposes of the 
Association. 



192 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



Address by Rev. A. W. Moore of Lynn, Mass. 

Reception by the teachers with Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Beedy, at the home of the 
latter, to the Alumni and friends. 

NINTH ALUMNI MEETING. 

June II, 1886. 

A. M. 

Vice-President Hortense M. Merrill in the chair. After the appointment of 
committees and routine business, adjourned till afternoon. 

p. M. 
PROGRAMME. 

1. Music, by the Association. 

2. Prayer, by the Chaplain, E. F. Blanchard, *82. 

3. Address of Welcome, by Principal Purington. 

4. Reply, by O. S. Norton, '70, President, pro tern. 

5. Music, by a double quartette. 

6. Flute solo, by Principal Purington. 

7. Election of the following officers: Prfsuient^ O. S. Norton, '70; Vice-Presi- 

dentSy L, IL Corliss, '77, Hortense M. Merrill, *8i; Secretary, R. Woodbury, 
'67; Assistant Secretary^ James S. Norton, '84; Treasurer^ A. W. Pottle, '83. 

8. Passage of the following resolutions : 

Resoheiiy That the Alumni Association of the Farmington State Normal School, 
assembleil at Farmington, June 11, i$$6, send friendly greetings and hearty good 
wishes to Dr. C. C. Roundss and express their continued love and respect as increased 
and strengthenetl with passing years. 

Resell ..i\ That the Alumni Association extend its earnest sympathy, and full sup- 
j^ort, to Principal C^"»rge C. Purington in his work in this School. 

AV^\V7 <-./, That, as since the last meeting of this Association, several members 
have been removeil by death, the Association express its deep grief and sense of 
irreparable loss. 
O, f\\\\j\ To send a c\^py v^f the resolutions to l>r. Rounds. 

10, I1%V./, That Mrs. E. T. Sewall be electeil an honorary member of this Associa- 

tion. 

11. Music, — Singing by the Ass«.>:ialiv^n. 

FVEMNvw 

Six^iaMe at Nornial Hall, with Music by Presson's Orchestra. One hundred six 
graJaalos wcrf pn^senl. 

r.^L\WH A:.C\UX/ JfKET/NG. 

June 14, 1 889. 
.V. M. 
Bus.iv.e:ss n*.eot*r,g, 

lV^\\'nt i"*, S. Nv^rtv^n. *>% :r. :hc cf.i'r 
Ma VI F. Ai:>::n» *7vx ohvy>**n Secret Arv\ ♦- *. -r. 

., --: .. -ir A *» — :•: r F ,« nx'.r. -r. W. O. Malletl. ^Sft. Lutie F. 
luo,i«,^I. 



ALUMNI RECORDS, 



193 



Voted, That the Constitution be amended so that Principal G. C. Purington be 
made an ex -officio member of the Association. 

Thanks of Mr. Purington in acknowledgement. 

Committee on Resolutions: Charles G. Chick, '68, Charles E. Williams, '70, A. P. 
McDonald, '84. 

PUBLIC MEETING. — PROGRAMME. 



Prayer, by the Chaplain, Rev. C. W. Purington, '70. 

Music, by Farmington Glee Club. 

Opening Address, by President O. S. Norton, '70. 

Address and summary of Alumni History, by Principal Purington. 

Piano Solo, — Mabel E. Austin, '79. 

Poem, — Lizzie Ellis Gammon, '76. 



7. Responses, by Alumni to the following sentiments : 

1. The Normal in College — A. P. McDonald, '84. 

2. The Normal in Medicine — C. E. Williams, '70. 

8. Music, by the Farmington Glee Club. 

3. The Normal Lawyer — Chas. G. Chick, '68. 

4. Mammon vs. Minerva — Geo. F. Stackpole, ex-'67. 

5. The Normal Clergyman — C. W. Purington, '70. 

6. The Normal Teacber — H. H. Bailey, '76. 

9. Music, by Farmington Glee Club. 

10. Voted, That further time be given the committee for preparation 'oi resolutions. 

When prepared, to be sent to the Secretary to record, and to have published 
in the local newspaper. 

11. Election of the following officers: President, Charles A. Harrington, '72; 

Vice-Presidents, A. P. McDonald, '84, Mrs. Jennie M. Sturgis, '67; 
Secretary, George H. Winter, '86; Assistant Secretary, Jillie H. Mayhew, 
'81 ; Executive Committee, Lillian I. Lincoln, '85, John B. Donovan, '76, 
Nancy Stilson, '80. 

12. Voted, That Greetings of the Association be sent by the Secretary to Prof. Am- 

brose P. Kelsey, Prof. George M. Gage, and Dr. Charles C. Rounds. 

13. Remarks by President- elect Harrington. 

14. A rising vote of thanks was given to the retiring officers. 

15. Adjourned till evening. 

The afternoon was devoted to class meetings and excursions about town. A very 
pleasant feature of the afternoon was the presentation of an elegant gold watch to 
Principal Purington by the Alumni, 1 884-1 889. 

Evening Programme at the "New Old South." 

1. Piano Solo, by Mabel E. Austin, '79. 

2. Address, — "Our Saxon Forefathers a thousand years ago," by Prof. John S. 

Sewall of Bangor. 

3. A Reception at Normal Hall by the Graduating Class to the Alumni and friends. 
Music by Presson's Orchestra. 

One hundred seventy-one graduates present at this reunion. 



25 



194 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

The following resolutions have been received from the Committee ; 

Whereas, The Alumni Association of the Farmington State Normal School in 
regular meeting assembled at Farmington, Me., on this 14th day of June, A. D. 1889, 
being impressed with the importance of recording a tribute of respect to the memory 
of its members who have been taken from us by the hand of death since our last 
meeting, 

Resolved, That this Association learns with sorrow of the death of Roliston 
Woodbury, Class '67, John W. Bixby, Class '68, Mary D. Bicknell (Mrs. Paul), Class 
'68, S. Evelyn Tarbox (Mrs. St. Clair), Class '69, Clara F. Elliot (Mrs. Floyd), 
2d Class '73, Jennie S. Furbush (Mrs. Blanchard), 2d Class '74, William J. Drew, 
2d Class '75, Stella B. Collins, 2d Class '76, Angie G. Yeaton, ist Class '77, Lizzie 
M. Prescott, ist Class '78, L. Maria Knight, 2d Class '78, Adelaide E. Smart, Class 
'81, Martha P. Adams, Nora M. Beedy, and Carrie B. Coffin, Class '85, Alice R. 
Cummings, Class '86, Myrtie P. Folsom, Class '87, each and all of whom were held in 
esteem by this Association. 

Resolved, That we especially mourn the death of our brother, Roliston Wood- 
bury, whose life as a student and teacher in our Alma Mater was that of the diligent, 
earnest searcher after truth, and the careful, painstaking instructor; that his earnest 
efforts at all times in behalf of this Association, as its Secretary, are remembered with 
gratitude. That in his death we lose an officer ever faithful to his duties, a member 
ever active for the good of the Association. A patient, persevering student, a kind 
and faithful teacher, a true friend to the cause of Education, and an upright Christian 
man has gone to his reward. That, while we mourn his loss, we commend his 
character as a fit example for all to follow. 

Resolved, That we extend to our brother, Ashley St. Clair, our deep sympathy in 
his affliction, and assure him of our appreciation of the estimable character of his 
late wife who was herself a member of our Association. 

Resolved, That we extend to our brother, Enos F. Floyd, oiir deep sympathy in 
his affliction, and assure him of our appreciation of the estimable character of his 
late wife, who was herself a member of our Association. 

Resolved, That while we remember the dead, it is fitting that the living be not 
forgotten. 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Association are due to Prin. Geo. C. Purington 
for his patient labor in collecting and presenting so full a history of our membership, 
and for his many acts of thoughtful care, whereby our meeting has been rendered 
pleasant, entertaining and profitable. 

Resolved, That copies of these resolutions be sent to the family of our late 
brother Woodbury, to brother St. Clair, to brother Floyd,/to Prin. Geo. C. Purington, 
and that they also be printed in the Farmington Chronicle and spread upon the 
records of our Association. 



Charles G. Chick, \ Committee 
Chas. E. Williams, \ on 

Alex. P. McDonald, j Resolutions. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



[In the Regular Course, classes enter every term. Classes are formed in the 
Advanced Course only at the beginning of the Fall Term.] 

REGULAR COURSE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

F Term — Geometry, Physiology, Geography, English Composition, School Or- 
ganization, Penmanship, Elementary Vocal Music, Reading, Spelling and Defining, 
Gymnastics. 

E Term — Geometry, Physiology, Physics, Geography, Arithmetic, School Organ- 
ization and Laws, Drawing, Elementary Vocal Music, Reading, English Literature, 
Spelling and Defining, Gymnastics. 

D Term — Algebra, Physics, Chemistry, Arithmetic, Physical Geography, Drawing, 
Advanced Vocal Music, Reading, English Literature, Spelling and Defining, Gym- 
nastics. 

SECOND YEAR. 

C Term — Algebra, Geology, Chemistry, Methods of Teaching, English Grammar, 
Drawing, Advanced Vocal Music, Reading, English Literature, Spelling and Defining, 
Gymnastics. 

B Term — Commercial and Mental Arithmetic, Astronomy, General History, Psy- 
chology, Civil Government, Drawing, Advanced Vocal Music, Model School Observa- 
tion, English Literature, Spelling and Defining, Gymnastics. 

A Term — Book-Keeping, Moral Philosophy, U. S. History, Science of Education, 
Botany, Model School Practice, Advanced Vocal Music, Elocution, English Literature, 
Spelling and Defining, Gymnastics. 

ADVANCED COURSE. 

First Term — Latin, French or German, Geometry, History, History and Philos- 
ophy of Education, Gymnastics. 

Second Term — Latin, French or German, Trigonometry, History of the English 
Language, History and Philosophy of Education, Gymnastics. 

Third Term — Latin, French or German, Surveying, Rhetoric, Physical Science 
and I^aboratory work. Gymnastics. 



196 FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

PRIMARY TRAINING SCHOOL COURSE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Reading — Stickney's Primer, by sentence, word and phonic methods combined. 
First Reader read half through. 

Spelling — All words of reading lessons by sounds. Easy words having no silent 
letters, by letters. 

Arithmetic — Combinations through 9, counting by i, 2, to 100. Counting back- 
wards by I, 2. Readmg numbers to 10. Practical examples. Value of coins to one 
dollar. Fraction i. 

Geography — Lessons on position of objects. Seven Little Sisters, and object les- 
sons on the products of other countries. 

Form — Work as outlined in Prang's " Use of Models." 

Color — Resemblance and difference in color; distinguishing and naming the 
common colors. 

Object Lessons — Familiar objects, human body, animals, plants, etc. 

Drawing — Simple exercises with straight lines for training eye and hand. 

Writing — Pupils' names. All the letters, large and small, on slates. Simple 
words and sentences as copies. 

Language — Conversational lessons on objects mainly, and careful correction of 
errors in speech; complete statements required in all recitations. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Reading — First and Second Readers, Stickney's Series. Supplementary Read- 
ing. 

Spelling — Spell by sounds; also spell easy words in reading lesson and short sen- 
tences, by letters; also spell days of the week and names of the months. 

Arithmetic — Counting by 3, 4, 5. Combinations through 19. Tables of 2, 3, 4 
and 5 in multiplication and division. Decimal value of lo's, loo's, looo's. All steps 
in addition and subtraction ; fractions ^, \. Practical examples. 

Geography — Oral lessons from " Our World ; " points of compass ; day and night ; 
change of seasons; mapping. 

Form — Work as outlined in Prang's " Use of Models." 

Color — Continue work of first year, and distinguish shades and tints. 

Object Lessons — Continue work of first year, and describe objects by form, quali- 
ties, and uses. 

Drawing — Dictation exercises, using straight and curved lines; copy simple 
figures. 

Writing — Writing pupils' names; writing, with pencil, short and familiar sen- 
tences on slate and paper. 

Language — Work of first year continued; attention called to forms of sentences. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Reading — Third Reader. Nursery and other supplementary reading. 

Spelling — All the words of the reading lessons and new words used in other les- 
sons. 

Arithmetic — Review and drill on tables and counting. All steps in multiplica- 
tion. Practical examples. 



COU/aSES OF STUDY. 197 

Geography — Oral lessons on the county and state. 

Form — Description of lines, and the simple plane figures and solids. 

Color — Hues, mixing colors. 

Object Lessons — Form, color, size, material, familiar qualities, uses, and sources of 
things, and by whom made. Animals, plants and minerals. 

Drawing — Exercises in dictation and copying. 

Writing — Spencerian Writing and Copy Book, No. 3. 

Language — Work of preceding years continued; reproduction of object lessons; 
attention to capitalizing and punctuatiofc. Exercises in composition. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Reading — Fourth Reader; read twice a week in Wide Awake. Other supple- 
mentary reading. 

Spelling — Spell words from all lessons, orally or by writing. 

Arithmetic — Review of third year's work. All steps in division. Constant drill 
on tables. Analysis of practical examples. Work in decimals, U. S. money and frac- 
tions. 

Geography — Careful study of New England. 

Form — Plane figure. 

Color — Mixing colors; formation of shades, tints and hues. Harmony of colors. 

Object Lessons — Continue work of previous year, and treat, in addition, of adap- 
tation of quality to use. 

Drawing — Designs in straight and curved lines; drawing pictures of objects, by 
imitation and dictation. 

Writing — Spencerian Copy Book, No. 4; writing from reading and other lessons, 
by writing spelling lessons. 

Language — Work of previous years continued and expanded; reproduction of 
stories read by teacher; simple narratives founded upon pictures; letter -writing. 

Music — Songs and hymns through the course taught by rote ; taught to read 
music from charts during third and fourth years. 



INDEX OF GRADUATES. 



Adams, Martha P. 


146 


Bixby, Lizzie M. 


49 


Alden, M. Ella 


lOI 


Blanchard, Edgar F. 


134 


Allen, Agnes E. 


134 


Blanchard, Luetta 


97 


Allen, Emma J. 


158 


Blunt, Carrie 


98 


Anderson, Allietta A. 


124 


Boothby, Angle L. 


72 


Andrews, Burt 


158 


Boston, Charles A. 


40 


Andrews, Martha O. 


171 


Bowker, William R. 


134 


Atkinson, Hattie 


48 


Boynton, Jennie C. 


124 


Atkinson, Will H. 


164 


Boynton, Lizzie B. 


129 


Austin, Mabel E. 


116 


Brackett, Laura N. 


49 






Brackett, Lura 


49 


Badger, Abner A. 


158 


Brackett, Mamie V. 


'59 


Badger, Forrest H. 


172 


Brackett, Sadie W. 


121 


Bailey, Holmes H. 


94 


Bradbury, James O. 


85 


Bailey, Mariana 


72 


Bradford, Anna E. 


108 


Baker, Amos L. 


94 


Briggs, Elmie J. 


152 


Baker, Emma 


129 


Briggs, Mary E. 


152 


Baker, Isadore A. 


116 


Brown, Emeline M. 


50 


Barker, Ella L. 


134 


Brown, Georgia A. 


m6 


Bartlett, Addie 


159 


Brown, James W. 


64 


Bass, Amanda I. 


97 


Brown, Lillian N. 


172 


Bass, Lillian E. 


124 


Brown, Lizzie M. 


89 


Bates, Helen N. 


85 


Brown, Rice 


50 


Beal, Isabel 


107 


Bucknam, Georgia P. 


85 


Beals, Rissia R. 


159 


Bugbee, Mary R. 


41 


Bean, Annie W. 


165 


Burr, Persis K. 


50 


Beedy, Nora M. 


146 


Butler, Frank W. 


160 


Belcher, Fanny S. 


159 


Butler, William O. 


137 


Bennett, Jennie S. 


Vs 






Bennett, Lorette C. 


Call, Cora L. 


129 


Berry, Addie S. 


79 


Campbell, Alice M. 


141 


Bessey, Merton W. 


172 


Cargill, Carrie A. 


72 


Bickmore, Mary E. 


165 


Carr, Fannie J. 


160 


Bicknell, Mary D. 


48 


Carr, Lillie A. 


160 


Billings, George F. 


57 


Carter, Lina V. 


142 


Billings, Maria N. 


57 


Carter, Lizzie H. 


108 


Bisbee, Charles M. 


40 


Carter, Lucy E. 


lOI 


Bisbee, Maria H. 


40 


Cartland, Nettie M. 


78 


Bishop, Alice M. 


159 


Carvill, Z. Vaughan 


105 


Bishop, Minnie J. 


159 


Case, John E. 


83 


Bixby, Electa W. 


40 


Chadbourne, J. Arthur 


102 


Bixby, John W. 


49 


Chadbourne, Mary A. 


130 



200 



FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



Chappell M. Hortense 


64 


Dillingham, Clara 


61 


Charles, Preston W. 


102 


Dixon, Annie M. 


"3 


Chase, Addie F. 


165 


Dixon, Emma S. 


"3 


Chase, Carrie A. 


140 


Dolley, Nettie G. 


148 


Chase, Lilla V. 


136 


Dolloff, Angle B. 


106 


Chick, Charles G. 


50 


Donovan, John B. 


9' 


Childs, Herman A. 


172 


Douglass, Carrie M. 


'53 


Church, Florence A. 


51 


Douglass, Grace L. 


'53 


Churchill, Lorene 


60 


Dow, Everett C. 


102 


Churchill, Minnie F. 


108 


Downing, A. Augusta 


121 


Clement, Celia E. 


72 


Downing, Ella F. 


58 


Clifford, Annie S. 


136 


Downing, Mary E. 


108 


Clifford, Edwin T. 


165 


Doyen, Sadie L. 


166 


Clifford, May L. 


'37 


Drew, Abbie L, 


99 


Clifford, Norman 


130 


Drew, Fidelia, 


106 


Clifford, Sunie C. 


172 


Drew, William J. 


89 


Clifford, Wesley N. 


137 


Dunton, Josephine W. 
Dunton, Martha J. 


'34 


Cobb, Helen M. 


'37 


148 


Cobb, Henrietta 


57 


Duley, Flora L. 


'53 


Cobb, Joseph J. 


98 


Duley, Nellie C. 


'54 


Coffin, Carrie B. 


'47 


Dyer, Milton B. 


9' 


Coffin, Elizabeth N. 


148 


Dyer, Susie M. 


41 


Coffin, Isabel A. 


116 






Colcord, Florence M. 


9' 


Eastman, Myra M. 


"7 


Colcord, Georgia \V. 


121 


Eaton, Crosby G. 


125 


Cole, Wm. H. B. 


51 


Eaton, Lizzie N. 


85 


Collins, Rose B. 


108 


Eaton, Marietta 


140 


Collins, Stella B. 


94 


Eaton, Mary E. 


'49 


Conant, Maud C. 


'37 


Eaton, Violette 


80 


Copeland, Clara F-. 


5' 


Elliot, Clara F. 


80 


Copeland, Lizzie M. 


5' 


Elliot, Ezra F. 


78 


Corliss, A. Diantha 


98 


Ellis, Clara M. 


108 


Corliss, Lewis H. 


99 


Ellis, Georgia A. 


88 


Couillard, Ernest L. 


'53 


Ellis, Lillian F. 


160 


Cowan, Grace L. 


165 


Ellis, Lizzie R. 


95 


Cowan, Ida S. 


165 


Emery, Mary E. 


'30 


Crabtree, Minnie F. 


99 


Evans, M. Augusta 


37 


Craig, Fred W. 


84 


Everett, Minnie A. 


142 


Craig, T. Parker 


124 






Croswell, Edward A. 


172 


Fales, Mae E. 


'34 


Crowell, Mabel A. 


160 


Farrar, Ida L. 


'35 1 


Cummings, Alice R. 


'53 


Farrar, Seretha E. 


'25 


Curtis, Belle D. 


'34 


Farrington, Sarah A. 


78 


Curtis, Sarah S. 


37 


Fassett, Emma I. 


130 


Cushman, Flavilla A. 


79 


Felch, Lew. M. 


'49 


Cushman, Thirza S. 


58 


Fellows, Annie M. 


'54 


Cutting, Emma A. 


'38 


Ferguson, George M. 


4' 


Cutts, Jennie M. 
Cutts, Maude L. 


'53 


Ferguson, May A. 


52 


148 


Fisher, Daniel L. 


80 






Fitch, Hattie E. 


'03 


Dakin, Anna M. 


65 


Floyd, Ada M. 


4' 


Davis, Frank L. 


148 


Floyd, Enos F. 


8i 


Davis, Gusta 


130 


f'ogg» Emma R. 


108 


Davis, Otis I. 


'30 


Fo som, Myrtie P. 


160 


Davis, Thomas J. 


65 


Forbes, Clara A. 


73 


Day, Emma L. 


79 


Ford, Sadie A. 


'54 


Day, R. Jennie 


61 


Foss, Carrie S. 


'54 


Delano, Susan J. 


70 


Foster, Alice I. 


121 


Dennett, Nellie 


142 


Foster, Frank C. 


"3 


Dike, George K. 


52 


Foster, N. Emma 


121 


Dill, M. Luella 


142 


Fowler, Moses A. 


99 



INDEX OF GRADUATES. 



20I 



Frazier, Olive A. 


113 


Hodgkins, Alice H. 


149 


Freeman, Emma J. 




Hodgkins, Lizzie S. 


114 


Frost, Fannie M. 


166 


Holden, Georgia R. 


90 


Furbush, Jennie S. 


86 


HoUey, Augusta A. 


74 


Furnel, Guy G. 


'54 


HoUey, Augusta B. 


149 






Holley, Ella M. 


106 


Gardner, Emma G. 


84 


Holman, E. Etta 


172 


Getchell, Eliza S. 


73 


Holmes, Henrietta M. 


167 


Gibbs, Statira E. 


113 


Holt, E. Burt 


117 


Giddinge, Mary L. 


86 


House, Clara E. 


125 


Giddinge, Nellie 


100 


House, Julia B. 


125 


Gill, Sarah 


84 


Howard, Henrietta 


86 


Gilman, Clara E. 


52 


Howe, Georgia F. 


74 


Goddard, Abbie E. 


117 


Hubbard, Minnie H. 


'35 


Goding, Joseph A. 


52 


Hunt, Anna V. 


8? 


Godwin, Emily W. 


160 


Hunt, C. Maria 


125 


Goodwin, Annie L. 


131 


Hupper, Lily G. 


167 


Goodwin, Mary L. 


42 


Huse, Abbie L. 


43 


Gordon, Delphina E. 


95 


Huse, Fannie W. 


53 


Gordon, Etta B. 


122 


Hussey, Vina F. 


'55 


Gorham, William E. 


73 


Hutchins, Juno F. 


172 


Gould, Pauline L. 


»55 


Hutchins, Lena B. 


167 


Greene, J. Arthur 


95 






Greenwood, Harry A. 


166 


Jackson, Cora A. 


'43 


Greenwood, Lizzie A. 


117 


Jackson, John 


43 


Gurney, Hettie B. 


122 


Jacobs, Mary V. 


126 






Jennings Albert E. 


167 


Hacker, Emma L. 


138 


Jennings, Clara A. 


100 


Haines, Juliette C. 


88 


Johnson, Clara A. 


'37 


Haines, Stephen 


91 


Johnson, Viola A. 


'38 


Haley, Alice M. 


161 


Johnston, Henrietta H. 


161 


Haley, Jane U. 


166 


Jones, Alice M. 


"4 


Hall, Florilla L. 


125 


Jones, Hannah S. 


95 


Hallowell, Florentius M. 


66 


Jones, Mira C. 


96 


Ham, Andietta L. 


'35 


Jones, Newton J. 


79 


Ham, Flora M. 


106 


Jordan, Charles S. 


96 


Hamlen, Florence E. 


70 


Jordan, Fannie B. 


"4 


Hamlin, Alice B. 


108 


Judkins, Annie F. 


'38 


Hardy, Lizzie A. 


81 






Harrington, Blanche M. 


'55 


Keene, M. Nettie 


"7 


Harrington, Charles A. 


74 


Keith, Herbert J. 


126 


Harris, Hannah M. 


166 


Kennison, Lillian V. 


161 


Harris, Joanna W. 


53 


Keniston, Rosa E. 


167 


Hartford, Annie A. 


172 


Kent, Minnie E. 


172 


Hartwell, Hattie 


140 


Keyes, Horence J. 


167 


Haskell, Melinda 


66 


Kilbreth, Etta 


70 


Hatch, Aldana C. 


74 


Kimball, Etta F. 


161 


Hatch William H. 


109 


Kimball, Nellie M. 


61 


Hayden, Addie Y. 


91 


Kinney, Nina E. 


167 


Hayden, Jennie M. 


42 


Knapp, Jerome B. 


43 


Hayden, Kittie L. 


100 


Knapp, Rose E. 


53 


Hayes, Charles A. 


61 


Knight, Joseph W. 


43 


Hayes, Edmund 


43 


Knight, L." Maria 


109 


Hayes, Mellen 


53 


Knowles, Margaret F. 


'73 


Hayes, Nellie M. 


38 


Knowles, Nettie M. 


'73 


Haynes, Lillian A. 


'3' 


Knowlton, Juliette 


66 


Haynes, Lovina H. 


86 






Hersom, Eula C. 


166 


, Lane, Neva 


'50 


Hewey, Lizzie S. 


103 


Lane, Stella E. 


150 


Hinckley, Clara A. 


61 


Lara, Mary P. 


66 


Hinkley, Essie J. 


166 


1 Leavitt, Edgar 


58 



26 



202 



FARMIXGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



Leaviit, Maryette, 


67 


Newell, WiUiam H. 


75 


Lebroke, Eva A. 


135 


Nichols, Eldora 


81 


Leighton, Mary T. 


87 


Norcross, Martha E. 


92 


Leland, Ella A. 


44 


Norton, Addie F. 


96 


Leland, Emma C. 


44 


Norton, Alice M. 


"5 


Leland, Louie A. 


74 


Norton, Carrie B. 


'73 


Lincoln, Lillian I. 


150 


Norton, Carrie F. 


122 


Lombard, Frank \V. 


161 


Norton, Dora M. 


70 


Longfellow, Ella J. 


'55 


Norton George W. 


97 


Longley, Mary E. 


100 


Norton, Isabella B. 


139 


Loomis, Lura A. 


140 


Norton, James S. 


144 


Lord, Charles 


114 


Norton, Lavella, A. 


132 


Lord, Mary O. 


44 


Norton, Lewis J. 


162 


Lothrop, Sadie J. 


168 


Norton, Lizzie H. 


75 


Lovejoy, Cora C. 


109 


Norton, Love M. 


67 


Lovejoy, Melvin W. 


109 


Norton, Mary E. 


126 


Lowe, Manley E. 


100 


Norton, Oliver S. 


62 


LoweU, Julia E. 


44 


Norton, Ruth A. 


132 


Luce, Affie E. 


H3 


Norton, S. Fannie 


38 


Luce, Elgiva B. 


168 


Nottage, Fred C. 


162 


Luce, Marion A. 


138 


Nutter, L. Blanche 


'44 


Luce, John R. 


96 






Lufkin, Ida M. 


»5o 


Osborne, Hannah E. 


92 


Luques, Lutie F. 


'3» 






Lyde, Charlotte 


92 


Packard, Ora K. 


n8 


Lyde, Louise 


92 


Paddack, Anna E. 


7' 


Lynch, Katie M. 


162 


Page, Henry J. 


162 






Page, Marie V. 


59 


Macartney, May L. 


173 


Park, Etta P. 


141 


Macomber, Abbie A. 


126 


Parker, Alvint W. 


'39 


Mallett, Lillian S. 


'55 


Parker, Katie \V. 


"5 


Mallett, Wilbert G. 


'55 


Parkhurst, Mary E. 


92 


Mann, Ella J. 


140 


Parsons, AdeUa C. 


45 


Mansfield; Henry H. 


135 


Parsons, Ellen N. 


87 


Mansur, Alice C. 


100 


Parsons, Emma M. 


lOI 


Manter, Alice A. 


"4 


Patten, Alice S. 


156 


Manter, J. Sherman 


122 


Patten, Arthur B. 


'44 


Mayhew, JiUie H. 


'3' 


Patten, Herbert 


75 


Mayhew, Louise D. 


58 


Paul, May E. 


n8 


McCollister, Mellie H. 


96 


Pearce, Anna DeW. 


45 


McDonald, Alexander P. 


'43 


Pearson, Josephine 


150 


McGaffey, Emma C. 


90 


Pease, Daniel 


54 


McLain, Addie F. 


'43 


Perham, Frank E. 


103 


McLain, Lizzie J. 


'39 


Perkins, Joseph \V. 


no 


McRoberts, Elizabeth M. 


87 


Perkins, Louis M. 


132 


Melcher, Lizzie G. 


67 


Perkins, Martha T. 


38 


Merchant, Adelaide M. 


156 


Perkins, Mary C. 


144 


Merrill, Emma L. 


62 


Peva, Georgia F. 


156 


Merrill, Emma R. 


'73 


Phinney, Hortense F. 


141 


Merrill, Hortense M. 


'3' 


Pickard, Arthur 


168 


Merrill, Milton L. 


53 


Pickard, Clara 


168 


Merry, Nellie E. 


no 


Pickard, Inez C. 


168 


Moore, Elizabeth D. 


156 


Pierce, Effie S. 


'39 


Morrill, Mae B. 


no 


Pierpont, Dicea S. 


75 


Morrill, Mary S. 


'43 


Pinkham, Annie M. 


III 


Morrill, M. Emma 


45 


Pinkham, Nancv M. 


54 


Morison, Haltie R. 


67 


Pollard, Mary C. 


n8 


M orison, James 


114 


Pollard, Mary D. 


'73 


Morrison, Alice 


'73 


Porter, Mary E. 


162 


Munger, Lillian M. 


no 


Porter, R. May 


126 


Murray, Charles S. 


126 


Potter, Alice J. 


62 



INDEX OF GRADUATES. 



203 



Potter, Sara>i L. 


90 


Pottle, Aimer W. 


139 


Pratt, Annette L. 


139 


Prescott, Alice A. 


106 


Prescott, Delia 


173 


Prescott, Lizzie M. 


106 


Prescott, Nellie A. 


88 


Prince, Alvin E. 


68 


Proctor, Uriah 


71 


Purington, Charles W. 


63 


Quint, Mary A. 


82 


Rackliff, Flora M. 


136 


Ramsdell, Lillian L. 


168 


Reed, Elva M. 


68 


Reed, Etta M. 


118 


Reed, Josie T. 


168 


Reed, Julia F. 


54 


Reed, Lewis H. 


82 


Reed, M. Etta 


162 


Reed, Nellie F. 


63 


Reed, Samuel H. 


54 


Rice, Minnie L. 


163 


Rich, Ruth G. 


45 


Richards, Emily J. 


III 


Richards, H. Pearl 


141 


Richards, John E. 


136 


Richardson, Annie E. 


"5 


Richardson, Annie L. 


122 


Ridlon, Marcia E. 


123 


Robbins, Fred E. C. 


76 


Robbins, Myrtie G. 


163 


Roberts, John G. 


45 


Robinson, Emma J. 


173 


Rogers, Dora 


103 


Rogers, Lizzie A. 


76 


Rogers, Rena H. 


III 


Rounds, Agnes L 


127 


Rounds, Arthur C. 


128 


Rounds, Ralph S. 


128 


Russell, Carrie S. 


156 


Russell, Frank E. 


157 


Russell, John A. 


ii8 


Russell, M. Nellie 


163 


Sanders, Abbie P. 


82 


Sanders, H. Arthur 


151 


Sanders, Martha W. 


"5 


Sanderson, Annie E. 


128 


Sanderson, Edward P. 


119 


Sanford, Lilla M. 


92 


Sawtelle, May H. 


"5 


Scales, Clara L. 


169 


Scales, Lilla M. 


82 


Seavey, Harriet A. 


173 


Sewall, Alice M. 


132 


Sewall, Carrie G. 


63 


Sewall, Lucy M. 


107 


Sewall, Nettie M. 


157 


Sharp, Hadessa L. 


169 



Shaw, Maria M. 


68 


Skinner, Carrie A. 


55 


Skinner, Nellie A. 


163 


Small, Emma S. 


88 


Small, Flora E. 


132 


Small, Fred O. 


174 


Smart, Adelaide E. 


133 


Smith, Charles W. 


93 


Smith, Lucilla E. 


59 


Smith, Sarah A. 


104 


Smith, Will L 


169 


Smullen, Addie P. 


119 


Smullen, Maggie E. 


m 


Soule, Halie P. 


93 


Spear, Herman S. 


169 


Sprague, Dora A. 


39 


Springer, Hattie M. 


140 


Springer, Nellie F. 


163 


Springstead, Maggie A. 


144 


Stacy, Annie M. 


123 


Stanley, Calvin F. 


82 


Stanley, Edith C. 


169 


Stanley, Edith J. 


151 


Stanley, Freelan 0. 


68 


Stanley, Philip E. 


157 


Stanley, Rose M. 


174 


Starbird, Attie T. 


III 


Starbird, Mary B. 


107 


St. Clair, Ashley 


59 


Stetson, Herbert E. 


76 


Stetson, J. Walter, 


69 


Stevens, Addie B. 


45 


Stevens, Annie M. 


151 


Stevens, Carrie H. 


169 


Stevens, Clara S. 


59 


Stevens, Eugene C. 


83 


Stevens, Flora E. 


112 


Stevens, Hattie F. 


60 


Stevens, Herbert L. 


169 


Stevens, J. Frank 


76 


Stevens, N. Maria 


63 


Stewart, Hannah B. 


39 


Stiles, Mary E. 


90 


Stilson, Nancy 


123 


Stone, Gertrude L. 


169 


Stoyell, Hiram B. 


69 


Strout, Flora E. 


163 


Sullivan, Carrie L 


157 


Swain, Addie M. 


"5 


Swain, Jennie F. 


"5 


Swan, Olive H. 


46 


Sweet, John A. 


46 


Sweet, Lizzie M. 


55 


Swett, Mertland W. 


170 


Swift, Alice C. 


151 


Swift, Julia W. 


157 


Swift, Mattie H. 


170 


Sylvester, Laura M. 


170 


Sylvester, Lucy M. 


170 


Sylvester, Mabel, 


170 



204 



FARMINGTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



Talbot, Julia S. 


97 


Walker, Charles S. 


112 


Tarbox, Josephine L. 


60 


Walker, Louise L. 


56 


Tarbox, Rose M. 


133 


Walker, Priscilla S. 


47 


Tarbox, S. Evelyn 


60 


Warren, Alice E. 


123 


Taylor, Emma 


119 


Webb, Elizzie R. 


112 


Taylor, Floriman J. 


93 


Westall, Mary 


152 


Taylor, Frances E. 


55 


Weston, Carrie M. 


93 


Thayer, Mary L. 


104 


Weston, Delia A. 


112 


Thayer, Sarah C. 


47 


Weston, Lizzie F. 


94 


Thomas, Clare B. 


104 


Weymouth, Lillie D. 


164 


Thomas, Lewis A. 


76 


Wheeler, Sammie C. 


174 


Thompson, Hattie F. 


119 


Whipple, Belle 


124 


Thompson, Josephine 


79 


White, Carrie P. 


H5 


Thompson, Mary J. 


119 


White, Mary D. 


145 


Thorndike, Lucy H. 


133 


Whitney, Alice M. 


164 


Thomdike, Winifred B. 


104 


Whitney, Charlene A. 


158 


Thorne, Helen C. 


87 


Whitney, Frederick E. 


56 


Thome, Jennie M. 


120 


Whitney, Myra A. 


71 


Titcomb, Elizabeth W. 


120 


Whittier, Annie V. 


56 


Titcomb, Ella F. 


'45 


Whittier, Carrie A. 


152 


Titcomb, Joseph S. 


'5' 


Whittier, E. Vodisa 


56 


Titcomb, Sarah P. 


^liZ 


Whittier, Gardner M. 


^ 


Tobey, Susie K. 


39 


Whittier, Grace E. 


120 


Toothaker, Olivia M. 


47 


Whittier, Mary E. 


»33 


Torrey, Eugene L. 


H5 


Whittredge, Lizzie F. 


164 


Townsend, Mary A. 


87 


WiUard, Edith A. 


136 


Townsend, NeUie F. 


104 


WiUett, Susie L. 


'52 


Tozier, Ardelle M. 


163 


Williams, Charles E. 


64 


Tozier, Hattie E. 


"74 


Williams, Laura H. 


171 


True, Lizzie C. 


77 


Winslow, EUen A. 


129 


Tuck, Aide L. 


107 


Winslow, Rosa 


171 


Tuck, John A. 


105 


Winter, George H. 


158 


Tufts, ainton D. 


87 


Winter, John C. 


90 


Tufts, Mahala R. 


55 


Witherell, Edith M. 


'74 


Tukey, Alonzo P. 


47 


Woodbury, Clinton A. 


77 


Turner, 'Addie A. 


164 


Woodbury, Roliston 


48 


Turner, Lucia A. 


88 


Woodman, Addie F. 


171 


Tuttle, T. Elwood 


93 


Woodward, Clara M. 


112 


Twombly, Sidney S. 


120 


Woodward, Hattie A. 


171 


Tyler, J. Albert 


141 


Works, Carrie J. 


112 






Worthley, Frank C. 


'45 


Vamey, Clare A. 


174 


Worthley, Lewis F. 


77 




77 


Wright, Sophia G. 


107 


Vaughan, Halie P. 


116 


Wyman, Elwood T. 


'45 


Vaughan, Mira Q. 


39 


Wyman, Emma S. 


105 


Verrill, Annie M. 


107 


Wyman, Josephine C. 


171 


Verrill, Myra K. 


164 


Wyman, Martha B. 


89 


Voter, Fannie A. 


170 










Yeaton, Angie G. 


lOI 


Wade, Carrie A. 


171 


Yeaton, Cora A. 


lOI 


Wadsworth, Elida V. 


>23 


Young, Ada B. 


174 


Wait, Alice M. 


»74 


Young, Harriet P. 


^Zl 


Wait, Lydia P. 


152 


Young, W. Scott 


'74 



CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS. 



Herbert E. Stei'son, Second Class 1872. 

Correction. — Eugene J., born Dec. 25, 1880, died, March 24, 1884. 

Clinton A. Woodbury, Second Class 1872. 

Correction. — Donald Clinton, born Sept. 30, 1879, died, Aug. 28, 
1881. 

James O. Bradbury, Second Class 1874. 

Addition. — Married, Aug. 5, 1877, Ella S. Butler, 7«:/^<7 died June 28, 
i88g. 

Helen B. Coffin, Teacher 1886-9, 1880-2, 1883-5. 

Addition. — Married, Aug. 5, 1875, Mr. Daniel Beedy, of Farming- 
ton, who died, July 2g, i88g. 



I 



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