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The 

HONIG/HOENIG FAMILY 

of Kirchenbirk, Falkenau and Karlsbad, Bohemia 

Including the Related Families 

Ad.er (Fsikensu), Heller (Mies), Blaustern (T achau and Vienn a) and Aschner (Vienna) 

F.scher (Alt-Rohiau/Karisbad), Loewy (Budau ne ar S aaz) , Holzner (Theusing, Purie,), 

and the Other Jewish Families in Falkenau 





ttonig 



By LEOPOLD HOENIG 

COPYRIGHT 1982, 1998 By LEOPOLD HOENIG 



TO 



and 



my daughters, GAIL SHARON HOENIG 



HELENE MICHELLE HOENIG 

who will continue 
the family heritage 
in the years ahead. 



and 



MY FATHER, JOSEPH HOENIG 



1900-1991 



who passed down 
to me the story of 
the hardships and 
joys of our family. 
He lived a long, 
happy and 
successful life. 
We will never 
forget him. 



Acknowledgements 



• 



This book could not have been written without the assistance of my late father, Joseph 
Hoenig, who was skeptical at first but who then became extremely interested in my work. He 
provided the basic family information and, until his death, translated letters and documents from 
German into English for me and answered whatever correspondence needed inquiries or replies 
in German. 

My wife, Doris Carol Hoenig, and our two daughters, Gail Sharon Hoenig and Helene 
Michelle Hoenig, showed extreme patience during the many months it took me to complete the 
original book as well as this updated revision. 

Others who provided information and assistance include: 



C. Hugh Abramson 

Dr. Joseph Aschner 

Ulrich Aschner 

Zeev Aschner 

Zdenek Bezdekovsky 

June Kohner Bierman 

David L. Binhak 

Rosa Hahn Brick 

Dr. Joseph Budlovsky 

Karl Budlovsky 

Susan Budlovsky 

Elsie Ann Hoenig Carrick 

Ray Frank Dobinsky 

Edna Morris Esberg (*) 

Alma Zepin Farkas (*) 

Mizzi Feuerstein 

Selma Pachter Frank (*) 

Gertrude Aschner Frohlich 

Egon Geiger 

Fred Glaser (*) 

Hildegarde Schoen Hecht (*) 

Paul Glaser Hill (*) 

Ernst Hoenig (*) 

Gretl Fischer Hoenig (*) 

Gustav Hoenig (*) 

Inge Greve Hoenig 

John David Hoenig 

Dr. Julius Hoenig 

Leopoldine "Poldi" HOnig 

Morris Hoenig (*) 

Otto Hoenig (*) 

Vera Holzner Jilek 



Josef Kreissl (*) 

Robert Lallement 

Elizabeth Aschner Laster 

Oliver Laster 

OttoLowy 

Werner Lowy 

Alfred Meyers Jr. 

Harold Meyers (*) 

Betty Anne Meyers McDougal (*) 

Sonja Hoenig Nanni 

Alice Stransky Orlicka 

Dr. Eva Orlicka 

Robert Posen 

Stephen Posen 

Sylvia Zepin Posen 

Emma HOnig Preindl (*) 

Frieda Hoenig Rupp (*) 

Hermine Weiss Sagl (*) 

Bertha Pfeffer Schwarzova (*) 

Dr. Boris Sprusil 

Theresia Siissner 

Rolf Tasche 

Helene Linger 

Frantisek Vana 

Jarmila Vanova 

Eva Vergeinerova 

Lici Treuer Weinrib 

Gerhart Weiss 

Suzy Weiss 

Gerda Ann Hoenig Whitehouse (*) 

Herma Fischer Wiener (*) 

(*) = Deceased 



A sabbatical leave for study for the 1981-82 school year granted to me by the New York City 
Board of Education and approved by Miss Joan M. Kenny, Community Superintendent of District 25 
Queens, enabled me to complete the original edition of this book, which was in partial fulfillment of the 
research requirements of the leave. 



Table of Contents 



• 



■ 



Introduction 

Chapter 1 : The Hbnig/Hoenig and Adler Families and the History of the Jews in Falkenau, 
Karlsbad, Kirchenbirk and Mies, Bohemia 



Family Background 2 

Notes About Names 2 

Geographical Setting and Historical Background 3 

"Edler Von HOnigsberg" n 

More Recent History 13 

Earliest Known Family Members 1 8 

Others Migrate to America 23 

The Holocaust 26 

Other Jewish Families in Falkenau 31 

Other Names From My Grandmother's Autograph Album 43 

Epilogue 44 

Chapter 2: My Life - From Europe to America, By Joseph Hoenig 45 

Chapter 3: How I Survived as a World War II Commando, By Paul [Glaser] Hill 68 

Chapter 4: Diary of My 1904 Trip Back to My Birthplace, By Carl Binhak 72 

Chapter 5: How the Nazi Invasion of Austria Changed My Life, By Sonja Hoenig Nanni 82 

Chapter 6: Maps 89 

Chapter 7: Cemeteries 95 

Pictures Unnumbered pages following Page 1 1 

Family Tree Charts - - Ill 

Bibliography 212 

Index of Names 214 

Index of Places 252 




Introduction 

This is the story of my family which, probably for many centuries, lived modestly and 
quietly in Bohemia (now part of the Czech Republic) and whose descendants today are scattered 
over four continents. 

It is my hope that what I have started here, a project which took more than two years to 
complete the original edition, and which now includes more than an additional decade of work, 
will be continued with an annual updating which I am now initiating. Since I have transcribed all 
the information and charts onto computer disks, it is now possible to easily correct any mistakes 
or omissions, do some more historical research, and update the charts with information about 
births, deaths and marriages. The archives of the Jewish State Museum in Prague, which has 
documents and records from more than one hundred Bohemian communities, should be extremely 
helpful in this effort. 

My work has brought me in contact with many relatives — in person, on the telephone, 
and by mail. Their interest in this project is most welcome and their help in gathering and 
confirming information is most appreciated. Coming in contact with so many relatives for the 
first time is a great thrill, and I am confident these relationships will become more close as the 
years pass on. 

Genealogy, the study of family history, is a fascinating field. Knowledge of one's roots 
gives one a strong feeling and pride for his background and helps to unite a group of widely 
dispersed people whose ancestors placed a strong emphasis on family ties. It is an area in the 
social sciences which should become a part of every school's curriculum. To this end I developed 
such a course of study in 1 982 and taught it as a unit of work in my social studies classes at 
Parsons J.H.S. 168 Queens for many years until my retirement from teaching in June, 1991. 

This, then, is the result of these efforts. 



Corrections, revisions, comments, updated information and all questions should be sent to 
me. This book is not published with the intent to provide anyone with a claim to any estate or 
inheritance nor is it intended as a profit-making venture. 

LEO HOENIG 

453-C FDR Drive 

Apartment C-1 504 

New York, N.Y. 10002-5906 

U.S.A. 



Telephone: (212) 533-1512 



January, 1998 



Chapter 1 

The Honig/Hoeniq and Adler Families 
f and theHl itory of the Jews in Falkenau. Karlsbad. 

Kirchenbirk and Mies, Bohemia 

FAMILY BACKGROUND 



• 



Our widely dispersed families are descended from Josef and Sophie Lov (or Levi) Adler of 
Falkenau (now Sokolov), Jacob and Rosa LOv (Levi) Spiegl of Eger (now Cheb) and Mr. and Mrs. 
(born LOv/Levi) [first names unknown] Steiniger of Falkenau, on one side, and from the three 
sons — Bemhard, Josef and Simon — and two daughters — Sophie (married name Klein) 
and Anna (married name Blaustern) — of Israel HOnig of Kirchenbirk (now Kostelm Briza 
— meaning place of birches), near Falkenau. 

Josef and Sophie Adler had two daughters: Anna, who married Wilhelm Heller of Mies 
(now Stribro — meaning silver), and Theresia, who married Adolf Fischer of Alt-Rohlau (now 
StarS Role). Jacob and Rosa Spiegl migrated to New York City with ten of their twelve children 
in the early 1 900s, while the Steinigers were childless. 

Bemhard and Josef Honig lived in Bohemia, although Bernhard, a teacher of languages, 
also resided in present-day Roumania and Hungary as well as in Vienna. Bernhard's first wife, 
Minna Neuberger, died in a cholera epidemic in Vienna a few months after the birth of their 
youngest daughter, Adele in 1 873. My father often said Simon HOnig went off to Hungary and was 
never again in contact with the rest of the family. Sophia Hoenig Klein migrated to the United 
States in the 1 850s and settled in St. Louis, Missouri, while her sister, Anna Blaustern, lived in 
Tachau and later moved to Vienna with her family. 



NOTES ABOUT NAMES 



• 



The spelling of the name Honig was changed to Hoenig by all of those who migrated to the 
United States, Canada and England. 

Inasmuch as our family members were German-speaking and the communities in which 
they lived had German names when they lived there, those German names are used in this book. 
Listed below are the German names of towns and cities and a mountain range in Bohemia found in 
this book or in the area along with their newer Czech names. 

GERMAN NAME CZECH NAME 

Alt-Rohlau Stars Role 

Aussig usti 

Bodenbach Podmokly 

Bahmisch Leipa Ceske Lipa 

Komotau Chomutov 

Eger Cheb 

Elbogen Loket 

Erzgebirge....Ore Mountains [English] Krusne Hory 

Falkenau Sokolov 

Graslitz Kraslice 

Joachimsthal Jachymov 



GERMAN NAME CZECH NAME 

Karlsbad Karlovy Vary 

Kirchenbirk Kostelni Briza 

KOnigsberg Klimkovice 

Kuttenplan (Plan) Chodova Plan| 

Lanz Lomnice 

Lichtenstadt Hroznetin 

Lobositz Lovosice 

Lundenberg Breclav 

Marienbad Marianske Lazne 

Mies Stribro 

Pi| sen p| Z en 

Prag....Prague [English] p ra ha 

Schonlind Krasna Lipa 

Teplitz-Schonau Teplice-Sanov 

Theresienstadt Terezin 



GEOGRAPHICAL SETTING 

Falkenau [also listed as Falknov] is located in northwestern Bohemia — today in the 
Czech Republic — on the Eger (now Ohre) River. It got its name from a man named Wastl who 
started the town in order to hunt for falcons, which made Falkenau their home. Before World 
War, Bohemia was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Since the end of World War I in 1 91 8 
the names of the cities and towns in the area have been changed from German to Czech and most of 
the German-speaking people who once lived there had to leave, according to the terms of the 
Potsdam Conference of 1 945. 

Located in the heart of the brown coal basin, Falkenau — now known as Sokolov in Czech 
— today has many glassworks, textile factories and coal-processing plants. An early Baroque 
castle, built in 1663, and two early Baroque churches are among its architectural highlights. 

In 1 989 Inge Hoenig, an artist and wife of Dr. Julius Hoenig, painted a landscape of the 
Falkenau marketplace in the center of the city. One sees the church in the center background In 
front of the church stands a memorial column for the victims of a cholera epidemic Further 
away from the church is a statue of a man holding a falcon; hence the name Falkenau As one faces 
the church, the prison, with its red roof, is to the right and the Ruczek house is next to the 
prison, further away from the church. The former Bloch house, with a red awninq is on the 
opposite side of the marketplace 

About 13-1/2 miles (22 km.) to the east of Falkenau is Karlsbad, where a number of 
family members lived. Founded by, and named after Charles (Karl) IV in 1 347-48 this city 
was famous in the 1 9th century as a resort place of European kings, princes and dukes Its 
world-famous baths — recommended for a variety of gastrointestinal disorders and diseases of 
the motor and nervous systems — and its pensions, sanatoria, colonnades and luxury hotels 
date from the last century. Today, Karlsbad is also a center of the Czech glass and porcelain 
industry. Kaolin deposits are nearby. 

The most famous porcelain factory in the area is located in Alt-Rohlau, a village just to the 
north of Karlsbad, where the family of Adolf and Theresia Adler Fischer lived. Emil and Hermine 
Fischer Kreissl were among those who worked in this porcelain factory. 

Kirchenbirk and Schonlind (where the old Falkenau Jewish cemetery is located and was 
used prior to 1 878) lie to the south of Falkenau in the Kaiserwald (Emperor's Woods) on the 
road to Kbnigswart (Kynzvart). In this little mountain village of Kirchenbirk my great grand- 



m 



% 



father, Bernhard Honig, a member of the Levite tribe, may have been born in July 1830 
(although some think he was born in the village of Altsattl, near Elbogen). His brother Josef 
Honig, lived in the Stammhaus (Family "Root" House) in Kirchenbirk with his wife and their 
nine children and he died there of diabetes in the spring of 1900. Josefs son, Ariel, and his 
wife, Klara Griinhut, and their seven children also lived in the Stammhaus which was still 
standing and occupied in October, 1996, when I visited the area. One of the elderly residents of 
Kirchenbirk, Zdenek Bezdekovsky, pointed out the house to me and he showed me the bars on the 
side rear door and winows of the rear section of the two-story house which indicated it was the 
old post office. Today, this small hamlet has only a letterbox on the side of the house, which is 
located on a little square across the road (leading from Rudolec to Schonlind) from the 
bombed-out church. In all, there are about ten buildings in Kirchenbirk. 

Assuming that the Honigs, Lovs, Adlers, Hellers, Spiegls and Fischers lived in the 
mountain towns near Falkenau and Karlsbad for many centuries, their history — and that of 
their fellow Bohemian Jews — is a remarkable study of survival through centuries of 
massacres, deprivation, poverty and other forms of discrimination. What follows now are some 
highlights of the plight of these Bohemian Jews. 

The disputed history of the earliest known Jews in Bohemia is shrouded in legend. The 
oldest Jewish sources refer to Bohemia as "Erez Kena'an," or Land of Slavic Speaking People. 
Some residents of its districts — including some Jews — were engaged in a vigorous slave 
trade. Jewish traders are mentioned in the Ruffellstaetten Tax Ordinance of 906. Their 
caravans traveled the great trade highway from the Rhineland to the Middle East, and in that year 
they formed a community on the left bank of the Moldau (Vltava) River at Prague. 

Jewish Bohemians were known as "Bene Heth" (Children of Heth). Because there was a 
great deal of trade with the East and there are Byzantine features in the Old Prague Synagogue's 
(Altshul) rituals, many assume that these Jews came to Bohemia from Germany, France, Poland 
and Austria in order to escape the Black Death. 

In Prague, Jews, and others, who brought salt or goods into the city had to pay a tax to St. 
Stephen's Church in 1 067. The Jews called Prague "Mezigrade," and from this city they spread 
into the Bohemian countryside. 

While there were occasional periods of toleration, the Jews of Bohemia from the 1 1 th 
through the 1 5th century suffered through humiliating restrictions, punitive taxes, forced 
baptisms, violent persecutions, and expulsions followed by readmissions. 

During the First Crusade period, in 1096, Jews were massacred or forcibly baptized. 
Two years later, when they tried to migrate to Poland or Hungary, Duke Vratislav II confiscated 
all their personal property. 



In 1 1 24, Jacob, a Prague Jew who had been forcibly baptized, returned to Judaism. When 
he removed the Christian altar and holy relics from the synagogue he was immediately thrown in 
jail. A fire destroyed the synagogue in 1 142. 

The attitude of the Church toward the Jews became, on the whole, benevolent, and 
conditions improved. Many Bohemian Jews became scholars. A friendly Papal Bull issued by 
Pope Innocent IV in 1 254 was confirmed by Ottocar II. Some Jews became moneylenders. 

By the next century, however, the horrors inflicted on Bohemia's Jews reappeared. In 
1321 seventy-five Jews were burned at the stake in Prague. King Johann of Luxembourg, in 
1336, plundered the synagogues and ordered the arrest of all Jews in Bohemia because he was 
unhappy with the taxes collected. He wanted to extort a ransom. Later that year 53 Jews were 
burned to death in Prague and Jews were murdered in other Bohemian towns. 



Emperor Charles IV divided with his nobles the possessions of Jews massacred in 1 348 
and 1349 during the Black Death in Prague. The entire Jewish community in Eger was 
butchered in 1350. Gravestones in the Prague Jewish cemetery were demolished on April 18, 
1 389 and many Jews were killed. They were accused of committing all sorts of "crimes" during 
this perios, ranging from "insulting the host" to "poisoning the wells." As usual, these charges 
of "crimes" were merely designed to make the Bohemian Jews scapegoats for the shortcomings of 
government and society. 

There were more than six Jewish communities in this area, known as the Royal 
Community of Falkenau on the Eger (Czech name: Falknov on the Ohri), during the second half of 
the 1 9th century. Amongst them lived the well-known Elbogner, the Kreisrabbiner (Regional 
Rabbi). Elbogen was the central city of the Provincial region, according to a History of the Jews 
in Falkenau, Elbogen and Surroundings, by Dr. Gustav Treixler of Graslitz. 

During the massacres of Jews in the 1 5th century only the congregation in Eger — 
where Jacob and Rosa (Lov) Spiegl lived before migrating to New York — was allowed to 
develop. In Chomutov (Komotau) — where Frieda Honig was married to Karl Ritter in the 
20th century — the entire Jewish community was destroyed during the Hussite uprising of 
1419-37. 

In 1 434, Kaiser Siegismund granted his Reich Chancellor, Baron [Grafen] Kaspar Grafen 
Schlick, the Royal Possessor of Elbogen, the right to accept Jews in the town. Schlick was too 
good a businessman not to have made good use of the Jews who were granted permission to settle 
in the area. In the year 1 494 the Jews were expelled, but two years later they were again in 
Elbogen, but they were not allowed to live inside the city, so they resided outside its fortified 
walls. 

When King Ladislaus II, in 1 499, confirmed the rights granted to Karlsbad by Charles IV, 
he added, "as an especial favor," that no Jew should be allowed to settle there. This policy 
remained in effect until 1 793 when Emperor Francis II directed the city to obey the nation's 
general laws in its attitude toward Jews. The city fathers, however, paid little attention to the 
Emperor's decrees. 

In 1 541 Bohemian nobles conspired to charge Bohemian Jews with "high treason." Jews 
were forced to pay a high property tax and wear special clothing. Finally, all but 1 5 Jewish 
families were expelled from Prague until 1554 only to be thrown out again five years later for 
another two year period. More expulsions followed. 

Elbogen's Jews were given permission to live in the inner town in 1559. An official in 
Elbogen, a Mr. von Hassenstein, wanted to expel the Jew Meier and his brother-in-law Juda for 
unknown reasons. In 1 550 King Ferdinand I succeeded in interceding in their behalf. In the year 
1 569 the Jew, David Leo, from Elbogen is mentioned. Three Jews who had to pay Tuerkensteuer 
[tax] were registered in the city in 1570. Kaiser Rudolf II, in 1583, protested against 
tolerating the presence of the Jews in Elbogen, but he was persuaded to change his mind and in 
1 588 he ordered that Jews with their married children be allowed to remain. In the year 1 590 
the Prague Jews again had to intercede in behalf of the Elbogen Jews, and in 1 636 they were 
expelled again. Nevertheless, there is evidence they stayed on. Despite all these expulsions a 
chevra [congregation] existed in Elbogen until 1 893. 

There are remnants of a Jewish mikva in the cellars of certain houses in Kirchengasse. 
The place in front of the castle was called "Judenberg." In the Elbogner Museum there 
are two Jewish gravestones — one to the right of the outer door of the building, the other 
severely damaged and not readable, some 60 cm wide and 70 cm high — on the first floor next 
to the entrance door. The first stone is about the same width, but one meter, 20 centimeters 
high, containing an inscription of eight lines in Kaldaik [chaldaeischer] [Aramaic] writing, as 
stated some time ago when a Rabbi from Miskolcz visited the museum. According to him, the 
translation is supposed to say: 

5 



• 



* 







"...Here lies buried N.N. (name is unreadable) the best of our chevra 
the head of our crown. We are crying about his loss with bitter tears' 
Died on 1 4 August 1 532." 

h™l 9 TtfT^ e h f ° Und ° n 3 me , ad ° W in What is today near the Elb °9" er orphanage, near the 
house of the feudal sharecroppers (Robitsch). Perhaps the stones could have floated there 
during a rainstorm. However, considering the sizes, this is not very likely. Or they came from a 
nearby ancient Jewish cemetery for they lie outside the original town but inside the elbow made 
by the Eger River wh.ch flows around the town. This elbow - from which the town took its 
name - replaced the moat that once surrounded the castle, and is in an area which is now the 
Gartenstrasse. The Elbogner community at the time was probably the biggest one in the area It 
lost importance because the town lacked a railroad and was not situated on the main trade route 
t is interesting to note that The Elbogen Jews had the right to use the Ten Commandments 
[Torahs] and other holy books from the Eger community, which had been in the archives of the 
city council. In 1841 Salomon Sachs of Lichtenstadt was Regional Rabbi of the Elbogen and 
Saazer areas. The last Rabbi of Elbogen was the highly recognized Jewish scholar, Moses Sachs. 

The old Falkenau chevra [congregation] is probably just as old as the one in Elbogen and it 
must have been quite important at one time. In 1435, the Royal owner of Falkenau, the Brothers 
Barons [Grafern] Kaspar and Baron Mathias Schlick, also received permission for Jews to live 
in the town at the same time as they were granted that right in Elbogen. According to 20th 
century Falkenau town chronicles, three interrelated Jewish Hirschberg families who originally 
came from Konigsberg migrated to Falkenau on the Eger in the 1 6th century. However, they 
wandered and became extinct. During the years 1675-1699, Dr. Max Freudenthal indicates in 
his writings, The Jewish Visitors to the Leipzig Fair From the Years 1675 to 1699, (Frank- 
furt on the Main, 1902, page 20), the following Falkenau Jews are mentioned with the years 
they visited: Salomon Abraham (1687), Abraham Adam (1675), Moses Daniel (1675-1679), 
Jakob Epstein (1677), D. Simon Lazarus (1687), Jakob Levi (1676), Salomon Levin (1668)! 
Abraham Schlam (1676) and Simon Schlam (1677, 1678 and 1684-1688). There were not as 
many Jews from Falkenau as from Lichtenstadt, but there were a fair number. 

During the 17th century, Prague's Jews were granted special favors by Emperor 
Ferdinand II in the hope they would convert to Christianity. The Prague Synagogue assessed and 
collected taxes from the congregations throughout Bohemia. The first census was taken in 
Bohemia in 1651 — all Jewish births, marriages and deaths had to be reported to the Catholic 
priests — and one was taken every ten years thereafter until 1910. The next one was compiled 
in 1921. 

In 1715 all Jewish books were confiscated. Prague Jews staunchly fought against the 
French and, for all their loyalty, in 1745 all 60,000 Jews were banished from Bohemia by 
Maria Theresia after paying a 1 60,000 gulden "fine." Undesirable results, however, convinced 
the authorities to readmit the expelled Jews to such places as Mies and Pilsen, but not to Eger. 
Also the Familianten Gesetz Law of 1726 and reaffirmed by Joseph II in 1781 — limiting the 
number of married Jews who could live in a community in Bohemia, Moravia and Silesia and the 
number of children these Jewish families could have — still remained. 

Thus, the Jewish population of those areas was fixed, and any family that exceeded the 
prescribed numbers was subject to punishment.The discriminatory anti-Semitic laws forcing 
Jews to wear a yellow collar on their coats (the Jew Badge), and a limitation on the number of 
Jewish doctors remained until 1 782. Another Familianten stated that only one son from each 
registered Jewish family could marry, and only after his father had died. 

The law stipulated a Jew had to possess an inherited special permit and "family number" 
in order to marry and raise a family. The permit and "family number" were transferable only to 
the oldest son and to no other sibling. This law was not repealed until 1 849, but many Jews 
circumvented it by marrying secretly, according to Jewish law, and not registering with the 
authorities, or by marrying in other countries. These secret marriages were often referred to as 



bodden-chasenes, or attic weddings, and the children born to such "unmarried" couples were 
forced to use their mothers' maiden names and were considered illegitimate by the government. 
Some of these secretly married Jews were forced to wander from town to town and in time they 
formed a class of Jewish beggars. Many of the younger children who were not permitted to 
marry founded new communities in underpopulated areas, where the restrictions did not apply. 

Falkenau is also mentioned in the response literature. R. David Falkenau brings a question 
from KOnigsberg to Prague between 1770 and 1800 (according to a report, the "Kedesh 
Naphtali" of Rabbi Naphtali Herz, by Emden Heilpern II, Page 1 22, published by Professor 
S. H. Lieben in Prague in the special Holiday issue of the writings Vereines Afike Jehuda, 
Prague - 1 930). In the year 1 768 Herz Emden Reb. Moses, son of the deceased David 
Falkenau, in Eidlitz was granted a special title (Chabertitel). Karlsbad's Rabbi, Dr. Ignaz Ziegler 
tells in his Documentation of the History of the Jews in Karlsbad (1791 - 1869), 
Karlsbad - 1913, published by Rudolf Hengstenberg, Page 28), that the Falkenau Regional 
Rabbi Isaias Lewi, is mentioned on June 9, 1795 in Karlsbad's statistical archives. But 
Falkenau had never been the head of the area [Kreishauptstadt ], so there may have been an 
error, and, in fact, this document is dated from Falkenau yet the signature states: "Isaias Lewi, 
Regional Rabbi." Hengstenberg thinks Lewi was the Regional Rabbi of Elbogen, Satz or Falkenau, 
and was probably in charge of all three regions. Perhaps on June 9, 1 785 he may have come to 
Falkenau to perform a religious ceremony such as a circumcision. [However, Dr. Julius Hoenig 
doubts this, since circumcisions were done by mOhels, not Rabbis!] 

The Falkenau congregation later had strong backing, but it shrank considerably during 
the early 19th century because there were only individual Jews, not enough to form a 
community. Now and then they appear in church records started by P. Josef KOrbl in 1835. He 
mentions three Jewish Christenings: Abraham Herz from Nikolsburg (1718), the daughter of 
Abraham Masch from Bernliben (1737), and the womens' clothing maker Salomon Epstein 
(1839). These three probably converted in order to improve their businesses or to end their 
loneliness. Only after the year 1 848 did other Jewish families return to settle in Falkenau, 
those from small communities who traveled two hours to Falkenau and from Amitzgriin and 
SchOnlind, both of which had Jewish cemeteries dating from Maria Theresia's time and even at 
the time of Kaiser Josef II, who introduced tolerance toward the Jews. Kaiser Josef II made made 
Jews barons, hoping they would convert to Christianity. 

By the beginning of the 1 9th century a maximum of 8,600 Jews were permitted to reside 
in Bohemia. Some exceptions in the stringent marriage-permit laws were made, usually in 
exchange for financial payments, permitting a father's second and third sons, in addition to the 
eldest, to wed and raise a family. 

This discriminatory Familianten Gesetz system remained in effect until revolutionary 
movements swept through central Europe in 1 848. At this time, and even afterwards, many 
Jewish families lived as poorly as their ancestors and they strictly observed religious customs. 



u 



Earlier, an edict of tolerance (Toleranzpatent) by the Holy Roman Emperor Josef II of 
Austria (who was the son of Maria Theresia) on February 1 3, 1 782 wiped away discrimination 
against the Jews. Jewish schools with compulsory teaching in German were opened. Jews were 
allowed to attend general high schools and universities and had to serve in the army. They were 
allowed to enter the professions and could live outside the ghetto. At this time Bohemian Jews 
began to take an active part in developing the country's industry and trade. The Hoenigsberg 
family played a leading role. 

In 1 785 Emperor Josef II required all Jews in Galicia to take family names. In 1 787 this 
was extended to Bohemia and all other Austrian provinces, but not to Hungary. A registration fee [^ 
was charged and those Jews who paid large sums received such names as Goldstein or Rosenthal 
(for gems and flowers). Names like Stahl or Eisen (steel or iron) went to those who paid smaller 



fees. Those who had no money received nonsense names such as Ochsenschwanz (ox tail) 
Treppengealender (stairway railing), Bauchgeschwuhr (stomach ulcers), Temperaturwechsel 
(temperature change), Wanzenknicker (bug squasher) or Galgenstrick (gallows rope). 

Ten years later Bohemian Jews were permitted to live in places where they had resided in 
1 725 and they could engage in any occupation except selling alcoholic beverages or leasing flour 
mills. New synagogues could be built, but only with the permission of the government In order 
to obtain a marriage license, Bohemian Jews had to have completed a German elementary school 
education or be admitted to a Talmudic school. 

During this one hundred year period before the 1 848 revolution, those Bohemian Jews 
who lived in the small villages and in the countryside lived a meager existence and were slaves to 
their work in order to feed their large families. The basic diet consisted of potatoes and bread, 
while the typical Shabbos meal included challah loaves (called barches in Bohemia) and goose. 

Very few Bohemian Jews during this time were craftsmen such as tailors (a trade learned 
in the early 20th century by my late father, Joseph Hoenig, in Falkenau and Prague), 
shoemakers and plumbers. Some of the region's Jewish tanners eventually became respected 
leather manufacturers, and others manufactured potash for a while. Many were simply poor 
peddlers, and other Bohemian Jews were involved in levying tolls. At the other end of the 
economic ladder, the tenants of the manorial breweries became the Jewish aristocracy in the 
region. 

It seems that the small Jewish community existed in Steinbach. even before 1 725. These 
communities, were definitely younger than the Elbogners and the old Falkenauers. The 
businessman Israel HOnig in Kirchenbirk kept the birth, marriage and death records for all of 
these little Jewish communities for many years. The history of the three places are probably 
kept in documents in the Eger archives, which are very extensive, and for the history of Elbogen 
in the State Archives and in the Elbogen Archives. 

In the year 1 806 one Jew, Jonas Rosner from SchOnlind, received permission to build a 
Jewish kitchen in Karlsbad. A regional Jewish cemetery already existed in the hills surrounding 
SchOnlind and, in 1 996, it still stood, virtually untouched and overgrown with grass and moss 
for more than half a century, with nearly 1 00 gravestones — all but three in Hebrew. After 
the year 1848 some Jewish citizens who lived in the little surrounding places moved to 
Karlsbad. In 1850 Filipp and Barbara Low from Kirchenbirk and Nathan and Barbara 
Buxbaum purchased houses [Schuettueber Hauser ]. In the year 1853 Jakob L6wy from 
Arnitzgrun lived in Karlsbad (Ziegler, Document Pages 29, 107, 108). The records from 
SchOnlind (1839-1896) and from Kirchenbirk - Arnitzgrun (1840 until 1896) were kept 
by the Falkenau Jewish community before World War II. During these 58 years 189 births, 41 
marriages and 1 1 9 deaths were recorded in SchOnlind; the other records, from Kirchenbirk - 
Arnitzgrun, show 144 births, 31 marriages and 1 14 deaths. Also in the Chodau community's 
records for the same years there appear 132 births, 19 marriages and 71 deaths. It is quite 
possible that smaller congregations existed even before 1725. In comparison, the oldest 
Falkenau Jewish register for the period 1840-1896, contain 259 births, 62 marriages and 
1 20 deaths, which means that in 1 896 the Falkenau Jewish community had more citizens than 
the SchOnlind community and was more than twice as large as the ones in Arnitzgrun and Chodau. 

The register from Steinbach was kept at Franzensbad prior to the Holocaust. Before 1819 
the Steinbacher Jews were given permission by the authorities to erect a synagogue [Gebethaus] 
but had to pay taxes to start a building. It isn't known how much these taxes were, because this 
community was very small and surely was not rich. However, in 1831 they still owed a balance 
of 50 florins and 1 florins for the mailing and stamping of documents, and they were allowed by 
the authorities (page 3350) on January 10, 1831 to pay the balance in five annual 
installments. It seems they were not able to pay in time and, therefore, on October 22, 1 838 



they asked the authorities for an extension of another five years which was granted on April 1 2, 
1839 (page 4695). The authorities in Falkenau were notified on April 30. In the meantime, 51 
kronen were added, and on August 1 7, 1 849 everything was paid. It seems, however, that no 
synagogue was built because the community was had grown small because most members had 
moved. Only the seventy-year-old Joachim Kohn and his family were left in Steinbach, The 
others had moved to Falkenau (amongst them David Steiniger), Eger or Elbogen. Besides Mr. 
Steiniger, Jakob Fischer from Steinbach, Hermann Spiegel, Karl Hirsch and the Reichel 
family, who had operated a glass factory, now lived in Falkenau. 

There were 22 Jewish souls in Falkenau in 1860 and already in the previous year they 
had thought about forming a congregation. They planned to obtain the holy items and Torah scrolls 
from Steinbach, but Joachim Kohn objected to this. Kohn was asked officially by the local 
authorities on August 6, 1 860, to explain what he did, and he maintained he paid and fed men on 
the Jewish holidays in order to have a minyan, for services in a room in his own house with the 
Torahs and Siddur books. These Jewish religious items, he said, belonged to his father-in-law, 
Salomon Steiniger, who was also the father of the deceased Abraham Steiniger, from whom he 
purchased these items. Joachim Kohn refused to let the Falkenauers have them. Those remarks by 
Kohn were answered on August 22, 1 860 by David Steiniger and others and the discussions were 
presented to the Regional Rabbi. One can imagine what became of all of this! It seems that the 
crisis was resolved as Kohn died shortly thereafter and the Steinbach Jewish community 
disappeared. Prior to the Holocaust, the Jewish items were still in the possession of the Falkenau 
community. 

The Steinbach-SchOnlind community had a Chevra Kadishe [Orthodox Jewish burial 
society] with ten congregants, led by Jakob Fischer, and members David Steiniger, David Kohn, 
F. Steiniger's heirs and Simon Rosner in Falkenau, Emanuel Kohn's sons, Jakob Zuckermann and 
Zuckermann and Kohn in Eger and Ignaz Steiniger and Jakob Zuckermann in Elbogen. The money 
and possessions of the Chevra Kadishe, which was in the hands of V. Fischer, was handed over to 
the Falkenau community and their committee and the committeee took it over under certain 
conditions on April 24, 1895. 



Mies is picturesquely located on the Mies River about 41 miles (66 km.) southeast of 
Eger, on the way to Pilsen and on the Vienna-Gmund-Eger state railroad. In this town lived the 
mother and stepfather of my grandmother, Anna and Wilhelm Heller. 

It is the seat of the district authority of the largest four Bohemian judicial districts 
(Mies, Tuschkau, Staab and Dobrzan) with eight towns and 1 34 rural townships. 

Its Czech name, Stribro, originates from the silver mines which were already in existence 
during the 12th century, when the town was founded in 1131. Mies is mentioned as a city in 
records dating from 1231 and 1266. Nine years later, in 1275, it is recorded as a "royal 
mining city" which gained civil liberties from King Johann and further liberties from King Karl 
IV. 

A law book with registrations from the period of 1380 to 1392, which existed before 
World War II, mentiones the Jew, Haymann, as residing in Mies in 1368. Pulmann, a Jew, is 
mentioned for the year 1380, as are Josef (1386) and his son, David. They were money lenders 
who dealt with some citizens and helped the city to eliminate its finacial problems. At one point, 
King Wenzel forbade the citizens of Mies — who had turned against Pilsen's and Eger's Jews 
— to molest the Jews, including Trostl, alias Schwarz (Niger). 

Zizka unsuccessfully laid siege to Mies in 1421, but in 1426 the Hussites conquered the ^ 
city and the German Empire's army was forced to flee the next year. 



Mies flourished during the 1 6th century. The city's church was built in 1 528, the city 
hall was constructed in 1 543, and the bridge over the Mies River was completed in 1 555. 

9 



During the Thirty Years War mkir ao\ «. : 
enemeies. The great General Albrech Wenzel lUS SUffered great,y from b <*h friends and 
and of Mecklenburg, and the Prfra tf^„ E f2^ WOn Walle " stein (the Duke of Fri edland 
22-23, 1634. Shortly thereafter havinc ? hi.n V overn '9ht in the city from February 
50-year-old military leader was assassinated in IZ 1"??^ ° f fitting treason thT 
was kept in the Minorities' vault for So years 9 * h,S b ° dy Was brou 9ht ?o Mies where * 

^Pl^ a ^£SStSST^S& ''I T— '" « — of 
Loewy's name is mentioned three times in thThili I ■ ! 4> ' who ,lved near the Judentorls 
from the mining town would not be in M es' tst I t^fT*** that the «^ S 
Nevertheless, the Royal .mperial Deputy, on jSry S* * WOU,d dama 9e trade 
government, on September 9, 1825, renewed \th72'n ' *"* the Royal lmDeri a' county 
rn.sp.aced the mining products and b^^£ £^^™ that Jews had' 

In 1 862, Mies had a population of 4 okk th;., «• 

f C u a rThVV he dty fr ° m ""^ J ^ communities ZZ^T* 61 J6WS ' ™ St of *m 
further dunng the 19th century because of thTraH road trafft ? Century - The city developed 
beautiful synagogue, located in the yard of house nlberifp "? * S teachin 9 institutions. The 
were both built in 1 879 and a teachers' seZ a %Z^sl^sZ^s^ "* "* "* SCho °' 

Emi. Zu"^^ Lederer, D, Ignaz Weil, Max Mand.er 

secretary and cashier. Rabbi Moritz Sabbath SSS^TLi"?*, I"?"™ W3S the ^ 
and he was succeeded by Rabbi Bemhard Glaser P "*' ' eader from 1875 to 1926 

in the^JS^e's KXSS^ W? Md * induded a » " Cities 
one was used only on the High Holy Days Since 1 900 ^ it m S'"^"! 1 " K ' adraU (a,thou 9 h this 
Kscheutzer Street. Before ?hat Mies' Jews were h^H n * d * be3Utiful cemeter y dose to 
Leiter. It is believed these cemeteries date baTk to th^nnT*" 65 in Piwana ' Dolit schen or 
one of the dissolved congregat 2n dates £ 839 1 ° S " A regiSter began in 1 883 ' b "t the 
started in 1917. It is not known if these SJSJ". com ™ nity commemorative book was 
Zionist Union in addition to ^SmZ^!^ ^ "" H ° ,0CauSt There was al *> a 

been ^TZZItf^tl ^1^1? "V"* *' "«» - having 
Weil and Philip Wilhelm. eopo,d Epste,n ' Edmund Lob ner, Julius Weil, Karl 

Ledere^oS Sr^ig'^tS ISSF^TSZ ^ ""** B ^ a " d 
Rosenberger, Ernst PoppeT, Ignaz k!uI c^ ma TlJ ^ ** Rosenber 9 er . Albert 
Bondy, drug store; E.saHubs'cher glass and porce at ^S^TT C, ° theS '' Bemard 
Schwarz and Kohn, feather and hide tradere Edmunri wJJ L ♦!' 9 " aZ K ° hner ' catt,e trader; 
Ignaz Weil, attorney; Dr. Weiner ohvsidan ?T d ^' ^^ Sh ° P; Hu9 ° Weil - Etcher; Dr 
grain and seed dealers and ol Max zSnteS den^T f' ^* Wi,h , e ' m ' EmH Zu "terstein, 

"*Xltt — this period and 



10 



The largest of the former Jewish communities surrounding Mies was in Dolischen, and 
nearby was Schweissing (Svojsin). The Svosjin castle is on the site of 12th century 
fortifications. It was built during the reign of Countess Judith Prichovsky in 1 723 together with 
the priest's office and a wooden bridge over the Mies River. The noble family Junker-Bigatto 
owned the seat during the first half of the 20th century. 

w 

Records indicate that a Jewish community existed in Schweissing in 1 660 but was founded ^ 
much earlier. Documents also mention a Jewish cemetery located on the street from Leiter to 
Oschelin which was used only occasionally in the early 1 900s, but which had been previously 
used by the Schweissing, Oschelin and Tisa Jewish communities (of the Tachau distict). The old 
prayer house was demolished in 1 844 and later the synagogue was located in the eastern part of 
Schweissing on the road to Otrocin. A 19th century temple, number 49, was built on the 
westerly town place and was sold to a Gentile in 1 895. 

There is a register (1798-1839) in the rectory of the deaths and births. Jewish houses 
were numbers 4, 12, 16, 20, 49, 40, 43, 47, 48, 50, 51, 52, 53, 57 and 58. The following 
Jewish families are mentioned in the Schweissing register: Abeles, Adler, Ascher (a Jewish 
teacher), Bandauer (a Jewish teacher), Bohm, Fleischmann, Heller, Hochheimer, Hoffmann, 
Kohner, Lurie , Rauscher, Riesner, Schwarz, Selig, Stein, Steiner.Wienerl and Willner. 

According to Kohn [Prague, 1852], there were a total of 17 Jewish families in 
Schweissing in 1849. In 1893 the 200-member chevra kadische — which included a mikva 
in addition to the synagogue and cemetery — was under the chairmanship of Siegmund Wiener 
and Josef Rauscher. The congregation also included Jews who lived in the surrounding village of 
Tschernoschin and the hamlets of Milikan and Leiter. 

Josef Adler (who eventually moved to Pilsen), Emanuel Willner (1870), Benedict Bonn 
(1880), Adolf Willner, and Gustav Adler (1890) are known to have been chairmen of the 
Jewish community. Other prominent members of the Schweissing Jewish congregation were 
Messrs. Eckstein (who moved to Weseritz in 1860), Koschinek (1870), Krauskopf, t 
Komfuhrer, David Eckstein, Moses Pollak, Abraham Schwarzberg, Albrecht Munk (a teacher), 
and Salomon Janowitz. 

Well-known pre-World War II Bohemian Jews from Schweissing include physicians Dr. 
Ignaz Bohm in Karlsbad, Dr. Hoffmann in Alt Rohlau, Dr. Bernhard Schwarz in Aussig, Dr. 
Emanuel Willner in Prague; attorneys Dr. Eckstein in Tetschen and Dr. Zunterstein in 
Tschernoschin, and the engineer Dr. Fritz LObner in Prague. 

In the years prior to World War II Families Gustav Adler, Ignaz Freund and Heinrich 
Weiss lived in Schweissing. 

Tachau was also an important town for our ancestors for Anna Honig, one of Israel Honig's 
daughters from Kirchenbirk, married Ignaz Blaustern and they lived in Tachau, where he 
operated the first mirror factory in Austria-Hungary. Here there six children — Paula, Rosa, 
Carolina, Emma, Fannie and Anton — were born. Eventually the Blaustern mirror firm went 
bankrupt because their water supply was cut off and the family moved to Vienna. 

EDLER VON HONIGSBERG 

Although there is no concrete evidence to indicate any relationship with our family, 
several of our Hbnig namesakes who lived in the same region of Bohemia as our family did attain 
aristocratic titles during this period. ^ 

Israel Honig, an Austrian tobacco manufacturer, was born in Kuttenplan (Chodova Plana), 
near Pilsen, Bohemia in October, 1 724. The eldest son of Lobel (Leib, Loew) Honig, a poor, 

11 



• 



i 



hard-working and compassionate merchant, he was the first Austrian Jew to be 
ennobled, for on September 2, 1789 Emperor Josef II conferred upon him the 
hereditary title "Edler von Hbnigsberg," and the right to acquire an estate in Lower 
Austria. 

The Emperor's Royal Proclamation reads: 

Through his extraordinary efforts and speculations, he succeeded in 
increasing the revenues that had dropped so low and, by introducing and 
carrying out the plan of operation that he devised throughout the whole of his 
tenancy, as well as through constant enormous effort, he succeeded in soothing 
the hatred against these institutions that had arisen among the public. At the 
same time, he brought about such a financial revenue that the highest 
beneficiary receiving a quarter share collected approximately 100,000 
florins, and Her Serene Highness Our Predecessor was moved to draw up a 
commendation and to assure him that when the opportunity arose he would 
receive a practical sign of her great satisfaction. 

In 1 768 he, Israel Hbnig, and his companies took over the tobacco 
lease in Inner Austria. With many difficulties and dangers he introduced the 
same operation as in the other patrimonial lands into Galicia and Lodomeria in 
1778 and through untiring effort produced the present (1789) substantial 
wealth. In 1 783 he succeeded in uniting the attitudes of his co-contractors to 
such a degree, that they decided to cede the tobacco lease before the termination 
of their contracts in accordance with our basic convictions, and to renounce all 
further profits and leave them to Our Aerarium [State Treasury]. Since then, 
the revenue operation has been carried on profitably according to the plan he 
devised and produced. In all the transactions just mentioned, he, Israel Honig 
has distinguished himself through undiminshed faithfulness, indisputable 
selflessness, and unlimited zeal. 

At the age of 1 3, Israel Honig left his native Kuttenplan for Prague to continue the Biblical 
and Talmudic studies with Rabbi Meier Fieschel, which he had started at home with his father. 
Two years later, in 1 739, he was forced to return home to join his father in business. 

Israel and his brother, Aaron Moses Hbnig (1730-1787), became involved in the tobacco 
business — then virtually unknown in Austria — while taking trips for Loebel Honig's firm. 
Together with their father they gained great wealth as a supplier to the army during the War of 
the Austrian Succession (1740-48). 

In 1 752, when Israel was 28, the two brothers and their father took over the lease of the 
Prague tobacco trade, Tabak Apalto, and tobacco customs charge of Bohemian estates, which, from 
1765 to 1774, was expanded to several Austrian provinces — Bohemia, Moravia, Silesia and 
Lower and Upper Austria — with a ten-year government contract for 900,000 florins 
annually. At the end of the lease Empress Maria Theresa granted the Hbnig family the right to 
purchase and build homes everywhere in Austria where there were Jewish communities, 
without having to pay any special taxes. 

Lbbel Hbnig obtained permission to build a synagogue in Kuttenplan in 1 756. 

During the Seven Years War (1756-63), during which Bohemia's Jews heroically 
defended Prague, the Hbnig tobacco firm again received army provisions contracts. Empress 
Maria Theresia was so satisfied with his service that she granted israel Hbnig letters of patent 
("Freibriefe") and the right to travel or settle anywhere in Bohemia and Moravia in 1764. Six 
years later he was offered tobacco concessions for the crown lands, Galicia and Lodomeria. 

12 



After the war, a bank founded by the Empress in 1 751 was on the verge of bankruptcy and 
it was turned over to four Honig brothers in 1 764, and under whose management it thrived. 

He surrendered his contracts in 1783 at the behest of the Emperor, who then appointed 
him councilor and "Tabak und Siegelgetalldirektor" [tobacco revenue director], and, in 1784, 
"Bankaldirektor" [banking revenue director]. He thus became the first Jew to become an 
Austrian official. Six years later he received the title of nobility. In 1793, under the regime of 
Emperor Francis I, he gained possession of former church property in Vellm in Lower Austria. 

Subsequently, Emperors Leopold II and Francis I confirmed Israel Honig's right to own his 
estate even though Jews were not allowed to own land in Austria. Throughout the four years of 
negotiations Israel refused to have his estate listed in the records under a Christian sponsor's 
name. 

Israel Honig died in Vienna on January 1 9, 1 808. 

The majority of his descendants, however, were converted to Christianity. Israel Honig 
had six sons and one daughter. Maximillian Hbnig (1754-1832) helped to start the Vienna 
Jewish community and served for 30 years as its representative. Enoch Honig (1744-1815), 
another son, was the great grandfather of Isidor Busch (Bush). Leopold (Loew) Honig, Enoch's 
son and Israel's grandson, became a Frankist in Prague, under the influence of his father- 
in-law, Jonas Beer Wehle, leader of the pro-independence group. Leopold Honig complained to 
the Prague police and sought "protection" on November 9, 1 800 from the rabbis he claimed were 
trying to coerce him. Eventually he wrote a 32-page protest attacking Prague's rabbis. 

Aaron Moses, Israel's brother and business partner, had ten children, six of whom were 
ennobled as Edler von Honigshofen in 1791. Following the death of Aaron Moses Honig's wife in 
1 796, all the children were baptized and this line of the family eventually died out. 

Adam Albert Honig (1745-181 1), another son of Lobel Honig, was baptized in 1781 and 
took the name von Honigstein in 1 784. 

Marianne, Lobel's only daughter, was the grandmother of the poet, L.A. Frankl. Soliman 
von Hdnigsberg (1804-1864) was secretary of the Prague Jewish community during the 19th 
century. He published a pamphlet in 1 848 entitled Zur Judenfrage (Jewish Questions). 

The family coat of arms, recreated on the front cover of this book, has tobacco leaves and 
golden honey bees, symbolizing both the tobacco business and the meaning of the family name 
Honig/ Hoenig: honey. 

However, even though the family names are the same — and my great great grandfather's 
name was Israel Honig — and both Honig families are from the same area, there is no evidence 
at this time that they are — or are not — related, especially since none of our ancestors 
claimed the hereditary title of nobility. 



MORE RECENT HISTORY 

Generally speaking, the treatment of Jews in Bohemia regressed again in the 19th 
century, but by 1 841 the law prohibiting land ownership by Jews was repealed. The hated 
Jewish tax was ended in 1 846. Two years later the ghetto was finally abolished. 

Karlsbad's Jews had to wait longer for better treatment. The city records and documents 
give ample evidence of the strength with which it opposed Jews settling within its walls. Jews 
who lived in the neighboring village of Lichtenstadt (Hroznetin) in GiesshObl (Kyselka) — 

13 



v 



V 



i 



where Paula Kreissl Roberts was born on September 11 iqw 

enter Karlsbad. All proved futile. ^P^nriDer 1 1, 1934 - made many attempts to 

They were, however, permitted to stav in kariek^j * 
licenses from May 16 to September 14 E?ceot for ,h» 1 TO , d "L al care or on peddlers ' 
monopoly no Jews were allowed there for the Sstof , h „ °[ the 9°«""*ent tobacco 

certifcate. Police were even ordered £ ScSLS^tl, ZF ^^ 

pe^issT," sSle VZSS^SoJfSSTS^S TT" "*"" *" 
winter treatment. For the next 30 veare ~L5L? , JmS who came there "" 

Karlsbad lived in Lichtenstadt ' nevertheless . »" «her jews doing business in 

govem^p^s^ 

objections o, tbe cit/s authorities. l*h tStSS, H^ Day 'iS were 2T """ "" 

Beginning about 1 850 many Jews decided to miorate to th P i initori ct^c ^ 
pogroms resulting from unsuccessful uprisings SS^wS^SS^ rtDmafm 
grandfather's sister, migrated from KLeL,\oT L Z^!u ri p^r to 1 s"!.' "* ^ 

the Jews? Z^^ZV*^^™ V^'TTVT^ "** 
meeting place and Ludwig Moser becam ^ PresiZt o r t he conSrea Jon l^Tl I*"™ their 
were house peddlers, food dea.ers, feather ^^XrS^TSS^n Taos S M™ "oS* 
and goats. Some were glass cutters, leading to the family name GTaseTa i Ka'rl Kurt an Fred 
S of r g° laS s a 3d ^^ ° f th6Se 9 ' aZierS W6nt fr ° m ^ t0 villa 9 e with thL heaves 

h h> fV hG 1 t o^° f u the 20th Century ' 50 ° tax Payi"9 Jews lived in Karlsbad A synaqooue 
dedicated in 877, became the center of Jewish cultural life there, led first by RabbU h' 

088* S! n 1 th P °n" 7 p 2) - f * *? T™* * *' Rud °' f PlaUt 0*™$. 5 ^ Nathan Purges 

^^S^^^^Sl^X^ born in D0,ny Kubin - *"**"> 

Around this time Jews began to move into the cities and large towns. You will note for 
example, the movement from Kirchenbirk to Falkenau by the family of Joshua Hbn£ t£ move 
J™ La " z (Lomn.ce) to Falkenau, in 1902, by my grandparents, Leopold and He?mne Adler 
Honig, and the move of Adolf and Theresia Adler Fischer from Alt-Rohlau to Karlsbad 

Bohemian rabbis - as well as those from Moravia - were among the most renowned 
Jewish authorities in the world. Bohemian religious scholars helped to lead the Jewish 
Enlightenment. On the other hand, many Bohemian Jews - especially those who lived in the 
countryside - spent their days worrying about getting enough food to eat, observing religious 
laws and fearing catastrophes. a 

Because Falkenau's Jews had many children, they hired Jonas Kohn in 1862 as religious 
teacher. He was also at the same time the cantor and slaughter controller. Two years later when 
the community had grown to 24 Jewish households, they applied for and were granted official 
permission to found the formal Jewish community. They rented a local prayerhouse in the 
Christian butcher Furnstein's house on the Market Place, and when it became too small they 
rented another prayer house [BetShtobe] in the Falkenau brewery [Falkenauer Braukommune] 
on Rosenplatz. There was a Jewish private school where private lessons were given in knowledge 
in Judaism, Hebrew writing and speech, and Torah studies in this local prayer house . In 1 893 
the prayer room was very simple, but decorated in a dignified manner and possessed five Torahs 
When the number of citizens of the community already had risen to 1 50-1 60, it was recogized 

14 



by the town as an independent community in 1873 under the leadership of Mr. Binhak. It now 
became essential to build a temple and the community decided to purchase a piece of land from the 
State community of Falkenau for the erection of a synagogue. Unfortunately, the great city fire of 
1 874 interfered with that plan. During that conflagration two-thirds of the city burned down 
and many Jewish families lost their homes and all their possessions. New city planning 
regulations were enacted after the fire and the land the Jews sought could not be purchased or 
used for the synagogue. 

As a consequence of the Bohemian land law of March 21 , 1 890 and the town council's order 
of March 10, 1893 (Page 1021/93), the Jewish communities in the area were redesigned. 
Although they reorganized (gerrymandered) the districts, Falkenau remained the seat of the 
Israelite community which served the court district of Falkenau, except for the villages and 
towns which remained part of the Kdnigsberg community such as Dassnitz, Konigsberg on the 
Eqer Lobs Mariakulm, Mulln, Pochlowitz, Steinhof, Schonbrunn and Schaben. The region of 
Elbogen with the exception of the places that belonged to Luditz, Gfell, Lessnitz, Rabensgrun, 
Schlaggenwald and Schonfeld, and the Graslitz community. Although the Christians had also 
decided to reorganize, the Jews in the places that were to be subsumed in the reorganization had 
already earlier decided to remain with Falkenau. 

The minutes of the Falkenau Chevra Kadische [Holy Society] meeting of April 29, 1 884, 

indicate that Nathan Ehrlich and Ignaz Lowi from the surrounding village of Chodau. were present 

They discussed the possibility of the Chodauer Jews joining those from Falkenau. Besides Messrs. 

Ehrlich and Lowi, other Jews who lived In Chodau at that time were Selig Ehrlich senior, Josef 

Weiss Siegmund Basch, Markus L6w Steiniger, Adolf Basch, Jakob Heller and Josef 

Neumann The committee demanded an entrance fee of 50 florins each and an annual fee of 40 

florins for the first year. The two delegates from Chodau acknowledged this and declared that they 

would have to consult the other members of their committee. However, they did not all agree at 

the same time because the mass admission never took place. Instead the Chodauers joined the 

Falkenau congregation individually. On June 14, Mr. Ehrlich and a Mr. Klein from Falkenau were 

accepted On October 7 Ignaz Lowi and the Elbogner Ignaz Steiniger were admitted. Mr. 

Zuckermann from Elbogen and Mr. Sadler from Falkenau joined on September 1, 1885, and on 

November 24 Josef Weiss from Chodau was admitted. In the following year, 1887, Adolf Maier 

from Chodau was accepted on April 16, Selig Ehrlich from Chodau joined on August 30, and on 

December 5 the attorney Dr. Richard Gutwillig from Falkenau became a member. Others who 

joined the congregation included Mr. Foges from Falkenau on February 11, 1888, J. Wozilka of 

Falkenau on April 1, 1888, and Adolf Koretz from Chodau on July 12, 1890. On July 24 1890 

the factory owner from Graslitz, Wilhelm Schulz, made an inquiry about accepting the Graslitz 

Jews into the Falkenau community and this took place. On November 25, 1891 the admissions of 

Max Lederer and of Hermann Schild are recorded. Then the land law of year 1 893 made it 

unnecessary to make an explicit entry of another Jew who lives in the same district and it didn t 

have to be recorded in the minutes. 

Because of the same land law, the communities in Arnitzgriin, Kirchenbirk - Schonlind 
and Steingrub where very few Jews remained, as well as those in Chodau and Elbogen were 
dissolved and their property was handed over to the Falkenau community. The Falkenau chevra 
fcommunity] had increased to 35 families and had reached a further increase of more than 100 
persons Now they again had to consider building a temple. After long negotiations the 
community's committee decided on January 15, 1891 to acquire a new piece of land on the 
so-named Mauerteich (one block down the street from the Honig house), which in the 1930s was 
called Schillerstrasse, The site, containing 374 square klaftern was purchased from the city for 
2992 fl on March 23, 1891. They found, however, that the sales contract had many errors and 
it had to be given back to the attorney, Dr. Friedl, for revision. On May 14, 1896 the 
announcement of the building of the Temple building was finally made. At the meeting on June 1 6 
the building contract was signed and the Falkenau architect Emil Lifka was commissioned to work 
with a building committee consisting of Messrs. Johann Steiner, Leopold Mohr, Karl Pollak, 

15 



^ 



* 



Hermann Adler, Dav.d Steiniger and David Kohn. On August 10 ground was broken and 
™* d The cornerstone was set, and on August 31, 1897 the beautiful Shul building was 
completed and dedicated with festivities. Rabbi Dr. Emanuel Schwarz from Eger gave the 
dedication sermon. My late father, Joseph Hoenig, recalled that the Falkenau Synagogue with a 
garden on each side and a big iron gate in front, was located opposite the public school on 
Turngasse. The Synagogue was burned down on Kristallnacht by a group of local Nazi 
sympathizers and no trace of it remains. 

AChevra Kadische [Holy Society] was formed in 1863 to handle social activities maintain 
the cemeteries, wash the bodies of the deceased, and conduct funerals. One of the founders was 
Karl Pollak, who was, since 1887, a most dedicated President. When he relinquished his office in 
1 91 8 because he moved to Karlsbad, he was elected as honorary President. He died in 1 928 His 
successors were Simon Rosner and after him Otto Bloch, followed by Alfred Fischer Karl Bondy 
Leopold Zentner, and, lastly, Emil Rosenzweig. 

The community had a cemetery on top of a park hill alongside the Lutheran and Catholic 
cemeteries overlooking Elbogener Strasse (now called Namesti [Street] K. H. Borovskeho) in the 
outskirts of Falkenau since 1 878 to serve the Jewish residents of Falkenau, Chodau (at that 
time consisting of ten families) and Schlaggenwald (eight families). This Jewish cemetery in 
1 878 succeeded an older one called Chelvee Rovas,"Gut On" (the Good Earth), which was located 
on a hill reached by a trail located between the brown and white two-story residence of Frantisek 
Vafta and his wife, Jarmila Vaflova, and the bridge over the fresh water dam and purification 
works in Schonlind (Krasna Lipa), a small mountain village which was a 90 minute walk from 
Falkenau. The newer cemetery in Falkenau needed to be enlarged, so on May 9, 1 906, the 
community committee applied to the Falkenau town council for permission to tear down the 
cemetery's wall on the left side and to build a communal memorial chapel. On July 5, 1 906 a 
common commission of the congregation's [chevra] Jews, represented by Leopold Mohr and 
Hugo Lowy (the father of Robert and Werner Lowy), and the Chevra Kadische represented by 
Karl Pollak met with Falkenau's Mayor, Dr. Peter, who suggested that the graveyard wall be 
moved by 50 steps, and this was later endorsed by the town council. The ceremonial memorial 
hall was built at the same time. Josef Hdnig, my father's granduncle, was the first one to be 
buried in the enlarged Falkenau Jewish cemetery. 

An Israeli Women's Benevolent Society [Sisterhood] was formed in 1910 and its. 
President was Mrs. Ida Fischer. 

The President of the Falkenau Zionist Organization was for a long time the coal mine 
owner, Wilhelm Griinwald, who died in the early 1 930s. 

The congregation's chairman, who was in charge of religious activities, was at first 
Philipp Steiniger, then Siegmund Binhak (the father of Carl Binhak, whose diary of his 1 904 
visit to Falkenau from the United States, appears as a chapter in this book), under whom the 
congregation began. He was followed by David Steiniger and then Johann Steiner, who also moved 
to Karlsbad in 1898, and he died there on June 19, 1912. Mr. Steiner was buried in Falkenau. 
His successor as the congregation's chairman was Leopold Mohr, who on December 4, 1901 also 
became Representative for the Eger Region in the organization of all the Jewish Bohemian Jewish 
communities. He was also a member of the school board and he earned great merit in Falkenau, 
with the building of the Temple. He never tired doing good deeds and he helped Jewish orphans and 
widows. Dr. Mohr died on September 22, 1 91 4, and he was buried on September 24. On the same 
day the Vice Chairman, Aifred Fischer, succeeded him and commemorated him with warm 
recollections at the same meeting. Karl Bondy followed Alfred Fischer as congregation chairman. 

The President of the congregation was responsible for the community's finances. 

Karl Pollak, the Temple Union leader since 1 897, was followed in that post by David 
Steiniger, then Karl Pollak once more, and after him, Leopold Zentner. 

16 



The first Rabbi, Jonas Kohn, was installed on May 4, 1 862 as the Religious teacher who in 
1887 celebrated his 25th anniversary and was honored in many ways on this occasion. Lehrer 
Kohn was a relative of my grandmother, Hermine Adler Hoenig. He died on April 5, 1 898 in 
Prague and his remains were transferred to Falkenau for burial, with the expense borne by the 
Chevr3 Kidische. Assisting him for a long time was S. Wedeles as the Religious teacher. Then j: 
from 1868 - 1873 Samuel Simon was the Religious teacher. There were enough pupils in y* 
Falkenau for two teachers at the Hebrew School (which was located in the brewery building), so 
on February 14, 1892 Adolf Pollak from Kosolup was installed as the second Religious 
instructor. 

After Rabbi Kohn's death the congregation on May 8, 1 898 advertised for a new Rabbi; on 
June 24 the four applicants were invited to give sermons and on August 24 Karl Pollak suggested 
the election of Dr. Salomon Feuerstein as the new Rabbi. He was chosen unanimously. Born on 
December 25, 1869 in Podgorze by Crackow, Rabbi Feuerstein served actively in an exemplary 
manner and taught religion in the middle school in Graslitz and Elbogen and in the Burger and 
Town schools until the Holocaust. The Rabbi's son, Eduard ("Eddie") Feuerstein, a lawyer who 
was educated at Charles University in Prague, died in Philadelphia, PA U.S.A. in 1978. His 
widow, Mizzi, was born in Aussig (usti) on the Elbe. 

The first cantor was Adolf Pollak, and following him was Moritz Bussgang from 
Zwittau (from November 2, 1893 until July 23, 1896). After him Lippmann Kurzweil from 
Salzburg was installed on October 1 4, 1 893 as cantor and teacher, who served this community 
in an admirable manner until his death in 1929. 

At the turn of the 20th century 434 Jews lived in Falkenau and 20 surounding hamlets. 
Karlsbad and twelve surrounding villages had 1,192 Jews in the early 1900s. Mies and 25 
surrounding villages contained 554 Jews. 

Originally the Jewish vital statistics records for Falkenau were kept by the Catholic (H^ 
clergy in Lobs; however, they were transferred to Philipp Steiniger in the 1 860s. Jonas Kohn 
took over this function in 1 884 which was continued by Dr. Feuerstein until the Holocaust. 

Beginning in 1 879 there was an endowment, the interest of which was distributed to the 
congregation's neediest members. 

During World War I the Falkenau congregation was involved in excellent welfare activity 
for its poor refugees and Jewish war wounded and which cost many thousands of Kronen. Five of 
its members were killed in the war. They were Arnold Schulz from Graslitz, born on November 
17,1890, killed on August 29, 1915 near Kaplince in Galicia, and the officer candidate Franz 
Bondy, son of the congregation's President Karl Bondy, died a hero's death on May 16, 1916 near 
Buczacz. Those who died from the consequences of war wounds or from war sickness were 
Emanuel Fuchs in Leitmeritz, the businessman Wilhelm Buxbaum in a war hospital in the 
vicinity of Graz, and N. Ldffler from Heinrichsgrun. 

In 1918 a brute mob in Falkenau rioted and plundered Jewish businesses and living 
quarters and caused great damage. "They came shouting 'dirty Jews,'" recalls Dr. Julius Hoenig. 
"Some had sabers and sticks and smashed windows. They wanted to plunder the possessions of the 
rich Jews. 



"When the mob came to the bridge opposite the HOnig house, my father, Joshua, my older 
brother, Paul, and some workers took up weapons, including a saber and a gun, which they had 
from World War I, and stood at the bridge. When the mob saw them they turned around and we 
weren't plundered." The rioters attacked Theodor Steiniger's tobacco business, and the Zentner's 
textile shop and apartment were completely destroyed and plundered. 

17 






^ 



were mos! «£^tt£^5£l%^ ** ** *"■ W ° dd War »' as 
Koenigswart, where WHhetaL^-^^ r ^'S , ^Ji th CentUry V™^* in 
Loewy, Josefs daughter and fSHLin n7m n * Godfather and husband of Veronika HOnig 
of the Oo^ortTSISSSSrK Z ?l andfather ' L !°P° ld Hoeni 9 - was once leader 
President ^e origin^^^^^ 

indud^ --, *>- other famines 

Fink, Fischer, Geiger Grunwald Hansf ^^ ^ ^"' Bwta ™' rtue,steta ' 
families), Kropf, Kuh, ^12*8^3^, i^rt^"' L^T' ^ ^° different 
families), Mendl, Mohr, Pfeffer Pleyer Pollak' Reich tar' RoLi^' ^ (tW ° different 
Schlesinger, Steiner, Steiniqer (several fLlSS .. Rosenbaum - Rosenzweig, Ruczek, 
Zuckerl-Zentner. Based or ^SZJ!^^^ f U ^ T \ }Nn ^ ma ^ Zentner and 
Frieda Hoenig Rupp; thTtote SS>SS TLiZJ^ .^ u^ H ° enig: my late aunt ' 
Budlovsky, Werner Lowy, Lies? Zentner Beha and I John man, "it^ 06 "' 9 ; ^ a " d Dr " Joseph 

Fa^iS^ 

mentioned to me by the others who gave iS^^SSS^SST "" ^ 
EARLIEST KNOWN! FAMH Y MFMRF PQ 

i «v n A T n( ! 185 P r ^ 9reat great great grandfather, Josef Adler of Falkenau married Soohie 
LOv (Lev.), also of Falkenau. He died about 1 858 at the age of 24 leaving his Sw and ?wo 

oT NrT 'fr ^ f< T and SiX " The y ° Unger daughter Anna Ad,er ' ^ gr^gra^ner 
gave birth, out of wedlock, to my grandmother, Hermine Adler. The father, whom Anna was roi 

CITES TV? a ^ ' 0Cksmith - Later ' Anna married Wilhelm H^Her and the^ 
l.ved ,n M.es where the four half-sisters and one half-brother of my grandmother were born 

thot JS J^u »T a Preind '' reCa " ed a few weeks before her death in Vie ™a on May 27, 1 980 
that Wilhelm Heller came every year to Falkenau for a few days' visit. His coat pockets were 
filled with candy and a certain kind of braided roll with poppyseed and caraway seed and salt we 
couldn t get m Falkenau." Wilhelm Heller, a glazier, often complained about headaches and some 
thought he was trying to evade work, but after his death, an autopsy revealed a brain tumor. 

Three of his children were killed by the Nazis. One, Helene, was caught by the Nazis when 
she went back to Mies to look for her sister, Marie, and brother-in-law, Alfred Hahn both of 
whom managed to escape. Earlier, on March 4, 1 91 9, Rosa Heller was accidentally shot to death 
by a Czech soldier in Mies and a large stone monument was erected at her gravesite in her honor 
by the town. 

My great great grandfather, Israel HOnig, in the early and mid 19th century lived with his 
wife, whose name is unknown, in Kirchenbirk, a little village south of Falkenau. Israel HOnig 
was a businessman and was also the village's postmaster. In addition, he was in charge of 
Kirchenbirk's Jewish records. He must have died prior to 1886 because his grandson, Theodore 
(Israel) HOnig, the oldest son of Joshua HOnig, was bom in 1 886 and was named after him. 

Bernhard HOnig, my father's grandfather, was born in Kirchenbirk in July, 1 830. He 
became a teacher of foreign languages, married Mina Neuberger, and lived in Vienna. In the 
1 860s he worked and lived in Temesvar (Timisoara), Austria Hungary, now Romania, in the 
province of Banat, Transylvania. There, in the "city of gardens" with its Baroque and Renais 
sance public buildings, his sons Morris Frederick and Leopold (my grandfather, after whom I am 

18 



named), and daughter, Bertha, were born. Johanna, Adele and Michael were born in Vienna after 
Bernhard and Mina HOnig returned there. Then Mina died around 1 873 in a cholera epidemic and 
Bernhard married her relative (relationship unknown), Anna Neuberger. He had two brothers, 
Josef, and Simon (who apparently went to Hungary and was never heard from again) and two 
sisters, Sophia and Anna (who married Ignaz Blaustern from Tachau and later moved to Vienna). 

(> 

On February 1 4, 1 899 my great grandfather, Bernhard HOnig, wrote a depressing letter 
from Vienna to his children in Falkenau. In it he thanked Joshua Honig for his hospitality during 
my great grandfather's recent visit to Falkenau and Kirchenbirk. "I got sick," he wrote, "on my 
way home and now i cannot walk very well, but I wanted to see you. I can't pay the rent. I need 
money. 

"Dear Children, have pity for your father and help me. I am desperate...." 

"I would like an early reply. I don't know when I'll be called to be with both of my wives." 

Bernhard Honig became blind and died in Vienna seventeen years later in 1916 at the age 
of 87. He was buried in Lundenburg (Breclav), where Simon and Bertha Honig Weiss lived at 
Spitalgasse 22-24. 

My grandparents, who were married in 1 897, moved from Lanz to Zwodauer Strasse in 
SchOnwerth-Falkenau in 1902. In Falkenau they later lived at Kreuzgasse 1, Butterscheibe 18 
and on the second floor of the Honig house at Mauerteich 4. My grandfather, Leopold Honig, 
affectionately called "Poyil" by my grandmother, was a salesman for the dry goods firm of Adolf 
Hermann (who was Jewish) in Falkenau. My grandmother, Hermine Adler Honig, sold kosher 
provisions, manufactured by the Tanzer Kosher Provisions firm in Pilsen and shipped to her by 
railroad. She picked up the provisions at the Falkenau railroad station and carried them from 
customer to customer in a big basket called a buckelkorb, which was strapped around her waist 
and shoulders. She also was a hard-working housewife, taking care of their eight children. |f 

My father, Joseph Hoenig, loved to play soccer for the Hagibor Jewish Sports Association. 
Because he was so skinny, he was usually the goalie or right wing. He learned tailoring as a 
youth in Bohemia and after a three-year apprenticeship he became a journeyman in 1 91 7. He 
worked for Filipp Steiniger in Falkenau and then for Hermann Horowitz at No. 1 Palace Koruna at 
Wenceslas Platz in Prague until he left for the United States. He arrived in New York on 
Thursday, September 22, 1921 aboard the S.S. Mount Carol. When he first arrived in the 
U.S. he stayed with Viennese friends of Aunts Johanna Hoenig and Adele Hoenig Waxman, the 
Charles Loeffler family at 81 6 Communipaw Avenue in Jersey City, NJ and then went, wearing 
Bohemian style men's clothing, to visit Oskar Hoenig on St. Ann's Avenue in the Bronx, NY. He 
quickly got a tailor's job and lived in rented rooms on Manhattan's east side on 75th Street 
between First and Second Avenues, and then with a family on East 90th Street. When his sister, 
Frieda, arrived in New York in 1 922, they rented an apartment on East 79th Street near First 
Avenue. After their sister, Ida [pronounced Eda] migrated to the U.S., leaving Bremen, Germany 
on the President Arthur on August 8, 1 923, the three of them lived in a three-room apartment 
(3F) in the Williamsburgh section of Brooklyn at 402-404 South 2nd Street, and then to 381 
South 3rd Street. When the rest of the family came to the U.S., they moved nearby to a railroad 
flat at 371 Rodney Street and then to 72 Lee Avenue. Then the family bought a house at 30-05 
89th Street in Jackson Heights, Queens, but lost it during the Depression and moved to 45th 
Street in the Borough Park section of Brooklyn. 

For most of the years until his retirement in February, 1966, my father worked as a 
tailor and foreman for "GGG" Clothes [William P. Goldman and Brothers] in Brooklyn, N.Y. U.S.A. 
and the Hilton Clothing Manufacturing Company in Linden, N.J. (1962- 66), but in the 1930s Tft 
he also owned the Hoenig Sinclair gasoline station on Brooklyn's Fourth Avenue [later known as 
the Rupp Sinclair and then Rupp Esso gasoline station], a custom tailor shop on Lexington 
Avenue, Manhattan, and a dry cleaning store at 33-1 1 Junction Boulevard in Jackson Heights. 

19 



™h ^ncl th * c ° nsidered one of the fi "est tailors in the nation, blending his great talent 

ewo*^ ? em0St C0m P' icated work " Hewas'oneof the 

few people at GGG Clothes who could des.gn and make an entire suit and coat. On many occasions 
he would bnng "spec.al" work home and after dinner he would set up "shop" in his favorrte easy 
cha.r m the Irving room. Some of these "specials" included tailoring ''GGG'' ^garments for 
Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower. 

pm h ?" SU 2 d3 J T? 9, Mar ° h 29, 1936 at 5:3 ° he marri8d Billa Hir sch, who was born in 
Polch (near Koblenz), Germany. They were married at the home of Rabbi I M Binder 1398 
Grand Concourse, in the Bronx, New York. My parents lived in the West Bronx at 93 West 
Tremont Avenue (in the top sixth floor apartment adjacent to the one in which my mother had 
been living with her brother, Max Hirsch, and her cousin, Claire Hirsch), 2 East 167th Street 
and 1776 Davidson Avenue, before moving to 1401 Willoughby Avenue in the Bushwick section 
of Brooklyn on a steamy, hot day in August, 1942 so my father could be close to the "GGG" 
factory. We moved to 568-J Grand Street, Apartment J-1704, in the brand new East River 
Housing Cooperative overlooking the East River on the Lower East Side of Manhattan on 
Thursday, February 23, 1956. My parents lived there for the remainder of their lives and my 
wife, Doris, our two daughters, Gail and Helene, and I reside in an identical apartment across the 
street. My mother died after heart arhythmias on Saturday, December 26, 1987 and my father 
died of a heart attack and a stroke eight days after a bladder procedure on Tuesday January 22 
1 991 . Both were 90 and both died at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. They are buried in 
Mount Hope Cemetery in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. 

I was born on Wednesday, May 19, 1937 in the Bronx, N.Y. I am a graduate of Queens 
College, where I was a history major and where I received my bachelor's and masters degrees. I 
taught social studies at Parsons Junior High School 1 68 [Flushing] Queens from September, 
1958 until my retirement on July 5, 1991. During many of my summer vacations I worked as 
a newspaper reporter for the now-defunct Long Island Press and Long Island Star-Journal of 
the Newhouse chain. 

My wife, Doris, and I were married in Jamaica, N.Y. on Sunday, March 31, 1968 by Rabbi 
Alex Pronman of New Jersey. We met when both of us were on the Parsons faculty and she then 
taught French. Now she is teaching English as a Second Language at Seward Park High School near 
our home. We have two daughters, Gail Sharon and Helene Michelle. (I was one of Rabbi 
Pronman's first four Bar Mitzvah boys, at the old Congregation Anshei Ernes on Stanhope Street 
in Brooklyn in 1950, and our older daughter, Gail Sharon, was his last Bat Mitzvah in June, 
1 985, six weeks before his death.) Gail, who graduated cum laude from Binghamton University 
(SUNY) in May, 1994 with a degree in Judaic studies and art history, is now a student at 
Fordham University School of Law in New York City. She was New York City Regional President 
of Young Judaea (Hadassah) in 1989-90 and represented the organization in the March of the 
Living to Poland and Israel in April, 1 990. She spent a year studying with Young Judaea in Israel 
in 1990-91. Helene graduated cum laude from Binghamton University in May, 1997 with a 
degree in Judaic studies and history and is now teaching first grade in Oakland, California. She 
spent the 1993-94 academic year studying in Israel with Young Judaea and served as its New 
York City Regional President in 1 992-93. 

My father was followed to the United States in 1922 by his older sister, Frieda; in 1923 
by his sister, Ida, and then by his parents, brothers Adolph and Gustav and younger sister, 
Gerda, in 1 924. All the Honigs who migrated to the United States, Canada and Great Britain 
changed the spelling of the family name to Hoenig. My grandfather — after whom I am named 
— died in my father's arms in his Brooklyn, NY home after suffering a stroke on Monday, 
April 14, 1930, the first night of Passover. My grandmother, nearly 13 years his junior, 
outlived him by almost 34 years. For a number of years in the late 1 930s she lived in a house at 
35-22 88th Street in the Jackson Heights section of Queens, N.Y. She passed away on the night 
of Saturday, January 11, 1964 in her bed in the 69-32 226th Street, Bayside, Queens, NY 
home of her daughter and son-in-law, Ida and Henry Farber, four days shy of her 85th birthday. 

20 



& 



My father's oldest sister, Emma, did not come to the United States until the outbreak of 
World War II. She had studied in Vienna where, in 1925, she married a Tyrolean, Alfonso 
Preindl. During the 1940s and 1950s they lived in New York City, where he worked as a 
professional photographer. Both returned to their villa at Josef Ganglgasse 1 7 in the Vienna 
Hills [XIII Sector] where they later died. 

Frieda, the second oldest, married Rudolf Rupp in New York on November 4, 1933 and 
they lived in the Bronx for many years until he took a job as an apartment house superintendent 
in Jackson Heights, Queens in the mid 1 950s. Then he moved on to another similar position in 
Forest Hills, from which he retired. On December 1 0, 1 990 they moved from Forest Hills into 
the Dumont Masonic Home on Pelham Road in New Rochelle, New York — a few blocks north of 
Pelham Park in the Bronx, where they celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary at a gala party 
in 1993. Exactly one week before their 61st wedding anniversary, Rudy took ill at the nursing 
home with a bladder infection on the morning of Friday, October 28, 1 994 and he passed away 
after suffering cardio-pulmonary arrest while eating dinner in New Rochelle Hospital just after 
6:30 p.m. the same day. Frieda died peacefully in her sleep at the Dumont Masonic Home on 
Monday morning, September 23, 1996, a little more than a month after her 97th birthday. The 
second oldest of eight children, she lived longer than any of her siblings and was the last to die. 

Ida Hoenig Farber — who moved from Bayside-Queens, New York to Newhall, California 
in 1 969 — was an upholsterer. She died on Saturday, March 1 , 1 980 after suffering a stroke. 
Emma, who took her sister's death badly, died of a stroke in her Vienna bedroom less than three 
months later. Henry Farber, a retired manufacturer of dental tools, died of a heart attack after 
an autombile accident in which Ida had been seriously injured at the wheel of their car in the 
shopping center of the Friendly Valley retirement development where they lived. 

Since it was difficult to get food in Austria-Hungary and other European countries 
during World War I, Herbert Hoover, the United States' food administrator (and future 
President), visited Falkenau — and other places — to gather information about starving 
children and he picked up an emaciated Adolph Hoenig and held him in his arms. Many decades W^ 
later, Adolph was a real estate manager for the New York City Department of Relocation. His 
first marriage, to Adeline Brick, on Saturday night, December 17, 1938 at Temple B'nai 
Sholaum, on Ninth Street between Sixth and Seventh Avenues in the Park Slope section of 
Brooklyn, ended in divorce twelve years later. Adeline died in Miami, Florida on August 17,1960 
and they had two children. About four years after the divorce, Adolph married Violet Myakich 
(pronounced Mack). He died of a heart attack in his car which he had parked in the Macy's [now 
Stern's] department store parking garage at Elmhurst, Queens, N.Y. and Violet died in a 
nursing home in Flushing, Queens on July 26, 1994. His son, Rev. John David Hoenig, who 
converted to the Moravian Church on February 4, 1 968, six weeks before he married Barbara 
Price on Saturday, March 23, 1968, was ordained a Protestant Minister of the Moravian Church 
in America on January 16, 1980. He was pastor of the Palmyra Moravian Church in 
Cinnaminson, N.J. for 13 years before entering specialized ministry. Adolph and Adeline's 
daughter, Elsie Ann, lives in Buchanan Dam, Texas, with her third husband, Charles ("Chuck") 
Carrick, a constable. 

Gustav Hoenig was a machinist while his wife, Lillian, is an electronic data processing tape 
librarian. After serving with the U.S. Army in the Pacific during World War II, Gus worked for 
a while for "GGG" Clothes in Brooklyn, New York with his oldest brother before moving to Dallas, 
Texas around 1950. Their son, Bruce, is a research laboratory technician with IBM, and their 
other son, Michael, is an electronics specialist with Texas Instruments Corporation. 



My father's youngest sister, Gerda Ann Hoenig Whitehouse, was an officer with the Chase 
Manhattan bank in New York City. Following her retirement, she and her husband, Orville 
("Win"), moved to Friendly Valley in Newhall, California, on the same street as Ida and Henry 
Farber. Several years after her husband's death, Gerda moved back east to live with her 
daughter and son-in-law, Florann and Andrew Gangloff, in Northport, New York, until her death 
in Smithtown General Hospital on Long Island on February 8, 1993. 

21 







My father's other sister, Gretl (Margareta), died in Falkenau on Saturday, September 1 6, 
1916, at the age of nine, about three years after contracting diptheria in an epidemic. The 
treatment had caused paralysis on her right side and eventually she suffered a fatal convulsion. 
Two years earlier she was given an Erinnerungsblatt [card of thanks] with a picture of Emperor 
Franz Josef praying, signed by her teacher at Falkenau's Second Girls' Public School, Emma 
Schlesinger, for making a contribution to the Fifth Child Care Day and War Orphans Day. The 
card states in part that Emperor Franz Josef wanted "to keep his people in peace," that he "knows 
the horrors of war," and his "responsibilities are in front of God." 

"I tried everything to prevent war," his statement continues, "but I must do my duty. I am 
depending on God to give victory to my troops. Take care of the children." 

As noted earlier, Bernhard Honig's brother, Josef, lived in the Stammhaus in Kirchenbirk 
with his wife and their nine children: twins Joshua and Helen, Ariel, Veronika, Wilhelmine, 
Leopoldine ("Poldi"), Julius ("Jus"), Karla and Anna. 

Joshua and his first wife, 'Anna Beer, had six children (Theodor, Dr. Leopold "Leo," Oskar, 
Rosa, Frieda, Elsa, Wilhelmina and Paul), and Dr. Julius is Joshua's only child by his second 
marriage to Bertha Graz. Joshua owned a retail and wholesale grocery and food business in 
Falkenau called Kolonial Waren. 

Dr. Julius ("Jussl") Hoenig, son of Joshua and Bertha Graz HOnig, and a half brother of 
Oskar Hoenig, is a world renowned psychiatrist, having studied at Charles University in Prague 
and then completing his medical degree during World War II in Oxford University in England in 
1943. He is the author of The Desegregation of the Mentally III, the English translation of The 
Essence of Psychotherapy by Karl Jaspers, General Psychopathology, and parts of other books 
and numerous professional articles. He was Professor and Chairman of the Department of 
Psychiatry at Memorial University of Newfoundland in St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada, for 
many years. Julius and his wife, Inge Greve Hoenig, an artist, now reside in Etobicoke, a suburb 
of Toronto, Canada. Inge fled Germany on the Kindertransport and she met Jussl in Scotland, 
where they were married. She was the only survivor in her family. Their son, Peter, is a New 
York lawyer, in New York, while their daughter, Elizabeth Hoenig Rogers, is a social worker in 
London, where her husband, Raymond Rogers, is an architect. 

Helen, Joshua's twin sister, married Albert Muller and they lived in Karlsbad with their 
five children (Anna, Max, Sophie, Emma and Rosa). 

Veronika married Wilhelm Loewy and they lived in Konigswart, where he was the Rabbi 
and took care of the town's synagogue. 

Wilhelmine married Moritz Lobl from Karlsbad and they had five children: Leopold, 
Julius (whose two children live in Brazil), Amalie (who married Max Stransky and they lived 
in Graslitz), Anna (the wife of Julius Samuel in Joachimstal), and Alfred (who also lived in 
Graslitz). The Stranskys had two daughters, Alice Stransky Orlicka, — who lives in Prague; 
her husband, Dr. Robert Orlicky, a retired Supreme Court judge, died in November, 1996 — 
and Ruth, who died in the Holocaust, as did Alice's first husband. Julius and Anna Samuel had a 
pension for guests who took mineral baths in Joachimstal, Bohemia, a town on the border with 
the German province of Saxony. Their daughter, Hermine (Mini) died in Israel in 1 986. 

Karla was married to a Mr. Eisenberger in Hohenelbe, and their daughter, Elli, lived in 
West Germany and Holland, and her other daughter, Hella, and sons Paul and Friedrich "Fritz" 
reside or resided in Germany. 



22 



OTHERS MIGRATE TO AMERICA 

My father's family was not the first of the Hoenig clan to migrate to the United States. 

As noted earlier, Sophia Hoenig — the sister of my great grandfather, Bernhard Honig 
— was the first of the Honigs to migrate to the United States. She came to St. Louis, Missouri 
prior to February 3, 1859, when, at the age of 21, she married Arant B. Klein from Poland. 
They resided at 2207 Broadway with their nine children. In the middle of the 1 9th century, St. 
Louis had a large, active Jewish population. A number of the Klein family's descendants still live 
in the suburb of Creve Coeur and are involved in Jewish and community affairs in the 1 990s, 
almost 1 40 years after the marriage of Sophia and Arant B. Klein. 

One of Sophia's granddaughters, Selma Pachter Frank, in 1980 wrote that the Kleins were 
married in Vienna (although there is a marriage certificate issued in St. Louis on which Sophia's 
maiden name is spelled Henig) and that they came to St. Louis with Arant's friend, Mr. Freund. 
Arant and Mr. Freund were bakers and they brought their famous rye bread recipe to St. Louis, 
where they opened a bakery. Eventually, they separated and Mr. Freund continued the business 
with his sons, while Arant's sons worked for the Anheuser Busch brewery. Sophie was often left 
alone, according to Selma Frank, and after she died in 1 885 at the age of 48, Arant worked hard 
to keep the family together until his de^th about eight years later, in 1 893, at the age of 60. 
Some family members believe he may have fought with the Union army during the Civil War and 
that one of the Klein sons may have been a Spanish-American War veteran. 

Sophia and Arant Klein's oldest child, Fredericka (Ricka) Kohner, was the second wife of 
Henry Kohner. He was in charge of the horse and wagon yard at the Anheuser Busch brewery in 
St. Louis. They lived at 2029 Market Street at the turn of the century. Henry and his first wife, 
Theresa Heller, were the parents of three sons (Louis, Simon and Joseph) and three daughters 
(Adella, Clara and Flora). He married Ricka after Theresa's death and they had a son, Aaron, who 
married Ann Darrish in 1 926. My father, Joseph Hoenig, visited with Ricka Kohner and some of 
her relatives in 1926. 

The next Klein child, Emanuel ("Manny"), was born around 1 862 and he died at a young 
age Bertha, the second oldest daughter, was married to Julius Abramson, and they lived at 3944 
Evans Avenue. Julius Abramson, a native of Hamburg, Germany, was president of the 
Central States Paper Company. A number of members of the family worked for the St. Louis 
firm, which also had a New York office, where my father visited with some of the Abramson sons. 

Benjamin Julius Klein, the fourth of Sophia and Arant Klein's children, was born in 
August, 1 869 and he was a bachelor. Nathan Klein was born around 1 870 and he married Bessie 
(maiden name unknown). They were the parents of five children. 

Pauline Klein, born in November, 1 872, married Samuel Zepin, who was born in Russia 
in 1867 They lived at 5942 McPherson Avenue with their two daughters, Sylvia and Alma, and 
son Oliver. Another son, Arnold, died in infancy. Sylvia married Edward Aaron Posen, who was 
born in Schlov, Russia, and they were the parents of three sons: Robert, a retired writer for the 
St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Michael, a retired marketer and analyst, and Stephen, an artist who 
lives in New York. 

Sophia and Arant Klein's sixth child was Bessie, who married Charles Meyers and lived in 
Salem, Illinois. They had two sons, Alfred and Harold. 

Rachael "Ray" Klein was born in 1 878, and, after her father died, she lived with Aunt 
Bertha and Uncle Julius Abramson and their young son, Alvin. She became Bertha's "special 
responsibility. "Ray" went to lots of parties and her social activities were reported in the St. 

23 



r 



• 



& 



• 



Louis newspapers, and the announcement of her engagement to Abraham "Abe" Pachter appeared 
in both the English and German newspapers. She met him at a party given by Hannah Guggenheim 
and "Ray" and "Abe" were married before 1 900. They were the parents of four children: Arthur, 
who was born in 1900 and died the next year; Selma, born on April 20, 1907 and died on May 
26, 1996, who was the wife of Maurice Frank, born in 1901, who was probably the longest 
practicing attorney in St., Louis until his death at 95 on November 29, 1996; David, who was 
married to Esther Brenner in 1 926 and Fanny Block in 1 937, and Adrian, who was the husband 
of Jeanette Schwab. Selma Frank's daughter, Ray Dobinsky, and granddaughter, Cathy Meyer, are 
following her tradition as community volunteer activists, and the many organizations with which 
they are and have been affiliated are listed in the family tree charts on page 1 84. 

Louis A. (Ludwig) "Ludy," who was born in February, 1 879, was the youngest of Sophia 
and Arant Klein's nine children. He was an avid baseball player and fan who would have liked to 
become a major league pitcher, but the family objected, even though he taught his brothers how 
to play. "Ludy" never married and he died in St. Louis on July 1 8, 1 934 at the age of 55. 

The artist, Stephen Posen (the youngest son of Edward and Sylvia Zepin Posen), received 
his bachelor of fine arts degree from Washington University in St. Louis in 1962. He then 
completed graduate school at Yale University, which was followed by several years of 
international study on Fulbright and Milliken Scholarships and a Guggenheim fellowship. In 
addition to painting, an article about him in the summer, 1 995 issue of Art Works, published by 
the Washington University School of Art, Gloria Shur Bilchik reports that he has "experimented 
with animated films and sculpture, in an early relationship of the relationship between physical 
reality, perception and illusion that has been the recurring motif of his work." 

"I found in film," Stephen Posen says, "a medium with enormous potential. It's an 
astonishing mode of expression, with great accessibility. If I hadn't become a painter, I might 

have been a filmmaker I'm a firm believer in the expressive power of paint. What I've 

learned is that if you can paint it, it is. If you can build it, it is. If you can imagine it, it can be. 
Paint is a medium in which ther limits of expression are waiting to be discovered." 

Today, he is an acknowledged, gifted, complex and iconoclastic painter in the medium of 
realism and his work is widely cited and dicussed in art literature and on display at art shows. He 
works in a spacious loft studio at 11 5 Spring Street in Soho (Manhattan), where he lives with 
his attorney wife, Susan Orzack, their actress daughter, Alexandra, and son, Zachary. 



My granduncle, Morris Frederick Hoenig, migrated to the United States in 1880. He 
probably visited his uncle and aunt, Arant and Sophia Hoenig Klein, and their children in St. 
Louis and then went west to San Francisco, California. We believe he was married there and had 
several children. There was a fire and earthquake in San Francisco in 1 893 and we believe that 
Morris Frederick's family, except for him, perished. He went to Fort Worth, Texas on 
horseback and was employed in a bath house there. He married Lillie Mae Buffaloe, adopted her 
son, Gordon, from a previous marriage, and they had three more children. They moved to Dallas 
in 1900, where they lived at 297 Commerce Street along with their three servants and 34 
boarders, according to the 1 900 U.S. census. 

My father visited Morris Frederick Hoenig in Dallas in 1 927. During my father's visit 
with the family, Uncle Morris told him in German that "here we are not Jews" and to "be sure to 
visit" his cousin, Ricka Kohner, in St. Louis, on the way home to New York City. Later, in St. 
Louis, Ricka Kohner told my father how she had met Morris Frederick Hoenig at the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition in St. Louis in 1 904 and gave him a message to write to his father (her 
uncle), Bernhard Honig, in Vienna, with whom he had not kept in contact. 

"I doubt seriously that "Papa" [Morris] Hoenig was in St. Louis before San Francisco," his 
granddaughter, Mary Veazey Worden, noted in 1981. "I know he and "Mama" [Lillie Mae] took 

24 



"Honey" [Bertha] to the Exposition in St. Louis in 1 904 when Honey was nearly six years old and 
I have a spoon he bought for Honey at that time, a souvenir of the Expo." 

Morris Frederick Hoenig worked with the Dallas Water Department from 1911 until his 
retirement in 1 944. During his 33 years with the department, he worked in nearly every phase 
of the meter division. He set the first meter in the city, number 1, which went to the 
then-Mayor, W.E. Holland. He also did the first meter repairing for the city, which consisted of 
walking from house to house with a haversack containing a few tools. He set up the first system 
of meter records in 191 1, which was used until 1939, at which time there were some 70,000 
meters in the Dallas system. He died on Friday, December 31, 1948 and is buried in Dallas 
Restland Memorial Park. 

His adopted grandson, Morris Hoenig, who died suddenly on Sunday, December 28, 1980, 
was an instrumentation technician. Morris Hoenig's older son, Ronald Morris Hoenig, is a fleet 
sales manager. Morris Hoenig's daughter, Mitzi Sue Pavazzi, was a stenographer before becoming 
the mother of two boys. James Morris Hoenig, the son from a previous marriage of Rita Jean 
Hoenig, and adopted by Ronald Morris Hoenig (Morris Hoenig's other son), was recognized in the 
summer of 1 985 by the City of DeSoto, Texas Fire Fighters Association for outstanding service to 
his community and courage in the lifesaving attempt at the city pool when a teenage boy was 
struck by lightning. James Morris was nominated to and accepted by the Society of Distinguished 
American High School Students in 1986. Thomas William Hoenig, Morris' other son, is an 
environmental quality control specialist. His wife, Donna Mae, has two degrees in biology and is 
a science teacher at Young Junior High School in Arlington, Texas. 

Morris Frederick's only daughter, Bertha "Honey" Hoenig (who married three times), was 
the first female bank teller in Dallas — possibly in Texas — working at the Mercantile 
National Bank of Dallas from 1 920 until her retirement in October, 1 963. The family has news 
clippings and articles about her, some of them from the American Institute of Banking. Crystal 
Lynn Hayes, Bertha's younger granddaughter, is an artist and a client services representative in 
a medical laboratory, and her husband, J.W. Hayes, is a systems analyst with a computer 
consultant firm. Their oldest son, Eugene Ward Hayes, is a computer operator. 



Johanna Hoenig, my father's aunt, came to New York City on June 4, 1 904 and worked for 
many years as the governess for the children of Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Sondern. One of the 
children later became an editor of Readers Digest magazine. Johanna Hoenig maintained her own 
second floor apartment at 41-25 48th Street in Woodside, Queens N.Y. until she was about 90 
years old. She lived her last years at the Neponsit Home for the Aged in Rockaway, Queens, N.Y., 
where she died on Sunday, June 30, 1 963, exactly four months before her 95th birthday. Adele 
Hoenig Waxman, Johanna's younger sister, also migrated to the U.S. from Vienna in the early 
20th century and she died in New York on March 3, 1 955 at the age of 82. 



Oskar Hoenig, Joshua and Anna Beer Hbnig's third oldest son, came to the United States in 
1914. He became a partner in the Witzel Brothers Soda Company in the Bronx, N.Y. When the 
business failed, he acquired the rights to the firm's name, tried to start anew, but failed even 
with $10,000 he had borrowed. Despondent, on Wednesday, April 13, 1932 he committed 
suicide by sitting in his car with the motor running. He is buried in a single grave in Woodlawn 
Cemetery, the Bronx, N.Y. His widow, Helen, the daughter of a gravedigger in Eger, remarried 
and went to Germany. 



On my grandmother's side, the Spiegls came to New York City before the turn of the 20th 
century, as mentioned on page 2. Jacob and Rosa LOv Spiegl, who died in 1 894 and 1 897 respec- 

25 



$ 



* 



tively, are buried in the family plot at Union Field Cemetery in Cypress Hills, Queens N Y with 
several of their children. Their daughter, Paula, the oldest child, married Otto Gess and they 
lived at 6 East 1 07th Street, Manhattan. Their daughter, Marie, owned a lampshade shop on 
Madison Avenue. Later, for a while, Marie and her husband, Marcel Lallement, lived in Tahiti 
and then opened another lampshade store in Beverly Hills, California. 

Mathilde Spiegl was the owner of a millinery firm which was located at 687 and later 701 
Madison Avenue in New York City. Mathilde's younger sisters, Hilde and Elsie, were employed in 
the business. Elsie handled the firm's books while Hilde took charge of the manufacturing. 
Meanwhile, Emma took care of the home and was, according to Edna Morris Esberg (Emma's 
niece), "a fantastic cook." Another sister, Bertha, became a buyer for a department store in 
Baltimore, MD. 

Louis Spiegl, the only son of Jacob and Rosa to live to adulthood, was a manufacturer of 
laundry dyes in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Marie "Flossy" Spiegl, the youngest in the family, married Martin Morris on Sunday, 
February 27, 1 910. He owned a bank vault and safe equipment firm, which was later headed by 
their son-in-law, Berthold Esberg, whose widow, Edna Morris Esberg, mentioned above, was 
president of the Peninsula Section of the National Council of Jewish Women. Martin and Marie 
Morris' other daughter, Helen, is married to Arthur Furst, a New York attorney. 

Most of the children of Jacob and Rosa Spiegl did not marry and first lived on East 96th 
Street, then at 106 East 85th Street and, from 1912 to 1957, at 790 Riverside Drive in 
Manhattan, New York City. 



THE HOLOCAUST 

The rest of the family remained in Bohemia and Vienna until the outbreak of World War II, 
which brought the worst horrors of all to the Jews. Many members of the family, such as my 
aunt, Emma Preindl, fled to England, Canada, Australia or the United States. Others who 
remained were captured by the Nazis. Some were murdered on the spot while others were sent to 
the concentration camps where many perished. 

Otto and Else Honig Lederer (the daughter of Ariel and Klara Griinhut Honig), who owned a 
shoe store in Rumburg, were captured by the Nazis in Milan, Italy and executed. Her brother, 
Dr. Herman Honig, an eye doctor who had red hair and freckles, according to my father, met a 
similar fate with his family. Leopold Honig and his wife, Ella Pollak, perished in the Holocaust. 
Ella was shot while fighting with the partisans in Italy. 

Another brother, Otto Hoenig, and his wife, Gretl Fischer Hoenig, managed to flee via 
Prague to Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, in 1938, where he owned an import-export business. For 
many years they lived in a beautiful house on Colquhoun Court at the edge of a cliff overlooking 
the entire city. After Otto's death, Gretl moved into an apartment on Bay Street in downtown 
Hamilton and, in 1994, to a senior citizens' residence as her eyesight continued to fail. Still 
possessing a sharp mind, she died in the residence on December 1 6, 1 995 at the age of 96. 

Prior to mid-1938, most Bohemian Jews felt safe. When the Nazis took over the 
Sudetenland, many of the Falkenau Jews fled to the Czech remainder of Czechoslovakia in October, 
1938. Karl Budlovsky, a grandson of Joshua and Anna Beer Honig, was on the last 
Czechoslovakian train which departed from Falkenau. Those who did not emigrate were 
transported to Theresienstadt (Terezin) and later to the death camps in Poland. 



26 



Once the Germans set up the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia — their puppet 
government — the Nazi authorities appropriated, sold or gave their friends the Jews' 
valuables. Religious objects which they confiscated were sent to the former Prague synagogues 
which became a museum of "an extinct nation." 

"We left everything behind, all our beautiful things," recalled Gretl Hoenig. "We left in a £; 
great hurry and feared for our lives when the Nazis came." 

"Otto Hoenig," reminisces Karl Budlovsky, "was the only one in Falkenau who had the great 
foresight to get out of there when he saw what was happening. He left his money and his property, 
while others could not part with their material things and many of them lost their lives." 

There was another doctor in this family besides Dr. Julius "Jussl" Hoenig, the 
psychiatrist, now living in Etobicoke, dntario, Canada. His older half brother, Dr. Leopold HOnig, 
lived and practiced in various parts of Europe, in Montevideo, Uruguay, and in New York, where 
he worked at the Daughters of Jacob Geriatric Center in the Bronx and the Jewish Home for the 
Aged in Riverdale-the Bronx, NY. There is an interesting photograph of him in a white 
physician's smock, vaccinating Kaiser Franz Josef's soldiers during World War I. My father 
visited him in his Karlsbad office in the "Goldener Schwan" on Kreuzstrasse on May 23, 1928. 
Later, he lived in New York and in Montevideo, Uruguay, where he experimented with medicinal 
herbs. Dr. Leo, as we affectionately called him, frequently was a guest of my parents, and he 
always took a special interest in me. He left New York for the last time on August 1 4, 1 954 on 
the French Line ship Flandre and spent six days in London, where he found his brother, Dr. 
Julius Hoenig, "very busy." From there he traveled to Germany, where life "didn't please" him. 
He went on to Zurich, Switzerland for three days and then for three more days in Salzburg before 
arriving in Vienna. "I was and am surprised with this beautiful city every day," he wrote to my 
father on October 28, 1954. "Here it is beautiful and one can live very cheaply. I am giving up 
my world travels to Spain and Montevideo. Vienna is the old Vienna of ther Kaisers, very 

beautiful with many businesses and orderly...." He died there less than two years later, on 

March 8,1956, following prostate surgery. % 

Paul Honig, one of Joshua and Anna Beer HOnig's eight children, who took over the family's 
provisions business, was another brother of Dr. Leo, and he perished during the Holocaust. His 
wife, Zdenka, was one of those saved on "Schindler's List." Wilhelmina (Mina), a sister of Paul 
and Dr. Leo Honig, resided in Halle an der Saale, Germany, where she died. One of Paul's older 
sisters, Frieda HOnig, married the butcher, Karl Ritter, and they lived in Komotau with their 
son, Wilhelm. When the Nazis occupied the region, they escaped, but returned home for some 
unexplained reason and the three of them perished. Elsa Honig married Joseph Mayer ("Mayer 
Pepp") from Falkenau and they migrated to New York in 1 924 with their infant son, Franz, who 
died of pneumonia which he caught on the voyage. Their daughter, Anna, was born four years 
later in New York. They lived on Cauldwell Avenue in the East Bronx until their deaths. Anna 
married John Jacewicz, a plumber, and they were the parents of three daughters (Linda, Joann 
and Mary Ann) and a son, Joseph. After Anna's death in the Bronx, New York on December 1 3, 
1973 — three days before her 45th birthday, John continued to live in there until moving to 
Florida in the 1 980s. Elsa's brother, Oskar, also lived in the Bronx and he is described earlier. 

Another sister, Rosa (Rosel) HOnig, married Gustav Budlovsky [spelled Budlowsky in 
German] from Zvestov u Votic. "She was a wonderful woman and one of my favorite cousins," my 
late father, Joseph Hoenig, often recalled with great affection. Their daughter, Anna ("Annerl"), 
died of a convulsion at the age of nine months, around 1915. Rosa and Gustav Budlovsky had two 
sons, Dr. Joseph ("Mopl") and Karl ("Bambino"). They lived in the Pilsener Hof in Karlsbad. 

Dr. Joseph ("Mopl") Budlovsky, was a physician in the Ministry of Health in Toronto, U| 
Canada. Karl Budlovsky, Dr. Joseph's brother, is an engineer, and his late wife, Alexandra ^ 
["Xandi"] Gutersloh, was the daughter of Albert Paris Gutersloh, a famous painter, novelist and 
playwright. Albert Paris Gutersloh was the author of Der Innere Erdteil [The Inner Continent], 

27 






Der Innere Erdteil Aus den Wdrterbuhern [The Inner Continent Out of the Dictionaries], Eine 
Sagenhafte [A Legendary Incredible Figure] (a platonic novel), Die Tanzende Tbrin [The Dancing 
Fool], Gewalt.g staunt der Mensch [Man is Mightily Astonished] and Zwischen den Zeilen 
[Between the Unes]. Xandra's mother was a ballet dancer. Karl Budlovsky is retired from 
McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. 

Their son, Alexander Gustav ("Sasha"), is an attorney, and their daughter Vera 
Demovsek, is a laboratory technician, as are Susan Budlovsky and Michael Budlovsky the wife 
and son of Dr. Joseph Budlovsky. Margaret and Dr. Richard Kardish, Dr. Joseph Bu'dlovsky's 
daughter and son-in-law, both hold degrees in chemistry. 

The Budlovskys and Dr. Julius ("Jussl") and Inge Hoenig get together quite often in 
Toronto. In response to a letter I wrote to Karl and Xandi Budlovsky about my daughter Gail's Bat 
Mitzvah in June, 1 985, Karl responded with a recollection about his Bar Mitzvah- "Can you 
imagine my surprise when I roamed through Jussl's library and found the Brehm's Life of 
Animals my mother [Rosa] gave to me to my Bar Mitzvah. Was I ever pleased " Karl and Xandi 
(who died on Monday, October 31, 1994), and Liesl Behal (the daughter of Gretl's sister, Emma 
Fischer and Heinrich Zentner) also looked after Gretl Hoenig, since they live in Ontario. 

Theodore (Israel) Honig, with whom my father loved to hand wrestle, and his wife, Regina 
(from Hochlibin) and their two daughters, Anna and Irma, did not survive the Holocaust. Their 
only son, Ernst Hoenig, lived in Sheffield, England with his second wife, Sylvia. 

Joshua Honig had a twin sister, Helen Honig Muller, who has grandchildren living in the 
United States and Canada. One of her granddaughters, Lici Treuer Weinrib, is the widow of Dr. 
Leonard Weinrib, a dentist in Scarsdale, New York. 

Many members of Albert and Helen HOnig Muller's family also perished during the 
Holocaust. They included their daughter, Anna Muller, her second husband, Ernst Samek, and 
their only child, Egon. Both of Max and Irma Epstein Muller's children, Franz and Helen, 
perished in the concentration camps, as did Kurt Glaser and Max Kohn, the oldest son and second 
husband of Sophie Muller Kohn-Glaser. Emma Muller and her second husband, Hermann 
Altmann, were murdered by the Nazis, while their older son, Leo, died on a ship trying to escape 
to Palestine. Rosa Muller, her husband, Fritz Treuer, and their daughters, Dr. Herta and Lili 
(Alice), migrated to the United States. They were the only branch of Albert and Helen Honig 
Muller's family to successfully escape from the Nazis as a complete unit. 

A large number of Moritz and Wilhelmine HOnig LObl's descendants also were deported to 
the concentration camps and did not survive the war. They include James LObl (the son of Leopold 
and Gertrude Schoenwald LObl) and the following members of Max and Amalie LObl Stransky's 
family: Karla Stransky Klug and her young son, Peter; Walter and Ruth Stransky Stingl; Anna 
LObl Samuel, her son, Friedrich, daughter and son-in-law Gertrude and Fritz Fischer and their 
young daughter, Ruth. Alfred and Mimi Pollak LObl and their daughter, Gertrud, (Moritz and 
Wilhelmine's son, daughter-in-law and granddaughter) were ail victims. Friedrich Samuel's 
wife, Vera Steinrich, managed to survive the horror and sher remarried after World War II. 

The original name of Dr. Robert Orlicky — the husband of Max and Amalie Loebl 
Stransky's daughter, Alice Stransky Orlicka from Graslitz — was Omstein, but he changed it 
since he wanted to advance himself in the government. Dr. Orlicky was once a judge in Falkenau, 
and after World War II. They remained in Czechoslovakia where he eventually became a High 
Judge of the Supreme Court in Prague. When Czechoslovakia liberated itself from Soviet 
domination in 1 990, President Vaclav Havel put Dr. Orlicky on a committee to write the nation's 
new Constitution. Their daughter, Eva Orlicka, holds two doctorates in law summa cum laude, one 
from Prague and the second from Zurich. Eva was a judge in Prague. 

28 



Paul Eisenberger, one of the sons of Karla HOnig Eisenberger, was deported from Holland 
by the Nazis, sent to Theresienstadt and then on to Auschwitz, where he perished. 

Also close with the family of Joshua HOnig were Tante (Lydia Beer) and Onkel (Ignaz) 
Holzner who lived in Theusing near Karlsbad. "After my father died," notes Karl Budlovsky, "we 
went every year to Uncle Holzner for Passover Seder." One of the Holzner grandsons, Otto Lowy, f ' 
lives in West Vancouver, British Columbia, where he is a broadcaster for the Canadian 
Broadcasting Corporation. He hosts a popular musical show, "The Transcontinental," heard 
throughout Canada. His wife, Barbara Hill Lowy, is chairman of the French department at a 
Vancouver high school. 

Unfortunately, many of the Holzner's lost their lives at the hands of the Nazis. They 
included Emil and Rosa Sgall Holzner; Ernst and Martha Holzner Herzig and their teenage 
daughter, Hanna; Otto and Hermine Osterreicher Holzner and their younger son, Rudolf; Ernst 
and Erna Holzner Lowy (Otto's parents), and Max Holzner. 

Dr. Bernard Aschner, grandson of the Blausterns, and son of Samuel Aschner, proprietor 
of a men's shirt and underwear manufacturing factory in Vienna, was a world renowned 
physician in Vienna and New York, specializing in gynecology, obstetrics and arthritis. He was 
credited by medical authorities with the discovery in 1908 of Aschner's phenomenon, the 
slowing of the pulse following pressure on the eyeball. Dr. Aschner did much research on 
endocrine glands in his younger days. He was a pioneer in the removal of pituitary glands from 
dogs. 

Dr. Aschner turned to the treatment of arthritis toward the close of his career. He was the 
author of many books on medicine, including The Art of Healing and Arthritis Can Be Cured, and 
numerous professional articles. He received his M.D. degree from the University in 1 907. He 
served as Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the University of Halle, Germany, lectured 
on those subjects at the University of Vienna, and was an obstetrician and gynecologist at the a 
University Clinic of Vienna. ^ 

A field surgeon with the rank of captain in the Austro-Hungarian army in World War I, 
Dr. Aschner won the Knight's Cross of the Order of Emperor Franz Josef. 

In 1938, with the Nazis overrunning Austria, he fled to New York where he maintained a 
Park Avenue office and affiliation with New York Polyclinic, Stuyvesant and Lebanon Hospitals. 
He died on Wednesday, March 9, 1 960 at the age of 77. 

His daughter, Elizabeth Aschner Laster, is a psychiatric counselor at a mental health 
clinic in Far Rockaway, NY. She is married to Oliver Laster, a former neighbor of her cousins 
Joseph and Ulrich Aschner in Vienna, who retired from the lumber business in 1992. Two of 
their children are following in their maternal grandfather's footsteps. Dr. Andrew J. Laster is a 
rheumatologist in Charlotte, NC, while Dr. Steven B. Laster is completing a fellowship in 
cardiology at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, MO. Elizabeth and Oliver Laster's daughter, Geraldine 
Macomber, earned degrees in applied mathematics and operations research at Brown and Stanford 
Universities and is now working for ROLM in Santa Clara, California. 

Dr. Aschner's four brothers were businessmen. Emil Aschner fled to England at the onset 
of the Holocaust. He returned to Vienna in order to try to free his brother, Richard, who had 
been arrested by the Nazis. Instead, both Emil and Richard Aschner and Richard's wife perished 
in Auschwitz. Their children, however, are alive. 

While the four brothers of Dr. Aschner were businessmen, the children of all five Aschner k 
brothers', for the most part, are professionals. 

Eva Aschner Vergeinerova, the daughter of Emil and Alice Fenichel Aschner, lives in 
Prague and is a simultaneous interpreter. She is fluent in English, Czech and German and has 

29 



travelled around the world to interpret at conferences. Her daughter Eva Veraeiner is ciftori in 
mathemat.cs. Peter Aschner, Eva Aschner Vergeinerova's bXr, i a journa ist and 9 |Ves in 
Vienna. L,ll,e Fenichel Aschner died in the 1920s and the two children we e SLdbv a 
housekeeper, Adele Hajak, who lived with Eva in Prague. She died in the late 1 980s * 

Peter Aschner, Emil and Lillie Fenichel Aschner's son, left Vienna for Enaland in 1938 

Th w'V ianCe r e ' H ? a R , uth T St ° lfer - They Were married in E "9'^ and had wo'chSen Erika 
and Wolfgang (now Zeev). Two years after Erika's birth in 1 944, Peter and Herta separated and 
he returned to Austria, where he married Use ROmer. He died there in Octote^SFlTtL™* 
Peter and Use had two ch.ldren, Susanna Claudia and Georg Aschner, who live n Vienna Herta 
moved from England to Israel with Wolfgang and Erika. Wolfgang (Zeev) Aschner is married ?n 
Rachel Shadmi and they Jive on Kibbutz Aye.et Hashahar in'the K'St^S; 
children Enka and her husband, Piotr Ronita, have two children. Susanna Claudia Aschner is 
marned to Robert Schwarz and they have two children, while Georg Aschner is unmarried 

Gertrude Aschner Schwarz, daughter of Richard and Alice Zimbler Aschner, is married to 
Dr. Gerhart Schwarz, a radiologist. They have three children: Doris Schwarz Lisenbee a 
psychologist; Marian Schwarz Phelps, a mathematician, and Dr. Richard Schwarz a physician 
and percussion musician. v"y*n**\\ 

Dr. Joseph Aschner, a son of Felix and Lily Pallester Aschner, is a retired professor of 
physics at the C.ty College of the City University of New York. His daughter, Katherine DeBruyn 
is a management consultant and computer director for a large law firm in Seattle, Washington 
U.S.A. Helga Buchenauer Aschner, second wife of Joseph Aschner, is a fashion designer. 

Ulrich Aschner, brother of Joseph Aschner, lives in Bogota, Colombia (where his parents 
lived and died after fleeing from the Nazis) and is a consulting engineer. The four survivinq 
children of Ulrich and Carmen Montoya Aschner are all professionals. Dr. Pablo Aschner and his 
sister, Dr. Elena Aschner, are both physicians, while Maria Christina Aschner is a lawyer and 
Alberto Aschner is an engineer. Anton FrOhlich, a son of Joseph Aschner's adopted sister Trude 
and her husband, Stefan FrOhlich, is a physicist and a computer expert. Anton's brother' Miquel 
Frohlich, is a cattle rancher in Codazzi, Colombia. 

Dr. Thomas Aschner, son of Carl (Carlos) and Nelly Wolf Aschner, was a chemist who lived 
in Benedikt Beuern, West Germany. He died in 1991. 

What happened to the German speaking Jewish communities of Falkenau, Karlsbad and the 
surrounding area after World War II? 

Of the 90,147 registered Jews in Bohemia and Moravia on October 1, 1939, only 8,695 
were left in mid-1943. Two-thirds of the 14,000 to 18,000 Jews who lived in all of 
Czechoslovakia in 1945 left shortly thereafter, and eventually nearly 19,000 Cezchoslovakian 
Jews migrated to Israel after the war. 

"Given the enormity of the loss of life and property during the Holocaust, it would have 
been inconceivable for the post-war Jewish community in Czechoslovakia to have revived its 
pre-war strength ansd vitality," Arno Parik writes in an an article about the history of Jewish 
communities in Bohemia and Moravia in Jewish Sights of Bohemia and Moravia, by Jiri Fiedler. 
"The size of the Jewish population increased with the arrival of refugees from Subcarpathian 
Ruthenia which was incorporated into the Soviet Union in 1945. In Bohemia and Moravia 52 
Jewish religious congregations were re-established for a short period of time with which about 
20,000 people registered in 1 948." 

Even though many in the Czech Liberation Army were Jewish, the German-speaking 
Czechoslovak Jewish soldiers were treated far differently from their Czech-speaking brothers. 
They had to reapply for Czech citizenship, were given "German" rations, and had to wear a badge 

30 



identifying them as Germans. At the Potsdam Conference in 1945 the Allied Powers agreed to 
transfer the Sudeten German population across the border to Germany by 1 946. 

Very little — less than ten per cent — of the property confiscated from the Bohemian 
Jews by the Nazis was returned to its owners. It seems rather bizarre, but the Jewish cemetery 
in Falkenau remained fairly intact throughout World War II only to have every tombstone 
removed by vandals during the communist regime. According to Dr. Julius Hoenig, who visited 
the cemetery in the 1 990s, only the walls remained, covered with obscene graffiti. The graffiti 
had been removed when I visited the empty cemetery in October, 1 996. 

"The Czech Jews in post-war Czechoslovakia," my father's cousin, Karl Budlovsky, told 
me recently in his Hamilton, Ontario home, "would not have made it without the help of the 
American Jews and organizations like H.I.A.S. [Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society]." Although he 
served in the Czech liberation army (from England) during World War II Karl was fired after 
nine days from his municipal job in post-war Karlsbad because he couldn't produce Czech 
citizenship papers. These papers had been denied to him by the government because his mother, 
Rosa Honig Budlovsky, had said she was Jewish before the war. 

"The Czech government did not care much for us in 1 945-46 by declaring that all Czechs 
were victims of the Nazis. They refused any help such as provisions for the elderly who survived 
the concentration camps. My own mother came back from England very sick with a heart ailment. 
All Jewish elderly were kept alive — and I mean what I say — by the support of the 
American Jewish organization, H.I.A.S. This support was distributed from the Jewish community 
center in Prague. During the Slansky pogrom and trial the Minister of Finance, a Jew named 
Fischel was hanged on the charges that the money from America should have come to the 
government's revenue and should not have been distributed by the Jewish community. If that 
money would have gone to the government, they would have stolen it. 

"H I A S supported us while we were in Vienna. They also paid our fares to Canada in 
England in 1 968 after we left Czechoslovakia. I am grateful to H.I.A.S. and the American Jews for 
their help." 



Our ancestors were Jewish, although today their descendants comprise not only Jews, but 
many members of a variety of Christian sects. 



(TTHFR IFWISH FAMILIES IN FALKENAU 

As mentioned previously, several dozen Jewish families lived in Falkenau soon after the 
turn of the 20th century. 

Adler 

The Adler family was involved in the tobacco traffic and Mrs. Adler's niece was from the 
Pleyer family. The name Adler means eagle. 

Auerbach 
Dr Ignaz Auerbach was the Honig's family physician. He had an office on Schrammstrasse 
— the second house from the corner [Family Kohn, "Federkohn," the feather dealer, lived in 
the house on the corner.] — two blocks from Eger River and one block from the street where 
the railroad to Eger operated. Dr. Auerbach's wife's name was Hermine (born Zentner) and they 
had two sons. Kurt, the oldest, was my father's classmate. He studied philosophy in Prague and 

31 



♦ 



S£M:=2SSSSHS53S 



Benda 

Hoenig. There was also a younger daughter. a^nau w<m ur. juiius 



Binhak 

The B.nhaks were a large family related to my grandmother, Hermine Adler Hoenia- David 
Stemiger of Falkenau (who owned a pearl button factory in Bleistadt and whose eS son was 
named Hans); Uncle and Tante Rosie Holzner in Karlsbad; the Steiners in Fa^enau MaS 

?S2J, ™u hef ' , Be ? a '" Kar ' Sbad; Tante Babette and her s °"> Sigmund vet t 

Tetschen, a cousin Hansel and son, Tony, and cousins Rosa and Frieda in Franzensbad Stranaelv 
in asking relatives and others about the Binhak family in Falkenau, only my ate fair and my" 
^i^ 19 R"PP- recalled that there were two unmarried Binhak'sisters n Fa kenau 
and one of them was named Hermine. They had a store and my grandmother, Hermine Hoeniq used 
to dean their house which may have been on Lauterbach Strasse. No one else asii S two 
members of the Binhak family and Walter Kohn, who lived in London, could recall this famiy ° 

eTewhtTn^mir ** ^ ^ ™" ** *" "" MWn » *"* members ™^ 

Siegmund Binhak and his wife had at least nine children in Falkenau. They were Carl 
Hugo, Otto, Anna, Emma, Helene, Marta, Olga and Paula. Siegmund Binhak was the second 
chairman of the Falkenau Jewish congregation and, under him, the congregation actually beqan to 
function in the late 1 800s. ' M 

Carl Binhak, a violinist, was married to his second cousin, Emma Binhak and they moved 
to New York in the 1880s or 1890s. He kept a detailed log of a trip he took from the United 
States to Karlsbad, Falkenau and other places in Europe in the summer of 1 904. David L Binhak 
a retired stockbroker who lives in Purchase, New York (in Westchester County, north of New 
York City), is in possession of his grandfather's log, a large section of which appears as another 
chapter of this book. 

Hugo lived in Lodau-Karlsbad. Otto, his wife and their four children resided in 
Teplitz-SchOnau. Wilhelm Binhak, Otto's son, who resides in Laguna Hills, California once lived 
in Karlsbad. 

Anna and her husband, Jacob Kohn, the parents of Walter Kohn (who lived in London until 
his death in the early 1 990s), once lived in Komotau where they had a very prosperous tailoring 
business which he continued after moving to London. Walter and his wife, Mina, owned a very 
successful export-import business in London, where they lived in a "lovely flat," according to 
his cousin, John H. [Hans] Steiniger (Theodor Steiniger's son). Walter donated funds to purchase 
an ambulance from Israel. Mina died in a home in Switzerland around 1992, a year before 
Walter. 

Emma apparently was unmarried and lived with her widowed mother in Falkenau in 1 904. 
At that time, Helene lived in Seestadl with her husband, Ignaz. 

Marta resided in Petschau. She may have been married to Hermann (based on a "process of 
elimination" from the diary), who had a store in Leitmeritz, according to Carl Binhak's diary. 
Uncle Moritz lived with or near Marta. 

32 



Olga was married to Leo and they and their son lived in Leitmeritz. 

Paula was the wife of Adolf and they lived in Briix with their two sons (one of whom was 
named Paul) and daughter, Erna. Paula lived, and apparently worked in the Fischer house in 
Moldau. 

If Siegmund Binhak had any other children, they either were not alive in the summer of 
1904 or they lived far from Bohemia, as there is no mention in Carl's diary of any other 
brothers or sisters. 



Bloch 
Jachim Heinrich and Bertha Bloch had a prominent building on the corner of the market 
square where they sold woolens and material. During the 1 920s, according to Werner Ldwy, Mr. 
Ludwig Lederer's toys and housewares shop was located in the Bloch's corner house. 

The Blochs were the parents of five children: Otto, Carl, Marie, Anna and Louise. Carl was 
born before 1899, according to Frieda Hoenig Rupp in 1992. The sons were bachelors, Marie 
and Anna remained single, while Louise married a religious man from Poland who lived in Eger. 
The five Bloch children were aunts and uncles of Gretl Fischer Hoenig. Otto Bloch was one of the 
Presidents of the Falkenau Jewish Congregation. 

Jachim Heinrich Bloch apparently had a brother who had a son named Karl, who lived in 
Franzensbad with his wife. Their son, Dr. Ferdinand Bloch, also lived in Franzensbad with his 
wife, Alexandra, and their son, Dr. Kurt Bloch. 

Anna Bloch visited her relatives in Franzensbad in 1 896 and that is where she signed the 
autograph and poetry album of my grandmother, Hermine Adler. 

Bondv 

Karl Bondy was married twice and his second wife's name was Steffi. She was nicknamed 
"Heureka," the Greek expression meaning "I have got it!"* because she was very energetic. They 
had two sons and Karl purchased the liquor business in Falkenau from the Pollaks. Steffi had a 
grown up son who lived in Leipzig, Germany and often visited them in Falkenau. 

[Archimedes was in his bath when he discovered how to measure the volume of an object and the 
purity of gold by applying the principle of specific gravity. He jumped out of the bath and ran naked 
through the town shouting "Heureka!"] 



Braun 
Frank Braun's parents had a farm in Theussau (Tisova) near Falkenau. His wife, Hilda 
Loewy Braun, is the daughter of Richard and Rosa Zentner Loewy. Frank Braun's father's name 
was Josef. Frank's sister married a German architect and builder, Mr. Greiner, and his firm's 
name was Bauer and Greiner. When the Nazis occupied the Sudetenland, Mr. Greiner divorced 
Frank Braun's sister and she perished during the Holocaust. Frank now lives near Hamilton, 
Ontario, Canada and is a prominent member of the Czech Canadian community. 



Buxbaum 
The Buxbaum family had a little store in Lobstal Strasse. [Lobs is the name of a little 
brook, and tal refers to the valley.] Annie "Bertel" Buxbaum , born in 1898 or 1899, was a 
classmate of Frieda Hoenig Rupp in Falkenau. She married Ernst Heller, who was born in 1 893 
or 1895. Her sister, Ida, married a Jewish man from Koenigsberg, a little village near 
Falkenau. Mathilde was the youngest of the three Buxbaum girls. She married a Mr. Baumgarten, 
a Christian from Falkenau. William Buxbaum was killed in action during World War I. 

33 



I 



♦ 



Ehrlich 

roH, Th6 , re ' S u a 9ravestone of an Ehrlich w Wch appears in a 1929 photograph taken at the 
Falkenau Jewish cemetery. It is behind and to the left of the grave of my father's sister G etl 
Honig (as one faces the grave). 



Feuerstein 
Falkenau's Jewish spiritual leader was Rabbi Solomon Feuerstein. Cantor Lippmann 
Kurzweil committed suic.de long before the Nazis came," according to Werner Ldwy in Prague 
leaving Rabb. Feuerstem as the only Jewish clergyman in Falkenau. Rabbi Feuerstein was very" 
angry about this type of economy." His wife, Gertrude, was a school teacher and they were the 
parents of one son, Eduard, a lawyer. Before World War II, the Feuerstein family lived on 
Schrammstrasse in Falkenau. Rabbi Feuerstein perished during his escape on a ship from Menton 
in southern France trying to get into Italy with refugees from Czechoslovakia. Eduard Feuerstein 
migrated to the United States, was married to Marianne ("Mizzi") and they and their dauqhter 
lived in Philadelphia, PA. Their daughter, Dorit Westheimer, was married to a speechwriter for 
Esther Peterson, a member of President Lyndon Johnsn's White House staff in the mid 1960s 
and now lives in Baltimore, MD, with her husband, who owns a brokerage firm. Eduard and Mizzi 
moved from Philadelphia to suburban Upper Darby, PA, and he died in Philadelphia in 1 978. 

Fink 
The Fink family lived in Falkenau. Luisa Ldwy was a saleslady at Adolf Herrmann's store 
until her marriage to Leo Fink. Then they opened a shoe store in the corner house in 
Briickenstrasse at the corner of Mauerteich Strasse, where Hugo and Rosa Ldwy resided. In 1932 
the LOwys rebuilt their house and the Fink's moved to the town of Leitmeritz (Litomerice). Leo 
Fink worked in the insurance business in Leitmeritz. 

The Finks had a daughter, Gerta "Gertie" Bor, who lives in Prague, and a son, Hans Georg 
Fink, who perished during the Holocaust. Gerta is married to Pavel Bor (formerly Pavel 
Edelstein). "Mr. Fink," recalls Werner Ldwy, "all the time had a newspaper notice in his pocket 
stating that his daughter [Gerta] was the first Jewish child in the Czech school in Falkenau." 
Before that, everyone in the Jewish community had attended the old German school in Falkenau. 



Fischer 
Alfred and Ida Fischer were prominent members of the Falkenau Jewish community and he 
was President of the Congregation before Emil Rosenzweig. The Fischers had a big corner house 
and they owned a large store and warehouse — a wholesale grocery, sugar and flour business 
which supplied small stores in the mountainside surrounding Falkenau — across the street 
from the railroad station. The Fischers sublet the top floor of their house to the government 
police [not the local police]. The ground floor, recalled John H. Steinger in 1 997, "was let to a 
small fruit shop and to the Schlesingers who had an umbrella repair shop." 

They had three children. Margaret (Gretl) Fischer married Otto Hoenig, and she resided in 
Hamilton, Ontario until her death on December 16, 1995 at the age of 96. Gretl and my aunt, 
Frieda Hoenig, were classmates in school. "We were good friends and Gretl was about a 
month older than I was," my aunt recalled. Her sister, Emma, married Heinrich Zentner, and 
they have a daughter, Liesl Behal, who lives in Toronto. Paul Fischer and his wife, Frieda Pollak, 
had a daughter, Doraliese "Dorli," who married a newspaperman, Mr. Winter, and they have a 
daughter, Sonja Winter. Sonja's grandfather was Karl "Schnaps" Pollak and his wife's name was 
Veronika. Paul Fischer apparently committed suicide when Dorli was a young child, according to 
Werner LOwy, and Frieda Fischer and Sonja Winter and her husband migrated to London in the 
1950s. 



34 



Geiqer 

Leo Geiger worked in Adolph Herrmann's store and in 1923 he and his wife, Ida 
Greenberger ((from Frauenthal, Bohemia) opened an underwear and textile store in Kreuzgasse. 
They perished in Auschwitz, but their son, Egon, born in 1 923, survived the concentration camp 
and death march. He now resides in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, with his wife, Martha 
Goldberger (from Prague), whom he met in Auschwitz, and their daughter, Hannah. 

Grunwald 
Wilhelm GrOnwald was a banker, according to Dr. Julius Hoenig. The Grunwalds had a son, 
Walter, and a daughter, Marieschen. Mr. Grunwald moved to Falkenau from Goding, Moravia (the 
same town where Siegmund Freud lived) because of a bank assignment. Later, he was involved in 
a scandal when he was accused of committing fraud. The charge was upheld and he lost his job and 
went to prison. 



• 



Brothers a firm in Chicago. My late father said he visited him once and received a letter from 
him. My father said Hans Herrman also had a brother who worked for Adolf Herrmann in 
Falkenau. According to John H. Steiniger, this nephew of Adolf Herrmann could hardly speak 
German because he had been living in the Czech speaking part of Czechoslovakia. 



Dr. Hermann, a pediatrician from Falkenau was married to lilli Steiniger, one of the two 
daughters of the lawyer, Dr. Ludwig Steiniger, and his wife Hannah from Teplitz. Lilli and her 
pediatrician husband Sived in Dr. Julius Hoenig's mother's house, as did Dr. Mohr. 

Huebsch 
Leo Huebsch and his wife owned a drug store in Falkenau and they were the parents of two 
children. 



Hansl 
Mrs. Emma Hansl was a born Steiner and she outlived her husband, Fred, by many years. 
There were three children. Arthur Hansl was the oldest, followed by his sister, Hedwig (who 
married a very rich man and who had a granddaughter also named Hedwig), and Karl (the 
youngest). Arthur worked for a coal firm while Karl, my father's friend, became a banker. 

Herrmann 

No one in Adolf Herrmann's family survived the Holocaust, according to John H. (Hans) 
Steiniger of London. Adolf Herrmann owned a large wholesale and retail households and textiles 
store and my grandfather, Leopold Honig, worked there. Ida Herrmann, born Kohn, was Adolf's 
wife and they had three children: Gretl (whose birthday was on September 21), Karl (a friend 
of my father's), and Julius ("Jussl") (a friend of Hans Steiniger). All three Herrmann children 
were musically inclined. 

"Adolf Herrmann used to sing at Jewish affairs," according to my late father, Joseph 
Hoenig, "and Gretl, who also had a good singing voice, played the piano very well." According to 
Werner LOwy, Gretl also performed in the Reichenberg Theatre in northern Bohemia and used to 
sing in the Falkenau synagogue on holidays. 

Adolf Herrmann was, according to John H. (Hans) Steiniger, "a well-respected town 
councilor for the then 'Social Demokrat Party.'" 

"Karl was an especially good friend of mine," recalled Joseph Hoenig, "and he had two 
violins. He wanted me to have one and he wanted to teach me how to play the violin, but I was not 
musically inclined, although I love music. Unfortunately, Karl died from meningitis when he was 
about 15. 

"Adolf Herrmann had a heart attack and died during Hitler's time. I proposed to send the 
two children an affidavit to come to the U.S., but they sent me back a reply that their mother was 
in an instiution and they didn't want to leave her alone, and I suppose they perished with their 
mother." 

"Both Julius and Gretl," notes John H. Steiniger, "could have enjoyed successful careers in 
the musical field if only they would have left, but they did not want to leave their mother behind. 
Ida Herrmann had some mental problems from time-to-time, which was a matter one tried to 
keep a secret." 

Adolf Herrmann had several brothers and they owned a big wholesale food business. One of 
his brother's sons, Max, lived in Eger and married Berta Schwarzbach, an immigrant. Another of 
Adolf Herrmann's nephews, Hans Herrmann, migrated to the United States and worked for Gage 

35 



Kohn 

There were apparently several Kohn families living in Falkenau. 

Lehrer [Teacher] Jonas Kohn, the Hebrew teacher in Falkenau in the late 1 800s, was 
related to the Adler and Heller families, thus making him my grandmother's [Hermine Adler 
Hoenig] distant relative, and she often spoke about him. My father often told me that whenever a 
member of the Kohn family died, my grandmother received some of their furniture. Lehrer Kohn 
died in 1898. 

Anna, the mother of Walter Kohn (he lived in London) was a born Binhak from Falkenau. 
She and her husband, Jacob, who had a very prosperous tailoring business in Komotau, ended up 
in London in 1941 where he continued his business. Anna and Jacob died there. He had died 
suddenly in the street, while Walter was in the movies, so Walter never went to the movies again 
until he went to Florida to vacation with David and Edith Binhak. Walter's nickname was "das 
Pferd" [horse], which referred to his tremendous energy. He and his wife, Mina, owned a very 
successful export-import business and lived in a "lovely flat" in London, notes John H. Steiniger. 
Walter Kohn donated funds to purchase an ambulance for Israel. Mina died in a home in 
Switzerland around 1 992, a year before Walter. 

Ignatz Kohn and his mother, Katherine ("Katel"), owned a shoestore in Bruckenstrasse 
(opposite the LOwy house) in Falkenau, according to my aunt, Frieda Hoenig Rupp. According to 
Werner Lowy, Ignatz Kohn was married and had a son, Walter. Bertha Pfeffer Schwarzova said 
the Kohn family moved to Salzburg. According to John H. Steiniger, this Walter Kohn emigrated 
to London and moved to Bath, England where he had a typewriter shop until he passed away some 
years ago. His wife's name was Greta. 

Kropf 

Family Kropf lived in Unterreichenau (Dolny Rychnov), a village near Falkenau, and he 
was the director of the Reichenau glassworks factory. They had an unmarried daughter, Liesl, 
who died on Long Island, New York in 1 994, and a son, Walter, who resides in Harrison, New 
York. Walter Kropf taught Dr. Julius Hoenig how to play chess in Falkenau and he was a good 
tennis player. 

Kuh 

The Kuh family lived on Schramm Strasse. Mrs. Kuh had a washery (laundry) on 
Bahnhofstrasse. There were three children: a daughter, Gretl, and two sons. Gretl, who died of 
cancer, was a nurse at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Ontario. One of her brothers owned a 
radio store in Pilsen. 

36 



Kurzweil 

Cantor Lippmann Kurzweil sang in the Falkenau Synagogue. He and his wife, Regina, were 
the parents of two daughters. Alice married a relative in Prague, while her younger sister, 
Wilma, was married in Vilna, Lithuania, long before the outbreak of World War II. Cantor 
Kurzweil, according to Werner Lowy in Prague, "committed suicide long before the Nazis came 
leaving Rabbi Feuerstein as the only Jewish clergyman in the Falkenau. Rabbi Feuerstein was 
very angry about this type of economy." 



Lang 
Josef Lang and his wife lived in Falkenau. Their son and daughter-in-law, Victor and Alice 
Lang, had a big shoe business and they lived near the church, and, according to my aunt, Frieda 
Hoenig Rupp, "Alice was a very fine woman." They had four children, Gerhart, Ella, Valerie 
("Wally") and Irma. Dr. Julius Hoenig says Gerhart, who migrated to Israel in 1933, was 
"absolutely brilliant and strong. He won all the prizes in school and he beat up all the goyim who 
hit the Jewish children." Ella, who had an illegitimate child, died during the Holocaust. Valerie 
lives in England and Irma died prior to the Holocaust. 



Lappert 
The two Lappert brothers were cattle dealers who lived across the street from Bertha 
Honig's business on Bahnhofstrasse (Nadrasni). Later, they moved to Vienna. One of the brothers 
had a daughter named Louisa. 



Lederer 

Ludwig Lederer and his wife, Ottillie, came to Falkenau in the late 1920s, just before 
Hitler's time. They lived in the Bloch house with their daughters, Irma and Helen, and they had a 
little toys and housewares store. Helen died of tuberculosis in the 1 920s. Later, the Lederers 
merged with Karl Ruczek, who owned a store with ready made clothing and shoes, called 
Lerufa, also on the Marktplatz, but opposite the Bloch house. Karl Ruczek married Hanna 
Fischer, but they had no children. 



Lov 
There were eight children in the Lov family. One of them, Ernst Lov, was my father's 
friend. The other children included Otto, Tony, Paul (the youngest), Emma, Helen and Marie. Otto 
worked for a coal mining firm. Emma, Helen and Marie worked in their father's ladies' store and 
they also had a store in Karlsbad, which Helen eventually managed. Later, Marie moved to London. 
They were forced to go to Prague when the Nazis took over Bohemia, where they were given one 
room in the center of the city in which to live. Because the others did not want to leave Prague, 
they perished during the Holocaust. 



ff 



.<• 



October 1 1 995 He and his bt* LT Z Vlll ,. S ^ York ' where he was a resident, on 
Postow, a'glstroenterSg V, t ?ng* ""d V I tflZTn ,"* *"""* ° f * J ™ L ° Wy 
Larchmont, New York. Robert was atalS r*t ni I ^ a Surgeon who lives in 

groups in New York Citv One dav *!m„S 11 q« k P Y6r Wh ° Derformed w *h chamber music 
just perforce I wit , a ^p^f Lher O, rn« ' t TT* to me ° n the telephone that he had 

who wa ?z Ears ss:: t rsar the r? 

Svata, from Nova Paka in northern Bohemia. ^^SZ%^£^&™£ 
then managed to cross the closed border to Romania and with the occupation ^Bessarabia bv the 

Chernow.tz. Every time the German army advanced, the factory - and Werner --moved 
further east mto the Soviet Union's interior, until they reached'the Kirghiz S S R There in 
1942 he married Natalia Stolarowa, a Russian. He remained in the Sovfet Union until 94? 
when he returned to Czechoslovakia with Natalia. After some time she demanded S thev should 
return to the USSR but Werner refused and they were divorced. Werner has ?woch,d re n from 
his first marriage. H.s son, Peter L6wy, is married to Lenka and they have two sons Ian and 

^veTn f^e 9 "' ^ iS """^ t0 K ° hak a " d they ™ the parents ° f a ^ -iacob. AH 

rwJ a Tao r c a l efUl t0 l Werne u r and Maya f0r their 9racious hospitality while I was in Prague in 
October 1 996 to complete the research for this book. Werner went with me all over the citv to 
visit with family members and he provided me with a great deal of additional information. 

"Werner and Maya," said John H. Steiniger in 1 997, "were very good to my sister Gretl 
Novak, prior to her death in Prague in the spring of 1995." 

All of Leopold and Julie Buchsbaum Lowy's children — including Oscar Pavel Frieda 
Marta and others — perished at the hands of the Nazis. Only Hugo survived. 

Loewv 

Mr. Loewy was employed by the Pollaks in the liquor business. Mr. and Mrs Loewy had a 
daughter. 



L6wv 
Hugo and Rosa Lowy often visited my parents and me after they migrated to the United 
States after being released from Theresienstadt to Switzerland on January 5, 1 945 by the 
International Red Cross via a railroad train with sealed cars. Hugo — the son of Leopold L6wy 
and Julie Buchsbaum, both from Schiittuber — was born in Giesshubl/Karlsbad on September 
25, 1875 and died in Queens, New York on April 2, 1957. Rosa, the daughter of Simon Schwarz 
and Katti Bloch, both from Kollautschen (Kolovec), was born in Kollautschen on February 28, 
1 884 and died in Queens, New York on February 1 2, 1 970. 

On July 5, 1 906, Hugo L6wy and Leopold Mohr, representing the Chevra Kadische, met 
with Falkenau's mayor, Dr. Peter, about enlarging the Jewish cemetery. Hugo and Rosa Lowy had 
two sons, Robert and Werner. Robert Lowy, born in Falkenau on October 28, 1906, was vice 

37 



Moritz and Regina Loewy were the parents of Fred, Hilda (who moved to Prague) and Erna 
(the youngest). Moritz's father lived in a house on the road from Falkenau to Prague. Regina 
Loewy, an aunt of the Brauns and a cousin of Rosa Budlovsky through the Beer family, was 
"famous for her marinated herrings in sour cream," according to Karl Budlovsky, "which she 
always prepared on Sundays. I was always her first customer, only I always forgot to pay her. As 
the saying goes, "Love comes through the stomach,' and I loved especially those of our mishpoche 
who were good cooks, including Aunt Regi." 

Mendl 
The Mendl family was very poor, as were my grandparents, and they had a little 
greengrocery store in Falkenau. There were six children, including Emil (the oldest and my 
father's friend), Max (the middle son), another son, Martha (the oldest daughter), Berta and 
Hermine (the youngest daughter). 

38 



Mohr 
Dr. of Jurisprudence Arthur Mohr was a judge. He lived in Dr. Julius Hoenig's mother's 
house on Bahnhofstrasse and was married to Flora Pollak. Dr. Mohr's daughter, Kaethe, was 
taken by the Nazis to work in a brothel during the Holocaust. 



Newman [Neumann?] 
There is a gravestone of Charlotte Newman Ehrlich which appears in a 1929 photograph 
taken at the Falkenau Jewish cemetery. It is immediately to the left of the grave of my father's 
sister, Gretl Hbnig (as one faces the grave). 



Pfeffer 

The Pfeffer family lived on Elbogener Strasse. After Mr. Pfeffer's first wife passed away, 
he married a Viennese woman. A Pfeffer family (it may have been this same family or another 
one, according to Werner Lbwy) lived in Schonwerth (a part of Falkenau on the road to Zwodau) 
where they operated a grocery shop. 



Plever 
Betty Pleyer worked in the tobacco shop for Mrs. Adler in the Honig house in Falkenau. 



Pollak 

Karl "Schnaps" Pollak and his wife, Veronika, owned a liquor store in Sommergasse. They 
had three daughters — Irma, Frieda and Marta — and a son, Walter. Frieda Pollak was the 
wife of Paul Fischer and they had a daughter, Doraliese "Dorli," who has a daughter, Sonja 
Winter. [Karl and Veronika Pollak may also have had two sons, Hans (who died many years 
before World War II) and Louis.] One of those employed in the Pollak's liquor store was Mr. 
Loewy. Eventually the Pollaks sold the liquor business to Karl Bondy. 

Reichler 

Family Reichler owned a flour and groceries store in Falkenau. Their son, Rudolf, was 
born around 1 900. He got married after World War I and moved to Craiova, Romania. Rudolf had 
a son, Fredi, who migrated to Israel before World War II. 

The Reichlers also had three daughters. Ella married Josef Schlesinger, who owned an 
umbrella store in Falkenau, and they also moved to Craiova, Romania, where Werner Lbwy 
visited them in 1 937. They had two daughters, Lia and Ruth, who may now be living in Israel. 
The two families in Craiova were in the grain trade business. 

Olga was married to the son of Adolph Schlesinger (not related to Josef Schlesinger) and 
then later was married to a Czech, Mr. Chaloupka, and it is presumed they perished during the 
Holocaust, according to Werner Lbwy. 

Rosenbaum 

Bernard Rosenbaum, an engineer, was the druggist in Falkenau. He was married to Ida 
Steiniger, daughter of the grocer, Bernard Steiniger, from Falkenau, and they were the parents 
of a child. 



Rosenzweiq 

Emil Rosenzweig was the last President of the Falkenau Jewish Congregation. He owned a 

39 



^ 



coal mine and his house was opposite the railway station. He and his wife had a little daughter 
Mirka, in the early 1930s who was slightly retarded. Mr. Rosenzweig refused to leave Falkenau 
when the Germans occupied the Sudetenland in the autumn of 1 938, so the Nazis took the entire 
family and transported them to Pilsen to a concentration camp or prison. 

"He was," noted Werner Lbwy, "a peculiar man. "In 1928-30 he built a very nice smaller 
chapel with heating facilities inside the Temple. It was used for services during the winter and 
was appropriately called 'the Wintertempl.'" 



Ruczek 
Karl Ruczek married Hanna Heller, Karl and Emma Zentner Heller's daughter, and they 
had no children. They owned a store on the Marktplatz opposite the Bloch house with ready made 
clothing and shoes, called Lerufa. The Lederers, who owned a little toys and housewares store on 
the Marktplatz merged their store with the Lerufa firm. The Ruczeks perished in the Holocaust. 

Schlesinger 
Two unrelated Schlesingers married two of the three Reichler daughters. 

Ella Reichler married Josef Schlesinger, who owned an umbrella store and repair shop on 
the ground floor of the Fischer's house on the Markt Platz (called Masarykovo namesti in Czech) 
in Falkenau, and they moved to Craiova, Romania, where her brother, Rudolf Reichler, and his 
family moved after World War I. Werner Lbwy visited them there in 1937. They had two 
daughters, Lia and Ruth, who may now be living in Israel. The two families in Craiova were in 
the grain trade business. 

Olga was the wife of Adolph Schlesinger's son (not related to Josef Schlesinger) and then 
later was married to a Czech, Mr. Chaloupka. They, too, may have perished during the Holocaust, 
according to Werner Lbwy. 



Steiner 

Emma, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Johann Steiner married Fred Hansl and she outlived 
her husband by many years. There were three children. Arthur Hansl was the oldest, 
followed by his sister, Hedwig (who married a very rich man and who had a granddaughter also 
named Hedwig), and Karl (the youngest). Arthur worked for a coal firm while Karl, my father's 
friend, became a banker. 

Johann Steiner was a member of the committee which worked with the architect, Emil 
Lifka, on plans for and the construction of the Falkenau synagogue in 1 896 and 1 897. 

The Steiners in Falkenau were related to the Binhak family. 



Steiniger 
There were several Steiniger families in Falkenau. 

Markus Low Steiniger, on April 29, 1 884, lived in the village of Chodau and was present 
at discussions of the possibility of the Chodauer Jews joining together with those of Falkenau. 

Salomon Steiniger was the owner of Torahs and Siddur (prayer) books in the small village 
of Steinbach, near Falkenau, and he had died prior to 1 860. His son, also deceased at that time, 
was Abraham Steiniger, and his son-in-law, Joachim Kohn, claimed he purchased the holy 
items from the deceased Abraham Steiniger. On August 6, 1 860, Joachim Kohn was asked by local 

40 



officials to explain why he had refused to turn over the items to the Falkenau Jews who were 
trying to form a congregation. Mr. Kohn maintained he had paid and fed men on the Jewish 
holidays in order to have a minyan, for services in a room in his own house with the Torahs and 
Siddur books. 

David Steiniger had moved from Steinbach to Falkenau in the 1 840s or 1 850s. On August 
22, 1 860 he and others answered Mr. Kohn's remarks and their arguments were presented to 
the Regional Rabbi. A crisis was averted since Mr. Kohn died shortly thereafter and the Steinbach 
Jewish community disappeared. 

The heirs of Franz Steiniger and David Steiniger also appear as some of the ten congregants 
of the Steinbach-Schonlind Jewish community [Chevra Kadishe] which was taken over by the 
Falkenau community on April 24, 1 895. 

David Steiniger owned a pearl (perlmutter) button factory in Bleistadt at the turn of the 
20th century, where he lived during the summers. His eldest son was named Hans. He was related 
to the Binhak family. David Steiniger was a member of the committee which worked with the 
architect, Emil Lifka, on plans for and the construction of the Falkenau synagogue in 1 896 and 
1897. 

Franz Steiniger lived in Falkenau with his wife, Berta, and their son, Walter, who studied 
medicine. 

Philipp and Charlotte Steiniger had three sons: Ernst (the oldest), Dr. Ludwig, and 
Theodor (the youngest). They were well-to-do, according to my father, and employed young 
women to take the little children outside in their baby carriages. 

Ernst Steiniger, whose wife's name was Klara, owned a large house in the Marktplatz and 
worked in the wholesale beer trade (Bier-Steiniger) and had the sole agency of the Pilsener 
and Egerer breweries. He also owned a tailor shop in the back of his large property at Marktplatz 
20, as well as a restaurant, which was more like a beer hall, which he rented to "Caffe Mein," 
part of a chain of stores in Czechoslovakia. They were the parents of four sons — Philipp, 
Fritz, Paul and Otto — and a daughter, Molly, who was married to an engineer in Germany. 
Philipp, the eldest son, managed the beer enterprise and later had a chemist shop on the site of 
the old restaurant. He married Wilma Bloch from Tachau (Tachov) in the 1 930s. They had a 
young daughter and they and Wilma's mother, Hermine Bloch (who was the wife of David Bloch 
from Tachau and the sister of Rosa Schwarz Lowy and thus Werner and Robert Lowy's aunt), 
perished in the Lodz, Poland concentration camp. [David Bloch was the only son of Nathan Bloch 
of Tachau.] Fritz, who did not marry the daughter of the owner of a hardware business in 
Reichenberg (Liberac), as planned by their parents, instead wed his old girlfriend, Helly, in 
Prague. He was also sent to the Lodz camp where he died when a Nazi beat him to death because he 
went on line for a second bowl of soup. Helly also perished in the Holocaust). Paul, who was a 
sick child, died from infantile paralysis as a teenager. Otto escaped to Israel on a ship, the 
Sakaria, by way of Danubis-Sulina, Romania, and the Black Sea. Later he moved to the United 
States where he lost a leg in a traffic accident. He died in Los Angeles. His wife's name is Helen 
and they had two sons, Michael and Fred Steiniger. Michael is an attorney in Los Angeles, and 
Fred is a successful architect and developer in Tucson, Arizona. He and his wife are the parents of 
three children. 

Dr. Ludwig Steiniger, a lawyer in Falkenau, was married to Hannah. She was from Teplitz, 
was very short, and walked with a limp. "She was always hanging on to Ludwig's arms, and after a 
while," some townspeople explained, "she became a little crooked." Ludwig and Hannah had a 
good-looking son, Kurt, who was born in 1 904-06 and died in Rhodesia, and two daughters, Lilli 
(who lived in Teplitz and was married to Dr. Hermann from Falkenau, and Hannah (who lived in 
Prague). Kurt was married to the daughter of Mr. Becher, a well-known manufacturer of plows 

41 






Austro-Hungarian monarchy was a monopoly and the product could onlv t Iht ' h * °. 
central supply firm In 1918 there was'anVjewish Jbttg^^gt Fakenau anS S 

r^hnJ t \ Cked , J Th l 1 d0r Ste J ni9er ' S t0baCC0 business A ^er Kid War I when the 
Czechoslovaks Republic was formed Theodor StPininpr inct i-hic ^ ',_..? 

H£M fro m his mother, Charge. jSS^SS^i Sb5"«S* h ? 1 K 
ma.n income was from the angros paper business, supplying the oorcelain and tPvti!' inn ?■ 
with industrial paper. He and his wife, Ma.chie, both ofwhom wereTpt "ed to le el and 1 En 
on rr'f "rH 6 ja» Perished in the Holocaust. They were the parents of two dZZe^andl 
son. Gretl, who died in Prague in the spring of 1995, was the widow of Vaclav Novak Christian 
who predeceased her. Hans became John H. Steiniger and he resides in London with his wife 

St' L y ° U T V s ter,Erna, u W3S married t0 Paul Kar P eles - the ™™ of a glass fa«o^ in 
Teplitz After a brief marriage they divorced and she changed her name to Erna Stein and she 
hves in London. Shortly before my father died in! 991 , Hans Steiniger wrote a letter To him 



According to Frieda Hoenig Rupp there was a Filipp and Fannie Steiniger family. He was a 
tailor for whom my father worked from March 24 until April 22, 1918, and his wife was mv 
grandmothers cousin. They had four or five children. There was a married son a married 
daughter, a son [according to my father - a daughter, according to Frieda Hoenig Rupp] who 
died of an inflammation of the brain, another married daughter and, possibly another son ] 



My father also talked about two other — unrelated to those already mentioned 
—Steiniger brothers: Filipp and Bernhard. Filipp owned a furniture and scrap iron business 
and he had five daughters (Frieda, Elsa— married in Prague, and three others). [Before her 
death in 1995, Gretl Hoenig said my father must have confused this family with other 
Stemigers.] Bernhard owned a large grocery store at #1 Kreuzgasse. Frieda says Bernhardt 
wife's name was Anna and they had three daughters: Ida (the oldest and unhappily married to a 
Mr. Rosenbaum, and they had a drugstore), Elsa, and Irma (who got married in Olmitz). 

Unqer 
Dr. Ludwig Linger owned a nice house in the wall of the old Tiergarten (zoo). He was a 
lawyer and he and his wife were the parents of two sons, Hans and Kurt. Hans, the older son, 
became a lawyer and moved to Tel Aviv, Israel long before World War II. He was married to 
Erni Kohorn from Karlsbad and he became a judge in Israel. He died after being run over by an 
automobile. Kurt was an architect and studied in Prague and Vienna, where he became one of the 
propagators of the designs of the famous Mr. Loos. He built his father's house in the Tiergarten 
wall before moving to Israel, where he owned a firm called "The Celebrated Home," prior to his 
death. 



Zentner 

Hermann and Julie (born Bloch) Zentner were the parents of two sons, Leopold and 
Heinrich. 

42 



Leopold Zentner, who was once President of the Falkenau Jewish community religious 
affairs, was born in Luditz in 1871 and he died in 1942 as a result of the Holocaust. He was 
married to Ida Heller, who was born in Postelberg (Postloprty) near Saaz (Zatec) in 1 881 . She, 
too, perished in the Holocaust in 1942. The Zentners lived in a large house on the Rosenplatz 
(Ruzove Namesti), next to the Lowy's paper and book store. Their names appear on a post- 
World War II memorial in the Karlsbad Jewish cemetery. Their daughter, Emma, married 
Rudolf Rindler, an automobile dealer in Karlsbad, and they lived in Seattle, Washington U.S.A., 
with their daughters, Eva and Susie. Emma Zentner Rindler died in May, 1997 and Rudolf 
predeceased her. Leopold and Ida Zentner's younger child was Paul, who was born around 1 903 in 
Falkenau. He was married to Lotte Loebl from Karlsbad and the both of them migrated to Israel 
where they died one week apart in December, 1991. They have a married daughter, Ruth, who 
lives in Tel Aviv, Israel with her two sons. Once, Paul fractured his ankle while ice skating. The 
Zentners were neighbors of the Ldwys. 

Heinrich Zentner, born in 1 874 in Luditz, was married to Emma Fischer, the older sister 
of Gretl Fischer Hoenig. Emma was born in Falkenau in 1 892 and she and her husband died in the 
Treblinka concentration camp in 1943. Their daughter, Elizabeth (Liesl), born on July 4, 19... 
in Falkenau, is the widow of Victor Behal, who was born on March 2, 1 922 in Prague and died in 
Hamilton, Ontario on December 11, 1988. 

Leopold and Heinrich Zentner were the owners of a textile store on the Rosenplatz which 
was sacked and plundered in the anti-Semitic riots of 1918. 

Zuckerl-Zentner 

The Zuckerl-Zentner family lived on Bahnhofstrasse. Their daughter, Hansi, was a friend 
of Gerta Fink Bor. 



t 



NAMES FROM MY GRANDMOTHER'S AUTOGRAPH BOOK 

After my grandmother, Hermine Adler Hoenig, died on January 11,1 964, four days shy of 
her 85th birthday, my late father found in her belongings her Poesie (book of poetry and 
autographs) penned and signed by relatives and friends. 

Among those who signed their names in her book are the following relatives and friends 
whose names appear in the text and charts of this family history: 
Anna Bloch (Franzisbad, 1 896). 
Your Parents, Wilhelm and Anna Heller [Hermine Adler Honig's mother and 

stepfather]. 
Adele [H5nig Waxman] (March 31, 1902). 

Bernhard Honig (Lundenburg, November 4, 1 897) [my great grandfather] 
Friedl (January 11,1 908), her daughter, Frieda Honig, born in Lanz in 1 899. 
Johanna Honig (Lanz, April 3, 1898). 

Leopold HOnig, your groom, (April 19, 1897, Falkenau) [my grandfather]; 
Michael Honig (Lanz, October 1 5, 1 897, with a quotation from Goethe). 
Josef Lang (Falkenau, June 1 , 1 894). 
Bernard Steiniger (Falkenau, May 1, 1895). 
Filips Steiniger (May 14, 1894). 
Bertha Honig Weiss. 

[Bernhard Honig and Bertha Honig Weiss' writings are on different pages of a 
separate four-page (folded) letter in the book.] A 

Others whose names appear are: 

Fanni Bergermonte/?J (Neukirchen). 
Emma Bergler (Mies, May 13, 1894). 

43 



Laura Bergler (Mies, May 13, 1894). 

your friend, Rudolf Bergler, II CI. [Mies]. 

(drawing of a heart) Jac. [Jacob] Delion (Eger). 

your friend, Ferdinand Himmel (Falkenau, May 22, 1894). [His name is signed 

Himmel Ferdinand.] 
Emma Himmel. 

Katharina Himmel (May 25, 1894). 
L. Honisch. 

Anna Klein (Mies, August 22, 1893). 
Karoline Kohn (Schweising, December 8, 1 895). 
Flora Oestreicher (Konigswart, August 25, 1894). 
Fr. J. Reichenauer. 

Elise Reitzner (Eger, May 31, 1896). 
Babette Riedl. 

your cousin, Johanna Schnaider. [No one knows who she is]. 
Hedwig Schneider (Neukirchen, June 1 4, 1 896). 
Bertha Tanzer (Falkenau, September, 1 894). 
Arthur Weil (Mies, March 2, 1893). 
Eugenia Weil ([Mies,] May 13, 1894). 
Irene Weil ([Mies,] May 13, 1894). 
Sophie Weil ([Mies,] May 13, 1894). 
Theresia Zniedler (August 12, 1894). 

No one knows how many , if any, of these people were Jewish. 



Another name mentioned during one of my visits in Hamilton, Ontario with Gretl Fischer 
Hoenig is that of her uncle, a Mr. Zuckerman, who lived in Eger. 



EPILOGUE 

And so we have accounted for as many members of the family as has been possible. 
Undoubtedly, additional information will be brought to my attention and this will be added to the 
charts, which is the reason why this book has not been bound so it can be placed in a looseleaf 
book. 

If anyone has been left out this is purely unintentional. 

As family members pass away and as young ones are born and others marry, the charts 
will have to be updated. You will be kept informed through regular mailings. Hopefully, this 
will also serve to unite in some way a family scattered throughout the world. 

One major unsolved mystery is the case of the whereabouts of the two children — George 
and Hedwig (Heidi) — of Col. Judge Blaustern Rhona and his wife (who was also his niece), 
Mitzi Rosenfeld Rhona. The children were apparently lost in Austria during World War II and 
may have been taken to Sweden. 

The other unsolved case is that of Simon Honig, who apparently came to Galveston, Texas 
with his sister, Sophia, in 1853. Sophia's descendants have been found, but no one knows 
anything about Simon, and thus far all efforts to locate information about him in the United 
States have failed. 



44 



Chapter 2 
My Life: From Europe to America 

By JOSEPH HOENIG 

This autobiography is based on a two-and-a-half hour tape recorded interview conducted 
on the afternoon and early evening of Sunday, January 13, 1991 in room 6L01D of Beth Israel 
Medical Center. Additional details from his personal papers, letters and documents have been 
incorporated into this autobiography. 

Present at and participating in the interview were his son, Leopold ["Leo"] Hoenig, age 
53; his daughter-in-law, Doris C. Hoenig, age 48, and his younger granddaughter, Helene 
Michelle Hoenig, age 15. Gail S. Hoenig, his older granddaughter, was in Israel, participating in 
Young Judaea 's Year Course for the 1990-1991 academic freshman college year. 

Joseph Hoenig underwent difficult surgery the next morning to remove a large amount of 
tumors from his bladder, and because of his weakened heart and advanced age — 90 — he was 
moved to bed 10 in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit (S.I.C.U.) during this interview. Gail 
returned home on Tuesday morning, January 15, 1991 — the same day the Gulf War in the 
Middle East erupted — and he was quite relieved to see her and talk to her about her Israeli 
experience and many other topics that day and the next. At about 9:30 pm on Wednesday, January 
1 6 he suffered a heart attack and was placed on a respirator and he was unable to talk because of 
the tube placed in his mouth. The next day he had cardiac arrest in our presence, and on 
Saturday, January 1 9 he suffered a massive stroke which left him unresponsive and unconscious 
until he passed away early in the morning on Tuesday, January 22, 1991. 

I was born in Lanz, near Falkenau, on October 1 7, 1 900. 

Originally, my grandfather, Bemhard Honig, and his brother, Josef Honig, and another 
brother, Simon Honig, and their parents, Israel Honig and his wife, mostlikely came from 
Hungary and they settled in Kirchenbirk, a village up in the mountains near Falkenau. 

My parents, Leopold and Hermine (born Adler) Honig were married in 1897. They were 
the parents of eight children: Emma (born on March 12, 1898), Frieda (born on August 6, 
1899), me (born on October 17, 1900), Ida (born on August 29, 1904), Margaret "Gretl" 
(born on March 9, 1 907), Adolph (born on September 8, 1 909), Gustav (born on September 
17, 1913) and Gertrude (born on July 13, 1917). 

In 1902, when I was very young, my parents, my older sisters Emma and Frieda, and I 
moved from Lanz into Falkenau at Zwodauer Street - Schonwerth 98. We also lived at Kreuzgasse 
(now Krizova Street)1, Butterscheibe 18, and lastly, on the second floor of the Honig house at 
Mauerteich 4. 

I had five years of public [elementary] school in Falkenau, and three years of so-called 
Burger School. That's like a high school here. During the five years of elementary school I had 
very nice teachers and I could not complain about them. There was even one teacher whose name 
was Schlesinger. I have a Dr. Schlesinger here in Beth Israel Hospital. The Principal was 
exceptionally friendly to us because we had a hard life. We were eight children and my father 
didn't have a big income. 

My mother had a concession for the kosher frankfurters and, on certain occasions, for the 
goose. Falkenau's Jews gave her orders when we had a little room in an old building in or near 
Butterscheibe 1 8. When we moved to the second floor of the Honig house at Mauerteich 4 — 
sometime between 1 91 2 and 1 91 5 — she conducted her business from the house. She got the 
wares from the railroad station when she was notified by the stationmaster that the merchandise 

45 



had arrived in a basket, the top of which had a webbing sewed around, and then the man in charge 
of the railroad cut the cord and he felt that there was smoked, roast, corned beef or a goose and 
frankfurters in it, and then he gave her his o.k. My mother had buckelcorp, a contraption wfuch 
tied around her waist like someone who gives you a hug, and with two straps going over her 
shoulders. It wasn't a knapsack; it was like garden furniture, a web but made f rom something 
like branches from trees They weave it together with long things. It's like bamboo. Well it had 
two things for her to put the arms through and she carried it from her shoulders, and she bent 
over When my mother brought the wares to some of the customers they objected A Jew.sh 
woman should not have to work so hard, they told her, especially since her husband also worked. 
But his wages were so small. 

When my brother Gus was born in 1913, I said to my father, "Another child?" He slapped 
me He qot so sore at me. Well, they had such a hard time, I tell you. There were a couple of 
Jewish families in Falkenau who were poor like us, but the majority of the Jewish people were 
prosperous. My father was not a stupid man, but he couldn't get out of his labor. I m lucky I 
didn't have the problems that my father had at home in Falkenau. You know what I mean. He was 
the head of the house, and it was terrible...such a poor way of living in Europe. People were so 
thriftv We shared a toilet with our neighbor. We had no bath, and when my father took sick, he 
had a portable bath made from from zinc. In Falkenau he had to take hot baths for the 
hemmorhoids, and he made painful noises. I felt pity for the man, I'm telling you, all these people 
had a hard life.. .except for the rich people. 

My sister Gretl [Margaret] was about eight or nine years old when there was a diphtheria 
epidemic - and another disease, the name of which I can't recall now - in Falkenau. About a 
dozen kids were in the hospital, including my sister. They were given injections, and when Gretl 
came home from the hospital she was sort of paralyzed on the right hand and she started to write 
with her left hand. She used to get attacks and she died on September 1 6, 1 91 6, during one of 
them. She was nine years old, and she is buried in Falkenau. 

I used to love soccer in Europe and I often played right wing. When I was young and agile 
and I was in my estimation, a fairly good player, but I didn't have the wind capacity. I was soon 
out of breath, but as far as playing, I was fairly good. I was well-liked and 1 was usually the 
only Jewish player on the team. Our fusball [soccer] club in Falkenau had a tram.ng place, a big 
field with doors and so on, where we trained. We played with one single door --- five, six 
people - and we played some out-of-towners. I was very agile. I used to run and jump and I 
loved it. 

When I graduated from Burger Schule, I had an offer from the Jewish congregation, from 
the Haqibohr to go to the Handelsacademie in Pilsen, but my sister Emma was already studying 
in Vienna and it cost quite a bit of money even though my aunt, Johanna Hoenig who lived in the 
United States since June 4, 1904, contributed to her tuition. My grandfather, Bernhard HOn.g, 
was a retired teacher of languages. He taught in the gymnasium and sometimes in the univers.ty. 
He was a widower, and he was also in need of financial help, so Aunt Johanna, his daughter in 
America used to help him too. There was no other choice, and even though I was a very good 
student and I would have loved to go on further with my education, it was not possible. 

The choice came down to a number of trades and I became a tailor. 

Daniel Wilk the father of one of my schoolmates, Hans Wilk, had a tailoring 
establishment. Hans became a tailor like me, but he never really worked and I don't know what 
Scame of hL I became his father's apprentice on October 1, 1914, two-and-a-half weeks 
be orTmy frrteenth'birthday. Well, anyway, on March 14, 1916, when the First World War 
was in progress Daniel Wilk had to go into the army, and I remember, I brought his rucksack 
Tback oackl to the railroad station and the next afternoon, as made out by prior arrangement, I 
went to work for another tailor, Theodore Linnemann. Before Daniel Wilk left he wrote in my 
workbook, which I still have, that I was "very diligent, well behaved" and that he had to leave 
for the army. Best recommendation." 

46 







Mr. Linnemann never had an apprentice, but I was already able to make pants and vests and 
it was very good for him. He had a son my age, who was in the same class with me, who became a 
barber because Mr. Linnemann's oldest son had a barber shop someplace else, not in our city. 
Mr. Linnemann's son didn't want to be an apprentice with his father, who got too excited right 
away and was liable to slap him. So my classmate became a barber. On occasions, when he used to 
come home to Falkenau he used to give haircuts to his father and me. I worked very hard and when 
my three years were up — I had to work every day until eight o'clock and a little earlier on 
Saturdays — I got up at seven o'clock and he said to me, "Where are you going?" I answered, 
"Now I'm no longer an apprentice." Mr. Linnemann gave me two weeks notice and I left on March 
1, 1918. 

Everyone who worked had to have government-issued working papers. I had a working 
book where my school, my religion and my three years of apprenticeship were entered. Now I 
was a journeyman, and wherever I went, the boss had the book and he entered the time when I 
came and the time when I left. 

I got another tailoring job with Fillip Steiniger and I started work there on March 24. I 
made more money, and it was very helpful at the time because we were in great straits. We were 
a big family with little income and food was very scarce. 

So, I had two or three jobs in the Falkenau area. I left Mr. Steiniger on April 22, 1918 to 
work for Franz Biederman in Teplitz until July 17. After the summer, I returned to work for 
Mr. Linnemann in Falkenau on October 1 and I stayed with him until July 19, 1919, when I 
changed jobs to become employed by Johann Hamak from July 20, 1919 until September 30, 
1920. 

I learned how to design clothes. I knew how to take measures and cut suits, so I advertised 
in the newspaper and I got a number of job offers. I had an offer from Hermann Horowitz in 
Prague. I went there with my drawings and things and he looked at them. His was one of the top 
stores in Prague, located in a building, the Palac Koruna, on the corner in Vaclavske Namesti 
— Wenceslas Platz [Wenceslas Square]. Mr. Horowitz looked at my work and then he smiled 
and he said, "This is not for the big city. I am one of the finest tailors in the city and in the 
country, but I see you're take an interest. Why don't you stay with me and learn the trade in the 
big city? " So I took the job starting October 1, 1920, joined the Prague Union of Tailors and 
Underware Workers on October 24, remained there for almost a year, and I made applications to 
come to America, because the conditions after World War I were not to my liking. 

I wrote to Aunt Johanna in New York for assistance, and on January 30, 1921 she replied, 
in part, "I don't know what is going on in Europe and you do not know what is happening here. 
There are 300,000 unemployed workers here. At this time I can't make out an affidavit for you 
to come, but I am trying to get the money together for you to come." My Aunt Adele Hoenig 
Waxman also lived in New York. 

When the time came to leave for the United States, I went home for a vacation on April 2, 
1921 and 1 didn't go back to Prague any more. I told Mr. Horowitz I was going to go to this 
country.. .to America, and so I left. Mr. Horowitz wrote the last entry in my Arbeitsbuch - 
Knizka pracovni [workbook], that I "worked to the best satisfaction" and left Prague "on his own 
volition." His place is not in business any more. I hope he didn't get killed by the Nazis because 
he was a very nice person, and as far as I am concerned I like the Czech people very much. 

Before I departed, I received a letter from a girlfriend in Falkenau, Gisela Sadler, dated 
June 24, 1 921 , wishing me "the best of luck in the United States." She added, "Don't forget us." 
Once she wrote to me in the United States once to tell me that her brother was serving in the 
Czech Army. She wrote a number of other letters to me, some of which included her picture, and 
she must have perished during the Holocaust. Anton Frank, a friend, sent me a picture postcard 
from Berlin on August 6, 1921. 

47 



I left Hamburg on September 8,1921 on the twin masted S.S. Mount Carroll of the 
Hamburg-America Line and I arrived in the States on September 22 after a rough swaying 
journey. I was in cabin 63. Among the passengers I met were three Hungarian Jews and a 
Catholic priest who had lectured in Germany. I stayed with our friends, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Loeffler, at 81 6 Communipaw Avenue in Jersey City, New Jersey. The next day I took the trolley ^ 
car to the ferry, crossed the Hudson River, and walked to the Staats Zeitung und Herold building V 
at 22 North William Street near City Hall in Lower Manhattan. There I spoke to someone in 
German and I received directions from him on how to get to my cousin, Oskar Hoenig's soda 
business at 558 St. Ann's Avenue in the Bronx. I took the Third Avenue IRT elevated train there 
and Oskar and his workers laughed when they saw me dressed in European clothes and with a 
feather in my hat. I stayed with Oskar for a few days until I found a tailoring job in Manhattan 
and I moved into a furnished room on East 75th Street between First and Second Avenues. I lived 
there for one week and then I moved to a family on 90th Street through somebody I met. 

I received quite a bit of mail in New York from my friends and relatives in Europe. My 
sister, Frieda, wrote to me on October 6. "I heard you had a very bad journey to America, but I 
hope it won't deter you," she wrote. "I'm sending you a picture. Happy birthday! May God keep 
you in the best of health. 

"I don't know anything new. Oskar Hoenig wants to come here in November and wants to 
take Mina [Wilhelmina Honig] with him back to the United States. I don't know if she'll go. I'm in 
good health. Please write more often." 

Two days after Frieda mailed her letter I received one from my parents. They wrote, "We 
received your nice letter. Thank God you got away so well. We were worried about you. Now we 
wish you lots of luck and good work in the New World so all your expectations and hopes will be 
fulfilled. 

"Sorry the journey was so bad. ip 

"Elsa Steiniger sends her greetings. 

"Now Frieda wants to come to America. Two weeks ago Ida got new teeth that cost about 500 
crowns and she looks much better. We received a card from Aunt Bertha who writes that Julius 
[Weiss] is in Yugoslavia. 

"Write soon. Love and kisses. 

"Your loving mother and father." 

My oldest sister, Emma, sent me an interesting letter from Vienna on November 29, 
1921 . "I hope everything is going well and soon you will be a millionaire." She complained about 
Vienna's high prices and wrote that perhaps she, too, will come to New York "one nice day." 

Emma had great confidence in my ability to adapt to my new country, for less than three 
weeks later, on December 14, 1921, she sent me a Christmas card on which she wrote in her 
beautiful penmanship, and in English, "Dearest brother: I wish you a merry Christmas-time 
and a happy New Year! I hope you are quite well. I go for the holidays at home. -Write me soon. 
-With many greetings and kisses I am your sister Emma. 1 4 XII 21 ." 

My oldest sister had already been studying and living in Vienna for a long time and in 1925 
she married a Tyrolean, Alfonso ("Ali") Preindl and they lived at Kirchberggasse 9/9, Vienna 
VII. 'W 



48 



Another newsy letter I still have is dated simply, Wednesday, 6 pm and it's from my 
friend Anton f'Toni"] Werner, with whom I worked at Johann Hamak's place in Falkenau in 
1919 and 1920. The Fischers, Zentners and Blochs wrote to us in America for many years. 

On January 6, 1922, at the age of 52, our father's unmarried sister, my aunt, Johanna 
Hoenig, signed an affidavit to allow my sister Frieda to migrate to the United States. In the 
affidvait Aunt Johanna stated she had arrived in the United States on June 4, 1 904, was earning 
$25 a week as a children's nurse (governess) for Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Sondern at 20 West 
55th Street in Manhattan, and had $2,500 in savings. Before coming to America, Frieda had 
worked as a kinderfraulein [children's nurse] for Mr. and Mrs. Eugen Federer at Porzellangasse 
26/4 in Vienna IX from September 28, 1918 until March 31, 1921, for Richard and Alice 
Aschner at Hietz. Haupstrasse 69 in Vienna XIII from March 31, 1921 until July 19, 1921, and 
for Leopold and Ella Pollak Honig in Falkenau from September, 1921 until July, 1922. She left 
Hamburg, Germany on July 27, 1922 traveling third class aboard the Hamburg-America Lines' 
Ooint service with United American Lines) ship, the Mount Clay. 

I lived on East 90th Street for a year until Frieda came and we rented a basement 
apartment at 303 East 79th Street, just around the corner from First Avenue, where we lived 
for approximately a half a year. Then I sent my sister Ida a package, for which she thanked me in 
a postcard on September 19, 1922. She came to America in 1923 and I got a job in Brooklyn. 
The three of us lived for a month in apartment 37 at 402-404 South Second Street in 
Williamsburgh-Brooklyn. and then we moved around the corner, almost opposite, to 381 South 
Third Street between Hooper Street and Union Avenue. Frieda and I had a three room apartment, 
and then Ida came. They slept together and I had a folding cot. I slept in the living room.There was 
a knitting mill in the same building and my sister Frieda got a job there as a winder. It was a 
nice apartment. In the place where we lived before this you had to share the bathroom and a toilet 
with the other family on the same floor and it was very primitive. Most people had no 
electricity. They had a gas light, and they had a meter. You had to drop in a quarter and it lasted 
for a certain amount of time and then if you didn't put another quarter in, then you had no light. 

A week or two after I got my first job in the U.S. I sent my parents $5. In January, 1 922, 
I think — I still have the letter of thanks — I sent home $100, and that was more money 
than what my father got as a pension for a year. Then my father became anxious to come. He was 
already not any more, you know, he was a spent many already. He had an operation. He had 
hemmorhoids and it was too far gone. It was all full of pus, and the surgeon cut the nerve so he 
couldn't hold the stool. He always had a towel in his pants and he couldn't go far, and that's why 
life was so hard for him. That made a half a human out of him, and he smoked. I used to buy him 
cartons of cigarettes. To me the cost didn't mean anything; I think a carton of cigarettes was 85 
cents. 

We had a hard time here when I came to New York in 1921, but it was far worse in 
Europe, where we didn't have meat every day. We ate a lot of cereal with griesefrei or noodles 
that my mother, let her rest in peace, used to make, and she put scrapes of chocolate flakes, 
sugar and cinnamon on the noodles, and we had to live that way. I know when my brother Adolph 
came to the United States he looked so, so thin and sickly. 

My father was already out of work for a year. He got severance pay of a year's salary and 
that was all in Europe. My mother became very anxious. She was a lovely, heavy set, hard 
working woman. 

On March 1 9, 1 923 she wrote a very anxious letter to me. "Even though you owe us a 
letter for three letters we sent to you, I am writing again. We also gave Dr. Leo a letter for you. 
Oskar and Helen are already probably in New York and they will tell you everything. It may take 
until May or June until Ida and Gerda can come. Ida has to stay at home because she can't get a job 
for such a short time. 



49 



"Your father cannot get a job either. It is impossible to find a job because of his age. 



"If we sell everything here we would get about 20,000 crowns. If you and Aunt Johanna 
would add to it we would come at the end of August. 

"We will write to Johanna right away for the affidavit. Can you children get us the missing % 
money? 

"Send us the affidavit as soon as possible so we can get a visa as soon as possible. Ask at the 
shipping company how much it will cost for us. Adolph will be 1 4 in September, Gus will be 1 
in September and Gerda will be 6 in July. I guess the youngest two will pay only half fare. 

"Elsa [Mayer] had a son [Franzjthis week. [Franz died in New York in 1 924 of pneumonia 
which he contracted on the ship to the United States.] 

"Send us the money to take the train to Bremen." 

In 1923 I brought over my parents and my brothers Adolph and Gus and my sister 
Gertrude. We moved to a three-room apartment and then we rented a five room ground floor 
railroad flat at 381 South Third Street in 1924. We bought a big folding bed and Adolph and I 
slept on it. My father and my mother had the bed then and Gertrude also slept in the bed. Frieda 
and Ida got also got a bed. Frieda and Ida got jobs and after a year Ida became a forelady because 
she was very skilled. She worked on fancy pillows and slipcovers and my job was as a tailor. 

My father was happy here because for him it was something new and promising. 

My mother couldn't understand the food here. When the neighbors found out that we were 
Jewish people, there came two Jewish women, each of whom held my mother's arms and they 
went to a grocery store on Havemeyer Street. The grocer had everything in bags: lentils, beans, _ 
flour, farina, a lot of sugar, and so on. The two women told the grocer, "Look. This is a Jewish % 
family." When there was so much in the bag, he kept filling it even more. Frieda remembers 
this so well. 

In the meantime I received a certificate from Evening School 67 for completing a course in 
men's garment design. 

I built my first radio in South Third Street and the landlord — his name was Greenberg 
or Greenfeld — told me, "This is all a fake." He thought it didn't work, but when he put the 
earphones on he didn't know what to say. I made a radio set for Joe and Elsa (born Hbnig) Meyer. 
I also made one during World War II for my brother Gus, who served in the Pacific Theater with 
the U.S. Army. 

I worked for the Model Tailors on Roebling and South First Streets until the union busted 
them. It was a non-union shop and they couldn't exist even with their low wages. I worked there 
close to a year, and when I was out of work I became a union member on March 1 5,1 923 [card 
number 49743], when they unionized that little shop. Then, when I was out of work in 1925, I 
went to the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union headquarters and I had to wait to be placed in 
another shop. When the bosses needed somebody they called up. So I was at the Union hiring hall 
a whole week and the man who gave out the jobs, a Union delegate, said to me, "You're too young! 
You're too young!" I always looked younger than my age. So they sent elderly people to the job 
openings at GGG Clothes [William P. Goldman and Brothers] on Varet Street in Brooklyn, and they 
were there for an hour or two and they were sent back because they couldn't do the work. So, 
finally, he said, "All right. I'll try you. You won't don't do any better than the older workers." M 

To me it wasn't much of a challenge. I worked right away at whatever they wanted. I 
worked at GGG Clothes two or three days and the man who was missing came back and I thought, 

50 



now I'll have to go home. The manager, Adolph Rosenberg, came, to me and he sat me down on a 
chair, and I had to do some work by hand. There was a Hungarian Jewish fellow, Sheye 
Muhlbauer, who started to talk to me. He wanted to talk to me in German, but he spoke Yiddish 
German. The next day, when Adolph Rosenberg came around to the workers, as he did every day, 
they said,"Good morning," and "Good morning." So Sheye Muhlbauer said to him — he was a 
Lantzman [country man] from the Rosenbergs — "Mr. Rosenberg, Joe Hoenig ist nicht kann 
Deutsche Goy. Ehr ist a Deutsche Jude." ["Mr. Rosenberg. Joe Hoenig isn't a German Gentile. He's 
a German Jew."] So Mr. Rosenberg smiled. Some other kind of tailoring work came up in the shop 
and they put me all over, wherever, and they trusted me. Then I got to know William P. Goldman 
who also came to the model shop with special jobs, but I wasn't smart enough yet. There were 
some refugees in the factory, including a husband and his wife. He was a ladies' tailor and she 
knew how to sew. She had a big mouth and they wanted a raise, so she told Adolph Rosenberg, "If 
you don't give us a raise, we're going to stop the shop." She had a couple of other friends. So 
Adolph Rosenberg said to her, "What? You're going to stop the shop?" He turned around where 
the husband was working and he said to them, "Stop, and you stop, and get the hell out of here!" 
and he threw them out right away. There were a lot of radical elements amongst the Jews. 

Around the same time in 1925 we moved around the corner to a fourth floor walk-up, 
four-room apartment at 371 Rodney Street because the other apartment was full of bed bugs. 
All these houses had bed bugs. When we got to Rodney Street we bought more beds. Frieda and I 
had brought the dining room furniture from East 79th Street. We had paid $55 to a French 
couple Mr and Mrs. H. Valet, in September, 1922 for a big table with one big, heavy stem leg, 
and chairs, a chest of drawers, and a couple of other items. It was enough for us. Fneda, Ida and I 
went to work, and the three kids went to school. 

Mv sister Gertrude, was seven years old and she went to public school, and so did my 
brother Gus, who was about nine or ten. Adolph had finished the fifth grade of the Burger School 
in Falkenau, so he only went to public school in Brooklyn for about a year and then he graduated 
and attended Eastern District High School. After he graduated from high school with honors 
Adolph went to Columbia University for one term and then he had an accident and he had to g.ve . 
up He worked for an electrician who made a hole through from the first floor to the basemen of 
a buiding in order to install a connection pipe. The worker who had the pipe > on , the upper floor 
tet it fall loose and it hit Adolph - who was in the basement - on the head, fracturing his 
skull. 

In 1926-27 I took a lengthy railroad trip to Dallas, Texas to visit my father's pother, 
Moritz [Morris] Hoenig, his wife, and family. He had come to New York in 1880, then to San 
Scisco and finalty to Fort Worth, Texas before the turn of the 20th century. He was happy to 
see me but ^told me "Hier sind wir kein Juden." ["We aren't Jews here."]. Before I left 
DallaThe toKto'be' sur e to visit his cousin, Ricka Kohner, at 4206-A McRee ,n St. Louis and 
Mid taking th^Market Street trolley car and transferring at Vandervente for another troltey 
ca She was one of the daughters of Sophia Hoenig Klein, my great grandfather's siste , and she 
was tite first one in the H5nig family to leave Bohemia for America. She migrated to St. Louis and 
^rVme Aran? We in's wife in 1 859 Ricka wanted me to meet her n.ece, Alma Zepin, but I had to 
SbeforshTarrted in order to catch the train to Chicago on my way home to New York. I 
never met ^er --Tbelieve she walked up to the house as I was leaving, but Ricka gave me a 
beautiful large color portrait of Alma and I still have it. 

j • w,rt .with nnr St Louis relatives for many years and then we stopped 

!*£££ a 3£n * " "' m « *5 ri"Sed your few days in St. 

S^rr,r4 r r h ssr^^ss: .—«.«.«» 

51 



that your family, the Hoenigs, were in America [if I hadn't visited her] I hope your dear 

sisters will oblige me with a few lines in the near future Many thanks for your Rosh 

Hashonah card and the beautiful pillow. From Aaron, Anna and, yours truly, Aunt Ricka, with 
best regards to the family P.S. always glad to hear from you." 

After two years on Rodney Street, in September, 1 927, we moved to 72 Lee Avenue, in 
Williamsburgh-Brooklyn. Franz Fischer and his wife had a two-story furnished room house. 
They were not Jewish and he came over to the U.S. with Oskar Hoenig and they were pals. The 
Fishers had one daughter and she was no good. So they had $1 0,000 saved up, and they wanted to 
go back to Vienna. There they were offered an opportunity to purchase a movie theater, but they 
couldn't buy it because he had to be an Austrian citizen, and they gave up their citizenship when 
they became American citizens. So they bought a store in a suburb of Vienna instead where they 
had novelties. I visited them. They had all these religious articles and Catholic people came from 
far away to a waldfahrt [a holy place]. The Fishers had these church Madonnas and the crucifix 
and hundred different items, and they lived in back of the store. 

Shortly after their arrival in Austria, I sent them a package of their belongings. I also 
arranged to have the proceeds of a $2,500 insurance policy sent to Franz. Somehow, who wrote 
to me on April 3, 1924, complaining that his "binoculars, raincoat and a small carrying bag" 
were not among the package's contents. 

At that time I opened up a tailoring shop upstairs in the front part of the first floor of 72 
Lee Avenue. I made a little business to suppplement my income from the Three Gs, but not 
enough. I became a naturalized United States citizen on December 27, 1927, and I still have the 
document, number 2523919, in my apartment. Soon I obtained U.S. passport number 507300. 

In 1 928 I left the Three Gs. I didn't actually leave them; I went back to Europe by ship for 
a vacation and I wanted to go and see my sister Gretl's grave. I had a stone setting placed around 
her grave so nobody should step on it. While I was in Falkenau and Karlsbad I brought a picture of 
Elsa Honig Mayer and her young daughter, Anna, to Rosa Budlovsky. I also brought a package to 
Rabbi Feuerstein and I worked on a coat for Werner Fischer. In Vienna I visited my sister, 
Emma, and her husband, Alfonso Pteindl, and my Uncle Michael Honig and his family. I met two 
Americans on the return voyage on the S.S. George Washington, E. Gordon Weatherly of Grand 
Rapids, Michigan, and Stuart F. Ball, an architect with the firm of Milburn, Heister and 
Company in Washington, D.C. I was in contact with both of them when we returned and I even 
translated some letters from German to English for Stuart Ball later on. 

When I came back home from Europe there was no work at GGG Clothes for a short time. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Loeffler, who were friends of Tante Johanna and Tante Adele, wanted to go to 
Vienna. The Loefflers came from Vienna, but originally they were Czech speaking people, so both 
spoke German and Czech. Tante Johanna said to me, "Why don't you manage their store? They told 
me they would like you to manage their store." The Loefflers had a ladies tailor store in Jersey 
City. So I was there, I think, two months, until they returned. I called up GGG Clothes and they 
said, "Come back right away." So, I went back to work in the afternoon.They were very slow at 
the time and Adolph Rosenberg had lost his job. He sent me a letter on August 27, 1 929 asking 
me to see him "on Sunday morning at 9:30 o'clock at the above address [271 McDonough Street, 
Brooklyn], my home. I would like to talk to you about business matters." He had gone into his own 
business with a partner on Fifth Avenue and he wanted me to measure people for suits and do all 
kinds of tailoring work. It didn't work out right. I didn't like it. 

I quit the job and I soon went into my own business in an upstairs store at 11 07 Lexington 
Avenue between 77th and 78th Streets, but that was in 1 929 and 1 930 during the Great 
Depression. I sent out announcement letters and, on November 22, 1929 I received a kind, 
typewritten note from our family physician, Dr. Daniel Kravitz [890 Park Place, Brooklyn], 
who wrote, "This morning I received a letter announcing the establishment of your own tailoring 

52 



business. I wish to express my sincerest wishes for your success. Possibly, your location so far 
from me will not enable me to patronize you, but I am quite sure that your success will be so 
great that you will not miss it." I was there a year, but I couldn't make out financially. I lost all 
the money I had. I made some suits, but not enough. When Sam Lipschitz, a relative of the 
Rosenbergs and the quality foreman at Three Gs, was out of a job he came to me. I was just 
working on a suit and he wanted to find out if, maybe, he could work with me, but I didn't have 
enough work for myself. 

My father suffered a stroke on the first night of Passover, April 14, 1930. He was sitting 
at the Seder table and you could see that an artery burst in his head and he became discolored 
with purple. I lifted him up and carried him to a bed, where he soon died peacefully in my arms 
at the age of 63. There was nothing we could do to save him. 

We were in Lee Avenue about four years and then the Fischers came back and somebody 
wanted to buy the place from us, but I had already promised it to them. So the woman gave us a 
big argument, but we were not tied to them because I didn't sign anything. In the spring of 1 931 
Ida and Frieda put down a thousand dollars each to buy the house at 30-05 89th Street in Jackson 
Heights. We moved out of Lee Avenue and the Fischers got back their house. You see, they rented 
rooms out to couples for hours and that was not for us, you know. We had children and that was 
not appropriate. 

Adolph was sick at that time from the accident and the doctors told us he should live in a 
quiet neighborhood because he cannot stand any noise. There Adolph had his own room and when 
Tante Johanna came to visit we had to give her the room and he slept with me in a big folding bed, 
and Gus had his own folding bed. It was too much. I had a tailoring and dry cleaning store at 
33-1 1 Junction Boulevard, on the east side of the street just south of Northern Boulevard, but 
that didn't work out either. Times were very bad. People walked around with change in their 
pockets, but no dollar bills. 

Gertrude went to Newtown High School, where she met her future husband, Orville 
("Win") Whitehouse, but Gus did not finish high school, and later on he said he didn't have a 
chance. 



We were on 89th Street for a year and we couldn't make out financially so we had to give 
up the house because there was no work. I had very little income, and Frieda and Ida worked in 
the city and I used to drive them way down to the IRT station on Roosevelt Avenue with my 1 932 
Plymouth. I bought it new and before that I had second hand cars including an Oakland. Giving 
them a lift meant a shorter ride for them to go to their jobs in the city. So we moved again, this 
time to on 45th Street, between 1 5th and 1 6th Avenues in Borough Park, Brooklyn, where I 
rented an old-fashioned house. 

Someone offered to sell me their Sinclair gasoline station on the corner of Fourth Avenue 
and Fourth Street in Brooklyn, so my brothers and I and my brother-in-law, Rudy Rupp, decided 
to try it. At that time I became acquainted with Mr. Herman J. Tart, a lawyer. Later on, his 
brother, Dr. Max Tart, was my dentist and he had his office at East 51st Street and Lexington 
Avenue. Another one of my Gentile friends was Joseph W. Fisher and, when he died in the 1 930s I 
was the executor of his estate. I arranged his funeral and burial in Mount Olivet Cemetery in 
Maspeth-Queens. I used to visit his grave every year with my son, Leo. 

That's also when I got to know Bella Hirsch. 

There was a Simchas Torah party In the Jewish club upstairs on 85th Street and Lexington 
Avenue in October, 1935. I had been introduced to Minnie Meyer and I brought her to the festive 
affair in my car. She was a big, husky woman who came from Alsace Lorraine and she spoke 
French, English, and German. At the party, I recognized Otto Lederer from Europe. I had been to 

53 



his Bar Mitzvah in Falkenau, but I didn't remember his name. Otto was born in Passau, Bavaria 
(Germany) and lived in Eggenfelden, Bavaria (Germany). His sister, Valli, was standing next to 
me. I didn't know her and I just asked her, "Who is that man?" She said, "That's my brother, 
Otto Lederer" So I went to Otto and then he introduced me to her and he introduced me to his wife, 
Helen. Otto worked as a food checker in the kitchen and dining room at the Astor Hotel. He checked 
out the orders from the food suppliers. A little later Helen gave birth to a boy, Bobby. At that 
happy occasion, I gave them a two-and-a-half dollars gold piece, which was something for poor 
people. They didn't have anything then. Helen Lederer had friends by the name of Reich. He was in 
a food line and he had one glass eye. They had an apartment further out on Fourth Avenue in 
Bensonhurst. Helen Lederer asked me to take her there with my car. 

Anyway, Helen introduced me to Bella — who came from Polch (near Koblenz), 
Germany, two kilometers from the little village of Mertloch where Helen was born — at the 
Simchas Torah affair and I liked her right away. I told her I would like to drive her home in my 
car, if it was all right with her. She said, "No. You cannot do this. You came with another girl and 
you want to take me home?" So I said to her I was taking others — including the Reich's 
brother and sister --- along too. I took Minnie Meyer home and she invited me up to her 
apartment which she shared with her brother, Armand Meyer, who had a trafe [non-kosher] 
butcher shop on Fifth Avenue around 50th Street in Brooklyn. He was single too. I was sitting on 
a chair at the kitchen table. Nobody spoke and that was the end of it. I didn't want to go out with 
her again. First of all, she was much too big for me, and I didn't care for that. So then, through 
Helen Lederer I got Bella's address and I wrote a letter to her in German — which she kept in 
her dresser drawer until the day she died — that I would like to go out with her and so on. So 
we made a date, and we went out. I forgot, but I think we went to the movies or something like 
that. We were not going out to spend $50. It wasn't the time for that. One night Bella slept with 
Ida at our house in Borough Park. 

The gasoline station wasn't profitable either, and I was 35 years old. I figured if I want to 
get married, I have to make a living. So I went to the 3Gs to see what was going on. I came to the 
3Gs factory on Varet Street. They were not working, but Adolph Rosenberg, Sam Lipschitz and 
two or three other men who worked for the firm were there. Sam Lipschitz was at the door, and 
when he spotted me, he yelled, "Look who's coming! Joe Hoenig." Then he called to Adolph 
Rosenberg, "Adolph. Come here. Look who is here!" So he came and he put his arm around me and 
said, "Now you will never go away from here." 

I didn't want to get married, but Gertrude — who was 17 years younger than me — 
did. She was still in high school and then in business school. So Tante Johanna said, "Let her get 
married, otherwise she'll come home with a big belly." So my mother agreed and I said to my 
mother, "If she can get married, I'll get married too." Frieda had married Rudolf ("Rudy") Rupp 
on November 4, 1933, and Emma was still living in Vienna with her husband, Alfonso ("Ali") 
Preindl at that time, you know. 

Bella and I became engaged. She earned $1 5 a week and she worked terrible hours for the 
Gallingers in their apartment at 242 East 1 9th Street at the southwest corner of Second Avenue. 
I went there once when we got engaged. The Gallingers invited me to come there on a Saturday. It 
was about six or seven o'clock and she was still mopping the floor. I said to Bella, "What are you 
doing?" She replied, "Well, I have to do it," and she looked all washed up. I said, "When we get 
married, I want you to stay home." So, she made $1 5 a week, and she had carfare, and then on 
the way' home she used to go shopping. She used to cook at home, and her brother, Max, depended 
on that. 

We were married at 5:30 pm on Sunday, March 29, 1936 at the home of Rabbi I.M. 
Binder at 1 398 Grand Concourse in the Bronx. We moved into a little apartment — off the 
f oyer ... on the top floor of 93 West Tremont Avenue in the West Bronx. It was right next to 
the apartment in which Bella had lived with Max, a men's custom tailor, and her first cousin, 
Claire Hirsch, a milliner. Bella and Claire had slept together in the same bed and Max slept on an 

54 



t 



opened wackel.ch [shaky] sofa bed in the living room. The three of them, all born in Polch (near 
Koblenz) Germany, were very devoted to each other. Max smoked all the time ar^d he developed a 
very weak heart around 1 948 or 1 949, when he was about 50 years old. I didn^see him drink 

• he?^ rl T, eSf T ally n,ce '.0r la '' man Wh ° Probab| y didn't wanted to get married 7n 1944 

a nd ,h« t t h? T, re TTJ u He didn,t marry her; she married him - She took a hold o him 
and she treated him like a little baby until he died when his heart stopped during duodenal ulceT 
surgery on October 1 6, 1 951 , six days shy of his 53rd birthday. auoaenai ulcer 

I told Bella, who hard worked very hard as a housekeeper and cook for the Gallingers I did 
not want her to go to work and to stay in the house and take care of me. We were satisfied with 
httle pleasures, and for years and years we went shopping in the city [Manhattan] on Sunday We 

nl^I £ "^ "! 1° w 9 °i°u the ° Pera ° r anyp,ace fancy ' even thou 9 h ' love classical musicand 
opera. She was used to hardship in Europe and hardship over here and she had a hard time over 
here, too. 

At that time I bought the breakfront with my money and Bella used her savings to buy the 
living room and the dining room furniture, and, when I started to work, we bought the rug from 
B. Altman and I bought an RCA radio and many other little odds and ends. We only paid $32 a 
month rent, and I had always the rent money. I tell you, Bella was so happy We were verv 
thrifty. Always. She came from hard times, too. 

We had lots of friends, but some of them couldn't pay their rent; at the end of the month 
they had to skimp to try to make ends meet. I know that on many Friday nights Ceiia Katz 
borrowed a $5 bill from Bella to buy a steak. They didn't have the money but she always gave it 

back She has two boys. In the 1950s she, her husband, Julius, and their sons lived in a 

private house near LaGuardia Airport. Julius got a job in a factory where they made dog food and 
then he became the manager of that place. He became well-to-do. He is no longer alive, but Celia 

• lives in Florida.. Julius was very well fluent in Hebrew and they came to us for the Passover 

Seder. He knew everything. So did Max, and Max also came to our Seder every Pesach. 

Lou and Irma Menasse Lotheim were also our good friends. They moved to Vineland, New 
Jersey and Lou died recently. He was very handy. Lou was a superintendent of a building and he 
was in charge of all its needs. He had all kinds of jobs and he worked in a laundry. They had their 
own house and it had two steps to go into the kitchen. Lou rebuilt that into a different, more 
comfortable and convenient step. He used to fix fountain pens too. Ceil Katz recently wrote to us 
from Florida. 

Max Hirsch was a member of Sebulon Lodge No. 8 of the Free Sons of Israel. He loved to go 
to meet his friends and play cards at the twice-monthly meetings held in the Free Sons building 
on West 93rd Street. A few months after Bella and I were married he asked me to join the Lodge 
and I applied for membership. You had to pass a physical examination in order to join and take 
out a Free Sons life insurance policy. Dr. Ritter, a Free Sons physician, who is probably no 
longer alive, examined me. He marked my heart with a pencil, and when he was finished — it 
took him an hour — he played around with it — and he said to me, "I'm sorry, but you have 
an enlarged heart and I cannot give you the o.k. to join the Lodge." When he found out, Max 
decided to go to the next meeting, and he told the Sebulon Lodge officers, "I don't understand the 
doctor. Joe works hard every day and comes home and he's not sick." So they sent me to a heart 
specialist who made me stand up with my shirt off, and he examined me back and forth and made 
notes. Then he called up the other doctor and he said, "I cannot see what you can't take this young 
Jewish fellow into the Lodge." So I had to go back to Dr. Ritter, who was also a member of 
Sebulon Lodge and he said the cardiologist was "taking a chance." Maybe three, four months later 

• we had a big initiation with about eighteen candidates. They came in, held the chain every few 

feet, and there were three stations where they had parts of the initiation. I was standing next to 
the doctor and one of the other candidates fell down on the floor. He was unconscious. So I said to 
the doctor, "Look, doctor, you took this man in and he cannot even come in. He's laying on the 

55 



floor" Dr. Ritter's reply was, "Well, it's very hot in here." Now I've been a Lodge member for 
54 years and I've served several times as President and Vice President and now as Trustee of 
Gad-New York-Sebulon Lodge No. 8. 1 was involved in the merger of the Lodges 1 5 years ago. 

In the afternoon of Wednesday, May 1 9, 1 937 my sister Frieda called me up in the 3Gs and 
said, "Bella just had a nice little boy." So I left the factory then and took the BMT 1 4th Street 
Canarsie subway to Union Square and then the IRT Lexington-Jerome Avenue subway to the 
Bronx to see Doris and the baby at the Concourse Hospital. Dr. Arthur Markowitz was there and 
he congratulated us. Bella stayed at home and took care of our baby, Leo, whose full name is 
Leopold as he was named after my father. That's almost 54 years ago. 

We moved to a fourth floor apartment in a walkup building at 2 East 1 67th Street in 1 938 
when Leo was less than a year old. In time, Leo used to roam around in the neighborhood park. The 
apartment house was located on the steep hill between River and Jerome Avenues and Leo used to 
love watching the red 1 67th Street trolley cars and the Jerome-Lexington Avenues and Sixth and 
Ninth Avenues elevated trains on Jerome Avenue. He used to call the short Sixth and Ninth Avenue 
"L" trains "the little choo choo." Although Bella was an excellent cook, Leo was a poor eater, 
although he loved to drink cherry sodas — with a red cherry on top — at the candy store in 
the front right side of our apartment house. One day our friend, Lou Lotheim, came. He took us 
someplace with his truck, and Leo was cranky. So he said to him, "Bei mir wis du fat werden!" 
["You'll get fat at my house."] Lou and Irma Menasse Lotheim had a boy — a "blue boy" —and 
he died. 

We lived at 2 East 1 67th Street for about two years and in early 1 940 we moved again, to 
1776 Davidson Avenue, less than a mile from our first two apartments. There we lived in a rear 
apartment that overlooked Jerome Avenue and the 1 76th Street elevated station, which was 
reached by walking down many flights of steps from Davidson Avenue into an alleyway with many 
stores. I came home from work late at night and Leo was already in his crib, usually sound 
asleep. Soon, Bella's brother, Leopold Hirsch, and his wife, Use, and my wife's two elderly 
unmarried aunts, Klara ("Clairschen") and Adelheid Hirsch, moved into an upper floor 
apartment across the street at 1 805 Davidson Avenue. Soon thereafter, Use gave birth to a son, 
Herman, and Leo soon had a cousin with whom he could play. 

We rented an attic room on the east side of Beach 1 1 4th Street in Rockaway Park for the 
summer so Bella and Leo could go to the beach every day. Adolph Rosenberg lived in Rockaway too 
and he took me there every day. I was still busy working when it was time to go home and yet he 
hollared, "Joe! Joe! Stop working!" Once he invited us to come to his home. Sam Moss, the 
manager of the cutting department, was there with his wife, as was Adolph Rosenberg's wife, and 
Sam Moss said to Bella and me, "You have a nice little boy." 

And then, to run from Jerome Avenue and also from Davidson Avenue in the Bronx to work 
in Brooklyn every morning was exhausting and Leo rarely saw me. I had a lot of work because of 
World War II, and I didn't want to let it go. I wanted to make extra money. Soon we were ordered 
to make Army uniforms for the men at war. I got a notice from the draft board, but I wasn't called 
to serve in the armed forces because I was a month too old. 

In August, 1942 we moved to 1401 Willoughby Avenue, in the Ridgewood-Bushwick 
neighborhood of Brooklyn to be close to my work. It was just one subway stop away from the 
three Gs factory. Our friends, Lena and Ziggy Falkenstein, found the apartment for us a block 
away from theirs on Suydam Street. Their son, Howard, is exactly one month older than Leo and 
they went to elementary, junior high and high school together. I came home from work with $37 
on the first day we lived in Brooklyn. That was about ten to fifteen dollars more than what the 
other tailors made and they were jealous. A lot of them knew only one kind of thing. They were 
not real tailors. There was that little Abie Wasserman. He used to be a canvas baster. 

56 



When we moved to Brooklyn I think Bella had about $800 saved in the bank, and I never 
asked her. Then she came to me and said, "Joe, we want to put all our savings together." We saved 
money when we lived in Brooklyn. She used to walk to to the Hamburg Savings Bank at the corner 
of Wyckoff and Gates Avenues, about a mile away from our apartment, to deposit our money. 

We lived there throughout World War II. After the war, 1 made out an affidvait to bring my 
aunt and uncle, Alfred and Marie Hahn, and their four daughters and son from England to the 
United States, and, after they were settled in with the help of H.I.A.S. [Hebrew Immigrant Aid 
Societry] they came to visit us on Willoughby Avenue. Another cousin of mine on my mother's 
side, Walter Heller, and his wife wrote to us for help on April 8, 1 946. They thanked my mother 
and brother Gus for sending them all of the food packages. We received a letter from Dr. Leo 
Honig who said he wanted to move in with his sister, Elsa Mayer, in the Bronx next year. He 
reported that Czechoslovakia is slowly recovering from the war, Joe Budlovsky became a 
physician and is practicing medicine in a Komotau hospital and is the head physician of the 
occupational medicine department at Aussig Hospital, and his mother, Rosa, lives in Fischern 
near Karlsbad, and that Mina resides in Halle, Saxony. 

Our son went to school — first to P.S. 162, across the street from us for kindergarten 
through the middle of the third grade. Then he was transferred to P.S. 123, three long blocks 
away, for the third to the sixth grades. He then returned to the first school, which had been 
turned into a junior high school for grades 7 to 9. Then he went to Thomas Jefferson High School. 
From there he entered Queens College, where he majored in history. 

Our lives were improving in post-war America. In 1 950 I bought a new Nash Ambassador 
Custom gray and white four-door sedan with hydramatic drive for $2,500. I kept it for more 
than twelve years. Two months later Leo had his Bar Mitzvah at Congregation Ansche Ernes on 
Stanhope Street and afterwards we had a dinner for 23 relatives and friends in our apartment. 
Leo was growing up but our three-room apartment on the third-top floor was very skimpy. He 
had to sleep in the living room, and I said I wanted Leo to have his own bedroom. It was 
impossible to find anything during World War II and in the post-war years, but, finally in 1955 
a four room apartment became vacant, and your mother wanted to move in. I said, "No. We're 
going to move into a new building." 

On February 23, 1956 we moved into our current residence — 568-J Grand Street, 
Apartment J-1704 — in the brand-new International Ladies Garment Workers Union (ILGWU 
Cooperative Village in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. David Dubinsky, ILGWU's President, 
Charles ("Sasha") Zimmerman and Louis Nelson, ILGWU Vice Presidents, and Arthur Morris 
Jacobson, an ILGWU organizer, were friends and my private customers for whom I made and 
altered suits. They urged us to move into their new development, which was then under 
construction, so Leo — now a Queens College student — could have his own room to study. We 
moved into a beautiful five-room apartment consisting of two large bedrooms, a kitchen, 
bathroom, dining are, living room and balcony. We paid $91 a month rent, compared to the $46 
on Willoughby Avenue. Everything was brand new and the parquet oak floor tiles were covered 
with kraft paper. Bella was scared we wouldn't be able to afford it, but I said, "Don't worry, 
Don't worry." I had so much work and I made money. Then for years I made around $100 a week 
and when we came to Manhattan we had $1 5,000 in the bank. You know, that was a lot of money 
at that time, and now « don't want to tell you how much I've got] 

Just before we moved we received a letter from Dr. Leo Honig in Vienna. On January 1 5 
1 956 he wrote, "My arteriosclerosis is getting on. Eight weeks ago I had a small stroke and I was 
in the hospital for two weeks. 

"One lives cheaply here. I like Wien [Vienna] better and better. It is the best city in the 
world I live like a little lord on 1 50 shillings a month. I have many friends." He added that he 
would soon undergo prostate surgery and he did not expect to survive the operation. It was to be 
his last letter to us. We were in our new apartment just a few days when my mother called me on 

57 



the telephone to inform me that Dr. Leo had died in a Vienna hospital following his surgery. He 
never married. 

In early 1 962 my good friend, Mike Criscito, the foreman on the third floor of the GGG 
factory, and I decided we had had enough of the Three Gs, and the both of us left there together and 
for good. I had started to work there in 1925, 37 years earlier, and after being made a foreman 
they took the position away from me and I went back on the production line and did all the special 
work, because no one: else among the hundreds of people in the factory knew how to do it. We went 
to the Hilton Clothing Manufacturing Co. in Linden, New Jersey. Mike became the manager of the 
shop and I became the first foreman — the "quality man." We were treated with great respect 
by the owners because we immediately improved the quality of the garments produced there. 
After a few months I gave the Nash to Mike's sons, Herbie and Mario, and I bought a new, 1 962 
American Motors Rambler Classic 400 aqua mist (light green) four-door sedan. I retired in 
February, 1 966 — nearly 25 years ago — four months after my 65th birthday. I had a 
little notebook there in which I crossed off the days until my retirement, which didn't take place 
until I had earned the maximum wages for 1 966 allowed under the Social Security laws. Mike 
stayed on at Hilton for a number of years, then took over a clothing factory in Chile, and then 
returned to his home in Hillside, New Jersey and he is now retired. As a matter of fact, Mike and 
his wife, Grace, are now on vacation in Florida. I know, because he just called me up from there 
to wish me good luck tomorrow. That's a loyal friend for you! 

Two other good friends of mine from the Three Gs are no longer alive. George Utkowitz and 
Philip Cohen, the pocketmaker. George and his wife, Ethel, moved to Miami Beach after he 
retired and Leo and I visited Ethel in 1 966 when we drove to Florida to see what it was like. 
Philip's son, Gilbert, has been our dentist for more than 30 years and Mario Criscito is my 
cardiologist. It's interesting that two of the three boys Leo used to play with when he came to the 
GGG factory many years ago are now my cardiologist and dentist. 

Leo received his bachelor's degree in history, with honors, in June 1 958 and, after 
spending the summer as a newspaper reporter at the Long Island Star-Journal, he began 
teaching social studies at Parsons Junior High School 1 68 in Flushing, and he has been there 
ever since, except for six-months of active duty with the Army Reserves in Fort Dix, New 
Jersey in 1 961 . He continued to work in the summer as a newspaper reporter at the Long Island 
Star-Journal and Long Island Press for many years. 

Late on the night of Saturday, January 11, 1964, my mother suffered heart failure and 
she died peacefully in her bed in my sister Ida's home in Bayside-Queens, four days shy of her 
85th birthday. Two days later a simple, dignified funeral service was held for her at the 
Schwartz Brothers Funeral Home in Forest Hills-Queens. Gus came up from Texas and everyone 
else in the family, except for Emma and Ali, who were back in their Vienna home, came to the 
services in spite of a heavy snowstorm. However, since only one limousine was available due to 
the treacherous weather, only Frieda, Ida, Adolph, Gus, Gerda, the Rabbi and I went to the burial 
in Mount Hebron Cemetery in Flushing. Bella, Leo and Rudy took the subway home. Now my dear 
mother lies buried next to my dear father, whom she outlived by almost 34 years. 

In 1967, after completing his military obligation, Leo took a trip to Israel and Europe and 
he visited Bella's parents graves. From this visit he developed an interest in family genealogy, 
but he didn't get to v/ork on it until 1 979. 

He married Doris Lovett, a French teacher at Parsons, on March 31, 1968 — two days 
after our 32nd wedding anniversary. Rabbi Alex Pronman, who was in charge of Leo's Bar 
Mitzvah at Congregation Anshe Ernes in Brooklyn almost 1 8 years earlier, officiated at their 
wedding. Doris and Leo lived in an apartment in Rego Park-Queens for less than two years and 
then bought an apartment in our co-operative development. When they got married I gave the car 
to Leo and Doris. The next year, the Rambler's transmission failed and Leo and Doris bought a 

58 



1 969 yellow American Motors Rebel station wagon, a big vehicle with lots of storage space and a 
V-8 motor. It lasted for almost 143,000 miles and 17-1/2 years, until Leo and Doris bought 
their present car, a compact dark pewter (dark gray) 1987 American Motors Renault Alliance 
DL 5-door hatchback. 

Our first granddaughter, Gail Sharon, was born on May 27, 1972, exactly 22 years after 
Leo's Bar Mitzvah. Soon Doris, Leo and Gail moved to bigger apartment identical to ours but 
across the street. Our second granddaughter, Helene Michelle (named after my mother and Bella's 
parents: Hermine, Hermann and Henrietta), was born on March 20, 1975. Our two 
granddaughters have brought sparkle to our golden years. When they were younger, we saw them 
almost every day. When the weather was nice we took them down to our gardens and playground, 
especially when Doris went back to work. 



When Doris was pregnant in 1 971 , Bella fell on a grating and fractured her kneecap. After 
it healed she developed arthritis in her hips, and it became painful for her to walk. I devoted all 
of my time and energy to helping her. She was still able to cook, and she made lunch for Gail and 
Helene every day they attended in the elementary school across the street. That stopped after 
Helene graduated from P.S. 1 1 in June, 1 990 and went uptown to Hunter College High School. 
Bella had already celebrated her 90th birthday and Gail was a student at Stuyvesant High School. 

Bella used to work like a beaver, but now she found it difficult to stand up and cook on 
many days and so she sat on the kitchen chair next to the stove and gave me instructions. "The day 
I can't cook my own food any more," she said, "I will die." At night I would jump out of my bed 
any time she made even a little motion. Bella became frail and went outside only with a walker or 
a wheelchair or she would lie down in the chaise lounge on our balcony. I followed her every 
move so she wouldn't fall, which she did a few times. She still watched the news on television, 
spoke with friends and relatives on the phone or whenever they visited, she knew everything and 
she kept up with everything. 

On the morning of Friday, December 25, 1987 Leo and I went to the United Jewish 
Council's lunch program on Willett Street to pick up our first two hot meals, while Gail stayed 
with her Oma, who had a bad cold that day. We did not leave her alone anymore because she might 
fall while walking in the apartment. When we returned, we put the meals in the refrigerator and 
Leo and Gail returned home. "You know," Gail told my son, "Oma is getting very old and you can 
hear her bones crackle when she moves. But she's smart. She talked to me about the Arabs' 
intifada in Israel!" Leo returned with a vaporizer and he brought Helene with him. He put on the 
vaporizer and Bella sat next to it. Helene stayed in the kitchen with her. After a while, Bella said 
to Leo, "Turn off this vaporizer and get the meals you brought out of the refrigerator so we can 
heat them up." Leo took the vaporizer out of the kitchen and went to wash his hands in the 
bathroom when Helene cried out, "Oma! Oma! Why are you slumped over like that?" Leo and I ran 
into the kitchen and he immediately called the Hatzoloh volunteer ambulance while I took her 
pulse. She had a pulse but she was asleep and her eyes were turned up. The ambulance technicians 
arrived within a few minutes and they revived her. "Who is this?" they asked her, and she 
replied, "my husband, Joe." Bella identified each person correctly and almost got the day of the 
week, Friday, correct. She thought it was Thursday. Although her pulse and blood pressure were 
normal, she was taken by Hatzoloh to Beth Israel Hospital, where she suffered several heart 
arhythmias and she passed away early the next morning, never having eaten the meal we brought 
for her. 

She was a good woman and Rabbi Philip Hiat, whose letterbox used to be next to ours 
downstairs, conducted the services and Gail delivered a tearful eulogy for all of us. Among the 
others in the audience at Riverside Memorial Chapels were her nieces and nephews; 
sister-in-law, Bertel Hirsch; cousin, Leo Hirsch; closest friend, Ella Albala, and her daughter, 
Arline- Mike Criscito; some of her friends from her hometown, Polch, including Caroline Herz 
Newhouse and Henry, Bina and Arthur Anschel, and many neighbors and friends. Bella was buried 

59 



in the Sebulon Lodge grounds in Mount Hope Cemetery in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York, close 
by her brothers, Max and Leopold, and friends of ours. Some day I will be there with her, too. 

Now I was alone, comforted by my photograph albums, classical music, bonds and mail, but 
I always had company and companionship. Leo, Doris and Gail were at my side regularly, and Leo 
became known as "the good son" in our large co-op housing development. They made sure that I ^ 
had everything I needed. Bella was gone, but I had plenty to occupy my time. Helene, who wanted * 
her own room, soon moved into Leo's old room so she could have privacy and a quiet place to 
study. She lived here during the school year until Gail went off to Israel last September. In the 
meantime, I developed chest pains and Leo took me to Dr. Mario Criscito — my friend Mike's 
son — in West Orange, New Jersey and he has become my cardiologist. Leo joined my Lodge, now 
Gad-New York-Sebulon Lodge No. 8 of the Free Sons of Israel and we went to the monthly 
meetings. There we received a royal welcome and I met some of my old friends whom I hadn't seen 
in all the years Bella was ailing, and lots of new Lodge Brothers and Sisters became friendly. 
Soon they elected me to be a Trustee, a post to which I have been reelected every year, and now 
Leo edits the monthly Lodge bulletin. Years earlier I had been President of the old Sebulon Lodge 
and I helped to engineer its merger with Gad-New York Lodge in 1 977. 

Not very long ago, on Sunday, October 21 , Leo, Doris and Helene invited more than twenty 
family members and friends to their apartment and we celebrated my 90th birthday. I enjoyed 
seeing and talking to everyone, posing for pictures, and eating lots of good food. I felt very good 
that day, considering that I had undergone corrective eye surgery just two months earlier. I had 
had cataract surgery in 1964 and it never really was totally satisfactory, but now my eyesight 
has improved greatly and I can thread a needle again. Last month I altered two of the coats I made 
for Bella some years ago. I gave the light green coat to Helene and a black one with a fur collar to 
Doris. 

Returning to the other members of my family, when Gertrude wanted to get married she 
was not even 1 8 years old. She was already earning $22 and $24 a week — nice wages for kids. 
Years earlier Gertrude had an accident and she got $2,000 in the settlement. This money came £ 
due on her 1 8th birthday, and she got married to her boyfriend, Orville ("Win") Whitehouse, on 
November 1 0, 1 936, a few months after her nineteenth birthday. He was 22, of English descent, 
and he soon joined the Merchant Marines. Win wanted to show her the world. William ["Billy") 
was born in New York on July 17, 1939. When World War II broke out and he became a 
Lieutenant Commander after he graduated from officer candidate school. Gertrude, Win and Billy 
lived in Middletown, Connecticut, where Win was stationed, and Bella, Leo and I went there to 
visit them. Gertrude and Win's daughter, Florann, was born there on July 17, 1941, exactly two 
years after Billy's birth. 

From Borough Park, my mother, Ida, Gus and Adolph moved to 1 57th Street and Broadway 
in Washington Heights-Manhattan. While they lived there, Ida and Frieda made out an affidavit so 
that my cousin Sonja, Uncle Michael's daughter, could come here from Vienna and escape from 
the Nazi terror. At that time Gertrude was already married and I remember that Win bought a 
percolator, an electric coffee maker. From there, my mother and Ida moved to a house in Jackson 
Heights, then to a rear, ground floor apartment in 45th Street in Sunnyside, and then a block 
away to a second-floor apartment at 41-44 44th Street. 

Gertrude — she called herself Gerda — and Win and their children lived in houses or 
apartments in Sunnyside (two floors above Mother and Ida), Auburndale-Flushing-Queens, and 
Commack, Long Island, New York, before moving to Friendly Valley in Newhall, California. In the 
1950s they bought a car, a Jaguar, and he was part-owner of a luncheonette-restaurant, called 
"Windy's" on Northern Boulevard in Flushing. On September 16, 1957, soon after Leo had 
started his senior year at Queens College, Ida called us up to tell us that Billy had committed ^ 
suicide by shooting himself in the head with a pistol in the Whitehouse's apartment in Flushing. ^ 
Win died in California on January 5, 1982 and she soon moved into Florann's house in 
Northport, Long Island, New York, where she lives today. 

60 



Adolph married Adeline Brick in Brooklyn on December 17, 1938 They lived on the 
second floor of a house across from Prospect Park in Brooklyn. After World War II Adeline's 
brother, Eddie, a chiropractor, married my cousin, Rosa, the daughter of my mother's half 
sister, Mane, and Alfred Hahn. Adolph and Adeline's daughter, Elsie Ann, was born on July 1 7 
1 941 and their son, John David, made his first appearance on July 9, 1 943. Adolph and Adeline 
were divorced on May 1, 1951 and, three years later, he married Violet Myakich My brother 
died on May 9, 1972 after suffering a heart attack in his car, a 1970 American Motors Hornet 
after parking it in the Macy's department store garage on Queens Boulevard in Elmhurst-Queens' 
He was 62, and the first of my brothers and sisters to die in adulthood. 

Gus enlisted in the Army Reserves and when World War II broke out he was sent into 
combat in the Pacific Theater. One Sunday morning, all of us went to my mother and Ida's 
apartment to await a phone call from Gus and each of us got a chance to say hello and a few words 
more. After returning home, Gus met Lillian Goldstein, who lived on 43rd Street in Sunnyside- 
Queens, New York City — around the corner from where Gus, my mother and Ida were living 
at 41 -44 44th Street. At one time, Adolph and Adeline and Gertrude and Win lived in the same 
apartment house, Tarste Johanna lived about four blocks away, on 48th Street in Woodside, and 
Emma and Ali had an apartment six blocks away on 50th Street, also in Woodside. I got Gus a job 
shaping suit collars at the Three Gs, but he didn't like the work. Gus and Lillian moved to Dallas, 
Texas about two or three years after their marriage on October 26, 1946. There, Lillian gave 
birth to two sons, Bruce and Michael, and in 1 964 they adopted a girl, Gretchen. Gus, who had 
had a stroke a few years earlier, died in a Dallas hospital on January 20, 1 984 and I flew there 
to attend the funeral. 

Ida was the last to get married, and she did so on February 1 , 1 947 with Henry Farber, a 
manufacturer of dental tools. They lived together with my mother in the second floor apartment 
on 44th Street in Sunnyside and, about four years later, they bought a brand new, ranch-style 
house at 69-28 226th Street in Bayside-Queens. My mother did the housekeeping while Ida 
went to her job as an upholsterer in Manhattan and Henry commuted to his business in Yonkers, 
New York. 



Henry and Ida sold their house in 1 969 and moved to the Friendly Valley senior citizens 
development in Newhall, California. He had developed a heart condition and Ida was learning to 
drive their Buick automobile on May 12, 1973. Henry moaned and Ida turned to look at him and 
the car careened into the side of the development's shopping center. Both of them were taken to 
the hospital. Ida suffered multiple facial, jaw and arm fractures, while Henry had a little scratch 
on his forehead. With a short time, perhaps an hour, Henry died, probably from shock. Ida 
recovered physically but not mentally, always showing guilt for what she perceived as having 
caused Henry's death. In February, 1 980 she was hospitalized with a stroke which left one hand 
paralyzed and her speech slurred, and she died on March 1 , 1 980. 

Emma and Ali kept their Queens apartment and car (which Adolph looked after) and 
returned to their home at Josef Ganglgasse 1 7 in the Vienna Woods. Once, in the 1 970s, when 
their landlord here threatened to evict them for not living in the apartment, they returned to 
Queens, cleared out the place and returned to Vienna, where Ali died on January 7, 1 976 at the 
age of 85. Emma's hands, by this time, shook terribly and her beautiful penmanship became 
illegible and she used a typewriter to send picture postcards and letters to us. She paid us a visit 
in 1 977 — after Ali's death — and seemed to get better physically and mentally once she was 
surrounded by my two granddaughters. Helene, especially, became very attached to her. When 
Gail, then five years old, called her younger two-year-old sister a "dumb, dumb," Helene would 
run to my sister and ask, "Am Emma. I'm not a dum, dum, am I?" Emma would hold Helene and 
tell her, "No, darling, you're not a dumb, dumb." We drove her to Kennedy Airport when she 
returned to Vienna and that's the last time we saw her, but the many postcards and letters 
back-and-forth continued. Leo wrote several letters to her when he started to work on this 
family history in 1 979, and she answered with detailed information. Emma became very de- 

61 



pressed when she received the news of Ida's death and a little more than two months later she 
suffered a stroke in her bed and died on Gail's eighth birthday, May 27, 1 980 at the age of 82. 

Frieda and Rudy gave up their apartment in Forest Hills just a few weeks ago, on December 
1 0, and moved to the Dumont Masonic Home in New Rochelle, New York. Rudy is a Mason. Frieda 
is already 91 and she could no longer take care of the apartment and Rudy is ill and confined to a 
wheelchair. Gerda, Florann, Leo, Rudy's sister Mary Osterwald, and I cleaned out their 
apartment two weeks ago. Leo, who has power of attorney for Frieda and Rudy, brought 1 5 
suitcases of more than 50 years of their papers and mail plus bags of photographs and Frieda's 
picture postcards to his old bedroom in my apartment and he plans to go though them, look for 
cash Frieda may have stashed away, and dispose of all their unnecessary things. Gerda, Mary and 
Florann took whatever furniture, fur coats, jewelry and other items of value that they wanted, 
and we gave the rest of the things to the superintendent. Last week Frieda suffered heart failure 
and Leo and I visited her in New Rochelle Hospital, where she is recovering. 

Aunt Johanna gave up her apartment after she was 90 and went into the Neponsit Nursing 
Home, where she died in her sleep on June 30, 1963, exactly four months before her 95th 
birthday. Aunt Adele died eight years earlier at the age of 82. 

As I noted at the beginning, originally my grandfather and his brother and another brother 
and their parents mostlikely came from Hungary and they settled in Kirchenbirk, a village up in 
the mountains near Falkenau. My great grandfather was Israel Honig, a businessman, 
recordkeeper and postmaster in Kirchenbirk. One brother took over the house when his father 
was about 80 years old in 1 900, the year I was born. The older brother was Ariel and the 
younger brother was Joshua, both Hebrew names. Joshua came to Falkenau and he had a business 
there selling groceries, and they bottled beer and soda. They were occupied all the time. The 
oldest daughter, Rosa, married a man by the name of Budlovsky and they were well-to-do. They 
had three children. Anna, the oldest, was less than a year old when she died. She had a convulsion, 
was accidentally dropped by the maid who took care of her, and suffered some internal injuries. 
Rosa had two more children, two boys who now live in Don Mills and Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 
Joseph ("Mop!") Budlovsky, a physician, lives in Don Mills with his wife, Susan, and the 
younger brother, Karl is an engineer and resides in Hamilton with his wife Xandi. On occasions I 
hear from them and Mopl and Susan visited us when they were here in New York. 

Joshua's wife died. They had eight or nine children, and he had a big business so he got a 
housekeeper, but it didn't work out right, I suppose. So, through an arrangement with the Rabbi 
he got acquainted with somebody, not in Falkenau, and he married her. They had a son, Julius, 
who is the only one of Joshua Honig' s children I know who is still alive. He lives in Etobicoke, a 
suburb of Toronto, with his wife, Inge. He is a well-known psychiatrist and he and Inge have two 
children. 

Leo Honig, one of Joshua's sons with his first wife also became a doctor, and he lived and 
practiced medicine and medical research in Vienna; Montevideo, Uruguay in South America, and 
in New York. Dr. Leo visited with us here many times and he was very fond of my son Leo. At one 
time he was affiliated with the Daughters of Jacob Nursing Home in the Bronx, New York City, 
where he attended to my wife, Bella's elderly aunt, Adelheid Hirsch, who was a resident there. 

Many years ago, when my son Leo was about eight years old, Bella and I went to Niagara 
Falls with him, and then we went by bus from there to Hamilton and we visited with Otto and 
Gretl, who lived in a house on Ontario Street. We stayed with their friends, the Waldsteins. Most 
of the Hoenigs didn't make it. Otto made out well financially in Canada. From Otto's house in 
Hamilton we took a bus to Toronto, where we visited with Joseph and Anna Kreissl. He was the 
son of my mother's aunt from Alt Rohlau. 

Otto's brother, Leopold, used to play soccer and he was much older than me. His wife's 
name was Ella. My sister, Frieda, used to be das kindermSdchen [the children's governess] taking 

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care of their young daughter, Use, from September 1921 until July 1922, and they had a 
servant. Leopold had a good job as he was in charge of the brewery. The young daughter, Use — 
a teenager or in her early twenties — wrote to us from Milano, "Please help me." I couldn't. 
We couldn't help her in America and she perished in the Holocaust. 

Otto Hoenig had a younger brother, also named Josef, who, like me, was born in 1 893, and 
when he was twenty-eight or twenty-nine years old — just a short while after I went to 
America — he contracted syphillis. They had a certain medication called Salvosan and the 
doctor applied it and he was not supposed to use any other medication for 24 hours, but he had 
such pain, I don't know what he had, that he went to a different doctor. He didn't tell him about the 
medication he had taken and the second doctor gave him another dosage of Salvarsan [which 
contains arsenic] and Josef died soon thereafter. 

He had another brother, Hermann, who was an eye specialist. He had a lame arm. Then 
there were two or three sisters, and there was the older brother, Leopold. He used to play soccer. 
He was much older than me. 

A distant relative, I think it was an uncle or maybe an uncle to my grandmother, I don't 
know, was Rabbiner Kohn. He led the congregation in the late 1800s. He had a so-called 
behtshtube [prayer room], and, just before 1 900 they built their own beautiful synagogue in 
Falkenau. It was just opposite from the school. It had a garden on each side and a big entrance 
that was opened in case of a funeral or a marriage, so that a horse and wagon could go right to the 
steps. On other occasions the side entrances to the Synagogue were used. The women sat upstairs 
and the men in the main sanctuary. They had a choir for certain holidays like Channukah and 
Purim. As far as that is concerned, I have very nice memories. 

There lived approximately 60 Jewish families in Falkenau and I remember some of them. 

I was on very good terms with the Rabbi's son, Eddie Feuerstein. His father, Dr. Salomon 
Feuerstein was our Rabbiner, and Lippman Kurzweil was the Synagogue's cantor. The Rabbiner 
and his wife had only one son, Eddie, who came to Philadelphia and we visited him. He had a 
daughter. He is not alive any more, but we do hear from his widow, Mizzi, who still lives in 
Strathmore near Philadelphia. 

The Fischers were a prominent family who had a big, corner house, a big store and a 
warehouse. They had a retail store and they supplied groceries to small outlets in the mountains. 
There were the husband and wife and their four children — two sons and two daughters. One 
daughter was married to Family Zentner. Two brothers, Hermann and Leopold Zentner. They had 
one child who left Europe just before Hitler and lived in Canada. A second cousin of mine, Otto 
Hoenig, married the younger sister from the Fischers, Gretl Fischer, and they emigrated to 
Hamilton, Ontario. Otto had a produce business. He supplied stores and restaurants, I believe, 
with meat and fish and a number of other things. He died about five years ago at the age of around 
92 He was born in 1 895 and Gretl Fischer was born in 1 899, a month before my sister, Frieda. 
She's still alive and she sent me a telegram on my 90th birthday last October. She is a very nice 
person. Her mother was a marvelous person, a born Bloch. 

In the Bloch family there were three sisters and two brothers, and their father. Their 
parents had a prominent building in Falkenau on the market square, a corner, and they sold 
woolen material. When the parent died two sisters remained single and two brothers remained 
single. One brother, Otto Bloch, was the congregation's president. 

Five families of Steiniger also lived there. In one family there were two brothers, Filipp 
and Bemhard Steiniger. And then there were three brothers, Philip, I believe Ernst, and 
forgot the other first name. The other one was a lawyer, in German an advocat, and they were all 
well-to-do. They had servants. They even had an extra cook and young women to take care of the 
children and take them out in the baby carriages. 

63 



Family Adolf Herrmann had a large wholesale and retail textile business. My father was 
employed there, in the end as a salesman, and he traveled all over the mountains because 
Falkenau is right in the center of a valley surrounded by fairly high mountains. There are a lot of 
villages and they had sometimes only one store and salespeople from different kinds of businesses 
came and to visit them and take orders. 

Adolf Herrmann had several brothers. One of his brothers lived in Eger. They had a big 
wholesale food business. One of his sons migrated to the United States and he worked for a firm in 
Chicago. I visited him once and I had a letter from him. I didn't know him too well. One of his 
brothers worked in Falkenau at his uncle's textile business. Adolf Herrmann was married to a 
born Kohn and they had three children. The daughter's name was Margaret, Gretl and their sons 
were Julius and Karl. They were all musically inclined. Adolf Herrmann himself could sing very 
well and he used to perform at some Jewish affairs. The daughter played the piano very well, 
and Karl — who was my especially good friend — had two violins. He wanted me to have one, 
and he wanted to teach me how to play the violin, but I was not musically inclined, although I love 
music. He died from menningitis when he was about fifteen years old. Adolf Herrmann had a 
heart attack and died in a hospital during Hitler's time, and I offered to send an affidvadit for the 
two remaining children so they could come to the United States. Unfortunately, they replied that 
their mother was in an institution and they didn't want to leave her alone. I suppose they 
perished with their mother in Hitler's time. Look, they had everything.. ..money, luxury and 
servants, as did many other Jewish people in Falkenau with very few exceptions, but it didn't 
help them at all during the Holocaust. 

There was a family Lowy. There were about nine children. One of them was about two 
years older than me, a daughter, Hedwig. Among the other Lowy children I recall were Mary, 
Ernst and Josef. The mother and a daughter had a ladies apparel business. They used to make 
skirts to measure and blouses, and they were quite busy. 

Falkenau's Jewish community contained a lot of people who did not living there originally. 
They worked in the stores. Hugo and Rosa Lowy had a school supplies and paper business. They 
were very, very nice people, and they were taken out from Theresienstadt, where they were in 
internment, on a special train with several hundred Jews from Bohemia to Switzerland, and 
from Switzerland they came to the United States. They lived on Judge Street in East 
Elmhurst-Queens and came to our apartment in Manhattan a number of times. Their son, Robert, 
lives in a house on Kessel Street in Forest Hills-Queens with his wife. He was in the 
import-export business and, at one time, my wife's brother, Leopold Hirsch, worked for his 
firm. Robert plays a chamber music in a string quartet organized by Esther Ostroff, a retired 
music teacher at Seward Park High School who lives in an apartment on the 20th floor of our 
apartment house, exactly three floors above our home. Their daughter, Joan, and son, Steven, are 
both medical doctors Werner Lowy, Hugo and Rosa's younger son, lives with his wife and family 
in Prague. 

There were also Families Mohr, Hansl, Wasserman, Lov, David Kohn, Heinrich Kohn, 
Huebsch (who had a drugstore) and Mendl. There were many, many more Jewish families in 
Falkenau. 

That brings us to the present. 

Now I'm in bed here in this modern hospital and I've been told my old boss, William P. 
Goldman, donated the funds to build this floor. Here comes Dr. Keiserman to do a procedure on me. 
He's going to put a line called a swan — to monitor my heart during tomorrow's surgical 
procedure — in my neck now. 

You know that I love to listen to classical music. I've replaced many of my 78s and long 
playing records with stereo cassettes. I can tell you that the records are not as good as the 
cassettes but I understand the CDs [compact disks] are better yet and Helene agrees. 

64 



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Will we go to the barber next week, Leo? He says we'll go when I get better. All right. 

I'm relieved that Gail's coming home from Israel in two days. That is a peculiar situation. 
I want to see Gail. I'm wondering how she is. You say she's fine. Well, she's probably grown since 
we last saw her in September. You know, in that age you change a lot. From a child, she is 
becoming a young woman. Helene just told me Gail is fine and she's probably got one big freckle 
now from all that sun in Israel. She's supposed to leave early in the morning on Tuesday, if she 
can get an early flight. Well, I think they have a few flights. Of course she has to be home in this 
hostile situation. Helene tells me she knows a few people who think Gail should stay, but I 
don't think so. Doris says she and Leo have no control over it and I know that. Twenty Young 
Judaeans are coming home, and fifty are staying. I think Iraq's threats won't come to anything 
and they're going to suspend the situation and in a month or so some sort of a compromise can be 
worked out. But surely Gail should come home anyway. Leo worries his head off about Gail and 
me, I know. 

Let her come home! You never can tell what's going to happen in Israel. I know she really 
doesn't want to return home. Doris, I know you and Leo have done all you can at this point. As 
soon as everything blows over, she can go back and finish her term. Doris tells me that whenever 
Gail goes out she's not allowed to go back to the program. Then she'll go back as a volunteer. That's 
all right. 

I wonder how my sister Frieda is. She's in the hospital too with heart failure and Leo and I 
visited her there the other day and we stopped at the nursing home to talk to Rudy. Leo tells me he 
spoke to Rudy today. 

Now the nurse is going to pull my type of blood and then she'll take some readings. The 
[male] nurse is setting a computer monitor machine on me. He says my readings are good. That's 
because I was not excited. "You," Leo says to me, "are the calmest one around here." The nurse 
now tells me, "You're the best patient we have here." I don't know about that. Hah. There are 
plenty of others. I had my blood pressure taken. It's 1 10 over 70.. ..Very good! I used to be 130 
over 70. They've also put an oxygen tube in my nose. 

Helene has cold hands. "Oh, I always have cold hands," she tells me. "It keeps me warm." I 
have warm hands. 

The nurse tells me I'll have my dinner tonight, but after dinner no more. She tells me to 
eat everything. I promised her I'd eat everything except the spoon! 

Doris, your mother [Mae H. Lovett] called me up from Florida. She said her sister Estelle 
[Mersand] has the flu. Everybody's got something. 

It's ten to five o'clock now and the nurse has to make a new incision.... to connect the swan 
over here on the wire. 

Doris tells me jokingly that the people at Beth Israel Hospital are very, very, very 
intelligent because I've only been here since Thursday and they spelled our name correctly. 
Doris has been teaching in the same school — Eastern District High School - - for over five 
years and they still can't spell her name correctly! Her chairman, she tells me, calls her 
"Hoening." 

You know, my old friend, Mike Criscito, wrote me a letter and spelled my name 
H-O-E-N-l-N-G. He knows me over forty, fifty years and it's not worth getting insulted over.He 
just called me from his vacation place in Florida. I retired 25 years ago next month, but Mike 
and I have always talked and seen each other regularly since then. He had a brother who was an 
archbishop and when he came to the factory in Linden, Mike introduced him to me and said that I 
was his special friend and his brother extended his hand to me and talked to me for a long time. 

65 



Speaking of spelling names, As a matter of fact, my cousin, Leo, the Doctor Leo Honig, 
spelled his name H-O-N-l-G. 

I'm not used to such attention. Helene says she always gives me attention, I know, but three 
family members giving me such attention at the same time is something I'm not used to. 

I hope you three have a long life too. I was never a strong person, per se, even though I had 
an athletic life in Falkenau. But I never figured I'd live to ninety. My father died when he was 63, 
and he was a strong man. My mother was just four days shy of her 85th birthday. My sister 
Emma lived to be 8?.. Doris says I may yet live to a hundred. Well, I'm not against it. But the 
thing is I think the conditions are not for it. Not many live to be a hundred. Alfred Sagl lived to be 
97. His wife — my dear and very close cousin, Mina, is two months older than me and she lives 
in Santa Monica. My Aunt Johanna lived to be 95. And the other aunt, Adele, was only 84. My 
brother Gus was 71, I think. Gus was born I think in 1913 and he died in 1984. I remember 
when Adolph was bom. That was in 1909. 

The modern world cannot imagine how primitive the world was here and worse in Europe. 
You know, you live through many situations when you get really old. I lived through the 21 
years that I was in Europe: my childhood, and when I was an apprentice, a journeyman, and when 
I started to.. ..to go to cities and work in different cities. Then I came to America. My first 
lunches, I used to go in a delicatessen store. That was the time like this. I'd get a glass of milk, 
and I'd get a sa....a roll, opened up with sardines. I'd eat that. It was about 25 or 28 cents. A cup of 
coffee was a nickel, and Nedick's frankfurters used to be a nickel. And look at how much my hand 
shakes from all those years of cutting men's clothes with my large, heavy shears. 

Helene says we earn more today. And look at how much things cost today. We earn more. 
Sure. But the value of the money is not so much cherished by the modern population. The old 
people, they had to skimp and scrimp. You know, rent was cheap, but a lot of things they couldn't 
afford. Housing was primitive. Toilets you had to share with others. You had a tub in the kitchen 
for the laundry. You took a bath in there, sitting. And most apartments at that time had no 
electricity. They had gas, on the side, you know, it came out and you had a mantle, and when you 
turned it the gas burned. It made the flame low. 

I remember when Gail and Helene were born. Doris should remember it better. 

The nurses are making a big fuss here about giving me injections and taking blood from me 
quite often and measuring my blood pressure. They have this fancy machine in my hand so they 
don't have to stick me every time they do it. The nurse says this is much better. It takes the 
blood pressure all the time. It's 110 over 70; I used to be 130 over 70. Also, there's an oxygen 
tube in my nose. 

It's now about 6 o'clock in the evening and Dr. Keiserman, the gentleman from Norristown, 
Pennsylvania who made an incision and inserted a "swan" into my neck today so they can monitor 
my heart during the operation tomorrow, has arrived. They've inserted something into my wrist 
and Dr. Keiserman says it is for measuring the arterial blood pressure. "These are the wonders 
of modern medicine," he tells me as he prepares me for tomorrow's procedure with Dr. 
Hochsztein. Dr. Moutoussis will be here to take care of me afterwards. 

That's the whole history of my family from Europe. ...of events that I have recalled....! was 
married 51 years.. ..all put down on little cassette tape. 

Oh, so many moments take place in a lifetime! 

What is this for me? Kisses? I'm not used to such attention as I'm getting here today from 
the three of you. 

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It s time for Leo, Doris and Helene to leave. Hopefully, things will work out all right 
tomorrow and I II see all of them when I awaken, but if not, I'm not afraid of dying. I've lived a 
full, long life and I'm very grateful for that and I'm proud of everything our family has 
accomplished. ' 

All right, it's late now, and time for the three of you to leave now. I love you. 



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Chapter 3 
How I Survived as a World War 18 Commando 

By PAUL HILL 

[Original Name: PAUL GLASER] 



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This is an edited copy of letter from Paul Hill to Mr. Tony Geraghty, c/o Methuens, Publishers, 

London. 

I borrowed a copy of your book, Inside the SAS [Special Air Service], from a friend. 

On page 1 3 you mentioned Philip Pinckney, whom I knew well in Africa, Sicily and Italy. 

I left my native Karlsbad, Czechoslovakia in 1939 and flew by plane from Prague to 
England. Later that year I joined the British army and my name was changed from Paul Glaser to 
Paul Hill. First I served with the 87th Company Pioneer Corps and from February, 1 940 until 
April, 1 940 we were stationed in Le Havre, France. We returned to Southampton, England from 
St. Malo, France and then I became a member of the 67th Commandoes which later became the 
Second Special Air Service. 

After several small raids in Africa, I was chosen to land on the heavily fortified island of 
Pantellaria — located in the Strait of Sicily, midway between Sicily and Tunisia — from a 
submarine, The Unshaken, under the direction of Major Appleyard. 

We started out from Valetta, Malta, and circled the island of Pantellaria several times. 
The island itself was constantly bombarded by Flying Fortresses, and when some of the bombs 
fell into the ocean near the sub, we didn't know whether these were bombs or depth charges fired 
by the Italians. 

Our mission was to take an Axis prisoner alive from the island who would later be sent to 
Algiers, the location of General Dwight D. Eisenhower's headquarters. 

Before we got out of the sub and into a rubber boat, we were told we were facing forty 
artillery pieces. We had Colt 45s and a wooden paddle. We climbed a cliff, and on top of it an 
Italian soldier was singing. We captured him, bound him, and threw him down on the lava sand at 
the bottom of the cliff. We became engaged in a short gun battle with the guards who came 
running. It was over in seconds, but we lost the Bristol policeman, Herstel, who was shot while 
he was next to me. Herstel's last words to me were, "Paul, I have had it." 

Major Appleyard gave orders to retreat and we got back into the sub by signalling with a 
hand grenade. The Italian prisoner was flown to Algiers. 

Pantellaria had only one artesian well, and when it was bombed, the island would 
surrender. It did, to an RAF Spitfire pilot on June 11, 1943, who landed after the Italians had 
placed a white cross on their airfield. The only casualty was a private who was bitten by a mule. 

Then we prepared from Tunis for a parachute landing in Sicily. We were supposed to land 
near the German headquarters in Taormina, 46 kilometers northeast of Catania and midway 
between Catania and Messina on the eastern coast of the island along the Ionian Sea, but the pilot 
did not find a suitable landing site and dropped us in a small woods high in the mountains 
southeast of Palermo in the northwestern sector of Sicily. Philip Pinckney had pushed me out of 
the plane. He had his arm in a plaster cast, which the doctor told him he could remove after 

68 



landing. Our plans had to be changed, and we cut the east-west railway line between Palermo and 
Messina every night, which the Italians repaired during the day. Major Appleyard was on the 
plane that brought us to Sicily, and the aircraft was shot down over Catania. 

During those days we discussed a raid on one of the Brenner Pass tunnels between northern 
Italy and southern Austria. What a pity I could not be with him then! « 

Later — in February, 1944 — I led a group of three SAS who parachuted in the 
Abruzzi Mountain, near a small resort from which Hitler swore he would save Mussolini. 
Earlier, in September, 1943, the remarkable Nazi commando leader, Otto Skorzeny, overran 
Abruzzi and kidnapped Mussolini in a light airplane. The Duce was then set up as a puppet head 
of the Fascist Republic in the north. 

We set an explosive device in the tunnel between Terni and Perugia, northeast of Rome. 
The explosive devices were the same type as those we had used to cut the rail line between 
Palermo and Messina. This was prior to the landing at Anzio bridgehead. After the war, Captain 
Barkworth told me that 1 00 German soldiers had died in the tunnel. On our way back to our lines 
we passed the farm where we had hidden our parachutes, hoping to trade them later for food from 
the farmers. The farmer told us that a German soldier had picked them up. 

Later, we heard about the landing at Anzio, so we changed our direction, hoping to reach 
our lines more quickly this way. One night we stopped in Subiaco, southwest of Rome in the 
Appenines. There, I went with the local priest under the bridge which the Germans were 
supposed to have mined, but they only had made holes, and there were no explosives in the holes. 

We got past Velletri, which, according to a radio announcement, was in Allied hands. 
Later, it turned out that it only had been bombed. There was a rainstorm all night long when we 
got past Velletri, and when it was daylight we hid in the barn of a farm near Ana and Berigelta. 
Little did we know that we were within 500 yards of a German army camp. The farmer fetched a 
German soldier armed with a rifle who awakened us with "Raus!" (jp 

We were given a first-class breakfast in the Segreant's Mess. Their attitude was that they 
might be prisoners themselves the next day since the front was so liquid. They emptied our 
pockets and I looked at one time at a compass on the table. Pointing at me, a German soldier 
shouted, "This one is already thinking of escaping." I told him, "The sun rises here in the east, 
there is west, and here is north, and there is south." Then, with a slip of the tongue, I said 
"Stimmts?" (which in German means, isn't it so?), so the secret was out that I spoke German. 

Then I had to tell them "The Novel" that had been arranged at the War Office: that my 
father was English, my mother was from Strasbourg, and I had been a hotel secretary at the 
Schweizer Hof in Basel. 

We were taken to the German Prisoner Collection Camp at Cine Cita outside Rome. From 
there we were taken to a famous prison, Regina Coeli, which the Gestapo had taken over. 
Apparently thgere was a secret order by Hitler that sabotage troops were to be killed (the 
German expression was Umlegen). 

During our stay in Philipville, Algeria, we were once visited by an American officer 
whose specialty was psychological warfare, who lectured us on how to behave when taken 
prisoner. This was now put into action. We saluted every buck private as if he was a general. 
We started talking to them about our families, and we inquired about their families. The 
American had advised us that if a prisoner establishes human contact with his captors, they will 
not kill him. ik 

An orderly in the prison brought us a note from an Italian general who was being kept in 
the prison as a hostage. "If I can get you Red Cross parcels, will you give me the chocolate from 

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Legacione Swizzere stamp on the back. u 9 are "es Tor each of us. The package had a 

Churchill in England and in the free world I told mv rantnrc th** w,c . " I,,ue "<-e or Winston 
thinking of the British soul. On the qu^'J^STof'K ^S^ZTS^ 
rn.ll.on American sold.ers ,n England ready for the invasion. They had not yet fired a shot On 
the question of war production, not only in England and Ireland but also the whole American 
comment (North and South), all of Africa, and most of Asia were working for the A^d cause 
Th,s amounted to milhons of working hours every day. The Gestapo's rep y was "There ?s 
always Hrtler's secret weapon." [We did not know about the Germans' VI and V2 rackets then ] 
They d.scussed with me the possibility of my joining Churchill's Battalion aganst the 
Communists. I told them, "You make your own arrangements with Churchill." 

One German officer, Mueller, had been at the Cotton Exchange in Liverpool before the war 
Mueller questioned my identity and said, "We have ways and means to find out who you really 

rTJti tUt C "? e t0 ,° U u r "I" 3nd t0 ' d me that my stor y about bein 9 a "otel secretary in 

Base was aH wrong. "Your father," Mueller told me, "is Lord Hill and he owns the Picadilly 
Hotel in London. Little did Mueller know that all the German spies had been caught during the 
war and their radios were being used by British counter intelligence. 

One day, two Gestapo men took us by truck from the prison to a German air force camp on 
the Via Appia outside Rome. There we stood in front of a German officer and I told him that we 
were registered prisoners of war. He asked me, "Can you prove it?" Then I showed him the pack 
of cigarettes with the stamp Legacione Swizzera on the back. I told him that an official from the 
Swiss Legation had visited us in the Regina Coeli prison and had taken our names The German 
officer told the Gestapo men to take us back to Rome. 

We remained in the guardhouse all morning. In the end I told them that if they were going 
to kill us we certainly deserved one last meal. An Austrian cook brought us a marvelous meal he 
had seen years ago at a soccer match between England and Austria. Another German soldier told 
me how wonderful British intelligence was. During his last leave, he told me, he had seen 
Shakespeare's Macbeth in a very anti-English performance, the same night the RAF destroyed the 
theater. 

Back in Rome I tried to speak to anyone who would listen to tell them we were registered 
prisoners of war. We caught lice in the prison and the Germans told me that they had no facilities 
to delouse us at the prison. I told therm the story that at the Sangro River a whole British 
division was taken out of the front lines to be deloused. This impressed the Germans so much that 
they took us out of the prison to an air force camp, Fabrica di Roma, and we were deloused there. 

In the end they sent a long letter to Field Marshal "Smiling Alfred" Kesselring telling him 
that we were registered prisoners of war, excellent soldiers, and we should not be executed. 

We were taken north. Going past the Brenner Pass from Italy into Austria I saw that there 
was a German guard stationed every 100 to 200 meters. We were separated in Oberursel, a 
northern suburb of Frankfurt on the Main, Germany, and I was taken to a camp near the Polish 
border in Upper Silesia. There I met my unit Sergeant Major, Jack Lloyd. He became camp 



prisoner commander and I was his interpreter (man of confidence). We had a good relationship 
with the old German officers, especially an Austrian medical officer who told me he was taking 
better care of the prisoners than of the Guard. For the exchange of injured prisoners he gave me 
the map of the first jet engine factory outside of Munich, which we hid in the inside of a crutch. 

One day, a German soldier who supervised our kitchen (He had been a butcher in a kosher 
butcher store in Frankfurt.) awoke me a 4 a.m. to tell me that there had been an attempt on 
Hitler's life, but that Hitler had survived and had made a speech on the radio. 

At the morning parade I asked the commanding officer how the Fuehrer was. He could not 
make out how I knew about the attempted assassination. The whole camp was turned upside down 
as the Germans tried to find a secret radio. They could not find anything, but Jack Lloyd and I 
were taken to another prison camp in Lamsdorf . The commanding officer refused to admit us 
since he said he had enough trouble makers. We spent a week with the Gestapo in Oppeln, Silesia. 
There, a German Gestapo man questioned me. "Are you Jewish?" My reply was: "How many 
Jewish parachutists are there in the German army?" — a typical Jewish way of answering a 
question with a question. He said, "We have no Jews at all in the German army." I responded, " I 
don't think there are any Jewish parachutists in the British army." 

In the end, we landed in a prison camp outside Nurenburg. 

Jack Lloyd and I escaped when they tried to march our camp's prisoners to a redoubt in the 
Alps. 

My regret, of course, is not having gone with Philip Pinckney, who, according to the book, 
was executed as a saboteur. 



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Chapter 4 
A Summer Visit to My Birthplace 

By CARL BINHAK 

Carl Binhak, a violinist, who was born in Falkenau to Siegmund Binhak and his wife, and 
migrated to the United States in the 1880s or 1890s, returned to his homeland on an extended 
trip in the summer of 1 904 and kept a diary of his journey, which is in the possession of his 
grandson, David Binhak (born in 1930, the son of Stephen Binhak: 1898/New York-August 24, 
1 959/New York) of Purchase, New York. Carl Binhak was a graduate of Charles University in 
Prague and his wife, born Emma Binhak (c.1 861 /Falkenau-February 13, 1950/New York, 
was a distant cousin. Carl and Emma were the parents of two sons, Stephen and Lawrence, who 
died in New York of pneumonia on February 11, 1918 at the age of 1 6. Carl died in New York on 
December 1, 1930 and he and his wife are buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Hawthorne 
(Westchester County), New York. 

The following are the edited (for spelling and grammatical purposes only) sections of the 
diary pertaining to Falkenau, Karlsbad and the surrounding towns. 

He left New York on Tuesday, June 7, 1904 — when Stephen ("my Stevie") was in 
kindergarten — aboard the North German Lloyd steamer"Princess Alice" (Norddeutsche Lloyd 
Dampfer "Prinzess Alice") and arrived in Bremerhaven (via Plymouth, England and Cherbourg, 
France) on Thursday, June 1 7, 1 904. 

Prior to arriving in Falkenau on Thursday, June 23, 1904, Carl Binhak visited 
Bremerhaven, Berlin and Dresden. After leaving Falkenau on July 27, 1904, he went to Munich 
Bavaria); Frankfurt on the Main, Bad Mannheim, Koblenz and Koln [Cologne] (Prussia), and 
arrived in Paris (France) on July 30. 



Thursday, June 23, 1904: from Dresden to Falkenau 



June 23, 1904. 



I get up at Dresden about 8:30 A.M. Leave hotel about 10:30. Walk up Prager Str. to buy 
some P.C., then back to hotel and leave Dresden Depot 1 1 :50 A.M. Real glad I was here. The trip 
through Saxonian Schweiz [was] beautiful, especially between Pima and Schandau, but from 
Tetschen-Bodenbach on through Bohemia [was] very tedious, as they use soft coal on engines and 
one could walk quicker than what the train goes. I meet Weinberger at Depot Briix — one 
minute stop — and then on to Karlsbad, where we arrived at 4:32 A.M. and could not connect 
for Falkenau. Went into Karlsbad. Walked as far as Caffee "Pupp." Had coffee there. Seen 
beautiful customs, studied faces. You see here all nations and the stores exhibit the most 
beautiful things you can see anywhere. Then walked back to Depot and on way met Tante Rosie 
Holzner. She made me and Mathille come into the store and there met Uncle Herrmann, Hugo and 
two of cousin Mathilde Hirsch's daughters. All nice to talk to and then on to the Depot. Took 8 
P.M. train for Falkenau. Arrived there 8:30 P.M. Awaited at Depot by mother and Olga 
. Have dinner and retire at 1 A.M. 

Good night. God bless everybody. 



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June 24, 1 904: Falkenau a/Eger, Bohemia 



Good morning! 



What do you think; they are in my room at 4:20 A.M. again, wake me and talk to me. Olga 
comes in my bed. Mother sits on it. [They] say they did not sleep and want to see and speak to 
me. I talk to them until 6 A.M., when I get up. Then, after breakfast, when mother relieved 
Emma at the store, Olga and I sneaked away to cemetery [and] visited father's grave. ...all there 
is left of [the] poor man. Had heart-to-heart talk to Olga. Then home where mother expects us 
already. My sisters Emma and Olga are the grandest girls that ever lived. The morning passes. In 
the afternoon Mathille calls with her aunt Bertha, then my cousins Tiny and Frieda. I take a 
walk with Olga and Emma and the child through City Park, a very pretty little affair. Then go 
alone with Emma. Return and take supper. Again, they do nothing but eat and worry all day what 
to give you next. Hugo comes from Karlsbad, is a fine boy, dresses nobly. I am proud of him. 
[He] bears such excellent reputation. We take another walk — Olga, Emma, Hugo and I. Come 
home about 1 0:30 P.M. Talk until 1 A.M. and retire, but this time I told them not to wake me. 

Good night my dear ones. 

Au Revoir. 



June 28/29, 1 904: Moldau (Bohemia, Saxonia) 



June 28, 19Q4. 



We take breakfast about 9 A.M. and leave for a walk. My sister Helene comes from 
Seestadtl and we continue walking. O! What beautiful walks! Where are my dear ones? We 
return noontime and take another walk and then at 4 P.M. mother and Helene leave again. We 
take still another walk and then a good supper and retire about 1 0:30 P.M. Good night. 

June 29, 1904. 

Arose 7 A.M. We go to Depot and Paula's two boys and brother-in-law Ignatz arrive at 1 
A.M. Take walk, then dinner, then walk again. Go to Depot at 3 P.M. Adolf arrives. We take 
another walk to Rehfeld (Saxonia). Return at 7 P.M. and we all, except Paula and one of her 
boys, leave at 7:45 P.M. I go with Anna to Komotau. Stay there overnight. She has a very stylish 
home. Every room is a big hall and we retire at 12 P.M. During the night (4 A.M.) I am startled 
by a trumpet, the fire alarm. The fire is quite a distance from us, so we go to bed again and I 
sleep until 7:1 5 A.M. and I am now on my trip to Prague. More about past day's experience when 
I get there. Excuse writing; this is done on board train but copied later. 

Au Revoir. 



June 25/26, 1904: Falkenau a/Eger (Bohemia) 

Good morning. There is nothing new — eat, eat, eat!!! I visited father's grave yesterday. 
[He] has a very nice place. Hugo comes here again to see me. I take him out in the evening for a 
glass of beer. The same routine: eat, talk, walk! My mother is happy. God bless her. She excuses 
me from Temple and I am glad of it. Met Uncle Ignatz. Tomorrow I'll go with mother to Moldau to 
visit Paula. Adieu from the hamlet. 

Au Revoir. 



June 27, 1904: Trip from Falkenau to Moldau (Bohemia) 

We leave Falkenau at 6:15 A.M. for Komotau, arriving there about 8:15 and visit 
brother-in-law Jacob Kohn. My sister Anna is not home; is on a visit to Paula. These people 
have the nicest apartment I have so far seen in Europe and are furnished grand. Brother-in-law 
Jacob is a nice fellow. We leave for Briix at 1 P.M. and arrive 1:45 P.M. Komotau is a nice little 
town but Briix is larger. We visit Adolf, Paula's husband. He is an exceedingly plain man with a 
big heart, but very outspoken. I see Paula's children. They are grand, not pretty, but bright and 
talkative. Ours are not right in this respect. We leave 4:15 P.M. for Moldau. This short trip 
goes through the grandest spaces that nature is endowed with. We ride to a height of 801 metres 
above sea level. Nothing but needles. The air is grand. how I wish I had music with me as they 
would enjoy it and benefit by it. By chance I look out of the window of the car and find Anna and 
Paula in Ossegg and we ride together to Moldau. This is the kind of place Nature interested man to 
live in. Nothing but mountains with Taninen and Fichters. I'll stay here for a few days. We 
retire at 10 P.M. Good night! God bless you all! 



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Prag (Bohemia), June 30, 1 904 



• 



• 



June 30, 1904. 



Arrived here 1 1 :20 A.M. Leave baggage at Depot (Staats bahnfof). Cashed a check damOr 
the Union Bank more rather than anything else. Then went to the Conservatory. Met Director 
Knittl, took walk with him to Ferdinand Strasse, thence to theater for ticket, then to Taussig 
Music Store, from there to their apartment in Bubna. Met the old lady; she was delighted. Then 
back to store. Met the old gent and brother. From there to Hugo Wolf, an old schoolmate. Found 
him out and then to Hotel Blauer Stem Graben where I A.M. stopping. Ate two frankfurters for 
supper and one bread at Malinka's Bkr. and then to Neues Deutsches Theater where I am sorry to 
say 1 witnessed a performance of "Fidelio" Beethoven. The orchestra, especially the Horn is and 
are rotten, the Conductor wholly incapable, the Scenery and Stage very good, the Singers rotten, 
the Soprano, Leonora, every tone sounds different, the Florestan beloved, Pizarro, had no voice 
and the rest was a good match. Sorry I wasted an evening in such a manner and spoiled my 
illusion of Prag's Opera. Met between and after the Opera Wolf at Ny Canok. Then went with him 
and his wife to Cafe Corsi. Took him home and then a walk and now will go to bed. 7 A.M. sorry I 
came here. This is an old rotten dirty town. I would not live here for anything. Tomorrow more. 
Good night. God bless you all. 



Prag (Bohemia), July 1, 1904 

Good morning! Got up about 8 A.M. Left hotel at about 9 A.M. Took coffee and rolls and 
"Caffee Continental" to Kleinseite Ring. Then walked up 1 95 steps to Hradschin and went into St. 
Veit's Dom, Cardinal Archbishop Leo von Skrbensky was just celebrating High mass in honor of 
St. Prokop whose remains had been taken from their old place of rest and placed in front of the 
Altar. There is a three-days festival in honor of his remains being taken to a new place of rest. 
Enjoyed the service hugely. They sang the gregorian chant beautiful and a mass a capella, 
perfectly i n tune and good ensemble under Dom Kapellmeister F6rster,my old Harmonie teacher. 

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Heard Lyric and Gloria. Then left and went up to St. Loretta. Went into "Schatzkammer." They 
have some beautiful things there, wood carvings, vestments. One looks as if gold braid was 
worked on purple velvet, but it is made of straw, a present of the Countess Lobkowitz; holy 
sacraments, one specially valuable, made in 1699, set with 6222 diamants. Visited the Santa 
Casa, a reproduction of the Chapel of same name in Rome (1 6th century), then Loretta Church. 
Had quite a chat with one of the Capuchin fathers, a lovely fellow. Passed Palais of Herzog of 
Tuscana, of Furst Schwarzenberg, of Cardinal, and Amyschwe Kaserne. Then went into Castle. 
Visited Wladislaw Hall, 1 6th century, old, historically interesting, then Laudtagstube, Rentamt, 
Office of the Reichs — ■ and Hofrathes, seen where they threw out the three Governors of the 
Province Martinitz, Slawata and Fabricius, with moments in the Garten where they landed. Then 
passed through the yard into the German Saal, then the Spanish Saal, the nicest and largest 
apartment in the Castle. This Castle is old and interesting but no comparison with the one in 
Berlin as far as splendor goes. Then to Belvedere, the only building in mittel Europe that is of 
absolute Italian Renaissance, but has no contents. Then down and across the bridge to the 
Conservatory. Visited small hall where we formerly had our orchestra rehearsal, looks now like 
a barn, found out that Hilmer, my former most intimate friend is Professor of Conservatory. 
Send dispatch to him to meet me at Caffee Continental at 4 P.M. Before this took dinner at 
German casino. Then went to Caffee house and met there Hilmer and Wolf and at 6 P.M. went with 
Hilmer to Weinberge where he lives. Met his rich wife and children. Then back to Josephsplatz. 
Met Wolf and took car to Baumgarten. Bully good time. Hilmer is still the good old fellow. Then 
back to Hotel and Depot and off for Vienna at 1 1 :05 P.M. Hilmer promised to meet me at Carlsbad 
on July 1 5. 

Good Night! Au Revoir! 



[July 2, 3, 4 -"Glory be to God on high !!! Today we have July 4 .": Vienna (Lower Austria)] 



July 5, 1904: Leitmeritz (Bohemia) 

Left Vienna July 4, 9:30 P.M. on the Oesterreichische Nordwestbahn for Leitmeritz, an 
uneventful trip in very nice cars and arrived at Leitmeritz (Bohemia) at 4:50 A.M. Had coffee 
at Depot and at 6:30 went to Olga's house. Was met by brother-in-law Leo and had some more 
coffee and fesh rolls and promptly spoiled my stomach. At 1 1 A.M. went with Leo to 
Theresienstadt (Forts, now reduced) and went through the place, returning in time for dinner 1 
P.M. to Leitmeritz. Had a short rest after it and at 4 P.M. went for a walk with Olga and the kid, 
of course. Returned, took supper at 7:30 P.M. and after closing of store at 9 P.M. went for a 
short walk with Olga and Leo around the Markt several times. Very tedious and retired at 1 1 
P.M. Leitmeritz is a pretty old Platz, old churches and buildings. Nothing else of interest. I'll be 
glad to get out of it again. Too slow for mine. Will leave here tomorrow, July 6 at 2 P.M. for 
Aussig and Seestadtl. 



Good night! 



Tomorrow more. 



July 6, 1 904: Leitmeritz, Aussig, Teplitz, Seestadtl (Bohemia) 

Got up about 8 A.M. Dressed and linger in the store of brother-in-law Herrmann. Very 
tiresome. I don't like the way they do business. Never let a customer go on account of price 



75 



a though signs all over the place "one price." They talk too much to customers I A M disausted 
but they do a great business. I take dinner at one P.M. and leave LeitmSz' a 2 ^40 P M for' 
Aussig Le.tmer.tz is a quaint old little town with beautiful vicinity. A ived Aussiqat 4 P M in 

?30P M'for T p e n.t GrU r ald ' ? T" ^ ^ Wan * bUt f ° Und nim out o 'took Vain' at 
5.30 P.M. for Teplitz. Ausstg .s the prettiest, busiest town I have so far visited in Bohemia 
Made an excellent impression on me. Arrived in Teplitz at 6:03 P.M. Went s S, to OttT's 
Otto lives ,n a bum street. He took a walk with me through the termerpal streets but howe 
Tephtz has gone back. Lots of stores empty. They have a nice theater there, severa other pretty 
buildings but that is all. Very few visitors. My bother Otto has four p^cZZn 'I 
pretty wife, six mouths to feed. "Lord, hold on with your blessings." Left Teplitz at 8 45 P M 
and | amved at Sesstadtl at 10:0!. Sister Helene and her husband awaited met a the De£t We 

Sfr saSb^s?pS ta an ,mbiss and youns chicken «- ^ **■• -E£ 

Good night. 



July 7, 1 904: Moldau (Bohemia, Saxonia) 

Got up at Seestadtl about 6:1 5 A.M. and took train for Moldau at 7:05 A M Arrived there at 
10 A.M. Went to Fischer Haus where Paula lives and we took together with a party of Paula's 
friend and stroll through this magnificent woods (pines) to the well of the Moldau which 
becomes quite a river in Saxonia. Then home for sinner and then at 3 P.M. for another walk to 
Niclasberg, about 6 kilometers from Moldau. what beautiful country, what magnificent woods' 
Took train home to Moldau and arrived 6 P.M. Took supper and then I played for them on the 
piano my compositions and was complimented so much that I doubt the sincerity Took another 
walk (short) at 9:30 P.M. and retired at 1 1 P.M. 

Au Revoir. 



July 8, 1 904: Brux and Seestadtl (Bohemia) 

Left Moldau at 7 A.M. in company of brother-in-law Jacob Kohn and arrived at Brux at 
8:45 A.M. Went to Adolf's house, Paula's husband, and had quite a chat with him, and a wak 
through the street with little Erna. Bought postal stamps for the boys and candy for Erna and 
then to Adolf's house again for dinner at 2 P.M. Went with him to Turkish Bath, fine, and 
returned after a rest there at 5 P.M. and took train at 5:45 P.M. for Seestadtl. Arrived there at 
6:05 and came just in time for supper. Sat around after it, talking with brother-in-law and 
sister. Took a short walk through their park, a very pretty natural affair this park and their 
home and then retired at about 1 1 P.M. I hope my dear ones are OK. Good bless them all. 

Adieu. 



July 9, 1 904: Seestadtl, Komotau (Bohemia) 

Got up about 7 A.M. and left 9:1 1 A.M. Seestadtl for Komotau, arriving there about 9:30 
A.M. Went to Anna's home. Took a walk with Jacob, then home for dinner and after it went out 
with Anna to the park. This park is the prettiest I've seen in Bohemia, has two beautiful rose 
gardens, and then went home. Took supper and left on the 6:30 P.M. train. There was the 
installation by the Statthalter of Bohemia of Komotau's new water main and the whole town was 



76 



up against it, but I left in spite of urgent invitations to stay and witness the festivities. I arrived 
in Falkenau at 8:30 P.M. Surprised mother. Had a nice walk with Emma and then to bed. 

Good night. 



July 1 0, 1 904: Karlsbad and Petschau (Bohemia) 

Left Falkenau at 6:20 A.M. Arrived 6:50 Karlsbad and 8 A.M. Petschau. Received Uncle 
Moritz and Marta at Depot. We took several walks. Visited cemetery. Uncle Moritz is the 
happiest man on earth through my visit and tells me so. We leave at 3 P.M. and arrive at 
Karlsbad at 4 P.M. Go to Holzner and Lappers. Take a walk through the town. Partake of coffee at 
Stadtpark and leave at 8:30 P.M. for Falkenau, arriving 9:15 P.M. Another walk and we retire 
about 1 1 P.M. 

Au Revoir. 



July 11,1 904: Falkenau a/Eger, Bohemia 
July 12, 1904: Graslitz, Bleistadt, Bohemia 

Got up at 8 A.M. and linger longer about nothing. Eat, talk and walk. 

July 12, 1904. 

I take with mother and Emma Kohn the 9:30 train for Graslitz. Arrive there 1 1 :30 A.M. 
Visit my old Alma Mater, the Music School and then my old teacher Ludwig's Family. Go to Hotel 
Schwan for dinner and then take a walk through the city and go at 2:30 P.M. for an inspection of 
the School of Music. Am received by all four teachers: Ludwig, Schaffer, Nettl and Fingl, the 
last named my schoolmate. How delighted they all are, specially Fingl, who otherwise bears the 
reputation of a very stiff article. I A.M. shown through a very modern building, different from 
what it used to be. Everything a No. 1 . They all promise to visit me at Falkenau and I leave at 
3:1 5 P.M. for Bleistadt arriving there at 3:45 P.M. A little hamlet beautifully situated among 
ther hills of the Egerbirge. I visit Uncle David Steiniger, who is there in his factory 
manufacturing pearl buttons and also lives there during ther summer. He is on the outs with his 
eldest Hans, and I think I was successful in patching up matters. The boy married a Christian 
girl, but I think they will make up now. I walked and talked with him for two hours and he is 
delighted with my visit and shows it promiscuously. I leave at 8:30 P.M. his hospitable house 
and arrive in Falkenau 9 P.M., a short walk and then to bed. Good night. 



July 13, 1904: Falkenau a/Eger (Bohemia) 

Get up 8 A.M. Mailed some music (marches) to Zimmermann [in] Leipzig for publication 
and to Colonel of 73 Reg. in Prag as dedication. Then for a walk, dinmner, sleep and another walk 
with the two Emmas to Wurdingriin abd Hamerl through the most beautiful Valley of the 
Lobsbach and then home arriving at 9:30 P.M. Another short walk in town. A short conversation 
at home and then to bed with the picture of my children I received a day ago. Sorry I had to take 
Agnes (picture) to bed with me instead of my wife's. But variety is the spice of life! Good night 
you dear ones. Au Revoir. 



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July 1 4, 1 904: Karlsbad and Petschau (Bohemia) 

Franke^t UP in ^ M A L S ft a F t a p enaU V A ^ A ™* d Karlsbad 9:30 ' lnt0 the citv - Met Osmond 
kZ^LH hS \ 5 f- at T PuP , p - The " f0r a walk throu 9 h town and met Uncle Moritz at 
Karlsbader Hof for dinner. Took train for Petschau at 1:30. Arrived 235 Took a nice walk 
through the Valley of the Tepl, more beautiful valley than even that of the Lobsbach Then ho me 
for supper. Another walk with Martha towards Karlsbad and home to bed at 1 1 P.M. 

God bless my dear ones! 
I'll see you soon. 
Auf Wiedershanen. 



July 1 5, 1 904: Petschau and Karlsbad (Bohemia) 

Got up about 8 A.M. Could not go out on account of heat in the A.M. Took dinner and nap and 
went out for a walk in the P.M. and then took train for Karlsbad arriving 8:45 P.M. Met Hugo 
and Kauf mann, a schoolmate, and had a pleasant evening at Hotel Lyon (before this visited Cousin 
Mathilde Hirsch) and left brother, friend and hotel to take train for Falkenau at 12:30, 
arriving at 1 : 1 5 A.M. I had to use pebbles to wake mother to get into house and then to bed. 

Good night. 



July 1 6, 1 904: Falkenau and Karlsbad (Bohemia) 

Got up early. Took train for Karlsbad and went to Holzners into the city. Met again Hugo and 
Kaufmann. Got an introduction to Eberhardt (Conductor). Promises to play one of my marches 
and then went home late again. 



July 1 7, 1 904: Briix (Bohemia) 

Got up about 8 A.M. Took train with mother and Emma to Briix arriving at 1:45 P.M. On 
way met Marta at Karlsbad, Hugo at Lodau. We had a family group [picture] taken of mother and 
nine children: Paula, Otto, Carl, Olga, Anna, Marta, Hugo, Helene and Emma. Had a grand lunch 
at Paula's, such as only she can prepare, a fine supper, and the took the folks to Depot. Olga and I 
stayed at Briix Hotel Adler and we sat down with Paula and Adolf and had some wine. A miserable 
night. I caught cold and every other d- thing. 



July 1 8, 1 904: Briix, Tetschen-Bodenbach, Falkenau (Bohemia) 

Got up in Briix 7 A.M. Went to Paula's for breakfast. Took leave of Olga and with Adolf the 
train for Tetschen-Bodenbach, arriving 12 noon. Took dinner at "Hotel Post." Very good. Then 
walked to Tetschen and visited Tante Babette and cousin Sigmund Veit, leaving after one hour's 
visit only. Walked back to Bodenbach and took train for Falkenau, arriving at 8:30 P.M. Tante 
Babette is a nice old woman. Cousin Sigmund was very attentive but I be d- if this was all worth 
spending a whole day on the road, specially when it is now with me, time is money. Took a nice 
walk in Falkenau yet and then to bed. Goodnight . 

78 



{July 19 and 20 entries appear out of chronological order in Mr. Binhak's diary.] 

July 20, 1904: Falkenau And Karlsbad (Bohemia) 

Got up about 5 A.M. Took train 6:10 A.M. for Karlsbad and gave march to Eberhardt to be 
played. Returned to Falkenau at 12:30 and mother called in the P.M. Doctor Wodava, who finds 
that I suffer with enlargement of the stomach and hydrophie of the liver, gives me some 
medicine, n.g. [no good]. We take several walks and retire, and I have the first good rest in a 
long while. 



July 1 9, 1 904: Falkenau a/Eger (Bohemia) 

I get up about 8 A.M. and copy music all A.M. and the P.M. had visit of Mrs. Steiner. Later 
take walk with Emma, then home and out with mother. She sends me to restaurant, where I met 
Hansel Cousin Tini's husband. We have quite a conversation about music and matters pertaining 
to same, and I go home 12 midnight. I retire and wake up about 1:30 A.M. from a nightmare, 
imagining I have consumption and A.M. in such a nervous state that I had to wake up the whole 
family. God forgive me. Never experience anything like [it]. Have chills and fever and fall alseep 
now about 3:30 A.M. 



July 21, 1904: Eger, Franzensbad (Bohemia), Falkenau 

Got up at 7 A.M. Left about 9:30 for Eger, arriving at about 10:30 A.M. Had dinner at 
Rathskeller, very pretty good restaurant, but the city is surely filthy, but old an interesting. 
Seen ruins of old castle and Rathhaus where Wallenstein was murdered. Took train at 1:26 for 
Franzenbad and visited cousins Rosa and Frieda. Had quite some walks through city. Beautiful 
parks, promenades and buildings. Left on the 6:30 train, arriving Falkenau 7:20 P.M. Short 
walk with sister Marta and to bed. 



July 22, 1904: Klingenthal (Saxonia) 

Took early train for Klingenthal (Sax) 6:20 A.M., arriving there at 8:30. Went to factory. 
Bought some Renaissance work for my wife and took train back to Falkenau at 1 1 A.M., arriving 
at 12:42 noon. Sister Anna is here on a visit (Falkenau) waiting at the Depot for me. We have 
some walks in the afternoon and evening and retire about 1 P.M. 



July 23, 1904: Graslitz and Klingenthal and Carlsbad (Bohemia, Saxonia, Bohemia) 

Got up 5:30 A.M. Took 6:30 train with Anna to Graslitz to buy some more Renaissance. 
Couldn't find any here, so walked with her one hour's walk to Klingenthal. Same factory as 
yesterday. Bought one curtain and two covers and took train at 12:52 for Carlsbad, arriving at 
1 :30 P.M. Went to Uncle Holzner and then into town to Cafe Sans Souci where Eberhardt's 
Orchestra plays my March No. 4 with success. Kapellmeister tells me I could easily get rid of 
same. He likes the composition and it really does sound well, because they notice dynamic signs 
and take pains with it. Met a lady at Cafe Sans Souci "who pays me lots of compliments." I guess I 
could have lots of fun if I had the time. In the evening I go to the Orpheum where I witness a 
variety performance of varied quality and just as I order something to eat at 9 P.M. (and it was 

79 



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macaroni too) the electric light goes out in all Karlsbad, and there we sit in the dark with 
candles and the performance is over. I take a walk and wind up at Hotel Lyon where I met my old 
chum Kaufmann and his wife. Am introduced to some folk, pass a pleasant hour or so and then 
take 1 2:30 train back to Falkenau arriving at 1 :1 2 A.M., a nice time to get home in such a little 
town. I retire at 2:30 A.M. after reading yet a little. Good night my dear. 

God bless you all. 



July 24, 1904: Falkenau a/Eger (Bohemia) 

This is the day of the Lord. I mean mine! I get up at about 8:30 A.M. Before I do so I already 
had one caller (Fred Griinwald). I A.M. hardly dressed when in comes Uncle Steiner with a 
bundle of mushrooms for the Spiegl girl. Then follows right on his heels Ferdinand Grunwald. 
We have some reminiscences of bygone days. I play for him. The d- fool goes as usual into 
ecstacies or rather fits, and while playing for him arrive at 10:45 A.M. Uncle Moritz, 
brother-in-law Adolf, Jacob, Leo, Ignaz and my nephew Paul. The house is full, all in my honor! 
I play ahead and they meanwhile (poor musical souls) take a walk, I after them, and after some 
chatting, we sit down to dinner, a very elaborate one. Anna cooks it and mother trying to give 
every one more than they can stand or want, spills it. In the P.M. Helen arrives. Uncle Moritz is 
happy once more. He is a fine character, proud as a peacock about my family. We pass a very 
pleasant afternoon. Adolf leaves with his Paul at 5:45 P.M. Jacob, Helene and Ignaz at 7:30 P.M. 
Thank God a little quiet. Leo and Anna remain. We take some walks and retire after a very noisy 
day. 

Au Revoir. 



July 25, 1904: Falkenau and Karlsbad, Bohemia 

Get up about 8 A.M. Fool around the A.M. Marta arrives from Petschau to say farewell at 
10:30 A.M. We have dinner and at 3 P.M. leave for Karlsbad. Leo, Marta and myself walk into 
town to Dr. Winterwitz. Find them out further to the alte Weise where I buy some articles and 
then we take Marta to the train at 6:30 for Petschau. Adieu, my beautiful sister. She really is a 
pretty dainty doll. We go back to the alte Weise. I buy some more things and then we visit 
Hirsch's and Holzner and I say farewell to them. We go to Hotel Lyon. I meet Kaufmann. Spent a 
pleasant hour with him and his wife and say Au Revoir to him and we take the 12:30 train for 
Falkenau. I come home and find Paula here already. 

Good night. 



July 26, 1904: Falkenau a/Eger and Eger (Bohemia) 

Get up at about 8 A.M. Go with sisters Paula and Emma to cemetery. My sister Paula is a 
jewel. God keep her well. We return about 9:30 A.M. She helps me pack. In fact, she does it 
herself. She has a golden hand. Trunks packed and ready at 1 2 noon. She and Leo and I take train 
for Eger to send my trunks from there to Bremen. This done, we go into town, return in time for 
3 o'clock train and we leave for Falkenau and she for Briix. Parting from her comes hard. I hope 
she got home safe and well. We return once more to mother. I stay with her as much as I only 
can. Take some walks and retire. My mother is already commencing to moan. 



Goodnight . 



80 



July 27, 1 904: Falkenau (Bohemia), Munchen (Bavaria) 

I get up at 7:30 A.M. and get ready to leave. My mother moans and groans, but hides it. Yet I 
A M ready to leave 11:15 A.M. with brother-in-law Leo when mother falls around my neck 
giving way. I console her, and ask her to leave me a moment, which I use to write a farewell 
letter to her giving it to Sis Emma not to be opened until mother returns from the Depot. This 
is a sad day. I don't think I have cried as much as this day in all my life. My sister Emma cries 
bitterly as I say good-bye. We leave for the Depot. The train arrives. My sister Anna groans. My 
mother moans and cries. It is really heartbreaking and even the Portier of the Depot feels sorry 
for mother and has tears in his eyes. A last farewell, a last kiss. The locomotive moves and all is 
over "Behut Dich Gott es war zu schon gewesen. Behiit Dich Gott es muss so sein." We (Leo and 
I) are enroute to Munich. We arrive at Eger at 12:45 noon and leave again at 1:01. Arrive in 
Munich at 6:30 P.M. Go to Hotel Kaiserhof . Very nice place and then straight to the "Theater am 
Gartnerplatz" where we witness an excellent performance of "Bruder Strumburger, an 
exceedingly fine comic opera. This theater is old but very pretty, stagehandling and scenery 
excellent, orchestra good, and the singers the best in that line that I ever heard. I enjoyed this 
performance hugely and after it we went to the 

After leaving Munich, Bavaria on July 28, 1904, Carl Binhak traveled via Frankfurt on 
the Main Bad Mannheim, Koblenz, Kbln and Hamburg, Prussia to Paris, France and boarded the 
North German Lloyd steamer "Kaiser Wilhelm the Great" (Norddeutscher Lloyd Dampfer 
"Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse") in Cherbourg, France on Wednesday, August 3 — leaving Paris 
at 920 A M "and after a very hot and uneventful railroad journey through southern France 
(Normandy) and leaving Paris at 3:50 P.M. in Cherbourg, board the tender, but have to wait 
about one hour for the Kaiser which has not arrived in the harbor as yet. We leave the tender 
about 5 PM and about 10 minutes later reach the big vessel, board her and Good bye Europe. 
When will I or will I ever see you again?" - and he returned home to New York on Monday 
Auqust 8 1 904 While on board the ship, he was "asked to play on Saturday [August 6, 1 904} 
at the concert for the sailors, widows and orphans," accompanied by Mr. Rothwell, at which he 
receives "lots of applause plenty of cigars for me and compliments." 



81 



Chapter 5 
How the Nazi Invasion of Austria Changed My Life 

By SONJA HOENIG NANNI 



I led a normal childhood for the first 18 years of my life as Josephine Hdnig in Vienna, 
where I was born on March 8, 1 920. 

My father, Michael Hdnig, was a proofreader for a big newspaper in Vienna for more than 
fifty years. I don't remember the name of the paper anymore because there were quite a few of 
them in Vienna. He married my mother after his first wife, Hermine Heller, died. I had a half 
brother, Friedrich "Fritz" Hdnig, who was about 1 8 to 20 years older than me. Fritz didn't live 
at home because he had his own family. I also had a stepbrother, Heinrich, whom my father 
adopted from his first wife. Heinrich was a couple of years older than Fritz and he had a son, 
Emil, who was two years old when I was born. 

Enrica Sachs, my mother, was bom in Podivin, Czechoslovakia. She was a homemaker who 
liked to cook, bake, do crafts, embroider, knit and crochet. My mother never went anywhere 
without her bag which always contained some kind of handiwork. From the time I was a little 
girl, I can remember that she always had her handiwork with her. My mother taught me how to 
make some of the things she made and so I, too, have always loved to embroider, work with 
beads, crochet, knit and sew. 

We lived in a modest second floor apartment on Hanovergasse in a building which went 
through to Kluckygasse, on the other side, in Vienna's Brigittenau (20th) District. Our home 
consisted of one bedroom, a little living room, a kitchen, a little toilet and a foyer. It wasn't 
very big. 

My mother used to bring her handiwork with her when she took me to the Brigitte 
Nauerlande Park on Kluckygasse, Klosterneuberger Strasse and Treu Strasse after grade school. 
She would work on it while I played with the children. On the weekends, we used to visit friends 
and relatives and I would play with my cousins. My mother came from a big family of 1 7 
children and my father came from a family of eight. So we did a lot of visiting in Vienna. Many 
members of my mother's family lived in Czechoslovakia. 

On some Sundays we used to go on hikes to the Vienna mountains and the Vienna Woods, to 
all different places. We used to go to the concerts, the ballet, and the State Opera (the little 
public operatta theaters) when I was a teenager. Yes, there was a lot of culture in Vienna and I 
enjoyed it too. We didn't even own a radio or a telephone, but we had a lot of fun. 

I finished school at 1 4 and I went to work in a fabric store selling fabrics. Then I went to 
work for a very fine dressmaking salon where I worked in the finishing department. When I 
didn't make deliveries I worked on finishing the dresses, sewing, doing hems and overcasting. 
They got a lot of money for their clothes so they had to be finished nicely. 

The trouble started in 1934 when there was a bit of an unrest. Dr. Engelbert Dollfuss, a 
Christian Socialist and strongly anti-Nazi, was the Chancellor of Austria. There was a lot of 
trouble — Nazi propaganda, German agitators, bombings, the expulsion of Hitler's special 
"inspector for Austria" (Theodor Habicht), the Communist "Reds," martial law, threats of 
execution of any civilians found with firearms, the resignation of a number of key government 
officials the blocking of the railroads, destruction of powerhouses, and assaults on individual 
Austrians — and then there were a lot of rumors. Then, when Hitler started to gain greater 
control of Germany a lot of rumors about an Anschluss (annexation by Germany) started. On 

82 



July 25, 1934, a group of armed Nazi "Brown Shirts" seized the government radio station (it 
was soon recaptured by government forces) and then another group of Nazis wearing fake 
Heimwehr uniforms entered the chancellery and captured several cabinet members. One of the 
Nazis, Otto Planetta, then shot Dollfuss twice and the Chancellor died when no one called for a 
doctor. Then Kurt von Schuschnigg took over as Chancellor until Hitler came into power in 
Austria. 

There was a little anti-Semitism as I was growing up and going to school, but not very 
much. But after 1 934 you surely noticed a lot of it. People started acting differently. Some of 
them liked to do what the Nazis did, so they tried to join different clubs. Even my brother's son, 
Emil, wanted to join the German army. I don't know if he ever did join or not and I don't know 
what became of him. 

My father didn't have any trouble at work then. He wasn't a young man anymore. He was 50 
when 1 was born, so he was 64 in 1 934 when the problems started and, luckily, he was pretty 
much left alone at that time. 

We really didn't celebrate Jewish holidays in my house that much. As a matter of fact, 
when there was a holiday I went to school. I loved school and I hated to miss a day. Then, of 
course, when time went on you started to think a little differently. You started thinking more of 
religion. You see, my father wasn't a religious man, so I wasn't raised that way. Soon, I joined 
Hadassah and different groups. We tried more camaraderie with people because it was getting a 
little tougher. 

I celebrated my 18th birthday on March 8, 1938, a day I will never forget as long as I 
live Five days later, on Saturday, March 13, Hitler's army marched into Austria and into 
Vienna, and my life changed completely. The Nazis were all over. People stayed home because 
they were frightened. A couple of days later, I went to visit an aunt of mine, Regina Becicka ~ 
one of my mother's sisters - in the Second District. I wanted to show her a suit my mother had 
knitted for me. My relatives wouldn't open the door. Then I found out why. The German storm 
troopers were on the street and I saw that they had gathered a lot of people. The S.S. wanted my 
cousins and all of them were hiding because they were afraid that the soldiers would come and 
get them. While I was waiting and looking around, I saw my cousin — by the way, her name 
was Didy Schindler — with her father, Karl, walking away crying. Later I found out that the 
Nazis took the people at random. They knocked on the apartment doors and if they found out the 
residents were Jewish or if they had something to do with Jewish people they took them and 
made them scrub the streets and sidewalks. They forced their victims to exercise and walk 
around, and they shouted all kinds of horrible and humiliating things at them. The scene was 
very discouraging. People were terrorized and they wouldn't go outside. 

When I went to work at the Sch6n hosiery store in Stubengasse in Maria Hilf, the Seventh 
District [in 1996 it was the Sixth District and Neubau was the Seventh District], on the Monday 
after Hitler marched in, there was nobody there. But then, a day later, I went to work again and 
on the windows the Nazis had written "Jew" and the owners and workers couldn't open the 
roll-up doors. They had to leave them half-way down. People would sneak in to the store, a few 
here and there, but there weren't too many customers. A lot of them were frightened especially 
when they saw that the troopers continued to drag out the people to scrub the streets. 

I was called from the store and forced to go out there and scrub. The soldiers just came to 
the door and said, "Come on out. We need you to clean the streets." They didn't make any bones 
about it. So I had to get on my hands and knees and scrub and clean the streets. 

Every day it got worse and worse. Fewer and fewer people went in because they were afraid 
of getting caught patronizing Jewish-owned stores. Shortly after that we closed up because you 
couldn't run the business that way. I was out of a job. 

83 



• 



• 



My father had a couple of sisters (Aunts Johanna Hoenig and Bertha Hdniq Waxman) and a 
s.ster-m-law Hermine Hoenig, the widow of my Uncle Leopold Hoenigfand nephews TnSnLces 

£Zk SI T S h J ° Se t Ph rt A , d0lPh H GUStaV ' ' da 3nd Gerda Hoeni 9 and FnedaHoenig RupTwhc Sin 
New York. They started send.ng us papers and affidavits so we could come to Amer ca and so at 

hf 27 ° f ^ r n , 9 Pe0P J e W ° Uld 9et a Chance to 9 et ™ay ft«n Hitler ^Th^? exact^ what 
they did for me and a few other cousins, including Gerhart Weiss. 

aa .1 had .! f6W c 1 onversations with my father about the situation, but in those days Barents 
tvl r\2 1 m h C ^V^ Wa l they d ° n0W " ThingS Were a ,ot diffe ™< tS. Yo'ur parents 
in ZT1 H y , they Ifl™" Wh3t th6y did ° r What the y wanted The V ne *er told you anything 

In those days you learned from your friends, or you learned from this one. That's what my 
mother used to tell me. They never said anything. They never said, "We have the money We'll 
give you the money to go to America." Nothing. y ' 

People were afraid to talk. They really were. It was one of those things that they were 
afraid that somebody m.ght tell on them. Then when things got that bad they didn't know whom 
they could trust It s understandable. They were worried that they could get in trouble and that 
they would take them. 

I remember the day when my Aunt Johanna from New York sent for me and I had to apply 
for a passport. Somebody warned me, "Be careful what you say when you go for your passport 
because if you say the wrong thing you won't get one." Somebody I knew told me that when they 
asked them to sign papers that you won't return to Austria or wherever you were from and if 
you didn't sign you didn't go. 

So when the Austrian passport officials asked me if I was coming back I told them I wasn't 
planning on it. That was it.l knew one of the young girls with whom I went to school was dumb 
enough to ask, "Well, what happens if Hitler or the regime changes?" She didn't get out. 

I had to do a lot of running around and I was frightened. I had to go to so many different 
places, doctors examined me and I had to do all the different things in order to get my papers and 
leave. I had to go and sign lots of papers. Then had to go and pick up my passport and visa. My 
mother went around with me on some of the errands, but she wasn't a well woman. I've forgotten 
so many of the details. Don't forget it's close to 58 years ago that I left, but I do remember a lot 
of the important things. 

My last day in Vienna on July 28 was sad and full of fond memories. It was very scary. I 
was 1 8 and I was about to leave my parents. I'd never been away from home before this day. I 
knew.... I had a hunch that I would never see them again. My father was 68 then and my mother 
was 58. She was about ten years younger than my Dad. So it was very sad. They were still living 
in that same apartment. After I left the Nazis started moving people around. 

I packed everything I could get into my suitcase: a lot of my nice clothes, a couple of table 
cloths that my mother gave me that she had embroidered, one half-finished table cloth that I 
finished years later, a few pictures which I still have, and that's about it. 

My parents took me to the Westbahnhof railroad terminal in downtown Vienna. We 
embraced one last time. They wished me good luck and gave me oral messages for the relatives in 
New York. We kissed. I took my suitcase and said a tearful goodbye. 

I took the train from Vienna to Cologne, Germany, where we had a couple of hours' 
layover, and then we got back on the train and we continued to Antwerp, Belgium. That's where I 
caught the very small ship, the S.S. Geroldstein, to America. There were quite a few young 
people among the 1 50 or so passengers on board. I was a bit on the shy side and you had to be 
careful, so I really didn't talk to anyone. You didn't know who you were talking to. You could say 

84 



something wrong to someone who might be a spy and then good bye, so I really don't remember 

too much about what I said to whom on the ship. 

Outside of being a little seasick the first day out, it wasn't a bad voyage. Twelve days later I 
arrived at the pier in Hoboken, New Jersey on August 10, 1938, where I met my Dad's sisters 
and a couple of cousins. They're the ones who sent for me and they're all gone now. 

When you've lived in Europe and then you come to the United States at the age of 1 8 you 
expect it to be so different. The way people talked, I expected to find gold in the streets. Really! 
That's the impression I had on the trip across the Atlantic, but when I arrived in Hoboken it was 
such a dirty place. In Vienna you could sit on the street and eat right off the sidewalk. That's how 
clean the city was in those days. 

But I was glad some of my aunts and cousins welcomed me at the dock. We went to live in 
my Aunt Hermine's big apartment at West 1 57th Street and Broadway in the Washington Heights 
section of Manhattan, a neighborhood that would be home to many German-speaking Jewish 
refugees. A lot of people — Tante Mina, Tante Johanna, Cousins Ida, Gerda and Gus Hoenig and 
Gerhart Weiss, and I — lived in that apartment. It was like a railroad flat which had rooms 
going off to the sides of a long hallway. It was nice. 

I spoke only a little bit of English, but I adapted quickly and quite easily. I learned the new 
language by talking to people, reading the comics, going to the movies and asking questions. All 
my relatives spoke English so I told them ,1 don't want to speak German. Please speak English so 
I can learn and that's what they did. 

After unpacking my suitcase, I wrote a letter to my parents in Vienna. I corresponded with 
them until 1 942. It was a joke, because the censors had almost everything blocked off and there 
was nothing to read in their letters. Just a few words here and there remained — then just 
Mom and Dad or something underneath — that was it. I didn't hear from them at all during the 
war because there was no mail from Europe. I didn't know what happened and I worried about 
them every day. Then, in 1 945, when the war ended, I got a letter from my brother Fritz, who 
wrote to me that my parents were killed in the gas chambers with hundreds and hundreds of 
others sometime in 1 942. Apparently he heard about their murders when he returned to Vienna 
after spending the war years in the Russian salt mines. 

My brother never told me where they got killed. I really don't know. Fritz shared very 
little of his experiences with me. I guess he believed in leaving things unsaid. He didn't want to 
open up old wounds. 

I lived in the Washington Heights apartment for two weeks and then my aunts told me I had 
to find a job to help pay the rent. 

At first I worked for a family on West 1 92nd Street in Manhattan near Fort Tryon Park, 
taking care of their cute little baby girl — I don't think she was a year old — and taking 
care of their home. They had a dress factory and they had to take care of their business so they 
couldn't take care of their infant daughter all day. I was pretty friendly with the family but I 
didn't stay there very long — only a couple of months — because there was so much that I 
had to do. 

Next I worked for a family in Brooklyn, taking care of their children. The family owned a 
butcher shop, but such a dirty place. I stayed there for a little while. 

Then I got a job working for Dr. Norman Shapiro, taking care of his two children. Steven 
was 11 or 1 2 years old and Gail was about nine. They had a maid who took care of the house. I 
just had responsibility for the children. I took them to school and dancing school and I worked 
for the family for several months. 

85 



• 



t 



A?nH Qr e, ? ha M ' !°' d h ° Siery a " d lingerie in the Jose P h Salem store °n Broadway and West 
82nd Street in Manhattan. J 

on FaKS Sll'Sf'STi ' iVed . in ^Vo Unt ' S aDartment - • moved into a little furnished room 
on East 85th Street off Broadway. I paid $3 a week or $3.50 a week rent. 

I liked Manhattan. New York is a funny town. When you've lived there for a while it qets 
into your blood and you never forget it. There's no place like New York in the whole world I 
enjoyed living in New York. There were places where Viennese people used to meet- little clubs 
little restaurants, little places. I made a lot of friends, people who were in the same boat I was 
in. We came over to the United States because we had to. You made friends and formed bonds 
with people of similar backgrounds. 

Most of these people tried to avoid talking about what was going on in Europe I guess 
maybe they thought if they didn't talk about it, it was going to change. Most people tried to avoid 
it. Maybe they didn't want to feel the pain. I don't know. The young people never really talked 
much about what happened in Vienna or why. 

In 1939, I worked in a summer resort, Perrineville, near Hightstown New Jersey I 
worked at the New York World's Fair in 1940. I was a shill, someone who stood outside an 
exhibit hall calling out in a loud voice to try to get the people to come inside and see the show. 
The building and show were like a Chinese temple. 

Then I got a job in a night club, the 400 Club on East 43rd Street and 5th Avenue, as a 

photographer, cigarette girl, check room person I did all kinds of jobs there. All the big name 

bands played there, so I met a lot of the well-known bandleaders Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, 

Benny Goodman and Duke Ellington. I met all those people. I met a lot of them. I took pictures of 
all of them as well as the famous drummer, Gene Krupa. Lots of people in the audience wanted 
their pictures taken with the bandleaders or with the bands so they gave me a little extra money 
to take the photographs. 

I was named after my grandmother, but after I was here for a couple of years, I didn't like 
the name Josephine too much and I changed it to Sonja. 

I met Thomas Nanni in a bowling alley on Broadway and West 79th St. I had a date with 
another man. We went to the bowling alley where a friend of his introduced us. Then Tom got mad 
because I said good night. Well, I was with somebody else who dropped me off. But then, after 
that, Tom and I started meeting each other and we got married in the old Queens Borough Hall in 
Jamaica, New York almost four years later, on January 3, 1 946, more than 50 years ago. He 
was working in the kitchen at Steuben's Restaurant. We lived in an apartment in Sunnyside 
right across from the actor, James Caan. We became friendly with his mother, Sophie. At that 
time in 1 949 he was just a teenager. Tommy was now working as a chauffeur for the Harry 
Bollins Limousine firm while I was still employed at the 400 Club. Then I worked at the world 
famous Latin Quarter night club. 

As a couple, we often went out to dinner at convenient restaurants. While it was nothing 
exceptional, we usually had a good time and our happiness together was the most important thing 
in our lives. 

We didn't have any children then. Our daughter, Michelle, was bom in 1959. 

Well, I haven't been in New York in several years now, but I don't really think there's 
much of a change. Well, 1 8 to 76, 1 guess there there would be changes in 58 years. 

We moved away from New York to a lovely house in Bushkill, Pennsylvania in the Poconos 
in 1 974. We picked the area because in those days they were doing so much advertising we were 



intrigued by it. We went looking around and we liked it there so we bought a little place and we 
moved there. Tom had a heart attack in 1 973. We wanted to get away from the city because it 
was getting to be too much of a strain. Michelle went to East Stroudsburg High School. We started 
working making those routed wood signs that you see around our trailer park in Fort Myers, 
Florida. We made a lot of other wooden items, including cut-out animals and I painted big signs, 
and we sold them. We did a lot of handy work. I started teaching arts and crafts at some of the 
campgrounds in Pennsylvania. 

In 1 977 a German friend of ours whom we met in Pennsylvania urged us to come south to 
Fort Myers, Florida to see if we would like it in the winter months. We bought a little trailer 
and we've been coming here ever since. We sold our house in the Poconos in 1 987 and we moved 
down here permanently two years later. 



Anti-Semitism was always around and I think it always will be because a lot of young 
people are still being raised today to have that feeling, to be against the Jews and other 
minorities. Maybe eventually it will be eradicated, but I don't think it will be that quick, 

personally. It's just my thought because I still hear people say, "Oh, that nigger," or "Oh, that 

Jew." You still hear it. Maybe they don't mean anything by it. Maybe they don't. Maybe it's a 
thoughtless way of talking. I wonder, but it's still very frightening and wrong, especially to 
someone who witnessed Nazi oppression first hand and it changed my entire life. 

Well, there's a lot Michelle may not aware of yet. She was thrilled when I told her about 
the interview I was having with Steven Spielberg's Shoah Holocaust oral history project. [It 
took place in my home on April 29, 1 996.] "Oh, Mommy, I'm so happy for you," she told me. 



Michelle and I took a nice, four-week trip to Vienna in 1971, when she was 12, and we 
saw my brother Fritz a couple of times but he never went into details about the war. He never 
told me anything really more than what he had written to me. As a matter of fact, Michelle and I 
went through the building on Hanovergasse and I showed her where I lived. It was still intact and 
in good shape. They rebuilt Vienna pretty much after World War II. I don't think Vienna got as 
badly damaged as some of the other countries. 

It was kind of funny. I enjoyed the trip but I was disappointed too, maybe because I've lived 
in this country so long — over 30 years in 1971. There's a big difference between the two 
places. Other than my brother and his wife, Poldi, and my cousin, Emma HOnig Preindl, ! really 
didn't know anybody in Vienna. I vaguely remembered a lot of the places we went to. It brought 
back memories from when I was a teenager. Since I've lived in America for so many years, I've 
become so used to the life here. Life was so different over there, and maybe that's what 
disappointed me. 

Michelle knows a lot about what happened to me. I don't believe in keeping secrets the way 
my parents did. 

Maybe, if I had known more what went on earlier, maybe things would have been different. 
I don't know. That's something we'll never know. 

Hitler greatly affected my life. If it wasn't for him I don't know if I would have ever gotten 
to this country, but I'm grateful for it because I love it here. I often think about my family, my 
relatives and my home in Vienna where I spent my early years. I'm not bitter about it, not 
anymore, because I don't think I would like it in Europe now. 

I sure hope people learn not to fall into a trap like we did because by the time we heard 
about Hitler coming in, there wasn't really a whole lot of time to do anything especially for 
people like us. My father, like I said, was no young man. He was 68 years old when I left and 
there was no way that he could have gone anywhere else. He didn't have that kind of money even 
though my Dad worked all his life. What would we have done? Where would we have gone with 
what little we had? We scrimped. Aunt Johanna had to send me a little bit of money towards the 
fare, and it was a whole lot cheaper then than it is now to come from Europe. I think my fare was 
about $150. 

I hope people would learn from the experience of what happened and that they would be 
more careful before they would get into something. In the movies and on television you 
sometimes see these young men with the swastikas and the shaved heads and I think it's terrible 
that they would still would really want to do something like this. Why? It doesn't make sense. 

87 



• 



My grandparents died before the war started. My Dad was 50 when I was born. I 
remember that my mother's mother died when I was a little girl and her father died in 
Czechoslovakia when I was just coming into my teens. 

Most of the members of my family — aunts, uncles and most of the cousins — are all 
gone now. All of them were good people. That's the way we were brought up, based on our history 
of persecution by others and a love for family, education and traditional values. Some of my 
relatives were killed during the Holocaust. Others died fighting for freedom in the war. A couple 
of my cousins moved to Australia, but I think they are gone. They were older than me. Some of 
the family moved to Czechoslovakia and I still have a couple of cousins living there. I don't know 
where, but most of them are gone. In New York, my Aunt Johanna lived to almost 95. Aunt 
Hermine Hoenig died just four days before her 85th birthday. Tante Adele died many years ago. 
My cousins — Joe, Adolph, Gus, Emma, Ida, Frieda and Gerda — and all but one of their 
spouses have left us. Now my generation is getting old and only Gerry Weiss and I are about the 
only ones left. It will be left to the next generation to carry on the Hoenig family traditions, as 
my cousin Joe's son, Leo, who was born in New York a year before I came here, is doing by 
writing this book and keeping the family links alive. 

I hope that by telling my story with these words I will send a clear message to future 
generations, including my young grandson, Matthew David Mohr, that we must learn about our 
history so we can understand the present and pass it on in order to deal with the future. 



Chapter 6 
Maps 



t 



• Czech Republic and Surrounding Nations 

• Falkenau f Sokolovl 

• Falkenau Region (Kirchenbirk. Schonlind. Lanz. ElboaenI 

• Karlsbad (Karlovy Varvl 

• Lundenburg [BreclayJ 



89 



MAP_OF_HE CZECH REPUB LIC AND SURROHMniM^ NAT10 NS 

Sl owing ancestral cities and Tnwg 




frtsenl 



90 



MAP OF FALKENAU \SCiKn\ OV] 



• 



MARKPiAtz 



SITE OF Old 



RUINS. OF 

JEWISH C6METE|?Y 




Mm 




a*, D 
y S(dli5« Vftdzna O 

J*- 



V 



4 







Nad koupaliitlstti '* 



Adapted from a map of Sokolov ©Vydala Agentura, 

Start Ostrov, Palackeho 768, Stav K 1.6.1994, 

Tisk Median a.s. Chebska 48, 360 06 Karlovy Vary, 

Czech Republic 



91 



MAP OF FAIKENAU [Snkrm nu| PFfi|rrr| 



FAIKEMU 



ELBOdBfi 




t 



KlRCpE/O&ifK &H0MUMP 



From a large old, undated map of the 

Falkenau and Graslitz region in German 

by Heinrich Stelzig of Aussig.found 

among the papers of my late father, 

Joseph Hoenig 



92 



» 



MAP OF KA RLSBAD fKARLQVY VARY] 



JEWISH CEMETERY 




t 



Adapted from a GeoCenter SHOCart City Map of Karlovy Vary 

©SHOCart Zlin 1995 (Nam. T.G. Masaryka 2433, 

760 01 Zlin, Czech Republic) 



93 



MAP OF LUNDENBURG fBRECLAVl 



TQipti ceuTEK 



Jewish CGMrreer 








Wroclaw ® / 

. Vabem^O ^ Ka,0 ^ iC8 
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Adapted from a 1 996/97 Breclav Information Map 

issued by the Breclav Tourist Information Offiice 

©1996, ARC Mikulov, Czech Republic 



94 



Chapter 7 
Cemeteries 

Bohemia 

Falkenau rSokolovl 

The Jewish cemetery in Falkenau, which dated from 1878, was destroyed by the Nazis 
during World War II. After the war, the remaining tombstones were removed during the 
communist regime and Dr. Julius Hoenig, who visited the cemetery in 1 988 found it empty and 
the walls covered with obscene graffiti. In October, 1 996 I visited the cemetery and found it 
totally overgrown with weeds and bushes and with no trace of any tombstones or graves. 

The Jewish cemetery (Zidovsky hrbitov, pronounced Zhidofsky Shpitoff), along with the 
Christian cemetery (Mestsky hrbitov) adjacent to the north, is located above the old Elbogener 
Strasse (now called K. H. Borovskeho). The cemeteries can be reached via an entrance from 
Homicka Street at smutecni sin to the south (and above the surrounding park's hill). 



Karlsbad fKarlovv Varvl 

Founded in 1 869, the Jewish cemetery contains more than one thousand — perhaps even 
several thousand — gravestones, all of which, I have been told, are completely indexed. This 
fairly well maintained cemetery is located in Krusnohorska Street, 250 meters northeast of the 
main mineral spring Vridlo, and 250 meters east of the Thermal Hotel. 

Not only are many Karlsbad Jews — including some who have died quite recently — 
buried here, but also there are the graves of visitors to the spa from many foreign countries and 
the father of Richard Feder, Bohemia and Moravia's Chief Rabbi. 

At the entrance is a monument to the Jews who died for the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 
World War I. Included among those listed on this monument are Leo Glaser (born in 1893), Leo 
Holzner (born in 1895), Leo Lobl (born in 1893), Heinrich Zentner (born in 1887), Paul 
Zentner (born in 1896), Walter Zentner (born in 1893), Arthur Binhak (born in 1899), 
Josef Fischer (born in 1890), Ernst Fischer (born in 1890), Emil Herrmann (born in 1886) 
and Karl Herrmann (born in 1877). 

A monument memorializing the Nazi victims and Jewish soldiers who perished in World 
War II stood on the site of the demolished synagogue from 1 956 to 1 983. 

The following gravestones of members of families appearing in this book were found by me 
in the cemetery: 

Family Binhak 

Erna Binhak, November 24, 1900-August 30, 1916, and 

Artur Binhak, September 15, 1899-killed at Monte Pelmlicaa on July 9, 1919 [may be 
incorrect, 1918?]. 

Family Budlovskv 

Gustav Budlovsky, June 16, 1 889-February 4, 1946, and 
Ruzenka (Rosa) Budlovska, February 2, 1891 -December 28, 1954. 

95 



Family Fischer 

Arthur Fischer, February 12, 1 867-December 3, 1911. 

Emil Fischer, June 5, 1854-June 11, 1929. 

Filipp Fischer, c. 1826-July 25, 1899 (in his 74th year). 

Dr. Heinrich Fischer, December 11, 1 864-June 25, 1934. 

Helene Fischer, born Collmann, December 26, 1871 -July 17, 1919. 

Jacob Fischer aus Lichtenstadt, died on October 3, 1 879. 

Family Glaser 
Amalie Glaser, born Hirsch, c. 1 843-November 7, 1930 (in her 88th year, mother). 
Josef Glaser, 1861-1932. 

Karl Glaser, December 17, 1875-September 20, 1918, and 
Sophie Kohn-Glaser, October 6, 1885-January 29, 1934. 
J.U.C. Leo Glaser, 1893-1916. 

Family Holzner 

Adolf Holzner, c. 1861 -May 29, 1913 (53rd year). 

Friedrich Holzner, 1872-1921. 

Hermann Holzner, 1833-1909, and 

Theresia Holzner, 1838-1923. 

Johanna Holzner, c. 1 897-October, 1848 (51st year), and, next to her, 

Ignaz Holzner, c. 1810-November 9, 1890 (80 years old.) (Each grave has a metal gate around 

it.) 
Frau Johanna Lauscher, born Holzner, c.1839-August 18, 1906 (68th year), and 
Israel Lauscher, c. 1 834-October 24, 1 896 (63rd year). 

Leo Holzner, Kadett Aspirant, March 3, 1895-fell on May 15, 1916 (bei viel gereuth). 
Simon Holzner, November 2, 1 838-September 28, 1905. 

Family L5bl 

Alina L6bl, aus Luditz, died January 7, 1897. 

Emil L6bl, c. 1817-January 15, 1891 (73 years old). 

Gustav Lobl, August 18, 1857-August 12, 1925. 

Gustav Lobl, c. 1861 -April 1, 1885 (25th year). 

Jsac Lobl, August 25, 1818 in Luk-July 22, 1881 in Karlsbad. 

Frau Karoline Lobl, March 12, 1848-August 22, 1924, and 

David Lobl, March 17, 1843-May 4, 1927. 

Ludwig Lobl, aus Podersam, c. 1866-May 10, 1900 (35th year). 

Moritz Lobl, April 9, 1844- June 16, 1912. 

Paula Spitzer, born Lobl, November 11, 1883-August 21, 1908. 

Rosa Lobl, c. 1821 -January 30, 1914 (94th year). 

Salomon Lobl, March 19, 1826-December 1, 1906, and 

Theresa Lobl, c. 1833-August 3, 1909 (77th year). 

Wilhelmine Lobl, c. 1854-September 9, 1898 (45th year). 

Family Miiller 

Albert Miiller, August 28, 1854-July 24, 1924, and 

Helene Miiller, born Honig, August 14, 1857-July 9, 1925. 

Carl Eugen Miiller, May 20, 1877-June 18, 1878. 

Salomon Miiller, born in Collin, December 25, 1838-August 21, 1902 in Karlsbad. 

Family Orenstein/Ornstein 

Behl Orenstein, 1838-December 1, 1911. 

Emil Omstein, zemrel April 24, 1935. 

Leo Ornstein, October 19, 1902-June 19, 1936. 



96 



% 



t 



Family Pick 

Rudolf Pick, February 6, 1896-April 30, 1978. [husband of Johanna Honig] 

Family Steinioer 

Emma Steiniger, 1893-1922. 

Sophie Zentner, born Steiniger, c.1858-November 3, 1935 (77th year). 



Family Stranskv 
Frau Josefine Stransky, born Fischl. 
Max Stransky, aus Graslitz, June 22, 1 867-November 13, 1919 (husband and father). 

Family Treuer 

Fanni Treuer, March 15, 1853-July 24, 1932. 

Family Zentner 
Arnost Zentner, 1910-1945. 

Berta Zentner, born Eisner, January 30, 1 878-November 27, 1906. 
David Zentner, c. 1831 -November 30, 1899 (69th year), and 
Anna Zentner, c. 1838-April 14, 1925 (88th year; children: Frantisek, Pavel, Johanna, 

Honova ). 

Emma Zentner, 1893-1922. 
Franz Zentner, 1900-1938. 

Sie starben in Auschwitz 
Flora Zentner, 1874-1944. 
Jrma Zentner, 1900-1944. 
Walter Zentner, 1926-1944. 
George Zentner, 1919-1944. 

Hugo Zentner, 1902-1942. 

Jrma Zentner, 1889-1927. 

Jrma Klementine Zentner, February 8, 1899-June 25, 1921. 

Frau Julie Zentner, aus ThOnischen, c. 1 825-February 9, 1912 (78th year). 

Julius Zentner, 1868-1925. 

Karel Zentner, 1905-1944? 

In memoriam: Leopold Zentner, 1871-1942. Da Zentnerova Roz. Hellerova, 1881-1942. 

Marie Zentner, born Klaber aus Zwiebau, c. 1 874-December 25, 1897 (24th year). 

Siegmund Zentner aus Fischern, c. 1861 -May 22, 1925 (in his 65th year). 

Dr. Jr. Siegmund Zentner, advocat in Karlsbad, November 27, 1862-March 5, 1908. 

Sophie Zentner, born Steiniger, c.1858-November 3, 1935 (77th year). 

William Zentner, pferdehandler (horsedealer), November 26, 1860-March 22, 1925, and 

Emma Zentnerova, Roz. Winterova, 1873-1945, and 

Wilhelm Heinrich Bergman, April 10, 1935-August 2, 1935. 



97 



Schonlind [Krasna Li pal 

The old Jewish cemetery in Schonlind (Krasna Lipa), contains 98 gravestones and two 
bases of gravestones, three of which have legible names in German. The others which have 
epitaphs are either completely in Hebrew or illegible due to age and the fact that no one has 
taken care of the site since way before World War II. The oldest tombstone dates to 1 724. 

Schonlind itself has but one new brown and white house, owned and occupied by Frantisek 
Vana and his wife, Jarmiia Vahova, both of whom maintain the adjacent waterworks which 
supplies fresh drinking water to the three nearby villages of Arnoldov, Kostelni Briza 
(Kirchenbirk) and Rovna. The cemetery is reached by climbing up a hill on a barely visible 
path immediately to the left of the bridge over the dam's reservoir and to the right of the Vana's 
home, then walking across a meadow at the top and then a short distance up the hill beyond the 
meadow. While the wire fence enclosing the cemetery has rusted away, most, if not all, of the 
cement posts to which the fence was attached still stand. To the right of the center entrance 36 
gravestones plus the base of another are located in nine rows, the second and fifth of which have 
no gravestones. There are 62 gravestones and one base to the left of the entrance, arranged in 1 2 
rows. This side of the cemetery goes further back than the right side. 

The old village of Schonlind was innundated when the dam was built. The foundations of an 
old Jewish quarter and an old synagogue now lie at the bottom of the dam. Even though this area 
was also used by the Czech and Russian armies for military exercises after World War II, the 
old Jewish cemetery has amazingly survived intact. 







■SCdOMCIND JEWISH ceMETEeY 




6* _ 

•P, 




• 



A-1: 

A-2: 

B: no gravestones. 

C-1: 

D-1: 

D-2: 

E-1: 

E-2: 

F: no gravestones. 

G-1: 

G-2: 

G-3: 

G-4: 

G-5: 

G-6: Martius [Markus??] Rosenbaum. 

G-7: 

G-8: 

H-1: 

H-2: 

H-3: 

H-4: 

H-5: 

H-6: 

H-7: 

H-8: 

H-9: 

1-1 : 

1-2: 

1-3: 

1-4: 

1-5: 

1-6: 

1-7: tombstone base only. 

1-8: 

1-9: 

1-10: 

1-1 1: 

1-12: 

1-13: 



Right Side 



Left Side 



A-1 

A-2 

B-1 

B-2 

B-3,4: two small graves, probably of infants. 

C-1 : leaning against fence post. 

C-2: 

D-1: 

D-2: 

D-3: 

D-4: 

E-1: 

E-2, 3: double stone. 



99 



Row A 
(to the left of the front pathway, begins in the eastern section of the cemetery) 

1 . no gravestone. 

2. no gravestone. 

3. no gravestone. 

4. no gravestone. 

5. no gravestone. 

6. no gravestone. 

7. no gravestone. 

8. huge monument, almost like a mausoleum. Ignaz Edler von Kuffner. Burgermeister of 

Ottakring [Vienna's 16th district]. Born April 22, 1822 in Lundenburg. Died March 23, 
1 882 in Ottakring. 



Row B 
(to the right of the front pathway, begins in the eastern section of the cemetery, opposite from 

Row A) 

1 . no gravestone. 

2. Josefine Meyer. 

3 . no gravestone. 

4. Familie Kohn: Marie Kohn, October 23, 1841-December 23, 1908, and 

Adolf Kohn, April 3, 1845-October 30, 1912. (huge black polished marble stone) 

5. no gravestone. 

6. Bernhard Goldschmid, August 19, 1857- September 30, 1909, and 

Johanna Goldschmid, September 23, 1 824-November 26, 1915. (huge monument) 

7. Familie Emanuel Hollander: Emanuel Hollander, October 15, 1825-September 10, 1901, 
and 

Frau Katharina Hollander, born Kiinstler, October 5, 1831-May 6, 1905. (huge 
monument) 

8. Familie David Stein: David Stein, November 24, 1822-July 4, 1899, 
Betty Stein, born Weinberger, June 18, 1830-October 18, 1902, and 
Dr. Julius Stein, M.D. in Briinn, February 3, 1863-July 3, 1910. 

9: Hebrew. 
1 0: Hebrew. 

RowC 

(to the right of the front path, running from west to east, right next to the path at the 

beginning, but later it is behind row B and across the path from row A) 

Frau Esther Weinberger, born Morganstern, c. 1798-May 18, 1861 (64th year). 

David Weinberger, February 14, 1799-August 4, 1864. 

Lazarus Cileris or Crdens (illegible) Gold Medal winner, c. 1833-May 18, 1872 (42nd 

year). 
Hebrew. 

Lazar Flamm, September, 1 800-September 6, 1879. 
Hermann Weinberger. 

Alexander Mai, December 29, 1811 -November 20, 1851. 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone. 



1. 
2. 
3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 

10 

11 

12 

13. no gravestone. 

14. no gravestone. 
1 5. no gravestone. 

16. Hermann Schwiller. 

17. no gravestone. 

18. no gravestone. 



102 



19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 
49. 
50. 
51. 
52. 
53. 
54. 
55. 
56. 
57. 
58. 
59. 
60. 
61. 



no gravestone. 
Hebrew: Simon, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone. 

Simon Marchfeld, c. 1 849-September 11, 1921 (73rd year), 
no gravestone. 
Hebrew, 
no gravestone, 
no name on gravestone, 
no gravestone. 

Israel Altbach, c. 1796-June 27, 1857 (62nd year). 
Jakob Neubach. 

hands only (indicating a Kohanim), illegible wording, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone. 

Rebecca Lustig, born Neubach, c. 1779-April 27, 1855 (77th year), 
tomstone base only. 
Hebrew. 

Frau Sophie Weinwurm. 
Babette Schwag, died May 13,1 896. 

Frau Maria Mallowan, born Weisz, died June 4, 5444 (1684). 
Frau Katharina Donat c. 1 799-December 27, 1885 (87th year), 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone. 
Hebrew. 

Theresia Halez, born Weiss, c. 1839-May 1, 1889 (51st year). 
Katti Bauer, born Greenbaum, c. 1 820-January 6, 1 898 (79th year). 
Rosalie Grunbaum, c. 1721 -March 9, 1804 (83rd year), 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone. 

Hebrew, tombstone base only, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone. 
Hebrew. 

Karl Neubach (hands indicating he was a Kohanim) 
no gravestone. 
Julius Hahn, locomotive fiihrer, c. 1859-April 17, 1911 (53rd year). 

Row D 



(One gravestone, directly behind Row C, to the right of the front path near the cemetery 

entrance) 
1 . Hebrew. 



Row E 

1 . Large monument with no incription. 

2. Large sarcophogi with no inscription. 

3. Alexander Weinberger. 

4. Hebrew. 

5. Frau Susanna May, born Fischer, November 24, 1790-May 30, 1853. 



103 



Friedrich May, May 12, 1 782-Verscheid July 27, 1827. 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone. 
Hebrew. 

no gravestone. 

no gravestone. 

no gravestone. 



6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 

10 

11 

12 

13. Regina Schwitzer, 30 Elul 5615 (September 1815)-4 Jaslew 5625 (November 1824). 

14. no gravestone. 
1 5. no gravestone. 
16. Jacob Stern. 

1 7. Sali Stern. 

18. no gravestone. 

19. Max Stern, October 3, 1821 -December 24, 1886. 

20. no gravestone. 

2 1 . no gravestone. 

22. no gravestone. 

23. Hebrew. 

24. no gravestone. 

25. Hebrew. 

26. no gravestone. 

27. no gravestone. 

28. no gravestone. 

29. no gravestone. 

30. no gravestone. 

3 1 . no gravestone. 

32. no gravestone. 
David Grunbaum. 
no gravestone. 

Frau Emma Goldreich, born Haas, c. 1 859-September 7, 1900 (52nd year). 
Frau Mina Haas, born Brum, c. 1824-July 16, 1878 (55th year). 
Hebrew (illegible). 

Frau Rachel Brum, born Gluck, c. 1 787-April 1 , 1 856 (70th year). 
Frau Marie Haas, born Brum, c. 1778-March 9, 1841 (64th year). 
Frau Peppi Frank, c. 1818-December 17, 1877 (60th year). 
Josef Frenk, c. 1812-October 30, 1889 (78th year). 
Fani Greenbaum. 

43. no gravestone. 

44. tombstone base only. 
Hebrew. 
Hebrew. 
Hebrew, 
no gravestone. 

Illegible Hebrew. 

50. no gravestone. 

5 1 . no gravestone. 

52. no gravestone. 

53. no gravestone. 

54. Friedrich Weiss, Pinchas ben hay, ,dov, raish, shemesh, lamed, ,aleph, yud, mem, 

chay, yud, yud, hay. 

55. no gravestone. 

56. no gravestone. 

57. tombstone base only - no name. 

58. Samuel (tombstone leans against its base and is partly obscured) 

59. no gravestone. 



33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 



45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 
49. 



104 



60. Frau Fani Laufer, born Lach. 

6 1 . tombstone base only. 

62. no gravestone. 

63. Leopold Marchfeld, died September 

64. no gravestone. 

65. Katharina Fleischer. 

66. tombstone base only. 

67. no gravestone. 

68. no gravestone. 

69. no gravestone. 

70. Hebrew. 



1890. 



t 



RowF 
(Lies between Row D and Row G, starting behind Grave D-24 and continuing toward the east 

end) 

1. Moritz Reich, 1792-1856. 

2. tombstone base only. 

3. Eva Grunbaum, c. 1801-1851 (51st year, mother of Katti Morgenstern). 

4. no gravestone. 

5. no gravestone. 

6. no gravestone. 

7. no gravestone. 

8. no gravestone. 

9. Moriz Frankl, September 15, 1846-May 26, 1907. 

10. no gravestone. 

1 1 . no gravestone. 

1 2. Abraham Frohlich, died October 1 9, 1 8 (79 years old). 

13. no gravestone. 

14. no gravestone. 

15. no gravestone. 

16. no gravestone. 

17. no gravestone. 

18. Jakob Schuck, August 16, 1790-January 16, 1854. 

RowG 

1 . no gravestone. 

2 . Hebrew. 

3 . no gravestone. 

4. no gravestone. 

5. no gravestone. 

6. no gravestone. 

7. Wolf Gluck, died November , 1879. 

8. no gravestone. 

9. no gravestone. 

10. no gravestone. 

1 1 . Babette Weinberger, born Bittner. 

12. Simon Schwitzer, 12 Elul 5542 (September, 1781)-9 Ab 5616 (August, 1856). 

13. Frau Mina Schwitzer, born Weinberger, 16 Nissan 5557 (April, 1797)-26 Adar 5616 

(March, 1856). 

14. Maria Hoffmann, born Bittner, August, 1785-April 8, 1835. 

15. no gravestone. 

16. Illegible Hebrew. 

17. no gravestone. 

18. Katharina Bittner, June 12, 1 787-November 25, 1875. 

1 9. Rosalia Rosenbaum, born Kuffner, died September 9, 1 



105 



20. no gravestone. 

2 1 . no epitaph on tombstone. 

22. no gravestone. 

23. no gravestone. 

24. Siegfried Strauss. 

25. Hebrew. 

26. Hebrew. 

27. no gravestone. 

28. Simon Grunbaum, c. 1 803-July 3, 1 877 (75th year; son, Joseph). 

29. no gravestone. 

30. no gravestone. 

31. no gravestone. . 

32. Hermann Spiegler, c. 1819-January 9, 1894 (76th year; husband, father). 

33. tombstone base only. 

34. no gravestone. 

35. no gravestone. 

36. Heinrich Weiss, c. 1829-May 2, 1847 (18 years old). 

37. Carl (the rest is buried into the ground). 

38. no gravestone. 

39. no gravestone. 

40. Frau Rosalie Kaupe, born Stein. 

4 1 . no gravestone. 

42. no gravestone. 

43. no gravestone. 

44. Catharine Grunbaum. 

45. (between D-44 and E-44) Katharina Grunbaum. 

46. no gravestone. 

47. Illegible. 

48. Hebrew. 

49. Hebrew. 

50. no gravestone. 

51. Hebrew. 

52. no gravestone. 

53. Hebrew. 

54. Markus Neubach, philosophy student, died February 26, 1904. 

55. no gravestone. 

56. Sofie Neubach, June 21, 1881 -June 5, 1901. 

57. Simon Neumann. 

58. tombstone base only. 

59. Illegible. 

Row H 

1. Johanna Kuffner, 5555 (1794-95)-26 Nissan 5609 (April, 1849). 

2. no gravestone. 

3. no gravestone. 

4. no gravestone. 

5. no gravestone. 

6. Simon Kunstler, c. 1 81 7-October 11 , 1899 (83rd year). 

7. no gravestone. 

8. Fei.. .stein. 

9. child's gravestone. 

10. Hebrew. 

1 1 . no gravestone. 

12. no gravestone. 

106 







t 



13. Illegible. 

14. no gravestone. 
1 5. no gravestone. 

16. Israel Bittner. 

17. Max Bittner, son of Sallomon Bittner, May 6, 1836-April 11, 1860. 

1 8. Abraham Bittner. 

19. Hermann Bittner, April 10, 1835-October 25, 1862. 

20. Lotti Bittner. 

21. no gravestone. 

22. no gravestone. 

23. no gravestone. 

24. no gravestone. 

25. no gravestone. 

26. no gravestone. 

27. no gravestone. 

28. no gravestone. 

29. no gravestone. 

30. Illegible. 

31 . Nora Reiner, died June 6, 1 895. 

32. no gravestone. 

33. no gravestone. 

34. no gravestone. 

35. no gravestone. 

36. no gravestone. 

37. no gravestone. 

38. no gravestone. 

39. Simon Brum, c. 1784-June 27, 1837 (53 years old; sons Leopold and Jacob Brum). 

40. no gravestone. 

41. no gravestone. 

42. no gravestone. 

43. no gravestone. 

44. Hebrew. 

45. no gravestone. 

46. no gravestone. 

47. no gravestone. 

48. Katharina Haas, born Fischer, January 22, 1851 -March 29, 1875. 

49. Dr. Wilhelm Haas, March 3, 1 848-January 8, 1883. 

50. no gravestone. 

5 1 . no gravestone. 

52. no gravestone. 

53. Hebrew. 

54. no gravestone. 

55. Hebrew. 

56. Hebrew. 

57. Hebrew. 

58. no gravestone. 

59. no gravestone. 

60. Adolf Malzner, December 27, 1828-July 25, 1 

61. Frau Marina Malzner, born Eckstein. 

62. Hebrew. 

63. no gravestone. 

64. no gravestone. 

65. Illegible. 

66. Jacob Grosser. 

67. Hebrew. 

107 



68. no gravestone. 

69. tombstone base only; written in German; no name. 

70. no gravestone. 

71. Frau Katti Steiner. 

72. tombstone base only; written in German; c. 1803-October 16, 1859 (57th year). 

73. Fraulein Regina Sternberg. 

74. Adolf Weinberger, c. 1817-June 22, 1897 (81st year). 

75. Jacob Spigel. 

76. no gravestone. 

77. Fanni Borg, c. 1821 -August 18, 1902 (84th year). 

78. Hebrew. 

Row I 

1. Mary Weinberger, born Fischer, c. 1778-May 30, 1855 (78th year). 

2. no gravestone. 

3. no gravestone. 

4. no gravestone. 

5. no gravestone. 

6. Hebrew. 

7. no gravestone. 

8. Hebrew. Tiny gravestone. 

9. Hebrew. 

10. no gravestone. 

1 1 . Illegible Hebrew. Tombstone is on the ground. 

12. Regina Hoffmann, May 15, 1 854-September 23, 1856. 

13. Alfred 

1 4. Moritz Rosenbaum, son of Isaac Rosenbaum, died April 1 8, 1 828. 

15. (in front of 1-14) Hebrew, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone, 
no gravestone. 



* 



16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 

2 1 . no gravestone. 

22. no gravestone. 

23. no gravestone. 

24. Maria Reich. 

25. Jakob Sigmann, December 4, 1 822-December 1 5, 1. 

26. no gravestone. 

27. Hebrew. Yosef Grunbaum. 

28. Hebrew. 

29. Cilli Glick, November 20, 1801 -August 28, 1808. 

30. no gravestone. 

3 1 . Hebrew. 

32. no gravestone. 

33. no gravestone. 

34. no gravestone. 

35. Josue Weisner. 

36. no gravestone. 

37. no gravestone. 

38. Hebrew. 

39. no gravestone. 

40. Illegible. 

4 1 . tombstone is on the ground. 

42. no gravestone. 



1857-September 12, 1859. 



t 



43. Hani Hoffmann, born Donat, c. 1 747-September 1 5, 1805 (49th year) 

44. Solomon Winter, c. 1791 -January 14, 1858 (68th year) 

45. Bernhard Haas, 1759-February 10, 1834. 

46. no gravestone. 

47. no gravestone. 

48. no gravestone. 

49. no gravestone. 

50. broken gravestone. 

5 1 . Hebrew. 

52. Hendel Haas, c. 1772 -February 8, 1839 (68th year) 

53. Illegible. 

54. Illegible. 

55. no gravestone. 

Row J 
(to the left of the rear west-east path which separates the gravestones from the new park) 

1. Hermine Bittner, December 14, 1849-April 15, 1855. 

2. no gravestone. 

3. Theodore Bittner, February 

4. no gravestone. 

5. no gravestone. 

6. no gravestone. 

7. no gravestone. 

8. no gravestone. 

9. no gravestone. 

1 0. tombstone is on the ground. 

1 1 . tombstone base only. 

12. no gravestone. 

13. tombstone base only. 

1 4. tombstone base only. 
1 5 . tombstone base only. 

16. no gravestone. 

1 7. Moritz (rest of gravestone is unreadable). 

1 8. no gravestone. 

19. no gravestone. 

20. large tombstone in Hebrew. 

2 1 . Moses Goldreich. 

22. no inscription on tombstone. 

23. tombstone base only. 

24. Julius Fuchs, aus Sirany. 

25. Hebrew. 

26. Hebrew. 

27. no gravestone. 

28. Hermine Braun, born Fischer, c. 1853-October 22, 1893 (41st year). 

29. Katharina Winter, born Steiner, 1808-June 9, 1876. 

30. no gravestone. 

31. Wilhelm Haas, died May 3, 18.. .8. 

32. no gravestone. 

33. Ester bas yud, hay vuv, lamed, aleph, lamed Haas 

34. no gravestone. 

35. no gravestone. 

36. Gustav Rosenbaum, January 30, 1854-March 2, 1891. 

37. no gravestone. 

38. Josef Gluck, c. 1812-December 6, 1887 (76th year). 

39. Hebrew. Illegible. 



108 



109 



40. Hebrew. Illegible. 

41. Hebrew. 

42. Hebrew. Half of the tombstone is on the ground. 

43. Hebrew. 

44. no name is on the tombstone. 

45. Illegible. 

46. Illegible. 

47. no gravestone. 

48. tombstone (a tower) has no name on it. 

49. no gravestone. 
50 no gravestone. 

5 1 . Hebrew. 

52. broken tombstone. 

53. Fanni Weiss, c. 1 808-December 2 (?), 1892 (84 years old). 

54. Hebrew. 

55. no gravestone. 

56. Edith Gross, March 12, 1885-July 21, 1890. 

57. tombstone base only. 

58. Hebrew. 

59. Hebrew. 

60. Salomon Wachs. 

61 . Katharina Preis, died December 2, 1880. 

62. Hebrew on the back, illegible on the front. 

63. Ignaz Lov, from Probsor. Tombstone is on the ground. 

64. Hebrew. 

tl. liable Hebrew and German. Mulious July 12, 1834-February 3, 1855. 

67. Hebrew. 

Row K 

(located in the far eastern part of the cemetery, along the north-south wall from a point to the 

east of Grave A-8 to the area in front of the ceremonial hall) 

2 Eduard Jeiiinek, from Altenmark, c. 1852-March 14, 1914 (63rd year). 

3 Frau Cilli Engel c. 1 850-November 3, 1907 (58th year). 

A Frau Marie Weiskopf, born Rosenberger, c. 1847-January 5, 1906 (60th year). 

5' Johanna Lustig, born (dates of birth and death are .(legible). 

6. Michael Winter, c. 1836-August 30, 1907 (58th year). 
7 Jacob Schmitz. . , _. x 

8 ' Joseph Weiss, June 10, 1864-May 5, 1927 (71st year; husband, father). 
' Leopold Lechner, c. 1 849-September 17, 1909 (61st year). 

Moritz Straussler, August 30, 1 868-September 20, 1926. 

Frau Theresa Winter c. 1835-February 2, 1910 (75th year; mother, grandmother). 

Elsa Reich, c. 1884-July 26, 1906 (23rd year). 

Elfrieda Herschan, c. 1900-October 11, 1918 (19th year). 

Hebrew on tombstone base and tower. 



J 



Pictures 



These pictures of Falkenau, Kirchenbirk, Mies, Karlsbad and Teplitz-Schonau and of 

some of the people mentioned in this book are representative of the thousands in the 

photo and picture card collections of Joseph Hoenig, Frieda Hoenig Rupp, Karl 

Budlovsky and Leo Hoenig. 



Photographs of the leaders of the Jewish communities in Falkenau and Mies were 

taken from Die Juden und Judengemeinden Bdhmens in Vergangenheit und Gegenwart 

[The Jews and the Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the Past and Present], 1934, 

Judischer Buch und Kunstverlag, Brunn - Prague. 



The pages in this Pictures section are unnumbered as more may be added as time goes 
by. These photographs and the names of those identified in them do not appear in the 

indexes. 



9. 

10. 
11. 
12 
13. 
14. 



"Row L" 



(Tombstones located along the west wall of the cemetery, in front of and to the right of the 
entrance gate, from the front to the back of the cemetery) 



1 Haas. 

2. a piece of a gravestone. 



• 



110 



The Honig Houses 



* 




Kirchenbirk (taken in October, 1 996). The home of Israel Honig and his 
family. 



ft 



• 




Mauerteich Strasse 4, Falkenau, around 1 900. Left to right: Dr. Leo Honig, Theodor 

(Israel) Honig, Frieda Honig, Anna Honig, Rosa Honig. Mauerteich means the wall 

around the pond. This house no longer exists. 



i 




Fatkenau 



1 



• 









Leopold Hbnig and his father, Bernhard Honig 




t 



Falkenau Burger School. 1929 - Reunion of the Class of 1914 . Bottom row, 
from the left: first person: Horayshee (a student who became a teacher); 
third person: Herr Kiesewetter (teacher); fifth person: Carl Loh (Principal. 
Second row - from the left: first person: Leo Hopf; third person: Schlosser; 
seventh person: Joseph Hoenig. 




The Family of Leopold and Hermine (born Adler) Honig (1917): Bottom (left 

to right): Hermine, Adolph, Gus (in front), Leopold. Back row: Joseph, 
Emma, Ida, Frieda. Gerda Ann, an infant, was not included. Gretl was deceased. 



t 




^ 



Rudolf and Frieda Hoenig Rupp's wedding portrait (November 4, 1933). 




The Wedding of Gustav Hoenig and Lillian Charlotte Goldstein , October 26, 
1946, Long Island City-Queens, New York. Rear (left to right): Orville 
"Win" Whitehouse, Joseph Hoenig. Combined middle rows (left to right): 
Adeline Brick Hoenig, Ida Hoenig Farber, John David Hoenig being held by 
Henry Farber, Frieda Hoenig Rupp, Adolph Hoenig behind Johanna Hoenig, 
Lillian Charlotte Goldstein Hoenig, Gustav Hoenig, Gerda Ann Whitehouse, Billa 
Hirsch Hoenig, Emma Honig Preindl. Middle center: Leo Hoenig (in front of 
Johanna Hoenig), Hermine Adler Hoenig. Front center (left to right): Elsie 
Ann Hoenig, William "Billy" Whitehouse and Florann Whitehouse. 
Not shown: Rudolf Rupp. Photo by Alfonso Preindl. 



* 



t 




Doris and Leo Hoenig at their March 31, 1968 wedding in Regency House, Jamaica, NY. 



^ 




Top: Joseph and Bella Hirsch Hoenig proudly keep an eye on baby 
granddaughter Gail Sharon Hoenig in the gardens of their co-operative housing 
development in the summer of 1 972. 

Bottom: Helene Michelle Hoenig, age 2-1/2 (left), and Gail Sharon Hoenig, 
age 5, entertain their great aunt, Emma Honig Preindl, in 1977. 



9 




Leaders of the Falkenau Jewish Community 




Alfred I'isch 




lib. Dr. S. Feuerstein 




FALKENAU a. d. Eger. BabnhofstraSe. Hotel Christl und Bahnhof. 




Adolf Herrmann's store in Falkenau 




Josef Honig, son of Leopold Honig is at the bottom right at this 1912 Purim 
party in Falkenau's synagogue. 



• 




Two of the 98 tombstones 
in the ancient Schbnlind 
Jewish cemetery. 






Top left (left to right): Theodor 

(Israel), Anna, Leopold (in Anna's 

lap) and Oskar (Abraham) Honig. 

Kirchenbirk (1891). 

Top right: Werner Lowy (1996) in 

Prague's Old Synagogue. 

Bottom left: Else Steiniger in 

Falkenau. 

Bottom right: Adele Honig Waxman. 




• 




Top (seated, left to right): Steffi Glaser, Hilda Turchin Hill, Paul Glaser Hill, Dr. 
Joseph Budlovsky and Susan Budlovsky. 

Bottom (left to right): Dr. Joseph Budlovsky, Karl Budlovsky, Fred "Fritz" Glaser, 
Steffi Glaser and Susan Budlovsky. 



% 



• 





Top (left to right): Karl Budlovsky, Gretl Fischer Hoenig, Leo Hoenig, Liesl Behal in 
Hamilton, Ontario (August 29, 1992). 

Bottom (left to right): Holly Ann Hoenig Gallo, Christopher Gallo, Gail Hoenig and 
Leo Hoenig at Holly and Chris' wedding (Cinnaminson, NJ-September 21, 1996). 



% 




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i • 1 















Karlsbad Jewish Cemetery (1996): Gravestone of Gustav and Rosa (born 
Honig) Budlovsky (top) and the memorial to those Jews who were killed 
during World War I. Photos by Leo Hoenig. 




Mina and Alfred Sagl at his 90th 
birthday party in Santa Monica, 
California, 1980. 



m 




Wedding portrait of Aaron and Ann Darrish Kohner in St. Louis, MO on 
October 3, 1926. 




Top: Alma Zepin's high school 
graduation portrait, about 1 924. 

Bottom: The sons of Julius and 
Bertha Klein Abramson in their 
World War I army uniforms. 
Herbert and Sidney Abramson (left 
photo) and Alvin Abramson (right). 





• 



t 



• 




The Family of Morris Frederick and Lillie Mae (born Buffaloe) Hoenig in 

Dallas, Texas before 1926. Seated (left to right): Bertha "Honey," Morns 

Frederick. Lillie Mae. Standing (left to right): George and Gordon. 



m^r ! % 







The Texas Hoenigs: Top left (circa 1 900): Lillie Mae and Morris Hoenig. Top right 
(circa 1940): Lillie Mae and Morris Hoenig. Bottom left (1934): Little Mae, 
Bertha ("Honey") and Morris Hoenig. Bottom right (1934): Eugene Worden and 
Morris Hoenig. 





# 



Texas Hoeniq Descendants : Top (1956): 
Eugene Thomas Worden. Center: Left 
(1995, left to right): Mary Veasey 
Osborne, Eugene Wray Worden, Crystal 
Lynn Hayes, Mary Veazey Worden. Right 
(1995): Eugene Ward Hayes, Elizabeth 
Lynn Hayes Knorpp and Marshall Tobey 
Hayes. Bottom: Left: Clifford Rollie 
Osborne II (left) and William Eugene 
Osborne. Right: Julia Marie Worden Jones, 
Kimbra Lynn Worden Cicle and Denise 
Wray Worden Allegri. 







L eaders of ths Mios igwish Community 



# 




Rb. Jakob Klemperer Kb. Bernhard Closer Jakob *~ aschauer 





Dr. Gabriel Scherzer 





Markus Poppi 



# 



TeplHs-6dianau — Bismnnttslrasse 



9 




LUNoei-iaiiKCi, a/iRHHotiBR'Xiir- 



/ 





Two Adler Sisters: Theresia Adler 
Fischer (standing), born in 1852, 
and Anna Adler Heller, born in 
1854. 



Helene Heller, standing behind her 
niece, Rosa Hahn (left), and her 
mother, Anna Adler Heller. 



t~ 




Chapter 8 
Family Tree Charts 



The Hongfl Family of Kuttenplan. Bohemia 

[There is no evidence they are related to the following Honig family] 

The Descendants of Israel Honig of Kirchenbirk. Bohemia 

[including the family of Bernard Honig in Falkenau, Bohemia; Lundenburg, Moravia; Vienna, Austria; 
Temesvar, Romania [Austria-Hungary], and the United States; Simon Honig, who probably migrated to 
Hungary; the Blaustern Family of Tachau, Bohemia and Vienna, Austria; the family of Josef 
Hbnig of Kirchenbirk, Bohemia.and the family of Sophia Honig Klein of St. Louis, Missouri U.S.A.] 

The Descendants of Jacob Beer of Purles and Theusing. 
Bohemia 

[including the family of Salomon and Rosa Beer Loewy and Ignaz and Lydia (Beer) Holzner of Theusing, 
Bohemia] 

The Descendants of the Low or Levi Family in Falkenau. 
Mies. Eger and Alt Rohlau. Bohemia 

[including the family of Josef and Sophie (L6v/Levi) Adier of Mies, Bohemia; the family of Jacob and 
Rosa (Ldv/Levi )Spiegl of Eger, Bohemia; Mr. and Mrs. (LOv/Levi Steiniger) of Falkenau.Bohemia; the 
Heller family of Mies, Bohemia, and the Fischer and Kreissl families of Alt Rohlau [Karlsbad], 
Bohemia] 



B. = birth 



KEY TO SYMBOLS USED IN CHARTS 

D. = death 



oo = marriage 



111 



I 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KUTTENPLAN, BOHEMIA - 1A 



LOBEL (LHB/LOEW) 
HONIG 



D.after 1745 



D.after 1745 



ISRAEL -KATHARINA 
Yisroel WEHL1 
"Pinkas von 
Kuttenplan " 

HONIG 



B. 10/20/1724 B. 17 



Kuttenplan 
D.l/19/1808 
Vienna 



AARON MOSES-.. 
Ahron Moshe 

ben Leib 

[Beer??] 
HONIG 



ADAM ALBERT 

Avraham 
ben Leib 

HONIG 



Wolin 
D. 
Vienna 



B.1730 
Kuttenplan 

D.1787 



B.17 



B.1745 

Kuttenplan 
D.1811 



-MARIANNE 
HONIG 



bas Leib 
FRANKL 



B.17 
Kuttenplan 

D.6/8/1791 



They took on the name 
HONIG VON HONIGSBERG 



They had ten children, six of 
whom were ennobled as 
VON HON1GSHOFEN in 1791. 
One daughter, Anna, marrie d 
Joachim Honig (see below).'' 



He was baptized 
in 1781andtook 
the name 
VON HONIGSTEIN 
in 1784. 



-EL 



Occ.Poet 



, SOLIMAN VON HONIGSBERG I 

I (1804-1864) ' 

was Secretary of the , 

i Prague Jewish Community. ; 



HENOCH -KAROLINA 



D.4/15/1815 
Prague 



MAXIMTLLIAN-KAROL1NA 



D.1832 



AHRON-ERNESTINE 
BARUCH 



JOACHIM-ANNA 
HONIG 



B.17 

Prague 
D. 



D 



B.17 

KSnigswart 
D. 



l.Franziska "Fanny" m.Max 
a fanner (became Catholics) 
-2Rosette (unmarried) 
■3. Nanette (unmarried) 
4Theresia (died in childhood) 



■1 Benedickt 
■2Josef 
■ 3Clarisse 
4Charlotte 



1. Josef, borne. 1785 
2Regina, bom c. 1787 
3Theresia, bom c. 1788 



LEOPOLD-KAROLINA 
(Loew) 

HONIG 



B.17 
D. 



LUDWIG -FR4NZISKA | 

DOBRUSt 
HONIG 



DR. ADAM 
I (M.D.) 
' HONIG 



| KARL-MARIANNE 
LEIDERSDORF 
HONIG 



JOACHIM - ANNA 

HONIG 

LEIDERSDORF I 



B.C. 1763 B.17 
D. D. 



1.17 B.17 B.17 

Brunn 
D.2/16/1790 D.6/8/1791 D.1831-32 D. 



1. daughter.married Mr.Busch 
la.They had a son, Isidore Busch 
(Bush) 



1 Marianne L.m.Karl Inzor Honig v t 
■2.Moses I^eidersdorf 
■3Karl Simson Leidersdorf 
-4.Rosalie L. m. Ludwig Gotzel 

from Konigswart 
- 5 Barbara Bluemele m. Ignaz 



Connection —if anv — to the following Hftniq charts is not known. 

fNQTE : None of the Honigs on the following pages ever claimed the hereditary title of nobility.] 

112 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHFMIA - 1A 







HONIG 



(Lived in Tachau. Bohemia) I 



IGNAZ 



ANNA 

Channa bas 

Yisroel 

HONIG 

BLAUSTERN 



B.1818-19 

Tachau 
D.8/30/1879 

Vienna 
Occ. owned a 
mirror factory 
in Tachau. Retired 
and moved to 
Vienna where 
he died of apo- 
plexy. 



B.I 822-23 
Kirchenbirk 

D.9/29/1905 
Vienna 



To Page 1 1 6 



















B 


B 




D 


D 







ISRAEL - 

Yisroel ben 



HONIG 



B 

Kirchenbirk? 
D.before 1 886 

Kirchenbirk 



D.I 8 

Kirchenbirk 



BERNHARD 
Sere/ ben 
Yisroel 



MINA 
NEUBERGER 

B.I 8 

Banat, Hungary 
D.1 873-74 
Vienna 



ANNA 
Channa bas 



NEUBERGER 



HONIG 



To 

_Page 
114 



B. July, 1830 
Kirchenbirk or 

Altsattl (near 

Elbogen) 

D 1916 

Falkenau or 
Lundenburg 

Occ.Teacher 
of Foreign 
Languages. 
(He spoke 

eight 
languages.) 



B.I 8 

Banat, Hungary 
D.before 1 899 



(Minna and Anna Neuberger 
were cousins.) 



To Page 1 30 



113 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - IB 



• 



From 

Page_ 

113 



To 
_Page 

115 



SIMON 
Shimon ben 

Yisroel 
HONIG 



B.18 

Kirchenbirk 
D. 



A 



It's thought he went to Hungary, and was not heard from any more. However, in 1993 I found a book, 
New Homes in a New Land: German Immigration to Texas 1847-1861, in the Mormons' Family History 
Library in Las Vegas, Nevada. It indicated he may have come from Bremerhaven, Germany to Galveston, 
Texas, U.S. on the ship Johann Eduard Grosse on December 18, 1853, with his sister Sophia. 

After more than three years of searching, I was informed on November 22, 1 997 by the Texas State 
Library and Archives Commission in Austin, Texas, that the Honigs — not Honigs — who traveled on 
that ship were definitely not members of our family. 

According to the books, Llano - Gem of the Hill Country, A History of Llano County, Texas, by Wilbur 
Oatman (1869-1967) and edited posthumously by his children, and Llano County Family Album-A 
History, sponsored by the Llano County Historical Society, Inc. and edited by Martha Gilliland Long and 
Marilyn Hale, Simon Honig was one of the early settlers of the Castell, Texas area. 

The Texas Simon Honig was born on December 2, 1818 in Westphalia, Germany. "He was a large man and 
a perfect physical specimen and served in the honor guard of the Kaiser," according to Mr. Oatman's 
book. "In the middle 1840's (1846), he came to the future Llanos County and was a founder of Castell. 
When the first church and parsonage were built on the south side of ther Llanos River, Simon was 
foreman of building the split log structures. His given name, Simon, and grandmother's name, Christine, 
reflect their deep Christian heritage." His picture shows him as having a full head of white hair, a 
mustache and a beard. 

Sophie, not Sophia, was Simon Honig's first wife. They had a daughter, also named Sophie, who married 
John Schlaudt, a blacksmith and mechanic in Fredericksburg, Texas, and they reared 1 1 children. 

After the death of Simon's first wife, Sophie, he went to New Braunfels, Texas and met Sophie Dorthea 
Christine Bushgien, who was born on August 26, 1838 in Ladebau, Germany, the daughter of John 
Bushgien, attorney general of the German state of Pomerania, and Anna Louise Brehmer of the Brehmer 
Ship Building Company of Bremerhaven, Germany. Sophie Dorthea Christine Bushgien had run away from 
her parents' strict discipline, fleeing from Ladabov, Pomerania, in 1856 "in bondage" on a three-month 
voyage from Hamburg to Indianola, Texas. 

Simon Honig and Sophie Dorthea Christine Bushgien were married in New Braunfels in 1860. Thus 
Simon's both wives were named Sophie, as was his daughter with his first wife. Simon and his second 
wife had three sons — William, Adolph and Herman (Adolph and Herman never married) -- and four 
daughters — Emma, Bertha [not Bertha], Amelia and Lena. 

Inasmuch as our Simon and Sophia Honig were born in Bohemia (Austria-Hu ngary), not in 
Germany; since thev were Jewish, not Christian, and since thev were probably 1 5-20 years 
younoer. the Llano Coun ty , Texas Simon and Sophie Honig are no t related to the Kirchenbirk 
Honigs. 



114 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK RQHEMIA - ^C. 




B.18 

Kirchenbirk 

D 1900 

Falkenau 



B.18. 



To Page 153 



ARANTB. - SOPHIA 



bas 



Yisroel 
HONIG 



KLEIN 



B. 1832 


B. 1837 




Poland 


Kirchenbirk 


D.6/6/1893 


D. 1885 


St.Louis,M0 


St.Louis.MO 


»2/3/1859 




St.Louis, MO 




To Page 173 





£ 



115 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 7A 
THE CHILDREN OF IGNA7 AND ANNA (H O NIG) BLAUSTERN 

FROM PAGF 113 



LEOPOLD - 

ASCHNER 



D. 



-[two other sons, Alois and Adolf 



see bottom of page] 



SAMUEL - PAULA 
BLAUSTERN 



ASCHNER 



ROSA 

(FREDERICKA) 
BLAUSTERN 
ROSENFELD 



B.18 

D.before 1915 

Vienna 
Occ.owned a 
shirt factory 
in Vienna 



To 

Page 

117 



B.18 

Tachau 
D.C.1923 

Vienna 



B.18 

Tachau 
D.before 1923 

Vienna 



B.18 



KAROLINA 
"CARLA,""ALINA' 
BLAUSTERN 
EISELT (Divorced) 



B.I 856-57 

Tachau 
D.1/17/1936 
Vienna 



To Page 1 1 8 



To Page 1 1 7 



Leopold Aschner and his wife had two other sons: Alois Aschner (wife's name unknown) and Adolf 
Aschner, who was married to Matilda Zelenka. Alois died at a young age and he and his wife were the 
parents of a son, Alexander, and a daughter, Anna. 

Matilda remarried after Adolf's death. When the Nazis took control of Vienna she had an opportunity 
to leave, but she refused and she perished in the Holocaust. 

Adolf and Matilda had a daughter, Fransiska, who married Hans Fenichel (who was the son of 
Leopold Fenichel and Emma Braun, and the brother of Alice Fenichel — the wife of Emil Aschner). 
Fransiska ("Fritzi") and Hans Fenichel had two daughters, Susan Alexander (born on March 15, 1922, 
now lives in Los Angeles) and Lilly (born in 1926). Lilly married her first or second cousin, Robert 
Zelenka, in Prague. Both were sent to Auschwitz, where he died. She survived, came back and left for 
England in 1947 to join her two sons, George (who died in the 1970s) and Jan, now renamed John 
Martin, who resides in London. A painter, Lilly now lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

Leopold and Emma Fenichel had another son, Otto Fenichel, a very famous psychoanalyst, who was 
married to Claire and they had a daughter, Hanna Fenichel-Pitkin, a professor of political science at the 
University of California at Berkeley. Hanna and her husband, Jack Schar, live in Ben Lomond, California. 



116 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - ?R 

THE CHILDREN OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 

FROMPAGE113 



From 
Page 
116 



EMMA 
BLAUSTERN 
B.1850s-60s 
Tachau 

D. Holocaust 

Occ.worked at 
Emil Aschner's 
textile weaving 
mill as an 
accountant 



ADOLF - FANNIE 

BLAUSTERN 
ABELES 



B.18 
D. 



B.18 

Tachau 
D. 
Vienna 



From Page 1 1 6 



Lt. Col. Judge - MITZI 

ROSENFELD 

BLAUSTERN > RHONA* 



B.18 

Tachau 
D. 



B.18 



D. 



ANTON 
IBLAUSTERN 



B.1865 

Tachau 
D.6/22/1901 

Vienna 
Occ. Bookkeeper 



Lt. Col. Judge Blaustem married his niece, 
the daughter of his sister, Rosa Blaustem 
Rosenfeld. He converted from Judaism to 
Christianity and changed his family name 
from Blaustem to Rhona. 



GEORGE 
RHONA 



B.19 



BARON -HEDWIG (HEIDI) 

RHONA 

GUTMANN 



B.19 



B.19 



oo1934 
Switzerland 

The whereabouts of George Rhona and his 
sister, Hedwig (Heidi) Rhona Gutmann, are 
unknown. Both were lost in Austria during 
World War II. It is believed they may have 
been taken to Sweden. 



117 



1 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3L 

THE DESCENDANTS OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 

THE CHILDREN OF SAMUEL AND PAULA (BLAUSTERN) ASCHNER 



FROM PAGE 113 



DR. BERNARD - JOHANNA 
KOENIG 
ASCHNER 



To 

Page 

119 



EMIL 



ALICE 
FENICHEL 
ASCHNER 



B.1/27/1883 

Vienna 
D.3/9/1960 

New York 
Occ.Physician 



(Hewlett. NY) 



B.2/23/1904 

Vienna 
D.2/9/1970 

New York 



B.1 1/30/1 884 

Vienna 
D.Holocaust 

Occ.owner of a 
textile mill, 
electrical 

engineer. 



B.I 895 

Vienna 
D.2/1 3/1925 

Vienna 



OTTO - ELIZABETH 
OLIVER* ASCHNER 
LASTER 



B.8/4/1921 
Vienna 



B.5/3/1928 
Vienna 



Occ. Engineer, Occ. Social 
Business Exec. Worker 
* Name changed from Otto. 



PETER - HERTA RUTH 
STORFER 

B.12/19/1922 
Vienna 

Occ.Dressmaker 
(Kibbutz Ginnosar 
Israel) 



- ILSE MARIA 
ROMER 
ASCHNER 



WALTER - EVA 

ASCHNER 
VERGEINER 



B.1 1/30/1916 

Karlsbad 
D.1/6/1980 

Prague 
Occ. Journalist, 

Social Security 

expert 



B.2/28/1918 
Vienna 
D.l 0/1 9/1 984 
Vienna 
Occ.Journalist 



B.9/26/19181 
Vienna 



Occ.Journalist 



B.3/14/1923 
Vienna 



Occ. Conference 
interpreter 



B.2/2/1962 

Prague 
Occ. Interpreter, 
translator 



To Page 1 20 To Page 1 22 To Page 1 21 

Fmil Aschner's name is listed with the names of deportees in the Klaus Synagogue in Prague. 



EVA 
VERGEINER 



118 



# 



From 
Page 
118 



THE HONIG FAMI LY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3M 

THE DESCENDANTS OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 

THE CHILDREN OF SAMU EL AND PAULA (BLAUSTF.RN) ASCHNER 

FROM PAGE 113 



RICHARD - ALICE 
ZIMBLER 
ASCHNER 



FELIX - 



LILLY 
PALLESTER 
ASCHNER 



B.1 1/2/1886 
Vienna 

D.Holocaust- 
Lodz, Poland 
5/11/1942 

Occ. owned a 
textile mill 
with Emil 
Aschner 



B.4/25/1896 
Vienna 

D.Holocaust- 
Lodz.Poland 
5/23/1943 



B. 4/20/1888 B. 7/27/1894 

Vienna 
D.1 2/29/1 959 
Bogota, Colombia 



CARL (CARLOS) - NELLY 
WOLF 
ASCHNER 



B.I 889 
Vienna 
D.9/21/1979 D.1969 
Bogota,Colombia Lugano.Switz. 



(New Rochelle. NY) 



DR. GERHART - GERTRUDE 
(M.D.) ASCHNER 
SCHWARZ 



B.6/19/1912 

Vienna 
D.1 0/8/1 982 

New Rochelle.NY 
Occ.Physician 

(Radiologist) 



B.2/13/1919 
Vienna 



Occ.Mathematics 
Teacher 



To Page 1 24 



B.6/8/1894 

Vienna 
D.10/3/1980 
Benedicktbeu- 
ern.Ger. 



To Page 1 29 



To Page 1 23 



$ 



Richard and Alice Zimbler Aschner's names are listed with the names of deportees in the Klaus 
Synagogue in Prague . 



119 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4A 
THE DESCENDANTS OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 



THE CHILDREN OF OLIVER AND ELIZABETH (ASCHNER) LASTER 

FROM PAGE 118 



(Charlotte. NO 



DR. ANDREW- MICHELE 

GARRETT 
LASTER 



(Los Altos Hills. CA) 



SCOTT 



GERALDINE 
LASTER 
MACOMBER 



B.4/18/1953 
New York 



B.9/3/1956 



B.4/27/1957 



Washington.DC Clearwater.FL New York 



B.7/27/1957 



NICHOLAS 
LASTER 



IAN 
LASTER 



KYLE 
MACOMBER 



BRYAN 
MACOMBER 



(Leawood. KS)) 



DR. STEVEN - LOUISE 
JACOBS 
LASTER 



.10/29/1960 B.1/7/1961 
New York New York 



SOPHIA 
LASTER 



GRANT 
LASTER 



B.12/7/1988 B.3/1 1/1991 

Charlotte.NC Charlotte.NC 



B.1 2/8/1 987 
Palo Alto.CA 



B.8/6/1990 
Palo Alto.CA 



B.7/17/1992 
St.Louis.MO 



B.10/26/1995 
Leawood.KS 



• 



120 



• 



• 



THE HONIG FAMIIY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4R 
THE DESCENDANTS OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 

THE CHILDRF N OF PFTFR ASCHNER AND 
HERTA RUTH ASCHNIFR-S TORFER fw , FE #11 

FROM PAGE 118 



ZEEV - RACHEL 
(WOLFGANG) SHADMI 
ASCHNER 



B.2/19/1943 
Manchester,Eng. 

»1 2/27/1 973 
Tel Yitshak.lsrael 
Occ. Computer 

Specialist.Cost 

Accountant, 

Photographer 



PIOTR - ERIKA 

Pinchas ASCHNER 
ROMIK 



B.1/25/1943 
Kfar Saba, Israel 



Occ. Hotel Manager- 
Kibbutz Ayelet 
Hashahar 



B.7/4/1946 
Hiory .Russia 

0.8/30/1972 
Tel Aviv.lsrael 
Occ. Electronic 
Manager 



B.8/3/1944 
Manchester,Eng. 



Occ. Psychologist, 
Social Worker 




B.2/19/1974 B.1 1/12/1976 
Petach Tikva, Petach Tikva, 
Israel Israel 



Occ. Fisherman Occ.Kibbutz 
staff 



• 



121 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4C 
THE DESCENDANTS OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 

[WIFE #2] 

THE CHILDREN OF PETER AND ILSE MARIA (ROMER) ASCHNER 
FROM PAGE 118 



(Vienna) 



ROBERT - SUSANNA CLAUDIA 
ASCHNER 
SCHWARZ 



B.3/22/1946 

Pettenbach, 

Upper Austria 



Occ.Teacher 



B.7/16/1947 
Salzburg.Austria 



Occ.Teacher 



VERA 
SCHWARZ 



PETRA 
SCHWARZ 



B.4/18/1980 B.3/17/1982 
Vienna Vienna 



(Vienna) 



GEORG 



ASCHNER 



B.4/25/1956 
Linz.Austria 



1 



t 



122 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4D 

THE DESCENDANTS OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 

THE CHILDREN OF DR. GERHART AND GERTRUDE (ASCHNER) 

SCHWARZ 



LARRY 



DORIS 
SCHWARZ 
LISENBEE 



B.6/28/1947 
Bakersfield.CA 

Occ.Budget 
Director 



B.9/29/1946 
Clifton Springs,NY 

Occ.Clinical 
Psychologist 



FROM PAGE 118 



ROBERT 



MARIAN 
SCHWARZ 
PHELPS 



DR. RICHARD 
SCHWARZ 



B.6/16/1949 
Syracuse, NY 

Occ.Physicist 



B.7/12/1949 
Clifton Springs,NY 

Occ. System 
Analyst 



B.3/1 3/1957 
New York 

Occ.Psychiatrist, 
Percussionist 



JEFFREY 
LISENBEE 



MICHAEL 
LISENBEE 



DAVID 
LISENBEE 



B.6/3/1980 B.7/4/1984 
San Jose,CA San Jose.CA 



B.3/27/1990 
San Jose,CA 



I ROBERT I 

Lphelp s J 

B.3/30/1991 
Colorado Springs.CO 



123 



THE HONIG FAMIL Y OF KIRCHFNBIRK. BOHFMIA - AF 
THE DESCENDANTS OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 
THE CHILDREN OF FELIX AND LILLY (PALLESTER) ASCHNFR 

FROM PAGE 119 



-(adopted)- 



STEFAN- GERTRUDE 
(Trude) 
ASCHNER 
FROHLICH 



B.7/5/1905 

Vienna 
D.1 2/22/1 988 

Vienna 

»9/21/1936 
Vienna 
Occ.owned paper 
works factory 



B.3/19/1915 
Vienna 



Occ.tour guide 



ANTON - LISL 

NAGELSTUTZ 
FROHLICH 



B.6/8/1938 
Vienna 

»oSept.1967 

Vienna 

Occ. insurance 

firm 



B.9/5/1941 
Vienna 



Occ. office 
worker.Merck & 
Co. 



PEDRO MIGUEL - MIKI 

LUDWIG 
B.1 2/27/1937 

Vienna 
D.Aug., 1996 

Vienna 
Occ. office work 
(Divorced) 



- MONIKA 
BRUCKMULLER 
FROHLICH 



B.9/1/1939 B.5/4/1950 
Bogota.Col. St.Leonhard/ 
Forst N.O. 

»Jan.1978 
Vienna 
Occ.owns farm Occ.owns farm 



To 

_Page 

127 



JOSEPH-MARY JANE 
McCUE 
B.7/4/1922 

D.4/9/1981 



HELGA 
BUCHENAUER 
ASCHNER 



B.1/23/1922 B.5/7/1934 
Vienna Frankfurt 

Occ. Professor 
of Physics.City 
College of NY 



DAVID - KATHERINE 
ASCHNER 
DE BRUYN 



-8/4/1945 B.3/26/1946 
Chicago 



.10/12/1987 



To Page 1 25 



To Page 1 26 



124 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 5A 

THE DESCENDANTS OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 

THE CHILDREN OF ANTON AND LISL (NAGELSTUTZ) FROHLICH 

FROM PAGE 124 



STEFAN-MICHAELS 
JEL 
FROHLICH 



CHRISTOPH 



FROHLICH 



B.2/22/1981 B.1971 
Vienna Vienna 



B.3/17/1983 
Vienna 



»9/7/1996 

Vienna 
Occ.computer Occ.decorator Occ.student 



* 



y 



125 



* 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 5B 

THE DESCENDANTS OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 

THE CHILDREN OF PEDRO MIGUEL AND MIKI (LUDWIG) FROHLICH 

FROM PAGE 124 



THOMAS 

1 FROHLICH 
B.1 2/1/1 964 

Vienna 



Occ. chemist 



ALEXANDER 



FROHLICH 



B.8/4/1966 
Vienna 



Occ. student 



CHRISTIAN-CORNELIA 

FROHLICH 

POHL 



B.10/15/1968 B.12/21/1968 
Vienna Vienna 



oo5/10/1991 

Vienna 
Occ. works for 

General Motors 



Occ. office 
worker 



ALEXANDER 
POHL 



B.I 2/23/1997 
Vienna 



• 



126 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4F 
THE DESCENDANTS OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 
THE CHILDREN OF FELIX AND LILLY (PALLESTER) ASCHNER 

FROM PAGE 119 



From 
Page 

124 


I (Boaota) 








ULRICH- CARMEN 
MONTOYA 
ASCHNER 






B.4/1 1/1924 

Vienna 


3.7/29/1924 
Bogota.Colombia 




Occ.engineer 


Occ. architectural 
draft swoman 










To 

Paae 


















128 


DR. PABLO-MARIA EUGENIA 
M.D. 

ROSELLI 
ASCHNER 




CARLOS 
ASCHNER 




MARIA CHRISTINA 
ASCHNER 






B 1952 






Bogota 


B.I 1/20/1953 / 




B.1 0/20/1 950 
Bogota 


B.2/15/1952 
Bogota 


D 1953 Bogota / 

Bogota / 




Occ.physician 


Occ. psychologist 1 










(adopted)/ 




I ! 












JUAN PABLO 
ASCHNER 


ANNA MARIA 
ASCHNER 




MARIANA 
ASCHNER 






B.7/1 1/1977 B.6/25/1979 
Bogota Bogota 




8.2/11/1984 

Bogota 




Occ.student 


Occ.student 










Occ.student 







127 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4G 
THE DESCENDANTS OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 
THE CHILDREN OF FELIX AND LILLY (PALLESTER) ASCHNFR 

FROM PAGE 119 



From 

Page. 

127 



DR. ELENA 

ASCHNER 

M.D. 



ALBERTO-MARIA VICTORIA 
RESTREPO 
ASCHNER 



FELIX 
ASCHNER 



B.I 2/29/1 955 
Bogota 

Occ.orthopedic 
surgeon 



B.3/10/1957 



Occ.engineer 



B.6/.../1957 



B.6/18/1960 

Bogota 
D.l/22/1977 

El Cocuy.Colombia 
(He died of mountain sickness 

while mountain climbing.) 



CAMILA 
ASCHNER I 



CATALINAl 
ASCHNER 



MARIA LUCIA 
ASCHNER 



B.3/27/1982 B.9/1 5/1984 B.2/19/1988 
Bogota Bogota Bogota 



* 



128 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENB1RK. BOHEMIA - 4H 
THE DESCENDANTS OF IGNAZ AND ANNA (HONIG) BLAUSTERN 
THE CHILDREN OF CARL (CARLOS) AND NELLY (WOLF) ASCHNER 

FROM PAGE 119 



DR. THOMAS - ERIKA 
Ph.D. WEISENFELD 



\ 



- HANNELORE 
BOLTINGAM 
ASCHNER 



B.5/21/1917 

Vienna 
D.4/24/1991 

Augsburg.Ger. 
<»10/31/1958 
Occ.chemist 



B.6/24/1930 



B.I 9 

U.S.A. 



- CAROLINE 




- PATRICIA 


ASCHNER 




ASCHNER 


(Divorced) 




(Divorced) 


SADEH 




SANBORN 



B.C. 1970 
U.S.A. 



BIBI 
ASCHNER 



B. 1921 

Vienna 
D. 1924 

Vienna 
(Died from polio) 




ASCHNER 



B.8/1 1/1964 B. 3/20/1963 

Philadelphia, PA 
D.8/23/1995 

Ulm,Germany 
ool993 
Occ. Physician 



129 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 2C 
THE CHILDREN OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER^ HONIG 



FROM PAGE 113 



MORRIS FREDERICK - LILLIE MAE 
Moshe ben Berel BUFF ALOE 
HONIG/HOENIG 



B.I 1/27/1861 
Temesvar,Aus.-Hung. 
D. 12/31/1948 
Dallas.Texas, USA 



B.6/2/1869 
Lincoln County, 
Tennessee, USA 
D.7/2/1955 
Dallas,Texas,USA 
ooMar. 26, 1894 



ISIMON - 

Shimon 

ben 



LUSTIG 



Morris Frederick Hoenig may have had 
a first wife — and children with her — 
all of whom perished in the 1 893 San 
Francisco, California earthquake and fire. 



SOPHIE 
FEDER 



BERTHA 



bas 



Berel 
HONIG 



WEISS 



B.1/5/1844 
Lundenburg 
or Kostel 
D. 1921 
Lundenburg, 
Czechoslovakia 



To 

Page 
131 



From 
Paqe 
197 



(Also on Paqe |l 97) 



LEOPOLD -HERMINE 
Leib ben ADLER 
Berel Minke bas 

"Poyil" Yosef 

HONIG/HOEN IG 



5.2/16/1867 
Temesvar, 
Aust.-Hung. 
D.4/14/1930 
Brooklyn.NY 
USA 



B.I 0/27/1 864 
Temesvar,Aus-Hun 
D. Holocaust 



B.1/15/1879 

Asch, Bohemia 

D.1/11/1964 

Bayside.NY, 

(Queens) 

USA 



To Page 1 46 



To Page 132 



To Page 1 40 



To Page 141 To Page 145 



130 







THE 


HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK 


^BOHEMIA - 2D 




THE CHILDREN OF BERNHARD AND 


MINNA (NEUBERGER) 


HONIG 


: rom 
3 age 


FROM PAGE 


113 






130 






















JOHANNA 

Channa bas 

Berel 

HONIG/HOENIG 




MICHAEL - 
Avraham 
ben Berel 1 


HERMINE 
HELLER 
3 


\ 


-ADELE 

Edel bas 
Berel 
HONIG 
WAXMAN 












B.I 0/30/1 868 


D 




Vienna.Austria 








B 


B.l 872-73 




D.6/30/1963 


- ENRIKA 






Rockaway (NYC), 
NY, USA 


SACHS 
HONIG 


D 


D. 3/5/1955 
New York 




B.I 0/1 0/1 870 
Werschetz (near 


B.4/17/1881 










Budapest),Hungary 
D.Holocaust 

co3/2/1919 

Vienna 
(He came to Vienna 
at the end of World 
War I.) 


D.Holocaust 


I ELSIE 
I WAXMAN 






B.C.1900 

Vienna 

D.C.I 901 

Vienna 






/ 

To Page 151 




To Page 1 52 



# 



131 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3C 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF MORRIS FREDERICK AND LILLIE MAE (BUFFALOE) 

HONIG/HOENIG 



FROM PAGE 130 



* 



• 



(adopted) 



GORDON 
HOENIG 



B.May 1892 



GEORGE-PAULINE EMMA 

THIELEMAN 
HOENIG 



D.10/14/1951 
Dallas.TX 



B.6/2/1895 
Ft. Worth.TX 

D. 1958 

Dallas.TX 
oo4/2/1916 



B.2/12/1899 



D.5/11/1987 
Dallas.TX 



Son of Lillie 
Mae Buffalo and 
her first husband, 

Mr Davis. 

Gordon was 
adopted by Morris 
Frederick Hoenig. 



EDDIE WRAY 

WORDEN 
B. 1892 

Dallas.TX 
11 0/20/1 91 8 
Meuse-Argonne.France 
World War I 



BERTHA 
"Honey" 
HOENIG 

o1912-Dallas 



HENRY 
ARNOLD 



D. 1926 



IRAN. 
"Red" 
McLENDON 



HENRY 

"Dude" 

HOENIG 



B. 1900 

Ft. Worth.TX 
D.9/3/1967 

Dallas.TX 



D. 1955 



B.10/17/1898 
Ft. Worth, TX 
D.1/17/1983 

Dallas.TX 



EUGENE THOMAS - MARY VEAZEY 
BARROW 
WORDEN 



B.7/20/1913 
Dallas.TX 
D.4/3/1957 
Pine Bluff ,AR 
o2/29/1936-Dallas 

To Page 1 37 



B.I 1/11/1915 
Martindale.TX 



REV. LONNIE REED-FRANCES 

HOENIG K 
B.9/1/1917 
,5/15/1936 Dallas.TX 

D.1 1/25/1992 



.6/.../1993 



DORIS 
MABE 



MU LLEN 



B.10/14/1916 B.1/21/1925 



MORRIS-DOROTHY SUE 
LONG 
HOENIG 



B.2/1 1/1919 
Dallas.TX 
D.I 2/28/1 980 
Arlington.TX 

oo5/18/1940 



£.8/14/1920 
Sulphur Spr- 
ings,TX 



HOWARD CAR 
CARSON 

/'b 


L-LILLIE MAE 
HOENIG 


D.1 1/9/1962 


oo1941 


GEORGE LEE 
(BRADBERRY 


B 


B.1/4/1922 
Dallas.TX 




D.4/8/1980 
Dallas,TX 



To Page 133 



To Page 1 34 
132 



To Page 136 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK, BOHEMIA - 41 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF REV. LONNIE REED AND FRANCES (HOENIG) 

MULLEN 



* 



LONNIE REED-PATRICIA SUE 
ffl SPECKMAN 



°9/13/1979 



LINDA 

NEER 

(Divorced) 



B.. 



- BRENDA 
YARBROUGH* 
MULLEN 



,9/13/1939 
Dallas 



.1 1/.../1 984 



B.12/29/1952 



* Brenda Yarbrough Mullen has two 
children, Sean Reardon and Deidre 
Hubbard, from a previous marriage, 



FROM PAGE 132 



LONNIE REED IV 
MULLEN 



SUSANN RACHEL 
MULLEN 



B.5/28/1963 



B.7/22/1969 



GERALD RICHARD-PAULA JEAN 

MULLEN 
LONGWELL 



B B.1 2/25/1 943 

Dallas 



PAULA CHEREE 
LONGWELL 



ROBIN JEREE 
LONGWELL 



B.5/5/1966 



B.5/21/1969 



133 



9 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4J 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF MORRIS AND DOROTHY SUE (LONG) HOENIG 



FROM PAGE 132 















1 














RONALD MORRIS-JANE RUTH 

ADWELL * 
B.6/29/1943 


V 


THOMAS WILLIAM- LEAH 
WALLIS 
B.1/20/1952 






(Divorced) 




(Divorced) 




- RITA 
HAAS 
HOENIG 


- DONNA MAE 
PLUMMER 
(Divorced) 




B.5/15/1941 


B.1/30/1951 
Dallas,TX 


HOENIG 




Dallas.TX 
oo2/14/1974 


B.3/20/1951 B.1/10/1954 

San Benito.TX St.Patrick AFB.FL 
o»3/15/1986 






(Rita's son 


from her first marriage, 



and adopted by Ronald Morris) 



ALAN -VICTORIA LYNN 
HOENIG 
BIGGERSTAFF 



B.3/18/1960 
Honolulu.HI 
D.3/9/1997 
Dallas.TX 



JAMES MORRIS- ANITA 
L. 
HOENIG LANG 



,4/28/1969 
Dallas.TX 



o8/20/1994 
Dallas.TX 



B.4/1/1964 



HOLLI MICHELLE 
BIGGERSTAFF 



KRISTAL LEIGH 
BIGGERSTAFF 



BEAU ALAN 
BIGGERSTAFF 



B.1 0/30/1 978 
Dallas.TX 



B.I 0/20/1983 
Dallas.TX 



B.1/6/1986 
Dallas.TX 



To 
Page 
135 



134 



# 



THE HONIG FA MILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. ROHEMIA - 4K 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF MORRIS AND DOROTHY SHE (LONG^ HOENIG 

FROM PAGE 13? 

From 

Page 

134 



STEPHEN - MITZI SUE 
DANFORD HOENIG 

B.1/14/1956 



(Divorced) 



MICHAEL - 

ANTONE 

PAVAZZI 

B.I 2/28/1 957 



(Divorced) 



RANDALL 
GORDON 



KING 



B.8/19/1954 B.1/4/1956 
Fort Worth.TX 



o12/20/1988 



MICHAEL ANTONE 1 1 

[PAVAZZI] 
KING* 



MATTHEW WARREN 
[PAVAZZI] 
KING.f*_ 



B.7/29/1983 



B.9/6/1984 



Adopted by Randall Gordon King in August, 1995. 



135 



% 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4L 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF HOWARD CARL AND LILLIE MAE (HOENIG) CARSON 

FROM PAGE 132 



HOWARD CARL JR.- WANDA 
MINOR 
CARSON 
(Divorced-1963) 



.1/12/1942 B. 



.1/7/1961 



HOWARD CARL III 
CARSON 



B.10/19/1961 



PATRICK-CAROLYN EARLENE] BUFORD FRITZ-KATHRIN IRENE 
iALLAGHER 
B 



CARSON 



(Divorced') 



EDDY - 
LA BLANC 



B B.3/10/1947 



CARSON 



WHITE 



B... 



B.4/30/1949 



KIMBERLIN 
LA BLANC 



CATHERINE 
LA BLANC 



ROY HOWARD 
WHITE 



KENNETH DEWAYNE 
WHITE 



136 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4M 
THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 
THE CHILDREN OF EUGENE THOMAS AND MARY VEAZEY (BARROW) 



WORDEN 
FROM PAGE 132 



To 
Page 
138 



CLIFFORD ROLLIE-MARY VEAZEY 
WORDEN 
(Divorced-! 995) 
OSBORNE 



B.7/10/1939 
Columbus, GA 



o10/19/1961 
Houston.TX 



CLIFFORD ROLLIE 
OSBORNE 1 1 



B.4/19/1962 
Houston.TX 



B.9/3/1937 
Dallas 



WILLIAM EUGENE 
OSBORNE 



B.7/8/1963 

Houston.TX 



137 



< 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4N 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF EUGENE THOMAS AND MARY VEAZEY (BARROW) 

WORDEN 



FROM PAGE 132 



From 
Page_ 
137 



To 

_Page 

139 



EUGENE WRAY-MARY ELIZABETH 

WHITING 
WORDEN 



B.8/19/1939 
Dallas.TX 



»9/8/1957 



B.11/17/1937 
Independence.MO 



GEORGE-JULIE MARIE 
WORDEN 
JONES 



ANDREW -KIMBRA LYNN 

WORDEN 
CICLE 



« 



• 



3.1/4/1956 (B.I 2/2/1 958 

Independence, MO 



oo12/31/1980 

Divorced- 1985 



B.5/5/1959 
Independence, MO 



o12/3/1994 



(ado sted) 



TIMOTHY -DENISE WRAY 
WORDEN 
ALLEGRI 



B. 1962 



B.6/20/1962 
Independence, MO 



AMBER ELIZABETH 
JONES 



KIRA LYNN 
CICLE 



LUKE MICHAEL 
ALLEGRI 



ANNA MARYKATHERINE 
ALLEGRI 



B.1/26/1982 
Independence.MO 



B.10/31/1995 
Russia 



B.10/10/1990 B.1/10/1992 
Blue Springs.MO Blue Springs,MO 



138 



i 



% 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 40 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF EUGENE THOMAS AND MARY VEAZEY (BARROW) 

WORDEN 



FROM PAGE 132 



* 



• 



From 
Page_ 
138 



EUGENE - ANGELA 
WARD G. 

VELEZ 
HAYES 



JW -CRYSTAL LYNN 
WORDEN 
HAYES 



B. 1/6/1933 
Killeen.TX 



-10/21/1965 
Houston.TX 



B.8/1 1/1943 
Dallas.TX 



DANIEL -ELIZABETH 
SCOTT LYNN 

HAYES 
KNORPP 



B.7/8/1966 
Houston.TX 



oo5/20/1988 
Ft.Worth.TX 



B.1 1/13/1968 
Nuremburg.Ger. 



1 




| 


DEREK J. 
HAYES 




KELSEY 
LYNN 
HAYES 


B.8/2/1991 


B.5/4/1994 



Bedford ,TX Bedford ,TX 



.7/15/1966 B.8/7/1968 
Dallas.TX Houston.TX 



o3/26/1988 
Dallas.TX 



CRYSTAL 
SUZANNE 
KNORPP 



JAMIE 
DANIELLE 
KNORPP 



MARSHALL -STEPHANIE 
TOBEY CHRISTINE 
ELLENNIS 
HAYES 



B.1 1/19/1970 B.1/15/1970 
N.Tarrytown.NY Bosier City, LA 



oo6/10/1995 
College Station.TX 



B.4/18/1992 B.6/1/1995 
Bedford.TX Bedford.TX 



139 



I 



% 



THE HONIG FAMI LY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3D 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA fNEUBERGER^ HONIG 

THE CHI LDREN OF SIMON AND ???? (LUSTIG) WEISS rwiFF #n 

FROM PAGF 130 



MORRIS - CAROLINE 



WEISS 



B 

Lundenburg, 
Aust.-Hung. 
D. Holocaust 



D. Holocaust 



- GRETA 
WEISS 



D. Holocaust D.Holocaust 



MORRIS - GISELA 
(Moshe) WEISS 
SCHOEN 



B 

Lundenburg, 
Aust.-Hung. 
D.Holocaust 



OTTO - HILDEGARDE 
HERLINGER SCHOEN 

B. 1895 



D. 



MICHAEL 
HECHT 



HERMANN 
(Zvi ben Moshe)! 
SCHOEN I 



B. 1895 



D.12/23/1954 
New York 



B. 11/28/1895 B.12/12/1900 



London 



D 

London 



ERICH 
HERLINGER 



B.I 0/1 8/1 924 



D. 1948 
Israel 



140 



i 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3E 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF SIMON AND SOPHIE (FEDER) WEISS Twife #21 
FROM PAGE 130 



1 



ORNSTEIN 



HEINRICH - GABRIELLA 
ORNSTEIN 
WEISS 



B.c.1879 
Lundenburg 
D.Holocaust 



B 

Iglau, near 
Jihlava,Czech. 
D 



To Page 142 



ADOLF - CAROLINA 
ORNSTEIN 

B 

Iglau, near 
Jihlava.Czech. 
D 



\ 



- ROSA 
HERLINGER 
WEISS 



To 

-Page 

144 



B.I 895-98 
Lundenburg 
D.Holocaust. 



Vienna 
D 



JULIUS - CAROLINE 



D 



- ETHEL 
FINKELSTEIN 
WEISS 



B. 1883 

Lundenburg 

D.c. 1977 

Magdiel, 

Israel 



D.I 980-81 

Magdiel, 

Israel 



To Page 1 43 To Page 1 43 



141 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4P 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF HEINRICH AND GABRIELLA (ORNSTEIN) WEISS 

FROM PAGE 141 



FRANTISEK -ANNA 
(FRANZ) _ WEISS 
SPRUSIL 



B.1 1/1 4/1 909 
Luzany, Austria 
D.11/11/1959 
Prague 



B.6/4/1891 
Lundenburg 
D.1/14/1961 
Prague 



MORRIS - MARGARETA 
(GRETA) 
WEISS 
WEINER 



DR. BORIS - OLGA 


Ph.D. KOVARNIKOVA 


SPRUSIL 


B.2/6/1938 


B.2/1/1938 


Lundenburg 


Zlin,Czech. 


Occ. Professor 




of Physics, 




Charles 




University, 




Prague 





ROBERT- DANUTA 
TORON 

B.19.... 

Poland 
Divorced) 



- JIRINA 
(GEORGINA) 
GABRIELOVA 
SPRUSIL 



B.I 1/14/1962 B 

Prague Czech. 



B.9/21/1894 
Goden.Austria 
D.1942 
Holocaust 



B.11/1 8/1901 
Lundenburg 
D.1942 
Holocaust 



1 




1 


TOMAS 
WEINER 




VERA 
WEINER 



B.11/13/1932 


B.2/21/1927 


Prague 


Prague 


D.1942 


D.1942 


Holocaust 


Holocaust 



<»6/23/1988 

Prague 
Occ.computers 



142 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF K1RCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 40 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF ADOLF AND CAROLINA (ORNSTEIN) WEISS rwiFE #11 

FROM PAGE 141 



HANS 


" 1 




WEISS 1 


B 


B 






D 


D 
















JOSEF 
WEISS 





-BERTHA 

WEISS 
MILLER 


B 


B 


D 


D 












RUTH 
MILLER 





D.Holocaust 



D.Holocaust 



• 



THE CHILDREN OF ADOLF AND ROSA (HERLINGER) WEISS rwiFE #21 

FROM PAGE 141 











1 




1 


RUDOLF 
WEISS 




KURT 
WEISS 



B.. 



Holocaust- 
may have 
escaped to 
Russia. 



D.Holocaust 



# 



143 



THE H0N1G FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3F 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF SIMON AND SOPHIE (FEDER) WEISS twife #21 

FROM PAGE 130 



S 



From 
Page_ 
141 



JOSEF - HILDEGARDE 
WEISS HRADETCHNY 

B.July 1885 
Lundenburg 
D.5/5/1927 
Vienna 



VICTOR 
SCHLESINGER 



D.1950 



WILHELM 
WEISS 



B. 1887 
Lundenburg 
D. Holocaust 



GUSTAV- IRMA 

FROELICH 
WEISS 



Troppau, Austria 
D 



GERHART - SUZY 

GOLDENSTEIN 
WEISS 



.12/13/1920 
Vienna 



o4/28/1951 
New York 



B.5/9/1924 
Rio de Janeiro, 
Brazil 



DANIEL JOSEPH - MONICA | 




WEISS 


HANSOM 


B.I 2/20/1 949 


B.6/26/1951 


Queens, NY 


New York 


»3/1/1981 




New York 




Occ. Librarian 


Occ.Teacher 



r 




1 


SARAH 
WEISS 
HANSON 




JESSE 

WEISS 

HANSON 



B.1 0/25/1 985 
Queens, NY 



.3/../1990 
Queens, NY 



B.6/2/1889 B 
Lundenburg Brno.Czech. 
D.Holocaust D 




MICHAEL RICHARD - LIANNE 
WEISS 
DE LA PENA 



B.7/14/1955 
Torrance.CA 

»8/1 9/1 990 
Rancho Palos 
Verdes.CA 



B.10/15/1954 
New York 



CHRISTINA 

SUZANA 

DE LA PENA 



I HANNAH 
I PRINCESS 
I DE LA PENA 



B.1 1/22/1991 
Los Angeles.CA 

144 



B.1 1/2/ 1996 
Torrance.CA 



i 



* 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3G 

THE DESCE NDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF SIMON AND SOPHIE (FEDER) WEISS rwiFE #21 



FROM PAGE 130 



From 
Page_ 
144 



MILAN - THERESE 
WEISS 
NEUBACH 



Lundenburg 
D.Holocaust 



B.10/14/1893 
Lundenburg 
D 



HERTHA 
NEUBACH 



B. 1926 
D. Holocaust 



THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF SIMON AND BERTHA (HONIG) WEISS rwiFE #31 
FROM PAGE 130 



ALFRED - HERMINA 
(Mina) 
WEISS 
SAGL 



B.8/28/1890 B.7/2/1900 
Schaffa, Austria-Hungary Lundenburg 
D.1 1/7/1987 D.9/15/1992 
Santa Monica,CA Santa Monica.CA 



145 



# 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3H 
THE DESCE NDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILD REN OF LEOPOLD AND HERMINE (ADLER) HONIG/HOENIG 

FROM PAGES 130. 197 



SO - EMMA 




RUDOLF - FRIEDA 

Fraidel bas Leib 


bas Leib 




HOENIG 


HONIG 






PREINDL 




RUPP 



B.6/6/1890 B.3/12/1898 
Tausten- Lanz.Bohemia 

Pustertal, D.5/27/1980 
So.Tyrol-Aus. Vienna 
D.1/7/1976 

Vienna 
oo1925 

Vienna 
Occ. Photographer Occ.Cook 



To 

_Page 

147 



JOSEPH - BILLA 
Yosef ben Leib Baila bas Zvi 
"Bella" 
HIRSCH 
HOENIG 



B.1/1 1/1903 B.8/6/1899 
Friedberg Lanz, Bohemia 

Fauerbach.Ger. D.9/23/1996 
D.I 0/28/ 1994 New Rochelle.NY 
New Rochelle.NY 
oo1 1/4/1 933 

New York 
Occ.Apartment 
house superintendent 



B.10/17/1900 
Lanz.Bohemia 
D.1/22/1991 
New York 
oo3/29/1936 

Bronx, NY 
Occ.Tailor 



B.4/17/1897 

Polch.Germany 

D.I 2/26/1 987 

New York 



LEOPOLD - 


DORIS CAROL 


Leib ben Devoshe Chaya bas 


Yosef 


Shlayme Getzel 


"Leo" 


LOVETT 


HOENIG 


B.5/19/1937 




B.10/5/1942 


Bronx, NY 




Brooklyn, NY 


=03/31/1968 






Jamaica, NY 






Occ.Retired 




Occ.Teacher 


Teacher, 






Journalist, 






Genealogist 







GAIL SHARON HELENE MICHELLE 



Shulamit Gittel 
bas Leib 
HOENIG i 



Minke Judit 
bas Leib 
HOENIG 



B.5/27/1972 
New York 



B.3/20/1975 
New York 



Occ.Law Student Occ.Teacher 



146 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 31 



t 



• 



THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA fNEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF LEOPOLD AND HERMINE (ADLER) HONIG/HOENIG 

FROM PAGES 130. 197 



From 
Page_ 
146 



From Page 1 99 



HENRY - IDA SOPHIE 
Edel 
bas Leib 
HOENIG 
FARBER 



MARGARET 

"Gretl" 



bas Leib 
HONIG 



B.11/2/1896 B.8/29/1904 

Austria Falkenau,Bohemia 

D.5/12/1973 D.3/1/1980 

Saugus.CA Van Nuys.CA 

"2/1/1947 

New York 
Occ. dental 

tools firm 



B.3/9/1907 
Falkenau.Bohemia 

D.9/16/1916 
Falkenau.Bohemia 



Occ. upholsterer 



To 

_Page 

149 



ADOLPH - ADELINE 
Simcha BRICK 

ben Leib Ester bas Yehudah 
B.I 2/1 6/1 906 
Pittsburgh.PA 
D.8/17/1960 

Miami.Florida 
oo12/17/1938 
Brooklyn, NY 
(Div. 5/1/T95D 



- VIOLET 
MYAKICH 
HOENIG 



B.9/8/1909 B.8/20/1905 
Falkenau.Bohemia Queens,NY 
D.5/9/1972 D.7/26/1994 
Elmhurst.NY Flushing.NY 
oo1954 

Occ.manager,NYC Housing 
Relocation Department 



Charles & Elsie Carrick : 
e.1. 4/1/1983 
Buchanan Dam, TX 
Div. 8/12/1985 
0.2. 1/22/1986 
Buchanan Dam, TX 



PIETRO JOHN-ELSIE ANN 
CALI HOENIG 

B.5/5/1924 
New York 
D.5/17/1976 
Newark, NJ 
o»7/17/1961 
Baldwin, GA 
(Div.1 0/3/1 969) 



HARRY RAYMOND- 
WINGER 
B.5/30/1937 

Johnstown.PA 
D.2/29/1980 
Buchanan Dam.TX 
oo9/18/1973 
Johnstown.PA 



REV. JOHN DAVID-BARBARA JAYNE 
Yehudah Dovid PRICE 
ben Simcha 
HOENIG 



B.7/9/1943 
Brooklyn, NY 



.3/23/1968 
Staten Island.NY 



CHARLES GERALD- 
CARRICK 



B.9/11/1917 B.7/17/1941 
Collinsville.OK Brooklyn.NY 

To Page 1 48 

147 



B.2/18/1947 
Staten Island.NY 



To Page 1 48 



THE HONIG FA MILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4R 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF PIETRO AND ELSIE ANN (HOENIG) CALI 

FROM PAGE 147 



PIETRO JOHN 1 1- LINDY 
Paltiyael ben 

Paltiyael 
CALI 



ROBERT PAUL-LOUISE DOMINIQUE 
CALI 
Leeza bas Paltiyael 
SIMS 



B.2/19/1962 
Macon, GA 



B. 6/7/1961 
Mineral Wells, TX 



oo10/16/1982 
Buchanan Dam,TX 



B.4/8/1964 
Atlanta, GA 



[Lindy Cali has a son, 

Spenser Cayson Nice, 

born 3/1 5/1 988,frqm B.6/18/1984 

a previous marriage.] Fort Worth, TX 



MICHAEL PAUL 
SIMS 



ALEXANDREA MARIE 
SIMS 



B. 6/17/1988 

U.S. Military Hospital, 
England 



• 




B.I 1/28/1967 B.7/21/1968 
Staten Island, NY 

»o9/5/1992 

Cinnaminson.NJ 



JONATHAN 
KINCAID 



ERIK JOSEPH 
CALI 



B.3/29/1989 B.4/8/1993 
New Jersey New Jersey 



THE CHILDREN OF REV. JOHN DAVID AND BARBARA (PRICE) HOENIG 

FROM PAGE 131 



CHRISTOPHER - HOLLY ANN 

HOENIG 
GALLO 



B. 



B.4/1/1969 
Onslow County, NC 



»9/21/1996 
Cinnaminson.NJ 
Occ. engineer 



DAVID ANDREW 
HOENIG 



B.4/28/1971 
Staten lsland,NY 
D.7/9/1995 
Fort Sill.OK 

Occ. U.S. Army 



t 



148 



§ 



* 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3J 
THE DESCE NDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 
THE CHILDREN OF LEOPOLD AND HERMINE (ADLER) HONIG/HOENIG 



FROM PAGES 130. 197 



From 
Page_ 
147 



To 

_Page 

150 



GUSTAV -LILLIAN CHARLOTTE 
Yermeyahu Leah Breindel bat 
[Jeremiah] Chaim Yitzchak 
ben Yehudah Leib GOLDSTEIN 
HOENIG 



B. 9/17/1913 
Falkenau.Bohemia 

D.1/20/1984 

Dallas, TX 
«.10/26/1946 

Long Island City, NY 



B.2/8/1923 
Bronx.NY 



_(adopted)_ 



BRUCE ALBERT- 



NORA KEE 
GEE 



HOENIG 



B.8/23/1953 
Dallas.TX 



oo11/6/1988 
Los Gatos.CA 



B.2/28/1953 
Kau Kong Heung, 
Nam Hoi District, 
Kwantung Province 
(Canton), China 



MICHAEL LEE- 



JANET 

RICHER 

B.9/9/1957 

Middleborough.M/ 1 
(Divorced) 



- TAMMY ANN 
GIBBS 
HOENIG 



JESSICA ANN 
HOENIG 



B.5/10/1955 
Dallas.TX 



»8/30/1985 
Dallas,TX 



B.9/18/1957 
CrockettTX 



GRETCHEN HERMINE 
1 HOENIG 



B.1/20/1964 
Fort Worth.TX 



DANIEL JASON 
HOENIG 



B.4/8/1991 



B.l 1/23/1978 
Oakland.CA 



149 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3K 
THE DESCE NDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 
THE CHILDREN OF LEOPOLD AND HERMINE (ADLER) HONIG/HOENIG 



FROM PAGES 130. 197 



From 
Page_ 
149 



ORVILLE - GERDA ANN 
("Win") HOENIG 

WHITEHOUSE 



B.6/3/1914 
Wappingers Falls.NY 

D.1/5/1982 

Van Nuys.Cal. 
Retired US Navy 

Lt. Commander 
«1 1/1 0/1 936 
Suffern, NY 



B.7/13/1917 
Falkenau, Bohemia 

D.2/8/1993 
Huntington, NY 

Occ: Supervisor, 
Chase Manhattan 

Bank, NYC 



WILLIAM 
(Billy) 
WHITEHOUSE 



ANDREW 



FLORANN 
WHITEHOUSE 
GANGLOFF 



B.7/17/1939 
New York 

D.9/16/1957 
Bayside.NY 



B.10/13/1940 
Flushing.NY 



Occ.Movie Sets 



B.7/17/1941 
Middletown,Conn. 



THOMAS -JENEANN 
BARSZCZ GANGLOFF 
B.10/21/1956 

Buffalo.NY 
(Divorced) 



BARRY PAUL 
PHILIPPY 



! 

B.10/1/1951 B.9/10/1958 
Minneapolis, Flushing.NY 
MN 
Occ.US Coast 
Guard (retired) 



ANDREW 

"Chip" 



- CHRISTINE 

B.I 1/12/1965 

Glen Cove, NY 
(Divorced) 



- BARBARA 
SALIANI* 
GANGLOFF 



GREGG - LISA 

GANGLOFF 
SMrTH 

(Divorced) 



i EDWARD 

Igangloff 



TED - 

FACKELMAN 



B.4/5/1964 
Syosset.NY 



Occ.Movie Sets 



B.9/25/1960 
Queens.NY 



B.1/19/1960 8-7/27/1950 

Manhasset.NY Bay Shore.NY Occ.Civil 
Occ.Business Exec. Engineer 

oo12/31/!991 



B.3/23/1962 

Manhasset,NY 

Occ.X-Ray 
Technician 




JOHN THOMAS - APRIL JENE 
BARSZCZ 
HOLLOWELL 



LUCAS ANDREW 
BARSZCZ 



ERIC DANIEL 
FACKELMAN 



EMILY MADELINE 
FACKELMAN 



B.9/24/1976 
Huntington, NY 



B.5/1 1/1979 
Ellsworth.ME 



B.6/25/1993 B.3/8/1997 
New Hyde Park.NY New Hyde Park.NY 



B.3/20/1977 
Portsmouth.VA 
0=5/13/1995 

* Barbara Gangloff's maiden name is Dennis. She has three children from a previous marnage: Scott 
Saliani (born 4/5/1970), Cindy Saliani (born 9/5/1974) and Timothy Saliani (born 5/30/1978). 

150 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3L 

THE DESCENDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF MICHAEL AND HERMINE (HELLER) HONIG rwiFE #11 

FROM PAGE 131 



HEINRICH 



MARIE 



HONIG 



B.before 1899 

Vienna 
D 



1 




EMIL - 




HONIG 


B.C. 1918 B 



FRIEDRICH 
"Fritz" 



- EMMA 
KOLLER 

B.Aug.22, 

Vienna 
D.1 1/1 1/1954 
Vienna 



- LEOPOLDINE 
"Poldi" 



HONIG 



B.4/24/1899 

Vienna 
D.I 2/3/1 975 



Vienna 



MINNA 
HONIG 



RUDI 
HONIG 



B.1/25/1921 

Vienna 
D.5/18/1962 



B.1/31/1925 

Vienna 
D 



Occ. beautician 
in Vienna 



151 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHFMIA - 3M 

THE DESCE NDANTS OF BERNHARD AND MINNA (NEUBERGER) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF MICHAEL AND ENRIKA (SACHS) HONIG twife #21 

FROM PAGE 131 



THOMAS -JOSEPHINE 
"Sonja" 
HOENIG 

NANNI 



(Live in 
B.7/29/1914 
Rochester,NY 

oo1/3/1946 

Jamaica, NY 
Occ.Chauffeur 



Fotf Myers,FL) 

B.3/18/1920 
Vienna 



Arrived in USA 8/10/1938 



DAVID A. 



MICHELE 

NANNI 



MOHR 



(Live in Fort 
B.6/30/1960 



O.10/13/1990 
Sanibel Island, FL 



Myers,FL) 

B.I 0/21/1 959 

Elmhurst-Queens, NY 



MATTHEW DAVID 
MOHR 



B. 3/23/1995 
Fort Myers.FL 



152 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENB1RK. BOHEMIA - 2E 

THE CHILDREN OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

FROM PAGE 115 

(Lived in Purles.Bohemia) 



BEER 



[PQrles=Brlozec in Czech] 



(Joshua and Helen Hbnig were twins.) 



JOSHUA - ANNA 
Yehoshua BEER 
ben Yosef B 



D. 1908 



- BERTHA 
GRAZ 
HONIG 



ALBERT-HELENE 
HONIG 



bas Yosef 
MULLER 



ARIEL- KLARA 

Ariel GRUNHUT 
ben Yosef 

HONIG 



lB.8/28/1854 
Karlsbad 
D.7/24/1924 
Karlsbad 



B.8/1/1857 
Kirchenbirk 
D. 1929 
Falkenau 

He came to 
the U.S. on a 
visit before 
1880 and 
probably 
saw his aunt, 
Sophia Klein, 
in St. Louis 



B.1/20/18721 
Srbec, Czech./ 

D. 1943 

Holocaust 



B.8/14/1857 B 3. 1866 

Kirchenbirk Kirchenbirk 
D.7/9/1925 
Karlsbad 



Kirchenbirk 



(Buried in Karlsbad) 



To Page 161 



To 
Page 
~154 



(Lived in 
Koniaswart.Boh imia) 



Rabbi 

WILHELM - VERONIKAl 
HONIG 

bas Yosef 
LOEWY 



Hamburg B B 

D 

D. before D.before 

1939 1939 



To Page 1 63 



From Page 1 90 



I (Lived in Theusing) I 



SALOMON - ROSA 

BEER 

LOEWY I 



IGNAZ - LYDIA 
BEER 
HOLZNER 



To Page 1 60 



To Page 1 5 5 



B.18 

Budau (Budov) 

near Saaz (Zatel) 

D.19 



B.18 

Purles 



D.19. 



B.C.I 890 

Purles 
D.3/25/1937 

Karlsbad 



B.18....... 

Purles 
D.19 



To Page 1 94 



[Theusing=Touzim] 
To Page 191 



Note- Ignaz Holzner and his wife, Lydia Beer Holzner, were first cousins, according to Karl Budlovsky, 
but Irma Holzner Tasche said they were not first cousins when asked by Verz Holzner in 1968. 

153 



I 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 2F 

THE CHILDREN OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

FROM PAGE 115 



From 
Page _ 
153 



(Karlsbad) 



MORITZ 



- WILHELMINE 

HONIG 
LOBL 



B.4/9/1844 

D.6/16/1912 

Karlsbad 
Occ.Food shop in 
Eger 



B.C. 1854 
Kirchenbirk 

D.9/9/1898 
Karlsbad 



[Buried in Karlsbad] 
To Page 1 65 



(Hohenelbe) 



-KARLA 

HONIG 
EISENBERGER 



To Page 171 



154 



• 



I 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3N 
THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 
THE CHILDREN OF JOSHUA AND ANNA (BEER) HONIG rwiFE #1 



FROM PAGE 153 



THEODOR -REGINA 
Israel ben 
Yehoshua 

LOEBEL 
HONIG 



DR. LEOPOLD 

"LEO" 

Leib ben 

Yehoshua 

HONIG 



To 

_Page 

156 



OSKAR - HELEN 
Avraham ben 

Yehoshua 

HOENIG 



B.Feb. 1886 

Falkenau 

D.Holocaust 

Occ.Farmer 
in Hochlibien, 
Bohemia 



B.Dec. 1883 

Hochlibin 

D.Holocaust 



B.4/26/1887 
Kirchenbirk 

D.3/8/1956 
Vienna 

Occ.Physician 



B.. 



B. 1888 

Falkenau Eger 

D.4/13/1932 D 

Bronx.NY 

Occ.Soda 
business 



ERNST 

ben 
Israel 


- OLGA 


B 


D 




- SYLVIA 


HOENIG 



! 




1 


ANNA 

bas Israel 
HONIG 




IRMA 

bas Israel 
HONIG 



She remarried and 
went back to Germany 
before World War II. 
Her father was a grave 
digger in Eger. 



BJan.1920 

Falkenau 

D. Holocaust 



B.Apr.1921 

Falkenau 

D. Holocaust 



B.5/10/1914 B.3/3/1916 
Falkenau 

D.5/ /1989 

Sheffield.Eng. 



155 



I 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 30 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF JOSHUA AND ANNA (BEER) HONIG rwiFE #11 

FROM PAGE 153 



From 

Page_ 

155 



To 

Page 

159 



GUSTAV -ROSA(ROSEL) 
Gershon ben Reeza bas 
Yehudah Yehoshua 
HONIG 
BUDLOVSKY 



B.6/16/1889 
Zvestov u Votic 
D.2/4/1926 
Eger 



B.2/2/1891 
Falkenau 
D.I 2/28/1 954 
Komotau 



(Buried in Karlsbad) 



ANNA 
BUDLOVSKY 



B.C.1914-15 

Falkenau 
D.C.1915 

Falkenau 
(Died at age of 
nine months.) 



DR. JOSEPH- SUSAN 

"Mopl" HERMAN 
Yosef ben 
Gershon 

BUDLOVSKY 



KARL - SANDRA ALEXANDRA 
"Bambino" "Xandi" 
Dovid ben GUTERSLOH 
Gershon 
BUDLOVSKY 



B.9/10/1915 
Falkenau 



B.I 1/12/1918 
Prague 



.11/30/1917 
Falkenau 



»1942 



B.3/16/1917 

Vienna 
D.10/31/1994 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Canada 



To Page 1 57 



To Page 1 57 



156 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4S 
THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSHUA AND BERTHA (GRAZ) HONIG 
THE CHILDREN OF DR. JOSEPH AND SUSAN (HERMAN) BUDLOVSKY 

FROM PAGE 156 



« 



• 



MICHEL- ALICE 
SCHULTZ 
BUDLOVSKY 



B.4/4/1949 
Komotau 

oo5/5/1973 
Toronto 
Occ. Chemist 



B.4/24/1948 
Komotau 



Occ. Computer 
Scientist 



DAVID 
BUDLOVSKY 



DANIEL 
BUDLOVSKY 



B.12/22/1975 
Toronto 



B.2/18/1977 
Toronto 



DR. RICHARD - MARGARET 

(PhD) BUDLOVSKY 

KARDISH 



B.2/5/1946 


B.8/1 2/1950 


Toronto 


Komotau 


oo5/15/1977 




Toronto 




Occ. Bio-Chemist 


Occ. Medical 




Technologist 



• 



157 



# 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4T 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSHUA AND BERTHA (GRAZ) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF KARL AND SANDRA ALEXANDRA (GUTERSLOH) 

BUDLOVSKY 

FROM PAGE 156 



(Houston. Texap) 



JOHN - VERA 
"Honsa" BUDLOVSKY 
DERNOVSEK 



(Vancol/ver. British Columbia) 



ALEXANDER GUSTAV- IRENA 
"Sasha" GUTMANN 
BUDLOVSKY 



B.1 0/23/1 946 
Koningenhof 

(Dvur Kralove) 
ooc.1964 

Ostrov.Czech. 



B.6/5/1946 
Karlsbad 



B.1/7/1948 

Karisbad 
ooFall 1983 

Vancouver.BC 



B.I 0/8/1 959 
Montreal 



ROBERT 



SUSAN 
LEE 
DERNOVSEK 



JOSHUA 



BUDLOVSKY 



THALIA 
BUDLOVSKY 



5.3/3/1965 B. 

Ostrov.Czech. 



ooc.1994 
Hamilton.Ontario 



B.I 2/3/1985 
Vancouver, BC 



B.3/31/1990 
Vancouver, BC 



158 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3P 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF JOSHUA AND ANNA (BEER^ HONIG rwiFE #n 

FROM PAGE 153 



From 
Page_ 
156 



KARL - FRIEDA 
Fraidel bas 
Yehoshua 
HONIG 
RITTER 



JOSEPH 



ELSA 

bas 

Yehoshua 

HONIG 

MAYER 



WILHELMINA 
bas 
Yehoshua 
HONIG 



B.4/10/1885 B.9/25/1896 B &.1898 

Komotau Falkenau Falkenau 

D.Holocaust D.Holocaust D 

1942-Lublin 1942-Lublin New York 



Occ.butcher 



t 



B.6/21/1900 
Falkenau 
Falkenau D.Dec. 1970 
D 1969 Halle.E.Germany 



New York 



PAUL 

ben 
Yehoshua 
HONIG 
B. 1905-06 
Falkenau 
D.Holocaust 
Occ.Merchant, 
family's pro- 
visions business 



ZDENKA 



OTTO 
LOEWY 



WILHELM 

"Willi" 
RITTER 



B.6/3/1920 
Komotau 
D.Holoca 



! FRANZ 
j "Franzl" 
| MAYER 

B.3/1 1-18/1923 

Falkenau 
D.1924 
New York 

He caught pneu- 
monia on the ship 
coming to N.Y. 




D. 1994 
Israel 
(They lived in Israel in the 
winter and in Munich, 
Germany during the 
summer. She was a Schind- 
ler's List person.) 



B.1/28/1929 
Brooklyn.NY 



.4/14/1955 



B.1 2/1 6/1 928 
New York 
D.1 2/1 3/1 973 
Bronx.NY 



VINCENT - LINDA 

JACEWICZ 

ROSSI | B.1/25/1959 

B B.6/1 1/1957 Bronx.NY 

Bronx.NY 



JOANN 
JACEWICZ 



MARY ANN 
| JACEWICZ I 

B.9/1 8/1961 
Bronx.NY 



JOSEPH 
JACEWICZ 



B.12/18/1962 
Bronx.NY 



VINCENT 
ROSSI 



B.8/18/1979 



159 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 30 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

THE SON OF JOSHUA AND BERTHA (GRAZ) HONIG rwiFE #21 

FROM PAGE 153 



RAYMOND-ELIZABETH 
"Liesl" 
HOENIG 
ROGERS 



B.10/19/1942 
London 



KATYA 
ROGERS 



B.4/14/1971 
London 



B.8/21/1942 
Glascow.Scotland 



DANIEL 
ROGERS 



B.12/17/1972 
London 



DR. JULIUS - INGE 
"Jussl" GREVE 

Shmuel ben 
Yehoshua 

HOENIG 



3.4/111916 
Falkenau 



B.3/28/1923 
Bielefeld, Westphalia, Germany 



PETER - ELLEN 
GLASS 
HOENIG 



B.3/28/1944 
Bishop Stortfort, 
England 



B.6/21/1951 
Queens, NY 



Occ. Attorney Occ.Art Teacher 



160 



* 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3R 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF ALBERT AND HELENE (HONIG) MULLER 

FROM PAGE 153 



/ 



KARL - ANNA 
HERMANN MULLER 
B 

D.C.1919 



ERNST 
SAMEK 



MAX - IRMA 
EPSTEIN 
MULLER 



Karlsbad 



Vienna 
D. 1944 
Holocaust 



Karlsbad 



EGON 
SAMEK 



Karlsbad 



To 

_Page 

162 



KARL - SOPHIE 
GLASER MULLER 

B.12/17/1875 

Saaz.Czech. 

D.9/20/1918 

Karlsbad 



MAX 
KOHN 



B. 1892 B.I 0/6/1 885 

Komotau Karlsbad 

D.Holocaust D.1/29/1934 
Karlsbad 



FRANZ 
MULLER 



HELEN 
MULLER 



KURTI 
GLASER 



B.I 93 

Karlsbad 
D. 1944 

Holocaust 



B. 1925 
Karlsbad 

D. 1944 
Holocaust 



B. 1927 
Karlsbad 
D. 1953 

England 



B.1/27/1908 

Karlsbad 
D. 1945 



FRED -STEPHANIE 
"Fritz" BROD 

GLASER 



B.12/1/1909B. 1909 
Karlsbad 

Holocaust D.9/1/1985 
Toronto 



PAUL 

GLASER 

*HILL 



- JUDITH 
HACKETT 
B.1913 
Bristol, Eng. 
D.I 980 
Montreal 



ANNETTE 
STANLEY 
B. 1915 

Montreal 
D. 1990 
Montreal 



HILDA 
TURCHIN 



B.3/19/1911 B. 

Karlsbad 
D.1/29/1994 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Canada 



1/26/191.. 
Brooklyn.NY 



* Name Changed 



161 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3S 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF ALBERT AND HELENE (HONIG) MULLER 

FROM PAGE 153 



* 



/ 



From 

Page_ 

161 



ERNST 
ROBITSCHEK 
B 

D 

(Divorced) 



EMMA 
MULLER 



HERMANN 
ALTMANN 



Galicia 

D. Holocaust 



B. 1897 
Karlsbad 

D. 1 944 
Holocaust 



LEO 
ALTMANN 



MAX 
ALTMANN 



B. 1918 


B. 1920 


Vienna 


Vienna 


D 




on a ship to 




Palestine in 


Last known 


World War II 


residence was 




in Florida. 



FRITZ 



- ROSA 

MULLER 
TREUER 



B.3/13/1893 
Temes Pocin, 
Yugoslavia 
D.1/.../1961 
New York 
Occ.buyer for 
Gengress 
department 
store.Vienna 



B. 2/13/1889 
Karlsbad 

D. 4/1/1973 
New York 



DR. EMIL - DR. HERTA 
TREUER 
ECKSTEIN 



B B. 1913 

Pilsen Karlsbad 

D. 1966 D. 1967 

Binghamton.NY Binghamton.NY 

(Both are buried in Temple 
Concord Cemetery, Johnson City, 
NY) 
Occ. Physician Occ.Physician 



DR. LEONARD- LICI 
(D.D.S.) "Alice" 

TREUER 
WEINRIB 



New York 
D.1 0/1 0/1 988 



Occ.Dentist 



B.8/7/1919 
Karlsbad 



STEVEN - ELEANOR 
WEINRIB 
SKOLNIK 



KENNETH- JANET 
WEINRIB 
SHELBY 



B /..../19... B.3/27/1955 B /.../19 



B.12/16/1957 



LENARD 




WILLIAM 




ISAAC 


RUBEN 




ZACHARY 




MICHAEL 


SKOLNIK 




SKOLNIK 




SHELBY 



B. 3/18/1989 B. 8/2/1991 B.5/27/1993 



162 



• 



t 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3T 
THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 
THE CHILDREN OF ARIEL AND KLARA (GRUNHim HONIG 

FROM PAGE 153 



LEOPOLD 



ELLA 
POLLAK 



HONIG 



DR. HERMAN- IRENE 

HEIDLER 
HONIG 



OTTO - ELSA 
HONIG 
LEDERER 



B. 1884 

Kirchenbirk 

D.Holocaust 



B B. 1886 

Kirchenbirk 

D.Holocaust D.Holocaust 
Italy 



ILSE 
HONIG 



HERBERT 
HONIG 



B.. 



B.. 



D.Holocaust 



D.Holocaust D.Holocaust 

(She joined the 
Italian parti- 
sans and was 
shot by the 
Germans.) 



B 

Imhost 
D.Holocaust 



B. 1892 



To 

_Page 

164 



OTTO - MARGARET 
"Gretl" 
FISCHER 
HOENIG 



KirchenbirkB.1 1/4/1897B. 7/28/1899 

D.Holocaust D.Holocaust Kirchenbirk Falkenau 
Milan, Milan, D.2/6/1985D.1 2/1 6/1995 

Italy Italy Hamilton.Ont Hamilton.Ont 

Canada Canada 



TEA 
HONIG 



D.Holocaust 



163 



• 



From 
Page_ 
163 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 31J 
THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 
THE CHILDREN OF ARIEL AND KLARA (GRUNHUT) HONIG 

FROM PAGE 153 



JOSEF 
HONIG 



B. 1893 
Kirchenbirk 

D. 10/3/1922 
(Yom Kippur) 
Kirchenbirk 



RUDOLF -JOHANNA 

("Jenny") 
HONIG 
PICK 



D. 



B.2/6/1896 fe. 1900 

Kirchenbirk 
D.4/30/197£ 

Karlsbad 
Occ. Director 
of a textile 
factory in 
Libauthal 
(Buried in 
Karlsbad) 



KURT PICK - DORA 

> STEINER 
*EG0N 

PESKA PESKOVA 



D.July 1980 
>* Name changed 



Karlsbad 



VLASTA - ... 
PESKA 




PESKA 



PESKA 
B 



PESKA 



B.. 



164 



# 







THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3V 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF MORITZ AND WILHELMINE (HONIG) LOBL 

FROM PAGE 154 



LEOPOLD -GERTRUDE 

SCHOENWALD 
LOBL 



B.c.1 876 

Eger 
D.1963 

Brussels 



B.I 8 

Berlin 
D.Aug. 1974 

Brussels 



(Brussels) 1 



ARIEL - MARION 
LOBL 
B.11/7/1910 

D. 1961 
Brussels 



LITVINE 



(Live in Israel) 



To 

Page 

166 



JAMES 
LOBL 



B.4/13/1913 

Brussels 
D. Holocaust 




165 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3W 



• 



THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 
THE CHILDREN OF MORITZ AND WILHELMINE (HONIG) LOBL 

FROM PAGE 154 




(Graslitz) 



To 

_Page 

168 



MAX 



- AMALIE 
LOBL 
STRANSKY 



Eger 



B.6/22/1867 

Reichenau 
D.11/13/1919 

Graslitz 
(Buried in 
Karslbad) 



B.8/1 5/1878 

Eger 
D.7/18/1940 

Prague 



PAUL - ANNA 

WOTITZKA 
STRANSKY 



DR. WILHELM - KARLA 

STRANSKY 
KLUG 



(Pragu e) 



To 

_Page 

167 



DR.ROBERT - ALICE 

STRANSKY 
ORNSTEIN > ORLICKY* 



B.1 1/7/1901 B.2/12/1902 
Trautenau Prague 

D.5/31/1950 D. 1991 
Prague Prague 



(Served in the 
English Army, 
1940-45) 



B 

Gevitch 
D.c.1 965 

Israel 



B.7/23/1907 

Graslitz 
D.1944 

Auschwitz 



PETER 
KLUG 



B.3/26/1908 

Kolin 
D.11/ /1996 

Prague 
Occ: Supreme 
Court Judge 

= name change 



(Zurich) 



B.I 1/18/1913 

Graslitz 



DR. EVA 
ORLICKA 



B.1/30/1935 


B.2/24/1951 


Pilsen 


Prague 


D. 1 944 




Auschwitz 






Occ. Lawyerjudge 




Two law degrees-summa cum 




laude (Prague, Zurich) 



166 



• 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3X 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

THE CHILDR EN OF MORITZ AND WILHELMINE (HONIG) LOBL 

FROM PAGE 154 



From 
Page 
166 



WALTER- RUTH 

STRANSKY 
STINGL 



B.before 1916 B.12/19/1916 

Marienbad Graslitz 

D.3/8/1944 D.Holocaust 
Holocaust 



167 



* 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3Y 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF MORITZ AND WILHELMINE (HONIG) LOBL 

FROM PAGE 154 



From 

Page_ 

166 



JULIUS 



- ALICE 

MAYER 
LOBL 



B.c. 1880 

Eger 

D 

Sao Paolo, 

Brazil 



(Saol Paulo. Brazil) 



CLAUDE -JEANETTE 



LOBL 



B.c.1 928 B 



ROBERTO 
LOBL 



(Sao Paulo. Brazil) 



- JANNY 

LOBL 
BERLINER 

(Divorced) 



BERLINER 



BERLINER 



To 

Page 

169 



BERLINER 



168 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3Z 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF MORITZ AND WILHELMINE (HONIG) LOBL 

FROM PAGE 154 



t 



From 
Page_ 
168 



(Joachimsthal) 



JULIUS - ANNA 
LOBL 
SAMUEL 



B.. 



D.before WWII 
Joachimsthal 



B 

Eger 
D.1942 
Holocaust 



OTTO 



- WILHELMINA 
"Mina/Minl" 
SAMUEL 
JAEGER 



Prague? 
D.I 970s 



B.3/26/1908 
Joachimsthal 
D.Nov.1986 
Israel 



FRIEDRICH 



VERA 
STEINREICH 
SAMUEL 



B. 1910 
Joachimsthal 
D. Holocaust 



To 

Page 

170 



FRITZ 



- GERTRUDE 
SAMUEL 
FISCHER 



Pilsen 
D. Holocaust 



(She survived 
the war and 
remarried) 



B.Jan. 1913 
Joachimsthal 
D. Holocaust 



RUTH 
FISCHER 



B. 1937 
Pilsen 
D. Holocaust 



169 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3AA 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF MORITZ AND WILHELMINE (HONIG) LOBL 

FROM PAGE 154 



From 

Page 

169 



ALFRED - MIMI 
POLLAK 
LOBL 



B.1898 

Eger 
D. 1942 

Holocaust 



B.after 1898 
Kuttenplan 

D. 1942 
Holocaust 



GERTRUD 
LOBL 



B. 1930 

Graslitz 
D. 1942 
Holocaust 



170 



1/ 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3AB 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF ???? AND KARLA (HONIG) E1SENBERGER 

FROM PAGE 154 



(Eindhoven. Holland) 



... - HELLA 

EISENBERGER 
CARP 



(Eindhoven (Eindhove n) 



CARP 



DORIS 
CARP 



(Garmish Parten. Ge(manv) 



CARL - ELLI 

., EISENBERGER 
DERFEL 



To 

_Page 

172 



PAUL - GRETL 
EISENBERGER 



IB. 



D.Holocaust 

(Deported 
from Holland 
to Theresien 

stadt and 
from there to 
Auschwitz) 



ERIKA 
EISENBERGER 



(Divorced) 



B. 

D.9/.../1996 

Heusenstamm, 

Germany 



PETER -ANGELA 



ZL 



CAROLINE 



171 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK - 3AC 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND ???? (????) HONIG 

THE CHILDREN OF ???? AND KARLA (HONIG) EISENBERGER 

FROM PAGE 154 



From 
Page_ 
171 



FRIEDRICH - JANA (GRETA) 
"Fritz" 

EISENBERGER 



B. 



172 



§ 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 2G 
THE CHILDREN OF ARANT B. AND SOPHIA (HON1G/HOENIG) KLEIN 

FROM PAGE 115 



To 
Page 
174 



HENRY 



- THERESA 
HELLER 

B.C. 1852 



D. 1891-99 
St. Louis, MO 
»1 2/1 4/1 876 
St. Louis, MO 



- FREDERICKS 

("Ricka") 
KLEIN 
KOHNER 



» 



• 



B.May,1846 \B.10/5/1861 
Germany \ St. Louis 

D.1 0/7/1 91 6\D. July 1934 
(Yom Kippur)\ St. Louis 
St. Louis 

«2/22/ 

Occ.Anheuser 

Busch Brewing 

Co. 



EMANUEL 

("Manny") 

KLEIN 



B.6/1 1/1862 

St. Louis 
D.1/13/1913 

St .Louis 
Occ. 




JULIUS 



BERTHA 
KLEIN 
ABRAMSON 



BENJAMIN JULIUS 
KLEIN 



B.Oct.1863 

Hamburg, 

Germany 

D 

St. Louis 
ool 1/14 
Occ. Central 
States 
Paper and 
Bag Co. 
* His grandson, 
C. Hugh 
Abramson, 
believes 
Julius was 
from 
Stuttgart. 



B.1/9/1865 
St. Louis, 
Missouri 

D.3/4/1945 

St. Louis 



B.8/13/1869 
St. Louis 

D 

St. Louis 

Occ. 



To Page 1 76 



To Page 1 79 



To Page 1 80 



173 



' 



• 



* 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 2H 
THE CHILDREN OF ARANT B. AND SOPHIA (HONIG/HOENIGI KLEIN 

FROM PAGE 115 



From 
Page_ 
173 



NATHAN - BESSIE 



KLEIN 



B.3/5/C.1870 

St. Louis 
D.1/8/1916 



Occ.Annheuser- \ 
Busch brewery J 



SAMUEL - PAULINE 
KLEIN 
ZEPIN 



CHARLES - BESSIE 
KLEIN 
MEYERS 



ARCHIE 
KLEIN 



I. 1867 

Russia 
D.9/5/1925 
St. Louis 



B.11/19/1872 
St. Louis 
D.10/3/1960 
St. Louis 



B.9/30/1877 

Germany 
D.8/20/1962 

Santa Cruz.CA 



B.I 873-74 
St .Louis 
D.10/22/1932 
Salem.lllinois 



c2/ 16/ 1902 



To Page 1 82 



~9/6/before 1900 
Occ.Merchant 

To Page 183 



To 
Page 

175 



EDWARD 

KLEIN 



BESSIE 
KLEIN 



EDNA 
KLEIN 



ADRIAN 
KLEIN 



B.12/17/ 



D.before 1 970 



D.before 1 970 



D.before 1 970 



He was a star 
football player 
at Missouri 
University 



174 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 21 
THE CHILDR EN OF ARANT B. AND SOPHIA (HONIG/HOEN1G1 KLEIN 

FROM PAGE 115 



From 
Page_ 
174 



ABRAHAM M 

"Abe" 



RACHAEL 
"Ray" 
KLEIN 
PACHTER 



LOUIS A. 

(Leo, Ludwig) 

"Ludy" "Louie" 

KLEIN 



B.I 2/25/1 878 

D.4/19/1921 
St. Louis 

.1/8/1899 
St. Louis 



B. 1/28/ 1878 B.2/24/1879 

St. Louis St. Louis 

D.5/14/1926 D.7/18/1934 

St. Louis St. Louis 



To Page 1 84 



175 



♦ 



THE H0N1G FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3AD 



HALF BROTHERS AND HALF SISTERS TO 

THE DESCENDANTS OF ARANT AND SOPHIA (HONIG/HOENIG) KLEIN 
THE CHILDREN OF HENRY AND THERESA (HELLER) KOHNER rwiFE #n 

FROM PAGE 173 



LOUIS 



KOHNER 



To 
_Page 
"177 



HARRY 



CLARA 
KOHNER 



HYMAN 



CHARLES S. 



FLORA 
KOHNER 



MILLER 



B.1/..../1876 

St. Louis 
D. 



B B.3/..../1887 

St. Louis 



D.after July 1 934 D. 



B.8/..../1891 
St. Louis 
D.after July 1934 



176 



THE HONIG FA MILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3AF 

HALF BROTHERS AND HALF SISTFRS TO 
THE DESCENDANTS DF ARANT AND SOPHIA (HONIG/HOENIG) KLEIN 

THE CHILDREN OF HFNR Y AND THERESA (HELLERS KOHNER fwiFF #n 

FROM PAGE 173 

From 
Page. 
176 



SIMON 



KOHNER 



B.10/..../1878 

St. Louis 
D.before July! 934? 



JOSEPH - 

KOHNER 



B.12/..../1884 I 
St. Louis 
D.before July 1934? 



ADELLA 
KOHNER 



St. Louis 
D.before July! 934 



177 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 4U 

DESCENDANTS OF THE STEPCHILDREN OF ONE OF ARANT B. AND 
SOPHIA (HONIG) KLEIN'S DAUGHTERS 

THE DESCENDANTS OF HENRY AND THERESIA (????) KOHNER 

TTHE DESCENDANTS OF THE STEPCHILDREN OF RICKA (KLEIN) KOHNER1 

THE CHILDREN OF THE KOHNERS 
FROM PAGES 176.177 



178 



• 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3AF 

THE DESCENDANTS OF ARANT AND SOPHIA (HQNIG/HOENIG) KLEIN 

THE SON OF HENRY AND FREDERICKA (KLEINS KQHNER rwiFE #21 

FROM PAGE 173 















AARON - ANN 






DARRISH 






KOHNER 




B.5/22/1904 


B.8/20/1903 


St. Louis 


St. Louis 


D.4/25/1976 


D.3/30/1970 


St. Louis 


St. Louis 


oo10/3/1926 




St. Louis 




Occ. Purchasing agent 


Occ.Transcribed 


for electrical supply co. 


medical records 



IRVEN 



JUNE 
KOHNER 



BIERMAN 



♦ 



B.2/4/1924 
St. Louis 

oo2/26/1950 

St. Louis 
Occ. Handbag 



B.6/15/1928 
St. Louis 



Occ. Bookkeeper 



)ONALD - HELENE 
KOHNER 
LEVITAN 


B.6/26/1931 
Tarrytown, NY 

oo10/14/1962 

St. Louis 
Occ. Communica- 
tions 


B.12/30/1932 
St. Louis 

Occ. Artist, 
Computer 
Operator 



(adopted) 



MARK 
RICHARD 
BIERMAN 



ROBERT - MELINDA 

MICHAEL KIELY 

BIERMAN 



STEVEN - STEPHANIE 

EDWARD TWICHELL 

BIERMAN 



B.3/21/1961 
St. Louis 



B.4/14/1964 
St. Louis 



B.4/18/1965 



B.8/6/1966 
St. Louis 



B.3/15/1969 



lEDWARD 

PHILLIP 
I BIERMAN I 
B.2/9/1969 

St. Louis 




B.1/18/1959 B.I 1/14/1963 
St. Louis 
D.I 2/1 7/1 996 

Occ.lnsurance Occ. Interior 
Adjuster Designer 



CHARLES 

■ LEVITAN I 

B.5/1 1/1967 

St. Louis 



Occ.Sales 



ANDREA 

I LEVITAN 
B.7/31/1970 
St. Louis 

Occ .Graphics 



179 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. 
THE DESCENDANTS OF ARANT AND SOPHIA 
THE CHILDREN OF JULIUS AND BERTHA 



BOHEMIA - 3AG 
(HONIG/HOENIG) KLEIN 



(KLEIN) ABRAMSON 



ALVIN ARNT - ELLA 
"Lalla" 
JACOBS 
ABRAMSON 



B.I 0/6/1 894 

St. Louis 
D. 1967 



B.3/16/1900 



D. 1 984 



(New York) 



CARROLL HUGH 



GAIL 
PANKEN 
ABRAMSON 



B. 1938 
St. Louis 



B. 1946 



FROM PAGE 173 



HERBERT - MILDRED 
SERMACH 



D. 



(Divorced) 

- ESTELLE 

"Stella" 

"Fuzzy" 

TANNEN 

ABRAMSON 



B.1 1/19/1896 fi- 
St. Louis 



To 

_Page 

181 



SIDNEY - JANE 
LEVY 
ABRAMSON 



B.Dec. 1899 B.. 
St. Louis 



(Jane's daughter from her 
previous marriage) 



HARVEY - LEANN 

SCHNEIDER 
B B 



180 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3AH 
THE DESCE NDANTS OF ARANT AND SOPHIA (HONIG/HOENIG) KLEIN 
THE CHILDREN OF JULIUS AND BERTHA (KLEIN) ABRAMSON 
FROM PAGE 173 



From 
Page_ 
180 



ELMER DAVID - KATHERINE 
EBERTS 

ABRAMSON 



B.I 904 

St. Louis 
D. 1983 



JOHN 
(JON) 



ABRAMSON 



St. Louis 



DAVID 



ABRAMSON 



St. Louis 



MILTON LOUIS -JENNIFER 
"Jen" 

ABRAMSON 



B.I 2/1 7/1 906 
St. Louis 
D. 1976 



|B. 





1 


1 


! 


I 


- ANN 


Jmilton ; i 


BARBARA 1 


I 


ABRAMSON 


JR. I | 
"Mickey" 
1 ABRAMSON 1 [ 


ABRAMSON 


B 


B 


B 


B 



St. Louis 



181 



§ 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3AI 

THE DESCENDANTS OF ARANT AND SOPHIA (HONIG/HOENIG) KLEIN 

THE CHILDREN OF SAMUEL AND PAUI INF. (KLEIN) ZEPIN 

FROM PAGE 174 



EDWARD - SYLVIA 
AARON ZEPIN 
POSEN 



B.3/3/1896 
Schlov.Russia 

D.2/..../1978 
St. Louis 

Occ.Comptroller, 
Central States 
Paper and Bag 

Co. 



ARNOLD 



ZEPIN 



SIDNEY - 



ALMA 
ZEPIN 



FARKAS 



OLIVER 
KLEIN 
ZEPIN 



B.1/10/1903 B. 1904 
St. Louis St. Louis 

D. 1905 
St. Louis 



B.12/10/ B.12/14/1907 

St.Louis 

D.1987 D.6/9/1993 

Los Angeles Los Angeles 

Occ.Accountant Occ.Teacher 



B.6/25/1910 
St. Louis 
D.5/.../1978 
St. Louis 
Occ.Salesman 



ROBERT - 



MARGE 



(Divorced) 



SANDRA 
SCHARNHORSTj 
POSEN 



3.2/13/1929 B.6/23/1938 
St. Louis Hermann, MO 



Occ.Retired 
Writer-St. 
Louis Post- 
Dispatch 



Occ.Retired 
Teacher 



MICHAEL - ROBERTA 

HALL 
POSEN 



STEPHEN -SUSAN 
ORZACK 
POSEN 



B.2/26/1931 B. 1930 
St. Louis 



B.9/27/1939 
St. Louis 



Occ.Retired 

Marketer, 
Analyst 



Occ.Retired • Occ.Artist 



B. 1945 
New York 



Occ.Lawyer 



PAULA 
POSEN 



CYNTHIA 
POSEN 



JANE 
POSEN 



RACHEL 
POSEN 



ALEXANDRA 
POSEN 



ZACHARY 
POSEN 



B.l 1/26/1955 B.1 2/31/1956 B.9/5/1969 B.9/1 1/1974 

St. Louis St. Louis 

Occ.Office Occ.Officer Occ.Social Occ.Accountant 

Worker Manager Worker 



B.1972 
New York 



B.1 0/24/1 980 
New York 



Occ.Actress Occ.Student 



182 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3AJ 

THE DESCE NDANTS OF ARANT AND SOPHIA (HONIG/HOENIG) KLEIN 

THE CHILDREN OF CHARLES AND BESSIE (KLEIN) MEYERS 

FROM PAGE 174 



ALFRED - FRANCES 
NUSSBAUM 
MEYERS 



(San Jose.CA) 



HAROLD 



- HELEN MARGARET 
ANDERSON* 
MEYERS 



B.7/2/1897 

St. Louis 
D.c.1 946 

Salem, IL 
oo6/13/19 

Occ. Merchant 



B.1 1/3/1898 
Texarkana, AR 

D.c.1 934 
Salem, IL 

(buried in St. Louis) 

Occ.Teacher 



(Rockford. IL) 



JOHN - BETTY ANNE 
MEYERS 
McDOUGAL 



(San Jose, CA) 



ALFRED - CAROL 
JR. GOODFRIEND 

MEYERS 



B.7/29/1907 

St.Louis 
D.9/18/1997 

San Jose,CA 
oo1945 

Occ.Electrical 
Engineer and 
Mechanical 
Engineer 



B.8/21/1904 

Pana.IL 
D.1 1/1 5/1 989 

San Jose.CA 



Occ.Accountant 

Helen Anderson's 
first marriage was 
to William Berroyer 



B.3/16/1924 
Okmulgee,OK 



oo11/24/1949 

Salem, IL 
Occ. High School 
Coach 



B.I 0/8/1 926 
Centralia.lL 

D. 8/8/1997 
RockfordJL 



B.I 2/6/1 929 
Salem.lL 



oo2/17/1961 

Las Vegas, NV 

Occ. Government 

Contract Manager 



B.5/3/1934 
Salinas.CA 



Occ.Accountant 



DAVID 



- REBECCA 
McDOUGAL 
HEITMANEK 



DAVID 



MARY 
McDOUGAL 
SHROEDER 



PAUL - NANCY 

McDOUGAL 
FRAUSON 



B.6/24/1950 B.7/4/1951 
YorkvilleJL 



B.2/2/1955 B.4/1/1954 
Elgin, IL 



Occ.Teacher Occ.Teacher Occ.Attorney 



KRISTIN LINDSAY 

HEITMANEK [HEITMANEK 
B.8/18/1979 B.5/23/1982 



B.8/21/1957 B.9/28/1957 
Woodridge.IL 



Occ.Teacher Occ.Teacher I Occ.Teacher 



RICHARD- CAROL 
LANSDELL 
MEYERS 



JONATHAN 
SHROEDER 



MICHAEL 
SHROEDER 



STEPHANIE 
SHROEDER 



B.9/27/1989 B.1 1/4/1993 B.1/30/1995 



B. 1955 

Salinas.CA 
Occ. Electrical 
Engineer 

3l980-Portola,CA 



MELISSA 
FRAUSON 



MICHAEL 



MEYERS 



B.1957 B.1972 

San Mateo.CA San Jose.CA 
Occ. Mechanical 
Engineer 



KIMBERLY 
FRAUSON 



B.12/8/1981 B.10/15/1984 



LINDSAY 
MEYERS 



(twins) 



MATTHEW ALLEN 
MEYERS 



ROBERT ADRIAN 
MEYERS 



B. 1984 B. 1990 

Fremont, CA Fremont, CA 

183 



B. 1990 
Fremont, C A 



THE HONIG FAMILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3AK 

THE DESCENDANTS OF ARANT AND SOPHIA (HONIG/HOENIG) KLEIN 

THE CHILDREN OF ABRAHAM AND RAY (KLEIN) PACHTER 



FROM PAGE 175 



ARTHUR 



PACHTER 



To 

Page 
185 



MAURICE - SELMA 
PACHTER 
FRANK 



B.5/21/1900 
St. Louis 

D.2/12/1901 
St. Louis 



B.11/9/1901 

St. Louis 
D.1 1/29/1996 

St. Louis 
oo1931-32 

St. Louis 
Occ.Attorney 



PAUL 



J= 



RAY 
FRANK 
DOBINSKY 



B.2/2/1929 
St. Louis 



~5/3/1953 

St. Louis 
Occ.lnsurance 

Executive) 



B.2/12/1933 
St. Louis 




DANIEL 



B.10/28/1944 
St.Louis 

oo2/1/1981 
St.Louis 
Occ.Computer 
Specialist 



Occ.Community 

Affairs activist-> 



B.10/18/1955 
St.Louis 

»1 1/3/1 984 

St.Louis 
Occ. 



ANDREW S. 
MEYER 



MARJORY RACHEL 
MEYER 



MELISSA 
DOBINSKY 



B. 2/2/1982 
St.Louis 



B.I 2/1 4/1 984 
St. Louis 



B.6/27/1988 
St.Louis 



B.4/20/1907 

St. Louis 
D.5/26/1996 

St. Louis Selma P. Frank's activities : 

• Charter member, founder, 
Jewish Special Needs Society 

Occ.Community "Officer: National Council of 
Affairs activist->Jewish Women, Jewish 

Hospital Auxiliary, Jewish 
Center for the Aged 
Auxiliary. 

• St.Louis Symphony Women's 
Society, Little Symphony 
Concerts Assn. at Washington 
University, Friends of the 
Arts Museum, Opera Guild of 
St.Louis, St.Louis Zoo Friends 
and Parents, National Society 
of Arts and Letters. 

-> Rav Dobinskv's activities : 

• Past President, Jewish Cen- 
ter for the Aged; Temple 

j Emanuel, Grace Hill Settle- 
ment House, Creve Coeur 
_| activities, Past VP National 
Council of Jewish Women 
(St. Louis). 

Paul Dobinskv's activities ; 
•Board of Directors of Grace 
Hill and Project.lnc. Past 
President of Temple. 
> Cathv Meyer's activities : 
•VP, Jewish Center for the 
Aged Auxiliary, Creve 
Coeur Days Chair, National 
Council of Jewish Women, 
local school activities. 



Occ. Community 

Volunteer-> 



SONIA 
SIROTA 
D OBINSKY 



B.4/16/1963 
New York 



Occ. 



JODI 
DOBINSKY 



B.1/8/1991 
St.Louis 



• 



184 



4 



THE HONIG FA MILY OF KIRCHENBIRK. BOHEMIA - 3AI 

THE DESCENDANTS OF ARANT ANO SOPHIA (HQNIG/HOENIf^ Kl FIN 

THE CHILDREN O F ABRAHAM AND RAY fKLEIN) PACHTFR 

FROM PAGE 175 

From 
Page 



184 




DAVID - ESTHER 
BRENNER 
B. 




D. 






oo1926 






FANNY 
BLOCK 
PACHTER 




B.2/27/1902 


B 




D.3/..../1979 


D. 1965 


oo1937 




Occ. 









ADRIAN - JEANETTE 
SCHWAB 
PACHTER 



B.6/27/1905 B. 
St. Louis 
D.1 1/18/1943 D. 1983 

oo1930 

Occ. 



(adopted) 



+ 



ALAN RICHARD- 



(Divorced) 
PACHTER 



B.12/3/1939 



ADRIENNi 
PACHTER 



B.10/..../1946 



185 



THE HOLZNER FAMII Y FROM PURLES - 1A 



• 



(Puries) 



HOLZNER 



(Micholup) 



BEIHER 



(Luft-Saaz) 



STEIN 



1 1 




SIMON - EVA 
BEIHER 

HOLZNER 




B. 

Puries 
D.I 8 

Puries 


B. 

Micholup 
D.I 8 

Puries 





JAKOB - ESTHER 
Yaakov ben STEIN 
Shimon Ester bas 
Moshe 
HOLZNER 



B.I 8 

Puries 
D.8/1/1886 
Puries 
Occ. Merchant 



B.I 8 

Luft (Saaz) 
D.6/18/1900 
Puries 



To Page 1 87 



(Pschribera) 



.LAUFFER 



za 



MOSES - ROSINA 
LAUFFER 



STEIN 



B. 

Luft (Saaz) 
D.I 8 

Luft (Saaz) 



Pschriberg 
D.18 
Luft (Saaz) 



186 



% 



• 



» 



THE HOLZNER FAMILY FROM PURLES - 2A 
THE CHILDREN OF JAKOB AND ESTHER (STEIN) HOLZNER 



FROM PAGE 186 



- AMALIE 

"Mali" 
HOLZNER 
HIRSCH 



-THERESE 

"Resi" 
HOLZNER 
VOGL 



DR. JOSEF 



ANNA 



HOLZNER 
SCHIMEK 



(Lived in LindAu 
leuthensdorf 



by Ober- 
[Louka n. 
LitvinQv] ) 
B. 



(Lived in Sakz [Zatec] ) 



D.6/23/1935 D. 



B.1850-51 



(Lived in Eisenberg [Jeseri] 
and later in Komotau 
[Chomutov]) 
B.I 873 B. 



D.1/30/1932 D.1942 



D.9/21/1936 



HUGO 



HIRSCH, 



RUDL- 



HIRSCH 



B. B. B. 

D.Holocaust D. Holocaust D.Holocaust 



D.Holocaust 



(Daughter) 
HIRSCH 



B. 



D.Holocaust 



»1903 

Prague 

Occ.Physician 
for the Austrian 
state railroad in 

the Komotau 
district 



ERNA 
VOGL 



D.Holocaust 



B. 
D.Holocaust 



To 

_Page 

188 



D.Holocaust D.Holocaust D.Holocaust 



» 



• 



187 



THE HOLZNER FAMILY FROM PURLES - 7R 



I 



THE CHILDREN OF JAKOB AND ESTHER (STFIN) HOLZNER 

FROM PAGE 186 



From 
Page 
187 



- LOTTE 
HOLZNER 



HUMML 



WILHELMINA (MINA) 
HOLZNER 



(Lived in Chdpinitz) 



D.before 1915 

Chemnitz 
Occ.Mason 



Purles 
D.8/12/1948 
Chemnitz, E.Germany 



(Lived in Chemnitz) 
B.7/4/1859 

Purles 
D.3/18/1930 

Chemnitz.E. Germany 



Her Godmother was 
Judith Kohorn, the wife 
of the merchant Bernard 
Kohorn. The name-giver 
was Markus Mijller, a 
private teacher in Purles. 



( Apnabera.Erzaeb. ) 



ADOLF 



HUMML 



Occ. Merchant 



(Chfmnitz>Bresla u> Gera ) 



( Chemnitz) 



EMIL 



RUTH 



HUMML 



B. 



P. 



Occ.Merchant, 
Agent 



(daughter) 
HUMML 



(daughter) 
HUMML 



(daughter) j 
HUMML i 



B. 



B. 



(daughter) 
HUMML 



PAUL 



ELSA 
HUMML 



VORWERK 



Occ. Electrician 



GERHARD 

I V ORWERK 
B. 

D.1945 

World War I 



To 

.Page 

189 



To 

.Page 

189 



188 



# 



THE HOLZNER FAMILY FROM PURLES - 3D 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JAKOB AND ESTHER (STEIN) HOLZNER 

THE CHILDREN OF AND LOTTE (HOLZNER) HUMML 

FROM PAGE 188 



• 



From 
Page 
188 



(Chemnitz) 



WALTER- 



HUMML 



B. B. 

D. D. 

Occ.Agent 



(Chemnitz) 



OTTO- 



HUMML 



D. 
Occ.Chauffeur 



(Chemnitz. Memel) 



FRITZ- 



HUMML 



Occ.Electrician 



r 




I 




| 




| 




| 


(son) 
HUMML 




(son) 
HUMML 




(daughter) 
HUMML 




(son) 
HUMML 




(daughter) 
HUMML 



B. B. B. 

Chemnitz Chemnitz Chemnitz 



189 



THE HOLZNER FAMILY FROM PURLES - 2C 



I 



THE CHILDREN OF JAKOB AND ESTHER (STEIN) HOLZNER 



FROM PAGE 186 



From 
Page_ 
188 



ANTON 
| MARSCH 



To 

.Page 

153 



EMMA 
HOLZNER 



(Lived in Chemnit.- since 1903) 



B.2/10/1856 

POrles 
B.8/6/1935 

POrles 
Occ. Farmer 

(Roman Catholic) 



B.1/14/1863 

Ptirles 
D.2/20/1955 

Chemnitz [Karl Marx Stadt], E.Germany 
Occ.Green Grocer (1903-19) 

(Jewish) 



WALDEMAR MARTHA 
HERBERT - IRMA 
HOLZNER 
TASCHE 



B.8/28/1889 
Chemnitz 

D.1/24/1979 
Karl Marx 

Stadt 
[Chemnitz] 

(Protestant) 



B.5/12/1890 

Chemnitz 

D.8/1 2/1979 

Karl Marx 

Stadt 

[Chemnitz] 

(Protestant) 



JUTTA 
MATTHES 



UHLIG 



ROLF 
TASCHE 



B.2/16/1923 
Chemnitz 



=o4/21/1957 

Chemnitz 
Occ.Engineer 



B.8/1 5/1927 
Penig, Saxony 

D.2/17/1988 
Chemnitz 



(Jutta Matthes Uhlig was widowed with four young children, all of whom were adopted by Rolf Tasche 
when he married Jutta and they took his family name.) 



BRIGITTE 
TASCHE I 



URSULA 
TASCHE 



KARL-HEINZ 
TASCHE 



RENATE 
TASCHE 



B.19 



B.19 



B.19 



B.19 
190 



• 



THE HOLZNER FAMILY OF THEUSING - 3A 



THE DESCENDANTS OF JACOB AND ESTHER HOLZNER 
THE CHILDREN OF IGNAZ AND LYDIA (BEER) HOLZNER 



FROM PAGE 153 



(Lived in Hronov) 



EMIL 



- RUZENA (ROSA) 

SGALL 
HOLZNER 



B.8/1 8/1883 

Theusing 
D.Holocaust- 

Auschwitz, 
7/10-12/1944 



(Lived in Karl s bad ) 



ERNST - MARTHA 

HOLZNER 
HERZIG 



To 

_Page 

192 



(Lived in Theusing) 



OTTO 



HERMINE 
OSTERREICHER 
HOLZNER 



B.5/6/1896 
Litomysl 

3. Holocaust 
1944 or 45 



D.I 943 

Auschwitz 
Occ. grave- 
digger 



B 

Theusing 
D.I 943 

Auschwitz 



Theusing 
D.I 943 
Auschwitz 



Buden-Budyne,Boh. 
D.I 943 
Auschwitz 



(Live in Prague) j 



VLADIMIR 



JILEK 



VERA 
HOLZNER 
JILKOVA 



t 



LYDIA 
HOLZNER 



HANNA 
HERZIG 



B.1 1/29/1917 B.2/1/1922 
Havlickuv Brod, Trutnov, 
Czechoslovakia Czech. 



B.1 1/26/1929 B.1924 
Prague Karlsbad 

D.1/30/1996 D.1943 
Prague Auschwitz 



Occ. economist 



RUDOLF-TRUDE 

'Rudi" 

HOLZNER 

BT916 
Theusing 
D. Holocaust- 
Mauthausen 
Occ.lawyer 



FRITZ- VERA 

FRED* 

HOLZNER>HOLT* 



Occ.photographer Occ.linguist 
oo6/4/l 963 
Prague 



JOSEPH - OLGA 

JILEKOVA 
KOUKOLIK 



B.19.... 



B.19.... 



PETR 
KUOKOLIK I 
$.19.... 



IVO 
KUOKOL IK 



B.19..., 




Australia 



(Olga Jilekova is from Vladimir 
Jilek's first marriage.) 

Vera and Lydia Holzner survived Auschwitz 
and were liberated from Bergen-Belsen by 
the British army in 1945. 



= name change in Australia. 

Vera Holt remarried after Fred's death. 



191 



THE HOLZNER FAMILY OF THEUSING - 3B 



THE DESCENDANTS OF JACOB AND ESTHER HOLZNER 
THE CHILDREN OF IGNAZ AND LYDIA (BEER) HOLZNER 



FROM PAGE 153 



From 

Page_ 

191 



(Pilsen) 



ERNST- ERNA 

HOLZNER 

LOWY (LOEWY) 
(Divorced) 



(Hroqov) 



MAX 
HOLZNER 



Luditz 



Theusing 



D. Holocaust! D.Holocaust 
1943 
Auschwitz 



B 

Theusing 
D.Holocaust 
1943 
Auschwitz 



(Saaz)) 



- FRIEDL 



ROBERT - 
HOLZNER 



(Prague) 



FRANZ - FRIEDL 
GRUNHUT 



HOLZNER 



(Tef. \itz) 



To 

.Page 

193 



WALTER 
HOLZNER 



B B B 

Theusing Theusing 

D. 19 D D. 1937 

Montevideo, Montevideo, Teplitz- 

Uruguay Uruguay Schbnau 



OTTO -BARBARA 
HALL 
LOWY 



B.3/4/1921 
Prague 




B.I 0/24/1 930 
Vancouver,B.C. 
Canada 



B.c.1924 



D.I 9 

Montevideo, 
Uruguay 
(She left for 
Montevideo 
in 1938.) 



Tachau 
D 



B 

Theusing 
D.I 978-79 
Tel Aviv, 
Israel 

(Went to Pal- 
estine in 1938) 



DR. JIRI - LYDIA 
(GEORGE) HOLZNER 
BONDY 



ALLAN 



(Helsin gborg. Sweden ) 



B.19 B.1921 

Prague Teplitz- 

D.Holocaust Schbnau 

t June, 1942 D.Holocaust 

Occ. physician t June, 1942 

(tThey were shot on the spot 
by the Nazis because her 
bicycle was used in 
the Heydrich affair.) 



EDITH 
HOLZNER 
JOHANSSON 
(Divorced) 



B.19.. 



B.l/7/1925 
Teplitz- 
Schonau 



DAVID 
LOWY 



3.10/18/1966 

Vancouver,B.C. 



KARL FREDERICK- EVA 

JOHANSSON 
LANDSTROM 



B.19 



B.I 96 

Helsingborg, 
Sweden 



KARL 

FREDERICK 

LANDSTROM 

B.19 




B.19 



192 



THE HOLZNER FAMILY OF THEUSING - 3C 
THE CHILDREN OF IGNAZ AND LYDIA (BEER) HOLZNER 

FROM PAGE 153 



From 
Page, 
192 



KARL 
HOLZNER 



ANNA 
HOLZNER 



Theusing Theusing 

D D 

Theusing Theusing 

(in infancy) (in infancy) 



193 



THE LOEWY FAMILY OF BUDAU NEAR SAAZ. BOHEMIA - 1A 
THE CHILDREN OF SALOMON AND ROSA (BEER) LOEWY 



FROM PAGE 153 



To 

_Page 

195 



MORIC-REGINA 
LOEBL 
LQEWY 



ROBERT- 

LOEWY 



D.. 



JOSEF- 

LOEWY 



•ERNA 
LOEWY 



ALFRED-BERTA 
LOEWY 



D D.12/../1991 D.3/2/1992 

Israel NJ 



# 



LOEWY 



194 



THE LOEWY FAMILY OF BUDAU NEAR SAAZ. BOHEMIA - IB 

THE CHILDREN OF SALOMON AND ROSA (BEER) LOEWY 

FROM PAGE 153 



From 
Pa ge 
194 



RICHARD- ROSA 

ZENTNER 
LOEWY 



B 


B... 








D 


D 












I 


FRANK - HILDA 
LOEWY 
BRAUN 



(His parents 
had a farm 
near Falkenau) 



J - HANA 

BRAUN 
HAVLICEK 
(Divorced) 



ANN 
HAVLICEK 



WILHELM - 

LOEWY 



EMIL 



D. 



PETER - SANDY 
FERIS 

BRAUN I 



JOHN 
HAVLICEK 



RICHARD 
HAVLICEK) 



B.. 



DAVID 
BRAUN 



.OEWY 



195 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAMILY OF FALKENAU AND EGER - 1A 



• 



LOV or LEVI 



JOSEF - SOPHIE 

LOV/LEVI 
ADLER 



B.c. 1834 
D.c. 1858 



LOV/LEVI 



STEINIGER 



(Lived in Falkenau - no children) 




D.7/18/1897 
New York 



To Page 1 97 



To Page 209 



i 



« 



OTHER ANCESTORS: 
FAMILIES KOHN, BINHAK. BOHM. REICH AND STEINIGER 

"Onkel" and "Tante" Kohn often visited with Anna Adler. The Kohn Family lived in 
Schweissig, Bohemia. They had two daughters — one was named Karoline — and 
they moved to Salzburg, Austria. 

Lehrer Kohn . the Hebrew teacher in Falkenau in the late 1 800s, was related to the 
Adler and Heller families, thus making him my grandmother's distant relative, and 
she often spoke about him. My father often told me that whenever a member of the 
Kohn family died, my grandmother received some of their furniture. Lehrer Kohn 
died in 1 898. [He was not related to the Kohn Family of Schweissig.] 

The mother of Walter Kohn (He lived at 22 Park Lodge, St. Johns Wood Park, London 
NW 8, England.) was a born Binhak and her brother was the grandfather of David L. 
Binhak. a retired stock broker who resides at 145 Duxbury Road, Purchase, 
N.Y.I 0577. David Binhak's grandfather kept a detailed log of a trip he took from the 
United States to Karlsbad, Falkenau and other places in Europe in 1 904, portions of 
which are reprinted in thias book. David Binhak is in possession of this log. Another 
member of the Binhak family with whom I have been in contact and who once lived in 
Karlsbad is Wilhelm Binhak. 3174-C Via Vista, Laguna Hills, Cal. 92653. QSS. 
Binhak was Wilhelm's father and Karl Binhak was Wilhelm's brother. Carl, a 
violinist, was married to his second cousin, Emma . Walter Kohn was the cousin of 
John rHansl Stei niger from Falkenau, who was the son of Ernst Steiniqer . 

Family BOhm was also related to the Adlers or Lov/Levi Family. Family Bohm lived in 
Mies, Bohemia, where they owned a dry goods store. Their daughter — first name 
unknown — married a Mr. Reich, but nothing more is known except that they 
perished in Auschwitz or Theresienstadt concentration camp. 

1% 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAMILY OF FALKENAU AND EGER - 2A 
THE CHILDREN OF JOSEF AND SOPHIE (LOV/LEVI) ADLER 



FROM PAGE 196 



To 
_Page 
200 



WILHELM- ANNA 
ADLER 
HELLER 



B. 1854 
D. 1936 



(illegitimate) 



(Also on Page 14 5) 



LEOPOLD-HERMINE 

Minke 
ADLER 
HOENIG 



RICHARD-FRANCISCA 

("Fannie") 
HELLER 
PFEFFER 



To 

_Page 

198 



HELENE 
HELLER 



I 



B.2/16/1867 B.1/15/1879 
Temesvar, Asch.Bohemia 
Hungary D.l/1 1/1964 

D.4/14/1930 Bayside.NY 
Brooklyn.NY 



To Page 1 46 



D. 1944 
Auschwitz 
Holocaust 



B. 1887 
Mies.Bohemia 
D. 1944 
Theresienstadt 
Holocaust 



B. 1890-91 

Mies.Bohemia 
D. 1942 
Holocaust 



KARL 
PFEFFER 



B.7/20/1909 
Mies 

D.1945 
Dachau - 
Holocaust 



WENZEL - BERTHA 
PFEFFER 
SCHWARZ 



MAX I 
PFEFFER I 



B.10/4/1914 
Plzen 
D. 1982 
Plzen 



B.1/14/1911 

Mies 
D.Spring 1989 

Plzen, Czech. 



B.10/11/1913 

Mies 
D.1945 

Holocaust 



RICHARD-VARSLOVA 
NOVAK 
SCHWARZ 



B.10/1/1949 
Darmstadt, 
Germany 



B.9/26/1951 

Most/Plzen, 

Czechoslovakia 



RICHARD 
SCHWARZ 



B.6/4/1975 
Darmstadt, Ger. 



197 



• 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAMILY OF FALKENAU AND EGFR - ?R 

THE CHILDR EN OF JOSEF AND SOPHIE (LOV/LEVh API FR 

FROM PAGE 196 



From 

Page_ 

197 



ROSA 
HELLER 



Mies, Bohemia 
D.3/4/1919 

Falkenau 
(Killed by a soldier) 



WALTER-BESCHA 
HELLER 



B.1913 



D.I 974-75 

Mies 



B., 



(Tachau.Czecn) 



- HELENE 
HELLER 



B B.I 947 

Mies 



ERNST- ANNIE 
("Bertel") 
BUXBAUM 
HELLER 



B.1893or 1895 
D.Holocaust 



B.I 898-99 
D.Holocaust 



KURT 
HELLER 



B.I 938-39 
D.Holocaust 



To 

Page 

199 



198 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAMILY OF FALKENAU AND EGER - 2C 
THE CHILDREN OF JOSEF AND SOPHIE (LOV/LEVI) ADLER 



FROM PAGE 196 



From 

Page_ 

198 



1 



ALFRED - MARIE 
Abraham Faegele 
HELLER 
HAHN 



JOHANN - ELSIE 

EPSTEIN 
BRICK 



B.7/3/1892 

D.10/16/1957 
Brooklyn.NY 



B.12/5/1899 
Mies.Bohemia 

D.3/17/1974 
Brooklyn.NY 



D.before 1941 
Brooklyn.NY 



B.. 



D.C.I 941 
Brooklyn.NY 



To Page 1 47 



DR.EDWARD-ROSA 
HAHN 
BRICK 



B.. 



D.Jan 1978 
Brooklyn.NY 



HERTA 
HAHN 



WILLIE 
HAHN 



DR.ARTHUR-ANNELIESE 

HAHN 
KRIEGER 



B. 



CHARLES CHRISTOPHER 
KRIEGER 1 KRIEGER 



B.. 



Queens.NY Queens.NY 





CALVIN-JEAN 
HAHN 
ROTHMAN 




R 




B 
















J 1 


JASON 
ROTHMAN 


AMY 
ROTHMAN 


B 




B 





Queens.NY Queens.NY 



199 



# 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAMILY OF FALKENAU AND EGER - 2D 

THE CHILD REN OF JOSEF AND SOPHIE (LOV/LEVI) ADLER 

FROM PAGE 196 



« 



From 

Page_ 

199 



ADOLF - THERESIA 
ADLER 
FISCHER 



B B.2/4/1852 



D. 1918 
Karlsbad 



D.4/28/1936 



EDMUND 
FISCHER 



"I 



To 
.Page 
207 



B.1/6/1873? 
AltRohlau B. 1869 

D.Holocaust 

D. 1905 



EMIL-HERMINE 
FISCHER 
KREISSL 



JOSEF -MARIE 
TOGEL 
DURRSCHMIDT 



B. 1883 
Alt Rohlau 
D. 1917 
Karlsbad 



B.1856 
D 



I (Two sons; Josef. FranzT ) 



JOSEF- ANNA 

KADERAVEK 
KREISSL 



RICHARD- FRANZISKA 

DURRSCHMIDT 
KREISSL 



B.10/20/1904 B.12/8/1908 B. 10/17/1902 

Karlsbad Pribunz.Bohemia Karlsbad 

D.2/19/1982 D.I /1 0/1979 D.Holocaust 

Toronto.Canada Toronto,Canada 

[Anna Kaderavek Kreissl had a half 
sister, Marianne Schwarz (born 
12/1/1912), who lives in Toronto.] 



B.3/4/1904 



LEOPOLD-JOHANNA 
("Hanni") 
KREISSL 
WEISS 



B.8/13/1900 



D.3/18/1954 



D.7/1 1/1976 



B.12/19/1905 

Karlsbad 
D.I 0/1 3/1 988 
Munich.Germany 



BRIAN 



- GERTRUDE 




JOSEF-WENDY 


KREISSL 




HALL 


BOOTH 




KREISSL 



To 
_Page 
205 



FRANK WILLIAM 



FOSTER 



MARIE 
KREISSL 



B.3/30/1926 
Plumley, 
Cheshire, 
England 



o1949 



B.3/22/1928 
Alt Rohlau, 
Bohemia, 
Czech, 



To Page 201 



B.3/23/1929 
Alt Rohlau, 
Bohemia, 
Czech. 
D.9/22/1983 
Timperley, 
Cheshire.Eng. 
o«2/4/1956 

To Page 202 
200 



B.2/19/1935 
Altrincham, 
Cheshire, 
England 



B.8/23/1921 IB.6/1/1930 
Old Trafford, Alt Rohlau, 
Manchester, Bohemia, 

England | Czech. 



o11/28/1953j 

To Page 204 



THE LOV, or LEVI. FAMILY OF FALKENAU AND EGER - 3A 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND SOPHIE (LOV/LEVH ADLER 

THE CHILDREN OF BRIAN AND GERTRUDE (KREISSL) BOOTH 

FROM PAGE ZOO 



RICHARD 
BOOTH 



JANET ELIZABETH 
BOOTH 



B.7/17/1949 



B.3/6/1957 



MICHAEL PAUL-HELEN MARGARET 

BOOTH 
HAWTHORN 



B. 8/8/1962 
»8/25/1 990 



B.2/28/1966 



THOMAS 
HAWTHORN 



SOPHIE 
HAWTHORN 



• 



201 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAMILY 


OF FALKENAL 


AND EGER 


- 3B 


THE DESCENDANTS 


OF JOSEF 


AND 


SOPHIE 


(LOV/LEVI) 


ADLER 


THE CHILDREN 


OF JOSEF 


AND 


WENDY 


(HALL) KREISSL 


- 


FROM 


PAGE 


200 




F 



SHANE - PATRICIA 
THOMSON 
KREISSL 



B.6/26/1957 B. 
Altrincham, 
Cheshire, 
England 

oo5/17/1994 



* 



§ 



To 

Page 

203 



TERENCE-FRANCES 
KREISSL 
ROBB 



B.I 0/31 /I 948 
Chester, 
England 



»7/26/1980 
Timperley, 
Cheshire, 

England 



B.9/5/1958 
Altrincham, 
Cheshire, 
England 



ALLEN JOSEF 
ROBB 



B.I 2/20/1 982 
Wythenshawe, 

Cheshire, 
England 



DANIEL TERENCE 
ROBB 



B.7/24/1984 
Wythenshawe, 
Cheshire, 
England 



* 



202 



» 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAMILY OF FALKENAU AND EGER - 3B 

THE DESCE NDANTS OF JOSEF AND SOPHIE (LOV/LEVl) ADLER 

THE CHILDREN OF JOSEF AND WENDY (HALL) KREISSL 

FROM PAGE 200 



From 
Page_ 
202 




PETER-JANICE GAIL 
MORT 
KREISSL 



B.12/1 1/1959 

Sale, 
Cheshire, 
England 

oo9/6/1986 
Timperley, 
Cheshire, 
England 



B.9/8/1957 
Davyhulme, 

Greater Manchester, 
England 



ADAM 
KREISSL 



B.4/26/1993 
Wythenshawe, 
Manchester, 
England 



B.5/26/1971 
Wythenshawe, 
Manchester, 
England 

oo8/22/1997 



England 



B.1/8/1965 
Davyhulme, 
Greater Manchester, 
England 



RYAN 
KREISSL 



SHAUN 
KREISSL 



B.I 0/1 4/1 994 
Macclesfield, 
Cheshire, 

England 



B.9/19/1996 
Macclesfield, 
Cheshire, 
England 



f 



i 



203 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FA MILY OF FA1 KENAU AND FfiFR - ZC. 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND SOPHIE (LOV/LEVO ADLER 

THE SON OF FRANK AND MARIE (KREISSL) FOSTER 

FROM PAGE 2QO 



MICHAEL- JANE 
WALKER 
FOSTER I 



B.5/2/1958 B. 2/5/1960 
«6/8/1 985 



STEPHEN WILLIAM -MICHELLE YVONNE 

SLACK 
FOSTER 



B.l 1/25/1960 
oo5/13/1995 



B.. 



NATASHA AMY 
FOSTER 



B. 8/4/1997 



204 



I 



TH E LOV, or LEVI, FAMILY OF FALKFNAU AND FGFR - ?F 

THE CHILDREN OF JOSFF AND SQPHIF. (LOV/LEVh API FR 

FROM PAGE 13fi 



ft 



From 

Page_ 

200 



FRANK- JEAN 

HOWARD 
KREISSL 



RONALD- PAULA 
KREISSL 
ROBERTS 



i.3/7/1933 


B.l/20/1927 


B.7/12/1928 


B.9/1 1/1934 


Lichtenstadt, 


Salford, 


Hale, 


Lichtenstadt 


Bohemia, 


Lancashire, 


Cheshire, 


Bohemia, 


Czech. 


England 


England 
Occ.Chauffeur 


Czech. 


2/21/1959 




coll/16/1957 




To Page 206 


To Page 206 



205 



I 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAMILY OF FALKENAU AND EGER - 3D 

THE DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND SOPHIE (LOV/LEVI) ADLER 

THE SON OF FRANK AND JEAN (HOWARD) KREISSL 

FROM PAGE 205 



MARK 
KREISSL 



B.7/2/1963 



• 



THE CHILDREN OF RONALD AND PAULA (KREISSL) ROBERTS 
FROM PAGE 205 



DAVID WILLIAM 
ROBERTS 



B.3/28/1959 



Occ. Hotel Catering 



MICHAEL ANDREW-CAROL ANN 
ROBERTS 
COWAN 



B.3/19/1954 

Occ. Insurance 
oo6/29/1 985 
Hale Barns Chapel, 
England 



B.3/17/1962 
Occ. Insurance 



206 



• 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAMILY OF FALKENAH AN D EGER - 2F 

DESCENDANTS OF JOSEF AND SOPHIE (LOV/LEVI) ADLER 

THE CHILDREN OF ADOLF AND THERESIA (ADLER) FISCHER 

FROM PAGE 196 



From 
Page . 
200 " 



ADOLF- HELENE 
FISCHER 
SUSSNER 



JULIE 
FISCHER 



B.1 1/2/1886 
Alt Rohlau 

D.4/16/1969 
Baldham,Ger. 



B.7/3/1885 
Alt Rohlau 

D.1/26/1961 
Baldham.Ger. 



B.C. 1887 
Alt Rohlau 
D.Holocaust 



JOSEF 
FISCHER 
B. 1890 
Alt Rohlau 
D.1914-18 

Killed in 

World War 1 



To 

_Page 

208 



ROSA 
FISCHER 1 
B. 1896 

Alt Rohlau 
D.1/17/1930 

Karlsbad 



THERESA 

SUSSNER 



B.5/21/1912 
Alt Rohlau 



ANTON- MARIE 
SUSSNER 
UNGER 



B.3/6/1918 
Fischem, 
near Karlsbad 



B.9/19/1913 

Alt Rohlau 
D.7/6/1984 
Zorneding, Germany 




ANTON 
UNGER 



B.1 1/5/1953 
Munich 



I 



207 



* 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAMILY OF FALKENAU AND EGER - 2G 

THE CHILDREN OF JOSEF AND SOPHIE (LOV/LEVI) ADLER 

FROM PAGE 196 



From 
Page 
207 



RUDOLF- PAULA 
FISCHER 
BARB1ER 



EMMA 
FISCHER 



B.1899 



ft 



D.1939 
Dachau- 
shot to 
death by 
the Nazis 



B.1898 
Alt Rohlau 

D.1/7/1937 
Karlsbad- 
suicide 



B. 1900 

Alt Rohlau 
D.1/16/1977 
Israel 



OSKARURI- HERMA 
FISCHER 
WIENER 



B.6/14/1921 



D.6/13/1969 
Israel 



B.1 2/30/1 922 

Karlsbad 
D.C.I 982 
Israel 



(Kfar Tabor. Israel) 



ZFIRAH- NOMI 
WIENER 
URI 



B.6/4/1947 



B.2/10/1947 



TALLY 
URI 



ITAY 
URI 



B.1 1/27/1 977 
Kiriat Ono, 
Israel 



B.1 1/2/1978 

Kiriat Ono, 

Israel 



208 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAM ILY OF FALKENAU AND RGER - 2H 

THE CHILD REN OF JACOB AND ROSA (I fW/l Fyp SPIEGL 

FROM PAGE 196 



OTTO A. - PAULA 
SPIEGL 
GESS 



EMMA 
SPIEGL 



MATHILDE 
SPIEGL 



To 

_Page 

210 



HILDA 
SPIEGL 



B.Oct. 1864 

Russia 
D 



B.Feb.1868 
Eger.Bohemia 

D 

New York 



B.4/16/1873 
Eger.Bohemia 
D.6/3/1937 
New York 



B.12/1/1874 
Eger.Bohemia 
D.9/4/1951 
New York 



B.4/17/1876 
Eger.Bohemia 
D. 1960 
New York 



MARCEL-MARIE LOUISE 

SCHMITTER 

B 

D.5/9/1927 



- MARIE 
GESS 
LALLEMENT 



ARBIE - STELLA 
GESS 

BIEDERMANN 



B.. 



B.9/21/1881 B.Aug. 1894 

France New York 

D D 

Los Angeles 

Marie Louise Schmitter died 
in childbirth. Their son, 
Robert Lallement, was reared 
by Marcel Lallement and his 
second wife, Marie Gess 
Lallement. 



B.c.1 890 
New York 
D.1 1/4/1975 
Los Angeles 



ROBERT-GRETA 
WOLF 
LALLEMENT I 



ERIC 



- CAROLYN 

BIEDERMANN 
OPEL 



B.5/9/1927 
France 



B.4/11/1932 
Chicago 



D.1 1/4/1975 
California 



# 



BRIAN DOUGLAS-FLORACY 
VILORIA 
LALLEMENT 



B.12/7/1953 
Los Angeles 



ROBERT L. 
LALLEMENT 
B 



MARC - TERRY SUZANNE 
| LALLEMENT 
1 HARRIS 



B.2/27/1956 
Los Angeles 



OPEL 



DYLAN E. 
HARRIS 



209 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAMILY OF FALKENAU AND EGER - 21 

THE CHILDREN OF JACOB AND ROSA (LOV/LEVI) SPIEGL 

FROM PAGE 196 



From 

Page_ 

209 



OLIVER - CLARA 
SPIEGL 
BUELL 



ANNA 
SPIEGL 



BERTHA 
SPIEGL 



B B.I 2/30/1 876 

Eger.Boriemia 

D.Sept.1965 D.5/17/1939 
Philadelphia.PA Philadelphia.PA 



B.1/1/1880 
Eger.Bohemia 
D.9/5/1908 
New York 



Eger.Bohemia 
D.9/29/1957 
New York 



To 

_Page 

211 



MARTIN 



MARIE 

("Flossy") 
SPIEGL 
MORRIS 



B.2/27/1886 

London 
D.10/14/1965 
New York 

-2/27/1910 



BERTHOLD- EDNA 
MORRIS 
ESBERG 







B.8/13/1909 

New York 
D.6/20/1978 
Woodmere.NY 

-9/3/1935 



B.12/8/1910 

New York 
D.4/23/1990 
Woodmere,NY 



SANO - ELSIE 
ESBERG 
DANIEL 
(Divorced) 



B.6/14/1947 
New York 



ALEXANDER 
DANIEL 



B.5/20/1887 
Eger,Bohemia 

D.1 1/7/1976 
New York 



ARTHUR- HELEN 
MORRIS 
FURST 



B.6/25/1913 



»9/5/1941 



B.4/3/1914 
New York 



KENNETH- NANCY 
FURST 
SCHUBACH 



B 



B.6/13/1948 
New York 



MICHAEL 
SCHUBAC H 



JONATHAN 
SCHUBACH 



B.7/6/1972 
New York 



B.10/16/1977 B.1/31/1981 



# 



210 



THE LOV. or LEVI. FAMILY OF FALKENAU AND EGER - 2J 

THE CHILDREN OF JACOB AND ROSA (LOV/LEVl) SPIEGL 

FROM PAGE 196 



From 
Page 
















210 
























ELSIE 


SPIEGL 


SPIEGL 


SPIEGL 



B. 18 

Eger.Bohemia 
D. 18 

Eger.Bohemia 



B. 18., 

Eger,Bohemia 
D. 18.... 
Eger.Bohemia 



B.3/15/1883 
Eger.Bohemia 

D. 7/28/1935 
New York 



211 



Bibliography 



Abeles-lggers, Wilma (editor), The Jews of Bohemia and Moravia: A Historical Reader, 
1992, Wayne State University Press, Detroit, Michigan, 412 pp. Translated by Wilma 
Abeles-lggers, Kaca PolSckova-Henley and Kathrine Talbot from the German edition, Juden in 
Bdhmen und MShren, 1986, Oscar Beck Verlagsbuchhandlung, Munich. 

Articles on Bohemia, Israel Honig (Elder Von Honigsberg), and Karlsbad in Encyclopedia 
Judaica and the Jewish Encyclopedia. 

Busch, Isidor, Kalender und Jahrbuch fur Israeliten aud das Schaltjahr (1848) 5608, 
1 847, Franz Edlen von Schmid, Vienna, (Pages 1 1 7-1 44). 

Donath, Dr. Oskar, Die Bdhmische Dorfjuden, 1926, Markus Krai, Brunn [Brno] 
(Moravia), Czechoslovakia, 126 pp. (Details about Jewish life and literature in Bohemia; 
written in German.) 

Fiedler, Jiri, Guide Book - Jewish Sights of Bohemia and Moravia, 1991, Sefer, Prague, 
224 pp. [Tourist guide to the history, synagogues, cemeteries and other Jewish places in 
Bohemia and Moravia, with photographs, sketches, diagrams and maps; written in English, with 
editions available in other languages.] 

Fodor, Eugene (editor), Fodor's Czechoslovakia, 1975, David McKay Inc., New York. 
[Tourist guide updated regularly. Used for information about Karlsbad (Karlovy Vary) and 
Falkenau (Sokolov)]. 






Friedlaender, Dr. Markus H., Die Juden in Bohmen, 1 900, Moritz Waizner and Son, 
Vienna. (History of the Jews in Bohemia; written in German.) 

Geue, Ethel Hander, New Homes in a New Land: German Immigration to Texas 
1847-1861, 1970, Lexian Press, Waco, Texas, 166 pages (Page 85). 

Hrasky, Dr. Josef, Ein Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Judensiedlungen in Bohmen in den Jahren 
1650 und 1674, 1 938, Prague. (An account, written in German, of Bohemian Jews in the 1 7th 
century.) 

Krai, Vacloc, Deutschen in der Tschechoslowakei, 1933-1947. (Lists place name changes 
from German to Czech.) 

Long, Martgha Gilliland, and Hale, Marilyn, Editors, Llano County-Family Album, A 
History, Llano County Historical Society, Inc., 1988, Llano, Texas. 

Oatman, Wilburn, Llano-Gem of the Hill Country, A History of Llano County, Texas, 
written after 1 967, Pioneer Book Publishers, Inc., Hereford, Texas. 

St. Louis Genealogical Society, Index of St. Louis Marriages, 1804-1876, Volume 1, 
1973, St. Louis. 

St. Louis Genealogical Society, St. Louis and St. Louis County, Missouri Index to the 1860 
Federal Census, Vol II: F-K, 1 984, St. Louis. 

TerezinskS Pametni Kniha [Terezin Remembrance Book], Volume 1 , Zidovste Obeti 
Naciostickych Deportaci Z Cech a Moravy - 1941-1945 [Jewish Victims of the Nazi 
Deportation from Czech and Moravia - 1941-1945], Dil Prvni [First Part], Terezinska 
Iniciativa Melantrich [Publisher: Terezin Initiative Melantrich], 1995, 677 pages. [Volume 2 
contains pages 687-1559.] 

212 



Treixler, Dr. Gustav, "Geschichte der Juden in Falkenau, Elbogen und Umgebung" 
["History of the Jews in Falkenau, Elbogen and Surroundings"], Pages 135-139 in Die Juden 
und Judengemeinden BOhmens in Vergangenheit und Gegenwart /The Jews and the Jewish 
Communities of Bohemia in the Past and Present], 1934, Judischer Buch und Kunstverlag, 
Brunn - Prague, 735 pages. Contains the history of 342 Jewish communities in Bohemia. 

Wach, W., "Geschichte der Juden Mies und Umgebung" ["History of the Jews in Mies and 
Surroundings"], Pages 399-402 in Die Juden und Judengemeinden Bohmens in Vergangenheit 
und Gegenwart [The Jews and the Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the Past and Present], 
1934, Judischer Buch und Kunstverlag, Brunn - Prague, 735 pages. Contains the history of 
342 Jewish communities in Bohemia. 

Wachstein, Dr. Bernhard, Die Inschriften des Alten Judenfriedhofes in Wien, 2. Teil 
(1696-1783), 1917, Wilhelm Braumuller, Vienna and Leipzig, (written in German) (Pages 
524-527). 

Ziegler, Dr. Ignaz, Dokumente zur Geschichte Der Juden in Karlsbad (1791-1869), 
1913, Rudolf Hendstenberg, Karlsbad. (A full, personal account of Jewish life in Karlsbad, 
dealing particularly with with David and Lazar Moser; written in German.) 

Ziegler, Prof. Dr. Ignaz, Ein Volksbuch Uber Die Propheten Israels, 1 938, Julius Kittls' 
Successors, Mahr.-Ostrau, Czechoslovakia. (Published on the 50th anniversary of Dr. Ziegler's 
appointment as Rabbi of Karlsbad. Contains a biographical sketch, his picture, and signature; 
written in German.) 



Various pamphlets on Timisoara (Temesvar) and Romania supplied by the Romanian 
National Tourist Office, 573 Third Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10016 U.S.A. 

Translations from German to English and personal recollections provided by my late 
father, Joseph Hoenig. 

Additional translations from German to English provided by Dr. Joseph Budlovsky, Karl 
Budlovsky, Herbert (Friesem) Fraser, Dr. Julius Hdnig, Maya Svata Levy (Lowy) and Lici 
(Alice) Treuer Weinrib. 

Personal accounts given by the many relatives listed on page il. 

The 1880 and 1900 United States Censuses were also used to obtain information 
about the Spiegl Family of New York and the Klein, Kohner and Abramson Families of 
St. Louis, Missouri. This research was completed at the U.S. National Archives branch 
formerly in Bayonne, New Jersey and now in New York, and the New York Public 
Library's Schomberg Center. 

The original edition was mimeographed at Parsons JHS 168 Queens, Flushing N.Y. 11366, USA. 
Not printed at school expense. This edition was word processed by me on my Macintosh Plus computer 
and printed privately. 



213 



Index of Names 

NOTES : Names with are listed alphabetically as if they were spelled oe. 
Children are listed with their father's name, wherever known. 



t 



Abeles Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 

Abeles, Adolf, husband of Fannie Blaustem, 1 1 7. 

Abeles, Fannie Blaustem, wife of Adolf Abeles, 

117. 
Abraham, Salomon, 6. 
Abramson, Alvin Arnt, son of Julius Abramson, 

husband of Ella Jacobs, 23,180. 
Abramson, Ann, daughter of Elmer David 

Abramson, 181. 
Abramson, Barbara, daughter of Milton Louis 

Abramson, 181. 
Abramson, Bertha Klein, daughter of Arant B. 

Klein, wife of Julius Abramson, 23, 

173, 180-181. 
Abramson, Carroll Hugh, son of Alvin Amt 

Abramson, husband of Gail Panken, ii, 

180. 
Abramson, David, son of Elmer David Abramson, 

181. 
Abramson, Ella ("Lalla") Jacobs, wife of Alvin 

Arnt Abramson, 180. 
Abramson, Elmer David, son of Julius Abramson, 

husband of Katherine Eberts, 181. 
Abramson, Estelle ("Stella") Tannen, wife of 

Herbert Abramson, 180. 
Abramson, Herbert, son of Julius Abramson, 

husband of Mildred Semach and Estelle 

("Stella") Tannen, 180. 
Abramson, Jennifer ("Jen"), wife of Milton Louis 

Abramson, 181. 
Abramson, John (Jon), son of Elmer David 

Abramson, 181. 
Abramson, Julius, husband of Bertha Klein, 23, 

173, 180-181. 
Abramson, Katherine Eberts, wife of Elmer David 

Abramson, 181. 
Abramson, Mildred Semach, wife of Herbert 

Abramson, 1 80. 
Abramson, Milton Louis, son of Julius Abramson, 

husband of Jennifer, 181. 
Abramson, Milton Jr. ("Mickey"), son of Milton 

Louis Abramson, 181. 
Abramson, Sidney, son of Julius Abramson, 

husband of Jane Levy, 1 80. 
Adam, Abraham, 6. 

Adler Family (from Falkenau), 18, 31, 36, 39. 
Adler Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 



Adler, Anna, daughter of Josef Adler, wife of 

Wilhelm Heller, 2-3, 9, 18, 43, 197. 
Adler, Gustav, 1 1 . 
Adler, Hermann, 16. 
Adler, Hermine, wife of Leopold Hoenig, 14, 17- 

20, 32-33, 36, 43, 45-46, 48-50, 54, 

57-61, 66, 84-85, 88, 130, 197. 
Adler, Josef, husband of Sophie Lov Adler, 2, 

18, 111, 197-208. 
Adler, Josef (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Adler, Mrs. (Falkenau), 39. 
Adler, Sophie, Lov, wife of Josef Adler, 2, 18, 

111, 197-208. 
Adler, Theresia, daughter of Josef Adler, wife 

of Adolf Fischer, 2, 3, 14, 200, 207. 
Adwell, Jane Ruth, wife of Ronald Morris Hoenig, 

134. 
Albala, Arline, daughter of Jack Albala, 59. 
Albala, Ella, wife of Jack Albala, 59. 
Alexander, Susan Fenichel, daughter of Hans 

Fenichel, wife of Mr. Alexander, 1 1 6. 
Allegri, Anna MaryKatherine, daughter of 

Timothy Allegri, 1 38. 
Allegri, Denise Wray Worden, daughter of Eugene 

Wray Worden, wife of Timothy Allegri, 

138. 
Allegri, Luke Michael, son of Timothy Allegri, 

138. 
Allegri, Timothy, husband of Denise Wray 

Worden, 138. 
Altbach, Israel, 103. 
Altmann, Emma Muller, daughter of Albert 

Muller, wife of Ernst Robitschek and 

Hermann Altmann, 22, 28, 1 62. 
Altmann, Hermann, husband of Emma Muller, 28, 

162. 
Altmann, Leo, son of Hermann Altmann, 28, 162. 
Altmann, Max, son of Hermann Altmann, 162. 
Anderson, Helen Margaret, wife of Harold 

Meyers, 183. 
Anschel, Arthur, son of Moses Anschel, 59. 
Anschel, Bina Diamant, wife of Henry Anschel, 

59. 
Anschel, Henry, son of Moritz Anschel, husband 

of Bina Diamant, 59. 
Appleyard, Major, 68-69. 
Arnold, Bertha ("Honey") Hoenig, daughter of 

Morris Frederick Hoenig; wife of Eddie 

Wray Worden, Henry Arnold and Ira N. 



214 



McLendon, 25, 132. 
Arnold, Henry, husband of Bertha ("Honey") 

Hoenig, 132. 
Ascher Family (from Schweissing), 11. 
Aschner, Adolf, son of Leopold Aschner, 1 1 6. 
Aschner, Alberto, son of Ulrich Aschner, husband 

of Maria Victoria Restrepo, 30, 1 28. 
Aschner, Alexander, son of Alois Aschner, 116. 
Aschner, Alice ("Lillie") Fenichel, wife of Emit 

Aschner, 29-30, 118. 
Aschner, Alice Zimbler, wife of Richard 

Aschner, 29-30, 49, 119. 
Aschner. Alois, son of Leopold Aschner, 116. 
Aschner, Anna, daughter of Alois Aschner, 116. 
Aschner, Anna Maria, daughter of Dr. Pablo 

Aschner, 127. 
Aschner, Bibi, daughter of Carl (Carlos) 

Aschner, 1 29. 
Aschner, Dr. Bernard, son of Samuel Aschner, 

29, 118. 

Aschner, Camila, daughter of Alberto Aschner, 

128. 
Aschner, Carl (Carlos), son of Samuel Aschner, 

husband of Nelly Wolf, 30, 119, 129. 
Aschner, Carlos, son of Ulrich Aschner, 1 27. 
Aschner, Carmen Montoya, wife of Ulrich 

Aschner, 30, 127. 
Aschner, Caroline, daughter of Dr. Thomas 

Aschner, 1 29. 
Aschner, Catalina, daughter of Alberto Aschner, 

128. 
Aschner, Dr. Elena, daughter of Ulrich Aschner, 

30, 128. 

Aschner, Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. Bernard 

Aschner, wife of Oliver Laster, ii, 29, 

118. 
Aschner, Emil, son of Samuel Aschner, husband 

of Lillie Fenichel, 29, 117-11 8. 
Aschner, Erica, wife of Dr. Thomas Aschner, 

129. 
Aschner, Erika, daughter of Peter Aschner, wife 

of Piotr [Ronita] Romik, 30, 121. 
Aschner, Eva, daughter of Emit Aschner, wife of 

Walter Vergeiner, ii. 29-30, 118. 
Aschner, Felix, son of Samuel Aschner, husband 

of Lilly Pallester, 30, 119, 1 24, 1 27. 
Aschner, Felix, son of Ulrich Aschner, 1 28. 
Aschner, Fransiska ("Fritzi"), daughter of Adolf 

Aschner, wife of Hans Fenichel, 1 1 6. 
Aschner, Georg, son of Peter Aschner, 30, 1 22. 
Aschner, Gertrude (Trude), daughter of Felix 

Aschner, wife of Stefan Frdhlich, 30, 

124. 



Aschner, Gertrude, daughter of Richard 

Aschner, wife of Dr. Gerhart Schwarz, 

ii, 30, 119. 
Aschner, Hannelore Boltingam, wife of Dr. 

Thomas Aschner, 1 29. 
Aschner, Helga Buchenauer, wife of Dr. Joseph 

Aschner, 30. 
Aschner, Herta Ruth Storfer, wife of Peter 

Aschner, 30, 118, 121. 
Aschner, Idan, son of Zeev Aschner, 121. 
Aschner, Use Marie Romer, wife of Peter 

Aschner, 30, 1 1 8. 
Aschner, Johanna Koenig, wife of Dr. Bernard 

Aschner, 118. 
Aschner, Dr. Joseph, son of Felix Aschner, 

husband of Mary Jane McCue and Helga 

Buchenauer, ii, 30. 
Aschner, Juan Pablo, son of Dr. Pablo Aschner, 

127. 
Aschner, (Catherine, daughter of Dr. Joseph 

Aschner, wife of David DeBruyn, 30, 

124. 
Aschner, Keren, daughter of Zeev Aschner, 121. 
Aschner, Lillie Fenichel (see Aschner, Alice 

Fenichel). 
Aschner, Lilly Pallester, wife of Felix Aschner, 

30, 119. 
Aschner, Leopold, 1 1 6. 
Aschner, Lothar, son of Dr. Thomas Aschner, 

129. 
Aschner, Maria Christina, daughter of Ulrich 

Aschner, 30, 127. 
Aschner, Maria Eugenia Roselli, wife of Dr. Pablo 

Aschner, 127. 
Aschner, Maria Lucia, daughter of Alberto 

Aschner, 128. 
Aschner, Maria Victoria Restrepo, wife of 

Alberto Aschner, 1 28. 
Aschner, Mariana, adopted daughter of Maria 

Christina Aschner, 1 27. 
Aschner, Matilde Zelenka, wife of Adolf Aschner, 

116. 
Aschner, Nelly Wolf, wife of Carl (Carlos) 

Aschner, 30, 119, 129. 
Aschner, Dr. Pablo, son of Ulrich Aschner, 

husband of Maria Eugenia Roselli, 30, 

127. 
Aschner, Patricia, daughter of Dr. Thomas 

Aschner, 1 29. 
Aschner, Paula Blaustem, daughter of Ignaz 

Blaustern, wife of Samuel Aschner, 1 1 6, 

118-119. 
Aschner, Peter, son of Emil Aschner, husband of 



+ 



215 



Herta Ruth Stolfer and Use Maria Romer, 

30, 118, 121-122. 
Aschner, Rachel Shadmi, wife of Zeev Aschner, 

30, 121. 
Aschner, Richard, son of Samuel Aschner, 

husband of Alice Zimbler, 29-30, 49, 

119. 
Aschner, Rom, son of Zeev Aschner, 121. 
Aschner, Samuel, son of Leopold Aschner, 

husband of Paula Blaustern, 29, 1 1 6, 

118-119. 
Aschner, Susanna Claudia, daughter of Peter 

Aschner, wife of Robert Schwarz, 30, 

122. 
Aschner, Dr. Thomas, son of Carl (Carlos) 

Aschner, husband of Erika and 

Hannelore Boltingam, 30, 1 29. 
Aschner, Tsach, son of Zeev Aschner, 121. 
Aschner, Ulrich, son of Felix Aschner, husband 

of Carmen Montoya, ii, 30, 127. 
Aschner, Wolfgang (see Aschner, Zeev). 
Aschner, Zeev (Wolfgang), son of Peter 

Aschner, husband of Rachel Shadmi, ii, 

30, 121. 
Auerbach Family (from Falkenau), 18, 31-32. 
Auerbach, Erich, son of Dr. Ignaz Auerbach, 32. 
Auerbach, Hermine Zentner, wife of Dr. ignaz 

Auerbach, 3 1 . 
Auerbach, Dr. Ignaz, husband of Hermine 

Zentner, 3 1 . 
Auerbach, Kurt, son of Dr. Ignaz Auerbach, 

31-32. 



B 



Ball, Stuart F., 52. 

Bandauer Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 

Barbier, Paula Fischer, daughter of Adolf 

Fischer, wife of Rudolf Barbier, 208. 
Barbier, Rudolf, husband of Paula Fischer, 208. 
Baruch, Ernestine, wife of Ahron Honig von 

Hbnigsberg, 1 12.Basch, Adolf, 15. 
Barrow, Mary Veazey, wife of Eugene Thomas 

Worden, 132, 137-139. 
Barszcz, April Jene, daughter of Thomas 

Barszcz, wife of John Thomas Hollowell, 

150. 
Barszcz, Jene Ann Gangloff, daughter of Andrew 

Gangloff, wife of Thomas Barszcz, 150. 
Barszcz, Lucas Andrew, son of Thomas Barszcz, 

150. 
Barszcz, Thomas, husband of Jene Ann Gangloff, 

150. 



Basch, Siegmund, 15. 
Bauer and Greiner, 33. 
Bauer, Katti Greenbaum, 103. 
Baumgarten, Mathilde Buxbaum, 33. 
Baumgarten, Mr., husband of Mathilde Buxbaum, 

33. 
Becher, Mr., 41-42. 
Beefier, Ms., daughter of Mr. Becher, wife of 

Kurt Steiniger, 41-42. 
Becicka, Regina, 83. 
Beckworth, Captain, 69. 
Beer Family, 38, 153. 
Beer, Anna Honig, daughter of Mr. Beer, wife of 

Joshua Honig, 22, 25-27, 153, 159. 
Beer, Lydia, daughter of Mr. Beer, wife of Ignaz 

Holzner, 29, 111, 153. 
Beer, Mr. and Mrs. (from Piirles), 153. 
Beer, Rosa, daughter of Mr. Beer, wife of 

Salomon Loewy, 111, 153. 
Behal, Liesl Zentner, daughter of Heinrich 

Zentner.wife of Victor Beha/,18, 28, 34, 

43. 
Behal, Victor, husband of Liesl Zentner, 43. 
Beiher, Eva, wife of Simon Holzner, 186. 
Benda Family (from Falkenau), 18, 32. 
Benda, Rudolph, 32. 
Bergermonte?, Fanni, 43. 
Bergler, Emma, 43. 
Bergler, Laura, 44. 
Bergler, Rudolf, 10, 44. 
Bergler, Siegmund, 10. 
Bergman, Wilhelm Heinrich, 97. 
Berliner, Jany Lobl, daughter of Julius Lobl, wife 

of Mr. Berliner, 1 68. 
Berliner, Mr., husband of Jany Lobl, first names 

of three children unknown, 1 68. 
Berroyer, Helen Margaret (see Anderson, Helen 

Margaret). 
Beumann, Franz R., 101. 
Bezdekovsky, Zdenek, ii, 4. 
Biederman, Franz, 47. 

Biedermann, Arbie, husband of Stella Gess, 209. 
Biedermann, Carolyn, daughter of Arbie 

Biedermann, wife of Eric Opel, 209. 
Biedermann, Stella Gess, daughter of Otto A. 

Gess, wife of Arbie Biedermann, 209. 
Bierman, Edward Philip, son of Irven Bierman, 

179. 
Bierman, Irven, husband of June Kohner, 1 79. 
Bierman, June Kohner, daughter of Aaron 

Kohner, wife of Irven Bierman ii, 1 79. 
Bierman, Mark Richard, son of Irven Bierman, 

179. 



216 



Bierman, Melinda Kiely, wife of Robert Michael 

Bierman, 179. 
Bierman, Robert Michael, son of Irven Bierman, 

husband of Melinda Kiely, 1 79. 
Bierman, Steven Edward, son of Irven Bierman, 

husband of Stephanie Twichell, 1 79. 
Biggerstaff, Alan, husband of Victoria Lynn 

Hoenig, 1 34. 
Biggerstaff, Beau Alan, son of Alan Biggerstaff, 

134. 
Biggerstaff, Holli Lynn, daughter of Alan 

Biggerstaff, 134. 
Biggerstaff. Kristal Leigh, daughter of Alan 

Biggerstaff, 1 34. 
Biggerstaff, Victoria Lynn Hoenig, wife of Alan 

Biggerstaff, 1 34. 
Bilchik, Gloria Shur, 24. 
Binder, Rabbi I. M., 20, 54. 
Binhak Family (from Falkenau), 18, 32-33, 40, 

72-81, 196. 
Binhak, Anna, daughter of Siegmund Binhak, wife 

of Jacob Kohn, 32,73-74,76-79,81. 
Binhak, Artur (Arthur) (died in World War I), 95. 
Binhak, Carl, son of Siegmund Binhak, 16, 

32-33, 72-81, 196. 
Binhak, David L., grandson of Carl Binhak, ii, 32, 

36, 72. 
Binhak, Edith, wife of David L. Binhak, 36. 
Binhak, Emma, daughter of Siegmund Binhak, 

32, 77-79, 81. 
Binhak, Emma, wife of Carl Binhak, 32, 72-73, 

80, 196. 
Binhak, Ema, 95. 
Binhak, Helene, daughter of Siegmund Binhak, 

wife of Ignaz in Seestadl, 32, 74, 76, 

78, 80. 
[Ignaz is not listed in this index since his 
family name is unknown. Pages where his name 

appears are included with Helene.] 
Binhak, Hermine, 32. 
Binhak, Hugo, son of Siegmund Binhak, 3 
Binhak, Lawrence, son of Carl Binhak, 72. 
Binhak, Marta, daughter of Siegmund Binhak, 

wife of Hermann in Petschau, 32, 77-80. 
Binhak, Moritz, 32, 77, 80. 
Binhak, Olga, daughter of Siegmund Binhak, wife 

of Leo in Leitmeritz, mother of a son, 

32-33, 72-73, 75-76, 78, 80-81. 

[Leo and his son (first name unknown), and 

also brother-in-law Hermann are not listed in 

this index as the family name is unknown. 

Pages where their names appear are included 

with Olga.] 



Binhak, Otto, son of Siegmund Binhak, 32, 76, 

196. 
Binhak, Paula, daughter of Siegmund Binhak, 

wife of Adolf in Brux, mother of Erna and 

Paul and another son, 32-33,73-74, 

76, 78, 80. 

[Adolf, Erna and Paul are not listed in this 

index because their family name is unknown. 

Pages where their names appear are included 

with Paula.] 

Binhak, Siegmund, 16, 32-33, 72-73, 77. 

Binhak, Mrs. Siegmund, iv/re of Siegmund Binhak, 

32, 72-73, 78-81. 
Binhak, Stephen, son of Carl Binhak, 72. 
Binhak, Wilhelm, son of Otto Binhak, 32, 196. 
Binhak cousins Frieda and Rosa in Franzensbad, 

79. 

[Their family name is unknown]. 
Bittner, Abraham, 107. 

Bittner, Babette, wife of Mr. Weinberger, 105. 
Bittner, Hermann, 107. 
Bittner, Hermine, 109. 
Bittner, Katharina, 105. 
Bittner, Maria, wife of Mr. Hoffmann, 105. 
Bittner, Max, son of Sallomon Bittner, 1 07. 
Bittner, Theodore, 109. 

Blaustern Family (from Tachau and Vienna), 111. 
Blaustern, Anna Honig, daughter of Israel Honig 

from Kirchenbirk, 2, 11, 19, 113, 116- 

129. 
Blaustern, Anton, 1 1 . 
Blaustern, Carolina, 1 1 . 
Blaustern, Emma, daughter of Ignaz Blaustern, 

11, 117. 
Blaustern, Fannie, daughter of Ignaz Blaustern, 

wife of Adolf Abeles, 11,117. 
Blaustern, Ignaz, husband of Anna Honig, ii, 11, 

19, 113, 116-129. 
Blaustern, Karolina ("Carla," "Alina"), daughter 

of Ignaz Blaustern, 1 1 6. 
Blaustern, Lt. Col. Judge , son of Ignaz 

Blaustern, husband of Mitzi Rosenfeld, 

117. 
Blaustern, Mitzi Rosenfeld, daughter of Rosa 

(Frederi cka) Blaustern Rosenfeld -> 

Rhona, 1 1 7. 
Blaustern, Paula, daughter of Ignaz Blaustern, 

11, 116, 118-119. 
Blaustern, Rosa (Fredericka), dauhter of Ignaz 

Blaustern, 11, 116. 
Bloch Family (from Falkenau), 18, 33, 49, 63. 
Bloch [house], 3, 33, 37. 
Bloch, Alexandra, wife of Dr. Ferdinand Bloch, 



217 



» 



33. 
Bloch, Anna, daughter of Jachim Heinrich Bloch, 

33, 43, 63. 
Bloch, Bertha, wife of Jachim Heinrich Bloch, 

33, 63. 
Bloch, Carl, son of Jachim Heinrich Bloch, 33, 

63. 
Bloch, David, son of Nathan Bloch, husband of 

Hermine Bloch, 41. 
Bloch, Dr. Ferdinand, son of Karl Bloch, husband 

of Alexandra Bloch, 33. 
Bloch, Hermine, wife of David Bloch, 41. 
Bloch, Ida, daughter of Jachim Heinrich Bloch, 

wife of Alfred Fischer, 16, 34, 63. 
Bloch, Jachim Heinrich, husband of Bertha, 33. 
Bloch, Karl, son of Dr. Ferdinand Bloch, 33. 
Bloch, Katti, wife of Simon Schwarz, 37. 
Bloch, Dr. Kurt, husband of Alexandra Bloch, 33. 
Bloch, Louise, daughter of Jachim Heinrich 

Bloch, 33, 63. 
Bloch, Marie, daughter of Jachim Heinrich 

Bloch, 33, 63. 
Bloch, Nathan, 41. 
Bloch, Otto, son of Jachim Heinrich Bloch, 1 6, 

33, 63. 
Bloch, Wilma, daughter of David Bloch, wife of 

Philipp Steiniger, 41. 
Block, Fanny, wife of David Pachter, 24. 
Bbhm Family (from Schweissing), 11, 1 96. 
Bbhm, Adolf, 10. 
Bbhm, Benedict, 1 1 . 
Bohm, Dr. Ignaz, 1 1 . 

Bohm, (daughter), wife of Mr. Reich, 1 96. 
Bollins, Harry, 86. 
Boltingam, Hannelore, wife of Dr. Thomas 

Aschner, 129. 
Bondy Family (from Falkenau), 1 8, 33. 
Bondy, Bernard, 10. 
Bondy, Franz, son of Karl Bondy, 17. 
Bondy, Dr. Jiri [George], hand of Lydia Holzner, 
192. 

Bondy, Karl, husband of and Steffi, 16, 33, 

39. 
Bondy, Lydia Holzner, daughter of Franz Holzner, 

wife of Dr. Jiri [George] Bondy, 192. 
Bondy, Steffi, wife of Karl Bondy, 33. 
Booth, Brian, husband of Gertrude Kreissl, 200- 

201. 
Booth, Gertrude Kreissl, daughter of Richard 

Kreissl, wife of Brian Booth, 200-201 . 
Booth, Helen Margaret, daughter of Brian Booth, 

wife of Michael Paul Hawthorn, 201 . 
Booth, Janet Elizabeth, daughter of Brian Booth, 



201. 
Booth, Richard, son of Brian Booth, 201. 
Bor, Gerta Fink.tv/fe of Pavel Bor [Pavel 

Edelstein], 34. 
Bor, Pavel, formerly Pavel Edelstein, husband of 

Gerta Fink, 34. 
Borg, Fanni, 108. 
Bradberry, George Lee, husband of Lillie Mae 

Hoenig, 1 32. 
Bradberry, Lillie Mae Hoenig, wife of George Lee 

Bradberry, 1 32. 
Braun Family (from Falkenau), 18, 33, 38. 
Braun, David, son of Peter Braun, 195. 
Braun, Emma, wife of Leopold Fenichel, 116. 
Braun, Frank, son of Josef Braun, husband of 

Hilde Loewy, 33, 195. 
Braun, Hana, daughter of Frank Braun, wife of J. 

Havlicek, 195. 
Braun, Hermine Fischer, 109. 
Braun, Hilde Loewy, daughter of Richard 

Loewy.wife of Frank Braun, 33, 1 95. 
Braun, Josef, father of Frank Braun, 33. 
Braun, Peter, son of Frank Braun, husband of 

Sandy Feris, 195. 
Braun, Sandy Feris, wife of Peter Braun, 195. 
Brehmer, Anna Louise, wife of John Bushgien, 

114. 
Brenner, Esther, wife of David Pachter, 24. 
Brick, Adeline, daughter of Johann Brick, wife of 

Adolph Hoenig, 21,61, 1 47. 
Brick, Dr. Edward, son of Johann Brick, husband 

ofRosaHahn, 61, 199. 
Brick, Elsie Epstein, wife of Johann Brick, 199. 
Brick, Johann, husband of Elsie Epstein, 199. 
Brick, Rosa Hahn, daughter of Alfred Hahn, wife 

of Dr. Edward Brick, ii, 57, 61, 199. 
Brod, Stephanie, wife of Fred ('Fritz") Glaser, 

161. 
Bruckmuller, Monika, wife of Pedro Miguel 

FrOhlich, 124. 
Brum, Jacob, son of Simon Brum, 107. 
Brum, Leopold, son of Simon Brum, 107. 
Brum, Marie, wife of Mr. Haas, 104. 
Brum, Mina, wife of Mr. Haas, 1 04. 
Brum, Rachel Gluck, 104. 
Brum, Simon, 107. 
Buchenauer, Helga Aschner,w/fe of Dr. Joseph 

Aschner, 30. 
Buchsbaum, Julie, wife of Leopold Lowy, 37. 
Budlovsky, Alexander Gustav ("Sasha"), son of 
Karl Budlovsky, husband of Irena 
Gutmann, 1 58. 
Budlovsky, Alexandra ("Xandra") Gutersloh, 



218 



daughter of Albert Paris Gutersloh, wife 
of Kari Budlovsky, 27-28, 62, 156, 158 
Budlovsky, Alice Schultz, wife of Michel 

Budlovsky, 157. 
Budlovsky, Anna, daughter of Gustav Budlovsky 

27,62,156. 
Budlovsky, Daniel, son of Michel Budlovsky, 157. 
Budlovsky, David, son of Michel Budlovsky! 157. 
Budlovsky, Gustav, husband of Rosa Hbnig' 27 

62, 95, 156. 
Budlovsky, Irena Gutmann, wife of Alexander 

Gustav ("Sasha") Budlovsky, 158. 
Budlovsky, Dr. Joseph ("Mopl"), son of Gustav 
Budlovsky, ii, 18, 27-28, 57, 62 156- 
157. 
Budlovsky, Joshua, son of Alexander Gustav 

("Sasha") Budlovsky, 158. 
Budlovsky, Karl, son of Gustav Budlovsky ii 

18, 26-29, 31, 38, 62, 156, 158'. 
Budlovsky, Margaret, daughter of Dr. Joseph 

("Mopl") Budlovsky, wife of Dr. Richard 
Kardish, 28, 1 57. 
Budlovsky, Michel, son of Karl Budlovsky, 
husband of Alice Schultz, 28,157. 
Budlovsky, Rosa Honig, daughter of Joshua Hbnig 
from Kirchenbirk, wife of Gustav 
Budlovsky, 22, 27, 31, 52, 57, 62, 95, 
156. 
Budlovsky, Sacha, son of Karl Budlovsky 28 

157. 
Budlovsky, Susan wife of Dr. Joseph 

Budlovsky, ii, 28, 62, 156-157. 
Budlovsky, Thalia, daughter of Alexander Gustav 

( "Sasha ") Budlovslky, 158. 
Budlovsky, Vera Demovsek, daughter of Karl 
Budlovsky, wife of John ("Honsa") 
Demovsek, 28, 158. 
Budlowsky, Alexander Gustav, Alexandra, Alice 
Schultz, Anna, Daniel, David, Gustav, 
Irena Gutmann, Dr. Joseph, Joshua, Karl, 
Margaret, Michel, Rosa Honig, Sacha, 
Susan, Thalia, Vera Demovsek, see 
listings under Budlovsky. 
Buell, Clara Spiegl, daughter of Jacob Spiegl, 

wife of Oliver Buell, 210. 
Buell, Oliver, husband of Clara Spiegl, 210. 
Buffaloe, Lillie Mae, wife of Morris Frederick 

Hoenig, 24, 51, 130, 132. 
Burgers, M., 10. 

Busch (Bush), Barbara (Bluemele), granddaughter 
of Leopold Hbnig von Honigsberg, wife of 
Ignaz, 112. 
Busch (Bush), Isidor, grandson of Leopold Honig 



von Honigsberg, 13, 112. 
Busch (Bush), Rosalie L, granddaughter of 

Leopold Honig von Honigsberg, wife of 

Ludwig Gbtzel, 1 1 2. 
Bushgien, Anna Louise Brehmer, wife of John 

Bushgien, 1 1 4. 
Bushgien, John, 1 14. 
Bushgien, Sophie Dorthea Christine, daughter of 

John Bushgien, wife of Simon Honig, 1 1 4. 
Bussgang, Moritz, 17. 

Buxbaum Family (from Falkenau), 18, 33-34. 
Buxbaum, Annie "Bertel," wife of Ernst Heller 

33, 198. 
Buxbaum, Barbara, wife of Nathan Buxbaum, 8. 
Buxbaum, Ida, 34. 
Buxbaum, Mathilde, wife of Mr. Baumqarten 

33. 
Buxbaum, Nathan, husband of Barbara Buxbaum 

8. 
Buxbaum, Wilhelm (William), 17, 33. 



Caan, James, son of Sophie Caan, 86. 

Caan, Sophie, 86. 

Cali, Anthony Michael, son of Pietro John Call, 

husband of Theresa Rader, 1 48. 
Cali, Elsie Ann Hoenig, daughter of Adolph 

Hoenig, wife of Pietro Cali, ii 21 147- 
148. 
Cali, Erik Joseph, son of Anthony Michael Cali 

148. 
Cali, Lindy, wife of Pietro John Cali II, 148. 
Cali, Louise Dominique, daughter of Pietro John 

Cali, wife of Robert Paul Sims, 1 48. 
Cali, Pietro John, husband of Elsie Ann Hoeniq 

147-148. 
Cali, Pietro John II, son of Pietro John Cali, 

husband of Lindy, 148. 
Cali, Theresa Rader, wife of Anthony Michael 

Cali, 1 48. 
Carp, Doris, daughter of Mr. Carp, 171. 
Carp, Hella Eisenberger, daughter of Karla Hbnig 

Eisenberger, wife of Mr. Carp, 171. 
Carp, Mr., husband of Hella Eisenberger, 171. 
Carrick, Charles, husband of Elsie Ann Hoenia 

21, 147. 
Carrick, Elsie Ann Hoenig, daughter of Adolph 
Hoenig, wife of Charles Carrick ii 2 1 
147. ' ' 

Carson, Carolyn Earlene, daughter of Howard 
Carl Carson, wife of Patrick Gallagher 
Eddy La Blanc, 136. 



♦ 



219 



Carson, Howard Carl, husband of Lillie Mae 

Hoenig, 132, 136. 
Carson, Howard Carl Jr., son of Howard Carl 

Carson, 136. 
Carson, Howard Carl III, son of Howard Carl 

Carson Jr., 136. 
Carson, Kathrin Irene, daughter of Howard Carl 

Carson, wife of Buford Fritz White, 136. 
Carson, Lillie Mae Hoenig, wife of Howard Carl 

Carson, 132, 136. 
Carson, Wanda Minor, wife of Howard Carl 

Carson Jr., 136. 
Chaloupka, Mr., husband of Olga Reichler, 39-40. 
Chaloupka, Olga Reichler, 39-40. 
Charles (Karl) IV, 3, 5, 18. 
Cicle, Andrew, husband of Kimbra Lynn Worden. 

138. 
Cicle, Kimbra Lynn Worden, daughter of Eugene 

Wray Worden, wife of Andrew Cicle, 138. 
Cicle, Kira Lynn, adopted daughter of Andrew 

Cicle, 1 38. 
Cileris (?), Lazarus, 102. 
Coats, Amy Levitan, daughter of Donald Levitan, 

wife of Sidney Coats, 1 79. 
Coats, Sidney, husband of Amy Levitan, 1 79. 
Cohen, Dr. Gilbert H., son of Philip Cohen, 58. 
Cohen, Philip, 58. 
Collmann, Helene, 96. 
Cowan, Carol Ann Roberts, daughter of Ronald 

Roberts, wife of Michael Andrew Cowan, 

206. 
Cowan, Michael Andrew, husband of Carol Ann 

Roberts, 206. 
Crdens (?), Lazarus, 102. 
Criscito, Grace, wife of Michael Criscito, 58. 
Criscito, Herbert, son of Michael Criscito, 58. 
Criscito, Dr. Mario A., son of Michael Criscito, 

58, 60. 
Criscito, Michael, husband of Grace, 58-59, 65. 



Danford, Stephen, husband of Mitzi Sue Hoenig, 

135. 
Daniel, Alexander, son of Sano Daniel, 210. 
Daniel, Elsie Esberg, daughter of Berthold Esberg, 

wife of Sano Daniel, 2 1 0. 
Daniel, Moses, 6. 

Daniel Sano, husband of Elsie Esberg, 21 0. 
Darrish, Ann, wife of Aaron Kohner, 52, 179. 
David (from Mies), son of Josef, 9. 
DeBruyn, David, husband of Katherine Aschner, 

124. 



DeBruyn, Katherine Aschner, daughter of Dr. 

Joseph Aschner, wife of David DeBruyn, 

30, 124. 
DeLaPena, Christina Suzana, daughter of Michael 

Richard DeLaPefia, 144. 
DeLaPena, Hannah Princess, daughter of Michael 

Richard DeLaPena, 1 44. 
DeLaPena, Lianne Weiss, daughter of Gerhart 

Weiss, wife of Michael Richard DeLaPena, 

144. 
DeLaPena, Michael Richard, husband of Lianne 

Weiss, 1 44. 
Delion, Jacob, 44. 
Demovsek, John, husband of Vera Budlovsky, 

158. 
Demovsek, Robert, son of John ("Honsa") 

Demovsek, husband of Susan Lee, 1 58. 
Demovsek, Susan Lee, wife of Robert Demovsek, 

158. 
Demovsek, Vera, daughter of Kari Budlovsky, 

wife of John ("Honsa") Demovsek, 28, 

158. 
Diamant, Bina, wife of Henry Anschel, 59. 
Dobinsky, Cathy, daughter of Paul Dobinsky, 184. 
Dobinsky, Daniel, son of Paul Dobinsky, husband 

of Sonia Sirota, 1 84. 
Dobinsky, Jodi, daughter of Daniel Dobinsky, 184. 
Dobinsky, Melissa, daughter of Daniel Dobinsky, 

184. 
Dobinsky, Paul, husband of Ray Frank, 1 84. 
Dobinsky, Ray Frank, daughter of Maurice Frank, 

wife of Paul Dobinsky, ii, 1 84. 
Dobinsky, Sonia Sirota, wife of Daniel Dobinsky, 

184. 
Dobrushka, Franziska, wife of Ludwig Honig von 

Honigsberg, 112. 
Dolfuss, Dr. Engelbert, 82-83. 
Donat, Hani, wife of Mr. Hoffmann, 109. 
Donat, Katharina, 103. 
Dorsey, Jimmy, 86. 
Dorsey, Tommy, 86. 
Dubinsky, David, 57. 
Durrschmidt, Franziska, daughter of Josef 

Durrschmidt, wife of Richard Kreissl, 

200. 
Durrschmidt, Josef, husband of Marie Tbgel, 200. 
Durrschmidt, Marie Togel, wife of Josef 

Durrschmidt, 200. 



Eberhardt, Conductor, 78-79. 
Eberts, Katherine, wife of Elmer David 



220 



Abramson, 181. 
Eckstein, Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Eckstein, Dr. (from Schweissing, in Tetschen), 

11. 
Eckstein, Mr. (from Kladren), 10. 
Eckstein, David, 1 1 . 
Eckstein, Dr. Emil, husband of Dr. Herta Treuer, 

28, 162. 
Eckstein, Dr. Herta Treuer, daughter of Fritz 

Treuer, wife of Dr. Emil Eckstein, 1 62. 
Eckstein, Marina, wife of Adolf Malzner, 107. 
Edelstein, Gerta Fink (see Bor, Gerta Fink). 
Edelstein, Pavel (see Bor, Pavel). 
Ehrlich Family, 34. 
Ehrlich, Charlotte Newman, 18, 39. 
Ehrlich, Nathan, 15. 
Ehrlich, Selig, 15. 
Ehrlich, Selig Senior, 1 5. 
Eiselt, Karolina ("Carla," "Alina) Blaustern, 

daughter of Ignaz Blaustern, wife of Mr. 

Eiselt, 116. 
Eisemann, Lena, wife of Sigmund Falkenstein, 56. 
Eisenberger, Elli, daughter of Karla Hbnig 

Eisenberger, wife of Carl Derfel, 22, 

171. 
Eisenberger, Erika, daughter of Paul Eisenberger, 

husband's name and their children's — 

Peter (husband of Angela) and Caroline - 

- family name is unknown, 171. 
Eisenberger, Friedrich ("Fritz"), son of Karla 

Hbnig Eisenberger, husband of Jana 

(Greta), 22, 172. 
Eisenberger, Gretl, wife of Paul Eisenberger, 

171. 
Eisenberger, Hella, daughter of Karla Hbnig 

Eisenberger, wife of Mr. Carp, 22, 171. 
Eisenberger, Jana (Greta), wife of Friedrich 

"Fritz") Eisenberger, 172. 
Eisenberger, Karla Honig, daughter of Josef 

Honig from Kirchenbirk, wife of Mr. 

Eisenberger, 22, 29, 154, 171-172. 
Eisenberger, Mr., husband of Karla Honig, 154, 

171-172. 
Eisenberger, Paul, son of Karla Hbnig 

Eisenberger, husband of Gretl, 22, 29, 

171. 
Eisenhower, President and General Dwight 

David, 20, 68. 
Ellennis, Stephanie Christine, wife of Mashall 

Tobey Hayes, 139. 
Ellington, (Edward Kennedy) Duke, 86. 
Engel, Cilli, 110. 
Epstein, Elsie, wife of Johann Brick, 199. 



Epstein, Irma, wife of Max Muller, 28, 161. 

Epstein, Jakob, 6. 

Epstein, Leonard, 10. 

Epstein, Salomon, 7. 

Esberg, Berthold, husband of Edna Morris, 210. 

Esberg, Edna Morris, daughter of Martin Morris, 

wife of Berthold Esberg, ii, 26, 210. 
Esberg, Elsie, daughter of Berthold Esberg, wife 

of Sano Daniel, 210. 



Fackelman, Emily Madeline, daughter of Ted 

Fackelman, 150. 
Fackelman, Erik Daniel, son of Ted Fackelman, 

150. 
Fackelman, Lisa Gangloff, daughter of Andrew 

Gangloff, wife of Ted Fackelman, 1 50. 
Fackelman, Ted, husband of Lisa Gangloff, 1 50. 
Falkenau, R. David, 7. 
Falkenstein, Howard, son of Sigmund 

Falkenstein, 56. 
Falkenstein, Lena Eisemann, wife of Sigmund 

("Ziggy") Falkenstein, 56. 
Falkenstein, Sigmund ("Ziggy"), husband of Lena 

Eisemann, 56. 
Farber, Henry, husband of Ida Hoenig, 20-2 1 , 

61, 147. 
Farber, Ida Sophie Hoenig, daughter of Leopold 

Hoenig, wife of Henry Farber, 1 9-2 1 , 

45, 48-49, 53-54, 58, 60-61, 84-85, 

147. 
Farkas, Alma Zepin, daughter of Samuel Zepin, 

wife of Sidney Farkas, ii, 23, 51, 182. 
Farkas, Sidney, husband of Alma Zepin, 182. 
Feder, Mr. (buried in Karlsbad), 95. 
Feder, Rabbi Richard, son of Mr. Feder, 95. 
Feder, Sophie, wife of Simon Weiss, 130, 141, 

144-145. 
Federer, Mr. and Mrs. Eugen, 49. 
Fenichel, Alice, wife of Emil Aschner, 29-30 

116, 118. 
Fenichel, Claire, wife of Otto Fenichel, 1 1 6. 
Fenichel, Fransiska ("Fritzi") Aschner, daughter 

of Adolf Aschner, wife of Hans Fenichel, 

116. 
Fenichel-Pitkin, Hanna, daughter of Otto Fenichel, 

wife of Jack Schar, 1 1 6. 
Fenichel, Hans, son of Leopold Fenichel, 1 1 6. 
Fenichel, Lillie (see Fenichel, Alice). 
Fenichel, Lilly, daughter of Hans Fenichel, wife of 

Robert Zelenka, 1 1 6. 
Fenichel, Leopold, husband of Emma Braun, 1 1 6. 
Fenichel, Otto, son of Leopold Fenichel, 1 1 6. 



221 



I 



) 



Fenichel, Susan, daughter of Hans Feniel, wife of 

Mr. Alexander, 116. 
Ferdinand I, King, 5. 

Feuerstein Family (from Falkenau), 1 8, 34. 
Feuerstein, Dorit, daughter of Eduard Feuerstein, 

wife of Mr. Westheimer, 34. 
Feuerstein, Eduard, son of Rabbi Salomon 

Feuerstein, 1 7, 34, 63. 
Feuerstein, Gertrude, wife of Rabbi Salomon 

Feuerstein, 34. 
Feuerstein, Mizzi, wife of Eduard Feuerstein, 

17, 34, 63. 
Feuerstein, Rabbi Dr. Salomon, husband of 

Gertrude Feuerstein, 1 7, 34, 37, 52, 63. 
Fiedler, Jiri, 30. 
Fieschel, Rabbi Meier, 1 2. 
Fingl, Mr., 77. 

Fink Family (from Falkenau), 18, 34. 
Fink, Greta, daughter of Leo Fink, wife of Pavel 

Bor [Pavel Edelstein], 34. 
Fink, Hans Georg, son of Leo Fink, 34. 
Fink, Leo, husband of Luisa Lbwy, 34. 
Fink, Luisa Lowy, wife of Leo Fink, 34. 
Finkelstein, Ethel, wife of Julius Weiss, 141. 
Fischer Family (from Alt Rohlau-Karlsbad), 111. 
Fischer Family (from Falkenau), 18, 34-35, 49, 

63. 
Fischer Family (house in Moldau), 33, 76. 
Fischer (house) (Falkenau), 40. 
Fischer, Adolf, husband of Theresia Adler, 2, 3, 

14, 200, 206. 
Fischer, Alfred, husband of Ida Fischer, 16, 34, 

63. 
Fischer, Arthur, 96. 
Fischer, Doraliese ("Dorli"), daughter of Paul 

Fischer, husband of Mr. Winter, 34, 39. 
Fischer, Edmund, son of Adolf Fischer, 200. 
Fischer, Emil, 96. 
Fischer, Emma, daughter of Alfred Fischer, wife 

of Heinrich Zentner, 28, 34, 43, 63. 
Fischer, Emma, daughter of Adolf Fischer, 208. 
Fischer, Ernst (died in World War I), 95. 
Fischer, Franz, 52-53. 
Fischer, Filipp, 96. 
Fischer, Frieda Pollak, daughter of Karl Pollak, 

wife of Paul Fischer, 34, 39. 
Fischer, Fritz, husband of Gertrude Samuel, 28, 

169. 
Fischer, Gertrude Samuel, daughter of Julius 

Samuel, wife of Fritz Fischer, 28, 1 69. 
Fischer, Hanna, wife of Karl Ruczek, 37, 40. 
Fischer, Dr. Heinrich, 96. 
Fischer, Helene, daughter of Adolf Fischer, wife 



of Adolf Sussner, 207. 
Fischer, Helene Collmann, 96. 
Fischer, Herma, daughter of Emma Fischer,wife 

of Oskar Uri Wiener, ii, 208. 
Fischer, Hermine, daughter of Adolf Fischer, 

wife of Emil Kreissl, 3, 200. 
Fischer, Hermine, wife of Mr. Braun, 109. 
Fischer, Ida Bloch, daughter of Jachim Heinrich 

Bloch, wife of Alfred Fischer, 1 6, 34, 

63. 
Fischer, Jacob (from Lichtenstadt), 96. 
Fischer, Jakob (from Steinbach), 9. 
Fischer, Josef (died in World War I), 95. 
Fischer, Joseph W., 53. 

Fischer, Julie, daughter of Adolf Fischer, 207. 
Fischer, Josef, son of Adolf Fischer, 207. 
Fischer, Katharina, wife of Dr. Wilhelm Haas, 

107. 
Fischer, Leopold, 10. 
Fischer, Margaret ("Gretl"), daughter of Alfred 

Fischer, wife of Otto Hoenig, ii, 1 8, 26- 

28, 33, 43, 62-63, 163. 
Fischer, Mary, wife of Mr. Weinberger, 1 08. 
Fischer, Paul, son of Alfred Fischer, husband of 

Frieda Pollak, 34, 39, 63. 
Fischer, Paula, daughter of Adolf Fischer, wife of 

Rudolf Barbier, 207. 
Fischer, Rosa, daughter of Adolf Fischer, 207. 
Fischer, Ruth, daughter of Fritz Fischer, 28, 

169. 
Fischer, Susanna, wife of Mr. May, 103. 
Fischer, Theresia Adler, daughter of Josef 

Adler, wife of Adolf Fischer, 2, 3, 1 4, 

200, 206. 
Fischer, V., 9. 
Fischer, Werner, 52. 

Fischl, Josefine, wife of Mr. Stransky, 97. 
Flamm, Lazarus, 102. 
Fleischer, Katharina, 105. 
Fleischmann Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Forster, Kappelmeister, 74, 79. 
Foges, Mr. (from Falkenau), 15. 
Foster, Frank William, husband of Marie Kreissl, 

200, 204. 
Foster, Jane Walker, husband of Michael Foster, 

204. 
Foster, Marie Kreissl, daughter of Richard 

Kreissl, wife of Frank William Foster, 

200, 204. 
Foster, Michael, son of Frank Foster, husband of 

Jane Walker, 204. 
Foster, Michelle Yvonne Slack, wife of Stephen 

William Foster, 204. 



222 



Foster, Natasha Amy, daughter of Stephen 

William Foster, 204. 
Foster, Stephen William, son of Frank Foster, 

204. 
Frank (also see Frenk). 
Frank, Peppi, 104. 
Frankl, Leopold A., son of Marianne Hbnig Frankl 

from Kuttenplan, 1 1 2. 
Frankl, Marianne Hbnig, daughter of Israel Honig 

from Kuttenplan, 13, 112. 
Frankl, Osmond, 78. 
Francis I, Emperor, 1 3. 
Francis II, Emperor, 5. 
Frank, Anton, 47. 
Frank, Maurice, husband of Selma Frank, 24, 

184. 
Frank, Ray, daughter of Maurice Frank, ii. 
Frank, Selma Pachter, daughter of Abraham 

Pachter, wife of Maurice Frank, ii, 23- 
24, 184. 
Frankl, L. A., 13. 
Frankl, Marianne Honig, daughter of Israel Hbnig 

from Kuttenplan, 13. 
Frankl, Moriz, 105. 
Franz Josef, Emperor, 22, 29. 
Frauson, Kimberly, daughter of Paul Frauson, 

183. 
Frauson, Melissa, daughter of Paul Frauson, 183. 
Frauson, Nancy McDougal, daughter of John 

McDougal, wife of Paul Frauson, 1 83. 
Frauson, Paul, husband of Nancy McDougal, 183. 
Free Sons of Israel, 55-56, 60. 
Frenk (also see Frank). 
Frenk, Josef, 104. 
Freudenthal, Dr. Max, 6. 
Freund, Mr. (Vienna-St. Louis), 23. 
Freund, Ignaz, 11. 

Friedl, Dr. (attorney from Falkenau), 15. 
Friesem, Henriette, daughter of Hermann 

Friesem, wife of Hermann Hirsch, 55. 
Freud, Siegmund, 35. 
Frbhlich, Abraham, 105. 
Frbhlich, Alexander, son of Pedro Miguel 

Frbhlich, 126. 
Frohlich, Anton, son of Stefan Frbhlich, 30, 1 24- 

125. 
Frohlich, Christoph, son of Anton Frbhlich, 125. 
Frohlich, Cornelia, daughter of Pedro Miguel 

Frbhlich, wife of Christian Pohl, 1 26. 
Frohlich, Gertrude Aschner, daughter of Felix 

Aschner, wife of Stefan Frbhlich, ii, 30, 
124. 
Frohlich, Lisl Nagelstutz, wife of Anton Frbhlich, 



124-125. 
Frbhlich, Michaela Jel, wife of Stefan Frbhlich, 

125. 
Frbhlich, Miki Ludwig, wife of Pedro Miguel 

Frbhlich, 124, 126. 
Frbhlich, Monika BruckmDIIer, wife of Pedro 

Miguel Frbhlich, 1 24. 
Frbhlich, Pedro Miguel, son of Stefan Frbhlich, 

30, 124, 126. 
Frbhlich, Stefan, husband of Gertrude (Trude) 

Aschner, 30, 124. 
Frbhlich, Stefan, son of Anton Frbhlich, 125. 
Frbhlich, Thomas, son of Pedro Miguel Frbhlich, 

126. 
Froelich, Irma, wife of Gustav Weiss, 144. 
Fuchs, Emanuel, 17. 
Fuchs, Julius, 109. 

Furst, Arthur, husband of Helen Morris, 26, 210. 
Furst, Helen Morris, daughter of Martin Morris, 

wife of Arthur Furst, 26, 210. 
Furst, Nancy, daughter of Arthur Furst, wife of 

Kenneth Schubach, 210. 



Gabrielova, Jirina [Georgina], wife of Robert 

Sprusil, 142. 
Gad-New York-Sebulon Lodge No. 8 (see Sebulon 

Lodge). 
Gallagher, Carolyn Earlene Carson, daughter of 

Howard Carl Carson, wife of Patrick 

Gallagher, 136. 
Gallagher, Patrick, husband of Carolyn Earlene 

Carson, 136. 
Gallinger, Mr. and Mrs., 54-55. 
Gallo, Christopher, husband of Holly Ann Hoenig, 

148. 
Gallo, Holly Ann Hoenig, daughter of Rev. John 

David Hoenig, wife of Christopher Gallo, 

148. 
Gangloff, Andrew, husband of Florann 

Whitehouse, 21, 150. 
Gangloff, Andrew ("Chip"), son of Andrew 

Gangloff, husband of Christine and 

Barbara Sciali, 150. 
Gangloff, Barbara Sciali, wife of Andrew 

("Chip") Gangloff, 1 50. 
Gangloff, Christine, wife of Andrew ("Chip") 

Gangloff, 150. 
Gangloff, Edward, son of Andrew Gangloff , 150. 
Gangloff, Florann Whitehouse, daughter of 

Orville Whitehouse, wife of Andrew 

Gangloff, 21, 60, 62, 150. 



223 



Gangloff, Jene Ann, daughter of Andrew 

Gangloff, wife of Thomas Barszcz and 

Barry Philippy, 150. 
Gangloff, Lisa, daughter of Andrew Gangloff, 

wife of Gregg Smith, wife of Ted 

Fackelman, 1 50. 
Geiger Family (from Falkenau), 18, 35. 
Geiger, Egon, son of Leo Geiger, husband of 

Martha Goldberger, 35. 
Geiger, Hannah, daughter of Leo Geiger, 35. 
Geiger, Ida Greenberger, wife of Leo Geiger, 35. 
Geiger, Leo, husband of Ida Greenberger, ii, 35. 
Geiger, Martha Goldberger, wife of Egon Geiger, 

35. 
Geraghty, Tony, 68. 

Gee, Nora Kee, wife of Bruce Albert Hoenig, 1 49. 
Gess, Marie, daughter of Otto Gess, wife of 

Marcel Lallement, 26, 209. 
Gess, Otto A., husband of Paula Spiegl, 26, 209. 
Gess, Paula Spiegl, daughter of Jacob Spiegl, 

wife of Otto A. Gess, 26, 209. 
Gess, Stella, daughter of Otto A. Gess, wife of 

Arbie Biedermann, 209. 
GGG Clothes (see Goldman, William P. and 

Brothers). 
Gibbs, Tammy Ann, wife of Michael Lee Hoenig, 

149. 
Glaser, Amalie Hirsch, 96. 
Glaser, Rabbi Bernhard, 10. 
Glaser, Fred, ii, 14, 161. 
Glaser, Josef, 96. 
Glaser, Karl, husband of Sophie Muller, 1 4, 28, 

96, 161. 
Glaser, Kurt, son of Karl Glaser, 14, 28, 161. 
Glaser, Leo, 95-96. 
Glaser, Paul (see Hill, Paul). 
Glaser, Sophie Muller, daughter of Albert 

Muller, wife of Karl Glaser and Max 

Kohn, 28, 96, 161. 
Glaser, Stephanie Brod, wife of Fred ("Fritz") 

Glaser, 161. 
Glick, Cilli, 108. 
Gluck, Josef, 109. 

Gluck, Rachel, wife of Mr. Brum, 104. 
Gluck, Wolf, 1 05. 

Goldberger, Ida, wife of Leo Geiger, 35. 
Goldenstein, Suzy, wfe of Gerhart Weiss, 1 44. 
Goldman, William P., 64. 
Goldman, William P. and Brothers, 19-20, 

50-54, 56, 58, 61. 
Goldreich, Emma Haas, 104. 
Goldreich, Moses, 109. 
Goldschmid, Bernhard, husband of Johanna, 1 02. 



Goldschmid, Johanna, wife of Bernhard 

Goldschmid, 1 02. 
Goldstein, Lillian Charlotte, wife of Gustav 

Hoenig, 21, 61, 149. 
Golomb, Ceil, wife of Max Hirsch, 55. 
Goodfriend, Carol, wfe of Alfred Meyers Jr 

183. 
Goodman, Benny, 86. 
Graz, Bertha, wife of Joshua Honig from 

Kirchenbirk, 22, 37, 39, 62, 153, 160. 
Greenbaum, Fani, 104. 
Greenbaum, Katti, wife of Mr. Bauer, 103. 
Greenberg, Mr., 50. 

Greenberger, Martha, wife of Egon Geiger, 35. 
Greenfeld, Mr., 50. 
Greiner, Mr., husband of Josef Braun's daughter, 

33. 
Greve, Inge, wife of Dr. Julius Hoenig, 3, 22, 

62, 160. 
Gross, Edith, 110. 
Grosser, Jacob, 107. 
Grunbaum, Catherine, 106. 
Grunbaum, David, 104. 
Grunbaum, Eva, 105. 
Grunbaum, Katharina, 106. 
Grunbaum, Rosalie, 103. 
Griinbaum, Simon, 1 06. 
Grunbaum, Yosef, 108. 
Grunhut, Klara, wife of Ariel Honig, 4, 26, 153, 

163-164. 
Grunwald Family (from Falkenau), 18, 35. 
Grunwald, Ferdinand, 80. 
Grunwald, Fred., 76, 80. 
Grunwald, Marieschen, daughter of Wilhelm 

Grunwald, 35. 
Grunwald, Walter, son of Wilhelm Grunwald, 35. 
Grunwald, Wilhelm, 16, 35. 
Guggenheim, Hannah, 24. 
Gutersloh, Alexandra ("Xandra"), daughter of 

Albert Paris Gutersloh, wife of Karl 

Budlovsky, 27-28, 156, 158. 
Gutersloh, Albert Paris, 27-28. 
Gutmann, Baron, husband of Hedwig (Heidi) 

Blaustern -> Rhona, 1 1 7. 
Gutmann, Hedwig (Heidi) Blaustern -> Rhona, 

daughter of Lt. Col. Judge Blaustern -> 

Rhona, wife of Baron Gutmann, 117. 
Gutmann, Irena, wife of Alexander Gustav 

("Sasha") Budlovsky, 158. 
Gutwillig, Dr. Richard, 15. 



H 



224 



Haas, Bemhard, 109. 

Haas, Emma, wife of Mr. Goldreich, 104. 

Haas, Es, 109. 

Haas, Hendel, 109. 

Haas, Katharina Fischer, wife Dr. Wilhelm Haas, 

107. 
Haas, Marie Brum, 104. 
Haas, Mina Brum, 104. 

Haas, Rita, wife of Ronald Morris Hoenig, 1 34. 
Haas, Wilhelm, 109. 
Haas, Dr. Wilhelm, husband of Katharina Fischer, 

107. 
Hackett, Judith, wife of Paul Hill, 161. 
Hahn, Alfred, husband of Marie Heller, 57, 61, 

199. 
Hahn, Anneliese, daughter of Alfred Hahn, wife 

of Dr. Arthur Krieger, 57, 199. 
Hahn, Herta, daughter of Alfred Hahn, 57, 199. 
Hahn, Jean, daughter of Alfred Hahn, wife of 

Calvin Rothman, 57,199. 
Hahn, Julius, 103. 
Hahn, Marie Heller, daughter of Wilhelm Heller, 

wife of Alfred Hahn, 18, 57, 61, 199. 
Hahn, Rosa, daughter of Alfred Hahn, wife of Dr. 

Edward Brick, ii, 57, 61, 199. 
Hahn, Willie, son of Alfred Hahn, 57, 199. 
Hajak, Adele, 30. 
Halez, Theresia Weiss, 103. 
Hall, Barbara, wife of Otto Lowy, 29,192. 
Hall, Roberta, wife of Michael Posen, 182. 
Hall, Wendy, wife of Josef Kreissl, 200, 202- 

203. 
Hamak, Johann, 47, 49. 
Hansel, Tini, (her husband) 79. 
Hansl Family (from Falkenau), 18, 35, 40, 64. 
Hansl, Arthur, son of Fred Hansl, 35. 
Hansl, Emma Steiner, daughter of Johann 

Steiner, wife of Fred Hansl, 35, 40. 
Hansl, Fred, husband of Emma Steiner, 35,40. 
Hansl, Hedwig, daughter of Fred Hansl, 35. 
Hansl, Karl, son of Fred Hansl, 35. 
Hanson, Daniel Joseph, husband of Monica Weiss, 

144. 
Hanson, Jesse Weiss, son of Daniel Joseph 

Hanson, 1 44. 
Hanson, Monica Weiss, daughter of Gerhart 

Weiss, wife of Daniel Joseph Hanson, 1 44. 
Hanson, Sarah Weiss, daughter of Daniel Joseph 

Hanson, 144. 
Harris, Dylan E., son of Marc Harris, 209. 
Harris, Marc, husband of Terry Suzanne 

Lallement, 209. 
Harris, Terry Suzanne, wife of Marc Harris, 



209. 
Havel, President Vaclav (Czech Republic), 28. 
Havlicek, Ann, daughter of J. Havlicek, 195. 
Havlicek, Hana Braun, daughter of Frank Braun, 

wife of J. Havlicek, 195. 
Havlicek, J., husband of Hana Braun, 195. 
Havlicek, John, son of J. Havlicek, 195. 
Havlicek, Richard, son of J. Havlicek, 195. 
Hawthorn, Helen Margaret Booth, daughter of 

Brian Booth, wife of Michael Paul 

Hawthorn, 201. 
Hawthorn, Michael Paul, husband of Helen 

Margaret Booth, 201. 
Hawthorn, Sophie, daughter of Michael Paul 

Hawthorn, 201. 
Hawthorn, Thomas, son of Michael Paul 

Hawthorn, 201. 
Hayes, Angela G. Velez, wife of Eugene Ward 

Hayes, 139. 
Hayes, Crystal Lynn Worden, daughter of Eugene 

Thomas Worden, wife of JW Hayes, 25, 

139. 
Hayes, Elizabeth Lynn, daughter of JW Hayes, 

wife of Daniel Scott Knorpp, 1 39. 
Hayes, Eugene Ward, son of JW Hayes, 25, 139. 
Hayes, JW, husband of Crystal Lynn Worden, 25, 

139. 
Hayes, Marshall Tobey, son of JW Hayes, 

husband of Stephanie Christine Ellennis, 

139. 
Hayes, Stephanie Christine Ellennis, wife of 

Marshall Tobey Hayes, 1 39. 
Haymann (from Mies), 9. 
Hecht, Hildegarde Schoen, dauugter of Morris 

(Moshe) Schoen, wife of Michael Hecht, 

ii, 140. 
Hecht, Michael, husband of Hildegarde Schoen, 

140. 
Heidler, Irene, wife of Dr. Herman Honig, 163. 
Heilpern, Emden II, 7. 
Heitmanek, David, husband of Rebecca McDougal, 

183. 
Heitmanek, Kristin, daughter of David Heitmanek, 

183. 
Heitmanek, Lindsay, dughter of David Heitmanek, 

183. 
Heitmanek, Rebecca McDougal, daughter of John 

McDougal, husband of David Heitmanek, 

183. 
Heller Family (from Mies), 36, 111. 
Heller Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Heller, Anna Adler, daughter of Josef Adler, 

wife of Wilhelm Heller, 2-3, 9, 18, 43, 



225 



197. 
Heller, Annie "Bertel" Buxbaum, wife of Ernst 

Heller, 33, 198. 
Heller, Bescha, wife of Walter Heller, 198. 
Heller, Ernst, son of Wilhelm Heller, husband of 
Annie "Bertel" Buxbaum, 33-34, 198. 
Heller, Fannie (see Heller, Francisca). 
Heller, Francisca ("Fannie"), daughter of Wilhelm 
Heller, wife of Richard Pfeffer, 10, 197. 
Heller, Helene, daughter of Wilhelm Heller, 18, 

197. 
Heller, Helene, daughter of Walter Heller, 1 98. 
Heller, Hermine, wife of Michael Honig, 82, 131, 

151. 
Heller, Ida [Hellerova], wife of Leopold 

Zentner, 43,97. 
Heller, Jakob, 15. 

Heller, Kurt, son of Ernst Heller, 198. 
Heller, Marie, daughter of Wilhelm Heller, wife 

of Alfred Hahn, 18, 11 
Heller, Rosa, daughter of Wilhelm Heller, 18, 

198. 
Heller, Theresa, wife of Henry Kohner, 23, 173, 

176-178. 
Heller, Walter, son of Rosa Heller, husband of 

Bescha, 198. 
Heller, Wilhelm, husband of Anna Adler, 2-3, 9, 

18, 43, 197. 
Hengstenberg, Rudolf, 7. 
Herlinger, Erich, son of Otto Herlinger, 140. 
Herlinger, Otto, husband of Hildegarde Schoen, 

140. 
Herlinger, Rosa, wife of Adolf Weiss, 141, 143. 
Herman, Susan, wife of Dr. Joseph ("Mopl") 

Budlovsky, 156- 1 57. 
Hermann, Karl, husband of Anna Muller, 161. 
Herrmann Family (from Falkenau), 18, 34-35, 

64. 
Herrmann, Adolf, husband of Ida Kohn, 34-35, 

64. 
Herrmann, Berta Schwarzbach, wife of Max 

Herrmann, 35. 
Herrmann, Dr., husband of Lilli Steiniger, 36, 

41-42. 
Herrmann, Emil (died In World War I), 95. 
Herrmann, Gretl, daughter of Adolf Herrmann, 

35, 64. 
Herrmann, Hans, nephew of Adolf Herrmann, 

35-36. 
Herrmann, Ida Kohn, wife of Adolf Herrmann, 
35, 64. 
■ Herrmann, Julius, son of Adolf Herrmann, 35, 
64. 



Herrmann, Karl, son of Adolf Hernnann, 35,64. 
Herrmann, Karl (died in World War I), 95. 
Herrmann, Lilli Steiniger, wife of Dr. Herrmann, 

36, 41-42. 
Herrmann, Margaret (see Herrmann, Gretl). 
Herrmann, Max, nephew of Adolf Hernnann, 35. 
Herschan, Elfrieda, 1 1 0. 
Herstel, Policeman, 68. 
Herz, Abraham, 7. 
Herz, Caroline, daughter of Jakob Herz, wife of 

Theodore Newhouse, 59. 
Herz, Rabbi Naphtali, 7. 
Herz Emden, Rabbi Moses, 7. 
Herzig, Ernst, husband of Martha Holzner, 29, 

191. 
Herzig, Hanna, daughter of Ernst Herzig, 29, 

191. 
Herzig, Martha Holzner, daughter of Ignaz 

Holzner, wife of Ernst Herzig, 29, 191. 
Heydrich [."Hangman" Reinhard] Affair, 192. 
Hiat, Rabbi Philip, 59. 

Hill, Annette Stanley, wife of Paul Hill, 161. 
Hill, Hilda Turchin, wife of Paul Hill,, 161. 
Hill, Judith Hackett, wife of Paul Hill, 161. 
Hill, Lord, 70. 

Hill, Paul [Glaser], son of Karl Glaser, husband of 
Judith Hackett, Annette Stanley and 
Hilda Turchin, ii, 68-71, 161. 
Hilmer, Mrs., wife of Professor Hilmer, 75. 
Hilmer, Professor, 75. 
Hilton Clothing Manufacturing Company, 58. 
Himmel, Emma, 44. 
Himmel, Ferdinand, 44. 
Himmel, Katharina, 44. 
Hirsch Family (from Karlsbad), 80. 
Hirsch, Adelheid, daughter of Salomon Hirsch, 
56, 62. 

Hirsch, Amalie, wife of Glaser, 96. 

Hirsch, Amalie Holzner, daughter of Jakob 
Holzner, wife of Mr. Hirsch (from 
Lindau), 187. 
Hirsch, Berte\, daughter of Jacob Schwarz, wife 

of Henry Hirsch, 59. 
Hirsch, Bertha, mother of Mathilde Hirsch, 32, 

73. 
Hirsch, Billa (Bella), daughter of Hermann 

Hirsch, wife of Joseph Hoenig, 20, 53- 
60, 62, 146. 
Hirsch, Claire, daughter of Gustav Hirsch, wife 

of Eric Leven, 20, 54-55. 
Hirsch, Ceil Golomb, wife of Max Hirsch, 55. 
Hirsch, Frieda, 73. 
Hirsch, Henriette Friesem, daughter of Hermann 



• 



226 



Friesem, wife of Hermann Hirsch, 59. 
Hirsch, Herman, son of Leopold Hirsch, 56. 
Hirsch, Herrmann, son of Salomon Hirsch, 59. 
Hirsch, Hugo, son of Amalie ("Mali") Holzner 

Hirsch. 187. 
Hirsch, Use Rosenbaum, wife of Leopold Hirsch, 

56. 
Hirsch, Karl, 9. 

Hirsch, Klara, daughter of Salomon Hirsch, 56. 
Hirsch, Leo, son of Gustav Hirsch, 59. 
Hirsch, Leopold, son of Hermann Hirsch, husband 

of Use Rosenbaum, 56, 60, 64. 
Hirsch, Mr. (of Lindau), husband of Amalie 

("Mali") Holzner, 187. 
Hirsch, Mathilde, daughter of Bertha Hirsch, 32, 

72-73, 78. 
Hirsch, Max, son of Hermann Hirsch, husband of 

Ceil Golomb, 20, 54-55, 60. 
Hirsch, Rudl, son of Amalie ("Mali") Holzner 

Hirsch, the names of his wife and 
daughter are unknown, 187. 
Hirsch, Tiny, 73. 
Hirschberg (Families), 6. 
Hitler, Adolf, 82-84, 87. 
Hochheimer Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Hochsztein, Dr. Paul, 66. 

Hoeniq. Honig 
[Also see Honig] 
Honig Family (from Kirchenbirk), 111, 113-185. 
Honig Family (from Kuttenplan), 111-112 (also 
see Von Honigsberg, von Honigshofen and 
von HSnigstein). 
Honig (house) (Falkenau), 39, 45. 
Honig, Aaron Moses (from Kuttenplan), son of 

Israel Honig, 12, 112. 
Honig, Dr. Adam, son of Israel Honig (von 

Honigsberg) from Kuttenplan, 112. 
Honig, Adam Albert, son of Lobel Honig from 

Kuttenplan, 13, 112. 
Hoenig (Honig), Adele, daughter of Bernhard 

Honig, husband of Mr. Waxman, 2, 19, 
25, 43, 47, 52, 62, 66, 88, 131. 
Hoenig, Adeline Brick, daughter of Johann Brick, 

wife ofAdolph Hoenig, 21 , 61 , 1 47. 
Hoenig (Honig), Adolph, son of Leopold Hoenig, 
20-21, 45, 50-51, 53, 58, 60-61, 66, 
84, 88, 147. 
Honig, Ahron, son of Israel Honig (von 

Honigsberg) from Kuttenplan, husband of 
Ernestine Baruch, 112. 
Honig, Anna, daughter of Israel Hdnig (from 

Kirchenbirk), wife of Ignaz Blaustern, 2, 
11, 19, 113, 116-129. 



Honig, Anna, daughter of Ahron Moses Honig von 

Honigshofen, wife of Joachim Honig von 

Honigsberg, 112. 
Honig, Anna, daughter of Joachim Honig von 

Honigsberg, wife of Joachim Leidersdorf, 

112. 
Honig, Anna, daughter of Mohtz Lobl, wife of 

Julius Samuel, 22, 28. 
Honig, Anna, daughter of Theodor Honig, 28, 155. 
Honig, Anna Beer, wife of Joshua Honig, 22, 

25-27, 153, 155-156, 159. 
Honig, Anna Neuberger, wife of Bernhard Honig, 

19, 113. 

Honig, Ariel, son of Josef Honig, husband of 

Klara Grunhut Honig, 4, 22, 26, 62, 153, 

163-164. 
Hoenig, Anita L. Lang [she uses Lang as her 

name], wife of James Morris Hoenig, 

134. 
Hoenig, Barbara Price, wife of Rev. John David 

Hoenig, 21, 147-148. 
Hoenig, Bella (Billa) Hirsch, daughter of 

Hermann Hirsch, wife of Joseph Hoenig, 

20, 53-60, 62, 146. 

Honig, Benedickt, son of Ahron Honig von 

Honigsberg, 112. 
Honig, Bernhard, son of Israel Honig, 2, 4, 

18-19, 22-23, 43, 45-46, 111, 113, 

130-152. 
Honig, Bertha Graz, wife of Joshua Honig from 

Kirchenbirk, 22, 37,39, 62, 160. 
Honig, Bertha, wife of Simon Weiss, daughter of 

Bernhard Honig, 19, 43, 48, 84, 1 30, 

145. 
Hoenig, Bertha "Honey," daughter of Morris 

Frederick Hoenig; wife of Eddie Wray 

Worden, Henry Arnold and Ira N. 

McLendon, 25, 132. 
Hoenig, Billa (Bella) Hirsch (see Hoenig, Bella). 
Hoenig, Bruce Albert, son of Gustav Hoenig, 

husband of Nora Kee Gee, 21,61, 1 49. 
Honig, Charlotte, daughter of Ahron Honig von 

Honigsberg, 112. 
Honig, C\ansse, daughter of Ahron Honig von 

Honigsberg, 112. 
Hoenig, Daniel Jason, son of Michael Lee Hoenig, 

149. 
Hoenig, David Andrew, son of Rev. John David 

Hoenig, 1 48. 
Hoenig, Donna Mae Plummer, wife of Thomas 

William Hoenig, 25, 1 34. 
Hoenig, Doris Carol Lovett, wife of Leopold 

"Leo" Hoenig, daughter of Gustave 



227 



I 



Lovett, ii, 20, 45, 60, 65-67, 146. 
Hoenig, Dorothy Sue Long, wife of Morris Hoenig, 

132, 134-135. 
Hoenig, Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. Julius Hoenig, 

wife of Raymond Rogers, 22, 1 60. 
Honig, Ella Pollak, wife of Leopold Honig, 26, 

49, 62-63, 163. 
Hoenig, Ellen Glass, wife of Peter Hoenig, 1 60. 
Honig, Elsa, daughter of Joshua Honig from 

Kirchenbirk, wife of Joseph Mayer, 22, 

27, 50, 52, 57, 159. 
Honig, Else, daughter of Ariel Honig, wife of Otto 

Lederer, 26, 1 63. 
Hoenig, Elsie Ann, daughter of Adolph Hoenig, 

wife of Pietro Call, Charles Carrick and 

Harry Winger, ii, 21, 61, 147-148. 
Honig, Emil, son of Heinrich Honig, wife's first 

name is unknown, 82-83,151. 
Honig, Emma, daughter of Leopold Hoenig, wife of 

Alfonso Preindl, ii, 18, 21, 26, 45-46, 

48, 52, 54, 58, 61-62, 66, 87-88, 146. 
Honig, Emma Koller, wife of Friednch ("Fritz") 

Honig, 151. 
Honig, Enoch, son of Israel Honig from 

Kuttenplan,] 3. 
Honig, Enrica Sachs, wife of Michael Honig, 82, 

84-85, 131,152. 
Hoenig (Honig), Ernst, son of Theodor Honig, 

husband of Olga and Sylvia, ii, 28, 1 55. 
Honig, Ernestine Baruch [von Honigsberg], wife 

of Ahron Honig von Honigsberg, 112. 
Hoenig, Frances, daughter of George Hoenig, 

wife of Rev. Lonnie Reed Mullen, 132- 

133. 
Honig, Franziska, daughter of Maximilian Honig 

von Honigsberg, wife of Max, 1 1 2. 
Honig, Franziska Dobrushka [von Honigsberg], 

wife of Ludwig Honig von Honigsberg, 

112. 
Hoenig (Honig), Frieda, daughter of Leopold 

Hoenig, wife of Rudolf Rupp, ii, 1 8-2 1 , 

32-34, 36-37, 42-43, 45, 48-51, 53- 

54, 56, 58, 62-63, 65, 84, 88, 146. 
Honig, Frieda, daughter of Joshua Honig from 

Kirchenbirk , wife of Karl Ritter, 5, 22, 

27, 159. 
Honig, Friedrich ("Fritz"), son of Michael Honig, 

husband of Emma Koller and Leopoldine 

("Poldi"), 82,85, 87, 151. 
Hoenig, Gail Sharon, daughter of Leopold "Leo" 

Hoenig, i, ii, 20, 28, 45, 59, 60, 65-66, 

146. 
Hoenig, George, son of Morris Frederick Hoenig, 



132. 
Hoenig (Honig), Gerda Ann, daughter of Leopold 

Hoenig, wife of Orville Whitehouse, ii, 

20-21, 49-51, 53-54, 58, 60-62, 84- 

85, 88, 150. 
Hoenig (Honig), Gertrude (see Hoenig [Honig], 

Gerda Ann). 
Hoenig, Gordon, adopted son of Morris Frederick 

Hoenig, 24, 1 32. 
Hoenig, Gretchen Hermine, adopted daughter of 

Gustav Hoenig, 61,1 49. 
Honig, Gretl (see Honig, Margaret). 
Hoenig (Honig), Gretl Fischer (see Hoenig, 

Margaret). 
Hoenig (Honig), Gustav, son of Leopold Hoenig, 

husband of Lillian Hoenig, ii, 20-21, 45- 

46, 50-51, 53, 57-58, 60-61, 66, 

84-85, 88, 149. 
Honig, Heinrich, adopted son of Michael Honig, 

husband of Marie, 82, 151. 
Hoenig (Honig), Helen, wife of Oskar Hoenig, 

25, 49, 155. 
Honig, Helene, daughter of Josef Honig from 

Kirchenbirk, wife of Albert Mailer, 22, 

28, 96, 153, 161-162. 
Hoenig, Helene Michelle, daughter of Leopold 

"Leo" Hoenig, i, ii, 20, 45, 59, 64, 

66-67, 146. 
Honig, Henoch, son of Israel Honig (von 

Honigsberg) from Kuttenplan, husband of 

Karolina, 112. 
Hoenig, Henry ("Dude"), son r>' jrris Frederick 

Hoenig, 132. 
Honig, Herbert, son of Dr. Hemtan Honig, 1 63. 
Honig, Dr. Hermann, son of Ariel Honig, husband 

of Irene Heidler, 26, 63, 163. 
Hoenig (Honig), Hennine Adler, wife of Leopold 

Hoenig, 14, 17-20, 32-33, 36, 43, 45- 

46, 48-50, 54, 57-61, 66, 84-85, 88, 

130, 146-147, 149-150, 197. 

Honig, Hermine Heller, wife of Michael Hdnig, 82, 

131, 151. 

Hoenig, Holly Ann, daughter of Rev. John David 
Hoenig, wife of Christopher Gallo, 1 48. 

Hoenig (Honig), Ida Sophie, daughter of Leopold 
Hoenig, wife of Henry Farber, 1 9-2 1 , 
45, 48-50, 53-54, 58, 60-61, 84-85, 
88, 147. 

Honig, Use, daughter of Leopold Honig, 63, 163. 

Hoenig, Inge Greve, wife of Dr. Julius Hoenig, 3, 
22, 28, 62, 160. 

Honig, Irene Heidler, wife of Dr. Herman Honig, 
163. 



228 



Hbnig, Irma, daughter of Theodor Hbnig, 28, 155. 
Hbnig, Israel (from Kirchenbirk), 2, 8, 11, 18, 

45, 62, 111. 
Honig, Israel (from Kuttenplan), 11-13, 112-113. 
Hoenlg, James Morris, son of Rita Jean Hoenig 

and adopted son of Ronald Morris Hoenig, 

husband of Anita L. Lang, 25, 1 34. 
Hoenig, Jane Ruth Adwell, wife of Ronald Morris 

Hoenig, 1 34. 
Hoenig, Janet Richer, wife of Michael Lee Hoenig, 

149. 
Hoenig, Jessica Ann, daughter of Bruce Albert 

Hoenig, 149. 
Honig, Joachim, son of Israel Honig (von 

Hbnigsberg) from Kuttenplan, husband oif 

Anna Honig von Hbnigshofen, 1 1 2. 
Hoenig (Honig), Johanna, daughter of Bernhard 

Honig, 19, 25, 43, 46-47, 49-50, 

52-54, 61-62, 66, 84-85, 87-88, 130. 
Honig, Johanna ("Jenny"), daughter of Ariel 

Honig, wife of Rudolf Pick, 97, 1 64. 
Hoenig, Rev. John David, son of Adolph Hoenig, 

husband of Barbara Price Hoenig, ii, 21, 

61, 147-148. 

Honig, Josef, son of Ahron Honig von Hbnigsberg, 

112. 
Honig, Josef, son of Ariel Honig, 63, 1 64. 
Honig, Josef, son of Israel Honig, wife's first 

name is unknown, 2, 4, 1 6, 1 9, 22, 45, 

111, 115, 153-172. 
Honig, Josef, son of Joachim Honig von 

Hbnigsberg, 112. 
Hoenig (Honig), Joseph, son of Leopold Hoenig, 

husband of Bella Hoenig, i, ii, 8, 16, 

18-20, 23-24, 27, 31, 35-36, 38, 40, 

42, 45-67, 84, 88, 146. 
Honig, Josephine, daughter of Michael Honig 

(see Honig, Sonja). 
Honig, Joshua, son of Josef Honig from 

Kirchenbirk, husband of Anna Beer and 

Bertha Graz, 14, 17-19, 22, 25-29, 

62, 153, 155-156, 159-160. 
Honig, Julius ("Jus"), son of Josef Honig from 

Kirchenbirk, 22, 62. 
Hoenig (Honig), Dr. Julius ("Jussl"), son of 

Joshua Honig from Kirchenbirk, husband 

of Inge Greve Hoenig, ii, 3, 7, 1 7-1 8, 

22, 27-28,31-32, 35-37, 39, 41, 95, 

160. 
Honig, Karl (Lazar), son of Israel Honig (von 

Hbnigsberg) from Kuttenplan, husband of 

Marianne Leidersdorf, 1 1 2. 
Honig, Karla, daughter of Josef Hbnig from 



Kirchenbirk, wife of Mr. Eisenberger, 
22, 29, 154, 171-172. 
Honig, Karolina Hbnig von Honigstein, wife of 

Henoch Hbnig von Honigstein, 112. 
Honig, Karolina Honig von Honigstein, wife of 

Leopold (Loew) Hbnig von Honigstein, 
112. 
Honig, Karolina Honig von Honigstein, wife of 

Maximilian Honig von Honigstein, 112. 
Honig, Katharina Wehli (from Kuttenplan and 

Wolin), 112. 
Honig, Klara Grunhut, wife of Ariel Honig, 4, 26, 

153, 163-164. 
Hoenig, Leah Wallis, wife of Thomas William 

Hoenig, 1 34. 
Honig, Leib (from Kuttenplan), 11-13, 112. 
Honig, Leopold, son of Ariel Hbnig, husband of 

Ella Pollak, 26, 49, 62-63, 1 63. 
Hoenig (Honig), Leopold, son of Bernhard Hbnig, 

14, 18-20, 35, 43, 45-46, 48-50, 53, 

66, 84, 130, 146-147, 149-150, 197. 
Honig, Dr. Leopold "Leo," son of Joshua Hbnig 

from Kirchenbirk, 22, 27, 49, 57-58, 

62, 66, 155. 
Hoenig, Leopold ("Leo"), son of Joseph Hoenig, 

husband of Doris Carol Hoenig, 1 , 20, 38, 

45, 51, 53, 56-60, 62, 65, 67, 88, 95, 

146. 
Honig, Leopold, son of Israel Hbnig from 

Kuttenplan, 13. 
Honig, Leopoldine, daughter of Josef Hbnig 

from Kirchenbirk, 22. 
Hbnig, Leopoldine ("Poldi"), wife of Friedrich 

"Fritz" Honig, ii, 87, 151. 
Hoenig, Lillian Charlotte Goldstein, wife of 

Gustav Hoenig, 21 , 61 , 1 49. 
Hoenig, Lillie Mae Buffaloe, wife of Morris 

Frederick Hoenig, 24, 51, 130, 132. 
Hoenig, Lillie Mae, daughter of George Hoenig, 

wife of Howard Carl Carson, George Lee 

Bradberry, 132, 136. 
Hbnig, Lbbel (from Kuttenplan), 11-13, 112. 
Hbnig, Loew (from Kuttenplan), 11-13, 112. 
Hbnig, Ludwig, son of Israel Hbnig (von 

Hbnigsberg) from Kuttenplan, husband of 

Franziska Dobrushka, 112. 
Hbnig, Margaret ("Gretl", daughter of Leopold 

Hbnig, 18, 22, 34, 39, 42, 45-46, 52 

147. 
Hoenig (Hbnig), Margaret ("Gretl") Fischer, wife 

of Otto Hoenig, h, 18, 26-28, 33-34 

43, 62-63, 163. 
Hbnig, Marianne, daughter of Israel Hbnig from 






$ 



t 



229 



Kuttenplan, 13, 112. 
Hbnig, Marie, wife of Heinrich Hbnig, 151. 
Hbnig, Maximillian, son of Israel Honig (von 

Hbnigsberg) from Kuttenplan, husband of 

Karolina, 13, 112. 
Hbnig, Michael, son of Bernhard Hbnig, 19, 43, 

52, 60, 82-85, 87-88, 131, 151-152'. 
Hoenig, Michael Lee, son of Gustav Hoenig, 

husband of Janet Richer and Tammy Ann 

Gibbs, 21, 61, 149. 
Hbnig, Mina Neuberger, wife of Bernhard Hbnig, 

2, 18-19, 113, 130-152, 146-152. 
Hbnig, Minna, daughter of Friedrich ("Fritz") 

Hbnig, 151. 
Hoenig, Mitzi Sue, daughter of Ronald Morris 

Hoenig, wife of Stephen Danford, Michael 

Antone Pavizzi and Randall Gordon King 

25, 135. 
Hoenig, Morris, son of George Hoenig, husband 

of Dorothy Sue Long, ii, 26, 132, 134- 

135. 
Hoenig, Morris (Moritz) Frederick, son of 

Bernhard Hbnig, husband of Lillie Mae 

Buffaloe, 18, 24-25, 51, 130, 132. 
Hbnig, Moritz, son of Bernhard Hbnig (see 
Hoenig, Morris Frederick). 
Hbnig, Nanette, daughter of Maximilian Hbnig von 

Hbnigsberg, 112. 
Hoenig, Nora Kee Gee, wife of Bruce Albert 

Hoenig, 149. 
Hoenig, Olga, wife of Ernst Hoenig (Hbnig), 155. 
Hoenig (Hbnig), Oskar, son of Joshua Hbnig from 

Kirchenbirk, 19,22,25,27,48-49, 

52, 155. 
Hoenig (Hbnig), Otto, son of Ariel Hbnig, husband 

of Margaret "Gretl" Fischer, ii, 26-27, 

34, 62-63, 163. 
Hbnig, Paul, son of Joshua Hbnig from 

Kirchenbirk, 1 7, 22, 27, 1 59. 
Hoenig, Pauline Emma Thieleman, wife of George 

Hoenig, 1 32. 
Hoenig, Peter, son of Dr. Julius Hoenig, husband 

of Ellen Glass, 22, 1 60. 
Hbnig, Poldi, daughter of Josef Hbnig from 

Kirchenbirk (see Hbnig, Leopoldine). 
Hbnig, Poldi, wife of Friedrich "Fritz" Hbnig, 

(see Hbnig, Leopoldine). 
Hbnig, Regina, daughter of Joachim Hbnig von 

Hbnigsberg, 112. 
Hbnig, Regina Loebel, wife of Theodor (Israel) 

Hbnig, 28, 155. 
Hbnig, Richard, son of Ariel Hbnig, 164. 
Hoenig, Rita Jean Haas, wife of Ronald Moms 



Hoenig, 25, 134. 
Hoenig, Ronald Morris, son of Morris Hoenig, 
husband of Jane Ruth Adwell and Rita 
Jean Haas, 25, 1 34. 
Hbnig, Rosa, daughter of Joshua Hbnig from 

Kirchenbirk, wife of Gustav Budlovsky 
22, 27, 31, 57, 62, 95, 156. 
Hbnig, Rosette, daughter of Maximilian Hbnig von 

Hbnigsberg, 112. 
Hbnig, Rudi, son of Friedrich ("Fritz") Hbnig, 151. 
Hbnig, Simon, son of Israel Hbnig, 2, 19, 23 

45, 111, 114. 
Hoenig (Hbnig), Sonja, daughter of Michael 

Hbnig, wife of Thomas Nanni, ii, 60 82- 
88, 152. 
Hoenig (Hbnig), Sophia, daughter of Israel Hbnig, 
wife of Arant B. Klein, 2, 14, 19, 23 
51, 111, 114-115, 173-185. 
Hoenig, Sylvia, wife of Ernst Hoenig, 28, 155. 
Hoenig, Tammy Ann Gibbs, wife of Michael Lee 

Hoenig, 149. 
Hbnig, Tea, daughter of Dr. Herman Hbnig, 1 63. 
Hbnig, Theodor (Israel), son of Joshua Hbnig, 

husband of Regina Loebel, 155. 
Hbnig, Theresia, daughter of Joachim Hbnig von 

Hbnigsberg, 112. 
Hbnig, Theresia, daughter of Maximilian Hbnig 

von Hbnigsberg, 112. 
Hbnig, Theodor (Israel), son of Joshua Hbnig, 

18, 22, 28. 
Hoenig, Thomas William, son of Morris Hoenig, 
husband of Leah Wallis and Donna Mae 
Plummer, 25, 134. 
Hbnig, Veronika, daughter of Josef Hbnig, wife of 

Wilhelm Loewy, 18, 22, 153. 
Hoenig, Victoria Lynn, wife of Alan Biggerstaff, 

134. 
Hoenig, Violet Myakich, wife of Adolph Hoenig, 

21, 61, 147. 
Hbnig, Wilhelmina, daughter of Joshua Hbnig 

from Kirchenbirk, 22, 27, 48, 57, 159. 
Hbnig, Wilhelmine, daughter of Josef Hbnig from 
Kirchenbirk, wife of Moritz Lbbl, 22, 
28, 96, 154, 165-170. 
Hbnig, Zdenka, wife of Paul Hbnig, 27, 1 59. 
Hbnigsberg, Edler von, 11-12. 
Hbnigsberg, Soliman von, 13. 
Hbnigshofen, Edler von, 13. 
Honigstein, Adam Albert von, 1 3. 
Hoffmann Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Hoffmann, Dr., 1 1 . 
Hoffmann, Hani Donat, 1 09. 
Hoffmann, Maria Bittner, 105. 



230 



Hoffmann, Regina, 108. 

Holland, Mayor W. E. (of Dallas, Texas), 25. 

Hollander, Emanuel, husband of Katharina 

Kunstler, 1 02. 
Hollander, Katharina Kunstler, wife of Emanuel 

Kunstler, 102. 
Hollowell, April Jene Barzcz, daughter of Thomas 

Barzcz, wife of John Thomas Hollowell, 

150. 
Hollowell, John Thomas, husband of April Jene 

Barzcz, 150. 
Holt, Fred [formerly Fritz Holzner], son of Otto 

Holzner, husband of Vera, 191. 
Holt, Nicholas, son of Fred Holt, 191. 
Holt, Paula, wife of Steven Holt, 191. 
Holt, Steven, son of Fred Holt, husband of Paula, 

191. 
Holt, Vera, wife of Fred Holt, 191. 
Holzner Family (from Karlsbad, Purles and 

Theusing)), 77-78, 80, 111, 153, 186- 

193. 
Holzner, Adolf, 96. 
Holzner, Amalie ("Mali"), daughter of Jakob 

Holzner, wife of Mr. Hirsch (of Lidau). 

187. 
Holzner, Anna, daughter of Ignaz Holzner, 193. 
Holzner, Anna, daughter of Jakob Holzner, wife 

of Dr. Josef Schimek, 1 87. 
Holzner, Edith, daughter of Franz Holzner, wife 

of Allan Johansson, 192. 
Holzner, Emil, son of Ignaz Holzner, husband of 

Rosa Sgall, 29, 191. 
Holzner, Emma, daughter of Jakob Holzner, wife 

of Anton Marsch (she kept her maiden 

name and her daughter, Martha (Irma) 

used it as well), 1 90. 
Holzner, Erna, daughter of Ignaz Holzner, wife 

of Ernst Lowy, 29, 1 92. 
Holzner, Esther Stein, daughter of Moses Stein, 

wife of Jakob Holzner, 1 86. 
Holzner, Eva Beiher, wife of Simon Holzner, 186. 
Holzner, Franz, son of Ignaz Holzner, husband of 

Friedl Grunhut, 1 92. 
Holzner, Friedl, wife of Robert Holzner, 192. 
Holzner, Friedrich, 96. 
Holzner, Fritz, son of Otto Holzner (see Holt, 

Fred). 
Holzner, Hermann, husband of Theresia Holzner, 

72, 96. 
Holzner, Hermine Oesterreicher, wife of Otto 

Holzner, 29, 191. 
Holzner, Hugo, 72-73. 
Holzner, Ignaz, son of Jakob Holzner, husband of 



Lydia Beer, 29, 111, 153, 191-193. 
Holzner, Ignaz, husband of Johanna, 96. 
Holzner, Jakob, son of Simon Holzner, husband of 

Esther Stein, 186. 
Holzner, Johanna, wife of Ignaz Holzner, 96. 
Holzner, Johanna, wife of Israel Lauscher, 96. 
Holzner, Karl, son of Ignaz Holzner, 193. 
Holzner, Leo, 95-96. 
Holzner, Lotte, daughter of Jakob Holzner, wife 

of Mr. Humml, 188. 
Holzner, Lydia Beer, daughter of Mr. Beer, wife 

of Ignaz Holzner, 29, 111, 153, 191- 

193. 
Holzner, Lydia, daughter of Emil Holzner, 191. 
Holzner, Lydia, daughter of Franz Holzner, wife 

of Dr. Jiri [George] Bondy, 1 92. 
Holzner, Martha, daughter of Ignaz Holzner, 

wife of Ernst Herzig, 29, 191. 
Holzner, Martha (Irma), daughter of Emma 

Holzner and Anton Marsch, wife of 

Waldemar (Herbert) Tasche, 190, 194. 
Hoizner, Max, son of Ignaz Holzner, 29, 1 92. 
Holzner, Otto, son of Ignaz Holzner, husband of 

Hermine Oesterreicher, 29, 191. 
Holzner, Robert, son of Ignaz Holzner, husband of 

Friedl, 192. 
Holzner, Rosa Sgall, wife of Emil Holzner, 29, 

191. 
Holzner, Rosie, 32, 72. 
Holzner, Rudolf, son of Otto Holzner, husband of 

Trude, 29, 191. 
Holzner, Simon (from Karlsbad), 96. 
Holzner, Simon (from Purles), husband of Eva 

Beiher, 186. 
Holzner, Therese ("Resi"), daughter of Jakob 

Holzner, wife of Mr. Vogl, 1 87. 
Holzner, Theresia, wife of Hermann Holzner, 96. 
Holzner, Uncle, husband of Rosie, 32, 79. 
Holzner, Vera, daughter of Emil Holzner, wife of 

Vladimir Jilek, ii, 191, 194. 
Holzner, Walter, son of Ignaz Holzner, 1 92. 
Holzner, Wilhelmina (Mina), daughter of Jakob 

Holzner, 1 88. 
Honig, Adolph, son of Simon Honig, 1 1 4. 
Honig, Amelia, daughter of Simon Honig, 114. 
Honig, Bertha, daughter of Simon Honig, 1 1 4. 
Honig, Emma, daughter of Simon Honig, 1 1 4. 
Honig, Herman, son of Simon Honig, 1 1 4. 
Honig, Lena, daughter of Simon Honig, 1 14. 
Honig, Simon, 1 1 4. 

Honig, Sophie, wife of Simon Honig, 1 1 4. 
Honig, Sophie, daughter of Simon Honig, wife of 

John Schlaudt, 114. 



231 






* 



Honig, Sophie Dorthea Christine Bushgien, 

daughter of John Bushgien, wife of Simon 

Honig, 114. 
Honig, William, son of Simon Honig, 114. 
Honisch, L., 44. 

Hoover, President Herbert, 21. 
Horowitz, Hermann, 19, 47. 
Howard, Jean, wife of Frank Kreissl, 205-206. 
Hradetchny, Hildegarde, wife of Josef Weiss and 

Victor Schlesinger, 1 44. 
Hubbard, Deidre, daughter of Brenda Yarbrough 

Mullen, 133. 
Huebsch Family (from Falkenau), 1 8, 36,64. 
Huebsch, Leo, 36. 
Hubscher, Elsa, 10. 
Hugo (from Karlsbad), 78. 
Humml, Adolf, son of Lotte Holzner Humml, 

names of his wife and their three 

daughters are unknown, 1 88. 
Humml, Elsa, daughter of Lotte Holzner Humml, 

wife of Paul Vorwerk, 188. 
Humml, Emil, son of Lotte Holzner Humml, 

husband of Ruth, first name of his 

daughter is unknown, 1 88. 
Humml, Fritz, son of Lotte Holzner Humml, the 

first names of his wife and their son and 

daughter are unknown, 189. 
Humml, Lotte Holzner, daughter of Jakob 

Holzner, wife of Mr. Humml, 1 88. 
Humml, Mr., husband of Lotte Holzner, 188. 
Humml, Otto, son of Lotte Holzner Humml, the 

first names of his wife and their two 

sons and daughter are unknown, 1 89. 
Humml, Ruth, wife of Emil Humml, 188. 
Humml, Walter, son of Lotte Holzner Humml, 189. 
Hyman, Clara Kohner, daughter of Henry 

Kohner, wife of Harry Hyman, 23, 176. 
Hyman, Harry, husband of Clara Kohner, 1 76. 



Innocent, Pope, 4. 



Jacewicz, Anna Mayer, daughter of Joseph 

Mayer, wife of John Jacewicz, 27, 52, 

159. 
Jacewicz, Joann, daughter of John Jacewicz, 

27, 159. 
Jacewicz, John, husband of Anna Mayer, 27, 

159. 
Jacewicz, Joseph, son of John Jacewicz, 1 59. 



Jacewicz, Linda, daughter of John Jacewicz, 

wife of Vincent Rossi, 27, 1 59. 
Jacewicz, Mary Ann, daughter of John 

Jacewicz, 27, 1 59. 
Jacob (Prague), 4. 
Jacobs, Ella ("Lalla"), wife of Alvin Amt 

Abramson, 180. 
Jacobs, Louise, wife of Dr. Steven Laster, 1 20. 
Jacobson, Arthur Morris, 57. 
Jaeger, Otto, husband of Wilhelmina ("Mina," 

"Mini") Samuel, 169. 
Jaeger, Wilhelmina ("Mina," "Mini") Samuel, 

daughter of Julius Samuel, wife of Otto 

Jaeger, 22, 169. 
Janowitz, Salomon, 1 1 . 
Jaspers, Karl, 22. 

Jel, Michaela, wife of Stefan Frohlich, 125. 
Jellinek, Eduard, 1 1 0. 
Jilek, Vera Holzner, daughter of Emil Holzner, 

wife of Vladimir Jilek, ii, 191. 
Jilekova, Olga, daughter of Vladimir Jilek, wife 

of Joseph Kuokolik, 191. 
Johann, King (from Luxembourg), 4, 9. 
Johansson, Allan, husband of Edith Holzner, 192. 
Johansson, Edith Holzner, daughter of Franz 

Holzner, wife of Allan Johansson, 1 92. 
Johansson, Eva, daughter of Allan Johansson, 

wife of Karl Frederick Landstrom, 192. 
Jones, Amber Elizabeth, daughter of George 

Jones, 1 38. 
Jones, George, husband of Julia Marie Worden, 

138. 
Jones, Julia Marie Worden, daughter of Eugene 

Wray Worden, wife of George Jones, 

138. 
Josef (from Mies), 9. 
Josef II, Kaiser [Emperor], 6-7, 12. 
Josef, David (from Mies), son of Josef, 9. 
Juda (Elbogen), 5. 
Junker-Bigatto Family (in Schweissing), 1 1 . 



K 



Kaderavek, Anna, wife of Josef Kreissl, 62, 

200. 
Kardish, Margaret Budlovsky, daughter of Dr. 

Joseph ("Mopl") Budlovsky, wife of Dr. 

Richard Kardish, 28, 1 57. 
Kardish, Dr. Richard, husband of Margaret 

Budlovsky, 28, 1 57. 
Karpeles, Erna Steiniger, daughter of Theodor 

Steiniger, wife of Paul Karpeles, 42. 
Karpeles, Paul, husband of Erna Steiniger, 42. 



232 



Kari (Charles IV), 3, 9. 

Katz, Celia, wife of Julius Katz, 55. 

Katz, Julius, husband of Celia, 55. 

Kaufmann, Mr. (from Karlsbad), 78, 80. 

Kaufmann, Mrs. (from Karlsbad), 80. 

Kaupe, Rosalie Stein, 1 06. 

Keiserman, Dr., 64, 66. 

Kesselring, Field Marshal Alfred, 70. 

Kincaid, Jonathan, son of Anthony Michael Call, 

148. 
King, Matthew Warren [Pavazzi], adopted son of 

Randall Gordon King, 135. 
King, Michael Antone [Pavazzi], adopted son of 

Randall Gordon King, 135. 
King, Mitzi Sue Hoenig, wife of Randall Gordon 

King, 135. 
King, Randall Gordon, husband of Mitzi Sue 

Hoenig, 135. 
Klaber, Marie (from Zwiebau), wife of Mr. 

Zentner, 97. 
Klein Family (from St. Louis, MO), 111, 115, 

173-185. 
Klein, Adrian, son of Nathan Klein, 1 74. 
Klein, Anna, 44. 
Klein, Arant B., husband of Sophia Hoenig, 23, 

51, 115, 173-185. 
Klein, Archie, son of Nathan Klein, 174. 
Klein, Benjamin Julius, son of Arant B. Klein, 

23, 173. 
Klein, Bertha, daughter of Arant B. Klein, wife 

of Julius Abramson, 23, 1 73. 
Klein, Bessie, daughter of Arant B. Klein, wife 

of Charles Meyers, 23, 174, 183. 
Klein, Bessie, wife of Nathan Klein, 23, 1 74. 
Klein, Bessie, daughter of Nathan Klein, 174. 
Klein, Edna, daughter of Nathan Klein, 174. 
Klein, Edward, son of Nathan Klein, 174. 
Klein, Emanuel, son of Arant B. Klein, 23, 173. 
Klein, Fredericka "Ricka," daughter of Arant B. 
Klein, wife of Henry Kohner, 23, 173. 
Klein, Louis A. (Ludwig), son of Arant B. Klein, 

24, 175. 
Klein, Mr. (from Falkenau), 1 5. 
Klein, Nathan, son of Arant B. Klein, husband of 

Bessie, 23, 174. 
Klein, Pauline, daughter of Arant B. Klein, wife 

of Samuel Zepin, 23, 174. 
Klein, Rachel (Ray), daughter of Arant B. Klein, 
wife of Abraham Pachter, 23-24, 175, 
184-185. 
Klein, Sophia Hoenig, wife of Arant B. Klein, 2, 
19, 23, 51, 111, 114-115, 153, 173- 
185. 



Klug, Karla Stransky, daughter of Max Stransky, 

wife of Dr. Wilhelm Klug, 28, 1 66. 
Klug, Peter, son of Dr. Wilhelm Klug, 28, 1 66. 
Klug, Dr. Wilhelm, husband of Karla Stransky, 

166. 
Knittl, Prag Conservatory Director, 74. 
Knorpp, Crystal Suzanne, daughter of Daniel 

Scott Knorpp, 1 39. 
Knorpp, Daniel Scott, husband of Elizabeth Lynn 

Hayes, 139. 
Knotpp, Elizabeth Lynn Hayes, daughter of JW 

Hayes, wife of Daniel Scott Knorpp, 1 39. 
Knorpp, Jamie Danielle, daughter of Daniel Scott 

Knorpp, 1 39. 
Koenig, Johanna, wife of Dr. Bernard Aschner, 

118. 
Korbl, P. Josef, 7. 
Kohak, Jacob, son of Mr. Kohak, 38. 
Kohak, Mr., husband of Vera Lbwy, 38. 
Kohak, Vera Lowy, daughter of Werner Lbwy, 

wife of Kohak, 38. 
Kohn (Families) (from Falkenau) ("Federkohn"), 

18, 31, 36, 64. 
Kohn Family (from Lundenburg), 102. 
Kohn Family (from Schweissig), 1 96. 
Kohn, Adlof, husband of Marie, 1 02. 
Kohn, Anna Binhak, daughter of Siegmund Binhak, 
wife of Jacob Kohn, 36, 73-74, 76-79, 
81. 
Kohn, David, 9, 1 6, 64. 
Kohn, Emanuel, 9. 
Kohn, Emma, 77. 

Kohn, Greta, wife of Walter Kohn, 36. 
Kohn, Heinrich, 64. 

Kohn, Ida, wife of Adolf Herrmann, 35. 
Kohn, Ignatz, son of Katherine Kohn, 36. 
Kohn, Jacob, husband of Anna Binhak, 32, 36, 

73, 76, 80. 
Kohn, Joachim, son-in-law of Salomon Steiniger, 

9, 40-41. 
Kohn, Rabbi [Lehrer, teacher] Jonas, 14, 17, 36, 

63, 196. 
Kohn, Josef, 10. 
Kohn, Karoline, 44. 
Kohn, Katherine ("Katel"), 36. 
Kohn, Marie, wife of Adolf Kohn, 1 02. 
Kohn, Max, husband of Sophie Muller, 28, 161. 
Kohn (Mies), 1 0. 

Kohn, Mina, wife of Walter Kohn, 32. 
Kohn, Sophie Muller, daughter of Albert Muller, 
wife of Karl Glaser and Max Kohn, 28, 
9, 161. 
Kohn, Walter, son of Jacob Kohn, husband of 



233 



I 



Mina, 32, 36. 
Kohn, Walter, son of Ignatz Kohn, husband of 

Greta, 36. 
Kohner Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Kohner, Aaron, son of Henry Kohner, husband of 

Ann Danish, 23, 52, 179. 
Kohner, Adella, daughter of Henry Kohner, 23, 

177. 
Kohner, Ann Darrish, wife of Aaron Kohner, 

52, 179. 
Kohner, Clara, daughter of Henry Kohner, wife 

of Harry Hyman, 23, 176. 
Kohner, Flora, daughter of Henry Kohner, wife 

of Charles S. Miller, 23, 176. 
Kohner, Fredericka "Ricka" Klein, daughter of 

Arant B. Klein, wife of Henry Kohner, 

23-24, 51-52, 173, 178-179. 
Kohner, Helene, daughter of Aaron Kohner, wife 

of Donald Levitan, 179. 
Kohner, Henry, husband of Theresa Heller and 

Fredericka "Ricka" Klein, 123, 173, 

176-179. 
Kohner, Ignaz, 10. 

Kohner, Joseph, son of Henry Kohner, 23, 1 77. 
Kohner, June, daughter of Aaron Kohner, wife of 

Irven Bierman, ii 179. 
Kohner, Louis, son of Henry Kohner, 23, 176. 
Kohner, Simon, son of Henry Kohner, 23, 177. 
Kohner, Theresa Heller, wife of Henry Kohner, 

23, 173, 176-178. 
Kohom, Bernard, husband of Judith, 1 88. 
Kohom, Erni, wife of Hans Linger, 42. 
Kohorn, Judith, wife of Bernard Kohorn, 188. 
Koller, Emma, wife of Friedrich ("Fritz") Honig, 

151. 
Koretz, Adolf, 15. 

Kornfiihrer Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Koschinek Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Koukolik, Ivo, son of Joseph Koukolik, 191. 
Koukolik, Joseph, husband of Olga Jilekova, 191. 
Koukolik, Olga Jilekova, daughter of Vladimir 

Jilek, wife of Joseph Koukolik, 191. 
Koukolik, Petr, son of Joseph Koukolik, 191. 
Kovamikova, Olga, wife of Dr. Boris Sprusil, 

142. 
Kraus, Ignaz, 10. 

Krauskopf Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Kravitz, Dr. Daniel, 52-53. 
Kreissl Family (from Alt Rohlau-Karlsbad), 111. 
Kreissl, Adam, son of Peter Kreissl, 203. 
Kreissl, Anna Kaderavek, wife of Josef Kreissl, 

62, 200. 
Kreissl, Emil, husband of Hermine Fischer, 3, 



200. 
Kreissl, Frances, daughter of Josef Kreissl, 

wife of Terence Robb, 202. 
Kreissl, Frank, son of Richard Kreissl, husband 

of Jean Howard, 204-205. 
Kreissl, Franziska Durrschmidt, wife of Richard 

Kreissl, 200. 
Kreissl, Gertrude, daughter of Richard Kreissl, 

wife of Brian Booth, 200-201 . 
Kreissl, Hermine Fischer, daughter of Adolf 

Fischer, wife of Emil Kreissl, 3, 200. 
Kreissl, Janice Gail Mort, wife of Peter Kreissl 

203. 
Kreissl, Jean Howard, wife of Frank Kreissl, 

204-205. 
Kreissl, Johanna ("Hanni"), daughter of Emil 

Kreissl, wife of Leopold Weiss, 200. 
Kreissl, Josef, son of Emil Kreissl, ii, 62, 200. 
Kreissl, Josef, son of Richard Kreissl, husband 

of Wendy Hall, 200, 202-203. 
Kreissl, Kevin, son of Josef Kreissl, 203. 
Kreissl, Marie, daughter of Richard Kreissl, 

wife of Frank William Foster, 200, 203. 
Kreissl, Mark, son of Frank Kreissl, 205. 
Kreissl, Peter, son of Josef Kreissl, husband of 

Janice Gail Mort, 203. 
Kreissl, Paula, wife of Ronald Roberts, 14,204- 

205. 
Kreissl, Richard, son of Emil Kreissl, husband 

of Franziska Durrschmidt, 200. 
Kreissl, Ryan, son of Kevin Kreissl, 203. 
Kreissl, Shane, son of Josef Kreissl, 202. 
Kreissl, Shaun, son of Kevin Kreissl, 203. 
Kreissl, Tracy Mort, wife of Kevin Kreissl, 203. 
Kreissl, Wendy Hall, wife of Josef Kreissl, 200, 

202-203. 
Kreieger, Anneliese Hahn, daughter of Alfred 

Hahn, wife of Dr. Arthur Krieger, 1 99. 
Krieger, Dr. Arthur, husband of Anneliese Hahn, 

199. 
Krieger, Charles, son of Dr. Arthur Krieger, 

199. 
Krieger, Christopher, son of Dr. Arthur Krieger, 

199. 
Kropf Family (from Falkenau), 1 8, 36. 
Kropf, Liesl, 36. 
Kropf, Walter, 36. 
Krupa, Gene, 86. 
Kunstler, Katharina, wife of Emanuel Kunstler, 

102. 
Kuffner, Ignaz Edler von, 102. 
Kuffner, Jacob Hirsch, 101. 
Kuffner, Johanna, 106. 



234 



Kuffner, Moriz Edler von 101 

Kuffner, Rosalia, wife of Mr. Rosenbaum, 105 

Kuh Family (from Falkenau), 18, 36 

Kuh, Gretl, daughter of Mrs. Kuh 36 

Kuh, Mrs., 36. ' 

Kunstler, Simon, 106. 

Kurzweil Family (from Falkenau) 18 37 

KurzweiL_Alice, daughter of Lippmann Kurzweil, 

Kurzweil Cantor Uppmann, husband of Reg^na 
17, 34, 37, 63. ' 

KurzwelL^Regina, wife of Lippmann Kurzweil, 

Kurzweil, Mima, daughter of Lippmann Kurzweil, 



La Blanc Carolyn Earlene Carson, daughter of 
Howard Carl Carson, wife of Eddv La 
Blanc, 136. 

La Blanc Catherine, daughter of Eddy La Blanc, 

1 36. 
La Blanc, Eddy, husband of Carolyn Earlene 
Carson, 136. 

La Blanc, Kimberlin, daughter of Eddy La Blanc, 

1 36. 
Lach, Fani, wife of Mr. Laufer, 105 
Ladislaus II, King, 5. 
Lallement, Brian Douglas, son of Robert 

Lallement, husband of Floracy Viloria, 

*_09. 

Lallement, Floracy Viloria, wife of Brian Douglas 

Lallement, 208. 
Lallement Greta Wolf, wife of Robert Lallement, 

Lallement, Marcel, husband of Marie Gess 25 
209. ' ° 

Lallement, Marie Louise Schmitter, wife of 
Marcel Lallement, 209. 

Lallement, Marie Gess, daughter of Otto Gess 
wife of Marcel Lallement, 26 209 

Lallement, Robert, son of Marcel Lallement, ii, 

Lallement, Robert L, son of Brian Douglas 

Lallement, 209. 
Lallement, Terry Suzanne, daughter of Robert 

Lallement, wife of Marc Harris 209 
Landstrbm, Eva Johansson, daughter of Allan 

Johansson, wife of Karl Frederick 

Landstrbm, 192. 
Landstrbm, Julia, daughter of Karl Frederick 

Landstrbm, 192. 



Landstrom, Karl Frederick, husband of Eva 

Johansson, 192. 
Landstrom, Karl Frederick, son of Karl Frederick 

Landstrbm, 192. 
Lang Family (from Falkenau), 18, 37 
Lang, Alice, wife of Victor Lang, *37 ' 
Lang, Anita L, wife of Jame Morris Hoenig, 134 
Lang, Ella, daughter of Victor Lang, 37 
Lang, Gerhart, son of Victor Lang, 37 
Lang, Irma, daughter of Victor Lang 37 
Lang, Josef, 37, 43. 

Lang, Valerie, daughter of Victor Lana 37 
Lang, Victor, son of Josef Lang, husband of 

Alice, 37. 
Lansdell, Carol, wife of Richard Meyers 183 
Lappers Family (from Karlsbad), 77 
Lappert Family (from Falkenau)', 18 37 
Lappert, Louisa, 37. 

LaSt6r ' ?20 AndreW J " S0 " ° f °'' Ver LaSter ' 29 ' 
Laster, Elizabeth Aschner, daughter of Dr. 

f £%t C i2a ^ ° f °" Ver Laster ' 

Laster, Geraldine, daughter of Oliver Laster.wife 

ot Scott Macomber, 29 120 
Laster, Ian, son of Dr. Andrew j. Laster, 120 
Laster, Lou.se Jacobs, wife of Dr. Steven Laster, 

Laster, Michele Garrett, wife of Dr. Andrew J 

Laster, 120. 
Laster, Nicholas, son of Dr. Andrew J. Laster, 

Laster, Oliver, husband of Elizabeth Aschner 

Laster, ii, 29, 118, 120 
Laster, Sophia, daughter of Dr. Steven Laster, 

Laster, Dr. Steven B., son of Oliver Laster 

husband ot Louise Jacobs, 29 120 
Laufer, Fani Lach, 105. 

Lauffer, Rosina, daughter of Mr. and Mrs 

I a „ff ^^ Wife ° f Moses Stei ". 186. 
Lauffer, Mr. and Mrs., 186. 

Lauscher, Israel, 96. 

Lauscher, Johanna Holzner, wife of Israel 

Lauscher, 96. 
Lazarus, D. Simon, 6. 
Lechner, Leopold, 1 1 

Lederer Family (from Falkenau), 18 37 40 
Lederer, Else Honig, daughter of Ariel Hbnig 

wife of Otto Lederer, 26 163 
Lederer Helen Wolf, daughter of ludwig 

Lederer, 37. 
Lederer, Helen Wolf, wife of Otto Lederer, 54. 



D 









235 



Lederer, Irma, daughter of Ludwig Lederer, 37. 

Lederer, Ludwig, husband of Ottillie, 33, 37. 

Lederer, Max, 15. 

Lederer, Moritz, 10. 

Lederer, Ottillie, wife of Ludwig Lederer, 37. 

Lederer, Otto, husband of Else Honig, 26, 1 63. 

Lederer, Otto, husband of Helen Wolf, 53-54. 

Lederer, Dr. Robert, son of Otto Lederer, 54. 

Lederer, Valli, 54. 

Lee, Susan, wife of Robert Dernovsek, 1 58. 

Leidersdorf, Anna Honig von Honigshofen, 

daughter of Aaron Moses Honig von 

Honigshofen, wife of Joachim Leidersdorf, 

112. 
Leidersdorf, Karl (Simson), son of Joachim 

Leidersdorf, 112. 
Leidersdorf, Marianne, wife of Karl (Lazar) 

Honig von Hbnigsberg, 112. 
Leidersdorf, Marianne, daughter of Joachim 
Leidersdorf, 1 1 2. 
Leidersdorf, Moses, son of Joachim Leidersdorf, 

112. 
Leo, David, 5. 
Leopold II, Emperor, 13. 
Leven, Claire Hirsch (see Hirsch, Claire). 
Levi Family (from Falkenau and Eger), 196-210. 
Levi, Jakob, 6. 
Levin, Salomon, 6. 
Levi/Lbv, Mrs. (first name unknown) Steiniger, 

2, 111. 
Levitan, Amy, daughter of Donald Levitan, wife 

of Sidney Coats, 1 79. 
Levitan, Andrea, daughter of Donald Levitan, 

179. 
Levitan, Charles, son of Donald Levitan, 1 79. 
Levitan, Donald, husband of Helene Kohner, 1 79. 
Levitan, Helene Kohner, wife of Donald Levitan, 

179. 
Levy, Adam (see Lowy, Adam). 
Levy, Ian (see Lowy, Ian). 
Levy, Jane, wife of Sidney Abramson, 180. 
Levy, Lenka (see Lowy, Lenka). 
Levy, Maya (see Lowy, Maya). 
Levy, Peter (see Lowy, Peter). 
Levy, Vemer (see Lowy, Werner). 
Lewi, Rabbi Isaias, 7. 
Lieben, S.H., 7. 
Lifka, Emil, 15, 41. 
Linnemann, Theodore, 46-47. 
Lipschitz, Sam, 53-54. 
Lisenbee, David, son of Larry Lisenbee, 1 23. 
Lisenbee, Doris Schwarz, daughter of Dr. 

Gerhart Schwarz, wife of Larry 



J 



Lisenbee, 30, 123. 
Lisenbee, Jeffrey, son of Larry Lisenbee, 123. 
Lisenbee, Larry, husband of Doris Schwarz, 

123. 
Lisenbee, Michael, son of Lany Lisenbee, 1 23. 
Litvine, Ariel, husband of Marion Lbbl, 165. 
Lloyd, Major Jack, 70-71. 
Lobkowitz, Countess, 75. 
Lbbl, Alfred, son of Moritz Loebl, husband of 

Mimi Pollak, 22, 28, 170. 
Lobl, Alice Mayer, wife of Julius Lbbl, 1 68. 
Lobl, Alina, 96. 
Lobl, Amalie, daughter of Moritz Loebl, wife of 

Max Stransky, 22, 166. 
Lobl, Anna, daughter of Moritz Loebl, wife of 

Julius Samuel, 22, 1 69. 
Lobl, Claude, son of Julius Lobl, husband of 

Jeanette, 1 68. 
Lobl, David, husband of Karoline L&bl, 96. 
Lbbl, Emil, 96. 

Lbbl, Gertrud, daughter of Alfred Lbbl, 28, 1 70. 
Lbbl, Gertrude Schoenwald, wife of Leopold Lbbl, 

28, 165. 
Lbbl, Gustav (1857-1925), 96. 
Lbbl, Gustav (1861-1885), 96. 
Lbbl, James, son of Leopold Lbbl, 28, 165. 
Lbbl, Jany, daughter of Julius Lbbl, wife of Mr. 

Berliner, 168. 
Lbbl, Jeanette, wife of Claude Lobl, 1 68. 
Lbbl, Jsac, 96. 
Lbbl, Julius, son of Moritz Loebl, husband of 

Alice Mayer, 22, 168. 
Lbbl, Karl, son of Moritz Lbbl, 166. 
Lbbl, Karoline, wife of David Lobl, 96. 
Loebl, Lotte, wife of Paul Zentner, 43. 
Lbbl, Leo, 95. 
Lbbl, Leopold, son of Moritz Loebl, husband of 

Gertrude Scchoenwald, 22, 28, 165. 
Lbbl, Ludwig, 96. 
Lbbl, Marion, daughter of Leopold Lbbl, wife of 

Ariel Litvine, 165. 
Lbbl, Mimi Pollak, wife of Alfred Lobl, 28, 1 70. 
Lbbl, Moritz, husband of Wilhelmine Hdnig, 22, 

28, 96, 154, 165-170. 
Lbbl, Paula, wife of Mr. Spitzer, 96. 
Loebel, Regina, wife of Theodore Honig, 28. 
Lbbl, Roberto, son of Claude Lbbl, 168. 
Lbbl, Rosa, 96. 
Lbbl, Salomon, 96. 
Lbbl, Thersia, 96. 

Lbbl, Wilhelmine Honig, daughter of Josef Honig 
from Kirchenhirk, wife of Moritz Loebl, 
22, 28, 96, 154, 165-170. 



236 



Lobner, Edmund, 1 0. 

Lobner, Dr. Fritz, 1 1 . 

Loeffler, Charles, 19, 48, 52. 

Loeffler, Mrs. Charles, 48, 52. 

Lbffler, N., 17. 

L6v, Loew, Loewy, Lowi, Lbwy, Lowi 

Lov Family (from Falkenau and Eger), 18, 37, 

64, 111, 196-210. 
Loewy Family (from Budau near Saaz), 111, 

194-195. 
Lov, Emma, 37. 

Lov, Ernst (from Falkenau), 37. 
Lbwy, Ernst (from Luditz), husband of Etna 

Holzner, 192. 
Lov, Helen, 37. 

Lov, Ignaz (from Probsor), 110. 
Lov, Marie, 37. 
Lov, Mrs. (first name unknown) Steiniger, 2, 

111, 196. 
Lov, Otto, 37. 
Lbwy, Otto, son of Ernst Lowy (from Luditz), 

husband of Barbara Hall) (see Lowy, 

Otto). 
Lov, Paul, 37. 
Lov, Rosa, wife of Jacob Spiegl, 2, 5, 25-26, 

111, 196. 
Lov, Sophie, wife of Josef Adler, 2, 18, 111, 

196. 
Lov, Tony, 37. 

Lowy Family (from Falkenau), 18, 37-38, 43. 
Loewy (Families) (from Falkenau), 18, 33, 64. 
Lowy, Adam, son of Peter Lbwy, 38. 
Loewy, Alfred, son of Moric Loewy, husband of 

Berta, name of daughter is unknown, 

194. 
Lowy, Barbara Hall, wife of Otto Lowy, 29. 
Loewy, Berta, wife of Alfred Loewy, 1 94. 
Loewy, Emil, son of Salomon Loewy, 195. 
Lbwy, Ema Holzner, daughter of Ignaz Holzner, 

wife of Ernst Lbwy, 29. 
Loewy, Erna, daughter of Moric Loewy, 194. 
Lbwy, Ernst, husband of Ema Holzner, 29. 
Lbwy, Ernst, 64. 

Loewy, Fred, son of Moritz Loewy, 38. 
Lbwy, Frieda, daughter of Leopold Lowy, 38. 
Lbwy, Hedwig, 64. 

Loewy, Hilda, daughter of Moritz Loewy, 38. 
Loewy, Hilde, daughter of Richard Loewy, wife 

of Frank Braun, 33, 1 95. 
Lbwy, Hugo, son of Leopold Lbwy, 16, 34, 37, 

64. 
Lbwy, Ian, son of Peter Lbwy, 38. 
Lowi, Ignaz, 15. 



Lbwy, Jacob, 8. 

Lbwy, Josef, 64. 

Loewy, Josef, son of Moric Loewy, 1 94. 

Lowy, Dr. Joan, daughter of Robert Lowy, 

married to Mr. Postow, 38, 64. 
Lbwy, Julie Buchsbaum, wife of Leopold Lbwy, 

37. 
Lbwy, Leopold, husband of Julie Buchsbaum, 37. 
Lbwy, Luisa, wife of Leo Fink, 34. 
Loewy, Mandel, 10. 

Lbwy, Marta, daughter of Leopold Lbwy, 38. 
Lbwy, Mary, 64. 
Loewy, Mr. and Mrs., 38. 
Lowy, Mathilde, wife of Robert Lowy, 38. 
Lbwy, Maya Svata, wife of Werner Lbwy, 38, 

64. 
Loewy, Moric, son of Salomon Loewy, husband 

of Regina Loebl, 1 94. 
Loewy, Moritz, husband of Regina, 38. 
Lbwy, Natalia Stolarowa, wife of Werner Lbwy, 

38. 
Lbwy, Oscar, son of Leopold Lbwy, 38. 
Lbwy, Pavel, son of Leopold Lbwy, 38. 
Lbwy, Peter, son of Werner Lbwy, husband of 

Lenka, 38. 
Lowy, Otto, son of Ernst Lbwy, husband of 

Barbara Hall, ii, 29. 
Loewy, Regina ("Regi"), wife of Moritz Loewy, 

38. 
Loewy, Regina Loebl, wife of Moric Loewy, 1 94. 
Loewy, Richard, husband of Rosa Zentner, 33, 

195. 
Lowy, Robert, son of Hugo Lbwy, husband of 

Mathilde, 1 6, 37-38, 41 , 64. 
Loewy, Robert, son of Moric Loewy, 194. 
Lowy, Rosa, daughter of Simon Schwarz, wife 

of Hugo Lbwy, 34, 37, 41 , 64. 
Loewy, Rosa Beer, daughter of Mr. Beer, wife 

of Salomon Loewy, 111, 1 53, 1 94-1 95. 
Loewy, Salomon, husband of Rosa Beer, 111, 

153, 194-195. 
Lowy, Dr. Steven, son of Robert Lowy, 38, 64. 
Lbwy, Vera, daughter of Werner Lbwy, wife of 

Kohak, 38. 
Loewy, Veronika Hbnig, daughter of Josef 

Hbnig, wife of Wilhelm Loewy, 18, 22, 

153. 
Lbwy, Werner, son of Hugo Lbwy, ii, 16, 18, 33- 

35, 37-41, 64. 
Loewy, Rabbi Wilhelm, husband of Veronika 

Hbnig, 18, 22, 153. 
Loewy, Wilhelm, son of Salomon Loewy, 195. 
Long, Dorothy Sue, wife of Morris Hoenig, 132, 






237 



134-135. 
Longwell, Gerald Richard, husband of Paula Jean 

Mullen, 133. 
Longwell, Paula Cheree, daughter of Gerald 

Richard Longwell, 1 33. 
Longwell, Paula Jean Mullen, daughter of Rev. 

Lonnie Reed Mullen, wife of Gerald 

Richard Longwell, 1 33. 
Longwell, Robin Jeree, daughter of Gerald 

Richard Longwell, 133. 
Loos, Mr., 42. 

Lotheim, Irma Menasse, wife of Louis, 55. 
Lotheim, Louis, husband of Irma Menasse, 55. 
Lovett, Doris Carol, wife of Leopold ("Leo") 

Hoenig, daughter of Gustave Lovett, ii, 

58-60, 65-67, 146. 
Lovett, Mae Himmelstein, mother of Doris 

Lovett Hoenig, 65. 
Lowy, Barbara Hall, wife of Otto Lowy, 192. 
Lowy, David, son of Otto Lowy, 192. 
Lowy, Otto, son of Ernst Lbwy (from Luditz), 

husband of Barbara Hall, 1 92. 
Ludwig, Mr., 77. 

Ludwig, Miki, wife of Pedro Miguel Frohlich, 124. 
Lurie Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 

Lustig , wife of Simon Weiss, 130,140. 

Lustig, Johanna, 1 1 0. 
Lustig, Rebecca Neubach, 103. 



M 



Macomber, Bryan, son of Scott Macomber, 1 20. 
Macomber, Geraldine Laster, daughter of Oliver 

Laster, wife of Scott Macomber, 29, 

120. 
Macomber, Kyle, son of Scott Macomber, 1 20. 
Macomber, Scott, husband of Geraldine Laster, 

120. 
Mabe, Doris, wife of Rev. Lonnie Reed Mullen, 

132. 
Mai, Alexander, 102. 
Maier, Adolf, 1 5. 
Mallowan, Maria Weisz, 103. 
Malzner, Adolf, husband of Marina Eckstein, 

107. 
Malzner, Marina Eckstein, wife of Adolf 

Malzner, 107. 
Mandler, Max, 10. 
Marchfeld, Leopold, 105. 
Marchfeld, Simon, 103. 
Maria Theresia, Empress, 7, 12. 
Markowitz, Dr. Arthur, 56. 
Marsch, Anton, husband of Emma Holzner, 190. 



Marsch, Emma Holzner (see Holzner, Emma). 
Marsch, Martha (Irma) Holzner, daughter of 

Anton Marsch and Emma Holzner, wife of 

Waldemar (Herbert) Tasche, (see 

Holzner, Emma, or Tasche, Martha 

(Irma). 
Martin, John [Jan Zelenka], son of Robert 

Zelenka, 1 1 6. 
Masch, Abraham, 7. 
Matthes, Jutta, wife of Mr. Uhlig and Rolf 

Tasche, 190. 
May, Friedrich, 104. 
May, Susanna Fischer, 103. 
Mayer, Anna, daughter of Joseph Mayer, wife 

of John Jacewicz, 27, 52, 159. 
Mayer, Elsa Hbnig, daughter of Joshua Hbnig 

from Kirchenbirk, wife of Joseph Mayer 

22,27,50,52,57,159. 
Mayer, Franz, son of Joseph Mayer, 27, 50 

159. 
Mayer, Joseph ("Pepp"), husband of Elsa Hbnig, 

27, 50, 159. 
McDougal, Betty Anne Meyers, daughter of 

Alfred Meyers, wife of John McDougal, 

ii, 183. 
McDougal, John, husband of Betty Anne Meyers, 

183. 
McDougal, Mary, daughter of John McDougal, 

wife of David Shroeder, 183. 
McDougal, Nancy, daughter of John McDougal, 

wife of Paul Frauson, 183. 
McDougal, Rebecca, daughter of John McDougal, 

wife of David Heitmanek, 183. 
McLendon, Bertha "Honey" Hoenig, daughter of 

Morris Frederick Hoenig; wife of Eddie 

Wray Worden, Henry Arnold and Ira N. 

McLendon, 25, 132. 
McLendon, Ira N., husband of Bertha ("Honey") 

Hoenig, 132. 
Meier (of Elbogen), 5. 
Menasse, Irma, wife of Louis Lotheim, 55. 
Mendl Family (from Falkenau), 18, 38, 64. 
Mendl, Berta, 38. 
Mendl, Emil, 38. 
Mendl, Hermine, 38. 
Mendl, Martha, 38. 
Mendl, Max, 38. 

Mersand, Estelle Himmelstein, 65. 
Meyer, Andrew S., son of Rick Meyer, 184. 
Meyer, Armand, 54. 
Meyer, Cathy Dobinsky, daughter of Paul 

Dobinsky, wife of Rick Meyer, 1 84. 
Meyer, Josefine, 1 02. 



238 



Meyer, Marjory Rachel, daughter of Rick Meyer, 

184. 
Meyer, Minnie, 53-54. 

Meyer, Rick, husband of Cathy Dobinsky, 1 84. 
Meyers, Alfred, son of Charles Meyers, husband 

of Frances Nussbaum, 23, 1 83. 
Meyers, Alfred Jr., son of Alfred Meyers, 

husband of Carol Goodfriend, ii, 1 83. 
Meyers, Bessie Klein, daughter of Arant B. Klein, 

wife of Charles Meyers, 23, 174, 183. 
Meyers, Betty Anne, daughter of Alfred Meyers, 

wife of John McDougal, ii, 183. 
Meyers, Carol Goodfriend, wife of Alfred Meyers 

Jr., 183. 
Meyers, Carol Lansdell, wife of Richard Meyers, 

183. 
Meyers, Charles, husband of Bessie Klein, 23, 

174, 183. 
Meyers, Harold, son of Charles Meyers, husband 

of Helen Margaret Anderson, ii, 23, 183. 
Meyers, Lindsay, daughter of Richard Meyers, 

183. 
Meyers, Matthew Allen, son of Richard Meyers, 

183. 
Meyers, Michael, son of Harold Meyers, 183. 
Meyers, Richard, son of Haroid Meyers, husband 

of Carol Lansdell, 183. 
Meyers, Robert Adrian, son of Richard Meyers, 

183. 
Milburn, Heister and Company, 52. 
Miller, Bertha Weiss, daughter of Adolf Weiss, 

wife of Mr. Miller, 143. 
Miller, Charles S., husband of Flora Kohner, 

176. 
Miller, Flora Kohner, daughter of Henry Kohner, 

wife of Charles S. Miller, 23, 1 76. 
Miller, Mr., husband of Bertha Weiss, 143. 
Minor, Wanda, wife of Howard Carl Carson Jr., 

136. 
Mohr Family (from Falkenau), 18, 64. 
Mohr, Dr. Arthur, 39, 41 . 
Mohr, David A., husband of Michele Nanni, 1 52. 
Mohr, Flora, wife of Dr. Arthur Mohr, 39. 
Mohr, Kaethe, daughter of Dr. Arthur Mohr, 39. 
Mohr, Dr. Leopold, 15-16, 36-37. 
Mohr, Matthew David, son of David A. Mohr, 

88, 152. 
Mohr, Michelle Nanni, daughter of Thomas Nanni, 

wife of David A. Mohr, 86-88, 152. 
Montoya, Carmen, wife of Ulrich Aschner, 30, 

127. 
Morganstern, Esther, wife of David Weinberger, 

102. 



Morris, Edna, daughter of Martin Morris, wife 

of Berthold Esberg, 26, 210. 
Morris, Helen, daughter of Martin Morris, wife 

of Arthur Furst, 26, 210. 
Morris, Marie "Flossy" Spiegl, daughter of 

Jacob Spiegl, wife of Martin Morris, 26, 

210. 
Morris, Martin, husband of Marie ("Flossy") 

Spiegl, 210. 
Mort, Janice Gail, wife of Peter Kreissl, 203. 
Mort, Mr., 203. 
Mort, Mrs., 203. 

Mort, Tracy, wife of Kevin Kreissl, 203. 
Moser, David, 14. 
Moser, Ludwig, 14. 
Moss, Sam, 56. 
Moutoussis, Dr. George, 66. 
Muller, Albert, husband of Helene Hbnig, 22,28, 

96, 153, 161-162. 
Muller, Anna, daughter of Albert Muller, wife of 

Karl Hermann and Ernst Samek, 22, 28, 

161. 
Muller, Carl Eugen, 96. 
Mailer, Emma, daughter of Albert Muller, wife of 

Ernst Robitschek and Hermann Altmann, 

22, 162. 
Muller, Franz, son of Max Muller, 28, 161. 
Muller, Helen, daughter of Max Muller, 28, 161. 
Muller, Helene Honig, daughter of Josef Hbnig 

from Kirchenbirk, wife of Albert Muller, 

22, 28, 96, 153, 161-162. 
Muller, Irma Epstein, wife of Max Muller, 28, 

161. 
Muller, Markus (from PQrles), 188. 
Muller, Max, son of Albert Muller, husband of 

Irma Epstein, 22, 28, 161. 
Mueller, Officer, 70. 
Muller, Rosa, daughter of Albert Muller, wife of 

Fritz Treuer, 22, 28, 1 62. 
MOller, Salomon, 96. 
Muller, Sophie, daughter of Albert Muller, wife 

of Karl Glaser and Max Kohn, 2, 28, 96, 

161. 
Muhlbauer, Sheya, 51. 
Mullen, Brenda Yarbrough, wife of Lonnie Reed 

Mullen III, 133. 
Mullen, Doris Mabe, wife of Rev. Lonnie Reed 

Mullen, 132. 
Mullen, Frances Hoenig, daughter of George 

Hoenig, wife of Rev. Lonnie Reed Mullen, 

132-133. 
Mullen, Rev. Lonnie Reed, husband of Frances 

Hoenig and Doris Mabe, 1 32-1 33. 



239 



? 



Mullen, Linda Neer, wife of Lonnie Reed Mullen 

III, 133. 
Mullen, Lonnie Reed III, son of Rev. Lonnie Reed 

Mullen, husband of Patricia Sue 

Speckman, Linda Neer and Brenda 

Yarbrough, 133. 
Mullen, Lonnie Reed IV, son of Lonnie Reed 

Mullen III, 133. 
Mullen, Patricia Sue Speckman, wife of Lonnie 

Reed Mullen III, 133. 
Mullen, Paula Jean, daughter of Rev. Lonnie Reed 

Mullen, wife of Gerald Richard Longwell, 

133. 
Mullen, Susann Rachel, daughter of Lonnie Reed 

Mullen III, 1 33. 
Munk, Albert, 1 1 . 
Mussolini, Benito, 69. 
Myakich, Violet, wife of Adolph Hoenig, 21, 61, 

147. 



N 



Nagelstutz, Lisl, wife of Anton Frbhlich, 1 24- 

125. 
Nanni, Michelle, daughter of Thomas Nanni, wife 

of David A. Mohr, 86-88, 152. 
Nanni, Sonja Hoenig, daughter of Michael Hbnig, 

wife of Thomas Nanni, ii, 60, 82-88,152. 
Nanni, Thomas, 86-87, 1 52. 
Naschauer, Jacob, 10. 
Nelson, Louis, 57. 
Nettl, Mr., 77. 

Neubach, Hertha, daughter of Milan Neubach, 145. 
Neubach, Jakob, 103. 
Neubach, Karl, 103. 
Neubach, Markus, 106. 

Neubach, Milan, husband of Therese Weiss, 145. 
Neubach, Rebecca, wife of Mr. Lustig, 1 03. 
Neubach, Sofie, 106. 
Neubach, Therese Weiss, daughter of Simon 

Weiss, wife of Milan Neubach, 145. 
Neuberger, Anna, wife of Bemhard Hbnig, 1 9, 

113. 
Neuberger, Mina,wife of Bemhard Honig, 2, 18- 

19, 113, 130-152. 
Neumann, Franz Ro., 101. 
Neumann, Josef, 1 5. 
Neumann, Simon, 106. 
Newhouse, Caroline Herz, daughter of Jakob 

Herz, wife of Theodore Newhouse, 59. 
Newman, Charlotte, 18, 39. 
Nice, Spenser Cayson, son of Lindy Call, 1 48. 
Novak, Gretl Steiniger, daughter of Theodor 



Steiniger, wife of Vaclav Novak, 42. 
Novak, Vaclav, husband of Gretl Steiniger, 42. 
Novak, Varslova, wife of Richard Schwarz, 1 97. 
Nussbaum, Frances, wife of Alfred Meyers, 183. 



Oestreicher, Flora, 44. 

Oesterreicher, Hermine, wife of Otto Holzner, 

191. 
Opel, Carolyn Biedermann, daughter of Arbie 

Biedermann, wife of Eric Opel, 209. 
Opel, Eric, husband of Carolyn Biedermann, his 

child's first name is unknown, 209. 
Oppenheimer, Rabbi J. H., 14. 
Orenstein, Behl, 96. 
Orenstein, Emil, 96. 
Orlicka, Alice Stransky, daughter of Max 

Stransky, wife of Dr. Robert Orlicky, ii, 

22, 28, 166. 
Orlicka, Dr. Eva, daughter of Dr. Robert Orlicky, 

ii, 28, 166. 
Orlicky, Dr. Robert, husband of Alice Stransky, 

22, 28, 166. 
Omstein, Carolina, daughter of Mr. Omstein, 

wife of Adolf Weiss, 141, 143. 
Ornstein, Gabriella, daughter of Mr. Omstein, 

wife of Heinrich Weiss, 141-142. 
Omstein, Leo, 96. 
Ornstein, Mr. and Mrs., 141. 
Omstein, Dr. Robert (see Orlicky, Dr. Robert). 
Orzack, Susan, wife of Stephen Posen, 25, 1 82. 
Osborne, Clifford Rollie, husband of Mary Veazey 

Worden, 1 37. 
Osborne, Clifford Rollie II, son of Clifford Rollie 

Osborne, 137. 
Osborne, Mary Veazey Worden, daughter of 

Eugene Thomas Worden, wife of Clifford 

Rollie Osborne, 137. 
Osborne, William Eugene, son of Clifford Rollie 

Osborne, 1 37. 
Osterwald, Mary, sister of Rudolf Rupp, 62. 
Ostroff, Esther, 38, 64. 
Ottocar II, 4. 



Pachter, Abraham (Abe), husband of Rachel (Ray) 

Klein, 24, 175, 184-185. 
Pachter, Adrian, son of Abraham Pachter, 

husband of Jeanette Schwab, 24, 185. 
Pachter, Adrienne, adopted daughter of David 

Pachter, 185. 



V 



240 



Pachter, Alan Richard, adopted son of David 

Pachter, 185. 
Pachter, Arthur, son of Abraham Pachter, 24, 

184. 
Pachter, David, son of Abraham Pachter, husband 

of Esther Brenner and Fanny Block, 24, 

185. 
Pachter, Esther Brenner, wife of David Pachter, 

24, 185. 
Pachter, Fanny Block, wife of David Pachter, 24, 

185. 
Pachter, Jeanette Schwab, wife of Adrian 

Pachter, 24, 185. 
Pachter, Rachel (Ray) Klein, daughter of Arant 

B. Klein, wife of Abraham Pachter, 23- 

24, 175, 184-185. 

Pachter, Selma, ii, daughter of Abraham 

Pachter, wife of Maurice Frank, 23-24, 

184. 
Pallester, Lilly, wife of Felix Aschner, 30, 119. 
Panken, Gail,w/fe of Carroll Hugh Abramson, 180. 
Parik, Arno, 30. 
Pavazzi, Matthew Warren, son of Michael Antone 

Pavazzi, 1 35. 
Pavazzi, Michael Antone, husband of Mitzi Sue 

Hoenig, 135. 
Pavazzi, Michael Antone III, son of Michael 

Antone Pavazzi, 135. 
Pavazzi, Mitzi Sue Hoenig, daughter of Morris 

Hoenig, wife of Michael Antone Pavazzi, 

25, 135. 

Peska, Egon, (Kurt Pick), son of Rudolf Pick, 

husband of Dora Steiner, 1 64. 
Peska, Vlasta, son of Egon Peska, 164. 
Peskova, Dora Steiner, wife of Egon Peska, 164. 
Peter, Dr. (Mayor of Falkenau), 16. 
Pfeffer Family (from Falkenau), 18, 39. 
Pfeffer, Bertha, daughter of Richard Pfeffer, 

wife of Wenzel Schwarz, ii, 10, 36, 197. 
Pfeffer, Francisca ("Fannie") Heller, 10, 197. 
Pfeffer, Karl, son of Richard Pfeffer, 10, 197. 
Pfeffer, Max, son of Richard Pfeffer, 10, 197. 
Pfeffer, Richard, 10, 197. 

Phelps, Marian Schwarz, daughter of Dr. Gerhart 
Schwarz, wife of Robert Phelps, 30, 123. 
Phelps, Robert, husband of Marian Schwarz, 1 23. 

Phelps, Robert, son of Robert Phelps, 1 23. 

Pick, Johanna Hbnig, daughter of Ariel Honig, 
wife of Rudolf Pick, 97, 1 64. 

Pick, Kurt (see Peska, Peska). 

Pick, Rudolf, husband of Johanna Honig, 97,164. 

Pinckney, Philip, 68-69, 71. 

Planetta, Otto, 83. 



Plaut, Dr. Rudolf, 14. 

Pleyer Family (from Falkenau), 18, 31, 39. 

Pleyer, Betty, 39. 

Plummer, Donna Mae, wife of Thomas William 

Hoenig, 134. 
Pohl, Alexander, son of Christian Pohl, 1 26. 
Pohl, Christian, husband of Cornelia Frohlich, 

126. 
Pohl, Cornelia Frohlich, daughter of Pedro 

Miguel Frohlich, wife of Christian Pohl, 

126. 
Pollak Family (from Falkenau) (liquor business), 

18, 33, 38-39. 
Pollak Family (from Schweissing), 11. 
Pollak, (first name unknown), husband of 

Marie Weiss, first names of their three 

children are unknown, 144. 
Pollak, Adolf, 17. 
Pollak, Ella, wife of Leopold Honig, 26,49,62- 

63, 163. 
Pollak, Frieda, daughter of Karl Pollak, wife of 

Paul Fischer, 34, 39. 
Pollak, Hans, son of Karl Pollak?, 39. 
Pollak, Irma, daughter of Karl Pollak, 39. 
Pollak, Karl ("Schnaps"), 15-16, 34, 39. 
Pollak, Louis, son of Karl Pollak?, 39. 
Pollak, Marie Weiss, daughter of Simon Weiss, 

wife of Mr. Pollak, first names of their 

three children are unknown, 144. 
Pollak, Marta, daughter of Karl Pollak, 39. 
Pollak, Mimi, wife of Alfred Lobl, 170. 
Pollak, Veronika, wife of Karl Pollak, 34, 39. 
Pollak, Walter, son of Karl Pollak, 39. 
Popper, Ernst, 1 0. 
Porges, Dr. Nathan, 14. 
Posen, Alexandra, daughter of Stephen Posen, 

24, 1 82. 
Posen, Cindy , daughter of Robert Posen, 182. 
Posen, Edward Aaron, husband of Sylvia Zepin, 

23-24, 182. 
Posen, Jane, daughter of Robert Posen, 182. 
Posen, Marge, wife of Robert Posen, 1 82. 
Posen, Michael, son of Edward Aaron Posen, ii, 

23, 182. 
Posen, Paula, daughter of Robert Posen, 182. 
Posen, Rachel, daughter of Robert Posen, 182. 
Posen, Robert, son of Edward Aaron Posen, ii, 

23, 182. 
Posen, Roberta Hall, wife of Michael Posen, 182. 
Posen, Sandra Schamhorst, wife of Robert 

Posen, 182. 
Posen, Stephen, son of Edward Aaron Posen, ii, 

23-24, 182. 



2> 



' 



241 



• 



Posen, Susan Orzack, wife of Stephen Posen, 24, 

182. 
Posen, Sylvia Zepin, daughter of Samuel Zepin, 

wife of Edward Aaron Posen, ii, 23-24, 

182. 
Posen, Zachary, son of Stephen Posen, 24, 182. 
Postow, Dr. Joan Lowy, daughter of Robert 

Lowy, 38, 64. 
Preindl, Alfonso ("Ali"), husband of Emma Honig, 

21, 48, 52, 54, 58, 61, 146. 
Preindl, Emma Honig, daughter of Leopold Hoenig, 

wife of Alfonso Preindl, ii, 18, 21, 26, 

45-46, 48, 52, 54, 58, 61-62, 66, 87, 

146. 
Preis, Katharina, 110. 
Price, Barbara, wife of Rev. John David Hoenig, 

21, 147-148. 
Prichovsky, Countess Judith, 1 1 . 
Pronman, Rabbi Alex, 20, 58. 
Pulmann (from Mies), 9. 



Rader, Theresa, wife of Anthony Michael Call, 

148. 
Rauscher Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Rauscher, Josef, 1 1 . 

Reardon, Sean, son of Brenda Yarbrough, 133. 
Reich, Elsa, 1 1 0. 
Reich, Maria, 108. 
Reich, Mr. and Mrs., 54. 
Reich, Mr., husband of Miss Bohm, 196. 
Reich, Moritz, 105. 
Reichel Family (from Falkenau), 9. 
Reichenauer, Franz Josef, 44. 
Reichler Family (from Falkenau), 18, 39-40. 
Reichler, Ella, wife of Josef Schlesinger, 39-40. 
Reichler, Fredi, son of Rudolf Reichler, 39. 
Reichler, Olga, wife of Adolph Schlesinger's son 

and Mr. Chaloupka, 39-40. 
Reichler, Rudolf, 39-40. 
Reiner, Nora, 107. 
Reissner, Mathias, 10. 
Riesner Family (from Schweissing), 11. 
Reitzner, Elise, 44. 
Restrepro, Maria Victoria, wife of Alberto 

Aschner, 128. 
Rhona, George, son of Lt. Col. Judge Blaustem 

-> Rhona, 117. 
Rhona, Hedwig (Heidi), daughter of Lt. Col. Judge 

Blaustem -> Rhona, wife of Baron 



Gutmann, 117. 

Rhona, Lt. Col. Judge , son of Ignaz 

Blaustem, husband of Mitzi Rosenfeld, 

117. 
Rhona, Mitzi, daughter of Rosa (Fredericka) 
Blaustem Rosenfeld, wife of Lt. Col. 
Judge Blaustem -> Rhona, 117. 
Richer, Janet, wife of Michael Lee Hoenig, 149. 
Riedl, Babette, 44. 
Rindler, Emma Zentner, daughter of Leopold 

Zentner, wife of Rudolf Rindler, 43. 
Rindler, Eva, daughter of Rudolf Rindler, 43. 
Rindler, Rudolf, husband of Emma Zentner, 43. 
Rindler, Susie, daughter of Rudolf Rindler, 43. 
Ritter, Dr., 55-56. 
Ritter, Frieda Honig, son of Joshua Honig from 

Kirchenbirk, wife of Karl Ritter, 5, 22, 

27, 1 59. 
Ritter, Karl, husband of Frieda Honig, 5, 27, 159. 
Ritter, Wilhelm, son of Karl Ritter, 27, 1 59. 
Robb, Allen Josef, son of Terence Robb, 202. 
Robb, Daniel Terence, son of Terence Robb, 202. 
Robb, Frances Kreissl, daughter of Josef 

Kreissl, wife of Terence Robb, 202. 
Robb, Terence, husband of Frances Kreissl, 202. 
Roberts, Carol Ann, daughter of Ronald Roberts, 

wife of Michael Andrew Cowan, 206. 
Roberts, David William, son of Ronald Roberts, 

206. 
Roberts, Paula Kreissl, daughter of Richard 

Kreissl, wife of Ronald Roberts, 14, 205- 

206. 
Roberts, Ronald, husband of Paula Kreissl, 205- 

206. 
Robitschek, Emma Muller, daughter of Albert 

Muller, wife of Ernst Robitschek and 

Hermann Altmann, 22, 28, 162. 
Robitschek, Ernst, husband of Emma Muller, 1 62. 
Romer, Use Maria, wife of Peter Aschner, 30, 

118, 122. 
Rogers, Daniel, son of Raymond Rogers, 160. 
Rogers, Elizabeth Hoenig, daughter of Dr. Julius 

Hoenig, wife of Raymond Rogers, 22,1 60. 
Rogers, Katya, daughter of Raymond Rogers, 160. 
Rogers, Raymond, husband of Elizabeth Hoenig, 

22, 160. 
Romik, Danny, son of Piotr Romik, 121. 
Romik, Erika Aschner, daughter of Peter 

Aschner, wife of Piotr Ronita, 30. 
Romik, Piotr, husband of Erika Aschner, 30, 121. 
Romik, Yuval, son of Piotr Romik, 121. 
Ronita, Erika Aschner (see Romik, Erika Aschner). 
Ronita, Piotr (see Romik, Piotr). 



242 



Roosevelt, President Franklin Delano, 20. 
Roselli. Maria Eugenia, wife of Dr. Pablo Aschner, 

127. 
Rosenbaum Family (from Falkenau), 18, 39, 99. 
Rosenbaum, Bernard, husband of Ida Steiniger, 

39, 42. 
Rosenbaum, Gustav, 109. 
Rosenbaum, Ida Steiniger, daughter of Bernard 
Steiniger, wife of Bernard Rosenbaum, 
39, 42. 
Rosenbaum, Use, wife of Leopold Hirsch, 56. 
Rosenbaum, Isaac, 108. 
Rosenbaum, Martius [Markus?], 99. 
Rosenbaum, Moritz, son of Isaac Rosenbaum, 108. 
Rosenbaum, Rosalia Kuffner, 105. 
Rosenberg, Adolph, 51-54, 56. 
Rosenberg, Samuel, 53. 
Rosenberger, Albert, 1 0. 

Rosenberger, Marie, wife of Mr. Weiskopf, 1 1 0. 
Rosenberger, Max, 1 0. 
Rosenfeld, Rosa (Fredericka) Blaustem, wife of 

Mr. Rosenfeld, 116. 
Rosenfeld, Mitzi, daughter of Rosa (Fredericka) 
Blaustem Rosenfeld, wife of Lt. Col. 
Judge Blaustem -> Rhona, 117. 
Rosenzweig Family (from Falkenau), 18, 39-40. 
Rosenzweig, Emil, 16, 34, 39-40. 
Rosenzweig, Mirka, daughter of Emil Rosenzweig, 

40. 
Rosenzweig, Mrs., wife of Emil Rosenzweig, 40. 
Rosner, Albert, husband of Mathilde, 1 00. 
Rosner, Jonas, 8. 

Rosner, Mathilde, wife of Albert Rosner, 100. 
Rosner, Simon, 9, 1 6. 
Rossi, Linda Jacewicz, daughter of John 

Jacewicz, wife of Vincent Rossi, 1 59. 
Rossi, Vincent, husband of Linda Jacewicz, 1 59. 
Rossi, Vincent, son of Vincent Rossi, 1 59. 
Rothman, Amy, daughter of Calvin Rothman, 1 99. 
Rothman, Calvin, husband of Jean Hahn, 199. 
Rothman, Jason, son of Calvin Rothman, 199. 
Rothman, Jean Hahn, daughter of Alfred Hahn, 

husband of Calvin Rothman, 1 99. 
Rothwell, Mr., 81. 

Ruczek Family (from Falkenau), 1 8, 37, 40. 
Ruczek [house], 3. 

Ruczek, Hanna Heller, wife of Karl Ruczek, 3, 40. 
Ruczek, Karl, husband of Hanna Heller, 37, 40. 
Rudolf II, Kaiser, 5. 

Rupp, Frieda Hoenig, daughter of Leopold Hoenig, 
wife of Rudolf Rupp, ii, 18-21, 32-33, 
36-37, 42-43, 45, 48-51, 53-54, 56, 
58, 62-63, 65, 84, 146. 



Rupp, Rudolf, husband of Frieda Hoenig, 21, 53- 
54, 58, 62, 65, 146. 



Sabbath, Dr. Moritz, 10. 

Sachs, Enrica, wife of Michael Hbnig, 82, 84- 

85, 131, 152. 
Sachs, Rabbi Moses, 6. 
Sachs, Rabbi Salomon, 6. 
Sadler, Mr. (from Falkenau), 15. 
Sadler, Gisela, 47. 

Sagl, Alfred, husband of Hermine Weiss, 66, 145. 
Sagl, Hermine "Mina" Weiss, daughter of Simon 
Weiss, wife of Alfred Sagl, ii, 66, 145. 
Salem, Joseph, 86. 
Samek, Anna Muller, daughter of Albert Muller, 

wife of Ernst Samek, 22, 28, 161. 
Samek, Egon, son of Ernst Samek, 28, 1 61 . 
Samek, Ernst, husband of Anna Muller, 28, 161. 
Samuel, Anna Lobl, daughter of Moritz Lbbl, 
wife of Julius Samuel, 22, 28, 169. 
Samuel, Friedrich, son of Julius Samuel, 

husband of Vera Steinreich, 28, 1 69. 
Samuel, Gertrude, daughter of Julius Samuel, 

wife of Fritz Fischer, 28, 1 69. 
Samuel, Hermine (Mini), daughter of Julius 

Samuel, wife of Otto Jaeger, 22. 
Samuel, Julius, husband of Anna Lobl, 22, 169. 
Samuel, Vera Steinreich, wife of Friedrich 

Samuel, 1 69. 
Samuel, Wilhelmine ("Mina, ""Mini"), daughter of 
Julius Samuel, wife of Otto Jaeger, 1 69. 
Schaffer, Mr., 77. 
Schar, Hanna Fenichel-Pitkin, daughter of Otto 

Fenichel, wife of Jack Schar, 116. 
Schar, Jack, husband of Hanna Fenichel-Pitkin, 

116. 
Schamhorst, Sandra, wife of Robert Posen, 

182. 
Scherzer, Dr. Gabriel, 10. 
Schild, Hermann, 15. 

Schindler, Didy, daughter of Karl Schindler, 83. 
Schindler, Karl, 83. 
Schlam, Abraham, 6. 
Schlam, Simon, 6. 
Schlaudt, John, 1 14. 
Schlaudt, Sophie Honig, wife of John Schlaudt, 

114. 
Schlesinger Family (from Falkenau), 18, 34, 40. 
Schlesinger, Dr. (physician in Beth Israel 

Hospital, New York), 45. 
Schlesinger, Ella Reichler, wife of Josef 



243 



1 



Schlesinger, 39-40. 
Schlesinger, Josef, husband of Ella Reichler, 39- 

40. 
Schlesinger, Lia, daughter of Josef Schlesinger, 

39-40. 
Schlesinger, Mr. (teacher in Falkenau), 45. 
Schlesinger, Olga Reichler, wife of Adolph 

Schlesinger's son, 39-40. 
Schlesinger, Ruth, daughter of Josef Schlesinger, 

39-40. 
Schlesinger, Victor, husband of Hildegarde 

Hradetchny, 1 44. 
Schlick, Grafern [Duke] Kaspar, 5-6. 
Schlick, Grafern [Duke] Mathias, 6. 
Schmiek, Anna Holzner, daughter of Jakob 

Holzner, wife of Dr. Josef Schmiek, 187. 
Schmiek, Dr. Josef, husband of Anna Holzner, 

187. 
Schmitter, Marie Louise, wife of Marcel 

Lallement, 209. 
Schmitz, Jacob, 1 1 0. 
Schnaider, Johanna, 44. 
Schneider, Harvey , husband of Leann, 180. 
Schneider, Hedwig, 44. 
Schneider, Leann, daughter of Jane Levy, wife 

of Harvey Schneider, 1 80. 
Schoen, Gisela Weiss, daughter of Simon Weiss, 

wife of Morris (Moshe) Schoen, 1 40. 
Schoen, Hermann, son of Morris Schoen, 1 40. 
Schoen, Hildegarde, daughter of Morris Schoen, 
wife of Otto Herlinger and Michael Hecht, 
ii, 140. 
Schoen, Morris (Moshe), husband of Gisela 

Weiss, 140. 
Schoenwald, Gertrude, wife of Leopold Lobl, 28, 

165. 
Schreiber, Adolf, 101. 
Schubach, Jonathan, son of Kenneth Schubach, 

210. 
Schubach, Kenneth, husband of Nancy Furst, 210. 
Schubach, Michael, son of Kenneth Schubach, 210. 
Schubach, Nancy Furst, daughter of Arthur 

Furst, wife of Kenneth Schubach, 210. 
Schuck, Jacob, 105. 

Schultz, Alice, wife of Michel Budlovsky, 1 57. 
Schulz, Arnold, 17. 
Schulz, Wilhelm, 15. 
Schuschnigg, Kurt von, 83. 
Schwab, Jeanette, wife of Adrian Pachter, 24, 

185. 
Schwag, Babette, 103. 
Schwarz (Mies), 10. 
Schwarz Family (from Schweissing), 11. 



Schwarz, Bernhard, 1 1 . 

Schwarz, Bertel, daughter of Jacob Schwarz, 

wife of Henry Hirsch, 59. 
Schwarz, Bertha Pfeffer, daughter of Richard 

Pfeffer, wife of Wenzel Schwarz, ii, 1 0, 
36, 197. 
Schwarz, Doris, daughter of Dr. Gerhart 

Schwarz.wife of Larry Lisenbee, 30,123. 
Schwarz, Rabbi Emanuel, 1 6. 
Schwarz, Dr. Gerhart, husband of Gertrude 

Aschner, 30, 119, 123. 
Schwarz, Gertrude Aschner, daughter of Richard 
Aschner, wife of Dr. Gerhart Schwarz, 
30, 119, 123. 
Schwarz, Katti Bloch.wfe of Simon Schwarz, 37. 
Schwarz, Marian, daughter of Dr. Gerhart 

Schwarz, wife of Robert Phelps, 30, 123. 
Schwarz, Marianne, half sister of Anna 

Kadaravek Kreissl, 200. 
Schwarz, Petra, daughter of Robert Schwarz, 

122. 
Schwarz, Dr. Richard, son of Dr. Gerhart 

Schwarz, 30, 123. 
Schwarz, Richard, son of Wenzel Schwarz, 

husband of Varslova Novak, 1 97. 
Schwarz, Richard, son of Richard Schwarz, 197. 
Schwarz, Robert, husband of Susanna Claudia 

Aschner, 30, 122. 
Schwarz, Rosa Lowy, daughter of Simon 

Schwarz, wife of Hugo L6wy,3A, 37, 41, 
64. 
Schwarz, Simon, husband of Katti Bloch, 37. 
Schwarz, Susanna Claudia Aschner, daughter of 
Peter Aschner, wife of Robert Schwarz, 
30, 122. 
Schwarz, Varslova Novak, wife of Richard 

Schwarz, 197. 
Schwarz, V 'era, daughter of Robert Schwarz, 122. 
Schwarz, Wenzel, husband of Bertha Pfeffer, 197. 
Schwarzbach, Berta, wife of Max Herrmann, 35. 
Schwarzberg, Abraham, 1 1 . 
Schwarzova, Bertha Pfeffer, wife of Wenzel 

Schwarz, ii, 10, 36. 
Schwiller, Hermann, 102. 
Schwitzer, Mina Weinberger, wife of Simon 

Schwitzer, 105. 
Schwitzer, Simon, husband of Mina Weinberger, 

105. 
Schwitzer, Regina, 104. 
Sciali, Barbara, wife of Andrew ("Chip") 

Gangloff, 150. 
Sebulon Lodge No. 8, 55-56, 60. 
Selig Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 



244 



Semach, Mildred, wife of Herbert AbramsonA 80. 
Sgall. Rosa, wife of Emil Holzner. 29, 191. 
Shadmi, Rachel, wife of Zeev Aschner, 30, 121. 
Shapiro, Gail, daughter of Dr. Norman Shapiro, 85. 
Shapiro, Dr. Norman, 85. 

Shapiro, Steven, son of Dr. Norman Shapiro, 85. 
Shelby, Isaac Michael, son of Kenneth Shelby, 162. 
Shelby, Janet Weinrib, daughter of Dr. Leonard 
Weinrib, wife of Kenneth Shelby, 1 62. 
Shelby, Kenneth, husband of Janet Weinrib, 162. 
Shroeder, David, husband of Mary McDougal, 183. 
Shroeder, Jonathan, son of David Shroeder, 183. 
Shroeder, Mary McDougal, wife of David 

Shroeder, 183. 
Shroeder, Michael, son of David Shroeder, 183. 
Shroeder, Stephanie, daughter of David Shroeder, 

183. 
Siegismund, Kaiser, 5. 
Sigmann, Jakob, 108. 
Simon, Samuel, 17. 
Sims, Alexandrea Marie, daughter of Robert 

Paul Sims, 148. 
Sims, Louise Dominique Cali, wife of Robert Paul 

Sims, 148. 
Sims, Michael Paul, son of Robert Paul Sims, 148. 
Sims, Robert Paul, husband of Louise Dominque 

Cali, 148. 
Sirota, Sonia, wife of Daniel Dobinsky, 184. 
Skolnik, Eleanor Weinrib, daughter of Dr. 

Leonard Weinrib, wife of Steven Skolnik, 
162. 
Skolnik, Leonard Rubin, son of Steven Skolnik, 

162. 
Skolnik, Steven, husband of Eleanor Weinrib, 

162. 
Skolnik, William Zachary, son of Steven Skolnik, 

162. 
Skorzeny, Otto, 69. 

Skrbensky, Cardinal Archbishop Leo von, 74. 
Slack, Michelle Yvonne, wife of Stephen William 

Foster, 203. 
Smith, Gregg, husband of Lisa Gangloff, 1 50. 
Smith, Lisa Gangloff, wife of Gregg Smith, 1 50. 
Sondern, Dr. and Mrs. Frederick, 25, 49. 
Spiegel, Hermann, 9. 
Spiegl Family, 80, 208-210. 
Spiegl, Anna, daughter of Jacob Spiegl, 210. 
Spiegl, Bertha, daughter of Jacob Spiegl,Z6, 210. 
Spiegl, Clara, daughter of Jacob Spiegl, wife of 

Oliver Buell, 210. 
Spiegl, daughter (first name unknown), daughter 

of Jacob Spiegl, 211. 
Spiegl, daughter (first name unknown), daughter 



of Jacob Spiegl, 211. 
Spiegl, Elsie, daughter of Jacob Spiegl, 26, 211. 
Spiegl, Emma, daughter of Jacob Spiegl, 26, 209. 
Spiegl, Hilda, daughter of Jacob Spiegl, 26, 209. 
Spiegl, Jacob, husband of Rosa Lov Spiegl, 2, 5, 

25-26, 111, 208-210. 
Spiegl, Louis, son of Jacob Spiegl, 26. 
Spiegl, Marie "Flossy," daughter of Jacob 

Spiegl, wife of Martin Morris, 26, 210. 
Spiegl, Mathilde, daughter of Jacob Spiegl, 26, 

209. 
Spiegl, Paula, daughter of Jacob Spiegl, wife of 

Otto Gess, 26, 209. 
Spiegl, Rosa Lov, wife of Jacob Spiegl, 2, 5, 25- 

26, 111, 208-210. 
Spiegler, Hermann, 106. 
Spielberg, Steven, 88. 
Spigel, Jacob, 108. 
Spitzer, Paula Lobl, 96. 
Sprusil, Anna, daughter of Heinrich Weiss, wife 

of Frantisek Sprusil, 1 42. 
Sprusil, Dr. Boris, son of Frantisek Sprusil, ii, 

142. 
Sprusil, Danuta Toron, wife of Robert Sprusil, 

142. 
Sprusil, Frantisek, husband of Anna Weiss, 142. 
Sprusil, Jirina [Georgina] Gabrieiova, wife of 

Robert Sprusil, 142. 
Sprusil, Olga Kovarnikova, wife of Dr. Boris 

Sprusil, 142. 
Sprusil, Robert, son of Dr., Boris Sprusil, 

husband of Danuta Toron and Jirina 

[Georgina] Gabrieiova, 142. 
Stanley, Annette, wife of Paul Hill, 161. 
Stein Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Stein, Betty Weinberger, wife of David Stein, 102. 
Stein, David, husband of Betty Weinberger, 102. 
Stein, Ema (see Steiniger, Ema). 
Stein, Esther, daughter of Moses Stein, wife of 

Jakob Holzner, 186. 
Stein, Dr. Julius, son of David Stein, 102. 
Stein, Mr. and Mrs., 186. 

Stein, Rosina Lauffer, wife of Moses Stein, 1 86. 
Stein, Moses, husband of Rosina Lauffer, 186. 
Stein, Rosalie, wife of Mr. Kaupe, 1 06. 
Steiner (Families) (from Falkenau), 18, 32, 40. 
Steiner Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Steiner, Dora, wife of Egon Peska, 1 64. 
Steiner, Emma, daughter of Johann Steiner, wife 

ofFredHansI, 40. 
Steiner, Johann, 15-16, 40, 80. 
Steiner, Mrs. Johann, 40 79. 
Steiner, Katharina, wife of Mr. Winter, 1 09. 



I 






245 



t 



J J 



Steiner, Katti, 108. 

Steiniger Families, 40-41, 63. 

Steiniger, Mr. and Mrs. (born Lov), 2, 111. 

Steiniger, Abraham, son of Salomon Steiniger, 9, 

40. 
Steiniger, Anna, wife of Bernard Steiniger, 42. 
Steiniger, Bernard, husband of Anna Steiniger, 

39, 42-43, 63. 
Steiniger, Berta, wife of Franz Steiniger, 41. 
Steiniger, Charlotte, wife of Philipp Steiniger, 41- 

42. 
Steiniger, David, 9, 16, 32, 41, 77. 
Steiniger, Elsa, daughter of Filipp Steiniger, 42, 

48. 
Steiniger, Emma, 97. 
Steiniger, Erna, daughter of Theodor Steiniger, 

wife of Paul Karpeles, 42. 
Steiniger, Ernst, son of Philipp Steiniger, 

husband of Klara, 41 . 
Steiniger, Fannie, wife of Filipp, 42. 
Steiniger, Filipp, husband of Fannie, 19,42-43, 

47, 63. 
Steiniger, Filipp, 42. 
Steiniger, Franz, 9, 41. 
Steiniger, Fred, son of Otto Steiniger, 41. 
Steiniger, Frieda, daughter of Filipp Steiniger, 42. 
Steiniger, Fritz, son of Ernst Steiniger, husband 

ofHelly, 41. 
Steiniger, Ernst, 63. 
Steiniger, Gretl, daughter of Theodor Steiniger, 

wife of Vaclav Novak, 42. 
Steiniger, Hannah, wife of Dr. Ludwig Steiniger, 

36, 41. 
Steiniger, Hans (see Steiniger, John H.). 
Steiniger, Hans, son of David Steiniger, 32, 77. 
Steiniger, Helen, wife of Otto Steiniger, 41. 
Steiniger, Helly, wife of Fritz Steiniger, 41. 
Steiniger, Ida, daughter of Bernard Steiniger, 

wife of Bernard Rosenbaum, 40, 42. 
Steiniger, Ignaz (from Elbogen), 15. 
Steiniger, Irma, daughter of Filipp Steiniger, 42. 
Steiniger, John H., son of Theodor Steiniger, 

husband of Sonja, 18, 32, 34-36, 42. 
Steiniger, Klara, wife of Ernst Steiniger, 41. 
Steiniger, Kurt, son of Dr. Ludwig Steiniger, 

husband of Becher, 32,41-42. 

Steiniger, Lilli, daughter of Dr. Ludwig 

Steiniger, wife of Dr. Heirmann, 36, 41. 
Steiniger, Dr. Ludwig, son of Philipp Steiniger, 

husband of Hannah, 36, 41. 
Steiniger, Malchie, wife of Theodor, 42. 
Steiniger, Markus Low, 15, 40. 
Steiniger, Michael, son of Otto Steiniger, 41 . 



Steiniger, Molly , daughter of Ernst Steiniger, 41. 
Steiniger, Mrs., born Becher, wife of Kurt 

Steiniger, 41-42. 
Steiniger, Otto, son of Ernst Steiniger, husband 

of Helen, 41. 
Steiniger, Paul, son of Ernst Steiniger, 41. 
Steiniger, Philipp, husband of Charlotte, 16-17, 

41, 63. 
Steiniger, Philipp, son of Ernst Steiniger, 

husband of Wilma Bloch, 4 1 . 
Steiniger, Salomon, 9, 40. 
Steiniger, Sophie, wife of Mr. Zentner, 97. 
Steiniger, Theodor, son of Philipp Steiniger, 

husband of Malchie, 17, 32, 41-42. 
Steiniger, Walter, son of Franz Steiniger, 41. 
Steiniger, Wilma Bloch, daughter of David Bloch, 

wife of Philipp Steiniger, 41. 
Steinreich, Vera, wife of Friedrich Samuel, 1 69. 
Stern, Max, 104. 
Sternberg, Regina, 108. 
Stingl, Ruth Stransky, daughter of Max Stransky, 

wife of Walter Stingl, 22, 28, 167. 
Stingl, Walter, husband of Ruth Stransky, 28, 

167. 
Stolarowa, Natalia, wife of Werner Ldwy, 38. 
Storfer, Herta Ruth, wife of Peter Aschner, 30, 

118, 121. 
Stransky, Alice, daughter of Max Stransky, 

wife of Dr. Robert Orlicky, ii, 22, 1 66. 
Stransky, Amalie Lobl, daughter of Moritz Lobl, 

wife of Max Stransky, 28, 166. 
Stransky, Anna Wotitzka, wife of Paul Stransky, 

166. 
Stransky, Karla, daughter of Max Stransky, 

wife of Dr. Wilhelm Klug, 28, 1 66. 
Stransky, Josefine Fischl, 97. 
Stransky, Max, husband of Amalie Loebl, 22, 28, 

97, 166. 
Stransky, Paul, son of Max Stransky, husband 

of Anna Wotitzka, 166. 
Stransky, Ruth, daughter of Max Stransky, wife 

of Walter Stingl, 22, 28, 167. 
Strauss, Siegfried, 1 06. 
Straussler, Moritz, 110. 

Sussner, Adolf, husband of Helene Fischer, 207. 
Siissner, Helene Fischer, daughter of Adolf 

Fischer, wife of Adolf Sussner, 207. 
Sussner, Marie, daughter of Adolf Sussner, wife 

of Anton linger, 207. 
Sussner, Theresia, daughter of Adolf Sussner, ii, 

207. 
Svata, Maya, wife of Werner Ldwy, 38, 64. 



246 



Tannen, Estelle ("Stella"), wife of Herbert 

Abramson, 1 80. 
Tanzer (kosher provisions, Pilsen), 19. 
Tanzer, Bertha, 44. 
Tart, Herman J., 53. 
Tart, Dr. Max, 53. 
Tasche, Brigitte (born Uhlig), adopted daughter 

of Rolf Tasche, 1 90. 
Tasche, Jutta, wife of Mr. Uhlig and Rolf Tasche, 

190. 
Tasche, Karl-Heinz (born Uhlig), adopted son of 

Rolf Tasche, 1 90. 
Tasche, Martha (lima) Holzner [Marsch], 

daughter of Anton Marsch and Emma 

Holzner, wife of Waldemar (Herbert) 

Tasche, 190, 194. 
Tasche, Renate (bom Uhlig), adopted daughter of 

Rolf Tasche, 1 90. 
Tasche, Rolf, husband of Jutta Matthes, ii, 1 90. 
Tasche, Ursula (born Uhlig), adopted daughter of 

Rolf Tasche, 190. 
Tasche, Waldemar (Herbert), husband of Martha 

(Irma) Holzner [Marsch], 1 90. 
Thieleman, Pauline Emma, wife of George Hoenig, 

132. 
Toron, Danuta, wife of Robert Sprusil, 142. 
Treixler, Dr. Gustav, 5. 
Treuer, Fanni, 97. 

Treuer, Fritz, husband of Rosa Muller, 28, 1 62. 
Treuer, Dr. Herta, daughter of Fritz Treuer, 

wife of Dr. Emil Eckstein, 28, 1 62. 
Treuer, Lici "Alice," daughter of Fritz Treuer, 

wife of Dr. Leonard Weinrib, ii, 28, 162. 
Treuer, Rosa Muller, daughter of Albert Muller, 

wife of Fritz Treuer, 28, 1 62. 
Trostl (from Mies), alias Schwarz (Niger), 9. 
Truman, President Harry S., 20. 
Turchin, Hilda, wife of Paul Hill, 161. 



U 



Uhlig, Brigitte (see Tasche, Brigitte). 
Uhlig, Karl-Heinz (see Tasche, Karl-Heinz). 
Uhlig, Mr., husband of Jutta Matthes, 190. 
Uhlig, Renate (see Tasche, Renate). 
Uhlig, Ursula (see Tasche, Ursula). 
Unger Family (from Falkenau), 18, 42. 
Unger, Anton, husband of Marie Sussner, 207. 
Unger, Anton, son of Anton Unger, 207. 
Unger, Emi Kohom, wife of Hans Unger, 42. 
Unger, Hans, son of Dr. Ludwig Unger, 42. 



Unger, Helene, daughter of Anton Unger, ii, 207. 
Unger, Kurt, son of Dr. Ludwig Unger, 42. 
Unger, Dr. Ludwig, 42. 
Unger, Marie Sussner.dauc/rirer of Adolf Sussner, 

wife of Anton Unger, 207. 
Uri, Itay, son of Zfirah Uri, 208. 
Uri, Nomi Wiener, daughter of Oskar Uri Wiener, 

wife of Zfirah Uri, 208. 
Uri, Tally, daughter of Zfirah Uri, 208. 
Uri, Zfirah, husband of Nomi Wiener, 208. 
Utkowitz, Ethel, wife of George Utkowitz, 58. 
Utkowitz, George, husband of Ethel, 58. 



V 



Valet, Mr. and Mrs. H., 51. 

Vana, Frantisek, ii, 16, 98. 

Vanova, Jarmila, ii, 16, 98. 

Veazey, Mary (Barrow), wife of Eugene Thomas 

Worden, 132, 137-139. 
Veit, Babette, mother of Sigmund Veit, 32, 78. 
Veit, Sigmund, son of Babette Veit, 32, 78. 
Velez, Angela G.,w/fe of Eugene Ward Hayes, 1 39. 
Vergeiner, Eva, daughter of Walter Vergeiner, 

30, 118. 
Vergeiner, Walter, husband of Eva Vergeinerova, 

118. 
Vergeinerova, Eva Aschner, daughter of Emil 

Aschner, wife of Walter Vergeiner, ii, 

29-30, 118. 
Viloria, Floracy, wife of Brian Douglas Lallement, 

208. 
Vogl, Erna, daughter of Therese ("Resi") Holzner 

Vogl,the names of her husband and those 

of their three children are unknown, 1 87. 
Vogl, Mr., husband of Therese ("Resi") Holzner, 

187. 
Vogl, Therese ("Resi") Ho\zner, daughter of Jakob 

Holzner, wife of Mr. Vogl, 1 86. 
von Hassenstein, Mr., 5. 
von Hbnigsberg, daughter of Leopold 

(Loew) Hbnig, wife of Mr. Busch, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Dr. Adam, son of Israel Honig 

von Hbnigsberg from Kuttenplan, 1 1 2. 
von Hbnigsberg, Ahron Honig, son of Israel Honig 

von Hbnigsberg from Kuttenplan, husband 

of Ernestine Baruch, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Anna Honig, daughter of Aaron 

Moses Honig von Hbnigshofen, wife of 

Joachim Honig von Hbnigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Anna Honig, daughter of Joachim 

Honig von Hbnigsberg, wife of Joachim 

Leidersdorf, 112. 




247 



von Hbnigsberg, Benedickt Honig, son of Ahron 

Honig von Hbnigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Charlotte Honig, daughter of 

Ahron Honig von Hbnigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Clarisse Honig, daughter of 

Ahron Honig von Hbnigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Ernestine Baruch, wife of Ahron 

Honig von Hbnigsberg, 112. 
von Honigsberg, Franziska Dobrushka Honig, wife 

of Ludwig Honig von Honigsberg, 1 1 2. 
von Hbnigsberg, Franziska Honig, daughter of 

Maximilian Honig von Honigsberg, wife of 

Max, 112. 
von Honigsberg, Henoch Honig, son of Israel Honig 

von Hbnigsberg from Kuttenplan, husband 

of Karolina, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Edler Israel Honig, 11-12, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Joachim Honig, son of Israel 

Honig von Hbnigsberg from Kuttenplan, 

husband of Anna Honig von Hbnigshofen, 

112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Josef Hbnig, son of Ahron Honig 

von Honigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Josef Honig, son of Joachim 

Hbnig von Hbnigsberg, 112. 
von Honigsberg, Karl (Lazar) Hbnig, son of 

Israel Honig von Hbnigsberg from 

Kuttenplan, husband of Marianne 

Leidersdorf, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Karolina, wife of Henoch Hbnig 

von Hbnigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Karolina, wife of Leopold (Loew) 

Hbnig, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Karolina, wife of Maximilian 

Hbnig von Honigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Leopold (Loew) Hbnig, son of 

Israel Hbnig von Honigsberg from 

Kuttenplan, husband of Karolina, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Ludwig Hbnig, son of Israel 

Honig von Honigsberg from Kuttenplan, 

husband of Franziska Dobrushka, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Marianne Leidersdorf, wife of 

Karl Hbnig von Honigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Maximilian Hbnig, son of Israel 

Honig von Honigsberg from Kuttenplan, 

husband of Karolina, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Nanette Hbnig, daughter of 

Maximilian Hbnig von Honigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Regina Hbnig, daughter of 

Joachim Hbnig von Honigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Rosette Hbnig, daughter of 

Maximilian Hbnig von Hbnigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Soliman Hbnig, 13, 112. 



von Hbnigsberg, Theresia Hbnig, daughter of 

Joachim Hbnig von Hbnigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigsberg, Theresia Hbnig, daughter of 

Maximilian Hbnig von Hbnigsberg, 1 1 2. 
von Hbnigshofen, Edler Aaron Moses Hbnig, son 

of Lbbel Hbnig from Kuttenplan, 13, 112. 
von Hbnigshofen, Anna Hbnig, daughter of Aaron 

Moses Honig von HOnigshofen from 

Kuttenplan, wife of Joachim Hbnig von 

Honigsberg, 112. 
von Hbnigstein, Adam Albert Hbnig, 13, 112. 
von Schuschnigg, Kurt, 83. 
von Skrbensky, Cardinal Archbishop Leo, 74. 
von Wallenstein, General Albrecht Wenzel 

Eusebius, 1 0. 
Vorwerk, Elsa Humml, daughter of Lotte Holzner 

Humml, wife of Paul Vorwerk, 1 88. 
Vorwerk, Gerhard, son of Paul Vorwerk, 1 88. 
Vorwerk, Paul, husband of Elsa Humml, 1 88. 
Vratislav II, Duke, 4. 



W 



Wachs, Salomon, 1 1 0. 
Waldstein, Mr. and Mrs. Edward, 62. 
Walker, Jane, wife of Michael Foster, 204. 
Wallenstein, General Albrecht Wenzel Eusebius 

von, 10, 79. 
Wallis, Leah, wife of Thomas William Hoenig, 1 34. 
Wasserman Family (from Falkenau), 18, 64. 
Wasserman, Abraham ("Abie"), 56. 
Wastl, Mr., 3. 
Waxman, Adele Hoenig, daughter of Bemhard 

Hbnig, husband of Mr. Waxman, 2, 19, 

25, 43, 47, 52, 62, 66, 84, 88, 131. 
Waxman, Elsie, daughter of Mr. Waxman, 131. 
Waxman, Mr., husband of Adele Honig, 131. 
Weatherly, E. Gordon, 52. 
Wedeles, S. (Hebrew teacher in Falkenau), 1 7. 
Wehle [Wehli], Jonas Beer, 13. 
Wehli, Katharina, daughter of Jonas Beer 

Wehle, wife of Israel Hbnig from 

Kuttenplan, 112. 
Weil, Arthur, 44. 
Weil, Edmund, 1 0. 
Weil, Eugenia, 44. 
Weil, Hugo, 1 0. 
Weil, Dr. Ignaz, 10. 
Weil, Irene, 44. 
Weil, Julius, 10. 
Weil, Karl, 10. 
Weil, Sophie, 44. 
Weinberger, Adolf, 108. 



I 



248 



Weinberger, Alexander, 1 03. 

Weinberger, Babette, 105. 

Weinberger, Betty, wife of David Stein, 102. 

Weinberger, David, husband of Esther 

Morganstem, 1 02. 
Weinberger, Esther Morganstem, wife of David 

Weinberger, 1 02. 
Weinberger, Hermann, 102. 
Weinberger, Mary Fischer, 108. 
Weinberger, Mina, wife of Simon Schwitzer, 105. 
Weiner, Dr. (Mies), 10. 
Weiner, Margareta ("Greta") Weiss, daughter 

of Heinrich Weiss, wife of Morris Weiner, 

142. 
Weiner, Max, 1 0. 
Weiner, Morris, husband of Margareta ("Greta") 

Weiss, 142. 
Weiner, Tomas, son of Morris Weiner, 142. 
Weiner, Vera, daughter of Morris Weiner, 142. 
Weinrib, Eleanor, daughter of Dr. Leonard 

Weinrib, wife of Steven Skolnik, 1 62. 
Weinrib, Janet, daughter of Dr. Leonard Weinrib, 

wife of Kenneth Shelby, 1 62. 
Weinrib, Dr. Leonard, husband of Lici "Alice" 

Treuer, 28, 162. 
Weinrib, Lici ("Alice") Treuer, daughter of Fritz 

Treuer, wife of Dr. Leonard Weinrib, ii, 

28, 162. 
Weinwurm, Sophie, 103. 
Weiskopf, Marie Rosenberger, 1 1 0. 
Weisner, Josue, 108. 
Weiss, Adolf, son of Simon Weiss, husband of 

Carolina Omstein and Rosa Herlinger, 

141, 143. 
Weiss, Anna, daughter of Heinrich Weiss, wife 

of Frantisek Sprusil, 142. 
Weiss, Bertha Hbnig, wife of Simon Weiss, 

daughter of Bernhard Hbnig, 1 9, 43, 48, 

130, 144-145. 
Weiss, Bertha, daughter of Adolf Weiss, wife of 

Mr. Miller, 143. 
Weiss, Carolina Omstein, daughter of Mr. 

Omstein, wife of Adolf Weiss, 141, 143. 
Weiss, Caroline, wife of Morris Weiss, 140. 
Weiss, Caroline, wife of Julius Weiss, 141. 
Weiss, Ethel, wife of Julius Weiss, 141. 
Weiss, Fanni, 1 10. 
Weiss, Friedrich, 104. 
Weiss, Gabriella Omstein, daughter of Mr. 

Omstein, wife of Heinrich Weiss, 141- 
142. 
Weiss, Gerhart, son of Josef Weiss, husband of 
Suzy Goldenstein, ii, 84-85, 88, 144. 



Weiss, 

Weiss, 

Weiss, 

Weiss, 

Weiss, 
Weiss, 
Weiss, 

Weiss, 

Weiss, 

Weiss, 
Weiss, 

Weiss, 
Weiss, 
Weiss, 

Weiss, 
Weiss, 

Weiss, 
Weiss, 

Weiss, 

Weiss, 

Weiss, 

Weiss, 

Weiss, 

Weiss, 

Weiss, 

Weiss, 
Weiss, 

Weiss, 
Weiss. 



Gisela, daughter of Simon Weiss, wife of 

Morris (Moshe) Schoen, 140. 
Greta, daughter of Morris Weiss, 

husband's name not known, 1 40. 
Gustav, son of Simon Weiss, husband of 

Irma Froelich, 144. 
Hans, son of Adolf Weiss, wife's name 

unknown, 143. 

Heinrich (from Schweissing), 11. 
Heinrich (from Lundenburg), 106. 
Heinrich (from Lundenburg), son of Simon 

Weiss, husband of Gabriella Omstein, 

141-143. 
Hermine ("Mina"), wife of Alfred Sagl, il, 

66, 145. 
Hildegarde Hradetchny, wife of Josef 

Weiss, 1 44. 

Irma Froelich, wife of Gustav Weiss, 144. 
Johanna Kreissl, daughter of Emit Kreissl, 

wife of Leopold Weiss, 200. 
Josef (from Chodau), 1 5. 
Josef, son of Hans Weiss, 143. 
Josef, son of Simon Weiss, husband of 

Hildegarde Hradetchny, 144. 
Joseph (from Lundenburg), 1 1 0. 
Julius, son of Simon Weiss, husband of 

Caroline, and Ethel Finkelstein, 48, 141. 
Kurt, son of Adolf Weiss, 143. 
Lianne, daughter of Gerhart Weiss, wife 

of Michael Richard DeLaPena, 1 44. 
Leopold, husband of Johanna ("Hanni") 

Kreissl, 200. 
Lustig, wife of Simon Weiss, 1 30, 

140. 
Margareta ("Greta"), daughter of 

Heinrich Weiss, wife of Morris Weiner, 

142. 

Marie, daughter of Simon Weiss, wife of 

Mr. Pollak, second husband's name is not 

known, 1 44. 
Monica, daughter of Gerhart Weiss, wife 

of Daniel Joseph Hanson, 1 44. 

Morris, son of Simon Weiss, husband of 

Caroline, 1 40. 
Rosa Herlinger, wife of Adolf Weiss, 141, 

143. 

Rudolf , son of Adolf Weiss, 143. 
Simon, husband of Lustig, Sophie 

Feder and Bertha Hbnig, 19, 130, 1 40- 

141, 144-145. 
Sophie Feder, wife of Simon Weiss, 1 30, 

141, 144-145. 
Suzy Goldenstein, wife of Gerhart Weiss, 



«!► 



249 



ii, 144. 
Weiss, Therese, daughter of Simon Weiss, wife 

of Milan Neubach, 145. 
Weiss, Theresia, wife of Mr. Halez, 103. 
Weiss, Wilhelm, son of Simon Weiss, 144. 
Weisz, Maria, wife of Mr. Mallowan, 103. 
Wenzel, King, 9. 
Werner, Anton, 49. 

Westheimer, Dorit Feuerstein, daughter of Eduard 
Feuerstein, wife of Mr. Westheimer, 34. 
Westheimer, Mr., husband of Dorit Feuerstein, 

34. 
White, Buford Fritz, husband of Kathrin Irene 

Carson, 1 36. 
White, Kathrin Irene Carson, daughter of Howard 
Carl Carson, wife of Buford Fritz White, 
136. 
White, Kenneth Dewayne, son of Buford Fritz 

White, 136. 
White, Roy Howard, son of Buford Fritz White, 

136. 
Whitehouse, Florann, daughter of Orville 

Whitehouse, wife of Andrew Gangloff, 
21, 60, 62, 150. 
Whitehouse, Gerda Ann Hoenig, daughter of 
Leopold Hoenig, wife of Orville 
Whitehouse, ii, 20-21, 49-51, 53-54, 
58, 60-62, 84-85, 150. 
Whitehouse, Orville, husband of Gerda Ann 

Hoenig, 21, 53, 60-61, 150. 
Whitehouse, William ("Billy"), son of Orville 

Whitehouse, 60, 1 50. 
Whiting, Mary Elizabeth, wife of Eugene Wray 

Worden, 138. 
Wiener, Herma Fischer, daughter of Emma 

Fischer, ii, 208. 
Wiener, Nomi, daughter of Oskar Un Wiener,wife 

of Zfirah Uri, 208. 
Wiener, Oskar Uri, husband of Herma Fischer, 

208. 
Wiener, Siegmund, 1 1 . 
Wienerl Family (from Schweissing), 11. 
Wilhelm, Max, 10. 
Wilhelm, Philip, 10. 
Wilk, Daniel, 46. 

Wilk, Hans, son of Daniel Wilk, 46. 
Willner Family (from Schweissing), 1 1 . 
Willner, Adolf, 11. 
Willner, Emanuel, 1 1 . 
Willner, Dr. Emanuel, 11. ..... 

Winqer, Elsie Ann Hoenig, daughter of Adolph 
Hoenig, wife of Harry Winger, ii, 21 , 
147. 



Winger, Harry, husband of Elsie Ann Hoenig, 147. 
Winter, Doraliese ("Dorli") Fischer), wife of Mr. 

Winter, 34, 39. 
Winter, Emma (see Winterova, Emma). 
Winter, Katharina Steiner, 109. 
Winter, Mr., husband of Doraliese ("Dorli") 

Fischer, 34. 
Winter, Michael, 1 1 0. 
Winter, Solomon, 109. 

Winter, Sonja, daughter of Mr., Winter, 34, 39. 
Winter, Theresa, 1 1 0. 

Winterova, Emma, wife of William Zentner, 97. 
Winterwitz, Dr., 80. 

Witzel Brothers (Oskar Hoenig's partners), 25. 
Wodava, Dr., 79. 

Wolf, Greta, wife of Robert Lallement, 208. 
Wolf Helen, wife of Otto Lederer, 54. 
Wolf, Hugo, 74. 
Wolf, Mrs. Hugo, 74. 
Wolf, Nelly, wife of Carl (Carlos) Aschner), 30, 

119, 129. 
Worden, Bertha "Honey" Hoenig, daughter of 
Morris Frederick Hoenig; wife of Eddie 
Wray Worden, Henry Arnold and Ira N. 
McLendon, 25, 132. 
Worden, Crystal Lynn, daughter of Eugene 

Thomas Worden, wife of J. W. Hayes, 
25, 139. 
Worden, Denise Wray, daughter of Eugene Wray 
Worden, wife of Timothy Allegri, 1 38. 
Worden, Eddie Wray , husband of Bertha ("Honey") 

Hoenig, 132. 
Worden, Eugene Thomas, son of Eddie Wray 
Worden, husband of Mary Veazey 
Barrow, 132, 137-139. 
Worden, Eugene Wray, son of Eugene Thomas 
Worden, husband of Mary Elizabeth 
Whiting, 138. 
Worden, Julie Marie, daughter of Eugene Wray 

Worden, wife of George Jones, 1 38. 
Worden, Kimbra Lynn, daughter of Eugene Wray 

Worden, wife of Andrew Ode, 1 38. 
Worden, Mary Elizabeth Whiting, wife of Eugene 

Wray Worden, 138. 
Worden, Mary Veazey, daughter-in-law of 

Eddie Wray Worden and Bertha ("Honey ) 
Hoenig Worden, wife of Eugene Thomas 
Worden, 24-25, 132, 137-139. 
Worden Mary Veazey, daughter of Eugene Thomas 
' Worden, wife of Clifford Rolle Osborne, 

Wotitzka, Anna, wife of Paul Stransky, 166. 
Wozilka, J. (from Falkenau), 15. 



250 



Yarbrough. Brenda, wife of Lonnie Reed Mullen 
III, 133. 



Zelenka, George, son of Robert Zelenka, 1 1 6. 
Zelenka, Jan [John Martin], son of Robert 

Zelenka, 116. 
Zelenka, Lilly, daughter of Hans Fenichel, 116. 
Zelenka, Matilde, wife of Adolf Aschner, 1 1 6. 
Zelenka, Robert, husband of Lilly Fenichel, 1 1 6. 
Zentner Family (from Falkenau), 18, 42-43, 49. 
Zentner, Anna, wife of David Zentner, 97. 
Zentner, Arnost, 97. 
Zentner, Berta Eisner, 97. 
Zentner, David, husband of Anna, 97. 
Zentner, Emma, daughter of Leopold Zentner, 

wife of Rudolf Rindler, 43. 
Zentner, Emma Fischer, wife of Heinrich 

Zentner, 28, 34, 43, 63. 
Zentner, Emma (from Karlsbad), 97. 
Zentner, Flora, 97. 

Zentner, Frantisek, son of David Zentner, 97. 
Zentner, Franz, 97. 
Zentner, Heinrich, son of Hermann Zentner, 

husband of Emma Fischer, 28, 34, 43. 
Zentner, Heinrich (died in World War I), 95. 
Zentner, Hermann, husband of Julie Bloch, 42. 
Zentner, Hermine, wife of Dr. Ignaz Auerbach, 31. 
Zentner, Honova, daughter of David Zentner, 97. 
Zentner, Ida Heller [Hellerova], wife of Leopold 

Zentner, 43, 97. 
Zentner, Johanna, daughter of David Zentner, 97. 
Zentner, Jrma, (from Karlsbad, died in 

Auschwitz), 97. 
Zentner, Jrma Klementine, (from Karlsbad, died 

in Auschwitz), 97. 
Zentner, Julie, wife of Hermann Zentner, 42. 
Zentner, Mrs. Julie (from Thonischen), 97. 
Zentner, Julius, 97. 
Zentner, Karel, 97. 
Zentner, Leopold, son of Hermann Zentner, 

husband of Ida Heller, 1 6-1 7, 42-43, 97. 
Zentner, Liesl, daughter of Heinrich Zentner, wife 

of Victor Behal, 1 8, 28, 34, 43. 
Zentner, Lotte Loebl, wife of Paul Zentner, 43. 
Zentner, Marie Klaber (from Zwiebau), 97. 
Zentner, Paul, son of Leopold Zentner, husband 



of Lotte Loebl, 43. 
Zentner, Paul (died in World War I), 95. 
Zentner, Pavel, son of David Zentner, 97. 
Zentner, Rosa, wife of Richard Loewy, 33, 195. 
Zentner, Ruth, daughter of Paul Zentner, 43. 
Zentner, Dr. Jur. Siegmund, 97. 
Zentner. Siegmund (from Fischem), 97. 
Zentner, Sophie Steiniger, 97. 
Zentner, Walter (died in World War I), 95. 
Zentner, William, husband of Emma Winterova, 

97. 
Zepin, Alma, daughter of Samuel Zepin, wife of 

Sidney Farkas, ii, 23, 51, 182. 
Zepin, Arnold, son of Samuel Zepin, 182. 
Zepin, Oliver Klein, son of Samuel Zepin, 23, 182. 
Zepin, Pauline Klein, daughter of Arant B. Klein, 

wife of Samuel Zepin, 23, 174, 182. 
Zepin, Samuel, husband of Pauline Klein, 23, 

174, 182. 
Zepin, Sylvia, daughter of Samuel Zepin, wife of 

Edward Aaron Posen, ii, 23-24, 182. 
Ziegler, Dr. Ignaz, 7-8, 14. 
Zimbler, Alice, wife of Richard Aschner, 29-30, 

49, 119. 
Zimmerman, Charles ("Sasha"), 57. 
Zimmermann, Mr. (from Leipzig), 77. 
Zizka, 9. 

Zniedler, Theresia, 44. 

Zuckerl-Zentner Family (from Falkenau), 1 8, 43. 
Zuckerl-Zentner, Hansi, 43. 
Zuckerman, Mr. (Eger), 44. 
Zuckermann, Mr. (from Elbogen), 15. 
Zuckermann, Jakob, 9. 
Zunterstein, Dr. (from Schweissing, in 
Tschernoschin), 11. , 

Zunterstein, Emil, 1 0. 
Zunterstein, Dr. Max, 10. 
Zuzie [first name, family name unknown, 

daughter of Friedl and her first husband; 

Friedl's second husband — Zuzie's 

stepfather — was Robert Holzner], 192. 



Index of Places 



i 



251 



..; 



Africa, 68. 



Algiers, 68. 
Philipville, 69. 



AFRICA 



ALGERIA 



AUSTRALIA 



Australia, 26, 88. 
Sydney, 191 . 

AUSTRIA 
Austria-Hungary prior to 1918. 

Austria, 147. 

Brenner Pass, 69-70. 

Goden, 142. 

Linz, 122. 

Luzany, 142. 

Mauthausen, 191. 

Ottakring [Vienna], 102. 

Pettenbach, 122. 

Salzburg, 17, 27, 36, 122, 196. 

Schaffa, 145. 

Tausten-Pustertal, 146, 

Troppau, 144. 

Vienna, 2, 11, 13, 18-19, 21, 23-24, 27, 29- 
31, 42, 48-49, 52-53, 57, 60-61, 75, 
82-85, 87, 102, 111-113, 116-119, 
122, 124-127, 129, 131, 144, 146, 
151-152, 155-156, 161-162. 

BELGIUM 

Antwerp, 84. 
Brussels, 165. 
Luk [Liege], 96. 

BRAZIL 

Brazil, 22. 

Rio de Janeiro, 144. 

Sao Paulo, 168. 



CANADA 



Canada, 26. 

Don Mills, Ontario, 62. 



Etobicoke, Ontario, 22, 27, 62. 

Hamilton, Ontario, 26, 28, 31, 33-34, 43-44, 

62-63, 156, 161, 163. 
Montreal, Quebec, 158, 161. 
St. John's, Newfoundland, 22. 
Toronto, Ontario, 22, 27-28, 34, 36, 62, 157, 

161, 200. 
Vancouver, British Columbia, 29, 158, 192. 
West Vancouver, 29. 

CHINA 

Kau Kong Heung, Nam Hoi District, Kwantung 
Province, 1 49. 

COLOMBIA 

Bogota, 30, 119, 124, 127-128. 
Codazzi, 30. 
El Cocuy, 1 28. 

CZECH REPUBLIC 
Austria Hungary prior to 1920) 

Czechoslovakia (1920-1995) 
Czech Republic (1 995-Present) 

All of the places in Bohemia had 
German names prior to ] 946. After World War 
II the Czechoslovakian government changed all 
the names of cities and towns in Bohemia from 
German to Czech. 

The pages on which these places appear 
are listed with their German names since 
almost everyone listed in this book lived there 
places when these cities and towns had German 
names. The places are also cross referenced 
with the italicized Czech names (which appear 
without page numbers). 



Altenmark, 1 10. 

Alt-Rohlau (Stara Role), 2-3, 11, 14, 62, 111, 

200, 205, 207-208. 
Altsattl, 4, 113. 
Arnitzgrun, 7-8, 1 5. 
Arnoldov, 98. 
Asch, 130, 197. 
Aussig (usti), 2, 11, 17, 57, 75. 



252 



B 

Bleistadt, 32, 41, 77. 

Bodenbach (Podmokly), 2, 78. 

Bohmisch Leipa (Ceske Lipa), 2. 

Breclav (See Lundenberg). 

Brno (See Brtinn). 

BrOnn (Brno), 102, 112, 144 

Bniix, 33, 72, 76, 78. 80. 

Buczacz, 1 7. 

Budau (Budov), 153, 194-195. 

Buden (Budyne), 191. 

Budyne (see Buden). 



Ceske Lipa (See Bohmisch Leipa) 

Cheb (See Eger). 

Chodau, 8, 15-16, 40. 

Chodova Plana (See Kuttenplan [Plan]) 

Chomutov (See Komotau) 

Collin, 96. 

Czechoslovakia, 142. 



Dassnitz, 15. 

Dobrzan, 9. 

Dolitschen, 10-11. 

Dolny Rychnov (See Unterreichenau) 

Dvur Kralove (See Koningenhof). 



Eger (Cheb;, 2-3, 5, 8-9, 16, 25, 44 64 79- 

80, 111, 155-156, 165, 168-170, 196- 

Eger (Ohre) River, 3. 

Eisenberg (Jeseri), 187. 

Elbogen (Loket), 2, 4-9, 15, 17, ] 13 

Erzgebirge [Ore Mountains] '(Krusne Hory) 2 



Falkenau (Falknov, Sokolov), 2-9, 14-1, 21-22 
26-27, 30-44, 45-47, 49, 52-53 62- 
64, 66, 72-73, 77-81, 95, 111 113 
"5, 147, 149-150, 153, 155-156 
159-160, 195-210. 

Falknov (See Falkenau). 

Fischern (Rybare), 57, 207. 

Franzensbad, 8, 33, 43, 79. 

Franzisbad (See Franzensbad). 



Frauenthal, 35. 



Gfell, 15. 
Gibacht, 10. 

Giesshubl (Kyselka), 13, 37. 
Goding, 35. 

Graslitz (Kraslice), 2, 5, 15, 17 22 28 77 
79, 167, 170. ' ' 

' Graz, 1 7. 



H 

Havlickuv Brod, 191. 
Heinrichsgrun, 17. 
Hochliben, 28, 155. 
Hroznetin (See Lichtenstadt). 
Hronov, 191. 



Iglau, 141. 
Imhost, 163. 



Jachymov (See Joachimsthal) 

Jeseri (See Eisenberg). 

Jihlava, 141. 

Joachimsthal (Jachymov), 2, 22, 169. 



Kaiserwald [Emperor's Woods] 3 
Karlovy Vary (See Karlsbad)' 
Karlsbad (Karlovy Vary), 2-5, 7-8 11 13 14 
22, 27, 30, 32, 37, 43, 52, 68 72-73 

156, 158, 161-162, 164, 191-19? 

200, 207-208. ' 

Kirchenbirk (Kostelni Briza), 2-4 8 11 14 k 
K,* m . , ,V 2 ' 45 ' 62 • 98 ••"•''3-.'3S 4 " ,5 • 

Klimkovice (See Kbnigsberg) 

Klingenthal, 79. 

Kollautschen (Kolovec), 37 

Kolovec (See Kollautschen) 

Komotau (Chomutov), 2, 27, 32 36 57 71 74 

/6-77, 156-157, 159,1 6lT 8 7 73V4 ' 
Konigsberg (Klimkovice) 2 15 33 
Kbnigswart (Kynsvart), 3, '1 8, 22, 44 112 1 « 
Koningenhof (Dvur Kralove) 15 8 ' 



» 



) 



253 



) 



. 



Kosolup, 1 7. 

Kostel, 130 

Kostelni Briza (See Kirchenbirk). 

Krasna Lipa (See Schonlind). 

Kraslice (See Graslitz). 

Krusne Hory (See Erzgebirge; Ore Mountains 

[English]). 
Kuttenplan (Plan) (Chodova Plana), 2, 12, 111- 

112, 170. 
Kynsvart (See Kbnigswart). 
Kyselka (See Guiesshiibl). 



Lanz (Lomnice), 2, 14, 19, 43, 45, 146. 
Leiter, 10-11. 

Leitmeritz, 17, 32-34, 75-76. 
Lessnitz, 15. 
Libauthal, 164. 
Liberac (see Reichenberg). 
Lichtenstadt (Hroznetin), 2, 6, 13, 14, 96, 205. 
Lindau, 187. 
Lipova (See Schonlind). 
Litomysl, 191. 
Lobositz (Lovosice), 2. 
Lobs, 15, 17. 
Lodau-Karlsbad, 32. 
Loket (See Elbogen). 
Lomnice (See Lanz). 

Louka n. Litvinov (See Oberleuthensdorf). 
Lovosice (See Lobositz). 
Luditz, 15, 43, 192. 
Luft-Saaz, 186. 

Lundenberg (Breclav), 2, 19, 43, 101-110, 111, 
113, 130, 140-142, 144-145. 



M 



Mariakulm, 15. 

Marianske Lazne (See Marienbad). 

Marienbad (Marianske Lazne), 2, 167. 

Micholop, 1 86. 

Mies (Stribro), 2-3, 6, 9-11, 17-18, 43-44, 

111, 196-199. 
Milikan, 1 1. 
Moldau, 73-74, 76. 
Most, 197. 
Mulln, 15. 



N 



Neukirchen, 43. 
Nova Paka, 38. 



Oberleuthensdorf (Louka n. Litvinov), 187. 
Ohre River (See Eger River). 
Olmitz, 42. 
Oschelin, 1 1 . 
Otrocin, 1 1 . 



Petschau, 32, 77-78, 80. 

Pilsen (Plzen), 3, 6, 9, 11, 19, 36, 40, 46, 
162, 166, 169, 192, 197. 

Piwana, 10. 

Plzen (See Pilsen). 

Pochlowitz, 1 5. 

Podersam, 96. 

Podivin, 82. 

Podmokly (See Bodenbach). 

Postelburg (Postloprty), 43. 

Postloprty (See Postelburg). 

Prag; Prague [English] (Praha), 1, 3-8, 11-14, 
17, 19, 22, 26, 28-31, 34-35, 37-39, 
42-43, 47, 64, 68, 74-75, 112, 116, 
118, 142, 156, 166, 169, 187, 191- 
192. 

Praha (See Prag; Prague [English]). 

Pribunz, 200. 

Pschriberg, 186. 

Piirles, 111, 153, 186-190. 

0. 
R 

Rabensgrun, 15. 

Rehfeld, 74. 

Reichenberg (Liberac), 35, 41. 

Rovna, 98. 

Rudolec, 4. 

Rumburg, 26. 

Rybare (See Fischern). 



Saaz (Zatel), 153, 161, 186-187, 192, 194- 

195. 
Schaben, 1 5. 
Schlaggenwald, 15-16. 
Schonbrunn, 1 5. 
Schonfeld, 1 5. 
Schonlind (Krasna Lipa), 3-4, 7-8, 15-16, 41, 



254 



98-100. 
Schbnwerth-Falkenau, 19, 39. 
Schuttuber, 37. 

Schweissing (Svojsin), 1 1 , 44, 1 96. 
Seestadl, 32, 74-76. 
Sir-any. 109. 
Slavonia, 4. 

Sokolov (See Falkenau). 
Srbec, 153. 
Staab, 9. 

Stara Role (See Alt-Rohlau). 
Steinbach, 8-9, 40-41. 
Steingrub, 15, 196. 
Steinhof, 1 5. 
Stribro (See Mies). 
Svojsin (See Schweissing). 



Tachau (Tachov), 11, 19, 41 , 113, 116-117, 

192, 198. 
Tachov (See Tachau). 
Teplice-Sanov (See Teplitz-Schbnau). 
Teplitz-Schbnau (Teplice-Sanov), 3, 32, 36, 41, 

47, 75-76, 192. 
Terezin (See Theresienstadt). 
Tetschen, 11, 72, 78. 
Theresienstadt (Terezin), 3, 26, 29, 37, 42, 64, 

171, 196. 
Theussau (Tisova), 33. 
Theusing, 29, 111, 153, 191-193. 
Thonischen, 97. 
Tisa, 11. 

Tisova (see Theussau). 
Trutnov, 191. 
Tschemoschin, 1 1 . 
Tuschkau, 9. 



U 



Unterreichenau (Dolny Rychnov), 36. 
usti (See Aussig). 



W 



Weseritz, 1 1 . 
Wolin, 112. 



Zatel (See Saaz). 
Zlin, 142. 

Zvestov u Votic, 2, 156. 
Zwiebau, 97. 
Zwittau, 1 7. 
Zwodau, 39. 

FRANCE 

Alsace Lorraine, 53. 
Cherbourg, 72, 81. 
France, 209. 
Menton, 34. 
Meuse-Argonne, 132. 
Paris, 72, 81. 
Strasbourg, 69. 

GALICIA 
Austria-Hungary prior to 1918. 

Galicia, 162. 
Kaplinice, 17. 



• 



) 



GERMANY 

Annaberg, 188. 

Augsburg, 1 29. 

Bad Mannheim, 72. 

Baldham, 207. 

Benedikt Beuern, 30, 1 1 9. 

Bergen-Belsen, 191. 

Berlin, 47, 72, 165. 

Bielefeld, Westphalia, 1 60. 

Bremen, 19, 50, 80. 

Bremerhaven, 72, 114. 

Chemnitz, 188-190. 

Dachau, 197, 207. 

Darmstadt, 197. 

Dresden, 72. 

Eggenfelden, 54. 

Friedberg Fauerbach, 146. 

Frankfurt, 70, 72, 81, 124. 

Garmish Parten, 171. 

Germany, 25, 173-174. 

Haar (Munich), 207. 

Halle an der Saale, 27, 29, 57, 159. 

Hamburg, 23, 48-49, 81, 114, 153, 173. 

Heusenstamm, 171. 

Hohenelbe, 1 54. 

Karl Marx Stadt (See Chemnitz). 

Koblenz, 53-54, 72, 81. 



o 



255 



V 



Koln, 72, 81. 

Ladabov, Pomerania, 114. 

Ladebau, Pomerania, 114. 

Lamsdorf, 71. 

Leipzig, 33. 

Memel, 189. 

Mertloch, 54. 

Munich [Munchen], 71, 72, 81, 159, 200, 207. 

Nuremburg (Nurenberg), 71, 139. 

Nurenburg (see Nuremburg). 

Oppeln, Silesia, 71 . 

Passau, 54. 

Penig, 190. 

Polch, 20, 53-54, 59, 146. 

St. Leonhard/Forst N.0, 1 24. 

Stuttgart, 173. 

Ulm, 129. 

Zomeding, 207. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

(ENGLAND. SCOTLAND) 

Altrincham, Cheshire, 200, 202. 

Bath, 36. 

Bishop Stotford, 1 60. 

Bristol, 68. 

Chester, 202. 

Davyhulme, Greater Manchester, 203. 

England, 26, 57, 161. 

Glascow, 1 60. 

Hale, Cheshire, 205. 

Hale Barnes Chapel, 206. 

Liverpool, 70. 

London, 22, 27, 32, 35-36, 42, 68, 116, 140, 

160, 196, 210. 
Macclesfield, Cheshire, 203. 
Manchester, 121, 200. 
Old Trafford, 200. 
Plumley, Cheshire, 200. 
Plymouth, 72. 
Oxford, 22. 
Sale, Cheshire, 203. 
Salford, Lancashire, 205. 
Sheffield, 28, 155. 
Southampton, 68. 

Timperley, Cheshire, 200, 202-203. 
■ U.S. Military Hospital, 148. 
Wythenshawe, Manchester, 202-203. 

HUNGARY 
Austria-Hungary prior to 1918. 

Banat, 1 1 3. 



Budapest, 14. 

Hungary, 2, 23, 45, 62, 111, 114. 
Temesvar (listed under Romania). 
Werschetz, 131. 



Iraq, 65. 



IRAQ 



ISRAEL 



Israel, 20, 22, 36-37, 41, 43, 45, 58, 65, 140, 

159, 165, 169, 194, 208. 
Kfar Saba, 121. 
Kfar Tabor, 208. 
Kiriat Ono, 208. 
Kibbutz Ayelet Hashahar, 30. 
Kibbutz Ginnosar, 1 1 8. 
Magdiel, 141. 
Petach Tikva, 121. 
Sefad, 121. 

Tel Aviv, 42, 121, 192. 
Tel Yitzchak, 121. 



ITALY 



Abruzzi, 69. 
Ana, 69. 
Anzio, 69. 
Berigelta, 69. 
Brenner Pass, 69-70. 
Catania, 68-69. 
Italy, 26, 68, 163. 
Messina, 68-69. 
Milan, 26, 63, 163. 
Monte Pelmlicaa, 95. 
Palermo, 68-69. 
Pantellaria (island), 68. 
Perugia, 69. 
Rome, 69-70. 
Sicily, 68. 
Subiaco, 69. 
Taormina, 68. 
Terni, 69. 
Velletri, 69. 



Vilna, 37. 



LITHUANIA 



LUXEMBOURG 



Luxembourg, 4. 



256 



Valetta, 68. 



MALTA 



NETHERLANDS 



Holland. 171. 
Eindhoven, 171. 

POLAND 
Austria-Hungary prior to 1918. 

Crackow, 17. 

Lodz, 119. 

Podogorze, 1 7. 

Poland, 20, 23, 33, 115, 142. 

Treblinka, 43. 

POLAND 

Auschwitz, 29, 35, 116, 166, 171, 191-192, 

196. 
Lodz, 41. 

RHODESIA 

Rhodesia, 41-42. 

ROMANIA 
Austria-Hungary prior to 1918. 

Craiova, 39-40. 

Danubis-Sulina, 41 . 

Romania, 38. 

Temesvar (Timisoara), 18, 111, 130, 197. 

Timisoara (See Temesvar). 

RUSSIA/SOVIET UNION 

Chernowitz, 38. 

Hiory, 121. 

Kirghiz S.S.R., 38. 

Russia, 138, 143, 174, 209. 

Schlov, 23, 182. 



Dolny Kubin, 14. 



Helsingborg, 192. 



SLOVAKIA 



SWEDEN 



Sweden, 44, 1 17. 

SWITZERLAND 

Basel, 69-70. 

Lugano, 1 1 9. 

Switzerland, 32, 36-37, 64, 117. 

Zurich, 27-28, 166. 

TUNISIA 

Tunis, 68. 
Tunisia, 68. 

UNITED STATES 

The United States of America (U.S.A.) 
is divided into fifty (50) states and one 
Federal District (the capital city). 

The abbreviations for the fifty states 
are: 

Alabama = AL 

Alaska = AK 

Arizona = AZ 

Arkansas = AR 

California = CA 

Colorado = CO 

Connecticut = CT 

Delaware = DE 

Florida = FL 

Georgia = GA 

Hawaii = HI 

Idaho = ID 

Illinois = IL 

Indiana = IN 

Iowa = IA 

Kansas ■= KS 

Kentucky = KY 

Louisiana = LA 

Maine = ME 

Maryland = MD 

Massachusetts = MA 

Michigan = MI 

Minnesota = MN 

Mississippi = MS 

Missouri = MO 

Montana =MT 

Nebraska = NE 

Nevada = NV 

New Hampshire = NH 

New Jersey = NJ 

New Mexico = NM 



: \J 



• 



« 



1 



257 



i 



New York = NY 

North Carolina = NC 

North Dakota = ND 

Ohio = OH 

Oklahoma = OK 

Oregon = OR 

Pennsylvania = PA 

Rhode Island = RI 

South Carolina = SC 

South Dakota = SD 

Tennessee = TN 

Texas = TX 

Utah = UT 

Vermont = VT 

Virginia = VA 

Washington = WA 

West Virginia = WV 

Wisconsin = WI 

Wyoming = WY 

The Federal District is the District of 
Columbia (D.C.), as in: 

Washington, D.C. 

New York City is divided into five 
boroughs: Manhattan [New York, NY], Brooklyn 
[Brooklyn, NY], the Bronx [Bronx, NY], Staten 
Island (or Richmond) [Staten Island, NY] and 
Queens [Queens, NY]. The Borough of Queens is 
subdivided into various neighborhoods, some 
of which are listed in this book, including 
Bayside, Cypress Hills, Elmhurst, Far 
Rockaway, Flushing, Forest Hills, Jackson 
Heights, Jamaica, Long Island City, Maspeth, 
Rockaway, and Sunnyside. 

Albuquerque, NM, 1 1 6. 

Arlington, TX, 25, 132. 

Atlanta, GA, 148. 

Bakersfield, CA, 123. 

Baldwin, GA, 147. 

Baltimore, MD, 26, 34. 

Bayside [Flushing-Queens], NY, 20-21, 58, 61, 

130, 150, 197. 
Ben Lomond, CA, 1 16. 
Berkeley, CA, 1 1 6. 
Beverly Hills, CA, 26. 
Binghamton, NY, 20, 1 62. 
Blue Springs, MO, 138. 
Bosier City, LA, 139. 
Bronx, NY, 19-21, 25, 27, 48, 54-57, 62, 146, 

149, 155, 159. 
Brooklyn, NY, 19-21, 49-54, 56-58, 60-61, 



85, 130, 146-147, 159, 161, 197, 199. 
Buchanan Dam, TX, 21, 147-148. 
Bushkill, PA, 86-87. 
California, 209. 
Castell, TX, 1 1 4. 
Centralia, IL, 183. 
Charlotte, NC, 29, 120. 
Chicago, IL, 36, 1 24, 209. 
Cinnaminson, NJ, 21, 148. 
Clearwater, FL, 120. 
Clifton Springs, NY, 123. 
Collinsville, OK, 147. 
Colorado Springs, CO, 123. 
Columbus, GA, 1 37. 
Commack, NY, 60. 
Creve Coeur, M0, 1 1 4. 
Crockett, TX, 149. 
Cypress Hills [Queens], NY 26. 
Dallas, TX, 21, 24-25, 51, 61, 130, 132-134, 

137-139, 149. 
DeSoto, TX, 25. 
East Stroudsburg, PA, 87. 
Elgin, IL, 183. 
Ellsworth, ME, 150. 

Elmhust [Queens], NY, 21, 61, 63, 147, 152. 
Far Rockaway [Queens], NY, 29. 
Florida, 36, 55, 162. 
Flushing [Queens], NY, 20-21, 38, 58, 60, 63, 

147, 150. 
Forest Hills [Queens], NY, 21, 62-63. 
Fort Myers, FL, 87, 152. 
Fort Sill, OK, 148. 

Fort Worth, TX, 24, 132, 135, 148-149. 
Fredericksburg, TX, 1 1 4. 
Galveston, TX, 1 1 4. 
Grand Rapids, Ml, 52. 
Harrison, NY, 36. 
Hastings-on-Hudson, NY, 20, 60. 
Hawthorne, NY, 72. 
Hermann, MO, 182. 
Hightstown, NJ, 86. 
Hoboken, NJ, 85. 
Honolulu, HI, 1 34. 
Houston, TX, 137, 139, 158. 
Huntington, NY, 150. 
Independence, MO, 1 38. 
Indianola, TX, 114. 

Jackson Heights (Queens), NY, 19-20, 53. 
Jamaica (Queens), NY, 20, 86, 146, 152. 
Jersey City, NJ, 19. 
Johnson City, NY, 1 62. 
Johnstown, PA, 147. 
Killeen, TX, 139. 



258 



Laguna Hills, CA, 32, 48, 196. 
Larchmont, NY, 38. 
Lawrenceville, NJ, 35. 
Leawood, KS, 1 20. 
Lincoln County, TN, 1 30. 
Linden, NJ, 19, 58, 65. 
Uano County, TX, 114. 
Long Island, NY, 36. 
Long Island City [Queens], NY, 149. 
Los Altos Hills, CA, 1 20. 
Los Angeles, CA, 41, 116, 144, 182, 209. 
Los Gatos, TX, 149. 
Macon, GA, 148. 
Manhasset, NY, 150. 
Martindale, TX, 132. 
Maspeth [Queens], NY, 53. 
Miami, FL, 21, 147. 
Miami Beach, FL, 58. 
Middletown, CT, 60, 1 50. 
Mineral Wells, TX, 148. 
Minneapolis, MN, 150. 
Newark, NJ, 147. 
New Braunfels, TX, 114. 
Newhall, CA, 21, 60-61. 
New Hyde Park, NY, 1 50. 
New Jersey, 1 94. 

New Rochelle, NY, 21, 62, 119, 146. 
New York, NY [Manhattan], 1, 19-22, 24-26, 
29-30, 45, 47-50, 52-56, 59-60, 63, 
72, 84-86, 88, 118, 120, 131, 140, 
143, 146-147, 150, 159, 162, 180, 
182, 196, 209-211. 

Niagara Falls, NY, 62. 

Norristown, PA, 66 

Northport, NY, 21 , 60. 

North Tarrytown, NY, 139. 

Oakland, CA, 149. 

Okmulgee, OK, 1 83. 

Onslow County, NC, 1 48. 

Palo Alto, CA, 1 20. 

Pana, IL, 183. 

Perrineville, NJ, 86. 

Philadelphia, PA, 17, 26, 34, 63, 129, 210. 

Pine Bluff, AR, 132. 

Pittsburgh, PA, 147. 

Purchase, NY, 32, 72, 196. 

Rochester, NY, 1 52. 

Rockaway [Queens], NY, 25, 56, 131. 

Rockford, IL, 183. 

Queens, NY, 1, 19-21, 25-26, 29, 37-38, 53, 
55-56, 58, 60-63, 86, 130-131, 144, 
146-147, 149-150, 152, 160, 197, 
199. 



Rancho Palos Verdes, CA, 144. 

St. Louis, MO, 2, 14, 23-25, 29, 51-52, 111, 

114-115, 120, 173-177, 179-185. 
St. Patrick Air Force Base, FL, 1 34. 
Salem, IL, 23, 174, 183. 
Salinas, CA, 183. 
San Benito, TX, 1 34. 
San Francisco, CA, 24, 1 30. 
Sanibel Island, FL, 152. 
San Jose, CA, 123, 183. 
Santa Clara, CA, 29. 
Santa Cruz, CA, 1 74. 
Santa Monica, CA, 66, 145. 
Saugus, CA, 147. 
Scarsdale, NY, . 
Seattle, WA, 30, 43. 
Smithtown, NY, 20. 
Staten Island, NY, 147-148. 
Strathmore, PA, 63. 
Suffern, NY, 150. 
Sulphur Springs, TX, 132. 
Sunnyside [Queens], NY, 60-61. 
Syosset, NY, 150. 
Syracuse, NY 123. 
Tarrytown, NY, 179. 
Tucson, AZ, 41. 
U.S.A., 129. 
Upper Darby, PA, 34. 
Van Nuys, CA, 147, 150. 
Vineland, NJ, 55. 
Wappingers Falls, NY 1 50. 
Washington, DC, 38, 52, 120. 
West Orange, NJ, 60. 
Woodmere, NY, 210. 
Woodridge, IL, 183. 
Yorkville, IL, 183. 

URUGUAY 

Montevideo, 27, 62, 192. 

YUGOSLAVIA 

Temes Pocin, 1 62. 
Yugoslavia, 48. 






k 



259