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Full text of "Holyoke in the great war .."

HOLYOKE 

GREAT WAR 

INCLUDING THE TOWN^. Or 
SOUTH HADLEY-WILLIMANSET 
BELCHERTOWN- FAIRVIEW 
AND GRANBY 







Class. 
Book.. 






bright Fr'^iill^Lt/C 

COPWyGHT DEPOSIT. 



HOLYOKE IN THE 
GREAT WAR 



ILLUSTRATED 



By CHARLES S. ZACK 






INCLUDING THE TOWNS OF 



SOUTH HADLEY, WILLIMANSETT, BELCHERTOWN, 
FAIRVIEW AND GRANBY 



Published by the 
TRANSCRIPT PUBLISHING COMPANY 



Holyoke, Massachusetts 



^"^4^ 
^^^ 



COPYRIGHT 1919 

Charles S. Zack 

All Rights Reserved 



©Cl.A5a57<8 



The Yankee On The Marne 



Ho! the h'English h'an' the h'lrish h'an' the 'owiing Scotties, too, 
The Cannucks h'an' h'Austryleans h'an' the 'airy French Pollu, 
The h'only thing that bothered us a year before we knew 
Was wot h'iii 'ell the Yanks 'ud look and wot h'in 'ell they'd do ! 

They didn't 'ave no tr'inin', an' they didn't know the gyme. 
They 'adn't never marched much, 'an their shootin' was the syme, 
'An the h'only thing that bothered us way back in lawst July 
Was 'ow in 'ell the line would 'old h'if they should ryn aw'y! 

Them leggy nosey new 'uns — just come across the sea, 
We couldn't 'elp but wonder 'ow in 'ell their guns would be. 
H'an the 'honly thing that bothered us h'in all the staggerin' ranks 
Was w'at in 'ell would 'appen h'if the 'Uns should 'it the Yanks. 

My word ! H'it 'appened sudden when the drive 'ad first begun. 
We see'd the Yanks arunnin' ! Gaw blimy ! 'Ow they run ! 
But the h'only thing that bothered us that see'd the chyse begin 
Was 'ow in 'ell to stop 'em, 'fore they got into Berlin ! 

They didn't 'ave no tactics but the bloody manuel, 
They 'adn't learned no borders but "OORAY" and "Give 'em 'ell !" 
But the h'only thing that bothered us about them leggy lads 
Was 'ow in 'ell to get the chow to feed their "Kamerads." 

So we're standin' hall together in a stifish firin' line, 
H'an' hif anyone should hawsk us, you can say "we're doin' fine." 
But the h'only thing that bothers us, and that don't bother much. 
His where h'in 'ell to get the dirt to cover up the Dutch. 

Gaw's truth h'its rotten fightin' that hall the troops 'ave seen, 
The 'Uns a dirty player, becos he's always been. 
But the h'only thing that bothers us in 'andin' 'in our thanks 
Is 'ow in 'ell we'd done it if it weren't for the Yanks. 

Ho ! the H'English h'an' the H'lrish h'an' the 'owlin' Scotties, too. 
The Cannucks h'an' H'Austryleans h'an' the 'airy French Pollu, 
The h'only thing that bothered us don't bother us no more, 
Hit's why in 'ell we didn't know the Yankee boys before. 

— From "Somewhere in France. 



DEDICATION 



THIS TOO BRIEF AND IMPERFECT MEMORIAL AND RECORD 

OF DARING SACRIFICE AND FAITHFULNESS IS 

DEDICATED 



To the men who preferred death, than Hfe enslaved by the Hun; 

To the women who sent their men to battle with a smile, and who were 
strong under trials ; 

To the workers, men and women, who filled the ranks of industry in 
the second army behind the lines ; 

To the heroes who died that the world might be made again a safe and 
decent place to live in ; 

To the victors who returned with a consciousness that, by their valor, 
free nations have been saved, and oppressed peoples delivered. 







GENERAL JOHN J. PERSHING. 



GEN. JOHN J. PERSHING 



COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF OF THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY 
FORCES. 



Won appointment to West Point in a competitive examination 
July 14, 1882. 

Graduated from West Point in 1886 as a second lieutenant. 

Assigned to Sixth Cavalry in the Apaches' campaign. 

Promoted to first lieutenant in 1891. 

Assigned to Tenth Cavalry at outbreak of Spanish-American War. 

Won distinction at the battle of San Juan. 

Ordered to Philippines as captain and adjutant-general District of 
Mindanao in 1899. 

On General Staff in 1904. 

Left for Japan in January, 1905, where he was Military Attache 
and Observer in Russo-Japanese War. 

In 190(5 promoted to be brigadier-general over the heads of 862 
officers. 

In command of the Department of Mindanao firmly established 
American authority in the Philippines. 

In 1914 was given command of Fort Bliss on the Mexican Border. 

In March, 1916, was sent into Mexico in command of the Punitive 
Expedition against Villa. 

Was given command of the American Expeditionary Forces in 
France by President Woodrow Wilson on May 24, 1917. 

Sailed for France on May 28. 

He was promoted to be General in American Army, October 4, to 
offer General Foch entire American resources. 




ADMIRAL WILLIAM SIMS. 



The United States Enters The War 



AMERICA'S entrance into the Great War marked the beginning of the end. 
This country had been slow in believing the stories of German atrocity in 
France and Belgium, but as evidence accumulated, and after the wholesale 
murder of women and children on the Lusitania, May 7, 1915, American 
indignation was aroused, and millions would have welcomed an immediate declara- 
tion of war. The government at Washington, however, thought it would be wiser 
to wait until more evidence had been collected before commencing hostilities. 

Two years passed, during which time every effort on the part of Presider.t 
Wilson was made to make Germany realize that she was violating all the laws of 
■civilized warfare. After Berlin's repeated promises had been proven to be but a 
series of brazen lies, the break finally came, when, on January 31, 1017, the Hun 
government added open insult to repeated injuries in decreeing to itself the owner- 
.ship of half the Atlantic ocean, for its submarines. It assumed to bar out of the 
"war zone" not only enemy vessels but neutral ships as well, under penalty of 
<iestruction by submarines. This country was forbidden to send to any port in 
Creat Britain more than one ship a week, and this vessel was to be distinguished 
according to German instructions, a barber pole decoration being suggested. 

The German ambassador was handed his passports on February ?,rd, and on 
February 26th President Wilson asked Congress for authority to arm merchant 
ships. 

UNITED STATES BREAKS WITH GERMANY. 

On April :3d, President Wilson asked Congress to declare the existence of a 
•state of war with Germany, and this was done on April 6th, Good Friday. 

Austria-Hungary severed diplomatic relations with the United States on April 
8th, and on April 21st Turkey took the same action. 

Ninety-nine German merchant ships which had remained in our ports because 
of fear of being captured by French and British war vessels, were seized by the 
United States. 

The first American naval fleet sailed immediately, and on May 4th the Ameri- 
can destroyers began co-operation with the British navy in the war zone. 

It was on May 18th that President Wilson signed the Selective Service Act, 
"which called into service all able-bodied men between the ages o| twenty-one and 
thirty-one. 

On June 26th American troops began to land in France, and they saw their 
first fighting on October 27th. The remainder of the year on this side was largely 
■consumed in raising and training an army, which finally grew to two million men 
in France, and as many more preparing to follow them, when successive surrenders 
•of Bulgaria. Turkey, Austria and Germany ended the war. 

MARINES ADD TO VICTORY ROLL. 

The Germans, balked in their direct attempts to divide the British and French 
and reach the channel ports, launched a new drive between Soissons and Rheims, 



10 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

with Paris as the goal. In six daj's the Huns had hamniort'd across tlic Aisne and, 
for the first time since September, 1914, reached the Marne, in the region of Cha- 
teau-Thierry. The French and Americans defeated their attempts to pusli further 
down the Ourcq and the Marne. At Cantigny and Belleau Wood the United States 
soldiers, marines, added new names to a victory roll that had its beginning at the 
birth of this country in 1775. 

During the first six months of 1918 it was a race between this country and 
Germany. For weeks it was a question whether the Yankees could cross the At- 
lantic fast enough. They were arriving in France at the rate of about 300,000 
a month, but the big question was whether they could get in the battle line quickly- 
enough. It was about the first of July, 1918, that this question was answered, for 
more than a million Americans were in France. They were literally pouring in, 
10,000 men a day, undaunted by U-boat raids on the American coast. 

What proved to be the last German drive was opened on July 15th. Unable to- 
open the way to Paris along the Oise and Ourcq valleys, they tried again from 
Chateau-Thierry to Rheims and eastward across Champagne to the edge of the 
Argonne forest. 

SECOND BATTLE OF THE MARNE. 

The attack was held within the French battle zone. Southwest of Rheims the 
Huns crossed the Marne and turned their drive toward Epernay. An example of 
American fighting came on July 18th, when the American marines went into Cha- 
teau-Thierry, 8,000 strong. Their casualties were 6,000 killed, wounded, gassed, 
shell-shocked and prisoners. But they halted the Hun advance. Marshal Foch had 
anticipated the plan of the enemy, and strong reserves were gathered in the forest 
of Villers-Cotterets, to the southwest of Soissons, and these were hurled against 
the west flank of the Marne wedge. 

This took the enemy by surprise, for it was engaged on the east side of the 
wedge. The Germans fell back before the Franco-American forces. 

The dfive toward Epernay was the high tide of the Hun, and Chateau-Thierry 
marked its final break. After that the Allies kept on the offensive, and never 
again lost that advantage. Foch gradually extended pressure all around the Marne 
pocket. The resistance of the Hun was stubborn, and by desperate efiforts he held 
the corners of the pocket and its mouth open through a retreat across the Vesle. A 
few days later Marshal Foch struck again at the nose of the Somme salient. Brit- 
ish and French troops advanced from Montdidier to Albert. Again the Hun was- 
taken by surprise, and by the middle of August had been driven back to the lines 
held before the Somme advance of the Allies back in 1916. 

By this time nearly two million Americans were in France. Heretofore they 
had been brigaded with the French and British troops. Now they were to show 
what they could do all by themselves. General Pershing had a million men under 
his personal command along the line from Verdun southeastward across Lorraine.. 

IN ST. anHIEL SALIENT. 

The Americans* great drive opened on September 12th and quickly smashed 
in the St. Mihiel salient, which the Huns had held for four years. Within a little 
more than a week the Yankees were within large gun range of the outer forts of 
Metz, but did not directly attack that enormous fortress. There was a longer but- 
less costly method of breaking the back of the German armies. 

The tedious task of fighting through the Argonne Forest followed. It was 
completed during October, and the Yankees had closed the Stenay gap and were- 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 11 

driving on to Sedan. In the early days of November, that historic place, the scene 
of the great French disaster in 1870, was reached. Its capture cut one of the two 
great German lines of supply and retreat. 

In the meanwhile French and British troops, with various Yankee outfits, had 
been driving the Hun in a retreat which increased daily in speed and disorder. 
The route was across French Flanders and Belgium. 

Ostend and Zeebrugge, lair of the U-boats, were abandoned. 

Fully 15,000 Germans were caught at the Dutch frontier and forced into inter- 
ment in Holland. 

When the German envoys came with white flags to Guise, on November 8th, 
to receive the terms of truce from General Foch, the Allied line was from east of 
Ghent and Audenaide to Maubeuge, while the Hun "Farthest West" in France, 
was at Chaumont-Porcien. 

ALLIED TROOPS REACH BOCROI. 

Before the terms of the armistice were formally accepted, this salient had been 
smashed in and Allied troops were in Rocroi, scene of a famous French victory 
over 200 years ago. 

The French had reached the Belgian frontier east of Avesnes, and the Cana- 
dians on the morning of November 11th took Mons, a place of heroic efforts of 
British forces in 1914 to stop the Hun advance. 

Pershing's men, on November 10th, had attacked on a front of 71 miles from 
the Meuse southeastward and were within 10 miles of the north side of Metz. If 
the Huns had not submitted it was evidently the plan to pocket Metz and push 
down the Moselle Valley for a direct invasion of Germany. 

On November 11th the terms of the armistice went into eflfect, and on that 
day hostilities ceased. 

IMPORTANT DATES IN WAR FROM AMERICAN STANDPOINT. 

January 31, 1917 — Germany announces unrestricted submarine warfare in 
specified zones. 

February 3 — United States severs diplomatic relations with Germany. 

February 26— The President asks Congress for authority to arm merchant 
ships. 

March 12— United States announces an armed guard will be placed on all 
American merchant vessels sailing through the war zone. 

March 24— Minister Brand Whitlock and American Relief Commission with- 
drawn from Belgium. 

April 2— The President asks Congress to declare the existence of a state of 
war with Germany. 

April 6 — War is declared. 

April 8 — Austria-Hungary severs diplomatic relations with United States. 

April 21 — Turkey severs relations with United States. 

May 4 — American destroyers begin co-operation with the British Navy in the 
war zone. 

May 18 — The President signs the selective service act. 

June 26 — The first American soldiers reach France. 

November 3 — The first clash of Americans with German soldiers. 

December 6 — The United States destroyer Jacob Jones sunk by submarines, 
with a loss of 60 American men. 

December 7 — The United States declares war on Austria-Hungary. 

December 28 — The President takes control of the railroads. 



12 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

January 8, 1918 — The President announces the 14 points in the peace program 
of the United States. 

February 3 — American troops officially announced on the Lorraine front near 
Toul. 

February 5 — Tuscania, carrying 2,179 American troops, torpedoed and sunk, 
with a loss of 211 American soldiers. 

March 10 — American troops occupy trenches at four different points on French 
front. 

March 11 — The first wholly American raid made in sector north of Toul is 
successful. 

May 21 — British transport Moldavia sunk with a loss of 53 Americans. 

May 24 — Major General March appointed Chief of Staff with rank of General. 

May 25 — German submarines on the American coast sink 19 coastwise vessels 
with a loss of 16 lives. 

May 27 — The third German drive begun, capturing Chemin des Dames and 
reaching the Marne east of Chateau-Thierry. The American marines aid the 
French at Chateau-Thierry. 

May 28 — American forces near Montdidier capture Cantigny and hold it 
against numerous counter attacks. 

May 31 — Transport Lincoln sunk by U-boat and 23 lives lost. 

June 11 — The American marines take Belleau Woods and 800 prisoners. 

June 15— Announcement is made that 800,000 American troops are in France. 

June 21 — Statement made that our troops hold 39 miles of French front in 
six sectors. 

July 15-18 — Anglo-American troops occupy strategic positions on Murman 
coast in northwestern Russia. 

July 18 — The second battle of the Marne begins with Foch's counter offensive 
between Soissons and Chateau-Thierry. French and Americans drive Germans 
back from the Marne almost to Aisne. 

July 27 — The Americans arrive on the Italian front. 

July 31 — The President takes over the telephone and telegraph lines. 

August 15 — Americans land in eastern Siberia. 

September 12 — Americans take St. Mihiel salient near Metz. Salient wiped out 
in three days. 

September 16 — The President refuses Austrian peace proposal. 

September 26 — Americans begin a drive in Meuse valley. 

October 4 — Germany asks Wilson for an armistice. Asks again on October 12 
and 20th. Austria-Hungary asks on October 7th, and Turkey on October 12th. 

October 31 — Turkey withdraws from war. 

November 2 — Americans rout Germans in Argonne. 

November 4^Austria-Hungary withdraws from war. 

November 5 — The President notifies Germany that Foch has the authority of 
the Allies to communicate terms of armistice. 

November 7 — Americans take Sedan. 

November 11 — The armistice is signed. 



The 26th Division's Record 



^i^ERHAPS no other division in the United States Army received, or deserved 
m ^° receive, the credit and distinction that came to our 26th, lovingly called 
^^p the Yankee Division and the New England Division. It was through hard 
fighting, extreme devotion to duty and the stick-to-it quality which has 
made the American doughboys the best fighters in the world, that brought to our 
division all the credit due it. Much has been written on the 26th, and there is a 
great deal more tliat will in time be written about the plucky boys of the New 
England States, but again there is a great deal that will never find its way into 
print. 

The men of the 26th during the war were fighters, one and all, but in peace 
they were nothing but big boys, homesick, and more than anxious to get home. 
The honor of being with the Army of Occupation meant nothing to them. Their 
honor was won on the field of battle, in the trenches, out in No Man's Land. They 
saw no adventure in going into Germany, and they were tired of sightseeing. 

A paragraph in a letter received in Holyoke from one of the Company D boys, 
who was in every one of the big engagements that his outfit took part in, has never 
before been published. It was written in reply to a letter from a relative who told 
the fighter that she was so glad that he was to have an opportunity of seeing Ger- 
many. Here it is, and it is quite characteristic of the fighting spirit of American 
youths : 

"Where do you get that stuff about being glad I'm going into Germany? To 
hell with Germany; I've had enough of Europe. All I want is to get back home. 
I never thought of home as I do now. This place was fine while there was some- 
ihing doing; but nix on this scenery stuff." 

The official record of what the 26th Division did in France is contained in the 
following data secured by Governor Calvin Coolidge from the Adjutant-General of 
Massachusetts in January, 1919, and is inclusive to November 23, 1918 : 



(a) Date of arrival of division head- 
quarters, 26th Division, in zone and suc- 
cessive locations : 

Location Date of Arrival 

Neufchateau Oct. 31,1917 

Couvrelles Feb. 8, 1918 

Bar-sur-Aube Mar. 18, 1918 

Joinville Mar. 2ii, 1918 

Neyel Mar. 27, 1918 

Boucq Mar. 31, 1918 

Trendes June 20,1918 

Toul June 8, 1918 

Ranteuil-les-Beaux June 29, 1918 

Chemigny July 9,1918 

Genevrois Farm July 10,1918 



Mery-sur-Marne July 15, 1918 

Genevrois Farm July 20,1918 

Lucy-le-Bocage July 21, 1918 

Grand Ru Farm July 21, 1918 

Mery-sur-Marne July 30, 1918 

Rusy-sur-Marne Aug. 16, 1918 

Bar-le-Duc Aug. 29, 1918 

Sommediene Aug. 30,1918 

Rupt-en-Woevre Sept. 6, 1918 

Trayon-sur-Meuse Sept. 16, 1918 

Verdun Oct. 8, 1918 

Bras Oct. 18, 1918 

Pierrefitte Nov. 14, 1918 

Benoite-Vaux Nov. 15, 1918 

Frebecourt Nov. 19, 1918 

Montigny-le-Roi >• • • Nov. 23, 1918 



14 



HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 



In the Front Lines. 

(b) Successive periods in front lines 
of 26th Division: 

The date of entrj', place and sector, 
active or quiet, and date of withdrawal 
follows : 

February 6, 1918, north of Soissons 
(brigaded with French), Chemin des 
Dames, quiet, March 21, 1918. 

April 3, 1918, north of Toul, La Reine 
and Boncq, quiet, June 28, 1918. 

July 10, 1918, north\yest of Chateau- 
Thierr}-, Pas Fini, active, July 25, 1918. 

September 8, 1918, north of St. Mihiel, 
Rupt and Troyon, active, October 8. 
1918. 

October 18, 1918, north of Verdun. 
Neptune, active, November 14, 1918. 

(c) 51st Field Artillery Brigade op- 
erated with 26th Division during all ac- 
tivities. 

(d) Prisoners captured by 26th Di- 
vision : 

Location Officers Men Total 

North of Toul 6 43 49 

Northwest of Chateau- 
Thierry 2 244 246 

North of St. A'Iihiel..4S 2,520 2.568 
North of Verdun 5 280 285 

Aggregate 61 3,087 3,148 

(e) Material captured by 26th Divi- 
sion: 

July 18-25 
Chateau Sept. 12-13. 
Thierry S M'hiel Tot. 

Heavy Artillery 12 3 

Light Artillery 3 10 13 

Trench IMortars 7 8 15 

Machine Guns 23 109 132 

Rifles — 42 42 



Xiinibor of Civsualties. 

(f) Total casualties of 26th Division 
since arrival in France : 

Officers 

Ivilled 78 

Wounded severely, 100 
Wounded slightly. .111 

Gassed 113 

Missing 10 

Prisoners 9 

Total 421 11,534 11,955 

(g) Total depth of advance, in kilo- 
meters, in principal offensives : 

Chateau-Thierry, July 18-25 17.5 

St. Mihiel Salient, Sept. 12-13 14.0 

\'erdun area, Oct. 18-Nov. 11. 



Men 


Total 


1,652 


1,730 


3,524 


3,624 


2,706 


2,819 


3,250 


3,363 


273 


283 


127 


136 



5.5 



Total 



37.0 



They occupied the following sectors : 
Sector 1918 

Chemin-des-Dames Feb. 6-Mar. 21 

La Reine and Bourcq . . .April 3-June 28 

Pas Fini July 10- July 25 

Rupt and Tryon Sept. 2-Oct. 8 

Neptune Oct. 10-Nov. 14 

The principal battles in which the di- 
vision was engaged are : 

1918 
Bois Brule or Apremont .April 10-13 

Seicheprey April 20-21 

Flirey May 20 

Xivray-Marvoisin June 15 

Chateau-Thierry (second 

Battle of Marne) July 10-25 

St. Mihiel Sept. 12-13 

North of ^'erdun Oct. 10-Nov. 14 



WAR REPARTMENT FIGURES, FEBRUARY 2, 1919. 

The War Department figures on 26th Division casualties differ considerably 
from the figures announced by Governor Coolidge recently as furnished by the 
State Adjutant-General's office. Major casualties include killed in action, died of 
wounds, prisoners and missing. The State figures showed the 26th Division as 
losing 1,730 killed in action; the War Department figures are 1,388. The State 
figures on prisoners were 136, while the Washington total is 354. The State figures 
gave the number of missing as 283, while the Washington totals apparently allow 
for 1,102 died of wounds and missing. The State figures showed 2,149 killed, miss- 
ing and prisoners, while the Washington figures show 2,864 killed, died of wounds, 
prisoners and missing. 




MAJOR-GENERAL CLARENCE R. EDWARDS. 



16 HoLYOKE In The Great W. 



Following are the losses in fighting of the units of the :36th Divi- i 
sion, exclusive of the 101st Field Signal Battalion and the divisional 
trains : 

Killed Died of Missing- in 

Regiment in action wounds action Prisoners Total 

101st Infantry :3")-") 140 118 27 540 

102d Infantry :i94 153 189 252 988 

103d Infantry 308 135 52 16 511 

104th Infantry 263 112 72 17 464 

101st Machine Gun Battalion. . . 10 9 1 .. 20 _ 

102d Machine Gun Battalion... 42 20 11 22 95 * 

103d Machine Gun BattaHon... 21 8 6 2 37 • 

101st Artillery 26 21 3 3 53 

102d Artillery 30 38 1 1 70 

103d Artillery 25 9 . . 9 43 

101st Trench Mortar Battery.. . 1 1 .. .. 2 

101st Engineers 13 14 9 5 41 

Totals 1,388 660 462 354 2,864 



FROM GENERAL PERSHING. 

Under date of "Great Headquarters, American Expeditionary Forces, February 
2," General John J. Pershing cabled Director-General Barrett as follows : 

"Replying to your cablegram, it gives me pleasure to send you a message about 
Vermont and New England troops. Briefly stated, they merit the warmest praise 
by the people they represent. They have maintained the best traditions of their 
New England ancestors, and the Spirit of Seventy-six has been theirs. They have 
played their full part in the splendid achievement of American arms on the battle- 
field and in the supporting services." 

MR. BAKER'S LETTER. 

On the same date the Hon. Newton D. Baker, Secretary of War, wrote Mr. 
Barrett as follows : 

"I have just received your note of the first. 

"The 26th, or New England Division, includes the 102d Regiment of Infantry, 
the 101st, 102d and 103d Machine Gun Battalions. In each of these organizations 
there are components of the old First Vermont. In order, therefore, to have any 
adequate appreciation of the service rendered by the Vermont soldiers in this war, 
it is necessary to follow the fortunes of the 26th Division, which went into the line 
on July 18, and which fought at Chateau-Thierry, Tourcy and Belleau Woods. In 
September this division occupied the left of the American Army in the attack on 
St. Mihiel, and closed the gap between the two American attacking wedges, cut- 
ting ofif the right of the Gertpans at midnight of the first day of that battle. Im- 
mediately after the St. Mihiel victory, the 26th was moved into the line east of the 
Meuse, where it remained in active combat until the signing of the armistice. 

"With the first and second regular army divisions, and the 42d, or Rainbow 
Division, the 26th is numbered, they being considered the first four veteran divi- 
sions of our great American expeditionary forces, and I would be glad to have the 




BRIGADIER-GEXERAL CHARLES H. COLE 



18 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

people of New England know that their division, the first of the National Guard 
troops to embark overseas, bore itself with distinction and gallantry, and that it 
contributed on every battle field to America's real participation in the fighting and 
the unbroken success of our arms." ' 

GENERAL MARCH'S STATEMENT. 

General Peyton C. March, chief of staflf, provided Mr. Barrett with the fol- 
lowing summarized "chronological statement of such activities of these troops as 
are now available in the War Department" : 

"The Vermont troops were incorporated into the 26th Division, the members 
being distributed through the 101st Machine Gun Battalion, 102d Machine Gun Bat- 
talion, 102d Infantry Regiment, 103d Machine Gun Battalion, 101st Ammunition 
Train, and the 57th Pioneer Infantry Regiment. 

"October 8, 1917 — Division Headquarters left Boston. October 31, 1917, ar- 
rived at U. S. P. O. 709, training area No. 2. Artillery at Coetyuidan for training 
Division trained intensively in these areas until early part of February. February 
5, 1918, entrained for front. Spent one month of trench instruction north of Sois- 
sons with headquarters at Couvrelles. Division was placed with the French 11th 
Army Corps. 

ATTACKED TWICE BY PICKED TROOPS. 

"March 18, 1918, withdrawn to Bar Sur Aube. March 27, 1918, upon comple- 
tion of month's tour ordered to line northeast of Toul to assist in the emergency. 
Division headquarters at Reynel. In this sector the division held a portion of the 
line usually assigned to two. divisions. Was attacked twice by picked troops. 

"April 10-11, 1918, the 104th was attacked in the forest of Apremont. 'April 
20-21, 1918, the 102d Infantry was attacked at Seicheprey. Both attacks were re- 
pulsed.. From this date until June 3, the 26th Division held the Toul sector, with 
more or less activity on both sides. 

REACH BOIS D'ETREPILLY. 

"About July 7, moved to the Marne front. July 17, 1918, 52d Brigade of 26th 
attacked and took Tourcy and Belleau. July 19, 1918, whole division attacked, reach- 
ing Bois d'Etrepilly. 

"July 22, 1918, withdrawn for rest. Month of August resting. First part of 
September ordered to line at St. Mihiel. 

September 19, 1918, on line near St. Hilaire. Usual trench warfare in the vi- 
cinity of Fresnes until October 23. 

"October 23, 1918, attacked. Captured Bois de Belleau, Bois de Warville and 
Bois d'Etraye. 

"November 11, 1918, attacked. Halted by the armistice." 



Historical Data of the "Yankee Division" 

Organized on August 22, 1917, in Boston, Alass., from units of National Guard 
trcops of the New England States and a quota of National Army troop's from 
Camp Devens, Mass. 

Trained at the following places : 

Division Headquarters, Boston, Mas.s. 

Headquarters Troop, Boston, Mass. 

101st Field Signal Battalion, Boston, Mass. 




LIEUTEX ANT-COLON EL ALFRED F. FOOTE. 



20 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

Headquarters olst Infantry Brigade, Framingham, Mass. 

101st Infantry, Framingham, Mass. 

10;3nd Infantry, New Haven, Conn. 

102nd Machine Gvm Battalion, Framingham, Mass. 

Headquarters 52nd Infantry Brigade, Westfield, Mass. 

103rd Infantry, Westfield, Mass. 

104th Infantry, Westfield, Mass. 

103rd Machine Gun Battalion, Quonset Point, R, I. 

101st Machine Gun Battalion, Niantic, Conn. 

GENERAL OFFICERS COMMANDING THE DIVISION WHILE IN THE 
STATES: 

Division Commander: Major-General Clarence R. Edwards. 
51st Infantry Brigade: Brigadier-General Peter E. Traub. 
52nd Infantry Brigade: Brigadier-General Charles H. Cole. 
51st F. A. Brigade : Brigadier-General William L. Lassiter. 

GENERAL OFFICERS C03IMANDIXG THE DIA ISION IN FRANCE: 

Division Commanders: Major-General Clarence R. Edwards. 
(Until October 25, 1918.) 
Brigadier-General Frank E. Bamford. 
Major-General Harry C. Hale. 
(Now Commanding.) 
51st Infantry Brigade: Brigadier-General Peter E. Traub. 

Brigadier-General George H. Shelton. 

(Now Commanding.) 
Brigadier-General L. L. Durfee. 
52d Infantry Brigade: Brigadier-General Charles H. Cole. 
(Now Commanding.) 
Brigadier-General George H. Shelton." 
51st F. A. Brigade : Brigadier-General William L. Lassiter. 
Brigadier-General Dwight F. Aultman. 
Brigadier-General Pelham D. Glassford. 
(Now Commanding.) 
First troops sailed from Hoboken, N. J., on September 7, 1917, and landed at 
St. Nazaire, France, on September 21, 1917. 

The division remained in Training Area, with headquarters at Neufchateau, 
for about four months, during which time details of troops were engaged construct- 
ing hospitals, building telephone lines, acting as labor detachments, assisting in or- 
ganizing sections of the service of supplies, and otherwise making preparations for 
the army, which began to arrive after January 1, 1918. 

SUCCESSIAE PERIODS IN LINE ON THR WESTERN FRONT: 

Date of Entry. Place Sector 

Feb. <), 1918. North of Soissons, "Chemin des Dames," 

(Brigaded with French.) 
April :J, 191S. North of Toul, "La Reine" and "Boucq," 
July 10, 1918. Chateau-Thierry "Pas Fini," 
Sept. 8, 1918. St. Mihiel Salient, "Rupt" and "Troyon," 
Oct. 18, 1918. North of Verdun, "Neptune," 

Aggregate time in line: 7 months or 210 days. 



Date Withd 


rawn 


March 


21, 


1918 


June 


28, 


1918 


July 


25, 


1918 


Oct. 


8, 


1918 


Nov. 


1-1, 


1918 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



21 



Note : "Date of Entry" and "Date Withdrawn," used above, are the dates on 
which the command passed to or from the 26th Division. This table does not in 
reality show the exact time which all units of this division served in line. There 
were several instances where regiments and brigades entered the line several days 
in advance of the passing of command to the division. Also, during the nine months' 
service, from February 6, 1918, the division spent only 10 days in a rest area (just 
prior to the St. Mihiel ofifensive), the balance of the time being consumed in mov- 
ing from one sector to another, or in support position awaiting entry into line. 

PRISOXERS CAPTURED BY THE TWEXTY-SIXTH DIY^SION: 

Officers, 61 ; other ranks, li.OST ; total, 3,149. 
AMONG GERMAN MATERIAL CAPTURED WERE THE FOLLOWING: 

Thirty-one pieces field artillery, 23 pieces trench artillery, 163 light and heavy 
machine guns, 830 rifles. 

CASUALTIES OF TWENTY-SIXTH DIVISION IN BATTLE: 

Officers Men Total 

Killed T8 1,652 1,730 

Wounded severely . . . .' 100 3,524 3,624 

Wounded slightly Ill 2,708 2,819 

Gassed 113 3,250 3,363 

Missing 10 273 283 

Prisoners 9 127 136 

Totals 421 11,534 11,955 

ENEMY TERRITORY TAKEN IN BATTLE: 

Offensive Date Depth 

Aisne-Marne July 18-25, 191S 17.5 Kilometers 

St. Mihiel Sept. 12-13, 1918 14.0 

Meuse-Argonne Oct. 18- 

Nov. 11, 1918 5.5 

Total depth of advance, 37.0 Kilometers 

The 51st Field Artillery Brigade (Divisional Artillery) operated with the 26th 
Division during all activities. Following relief of division in Aisne and Marne of- 
fensive on July 25th, the Brigade operated with the 29th, 42nd and 4th Divisions 
until relieved on August 4th. 

IMPORTANT FEATURES OF LINE IN SEVERAL SECTORS HKLD: 

Cheiniii ties Dames Sector: La Reiiie and Boucq (Toiil Seetoi) : 

(a) The Chemin des Dames (a) Montsec 

(b) Fort de Malmaison (b) Bois Brule (Apremont Woods) 

(c) Chavignon Valley (c) Seicheprey (Remiere Woods and 

(d) Laffaux Valley Jury Woods) 

(e) Pinon Woods (d) Xivray-Marvoisin 

(f) Cheval Mort Hill ' (e) Dead Man's Curve 

(g) Aisne River 

(h) Rouge Maison (Cave) 
(i) Rochefort (Cave) 



22 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



Aisne 1 


2iid Marne Ott'ensi> 


-e: St, 


. Mihiel Offensive: 


(a) 


Bois Belleau 






(a) Les Eparges 


(b) 


Hill 190 






(b) Vigneulles 


(c) 


Bouresches Railway Station 


(c) Hattonchatel 


(d) 


Trugny Woods 




(d) Dommartin 


(e) 


Epieds 






(e) Bois de St. Remy 


(f) 


Vesle River 


(Arti 


Hery Brigade) 




(g) 


Vaux 


(a) 
(b) 
(c) 
(d) 


Meuse-Argoiuie 

Marcheviele 
Bois Belleu 
Hill 360 
Bois d'Ormont 


Offensive: 






(e) 


Bois d'Haumont 






(f) 


Bois d'Etrayes 








(g) 


Les Houppy Bois 






(h) 


La Wavrille 








(i) 


Bois de Ville devant Chaumont 






(J) 


Cote de Talou 





OTHER INTERESTING HISTORY OF THE 26TH DIVISION: 

The first American unit organized as a Division in the United States and 
transported complete to France. 

While in the "La Reine and Boucq Sector," north of Toul, the 26th Division 
engaged in the first two battles in which the Americans fought without the support 
of French infantry. 

The 104th Infantry (form.erly 2nd, 6th and 8th Massachusetts Infantry), after 
the. battle in the Bois Brule at Apremont, was cited in G. O. No. 737 A, Hq., 32nd 
.Army Corps (French), April 26, 1918, and had its colors decorated with the Croix 
de Guerre. The 104th Infantry is the only American regiment in the United States 
Army to have its colors decorated by a foreign government. 

The division has been cited in American and French orders and commended in 
letters and service memorandums as follows : 

Cited in G. O. No. 7, Hq. nth Army Corps (French), March 15, 1918. 

Cited (104th Infantry), in G. O. No. 737 A. Hq. 32nd Army Corps (French), 
April 26, 1918. 

Commended (lOlst Infantry), in Service Memorandum, Hq. Vlllth Army 
(French), June 8, 1918. 

Commended in Service Memorandum, Hq. Vllth Army (French), June 17, 
1918. 

Congratulated in Memorandum, Hq. 32nd Army Corps (French), June 18, 1918. 

Cited in G. O. No. 131, Hq. 32nd Army Corps (French), June 18, 1918. 

Commended (103d Infantry), in letter from G. H. Q., A. E. F., June 20, 1918. 

Cited in G. O. No. 133, Hq. 32nd Army Corps (French), June 27, 1918. 

Congratulated in letter, Hq. Vlth Army (French), July 29, 1918. 

City in G. O. Vlth Army (French), August 9, 1918. 

Cited in G. O., G. H. Q., American E. F., August 28, 1918. 

Cited (102nd Infantry), in G. O. No. 19, Hq. oth Army Corps, American E. F., 
September 18, 1918. 

Commended in letter from Hq. 2nd Colonial Corps (French), October 3, 1918. 

Commended in letter from Hq. 2nd Colonial Troops (French), October 7, 1918. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 23 

Commended in letter from Hq. 17th Army Corps (French), October 24, 1918. 

Commended (104th Infantry), in letter from Hq. 18th Division (French), No- 
vember 17, 1918. 

Commended in letter from Hq. 3nd Colonial Corps (French), November 14, 
1918. 

Cited in G. O. No. 233, G. H. Q., A. E. F., December 19, 1918. 

Cited in G. O. No. 238, G. H Q., A. E. F., December 26, 1918. 

British G. H. Q., on October 20, 1918, made public the following extract from 
a confidential document captured from the Nineteenth German Army: "The 26th 
American Division is a fighting division which has proven its qualities in battles on 
various parts of the front." 

The 26th Division is officially known as the "Yankee Division." Distinctive in- 
signia worn on left sleeve of uniform by authority of G. O. No. 33, Hq. 1st Army, 
American E. F. — "Monogram YD in dark blue on diamond shaped field of olive 
drab." — 

Citation of first man awarded Congressional Aledal of Honor in 26th Division 
as follows : 

PRIVATE FIRST-CLASS GEORGE DILBOY (Deceased), Company "H," 
103d Infantry. 

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in 
action with the enemy on 18 July, 1918, near Belleau, France. 

After his platoon had gained its objective along a railroad embankment, Private 
Dilboy, accompanying his platoon leader to reconnoiter the ground beyond, was 
suddenly fired upon by an enemy machine gun from one hundred yards. From a 
standing position on the railroad track, fully exposed to view, he opened fire at 
once, but, failing to silence the gun, rushed forward with his bayonet fixed, through 
a wheat field towards the gun emplacement, falling within twenty-five yards of the 
gun with his right leg nearly severed above the knee, and with several bullet holes 
in his body. With undaunted courage, he continued to fire into the emplacement 
from a prone position, killing two of the enemy and dispersing the rest of the 
crew. 

Next of kin: Antone Dilboy (father), Massachusetts General Hospital, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 



Massachusetts Seventh in Supplying Men 

A table showing the number of men supplied to the Army by each State dur- 
ing the' war was made public by the War Department. New York led with 367,864, 
and Nevada stood last, with 5,10.5, in the total of 3,757,624 men obtained by draft, 
voluntary enlistment or through the National Guard. 

The men actually supplied ran close to the obligation of the States, making 
their quotas proportionate to their population. 

The figures are compiled up to November 11, and the grand total includes 
the overseas garrisons in Porto Rico, Hav;aii, the Philippines and Alaska, as well 
as the American Expeditionary Forces and the Army at home. 

Men supplied by the States follow: 

New York, 367,864; Pennsylvania, 297,891; Illinois, 251,074; Ohio, 200,293; 
Texas, 161,065; Michigan, 135,485; Massachusetts, 132,610; Missouri, 128,544; Cal- 
ifornia, 112,514; Indiana, 106,581; New Jersej', 105,207; Minnesota, 99,116; Iowa, 
08,781; Wisconsin, 98,211; Georgia, 85,506; Oklahoma, 80,169; Tennessee, 75,825; 
Kentucky, 75,043; Alabama, 74,678; Virginia, 73,062; North Carolina, 73,003; 



24 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

Louisiana, ()5,988 ; Kansas, (53,428; Arkansas, 61,027; West Virginia, 5.j,777 ; Miss- 
issippi, 54,295 ; South Carolina 53,482 ; Connecticut, 50,069 ; Nebraska, 47,805 ; Mary- 
land, 47,054; Washington, 45,154; Montana, 36,293; Colorado, 34,393; Florida, 
33,331; Oregon, 30,116; South Dakota, 29,686; North Dakota, 25,803; Maine, 24,252 
Idaho, 19,016; Utah, 17,361; Rhode Island, 16,868; District of Columbia, 15,980 
New Hampshire, 14.374 ; New Mexico, 12,439 ; Wyoming, 11,393 ; xA.rizona, 10,492 
Vermont, 9,338; Delaware, 7,484; Nevada, 5,105. 

The total of 3,575,624 included also 16,538 from Porto Rico, 5,644 from 
Hawaii, 2,102 from Alaska, 255 from the Philippines, 1,318 not allocated and 1,499 
credited to the American Expeditionary Forces comprising men who joined the 
army in Europe. 



The Yankee Division Cemetery 



The peasant children pass it as they leave the village school, 

The pious strangers cross themselves along the road to Toul ; 

The captains call attention as the dusty troops plod by, 

The officers salute it, though receiving no reply ; 

'Tis a spot all brown and barren, 'mid the poppies in the grain,— 

The Y. D. cemetery by a roadside in Lorraine. 

A row of wooden crosses and beneath the upturned sod 
The hearts once wild and restless now know the peace of God. 
The brave young lads who left us while life was at its flood. 
While life was fresh and joyous and fire was in the blood, — 
Their young lives now enfranchised from mirth or joy or pain, 
They sleep the sleep eternal by a road side in Lorraine. 

Of all the myriad places for the dead of man to rest, 

The graveyard of the warrior for a freeman is the best ; 

Oh ! not for them our pity, but far across the foam, 

For the graj^-haired mother, weeping in some New England home, 

'Tis she who has our pity, 'tis she who feels the pain 

Of the Y. D. cemetery by a roadside in Lorraine. 

The plodding columns pass them along the old Toul road ; 
New companies come marching where yesterday they strode; 
Above the whirr of motors, — beyond the roar of guns 
Where their allies and their brothers join battle with the Huns; 
And the sunlight of their glory bursts through the clouds and rain 
O'er the Y. D. cemetery by a roadside in Lorraine. 

"Tex Cavitt. 





COAIPAXV D, LEAVING FOR MEXICAN BORDER, l'. 



HOLYOKE'S OWN COMPANY D 



^^I^IIA'HILE Company D, 104th Infantry, First Battalion, 52d Brigade, of the fa- 
^tltl mous 26th Division, was called out on the day the United States entered 
* * the war, its history as a part of the Yankee Division does not start until 
it was reorganized at Camp Bartlett, Hampton Plains, in September of 
1917. From the date of the mobilization of the Second Massachusetts Regiment, 
of which "Holyoke's Own" was then a part, until the reorganization, the local com- 
pany did its share in guarding bridges and power plants in this state, keeping guard 
at the Arsenal in Springfield, and finally establishing a record at Camp Bartlett. 
It was the last company in the Second Regiment to arrive at the concentration 
camp and was one of the last to leave. It was looked up to for its efficiency, and 
was credited with being one of the best officered outfits in the camp. 

On October 4 the local company pulled out of Camp Bartlett on a special train 
and the following day arrived in Montreal. There the men went on board the S. S. 
Scotian, a British transport, and went to Halifax. There luck was against them; 
for they missed their convoy and had to wait four days. This was galling to the 
boys, who were anxious to go over. Finally the start was made, and for seven 
days Company D was at sea. 

Arriving in Liverpool, England, on October 17, Company D entrained for a 
camp outside of Southampton. One of the members of the company wrote that "It 
was here we had our first baptism of foreign mud." 

Company D was in England but four days when it boarded the S. S. Archangel, 
considered one of the fastest transports, and which formerly was one of Sir 
Thomas Lipton's pleasure boats, going to France. The port of Le Harve, France, 
was the destination of the local outfit. There the boys remained a day and boarded 
a train of box cars, "Forty Men and Eight Horses." For three days and two nights 
they traveled, and arrived at Harrenville, a province of Houte Marne. The first 
training camp in France, where the local boys were stationed was at the village of 
Sartes, which they reached by marching eight kilometers. 

Here Compan}- D remained over Thanksgiving and Christmas, and on February 
6, 1918, to March 21, they went into the Chemin-des-dames sector, it being the first 
trip to the lines by the local boys. Then followed a four days' hike to a rest camp 
at Rimaucourt. But "Holyoke's Own" did not rest, for orders came for an im- 
mediate return to the lines. On Easter Sunday Company D took to its trucks and 
rushed for the front, and arrived in front of Apremont at 2.30 o'clock on April 2. 
They held that sector and a sector to the right of it, in front of Montsec, for three 
months. It was a "quiet" three months, with occasional artillery offensives, trench 
raids, patrol encounters, mustard gas, and some casualties. Four Holyoke boys in 
the company were killed on June 16. They were Corporal John J. Kelly, Corporal 
George Tremblay, Musician Alfred S. Anderson and Private Louis M. Croteau. 

From there the company took over the sector at Belleau Wood, where the com- 
pany suffered some more casualties, and at the fighting at Chateau-Thierry, in the 
second battle of the Marne, Company D lost, in one day (July 22, 1918), five more 



28 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

Holyoke men, Corporal Frank J. Aloynihan, Corporal Jeremiah F. Sullivan, Priv- 
ates Joseph L. Fineni, Arthur W. Fleming and Howard J. Sullivan. The day be- 
fore. Private Harold W. Martin gave his all. Also in the same month of July the 
company lost Sergeant Douglas Urquhart, Bugler Leon F. Burgess, and Privates 
John Lambert and Frank E. Snj^der, in addition to several men who were taken 
prisoners by the Gerjnans. At Chateau-Thierry a few men fell into the enemy's 
hands but were rescued by a Pennsylvania outfit. 

At Belleau Wood the local company took part in a hot battle that while short, 
was intense, driving the Hun back in the town of Bouscrebe. 

After the fighting at Chateau-Thierry Company D was sent back of the lines 
for replacements and to rest up. There were but a few of the original company of 
250 men that left Camp Bartlett nine months before. Those who were not killed 
were in hospitals, v/ounded, gassed or shell-shocked ; some were prisoners in Ger- 
man camps, and others were "missing." 

Then came the St. Alihiel drive. Company D went into the fight on September 
11, and went over the top on the ]2th. On that day they took the town of St. 
Maurice, after advancing five miles in thirty hours. Sergeant Robert W. Gorham 
and Sergeant Raymond B. Thomson, both leading detachments, were killed in ac- 
tion on the 12th. After the St. Mihiel offensive, the local company, which, by this 
time had but a very few men from this city in its ranks, took part in the fighting 
north of Verdun, arriving there the 13th of October, and going over the top three 
times the following day. They remained in this sector until the signing of the 
armistice brought a cessation of hostilities. It was in this sector that Private Wil- 
liam Pueschel lost his life, and Sergeant William B. Craven succumbed to 
pneumonia. 

Outside of the casualties Company D suffered other blows — the loss of its offi- 
cers. It is a matter of record that out of the original company of 1.50 men from 
Holyoke and vicinity, which answered the country's call in April, 1917, there re- 
mained, at the time of the signing of the armistice, but i:i in the ranks. The rest 
had been either killed, transferred or were in hospitals recovering from wounds, 
gas or shell-shock. 

The officer personnel of Company D originally was as follows : Captain Ed- 
mund J. Slate, First Lieutenant Wallace A. Choquette and Second Lieutenant Don- 
ald B. Logan. The other officers, transferred to the company at Camp Bartlett 
when the unit v,^as filled to the new war-strength of a captain, five lieutenants and 
2.50 men, were Lieutenant George H. Weir of Fitchburg, Lieutenant William M. 
Brigham, Jr., of Marlboro, and Lieutenant F. Gardner Blaisdell of Brookline. 

Lieutenant Logan was the first to go— being transferred to the intelligence de- 
partment. Captain Slate was next, being put in charge of the supply outfit of the 
regiment. Lieutenant Choquette was transferred to the tank service; Lieutenant 
Brigham was killed in action at Chateau-Thierry; Lieutenant Blaisdell was 
wounded severely in action at Chateau-Thierry, and never returned to the com- 
pany, and Lieutenant Weir was transferred to the disciplinarian camp. Lieutenant 
Thomas Shea of Springfield, who was transferred to the local outfit in France, 
was taken prisoner by the enemy. Another officer, a Lieutenant Roth, who also 
joined the company in France, was wounded in action. Lieutenant Paul DeVerter 
of Virginia was for some time in command of the Holyoke company. 

lyu _ _"WI 




COMPANY D PASSING IN REVIE^^^ 1-ARE\VELL PARADE. 




C( ).\li' \.\A h l.\ I- AkM-.W l-.l.:, 1' ARADE. 



Camp Bartlett^ Hampton Plains 



CAMP BARTLETT, during the summer and early fall of 1917, was an inter- 
esting spot. At one time there were over 15,000 men there, before the 103d 
and 10-ith Infantries, part of the 52d Brigade oi the 26th Division, left for 
France. It was here that Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and Massachu- 
setts regiments lost their identities. Among them being regiments that served 
in the Spanish-American War and on the Mexican Border. Many of the officers 
of the 26th Division, who won fame on the battlefields of France were at one time 
or another at the concentration camp on Hampton Plains. The history of the camp 
from August 16 to November 22, 1917, is given as follows : 

August 16, 1917 — Brigadier General Charles H. Cole paid a surprise visit to 
Holyoke and inspected Camp Bartlett, Hampton Plains. 

August 17 — The War Department announced that four Massachusetts regi- 
ments were to be brigaded together, forming the 52d Brigade, in command of 
General Cole. 

August 18 — Second Battalion of Second Massachusetts Regiment started for 
Camp Bartlett from Greenfield in charge of Major Beckman of Northampton; de- 
tail of fifteen men broke ground and started laying water mains. 

August 19 — Brigadier General Cole assumed command. 

August 20 — Second Maine Regiment and First Battalion, Second Massachusetts, 
arrived in camp ; Holyoke and Chicopee. police believed soldiers operating a stolen 
automobile killed Willimansett man. 

August 21 — Rhode Island Cavalry arrived; Lee H. Brow in charge of Maine 
Y. M. C. A. tent; Provost Guard established in Holyoke. 

August 22 — Eighth Massachusetts Regiment, after sleeping in trains all night, 
marched into camp, followed shortly after by another troop of Rhode Island 
Cavalry. 

August 23 — First New Hampshire and First Vermont Infantries arrived, and 
the Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and Rhode Island troops were amalgamated 
into the 103d United States Infantry; six companies of the Eighth Massachusetts 
arrived in Springfield to relieve Major Alfred F. Foote's 3rd Battalion. 

August 24 — Third Battalion, Second Massachusetts Infantry, which included 
Company D of Holyoke, arrived in camp after an eleven-mile hike from Spring- 
field ; the 103rd Machine Gun Battalion formed ; sanitary inspection found every- 
thing in good condition. 

August 25 — Major Foote officer of the day; Divisional Supply Train reor- 
ganized under the command of Captain David G. Arnold. 

August 26 — Nearly 100,000 visitors at the first review of the 52d Brigade; 1st 
Maine Heavy Artillery arrived ; General Cole moved his headquarters ; several 
hundred more 1st Vermonters arrived with Field Bakery Company No. 16, U. S. A., 
from Gettysburg, Pa.; Major Foote relieved of his command and assumed special 
duties as road inspector. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 31 

August 27 — Detachment of Coast Artillery Corps arrived. Governor Milliken 
of Maine and Governor Keyes of New Hampshire inspected 103d Infantry; Major- 
General Clarence R. Edwards present at inspection. 

August 28 — Two troops of United States Cavalry from Fort Ethan Allen, Vt., 
arrived in camp ; transportation problems discussed by camp officials and Holyoke 
men. 

August 29 — Sixth Massachusetts Regiment arrived in camp; Major-General 
Edwards praised Camp Bartlett. 

August 30— Governor Samuel W. McCall bade farewell to 104th Infantry at 
the first review of the Massachusetts boys, and the second in the camp; 96 men 
from 6th Regiment assigned to Company D of Holyoke, two lieutenants included 
in this number; Lieutenant Joseph W. O'Connor, 9th Massachusetts Infantry, ap- 
pointed brigadier-adjutant to General Cole; newspapermen guests of General Cole 
at noon mess ; 8th Massachusetts Regiment again arrived in camp after special de- 
tail in Springfield; Company M of 6th Massachusetts Regiment arrived in camp. 

August 31 — David M. Osborne, son of Thomas Mott Osborne, enlisted at Camp 
Bartlett; General Cole discovered owners of Camp Bartlett; Rt. Rev. Thomas D. 
Beaven, Bishop of Springfield, visited the camp ; examination of officers started. 

September 1 — About 7,000 soldiers given 36-hour leaves of absence ; balance of 
the 1st New Hampshire Infantry and Signal Corps, 700 men, arrived; ten Platts- 
burg men among them, Lieutenant Mahlon T. Hill, formerly a corporal in Com- 
pany D, and Lieutenant Herbert C. Coar, nephew of Rev. A. H. Coar of Holyoke. 
arrived ; Sergeant John F. Green of Springfield killed in an auto accident. 

September 3 — Sporting events cheered soldiers on Labor Day; Brigadier Gen- 
eral E. Leroy Sweetser, commander of the Depot Brigade, visited General Cole. 

September 4 — Governor R. L. Beekman reviewed Rhode Island troops ; 700 
men arrived from Fort Ethan Allen with detachment of regulars of the Quarter- 
master Corps from Boston ; two Plattsburg lieutenants assigned to Company D, 
Holyoke. 

September 5 — Rev. George S. L. Connor assigned to Brigade Headquarters as 
the guest of General Cole ; Colonel Sweetser's military police arrived. 

September 6 — One battery from 1st Maine Heavy Artillery ordered to Box- 
ford ; more Plattsburg officers arrived ; sanitary detachment from 1st Vermont 
Infantry ordered to Framingham. 

September 7 — Sergeant George T. Mack, of Fitchburg, 6th Massachusetts Regi- 
ment, committed suicide ; General Cole gave Father Connor permission to erect an 
altar on parade grounds ; first military wedding took place in camp ; General Cole 
guest at a banquet in Springfield. 

September 8 — First accident to a civilian took place at the camp ; General Cole 
guest at banquet in Holyoke ; 103rd Infantryman, classed as a deserter, found dead 
in the woods in Salisbury, N. H. 

September 9 — Bishop Lawrence spoke to the men at the camp ; Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor Calvin Coolidge. with a party of friends, witnessed baseball games and other 
sports ; 20,000 persons watched the 104th Infantry's guard mount and evening 
parade. 

September 10 — Maine soldiers cast ballots in the Maine Special Election, wo- 
man suffrage being among the amendments ; every state in New England repre- 
sented when the Connecticut Signal Corps troops arrived; the first measles cases 
reported. 

September 11 — Maine Artillery men received their first pay; field hospital es- 
tablished in the Depot Brigade; first camp summary court martial held, at which 



32 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

300 cases were disposed of; the hftli V. M. C. A. tent erected; four field kitchens 
arrived ; vote of the Maine men announced, with 391 for and 610 against suffrage. 

September 12— Company D of Holyoke did regimental guard duty; another 
Plattsburg lieutenant assigned to Company D ; war marriages become popular at 
the camp; two captains in the 104th rejected for physical disability; supply depots 
established at Westfield. 

September 13 — The 104th Infantry, composed of men of the 2nd, 6th and 8th 
Massachusetts Regiments, marched in a big farewell parade in Springfield ; Gen- 
eral Cole explained that Holyoke was not on the "blacklist": in4th Infantry had a 
payday. 

September 14 — Major Watson of the 1st Vermont named head of the Supply 
Train ; Chaplain Danker bought footballs for the men of the 104th. 

September 15 — Maine soldiers fought a forest fire that threatened the entire 
camp ; .5,000 men granted 36-hour leaves of absence ; General Cole made arrange- 
ments with the Boston & Albany to run special trains to and from Boston. 

September 16 — The Holyoke Street Railway Company promised to furnish ade- 
quate transportation for the soldiers ; plans made for farewell celebration for 
Company D. 

September 17 — Major Foote was named acting lieutenant-colonel of the 104th 
Infantry; eleven Plattsburg men were sent to Boxf ord ; Isolation Hospital estab- 
lished in rear of Brigade Headquarters ; Lieutenant-Colonel Edwin R. Gray and 
Major Albert G. Beckman transferred to the Depot Brigade in big shakeup among 
the officers of the 104th Infantry. 

September IcS — Seven hundred men of the 103d and 104th Infantries absent 
without leave ; first instructions given in bomb throwing. 

September 19 — Thousands witnessed farewell to Company D in Holyoke ; Hol- 
yoke adopted the new men assigned to "Hblyoke's Own" ; parade viewed bj- Gov- 
ernor McCall, General Cole, Colonel Hayes and otlier officers and prominent men ; 
following the parade there was a military drill on the Maple Street playground ; in 
the evening a banquet was tended officers and men at the Nonotuck ; 400 National 
Army men from Camp Devens arrived at Camp Bartlett. 

September 20 — First authentic word received that Camp Bartlett was not to 
he a permanent cantonment. 

September 21 — One hundred and tliird Infantry fully equipped; Major W. E. 
Blandford succeeded Major Joseph S. Hart as Divisional Surgeon; twenty-eight 
Holyoke women went to Maine Y. M. C. A. tent to sew for soldiers ; General Cole 
announced several changes in officer personnel ; Divisional Inspection Officers from 
the Northwestern Department surveyed Camp Bartlett. 

September 22 — Two hundred members of the military police left camp to 
round up deserters and men absent without leave. 

September 23— Major W. H. Dolan of the 6th Massachusetts placed in com- 
mand of Divisional Military Police Train, relieving Colonel Loring E. Sweetser, 
who went to the Military Hospital in New Mexico for treatment; Major Foote re- 
lieved of road building duties. 

September 24 — Commanders of the 104th busy assigning drafted men ; Com- 
pany D drew twenty foreigners ; General Cole received word from War Depart- 
ment to immediately start erecting a wooden building to be used as a hospital ; 
first cold weather at the camp; ice formed in the water pails. 

September 2.'5 — Non-commissioned officers of Company D received promotions ; 
only twenty-seven enlisted men left in the 8th Massachusetts. 

September 26 — Brigadier General E. Leroy Sweetser formally took over com- 
mand of Camp Bartlett ; General Cole started on his trip to France. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 33 

September 27 — Colonel Arthur T. Ballentine of the 1st Maine Heavy Artillery 
named acting camp commander in absence of General Sweetser, who kept his head- 
quarters in Boston ; Camp Bartlett was declared free from all evils generally found 
around a military camp. 

September 28— Colonel Ballentine issued an ultimatum to the owners of squat- 
ter shacks to close up or be hailed into P"ederal court; athletic committee was 
named for Company D; Boston newspapermen discovered that General Cole had 
been secretly married ten years before. 

September 29 — Field instruction given at the camp. 

September 30 — Major E. W. Gates, who was in charge of the base hospital, 
resigned. 

October 1 — Company D divided into four platoons; Major Edward S. Moulton 
took charge of the camp hospital; Captain B. S. Munyan, Company G, 104t]i In- 
fantry, discharged. 

October 2 — Squatters opened up in defiance of orders from Colonel Ballentine, 
but closed in a hurry when armed guards were sent to enforce the orders; the 103d 
Infantry announced on its way to France. 

October 3 — Mess sergeants ordered to buy their meat through the camp quar- 
termaster. 

October 4 — Company D left camp; nine more drafted men assigned to "Hol- 
yoke's Own" before it left. 

October 5 — Thirteen prisoners discharged from bull pen following Colonel Bal- 
lentine's work of weeding out the minor offenders. 

October 6 — The soldiers received the world series' scores over direct wire ; 
Colonel Perry of the 8th Massachusetts named acting camp commander. 

October 7 — Lieutenant Boscone of the French Army arrived at the camp to 
instruct in art of trench building, bomb and hand grenade throwing and other fine 
points of French method of warfare; eighty-five men from sanitary department at 
Fort Ethan Allen arrived and assigned to the camp hospital. 

October 8 — Second Lieuteuant Emil Dufresne of Marlboro committed sui- 
cide, the second in camp. 

October 9 — Word received that General Cole had arrived in France; 100 
picked men attended a lect&re given by Lieutenant Boscone of the French Army; 
Rev. George S. L. Connor commissioned a chaplain in the United States Army with 
the rank of first lieutenant. 

October 10 — Captain Harry Eastman, acting camp quartermaster, injured in an 
suto accident; Brigadier General Sweetser believed War Department would send 
enough men to Camp Bartlett to fill the Depot Brigade. 

October 11 — Two negro companies arrived ; all outdoor work under the French 
instructor postponed because of weather; the Liberty Loan drive opened. 

October 12 — The 1st Maine Heavy Field Artillery football team went to Port- 
land, Me., to play the University of Maine; the Depot Brigade had another pay- 
day. 

October 13 — It was announced that $36,.j00 had been pledged in the Liberty 
Loan drive on the second day; several deaths from pneumonia. 

October 14 — Colored troopers fought a night fire at the camp when a Y. M. 
C. A. tent blazed up ; fire discovered by a sentinel, who sounded the alarm ; word 
received that the 103d Infantry had arrived in France; 1st Maine "Heavies" de- 
feated the University of Maine. 

October 15 — Liberty Loan quota reached $42,000; Colonel Perry started re- 
cruiting the 8th Massachusetts; the 104th Infantry reported overseas. 

3 



34 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

October 16 — Governor McCall reviewed the troops at Camp Bartlett and talked 
on the Liberty Loan ; Rev. Paul Dwight Moody appointed a chaplain of the Depot 
Brigade. 

October 17 — ^Work started on the amalgamation of five bands into the largest 
military band in the world. 

October 18— The $70,000 goal reached in the Liberty Loan drive. 

October 19 — Liberty Loan total over $90,000; six companies had a record of 
100 per cent; United States District Court refused the petition of a Maine lawyer 
for his release from the army. 

October 20 — The 1st Maine "Heavies" left for Boston to play the Harvard In- 
f ormals ; the total for the Liberty Loan amounted to $111,000; Colonel Ballentine 
gave permission for the Maine "Heavies" to play the St. Aloysius of Holyoke for 
the benefit of the Red Cross ; in the absence of all other commanding officers 
Major O. E. Cain of the 1st New Hampshire was camp commander. 

October 31 — Several Maine soldiers married while the "Heavies" were in 
Maine ; only a few patients in isolation camp ; Harvard defeated the "Heavies," 
13-0. 

October 32 — One hundred and thirty-two thousand, five hundred dollars raised 
in the Liberty Loan drive; Catholic soldiers forced to go to Westfield to attend 
mass, there being no Catholic chaplain left in the camp ; Brigadier General John A. 
Johnston, commander of the Northeastern Department, visited the camp. 

October 33 — Colonel Perry of the 8th Massachusetts received thirty-two new 
recruits ; a fire in the isolation camp was beyond control until the arrival of the 
colored troops ; figures on this date for the Liberty Loan were $141,000. 

October 24 — Rain prevented athletic events scheduled for Libertv' Loan Day at 
the camp; Major Edward Moulton received his discharge. 

October 25 — Plans formulated for a big game in Holyoke ; heavy wind blew 
down fifty squad tents, the Holyoke hospitality tent; the camp quartermaster's tent 
and the storehouse tent at Brigade Headquarters ; high water flooded out the stove 
fires in the tents ; the amount subscribed for Liberty Loan reached $166,000. 

October 36 — Colonel Perry of the 8th gained eighteen more recruits ; rumored 
that the Depot Brigade would be assigned to a divig^on which would be led by 
Colonel Roosevelt. 

October 27— The final Liberty Loan figures were $177,000 ; three-fourths of the 
men in camp subscribed and the 1st New Hampshire Infantry led ; the "Heavies" 
defeated the St. Aloysius, 19-6 ; $1,200 cleared for the Red Cross ; official reports 
announced that the 104th Infantry had arrived in France. 

October 28 — Six soldiers moved into the new camp hospital ; several pneumonia 
cases as a result of rainy weather; Holyoke hospitality tent moved into winter 
quarters, a wooden building had been provided by the camp commander; second 
wind storm swept the tents down while soliders slept ; isolation hospital closed, as 
there were no contagious or infectious diseases in camp; two soldiers died of 
pneumonia; the 8th Massachusetts received 100 new recruits. 

October 30 — University of Maine men in camp held reunion with fifteen 
present. 

October 31 — Two deserters who broke out of the bull pen at Camp Bartlett, 
captured at Gardner; Holyoke City Hospital offered use of a ward in case of an- 
other outbreak of measles ; drilling resumed. 

November 1 — First real cold weather ; ice formed in the water pails a half inch 
thick; four soldiers filed marriage intentions at Westfield. 

November 2 — All extra tents stored in the warehouse at Westfield. ' 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 35 

November 3— Colonel Perry asked War Department how long the troops would 
be kept at Hampton Plains. 

November 4 — The deserters who were captured at Gardner a few days previous 

again broke out of the bull pen ; members of the prison guard were placed under 

arrest; a few hours after escape a house was broken into in Westfield; the 1st 

Maine "Heavies" started on a twenty-mile hike; Colonel Michael J. Healey of the 

' 1st New Hampshire acting camp commander. 

November 5 — Members of the 8th Massachusetts Regiment started rifle and 
revolver practice on a new seventy-five foot range ; this was the first range work at 
the camp. 

November 6 — ^Confidential orders were received as to when the troops would 
leave Camp Bartlett; inspection officers from the Northeastern Department super- 
vised the removal of the depot storehouse from the camp. 

November 7 — The Depot" Brigade took part in a sham battle; less than 2,500 
men left in camp, according to official figures, as compared with over 15,000 less 
than a month before. 

November 8 — The 1st New Hampshire Infantry organized into the 1st Pioneer 
Infantry, and ordered to Camp Greene, Charlotte, N. C. ; high military officials in 
the camp announced that Hampton Plains could be deserted in five hours' notice; 
men received instructions as to War Risks Insurance. 

November 9 — Reported the United States Government was negotiating with 
the owners of Hampton Plains for lease during the period of the war; military 
police captured deserters who broke out of the bull pen; Captain William G. Pond 
named judge advocate for a general court martial. 

November 10— Brigadier General Sweetser transferred 10 officers to the Pio- 
neer Regiment. 

Novmber 11— First general court martial took place at the camp; ten soldiers 
tried ; results kept secret. 

November 12 — Orders to leave Camp Bartlett as soon as possible received by 
Acting Commander Ballentine. 

November 13 — The 1st Maine "Heavies" started to break camp ; General Sweet- 
ser was named camp commander of Camp Greene, N. C, where the troops from 
Camp Bartlett went. 

November 14 — Major Duncan M. Stewart, Provost Marshal, ordered to proceed 
to Norfolk, Va., with the casuals left behind by the 103d and 104th Infantries. 

November 15 — Two ex-officers of the 8th Massachusetts rejoined their com- 
mands as privates. 

November 16 — The 1st Maine "Heavies" entrained for Camp Greene; provost 
guard members arrested two bootleggers; Colonel Perry gave away ten cords of 
•wood. 

November 17 — Railroad facilities delay troops in leaving for the south; negro 
troops dug up water pipes on the deserted sites. 

November 18— A large crowd of visitors present on the farewell Sunday; offi- 
cers auctioned off their autos which they were unable to take away with them ; 
reported that the Maine "Heavies" had reached Camp Greene; the 6th Massachu- 
setts and the 1st New Hampshire troops left camp and were followed by the Con- 
necticut and New Hampshire Signal Corps. 

November 19— Lieutenant-Colonel N. B. Perkins in command of the quarter- 
master department at the camp; 8th Massachusetts Regiment left the camp. 

November 20 — Prisoners in the bull pen were ordered to tear down the stock- 
ade; the 1st Vermont Regiment aided the negroes in clearing up the camp site. 



36 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

November 21 — First Vermont Infantry and two companies of negro soldiers 
left the camp. 

November 22 — The Medical Unit was abandoned in camp; a detail cf seventeen 
men unable to move because of the loss of orders. 

November 23 — The Medical men left the camp ; Camp Bartlett closed. 




COMPANY D AT CAMP BARTLETT. 



Disease Death Rate Low 

Battle death rate in the American Army during the war exceeded the death 
rate from disease, General March announced in making public statistics prepared 
by the General Staff. In past wars disease killed many more men than lost their 
lives under fire. 

The battle death rate for the entire American Army in the war was 20 per 
1,000 per year. In the expeditionary forces it was 57 per 1,000 per year. The 
disease death rate was 17 per 1,000 per year in the expeditionary forces and 16 in 
the army at home. 

The battle death rate in the British Expeditionary Forces was 110 per 1,000 
per year. 

General March said that the lower death rate from disease undoubtedly was 
due largely to the inoculation requirement of the army, and, secondly, to the effi- 
cient work of the Medical Corps. But for the influenza epidemic, he said, the 
disease rate would have been cut in half. 

The table of comparative battle and disease death rates per thousand per 
.year for wars in which the United States has engaged since the War of 1812, 
follows : 

Battle Disease 

Mexican War 15 110 

Civil War (North) 33 65 

Spanish War 5 26 

Present War ( A. E. F.) 57 17 



Chronology of President Wilson^s Life 



1856 — December :38 — T. Woodrow Wilson, teacher, jurist, historian, President and 
statesman, was born in Staunton, Va., son of Rev. Joseph Ruggles and Jessie 
(Woodrow) Wilson; Scotch-Irish old pioneer stock. 

Boyhood spent in the South, chiefly in Georgia and South Carolina. Was 
not taught his letters until he was 9. Attended private schools, but was al- 
ways instructed by his father as well. Made weekly trips to manufacturing 
and mercantile plants with his father. 

1873 — Entered Davidson, N. C, College, a Presbyterian institution, where students 
did their own chores. Joined the' Literary Society. Played oiv ball team and 

was told he would be a good player if he was not so d n'lazy. Became 

known as Woodrow, rather than as Thomas Wilson. Left in fall, ill from 
too rapid growth. 

1875 — September — Entered Princeton, then known as the College of New Jersey. 
Was even then a democrat of stout opinions, and a leader of his class. 
Reading the Gentleman's Alagazine, Lucy articles on the British Parliament, 
he decided upon a public career, and specialized in studies for that purpose. 

1879 — August — He wrote for the International Review an essay contrasting Amer- 
ican and British systems of government, arraigning practice in Congress of 
doing all important work in secret committee session, and maintaining that 
in secrecy corruption flourishes. 

1879 — Was graduated from Princeton with degree of A. B. Returned to his native 
state, taking the law course in the University of Virginia, and passing bar 
/examinations in 1882. 

1882 — May — Went to Atlanta, as a growing city, and formed law partnership with 
Edward Ireland Renick, at 48 Marietta street. In eighteen months they 
never had a client. Began to write a book, "Congressional Government." 

1883 — Met Ellen Louise Axson, at Rome, Ga., whom he had known as a child. 
Had met her 11 times when he secured her promise to be his wife. Had no 
idea of immediate marriage. 

1884 — Entered Johns Hopkins University to study science of government. In his 
second year he was the holder of the Historical Fellowship. 

1885 — Published his book, "Congressional Government." It was a big success. Ac- 
cepted associate chair in History and Political Economy at Bryn Mawr. 

1.'*8.5 — June 24 — ^Was married to Ellen Louise Axson, at her grandfather's home in 
Savannah. That autumn lived at Main Line, near Philadelphia. 

1886 — June — Took his Ph. D. degree, Johns Hopkins University accepting his book 
as a thesis. In the third year at Bryn Mawr he also gave twenty-five lectures 
at Johns Hopkins. 

JS87 — Received honorary degree of LL. D. from Wake Forest College. 

1888 — Professor Wilson accepted the chair of History and Political Economy at 
Wesleyan Universitj^ and continued his lectures at Johns Hopkins. Lectured 
throughout New England. 

1890 — Chair of Jurisprudence and Politics at Princeton University was accepted by 
him. Became a great favorite as a lecturer. 

1890-1892 — Grew in popularity and power at Princeton. Wrote four new books. 
Lectured all over the country. 

lS98--Degree of LL. D. awarded him by Tulare University; 1901 by Johns Hop- 
kins University; 1902 by Rutgers University. 

1902 — Chosen president of Princeton University, Degree of LL. D. awarded by 
Universitj^ of Pennsylvania in 1903 ; by Brown University in 1903 ; by Harv- 
ard University in 1907, and honorary degree of Litt D. conferred by Yale 
University in 1901. 

1907— After forcing many reforms at Princeton, he created a big storm by his 
"quad" proposition for the social and intellectual co-ordination of the uni- 



38 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

versity. The boldness of his views brought him into national fame as a 
reformer. 

1910 — Was given the Democratic nomination for Governor of New Jersey. 

1911 — November 8 — Elected Governor of New Jersey, swinging 66,000 votes to win. 
He worked out and carried through many reforms in that State Government. 
He always carried his fights to the people and won public confidence. He be- 
came a national figure. 

1911 — Was nominated by the Democratic National Convention for the presidency, 
on the 46th ballot, over Champ Clark. 

1912 — Elected President of the United States, with 6,291,776 votes, to Roosevelt's 
4,106,247, and Taft's 3,481,119. He was the first Democratic President elected 
since Cleveland, in 1897. 

1914 — March 5 — Urged the repeal of toll exemption clause of the Panama Canal 
Act, and it was repealed March 31. 

1914 — April 21 — Ordered the landing of United States Naval forces at Vera Cruz 
and the seizure of the Custom House, because the American flag had not 
been saluted after it had been insulted at Tampico, April 13. 

1914 — August 6 — Death of Mrs. Wilson. 

1914 — August 28 — By Presidential order the Panama Canal was opened to traffic. 

1915 — February 10 — President warned Germany she would be held accountable for 
American sufferings due to U-boat policy. 

1915 — May 13 — Sent a note protesting the sinking of the Lusitania. 

1915 — December 3 — President demanded Germany recall Captains Boy-Ed and Von 
Papen. 

1915 — December 18 — President was married to Mrs. Edith Boiling Gait of Wash- 
ington, D. C, a descendant of Pocahontas. 

1916 — March 15 — President sent General Pershing and 6,000 troops into Mexico to 
pursue Villa. 

1916 — April 19 — American note sent to Germany warning her that unless U-boat 
activity against merchant vessels was stopped United States would sever 
relations. 

1916 — June 18 — President called out militia or forty-five states for service on the 
Mexican border. 

1916 — November 7 — President was re-elected. 

1916 — November 14 — United States protested deportation of Belgians. 

3916 — December 12 — President requested warring nations to define their terms for 
a lasting peace. Germany replied in general terms only. 

1917 — February 1 — Germany declared a war zone about British Isles, and gave or- 
ders that one American vessel a week would be allowed to enter Falmouth, if 
painted according to instructions. 

1917 — February 3 — Count Von Bernstorff, German Ambassador, was dismissed by 
order of President Wilson, and Ambassador Gerard was recalled from Ber- 
lin. German ships here seized. 

1917 — February 27 — President asked Congress for permission to arm American 
ships to pursue a policy of armed neutrality. 

1918 — January 8 — Announcement by President Wilson of war aims based on repar- 
ation and restoration to invaded nations (the famous 14 points). Draft law 
had been upheld by United States Supreme Court the day prior. 

1918 — September 6 — President Wilson replied to the Austria-Hungarian note in- 
viting Allies to a confidential discussion of the basic principles for the con- 
clusion of a peace, that the United States would entertain no proposals for 
a conference, where the position of this country had been made so plain. 

1918 — September 30 — Urged upon the United States Senate the granting of the 
franchise to women. 

1918— October 15 — President Wilson informed Germany that peace or an armistice 
could not come while Germany's crimes continued or the Kaiser ruled. 

1918— October 28— Austria accepted Wilson's conditions and asked for an imme- 
diate and separate peace. November 3, Austria accepted the terms and quit 
the war. ... 

1918— November 5— President sent another note to Germany, msistmg on terms 
previously submitted to her for the Allies. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 39 

1918 — November 7 — Word received here that Germany accepted Allied terms. 

1918 — November 11 — Armistice terms signed, after United States had been in the 
war eighteen months, and had expended $18,000,000,000, and the Allies over 
$123,400,000,000. 

1918— December 4— Left Washington, D. C, at 12.30 a. m. for New York, to sail 
for Europe. United States Senators on the day prior severely criticised his 
decision to attend the Peace Conference. 

1918 — December 4 — President and Mrs. Wilson sailed from New York on steamship 
George Washington. 

1918 — December 13 — Arrived at Brest at 3.15 p. m. — escorted by 10 American, 5 
French and 1 Italian battleships and 29 destroyers thundering salutes, while 
airships droned aloft. Received spectacular welcome from people and 40,000 
Allied troops. 

1918 — December 14 — Arrived in Paris, where the city went wild over him, and 
windows on the fourth floor of houses along the route of the procession sold 
for $10 each. Addressing a Socialist delegation, he said the aim in peace 
was for man's final emancipation. He attended church twice during the day. 

1918 — December 16 — Great gold medal of the City of Paris presented President 
Wilson at City Hall. Mrs. Wilson was presented a diamond brooch adorned 
with an enamel dove. 

1918 — December 21 — The University of Paris conferred the degree of doctor, 
Honoris Causa, in recognition of his work, the first time in the history of 
the Sorbonne that an honorary degree has been bestowed. 

1918 — December 25 — President and Mrs. Wilson, General Pershing and others 
dined with the 26th Division at Chaumont in an old hospital outside the city. 

1918 — December 26 — ^President and party arrived at Dover, Eng., escorted by a 
British and French fleet and many airships. Girls strewed his path with 
flowers. His party arrived in London in the afternoon, receiving a welcome 
such as no other person ever received. It was even more cordial than that 
he received in Paris. He was driven to Buckingham Palace, accompanied by 
the King, while Mrs. Wilson, rode next with the Queen. Their passage was 
one roaring ovation. 

1918 — December 31 — They left London at 9.18 a. m., with crowds lining the streets; 
went to Dover, and sailed for Calais at 11.20 a. m., arriving in Paris that 
night. 

1919 — January 1 — Started for Rome. January 3 he arrived in Rome, receiving a 
tremendous ovation, flowers being showered upon him and Mrs. Wilson from 
the windows. He was met by King Victor Emmanuel, the Queen, and high 
officials, and was escorted to the Quirinal. An official dinner was given by 
the King in the evening. He was made a citizen of Rome, and Mrs. Wilson 
was given a gold replica of the famed Romulus wolf. President Wilson 
spoke in favor of the freedom of the Balkans. 

1919 — January 4 — President Wilson visited Pope Benedict, at the Vatican. At 9 
p. m. he left for Paris, stopping at Genoa, Milan and Turin, and arriving at 
Paris January 7. 

1919 — January 13 — President's second request for $100,000,000 from this country for 
European food relief, passed by the House at Washington. D. C. 

1919 — January 18 — Peace Conference sessions open and President Wilson nominates 
Clemenceau as chairman. 

1919 — January 22 — President Wilson's policy in extending the hand of fellowship 
to Russia carries all before it in the Supreme Council. 

1919 — January 25 — Peace Conference adopts United States plan of a League of 
Nations, after address by Wilson, who is made chairman of its first com- 
mission. 

1919 — February 3 — President Wilson presides at opening conference of League of 
Nations Commission, and did the same on the following Evening. 

1919 — February 8 — Wilson's armistice proposal adopted. 

1919— February 13— Draft of League of Nations adopted; Wilson's plan being 
carried. 

1919 — February 14 — President Wilson reads draft of League to Peace Conference. 

1919 — February 15 — Sailed from Brest, with French and American naval escort, for 
Boston. 



HOLYOKE'S ROLL OF HONOR 



Cx\PTAIX. 

SMITH, JOSEPH W., lOStli Infantry, entered the regular army in lUlC). He 
went to the Mexican Border with a New ^'ork Regiment as a second lieutenant, 
vvon promotion to ihe rank of first lieutenant, and while in France won his cap- 
tain's bars. He was formerly a first lieutenant in Company D, :2d Massachusetts 
Regiment. Was killed in action in France, September 29, 1918. 

CHAPLAIN. 

DAVITT, REV. WILLIAM ¥., Chaplain of the 12.oth Infantry, entered the 
service in September, 1917, with the rank of first lieutenant. Cited for gallantry 
and meritorious conduct in action for leading a detachment to rescue surrounded 
group of comrades. Killed in action in France on November 11, 1918, one hour 
Ziud fifteen minutes before hostilities ceased. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

DAGENAIS, HOMER A., Quartermaster Corps, entered the service October 
28, 191(). Commissioned a second lieutenant at Camp Johnston, Ala., September 14, 
1918. Died of pneumonia at Syracuse, N. Y., October 4, 1918. Buried in Holyoke. 

HASTINGS, WOLCOTT B., Infantry, entered the servic? in August, 1917. 
Commissioned' a first lieutenant at Platts'burg, November, 1917, and assigned to 
Camp Dix. He was later transferred to Camp Gordon. Went overseas in August, 
1918. Killed in action in France, October 16, 1918. 

KINGSLAND, EDWIN R., Aviation, entered the service in April. 1917, after 
attending Plattsburg Cam]). Assigned to Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
and transferred to Canada, where he was assigned to British Royal Flying Corps. 
Transferred to Camp Hicks, Texas, where he received his first lieutenant's com- 
mission. Went overseas February, 1918, attached to 8th Aero Squadron. Killed in 
flying accident in France. August ;!1. 1918. 

?.IcNALLY, WILLIAM H., 20th Company, .ith Regiment of Marines, entered 
the service in 1909. Was a gunnery sergeant until after the fighting at Chateau- 
Thierry and Bois de Belleau, when he was decorated with the Croix de Guerre and 
recommended for a commission. He was cited for bravery and awarded the Dis- 
tinguished Service Medal. Killed in action in France on July 19, 1918, while lead- 
ing his battalion. 

PERRAULT, ARTHUR J., 3rd Aero Squadron, entered the service in June, 
1917, and was sent to Massachusetts Institute of Technology for preliminary train- 
ing. Received commission in September, 1917, and went to England in December, 
1917, being transferred to Royal Flying School at Paris. First "Holyoker to pilot 
a machine in France for United States Army. Killed in aeroplane accident in 
France, March 7, 1918. Board of Officers found death was in line of duty. 

WILRER, CHARLES R., I26th Infantry, entered the service in fall of 1917, 
going to officers' training school at Camp Upton, L. I. Received his commission in 
December, 1917, and went to France shortly after. Wounded severely in July, 1918. 
Killed in action September 29, 1918. 

SERGEANTS. 

CRAA^EN, AVILLIA^I B., Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service in 
April, 1917. Went to France as a private. Died of pneumonia in France, Novem- 
ber 9, 1918. 

GALLIVAN, DANIEL J., Company E, 14th Infantry, entered the service in 
1898. Served at the Mexican Border and at Panama Canal Zone. Died of heart 
disease at Fort George Wright, Washington, February 21, 1918. Buried in Holyoke. 




CHAPLAIN WILLIAM F. DAVITT. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 43 

GORHAM, ROBERT W., Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service in 
1912, with Company D of 2d Massachusetts Regiment. Served at Mexican Border 
in 1916. Killed in action in France, September 12, 1918. (St. Mihiel.) 

McNALLY, WILLlAxM J., Battery D, 7th Field Artillery. Entered the service 
on May 15, 1917. Was killed in air raid in France June 6, 1918, while on duty. 

SIARTIN, THOMAS P., Company A, First Engineers, entered the service De- 
cember 13, 1915. Was first Holyoke boy reported dead in France. Died of menin- 
gitis on February 23, 1918. 

MORIARTY, MICHAEL J., Company D, 57th Pioneer Infantry, entered the 
service in 1915. Served with Company D, 2d Massachusetts Regiment at Mexican 
Border in 1916. Transferred to First Vermont Infantry at Camp Bartlett. Went 
to Camp Greene, N. C, where his outfit was reorganized into a pioneer infantry. 
Died of disease in France, October 12, 1918. 

SERRITRIER, LOUIS, Pigeon Section, Signal Corps, entered the service Sep- 
tember 19, 1917, at Fort Wood, N. Y. Killed in motorcycle accident in France, 
October 15, 1918. 

SHEEHAN, JOHN F., Infantrj', entered the service in 1915. Killed in explo- 
sion accident at the Mexican Border, August 21, 1917, being the first Holyoke man 
to die in United States service in great war. Buried in Holyoke. 

THOMSON, RAYMOND B., Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service 
May 27, 1916, and served at the Mexican Border that year. Went overseas as a 
private. Killed in action in France, September 12, 1918. (St. Mihiel.) 

URQUHART, DOUGLAS, Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service in 
June, 1916. Went to Mexican Border with local command. Went overseas as a 
corporal. Died of wounds received in action in France, in July, 1918. (Chateau- 
Thierry.) 

WATTERS, JOHN A., Company K, 328th Infantry, entered the service Sep- 
tember 19, 1917. Went to Camp Devens ; transferred to Camp Gordon. Went 
overseas in July, 1918. Died of bronchial pneumonia in France, October 26, 1918. 

CORPORALS. 

AVERY, ALVAH E., Headquarters Company, 328th Infantry, entered the serv- 
ice in October, 1917. Went to Camp Devens and later transferred to Camp Gordon. 
Died in France of measles and pneumonia, October 17, 1918. 

BURNETT, ROBERT — Company E, 49th Infantry. 

Entered service April 23, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Merritt, N. J. ; went over- 
seas with American Expeditionary Forces ; returned after six months' foreign 
service; died of disease at the West Haven General Hospital, Military Hospital 
No. 16, March 20, 1919; buried in Holyoke. 

FITZGERALD, JAMES A., Company L, 23rd Infantry, entered the service 
March 28, 1917. Wounded in action, degree undetermined, October 4, 1918, and 
died of wounds two days later, October 6, in France. 

KELLY, JOHN J., Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service June 20, 
1916, and served on the Mexican Border that summer. Went overseas as a private. 
Killed in action June 16, 1918, while rescuing women in a French town that was be- 
ing shelled by Huns. 

KIRKPATRICK, JAMES J., Battery B, 12th Field Artillery, entered the serv- 
ice May 22, 1917, and was stationed at Fort Meyer, Va., before going_ overseas. 
Won corporal stripes "over there." Died of wounds received in action in France, 
June 22, 1918. 

McCarthy, JOHN F., Battery I, 19th Field Artillery, entered the service in 
April, 1917. Was for a time stationed at San Antonio, Texas, a member of "Red 
Ace" division. Killed in action in France, October 14, 1918. 

MANN, EDWARD LEO, Company L, 26th Infantry, entered the service De- 
cember 4, 1916, at Fort Slocum and was transferred to Arlington, Texas, and later 
to Kingston, Texas. Went overseas with first United States contingent. Promoted 
to corporal in France. Died of wounds received in action, July 22, 1918. 




LIEUT. ARTHUR J. PERRAULT LIEUT. WILLIAM McNALLY 




LIEUT. WALCOTT B. HASTINGS LIEUT. EDWIN R. KINGSLAND 




LIEUT. PERC^' W. 1)1':KE]{\V SERGT. WILLL\M I. McNALLY 





SERGT. RAVAIUXD J). THUAISON SERGT. ROBERT W. GORHAM 



46 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

MOYNIHAN, FRANK J., Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service 
June 20, 1916, and served on Mexican Border that year. Killed in action in France, 
July 22, 1918. (Chateau-Thierry.) 

PAPPAS, THEODOR, United States Army, killed in action in France No- 
vember, 1917. 

PARENT, ERNEST A., U. S. Marine Corps, entered the service in July, 1917, 
at Brooklyn, N. Y., and for a time was stationed at South Paris Island, S. C. Died 
in France of pneumonia, March 15, 1918. 

SULLIVAN, JEREMIAH F., Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service 
June 20, 1916, and served at the Mexican Border that summer. Killed in action in 
France, July 22, 1918. (Chateau-Thierry.) 

TREMBLAY, GEORGE, Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service May 
29, 1917. Killed in action in France, June 16, 1918. 

BUGLER. 

BURGESS, LEON F., Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service_ June, 

1916, and served on the Mexican Border. Died of v^ounds received in action in 
France, July 6, 1918. (Belleau Woods.) 

MUSICIAN. 

ANDERSON, ALFRED S., Band, 104th Infantry, entered the service in April, 

1917, shortly after the declaration of war. Awarded Distinguished Service Medal 
for bravery and gallant conduct in action from April 2d to April 14th. Killed in 
action in France, June 16, 1918. 

STUDENTS (S. A. T. C.) 

CURRAN, PATRICK J., Amherst College, entered the service in September, 

1918, and died of pneumonia at Amherst, December 9, 1918. Buried in Holyoke. 
LYONS, CHARLES, Boston Law School, entered the service in September, 

1918, and died in Boston City Hospital, October 7, 1918, of influenza. Buried in 
Holyoke. 

SMALL, KENNETH L., Rensaeller Polytechnic Institute, entered the service 
early in October, 1918, and died at Troy, X. Y., October 21, 1918, of pneumonia. 

PRIVATES. 

BEGLEY, DENNIS, Company K, 165th Infantry, entered the service in Sep- 
tember, 1917. Went to Camp Devens with the first draft contingent. Killed in 
action in France, July 29, 1918. 

BLAIR, JOSEPH E., Company E, 104th Infantry, entered the service May 8, 
1917, in Orange. Killed in action in France, April 13, 1918. A few days after his 
death he was awarded the French Croix de Guerre for "refusing to take shelter in 
a dugout during a bombardment, but remained at his post, exposed, and waited 
for the enemy's attack." On July 12, 1918, United States Government awarded 
(posthumously) the Distinguished Service Medal. 

BLUTEAU, ANDREW W., Machine Gun Company, 35th Infantry, entered 
the service in 1907. Stationed at Nogales, Ariz., where he died of bronchial inflam- 
mation on April 15, 1918. Buried in Holyoke. 

BRACKMAN, WILLIAM F., Company E, 7th U. S. Engineers, entered the 
service on June 10, 1917. First stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt., later at Fort 
Leavenworth, Kans. Sailed for France in March, 1918, and died at sea, March 
13th. Buried at sea. 

BRETON, JOSEPH J., Company L, 23rd Infantry, entered the service July 
16, 1917. Killed in action in France, June 26, 1918. 

BROVAREK, FRANK, Company G, 103rd Infantry, entered the service with 
a Chicopee draft contingent. Killed in action in France, September 8, 1918. 

BROWN, IRVING E., Companv D, 167th Infantry. Died of disease, October 
14, 1918. 





SERGT. DANIEL GALLIVAN SERGT. DOUGLAS URQUHART 




SERGT. THOMAS P. AL\RTL\ CORP. ERNEST PARENT 




^"^ 

^^^K 



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CORP. EDWARD L. MAXN CORP. FRANK J. MOYNIHAN 







y 



-1^1/^ 



CORP. AlA Ml W \:R\ C( 



I 4M 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 49 

BROWNE, FRANCIS P., Depot Brigade, entered the service February 26, 
1918. Died of pneumonia at Camp Devens, September 26, 1918. Buried in Holyoke. 

BRUDER, EiMIL, Company D, 23rd Infantry, entered the service in 1911. 
Stationed at Fort Meade, No. Dak. Re-enlisted for the third time July 5, 1917. 
Killed in action in France, June 8, 1918. 

CLARKE, GEORGE G., Company F, lO'lth Infantry, entered the service Sep- 
tember 31, 1917. Went to Camp Devens, later transferred to Camp Bartlett, and 
went overseas in October, 1917, with the 26th Division. Died of gunshot wounds 
(accidental) in France, February 17, 1918. 

COBURN, JAMES M., Company C, 335th Machine Gun Battalion, entered the 
service June 27, 1918. Killed in a motor truck accident in France, November 16, 
1918. (After close of the war.) 

CONAOGIRIS, NICHOLAS, United States Army, entered the service May 27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. Died of disease in France, September 12, 
1918. 

CROTEAU, LOUIS M., Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service May 
30, 1917. Killed in action June 16, 1918. 

DEROY, NARCISSE A., Company L, 104th Infantry. Entered service 1915, 
Company L, 2nd Massachusetts Regiment ; served Mexican border, 1916 ; wounded 
in action July 21, 1918, at Chateau-Thierry; died in France, date and cause un- 
determined. 

EVANS, WILLIAM H., Company D, 305th Infantry, entered the service Feb- 
ruary 20, 1918. Wounded severely in action August 31, 1918. Died in France, 
September 2, 1918, of wounds. 

FINEM, JOSEPH L., Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service June 5, 

1917. Killed in action July 22, 1918, in France. (Chateau-Thierry.) 

FLEMING, ARTHUR W., Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service in 
June, 1916. Served at the Mexican Border that year. Killed in action July 22, 

1918, in France. (Chateau-Thierry.) 

FOSTER, FRANK J., United States Army, entered the service on September 
6, 1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. Died there October 22, 1918, of 
pneumonia. Buried in Holyoke. 

GATELY, EDWARD P., Aviation Corps, entered the service October 30, 1917. 
Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Fort Omaha, Neb. Died of 
pneumonia, January 2, 1918. Buried in Holyoke. 

GEISSLER, FRED B., Company C, 319th Infantry, entered the service with 
a Boston draft contingent. Stationed at Camp Lee, Va. Went overseas in May, 
1918. Died of wounds received in action in France, October 13, 1918. 

GILLETTE, AVILLIAM O., 48th Company, 12th Battalion, Depot Brigade, en- 
tered the service in July, 1918, with Saco, Me., draft contingent. Stationed at 
Camp Devens. Died of pneumonia there September 28, 1918. Buried in Holyoke. 

GINLEY, MiVRTIN J., Company D, 7th Engineers, entered the service June 6, 
1917. Stationed at Camp Funston, Kans. Transferred to Camp Merritt, N. J., 
going overseas from there. Reported missing in action October 1, 1918. Reported 
killed in action, October 14, 1918. 

GOODSTEIN, LOUIS B., 310th Infantry, entered the service December 3, 

1917. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. Taken ill and sent home to recuperate. Died 
in the Providence Hospital, Holyoke, April 5, 1918, of pneumonia. Buried in 
Holyoke. 

GOULET, AJVIEDEE A., ll3th Infantry, entered service in May, 1918; with 
American Expeditionary Forces ; reported missing in action on October 16, 1918 ; 
later reported to have been killed in action in France on that same date. 

GUERTIN, HERVE, Company M, 302d Infantry, entered the service April 27, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Went overseas July 3, 1918. Killed in action in 
France, November 4, 1918. 





BUGLER LEON F. BURGESS 



MUS. ALFRED S. ANDERSON 



-^^^ 





PRIVATE EDWLX J. MITCHELL PRIVATE JAMES C. WILLIAMSON 




PRIVATE EDWARD J. WELCH PRIVATE JOHN LAMBERT 





PRIVATE WILLIAM WYNN 



PRR'ATE EDWARD P. GATELY 



52 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

GUDZEK, THOMAS J., 4th Company, Coast Artillery Corps, entered the serv- 
ice in 1913. Served on the Mexican Border in 1916. Stationed at Fort Wright, 
Fisher's Island, N. Y. Shot and instantly killed April 9, 1918, at Fort Wright by 
an insane soldier. Buried in Holyoke. 

HAYDEN, JAMES M., Company D, 305th Infantry, entered the service Feb- 
ruary 25, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens, transferred to Camp Upton, L. I., and 
went overseas in April, 1918. Killed in action in France, October 2, 1918. 

HEBERT, ALBERT, Battery B, 76th Field Artillery, entered the service in 
April, 1917. Went overseas April 28, 1918. Killed in action in France, September 
24, 1918. 

JOYAL, DESIRE, Company C, 101st Engineers. Entered the service Septem- 
ber 21, 1917; stationed at Camp Devens; September 25, 1917, left for overseas; died 
of pneumonia in France, February 9, 1919. 

KENNEDY, MARTIN P., 3rd Company, 1st Infantry, Training Battalion, en- 
tered the service November 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens, transferred to 
Camp Merritt, N. J. Went overseas in April, 1918. Killed in action in France, 
May 27, 1918. 

liAIiLY, PATRICK F., Ordnance Department, entered the service in Jul3% 
1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. Died in a rooming house fire in Syra- 
cuse, N. Y., December 17, 1918. Buried in Holyoke. 

LAMBERT, JOHN, Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service June 19, 

1916, and served on the Mexican Border that summer. Killed in action in France, 
July 8, 1918, while trying to rescue a comrade. (Marne.) 

LARIVEE, JOSEPH H., Cavalry, entered the service February 15, 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Fort Slocum, N. Y., transferred to Fort Worth, Texas. Died in Alorfa, 
Texas, October 20, 1918, of pneumonia. Buried in Holyoke. 

LEADERS, LESTER F., Company L, 77th Infantry, entered the service July 
12, 1918, with a draft contingent at AUega County, Mich. Died at Camp Custer, 
Mich., of pneumonia on October 6, 1918. Buried at Otsego, Mich. 

MacINNIS, JOHN, Company M, 111th Infantry, entered the service July 29, 

1917, in Philadelphia, Pa. Killed in action in France, October 5, 1918. 

MARION, EDMOND A., Company E, 305th Infantry, entered the service Feb- 
ruary 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens, transferred to Camp Upton, L. I. 
Went overseas in April, 1918. Died in France of wounds received in action, Octo- 
ber 22, 1918. 

MARTIN, HAROLD AV., Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service in 
February, 1917 ; entered the officers' training school in France. Killed in action in 
France, July 21, 1918. (Chateau-Thierry.) 

MARTIN, JAMES F., Company C, 305th Infantry, entered the service Feb- 
ruary 25, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Went overseas in April, 1918. Killed 
in action in France, August 15, 1918. 

MITCHELL, EDWIN M., Company I, 308th Infantry. Entered the service 
February 26, 1918 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; transferred to Camp Upton, L. I. ; 
arrived overseas in April, 1918, with a machine gun unit; transferred to Company 
I, 308th Infantry; reported missing in action since August 22, 1918, following a raid 
on the American front line trenches by the enemy ; later unofficial!}' reported a pris- 
oner ; in February, 1919, War Department declared that he had been killed in action, 
date undetermined. 

MORIARTY, JOSEPH J., Company G, 16th Infantry, entered the service May 
22, 1917. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt, transferred to Camp Syracuse, N. Y., 
and assigned to Machine Gun Company and later shifted back to the Infantry. 
Went overseas in November, 1917. Died in France, June 22, 1918, from wounds 
received in action. 

MURPHY, WILLIAM J., Machine Gun Company, 9th Infantry, entered the 
service in September, 1917. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. Wounded, degree 
undetermined, July 18, 1918. Died in France from wounds received in action, July 
31. 1918. 




PRIVATE WM. C. PUESCHEL 




PRIVATE OVILA NOLIN 




' '. ', 41»^~^'«^r"''""l?^r"TT"'"'" "\ 




J 



i.\ 



K 



PRIVATE NARCISSE DEROY 



PRIVATE HAROLD MARTIN 




v 




/^tli&f^ 



PRIVATE WALTER W. PAIRADEE PRIVATE HENRY A. QUIRK 





PRIVATE RAOUL J. WILLEMAIX PRIVATE JOSEPH L. FINEM 



HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 55 

NOLIN, OVILA, Company M, 302d Infantry, entered the service April ,27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Went overseas July 3, 1918. Reported wounded 
severely in action November 1, 1918. Later reported killed in action, November 1, 
1918. 

OUIMETTE, ALBERT, Company D, 104th Infantry. Enlisted in Company D, 
2nd Massachusetts Regiment, June 25, 1916; served in Mexican border expedition, 
1916; went overseas in October, 1917, with Company D, 104th Infantry; reported 
by War Department as missing in action since July 22, 1918; on February 15, 1919, 
officially declared by War Department to have been killed in action, date undeter- 
mined. 

PADDEN, JOHN J., Headquarters Company, 9th Infantry, entered the service 
October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Went overseas in March, 1918. 
Killed in action, July 18, 1918. (Soissons.) 

P.AIKADEE, WALTER W., Company D, 32Gth Infantry, entered the service 
October 8, 1917, and was stationed at Camp Devens. Died in France, September 7, 
1918, of wounds received in action. 

PUESCHEL, WILLIA]>r, Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service in 
May, 1917. Was gassed in April, 1918, and killed in action in France, October 20, 
1918. 

QUIRK, HEXRY A., Machine Gun Battalion. Served five years in regular 
army. Entered the service in this war in October, 1917, and was stationed at 
Camp Devens. He previously made three trips across the ocean, and on two trips 
the ships were sunk by torpedoes. Killed in action in France, September 7, 1918. 

SHEA, JAMES E., Company H, 308th Infantry, entered the service February 
26, 1918. Sent to Camp Devens and later transferred to Camp Upton. Went over- 
seas in March, 1918. Wounded in action early in September, 1918, and killed in 
action, October 8th. 

SMITH, JEFFERSON M., Supply Company, 71st Field Artillery, entered the 
service April 8, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Went overseas in August, 
1918. Died in France, October, 1918, of influenza. 

SMITH, RICHARD, United States Army, entered the service in August, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens, where he died September 30, 1918, of influenza. Buried 
in Holyoke. 

SNYDER, FRANK E., Companv D. 104th Infantry, entered the service in 
May, 1917. Killed in action in France, July 11, 1918. (Chateau-Thierry.) 

STACHOWICZ, ANTHONY, Private, Battery F, 76th Field Artillery. Entered 
service February 8. 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Died of wounds 
in France March 18, 1919. 

STEDMAN, HAROLD B., United States Army, entered the service in Sep- 
tember, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Previous to his enlistment he was 
engaged in Red Trinagle work. Died of pneumonia at Fort Slocum, N. Y., Octo- 
ber 9, 1918. 

SULLIVAN, HOWARD J., Company D, 104th Infantry, entered the service in 
April, 1913. Served on the Mexican Border in summer of 1916. Killed in action 
in France, July 22, 1918. (Chateau-Thierry.) 

TIGHE, HARRY, United States Army, entered the service in March, 1918. 
War Department, on August 12, 1918, reported him "missing in action." He was 
killed in action in France July 18, 1918. 

TOMASKO, TONY, Company I, 104th Infantry, entered the service September 
21, 1917, with a Sunderland contingent and was sent to Camp Devens. Transferred 
to Camp Bartlett and assigned to "Northampton's Own." Went overseas in Octo- 
ber, 1917. Killed in action October 16, 1918, in France. 

TOWER, CHARLES R., Company L, 26th Infantry, entered the service in 
June, 1916. Went to Mexican Border with Company K, 1st Vermont Infantry. In 
April, 1917, he was transferred to regulars. Killed in action in France, July 18, 
1918. 




^/ \-' 




^4'^ 



^^ 

^m.. 




PRIVATE ARTHUR W. FLEMING PRIVATE EMIL BRUDER 






PRIVATE JOSEPH J. MORIARTY PRIVATl. JOSI'.PH E. BLAIR 



-^^1 





PRIVATE GEORGE TREMBLAY PRIVATE FRANK SNYDER 




PRIVATE DENNIS BEGLEY PRIVATE MARTIN P. KENNEDY 



58 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

VARNEY, GEORGE F., Supply Company, 1st Infantry, entered the service in 
September, 1917. Stationed at Camp Carney, Cal., and died there November 7, 
1918, of pneumonia. Buried in Holyoke. 

WELCH, EDWARD J., 289th Aero Squad Signal Corps, entered the service 
December 6, 1917, at Washington, D. C. Stationed at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, 
where he died of pneumonia, January 15, 1918. Buried in Holyoke. 

WELCH, 3IICHAEL, Company D, 28th Infantry, entered service March 29, 
1918. Killed in action in France, October 9, 1918. 

WILLEMAIX, RAOUL J., Company L, 23rd Infantry, entered the service 
August 1, 1917. Killed in action in France, July 18, 1918. 

AVYXX, WILLIAM, United States Army Engineers, entered the service in 
January, 1918. Injured in accident at Plattsburg, N. Y. Died there July 29, 1918, 
of pneumonia, brought on by the injury to his spine. Buried in Holyoke. 

NAVY. 

CONWAY^, WILLIAM L., Seaman, entered the service in June, 1918, at Indian- 
apolis, Ind. Stationed at Notre Dame University in the Reserve Officers' Training 
School. Died October 22, 1918, at the University Hospital, South Bend., Ind., of 
pneumonia. Buried in Holyoke. 

HEALEY, PATRICK, Storekeeper, entered the service March 26, 1918, and 
stationed at Chelsea Naval Base. Died of pneumonia September 25, 1918, at Chel- 
sea Naval Hospital. Buried in Holyoke. 

HENRY'E, EMILE J., Fireman, second-class, entered the service December 5,. 
1917, in Bridgeport, Conn. Stationed on the U. S. S. Nopatin after he had re- 
ceived his preliminary training at the naval training station, Newport, R. I. Died 
July 8, 1918, in France, of Anthrax. 

LAPOINTE, ARMAND, Seaman, stationed at Charlestown Navy Yard. Died 
in Boston March 3, 1919, of pneumonia. 

MciaLLOP, MATTHEW J., Gunner's Mate, entered the service in 1916 at 
Baltimore, Md. Stationed on the U. S. S. Utah. Died at Newport News, Va., 
March 15, 1918, of pneumonia. Buried in Holyoke. 

MENARD, HECTOR N., Seaman, entered the service in April, 1917, at Bridge- 
port, Conn. Stationed on the U. S. S. Hancock. He made three trips across the 
ocean and was drowned January 12, 1918, at sea during a storm. His body was 
recovered and was buried in Bridgeport, Conn. 

SCARRY", FRANK B., Quartermaster, entered the service in September, 1917. 
Stationed on a United States Transport. Died at Brooklyn, N! Y., Naval Hospital, 
September 13, 1918, of pneumonia. Buried in Dedham. 



ALLIED SERVICE. 

(Since United States entered the war.) 

LIEUTENANTS. 

DEFFEW, PERCY W. (British), entered the service August 7, 191.5. in Eng- 
land and was assigned to the Scot Guards. Wounded five times in action, once 
while on a volunteer bombing expedition. Was in the trenches for fifteen months 
and was decorated for courage. Won his commission at the front for heroic action. 
Once listed as "missing." Killed in action, November 25, 1917, in France. 

FINLAYSON, R. MURRAY (Canadian), entered the service in 1917 in Can- 
ada. Experience gained at Plattsburg training camp resulted in his promotion at 
once to the rank of sergeant. Commissioned as second lieutenant at Valcartier 
Camp, Quebec. Attended Buxhall Institute, London, specializing in gas and bomb 
attack. Resigned his commission in March, 1918, and went to France as a private 
with 13th Canadian contingent. Commissioned a second lieutenant a second time. 
Killed in action, August 8, 1918, in France. 




*»*»•><» 



i 






PRIVATE NAZAIRE DEMERS PRIVATE LOUIS M. CROTEAU 




PRIVATE LOUIS B. GOODSTEIN PRIVATE WM. F. BRACKMAN 



60 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



GUNNER. 



COUGHLIN, KIRWIN (Canadian), entered the service in June, 1917, in Can- 
ada after several attempts to enter the United States service. Was attached to 7th 
Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery. Killed in action in France, November 4, 1917. 

TESTER. 

PETRIE, JAMES (British), entered the service in 1915 in England. Killed in 
an automobile accident in London, England, July 18, 1918. 

SIGNALLER. 

TILBE, AVARREN E. (British), entered the service in 1915 in England. At- 
tached to the Royal West Kent Regiment. Wounded in shoulder in 1917. Killed 
in action in France, August 6, 1918. 

PRIVATES. 

CARLO W, JOHN (British), entered the service in England in 1914. Attached 
lo 14th Machine Gun Company (B. E. F.)._ Wounded by shrapnel after sixteen 
months in trenches. Died of wounds received in action, December 8, 1917, in 
France. 

CHATTERTON, ARTHUR (Canadian), entered the service in April, 1915. 
Killed in action August 8, 1917, in fighting at Messines Ridge. 

DE]\IERS, NAZAIRE (Canadian), entered the service February 8, 1918, at 
British Canadian Recruiting rally in Holyoke. Killed in action in France, October 
1, 1918. 

GADBOIS, EDWARD (Canadian), entered the service in 1914 in Canada. 
Attached to 22d Canadian Battalion. Wounded six times. Killed in action in 
France, April 2, 1918. 

GENDRON, ALBERT (Canadian), entered the service in 1914 in Canada. At- 
tached to 22d Canadian Battalion. Killed in action in France, August 25, 1917. 

GOW, JAMES (British), entered the service in 1914 in England. Killed in 
action in France in August, 1917. 

GRIFFIN, WILLIAM P. (Canadian), entered the service May 10, 1916. At- 
tached to 183rd overseas battalion (C. E. F.), and stationed at Camp Hughes, Man- 
itoba, Canada. Died of pneumonia, October 30, 1918, at the Provincial Hospital, 
Battleford, Sask., Canada. 

HENDERSON, WILLIAM (Canadian), entered the service in 1914 in Canada. 
He was gassed at Ypres in July, 1917, and killed in action in France, August, 1917. 

JONES, JOHN (British), entered the service in 1914. Wounded three times. 
Killed in action in Jerusalem in June, 1918. 

NOLAN, THOMAS F. (Canadian), entered the service in 1917 at Hartford, 
Conn. Killed in action in France, October 2, 1918. 

VERHEYN, CHARLES (French), entered the service in 1914. Wounded 
twice — bayoneted in the knee in a hand-to-hand encounter with the enemy, and dis- 
abled by shell shock. Invalided home in 1917. Died in Holyoke, September 28, 
1918, as a result of the injuries. Buried in Holyoke. 

WILLIAMSON, JAMES C. (Canadian), entered the service in 1916 at On- 
tario. Attached to Company C. 176th Battalion, and was overseas eighteen months. 
Killed in action in France, August 38, 1918. 




PRIVATE THOMAS T. GUZDEK GUNNER KIRWIN COUGHLIN 




FIREMAN EMILE J. HENRYE STUDENT WILLIAAI L. CONWAY 



Citations and Decorations 





CROIX DE GUERRE 



DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL 



Awarded Both Croix de Guerre and Distinguished 
Service Medals 



JOSEPH E. BLAIR (Deceased). 
Company E, 104th Infantry. 
During the action of April 12, 1918, displayed exceptional courage and devotion. 
Refused to take shelter in a dugout during a bombardment, but remained at his 
post, exposed, and waited for the enemy's attack. Killed at his post. 

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM A. STACK. 

175th Field Artillery. 
Keeping up communication throughout the entire time his outfit occupied the 
sector, never once losing contact with his regimental headquarters. 

MAJOR WILLIAM P. RYAX. 

First Army of Occupation. 
During a hostile aeroplane raid on the town of Joinville, France, July 10, 1918, 
Captain Ryan displayed extraordinary heroism and total disregard for his own 



HoLYOKE In The Ctreat War. 63 

safety by going about the town and administering to the wounded French soldiers 
-and civilians, thereby saving the lives of many. After the raid Captain Ryan spent 
all night operating on civilians, of which there were 17 in all, having established a 
first-aid station at Charpentry, which was under severe artillery fire; remained con- 
stantly at his post tending the wounded, and, by his devotion to duty, saved many 
lives of both French and American soldiers. 

Medical Reserve Corps. 

REPUBLIC FRANCAISE. 
Department de la Haute-Marne, 
Maire de Joinville. 
I, the undersigned, Emile Humboldt, Mayor of Joinville, do hereby declare 
that on the fourth day of September, 1917, during the bombardment by the Boche 
aeroplanes, which took a toll of, five victims killed and seventeen wounded. Dr. 
William P. Ryan of the medical service of the American Army, being enroute 
through Joinville, hastened to attend the victims at the station. 

He contributed his skill, and aided most devotedly in alleviating the sufiferings 
of the wounded women and children; then, after cutting away the entangled elec- 
tric wires from about the station, he went directly to Military Hospital No. 42, in- 
stalled in a place called "Le Petet Bois," whither the wounded, as well as the dead 
had been carried. 

With the aid of an infirmary of the Red Cross he operated on the wounded 
soldiers and civilians alike, satisfying all their needs, and quitting the hospital only 
after ha\v'ing made certain 'that his presence there was on longer needed. 

Dr. Garrigue, Chief Physician of Hospital No. 42, can bear me out in the 
above statements. 

I extend to Dr. William P. Ryan the testimony of my grateful acknowledg- 
ment of his services, and assure him of our deepest gratitude for his work accom- 
plished at a very trying moment. 

(Signed) Le Maire de Joinville, 
July 10, 1918. EMILE HUMBOLDT. 

MAJOR MICHAEL J. DOXOGHl E. 

339th Infantry. 
For gallantry in action at the Dvina River in Russia. Cited by British. 

For courage and contempt of danger while commander of the .-Xmericans in 
Kadish Sector for four months, awarded Croix de Guerre. 



Distinguished Service Medals 



ALEXANDER BOl DREAU. 

Machine Gun Company, 104th Infantry. 
When oae of the machine guns jammed, Sergeant Alexander Boudreau of 
Holyoke, Mass., stood up on the parapet and hurled hand grenades with both 
kands as the enemy came on, only stopping after the gun was again put in working 
order. 

CHAPLAIN WILLIAM F. DAVITT (Deceased). 

125th Infantry. 

On August 6, 1918, during the operations along the Vesle river, learning that 

40 wounded Americans were cut off in a ravine, he called for volunteers and led 

a rescuing party through a hail of machine gun bullets. The party rescued every 

one of the wounded men, and not a member of the rescuing party was hit. 



64 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM McNALLY (Deceased). 
United States Marines. 
When his platoon commander was wounded, took charge and, against terrific 
fire, led his men into action, capturing a gun. 

JOHN McNULTY. 

Company C, 6th Machine Gun Battalion, United States Marines. 
For extraordinary heroism in action between Blanc Mont and St. Etienne, 
France, October 4, 1918. Although he was severely wounded during an enemy 
counter attack. Sergeant McNulty voluntarily remained on the firing line under 
heavy artillery and machine gun fire, operating a machine gun, the crew of which 
had all been killed or wounded. By staying at his post until the enemy Avas re- 
pulsed and he was ordered to the rear by his commanding officer he furnished an 
inspiring example to the other members of the company. 

HARRY DAVID READ. 

Machine Gun Company, 104th Infantry. 
For gallant and especially meritorious conduct in action against the enemy 
from April 3 to April 14, 1918, inclusive, during the occupation of the Bois Brule 
sector. From April 2 to 14, while attacked and raided by the enemy in superior 
numbers, and from April 10 to 13 withstanding heavy artillery fire. 

SERGE.INT WILLIAM DOYLE. 

Company D, 104th Infantry. 
At Chateau-Thierry he had command of a platoon of men from Company D, 
104th Infantry. His orders were to "mop up" an enemy machine gun nest. In the 
advance two of his men were killed. Sergeant Doyle, single-handed, took six pris- 
oners that were hiding in a shell hole. When the balance of his men came up they 
advanced on the nest, shielding themselves behind their prisoners, capturing the gun 
and its crew. 

ERNEST J. ROY. 
Headquarters, 104th Infantry. 
I commend the following named enlisted man serving in the 26th Division for 
gallantry and especially meritorious service in action against the enemy on the Bois 
Brule sector from April 2 to 14, 1918: Musician, third-class, Ernest J. Roy. 

DUNCAN K. MAJOR, JR., 

Lieut. Col. Inf., Chief of Staflf. 

I have read with much pleasure the reports of your regimental commander and 
brigade commander regarding your gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the 
field on April 2 to 14, 1918, while attacked by superior numbers under heavy enemy 
fire on the Toul sector, and have ordered your name and deed to be entered on the 
records of the Yankee Division. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding 26th Div. 



Awarded Croix De Guerre 



ALBERT BLAIS. 

Headquarters Company, 9th Infantry. 
While acting as a regimental runner for seven days carried messages to the 
front line trenches through intense artillery and machine gun fire, near Medeah 
Ferme. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 65 

JOHN R. FLOOD. 

Headquarters Company, 104th Infantry. 
On behalf of the 26th Division I recommend the following named enlisted man 
servmg with this command on the Bois Brule sector, for gallantry and especially 
meritorious service in action against the enemy from April 2 to April 14 1918 

C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding 26th Div. 

CORPORAL PATRICK DESILETS. 
30th United States Infantry. 

General Headquarters of the Armies of the North and Northeast. 

With the approbation of the Commander-in-Chief of the American Expedition- 
ary Forces in France, the General Commander-in-Chief of the French Armies of 
the North and Northeast cites in the order of the regiment, Corporal Patrick 
Desilets, 30th Regiment, Infantry. 

In full daylight, he led a patrol under fire, made reconnaissance of the posi- 
tions of the American first line as well as of those of the Germans ; brought back 
valuable information ; led the remaining fractions to their places of combat under 
a violent bombardment. 

At General Headquarters, November 15, 1918. 

The General Commander-in-Chief, PETAIN. 

LIEUTENANT FRANCIS C. HEYWOOD. 

Detached Service. 
Previous to the drive of March 21, 1918, was transferred to a French regiment 
in the front line, being the only American in entire regiment. Did excellent work 
in application of gas attacks. 

ROBERT C. SLATTERY. 
Headquarters, 104th Infantry. 
Showed courage and strength of character in the service of stretcher bearers 
April 10, 12 and 13, 1918; exposed his life in the front line to assist in the evacu- 
ation of the dead and wounded and encouraged his comrades by words and example. 

ROBERT R. TWISS. 

Headquarters, 104th Infantry. 
Showed courage and strength of character in the service of stretcher bearers 
April 10, 12 and 13, 1918 ; exposed his life in the front line to assist in the evacu- 
ation of the dead and wounded and encouraged his comrades by words and 
example. 

RICHARD M. WEISER. 

Medical Corps, 104th Infantry. 

Exceptional courage and devotion. Refused to take shelter in a dugout during 

a bombardment. He gave first aid to wounded under fire in the combats of the 

12th and 13th of April, 1918. He gave assistance at the advanced first aid post and 

served as a runner between the posts, across the zones swept by artillery fire. 

WILLIAM F. WRUCK. 

Headquarters, 104th Infantry. 
Showed courage and strength of character in the service of stretcher bearers 
April 10, 12 and 13, 1918; exposed his life in the front line to assist in the evacua- 
tion of the dead and wounded and encouraged his comrades by words and example. 

JOHN STEFANIK. 

Company G, 104th Infantry. 
For extreme heroism in taking machine gun nest before Apremont on April 
8th. Started out in a squad after two other squads, sixteen men, had been killed 
or wounded, and succeeded in killing off the enemy crew of seventeen men (being 
the only member of the squad uninjured), thereby saving the lives of many of his 
comrades. 

5 



66 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

Citations For Bravery 



JOHN MACKENZIE (S. H. F.) 

U. S. S. Remlik. 
During a heavy gale on December 17, 1917, a depth charge, weighing several 
hundred pounds, broke its fastenings at the stern of the Remhk and went sweeping 
about the deck. The heavy seas washing over the quarter deck made it dangerous 
for anyone to attempt to reach that part of the ship. As officers and crew watched 
the bomb, someone saw the safety pin fall out of the charge, making it a source of 
serious danger to the officers and crew. Mackenzie, realizing the danger, shouted : 
"Watch me ; I'll get it," and dashed down the deck, flinging himself upon the 
charging cylinder. Three times the daring man almost had his arms about the 
bomb, but each time the seas tore it from him, and once it almost crushed him. 
He stuck to the task, however, and on the fourth attempt got a firm grip on the 
cylinder, heaved it upright on one flat end, and held it until lines could be run to 
him and he and the bomb safely lashed. Soon afterward the ship was headed up 
into the sea, and the charge was carried to a place of safety. 
Statement issued by 

SECRETARY OF THE NAVY JOSEPHUS DANIELS. 
Awarded gold medal and $100 in gold. 

KAY A. LEDUC. 
Company H, 104th Infantry. 
I have read with pleasure the reports of the commander of the combined 
American and French patrol, of which you were a member on the night of Feb- 
ruary 13, 1918, and of the officers in charge of the American detachment of that 
patrol. Both refer to the creditable manner in which the American members per- 
formed their duties. It will be noted in the regimental records, and will always 
remain to your credit, that you were a member of the first patrol officially to repre- 
sent this regiment on the prescribed mission against the enemy in this war. 

(Signed) GEORGE H. SHELTON, 

Colonel, U. S. A., Commanding. 

LIEUTENANT ALEXANDER MACDONALD. 

Divisional Postmaster, 26th Division. 

Headquarters, 26th Division, 
A. E. F., France, May 13, 1918. 
General Orders No. 40. (Extract) 
On April 2, 1918, the 104th Infantry occupied the Bois Brule sector, and be- 
tween that date and April 14 they were attacked and raided by the enemy in su- 
perior numbers and with violent artillery bombardment, especially April 10 to 13, 
inclusive. The regiment has already been mentioned in orders and decorated by 
the Corps Commander for its gallant conduct. Many of the men have also re- 
ceived the Croix de Guerre, and, in addition to which, on behalf of the 26th Di- 
vision, I commend the following named officer serving with this command for gal- 
lantry and especially meritorious service in action against the enemy from April 2 
to 14, 1918. 

First Lieutenant Alexander Macdonald. 

By command of 

MAJ. GEN. C. R. EDWARDS. 

The Yankee Division. 

I have read with much pleasure the reports of your regimental commander 
and brigade commander regarding your gallant conduct and devotion to duty in 
the field on April 2-14, 191S, while attacked by superior numbers under heavy 
enemy fire, Toul sector, and have ordered your name and deed to be entertd in the 
record of the Yankee Division. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding 26th Div. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 67 

JOHN D. LaFLESH. 

Company D, 104th Infantry. 
I have read with much pleasure the reports of your regimental commander and 
brigade commander regarding your gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the 
field on July 22, 1918, although wounded, aiding the wounded, capturing one of an 
enemy group and dispersing the others — Bouresches — second battle of the Marne, 
and have ordered your name and deed to be entered in the record of the Yankee 
Division. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding 26th Div. 

ED^\^N C. PARSONS. 

Lafayette Escadrille. 
An excellent pilot, who has downed three enemy airplanes. 
Awarded Croix de Guerre and French Military Medal. 

—Printed in Official Journal, July 2, 1918. 
(Note — Since the above citation was published Parsons brought down four 
more enemj^ planes.) 

REGINALD TURNER. 

Company E, First U. S. Engineers. 

November 21, 1917, from commanding officer. Engineer Detachment, 3rd Bat- 
talion, 18th Infantry, to commanding officer Company E, First U. S. Engineers; 
subject, conduct of engineer detachment. 

A detachment of twenty-four men of Company E was attached to the 3rd 
Battalion of the 18th Infantry during its occupation of a sector at the front. 
While working on the reconstruction of a front line trench during a gas alarm 
immediately afterward. The men behaved with a coolness that won the commen- 
dation of the officers present, the work being suspended only when the gas masks 
were on. The detachment at all times showed ability and willingness, and carried 
through with enthusiasm the arduous tasks assigned to it. The personnel of the 
detachment included Reginald Turner. 

(Signed) BERNARD SMITH, First Lieut. 

HUGH WEIR. 

46th Canadian Infantry. 

For bravery and devotion to duty, February 14, 1918. Led a section of seven 
men in a raid on the enemy's line. In the advance he was severely wounded, but 
led his party forward and directed them in mopping up the area assigned to the 
party. This work was gallantly carried out in the face of enemy machine gun fire. 
He set a fine example of fearlessness and gallantry. 

Awarded British Military Medal. 

ERNEST H. YOUNG. 

Company K, 104th Infantry. 
I have read with much pleasure the reports of your regimental commander 
and brigade commander regarding your gallant conduct and devotion to duty in 
the field on July 20, 1918, though wounded, killing enemy sniper, thus saving many 
of your comrades — Bouresches — second battle of the Marne, and have ordered your 
name and deed to be entered in the record of the Yankee Division. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding 26th Div. 

CHAPLAIN GEORGE S. L. CONNOR. 

Senior Corps Chaplain, 3rd Army. 
His work under fire was an inspiration to the men in the command. 
C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding 26th Div. 



68 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

SAMUEL LEVENSON. 

Company M, 104th Infantry. 
On April 2, 1918, the 104th Infantry occupied the Bois Brule sector, and be- 
tween that date and April 14 they were attacked and raided by the enemj- in su- 
perior numbers and with violent artillery bombardment, especially April 10 to 13, 
inclusive. The regiment has already been mentioned in orders and decorated by 
the Corps Commander for its gallant conduct. Many of the men have also re- 
ceived the Croix de Guerre, and in addition to which, on behalf of the 26th Di- 
vision, I commend the following named enlisted men serving with this command 
for gallantry and especially meritorious service in action against the enemy from 
April 2 to 14, 1918. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding 26th Div. 

ALFRED S. ANDERSON (Deceased). 
Headquarters, 104th Infantry. 
On April 2, 1918, the •104th Infantry occupied the Bois Brule sector, and be- 
tween that date and April 14 they were attacked and raided by the enemy in su- 
perior numbers and with violent artillery bombardment, especially April 10 to 13, 
inclusive. The regiment has already been mentioned in orders and decorated by 
the Corps Commander for its gallant conduct. Many of the men have also re- 
ceived the Croix de Guerre, and in addition to which, on behalf of the 26th Di- 
vision, I commend the following named enlisted men serving with this command 
for gallantry and especially meritorious service in action against the enemy from 
April 2 to 14, 1918. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding 26th Div. 

ARTHUR V. LEVERAULT. 

Headquarters, 104th Infantry. 
On April 2, 1918, the 104th Infantry occupied the Bois Brule sector, and be- 
xween that date and April 14 they were attacked and raided by the enemy in su- 
perior numbers and with violent artillery bombardment, especially April 10 to 13, 
inclusive. The regiment has already been mentioned in orders and decorated by 
the Corps Commander for its gallant conduct. Many of the men have also re- 
ceived the Croix de Guerre, and in addition to which, on behalf of the 26th Di- 
vision, I commend the following named enlisted men serving with this command 
for gallantry and especially meritorious service in action against the enemy from 
April 2 to 14, 1918. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding 26th Div. 

HENRY A. BROAVN. 

Company D, 104th Infantry. 
I have read with much pleasure the reports of your regimental commander and 
brigade commander regarding your gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the 
field on July 18-21, 1918, carrying messages under heavy enemy fire — Belleau — 
second battle of the Marne, and have ordered your name and deed to be entered 
in the record of the Yankee Division. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 
Major General Commanding 26th Division. 

— LIEUTENANT ANTHONY H. MANLEY. 

Aviation. 
The commanding officer of the Groupement pays his sincere respects to 
Anthony H. Manley of the Peloton A, Section Groupe Genin, for having, on the 
nights of the 8th and 9th of October, 1917, driven and discharged his Camion, 
under heavy fire of the enemy, back and forth to the advance depot of LaLoge, and 
for having shown bravery and cool-headedness in the discharge of his duty. 

CAPTAIN PERISSEZ, 
(Signed) PAVILLON. Commandent of Groupement 



HoLYOivE In The Great War. 69 

JOSEPH E. COMEAU. 

Headquarters, 104th Infantry. 
On April 2, 1918, the 104th Infantry occupied the Bois Brule sector, and be- 
tween that date and April 14 they were attacked and raided by the enemy in su- 
perior numbers and with violent artillery bombardment, especially April 10 to 13, 
inclusive. The regiment has already been mentioned in orders and decorated by 
the Corps Commander for its gallant conduct. Many of the men have also xe- 
ceived the Croix de Guerre, and in addition to which, on behalf of the 36th Di- 
vision, I commend the following named enlisted men serving with this command 
for gallantry and especially meritorious service in action against the enemy from 
April 2 to 14, 1918. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding 26th Div. 

STEWART A. RUSSELL. 

Sanitary Detachment, 104th Infantry. 
I have read with much pleasure the reports of your regimental commander and 
brigade commander regarding your gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the 
field on July 18-23, aiding your wounded comrades under heavy enemy fire — 
Trugny — Second Battle of the Marne, and have ordered your name and deed to be 
entered in the record of the Yankee Division. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding 26th Div. 



[^_ _ '^\ 





HOLYOKE STATE ARMORY. 



Awarded High Naval Honors 





Souin Hadiey Falls Sailor Held Deadly Depth Bomb In Gale 
Saving Ship and Crew 



Chasing a U-boat while fighting a 100-mile gale, and having a depth bomb 
break loose from its fastening and go rolling about the decks, in imminent danger 
of exploding and blowing up the ship, was one of the experiences of the crew of 
the U. S. S. converted yacht Remlik. 

And then, as the full realization of their peril was sweeping over the officers, 
into the picture springs a figure that wrestles with the deadly missile, filled with 
TNT, and holds it until it can be safely secured. 

Thus did Chief Boatswain's Mate John Mackenzie of South Hadiey Falls res- 
cue his ship and its 80 officers and men from certain destruction, later to receive 
the commendation of his commander and a citation with the medal of honor from 
the Secretary of the Navy. 

"There wasn't much to it; it was simply a case of go get it," Mate Mackenzie 
said, when cornered in his cubbyhole office at Battery Wharf, Boston. He was 
much more communicative concerning the heroic achievements of the officers. 

"Their acts of bravery will never be written," he said. "Why, take our cap- 
tain, for example, now Lieutenant-Commander Isaac C. Johnson. When we sailed 
out of New York it was freely predicted we would never reach the other side. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. " 71 

Our commander never had his clothes off during our whole trip across, and never 
went to his quarters to sleep. I have seen him standing with one arm thrown 
around a stanchion, snatching a nap, having given orders that if he was wanted to 
touch his arm. And all through the navy there are hundreds of such incidents that 
history will never record." 

To understand the great danger of a depth bomb, it is necessary to explain its 
mechanism. In this instance, it was of the old Sperry type, resembling an ash can 
in form, but now practically obsolete. It is in two sections, the top for about a 
quarter of the length of the cylinder being the buoy. The lower section is filled 
with about 100 pounds of TNT, and is the mine. The sections are held together 
by a wire running from the mine up through the center of the buoy to its top, 
where it is fastened by a cotter pin. The wire can be fixed to pay out to any depth 
desired. In this case it was set for fifty feet. When the bomb is dropped over- 
board, the safety pin is pulled out; the buoy and mine separate, the mine, of course, 
dropping until the limit of the wire is reached, when the pull detonates the charge. 
This particular bomb was resting in a U-shaped cradle at the stern. 

Chief Mackenzie's own story of the incident is this : 

"We were convoying in the Bay of Biscay, and had been a day and a half in a 
gale. We had just sighted a submarine, and everybody was ordered on deck. I 
happened to be walking aft when I saw a big wave break over the stern and smash 
the cradle. The depth bomb was let loose and started rolling around the decks. I 
threw myself on it, grabbed it in my arms, braced my feet against the gun platform, 
and was able to hold it fast." 

This laconic tale of the heroic deed takes no account of the dangers he was 
facing other than from the bomb itself, the chances of being swept into the sea by 
each receding breaker, his safety depending wholly upon the length of time he could 
retain his foot grip upon the timbers of the gun platform, since, as the official re- 
port states it, there was no way to get assistance to him "until the ship could be 
headed into the sea and the after part made more secure for passage." 

But in the navy records of the World War will be found this official report 
from Lieutenant-Commander Johnson of the Remlik: 

"The depth charge box on the taffrail, containing a Sperry depth charge, was 
washed overboard on December 17, 1917, the depth charge itself falling inboard and 
remaining on deck. It was impossible for anyone to carry it to safety, and it was 
even dangerous for anyone to go to that part of the ship, due to the seas washing 
over the stern. Mackenzie, on his own initiative, went aft and sat down on the 
depth charge until the ship was headed into the sea. 

"After the depth charge was carried to a place of safety it was found that the 
safety pin had become detached, and had it remained on deck and been washed 
around with the sea the buoy section of the depth charge would, no doubt, have be- 
come detached and the depth charge detonated had not Mackenzie acted imme- 
diately as he did. 

"Mackenzie exposed his life and prevented a serious accident to the ship and 
probable loss of the ship and entire crew. 

"The action of Mackenzie in this case is most highly recommended for the 
serious consideration of the department." 

Chief Boatswain's Mate Mackenzie's "extraordinary heroism in the line of his 
profession" was made the subject of general orders in the navy. Following this 
came the citation from the Secretary of the Navy. 

"You have upheld the best traditions of the naval service, and the department 
heartily commends you. The department will also award you a medal of honor," 
wrote Secretary Daniels. 

Mate Mackenzie also received the $100 gratuity that accompanies awards for 
"extraordinary heroism." Later he received a check for the same amount from 
Willis S. Kilmer, owner of the yacht Remlik. The inscription on the medal reads : 

"Awarded to John Mackenzie. U. S. N. F., for extraordinary heroism, U. S. 
S. Remlik, December 17, 1917. Saved ship from destruction by securing depth 
bomb." 

Chief Mackenzie may be classed with the veterans of the navy. He served as 
a naval apprentice from 1902 to 1907, during which his cruises carried him over 
66,000 miles of sea. After leaving the navy he engaged in the automobile accessory 
business at vSpringfield. He re-entered the naval service on May 12, 1917, served 
overseas in convoy work and submarine chasing. 



Holyoke^s Army Officers 



LIEUTENANT-COLONEL. 

FOOTE, ALFRED F.— Inspector-General, 26th Division. 

Enlisted in Company D, 2nd Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, January 2, 1896 ; 
on June 2, 1897, was appointed a corporal ; on December 10, 1898, was made a ser- 
geant; elected first lieutenant of Company D July 18, 1899; elected captain on May 
9, 1904; November 8, 1911, was made major of the Third Battalion; served in the 
Spanish-American War as a sergeant; was detailed to the Mexican border for in- 
struction in April, 1911; served in the Punitive Expedition as major of the Second 
Infantry, National Guard, from June 18, 1916, to October 30, 1916 ; attended school 
of musketry at Fort Sill, Okla., from May 27, 1917, to August 1, 1917; arrived at 
Camp Bartlett August 24, 1917; assigned by Brigadier-General Charles H. Cole to 
put the camp roads in condition ; was named acting lieutenant-colonel of the 104th 
Infantry September 17, 1917 ; left for France September 26, 1917, and was commis- 
sioned a lieutenant-colonel in France on January 29, 1918 (the youngest lieutenant- 
colonel in Pershing's army, being 40 years old). While acting commander of the 
104th Infantry he led the regiment against the enemy on the Aisne-Marne front 
and also at Chateau-Thierry. On September 25, 1918, word was received here that 
he had been transferred to Division Headquarters as assistant inspector, and on 
November 26th he was reported to have been promoted to be division inspector, 
and was later promoted to be inspector-general of the 26th Division. 

MAJORS. 

BALLARD, WILLIS D. — Ordnance Department. 

Enlisted in the Ordnance Corps March, 1918 ; assigned to the personnel depart- 
ment at Boston; commissioned a major June 12, 1918. 

CURRY, DR. WILLIAM J, — United States Public Health Service. 
Commissioned a major December 4, 1918; stationed at Bridgeport, Conn., as 
assistant surgeon and consulting hygienist. 

DONOGHUE, MICHAEL J. — Infantry. 

Enlisted in the United States Army in 1902; stationed in the Panama Canal 
Zone with the Fifth United States Infantry; promoted to a sergeant; commissioned 
a second lieutenant while in the Canal Zone; rated as one of the best instructors 
in the Fifth Infantry; August, 1917, was promoted to first lieutenant and, Septem- 
ber, 1917, commissioned a captain ; assigned to command Company K, 337th In- 
fantry then at Battle Creek, Mich.; cited and awarded the Distinguished Service 
Medal by the British for gallantry in action at the Dvina River, near Kadish, in 
Russia; commissioned a major in France. 

HENDERSON, DR. GEORGE D. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Entered the service August 13, 1917, as a captain ; assigned to officers' training 
camp, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana; November 1, 1917, appointed to official 
board of consultants on cardiac vascular diseases ; transferred to Camp McArthur, 
Waco, Texas ; transferred to Camp Wadsworth, S. C, and assigned to the 27th 
Division; commissioned a major April 10, 1918. 

MORTON, DR. JOHN J. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Entered the service in 1915 as a first lieutenant; in May, 1917, went overseas 
with the Harvard Hospital Unit; was in a Red Cross hospital which the Huns 
bombed from the air; promoted to captain in France in February, 1918; promoted 
to major. 





LIEUT.-COL. ALFRED F. FOOTE MAJOR WILLIAM P. RYAN 




|f 



Mz\JOR JOHN W. PAGE 



J^L J\ I V,'1V V r] .> I L\\ 



ki 



il, RICHTER 



74 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

PAGE, JOHN WATT— Southern Department. 

Enlisted in Company D, 2d Massachusetts Regiment, 1902 ; enlisted in the regu- 
lar army at Denver, Colo., as a private, and promoted to captain during the Mex- 
ican border trouble, in 1916; commissioned a major in September, 1918. 

POPP, EARL C. — Gas Defence. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant September 21, 1917 ; stationed at the camp at 
the American University, Washington, D. C. ; in October, 1917, was the honor man 
in field training section, gas defence ; member of the first overseas detachment in 
November, 1917 ; attached to the divisional staff ; in May, 1918, was wounded and 
shell-shocked ; commissioned a captain in France October 7, 1918 ; promoted to 
major. 

RICHTER, GEORGE H. — Ordnance Department. 

Commissioned a major at Washington in September, 1918; named to board of 
chemical engineers of the War Department in charge of gas warfare and chemical 
development. 

RILEY, JOHN L. — Reconstruction Department. 

Commissioned a major in September, 1918; in charge of General Hospital No. 
6 at Fort McPherson, Ga., doing physical reconstruction work. 

RYAN, DR. WILLLIM P. — Medical Department. 

Entered the service December 18, 1916, as a first lieutenant in the Medical 
Corps and assigned to El Paso, Texas, on the Mexican border ; later transferred to 
San Antonio, Texas ; on July 9, 1917, arrived in London, and shortly after went to 
France ; promoted to a captain in France in September, 1917 ; promoted to be chief 
surgeon of First Division, Machine Gun Battalion ; took an active part in the 
Marne counter-ofifensive ; was given charge of prize drug booty, valued at $10,000, 
v/hich was captured from the enemy at St. Mihiel ; recommended for Distinguished 
Service Medal for conspicuous gallantry in action ; received Croix de Guerre ; pro- 
m.oted to major November 14, and recommended for promotion to rank of lieuten- 
ant-colonel. 

CAPTAINS. 

ADAMS, ANTHONY O. — Forty-first Infantry. 

Entered the service September, 1908; did duty on Mexican border, Galveston, 
Texas, New Orleans, La., Kansas City, Mo., Minneapolis, Minn., and in Arizona; 
leceived many marksman medals; commissioned a first lieutenant at Fort Crook, 
Neb., and assigned as instructor in machine gunnery; transferred to Fort Omaha, 
Neb.; transferred to Camp Funston, Kan., for overseas duty; held there by the 
signing of the armistice. 

ALLEN, DR. FRED H. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a captain July 13, 1918; sent to Camp Greenleaf, Fort Ogle- 
thorpe, Ga. 

BEAUPRE, CHARLES T. — Infantry. 

Enlisted in Company D, 2nd Massachusetts Infantry; went to the Mexican 
border in 1916; went overseas as a first sergeant in Company D, 104th Infantry; 
taken ill in England in October, 1917 ; attended Officers' Training School in France 
and, after a four months' course, received a commission as a second lieutenant in 
July, 1918; stood fourth on the list of five hundred and fifty candidates; promoted 
to first lieutenant; promoted to captain. 

BEAUPRE, DR. D. I. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant August 11, 1917; assigned to Fort Benjamin 
Harrison, Ind ; transferred February, 1918, to Post Hospital, Signal Aviation Corps, 
Belleville, 111. ; November 25, 1918, commissioned a captain ; assigned to 137th 
aero squadron while in France. 




CAPT. EDMUND J. SLATE 



CAPT. DONALD B. LOGAN 





CAPT. HERBERT L. FRINK CAPT. WILFRED C. DROUIN 



76 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

BRINDAMOUR, DR. JOSEPH— Medical Reserve Corps 

Commissioned a captain October 29, 1918; stationed at Camp Greenleaf, Ogle- 
thorpe, Ga. 

CALLAHAN, GERALD J. — Infantry. 

Entered the Plattsburg Training Camp May, 1917; recommended for a second 
course ; entered a second time September 27, 1917 ; commissioned a first lieutenant 
November 26, 1917; assigned to Camp Stanley, Texas; transferred to Camp 
Wheeler, Ga., where he was training candidates for officers' training camp ; pro- 
moted to captain. 

CARROLL, DR. J. J. — United States Public Health Service. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant September 25, 1918, in United States Public 
Health Service ; stationed at Boston as state director of venereal diseases ; promoted 
to captain. 

CAVANAUGH, DR. THOMAS E.— Medical Reserve Corps. 
Commissioned a captain October 3, 1918; stationed at Camp Greenleaf, Fort 
Oglethorpe, Ga. ; transferred to Hospital No. 29, Fort Snelling, Minn. 

CLEARY, DR. ROBERT E. — Marine Corps. 

Commissioned a junior lieutenant in the Naval Reserves, Coast Defence, No- 
vember, 1917; stationed at Charlestown Navy Yards, Boston; transferred overseas 
on September 21, 1918; went to London first and then to Brest, France; commis- 
sioned a captain in Marine Corps September 21, 1918. 

COX, DR. STANLEY C. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a captain July 2, 1918 ; assigned to Roosevelt Hospital, N. Y. ; 
transferred to Camp Gordon, Ga. ; later transferred to Hospital No. 30, Camp 
Green, N. C. ; arrived in France November, 1918 ; assigned to Evacuation Hospital 
No. 30 at Le Mans. 

DROUIN, DR. WILFRED G. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

In March, 1917, he returned from France, after having been in active service 
eighteen months in the Edith Cavell hospital m Paris ; he had enlisted with the 
French Medical Corps, and was engaged for weeks in underground hospitals near 
the front at Bar Le Due, near Verdun, and in the Somme region ; was at Verdun 
when Fort Vaux was captured ; after he had received his commission from the 
United States Government, on June 12, 1918, he was ordered to report to Camp 
Yaphank, L.- I. 

FRINK, HERBERT L. — Infantry. 

Entered Plattsburg May 12, 1917 ; commissioned a second lieutenant August 10, 
1917; assigned to Camp Devens in the 1st Battalion, 2nd Company, Depot Brigade; 
commissioned a first lieutenant April 5, 1918 ; promoted to a captain at Camp 
Devens. 

, GABLER, DR. G. L.^Medical Reserve Corps. 

; Commissioned a captain June 27, 1918 ; stationed at United States Base Hos- 
pital No. 1, Williams Bridge, N. Y. 

GREEN, DONALD R. — Field Artillery. 

Entered Plattsburg May 12, 1917; commissioned a first lieutenant in the cav- 
alry August 10, 1917 ; later assigned to the 6th Field Artillery, 1st Division ; went 
overseas with Pershing; arrived back in United States of America September 2, 
J918, after he had been assigned to Camp Meade, Md., to instruct officers; was in 
the battle of the Marne on Soisson Front; commissioned a captain September 14, 
1938, and transferred to Fort Sill, Okla., to attend the school of gunnery. 

HAZEN, JOHN — Ordnance Department. 

Entered Plattsburg May 12, 1917; commissioned a second lieutenant August 
10, 1917; promoted to first lieutenant, and later to captain; stationed at Washing- 
ton, D. C. 






CAPT. DONALD R. GREEN CHAPLAIN ARTHUR J. B. CAYER 




CAPT. HER-\L\X WEIS 



CAPT. C. I.. (xABLER 



78 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

HORRIGAN, DR. ARTHUR J. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant in May, 1917 ; took an X-ray course in Boston 
under Major Ariel George; transferred to Camp Hancock, Ga. ; promoted to cap- 
tain February 22, 1918; arrived in France in August, 1918. 

HUSSEY, DR. EDAVARD J. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a captain June 29, 1918 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; reported at 
Camp Crane, Allentown, Pa., for overseas duty. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

HUTCHESON, JAMES G. — Infantry. 

Was a sergeant in charge of the Holyoke Recruiting Station in 1912 and 1913 ; 
transferred to Davenport, Iowa; commissioned a captain December 6, 1917. 

KNOWLTON, DR. EDWARD A. — Medical Reserve Corps. 
Commissioned a captain June 12, 1918 ; sent to Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga. ; 
transferred to Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. ; transferred to Hospital No. 22, Richmond, Va. 

LOGAN, DONALD B. — Infantry. 

Elected second lieutenant Company D, 2nd Massachusetts Regiment, December 
20, 1915, after a course of training at Plattsburg ; served at the Mexican border, in 
1916, where he was for a time acting battalion adjutant; went overseas with Com- 
pany D, 104th Infantry, in October, 1917, as commander of first platoon ; detached 
from his company and assigned to special work ; promoted to first lieutenant in 
November, 1917, and assigned to Intelligence Department ; promoted to captain. 

LYNN, EDISON A. — Coast Artillery Corps. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant in Los Angeles, Cal., April, 1917 ; promoted 
to first lieutenant at American Lake, Utah, August 15, 1917 ; assigned to Fortress 
Monroe, Va. ; promoted to captain November 9, 1917. 

McELWAIN, HENRY E., JR. — Coast Artillery Corps. 

Entered the service in the Coast Artillery Corps at Chicago in July, 1917 ; sta- 
tioned at Camp Sheridan, 111.; transferred to Fortress Monroe Training School, 
where he received his commission as first lieutenant; went overseas in May, 1918, 
with Battery F, 60th Coast Artillery Corps ; during June, July and August was act- 
ing regimental assistant adjutant and was sent to the headquarters of one of the 
French armies to study their information service; commissioned a captain October, 
1918. 

MAGNA, JOSEPH — Aviation. 

Commissioned a captain June, 1918 ; stationed at Washington, D. C, as an ex- 
pert on gas engines. 

MALONE, GEORGE B. — Engineers. 

Commissioned a captain May 1, 1918 ; stationed at Washington Barracks, Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; organized a welding school ; appointed a signal post engineer. 

NICKERSON, RALPH H. — Coast Artillery Corps. 

Commissioned a captain at Fortress Munroe, Va., August 10, 1917 ; entered 
Camp Benjamin Harrison, Indiana; transferred to Fortress Monroe, and later 
transferred to Fort Adams, R. I. 

O'CONNELL, DR. EDWARD P. — Veterinary. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant in May, 1917, and stationed at San Antonio, 
Texas; arrived in France September 11, 1917, with the Divisional Supply Train; 
saw previous service in the Philippines, Tientsin, China, and the Mexican border; 
commissioned a captain in France in December, 1917 ; did duty in Spain, Portugal 
and Algiers ; assigned to the 26th Division in January, 1919. 

O'CONNELL, GEORGE P. — Engineers. 

Commissioned a captain September 23. 1918; stationed at Camp Humphrey; 
went overseas with American Expeditionary Forces. 




CAPT. ANTHONY O. ADAiMS CAPT. GEORGE C. ROBERTS 




CAI'T. ERANK J. STAEKER 



CAPT. STANLEY C. COX 



80 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

PETERSON, OARL — Infantry. 

Commissioned a captain on August 15, 1917, at Madison Barracks, N. Y. ; 
transferred to Plattsburg and won a commission as first lieutenant; transferred to 
Brown University as an instructor and commissioned as captain. 

ROBERTS, DR. GEORGE C— Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a captain July 24, 1918; stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

SEARS, FRANK M.— Engineers. 

Commissioned a captain July 10, 1918 ; sent to Camp Lee, Va. ; transferred to 
Camp Humphrey, Va. ; later transferred to Washington, D. C. 

SLATE, EDMUND J. — Regimental Supply Officer, 26th Division. 

Enlisted as a private in Company I, 2nd Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, Sep- 
tember IG, 1894, and served for three years; on September 16, 1897, he enlisted in 
Company D, Holyoke, and was appointed corporal; promoted to sergeant August 
3, 1899 ; May 26, 1900, was made quartermaster sergeant, and on May 24, 1904, a 
first sergeant; elected a captain December 8, 1913; served in the Spanish- American 
War from May 3, 1898, to November 3, 1898, as a corporal ; did duty at the Mexi- 
can border from June 18 to October 30, 1916; stationed at Columbus, New Mexico; 
left Camp Bartlett October 5, 1917, at the head of Company D, 104th Infantry; 
vvhile in France was transferred to have charge of regimental supplies. 

STALKER, DR. FRANK J— American Red Cross. 

Went overseas with a Red Cross Unit in March, 1918; commissioned a first 
lieutenant in the Dental Reserve Corps and assigned to American Red Cross; pro- 
moted to captain. 

WEIS, HERMAN — Field Artillery. 

Commissioned a captain November 28, 1917, at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind. ; 
transferred to Camp Funston, Kan., as an instructor. 

CHAPLAINS. 

CAYER, REV. ARTHUR J. B. — 161st Infantry. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant December 17, 1917 ; presented with a mahogany 
field altar by his parishioners of Gardner; reported March 1, 1918, at Hoboken, 
N. J.; arrived in France March 26, 1918, and was attached to 161st Infantry; pro- 
moted to captain March 17, 1919. 

CONNOR, REV. GEORGE S. L. — Senior Chaplain, 3rd Army Corps. 

Assigned to Mexican border in June, 1916, by Bishop Beaven, and served 
throughout the Punitive Expedition with the 2nd Massachusetts Regiment; ar- 
rived in Camp Bartlett in September, 1917, and acted as chaplain, although he had 
no commission ; was assigned to Brigade Headquarters as the guest of General 
Cole ; presented with a silver communion service by the Springfield Knights of 
Columbus, October 9, 1917 ; received commission as first lieutenant and was as- 
signed to Military Police Train which had already left Camp Bartlett; went over- 
seas in the same convoy as did Company D. During the fighting in France Father 
Connor was always in the front. He administered the last rites of the church -to 
five Company D boys killed by one shell on a Sunday morning, and officiated at 
ihe mass for Chaplain William F. Davitt, his boyhood chum. In October, 1918, he 
was promoted Senior Divisional Chaplain of the 32nd Division ; three weeks later 
was promoted to Senior Corps Chaplain, 3rd Army Corps, giving him the religious 
supervision of over 80,000 men; with the Army of Occupation. 

FITZGIBBON, REV. JAMES J. — Army. 

Went to Camp Taylor Training School, Kentucky, August 21, 1918; commis- 
sioned a first lieutenant September 30, 1918 ; stationed at Camp Devens. 

FOLEY, REV. CHARLES L. — Army. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant April 17, 1918; given a purse of gold by Holy 
Cross Church parishioners ; stationed at Camp Greenleaf, Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., as 
senior post chaplain. 




CAPT. ROBERT E. CLEARY CAPT. GERALD J. CALLAHAN 




¥^< 



LIEUT. ANDREW MANGUM LIEUT. ERANK L. GIBSON 



82 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

MAllTIN, KEY. JOHN A. — Army. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant in July, 1918 ; stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

3IONGOVAN, REV. JOHN T. — Army. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant July 27, 1918; presented with a purse of gold 
by the parishioners of Holy Cross Church ; reported at Hoboken, N. J., September 
5, and arrived in France September :27, 19] 8. 

REMY, REV. HORMISDAS — Army. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant April 17, 1918 ; presented with a purse of gold 
by the parishioners of Precious Blood Church ; ordered to report to Fortress Mon- 
roe, Va., notification arriving too late ; sent to Boston for examination and assigned 
to Camp Meade, Md. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

AIKEN, HOWARD W.— Transport Corps. 

Enlisted in the regular army 1915 ; commissioned a second lieutenant at Leon 
Springs, Texas, on August 12, 1917; assigned to quartermaster corps at Camp 
Devens; transferred to Camp Johnston, Jacksonville, Fla. ; assigned to transport 
corps with the American Expeditionary Forces. 

ALLEN, LELAND C. — Medical Corps. 

Entered the service June 4, 1917; assigned to the Base Hospital at Camp 
Devens ; promoted to corporal ; commissioned a second lieutenant August 8, 1918. 

BECK, JOHN H.— Field Artillery. 

Entered Plattsburg and graduated November 26, 1917, with the rank of second 
lieutenant; assigned to Camp Devens; transferred to School of Fire at Fort Sill, 
Okla., where he was made an instructor in field gunnery: attached to 301st Field 
Artillery, American Expeditionary Forces. 

BIGELOW, DR. JAMES B. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant July 20, 1918 ; sent to Camp Greenleaf , Fort 
Oglethorpe, Ga. ; transferred to the base hospital at Camp McClellan, where he was 
placed in charge. 

BLUNT, STANLEY E. — Ordnance Department. 
Commissioned a second lieutenant September 24, 1917. 

BURKHARDT, EDWIN H. — Quartermaster Corps. 

Entered the service in September, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; promoted 
to sergeant; commissioned a second lieutenant July 12, 1918; placed in quartermas- 
ter corps in Public Utilities Department. 

BURKHARDT, HAROLD H. — Field Artillery. 

Entered the service November 27, 1916; stationed at Camp Stanley, Leon 
Springs, Texas ; commissioned a first lieutenant November 27, 1917 ; assigned to 
20th Field Artillery; went overseas with American Expeditionary Forces. 

BURNS, THOMAS R. — Aviation. 

Entered the Aviation Corps July, 1917 ; stationed at Mineola, L. L ; commis- 
sioned a first lieutenant August 30, 1918; assigned to Lake Charles, La., where he 
was instructor in gunnery and aero work; transferred to Rockwell Field, San 
Diego, Cal. 

CASEY, THOMAS L. — Sanitary Corps. 

Entered the service in June, 1916; went to Mexican border with a New York 
inilitia outfit; stationed at San Antonio, Texas, as head pharmacist for the di- 
vision; attended Plattsburg; later attached to the Whie House Guards as a ser- 
geant; commissioned a first lieutenant in the Sanitary Corps June 19, 1918. 





LIEUT. ALEX. MACDONALD LIEUT. FRANK J. MANLEY 




LIEUT. JOHN F. McCARTHY LIEUT. JOHN HALFPENNY 



84 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

CAVANAUGH, WILLIAM — Infantry. 

Entered 69th New York Infantry, National Guard; went overseas in October, 
1917, with the 165th Regiment, "Rainbow Division"; sent home in June, 1918, to 
assist in training officers ; while overseas was in action several times. 

CAVERLY, ARTHUR S.— Signal Corps. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant October 30, 1918. 

CHOQUETTE, AVALLACE A. — Tank Corps. 

Enlisted in Company D, 2nd Massachusetts Regiment, June 29, 1910; promoted 
to corporal June, 1911 ; on December 11, 1911, promoted to sergeant ; elected first 
lieutenant May 26, 1913 ; went to the Mexican border with Company D, 2nd Massa- 
chusetts Regiment ; was detached from his company and served one month as act- 
ing battalion adjutant, and for two and a half months was in charge of No. 7 
Truck Train; went to France with Company D, 104th Infantry; was again de- 
tached from his company and attended an officers' training school in the French 
front line trenches ; assigned to Tank Corps in June, 1918. 

CLARK, DR. GEORGE A. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant January, 1918, assigned to the medical staff of 
the Roosevelt Hospital, N. Y. ; transferred to Camp Jackson, S. C. 

CLARKE, DR. PHILIP H.— Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant January 21, 1918 ; assigned to the Army Medi- 
cal School, Washington, D. C. ; transferred to Newport News, Va. ; stationed in 
surgeon's office headquarters. 

COLLIXGWOOD, FRANK M. — Army. 

Entered the service October, 1918 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; promoted to 
corporal March 21, 1918 ; entered the fourth officers' training school at Camp 
Devens May 15, 1918; transferred to Camp Lee, Va. ; commissioned a second lieu- 
lenant August, 1918 ; returned to Camp Devens and assigned to the Depot Brigade. 

COLLINGAVOOD, GEORGE — Ordnance Department. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant July, 1917 ; stationed at different points in 
Ohio in charge of ammunition plants. 

CONNOR, DR. CHARLES— Medical Reserve Corps. 

Served four years in the navy and was with the American Fleet on its four- 
teen months' tour of the world, being attached to the U. S. S. Ohio ; commissioned 
a first lieutenant in the Medical Reserve Corps November 5, 1918 ; stationed at 
Camp Greenleaf, Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. ; transferred to Newport News, Va. 

COYNE, CHARLES E.— Ordnance Department. 

Active in Liberty Loan, Y. M. C. A., K. of C, Red Cross campaigns ; in charge 
of the Boy Scouts in the Second Liberty Loan; raised $65,000; secretary for the 
Red Anchor (K. of C.) ca'mpaign, which raised $46,000; commissioned a second 
lieutenant October 26, 1918, after completing a course in the Officers' Training 
School at Camp Meigs, Washington, D. C. ; stationed at Washington in the Admin- 
istrative Branch, Requirements Division, office of Purchase and Storage, General 
Staff; compiled and edited "History of The Requirements Division in the World 
War, 1917-1918." 

CROSIER, WALTER E— Quartermaster Corps. 

Entered the service October 5, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; promoted to- 
corporal March 30, 1918 ; promoted to sergeant in July, 1918 ; transferred to Offi- 
cers' Training School, Camp Meigs, Washington, D. C, October 30, 1918; commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant December 11, 1918. 

GUMMING, FRED — Aviation. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant at Plattsburg November, 1917 ; stationed at 
San Antonio, Texas. 

DALTON, WILLIAM E. — Aviation. 

Took a two months' course at Plattsburg; entered the Aviation Corps Decem- 
ber 7, 1917; stationed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology ;_ later at Prince- 
ton; transferred to Camp Hicks, Texas; commissioned a second lieutenant July 2, 
1918; transferred to Fort Worth, Texas. 





LIEUT. HOWARD AIKEN 



LIEUT. JOHN H. BECK 




LIEUT. ROBERT BURKE. LIEUT. W. A. LMunjLiMir, 



86 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

DIAMOND, NIGEL H. — Infantry. 

Entered Company D, 2nd Massachusetts Regiment in June, 1916 ; served at the 
Mexican border that summer ; re-enlisted March 10, 1917 ; promoted to corporal at 
Camp Bartlett ; went overseas in October, 1917, with "Holyoke's Own"; entered 
the Officers' Training School in France in October, 1918; commissioned a second 
lieutenant November, 1918; later assigned to Company B, 47th Infantry. 

DICKINSON, C. ROl— Aviation. 

Entered the service February 9, 1918 ; assigned to Cornell Aviation School ; 
commissioned a second lieutenant (aeronautics) August 2, 1918; assigned to Hous- 
ton, Texas. 

DOWD, 30CHAEL J. — Railway Engineers. 

Entered the service in June, 1917, with the 14th Railway Engineers; went over- 
seas in July, 1917; promoted to sergeant; commissioned a first lieutenant in France 
in March, 1918, for distinguished service ; a member of the regiment which took 
up arms against the enemy, the first American forces to open fire; was for a time 
on detached service with the British. 

DUPBE, LEO A.— Field Artillery. 

Served in the Hawaiian Islands with the First Artillery; at Fort Sill, Okla., 
with the Ninth Artillery; won commission as second lieutenant at Field Artillery 
Central Officers' Training School. Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., December 9, 1918 ; 
placed in active service. 

DLTIANT, CONANT — Quartermaster Corps. 

Enlisted December 1.3, 1917 ; stationed at Fort Slocum, X. Y. ; transferred to 
Camp Dix, N. J., where he received his commission as second lieutenant August 7, 
1918; transferred to Camp Mills, where he belonged to the salvage corps. 

FARR, DR. L. H. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant in the X-ray Department October 28, 1918 ; 
assigned to Camp Greenleaf, Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

FAY, LEVI E.— Infantry. 

Enlisted in Company D, 2nd Massachusetts Regiment on March 10, 1916; 
served in the Mexican Border Expedition ; promoted to corporal at the border ; 
promoted to mess sergeant at Camp Bartlett ; went overseas with Company D, 
104th Infantry; entered the Officers' Training School in France in April, 1918; 
commissioned a second lieutenant in July, 1918. 

FENTON, DANIEL E. — Artillery. 

Attended Second Plattsburg Camp ; commissioned first lieutenant November 23, 
1917 ; stafif duty, Washington. D. C, until May, 1918 ; transferred to heavy artillery 
at Fortress Monroe, Va. ; assigned to 45th Artillery, C. A. C. ; transferred to Camp 
Eustis, Va., August. 1918; with American Expeditionary Forces as Battery Com- 
mander, Battery C, 45th Artillery. 

FITZSIMMONS, HAROLD — Infantry. 

Entered the service September 7, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; promoted 
to_ sergeant January 23, 1918 ; selected to attend the officers' training school ; com- 
missioned a second lieutenant at Camp Devens in April, 1918; assigned to infantry; 
transferred to Camp Gordon, Ga. ; later transferred to Vancouver Barracks, State 
of Washington ; named an infantry instructor. 

FORRESTER, GEORGE W. — Aviation. 

Entered the service in June, 1917; commissioned a first lieutenant in the aero 
service in France in June, 1918. 

GALLUP, BURTON A. — Aviation. 

Entered the service in December, 1917 ; assigned to Military School of Aero- 
nautics at Ohio State University; transferred to University of California; trans- 
ferred to Flying Squadron, Lonoke, Ark. ; commissioned a second lieutenant June 
14, 1918; assigned to Camp Dix, Texas, as an instructor. 





LIEUT. MAHLON T. HILL LIEUT. THOMAS MacMAHON 




LIEUT. WILLIAM STACK 



88 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

GERAN, JOHN C— Infantry. 

Attended both Plattsburg camps in 1917; commissioned a first lieutenant, field 
artillery, at Plattsburg, November 26, 1917; assigned to Camp Devens; transferred 
to Camp Greene, N. C); assigned to Company E, 1st New Hampshire Infantry. 

GIBSON, DR. PRANK L.— Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant July 15, 1918 ; ordered to Camp Greenleaf , 
I'ort Oglethorpe, Ga., where he was assigned to the base hospital ; went overseas, 
and was stationed at the base hospital in Brest, France. 

GILLIS, RONALD C. — Infantry. 

Entered the service in June, 191(i, with the California National Guard; served 
on the Mexican border: discharged with the rank of sergeant; entered the service 
again in May, 1917 ; commissioned a first lieutenant December, 1917 ; assigned to 
Company M, 3G4th Infantry; transferred to Camp Lewis, Wash. 

GREANEY, DR. WILLIAM F. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant August 15, 1917; ordered to Fort Benjamin 
Harrison, Ind. ; transferred to the Army Medical School, Washington, D. C. ; sent 
to garrison hospital at Plattsburg; went overseas September 1, 1918, and assigned 
to sanitary train of the 9:hKl Division, and later to Field Hospital No. 368. (This 
hospital was shelled by the enemy in the Argonne Forest battle.) 

GREEN, ADDISON B. — Field Artillery. 

Entered the Plattsburg Camp August 23, 1917; commissioned a second lieu- 
tenant November 26, 1917 ; assigned to Camp Greene, N. C. ; commissioned a first 
lieutenant March 3, 1918; assigned to the 16th Field Artillery; went overseas in 
May, 1918. 

GREEN, GILLIS— United States Army. 

Enlisted July 6, 1898 ; sent to Fort Crooke, Neb. ; assigned to Company K, 
22nd Infantry; on January 27, 1899, left for Manila; was in battle of Pasig, March 
13,1899; at the battle of Malinta Hill, on March 26th; left Camdaha October 5; 
finished the campaign December 7th ; returned to the United States in February, 
1902; discharged and re-enlisted in Company A, 5th Infantry; assigned to Lin- 
gayer, Philippine Islands; did garrison duty until June 1, 1903; returned to the 
United States through the Suez Canal; sent to Plattsburg Barracks, New York; 
discharged in 1906, and re-enlisted for general service in the infantry at Columbus 
Barracks, Ohio; assigned to 12th Recruiting Company: transferred in 1908 to the 
1st Company at Fort Leavitt, Maine; discharged in 1909; re-enlisted, and later 
transferred to the 51st Company at Fort McKinley, Maine ; re-enlisted in 1911, and 
again in 1914 ; in December, 1916, was assigned to recruiting service ; sent to Hol- 
yoke January 1, 1917 ; was here eighteen months and, during that time, enlisted 
over 1,500 men; transferred to Fort Slocum in September, 1918; commissioned a 
lirst lieutenant in October, 1918 ; assigned to quartermaster corps. Camp Greene, 
N. C, 351st (colored) Labor Battalion. 

GUAY, GEORGE H. — Infantry. 

Entered the service in June, 1915 ; promoted to sergeant in Troop F, 16th 
Cavalry, stationed at Fort Worth, Texas; commissioned a second lieutenant of 
infantry August 29, 1918; transferred to Vancouver Barracks, State of Washington. 

GULLIVER, JAMES L.— Infantry. 

Entered the service December 31, 1917; stationed at Camp Devens; commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant April, 1918. 

HAFEY, DR. JOSEPH M.— Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant September 27, 1918 ; assigned to 13th Vet- 
erinary Hospital, Camp Lee, Va. ; went overseas in November, 1918. 

HALFPENNY, JOHN H. — Engineer Corps. 

Entered Plattsburg May 14,vi917; commissioned a first lieutenant August 15, 
1917, at Officers' Training Camp, American University, Washington, D. C. ; sent 
to Camp Upton, L. I., Company B, 302d Engineer Corps; went overseas in April, 
1918. 




LirCUT. WII.I.IXM McGARRY LIEUT. ADDISON B. GREEN 




LIEUT. JOHN ROSS LIEUT. FRANK ,. Oi.i^IL 



90 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

HALLISEY, EDWARD J. — Ordnance Department. 

Entered the service in December, 1917; stationed at Washington, D. C, as a 
first-class accountant; commissioned a second lieutenant October 16, 1918, at Camp. 
Lee, Va. ; transferred to Camp Sherman, Ohio. 

HAND, DR. EDWARD P. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant August 6, 1918; stationed at Camp Devens. 

HARTIGAN, DANIEL J. — United States Army. 

Entered the service September 23. 1917; stationed at Camp Devens; attended 
the officers' training school at Camp Devens ; transferred to Camp Lee, Va. ; com- 
missioned a second lieutenant September 3, 1918, at Camp Lee. 

HASTINGS, ARTHUR C. J. — Ordnance Department. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant August, 1918 ; stationed at Washington, D. C. 

HASTINGS, ORLANDO B. — Machine Gun. 

Enlisted in Company D, 2nd Massachusetts Regiment, in June, 1916 ; did duty 
ar the Mexican border that summer; promoted to supply sergeant at Camp Bart- 
lott; went overseas with Company D, 104th Infantry; entered the Officers' Training 
School in France ; commissioned a second lieutenant April, 1918 ; later took a 
course in gas warfare ; assigned to the Machine Gun Battalion of the 78th Division. 

HAGGERTY, CLAUDE M. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant May 10, 1918 ; assigned to Company E, 
Coast Artillery Corps; stationed at Fort Warren. 

HAYWARD, CHARLES L. — Air Service. 

Entered the service May 3, 1917; stationed at Stapleton, L. L; commissioned 
balloon pilot with the rank of second lieutenant at Fort Omaha, Neb., November 
:."2, 1917 ; at that time he was one of twenty-two men holding this rank in the 
United States service; was with the first American Balloon Squadron in France 
in December, 1917; made commander of the 13th Balloon Company in September, 
I'JIS. 

HEINRITZ, STUART F.— Signal Corps. 

Entered the service July 20, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; promoted to 
corporal September, 1917 ; promoted to sergeant March, 1918 ; won his commission 
as second lieutenant August 27, 1918, at Camp Morse; transferred to Camp Stan- 
lej', Texas, and later sent to Camp Meade, Md. 

HENDERSON, R. J. — Aviation. 

Entered the service in February, 1918; stationed at Camp Custer; commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant April 17, 1918, at the School of Military Aeronautics, 
Georgia Institute of Technology. 

HERLIHY% DR. JOHN P. — Dental Reserve Corps. 

Entered the service June, 1917 ; commissioned a first lieutenant in August, 
1917; stationed at Forsythe Dental Infirmary, Boston; transferred to Camp Upton, 
L. I. ; placed in charge of the extracting department ; later promoted to head of the 
Department of Oral Surgery; recommended for promotion to the rank of captain. 

HEYWOOD, FRANCIS — Infantry. 

Enlisted in Company D, 2nd Massachusetts Regiment, in March, 1916 ; went to 
the Mexican border, where, for a time, he was with the supply company of the 2nd 
Regiment; went to France as a sergeant in Company D, 104th Infantrj'; commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant in France April, 1918 ; assigned to Company G, 11th 
Infantry; returned to the United States in August, 1918, and was assigned to 
Camp Dix, N. J., as an instructor; transferred to Camp Devens; while awaiting 
his commission in France he was detached from his company and specialized in 
application of gas attacks ; in the big drive of March 21, 1918, while serving with 
the French, he was cited for distinguished service and awarded the Croix de 
Guerre. 




LIEUT. LEVI E. FAY LIEUT. JOHN C. GER. \ 




r 



LIEUT. PATRI . 1 )YNIHAN MIL 1 1'. II. I'AVTON 




92 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

HILL, >L\HLON T.— Infantry. 

Enlisted in Company D, 2nd Massachusetts Regiment, March 10, 1916; went 
to the Mexican border that summer ; promoted to corporal while in New Mexico ; 
selected by Captain Slate to attend Plattsburg ; commissioned a second lieutenant 
at Plattsburg August 11, 1917; assigned to Company G, 103rd Infantry at Camp 
Bartlett ; went overseas with 103rd Infantry ; sent back to the United States in 
May, 1918, as an instructor in automatic rifles and tactical work; stationed at Camp 
Beauregard, La. 

HOOKS, DAVID— Artillery. 

Attended first officers' training school at Fort Meyer, Va., where he received 
his commission as first lieutenant in August, 1917. 

HOWES, CARROLL C— Quartermaster Corps. 

Entered the service December 8, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Johnston, Fla. ; com- 
missioned a second lieutenant while at Camp Johnston September 16, 1918. 

HOYT, DR. P. A.— Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant Medical Reserve Corps September 6, 1918. 
HUBBARD, WILLIAM — Field Artillery. 

Entered the service August 36, 1918; stationed at Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. ; 
commissioned a second lieutenant October, 1918. 

HUBBARD, EDWARD W. — Field Artillery. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant at Plattsburg August 15, 1917 ; assigned to 
Battery B, 305th Field Artillery, at Camp Devens ; transferred to 303rd Field Art- 
illery of the 76th Division ; went overseas. 

HUBBARD, RALPH B. — Engineer Corps. 

Entered Plattsburg in May, 1917, with the New York Field Artillery ; special- 
ized in engineering, and was transferred to American University at Washington, 
D. C, where he was commissioned a second lieutenant August 12, 1917 ; stationed 
at the American University and later transferred to Rockford, Va. 

LACZYNSKI, DR. FRANCIS S.— Medical Reserve Corps. 
Commissioned a first lieutenant August 30, 1918; stationed at Camp Greenleaf, 
Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

LAPORTE, ALBERT N.— Quartermaster Corps. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant August 12, 1917, at Fort Meyer, Va. ; trans- 
ferred to Camp -Lee, Va. 

LINNELL, DON C. G.— Engineer Corps. 

Entered Plattsburg in May, 1917; transferred to engineering school at Ameri- 
can University, Washington, D. C. ; commissioned a second lieutenant August 12, 
1917; transferred to Camp Lee, Va. 

LYNCH, DR. HENRY E. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Rejected for a commission in the navy; commissioned a first lieutenant in the 
army July 29, 1917; stationed at Camp Greenleaf, Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. ; transferred 
to Camp Sheridan, Ala. 

McCarthy, JOHN p.— Tank Corps. 

Entered the service October 8, 1917, in the Aviation Corps ; stationed at Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology; transferred to Cornell University; later trans- 
ferred to Tank Corps, Gettysburg, Pa. ; promoted to sergeant in the Tank Corps 
May, 1918 ; commissioned a second lieutenant October 5, 1918 ; went overseas No- 
vember, 1918. 

McGARRY, WILLIAM H. — Infantry. 

Enlisted in Company D, 2nd Massachusetts Regiment, in June, 1916 ; served on 
the Mexican border; promoted to sergeant; injured in an auto accident at the 
Notch May 24, 1917, while the troops were at Springfield doing guard duty; laid 




LIEUT. CHARLES T. BEAUPRE 



LIELT. lOllX IIERLII 




LIEUT. FRANCIS C. HEYWOOD LIEUT. PETER MERRLMAN 



94 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

pipe lines at Camp Bartlett ; went overseas as a sergeant in Company D, 104th In- 
fantr}-, in October, 1917 ; entered the officers' training school in France in Decem- 
ber, 1918 ; commissioned a second lieutenant May 3, 1918 ; attended a specialist 
school in automatic weapons; transferred to Headquarters Company, 328th Infan- 
try; transferred to 104th Infantry. 

MACDONALD, ALEXANDER — Division Postmaster, 26th Division. 

Enlisted in Company D, 2nd Massachusetrs Regiment, March 20, 189.5 ; pro- 
moted to corporal May 3, 1898 ; served in the Spanish-American War as a corporal, 
and was discharged November 3, 1898, with the rank of sergeant; elected first lieu- 
tenant May 4, 1904 ; elected captain December 4, 1911 ; November 1, 1913, elected 
major; re-entered the service with the rank of first lieutenant, battalion adjutant, 
November 12, 1913 ; at the Mexican border in 1916 he was assigned as commander 
of a casual detachment regiment, and later made assistant to the commander of 
base headquarters; at Camp Bartlett he was assigned as adjutant of the 2nd Bat- 
talion; went overseas with the 104th Infantry in October, 1917; on November 28, 
1917, one of his little sons met death from burns ; while in France promoted to Di- 
visional Postmaster ; received three citations for bravery. 

McMAHON, THOMAS J. — Infantry. 

Entered the service October 7, 1917 ; sent to Camp Devens ; transferred to 
Camp Gordon, Ga. ; promoted to sergeant ; attended an officers' training school and 
received a commission as second lieutenant April 29, 1918 ; transferred to Camp 
Upton, L. I. ; arrived overseas in June, 1918. 

MANGUM, ANDREW B. — Infantry. 

Entered the service May 28, 1917 ; stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. ; trans- 
ferred to Camp Devens ; promoted to sergeant ; went overseas in September, 1918 ; 
commissioned a second lieutenant while in France in November, 1918; transferred 
to Philippine Islands as an expert in 'X-ray work; transferred to Russia. 

3IANLEY, ANTHONY B. — Aviation. 

Entered the service June 4, 1917 ; arrived overseas June 20, 1917. with the 
American Field Ambulance Unit; stationed on the French front; transferred to the 
Transportation Service; cited for bravery; received a certificate of service from 
the French Government ; commissioned a second lieutenant in France June, 1918 : 
transferred to Aviation Corps. 

MANLEY, DR. J. FRANK — Dental Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant August 15, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

MASTERSON, BENJAMIN E. — Infantry. 

Entered the Medical Corps March 12, 1918 ; stationed at Camp Greenleaf , Fort 
Oglethorpe, Ga. ; transferred to Camp Lee, Va. ; transferred to Camp Hancock, Ga.. 
v'here he was commissioned a second lieutenant of infantry November 17, 1918, and 
sssigned as a machine gun instructor. 

MERRIMAN, PETER — Infantry. 

Entered the service in June, 1916, with the supply company, 2d Mass. Regi- 
ment; served on the Mexican Border with Company D; went overseas in October, 
1917, as a sergeant of the 104th Regimental Supply Company; entered the Officers' 
Training School in France ; commissioned a second lieutenant May 3, 1918 ; as- 
signed to Company E, 311th Infantrj^ 27th Division ; wounded in action in Octo- 
ber, 1918. 

METCALF, EARL — Infantry. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant at Plattsburg in August, 1917. 

MOORE, EDWIN A. — Ordnance. 

Entered the service' in December, 1917 ; stationed at Washington, D. C, pro- 
moted to sergeant of ordnance in the Engraving Bureau; commissioned a second 
lieutenant in motor transportation service September 28, 1918; transferred to 
Florida. 




LIEUT. E. J. STAPLETON LIEUT. STUART T. HEINRITZ 




r \l 

imh i^t I 

LIEUT. HAROLD H. BURKHARDT 



LIEUT. WALTER E. CROSIER 



96 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

MOYNIHAN, PATRICK J. — Infantry. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant at Plattsburg November 26, 1917 ; stationed 
in Ohio ; transferred to Camp Upton, L. I. 

NEVVCOMB, BENJA]VUN R. — Ordnance Department. 

Entered the service August 22, 1917 ; commissioned a first lieutenant Sep- 
tember 17, 1917 ; stationed in Washington, D. C. ; transferred to Camp Hancock, 
Ga. ; transferred back to Washington as head of Patent Section, Ordnance De- 
partment. 

O'CONNOR, MICHAEL F. — Infantry. 

Entered the service September 21, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; promoted 
to sergeant; entered the Officers' Training School May 15, 1918; commissioned a 
second lieutenant at Camp Lee, Va., August 24, 1918. 

O'DONNELL, DR. JAMES R.— Dental Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant February 7, 1918; ordered to Camp Dix, N. J., 
and later had these orders revoked. 

O'NEIL, FRANK J. — Infantry. 

Entered the service September 21, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; promoted 
to sergeant; selected to attend Officers' Training School; commissioned a second 
lieutenant May 1, 1918; transferred to Camp Gordon, Ga. ; transferred to Univer- 
sity of Nebraska as an instructor. 

PAYTON, DR. PATRICK H.— Dental Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant May, 1917 ; stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

POWERS, JAMES B.— Motor Transportation Corps. 

Entered the service June 14, 1917 ; stationed at Wentworth Institute ; com- 
missioned a second lieutenant October, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Johnston, Fla. ; 
scheduled for overseas duty but was prevented from going by the signing of the 
armistice. 

PRESCOTT, EDWIN C. — Quartermaster Corps. 

Entered the service June 4, 1917 ; stationed at Washington Barracks, with the 
fjth Engineers ; promoted to sergeant ; commissioned a second lieutenant in the 
quartermaster corps. 

PROVOST, DR. BENJARIIN— Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant October, 1917 ; assigned to Medical Corps 41st 
Engineers ; stationed at Washington, D. C. 

REGAN, MAURICE A. — Infantry. 

Entered the service September ,21, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; promoted 
Lo corporal; promoted to sergeant; transferred to Camp Lee, Va. ; commissioned a 
second lieutenant August 28, 1918; transferred to Camp Meade, Md. 

RHOADES, HARRY S. — Infantry. 

Enlisted in Company D, 2d Ad:assachusetts Regiment, June, 1916 ; served on the 
Mexican border ; promoted to corporal, and then to sergeant at Camp Bartlett ; 
went overseas with Company D, 104th Infantry; commissioned a second lieutenant 
in France; transferred to United States Gas Service; was gassed in action. 

ROSS, JOHN D. — Army Service Corps. 

Enteied the service July 23, 1918; stationed at Camp Devens; transferred to 
engineering corps, Washington, D. C. ; commissioned a second lieutenant in the 
army service corps November 8, 1918; promoted to first lieutenant December 18, 
1918. 

RYAN, J. RAYMOND — Aviation. 

Entered the service in July, 1917 ; sent to Boston Tech. ; transferred to Mineola, 
L. I. ; transferred to Washington, D. C. ; commissioned a first lieutenant November 
13, 1917; went overseas the same month as did the 10th Foreign Detachment; sent 




LIEUT. EDWARD W. HUBBARD LIEUT. ANTHONY MANLEY 




LIEUT. O. B. HASTINGS 



LIEUT. CHAR LI', S H. SIZARS 



98 IIOLYOKE In The Great War. 

to Italy for training; transferred to a bombing squad; returned to United States 
en transport Northern Star, which was stranded on the rocks on Fire Island. 

SACHS, EDWARD A.— Chemical Warfare Service. 

Entered the service in June, 1917, as a junior chemist in the Bureau of Mines, 
Washington, D. C. ; commissioned a second lieutenant October 14, 1918; transferred 
to American Experiment Station. 

SANDERSON, JAMES W. — Aviation. 

Entered the service December, 1917, after two attempts to enter Plattsburg; 
stationed at Cornell; transferred to Dallas, Texas; transferred to Mineola, L. I.; 
commissioned a first lieutenant September, 1918, and made a pursuit pilot; trans- 
ferred to San Antonio, Texas ; transferred to California. 

SEARS, CHARLES H. — Infantry. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant August 11, 1917, at Madison Barracks, New 
York; stationed at Camp Merritt, N. J.; went overseas with the Expeditionary 
Forces. 

SENIOR, DR. PHILIP— Ordnance. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant, 1st Battery, 2nd New York Regiment ; com- 
missioned a first lieutenant in May, 1917, in the Ordnance Department August 13, 
1917, after a three months' course at Plattsburg. 

SPENCER, THADDEUS H. — Engineers' Reserve Corps. 

Entered the service May 19, 1918; commissioned a second lieutenant October 
30, 1918; assigned to Company B, 6th Regiment. 

STACK, WILLIAM A— Field Artillery. 

Entered the service in October, 1917 ; promoted to sergeant ; attended the Field 
Artillery School of Instruction; commissioned a first lieutenant July 12, 1918, in 
France; assigned to Battery C, 175th Field Artillery; cited for bravery in action 
and decorated with Distinguished Service Medal. 

STAPLETON, E. J.— Ordnance Department. 

Entered the service August 8, 1917, with the rank of corporal of ordnance; 
stationed at Watertown Arsenal ; promoted to sergeant and transferred to Ho- 
boken, N. J.; commissioned a second lieutenant October 18, 1918. 

STIMPSON, E. ALBION — Engineers. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant August 1, 1917; assigned to Company C, 5th 
Engineer Train, E. O. R. C. 

ST. GEORGES, DR. WILFRED M.— Medical Reserve Corps. 
Commissioned a first lieutenant July 23, 1918; stationed at Camp Wadsworth, 
S. C. ; attached to 5th Pioneer Infantry; transferred to Camp Dix, N. J.' 

TARDY, ALBERT, JR. — Infantry. 

Went to Ardgay, Scotlarid,_ with Saw Mill Unit No. 10, in, June, 1917; dis- 
charged in June, 1918; commissioned a second lieutenant in September, 1918; sta- 
tbned at Camp Devens. 

WARNER, FREDERICK H. J. — Aviation. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant December 1, 1917, at Plattsburg; assigned to 
Champaign, 111. 

WEISER, RICHARD M.— Coast Artillery Corps. 

Entered the service May 21, 1917, in the Medical Department, 2nd Massachu- 
setts Regiment ; went overseas in October, 1917, with the Medical Company, 104th 
Infantry; cited for bravery in action, and awarded the Croix de Guerre; commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Corps in October, 1918. 

WETHERELL, DR. BRYANT D. — Medical Reserve Corps. 
Commissioned a first lieutenant June 29, 1918 ; assigned to Base Hospital No. 2 
at Garden City, L. I. 




LIEUT. BURTON A. GALLUP LIEUT. HARRY S. RHOADS 




LIEUT. RICHARD M. WEISER LIEUT. EDWARD HALLISSEY. 



100 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

WILLIAMS, FAY W. — Aviation. 

Entered Plattsburg in August, 1917; after a month's training was transferred 
to Fortress Monroe Coast Artillery School, where he received his commission as 
first lieutenant in November, 1917 ; went overseas with four hundred volunteer offi- 
cers in December, 1917; attended various officers' schools in France; had charge of 
billeting the 51st and 56th Regiments ; was regimental supply officer for a time ; 
volunteered for the air service, and was transferred to Aviation Instruction Centre 
at Tours ; went to the front in September, 1918, as an aerial observer ; took part in 
drives at St. Mihiel, Argonne Forest and Sedan ; was in one of the first planes 
that went over into Luxemburg after the signing of the armistice. 

WILMOT, CHARLES — Ordnance Department. 

Entered the service in 1916; served at the Mexican border; transferred to Fort 
Bliss, Texas, as a machine gun instructor ; commissioned a second lieutenant Jan- 
uavy, 1918 ; assigned to Springfield Arsenal. 

WINTERS, EDWARD J. — Marine Corps. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant July 17, 1917 ; stationed at Quantico, Va. ; 
transferred to Philadelphia Naval Yards. 

YOUNG, FREDERICK R. — Infantry. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant December 15, 1917, at the officers' training 
school. Fort Sheridan, 111. ; transferred to Camp Grant, 111., as paymaster. 



Holyoke's Naval Officers 



CAPTAIN. 



HYLAND, JOHN J.— United States Navy. 

Graduated from Holyoke High School in 1895 ; appointed to the Naval Acad- 
emy in 1896 ; graduated from Annapolis in 1900 with high honors ; passed through 
the usual service routine until he was appointed to the supervision of the oil fuel 
experiments at the navy yard in Philadelphia ; his work here was of very high 
order; was promoted to commander June 9, 1917, and on August 12, 1918, was pro- 
moted to captain ; assigned to the command of the Cleveland, which was in convoy- 
service. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER. 

CROSIER, CHARLES R.— United States Navy. 

Entered the Naval Reserves May 20, 1917 ; was at that time employed by the 
Standard Oil Company as a marine engineer ; for a time was in the government 
lighthouse service on the Great Lakes ; commissioned a lieutenant March 29, 1918 ; 
commissioned a lieutenant-commander May 20, 1918, and left for overseas duty. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

BENHARD, DR. ALBERT H. — United States Navy. 

Commissioned a lieutenant May 23, 1918, and appointed assistant surgeon ; sta- 
tioned at Great Lakes Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, 111. 

BRADY, DR. WILLIAM F. — United States Naval Reserves. 
Commissioned a junior lieutenant September 7, 1918, and appointed assistant 
surgeon, but was not called into service. 

EIDMAN, FRANK L.— United States Navy. 

Commissioned an ensign at Aviation Engineers' School, Columbia University ;^ 
was officer in charge ; organized school for advanced machinists' mates at Great 
Lakes Training Station. 




CAPTAIN JOHN HYLAND. 



102 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

GARLAND, 3nCHAEL— United States Navy. 

Entered the service March 2, 1902, as an apprentice seaman ; commissioned an 
ensign in January, 1917 ; stationed at Charlestown Navy Yards ; promoted to lieu- 
tenant in December, 1917. 

McCORKINDALE, ROY E. — United States Navy. 

Commissioned a junior Heutenant March, 1917; appointed assistant civil engi- 
I'.eer; stationed at Washington, D. C. ; transferred to Vallejo, Mare Island, Cal. 

ENSIGNS. 

BARTLETT, F. T. — United States Navy. 

Entered the service in June, 1917 ; commissioned an ensign in August, 1918 ; 
stationed at Brooklyn Navy Yard. 

BEGLEY, JOHN S.— United States Naval Aviation. 

Entered the service as a landsman quartermaster (naval air) December 23, 
1917; stationed at Charlestown Navy Yard; transferred to Pensacola, Fla._, where 
he entered the Naval Aviation School ; transferred to Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology ; promoted to cadet ; acting instructor in machine gunnery at M. I. T. ; 
commissioned an ensign in July, 1918. 

BUCKLEY, FRANK L. — United States Navy. 

Commissioned an ensign October 13, 1917, and appointed assistant paymaster, 
•vvhile taking a military course at Plattsburg; attached to U. S. S. Susquehanna in 
foreign waters. 

BURNS, JAMES E. — United States Navy. 

Entered the service in April, 1917 : stationed at Newport, R. I., Training School ; 
commissioned an ensign May 1, 1918. 

CRONIN, JOHN A.— United States Navy. 

Entered the service May, 1917; stationed at Newport, R. I.; transferred to New 
London, Conn. ; commissioned an ensign January 19, 1918, at Annapolis ; attached 
to U. S. S. Kentucky. 

EGER, EDWARD— United States Navy. 

Entered the service in 1910 as a machinist mate ; promoted to warrant machin- 
ist October 4, 1916 ; attached to U. S. S. Bridge ; commissioned an ensign in July, 
1917 ; promoted to ensign engineer January 31, 1918 ; transferred to mine-laying 
squadron U. S. S. Black Hawk. 

GERAN, GEORGE P.— United States Merchant Marine. 

Entered the service October, 1917, as a machinist in the Naval Aviation ; com- 
missioned an ensign and transferred to the United States Merchant Marine service. 

JUDGE, C. JOHN — United States Navy. 

Entered the service in June, 1918; commissioned an ensign; stationed at Car- 
negie Institute at Pittsburg, Pa., studying steam turbines. 

PETERSON, MANGUS F. — United States Navy. 

Entered the service in January, 1918; commissioned an ensign May 4, 1918; ap- 
pointed assistant paymaster; previous to entering the naval service was a Y. M. 
C. A. secretary at Camp Devens ; detailed to special cost inspection work at Beth- 
lehem Ship Building Corporation at Quincy; transferred to Wollaston. 

WALSH, MAURICE— United States Navy. 
Commissioned an ensign May 31, 1918. 

VINING, MERRITT A.— United States Naval Aviation. 

Entered the service November 23, 1917 ; assigned to United States Naval Re- 
serves Flying Corps; commissioned an ensign. 

NAVIGATING OFFICER. 

ROCHFORD, WILLIAM — United States Merchant Marine. 
Served in the navy from 1907 to 1910; entered Plattsburg August, 1917; called 
into Merchant Marine Service, and later promoted to navigating officer. 






LIEUT.-COM. CHARLES CROSIER ENSIGN GEORGE P. GERAN 




ENSIGN JOHN JUDGE 



ACE EDWIN PARSONS 



104 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

OfEcers in Allied Service 



ACE. 

PARSONS, EDWIN C— (French Air Service.) 

First air work in Mexico, when he served for Villa in the campaigns against 
Carranza ; went overseas in 191.") and joined the Lafayette Escadrille ; on Septem- 
ber 4, 1917, captured his third German plane (official), and was cited to receive 
the war cross ; credited with being one of the most clever "circus" performers in 
the Escadrille ; returned to the United States in November, 1917, for a three weeks' 
rest; arrived back in France March 6, 1918, and brought down his fourth enemy 
plane a few days later to celebrate his return; in May, 1918, brought down the fifth 
plane ; won a military medal and named officially an ace ; shot down his sixth plane 
tn August, 1918, and his seventh September r29,"l918. 

CAPTAIN. 

FOERSTER, DR. JOHN F. C. — (Canadian Medical Corps.) 
Commissioned a captain in the Canadian Medical Corps June 17, 1918 ; reported 
for duty in Canada September 10, 1918. 

LIEUTENANT. 

FOSTER, THOMAS— (British Field Artillery.) 

Entered the service in 1916 with the British Field Battery; won promotion to 
the rank of lieutenant for bravery in action; buried by shell explosion; escaped 
with minor injuries; gassed in action. 

NARDI, FRANK— (Italian Infantry.) 

Entered the service September, 1914; commissioned a lieutenant January 6, 
1915 ; wounded January 15, 1915 ; taken prisoner by the Germans January 24, 1915, 
after he had taken command on the death of his captain ; attempted to escape from 
prison camp at Mulhauser ; recaptured after being at large four days. 




Left to right: — Charles McDonnell, James Kidnay, Ulric Ruel, Mar- 
tin McAlpine, John Sulivan, John Sweeney. 

— In a French Village. 



Holyoke Men in the Service 



Army 

ABBOTT, HAROLD F., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 11, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum. Transferred to Camp Ostisville, N. Y. 

ABELEIN, GEORGE F., Corporal, 618th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
December 12, 1917. Stationed at Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas. 

ABELEIN, HERMAN C, Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service Decem- 
ber 12, 1917. 

ALBERT, FRED C, Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service July 3, 1918. 

ABRAHAM, HERMAN G., Private, 2nd Separate Company, Depot Brigade, 
Artillery. Entered service December 5, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ADAMS, CLYDE, Private, Springfield Technical School. Entered service 
July 11, 1918. 

AHNERT, WALTER, Private, Depot Brigade. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

AHEARN, CORNELIUS E., Sergeant, Quartermaster Corps, Field Artillery. 
Entered service May 31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum. 

AHEARN, RALPH J., Sergeant, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service Sep- 
tember 23, 1917. 

xlIKEN, HAROLD F., Private, Company A, 5th Battalion, Forestry Engineers. 
Entered service December 5, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

AITKENS, JAMES A. F., Sergeant, Tank Corps. Entered service May 24, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Tobyanna, Pa. Later with 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

AITCHISON, JAMES G., Private, Battery 9, L. F. R. D. Entered _ service 
April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

AITCHISON, GEORGE W., Private, Field Artillery. Entered service June 4, 
1918. With the American Expeditionary Forces. In hospital with pneumonia. 

ALBEN, CHESTER H., Private, Company A, Motor Truck Division, 1st Reg- 
iment Supply Train. Entered service December 10, 1917. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

ALDER]\L1N, PAUL, Private, 330th Battalion. Entered service April 29, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Colt, Gettysburg, Pa. Later with American Expedition- 
ary Forces. 

ALEXANDER, THOMAS, Sergeant, 268th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
December 17, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum. Later with American Expedition- 
ary Forces. 

ALIX, ARMAND V., Private, Company F, 102d Regiment, Field Artillery. 
With the American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded and gassed July 23, 1918. 

ALL.IRD, ROMEO, Private, United States Army. Entered service July, 1917. 
ALLEN, HEYWOOD H., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ALLEN, CARL M., Corporal, Medical Corps. Entered service July 5, 1917. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. American Red Cross Military Unit Hos- 
pital No. 1. 



106 IIoLYOKE In The Great War. 

ALLEN, AlVDEDEE, Private, United States Army. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

ALLEN, JOHN R., Private, Depot Brigade. Entered service July 16, 1917. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ALLENS, EMIL, Private, United States Army. Entered service December 
G, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. 

ALLEY, EDGAR, Private, 74th Machine Gun Company. Entered service 
August, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ALLYN, STEWART R., Sergeant, 4th Division Sanitary Corps, 77th Field 
Artillery Medical Corps. Entered service June 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp 
Greene, N. C, Camp Shelby, Hattiesburg, Minn. Later with American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. On duty in the French Alps. 

ALMOND, HARRY, Private, United States Army. Entered service June 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

ALMOND, JAMES H., Private, United States Army. Entered service De- 
cember 10, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

ALTMAN, JACOB, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
Ji:ne 19, 1916. Mexican Border Service. Later with American Expeditionary 
Forces. At base censor office. 

AMIRR, ALEX A., Private, United States Army. Entered service Septem- 
ber 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

ANASTOPOLOUS, DEMETRIOUS, Private, United States Army. Entered 
service April 17, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Wounded in action. 

ANDERS, ALBERT H., Private, Detachment No. 1, 566th Signal Corps. 
Entered service March 8, 1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. Later with 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

ANDERSON, GEORGE B., Private, 29th Division Medical Corps. Stationed 
at Camp McClellan, Anniston, Ala. 

ANSON, NORMAN D., Corporal, Company A, Second Corps, Field Artillery. 
Entered service May 31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum. 

ANTHONY, LEO, Private. United States Army. Entered service November, 
J 917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ARCHAMBAULT, RANDOLPH, Private, Company H, C. A. C, 71st Artil- 
lery. Entered service March 13, 1918. 

ARCHAMBAULT, SERAFIN, Corporal, 2nd Cavalry Band. Entered service 
February, 1918. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

AREL, THEOPHILE, Private, F Troop, Cavalry 5. Entered service March 
1, 1918. 

ARENKOWITCH, JOSEPH, Private, Company 17, 151st Depot Brigade. 
Entered service June 17, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ARRHTAGE, JOHN H., Private, Truck Company, 3192566 Motor Company. 
Entered service May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ARMSTRONG, C. C, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With the Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

ARMSTRONG, HENRY, Private, Battery A, C. A. C. Artillery. Entered 
service March 18, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ARMSTRONG, JOSEPH H., Private, Company K, 42nd Infantry. Entered 
service April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ARMSTRONG, RALPH H., Corporal, Company D, I04th Infantry. Entered 
service June 23, 1916. Mexican border service. Later with American Expedition- 
ary Forces. Wounded in action, July 11, 1918. 




^i1 




JOHN G. McNAUGHT 




\[.I Kl 1) I (.IIOKJLI 1 ir 





JOHN D. LaFLESH 



JAMHS BUCKLEY 



108 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

ARXITZ, CHARLES J., Private, Infantry. Entered service July 18, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ARSENAULT, PASCAL, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
August 20, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, N. Y. 

ASHE, ELMER C, Private, Company A, 36th Machine Gun Company. En- 
tered service July 25, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ASHE, JOHN F., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service August, 

1917. Stationed at Camp Merritt, N. J. 

ASHAVOOD, NELSON J., Private, Company V. S. G., 35th Battalion, Medical 
Corps. Entered service April 29, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

ASKEN, ROBERT R., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
jG, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ASLN, SAM, Private, United States Army. 

AUBERTIN, CHARLES, Private, Company B, 3.5th Machine Gun Battalion, 
Artillery. Entered service July 22, 1918. 

AUBUCHON, PETER, Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober 21, 1918. Stationed at Fort Williams, Portland, Me. 

AULD, ALEXANDER B., Sergeant, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service May 1, 1916. Mexican border service. Later with American Expeditionary 
Forces. Returned to United States as instructor, and stationed at Camp Sheridan, 
Montgomery, Ala. 

AUBERTIN, CHARLES, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
H'd, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

AUTHIER, EMILE, Corporal, 7th F. A. R. D. Entered service May 28, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

AUTHIER, LOUIS P., Private, 303d Heavy Field Artillery. Entered service 
September 19, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

AVERY, EVERETT F., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
5, 1918, Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Later with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

BAOHAND, EMERILE, Private, United States Army. Entered service Aug- 
ust 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, Columbia, S. C. 

BACKUS, GEORGE, Private, 4th Company, Training Battalion, 16th Infantry. 
Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

BADER, CHARLES J., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
22, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BADER, MORRIS J., Private, Company L, 2nd Prov. Regiment. Entered 
service August 30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

BAGG, JOHN, Private, United States Army. Entered service October 14, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Zackary Taylor, Ky. 

BAGG, ROBERT, Sergeant, Chemical Warfare Service", Ordnance Corps. En- 
tered service March 23, 1918. Stationed at Stamford, Conn. 

BAILLARGEON, EUCLYDE, Private, Company A, 101st Engineers. Entered 
service September 8, 1917. 

BAILLARGEON, LEO, Corporal, Company D, 47th Infantry. Entered service 
June, 1917. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. Transferred to Camp Greene, Charlotte, 
N. C. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action October 
14, 1918. 

BAIRD, ELWOOD J., Private, Company H, Signal Corps. Entered service 
October 14, 1917. 

BAKER, ARTHUR, Private, 308th Regiment, Quartermaster Corps. Entered 
service October, 1917 



■;"::\ 





JAMES COLLINS 



FRANCIS H. THORPE 



^^^F^??SM 



\-\ *^^ f 






STEPHEN ZUCK 



FRANCIS DOWD 



110 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

BAKER, FRED J., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service, 1916. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BAKER, JAMES J., Private, 5th Company, 2nd Battalion, 151st Depot Bri- 
gade. Entered service September 18, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BAKER, JOHN, Private, Ambulance Corps. Entered service December 13, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BAKER, NICHOLAS A., Private, 1st Company, Military Police. Entered 
service October 6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BALDWIN, ANTHONY, Private, United States Army. Entered service De- 
cember 6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BANCROFT, WILLIAM H., Private. Supply Troop, .2nd Cavalry. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

BARON, JOHN, Private, United States Army. Entered service, 1917. Sta- 
rioned at Camp Devens. 

BARNETT, CHARLES J. T., Private, Company A, 330th Battalion, Medical 
Corps. Entered service May 1, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BARNETT, EDWARD W., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service October 4, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Transferred to Camp Bart- 
lett, Mass. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

BARNETT, M^ILLIAM T., Private, Company B, Military Police, 12th Divi- 
sion. Entered service July 12, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BARRETT, EDWARD T., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service November 30, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American 
Expeditionary Forces. Severely wounded in action October 17, 1918. 

BARRETT, EDWARD, Private, Field Artillery. Entered service February 
26, 1918. 

BARRETT, FRANK J., Sergeant, Company E, 57th Regiment. Entered serv- 
ice September 26, 1906. Stationed in Texas. 

BARRETT, MYLES, Private, 2nd Detachment Veterinary Corps. Entered 
service October 7, 1917. 

BARSALOU, FRANK W., Private, Company H, 19th Infantry. Stationed at 
Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

BARSALOU, GEORGE, Private, Company B, 31st Battalion, Artillery. En- 
tered service March 13, 1918. 

BARTLETT, BRYANT C, Private, Medical Corps, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service May 17, 1917. Stationed at Camp Bartlett. Later with American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

BASSETT, HAROLD R., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
9, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Camp Humphries, Va. 

BATCHELOR, GEORGE, Private, Motor Corps, 12th Division. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BAULNE, LEO, Private, Battery C, 3d Field Artillery. Entered service May 
20, 1918. 

BAUM, MILTON, Private, 32nd Company, 1st Battalion, 151st Depot Brigade. 
Entered service February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BAUSCH, ROBERT C, Corporal, Company C, 321st Machine Gun Com- 
pany. Entered service September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Atlanta, 
Ga. Later with the American Expeditionary Forces. 

BAZAN, NICHOLAS, Private, United States Army. Entered service March 
11, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BAZINET, RUDOLPH, Private, Company E, 212th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens.' 





JOSEPH COMEAU 



ERNEST ROY 





PETER GATELY 



GEORGE BOLDWAY 



112 HoLYOxE In The Great War. 

BEAN, HAROLD F., Private, United States Army. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

BEAKS, GEORGE, Sergeant, Ordnance Department. Stationed at Camp 
Jackson, S. C. Transferred to Camp Hancock, Ga. 

BEAUCHAMP, AR^IAXD, Private, United States Arm}-. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

BEAUCHAMP, HERMAS, Private, Wagoner 315th American Training Com- 
pany A. Entered service May 1, 1918. Stationed at Wentworth Institute, Mass. 
Later with American Expeditionary Forces. 

BEAUCHAMP, LEO A., Private, Field Bakery. Entered service September 
25, 1918. 

BEAUDIN, JEREMIAH, Private, Company A, 69th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice June 23, 1918. 

BEAUDOIN, ADELARD, Private, 36th Headquarters, Signal Platoon. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BEAUDRY, LEON A., Private, 191st Aero Squadron. Entered service Jan- 
uary 23, 1918. 

BEAUDRY, VICTOR E., Sergeant, 55th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
July 28, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BEAULAC, PHILIP, Private, Company B, 35th Machine Gun Battalion. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BEAULIER, JOHN, Private, Medical Department, 7th Regiment, C. A. C. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BEAUPRE, ALFRED J., Corporal, 66th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
August 1. 1917. 

BEAUPRE, FRANCIS X., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 
T. 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BEAUREGARD, CHARLES, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BEAUREGARD, EUDGERE, Private, 12th Company, 3d Battalion. Entered 
.service October 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

BEAUREGARD, JOSEPH, Private, 21st Company. Entered service March 4, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BEAUREG.^RD, RAYMOND A., Private, Company K, 73d Infantry. En- 
tered service June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

BEAU^AIS, ERNEST A., Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 24, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BECHARD, SAMUEL J., Sergeant, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June 21, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. Wounded in action. 

BECK, RAYMOND J., Private, United States Army. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

BEDARD, GEORGE, Private, Company E, 39th Infantry. Entered service 
February 2, 1917. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

BEGLEY, THOMAS F., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service April 
n, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BELAIRE, HARVEY, Private, Ordnance, 152nd Depot Brigade. Entered 
service December 12, 1917. 

BELANGER, AMIE, Corporal, Tank Corps, 3d Battalion, Company A. En- 
tered service July 15, 1918. Stationed at Springfield Technical School. 

BELANGER, EDAVARD, Private. 307th Headquarters Supply Division. En- 
tered service October, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. Later Virith Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 




JOHN LUCCHESI 



RAYMOND LANCTO 




HENRY F. McGRATH 



JAMES J. KEIJA 



114 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

BELANGER, OSCAR, Private, Company B, 12th Regiment. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BELISLE, ADELARD, Private, 35th Machine Gun Battalion. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BELISLE, EDWARD, Private, Battery G, C. A. C. Entered service April 
lo, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BELL, FRANK, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service June, 1918. 

BELL, JOSEPH D., Private, Company B, 12th Military Police. Entered serv- 
ice July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BELL, RICHARD H., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service January 25, 
1918. Stationed at Springfield Armory. 

BELL, WALTER, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BELLEFEUILLE, NAPOLEON D., Private, Headquarters Company, 41st 
Artillery. Entered service June 9, 1918. Stationed at Camp Eustis, Va. 

BELLEROSE, JOSEPH N., Private, Battery D, 102d F. A. Entered service 
September 8, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BELLIVEAU, ARTHUR, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
9, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum. 

BELLIVEAU, JOSEPH, Private, Band, Depot Brigade. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 26, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BENNETT, JOHN S., Private, Aero Squadron No. 870. Entered service 
Ivlarch 18, 1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

BERDACHOWSKE, WLADISLAW, Private, No. 7 Bakery, Quartermaster 
Corps. Entered service February 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Green. 

BERGER, HARRY, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 15, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum. 

BERGERON, LEON, Private, United States Army. Entered service February 
25, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BERGMAN, WILLIAM F., Private, 2nd Casuals, Quartermaster Corps. En- 
tered service December 13, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BERKOWITZ, ISADORE, Corporal, Motor Mechanics Regiment. Entered 
service February 14, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Later with American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

BERKOWITZ, SHLTON, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 
25, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BERNARD, GEORGE J., Private, 1st Depot Brigade. Entered service May 
24, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. 

BERNARD, JOSEPH L., Private, 36th Company. Entered service Septem- 
ber 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BERNIER, ARTHUR, Private, Battalion A, 33rd Artillery, C. A. C. Entered 
•■ervice September 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BERNIER, JOHN, Private, Company B, 306th Infantry. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 25, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

BERNIER, N.IPOLEON, Private, Companv D, 58th Infantry. Entered ser\- 
ice March 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expedition- 
ary Forces. 

BERTHIAUME, OSCAR, Private, United States Army. 

BESSETT, RAOUL M., Private, 13th Cavalry. Entered service August 8, 
1918. 




ARCHIE HERTZMARK HENRY D. READ 





ALFRED D. DUROCHER,Jr. JAMES LOUDEN 



116 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

BESSETTE, ERNEST, Private, United States Army. 

BESSETTE, OLIVER, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 
17, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BIALAS, JOHX, Private, United States Army. Entered service November 27, 
1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BIBEAU, DOXAT, Private, Troop E, 12th Cavalry. Stationed at Columbus, 
N. M. 

BIBEAU, FRAXli J., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service December 17, 
1917. 

BIBEAUTE, JOHN, Private, United States Army. 

BIEBER, HARRY P., Sergeatit, 76th U. S. Field Artillery. Stationed at Fort 
Elhan Allen, Vt. Transferred to Camp Shelby, Miss. Later v^^ith 150th Infantry, 
American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action November 2, 1918. 

BIENVENUE, ANTONIO, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
Maj^ 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BIENVENUE, OSCAR G., Private, Signal Corps. Enlisted December, 1917. 

BIGGINS, THOMAS, Private, United States Army. Stationed at Camp Jack- 
son, S. c. 

BIGGINS, WILLIAM, Private, Battery E. 10th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice May 24, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BILODEAU, GEORGE N., Private, Military Police, 1st Army Headquarters. 
Entered service September 21, 1917. Stationed at Camp Greene, N. C. 

BINGLER, EUGENE, Private, United States Guards, Company A, 1st Bat- 
falion. Stationed at Long Wharf, Boston, Mass. 

BIRNIE, ANDREW H., Sergeant, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice March 10, 1916. Mexican border service. With the American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

BIRON, FERDINAND, Private, United States Army. 

BLACIiWELL, JAMES R., Private, United States Army. 

BLAIR, HOMER, Private, 10th Regiment, Radio School. Entered service 
May 31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. ,Y. Transferred to Camp Gordon, 
S. C. 

BLAIS, ALBERT, Private, Headquarters Company, 9th Infantry. Entered 
service December 4, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Awarded Croix 
dc Guerre for bravery in action. 

BLAIS, ALFRED, Private, United States Army. Entered service February 
26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BLAKELY, WILLIAM E., Private, Quartermaster Corps. United States 
Army. 

BLANCHARD, EDWARD, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
December 6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BLANCHETTE, AIMEE, Private, Company E, 307th Supply Train. Stationed 
at Camp Gordon, Ga. Entered service September 2, 1917. 

BLANCHETTE, ALEXANDER, Private, Det. B, 106th A. S. R. S. Entered 

service May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, N. Y. 

BLANCHETTE, LEO J., Private, Battery A, Artillery C. A. C. Entered 
service April 3, 1918. 

BLIGH, FRANK J., Corporal, United States Army. Philippine Islands serv- 
ice. Stationed later at San Francisco, Cal. 

BLEUMER, FRED W., Sergeant, Company E, 305th Engineers. With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. Gassed. Wounded in action. Returned to Company. 




LIONEL J. OAU. 



FRANK U'BRIHN 





RAYMOND O'CONNELL 



ALBERT LADOUCEUR 



118 HiOLYOKE In The Great War. 

BLEUMER, RAYMOND JOHN, Private, Company A, 504th Engineer Service 
Battalion. With the American Expeditionary Forces. 

BLUENKE, FRED, Private, United States Army. 

BOARDWAY, FRANK E., Corporal, Battery D, 34th Artillery, C. A. C. 
Entered service July 7, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BOBER, PETER J., Corporal, 20th Field Artillery. Entered service May 7, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Stanley, Texas. 

BOOGIO, GUIDO C, Private, Company I, 302d Infantry. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BOISA^ERT, WILFRED, Private, Medical Department, 8th Regiment. En- 
tered service June 1, 1918. 

BOLDUC, ALFRED, Private, Battery A, 47th Artillery, C. A. C. Entered 
service July 9, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BOLDUC, GEORGE, Corporal, Tank Corps. Stationed at Camp Raleigh, 
N. C. 

BOLD WAY, GEORGE F., Bugler, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action twice. 

BOLTER, ARTHUR L., Private, United States Army. Entered service De- 
cember, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BONACKER, ALEXANDER, JR., Private, Mechanics, 327th Aero Squadron. 
Entered service December 10, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred 
to Kelly Field, Texas. 

BONNEAU, JOSEPH A., Sergeant-major, 221st Aero Training Squadron. 
Entered service August, 1917. 

BONNEAU, ODDLLION J., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
September 30, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BONNEVILLE, GEORGE R., Private, 12th Division Military Police. Sta- 
tioned at Camp Devens. 

BOSS'IERE, LORENZO, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Qamp Devens. 

BOUCHER, ALFRED W., Private, Battery E, 58th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 10, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slbcum, N. Y. 

BOUCHER, GEORGE G., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service May 31: 
1918. 

BOUCHER, THEODORE, Private, Battery E, 3rd Field Artillery, R. D. 
Entered service August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

BOUDREAU, ALEX, Sergeant, Machine Gun Company, 104th Infantry. En- 
tered service March 28, 1918. American Expeditionary Forces. Received Dis- 
tinguished Service Medal for bravery in action. 

BOUDREAU, ANTONIO J., Private, C. A. C. Entered service May 27, 1918. 
Entered service May 31, 1918. 

BOUDREAU, FRANK, Private, United States Army. Entered service March, 
1018. Stationed at Kelly field Texas. 

BOULERICE, JOSEPH R., Private, Truck B, 103d Infantry. Entered service 
December 13, 1918. 

BOUDRIS, GEORGE, Private, 5th Casuals, 3rd ^L M. Regiment. Entered 
service December 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Hancock, Ga. 

BOURASSA, NAPOLEON J., Private, Cavalry. Stationed at Fort Slocum, 
N. Y. Transferred. 

BOURQUE, AIME, Private, Medical Department. With American Expedi- 
iionary Forces. 




CORNELIUS J. CREAN 



RAYMOND S. TUCKER 



ALEX BOUDREAU 




ARCHIE R. PAIRADEE 



120 lloLYOKE In The Great War. 

BOURQUE, ARTHUR, Corporal, 6th Regiment, F. A. R. D. Entered service 
May 31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BOURQUE, OVILA, Machinist, Truck and Wagon Train. Entered service 
November 26, 1917. 

BOURQUE, WILLIAM, Private. United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober 14, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BOUTIX, ALFRED J., Corporal, Unit 306, Q. M. R. S. Entered service 
May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

BOAVE, FRANK J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry Entered service 
June 20, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded and gassed in 
action. 

BOWE, LAWRENCE C, Private, Medical Department. Entered service Jan- 
uary 22, 1918. 

BOWERS, FRANK C, Private, United States Army. Entered service April, 
1018. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BOWERS, WILLIAM J., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 17, 
1018. Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

BOWLER, JAMES, Private, 3rd Company, Depot Brigade. Entered service 
December 5, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. Reported wounded severely in action. 

BOWLER, PATRICK, Private, United States Army. Entered service March 
28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BOWLER, STUART M., Private, 310th Company, Troop B, Cavalry. En- 
tered service May, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred. 

BOWLER, TIMOTHY, Private, Company A, Machine Gun Battalion. Sta- 
tioned at Camp Devens. Entered service July 23, 1918. 

BOWLER, AVILLIAM A., Private, 18th Company, 1.51st Depot Brigade. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BOWLES, ALLEN, Sergeant, Quartermaster Corps. Stationed at Camp 
Devens. 

BOY, WALTER A., Private, 90th Company, 22nd Rect. Battalion. Entered 
service September 6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

BOYER, EDMOND J., Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BOGIAGE, CHRIS, Private. United States Army. Entered service May 31, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BRACH, JACOB, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service September 
3, 1917. 

BRACKMAN, GEORGE, Private, United States Cavalry. Entered service 
June 1, 1917. Stationed at Camp McArthur, Texas. 

BRADLEY, JA3IES J., Private, Company A, 315th Ammunition Train. En- 
tered service May 1, 1918. Stationed at Wentworth Institute, Mass. 

BRADY, JAMES H., Private, Machine Gun Instructor, Ordnance Department. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BRAINERD, G. WINTHROP, Private, Base Hospital No. 9, Medical service, 
American Expeditionary Forces. Entered service July, 1917. 

BRANAGAN, JOHN, Private, Company D, 42nd Infantry. Entered service 
July 24, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BRASSACK, HARRY, Private, United States Army. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

BRASSINGTON, JOHN W., Engineer, Ordnance Department. Entered serv- 
i'-e April 1, 1918. Stationed at Washington. D. C. 





LUUXARD H. iiiLL 



EUGENE W. MORI ARTY / 




FREDERICK DOWD 



ALBERT E. CAYER 



122 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

BRASSIL, EDWARD F., Sergeant, Medical Corps. Entered service March 
14, 1917. Stationed at Fort Myers, Va. Later with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

BRAULT, ADELARD, Private, Company 20, F. H. A. Entered service Aug- 
ust 22, 1917. 

BRAULT, LOUIS A., Private, United States Army. Entered service October 
11, 1918. Stationed at Fort WiUiams, Me. 

BREAULT, ARMAND, Private, United States Army. Entered service April, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BRENNAN, THOMAS, Private. Entered service August, 1918. Stationed at 
Camp Devens. ^Transferred to Camp Upton, L. 1. 

BRENNAN, WILLL4.M, Private, 36th Infantry, Signal Platoon, Headquarters. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BRESNAHAN, CORNELIUS A., Private, 255th Aero Squadron. Entered 
service December 12, 1917. Stationed at Camp Upon, L. I. 

BRESNAHAN, CORNELIUS P., Private, Company B, 8th Balloon Squadron. 
Stationed at Aviation Camp, Waco, Texas. 

BRESNAHAN, EDWARD, Private, 34th Squadron, Aviation. Entered service 
December 10, 1917. 

BRESNAHAN, EDWARD, Private, Cavalry. Entered service May, 1918. 

BRESNAHAN, JEREMIAH, Private, Field Hospital, 12th Division. Entered 
service August 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BRESNAHAN, JOHN J., Private, United States Army, Company D, 504th 
Engineers. 

BRESNAHAN, MATTHEW, Private United States Army. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BRESNAHAN, ^^CHAEL J., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BRESNAHAN, RAYMOND L., Private. Troop E, 2nd Cavalry. Entered serv- 
ice May 8, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BRETON, AIME, Private, Company B, 336th Machine Gun Battalion. En- 
tered service June 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

BRETON, FRANCOIS, Private, Troop B, 310th Cavalry. Entered service 
May 10, 1918. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. 

BRETSCHNEIDER, WILLIAM M., Private, 18th Company, 5th Battalion. 
Entered service July 20, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BRICK, JEREMIAH, Private, 17th ^Balloon Company. Entered service March 
7, 1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

BRIDGES, CHARLES A., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service Septem- 
ber 21, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Transferred to Dental Corps. 

BRIDGES, FRED, Private, Company C, 329th Machine Gun Battalion. En- 
tered service September 19, 1917. Stationed at Camp Cody, N. M. Later with 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

BRIEN, HENRY, Private, C. A. C. Entered service March 7, 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred. 

BRIGOS, SAIMUEL T., Private, Company 2, U. S. D. B. Guards. Entered 
service May 21, 1918. Stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Texas. 

BRISSETTE, VICTOR, Private, 16th Regiment, 4th Training Battalion. En- 
tered service July 3, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BRITT, EDWARD P., Private, United Sttates Army. 

BRIZARD, ROMEO, Private, Troop C, 310th Cavalry. Entered service May 
11, 1918. 




VALERE S. LALIBERTI 



JOHN RENAUD 




WILFRED A. RACICOT 



ARTHUR L. WELCH 



124 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

BRODERICK, THOMAS, Private, Machine Gun Company, 74tli Infantry. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BRODERICK, WALTER J., Private, Headquarters Company, 31st Field Art- 
illery. Entered service July 9, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred 
to Camp Meade, Me. 

BRODEUR, LEO A., Private, Cavalry. Entered service February 20, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

BRODINSKY, SAMUEL, Private, Battery A, 55th Field Artillery. Entered 
service December 12, 1917. Stationed at Fort Revere, Mass. Later with American 
Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

BROECKER, WILLLIM F., Bugler, Company B, 326th Infantry. Entered 
service October 5, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. Later with American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

BRONNER, A., Private, Company M, 104th United States Infantry. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

BROOKSBANK, ARTHUR W., Corporal, Company B, 303d Engineers. En- 
tered service February, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BROUILLET, ALFRED L., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BROUILLETTE, HECTOR R., Private, United States Army. Entered serv- 
ice August 15, 1918. Stationed at Franklin Union Institute, Boston, Mass.. 

BROW, LEE H., Sergeant-major, United States Army. Entered service May 
10, 1918. Stationed at Camp Hancock, Ga. Formerly in Red Triangle service at 
New England training camps. 

BROWN, AMOS W., Corporal, Ammunition Company. Entered service Sep- 
tember 21, 1917. 

BROWN, DANIEL G., Private, Company F, 8th Field Artillery. Entered 
service March 24, 1917. 

BROWN, HENRY A., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Severely wounded and 
gassed in action, September 13, 1918. Cited for bravery. 

BROWN, JOHN, Private, 120th Aero Squadron. Entered service October 15, 
1917. 

BROWN, PETER, Private, Battery E, 20th Field Artillery. Entered service 
June 3, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded and gassed in 
action. 

BROAVN, WALTER J., Private, United States Army. 

BROWN, WILFRED M., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
March 4, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BROWNE, JOHN H., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23. 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BRUNEAULT, JOSEPH C, Private, C. A. C. Entered service June 25, 1918. 

BRUNELL, FRANK X., Private, Infantry, United States Army. Entered 
service April 30, 1917. 

BRUNELLE, LEO J., Private, Company L, 327th Regiment. Entered service 
October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

BUCHANAN, JAMES R., Private, Ordnance Department, 3rd Supply Com- 
pany. Entered service June 3, 1918. 

BUCKLEY, FRANK E., Private. 65th C. A. C. Entered service August 13, 
1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BUCKLEY, JAMES, Sergeant, 80th Field Artillery. Entered service June 12, 
1917. Later with G Company, 7th Division, Ambulance Train. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 





FRED CHLCI- 



ALBERT L'HEUREUX 




WILLL\M HOPKINSON 



lUHN KALUZA 



126 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

BUCItLEY, MICHAEL, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service Sep- 
tember, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BUCItLEY, WILLIAM, Private, 111th Company, 29th Division, Machine Gun 
Battalion. Entered service May 1, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BUDD, GEORGE, Senior Master Engineer, 309th Engineers. Entered service 
May, 1917. Stationed at Camp Taylor, Ky. Later vi^ith American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

BUDD, ROWLAND, Sergeant, Medical Corps. Entered service May, 1917. 
Stationed at Camp Beauregard, La. 

BULLARD, IRVING E., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 15, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. Later with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

BURGE, NAPOLEON, Private, United States Guards. Entered service March 
1, 1918. 

BURIvE, FRANCIS J., Private, Ambulance Service Sanitary Unit 512, Medi- 
cal Department. Entered service June 1, 1917. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

BURKE, JAMES F., Private, C. A. C. Entered service April 24, 1918. 

BURKE,^ JOHN J., Private, United States Army. Entered service October 
7. 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

BURKE, JOHN J., Private, Engineers. Entered service May 17, 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BURKE, LEO, Corporal, Company G, 322d Infantry. Entered service May 
28, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action November 11, 
1918. 

BURKHARDT, EDWIN H., Sergeant, Quartermaster Utilities. Entered serv- 
ice September 21, 1917. 

BURKHARDT, HARRY F., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
September, 1918. Stationed at Camp Raritan, N. J. 

BURNETT, DAVID A., Private, Band, U. S. Army. Entered service April, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BURNETT, GEORGE, Private, C. A. C. Entered service July 9, 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Fort Slocum. 

BURNETT, HAROLD C, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

BURNETT, JAMES, Private, 20th Field Artillery, Battery E. Stationed at 
Camp Stanley, Texas. 

BURNETT, JOHN, Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service March, 1918. 
Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

BURNETT, LEON L., Private, United States Army. Entered service June, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

BURNETTE, HARRY J., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
July, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BURNS, ANDREW, Private, Company D, 305th Infantry. Entered service 
February, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

BURNS, CHRISTOPHER, Private, Machine Gun Company, 36th Infantry. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BURNS, EDWARD J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June 25, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BURNS, GEORGE R., Private, 14th Railway Engineer Corps. Entered serv- 
ice in May, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BURNS, HOWARD, Private, Troop L, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service Septem- 
ber 22, 1917. 




JOHN G. O'CONNOR 



EDWARD J. FAY 




W li.l.I \M C; 'IITORPE 



HENRY BROWN 



128 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

BURNS, JAMES F., Private, Company K, 327th Infantry. Entered service 
September 26, 1917. With American J^.xpeditionary Forces. 

BURNS, ROBERT S., Corporal, Machine Gun Company, 104th Infantry. En- 
tered service June 25, 1910. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BURNS, TIMOTHY J., Sergeant, Aviation Corps. Entered service March 12, 
1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

BURT, HARRY, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 2::. 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BUSHEY, HENRY, Private, United States Army. 

BUSHEY, HONORE, Private, C. A. C. Entered service December 14, 1917. 

BUSHAVORTH, THOMAS E., Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service De- 
cember, 1917. 

BUTTERFIELII, JOSEPH, Private, 101st Regiment. Entered service Sep- 
tember, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Transferred to Camp Bartlett. In 
France assigned to post office, 26th Division. Erroneously reported missing in 
action. 

BYNAN, LOUIS, Private, Company F, 312th Ammunition Train. Entered 
service March 11, 1918. 

BYNAN, PATRICK J., Private, United States Army. Entered service June, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

BYRNES, JAMES E., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BYRNES, JOHN J., Sergeant, United States Army. Entered service February 
25, 1918. 

CABANA, THEODORE T., Private, 2nd Company, 1st Battalion, 151st Depot 
Brigade. Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CADDY, PETER, Private, Company C, 308th Infantry. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 25, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

CADIEUX, FORTUNAT, Corporal, Company C, 321st Infantry. Entered 
service September, 1917. 

CADIGAN, HUGH A., Private, 35th Machine Gun Company, 12th Division. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CADIGAN, MICHAEL, Private, 329th Remount Division. Entered service 
December 13, 1917. 

CADIGAN, MICHAEL J., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CADIGAN, THOMAS, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CADIGAN, WILLIAM, Private, 92d Aero Squadron. Entered service July, 
1917. Stationed at Mineola, L. I. Later w^ith American Expeditionary Forces. 

CAHILL, PATRICK, Sergeant, United States Army. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. Wounded in action, October 12, 1918. 

CAIN, ARTHUR W., Private, Company E, 101st Ammunition Train. Entered 
service April, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

CAIN, JOSEPH J., Private, Company F, 6th United States Engineer Corps. 
Bintered service June 2, 1916. W^ith American Expeditionary Forces. 

CALLAHAN, DAVID, Private, 34th Aero Squadron. Entered service Decem- 
ber 13, 1917. Stationed at Waco, Texas. 

CALLAHAN, EDWARD D., Private, Battery C, 1st Field Artillery. Entered 
service December 11, 1916. Stationed at Honolulu. Later with American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 




FRANK P. SESCILA 



ROLAND E. MORIARTY 





MAURICE POWi.Kb 



HUGH J. LACEY 



r.H) HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

CAMEliOX, GEORGE, Private. Quartermaster Corps. Entered service De- 
cember 14, 1917. Stationed at Canii) Jackson, Fla. Later with American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

CAMPAGNE, ELZEAR J., Private, 101st Engineers. Entered service Sep- 
tember 23, 1917. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. 

CAMPIOX, EDWARD, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 9, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

CAXAOX, PATRICK J., Private, United States Army. 

CANOVA,^ HUGH C, Sergeant, G. M. C. Detachment. Stationed at Camp 
Gordon, Ga. 

CAOUETTE, JOSEPH A., Private, Aviation. Entered service March 20, 1918. 

CARDIN, GASTON, Private, United States Army. Entered service Mav 23, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

CARDINAL, HENRY, Private, Infantry, United States Army. Entered serv- 
ice July 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CARDINAL, WILFRED L., Private, Infantry, United States Army. Entered 
service October 22, 1918. Stationed at Fort Warren, Boston, Mass. 

CAREY, JAMES R., Private, United States Army. Entered service Decem- 
ber, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

CAREY, JOHN J., Private, 320th United States Infantry. Entered service No- 
A-ember, 1917. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. Gassed in action. 

CARLIN, ADAM, Private, Company D, 103rd Infantry. Entered service June, 
1916. Served on Mexican border with 1st New Hampshire Infantry. With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

CARLINSKY, LOUIS, Private, United States Army. Entered service June, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CARMEL, ALVARIS J., Private, Medical Corps. U. S. Base Hospital No. 

102. Entered service March 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
(Italian Front.) 

CARMEL, HENRY D., Private. Medical Corps, U. S. Base Hospital No. 102. 
Entered service March 27 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. (Italian 
Front.) 

CARMODY, THOMAS J., Sergeant, Ordnance. Entered service September 
15, 1917. 

CARON, STEPHEN, Private, United States Army. Entered service August. 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CARROLL, ALFRED, Sergeant, 76th Division. Entered service September 
21, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. 

CARROLL, GEORGE, Corporal, United States Marines. Stationed at Paris 
Island, S. C. Entered service November 20, 1917. 

CARROLL, TIMOTHY, Private, 5th Company, 2nd Battalion. Entered serv- 
ice September 4, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CARROLL, TIMOTHY, Private, United States Army. Entered service Tulv 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CARTER, GEORGE S., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service June 15, 
1918. 

CARTER, THOMAS, Private, 72d Aero Squadron. Entered service August, 
1917. 

CASEY, A\T[LLIAM P., Sergeant, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Transferred to Officers' Training 
School, Camp Stanley, Texas. 



r' 



^**^ ^ 





JOSEPH E. O'CONNOR 



l.hMi \l) > l.l\' ' 'I l:l 




GEORGE M. McCarthy 



PAUL L. STEC 



132 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

CASSIDY, EDMUND J., Private, 1st Artillery. Entered service October 23, 
1918. 

CASSIDY, HENRY F., Private, Headquarters Troop, 4th Cavalry. Entered 
service May, 1917. Stationed at Camp Greene, N. C. 

CASSIDY, JAMES J., Private, 7th Aero Squadron. Entered service July 8, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Sherman. 

CASTONGUAY, JOSEPH, Private, 327th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
December 1, 1917. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

CATHRO, DAVID E., Private, 90th Company, 22nd Battalion. Entered serv- 
ice September 6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

CAULEY, HARRY D., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
May, 1916. Mexican border" service. With the American Expeditionary Forces. 

CAVLEY, JOHN F., Sergeant, 31st ^Company, Depot Brigade. Entered service 
October 17, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Transferred to Officers' Training 
School, Camp Lee, Va. 

CAVANAUGH, LAWRENCE J., Sergeant-major, Headquarters. Entered 
service February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CAYER, ALBERT E., Private, Ordnance Department. Entered service De- 
cember 12, 1917. Stationed at Washington, D. C. 

CAYHrE, ARTHUR, Private, United States Army. Stationed at Fort Bliss. 

CELCE, FREDERICK A\^LLIAM, Sergeant, Medical Department, 104th In- 
fantry. Entered service April, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Trans- 
ferred to office of surgeon-general. 

CHALIFOUX, ARTHUR, Private, C. A. C. Entered service December 3, 
1917. 

CHALIFOUX, EUGENE, Private, C. A. C. Entered service December 3, 1917. 

CHALMERS, CHARLES C, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
December, 1917. 

CHALMERS, LEON W., Company B, 12th Military Police. Entered service 
July 22, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CHAMPAGNE, HARRY, Sergeant, Company C, 7th U. S. Engineers. En- 
tered service June 9, 1917. Stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

CHAMPAGNE, HENRY S., Private 46th Company, 12th Battalion. Entered 
service August, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CHAMPAGNE, JOSEPH, Private, Engineer Corps, 7th Regiment. Stationed 
at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 

CHAMPIGNY, ALBERT, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CHAMPIGNY, DOLPHIS, Private, Battery B, 16th Battalion. Entered serv- 
ice May 31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

CHAPIN, GEORGE E., Private, 18th Company, Depot Brigade. Stationed at 
Camp Devens. 

CHAPIN, WHITMAN, Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

CHAPUT, EUGENE A., Private. 36th Balloon Company, Air Service. Entered 
service March 5, 1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

CHAREST, ARTHUR, Private, 5th Company, 2nd Battalion, 151st Depot Bri- 
gade. Entered service September 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 
CHAREST, WILLIAM, Corporal, Company L, 38th Infantry. 

CHARON, ALFRED, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 





^ 



JOHN J. HICKEY 




JOHN J. GIGUERE 




JOHN R. GORDON 




SAMUEL LHVENSON 



lo4 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

CHARTIER, ALBERT, Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
lober 18, 1918. Stationed at Fort Williams, Me. 

CHARTIER, ROMEO, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CHENEVERT, LEO, Private, United States Army. Entered service October 
23, 1918. Stationed at Fort Warren, Boston, Mass. 

CHEVALIER, LOUIS A., Prixate, Company D, l()4th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice December 26, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. Wounded and gassed. 

CHILDS, FRED, Corporal, Company I, 22nd U. S. Infantry. Entered service 
August 29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Niagara, N. Y. Transferred to Governor's 
liland N. Y. 

CHILDS, PRESCOTT, Private, Tank Corps. Entered service May, 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. 

CHIXARD, RALPH J., Private, Signal Corps. Entered service April 28, 1917. 

CHOUIXARD, ARTHUR, Private, Company 18th, 36th Infantry, Signal Corps. 
Entered service July 22, 1918. 

CROQUETTE, ALFRED J., Color Sergeant, Headquarters, Company W, 
104th Infantry. Entered service June, 1911. ^Mexican border service. With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

CROQUETTE, JAMES, Private, Headquarters Company, A. S. C. Entered 
service April 15, 1918. 

CROQUETTE, MEDRIC H., Private, Supply Company, 305th Infantry. En- 
tered service February 25, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

CIEMPA, JOHN, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CIENOSKI, WILLIAM, Private, Company F, 30th Infantry. 

CLARK, DAVID G., Private, Company D, 16th Battalion, United States 
Guards. Entered service June, 1918. 

CLARK, FORRESTER B., Private, Field Artillery, Third, Battery F. Sta- 
tioned at Fort Meyer. Transferred to Fort Riley, Kan. 

CLARKE, GEORGE, Private, Aviation Corps, United States Army. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

CLARK, HUGH, Private. Enlisted 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CLARK, JOHN F., Private, United States Cavalry. 

CLARK, PAUL, Private, Aviation Training. Entered service May 18, 1918. 
Stationed at Garden City. 

CLARK, ROBERT W., Cadet, School of Military Aeronautics, Princeton Uni- 
versity, N. J. 

CLARK, STEWART S., Private, Chemistry Department. Entered service 
May 1, 1918. 

CLAYTON, JOHN J., Private, 3rd Company, 157th Depot Brigade. Entered 
service December 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

CLAYTON, WALTER, Corporal, 546th Motor Truck Company, Ordnance De- 
partment. Entered service May 18, 1918. Stationed at Wentworth Institute, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

CLEARY, JAMES, Sergeant, Troop F, 16th Cavalry. Entered service May 
27, 1913. Stationed at Fort Brown, Texas. 

CLEFE, PETER H., Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service April 
9, 1917. 

CLEGHORN, JAMES, Private, Troop B, 15th Cavalry. Entered service De- 
cember 29, 1917. 




ALEXANDER A. KURNICK 



WILLIAM M. RYAN 





K 



PATRICK F. CONWAY 



lOHN I'OWlvRS 



136 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

CLEVELAND, LAWTON, Private, 4th Field Artillery. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 23, 1918. Stationed at Douglas, Ariz. 

CLICHE, ALFRED J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
April, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded and gassed. 

CLINSKY, CIRIL, Private, United States Army. Entered service March 29, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CLOUTIER, ELPHEGE E., Private, Company E, 347th Infantry. Entered 
service Tune 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

COCHRANE, HUGH, Private, 16th Company, C. A. C. Entered service Jan- 
uary 17, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

CODERRE, ARTHUR W., Private, Company A, 318th Engineers. Entered 
service December 10, 1917. 

CODERRE, EUGENE S., Corporal, 2nd Company, 3rd Motor Mechanics. En- 
tered service December 12, 1917. 

COFFEY, JEREMIAH F., Private, C. A. C. Entered service October 21, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Williams, Me. 

COFFEY, JOHN J., Wagoner, 20th Forestry Engineers. Entered service July 
22, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

COHEN, HARRY J., Private, United States Army. Entered service May 10, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Cavalry, Fort Ethan Al- 
len, Vt. 

COLE, CHARLES, Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service March 14, 1918. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

COLGAN, WILLIAM S., Private, Medical Corps. 

_ COLLINGWOOD, FRANK M., Corporal, 13th Company, 4th Battalion, Depot 
Brigade. Entered service October, 1917. 

COLLINS, ARCHIE, Private, No. 1 Motor Repair, Aviation Corps. Entered 
service December 12, 1917. Stationed at Camp J. E. Johnson, Jacksonville, Fla. 

COLLINS, DANIEL J., Private, Barracks C, Quartermaster Corps. Entered 
service September 14, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

COLLINS, ERNEST R., Sergeant, 505th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
November 26, 1917. Stationed at Fort Waco, Texas. 

COLLINS, JAMES, Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service March 19, 1918. 
Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

COLLINS, LUCIEN, Corporal, Company L, 53d Infantry. Entered service 
jNIay 30, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

COLLINS, PARKER W., Private, Company K, 73rd Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June 22, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

COLLINS, STEPHEN A., Private, Aviation Corps, 446th Aero Squadron. En- 
tered service April 17, 1917. With the American Expeditionary Forces. 

COLLINS, THOMAS J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service, 

1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

COLLINS, WILLIAM F., Private, United States Army. With American Ex-, 
peditionary Forces. 

COLTON, JOSEPH K., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 6, 

1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

COMEAU, JOSEPH, Bandsman, Headquarters,' 104th Infantry. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. Cited for bravery. 

COMTOIS, EDGAR, Private. Medical Corps. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. Wounded in action. 

COMTOIS, OSCAR Q., Private, Medical Corps. Stationed at Spartansburg, 

s. c. 





RAYMOMJ i. MURiARTY 





ROBERT L. O'CONNOR ERNEST H. VOUNG 



138 HoLYOKE In The Great AYar. 

COMTOIS, VALMORE H., Private, Medical Department, 77th Field Artil- 
lery. Entered service May 31, 1918. Stationed at Camp Stanley, Miss. 

CONDON, AVILLIAM HENRY, Private, Alarine Corps. Entered service July 
jl, 1918. 

CONNELLY, PHILIP J., Private, 13th Company, 4th Battalion, Depot Bri- 
gade. Entered service December 6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CONNERY, SAMUEL J., Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 6, 1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. 

CONNORS, DANIEL A., Sergeant, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 6, 1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. Transferred Animal Investi- 
gating Bureau, Charleston, S. C. 

CONNORS, FRANCIS P., Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CONNORS, JAMES F., Private, 71st Engineers. Entered service September 6, 
1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

CONNORS, JOHN, Private, Company 8, Military Police. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

CON^NOR, THOMAS, Private. United States Army. Entered service July 9, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

CONNORS, WILLIAM T., Private, Company L, 48th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice January 8, 1918. Stationed at Newport Nevi^s, Va. 

CONNOR, WTILLIAM P., Private, Sanitary Corps, Medical Department. En- 
tered service September 17, 1918. Stationed at Hoboken, N. J. 

CONSTANCE, PHILIP J., Private, Medical Department. Entered service 
January 29, 1918. Stationed at Fort Totten, N. Y. 

CONT, ANTONIO, Private, Company A, 104th Infantry. Entered service Sep- 
tember 23, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Severely wounded in ac- 
tion July 28, 1918. 

CONWAY, JOHN, Corporal, Company A, 3rd Battalioii, United States Guards. 
Entered service January 12, 1918. Stationed at Long Wharf, Boston, Mass. Trans- 
ferred to Springfield Armory, Mass. 

CONWAY, PATRICK F., Private, Ammunition Train, 87th Division. Entered 
service June 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

CONW^AY, WILLIAM J., Private, Battery B, 2nd Field Artillery. Entered 
service, 1913. 

COOK, HENRY C, Corporal, Remount Station. Stationed at Camp Devens. 
COOLEY, CHAVNCEY, Sergeant, Motor Truck Transport Company. En- 
tered service September 1, 1917. Stationed at Fort Cody, N. M. 

COOPER, EDWARD N., Private, Battery D, 303rd Field Artillery. Entered 
service April 21, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

COOPER, JOHN, Private, 303d Field Artillery. Entered service Mav 20, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

CORBIELLE, PIERRE, Private, Headquarters Company, 36th Infantry, 
Lnited States Army. Entered service August 23, 1918. 

CORDINGLY, ALBERT, Private, United States Army. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

COSTELLO, RAYMOND F., Corporal. 7th Field Artillery. Entered service 
January 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

COSTELLO, WILLIAM, Private, 18th Company, 5th Battalion, Depot Brigade, 
United States Army. Entered service August, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

COTE, ALPHONSE, Private, Company F, 6th Infantry. Entered service Sep- 
tember, 1917. Stationed at Chattanooga, Tenn. 




ERNEST J. GORHAM 



\.\k lA'XCH 





JACOB ALTMAN 



IRVING BULLARD 



140 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

COTE, ARTHUR, Private, United States Army. Entered service August 30, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

COTE, JOSEPH R., Private, 18th Depot Brigade. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

COTE, ULRIC, Private, Ambulance Corps. Entered service July, 1918. 

COTTER, PAUL, Wagoner, Supply Company, 9th Field Artillery. Entered 
.service March 22, 1918. Stationed at School of Fire, Fort Sill, Okla. 

COUGHLIN, PATRICK A., Private, Military Police. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

COUGHIilN, RALPH, Private, C. A. C, United States Army. Entered serv- 
ice March 4, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

OOUNIHAN, PATRICK J., Sergeant, Quartermaster Corps. Stationed at 
Camp Green, N. C. 

COUNTER, GEORGE F., Private, Ordnance Department. Entered service 
February 20, 1918. Stationed at Watertown Arsenal. 

COURTNEY, DANIEL H., Private, 6th Company, C. A. C. Entered service 
December 13, 1917. 

COURTNEY, DANIEL, Private, 36th Machine Gun Company. Entered serv- 
ice July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

COURTNEY, MICHAEL D., Private, Company C, 38th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service July 9, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

COUSINEAU, GEORGE, Private, Battery B, 319th Artillery. Entered service 
June 18, 1918. 

COUTU, JOSEPH J., Private, 15th Service Company, Signal Corps. Entered 
service May 6, 1918. Stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 

COUTURE, ADELARD, Private, Company A, 23rd Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action July 20, 1918. 

COUTURE, ALPHONSE, Private, Medical Corps, United States Base Hos- 
pital No. 102. Entered service May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. (Italian front.) 

COUTURE, JOSEPH, Private, 23rd Balloon Company, Aviation Corps. En- 
tered service December 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

COUTURE, NAPOLEON, Private. 60th Squadron Aviation Corps. Entered 
service December 13, 1917. 

COWIE, WILLIAM, Private, Engineer Reserve Corps. Entered service Feb- 
ruary, 1918. 

COX, GEORGE F., Private, 46th Company, Training School, Depot Brigade. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CRAIG, GEORGE L., Corporal, 151st Depot Brigade. Entered service April 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CRAIGE, RAYMOND G., Private, Battery D, 33rd Coast Artillery. Entered 
service September 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Eustis, Va. 

CRANE, MICHAEL V.. Private, Medical Corps. Entered service September 
21, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CRAVEN, GEORGE, Private, Company O, 3rd Depot Brigade. Entered serv- 
ice August 29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CRAVEN, GLADSTONE H., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CRAVEN, HARRY G., Private, United States Army. Stationed at Camp 
Jackson, Miss. 

CRAY, RAYMOND S., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
May, 1916. Mexican border service. With the American Expeditionary Forces. 
Gassed. 




TAMES F. SWEENEY 



CHARLES A. DOSSIN 





OVIDE J. HOULE 



WILLIAM J. MULQUEENEY 



142 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

CREAN, CORNELIUS J., Sergeant, oth Balloon Section. Air Service. En- 
listed August 17, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Kelly 
Field, Texas. Transferred to Fort Omaha. Later with American Expeditionary, 
Forces. Wounded in action. 

CREAN, PETER, Private, Battery D, 304th Field Artillery. Entered service 
March 28, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

CREAN, TIMOTHY, Private, Battery B, 33d Field Artillery. Entered service 
September 6, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CREPEAF, J, EUGENE, Private, Medical Corps. Enlisted May :29. 1918. 

CREVTER, TELLEMER, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

CRIMI, EMMETT, Private, Remount Company, Quartermaster Corps. Entered 
service December 13, 1917. 

CRIMI, HARRY J„ Private, United States Army. Entered service May 31, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Houston, Texas. Transferred O. T. C, Jacksonville, Fla. 

CROCHETIERE, GEORGE, Corporal,, Medical Corps. Entered service Aug- 
ust 9, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CRONIN, FRANCIS J., Sergeant, Battery A, 61st Regiment. C. A. C. En- 
tered service October IG, 1915. With Am.erican Expeditionary Forces. 

CRONIN, JAMES F., Sergeant, Railway Engineers. Entered service May 27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. Transferred to Newark, X. J. 

CRONIN, JOSEPH F., Private, Battery A, 61st Artillery. Entered service 
October 16, 1914. Stationed at Fort Moultrie, S. C. 

CRONIN, MATTHEW J., Sergeant, Company E, 34th Infantry. Entered 
service March 27, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

CROOK, JAMES ADAMS, Private, 1st Developing Battalion, Medical Corps. 
Entered service September 6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

CROSSON; THOMAS, Private, 77th Field Artillery. Entered service June 10, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

CROSSLAND, ALBERT, Corporal, Company F, 7th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice June 9, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

CROTHERS, THOMAS, Private, United States Army. Entered service Aug- 
ust 30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

CROWNSBERRY, JAMES P., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
July 29, 1918. Stationed at Fort Warren, Boston, Mass. 

CUCHER, JOHN, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service February 
13, 1918. 

CUNNIFF, FRANCIS, Private, Ordnance. Entered service April. 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Fort Benjamin Harrison. Ind. 

CUNNIFF, JOHN RAYMOND, Corporal, Medical Department, 474th Aero 
Construction Squadron. Entered service September 26, 1917. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

CUNNINGHAM, GEORGE, Private, Company B. 3.5th Machine Gun Battalion. 
F^ntered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CUNNINGHAM, JAMES M., Private, Motor Truck Transportation. Entered 
service December 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

CUNNINGHAM, JOHN R., Sergeant, Ordnance Corps. Entered service Sep- 
tember 20, 1917. Stationed at Watertown Arsenal. 

CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM A., Private, Engineer Corps. Entered service 
December 6, 1917. 

CURLEY, FRANK C, Sergeant. Medical Corps. Entered service .September, 
1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. Transferred to Oflficers' Training School. 




RAYMOND WARD 



T. LEVREAULT 




ERNEST E. GL'IMOND 



FRANK T. McGOUGH 



144 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

CURLEY, JAMES F., Private, Machine Gun Battalion. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CURLEY, WILLIAM B., Private, 56th Aerial Construction Squad. Entered 
service July 28, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

CURRAN, EDWARD, Private, Medical Corps, 104th Regiment. 'With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

CURRAN, FRANCIS M., Private. Entered service November 10, 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Officers' Training School, Camp Lee, Va. 

CURRAN, JOHN F., Private, United States Army. Entered service Septem- 
ber 6, 1918. Stationed -at Syracuse, N. Y. 

CURRAN, JOHN, Private, 301st Field Artillery. Entered service March, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. , 

CURRAN, JO^N, Private, 6th Supply Company. Entered service May 31, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

CURRAN, JOHN J., Private, 6th Regiment, United States Marine Corps. En- 
tered service August 24, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

CURRAN, PATRICK, Sergeant, 336th Battalion, 10th. Corps. Entered service 
July 15, 1918. Stationed at Springfield Technical School, Mass. Later with Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

CURRAN, PETER, Private, 36th Machine Gun Company. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CURRAN, WILLIAM H., Private, Artillery Officers' Training School. En- 
tered service November 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. 

CURTIN, EDWARD, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service April, 
1918. 

CURTIN, GEORGE F., Private, 17th Company, Depot Brigade. Entered serv- 
ice August 30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. L 

CZAJECKI, LEON, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 9, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

DAGENAIS, ERNEST, Private, Battery C, 55th C. A. C. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

DALEY, EDWARD J., Private, Field Artillery. Entered service May 31, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

DALEY, JAMES B., Private, Company A, 28th Infantry. Entered service 
February 27, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Missing in action July 
21, 1918. Back with company October, 1918. Missing in action for second time 
October, 1918. 

DALEY, PHILIP, Private, United States Army. Entered service November 
5, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DALEY, THOMAS, Private, Troop F, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service May 26, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DALEY, TIMOTHY J., Private, 301st Engineers. Entered service September 
15, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. 

DALEY, WILLIAM A., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DALEY, WILLIAM F., Private, United States Army. Entered service May 
10, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Fort Ethan Allen, Vf. 

DALTON, WILLIAM E., Private, Squadron No. 13, Aviation. Entered serv- 
ice August, 1917. Stationed at Camp Dick, Dallas, Texas. 

DAME, HOMER F., Sergeant, Company D, 104th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

DAMON, RALPH, Private, Company B, 39th Engineers. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 




JUH^ B. CHOQUETTE 



GEORGE BRACKMAN 




v^EORGE MacDONALD 



DANIEL D. MAllUXEV, )r. 



146 IIoLYOKE In The Great War. 

DAMOUR, FRED, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service September i), 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DANDRIA, GEORGE, Sergeant, Headquarters Company, 321st Field Artillery. 
Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

DAUNHEIMER, PHILIP, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service August, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DAUPHINAIS, ANTOLE, Private, Company M, 345th Infantry. Entered 
service June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

DAUPHINAIS, SILVUS, Private, Company H, 347th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June 27 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

DAVIAU, ANTONIO, Private, Company E, 74th Infantry. Entered service 
August 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DAVIGNON, ROMEO, Private, Company C, 245th C. A. C. Entered service 
March 25, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DAVIGNON, RAOUL, Private Company D, 102d Engineers. Entered service 
January 4, 1918. 

DAVIS, EDWIN J., Private, 303d Field Artillery. Entered service June, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DAZENAIS, ERNEST G., Private, Battery C, 55th C. A. C. Entered service 
December 6, 1917. 

DEAN, EDWIN R., Private. Company G, 1st Replacement Engineers. Entered 
service March 2, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DEAN, HAROLD F., Bugler, 119th Field Artillery. Entered service April, 

1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action July 22, 1918, 
at Chateau-Thierry. Gassed at Alsace. 

DEARDON, CHARLES, Private, Medical Corps, Tth Regiment, C. A. C. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

DEARDON, JOHN B., Private, 74th Infantry Band. Entered service July 23, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DEARDON, ROBERT B., Private, Company A, 59th Field Artillery. Entered 
service July, 1918. Stationed at Rhode Island State College. 

DECELLE, RALPH, Private, 4th Company, Evacuation, Hospital Corps. En- 
tered service September, 1918. 

DEGRES, VIDERVE, Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DEGUISX, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service Aug- 
ust, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

DELANEY, ROBERT W., Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service Decem- 
ber 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DELLAPENNA, PHILIP, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
0, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

DELISLE, ANDREW, Private, 303rd Field Artillery. Entered service April 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DELISLE, LEO J., Private, United States Cavalry. Entered service January 
21, 1918. 

DELISLE, LIONEL G., Private, Battery F, 55th C. A. C. Entered service 
February 23, 1918. 

DELISLE, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. 

DELONGCHAMP, AMOS, Private, C. A. C. Entered service March 15, 1917. 

DEMBAK, PETER, Private, Company B, 327th Infantry. Entered service 
August 17, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expeditionary 
Forces. Wounded in action October 9, 1918. 

DEMERS, OVILA, Private, United States Army. 




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V_^/ 



JOHN F. MORIARTY 



STEPHEN COLLINS 




TIMOTHY FLAHERTY 



PATRICK E. SMITH 



148 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

JJExMERS, TENOPHILE, Private, Company A, 36th Battalion. Entered serv- 
ice July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DEMOPOULOS, GUST, Private, Company G, 308th Infantrjf Entered service 
March, 1918. With .\merican E.xpeditionary Forces. Wounded in action Septem- 
ber 9, 1918. 

DENARDO, T0?;Y, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DENIMO, NICOLA, Private, United States Acmy. Entered service July 23. 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DENIS, WILLIAM F., Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DEPKAHPO, ANTONIO, Private, United States Army. 

DEKOY, GEORGE, Private, 31st Field Artillery. Entered service April 27, 
1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DESALTTELS, JOHN, Private, Supply Company, 56th Reg. Artillery. Sta- 
tioned at Fort H. G. Wright, N. Y. 

DESAUZA, ENNOCINCINO, Private, United States Army. 

DESBONNETT, RAYMOND, Private, Field Artillery. Entered service June 
1, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

DESCOTEAF, OVIDA, Private, 328th Infantry. Entered service September 
19, 1917. 

DESILETS, PATRICK S., Sergeant, Company E, 30th Infantry. Entered 
service June 1, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

DESMARAIS, PETER, Private, Company L, 302nd Infantry. Entered service 
May, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DESMOND, EDWARD T., Private, Tank Corps, Company B, 30-tth Battalion. 
Entered service July 15, 1918. Stationed at Rhode Island State College. 

DESMOND, FRANK ?.!., Private, Ordnance Department. Entered service 
July 1, 1918. Stationed at Wentw^orth Institute, Mass. With American Expedition- 
ary Forces. 

DESNOYERS, FHILLIPE D., Private. Truck Company D. Entered service 
May 31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

DESPAULT, ROMEO, Private, Engineers. Entered service June 15, 1918. 
Stationed at Wentworth Institute. 

DESROCHES, EUCLIDE, Sergeant, Company H, 2nd Battalion. Entered 
service. January, 1918. .Stationed at Washington, D. C. Transferred to Edgewood 
Plant, Md. 

DESROSIERS, ARTHLR, Private, Company A, 55th Coast Artillery. En- 
tered service December, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DESROSIERS, OSCAR, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice May 31, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

DEVAN, JOHN, Private, 120th Aero Squadron. 

DEVINE, JOHN P., Private, Medical Department, 29th Division. Entered 
service April 27, 1917. Stationed at Camp McClellan, Ala. 

DEYO, CHARLES, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June 21, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Severely wounded in action July 12, 1918. 

DEYO, CLARENCE E., Private, United States Army. Entered service June 
13, 1918. 

DEY'O, AVILLIAM F., Private, Company L, 310th Regiment. Entered service 
December 13, 1917. 

DICKINSON, WILLARD. Sergeant, 68th Balloon Squadron. Entered service 
November 9, 1917. Stationed at Fort Omaha, Neb. 





JOHN H. ROHAN 



TOHX SULLIVAN 





SEBASTIN KORDAS 



WILLIAM E. HUNTER 



150 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

DICKSON, EARLE E., Sergeant, Medical Corps, 310th Ambulance Company. 
Entered service August 1, 1917. Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. Transferred to 
Camp Dix, N. J. 

DIETZ, HERMAN R., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DIFABIO, GABRIEL, Private, United States Army. Entered service August 
28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

DILLON, JEREMIAH J„ Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice May, 1917. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded and gassed in action July, 1918. 

DILLON, MICHAEL J., Private, United States Army. Stationed at Camp 
Gordon, Ga. 

DIMICKI, LEON, Private, Company A, 102nd Infantry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. Taken prisoner July 23, 1918. Erroneously reported killed in 
action. 

DION, JOSEPH F., Corporal, Cornpany D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
October, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

DIPIPPO, TEOGINO, Private, 4th Company, Training Battalion, 16th In- 
fantry. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

DIXON, WILLIAM F., Private, Coast Artillery. Entered service April 19, 
1917. 

DIZENSKL ANTONIO, Private, Company L, 50th Infantry. Entered service 
July, 1917. 

DOANE, RALPH, Private, 13th Company, Depot Brigade. Stationed at Camp 
Devens. Previously Red Triangle secretary. 

pOBBS, GEORGE D., Private, 13th Cavalry. Entered service 

Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DOBER, FRED, Private, United States Army. 

DOCHERTY, EDWARD, Sergeant, Company D, 14th Railway Engineers. En- 
tered service June 25th, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DODGE, ISAAC W., Private, Company A, 318th Engineers. Entered service 
December 11, 1917. 

DOHERTY, FRANCIS, Private, Coast Artillery. Entered service July 8, 1918. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DOHERTY, JAMES F., Private, 21st Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
March 6, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

DOHERTY, JOHN, Private, Company C, 3rd Prov. Ordnance Battalion. En- 
tered service December 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. Later with 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

DOLIGY, ABBID, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DORHNICK, VINCENTY, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 
10, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N, Y. 

DOMINIE, THEODORE, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service January 
18, 1918. 

DOMINIQUE, ARTHUR, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

DOMINQUE, LOUIS, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 31. 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

DOMURAT, JOSEPH, Private, Battery F, 8th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice April 10, 1917. 

DONAHUE, HARRY, Corporal, 4th Company, 16th Training Battalion. Sta- 
tioned at Syracuse, N. Y. 



^w^ 



z:^ 





LEO T. MASON 



GEORGE R. BURNS 





HAROLD LYNCH 



WILFRED J. LAVALLE 



152 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

DOXEGAX, JAMES J., Private, Company B, 312th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice June 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Hancock, Ga. 

DOXOGHUE, JEKEMIAH F., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DONOGHUE, JOHN S., Private, Medical Corps, United States Base Hospital 
No. 10:2. Entered service May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. Later 
v/ith American Expeditionary Forces. (Italian front.) 

DOXOGHUE, JOSEPH L., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
May 31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

DOXOGHUE, MICHAEL, Sergeant, 3rd Company. 1st Battalion, Depot Bri- 
gade. Entered service February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DOXOGHUE, TIMOTHY, private, Company G, 21st Division. Entered serv- 
ice July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DOXOVAX, AVELTON J., Private, United States Army. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces- 

DOOLEY, THOMAS F., Sergeant, Battery B, 11th Regiment, F. A. R. D. 
Entered service May 31, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

DOUGHERTY, DAXIEL D., Private. United States Armv. Entered service 
May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, N. Y. 

DOUGilERTY, JOHN C, Private, Medical Corps. Enlisted March 5, 1918. 

DOUILIiARD, ISAIE, Private, United States Army. Entered service De- 
cember 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DOUVILLE, JOSEPH, Private, Company A, 504th Engineers. Entered service 
September 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DOWD, BARXEY, Private, United States Army. 

DOWp, FRAXCIS J., Sergeant-Major. Company D, 104th Infantry. En- 
tered service September 1, 1915. Mexican border service. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. Wounded in action. Transferred to Headquarters, 104th 
Infantry. 

' DO WD, FREDERICK A., Corporal, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June 1, 1916. Mexican border service. With the American Expeditionary 
Forces. Wounded in action. 

DOWD, JAMES J., Private, 117th Sanitary Train. 165th Field Hospital, Rain- 
bow Division. Entered service August, 1917. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

DOWD, JEREMIAH J., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service December 
6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DOWD, JOSEPH, Sergeant, Company B, 312th :\Iachine Gun Company. Sta- 
tioned at Camp Meade, Md. 

DOWD, PATRICK, Private, 255th Aero Squadron. Entered service Decem- 
ber 12, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DOWD, THOMAS J., Private, Troop T, 3rd Cavalry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

DOWD, THO^IAS, Sergeant, 6th Company, 2nd Battalion, Aviation. 

DOAVLING, EDWARD J., Sergeant, United States Army. Entered service 
December 14, 1917. Stationed at Akron, Ohio. 

DOWNEY, DAXIEL, Private, United States Army. Entered service Septem- 
ber 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

DOYLE, JOHX, Private, Headquarters Troop, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service 
September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DOYLE, AVILLIAM E., Sergeant, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice May, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action; later reported missing; cited for bravery. 




ARTHUR LAXCTO 



EMILE P. DUROCHER 




MAURICE 1. O'COXXOR 



CYRIL HAFEY 



154 HoLYOKE In The Great War, 

DOYLE, WILLIAM H., Private, United States Army. Entered service De- 
cember 12, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DRAKE, FRANCIS Y., Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 7, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

DRAKE, FRANK A., Private, 315th Trench Mortar Company. Entered serv- 
ice May 31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DRAKE, GEORGE E., Corporal, Company A, 7th Engineer Corps. Entered 
service June 9, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DREICORN, RICHARD E., Private, 2nd Company, Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 28, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

DREW, FRED L., Private, 24th Company, C. A. C. Entered service August 
13, 1918. Stationed at Fort Heath, Boston, Mass. 

DRISCOLL, TH03IAS, Corporal, Company E, 33rd Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice March, 1915. 

DROUIN, MOISE, Corporal, Troop C, 310th Cavalrv. Entered service May 
10, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

DRU»IMOND, JOSEPH L., Corporal, Battery D, 51st Artillery, C. A. C. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

DUBE, CHARLES F., Private, Field Artillery. Entered service May 11, 1918. 
With American Expeditionary F'orces. 

DUBOIS, ADRIEN, Private, Battery A, 321st Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice September 21, 1918. 

DUBOUR, HORMIDAS, Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober 11, 1918. Stationed at Fort Williams, Me. 

DUBUQUE, EARL C, Private, 213th Aero Squadron. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

DUCEY, PATRICK W., Corporal, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June 25, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DUCHARME, ALFRED J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. Gassed. 

DUCHARME, CAMILLE V., Private, Battery E, 10th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service June 8, 1918. 

DUCHARME, EDGAR R., Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service May 
31, 1918. 

DUCHARME, HENRY, Private, Company G, 104th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

DUCHARME, HORACE, Private, Company B, 35th Machine Gun Battalion. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DUFFEY, THOMAS H., Corporal, Battery B, 319th Field Artillery. Witli 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

DUFFNEY, EDWARD P., Private, United States Cavalry. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. 

DUFFY, JAMES, Private, 15th Company, 12th Military Police. Entered serv- 
ice July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DUFFY, PATRICK D., Private, United States Army. Entered service April 
27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DUFRANE, HARVEY J., Private, Company B, 318th Eiigineers. Entered 
service December 11, 1917. 

DUFRESNE, WILFRED, Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

DUGGAN, JOSEPH F., Corporal, 18th Company, 5th Battalion. Entered serv- 
ice July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DUMAINE, LIONEL A., Private, Engineer Corps. Entered service January 
9, 1918. 








JOHN BRESNAHAN 



ABRAHAM A. GLASSMAN 




AUL 



GEORGE R. OSBORNE 



156 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

DUMELOW, JOHN C, Private, Gas Defense Service. Stationed at Edge- 
worth, Md. Accidentally gassed. 

DUMKIN, OSCAR, Private, Company E, 63rd Pioneer Infantry. Entered 
service April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DUMONT, WILLIAM E., Private, United States Army. Entered service May 
31. 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

DUNPHY, AVILLIAM J., Private, Company E, GOth Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice December 15, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DU3IURAT, STANLEY, Private, Company C, 318th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service May, 1918. With xA.merican Expeditionary Forces. 

DUNLEA, RAYMOND, Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

DUNN, EDMUND J., Private, 12th Division. Military Police. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DUNN, ROLLAND A., Sergeant, Personnel Department. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DUPELL, EDWARD, Private, 10:;d Infantry, :2(3th Division. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

DUNPHY, MARK E., Private, Chauffeur, Medical Department. Entered serv- 
ice January 2, 1918. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

DUPONT, ADRIEN, Private, Company A, 321st Machine Gun Company. En- 
tered service September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded 
in action. 

DUPONT, CLAUDE E., Private, 139th Aero Squadron. Stationed at Alle- 
^,any, Ore. 

DURANT, WILLIAM E., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. 

DUROCHER, ALFRED J., Private, Company B, 12th Supply Train. Entered 
service June 12, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

DUROCHER, EMILE P., Wagoner, Battery A, 38th C. A. C. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Stevi^art. 

DUROCHER, EUCLIDE, Private, Ordnance Corps. Stationed at Washington, 
D. C. 

DUROCHER, OCTAVE, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
5, 1918. 

DUSSIERE, LORENZO, Private, United States Army. 

DUVAL, LEO, Private, U. G. Troop. 12th Cavalry. Stationed at Columbus, 
N, M. 

DUVAL, ROSARIO, Pi-ivate, Battery D, 13th Field Artillery. Entered service 
August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

DWY^ER, JAMES 31., Private, Battery B, 321st Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice September 21, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

DWYER, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Stationed at Camp Gor- 
don, Ga. 

DWYER, WILLIAM C, Private, Company C, :.04th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice September 21, 1917. 

EAGAN, BERNARD M., Private, Company A, 12th Machine Gun Battalion. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

EARLE, FREDERICK M., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry." With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

EARLY, JAMES J., Private, Company A, 6th Engineers. Entered service 
October 20, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 




\^ illiaai powers 



TOHN R. LYMAN. 





.LGEXE LYXXH 



llKAl \- uil 1 l\' 



158 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

EARLY, JOHN J., Sergeant, 13th Company, Depot Brigade. Entered service 
September 22, 1917. 

ECKERT, EMIL, Private, Battery D, Field Artillery. Entered service July 
31, 1918. Stationed at University of Maine. 

EOKERT, HERMAN, Private, Signal Corps. Entered service April 9, 1918. 

ECKERT, JOHN, Private. United States Army. With American Expedition- 
ary Forces. 

EGER, ALBERT, Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service March 18, 1918. 
Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

EGER, CHARLES H., Private, United States Armv. Entered service Aug- 
ust 29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

EIDMAN, FRANK L., Engineer of Tests, Ordnance Corps. Entered service 
March 11, 1918. 

ELLERT, RICHARD, Private, Tank Corps, Companv C, 345th Battalion. En- 
tered service May 21, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

EME^Y, GEORGE, Private, Headquarters Company, 325th Infantry. En- 
tered service October, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

EJMERY, HAROLD A., Private, Battery A, 7th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice May 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ENGEL, CHARLES, Private, 19th Anti-Aircraft Battery. Entered service 
July 9, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ENGEL, HERMAN, Private, Company A, 36th Machine Gun Battalion. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ENGEL, JOHN, Private, Company C, 301st Infantry. Entered service June 
17, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces^ 

ENGLER, ALBERT, Private, United States Army. Entered service June 27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

EPSTEIN, THOMAS, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 9, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

EQUI, CAESAR, Private, Company A, 36th Machine Gun Battalion. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ERLIN, HARRY, Private, United States Army. Entered service February 

26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ESKIOGLU, SPEROS, Private, 4th Company, 16th Training Battalion. Sta- 
tioned at Syracuse, N. Y. 

ETHIER, LOUIS C. S., Sergeant, United States Army. Entered service April 

27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

EVANS, GEORGE, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 27, 
1918, Stationed at Camp Devens. 

EVANS, JOHN L., Private, Company A, 320th Machine Gun Battalion. En- 
tered service December, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded 
in action. 

EVANS, REUBEN J., Private, 302d Ammunition Train, Ordnance Corps. 
Entered service February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

EVANS, VICTOR, Private, 24th Company, 152d Depot Brigade. Entered serv- 
ice August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton. L. I. 

EZOLD, RAYMOND E., Private, Company B, 34th Machine Gun Battalion. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FADUKOYEZ, HARRY, Private, United States Army. 

FAHEY, EDWARD, Private, Battery A, 55th C. A. C. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FAHEY, PATRICK, Private, United States Army. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 




JOHN E. MANGUM ERNEST and ARTHUR WICKS 





JAMES and GEORGE CLARK WALTER CAREY 



160 HoLYOKE Ik The Great War. 

FAIiVEV, MICHAEL. J., Corporal Company E, 20th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service May 13, 1917. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. 

PAKR, CLARENCE L., Sergeant. Quartermaster, Auxiliary Remount. En- 
tered service December 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

FARRELL, EUGENE, Private, Battery B, 33rd Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice August 10, 1918. 

FARRELL, JOSEPH W., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FARROW, LEBAN, Private, 4th Company, 16th Training Battalion. Sta- 
tioned at Syracuse, N. Y. 

FAWCETT, HAROLD, Private, Motor Truck Company, Quartermaster Corps. 
Entered service June 27, 1918. 

FAWCETT, JAMES H., Private, 322nd Field Hospital, Medical Corps. En- 
tered service June 18, 1917. Stationed at Camp Sevier, S. C. 

FAY, ALBERT, Private, Company L, 301st Infantry. With American Expe- 
ditionary Rorces. 

FAY, EARL C, Private, Troop A, 6th Cavalry. Entered service January 2, 
1918. 

FAY, EDWARD J., Bugler, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded. Gassed. 

FEATHER, FRANK R., Wagoner, Company A, 1st Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice May 20, 1916. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FEDORA, BASIL, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service Sep- 
tember 6, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FEENEY, BERNARD, Private, United States Arm}-. Entered service April 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FEENEY, FRANCIS F., Private, 8th Camp Headquarters. Entered service 
August 30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

FELCH, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FELPER, ROBERT, Private, 33rd C. A. C. Entered service September 3, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FERRIS, RALPH B., Corporal, 5th Battalion, Depot Brigade. Entered serv- 
ice July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens; 

FERRITER, JOHN J., Private, Battery D, 73rd Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service August 13, 1918. Stationed at Fort Strong. 

FIFE, JOHN P., Private, Company L, 29th Engineers. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FIFE, MICHAEL, Private, Company D, 6th Engineers. Entered service June 
4, 1917. 

FINN, JAMES J., Private, 147th Signal Corps, United States Marines. En- 
tered service June 20, 1918. Stationed at Fort Royal, S. C. 

FINNERTY, LEO H., Private, Company A, 74th Infantry. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FITZELL, JAMES, Private, Battery A, 55th C. A. C. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. Stationed at Fort Revere Hall, Mass? With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

FITZELL, THOMAS, Private, United States Army. Entered service July, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

FITZELL,, TIMOTHY, Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

FITZGERALD, DAVID, Private, Company F, 15th Infantry. Entered service 
September 4. 191S. 




EARL L. KNAPP 



EDWARD T. THORPE 




^vii^ 




^1 w 

IRVING STEWART 




JEROME E. MORIARTY 



162 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

FITZGERALD, EDWARD J., Chauffeur, 32nd Balloon Company, Aviation. 
Entered service December 15, 1917. 

FITZGERALD, EUGENE, Private, 14th Cavalry. Entered service January 
10, 1918. 

FITZGERALD, FRANCIS, Private, Company K, 61st Pioneer Infantry. En- 
tered service October 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Wadsworth, Pa. 

FITZGERALD, FRANCIS G., Private, Company E, 33rd C. A. C. Entered 
service September 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FITZGERALD, JAMES, Sergeant, United States Army. Stationed at Camp 
Grant, 111. 

FITZGERALD, MICHAEL, Private, Company I, 302nd Infantry. Entered 
i.Tvice April 26, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FITZGERALD, NICHOLAS J., Private, Battery D, 304th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service March 29, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FITZGERALD, P. EDWARD, Private, Battery A, 3rd Field Artillery. En- 
tered service September 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

FITi^GERALD, P. HENRY, Private, Company B, 14th Railway Engineers. 
Entered service May, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FITZGERALD, THOMAS, Private, United States Army. 

FITZSIMMONS, RAPHAEL, Corporal, 15th Quartermaster Corps. Stationed 
at Camp Joseph E. Johnston, Fla. 

FLAHERTY, TIMOTHY, Private, Company F, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice September 23, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

FLAHIVE, PATRICK D., Private, Company C, 305th Infantry. Entered 
service April, 1918. Wounded in action twice. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

FLANAGAN, JAMES, Private, Company D, 35th Machine Gun Battalion. 
Entered service August 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FLANAGAN, JOHN C, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service Sep- 
tember 9, 1917. Stationed at Camp Mills. 

FLECHSIG, ALBERT J., Private, United States Army. Stationed at Camp 
Devens. 

FLETCHER, SAMUEL, Sergeant, 312th Cavalry. Entered service June 11, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FLOK, PAUL, Corporal, United States Army. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

FLOOD, JOHN R., Musician, Band, 104th Infantry. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. Cited for bravery in action. 

FLYNN, FRANK N., Private, 4th Company, 16th Training Battalion. Sta- 
tioned at Syracuse, N. Y. 

FLYNN, GEORGE H., Private, United States Army. Entered service August 
20, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

FLYNN, MICHAEL M., Private, 714th Hospital Corps. Entered service Sep- 
tember 19, 1917, With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FLYNN, RAYMOND, Private, Company E, 308th Infantry. Entered service 
December 6, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. (With the "Lost Bat- 
talion. ") 

FLYNN, WILLIAM J., Private, Battery D, 304th Field Artillery. Entered 
service March 28, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FOERSTER, ARTHUR, Private, 5th Company, 150th Depot Brigade. Entered 
service September 16, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FOERSTER, CHARLES H., Sergeant, Company B, 2nd Engineer Corps. En- 
tered service June 19, 1916. With American Expeditionary Forces. 




MAURICE POWERS 



DELPHIS GUILLERI 




CHAUNCEY COOLEY 



CHARLES RYAN 



164 IIoLYOKE In The Great War. 

FOLEY, WILLIAM F., Private, Company D, 307th Infantry. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FOLEY, WILLIAM K., Private, United States Army. Entered Service May 
31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

FONTAINE, ARMOUR E., Private, Company F, 307th Ammunition Train. 
Entered service September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FONTAINE, HECTOR F., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June 24, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

FONTAINE, JOSEPH H., Private, Company A, 334th Machine Gun Battal- 
ion. Entered service June 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

FORBES, HAROLD K., Corporal, Battery D, 29th Field Artillery, C. A. C. 
Entered service October 19, 1918. Stationed at Fort McKinley. 

FORI), EDWARD, Sergeant, Aviation. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

FORD, JOHN, Private, Hospital Corps. Entered service July 23, 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Camp Devens. 

FORD, W^ILLIAM J., Corporal, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

FORGET, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service Septem- 
ber 6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

FORGREE, ARMAND, Private, 59th Aero Squadron, Aviation Corps. En- 
tered service July 31, 1917. Stationed at Morrison, Va. 

FORHAN, TIMOTHY F., Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service July 27, 

1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FORTIN, ARTHUR, Private, United States Army. Entered service June 27, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

FORTIN, GEORGE C, Private, 147th Field Artillerv. Entered service May 
31, 1918. 

FOUNTAIN, HAROLD E., Private, Coast Artillerv Corps. Entered service 
April 2, 1917. 

FOUNTAINE, LIONEL, Private, Company I, 42nd Infantry. Entered service 
May 3, 1918. 

rOURNi:pR, AIME J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
May 26, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded. 

FOURNIER, ARTHUR, Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FOURNIER, OSILIDA, Private, Company A, 26th Infantry. Entered service 
February 19, 1917. With American Expeditionary^ Forces. Wounded in action. 

FOURNIER, ^VILFRED, Private, Coast Artillerv Corps. Entered service 
July 5, 1918. 

FOX, ALBERT E., Private, 2nd Veterinary Depot. Entered service October 
7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FOX, HENRY, Private, Headquarters Detachment, 1.54th Infantry. Entered 
service February 28, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
action. 

FOX, PHILIP L., Private. Medical Corps. Entered service August 15, 1917. 
Stationed at Gun Hill Road, William's Bridge, N. Y. 

FRANCOEUR, ARTHUR, Private, 479th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
November 24, 1917. 

FRANCOEUR, ELMER L., Private, Company C, 312th Field Signal Battal- 
ion. Entered service July 1, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FRAPPIER, HENRY, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 
27. 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 




iiUGlI D. McLEAN 



WILLIAM F. WRUCK 





HERBERT D. TIDSWELL 



ROBERT R. TWISS 



166 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

FRASER, JAMES, Corporal, Battery C, 3rd Field Artillery. Entered service 
June 9, 1918. 

FRASER, JOHN, Private, Battery A, 6th Anti-Aircraft Battalion. Entered 
service July, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FRECHETTE, FRED L., Private, 437th Engineers. Entered service June 
17, 1918. Stationed at Washington, D. C. 

FREDETTE, ALFRED, Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service March 
8. 1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

' FREDETTE, CLOVIS E., Sergeant, Flying School Detachment. Entered 
service January 29, 1918. Stationed at Brooks Field, Texas. 

FREDETTE, JOSEPH J., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
March 16, 1917. 

FREDETTE, WILLIAM G., Private, Company E, 9th Infantry. Entered 
service July 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FREEMAN, JAMES P., Private, United States Army. Entered service Aug- 
ust 17, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

FREELOVE, JAMES T., Sergeant, Company B, 37th Engineers. Entered 
service March 13, 1917. Stationed at Fort Meyers, Va. 

FREITAG, FRANK, Private, Company F, 1st Engineers. Entered service in 
1913. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. Erroneously 
leported killed in action. 

FRENCH, EMMETT A., Private, Headquarters Company, 2nd Division. En- 
tered service December 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FRENIER, ARTHUR J., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

FRENIER, LIONEL J., Private, 303d Guard and Fire Company. Entered 
service July, 1918. Stationed at Hoboken, N. J. 

FREYER, ARTHUR P., Private, Gas Corps, 31st Company, 8th Battalion. 
Entered service April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FRIEDRICH, CHARLES O., Private, Company C, 101st United States Engi- 
neers. Entered service September 23, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FRIEDRICH, GEORGE W., Private, 22nd Signal Corps. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Transferred to Fort Jay, N. Y. 

FRIEDRICH, HUGO E., Private, 51st Field Artillery. Entered service July 
2, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FRODYMA, JOHN, Private, Company M, 345th Infantry. Entered service 
June 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FROMBOLD, ARTHUR E., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

FULLER, RAYMOND S., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June 8, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

FULLER, ALBERT G., Private, United States Army. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

GABBETT, JAMES F., Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 6, 1918. Stationed at Franklin-Union Institute. 

GADBOIS, ARTHUR, Private, Company I, 23rd Infantry. Entered service 
March 28, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action July 
1, 1918. 

GADBOIS, JOSEPH A., Private, Company M, First Army Headquarters. 
Entered service December 5, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GARBOIS, OVILA C, Private, Hospital Corps. Entered service May 31, 
1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 




^.-W;-. 




JAMES A. DAVIDSON 



SAMUEL O'CONNELL 




PATRICK POWERS 



CHARLES F. MORRISON 



168 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

GAGNE, FRED J., Private, United States Army. Eiuered service April 30, 
1917. 

GAGNON, ARTHUR A., Corporal, 151st Depot Brigade. Entered service 
September 2, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GAGNON, EDWARD H., Private, Battery B, 12th Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 1, 1917. Stationed at Camp Merritt, N. J. 

GAGNON, FRANK, Private, 22nd Ambulance Corps, Medical Department. 
Entered service July 26, 1918. 

GAGNON, GEORGE, Private, Company C, 2nd Battalion. Entered service 
August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

GAGNON, GEORGE, Private, Truck and Wagon Train. Entered service 
November 26, 1917. 

GAGNON, HERMON H., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Eiitered 
service June 1, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

GAGNON, LIONEL J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
February, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action twice. 

GAGNON, OSWALD W., Corporal, 3rd M. M. Regiment. Entered service 
December 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GAINNI, PASQUALE, Private, Company C, 321st Machine Gun Battalion. 
Entered service September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action. 

GALLIV'AN, JAMES, Marine Gunner, 43d Company, 5th Regiment, United 
States Marine Corps. Entered service April 21, 1894. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

GAMACHE, FRANK _X., Private, Battery B, 71st C. A. C. Entered service 
April 6, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GAMMIE, PETER, Private, Company C, 165th Infantry. Entered service 
June 20, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

GANSOR, FRANK, Private, United States Army. Entered service Decem- 
ber, 1917. 

GARABEDIAN^ OSCAR J., Private, United States Army. 

GARLAND, FRANK, Sergeant, 81st Cavalry. Entered service March Ki, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GARNARD, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 
^6, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GARRANT, GEORGE, Private, United States Army. 

GARRIEPY, FRANK A., Private, United States Armv. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 25, 1918. 

GARRITY, JOHN, Sergeant, Recruiting Officer. Entered service August 20, 

1917. Stationed at Chicago, 111. 

GARRITY, WILLIAM P., Private, Battery B, 3rd Field Artillery. Entered 
service August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

GARVEY, BRANDON, Private, Company M, 345th Infantrv. Entered serv- 
ice June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

GAUDARD, LUCIEN, Sergeant, Battery A, 11th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

GAULIN, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 31. 

1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

_ GAUTHIER, MATHIAS, Private, 23d Infantry. Entered rcrvice June, 1917. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GAUTHIER, PAUL, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service Decem- 
ber, 1917. 




Top row (left to right) Fairtield Wliitmg, Walter J. U'Leary, Hdward W. Gerbert ; 
second row — Rodolphe bazinet, Lucien Robert, Thomas M. Kennedy; third row — 
Stanley Jamrock, Hector R. Brouillett. William E. Taupier ; bottom row — William 
Russell, Arthur Reynolds, William j. Mengcl. 



170 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

GAYLORI), LYMAN F., Private Ordnance Corps. Entered service March 5, 
1918. Stationed at Watertown Arsenal. 

GAYLORD, SAMUEL S., Private, 340th Regiment. Entered^ service July 25, 
1^)18. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

GEE, MICHAEL B., Sergeant, Camouflage Corps. Entered service March 29,. 
1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GELINEAU, DR. J. H., Interpreter, Medical Corps. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

GELLATLY, JOHN R., Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 2, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GELTER, JOSEPH B., Private 10th C. A. C. Entered service March 4, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Strong, Boston, Mass. 

GENARD, LEON J., Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service March 5, 
1918. 

GENDRON, PHILIP, Private, Battery D, 29th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice October 21, 1918. Stationed at Fort Williams, Me. 

GEORGE, BERNIE M., Private 101st Ammunition Train. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

GEORGE, DORIA, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

GERAGHTY, JOHN J., Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GERAN, DANIEL, Private, United States Army. With American Expedition- 
ary Forces. 

GERBERT, EDWARD G., Private, United States Army. Entered service- 
July 5, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GERMAIN, HARVEY C, Private. United States Army. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devcn.s. 

GIAMEITTORIO, I. F., Private, United States Army. Entered service Aug- 
ust, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GIGUERE, JOHN, Private, Company E, 48th Infantry. Entered service June 
11, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

GILBERT, ARTHUR, Private, 9th C. A. C. Entered service December 17, 

1917. Stationed at United States Armory, Springfield, Mass. 

GILBERT, HENRY G., Private, Troop C, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service 
May 14, 1917. Stationed at Fort Meyer, Va. 

GILBERT, OMER, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
September 1, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GILBERT, WILFRED, Private, Battery C, 80th Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 12, 1917. Stationed at Camp McArthur, Texas. 

GILL, BARTHOLOMEW P., Private, United States Marines. Stationed at 
Boston, Mass. 

GILL, MICHAEL F., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Remount Depot. En- 
tered service September 21, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GILLIGAN, GEORGE L., Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
March 7, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

GILLIGAN, JAMES T., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GILLISPIE, MICHAEL J., Private, 147th Tank Corps. Entered service 
March 1, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GILMORE, JOHN R., Private, 2nd Overseas Detachment. Entered service 
October 15, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GILMOUR, HUGH, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 27, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 




Top row (left to right)— Emile Roberts, Michael Manning, Clement E. O'Neil; 
second row — Edward Docherty, Peter Bober, Clarence Reffenburg; third row — 
Leonard F. Law. Antonio J. Boudreau, Alphonse Orban ; bottom row — Leopold 
G. Miller, Emile S. Fremont, Henry Schaudynat. 



172 rioLYOKE In The Great War. 

GILPATRICK, AMISA M., Sergeant, United States Army. Entered service 
October, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GINGRAS, AMEDEE, Private, 301st Infantry. Entered service May 20, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GIROUX, JOSEPH, Private, .312th Ammunition Train. Entered service June 
27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GIROUX, ROSARIO, Private, Troop C, 11th Cavalry. Entered service Aug- 
ust 6, 1917. 

GIROUX, VALMORE, Private, Headquarters, 336th Field Artillery, 87th Di- 
vision. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GLADU, WILFRED J., Private, United States Cavalrv. Entered service May 
24, 1916. 

GLASSMAN, ABRAHAM, Private, Battery C, 55th C. A. C. Entered service 
December 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GLASTER, THOMAS F., Private, United States Army. Entered service April 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GLEASON, DANIEL, Private, Company G, 327th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice September 19, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GLEASON, EDWARD J., Sergeant, Company H, 306th Infantry. Entered 
service December 11, 1917. Stationed at Camp Johnston, Fla. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

GLENS, FREDERICK A., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. Gassed. 

GLINSKY, CIRIL, Private, United States Army. Entered service March, 
1918. 

GLOSTER, JOHN F„ Private, Ordnance Detachment, 69th Company. En- 
tered service December 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GLOSTER, MAURICE F., Corporal, 61st Field Artillerv. Entered service 
December 26, 1916. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

GLOTH, ROBERT, Private, United States Army. Entered service June 24, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GODDU, ADJUTOR, Private, Company M, 302d Infantry. Entered service 
April 29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GODDU, ANDREW C, Private, Company C, 101st Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GODDU, JULIEN E., Bandsman, 101st Engineers. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

GODDU, WILLIA3I, Private, United States Army. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

GODEK, KARL, Private, United States Army. Entered service December, 
1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GODERE, LEON H., Private, Medical Corps, 1st Depot Brigade. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GOEBERT, EDWIN W., Musician, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
December, 1917. 

I GOGOLIN, JOHN W., Private, 18th Anti-Aircraft Battery. Entered service 
June 28, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GOLEN, FRANK J., Private, Battery A, 369th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice November, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

GOLDEN, JOHN, Private, 8th Cavalry. Entered service February 19, 1918. 
GO>fA\, EARLE W., Private, Tank Corps. Entered service May 10. 1917. 

Stationed r.t Fort Slocum, N. Y. 




gp«aKW'-"v<?^ 








i 


I^V-^- 


L 






I 






■"^^ 







Top row (left to right )— Elmer L. Francreur, Silas Dauphinais, Omer Lavelle ; 
second row— Henry Armstrong, George Laverty, Andrew Delisle ; third row — 
Myles Barrett, Patrick H. McNulty, Thomas Koernski ; bottom row— Joseph Arm- 
strong, Frank Powers, Joseph Giroux. 



174 IIoLYOKE In The Great War. 

GOMOSKI, ALEXANDER, Private, 38th Company, 10th Battalion. Stationed 
at Camp Devens. 

GONET, JOHN C, Musician, Headquarters Troop, 8th Cavalry. Entered 
service October 31, 1917. Stationed at Marfa, Texas. 

GOODWIN, JOSEPH C, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service April 29, 
1918. 

GOODWIN, WALLACE, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 15, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

GORDON, JOHN R., Sergeant, 31st Company, 8th Battalion. Entered service 
September .21, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Transferred to Officers' Train- 
ing School, Camp Lee, Va. 

GORDON, THEODORE, Corporal, 72d Quartermaster Corps. Entered serv- 
ice June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

GORHAM, EDWARD N., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 19^8. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GORHA3I, ERNEST, Sergeant, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
P'ebruary, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action. 

GORMAN, JOSEPH, Private, 494th Supply Company. Entered service June 
10, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GORMAN, LOUIS O., Sergeant, Troop C, 3rd United States Cavalry. En- 
tered service May, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GOSS, EDWIN G., Private, Company F, 56th Engineers. Entered service 
March 19, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GOSS, ELBERT, Private, 838th Aero Squadron. Entered service December 
13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GOSS, RAYMOND, Sergeant-Major, 9.!4th Aero Squadron. Entered rcrvice 
December 10, 1917. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

GOSSELIN, ALMANZAR, Private, Company F, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GOYETTE, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 
31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y, 

GRACE, JOHN F., Private, 305th Infantry. Entered service February, 1918. 
With American Expeditionary. Forces. 

_ GRACE, ROBERT J., Private, Quaitermaster Corps, 25th Company, Depot 
Brigade. Entered service September 23, 1917. 

GRADY, THOMAS, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service June, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

GRAHAM, CHARLES, Private, 10th Company, Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service March 5, 1918. 

GRAHAM, EDWARD J., Sergeant, Aviation Corps. Entered service De- 
cember 10, 1917. Stationed at Camp Grant, 111. 

GRANDCHAMP, AELMAN D., Private, United States Marine Corps. En- 
tered service June 29, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GRANDCHAMP, ALFRED A., Private, United States Army. 

GRANT, ANDREAV K., Private, 305th Infantry. Entered service August, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GRAVES, FREDERICK, Private, 31st C. A. C. Entered service November 
1, 1918. Stationed at Fort Warren, Boston, Mass. 

GRAVES, ALBERT, Private, Company I, 302d Infantry. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GREANEY, GEORGE B., Sergeant TTnited States Tank Corps. Entered 
service April, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 




■Iliirai 



Top row (left to right)— Amedee E. Robert, Ernest St. Lawrence, Alfred Forbes- 
second row— Joseph Pole, Arthur Freniere, Theophile Arel ; third row— Ulric 
Provost, ^rancois Breton, Henry L. Landry; bottom row— Elzear Lavalle, Brandon 
Garvey, Philip Heroux. 



176 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

GKEANEY, HOWARD B., Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
\ugust 13, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GKEAXEY, THOMAS, Private, Battery B, 35uth Artillery. Entered service 
June 27, 1918. Stationed at Lamp bix, .N. j. 

GREANEY, THOMAS, Private, Field Artillery. Entered service June 1, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. V. 

GREA]\EY, TIMOTHY ¥., Private, Quartermaiter Corps. Entered service 
September 1"), 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GREANEY, FRANCIS M., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 
7, 1918. 

GREELEY, JOSEPH, Private, Company D, l()4th Infantry. Entered service 
June 25, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Taken prisoner in action. Later released. 

GREEN, COY, Private, United States Army. Entered service September 19, 
l')18. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

GREEN, SOLLIE, Private, Company B, 310th Infantry. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. 

GREENE, AARON, Sergeant, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service April 
12, 1918. Stationed at Fort Johnston, Fla. Later with American Expeditionary 
P'orces. 

GREGOIRE, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 
7, 1917. 

GRESSY, WILLLIM A., Sergeant, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
December, 1917. Stationed at Fort Johnston, Fla. 

GRIFFIN, FRANCIS E., Private, Battery B, 12th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

GRIFFIN, JAMES J., Private, Company H, 6th Infantry. Entered service 
September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Eorces. Wounded in action. 

GRIFFIN, MAURICE L., Corporal, Company A, 36th Machine Gun Battalion, 
12th Division. Entered service July 17, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

_ GRIFFIN, PATRICK, Private, 32d Infantry. Entered service April 27, 1918. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. Severely wounded in action. 

GRIFFIN, THOMAS, Private, United States Arm.v. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GRIOT, LOUIS E., Cook, Company B, 23d Engineering Corps. Entered serv- 
ice October 4, 1917. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

GROGAN, EDWARD J., Private, Coast x\rtillery Corps. Entered service 
.\pril 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

GUIEL, EUGENE V., Private, Battery F, 12th Field Artillery. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

GROISE, ALPHONSE, Private, 33d Coast Artillery. Entered service August 
1.5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Heustis, Va. 

GUENTHER, GEORGE C, Private, Machine Gun Battalion, 12th Division. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GUENTHER, HENRY, Private, Military Police. Entered service October 1, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

GUENTHER, WALTER A., Private, Battery E, 3rd Field Artillery. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GUERTIN, ELPHEGE A., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
.August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

GUERTIN, JOSEPH, Private, 217th Aero Squadron. Entered service Decem- 
ber 5, 1917. 




Top row (left to right)— William R. Henderson, Frederick Childs, Edward J. 
Burns; second row — George Barsalou, Richard E. Dreicorn, Elzear Campagne; 
third row— Elmer C. Ashe. Joseph Queneville, Joseph Bader; bottom row — Williarr 
Persky, Henry T. Labelle, John Knreck. 



178 HoLYOKE In The Great War, 

GUGENBERGEK, JOSEPH, Private, Medical Department, Army General 
Hospital No. 2. Entered service August 11, 1917. 

GUILBEAULT, ALEX, Private, Company G, ;56th Infantry. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GUILE3IETTE, AIK)LPH, Private, United States Cavalry. 

GUIMOND, ERNEST E., Sergeant, 9th Company, 1st United States Signal 
Corps. Entered service December 5, 1917. Stationed at Tenafly, N. J. 

GUINARD, JOSEPH, Private, Motorcycle Company, 12th Division. Entered 
service' April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HAFEY, CYRIL, Sergeant, Medical Corps, 30th Infantry. Entered service 
July 26, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HAGERTY, JOHN J., Corporal, Battery F, 20th Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 17, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HAGERTY, 3IICHAEL F., Private, Troop A, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service 
May 19, 1917. Stationed at Fort Meyer, Va. 

HAGGERTY, GILES M„ Sergeant. Headquarters, 307th Ammunition Train. 
Entered service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HAGGERTY, JEREMIAH F., Sergeant, H Company, 16th Infantry. En- 
tered service March 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
action. 

HAGGERTY, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Stationed at Camp 
Stanley, Texas. 

HAGNE, HOWARD F., Private, 2nd Cavalrv. Entered service January 22, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

HAIN, JOHN J., Sergeant, 46th Company, 12th Battalion, 151st Depot Brigade. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HAJEC, THOMAS, Private, Battery F, 25th Field Artillery. Entered service 
August 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp McClellan, Ala. 

HALL, HARRY P., Private, United States Army. Entered service September 
?., 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HALL, PERL M„ Corporal, Battery A, 3rd F. A. R. D. Entered service Aug- 
ust 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

HALLIDAY, WILLIAM E., Clerk, Supply Company, 7th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service May 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HALLISEY, FRANCIS J., Private, Company A, 321st Machine Gun Battal- 
ion. Entered service September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

HAMEL, ALPHONSE, Private, United States Army. Entered service October 
21, 1918. Stationed at Fort Williams, Maine. 

HAMEL, GEORGE F., Private, Battery C, 321st Field Artillery. Entered 
service September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HAMEL, ROMEO S., Private, 13th Base Hospital. Entered service Septem- 
ber 23, 1917. 

HAMELIN, RUDOLPH, Private, 30th Aero Squadron. Entered service Aug- 
ust 20, 1917. 

HAMILL, ROBERT E., Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service January, 
1918. Stationed at Princeton University, N. J. 

HAMILTON, ERNEST A., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
September 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

HANCOCK, THOMAS G., Sergeant, Headquarters, 12th Division. Entered 
service February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HANLEY, GEORGE, Private, Company B, 211th F. S. B. Entered service 
July 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Alfred Vail, N. J. 




Top row (left to right)— John Nitch, Joseph V. Bellerose, Dona Tetrault ; second 
row— Wilham O'Brien, Amos McNulty, S. Y. Yuzazek ; third row— Robert Neil, 
S. T. Briggs, Jr., F. Howard Quirk; bottom row— James Walker, Walter J. Blown, 
William F. Kureck. 



180 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

HAXLEY, GEORGE F., Corporal, Battery A, 319th Field Artillery. Entered 
service September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
DCtion. 

HANXA, JOHNSTON, Private, Company D, .3().Jth Infantry. Entered service 
February 28, 1918. With American E.xpeditionary Forces. Wounded in action 
twice. 

HAPGOOD, FREDERICK 31., Private, Engineer Corps. Entered service 
1917. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

HARDING, GEORGE L., Private, Medical Department, 26th Division. En- 
tered service August 12, 1918. 

HARDING, FOSTER, Private, Ordnance Department. Entered service No- 
vember 9, 1918. Stationed at Officers' Training School, Camp Lee, Va. 

HARNOIS, EDWARD F., Private, Veterinary Hospital. Entered service Sep- 
tember, 1918. Stationed at Camp Hill, Newport News, Va. 

HARPER, ERNEST J., Private, 15th Company, 2nd Regiment, M. M. S. C. 
Entered service December 13, 1917. With .American Expeditionary Forces. 

HARRE, FREDERICIv, Cook, Medical Department. Entered service June 4, 

1917. Stationed at Camp McClellan, Ala. 

HARRINGTON, JOHN A., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service Alay 1, 
1918. 

HARRINGTON, FRxlNK, Private, Medical Department. Entered service 
May 1, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

HARSCHILD, GEORGE E., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
December 13, 1917. 

HARTLING, EMIL, Private, 882nd Aero Squadron. Entered service April 27. 

1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

HARTNETT, JOSEPH F., Sergeant, Aircraft Production. Entered service 
October 13, 1918. Stationed at Washington, D. C. 

HARTNETT, MICHAEL A., Private, Base Veterinary Hospital No. 2. En- 
tered service April 8, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HARVEY, CLAYTON R., Private. 44th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered serv- 
ice August 17, 1918. Stationed at Winthrop, Mass. With American Expeditionary 
Porces. 

HASKELL, LOLIS, Private, 7th Field Artillery. Entered service September 
21, 1918. Stationed at Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. 

HAY'ES, FRANK E., Private. Company B, 36th Machine Gun Battalion. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HAYIE, JOHN, Private, Battery D, 321st Field Artillery. Entered service 
September 3, 1917. 

HAYTON, CLIFFORD, Private. Troop I, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service June 
7, 1917. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. Later with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

HEALEY% ANDREW F., Private, 196th Aero Squadron. Entered service No- 
%ember 19, 1917. Stationed at Grestmer Field, La. 

HEALEY, DAVID, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 10, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

HEALEY, FRANK E., Private, 304th Sanitary Train. Entered service June 
11, 1917. 

HEALEY, JOHN M., Private, 36th 'Signal Platoon. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HEBER, ALFRED W., Private, Supply Company, 112th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service May 31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

HEBERT, ALEXANDER, Private, Company C, 138th Engineers. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 




Top row (left to right; — George Crochetiere, William Charest, A. Uauphinais ; 
second row — Robert Skilling, Arthur Queneville, Alex Blanchette ; third row — 
John W. Gogolin, Fred Lajoie, Fedora J. Viau ; bottom row — Alexis Forgue, James 
Stewart, Earl R. McCormick. 



182 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

HEBEKT, AKMAXD, Private, United States Marine Corps. Stationed at Key 
West, Fla. 

HEBERT, JEAN B. H., Private. Company E, 347th Infantry. Entered service, 
June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

HEBERT, JOSEPH AV., Private, Troop K, :22nd Cavalrv. Entered service 
June 13, 1918. 

HEBERT, THEODORE, Private. :mh Headquarters, Pioneer Platoon. En- 
tered service August 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HEINICKE, KARL W., Private, Company N, 4th Battalion. Entered service 
April 29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HENDERSON, ALLEN, Private, 5.5th Coast Artillery. Entered service June 
8, 1918. Stationed at Fort Worth, Texas. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HENDERSON, WILLIAM R., Private, Quartermaster Corps, Wagon Com- 
pany No. 2, A. R. D. 329. Entered service December 13, 1917. 

HENRY, HUGH, Armorer, Flying School Detachment. Entered service 
March 18, 1917. Stationed at March Field, Riverside, Cal. 

HENRYE, ALBERT E., Sergeant, 9th Company Signal Corps. Entered serv- 
ice December 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HERBERT, ALFRED, Private, United States Army. Stationed at Camp 
Jackson, S. C. 

HERBERT, CHARLES H., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

HERBERT, HENRY, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 31, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

HERD, ROBERT W., Private, 24th Field Artillery. Entered service August 
30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

HERDER, FRANK, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HEROUX, PHILIP, Private, Company A, 504th Engineers. Stationed at 
Camp Merritt, N. J. 

HERTZMARK, ARTHUR, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
December 10, 1917. Stationed at Camp McClellan, Ala. 

HERZOG, ALFRED F., Sergeant, 27th Company, 7th Depot Brigade. En- 
tered service September 21, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Transferred to Offi- 
cers' Training School, Camp Grant. 111. 

HEWITT, JOSEPH, Private, Hospital Corps. Entered service September 1, 
1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

HEYER, HERMAN, Private, United States Army. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

HICKEY, HARRY^ P., Sergeant, 51st Infantry. Entered service March 14, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HICKEY, JOHN J., Wagoner, Supply Company, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service March 26, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HICKSON, JAMES, Private, Battery 2, 41st Field Artillery. Entered service 
August 8, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HIGGINBOTHAM, RALPH T., Private, 6th Company, 2nd Battalion. 152d 
Depot Brigade. Entered service September 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, 
L. I. 

HILL, HERBERT K., Sergeant, 55th Aero Squadron. Entered service July 
26, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HILL, LEONARD E., Corporal, Company D. 104th Infantry. Entered service 
February 26, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action. 




Top row (left to right) John J. Kane, Eloi Plante, Thomas F, Tierney; second row 
— William J. Lapalm, Alexander Bonacker, Edward McKillop; third row — David W. 
Vaillancourt, James H. McCormick, Fred Matthes ; bottom row — John S. Whalen, 
Harold Kinley, Orcade Legault. 



184 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

HILL, NORMAN, Private, Medical Corps. 

HILLMAN, FRANK, Private, 3rd Company, 151st Depot Brigade. Entered 
service February 26, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later vi^ith American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

HIMMELRICH, CHARLES J., Private, United States Cavalry. Entered 
service May 4, 1918. 

HIRSCH, ABE, Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service September 30, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Raritan, N. J. 

HMURA, JOHN, Private, United States Cavalry. 

HOAR, ]VnCHAEL P., Private, 334th F and G Company. Entered service 
August 29, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

HOAR, PATRICK, Private, United States Army. Entered service September 
6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

HOAR, THOMAS F., Private, 27th Balloon Company, Aviation Corps. En- 
tered service December 12, 1917. Stationed at Waco, Texas. 

HOFFM.IN, JOHN A., Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HOGAN, HUGH J., Private, Medical Corps, Base Hospital 60. Entered serv- 
ice June, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HOGAN, WILLIAM, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service August 11, 
1918. Sent to Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

HOGAN, JAMES, Private, 15th Company, 4th Battalion, 155th Depot Brigade. 
Entered service July 2, 1917. Stationed at Camp Lee, Va. 

HOGAN, JAMES, Private, 18th Company, 55th Battalion, Depot Brigade. En- 
tered service August 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HOGAN, JOHN W., Private, United States Army. Entered service December, 
1917. 

HOGAN, JOSEPH M., Private, 305th Infantry, 77th Division. Entered serv- 
ice February 26, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HOGAN, RAYMOND, Private, Ordnance Corps, 4th Prov. School. Entered 
i^ervice September 1, 1918. 

HOGAN, THOMAS F., Private, Company M, 338th Infantry. Entered service 
June 26, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HOLBROOKE, SAMUEL S., Private, 2nd Prov. Training Company, 71st En- 
gineers. Entered service September 6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

HOOKS, WILLIAM, Private, Signal Corps. Entered service March 7, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Vail, N. J. 

HOOPER, ISADORE, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
September 19, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HOPKINS, JOHN, Corporal, Field Artillery. Entered service July 15, 1917. 
Stationed at San Antonio, Texas. 

HOPiaNSON, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
October 6, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

HORNE, ARTHUR A, Private, 52d Aero Squadron. Entered service August, 
1917. 

HORNE, JOHN N., Private, 152d Depot Brigade. Entered service August 31, 
1938. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

HORNE, IRVING L., Sergeant, 56th Engineer Corps. Entered service March, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HORTIE, ALFRED, Private, 5th Company, 3rd Motor Mechanic Battalion. 
Entered service December 13, 1917. 

HOTIN, ALBERT H., Sergeant, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June 25, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Gassed, wounded, and shell-shocked in action. 




Top row (left to right) William Stewart. John B. Murray, Edward Belisle; second 
row — Joseph Couture, T. Butler Wood. Albert Kress; third row — Edwin R. Dean, 
Wilfred Taylor, Felix J. Lussier : bottom row — Randolph Archambault, Alfred J. 
Boutin, Jacob L. ZaSS- 



186 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

HOUDT, ERHLE D., Private, United States Army. Entered service February,. 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HOUGHTALING, S. T., Corporal, Motor Truck Company. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

HOULE, HENRY, Sergeant, 20th Company, 2nd Motor Mechanic Department. 
Entered service December 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HOULE, OVIDE J., Sergeant, 20th Depot Brigade. Entered service Sep- 
tember 5, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HOUSTON, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service Aug- 
ust 31, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. 1. 

HOWARD, DAVID B., Sergeant, 6th Company, 152d Depot Brigade. Entered 
service May 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

HOWARD, EDWIN, Bandsman, 2nd Infantry Band. Stationed at Camp 
Devens. 

HOYT, JOHN F., Corporal, Company A, 6th Engineers. Entered service May 
29, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HOYT, WALTER R., Private, Troop C, 9th Cavalry. Entered service March 
1, 1918. 

HUDSON, CHARLES A., Private, Battery B, 12th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 18, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HUGHES, PATRICK, Private, United States Hospital. Entered service Oc- 
tober, 1917. Stationed at Camp Greene, S. C. 

HUGHES, WILLIAM, Private, Battery C, 5.5th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice December 3, 1917. Stationed at Fort Heath. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

HUMES, WILLIAM H., Sergeant. Sanitary Corps, 56th Pioneer Regiment. 
Entered service July, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HU3IESTON, RAYMOND F., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
August 31, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

HUNTER, GEORGE, Private, Battery D, 53rd C. A. C. Entered service 
June 28, 1918. Stationed at Wentworth Institute. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

HUNTER, JOHN, Private, United States Army. Entered service August, 
]yl8. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. Transferred to Camp Stuart, Va. 

HUFFER, WILLIAM, Private, Company C, 305th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

HURLEY, DANIEL F., Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 25, 1918. Stationed at Camp Johnston, Fla. 

HURLEY, EDWARD X„ Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
August 22, 1918. Stationed at Franklin-Union Institute. 

HURLEY, JAMES, Private, 87th Company, Signal Corps, United States 
Alarine Corps. Entered service July 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Edwin C. Fuller, 
Penn. 

HURLEY, JOHN E., Private, Company D, 61st Ammunition Train. Entered 
service October 22, 1918. Stationed at Fort Warren, Boston, Mass. 

HURLEY, JOHN J., Private, Battery B, 35th Machine Gun Battalion. En- 
tered service August 22, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HURLEY, ]VnCHAEL J., Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
August 15, 1918. Stationed at Franklin-Union Institute. 

HUSS, FRANK, Private, 17th Cavalry. Entered service March 11, 1918. 

HUTCHINS, A. J., Sergeant, United States Army. 

HUTTON, HUGH P., Private, Troop H, 3rd Cavalry. Entered service April 
16, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 




Top row (left to right) Joseph F. Cronin, George Counter, Hugh Cadigan; second 
row — David Rubin, Barney Wiener, Francis F. Vincent ; third row — Frank H. Drake, 
Joseph A. Bonneau, John O. Boldway; bottom row— Napoleon Couture, Adelard 
Trudel. Emile Authier. 



188 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

HYDE, WILLIAM W., Sergeant, Medical Corps. Entered service June 15, 

1917. Stationed at Camp Hill, Newport News, Va. 

HYND, PETER G., Private, Headquarters, 80th Field Artillery. Entered 
service October 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

IMHOP, ALBERT, Private, United States Army. Entered service June 27, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

INNAN, WILLIAM H., Private, United States Army. Entered service April 
£7, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

JACOBSON, MAX, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service December 
13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

JACKSON, JOHN W., JR., Private, United States Army. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

JACQUES, EDDIE E., Private, 461st Aero Squadron. Entered service De- 
cember 11, 1917. 

JAMROOK, STANLEY, Private, Battery D, 14th Field Artillery. Entered 
service September 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

JANACK, LOUIS, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 27, 
1917. 

JANCZUREWICZ, TONY', Private, 31st Company, 8th Battalion, Medical 
Corps. Entered service December 6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

JANLEWICZ, JOHN, Private, United States Army. Entered service March 
1'9, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

JENARD, ARTHUR J., Private, Aviation Corps. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

JENARD, LEON J., Private, Aviation Corps. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

JENARD, THEODORE, Private, Aviation Corps. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

JENKINS, ROBERT H., Private, 9th Company, Tank Service. Entered serv- 
ice June 18, 1918. 

JENKINS, WILLIAM C, JR., Sergeant, Medical Corps. Entered service June 
1, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

JIORJIOLE, MICHELE, Private, Company G, 304th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice April 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

JOHANNIS, ROBERT W., JR., Sergeant, 56th Engineers. Entered service 
April, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

JOHNSON, RUDOLPH A., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
August 12, 1918. Stationed at Camp Humphrey. 

JOHNSON, WALTER W., Private. Company D, Rect. Battalion 14. Entered 
service March 7, 1918. Stationed at Chickamauga Park, Ga. Transferred to Med- 
ical Officers' Training Corps, Camp Greenleaf, Ga. 

JOHNSTON, WILLIAM, Private, Company A, 6th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice May 30, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

JOINETTE, JOHN, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

JOLLY', ALBERT J., Private. Battery C, 6th Field Artillery. Entered service 
April 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

JONES, HAROLD, Corporal, Company H, 12th Division. Entered service 
A.pril 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

JONES, JULIUS W., Private, 17th Company, Depot Brigade. Entered serv- 
ice December 5, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

JONES, OWEN, Private, United States Army. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

JORDAN, FRANK M., Private. United States Army. 




Top row (left to right) Thomas Kennedy, Wilham R. Stapley, Alfred Cliche; second 
row— John J. Sullivan, A. G. Ducharme, George A. Ploufife; third row— Henry P. 
LeGrand, Alfred L. Brouillet, B. H. Merrill; bottom row— B. A. Warner, C. G. 
Lefebre, Raymond Fuller. 



190 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

JOSIMOND, JOSEPH, Private, Field Artillery. Entered service November 
30, 1917. 

JOTYRALA, JOHN P., Private, United States Army. Entered service March 
ID, 1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

JOY, "WIIililAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 3, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

JOYAIy, DESIRE, Private, Company C, 101st Engineers. Entered service 
September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

JOYAL, HERMOGENE, Private, United States Army. 

JOYAL, JULE, Bugler, Company B, 326th Infantry. Entered service Septem- 
ber 21, 1917. 

JOYCE, WILLIAM T., Private, Company D, 103d Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice April, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

JUDELSON, HARRY L., Private, United States Army. Entered service June 
24, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KABLE, WILFRED, Sergeant, 3rd Company, Artillery. Entered service April 
6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

KANE, EDWARD B., Private, Signal Corps. Entered service July 17, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 

KANE, EDWARD J., Corporal, 20th Company, Depot Brigade. Entered serv- 
ice August 30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

ICANE, FRANCIS, Private, Battery E, 112th Field Artillery. Entered service 
May 31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KANE, HENRY, Private, Service Company No. 1. Entered service December 
13, 1917, 

KANE, JAMES H., Private. Medical Corps, 34th Infantry. Entered service 
December 13, 1917. 

KANE, JOHN, Private, 30th Supply Company, Quartermaster Corps. Entered 
service September 15, 1918. 

IfANE, JOHN J., Private, Company K, 29th Regiment. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 19, 1917. Stationed at Canal Zone, Panama. 

KANE, JOHN A., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 9, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

KANE, JOHN J., Private, Company F, 345th Infantry. Entered service June 
29, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KANE, JOHN J., Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service December 11, 

1917. Stationed at Fort Hancock, N. J. 

KANE, THOMAS, Corporal, Company B, 303d Signal Battalion. Entered serv- 
ice December 12, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KANE, WILLIAM E., Private, 2d Company, 71st Engineers. Entered service 
September 5, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

IfANE, WILLIAM H., Sergeant, Troop C, Cavalry. Entered service May 10, 

1918. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. 

KANE, WILLIAM V., Private, 5th Regiment, F. A. R. D. Entered service 
May 31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

KAORUIS, BASIL, Private, United States Army. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KAPLAN, JOSEPH H., Private, Company A, 319th Machine Gun Battalion. 
Entered service September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KASIANOWICH, PETER, Private, Company C, 307th Engineers. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

KASPUTIS, JOHN, Private, United States Cavalry. Entered service January 
]0, 1918. 

KAWAKIK, JOHN, Private, United States Armv. 



192 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

KEANE, HENRY J., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service Decem- 
ber 11, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

liEATlNG, GEORGE H., Private, 14th Provisional Corps. Entered service 
December 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

KEENAN, THOMAS J., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service February 
;J7, 1918. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. 

KEENEY, ROLLIN D., Sergeant, Company D, 101st Engineers. Entered 
service April 10, 1917*. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KELLOGG, J. STEWART, Private, Signal Corps. Entered service May, 1918. 

KELLEY, EDWARJ) F., Private, United States Army. Entered service De- 
cember 12, 1917. 

KELLY, EDWARD J., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service August 5, 
1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

KELLY, FELIX, Private, 308th Machine Gun Battalion. Entered service 
February 29, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

KELLY, GEORGE, Private, United States Army. Entered service luly 9, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

KELLY, JAMES F., Private, 2nd Caisson Company, 2nd Ammunition Train^ 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KELLY, JAMES J., Musician, 104th Infantry Band. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

KELLY, JOHN J., Corporal, Company E, 108tli Infantry. With American. 
Expeditionary Forces. W'ounded in action. 

KELLY, MICHAEL F., Private, Infantry. Entered service 1916. Served 
Mexican border campaign. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
action. 

KELLY, MICHAEL F., Private, Battery D. 73rd Artillery. Entered service 
July 22, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KENFIELD, GEORGE R., Sergeant, Company B, 10th Forestry Engineers. 
Entered service July 4, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KENFIELD, JOHN J., Private, Company D, 61st Infantry. Entered service 
October 15, 1918. Stationed at Fort Warren, Boston, Mass. 

KENNEDY, EDWARD F., Corporal, Company D, 305th Infantry. Entered 
service February 26, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KENNEDY, HAROLD, Private, 43d Infantry. Entered service July, 1917. 
Stationed at Camp Logan, Texas. 

KENNEDY, JOHN, Private, United States Army. Entered service March 29, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KENNEDY, JOSEPH J., Private, Company B, Mounted Police. Entered serv- 
ice November 28, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KENNEDY, NEWTON D., Private, United States Army., Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KENNEDY, RAYMOND, Corporal, Headquarters Company, 23rd United 
States Infantry. Entered service July, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KENNEDY, RICHARI) L., Private, Company F, 312th Engineers. Entered 
service June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

KENNEDY, THOMAS J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June 2."), 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded. Gassed. 

KENNEDY, THOMAS M., Private, 4(i5th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
July 30, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KENNEDY, WILLIAM, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service September 
.";, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 




Top row (left to right) A. O. Lague, Walter Scott, A. J. Viens; second row — C. C. 
Armstrong, Alfred Lapointe, Patrick W. Ducey; third row — R. J. Sullivan, Arthur J. 
Pouliot, Stephen Musante ; bottom row — Andrew H. Birnie, F. M. Earle, Raymond 
Therrien. 



194 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

KENNEDY, WILLIAM T., Private, Company C, o3rd Engineers. Entered 
service March 29, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KENYON, DANIEL, Private, Engineer Corps, 7th Regiment. Entered service 

1917. With American Expeditionary P'orces. 

KERR, ROBERT W., Private, 3rd Company, 1st Battalion, 151st Depot Bri- 
gade. Entered service February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

KERR, THOMAS W., Private, 53rd Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
July 9, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KEYES, WILLIAM F., Sergeant, Medical Corps. Entered service September 
5, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KEYSER, WILLIAM J., Private, 321st Supply Company. Stationed at Camp 
Devens. 

KIAWTHOSKI, JOHN, Private, United States Army. Entered service De- 
cember 6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KIDA, VALENTY, Private, 325th Field Artillery. Entered service June 27, 

1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KIDNAY, JAMES W., Corporal, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 9, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KIETH, ALPHONSE, Private, United States Army. Entered service March 
1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KILKER, JAMES, Private, Company C, 212th Signal Battalion, 12th Division. 
Entered service June 17, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KILKER, JOHN A., Private, United States Army. Entered service October 
J 5, 1918. Stationed at Fort Williams, Maine. 

KILMURRAY, MARTIN J., Private. Company B, 58th Ammunition Train. 
Entered service July 30, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

KING, ALFRED H., Sergeant-Major, United States Army. Entered service 
February 25, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KINGSBURY, HAROLD W., Private, Tank Corps, United States Army. En- 
tered service February 25, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KINLEY, HAROLD R., Private, Headquarters, 11th Field Artillery. Entered 
service February 23, 1918. 

KIRCHNER, FRED E., Private, Company B, 4th Balloon Squadron. En- 
tered service October 13, 1917. 

KIRKPATRICK, THOMAS E., Corporal, Company D, 104th Infantry. En- 
tered service January 1, 1915. Mexican border service. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

KISELEVIEZ, PAUL, Pirvate, Company C, 7th Machine Gun Battalion. 

KISSELL, AUGUST, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service December 6, 

1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KLEIN, NORRIAN, Private, Medical Corps. With .American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

KNAPEK, PETER, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KNAPP, JOSEPH N., Private, 11th Cavalry. Entered service May 8, 1917. 

KNAPP, PETER P., Private, United States Army. Entered service October 
1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

KNAPP, RAYMOND J., Private, 11th Cavalry. Entered service May 9, 1917. 

KNIGHT, FRANK, Private, 1st Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service Oc- 
tober 22, 1918. Stationed at Fort Rodman. 

KNOWLES, WALTER C, Private, Supply Company, 327th Infantry. Entered 
tervice September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 




Top row (left to right) Romeo Girard. Tames A. Cook, Paul Cotter; second row— 
Adrien Dubois, John J. Ryan, Tohn Lapointe ; third row— Patrick F. McHale, Joseph 
J. Coutu, Charles F. O'Rourke : bottom, row— Frank C. Knight. Robert E. Lee, John 
B. Dearden. 



1D6 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

KOEHIiER, RUDOLPH C, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
December 13, 1917. 

KOKKEXSKY, THOiMAS, Private, Auxiliary Remount. Entered service Sep- 
tember :-'l, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KOXOTSKI, JOSEPH, Private, Company G, 338th Infantry. Entered service 
November 6, 1917. 

KORDAS, SEBASTIN, Private, United States Army. 

KOSKE, THOMAS, Private, Field Artillery. Entered service March 14, 1918. 

KOTFILA, EDWARD J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service September 4, 1915. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. Wounded in action. 

KOWALIK, STANLEY, Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 13, 1917. 

KOZACK, MAXIM, Private, United States Army. Reported missing in action. 

KRALL, FREDERICK, Private, 2nd Development Battalion. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KRALL, AVALTER, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service August 29, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KRAMER, WALTER, Private, United States Army. Entered service. Mav 14, 
1918. 

KRAMPETZ, GUSTAVE E.,, Private. Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
March 4, 1918. 

KRAZANSKI, FRANK, Private, 30th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
January, 1918. Stationed at Fort Standish, Boston, Mass. 

KREDYS, CLEMENS, Private, United States Army. 

KRELOF, SAMUEL, Private, 674th Aero Squadron. Entered service Decem- 
ber 4, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KRESS, ALBERT, Sergeant, Company G, 327th Infantry. Entered service 
October 8, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KREUTER, WILLIAM J., Private. 13th Service Companv. Entered service 
September 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

IvROLSKI, STANLEY, Private, Tank Corps. Entered service April 27. 1918. 

KRONIK, NATHAN, Private, United States Army. Entered service August 
28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

KUBITZA, RUDOLPH, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
March 5, 1918. 

KUDS, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service September 
10, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KUENZEL, AVILLIAM G., Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
December 9, 1914. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KUNKEL, OSCAR B., Private, 3rd Company, 1st Battalion, 151st Depot Bri- 
gade. Entered service March 29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KURECK, JOHN, Private, Companv L, 2nd Battalion. Entered service Aug- 
ust 2, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

KURECK, WILLIAM F., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service May 27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

KURNIK, ADAM A., Private, Company I. 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June 25, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KURNIK, ALEXANDER, Sergeant, 304th Company, Field Artillery. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

KlTtNiK, JOHN, Corporal, United States Army. Entered service July 9, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Totten, L. I. 




Top row (left to right) Raymond Costello, Dwain C. Morres, Leroy M. Orcutt; 
second row — H. B. Bressack, Edward Williams, George R. Quenneville : third row — • 
Harold W. Wynn, Edwin A. Moore, Wilfred R. Rosezza ; bottom row — Charles 
Friedrich, George Hunter, Giles M. Haggerty. 



198 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

KURPSK, TOMASZ, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23. 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KURTZ, OTTO A., Private, 314th Motor Ambulance Company. Entered serv- 
ice August 1, 1917. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

liABELLE, HENRY T.. Private, Aero Photo Detachment. Entered service 
March 22, 1918. Stationed at Long Island, N. Y. 

L/ABELLE, LEO E., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service July 5, 
1918. 

LABONTE, ADELOR, JR., Private, Company D, 1st Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice May, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LABRECQUE, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service Aug- 
ust 30, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

LACAILLE, RAOUL, Private, United States Army. Entered service August 
5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LACEY, HUGH J., Private, 76th Company, 6th United States Marine Corps. 
Entered service June 1, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
action. 

LACEY, JOHN S., Private, Headquarters, 102d Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice September 8, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LACHANCE, ALPHONSE G., Private, 471st Motor Truck Company, 5th 
Army Corps. Entered service May 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LACHAPELLE, OREAL, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
April 26, 1918. 

LACHOWICZ, BARON, Private, United States Army. Entered service June, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LACOMBE, ROMEO, Private, Company B, 35th Machine Gun Battalion. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LACOSTE, HERMAN, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 27. 
1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

LACOURSE, ERNEST, Private, Company B. 19th Aircraft Division. Entered 
service July 9, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

LACROIX, ALPHERIE, Corporal, 4th Company, 1st Training Battalion. En- 
tered service May 27, 1918. 

LACRODC, ARTHUR E., Private, 301st Engineers. Entered service March 
29, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LADOUCER, ALBERT, Corporal, Company K, 38th Infantry, 3rd Division. 
Entered service August 22, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded 
in action. 

LADOUCER, EDWARD D., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
June 3, 1918. 

LADOUCER, FERDINAND, Private, Company B, 301st Engineers. Entered 
service April 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LADOUCER, MARCEL J., Corporal, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
£.ervice June 20, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. Wounded in action. 

LADUKE, GEORGE A., Private, Troop K, 6th United States Cavalry. En- 
tered service January 4, 1918. 

LAFERRIERE, ALFRED, Private, 13th Depot Brigade. Entered service No- 
vember, 1917. 

LAFERRIERE, ALPHONSE G., Private, 6th Company, 2nd Battalion. En- 
tered service September 3, 1918. 

LAFERRIERE, AUGUST, Private, Battery C, 6th Anti-Aircraft Battalion. 
Entered service July 9, 1918. Stationed at Camp Mills, L. I. 

LAFERRIERE, JOSEPH, Private, Company H, 73d Regiment. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 




Top row (left to right I Frank Garland, Edward Berdchowiki, Edward Lancour ; 
second row — Rene A. Milletti, Joseph Forget. William Kane ; third row — Louis 
Marsette, Louis C. S. Ethier, Edward Barrett; bottow row — George Anderson, 
Patrick Mo3mihan, Arthur Sullivan. 



200 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

LAFERRIKKE, WILFRED, Private, Troop C, 2nd United States Cavalry. 
Entered service November 9, 1918. 

LAELAME, JOSEPH, Sergeant, 81st Aero Squadron. Entered service July. 
1018. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LAFLESH, JOHN D., Corporal, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
jime, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
\\'ounded twice in action. Gassed in action. Taken prisoner. Released. Cited for 
bravery. 

LAFONTAIN, HUGH J., Private, United States Army. Entered service April 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LAFOUNTAIN, MOSES J., Cook, 27th Division. Entered service July, 1918. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LAFRANCE, WILLIE, Private, 5th Company, 151st Depot Brigade. Entered 
service September 3, 1918. 

LAGUE, ALEXANDER O., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry., Entered 
service June 2, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LAIDLAW, JOHN, Private, 15th Aero Squadron. Entered service December 
10, 1917. 

LAIRD, CHARLES E., Sergeant-Major, Headquarters, 328th Infantry. En- 
tered service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LAJOIE, DANIEL, Private, 25th Company. Entered service March, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

LAJOIE, ERNEST, Private. Company A, Gth Anti Aero Squadron. Entered 
service August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

LAJOIE, FREDERICK, Private, Company A, 7th Infantry. Entered service 
May 17, 1917. 

LAJOIE, JOSEPH, Private, Company D, 34th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service July 9, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

LAJOIE, WILLIAM F., Private, Company L, 23d Infantry. Entered service 
August, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

LALIBERTE, AMEDEE R., Private, 1st Prov. Company, Headquarters De- 
tachment. Entered service April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LALIBERTE, VALERE S., Sergeant, 120th Army Service Corps. Entered 
service October 18, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LALLY, ANTHONY J., Private, Company C, 305th Infantry. Entered service 
February, 1918. With American E-xpeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

LALLY, PATRICK J., Corporal, Ordnance Department. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LALONDE, PHILIP H., Private, Medical Corps, 76th Division. Entered serv- 
ice February 25, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LAMAGDELAINE, ALFRED, Private, Company C, 321st Infantry. Entered 
service October 7, 1917. 

LAMAGDELAINE, ARTHUR W., Private, United States Army. Entered- 
service April 5, 1917. 

LAMAGDELAINE, EDMOND L., Private, Battery B, Replacement Battalion. 
Entered service May 15. 1918. 

LAMAGDELAINE, EMILE R., Private, United States Engineers. Entered 
service June 4, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LAMARANDE, OMER, Private, 59th Aero Squadron. Entered service Aug- 
ust 1, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LAMARZ, CHARLES R., Private, United States Army. Entered service May 
31, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

LAMONDE, FABIAN, Private, United States Army. Entered service March 
13, 1918. Stationed at Kelly Field. Texas. 




fop row (left to right) Edwarrl Wiesel, George W. Marcotte, Lewis E. LeDuc- 
second row Lee H. Brow, Fred W. Bridges. Arestede Quenneville ; third row- 
Edward J. Fitzgerald, Eugene Marion, William L. Martin; bottom row— Frank 
Leary, Thomas Grady, Raymond Cunniff 



202 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

LANCOUR, EDWARD D., Private, Quartermaster Corps, 310th Field Re- 
mount Squad. Entered service June 2, 1918.~ With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LANCOUR, HOWARD F., Corporal, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June 25, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary- 
Forces. Gassed in action. 

LANCTO, ARTHUR, Private, 104th Machine Gun Company. Mexican border 
service. 

LANCTO, RAYMOND, Private, 104th Machine Gun Company. Mexican bor- 
der service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LANDRY, HENRY L., Private, Battery E, 12th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice May 30, 1918. 

LANDRY, ARTHUR, Corporal, Aviation Corps. With American Expedition- 
ary Forces. 

LANDRY, PAUL N., Private, Company C, 212th Field Signal Corps. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LANGE, FRED W., Private, Machine Gun Company, 58th Infantry. Entered 
service March 29, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

LANGHAUSER, GEORGE H., Private, Company A, 318th Engineers. En- 
tered service December 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LANGLOIS, EDWARD, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 9^ 
1918. 

LANGLOIS, WILLIAM J., Private, United States Army, Ambulance Corps. 
Entered service August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

LAPALM, WILLIAM J., Private, 3rd Artillery. Entered service August 28,. 
1)18. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

LAPAM, BENJAMIN, Private, Medical Corps. Enlisted February, 1918. 
LAPEAN, FRED W., Sergeant, Medical Corps, 7th Infantry. Entered service 
June 4, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

_ LAPLANT, ARTHUR, Private, 7th Engineer Corps, United States Army. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LAPLANT, JEREMIAH, Private, Company M, 104th Infantry. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

LAPLANT, JOHN, Private, Company G, 104th Infantry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

LAPLANT, JOSEPH, Private, Company M, 104th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

LAPLANTE, JOHN, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 5, 1918. 

LAPLANTE, PETER, Private, 223rd Transportation Company. Entered serv- 
ice in June, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

LAPLANTE, WILLIAM J., Corporal, Company B, 108th Engineers. Entered 
service June, 1917, With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LAPOINTE, ALFRED, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded and gassed in action. 

LAPOINTE, DUmONNE, Private, Company D, Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service October 22, 1918. Stationed at Camp Warren, Boston, Mass. 

LAPOINTE, EDWARD, Private, Company B, 73rd Infantry. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LAPOINTE, JOHN, Private, Battery E, 305th Artillery. Entered service 
March 29, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LAPOINTE, JOSEPH, Private, Company A, 16th Infantry. Entered service 
May 19, 1917. 




Top row (left to right)— George B. Greaney, Edward King, Thomas E. Kirkpatrick ; 
second row — Charles F. Lippman. Rene Peltere, David Rogers; third row— B. A. 
Squires. E. J. Kotfila, Raymond G. Lawrence; bottom row— Robert Sheehan, Alex- 
ander B. Auld, J. A. Perrault. 



204 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

LAPPIX, BERNARD, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 7, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. Later with American Expeditionary 
i-'orces. 

LAPRADE, ARTHUR, Private, Company I, 327th Infantry. Entered service 
December, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

liAROCHE, PHILIAS J., Private. Field Artillery. Entered service August, 
1917. 

LAROSE, CLEO N., Corporal, 1st Armv Corps. Entered service December 
13, 1917. 

LARRIVE, DONAT A., Dentist Assistant, Post Hospital, Medical Corps. En- 
tered service July 27, 1917. 

LARROW, EDWIN, Private, Companv A, 103d Infantry. Entered service 
March 3, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LARROW, FRANK W., Corporal, Battery A, 102nd Field Artillery. Entered 
service July 25, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LATAILLE, NARCISSE, Private, Cannon Relieving School, Ordnance Corps. 
Entered service June 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Hancock, Ga. 

LATKA, ALEXANDER, Private, 1st Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
June, 1918. Stationed at Fort Totten, N. Y. 

liATOUR, ARTHUR, Corporal, Company G, 58th Infantry. Entered service 
March 29, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

LATOURNEAU, ALPHONSE, Sergeant, Company E, 302d Engineers. En- 
tered service June 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

LAVALLEE, ELZEAR, Private, Company M, 345th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice October 5, 1917. 

LAVALLEE, HENRY, Private, Battery E, 305th Artillery. Entered service 
March 28, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LAVALLEE, HOMER, Private, Battery E, 321st Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice October 7, 1917. 

LAVALLEE, WILFRED, Private, Company M, 301st Infantry. Entered 
service April 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

LAVALLEE, WILFRED J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service July 2, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded tvi'ice in 
action. 

LAVERTY, GEORGE, Private, Battery E, 38th Artillery. Entered service 
June, 1918. 

LAVERTY, JOSEPH, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
August, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LA^GNE, FRED L., Private, Company M, 101st Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

LAVOIE, HENRY A., Corporal, Company I, 38th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

LAW, LEONARD F., Corporal, Company G, 73rd Infantry. Entered service 
March 29, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LAWLER, STEPHEN J., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

LAWLISS, RALPH, Private, Company H, 1st Vermont Infantry. Entered 
service April 6, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LAWRENCE, RAYMOND G., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service May 29, 1917. With Expeditionary Forces. 

LEAHY, DANIEL F., Sergeant, Headquarters Company. Entered service 
September, 1917. 

-.Q./'^c'^^-^' '^^^^ ^" P"vate, United States Army. Entered service May 27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 





t 



±± 




4Mj 






Top row (left to right) — Patrick F. Conway, Raoul M. Bessett; center — George C, 
Fortin; bottom row — Albert H. Anders, Herbert B. Pickup. 



206 HoLYOKE In The Grex\t War. 

LEAHY, JOHN J., Private, Third Army of Occupation. Entered service 
July 15, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LEAHY, PATRICK J., Private, United States Army. Entered service May 
i>l, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

LEARY, EDWARD D., Corporal, Quartermaster Corps, Supply Train, United 
Slates Army. 

LEARY, FRANK, Private, 18th Anti-Aircraft Battalion. Entered service 
July 9, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LEARY, MARTIN J., Private, 26th Division. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

LEARY, ROBERT, Private, United States Army. Entered service April, 1918. 

LEBBY, NAPOLEON, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LEBEL, HENRY, Private, 18th Infantry. Entered service July 23, 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Camp Devens. 

LEBELLE, EMIL, Private, 337th Aero Squadron. Entered service December 
10, 1917. 

LEBLANC, LIONEL, Private, 23rd Ambulance Corps. Entered service Aug- 
ust, 30, 1917. 

LECLAIR, DONAT T., Private, Medical Corps, 25th Receiving Company. En- 
tered service September 30, 1918. 

LECLAIR, HENRY, Sergeant, Service Company No. 1. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Johnston, Fla. 

LECUYER, LINDEN P., Private, 25th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered serv- 
ice October 20, 1918. Stationed at Fort Williams, Maine. 

LEDUC, EMIL T., Private, Troop E, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service May 8, 

1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LEDUC, LEWIS E., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service Decem- 
ber 10, 1917. 

LEDUC, JOSEPH A., Private, United States Army. Entered service Septem- 
ber 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LEDUC, WILLIAM, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service June 3, 
1018. 

LEE, ERNEST T., Sergeant, 111th Ordnance Corps. Entered service May 2, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Grant, 111. 

LEE, JAMES E., Corporal, Medical Corps, 151st Depot Brigade. Entered 
service July 6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LEE, ROBERT E., Private, Company I, 50th Infantry. Entered service Aug- 
ust 1, 1917. 

LEEN, THOMAS H., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LEFEBVRE, CHARLES G., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded. Gassed. 

LAFEBVRE, LEO, Private, Salvage Department, Quartermaster Corps. En- 
tered service June 2, 1918. 

LEGAULT, ALFRED, Private, Battery D, 44th Tractor Artillery Replacement 
Battalion. Entered service July 5, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LEGAULT, ORCADE E., Private, Battery A, 15th Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LEGRAND, HENRY P., Sergeant, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice May, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LEIBECK, EDAVARD H., Sergeant, 67th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
August 14. 1917. . 




Top row (left to right) — Frank Lescilles, Lawrence Wagner, B. Johnson; bottom 
row — Henry P. Cauley, Joseph Yelle, Otto Wendt. 





ROMEO LEMIEUX 



JOHN MERRIMAN 



208 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

LELAND, WARREN E., JR., Private, Tank Corps. Entered service Novem- 
ber 9, 1918. Stationed at Camp Polk, N. C. 

LEMIEUX, ROMEO A., Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober, 1917. 

LEMIRE, ^\^[LLIAM, Private, Company M, 34.-)th Infantry. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. 

LExMPKE, ERNEST, Private, United States Army. Entered service August 

30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

LiENIHAN, JOHN E., Private, Company D, 327th Infantry. Entered service 
October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

LEOFFLER, ALBERT F., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
action. 

LEONARD, CARLETON W„ Sergeant. 320th Headquarters Company. En- 
tered service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LEONARD, EDMOND, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 
:-!l, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

LEONARD, anCHAEL J., Corporal, Unit 115, Ordnance Corps. Entered 
service June 15, 1918. With x^merican Expeditionary Forces. 

LEONARD, STEPHEN F., Private, Troop G, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service 
May 8, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LE PAGE, LIONEL, Private, United States Army. 

LEPROHON, JOSEPH, Sergeant, Medical Corps, 76th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service June 4, 1917. 

LESCILCES, FRANK, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

LETELLIERE, AVILLIAM, Wagoner, Battery B, (ith Anti-Aircraft Battalion. 
Entered service July 9, 1918. 

LETOURNEAU, ALPHONSE, Sergeant, Company E, 302d Engineers. En- 
tered service June, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

LEVEILLE, LEOPOLD, Private, Company I, ;!21st Field Artillery. Entered 
service October 5, 1917. 

LEVEILLE, M. AUGl'STE, Private, United States Armv. Entered service 
July 30, 1918. 

LEVENSON, SAMUEL, Sergeant, Company M, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LEVINE, ALEX, Private, Ordnance Corps, 2nd Companj^ 4th Ordnance. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

LEA^ITT, FRED A., Private, United States Armv. Entered service June 28, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

LEVRExlVLT, TELESPHORE, Private, United States Army. Entered serv- 
ice October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LEW^S, ADELBERT, Private, United States Army. Entered service August, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LEY, PAUL, JR., Private, 24th Company, 6th Battalion, 152d Depot Brigade. 
Entered service August 30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

L'HENREAUX, ALBERT J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

LIPPMANN, CHARLES F.. Private, Machine Gun Company, 104th Infantry. 
Entered service March 27, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LIS, JOSEPH, Private, 21st Coast Artillerv Corps. Entered service January 

31, 1918. 















Top row (left to right) — W. R. Williams. Charles Ouirk, John Bowler. George Tiffany; second row 
— R. M. Cleveland. J. P. Dugan. L. Pasquinuci, M. J. Burke; third row— F. H. Carey, Adelard G. 
Boudreau. Edward Ryan, T. J. Begley; fourth row — J. J. O'Connor. J. L. Sheehan, Edgar Simes, 
Ray A. Cayhue; fifth row — John Alcott, Leonard Nichols, John Tierney, Samuel Levenson; bottom 
row — Charles Newmann, William Wright, J. A. Dugan, J. P. Driscoll. 
14 



210 HoLYoKE Ix The Great War. 

LISIECKI, WACIiAW, Private, ISth Company, .Jth Training Battalion, Depot 
Brigade. Entered service July :*o, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LISTER, GEORGE \V., Private, Company D, l()4th Infantry. Entered service 
June, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LITTLE, PHILIP W., Field Clerk, 151st Depot Brigade. Entered service Sep- 
tember 6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LOEPFLER, ALBERT F., Private, Company D. l()4th Infantry. Entered 
service September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

L'OPTUS, WILLIAM E., Private, Company D, Ammunition Train. Entered 
service July 29, 1918. 

LOISELLE, DOSILVA, Private, Battery E, 21st Field Artillery. Entered 
service April 9, 1917. 

LOISELLE, HEXRY, Sergeant, Company C, 212th Engineers. Entered service 
March, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LOISELLE, ROMEO, Private, 16th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
May 1, 1918. Stationed at Fort Revere, Mass. 

LOMBARD, DOMICK, Private, Company B, 27 th Engineers. Entered service 
April 27, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LONG, HENRY, Private, 20th Motor Truck Company. Entered service Oc- 
tober 26, 1917. 

LONG, JOHN A., Private, 4th Company, Quartermaster Corps. Entered serv- 
ice September 6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

LONG, JOHN F., Private, Company H, 36th Infantry. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LONG, THOMAS, Private, Company C, J04th Engineers. Entered service 
September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LONGBOTTOM, ARTHUR, Private, 312th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
March 8, 1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

LOPEZ, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 16, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LOSTY, AVILLIAM B., Private, Company A, 77th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LOUDEN, JAMES, Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service December, 1917. 
Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

LOUDEN, RAYMOND S., Sergeant, 2.54th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
December 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LOUGHREY, GEORGE E., Private, Company E, 37th Coast Artillery Corps. 
Entered service July 9, 1918. 

LOWELL, DANIEL, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LOWELL, ROBERT, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service August 
12, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

LUBOLD, RICHARD, JR., Private, Company H, 58th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice February 26, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

LUBOLD, FREDERICK, Wagoner, Company B, 315th Ammunition Train. 
Entered service April 30, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LUOCHESI, JOHN, Private, Headquarters Company, 328th Infantry. Entered 
service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded tvi^ice 
in action. 

LUCEY, FRANCIS J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action. 




Top row (left to right) — Robert S. Burns, George H. Bork, Charles H. Herbert, Arthur Chouinard; 
second row — Arthur Longbottom, William Costello, John Potyrola, Ray C. Winkler; third row — 
Karl M. Heinicke, Walter E- Martell, Stephen J. O'Connor. Charles P. Nadeau; bottom row — 
George F. Reardon, A. P. Matrogos, Joseph H. Fontaine, E. P. Paulacci. 



212 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

LUCEV, JOHN P., Sergeant, Ordnance Corps. Entered service September 
19, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LUCEY, JOSEPH EAKL, Instructor, Developments Battalion. Entered serv- 
ice September 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

LUCIER, ERNEST, Private, Battery B, 147th Field Artillerv. Entered service 
June 15, 1918. 

LUSSIEK, FELIX J., Private, 3rd Ordnance Department. Entered service 
May 31, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

LYLE, WILLIAM, Musician, Company E, :528th Infantry. Entered service 
October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LY3IAN, JOHN R., Sergeant, 19th Field Artillery. Entered service April 24, 

1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LYNCH, EUGENE A., Private, United States Armv. Stationed at Camp Lee, 
V"a. 

LY^NCH, FRANK E., Corporal, Battery D, 29th Heavy Field Artillery. En- 
tered service October 21, 1918. Stationed at Fort Williams, Maine. 

LY'NCH, HAROLD, Sergeant, Medical Corps, 5(;th Pioneer Infantry. Entered 
service July 24, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LYNCH, JAMES, Corporal, Battery D, 19th Field Artillery. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

LYNCH, JOHN F., Private, Battery B, 7th Anti-Aircraft Battalion. Entered 
service July 9, 1918. 

LYNCH, JOHN J., Private, Heavy Artillery. Entered service February 25. 

1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LYNCH, JOHN M., Sergeant, Battery A, llllh Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice May 31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LYNCH JOHN T., Corporal, Company A, :>19th Heavy Field Artillery. En- 
tered service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LYNCH, JOHN W., Sergeant, 218th Aero Squadron. Stationed at Kelly Field. 
Texas. With Anu-rican Expeditionarj- Eorces. 

LYNCH, JOSI-:j'H K., Cadet, School of Military Aeronautics. Entered service 
December, 1917. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

LYNCH, JOSEPH T., Private. C. A. C, .".Ist Division. Entered service July 
19, 1918.- Stationed at Wentwurth Institute, Mass. Later with American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

LYNCH, MAURICE, Private, Company C, :K)lst Field Signal Corps. Entered 
service October 8, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

; LYNCH, MICHAEL J„ Private, Company C, 101st Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

■ LAUNCH, RAYMOND J., Private, :U7th Infantry. Entered service August 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LYNCH, THOMAS, Private, 20th Anti-Aircraft Battalion. Entered service 
July 9, 1918, With American Expeditionary Forces. 

LY'NCH, TLMOTHY J., Corporal, Battery D, 19th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 15, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

LYONS, RAY'MOND J., Sergeant. Medical Corps. Entered service January. 
IflS. Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

LYONS, AVILLIA3I M., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

McAllister, BERNARD R., Private, Company A, 321st Machine Gun Com- 
p.^ny. Entered service September 2L 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Shell-shocked in action. 




Top row (left to right) — George Weidhass. P. T. Martel, Robert Norton, M. A. Regan; second row 
--Adelard Belisle, Peter Pysz, P. D. Duffy, E."j. Scully: third row— William Shapiro, E. B. Kane, 
F. C. Welch, George Musante; fourth row — Patrick Griffin, N. Jiorgiole, Frank Marier, R. G. 
Craigie; fifth row — G. L. Mav, R. C. Ezold, A. P. Meunier, Joseph Martin; bottom row — Joseph 
Lajoie, T. F. Quinn, William Kreuter, D. A. Larivee. 



214 HoLYOKE Ix The Great "War. 

McAllister, GEORGE, Private, Company L, 325th Infantry. Entered 
service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McALPINE, ]\IARTIN J., Private, Troop K, 2nd United States Cavalry. En- 
tered service May 20, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McANDREW, LAWRENCE, Private, 18th Depot Brigade. Entered service 
J-.ily 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

McARTHUR, ALBERT H., Private, United States Army. 

McBEAN, THOMAS, Private, Ordnance Corps. Stationed at Watertown 
Arsenal. 

McCABE, RAY3IOND, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 24. 
193 8. Stationed with Boston City Hospital Unit. 

McCaffrey, AVILLLIM F., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

McCART, ARTHUR, Private, Machine Gun Company, 74th Infantry. Entered 
service August 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

McCarthy, albert M., Private, Troop C, 11th Cavalry. Entered service 
June 4, 1917. Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

McCarthy, Florence J., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
December 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Johnston, Fla. 

McCarthy, GEORGE M., Private, Troop L, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service 
June 1, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

Mccormick, Andrew j.. Private, utility Company, Quartermaster Corps. 
ICntered service August 30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

Mccormick, earl R., Private, Headquarters Troop, 6th Cavalry. Entered 
service May, 1916. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

Mccormick, GEORGE R., Private, Ambulance Company No. 7, Medical 
Corps, 3rd Division. Entered service July 14, 1917. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

Mccormick, JAIVIES H. j.. Sergeant, Company G, 83rd Infantry. Entered 
service in 1913. Stationed in Louisiana. 

Mccormick, JOSEPH, Private, Battery F, 53rd Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service July 9, 1918. 

McCOR]\nCK, STEPHEN F., Private, 3rd Company, 1st Battalion, 151st De- 
pot Brigade. Entered service February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Meade. Md. 

McCOY, ANGUS, Private, 28th Company, 7th Battalion. Depot Brigade. En- 
tered service July 17, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

McCOY, RAYMOND J., Private, Battery C, 33rd C. A. C. Entered service 
-August, 1918. Stationed at Camp Eustis, Va. 

McDERMOTT, MICHAEL J., Private. Company H, 48th Infantry. Entered 
service September 5, 1917. 

McDonald, DANIEL, Private, Company E, 60th Infantry. Entered service 
December 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

Mcdonald, ERNEST a.. Private, Company E. 49th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice July, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wouncled in action. 

Mcdonald, FRANCIS, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
April 22, 1918. 

McDonnell, Patrick, Private, Company E, 303rd Engineers. Entered 
service, 1917. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

McELLIGOTT, JAMES, Private. Company G, 308th Infantry. Entered service 
March 1, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McELWAIN, HARRY, Private, Officers' Training School. Stationed at Fort 
Sheridan. 




Top row (left to right) — Andrew Roe, Joseph E. Lynch, D. P. Howard, Raymond Hogan; second 
row — James A. Reardon. Robert E. Dearden, lyucien Gaudard, Peter Caddy; third row — Fred L. 
Frechette, Gordon Trowbridge, J. Francis Sullivan, Thomas Alexander; bottom row — Romeo J. 
Perrault, Hugh P. McLean, Leo H. Finnerty, Edward T. Desmond. 



216 HoLYuKE Ix The Great War. 

McELWAIX, LECEISTER, Corporal 101st Machine Gun Battalion. Entered 
service in June, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

3IcELWAIN, THOMAS, Private, United States Army. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

McEWAN", , Corporal, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service Decem- 
ber 13, 1917. 

-McFADDEN, CHARLES, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 7, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

McFADDEN, JAMES, Private, Medical Corps. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

McGAKRITY, PATRICK J., Private, 8th Battalion, 31st Depot Brigade. En- 
tered service October 7, 1917. 

McGARRITY, PETER, Private, Battery C, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service March 15, 1918. 

McGARVIE, JAMES H. M., Private, Company D, 3rd Field Artillery. En- 
tered service June 15, 1917. 

MrGINXIS, PAUL W., Private, Battery B, 20th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice April, 1917. 

McGOtXiH, FRAXK T., Corporal, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June 20, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Gassed in action. 

McGOUGH, JOHX, Private, Coast x^rtillery Corps. Stationed at Fort Strong. 

McGRATH, CHARLES, Private, 72nd Aero Squadron. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McGRATH, HEXRY F., Private, Company I, 7th Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

McGRATH, MARTIN J., Private, 41st Aviation Corps. Entered service De- 
cc^mber 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McGRATH, WILLIAM, Private, Company B, 217th Field Signal Battalion. 
Jintered service July 2, 1918. Stationed at Camp Beauregard, La. 

McGRATH, WILLIAM J., Private, 167th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
April 28, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McGRATH, AVILLIAM H., Private, Company I, 74th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice May 31, 1918. 

McGUINNES, RAYMOND J., Private, United States Cavalrv. Entered serv- 
ice May 23, 1918. 

McGUIRE, CHARLES E., Private, Battery B, 20th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 14, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McGUIRE, WILLIA3I J., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
December 12, 1917. 

McGURK, ARTHUR J., Private, Troop F, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service May 
28, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McHALE, PATRICK F., Private, Company H, Ordnance Corps. Entered 
service December 13, 1918. 

McINTYRE, HUGH J., Private, Battery A, 6th Anti-Aircraft Battalion. En- 
tered service July 9, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McINTYRE, JAMES R., Private, Company C, 315th Infantry. 

IMcKAY, DAVID, Private, 9th Coast Artillerv Corps. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 16, 1918. 

McKAY, JOHN C, Private, Troop L, 14th Cavalrv. Entered service Tanuary 
11, 1918. 

McKEGNEY, CHARLES S., Private, Company L, 2nd Cavalry. Entered serv- 
ice June 1, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 




Top row (left to right)— Emile Sansouci, Albert E. Hetirve. Morse Roberts, Frank S. OConnell; 
second row— Felix Stackowicz, John Monahan, Albert Blais. J. \V. Lynch; third row— Narcisse 
Lataille, Anthony O'Kraska, Leo W. Menard, Richard W. O'Rourke: bottom row — Elliott Read, 
Patrick Shea, Vincent A. Smith. John J. Shea. 



218 IIoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

McKENNA, MICHAEL J., Private. Companj- B, 49th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McKEXZIE, DONALD, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service 1917. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

McKEON, ALBERT J., Private, Company A, 3rd Regiment. Entered service 
August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

McKILLOP, EDWARD, Corporal, 11th Company, 3rd Battalion. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

McKINSTRIE, GEORGE, Private, 13th Company, 4th Battalion. Entered 
service September 21, 1917. 

McKINSTRIE, JOSEPH, Private, Battery B, 47th Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service July 8, 1918. 

Mclaughlin, JOHN F., Private, Medical Detachment. Entered service 
May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

Mclaughlin, peter. Sergeant, Machine Gun Company. Entered service 
June, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

McLEAN, HUGH P., Private, Supply Company 324, Quartermaster Corps. 
Entered service May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton. L. I. 

McLEAN, LEONARD, Private, 2nd United States Cavalry. Entered service. 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McLEAN, LOUIS, Private, Battery B, 336th Field Artillery. Entered service 
July, 1918. 

McMAHON, GEORGE F., Private, Battery F, 11th Field Artillery. Entered 
service August 15, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

McMAHON, MICHAEL E., Private, Company B, 307th Military Police De- 
tachment. Entered service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McNAIRN, PETER J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

McNAIRN, AVILFRED, Private, Company B, 19th Infantrj^ Entered service 
January 11, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

McNALLY, EDWARD J., Corporal, Company _B, 326th Infantry. Entered 
service September 22, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
action. 

McNALLY, MAURICE, Sergeant. Medical Corps. Entered service August 30, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McNAUGHT, JOHN G., Corporal, Signal Corps. 302d Field Battalion. En- 
tered service October 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McNULTY, AMOS, Private, Medical Unit, Hospital Corps. Entered service 
June, 1918. 

McNULTY, EDWARD J., Private, 1st Company, 26th O. R. S. D. Entered 
service June 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Hancock, Ga. 

McNULTY, JOHN, Sergeant, Company C, 6th Machine Gun Company, United' 
States Marines. W'ith American Expeditionary Forces. Cited for bravery in 
action. 

McNULTY, PATRICK H., Private, Company I, 305th Hospital Corps. En- 
tered service May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

McVEIGH, JOSEPH, Private. Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at 
Camp Devens. 

MacMENIGALL, ROY, Corporal. Company D. 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Taken prisoner in action. 
Released. 

MacLEOD, WILLIA^I, Private, Aledical Corps. Stationed at Field Hospital 
No. 2, Hempstead, L. I. 




Top row (left to right) — Francis Curran, Russell Widdoson, Michael Monahan, Stanley Ostrowskir- 
second row — Ralph J. Damon, Caesar P. Equi, Jr., Leo H. Baril, John E). O'Rourke; third row^ 
Aimee Belanger, Arthur Gagnon. James J. Finn, Frank O'Connell; bottom row — Edward J. Scan- 
Ion, Leo J. Blanchette, Oscar B. Perrault, Rene Viens. 



220 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

MADDEN, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Lee, Va. 

MADDEN, PETER J., Private, Troop A, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service May 
21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MADELLE, CLARENCE F., Private,^ Company K, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service May, 191T. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

MADRU, LOUIS, Private, Battery F, 3rd Field Artillery. Entered service 
August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

MAHONEY, DANIEL D., JR., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June 19, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. Gassed in action. 

MAHONEY, DENNIS E., Private, 18th Company, 151st Depot Brigade. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MAHONEY, WILLIAM H., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MAINVILLE, ALFRED, Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MAINVILLE, ARTHUR, Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MAINVILLE, MxlRC, Private, Company B, 2.")th Engineers. Entered service 
October 1.5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MAINVILLE, PETER, Private. Quartermaster Corps. Entered service May 
SI, 1918. 

MAISLANI), JOHN R., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service De- 
cember, 1917. 

MAKIELLA, STANLEY F., Private. Coast Artillerv Corps. Entered service 
December 29, 1916. 

MALANOSKI, WALTER, Private. 1st Field Artillerv. Entered service March 
16, 1917. 

3IALCOLM, JOHN, Private, 1st Companj-, Replacement Troops, Engineer 
Corps. Entered service June 15, 1917. 

MxlLEZIAN, NESHUBI, Private, 251st Aero Squadron. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. 

MALLOY, GEORGE T., Private, 7th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
July, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MALONEY, FRANK E., Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service Decem- 
ber 11, 1917. Stationed at United States Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Md. 

MANDEVILLE, HOMER L., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service May, 1917. W'ith American Expeditionary Forces. 

MANDEVILLE, NORBERT, Sergeant, 12th Coast Artillery Corps, Medical 
Department. Entered service February 28, 1918. Stationed at Fort Strong, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

MANDEVILLE, RAYMOND, Private, 31st Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service March 1, 1918. 

MANGIANTINL \T:TTARI0, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
September 7, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, X. Y. 

MANGUM, ANDREW, Sergeant, Medical Department, Hospital Corps. En- 
tered service May 28, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

MANNING, CHRISTOPHER J., Private, 652d Aero Squadron. Entered 
service December 11, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MANNING, JOHN J., Private, Company D, 1st Replacement Engineers. En- 
tered service December 5, 1917. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 221 

MANNING, MICHAEL, Private. 1st Balloon Battalion. Entered service 
March 12, 1918. 

MANNING, MICHAEL J., Private. 4th Company, A. R. D. Entered service 
August 15, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

MANNING, PATRICK J., Private, Military Police. Entered service July, 

1917. Stationed at Camp Merritt, N. J. 

MANNING, ROY J., Private, United States Army. Entered service Septem- 
ber 21, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

MANNIX, MICHAEL P., Musician, Battery E, 25th Field Artillery. Entered 
service August 6, 1918. 

MANNIX, THOMAS J., Sergeant. Company A, 35th Machine Gun Company. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MANSFIELD, PATRICK, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
December, 1917. 

MARCEAU, PATRICK J., Bugler, Battery B, 3rd Corps, Artillery. Entered 
service May 31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

3IARCEAU, WILLIAM P., Corporal, Company 13, Motor Mechanic, .\viation 
Corps. Entered service December 6, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MARCHANl), FORTUNA, Corporal, Company E, 48th Infantry. Entered 
service June 11, 1917. Stationed at Newport New^s, Va. 

MARCHANl), JOSEPH, Private, Battery E, 58th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 10, 1918. 

xMARCOTTE, GEORGE W., Private. Machine Gun Company, 302d Infantry. 
Entered service April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MARCOTTE, JOSEPH E., Bugler. 31st Signal Corps. Entered service Oc- 
tober 7, 1917. 

MARCOTTE, WILLIA3I, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MARIER, PRANK, Private, Battery D, 33d Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service September 3, 1918. 

MARION, EUGENE P., Corporal, Battery A, 321st Field Artillery. Entered 
service September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MARION, HENRY, Private, United States Army. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

MARKAVART, JOHN, Private. United States Army. With American Expe- 
ditionar}^ Forces. Wounded in action. 

3IARR, HENRY J., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MARRA, JOHN J., Private, Troop H, 1st Cavalry. Entered service January 
21, 1914. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MARSHALL, JOHN, Sergeant, 5th Engineers' Otficers' Training School. En- 
tered service April, 1918. Stationed at Camp Lee. Va. 

MARSLAND, JOHN R., Corporal, Battery E, 119th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MARTIAL, PAUL, Private. Company D. 104th Infantry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

MARTEL, PIERRE J., Private, lG7th Aero Squadron. Entered service Sep- 
tember 22, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

:MARTEL, WALTER, Private, 226th Aero Squadron. Entered service De- 
cember 11, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MARTELL, AVALTER E., Private, 152d Aero Squadron. Entered service 
September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



222 HoLYoKi: Ix The Great War. 

MARTIN, CHARLES W., Private, Medical Department. Entered service July. 
1017. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

3IARTIN, DANIEL A., Private, Company H, 10:M Field Artillery. Entered 
service Spetember 5, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

MARTIN, EDGAR R., Private, United States Army. Entered service August 
5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MARTIN, FRANK E., Private, Company D, 3:26th Infantry. Entered service 
October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

MARTIN, FREDERICK AV., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

MARTIN, HAROLD E., Private, Battery B, o4th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MARTIN, JOSEPH, Private, Company C, 301st Ambulance Train. Entered 
service April 27, 1918. 

MARTIN, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service April, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MxlRTIN, MICHAEL, Private, -Ith Tractor Artillery. Entered service June 
4, 1918. 

MARTIN, NAPOLEON, Private, United States Army. Entered service April, 
3918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MARTIN, PHILLIP, Private, Aviation Training Station. Stationed at Great 
Lakes, 111. 

MARTIN, WILLIAM F., Private, Company B, 35th Machine Gun Battalion. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MARTINEAU, ANDREW, Private, 428th Engineer Corps. Entered service 
December 10, 1917. 

MARTINEAU, ARTHUR, Sergeant, Medical Corps. Entered service June 5, 

1917. Stationed at Camp Beauregard, La. 

MARTINEAU, EDWARD N., Private, United States Armv. Entered service 
July 9, 1918. 

MARTINEAU, JAMES J„ Private, Company F, 39th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice September 3, 1917. 

MASSE, ASIAS, Private, 9th Balloon Company. Entered service March 8, 

1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

MASSE, ROMEO, Private, Battery E, 76th Field Artillery. Entered service 
September 19, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MASON, LEO T., Corporal, Company D, 104th Infantry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

MASON, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service Septem- 
ber 19, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MATHEY, ALFRED S., Private, 20th Company, 2nd Motor Truck Company. 
Entered service December, 1917. 

IVIATHIEU, PHILLIPPE P., Corporal, Company I, 104th Infantry. _ Entered 
service April 1, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

MATRAGOS, ANGELUS P., Private, Medical Corps, 50th Infantry. Entered 
service July 28, 1917. 

MATTHES, FRED, Private, United States Army. 

MATTHEW, FRED, Private, Reclamation Detachment, Quartermaster Corps. 
Entered service October 7, 1917. 

MATURO, PETER, Private. Company I. 302d Infantry. Entered service April 
27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 223 

MAUEK, GEORGE, Sergeant, Motor Truck Company, Quartermaster Corps. 
iEntered service December 11, 1917. Stationed at Newport News, Va. 

MAULE, ALMERICO, Private, Battery B. 14th Field Artillery. Entered serv- - 
ice March 21, 1917. Stationed at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. 

aLlULE, FRED, Private, Battery D. 8th Field Artillery. Entered service 
March 21, 1917. Stationed at Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

MAUA^AIS, EDWARD, Private, United States Army. 

MAXFIELD, ARTHUR, Sergeant, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
August 31, 1917. 

MAY, GEORGE L., Private, Company D, 304th Infantry. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. ' 

MAYETTE, CHARLES E., Private, Company A, 29th Engineers. Entered 
service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MAYOTTE, FELIX, Private, Company H, StJth Infantry. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MAYS, RICHARD J., Corporal, Ordnance Department. Stationed at Camp 
Sevier, S. C. 

>L\ZUN, MICHAEL, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 37, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

MELLIER, EMILE, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service August 5, 
1918. 

MENARD, ARTHUR J., Private, 20th Anti-Aircraft Battery. Entered service 
July 5, 1918. 

MENARD, EDWARD, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service Aug- 
ust 6, 1918. 

MENARD, HENRY F., Private, 25th Cavalry. Entered service February 1.5. 
1018. Stationed at Fort Bliss, Texas. 

MENARD, LEODORE, Private, 96th Aero Squadron. Stationed at Mineola, 
L. I. 

MENARDi VALMORE, Private, Company I, 49th Regiment, 30th Infantry. 
Entered service July 26, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MENGEL, WILLIAM C, Private, ISth Company, 5th Battalion, Depot Bri- 
gade. Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MERKLE, DAVID J., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service June 1, 1917. 
Stationed at Camp Beauregard, La. 

MERLET, CHARLES C, Sergeant, Aviation Corps. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 28, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MERRIWETHER, JAMES, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
September 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MERWIN, HERBERT, Private, United States Army. 

MESSIER, EDWARD, Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 25, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MESSIER, ERNEST, Private, Signal Corps. Entered service April 27, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MESSIER, HENRY, Musician, 73rd Infantry Band. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

METTLER, FRANK, Private, Company C, 101st United States Engineers. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MEUNIER, ALFRED P., Private, Company B, 12th Supply Train. Entered 
service July 23. 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MEUNIER, UBALD, Corporal, Battery F, 321st Field Artillery. Entered 
service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



224 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

MEVETTE, KOLAM), Private, 326th Infantry. Entered service November, 
];)17. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MIELKE, WILLIAM (i.. Private, Battery E, 305th Field Artillery. Entered 
service March 29, 19] 8. 

MIKLASEWSKI, STEFAX, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
May 31, 1918. 

MIKLASZEWIZ, JOH\, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service August, 
J 917. Stationed at Camp Greene, N. C. 

MIKSA, ?.IICHAEL, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 31, 
J 918. 

MILES, EDWARD A., Private, Battery D, Tractor Coast Artillery. Entered 
service July 22, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MILKAY, JOHN, Private, Battery C, 320th Field Artillery. Entered service 
October, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MILLAR, JOHN 15., Private, Headquarters Company, 327th Infantry. En- 
tered service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
action. 

MILLER, ELI, Private, Company E, 60th Infantry. Entered service Decem- 
ber 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MILLER, GEORCiE, JR., Private, Company E, 20th Engineers. Entered 
service August, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MILLER, LEOPOLD G., Sergeant, Field Artillery. Entered service May 31, 
1918. 

MILLETTE, REXE A., Private, Battery E, 33rd Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service August 22, 1918. 

>ULLS, EVERETT J., Private, Ambulance Company No. 23. Entered serv- 
ice September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MIXER, EARL E., Private, 41st Squadron, 3rd Provision Regiment, A. S. 
S. C. Entered service December 13, 1917. Stationed at Waco, Texas. 

MIREAULT, AQVILLA G., Private, Company K, 165th Infantry. Entered 
service April 25, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MIREAULT, JOSEPH D., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
June, 1918. 

MISKEY, EDWARD AV., Private, United States Army. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

MISKO, STANLEY, Private, United States Army. 

MITCHELL, FERDINAND F., Cook, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June 26, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

MITTLER, FRANK A., Private, 101st Engineers. Entered service Septem- 
ber, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

>IOFFATT, EDW^'\RD, Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service June 10, 
1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MOFFATT, JAMES AV., Private, Troop I, 15th Cavalry. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MOISE, MICHAEL, Private, Battery C, 16th Field Artillery. Entered service 
May 31, 1918. 

MONAGHAN, DOMINICK, Private, Battery E, 17th Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 29, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

MONAGHAN, HENRY F., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June. 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

MONAGHAN, MARTIN, Private, 6th Company, Recruit Depot Brigade. Sta- 
lioned at Camp Hancock, Ga. 



HoLYOKE In The Geeat War. 225 

MONAHAN, HUGH, Private, Company G, 38th Regiment. Entered service 
August 24, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

MONAHAN, MICHAEL, Private, 3rd Company, 15th Regiment. Entered 
service December 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
action. 

MONAHAN, MICHAEL S., Corporal, Company B, 308th Infantry. Entered 
service March 26, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MONAT, ALBERT E., Private, Company D, 61st Ambulance Train. Entered 
service October, 1918. Stationed at Fort Warren, Boston, Mass. 

MONIHAN, JOHN, Private, United States Army. Entered service August 
6, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MONDOR, EDWARD A., Private, Headquarters, 36th Infantry. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. 

MONTGOMERY, LAWRENCE J., Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service 
February, 1918. Stationed at Washington, D. C. 

MOORE, EDWARD L., Corporal, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service May 
26, 1917. 

MOORES, DERAIN, Private, Company B, 12th Division. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MOQUIN, ARCHIE, Private, Company G, Medical Corps. Entered service 
September 3, 1918. Stationed at United States Debarkment Hospital No. 3. 

MOQriN, HENRY A., Private, Battery D, 37th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice July 9, 1918. 

MOQUIN, JOHN B., Private, Company D, 109th Engineers. Entered service 
June 27, 1918. 

xMOQUIN, ROMEO V., Private, Company D, 42nd Infantry. Entered service 
September 3, 1914. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MORAN, BERNARD, Private, Wagon Company No. 2, Quartermaster Corps. 
Entered service December 13, 1917. 

MORAN, DANIEL F., Private, Company I, 327th Infantry. Entered service 
October .5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

MOREAU, ALBERT, Private, United States Army. Entered service Decem- 
ber 6, 1917. 

MOREAU, ARTHUR, Private, 3o4th Butcher Company, Quartermaster Corps. 
Entered service May 27, 1918. With .A.merican Expeditionary Forces. 

MOREAU, HENRY O., Corporal, 18th Company, .5th Battalion, Depot Brigade. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MOREAU, JOHN, Corporal, United States Army. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MORELL, FRANK, Private, United States Army. 

MORENCY, FRANK, Cook, United States Army. Stationed at Camp Mills, 
L. I. 

MORGAN, LEONARD O., Corporal, Company B, 116th Engineer Corps. En- 
tered service May 31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MOIRCAK, WTORALELIN, Private. United States Army. Entered service 
July 9, 1918. 

MORIARTY, C. J., Sergeant, Motor Transport Corps. Stationed at Camp 
Greene, S. C. 

MORIARTY, CORNELIUS, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORIARTY, DANIEL, Private, 6th Company, 60th Field Artillery. Entered 
service April 9, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORIARTY, DONALD F., Private, Medical Corps, 140th Regiment, 35th Di- 
vision. Entered service January 4, 1918. Stationed at Camp Greenleaf, Ga. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
15 



226 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

MORIARTY, EUGENE W., Sergeant, Company B, 319th Infantry. Entered 
ircrvice October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORIARTY, JA3IES J., Private, Company F, 7th Engineers. Entered service 
June 4, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORIARTY, JER03IE, Sergeant, Medical Corps. Entered service April, 1917. 
Stationed at Camp Beauregard, La. 

MORIARTY, JOHN F., Private, Battery A, 7th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice April 20, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORIARTY, JOHN F., Corporal, Company B, Machine Gun Battalion. En- 
tered service July ,23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MORIARTY, JOHN F., Private, 7th Field Artillery. Entered service March 
12, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORIARTY, JOHN J., Private, United States Army. Entered service April 
37, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MORIARTY, JOHN J., Private, :218th Aero Squadron. Entered service De- 
cember 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORIARTY, JOSEPH J., Private, 1st Machine Gun Company, 16th Infantry. 
Entered service May 22, 1917. 

MORIARTY, JOSEPH L., Private, 4th Company, 151st Depot Brigade. En- 
tered service February 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MORIARTY, PATRICK J., Sergeant, 31st Company, 8th Battalion. Entered 
service September 30, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
action. 

BIORIARTY, RAYMOND J., Corporal, Battery D, 29th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service October 21, 1918. 

MORIARTY, ROLAND, Private, 48th Aero Squadron. Entered service De- 
cember 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORIARTY, THOMAS, Sergeant, 24eth Ambulance Corps, 12th Division. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MORIARTY, THOMAS J., Private, Battery E. 33rd Coast Artillery Corps. 
Entered service October 3, 1918. 

MORIARTY, WILLIAM, Private, Coast .Artillery Corps. Entered service 
January 31, 1918. 

MORIARTY, AYILLIAM E., Corporal, Company B, 4th Truck Corps, Aviation 
Corps. Entered service May 30, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORIN, ARMAND, Private, 305th Field Artillery. Entered service March 29, 
J 918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORIN, CHARLES E., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MORIN, HENRY L., Private, Battery C, 71st Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service March 12, 1918. 

MORIN, RAYMONJ), Private, 255th Aero Squadron. Entered service Decem- 
ber 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORIN, VICTOR, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

MORRISON, CHARLES F., Private, Company K, 102nd Infantry. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORRISON, GEORGE F., Private, Company L, 328th Infantry. Entered 
service August 26, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORRISON, HUGH J., Corporal, Company D, 54th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June 16, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORSE, CHARLES, Sergeant, 30th Company, 153d Depot Brigade. Entered 
service May 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 227 

MOrSETTE, LOUIS, Private, Company C. 107th Engineers. Entered service 
May 27, 1918. 

MOYNIHAN, ANDREW J., Private, Battery E, 15th Field Artillery. Entered 
service December 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MOYNIHAN, FRANK, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 
27, 1918. 

MOYNIHAN, FRANK J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MOYNIHAN, JOHN, Private, Headquarters Company, 12th Division. Entered 
service x\ugust 6, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MOYNIHAN, JOHN A., Private, 140th Aero Squadron. Entered service Oc- 
tober 12, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RIOYNIHAN, JOHN I)., Private, Headquarters Company, 12th Division. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MOYNIHAN, PATRICK J., Private, Tank Corps. Entered service August 
23, 1918. 

MOYNIHAN, THOMAS F., Private, Headquarters Troop. 2nd Cavalry. En- 
tered service May 6, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

_ MOYNIHAN, WILLIAM D., Private, Company A, 303d Machine Gun Bat- 
ialion. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MULFORD, LEON J., Private, United States Army. Entered service March 
18, 1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

MULLEN, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service Septem- 
ber 6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

MULQUEENY, WILLIAM J., Private, 13th Machine Gun Battalion. Entered 
service May 3, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

MULVANEY, LAWRENCE, Private, Company E, 60th Infantry. Entered 
service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
action. 

MUNDIE, DAVID, Private, Battery C, 3rd Field Artillery. Entered service 
June 9, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MURDOCH, NORMAN, Private, 61st Ammunition Train. Entered service 
October 22, 1918. Stationed at Fort Warren, Boston, Mass. 

MURPHY, EDWARD, Private, Battery C, 55th Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service December 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MURPHY, EDWARD J., Corporal, Troop C, 11th Cavalry. Entered service 
June 4, 1917. Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

MURPHY, IRVING T., Private, United States x\rmy. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later transferred to Camp Upton, L. I. 

MURPHY, JAMES E., Private, Company G, 42nd Infantry." Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MURPHY, JOHN, Private, Hospital Medical Corps. Entered service August 
30, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

MURPHY, JOHN F., Private, Company B, 14th Railway Engineers. Entered 
service June 11, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MURPHY, JOSEPH G., Private, 413th Marine Corps. Entered service Oc- 
tober 28, 1918. 

MURPHY, RALPH E., Corporal, 3rd Company, 1st Battalion, Depot Brigade. 
Entered service February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MURPHY, RICHARD J., Corporal, Battery B, 2nd Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service December 27, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MURPHY, THOMAS V., Private, loOth Aero Squadron. Entered service Oc- 
tober 15, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



228 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

MURPHY, VERNON, Private, Quartermaster Corps, Mechanical Unit. En- 
tered service February 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Holebird, Md. 

MURPHY, WILLIAM, Private, Battery D, 76th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice September 25, 1916. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MURRAY, JOHN B., Corporal, 2nd Artillery. Entered service May 31, 1918. 

MURRAY, JOHN P., Private, Headquarters Company. Entered service Sep- 
tember, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MURRAY, JOSEPH P., JR., Private, Company I, 347th Infantry. Entered 
service June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

MURRAY, AnLLIAM B., Private, Company G, 161st Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice December 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MURRAY, WILLIAM, Private, Company A, 7th Engineers. Entered service 
June 9, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MURRAY, WILLIAM P., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action. 

MURZGENSAL, PRANK J., Private, United States Army. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

MUSANTE, FRED, Private, 171st Aero Squadron. Entered service October 
24, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MUSANTE, GEORGE, Private, 18th Company, 5th Battalion. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MUSANTE, LEO, Private, Company A, 2nd Provisional Company, 156th De- 
pot Brigade. Entered service June 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MUSANTE, STEPHEN, Private, 104th Machine Gun Company. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

MYERS, JAMES M., Private, Machine Gun Company, 74th Infantry. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

NADEAU, GHARLES P., Sergeant, Company B, 70th Engineers. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

NADEAU, JOSEPH V., Private, Troop E, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service May 
10, 1918. 

NADEAU, OLIVER, Private, Company C, 39th Infantry. Entered service 
October 15, 1917. Stationed at Camp Greene, N. C. 

NADEAU, R03IE0, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service February 
13, 1918. Stationed in Virginia. 

NAGLE, FRANK, Private, Machine Gun Company, 131st Infantry. Entered 
service May 31, 1918 With American Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

NATHANSON, JOSEPH, Private, Company B, 34th Machine Gun Battalion. 
Entered service 'July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

NAULT, ERNEST C., Private, Company D, 16th Battalion. Entered service 
June 27, 1918. 

NEIL, JOHN, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service July 23, 1918. 

NEIL, ROBERT, Private, Company F, 23rd Infantry. Entered service July 
22, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

NEILL, WILLIAM G., Corporal, 18th Company, 5th Battalion, Depot Brigade. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

NEVIN, RALPH F., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

NEWTON, EDWARD B., Corporal, Company C. 504th Engineers. Entered 
service September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

NIEBOLA, FRANK, Private, 31st Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service De- 
cember 21, 1917. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 229 

NITCH, JOHN, Sergeant, Evacuation Company No. 40, Hospital Group. En- 
tered service May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Greenleaf, Ga. 

NORMANDEAU, RENE, Private, Company A, 312th Ammunition Train. En- 
tered service June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

NORRIS, JOHN J., Private, United States Army. Entered service June 27, 
1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

NORTON, ROBERT E., Private, Company B, 73rd Infantry. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

NrSCIUR, ADAM, Private, Military Police. Entered service July 3, 1917. 

NYE, MARSHALL C, Private, 9th Company, Ordnance Corps, 152d Depot 
Brigade. Entered service December 13, 1917. 

O'BRIEN, FRANK S., Private, Company C, 101st Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice July, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'BRIEN, JOHN J., Private, Company B, 23rd Engineers. Entered service 
October 9, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'BRIEN, JOHN J., Sergeant, 9th Construction Co. Entered service Decem- 
ber 12, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'BRIEN, JOHN F., Private, United States Army. Entered service Septem- 
ber 20, 1918. 

O'BRIEN, JOSEPH L., Private, Company D, 9th United States Marine Corps. 
Entered service August 5, 1918. 

O'BRIEN, THOMAS J., Private, United States Army. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

O'BRIEN, WILLIAM, Corporal, Company B, 14th Engineers. Entered service 
Ma}', 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. In railroad accident. 

OBUCHOWSKI, JOHN P., Private, Battery C, 55th Field Artillery. Entered 
service December 4, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNELL, BERNARD H., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
December 13, 1917. 

O'CONNELL, CARL, Sergeant, 136th Aviation Corps. Entered service Oc- 
tober 29, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNELL, EDMUND E„ Private, Radio Operator. Entered service No- 
vember 15, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONN'ELL, FRANCIS A., Sergeant, Company A, 25th Engineers. Entered 
service October 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNELL, FRANIv, Private. Entered service April 1, 1918. Traffic Man- 
ager at Watervliet, N. Y., Arsenal. 

O'CONNELL, FRANK, Private. Battery F, 60th Field Artillery. Entered 
service August 7, 1918. 

. O'CONNELL, FRANK, Private, United States Marines. Entered service July 
11, 1918. Stationed at Port Royal, S. C. 

O'CONNELL, GERALD F., Private, 6th Engineers. Entered service June 1, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNELL, JAMES, Sergeant. United States Army. Entered service 1911. 
Mexican border service. 

O'CONNELL, JAMES E., Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

O'CONNELL, SAMUEL, Sergeant, Supply Company, 34th Coast Artillery 
Corps. Entered service July 15, 1918. Stationed at Camp Eustis, Va. 

O'CONNOR, ANDREW R., Private, 14th Provisional Ordnance Corps. En- 
tered service December 12. 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



230 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

O'CONNOR, BARTHOLOMEW, Private. United States Army. Entered serv- 
ice July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

O'CONNOR, DANIEL, Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

O'CONNOR, FRANK, Private, 14th Railway Engineers. Entered service June 
4, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNOR, JAMES J., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service August 13. 
1918. 

O'CONNOR, JEREMIAH J., Private, Battery D, 321st Field Artillery. En- 
tered service September 24, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNOR, JOHN, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service June 3 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Later transferred to the Medical Corps 
at Fort Totten, N. Y. 

O'CONNOR, JOHN R., Corporal, Battery B, 6th Field Artillery. With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNOR, JOHN M., Mechanic. Company G, 161st Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice November, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNOR, JOSEPH, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 7, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Greenleaf, Ga. 

O'CONNOR, JOSEPH E., Orderly, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNOR, MAURICE J., Private, Company H, 103rd Infantry. Entered 
service July, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

O'CONNOR, MICHAEL, Private, Headquarters Company, 36th Infantry, 12th 
Division. Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

O'CONNOR, MICHAEL J., Sergeant, Battery C, 147th Artillery. Entered 
service May 31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Missing in action. 
Returned to company. 

O'CONNOR, MORTIMER, Private, Machine Gun Company, 12th Division. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

O'CONNOR, PATRICK, Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
rary 26, 1918. 

O'CONNOR, PATRICK, Sergeant, Motor Truck Company 477. Entered serv- 
ice December 11, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNOR, PATRICK, Private, Machine Gun Company, 74th Infantry. En- 
tered service September 3, 1918. 

O'CONNOR, ROBERT L., Private, Company B, 28th Engineers. Entered 
service November 30, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNOR, STEPHEN J., Private, 307th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
December 6, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNOR, THOMAS J., Sergeant, 1st United States Engineers. Entered 
service May 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. • 

O'CONNOR, WILLIAM F., Private, Supply Company, 19th Field Artillery. 
Entered service May 11, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'DONNELL, EUGENE, Private, Headquarters Troop, 2nd Cavalry. Entered 
service September 19, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'DONNELL, FRANK, Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service December 
10, 1917. 

O'DONNELL, JAMES F., Sergeant, Bricklaying Unit, United States Army. 
Entered service February 25, 1918. Stationed at Hempstead, L. I. 

O'DONNELL, JAMES F., Private, Officers' Training School. Entered service 
September 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later transferred to Camp Zach- 
ZLvy Taylor, Ky. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 231 

O'DONNELLr, JOHN J., Private, Troop H, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service 
May 26, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'DONNELL, TERRENCE, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

O'GRADY, JOSEPH W., Private, Battery B, 18th Field Artillery. Entered 
service October 9, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'HARA, JAMES H., Sergeant, Company H, 58th Infantry. Entered service 
June, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'HARA, RICHARD S., Private, Battery A, 15th Field Artillery. Entered 
service June, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'HARE, JOHN J., Private, Battery B, 336th Field Artillery. Entered service 
June 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'HARE, WILLIAM J., Sergeant, United States Army. Entered service 
February 25, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

O'KEEFE, FREDDIE, Private, 7th Company, C. A. C. Entered service Oc- 
tober, 1918. Stationed at Fort Warren. 

O'KEEFE, JAMES, Private, Company I, 347th Infantry. Entered service 
June 19, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'KEEFE, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. Stationed at Camp 
Jackson, S. C. 

O'KRASKA, ANTHONY, Musician, 104th Infantry Band. Entered service 
May 3, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

O'KRASKA, ROMAN, Private, Company A, 102nd Infantry. Entered service 
July, 917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

O'LEARY, JOHN F., Private, Troop M, United States Cavalry. Entered 
service April 19, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'LEARY, MARTIN, Private, Company C, 101st Engineers, Signal Corps. 
Entered service April 15, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in 
action. 

O'LEARY, STANLEY, Private, Medical Corps. Stationed at Vancouver, 
Wash. 

^LEJNIK, JOSEPH J., Private, United States Army. 

OLSON, OSCAR T., Private, United States Army. 

OLTSKI, WILLIAM, Private, United States Cavalry. Entered service August 
2, 1918. 

O'NEIL, CLEMENT, Private, Company F, 220th Engineers. Entered service 
April 26, 1918. 

O'NEILL, EDWARD, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service February 8, 
1918. 

O'NEILL, EUGENE T., Private, Bricklayers' Unit. Entered service January 
5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Sevier, S. C. 

O'NEILL, JOHN F., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 28, 
1918. At Officers' Training School. 

O'NEILL, JOHN E., Sergeant, United States Army. Entered service May 31, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

O'NEILL, LAWRENCE E., Private, 3rd Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service October, 1916. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'NEILL, MICHAEL, Private, 13th Company, 4th Battalion. Entered service 
April 18, 1918. 

O'NEILL, NICHOLAS T., Sergeant, 3rd Battery Reserve Field Artillery. En- 
tered service May 31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'NEILL, RAYMOND, Private, 49th United States Marine Corps. Entered 
i^ervice October, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



232 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

O'NEILL, TIMOTHY, Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'NEILL, WILLIAM F., Private, Battery B, 336th Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 27, 1018. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ORBAN, ALPHONSE, Private, United States Army. Entered service March, 
.1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

ORBAN, JOSEPH, Private, Company G, 58th Infantry. Entered service 
March 28, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded twice in action. 

O'ROURKE, CHARLES F., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
December 13, 1917. 

O'ROURKE, JAMES, Private, United States Army. Entered service Septem- 
ber, 1917. 

O'ROURKE, JOHN D., Private. Cotnpany C, 12th United States Guards. En- 
tered service April 1, 1918. Stationed at Wilmington, Del. 

O'ROURKE, JOHN E,, Private, Auditing, Camp Personnel Department. En- 
tered service Julj^ 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

O'ROURKE, RICHARD W., Corporal, Headquarters Office, Personnel De- 
partment. Entered service September 1. 1918. Stationed at Camp Sevier, S. C. 

ORECO, JAMES, Private, Company E, 2nd Corps School. Entered service 
.\pril 27, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

OSBORNE, GEORGE R., Private, Medical Corps, 10-lth Infantry. Entered 
service April, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

OSBORNE, THOMAS, Private, United States Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice May 11, 1918. 

OSTROWSKI, STANLEY J., Private, Battery A, 12th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service May 31, 1918. 

OTTOMANOELLO, VITO, Private, 39th Supply Company, United States 
Army. 

OWENS, TURNER, Sergeant, United States Army. Entered service October, 
1917. 

PACKARD, WARD C, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Enlisted May 1, 1918. 

PAGE, AI>ELARD, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 2, 
1917. 

PAGE, ROMEO, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 27, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PAIRADEE, ARCHIE R., Private. Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June 19, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. Wounded in action. 

PAQUIN, RUDOLPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 31, 
K)]8. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

PARADISE, LEON G., Private. United States Army. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

PARADIS, SYLVIO, Private, 233rd Aero Squadron. Entered service March 
18, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

■ PARE, ERNEST, Private, 6th Company, 489tli M. T. Entered service June 
15, 1918. 

PARE, LAURANT, Private, 6th Bakers' Company. Entered service August 
28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

PARENT, ROSARIO, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 31. 
1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. 1. 

PARENT, FRANCIS M., Private, 41st Aero Squadron. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PARENT, GEORGE H., Private, 11th Ammunition Train. Entered service 
September 1, 1918. Stationed at Wentworth Institute. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 233 

PARENT, JOSEPH L., Corporal, 13th Company, 4th Battalion, Depot Bri- 
gade. Entered service September 21, 1917. 

PARENT, LEO F., Corporal, 8th Company, 31st Battalion, Depot Brigade. 
Entered service October, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PARENT, WILLIAM F., Private, Company B, 25th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice August, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PARENTEAU, DONAT, Private. 2nd Veterinarian Department. Entered 
service December .5, 1917. 

PARENCHUCK, MARCUS, Private, United States Army. 

PARFITT, HOWARD W., Sergeant, 3rd Battalion, Trench Artillery. En- 
tered service November 12,. 1917. With the American Expeditionary Forces. 

PARFITT, JAMES N., Corporal, ISth Company, 5th Battalion, Depot Brigade. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PARKICHUK, MASKIN, Private, 6th Anti Aircraft Battalion. Entered serv- 
ice July 9, 1918. 

PARKMAN, EDWARD E., Private, Company I, 36th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June, 1916. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PARKMAN, GEORGE N., Private, Company H, 29th Engineers. Entered 
service January, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PARKMAN, IVAN C, Aviation Master, Aviation Corps. Entered service De- 
cember, 1917. Stationed at Miami, Fla. 

PARLOW, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. 

PARSONS, ERNEST L., Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

PATENAUDE, PACIFIC J., Private, 55th Coast Artillery Corps. Stationed 
at Fort Heath, Winthrop, Mass. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PAUL, LOUIS E., Private, Troop G, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service May 30, 

1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PAULIN, ROMEO, Private, United States Army. Entered service February, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PAULUCCI, EUSEBIO P., Private, Headquarters Company, 11th Field Art- 
illery. Entered service August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton. L. I. 

PAVLEA, ANDREW J., Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
January 31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PAYETTE, EUGENE, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PECITELLI, FRANK, Private, United States Army. Entered service August 
31, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

PELLETIER, ERNEST J., Private, Company D. 104th Infantry. Witii Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

PELTERE, RENE, Private, Company K, 104th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

PENDERGAST, THOMAS J., Sergeant, Medical Corps. Entered service May 
14, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PENNA, PHILIP, Private. United States Armv. Entered service July 9, 
1918. 

PEPIN, ALEIBIADE, Private, 4th Recruit Company. Entered service Sep- 
tember 30, 1918. 

PERRAULT, FRED, Cook, Supply Company 310, Quartermaster Corps. En- 
tered service December 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PERREAULT, JOSEPH A., Private, Company K, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service April, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 



234 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

PERREATJliT, JOSEPH R., Private, Troop A, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service 
August, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PERRAULT, RAYMOND F,, Private, United States Army. 

PERRAULT, ROMEO, Corporal, 17th Company, 4th Aviation Corps. Entered 
service December 15, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PERREAITLT, ROMEO, Private, Troop F, 6th Cavalry. Entered service 
January 14, 1918. Stationed at Camp Merritt, N. J. 

PERSKY, WILLIAM,^ Corporal, 302d Field Artillery. Entered service July 
5, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PERSON, CARL I., Private, United States Army. Entered service April, 27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PERSONS, ERNEST, Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. Later physical instructor at Fort 
Hancock, N. J. 

PETERS, GEORGE A., Sergeant, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice December 15, 1914. Served Mexican border, 1916. With American Expedition- 
ary Forces. Wounded in action. 

PETERS, WALTER J., Private, 14th Provisional Ordnance Company. En- 
tered service December 13, 1917. 

PETERSON, CHRISTIAN, Private, United States Army. 

PETERSON, GUSTAVE, Private, 7th Provisional Company, Ordnance Corps. 
Entered service December 13, 1917. 

PETERSON, JOHN A., Sergeant, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice December 15, 1914. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

PETERSON, PETER, Private, United States Army. 

PETRAULT, HOMER A., Private, Coast Artillerv Corps. Entered service 
Tune 26, 1918. 

PETTE, JOSEPH, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. 

PETTYJOHN, HAROLD, Private, Stevadore Regiment. Entered service 
January 4, 1918. 

PEVEILLE, AUGUST, Private, United States Armt. Entered service August 
3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PHANOAUF, FRED, Private, 20th Company, 1st Office Corps. Entered serv- 
ice June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

PHATANIDE, POLILIO- H., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
December 6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PHILLIP, REINHARD, Sergeant, Headquarters Company, Coast Artillery 
Corps. Entered service July 9, 1918. Stationed at Camp Eustis, Va. 

PICARD, DELPHISE, Private, Headquarters Company, 327th Infantry. En- 
tered service October, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PICARD, RUDOLPH, Private, Battery B, 319th Field Artillery. Entered 
service October, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PICKARD, H., Sergeant, Troop C, 2nd Cavalry. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

PICKUP, HERBERT B., Corporal, Battery F, 3rd Field Artillery Corps. 
Entered service August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

PIERCE, HAROLD B., Private, United States Army. 

PILLATIER, WILFRED, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

PIQUETTE, FRED, Private, United States Army. 

PLANTE, ALFRED, Private, Headquarters Detachment, Depot Brigade. En- 
tered service August 6, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 235 

PLANTE, ELOI, Private, Battalion A, 57th Field Artillery. Entered service 
March 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

PLANTE, JOHN E., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 7. 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

PLANTE, RAOUL, Private, Ordnance Corps, 11th Battalion. Stationed at 
Camp Meade, Md. 

PLATANIDE, POLIBOIS H., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
November, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PLOUFFE, LEO A., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
May, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

POmiER, ARTHUR H., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
9, 1918. 

POIRIER, RICHARD, Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 6, 1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

POISSON, ALFRED, Private, United States Army. 

POLI, JOSEPH, Private, Company A, Medical Corps. Entered service April 
1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

POPIELSKI, ADAM, Private, Battery E. Field Artillery. Entered service 
September 21, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

PORTERFIELD, WILLIAM H., Sergeant, Motor Transport Corps. Sta- 
tioned at Camp Jessup, Ga. 

POTVIN, HECTOR G., Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service December 
13. 1917. 

POTYRODA, JOHN P., Private, 41st Supply Company. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 18. 1918. 

POUDIN, FRED, Private, Company C, 9th Infantry. Entered service Oc- 
tober, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

POULIN, CHARLES, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service May 2, 1918. 

POULIN, GEORGE W., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service May 29, 
1918. 

POULIN, ROMEO, Private, United States Army. Entered service February 
26, 1918. 

POULIOT, ARTHUR J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
I ice May 31, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

POWERS, CORNELIUS, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service April 22, 
1918. 

POWERS, FRANK, Private, United States Army. Stationed at Camp 
Devens. 

POWERS, FRANK M., Private, Battery E, 33rd Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service July 15, 1918. 

POWERS, HENRY J., Private, 18th Company, 51st Battalion, Depot Brigade. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

POWERS, JAMES J., Private, 9th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
December 12, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

POWERS, MAURICE P., Private, Battery E, 3rd Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 4, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

POWERS, VICTOR R., Private, United States Army. 

PRESCONIiA, EDWARD F., Private, Company D, 22nd Infantry. Entered 
service January 17, 1918. 

PREISS, PAUL E., Private, United States Army. Entered service August 1, 
1918. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

PREMONT, EMILE J., Private, Battery E, 305th Field Artillery. Entered 
service March 22, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



236 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

_ PRESCOTT, CH.lllLES, Private. 306th Tank Corps. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

PRESCOTT, JOSEPH P., Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service May, 
1918. Stationed at Massachusetts Technical School. 

PRESS, LOUIS, Private, United States Army. Entered service June, 1918. 

PROTASEVEYZ, FRANK, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

PROUIiX, HECTOR, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PROVOST, CLAUDIO, Private, 19th Anti-Aircraft Battalion. Entered serv- 
ice July 9, 1918. 

PROVOST, EARL C, Private, Battery E, .3rd Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice June 11, 1917. Stationed at Fort Sill, Okla. 

PROVOST, JOSEPH A., Private, Troop G, 8th Cavalry. Entered service 
February 15, 1918. Stationed at Valentine, Texas. 

PROVOST, RAOUL, Private, 19th Anti-Aircraft Battalion. Entered service 
July 9, 1918. 

PROVOST, ULRIC, Private, Battery C, 7th Anti-Aircraft Battalion. Entered 
service July 9, 1918. 

PURRINGTON, DONALD, Private, Engineer Corps. Entered service July 
fl9, 1918. Stationed at Officers' Training School. 

PUSEPAKI, PETER, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

PYSZ, PETER, Private, Headquarters Company, 36th Infantry, 12th Division. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

QUEALY, TIMOTHY, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 
17, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

QUENNEVILLE, ARESTIDE W., Private. Battery D, 73rd Coast Artillery 
Corps. Entered service June 5, 1918. 

QUENNEl^LLE, ARMAND. L., Private, 25th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service December 3, 1917. Stationed at Watertown Arsenal. 

QUENNEVILLE, ARTHUR, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service May 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

QUENNEVILLE, GEORGE R., Private, 58th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice May 10, 1918. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. 

QUENNEVILLE, JOSEPH, Private, Headquarters Company, 55th Coast Art- 
illery Corps. Entered service February 23, 1918. Stationed at Fort Strong, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

QUIGLEY, EDWARD A., Sergeant, United States Army. Entered service 
September 6, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

QUIGLEY, WILLIAM, Private, 18th Company, 51st Battalion, Depot Bri- 
gade. Entered service April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

QUILL, JEREMIAH, Private, Company E. 49th Infantry. Entered service 
September 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

QUINN, JAMES B., Corporal, 56th Aero Squadron. Entered service Julv 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

QUINN, JUCHAEL, Private, Aviation Corps. 

QUINN, PATRICK J., Private, Coast Artillerv Corps. Entered service March 
2, 1918. 

QUINN, TH03IAS F., Private, Company K, 2nd Battalion, Infantry. Entered 
service August 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

^ QUIRK, FRANK, HOWARD, Chauffeur, Company D, 55th Telegraph Bat- 
talion, Signal Corps. Entered service May 8. 1917. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 237 

QniRK, PATRICK T., Private, 18th Company, 5th Gas Defense Battalion. 
Entered service July 30, 1918. Stationed at Fort Jay, N. Y. 

RACIXE, ERNEST R., Private, 5th Company, 331st G and F Regiment. En- 
tered service July 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Mills, N. Y. 

RACICOT, \VILERB]I> A., Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service May 
26, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RACKLIFFE, ALBERT C, Sergeant, Company D, 41st Regiment, Ordnance 
Corps. Entered service August 20, 1918. Served with 97th American Legion, 
British Expeditionary Forces, January 14. 1916, to April 16, 1918. Wounded at 
Vimy Ridge. 

RAI\AU1>, ULRIC A., Private, 36th Company, 7th Division, Motor Mechanics. 
Entered service December 12, 1917. .With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RAINAULT, RAOUL C, Private, 1st Depot Brigade. Entered service March 
7, 1918. 

RANDOLPH, JAMES A., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
January 4, 1918. 

RAVENELLE, UBALD, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
£3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

RAY, WILLIAM J., Private, United States Cavalry. Entered service May 24, 
1918. 

RAYMOND, ALFRED, Corporal, United States Army. Entered service May ' 
31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RAYMOND, EDWARD L., Sergeant, United States Army. Entered service 
Decmber 13, 1915. Stationed at Honolulu. Later transferred to Camp Stanley, 
Texas. 

RAY^MOND, SAMUEL, Private, Company C, 2nd Infantry. Entered service 
July, 1918. Stationed at Fort Totten. 

READ, HENRY D., Private, Machine Gun Company, 104th Infantry. En- 
tered service June 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
action. Cited for bravery in action. 

REARDON, JA3IES A., Private, Squadron A, Aviation Corps. Entered 
service March 12, 1918. 

REARDON, JOHN J., Private, 2nd Machine Gun Battalion. Entered service 
May, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

REED, ELLIOTT, Private, 4th Provisional School Company. Entered serv- 
ice September 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Raritan, N. J. 

REED, EVERETT, Private, United States Army. Entered service August 28, 
1018. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

REGAN, JOHN P\, Private, 18th Company, 151st Depot Brigade. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

REGAN, LEO M., Private, Company C, 8th Infantry. Entered service March, 
J 918. Stationed at Camp Greene, N. C. 

REILLY^ TERRENCE A., Private, United States Armv. Entered service 
September 30, 1918. 

REMILLARD, ADRIEN, Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 2, 1918. 

REMILLARD, RAY'MOND, Private, Company B, 48th Battalion. Entered 
service June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N .J. 

RENARDSON, JA3IES, Private, 22nd Infantry. Entered service May 2, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Jay, N. Y. 

RENARDSON, ROBERT, Private, 22nd Infantry. Entered service May 2, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Jay, N. Y. 

RENALD, GEORGE F., Private, Battery G, 53d Artillery Corps. Entered 
service April 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



238 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

RENALD, JOHN, Private, Battery B, 15th Field Artillery. Entered service 
Jane 4, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

RENAUD, WILLIAM, Private, Battery A, 71st Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service March 7, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

REYNOLDS, ARTHUR, Private, Battery B, 3rd Field Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service August 20, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

REYNOLDS, JAMES, Corporal, Company C, 7th Engineers. Entered service 
June 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

REYNOLDS, PATRICK, Private, United States Army. Entered srevice May. 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Missing in action. 

REYNOLDS, RICHARD A., Private, 77th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
December 12, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RHEAUME, EDGAR, Private, Company B, 34th Machine Gun Company. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

RICHARD, FORTUNA, Private, Company L, 325th Infantry. Entered service 
October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RICHARD, HENRY, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
May 30, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. Taken 
prisoner. Returned to company. 

RICHARD, POLYCARPE, Private, United States Army. 

RICHARDS, N. H., Private, United States Army. Stationed at Buffalo, N. Y. 

RICHARDSON, EDAVIN A., JR., Private, Company A, 304th Heavy Tank 
Battalion. Entered service May 14, 1918. 

RIELLY, RICHARD P., Sergeant, Company F, 83nd Division, 307th Supply 
Train. Entered service October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

RIFFENBURG, CLARENCE W., Private, Battery C, 51st Field Artillery. 
Entered service June 8, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RIGALI, EMILIO, Private, Battery E, 33rd Light Field Artillery. Entered 
service August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

RIGALI, FERDINAND, Private, Battery A, 33rd Light Field Artillery. En- 
tered service August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

RILEY, ANDREW, Private, Engineer Corps. Entered service November 13, 
1917. 

RILEY, ELWYN E., Private. United States Army. Entered service October 
3, 1918. 

RILEY, jVnCHAEL J., Private, Remount Depot. Entered service September, 
1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

RILEY, PATRICK F., Private, United States Army. 

RIOPEL, ARMAND, Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 19, 1917. 

RIOPEL, AVILA, Private, Company K, 156th Depot Brigade. Entered serv- 
ice July 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

RIPA, S. v., Private, 301st Field Hospital. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

RIPLEY, BENJAMIN, Private, United States Army. 

RIPLEY, ROBERT W., Private, Battery C, 1st Field Artillery. Entered 
service December 11, 1916. 

RISTEEN, MILFORD R., Private, United States Army. 

RIVOTTO, MARIO, Private, Battery C, 55th Field Artillery. Entered service 
December 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ROBERTS, ALFRED A., Private, Battery B, 71st Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service May 6, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 239 

ROBERT, ABIEDEE E., Private, Company D, 6th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice May 28, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ROBERTS, CLAUDE, Private, Company C, 304th Tank Corps. Entered serv- 
ice July 21, 1918. Stationed at Camp Colt, Pa. 

ROBERTS, DIONESE, Private, United States Army. 

ROBERTS, EMILE G., Private, 6.5th Aero Squadron. Entered service July 
25, 1917. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

ROBERTS, GEORGE, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 
31, 1918. 

ROBERTS, JOSEPH A., Private, Battery A, 44th Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service in July, 1917. Stationed at Fort Siocum, N. Y. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

ROBERTS, LUCIEN, Private, 10th Field Artillery Corps. Entered service 
August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

ROBERTS, MORSE, Headquarters Company, 12th Division. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ROBERTS, A\^LLIAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ROBILL.ARD, WILLIAM, Private, Company .\, 29th Infantry. Entered 
service March 17, 1917. 

ROCK, GIDEON J., Private, Ambulance Corps. Entered service March, 1917. 

ROCK, HECTOR C, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service March 
11, 1918. Stationed at Fort Siocum, N. Y. 

RODA, NATHALE, Private, United States Army. Entered service August, 
1918. 

ROE, ANDREW, Corporal, 244th Aero Squadron. Entered service October 
'60, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ROGERS, CHRISTOPHER M., Private, United States Army. 

ROGERS, DAVID, Private. Company D, 104th Infantry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

ROHAN, >nCHAEL J., Private, Battery A, 320th Field Artillery. Entered 
service September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RAKOWSia, KAROL, Private, Field Artillery Corps. Entered service Sep- 
tember 3, 1917. 

RONDEAU, ARTHUR ROCK, Private, Headquarters Company, 327th In- 
fantry. Entered service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RONDEAU, LOUIS, Private, Battery F, 110th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice May 31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ROONEY, JOHN J., Private, Battery D, 71st Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service April 1, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ROONEY, WILLIAM E., Private. United States Army. Entered service, 
1918. 

ROOT, ARTHUR F., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 9, 
1918. 

ROOT, H.1RRY E., Private, United States Armv. Entered service August 
28, 1917. 

ROOT, HINCKLEY F„ Private, Company D, 337th Infantry. Entered service 
November 26, 1917. Stationed at Camp McArthur, Texas. 

ROSEZZA, WILFRED, Sergeant, Company C, 5th Engineer Corps. Entered 
service March 3, 1915. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ROSS, CLIFFORD, Sergeant, Machine Gun Battalion. Entered service 1912. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ROSS, WILLIAM P., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service December, 
1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 



240 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

ROSSEAU, ERNEST, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service September, 
1916. Stationed at Camp Beauregard, La. 

ROUSSEAU, EDWIN, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
2:i, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ROUSSEAU, JOSEPH H., Private, Battery C, 305th Field Artillery. Entered 
service March 29, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ROUSSEL, WILLIAM, Sergeant, 40th Balloon Air Service. Entered service 
December 10, 1917. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

ROW'E, LAWRENCE C, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service April 29, 
1918. 

ROWLAND, PETER J., Private, 154th Depot Brigade, 11th Training Com- 
pany. Enterd service September 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ROY, ERNEST J., Musician, 104th Infantry Headquarters Band. Entered 
service March, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Cited and decorated 
for bravery in action. 

ROY, FRANK J., Private, United States Army. Entered service December 
6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ROY, JAMES S., Private, Machine Gun Company, 328th Infantry. Entered 
service September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ROY, JOSEPH A., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 9, 
1918. 

ROY, WILFRED, Private, Company M, 345th Infantry. Entered service June 
J 9, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

ROYER, ED3IOND J., Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 26, 1918. 

RUDERT, FRANK, Sergeant, Quartermaster Corps. Stationed at Presidio, 
Texas. 

RUDIGER, LOUIS J., Sergeant, Medical Corps. Entered service November 
23, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RUEL, ARTHUR, Private, Headquarters Company, 327th Infantry. Entered 
service September 19, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. Later with American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

RUEL, EDWARD, Private, 301st Infantry. Entered service October 7, 1917. 

RUEL, ULRIC, Private, Troop K, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service July 31, 1917. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

RUSHW'ORTH, ALFRED J., Sergeant, Headquarters Battery, 83rd Field 
Artillery. Entered service June, 1916. Stationed at Camp Freemont, Cal. 

RUSHW^ORTH, THOMAS, Corporal, Company B, 12th Military Police. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

RUSSELL, ARTHUR, Private, Battery A, 71st Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service March 7, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RUSSELL, ERNEST L., Private, Company D, 1st Division. Entered service 
October 21, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

RUSSELL, HAROLD J., Private, Battery B, 12th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 18, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RUSSELL, JAMES J., Private, 11th Company, 3rd Battalion, 151st Depot Bri- 
gade. Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

RUSSELL, STEWART A., Private, Medical Corps, 104th Infantry. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. Cited for bravery. 

RUSSELL, WILLIAM J., Private, 508th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
December 10, 1917. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

RUTANA, FRANCIS J., Private, United States Army. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 241 

RYAN, DANIEL J., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service August 
■.iO, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

RYAN, EDWARD, Corporal, Hospital Unit K. With American Expedition- 
ary Forces. Wounded in action. 

RYAN, JOHN J., Private, Company F, 7th Engineers. Entered service May 
JO, 1918. 

RYAN, WILIilAM, Corporal, 3rd Company, 1st Battalion, Depot Brigade. 
Entered service February, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

RYBAICICK, JOHN, Private, United States Army. 

RYDER, FRANK, Private, Battery C, 16th Field Artillery. Entered service 
December 11, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SABOURIN, ARTHUR F., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service January 
26, 1918. 

SABOURIN, JOSEPH, Private, 307th Motor Supply Company. Stationed at 
Camp Gordon, Ga. 

SACHARIAT, LOUIS T., Private, Gas and Flame Section, 49th Infantry. En- 
tered service December 5, 1917. 

SADLER, C. T., Private, Troop A, 2d Cavalry. Entered service May 12, 1917. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SALIVAY, PETER, Private, United States Army. 

SALOIS, EUCLIDE, Private, Company D, 61st Ammunition Train, C. A. C. 
Entered service October 22, 1918. Stationed at Fort Warren, Boston, Mass. 

SAMSON, CHARLES E., Private, Utilities Department, Quartermaster Corps. 
Entered service April 27, 1918. 

SAMSON, HECTOR A., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

SAMSON, HENRY E., Private, United States Army. Entered service August 
30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

SAMSON, LEO H., Sergeant, 67th Company, 164th Depot Brigade. Entered 
service November 13, 1914. Stationed at Camp Funston, Kansas. 

SAMPSON, GEORGE F., Private, United States Army. Entered service Aug- 
ust 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SAMPSON, ROMEO, Private, 8th Cavalry. Entered service February 11, 1918. 

SANSOUCI, E^VOLE, Private, 374th Aero Squadron. Entered service Decem- 
ber 5, 1917. Stationed at Hazelhurst Field, N. J. 

SANSOUCL HECTOR A., Private, Battery C, 58th Field Artillery. Entered 
.service June 21, 1918. 

SARGEANT, CHARLES F., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
November 30, 1917. 

SARNESKY, EDWARD, Private, United States Army. 

SATTLER, EDWARD E., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
September 21, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

SATTLER, WALTER E., Corporal, Battery E, 103rd Field Artillery. En- 
tered service May 31, 1918. 

_ SAVAGE, PATRICK R., Private, Company F, 42nd Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SAVOY, GEORGE P., Private-Cadet, West Point Military Academy. En- 
tered service October 10, 1918. Stationed with Amherst S. A. T. C Later ap- 
pointed to West Point. 

SAW^YER, ROMEO, Corporal, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

16 



242 • HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

SCANLON, EDWARD J., Army Field Clerk. Entered service February, 
1938. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SCANLON, FRANCIS T., Private, Company C, 101st Engineers, 26th Division. 
Entered service September 6, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SCANLON, JAMES E., Private, Battery B, 12th Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 1, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SCANLON, MICHAEL, Private, Battery B, 12th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SCANNELL, EDWARD J., Private, United States Cavalry. 

SCHAEFFER, GEORGE W., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
May 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SCHAUDYNAT, HENRY, Private, Company F. Truck Company. Entered 
service May 31, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SCHELLING, FRED E., Private, Field Artillery. Entered service December 
-.2, 1916. 

SCHENKER, OSCAR, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service Aug- 
ust 22, 1917. 

SCHICK, EDWARD, Private, Battery B, 59th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice May 10, 1918. 

SCHLICHTING, ALFRED H., Private, 246th Ambulance Corps, 12th Sanitary 
Train, Medical Corps. Entered service August 6, 1918. Stationed at Camp 
Devens. 

SCHLICHTING, OSWIN, Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service Septem- 
ber 7, 1918. 

SCHOENFELD, CHARLES R., Private, Supply Department, 12th Division. 
Entered service August 6, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SCHOENFELD, WILLIAM G., Private, 31st Company, 8th Battalion. En- 
tered service September, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

SCHOENFELDT, LOUIS F. B., Private, United States Army. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

SCHUMAN, ALEX, Private, United States Army. Entered service August 
15, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SCHWABE, HENRY, Private, Company_ K, 325th Infantry. Entered service 
September 23, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SCHWALM, GEORGE E., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
July, 1918. Stationed at Rhode Island State College. 

SCHWENK, FREDERICK AV., Private, United States Army. Entered serv- 
ice October 11, 1918. Stationed at Fort McKinley, Maine. 

SCOLLARD, JOHN M., Private, Battery E, 17th Field Artillery. Entered 
.'■.ervice April 1, 1918. 

SCOLLARD, W^LLIAM J., Private, United States Army Mail Service. En- 
tered service February, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SCOTT, WALTER A., Corporal, Company D, 104th Infantry. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

SCULY, EDWARD J., Corporal, 5th Company, 151st Depot Brigade. Entered 
service September 3, 1918. 

SCULLY, MICHAEL, Private, United States Army. 

SEARS, H. S., Corporal, United States Army, Ordnance Corps. With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

SEARS, PHILIP H., Private, Signal Corps Entered service April 30, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Leavenv^^orth, Kansas. Transferred to Camp Upton. Later with 
American Expeditionary Forces. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War, 243 

SEARS, WILLIAM A., Private, United States Army. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

SEIDEL, GEORGE E., Private, 13(ith Infantry. Entered service September 

1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SENAY, ARMAND, Private, Motor Mechanic Company, Aviation Corps. En- 
tered service January 14, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SENERARO, FRANK A., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SESCILA, FRANK P., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

SHAPIRO, WILLIAM, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

SHARPE, ESBON G., Private, Company H, 4th Pioneer Troops. Entered 
service September 21, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHAUGNESSEY, MICHAEL, Private, United States Marine Corps. Entered 
service April, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHAUGNESSEY, MICHAEL J., Private, 87th Company, 347th Infantry. En- 
tered service June 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHAW, JAMES, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service March 7, 

1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHAW, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service August, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SHEA, DANIEL J., Private, 53rd Aerial Construction Squadron. Entered 
service July 27, 1917. 

SHEA, DENN^S J., Sergeant, Battery A, 319th Field Artillery. Entered 
service October, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

SHEA, EDWARD, Private, 493d Aero Squadron. Entered service August, 

1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHEA, FINNIAN M., Private, United States Army. 

SHEA, FRANK E., Private, United States Army. Entered service March 7, 

1918. Stationed at Officers' Training School, Camp Lee, Va. 

SHEA, GEORGE, Private, 312th Cavalry. Stationed at Fort D. A. Russell, 
Wyoming. 

SHEA, JAMES J., Private, Company K, 4th Infantry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

SHEA, JOHN J., Private, 50th Aero Squadron. Entered service December 
14, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHEA, JOHN J., Bugler, Company H, 51st Infantry. Entered service March 
14, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHEA, JOHN J., Private, Battery D, 29th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service October 21, 1918. Stationed at Fort McKinley, Maine. 

SHEA, MICHAEL J., Private, 56th Aero Squadron. Entered service July, 
1017. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHEA, PATRICK J., Private, 24th Company, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service July 12, 1918. 

SHEA, ROY S., Bugler, Company A, 318th Engineers. Entered service Oc- 
tober, 1917. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHEA, THOMAS J., Private, Company M, 328th Infantry. Entered service 
December, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. . Wounded in action. 

SHEA, WILLIAM, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service May 22, 1918. 
SHEA, WILLIAM F., Corporal, Battery F, 20th Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 16, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



244 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

SHEA, WILLIAM J., Private, Company L, 30th Infantry. Entered service 
August, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

SHE.ARER, FRED, Private, United States Army. Stationed at Officers' 
Training School, Camp Zachary Taylor, Texas. 

SHEEHAN, FRANK T., Wagoner, 315th Ammunition Train. Entered service 
May 1, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

SHEEHAN, JAMES E., Private, 5th Company, 151st Depot .Brigade. Entered 
service September 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SHEEHAN, JAMES, Private, United States Army. 

SHEEHAN, JAMES W., Private, 304th Engineers. Entered service Septem- 
ber 6, 1918. Stationed at Newark, N. J. 

SHEEHAN, JOHN E., Private, Battery D, 1st Field Artillery, Reserve Corps. 
Entered service August, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson,. S. C. 

SHEEHAN, ROBERT A., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June 29, 1914. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

SHEEHAN, THOMAS J., Private, United States Army. Entered service Aug- 
ust, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SHEPRO, ISAAC M., Private, 15th United States Marine Corps. Entered 
i^ervice May, 1915. Stationed at Pensacola, Fla. 

SHERMAN, HARRY, Private, 319th Infantry. Entered service April 27, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded 
in action. 

SHEVLIN, JOSEPH J., Private, United States Army. Entered service De- 
cember 12, 1917. 

SHEVLIN, MICHAEL J., Private, Company A, 156th Depot Brigade. En- 
tered service May 31, 1918. 

SHRIDER, GEORGE, Private, Battery B, 146th Field Artillery. Entered 
service November 15, 1917. »With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHUGRUE, PATRICK J., Private, 43rd Signal Corps. Entered service April 
26, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHUGRUE, PATRICK J., Private, 30th Signal Corps. Entered service July 
9, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHUMAN, ROY W., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 9, 
1918. 

SIENKIEWICZ, STANZ, Baker,_ 335th Bakery Company, Quartermaster Corps 
Entered service September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SILK, MARTIN, Private, 9th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service Decem- 
ber 15, 1917. 

SILK, THOMAS, Private, Company D, 10th Engineers. Entered service July 
1, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SILK, WILLIAM J., Private, 74th Machine Gun Battalion. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SILL, ALFRED W., Private, Company A, 38th Engineers. Entered service 
October, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SILVERMAN, EMANUEL, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
September 30, 1918. Stationed at West Baden, Ind. 

SIMARD, ARTHUR, Private, 101st Ordnance Corps. Entered service Tuly 8, 
1918. 

SINCLAIR, HARROP S., Private, Battery A, 3rd Regiment. Entered service 
August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. Transferred to Officers' 
Training School. 

SINCLAIR, HOMER M., Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober 22, 1918. Stationed at Fort Warren, Boston, Mass. Later transferred to 
Officers' Training School, Camp Lee, Va. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 245 

SINCLAIR, PETER S., Corporal, Field Artillery. With American Expedi- 
lionary Forces. 

SIZER, JOHN, Private, Medical Corps. Stationed at Camp Devens. 
SKABARA, MICHAEL, Private, United States Army. 

SHILLING, ROBERT B., Private, Company B, 7th Engineers. Entered serv- 
'ice June 9, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SIvILLING, WALTER S., Private, Company A, 73rd Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice August 28, 1918. 

SKOLNIK, CHARLES, Private, Signal Radio Corps. Entered service Sep- 
tember .20, 1918. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

SKUSE, ADOLPH, Private, 3rd Company, 151st Depot Brigade. Entered 
service March 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SKYPECK, JOSEPH J., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service May 27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

SLATTERY, CHARLES, Private, Company A, Provost Guard. Entered 
service June 5, 1917. 

SLATTERY, CHARLES, Private, 254th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
December 10, 1917. 

SLATTERY, EDWARD, Private, Battery D, 102d Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

SLATTERY, JOHN J. McCOY, Private, United States Army. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

SLATTERY, ROBERT, Musician, 104th Infantry Band. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. Decorated for bravery in action. 

SLAVIN, FRANCIS, Corporal, Company B, 38th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice September 9, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

SLOAN, DAVID, Private, 80th Field Artillery. Entered service October 19, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

S>nTH, CLAUDE H., Corporal, Company A, 115th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice June, 1917. Stationed at Camp Kearney, Cal. 

S]\IITH, FRANK, Corporal, United States Armv. Stationed at Camp Meade, 
Md. 

S^HTH, FREDERICK E., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
23. 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SMITH, GEORGE HENRY, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service No- 
vember 26, 1915. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SMITH, JAMES, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SMITH, JAMES L., Sergeant-Major, 1st Machine Gun Replacement Battalion 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SMITH, LOUIS, Private, Company B, 307th Engineers. Entered service Oc- 
tober, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SanTH, MICHAEL, Private, Company A, 2nd Military Police. Entered serv- 
ice June, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SMITH, PATRICK E., Sergeant, 9th Company, 2nd Motor Mechanics. En- 
tered service January 5, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SMITH, RALPH E., Private, Battery A, 31st Field Artillery. Entered service 
October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SMITH, STERLING L., Sergeant, Engineer Corps. Stationed at West Point 
Military Academy, New York. 

SMITH, VINCENT A., Private, 14th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
October 21, 1918. Stationed at Fort Heath. 



246 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

SMITH, WARREN M., Private, Headquarters Detachment, 6th Anti-Aircraft 
Battalion. Entered service August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Wadsworth, S. C. 

SiAHTH, WILLIAM A., Private, 15th Company, 4th Depot Brigade. Stationed 
at Camp Devens. 

SNYDER, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service May" 15, 
1918. 

SPAFFORD, CHARLES, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Stationed at Fort 
Adams, R. I. 

SPALEY, HOWARD, Private, Aviation Corps. 

SPENCER, LIONEL P., Sergeant, 5th Machine Gun Battalion. Entered serv- 
ice in 1910. Served a year in army. Enlisted in navy in 1912. Was at Very Cruz 
m 1914. At Mexican border in 1916 vi^ith New York National Guard. Transferred 
to regular army. With American Expeditionary Forces. Gassed and shell-shocked 
in action. 

SPINKS, JOSEPH T., Private, Company K, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
Atay 30, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SQUIRES, BYRON A., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June 20, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action. Shell-shocked in action. 

STACHOWICZ, FELIX,_ Private, Battery F,_76th Field Artillery. Entered 
service February 8, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

STACHOAVICZ, JOHN L., Private, ISth Field Artillery. Entered service No- 
vember 16, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

STACKE, WILLIAM F., Private, 21st Recruit Company. Entered service 
September, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

STACY, WILLIAM H., Sergeant. 325th Company, 307th Sanitary Train. En- 
tered service June 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

STALKER, JAMES A., Corporal, Medical Corps. Entered service March, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later at Porto Rico. 

STAMATELLOS, HOUSTOS, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
November 27, 1917. 

STANDEN, ALBERT E., Private, 231st Aero Squadron. Entered service 
March 19, 1918. Stationed at Wilbur Wright Field, N. J. 

STANGONI, FERDINAND V., Private, Company E, 104th Infantry. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

STAPLETON, THOMAS H., Corporal, Ordnance Reserve Corps. Entered 
service July 20, 1917. Stationed at Washington, D. C. 

STAPLETON, AVILLIAM J., Sergeant, 49th Machine Gun Company. Entered 
service February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Beauregard, La. 

STAPLEY, WILLIAM R., Sergeant, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June 25, 1916. Mexican border service. Later with American Expedition- 
ary Forces. Transferred to Officers' Training School. 

STARZYK, JOSEPH A., Private, 31st Company, 8th Battalion. Entered serv- 
ice September, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

STAWICK, JOSEPH, Corporal, Troop A, 11th Cavalry. Entered service Aug- 
ust, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

STEARNS, HERBERT A., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
December, 1917. 

STEARNS, RUSSELL E., Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service March 
5, 1918. 

STEC, PAUL L., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service June 
15, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

STEADMAN, LAWRENCE, Private, Supply Company, 308th Field Artillery. 
Entered service May, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 247 

STEDMAN, ARTHUR P., Private, Headquarters Detachment, 12th Division. 
Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

STEDMAN, ERNEST, Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service December 
14, 1917. 

STEDMAN, LEON P., Private, 31st Depot Brigade. Entered service Decem- 
ber 5, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

STEDMAN, WILLIAM S., Corporal, 96th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
August 6, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

STEFANIK, JOHN, Private, Company G, 104th Infantry. Mexican border 
service. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. Cited and 
decorated for bravery. 

STEMPKOWSia, FRANK, Private, Company L, 303d Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice July, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

STEWART, ANDREW, Sergeant, United States Cavalry. Entered service 
1906. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

STEWART, IRVING N., Musician, 12th Field Artillery. Entered service 
August 30, 1916. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

STEWART, JAMES E., Corporal, Company B, 9th Machine Gun Battalion. 
Entered service August 14, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

STEWART, NICOL, Private, 36th Infantry. Entered service August 2, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

STEWART, THOMAS E., Sergeant, Company C, 218th Field Signal Battalion. 
Entered service June 9, 1918. 

STEWART, WILLIAM, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service Aug- 
ust 20, 1918. 

ST. GERMAIN, AMEDEE, Private, 13th Company, 4th Battalion, Depot Bri- 
gade. Entered service October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ST. GERMAIN, HARVEY, Private, United States Army. Enterd service Oc- 
tober 11, 1918. Stationed at Fort McKinley, Maine. 

ST. GEORGE, ARTHUR, Private, United States Army. Entered service Aug- 
ust 30, 1918. 

STIMPSON, CHARLES H., Private, Medical Corps, 211th Engineers. En- 
tered service December 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

ST. JOHN, LEO, Private, Troop D, 3rd Cavalry. Entered service April 17, 
1017. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ST. LAW^RENCE, ALPHONSE, Private, United States Army. Entered serv- 
ice May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

ST. LAWRENCE, ERNEST, Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service 
March 8, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

ST. LAWRENCE, LOUISI F., Private, Company H, 9th Infantry. ' Entered 
service July 17, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ST. LAWRENCE, PAUL, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

ST. MARTIN, SAMUEL, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service October 
27, 1917. Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

STOESELL, CHARLES, Bugler, Company C, 38th Infantry. Entered service 
July, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

STONE, GEORGE F., Corporal, 20th Company, r,th Battalion, 151st Depot 
Brigade. Entered service September 5, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

STONE, OLIVER E., Private, Company E, r.th Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service April 13, 1917. 

STOREY, HERBERT, Private, Ambulance Corps. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 



248 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

STOZDO, TONY, Private, United States Army. Entered service December, 

1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

STRACHAN, ALLAN, Bugler, Aviation Corps. Entered service March 18, 

1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

STRAIN, JOSEPH, Private, 17,2d Aero Squadron. Entered service March 19, 
1918. 

STRAIN, WILLIAM H., JR., Corporal, Headquarters Detachmnet, 12th Di- 
vision. Entered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

STRONG, EBMOND, Private, Signal Corps, Aviation. Entered service De 
cember 12, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SUBELKO, LUTIAN, Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober 2.3, 1918. Stationed at Fort Rodman, Mass. 

SUGHRUE, PATRICK J., Private, United States Army. Stationed at Fort 
Slocum, N. Y. 

SFHER, EDWARD, Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service May 28, 
1018. 

SULLIVAN, ARTHUR, Private, Company E, 7th Engineers. Entered service 
June 4, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, DANIEL J., Private, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service May 2, 1917. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, DENNIS F., Private, Field Artillery. Entered service March 21, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, DENNIS J., Private, United States Army. Entered service June 

27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

SULLIVAN, D. STEWART, Private, 330th Fire Guard Company. Entered 
service July 29, 1918. 

SULLIVAN, EDWARD, Private, United States Army. Entered service March 
29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, GEORGE A., Private, Wr^th Infantry. Entered service March 

28, 193 8. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

SULLIVAN, J. FRANCIS, Private, Company D, 307th Supply Train. En- 
tered service September 25, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, JAMES D., Private, .58th Field Artillery. Entered service May 
10, 1918. 

SULLIVAN, JAMES E., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice March 25, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, JAMES F., Corporal, Battery F, 20th Field Artillery. Entered 
.service June 16, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, JEREMIAH T., Sergeant, Battery C, 111th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service May 29, 1919. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, JEREMIAH F., Private, Engineer Corps. Entered service June 
19, 1918. 

SULLIVAN, JOHN, Private. Engineer Corps. Entered service Tune, 1918. 

SULLIVAN, JOHN H., Sergeant, Troop K, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service 
.^'iarch, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, JOHN J,, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June 18, 1916. Mexican border service. Later with American Expeditionary 
Forces. Gassed in action. 

SULLIVAN, JOHN S., Private, 326th Infantry. Entered service October, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Shell-shocked in action. Returned 
to company. Gassed in action. 

SULLIVAN, JOSEPH S., Private, Company F, 307th Ammunition Train. En- 
tered service September 2L 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 249 

SULLIVAX, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service Decem- 
ber, 1917. 

SULLIVAN, MICHAEL, Private, 77th Aero Squadron. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. With American Expeditionar}^ Forces. 

SULLIVAIV, MICHAEL J., Private, 3rd Provisional Regiment, 47th _ Aero 
Squadron. Entered service December 13, 1917. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

SULLIVAN, ^nCHAEL VV., Sergeant, Company H, 33rd Infantry. Stationed 
at Panama Canal. 

SULLIVAN, PATRICK F., Private, Engineer Corps. Entered service No- 
vember 26, 1917. 

SULLIVAN, R. J., Private, Company E, 104th Infantry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, THOMAS E., Private, Company A, 25th Engineers. Entered 
service June 1, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, THOMAS E., JR., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. 

SULLIVAN, THOMAS J., Corporal, 302nd Bakery Company, Quartermaster 
Corps. Entered service June 17, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, TIMOTHY J., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
November 27, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. > 

SULLIVAN, WILLIAM F., Corporal, Company C, 10th Field Battalion, Sig- 
nal Corps. Entered service September, 1917. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. Cited for bravery in action. 

SULLIVAN, AVILLIAM F., Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
March 6, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

SULLIA^AN, WILLIAM F., Sergeant, 2nd Company, 1st Battalion, 151st De- 
pot Brigade. Entered service April 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SULLIA^AN. WILLIAM T., Private, Motor Truck Company, Training Devel- 
opment. Entered service May 10, 1918. Stationed at Camp Hancock, Ga. 

SUPRENANT, CHARLES, Private, Comijany R, 102d Infantry. With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

SUPERNEAU, PAUL V., Private, Company B, 102nd Infantry. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

SUSSENGUTH, HAROLD, Private, 43rd Company, 5th United States Ma- 
rines. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SUTCLIFFE, MAURICE, Private, 78th Aero Squadron. Entered service De- 
cember 12, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SVOKA, WALENTY, Private, Battery E, 321st Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice September, 1917. 

SWANSON, RAYMOND, Private, Headquarters Company, 308th Sanitary 
Train. Entered service July 6, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SWEENEY, CHARLES P., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service May 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

SWEENEY, EDWARD P., Private, 308th Infantry. Entered service March 1, 
1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SWEENEY, JAMES F., Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service March 7, 
1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SWEENEY, JOHN J., Private, Troop K, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service May 
t:0, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SWEENEY, MICHAEL J., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
November, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



250 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

SWEETSER, CLARENCE W., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SWIOTEK, JOSEF, Private, Company D, 102nd Infantry. Entered service 
June, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SYREK, LEON, Private, United States Army. Entered service December, 

1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SZALKUCKI, BRONISLAW, Private, Company B, 12th MiHtary Police. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SZALKEWICZ, ANTONIO, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

TAFT, IvnCHAEL J., Private, 3rd Company, 1st Battalion. 151st Depot Bri- 
gade. Entered service February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

TALDEN, JOHN E., Private, United States Cavalry. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 19, 1918. 

TANCREDE, LOUIS, Private, Medical Corps. Stationed at Camp Devens. 
TANZI, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service June 27, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

TATRO, JOHN A., Private, 29th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service April 
10, 1918. 

TAUPIER, WILLIA3I E., JR., Private, 883rd Aero Squadron. Entered serv- 
ice March 19, 1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

TAUSCHER, OTTO H., Private, Battery D, 10th Field Artillery Reserve 
Corps. Entered service June 15, 1918. 

TAUSCHER, RICHARD C, Private, Headquarters, 3Gth Infantry. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

TAUSCHER, WILLIAM E., Private, 22nd Company, 152nd Depot Brigade. 
Entered service September 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

TAYLOR, FRANK L., Private, 302nd Baking Company. Entered service 
February, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TAYLOR, LEONARD P., Sergeant, Medical Corps. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. * 

TAYLOR, SMITH, Private, Medical Corps, United States Army. 

TAYLOR, WILFRED, Private, Company D, 6th Engineers. Entered service 
June 1, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TENCZAR, TOMASZ, Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Missing in action. 

TERRIEN, REO L., Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service 1917. 

TESSIER, EDMOND, Private, Ordnance Corps. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

TESSIER, LEO, Private, United States Army. Entered service October 15, 
1918. Stationed at Fort McKinley, Maine. 

TETRAULT, DONA, Sergeant, Company C, 327th Infantry. Entered service 
November, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

THANAPOULOS, ARTHUR, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

THAYER, WALTER, Corporal, United States Army. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

THEROUX, ARSENE J., Sergeant, 55th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
July 28, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

THEROUX, ARTHUR, Private, Company A, 30th Depot Brigade. Entered 
.service August 30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C 

THERRIEN, PHILLIPPE, Private, Headquarters, 326th Infantry. Entered 
service September 17, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



HoLYOKE In The Great "War. 251 

THERRIEN, RAYMOND, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

THERRIEN, ULYSSES G., Private, 350th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
December 11, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

THIBEAULT, JOHN, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

THIBODEAU, EDWARD, Private, 4o6th Aero Construction Squadron. En- 
tered service December 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

THIVIRGE, ARMAND, Private, Company D, 504th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice October, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

THOMPSON, JOHN F., Corporal, Company A, 49th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice February 10, 1917. 

THOMPSON, JOSEPH, Private, 66th Coast Artillery Corps. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

THOMPSON, THOMAS R., Private, Company A, 321st Machine Gun Battal- 
ion. Entered service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Gassed in action. 

THOMPSON, THOMAS A., Corporal, Company E, 212th Engineers. Entered 
service September 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

THOMPSON, WALLACE, Private, Medical Corps. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

THORPE, EDWARD J., Private, Company L, 16th Infantry. Entered service 
June, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

THORPE, FRANCIS H., Private, Company B, Medical Detachment. Entered 
service February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

THORPE, WILLIAM G., Private, Headquarters, Machine Gun Battalion. En- 
tered service January, 1913. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TIDSWELL, HERBERT D., Private, Battery D, 303d Field Artillery. En- 
tered service July 12, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TIERNEY, JOHN J., Sergeant, Ordnance Corps. Entered service September, 

1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TIERNEY, THOMAS F., Private, Company G, 2nd Battalion, Depot Brigade. 
Entered service February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

TIFFANY, FREDERICK F., Musician, 5th Field Artillery Band. Entered 
service March 9, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TORRANTE, WILLIAM, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 7, 

1918. Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

TOUSSAINT, ALBERT, Private, Company L, 325th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

TOWER, EDGAR R., Wagoner, 9th Supply Company. Entered service April 
17, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TOWNE, RICHARD, Corporal, Company V, Training Infantry. Entered 
service June 1, 1918. Stationed at Plattsburg Reserve Officers' Training Camp, 
N. Y. 

TRACEY, CARROLL, Sergeant, 607th Aviation Corps, Medical Detachment. 
Entered service September 27, 1918. Stationed at Fort Wayne, N. Y. 

TRACEY, JOSEPH, Cook, Company D, 104th Infantry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

TRAPALIS, WILLIAM D., Private, Company E, ~23rd Infantry. Entered 
service July 9, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TRAQUAIR, WILLIAM K.,_ Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service June 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



252 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

TREMBLAY, GEORGE, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

TREMBLAY, R03IE0, Private, Company H, 151st Depot Brigade. Entered 
service June 24, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

TREPANIER, ROMEO J., Private, Battery B, 38th Coast Artillery Corps. 
Entered service July 9, 1918. 

TROTTIER, HENRY J., Private, Company K, 29th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice August 28, 1918. Stationed at Fort Meyer, Va. 

TRUDEAU, HENRY, Private, United States Army. Entered service Novem- 
ber, 1917. 

TRUDEAU, AVILBUR, Private, United States Army. 

TRUDEL, ADELARD, Sergeant, 3rd Company, 152nd Depot Brigade. En- 
tered service May 2, 1918. 

TRUDEL, ALFRED, Private, Battery D. 551st Anti-Aircraft Battalion. En- 
tered service July 9, 1918. 

TRUMPOLD, EMHi H., Sergeant, Medical Corps, 74th Infantry.^ Entered 
service July 21, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

TUCKER, RAYMOND, Sergeant, 2nd Company, 304th Infantry. Entered 
service March 14, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TURGEON, ALFRED, Corporal, Battery D, 38th Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service March 6, 1918. 

TURKIELWICZ, WLADYSLAW, Private, Company K, 325th Infantry. En- 
tered service August 5, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TURNER, ARTHUR, Private, Headquarters Troops, 4th Army Corps. En- 
tered service March 29, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TURNER, JOHN T., Private, United States x\rmy. Entered service August 
1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

TURNER, REGINALD, Private, Company E, 1st Engineers. Entered service 
May 8, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TWISS, ROBERT, Musician, 104th Infantry Band. With American Forces. 
Cited for bravery in action. 

TWOHIG, DAVID, Private, 336th Field Artillery. Entered service June 27, 
1918. 

TWOVEK, STANLEY F., Private, United States Army. 

ULACHOLIS, GEORGE D., Private, Company M., 328th Infantry. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

UMBERTO, LEONARDI, Private, Battery D, 303rd Field Artillery. Entered 
service April 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

VACHON, EDWARD, Private, United States Army. 

VAILLANCOURT, DAA^ID, Corporal, Officers' Training School. Entered 
service April 27, 1918. 

VAILLANCOURT, ELZEAR W., Private, Headquarters, 71st Coast Artillery 
Corps. Entered service April 16, 1918. 

VALNECIA, RALPH M., Private, Battery F, 20th Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 19, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

VANOTTI, LEONE, Private, 151st Depot Brigade. Entered service July 23, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

VANTRAIS, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service Aug- 
ust 1, 1918. Statione dat Syracuse, N. Y. 

VAUGHN, CHARLES A., Private, Company L, 74th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June 24, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 



HoLYOKE In The Great AVar. 253 

V^EILLEUX, FREDERICK, Private, United States Army. 

VERSHON, JOHN L., Private, Military Police. Entered service August 5, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

VERSHON, RAYMOND A., Private, Medical Corps, 82nd Division. Entered 
service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

VIAN, FEDORA J., Private, Battery E, 38th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service July 9, 1918. 

VIENS, ALBERT J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June 15, 1915. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action. 

VIENS, ARMAND, Private, Headquarters, 326th Infantry. Entered service 
September 19, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

yiENS, CHARLES J., Private, Battery D, 320th Field Artillery. Entered 
service October 7, 1917. 

\T:ENS, JOSEPH G., Sergeant, Headquarters Detachment, Air Signal Service. 
Entered service April 12, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

VIENS, OSCAR, Private, Troop F, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service September 
22, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

VINCENT, FRANCIS F., Sergeant, Medical Corps, 329th Infantry. Entered 
service June 20, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

VINES, GEORGE E., Corporal, Ordnance Corps. Entered service December 
13, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

VOLLERT, ROBERT, Private, Headquarters, 61st Field Artillery. Entered 
service July 9, 1918. 

WADE, JOHN, Sergeant, Troop B, 13th Cavalry. Entered service December 
30, 1907. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WAGNER, FRANK J., Private, Battery E, 3rd Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice August, 1918. 

WAGNER, LAWRENCE A., Private, Company D, 101th Infantry. Entered 
service June, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action. 

WALDEN, ALFRED J., Corporal, 199th Aero Squadron. Entered service Oc- 
tober 22, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WALDEN, JOHN E., Private, Engineers, 307th Train. Stationed at Camp 
Devens. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. 

WALItER, JAMES, Private, Company A, 36th Machine Gun Battalion. En- 
tered service July 23, 1918. 

WALKER, MARTIN J., Private, Headquarters Company, 328th Infantry. 
Entered service September 2, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

AVALL, FRANK, Private, 9th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service March 
11, 1918. 

WALL, LAWRENCE J., Private, Company K, 347th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June 26, 1918. WFth American Expeditionary Forces. 

WALSH, CHARLES A., Private, Training Detachment. Entered service Sep- 
tember 1, 1918. Stationed at Wentworth Institute, Mass. 

WALSH, JOHN F., Private, Medical Corps, Hospital Unit. Entered service 
May 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WxlLSH, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 26, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

WARD, JOHN, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 9, 1918. 

WARD, PATRICK, Private, Company A, 60th Regiment. Entered service 
May 17, 1918. 



254 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

WARD, RAYMOND J., Private, 154th Aviation Corps. Entered service Oc- 
lober 28, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WARING, NORMAN L., Private, 172d Aero Squadron. Entered service No- 
vember 1, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WMRNER, BERTRAM C, Corporal, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service March, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

WARNETTE, LEON, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

WARREN, EDWIN H., Private, 302nd Infantry Band. Entered service March 
22, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WARRENSKI, ANTHONY F., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered serv- 
ice June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. 

WASHINGTON, GEORGE, Private, Company K, 347th Infantry. Entered 
service June 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. Later with American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

WASHINGTON, JOSEPH, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service July 9, 
1918. 

WASSEL, LOUIS J., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Stationed at Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

W^ASYLOW, HENRY, Private, United States Army. 

WATERS, FRANK J., Sergeant, Company L, 44th Infantry. Entered service 
May 22, 1918. Stationed at Cam.p Lewis, Wash. 

WATERS, JOSEPH J., Private, Company B, 152nd Infantry. Entered service 
August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

WAUCHOPE, ALEXANDER, Private, Battery A, 1st Operating Battalion, 
Artillery. Entered service August 13, 1918. 

WEBBER, JEREMIAH, Private. 4th Company, 16th Infantry Training Bat- 
talion. Stationed at Syracuse, N. Y. 

WEBSTER, CLARKE, Private, United States Army. 

WEIDHASS, GEORGE O., Wagoner, Company C, 301st Ammunition Train. 
Entered service April, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WEINER, BARNEY, Private, Company B, 321st Infantry. Entered service 
September 3, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WEISEL, EDAVARD, Private, 301st Field Artillery. Entered service Novem- 
ber 11, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WELCH, ARTHUR L., Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober 8, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

WELCH, EDMUND L., Corporal, Battery B, 12th Field Artillery. Entered 
service May 22, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WELCH, FRANCIS C, Private, 27th Company, 7th Battalion." Entered serv- 
ice September 19, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

AVELCH, JOHN J., Private, Headquarters Detachment, 1st Field Artillery. 
Entered service February 19, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

AVELCH, MICHAEL, Private, Company D, 28th Infantry. Entered service 
March 24, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WELCH, BHCHAEL F., Private, Artillery. Entered service April 27, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Eustis, Va. 

WELLS, ARTHUR E., Private, 478th Aero Squadron. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 11, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WENDT, OTTO, Private, Machine Gun Battalion, United States Army. 

WESPBESER, ERNEST, Private, Company I, 328th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



HoLYOKE In The GrExVt War. 255 

WEST, JOHN E., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

WHALEN, JOHN S., Private, Battery A, 5.5th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service December 12, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Cited for 
bravery in action. 

WTIALEN, THOMAS J., Machine Gun Inspector. Entered service June. 1916. 
Mexican border service. Stationed at Fort Bliss, Texas. 

WHEELER, FRANCIS, Private, 17th Aero Squadron. Entered service De- 
cember 28, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WHEELER, HOWARD R., Sergean_t, Medical Corps. Entered service June 
20, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WHEELER, WALDO S., Private, 175th Aero Squadron. Entered service Oc- 
tober 15, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WHELIHAN, FRANCIS H., Private, Battery C, 73rd Coast Artillery Corps. 
Entered service June 9, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WTIIPPLE, RAYMOND G., Private, Army Medical School. Stationed at 
Washington, D. C. 

WHITAKER, CHARLES, Private, United States Army. 

WHITE, J. LEONARD, Musician, 301st Artillery Band. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

WHITE, ROBERT, Private, Company M, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
December 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

WHITING, EDWARD C, Private, United S^tes Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WHITMORE, GEORGE D., Corporal, Medical Corps. Entered service Sep- 
tember 25, 1917. Stationed at Fortress Monroe. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

WIDDOWSON, RUSSELL J., Private, Gas Service. Entered service August 
G, 1918. 

WIED, BRUNZ, Private, 8th Company, 2nd Battalion. Entered service .Aug- 
ust 5, 1918. 

WIENER, LOUIS, Corporal, Battery F, 59th Field Artillery. Entered service 
May 10, 1918. 

WIESING, HAROLD H., Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service November 
5, 1918. 

WIESING, JOHN E., Privote, 613th Aero Squadron. Entered service No- 
vember 30, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WILCOX, HARRY D., Private, 25th Engineer Corps. Stationed at Camp 
Devens. 

WILCOXEN, LEWIS C„ Private, United States Army. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

WILLIAMS, ABE E., Private, United States Army. Entered service Feb- 
ruary, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

WILLIAMS, ARTHUR C, Private, 13th Battalion, 49th Regiment. Entered 
service August 1, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

AVILLIAMS, EDWARD D., Corporal, Company M, 328th Infantry. Entered 
service September 21, 1917. With xA.merican Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in 
action. 

WILLIAMS, JAMES K., Sergeant, 301st Military Police. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

WILLIAMS, RALPH, Saddler, Company M, 367th Infantry. Entered service 
June, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM R., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service 
May 29, 1918. 



256 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

WILLIAMSON, DANIEL P., Private, Headquarters, GOth Infantry. Entered 
service December 5, 1917. Stationed at Camp Greene, N. C. Transferred to 
Camp Devens. 

A\lLLISTON, CLIFTON A., Private, Medical Corps, Hospital Unit. Entered 
service May 28, 1917. Stationed at Camp Stafford, Pa. 

WILMOT, ARTHUR, Private, 28th Company, lo2d Depot Brigade. Entered 
service September 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

AA^LMOT, FREDERICK B., Corporal, Battery F, 20th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service June, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WILSON, JOHN, Private, 805th Aero Squadron. Entered service March 18, 
1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

WILSON, THURSTON, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
March 7, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

WINKLER, RAYMOND, Corporal, Company D, Chemical Warfare Service. 
Entered service March 13, 1918. Stationed at Edgewood, Md. 

WINTER, ADOLPH, Private, United States Marines. Stationed at Quantico. 

WINTERS, JOHN LEO, Private. United States Army. Entered service May 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

WOCHIN'G, ALBERT, Private, United States Army. Entered service June 

25, 1918. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

WOJAKIEWICZ, JOHN W., Private, Battery D, 29th Coast Artillery Corps. 
Entered service October 19, 1918. Stationed at Fort McKinley, Maine. 

WOLGER, NAPOLEON H., Private, 151st Depot Brigade. Entered service 
July 24, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

WOOD, CHARLES G., Private, Postal Express Service. Entered service Oc- 
tober 15, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WOOD, THOMAS B., Private, 7th Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
October 22, 1918. Stationed at Fort Warren, Boston, Mass. 

WOOD, WALTER L., Private, United States Army. Entered service October 
4, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

WOOD, WILLIAM H., Corporal, Headquarters, 3rd Field Artillery. Entered 
service August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

WOODRUFF, HAROLD G., Corporal, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action. 

W^ORONIK, LUDWIK, Private, United States Army. 

WORTH, WILLIAM T., Private, Company B, 321st Machine Gun Battalion, 
Entered service October 7, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded 
in action. 

WRUCK, WILLIAM F., Sergeant, 104th Infantry Band. Entered service 
January 10, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WYNN, HAROLD W., Sergeant, Medical Corps. Entered service May 22, 
1918. 

YAZOMBEK, STANLEY, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

YELLE, JOSEPH, Cook, Company D, 104th Infantry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

YELLE, THOMAS A., Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service June 

26. 1918. 

YOUNG, ERNEST H., Private, Company K, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
May 26, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded three times in 
action. Cited for bravery. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 257 

YOUNG, HARRISON M., Private, 47th Battery, 6th Anti-Aircraft Sector. 
Entered service July, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

YOUNG, JAMES D., Private, United States Army. Entered service April 27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

YOUNG, MATTHEW A., Private, Battery F, 61st Field Artillery. Entered 
service March 11, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

YOUNG, ROBERT W., Corporal, 4th Field Artillery. Entered- service May 
?1, 1918. 

YOUNG, WILLIAM, Corporal, Quartermaster Corps, 329th Field Artillery. 
Entered service December 12, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

YUZYUZAZEK, SEWERYN Y., Private, Company C, 1st Vermont Infantry. 
Entered service August, 1917. 

ZAJAC, EDWARD, Corporal, Headquarters Company, 109th Field Artillery. 
Entered service March 14, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Gassed 
in action. 

ZASS, JACOB L., Private, Signal Corps, Motor Mechanics. Entered service 
September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

ZITTA, WILLIAM, Private, Aviation Corps. Entered service February 14, 
1918. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

ZUCK, STEPHEN, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered service 
June 19, 1916. Mexican border service. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action. 

ZWIRBLIO, TARAS, Private, Company G, 328th Infantry. Entered service 
September 6, 1917. Stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. 



Nav> 



ADAMS, LIONEL H., Apprentice Seaman, United States Navy. Entered 
service April 8, 1918. 

AHERN, JOHN, Seaman, Merchant Marine. Entered service August 28, 1918. 
ALCOTT, JOHN, Apprentice Seaman. Entered service September 11, 1917. 

ANDERSTROM, AR\T[D G., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
May, 1917. 

ARNOLD, WILLIAM S., Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service April 
1917. 

ASHE, JAMES M., Apprentice Seaman, Merchant Marine. Entered service 
April 22, 1918. 

ASTLEY, LAW A., Mechanic's Mate. Entered service May 22, 1918. Aboard 
U. S. S. Corona. 

AUBREY, LEO J., Seaman, Merchant Marine. Entered service January 20, 
1919. 

BACH, xlLLAN, Apprentice Seaman. Entered service December 13, 1917. 

BAKER, HAROLD R., Seaman, United States Navy. 

BARIL, LEO H., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service October 23, 
1918. 

BARNETT, JOHN A. C, Gun Captain, United States Navy. Entered service 
November, 1917. 

BARRETT, HAROLD, Electrician, United States Navy. Entered service Oc- 
tober 22, 1918. 

HARTLEY, JOHN W., Student. Naval Aviation. Entered service June 30, 
1918. 

17 



258 IIoLYOKE In The Great War. 

BATCHKJjOII, KAVMONI) W., Apprentice Seaman. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 2, 191(). 

BATTEKSBY, EDWARD, Petty Officer, United States Navy. 

BEAUPRE, JOSEPH \V., Apprentice seaman. Entered service January 22, 
1918. 

BEAUREGARD, LEO J., Machinist Mate. Entered service August 8, 1917. 

BEDARD, JOSEPH, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 12, 
1918. 

BEELER, STEWART A., Landsman Quartermaster, United States Navy. 
Entered service July 19, 1918. 

BEGLEY, THOMAS JENNINGS, Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered 
service August, 1918. 

BELANGER, JOSEPH, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Sep- 
tember 4, 1918. 

BELL, WILLIAM, JR., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered' service April, 

1917. Aboard U. S. S. Nebraska. 

BENTLEY% ARCHIE, Seam.an-Guard, United States Navv. Entered service 
October 22, 1917. 

BERGERON, ALFRED, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service July 
1, 191 8'. 

BERNARD, ALFRED A., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service August 19, 1918. 

BEVAN, JOSEPH H., 1st Class Gun Pointer. Entered service May 28, 1917. 
Aboard U. S. S. Pocahontas. 

BIBEAU, EUGENE B., Seaman, United States Navv. Entered service April, 

1918. Aboard U. S. S. Corola. 

BIGGINS, JOHN E., Seaman, United States Navv. Entered service April 9, 
1918. 

BOND, CHESTER C, Radio Man, United States Navy. Entered service 
April, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Machais. 

BOND, PHILIP, Ensign, United States Navy. Entered service May, 1918. 

BORK, GEORGE, Chief Petty Officer, United States Navy. Entered service 
May 20, 1917. 

BOUDREAU, ADELARD G., Commissary School, United States Navy. En- 
tered service July 12, 1918. 

BOULET, ADELARD, Apprentice Seaman, United States Navy. EnterecJ 
service April 4, 1917. 

BOURQUE, A3IEDEE J., Seaman, Merchant Marine. Entered service May 
27, 1918. 

BOWLER, JOHN, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 1, 
1918. 

BRADLEY, WILLIAM F„ Petty Officer, United States Navy. Entered serv- 
ice August, 1918. 

BRADLEY, RUSSELL, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Sep- 
tember 5, 1918. Aboard U. S. S. Agammomnon. 

BRADLINSKI, FRANK J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
October 28, 1915. Aboard U. S. S. Virginia. 

BRASSILL, JOHN, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service October 
22, 1918. 

BRENNAN, PATRICK J., Naval Aviation Service. Entered service May 18. 
1918. 

BRESNAHAN, CORNELIUS, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
December 14, 1917. 

BRESNAHAN, GEORGE A., Gun Pointer, United States Navy. Entered 
service April 24, 1917. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 259 

BRESNAHAN, JOHN J., Electrician, United States Navy. Entered service 
January 10, 1917. 

BRESNAHAN, THOMAS B., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
September 17, 1917. x\board U. S. S. Mavi. Injured at sea in storm. 

BRODEUR, JOHN B., Seaman, United States Navy. Aboard U. S. S. Wil- 
helm. 

BRUNAULT, ARTHUR C, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
October, 1917. 

BURKE, EDWARD T., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service March 
15, 1918. 

BURNS, JAMES E., Cloyne Naval School. Entered service April, 1917. 

BURKE, MxlRTIN J., Gunners Mate, 2nd Class, United States Navy. En- 
tered service April, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Lamberton. 

BURNS, JOHN, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service September, 
1917. 

BURNSIDE, W. G., Seaman, United States Navy. Aboard U. S. Destroyer 
Little. 

BYRNES, JAMES E., United States Medical Reserve Corps. Entered serv- 
ice May 31, 1918. 

CADIGAN, PATRICK J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
August 13, 1918. 

CALLAHAN, JOSEPH G., Assistant Engineer, United States Merchant Ma- 
rine. Entered service June, 1918. 

CAMPBELL, THOIMAS, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 
23, 1916. 

CANTIN, JOSEPH A., Fireman, United States Navy. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1916. 

CANTIN, JOSEPH E., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Sep- 
tember 30, 1916. 

CAREY, FREDERICK H., Petty Officer, Fireman's School. Entered service 
May 11, 1917. 

CAREY, WALTER, Student, Massachusetts Nautical School. United States 
Navy. 

CARON, WILFRED E., Seaman, United States Navy. 

CAULEY, HENRY, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service August 
20, 1918. 

CAYHUE, RAY A., Cook, United States Navy. Aboard U. S. S. 'Florida. 
With American Fleet at German naval surrender. 

CHAPMAN, WILLIAM, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 
3, 1918. 

CHAPUT, SYLVIO, Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service .\pril 14, 
1917. 

CRENELLE, ARMAND C, Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. En- 
tered service January 20, 1919. 

CHOUQUETTE, JOHN B., Boatswain's Mate. Entered service January, 1914. 
Aboard U. S. S. Arkansas. With American Fleet at the German naval surrender. 

CLARK, CHARLES C, United States Navy. Camouflage Department. 

CLARK, JAMES T., Engineer Yeoman. Entered service June 4, 1917. 
Aboard U. S. S. New Y'ork. With American Fleet at the German naval surrender. 

CLARK, JOHN, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service December, 
1917. 

CLARK, JOHN W., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered serv- 
ice January 30, 1919. 

CLARKE, GEORGE, Water-tender, United States Navy. Entered service 
February 23, 1916. Aboard U. S. S. Manley. 



260 HoLTOKE In The Great War. 

CLEARY, JAMES F., JR., Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service 
2s;ovember 9, 1918. 

CLEVELAND, RICHARD M., Mechanic's Mate, United States Naval Avia- 
tion Corps. Entered service July 14, 1918. 

COBURN, EARL C, Seaman, United States Navy. 

COCHRANE, ROBERT D., Electrician, United States Navy. Entered service 
June 23, 1916. 

COFFEY, LEO T., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 13, 
1918. 

COFFEY, PATRICK B., Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service April, 
1917. 

COHEN, HERMAN, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service July 15, 
1918. 

COLLINGE, WILLIAM H., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
October 30, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Lamberton. 

COLLINS, RAYMOND J., Fireman, United States Navy. Entered service 
May 14, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Bath. 

CONNOR, JAMES, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service July 16, 
1918. 

CONNORS, MICHAEL J., Seaman, Quartermaster Aviation School, United 
States Navy. Entered service September 6, 1918. 

COOK, JOHN F., Radio Operator, United States Navy. Entered service April 
10, 1918. 

CORLISS, GEORGE, Seaman, United States Navy. 

COUGHLIN, JAMES, Electrician, United States Navy. Entered service March 
So, 1917. 

COUNIHAN, GEORGE H., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
May 10, 1918. 

COURTNEY, JOHN D., Plumber, United States Navy. Entered service June 
1, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Mt. Vernont when torpedoed. Rescued. 

CRANE, JAMES M., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 5, 
1917. Aboard U. S. S. Bell. 

CUNNINGHAM, WILLIAM P., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered serv- 
ice March 2, 1918. 

CURRAN, JOHN J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service October 
18, 1918. 

CURTIS, DON H., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 20, 
1918. 

CWIKDINSKI, EDMUND J., Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service 
July 30, 1918. 

DALEY, WILLIAM J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service April 
9, 1918. 

DEACON, ALBERT E., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. 

DEAN, JAMES, Seaman. Entered service April 6, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. 
Denver. 

DeCOUAGNE, ALFRED J., United States Navy. Entered service in January, 
1018. 

DELANEY, THOMAS, Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service May 
£1,1918. 

DEMARSH, ALBERT, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service January 
23, 1919. 

DESROSIERS, EDWARD P., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
October 30, 1917. 

DESROSIERS, JOSEPH, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service No- 
vember, 1917. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 261 

DESROSIERS, RALPH, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service No- 
vember, 1918. Aboard U. S. S. New Mexico. Four years' previous service. 

DeROY, JOSEPH OSCAR, Gun-pointer, United States Navy. Entered service 
September 22, 1916. Aboard U. S. S. Parker. 

DIETEL, JOHN H., Seaman, United States Navy. 

DILLON, JAMES B., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service August 

14, 1918. 

DILLON, WILLIAM T., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Aug- 
ust 1, 1918. 

DINEEN, ARTHUR F., Midshipman, Annapolis Naval Academy. Appointed 
June, 1918. 

DONAHUE, CORNELIUS, Paymaster, United States Navy. Entered service 
in June, 1918. 

DONAHUE, Wn.LIAM F., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
Alay 16, 1918. 

DOOLEY, THOMAS B., Seaman, United States Navy. Aboard U. S. S. 
Nebraska. 

DOSSIN, CHARLES A., Chief Pharmacist Mate, United States Navy. Aboard 
U. S. S. Noma. 

DOAVD, LAWRENCE, Chief Petty Officer, United States Navy. Entered 
service July 10, 1918. 

DOWD, THOMAS, Seaman, United States Navy. 

DRAKE, EDWARD, Quartermaster, 2nd Class. Entered service May 1, 1918. 

DRISCOLL, JOHN P., Musician, United States Navy, Entered service June 1, 
1917. Aboard U. S. S. Florida. With American Fleet at German naval surrender. 

DUCHARME, CLEMENT, Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service 
May, 1918. 

DUFFEY, GEORGE W., Baker, United States Navy. Entered service April 
10, 1917. 

DUGGAN, JAMES A., Chief Mechanic's Mate. Entered service April 28, 
1918. 

DUGAN, JOSEPH, Machinist, United States Navv. Entered service October 

15, 1912. Aboard U. S. S. Little. 

DUMAN, GEORGE, Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered serv- 
ice March 22, 1918. 

DUROCHER, ALFRED D., JR., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered serv- 
ice May 24, 1918. 

ENO, WILLIAM E., Electrician, United States Navy. Entered service April 
10, 1916. Aboard U. S. S. Pennsylvania. With American Fleet at German naval 
surrender. 

EVANS, JOHN J., JR., Mechanic's Mate. Entered service March 23, 1918. 

FISCHER, HERMAN, Engineer, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service September, 1918. 

FISHER, JAMES D., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service January 
31, 1919. 

FITZGERALD, DAVID, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Aug- 
ust 31, 1918. 

FITZGERALD, JAMES F., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. En- 
tered service June 26, 1918. 

FITZGERALD, JOHN F., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
July 9, 1918. 

FLANAGAN, JAMES E., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service March 8, 1918. 

FLETCHER, WILLIAM T., Machinist's Mate. Entered service April 15, 
1918. 



262 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

FLYNN, THOMAS, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service July 17, 
1918. 

FLYIVN, THOMAS A., Fireman. Entered service July 8, 1917. Aboard 
'J. S. S. Pennsylvania. With American Fleet at German naval surrender. 

FOLEY, WILLIA3I, Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered serv- 
ice April 25, 1918. 

FONTAINE, GEORGE J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Oc- 
tober 26, 1916. Aboard U. S. S. Pennsylvania. With American Fleet at German 
naval surrender. 

FORBES, JAMES D., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 3, 1919. 

FOREST, JOSEPH F., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 9, 
1918. 

FORTIER,. ALBERT J., Seaman, United States Navy. Aboard U. S. S. 
Oklahoma. With American Fleet at German naval surrender. 

FRENCH, AUGUSTUS M., Mechanic's Mate. Entered service June 25, 1917. 

GATELY, PETER, Machinist, United States Navy. Entered service Decem- 
ber, 1917. 

GENINEAU, HORACE R., Seaman, Merchant Marine. Entered service April 
20, 1918. 

GERAN, JEREMIAH, Student, Naval Radio School. Entered service Jan- 
uary, 1918. 

GILL, THOMAS M., Fireman, United States Navy. Entered service March 19, 
1918. 

GIRARD, GEORGE, Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service Decem- 
ber, 1917. 

GIRARD, ROMEO C, Bandsman, United States Navy. Entered service Oc- 
tober, 1917. 

GLEASON, WILLIAM, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 4, 1918. 

GLOSTER, MAURICE F., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service De- 
cember 26, 1916. 

GOLDEN, FRANK J., Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service June 
18, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Wakiva vi^hen torpedoed. Rescued. 

GORMAN, ARTHUR T., Water-tender, United States Navy. Entered service 
January 18, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Texas. 

GORMAN, JASIES D., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Oc- 
tober 23, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Texas. 

GOSS, WILLIAM J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 23, 
1916. Aboard U. S. S. Utah. 

GRADY, FRED B., Naval Dental Reserve Corps. Entered service December, 
1917. 

GRAHAM, FREDERICK R., Carpenter's Mate. Aboard U. S. S. North 
Dakota. 

GRAHAM, GEORGE, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Decem- 
ber 6, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Wilhelmina. 

GRAY, ARTHUR, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 26, 
1918. 

GREANEY, FRANK C, Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service April, 
1918. 

GREANEY, JOHN F., Petty Officer, United States Navy. Entered service 
October 1, 1917. 

GREANEY, ROBERT J., Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service 
April 24, 1918. 

GREANEY, WILLIAM, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service De- 
cember, 1917. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 263 

GREENE, MILTON J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Oc- 
tober 23, 1918. 

GREEN, SOL, Landsman-Quartermaster, United States Navy. Entered serv- 
ice July 25, 1918. 

GREEN, WALLACE, Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service July 9, 
1918. 

GRLPFIN, JOHN J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 1, 
1918. 

GUILLERIE, DELPHIS, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service De- 
cember 15, 1918. Aboard U. S. S. Narragansett. 

HAFEY, MILTON J., Machinist's Mate, United States Navy. Entered service 
September 21, 1918. 

HAFEY, RAYMOND C, Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service Oc- 
tober, 1917. Stationed at London. 

HARDAKER, JAMES, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service July 
3, 1918. 

HART, ARTHUR A., Fireman, United States Navy. Entered service Aug- 
ust, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Rhode Island. 

HART, EDWARD R., Paymaster, United States Navy. Entered service April 
23, 1918. 

HARTNETT, JOHN T., JR., Quartermaster Corps, Naval Aviation. Entered 
service June 15, 1918. 

HxlUNTON, THURSTON C, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
June, 1918. 

HAYDEN, JAMES H., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service July 29, 
1918. 

HAYDEN, JOHN, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service October 18, 
1918. 

BLIYTON, WALTER, Musician, United States Navy. Entered service De- 
cember 29, 1916. 

HAYWARD, PHILIP, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 3, 
1917. 

HEBERT, CHARLES H., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service July, 1918. 

HEBERT, EUDORE, Hospital Apprentice, United States Navy. Entered 
service July 8, 1918. ,t. 

HEIDNER, RAi'MONl), Naval Aviation Corps. Entered service September, 
1918. 

HERD, JAHN, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service February, 1918. 

HICKSOX, JOHN, Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service April 8, 
1918. Aboard U. S. S. Mt. Vernon. 

HIEBEL, EARL R,, Junior Engineer, United States Merchant Marine. 

HILBERT, OTTO W., Oiler, United States Merchant Marine. Entered serv- 
ice April 14, 1918. 

HOGAN, HOWARD M., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Jan- 
uary, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Nebraska. 

HOGAN, JOHN F., Petty Officer. United States Navy. Entered service June 
26, 1917. 

HOGAN, J. JOSEPH, Machinist's Mate, United States Navy. Entered service 
November 16, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Oklahoma. With American Fleet at the 
German naval surrender. 

HOLLY, FREDERICK, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service De- 
cember 27, 1917. 

HORGEN, MATTHEW, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service No- 
vember, 1917. 

HOWARD, E. C, Chief Gunner's Mate, United States Navy. Aboard U. S. S. 
Saranac. 



264 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

HUBBARD, HOWARD G., Seaman, United States Navy. 

HUNT, HARRY, Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service April 27, 1918. 

HUNTER, WILLIAM, Chief Petty Officer. United States Navy. Entered 
service June, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. President Lincoln 

HUNTER, PROFESSOR WILLIS C, Bandmaster, United States Navy 
Aboard the U. S. S. George Washington. 

HURLEY, FRANCIS, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Oc- 
tober 29, 1917. 

JETTE, JOSEPH, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 4, 1918. 
JOHANNIS, EDMUND, Musician, United States Navy. Entered service Aug- 
ust 29, 1918. * 



'^P^^^^.V^^^^^' Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered service 



JOHNSON, EDWIN, Seaman, United States Navy. 
JONES, 1 

May 29, 1918. 

1918^^^^^' ™^^'^^ ^" S"^"^^"' U"^ted States Navy. Entered service April 23, 

JUDGE, WILLIAM J., Fireman, United States Navy. Entered service No- 
vember, 1917, 

KALLANGER, EDWARD, Seaman, United States Navy. Aboard the U S S 
Seattle. 

KANE, ANTHONY F., Electrician, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service May 1, 1918. 

KANE, EDWARD J., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service May 14, 1918. 

KEARNEY, JAMES P., Petty Officer, United States Navy. Entered service 
May 7, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Texas. With American Fleet at German naval 
surrender. 

KEATING, JOSEPH M., Seaman, United States Navy. 

KEATING, RAYMOND, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service No- 
vember, 1917. 

^ KEELER, EARL, Landsman Mate, United States Naval Aviation Service. 
Entered service July 22, 1918. 

KELLY, HAROLD P., Chief Gunner's Mate, United States Navy. Entered 
service June, 1917. 

KELLOGG, EDWIN R„ Gun Pointer, United States Navy. Entered service 
May 20, 1918. Aboard U. S. S. Charles Whittemore. 

KELLY, JARIES, Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered service 
June 17, 1918. 

KELLY, WILLIAM B., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 
23, 1918. 

KENNEDY, JOSEPH, Engineer, United States Navy. Entered service No- 
vember 24, 1916. Aboard U. S. S. Bridge. 

KENNEDY, IMAURICE L., Quartermaster, United States Merchant Marine. 
Entered service May 15, 1918. 

KENNEDY, THOMAS, Quartermaster, United States Navy. Entered service 
April 11, 1918. 

KENNEY, CHARLES T., Storekeeper, United States Navy. Entered service 
May 14, 1918. 

KENNEY, DANIEL W., JR., Hospital Apprentice, United States Navy. En- 
tered service March 28, 1918. Aboard U. S. S. Minnesota. 

KERON, MICHAEL T., Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service July 
5, 1918. 

KEYES, PARDON L., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service October 17, 1918. 

KIELEY, JAMES P., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service October 
22, 1917. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 265 

lilELEY, JOHN J., Fireman, United States Navy. Entered service June 8, 
1917. Aboard U. S. S. Pennsylvania. With American Fleet at German naval 
surrender. 

KING, GERALD, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service April 23, 
1918. 

KING, LEROY, Engineer, United States Merchant Marine. Entered service 
July 31, 1918. 

KNAPP, EARLE L., Acting Master-at-Arms, United States Navy. Aboard 
U. S. S. Nebraska. 

KREUTER, JOSEPH, Gun Captain, United States Navy. Entered service 
July, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. George Washington. Made 17 trips across. 

LABBIE, DEWEY, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 3, 
1918. 

LADD, ALFRED, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June, 1918. 

LADD, ALLEN, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June, 1918. 

LALIBERTIE, GEORGE H., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. En- 
tered service July 25, 1918. 

LAPOINT, HERMAN, Seaman, United States Navy. 

LARROW, EDWIN J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Tan- 
tiary 7, 1916. 

LARROW, RAYMOND J., Seaman, United States Navv. Entered service 
September 17, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Gold Shell. 

LEAHY, JOHN E., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered service 
May 14, 1918. 

LECUYER, ROMEO, Chief Petty Officer, United States Navy. Entered serv- 
ice March, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Isabel. 

LEVENSON, SAMUEL, Hospital Apprentice, United States Navy. Entered 
service June, 1918. 

LINTON, ROBERT J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June, 
1917. Aboard U. S. S. Oklahoma. With American Fleet at the German surrender. 

LOCKE, WILLIAM F., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 
3, 1918. 

LOUDEN, NORMAN S., Seaman, United States Navy. Stationed at Hiiigham 
Training Station. 

LUCEY, FRANK, Storekeeper, United States Navy. Entered service May, 
1918. 

LUDDEN, WILLIAM J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Aug- 
ust 23, 1916. Aboard U. S. S. Connecticut. 

LYNCH, EDWARD J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service August, 
1918. 

LYNCH, WALTER, Naval Aviation Corps. Entered service February, 1918. 

LYONS, TIMOTHY, Cook, United States Navy. Entered service November, 
1915. Aboard U. S. S. Missouri. 

McAUSLAN, JOHN A,, Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service June 5, 1918. 

McCAUGHEY, THOMAS, Seaman, United States Navy. 

Mccormick, JOHN J. D., Chief Boatswain's Mate, United States Navy. 
Entered service August 28, 1918. 

McDonald, Arthur, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Aug- 
ust 27, 1918. 

McDonnell, FRANCIS M., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
October 22, 1917. 

McMANUS, HAROLD L., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
May 31, 1916. 

MacDERMOTT, GEORGE E., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
July, 1917. 



266 HoLYOKE In The Great AVar. 

MacDONALD, GEORGE J., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. En- 
tered service April, 1938. 

MAGGI, JOSEPH F., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service March 2. 
1918. 

MARION, JOHN L., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered serv- 
ice August 10, 1918. 

3IARION, JOSEPH A., Marine Engineer, United States Merchant Marine. 
Entered service September, 1918. 

MARLAND, ELTON, Supply Officer, United States Naw. Entered service 
October 24, 1918. 

MAROTTE, ERNEST V., Seaman, United States Naw. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 1, 1916. 

MARSHALL, ROBERT H., Yeoman, United States Naw. Entered service 
July 2, 1918. 

MARTIN, D. K., Electrician, United States Navy. Entered service August 7, 
1918. 

MAXIC-MARTELLE, JOSEPH W., Machinist, United States Navy. Entered 
service July 9, 1918. 

MAYER, WILFRED, Gunner, United States Navy. Entered service May 7, 
1917. Aboard U. S. S. Arizona. With American Fleet at German naval sur- 
render. 

MEE, THOMAS P., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service April 23, 
1918. 

MEFFERT, WILLIAM, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service April 
23, 1918. 

MENARD, LEO J., Machinist, United States Navy. Entered service October 
9, 1918. 

MILES, CLARENCE T., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service September 1, 1918. 

MOBLEY, P. PAUL, Chief Petty Officer, United States Navy. 

MONSON, WHITNEY, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Tuly, 
1918. 

MOREAU, JOSEPH T., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. 

MORLIRTY, EDWARD, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service No- 
vember 17, 1917. 

MORIARTY, JOHN F., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Jan- 
uary, 1918. 

MORIARTIT, PATRICK, Seaman, United States Navy. 

MORIARTY, RAYMOND F., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
February 14, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Louisiana. 

MORIARTY, WILLIAM A., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
April 15, 1918. 

MORIARTY, WILLIAM E., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. En- 
tered service May 16, 1918. 

MOYNIHAN, PATRICK J., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. En- 
tered service May 27, 1918. 

MURPHY, DANIEL J., Quartermaster, United States Navy. Entered service 
June 24, 1916. 

MURPHY, EDMUND F., Pharmacist's Mate, United States Navy. Entered 
service 1912. 

MURPHY, JOSEPH G., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Oc- 
tober 28, 1918. 

MURPHY, MICHAEL, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service No- 
vember, 1917. 

MURPHY, AVILLIAM, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Oc- 
tober 22, 1917. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 267 

IVIUSANTE, AMADALE C, Cook, United States Navy. Entered service July 
15, 1918. 

MUSANTE, FRANK J., Electrician, United States Navy. Entered service 
October 30, 1917. 

MUSANTE, HERBERT, Chief Petty Officer, United States Navy. Entered 
service 1907. 

MUSANTE, VICTOR A., Gun Pointer. Entered service June 2?,. 1916. 
Aboard U. S. S. Arizona. With American Fleet at German naval surrender. 

NEWELL, JOSEPH P., Stevi^ard, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service September 3, 1918. 

NEWMANN, CHARLES, Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service July 19, 1918. 

NICHOLS, LEONARD, Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service July 19, 1918. 

NORRIS, ALBERT F., Fireman, United States Navy. 

O'BRIEN, JOHN F., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service July 29, 
1918. 

O'CONNELL, EDAVARD E., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
November 15, 1917. 

O'CONNELL, EDMUND E., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
November 15, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Oklahoma. With American Fleet at German 
naval surrender. 

O'CONNOR, JOHN G., Officers' Steward, United States Merchant Marine. 
Entered service February, 1918. 

O'CONNOR, JOHN J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 1, 
1918. 

O'DONNELL, EDWARD J., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. En- 
tered service May 16, 1918. 

O'DONNELL, IVIAURICE, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
April 8, 1918. Aboard U. S. S. Seattle. 

O'DONNELL, PATRICK E., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. En- 
tered service May, 1918. 

O'HARE, JOHN M., Oiler, United States Merchant Marine. Entered service 
May 25, 1918. 

O'LEARY, DANIEL C, Machinist, United States Navy. Entered service No- 
vevmber 20, 1917. 

PAGE, HOWARD L., Cadet, Harvard School of Ensigns. Appointed Jan- 
uary 15, 1918. 

PARMELEE, ALBERT, Wireless Operator, United States Navy. Aboard 
U. S. S. Israel. 

PASQITINUCCI, LORENZO J., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. En- 
tered service May 5, 1918. 

PATTISON, ROBERT D., Seaman, United States Navy. 

PAUL, MICHAEL J., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service May 17, 1918. 

PECIi, JOSEPH, Petty Officer, United States Navy. Aboard U. S. S. Penn- 
sylvania. With American Fleet at German naval surrender. 

PECK, WILLIAM R., Cadet, Harvard Cadet School, United States Xavy. En- 
tered service March 21, 1918. 

PERREAULT, LOUIS A., Seaman, United States Navy, .\board U. S. S. 
Von Steuben. 

PETELL, LEO A., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service February 
15, 1918. 

PETERSON, HERBERT, Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service September 9, 1918. 



268 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

POWERS, GORDON A., Hospital Attendant, United States Navy. Entered 
service August 20, 1918. 

POWERS, JOHN F., Chief Carpenter, United States Navy. Entered service 
1914. 

POWTERS, PATRICK F., Ensign, United States Navy. Entered service 1909. 

POWERS, PATRICK A., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service July 
oO, 1918. 

POWERS, WILLIAM F., Recruiting Officer, United States Navy. Entered 
service 1909. 

PROVOST, CHARLES E., Petty Officer, United States Navy. Entered serv- 
ice September 6, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Nevada. With American Fleet at German 
naval surrender. 

PROVOST, SOLOMON, Hospital Apprentice, United States Navy. Entered 
service July, 1918. 

QUIGLEY, EDWARD F., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Oc- 
tober 29, 1917. 

QUIGLEY, WILLIAM P., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
April, 1918. 

QUILL, CORNELIUS A., Blacksmith, United States Navy. Entered service 
June 8, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Marr. 

QUIRK, CHARLES E. A., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. En- 
tered service May 16, 1918. 

QUIRK, WILLIAM S., Yeoman, United States Navy. Entered service De- 
cember 13, 1917. 

RAYMOND, HERMAN J., Coxswain, United States Navy. Entered service 
May 1, 1916. 

REDFORD, CARL, Machinist, United States Navy. Entered service July 28, 
1917. 

, REDFORD, EVERETT R., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
June, 1917. 

RENNER, A. W., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service December, 
1917, 

RICHARDS, EARL L., Third Mate, United States Merchant Marine. En- 
tered service February 1, 1918. 

RICHARDSON, JOHN H., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
February 12, 1918. 

ROBERT, HONOliE, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 3, 
1917. Aboard U. S. S. Old Colony. 

ROCHETTE, JOSEPH A., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
April, 1918. 

RODIER, MURAT R., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 22, 
1918. 

ROHAN, JOHN H., Fireman, United States Navy. Entered service November 
24, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Nevada. With American Fleet at German naval sur- 
render. 

ROTHERMEL, MARTIN T., Chief Gunner's Mate, United States Navy. En- 
tered service July 30, 1916. 

RUBIN, DAVID, Chief Mechanic's Mate, United States Navy. Entered serv- 
ice July 9, 1918. 

RUSSELL, THEODORE, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
June 5, 1918. 

RYAN, CHARLES, Machinist's Mate, United States Naval Corps. Entered 
service November, 1917. 

RYAN, EDWARD, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 27, 
1918. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 269 

RYAX, KENNETH, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June, 
1918. 

SATTLER, THEODORE, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service No- 
vember 10, 1918. 

SCULLY, RAYMOND C, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 
' 4, 1918. 

SHEA, DAVID, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 13, 1917. 
Aboard U. S. S. Oklahoma. Wifh American Fleet at German naval surrender. 

SHEA, EDWARD, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service April 18, 
1918. 

SHEA, JAMES E., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered service 
July 8, 1918. 

SHEA, JOHN F., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 9, 1918. 

SHEAN, JOHN J., Fireman, United States Navy. Entered service May 5, 
191T. Aboard U. S. S. Nebraska. 

SHEEHAN, JOHN, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service August 16, 
1918. 

SHEEHAN, JOHN J., Aviator-Cadet, United States Naval Corps. Entered 
service September 4, 1918. 

SHEEHAN, JOHN L., Seaman. United States Navy. Entered service June 
13, 1918. 

SHEEHAN, WILLIAM J., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service January 30, 1919. 

SIMES, EDGAR, Machinist Mate, United States Navy. Entered service Aug- 
ust 5, 1918. 

SIMES, GEORGE, Chief Petty Officer, United States Navy. Entered service 
March 27, 1918. 

SIZER, WALTER J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Feb- 
ruary 25, 1918. 

SKINNER, EDWARD C, Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service July 8, 1918. 

SKINNER, WILLIAM 2nd, Quartermaster, United States Navy. Entered 
service July 1"), 1918. 

SLATTERY, EDWARD, Fireman, United States Navy. 

SMITH, GEORGE H., Seaman, United States Navy. 

S>nTH, STANLEY H., Petty Officer, United States Navy. Entered service 
May 20, 1918. 

SNIDER, W. LESTER, Machinist's Mate, United States Navy. Entered serv- 
ice July 11, 1918. 

SPAFFORD, CHARLES W., Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. En- 
tered service January 30, 1919. 

STEINBOCK, WALTER F., Engineer, Uinted States Navy. Entered service 
October 12, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Tacoma. 

STEVENS, PERCY E., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service May 
15, 1916. Aboard U. S. S. Talbot. 

STREIBER, ARTHUR E., Seaman, United States Navy. 

STUEBI, THEODORE G., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
March 4, 1918. Aboard U. S. S. Kroonland. 

SULLIVAN, CORNELIUS, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service 
March 23, 1918. 

SULLIVAN, PATRICK J., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Oc- 
tober 22, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Neptune. 

TAUSCHER, WILLIAM F., Petty Officer, United States Navy. 

TAYLOR, JOHN, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 18, 



270 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

THOMAS, LIONEL, Seaman, United States Nav.v. Entered service Decem- 
ber, 1917. 

THOMPSON, JOHN J., Seaman, United States Navy. Aboard U. S. S. 
Arkansas. With American Fleet at German naval surrender. 

TIERNEY, JOHN,_ JR., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service June 
25, 1918. 

TIFFANY, GEORGE, JR., Musician, United States Navy. Entered service 
June 13, 1917. Aboard U. S. S. Florida. With American Fleet at German naval 
surrender. 

TOMASKI, JOHN, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service July, 1918. 

TOOLE, WALLACE, Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered 
service May 14, 1918. 

TROWBRIDGE, GORDON P., Ship Carpenter, United States Merchant Ma- 
rine. Entered service July 29, 1918. 

WALKER, JAMES, Machinist's Mate, United States Navy, Submarine Service. 

WALKER, JAMES, Seaman, United States Merchant Marine. Entered serv- 
ice May 17, 1918. 

WEINSTEIN, MILTON, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service July 
10, 1918. 

WESLEY, WALTER S., Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service Mav 
1, 1918. 

WHITHILL, WILLIAM, Coppersmith, United States Navv. Entered service 
November 14, 1918. 

WHITING, FAIRFIELD, Seaman, United States Navy. Entered service July, 
1918. 

WTIITING, WILLIAM, Seaman, United States Navv. Entered service Oc- 
tober 21, 1918. 

W^NTERBOTTOM, JOHN, Engineer, United States Merchant Alarine. En- 
tered service August 1, 1918. 

WOLCOTT, HILAS D., Seaman, United States Navv. Entered service Jan- 
uary 27, 1916. Aboard U. S. S. New Jersey. 

AVOOD, JOSEPH A., Quartermaster, United States Navv. Entered service 
March 11. 1918. 

WRIGHT, WILLIAM, Fireman, United States Navy. Entered service 1917. 
Aboard U. S. S. New York. With American Fleet at German naval surrender. 

YOUNG, JAMES, Seaman, United States Navv. Entered service November, 
1918. 

YOUNG, CLIFFORD, Seaman, United States Navv. Entered service October 
25, 1917. 



Allied Service 

ADAMS, ROBERT, Private, British Army. Entered service February 9, 1918, 
at Holyoke Recruiting Mission. With British Expeditionary Forces. 

ALLEN, JOSEPH, Private, British Army. Entered service February 9, 1918, 
at Holyoke Recruiting Mission. With British Expeditionary Forces. 

ANDERSON, JOHN, Private, Canadian Black Watch. Entered service in Sep- 
tember, 1917. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces, Wounded in action Septem- 
ber 29, 1918. 

AKCHAMBAULT, FRANK E., Private, 2nd Canadian Engineers. Entered 
service April 10, 1916. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

BAIN, JOHN G., Private, 8th Canadian Reserve Battalion. Entered service in 
October, 1917. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 271 

BAIRD, JAMES, Sergeant, British Army. Entered service in 1915. With 
British Expeditionary Forces. Wounded and gassed in action. 

BANNERMAN, WILLIAM, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service Jan- 
uary 4, 1918. 

BARCLAY, ALEXANDER P., Private, 3rd Company, Battery L, 2nd Cana- 
dian Machine Gun Corps. Entered service in January, 1918. With Canadian Ex- 
peditionary Forces. Shell-shocked in action October 2, 1918. 

BEAliTJOIN, EMIL, Private, British Army. Entered service February 9, 1918, 
at Holyoke Recruiting Mission. With British Expeditionary Forces. 

BEECHER, ROBERT H., Private, British Army. Entered service March 19, 
1918. 

BERGERON, ERNEST, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1916. 
With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

BIEDRON, STANLEY, Private, Polish Army. Entered service in 1918. With 
the fighting forces in France. 

BONNELL, JOHN W., Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1914. 
With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

BRODALSKI, STANISLAAV, Sergeant, Polish Army. Entered service in 
1918. With Polish Army in France. 

BUTLER, ANDREWS, Private. Canadian Army. Entered service in October, 

1917. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

CATHRO, ALEC, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in January, 1918. 
With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

CHAPDELAINE, JOHN C, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service March 
30, 1918. 

CLARK, GEORGE, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in February, 

1918. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

CLARKSON, HARRY, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service January 11, 
1918. 

COLIN, LOUIS, Corporal, 321st French Machine Gun Regiment. Entered 
service in 1914. Wounded in 1916. Wounded March 29, 1918. Wounded Septem- 
ber 25, 1918. 

CORRE, LOUIS, Private, French Army. Entered /ervice in August, 1914. 
wounded September 27, 191.i. Lay on battlefield at Champagne. Decorated with 
Croix de Guerre and Military Medal. 

CRAPEAU, ELTHEGE, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1915. 
With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action August 26, 1918. 

DAVIDSON, J. A., Private, British Army. Entered service November ?>, 1917. 
With British Expeditionary Forces. 

DAVIDSON, JAMES A., Private, Canadian Army. Entered service February, 
1918. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action September 2, 
1918. Erroneously reported dead. 

DEMERS, ADELARD, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service -\ugust 17, 
1918. 

DIDIERJEAN, ARMAND, Private, French Army. Entered service in 1914. 
Wounded in action. 

DIXON, H. R., Private, British .\rmy. Entered service in 1914. With British 
Expeditionary Forces. Taken prisoner >in 1915. 

ELLIS, GEORGE A., Band Corporal. Canadian Army. With first Quebec 
regiment. 

FORBES, ALFRED, Private, British Army. Entered service July 10, 1918. 
W^ith British Expeditionary Forces. 

FOSTER, HERBERT V., Private, British Army. Entered service February 9, 
1918, at Holyoke Recruiting Mission. With British Expeditionary Forces. 

FOX, JOSEPH B., Sapper, Company B, Canadian Engineers. Entered service 
June 22, 1917. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Previous service in Black 
Watch and Highland Light Infantry. 



272 IIoLYOKE In The Great War. 

FOX, WILIilAM S., Private, British Army. Entered service in 1914. Sta- 
tioned at Glasgow, Scotland. 

FRASER, WILLIAM, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service July 3, 1918. 
With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

GARBUTT, GEORGE T., Private, Canadian Army. Entered service June 25, 
1918. Stationed in Canada. 

GOOD, JABIES, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in April, 1917. 
With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Wounded August 28, 1918. 

GOODWIN, JOHN, Private, 9th Scottish Rifles. Entered service in September, 
1915. With British Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

GOODWIN, ROBERT, Private, British Army. Entered service January 11, 
1918. 

GOODWIN, THOMAS, Driver, Canadian Army. Entered service December 
9, 1914. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

GOULET, ADELARD, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service March 14, 
1918. 

GREEN, JAMES, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1915. With 
Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action August, 1918. 

_ GRIFFIN, EDWARD, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1917. 
With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

GRIFFIN, JOHN, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1918. With 
Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

GRYSKIEWICZ, WLADUSLAW, Private, Polish Army. Entered service in 
July, 1918. With fighting forces in France. 

HART, GEORGE A., Private, British Army. Entered service February 2G, 
1918. With British Expeditionary Forces. 

HARTNETT, GERALD, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service April 25, 
1918. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

HAYTON, WILLIAM, Private, Royal Flying Corps. Entered service in Feb- 
ruary, 1918. 

HINDS, JOHN, Private, British Army. Entered service in 1915. With Brit- 
ish Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action in September, 1918. 

HOWARTH, FRANK, Private, British Army. Entered service February 9, 
1918, at Holyoke Recruiting Mission. With British Expeditionary Forces. 

HUNT, ALBERT E., Private, Canadian Army. Entered service February 23, 
1918. 

HYND, JAMES, Private, British Army. Entered service in October, 1917. 
With British Expeditionary Forces. 

JACK, JAMES, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service January 25, 1918. 

JOHNSON, JOSEPH A., Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1916. 
With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. "Wounded in action March 3, 1918. 

KALUZA, JOHN, Private, Polish Army. Entered service in 1918. Wounded 
in action in June, 1918. 

KESELTON, CORBIN, Private, British Army. Entered service February 9, 
1918, at Holyoke Recruiting Mission. 

KOHLER, CHARLES, Private, French Army. Entered service in 1914. 

LANDIS, OlMER, Aviator, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1914. Injured 
in a fall in France. 

LeBLANC, DANIEL, Private, British Army. Entered service July 19, 1918. 
_ LETOURNEAU, EDWARD, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service 1917. 
With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

LINCOURT, EDMUND C, Private, Canadian Army. Entered United States 
service in April, 1917. Discharged because he was under age. Entered Canadian 
service October 10, 1917. Wounded at Halifax Explosion. With Canadian Expe- 
ditionary Forces. Wounded in action October 2, 1918. 



HoLYOKE In The Great "War. 273 

LONG, GEORGE, Private, British Army. Entered service February 9, 1918, 
at Holyoke Recruiting Mission. 

LOVIE, JAMES, Private, British Army. Entered service in August, 1916. 
With British Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

McCORMICK, WILIjIAM, Signaler, British Army. Entered service in July, 
J 015. With British Expeditionary Forces. Wounded twice in action. 

Mccracken, JOHN, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service August 24, 
1918. 

McFARLAND, JAIVIES, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1917. 
With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. (Served the United States in Spanish- 
American War.) 

McKINSTRIE, NATHANIEL, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 
1917. 

McLEAN, HUGH D., JR., Corporal, 7th Inneskiller Fusileers. Entered serv- 
ice in 1914. Transferred to 2nd Royal Irish Regiment. Wounded in 1917 ; again 
on March 7, 1918, and for the third time in May, 1918. Served in United States 
Army previous to world war. 

MACLEAN, FRANK, Recruiting Officer, Canadian Army. Entered service in 
1017. Stationed in England after being wounded twice in action. 

MACMENIGALL, WILLIA3I, Aerial Gunner, British Army. Entered service 
in 1915. With Royal Flying Corps. Injured by a fall in February, 1918. 

MATHIESON, A\^LSON, Private, British Army. Entered service November 
3, 1917. 

MENARD, EDGAR, Private, British Army. Entered service February 9, 
1918, at Holyoke Recruiting Mission. 

MOODY, JA3IES G., Private, British Army. Entered service January 14, 
1918. With British Expeditionary Forces. 

MULLER, LOUIS, Private, French Army. Entered service in 1914. With 
French Forces in action. Shell-shocked. 

MURPHY, ROBERT, Private, British Army. Entered service March 1, 1918. 
_ NOWACKI, MICHAEL, Private. Polish Army. Entered service in 1917. 
With fighting forces in France. 

OBEE, H. \V., Corporal, British Army. Entered service in 1914. With Brit- 
ish Expeditionary Forces in Egypt. 

ORZECHOWSKI, FRANK, Private, British Army. Entered the United States 
service in 1917, at Little Rock, Ark., but was rejected because he could not produce 
a birth certificate. Enlisted in British Army and sent to Windsor. N. S. With 
British Army of Occupation. Claims to be youngest American in Allied service. 

OLIVER, WALTER, Private. British Army. Entered service October 19, 
1917. With British Expeditionary Forces. 

PILL, WILLIAM H., Private, British Army. Entered service February 14, 
1918. 

PRATT, FREDERICK C, Private, British Army. Entered service January 
13, 1918. Stationed in Canada. 

PROVOST, LUCIEN E., Sergeant-Major, Canadian Army. Entered service 
in 1915. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Was previously a corporal in the 
United States service. 

QLTINN, JAMES, Private, Canadian Engineers. With Canadian Expeditionary 
Forces. 

READ, FRED W., Lance Corporal, British Army. Entered service in May, 
1916. With British Expeditionary Forces. 

RAMSAY, DAVID, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in December, 
1915. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action in October, 1917. 
Was previously with United States Forces at the Mexican border. 

SANSOUCY, VALMORE, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service February 
4, 1918. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

18 

S 



274 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

SAVILLE, JAMES, Private, British Army. Entered service March 1, 1918, 
With British Expeditionary Forces. 

SAVOY, JOHN A., Private, French Army. Entered service in 1916. With the 
American Ambulance Corps w^ith the French Army. 

SHRUOFFENGER, CHARLES, Private, French Army. Entered service in 
1914. With 49th French Territorials. 

SHEARD, ARTHUR, Lance Corporal, British Army. Entered service in 1915. 
With British E.xpeditionary Forces. Cited for bravery and awarded War Medal. 

SHIELS, H. M., Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1915. With 

Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

SIMS, WILLIAM J., Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in September, 
3 918. Stationed in Canada. 

SLOSS, JAMES, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1915. With 
Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

SMITH, JAMES, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service October 19, 1917. 
Vv'ith Canadian Expeditionary Forces. 

SxMITH, THOMAS, Private, British Army. Entered service February 9, 1918, 
at Holyoke Recruiting Mission. 

STEWART, DAVID, Private, Black Watch. Entered service in 1915. With 
British Expeditionary Forces in Egypt. 

STOCK, WILLIAM, Blacksmith, British Army. Entered service April 20, 
1918. 

SULLIVAN, TIMOTHY, Private, British Army. Entered service June 12, 
1918. 

THO?.IPSON, ROBERT, Private, British Army. Entered service February 9, 
1918, at Holyoke Recruiting Mission. 

TONDRE, FERNAND, Private, French Army. Entered service in 1914. With. 
French Army in France. Awarded War Medal for bravery. 

TONDRE, FRANK, Private, French Army. Entered service September 16, 

1914. With 170th Regiment of Infantry. Gassed in action. 

TONDRE, JOSEPH, Private, French Army. Entered service in 1914. With 
French Army in France. 

TRINNELL, CHARLES F., Engineer, Canadian Army. Entered service in 

1915. With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

WALTON, JAMES, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1916. With 
Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action October 9, 1918. 

WATRAS, WILLIAM J., Sergeant, Polish Army. Recruiting duty in Hol- 
yoke. 

WEIR, HUGH, Lance Corporal, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1915. 
With Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. Cited and decorated 
for bravery. 

WIG<}LESWORTH, FRED, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 
1915. With British Transport service. Transferred to the Indian Cavalry. Er- 
roneously reported dead. 

WILLIAMSON, CECIL, Private, British Army. With British Expeditionary 
Forces. 

WILSON, WILLIAM, Private, British Army. Entered service February 14, 
1918. 

WILSON, WILLIAM, Private, Canadian Engineers. Entered service Septem- 
ber 18, 1918. 

YELLE, RAOUL, Private, Canadian Army. Entered service in 1915. With 
Canadian Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action in March, 1918. 

YOUNG, ROBERT T., Private, British Army. Entered service February 14, 
1918. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 275 

Holyoke Student Army Training Corps 

AHERN, JAMES A., Holy Cross College. 

ALDERMAN, KARL, University of Vermont. 

ALLYN, HENRY, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

BAIL, OSCAR, Boston University. 

BALL, CHARLES, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

BIGGINS, THOMAS, Holy Cross College. 

BOBER, HERMAN, Boston University. 

BOBER, STANLEY, Holy Cross College. 

BOND, RAYMOND, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

BRENNAN, RALPH, Amherst College. 

BRESNAHAN, JOHN, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

BYRNES, JAMES E., Tufts College. (Naval Unit.) 

BYRNES, JOHN J., Tufts Dental College. 

CASSY, JOHN, Worcester Institute of Technology. 

CHILSON, BERTON, Amherst College. 

CLAYTON, MARTIN, Holy Cross College. 

COOK, RALPH, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

CRANE, DOIVnNIC, Lehigh University. 

DAY, ROBERT, Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute. 

DAVIS, WILBERT E., Springfield Y. M. C. A. College. 

DESJARDINS, SILVIO P., University of Vermont. 

DONOGHUE, WILLIAM J., Amherst College. 

DOWD, DENNIS, Catholic University. 

DOWD, HENRY, Holy Cross College. 

DUDLEY, EDWARD, Holy Cross College. 

PARRELL, HAROLD, Holy Cross College. 

FEINSTEIN, MONTE, University of Pennsylvania. 

FELGENTRAGER, RICHARD, Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute. 

FITZGERALD, BERNARD, Catholic University. 

FITZGERALD, WILLIAM, Tufts College. 

FOLEY, JOHN, Boston University. 

FORHAM, JOHN, Boston University. 

GAGE, LEONARD, Tufts College. 

GAUSANGE, ROBERT, Boston University. 

GOEHRING, WALTER R., Yale College. 

GORDON, EDWARD, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

GRANFIELD, MICHAEL T., Amherst College. 

GREENSPAN, ISRAEL, Harvard College. 

HAGGERTY, THOMAS, Holy Cross College. 

HARRINGTON, RICHARD, Cornell University. 

HEALEY, ALDEN, Union Institute. 

HEFFRON, Holy Cross College. 

HICKEY, JOHN, Holy Cross College. 

HORNE, EDGAR, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

HUNTER, ROBERT, Syracuse University, 

HUTCHINS, ARTHUR J., Tufts College. 

JOHNSON, IRVING, Holy Cross College. 

JOYCE, LEO, Holy Cross College. 

KALLOCH, SAMUEL, Springfield Y. M. C. A. College. 



276 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

KEATING, WILMAM, Massachusetts Agircultural College. 

KELLEY, JOSEPH, Holy Cross College. 

KING, GEORGE W., Amherst College. 

LAPORTE, RUDOLPH, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

LAPPIN, JOHN, Holy Cross College. 

LYONS, WILLIAM, Lehigh University. 

McCarthy, EUGENE, Harvard College. 

McGOLDBRICK, BARRY, Holy Cross College. 

McLEAN, WILLIAM, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

McNERNY, FRANCIS, Holy Cross College. 

MAHONEY, STEPHEN, Harvard College. 

MAINVILLE, ALBERT, Amherst College. 

MARTIN, DANIEL, Holy Cross College. 

MARTIN, JOHN, Holy Cross College. 

MARTIN, LEO F., Amherst College. 

MENARD, ALFRED, University of Vermont. 

MENARD, OSCAR, Holy Cross College. 

MERRIMAN, JOHN, Union College. 

MORIARTY, DANIEL, Boston University. 

MORIARTY, JOHN, JR., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

MULLEN, JAMES, University of Pennsylvania. 

MURPHY, FRANCIS, Holy Cross College. 

NEWELL, EDWARD T., Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

O'CONNELL, RAYMOND, Amherst College. 

O'CONNOR, CHARLES, Tufts College. 

O'CONNOR, JAMES, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

O'DONNELL, RAYMOND J., Amherst College. 

O'ROURE, EDWARD, Yale College. 

O'SHEA, EDWARD J., Dartmouth College. 

PERKINS, SUMNER, Harvard College. 

PERRAULT, OSCAR, Amherst College. 

POLAND, BURDETTE, Boston University. 

QUIGLEY, JOSEPH, Boston College. 

RILEY, JOHN, Holy Cross College. 

ROHAN, JAMES P., Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

SCHIEBEL, JULIUS A., Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

SCOTT, WALTER, Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute. 

SHEA, AMBROSE, Catholic University. 

SHEA, THOMAS F., Amherst College. 

SHEA, TIMOTHY, Holy Cross College. 

SHEA, W^ILLIAM F., Amherst College. 

SHEEHAN, RAYMOND F., Tufts College. 

SHELDON, BURDETTE, Amherst College. 

SHINE, WILLIAM, University of Vermont. 

SIEBEL, JOHN J., Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

SMALL, K. LESTER, Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute. 

SMITH, WALLACE F., Amherst College. 

STEDMAN, RALPH, Amherst College. 

STEINERT, HERMAN, Springfield Y. M. C. A. College. 

SULLIVAN, TIMOTHY, Holy Cross College. 

SWORDS, FRANK, Catholic University. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 277 



TAYIiOR, JOHN, Colgate Naval Unit. 

TAYLOR, SIDNEY, Tufts College. 

TETLER, LOYALL, Boston University. 

THOMAS, HOWARD, Boston University. 

TOWNE, HERBERT, Yale College. 

VALENTINE, JOSEPH, Syracuse University. 

VIENS, RENE, Boston University. 

WEINBERG, CHARLES, Amherst College. 

WEINBERG, MAX, Amherst College. 

WELSH, GEORGE, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

WESLEY, WALTER F„ University of Pennsylvania. 

WTLHEIM, ROBERT C, University of Vermont. 



Holyoke Men in War Work 



AIRMAN, H. DUNCAN, War Correspondent, France. 

ALLEN, EDWARD L., War Work, Baltimore, Md. 

BAGG, AARON C, Y. M. C. A., France. 

BEMAN, B. W., Y. M. C. A., United States. 

BOND, WILLIAM, War Work, United States. 

BOWER, JAMES, Y. M. C. A., France. 

BRADY, JAMES H., Machine Gun Instructor, France. 

COAR, REV. A. H., Y. M. C. A., France. 

CROSBY, ROY R., Y. M. C. A., France. 

DEYO, GEORGE, JR., War Department, Newport News, Va. 

DIXON, EARL, War Department, England. 

DOWD, THOMAS, Knights of Columbus, France. 

DOLAN, REV. E. B., Y. M. C. A., United States. 

ELY, HAROLD J., Y. M. C. A., France. 

FLETCHER, ALEX, Y. M. C. A., France. 

FOLEY, JOHN, War Department, Washington, D. C. 

FRANZ, FRED, War Department, New York. 

GARVAN, FRANCIS P., Bureau of Investigation, Washington. D. C. 

HANCOCK, WILLIAM, War Department, Washington, D. C. 

HANNUM, REV. H. O., Y. M. C. A., United States. 

HAY, HAROLD T., War Department, Washington, D. C. 

HEATH, H. W., War Department, Washington, D. C. 

HOWE, REV. H. B., Y. M. C. A., France. 

HOWES, PAUL S., Ordnance Department, Washington, D. C. 

HUMESTON, EDWARD J., Y. M. C. A., United States. 

KELLEY, THOMAS J., Knights of Columbus, Camp Lee, Va. 

KNIGHT, HOMER L., Diplomatic Service, Mexico. 

LEONARD, RUSSELL B., War Department, Wilmington, Del. 

LEWIS, GEORGE S., Saw Mill Unit, Scotland. 

McCOY, WILLIAM, Machine Gun Instructor, France. 

McLaughlin, ALLAN a., Y. M. C. a., France. 

MASON, PETER E., Shipping Board, Portsmouth, N. H. 

METCALFE, G. WARNER, Y. M. C. A., Camp Dix, N. J. 

MOQUIN, WILLIA3I, War Department, Washington, D. C. 



278 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

MORSE, WILLIAM A., Y. M. C. A., United States. 

NORTON, WILLIAM R., Knights of Columbus, Washington, D. C. 

O'CONNOR, FRANK D., War Department, Nitro, W. Va. 

O'DONNELL, DR. FRANK J., Knights of Columbus, France. 

PETERSON, MAGNUS F., Y. M. C. A., United States. 

PROVENCHER, ARTHUR P., Y. M. C. A, France. 

PURRINGTON, E. C, Y. M. C. A., France. 

REARDON, GEORGE F., Knights of Columbus, France. 

ROSE, ALBERT, Y. M. C. A., United States. 

SCANLON, GEORGE J., Reconstruction Work, United States. 

SHEEHAN, JOHN, Knights of Columbus, France. 

SIMPSON, JAMES, Y. M. C. A., France. 

SIMMONDS, GEORGE E., Y. M. C. A., France. 

TAYLOR, ARTHUR, Y. M. C. A., United States. 

TETLOW, LEWIS J., Aeroplane Inventor, Dayton, Ohio. 

THORPE, HENRY A., War Department, Bristol, Pa. 

WICKS, REV. R. R., Y. M. C. A., France. 



Holyoke Women in Service 

YEOWOMEN — NAVY. 

ANDERSON, ELIZABETH V., Hampton Roads, Va. 
ANDERSON, MARY, Hampton Roads, Va. 
O'CONNELL, FRANCIS G., Boston Navy Yard. 
O'CONNELL, HAZEL, Newport Naval Station. 
PEARSONS, CORA, Charlestown Navy Yard. 
SAFFORD, RUTH, Newport Navy Yard. 
SCHENKER, ELSIE A., Charlestown Navy Yard. 
NURSES — ARMY. 

BACH, LULU M., Camp Servier, S. C, and Camp Lee, Va. 

BADER, HELEN, Camp Jackson, S. C, and Camp Devens. 

BEAN, SARAH V., Evacuation Hospital No. 3, France. 

BLAIR, CHARLOTTE J., Base Hospital No. 86, France. 

BOYD, GLADYS M., (not called). 

BRAY, BEULAH F., (not called). 

BUCKLEY, EVA C, (not called). 

BURNS, OLIVE R., Roosevelt Hospital, New York. 

CANAVAN, AGNES C, Camp Jackson, S. C. 

CARROLL, AGNES, Camp Jackson, S. C. 

CHRISTIANSEN, ELLEN, (not called). 

CLARKE, GRACE, St. Vincent's Hospital, New York. 

CLEARY, MAYBELLE L., (not called). 

CLEVELAND, DOROTHY, Camp Upton, L. I. 

OONROY, JULIA, France. 

DAZELLE, AGNES M., (not called). 

DICKINSON, MARION, (not called). 

DOANE, HATTIE B., France. 

DOHERTY, ETHEL, Home Service. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 279 

DONOVAN, VIVIAN J., (not called). 

DWYER, JOSEPHINE, Camp Servier, S. C. 

EVANS, HYACINTHE V., (not called). 

FITZGERALD, ELIZABETH R., Camp Stewart, Va. ; France. 

FRAZER, KATE M., (not called). 

GERAN, MARY C, Camp Devens and Camp Jackson, S. C. 

GRAVES, RETA M., (not called). 

GREGORY, MARY A., Camp Devens. 

HITOHMY, SOPHIA, France. 

HOGAN, KATHERINE F., Camp Devens and Camp Jackson, S. C. 

HUGHES, CLARA, France. 

JOHNSTON, ANNA E., Camp Devens. 

JOYCE, MARTHA, France. ' 

KENNEDY, JOSEPHINE, Camp Jackson, S. C. 

KENNEDY, MINNIE, Camp Upton, L. I. 

KNAPP, RUTH A. (second lieutenant), Boston. 

LAMPHIER, WINIFRED, (second lieutenant), Canadian Expeditionary 

Forces. 
LEE, MARGARET, France. 

LIPPMAN, CARRIE, Camp Devens and Camp Jackson, S. C. 

MCDONALD, MATHILDA, Camp Lee, Va. 

McKEE, MARGARET L., (not called). 

McKAY, MARY J., France. 

McKILLOP, MARGARET, Camp Devens and Camp Jackson, S. C. 

McNAUGHT, ROSE, Camp Devens. 

MacDERMOTT, MAE, France. 

MACKAY, MARY, France. 

MACLAREN, ELIZABETH J., Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. 

MORIARTY, MARGARET, Boston. 

MURPHY, MARY K., Boston. 

MURPHY, LILLIAN, Boston. 

NUGENT, KATHERINE, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

O'CONNOR, MARGARET, France. 

O'NEILL, MARY, Camp Devens. 

OLSON, AGNES, Camp Devens and Camp Jackson, S. C. 

OSBORNE, LELIA, Camp Meade, Md. 

PATRICK, ISABELLE J., Camp Devens. 

PERCY, DORA MARY, (not called). 

PERRIN, JESSIE L., Camp Devens. 

PHILLIPS, GERTRUDE, Camp Jackson, S. C. 

PIERCE, INA, Base Hospital No. 3. France. 

QLTINN, KATHERINE, France. 

RAE, CHRISTINE L., Camp Jackson, S. C. 

RAFUSE, ELLA, France. 

RILEY, DELIA M., Camp Servier, S. C. 

ROBBINS, FRANCES M., Camp Devens. 

ROBINSON, RHEA, Medford Hospital, Mass. 

ROSS, CHRISTINE, Evacuation Hospital No. 12, France. 

STREET, FLORENCE, General Hospital No. 1, New York. 

SZETELA, JOSEPHINE, Boston City Hospital. 

WALSH, ANNA, Camp Devens and Camp Jackson, S. C. 



280 IIoLYOKE In The Great War. 

WAKREN, IRMA, Camp Jackson, S. C. 
WILLIAMS, RUTH, France. 
VVILSOX, AGNES F., Camp Lakewood, N. J. 
WILSON, MARY, France. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

AHERN, ELLEN, Civilian Relief, Holyoke. 
ARNOLD, ELIZABETH, War Department, Washington, D. C. 
BEGLEY, KATHERINE, Telephone, Camp Devens. 
BENGSTON, ESTHER, War Department, Washington, D. C. 
BIGELOW, ELIZABETH, Civilian Relief, Holyoke. 
BRENNAN, HELEN, Bureau of Mines, Washington, D. C. 
BROWN, GERTRUDE, Munition Plant, Woodbury, N. J. 
BUDD, MABEL, British Navy Corps, England. 
BURKE, ANNA I., National War Work Council, France. 
BURItE, BESSIE, Hut Work, France. 
CADIEUX, AGNES, Catholic War Council, France. 
CALLAHAN, CLARA, Red Anchor, France. 
CALLAHAN, MARY, Signal Corps, Washington, D. C. 

CASSIDY, MABEL M., Bureau of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 
CHAPIN, JULIA, Y. W. C. A., Brest, France. 
CHAPUT, ERNESTINE, Telephone (not called). 
CHASE, LAURA, Red Cross Missionary, Siberia. 

CICCKI, ROSE, Red Cross, Italy. 

CLARK, MARION E., Y. W. C. A., Russia. 

COWIE, ELIZABETH, Civilian Relief, Holyoke. 

CRANE, JULIA, War Department, Washington, D. C. 

CURLEY, JENNIE, War Department, Washington, D. C. 

DONOGHUE, ANNA, War Department, Washington, D. C. 

DONOGHUE, i^lARY, Civilian Relief, Holyoke. 

DUPHINS, IRENE, Telephone, France. 

FORBES, MINA, Engineering Department, Navy, Washington, D. C. 

GILLIGAN, BERTHA E., War Department," Washington, D. C. 

GREELEY, MARY, War Department, Washington, D. C. 

GREELEY, MOLLIE W., Emergency Fleet, France. 

HARDING, ROSE, Telephone, Camp Devens. 

HAYTON, EFFIE, War Department, Washington, D. C. 

HAYWARD, ELEANOR, Social War Work, Smith College. 

KIRKPATRICK, REGINA, War Department, Washington, D. C. 

KNIGHT, ELLEN T., Civilian Relief, Holyoke. 

McTEAMAN, ETHEL, Civilian Relief, Holyoke. 

MANLEY, MAE, Red Anchor, France. 

MOREAU, RHEA D., Telephone (not called). 

O'CONNOR, ALICE, War Industries Board, Washington, D. C. 

PRENTISS, BERTHA, Y. W. C. A., Quantico, Va. 

SKINNER, BELLE, Village Reconstruction, France. 

SKINNER, RUTH, Y. W. C. A., France. 

STEIGER, MRS. PHILIP, Y. W. C. A., France. 
SULLIVAN, MARGARET, Red Cross, France. 

TATRO, LENA, Chief of Engineers' Office, Washington, D. C. 

THOMPSON, MARY, Telephone, Camp Devens. 
TIERNEY, THERESA, Telephone, Camp Devens. 
WILLIAMS, FLORENCE, Y. W. C. A., New York. 

WHITMORE, KATE, Agricultural Department, Washington, D. C. 



How the 104th Won Its Cross 



Hereos of Apremont, Victors at Belleau Wood, Cutters of the 
St. Mihiel Salient— A Record of Valor 



J^]-^ EROES of Apremont— the 104th Infantry Regiment— men who made a 

wJ bloody sacrifice and won gallant victories at Belleau Wood and helped 

^^^ to make immortal history in cutting the St. Mihiel salient, have their deeds 

officially recorded in a literary work which has been compiled and from 

■which this story is taken. 

FIRST TO BE DECORATED 

The official history was brought back home by the regiment when it landed 
in Boston April 11, 1919. In great detail the movements of the 104th are followed 
in the original. All the engagements and battles in which the dauntless men of 
this unit took part are pictured, particularly Apremont at Bois Brule, where the 
regiment won great honor by having its colors decorated by a commanding general 
of a French army corps — first decoration of any American regiment by a foreign 
power and first battle of the war in which American troops were successful with- 
out allied aid. 

The story of the 104th Infantry is a thriller. Every line of it is interesting 
to any American, but particularly to those of the blood and kin of the men who 
made up this fighting regiment. 

OLD 2D, 6TH AND sTH 

The old Second and Eighth National Guard Regiments, units from the Sixth 
Regiment and a detachment of new draft men from Camp Devens were used to 
make up the 104th U. S. Infantry, 26th Division, which was formed at Westfield 
on August 25, 1917. The month of September was used in perfecting the new 
organization, drilling and preparing for immediate sailing to France. 

Four companies of the regiment, Companies F, I, L and M, were the first 
to start for France, though not the first to arrive there. They left Camp Bartlett 
on September 25, entrained for Montreal, from there sailed to Halifax, and arrived 
in that port just too late to enter a convoy. These units remained aboard ship, 
anchored in Halifax Harbor, for a whole week. The passage across was unevent- 
ful, except for a three days' storm, and the units were landed in Liverpool Octo- 
ber 17. 

REACH FRANCE OCTOBER 24 
Entraining, they reached Borden at 5 o'clock the next morning, were met by 
an English band and escorted to Oxney Camp, where they stayed until October 23. 
Then they were off to Southampton, across the channel and to Havre, where they 
landed — in France — on the morning of October 24. 



282 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

But Colonel William C. Hayes and staiif, headquarters and supply company 
and machine gun company, who left camp back in Westfield on September 26, a 
day after the others, were in France first. They had sailed from New York on 
the 27th, arrived in Liverpool on October 9, and were in Havre the 17th, a whole 
week ahead of the four companies which had first left Camp Bartlett. 

IN REST CAMPS AT MONTH'S END 

Companies E, G and K and the 101st Ammunition Train left camp October 2, 
sailed from New York the 3d, arrived in Liverpool the 17th and were in Havre 
the 22d, also in advance of the four companies which started first. The last four 
units of the 104th, Companies A, B, C, D and H, left camp October 4, arrived in 
Montreal October 5, sailed from Halifax and arrived in Liverpool October 23. They 
were in France, at Havre, on the 29th. All were in rest camps by the end of the 
month. 

Regimental headquarters, headquarters company, machine gun company, supply 
company and the 2d battalion were billeted in Harreville, the 3d battalion in Pom- 
pierre, and the 1st battalion in Sartes. 

TO THE FRONT O'N FEBRUARY 5 

For three months the regiment trained with the 151st French Infantry. On 
February 5 the regiment entrained at Liffol-le-Grand for its first war service. Sois- 
sons was reached the next day and on that afternoon the 2d battalion started its 
march to the front lines. War was a reality at last for these sons of Western 
Massachusetts, the men of the "Farmer Regiment," who had traditions and high 
honors to uphold. 

The first few days were without incident, and on the 12th, Lincoln's Birthday, 
Lieutenant Dexter of H Company went out on the first patrol with a party of 
French officers and men. He took with him Corporals Donabedian and Lowell and 
Privates Moreau, LeDuc and O'Leary. They crossed No Man's Land to the Boche 
wire, examined the terrain for listening posts and returned without mishap after 
accomplishing their mission. 

Two days later the first prisoners were captured, the first prisoners of the regi- 
ment and of the Yankee Division. They were taken in a fight with a Boche patrol 
on No Man's Land by Lieutenant Brown, Sergeant O'Leary, Sergeant Letzing, 
Corporal Bedard and Privates Bonneau and Heppler. The next day Colonel Tayler, 
commanding the 19th French Infantry, bestowed the Croix de Guerre on Lieutenant 
Brown and Sergeant Letzing. 

The first man of the regiment to make the final sacrifice was Private George 
G. Clark of F Company. He was killed during a heavy harassing fire on the Bois 
Quincy, laid down by the enemy on the night of February 17. A similar barrage 
was sent over two evenings later, and the first attack of importance, in which 80 
Huns took part, was routed. 

COLONEL HAYES RELIEVED 

All units of the regiment had their baptism of fire on this front for 10 days, 
during which time the casualties officially were: Killed in action, 1; wounded, 21; 
gassed, 4; accidents, 11; sick, 190. 

From there they marched four days to the new area around Rimacourt. By 
this time Colonel Hayes had been relieved of command, under circumstances which 
are generally well known. The new commander was Colonel George H. Shelton, 
a West Pointer, whose home is in Seymour, Conn. The regiment reached its rest 
area March 27, and plans were under way for getting back into condition after 42 
days in the trenches at the Chemin des Dames. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. , 283 

BY MOTOR TRUCKS 

Leaves were expected for the men and officers, but the big drive of the Germans 
made it necessary for the allies to put every available man into the fight, and the 
104th was placed under the command of the 32d French Army Corps and ordered 
to take over a section of the Toul front. 

By motor trucks the regiment was transported to that part of the battlefront. 
The Third Battalion took its place at Bois Brule, Apremont. The First Battalion 
went to Brisaurd. The Second Battalion was held in reserve at Vignot. 

GIVEN POST OF HONOR TO' HOLD 

Of the whole defensive system the ridge at Bois Brule was the keystone. It 
had to be held at all cost. It was the "Post of Honor" as the French called it. 
Day by day the artillery fire became more severe, and from the 6th to the 9th of 
April became an almost continuous bombardment. 

The famous attack began on the morning of the 10th. The listening post dis- 
covered their approach and a barrage signal was promptly answered and with 
machine gun and rifle fire their attack was , completely broken up. The Yankee 
artillery hammered their positions mercilessly for the rest of the morning. The 
Boche reciprocated, making the wood a perfect hell-hole. Prisoners taken by our 
men said that 800 picked men had made the attack against the Americans. The 
Hun losses had been very severe. 

ATTACK IN FORCE ON 12TH 

Yet the Americans felt the Hun would return to the attack so the Third Bat- 
talion was ordered back to Vignot for reserve and were replaced by the Second 
Battalion that night, under terrific shell fire. 

On the 11th at night the enemy shelling attained the violence of drum-fire and 
under a rolling barrage the Hun attacked in force at 4.30 on the morning of the 12th. 

The attack extended across the entire battalion front into the sector on the left 
held by the 33d French Colonials to the right held by Company F, left front by 
Company E, and Companies H and G in support. The French were driven back 
on the left. Company E's flank was attacked front, flank and rear and driven in 
on the center. 

SUPPORT GETS INTO ACTION. 

Company G's right had been driven in when the support platoons of Companies 
E and F got into action, re-establishing Company E's right. Company F made a 
new disposition and their left was reinforced by a platoon from Company H, com- 
manded by Lieutenant Knight, who was killed later leading his men in a counter 
attack. 

Lieutenant Wilcox of the machine gun company took a group of Company E 
men and with another bunch from Company F under Lieutenant Edmunds attacked 
the Boche who were in a deserted trench in front of the battalion. The Boches 
were driven out and 24 prisoners taken, 16 of whom were from the 16th Uhlans. 
Three machine guns were also captured. All the while the most terrific fire from 
the Yankee batteries was sweeping No Man's Land and the enemy was seeking 
every possible safety in shell holes. 

RESCUE FRENCH POSITION 
The remainder of the morning the fighting continued but the enemy at na 
time and no place succeeded in entering the lines of the 104th. A platoon from 
Company G reinforced the left of Company E and by sharp fighting through the 



284 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

smashed-up trenches went to the rescue of the French position. Captain Connelly 
especially distinguished himself in getting aid to the French which they had 
asked for. 

All day the fight went on. It was one of the fiercest of the war. Two hours 
after midnight — the 13th — G Company, again attacked, going through the Boche 
front line and driving them out. That ended all infantry action on the part of 
the enemy, but the artillery and minenwerfer continued to harass the position 
held by the Massachusetts boys. 

RELIEVED BY THE 103D 

Relief came in the form of the 103d Infantry — those boys from Maine, New 
Hampshire and Vermont — on the next day, and the 104th went into reserve at 
Aulnois Vertuzey and Camp La Rehanne in the forest de la Raine. 

During these days and nights of incessant artillery fire on every line of com- 
munication in this sector the carrying of supplies and the evacuation of the 
wounded was very nearly an impossibility, but the great courage and determination 
•of the medical detachment under the command, first of Lieutenant Kirkpatrick 
and later of Captain Dudley, of the band under command of Band Leader Dawes 
and of Father Des Valles, saved the lives of many of our wounded. 

DECORATION OF COLORS 

The story of the decoration of the colors — first and most glorious, therefore, 
of any honor bestowed upon an American army unit — is told in the official history 
in the following words : 

"On the afternoon of April 28 the entire regiment was assembled on the plains 
south of Bouq, where General Pasaga, commanding the 32d French Army Corps, 
•of which the Yankee Division was then a part, decorated the regimental flag with 
the Croix de Guerre with the following citation : 'It showed the greatest audacity 
and a fine spirit of sacrifice. Subjected to very violent bombardments and attacked 
by large German forces, it succeeded in checking the dangerous advance and took 
at the point of the bayonet in a most dangerous way prisoners and some demolished 
trenches from which they had fallen back at the first assault.' After decorating 
the flag General Pasaga decorated 119 officers and men of the regiment who had 
distinguished themselves by conspicuous bravery during the action of April 10-13 
at Bois Brule. The 104th Infantry has the honor of being the first American regi- 
ment decorated by a foreign power and also the honor of fighting and winning the 
first big fight in which American troops fought without the aid of our allies in 
this war." 

ON MOVE FROM APRIL 20 TO JUNE 30 

From April 20 until June 30 the regiment was kept on the move from one 
point to another, relieving this unit, then that, taking part in raids, withstanding 
attacks and heavy artillery fire, but none of it compared with the fight at Apremont. 

During this period they were in the rear of the 102d' at Seicheprey, but were 
not needed. On May 1 they went to the relief of the 101st at Raulecourt remaining 
in that sector until the 13th of the month, when they were relieved by the 103d. 

The regiment then became divisional reserve, with the First Battalion head- 
quarters at Royaumeix, and during the long-range bombardment of the rear areas 
on Sunday, June 16, Chaplain Danker was mortally wounded and Colonel Shelton 
slightly wounded. The losses on that morning alone were 15 killed and 7 wounded. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 285 

MOVE TO NEW SECTOR 

After a short period of service at Bruley and Orley and neighboring towns 
around Toul, the regiment got ready for movement to another sector, and on June 
30 m.arched to Foug, where the regiment entrained. 

During this period the losses of the regiment were: Killed, 74; wounded, 181; 
gassed, 13; accidents, 38; prisoners, 2; sick, 912. The regiment reached La Ferte- 
sous Jouarre July 1. 

Officers of the First Battalion reconnoitered Bois de Belleau on the next day, 
and on the big day — Fourth of July — went into the front lines of Belleau Wood. 
The big battle was not far off; the great sacrifices of these sterling fighters from 
Western Massachusetts, from Springfield, Holyoke, Northampton, Worcester, Green- 
field, Orange and others were soon to come. 

COLONEL FOOTE IN COMMAND 

Here the regiment was subjected to heavy enemy fire on all lines of communi- 
cations and positions all day and night. There were no trenches, no shelters, just 
holes dug by the men holding their position. Food and supplies were carried to 
the front lines at night under the greatest difficulty. It was a question of "pulling 
the belt tight and hanging on." 

On July IG Colonel Shelton was relieved of his command, advanced to the 
rank of brigadier-general and placed in command of the 51st Infantry Brigade. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Alfred F. Foote of Holyoke took command of the regiment. He 
was the leader of the regiment during all of the terrific fighting soon to come, 
during all of the bloody and courageous days of Belleau Wood. 

BELLEAU THE OBJECTIVE. 

The day after Colonel Foote took command he was ordered to report to brigade 
headquarters. There plans were for an attack to be made at 4.35 o'clock July 18. 
The objective for the third battalion was the town of Belleau, then the railroad 
tracks on the north side of the town, and lastly the town of Givray. 

K Company of the 3d Battalion was in quarantine at the time and D Company 
of the 1st Battalion was ordered to take its place. D Company was unable, due 
to the distance and blocked condition of the roads, to join the attacking battalion 
on time. 

ACROSS WHEAT FIELD 

It was a dark night, raining, when the battalion started forward at 1.30 in the 
morning to take its position. Being unfamiliar with the ground' they were unable 
to reach the jumping off place in time for attack, so the men, under command of 
Major Lewis of the 2d Battalion, attacked across a wheat field, H Company taking 
the place of D Company, which had failed to report. 

Company M did great work to the right of the town, H Company pushed 
through and cleaned out the right of the town, the enemy running away without 
putting up a fight. T Company cleaned the left of the town, then all advanced and 
M Company cleaned out the town of Givray. By 9 o'clock the battalion was set 
and all objectives taken. 

ENTIRE REAR A HELL AREA 
The Boche shelled these positions heavily. The wheat field between Belleau 
and Bois de Belleau and the entire rear area was a hell-area. All telephone lines 
were out of order. Out of 22 runners used in trying to get a message through to 
Major Lewis, five were killed and 12 wounded. Private Roy of H Company finally 
got through, for which he later received a distinguished service cross. 



286 HoLYOKE In The GrexVt War. 

D Company had arrived and took up a position. Then followed the attacks on 
Hill 193 and Hill 190. Days of fighting, without let up followed, during which 
attacks were repulsed and made. It was fierce. Then came the concentrated 
attack on these hills. All four regiments of the Yankee Division and the 167th 
French Division took part. 

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS' PLUCK 

During the advance, Captain Phillips, in command of the First Battalion, was 
mortally wounded, but insisted on being carried forward on a stretcher until his 
battalion made their objective and he had received messages from his company 
commanders that they were all set in their positions and he had given them their 
orders. 

Then only did he allow the men to carry him to the rear where he died two 
days later. In his death the regiment lost one of the bravest and finest officers it 
ever had. 

72 HOURS WITHOUT FOOD 

The attack had been successful, and pursuit of the enemy began, the Third 
Battalion going through Prugny and Epieds to La Croix Rouge Fme. There was 
fighting much of the way, gas was heavy and the men had to wear their masks. 
They faced murderous machine gun nests and silenced them. For 72 hours without 
food and with only shell-hole water to drink, the men of the regiment and brigade 
were happy when the work they had done was turned over to the care of the 56th 
Brigade. 

The division had gained 17J^ kilometres, and the losses of the 104th were: 
Killed, 130; wounded, 876; prisoners, 13; missing, 17; sick, 567. 

SIX MONTHS' RIGOROUS DUTY 

July 30 the regiment started for the rear and went into billets around La Ferte 
to reorganize and be re-equipped. Changes were made in the list of officers and 
many replacements were received. Within a few days the regiment had three new 
commanders, first. Colonel Hobbs, then Colonel Major and then Colonel McCaskey. 
While there some of the officers and men received 48-hour passes to visit Paris, 
the first leaves granted since arrival in France. 

On August 13 the regiment marched 17 kilometres to Trilpourt, entrained and 
went into a rear area, detraining near Chatillon-sur-Seine, and hiking from there 
to Ampilly, where the first rest and relief from fighting was in order since Febru- 
ary 6 — just six months of rigorous duty. 

ON TO ST. MIHIEL 

Leaves were being planned for and long schedules of training and maneuvres 
were out, but leaves were cancelled on August 27 and the regiment was ordered 
to move. A train ride to Ligny, near Bar-sur-Aube, was the new jump, which was 
followed by a series of night marches. The men rested in the woods each day 
until the night of September 6 they arrived in the woods in the rear of the trenches 
around Les Esparges. The regiment remained bivouacked in these woods until the 
night of September 11, during which time the positions were reconnoitered in prep- 
aration for the attack to take place on "D Day at H Hour." 

St. Mihiel — that was the impending struggle. The world knows today what 
the fighting Americans did there. The army of the United States long ago recog- 
nized the efficiency of the 104th Regiment and the part it took in cutting across 
the salient, closing it, straightening the front and capturing thousands of prisoners. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 287 

COLO'NEL CHEATHAM IN COMMAND 
In the official history of the regiment the army plans are given, how they were 
carried out with hardly a hitch though prepared in the most exacting manner to 
the smallest detail. The daring of the men was displayed prominently on this 
occasion and in the subsequent holding of Rupt and Troyon. On September 28, 
Colonel Cheatham relieved Colonel McCaskey in command of the regiment. 

Then followed the fighting around Haumont Wood on October 15, in which D 
Company played such a valiant part. It was on that front that the Germans asked 
to be allowed to surrender and on the 22d a group of them marched over in the 
night saying they had heard talk of peace and did not want to fight so close to 
the end. 

DAY OF THE ARMISTICE 

On November 8, a retreat of the enemy was noted and the advance on them 
began, proceeded successfully and without much more than engagements with 
machine gun flanking parties of the enemy. It was on November 10 that Major 
Connelly was wounded and that the 103d on the right of the Massachusetts regi- 
ment took Bois de Ville. 

The men were still going forward at 9 o'clock on November 11 — the day 
the armistice was signed — and the regimental post of command had been established 
at Beaumont when at 10.10 o'clock in the morning the following message from the 
commanding general, 52d Infantry Brigade, was received : "Hostilities will cease 
upon the entire front at 11 o'clock today, French time." This was sent by a runner 
to the two advanced battalions, and at 11 o'clock the advance stopped and positions 
of defence taken in accordance with orders. 

END OF 19 MONTHS' SERVICE 

November 12, the 104th took over the left of the divisional front line and 
patrolled the area until the 14th when it started for the rear and a long needed rest. 

Marching for eight days the men reached Dammartin and neighboring towns 
where the regiment went into billets and started to work cleaning up, reorganizing 
and training, which ultimately brought them with other divisional units to the area 
at Le Mans, then to Brest and at last to Boston, to Massachusetts and "Home" 
after 19 months' of service — almost to a day, with a record of valor, heroism and 
daring, hardly paralleled and by none surpassed. 



Lieutenant Colonel Foote's Tribute 

When Lieut. Col. Alfred F. Foote, divisional inspector of the 26th Division, 
returned to Holyoke, he said : 

"I am glad to be back with my loved ones, glad to be back to Holyoke, the 
city I love. 

"I know I voice the sentiments of all the service men of Holyoke when I say 
that we are all deeply grateful for the manner in which Holyoke has backed us 
up. I am personally grateful to all my friends who were so very kind to my little 
family during my absence. 

"In this hour of joyfulness let us not forget the sorrow in the homes where 
there is a vacant chair. 

"I realize how feeble any attempt of mine to assuage the sorrow of those whose 
loved ones made the last supreme sacrifice, but I desire to assure them that their 
boys faced the fire like veterans and died with their faces toward the enemy, fighting 
until the last breath. 

"They died for their flag in the great cause of freedom and God will have 
mercy on their souls. 

"To the mothers of Holyoke I desire to say that no braver or better soldiers 
.ever wore a uniform than your sons." 



Holyoke in the Great War 



^^ ^ ^'OR heroism of her sons on the fields of battle, for devotion to the cause by 
^w\ the people at home, for volunteer sacrifice, Holyoke made an enviable 
^^-^ ' record in the great war. No city in Massachusetts, New England or the 
country has a more illustrous war history than Holyoke. 
It is no idle boast of what Holyoke did to help in the preservation of Democracy. 
Facts and figures there are to back up every claim of what the city did in furnish- 
ing manpower, financial help and welfare work towards the great cause. 

The records show a total of 3,797 men and women in service, the highest per- 
centage of any city of Holyoke's size in the United States. There were : 

Men in Army 2665 

Men in Navy 427 

Men in S. A. T. C 112 

Allied Service 113 

Officers in Army 155 

Officers in Navy 20 

Officers in Allied Service 4 

U. S. Honor Roll 106 

Allied Honor Roll 17 

Women in Service 127 

Men, Non-active Service 51 

And this is how Holyoke backed them up with her money when the calls 
came from the Government, the Red Cross, Y. M. C. A., Knights of Columbus, 
and Salvation Army — the figures speak eloquently and impressively of the patriotic 
response to all appeals : 

Total Over 

Name of Drive. Quota Subscriptions. Subscribed. 

Salvation Army $2,000.00 $2,248.54 $248.54 

Knights of Columbus, Red Anchor 20,000.00 35,000.00 15,000.00 

1st Liberty Loan 2,460,000.00 2.713,050.00 $253,050.00 

2nd Liberty Loan, minimum 2,840,000.00 

Maximum 4,680,000.00 4,159,250.00 1,119,250.00 

3d Liberty Loan 2,222,300.00 2.934,500.00 712,200.00 

4th Liberty Loan 4,455,000.00 6,061,150.00 1,606,150.00 

Y. M. C. A., Red Triangle 75,000.00 112,000.00 37,000.00 

1st Red Cross '100,000.00 104,000.00 4,000.00 

2nd Red Cross 90,000.00 189,000.00 99,000.00 

United War Work 70,000.00 227,486.70 161,515.55 

Red Cross Membership 7,500.00 8,500.00 1,000.00 

The deeds of Holyoke's sons and daughters in the service are recounted on 
other pages and their names will always occupy places of the highest honor in the 
history of the country. Of the deeds of those at home, their contributions to 
various causes, tell in some measure of what they did — but not all. On the farms, 



HoLYOKE In The Great "War. 289 

in the factories, and in the homes — the army behind the army, "over there'' and 
"over here," rendered perhaps a less thrilling but a no less important service to 
the country. These men and women, boys and girls, who made up this second 
arm}', were moved by the same courageous spirit and were animated by the same 
will to win as those heroes in the first line trenches. 

Holyoke's national guardsmen were in the first increments of American soldiers 
to arrive in France — their history is gloriously written in the records of the 26th — 
the Yankee Division. When the first call came for volunteers Holyoke was ready 
and into the army and navy the young men flocked. Here again official records 
back up the claims that the percentage of enlistments led all other places. Then 
came the calls under the selective service law and again was the splendid clean-cut 
manhood of Holyoke responsive. They were quick and eager to adapt themselves 
to the rudiments of modern warfare and in the training camps they were promoted 
with rapidity, many later winning commissions. On all fronts in France they were 
to be found in the Allied armies and they roamed the seas on fighting craft and 
on merchant ship seeking and defying the German submarine menace. 

The boys were sent away with a smile — they were told that Holyoke would 
not forget them — Holyoke would stand by them — and Holyoke kept its promise. 
The mother, father, brother, sister, wife, children and sweetheart, with eyes dimmed 
with tears, took fresh courage knowing that Holyoke was behind their loved ones 
to the end. It was little wonder then that the boys left the city in the same splendid 
morale that permeated the entire United States army and navy and brought the 
finish to Germany's dream of a world empire. With them went Holyoke nurses, 
Holyoke physicians and Holyoke welfare workers. 

Holyoke hustled every minute while the boys were fighting; the women knitted 
and sewed for the Red Cross, they labored long hours willingly to provide for the 
men in trench and camp ; they gathered clothing for the Belgians and refugees of 
Northern France ; those at home contributed money, smokes and delicacies and many 
other comforts for those in service ; they got along without sugar, used less flour 
and meat and stinted their daily food supply in order to help Uncle Sam in the 
great work of feeding the allies. They saved gasoline, sacrificed automobile riding 
for pleasure. In the mills the wheels and spindles and other instruments of 
machinery buzzed continually, the workers ever imbued with a great ambition to 
serve and contribute their bit to the winning of the war, not only in the produc- 
tion, in all lines of manufacture, but in quality of workmanship. Holyoke had 
many manufacturing establishments engaged in various kinds of war work. 

Holyoke came to a quick realization of the war and what it meant when Camp 
Bartlett at Hampton Plains, Westfield, was opened and Holyoke's Own D Co., 
104th, and thousands of other troops gathered there for preliminary training before 
starting overseas. Holyoke threw open its doors to welcome the boys in khaki and 
provided, through its civic organizations, entertainment, transportation and financial 
assistance needed by the soldiers. 

Mayor John J. White appointed a Public Safety Committee to look after the 
city's interests in the boys. The committee consisted of William F. Whiting, Maj. 
W. J. Crosier, A. C. Hastings, A. J. Osborne, L. A. Williston, Clement Ducharme, 
John P. Sullivan, Martin P. Conway, William E. Hayes, M. J. Bowler, B. Fein- 
stein, John Stalker, D. J. O'Brien, L. A. LaFrance, S. C. Reynolds, J. J. O'Donnell, 
D. F. Shea, H. J. Bardwell, F. H. Metcalf. When the boys began to answer the 
summons under the draft and went to Camp Devens and other places, the city 
provided a volunteer band to escort them to the depot, supplied them with smokes, 
and gave each man a blanket. Then Mayor John D. Ryan took up the work and 
carried it along through his War Relief Board which comprised Maj. W. J. 
Crosier. Frederick Childs, Arthur Ryan, Joseph A. Skinner, Melvin N. Snow, M. H. 
Scannell, Charles H. E. Moran and Joseph E. Doran, secretary. 

19 



Enlistments and Draft 



EVERAL thousand Holyoke boys and many from neighboring cities and 
towns enlisted at the army recruiting station in charge of Lieut. Gillis 
Green, then holding the rank of sergeant. His office was the mecca 
for the young men of the city in the early days of the war and he couldn't 
ship them fast enough to Fort Slocum and other training points. Those who pre- 
ferred the navy went to Springfield and Hartford and even Boston to enlist, and 
later many joined the Merchant Marine. 

While the United States was gathering volunteers the allies were also receiv- 
ing Holyoke recruits. The French government at the very outbreak of the war in 
1914 issued a call for reservists and without delay several hundred started back 
to France from Holyoke and they were given tremendous sendoffs. The British 
'government had a recruiting office in Springfield and held recruiting rallies there 
with good results. In the Kosciuszko Hall there was opened a central recruiting 
office for the western end of New England for the Polish Army in France and 
here hundreds of Polish residents were signed up for service overseas. 

The Holyoke draft boards made a splendid record from the time of their 
organization, following the declaration of war, and the subsequent registration on 
June 5, 1017. 

The governors of the different states appointed the Exemption Board members. 
In Holyoke two boards were organized, Exemption Board Division Number One, 
comprising Wards One, Two and Three, and Exemption Board Division Number 
Two, comprising Wards Four, Five, Six and Seven. Governor Samuel W. McCall 
appointed the following members on June 21, 1917: Division One, Lorenzo A. 
Williston, Chairman, John J. O'Neill, Secretary, and Dr. Henry E. Chaput, Medi- 
cal Examiner ; Division Two, Nathan P. Avery, Chairman, Joseph F. Ranger, 
Secretary, and Dr. Stephen A. Mahoney, Medical Examiner. 

Offices were opened in the City Hall, on July 23, 1917, with the following 
permanent clerks: Division One, Chief Clerk, Catherine Moriarty; Assistant, Ger- 
trude McCrohan. Division Two, Chief Clerk, Alice Bleasius ; Assistant, Esther 
Welch. These clerks were assisted at different times during the exigency of the 
work, by Mary Forbes, Dora Martineau, Margaret Bowler, Nora Curran, Loretta 
Coffey, Catherine Healey and Catherine Callahan. Immediately after the opening 
of the offices on July 23, 1917, the boards began work. On July 30, 1917, the first 
call for examinations was sent out. The permanent medical examiners were 
assisted in their duties by Drs. W. J. Powers, F. Gibson, G. J. Herbert, J. F. 
Forster, R. Charest, J. L. Bliss, J. H. Potts, E. A. Knowlton, E. P. Bagg, J. J. 
Carroll, I. N. Kilburn, D. F. Donoghue, J. J. McCabe, S. C. Cox, F. H. Allen, 
J. B. Bigelow, T. E. Cavanaugh, E. J. Miller, E. D. Warren and H. E. Lynch. 

From July 30th, the boards were kept busy, examining registrants, hearing 
claims for exemption, certifying registrants to the District Board, and referring 
registrants to the Medical Advisory Board. The Medical Advisory Board con- 
sisted of Drs. Frank A. Woods, Chairman, E. J. Hussey, C. A. Allen, L. H. Clarke, 
H. W. Lamb, of Holyoke, and Dr. Arthur N. Ball of Northampton. 

In hearing claims for exemption, both boards were assisted by the Government 
Appeal Agent, Attorney Oscar O. Lamontagne, who was appointed by Governor 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 291 

McCall, and whose assistance ' was of the greatest vahie to both boards. On 
September 5, 1917, the first drafted men left Holyoke, by automobile, for Camp 
Devens, Ayer, Mass. The quota for September 5th, was four men, two from each 
division. Division One sent Ovide J. Houle and George F. Stone. Division Two 
sent Daniel A. Martin and John A. Hofifman. From September 5, 1917, calls for 
men came continually to the exemption boards, until the signing of the armistice 
on November 11, 1918. 

There were no men inducted by the boards during the month of January. In 
December, 1917, the method of calling the men was changed. From the time the 
boards were organized, until December, all registrants were examined, whether 
or not they claimed exemption or discharge. After the method was changed, 
questionnaires were mailed to every registrant, and only registrants classified in 
Class 1 were examined, as they were the only registrants who could be inducted 
by the boards. From this date, the boards were kept busy classifying, examining, 
and inducting the registrants. 

In filling the questionnaires, the registrants were given assistance by the 
members of the Legal Advisory Board. The permanent members of this board 
were Attorneys W. H. Brooks, T. D. O^Brien, J. Hildreth and P. H. Sheehan. 
The associate members were Attorneys W. P. Buckley, R. A. Allyn, F. F. Bennett, 
C. Brooks, R. L. Davenport, W. T. Dillon, J. A. Frankowski, P. J. Garvey, A. S. 
Gaylord, O. E. Genest, A. L. Green, E. A. Lynch, T. J. Lynch, C. S. Lyon, T. C. 
Maher, F. J. McKay, T. J. O'Connor, A. E. Orrell, J. O'Shea, F. E. Richard, G. W. 
Ritter, M. Slotnick, R. P. Stapleton, T. J. Tierney, M. O. Welcker, C. Ducharme, 
and Messrs. M. M. S. Moriarty, H. Mitchell, M. F. Walsh, J. J. Kelly, J. Zielinski, 
T. Yeannopoulos, F. Bailey, R. Newell, R. C. Brown, O. Ferry, A. E. Pickup, 
J. R. Lussier, O'. J. Fortier, R. W. Clement, H. R. Thorpe, F. W. Prentiss, G. D. 
Hearn, A. O. Hebert, M. B. Sanford, E. J. Tripp, C. E. Dawson, R. P. Barry, 
J. J. Lynch, A. McDonald, M. J. Greaney, T. E. Begley, G. Johnston, A. S. Wilde, 
M. Bachary, P. W. Cutler, J. Kaplinski, J. D. Gorman, J. F. Forhan, J. P. Ken- 
nedy, R. J. Hunter, W. C. Gutzman, J. H. Kennedy, D. Moxon, J. F. O'Neill, 
J. B. Newton, L. P. Garland, C. Guimond, H. Fisher and W. J. Szewczynski. 

The class one men who registered on June 5, 1917, being nearly exhausted 
throughout the country, and the need for soldiers being still great, the President 
issued another proclamation calling for the registration of all men, on June 5, 
1918, who had reached their 21st birthday, since the registration on June 5, 1917. 

There was but one change in the personnel of the boards during their organiza- 
tion in Holyoke. This change took place after the registration on June 5, 1918, and 
was caused by the death of Mr. L. A. Williston, Chairman of Division One Exemp- 
tion Board. Mr. Williston died in July, 1918. In August, 1918, Governor McCall 
appointed Mr. Arthur J. Newell to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Mr. 
Williston. Mr. Newell immediately began his duties as Chairman of Division One 
Exemption Board. 

On August 24, 1918, another registration took place, this registration being 
for men who had reached their 21st birthday since June 5, 1918. The registrations 
of June 5, 1918, and August :^i, lOlS, did not swell the class one registrants to a 
very great extent, and as the men were needed, the President called for another 
registration. This registration took place on September 12, 1918, and called for the 
Tgistration of all men between the ages of 18 and 45 years. This registration 
called for a great amount of work on the part of the members and clerks of the 
Exemption Boards. 

Questionnaires were immediately mailed to registrants between the ages of 
19 and ?.6, and the registrants were classified and examined. The boards were 



292 HoLYOKE In The Great Wak. 

called upon to furnish men on November 12th and 13th, 1918. Division One was 
to send 89 men to Camp Lee, Petersburg, Va., and 67 men to Camp Sevier, Green- 
ville, S. C. Division Two was to send 92 men to Camp Lee, Petersburg, Va., and 
70 men to Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C. Most of these men were to have been 
taken from the registration on September 12th. However, the signing of the 
armistice on November 11th, caused this call to be cancelled, and the men were 
immediately notified to this effect. After the signing of the armistice, the work 
of the boards was lessened. No more questionnaires were classified, and no more 
registrants examined. The boards were given instructions to finish up the work. 
The questionnaires and registration cards were packed and sealed, ready for ship- 
ment to Washington, D. C. 

The members of the Exemption Boards, with the Government Appeal Agent, 
ungrudgingly sacrificed their large personal, business and professional interests, 
when the Government called them to perform this most important war work. The 
Legal Advisory and Medical Advisory Boards rendered invaluable service in the 
expedition of the work. 



Spirit of Patriotism 



'■^^^^'OLYO'KE was ever alive with the spirit of patriotism and there were 
«f^ innumerable public gatherings when the people turned out to show their 
'^^ loyalty, especially when the boys were leaving for camp. Liberty Loan 
rallies in public halls and on the streets drew crowds as did meetings for 
the Red Cross and other patriotic drives. Holyoke held a big parade July 4, 1917, 
and again on July 4, 1918, there was a monster procession — one that teemed with 
the patriotism of the day and in which every nationality in the city was represented 
— a truly All-American parade. No finer spectacle was ever presented in the 
city with the civic, fraternal, business and manufacturing interests all uniting on 
this great occasion. That memorable day, September 19, 1917, became a holiday 
for all industrial and mercantile establishments when D Co., 104th, made its fare- 
well visit to Holyoke before leaving Camp Bartlett for France. There was a 
parade and a drill on the Maple Street Playgrounds and then a banquet for the 
soldiers in the Hotel Nonotuck. 

Holyokers— 25,000 of them, it was estimated— gathered at the Public Library 
Sunday afternoon, October 13, 1918, in response to the news that had flashed 
around the city that "upon authentic information from Washington — Germany 
accepts President Wilson's terms of unconditional surrender, and agrees to evacu- 
ate all occupied territory." There was community singing, speeches and an auto- 
mobile parade and Holyoke celebrated, as it was believed the news was correct. The 
report was received here shortly before dawn that Sunday morning and telephones 
tinkled and there was immediate activity to get "something started." An extra 
edition of the Transcript was published and fliers announcing the meeting at the 
Library lawn at 3 o'clock were scattered about the city— announcements that the 
war was over was made in the churches, based on the alleged "authentic report." 
But it turned out to be premature. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 293 

Yet, Holyoke was not downcast to learn that the celebration had been some 
time ahead of schedule and when the correct news was received of the signing of 
the armistice on November 11th, there was an outburst of rejoicing. At first there 
were those who were somewhat skeptical at the truth of the report, but once it 
became definitely certain that the fighting had ceased, then Holyoke cut loose with 
some real celebrating. 



M Company, 20th Regiment, M. S. G. 



'^/[ N common with all its activities in the late war, Holyoke did its part in con- 
^r tributing to the safety of the State and having adequate military protection 
"*'• while the country was fighting with the allies to crush autocracy, and so 
many hundreds of Holyoke's men had gone to war. 

While the average person was concerned with the strength of the national 
army to cope with Germany and allies, the State officials under Governor McCall 
were desirous of creating and maintaining a force within the State that could, cope 
with any emergency that would arise. 

How well Massachusetts succeeded in taking necessary precautions to main- 
tain law and order was exemplified by the fact that the State had, during the 
war, 13,000 officers and men, all sworn in for two years' service or duration of 
war. This was the most satisfactory precaution and best military accomplishment 
of all the states, as the Massachusetts State Guard units ranked higher in military 
efficiency and organization than all other plans adopted by other states for home 
defense. 

The Massachusetts State Guard today takes the place of the Massachusetts 
Volunteer Militia and are subject to all laws and discipline that govern that service. 

M Co. ranked high in State Guard activities. The standard of service rendered 
by M Co. was equal to any in the State. 

M Co. is quartered in the State Armory and drills every Monday evening. 
Attendance at drills have been very good and the rank and file of M Co. has often 
been commended for its consistent service. 

At Camp Gardner, South Framingham, August 9 to 14, 1918, M Co. made a 
remarkable showing at State Encampment and were commended by the regimental 
staff officials for their fine showing. 

No trouble in State necessitated the service of the State Guard, but east- 
ern units of the Massachusetts State Guard had service guarding docks and 
other State property during the submarine scare. 

In the Spanish Influenza epidemic which raged in the winter of 191S-1919 State 
Guard units throughout the State rendered valuable assistance to health authorities 
and their services were highly appreciated. The Holyoke unit volunteered to 
assist the local Board of Health and were detailed to hospital and ambulance work. 

The Holyoke company took considerable interest in the boys in the regular 
army and navy service. They furnished military details at all services held for 
soldiers and sailors and on one occasion sent over money to D Co., 104th Regi- 
ment, in France. 




CAPT. THOMAS RAE, Jr. 




LIEUT. LOUIS EMERY 



LIEUT. ROBERT W. HUNTER 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 295 

When D Co. left Holyoke for war service, former Mayor White called for 
volunteers to organize a Home Defense. More than six hundred Holyokers 
responded and two companies, A and B, were organized. 

These two companies represented men of all nationalities and all callings of 
life were represented, all eager to offer their services even though most were 
beyond military age. 

When these companies were formed they drilled assiduously and showed 
that they were ready for action should the occasion arise. 

Later events showed that the Home Guard Companies could not be called a 
strict military body without associating themselves with the State's military 
authorities. 

Then the M Co., Massachusetts State Guard was organized. Captain Thomas 
Rae, Jr., organized a body of men and were admitted to the service of the State 
of Massachusetts, and are now drilling weekly at the State Armory. 

Holyoke's M Co. is a highly rated company in the estimation of the State officers. 

M Co. was organized October 1, 1917, at the State Armory, with a full quota 
of sixty-five men and three officers. Thirty-four of these men were from the 
Civic Guard and over one-half of the enlisted men are seasoned veterans of the 
M. V. M. and N. G., and the regular army. 

Captain Rae boasts that he has in his ranks a company of marksmen that 
can stand against the best in the State. 

Service men were enrolled as follows : 

Spanish War 3 

Boer War 1 

French Army, 3 years, 1914-17 1 

French Foreign Legion 1 

German Army 2 

English Army 2 

Canadian Volunteers 1 

U. S. Punitive Exp 4 

The following remarks were written m the report of the State Inspector at 
the State Inspection Drill, February 25, 1918, and forwarded to the Adjutant- 
General : 

"Officers are efficient and experienced. Non-commissioned officers are good. 
Musicians are efficient. Men are well set and soldierly looking. Sergeants have 
no belts and side armps. Only few of the men have regulation shoes. Close order 
drill by company platoon and squads was well done. 

"In coming to the order, too much noise, otherwise manual of arms good. 

"Guard mounting and guard duty was very well done. 

"The non-coms, and privates have been well instructed in this work. 

"Uniforms, arms and equipment were clean and in good condition. 

"This company being stationed at the State Armory has ample room and 
facilities for a good company and the officers and men are aware of the fact. 

"Signed, WILLIAM BUTEMENT, 

"Major Acting Inspector." 

ROSTER OF THE COMPANY 

Captain : Second Lieutenant : First Sergeants : 
Thomas Rae Robert W. Hunter William F. McGrath 

First Lieutenant : Sergeant : Thomas F. Hargaden 

Louis E. Emery Frederick Childs Neil Gillis 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



297 



Quartermaster Sergeant : 

Harry W. Rogers 
Mess Sergeant : 

Alfred W. Wilson 
Cornorals : 

George P. Brouillette 

William G. King 

James Bower 

Milton S. Spies 

Harrington Fay 

Willard Cutler 

Emil N. Meunier 
Musician : 

Emil Clad 
Mechanic : 

John P. Robinson 
Cooks : 

Fred Winkler 

Joseph Pfanner 
Privates : 

Bernard Abbott 

Fred W. Abbott 



George Barnett, Jr. 
Adjutor Bergeron 
Clarence A. Bridges 
George B. Cassidy 
Paul Choinard 
Frederick J. Craven 
Howard B. Deacon 
Walter H. Duenkel 
George Erhardt 
William Fadden 
Louis E. Fortier 
John B. Goephert 
Patrick Gannon 
David B. Howard 
William J. Hall 
Allen Hunter 
Robert M. Hunter 
Walter Henderson 
Eugene Jacquel 
Emery L. Leprohan 
Ira E. Lajoie 
Philias Larivie 
Charles G. Lanctot 



Henry J. Levene 
John Lowell, Jr. 
Samuel W. Mason 
James G. Moodie 
Jean Misch 
James P. Mack 
Peter J. Mason 
Valmore Mercier 
Camile L. Picard 
Arthur Ryan 
Thomas F. Rohan 
John J. Roy 
James H. Reed 
Alexander Scott 
David Strachan 
Christian A. Schroeder 
Edward J. Thornton 
William Turner 
John J. Taugher 
Eugene Wernette 
Frederick Watson 
Frank Zurlinder 



Holyoke Red Cross Chapter 



^^f HE American Red Cross and its work needs no praise — its work will stand 
IL\ forever as a monument to the devotion and sacrifices of its members. The 

^^^ Holyoke Chapter was a stout link always in the Red Cross Chain that 
stretches around the world. The officers of the Holyoke Chapter are: 
Chairman, Dr. Edward P. Bagg, Jr.; Vice-Chairman, Mrs. Frank H. Metcalf; 
Secretary, Mrs. Ellen R. Campbell; Treasurer, L. L. Titus. 

Branches- — South Hadley, Miss Rose Doonan, Chairman; South Hadley Cen- 
ter, Miss Alice C. Brockway, Chairman; Mt. Holyoke College, Miss Mary E. 
Taylor, Secretary; Plains Auxiliary, Fairview, Mrs. Anna Parmenter, Chairman; 
membership, Holyoke Chapter, 9,575 ; Mt. Holyoke College, 563 ; South Hadley, 
€09; South Hadley Center, 329; Plains Auxiliary, 157. Total, 11,233. Circles 
working for Holyoke Chapter, 30. 

When the war with Germany was declared this organization was a branch 
of the Hampden County Chapter. It had no home and only fifteen members. 
Mayor White donated a room in the City Hall and the Holyoke Surgical Dress- 
ings Committee (which under the splendid leadership of Mrs. Aaron Bagg had 
been doing such fine work for many months) came forward with the ofifer of 
workers, money and materials. They soon outgrew these quarters and decided 
that Holyoke was big and powerful enough to be a chapter by itself. Holyoke 



298 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

organized as a chapter in May, 1917, with a membership of 175 members. It has. 
been a wonderful growth, with the hearty co-operation of practically every man 
and woman and child in Holyoke doing their part in the great work. 

Holyoke Chapter fitted out the boys in D Co., 104th. before the company 
w^ent overseas. Boys fitted, 361 ; articles, 1,338. 

Drafted boys fitted out from February 1. 1918, to September 1, 1918: Boys 
fitted, 950; knitted articles supplied, 2.770; Christmas parcels bought and sent to 
soldiers abroad 1918, 1,902. 

The Surgical Dressings department, under Miss Lavinia Whiting, has made- 
308,114 articles; the Hospital Garment department, under Mrs. Morton Hull and 
Mrs. John Finn, has made 9,125 articles, and the Knitted department, under Miss 
Josephine Houston, has made 39,435 articles. 

The Chapter has conducted two Christmas drives for membership; two drives 
for clothes for Belgium, netted garments which weighed 22,891 pounds, and a linen 
drive gained 3,955 articles. The firemen of the city did magnificent work in knit- 
ting socks. During the epidemic of influenza the Chapter made all the gauze 
masks needed. The Moor Corps, under Miss Jessie Mackintosh, supplied cars and 
drivers for work during the epidemic. Two classes were conducted in Home Nursing 
and First Aid. 

The Chapter, under the leadership of Joseph A. Skinner, has raised two war 
funds. The first war fund asked for was $70,000 and pledges amounted to $107,- 
467.94; second war fund asked for, $90,000, pledges, $163,673.76. 

The Chapter now occupies quarters on the fifth floor of the Hotel Nonotuck. 



Holyoke Chapter of Junior Red Cross 

War Activities in the Holyoke Schools 



^^^HE American Red Cross, which had received recognition from Congress as 
ff\ the one official organization in time of war to bring aid to soldier and 
^^ sailor, to the sick and wounded, and to disabled prisoners, felt itself justi- 
fied in asking for a Red Cross hour of loyal activity in the schools. 

The aim of the American Red Cross in establishing the Junior Red Cross is, 
primarily, an educational one; It offers the school children a release of energies,, 
stimulated at the present time by unusual conditions, through organized activities 
for others. It proposes, however, not to stop its work with the cessation of war, 
but to continue in time of peace its efforts to inculcate the highest duties of citizen- 
ship, which involve all the ideals for which the Red Cross worked for years. 

These ideals are promotion of personal health and efficiency, betterment of 
community conditions, the inculcations of respect and care for harmless birds and 
animals, the spread of health education throughout the country by preventive 
means, instruction in elementary measures of aid in emergencies, and in home 
nursing and dietetics, and the preparation of supplies by those who have time and 
service to give to aid the destitute, wherever found, in this or other countries. 
"The Red Cross teaches these things because in them is found the highest interpre- 



300 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

tation of the word 'Patriotism' that the child can learn. To be a good neighbor is 
to be the best citizen." 

The plan of the Junior Membership of the Red Cross was announced by the 
American Red Cross September 3, 1917. It practically came into being by the pro- 
clamation of President Wilson September 15, 1918. 

THE PRESIDENT'S PROCLAMATION. 

The president of the United States is also President of the American Red 
Cross. It is from these offices joined in one I write you a word of greeting at 
this time when so many of you are beginning School year. 

The American Red Cross has just prepared a Junior Membership with school 
activities in which every pupil in the United States can find a chance to serve our 
country. The school is the natural center of your life. Through it you can best 
work in the great cause of freedom to which we have all pledged ourselves. 

Our Junior Red Cross will bring to you opportunities of service to your com- 
munity and to other communilies all over the world, and guide your service with 
high and religious ideals. It will teach you how to save in order that sufifering 
children elsewhere may have a chance to live. It will teach you how to prepare 
some supplies which wounded soldiers and homeless families lack. It will send to 
you through the Red Cross Bulletin, the thrilling stories of relief and rescue. And, 
best of all, more perfectly than through any other school lessons, you will learn by 
•doing these kind things under your teacher's direction to be the future good citizens 
of the great country which we all love. 

And I commend to all school teachers in the country the simple plan which the 
American Red Cross has worked out to provide for your co-operation, knowing 
as I do, that school children will give their best service under the direct guidance 
and instruction of their teacher. Is not this service perhaps the chance for which 
you have been looking to give your time and efforts in some measure to meet our 
national needs. 

WOODROW WILSON, President. 

Dr. H. N. McCracken, President ot Vassar College, was chosen as the National 
Director. Mr. James Jackson is manager of the New England Division. 

Dr. Edward Bagg, chairman of our local Chapter American Red Cross, ap- 
pointed a committee to organize this work in Holyoke. This committee, known as 
ihe "Branch School Committee," was : Chairman, Mr. J. B. Weis, Mr. Francis 
McSherry, Dr. Edward Bagg, Mrs. Ellen Campbell, Miss Pearl Rand, and Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Miss Jennie E. Scolley. 

The chapter is made up of auxiliaries, each school being an auxiliary, and each 
class a unit under the teacher. 

A Work and Material Committee was appointed to aid the above Committee. 
This committee is as follows : Mrs. Isabelle Ferry,. Miss Teresa Dowd, Mr. Leon- 
ard and Miss Jennie E. Scolley. Mr. Hebert took Mr. Leonard's place a little later. 
On Mr. Hebert's resignation, Mr. Robert E. Hamill, who had returned to school 
from the military service, was appointed to this place. 

On account of various circumstances and the health conditions in the city dur- 
ing the year, we did not organize until March 11, 1918. 

Previous to organization the teachers and pupils in all schools had been able 
to do much splendid war work. Sweaters, socks, wristers, blankets, scrap books, 
etc., were made. These supplies were shipped across the water before Christmas, 
1917, just the time they were most needed. They were among the first supplies 



302 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

sent from this side. The Secretary counted all these and valued this work in all 
schools. It was valued at $6,002.57. Recorded by schools, it is as follows: 

Elm Street School $471.28 

Elmwood School 204.25 

Ewingville School 42.00 

Hamilton Street School 383.52 

Highland School 988.80 

Ingleside School 41.50 

Joseph Metcalf School 735.60 

Kirtland School 800.00 

Lawrence School 604.00 

Morgan School 290.00 

Nonotuck Street School ' 213.00 

Park Street School 84.00 

Sargeant Street School 97.50 

South Chestnut Street School 328.62 

Springdale School 120.00 

West Street School 343.00 

William Whiting School 246.45 

West Holyoke School 9.00 

Total $6,002.57 

The pupil's pledge card, which each member muit sign who joins the Junior 
Red Cross organization, was designed by Superintendent Francis McSherry. It is 
arranged to serve six years and reads as follows : 

I promise, as far as I am able, to 

1. Make or grow something for the Red Cross. 

2. Save by denying myself something I want but do not need. 

3. Give to those who have suffered in the war. 

4. Pay twenty-five cents a year for dues or furnish the equivalent in labor or 
material. 

On the reverse side of the card the following advice is given: 

1.- Hold yourself ready to perform any service consistent with home and 

school duties that will directly or indirectly forward the work of the 

American Red Cross. 

2. Try to conserve the material resources of your country to the end that 
nothing shall be wasted that can strengthen the vigor of the nation. 

3. Endeavor at all times so to conduct yourself as to show your loyalty to 
your country and your respect for those who are bearing the burden of 
defense. 

4. Wear your Red Cross badge to the end that everyone may know that you 
belong to the home reserve army of your country. 

5. Promise during the period of your membership in the Red Cross to save 
by self-denial all that you can give to the Holyoke Chapter of the Red 
Cross to use to help the families of the men who are serving in the Army 
and Navy of your country or to use where it may be most needed. 

We organized with nineteen auxiliaries, with 6,527 pupils or 100% strong. 
Since September 2, 1918, 1,700 new members have been enrolled, 600 at Sacred 
Heart, 200 at St. Jerome, 200 at the Rosary, 500 at Precious Blood Schools, 200 at 
Perpetual Help, and 10 boys at Hadley Hall, making the membership January 1, 



304 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

1919, as follows : Twenty-five auxiliaries with a total membership of 8,237 members. 
From March 11, 1918, to February 1, 1919, the following articles were turned 
over to the Red Cross : 

32 Children's black sateen aprons. 149 Helmets. 

32 Children's capes with hoods. 136 Flannel petticoats. 

8 Boys' corduroy trousers. 754 Wash cloths. 

5 Boys' shirts. 21,192 Gunwipes. 

10 Girls' dresses. 50 Belgian blankets. 

102 Women's and girls' chemises. 30 Pairs of wristers. 

32 Women's skirts. 572 Crutch pads. 

74 Shoulder shawls. 1,308 Scrap books. 

17 Towels. 300 Needle cases filled. 

32 House gowns. 329 Picture puzzles. 

56 Pairs of socks. 380 Swat clubs. 

391 Sweaters. 202 Shot bags. 

56 Scarfs. 117 Rolls of tape rolled. 

1,014 Comfort pillows. 400 Handkerchiefs. 

48 Packing cases (High School). 1 Large table. 

48 Packing cases (Vocational School). 
This makes a total of 27,877 articles furnished by the Junior Red Cross. 
The Secretary of the Junior Red Cross sent a check to Treasurer of Red Cross 
for $18.00 for subscriptions to the Red Cross Magazine. The following schools' 
will be supplied with a year's subscription each : 

Lawrence School South Chestnut Street School 

Highland School Sargeant Street School 

West Street School Park Street School 

Morgan School Springdale School 

Joseph Metcalf School Elmwood School 

High School Ingleside School 

Hamilton Street School Nonotuck Street School 

Elm Street School Ewingville School 

William Whiting School Kirtland School 

The Treasurer received $653.09 and expended for supplies and the Red Cross 
Magazine $507,48, leaving a balance in the bank, March 1, 1919, of $145.61. 

By a rule of the Superintendent of Schools and the School Board all war ac- 
tivities of any kind in the schools must come under the head of the Junior Red 
Cross. Therefore the sale of Thrift Stamps is a Junior Red Cross Activity under 
the direction of Miss Mabel Baush. The Secretary of Junior Red Cross organized 
Happy Jack Thrift Clubs in all schools. There was a Happy Jack Corner in each 
of our evening papers. The children wrote compositions on "Thrift," "How I 
Earned My Thrift Stamp Money," and on other similar titles. 

From January 1, 1918, to January 1, 1919, 4,652 children have bought $14,369.59 
worth of stamps. The report of schools is as fellows : 

Elmwood 248 pupils bought $1,073.40 

Elm Street . . .• 374 "> " 1,650.70 

Ewingville 54 " " 358.11 

Hamilton Street 340 " " 461.68 

Highland 484 " " 1,007.89 

High 674 " " 1,808.13 

Ingleside ' 40 " " _155.22 

Kirtland 201 " " '671.91 

Lawrence 222 " " 1,214.94 



HoLYOKE In The Great War 

Joseph Metcalf 435 

Morgan , 198 

Nonotuck Street 103 

Park Street 212 

Sargeant Street 164 

South Chestnut Street 384 

Springdale 105 

Vocational 35 

West Street 197 

William Whiting 192 



305 



Total. 



,4.652 



1,360.26 
914.20 
152.39 
487.36 
;il3.56 
925.72 
453.63 
383.32 
538.19 
538.98 

$14,369.59 



During the various Liberty Loan drives in the city the pupils have vv^ritten' 
compositions, made three-minute speeches and distributed quantities of literature. 
Several of the schools bought bonds for the schools. Numbers of children bought 
bonds. Many of them earned every cent of the money themselves. 

The United War Work Campaign furnished another opportunity for the Junior 
Red Cross to prove that they are patriotic, loyal Americans. The "Victory Boys 
and Girls," members of both public and parochial schools, under the chairmanship 
of Superintendent of Schools Francis McSherry, pledged to earn and give $7,704.65 
to the cause. This money to be paid in three installments. They are bravely living 
up to their pledges. 

Another activity, virhich is strictly a local one, is the "I Will Help" Club. 

Through the association in Holyoke known as the "Les Village Libere de la 
France," our citizens are planning to aid Miss Belle Skinner in the great work to 
which she is giving her time, money and personal service. The children have 
pledged a penny a week from June, 1918, to June, 1919, for this reconstruction 
work in France. We have sent to the Treasurer of this association $t).")4.05 up to 
March 6, 1919. 

Recorded by schools, it is as follows : 

Lawrence School $85.00 

Joseph Metcalf School 72.91 

Highland School 71.88 

Elm Street School 72.12 

Elmwood School 51.97 

South Chestnut Street School 50.20 

Nonotuck Street School 48.91 

Kirtland School 36.44 

Hamilton Street School 31.18 

Springdale School 27.72 

Park Street School 28.31 

William Whiting 25.53 

West Street School 19.72 

Morgan School 18.31 

Sargeant Street School 6.14 

Ingleside School 5.71 

Ewingville School 2.00 



$654.05 



306 HoLYOKLE In The Great War. 

The War Gardens or School Gardens, the raising of pouUry and pigs, and 
classes in canning were other important and valuable activities. This w^ork was 
under the direction of Mr. George D. Hearn of the Science department of the 
High School. Mr. Hearn is Director of Agriculture for the city. 

Working under pressure in the spring three hundred school gardens were 
planted in five days by team work on the part of the children and efficiency of the 
teachers. The gardens were arranged end to end and the cross path omitted. 
This brought two gardens together, and put a gardener at each end of a planting 
line. Thus two worked together on each garden and planted two gardens in the 
time ordinarily used to plant one, and also made the work more pleasant. 

The canning work was put on a more systematic basis and a good foundation 
laid for next season's operations. Weekly demonstrations were held at the dif- 
ferent school centers, which are nicely equipped for canning. Each canner's home 
Avas also visited each week, and this established a bond of mutual endeavor and 
interest on the part of the parent, teacher and child. 

The poultry and pig work were also carried along more thoroughly; in fact 
this year witnessed the start of the porker as a Holyoke city resident in the back 
yards of some of the school children. This is a line which is well worth encour- 
aging. 

The foregoing is strong proof that the school children of Holyoke responded 
enthusiastically to the nation's call for more food. The vegetables, canned prod- 
ucts, poultry, eggs and pork will mean much in the feeding of Holyoke. 

The number of gardeners at the end of the season were 1,200 

Number of classes for canning 245 

Number raising poultry and pigs 245 

Acres planted 6.5 

Value of garden produce, canned goods, poultry and pigs $15,000 

In the first shipment to France of Junior Red Cross articles 67 knitted hos- 
pital blankets were sent. One of them was received by Captain C. W. Mack, cap- 
tain M. R. C. Below is a copy of his letter of thanks to the pupils of Grade Six 
of the Hamilton Street School, where the blanket was made : 

American Expeditionary Forces, France. 

A. P. O. 731, June 28, 1918. 
Hamilton Street School, Grade VI. 

Dear Friends: I have many friends in Michigan and California, but I didn't 
know that I had so many friends in Grade VI until I received a beautiful bed- 
spread which you sent through the Red Cross to me. 

Thanks so much for it. It is so warm and comfortable and well made. I have 
plept under canvas, when the snow and rain were falling, with the wind blowing 
cold, and sometimes under eiderdown French covers, as a rare event, to make 
dreams of comfort come true. I have slept on two sticks, placed to keep me above 
the muddy water of the trenches, sleeping thus under the blue sky. I have slept 
under the thatched roof of an abandoned French farm building used by the pigs, 
sleeping under the corner of an oiled sheet, not sufficient to cover the three occu- 
pants completely at one time. I have slept under various peculiar conditions, un- 
der all sorts of things to keep one warm, but I have never slept under such a nice 
cover as this which you have given me. It will not only give one pleasure but 
add to my efficiency; so in this way you have all helped in the Great War. 

I congratulate you on your promotion to the seventh grade, and again thank 
you all most sincerely. 

C. W. MACK, Captain M. R. C, A. E. F., France. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 307 

Another of these blankets was made by the pupils of Grade V in the Elm 
Street School. This blanket was received at Base Hospital 116, France. 

A nurse at the hospital sent the following letter of thanks to the pupils in 
this school. She also returned the paper containing the list of names of the pupils 
who made the blanket, that they might know that the paper had been to France 
and back again. The pupils of the Elm Street School often look at it as a treas- 
ure, as it hangs framed on the school wall. 

Elm Street School, Base Hospital 116, 

Holyoke, Mass. A. E. F., France. 

Grade V. 
Dear Children : 

This is just to let you know your nice knitted quilt found its way to a real 
Ease Hospital. We think a great deal of them and more because we know the 
dear children are really thinking of our dear soldiers, who are very brave and 
good. Some day when I come back I may have a chance to visit Holyoke, and 
I certamly will come to the Elm Street School and tell you about the boys. 
Please accept my thanks and every good wish to you all. I am, 
Your new friend, 

WINIFRED ALLISON. A. N. C. 
The following children made the blanket mentioned above : 

Gregory Alberto John Lyons Loretta Reed 

Max Banas Delia Marcotte Jessie Roach 

Claire Beauregard Jennie Wallach Hollis Smith 

Ethel Brent Aris Willey Lucile Smith 

Mae Burke Florence O'Connor Fred Stevens 

Laura Charlton Doris Osborne Ruth Stone 

Bertha Foster John Pellegrine Catherine Tierney 

Mary Harrop Casper Ranger Hannah Von Goecking 

Ethel Lambert Aris Willey 

The little children in grades one and two made thousands of little gunwipes, 
v.hich seemed to be much appreciated by the soldiers. The following letter was 
received by Mrs. Frank Metcalf, who turned it over to the Secretary of the Junior 
Red Cross : 

Mrs. Frank Metcalf, May 6, 1918. 

Holyoke, Mass. 
My Dear Mrs. Metcalf: 

Through Mrs. Elmer H. Allen of Shirley, Mass., there has been received at 
this office one box of many thousand gunwipes. 

It is understood that the school children of Holyoke are the diligent workers 
and producers of these very necessary and excellently made aids to soldiers. These 
gunwipes will be distributed to the men of this command, and I am sure they will 
be very much appreciated. 

The Commanding General wishes to express his thanks to you and to all who 
contributed in the contribution of these articles. 
Very truly yours. 

By direction of the Division Quartermaster, 
1st Lieut, Q. M. C, N. A. R. G. GRAHAM. 

To sum up briefly, our loyal young Americans have raised $653.59 for Red 
Cross, $14,369.59 for War Stamps, $7,704.65 for United War Work, $654,05 for "I 
Will Help," or a total of $23,381.23. They have made 27,877 articles and 1,200 
workers in war gardens, etc., produced $15,000 worth of food. 
JENNIE E. SCOLLEY, 

Secretary-Treasurer Junior Red Cross. 



Holyoke's Civilian Relief 



^^ HE Home Service and Civilian Relief Sections of the Holyoke Chapter, 
■ 1 came into being toward the end of October, 1917. The first case came to 
^^^ the committee at that time, and found the Section without offices or equip- 
ment. Miss Mary J. MacMahon was in charge of the service work, acting 
in the capacity which is now designated as executive secretary. At that early 
stage of the game no one realized the amount of work which was going to come 
to this division of the Red Cross. Months went on, and Miss MacMahon car- 
ried on the work, quietly, satisfactorily, with a never failing interest and sympathy. 
One by one, families, passing the word from one to another, came to her with 
their troubles. No two had the same difficulties, but they found that under the 
wise guidance of the national heads of the organization in Washington, provision 
had been made for caring for every possible kind of difficulty. 

In June, 1918, only about 60 cases had been handled, and practically all of 
these had been for financial aid, made necessary by the fact that the breadwinner 
of the family had taken his place in the ranks of the army or navy, and his allot- 
ment and allowance had not come immediately, or because of illness in the family. 
Just at this time, the government began to make continued calls for men, with 
the result that queries of all kinds from camps and cantonments throughout the 
country, began to flood the local committee. 

It was only then, that the necessity of establishing an office, with someone 
permanently in charge, and office hours throughout every day of the week, became 
apparent. As a result of continued consultation, the New England division head- 
quarters of the Red Cross arranged for an organizer. Miss Myra H. Church, for 
years one of the valued workers of the Associated Charities at Lawrence, Mass., 
to come to Holyoke, and stay six weeks, to open an office and establish a perma- 
nent organization. On the first of July offices were opened in the Prew Build- 
ing on High Street, with Miss Church in charge, and a class for a six weeks' 
course of lectures was opened, with a membership of about 20. Twice a week, 
this little group gathered to get the very little that could be taught in so limited 
a time, giving them an idea of what social service is. 

To this group, the wonderful plans of the National Red Cross were unfolded. 
They found that there was practically no limit to the things that this organiza- 
tion had planned to do for the men in service and their dependents. If the 
allotment and allowance duly made by the soldier, to those at home, depending 
upon him, did not come at once (and it seldom did) a loan could be arranged, 
and the money returned when the checks did come. This arrangement was made, 
that persons who had never been obliged to accept a cent from any organization, 
need not feel that they were now an object of charity. It was also planned par- 
ticularly with an eye to maintaining morale, and keeping those at home, likely 
to lose their self respect, alert, and awake to the fact that they were expected to 
do their share. If, however, it was found that present needs of the family were 
too great to make it possible to return the money at a later date, the money was 
given outright. If the need is only temporary, caused by a member of the family 
being out of work, for a week or so, the money may be given in a lump sum, 



HoLTOKE In The Great War. 309 

either as a loan or as a gift. If a family has sickness, a physician is provided, 
if a death, arrangements may be made with the undertaker. If a bill is press- 
ing, arrangements may be made with the storekeeper, and if he tries to threaten 
the family, he is promptly notified that he cannot press the family of a man in 
service, although the Section does everything possible to help him collect his bill, 
if it is just, when the family can reasonably spare the money. If the landlord 
tries to eject a family with a man in service, he is notified that he cannot do this, 
without getting an order from the court. If installments are being paid on an 
article, it cannot be taken without an order from the court. There is really no 
financial problem of a soldier's family, which the Red Cross cannot untangle. 

But the financial assistance is the least of the plans of the Red Cross. Every 
difficulty can be overcome. The soldier, is perhaps overseas, and has had no word 
from home in months. His mother comes to the Home Service Section, and 
says that she has been writing for weeks, but her letters never reach him. At 
once a letter is dispatched to the New England Division Headquarters, at Boston, 
telling the trouble, and giving a picture of the family life. "Lillian is well, and you 
would hardly know her, she has grown so since you have been gone. Your father 
has been having a touch of the grip, but is now back at work, and your allotment 
and allowance came through so that they have wanted for nothing. We thought 
it best to send him to the hospital, so that he might have the best of care, and 
that bill your mother will not have to worry about." This is only a sample of 
the family news that reaches a man, through Boston, and then through the Bureau 
of Communication. 

A soldier in a Southern camp was taken ill. His mother received no letters 
for days, and finally came to make inquiry. A telegram was sent at once to the 
Associate Field Director for the Red Cross at the camp, and inside of four hours, 
a reply was received saying that the soldier was in the base hospital, very ill 
with pneumonia. The further information was given that everything possible was 
being done for him, and if it was necessary for the family to come, they would 
be notified. In two days, the telegram received, stated that the crisis was past 
and all was well. 

These are two of the simplest problems that come to the Home Service. 
Family interference often complicates matters, and sometimes it seems almost 
impossible to get matters righted, but this can be done, if the Home Service 
Section has the patience to keep at it. 

Since the first of July, 1918, cases have come in, with a rapidity which shows 
that soldiers' families are keenly alive to the abilities of the Red Cross for real 
service. At present, on March 15, 1919, there are about 700 cases on record, 
in the office, and every day adds from five to twenty cases. 

One of the most important tasks which has fallen to the lot of the Home 
Service Sections throughout the country, has been that of caring for the families 
of the soldiers of our allies, and it makes no difiference whether the man is in 
the Polish, French, British, Canadian, or other allied forces, as to the care which 
his family receives. In Holyoke a number of men enlisted in the allied service, 
and in the case of the Polish, there was no allowance made for the families by 
the government, so that it has meant these families must be cared for, and the 
money given them as a regular allowance, every week. In the French, British 
and Canadian, the allotments have sometimes been supplemented, and all this 
has been done with the regular Red Cross funds. 

It is most interesting to look back on the regular weekly disbursing sheet and 
to find that the first week on record, ten dollars was given, and for the week, 
just previous to this writing, $209.75 was given out. At the present time it costs 



310 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



the Red Cross about $1,500 per month to take care of its Home Service families, 
this including hospital bills, drugs, clothing, groceries, and cash. The task has 
been greatly increased by the return of men from the service, for the responsi- 
bility of the Red Cross does not cease when the man leaves service, if he really 
does his level best to resume his place in civilian life. Many times the question 
has been asked, "When will you close the office?" and the answer has been made 
by the Red Cross, "When the last men return from France." There is added 
need each day, for more help in the office, more visitors, more co-operation, more 
everything, that the morale may not be broken at this most critical time. 



Clan MacLaren, No. 144 

(Order of Scottish Clans) 

Clan MacLaren has purchased $800 in Liberty Bonds and the net proceeds of 
their annual concert and ball, February 21, 1918, amounting to $230, was given to 
the American Red Cross. Out of a total membership of 170, there were 55 mem- 
bers in the Allied armies, three dying in service, William F. Henderson, James Gow 
and John Waiters. 



L'Union Alsace Lorraine 

L'Union Alsace Lorraine has bought $1,250 worth of Liberty Bonds, con- 
tributed $200 to the Red Cross and $25 to the United War Work campaign. Nine 
members were in the service and of these Emile Colin and Victor Bollecker, died. 




MISS MARY GERAN 



MISS CHRISTINE ROSS 




MISS CHARLOTTE BLAIR 



MISS MINA FORBES 




MISS M.AKi AiNbhKo 



LIEUT. MISS RUTH KXAPP 



Holyoke Council, Knights of Columbus 



^^■^HE number of members of Holyoke Council No. 9, Knights of Columbus, 

^pL in service, including seven secretaries, 264. Seven died while in service, as 

follows : Edwin J. Mitchell, James Kirkpatrick, Martin P. Kennedy, Patrick 

J. Healey, James M. Hayden, James E. Shea, Frank B. Scarry. Five of 

the above were killed in action, the other two died of disease. 

The Council bought $1,300 worth of Liberty Bonds and $500 in War Savings 
Stamps; gave to Red Cross, $683; collected for Red Anchor War Camp Fund, 
$36.128.93 ; gave the use of K. of C. Adutorium free to the Red Cross nurses. 
Chamber of Commerce, Holy Cross branch of Red Cross and a number of other 
organizations. 

A number of the members acted on committees on all drives. The Council 
rooms were open at all times to all soldiers and sailors in the service. A sign to 
that effect is hung outside the building. The first Christmas the Council sent to 
every member who was "over there" a Christmas box containing cigarettes, chewing 
tobacco, gum. chocolates, tooth paste, shaving cream, socks, handkerchiefs, cold 
cream, etc. Christmas, 1918, a Christmas greeting of a Victory Letter was sent 
to every member in the service whether "over here" or "over there." This letter 
was signed by the worthy chaplain and grand knight and expressed the sentiments 
of every member of the Council. An Honor Roll containing the names of every 
member in the service was made and hung in the Council rooms. Pictures of 
the members who died in the service were procured and framed and are now 
hung in the Council rooms with the Honor Roll. A committee has been appointed 
to procure some suitable souvenir for every member in the service. A number 
of strangers who were in the service and who are in the service at the present 
have been helped by Holyoke Council. They were provided with money and lodging. 

The Council's shower baths were opened to all soldiers and sailors in the serv- 
ice and towels and soap were furnished them free of charge. Magazines, books, 
papers, etc., were sent to the different camps for the use of the soldiers. A min- 
strel show was staged at Camp Devens by the K. of C. Minstrels and all automo- 
biles that carried the troupe down were furnished by members of Holyoke Council. 
A service flag with the numljcr of members in the service is hung outside the K. of C. 
building. The Government was offered the use of the K. of C. Auditorium and 
lodge room as a hospital for the wounded soldiers, sailors and marines if they 
should need it. 



Jewish Welfare Board 



^•^^HE Holyoke branch of the Jewish Welfare Board was organized in the 
..^m very early days of the war, to supplement in local work what the National 
^^^ organization was doing in National and international work. The purpose 
of the Jewish Welfare Board was to cater primarily to the Jewish boys in 
the service ; and secondly to co-operate with all other agencies in striving to give 
all men in the service and their families the greatest possible aid to make war 
somewhat brighter. 

As one of the branches of the National organization, Holyoke was called 
upon to look after the welfare of the Jewish boys from the moment their names 
appeared in draft or enlistment lists until the time they were back to civilian life 
again. The work was divided as follows : 

STATISTICS. 

Careful records were made of each man in the service — those dependent upon 
him, his occupation, particular fitness for special work, etc. After reaching the 
army careful track was kept of his location, rank, promotion, citation, etc. 

ENTERTAINMENT. 

As each man or group of men left town they were given a send-off which was 
largely attended by the Jewish community. A gift was given each man in the form 
of wrist watches, flash lights, fountain pens, safety razors, and comfort kits 
especially. Each fellow received in addition a prayer book and a book of Psalms 
and quotations from the Bible. These books were vest pocket size and con- 
veniently carried. As the boys came back on furloughs, either singly or in groups, 
especial provisions were made for receptions of one kind or another. Local talent 
was sent to the various camps to provide entertainment. 

PERSONAL SERVICE. 

Personal attention was given to each Holyoke Jewish boy in the service. A 
letter was sent to him regularly once a week. Each month the "Y. M. H. A. 
News," a publication issued by the Holyoke Young Men's Hebrew Association, 
was mailed to them. This paper gave them all the local news, and was probably 
far more appreciated than anything else that any of the organizations did for them, 
since they were given the local news which they were hungering for. Regularly, 
■especially at holidays, boxes of goodies were forwarded to them. Special requests 
from the boys were taken care of by this department. 

CIVILIAN RELIEF. 

This work was done through the Red Cross, which was particularly fitted to 
perform such work. 

RELIGION. 

Services were held for the men before leaving for camps and during furloughs. 

The local branch also served as one of the sources from which men were 

■drawn for work with the National board in the camps, both at home and abroad. 



314 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

Thousands of men were needed for various kinds of work, such as religious 
leaders, camp workers and entertainers. 

The Holyoke branch co-operated extensively in all the Liberty Loans, Red 
Cross and U. W. W. drives, having had its representatives both on the executive 
boards of these drives, and among the list of workers. 

No sooner was the armistice signed than immediately full arrangements were 
made for the following work : 

1. To assist the returning men in securing suitable positions without undue 
loss of time. 

2. To assist the families of discharged men in securing instant and satisfac- 
tory relief in cases of emergency. 

3. To keep the discharged men and their families informed of their rights 
and opportunities with relation to industrial and social changes which are constantly 
taking place. 

4. To assist the wounded men in taking advantage of the rehabilitation and 
educational program of the government. 

The officers of the Holyoke branch of the Jewish Welfare Board are as follows : 
President, Jacob L. Barowsky; Vice-President, Harry Berman; Secretary, 
Harry Shepro ; Treasurer, Samuel Wasserman ; Chairman Religious Committee, 
Rabbi M. Kurland; Chairman Entertainment Committee, Miss Celia Press; Chair- 
man Personal Service Committee, Miss Lena Slotnick ; Chairman Statistical Depart- 
ment, Miss Sarah Silverman; Chairman Civilian Relief, Mrs. J. Gold. 

There were 71 Holyoke Jewish boys in the service. Since there was a total 
population of about 1,000 Jews, this gives a percentage of over 7 per cent. Hol- 
yoke's entire contribution of 3,600 men makes an approximate percentage of about 
5 per cent of the total population. The Jews, therefore, of this city, have played 
their part well in this war. 



Young Men^s Christian Association 

/ym^H'E Holyoke Young Men's Christian Association during the period of the 
/j war steadfastly maintained a "win the war'' spirit. With a total mem- 
^^^ bership of 1,200 men and boys, 182 of its younger men were in the United 
States Army, Navy and Marine Corps. Of the number entering the service, 
five gave their lives in the world's campaign for the safety of Democracy. 

Seventeen local men represented the Holyoke Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion in the work of the Red Triangle during the war in camps of this country 
and overseas. Those serving in the United States were W. A. Morse, General 
Secretary; Lee H. Brow, Assistant General Secretary; Herbert B. Elmer, former 
Boys' Work Secretary; B. W. Beaman, Physical Director; Rev. Edwin B. Dolan, 
Rev. H. B. Howe, Ralph B. Doane, Magnus F. Peterson, Stephen Mahoney, Fred 
Webber ,and Frank Smith. The men serving overseas were Rev. Robert Russell 
Wicks, Rev. A. H. Coar, E. C. Purrington, Aaron C. Bagg, James Bower and 
Arthur P. Provencher. 

In the Red Triangle drive in November, 1917, $112,000 was raised in a great 
campaign in charge of Herbert D. Elmer, Acting General Secretary, in the interests 
of all the men in the Army, Navy and Marine Corps. 



HoLYOKE In The Great AVar. 315 

The United War Work campaign in the fall of 1918, under the direction of 
W. A. Morse of the Holyoke Young Men's Christian Association, went "over the 
top" and captured the magnificent sum of $227,000, which was divided among the 
great organizations engaged in welfare work among the service men at home and 
abroad. 

The Holyoke Young Men's Christian Association from the very beginning kept 
its hand on the pulse of afifairs as they related Holyoke to the great needs of the 
world, and endeavored at all times to stand shoulder to shoulder with the other 
splendid institutions of our city. 



Holyoke Women's Christian Temperance Union 

The Holyoke Woman's Christian Temperance Union has rendered war service 
wherever they have seen an opportunity, both through their own individual efforts 
and in co-operation with other societies. The Union was represented by one of its 
members on the Woman's Committee for National Defense and thus kept in touch 
with the government plans for woman's work. For many months every alternate 
meeting was given to sewing for the Red Cross and early in the war a great amount 
of old linen was collected for surgical use. The society has a membership of nearly 
500 and the members working at home and at the Red Cross rooms gave about 25,000 
hours to the work. The sum of $10 was contributed to the Red Cross linen shower ; 
50 garments were made for the children of France and one French orphan has been 
adopted. Probably 2,000 knitted articles were handed ill by the members. The 
members practiced faithfully food conservation and secured through one of its 
members 2,000 signatures to the food conservation pledge cards. 

When Camp Bartlett was opened at Westfield a great supply of temperance 
literature and posters was furnished for the use of those in charge. 

In expenditure of money, this society has not been behind others in its patriot- 
ism. It has already paid for two $100 Liberty Bonds and its members have served 
on Liberty Bond committees. Early in the war $25 was given toward the fund for 
a White Ribbon Ambulance, which was sqnt to the front by the National organiza- 
tion. A drive for $50,000 was made by the State W. C. T. U. and the Holyoke 
branch raised over $2,100. This $50,000 raised in the State was for the purchase 
of a Massachusetts ambulance and field kitchens, which were sent to the front; 
also for a chocolate fund and to help in the purchase of the White Ribbon Home at 
Ayer, which has proven a great blessing to the soldiers and their relatives, furnish- 
ing not only a social center but comfortable rooms for women near the railroad 
station and having a well equipped cafeteria. Before the drive was made the 
Holyoke W. C. T. U. gave $100 toward this home as well as one hundred towels 
and several thousand paper napkins. 

Fifty comfort bags for soldiers and sailors have been made and filled at an 
expense of $100 each. • These bags contain not only the usual comforts but also 
&■ copy of the Gospel, a few telling temperance leaflets or cards, such as "What 
God Says to His Soldiers," and very often a personal letter from some older 
woman of the Union. 

Last but not least has been the service rendered toward War Prohibition. The 
W. C. T. U. sent petitions, letters, telegrams and asked many prominent men 
to do the same and found them very willing to do so. 



316 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

Queen Mary's Needlework Guild 

Queen Mary's Needlework Guild, with more than 100 members, was the first 
■organization in Holyoke to send a box of hospital garments to the Allies. The 
materials were bought by the members and made up by them, the Cunard Steam- 
ship Company furnishing free transportation. The Guild members raised through 
their own efforts by the holding of socials, card parties, etc., the sum of $3,897, 
which was used to buy materials for making hospital garments for boys in the 
American Hospital in London and the British Hospital in Bradford, Yorkshire, 
England. The Guild also bought nearly $200 worth of wool which was knitted by 
the members into socks, sweaters and other articles for outfits for local boys going 
into the service. In addition subscriptions were made as follows : Red Cross, $130 ; 
Red Triangle, $50; Red Anchor, $25; Salvation Army War Fund, $25; Women's 
Christian Temperance Union, $25; United War Work campaign, $25. Christmas 
checks to the amount of $122 were sent to the boys and letters and gifts were 
sent them frequently. The members also did a lot of sewing and knitting at their 
liomes for the Red Cross and also at the rooms of the Holyoke Chapter. Thirty- 
four members had sons in the service and two made the supreme sacrifice, Charles 
Trotman and William B. Craven. The officers of the Guild are : President, Frances 
Iv. Parfitt ; vice-presidents, Mrs. Albert Cordingley, Mrs. James Parfitt, Mrs. Samuel 
Kershaw, Mrs. George Tififany, Mrs. Levi Holgate ; treasurer, James Parfitt ; assist- 
ant treasurer, George A. Sorton; collector, Mrs. Kelita Moxon ; Red Cross, Miss 
"Sarah Clayton ; secretary, Mrs. Albert Cordingley. 



Union Club 

Through the activities of the members of the Union Club and the co-operation 
•of the Cricket Club, the sum of about $1,000 was raised and applied for war 
purposes. Of this amount $565 was set aside for the maintenance of two beds at 
Neltey Hospital, England. A donation of $70 was made to the Holyoke chapter 
of the Red Cross, $50 to the Halifax Relief Fund, $30 each to Queen Mary's 
Needlework Guild and the British Unit. The tobacco committee sent out about 
^200 worth of tobacco and cigarettes to all the boys and also gave to each and 
every one entering the service, a nice little present to take away with them. The 
club has invested $2,500 in Liberty Bonds and purchased a Roll of Honor at a 
•cost of $100. 

Last but not least of the war undertakings of the club was the maintenance 
of communications with each and every member in the service and sending them 
vv^ords of encouragement and good cheer from time to time. Eighteen members 
were in the American service, of which John Watters died in France of pneumonia, 
-while 17 joined the British and Canadian armies and of these Arthur Chatterton 
and James Gow were killed in action and Patrick McManus was a prisoner for two 
years in Germany. 



Pioneer Lodge, No. 21, Sons of St. George 

Pioneer Lodge has had 31 members in service and 14 have seen service in 
France. Henry Lowe, Jr., was the only one to die in the service. The lodge 
•contributed to the Prince of Wales Fund, American Soldiers' Relief, Halifax Relief, 
Canadian Mission, Red Cross, United War Work and Widows' and Orphans' 
Fund. The amount of money donated was $2,771, not including tobacco sent to 
the boys which reached several hundred dollars worth. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 317 

Firemen's Progressive Union 

The Firemen's Progressive Club, Local No. 40, International Association of 
Fire Fighters, did its part with men, money and labor in helping win the war. 
Out of 110 men in the fire department, and most of them over the required age, 
10 went into the service, three in the navy and seven in the army. When the 
age limit was raised there were 20 more firemen ready for the call. 

The firemen at home bought Liberty bonds, Thrift stamps and knitted socks 
for the men in service. In the First Liberty loan the members of the department 
bought $3,350 worth, the second loan, $3,400, the third, $4,200, and the fourth, 
$7,000, all individual subscriptions. In addition the Firemen's Aid Association 
bought $6,000 worth and the Firemen's Progressive Club Fund took $100. The 
department records show a total of $24,050 in bonds and does not take into account 
several hundred dollars worth of Thrift stamps. The Knights of Columbus, 
Y. M. C. A. and Red Cross, United War drives, the department members made 
generous contributions. 

In the fall of 1918, through the Red Cross, several machines were furnished 
the firemen for knitting socks for service men. For the first time in 34 years 
the firemen omitted their annual ball, the proceeds of which were for a worthy 
cause. The firemen realized that the people had been called upon heavily for 
donations and for this reason decided to omit the ball that others might receive 
what they might have had. 



Holyoke Lodge, No. 902, B. P. O. E. 

Holyoke Lodge of Elks made a wonderful record in helping send Holyoke "over 
the top" in the various Liberty Loan campaigns. In the first loan the lodge itself 
bought $5,000 worth of bonds. When the second loan was launched the lodge 
purchased $60,000 worth of bonds and sold them to its members either for cash 
or on the partial payment plan. On the third loan the lodge bought $1,000 worth. 
On the fourth loan the lodge appointed a committee that sold to the members 
over and above what they had previously bought in their different walks of life, 
$100,000 worth of bonds. Of this amount about $20,000 was bought among the 
members living in Westfield and the remaining $80,000 in Holyoke. The lodge 
contributed $475 for various war works and gave $1,025 as its share to the Grand 
Lodge to build reconstruction hospitals and maintain base hospitals in France. 
The lodge also placed its home at the disposal of the government for use as a 
hospital for returned wounded soldiers. 



St. Jerome T. A. B. 8C L. Society 

The St. Jerome Temperance Society had 45 men in service and kept in constant 
touch with all of them at home and overseas. Tobacco and other supplies were 
sent to them and they were not forgotten at Christmas. The St. Jerome Ladies' 
Aid Society joined with the men's organization and knitted sweaters and other 
articles which were sent to the boys. Edwin J. Mitchell, who had always been a 
loyal and faithful worker for the society, was the only member to die in the 
.-service, being killed in action. 



318 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



Permanent Memorial Building 



Holyoke's part in the great war will be commemorated by the erection of a 
memorial building, a structure that will stand forever as a monument to those 
who fought in France and elsewhere and for those at home who did their part 
ih backing them up. Mayor Ryan has appointed a committee as follows : Joseph 
A. Skinner, Chairman ; William L. Foote, Secretary ; J. Lewis Perkins, Edward N. 
White, Urban Fleming, Frank B. Towne, John A. Callahan, C. L. Newcomb, John 
J. Lynch, Louis A. LaFrance, Philip M. Judd, Rev. Casimir Cwiklinski, David 
Clark, Donald Cameron, William C. Hammond, Peter J. Hinds, Samuel Baum, 
Joseph Equi and P. J. Garvey. This committee is empowered to get plans for the 
proposed building, select the site and intends to make it one of the finest in the 
countrv. 



L'Union National Francaise 

Thirtj'-five members of L'Union Francaise served in the French army and 
12 died in the French service, Lucien Lang, Emile Collin, Jules Rumelhard, Alfred 
Charton, Auguste Braun, Aloise Ruez, Marcel Sauvageot, Joseph Sauvageot, L. 
Hoesoart, Albert Cantini and Louis Houder. Two members were killed in action 
with the United States forces, Emile Bruder and Raoul Willemain. The organi- 
zation invested a total of $1,200 in the first four Liberty loans and gave the Red 
Cross $435 and $25 monthly. 



Cercle Rochambeau 

Cercle Rochambeau had 82 men in the service, two died, Priv. Joseph Leo Larivee 
and Priv. Desire Joyal, and four were wounded. The society contributed to the 
Red Triangle, Red Cross, Joffre French Relief Fund and the Syrian Relief Fund. 
For the members in service the Cercle had a tobacco fund which has been turned 
into a reception fund since the armistice was signed. The physical director had 
charge of sending newspapers to the boys and the recording secretary looked after 
the correspondence with them and kept in touch with their relatives as much as 
possible, a committee of three assisting. In the Fourth Liberty loan campaign 
95 per cent of the members bought bonds. 



Police Relief Association 

The Holyoke Police Relief Association bought Liberty Loan bonds to the 
amount of $9,000. The association voted not to hold its annual ball last year 
because of the war and the drain on the people of the city for the support of 
various war campaigns. Three regular members were in the service, Joseph Bader, 
James Baker and Jeremiah Coffey. The police department also did much work 
in assisting government agencies, in keeping tabs on residents suspected of unfriend- 
liness to the United States, in checking up enemy aliens, and co-operating with the 
exemption boards in looking up questionnaires and preventing evasions of the 
selective service law. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 319 



Holyoke Nest of Orioles 



The Holyoke Nest, Fraternal Order of Orioles, wa^ only a few months old 
when war was declared. Out of 146 members, 27 entered the service and the 
lodge kept in constant communication with those in the various camps and after 
they had gone overseas. From time to time a little remembrance of tobacto and 
chocolates were sent to them. Through the Supreme Nest, the lodge bought $300 
worth of Liberty Bonds and members were urged to make individual purchases 
of bonds and Thrift stamps. 



All Were Patriotic 

The Red Men, Odd Fellows, Masonic Orders, A. O. H. and various other 
fraternal organizations, social clubs and neighborhood groups all contributed their 
share in the purchase of bonds. Thrift stamps and donations to the various welfare 
drives and were represented by hundreds of members in the service. The labor 
organizations were patriotic to the core and bought bonds and stamps and helped 
in the other drives. The Central Labor Union was a heavy buyer of bonds and 
ever ready to assist in all patriotic causes. 

General Foch's Ten Commandments 

It was Moses who wrote the Ten Commandments, but it remained for Marshal 
Foch to write the 10 rules of war by which his men beat back the Germans. It 
is the little things that count and it is the exact nicety of the fighting of the man 
in the ranks that wins the war, thought the great French general. Here are the 
10 military commandments of Foch : 

1. Keep your eyes and ears ready and your mouth in the safety notch, for 
it is your soldierly duty to see and hear clearly, but as a rule you should be 
heard mainly in the sentry challenges or the charging cheer. 

2. Obey orders first, and if still alive kick afterward if you have been wronged. 

3. Keep your arms and equipment clean and in good order; treat your animals 
fairly and kindly and your motor or other machine as though it belonged to you 
and was the only one in the world. Do not waste your ammunition, your gas, 
your food, your time, nor your opportunity. 

4. Never try to fire an empty gun nor at an empty trench, but when you 
shoot, shoot to kill and forget not that at close quarters a bayonet beats a bullet. 

5. Tell the truth squarely, face the music and take your punishment like a 
man; for a good soldier won't lie, he doesn't sulk, and is no squealer. 

6. Be merciful to the women of your foe and shame them not, for you are a 
man; pity and shield the children in your captured territory, for you were once a 
helpless child. 

7. Bear in mind that the enemy is your enemy and the enemy of humanity 
until he is killed or captured ; then he is your dear brother or fellow soldier beaten 
or ashamed, whom you should no further humiliate. 

8. Do your best to keep your head clear and cool, your body clean and com- 
fortable and your feet in good condition, for you think with your head, fight with 
your body and march with your feet. 

9. Be of good cheer and high courage; shirk neither work nor danger; suffer 
in silence and cheer the comrades at your side with a smile. 

10. Dread defeat, but not wounds; fear dishonor, but not death and die gam?, 
and whatever the task, remember the motto of the division, "It Shall be Done." 



so. HADLEY'S HONOR ROLL 



DOMPIER, FRANCIS W., Private, Battery F, 12th Field Artillery. Entered 
service April 24, 1917, and went overseas in January, 1918. Killed in action in 
France October 24, 1918. 

GAYLORD, FRANCIS M., Student, S. A. T. C, University of Illinois. En- 
tered service in October, 1918. Passed examination for a commission. Died at 
the University Hospital October 22, 1918. Buried in South Hadley. 

GAW, WILLIAM H., Private, Veterinary Hospital No. 1. Entered service 
September 23, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 
Died of pneumonia in Holyoke, March 29, 1919. 

MAGUIRE, LEON T., Private, Company B, 337th Infantry. Entered service 
October 7, 1917, and sent to Camp Devens. Transferred to Camp Gordon, Ga., and 
sailed for overseas April 28, 1918. Killed in action in France October 10, 1918. 

MOODY, JAMES, Lumberman, New England Lumber Unit No. 8. Entered 
service June 16, 1917. Stationed at Ardgay, Scotland, where he contracted pleurisy. 
Invalided home February 19, 1918, and died in South Hadley Falls April 5, 1918. 
Buried in South Hadley Falls. 

WALLACE, CYRIL J., Lieutenant (British). Entered service in 1915. Went 
to England on Lusitania, which was torpedoed. Was in the water over three hours 
without a life belt. Won his commission on the battlefield. Died of wounds Sep- 
tember 9, 1918, in France. 

WHITE, BENJAMIN C, Private, Battery F, 12th Field Artillery. Entered 
service April 26, 1917, and went overseas in January, 1918. Wounded June 7, 1918, 
and died of wounds June 8th in France. 

WILLIAMS, HARRY L., Military Police. Entered service April 27, 1918 with 
a Lee contingent. Stationed at Camp Devens and sent overseas with Company H, 
302nd Infantry. Later transferred to Military Police. Died of pneumonia in 
France January 4, 1919. 




LmL I. N\ l.M MROP H. SMITH lj^uT. MOREY RORLEN 






LIEUT. ANDREW C. SMITH 



LIEUT. H. C. HUXTER 



South Hadley^s Army Officers 



CAPTAIN. 



AUDET, HERBERT R.— Ordnance Department. 

Entered service July 11, 1917; commissioned a lieutenant July 20, 1917; com- 
missioned a captain January 8, 1918 ; stationed at United States Armory, Spring- 
field, Mass. ; served with the British Army in the Boer War, and served five years 
in the 6th Massachusetts Regiment, M. V. M. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

BORLEN, MOREY— Quartermaster Corps. 

Entered servfce October 7, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; promoted to first 
sergeant; attended Officers' Training School and won commission; transferred to 
Camp Johnston, Fla. ; later assigned to Washington. 

BRITTON, RALPH R.— Aviation Corps. 

Entered service September 7, 1917, with a draft contingent to Camp Devens ; 
promoted to corporal ; discharged for physical reasons ; enlisted in aviation branch ; 
stationed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology; transferred to a gunnery 
school in Texas ; made flights at Taliaferro Field, Texas ; commissioned a lieuten- 
ant in June, 1918 ; transferred to Garden City, L. I. ; went overseas. 

DOWNS, FRED— 301st Company, Quartermaster Corps. 

Entered service in October, 1917 ; commissioned a first lieutenant at Columbus, 
Ohio; transferred to Camp Merritt, N. J.; with American Expeditionary Forces. 

DUDLEY, LAWRENCE A. — 5th Battery, J. A. R. D. 

Entered service June 3, 1918 ; stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. ; went overseas 
in August, 1918 ; commissioned a second lieutenant in France. 

GAYLORD, DR. JAMES T. — Medical Reserve Corps. 

Entered service August 10, 1918 ; stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. ; transferred 
to Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

GRIFFIN, DR. WILLIAM G. — Dental Reserve Corps. 
Commissioned a first lieutenant June 30, 1917. (Never called.) 

HARTIGAN, DANIEL J. — Infantry. 

Entered service September 23, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; graduated 
from Fourth Officers' Training School at Camp Devens; transferred to Camp Lee, 
Va. ; commissioned a second lieutenant. 

HOLLIS, STEPHEN— United States Army. 

Entered service February 26, 1918; stationed at Camp Devens ; transferred to 
Camp Meigs, Washington. D. C. ; promoted to corporal ; attended Officers' Train- 
ing School at Camp Meigs ; commissioned a second lieutenant. 

HUNTER, HAROLD C— Company H, 131st Infantry. 

Entered service January 5, 1918, going to Officers' Training School at Camp 
Upton, L. I. ; commissioned a second lieutenant April 5, 1918 ; served for a time in 
Company I, 306th Infantry; went overseas in May, 1918; wounded in left hand in 
Aiigust, 1918. 



1 




Top row (left to right)— Robert Wingate, Edwin Moffitt, Richard Bertram; middle 
row — William H. Gaw (deceased), Sidney Ingham, Lieut. Arthur E. Whittemore; 
bottom row— William Dressell, Michael P. O'Connor, Joseph Drohan. 



324 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

MOYNIHAN, HAROLD J. — Company I, 328th Infantry. 

Entered service September 23, 1917; stationed at Camp Devens ; transferred to 
Camp Gordon^ Ga. ; went overseas May 4, 1918 ; was first sergeant when he landed 
in France ; commissioned a second lieutenant in France. 

SMITH, ANDREW C— Machine Gun. 

Entered service October 7, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Devens ; promoted to cor- 
poral ; transferred to Camp Hancock, Ga., to a machine gun battalion ; commis- 
fioned a second lieutenant September 20, 1918; transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C. 

SMITH, WINTHROP H.— Field Artillery. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant at Plattsburg August 11, 1917 ; stationed at 
Camp Shelby, Miss.; transferred to Camp Jackson, S. C. ; assigned to 2nd Regi- 
ment, Field Artillery, R. D. 

STACY, PHILIP H.— Field Artillery. 

Entered service November 5, 1918 ; attended Officers' Training School, Camp 
Zachary Taylor; commissioned second lieutenant in February, 1919. 

SULLIVAN, MICHAEL W. — Infantry. 

Entered service in 1914 ; stationed at Canal Zone with Company H, 33rd In- 
fantry; transferred to Cam.p Beauregard, La, ; commissioned a second lieutenant 
October 8, 1918. 

WEISMAN, RUSSELL — Ambulance Service. 

Entered service in June, 1917 ; assigned to Upited States Army Ambulance 
Service, section 12 ; went overseas ; commissioned a first lieutenant and assigned to 
S. S. V. 512, French Army, detached service. 

WHITTEMORE, ARTHUR E. — Infantry. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant August 15, 1917, at Plattsburg; assigned to 
Camp Devens ; transferred to Camp Mills, N. J., and assigned to Company B, 168th 
Infantry, "Rainbow Division"; went overseas in December, 1917; assigned to Brit- 
ish Infantry School to learn bomb throwing; promoted to first lieutenant in June, 
1918 ; wounded at capture of Sergy, in July, 1918 ; recovered in time to take part in 
the battle of St. Mihiel, in September; wounded a second time and gassed while in 
action north of Verdun in October, 1918 ; with Army of Occupation. 



South Hadley^s Naval Officers 



LIEUTENANTS. 
GRIFFIN, DR. TI310THY. 

Commissioned a lieutenant in the Naval Reserves September 25, 1918 ; stationed 
at Boston Radio School, Cambridge; transferred, to headquarters 1st Xaval Dis- 
trict, Boston. 

IRWIN, DR. GRATTAN G. 

Commissioned surgeon in United States Navy with rank of lieutenant; in 
charge of naval laboratory, Charleston, Va. 

KENNEDY, DR. PATRICK F. 

Entered service October 7 1917; stationed at Camp Devens; commissioned a 
lieutenant in the Naval Reserves as Dental Surgeon October 5, 1917, subject to dis- 
charge from army ; discharged from army October 18, 1917 ; stationed at Newport 
Naval Training Station; served on U. S. S. New Jersey, U. S. S. Plattsburg and 
U. S. S. Leviathan. 

KENNEDY, DR. THOMAS J. 

Commissioned a lieutenant in Naval Reserves April 28, 1917 ; stationed at Naval 
Hospital in New York; transferred to Naval Hospital, Washington, D. C. ; trans- 
ferred to Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, N. H. 




MISS MARY SHEA 



LINCOLN B. SMITH 




'^ 





DEXTER L. BULLARD 



JAMES MOODY 



South Hadleij Men in the Service 



ASTLEY, ALBERT W., Sergeant, Headquarters Compan3% Tank Corps. 304th 
Battalion. Entered service November, 11)17. Stationed at Fort Myers, Va. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

AUBREY, ELIJAH J., Private, United States Army. Entered service October 
8, 1918. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

AUBREY, JEREMIAH. J., Private, Field Artillery. Entered service August 
12, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BABYOK, JOHN A., JR., Field Clerk, United States Army. Entered service 
May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

BACH, LOUIS A., Private, Veterinary Hospital No. 1. Entered service Oc- 
tober 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BARDWELL, CURTIS F., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
Mcrch 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BARRETT, FRANCIS J., Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober 8, 1918. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

BEAUREGARD, EDWARD C, Private, Supply Troop, 3rd Cavalry. Entered 
service December, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BEAUREGARD, GEORGE C, Private, Company E, 1st Army Headquarters 
Regiment. Entered service October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

BEAUREGARD, HORMISDAS, Private, 47th Company, M. T. O. Entered 
service July 7, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Camp Han- 
cock, Ga. 

BENNETT, HERBERT W., Private, Medical Department, 52nd Coast Ar- 
tillery Corps. Entered service December, 1917. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

BERGERON, ELZEAR., Private, Headquarters Company, 301st Infantry. En- 
tered service March 14, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

BERTRA3I, RICHARD, Private, 29th Engineers. Entered service June 24, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. Transferred to Fort Myer, Va. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

BLACIiMER, PAUL AV., Private, Company L, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

BLANCHARD, JOSEPH E., Private, Company D, 305th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service March 29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

BUCKLEY, RAYMOND C, Private, United States Army. Entered service 
August 15, 1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. 




STANLEY SEFTON 



JAMES SHEA 




EUGENE V. GUIEL 



FRANK SHEA 



328 HoLYOKE In The (treat War. 

BULLARD, DEXTER L., Private, Company E, 20th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice November 3, 1917. Stationed at Camp Lewis, American Lake, Washington, 
D. C. Went overseas on S. S. Tuscania, which was torpedoed. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

BriiNETT, DAVID McA., Private, Company D. r,th Machine Gun Battalion. 
Entered service June 16, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded 
twice in action. 

BURNETT, JAMES, Private, Coast Artillery Corps, S. A. R. D. Unit. En- 
tered service June 3, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

BURNETT, JAMES H., Private, Battery E, 20th Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 16, 1914. Stationed at Camp Stanley, Texas. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

BURNETTE, ROllERT, JR., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
September 6, 1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. 

BLANCHETTE, AIMEE, Corporal, Company E, 307th Supply Train. Entered 
service September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

BOERNER, PAUL C, Private, Company H, 302nd Infantry. Entered service 
March 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BOERNER, WALTER W., Private, Headquarters Company, 602d Engineers. 
Entered service April 27, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

BOERNER, WILLLIM P., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BOISJOLIER, JOSEPH A„ Private, United States Army. Entered service 
October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BOISJOLIER, NAPOLEON J., Private, United States Army. Entered serv- 
ice September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BONNEVILLE, GEORGE R., JR., Private, United States Army. Entered 
service July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BOURK, PHILIP, Bugler, Company I, 101st Infantry. Entered service Sep- 
tember 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp 'Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action. 

BRAINERD, BURNETTE J., Private, Company L, 32.5th Infantry. Entered 
eervice September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

BRODEUR, CLAU»)E J., Sergeant, 20th Aero Squadron. Entered service in 
November, 1917. Stationed at Mineola, L. I. Assigned to detached service with 
Royal Flying Corps in England. Later with American Expeditionary Forces. 

BRUNT, AVILLIAM L., Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober 8, 1918. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

CALKINS, CHARLES M.. Private, United States Irmy. 

CALKINS, RALPH E.. Private, Supply Company, 21st Field Artillery. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

CAMPBELL, ALEXANDER, Bugler, 5th Replacement Detachment, Coast Ar- 
tillery Corps. Entered service July 22, 1918. Stationed at Boston. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

CAMPBELL, AVILFRED, Private. United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 19, 1918. Stationed at University of Vermont. 

CARLIN, GEORGE F., Corporal, 24th Aero Squadron, Observation Group, 
4th Army Corps. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

CARTER, GROVER C, Private, United States Army. Entered service March 
30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 329 

CHAPLA, JOSEPH W., JR., Private, Troop E, 2nd Cavalry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

CHARLEBOIS, GEORGE L., Private, United States Army. 

CLEARY, HARRY P., Private, Troop E, 2nd Cavalry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

CORDES, AVALTER C, Private, Company B, 7th Engineers. Entered service 
in December, 1917. Stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

CORMIER, HAROLD E., Private, Machine Gun Company, 48th Infantry. Sta- 
tioned at Camp Lewis, Wash. 

CORRIDEX, THOMAS F., Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
December 13, 1917. Stationed at Fort Strong, Boston. 

CORTIER, ALBERT A., Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 6, 1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. 

CRAFTS, JOHX A., Private, Company L 89th Infantry. Entered service in 
December, 1917. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. Transferred to Camp Greene, 
N. C. With American E.xpeditionary Forces. Gassed twice. 

CUXXIXGHAIM, HAROLD P., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
June 3, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

CUXXIXGHAM, LEOXARD J., Private, Headquarters Company, 301st In- 
fantry. Entered service December 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

CUXXIXGHAM, RAYMOXD, Private, United States Army. Stationed at Fort 
Slocum, N. Y. 

DAXIELS, JOvSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service March 30, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

DAXKO, CHARLES, JR., Private, Troop E, 4th Cavalry. Entered service 
in May, 1917. Stationed at Hawaii. 

DEITEL, CHARLES J., JR., Sergeant, Medical Corps. Entered service Oc- 
tober 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Transferred to Camp Gordon, Ga. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

DOUCETTE, LOnS A., Private, Company D, 1st Army Headquarters Regi- 
ment. Entered service June 1, 1917, with Company H, 74th Infantry, National 
Guard of New York. Transferred to 122d Infantry, and later to 108th Infantry at 
Camp Wadsworth, S. C Transferred to Company D, 1st New Hampshire Infantry, 
at Camp Greene, N. C. This company was reorganized into the 1st Army Head- 
quarters Regiment with American Expeditionary Forces. 

DOWXEY, EARL F., Sergeant, Radio Department, .Air Service. Entered serv- 
ice July, 1917. Stationed at San Antonio, Texas. Transferred to Park Field, Mem- 
phis, Tenn. 

DOWXS, STAXLEY, Private, First Company, Development Battalion. Sta- 
tioned at Camp Wheeler, Ga. 

DRESSELL, FREDERICK, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service 
Aug-ust 5, 1917. Stationed at Fort Banks. 

DROHAX, JOSEPH C, Private, Company B, 104th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

DUCHARME, ROLAXD, Private, United States Army. Entered service Aug- 
ust 1, 1918. 

DUDLEY, GEORGE F., Private, Company G, 301st Infantry. Entered service 
March 29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

DUDLEY, JAMES R., Supply Sergeant, 7th Regiment, Field Artillery Reserve 
Detachment. Entered service August 28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 



330 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

DUGAN, THOMAS F., Private, United States Army. Entered service in Aug- 
ust, 1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. 

DUNCAN, HAROLD E., Private, Aviation. Entered service in December, 
1917. Stationed at Kelly Field, Texas. 

DUNLEA, KAY3IOND AV., Private, 58th Ammunition Train. Entered service 
September 14, 1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. Transferred to Fort Ad- 
ams, R. I. 

DUPONT, GEORGE, Private, IGth Depot Brigade. Entered service August 
28. 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. Transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C. 

ELLISON, NORMAN B., Private, United States Army. Entered service April 

27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

FARRrER, CLARENCE E., Private, 39th Machine Gun Battalion. Entered 
service July 7, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Camp Lewfis, 
D. C. 

FITZGERALD, WILLIAM L., Private. Field Medical Supply Depot No. 3. 
Entered service March 21, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

FORD, ALEXANDER G., Private, Company H, 76th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FORD, ALEXANDER S., Mechanic, Company L, 328th Infantry. Entered 
service October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

FORD, EDWARD, Sergeant, 481st Aero Squadron. Stationed at Morrison,. 
N. J. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FORD, JOSEPH C, Private, 319th Fire and Guard Company. Entered serv- 
ice, July 30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. Transferred to Camp Stuart,. 
7irginia. 

FORD, THOMAS W., Private, Company No. 1, S. A. R. D. Engineers. En- 
tered service June 15, 1918. Stationed at Newtonville Institute. Transferred ta 
Washington Barracks, Washington, D. C. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

FRENETTE, WILFRED P., Private, Truck Company C, 2nd Corps, Artillery 
Park. Entered service June 3, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

FRP:NETTE, WILLIAM J., Sergeant, Company F, 5th Division, Ammunition 
Train. Entered service in January, 1917. Stationed at Fort Ringgold, Texas. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

FRODYMA, WILLIAM B., Private, Battery F, 31st Field Artillery. Entered 
service June 3, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Camp Aleade,. 
Maryland. 

GAGNON, FREEMAN, Private, United States Army. Entered service August 

28, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

GARDNER, GRAYSON, Private, United States Army. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

GAYLORD, WILLIAM H., Corporal, Battery C, 321st Field Artillery. En- 
tered service September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

GERMAIN, FRANK, Private, United States Army. Entered service August 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

GERMAIN, HENRY E., Private, Aviation. Entered service January 16, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Kelly Field, Texas. Transferred 
to Camp Morrison, Va. 

GLACKNER, FRANK W., Private, Machine Gun Company, 327th Infantry. 
Entered service October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 331 

GLACKNER, GEORGE H., Corporal, 481st Aero Squadron. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

GODDARD, JOHN E., Private, Company G, 302nd Infantry. Entered service 
in April, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HAAS, PAUL P., Corporal, Ordnance Department. Entered service July 1,. 
1918. Stationed at Wentworth Institute. Transferred to Camp Merritt, N. J. 

HALKET, ROBERT, Private, Troop A, 15th Cavalry. Entered service Jan- 
uary 10, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

HALL, ROBERT H., Private, Battery E, 53d Coast Artillery Corps. Entered 
service August 13, 1917, in the 6th Field Artillery. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. 
Y. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HAUTERMAN, JULES, Private, Field Artillery. Entered service August 23, 
J 918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

HENNEMAN, ALBERT F., Private, Company L, 49th Infantry. With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

HOFFMAN, CHARLES W., Corporal, A. S. S. C, 3rd Construction Bricklay- 
ing Company. Entered service September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HOFFMAN, GEORGE B., Private, A. S. S. C, 3rd Construction Bricklaying^ 
Company. Entered service September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

HOLDEN, HARRY A., Private, 5th Battery, I. A. R. D. Entered service June 
3, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HVILSTED, EINAR, Private, 3Gth Machine Gun Battalion. Entered service 
July 23, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

INGHAM, SYDNEY, Sergeant, Company L, 3rd Development Battalion. En- 
tered service March 29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

IRWIN, HAROLD M., Corporal, 327th Infantry. Entered service September 
23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Wounded in action. 

JOHNSON, FRANK M., Corporal, Company 3, 1st Motor Mechanics. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

JUDGE, FRANK H., Sergeant, 662d Aero Supply Squadron. Entered service 
November 10, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Kelly Field, 
Texas. 

KELLY, ALOYSIUS, Corporal, 1st Entrenchment Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice June 7, 1918. Stationed at Newtonville Institute. Transferred to Washington 
Barracks, Washington, D. C. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

KELLEY, EDWARD B., Sergeant, 4th Battery Field Artillery, R. R. Dept. 
Division. Entered service April 24, 1917. Stationed at Fort Myer, Va. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

KELLEY, JAMES F., JR., Corporal, Company F, 2d Division, Ammunition 
Train. Entered service December 1, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. With 
American Expeditionary F'orces. 

KELLEY, JOHN H., Private, Auxiliary Remount Depot. Entered service 
July 26, 1917. Stationed at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

KENNEDY, JOHN J., Sergeant, 59th Field Artillery. Entered service May 10, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Camp Jackson, S. C. 

KENNEDY, PATRICK, Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

KEOUGH, CHARLES P., Sergeant, Company D, 519th Engineers. Entered 
service in November, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 



332 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

KEOUGH, AVILLIAM F., Sergeant, Air Service Flying School. Stationed at 
Kelly Field, Texas. Transferred to Camp McArthur, Texas. Transferred to Camp 
Hicks, Texas. 

KOCENICK, JOSEPH J., Private, Battery B, 102nd Field Artillery. Entered 
service September 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

LACEY, RAYMOND W., Sergeant, 17oth Aero Squadron. Stationed at Fort 
Siocum, X. Y. Transferred to Ellington Field, Houston, Texas. Transferred to 
Payne Field, Miss. 

LACROIX, ARTHUR E., Private, Headquarters Company, 301st Engineers. 
Entered service March :29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

LAMB, NORMAN F„ Sergeant, Searchlight Depot, 53rd Engineers. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

LEGRAND, EUGENE, Private, Provisional Truck Motor Company, 1st Depot 
r)ivision. Entered service April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

LEGRAND, THOMAS J., Private, Chemical Service. Entered service Sep- 
tember 25, 1918. Stationed at Washington, D. C. 

LEMOINE, AVILLIAM, Private, Company B, 314th Infantry. Entered service 
May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

L'ESPERANCE, CHARLES H., Private, United States Army. Entered serv- 
ice February 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

L'ESPERANCE, FREDERICK A., Corporal, Company K, 302d Infantry. En- 
tered service April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

LYNCH, CHARLES T., Private, Company M, 102nd Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice December 13, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

3IACKIE, JAMES R., Private, Machine Gun Company, 327th Infantry. En- 
t'-red service September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

MADSEN, CLINTON L., Private, Company G, 302d Infantry. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MAHON, PATRICK, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 10, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Siocum, N. Y. 

McCABE, JOHN J., Private, Training Detachment. Entered service Septem- 
ber 19, 1918. Stationed at University of Vermont. 

JIcELAVAIN, ROBERT H., Private, Motor Truck Company No. 472, Main 
Supply Train No. 418. Entered service May 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, 
h. I. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

McGURK, ARTHUR J., Private, Troop F, 2nd Cavalry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

McLEOD, MURDIE A., Private, United States Army. Entered service May 
27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

3IcLEOD, WILLIAM, Corporal, United States Army. 

MESSOM, ARTHUR T., Private, Aviation. Entered service February 6, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Siocum, N. Y. Transferred to Fort Omaha, Neb. 

3IIKNA, MICHAEL, Sergeant, 15th Trench Mortar Battery. Entered the 
service May 29, 1917. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt.. with 2nd Cavalry. Trans- 
ferred to Camp Bartlett. Transferred to 4th Cavalry, Schofield Barracks, Hawaiian 
Islands. Transferred to 305th Cavalry at Fort Stanley, Texas, where he was made 
first sergeant. His troop was converted into the 15th Trench Mortar Battery. 



HoLYOKE Ix The Great AVar. 333 

3IITCHELL, JOHN F., Corporal, 12th Sanitary Train. Entered service March 

29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

MITCHELL, JOHN P., Corporal, Medical Department, 51st Regiment, Coast 
Artillery Corps. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MONGEON, WILFRED J., Corporal, Company C, 28th Infantry. Entered 
service September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

MOODY, GEORGE H., Corporal, United States Army. 

MORENCY, JOSEPH, Private, Supply Company, 18th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service November 28, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MORRISON, HAROLD R., Private, Company B, 14th R. R. Engineers. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

MOYNIHAN, FRANK, Private, Medical Department. Entered service May 20, 
1918. 

MUNN, ROBERT D., Private, United States Army. Entered service October 
8, 1918. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

NADEAU, THEOBALL A., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
September 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

NADEAU, WILFRED J.. Private, Field Artillery. Entered service Tune 26, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Camp Jackson, S. C. 

NOEL, LEON H., Private, Aviation. , Entered service January 16, 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Ellington Field, Houston, Texas. 

O'BRIEN, JAMES, Private, 3q6th Engineers. Entered service May 27, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. With Am.erican Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNELL, CHARLES P., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
September 3, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

O'CONNELL, JAMES AV., Clerk, 6th Provisional Company, S. A. R. D. ^ En- 
tered service July 6, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Camp 
Hancock, Ga. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNELL, JOSEPH F., Private, Company G, 302nd Infantry. Entered 
service April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

O'CONNOR, JOHN R., Private, Battery H, 44t_h Co^st Artillery Corps. Sta- 
tioned at Fort Myers, Va. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNOR, RHCHAEL A., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
July 30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. 

O'CONNOR, MICHAEL P., Sergeant, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered 
service February 17, 1911. Was first cadet appointed from Holyoke for Massachu- 
setts Training School at Charlestown, 191.j. Did duty at Mexican border in 1916. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

O'CONNOR, PATRICK J., Corporal, Company E, 301st Engineers. Entered 
service April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. Gassed in action. 

O'DONNELL, JOHN F., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 

30, 1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse. N. Y. 

O'DONNELL, STEPHEN P., Clerk, United States Army. Entered service 
August 29, 1918. Stationed at Madison Barracks, N. Y. Transferred to school 
of area photography, Rochester, N. Y. 

OERTEL, JOHN T., Private, Field Artillery. Entered service June 26, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Dix, N. T. Transferred to Central Officers' Training School, 
Camp Taylor, Ky. 

O'NEIL, MARTIN E.. Private, United States Army. Entered service October 
22. 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 



334 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

PAUL, HENRY P., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 1, 
1918. Stationed at Wentworth Institute. Transferred to Camp Merritt, N. J. 

PELOQUIN, ALFRED H., Corporal, Truck Company, 2nd Corps, Artillery 
Park. Entered service June 3, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. With Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

PELOQUIN, EMILE, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 27, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PELOQUIN, LEO J., Private, Air Service Mechanics School. Entered serv- 
ice January 16, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to St. Paul, 
Minn. 

PELOQUIN, WILFRED, Private, Battery B, 319th Field Artillery. Entered 
service October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expedition- 
aiy Forces. 

PETERSON, ROBERT J., Private, Field Artillery. Entered service August 
28. 1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

PIERCE, JOSEPH H., Private, Company I, 3rd Chemical Battalion. Entered 
service February 27, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Edge- 
wood, Md. 

QUESNELL, WILFRED, Private, Battery D, 305th Field Artillery. Entered 
t:ervice March, 29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expedition- 
ary Forces. 

QUINLAN, ROBERT G., Private, United States Army. Entered service Sep- 
tember 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

RACHKIS, JOSEPH A., Private, Battery B, 305th Field Artillery. Entered 
service March 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

_RAE, CHARLES C, Private, Marine Corps. Entered service June 19. 1918. 
Stationed in South Carolina. 

RANNEY, CLAYTON N., Private, Medical Corps, 7th Field Artillery. En- 
tered service May 14, 1917. Stationed at Camp Shelby, Va. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

REINHARD, JOHN R., Private, Intelligence Corps, S. O. S., General Head- 
quarters. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

RENAUD, DORIA, Private, Cavalry. Entered service May 9, 1918. Stationed 
at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

RICHARDS, NORMAN F., Sergeant, United States Army. Stationed at Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

SCHNEIDERWIND, HARRY A., Private, United States Army. Entered 
service April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SEARLE, EDWARD B., JR., Private, Company F, 301st Engineers. Entered 
service September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

SEARLE, STUART R., Private, 33rd Regiment, Coast Artillery Corps. En- 
tered service August 15, 1918. Stationed at New York State College for Teachers. 
Transferred to Camp Eustis, Va. 

SEFTON, STANLEY, Corporal, Company B, 120th Machine Gun Battalion. 
Entered service October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

SELKIRK, JOHN, Sergeant, United States Army. Entered service April, 
1917. Stationed at Camp Beauregard, La. 

SELKIRK, ROBERT, JR., Sergeant, 59th Field Artillery. Entered service 
May 10, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Camp Jackson, 
S. C. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 335 

SELIvIKK, WILLIAM, Sergeant, United States Army. Entered service April, 

1917. Stationed at Camp Beauregard, La. 

SHEA, JA3IES F., Sergeant, Base Hospital No. 39 (Yale Mobile Unit). En- 
tered service September, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHEA, JAiMES R., Private, United States Army. Entered service April 27, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Transferred to a map school in Virginia. Trans- 
ferred to the Westinghouse Plant in Chicopee Falls. 

SHEA, FRANK P., Sergeant, 1st Army Corps, Special Training Battalion. En- 
tered service September 5, 1917. Previous service in Company D, 2nd Massachu- 
setts Regiment. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Gassed in action. 

SHEEHAN, JOHN E., Private, United States Army. Entered service z\ugust 
28. 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SHEEHAN, THOMAS J., Sergeant-Major, Headquarters Company, 348th In- 
fantry. Entered service June 2G, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. With Amer 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

SIMOND, JOSEPH X., Private, Infantry. Entered service May 10, 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

SLATTERY, DENNIS J., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
7, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

SLATTERY, JOHN F., Private, United States Army. Entered service June 
3, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

SMITH, ARTHUR J., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service in January, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Beauregard, La. 

SMITH, CLAYTON M., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 
22, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SMITH, JAMES L., Sergeant-Major, 1st Machine Gun Replacement Battalion, 
()th Marine Corps. Entered service in 1889. Served in the Infantry, Artillery and 
Marine Corps. Stationed at Philadelphia. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SMITH, LINCOLN B., Corporal, Battery B, 103rd Field Artillery. Entered 
service in April, 1917. Stationed at Boxford. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SMITH, ailLO S., Private, Company F, 301st Engineers. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces, 

SMITH, WALTER V., Private, Gas Defense. Entered service April 2, 1918. 
Stationed at Astoria, L. I. 

SMITH, WILLIAM A., Private, Company K, 165th Infantry. Entered service 
September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

SORTON, EDGAR, Private, Headquarters Troop, 7th Cavalry. Entered serv- 
ice February 22, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Fort Bliss, 
Texas. 

SPENCER, FRANK R„ Private, Company D, 42nd Infantry. Entered service 
June 24, 1918. Stationed at Camp Deven's. Transferred to Camp Upton, L. I. 

STALMANN, HENRY W., Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober 8, 1918. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

ST. MICHAEL, JOSEPH, Private, Company D, Machine Gun Battalion, 120th 
Infantry. Entered service September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

STRONG, CHESTER L., Private, Depot Brigade. Entered service September 
5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Upton, L. I. 

STRUTHER, PHILIP J., Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober .J, ]918. Stationed at Camp Sevier, S. C. 



336 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

SULLIVAN, CORNELILTS E., Private, 325th Fire and Guard Company. En- 
tered service August 5, 1918. Stationed at Camp Syracuse, N. Y. Transferred to 
Camp Stuart, Va. 

SULLIVAN, JAMES F., Corporal, Headquarters Company, 327th Infantry. En- 
tered service September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, JOHN J., Private, United States Army. Entered service August 
^9, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SULLIVAN, JOHN J., Corporal, Company B, 301st Infantry. Entered service 
April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SULLIVAN, MICHAEL J., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
Aiay 10, 1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Camp Jackson, 
S. C. 

SULLIVAN, PETER D„ Private, Field Artillery. Stationed at Camp Jackson, 
S. C. Transferred to Camp Dix, N. J. 

TACK, KARL E., Private, Troop C, 15th Cavalry. Entered service January 
n, 1918. Stationed at Fort Douglas, Arizona. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

TACY, OSCAR L., Sergeant-Major, 12th Division, Military Police. Entered 
service September 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

TAUGHER, J.IMES P., Private, Troop K, 15th Cavalry. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces 

THAYER, EARL F., Private, Company D, 42nd Infantry. Entered service 
June 24, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Transferred to Camp Upton, L. I. 

THOMPSON, FRED E., Private, United States Army. Entered service Oc- 
tober 8, 1918. Stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

THOMPSON, JAMES, Private, Battery C, 335th Field Artillery. Entered serv- 
ice June 26, 1918. Stationed at Camp Dix, N. J. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

TODT, CHARLES, JR., Private, Headquarters Company, 41st Dept. Division. 
1st Corps. Entered service October 7, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With 
American Expeditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

VANDENBURG, WARREN M., Private, Troop K, 2nd Cavalry. Entered 
service April 23, 1918. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

VILBON, CHARLES, Private, Army Coast Defense. Entered service October 
21, 1918. Stationed at Fort Williams, Me. 

WALL, JAMES J., JR., Sergeant, 301st Engineer Train. Entered service Sep- 
tember 23, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WATSON, HENRY B., Private, Field Artillery. Entered service August 28, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Jackson, S. C. 

WHITE, GEORGE T., Corporal, Company C, 60th Engineers. Entered serv- 
ice March 29, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

WHITFORD, GEORGE W., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
August 28, 1918. Stationed at Franklin University, Boston. 

WILLIAMS, HERBERT C, Private, Company D, 42nd Infantry. Entered 
service June 24, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. Transferred to Camp Upton, 
L. I. 

WINGATE, ROBERT H„ Private, Company K, 302d Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice April 27, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

YOUNG, GEORGE W.,_ Private, Ordnance. Entered service December 19, 
1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 



, HoLYOKE In The Great AVar. 337 

Navy 

BERTRAM, JAMES J. Attached to Transport Mercury. 
BIBEAU, EUGENE B., JR. Stationed on U. S. S. Carola IV. 

BROOKS, EDMUND W. Bluejacket Guard. Stationed at Newport. R. I. 

BROWN FRANK A.. Stationed on U. S. S. Nebraska. Entered service with 
Company H, Naval Brigade of Springfield. Formerly on U. S. S. Kittery. Took 
part in German naval surrender. 

DICKINSON, ASHLEY W. 

DIETEL, JOHN H. Stationed on U. S. S. Tacoma. 

DRESSEL, WILLIAM E. Stationed on U. S. S. New York. Entered serv- 
ice August 10, 1916. With American Battle Eleet. Took part in German naval 
surrender. 

FITZGERALD, FRANCIS. Entered service June 3, 1918. Stationed at Bos- 
ton. Transferred to Naval Base, Portland, Me. 

GIROUX, LOUIS. Stationed on U. S. S. Little Brothers. 

HAMEL, WILDER B. Stationed on U. S. S. New York. Entered service 
June 1, 1917. Stationed on U. S. S. Delaware. Transferred to U. S. S. New York. 
Took part in German naval surrender. 

KELLY, HERBERT K. Entered service August 28, 1918. Stationed at Boston. 

KENNEDY, MAURICE. Entered service June 27, 1918. 

KOSKEY, STANLEY J. Stationed on U. S. S. Arizona. Took part in the 
German naval surrender. 

LYNCH, RAYxMOND. Entered service July 12, 1918. Stationed at Newport, 
R. I., Training School. 

MACKENZIE, JOHN S., Chief Boatswain's Mate. Entered service in 1913. 
Re-enlisted 1917. While assigned to U. S. S. Remlik, saved ship and all on board. 
U. S. S. Remlik did convoy work as part of the so-called "suicide fleet." Trans- 
ferred to U. S. S. Walker. 

METHOT, GEORGE A. Stationed on U. S. S. Walker. 

AUTCHELL, MICHAEL J. Entered service June 3, 1918. Stationed at Boston, 

MOFFATT, EDWIN H. Entered service June 3, 1918. Stationed at Boston. 
Transferred to Pelham Bay, N. Y. 

MOODY, ALFRED S., JR. Entered service October 15, 1918. Stationed at 
Boston. Previously served one year (June, 1917, to June, 1918) with the New Eng- 
land Sawmill Unit No. 8 in Ardgay, Scotland. Transferred to Portsmouth Navy 
Yard. 

MORAN, FRANCIS P. Entered service December 8, 1916. 

PETERS, JOSEPH M. Stationed on U. S. S. Mt. Vernon. When on this 
vessel was torpedoed off the Erench coast. 

PROVOST, SOLOMAN. Entered service July 8, 1918, in the Medical Depart- 
ment of the Naval Reserves. Stationed at Boston. Assigned to U. S. S. South- 
eroy. 

RILEY, BRYAN J. 

SLATTERY, JEREMIAH N. Entered service June 3, 1918. Stationed at 
Boston. 

SMITH, PAUL F. H. Entered service May 16, 1918. 

STANLEY, LESLIE H. Stationed on U. S. S. Nebraska. Entered service 
with Company H, Springfield Naval Brigade. Took part in German naval surren- 
der. 

STRUTHERS, WINFRED L. Second Company Bluejacket Guard, Newport, 
R. I. 

TEMPLE, EARLE R. Entered the Merchant Marine service April 22, 1918. 
In foreign waters. 

WARREN, HIRAM D.— Stationed on U. S. S. Vestal. 

WHITE, HENRY F. Stationed on U. S. S. Salem. 

22 



338 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

South Hadley Student Army Training Corps 

BAGG, QUINCY A., Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

BRUNT, CARLTON L., Worcester Institute of Technology. 

BURNETT, ROLLAND, Worcester Institute of Technology. 

DEMARY, WALTER, University of Vermont. 

DIETEL, FREDERICK W., Colgate College. 

DUDLEY, EDAVARD M., Holy Cross College. 

DUNBAR, EDSON S., Amherst College. 

EATON, DWIGHT H., Amherst College. 

FOUNTAIN, CHARLES, University of Pennsylvania. 

HAMILTON, CHARLES M., Cornell College. 

HUNTER, REGINALD, Colgate College. 

IRWIN, RALPH F., Catholic University. 

JUDGE, GERALD A., Amherst College. 

KEENS, RALPH, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

KRAYNICHUCK, GEORGE E., Catholic University. 

LACEY, FRANCIS, Holy Cross College. 

LONG, JOHN, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

LOVELL, LYMAN C, Worcester Institute of Technology. 

LYNCH, JOSEPH, Holy Cross College. 

MOYNAHAN, JOSEPH P., Amherst College. 

ROBERTS, WILLIAM McK., Amherst College. 

SmTH, FREDERICK M.. JR., Yale College (Naval Unit). 

WHITTEMORE, ALFRED L., Brown University. 

WILKINSON, ALBERT F., Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



Allied Service 

ARCHAMBAULT, FRANK D., (Canadian Expeditionary Forces). 
CHAPDELAIN, EDWARD, (Canadian Expeditionary Forces). 
CUNNINGHAM, JAMES, (Canadian Expeditionary Forces). 
LOVIE, CHARLES, (British Expeditionary Forces). 
McLEA, DUNCAN, (British Expeditionary Forces). 
McLUSKEY, JOHN, (British Navy). 
RAMSAY, ROBERT, (Canadian Expeditionary Forces). 
ROUGH, WILLIAM, (British .Expeditionary Forces). 



South Hadley Women in Service 

BOYCE, EDNA M., Red Cross Nurse, France. 
DIClilNSON, ELLEN M., Red Cross Nurse, Camp Devens. 
DIETEL, LILLIAN M., Red Cross Nurse, Camp Devens. 
HARHLTON, ELIZABETH G., Red Cross Nurse, Camp Devens. 
O'CONNOR, MARGARET, Medical Department, Camp Greene, N. C. 
SHEA, MARY A., Red Cross Nurse, Camp Wheeler, Ga. 
THOMPSON, MARJORIE E., Red Cross Nurse, Camp Devens. 
CUNNINGHAM, RUBY, Telephone Operator, Camp Devens. 
KIRKPATRICK, ELLEN A., Civilian Relief. Holvoke. 



Willimansett^s War Record 



Honor Roll 

BEAUCHAMP, HOMER R., Fireman, Transport Mt. Vernon. Entered serv- 
ice June 5, 1917. Was one of thirty-five men killed by the explosion of a torpedo 
wJiich struck the vessel while two hundred miles from French coast on September 
5, 1918. Buried in Willimansett. 

GEOFFRION, DONA, Private, 58th Infantry. Entered service in May, 1918. 
Killed in action in France September 5, 1918. 



Willimansett s Army Officers 

CHAPLAIN. 

BOUTIN, REV. JOSEPH H. — Infantry. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant June, 1917 ; stationed at Camp Zachary Taylor. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

GRAY, ELMER J.— Field Artillery. 

Entered service in April, 1917 ; stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. ; commissioned 
a second lieutenant November 10, 1917 ; assignted to 16th Field Artillery and sta- 
tioned at Camp Greene, N. C. 

HEYWOOD, DR. NATHANIEL J. — Medical Reserve Corps. 
Commissioned a first lieutenant June 28, 1918. 

KANE, JAMES F.— Infantry. 

Commissioned a second lieutenant August 10, 1917, at Fort Benjamin Harrison, 
Ind. ; assigned to Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., as athletic instructor ; promoted to 
first lieutenant July 15, 1918. 

MEAD, DR. FREDERICK A.— Medical Reserve Corps. 

Commissioned a first lieutenant June 14, 1918; stationed at Columbus, S. C. ; 
transferred to Camp Greenleaf, Fort (3glethorpe, Ga. 

WEINRICH, WILLIA?.! O.— Infantry. 

Entered service April, 1917; stationed at Camp Meade, Md.; commissioned a 
second lieutenant April 29, 1918. 




UnUT TAMES P. KANE 



CHARLES DEARDEN 




HENRY T. HOPKINS 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 341 

Army 

BAILLE, JEAN B., JR., Private, Engineer Corps. Entered service January 
7, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. "^ 

BAILIiEY, JOHN, Private, United States Army. Went overseas with Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

BAILLEY, LOUIS, Private, United States Army. Went overseas with Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

BALL, THOMAS J., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service March 15, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. 

BEAUCHAMP, EDWARD L., Private, United States Army. Entered service 
in July, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BEYER, GEORGE E., Corporal, Headquarters, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice June, 1917. Went overseas with American Expeditionary Forces. Cited for 
bravery in action from April 2nd to the 14th, 1918. 

BLANCHARD, EUCLID, Private, United States Army. Entered service in 
July, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BOISVERT, SAMUEL J., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service July 29, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

BOISVERT, WILLIAM, Private, 20th Engineer Corps. Entered service in 
August, 1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. Went overseas with American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

BOUCHARD, EanLE, Private, United States Army. Entered service in July, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

BRAZEIL, JAMES A., Corporal, Field Artillery. Entered service in January, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Camp Doplin, Okla. 

CARROLL, FRANIi, Private. Engineer Corps. Entered service December 7, 
1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

CARROLL, GEORGE S., Private, Aviation. Entered service December 7, 

1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to San Antonio, Texas. 

CASOLO, AREANGELO, Private, United States Army. Entered service in 
July, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CHRETIEN, RE»n, Private, Infantry. Entered service in May, 1917. 

CLARKE, WILLIAM, Private, United States Army. Entered service in- July, 

1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

CORDINGLY", ALBERT E., Mechanic, 218th Aero Squadron. Entered service 
October 18, 1917. Stationed at Fort Worth, Texas. Transferred to Kelly Field, 
Texas. Transferred to Garden City, L. I. Went overseas in March, 1918. 

DAVIAU, ARMAND E., Private, Company K, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice in June, 1916. Did duty on the Mexican border. Went overseas. Was gassed 
in action. 

DEARDEN, CHARLES G., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service in May, 
1917, in the 8th Coast Artillery Corps. Transferred to the medical department. 
Went overseas. 

DEARDEN, ELMER J., Private, Cavalry. Entered service March 7, 1917. 
Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. Transferred to Fort Bliss, Texas, and assigned to 
Troop B, 5th Cavalry. 

DEBIEN, EDWARD J., Private, Medical Corps. Entered service in July, 
1917. Stationed at the base hospital at Camp Devens. 

DOMIXQUE, ANTHOXY% Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. Entered serv- 
ice in June, 1917. Went overseas in October, 1917. Was wounded in action. 




Top row (left to right)-^Paul Martel, Edward Hemond, George Hemond; middle 
row — Avila Riopel, Anthony Domingue, A. Davian ; bottom row — Armand Hemond, 
R. Chretien. 



HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 343 

DUFFY, THOMAS, Corporal United States Army. Stationed at Camp Mills, 
N. Y. 

DUROCHERS, ARCHIE, Private, United States Army. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

FONTAINE, MOSES, Private, United States Army. Entered service in July, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GAGNE, CHARLES, Sergeant, Medical Corps. Entered service in October, 

1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 

GAGNE, ERNEST, Private, Cavalry. Entered service July 17, 1918. Stationed 
at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

GAGNE, W^LLLIM, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service June 12, 

1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

GAGNON, ELPHEGE, Private, Cavalry. Entered service April 17, 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

GAMACHE, FRANK, Private, United States Army. Entered service April 13, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

GAREAU, EUGENE F., Private, United States Army. .Entered service in 
J'uly, 1918, Stationed at Camp Devens. 

GEOFFRION, ALBERT C, Private, Company G, 58th Infantry. Entered 
service in March, 1918. With American Expeditionary Forces. Wounded twice. 

GLOUTAKY, JOSEPH F., Private, Cavalry. Entered service March 11, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

GRIFFIN, RAYMOND, Sergeant, Aviation. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

GUERTIN, LEONARD E., Private, United States Army. Entered service De- 
cember 10, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

HEBERT, OVILA, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 16, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HEMOND, ARMAND, Private, Ammunition Train. Entered service in Aug- 
ust, •1917. Stationed at Camp Devens. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HEMOND, EDWARD, Wagoner, Ammunition Train. Entered service May 1, 
3918. Stationed at Wentworth Institute. With American Expeditionary Forces. 
Gassed four times in action. 

HEMOND, GEORGE, Private, Medical Corps. Entered service in June, 1917, 
after two months in Naval Coast Service. Stationed at Camp McClellan, Ala. 

HIGGINS, DAVID A., Private, United States Army. Entered service in July, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

HOOKER, GEORGE, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action and gassed twice. 

HOPIvINS, HENRY T., Private, 308th Infantry. Entered service in Septem- 
ber, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

HOPiaNS, JOHN J., Supply Sergeant, 19th Field Artillery. Entered service 
May 12, 1917. Stationed at Camp Stanley, Texas. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

JARRY, EDWARD, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service January 
9, 1918. 

JOHNSON, EDWIN T., Private, Quartermaster Corps. Entered service De- 
cember 11, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 



344 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



KEATING, JOHN M., Private, United States Army. Entered service October 
30, 1917. 

KENNEDY, CORNELIUS, Private, United States Army. Entered service in 
July, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LACROIX, OVILA, Private, United States Army. Entered service in July, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LAFLEUR, DENNIS, Sergeant, United States Army. 

LAMAGDELAINE, ROBERT E., Private, Cavalry. Entered service May 23, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

LANGEVIN, LEONARD, Sergeant, Engineer Corps. Stationed at Washing- 
ton Barracks, Washington, D. C, as assistant post engineer. 

LANGLOIS, JOSEPH, Corporal, United States Army. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

LEARY, FRANK, Private, United States Army. Entered service February 25, 
193 8. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

LEONARD, EDMOND, Private, United States Army. Entered service May 31, 
1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

LEVERAULT, A. V., Musician, Headquarters, 104th Infantry. With Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. Cited for bravery, awarded Croix de Guerre, and rec- 
ommended for a Distinguished Service Medal. 

McGRATH, JOSEPH, Private, 2nd Cavalry. Entered service in June, 1917. 
With American Expeditionary Forces. 

3IARCUS, PHILIP N., Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service July 
SO, 1918. 

MARTELL, PAUL G., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry. With American 
Expeditionary Forces. Wounded in action. 




ARTHUR V. LEVERAULT 



ALBERT C. CxKUI<l<RIUN 



HoLTOKE In The Great War. 345 

MESCART, HENRY A., Private, United States Army. 

MEUNIER, WILLIAM J., Private, United States Army. Stationed at Camp 
Dlx, N. J. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

MILLER, RALPH W., Private, United States Army. Entered service Decem- 
ber 10, 1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. With American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

MONKS, JAMES A., Private, Aviation. Entered service March 29, 1918. Sta- 
tioned at Camp Devens. 

MULHOLLAND, HUGH A., Sergeant, United States Army. 

NAREY, JOHN H., Wagoner, Medical Corps. Entered service June 17, 1917. 
Stationed at Camp Sherman, Ohio. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

OGRONIK, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army. Entered service in July, 
1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

PELLAND, ALCIDE J., Private, Aviation. Entered service December 11, 

1917. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

PELLETIER, RENE, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. Entered service June 3, 

1918. Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

REARDON, MICHAEL J., Private, United States Army. Entered service in 
July, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

RICHEY, ALBERT E., Sergeant, 97th Aero Squadron. Entered service in 
August, 1917. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SCARR, GEORGE, Private, United States Army. Entered service June 30, 
1918. Stationed at Wentworth Institute. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

SCOTT, RALPH H., Private, Cavalry. Entered service February 26, 1918. 
Stationed at Fort Slocum, N. Y. 

SEARS, EDWARD R., Private, United States Army. Stationed at Fort Til- 
den, N. Y. 

SENEGAL, LEO, Private, United States Army. Entered service July 23, 1918. 
Stationed at Camp Devens. 

SNOW, CHARLES E., Private, United States Army. With American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

TAILLEFER, E. U., Private, 2d Cavalry. Entered service May 5, 1917. Sta- 
tioned at Fort Myers, Va. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

TETREAULT, HENRY, Private, United States Army. With American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. Gassed in action. 

TREMBLAY, HERMAN H., Private, United States Army. Entered service in 
July, 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

TUCKER, WARREN, Private, United States Army. Entered service August 
30. 1918. Stationed at Camp Devens. 

WARD, CHARLES J., Private, United States Army. Entered service July 22, 
1018. 

WARD, RAYMOND, Sergeant, Signal Corps. Entered service in April, 1917. 
Stationed in Virginia. With American Expeditionary Forces. 

WEINRICH, ALBERT E., Pharmacist, Medical Corps. Entered service Aug- 
ust 14, 1917. Stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt. 



346 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



Navy 



FRAZIER, CHARLES W. Entered service in 1910. Stationed at Newport 
News, Va. Assigned to S. S. El Sol as engineer. Stationed in foreign waters. 

GRIFFIN, HAROLD F. Entered service January 2, 1914. Was on U. S. S. 

Nebraska for three years as first-class gunner. Was in first campaign under fire at 
Vera Cruz. A member of the landing party. Transferred to U. S. S. San Fran- 
cisco, a mine layer. 

HIRST, ALEXANDER. Entered service in February, 1917. Assigned to U. 
S, S. New Hampshire as a seaman. 

MOHAN, BERNARD A. Entered service in November, 1917. Stationed at 
Pelham Park, N. Y. 

MORIARTY, ROLAND D. Entered service June 5, 1918. Stationed at Hing- 
ham, Mass. 

PHOENIX, RAYMOND C. Entered service in 1917. Stationed at Boston. 



Allied Service 

BOISVERT, JOSEPH, Private (British). Entered the British Army July 19, 
1918, at the Springfield Recruiting Station. 

HARVEY, ALEXANDER, Private (Canadian). Entered the Canadian Army 
September 18, 1918, at the Springfield Recruiting Station. 

WINKLER, JOHN C, Private (British). Entered the British Army February 
9. 1918, at the recruiting mission in Holyoke. 



Willimansett Student Army Training Corps 

BANNISTER, RALPH, Pratt Institute. 

FRANK, ARTHUR, University of Vermont. 

MEAD, KARL E., Northeastern College, 

RICKEY, CLIFFORD E., Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



Nurse 



GRAY, EDITH, Red Cross. Stationed ,at Camp MacArthur, Texas. Trans- 
ferred overseas to France. 



Fairview^s War Record 



Honor Roll 

BOULERICE, ALEEIIT, Private, Coast Art/llery Corps, entered the service 
October 16, 1918. Stationed at Fort Williams, Me. Died of pneumonia at the fort, 
November 17, 1918. Buried in Fairview. 

VAILLANCOURT, FRANK A., Private, Company L, 104th Infantry, entered 
the service in June, 1910. Served on the Mexican Border that summer with Green- 
field outfit. Killed in action in France, July 20, 1918. 



Army 

BAUMANN, OTTO C, Private, Infantry, with American Expeditionary 
Forces; wounded and gassed. 

BAUSER, HENRY, Private, Company 25, 7th Battalion, 153d Depot Brigade; 
with American Expeditionary Forces. 

BEARDER, JAMES, Private, Infantry, with American Expeditionary Forces; 
wounded. 

BEARDER, WTLLIAM, Private, Company E, 2d Engineers, with American 
Expeditionary Forces ; wounded and gassed. 

BEGLEY, JOHN D., Private, Company F, 102d Infantry, with American Ex- 
peditionary Forces; wounded in action. 

BESSETTE, FRANIi, Private, Artillery, stationed at Camp Knox, Ky. 

BOCK, MAX, Private, Ordnance Department, with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

BODAIN, ARCHIE, Private, Infantry, with American Expeditionary Forces. 
BOUDRY, E>nL, Sergeant, Supply Company, Camp Joseph E. Johnston. 
BOULIEU, LEO, Private, Quartermaster Corps, Camp Wadsworth. 

BRENN, ARTHUR, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry, with American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

BUSS, CHARLES F., Private, Troop D, 2d Cavalry, with American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

BUSS, JAMES S., Private, Ordnance Department, stationed at Boston. 

COLLINS, ARCHIE, Private, Motor Truck Company, Jacksonville, Fla. 

COLLINS, ElMIL G„ Private, Ordnance Corps, stationed at Springfield, Mass. 

COLLINS, PERLEY, Private, Quartermaster Corps, stationed at Camp Meigs, 
Washington. 





ARCHIE COLLINS 



EMIL G. COLLINS 




PERLEY COLLINS 



" : , V .^j^..:.. , 

WILLIAM COLLINS 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 349 

COLtLINS, WILLIAM J., Private, Company C, 149th Machine Gun Battalion ; 
with American Expeditionary Forces. 

CX)MEAU, JOSEPH E., Private, 104th Infantry, with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

DEARDEN, JAMES, Private, 326th Infantry, with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

DELISLE, ROUAL, Private, Troom F, 6th Cavalry, with American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

DE LONGCHAMP, AMOS, Corporal, Coast Artillery, stationed at Fort 
Schuyler. 

BISSELL, ALFRED, Private, Medical Corps; stationed at Staten Island De- 
barkation Hospital. 

DUPONT, WILFRED, Private, Coast Artillery Corps, stationed at Fort Rod- 
man, Mass. 

ELLIS, HERBERT L., Jr., Private, Medical Corps, stationed at Ellis Island, 
N. Y. 

FINLAYSON, JOHN, Private, United States Army, stationed at Camp Devens. 

GAMACHI], OSCAR, Private, Infantry, with American Expeditionary Forces. 

GLADU, ALEX, Private, Company A, 4th Machine Gun Battalion, with Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

GLADU, WILFRED J., Private, Medical Corps, stationed at Fort Slocum. 

GLESSMAN, ERNEST, Private, Company H, 308th Infantry, with American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

GOODWIN, WALLACE, Private, Medical Corps, with American Expedition- 
ary Forces. 

GOYETTE, ALBERT, Private, Machine Gun Battalion, stationed at Camp 
Freemont, Cal. 

GOYETTE, POLLEDOR, Private, Battery A, 58th Field Artillery, with Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

HALL, LEONARD, Private, United States Army, stationed at Camp Devens. 

HEBERT, ALFRED, Private, United States Army, stationed at Camp Hill, 
Va. 

HEBERT, GILBERT, Private, Company H, 301st Infantry, with American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

HEYER, HERMAN, Private, Infantry, with American Expeditionary Forces; 
wounded and gassed. 

HURST, FRANK, Private, United States Army, with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

KUENZEL, JULIUS, Private, Coast Artillery Corps, stationed at Fort Mc- 
Kinley, Me. 

LECLAIRE, EDWARD, Private, United States Army, stationed at Fort Mey- 
ers, Va. 

LEHORE, LOUIS C, Private, Troop H, 2d Cavalry, with American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

McKISSICK, DONALD, Private, Medical Corps, with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 



350 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

MURRAY, GERALD, Private, Medical Corps, stationed at Camp Greenleaf, 
Ga. 

O'CONNOR, J. RAYMOND, Private, Battery B, 44th Field Artillery, with 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

PARMENTIER, EUGENE, Private, Battery F, 59th Field Artillery, stationed 
<it Camp Jackson, S. C. 

REED, ALFRED F., Corporal, Police and Coast Guard, stationed on the At- 
lantic Coast. 

RIOPEL, ARMAND, Private, United States Army, stationed at Camp Wads- 
worth. 

RIVAL, ANDREW, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry, with Ameri.can Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

RIVAL, ARTHUR, Private, 504th Engineer Corps, with American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

RIVAL, EDWARD, Private, 504th Engineer Corps, with American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

ROBERT, JOSEPH, Private, Company 3, 1st Infantry, Depot Brigade, sta- 
tioned at Camp Devens. 

RUDERT, FRANK, Sergeant, Cavalry, stationed at Presidio, Texas. 

SCHAU, JOSEPH, Private, 36th Machine Gun Battalion, 13th Division, sta- 
tioned at Camp Devens. 

SCHORR, MAX, Private, Machine Gun Battalion, with American Expedition- 
ary Forces. 

ST. JEAN, NORMAN, Private, Company H, 301st Infantry, with American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

TOUGAS, VICTOR A., Coast Artillery Corps, stationed at Fort Slocum. 

WILLETTE, VICTOR, Mechanic, Battery E, 57th Field Artillery, with Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 



Navy 



BEELER, STEWART, Chief Master at Arms, stationed at Great Lakes Naval 
Training Station. 

BEGLEY, CORNELIUS, Seaman, United States Navy. 

BRENNAN, LEO, Seaman, U. S. S. Arizona. 

FERGUSON, WILLIAM, Machinist, Home Guard Patrol, United States Navy. 

GRAY, WALTER S., Seaman, Naval Aviation, stationed at Pensacola, Fla. 

GRAY, HAROLD G., Seaman, Naval Reserve, stationed at Newport, R. I. 

HOLGATE, COLONEL E., Master Mechanic, Naval Reserve, stationed at 
Nantucket. 

HUNT, HARRY, Yeoman, U. S. Navy, stationed at Boston Navy Yards. 

LANGEVIN, ARTHUR, Seaman, United States Navy. 

NICKERSON, LESTER S., Seaman, U. S. S. Oklahoma. 

OSBORN, FRED, Master Mechanic, stationed at New London, Conn. 

REED, WINFRED, Seaman, Merchant Marine Service. 

REILLY, BRYAN, Seaman, U. S. S. Louisiana. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 351 

Allied Service 

ANDERSON, JOHN, Private, Canadian Expeditionary Forces; wounded. 
GOYETTE, GEORGE, Private, British Expeditionary Forces. 
PRATT, JOHN W., Private, British Expeditionary Forces ; wounded. 



Fairview Student Army Training Corps 
HUDSON, FRANK, Private, Amherst College. 



Belchertown^s War Record 



Honor Roll 

WALKER, CHAUNCEY D., Corporal, Company G, 104th Infantry, entered 
the service in August, 1917, at Camp Bartlett, Mass. Promoted to the rank of cor- 
poral before the regiment left, in October, 1917, for overseas. Wounded in left 
hand in May, 1918. Died of wounds (presumably received later), June 24, 1918, 
in France. 



Belehertown's Army Officers 



MAJOR. 
PERRY, 1>R. STEPHEN W., ?,ioth Engineers, Camp Custer, Mich. 

CAPTAINS. 
BARTLETT, DR. EDWARD P., Medical Corps, New York. 

ELLIOTT, W. H., Coast Artillery Corps, Boston Harbor. 

LIEUTENANTS. 
AUSTIN, FRANCIS M., Remount Depot, Camp Devens. 

COLEMAN, DR. DANIEL B., Medical Reserve Corps, Fort Ogelthorpe, Ga. 
DUDLEY, LOFTON L., 5th Battalion, Depot Brigade, Camp Devens. 
HILL, WILIAM B., Jr., Infantry. 
HUBBARD, MOSES, Aviation Corps. 

SHUnVIWAY, WALDO, Infantry, American Expeditionary Forces; wounded. 
SQUIRES, PAUL F., Artillery, American Expeditionary Forces. 
STONE, DR. P. W., Medical Reserve Corps, Fort Ogelthorpe, Ga. 
VAN CORTLAND, C. W., Quartermaster Corps, Camp Upton, L. I. 



352 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

Army 
AliLiEN, EDGAR, Private, United States Army. 

ALLEN, LESTER J., Private, Company A, 60th Infantry, American Expedi- 
tionary Forces; wounded. 

BAGrGS, ROBERT N., Private, Machine Gun Company, 111th Infantry, Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. 

BAILEY, HAROLD F., Private, Headquarters Company, IbSth Infantry, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

BARDWELL, VERNON L., Private, Company B, 29th Engineers, American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

BISHOP, HARRY E., Private, Headquarters Company, 328th Field Artillery, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

BISHOP, WILLIAM C, Corporal, Headquarters Company, 328th Infantry, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

BLACKMER, RAYMOND, Private, Cavalry, Presidio, Texas. 

BOTHWELL, JOSEPH C, Private, Company C, 301st Field Signal Battalion, 

American Expeditionary Forces. 

BRACKETT, WILLIAM D., Private, United States Army. 

BRISTOL, KENNETH F., Private, Aero Repair Squadron, American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

COOK, LEWIS, Private, Infantry, American Expeditionary Forces. 

COOK, LINCOLN A., Private, 39th Labor Company, Camp Johnston, Fla. 

DE MOSS, STANLEY, Private, United States Army. 

DODGE, RALPH A., Private, Soldiers' Home Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

EARL, HAROLD D., Private, 125th Supply Company, Ordnance Detachment, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

EARL, JOSIAH J., Private, Company A, 301st Military Police, American Ex- 
peditionary Forces. 

ENGEL, CHARLES, Private, 1st Company, Coast Artillery Corps, Fort Tot- 
len, N. Y. 

GAY, STACY, Private, United States Army. 

GLOA^R, CHARLES, Private, Miscellaneous Detachment, Aviation Section, 
Camp Hill, Va. 

GOULD, HARRY, Private, Troop D, 310th Cavalry. 

GRENERY, ALFRED, Private, Company I, 104th Infantry, American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

HANNUM, GEORGE, Private, Company D, 104th Infantry, American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

HUSSEY, ALBERT, Private, Company F, 30th Engineers, American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

JACKSON, JOHN W., JR., Private, Company H, 308th Infantry, American 
Expeditionary Forces. 

JENKS, GEORGE N., Private, United States Army, Camp Devens. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 353 

LEMON, REUBEN, Private, United States Army, Camp Devens. 

LEWIS, ALVIN R., JR., Private, Headquarters Troop, 12th Division Military 
Police, Camp Devens. 

MATTUSEWICZE, BRUNO, Private, 3rd Company, Coast Artillery Corps, 
Fort Amdor, Panama, Canal Zone. 

O'CONNOR, T. v., Private, United States Army. 

PARENT, EDWARD AV., Private, Company D, 11th Railway Engineers, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

RANDALL, WARING, Private, Company K, 5th Engineer Train Regiment, 
Camp Humphrey, Va. 

REARDON, CHARLES, Corporal, 479th Aero Squadron, American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

RILEY, JOHN B., Sergeant, Company L, 104th Infantry, American Expedi- 
tionary Forces. 

RILEY, THOMAS, Private, United States Army. 

RIPLEY, JOHN, Corporal, Headquarters Troop, 12th Division Military Po- 
lice, Camp Devens. 

. RUELL, JEREMIAH, Wagoner, Company I, 5th Regiment Pioneer Infantry, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

SHUMWAY, CONRAD, Private, United States Army, Camp Upton, L. I. 

SHUMWAY", ERIC, Private, United States Army. 

SHUMWAY, LOWELL, Private, United States Army, Camp Upton, L. I. 

STORY, HERBERT J., JR., Sergeant, U. S. Ambulance Company No. 25, 5th 
Division Sanitary Train, American Expeditionary Forces. 

VANCE, PHINIAN, Private, 301st Field Battery, American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

WALKER, F. DUDLEY% Private, 56th Pioneer Infantry, American Expe- 
ditionary Forces. 

WHITE, CARLTON E., Sergeant, Remount Depot, Camp Devens. 

WITT, E. CLIFTON, Private, 19th Company, 5th Battalion, Depot Brigade, 
Camp Devens. 

WOOD, FRED, Private, Company D, 304th Infantry, American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

AVRIGHT, WARREN, Private, United States Army. 

WYDEEN, ALBERT H., Private, United States Army. 



Nav> 



ALLEN, HAROLD K., Mechanic, Naval Aviation, Charleston, S. C. 

BARTON, CLIFTON, Seaman, United States Navy. 

DAMON, IRA, Machinist Mate, Naval Reserves. 

THAYER, LEWIS, Seaman, S. S. Yacht Exen. 
23 



354 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

Allied Service 

BEECHER, ROBERT, Private, British Expeditionary Forces. 
Mcdonough, RICHARD, Sergeant, British Expeditionary Forces. 



Belchertown Student Army Training Corps 
BRIDGEMAN, WILLIAM E., Private, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
DAVIS, HAROLD, Private. Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
DAVIS, ORRIN, Private, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
JACKSON, BELDON, Private, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
KliMBALL, WILLIAM, Private, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
SPELDMANN, CLARK P., Private, Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. 



War Work 

THOMPSON, DOROTHY, Yeowoman, Navy, Boston. 



Granby^s War Record 



Honor Roll 

MORGAN, JAMES, Private, U. S. Marines, entered the service in May, 1917, 
in Boston. Died of wounds in June, 1918, in France. 



Granby's Army Officers 



CAPTAIN. 
SMITH, ARTHUR P., Ordnance Department, Washington, D. C. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

CLARK, WALTER F., Infantry, Camp Devens, Camp Lee, Va. ; Camp Perry, 
Ohio. 

EASTON, DR. E. R., Medical Corps, Chattanooga, Tenn. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 355 

Army 

BEAUDIN, ARTHUR, Private, United States Army, stationed at Camp Jack- 
son. 

BLxlKE, LEROY L., Private, United States Army, stationed at Camp Devens. 

BREEN, ARTHUR J., Private, Company D, 104th Infantry; with American 
Expeditionary Forces ; wounded. 

DRESSELL, FREDERICK, Private, Coast Artillery Corps. 

DULASKI, MICHAEL, Sergeant, United States Army, stationed at Camp 
Devens. 

FITZ, GEORGE, Private, Infantry, with American Expeditionary Forces ; 
wounded. 

GRIFFIN, GEORGE, Private, United States Army. 

GUIEL, EUGENE V., Corporal, Battery F, 12th Field Artillery, with Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. 

HOOTIN, HERBERT, Private, United States Army. 

ISABELLE, LEOPOLD, Private, United States Army. 

LYMAN, GUY, Private, United States Marines, stationed at Quantico, Va. 

McKAY, JOHN 31., Corporal, Medical Corps, stationed at Camp Columbia, 
S. C. 

MIKOLACY^'JK, JOSEPH, Private, United States Army, stationed at Camp 
Jackson. 

O'CONNOR, RAYMOND, Private, Battery B, 44th Coast Artillery Corps ; with 
American Expeditionary Forces. 

RACINE, ARCADE J., Private, United States Army, stationed at Camp Dix, 
N. J. 

ROBERTS, JOSEPH F., Private, United States Army, stationed at Camp 
Devens. 

SMITH, CLAYTON, Private, United States Army, stationed at Camp Devens. 

SMITH, EASTMAN, Private, Medical Corps; with American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

ST. JEAN, NOR3IAN, Private, United States Army. 



Navy 
DAMON, IRA* Seaman, United States Navy. 



Granby Student Army Training Corps 

BALL, CHARLES G., Private, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 



War Work 

TAYLOR, anSS ELSIE, War Department Clerk, Washington, D. C. 
BAGGS, J. RAYMOND, War Department Clerk, Wasliington, D. C. 
COYLE, DAVID, Red Triangle Secretary, France. 
■CURTIS, REV. HAROLD, Red Triangle Secretary, Fort Constitution. 



"The Lost Battalion ^^ 



/yt^-KlVATE RAYMOND FLYNN, Co. E, 308th Infantry, who was with 
J Em ^^'^^^ famous "Lost Battalion" in the Argonne Forest, has written the his- 
t[^ tory of that eventful period. He emphatically states that Major Whittle- 
sey did not write a note or send word over under cover of a white flag, but 
told the wounded man who brought the surrender request, "You can tell him to 
go to hell." His story follows: 

On the 26th of September, about 2 a. m., we were marching up toward the 
line on a dark, muddy road, and each were handed a couple hundred rounds of 
ammunition extra, and this fact alone was enough for us to know that there was 
going to be something doing. Just as we were taking over the trenches, relieving 
the French, our artillery opened up in back of us, and for miles the sky was red 
with gun flashes. It meant the opening barrage of the drive that is now history. 
It was some volley of shells that went over into the German line. 

We advanced in the early hours of morning, under the most difficult conditions 
imaginable. "No Man's Land" was one mass of barbed wire entanglements, swamp 
and thick underbrush. To make things worse there was a heavy fog, although I 
suppose this had its advantages as well as disadvantages. The attack was such a 
surprise to the enemy, that he had to retire immediately to positions further back. 
We finally worked our way into the trenches that they abandoned, and spent the 
first night there, resting in mud up to our knees. 

At daybreak we started out again and from the second day on we met heavy 
machine gun fire, and we knew that the sailing was not going to be as easy as on 
the first day. We advanced gradually through their communicating trenches and 
on the fourth day the battalion reformed in a deep valley, to advance over a steep 
hill. We were by this time in the heart of the Argonne Forest, and to get rations 
up to us was almost impossible and in the first four days we had only one meal 
brought up from the rear. This meal consisted of cold cabbage and roast beef 
with bread. We lost quite a few men in taking this first hill, but we had to go 
over at all costs and when we reached the top, we found the effects of our own 
fire. All this time, you must not forget, I was carrying and operating an automatic 
rifle that weighs, when loaded, about 23 pounds. To do this on a full stomach, 
requires some little effort, so you can imagine how I was puffing when we had 
hills almost as steep as the side of our block to climb. We dug in here and held 
the top of the hill over night. This gave us a chance for a little rest. Sleep was 
out of the question, but to sit down and "watch" all night was rest enough for us. 
That night the enemy retired from the valley below and went over into the next 
hollow. The valley from which he retired was strewn with dead Germans, the 
results of our artillery that had been banging away all night. 

On the night of October 2, just before dark, we crossed the top of the second 
hill and as near as I can understand, the battalion on our right and left, did not 
keep up with our advance. We were going too fast, while at the same time we 
were trying to establish communication with both flanks. We had started out on 
the 26th of September with almost 200 men and the strength of E Co., in the 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 357 

night of October 2, was exactly 52 men and 2 officers. The wounded, killed and 
missing had reduced our company to that number. It was on this night that we 
walked unknowingly, through the German line, down the side of the hill, and across 
the valley to take up position for over night on the further side of the valley, 
this hill afifording us the best protection. While we rested that night, the enemy 
was busy coming in behind us through a trench that we supposed was abandoned. 
He also established lines on both flanks, and on the top of the hill, in front of us. 

In the morning at daybreak, my company started out, along the bottom of 
the hill, toward the left flank. The different companies of the battalion were taking 
up their positions, preparatory to advancing. We walked about 200 yards along 
the bottom of the hill, and then started up the steep incline. When we got to 
within about 20 yards from the top, some one hollered down to us. (I am speaking 
of E Co. only, as we were separated from the battalion at this time), "Americans!" 
We all kept cjuiet for a minute or two, and the exclamation came again, "Ameri- 
cans down there?" One of our men answered "Yes." The voice came back, "What 
company?" We answered, "E Co." To our surprise it was a German talking 
English and when he discovered that we were Americans, he started to give orders 
to his men. What he was saying I do not know, but I did hear him say something 
about "hand grenade." They pronounce this word almost like we do in English. 

The brush was so thick that we could not see more than a few feet in front 
of us, but we could hear, and knew there was going to be something doing. A 
shower of hand grenades greeted us, and they opened up with machine guns, that 
lined the top of the hill in back of us. across the valley, which was only about 50 
yards wide, and the side of that hill was filled with Boches. While half of the 
company fired to the top of the hill in front of us, the other half opened up on 
the hill in back of us. We realized that we were surrounded and it took pretty 
quick thinking to keep ourselves from being annihilated. Naturally there was a 
little confusion among the men, and in the excitement the company split, .35 men 
going along toward the left working their way as best they could out of the 
predicament. Of these 35 men several lost their lives and many were taken pris- 
oners. In the meantime 17 of us were doing all we could to hold them off from 
coming at us in the rear. I emptied several magazines of ammunition with the 
automatics and it was here that I claimed two to their credit. I saw them go 
down, and they never got up. Gradually our little body of 17 men, there being 
only 15 by this time, two had been killed, worked down the right side of the hill 
and across the valley. I'll never forget going across that open space below. A 
machine gun opened up on us, but we all managed to get back to the battalion 
without getting hit. If you remember I told you the rest of the battalion was only 
200 yards away from us, on the side of the hill. Lieut. Leach who worked his 
way back with us immediately reported to Major Whittlesey what had happened. 
The battalion prepared for an attack, and it was only a question of a few minutes 
when machine guns opened up on us from all sides. 

We were ordered to dig in, and dig like hell. As a rule, at least, two men 
always work together when "digging in," so myself and one of my close friends, 
a fellow named Chisewell from Union City, Conn., got our little shovels going 
and soon had a hole deep enough to keep our bodies below the level of the 
ground. Several of the men were killed while digging, but as we had stayed there 
the night before most of the men had already dug in. From the top of the hill 
in front of us, there came a steady shower of hand grenades, rifle grenades and 
they had a couple of trench mortars working. These, with machine guns working 
on our left, and in back of us, were putting out many of our men and in no time 
the hill was strewn with dead and wounded. 



358 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

This was the principal cause of our staying on the side of this hill for six 
days and nights. We could not leave our wounded, to try and fight our way out. 
You can imagine the situation. It would take all of the men who were not wounded 
to carry the wounded back, and as we were surrounded it was impossible to do 
this. It would not be the American style to abandon the wounded and think only 
of ourselves. There was only the one thing to do, hold them off as best we could 
and wait for help. This help was a long time coming, and each day we were losing 
many more men. When the third or fourth day had gone by we were pretty well 
exhausted, being without food or rest, trying our best to keep them from us as I 
say, it was simply a case of protecting the wounded until help reached us. We 
could hear our troops fighting in back of us, and the sound of their guns was get- 
ting closer every hour. 

The French were fighting hard on our right. By this time our troops in back 
of us knew we were lost, and had received orders from headquarters to continue 
the advance at all cost until they reached us. We withstood attack after attack, 
even though most of us who could handle a gun were so weak that it required 
great effort. To hear those wounded men crying with pain night after night was 
enough to take the heart out of any man, and I must confess that I had given up 
all hopes of ever seeing Holyoke again. Who wouldn't with dead and wounded 
lying all around you? Chances looked pretty slim. On the sixth day, when the 
307th broke their way through, after losing many men, it was like a dream coming 
true. The Boche beat a hasty retreat, and less time than it takes to tell we had 
doctors and plenty of Red Cross ambulances to rush the wounded and exhausted 
men back to the field hospitals. 

Our colonel and General Alexander were on the hill a short time after they 
reached us and they were more than pleased when they heard that we had refused 
an "invitation" to surrender by the commander of the German forces. We had 
been sending out patrols every day to try to work their way through the line in 
back of us to get word to headquarters of the exact spot that we were in. These 
patrols every day, generally two or three men, were either killed or captured, and 
on the fifth day one of our men who had attempted to get through with six others, 
came back wounded with a note from the German commander to Major Whittlesey 
telling him that "on the grounds of humanity he should surrender, as they could 
hear the cries of our wounded every night." 

I have read several articles from different papers and it's amusing to read all 
the different versions of Major Whittelsey's answer to the note. One paper said 
he tied a piece of paper to a rock and threw it over into the German line with 
the answer, "Go to Hell." Another paper said it was a German who brought the 
note over with a white flag. Well, you know how many different ways the paper 
spoke of the answer to the note. The truth of it is that he simply remarked to 
the wounded man that brought the note back, "You can tell him to go to hell." 

When I came out of there I had a two weeks' growth of beard on my face, 
and looked as though I was drawn through a knot hole. My clothes were torn to 
pieces and I looked like a wild man. I was in bed about three weeks, but soon 
after I had gotten my strength back and was able to join the company. While on 
my way back the armistice was signed. I can assure you this was the best bit 
of news I had ever heard in my young life. Several of our men who were taken 
prisoners have come back to the company and we spent many a happy hour around 
a candle in our billet telling our different experiences. The men who were pris- 
oners have many interesting stories to tell. 



Corporal MacMenigalPs Story 



CORP. ROY .AIacMENIGALL, Co. D, 104th Infantry, "Holyoke's Own," gave 
a vivid account of his capture by the Germans and of the fight preceding 
it, in which his company was engaged. Corp. MacMenigall's story follows : 
"After our company left the Toul sector to go to Chateau-Thierry the boys 
thought that they were going to Paris for a rest. They were put in box cars and 
started in that direction and got near enough to see the city when they were sent 
to one side and stopped outside at Noissy le Sec. Here another engine was put 
on and they were started away again, stopping at a large farm, where D Co, was 
billeted for about four days and enjoyed a good rest. Then came the order to 
move and the company was loaded on auto trucks about 5 a. m. on the morning of 
July 3 and rode all day and into the evening. As they proceeded the sound of the 
guns got louder and louder. The French lined the roads and wished us good luck, 
saying we were going into a bad sector. We got off the trucks at night and marched 
through the woods nearer to the gun fire. Shallow dugouts were in the woods 
where we were stationed all that day and the next day, and we were not far from 
the front lines. The next night we started for the front lines in the ravine, where 
we relieved the Marines who had stopped the German drive at the point of the 
Chateau Thierry salient. 

"Our company took over the positions of a company of Marines in this ravine 
which resembled in some way the Elmwood dingle, only it was not so deep. At 
the bottom a brook flowed, something like the stream flowing through the dingle, 
only deeper. The ravine was not quite as deep, being about 30 feet in depth and 
rocky. On the sides next the brook dugouts were made, merely holes in the side 
of the bank, good to keep off sharpnel, but not strong enough to withstand a shell. 
On arrival work had to be started in burying the dead Germans and Marines lay- 
ing in the ravine, although I was lucky in not having to act on the burying detail. 
The front line was advanced a number of yards from the edge of the ravine in a 
wheat field, the boys digging dugouts like graves, which they covered with wheat 
and in some cases small crosses were set up to give German aviators the notion 
that only graves were located in the wheat 'field. This seemed to work as the 
Germans thought the line was farther back and shelled the edge of the ravine and 
woods, letting the wheat field alone. A, B and C Cos. held the front line and D 
was in support a few hundred yards back. 

"The company, besides furnishing burial details, had to bring up the rations 
at night. My duty as corporal of the runners was to stand at the majpr's dugout 
and when he called for a runner to go and get them for him, and I was four 
hours on duty and eight hours off. All this time the German shells were coming 
over and to protect myself I stood in the entrance to the major's dugout. The 
adjutant asked me what I was standing there for and to go outside. Later he 
came out and about that time two or three whizz-bangs came over in quick suc- 
cession and he dove into the dugout with me on top of him. After that he did 
not criticize me for taking cover. My post before the dugout was on top of a 
mound under which a German was buried and the grave was shallow and at night 



360 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

the odor was terrible. Another had been buried in the bank nearby with his head 
sticking out and another over across, so I had company. 

"It seemed cruel to send the runners out into the shell fire where their chance 
for life was small, but it had to be done and these runners were among the bravest. 
We all seemed like children for we wanted to go together and not alone, and would 
join hands and run double on the errands. I saw Jack Lambert meet his death in 
this place, a bugler and five or six others. The shells would knock down the trees 
and the earth and dugouts seemed to go up and down with the explosions. After 
seven days, we were relieved and were again shelled going out, and it was then 
that Snider was killed. 

"We were in reserve for a time and then went to the front again, D Co. being 
sent in with the second battalion, because K Co. was in quarantine. Through some 
mix-up in orders the company got into position late and were two kilometers behind 
at daylight, so 'that they got shelled and gassed. As we were running up in single 
file with bayonets fixed, another line passed us going to the rear and yelled to us, 
'Go to it, D.' We faced about later and passed through the ravine and when 
coming out Corporal Ladouceur was wounded. Another man dropped in the 
brook and across the bridge two fellows were lying in the path and another was 
blown up into a tree by a high explosive shell and his legs and arms blown off. 
On the edge of the woods we took cover, the shells going over our heads and 
bursting behind us. The wounded came by us and we helped to give some first- 
aid. We were ordered to hold where we were. We were then ordered to take 
protection in the ravine and we went there and got into dugouts. 

"In the dugout where I went there were two wounded D Co. boys, the Red 
Cross later taking them out. The Germans were retreating and we followed, and 
the night of the 21st got into contact with them again. We were ordered forward, 
but through mistake our barrage dropped behind us instead of over and we had 
to march to the right and back and the barrage was stopped. We then advanced 
again and got to where we could see the Germans at the machine guns and a lot 
of us got touched by gas. 

"Machine guns in front were firing directly at us and back of that position 
was a wooded hill and as we advanced the Germans made a run for the hill. 
Two started away from the guns, but others who had started away came back and 
we had to drop down to escape the bullets. A number of the boys were hit. I 
laid flat in the wheat field and Craven came up to where I was. Some one yelled, 
'Every one for himself,' but we could not get up without getting mowed down by 
the guns. Craven had an automatic rifle but was out of ammunition and we could 
not find any, and a sniper began firing at me. A little ways away I could hear 
Mason singing 'Tipperary' and another fellow over further said to Mason, 'I'm shot 
now.' Some one else said, 'Shut up, if you don't want to be made into a sieve.' 

"The last I remember the Germans were shelling the woods, the shells pass- 
ing close overhead and when I recovered consciousness a German was pushing 
me with his foot and there were a number of others around so I knew that the 
game was up. He asked me if I was wounded and I told him 'No.' He handed 
me a cigarette and took my pistol and said, 'Come.' He asked me where was our 
line and I told him we didn't have any. 'What do you mean? Of course you 
have a line.' I said we were chasing them as they retreated and so didn't know 
anything about a line. He said later that he was an American but happened to 
be over in Germany when the war started and they pushed him in. There were 
no stretchers and Joe Greeley and I took part of a shelter tent and brought in the 
wounded boys. We could see our boys coming. 



lioLYOKE In The Great War. 361 

"That night we were sent to regimental headquarters and slept in a barn with 
200 Germans. A shell hit the barn and killed 13 'Jerrys' and wounded as many 
more. The next day we started for the rear and in passing a battery one of the 
artillerymen jeered at us. About five minutes afterward the wliole battery was 
wiped out by American shellfire. They caught another battery on the road and 
wiped that out. 

"We got to divisional headquarters and a general there asked me, 'How do you 
like the war'? I thought of the D Co. joke and responded, 'That it was the only 
war we had on hand and we had to take care of it.' Another German asked how 
many Americans were across and I said two million. He said I lied and that there 
was only 9,000. 

"On the way back to the rear the Allied planes came over, bombed the town 
and chased the artillery out of the woods and smashed them up. The food given 
was not sufficient until we reached Germany when the Red Cross rations arrived 
and after that there was no more trouble. The Y. M. C. A. sent the prisoners 
equipment for games, etc., and they remained in prison camp until the armistice 
was signed, when the Germans threw open the gates and told the prisoners to go 
home. We were ordered to stay for a short time, however, until arrangements 
could be made to ship them through Switzerland and finally they arrived in America 
p few weeks before D Co. came back." 



Last Officer in A. E. F. Killed 



>»^ E\". WILLIA.M F. DAVITT of Holyoke and Willimansett, a chaplain in the 
^W\^ army with the rank of first lieutenant, was killed by a shell explosion at 
'^^^ 9.45 o'clock on the morning of the signing of the armistice and just one 
hour and 15 minutes before the time set for the stopping of hostilities. 
He was the last chaplain and the last officer of the American Expeditionary Forces 
to give up his life for democracy in the great war. 

On the date of his death— November n, 1918, he had returned to his old 
regiment, after being attached to the corps headquarters for a few weeks. He 
remarked that it was like a homecoming. He gave Colonel Eckert a flag which he 
had been carrying in his roll of bedding. He proposed that the flag was to be used 
in the flag-raising at the close of hostilities. A few minutes later, so the dispatch 
says, he started out across a clearing and a shell struck him. He was killed 
instantly. 

Chaplain Davitt was worshipped by the entire division. A casket of oak was 
made for him and it was lined with an olive drab army blanket. Another blanket 
was folded and used as a pillow. The flag that he had given to the colonel was 
draped over the casket. He was buried the next day with one of the most impres- 
sive ceremonies accorded anyone. 

The hearse was formed with two machine gun carts and an army mule, which 
had been one of the chaplain's pets, drew the casket. The horse of the chaplain 
was led to the burying ground by an orderly. The stirrups were reversed and the 
regimental band trailed playing the dead march. 



:562 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

The clergyman who officiated at the grave was Rev. George S. L. Connor of 
this city, senior chaplain with the 32nd Division. He was a classmate of Father 
Davitt's and a close personal friend. They had sought each other since the time 
they heard that the other was in France and held a reunion but a few weeks 
before Chaplain Davitt was killed. 

Chaplain Davitt was cited for bravery on August 6. during the operations 
along the Vesle river. Learning that 40 wounded Americans were cut off in a 
ravine, he called for volunteers and led a rescuing party through a hail of machine 
gun bullets. The party rescued every one of the wounded men and not a member 
of the rescuing party had been hit. 

The Distinguished Service Cross won for this brave and gallant action had 
been awarded to the local chaplain. 

Father Davitt was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Davitt of 842 Chicopee 
street, Willimansett. He was born on Sargeant street, Holyoke, about 32 years 
ago and received his early education in this city, graduating from the Chicopee 
High School in the class of 1903. He attended Holy Cross College where he played 
for three years on the varsity football team, being a star tackle. His chum, Father 
Connor, was end on the same team. Father Davitt for one year was captain of 
the team. 

Chaplain Davitt was an all-around athlete, having played basketball with the 
Holyoke Y. M. C. A. team in the old days and being an excellent wrestler. He 
was fond of sports. At the home of his parents in Willimansett there are several 
silver cups which he won in different events. 

At Holy Cross College he made a host of friends readily with his genial and 
affable disposition, his high standing as a student and his ready participation in 
the college activities. He had a faculty of keeping these friendships in after years 
and there were none closer to him than his classmates, Father Connor in France, 
Rev. Charles H. Duffy of St. Michael's Cathedral in Springfield, Rev. Dr. P. F. 
Dowd, formerly of Holy Cross Church here and now in Pittsfield, and Rev. Charles 
L. Foley, a chaplain in the United States Army. 

After completing his studies at Holy Cross College in 1907 he spent a year 
at Okron, Ohio, and then entered the Grand Seminary at Montreal, Canada, from 
which he was ordained to the priesthood in December, 1911, by Archbishop Bruchesi 
of Montreal. 

His first appointment was to St. John's Church, Worcester, where he became 
a great influence in the charitable and philanthropic work of the city. He served 
four years as chaplain of the State Industrial School, the Lyman School for Boys 
in Westboro, and was very popular with and much admired by the youths with 
whom he came in contact. He was greatly instrumental in the organization of 
St. Agnes' Guild in Worcester, temporary charitable home for women, girls and 
children, and was active in juvenile court work. 

Father Davitt went to Lenox in 1916 as assistant to Rev. William F. Grace 
of St. Ann's Church and it was there that he was located when he was called in 
September, 1917, to become a K. of C. chaplain. After several months spent at 
Camp McArthur, Waco, Tex., he was commissioned a first lieutenant and returned 
to Waco on November 6, 1917, and left for overseas February, 1918, with the 
125th Infantry of the 32d Division, this regiment being composed of National 
Guard troops from Michigan and Wisconsin. He was detached for a time, during 
which he went over the top on several occasions with machine gun outfits of which 
he was temporary chaplain. He rejoined his old regiment on the day he was killed. 

He was beloved by his men from the first, as was evidenced in letters received 
from them. He was with them always in the thick of the fight and was more to 
them than a friend and counselor. 

His brother, Lieut. James Davitt of the Aviation Corps, was but five miles 
away from the place where his brother was killed. 



Brig.-Gen. Cole Fully Vindicated 



>«^ HE vindication of Brig.-Gen. Charles H. Cole of the 52d Brigade, 26tb 
^M Division, was received with joy by the general's many friends in Holyoke. 
^^^ During the time that the troops were at Camp Bartlett, under the com- 
mand of General Cole, he had time to renew old friendships and so well 
was he liked that he was tendered a banquet in the Hotel Nonotuck. General Cole 
was also the friend of every man at the concentration camp at Hampton Plains 
and while he was a stickler for discipline, he was always ready to help the men 
out. The Boston Globe gave the following story on January 4, 1919 : 

"The history of the fraternization episode in the 26th Division as stated by 
General Cole in replying to the charges follows : 

"On October 20, the 52d Brigade heard that another unit of the division had 
been trying to efifect a surrender by enemy troops and that no objection had been 
made to the plan. No orders had been issued against such fraternization, but 
General Cole at the time expressed his disapproval of the practice to his sub- 
ordinates. 

"The same day the enemy tried to fraternize with the 102d Infantry of his 
brigade and Colonel Cheatham promptly issued orders forbidding his men from 
communicating with the enemy in accordance with General Cole's expressed opinion. 

"When the 103d Infantry also of the 52d brigade took over the front, October 
25, General Cole ordered Colonel Hume, commanding the 103d, to see to it that 
no fraternization took place. 

"Major General Edwards had relinquished command of the division to Brig.- 
Gen. Bamford, October 22. 

"A message came from division headquarters to the 52d brigade, October 30,. 
saying that fraternization was not to be permitted, this being the first word to- 
come from above that the practice was disapproved. Brig.-Gen. Cole, however, 
had disapproved the practice 10 days before the message came from headquarters. 

"When this message was received. General Cole directed that every officer of 
his brigade should be sent written orders confirming his previous verbal order and 
stating the order more forcefully than ever. 

"To see that his orders were being carried out, General Cole talked with 
Colonel Hume and other officers and learned that instead of there being fraterniza- 
tion at the front there were casualties every day. Any infantryman who started 
strolling into No Man's Land met bullets instead of greetings. 

"The German and Yankee lines were less than 75 yards apart and the situation- 
remained tense during the first week of November, while the Americans were await- 
ing their chance to pursue the Germans. 

"On November 6 six Germans entered the 52d Brigade lines and surrendered. 
When they were seen at. headquarters by General Cole he was informed that there 
was evidence that some of his enlisted men had not obeyed the orders against 
fraternization but that the platoon commander had immediately stopped the practice. 

"Thereupon General Cole ordered an immediate investigation of the reported 
fraternization and ordered that the results be reported to him. 



364 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

"But the report never reached General Cole, because, November 8 he was 
removed and was not told the cause of his removal. 

"Accordingly General Cole felt when told that he was charged with allowing 
his troops to fraternize and with not stopping the practice when ordered to, that 
the charge was untrue. He felt so because he had disapproved the practice 10 
da\s before he was ordered to prevent it, even though it was allowed in another 
regiment; because when a message was received from headquarters he sent it out 
to all his officers as a general order and because from the first he had been more 
than ordinarily careful to prevent fraternization. 

"The other charge, of not being aggressive in contact with the enemy seemed 
to General Cole even more unwarranted, as is shown by this presentation of the 
case: 

"He had organized the brigade in August, 1917, and for 12 months had been 
in command in France, taking it into the front line in the Chemin-des-Dames dur- 
ing February and March, 1918 ; into the Apremont-Toul sector from April until 
June; in the Bois de la Brigade Marne sector from July 18 to 2.5; in the St. Mihiel 
drive, and finally in the Neptune sector north of Verdun from the middle of 
October until the day he was relieved. 

"During all that service his brigade had come under the orders of no fewer 
than eight French or American division commanders, and from no one of them 
did General Cole hear any criticism indicating that he was not aggressive. 

"Incidentally, Brig.-Gen. Cole served longer in the front line than any other 
brigadier in the American army. In the shakeup of the 26th Division officers, 
Sibley pointed out in a dispatch that General Cole, Colonel Bunnell of the Engineers 
and Colonel W. J. Keville of the Ammunition Train were the only commanding 
officers left on November 6 with the commands they had brought from America. 

"From Brig.-Gen. Bamford, General Cole heard no criticism of his lack of 
aggressiveness until told of the charge after leaving his command. No specific 
instances were mentioned in the charges. 

''General Cole had served under General Bamford only two weeks when he 
was removed, and in that time General Bamford had come in personal contact 
with General Cole only during one 10-minute interview, Octol)er 28. 

"During those two weeks under General Bamford the 52d Brigade had inces- 
santly harassed the enemy by day and night patrols. Two raids had been repelled, 
in which casualties were inflicted on the enemy and no prisoner was taken by the 
Germans. 

"When both infantry brigades were ordered to raid the enemy trenches, the 
52d succeeded in entering the enemy trenches, leaving four killed and seven 
wounded. 

"While in the Toul sector the 52d Brigade and both its regiments were cited 
in orders by General Pasaga. 

"As is well known, the colors of the 104th were decorated, the only regiment 
so honored, it is understood. 

"The other regiment of his brigade, the 103d Infantry, was specially named and 
commended by the French general commanding the 8th French Army and by 
General Pershing. 

"The brigade had made a record in defense and assault which left no place 
for a charge of lack of aggressiveness, never being behind units which held 
neighboring sectors on the front. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



365 



"At the moment General Cole was removed from his command the men of 
his brigade were leading the entire divisional front, and General Cole w-as nearer 
to the front than any other field officer of the division. 

"Such, the Globe knows, is the record on which Brig.-Gen. Cole went before 
the board of superior officers, who decided that he should be restored to his com- 
mand : and the well-known and well-liked Massachusetts soldier who jumped into 
the ranks as a private the spring of 1917, so that he wouldn't be left out of the 
war, today commands the 52d Infantry Brigade." 



Ready For Service 



Over noo Holyoke men were ready to enter the United States service on Novem- 



ber 12 and 1 
by the loc 



but were held here by the signing of the armistice. They were called 
draft boards as follows : 



DIVISION ONE 

For Camp Sevier, South Carolina 



Alex A. Amirr, 284 Elm street. 
George O. Antil, 2 Day avenue. 
Victor Auger, 85 Bridge street. 

Edward A. Benoit, 553 Summer street. 
Eugene H. Boucher, 168 E. Dwight 

street. 
Alphonse Brodeur, 264 Main street. 

Aime Cadieux, 59 Bowers street. 
William R. Canfield, 1 Park View Ter- 
race. 
William N. Carmel, 27 Temple street. 
Howard A. Casey, 21 Bowers street. 
James H. Cooper, 557 Bridge street. 
Arthur A. Cotnoir, 30 Lyman street. 
Hector Cotnoir, 59 Lyman street. 
William H. Crevier, 3 Ely court. 

George Daignault, 109 Main street. 

George Daysle, 40 Main street, North- 
ampton, Mass. 

Gordon H. Deardon, 15 Lawler street. 

Joseph W. A. Desrosiers, 100 Lyman 
street. 

Frank X. Duprey. 11 Spring street. 



Lionel Fontaine. 57 Bowers street. 
Joseph Fourigny, 587 S. Bridge street. 

Joseph Girard, 12 Sargeant street. 
Max Goodstein, 179 Main street. 
Lsrael Greenspan, 229 Chestnut street. 

John H. Healey, 201 Park street. 
Leldore Houle, 530 Summer street. 

James E. Kane, 17 Mosher street. 
Patrick J. Kane, 26 Gates street. 

Edward Lamlein, 79 Hitchcock street. 
Alfred J. Lebarre, 57 Bowers street. 
Wilfred Legace, 159 Main street. 

Temafer Manchuk, 315 Park street. 
Walter P. Manning. 176 West street. 
Euclide L. Marchand, 550 Summer street. 
Karol Markelin, 613 S. Bridge street. 
Arthur J. Martin, 97 N. East street. 
Thomas J. Martin, 67 Mosher street. 
Henry G. Marx, 58 Brown avenue. 
Henry L. Mathey, 645 Summer street. 
Vincent McAllister, 22 Gates street. 
Valmore Mercier, 415 Elm street. 



366 



Holyok:e In The Gr^at War. 



Walter P. Mengal, 855 Main street. 
Oliver P. Morin, 588 Summer street. 
Patrick J. Murphy, 28 Lyman street. 

Carl A. Neisnir, 6 James street. 
William Neumann, 30 Vernon street. 
William A. Neumann, 7 Vernon street. 
Omer A. Normand, 85 Park street. 

William H. O'Connell, 480 Maple street. 
Michael J. O'Connor, 60 Bridge street. 

Armand L. Perron, 26 Mosher street. 
William J. Perron, 51 N. Summer street. 
Albert Peloquin, 289 Main street. 
Edward Pickerell, 379 Main street. 

James T. Riffenburg, 587 Bridge street. 
William A. Roy, 352 Main street. 



Alphonse Sarrazin, 275 Park street. 
William Seidel, 20 Vernon street. 
Patrick H. Shea, 151 E. Dwight street 
Rosario Sicotte, 357 Main street. 
Edward Smart, 379 Main street. 
Homer St. George, 20 Cabot street. 
Frank H. Suher, 686 East street. 
George Surpernaut, Box 88, Lower 
Westfield road. 

William H. Undterdorfel, 15 Clark street. 

Charles E. Varley, 63 Franklin street. 

Edward B. Whalen, 647 S. Summer 
street. 

Joseph E. Yelle, 101 Lyman street. 

Abraham Zass, 173 Brown avenue. 



For Camp Lee, Vii 



•ginia 



Emile Archambault, 563 Canal street. 
Francis L. Ashe, 264 Sargeant street. 

Leonard L. Benoit, 292 Linden street. 
Fred Bernier, 379 Main street. 
Max F. Bialkoske, 582 Summer street. 
Hormisdas J. Blanchette, 51 Cabot street. 
Albert H. Bosbach, 146 Brown avenue. 
James E. Bronner, 68 Center street. 
William J. Brooksbank, R. F. D. No. 60. 
Armand P. Bucher, 550 Summer street. 
James F. Burke, 437 Main street. 
David T. Butler, 823 High street. 

Thomas B. Canfield, Park View terrace. 
Henry Casevant, 522 Summer street. 
Patrick J. Cassidy, 80 Mosher street. 
Emery W. Chagnon, 10 Bridge street. 
Napoleon Charbonneau, 190 E. Dwight 

street. 
Edward J. Clark, 190 E. Dwight street. 
William J. Collins, 80 Chapin avenue. 
Alfred J. Corbeil, 542 Bridge street. 
Henry J. Coyle, 60 Mosher street. 
Cornelius E. Crimmins, 105 Congress 

avenue. 
Stanley W. Croke, 222 E. Dwight street. 

Arthur P. Damour, 151 E. Dwight street. 
David E. Davies, 506 Maple street. 
James F. Desmond, 433 Elm street. 
William Desroches, 568 East street. 



Roger Donoghue, 605 Bridge street. 
Thomas W. Dowd, 121 Hillside avenue. 
Herman Dugroo, 12 Charles street. 
Arthur Dumais, 52 Sargeant street. 
Antonio Dupont, 186 West street. 

Herman Emard, 527 S. Summer street. 

Dollard Forget, 16 Cabot street. 
Ludwig Freitag, 460 Main street. 

Arthur Geissler, 34 Vernon street. 
Eugene Germain, 28 Lyman street. 
Elcidor A. Goyette, 523 Bridge street. 
Omer Guenette, 569 Canal street. 

John J. Hoar, 468 Maple street. 

Francis X. Isabelle, 90 Mosher street. 

John F. Joyce, 58 Franklin street. 

Abraham Kalicka, 37 Sargeant street. 
John Kane, 80 Mosher street. 
Frank Kapzunski, 580 Summer street. 
John F. Kelly, 116 Bridge street. 
Thomas Kennedy, 65 Congress avenue. 
Louis C. Koehler, 36 Carlton street. 
Hugo E. Krausse, 123 Westfield road. 

Joseph E. Labarre, 57 Bowers street. 
Adelbert A. Labarrem, 123 Park street. 
Theodore Lamphere, 11 Mosher street. 
Herve W. Lenay, 31 Temple street. 



HoLYOKE In The Great "War. 



867 



Alphonse U. Marion, 59 Moslier street. 
Claude Martel, 59 East street. 
Albert H. Marchand, 550 Summer street. 
George F. McCarthy, 28 Williams street. 
Elmer F. McCormick, 61 Gates street. 
Alexander P. McGuire, 52 Franklin 

street. 
Fernarde Menard, 12 Sargeant street. 
Albert W. Moreau, 2105 Northampton 

street. 
Arthur Morin, 35 Bowers street. 
Harold E. Moynihan, 149 Brown avenue. 

John F. Napey, SO Hamilton street. 

Amil Nelson, 125 Main street. 

Ernest Normandeau, 200 E. Dvvight 

street. 
Timothy F. O'Brien, 194 Sargeant street. 
Robert E. Olivier, 586 Summer street. 
Alexis G. Ouimet, 269 Main street. 

Michael J. Padden, 22 East street. 
Joseph E. Perrault, 92 Lyman street. 
Laurence E. Perrault, 10 Spring street. 



Alfred D. Picard, 76 Chapin street. 
Louis F. Plante, 552 Summer street. 
Arthur E. Pronvost, 580 Summer street. 

Otto Rehm, 25 Temple street. 
Frederick Ritter, 534 East street. 
Joseph O. Rouleau, 14 Mosher street. 

Albert W. Schenker, 335 East 88th 
street, New York, care of Mrs. Sauer. 
Louis R. Segard, 12 Sargeant street. 
John A. Stansfield, 63 King street. 

Osias J. Theroux, 84 Park street. 
Claude W. R. Thompson, 42 Washing- 
ton avenue. 

William L. Vandewall, 61 Bowers. 
Frank A. Vogt, 7 Columbus avenue. 

Stephen Watkin, 107 Ely street. 
Julius W. Weiland, 283 Main street. 
George E. Welch, 260 E. Dwight street. 
Thomas H. Westphal, 33 Norwood 

terrace. 
Stanley W. Worth, 12 Myrtle avenue. 



DIVISION TWO 

For Camp Sevier, South Carolina 



Henry D. Allyn, 3 River terrace. 
Richard T. Ashe, 17 Elm street. 
Erickson Bailey, 1227 Northampton 

street. 
Ledor J. Bascom, 462 Maple street. 
Frank S. Bell, 113 Sargeant street. 
Frank L. Blair, 380 Appleton street. 
Philip C. Blanchard, 80S Dwight street. 
Joseph E. Blanchette, 13 Prospect street. 
Richard Bligh, 96 Beech street. 
Casper W. Blue, 67 Walnut street. 
Ernest Bourque, 169 High street. 
Michael Bowler, 395 Main street. 
Edward J. Brennan, 42 Taylor street. 

Benjamin Cantor, 764 Dwight street. 
George A. Cardin, 144 Cabot street. 
Martin F. Cauley, 39 High street. 
John F. Conway, 25 Commercial street. 
Wilfred Cote, 66 High street. 



William Coupe, Jr., 75 Hampshire street. 
John S. Crowe, 270 Walnut street. 

Joseph T. Dolan, 1074 Dwight street. 
Owen S. Donnelly, 299 Appleton street. 
Cornelius J. Donoghue, 291 Chestnut 

street. 
Edward T. Dowd, 316 Maple street. 

Timothy C. Fahey, 31 Pearl street. 
Harrington B. Fay, 298 Elm street. 
James T. Fitzgerald, 319 Chestnut street. 
Robert J. Foley, 300 Chestnut street. 
Maurice M. Forhan, 132 Sargeant street. 

John J. Gau'ghan, 4 Sonoma place. 

Charles Hannifan, 112 Hampden street. 
Andrew F. Hurley, 36 Elm street. 

Thomas J. Kilker, 44 Chestnut street. 

Anatole R. Leclaire, 289 Walnut street. 



368 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



Albert L. Lescault, 30G Chestnut street. 
George W. Lewis, 5 Worcester place. 
William F. Lovett, 284 Elm street. 

John A. McCarthy, 328 Maple street. 
Thomas J. McCarthy, 9 Chestnut street. 
Thomas F. Moriarty, 59 Pine street. 
James A. Morrison. 96 Beech street. 
Edward C. Murphy, 299 Appleton street. 

Edward A. Nardi, 4 River terrace. 
George J. Norman, 936 Dwight street. 
Michael I. Nutley, 453 Appleton street. 

Daniel J. O'Connell, 101 Beech street. 
Arthur P. O'Connor, 181 Walnut street. 
Hugh J. O'Connor, 232 Lyman street. 
William A. O'Neill, 1204 Hampden 

street. 
William J. O'Neill, 2S9 Locust street. 
Nelson E. Osterburg, 400 High street. 



James Partalides, 285 High street. 
John Parwlicki, 13 Union street. 
Frank A. Perron, 279 Elm street. 
Arthur Proushe, 255 Maple street. 

Daniel J. Regan, 167 Lyman street. 
Amedee Richard, 87 Front street. 

Michael Sears, 109 Sargeant street. 
Earl W. Shaw, 205 Walnut street. 
Harold J. Stewart, 104 Pleasant street. 
James Sweeney, 39 Elm street. 
John J. Swider, 214 Lyman street. 

Peter J. Trainor, 452 Maple street. 
Burnice G. Tyrell, 310 Maple street. 

William C. Van Tassell, 250 Maple 

Albert A. Washington, 782 Hampden 
street. 

Daniel F. Waters, 25 Linden street. 



For Camp Lee, Virginia 



Frank N. Bligh, 96 Beech street. 
Patrick H. Brennan, 17 Linden street. 
Louis A. Brodeur, 402 Maple street. 
Frederick F. Brooks, 411 High street. 
Daniel T. Brown, 891 Hampshire street. 
Amos O. Bushey, Maplewood. 

Timothy J. Cadigan, 103 Sargeant street. 
John F. Cain, 56 Linden street. 
Daniel T. Casey, 78 Newton street. 
Charles C. Cassidy, 12 Newton street. 
William J. Cleary, 1049 Dwight street. 
Joseph H. Collinge, 94 Jackson street. 

Bernard J. Downey, 86 Maple street. 

Brandon Fitzgerald, 144 Sargeant street. 
Frederick B. Foley, 40 Chestnut street. 

John Gardiner, 1214 Hampden street. 
Howard Garland, 323 High street. 
Burt W. Gavin, 30 Beacon avenue. 
Arthur W. Giehler, 751 Hampden street. 
Patrick J. Gloster, 35 Elm street. 
Antonio Grabouski, 148 Essex street. 
John J. Griffin, 213 Lyman street. 
Frank Guisti, 86 Bond street. 

Edgar S. Habaca, 54 Hampden street. 
John J. Haley, 9 Easthampton road. 
John J. Hanifan, 842 Dwight street. 



Leonard R. Hanson, 123 Pine street. 
Joseph S. Harris, 59 Taylor street. 
Peter F. Harris, 59 Taylor street. 
Cornelius J. Healy, 229 Hampden street. 
Edward A. Heffern, 89 Beacon avenue. 
Patrick F. Hurley, 101 Walnut street. 

Patrick J. Jordan, 783 Dwight street. 

Elias Kalil, 314 Maple street. 

William C. Kaufman, 141 Sargeant 

street. 
Edward F. Kelliher, 823 Dwight street. 
George F. Kelliher, 923 Dwight street. 
.\ndrew Kovalsky, 71 Pine street. 
Frank J. Kwiatkowski, 148 Essex street. 

Wilfred J. LaBlanc, 125 Sargeant street. 
Edward Lamirande, 101 Hampden street. 
Joseph A. LaPointe, 4 Elm street. 

Lewis S. MacDonald, 5 Worcester place. 
Albaini N. Mailloux, 111 Newton street. 
James A. Malcolm, 288 Walnut street. 
Edwin J. Maloney, 125 Beech street. 
David Markowitz, 200 High street. 
Perle M. Marrs, 644 DAvight street. 
John A. Martin, 38 Chestnut street. 
Edgar L. Masse, 1537 Northampton 
street. 



HoLYOKE In The Great "War. 



369 



Arthur F. McCray, Springfield, Mass. 
John McKillop, 185 Pleasant street. 
Thomas J. McMahon, 10 Elm street. 
John E. McNerney, 132 Pine street. 
Armand N. Mercure, 133 Walnut street. 
Edward J. Michel, 146 Sargeant street. 
Oscar F. Minkley, 56 Taylor street. 
Raymond E. Moody, 265 Suffolk street. 
Adelard C. Moreau, 294 Chestnut street. 
Thomas J. Moriarty, 448 Maple street. 
Rodrigue V. Mounier, 68 High street. 
George F. Murphy, 719 Dwight street. 
John F. Murphy, Albany. 

Patrick T. O'Connor. 19 Linden street. 
Edward O'Donnell, 384 Appleton street. 
Leroy Orcutt, 214 Walnut street. 

Joseph P. Payant, 289 Main street. 
Ernest A. Provost, 194 High street. 

Henry H. Roeske, 8 Fairfield avenue. 
Harold S. Roosevelt, 5 Fairfield avenue. 



William R. Ross, 1105 Hampden street. 
Lawrence C. Rowe, 69 Front street. 
Walter Rusiscki, 13 Union street. 
Arthur Ryan, 1224 Hampden street. 

John J. Sammons, 106 High street. 
John W. Schmidt, 16 Hampshire street. 
Louis A. Sefranka, 179 High street. 
Thomas F. Sheehan, 7 Highland avenue. 
William J. Sheehan, 167 Lyman street. 
Wells A. Sholenberg, 598 Dwight street. 
William P. Smalley, 733 High street. 
Ralph W. Stedman, 307 Locust street. 
John Stewart, 145 Cabot street. 
William J. St. John, 22 Lyman street. 

Timothy L. Thompson, 67 Pine street. 
William J. Thompson, 100 Walnut street. 
Louis E. Thibodeau, 182 Beech street. 

Albert Ward, 126 Cabot street. 

Clarence E. Young, 19 Beacon avenue. 



FOR OFFICERS' TRAINING SCHOOL 
Camp Freemont, California 



The following had been recommended for the civilian officers' training school at 
Camp Freemont, Cal. : 



Mario S. Boggio, 134 Beech street. 
John L. Callahan, 90 Nonotuck street. 
Willard A. Cutler, 675 High street. 
Henry S. Delaney, 219 Chestnut street. 
Timothy C. Fahey, 31 Pearl street. 
John Gardiner, 1214 Hampden street. 
John J. Gaughan, 4 Sonoma place. 
W. A. Girard, 292 Pine street. 
Henry H. Haines, 79 Hitchcock street. 
Alfred O. Hebert, 294 Pine street. 
A. L. Lescault, 306 Chestnut street. 
Eugene A. Lynch, 233 Suffolk street. 
Edward J. Lyons, 49 Linden street. 

24 



M. J. McDonald, 86 North Canal street. 
Philip E. McTigue, 131 Pine street. 
Achille Mescart, 36 Adams street. 
G. F. Murphy, 719 Dwight street. 
D. F. O'Connell, 903 Dwight street. 
P. J. O'Connor, 19 Linden street. 
A. O'Neill, 1204 Hampden street. 
D. J. Regan, 297 Chestnut street. 
Arthur Ryan, 1224 Hampden street. 
Irving E. Teahan, 14 Lyman street. 
P. R. Vincent, 337 Main street. 
Daniel F. Waters, 5 Linden street. 



^^Hell Fighters" Bring Back Good Stories 



They were known as the "Hell Fighters," those negro doughboys of the 369th 
(old 15th New York Infantry), whom Colonel William Hayward led in France. 
From all accounts they earned the title ; and they brought back with them not only 
glory, but anecdotes filled with humor and the dialect of their race. Some of the 
stories they told on themselves, others were retailed by their officers. 

"Would you like to be in the airplane service?" an officer asked one of the 
negroes while he was watching a French machine sailing overhead. 

"No, suh, not fo' mine," was the rejoinder. 

"Why?" the officer persisted. 

"Well, you see, ef I was up in dat dah machine an^ de officer got kilt I'd have 
to git out an' crank up de engine, wouldn't I? I wouldn't have nothin' to 
Stan' on." 



A story often told concerns a seasick negro whose bunkie urged him to go out 

on deck. 

"Come awn," he begged. "Dey's a ship a-passin' right now." 

"Go 'way," said he of the sickbed. "Doan you bothah me until we's passin' a 

tree." 



In one of the first trenches were 5,000 negro troops, supported at some distance 
in the rear by a force of whites 10,000 strong. A newly arrived negro trooper, 
who was visibly nervous, was being "kidded" mercifully by his companions. 

"Whut's you do. Hennery," one of the tormentors asked, "ef ten billion, o' 
dem bush Germans wuz to pop up outen de groun' right 'bout as close to you as 
nineteen is to twenty?" 

"I ain't a-tellin' whut I'd do," Henry answered, "but I know whut de res' o' 
you niggahs would do, an' I know whut de papers back home would be sayin' de 
nex' mawnin'. Dey'd have big headlines : 'Ten Thousand White Folks Trampled 
to Death.'" 



One force of negroes was quartered next to a division of Moroccans, who had 
a perpetual fued with a regiment of Singalese nearby. The Moroccans are mulatto 
in color, while the Singalese are as black as most of the members of Colonel Hay- 
ward's old regiment. This fact was really at the bottom of the fued. 

On one occasion Colonel Hayward wanted to send a messenger to the Moroccan 
commander and chose three of his own men to deliver it. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 371 

As the messengers approached the Moroccan camp the latter mistook them 
for the despised Singalese. They rushed from their dugouts brandishing guns, 
knives and pistols, and with wild shouts warned the strangers not to come nearer. 

The New Yorkers beat a hasty retreat, and when Colonel Hayward demanded 
of one what the troulile was he replied : 

"Color.el. you bettah sen' some o" deni light cullud Hahlem lounge lizahds fo' 
dis job. We's done !"' 



The Morocco Division occupied the same position for months, and during that 
time managed to collect a large number of German marks, each coin being worth 
about 16 cents. The New York troops spent their energies in collecting French 
francs. Whenever they were able to do so they exchanged their francs for the 
German coin. Colonel Hayward asked one of his men why he did this. 

"Why, we's gwine to spen' it in Germany, of cose," the doughboy replied. 
"Ain't dat whah we's a-gwine?" 



A group of colored Harlemites was standing in the mess line when several 
German planes suddenly appeared overhead. In half a minute the line had melted 
to one man, the top sergeant. 

'Ts you jes plum crazy or don't you know nothin'?" the sergeant remonstrated 
when the men returned. 

"Well, boss," replied the courageous vSam, "heaven is a long ways from France 
an' I ain't no hand to go travelin' on a empty stunimick." 



A lieutenant inquired of a homesick youth why he was so anxious to get back 
home. "Aren't you being used all right? Did you ever see such pretty girls in 
your life?" 

"I'se liein' used all right and de French ladies is sho easy to look at," was 
the reply; "but my heart's jes natchally yeahnin' fo' de little O. D. gal I lef in 
Alabam'." (O. D. is army for olive drab.) 



"What would you do if a pack of Germans suddenly came right down on top 
of us ?" asked a sergeant. 

"Dey ain't gwine to know whar I is," replied the private. 

"How's that, Sam?" 

"Well, you see, dey might know whar I wuz, but not whar I is." 



On the night of armistice day a negro trooper met some hilarious Frenchmen. 
Next morning he was before his captain charged with intoxication. 

"Young man," scowled the captain, "you've got a mighty good record and I'm 
sorry. Have you any excuse to offer for this outbreak?" 

"I ain't got no 'xcuse, please Cap'n," said the culprit, "but I'se done got a good 
reason." 

"A reason!" exclaimed the Captain. "What is it?" 

"Well, Cap'n, I dunno de English fo" it, but de bunch I met las' night called 
it 'encore.' " 



Fighting K. of C. Chaplain 



Rev. John B. DeValles, K. of C. chaplain with the 104th Infantry, who was 
decorated when 116 members of the regiment received the Croix de Guerre in 
May, 1918, served as one of the chaplains of the regiment and was commissioned 
a first lieutenant. Dr. DeValles told of fighting in the St. Mihiel drive, as follows : 

"The hardships and discomforts of the last drive were the strain that broke 
the camel's back for me. Following the retreating Boches, I wrenched my back 
in jumping a trench. I hobbled for hours in opposition to medico's advice, which 
I now regret having refused. 

"I shall never forget that outpost as long as I live. We arrived there around 
midnight and relieved a whole company of Singalese in command of a French 
captain. I acted as interpreter for the young American lieutenant in charge. 
After placing our men the medico and I decided on a dugout for a first aid right 
in the village center evacuated by the Germans after holding it four years. The 
French captain before leaving us gave us the pleasant information that the enemy 
were only 8,000 yards away in the next hamlet. But they were nearer than that. 
Some of the enemy were spending the night hidden in the dugout near ours. We 
were in blissful ignorance of the fact and I gladly rolled up in blanket and sought 
sleep on the hard cement floor of a German pillbox. The medico and four litter 
bearers slept in the first aid station a few yards away. 

"At 4.30 a. m. I awoke two of the litter bearers and ambulance men near me 
and told them I heard German machine guns shooting very close and that bullets 
were striking at the pillbox. We carefully struck a match, lit a bit of candle, hid 
it in a corner and cautiously opened the slits in the wall. The boys, at first doubt- 
ful, then believed I was right. 

"I rushed to the first aid and found myself in a street battle before I realized 
it. I shouted at the doctor to come out and see the 'movies,' not realizing that 
the enemy was raiding us. The doctor, taking his time to get his boots, I glanced 
over my shoulder just in time to get the surprise of my life. A Boche lieutenant 
across the street was in the act of throwing a hand grenade at the doorway of the 
aid station in which I was standing. 

"With his arm upraised he suddenly fell on the spot, shot through the heart 
by Lieut. Morris, who stood near me behind a tree, and was watching the perform- 
ance. The scrap then became a free for all fight and of short duration. Our 
little band awoke from their early dawn slumbers, had taken several prisoners and 
killed about 20 right around yours truly and his first aid station. 

"Two of our brave boys were killed and four slightly wounded. 

"When I arrived with my little group at the village of W , where the 

rest of the battalion was and the P. C., the colonel and major and men sur- 
rounded me to get full details of the men's good work and our narrow escape. I 
refused an ambulance ride and that night hiked again to another position with 
the troops. 

"The strain finally told on me as I was finally evacuated to the hospital and 
had two Boche prisoners litter me into the hospital train." 



Brief Summary of Holyoke in the Wars 



/%>^ERHAPS any history of Holyoke in the great European war should contain 
4rl ^ brief reference to the doings of Holyokers in previous struggles although, 
•^[p of course, there was no Holyoke before 1850, the present Holyoke territory 
then being included in West Springfield and Northampton ; the greater part 
of the present Holyoke being the Third Parish of West Springfield, and the bal- 
ance — the Smiths Ferry 'part — being under the jurisdiction of Northampton. For 
this reason the record of Holyoke's war-like citizens would have to be located in 
the town books of West Springfield and of the city up the river. 

That Hob'okers were fighters way back in the 1700's is assured from what 
has already been published from time to time. In Smiths Ferry we are told 
Benjamin Wright settled in 1704 and on the Easthampton road near Mt. Tom 
junction there were a half dozen families who worked with firearms always where 
they could get at them and "Forted" together nights for protection against the 
Indians. There seems no Holyoke records available of the list of men who took 
part in the early colonial wars. Lieut. Joseph Morgan is said to have been 
captured when Fort William Henry was taken by the French and Indians in 1757, 
but how he escaped that fearful massacre, there has been nothing handed down 
for the records. 

There does not seem to have been compiled a list of men from Holyoke terri- 
tory who took part in the Revolutionary war, or in the war of 1812, although there 
were ancestors of present Holyokers in both of these struggles. Neither does 
there seem to be a record of Holyokers who may have taken part in the Mexican 
war. Perhaps as the city was getting ready to be founded at that time the resi- 
dents were too busy to chase Mexicans. It is sure that early in the century 
Holyoke had a martial spirit for Company D, "Holyoke's 0*wn," was not the first 
militia company organized. The records show that when in 1829 a militia company 
was organized, Holyoke residents were on hand and helped to officer the company. 
This w'as a cavalry company of the First Brigade of the Fourth Division of the 
State Militia and the organization was efifected April 20, 1829, and the muster rolls 
signed October 6 of the same year. Of course Holyoke was a part of West 
Springfield at that time but these names among the officers sound rather familiar : 
Moses Loomis, Edwin H. Ball, Charles R. Ball. Among other Holyokers were 
Eldbridge and Newbury Day. From that time until 1842, the residents of the 
"Third Parish" seemed to have taken part in no struggles and lived a peaceful life. 

In 1842 Dorr's rebellion took at least one Holyoker into a fight and it is pre- 
sumed that the Mexican war may have drawn a few. 

The Civil war, of course, took a large number of Holyokers and it is known 
That at least one Holyoker was in the Seventh U. S. Cavalry, a part of which was 
wiped out in Custer's fight at the Little Big Horn. 

The Spanish war was the next struggle that called any great number of Hol- 
yokers to the colors and Holyoke's part in this contest is given in Major W. J. 
Crosier's book, giving a history of Company D in the struggle. From this war 
until Company D was called to the Mexican border, any Holyoke war activity was 
confined to Holyokers serving in the regular army, although there were Holyokers 



374 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

identitied in llie lighting in the Philippines. From the ^^lexican 1)order Company D 
went into the great European war and were joined by hundreds of other Holyokers 
in the conflict.. 

Dorr's rebellion, in which one Holyoker took part, occurred in 1842, taking place 
in Rhode Island and Dr. Elijah Lyon participated. Dr. Lyon, who for many years 
resided on Pleasant street, was well known to many present-day Holyokers. At 
the time of this little muss he was about 19 years of age and when the supporters 
of Thomas Wilson Dorr's claim to the governorship of Rhode Island, started 
recruiting in this section for the army which was to place Dorr in the guber- 
natorial chair, Dr. Lyon was one of the recruits. Dr. Lyon used to recount his 
experiences and said that he was chased and shot at in three states after the 
retreat and certainly any record of Holyoke in the wars should include this. 

To those who have never heard of Dorr's rebellion, a few words in explana- 
tion may not be amiss. 

Thomas Wilson D'orr was a reformer and started out to do away with the 
unjust Rhode Island law which, at the time he ran for governor in 1843, only 
allowed those to vote who owned $200 in real estate and even then the owner and 
his oldest son were the only two in the family privileged to cast a ballot. 
Dorr claimed that in the election of April 18, 1842, he was elected governor of the 
state and started to form his government on May 3 of that year. In the mean- 
time a re-election of Governor King had taken place, and his government was 
also organized on that date. The suffragists, as Dorr's party was called, refused 
to acknowledge the election of Governor King and, with trouble imminent, martial 
law was declared. Dorr's party at once flew to arms and called for assistance 
from the neighboring states. An attempt to capture the arsenal at Providence was 
frustrated and later the forces of Dorr disintegrated and Dorr fled, to be captured 
later, and was sentenced to life imprisonment for treason, but was pardoned about 
1851. It was when the call for help from Massachusetts came that Holyoke stepped 
into the war activities, for Dr. Lyon enlisted expecting to form one in a company 
of 50, but two enlistments were all that were gained and the two were sent to 
Providence, R. I., where they joined Dorr's forces which were much smaller than 
the Holyoke man had been led to believe. 

With about 300 others he marched on the Providence arsenal and, while accord- 
ing to history there was no bloodshed, the doctor stated, when recalling the fight 
a few years ago, that after the summons had been made on the arsenal to surrender 
and the summons was refused, the forces were fired upon with cannon and two 
or three men were killed. When the rebels tried to fire their cannon at the fort 
they found that some traitors in the ranks had spiked the guns and, as it seemed 
useless to face the artillery with rifles, they dispersed. When shortly afterward the 
rebellion was broken for good the Holyoke part of the war started for home and 
took refuge at Pomfret, Conn. Later he was chased out and finally captured, but 
escaping from his captors made good his escape into Massachusetts. The doctor 
always maintained that Dorr's case was a just one and used to point out that as 
a result of the rebellion the laws which caused it were abated. 

With no records of the Mexican war as far as Holyoke is concerned, the first 
great struggle in which Holyoke took part, and this time as the Town of Holyoke. 
was the Civil war. In this war Holyoke's record as a fighting community is one 
of which to be proud and Holyokers were in practically every branch of the service. 
Old residents of the city still recall the rallies held to promote enlistments and 
the record of soldiers who volunteered and entered the service shows that these 
rallies were not held in vain. The story of the Civil war has been often told and 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



375 



it is not necessary to go further with it than to append the list of names of those 
who went from Hoh'oke. There are yet in the city men living whose names are 
on this list. 



Holyoke in the Rebellion 



Albert F. Henry, Kith Regt., Co. I. 

Chas. H. Knapp, lUth Regt., Co. I. 

H. P. Smith, 10th Regt., Co. 1. 

H. A. Page, 10th Regt., Co. I. 
*0. B. Paul, 10th Regt, Co. I. 

John H. Kelley, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

S. W. Reed, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

D. B. Nye, lOth Regt., Co. I. 
fA. D. Otis, 10th Regt, Co. I. 

Chas. W. Cockrane, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

Geo. Connor, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

Augustus Seifert, 10th Regt., Co. I. 
tJas. W. Burt, 10th Regt., Co. I. 
*Robt J. Stewart, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

Chas. F. Towner, 10th Regt., Co. I. 
*Chas. E. Hovey, 10th Regt., Co. I. 
*W. H. Estes, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

John Sullivan, 10th Regt, Co. I. 

Chas. H. Deoie, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

W. F. Lamb, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

Wm. H. Eaton, 10th Regt., Co. I. 
*John Barry, 10th Regt., Co. I. 
*Simeon P. Smith, 10th Regt., Co. I. 
tJohn Falvey, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

H. K. Bean, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

Jas. N. Dailey, 10th Regt, Co. I. 

Patrick Russell, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

Henry M. Converse, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

G. W. Peabody, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

D. O. Judd, 10th Regt, Co. I. 
*Josiah Gleason, 21st Regt. 
tJas. Baldwin, 10th Regt, Co. I. 

John R. Walker, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

Frederick Burnham, 10th Regt.. Co. I. 

Geo. Burnham, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

Sylvanus H. Brady, 10th Regt., Co. I. 
*H. J. Boyington, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

A. F. Bradford, 10th Regt., Co. I. 
fAnthony Cain, 10th Regt, Co. I. 
*Daniel Cronan, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

Peter Huot, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

Jos. Kelley, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

Jas. Kilroy, 10th Regt, Co. I. 
*Ki]led. fDied. 



*D. D. Shea, 10th Regt., Co. I. 
tJos. Maguire, 10th Regt., Co. I. 

A. Robert, 2d Regt., Co. E. 

John Alexander, 2d Regt., Co. B. 

J no. Allan, Jr., 2d Regt 

Jos. G. Albee, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

John Avery, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

H. D. Aldrich, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

Chas. R. Avery, 36th Regt., Co. K. 

J., Amsiz, 4th Cav., Co. C. 

Jos. Ashley, 13th Art., Co. I. 

John Ashley, 13th Art., Co. I. 

Oliver Allen, 3d H. Art., Co. I. 

A. L. Bundy, 21st Regt., Co. H. 

Geo. H. Bean, 21st Regt., Co. H. 

J. W. Bartlett, 24th Regt., Co. C. 

J. H. Burnham, 24th Regt., Co. A. 

John Burns, 2d Regt. 

Albert Poshodt, 2d Regt., Co. A. 

D. W. C. Browning, 2d Regt, Co. I. 
Geo. Baldwin, 2d Regt. 

.\aron Baldwin, 27th Regt., Co. G. 

W. S. Buxton, 27th Regt., Co. K. 

O. Burlingame, 27th Regt, Co. K. 

A. M. Butler, 27th Regt., Co. K. 

.\very Bryant, 27th Regt, Co. C. 

J. H. Burlingame, 27th Regt., Co. K. 

J. H. Burnham, 34th Regt., Co. E. 

John B. Burgess, 27th Regt., Co. B. 

J. H. Ball, 46th Regt. 

Eli W. Bartlett, 46th Regt. 

G. W. Berry, 46th Regt. 

Jno. Bradley, 46th Regt. 

Wm. Bradley, 46th Regt. 

John C. Bryant, 46th Regt. 

H. J. Butler, 46th Regt. 

John Bare, 8th Regt. 

E. M. Burgess, 1st Cav., Co. B. 
Wm. Burnett, 4th Cav., Co. G. 
Carl Brandt, 4th Regt., Co. E. 
Jas. Bostwick, 3d H. Art., Co. C. 
Wm. Barry, 3d Regt., Co. C. 
Jas. Boady, 2d H. Art., Co. C. 



376 



IIoLYOKE In The Great War. 



G. N. Bean, 3d Regt. 

John Carlin, 2d Regt. 

Chas. Clark, 2d Regt. 

Jas. Clark, 2d Regt. 

Richard Clark, 34th Regt., Co. D. 
*James Connors, 10th Regt., Co. H. 

H. D. Cochran, 20th Regt. 

M. Connors, 21st Regt., Co. B. 
*Pat. dishing, 21st Regt., Co. B. 

Geo. Chalmers, 27th Regt., Co. G. 

Richard Curry, 27th Regt. Co. G. 

Stephen C. Clark, 32d Regt., Co. E. 

Neil Cullen, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

J. H. Copeland, 34th Regt., Co. D. 
tE. Clark, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

Jas. Connors, 34th Regt. 

H. D. Cochrane, 37th Regt.. Co. A. 

E. P. Clark, 46th Regt. 

G. W. Chase, 46th Regt. 

L. A. Childs, 46th Regt. 

Robert Clapp, 46th Regt. 

J. A. Cleveland, 46th Regt. 

C. W. Cozin, 46th Regt. 
Mike Eystel, 46th Regt. 

E. M. Clapp, 52d Regt., Co. H. 
Chas. Connell, 59th Regt., Co. G. 

D. Charlewath, 59th Regt., Co. G. 
H. Connors, 59th Regt., Co. G. 

R. J. Cochrane, 1st Cav., Co. E. 

D. B. R. Couch, 1st Cav., Co. F. 
John Connor, 1st Cav., Co. G. 
J. J. Curran, 2d H. Art., Co. B. 
Jas. Connors, 3d H. Art., Co. C. 
J. Couchen, 13th H. Art., Co. I. 
Thos. Doyle, 2d Regt. 

tPat. Devine, 31st Regt., Co. E. 

C. Donahue, 31st Regt., Co. G. 
*John Donahue (2d), 31st Regt., Co. G. 

T. B. Dooley, 34th Regt., Co. D. 
*Con. Donahue, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

C. L. Delmage, 34th Regt., Co. I. 

M. Donnelly, 34th Regt., Co. I. 

J. W. Davis, 46th Regt. 

H. P. Dickerman, 46th Regt. 

E. E. Davis, 46th Regt. 
E. P. Davis, 46th Regt. 
H. B. Dayton, 46th Regt. 
H. S. Dickerman, 46th Regt. 
P. F. Dover, 46th Regt. 

Jas. Doyle, 46th Regt. 

*Ki]led. tDied. 



Robert Dillon, 46th Regt. 

B. F. Davenport, 1st Cav. 

John Donahue, 3d H. Art. 

Wm. Downs, 3d Cav. 
tH. A. Eaton, 2d Regt., Co. G. 

Oscar Ely, 46th Regt. 

Chas. Ely, 46th Regt. 

J. A. Ellsbree, 46th Regt. 

Wm. Fletcher, 2d Regt, Co. F. 

Lawrence Fay, 2d Regt. 

Chas. Francis, 2d Regt. 
tJ. D. Frazer, 21st Regt., Co. H. 

F. S. Fairbank, 21st Regt, Co. H. 
Maurice Farrell, 21st Regt., Co. B. 
Chas. H. Foster, 31st Regt., Co. E. 
R. R. Fuller, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

L. E. Fisher, 34th Regt., Co. I. 
Chas. Fish, 46th Regt. 
John Flynn, 46th Regt 
Chas. Freeland, 46th Regt. 
J. Fuller, 46th Regt., Co. A. 
James Fox, 1st Cav., Co. F. 
William Fitzgerald, 4th Regt., Co. H. 
Jas. Fryer, 2d H. Art., Co. E. 
Chas. H. Flanders, 3d H. Art., Co. C. 
S. Fonleroy, 5th Cav., Co. I. 
*M. Gorman, 10th Regt., Co. H. 

D. F. Griswold, 2d Regt., Co. B. 
I. W. Gibson, 21st Regt, Co. H. 
Thos. Goodress, 21st Regt., Co. H. 
Pat Gartland, 31st Regt, Co. E. 
Fred. Goddard. 34th Regt, Co. D. 

E. F. Gill, 46th Regt. 
Napoleon Gill, 46th Regt. 
J. R. Gilmore, 46th Regt. 

G. W. Gorham, 41st Regt., Co. F. 
H. L. Gill, 57th Regt., Co. K. 
M. Gary, 13th H. Art., Co. I. 

J. D. Green, 13th H. Art, Co. I. 
Geo. H. Gunn. 

John Gorman, 173d N. Y. Regt. 
fT. S. Holman, 1st Regt. 
John Howe, 2d Regt. 
John Harper, 2d Regt. 
John Hinley, 2d Regt. 

F. Horning, 2d Regt. 
John Howard, 2d Regt. 

Jas. Hart, 15th Regt., Co. K. 
J. Hang, 1.5th Regt, Co. A. 
J. Hascor, 21st Regt. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



377 



A. E. Hummiston, 21st Regt., Co. H. 

Fred. Horning, 21st Regt. 

Wm. Hamepin, 27th Regt. 

C. H. Hopkin, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

H. C. Hallett, 34th Regt, Co. F. 

I. N. Hitchcock, 34th Regt., Co. F. 

Jerry Harrington, 35th Regt. 

Con. Healy, 46th Regt. 

S. A. Hall, 46th Regt. 

Daniel Harmon, 46th Regt. 

John Harrington, 46th Regt, Co. B. 

C. H. Hatfield, 46th Regt. 

J. B. Holland, 57th Regt, Co. C. 
J. J. Helmer, 57th Regt. 
Homer Hyde, 1st Cav. 
Philip Hyde, 1st Cav. 
P. Hines, 1st Cav., Co. E. 
Wm. Hall, 1st Cav., Co. D. 
-{•Morris Herman, 1st Cav., Co. I. 
J. H. Henley. 

H. B. Ingraham, 1st Cav., Co. F. 
F. M. James, 10th Regt, Co. C. 
Wm. Johnson, 2d Regt., Co. A. 
Jas. Johnson, 2d Regt. 
Joseph Johnson, 2d Regt. 
Ed. M. Gillson, 27th Regt., Co. G. 
Fred A. Judd, 34th Regt., Co. D. 
E. F. Jefts, 46th Regt. 
Albert Johnson, 1st Cav. 
Jos. Jiginer, 13th H. Art., Co. I. 
Chas. Kurz, 2d Regt. 
Wm. J. Knight, 15th Regt., Co. K. 
John Kelt, 21st Regt. 
James Kogler, 25th Regt., Co. G. 
Lester Kendell, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

D. E. Kingsbury, 46th Regt. 
A. O. Kenney, 46th Regt 
Wm. D. Knight, 46th Regt. 

E. H. Kelly, 3d H. Art, Co. C. 
Geo. Leonard, 2d Regt., Co. E. 
James Lamb, 16th Regt., Co. G. 
A. Lecour. 

fHenry Lyman, 27th Regt, Co. A/ 
John Landers, 27th Regt., Co. E. 
Daniel Lommey, 34th Regt., Co. D. 
Orrin Ladd, 34th Regt, Co. D. 
Joseph Laporte, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

*W. S. Loomis, 46th Regt., Co. B. 
James Limehan, 46th Regt 
J. M. Locklin, 1st Cav., Co. E. 
*Ki!led. tDied. 



James Looney, 2d Regt. 
W. J. S. Linyo, 3d Cav. 
L. Mullo. 

D. McCrohin, 2d Regt., Co. G. 
Jerry Murphy, 2d Regt, Co. E. 
Pat. McCarty, 2d Regt 
James McLoughlin, 2d Regt. 
John Mockay, 2d Regt. 
Thomas Montclair, 2d Regt. 
James Morgan, 2d Regt. 
John Mulligan, 2d Regt. 
Francis Mackin, 19th Regt., Co. G. 
Joseph Moran, 21st Regt., Co. H. 
James McDonald, 27th Regt., Co. G. 

tB. F. Makinster, 27th Regt., Co. G. 

Robert McDonald, 27th Regt., Co. K. 

H. H. Meacham, 32d Regt., Co. E. 

James McFarlain, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

John McMahan, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

James McSweeney, 46th Regt. 

Charles McFarlan, 46th Regt. 

Willington Munyan, 46th Regt. 

Edward Moren, 46th Regt 

M. Manning, 46th Regt 

John Maloney, 46th Regt. 

Pat. McGrath, 46th Regt. 

N. McCallister, 1st Cav., Co. E. 

Wm. Marsh, 1st Cav. 
tJohn Minehan, 1st Cav., Co. F. 

Charles McFarlan, 4th Cav. 

John Moohr, 4th Cav., Co. E. 

David Morris, 4th Cav., Co. F. 

Pat. Mahoney, 2d H. Art., Co. A. 

James Markey, 3d H. Art., Co. L 

George Martin, 5th Cav., Co. I. 

Charles Marshall. 

E. Newton. 

C. Nolan, 15th Regt., Co. K. 

Arthur Neal, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

John Norris, 37th Regt, Co. L 

C. H. Noyes, 46th Regt., Co. L 

Samuel Niles, 4th Cav., Co. M. 

Joseph Noel, 13th H. Art., Co. L 

John Norton. 

Jerry O^Connor, 31st Regt., Co. B. 

Geo. B. Oaks, 31st Regt., Co. E. 

T. O'Donnell. 

T. H. Orwell, 46th Regt. 

T. O'Connor, 1st Cav., Co. C. 

Daniel O'Keefe, .".4th Regt.. Co. D. 



378 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



i\l. Prescott, 2d Regt., Co. B. 

John Paxtoii, 28th Regt., Co. A. 

John E. Parker, 31st Regt., Co. E. 

James M. Perkins, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

Frank Parsons, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

Henry Parsons, 46th Regt. 

A. C. Pratt, 46th Regt. 

L. R. Peebles, 46th Regt., Co. I. 

G. B. Peirce, 46th Regt., Co. B. 

John H. Pike, 46th Regt., Co. I. 
*M. C. Pratt, 1st Cav., Co. E. 

F. B. Pierce, 13th H. Art. 

C. F. Quint, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

Wm. Ryan, 2d Regt., Co. I. 

Chas. H. Roby, 46th Regt. 

S. B. Rano, 46th Regt. 

J. H. Richmond, 57th Regt., Co. G. 

Pat. Ryan, 4th Cav. 

Wm. F. Rucker, 2d H. Art., Co. A. 

John Reeves, 2d H. Art. 

S. C. Robbins, 3d H. Art., Co. C. 

Henry Smith, 2d Regt., Co. A. 

Geo. Scott, 2d Regt. 
tS. Sill, 15th Regt., Co. E. 

James Sullivan, 21st Regt., Co. H. 

Jerry Sullivan, 21st Regt., Co. B. 

Thomas Shay, 21st Regt. 
*James Sullivan, 27th Regt., Co. G. 

Mathew Sullivan, 27th Regt, Co. G. 
fThomas Sullivan, 27th Regt., Co. K. 

Chas. A. Spencer, 27th Regt., Co. A. 

F. D. Stearns, 31st Regt., Co. D. 
A. Sill, 34th Regt, Co. D. 
Abram Smith, 34th Regt., Co. D. 
John A. Savage, 34th Regt, Co. D. 
Chas. H. Sampson, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

*M. Smith, 34th Regt., Co. D. 
S. H. Stewart, 35th Regt., Co. B. 

G. D. Sampson, 36th Regt., Co. K. 
C. V. B. Smart, 46th Regt. 

E. B. StilUngs, 46th Regt., Co. A. 
J. Sefton, Jr., 46th Regt. 
Chas. A. Sanborn, 46th Regt 
J. Shahone, 46th Regt. 
J. A. Snell, 46th Regt. 
Asa M. Scarlet, 46th Regt. 
W. H. Smith, 1st Cav., Co. F. 
J. Lolan, 1st Cav. 
W. H. Sisson, 1st Cav., Co. G. 
John Shehan. 13th H. Art., Co. H. 
*Killed. fDied. 



A. Salis, 2d Regt. 
Wm. Snyder. 

John Thompson, 2d Regt. 
James Tooney, 2d Regt. 
M. Toughey. 
M. Tranier, 35th Regt. 
John Tenhill, 37th Regt. 
John Terrill, 46th Regt., Co. B. 
James Trumbull, 3d H. Art., Co. I. 
John Underbill, 2d Regt.. Co. I. 
C. D. Ufford, 10th Regt., Co. F. 
C. Van Arx, 2d Regt. 
M. C. Van Valkenburg. 31st Regt., 
Co. E. 
*R. Williston, 2d Regt, Co. G. 
M. Warren, 2d Regt., Co. A. 

B. Wheeler, 2d Regt. 

J. A. Wallace, 2d Regt, Co. E. 

H. A. Warner, 10th Regt., Co. C. 

John Warner, 10th Regt., Co. D. 

Thos. Wood, 15th Regt., Co. K. 

R. Welsh, 15th Regt., Co. K. 

Alvin White, 21st Regt., Co. H. 

H. A. Walters, 27th Regt., Co. G. 

H. S. Williams, 27th Regt., Co. G. 

A. Walter, 27th Regt., Co. G. 

John Ward, 27th Regt, Co. G. 

William Winters, 30th Regt. 

Frank Wispdane, 31st Regt, Co. G. 

Daniel Webster, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

J. A. Winn, 34th Regt, Co. D. 

O. Washburn, 36th Regt., Co. K. 

J. W. Wright, 36th Regt., Co. K. 

Henry Wheeler, 46th Regt. 

G. E. Whitaker, 46th Regt. 

E. Whitney, 46th Regt. 

L. White, 46th Regt., Co. M. 

E. W. Wellington, 46th Regt 

R. Ware, 46th Regt. 

E. Ware, 46th Regt. 

A. C. Wheeler, 46th Regt. 

L. W. Williams, 1st Cav. 

J. H. Wild, 1st Cav., Co. D. 

N. Wilcomer. 

A. Ee Grave, 57th Regt., Co. I. 

John Murphy, 2d Regt. 

M. Conner, 34th Regt., Co. D. 

C. W. Cochrane, 37th Regt., Co. C. 
C. O. Carpenter. 

*William Prentiss, Jr., 57th Regt., Co. K. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 379 

'E. C. Pierct'. NAVAL SERVICE. 

^F. S. Cook, 31st Regt. 



J. G. Smith, 46th Regt. 



John Baker, B. McEnty, W. F. Morse, 



J R Webster J' ^^ ^°°'''' J" ^- Mehghin, J. 

*n ^T ,.ru ,- .T w ^ ^ Morbiit, Wm. Nichols, Jas. O'Neil, 

*G. M. Wilhston, 58th N. Y., Co. C. a. O'Neil, Jas. Outres, N. s! 

*L. Brooke. 10th Regt., Co. B. Powers, D. Sheridan, and Henry 

R. B. Palmer, 27th Regt., Co. A. Thomas. 
*Killed. 



The War With Spa 



in 



From the Civil war Holyokers in any numbers turned no more to combat until 
the v.ar againfi Spain for the lilieration of Cuba when Company D represented 
the community, a city now, and went through the campaign. 

According to the history of the company, written by Major W. J. Crosier, who 
was captain of Company D during this service, the company left its armory in 
the City Hall on May 3, 1898, for Framingham and they were mustered into the 
United States service at 6 o'clock on the morning of May 10th. They were 
ordered to strike camp on May 12th, to embark for the South, and at 9.15 that 
night went on board the Steamer '"Plymouth," arriving in New York on the 
morning following, where they were transferred to the "Saratoga" and later to 
the "Vigilancia." 

They remained at anchor in New York until the next day when rumors that 
the Spanish fleet was off the coast caused a change in the plans of the War 
Department and they were transferred to trains at Jersey City and sent south by 
rail. On May 16th they arrived at Lakeland, Fla., where they remained until 
the 30th and then were sent to Ybor City, Tampa, Fla. On June 9th orders 
came from Division Headquarteis to strike camp, but the troops were not moved 
until the next afternoon and they arrived at Port Tampa at S in the evening, 
camping on the dock until morning, when the company was assigned to the 
"Orizabab" with the 22nd U. S. Infantry and two batteries of the 4th Heavy 
Artillery. The 13th of June the company was transferred to the "Knickerbocker" 
and it was not until June 20th that they came in sight of Cuban soil and drifted 
along the shore watching the transports and fleets. The shelling of the shore by 
the fleet was watched with much interest by the Holyoke boys, who expected 
every minute that orders would come to take boats for the shore.' The next 
morning the orders to disembark came and the men landed at last upon the soil 
of Cuba. 

The regiment started for Siboney, where it was halted for rations. It was at 
Siboney that the first firing was heard in the distance and seemed to be approach- 
ing and it was learned that the "Rough Riders" were in a scrimmage. Soon a 
horseman appeared crying out, "Second Massachusetts fall in. We are all cut to 
pieces !" 

The regiment started up the side of the mountain, in single file, the night being 
pitch dark, and finally reached the battle ground of the "Rough Riders." Here 
blanket rolls were strewn about and the bodies of those killed in the fight were 
seen. Camp was made beside the "Rough Riders" and in the morning the regi- 
ment was again on the move. On the morning of June 27th Companies D and C 
were on outpost duty and when the regiment arrived at the assigned position. 



380 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

ihey were in full view of the city of Santiago. They remained in this position 
until the evening of the 30th, when the march was again taken up and about 10 
o'clock halted in full view of Santiago. They camped for the night and at 4 
o'clock on the morning of July 1st were awakened and started again on the march. 
The cannon of Capron's battery began to be heard nearer and nearer. The trail 
was left and the soldiers took to the field and a piece of woods between the tele- 
phone line and the Santiago road and there formed their line. Company D was 
detailed to proceed up the road as an advanced guard, with instructions to pro- 
ceed as far as possible without getting in direct range of Capron's guns. Emerg- 
ing from the thickets they found themselves in the open space facing El Caney and 
directly in range with their entrenchments. 

The enemy at once opened fire. The company continued up the road almost 
under the fire of their guns, halting under the road embankments and Companies 
L, E, M and G came up into position with them. 

The wounded began to come down the road on the way to the hospital and 
at this time the first death of a Company D boy occurred. Because of the use of 
black powder, the smoke from which gave away the position of the company and 
drew the fire of the enemy, orders were received to stop firing. Late in the after- 
noon the fight at El Caney was over and details were sent out to care for the 
wounded and bury the dead. 

About 6 o'clock the start for San Juan was made and halted in such a way 
as to place Company D on the old Spanish stone bridge, and the night was spent 
there with artillery, ammunition wagons, supplies and troops fording the stream, 
both above and below them. At daybreak, July 2d, the troops moved again and 
went up over the hills and into the San Juan valley. Sharpshooters were busy, 
and more Company D boys were hit. They went past the Sugar mill and forded 
the San Juan river, the men of D Company being almost exhausted as they had 
performed outpost duty for three days, after which followed the night march to 
El Caney, the all day fight and the night march again to San Juan with its day's 
work there. The morning of the 3d the men were awakened by heavy rifle fire, 
the enemy attacking for the purpose of driving the United States forces from the 
ground they had gained, but the attack was checked after about two hours firing. 

The troops moved again and Company D found themselves on a hill over- 
looking the city. Trenches were dug, only to have orders come to move and the 
71st New York regiment took possession of the position and Company D had to 
dig new trenches in another position. The company was ordered to do guard 
duty on the railroad under the hill from the trench line. Later it was moved to 
the right and was finally located on flat, swampy land facing Santiago and within 
sight of the bay. More trenches were dug and the company occupied this position 
until the time when the enemy surrendered. Tropical fever succeeded the dangers 
of war and finally the company was embarked and sailed for the United States, 
on their arrival going into a detention camp at Montauk Point. The suffering of 
the men from fever and the blunders of the government at that time are still 
remembered and it is useless to recount them. Eleven of the company gave their 
lives and four were wounded. 

The roster of Company D in the Spanish war, the names of those giving their 
lives in the service and those wounded follow: 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



381 



ROSTER OF COMPANY D, 

2nd Regt. Mass. U. S. Vol. Infantry Serving During the War with Spain. 
Mustered into U. S. Service May 3, 1898, by Lieut. E. M. Weaver, U. S. A. 

Camp Dewey, South Framingham. 



Captain William J. Crosier. 
1st Lieut. Robert W. Hunter. 
2nd Lieut. Francis D. Phillips. 
1st Sergt. William L. Weymouth. 
Q. M. Sergt. Edgar R. Train. 
Sergeant George A. Collier. 
Sergeant Alfred F. Foote. 
Sergeant Alfred F. Reed. 
Sergeant Frank G. Mattice. 
Corporal Ruel H. Coit. 
Corporal Alexander Macdonald. 
Corporal Edmund J. Slate. 
Corporal Edward Wagner. 
Corporal Napoleon B. Emery. 
Corporal Joseph W. Eaton. 
Musician Henry Lempke. 
Musician Alfred Marion. 
Wagoner Sainuel C. Bogart. 
Artificer Allen B. Chamberlain. 
Private George H. Brown. 
Private George Burckard. 
Private Emil Boutin. 
Private Charles E. Boudreau. 
Private William Basinet. 
Private William Blanchard. 
Private Joseph Bonneville. 
Private Timothy J. Canavan. 
Private George D. Crosby. 
Private Earl J. Cain. 
Private William M. Cleveland. 
Private Louis Davis. 
Private Edmond Damour. 
Private Anatole Dugas. 
Private Richard F. Engelhardt. 
Private Otto Eger. 
Private Albert E. Fay. 
Private George A. Fisher. 
Private Jerry Grady. 
Private Warren A. Graves. 



Pfivate John E. Goss. 
Private Samuel P. Hazelwood. 
Private Jerry F. Healey. 
Private Arthur Julian. 
Private Lester R. Jackson. 
Private George H. Keith. 
Private Anthony F. Kean. 
Private Patrick Kilkelley, Jr. 
Private Henry Langelier. 
Private John C. Libeck. 
Private George J. Lapointe. 
Private David McBride. 
Private Richard Mackey. 
Private Alexander McElwain. 
Private Herman Markert. 
Private Edward J. Morrison. 
Private Emile Meunier. 
Private Andrew Muirhead. 
Private Frank A. Pierce. 
Private Joseph D. Powers. 
Private Clarence E. Provost. 
Private Charles D. Read. 
Private Nelson Reno. 
Private Harry E. Root. 
Private Jerry Scannell. 
Private Thomas Sugrue. 
Private Harry L. Small. 
Private Arthur H. Smith. 
Private Dennis J. Sheehan. 
Private Frederick W. Slate. 
Private George S. Tinkham. 
Private Joseph A. Tinkham. 
Private Willie H. Tatro. 
Private Frank T. Turcott. 
Private John E. Urmson. 
Private Fred Vigneux. 
Private George Vogel. 
Private James E. Watson. 



DECEASED MEMBERS OF D COMPANY. 

Sergt. Edgar R. Train. Joseph Bonneville. 

Sergt. George A. Collier. Timothy J. Canavan. 

Sergt. Frank G. Mattice. Anatole Dugas. 

Sergt. Samuel C. Bogart. Samuel P. Hazelwood. 

Corp. Ruel H. Coit. Richard Mackey. 
Allen B. Chamberlain. 



382 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

WOUNDED MEN OF D COMPANY. 

Corp. Ruel H. Coit, July 1, El Caney. Corp. Joseph Eaton, July 2, near Sugar 

Edmund Damour, July 1, El Caney. Mill, San Juan. 

Frederick W. vSlate, July 1. El Caney. 



The Mexican Border Trouble 

Following the Spanish war no Holyoker was under fire until the Marines 
landed at Vera Cruz, Mexico, April 21, 1914, and in this squabble, Holyoke was 
represented. Lionel Spencer of 45 Nonotuck street was in the landing party and 
laid in front of the college buildings on the square in that city and heard the 
bullets whistle over his head. Had the vessels from the fleet waited a short time 
longer before throwing shells into the building where the Mexicans were 
entrenched, the landing party would have had a_slight chance of getting away 
alive and one Holyoker would never have seen his home agahi. With the Marines 
Spencer took part in clearing the city from snipers and on his return to Holyoke 
later had manj- interesting stories to tell of his experiences. 

This trouble having been settled Holyoke rested until June 19, 1916, when the 
militia call was sounded on the City Hall bell for the mobilization of the militia. 
There was a rush to enlist in Company D and, with ranks filled, the company 
took train from Framingham on June 21, 1916. They were at camp only a short 
time when they took troop trains for the Mexican border. It is noted that on 
July 11, the company broke up a dance hall riot in Columbus, Ga. The company 
did excellent service on the border, Lieut. Wallace Choquette of the company doing 
service with the General Pershing expedition into Mexican territory. Their 
service over, the company returned to Holyoke on October 15 and were given a 
rousing reception and welcome by the Holyoke residents. Hoh'oke had no further 
part in military doings of consequence until America entered into the great Euro- 
pean war. 



The Golden Roll— Holyoke High School 

Tears has Holyoke High for her noble dead, pride in their glorious achieve- 
ments and their immortal fame. Great is the glory of those who offer their lives 
that their land may enjoy freedom, greater for the honor of those who cross sea 
and land to offer their lives for the ransom of their fellow men. The first to give 
his life was the amiable and beloved Edward Welch, 1911, who succumbed to 
pneumonia in a Texas camp. The list slowly grew until the counter drive which 
stopped the German drive on Paris. In that period Kirkpatrick, Lambert, Thom- 
son, Snyder, Mitchell and McCarthy, w^ere killed in action. Influenza in the fall 
of 1918 took its percentage of High men including Stedman. Browne, Conway, 
Gaylord, Lyons, Small. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 383 

Following is the Golden Roll : 

Matthew John McKillop, 1904. Raymond Bunton Thomson, 1912. 

Patrick J. Healy, 1906. Francis Paul Browne, 1913. 

George Gilbert Clark, 1906. John Lambert, 1914. 

2d Lieut. Edwin R. Kingsland, 1907. William Leo Conway, 1915. 

Edwin J. Mitchell, 1907. Francis Moses Gaylord, 1915. 

Corp. John F. McCarthy, 1907. Charles James Lyons, 1915. 

Corp. James J. Kirkpatrick, 1910. Ernest A. Parent. 1916. 

Lieut. Arthur J. Perreault, 1910. Frank Ernest Snyder, 1916. 

Edward Welch, 1911. Kenneth Lin wood Small, 1918. 
Harold Bridgman Stedman, 1912. 

Of them, as of all who have fallen in defense of the world's liberties, it may 
fitly be said : "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life 
for his friends." 



West Street Grammar School Roll of Honor 

These young American sailors and soldiers were at one time pupils in this 
school. In their young manhood they responded to their Nation's call. They died 
in the service of their country. They made the supreme sacrifice for the honor of 
their country, for the ideals of humanity, for the principles of righteousness, for 
the sacred right of all peoples to determine their own form of government, and for 
the security of democratic institutions by peoples who have been so divinely blessed. 

These heroes died for libertj^ civilization, Christianity, and Democracy. May 
the supreme sacrifices of those noble young heroes and the great services of their 
millions of living companions, secure forever to the generations yet unborn the 
blessings of the ideals, the rights, the principles, and the institutions for which the 
Allied Nations fought. 

May we always cherish their memories, and may our successors find this leg- 
acy, of preserving those heroes' memories, their noblest service. 

May our Heavenly Father reward those young heroes for their noble sacrifice 
in the hour of their greatest hope and ambition — precious youth. 

George G. Clark Mathew J. McKillop Louis P. Goodstein 

Martin P. Kennedy Vv''illiam J. McNally George Tremblay 

John J. Kelly Jeremiah F. Sullivan Ernest .A.. Parent 

William H. McNally Emile J. Henry John Lambert 

James J. Kirkpatrick James Martin 



Gen. Pershing^s Complete Story of Our Army 
in France 



From the Organization of the Expeditionary Force Until the Capture of Sedan. 

When "We Had Cut the Enemy's Main Line of Communications 

and Nothing but Surrender or an Armistice Could 

Save His Army from Complete Disaster" 



November 20, 1918. 
My Dear Mr. Secretary : 

In response to your request, I have the honor to submit this brief summary of 
the organization and operation of the American Expeditionary Force from May 
26, 1917, until the signing of the armistice November 11, 1918. Pursuant to your 
instructions, immediately upon receiving my orders I selected a small staff and 
proceeded to Europe in order to become familiar with conditions at the earliest 
possible moment. 

The warmth of our reception in England and France was only equalled by the 
readiness of the Commanders in Chief of the veteran armies of the allies, and 
their staffs, to place their experience at our disposal. In consultation with them 
the m.ost effective means of co-operation of effort was considered. With the French 
and British armies at their maximum strength and when all efforts to dispossess 
the enemy from his firmly intrenched positions in Belgium and France, had failed, 
it was necessary to plan for an American force adequate to turn the scale in 
favor of the allies. Taking account of the strength of the Central Powers at that 
time, the immensity of the problem which confronted us could hardly be over- 
estimated. The first requisite being an organization that could give intelligent 
direction to effort, the formation of a General Staff occupied my early attention. 

GENERAL STAFF. 

A well organized General Staff, through which the Commander exercises his 
functions, is essential to a successful modern army. However capable our 
division, our battalion, and our companies as such, success would be impossible 
without thoroughly co-ordinated endeavor. A General Staff broadly organized and 
trained for war had not hitherto existed in our army. Under the Commander 
in Chief, this staff must carry out the policy and direct the details of administra- 
tion, supply, preparation, and operations of the army as a whole, with all special 
branches and bureaus subject to its control. As models to aid us we had the 
veteran French General Staff and the experience of the British, who had similarly 
formed an organization to meet the demands of a great army. By selecting from 
each the features best adapted to our basic organization, and fortified by our 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 385 

own early experience in the war, the development of our great General Staff system 
was completed. 

The General Staff is naturally divided into five groups, each with its chief, 
who is an assistant to the Chief of the General Staff. G. 1 is in charge of organi- 
zation and equipment of troops, replacements, tonnage, priority of overseas ship- 
ment, the auxiliary welfare association, and cognate subjects; G. 2 has censorship, 
enemy intelligence, gathering and disseminating information, preparation of maps 
and all similar subjects; G. 3 is charged with all strategic studies and plans, move- 
ment of troops, and the supervision of combat operations ; G. 4 co-ordinates 
important questions of supply, construction, transport arrangements for combat, 
and of the operations of the service of supply, and of hospitalization and the 
evacuation of the sick and wounded ; G. 5 supervises the various schools and 
has general direction and co-ordination of education and training. 

The first Chief of Staff was Colonel (now Major General) James G. Harbord, 
who was succeeded in March, 1918, by Major General James W. McAndrew. To 
these officers to the Deputy Chief of Staff, and to the Assistant Chiefs of Staff, 
who, as heads of sections, aided them, great credit is due for the results obtained, 
not only in perfecting the General Staff organization, but in applying correct prin- 
ciples to the multiplicity of ]iroblenis that have arisen. 

ORGANIZATION AND TRAINING. 

After a thorough consideration of allied organizations it was decided that our 
combat division should consist of four regiments of infantry of 3,000 men, with 
three battalions to re'giment and four companies of 250 men each to a battalion, 
and of an artillery brigade of three regiments, a machine gun battalion, an engineer 
regiment, a trench mortar battery, a signal battalion, wagon trains, and the head- 
c[uarters staffs and military police. These, with medical and other units, made a 
total of over 28,000 men, or practically double the size of a French or German 
division. Each corps would normally consist of six divisions — four combat and 
one depot and one replacement division — and also two regiments of cavalry, and 
each army of from three to five corps. With four divisions fully trained, a corps 
could take over an American sector with two divisions in line and two in reserve, 
with the depot and replacement divisions prepared to fill the gaps in the ranks. 

Our purpose was to prepare an integral American force which should be able 
to take the offensive in every respect. Accordingly, the development of a self- 
reliant infantry by thorough drill in the use of the rifle and in the tactics of open 
warfare was always uppermost. The plan of training after arrival in France 
allowed a division one month for acclimization and instruction in small unit? from 
battalions down, a second month in quiet trench sectors by battalion, and third 
month after it came out of the trenches when it should be trained as a complete 
division in war of movement. 

Very early a system of schools was outlined and started, which should have 
the advantage of instruction by officers direct from the front. At the great school 
center at Langres, one of the first to be organized, was the staff school, where 
the principles of general staff work as laid down in our own organization, were 
taught to carefully selected officers. Men in the ranks, who had shown qualities 
of leadership, were sent to the school of candidates for commissions. A school 
of the line taught younger officers the principles of leadership, tactics, and the 
use of the different weapons. In the artillery school, at Saumur, young officers 
were taught the fundamental principles of modern artillery; while at Issoudun an 
immense plant was built for training cadets in aviation. These and other schools, 
25 



386 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

with their well-considered curriculums for training in every branch of our organi- 
zation, were co-ordinated in a manner best to develop an efficient army out of 
willing and industrious young men, many of whom had not before known even 
the rudiments of military technique. Both Marshal Haig and General Petain 
placed oflficers and men at our disposal for instructional purposes, and we are 
deeply indebted for the opportunities given to profit by their veteran experience. 

AMERICAN ZONE. 

The eventual place the American army should take on the western front 
was to a large extent influenced by the vital questions of communication and 
supply. The northern ports of France were crowded by the British armies' ship- 
ping and supplies, while the southern ports, though otherwise at our service, had 
not adequate port facilities for our purposes, and these we should have to build. 
The already overtaxed railway system behind the active front in Northern France 
would not be available for us as lines of supply, and those leading from the 
southern ports of Northeastern France would be unequal to our needs without 
much new construction. Practically all warehouses, supply depots and regulating 
station must be provided by fresh constructions. While France offered us such 
material as she had to spare after a drain of three years enormous quantities of 
material had to be brought across the Atlantic. 

With such a problem any temporization or lack of definiteness in making plans 
might cause failure even with victory within our grasp. Moreover, broad plans 
commensurate with our national purpose and resources would bring conviction of 
our power to every soldier in the front line, to the nations associated with us in 
the war, and to the enemy. The tonnage for material for necessary construction 
for the supply of an army of three and perhaps four million men would require 
a mammoth program of shipbuilding at home, and miles of dock construction in 
France, with a corresponding large project for additional railways and for storage 
depots. 

All these considerations led to the inevitable conclusion that if we were to 
handle and supply the great forces deemed essential to win the war we must 
utilize the southern ports of France — Bordeaux, La Pallice, St. Nazaire and Brest — 
and the comparatively unused railway systems leading therefrom to the northeast. 
Generally speaking, then, this would contemplate the use of our forces against 
the enemy somewhere in that direction, but the great depots of supply must be 
centrally located, preferably in the area included by Tours, Bourges and Chateau- 
roux, so that our armies could be supplied with equal facility wherever they might 
be serving on the western front. 

GROWTH OF THE SERVICE OF SUPPLY. 

To build up such a system there were talented men in the regular army, but 
more experts were necessary than the army could furnish. Thanks to the 
patriotic spirit of our people at home there came from civil life men trained for 
every sort of work involved in building and managing the organization necessary 
to handle and transport such an army and keep it supplied. With such assistance 
the construction and general development of our plans have kept pace with the 
growth of the forces, and the service of supply is now able to discharge from 
ships and move 45,000 tons daily, besides transporting troops and material in the 
conduct of active operations. 

As to organization, all the administrative and supply services, except the 
adjutant general's, inspector general's, and judge advocate general's depart- 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 387 

ments which remain at general headquarters, have been transferred to the head- 
quarters of the services of supplies at Tours under a commanding general respons- 
ible to the Commander-in-Chief for supply of the armies. The chief quartermaster, 
chief surgeon, chief signal officer, chief of ordnance, chief of air service, chief 
of chemical warfare, the general purchasing agent in all that pertains to questions 
of procurements and supply, the provost marshal general in the maintenance of 
order in general, the director general of transportation in all that afifects such 
matters, and the chief engineer in all matters of administration and supply, are 
subordinate to the commanding general of the service of supply, who, assisted by 
a staff especially organized for the purpose, is charged with the administrative 
co-ordination of all these services. 

The transportation department under the service of supply directs the operation, 
maintenance and construction of railways, the operation of terminals, the unload- 
ing of ships, and transportation of material to warehouses or to the front. Its 
functions make necessary the most intimate relationship between our organization 
and that of the French, with the practical result that our transportation depart- 
ment has been able to improve materially the operations of railways generally. 
Constantly laboring under a shortage of rolling stock, the transportation depart- 
ment has nevertheless been able by efficient management to meet every emergency. 

The Engineer Corps is charged with all construction, including light railways 
and roads. It has planned and constructed the many projects required, the most 
important of which are the new wharves at Bordeaux and Nantes, and the immense 
storage depots at La Palice, Montoir and Gievres, besides innumerable hospitals 
and barracks in various ports of France. These projects have all been carried on 
by phases keeping pace with our needs. The Forestry Service, under the Engineer 
Corps, has cut the greater part of the timber and railway ties required. 

To meet the shortage of supplies from America, due to lack of shipping, the 
representatives of the different supply departments were constantly in search of 
available material and supplies in Europe. In order to co-ordinate these pur- 
chases and to prevent competition between our departments a general purchasing 
agency was created early in our experience to co-ordinate our purchases and, if 
possible, induce our allies to apply the principle among the allied armies. While 
there was no authority for the general use of appropriations, this was met by 
grouping the purchasing representatives of the different departments under one 
control, charged with the duty of consolidating requisitions and purchases. Our 
efforts to extend the principle have been signally successful, and all purchases for 
ihe allied armies are now on an equitable and co-operative basis. Indeed, it may 
be said that the work of this bureau has been thoroughly efficient and businesslike. 

ARTILLERY, AIRPLANES, AND TANKS. 

Our entry into the war found us with few of the auxiliaries necessary for its 
conduct in the modern sense. Among our most important deficiencies in material 
were artillery, aviation and tanks. In order to meet our requirements as rapidly 
as possible, we accepted the offer of the French government to provide us with 
the necessary artillery equipment of seventy-fives, one fifty-five millimeter howitzers, 
and one fifty-five G. P. F. guns, from their own factories for 30 divisions. The 
wisdom of this course is fully demonstrated by the fact that although we soon 
began the manufacture of these classes of guns at home, there were no guns 
of the calibers mentioned manufactured in America on our front at the date the 
armistice was signed. The only guns of these types produced at home thus far 
received in France are 109 seventy-five millimeter guns. 



388 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

In aviation we were in the same situation and here again the French govern- 
ment came to our aid until our own aviation program should be under way. 
We obtained from the French the necessary planes for training our personnel and 
they have provided us with a total of 2,676 pursuit, observation and bombing planes. 
The first airplanes received from home arrived in May, and altogether we have 
received 1,379. The first American squadron completely equipped by American 
production, including airplanes, crossed the German lines on August 7, 191S. As 
to tanks we were also compelled to rely upon the French. Here, however, we 
were less fortunate, for the reason that the French production could barely meet 
the requirements of their own armies. 

It should be fully realized that the French government has always taken 
a most liberal attitude and has been most anxious to give us every possible 
assistance in meeting our deficiencies in these as well as in other respects. Our 
dependence upon France for artillery, aviation and tanks, was, of course, due to 
the fact that our industries had not been exclusively devoted to military production. 
All credit is due our own manufacturers for their efforts to meet our require- 
ments as at the time the armistice was signed we were able to look forward to 
(he early supply of practically all our necessities from our own factories. 

The welfare of the troops touches my responsibility as commander in chief 
to the mothers and fathers and kindred of the men who came to France in the 
impressionable period of youth. They could not have the privilege accorded 
European soldiers during their periods of visiting their families and renewing 
their home ties. Fully realizing that the standard of conduct that should be 
established for them must have a permanent influence in their lives and on the 
character of their future citizenship, the Red Cross, the Y. M. C. A., Knights of 
Columbus, the Salvation Army and the Jew'ish Welfare Board, as auxiliaries in 
this work, were encouraged in every possible way. The fact that our soldiers, 
in a land of different customs and language, have borne themselves in a manner 
in keeping with the cause for which they fought, is due not only to the efforts in 
their behalf, but more to other high ideals, their discipline and ther innate sense 
of self-respect. It should be recorded, however, that the members of these welfare 
societies have been untiring in their desire to be of real service to our officers 
and men. The patriotic devotion of these representative men and women has 
given a new significance to the Golden Rule and we owe to them a debt of grati- 
tude that can never be repaid. 

COMBAT OPERATIONS. 

During our period of training in the trenches some of our divisions had 
engaged the enemy in local combats, the most important of which was Seicheprey 
by the 26th on April 20, in the Toul sector, but none had participated in action as 
a unit. The 1st Division, which had passed through the preliminary stages of 
training, had gone to the trenches for its first period of instruction at the end 
of October, and by March 21, when the German offensive in Picardy began, we 
had four divisions with experience in the trenches, all of which were equal to 
any demands of battle action. The crisis which this offensive developed was such 
that our occupation of an American sector must be postponed. 

On March 28, I placed at the disposal of Marshal Foch, who had been 
agreed upon as commander-in-chief of the allied armies, all of our forces to be 
used as he might decide. At his request the 1st Division was transferred from 
the Toul sector to a position in reserve at Chaumont en Vexin. As German 
superiority in numbers required prompt action, an agreement was reached at the 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 389 

Abbeville conference of the allied premiers and commanders, and myself on May 2 
by which British shipping was to transport ten American divisions to the British 
army area, where they were to be trained and equipped and additional British 
shipping was to be provided for as many divisions as possible for use elsewhere. 

On April 26, the 1st Division had gone into the line in the Montdidier salient 
on the Picardy battlefront. Tactics had been suddenly revolutonized to those of 
open warfare and our men, confident of the results of their training, were eager 
for the test. On the morning of May 28 this division attacked the commanding 
German positions in its front, taking with splendid dash the town of Cantigny and 
all other objectives which were organized and held steadfastly against vicious 
counter attacks and galling artillery fire. Although local, this brilliant action had 
an electrical effect, as it demonstrated our fighting qualities under extreme battle 
conditions, and also that the enemy's troops were not altogether invincible. 

The Germans' Aisne offensive, which began on May 27, had advanced rapidly 
toward the River Marne and Paris, and the allies faced a crisis equally as grave 
as that of the Picardy offensive in March. Again every available man was placed 
at Marshal Foch's disposal, and the 3d Division which had just come from its 
preliminary training in the trenches, was hurried to the Marne. Its motorized 
machine gun battalion preceded the other units and successfully held the bridge- 
head at the Marne, opposite Chateau-Thierry. The 2d Division in reserve near 
Montdidier, was sent by motor trucks and other available transport to check the 
progress of the enemy toward Paris. The division attacked and retook the town 
and railroad station at Bouresches and sturdily held its ground against the enemy's 
best guard divisions. In the battle of Belleau Wood, which followed our men 
proved their superiority and gained a strong tactical position, with far greater loss 
to the enemy than to ourselves. On July 1 before the 2d was relieved, it captured 
the village of Vaux with most splendid precision. 

Meanwhile our 2d Corps, under Major General George W. Read, had been 
organized for the command of our divisions with the British, which were held 
back in training areas or assigned in second-line defenses. Five of the ten 
divisions were withdrawn from the British area in June, three to relieve divisions 
in Lorraine and in the Vosges and two to the Paris area to join the group of 
American divisions which stood between the city and any further advance of the 
enemy in that direction. 

The great June-July troop movement from the States was well under way, 
and, although these troops were to be given some preliminary training before 
being put into action, their very presence warranted the use of all the older 
divisions in the confidence that we did not lack reserves. Elements of the 42d 
Division were in the line east of Rheims against the German offensive of July 15, 
and held their ground unflinchingly. On the right flank of this offensive four 
companies of the 28th Division were in position in face of the advancing waves of 
the German infantry. The 3d Division was holdng the bank of the Marne from 
the bend east of the mouth of the Surmelin to the west of Mezy, opposite Chateau- 
Thierry, where a large force of German infantry sought to force a passage under 
support of powerful artillery concentrations and under cover of smoke screens. 
A single regiment of the 3d wrote one of the most brilliant pages in our military 
annals on this occasion. It prevented the crossing at certain points on its front 
while on either flank, the Germans, who had gained a footing, pressed forward. 
Our men, firing in three directions, met the German attacks with counter- 
attacks at critical points and succeeded in throwing two German divisions into 
complete confrsion, capturing 600 prisoners. 



390 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

The great force of the German Chateau-Thierry offensive estabhshed the 
deep Marne saHent, but the enemy was taking chances, and the vuhierabihty of 
this pocket to attack might be turned to his disadvantage. Seizing this oppor- 
tunity to support my conviction, every division with any sort of training was 
made available for use in a counter-offensive. The place of honor in the thrust 
toward Soissons on July 18 was given to our 1st and 2d Divisions in company with 
chosen French divisions. Without the usual brief warning of a preliminary bom- 
bardment, the massed French and American artillery, firing by the map, laid 
down its rolling barrage at dawn while the infantry began its charge. The 
tactical handling of our troops under these trying conditions was excellent through- 
out the action. The enemy brought up large numbers of reserves and made a 
stubborn defense, both with machine guns and artillery, but through five days' 
fighting the 1st Division continued to advance until it had gained the heights above 
Soissons and captured the village of Berzy-le-Sec. The 2d Division took Beau 
Repaire farm and Vierzy in a very rapid advance and reached a position in front 
of Tigny at the end of its second day. These two divisions captured 7,000 
prisoners and over 100 pieces of artillery. 

The 26th Division, which, with a French division, was under command of 
our 1st Corps, acted as a pivot of the movement toward Soissons. On the 18th 
it took the village of Torcy while the 3d Division was crossing the Marne in 
pursuit of the retiring enemy. The 26th attacked again on the 21st, and the enemy 
withdrew past the Chateau-Thierry-Soissons road. The 3d Division, continuing its 
progress, took the heights of Mont St. Pere and the villages of Charteves and 
Jaulgonne in the face of both machine gun and artillery fire. 

On the 24th, after the Germans had fallen back from Trugny and Epieds, our 
42d Division, which had been brought over from the Champagne, relieved the 
Twenty-sixth and, fighting its way through the Foret de Fere, overwhelmed the 
nest of machine guns in its path. By the 27th it had reached the Ourcq, whence 
the 3d and 4th Divisions were already advancing, while the French divisions with 
which we were co-operating were moving forward at other points. 

The 3d Division had made its advance into Roncheres wood on the 29th and 
was relieved for rest by a brigade of the Thirty-second. The Forty-second and 
Thirty-second undertook the task of conquering the heights beyond Clerges, the 
Forty-second capturing Sergy and the Thirty-second capturing Hill 230, both 
American divisions joining in the pursuit of the enemy to the Vesle, and thus 
the operation of reducing the salient was finished. Meanwhile the Forty-second 
was relieved by the Fourth at Chery-Chartreuve, and the Thirty-second by the 
Twenty-eighth, while the 77th Division took up a position on the Vesle. The 
operations of these divisions on the Vesle were under the 3d Corps. Major Gen- 
eral Robert L. Bullard commanding. 

BATTLE OF ST. MIHIEL. 
I 
With the reduction of the Marne salient, we could look forward to the con- 
centration of our divisions in our own zone. In view of the forthcoming opera- 
tion against the St. Mihiel salient, which had long been planned as our first offensive 
action on a large scale, the First Army was organized on August 10 under my 
personal command. While American units had held different divisional and corps 
sectors along the western front, there had not been up to this time, for obvious 
reasons, a distinct American sector; but, in view of the important parts the 
American forces were now to play, it was necessary to take over a permanent 
portion of the line. Accordingly, on August 30, the line beginning at Port sur 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 391 

Seille, east of the Moselle and extending to the west through St. Mihiel, thence 
north to a point opposite Verdun, was placed under my command. The American 
sector was afterward extended across the Meuse to the western edge of the 
Argonne Forest, and included the 2d Colonial French, which held the point of 
the salient, and the 17th French Corps, which occupied the heights above Verdun. 

The preparation for a complicated operation against the formidable defenses 
in front of us included the assembling of divisions and of corps and army artillery 
transport, aircraft, tanks, ambulances, the location of hospitals, and the molding 
together of all of the elements of a great modern army with its own railheads, 
supplied directly by our own Service of Supply. The concentration for this 
operation, which was to be a surprise, involved the movement, mostly at night, 
of approximately 600,000 troops, and required for its success the most careful 
attention to every detail. 

The French were generous in giving us assistance in corps and army artil- 
lery, with its personnel, and we were confident from the start of our superiority 
over the enemy in guns of all calibres. Our heavy guns werte able to reach Metz 
and to interfere seriously with German rail movements. The French Independent 
Air Force was placed under my command which, together with the British bomb- 
ing squadrons and our air forces, gave us the largest assembly of aviation that 
had even been engaged in one operation on the western front. 

From Les Eparges around the nose of the salient at St. Mihiel to the Moselle 
River the line was roughly forty miles long and situated on commanding ground 
greatly strengthened by artificial defenses. Our 1st Corps (82d, 90th, 5th, and 2d 
Divisions), under command of Major General Hunter Liggett, restrung its right 
on Port-a-Mousson, with its left joining our 3d Corps (the 89th, 42d, and 1st 
Divisions), under Major General Joseph T. Dickman, in line to Xivray, were to 
swing toward Vigneulles on the pivot of the Moselle River for the initial assault. 
From Xivray to Mouilly the 2d Colonial French Corps was in line in the center, 
and our 5th Corps, under command of Major General George H. Cameron, with 
our 26th Division and a French division at the western base of the salient, were 
to attack three difficult hills— Les Eparges, Combres, and Aniaramthe. Our 1st 
Corps had in reserve the 78th Division, our 4th Corps the 3d Division, and our 
First Army the 35th and 91st Divisions, with the 80th and 33d available. It should 
be understood that our corps organizations are very elastic, and that we have at 
no time had permanent assignments of divisions to corps. 

After four hours' artillery preparation, the seven American divisions in the 
front line advanced at 5 a. m. on September 12, assisted by a limited number of 
tanks manned partly by Americans and partly by French. These divisions, accom- 
panied by groups of wire cutters and others armed with bangalore torpedoes, went 
through the successive bands of barbed wire that protected the enemy's front line 
and support trenches, in irresistible waves on schedule time, breaking dov?n all 
defense of an enemy demoralized by the great volume of our artillery fire and our 
sudden approach out of the fog. 

Our 1st Corps advanced to Thiacourt, while our 4th Corps curved back to the 
southwest through Nonsard. The 2d Colonial French Corps made the slight 
advance required of it on very difficult ground, and the 5th Corps took its three 
ridges and repulsed a counterattack. A rapid march brought reserve regiments of 
a division of the 5th Corps into Vigneulles in the early morning, where it linked 
up with patrols of our 4th Corps, closing the salient and forming a new line west 
of Thiacourt to Vigneulles and beyond Fresnes-en-Woevre. At the cost of only 
7,000 casualties, mostly light, we had taken 16,000 prisoners and 443 guns, a great 



3i»2 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

(luantity of material, released the inhabitants of many villages from enemy domina- 
tion, and established our lines in a position to threaten Metz. This signal success 
of the American First Army in its first oflfensive was of prime importance. The 
allies found they had a formidable army to aid them, and the enemy learned finally 
that he had one to reckon with. 

MEUSE-ARGONNE OFFENSIVE, FIRST PHASE. 

On the day after we had taken the St. Mihiel salient, much of our corps 
and army artillery which had operated at St. Mihiel, and our divisions in reserve 
at other points, were already on the move toward the area back of the line 
between the Meuse River and the western edge of the forest of Argonne. With 
the exception of St. Mihiel, the old German front line from Switzerland to the 
east of Rheims was still intact. In the general attack all along the line the opera- 
tion assigned the American army as the hinge of this allied offensive was directed 
toward the important railroad communications of the German armies through 
Mezieres and Sedan. The enemy must hold fast to this part of his lines or the 
withdrawal of his forces with four years' accumulation of plants and material 
would be dangerously imperiled. 

The German army had as yet shown no demoralization, and, while the mass 
of its troops had sufifered in morale, its first-class divisions, and notably its 
machine-gun defense, were . exhibiting remarkable tactical efficiency as well as 
courage. The German General Staff was fully aware of the consequences of a 
success on the Meuse-Argonne line. Certain that he would do everything in his 
power to oppose us, the action was planned with as much secrecy as possible 
and was undertaken with the determination to use all our divisions in forcing 
decision. We expected to draw the best German divisions to our front and to 
consume them while the enemy was held under grave apprehension lest our attack 
should break his line, which it was our firm purpose to do. 

Our right f^ank was protected by the Meuse, while our left embraced the 
Argonne Forest, whose ravines, hills, and elaborate defense, screened by dense 
thickets, had been generally considered impregnable. Our order of battle from 
right to left was the 3d Corps from the Meuse to Melancourt, with the 33d, 80th 
and 4th Divisions in line and the od Division as corps reserve ; the 5th Corps 
from Melancourt to Vausuois, with 79th, 87th and 91st Divisions in line, and the 
32d in corps reserve, and the 1st Corps, from Vauquois to Vienne le Chateau, 
with 3.5th, 28th and 77th Divisions in line, and the 92d in corps reser've. The 
army reserve consisted of the 1st, 29th and 82d Divisions. 

On the night of September 25 our troops quietly took the place of the French 
who thinly held the line in this sector which had long been inactive. In the 
attack which began on the 2r)th we drove through the barbed wire entanglements 
and the sea of shell craters across No Man's Land, mastering all the first-line 
defenses. Continuing on the 27th and 28th against machine guns and artillery of 
an increasing number of enemy reserve divisions, we penetrated to a depth of from 
three to seven miles and took the village of Montfaucon and its commanding hill 
and Exermont, Gercourt, Cuisy, Septsarges, Melancourt, Ivoiry, Epinonville, Char- 
pentry, Very, and other villages. East of the Meuse one of our divisions, which 
was with the 2d Colonial French Corps, captured Marcheville and Rieville, giving 
further protection to the flank of our main body. We had taken 10,000 prisoners, 
we had gained our point of forcing the battle into the open, and were prepared 
for the enemy's reaction, which was bound to come, as he had good roads and 
ample railroad facilities for bringing up his artillery and reserves. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 393 

In the chil! rain of dark nights our engineers had to build new roads across 
spongy, shell-torn areas, repair broken roads beyond No Man's Land, and build 
bridges. Onr gunners, with no thought of sleep, put their shoulders to wheels 
and drag-ropes to bring their guns through the mire in support of the infantry 
now under the increasing fire of the enemy's artillery. Our attack had taken 
the enemy by surprise, but, quickly recovering himself, he began to fire counter- 
attacks in strong force, supported by heavy bombardments, with large quantities 
of gas. From September 28 until October 4 we maintained the offensive against 
patches of woods defended by jnipers and continuous lines of machine guns, and 
pushed forward our guns and transport, seizing strategical points in preparation 
for fnrtlier attacks. 

OTHER UNITS WITH ALLIES. 

Other divisions attached to the allied armies were doing their part. It was 
the fortune of our 2d Corps, composed of the 27th and 30th Divisions which had 
remained with the British, to have a place of honor in co-operation with the 
Australian Corps on September 29 and October 1 in the assault on the Hinden- 
burg line, where the St. Quentin canal passes through a tunnel under a ridge. 
The 30th Division speedily broke through the main line of defense for all its 
objectives, while the 27th pushed on impetuously through the main line until some 
of the elements reached Guoy. In the midst of the maze of trenches and shell 
craters and under crossfire from machine guns the other elements fought des- 
perately against odds. In this and in later actions, from October 6 to October 19, 
our 2d Corps captured over 6,000 prisoners and advanced over 13 miles. The 
spirit and aggressiveness of these divisions have been highly praised by the British 
army commander under whom they served. 

On October 2-9 our 2d and 36th Divisions were sent to assist the French in 
an important attack against the old German positions before Rheims. The 2d 
conquered the complicated defense works on their front against a persistent 
defense worthy of the grimmest period of trench warfare and attacked the 
strongly held wooded hill of Blanc Mont, which they captured in a second assault, 
sweeping bver it with consummate dash and .=kill. This division then repulsed 
strong counter-attacks before the village and cemetery of Ste. Etienne and took 
the town, forcing the Germans to fall back from before Rheims and yield positions 
they had held since September, 1914. On October 9 the 36th Division relieved 
the 2d and in its first experience under fire withstood very severe artillery bom- 
bardment and rapidly took up the pursuit of the enemy, now retiring behind the 
Aisne. 

MEUSE-ARGONNE OFFENSIVE, SECOND PHASE. 

The allied progress elsewhere cheered the efforts of our men in this crucial 
contest, as the German command threw in more and more first-class troops to 
stop our advance. We made steady headway in the almost impenetrable and 
strongly held Argonne Forest, for, despite this reinforcement, it was our army 
that was doing the driving. Our aircraft was increasing in skill and numbers and 
forcing the issue, and our infantry and artillery were improving rapidly with each 
new experience. The replacements fresh from home were put into exhausted 
divisions with little time for training, but they had the advantage of serving 
beside men who knew their business and who had almost become veterans over 
night. The enemy had taken every advantage of the terrain, which especially 



394 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

favored the defense, by a prodigal use of machine guns manned by highly trained 
veterans and by using his artillery at short ranges. In the face of such strong 
frontal positions we should have been unable to accomplish any progress according 
to previously accepted standards, but I had every confidence in our aggressive 
tactics and the courage of our troops. 

On October 4 the attack was renewed all along our front. The 3d Corps, 
tilting to the left, followed the Brieulles Canal road ; our 5th Corps took Gesne, 
while the 1st Corps advanced for over two miles along the irregular valley of 
the Aire River and in the wooded hills of the Argonne that bordered the river, 
used by the enemy with all his art and weapons of defense. This sort of fighting 
continued against an enemy striving to hold every foot of ground and whose very 
strong counter-attacks challenged us at every point. On the 7th the 1st Corps 
captured Chatel-Chenery and continued along the river to Cornay. On the east 
of Meuse sector one of the two divisions, co-operating with the French, captured 
Consenvoye and the Haumont Woods. On the 9th the 5th Corps, in its progress 
up the Aire, took Fleville, and the 3d Corps, which had continuous fighting against 
odds, was working its way through Brieulles and Cunel. On the 10th we had 
cleared the Argonne Forest of the enemy. 

It was now necessary to constitute a second army, and on October 9 the 
immediate command of the First Army was turned over to Lieut.-Gen. Hunter 
Liggett. The command of the Second Army, whose divisions occupied a sector 
in the Woevre, was given to Lieut.-Gen. Robert L. Bullard, who had been com- 
mander of the 1st Division and then of the 3d Corps. Major-General Dickman 
was transferred to the command of the 1st Corps, while the 5th Corps was 
placed under Major-General Charles P. Summerall, who had recently commanded 
the 1st Division. Major-General John L. Hines, who had gone rapidly up from 
regimental to division commander, was assigned to the 3d Corps. These four 
officers had been in France from the early days of the expedition and had learned 
their lessons in the school of practical warfare. 

Our constant pressure against the enemy brought day by day more prisoners, 
mostly survivors from machine gun nests captured in fighting at close quarters. 
On October 18 there was very fierce fighting in the Caures Woods east of the 
Meuse and in the Ormont Woods. On the 14th the 1st Corps took St. Juvin and 
the 5th Corps, in hand-to-hand encounters, entered the formidable Kriemhilde 
line, where the enemy had hoped to check us indefinitely. Later the 5th Corps, 
penetrated further the Kriemhilde line, and the 1st Corps took Champiganeulles and 
the important town of Grandpre. Our dogged offensive was wearing down the 
enemy, who continued desperately to throw his best troops against us. thus weak- 
ening his line in front of our allies and making their advance less difficult. 

DIVISIONS IN BELGIUM. 

Meantime we were not only able to continue the battle, but our 37th and 
91st Divisions were hastily withdrawn from our front and dispatched to help 
the French army in Belgium. Detraining in the neghborhood of Ypres, these 
divisions advanced by rapid stages to the fighting line and were assigned to 
adjacent French corps. On October 31, in continuation of the Flanders offensive, 
they attacked and methodically broke down all enemy resistance. On November 3, 
the 37th had completed its mission in dividing the enemy across the Escaut River 
and firmly established itself along the east bank included in the division zone of 
action. By a clever flanking movement, troops of the 91st Division captured 
Spitaals Bosschen, a difficult wood extending across the central part of the division 



HoLYOKE In The Great "War. SOS- 

sector, reached the Escaut and penetrated into the town of Audenarde. These 
divisions received high commendation from their corps commanders for their dash 
and energy. 

MEUSE-ARGONNE, LAST PHASE. 

On the 23d the 3d and 5th Corps pushed northward to the level of Bantheville. 
While we continued to press forward and throw back the enemy's violent counter- 
attacks with great loss to him, a regrouping of our forces was under way for the 
final assault. Evidences of loss of morale by the enemy gave our men more 
confidence in attack and more fortitude in enduring the fatigue of incessant effort 
and the hardships of very inclement weather. 

With comparatively well-rested divisions, the final advance in the Meuse- 
Argonne front was begun on November 1. Our increased artillery force acquitted 
itself magnificently in support of the advance and the enemy broke before the 
determined infantry, which by its persistent fighting of the past weeks and the 
dash of this attack, had overcome his will to resist. The 3d Corps took Ancre- 
ville, Doulcon and Andevanne and the 5th Corps took Landres et St. Georges and 
pressed through successive lines of resistance to Bayonville and Chennery. On the 
2d, the 1st Corps joined in the movement, which now became an imipetuous 
onslaught that could not be stayed. 

On the 3d advance troops surged forward in pursuit, some by motor trucks 
while the artillery pressed along the country roads close behind. The 1st Corps 
reached Authe and Chatillon-Sur-Bar, the 5th Corps, Fosse and Nouart, and the 
3d Corps, Halles, penetrating the enemy's line to a depth of 12 miles. Our large 
caliber guns had advanced and were skilfully brought into position to fire upon 
the important line at Montmedy, Longuyon and Conflans. Our 3d Corps crossed 
the Meuse on the 5th and the other corps, in the full confidence that the day 
was theirs, eagerly cleared the w^ay of machine guns as they swept northward, 
maintaining complete co-ordination throughout. On the 6th, a division of the 1st 
Corps reached a point on the Meuse opposite Sedan, 25 miles from the line of 
departure. The strategical goal which was our highest hope was gained. We had 
cut the enemy's main line of communications and nothing but surrender or an 
armistice could save his army from complete disaster. 

In all forty enemy divisions had been used against us in the Meuse-Argonne 
battle. Between September 26 and November 6, we took 26,059 prisoners and 
468 guns on this front. Our divisions engaged were the 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th. 26th, 
28th, 29th, 33d, 35th, 42d, 77th, 78th, 79th, 80th, 82d, 89th, 90th and 91st. Many 
of .our divisions remained in line for a length of time that required nerves of steel 
while others were sent in again after only a few days' rest. The 1st, 5th, 26th, 
42d, 77th, 80th, 89th and 90th were in the line twice. Although some of the 
divisions were fighting their first battle they soon became equal to the best. 

OPERATIONS EAST OF THE MEUSE. 

On the three days preceding, November 10, the 3d, the 2d Colonials and the 
17th French Corps fought a difficult struggle through the Meuse hills south of 
Stenay and forced the enemy into the plain. Meanwhile my plans for further 
use of the American forces contemplated an advance between the Meuse and the 
Moselle in the direction of Longwy by the First Army, while at the same time 
the Second Army should assume the offensive toward the rich coal fields of Briey. 
These operations were to be followed by an offensive toward Chateau-Salins, east 



396 HoLYOivE In The Great War. 

of the Moselle thus isolating Metz. Accordingly attacks on the American front 
had been ordered and that of the Second Army was in progress on the morning 
of November 11, when instructions were received that hostilities should cease at 
11 o'clock a. m. 

At this moment the line of the American sector from right to left began at 
Port-sur-Selle, thence across the Moselle to Vandieres and through the Woevre to 
Bezonvaux in the foothills of the Meuse, thence along the foothills and through 
the northern edge of the Woevre forests to the Meuse at Mouzay, thence along 
the Meuse connecting with the French under Sedan. 

RELATIONS WITH THE ALLIES. 

Co-operation among the allies has at all times been most cordial. A far 
greater effort has been put forth by the allied armies and staffs to assist us than 
could have been expected. The French government and army have always stood 
ready to furnish us with supplies, equipment, and transportation and to aid us 
in every way. In the towns and hamlets wherever our troops have been stationed 
or billeted the French people have everywhere received them more as relatives and 
intimate friends than as soldiers of a foreign army. For these things words are 
■quite inadequate to express our gratitude. There can be no doubt that the relations 
growing out of our association here assure a permanent friendship between the 
two peoples. Although we have not been so intimately associated with the people 
of Great Britain, yet their troops and ours when thrown together have always 
warmly fraternized. The reception of those of our forces who have passed through 
England and of those who have been stationed there has always been enthusiastic. 
Altogether it has been deeply impressed upon us that the ties of language and 
blood bring the British and ourselves together completely and inseparably. 

STRENGTH. 

There are in Europe altogether, including a regiment and some sanitary units 
with the Italian army and the organizations at Murmansk, also including those 
enroute from the States, approximately 2,053,347 men, less our losses. Of this 
total there are in France 1,338,169 combatant troops. Forty divisions have arrived, 
of which the infantry personnel of ten have been used as replacements, leaving 
thirty divisions now in France organized into three armies of three corps each. 

The losses of the Americans up to November 18 are : Killed and wounded, 
36,145; died of disease, 14,811; deaths unclassified, 2,204; wounded, 170,625; pris- 
oners, 2,163 ; missing, 1,160. We have captured about 44,000 prisoners and 1,400 
guns, howitzers, and trench mortars. 

COMMENDATION. 

The duties of the General Staff, as well as those of the army and corps staffs, 
have been very ably performed. Especially is this true when we consider the new 
and difficult problems with which they have been confronted. This body of officers, 
both as individuals and as an organization, have, I believe, no superiors in pro- 
fessional ability, in efficiency, or in loyalty. 

Nothing that we have in France better reflects the efficiency and devotion to 
duty of Americans in general than the Service of Supply, whose personnel is 
thoroughly imbued with a patriotic desire to do its full duty. They have at all 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 397 

times fully appreciated their responsibility to the rest of the army and the results 
produced have been most gratifying. 

Our Medical Corps is especially entitled to praise for the general effectiveness 
of its work, both in hospital and at the front. Embracing men of high professional 
attainments, and splendid women devoted to their calling and untiring in their 
efforts, this department has made a new record for medical and sanitary proficiency. 

The Quartermaster Department has had difficult and various tasks, but it has 
more than met all demands that have been made upon it. Its management and 
its personnel have been exceptionally efficient, and deserve every possible com- 
mendation. 

As to the more technical services-, the able personnel of the Ordnance Depart- 
ment in France has splendidly fulfilled its functions, both in procurement and in 
forwarding the immense quantities of ordnance required. The officers and men 
and the young women of the Signal Corps have performed their duties with a 
large conception of the problem, and with a devoted and patriotic spirit to which 
the perfection of our communications daily testifies. While the Engineer Corps 
has been referred to in another part of this report, it should be further stated that 
the \\ork has required large vision and high professional skill, and great credit 
IS due to their personnel for the high proficiency that they have constantly main- 
tained. 

Our aviators have no equals in daring or in fighting ability, and have left 
a record of courageous deeds that will ever remain a brilliant page in the annals 
of our army. While the Tank Corps has had limited opportunities, its personnel 
has responded gallantly on every possible occasion, and has shown courage of the 
highest order. 

The Adjutant General's Department has been directed with a systematic thor- 
oughness and excellence that surpassed any previous work of its kind. The 
Inspector General's Department has risen to the highest standards, and throughout 
has ably assisted commanders in the enforcement of discipline. The able per- 
sonnel of the Judge Advocate General's Department has solved with judgment and 
wisdom the multitude of difficult legal problems, many of them involving questions 
of great international importance. 

It would be impossible in this brief preliminary report to do justice to the 
personnel of all the different branches of this organization, which I shall cover in 
detail in a later report. 

As to the Americans in Europe not in the military service, it is the greatest 
pleasure to say that, both in official and in private Ife, they are intensely patriotic 
and loyal, and have been invariably sympathetic and helpful to the army. 

Finally, I pay the supreme tribute to our officers and soldiers of the line. 
When I think of their heroism, their patience under hardships, their unflinching 
spirit of offensive action, I am tilled with emotion which I am unable to express. 
Their deeds are immortal, and they have earned the eternal gratitude of our 
country. 



I am, Mr. Secretary, very respectfully, 



JOHN J. PERSHING, 



General Commander-in-Chief, American Expeditionary Forces. 
To the Secretary of War. 



Yankee Division Has Its Final Review 



CAMP DEVENS, April 22, 1919.— While upward of 250,000 persons watched 
and wept and applauded, the Yankee Division of New England today "passed out" 
in a blaze of splendor and glory that will live forever in the memory of those 
who saw the final official military gathering of one of the finest fighting aggrega- 
tions that ever represented a great country in battle. 

Perhaps the interest of the people of New England in the 26th Division will 
Teach its zenith Friday, April 25th, when the division marches through the streets of 
Boston, just before its members return to civilian life again; but today was the 
biggest day ever in the history of this cantonment, and certainly the biggest day 
in the history of the Division up to the present. 

It was a day with two main features : One, the most impressive, beautiful, 
almost sacred military ceremonies ever before held on New England soil, and the 
other, the gathering together of a quarter million people in a bare, out-of-the-way 
spot in order to do honor to some 20,000 of their flesh and blood who have fought 
and won, that liberty shall not perish from the earth. 

A SEA OF STEEL. 

From hilltops, from rooftops, from telegraph poles and trees, and by straining 
to see over the shoulders of those in front of them, the New Englanders who 
gathered here today looked out over a sea of gleaming bayonets and steel helmets 
and saw every flag in the Yankee Division decorated with gay streamers that 
proclaim their participation in the hardest of all the closing fights of the great 
world war. 

They saw these standards massed together in a blaze of splendor for the 
first time in the history of the Division, and a Major General of the United States 
Army proudly attached the battle streamers to each gleaming staff, while the 
massed bands of the whole Division — some 250 strong — sent triumphant martial 
music out across the swarming fields, and New England folk lifted their voices 
in proud acclaim. 

In the first place, it was a day made to order — bright, clear, warm and very 
little wind — which made it decidedly more comfortable for those thousands who 
were lined up anywhere from 15 to 40 deep all around the whole vast expanse of 
that parade ground. When a brisk wind sweeps across that expanse it carries 
before it clouds of blinding dust and sand. 

EVERYTHING ON TIME. 

Like most military ceremonies, everything ran smoothly and within a few 
seconds of scheduled time. The Yankee Division had been ordered to be massed 
in their proper formation on the parade ground promptly at 1.45. They were there 
and ready on the minute. The ceremony of decorating the colors of the various 
regiments and separate organizations was planned to start at 2 sharp and it was 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 399 

just that hour when the helmeted trumpeter who followed Major General Harry 
C. Hale throughout the afternoon blew "attention." 

Sweet and clear the silvery notes of that trumpet carried across the field 
and reechoed through the swarming hilltops. A hush descended on the assembled 
thousands. The Governors of the six New England States, accompanied by their 
staffs, stood in a group with Major General Clarence R. Edwards, former com- 
mander of the Yankee Division; Major General Henry P. McCain, commander of 
this camp; Major General Harry C. Hale, present commander of the division, 
accompanied by Lieut. Col. Charles A. Stevens, division adjutant, and Major 
Emerson G. Taylor, acting chief of staff. 

Suddenly there was a crash of music from that huge band which was massed 
in the extreme corner of the parade ground, opposite the division officers' club, 
and clatter of applause arose from the spectators as the 12 flags of the division 
were seen moving forward. 

Each flag, besides its color guard, was escorted by the regimental or unit 
commander. There were the blue flags of the four infantry regiments, accom- 
panied by the National colors, and the red flags of the artillery regiments and 
engineers, besides the flags of machine-gun battalions and trains — just 12 in all. 

FLAGLESS NOT FORGOTTEN. 

Slowly, it seemed, they moved along the entire front of the division until 
they reached the central point. Then, turning, the 12 parties marched side by 
side up to the reviewing stand. There they halted and dipped their colors. 

Those who saw it will never forget the dazzling splendor of these silken 
banners as they flung back the radiance of the blazing sun poured upon them. 

Then General Hale stepped forward. He was followed by Major Taylor and 
Colonel Stevens, the former carrying a copy of the order from the War Depart- 
ment to decorate the flags, and the latter the streamers that were soon to be 
attached to the flags. 

Speaking clearly and distinctly to the commanders of the units whose colors 
were before him. General Hale explained the significance of this ceremony. He 
said that these battle ribbons were only temporary decorations. They are to be 
used in lieu of the silver bands that will later be attached to each flagstaff. 

General Hale explained that he was ordered to decorate each of the 12 flags 
before him with streamers bearing the names of the six big battles in which the 
Yankee Division participated. He named each of the units in turn and spoke 
briefly of their part in these battles, which cover the entire period from the time 
the division first entered the line until the armistice. 

"But," concluded General Hale, "in this proud moment let us not forget the 
other organizations who have no flags to decorate, but who bore their equal share 
in all of the engagements in which the division participated ; and let us remember 
that though they have no flags to which streamers may be attached, this fact does 
not in the slightest detract from the value of their service or their valor." 

Then one by one he named these units who have no flags, from the head- 
quarters troop dov/n to the trains and military police. 

102D FIRST DECORATED. 

As General Hale finished speaking Major Taylor read aloud from General 
Order No. 28, which provides for the decorations of the flags by order of the 
Commander-in-Chief of the American Expeditionary Forces. Clearly and dis- 



400 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

tinctly he repeated the names of the battles that have become almost household 
words ill the homes of New England: Chemin des Dames, Toul, the Aisne-Marne, 
St. Alihiel. Troyon and the Meuse-Argonne. And as each historic name was heard, 
applause burst from the spectators again. 

Then the part}' moved forward to the first flag, that of the ]02d Infantry. The 
tip of the stafif dipped low and General Hale took a cluster of blue silken streamers 
handed to him by Colonel Stevens and quickly attached it to the end of the staff. 
Then came the flag of the Boston regiment — Colonel Edward L. Logan's 101st 
Infantry. As the battle streamers were attached to this flag the applause 
exceeded anything that had been heard before. 

Batteries of motion picture cameras and newspaper photographers followed 
General Hale and his stafif right down the line, taking pictures of the decoration 
of every flag. The army photographers were on the job, too, making official films 
of the ceremony that will be stored away as records of the event, to be cherished 
through the coming years. 

As the last flag was decorated the band struck into "The Star Spangled 
Banner." If there are any who for a moment doubt that Americans love and 
nonor their country and their flag, it were a pity that they were not present at 
ihat moment. Every male civilian's hat was off and every officer and man was 
standing rigidly at salute. 

Their eyes lifted and fixed on the glittering folds of this starry banner for 
which these men before them liad offered their lives. The air was vibrant with 
feeling, and many a mother in that vast crowd sobbed softly, while reluctant tears 
forced their way from more than one man's eyes. 

It was one of the most impressive military ceremonies the majority of the 
officers here have ever seen. They so declared it. And there are abundant cere- 
monies of beauty in this army of ours. 

INDIVIDUAL HEROES NEXT. 

Then came the decoration of off.cers and men of the division whose valorous 
deeds had not yet been officially recognized by the reward of crosses. Through 
the ceremony of decorating the colors these officers and men had stood in a long 
line behind the standards and the color guards. 

At the word of command they split, half marching to the right and the other 
half to the left. At each end of the long line of color bearers they turned again, 
coming around in front of the flags, the two parties joining in a single line again 
in front of their division commander. 

But before these men received their decorations there was a sadder core- 
mony to be performed. From the group of distinguished statesmen and soldiers 
who were standing together at the reviewing point was conducted a man well 
past middle age, dressed entirely in black. He was just a plain, every-day sort of 
man, his shoulders slightly stooped with toil, his hands hardened by honest work. 

PERKINS' FEAT WELL REMEMBERED. 

And again a hush fell upon this great multitude of people. They didn't have 
to be told who he was. They had read of the deeds of his son, Private 1st class 
Michael J. Perkins of Company D, 101st Infantry, 247 E street. South Boston. 
They knew how this lad on the 27th of October, last year, at Bellieu Bois, France, 
had shown "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity, above and beyond the call of 
duty." 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 401 

They had. read of how, when his platoon was hard pressed by the enemy, who 
were casting grenades at them from a concrete machine gun nest, Private Michael 
Perkins had voluntarily crawled forth, armed only with a grenade and a trench 
knife, until he had reached the rear of the nest, and how, awaiting his opportunity, 
he had cast his grenade into the nest and blown out the door, following this act 
up by casting himself into the midst of the Germans, killing and wounding several 
of them and taking about 25 of them prisoners. 

They knew also, that while being taken to a hospital in an ambulance to have 
his wound dressed, this lad was instantly killed when a German shell struck and 
completely demolished the ambulance in which he was riding. 

All this they knew, and that was why, as the father of this boy came slowly 
forward to receive for his dead son the highest award it is possible for the United 
States Government to bestow— the Congressional Medal of Honor— their hearts 
went out to him in sympathy. 

As he was presented to Major General Hale Mr. Perkins bared his head. The 
General took him by the hand and in a low voice told him how proud the people 
of this Nation and the men of the Yankee Division were over the deed of his son. 
And as the old man's face quivered with emotion, even as his eyes gleamed with 
pride, General Hale pinned to the left breast of his coat in the name of the Congress 
of the United States the gleaming medal with its blue ribbon and 13 white stars. 

Those who saw that pathetic little ceremony will never forget it. It brought 
forth more tears, though they were accompanied by ringing applause. Then Mr. 
Perkins accompanied the General and his staff as they went farther on the field 
to decorate the officers and men who were standing rigidly at attention. 

FORTY-EIGHT OTHERS DECORATED. 

There were 48 of these officers and men to be decorated. Major General Hale 
decorated half of them and Major General Edwards the other half. It had been 
previously arranged that General Hale should confer the decorations that were 
awarded after General Edwards gave up command of the division, and that General 
Edwards should decorate those whose decorations had been awarded while he was 
still in command, and it worked out so that there were 24 in each group. 

As General Hale paused before each man, Major Taylor read aloud the citation 
that accompanied the decoration. As he finished Colonel Stevens handed the 
medal to the General, who pinned it to the coat of the man he was decorating and 
shook him warmly by the hand. 

Hundreds of spectators noticed the same thing about these men who received 
decorations today. It seemed as though about half of them had been decorated 
before. Several officers and men who received the Distinguished Service Cross 
today were already wearing a Croix de Guerre on their coats, and a number who 
received the Croix de Guerre already had a Distinguished Service Cross. 

As each man received his decoration the spectators applauded. They were too 
far away to hear the citations as they were read, but they knew that each of these 
men who received from General Hale a war medal had done something out of the 
ordinary to merit it. 

GENERAL EDWARDS' TURN NOW. 

Half way down this line of men General Hale stopped. He had decorated 24 

of the men. Turning toward the reviewing party he motioned to General Edwards. 

What a roar of welcome went up as this graj^-haired old warrior stepped for- 



402 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

ward ! The former Y-D commander's heart was pretty full as he faced those men 
who once were his and who learned to love and respect him on the blood-drenched 
soil of France, amid the stress and strife of battle. He thanked General Hale for 
asking him to present part of the decorations to the men he formerly commanded. 
Then he turned to the men before him. 

'T am given a great honor in being asked to confer these decorations on you," 
said General Edwards. "I have always called you a stout-hearted lot of lads. It 
makes my heart pulsate with pride to be with you today. 

"We know that the deeds of those of you who have been selected for these 
honors are known. We also know that there are many of your fellows whose gallant 
deeds have escaped notice. It will make me very happy to see decorations awarded 
to all those whose deeds can be learned. 

"The War Department allows five years for the recording of acts of bravery, 
when justice can be done according to the facts that come tp light afterward. If 
any of you men know of gallant deeds which reflect honor on your fellows, send 
the facts to me and I shall be happy to make report on them." 

CROSvS OF W^'\R FOR GENERAL COLE. 

Then General Edwards looked for a moment out over that mass of gleaming 
bayonets and helmeted men. As he started to confer the decorations, he said : 

"Men, I congratulate you." 

The first decoration General Edwards conferred was a French Croix de Guerre. 
He pinned it on the breast of Brig.-Gen. Charles H. Cole, the only brigade com- 
mander to start out with the Yankee Division and to return still commanding his 
brigade. 

As the two Generals clasped hands they looked for a moment into each other's 
eyes. And there was pride in the eyes of each, as well as understanding. 

The Governors of the six New England states had followed the generals 
through the entire ceremony, and they shook hands with each man as he received 
his medal. The governors were proud of these New Englanders, of course, but 
their pride was as nothing to that of the fathers and mothers who were standing 
in the crowds, straining their eyes to catch every movement of their dear ones. 

Following the ceremony of presenting the decorations, and while the big band 
played again, the colors and the decorated men returned to their posts with the 
main body of the division. It had been planned to have the presentation of these 
decorations take just an hour, and that was exactly what it took, or within two 
minutes of that time. 

100,000 ON HAND BY NOON. 

But no hour ever passed more quickly, even for these spectators who were 
standing still beneath the blazing sun or for those who were clinging to the roofs 
of buildings on all sides of the parade ground. Most of them had their troubles 
in even reaching the camp at all. Perhaps 100,000 of them had reached camp by 
noon and had seized what they believed to be the vantage points from which to 
watch the exercises. 

Those who came later than that hour were thankful and considered themselves 
lucky that they reached camp at all. For the entire road from Ayer Village to 
the main gate of the camp was choked with automobiles. They even spread over 
the car tracks, which run beside the road, and this consequently meant that the 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 403 

trolley cars were tied up, too, so that the quickest way to reach the camp was to 
walk across the fields. And many did so. 

When all was ready for the exercises to begin — and that was when the Governor's 
automobile rolled onto the field — Barlow's Hill, beside the engineer area, was com- 
pletely hidden from view by the mass of people who had taken positions on it. 
No roof within sight was without its load of humanity. The division's officers' 
club, from chimneys to porch, was literally buried in people. 

And it was admitted that those who were several hundred yards away from 
the field, and could see at all, secured a much more satisfactory view than those 
who were in the front row of spectators that lined the field. 

As the colors took up their positions in their units and the officers and men' 
had taken their proper stations. General Hale and his staff mounted their horses and 
galloped out in front of the division. 

As they took their posts the general spoke to the trumpeter. "Present arm<" 
was the call that went floating out from the bell of the bugle. In a trice the com- 
mand was executed. 

The bayonets cast back the glint of the sun. Twenty thousand fighting men 
stood like statues. General Hale snapped his hand up to his helmet in salute, 
facing the governors who had taken their positions at the reviewing point. Thus 
was the Yankee Division presented to the people of New England. And the band 
crashed forth in triumph once more. It was only another of the many dramatic 
moments that filled the day. 

Then called the division to "order arms" again. General Hale and his staff 
galloped in to the reviewing stand and eight automobiles, each flying the flag of one 
of the New England states, rolled onto the field. 

Governor Calvin Coolidge of Massachusetts and his staff entered the first car. 
Car No. 2 bore Governor Marcus H. Holcomb of Connecticut and his staff. 
The third car took Governor John H. Bartlett of New Hampshire and his staff; 
the fourth. Governor R. Livingston Beeckman of Rhode Island and his staff; the 
fifth. Governor Percival W. Clement of Vermont and staff, and the sixth, Governor 
Carl E. Milliken of Maine and staff. General Edwards and his staff entered the 
seventh car and in the eighth were Mrs. Edwards and Dr. and Mrs. Dane. 

Applause greeted each governor as he took his seat and his car rolled away 
behind the division commander and his officers, but in a few moments it was the 
governors themselves who were applauding. Eor their cars were going around the 
Yankee Division, and they couldn't help but show their pride in these fighting 
veterans. 

As the cars returned to the reviewing stand again and the governors alighted, 
it was just 3.20. They lined up with Governor Coolidge on the right. The band 
blared again as General Hale rode out and took his place at the head of the Yankee 
Division, and the march past started. 

Up to this time the military police of the Yankee Division, assisted by the camp 
provost guard, had effectively held the crowd in check behind the ropes. But as 
that band of 250 pieces came marching down the field and General Hale and his 
staff swung in behind the governors, dismounted and took their places, the crowd 
near the reviewing stand burst all bounds, and there was no power on that field, 
unless it was the division itself, could hold them. 

For the Yankee Division was coming, its band was blaring. Bayonets were 
flashing and the dust began to rise from the tramp of marching feet. These fighters 
of whom they were so proud were on their way. How could they remain behind 



404 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

mere ropes? They wanted to get close; dose enough to see the boys' faces and 
see every last detail of their equipment. 

So men and women and children leaped nimbly over the ropes, or slipped under 
them, and they swarmed out onto the field until they were right on a line with 
General Hale and the governors. And there they stayed, cheering and applauding 
as each regiment went by. 

The 102d Infantry led the march down the field, passing, as did every other 
unit, in a column of battalions. The 101st followed it. And what a reception 
Colonel "Eddie" Logan got as he led his regiment down the field. It was certainly 
a proud day for Boston, as well as for the rest of New England. 

The band played continuously for 40 minutes, changing from one march to 
another as each regiment came up. And as each of the colors dipped while pass- 
ing the . reviewing stand, the trumpeters at the rear of the band proper sent the 
shrill notes of salute soaring into the air. They played "Our Director" as Colonel 
Logan's regiment passed, and "The National Emblem" as the 101st Field Artillery 
passed. 

The artillery brigade, with the exception of small detachments here and there, 
marched without arms. Their guns, which thundered death and destruction into 
the ranks of the Hun, are still in France. They carried only their packs and each 
battery its guidon. But these scarlet guidons went a long way in making up for 
the lack of arms, for inscribed brilliantly on each red field is the battery letter 
and the number of the regiment. Thus were the spectators able to identify each 
battery as it passed. 

The last unit passed and the band swung in behind it and marched from the 
field just at 4 o'clock. There wasn't the slightest bit of confusion. Everything 
worked like a well-oiled machine, and the camp swallowed the thousands of men 
as quickly as they passed, for about 100 yards past the reviewing stand each outfit 
broke into double time and in that way avoided any piling up. 

As the last unit passed, the governors turned to Major General Hale and 
congratulated him on the fine showing of the division. The chief executives of 
each state had nothing but the highest praise for the whole of the Yankee Division, 
and they didn't hesitate about saying so. General McHale, when asked for his 
opinion, would only remark that he was gratified at the showing the Y-D had made. 
But there was a look in his eye that was little short of sheer pride, and with reason. 

Impromptu receptions were held right on the field after the review was over. 
Each governor found a host of friends on hand to greet him, among them many 
men prominent in public affairs. The entire official party went right back to 
division headquarters following the review and there they said goodbye to Generals 
Hale, Edwards and McCain and quickly departed. 

The thousands of spectators poured in what seemed to be a never ending 
stream through both gates of the camp, and there was a repetition of the traffic 
jam of the morning. The military police handled the thousands w^ho thronged the 
roads -in a very capable manner, however, and it was reported from the base hos- 
pital that not a single case of accident had been reported. Traffic men on the main 
gate estimated that there were close to 40,000 automobiles in camp, which breaks 
all records ever set here, even when the camp first opened. 

So the final official review of the Yankee Division was an unqualified success, 
in every sense of the word, and both the officers and men, as well as the spec- 
tators, tired as they were, had no regrets and nothing but a feeling of supreme 
satisfaction over the entire dav. 



"Death Platoon" 



A THRILLING story of the "death platoon,"' the heroes of which received 
after the war justly deserved recognition, was composed of the first platoon 
of A Co., 104th Infantry, of Worcester. There isn't much known about the 
platoon, for the simple reason that there is no one left to tell the whole 
story. Parts of the tale will be known because there are some few soldiers who 
witnessed the work of the platoon just before they passed from the sight of the 
remainder of the American attacking party. The platoon got its name because the 
nine members which composed it never returned to their outfits alive, all having 
been killed by German shell fire. 

The members of A Co., along with D Co., "Holyoke's Own," and E Co. of 
the 104th Regiment, started out on the morning of October 16, 1918. The story of 
what followed and the fate of the "death platoon," was told when the division 
returned by Corp. Edwin Moore, a Worcester boy, who participated in the attack 
and had his eyes glued on the nine m^n until they had passed out of sight never 
to return. 

"I shall never forget that day as long as I live, for it was one of the worst 
attacks in which A Co. figured," said Corp. Moore. "We started out at 5 o'clock in 
the morning, and it was one of the worst possible mornings. If we were to look for 
worse weather I don't believe we could have found it. 

"A Co. was in the command of Lieut. Chester R. Howard. Before I go on 
with my story, I want to say a few words about this same Lieut. Howard, because 
without people knowing the soldier, they cannot appreciate his supreme heroism. 
Lieut. Howard was only 23 years old. He was tall, well-built and fine looking. 
He was one of the most impressive looking officers in all France. 

"And Lieut. Howard was all man. He was a westerner, coming from Man- 
hattan, Kan., and had attended college at the University of Michigan. While at 
the Michigan institution he won renown as a football player. 

"Lieut. Howard joined the company while we were fighting in the Chemin des 
Dames sector, or a little while before, I think. And how that boy stuck with us, 
all through thick and thin. He was a most wonderful leader and a most daring 
officer. Why, every time Lieut. Howard would go out in the direction of the 
Boche, it would seem as though he went with his head up in the air, and with 
his chest thrown out, in open defiance of the Huns. And I truly guess that's 
about the way he felt towards the Germans. 

"Lieut. Howard was first recognized by the government, for which he gave 
up his young and fine life, when he was awarded a Distinguished Service Cross for 
bravery at Chateau-Thierry. This was for sticking to his post, after a machine 
gun bullet had gone through his left thigh. 

"Well, getting back to the story of the 'Death Platoon,' finds Lieut. Howard 
at the head of A Co. We started out early and fought and fought for two long 
hours, with the first platoon, under the command of Lieut. Howard, away ahead of 
the rest. Our objective was a woods known as Haumont woods. The story of 



406 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

the French tanks and the llaumont woods attack is quite well known around 
Worcester, because there were a few Worcester boys in the attacking party. 

"There were three companies of infantry supported by 20 French tanks which 
made the attack. A Co.'s objective was the right piece of the woods. D Co. was 
to advance toward the center of the woods, while E Co. advanced toward the left 
fringe of the woods. Ten tanks were to go on either side and attempt to get to 
the rear of the woods. The tanks, if they gained this position, were to crash 
through from the rear and drive the Huns out into the open, where we would meet 
them and give them all that was coming to them, the same kind of a beating as 
they suffered at Chateau-Thierry, when we fought with them in open battle. 

"But the tanks failed, and they failed miserably. And returned Worcester 
boys who were there will say so, and what a tragedy it proved for us. Instead 
of going in the direction they were supposed, the tanks started for the center of 
the woods. One of the tanks got stuck in a shell hole, and then the whole 20 
seemed to get stuck at the same time. And the Frenchmen in charge of the tanks 
were also stuck. 

"The Frenchmen didn't stick with us. They just beat it back to the safest spot 
they could find and left us kids to our fate. And there we were in the open, living 
targets to the nests of machine guns. We couldn't possibly last. The boys were 
being slaughtered mercilessly and so we had to quit and retire at 7 o'clock. That 
is, most of the attacking party retired. 

"But not the death platoon. No, sir, eot with Lieut. Howard at »the head of 
that platoon. That boy didn't know what it was to quit up to that time, and he 
had been through some pretty hot skirmishes, so he wasn't going to quit then. 
Lieut. Howard and the nine men of the first platoon who followed him, never quit 
until their bodies were cold in death. 

"I was able to see a little more than some of the other fellows, because I lay 
there waiting for dark until I could crawl back to the company. I fell in a shell 
hole and was up to my waist in water for about 10 hours. If they ever sent over 
gas I surely would have kicked in, for my mask was soaking wet and incapable 
of benefiting me if the Huns ever sent over a gas barrage. 

"The last I saw of that gang of one officer and nine men, was when they 
were going into that end of the woods, which had been their objective. That was 
all we heard of them for three weeks. 

"We heard no more until November 9. From letters we received from home, 
the information given out from Washington was that these nine soldiers were 
missing in action. That was all we knew. We didn't know whether or not they 
were dead, dying from wounds or loss of food, or of disease, or whether they 
had been taken prisoners by the Germans. But we found out November 9. 

"It is a day which will always remain vivid in my life. We started another 
drive for the woods, and maybe we didn't drive some. Then we came to that part 
of the woods which had been the objective of the first platoon. And there we 
found those boys. They had gained their objective. How they did it we never 
were able to fathom. But they made it and held it as long as they could. 

"It was apparent that the soldiers had dug themselves in. We found poor 
old Lieut. Howard with the top of his head blown off. It was a terrible sight 
for us boys, but it was just a part of the more terrible game we were playing. 
We buried them right on the spot they had taken at such great cost. 

"The fellows after arriving there, must have found it impossible to make the 
objective defensible and so had dug themselves into foxholes, or had slipped into 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 407 

shell holes or had quickly thrown up entrenchments. It appeared to us that Lieut. 
Howard had been in the act of bandaging up his leg when he was hit by the shell 
that took his life. 

"And the Huns had not been content to just kill the soldiers. They also had 
to plunder. They even took the shoes from the feet of the brave boys. Lieut. 
Howard's Distinguished Service Cross, which had been awarded him for bravery 
in action at Chateau-Thierry, had been stolen. 

"And what a burial we gave these boys. Their bodies were partially preserved. 
We were able to recognize all. Colonel B. F. Cheatham, commander of the 104th 
Regiment, has recommended posthumous awards of the Distinguished Service Cross 
to the nine men, while Lieut. Howard has been recommended for the Congressional 
Medal of Honor." 

The soldiers with the 1st platoon who were with Lieut. Howard and who were 
killed while holding the objective were: Priv. John J. O'Keefe, Cambridge; Priv. 
Franklin Whitman, Williamsport, Pa.; Priv. Naramo Demartino, Terarno, Italy; 
Priv. Fred A. Holmes, South Minneapolis; Priv. John D. Noughton, Chicago; 
Priv. John D. Jens, Milwaukee, Miss.: Priv. Earl B. Hall, Mayville, Cal. ; Priv. 
Seymour L. Schwartz, Chicago, and Priv. Albert Boisnert of Lowell, formerly of 
Worcester. 



They Sleep In France 



They sleep in peace, those boys of ours 

Under the soil of France, 
'Neath winter snows and springtime flowers 

And the breezes as they dance. 
So let them rest, the lads so brave, 

Yes, rest there side by side 
With freedom's flag to guard each grave 

The flag for which they died. 

They rest so well, the flag unstained 

By greed or lust of fear. 
They died for honor — well attained 

For all we hold most dear. 
So laddies, sleep your last long sleep. 

Where courage won the day 
Mute memories for France to keep 

Of all we had to pay. 

Oh mothers, you who gave your sons. 

Be first to say "I know 
My boy would lie where freedom's guns 

Laid hate forever low. 
His body may be far away 

His spirit's close to me 
So rest, dear lad. yes, rest for aye 

In France across the sea." 



High Honors for Company D 



Company D, "Holyoke's O-wn," returned from France with the reputation of 
being the best outfit in the 26th Division, and the third platoon of Company D 
was the best platoon in the division. As proof of such superiority the company 
possesses two bronze medals, one for the champion company and the other for 
the champion platoon. These medals were won at the divisional military and 
athletic tournament held at Ecommoy, France, March 10, 11 and 12, 1919. 

The company competition consisted of infantry drill, including the manual of 
arms and school of the company and a five-mile hike under arms. The platoon 
competition included an inspection, manual of arms, close order drill, calisthenics 
and bayonet drill. 

"We certainly traveled on that hike," said Capt. Thomas Keatoe, commanding 
Company D when it returned to Boston April 4 on the Mt. Vernon and went to 
Camp Devens, where the boys received their discharges April 28. "The boys 
stripped to their shirts and we double-timed the whole eight kilometers. Our 
time of one hour and seven minutes was easily 12 minutes better than that of the 
next company. And only three men fell out along the way." 

The leader of the 3d platoon of Company D, winner of the platoon champion- 
ship, is a Springfield man. Second Lieut. E. D. Martin. 

This tournament in which Company D won so much honor is the same one 
in which the 104th Regiment won the cup for having the highest total in the com- 
bined military and athletic events. Every man in Company D has one of the medals 
awarded the company and the men in the 3d platoon have in addition one of the 
platoon medals. 



Parade of the 26th Division 



BOSTON, April 25, 1919. — New England had its chance to honor the Yankee 
Division — and how it did honor it ! 

How many were in that multitude which packed itself as the banks in a flag- 
decked lane of triumph is only conjecture. It was at least 1,000,000. It cheered like 
5,000,000. 

It saw a horseman, sitting erect and at salute, round a bend in the lane of 
triumph. Major-General Clarence R. Edwards was turning into Beacon street from 
Arlington street. The parade was under way. 

Then did the cheers break loose — the cheers that tossed and heaved in incessant 
din through nearly four hours of chill April air. Not alone did that din contain 
cheers. The throng that turned out to do the Yankee Division honor had too much 
honor to give to depend entirely upon the throat's power of offering. Mingling with 
the roar of cheers was the crackling of rackets, the tinkle and clamor of bells, the 
hoarse blasts of horns. Hands clapped loudly in concerted plaudits of contribution 
to the day's acclaim and feet stamped on sidewalks and grandstand boards in deep, 
far-carrying tattoo. 

WILL LIVE FOREVER IN THEIR MEMORIES. 

For days will that formal welcome home roar in the ears of the boys who 
marched through it all. Down through the years will its echo live in their memories. 

It told them and will ever remind them that the home folks appreciate them — 
appreciate their patriotism, their hardships, their sacrifices, their valor and their 
victory. 

A martial spectacle such as New England has never before beheld was unfolded 
— a spectacle in itself sufficient to stir the blood and impel marvelous applause. 

But it was the significance resting within that spectacle which turned marvelous 
applause into the wildest of demonstrations. 

These men were combat troops — veterans of the war of wars. They had gone 
through months of the super-hell which is the modern war — and they were back. 

HONOR FLAG TELLS OE SACRIFICES. 

Not all of them were back, however. In place of honor near the head of the 
column — in advance even of that place of honor assigned to the men who are back, 
but weakened by wounds — was a white-fielded flag. In its center blazed a golden 
star. This was the flag which told of the Division's losses — and their number was 
announced in the figures 1,760 inscribed beneath the star. 

Killed in action — 1,760. Wounded in action — there were thousands of golden 
chevrons worn low on the right sleeves of men who participated in that parade. 
At the head of the marching column drove two long trains of automobiles, each 
machine bearing the Division's most severely wounded. More than 1,100 YD men 
thus went over the Division's triumphal parade route. And through the ranks were 
scattered everywhere men who fell before German fire and gas. but who came back 
to the ranks again. 



410 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

Everywhere also were men wearing valor medals on their breasts — the Croix 
de Guerre of France or of Belgium, and the Distinguished Service Cross of America. 

Every grandstand was a turbulent bank of humanity. Curbstones had their 
claimants — claimants who held their vantage places jealously as behind them formed 
the crowds that packed sidewalks from edge to fence or wall. 

Every window along the way was a frame for faces ; rooftops, cornices, tele- 
graph poles and trees had their members of the reviewing host. 

MILES OF CHEERS FOR EDWARDS AND LOGAN. 

The cheers and din and clamor which went forth at the appearance of General 
Edwards continued till the last man had completed the march— continued with vol- 
ume that rose and fell, but which never again attained to such mighty proportions 
except once. 

This once was when Colonel Logan passed along at the head of the lOlst — 
Colonel "Eddie" Logan of South Boston at the head of the doughboy regiment, 
which is Boston's loftiest pride. 

The 101st and its gallant commander needed no herald as it moved down that 
human lane. Everybody knew instinctively who were coming next. Excitement at- 
tained to renewed level of exceeding thrill ; cheers and din once more climbed to 
that altitude which only a few moments before they had reached at the sight of the 
erect and saluting general at the Division's head. 

It was a great day for General Edwards and Colonel Logan. It was a great 
day for ever}' man who wore the YD. Brigadier-General Cole and Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Sherburne, both Boston men, men whom all New England knows have the ut- 
most love and esteem of their soldiers, received greetings all along the way which 
vied with those accorded Edwards and Logan. 

HALE, COLE AND SHERBURNE SHARE IN HOMAGE. 

The other commanders of Yankee Division units, whose place in the hearts of 
iheir men all New England also knows, were recipients of cheering outbursts which 
punctuated the afternoon's hours of cheering with more intense notes. For General 
Hale, commander of the Division in its final months, there were flattering waves of 
acclaim. 

But the bulk of the cheers — the overwhelming burden of ovation — went out to 
those boys who came along on foot. They streamed along for hours to give New 
England a realization of the proportions of an army division. 

Tin-helmeted, mostly with bayonet blades in gleaming array along their ranks, 
these boys of the Division's rank and file had all the aspect of the real veterans they 
are. 

They marched at attention — and they were soldiers all the time. Neither to the 
right nor to the left did they look, save when they executed eyes right in acknowl- 
edgment of reviewing dignitaries. 

"SMILE A LITTLE." GENERAL EDWARDS COMMANDS. 

Only once did any men of the long, undulating column of olive drab permit 
their lips to twitch in smiles — and this was at command of their general. 

"You look too serious ; smile a little, lads ; this is your day." This was the be- 
hest of General Edwards as the ranks swung by him before his reviewing stand on 
Coluinbus avenue. It was repeated over and over at intervals. General Edwards 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 411 

would have liked to say it to the men of every rank. Along those ranks which 
heard it flashed a line of gleaming teeth. Every man wanted to smile at that man 
who stood up there on the reviewing stand — but it just wasn't military without per- 
mission. Permission accorded, the smiles blossomed radiantly. 

Browned with campaigning were those faces set at stern attention under the 
edges of helmets of steel. Rugged of body were the men who swung along in lithe 
quickstep. There was rhythm to every stride. Alignments were straight, the mark 
of veteran and well-trained soldiers. Rifles lying easily on accustomed shoulders 
shot upward to their bright bayonet points at equal angles. 

The display of soldierly excellence was all the more notable because those YD 
men of the parade marched over a five-mile route in platoon front of three squads 
and two guides — a 14-man rank. This was a drill field formation usually main- 
tained but for short distances : it was a march formation rarely attempted. 

SOLDIERS TO THE CORE, TRIED AND PROVEN. 

It took rare military ability to maintain this formation so admirably as it was 
maintained in the parade. But these men have proven themselves soldiers to the 
very core — have proven themselves soldiers under the most gruelling of battle con- 
ditions that ever soldiers went through. In those days of battle they knew no close 
order formations ; in far-flung, deployed lines w-ere they ranged. But they gathered 
back into the mass formations to put forth a display of ceremonial soldiery which 
only the parade field at West Point usually offers. 

As regiment and battalion and company of these men came along with helmet 
straps at their chins, gas masks slung at their sides, packs on their backs, canteens 
at their belt, the pressing throngs at either side just cheered and cheered and then 
kept right on cheering. Those men with the YD insignia on their shoulders and 
golden chevrons on their arms were soldiers giving a marvelous demonstration of 
soldierly bearing and skill ; they were veterans of scenes which torture the mind 
which tries to conceive them — but, most of all, they were New England's hero boys 
back home again. 

Not alone was it cheers which marked their marching way — there were tears, 
too. Tears glistened in hundreds of eyes. There were tears of grief; many of the 
mothers and fathers who sat in the huge stands along Commonwealth avenue had 
sons represented in that gold star of the Division's flag of honor. 

TEARS OF PRIDE IN EYES OF RELATIVES. 

But the tears were not alone of solemnity ; tears express many emotions. They 
expressed for thousands the pride and adulation in those marching boys which 
found all other modes of utterance insufficient. There were tears which were forced 
to the eyes by the fullness of gladness in the hearts — tears which just welled up 
unrestrainable. More than the cheers and the waving of flags, these tears told the 
place that the men of the Yankee Division hold in the esteem of New England. 

The men were at their parade positions a half hour before noon. The men 
who came down from Ayer marched directly to their places of readiness for the 
march. Those who came down from camp the day before left their armories at a 
time which would permit them to reach their places by 11.30. 

General Edwards, mounted, not on YD but on Walla-Walla, was at his place a 
full half hour before 1 o'clock. His staff, with his mount prancing circles at its 
front, rested on Arlington street, just around the corner from Beacon street. 



412 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

GENERAL EDWARDS STARTS PARADE PROMPTLY. 

It was scarce 1 o'clock when he turned his horse's head into the route of 
parade. He turned into Beacon street and the parade was on. Then it was that 
the tumult entered upon its career which was not to end until the last YD man had 
passed through Park square. 

At the head of the column, only the troop of mounted police in advance of him, 
he rode straight through the middle of the roadwaj". Astride the bough of a tree 
overhanging Beacon street from the Common was a boy who had converted his 
coat into a flag — an improvised flag — which he waved furiously. Nested in trees 
all along the Common were adventurous boys who knew how to find free reserved 
seats. 

Past the State House, its governors and other dignitaries and its frontage for 
the day of massed humanity, the Division's leader progressed, down Park street 
and before the great stands of Tremont street, with Mayor Peters standing, to ex- 
press officially the city's honor. Every moment seemed trying to outdo the acclaim 
of the preceding moment. 

FRANTIC WELCOME FROM RELATIVES' STANDS. 

Then the mounted figure at the Division's head turned into Commonwealth ave- 
nue — and instantly reviewing stand thousands were on their feet. Commonwealth 
avenue's stands held the mothers and fathers and other relatives of the men of the 
Yankee Division. Here, more than anywhere else along the parade route, was the 
interest in the Division vital — and the cheers that arose at the sight of that van- 
guard of horsemen seemed to have a keener and clearer ring than those sent from 
any other point in the parade. 

It was the first view for most of these mothers and fathers of the man over 
whom their sons have raved in their letters — the first view of the man who led their 
sons overseas. And as he rode down the line he was the object of the keenest 
scrutiny of the day. The cheers told of the approval that the scrutinies had found. 

Half way down the north side of the avenue the column halted. The first half 
hour of the parade was over and this was the pre-arranged 3-minute rest. 

The throngs in the reviewing stands only partially realized what was its occa- 
sion. They saw General Edwards turn his horse broadside to the street and bow 
before the group which stood on the porch of the house at 6.3 Commonwealth 
avenue. 

GENERAL EDWARDS SALUTES HIS WIFE. 

Then, to send a thrill down those rows of mothers in the huge reviewing stands 
set up on the avenue's mall ran the word that that was Mrs. Edwards who was 
bowing acknowledgment from the house's porch — the little woman in black with the 
grave, sweet face. 

The parade had halted at the very moment General Edwards reached a place 
directly in front of his home. All the elements of perfect dramatics were in that 
halt — and those other women folks of the Yankee Division's men across the street 
appreciated it to the full. 

The parade moved again and the brief lull in the cheering as the throngs de- 
ferred to the exchange of salutations between the man on horseback and the little 
woman on the porch was broken with cheers that never again entered a lull till the 
parade was through. 



HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 413 

Colonel Logan came along to the view of the mothers and fathers and the others 
in these Commonwealth avenue stands. There was something more than tumult in 
those stands then. General Edwards had received what seemed the apex of heart 
demonstrations here: the demonstration accorded Colonel Logan rivaled it. 

The head of the column went far down Commonwealth avenue's one side and 
then back the other. It turned into Copley square and everybody and everything 
there seemed involved in the spirit of the day. Phillips Brooks, his bronze features 
gazing out over the top of a protecting board fence, was holding his right hand 
aloft in seeming gesture for the occasion. Every Copley square roof, even to the 
Public Library, had its throngs. 

TUMULTUOUS GREETING FOR COLONEL LOGAN. 

Then the parade progress took the head of the column by the stands ranged 
along the railroad side of Boylston street. Here were gathered in a huge, long 
stand the families and friends of the 101st infantry. Congressman Gallivan was 
out in front leading the cheering. They gave a tremendous greeting to General Ed- 
wards, but they simply went wild when Colonel Logan came along. 

Next of the stands was that of the Elks. Vociferous to the full power of lungs 
and of adjunct noise-makers was the greeting to General Edwards from this stand, 
but most notable was the picturesqueness which it afforded. Every person in the 
stand was waving a large American flag — the stand was a waving mass of red, 
white and blue. 

There was a halt at lower Boylston street. "This is marvelous," General Ed- ■ 
wards took occasion to say, "I guess this shows what the home folk think of those 
stout-hearted lads of the Yankee Division." 

Again there was a halt just before the column turned into Columbus avenue, 
and General Edwards here gave utterance to the thought which had been hammering 
through his head through all the din of ovation. 

"I can't help thinking all the time," he said, "of those 1,760 men we left behind 
us in France. They are lying over there that we may march here. If only we 
could have them with us on such a glorious day as this !" 

At 2.40 General Edwards dismounted and walked to his reviewing stand on Co- 
lumbus avenue. Then was demonstrated eloquently how the men of the Yankee 
Division revere him. Then, too, was demonstrated why they revere him. 

The wounded of the automobile columns came along. These men were not at 
attention. And neither was their general. They rose to their feet and cheered — 
whole automoliile loads of them. They waved crutches in the air and empty sleeves. 
This w-as tribute to a commander who was something more than a commander to 
his men — a commander who was also a father and a comrade. 

And the general on the platform had for each automobile load of wounded 
YD heroes a genial shout of greeting. Major Christopher Lee of the 101st infantry, 
hero soldier, who could not rise to acknowledge the general's salute, was in the 
leading automobile of the wounded fleet. 

"Good luck to you, Alajor Lee." was all that General Edwards had time to 
utter before the machine was by. 

Another halt in the parade stopped the middle of the automobile column in 
front of the stand. 

The general questioned the men as to the battles in which they received their 
vrounds. He inquired as to how their wounds were healing. He recognized a man 
here and there and recalled the time when he had met him "over there." 



414 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

SHAKES HANDS WITH PRIVATE. 

A private climbed out of one of the automobiles and came over to shake hands. 
He identified himself in response to General Edwards's inquiries as Private Smith, 
103d Infantry, of Calais, Me. 

Private Smith is of portly build. 

"How did such a weather strip as you miss so many bullets?" the general 
asked, as the soldier was returning to his machine. 

■'I didn't miss many of them, sir," was the reply; "I got hit five times." 

A little later a soldier on crutches, one leg gone, and another leaning on a cane, 
passed along the opposite side of the street. General Edwards called them over to 
the stand. They explained that they had just climbed out of the automobile which 
had borne them through the parade to that point. He gave them a seat in the front 
row of his stand. 

The general had a "Good luck" for each general and colonel and major that 
passed along. His shout to Colonel Hume of the 103d Infantry was : 

"Governor, I congratulate you." 

Colonel Hume is to be a candidate for governor of Maine this fall. 

Major Bogan came along at the head of the 101st Sanitary Train. "How is 
the baby, Major?" General Edwards inquired. 

"Why, I'm just getting acquainted with it now, sir; but it's fine," was the reply. 
The baby was born while Major Bogan was overseas, and he saw it for the first 
time when his ship came into Commonwealth Pier. 

"It's one of the most beautiful babies I ever saw," General Edwards called as 
the major's horse moved on. 

MASCOT DOG WITH HIS WOUND STRIPE. 

One of the halts in the parade brought the mascot of one of the units in front 
of General Edwards's reviewing stand. This was a dog with a blanket, bearing a 
wound stripe. There were numerous animal mascots in the parade, notably "Nan- 
nette," the goat mascot which used to go over the top with L Company of the 101st 
Infantry. 

As the men passed the reviewing stand many of them carried in their free 
hands the trophies of the bombardments of chocolate bars and cigarettes and or- 
anges with which they had been met all along the way. Nearly 100 girls passed 
out or tossed the gifts to the men as they passed the Tremont street stand. The 
ammunition for this bombardment was furnished by the mayor's entertainment com- 
mittee, headed by former Lieutenant-Governor Barry. Another heavy bombard- 
ment came from the stands along Commonwealth avenue. 

General Hale, although not as well known to the New England public as Gen- 
eral Edwards, received a very cordial welcome from those standing along the line 
of march. He saluted General Edwards as he passed the latter at the Columbus 
square reviewing stand, and, upon reaching the Cadet armory, made his way with 
his staff to the reviewing stand built for him by the First Corps Cadets' Veterans' 
Association. 

General Hale and his staff remained on that stand until the 52d Infantry, com- 
manded by Brigadier-General Charles H. Cole, made its appearance. Necessity for 
an early departure for New York and from there to Camp Dix. of which he is to 
take command, resulted in his having to leave Boston early. 

GENERAL HALE PRAISES 26TH DIVISION. 
Before going, however, he expressed his appreciation for everything that New 
England has done for him and his division. He paid tribute to the men and to 



HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 415 

their commanding officers, and he endorsed every sentiment voiced by General Ed- 
wards in his tribute to the troops of the 26th and the men and women of New 
England. 

On General Edwards's staff were Col. W. A. Alfonte, Col. A. L. Pendleton, 
Major Stanley Washburn, Col. M. C. Dowell, Major Allison Cole, Col. J. F. How- 
ard, Major John W. Hyatt, his personal aid; Capt. Oliver Wolcott, Lieut. Willis 
Simpkins, Lieut. Daniel Willard, Jr., Capt. H. D. Cormerais, Capt. George C. Capelle 
and Frank Sibley, war correspondent. 

With General Hale were Col. John H. Allen, Col. Wiliam H. Dolan, Lieut.-Col. 
John D. Murphy, Lieut.-Col. Charles A. Stevens, Lieut.-Col. Alfred F. Foote, Lieut.- 
Col. Elon F. Tandy, Lieut.-Col. Albert Greenlaw, Lieut.-Col. Hamilton R. Horsey. 
Lieut.-Col. Thomas L. Jenkins, Major Paul Loughbridge, Major George M. King, 
Major Oscar G. Lagerquist, Major Carl R. Bailey, Major Emerson G. Taylor, Ma- 
jor William B. Morgan, Major Nicholas Biddle, Capt. Charles D. Campbell, Capt. 
Keith P. Ribble, Capt. Charles D. Hodges, Capt. Willis M. Hale, Capt. Lawrence 
B. Cummings, Capt. Robert B. Dickson, Capt. William J. Henderson, Capt. Howard, 
Sachs, Capt. Charles W. Bowen, Capt. James F. Coburn and Chaplain Michael J. 
O'Connor. 

"HISTORIC," SAYS COOLIDGE. 

"A parade that will be historic in this Commonwealth has just been finished 
with great success," said Governor Coolidge, immediately after leaving the State 
House reviewing stand. "I desire to express my thanks to all those who have made 
it a success — first to the soldiers for their sacrifice in remaining in the service, and 
then to all the civil authorities and the special committees that have co-operated so 
splendidly in every way. 

"It was especially gratifying to have present the governors of the New Eng- 
land States and their guests. Their co-operation was very helpful in making the day 
complete. It should also be remembered that the city of Boston has extended every 
possible hospitality to the many guests who came here for this occasion. It has 
been an experience for the Commonwealth that will richly repay every expenditure 
of time and money that was necessary to bring it about." 

"It was fine and wonderfully impressive," said Governor Clement of Vermont. 
"The men certainly looked great and acquitted themselves fully as well as in the 
wonderful review at Camp Devens. Massachusetts has treated her neighboring 
states wonderfully well, and I am sure I speak for all Vermonters when I say that 
we are perfectly satisfied with the treatment given us in connection with the parade." 

Governor Bartlett of New Hampshire was enthusiastic in his praise of the 
marching men. "It was splendid; never have I seen troops so uniformly military 
in their bearing. The parade was a wonderful exemplification of the training the 
men have had and spoke wonders for their ability to assimilate the instruction given 
them. Massachusetts and Boston have treated us wonderfully." 

"That word 'wonderful' tells the whole story," said Governor Milliken of Maine. 
"The arrangements were perfect and were carried out with a precision no one 
could have expected. No words of mine could possibly do justice to the boys — 
their marching spoke for them. They were great." 

"They all looked good to me," said Governor Holcomb of Connecticut, "and 
the Connecticut boys were certainly as good as any in the parade. We are proud of 
them and of every man in the Yankee Division, and we are grateful, especially to 
Governor Coolidge, for the splendid manner in which the parade was handled." 



416 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



1 

I Chronological History of the Yankee Division f 

? t 

I . ? 



i I 

? August 22, 1917 — Division organized in Boston from units of Na- ? 

I tional Guard troops of New England states and a quota of National f 

I Army troops from Camp Devens. • ' 

t September 7, 1917 — First of division sailed from Hoboken, N. J. ? 

I September 21, 1917 — First of division landed at St. Nazaire, ? 

I France. • 

? October 31, 1917 — Division arrived and established headquarters ? 

? at Neuchateau. ? 

I February 5, 191S— Battery A, 101st Field Artillery, of the division, i 

I took position on the line and at 3.45 o'clock, for the division, fired the | 

t first shot by the National Guard in the war. ? 

I February 6, 1918 — Division entered front line, north of Soissons, f 

I in the Chemin des Dames sector. • 

t ]\iarch 21, 1918 — Division withdrew from front line. 

? April 3, 1918— Division entered front line north of Toul, in the 

I La Reine and Boucq sector. 

; June 28 — Division withdrew from front line. 

July 10, 1918 — Division entered front line northwest of Chateau- 
Thierry, in the Pas Fini sector. 

July IS, 1918— Division took oiifensive at Chateau-Thierry and 
July lS-25 advanced 17.5 kilometers. 

t July 25, 1918 — Division withdrew from front line. 

? September 8, 1918— Division entered front line north of St. Mihiel, 

• in the Rupt and Troyon sector. 

4 September 12, 1918— Division took offensive in St. Mihiel salient 

t .n.nd September 12, 13, advanced 14 kilometers. 

I October 18, 1918— Division withdrew from front line. 

I October 18, 1918 — Division entered front line north of Verdun, in 

I the Neptune sector, the same day taking the offensive, and October 

I 18 to November 11, advanced 5.5 kilometers. 

? November 14, 1918 — Division withdrew from the front line, armis- 

• tice having been signed November 11. ? 
I November 23, 1918— Division went into rest area at Montigny-le- ? 
I Roi, there to await orders for return home. ? 
I ATarch 27. 1919 — First of the division sailed from Brest, for home, • 
I aboard the transport Mt. Vernon. | 
f April 4, 1919— First of the division reached Boston— home. | 

• April 22, 1919 — Divisional review at Camp Devens. | 
I April 2.'!, 1919— Last of the division reaches home, coming into ? 
t Boston on the U. S. battleship New Jersey. ? 
I April 25, 1919 — Division parades in Boston. • 



Major General Clarence R. Edwards 



Born Cleveland, Ohio, January 1, 1860. 

Graduated United States Military Academy, 1883. 

Has honorary degree of A. M. and LL.D. from St. John's, Ford- 
ham, where he was military instructor. 

Married Bessie Rochester Porter, June 11, 1889, Niagara Falls, 
N. Y. 

Commissioned second lieutenant, 10th infantry, on graduation. 
West Point. 

Frontier service for several years. 

Major, United States Volunteers, May 12, 1898. 

Lieutenant Colonel, United States Volunteers, August IT, 1899. 

Mustered out of Volunteers' service, July 2, 1901. 

Brigadier General, United States Army, June 30, 1906. 

Major General, United States Army, August 5, 1917. 

Chief of Staff for General Lawton in the Philippines. Partici- 
pated in all of Lawton's campaigns and brought back to the United 
States the body of his chief. 

Chief of the Bureau of Insular Affairs, Washington, July 1, 1902, 
to May 12, 1912. 

Later commanded 2d Brigade, Texas City, Hawaiian Brigade and 
Panama Canal Zone troops. 

Appointed Commander Northeastern Department, April 30, 1917. 

Made Commander 26th Division, made up of National Guard units 
of New England states, August 22, 1917. 

Sailed for France with this division, September 7, 1917. 

Commanded division in all of its engagements up to October 24, 
1918, when he was relieved and ordered home to a command at Camp 
Lee, Va. 

Never took latter command ; ordered' to resume his old command 
at Boston, as head of the Northeastern Department, November 30, 
1918. 

Returned to Boston, November 24, 1918. Guest of state and city 
at the Edwards Day celebration in this city, November 26, 1918. 



418 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



Major General Clarence R. Edwards 




Maj.-Gen. Clarence R. Edwards observed New Year's 
day, 1860, by being born in Cleveland, Ohio. He is, however, 
of New England stock. He was graduated from West Point 
in 1883 and was commissioned a lieutenant in the 23d cavalry. 
During the Spanish war he served as a brevet major, and af- 
terwards in the Philippines was rapidly breveted lieutenant- 
colonel, colonel and brigadier-general for gallantry in the field. 
He organized the bureau of insular affairs and then was sent 
to command the troops at Panama. When war was declared 
with Germany he was in command of the Department of the 
Northeast, from which we went to France with the 26th di- 
vision. To him went the credit of landing the first complete 
militia division in France. Shortly before the armistice, he 
was relieved and returned to this country, but when the Yan- 
kee division returned home he again was made its commander. 



General Harry C. Hale 




Harry C. Hale was born in Galesburg, 111., July 10, 1861. 
He was commissioned in the regular army in 1879 on gradua- 
tion from West Point. He served as a captain in the Spanish 
war and afterwards, during Philippine campaigns, was pro- 
moted to major. He became a lieutenant-colonel in 1911 ; col- 
onel in 1915. When the war with Germany came, he was 
sent to China. While in the Orient he received his commis- 
sion as a brigadier-general, which was followed soon after 
by promotion to major-general. In 1918 he was sent to France 
and there relieved Brig.-Gen. Bamford in command of the 
26th division, just a short time after the armistice. He had 
charge of the division during the trying months preceding the 
armistice and got the unit in shape for the return home. He 
is a warm friend of Maj.-Gen. Edwards. It is said of Gen- 
eral Hale that he writes his mother every day. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



419 



General John H. Sherburne 




John H. Sherburne is a typical New Englander. He was 
born in Boston, and like a conventional Bostonese, attended 
Harvard, from which he graduated in 1899. After graduation 
he entered politics and became a representative in the Great 
and General Court. He served on the military affairs com- 
mittee year after year, and did much good work as a com- 
mitteeman. His first connection with the army came when 
he enlisted as a private in battery A, 1st Massachusetts field 
artillery, March 24, 1896. He was rapidly promoted through 
successive ranks as lieutenant, captain, major, lieutenant-col- 
onel and finally became colonel. When the 101st field artil- 
tery was formed he was made its commanding officer. He 
did so well during the early days of the war that he was made 
a brigadier-general and was given command of the 51st artil- 
lery brigade of the 26th division. Like most of the higher 
militia officers of the division, he saw service at the Mexican 
border. 



Brigadier General Charles H. Cole 





Charles H. Cole has held some of the most important of- 
fices in the state. He was born in South Boston, October 
20, 1871, and was graduated from the English high school, 
where he was commander of the school cadets. He entered 
the 1st corps Cadets in 1890, and worked up until he became 
a major of the corps. Governor Douglas appointed him in- 
spector of rifle practice in 1905 for all the state militia. 
Shortly after he became a police commissioner of Boston, but 
resigned during the Curley regime. During the Mexican 
trouble he was adjutant-general for the state. In the follow- 
ing year he ran for the Democratic nomination for governor. 
When the war with Germany broke out he enlisted in the 
9th infantry, M. V. M., as a private, and speedily was pro- 
moted to captain. Then he was made brigadier-general and 
was put in command of the 52d infantry brigade.. 



420 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 



Colonel Robert E. Goodwin 




Col. Robert E. Goodwin was born in historic Concord and, 
like the men of '75, he has always been on the job when his 
country needed soldiers. He received his education at Har- 
vard, from which he was graduated in 1901, and from the 
Boston University law school. At Harvard he was a 'var- 
sity oarsman during his senior year. Always a good student, 
he applied his knowledge to the afifairs of the militia, so that 
when this war started and his commander. Colonel Sherburne, 
became a brigadier-general, he became colonel of the 101st 
field artillery. To him has been given the credit for origina- 
tion of "the intuition barrage," which was nothing but the 
laying down of a barrage because the colonel believed the 
Huns were about to attack, and wanted to stop them, although 
he had no information of the attack. He has been decorated 
until his chest, when he is dressed up, looks like Joseph's 
coat. 



Colonel Edward L. Logan 




Edward L. Logan of South Boston comes from a fight- 
ing family. His father before him was commander of the 
old 9th Massachusetts infantry, and later became Gen. Law- 
rence A. Logan. Edward L. Logan is now forty-four years 
of age. He was graduated from Harvard in 1898, served as 
a sergeant major in the Spanish war under his father. After 
the war he entered the Harvard Law School, from which he 
was graduated in 1902. He entered politics, was elected suc- 
cessively to the city council, the House of Representatives 
and the state Senate. All this time he was rising in the mili- 
tia, until, when the Mexican troubles broke out, he was colo- 
nel of the "Fighting 9th." At the outbreak of the war in 
1917 he became commander of the 101st infantry, of which the 
9th was the nucleus. He has held this position since, except 
for the brief period after his removal because of charges 
which never were substantiated. 

\ 



HoLTOKE In The Great War. 



421 



Colonel George W. Bunnell 




George \V. Bunnell was born in Oakland, Cal., forty-four 
years ago. He was a West Pointer by education, but resigned 
his commission after the Spanish war and left the 4th artil- 
lery, with which he had been stationed, to enter business. 
For some time he was connected with the New York militia, 
holding various ranks until, in 1912, he was chief of the en- 
gineer division of the Empire state national guard. He re- 
signed to come to Massachusetts, where he became president 
of the Power Construction Company, making his home in 
Worcester. At the outbreak of the war he was found as com- 
mander of the 101st engineers, composed of what had been 
the 1st corps Cadets. He organized his regiment into one of 
the most efficient engineer detachments in the A. E. F. His 
troops served not only as engineers, but on numerous occa- 
sions forsook their spades for rifles and took their places as 
combat troops. 



Colonel Frank M. Hume 




Col. Frank M. Hume is a "down-Easter." He was born 
in Bridgewater, Me., but lived most of his life in Houlton, 
Me. He enlisted in the 2d Maine infantry for the Spanish 
war, after he had completed his education at Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y. He was graduated from Spanish war as a captain. 
After that he continued service with the ]Maine militia and 
gradually won promotion until, at the outbreak of the Mexi- 
can trouble, he was a colonel. When the war with Germany 
came, he held his rank and was placed in command of the 
103d infantry, a regiment composed of the old 2d Maine in- 
fantry and the old 1st New Hampshire infantry. Colonel 
Hume's services with this regiment won him the croix de 
guerre after the battle of Seicheprey. Like Colonel Logan he 
was removed from his command at the time of the armistice, 
but also like Colonel Logan, he later was reinstated, and the 
charges against him proved groundless. 



422 



HoLYOKE In The Great Wak. 



General George H. Shelton 




Although a regular army man Gen. George H. Shelton is 
another New Englander and "fits" with the Yankee division. 
He was born in Connecticut and graduated from West Point 
in 1896. During the Spanish war he served as a second lieu- 
tenant of the 11th infantry. In 1901 he was made a captain 
in the 25th infantry. In 1908 he became a major and was 
transferred to the bureau of insular affairs, which had been 
organized by Maj.-Gen. Clarence R. Edwards. At the begin- 
ning of the war with Germany he was made lieutenant-col- 
onel, replacing Col. William C. Hayes of Springfield in com- 
mand of the 104th infantry after the regiment had reached 
France. This command came, however, only after mer- 
itorious service as chief of staff for General Edwards. For 
the good work of the 104th, Colonel Shelton was made briga- 
dier-general of the 51st infantry brigade. 



Chaplain Michael J. O^Connor 




The Rev. Father Michael J. O'Connor was born in Ire- 
land, July 12, 1869, and came to this country when a boy. 
He attended the local schools and Holy Cross College. He 
enlisted as a private in the 9th infantry in 1890. Later he be- 
came chaplain of the same regiment. He was ordained to the 
priesthood December 22, 1901, and was first assigned to the 
parish of St. Peter's church, Rutland, Vt. He was recalled 
to this diocese and became rector of St. Patrick's Church, 
Stoneham. In 1905 he was assigned to St. Francis de Sales' 
church, Roxbury, a pastorate he held when he became chap- 
lain of the 9th in 1907, and continued to hold when he went 
to the Mexican border with the regiment and when he went 
to France with the 101st infantry. He later was made chap- 
lain of the 26th division. Chaplain O'Connor is known as 
"the fighting chaplain," and has lived up to the name. He 
particularly likes to remember that he first was in the militia 
as a private. 



In Flanders Fields 



In Flanders fields the poppies blow 
Between the Crosses, row on row, 
That mark our place ; and in the sky 
The larks, still bravely singing, fly. 
Scarce heard amidst the guns below. 

We are the dead. 
Short days ago Ave lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, 
Loved and were loved, and now we lie 

In Flanders fields. 

Take up our quarrel with the foe. 
To you from falling hands we throw the torch. 
Be yours to hold it high. 
If ye break faith with us who die 
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow 
In Flanders fields. 

— By Lt. Col. John McCrae, of Montreal, 
Whose Body Lies in Flanders Fields. 



Additions to the Honor Roll 






Lieut. H. A. DAGENAIS Tester JAMES PETRIE 




Corp. JOHN J. KELLY Storekeeper P. HEALEY 





Corp. J AS. A. FITZGERALD Gun. Mate M. J. McKILLOP 





Priv. JOHN CARLOW Piiv. ALBERT GENDRON 





Priv. EDWARD GADBOIS Piiv. WM. HENDERSON 





liv. JAMES (;UW 



Sign. WAItlili-N K. TILBE 





Priv. CHARLES VERHEYN Priv. GEORGE G. CLARKE 





Priv. A. W. BLUTEAU Priv. FRANK J. FOSTER 





Priv. FRANCIS P. BROWNE Priv. WM. O. GILLETTE 





^ 



i ii^ii& 

'^' 




student K. L. SMALL Priv. MARTIN J. GINLEY 




Priv. JAMES F. MARTIN Student CHARLES LYONS 






Priv. JAMES M. COBURN Priv. JOHN J. PADDEN 






Piiv. RICHARD SJHTH Priv. H. J. SULLIVAN 




Priv. JOSEPH H. LARIVEE Priv. CHARLES R. TOWER 



mM 




Priv. JOHN MacINNIS Priv. JAMES M. HAYDEN 





Priv. EDMUND A. MARION Piiv. JAMES E. SHEA 

EUGENE BINGLER, United States Guards. 

Entered the service in 1892, serving in Cuba and the Philippines. Wounded m 
the Philippine Islands. Retired on pension. Enlisted in great war in April, 1917, 
entering United States Guards. Killed in automobile accident in Newark, N. J.,. 
March 30, 1919. 



The Empty Chair 



Wherever is an empty chair — \ 

Lord, be Thou there ! | 

And fill it — like an answered prayer — t 

With grace of fragrant thought, and rare ? 

Sweet memories of him whose place I 

Thou takest for a little space ! — | 

- — With thought of that heroical * 

Great heart that sprang to Duty's call; I 

— With thought of all the best in him, | 

That Time shall have no power to dim; t 

—With thought of Duty nobly done, I 

And High Eternal Welfare won. | 



Think ! Would you wish that he had stayed, 
When all the re'st The Call obeyed? 
— That thought of self had held in thrall 
His soul, and shrunk it mean and small? 

Nay, rather thank the Lord that he 
Rose to such height of chivalry ; 
— That, with the need, his loyal soul 
Swung like a needle to its pole ; 
— That, setting duty first, he went 
At once, as to a sacrament. 

i 

So, Lord, we thank Thee for Thy Grace, ? 

And pray Thee fill his vacant place ! | 

— From ''All's Well,'' by John Oxenham. 



Company D Returns Home 



The handful of Co. D, "Holyoke's Own," who returned today (April 28, 1919), 
after eighteen months' active service in France, was given the biggest welcome in 
the history of the city. Thousands of people turned out to greet them and the streets 
through which the boys marched was jammed with humanity. There were greet- 
ings of every kind, bells rang, whistles blew, sirens shrieked and people shouted 
themselves hoarse, in an effort to show the lads that their war record was appre- 
ciated. At the banquet in the Nonotuck there were all kinds of expressions of 
welcome. 

As early as 2.30 people started seeking advantageous positions along the line of 
march. They waited patiently until after six o'clock to see the heroes. Shortly be- 
fore three o'clock a mill engineer got his signals crossed and started blowing his 
whistle. This brought out hundreds of people, who once securing a position, held 
it against all odds. At five twenty-five the fire alarm sounded the official thirty 
minute notice of the coming of the automobile fleet, but it was nearly an hour be- 
fore the machines arrived. 

A half dozen Co. D boys, who had been in the city for some time, arrived at 
the South Holyoke Engine House in an automobile. People thought they were the 
first to return from Devens and they were given a mad ovation. The police platoon 
which had been waiting at the corner of Main and Sargeant streets, formed into 
position and came marching up. Shortly after, the first machine from the camp 
arrived. In it was Lieut. Col. Alfred F. Foote, Capt. E. J. Slate and Lieut. William 
H. McGarry and others. The other machines followed the first car closely. 

It was at the request of the committee in charge of the affair that the soldiers 
got out of the machines and marched along the route. It had been first planned 
that they Vv'ere to ride. The parade formation was simple. First came a platoon 
of police in charge of Sergt. John Moriarty, followed by Co. D, led by Lieut. Col. 
Foote, Capt. Slate and Lieut. McGarry. Behind "Holyoke's Own" were members of 
the 101st Engineers, while a fleet of autos brought up the rear. 

A regiment could not have received a bigger welcome in Holyoke than was 
given those half-hundred battle scarred vets. Although mere boys as to age, they 
were men in experience. There were but a few who did not wear the wound stripe ; 
some had two, and others wore the Croix de Guerre or Distinguished Service Medal, 
while others had received citations for bravery under fire. 

There was barely enough room in the streets for the soldiers to pass through. 
Everyone wanted to shake hands with the boys at once. Girls threw confetti, candy 
and cigarettes. 

As the parade passed the Central Fire Station the boys saw every piece of ap- 
paratus out near the doors, and firemen turning the sirens. The noise drowned out 
every other bit of noise in the vicinity. 

In the front of the Soldiers' Memorial Tablet the men were drawn up facing 
the tablet and standing at attention, while the crowd stood bareheaded, the City 
band played the "Star Spangled Banner." President William M. Hart of the Board 
of Aldermen was the only speaker at the Memorial Tablet exercises. He read a 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 431 

telegram of welcome from Mayor Ryan who is away on his honeymoon. President 
Hart said : "Holyoke is proud of you. It is useless for me to try and put into 
words what your efforts have meant to the city. We are standing here in the 
midst of the living and the dead, and it is as a tribute to your qualities that this 
demonstration is made. You exemplify in life what these poor boys do in death, 
because God knows that you were in the Valley of Death, not once but hundreds of 
times. I pledge you, Holyoke will not forget its brave heroes." 

The tables in the large ballroom of the Nonotuck were artistically arranged 
in the form of Co. D. The "O" was inside the "C" and at this round table were 
the ranking officers present. Around the "C" were the guests, while the Co. D boys 
sat around the "D" table. 

Alderman William Hayes, chairman of the committee in charge, was the toast- 
master and opened the banquet by calling on Rev. J. C. Sycamore for a prayer. 
The chaplain offered prayers for those boys who died in France and prayers of 
thanksgiving for those who have returned. 

During the evening Corp. Edward F. Murphy of Fitchburg, a Co. D boy who 
was wounded in action, decorated with the Distinguished Service Medal and rec- 
ommended for the Congressional Medal of Honor, walked down the banquet hall 
to meet Congressman Allen T. Treadway. He was recognized and given a great 
ovation. 

There were exactly 152 soldiers and friends present and entertainment was 
furnished by the hotel jazz band, the K. of C. trio, composed of Roy, Roache and 
Walter, and the Male Art Quartet, composed of Arthur Lj'nch, Norman Dash, Ed- 
ward F. Gilday and John Cox. Several soldiers played the piano. 

Congressman Treadway was the first speaker and after stating that he was be- 
ginning to believe that his domicile was in Holyoke, he paid a glowing tribute to the 
Holyoke boys of the 26th Division, whom he bade God-speed a year ago last Septem- 
ber, when they were leaving for France. He told how out of the 120 local men in 
the company of 250 men that proudly marched out of the city, but one-third 
marched back. "The other two-thirds," he said, '"are scattered, and some lie buried 
over yonder. Our first thoughts, therefore, are for them. There are thoughts 
of happiness and thoughts of sadness here tonight." 

The speaker said in part as follows : 

"I cordially join in welcoming Co. D back home, and I feel justified as your 
representative in Congress to officially welcome you home. We are glad you are 
here. We thank you from the bottom of our hearts for what you have done for 
the country and for the world. The arms of the country are opened to receive you 
boys and the city of Holyoke welcomes you tonight. May the lessons and hard- 
ships you have endured in our behalf ever pay you full recompense for the dangers 
in doing, and may you ever realize that you have done your full duty, both as cit- 
izens and as soldiers, and that Holyoke and the couVitry at large wishes you all 
manner of future success, happiness and the best of good health. 

"It was my privilege to bid you God-speed at a banquet in this hall less than 
two years ago. The hall that night was packed with soldiers. Tonight the letter 
*D' formed by the tables is sufficient to seat those who have returned. One-third 
of you are back tonight; two-thirds are scattered. Many are buried in France, 
and there are thoughts of sadness here tonight. 

"The country entered into a solemn obligation with you men that we would 
take care of those you left behind. We have done that, and we will continue to 
do it. There have been mistakes made in reference to insurance, allotments, etc., 
but all these things will sooner or later be straightened out. There are some dis- 



432 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

crepancies in the war risk insurance law as enacted, but Congress will see to it that 
these are stricken out and that justice will be given every boy, and those dependent 
upon him." 

Congressman Treadway paid tributes to General Edwards, Colonel Foote, Cap- 
tain Slate and to the men in the ranks. He also paid a tribute to the wonderful 
work done by the women in the last two and a half years. 

Holyoke's ranking army officer, Lieut. Col. Alfred F. Foote, gave some vivid 
impressions of what the 104th Infantry and especially the boys of Co. D did over 
there. He held his audience spellbound, not so much by his eloquence, but by the 
truths of his statements. He said in part as follows: 

"We appreciate the welcome home given us by the country, by Massachusetts, 
and by our beloved city of Holyoke. When I see the 104th fading away there is a 
tug at my heartstrings. We are homesick and lonesome. All the joy of home- 
coming has a touch of sadness. We cannot forget the past. Everywhere we turn 
we see it. As I looked back over the company, coming up the hill to the City Hall 
it struck me hard to see the small handful of men we were bringing back compared 
with the 250 we took away. Some of those that were not in line are still living, 
but a lot of them are not. Some day when things get straightened out, I want to 
meet the fathers and mothers of Holyoke so I may tell them of what their boys 
did. 

'"It was wonderful to see these kids, as I call them, go up against the Boche, 
saying, 'I am a better man than you are.' At the Apremont front the 104th threw 
down the gauntlet and said, 'We are ready.' The enemy attacked, but they did 
not get through. I believe it was right there, one year ago this month, that the 
Boche first found the temper of the steel of the American soldier's bayonet. If 
you ever go to France, go to Vignon, on the road to St. Mihiel, where you will see 
sixty white crosses — your boys of Western Massachusetts, who held the Boche. 
Sixty of them made the supreme sacrifice then and there. 

"The boys you sent out were willing to do anything, no matter what it was. 
There was but one thing that bothered them, 'Why stay here, let's go forward.' 
General Edwards wanted to send his division through, but the French High Com- 
mand knew the time had not yet come. We went into Belleau Woods for ten 
days. It was hell.. The boys will never forget it. The 104th lost 142 men just 
holding the Woods. No man will forget, who was there on the morning of the 
18th of July, last year, when we were sent across the wheat fields, over into the 
valley near the railroad. The 104th taught the Boche we could do more than de- 
fend. We took the offensive. I told two or three non-commissioned officers that 
the next morning they were to have an opportunity to avenge the death of their 
comrades. Co. D went over the top at 4.25 that next morning, and I think there 
is not a man of Co. D but who is satisfied that revenge was taken. For five days 
it was attack after attack. At the end of five days, there were 2,000 casualties 
out of 3,200 men. General Edwards then wanted to get into the town of Epieds. He 
told me to go ahead with the 104th. We went that night. We brought out of 
Epieds a broken 104th. The regiment was re-established. In fact, the 26th Division 
was replaced four times in all. 

"This impression was imbedded into the minds of all, 'that in this struggle 
for liberty, the indivdual counts for very little. If you or I or he dies it matters 
very little. It is how you or I or he dies that matters.' 

"We are glad it is all over, as you are. We have known all the while you 
were behind us. We smoked your cigars, K. of C. ; we ate your candy, Jewish 
Welfare Society; we ate your doughnuts, Salvation Army; we wore your socks. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 433 

Red Cross; we enjoyed your entertainments and danced with your girls, Y. M. 
C. A. ; we took in the whole show/' 

Judge Thomas J. Lynch, representing Mayor John D. Ryan, spoke as follows: 
"We all remember when Company D went away, brave, courageous and up- 
right. They went away because civilization was at stake. They have more than 
made good. They surely have played a wonderfully big part in making the world 
safe for democracy. 

"The touch of sadness is felt for those who are not coming back, but they 
hallowed the soil of France with noble sacrifice. 

"Holyoke welcomes you boys back. The hearts of all of us swell up with pride 
for the deeds, you have done. We wish you every success as you re-enter civilian 
life. Holyoke was always behind you. Holyoke has never failed in any undertak- 
ing. While you were across 'she was willing to do her part, and she did it well. 
There is still a finishing task ahead, to put over the Victory loan, but Holyoke will 
again do her full part and will 'finish the job.'" 

Judge Lynch then read the following message from the mayor : 
"Valiant soldiers, I wish to express to you the deep pride we feel in the fame 
and renown you have achieved on the battlefields of France. We watched your 
progress during the war and prayed for your success. You never failed. You 
did not disappoint our highest hopes and how truly can we say you fought a good 
fight. You have kept the faith. 

"Holyoke is proud of her sons and the part they have taken in this war. In 
proportion to her population and resources, she has not been surpassed by any 
community in the country. Her sons in the army and navy have done their duty 
and her citizens, men and women at home, have never faltered in the obligations 
which they owe her. 

"Two years have almost elapsed since you left our midst, strong, sturdy and 
courageous. Your ranks have become thinner, and many of your comrades have 
fallen by the way, having made the supreme sacrifice. They died for their coun- 
try and what greater sacrifice could any man make than to offer his life on the 
altar of his country. 'Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori,' as the Latin poet 
has said, 'Sweet and beautiful to die for one's country.' 

"We welcome you home and extend to you the hand of friendship and sin- 
cerity. You are to take your accustomed places among your fellow citizens who 
will ever be mindful of the great work you have done. The war is behind you 
and the lesson of loyalty and patriotism and the high ideals which have been im- 
pressed upon your minds are something that you can never lose. Selfishness never 
marked your paths. It was a patriotic duty that you undertook and you have the 
thanks of a grateful people, 

"Veterans of the world war, young men, nevertheless veterans, you have nobly 
undergone all the trials, tribulations and sorrows in the performance of your duty. 
Indeed, you are the orators this evening, it matters little who may be the speakers. 
Holyoke will ever honor and cherish your brave and unselfish deeds." 

Other speakers were : Rev. R. R. Wicks, who spent six months in France 
with the Y. M. C. A.; Dr. E. P. Bagg, Jr., representing the Holyoke Chapter of 
the American Red Cross ; P. J. Hinds, representing the Holyoke Council, Knights 
of Columbus ; William A. Morse, representing the Holyoke Y. M. C. A., and J. L. 
Barowsky, representing the Holyoke Jewish Welfare Board. Captain E. J. Slate, 
who left Holyoke as commander of Company D, and who came home as com- 
mander of the Supply Company of the regiment, said that he was proud of both 
his companies ; Lieutenant Wallace A. Choquette, who left Holyoke as first lieu- 
28 



434 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

tenant of Company D, and who was transferred to the Tank Corps, and Lieutenant 
William McGarry, who left Holyoke as a sergeant of Company D, and who was 
promoted to a lieutenant in France. 

Chairman Hayes read the following letter: 

"It is a source of great regret that I cannot be with you tonight to welcome 
our boys who have done such valiant service for God and humanity. I remember 
well the dinner we gave them just before leaving. The enthusiasm of the affair 
and the confidence expressed in our men. That confidence was not misplaced, the 
men did their work. That for which they fought was won. 

"JOSEPH A. SKINNER." 

At the head table were the following guests : Congressman Treadway, 
Rev. R. R. Wicks, Frank B. Towne, Capt. Thomas Rae, Jr., Dr. George C. Roberts, 
John J. Lynch, William M. Hart, George A. Savoy, William J. W^alsh, E. N. White, 
Thomas J. Lynch, Rev. J. C. Sycamore, Dr. E. P. Bagg, Jr., and William Hayes. 

The aldermanic committee in charge of the affair was composed of Alderman 
Hayes, chairman; Aldermen P. J. Kane, David Matthews, Daniel E. Riley and 
William Skillings. 

Lieut. Col. Alfred F. Foote, 26th Division Inspector; Capt. E. J. Slate, regi- 
mental supply officer, 104th Infantry; Lieut. Wallace A. Choquette, Tank Corps; 
Lieut. William H. McGarry, 104th Infantry; Color Sergt. Alfred A. Choquette, 
104th Infantry; Sergt. Major Francis Dowd, 104th Infantry; Band Sergt. William 
Wruck, Headquarters, 104th Infantry. 

Company D— Sergt. Andrew Birnie, Sergt. Archie Pairdee, Sergt. Richard 
Stapley, Mess Sergt. Albert Hotin, Sergt. Henry LeGrand, Corp. Walter Scott, 
Corp. Harold C. Burnett, Corp. Howard Lancour, Corp. Joseph Dion, Corp. Albert 
L'Heureux, Corp. Isadore Hooper, Corp. Henry Brown, Corp. Byron Squires, 
Sergt. E. J. Gorham, Bugler Edward J. Fay, Bugler George Boldway; Privates 
Ernest Roy. Raymond Therrien, Herman Gagnon, Frank Lucey, Alfred Laplante, 
Henry Richard, George A. Hooker, Hector Fountain, Joseph O'Connor, John 
O'Connor, Raymond Cray, Romeo Sawyer, Alfred Cliche, Louis Chevalier, Wil- 
fred Lavallee, Paul Stec, Thomas Collins, Stephen Musante, Philip Daunheimer, 
Arthur Breen, William F. Murray, Thomas J. Kennedy, Raymond Fuller, Jeremiah 
Dillon, Robert A. Sheehan, Timothy Flaherty, Walter Mevas, Adam Kronick, 
William Lyons, Frank J. Bowe, Albert F. Leoffler, Fred Glens, Alfred Brouillett. 
Co. B, 104th Infantry— Private Rene Chretien. 

Co. C, 101st Engineers (26th Division)— Corp. Frank A. Mittler, Mechanic 
Euclyde Baillargeon, Privates Charles O. Friedrich, Michael J. Lynch and Andrew 
C. Goddu. 



Decorations Matter of Luck 

Major General Robert Alexander, commanding the Liberty Division, says that 
being decorated is a matter of luck. He said : 

"Being decorated is largely a matter of luck. If you happen to do something 
and someone sees you and tells on you, then you stand a good chance of getting a 
decoration. 

"But if you do something and no one sees you and there is no one to tell on 
you, then you are out of luck and the chances are against your getting a decoration. 

"I believe that more men than I would care to number are worthy of decora- 
tions ; but were out of luck."' 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 435 

General Edwards' Farewell 

General Edwards' farewell to his men of the 26th Division: 

"From the earliest days of colonial history there has been a peculiar psychol- 
ogy and morale deep rooted in the New England character— a morale exemplified 
by a love of liberty and a sense of justice; a psychology which has run unbroken 
through the annals of the six states from which your division has been recruited. 

"The spirit that first brought the colonial, fathers to your shores was indomi- 
table in 1776. At Lexington your forefathers dropped their early avocations in 
the cause of freedom. In '61 your fathers in the 6th Massachusetts Infantry, re- 
sponded to Lincoln's call for volunteers and on the 19th of April the first blood in 
the Civil War was shed on the streets of Baltimore by men of Massachusetts. 

"When in this world crisis the call to arms blazoned forth, the same character- 
istics, which have ever made New England a Rock of Gibraltar for any righteous 
cause, flowered forth. 

"The men of the 26th Division who went overseas carried with them the tra- 
ditions of more than two centuries of stern purpose, and you who have now re- 
turned bring back untarnished the reputation bequeathed by your fathers. I am 
but a grandson of New England by birth and I can therefore with propriety say 
without prejudice to you and to the people of these six states who are assembled 
here today to see you that the blood of New England has not attenuated. You 
men here have brought back reputations which will shed upon the history of your 
states a glory which even '76 and '61 cannot dim. 

"I cannot adequately express in words the depths of my feelings in parting from 
you, nor the pride that it gives me to turn you back once more to those who sent 
30U forth on your world errand and to whose arms I now commend you. 

"I bid you farewell as soldiers, true and tried, and I wish you Godspeed on 
your career as civilians in the republic whose history you have adorned and beauti- 
fied by your deeds of heroism and sacrifice across the seas. 

"To one and all of you, my stout-hearted lads of the 26th, I say goodby and 
God bless vou !" 



General Cole's Farewell 

To THE Officers and Men of the 52d Infantry Brigade : 

You are tried veterans of the greatest war in history. Your courageous deeds 
are engraved on the tablets of y6ur country's fame. 

As long as these United States shall endure, your honor and glory shall be 
sung whenever the immortal names of Chemin des Dames, Apremont, Xivray, 
Bois de Belleau, Torcy, Etripilly Plateau, Chateau-Thierry, St. Mihiel. Riaville, 
Verdun, Meuse-Argonne are spoken or written. 

Our heroic dead lie in glorious France as our silent, sacred testimony that we 
have kept the faith. 

The ideals for which you fought will ever serve as an inspiration of loyalty 
and patriotism to the youth of x\merica. 

With a sadness that is indescribable, but with a heart beating with honor, 
pride and pleasure in your achievements, I bid you goodby, confident that in civic 
affairs you will make as absolutely and everlasting good as you did in battle. 

May God keep and bless you. 



436 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

General Hale's Farewell 

Maj.-Gen. Harry C. Hale gave out the following statement: 

"In response to a request from the press for a brief expression of appreciation 
of the 26th Division upon the eve of its demobilization, I take pleasure in saying 
that from the moment of my assumption of command to the present I have been 
loyally supported by the commissioned and enlisted personnel of the division in my 
efforts in its behalf. 

"Beginning with an impersonal interest, due solely to a sense of duty, I have 
come to possess a personal regard for the Yankee Division and a personal desire 
for its success. 

"It is with a feeling of satisfaction, therefore, that I see the division in its last 
days conducting itself so worthily, and it is with no disloyalty to my own, the 'Lin- 
coln Division,' where my affection lies deeply rooted, that I say goodby to the 26th 
Division with a sincere feeling of respect, good-will and friendship. 

"Harry C. Hai<e, 
"Major General, U. S. Army. 



Two Reviews— 1865-1919 

Back through the misty years, over a full half-century and more, to the days 
of the Grand Review of '65, the minds of a scattered handful of veterans go wan- 
dering today. They are veterans of another war, fought, not on foreign soil, but 
here at home — a war waged in the cause of downtrodden humanity, as this last 
war was waged. 

The Grand Review ! What memories the words recall. 

The great review of the 26th Division lasted but a few hours ; the Grand Re- 
view of '65 lasted two days. In 1919 18,000 men marched ; in '65 full 200,000 were 
in line. In 1919 there were but few horses; in '65 there were nearly 10,000. In 
1919, no mighty guns; in '65 the artillery of two powerful armies. 

First, on May 23, the Army of the Potomac, Gen. George G. Meade riding 
at its head, moved majestically down Pennsylvania avenue, past the Treasury 
building, and then along the flag-bedecked stand on the White House grounds, 
where President Johnson, General Grant and other notable leaders stood to review. 
The whole army was there, nearly 130,000 men with scores of rumbling batteries 
and regiment after regiment of cavalry. 

Next day came Sherman's host, the army that had made the famous "march 
to the sea" through Georgia, and had fought the Carolinas campaign. His "bum- 
mers" or foragers were there, their saddles and mule wagons loaded with pro- 
visions they had gathered through the countryside. And at the rear of each regi- 
ment flocked groups of negro refugees, who had joined the army in its march to 
the sea, and had followed it to freedom. 

Those who marched in that Grand Review, and those who witnessed it, never 
will forget. The Grand Review of 1865 will live forever in history. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War, 437 

New England Always First 

Minute Men of Massachusetts fired the shot heard 'round the world April 19, 
1775, offering the first resistance to British forces in the Revolution. 

The 6th Massachusetts Infantry was the first Northern regiment to shed its 
blood on Southern soil in '61, encountering. a mob while passing through Baltimore 
in answer to Lincoln's call for troops to guard the capital. 

The 2d Massachusetts Infantry was first of the National Guard regiments, 
with the 71st New York, on the firing line in Cuba. 

The 26th Division was the first American unit organized as a division in the 
United States and transported complete to France ; and it engaged in the first two 
battles in which Americans fought without the support of French infantry. 



TKen — and ~ Now 

Just a year ago today 

Who could hold the German line? 
Now the two-base hit is booming- 

In a pasture on the Rhine. 
Just a year ago this morning 

Prussian Guards were all alert. 
Now they're yelling "Slide" in Coblenz 

As the doughboy hits the dirt. 

When the doughboy hits the dirt 

With the Rhine mud on his shirt — 

And a year ago this morning they were winning: 

Now they stand by in a daze 

As we pull off double plays 

In a land that never knew a "seventh inning." 

Just a year ago today 

Who could check the Prussian blow? 
Now they're beating out a single 

Where the goose-step used to grow; 
Just a year ago this morning 

They were swarming into France ; 
Now we 're yelling ' ' Make 'im hit it ! " 

Where the Ulilan swung his lance. 

Where the Uhlan swung his lance 
For another drive in France, 
Oh, a year ago they revelled in the clover 
Now they wonder what we mean 
When some doughboy ducks his bean 
While the clan is yelping loudly, 
"Get 'it over!" 

— Grantland Rice. 



438 HoLYOKE In The Great AVar. 

Holyoke World War Veterans' Association 

On February 21, 1919, a meeting of honorably discharged service men was held 
in the State Armory, Holyoke, Mass. The meeting was not very well attended, 
but the men present were an enthusiastic bunch of workers and Major W. J. 
Crosier of the Spanish War Veterans' Association proposed that the service men 
present form an organization to include all honorably discharged soldiers, sailors 
c<nd marines who had served in the war against the Central Powers. Comrade 
Michael Scannell of the Spanish War Veterans' Association was chosen chairman 
pro tem. Resolutions were adopted that the organization about to be formed should 
be along the lines of comradeship and mutual help, all ex-service men, soldiers, sail- 
ors and marines to be eligible for membership whether they had served in this coun- 
try or abroad during the war with the Central Powers, and whether they had 
served in the United States Army or Navy or in the armies or navies of our allies. 

An election of officers was then held., William J. Foley, 293 Chestnut street, 
Holyoke, and William Stewart, 52 Franklin street, were unanimously elected presi- 
dent and secretary respectively. The election of a full board of officers was de- 
ferred so that others may be chosen as the organization progressed and its needs 
demanded. 

Motion carried that Major W. J. Crosier, Sergt. Melvin Snow and Comrade 
Michael Scannell of the United Spanish' W^ar Veterans' Association, be invited to 
co-operate in the work of organization. 

Motion carried that meetings be held until further notice in the Armory every 
Tuesday evening at 8 p. m. 

At a meeting held in the State Armory Tuesday, March 18, 1919, Frank E. 
Shea was elected commander of the Holyoke World War Veterans' Association; 
Frederick Childs, Sr., vice-commander, and William Stewart, adjutant. 

At a meeting held in the State Armory Tuesday, March 25, 1919, the following 
officers were added to the board : Junior vice-commander, James O'Donnell ; 
quartermaster, James Stalker ; paymaster, John Gordon ; officer of the day, Frank 
L. Connor ; officer of the guard, Michael Joseph Donoghue. The organization is 
progressing rapidly, and at date of writing this story, April 29, 1919, it now num- 
bers 580 members. 

Many of the members have served with distinction on the battlefields of Flan- 
ders, and each and every member of the organization has been a link in the chain 
which helped carry forward to a successful conclusion the war against the Central 
Powers. 

A band has now been organized, and I feel confident in predicting a great 
future for the Holyoke World War Veterans' Association. 

Many of the Company D men, "Holyoke's Own," have been added to our 
membership, and Lieut. Col. A. F. F'oote has forwarded to the organization a letter 
assuring us of his active interest and willingness to help in any possible way. 

WILLIAM STEWART, Adjutant. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 439 

Holyoke Ex-Service Men's Association 

With the spirit which so fittingly characterized the Fifth Victory Liberty Loan, 
'"Sure, We'll Finish the Job/' Holyoke assumed its responsibility during the days 
of demobilization and the beginning of the period of reconstruction in an heroic and 
common sense manner. 

The signing of the armistice necessarily brought temporary industrial depres- 
sion. The cry for "jobs" was heard on all sides by the returning soldiers. At once 
it was evident that no better service could be rendered our discharged soldiers 
than that of putting them again in some kind of economic employment. 

The j\Iayor of Holyoke, Hon. John D. Ryan, appointed a Citizens' Committee 
with George A. Savoy, Chairman; Major W. J. Crosier, Vice-Chairman, Lee H. 
Brow, Secretary; John M. James. Treasurer; John J. Lynch, Peter J. Hinds and 
John M. James, Housing Committee. In addition to the above, several public- 
spirited people served on the General Committee. The committee organized what is 
known as the Holyoke ex-Service Men's Association. The Housing Committee 
secured rooms in P. J. Meany's Block, 343 High street, where headquarters were 
opened. William Stewart, an ex-service man, was engaged to be secretary in charge 
of the rooms. Lip to the time of this writing, Mr. Stewart has been ably assisted 
by Arthur Beaudry, Jeremiah J. Dowd. and Henry C. Dowd. 

From the first the rooms have been the mecca for discharged soldiers, sailors 
and marines. Mr. Stewart in his own splendid way has been like a "Daddy" to 
hundreds of Holyoke's returned service men. 

The splendid spirit of unselfish co-operation on the part of the City of Hol- 
yoke, the Red Cross, the Young Women's Christian Association, the Knights of 
Columbus, the Young Men's Christian Association, scores of individuals and many 
business concerns makes possible the basis of the following detailed report, which 
covers the period from March 5, 1919 to April 28, 1919. The reader is asked to 
bear in mind that it is impossible to record every act of service. 

Steady employment secured for 195 men. 
. Temporary employment secured for 90 men. 

Free beds secured for SO men. 

Three men placed in furnished rooms. 

Meals provided free to 225 men. 

Transportation given to 60 men. 

Clothing provided for 54 men. 

Soldiers' families assisted and made self supporting. 

Fifty men were aided in taking up with the government matters pertaining to 
allotments, insurance and Liberty Bonds. 

Four hundred and twenty-five men were assisted in getting the $60.00 War 
Bonus. 

The foregoing indicates something of the answer the Holyoke ex- Service 
Men's Committee made to the passing need brought about as the result of the close 
of the war. At the time this is written the work is progressing to the growing sat- 
isfaction of the community. The city of Holyoke has authorized the existence 
of the association until the last man is at work again. Holyoke's record in the 
World War is one hundred per cent American, and is no less so during these days 
of new opportunity. Holyoke is justly proud of all her service men and through 
such agencies as the ex-Service Men's Association is endeavoring and with great 
success to show her appreciation for the valiant services so faithfully done. 

— Lee H. Brow, Secretary. 



What They Thought of the 26th Division 



In glorious fragments of the glorious story of the 26th Division — United States 
Army — the "Yankee Division" — New England's Own — "First to Fight" — has, in- 
deed, been told. Its brave achievements and the part it plajed in the winning of 
victory were too great and too vital long to remain in obscurity. Yet the news as 
carried by cable, under the censorship, necessarily was vague and inadequate as to 
many particulars. In fact it omitted whole chapters — or the true significance of 
whole chapters — of the 26th's career in the fighting in France. 

Specifically considered, the series of papers attached comprises no more than 
the citations of praise won by the Yankee Division as a whole, by the larger units 
of which, at various times, it formed a part, and by the constituent units of the 
Division itself. As such, however, it will be found to ofifer a fairly connected story 
and at all times a deeply revealing and compelling story of the activities and ex- 
ploits of the Division down all the bright but hard-fought and even terrible road of 
its travel from the day when, in the middle of March, it left the command of Gen- 
eral de Maud'huy of the Eleventh French Army Corps, under whom, for 46 days, 
it had been brigaded, and under whom it saw its first actual fighting, on through the 
brilliant brushes at Xivray and Seicheprey, and the smashing blows at Chateau- 
Thierry, when Foch began the victorious Allied offensive, and the American troops 
first became known for their full power, down to the part which the Division 
played in the sweeping reduction of the St. Mihiel salient and in operations on the 
north of Verdun. 

A RECORD RICH IN SIGNIFICANCE. 

And if most of the papers are strictly citations, these are not unaccompanied by 
orders of the day, by letters and comment of high commanding generals, and by 
marginal notations, which richly complete the record. But this record, whether 
official or private, is, from beginning to end, a chant of praise, and of praise not 
from the American officers only, but also and in particular from the French com- 
mand. In this connection it will be admitted that praise from the victors of the 
first battle of the Marne, when France stood almost alone against the brunt of the 
German forces, to the co-victors of the second battle of the Marne, when France 
had all civilization gratefully in arms at her side, is praise, indeed. 

In the course of the heroic tale many important new points and much new 
contributory evidence are brought out concerning the operations of all the armies. 
For instance. General Passaga's order of June IS, suggests very conclusively that 
even at that date the Allies' resolve to take the offensive in the near future was al- 
ready fixed. And of absorbing interest is the explanation given by General Blodiat, 
on October 5, of the fact that, although the American press after the success in the 
St. Mihiel sector was full of prognostications, grounded upon the news from the 
front, of a tremendous attack upon Metz, no such attack ever developed. As it now 
appears, the whole movement toward the big German stronghold was nothing more 
or less than a strategic feint. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 441 

PREVIOUS HISTORY OF THE DIVISION. 

Before coming at once to the documents themselves, it will, perhaps, be worth 
while to pause for but one thing else, and that is a quick review of the movements 
of the 26th Division from the days when it was formed, soon after the American 
declaration of war, to the date when the narrative of the citations begins. As- 
sembled, drilled and roughly prepared in New England, being largely composed, 
indeed, of former militia units of the New England States, the Division set sail 
for France, under the command of Major-General Clarence R. Edwards, at various 
dates during the month of September, 1917. Most of its units were disembarked at 
the port of Saint Nazaire, and all were in France by an early day in October. 

Immediately after arrival they were assembled southwest of Nancy with head- 
quarters at Neufchateau, and there they remained, undergoing all manner of train- 
ing and instruction, until February 1, 1918. It was then that they were disposed 
along the Toul sector, and brigaded under the command of General de Maud'huy, 
as before stated. There they had their initial experience of actual combat, and 
there they first met the Boche, although for a time at least parts of the Division 
were also posted along the Chemin des Dames. 

Shortly before the beginning of the German spring offensive, on March 18, 
they were withdrawn to their old training and rest billets near Neufchateau, for 
their normal period of relief; but with the onset of Ludendorf's first victorious 
rushes in Picardy they were immediately ordered back, after only two or three days 
in cantonments, to the active defence of the Toul sector, where they had formerly 
been engaged. It was for the period of service concluded just before this unex- 
pected incident in the Division's life that General de Maud'huy will be found ex- 
pressing his thanks in the first of the official citations which now ensue. 

GODSON LEAVES GODFATHER. 

The 26th Division, U. S. A., served under General de Maud'huy, whose corps 
was a part of the 6th French Army, for 46 days, from the 1st of February, 1918. 
The whole Division was in the general's line, distributed throughout his various 
divisions, and all had contact with the enemy. 

H. Q., March 15. 1918. 
nth Army Corps 
Staff— 1st Bureau. 

GENERAL ORDER NO. 7. 

We regret that our comrades of the 26th Division should leave us in order to 
fulfill their task elsewhere. 

We have been able to appreciate their bravery, their sense of duty and dis- 
cipline, also their frank comradeship ; they carry away our unanimous regrets. 

General Edwards has been pleased to consider the 11th Corps as godfather to 
the 26th Division ; the 11th Corps feels proud of the awarded honor, being sure that, 
wherever he may be sent, the godson shall do credit to the godfather. 

L. GENERAL DE MAUD'HUY, 

Commandant le lime Corps d'Armee. 



442 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

REGIMENTAL HONORS FOR THE 104TH. 

This citation from General Passaga, of the Eighth French Army, resulted in 
the decoration of the colors of the 104th Infantry with the Croix de Guerre, as well 
as 117 men of the 104th Infantry. 



H. Q., April 26th, 1918. 



32d Army Corps 

Staff. 



GENERAL ORDER NO. 737A. 

General Passaga, in command of the 32d Army Corps, mentions in the Army 
Corps' dispatches : 

104th Infantry Regiment, U. S. A., under command of Colonel G. H. Shelton : 
"For greatest fighting spirit and self-sacrifice during action of April 10th, 12th 
and 13th, 1918. Suffering from heavy bombardments and attacked by very strong 
German forces, succeeded in preventing their dangerous advance, and with greatest 
energy reconquered at the point of the bayonet the few ruined trenches which had 
been abandoned at the first onset, at the same time making prisoners." 

GENERAL PASAGA, 

Commanding 32d Army Corps. 

THE lOlST RAIDS CAMP DU MOULIN. 

This order of General Gerard expresses his congratulations to the lOlst In- 
fantry and other detachments of the 26th Division in the first raid of much magni- 
tude in the Toul sector, which was a distinct success. 

Army H. Q., June 8, 1918. 
Staff— 3rd Bureau. 
Vlllth Army 

SERVICE MEMORANDUM. 

The Commanding General of the Vlllth Army is happy to pronounce the suc- 
cess of the raid on the Camp du Moulin, carried out during the night of May 30-31, 
1918, by the lOlst Regiment of American Infantry. 

He requests the Commanding General of the 32d Army Corps to forward his 
congratulations for this operation, as well planned as it was energetically con- 
True Copy sent to Commanding General of the 26th American Division. 

Signed: GENERAL GERARD. 
32d Army Corps 
Staff— 3rd Bureau. 

True Copy sent to : Commanding General of the 26th American Division. 

The Commanding General of the 32d Army Corps is happy to forward the 
congratulations of the Commanding General of the Vlllth Army to the Command- 
ing General of the 26th American Division. 

H. Q., June 9, 1918. 
By Order of the Chief of Staff. 
Signed: E. MANGIN. 



HoLYOKE In The Great AVar. 443 

XIVRAY LOST— AND WON ! 

This citation refers to the attack of the Germans on Xivray-Marvoisn. Three 
platoons of the 103d Infantry, the Maine-New Hampshire Regiment, not only re- 
pulsed the attack but also gained about 50 prisoners, and practically wiped out 600 
or 700 of the enemy. Our troops were outnumbered about five or six to one. 

Vlllth Army Army H. Q., June 17, 1918. 

Staff — 3rd Bureau. 

SERVICE ^lEMORANDUM. 

In the course of a powerful raid carried out on June 16, about three o'clock, 
against the sector of the 26th American Division, the Germans penetrated the vil- 
lage of Xivray, which was evacuated by our combat group; everywhere else they 
were thrown back by the determined defence of the occupants, who stuck to their 
positions. 

Shortly afterwards, a counter-attack, vigorously carried out by elements from 
two American battalions, drove the Germans out of Xivray, leaving in our hands 
several prisoners, including an officer. 

The Commanding General of the Vlllth Army is happy to acknowledge the 
fine conduct of the American units in the course of this action; the spirit of init- 
iative and general grasp of the situation shown by the decisions of the commanders; 
the stubbornness in defending and sharpness in attacking shown by the participants. 

The Commanding General of the 32d Army Corps will be so good as to for- 
ward the compliments of the Commanding General of the Army to the Command- 
ing General of the 26th American Division, requesting the latter to congratulate, 
in the name of the Commanding General of the Army, the officers and men who 
took part in the action, for the fine soldierly qualities of which they have given 
proof. 

GENERAL GERARD. 
32d Army Corps 
Staff— 3rd Bureau. 
True Copy sent to Commanding General the 26th American Division. 

In forwarding the above Service Memorandum from the Commanding Gen- 
eral of the Vlllth Army, the Commanding General of the 32d Army Corps is happy 
to add his personal congratulations which, moreover, are the subject of General 
Order No. 131, forwarded to all the troops under his command. 

H. Q., June 18, 1918. 

By Order of the Chief of Staff. 

Signed: E. MANGIN. 

SEICHEPREY— JUNE 18 FORETELLS JULY 18. 

'This order is self-explanatory and refers to the 103d Infantry, the Maine and 
New Hampshire Regiment. 

Headquarters, June 18, 1918. 
Vlllth Army 
32d Army Corps 
Staff — 3rd Bureau. 

GENERAL ORDER NO. 131. 

On June 16, a strong detachment of 600 Germans, previously selected, rein- 
forced by units from an assault battalion, attacked at daylight', the front line of 



444 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

the 26th American Division, at Xivray, and between Xixray and Seicheprey. The 
enemy was everywhere thrown back by immediate counter-attacks, leaving numerous 
dead on the terrain and 10 prisoners, including one officer. 

This brilliant action does the greatest honor to the 26th Division, and partic- 
ularly to the 103d Regiment, Colonel Hume commanding. 

This operation shows the unquestionable superiority of the American soldier 
over the German soldier. It also gives an idea of all that may be expected of these 
magnificent troops when the Entente, in its turn, takes the offensive. 

GENERAL PASSAGA, 

Commanding the 32d Army Corps. 
Signed : PASSAGA. 
Official: The Chief of Staff. 
Sgd., Mangin. 

PERSHING ADDS HIS PRAISE. 

This is General Pershing's citation of the brilliant work of the 103d Infantry, 
the Maine and New Hampshire Regiment, Colonel Hume, which was commanded 
by General Passaga. 

General Headquarters, 
American Expeditionary Forces, 
Office of the Chief of Staff. 
June 20, 1918. 
From : Commander-in-chief 
To : Commanding General, 26th Division. 
Subject: 103d Regiment. 

1. I am directed by the commander-in-chief to inform you that he has noted 
with sincere appreciation the excellent work of the 103d Regiment of j^our Division, 
which inflicted severe losses in killed, wounded and prisoners in repelling the strong 
raid attempted by the enemy on the morning of June 16, 1918, on the Xivray sector. 

J. W. McANDREWS, 

Chief of Staff. 

PASSAGA BIDS THE DIVISION FAREWELL. 

The good-by general order of citation for the three months' work of the 
Division in the Toul sector with the 32d French Army Corps : 

Headquarters, June 27, 1918. 
Vlllth Army 
32d Army Corps 
Staff— 3rd Bureau. 

GENERAL ORDER NO. 133. 

At the moment when the 26th Division of Infantry of the United States is 
leaving the 32d French Corps, I salute its colors and thank it for the splendid 
service it has rendered here to the common cause. 

Under the distinguished command of their chief, General Edwards, the high- 
spirited soldiers of the "Yankee Division" have taught the enemy some bitter les- 
sons, at Bois Brule, at Seicheprey, at Xivray-Marvoisin ; they have taught him to 



HoLYOKE In The Great "War. 445 

realize the staunch vigor of the sons of the Great Republic, fighting for the world's 
freedom. 

My heartiest good wishes will accompany the "Yankee Division" always in its 
future combats. 

GENERAL PASSAGA, 

Commanding the 32d Army Corps. 
Signed: PASSAGA. 

THE 26TH TAKES UP A "CRITICAL SECTOR." 

This order was issued just as the Division took over the Chateau-Thierry sec- 
tor, with the knowledge of serious work ahead, as they anticipated the break 
through that came afterwards. 

Headquarters, 26th Division. 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
France, July 11, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 60. 

1. At the moment that the 26th Division takes up its position on its third sec- 
tor in three months it is fitting and proper that the Division commander should 
take this opportunity to thank and congratulate the officers and men of the Yankee 
Division on the record that they have achieved since the Division actively took its 
place in the fighting lines of the Allies for the common cause. 

2. You have been taken from a sector where, in three battles, you have shown 
that the blood of New England has not attenuated and that the same spirit and 
traditions which your forefathers made glorious at Lexington and at Bunker Hill 
still survive in the generation which, at Bois Brule, Seicheprey, Humbert Planta- 
tion and Xivray have met and defeated the picked troops of the enemy. His four 
years of experience in active warfare and the ferocity of his methods have not 
daunted you, and on every occasion where you have been called upon to face him 
you have distinguished yourself with notable valor and brought credit upon your 
Division and upon the people of New England, from which you have come to en- 
gage in this righteous conflict. 

3. A great honor has been conferred upon the whole Division, in that the 
French and American high command has at this time picked your Division to come 
into this critical sector. That j'ou have been so hurried to this sector is the evidence 
to you all of the opinion of the high command of the mettle of which this Division 
is constituted. 

4. The past months in battle have brought men and officers into that close 
union of confidence and affection which has resulted in the growing morale of this 
Division. Looking back on the past four months with its spotless record and 
known achievements which have been recognized by both France and America, it is 
with unqualified faith in the future and pride of the past that I see the 26th Di- 
vision go into a new sector, certain in my conviction that the men of New England 
will prove once more that they are capable of every effort and every sacrifice which 
the future may demand of them. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding. 



446 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

DEGOUTTE DESCRIBES CHATEAU-THIERRY. 

American Expeditionary' Forces, 
France, July 28, 1918. 

The following is General Degoutte's marginal comment given to the French 
press after the advance of the 26th Division at Chateau-Thierry in the second battle 
of the Marne. 

If one wants to judge the offensive spirit which animates the Americans and 
their tactical methods, one has only to follow in the beginning of our counter- 
attack between Chateau-Thierry and Soissons. 

It was on the 18th at 4 a. m. that the order to take the first line of German 
positions was received. The American division, whose movements we will 
relate, was at that time northwest of Chateau-Thierry, in the Bois de Belleau, at 
the pivot of the Degoutte army. This division was made up of a division which 
took part in the operations of Belleau and Bouresches, and it wanted to distinguish 
itself as well as those elite troops. But the divisions placed at the pivot have to 
advance slowly, according to the progress made by the wings. 

On the very first day it was necessary to moderate the ardor of the Americans, 
who would willingly have gone farther than the first objectives. Indeed, at the 
signal of the attack, the American troops went with perfect discipline, in rear of 
the artillery barrage, to the Torcy-Belleau-Givry line, and the railroad line up to the 
Bouresches station. They reached this line in one sweep, almost without meeting 
resistance, and, excited by their success, they wanted to go farther. 

However, it was necessary, before continuing the general advance, to take 
Monthiers and the Petret Wood, still strongly occupied by the Germans. There 
was hard fighting on the part of the French troops on the left to annihilate the re- 
sistance of the enemy. 

In order to relieve them the Americans on the evening of the 20th made ap 
enveloping manoeuvre which was crowned with success. With splendid valiance 
they went in one sweep as far as Etrepilly height, the Gonetrie Farm and Halmar- 
diere. It was a model surprise attack, and it was a revelation of American au- 
dacity. Notwithstanding the machine gun barrage and the enemy's islands of re- 
sistance, they advanced for two kilometers, capturing three guns, a big minenwerfer 
and numerous machine guns. Moreover, two hundred prisoners were taken by the 
Americans. 

"I could not have done better in a similar occasion with my best troops," com- 
mented General Degoutte, upon learning of this fine American success. 

The Germans then found themselves in such a disfavorable position in Mon- 
thiers that they had to begin a retreat. 

On the 21st the whole German line was in retreat, and the Chateau-Thierry- 
Soissons highway was reached. The Americans were cleaning the ground and 
vigorously pursued the enemy's rear guard. 

On the 22d, a battalion (the 102d Machine Gun Battalion) of Americans oc- 
cupied Epieds. There was hard fighting in the village, and the enemy opened a 
violent barrage fire. The fight was in open country, and on that day it was not 
possible to take the village entirely. Rather than to sustain heavy losses, the com- 
mander of the American Division preferred to take his troops to the rear. It was 
necessary, it the difficulty was to be overcome, to start the surrounding movement 
again, and on the 23d the Americans sought to enter the Trugny Wood, south of 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 447 

Epieds. The Germans strongly opposed this attempt and counter-attacked with en- 
ergy, but they learned at their expense what American tenacity is. Stopped once 
in the manoeuvre, the Americans occupied the fringe of the wood on the 24th, en- 
tered it deliberately, took a whole company of German pioneers and continued their 
advance with such fury that about 3 p. m. they were at the fringe of the Fere 
Woods, and on the same evening had reached the road from Fere-en-Tardenois to 
Jaulgonne. 

This American division has, therefore, realized, in three days an advance of as 
much as 17 kilometers at certain points, fighting continuously, night and day, and 
displaying the finest military qualities. All the liason services worked perfectly, 
both at the right and left wings and between the units of the division. A discipline 
which caused the Germans to wonder and admire animated the attacking troops. 
They were marching with their officers at the head of the column and their body- 
guards on the flanks, as the French troops. The German prisoners were astonished. 
"We do not see often those who command us," they declared to their captors ; 
"you're lucky ; like the French, you are led to the fight by your officers.'' The 
French and American high commands work during the action in as close a harmony 
as the troops. 

The general commanding the division in question is a leader of men, broad- 
minded, precise in his orders, of practical mind, who, from the first moment, dealt 
with the problems raised by the operations under way with a mastery which cost 
dear to the enemy. 

These days from the ISth to the 25th give a new and emphatic proof of what 
the alliance of France and the United States can do on a battlefield. 



EDWARDS PRAISED, GIVES PRAISE. 

Here follows General Edwards's own review of the activities of his Division 
in the second battle of the Marne : 

Headquarters, 26th Division, 
A. E. F., France, 
August 2, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 67. 

To the Officers and Men of the 26th Division: 

On July IS you entered, as part of the Allied drive against the enemy, upon 
the offensive, and continued the offensive combat until the major portion of the 
command was relieved on July 25. 

On the assumption of the offensive your position in the line demanded an im- 
portant and difficult manoeuvre. Your success in this was immediate and great, 
and the way in which you executed it elicited high praise from the French army 
commander. The eight days from July 18 to 25, marking the first great advance 
against the enemy, in which American troops bore proportionately a considerable 
share, are sure of historical setting. Your part therein can never be forgotten. In 
those eight days you carried your line as far as any part of the advance was car- 
ried, Torcy, Belleau, Givry, the Bouresches Woods, Rochet Woods, Hill 190, 
overlooking Chateau-Thierry, Etrepilly, Epieds, Trugny and, finally, Le Fere Woods 
and the objective, the JauIgonne-Fere-en-Tardenois road, belong to your arms. 
You are the recipient of praise, thanks and congratulations of our commander-in- 
chief. You went, unafraid, into the face of the enemy's fire ; you forced him to 



448 HoLYOKE In The Great War, 

withdraw before you, or to accept the alternative of hand-to-hand combat, in which 
you proved 3'ourselves morally and physically his superior ; you gave freely and 
gave much of your strength, and of your blood and your lives, until pushed beyond 
mere physical endurance, fighting night and day, you still forced yourselves for- 
ward, sustained almost by spirit alone. 

These things are now part of your own consciousness. Nothing can detract 
from them. Nothing that I can say can add to them. But I can testify in this way 
to my pride in commanding such troops, so capable of achieving success in every 
undertaking ; and this testimony I give to each of you gladly and with deep gratitude. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 

Major General Commanding. 

SOLE BAR BETWEEN THE HUN AND PARIS. 

The following memoranda express the deep appreciation of the French people 
of the protection given them by the 26th Division, which has been credited with 
having kept the Germans from reaching Paris. The service was the more conspic- 
uous because the whole energy of the Division was exerted at a time when there 
were no reserves behind, between it and Paris. 

Headquarters, 26th Division, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
France, August 3, 1918, 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 68. 

1. The division commander publishes for the information of all concerned 
two memoranda and an official letter from the commanding general, 6th Army, 
which are self-explanatory. 

P. C., July 26, 1918. 
6th Army 
Staff— 3rd Bureau. 
No. 2283-3. 

MEMORANDUM. 

The President of the Republic, during a visit to the 6th Army, expressed his 
satisfaction over the results obtained as well as the proofs of valor and endurance 
shown by all the units of the army. 

The commanding general of the 6th Army takes pleasure in communicating to 
the troops of his army the congratulations of the President of the Republic. 

GENERAL DEGOUTTE. 
P. C., July 26, 1918. 
6th Army 
Staff^ — 3rd Bureau. 
No. 2284-.3. 

MEMORANDUM. 

The commanding general of the 6th Army brings to the attention of the troops 
of the army the following address received from the mayors of the arrondisement 
of Meaux, in meeting assembled, on the 20th of July, 1918. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 449 

The mayors of the arrondisement of Meaux, in meeting assembled, on the 20th 
of July, 1918, are happy to acknowledge the great victory of the (3th Army which, 
as at the time of the battle of the Marne, has just saved their commune from the 
invasion which was threatening them. 

Send to the valiant troops of the 6th Army the most earnest expression of 
their gratitude and admiration. 

The President of the Congress of Mayors, 

G. HUGEL, 

Mayor of Meaux. 
Deputy from the Department of Seine and Marne. 

The commanding general of the 6th Army takes pleasure in transmitting these 
congratulations to the troops of his army. 

General Degoutte. 
H. Q., July 29, 1918. 
6th Army 
No. 2353-3. 

From : General Degoutte, Commanding the 6th Army. 

To : General Edwards, Commanding the 26th American Division. 

The operations carried out by the 26th American Division from July 18 to 
July 24 demonstrated the fine soldierly qualities of this unit and the worth of its 
leader. General Edwards. 

Co-operating in the attack north of the Marne, the 26th Division fought bril- 
liantly on the line Torcy-Belleau, at Monthiers, Epieds and Trugny and in the 
Forest of Fere, advancing more than lo kilometers in depth in spite of the des- 
perate resistance of the enemy. 

I take great pleasure in communicating to General Edwards and his valiant Di- 
vision this expression of my great esteem, together with my heartiest congratula- 
tions for tlie manner in which they have served the common cause. 

DEGOUTTE. 

By Command of Major-Generar Edwards, 
W. S. BOWEN, 
Lieutenant-Colonel, G. S., 

Acting Chief of Staff. 
Official : 

C. A. Stevens, 

Adjutant-General. 

Adjutant. 

AFTER TWENTY DAYS OF TRIUMPH. 

This order relates to the advance of the 26th, 42nd and 4th Divisions. 

P. C, Aug. 9, 1918. 
6th Army 

GENERAL ORDER. 

Before the great offensive of July IS, the American troops forming a part of 
the 6th French Armv distinguished themselves by taking from the enemy the Bois 



450 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

de la Brigade de Marine and the village of Vaux, stopping his offensive on the 
Marne and at Fossoy. 

Since then they have taken a most glorious part in the second battle of the 
Marne, rivaling the French troops in ardor and gallantry. In twenty days of in- 
cessant fighting they liberated numerous French villages and made, over difficult 
terrain, an advance of 40 kilometers which carried them beyond the Vesle. 

Their glorious advance is marked by names which, in the future, will make 
illustrious the military history of the United States : Torcy, Belleau, Plateau of 
Etrepilly, Epieds, le Charmel, the Ourcq. Seringes-et-Nesles, Sergy, the Vesle, and 
Fismes. 

The new divisions, under fire for the first time, showed themselves worthy 
of the old fighting traditions of the regular army. They had the same ardent de- 
sire to whip the Boche, and that discipline which always insures the carrying out 
of orders of their commander, whatever be the difficulties to be overcome, or the 
sacrifices to be made. 

The magnificent results obtained are due to the energy and skilfulness of their 
commanders and to the bravery of the soldiers. 

I am proud to have commanded such troops. 

The Commanding General of the 6th Army. 
Signed: DEGOUTTE. 

Headquarters, 26th Division, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
France, Sept. 15, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 77. 

The following letter is published for the information of all those concerned: 

Rupt-en-Woevre, Sept. 3, 1918. 

Sir:— Your gallant 26th American Division has just set us free. 

Smce September, 1914, the barbarians have held the Heights of the Meuse. 
have foully murdered three hostages from Mouilly, have shelled Rupt, and, on July 
23, 1915, forced its inhabitants to scatter to the four corners of France. 

I, who remain at my little listening post upon the advice of my bishop, feel 
certain, sir, that I do but speak for Monseigneur Ginisty, Lord Bishop of Verdun, 
my parishioners of Rupt, Mouilly and Genicourt, and the people of this vicinity in 
conveying to you and your associates the heartfelt and unforgettable gratitude of all. 

Several of your comrades lie at rest in our truly Christian and French soil. 

Their ashes shall be cared for as if they were our own. We shall cover their 
graves with flowers and shall kneel by them as their own families would do, with 
a prayer to God to reward with eternal glory these heroes fallen on the field of 
honor and to bless the 36th Division and generous America. 

Be pleased. Sir, to accept the expression of my profound respect. 

A. LECLERC, 

Cure of Rupt-en-Woevre. 

By Command of Major General Edwards. 
DUNCAN K. AL\JOR, JR., 

Chief of Stafl:'. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 451 



Official : 

C. A. Stevens, 
Adjutant-General. 
Adjutant. 



Note — Rupt-en-Woevre was the advance Post of Command of the 26th Di- 
vision during the battle of St. INIihiel, where the 26th Division broke through Les 
Eparges. 

IN THE FIRST ARMY'S FIRST BATTLE. 

During the battle for the reduction of the St. }klihiel salient, referred to below, 
the 2*ith Division was in the 5th American Corps, and the 1st American Army. 

Headquarters, 26th Division, 
American Expeditionary Forces, 
September 18, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 79. 

1. The following telegrams from the President of the L'nited States, the com- 
mander-in-chief of the Allied Armies, and the commander-in-chief of the Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces, are published to the command : 

Washington, September 14. 191S. 

General John J. Pershing, 

American Expeditionary Forces, France. 

Accept my warmest congratulations on the brilliant achievements of the army 
under your command. The boys have done what we expected of them and done 
it in the way we most admire. We are deeply proud of them and of their chief. 
Please convey to all concerned my grateful and affectionate thanks. 

(Signed) WOODROW WILSON. 

Commanding General. 
First Army. 

September 14, 191S. 
My Dear General : 

The First American Army under your command on this first day has won a 
magnificent victory by a manoeuvre as skilfully prepared as it was valiantly exe- 
cuted. 1 extend to you as well as to the officers and to the troops under your com- 
mand my warmest compliments. 

(Signed) MARSHAL FOCH. 

September 15, 1918. 
Commanding General. 
Fifth Corps. 
Please extend to the officers and men of the Fifth Corps my sincere congrat- 
ulations for the part they have taken in the first battle of the American Army. 
Our successes have thrilled our countrymen and evoked the enthusiasm of all Allies. 



452 HoLYOKE In The Great War. 

Will you convey to the command my cordial appreciation of their work. I am 
proud of the accomplishment. 

(Signed) PERSHING. 

By Command of Major General Edwards. 

DUNCAN K. MAJOR, Chief of Staff. 
Official : 

C. A. Stevens, Adjutant-General, 
Adjutant. 

THRILLING TRIBUTE FROM GENERAL EDWARDS. 

Here follows General Edwards's order of the day, on the activity of the 26th 
Division in the St. Mihiel sector: 

Headquarters, 26th Division. 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
France, Sept. 28, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDER NO. 82. 
To the Twenty-sixth Division: 

1. Again it becomes my duty and pleasure to congratulate this Division on 
the important part it played in the battle of the St. Mihiel salient, September 12-14, 
1918. 

Our task was to attack on the historic and hitherto impregnable ground near 
Les Eparges, where, in the past, so many thousands of French lives have been 
sacrificed. 

In front of us the fortifications were manned by Germans, with a No Man's 
Land on difficult slopes, churned and pitted by four years of 'shelling and with a 
mass of wire and other obstacles from trench to trench. 

The three infantry regiments in line, the 101st, the 103d and the 104th, with 
the brigade machine gun units, met a determined resistance. The enemy machine 
gun fire was intense. The artillery, without daylight registration, did well during 
that part of the night allowed for preparation, in cutting breaches through this 
mass of wire, which were completed by the infantry before and during the attack. 

The determined and effective methods of the infantry in the attack on the 
machine gun nests, the deliberate locating of these nests, and the subsequent in- 
filtration processes used in overcoming these nests, the bold dashes wherever op- 
portunity offered, in one case resulting in the Second Battalion of the 103d Infantry 
rushing and capturing a hostile battalion of greater strength, before the enemy 
could raise his head; the fine liason and co-operation of the artillery; the expedi- 
tion with which followup roads were constructed by the engineers ; the enterprise 
of the medical, supply and other auxiliary units — all combined to prove that its 
wide service and experience have made this a veteran Division. 

I was pleased with all elements of the Division. 

2. By dark on the 12th the principal resistance of the enemy had been over- 
come. Then came the order to close the gap between our forces on the north 
and our troops advancing from the south in order to prevent the escape of the 



HoLYOKE In The Great \Yar. 453 

enemy from St. Mihiel. Our mission then was to reach Vigneulles hefore daylight, 
and there establish contact with troops of our Fourth Corps. 

?>. The 102d Infantry, in the Division reserve, which had followed the ad- 
vance closely throughout the battle, in readiness for any such emergency, was 
ordered to spare neither energy nor blood to accomplish this mission. The whole 
Division was pushed forward through the night, the rest of the 51st Infantry Bri- 
gade following the dash of the 102d Infantry, and the 52d Infantry Brigade moving 
out on the left rear of the 102d Infantry, with the towns on the plain to the north- 
west of Hattonchatel, to include St. Maurice, as objectives. 

In less than one-half hour after receipt of this order, the 102d Infantry and 
the 102d Machine Gun Battalion were on the march, led and inspired by the regi- 
mental and battalion commanders in person. They marched over nine kilometers 
on the only existing road, through a dense forest, in an unknown and hostile coun- 
try, infested with the enemy, losing for the time being liason both to the right and 
left. The leading elements, passing through Hattonchatel, reached Vigneulles be- 
fore two o'clock in the morning, took complete possession of these two towns by 
three o'clock and, pushing out, occupied Creue and Heudicourt, and blocked the 
roads leading from the southwest, while sending patrols farther into the plain to 
gain control with the American forces coming from the south. 

This advance force captured many prisoners, much ammunition, stores of all 
kinds, and released many captive civilians from St. Mihiel that the enemy in his 
hasty retreat was forced by the 102d Infantry to abandon. 

With this advance force were the entire 102d Infantry, three companies of the 
102d Machine Gun Battalion from the Division reserve. This last part, abandoning 
its motors, marched fourteen kilometers, carrying its guns by hand the entire way. 

By morning the whole command had taken possession of all the towns in the 
sector of its advance, and was impatient to pursue the enemy across the Hindenburg 
line. 

4. The towns of St. Remy, Domartin. Thillot, St. Maurice, Billy-sous-les- 
Cotes, Vieville-sous-les-Cotes, Hattonchatel, Hannonville, Vigneulles, Crue, Heud- 
icourt, Deuxnouds, Wadonville, Avvillers and Butgneville as well as the entire 
length of the Grande Tranchee de Calonne, with a gain of fourteen kilometers, be- 
long to your arms. 

The Division captured about 2,400 prisoners, large stores of supplies and ammu- 
nition, horses and motor transportation and about 50 guns. 

I am proud of you. You are a shock Division. 

C. R. EDWARDS. 

Major General Commanding. 



THE 102D CLOSES A DANGEROUS GAP. 

The American Corps commander's citation of the troops that took Vigneulles 
and closed the St. Mihiel salient — the 102d Infantry, largely composed of Connec- 
ticut men. 

Headquarters, 5th Army Corps. 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
France, Sept. IS, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 19. 

1. During the recent operations for the reduction of the St. Mihiel salient one 
regiment in particular of the 2(5th Division should be mentioned as having ac- 



454 HoLYOKE In The Great \Yar. 

quitted itself in a most inspiring manner. The 102d Infantry (Col. Hiram L. 
Bearse commanding) was ordered late in the evening to march at once on Vig- 
neulles, in order to close the remaining gap between the two attacks. 

The regiment marched five miles in darkness through woods, infested with the 
enemy, captured 280 prisoners, and completed its mission long before daylight. 
The main roads of the salient were cut off, and no more of the enemy could escape. 

This fine example of courage and soldierly acceptance of battle conditions is 
worthy of emulation. The corps' commander congratulates them and looks forward 
with confidence to a continuation of their good work. 

By Command of Major-General Cameron. 

W. B. BURTT, Brig.-Gen., 

Chief of Staff. 
Official: 

Harry C. Kaefring, Adjutant General. 

GENERAL HENNOCQUE TO GENERAL EDWARDS. 

This is an unofficial communication from General Hennocque of the French 
Army to the commanding officer of the 26th Division : 

Second Cavalry Division (Dismounted Staff). 
P. C, Sept. 15, 1918. 

My Dear General : — Your letter of September 14 moves me greatly. My divi- 
sion and I are very grateful for the congratulations and thanks that you so kindly 
sent to us all, and especially to the 8th Cuirassiers. Great is my joy to have been 
able to be of service to one of these fine young American divisions which have not 
hesitated to leave their homes and to cross the Atlantic to come to our aid in the 
destruction of the noxious beast, the Boche. 

I am extremely happy to have fought by the side of such a commander as you, 
who, by communicating to his agreeable staff and to his troops his own dash, his 
optimism and his will to conquer, enabled his gallant division to smash the re- 
sistance offered to it on the 12th and 13th of September, and to win a brilliant 
victory. 

In return, be pleased. General, to accept my most sincere and enthusiastic con- 
gratulations upon the occasion of this fine success which, added to the Chateau- 
Thierry achievement, is but the first chapter of a famous epic. 

Repeating the expression of the deep friendliness I felt for you at the time of 
our first meeting and my hope to fight again at your side, I beg you. Sir, to accept 
this expression of the most kindly feeling from your devoted "Buck-eye." 

GENERAL HENNOCQUE, 
Commanding General, 2d Dismounted Cavalry Division. 
To General Edwards, Commanding General. 26th American Division. 



Note — General Hennocque"s division, the Second Cavalry, Dismounted, was on 
the right of the 26th Division during the battle of St. Mihiel. His father served as 
an officer in the Union Army throughout our Civil War, and married a woman from 
Gallipolis, Ohio. 



H'OLYOKE Ix The Great War. 455 

THE BRILLIANT FEINT AGAINST METZ. 

These letters referred to the activities of the 26th Division in the Troyon sec- 
tor, which the 26th Division organized and occupied after the battle of St. Mihiel. 
Its two sub-sectors were ''Massachusetts'' and "Connecticut," and its various P. C.'s 
were given names of capitals of the States of New England. At the beginning 
of the engagement of September 26th, from the Meuse beyond the Argonne, the 
role of the 26th Division was to make the Boches believe we purposed to break 
through and attack Metz. 

Headquarters, 26th Division, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
France, October 10, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 85. 

1. The following letters are published to the command: 

2d Colonial Corps Staff, No. 29,329. 
H. Q., October 5, 1918. 
From General Blondlat, Commanding 2d Colonial Corps : 
To the Commander-in-Chief (through Channels, General Commanding 2d Army). 

Subject: Proposition for citation in Army Orders in favor of the 1st Battal- 
ion, 102d Regiment of Infantry, U. S. 

I have the honor to send you the report which I had the general commanding 
the 26th United States Division to make on the very hard and glorious combat 
which this Division engaged September 26, 1918. 

The 2d Colonial Corps had received orders to carry out extensive raids to at- 
tract and fix the attention of the enemy: General Order No. 20, September 20, 
1918, of the General Commanding the First United States Army. The 2d Colonial 
Corps will hold the front of Bois de Chauffeur inclusive to Mesnil exclusive. 

"The 2d Colonial Corps will make a demonstration along its front, launching 
artillery bombardment as well as making extensive raids at H hour." 

The dimension and duration of the raid executed by the 26th United States 
Division certainly deceived the enemy as to our intentions ; the losses suffered by 
the troops taking part in this operation were fairly severe, but there is no doubt 
that those suffered by the Germans were much more serious. 

The spirit of sacrifice and magnificent courage displayed by the troops of the 
26th United States Division on this occasion were certainly not in vain; they seem 
to be worthy of recompense and praise ; therefore, I directed the general command- 
ing this Division to address propositions to me on this subject. 

I urgently request that the 1st Battalion of the 102d Infantry be cited in Army 
Orders on the following grounds : . 

"Picked troops who, trained by Col. Hiram J. Bearse, who led the attack in 
the first line, carried out brilliantly and with splendid energy, a particularly deli- 
cate operation; engaged battle with a superb dash; won a victory after a violent 
combat over an enemy who was both stubborn and superior in numbers, entrenched 
in concrete shelters, strongly supported by numerous machine guns and powerful 
artillery, and who made use of, in the course of the action, infamous methods of 
warfare ; heroically carried out their mission in capturing in heavy fighting a village 
where they maintained themselves all day in spite of four enemy counter-attacks, 
and thus furnished the finest example of courage, abnegation and self-sacrifice." 



456 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

I request further tliat the officers aud men mentioned in General Edwards's 
report receive each and severally the rewards suggested for them by name. 

(Signed) BLONDLAT. 
H. Q., October 7, 1918. 
2d Colonial Army Corps, 
Staff No. 29,431-A. 

From General Blondlat, Commanding the 2d Colonial Army Corps. 
To the Commanding General, r26th American Division. 

At this time when the 26th Division is leaving the zone of the 2d Colonial 
Army Corps, I wish to forward to General Edwards and to his gallant Division the 
expression of my complete satisfaction, my best wishes for its successes to come, 
and my hearty tlianks for the brilliant services in the attack on the St. Mihiel 
salient. 

Although the 26th Division was only under my orders for a short time, I dis- 
covered on the part of all, both officers and men, those qualities of discipline, ardor 
and esprit de corps which characterize picked troops. 

I thought it but my duty to call to the attention of the French High Command 
the fine conduct under fire of your men in the glorious battle of September 26; they 
demonstrated once again their high qualities of energy and spirit of sacrifice. I 
have requested thit citations be bestowed upon the brave men whose conduct has 
been especially reported to me. 

(Signed) BLOXDLAT. 

By Command of Major General Edwards. 

Duncan K. Major, Jr., Chief of Staff. 
Official: C. A. Stevens, 

Adjutant-General, Adjutant. 

AFTER TAKING THE HEIGHTS OF THE MEUSE. 

Headquarters, 26th Division, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
France, October 24, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 93. 

Extract. 

II. The following tribute to the Division is published for the information of 
all concerned : 

H. Q., 24 October. 1918. 
17th Army Corps, Staff'— 1st Brigade. 
General Claudel, Commanding the 17th Army Corps. 
To the Commanding General 26th Division. 

General : — The reputation of your Division preceded it here far ahead. 

To all its titles of glory gained in fierce struggles and only recently at the sig- 
nal of Hattonchatel, it has added on the 23d of October, a page which, perhaps, is 
more modest, but still does it great honor 

In a few hours, as at a manoeuvre, it has gained all the objectives assigned to 
it in the difficult sector of the Woods of Houppy, Etrayes and Belleau. 

This operation is evidence, indeed, of superior instruction, mobility and will. 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 457 

I do not know how to thank you sufficiently for your assistance, dear General, 
and it is my great desire to express to you all our grateful admiration for your 
splendid Division which thus has added its name to all of those who have fought 
to hurl the enemy back from the outskirts of Verdun. 

H. CLAUDEL. 

C. R. EDWARDS. 
Major General Commanding. 

Note — General Claudel commanded the 17th French Army Corps, which oper- 
ated north of Verdun, east of the Meuse, and which took the prominent observa- 
tion points of the Hants de Meuse, where there was desperate fighting. 

THE UNITS THAT DID THE JOB. 

General Edwards's citation of his troops which referred to the same operation 
as does General Claudel's order, the successful taking of the objectives in the op- 
erations of that date : 

Headquarters, :.'6th Division, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
France, October 23, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 32. 

1. The Division commander extends to the commanding officer. .51st Infantry 
Brigade, and the officers and men of the following organizations his hearty con- 
gratulations on their great success in the operations of this date for the capture of 
the heights of the Meuse in the region of Le Houppy Bois and Bellieu Bois. 

.">lst Infantry Brigade. 
101st Infantry. 
102d Infantry. 

101st Machine Gun Battalion. 
102d Machine Gun Battalion. 
Detachment, 101st Field Signal Battalion. 
Detachment, 101st Sanitary Train. 
281st Aero Squadron (French). 
Balloon No. 2.'5 (French). 
51st Artillery Brigade. 
1st Battalion, 11th F. A. (French). 

2. The attack as planned was difficult of execution, and only to be attempted 
by trained troops. You carried it out like the veterans you are, and with a dash 
and valor worthy of the best traditions of the 26th Division. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 
Major General Commanding. 

BOIS D'HAUMONT— A COUP DE GRACE. 

Before the 26th Division had fully taken over the sector occupied by the ISth 
French Division, three companies of the 104th United States Infantry participated 
in a desperate attack, serving under General Andlauer, the French commander. 



458 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

Headquarters, 26th Division, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
France, October 24, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 93. 
Extract. 

3. The following tribute is published for the information of all concerned: 

October 17, 1918. 
General Andlauer, Commanding the 18th Division of Infantry. 
To the Commanding General, 26th Division. 

General: — At the moment the 18th Division of Infantry is relieved in its sec- 
tor by the 26th D. I. U. S. I wish to send you my heartiest thanks for the sup- 
port given to its comrades of the 77th Regiment, by the 104th Infantry, which, 
since its arrival in the sector, attacked with tanks and succeeded, thanks to a stub- 
born infantry battle, in forcing the evacuation of half of the edge of the Bois 
d'Haumont by the enemy. 

ANDLAUER. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 
Major General Commanding. 

Note— General Andlauer commanded the 18th French Division, which was re- 
lieved by the 26th Division. 

EDWARDS COMMENDS HIS ARTILLERY. 

General Edwards's good-bye commendation order to the 51st Artillery Brigade 
of the 26th Division, which rendered such brilliant service throughout the war as 
indicated: 

Headquarters, 26th Division, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
France, October 24, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 93. 

1. To the artillery of the 26th Division is due my expression of admiration 
for its efficiency and aggressive fighting qualities and for its indefatigable support 
of our fine infantry. 

Artillery can desire no higher tribute than the conscious fact it has gained the 
confidence, reliance and thanks of the infantry. 

2. During more than eight months of fighting service the spirit of loyalty 
displayed by every officer and man of the 51st Artillery Brigade towards his duty, 
toward the Yankee Division and toward the Division commander has been fine. 

3. The record of the 51st Artillery Brigade in the Second battle of the Marne 
is glorious. It went with, supported and, protected the infantry in its advance of 
isy2 kilometers by Chateau-Thierry, and, afterwards in succession two other divi- 
sions in the advance from the Marne to the Vesle for a period of 18 days, between 



HoLYOKE In The Great War. 459 

July 18th and August 4th, with a gain of over 40 kilometers. It is a record of 
which the entire Division and our country justly may be proud. 

I congratulate and thank the Artillery Brigade of the Yankee Division. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 
Major General Commanding. 

THE DIVISION COMMANDER'S FAREWELL. 

Headquarters, 26th Division, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
France, October 24, 1918. 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 95. 
Extract. 
IV. 1. In compliance with paragraph 48, Special Orders, No. 293, G. H. Q., 
A. E. F.. the undersigned relinquishes command of the 26th Division. 

2. He thanks the Division for its loyalty to him and for what it has ac- 
complished in the common cause. He bespeaks for his successor in command the 
same loyalty and devotion, and he leaves the Division in full confidence that its 
same fine work will continue to the end. 

C. R. EDWARDS, 
Major General Commanding. 



Major Rijan^s Story 



Major William P. Ryan, a Holyoke boy, who was City Physician previous to 
entering the service, who was with the first army in France, and who saw service 
on every front during the war, having been decorated with a Croix de Guerre, with 
palms, the Distinguished Service Medal, and cited four times for bravery, told his 
story at a Victory Loan rally. He said : 

"I have been with the English, with the French, the Portuguese, the Italians 
and the Belgians, but the greatest hero, and especially when he was wounded, was 
your boy, the American doughboy. There was never a more patient man came to 
visit a doctor. He came with a smile, and he never kicked. His only anxiety was 
the comfort of his buddy. 

"You have two duties which you owe these boys. Many of them are now with 
the Army of Occupation in Germany. It costs $200 to bring each boy home. You 
furnished the money to bring us all over there, now you must furnish it to bring 
us all back home. And you owe it to every man in the United States Army to get 
him a job. There is not a soldier that wants charity. He wants work, and it is 
up to you to find it for him. 

"I do not believe the women of America, especially those who went to France, 
have been given credit for the tremendous effort and work they accomplished in 
this war. They are just as much heroes as your soldiers, and I hope some day 
some writer will record their wondrous record. I cannot too highly testify to the 
wonderful work of the Red Cross, Knights of Columbus, Y. M. C. A. and other 
organizations that cared for and comforted the soldiers. 



460 HoLYOKE Ix The Great War. 

"The battle of Catigny took place on May 28, 1917. There was an opening 
at this point once for twelve miles. The French, however, held the lines. For 
days and days we buried them. They went in 30,000 strong, and came out with 
■1,000 men. We could not move around in the daytime, living like ground hogs ; 
2nd at night we worked. It was a terrible existence. At last it was decided that 
the obstacle must be removed. It was planned by the First Army of the French, 
and it was the 26th Division that was to do it. It was a tremendous task. But 
nothing was too great for those American boys. The flu was raging, but men 
pleaded with me not to send them back to the hospitals, but to let them go on. 

"All night before the day of the drive we were nervous, for fear the Germans 
knew our plans. The morning of the drive the sun came up, and the scene was 
beautiful before the battle started. At 6.4.5 the men went over the top. It was 
the first time Americans had gone over. I shall never forget that morning. With 
fixed bayonets the men went on behind their own barrage. All one could see 
around was smoke, fire and dust, and then the men. Across No Man's Land they 
went for a quarter of a mile. Up the hill they went. You would see them fall._ 
They were only boys, but they went on, and they got there. What had once been 
a beautiful town, was a mass of wreckage when the Americans reached there. But 
the orders were to keep going, as the objective was outside of the city of Catigny. 
And they went on. 

"To see your own pals, boys you had known for a long period of time, falling 
one by one, can you realize what that means? We went over 1,200 strong; 674 of 
us got there. And then we dug in. I never lifted a pick or shovel in my life be- 
fore, but you bet I can do a good job now. Night came, and there was no water. 
We were all exhausted, having nothing to eat or drink, but we stayed there. In 
the morning we were still there ; but now there was only 417 of us. I opened a 
hospital for the wounded in one of the dugouts. 

"Previous to this battle, the morale of the English had been broken ; the French 
were skeptical. We demonstrated to the entire Allied army that we were there, 
and we could take our stand side by side with the best Allied troops in Europe. 
We demonstrated to the world that trench warfare was not our method of fight- 
ing, and that open warfare was the best, and most effective. But to think of those 
men who died there, who are now buried over there, your boys, my pals. 

"We did not know it for several months, but on that day there were seven 
Hun divisions against the one American division, and the Germans were defeated 
and forced to retreat. 

"But to pass by the other fights, and to come to the end ; the day the war was 
over. What a thought, that no more men were to be killed, and no additional suf- 
fering. The reaction was too great to speak of. We were under a strain all the 
way, working on our nerves. 

"When the armistice was signed, we knew there were millions back in America 
ready to come over, and that even if we died there were many to take our places, 
and that in the end the Allies would win the war. But it was a wonderful feeling 
to know that it was unnecessary for those millions to come over. 

"We then walked into Germany, 700 kilometers, in 35 days. It meant hiking 
from four o'clock in the morning until eight o'clock at night. The proudest mo- 
ment of my life was when I crossed the bridge, and took my watch on the right 
bank of the Rhine at Coblenz. That was last December. The men with the Army 
of Occupation in Germany want to get home, as we wanted to get home, and no 
man who has not been over there can appreciate what it means to get out of that 
hell and back in the good old United States again, the best land in the world." 



Petty Officer Hunter^s Story 



Petty Officer Williarrt Hunter, a member of the crew of the S. S. President 
Lincohi, which was torpedoed and sunk, vividly told the story of the fate of the 
transport, as follows : 

"We had left Brest on May 29, 1917, after landing 5,000 troops. It was our 
fifth trip, and we had brought over 25,000 troops in all. We were convoyed out 
of the harbor by four destroyers, who stayed with us until sundown of the next 
day, when they went away to meet some incoming convoys. We awoke the next 
morning to find ourselves outside the danger zone, and we congratulated ourselves 
that we would finish another successful voyage; but we were doomed to disappoint- 
ment, and some of the crew never reached America's shores again. 

"It was 8 :55 in the morning, and I was in the pay office when I heard two 
terrific explosions right in succession. We all grabbed life preservers and went to 
our stations. The order was given to be on the lookout for a third torpedo. The 
two had struck the ship almost at once. We saw the third one coming. It smashed 
one of the lifeboats, and the flying splinters killed several men. The captain then 
ordered an investigation to see if the ship could be kept afloat. It was a 19,000- 
ton ship, nearly 650 feet long, with a beam of 75 feet. They had made sure work 
with their third torpedo, however, and it was not long before it was determined 
that the ship could not be saved. Orders were given, and each sailor went to his 
particular duty. I was assigned to lowering life rafts. 

"W'e had 25 sick soldiers aboard, and we put them in the lifeboats tirst. The 
v/ater began coming over the main deck. I decided it was time to leave, and 
jumped into the water, being fortunate enough to come up close to a life raft, 
which I boarded. By this time everj-one was off the ship with the exception of the 
captain, one of the officers and the wireless operator, who stuck to his post, send- 
ing out liis S. O. S. signal. He finally made a leap from the highest part of the 
ship, and was picked up by a life raft. We were all on our stomachs paddling 
with our hands, as we had no oars, and were anxious to get as far away from the 
sinking ship as possible, lest we be sucked in when the boat went down. 

"The yell went up, 'There she goes,' when the ship took a lift and went down. 
It was exactly 18 minutes from the time she was struck that the ship went under. 
There was one funny incident which really drew a laugh, even then. The chaplain 
of the ship was on a raft with a Bible in his hand. He said to the boys, 'Don't give 
up, the Lord is with us,' and one fellow shouted back, 'Well, if he is give him an 
oar.' For 25 minutes we floated around, and then we saw what we thought w^as a 
sailboat, but it proved to be the U-boat that sank our ship. It came in and out 
among the rafts looking for the captain, whom they did not find, because, as we 
learned later,* he had changed into a seaman's uniform. They took our lieutenant 
and made him prisoner. For two hours they sailed round, offering no aid. and then 
submerged and were gone." 

At 1.30 o'clock in the afternoon, four and a half hours after the appearance 
of the submarine, two American destroyers hove in sight and picked up the crew. 



The Comrade in White 



Strange tales have reached us lately in the trenches. Rumors have been going 
the rounds along the three-hundred-mile lines stretched from Switzerland to the 
sea. We were unable to find the source of them or the truth of them. They came 
quickly and went quickly. 

Yet somehow I still remember the hour that George Casey turned to me with 
a queer look in his blue eyes and asked if I had seen the "Friend of the wounded." 
He then told me all he knew regarding this strange person. After many a hot en- 
gagement a man in white had been seen bending over the wounded. Snipers sniped 
at him. Shells fell all around him, but nothing seemed to have power enough to 
touch him. He was either heroic beyond all heroes or was something greater still. 
This mysterious person whom the French called "The Comrade in White," seemed 
to be everywhere at once. At Nancy, at Ypres ; everywhere at Soissons men were 
talking about him with hushed voices. 

But some laughed and said that the trenches were beginnuig to tell on men's 
nerves. As for myself, seeing is believing, and I didn't expect anything but the 
enemy's